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Sample records for self-compartmentalizing protease family

  1. A Self-compartmentalizing Hexamer Serine Protease from Pyrococcus Horikoshii

    PubMed Central

    Menyhárd, Dóra K.; Kiss-Szemán, Anna; Tichy-Rács, Éva; Hornung, Balázs; Rádi, Krisztina; Szeltner, Zoltán; Domokos, Klarissza; Szamosi, Ilona; Náray-Szabó, Gábor; Polgár, László; Harmat, Veronika

    2013-01-01

    Oligopeptidases impose a size limitation on their substrates, the mechanism of which has long been under debate. Here we present the structure of a hexameric serine protease, an oligopeptidase from Pyrococcus horikoshii (PhAAP), revealing a complex, self-compartmentalized inner space, where substrates may access the monomer active sites passing through a double-gated “check-in” system, first passing through a pore on the hexamer surface and then turning to enter through an even smaller opening at the monomers' domain interface. This substrate screening strategy is unique within the family. We found that among oligopeptidases, a residue of the catalytic apparatus is positioned near an amylogenic β-edge, which needs to be protected to prevent aggregation, and we found that different oligopeptidases use different strategies to achieve such an end. We propose that self-assembly within the family results in characteristically different substrate selection mechanisms coupled to different multimerization states. PMID:23632025

  2. A self-compartmentalizing hexamer serine protease from Pyrococcus horikoshii: substrate selection achieved through multimerization.

    PubMed

    Menyhárd, Dóra K; Kiss-Szemán, Anna; Tichy-Rács, Éva; Hornung, Balázs; Rádi, Krisztina; Szeltner, Zoltán; Domokos, Klarissza; Szamosi, Ilona; Náray-Szabó, Gábor; Polgár, László; Harmat, Veronika

    2013-06-14

    Oligopeptidases impose a size limitation on their substrates, the mechanism of which has long been under debate. Here we present the structure of a hexameric serine protease, an oligopeptidase from Pyrococcus horikoshii (PhAAP), revealing a complex, self-compartmentalized inner space, where substrates may access the monomer active sites passing through a double-gated "check-in" system, first passing through a pore on the hexamer surface and then turning to enter through an even smaller opening at the monomers' domain interface. This substrate screening strategy is unique within the family. We found that among oligopeptidases, a residue of the catalytic apparatus is positioned near an amylogenic β-edge, which needs to be protected to prevent aggregation, and we found that different oligopeptidases use different strategies to achieve such an end. We propose that self-assembly within the family results in characteristically different substrate selection mechanisms coupled to different multimerization states. PMID:23632025

  3. Novel proteases: common themes and surprising features.

    PubMed

    Vandeputte-Rutten, Lucy; Gros, Piet

    2002-12-01

    Proteases perform a wide variety of functions, inside and outside cells, regulating many biological processes. Recent years have witnessed a number of significant advances in the structural biology of proteases, including aspects of intracellular protein and peptide degradation by self-compartmentalizing proteases, activation of proteases in proteolytic cascades of regulatory pathways, and mechanisms of microbial proteases in pathogenicity. PMID:12504673

  4. ADAMTS: a novel family of extracellular matrix proteases.

    PubMed

    Tang, B L

    2001-01-01

    ADAMTS (a disintegrin and metalloprotease with thrombospondin motifs) is a novel family of extracellular proteases found in both mammals and invertebrates. Members of the family may be distinguished from the ADAM (a disintegrin and metalloprotease) family members based on the multiple copies of thrombospondin 1-like repeats they carry. With at least nine members in mammals alone, the ADAMTS family members are predicted by their structural domains to be extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins with a wide range of activities and functions distinct from members of the ADAM family that are largely anchored on the cell surface. ADAMTS2 is a procollagen N-proteinase, and the mutations of its gene are responsible for Human Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type VII C and bovine dermatosparaxis. ADAMTS4 and ADAMTS5 are aggrecanases implicated in the degradation of cartilage aggrecan in arthritic diseases. Other members of the ADAMTS family have also been implicated in roles during embryonic development and angiogenesis. Current and future studies on this emerging group of ECM proteases may provide important insights into developmental or pathological processes involving ECM remodeling. PMID:11167130

  5. Evolution of the protease-activated receptor family in vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    JIN, MIN; YANG, HAI-WEI; TAO, AI-LIN; WEI, JI-FU

    2016-01-01

    Belonging to the G protein-coupled receptor (GPcr) family, the protease-activated receptors (Pars) consist of 4 members, PAR1-4. PARs mediate the activation of cells via thrombin, serine and other proteases. Such protease-triggered signaling events are thought to be critical for hemostasis, thrombosis and other normal pathological processes. In the present study, we examined the evolution of PARs by analyzing phylogenetic trees, chromosome location, selective pressure and functional divergence based on the 169 functional gene alignment sequences from 57 vertebrate gene sequences. We found that the 4 PARs originated from 4 invertebrate ancestors by phylogenetic trees analysis. The selective pressure results revealed that only PAR1 appeared by positive selection during its evolution, while the other PAR members did not. In addition, we noticed that although these PARs evolved separately, the results of functional divergence indicated that their evolutional rates were similar and their functions did not significantly diverge. The findings of our study provide valuable insight into the evolutionary history of the vertebrate PAR family. PMID:26820116

  6. Crystal Structure of a Rhomboid Family Intramembrane Protease.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang,Y.; Zhang, Y.; Ha, Y.

    2006-01-01

    Escherichia coli GlpG is an integral membrane protein that belongs to the widespread rhomboid protease family. Rhomboid proteases, like site-2 protease (S2P) and {gamma}-secretase, are unique in that they cleave the transmembrane domain of other membrane proteins. Here we describe the 2.1 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of the GlpG core domain. This structure contains six transmembrane segments. Residues previously shown to be involved in catalysis, including a Ser-His dyad, and several water molecules are found at the protein interior at a depth below the membrane surface. This putative active site is accessible by substrate through a large 'V-shaped' opening that faces laterally towards the lipid, but is blocked by a half-submerged loop structure. These observations indicate that, in intramembrane proteolysis, the scission of peptide bonds takes place within the hydrophobic environment of the membrane bilayer. The crystal structure also suggests a gating mechanism for GlpG that controls substrate access to its hydrophilic active site.

  7. Structural and mechanistic aspects of 3C proteases from the Picornavirus family.

    PubMed

    Arad, D; Kreisberg, R; Shokhen, M

    1993-01-01

    Picornavirus 3C proteases are prime targets for rational drug design. This viral protease appears in a large number of viruses from the Picornavirus family that cause serious disease syndromes, and it has an important role in the life cycle of the virus, processing the translation product of the Picornavirus genome by progressive co- and posttranslational cleavages. It is, therefore, important to gain structural and mechanistic information about this family of enzymes. We concentrate in this paper on the specific features of the 3C; particularly, we are trying to show that the 3C constitute a new family to enzymes which is neither a serine- nor a cysteine-type protease. General basic theory on the behavior of sulfur nucleophile vs the behavior of oxygen nucleophile regarding the nucleophilic attack on carbonyl compounds and the possible determinants in the structure of 3C viral proteases of rhinovirus 1A are being discussed. PMID:8320292

  8. Identification of papain-like cysteine proteases from the bovine piroplasm Babesia bigemina and evolutionary relationship of piroplasms C1 family of cysteine proteases.

    PubMed

    Martins, Tiago M; do Rosário, Virgílio E; Domingos, Ana

    2011-01-01

    Papain-like cysteine proteases have been shown to have essential roles in parasitic protozoa and are under study as promising drug targets. Five genes were identified by sequence similarity search to be homologous to the cysteine protease family in the ongoing Babesia bigemina genome sequencing project database and were compared with the annotated genes from the complete bovine piroplasm genomes of Babesia bovis, Theileria annulata, and Theileria parva. Multiple genome alignments and sequence analysis were used to evaluate the molecular evolution events that occurred in the C1 family of cysteine proteases in these piroplasms of veterinary importance. BbiCPL1, one of the newly identified cysteine protease genes in the B. bigemina genome was expressed in Escherichia coli and shows activity against peptide substrates. Considerable differences were observed in the cysteine protease family between Babesia and Theileria genera, and this may partially explain the diverse infection mechanisms of these tick-borne diseases. PMID:20655912

  9. A conserved activation cluster is required for allosteric communication in HtrA-family proteases.

    PubMed

    de Regt, Anna K; Kim, Seokhee; Sohn, Jungsan; Grant, Robert A; Baker, Tania A; Sauer, Robert T

    2015-03-01

    In E. coli, outer-membrane stress causes a transcriptional response through a signaling cascade initiated by DegS cleavage of a transmembrane antisigma factor. Each subunit of DegS, an HtrA-family protease, contains a protease domain and a PDZ domain. The trimeric protease domain is autoinhibited by the unliganded PDZ domains. Allosteric activation requires binding of unassembled outer-membrane proteins (OMPs) to the PDZ domains and protein substrate binding. Here, we identify a set of DegS residues that cluster together at subunit-subunit interfaces in the trimer, link the active sites and substrate binding sites, and are crucial for stabilizing the active enzyme conformation in response to OMP signaling. These residues are conserved across the HtrA-protease family, including orthologs linked to human disease, supporting a common mechanism of allosteric activation. Indeed, mutation of residues at homologous positions in the DegP quality-control protease also eliminates allosteric activation. PMID:25703375

  10. Broad Spectrum Activity of a Lectin-Like Bacterial Serine Protease Family on Human Leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ayala-Lujan, Jorge Luis; Vijayakumar, Vidhya; Gong, Mei; Smith, Rachel; Santiago, Araceli E.; Ruiz-Perez, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    The serine protease autotransporter from Enterobacteriaceae (SPATE) family, which number more than 25 proteases with apparent diverse functions, have been phylogenetically divided into two distinct classes, designated 1 and 2. We recently demonstrated that Pic and Tsh, two members of the class-2 SPATE family produced by intestinal and extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli, were able to cleave a number of O-glycosylated proteins on neutrophils and lymphocytes resulting in impaired leukocyte functions. Here we show that most members of the class-2 SPATE family have lectin-like properties and exhibit differential protease activity reliant on glycoprotein type and cell lineage. Protease activity was seen in virtually all tested O-glycosylated proteins including CD34, CD55, CD164, TIM1, TIM3, TIM4 and C1-INH. We also show that although SPATE proteins bound and cleaved glycoproteins more efficiently on granulocytes and monocytes, they also targeted glycoproteins on B, T and natural killer lymphocytes. Finally, we found that the characteristic domain-2 of class-2 SPATEs is not required for glycoprotease activity, but single amino acid mutations in Pic domain-1 to those residues naturally occurring in domain-1 of SepA, were sufficient to hamper Pic glycoprotease activity. This study shows that most class-2 SPATEs have redundant activities and suggest that they may function as immunomodulators at several levels of the immune system. PMID:25251283

  11. Broad spectrum activity of a lectin-like bacterial serine protease family on human leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Ayala-Lujan, Jorge Luis; Vijayakumar, Vidhya; Gong, Mei; Smith, Rachel; Santiago, Araceli E; Ruiz-Perez, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    The serine protease autotransporter from Enterobacteriaceae (SPATE) family, which number more than 25 proteases with apparent diverse functions, have been phylogenetically divided into two distinct classes, designated 1 and 2. We recently demonstrated that Pic and Tsh, two members of the class-2 SPATE family produced by intestinal and extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli, were able to cleave a number of O-glycosylated proteins on neutrophils and lymphocytes resulting in impaired leukocyte functions. Here we show that most members of the class-2 SPATE family have lectin-like properties and exhibit differential protease activity reliant on glycoprotein type and cell lineage. Protease activity was seen in virtually all tested O-glycosylated proteins including CD34, CD55, CD164, TIM1, TIM3, TIM4 and C1-INH. We also show that although SPATE proteins bound and cleaved glycoproteins more efficiently on granulocytes and monocytes, they also targeted glycoproteins on B, T and natural killer lymphocytes. Finally, we found that the characteristic domain-2 of class-2 SPATEs is not required for glycoprotease activity, but single amino acid mutations in Pic domain-1 to those residues naturally occurring in domain-1 of SepA, were sufficient to hamper Pic glycoprotease activity. This study shows that most class-2 SPATEs have redundant activities and suggest that they may function as immunomodulators at several levels of the immune system. PMID:25251283

  12. Natural cysteine protease inhibitors in protozoa: Fifteen years of the chagasin family.

    PubMed

    Costa, Tatiana F R; Lima, Ana Paula C A

    2016-03-01

    Chagasin-type inhibitors comprise natural inhibitors of papain-like cysteine proteases that are distributed among Protist, Bacteria and Archaea. Chagasin was identified in the pathogenic protozoa Trypanosoma cruzi as an approximately 11 kDa protein that is a tight-binding and highly thermostable inhibitor of papain, cysteine cathepsins and endogenous parasite cysteine proteases. It displays an Imunoglobulin-like fold with three exposed loops to one side of the molecule, where amino acid residues present in conserved motifs at the tips of each loop contact target proteases. Differently from cystatins, the loop 2 of chagasin enters the active-site cleft, making direct contact with the catalytic residues, while loops 4 and 6 embrace the enzyme from the sides. Orthologues of chagasin are named Inhibitors of Cysteine Peptidases (ICP), and share conserved overall tri-dimensional structure and mode of binding to proteases. ICPs are tentatively distributed in three families: in family I42 are grouped chagasin-type inhibitors that share conserved residues at the exposed loops; family I71 contains Plasmodium ICPs, which are large proteins having a chagasin-like domain at the C-terminus, with lower similarity to chagasin in the conserved motif at loop 2; family I81 contains Toxoplasma ICP. Recombinant ICPs tested so far can inactivate protozoa cathepsin-like proteases and their mammalian counterparts. Studies on their biological roles were carried out in a few species, mainly using transgenic protozoa, and the conclusions vary. However, in all cases, alterations in the levels of expression of chagasin/ICPs led to substantial changes in one or more steps of parasite biology, with higher incidence in influencing their interaction with the hosts. We will cover most of the findings on chagasin/ICP structural and functional properties and overview the current knowledge on their roles in protozoa. PMID:26546840

  13. Using the SUBcellular database for Arabidopsis proteins to localize the Deg protease family.

    PubMed

    Tanz, Sandra K; Castleden, Ian; Hooper, Cornelia M; Small, Ian; Millar, A Harvey

    2014-01-01

    Sub-functionalization during the expansion of gene families in eukaryotes has occurred in part through specific subcellular localization of different family members. To better understand this process in plants, compiled records of large-scale proteomic and fluorescent protein localization datasets can be explored and bioinformatic predictions for protein localization can be used to predict the gaps in experimental data. This process can be followed by targeted experiments to test predictions. The SUBA3 database is a free web-service at http://suba.plantenergy.uwa.edu.au that helps users to explore reported experimental data and predictions concerning proteins encoded by gene families and to define the experiments required to locate these homologous sets of proteins. Here we show how SUBA3 can be used to explore the subcellular location of the Deg protease family of ATP-independent serine endopeptidases (Deg1-Deg16). Combined data integration and new experiments refined location information for Deg1 and Deg9, confirmed Deg2, Deg5, and Deg8 in plastids and Deg 15 in peroxisomes and provide substantial experimental evidence for mitochondrial localized Deg proteases. Two of these, Deg3 and Deg10, additionally localized to the plastid, revealing novel dual-targeted Deg proteases in the plastid and the mitochondrion. SUBA3 is continually updated to ensure that researchers can use the latest published data when planning the experimental steps remaining to localize gene family functions. PMID:25161662

  14. Using the SUBcellular database for Arabidopsis proteins to localize the Deg protease family

    PubMed Central

    Tanz, Sandra K.; Castleden, Ian; Hooper, Cornelia M.; Small, Ian; Millar, A. Harvey

    2014-01-01

    Sub-functionalization during the expansion of gene families in eukaryotes has occurred in part through specific subcellular localization of different family members. To better understand this process in plants, compiled records of large-scale proteomic and fluorescent protein localization datasets can be explored and bioinformatic predictions for protein localization can be used to predict the gaps in experimental data. This process can be followed by targeted experiments to test predictions. The SUBA3 database is a free web-service at http://suba.plantenergy.uwa.edu.au that helps users to explore reported experimental data and predictions concerning proteins encoded by gene families and to define the experiments required to locate these homologous sets of proteins. Here we show how SUBA3 can be used to explore the subcellular location of the Deg protease family of ATP-independent serine endopeptidases (Deg1–Deg16). Combined data integration and new experiments refined location information for Deg1 and Deg9, confirmed Deg2, Deg5, and Deg8 in plastids and Deg 15 in peroxisomes and provide substantial experimental evidence for mitochondrial localized Deg proteases. Two of these, Deg3 and Deg10, additionally localized to the plastid, revealing novel dual-targeted Deg proteases in the plastid and the mitochondrion. SUBA3 is continually updated to ensure that researchers can use the latest published data when planning the experimental steps remaining to localize gene family functions. PMID:25161662

  15. Structures of a bi-functional Kunitz-type STI family inhibitor of serine and aspartic proteases: Could the aspartic protease inhibition have evolved from a canonical serine protease-binding loop?

    PubMed

    Guerra, Yasel; Valiente, Pedro A; Pons, Tirso; Berry, Colin; Rudiño-Piñera, Enrique

    2016-08-01

    Bi-functional inhibitors from the Kunitz-type soybean trypsin inhibitor (STI) family are glycosylated proteins able to inhibit serine and aspartic proteases. Here we report six crystal structures of the wild-type and a non-glycosylated mutant of the bifunctional inhibitor E3Ad obtained at different pH values and space groups. The crystal structures show that E3Ad adopts the typical β-trefoil fold of the STI family exhibiting some conformational changes due to pH variations and crystal packing. Despite the high sequence identity with a recently reported potato cathepsin D inhibitor (PDI), three-dimensional structures obtained in this work show a significant conformational change in the protease-binding loop proposed for aspartic protease inhibition. The E3Ad binding loop for serine protease inhibition is also proposed, based on structural similarity with a novel non-canonical conformation described for the double-headed inhibitor API-A from the Kunitz-type STI family. In addition, structural and sequence analyses suggest that bifunctional inhibitors of serine and aspartic proteases from the Kunitz-type STI family are more similar to double-headed inhibitor API-A than other inhibitors with a canonical protease-binding loop. PMID:27329566

  16. A computational module assembled from different protease family motifs identifies PI PLC from Bacillus cereus as a putative prolyl peptidase with a serine protease scaffold.

    PubMed

    Rendón-Ramírez, Adela; Shukla, Manish; Oda, Masataka; Chakraborty, Sandeep; Minda, Renu; Dandekar, Abhaya M; Ásgeirsson, Bjarni; Goñi, Félix M; Rao, Basuthkar J

    2013-01-01

    Proteolytic enzymes have evolved several mechanisms to cleave peptide bonds. These distinct types have been systematically categorized in the MEROPS database. While a BLAST search on these proteases identifies homologous proteins, sequence alignment methods often fail to identify relationships arising from convergent evolution, exon shuffling, and modular reuse of catalytic units. We have previously established a computational method to detect functions in proteins based on the spatial and electrostatic properties of the catalytic residues (CLASP). CLASP identified a promiscuous serine protease scaffold in alkaline phosphatases (AP) and a scaffold recognizing a β-lactam (imipenem) in a cold-active Vibrio AP. Subsequently, we defined a methodology to quantify promiscuous activities in a wide range of proteins. Here, we assemble a module which encapsulates the multifarious motifs used by protease families listed in the MEROPS database. Since APs and proteases are an integral component of outer membrane vesicles (OMV), we sought to query other OMV proteins, like phospholipase C (PLC), using this search module. Our analysis indicated that phosphoinositide-specific PLC from Bacillus cereus is a serine protease. This was validated by protease assays, mass spectrometry and by inhibition of the native phospholipase activity of PI-PLC by the well-known serine protease inhibitor AEBSF (IC50 = 0.018 mM). Edman degradation analysis linked the specificity of the protease activity to a proline in the amino terminal, suggesting that the PI-PLC is a prolyl peptidase. Thus, we propose a computational method of extending protein families based on the spatial and electrostatic congruence of active site residues. PMID:23940667

  17. Specificity of botulinum protease for human VAMP family proteins.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Hideyuki; Ida, Tomoaki; Tsutsuki, Hiroyasu; Mori, Masatoshi; Matsumoto, Tomoko; Kohda, Tomoko; Mukamoto, Masafumi; Goshima, Naoki; Kozaki, Shunji; Ihara, Hideshi

    2012-04-01

    The botulinum neurotoxin light chain (BoNT-LC) is a zinc-dependent metalloprotease that cleaves neuronal SNARE proteins such as SNAP-25, VAMP2, and Syntaxin1. This cleavage interferes with the neurotransmitter release of peripheral neurons and results in flaccid paralysis. SNAP, VAMP, and Syntaxin are representative of large families of proteins that mediate most membrane fusion reactions, as well as both neuronal and non-neuronal exocytotic events in eukaryotic cells. Neuron-specific SNARE proteins, which are target substrates of BoNT, have been well studied; however, it is unclear whether other SNARE proteins are also proteolyzed by BoNT. Herein, we define the substrate specificity of BoNT-LC/B, /D, and /F towards recombinant human VAMP family proteins. We demonstrate that LC/B, /D, and /F are able to cleave VAMP1, 2, and 3, but no other VAMP family proteins. Kinetic analysis revealed that all LC have higher affinity and catalytic activity for the non-neuronal SNARE isoform VAMP3 than for the neuronal VAMP1 and 2 isoforms. LC/D in particular exhibited extremely low catalytic activity towards VAMP1 relative to other interactions, which we determined through point mutation analysis to be a result of the Ile present at residue 48 of VAMP1. We also identified the VAMP3 cleavage sites to be at the Gln 59-Phe 60 (LC/B), Lys 42-Leu 43 (LC/D), and Gln 41-Lys 42 (LC/F) peptide bonds, which correspond to those of VAMP1 or 2. Understanding the substrate specificity and kinetic characteristics of BoNT towards human SNARE proteins may aid in the development of novel therapeutic uses for BoNT. PMID:22289120

  18. Divergence in Ubiquitin Interaction and Catalysis among the Ubiquitin-Specific Protease Family Deubiquitinating Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Tencer, Adam H; Liang, Qin; Zhuang, Zhihao

    2016-08-23

    Deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) are responsible for reversing mono- and polyubiquitination of proteins and play essential roles in numerous cellular processes. Close to 100 human DUBs have been identified and are classified into five families, with the ubiquitin-specific protease (USP) family being the largest (>50 members). The binding of ubiquitin (Ub) to USP is strikingly different from that observed for the DUBs in the ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase (UCH) and ovarian tumor domain protease (OTU) families. We generated a panel of mutant ubiquitins and used them to probe the ubiquitin's interaction with a number of USPs. Our results revealed a remarkable divergence of USP-Ub interactions among the USP catalytic domains. Our double-mutant cycle analysis targeting the ubiquitin residues located in the tip, the central body, and the tail of ubiquitin also demonstrated different crosstalk among the USP-Ub interactions. This work uncovered intriguing divergence in the ubiquitin-binding mode in the USP family DUBs and raised the possibility of targeting the ubiquitin-binding hot spots on USPs for selective inhibition of USPs by small molecule antagonists. PMID:27501351

  19. CPDadh: A new peptidase family homologous to the cysteine protease domain in bacterial MARTX toxins

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Jimin; Lupardus, Patrick J; Garcia, K Christopher; Grishin, Nick V

    2009-01-01

    A cysteine protease domain (CPD) has been recently discovered in a group of multifunctional, autoprocessing RTX toxins (MARTX) and Clostridium difficile toxins A and B. These CPDs (referred to as CPDmartx) autocleave the toxins to release domains with toxic effects inside host cells. We report identification and computational analysis of CPDadh, a new cysteine peptidase family homologous to CPDmartx. CPDadh and CPDmartx share a Rossmann-like structural core and conserved catalytic residues. In bacteria, domains of the CPDadh family are present at the N-termini of a diverse group of putative cell-cell interaction proteins and at the C-termini of some RHS (recombination hot spot) proteins. In eukaryotes, catalytically inactive members of the CPDadh family are found in cell surface protein NELF (nasal embryonic LHRH factor) and some putative signaling proteins. PMID:19309740

  20. Serotype-Specific Structural Differences in the Protease-Cofactor Complexes of the Dengue Virus Family

    SciTech Connect

    Chandramouli, Sumana; Joseph, Jeremiah S.; Daudenarde, Sophie; Gatchalian, Jovylyn; Cornillez-Ty, Cromwell; Kuhn, Peter

    2010-03-04

    With an estimated 40% of the world population at risk, dengue poses a significant threat to human health, especially in tropical and subtropical regions. Preventative and curative efforts, such as vaccine development and drug discovery, face additional challenges due to the occurrence of four antigenically distinct serotypes of the causative dengue virus (DEN1 to -4). Complex immune responses resulting from repeat assaults by the different serotypes necessitate simultaneous targeting of all forms of the virus. One of the promising targets for drug development is the highly conserved two-component viral protease NS2B-NS3, which plays an essential role in viral replication by processing the viral precursor polyprotein into functional proteins. In this paper, we report the 2.1-{angstrom} crystal structure of the DEN1 NS2B hydrophilic core (residues 49 to 95) in complex with the NS3 protease domain (residues 1 to 186) carrying an internal deletion in the N terminus (residues 11 to 20). While the overall folds within the protease core are similar to those of DEN2 and DEN4 proteases, the conformation of the cofactor NS2B is dramatically different from those of other flaviviral apoprotease structures. The differences are especially apparent within its C-terminal region, implicated in substrate binding. The structure reveals for the first time serotype-specific structural elements in the dengue virus family, with the reported alternate conformation resulting from a unique metal-binding site within the DEN1 sequence. We also report the identification of a 10-residue stretch within NS3pro that separates the substrate-binding function from the catalytic turnover rate of the enzyme. Implications for broad-spectrum drug discovery are discussed.

  1. The Spn4 gene from Drosophila melanogaster is a multipurpose defence tool directed against proteases from three different peptidase families

    PubMed Central

    Brüning, Mareke; Lummer, Martina; Bentele, Caterina; Smolenaars, Marcel M. W.; Rodenburg, Kees W.; Ragg, Hermann

    2006-01-01

    By alternative use of four RSL (reactive site loop) coding exon cassettes, the serpin (serine protease inhibitor) gene Spn4 from Drosophila melanogaster was proposed to enable the synthesis of multiple protease inhibitor isoforms, one of which has been shown to be a potent inhibitor of human furin. Here, we have investigated the inhibitory spectrum of all Spn4 RSL variants. The analyses indicate that the Spn4 gene encodes inhibitors that may inhibit serine proteases of the subtilase family (S8), the chymotrypsin family (S1), and the papain-like cysteine protease family (C1), most of them at high rates. Thus a cohort of different protease inhibitors is generated simply by grafting enzyme-adapted RSL sequences on to a single serpin scaffold, even though the target proteases contain different types and/or a varying order of catalytic residues and are descendents of different phylogenetic lineages. Since all of the Spn4 RSL isoforms are produced as intracellular residents and additionally as variants destined for export or associated with the secretory pathway, the Spn4 gene represents a versatile defence tool kit that may provide multiple antiproteolytic functions. PMID:16989645

  2. Human mast cell tryptase: Multiple cDNAs and genes reveal a multigene serine protease family

    SciTech Connect

    Vanderslice, P.; Ballinger, S.M., Tam, E.K.; Goldstein, S.M.; Craik, C.S.; Caughey, G.H. )

    1990-05-01

    Three different cDNAs and a gene encoding human skin mast cell tryptase have been cloned and sequenced in their entirety. The deduced amino acid sequences reveal a 30-amino acid prepropeptide followed by a 245-amino acid catalytic domain. The C-terminal undecapeptide of the human preprosequence is identical in dog tryptase and appears to be part of a prosequence unique among serine proteases. The differences among the three human tryptase catalytic domains include the loss of a consensus N-glycosylation site in one cDNA, which may explain some of the heterogeneity in size and susceptibility to deglycosylation seen in tryptase preparations. All three tryptase cDNAs are distinct from a recently reported cDNA obtained from a human lung mast cell library. A skin tryptase cDNA was used to isolate a human tryptase gene, the exons of which match one of the skin-derived cDNAs. The organization of the {approx}1.8-kilobase-pair tryptase gene is unique and is not closely related to that of any other mast cell or leukocyte serine protease. The 5{prime} regulatory regions of the gene share features with those of other serine proteases, including mast cell chymase, but are unusual in being separated from the protein-coding sequence by an intron. High-stringency hybridization of a human genomic DNA blot with a fragment of the tryptase gene confirms the presence of multiple tryptase genes. These findings provide genetic evidence that human mast cell tryptases are the products of a multigene family.

  3. A novel member of the subtilisin-like protease family from Streptomyces albogriseolus.

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, M; Taguchi, S; Yamada, S; Kojima, S; Miura, K I; Momose, H

    1997-01-01

    SSI, chymostatin, and EDTA. The proteolytic activity of SAM-P45 was stimulated by the divalent cations Ca2+ and Mg2+. From these findings, we conclude that SAM-P45 interacts with SSI and can be categorized as a novel member of the subtilisin-like serine protease family. PMID:8990295

  4. Non-erythroid alpha-spectrin breakdown by calpain and interleukin 1 beta-converting-enzyme-like protease(s) in apoptotic cells: contributory roles of both protease families in neuronal apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Nath, R; Raser, K J; Stafford, D; Hajimohammadreza, I; Posner, A; Allen, H; Talanian, R V; Yuen, P; Gilbertsen, R B; Wang, K K

    1996-11-01

    The cytoskeletal protein non-erythroid alpha-spectrin is well documented as an endogenous calpain substrate, especially under pathophysiological conditions. In cell necrosis (e.g. maitotoxin-treated neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells), alpha-spectrin breakdown products (SBDPs) of 150 kDa and 145 kDa were produced by cellular calpains. In contrast, in neuronal cells undergoing apoptosis (cerebellar granule neurons subjected to low potassium and SH-SY5Y cells treated with staurosporine), an additional SBDP of 120 kDa was also observed. The formation of the 120 kDa SBDP was insensitive to calpain inhibitors but was completely blocked by an interleukin 1 beta-converting-enzyme (ICE)-like protease inhibitor, Z-Asp-CH2OC(O)-2,6-dichlorobenzene. Autolytic activation of both calpain and the ICE homologue CPP32 was also observed in apoptotic cells. alpha-Spectrin can also be cleaved in vitro by purified calpains to produce the SBDP doublet of 150/145 kDa and by ICE and ICE homologues [ICH-1, ICH-2 and CPP32(beta)] to produce a 150 kDa SBDP. In addition, CPP32 and ICE also produced a 120 kDa SBDP. Furthermore inhibition of either ICE-like protease(s) or calpain protects both granule neurons and SH-SY5Y cells against apoptosis. Our results suggest that both protease families participate in the expression of neuronal apoptosis. PMID:8920967

  5. Chymotrypsin protease inhibitor gene family in rice: Genomic organization and evidence for the presence of a bidirectional promoter shared between two chymotrypsin protease inhibitor genes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amanjot; Sahi, Chandan; Grover, Anil

    2009-01-01

    Protease inhibitors play important roles in stress and developmental responses of plants. Rice genome contains 17 putative members in chymotrypsin protease inhibitor (ranging in size from 7.21 to 11.9 kDa) gene family with different predicted localization sites. Full-length cDNA encoding for a putative subtilisin-chymotrypsin protease inhibitor (OCPI2) was obtained from Pusa basmati 1 (indica) rice seedlings. 620 bp-long OCPI2 cDNA contained 219 bp-long ORF, coding for 72 amino acid-long 7.7 kDa subtilisin-chymotrypsin protease inhibitor (CPI) cytoplasmic protein. Expression analysis by semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that OCPI2 transcript is induced by varied stresses including salt, ABA, low temperature and mechanical injury in both root and shoot tissues of the seedlings. Transgenic rice plants produced with OCPI2 promoter-gus reporter gene showed that this promoter directs high salt- and ABA-regulated expression of the GUS gene. Another CPI gene (OCPI1) upstream to OCPI2 (with 1126 bp distance between the transcription initiation sites of the two genes; transcription in the reverse orientation) was noted in genome sequence of rice genome. A vector that had GFP and GUS reporter genes in opposite orientations driven by 1881 bp intergenic sequence between the OCPI2 and OCPI1 (encompassing the region between the translation initiation sites of the two genes) was constructed and shot in onion epidermal cells by particle bombardment. Expression of both GFP and GUS from the same epidermal cell showed that this sequence represents a bidirectional promoter. Examples illustrating gene pairs showing co-expression of two divergent neighboring genes sharing a bidirectional promoter have recently been extensively worked out in yeast and human systems. We provide an example of a gene pair constituted of two homologous genes showing co-expression governed by a bidirectional promoter in rice. PMID:18952157

  6. Structure of a Complex between Nedd8 and the Ulp/Senp Protease Family Member Den1

    SciTech Connect

    Reverter, David; Wu, Kenneth; Erdene, Tudeviin Gan; Pan, Zhen-Qiang; Wilkinson, Keith D.; Lima, Christopher D.

    2010-07-20

    The Nedd8 conjugation pathway is conserved from yeast to humans and is essential in many organisms. Nedd8 is conjugated to cullin proteins in a process that alters SCF E3 ubiquitin ligase activity, and it is presumed that Nedd8 deconjugation would reverse these effects. We now report the X-ray structures of the human Nedd8-specific protease, Den1, in a complex with the inhibitor Nedd8 aldehyde, thus revealing a model for the tetrahedral transition state intermediate generated during proteolysis. Although Den1 is closely related to the SUMO-specific protease family (Ulp/Senp family), structural analysis of the interface suggests determinants involved in Nedd8 selectivity by Den1 over other ubiquitin-like family members and suggests how the Ulp/Senp architecture has been modified to interact with different ubiquitin-like modifiers.

  7. Fas activation of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signalling pathway requires ICE/CED-3 family proteases.

    PubMed Central

    Juo, P; Kuo, C J; Reynolds, S E; Konz, R F; Raingeaud, J; Davis, R J; Biemann, H P; Blenis, J

    1997-01-01

    The Fas receptor mediates a signalling cascade resulting in programmed cell death (apoptosis) within hours of receptor cross-linking. In this study Fas activated the stress-responsive mitogen-activated protein kinases, p38 and JNK, within 2 h in Jurkat T lymphocytes but not the mitogen-responsive kinase ERK1 or pp70S6k. Fas activation of p38 correlated temporally with the onset of apoptosis, and transfection of constitutively active MKK3 (glu), an upstream regulator of p38, potentiated Fas-induced cell death, suggesting a potential involvement of the MKK3/p38 activation pathway in Fas-mediated apoptosis. Fas has been shown to require ICE (interleukin-1 beta-converting enzyme) family proteases to induce apoptosis from studies utilizing the cowpox ICE inhibitor protein CrmA, the synthetic tetrapeptide ICE inhibitor YVAD-CMK, and the tripeptide pan-ICE inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK. In this study, crmA antagonized, and YVAD-CMK and Z-VAD-FMK completely inhibited, Fas activation of p38 kinase activity, demonstrating that Fas-dependent activation of p38 requires ICE/CED-3 family members and conversely that the MKK3/p38 activation cascade represents a downstream target for the ICE/CED-3 family proteases. Intriguingly, p38 activation by sorbitol and etoposide was resistant to YVAD-CMK and Z-VAD-FMK, suggesting the existence of an additional mechanism(s) of p38 regulation. The ICE/CED-3 family-p38 regulatory relationship described in the current work indicates that in addition to the previously described destructive cleavage of substrates such as poly(ADP ribose) polymerase, lamins, and topoisomerase, the apoptotic cysteine proteases also function to regulate stress kinase signalling cascades. PMID:8972182

  8. Data-mining approaches reveal hidden families of proteases in the genome of malaria parasite.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yimin; Wang, Xiangyun; Liu, Xia; Wang, Yufeng

    2003-04-01

    The search for novel antimalarial drug targets is urgent due to the growing resistance of Plasmodium falciparum parasites to available drugs. Proteases are attractive antimalarial targets because of their indispensable roles in parasite infection and development, especially in the processes of host erythrocyte rupture/invasion and hemoglobin degradation. However, to date, only a small number of proteases have been identified and characterized in Plasmodium species. Using an extensive sequence similarity search, we have identified 92 putative proteases in the P. falciparum genome. A set of putative proteases including calpain, metacaspase, and signal peptidase I have been implicated to be central mediators for essential parasitic activity and distantly related to the vertebrate host. Moreover, of the 92, at least 88 have been demonstrated to code for gene products at the transcriptional levels, based upon the microarray and RT-PCR results, and the publicly available microarray and proteomics data. The present study represents an initial effort to identify a set of expressed, active, and essential proteases as targets for inhibitor-based drug design. PMID:12671001

  9. Determinants of Affinity and Proteolytic Stability in Interactions of Kunitz Family Protease Inhibitors with Mesotrypsin

    SciTech Connect

    M Salameh; A Soares; D Navaneetham; D Sinha; P Walsh; E Radisky

    2011-12-31

    An important functional property of protein protease inhibitors is their stability to proteolysis. Mesotrypsin is a human trypsin that has been implicated in the proteolytic inactivation of several protein protease inhibitors. We have found that bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI), a Kunitz protease inhibitor, inhibits mesotrypsin very weakly and is slowly proteolyzed, whereas, despite close sequence and structural homology, the Kunitz protease inhibitor domain of the amyloid precursor protein (APPI) binds to mesotrypsin 100 times more tightly and is cleaved 300 times more rapidly. To define features responsible for these differences, we have assessed the binding and cleavage by mesotrypsin of APPI and BPTI reciprocally mutated at two nonidentical residues that make direct contact with the enzyme. We find that Arg at P{sub 1} (versus Lys) favors both tighter binding and more rapid cleavage, whereas Met (versus Arg) at P'{sub 2} favors tighter binding but has minimal effect on cleavage. Surprisingly, we find that the APPI scaffold greatly enhances proteolytic cleavage rates, independently of the binding loop. We draw thermodynamic additivity cycles analyzing the interdependence of P{sub 1} and P'{sub 2} substitutions and scaffold differences, finding multiple instances in which the contributions of these features are nonadditive. We also report the crystal structure of the mesotrypsin-APPI complex, in which we find that the binding loop of APPI displays evidence of increased mobility compared with BPTI. Our data suggest that the enhanced vulnerability of APPI to mesotrypsin cleavage may derive from sequence differences in the scaffold that propagate increased flexibility and mobility to the binding loop.

  10. Determinants of Affinity and Proteolytic Stability in Interactions of Kunitz Family Protease Inhibitors with Mesotrypsin

    SciTech Connect

    Salameh, M.A.; Soares, A.; Navaneetham, D.; Sinha, D.; Walsh, P. N.; Radisky, E. S.

    2010-11-19

    An important functional property of protein protease inhibitors is their stability to proteolysis. Mesotrypsin is a human trypsin that has been implicated in the proteolytic inactivation of several protein protease inhibitors. We have found that bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI), a Kunitz protease inhibitor, inhibits mesotrypsin very weakly and is slowly proteolyzed, whereas, despite close sequence and structural homology, the Kunitz protease inhibitor domain of the amyloid precursor protein (APPI) binds to mesotrypsin 100 times more tightly and is cleaved 300 times more rapidly. To define features responsible for these differences, we have assessed the binding and cleavage by mesotrypsin of APPI and BPTI reciprocally mutated at two nonidentical residues that make direct contact with the enzyme. We find that Arg at P{sub 1} (versus Lys) favors both tighter binding and more rapid cleavage, whereas Met (versus Arg) at P'{sub 2} favors tighter binding but has minimal effect on cleavage. Surprisingly, we find that the APPI scaffold greatly enhances proteolytic cleavage rates, independently of the binding loop. We draw thermodynamic additivity cycles analyzing the interdependence of P1 and P'{sub 2} substitutions and scaffold differences, finding multiple instances in which the contributions of these features are nonadditive. We also report the crystal structure of the mesotrypsin {center_dot} APPI complex, in which we find that the binding loop of APPI displays evidence of increased mobility compared with BPTI. Our data suggest that the enhanced vulnerability of APPI to mesotrypsin cleavage may derive from sequence differences in the scaffold that propagate increased flexibility and mobility to the binding loop.

  11. The HtrA/DegP family protease MamE is a bifunctional protein with roles in magnetosome protein localization and magnetite biomineralization

    PubMed Central

    Quinlan, Anna; Murat, Dorothée; Vali, Hojatollah; Komeili, Arash

    2011-01-01

    Summary Magnetotactic bacteria contain nanometer-sized, membrane-bound organelles, called magnetosomes, which are tasked with the biomineralization of small crystals of the iron oxide magnetite allowing the organism to use geomagnetic field lines for navigation. A key player in this process is the HtrA/DegP family protease MamE. In its absence, Magnetospirillum magneticum str AMB-1 is able to form magnetosome membranes but not magnetite crystals, a defect previously linked to the mislocalization of magnetosome proteins. In this work we use a directed genetic approach to find that MamE, and another predicted magnetosome-associated protease, MamO, likely function as proteases in vivo. However, as opposed to the complete loss of mamE where no biomineralization is observed, the protease-deficient variant of this protein still supports the initiation and formation of small, 20 nm-sized crystals of magnetite, too small to hold a permanent magnetic dipole moment. This analysis also reveals that MamE is a bifunctional protein with a protease-independent role in magnetosome protein localization and a protease-dependent role in maturation of small magnetite crystals. Together these results imply the existence of a previously unrecognized “checkpoint” in biomineralization where MamE moderates the completion of magnetite formation and thus committal to magneto-aerotaxis as the organism’s dominant mode of navigating the environment. PMID:21414040

  12. Loss-of-function analyses defines vital and redundant functions of the Plasmodium rhomboid protease family.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jing-Wen; Meireles, Patrícia; Prudêncio, Miguel; Engelmann, Sabine; Annoura, Takeshi; Sajid, Mohammed; Chevalley-Maurel, Séverine; Ramesar, Jai; Nahar, Carolin; Avramut, Cristina M C; Koster, Abraham J; Matuschewski, Kai; Waters, Andrew P; Janse, Chris J; Mair, Gunnar R; Khan, Shahid M

    2013-04-01

    Rhomboid-like proteases cleave membrane-anchored proteins within their transmembrane domains. In apicomplexan parasites substrates include molecules that function in parasite motility and host cell invasion. While two Plasmodium rhomboids, ROM1 and ROM4, have been examined, the roles of the remaining six rhomboids during the malaria parasite's life cycle are unknown. We present systematic gene deletion analyses of all eight Plasmodium rhomboid-like proteins as a means to discover stage-specific phenotypes and potential functions in the rodent malaria model, P. berghei. Four rhomboids (ROM4, 6, 7 and 8) are refractory to gene deletion, suggesting an essential role during asexual blood stage development. In contrast ROM1, 3, 9 and 10 were dispensable for blood stage development and exhibited no, subtle or severe defects in mosquito or liver development. Parasites lacking ROM9 and ROM10 showed no major phenotypic defects. Parasites lacking ROM1 presented a delay in blood stage patency following liver infection, but in contrast to a previous study blood stage parasites had similar growth and virulence characteristics as wild type parasites. Parasites lacking ROM3 in mosquitoes readily established oocysts but failed to produce sporozoites. ROM3 is the first apicomplexan rhomboid identified to play a vital role in sporogony. PMID:23490234

  13. Antimicrobial peptide inhibition of fungalysin proteases that target plant type 19 Family IV defense chitinases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cereal crops and other plants produce secreted seed chitinases that reduce pathogenic infection, most likely by targeting the fungal chitinous cell wall. We have shown that corn (Zea mays) produces three GH family 19, plant class IV chitinases, that help in protecting the plant against Fusarium and ...

  14. GlyGly-CTERM and Rhombosortase: A C-Terminal Protein Processing Signal in a Many-to-One Pairing with a Rhomboid Family Intramembrane Serine Protease

    PubMed Central

    Haft, Daniel H.; Varghese, Neha

    2011-01-01

    The rhomboid family of serine proteases occurs in all domains of life. Its members contain at least six hydrophobic membrane-spanning helices, with an active site serine located deep within the hydrophobic interior of the plasma membrane. The model member GlpG from Escherichia coli is heavily studied through engineered mutant forms, varied model substrates, and multiple X-ray crystal studies, yet its relationship to endogenous substrates is not well understood. Here we describe an apparent membrane anchoring C-terminal homology domain that appears in numerous genera including Shewanella, Vibrio, Acinetobacter, and Ralstonia, but excluding Escherichia and Haemophilus. Individual genomes encode up to thirteen members, usually homologous to each other only in this C-terminal region. The domain's tripartite architecture consists of motif, transmembrane helix, and cluster of basic residues at the protein C-terminus, as also seen with the LPXTG recognition sequence for sortase A and the PEP-CTERM recognition sequence for exosortase. Partial Phylogenetic Profiling identifies a distinctive rhomboid-like protease subfamily almost perfectly co-distributed with this recognition sequence. This protease subfamily and its putative target domain are hereby renamed rhombosortase and GlyGly-CTERM, respectively. The protease and target are encoded by consecutive genes in most genomes with just a single target, but far apart otherwise. The signature motif of the Rhombo-CTERM domain, often SGGS, only partially resembles known cleavage sites of rhomboid protease family model substrates. Some protein families that have several members with C-terminal GlyGly-CTERM domains also have additional members with LPXTG or PEP-CTERM domains instead, suggesting there may be common themes to the post-translational processing of these proteins by three different membrane protein superfamilies. PMID:22194940

  15. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of human kallikrein 7, a serine protease of the multigene kallikrein family

    SciTech Connect

    Fernández, Israel S.; Ständker, Ludger; Forssmann, Wolf-Georg; Giménez-Gallego, Guillermo; Romero, Antonio

    2007-08-01

    The cloning, expression, purification and crystallization of recombinant human kallikrein 7, directly synthesized in the active form in E. coli, is described. Diffraction data were collected to 2.8 Å resolution from native crystals. Human kallikreins are a group of serine proteases of high sequence homology whose genes are grouped as a single cluster at chromosome 19. Although the physiological roles of kallikreins are generally still unknown, members of the kallikrein family have been clearly implicated in pathological situations such as cancer and psoriasis. Human kallikrein 7 (hK7) has been shown to be involved in pathological keratinization, psoriasis and ovarian cancer. In order to gain insight into the molecular structure of this protein, hK7 was crystallized after recombinant production in its folded and active form using a periplasmic secretion vector in Escherichia coli. The crystals belonged to the rhombohedral space group H32 and diffracted to 2.8 Å. The phase problem was solved by molecular replacement using the mouse kallikrein-related protein neuropsin. Completion of the model and structure refinement are under way.

  16. The lone S41 family C-terminal processing protease in Staphylococcus aureus is localized to the cell wall and contributes to virulence.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Ronan K; Rivera, Frances E; Cavaco, Courtney K; Johnson, Grant M; Martin, David; Shaw, Lindsey N

    2014-08-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a versatile pathogen of humans and a continued public health concern due to the rise and spread of multidrug-resistant strains. As part of an ongoing investigation into the pathogenic mechanisms of this organism we previously demonstrated that an intracellular N-terminal processing protease is required for S. aureus virulence. Following on from this, here we examine the role of CtpA, the lone C-terminal processing protease of S. aureus. CtpA, a member of the S41 family, is a serine protease whose homologues in Gram-negative bacteria have been implicated in a range of biological functions, including pathogenesis. We demonstrate that S. aureus CtpA is localized to the bacterial cell wall and expression of the ctpA gene is maximal upon exposure to conditions encountered during infection. Disruption of the ctpA gene leads to decreased heat tolerance and increased sensitivity when exposed to components of the host immune system. Finally we demonstrate that the ctpA(-) mutant strain is attenuated for virulence in a murine model of infection. Our results represent the first characterization of a C-terminal processing protease in a pathogenic Gram-positive bacterium and show that it plays a critical role during infection. PMID:24928312

  17. The porcine gene TBP10 encodes a protein homologous to the human tat-binding protein/26S protease subunit family.

    PubMed

    Leeb, T; Rettenberger, G; Breech, J; Hameister, H; Brenig, B

    1996-03-01

    We have cloned a porcine gene, designated TBP1O, that belongs to the Tat-binding protein/26S protease subunit family. The genomic structure of the porcine TBP1O gene was analyzed after isolation of three overlapping genomic phage lambda clones. The TBP10 gene harbors 12 exons spanning 4.5 kb of chromosomal DNA. The TBP1O gene was assigned to Chromosome (Chr) 12 by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) on metaphase chromosomes. The chromosomal location was confirmed by PCR analysis of a porcine-rodent hybrid cell panel. The TBP1O protein is encoded by a 1221 nucleotide cDNA and has a molecular mass of 45.6 kDa. The predicted amino acid sequence has highest similarity to the human and bovine p45 subunit of the 26S protease and the human transcription factor TRIP1. Further similarities were detected to the slime mold protein DdTBP1O and the Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein SUG1. Like DdTBP1O and other members of the protein family, the porcine TBP1O harbors a leucine zipper motif in the N-terminal region and a domain characteristics of ATP-dependent proteases in the C-terminal region. PMID:8833236

  18. Proteomics and phylogenetic analysis of the cathepsin L protease family of the helminth pathogen Fasciola hepatica: expansion of a repertoire of virulence-associated factors.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Mark W; Tort, Jose F; Lowther, Jonathan; Donnelly, Sheila M; Wong, Emily; Xu, Weibo; Stack, Colin M; Padula, Matthew; Herbert, Ben; Dalton, John P

    2008-06-01

    Cathepsin L proteases secreted by the helminth pathogen Fasciola hepatica have functions in parasite virulence including tissue invasion and suppression of host immune responses. Using proteomics methods alongside phylogenetic studies we characterized the profile of cathepsin L proteases secreted by adult F. hepatica and hence identified those involved in host-pathogen interaction. Phylogenetic analyses showed that the Fasciola cathepsin L gene family expanded by a series of gene duplications followed by divergence that gave rise to three clades associated with mature adult worms (Clades 1, 2, and 5) and two clades specific to infective juvenile stages (Clades 3 and 4). Consistent with these observations our proteomics studies identified representatives from Clades 1, 2, and 5 but not from Clades 3 and 4 in adult F. hepatica secretory products. Clades 1 and 2 account for 67.39 and 27.63% of total secreted cathepsin Ls, respectively, suggesting that their expansion was positively driven and that these proteases are most critical for parasite survival and adaptation. Sequence comparison studies revealed that the expansion of cathepsin Ls by gene duplication was followed by residue changes in the S2 pocket of the active site. Our biochemical studies showed that these changes result in alterations in substrate binding and suggested that the divergence of the cathepsin L family produced a repertoire of enzymes with overlapping and complementary substrate specificities that could cleave host macromolecules more efficiently. Although the cathepsin Ls are produced as zymogens containing a prosegment and mature domain, all secreted enzymes identified by MS were processed to mature active enzymes. The prosegment region was highly conserved between the clades except at the boundary of prosegment and mature enzyme. Despite the lack of conservation at this section, sites for exogenous cleavage by asparaginyl endopeptidases and a Leu-Ser[downward arrow]His motif for

  19. Structure of the mexicain-E-64 complex and comparison with other cysteine proteases of the papain family.

    PubMed

    Gavira, J A; González-Ramírez, L A; Oliver-Salvador, M C; Soriano-García, M; García-Ruiz, J M

    2007-05-01

    Mexicain is a 23.8 kDa cysteine protease from the tropical plant Jacaratia mexicana. It is isolated as the most abundant product after cation-exchange chromatography of the mix of proteases extracted from the latex of the fruit. The purified enzyme inhibited with E-64 [N-(3-carboxyoxirane-2-carbonyl)-leucyl-amino(4-guanido)butane] was crystallized by sitting-drop vapour diffusion and the structure was solved by molecular replacement at 2.1 A resolution and refined to an R factor of 17.7% (R(free) = 23.8%). The enzyme belongs to the alpha+beta class of proteins and the structure shows the typical papain-like fold composed of two domains, the alpha-helix-rich (L) domain and the beta-barrel-like (R) domain, separated by a groove containing the active site formed by residues Cys25 and His159, one from each domain. The four monomers in the asymmetric unit show one E-64 molecule covalently bound to Cys25 in the active site and differences have been found in the placement of E-64 in each monomer. PMID:17452780

  20. The mouse frizzy (fr) and rat 'hairless' (frCR) mutations are natural variants of protease serine S1 family member 8 (Prss8).

    PubMed

    Spacek, Damek V; Perez, Amarilis F; Ferranti, Katelynn M; Wu, Lillya K-L; Moy, Daniel M; Magnan, David R; King, Thomas R

    2010-06-01

    Please cite this paper as: The mouse frizzy (fr) and rat 'hairless' (fr(CR)) mutations are natural variants of protease serine S1 family member 8 (Prss8). Experimental Dermatology 2010; 19: 527-532. Abstract: We have previously suggested (based on genetic mapping analysis) that the allelic 'fuzzy' and 'hairless' mutations in the rat are likely orthologues of the mouse frizzy mutation (fr). Here, we analysed three large intraspecific backcross panels that segregated for mouse fr to restrict this locus to a 0.6-Mb region that includes fewer than 30 genes. DNA sequencing of one of these candidates known to be expressed in skin, protease serine S1 family member 8 (Prss8), revealed a T to A transversion associated with the fr allele that would result in a valine to aspartate substitution at residue 170 in the gene product. To test whether this missense mutation might be the molecular basis of this frizzy variant, we crossed fr/fr mice with mice that carried a recessive perinatal lethal mutation in Prss8. Hybrid offspring that inherited both fr and the Prss8 null allele displayed abnormal hair and skin, showing that these two mutations are allelic, and suggesting strongly that the T to A mutation in Prss8 is responsible for the mutant frizzy phenotype. Sequence analysis of all Prss8 coding regions in the 'hairless' rat identified a 12-bp deletion in the third exon, indicating that mouse fr and the rat 'hairless' mutations are indeed orthologues. However, this analysis failed to detect any alterations to Prss8 coding sequences in the allelic 'fuzzy' rat variant. PMID:20201958

  1. A Zinc-Dependent Protease AMZ-tk from a Thermophilic Archaeon is a New Member of the Archaemetzincin Protein Family.

    PubMed

    Jia, Baolei; Li, Zhengqun; Liu, Jinliang; Sun, Ying; Jia, Xiaomeng; Xuan, Yuan Hu; Zhang, Jiayan; Jeon, Che Ok

    2015-01-01

    A putative zinc-dependent protease (TK0512) in Thermococcus kodakarensis KOD1 shares a conserved motif with archaemetzincins, which are metalloproteases found in archaea, bacteria, and eukarya. Phylogenetic and sequence analyses showed that TK0512 and its homologues in Thermococcaceae represent new members in the archaemetzincins family, which we named AMZ-tk. We further confirmed its proteolytic activity biochemically by overexpression of the recombinant AMZ-tk in Escherichia coli and characterization of the purified enzyme. In the presence of zinc, the purified enzyme degraded casein, while adding EDTA strongly inhibited the enzyme activity. AMZ-tk also exhibited self-cleavage activity that required Zn(2+). These results demonstrated that AMZ-tk is a zinc-dependent protease within the archaemetzincin family. The enzyme displayed activity at alkaline pHs ranging from 7.0 to 10.0, with the optimal pH being 8.0. The optimum temperature for the catalytic activity of AMZ-tk was 55°C. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR revealed that transcription of AMZ-tk was also up-regulated after exposing the cells to 55 and 65°C. Mutant analysis suggested that Zn(2+) binding histidine and catalytic glutamate play key roles in proteolysis. AMZ-tk was thermostable on incubation for 4 h at 70°C in the presence of EDTA. AMZ-tk also retained >50% of its original activity in the presence of both laboratory surfactants and commercial laundry detergents. AMZ-tk further showed antibacterial activity against several bacteria. Therefore, AMZ-tk is of considerable interest for many purposes in view of its activity at alkaline pH, detergents, and thermostability. PMID:26733945

  2. A Zinc-Dependent Protease AMZ-tk from a Thermophilic Archaeon is a New Member of the Archaemetzincin Protein Family

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Baolei; Li, Zhengqun; Liu, Jinliang; Sun, Ying; Jia, Xiaomeng; Xuan, Yuan Hu; Zhang, Jiayan; Jeon, Che Ok

    2015-01-01

    A putative zinc-dependent protease (TK0512) in Thermococcus kodakarensis KOD1 shares a conserved motif with archaemetzincins, which are metalloproteases found in archaea, bacteria, and eukarya. Phylogenetic and sequence analyses showed that TK0512 and its homologues in Thermococcaceae represent new members in the archaemetzincins family, which we named AMZ-tk. We further confirmed its proteolytic activity biochemically by overexpression of the recombinant AMZ-tk in Escherichia coli and characterization of the purified enzyme. In the presence of zinc, the purified enzyme degraded casein, while adding EDTA strongly inhibited the enzyme activity. AMZ-tk also exhibited self-cleavage activity that required Zn2+. These results demonstrated that AMZ-tk is a zinc-dependent protease within the archaemetzincin family. The enzyme displayed activity at alkaline pHs ranging from 7.0 to 10.0, with the optimal pH being 8.0. The optimum temperature for the catalytic activity of AMZ-tk was 55°C. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR revealed that transcription of AMZ-tk was also up-regulated after exposing the cells to 55 and 65°C. Mutant analysis suggested that Zn2+ binding histidine and catalytic glutamate play key roles in proteolysis. AMZ-tk was thermostable on incubation for 4 h at 70°C in the presence of EDTA. AMZ-tk also retained >50% of its original activity in the presence of both laboratory surfactants and commercial laundry detergents. AMZ-tk further showed antibacterial activity against several bacteria. Therefore, AMZ-tk is of considerable interest for many purposes in view of its activity at alkaline pH, detergents, and thermostability. PMID:26733945

  3. Identification and Characterization of a Novel Aspergillus fumigatus Rhomboid Family Putative Protease, RbdA, Involved in Hypoxia Sensing and Virulence.

    PubMed

    Vaknin, Yakir; Hillmann, Falk; Iannitti, Rossana; Ben Baruch, Netali; Sandovsky-Losica, Hana; Shadkchan, Yona; Romani, Luigina; Brakhage, Axel; Kniemeyer, Olaf; Osherov, Nir

    2016-06-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is the most common pathogenic mold infecting humans and a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients. In invasive pulmonary aspergillosis, A. fumigatus spores are inhaled into the lungs, undergoing germination and invasive hyphal growth. The fungus occludes and disrupts the blood vessels, leading to hypoxia and eventual tissue necrosis. The ability of this mold to adapt to hypoxia is regulated in part by the sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP) SrbA and the DscA to DscD Golgi E3 ligase complex critical for SREBP activation by proteolytic cleavage. Loss of the genes encoding these proteins results in avirulence. To identify novel regulators of hypoxia sensing, we screened the Neurospora crassa gene deletion library under hypoxia and identified a novel rhomboid family protease essential for hypoxic growth. Deletion of the A. fumigatus rhomboid homolog rbdA resulted in an inability to grow under hypoxia, hypersensitivity to CoCl2, nikkomycin Z, fluconazole, and ferrozine, abnormal swollen tip morphology, and transcriptional dysregulation-accurately phenocopying deletion of srbA. In vivo, rbdA deletion resulted in increased sensitivity to phagocytic killing, a reduced inflammatory Th1 and Th17 response, and strongly attenuated virulence. Phenotypic rescue of the ΔrbdA mutant was achieved by expression and nuclear localization of the N terminus of SrbA, including its HLH domain, further indicating that RbdA and SrbA act in the same signaling pathway. In summary, we have identified RbdA, a novel putative rhomboid family protease in A. fumigatus that mediates hypoxia adaptation and fungal virulence and that is likely linked to SrbA cleavage and activation. PMID:27068092

  4. Supermarket Proteases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagar, William G.; Bullerwell, Lornie D.

    2003-01-01

    Presents a laboratory activity on enzymes. Uses common items found in the supermarket that contain protease enzymes, such as contact lens cleaner and meat tenderizer. Demonstrates the digestion of gelatin proteins as part of enzymatic reactions. (Author/SOE)

  5. Mutagenesis and crystallographic studies of the catalytic residues of the papain family protease bleomycin hydrolase: new insights into active-site structure

    PubMed Central

    O'Farrell, Paul A.; Joshua-Tor, Leemor

    2006-01-01

    Bleomycin hydrolase (BH) is a hexameric papain family cysteine protease which is involved in preparing peptides for antigen presentation and has been implicated in tumour cell resistance to bleomycin chemotherapy. Structures of active-site mutants of yeast BH yielded unexpected results. Replacement of the active-site asparagine with alanine, valine or leucine results in the destabilization of the histidine side chain, demonstrating unambiguously the role of the asparagine residue in correctly positioning the histidine for catalysis. Replacement of the histidine with alanine or leucine destabilizes the asparagine position, indicating a delicate arrangement of the active-site residues. In all of the mutants, the C-terminus of the protein, which lies in the active site, protrudes further into the active site. All mutants were compromised in their catalytic activity. The structures also revealed the importance of a tightly bound water molecule which stabilizes a loop near the active site and which is conserved throughout the papain family. It is displaced in a number of the mutants, causing destabilization of this loop and a nearby loop, resulting in a large movement of the active-site cysteine. The results imply that this water molecule plays a key structural role in this family of enzymes. PMID:17007609

  6. SLC6 family transporter SNF-10 is required for protease-mediated activation of sperm motility in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Fenker, Kristin E.; Hansen, Angela A.; Chong, Conrad A.; Jud, Molly C.; Duffy, Brittany A.; Norton, J. Paul; Hansen, Jody M.; Stanfield, Gillian M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Motility of sperm is crucial for their directed migration to the egg. The acquisition and modulation of motility are regulated to ensure that sperm move when and where needed, thereby promoting reproductive success. One specific example of this phenomenon occurs during differentiation of the amoeboid sperm of C. elegans as they activate from a round spermatid to a mature, crawling spermatozoon. Sperm activation is regulated by redundant pathways to occur at a specific time and place for each sex. Here, we report the identification of the solute carrier 6 (SLC6) transporter protein SNF-10 as a key regulator of C. elegans sperm activation in response to male protease activation signals. We find that SNF-10 is present in sperm and is required for activation by the male but not by the hermaphrodite. Loss of both snf-10 and a hermaphrodite activation factor render sperm completely insensitive to activation. Using in vitro assays, we find that snf-10 mutant sperm show a specific deficit in response to protease treatment but not to other activators. Prior to activation, SNF-10 is present in the plasma membrane, where it represents a strong candidate to receive signals that lead to subcellular morphogenesis. After activation, it shows polarized localization to the cell body region that is dependent on membrane fusions mediated by the dysferlin FER-1. Our discovery of snf-10 offers insight into the mechanisms differentially employed by the two sexes to accomplish the common goal of producing functional sperm, as well as how the physiology of nematode sperm may be regulated to control motility as it is in mammals. PMID:24929237

  7. Inhibitors of rhomboid proteases.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Eliane V; Verhelst, Steven H L

    2016-03-01

    Rhomboid proteases form one of the most widespread families of intramembrane proteases. They utilize a catalytic serine-histidine dyad located several Å below the surface of the membrane for substrate hydrolysis. Multiple studies have implicated rhomboid proteases in biologically and medically relevant processes. Several assays have been developed that are able to monitor rhomboid activity. With the aid of these assays, different types of inhibitors have been found, all based on electrophiles that covalently react with the active site machinery. Although the currently available inhibitors have limited selectivity and moderate potency, they can function as research tools and as starting point for the development of activity-based probes, which are reagents that can specifically detect active rhomboid species. Structural studies on complexes of inhibitors with the Escherichia coli rhomboid GlpG have provided insight into how substrate recognition may occur. Future synthetic efforts, aided by high-throughput screening or structure-based design, may lead to more potent and selective inhibitors for this interesting family of proteases. PMID:26166068

  8. The ubiquitin-specific protease family from Arabidopsis. AtUBP1 and 2 are required for the resistance to the amino acid analog canavanine.

    PubMed

    Yan, N; Doelling, J H; Falbel, T G; Durski, A M; Vierstra, R D

    2000-12-01

    Ubiquitin-specific proteases (UBPs) are a family of unique hydrolases that specifically remove polypeptides covalently linked via peptide or isopeptide bonds to the C-terminal glycine of ubiquitin. UBPs help regulate the ubiquitin/26S proteolytic pathway by generating free ubiquitin monomers from their initial translational products, recycling ubiquitins during the breakdown of ubiquitin-protein conjugates, and/or by removing ubiquitin from specific targets and thus presumably preventing target degradation. Here, we describe a family of 27 UBP genes from Arabidopsis that contain both the conserved cysteine (Cys) and histidine boxes essential for catalysis. They can be clustered into 14 subfamilies based on sequence similarity, genomic organization, and alignments with their closest relatives from other organisms, with seven subfamilies having two or more members. Recombinant AtUBP2 functions as a bona fide UBP: It can release polypeptides attached to ubiquitins via either alpha- or epsilon-amino linkages by an activity that requires the predicted active-site Cys within the Cys box. From the analysis of T-DNA insertion mutants, we demonstrate that the AtUBP1 and 2 subfamily helps confer resistance to the arginine analog canavanine. This phenotype suggests that the AtUBP1 and 2 enzymes are needed for abnormal protein turnover in Arabidopsis. PMID:11115897

  9. NMR characterization and conformational analysis of a potent papain-family cathepsin L-like cysteine protease inhibitor with different behaviour in polar and apolar media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotondo, Archimede; Ettari, Roberta; Zappalà, Maria; De Micheli, Carlo; Rotondo, Enrico

    2014-11-01

    We recently reported the synthesis, of a potent papain-family cathepsin L-like cysteine protease inhibitor, as new lead compound for the development of new drugs that can be used as antiprotozoal agents. The investigation of its conformational profile is crucial for the in-depth understanding of its biological behaviour. Our careful NMR analysis has been based on the complete and total assignment of 1H, 13C, 15N and 19F signals of the molecule in both CDCl3 and CD3OH, which could reproduce in some way a scenario of polar and not polar phases into the biological environment. In this way it has been unveiled a different behaviour of the molecule in polar and apolar media. In CDCl3 it is possible to define stable conformational arrangements on the basis of the detected through space contacts, whereas, in CD3OH a greater conformational freedom is envisaged: (a) by the overlap of any of the CH2 diastereotopic resonances (unable to distinguish asymmetric molecular sides because of the free rotation about the single bonded chains), (b) by the less definite measured vicinities not consistent with just one conformation and (c) by the evident loss or switching of key intramolecular hydrogen interactions.

  10. Serine proteases of parasitic helminths.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yong; Wen, Yun jun; Cai, Ya Nan; Vallée, Isabelle; Boireau, Pascal; Liu, Ming Yuan; Cheng, Shi Peng

    2015-02-01

    Serine proteases form one of the most important families of enzymes and perform significant functions in a broad range of biological processes, such as intra- and extracellular protein metabolism, digestion, blood coagulation, regulation of development, and fertilization. A number of serine proteases have been identified in parasitic helminths that have putative roles in parasite development and nutrition, host tissues and cell invasion, anticoagulation, and immune evasion. In this review, we described the serine proteases that have been identified in parasitic helminths, including nematodes (Trichinella spiralis, T. pseudospiralis, Trichuris muris, Anisakis simplex, Ascaris suum, Onchocerca volvulus, O. lienalis, Brugia malayi, Ancylostoma caninum, and Steinernema carpocapsae), cestodes (Spirometra mansoni, Echinococcus granulosus, and Schistocephalus solidus), and trematodes (Fasciola hepatica, F. gigantica, and Schistosoma mansoni). Moreover, the possible biological functions of these serine proteases in the endogenous biological phenomena of these parasites and in the host-parasite interaction were also discussed. PMID:25748703

  11. Serine Proteases of Parasitic Helminths

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yong; Wen, Yun jun; Cai, Ya Nan; Vallée, Isabelle; Boireau, Pascal; Liu, Ming Yuan; Cheng, Shi Peng

    2015-01-01

    Serine proteases form one of the most important families of enzymes and perform significant functions in a broad range of biological processes, such as intra- and extracellular protein metabolism, digestion, blood coagulation, regulation of development, and fertilization. A number of serine proteases have been identified in parasitic helminths that have putative roles in parasite development and nutrition, host tissues and cell invasion, anticoagulation, and immune evasion. In this review, we described the serine proteases that have been identified in parasitic helminths, including nematodes (Trichinella spiralis, T. pseudospiralis, Trichuris muris, Anisakis simplex, Ascaris suum, Onchocerca volvulus, O. lienalis, Brugia malayi, Ancylostoma caninum, and Steinernema carpocapsae), cestodes (Spirometra mansoni, Echinococcus granulosus, and Schistocephalus solidus), and trematodes (Fasciola hepatica, F. gigantica, and Schistosoma mansoni). Moreover, the possible biological functions of these serine proteases in the endogenous biological phenomena of these parasites and in the host-parasite interaction were also discussed. PMID:25748703

  12. Genotype-dependent expression of specific members of potato protease inhibitor gene families in different tissues and in response to wounding and nematode infection.

    PubMed

    Turrà, David; Bellin, Diana; Lorito, Matteo; Gebhardt, Christiane

    2009-05-01

    Protease inhibitors (PIs) are small ubiquitous proteins with a variety of biological functions in plants, including protein stabilization, modulation of apoptosis and defense against pathogens. Kunitz-like inhibitors (PKPIs) and proteinase inhibitors 1 (PI-1) are abundant in storage organs of potato plants and are up-regulated in other tissues in response to biotic and abiotic stress. However, little information is available on genotype-dependent regulation of individual PKPI group- and PI-1 genes. We isolated, sequenced and characterized four novel full-length PI-1 cDNAs (PPI3A2, PPI3A4, PPI2C4 and PPI2C1A) from Solanum tuberosum cv. Desirée. Specific primers were developed for PI-1 genes PPI3A2, PPI3B2 and PPI2C4 and the three PKPI homology groups A, B and C. Their expression profiles were studied by semi-quantitative RT-PCR in comparison with transcripts of the PI-1, Pin2 and PR1 gene families in various tissues, after wounding and Globodera rostochiensis infection of nematode-resistant genotypes P40 and LB7/4/c-I-7, and susceptible cv. Desirée. Individual PI-1 genes and PKPI homology groups were expressed in a tissue- and genotype-dependent manner after wounding and nematode infection. The differences in PI expression patterns were related to the intensity, type of inhibitors produced, and the kinetics of induction. Therefore, different genotype-environment combinations produce different sets of PI transcripts. Potato plants reacted to G. rostochiensis infection by modulating PKPI, PI-1 and Pin2, but not PR1 gene expression, suggesting that the jasmonic acid but not the salicylic acid defense signaling pathway is activated. PI expression profiles were not correlated with the resistance status of the potato genotype infected with G. rostochiensis. PMID:19095329

  13. Proteases as Insecticidal Agents

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Robert L.; Bonning, Bryony C.

    2010-01-01

    Proteases from a variety of sources (viruses, bacteria, fungi, plants, and insects) have toxicity towards insects. Some of these insecticidal proteases evolved as venom components, herbivore resistance factors, or microbial pathogenicity factors, while other proteases play roles in insect development or digestion, but exert an insecticidal effect when over-expressed from genetically engineered plants or microbial pathogens. Many of these proteases are cysteine proteases, although insect-toxic metalloproteases and serine proteases have also been examined. The sites of protease toxic activity range from the insect midgut to the hemocoel (body cavity) to the cuticle. This review discusses these insecticidal proteases along with their evaluation and use as potential pesticides. PMID:22069618

  14. Diversity, Structures, and Collagen-Degrading Mechanisms of Bacterial Collagenolytic Proteases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu-Zhong; Ran, Li-Yuan; Li, Chun-Yang

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial collagenolytic proteases are important because of their essential role in global collagen degradation and because of their virulence in some human bacterial infections. Bacterial collagenolytic proteases include some metalloproteases of the M9 family from Clostridium or Vibrio strains, some serine proteases distributed in the S1, S8, and S53 families, and members of the U32 family. In recent years, there has been remarkable progress in discovering new bacterial collagenolytic proteases and in investigating the collagen-degrading mechanisms of bacterial collagenolytic proteases. This review provides comprehensive insight into bacterial collagenolytic proteases, especially focusing on the structures and collagen-degrading mechanisms of representative bacterial collagenolytic proteases in each family. The roles of bacterial collagenolytic proteases in human diseases and global nitrogen cycling, together with the biotechnological and medical applications for these proteases, are also briefly discussed. PMID:26150451

  15. Barrel-shaped ClpP Proteases Display Attenuated Cleavage Specificities.

    PubMed

    Gersch, Malte; Stahl, Matthias; Poreba, Marcin; Dahmen, Maria; Dziedzic, Anna; Drag, Marcin; Sieber, Stephan A

    2016-02-19

    ClpP is a self-compartmentalizing protease with crucial roles in bacterial and mitochondrial protein quality control. Although the ClpP homocomplex is composed of 14 equivalent active sites, it degrades a multitude of substrates to small peptides, demonstrating its capability to carry out diverse cleavage reactions. Here, we show that ClpP proteases from E. coli, S. aureus, and human mitochondria exhibit preferences for certain amino acids in the P1, P2, and P3 positions using a tailored fluorogenic substrate library. However, this high specificity is not retained during proteolysis of endogenous substrates as shown by mass spectrometric analysis of peptides produced in ClpXP-mediated degradation reactions. Our data suggest a mechanism that implicates the barrel-shaped architecture of ClpP not only in shielding the active sites to prevent uncontrolled proteolysis but also in providing high local substrate concentrations to enable efficient proteolytic processing. Furthermore, we introduce customized fluorogenic substrates with unnatural amino acids that greatly surpass the sensitivity of previously used tools. We used these to profile the activity of cancer-patient- and Perrault-syndrome-derived ClpP mutant proteins. PMID:26606371

  16. Serine protease autotransporters of enterobacteriaceae (SPATEs): biogenesis and function.

    PubMed

    Dautin, Nathalie

    2010-06-01

    Serine Protease Autotransporters of Enterobacteriaceae (SPATEs) constitute a large family of proteases secreted by Escherichia coli and Shigella. SPATEs exhibit two distinct proteolytic activities. First, a C-terminal catalytic site triggers an intra-molecular cleavage that releases the N-terminal portion of these proteins in the extracellular medium. Second, the secreted N-terminal domains of SPATEs are themselves proteases; each contains a canonical serine-protease catalytic site. Some of these secreted proteases are toxins, eliciting various effects on mammalian cells. Here, we discuss the biogenesis of SPATEs and their function as toxins. PMID:22069633

  17. CtpB assembles a gated protease tunnel regulating cell-cell signaling during spore formation in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Mastny, Markus; Heuck, Alexander; Kurzbauer, Robert; Heiduk, Anja; Boisguerin, Prisca; Volkmer, Rudolf; Ehrmann, Michael; Rodrigues, Christopher D A; Rudner, David Z; Clausen, Tim

    2013-10-24

    Spore formation in Bacillus subtilis relies on a regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP) pathway that synchronizes mother-cell and forespore development. To address the molecular basis of this SpoIV transmembrane signaling, we carried out a structure-function analysis of the activating protease CtpB. Crystal structures reflecting distinct functional states show that CtpB constitutes a ring-like protein scaffold penetrated by two narrow tunnels. Access to the proteolytic sites sequestered within these tunnels is controlled by PDZ domains that rearrange upon substrate binding. Accordingly, CtpB resembles a minimal version of a self-compartmentalizing protease regulated by a unique allosteric mechanism. Moreover, biochemical analysis of the PDZ-gated channel combined with sporulation assays reveal that activation of the SpoIV RIP pathway is induced by the concerted activity of CtpB and a second signaling protease, SpoIVB. This proteolytic mechanism is of broad relevance for cell-cell communication, illustrating how distinct signaling pathways can be integrated into a single RIP module. PMID:24243021

  18. Investigations with Protease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yip, Din Yan

    1997-01-01

    Presents two simple and reliable ways for measuring protease activity that can be used for a variety of investigations in a range of biology class levels. The investigations use protease from a variety of sources. (DDR)

  19. A new principle of oligomerization of plant DEG7 protease based on interactions of degenerated protease domains

    PubMed Central

    Schuhmann, Holger; Mogg, Ulrike; Adamska, Iwona

    2011-01-01

    Deg/HtrA proteases are a large group of ATP-independent serine endoproteases found in almost every organism. Their usual domain arrangement comprises a trypsin-type protease domain and one or more PDZ domains. All Deg/HtrA proteases form homo-oligomers with trimers as the basic unit, where the active protease domain mediates the interaction between individual monomers. Among the members of the Deg/HtrA protease family, the plant protease DEG7 is unique since it contains two protease domains (one active and one degenerated) and four PDZ domains. In the present study, we investigated the oligomerization behaviour of this unusual protease using yeast two-hybrid analysis in vivo and with recombinant protein in vitro. We show that DEG7 forms trimeric complexes, but in contrast with other known Deg/HtrA proteases, it shows a new principle of oligomerization, where trimerization is based on the interactions between degenerated protease domains. We propose that, during evolution, a duplicated active protease domain degenerated and specialized in protein–protein interaction and complex formation. PMID:21247409

  20. Characterization of EspC, a 110-kilodalton protein secreted by enteropathogenic Escherichia coli which is homologous to members of the immunoglobulin A protease-like family of secreted proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Stein, M; Kenny, B; Stein, M A; Finlay, B B

    1996-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) secretes at least five proteins. Two of these proteins, EspA and EspB (previously called EaeB), activate signal transduction pathways in host epithelial cells. While the role of the other three proteins (39, 40, and 110 kDa) remains undetermined, secretion of all five proteins is under the control of perA, a known positive regulator of several EPEC virulence factors. On the basis of amino-terminal protein sequence data, we cloned and sequenced the gene which encodes the 110-kDa secreted protein and examined its possible role in EPEC signaling and interaction with epithelial cells. In accordance with the terminology used for espA and espB, we called this gene espC, for EPEC-secreted protein C. We found significant homology between the predicted EspC protein sequence and a family of immunoglobulin A (IgA) protease-like proteins which are widespread among pathogenic bacteria. Members of this protein family are found in avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (Tsh), Haemophilus influenzae (Hap), and Shigella flexneri (SepA). Although these proteins and EspC do not encode IgA protease activity, they have considerable homology with IgA protease from Neisseria gonorrhoeae and H. influenzae and appear to use a export system for secretion. We found that genes homologous to espC also exist in other pathogenic bacteria which cause attaching and effacing lesions, including Hafnia alvei biotype 19982, Citrobacter freundii biotype 4280, and rabbit diarrheagenic E. coli (RDEC-1). Although these strains secrete various proteins similar in molecular size to the proteins secreted by EPEC, we did not detect secretion of a 110-kDa protein by these strains. To examine the possible role of EspC in EPEC interactions with epithelial cells, we constructed a deletion mutant in espC by allelic exchange and characterized the mutant by standard tissue culture assays. We found that EspC is not necessary for mediating EPEC-induced signal transduction in He

  1. Protease inhibitor from Moringa oleifera with potential for use as therapeutic drug and as seafood preservative

    PubMed Central

    Bijina, B.; Chellappan, Sreeja; Krishna, Jissa G.; Basheer, Soorej M.; Elyas, K.K.; Bahkali, Ali H.; Chandrasekaran, M.

    2011-01-01

    Protease inhibitors are well known to have several applications in medicine and biotechnology. Several plant sources are known to return potential protease inhibitors. In this study plants belonging to different families of Leguminosae, Malvaceae, Rutaceae, Graminae and Moringaceae were screened for the protease inhibitor. Among them Moringa oleifera, belonging to the family Moringaceae, recorded high level of protease inhibitor activity after ammonium sulfate fractionation. M. oleifera, which grows throughout most of the tropics and having several industrial and medicinal uses, was selected as a source of protease inhibitor since so far no reports were made on isolation of the protease inhibitor. Among the different parts of M. oleifera tested, the crude extract isolated from the mature leaves and seeds showed the highest level of inhibition against trypsin. Among the various extraction media evaluated, the crude extract prepared in phosphate buffer showed maximum recovery of the protease inhibitor. The protease inhibitor recorded high inhibitory activity toward the serine proteases thrombin, elastase, chymotrypsin and the cysteine proteases cathepsin B and papain which have more importance in pharmaceutical industry. The protease inhibitor also showed complete inhibition of activities of the commercially available proteases of Bacillus licheniformis and Aspergillus oryzae. However, inhibitory activities toward subtilisin, esperase, pronase E and proteinase K were negligible. Further, it was found that the protease inhibitor could prevent proteolysis in a commercially valuable shrimp Penaeus monodon during storage indicating the scope for its application as a seafood preservative. This is the first report on isolation of a protease inhibitor from M. oleifera. PMID:23961135

  2. Subtilisin-like proteases in nematodes.

    PubMed

    Poole, Catherine B; Jin, Jingmin; McReynolds, Larry A

    2007-09-01

    Cleavage by subtilisin-like proteases (subtilases) is an essential step in post-translational processing of proteins found in organisms ranging from yeast to mammals. Our knowledge of the diversity of this protease family in nematodes is aided by the rapid increase in sequence information, especially from the Brugia malayi genome project. Genetic studies of the subtilases in Caenorhabitis elegans give valuable insight into the biological function of these proteases in other nematode species. In this review, we focus on the subtilases in filarial nematodes as well as other parasitic and free-living nematodes in comparison to what is known in C. elegans. Topics to be addressed include expansion and diversity of the subtilase gene family during evolution, enhanced complexity created by alternative RNA splicing, molecular and biochemical characterization of the different subtilases and the challenges of designing subtilase-specific inhibitors for parasitic nematodes. PMID:17570539

  3. AAA proteases in mitochondria: diverse functions of membrane-bound proteolytic machines.

    PubMed

    Tatsuta, Takashi; Langer, Thomas

    2009-11-01

    FtsH/AAA proteases comprise a distinct family of membrane-bound, ATP-dependent proteases present in eubacteria and eukaryotic cells, where they are confined to mitochondria and chloroplasts. Here, we will summarize versatile functions of AAA proteases within mitochondria, which ensure mitochondrial integrity and cell survival, acting both as quality control and processing enzymes. PMID:19781639

  4. Detergent alkaline proteases: enzymatic properties, genes, and crystal structures.

    PubMed

    Saeki, Katsuhisa; Ozaki, Katsuya; Kobayashi, Tohru; Ito, Susumu

    2007-06-01

    Subtilisin-like serine proteases from bacilli have been used in various industrial fields worldwide, particularly in the production of laundry and automatic dishwashing detergents. They belong to family A of the subtilase superfamily, which is composed of three clans, namely, true subtilisins, high-alkaline proteases, and intracellular proteases. We succeeded in the large-scale production of a high-alkaline protease (M-protease) from alkaliphilic Bacillus clausii KSM-K16, and the enzyme has been introduced into compact heavy-duty laundry detergents. We have also succeeded in the industrial-scale production of a new alkaline protease, KP-43, which was originally resistant to chemical oxidants and to surfactants, produced by alkaliphilic Bacillus sp. strain KSM-KP43 and have incorporated it into laundry detergents. KP-43 and related proteases form a new clan, oxidatively stable proteases, in subtilase family A. In this review, we describe the enzymatic properties, gene sequences, and crystal structures of M-protease, KP-43, and related enzymes. PMID:17630120

  5. Assaying the kinetics of protein denaturation catalyzed by AAA+ unfolding machines and proteases.

    PubMed

    Baytshtok, Vladimir; Baker, Tania A; Sauer, Robert T

    2015-04-28

    ATP-dependent molecular machines of the AAA+ superfamily unfold or remodel proteins in all cells. For example, AAA+ ClpX and ClpA hexamers collaborate with the self-compartmentalized ClpP peptidase to unfold and degrade specific proteins in bacteria and some eukaryotic organelles. Although degradation assays are straightforward, robust methods to assay the kinetics of enzyme-catalyzed protein unfolding in the absence of proteolysis have been lacking. Here, we describe a FRET-based assay in which enzymatic unfolding converts a mixture of donor-labeled and acceptor-labeled homodimers into heterodimers. In this assay, ClpX is a more efficient protein-unfolding machine than ClpA both kinetically and in terms of ATP consumed. However, ClpP enhances the mechanical activities of ClpA substantially, and ClpAP degrades the dimeric substrate faster than ClpXP. When ClpXP or ClpAP engage the dimeric subunit, one subunit is actively unfolded and degraded, whereas the other subunit is passively unfolded by loss of its partner and released. This assay should be broadly applicable for studying the mechanisms of AAA+ proteases and remodeling chaperones. PMID:25870262

  6. Structural determinants of tobacco vein mottling virus protease substrate specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Ping; Austin, Brian P.; Tozer, Jozsef; Waugh, David

    2010-10-28

    Tobacco vein mottling virus (TVMV) is a member of the Potyviridae, one of the largest families of plant viruses. The TVMV genome is translated into a single large polyprotein that is subsequently processed by three virally encoded proteases. Seven of the nine cleavage events are carried out by the NIa protease. Its homolog from the tobacco etch virus (TEV) is a widely used reagent for the removal of affinity tags from recombinant proteins. Although TVMV protease is a close relative of TEV protease, they exhibit distinct sequence specificities. We report here the crystal structure of a catalytically inactive mutant TVMV protease (K65A/K67A/C151A) in complex with a canonical peptide substrate (Ac-RETVRFQSD) at 1.7-{angstrom} resolution. As observed in several crystal structures of TEV protease, the C-terminus ({approx}20 residues) of TVMV protease is disordered. Unexpectedly, although deleting the disordered residues from TEV protease reduces its catalytic activity by {approx}10-fold, an analogous truncation mutant of TVMV protease is significantly more active. Comparison of the structures of TEV and TVMV protease in complex with their respective canonical substrate peptides reveals that the S3 and S4 pockets are mainly responsible for the differing substrate specificities. The structure of TVMV protease suggests that it is less tolerant of variation at the P1{prime} position than TEV protease. This conjecture was confirmed experimentally by determining kinetic parameters k{sub cat} and K{sub m} for a series of oligopeptide substrates. Also, as predicted by the cocrystal structure, we confirm that substitutions in the P6 position are more readily tolerated by TVMV than TEV protease.

  7. Characterization of a protease-resistant α-galactosidase from the thermophilic fungus Rhizomucor miehei and its application in removal of raffinose family oligosaccharides.

    PubMed

    Katrolia, Priti; Jia, Huiyong; Yan, Qiaojuan; Song, Shuang; Jiang, Zhengqiang; Xu, Haibo

    2012-04-01

    The α-galactosidase gene, RmGal36, from Rhizomucor miehei was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The gene has an open reading frame of 2256bp encoding 751 amino acid residues. RmGal36 was optimally active at pH 4.5 and 60°C, but is stable between pH 4.5 and 10.0 and at a temperature of up to 55°C for 30min retaining more than 80% of its relative activity. It displayed remarkable resistance to proteases and its activity was not inhibited by galactose concentrations of 100mM. The relative specificity of RmGal36 towards various substrates is in the order of p-nitrophenyl α-galactopyranoside>melibiose>stachyose>raffinose, with a K(m) of 0.36, 16.9, 27.6, and 47.9mM, respectively. The enzyme completely hydrolyzed raffinose and stachyose present in soybeans and kidney beans at 50°C within 60min. These features make RmGal36 useful in the food and feed industries and in processing of beet-sugar. PMID:22349190

  8. Using specificity to strategically target proteases

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Mark D.; Craik, Charles S.

    2009-01-01

    Proteases are a family of naturally occurring enzymes in the body whose dysregulation has been implicated in numerous diseases and cancers. Their ability to selectively and catalytically turnover substrate adds both signal amplification and functionality as parameters for the detection of disease. This review will focus on the development of activity-based methodologies to characterize proteases, and in particular, the use of positional scanning, synthetic combinatorial libraries (PS-SCL’s), and substrate activity screening (SAS) assays. The use of these approaches to better understand a protease’s natural substrate will be discussed as well as the technologies that emerged. PMID:18434168

  9. Positive selection of digestive Cys proteases in herbivorous Coleoptera.

    PubMed

    Vorster, Juan; Rasoolizadeh, Asieh; Goulet, Marie-Claire; Cloutier, Conrad; Sainsbury, Frank; Michaud, Dominique

    2015-10-01

    Positive selection is thought to contribute to the functional diversification of insect-inducible protease inhibitors in plants in response to selective pressures exerted by the digestive proteases of their herbivorous enemies. Here we assessed whether a reciprocal evolutionary process takes place on the insect side, and whether ingestion of a positively selected plant inhibitor may translate into a measurable rebalancing of midgut proteases in vivo. Midgut Cys proteases of herbivorous Coleoptera, including the major pest Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata), were first compared using a codon-based evolutionary model to look for the occurrence of hypervariable, positively selected amino acid sites among the tested sequences. Hypervariable sites were found, distributed within -or close to- amino acid regions interacting with Cys-type inhibitors of the plant cystatin protein family. A close examination of L. decemlineata sequences indicated a link between their assignment to protease functional families and amino acid identity at positively selected sites. A function-diversifying role for positive selection was further suggested empirically by in vitro protease assays and a shotgun proteomic analysis of L. decemlineata Cys proteases showing a differential rebalancing of protease functional family complements in larvae fed single variants of a model cystatin mutated at positively selected amino acid sites. These data confirm overall the occurrence of hypervariable, positively selected amino acid sites in herbivorous Coleoptera digestive Cys proteases. They also support the idea of an adaptive role for positive selection, useful to generate functionally diverse proteases in insect herbivores ingesting functionally diverse, rapidly evolving dietary cystatins. PMID:26264818

  10. Improved immunohistochemical detection of postsynaptically located PSD-95/SAP90 protein family by protease section pretreatment: a study in the adult mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Fukaya, M; Watanabe, M

    2000-10-30

    Postsynaptic density (PSD)-95, SAP102, and Chapsyn-110 are members of the PSD-95/SAP90 protein family, which interact with the C-terminus of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor and shaker-type potassium channel subunits. Here we report that appropriate section pretreatment with pepsin has led to qualitative and quantitative changes in light microscopic immunohistochemical detection of the protein family. First, pepsin pretreatment lowered the concentration of affinity-purified primary antibodies, while it greatly increased the intensity of immunoreactions. Second, the resulting overall distributions of PSD-95, SAP102, and Chapsyn-110 in the adult mouse brain were consistent with their mRNA distributions. Third, instead of the reported patterns of somatodendritic labeling, tiny punctate staining in the neuropil became overwhelming. Fourth, many PSD-95-immunopositive puncta were apposed closely to synaptophysin-positive nerve terminals and overlapped with NMDA receptor subunits. By postembedding immunogold, the PSD-95 antibody was shown to label exclusively the postsynaptic density at asymmetrical synapses. Based on these results, we conclude that antibody access and binding to the postsynaptically located PSD-95/SAP90 protein family are hindered when conventional immunohistochemistry is adopted, and that pepsin pretreatment effectively unmasks the postsynaptic epitopes. On the other hand, PSD-95 in axon terminals of cerebellar basket cells, where high levels of potassium channels are present, was detectable irrespective of pepsin pretreatment, suggesting that PSD-95 antibody is readily accessible to the presynaptic epitopes. Consequently, the present immunohistochemical results have provided light microscopic evidence supporting the prevailing notion that the PSD-95/SAP90 protein family interacts with NMDA receptor subunits and potassium channel subunits. PMID:11027400

  11. Redefining the concept of protease-activated receptors: cathepsin S evokes itch via activation of Mrgprs

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Vemuri B.; Sun, Shuohao; Azimi, Ehsan; Elmariah, Sarina B.; Dong, Xinzhong; Lerner, Ethan A.

    2015-01-01

    Sensory neurons expressing Mas-related G protein coupled receptors (Mrgprs) mediate histamine-independent itch. We show that the cysteine protease cathepsin S activates MrgprC11 and evokes receptor-dependent scratching in mice. In contrast to its activation of conventional protease-activated receptors, cathepsin S mediated activation of MrgprC11 did not involve the generation of a tethered ligand. We demonstrate further that different cysteine proteases selectively activate specific mouse and human Mrgpr family members. This expansion of our understanding by which proteases interact with GPCRs redefines the concept of what constitutes a protease-activated receptor. The findings also implicate proteases as ligands to members of this orphan receptor family while providing new insights into how cysteine proteases contribute to itch. PMID:26216096

  12. Cysteine Protease Inhibitors as Chemotherapy: Lessons from a Parasite Target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selzer, Paul M.; Pingel, Sabine; Hsieh, Ivy; Ugele, Bernhard; Chan, Victor J.; Engel, Juan C.; Bogyo, Matthew; Russell, David G.; Sakanari, Judy A.; McKerrow, James H.

    1999-09-01

    Papain family cysteine proteases are key factors in the pathogenesis of cancer invasion, arthritis, osteoporosis, and microbial infections. Targeting this enzyme family is therefore one strategy in the development of new chemotherapy for a number of diseases. Little is known, however, about the efficacy, selectivity, and safety of cysteine protease inhibitors in cell culture or in vivo. We now report that specific cysteine protease inhibitors kill Leishmania parasites in vitro, at concentrations that do not overtly affect mammalian host cells. Inhibition of Leishmania cysteine protease activity was accompanied by defects in the parasite's lysosome/endosome compartment resembling those seen in lysosomal storage diseases. Colocalization of anti-protease antibodies with biotinylated surface proteins and accumulation of undigested debris and protease in the flagellar pocket of treated parasites were consistent with a pathway of protease trafficking from flagellar pocket to the lysosome/endosome compartment. The inhibitors were sufficiently absorbed and stable in vivo to ameliorate the pathology associated with a mouse model of Leishmania infection.

  13. Characterization of a Glycoside Hydrolase Family 27 α-Galactosidase from Pontibacter Reveals Its Novel Salt-Protease Tolerance and Transglycosylation Activity.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Junpei; Liu, Yu; Lu, Qian; Zhang, Rui; Wu, Qian; Li, Chunyan; Li, Junjun; Tang, Xianghua; Xu, Bo; Ding, Junmei; Han, Nanyu; Huang, Zunxi

    2016-03-23

    α-Galactosidases are of great interest in various applications. A glycoside hydrolase family 27 α-galactosidase was cloned from Pontibacter sp. harbored in a saline soil and expressed in Escherichia coli. The purified recombinant enzyme (rAgaAHJ8) was little or not affected by 3.5-30.0% (w/v) NaCl, 10.0-100.0 mM Pb(CH3COO)2, 10.0-60.0 mM ZnSO4, or 8.3-100.0 mg mL(-1) trypsin and by most metal ions and chemical reagents at 1.0 and 10.0 mM concentrations. The degree of synergy on enzymatic degradation of locust bean gum and guar gum by an endomannanase and rAgaAHJ8 was 1.22-1.54. In the presence of trypsin, the amount of reducing sugars released from soybean milk treated by rAgaAHJ8 was approximately 3.8-fold compared with that treated by a commercial α-galactosidase. rAgaAHJ8 showed transglycosylation activity when using sucrose, raffinose, and 3-methyl-1-butanol as the acceptors. Furthermore, potential factors for salt adaptation of the enzyme were presumed. PMID:26948050

  14. A New Subtilase-Like Protease Deriving from Fusarium equiseti with High Potential for Industrial Applications.

    PubMed

    Juntunen, Kari; Mäkinen, Susanna; Isoniemi, Sari; Valtakari, Leena; Pelzer, Alexander; Jänis, Janne; Paloheimo, Marja

    2015-09-01

    A gene encoding a novel extracellular subtilisin-like protease was cloned from the ascomycete Fusarium equiseti and expressed in Trichoderma reesei. The F. equiseti protease (Fe protease) showed excellent performance in stain removal and good compatibility with several commercial laundry detergent formulations, suggesting that it has high potential for use in various industrial applications. The recombinant enzyme was purified and characterized. The temperature optimum of the Fe protease was 60 °C and it showed high activity in the pH range of 6-10, with a sharp decline in activity at pH above 10. The amino acid specificity of the Fe protease was studied using casein, cytochrome c, and ubiquitin as substrates. The Fe protease had broad substrate specificity: almost all amino acid residues were accepted at position P1, even though it showed some preference for cleavage at the C-terminal side of asparagine and histidine residues. The S4 subsite of Fe protease favors aspartic acid and threonine. The other well-characterized proteases from filamentous fungi, Proteinase K from Engyodontium album, Thermomycolin from Malbranchea sulfurea, and alkaline subtilisins from Bacillus species prefer hydrophobic amino acids in both the S1 and S4 subsites. Due to its different specificity compared to the members of the S8 family of clan SB of proteases, we consider that the Fe protease is a new protease. It does not belong to any previously defined IUBMB groups of proteases. PMID:26178876

  15. The Crystal Structure of GXGD Membrane Protease FlaK

    SciTech Connect

    J Hu; Y Xue; S Lee; Y Ha

    2011-12-31

    The GXGD proteases are polytopic membrane proteins with catalytic activities against membrane-spanning substrates that require a pair of aspartyl residues. Representative members of the family include preflagellin peptidase, type 4 prepilin peptidase, presenilin and signal peptide peptidase. Many GXGD proteases are important in medicine. For example, type 4 prepilin peptidase may contribute to bacterial pathogenesis, and mutations in presenilin are associated with Alzheimer's disease. As yet, there is no atomic-resolution structure in this protease family. Here we report the crystal structure of FlaK, a preflagellin peptidase from Methanococcus maripaludis, solved at 3.6 {angstrom} resolution. The structure contains six transmembrane helices. The GXGD motif and a short transmembrane helix, helix 4, are positioned at the centre, surrounded by other transmembrane helices. The crystal structure indicates that the protease must undergo conformational changes to bring the GXGD motif and a second essential aspartyl residue from transmembrane helix 1 into close proximity for catalysis. A comparison of the crystal structure with models of presenilin derived from biochemical analysis reveals three common transmembrane segments that are similarly arranged around the active site. This observation reinforces the idea that the prokaryotic and human proteases are evolutionarily related. The crystal structure presented here provides a framework for understanding the mechanism of the GXGD proteases, and may facilitate the rational design of inhibitors that target specific members of the family.

  16. The crystal structure of GXGD membrane protease FlaK

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jian; Xue, Yi; Lee, Sangwon; Ha, Ya

    2011-09-20

    The GXGD proteases are polytopic membrane proteins with catalytic activities against membrane-spanning substrates that require a pair of aspartyl residues. Representative members of the family include preflagellin peptidase, type 4 prepilin peptidase, presenilin and signal peptide peptidase. Many GXGD proteases are important in medicine. For example, type 4 prepilin peptidase may contribute to bacterial pathogenesis, and mutations in presenilin are associated with Alzheimer's disease. As yet, there is no atomic-resolution structure in this protease family. Here we report the crystal structure of FlaK, a preflagellin peptidase from Methanococcus maripaludis, solved at 3.6 {angstrom} resolution. The structure contains six transmembrane helices. The GXGD motif and a short transmembrane helix, helix 4, are positioned at the centre, surrounded by other transmembrane helices. The crystal structure indicates that the protease must undergo conformational changes to bring the GXGD motif and a second essential aspartyl residue from transmembrane helix 1 into close proximity for catalysis. A comparison of the crystal structure with models of presenilin derived from biochemical analysis reveals three common transmembrane segments that are similarly arranged around the active site. This observation reinforces the idea that the prokaryotic and human proteases are evolutionarily related. The crystal structure presented here provides a framework for understanding the mechanism of the GXGD proteases, and may facilitate the rational design of inhibitors that target specific members of the family.

  17. ADAM Proteases and Gastrointestinal Function.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jennifer C; Rustagi, Shelly; Dempsey, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    A disintegrin and metalloproteinases (ADAMs) are a family of cell surface proteases that regulate diverse cellular functions, including cell adhesion, migration, cellular signaling, and proteolysis. Proteolytically active ADAMs are responsible for ectodomain shedding of membrane-associated proteins. ADAMs rapidly modulate key cell signaling pathways in response to changes in the extracellular environment (e.g., inflammation) and play a central role in coordinating intercellular communication within the local microenvironment. ADAM10 and ADAM17 are the most studied members of the ADAM family in the gastrointestinal tract. ADAMs regulate many cellular processes associated with intestinal development, cell fate specification, and the maintenance of intestinal stem cell/progenitor populations. Several signaling pathway molecules that undergo ectodomain shedding by ADAMs [e.g., ligands and receptors from epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)/ErbB and tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) receptor (TNFR) families] help drive and control intestinal inflammation and injury/repair responses. Dysregulation of these processes through aberrant ADAM expression or sustained ADAM activity is linked to chronic inflammation, inflammation-associated cancer, and tumorigenesis. PMID:26667078

  18. ADAM Proteases and Gastrointestinal Function

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Jennifer C.; Rustagi, Shelly; Dempsey, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    A disintegrin and metalloproteinases (ADAMs) are a family of cell surface proteases that regulate diverse cellular functions, including cell adhesion, migration, cellular signaling, and proteolysis. Proteolytically active ADAMs are responsible for ectodomain shedding of membrane-associated proteins. ADAMs rapidly modulate key cell signaling pathways in response to changes in the extracellular environment (e.g., inflammation) and play a central role in coordinating intercellular communication within the local microenvironment. ADAM10 and ADAM17 are the most studied members of the ADAM family in the gastrointestinal tract. ADAMs regulate many cellular processes associated with intestinal development, cell fate specification, and the maintenance of intestinal stem cell/progenitor populations. Several signaling pathway molecules that undergo ectodomain shedding by ADAMs [e.g., ligands and receptors from epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)/ErbB and tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) receptor (TNFR) families] help drive and control intestinal inflammation and injury/repair responses. Dysregulation of these processes through aberrant ADAM expression or sustained ADAM activity is linked to chronic inflammation, inflammation-associated cancer, and tumorigenesis. PMID:26667078

  19. Proteases decode the extracellular matrix cryptome.

    PubMed

    Ricard-Blum, Sylvie; Vallet, Sylvain D

    2016-03-01

    The extracellular matrix is comprised of 1100 core-matrisome and matrisome-associated proteins and of glycosaminoglycans. This structural scaffold contributes to the organization and mechanical properties of tissues and modulates cell behavior. The extracellular matrix is dynamic and undergoes constant remodeling, which leads to diseases if uncontrolled. Bioactive fragments, called matricryptins, are released from the extracellular proteins by limited proteolysis and have biological activities on their own. They regulate numerous physiological and pathological processes such as angiogenesis, cancer, diabetes, wound healing, fibrosis and infectious diseases and either improve or worsen the course of diseases depending on the matricryptins and on the molecular and biological contexts. Several protease families release matricryptins from core-matrisome and matrisome-associated proteins both in vitro and in vivo. The major proteases, which decrypt the extracellular matrix, are zinc metalloproteinases of the metzincin superfamily (matrixins, adamalysins and astacins), cysteine proteinases and serine proteases. Some matricryptins act as enzyme inhibitors, further connecting protease and matricryptin fates and providing intricate regulation of major physiopathological processes such as angiogenesis and tumorigenesis. They strengthen the role of the extracellular matrix as a key player in tissue failure and core-matrisome and matrisome-associated proteins as important therapeutic targets. PMID:26382969

  20. The Plasticity of the β-Trefoil Fold Constitutes an Evolutionary Platform for Protease Inhibition*

    PubMed Central

    Azarkan, Mohamed; Martinez-Rodriguez, Sergio; Buts, Lieven; Baeyens-Volant, Danielle; Garcia-Pino, Abel

    2011-01-01

    Proteases carry out a number of crucial functions inside and outside the cell. To protect the cells against the potentially lethal activities of these enzymes, specific inhibitors are produced to tightly regulate the protease activity. Independent reports suggest that the Kunitz-soybean trypsin inhibitor (STI) family has the potential to inhibit proteases with different specificities. In this study, we use a combination of biophysical methods to define the structural basis of the interaction of papaya protease inhibitor (PPI) with serine proteases. We show that PPI is a multiple-headed inhibitor; a single PPI molecule can bind two trypsin units at the same time. Based on sequence and structural analysis, we hypothesize that the inherent plasticity of the β-trefoil fold is paramount in the functional evolution of this family toward multiple protease inhibition. PMID:22027836

  1. The plasticity of the β-trefoil fold constitutes an evolutionary platform for protease inhibition.

    PubMed

    Azarkan, Mohamed; Martinez-Rodriguez, Sergio; Buts, Lieven; Baeyens-Volant, Danielle; Garcia-Pino, Abel

    2011-12-23

    Proteases carry out a number of crucial functions inside and outside the cell. To protect the cells against the potentially lethal activities of these enzymes, specific inhibitors are produced to tightly regulate the protease activity. Independent reports suggest that the Kunitz-soybean trypsin inhibitor (STI) family has the potential to inhibit proteases with different specificities. In this study, we use a combination of biophysical methods to define the structural basis of the interaction of papaya protease inhibitor (PPI) with serine proteases. We show that PPI is a multiple-headed inhibitor; a single PPI molecule can bind two trypsin units at the same time. Based on sequence and structural analysis, we hypothesize that the inherent plasticity of the β-trefoil fold is paramount in the functional evolution of this family toward multiple protease inhibition. PMID:22027836

  2. Cloning, expression and activity analysis of a novel fibrinolytic serine protease from Arenicola cristata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Chunling; Ju, Jiyu

    2015-06-01

    The full-length cDNA of a protease gene from a marine annelid Arenicola cristata was amplified through rapid amplification of cDNA ends technique and sequenced. The size of the cDNA was 936 bp in length, including an open reading frame encoding a polypeptide of 270 amino acid residues. The deduced amino acid sequnce consisted of pro- and mature sequences. The protease belonged to the serine protease family because it contained the highly conserved sequence GDSGGP. This protease was novel as it showed a low amino acid sequence similarity (< 40%) to other serine proteases. The gene encoding the active form of A. cristata serine protease was cloned and expressed in E. coli. Purified recombinant protease in a supernatant could dissolve an artificial fibrin plate with plasminogen-rich fibrin, whereas the plasminogen-free fibrin showed no clear zone caused by hydrolysis. This result suggested that the recombinant protease showed an indirect fibrinolytic activity of dissolving fibrin, and was probably a plasminogen activator. A rat model with venous thrombosis was established to demonstrate that the recombinant protease could also hydrolyze blood clot in vivo. Therefore, this recombinant protease may be used as a thrombolytic agent for thrombosis treatment. To our knowledge, this study is the first of reporting the fibrinolytic serine protease gene in A. cristata.

  3. Neuroserpin, an axonally secreted serine protease inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Osterwalder, T; Contartese, J; Stoeckli, E T; Kuhn, T B; Sonderegger, P

    1996-01-01

    We have identified and chromatographically purified an axonally secreted glycoprotein of CNS and PNS neurons. Several peptides derived from it were microsequenced. Based on these sequences, a fragment of the corresponding cDNA was amplified and used as a probe to isolate a full length cDNA from a chicken brain cDNA library. Because the deduced amino acid sequence qualified the protein as a novel member of the serpin family of serine protease inhibitors, we called it neuroserpin. Analysis of the primary structural features further characterized neuroserpin as a heparin-independent, functional inhibitor of a trypsin-like serine protease. In situ hybridization revealed a predominantly neuronal expression during the late stages of neurogenesis and in the adult brain in regions which exhibit synaptic plasticity. Thus, neuroserpin might function as an axonally secreted regulator of the local extracellular proteolysis involved in the reorganization of the synaptic connectivity during development and synapse plasticity in the adult. Images PMID:8670795

  4. From proteases to proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Neurath, Hans

    2001-01-01

    This personal and professional autobiography covers the 50-yr period of 1950–2000 and includes the following topics: History of the University of Washington School of Medicine and its Department of Biochemistry (Mount Rainier and the University of Washington, recruiting faculty, biology, research programs); scientific editing (publication, Biochemistry, Protein Science, electronic publication); Europe revisited (Heidelberg, approaching retirement, the German Research Center, reunion in Vienna); and 50 yr of research on proteolytic enzymes (trypsin, carboxypeptidases, mast cell proteases, future developments). PMID:11274481

  5. Protease-mediated drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickson, Eva F.; Goyan, Rebecca L.; Kennedy, James C.; Mackay, M.; Mendes, M. A. K.; Pottier, Roy H.

    2003-12-01

    Drugs used in disease treatment can cause damage to both malignant and normal tissue. This toxicity limits the maximum therapeutic dose. Drug targeting is of high interest to increase the therapeutic efficacy of the drug without increasing systemic toxicity. Certain tissue abnormalities, disease processes, cancers, and infections are characterized by high levels of activity of specific extracellular and/or intracellular proteases. Abnormally high activity levels of specific proteases are present at sites of physical or chemical trauma, blood clots, malignant tumors, rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, gingival disease, glomerulonerphritis, and acute pancreatitis. Abnormal protease activity is suspected in development of liver thrombosis, pulmonary emphysema, atherosclerosis, and muscular dystrophy. Inactiviating disease-associated proteases by the administration of appropriate protease inhibitors has had limited success. Instead, one could use such proteases to target drugs to treat the condition. Protease mediated drug delivery offers such a possibility. Solubilizing groups are attached to insoluble drugs via a polypeptide chain which is specifically cleavable by certian proteases. When the solubilized drug enounters the protease, the solubilizing moieties are cleaved, and the drug precipitates at the disease location. Thus, a smaller systemic dosage could result in a therapeutic drug concentration at the treatment site with less systemic toxicity.

  6. Cysteine Proteases: Modes of Activation and Future Prospects as Pharmacological Targets.

    PubMed

    Verma, Sonia; Dixit, Rajnikant; Pandey, Kailash C

    2016-01-01

    Proteolytic enzymes are crucial for a variety of biological processes in organisms ranging from lower (virus, bacteria, and parasite) to the higher organisms (mammals). Proteases cleave proteins into smaller fragments by catalyzing peptide bonds hydrolysis. Proteases are classified according to their catalytic site, and distributed into four major classes: cysteine proteases, serine proteases, aspartic proteases, and metalloproteases. This review will cover only cysteine proteases, papain family enzymes which are involved in multiple functions such as extracellular matrix turnover, antigen presentation, processing events, digestion, immune invasion, hemoglobin hydrolysis, parasite invasion, parasite egress, and processing surface proteins. Therefore, they are promising drug targets for various diseases. For preventing unwanted digestion, cysteine proteases are synthesized as zymogens, and contain a prodomain (regulatory) and a mature domain (catalytic). The prodomain acts as an endogenous inhibitor of the mature enzyme. For activation of the mature enzyme, removal of the prodomain is necessary and achieved by different modes. The pro-mature domain interaction can be categorized as protein-protein interactions (PPIs) and may be targeted in a range of diseases. Cysteine protease inhibitors are available that can block the active site but no such inhibitor available yet that can be targeted to block the pro-mature domain interactions and prevent it activation. This review specifically highlights the modes of activation (processing) of papain family enzymes, which involve auto-activation, trans-activation and also clarifies the future aspects of targeting PPIs to prevent the activation of cysteine proteases. PMID:27199750

  7. Cysteine Proteases: Modes of Activation and Future Prospects as Pharmacological Targets

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Sonia; Dixit, Rajnikant; Pandey, Kailash C.

    2016-01-01

    Proteolytic enzymes are crucial for a variety of biological processes in organisms ranging from lower (virus, bacteria, and parasite) to the higher organisms (mammals). Proteases cleave proteins into smaller fragments by catalyzing peptide bonds hydrolysis. Proteases are classified according to their catalytic site, and distributed into four major classes: cysteine proteases, serine proteases, aspartic proteases, and metalloproteases. This review will cover only cysteine proteases, papain family enzymes which are involved in multiple functions such as extracellular matrix turnover, antigen presentation, processing events, digestion, immune invasion, hemoglobin hydrolysis, parasite invasion, parasite egress, and processing surface proteins. Therefore, they are promising drug targets for various diseases. For preventing unwanted digestion, cysteine proteases are synthesized as zymogens, and contain a prodomain (regulatory) and a mature domain (catalytic). The prodomain acts as an endogenous inhibitor of the mature enzyme. For activation of the mature enzyme, removal of the prodomain is necessary and achieved by different modes. The pro-mature domain interaction can be categorized as protein–protein interactions (PPIs) and may be targeted in a range of diseases. Cysteine protease inhibitors are available that can block the active site but no such inhibitor available yet that can be targeted to block the pro-mature domain interactions and prevent it activation. This review specifically highlights the modes of activation (processing) of papain family enzymes, which involve auto-activation, trans-activation and also clarifies the future aspects of targeting PPIs to prevent the activation of cysteine proteases. PMID:27199750

  8. Insights into the Cyanobacterial Deg/HtrA Proteases

    PubMed Central

    Cheregi, Otilia; Wagner, Raik; Funk, Christiane

    2016-01-01

    Proteins are the main machinery for all living processes in a cell; they provide structural elements, regulate biochemical reactions as enzymes, and are the interface to the outside as receptors and transporters. Like any other machinery proteins have to be assembled correctly and need maintenance after damage, e.g., caused by changes in environmental conditions, genetic mutations, and limitations in the availability of cofactors. Proteases and chaperones help in repair, assembly, and folding of damaged and misfolded protein complexes cost-effective, with low energy investment compared with neo-synthesis. Despite their importance for viability, the specific biological role of most proteases in vivo is largely unknown. Deg/HtrA proteases, a family of serine-type ATP-independent proteases, have been shown in higher plants to be involved in the degradation of the Photosystem II reaction center protein D1. The objective of this review is to highlight the structure and function of their cyanobacterial orthologs. Homology modeling was used to find specific features of the SynDeg/HtrA proteases of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Based on the available data concerning their location and their physiological substrates we conclude that these Deg proteases not only have important housekeeping and chaperone functions within the cell, but also are needed for remodeling the cell exterior. PMID:27252714

  9. Interdomain Contacts and the Stability of Serralysin Protease from Serratia marcescens

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liang; Morrison, Anneliese J.; Thibodeau, Patrick H.

    2015-01-01

    The serralysin family of bacterial metalloproteases is associated with virulence in multiple modes of infection. These extracellular proteases are members of the Repeats-in-ToXin (RTX) family of toxins and virulence factors, which mediated virulence in E. coli, B. pertussis, and P. aeruginosa, as well as other animal and plant pathogens. The serralysin proteases are structurally dynamic and their folding is regulated by calcium binding to a C-terminal domain that defines the RTX family of proteins. Previous studies have suggested that interactions between N-terminal sequences and this C-terminal domain are important for the high thermal and chemical stabilities of the RTX proteases. Extending from this, stabilization of these interactions in the native structure may lead to hyperstabilization of the folded protein. To test this hypothesis, cysteine pairs were introduced into the N-terminal helix and the RTX domain and protease folding and activity were assessed. Under stringent pH and temperature conditions, the disulfide-bonded mutant showed increased protease activity and stability. This activity was dependent on the redox environment of the refolding reaction and could be blocked by selective modification of the cysteine residues before protease refolding. These data demonstrate that the thermal and chemical stability of these proteases is, in part, mediated by binding between the RTX domain and the N-terminal helix and demonstrate that stabilization of this interaction can further stabilize the active protease, leading to additional pH and thermal tolerance. PMID:26378460

  10. Mitochondrial Proteases as Emerging Pharmacological Targets.

    PubMed

    Gibellini, Lara; De Biasi, Sara; Nasi, Milena; Iannone, Anna; Cossarizza, Andrea; Pinti, Marcello

    2016-01-01

    The preservation of mitochondrial function and integrity is critical for cell viability. Under stress conditions, unfolded, misfolded or damaged proteins accumulate in a certain compartment of the organelle, interfering with oxidative phosphorylation and normal mitochondrial functions. In stress conditions, several mechanisms, including mitochondrial unfolded protease response (UPRmt), fusion and fission, and mitophagy are engaged to restore normal proteostasis of the organelle. Mitochondrial proteases are a family of more than 20 enzymes that not only are involved in the UPRmt, but actively participate at multiple levels in the stress-response system. Alterations in their expression levels, or mutations that determine loss or gain of function of these proteases deeply impair mitochondrial functionality and can be associated with the onset of inherited diseases, with the development of neurodegenerative disorders and with the process of carcinogenesis. In this review, we focus our attention on six of them, namely CLPP, HTRA2 and LONP1, by analysing the current knowledge about their functions, their involvement in the pathogenesis of human diseases, and the compounds currently available for inhibiting their functions. PMID:26831646

  11. Cysteine proteases as therapeutic targets: does selectivity matter? A systematic review of calpain and cathepsin inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Siklos, Marton; BenAissa, Manel; Thatcher, Gregory R.J.

    2015-01-01

    Cysteine proteases continue to provide validated targets for treatment of human diseases. In neurodegenerative disorders, multiple cysteine proteases provide targets for enzyme inhibitors, notably caspases, calpains, and cathepsins. The reactive, active-site cysteine provides specificity for many inhibitor designs over other families of proteases, such as aspartate and serine; however, a) inhibitor strategies often use covalent enzyme modification, and b) obtaining selectivity within families of cysteine proteases and their isozymes is problematic. This review provides a general update on strategies for cysteine protease inhibitor design and a focus on cathepsin B and calpain 1 as drug targets for neurodegenerative disorders; the latter focus providing an interesting query for the contemporary assumptions that irreversible, covalent protein modification and low selectivity are anathema to therapeutic safety and efficacy. PMID:26713267

  12. Covalent structure of human haptoglobin: a serine protease homolog.

    PubMed Central

    Kurosky, A; Barnett, D R; Lee, T H; Touchstone, B; Hay, R E; Arnott, M S; Bowman, B H; Fitch, W M

    1980-01-01

    The complete amino acid sequences and the disulfide arrangements of the two chains of human haptoglobin 1-1 were established. The alpha 1 and beta chains of haptoglobin contain 83 and 245 residues, respectively. Comparison of the primary structure of haptoglobin with that of the chymotrypsinogen family of serine proteases revealed a significant degree of chemical similarity. The probability was less than 10(-5) that the chemical similarity of the beta chain of haptoglobin to the proteases was due to chance. The amino acid sequence of the beta chain of haptoglobin is 29--33% identical to bovine trypsin, bovine chymotrypsin, porcine elastase, human thrombin, or human plasmin. Comparison of haptoglobin alpha 1 chain to activation peptide regions of the zymogens revealed an identity of 25% to the fifth "kringle" region of the activation peptide of plasminogen. The probability was less than 0.014 that this similarity was due to chance. These results strongly indicate haptoglobin to be a homolog of the chymotrypsinogen family of serine proteases. Alignment of the beta-chain sequence of haptoglobin to the serine proteases is remarkably consistent except for an insertion of 16 residues in the region corresponding to the methionyl loop of the serine proteases. The active-site residues typical of the serine proteases, histidine-57 and serine-195, are replaced in haptoglobin by lysine and alanine, respectively; however, aspartic acid-102 and the trypsin specificity, residue, aspartic acid-189, do occur in haptoglobin. Haptoglobin and the serine proteases represent a striking example of homologous proteins with different biological functions. PMID:6997877

  13. Protease degradable electrospun fibrous hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Wade, Ryan J.; Bassin, Ethan J.; Rodell, Christopher B.; Burdick, Jason A.

    2015-01-01

    Electrospun nanofibers are promising in biomedical applications to replicate features of the natural extracellular matrix (ECM). However, nearly all electrospun scaffolds are either non-degradable or degrade hydrolytically, whereas natural ECM degrades proteolytically, often through matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Here, we synthesize reactive macromers that contain protease-cleavable and fluorescent peptides and are able to form both isotropic hydrogels and electrospun fibrous hydrogels through a photoinitiated polymerization. These biomimetic scaffolds are susceptible to protease-mediated cleavage in vitro in a protease dose dependent manner and in vivo in a subcutaneous mouse model using transdermal fluorescent imaging to monitor degradation. Importantly, materials containing an alternate and non-protease-cleavable peptide sequence are stable in both in vitro and in vivo settings. To illustrate the specificity in degradation, scaffolds with mixed fiber populations support selective fiber degradation based on individual fiber degradability. Overall, this represents a novel biomimetic approach to generate protease-sensitive fibrous scaffolds for biomedical applications. PMID:25799370

  14. Schistosome serine protease inhibitors: parasite defense or homeostasis?

    PubMed Central

    Lopez Quezada, Landys A.; McKerrow, James H.

    2016-01-01

    Serpins are a structurally conserved family of macromolecular inhibitors found in numerous biological systems. The completion and annotation of the genomes of Schistosoma mansoni and Schistosoma japonicum has enabled the identification by phylogenetic analysis of two major serpin clades. S. mansoni shows a greater multiplicity of serpin genes, perhaps reflecting adaptation to infection of a human host. Putative targets of schistosome serpins can be predicted from the sequence of the reactive center loop (RCL). Schistosome serpins may play important roles in both post-translational regulation of schistosome-derived proteases, as well as parasite defense mechanisms against the action of host proteases. PMID:21670886

  15. Genome and secretome analyses provide insights into keratin decomposition by novel proteases from the non-pathogenic fungus Onygena corvina.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuhong; Busk, Peter Kamp; Herbst, Florian-Alexander; Lange, Lene

    2015-11-01

    Poultry processing plants and slaughterhouses produce huge quantities of feathers and hair/bristle waste annually. These keratinaceous wastes are highly resistant to degradation. Onygena corvina, a non-pathogenic fungus, grows specifically on feathers, hooves, horn, and hair in nature. Hence, the proteases secreted by O. corvina are interesting in view of their potential relevance for industrial decomposition of keratinaceous wastes. We sequenced and assembled the genome of O. corvina and used a method called peptide pattern recognition to identify 73 different proteases. Comparative genome analysis of proteases in keratin-degrading and non-keratin-degrading fungi indicated that 18 putative secreted proteases from four protease families (M36, M35, M43, and S8) may be responsible for keratin decomposition. Twelve of the 18 predicted protease genes could be amplified from O. corvina grown on keratinaceous materials and were transformed into Pichia pastoris. One of the recombinant proteases belonging to the S8 family showed high keratin-degrading activity. Furthermore, 29 different proteases were identified by mass spectrometry in the culture broth of O. corvina grown on feathers and bristle. The culture broth was fractionated by ion exchange chromatography to isolate active fractions with five novel proteases belonging to three protease families (S8, M28, and M3). Enzyme blends composed of three of these five proteases, one from each family, showed high degree of degradation of keratin in vitro. A blend of novel proteases, such as those we discovered, could possibly find a use for degrading keratinaceous wastes and provide proteins, peptides, and amino acids as valuable ingredients for animal feed. PMID:26177915

  16. Substrate specificity of the ubiquitin and Ubl proteases

    PubMed Central

    Ronau, Judith A; Beckmann, John F; Hochstrasser, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Conjugation and deconjugation of ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like proteins (Ubls) to cellular proteins are highly regulated processes integral to cellular homeostasis. Most often, the C-termini of these small polypeptides are attached to lysine side chains of target proteins by an amide (isopeptide) linkage. Deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) and Ubl-specific proteases (ULPs) comprise a diverse group of proteases that recognize and remove ubiquitin and Ubls from their substrates. How DUBs and ULPs distinguish among different modifiers, or different polymeric forms of these modifiers, remains poorly understood. The specificity of ubiquitin/Ubl-deconjugating enzymes for particular substrates depends on multiple factors, ranging from the topography of specific substrate features, as in different polyubiquitin chain types, to structural elements unique to each enzyme. Here we summarize recent structural and biochemical studies that provide insights into mechanisms of substrate specificity among various DUBs and ULPs. We also discuss the unexpected specificities of non-eukaryotic proteases in these families. PMID:27012468

  17. Identification and structural analysis of four serine proteases in a monotreme, the platypus, Ornithorhynchus anatinus.

    PubMed

    Poorafshar, M; Aveskogh, M; Munday, B; Hellman, L

    2000-11-01

    To study the emergence of the major subfamilies of serine proteases during vertebrate evolution, we present here the primary structure of four serine proteases expressed in the spleen of a monotreme, the platypus, Ornithorhynchus anatinus. Partial cDNA clones for four serine proteases were isolated by a PCR-based strategy. This strategy is based on the high level of sequence identity between various members of the large gene family of trypsin-related serine proteases, over two highly conserved regions, those of the histidine and the serine of the catalytic triad. The partial cDNA clones were used to isolate full-length or almost full-length cDNA clones for three of these proteases from a platypus spleen cDNA library. By phylogenetic analysis, these three clones were identified as being the platypus homologues of human coagulation factor X, neutrophil elastase, and a protease distantly related to the T-cell granzymes. The remaining partial clone was found to represent a close homologue of human complement factor D (adipsin). The isolation of these four clones shows that several of the major subfamilies of serine proteases had evolved as separate subfamilies long before the radiation of the major mammalian lineages of today, the monotremes, the marsupials, and the placental mammals. Upon comparison of the corresponding proteases of monotremes and eutherian mammals, the coagulation and complement proteases were shown to display a higher degree of conservation compared to the hematopoietic proteases N-elastase and the T-cell granzymes. This latter finding indicates a higher evolutionary pressure to maintain specific functions in the complement and coagulation enzymes compared to many of the hematopoietic serine proteases. PMID:11132153

  18. Calcicludine, a venom peptide of the Kunitz-type protease inhibitor family, is a potent blocker of high-threshold Ca2+ channels with a high affinity for L-type channels in cerebellar granule neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Schweitz, H; Heurteaux, C; Bois, P; Moinier, D; Romey, G; Lazdunski, M

    1994-01-01

    Calcicludine (CaC) is a 60-amino acid polypeptide from the venom of Dendroaspis angusticeps. It is structurally homologous to the Kunitz-type protease inhibitor, to dendrotoxins, which block K+ channels, and to the protease inhibitor domain of the amyloid beta protein that accumulates in Alzheimer disease. Voltage-clamp experiments on a variety of excitable cells have shown that CaC specifically blocks most of the high-threshold Ca2+ channels (L-, N-, or P-type) in the 10-100 nM range. Particularly high densities of specific 125I-labeled CaC binding sites were found in the olfactory bulb, in the molecular layer of the dentate gyrus and the stratum oriens of CA3 field in the hippocampal formation, and in the granular layer of the cerebellum. 125I-labeled CaC binds with a high affinity (Kd = 15 pM) to a single class of noninteracting sites in rat olfactory bulb microsomes. The distribution of CaC binding sites in cerebella of three mutant mice (Weaver, Reeler, and Purkinje cell degeneration) clearly shows that the specific high-affinity labeling is associated with granule cells. Electrophysiological experiments on rat cerebellar granule neurons in primary culture have shown that CaC potently blocks the L-type component of the Ca2+ current (K0.5 = 0.2 nM). Then CaC, in the nanomolar range, appears to be a highly potent blocker of an L-subtype of neuronal Ca2+ channels. Images PMID:8302860

  19. Inhibition of viral proteases by Zingiberaceae extracts and flavones isolated from Kaempferia parviflora.

    PubMed

    Sookkongwaree, K; Geitmann, M; Roengsumran, S; Petsom, A; Danielson, U H

    2006-08-01

    In order to identify novel lead compounds with antiviral effect, methanol and aqueous extracts of eight medicinal plants in the Zingiberaceae family were screened for inhibition of proteases from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). In general, the methanol extracts inhibited the enzymes more effectively than the aqueous extracts. HIV-1 protease was strongly inhibited by the methanol extract of Alpinia galanga. This extract also inhibited HCV and HCMV proteases, but to a lower degree. HCV protease was most efficiently inhibited by the extracts from Zingiber officinale, with little difference between the aqueous and the methanol extracts. Many of the methanol extracts inhibited HCMV protease, but the aqueous extracts showed weak inhibition. In a first endeavor to identify the active constituents, eight flavones were isolated from the black rhizomes of Kaempferia parviflora. The most effective inhibitors, 5-hydroxy-7-methoxyflavone and 5,7-dimethoxyflavone, inhibited HIV-1 protease with IC50 values of 19 microM. Moreover, 5-hydroxy-3,7-dimethoxyflavone inhibited HCV protease and HCMV protease with IC50 values of 190 and 250 microM, respectively. PMID:16964717

  20. Cysteine protease of the nematode Nippostrongylus brasiliensis preferentially evokes an IgE/IgG1 antibody response in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Kamata, I; Yamada, M; Uchikawa, R; Matsuda, S; Arizono, N

    1995-01-01

    Some cysteine proteases such as papain and those of mites and schistosomes have potent allergenic properties. To clarify the allergenicity of nematode cysteine proteases, the enzyme was purified from the intestinal nematode Nippostrongylus brasiliensis using cation exchange chromatography and gel filtration chromatography. The purified protease, of 16 kD and pI 8.5, showed maximum enzyme activity at pH 5.5 and substrate preference for Z-Phe-Arg-MCA. The specific inhibitors of cysteine protease leupeptin, iodoacetic acid, and E-64, completely suppressed the activity, indicating that the purified enzyme belongs to the cysteine protease family. Cysteine protease activity was found not only in somatic extract, but also in the excretory-secretory (ES) product of the nematode. When anti-cysteine protease immunoglobulin isotypes were examined in sera from rats infected with N. brasiliensis, a high level of IgG1 and a lower level of IgE antibody were detected. Depletion of IgG antibodies from the sera using protein G affinity columns resulted in a marked increase in reactivity of anti-cysteine protease IgE with the antigen, possibly due to the removal of competing IgG antibodies. In contrast to IgE and IgG1, production of anti-cysteine protease IgG2a was negligible. These results indicate that the nematode cysteine protease preferentially evokes an IgE/IgG1 antibody response. Images Fig. 2 PMID:7554403

  1. Microbial inhibitors of cysteine proteases.

    PubMed

    Kędzior, Mateusz; Seredyński, Rafał; Gutowicz, Jan

    2016-08-01

    Cysteine proteases are one of the major classes of proteolytic enzymes involved in a number of physiological and pathological processes in plants, animals and microorganisms. When their synthesis, activity and localization in mammalian cells are altered, they may contribute to the development of many diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, osteoporosis and cancer. Therefore, cysteine proteases have become promising drug targets for the medical treatment of these disorders. Inhibitors of cysteine proteases are also produced by almost every group of living organisms, being responsible for the control of intracellular proteolytic activity. Microorganisms synthesize cysteine protease inhibitors not only to regulate the activity of endogenous, often virulent enzymes, but also to hinder the host's proteolytic defense system and evade its immune responses against infections. Present work describes known to date microbial inhibitors of cysteine proteases in terms of their structure, enzyme binding mechanism, specificity and pathophysiological roles. The overview of both proteinaceous and small-molecule inhibitors produced by all groups of microorganisms (bacteria, archaea, fungi, protists) and viruses is provided. Subsequently, possible applications of microbial inhibitors in science, medicine and biotechnology are also highlighted. PMID:27048482

  2. Taspase 1: A protease with many biological surprises

    PubMed Central

    Niizuma, Hidetaka; Cheng, Emily H; Hsieh, James J

    2015-01-01

    Taspase 1 (TASP1) cleaves the mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL) and transcription factor (TF) IIA families of nuclear proteins to orchestrate various biological processes. TASP1 is not a classical oncogene, but assists in cell proliferation and permits oncogenic initiation through cleavage of MLL and TFIIA. TASP1 is thus better classified as a “non-oncogene addiction” protease, and targeting TASP1 offers a novel and attractive anticancer therapeutic strategy. PMID:27308523

  3. [Prospects for the design of new therapeutically significant protease inhibitors based on knottins and sunflower seed trypsin inhibitor (SFTI 1)].

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, S S; Kolesanova, E F; Talanova, A V; Veselovsky, A V

    2016-05-01

    Plant seed knottins, mainly from the Cucurbitacea family, and sunflower seed trypsin inhibitor (SFTI 1) are the most low-molecular canonical peptide inhibitors of serine proteases. High efficiency of inhibition of various serine proteases, structure rigidity together with the possibility of limited variations of amino acid sequences, high chemical stability, lack of toxic properties, opportunity of production by either chemical synthesis or use of heterologous expression systems make these inhibitors attractive templates for design of new compounds for regulation of therapeutically significant serine protease activities. Hence the design of such compounds represents a prospective research field. The review considers structural characteristics of these inhibitors, their properties, methods of preparation and design of new analogs. Examples of successful employment of natural serine protease inhibitors belonging to knottin family and SFTI 1 as templates for the design of highly specific inhibitors of certain proteases are given. PMID:27562989

  4. Design, Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of a Library of Thiocarbazates and their Activity as Cysteine Protease Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhuqing; Myers, Michael C.; Shah, Parag P.; Beavers, Mary Pat; Benedetti, Phillip A.; Diamond, Scott L.

    2010-01-01

    Recently, we identified a novel class of potent cathepsin L inhibitors, characterized by a thiocarbazate warhead. Given the potential of these compounds to inhibit other cysteine proteases, we designed and synthesized a library of thiocarbazates containing diversity elements at three positions. Biological characterization of this library for activity against a panel proteases indicated a significant preference for members of the papain family of cysteine proteases over serine, metallo-, and certain classes of cysteine proteases, such as caspases. Several very potent inhibitors of Cathepsin L and S were identified. The SAR data was employed in docking studies in an effort to understand the structural elements required for Cathepsin S inhibition. This study provides the basis for the design of highly potent and selective inhibitors of the papain family of cysteine proteases. PMID:20438448

  5. Highly potent fibrinolytic serine protease from Streptomyces.

    PubMed

    Uesugi, Yoshiko; Usuki, Hirokazu; Iwabuchi, Masaki; Hatanaka, Tadashi

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a highly potent fibrinolytic serine protease from Streptomyces omiyaensis (SOT), which belongs to the trypsin family. The fibrinolytic activity of SOT was examined using in vitro assays and was compared with those of known fibrinolytic enzymes such as plasmin, tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA), urokinase, and nattokinase. Compared to other enzymes, SOT showed remarkably higher hydrolytic activity toward mimic peptides of fibrin and plasminogen. The fibrinolytic activity of SOT is about 18-fold higher than that of plasmin, and is comparable to that of t-PA by fibrin plate assays. Furthermore, SOT had some plasminogen activator-like activity. Results show that SOT and nattokinase have very different fibrinolytic and fibrinogenolytic modes, engendering significant synergetic effects of SOT and nattokinase on fibrinolysis. These results suggest that SOT presents important possibilities for application in the therapy of thrombosis. PMID:22112764

  6. Binding modes of a new epoxysuccinyl-peptide inhibitor of cysteine proteases. Where and how do cysteine proteases express their selectivity?

    PubMed

    Czaplewski, C; Grzonka, Z; Jaskólski, M; Kasprzykowski, F; Kozak, M; Politowska, E; Ciarkowski, J

    1999-05-18

    Papain from Carica papaya, an easily available cysteine protease, is the best-studied representative of this family of enzymes. The three dimensional structure of papain is very similar to that of other cysteine proteases of either plant (actinidin, caricain, papaya protease IV) or animal (cathepsins B, K, L, H) origin. As abnormalities in the activities of mammalian cysteine proteases accompany a variety of diseases, there has been a long-lasting interest in the development of potent and selective inhibitors for these enzymes. A covalent inhibitor of cysteine proteases, designed as a combination of epoxysuccinyl and peptide moieties, has been modeled in the catalytic pocket of papain. A number of its configurations have been generated and relaxed by constrained simulated annealing-molecular dynamics in water. A clear conformational variability of this inhibitor is discussed in the context of a conspicuous conformational diversity observed earlier in several solid-state structures of other complexes between cysteine proteases and covalent inhibitors. The catalytic pockets S2 and even more so S3, as defined by the pioneering studies on the papain-ZPACK, papain-E64c and papain-leupeptin complexes, appear elusive in view of the evident flexibility of the present inhibitor and in confrontation with the obvious conformational scatter seen in other examples. This predicts limited chances for the development of selective structure-based inhibitors of thiol proteases, designed to exploit the minute differences in the catalytic pockets of various members of this family. A simultaneous comparison of the three published proenzyme structures suggests the enzyme's prosegment binding loop-prosegment interface as a new potential target for selective inhibitors of papain-related thiol proteases. PMID:10350606

  7. Protease determination using an optimized alcohol enzyme electrode.

    PubMed

    Bardeletti, G; Carillon, C

    1993-12-01

    A new method for the determination of protease activities is described. In this large family, trypsin is used as a protease model that cleaves the ethyl or methyl ester of artificial substrates producing ethanol or methanol. Alcohol is detected using an alcohol oxidase enzyme electrode. The H2O2 production that occurs is measured amperometrically. At 30 degrees C, in a 0.1M phosphate buffer, pH 7.5, the enzyme electrode response for ethanol was calibrated at 3.10(-6)-3.10(-3)M and for methanol from 3.10(-7) to 4.10(-4)M in the cell measurement. Trypsin levels as determined by the proposed method and by a conventional spectrophotometric method are in good agreement when using the same measurement conditions. A detection limit of 10 U.L-1 and a linear calibration curve of 10-100,000 U.L-1 in the sample were obtained. Measuring time for the required trypsin solution concentration was from 4 min (for the most dilute samples) to 1 min (for the most concentrate samples). In a typical experiment, protease measurements did not inactivate the alcohol oxidase on the probe, nor did a more classical use for alcohol detection. The procedure developed could permit any protease estimation on the condition that they hydrolyze ester bonds from synthetic substrate. PMID:8109959

  8. Exogenous proteases for meat tenderization.

    PubMed

    Bekhit, Alaa A; Hopkins, David L; Geesink, Geert; Bekhit, Adnan A; Franks, Philip

    2014-01-01

    The use of exogenous proteases to improve meat tenderness has attracted much interest recently, with a view to consistent production of tender meat and added value to lower grade meat cuts. This review discusses the sources, characteristics, and use of exogenous proteases in meat tenderization to highlight the specificity of the proteases toward meat proteins and their impact on meat quality. Plant enzymes (such as papain, bromelain, and ficin) have been extensively investigated as meat tenderizers. New plant proteases (actinidin and zingibain) and microbial enzyme preparations have been of recent interest due to controlled meat tenderization and other advantages. Successful use of these enzymes in fresh meat requires their enzymatic kinetics and characteristics to be determined, together with an understanding of the impact of the surrounding environmental conditions of the meat (pH, temperature) on enzyme function. This enables the optimal conditions for tenderizing fresh meat to be established, and the elimination or reduction of any negative impacts on other quality attributes. PMID:24499119

  9. Mammalian EGF receptor activation by the rhomboid protease RHBDL2.

    PubMed

    Adrain, Colin; Strisovsky, Kvido; Zettl, Markus; Hu, Landian; Lemberg, Marius K; Freeman, Matthew

    2011-05-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has several functions in mammalian development and disease, particularly cancer. Most EGF ligands are synthesized as membrane-tethered precursors, and their proteolytic release activates signalling. In Drosophila, rhomboid intramembrane proteases catalyse the release of EGF-family ligands; however, in mammals this seems to be primarily achieved by ADAM-family metalloproteases. We report here that EGF is an efficient substrate of the mammalian rhomboid RHBDL2. RHBDL2 cleaves EGF just outside its transmembrane domain, thereby facilitating its secretion and triggering activation of the EGFR. We have identified endogenous RHBDL2 activity in several tumour cell lines. PMID:21494248

  10. Mammalian EGF receptor activation by the rhomboid protease RHBDL2

    PubMed Central

    Adrain, Colin; Strisovsky, Kvido; Zettl, Markus; Hu, Landian; Lemberg, Marius K; Freeman, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has several functions in mammalian development and disease, particularly cancer. Most EGF ligands are synthesized as membrane-tethered precursors, and their proteolytic release activates signalling. In Drosophila, rhomboid intramembrane proteases catalyse the release of EGF-family ligands; however, in mammals this seems to be primarily achieved by ADAM-family metalloproteases. We report here that EGF is an efficient substrate of the mammalian rhomboid RHBDL2. RHBDL2 cleaves EGF just outside its transmembrane domain, thereby facilitating its secretion and triggering activation of the EGFR. We have identified endogenous RHBDL2 activity in several tumour cell lines. PMID:21494248

  11. Network Analyses Reveal Pervasive Functional Regulation Between Proteases in the Human Protease Web

    PubMed Central

    Fortelny, Nikolaus; Cox, Jennifer H.; Kappelhoff, Reinhild; Starr, Amanda E.; Lange, Philipp F.; Pavlidis, Paul; Overall, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Proteolytic processing is an irreversible posttranslational modification affecting a large portion of the proteome. Protease-cleaved mediators frequently exhibit altered activity, and biological pathways are often regulated by proteolytic processing. Many of these mechanisms have not been appreciated as being protease-dependent, and the potential in unraveling a complex new dimension of biological control is increasingly recognized. Proteases are currently believed to act individually or in isolated cascades. However, conclusive but scattered biochemical evidence indicates broader regulation of proteases by protease and inhibitor interactions. Therefore, to systematically study such interactions, we assembled curated protease cleavage and inhibition data into a global, computational representation, termed the protease web. This revealed that proteases pervasively influence the activity of other proteases directly or by cleaving intermediate proteases or protease inhibitors. The protease web spans four classes of proteases and inhibitors and so links both recently and classically described protease groups and cascades, which can no longer be viewed as operating in isolation in vivo. We demonstrated that this observation, termed reachability, is robust to alterations in the data and will only increase in the future as additional data are added. We further show how subnetworks of the web are operational in 23 different tissues reflecting different phenotypes. We applied our network to develop novel insights into biologically relevant protease interactions using cell-specific proteases of the polymorphonuclear leukocyte as a system. Predictions from the protease web on the activity of matrix metalloproteinase 8 (MMP8) and neutrophil elastase being linked by an inactivating cleavage of serpinA1 by MMP8 were validated and explain perplexing Mmp8 −/− versus wild-type polymorphonuclear chemokine cleavages in vivo. Our findings supply systematically derived and

  12. Purification, characterization and identification of a senescence related serine protease in dark-induced senescent wheat leaves.

    PubMed

    Wang, Renxian; Liu, Shaowei; Wang, Jin; Dong, Qiang; Xu, Langlai; Rui, Qi

    2013-11-01

    Senescence-related proteases play important roles in leaf senescence by regulating protein degradation and nutrient recycling. A 98.9kDa senescence-related protease EP3 in wheat leaves was purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation, Q-Sepharose fast flow anion exchange chromatography and gel slicing after gel electrophoresis. Due to its relatively high thermal stability, its protease activity did not decrease after incubation at 40°C for 1-h. EP3 protease was suggested to be a metal-dependent serine protease, because its activity was inhibited by serine protease inhibitors PMSF and AEBSF and metal related protease inhibitor EGTA. It was identified as a subtilisin-like serine protease of the S8A family based on data from both mass spectrometry and the cloned cDNA sequence. Therefore, these data suggest that a serine protease of the S8A subfamily with specific biochemical properties is involved in senescence-associated protein degradation. PMID:23910959

  13. An Autoinhibited Coiled-Coil Design Strategy for Split-Protein Protease Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Shekhawat, Sujan S.; Porter, Jason R.; Sriprasad, Akshay; Ghosh, Indraneel

    2009-01-01

    Proteases are widely studied as they are integral players in cell cycle control and apoptosis. We report a new approach for the design of a family of genetically encoded turn-on protease biosensors. In our design, an auto-inhibited coiled-coil switch is turned on upon proteolytic cleavage, which results in the complementation of split-protein reporters. Utilizing this new auto-inhibition design paradigm, we present the rational construction and optimization of three generations of protease biosensors, with the final design providing a 1000 fold increase in bioluminescent signal upon addition of the TEV protease. We demonstrate the generality of the approach utilizing two different split-protein reporters, firefly luciferase and beta-lactamase, while also testing our design in the context of a therapeutically relevant protease, caspase-3. Finally, we present a dual-protease sensor geometry that allows for the use of these turn-on sensors as potential AND logic gates. Thus these studies potentially provide a new method for the design and implementation of genetically encoded turn-on protease sensors while also providing a general auto-inhibited coiled-coil strategy for controlling the activity of fragmented proteins. PMID:19803505

  14. Modulation of the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) by bacterial metalloproteases and protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Butterworth, Michael B; Zhang, Liang; Liu, Xiaoning; Shanks, Robert M; Thibodeau, Patrick H

    2014-01-01

    The serralysin family of metalloproteases is associated with the virulence of multiple gram-negative human pathogens, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Serratia marcescens. The serralysin proteases share highly conserved catalytic domains and show evolutionary similarity to the mammalian matrix metalloproteases. Our previous studies demonstrated that alkaline protease (AP) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa is capable of activating the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC), leading to an increase in sodium absorption in airway epithelia. The serralysin proteases are often co-expressed with endogenous, intracellular or periplasmic inhibitors, which putatively protect the bacterium from unwanted or unregulated protease activities. To evaluate the potential use of these small protein inhibitors in regulating the serralysin induced activation of ENaC, proteases from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Serratia marcescens were purified for characterization along with a high affinity inhibitor from Pseudomonas. Both proteases showed activity against in vitro substrates and could be blocked by near stoichiometric concentrations of the inhibitor. In addition, both proteases were capable of activating ENaC when added to the apical surfaces of multiple epithelial cells with similar slow activation kinetics. The high-affinity periplasmic inhibitor from Pseudomonas effectively blocked this activation. These data suggest that multiple metalloproteases are capable of activating ENaC. Further, the endogenous, periplasmic bacterial inhibitors may be useful for modulating the downstream effects of the serralysin virulence factors under physiological conditions. PMID:24963801

  15. Biotechnology of Cold-Active Proteases

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Swati; Satyanarayana, Tulasi

    2013-01-01

    The bulk of Earth’s biosphere is cold (<5 °C) and inhabited by psychrophiles. Biocatalysts from psychrophilic organisms (psychrozymes) have attracted attention because of their application in the ongoing efforts to decrease energy consumption. Proteinases as a class represent the largest category of industrial enzymes. There has been an emphasis on employing cold-active proteases in detergents because this allows laundry operations at ambient temperatures. Proteases have been used in environmental bioremediation, food industry and molecular biology. In view of the present limited understanding and availability of cold-active proteases with diverse characteristics, it is essential to explore Earth’s surface more in search of an ideal cold-active protease. The understanding of molecular and mechanistic details of these proteases will open up new avenues to tailor proteases with the desired properties. A detailed account of the developments in the production and applications of cold-active proteases is presented in this review. PMID:24832807

  16. Recombinant expression and antigenic properties of a 32-kilodalton extracellular alkaline protease, representing a possible virulence factor from Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed Central

    Moser, M; Menz, G; Blaser, K; Crameri, R

    1994-01-01

    A 32-kDa nonglycosylated alkaline protease (EC 3.4.1.14) with elastolytic activity, secreted by the opportunistic pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus ATCC 42202, is suggested to be a virulence factor of this fungus. The enzyme is a serine protease of the subtilisin family, and its cDNA nucleotide sequence has recently been reported. We have cloned the cDNA encoding the mature protease into a high-level Escherichia coli expression plasmid and produced the recombinant protease as a fusion protein with a six-adjacent-histidine affinity tag at the carboxy terminus. Subsequently, the recombinant protease was purified to homogeneity, with affinity chromatography yielding 30 to 40 mg of recombinant protease per liter of E. coli culture. Refolded recombinant protease, in comparison with native protease, demonstrated weak enzymatic activity but similar immunochemical characteristics as analyzed by antigen-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), competition ELISA, and immunoblotting assays. To assess the allergenic potential of the protease, sera from patients with allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis and sera from healthy control individuals were analyzed by ELISA and immunoblotting techniques. Sera from patients with allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis did not have protease-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies and, remarkably, did not show significantly elevated protease-specific IgG antibody levels compared with those in sera from healthy control individuals. This suggests that the alkaline protease from A. fumigatus does not elicit IgE antibodies and has weak immunogenicity, a property which may explain fungus persistence in allergic individuals. Images PMID:8112866

  17. Structural Mechanisms of Inactivation in Scabies Mite Serine Protease Paralogues

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Katja; Langendorf, Christopher G.; Irving, James A.; Reynolds, Simone; Willis, Charlene; Beckham, Simone; Law, Ruby H.P.; Yang, Sundy; Bashtannyk-Puhalovich, Tanya A.; McGowan, Sheena; Whisstock, James C.; Pike, Robert N.; Kemp, David J.; Buckle, Ashley M.

    2009-08-07

    The scabies mite (Sarcoptes scabiei) is a parasite responsible for major morbidity in disadvantaged communities and immuno-compromised patients worldwide. In addition to the physical discomfort caused by the disease, scabies infestations facilitate infection by Streptococcal species via skin lesions, resulting in a high prevalence of rheumatic fever/heart disease in affected communities. The scabies mite produces 33 proteins that are closely related to those in the dust mite group 3 allergen and belong to the S1-like protease family (chymotrypsin-like). However, all but one of these molecules contain mutations in the conserved active-site catalytic triad that are predicted to render them catalytically inactive. These molecules are thus termed scabies mite inactivated protease paralogues (SMIPPs). The precise function of SMIPPs is unclear; however, it has been suggested that these proteins might function by binding and protecting target substrates from cleavage by host immune proteases, thus preventing the host from mounting an effective immune challenge. In order to begin to understand the structural basis for SMIPP function, we solved the crystal structures of SMIPP-S-I1 and SMIPP-S-D1 at 1.85 {angstrom} and 2.0 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. Both structures adopt the characteristic serine protease fold, albeit with large structural variations over much of the molecule. In both structures, mutations in the catalytic triad together with occlusion of the S1 subsite by a conserved Tyr200 residue is predicted to block substrate ingress. Accordingly, we show that both proteases lack catalytic function. Attempts to restore function (via site-directed mutagenesis of catalytic residues as well as Tyr200) were unsuccessful. Taken together, these data suggest that SMIPPs have lost the ability to bind substrates in a classical 'canonical' fashion, and instead have evolved alternative functions in the lifecycle of the scabies mite.

  18. Evaluation on Potential Contributions of Protease Activated Receptors Related Mediators in Allergic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huiyun; Zeng, Xiaoning; He, Shaoheng

    2014-01-01

    Protease activated receptors (PARs) have been recognized as a distinctive four-member family of seven transmembrane G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that can be cleaved by certain serine proteases. In recent years, there has been considerable interest in the role of PARs in allergic inflammation, the fundamental pathologic changes of allergy, but the potential roles of PARs in allergy remain obscure. Since many of these proteases are produced and actively involved in the pathologic process of inflammation including exudation of plasma components, inflammatory cell infiltration, and tissue damage and repair, PARs appear to make important contribution to allergy. The aim of the present review is to summarize the expression of PARs in inflammatory and structural cells, the influence of agonists or antagonists of PARs on cell behavior, and the involvement of PARs in allergic disorders, which will help us to better understand the roles of serine proteases and PARs in allergy. PMID:24876677

  19. SjAPI, the First Functionally Characterized Ascaris-Type Protease Inhibitor from Animal Venoms

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Weishan; Cao, Zhijian; Zhuo, Renxi; Li, Wenxin; Wu, Yingliang

    2013-01-01

    Background Serine protease inhibitors act as modulators of serine proteases, playing important roles in protecting animal toxin peptides from degradation. However, all known serine protease inhibitors discovered thus far from animal venom belong to the Kunitz-type subfamily, and whether there are other novel types of protease inhibitors in animal venom remains unclear. Principal Findings Here, by screening scorpion venom gland cDNA libraries, we identified the first Ascaris-type animal toxin family, which contains four members: Scorpiops jendeki Ascaris-type protease inhibitor (SjAPI), Scorpiops jendeki Ascaris-type protease inhibitor 2 (SjAPI-2), Chaerilus tricostatus Ascaris-type protease inhibitor (CtAPI), and Buthus martensii Ascaris-type protease inhibitor (BmAPI). The detailed characterization of Ascaris-type peptide SjAPI from the venom gland of scorpion Scorpiops jendeki was carried out. The mature peptide of SjAPI contains 64 residues and possesses a classical Ascaris-type cysteine framework reticulated by five disulfide bridges, different from all known protease inhibitors from venomous animals. Enzyme and inhibitor reaction kinetics experiments showed that recombinant SjAPI was a dual function peptide with α-chymotrypsin- and elastase-inhibiting properties. Recombinant SjAPI inhibited α-chymotrypsin with a Ki of 97.1 nM and elastase with a Ki of 3.7 μM, respectively. Bioinformatics analyses and chimera experiments indicated that SjAPI contained the unique short side chain functional residues “AAV” and might be a useful template to produce new serine protease inhibitors. Conclusions/Significance To our knowledge, SjAPI is the first functionally characterized animal toxin peptide with an Ascaris-type fold. The structural and functional diversity of animal toxins with protease-inhibiting properties suggested that bioactive peptides from animal venom glands might be a new source of protease inhibitors, which will accelerate the development of

  20. Molecular Imaging of Proteases in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yunan; Hong, Hao; Zhang, Yin; Cai, Weibo

    2010-01-01

    Proteases play important roles during tumor angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis. Various molecular imaging techniques have been employed for protease imaging: optical (both fluorescence and bioluminescence), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and positron emission tomography (PET). In this review, we will summarize the current status of imaging proteases in cancer with these techniques. Optical imaging of proteases, in particular with fluorescence, is the most intensively validated and many of the imaging probes are already commercially available. It is generally agreed that the use of activatable probes is the most accurate and appropriate means for measuring protease activity. Molecular imaging of proteases with other techniques (i.e. MRI, SPECT, and PET) has not been well-documented in the literature which certainly deserves much future effort. Optical imaging and molecular MRI of protease activity has very limited potential for clinical investigation. PET/SPECT imaging is suitable for clinical investigation; however the optimal probes for PET/SPECT imaging of proteases in cancer have yet to be developed. Successful development of protease imaging probes with optimal in vivo stability, tumor targeting efficacy, and desirable pharmacokinetics for clinical translation will eventually improve cancer patient management. Not limited to cancer, these protease-targeted imaging probes will also have broad applications in other diseases such as arthritis, atherosclerosis, and myocardial infarction. PMID:20234801

  1. Advances in protease engineering for laundry detergents.

    PubMed

    Vojcic, Ljubica; Pitzler, Christian; Körfer, Georgette; Jakob, Felix; Ronny Martinez; Maurer, Karl-Heinz; Schwaneberg, Ulrich

    2015-12-25

    Proteases are essential ingredients in modern laundry detergents. Over the past 30 years, subtilisin proteases employed in the laundry detergent industry have been engineered by directed evolution and rational design to tailor their properties towards industrial demands. This comprehensive review discusses recent success stories in subtilisin protease engineering. Advances in protease engineering for laundry detergents comprise simultaneous improvement of thermal resistance and activity at low temperatures, a rational strategy to modulate pH profiles, and a general hypothesis for how to increase promiscuous activity towards the production of peroxycarboxylic acids as mild bleaching agents. The three protease engineering campaigns presented provide in-depth analysis of protease properties and have identified principles that can be applied to improve or generate enzyme variants for industrial applications beyond laundry detergents. PMID:25579194

  2. Extracellular proteases as targets for drug development.

    PubMed

    Cudic, Mare; Fields, Gregg B

    2009-08-01

    Proteases constitute one of the primary targets in drug discovery. In the present review, we focus on extracellular proteases (ECPs) because of their differential expression in many pathophysiological processes, including cancer, cardiovascular conditions, and inflammatory, pulmonary, and periodontal diseases. Many new ECP inhibitors are currently under clinical investigation and a significant increase in new therapies based on protease inhibition can be expected in the coming years. In addition to directly blocking the activity of a targeted protease, one can take advantage of differential expression in disease states to selectively deliver therapeutic or imaging agents. Recent studies in targeted drug development for the metalloproteases (matrix metalloproteinases, adamalysins, pappalysins, neprilysin, angiotensin-converting enzyme, metallocarboxypeptidases, and glutamate carboxypeptidase II), serine proteases (elastase, coagulation factors, tissue/urokinase plasminogen activator system, kallikreins, tryptase, dipeptidyl peptidase IV) and cysteine proteases (cathepsin B) are discussed herein. PMID:19689354

  3. Proteases in biological control and biotechnology

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, D.D.; Long, G.L.

    1987-01-01

    This book explores the role of proteases in biological control systems and diseases, examines their structures and evolution, and reviews the methods by which proteases and protease inhibitors are engineered. In addition, the use of recombinant DNA technology is explained throughout the volume. Specific topics examined include: the versatility of proteolytic enzymes, the intricate proteolytic control mechanisms in hemostasis and their application to thrombolytic therapy, the evolution of proteolytic enzymes, and the role of limited proteolytic processing in several biological control processes.

  4. Nucleotide sequences encoding a thermostable alkaline protease

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, David B.; Lao, Guifang

    1998-01-01

    Nucleotide sequences, derived from a thermophilic actinomycete microorganism, which encode a thermostable alkaline protease are disclosed. Also disclosed are variants of the nucleotide sequences which encode a polypeptide having thermostable alkaline proteolytic activity. Recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide may be obtained by culturing in a medium a host cell genetically engineered to contain and express a nucleotide sequence according to the present invention, and recovering the recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide from the culture medium.

  5. Nucleotide sequences encoding a thermostable alkaline protease

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, D.B.; Lao, G.

    1998-01-06

    Nucleotide sequences, derived from a thermophilic actinomycete microorganism, which encode a thermostable alkaline protease are disclosed. Also disclosed are variants of the nucleotide sequences which encode a polypeptide having thermostable alkaline proteolytic activity. Recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide may be obtained by culturing in a medium a host cell genetically engineered to contain and express a nucleotide sequence according to the present invention, and recovering the recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide from the culture medium. 3 figs.

  6. Proteolytic crosstalk in multi-protease networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogle, Curtis T.; Mather, William H.

    2016-04-01

    Processive proteases, such as ClpXP in E. coli, are conserved enzyme assemblies that can recognize and rapidly degrade proteins. These proteases are used for a number of purposes, including degrading mistranslated proteins and controlling cellular stress response. However, proteolytic machinery within the cell is limited in capacity and can lead to a bottleneck in protein degradation, whereby many proteins compete (‘queue’) for proteolytic resources. Previous work has demonstrated that such queueing can lead to pronounced statistical relationships between different protein counts when proteins compete for a single common protease. However, real cells contain many different proteases, e.g. ClpXP, ClpAP, and Lon in E. coli, and it is not clear how competition between proteins for multiple classes of protease would influence the dynamics of cellular networks. In the present work, we theoretically demonstrate that a multi-protease proteolytic bottleneck can substantially couple the dynamics for both simple and complex (oscillatory) networks, even between substrates with substantially different affinities for protease. For these networks, queueing often leads to strong positive correlations between protein counts, and these correlations are strongest near the queueing theoretic point of balance. Furthermore, we find that the qualitative behavior of these networks depends on the relative size of the absolute affinity of substrate to protease compared to the cross affinity of substrate to protease, leading in certain regimes to priority queue statistics.

  7. Proteolytic crosstalk in multi-protease networks.

    PubMed

    Ogle, Curtis T; Mather, William H

    2016-01-01

    Processive proteases, such as ClpXP in E. coli, are conserved enzyme assemblies that can recognize and rapidly degrade proteins. These proteases are used for a number of purposes, including degrading mistranslated proteins and controlling cellular stress response. However, proteolytic machinery within the cell is limited in capacity and can lead to a bottleneck in protein degradation, whereby many proteins compete ('queue') for proteolytic resources. Previous work has demonstrated that such queueing can lead to pronounced statistical relationships between different protein counts when proteins compete for a single common protease. However, real cells contain many different proteases, e.g. ClpXP, ClpAP, and Lon in E. coli, and it is not clear how competition between proteins for multiple classes of protease would influence the dynamics of cellular networks. In the present work, we theoretically demonstrate that a multi-protease proteolytic bottleneck can substantially couple the dynamics for both simple and complex (oscillatory) networks, even between substrates with substantially different affinities for protease. For these networks, queueing often leads to strong positive correlations between protein counts, and these correlations are strongest near the queueing theoretic point of balance. Furthermore, we find that the qualitative behavior of these networks depends on the relative size of the absolute affinity of substrate to protease compared to the cross affinity of substrate to protease, leading in certain regimes to priority queue statistics. PMID:27042892

  8. Development and binding characteristics of phosphonate inhibitors of SplA protease from Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Burchacka, Ewa; Zdzalik, Michal; Niemczyk, Justyna-Stec; Pustelny, Katarzyna; Popowicz, Grzegorz; Wladyka, Benedykt; Dubin, Adam; Potempa, Jan; Sienczyk, Marcin; Dubin, Grzegorz; Oleksyszyn, Jozef

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is responsible for a variety of human infections, including life-threatening, systemic conditions. Secreted proteome, including a range of proteases, constitutes the major virulence factor of the bacterium. However, the functions of individual enzymes, in particular SplA protease, remain poorly characterized. Here, we report development of specific inhibitors of SplA protease. The design, synthesis, and activity of a series of α-aminoalkylphosphonate diaryl esters and their peptidyl derivatives are described. Potent inhibitors of SplA are reported, which may facilitate future investigation of physiological function of the protease. The binding modes of the high-affinity compounds Cbz-PheP-(OC6H4−4-SO2CH3)2 and Suc-Val-Pro-PheP-(OC6H5)2 are revealed by high-resolution crystal structures of complexes with the protease. Surprisingly, the binding mode of both compounds deviates from previously characterized canonical interaction of α-aminoalkylphosphonate peptidyl derivatives and family S1 serine proteases. PMID:24375505

  9. Protease inhibitors from marine venomous animals and their counterparts in terrestrial venomous animals.

    PubMed

    Mourão, Caroline B F; Schwartz, Elisabeth F

    2013-06-01

    The Kunitz-type protease inhibitors are the best-characterized family of serine protease inhibitors, probably due to their abundance in several organisms. These inhibitors consist of a chain of ~60 amino acid residues stabilized by three disulfide bridges, and was first observed in the bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI)-like protease inhibitors, which strongly inhibit trypsin and chymotrypsin. In this review we present the protease inhibitors (PIs) described to date from marine venomous animals, such as from sea anemone extracts and Conus venom, as well as their counterparts in terrestrial venomous animals, such as snakes, scorpions, spiders, Anurans, and Hymenopterans. More emphasis was given to the Kunitz-type inhibitors, once they are found in all these organisms. Their biological sources, specificity against different proteases, and other molecular blanks (being also K+ channel blockers) are presented, followed by their molecular diversity. Whereas sea anemone, snakes and other venomous animals present mainly Kunitz-type inhibitors, PIs from Anurans present the major variety in structure length and number of Cys residues, with at least six distinguishable classes. A representative alignment of PIs from these venomous animals shows that, despite eventual differences in Cys assignment, the key-residues for the protease inhibitory activity in all of them occupy similar positions in primary sequence. The key-residues for the K+ channel blocking activity was also compared. PMID:23771044

  10. The Degradome database: expanding roles of mammalian proteases in life and disease.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Silva, José G; Español, Yaiza; Velasco, Gloria; Quesada, Víctor

    2016-01-01

    Since the definition of the degradome as the complete repertoire of proteases in a given organism, the combined effort of numerous laboratories has greatly expanded our knowledge of its roles in biology and pathology. Once the genomic sequences of several important model organisms were made available, we presented the Degradome database containing the curated sets of known protease genes in human, chimpanzee, mouse and rat. Here, we describe the updated Degradome database, featuring 81 new protease genes and 7 new protease families. Notably, in this short time span, the number of known hereditary diseases caused by mutations in protease genes has increased from 77 to 119. This increase reflects the growing interest on the roles of the degradome in multiple diseases, including cancer and ageing. Finally, we have leveraged the widespread adoption of new webtools to provide interactive graphic views that show information about proteases in the global context of the degradome. The Degradome database can be accessed through its web interface at http://degradome.uniovi.es. PMID:26553809

  11. Purification and characterization of a prothrombin-activating protease from Nephila clavata.

    PubMed

    Joo, Han-Seung; Park, Gun-Chun; Cho, Woo Ri; Tak, Eunsik; Paik, Seung R; Chang, Chung-Soon

    2002-03-01

    We report upon the purification and characterization of a novel prothrombin-activating enzyme from the body fluid (total homogenates of isolated digestive tract without eggs, spinnerets and silk glands) of the spider, Nephila clavata by a combination of acetone fractionation, ion exchange, and Soybean trypsin inhibitor-Sepharose chromatography. Analysis of the purified enzyme with SDS-PAGE and gel filtration revealed a single polypeptide chain with an apparent molecular weight of 24kDa. The proteolytic activity of the enzyme was stable up to 50 degrees C, however, it became unstable over 55 degrees C. The enzyme had an optimum pH of 8, and Ca(2+) was not required for the enzyme activity. According to inhibition profiles obtained with several serine protease inhibitors such as PMSF and benzamidine, the purified protease is a member of the serine proteases. Bz-Ile-Glu(gamma-OR)- Gly-Arg-pNA and Z-Arg-Gly-Arg-pNA which are known as substrates for factor Xa, were hydrolyzed favorably by the enzyme. And the Nephila protease could produce thrombin from prothrombin at nM range, and form the turbid ring using fibrinogen-agarose plate. The results obtained confirmed that the purified protease is a potent prothrombin-activating activity belonging to the family of serine protease. PMID:11711126

  12. Purification and characterization of a novel extracellular alkaline protease from Cellulomonas bogoriensis.

    PubMed

    Li, Fan; Yang, Liyuan; Lv, Xue; Liu, Dongbo; Xia, Hongmei; Chen, Shan

    2016-05-01

    An extracellular alkaline protease produced by the alkali-tolerant Cellulomonas bogoriensis was purified by a combination of ammonium sulfate precipitation and cation exchange chromatography. The purity of the protease was detected by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and its molecular weight was confirmed to be 18.3 kDa. The enzyme showed optimum activity at 60 °C and pH 11. The stability of the protease was maintained at a wide temperature range of 4-60 °C and pH range of 3-12. Irreversible inhibition of the enzyme activity by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride and tosyl-l-phenylalanine chloromethyl ketone demonstrated that the purified enzyme is a chymotrypsin of the serine protease family. The Km and Vmax of the protease activity on casein were 19.2 mg/mL and 25000 μg/min/mg, respectively. The broad substrate specificity and remarkable stability in the presence of organic solvents, salt, and commercial detergents, as well as its excellent stain removal and dehairing capability, make the purified alkaline protease a promising candidate for industrial applications. PMID:26849962

  13. Protease Inhibitors from Marine Venomous Animals and Their Counterparts in Terrestrial Venomous Animals

    PubMed Central

    Mourão, Caroline B.F.; Schwartz, Elisabeth F.

    2013-01-01

    The Kunitz-type protease inhibitors are the best-characterized family of serine protease inhibitors, probably due to their abundance in several organisms. These inhibitors consist of a chain of ~60 amino acid residues stabilized by three disulfide bridges, and was first observed in the bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI)-like protease inhibitors, which strongly inhibit trypsin and chymotrypsin. In this review we present the protease inhibitors (PIs) described to date from marine venomous animals, such as from sea anemone extracts and Conus venom, as well as their counterparts in terrestrial venomous animals, such as snakes, scorpions, spiders, Anurans, and Hymenopterans. More emphasis was given to the Kunitz-type inhibitors, once they are found in all these organisms. Their biological sources, specificity against different proteases, and other molecular blanks (being also K+ channel blockers) are presented, followed by their molecular diversity. Whereas sea anemone, snakes and other venomous animals present mainly Kunitz-type inhibitors, PIs from Anurans present the major variety in structure length and number of Cys residues, with at least six distinguishable classes. A representative alignment of PIs from these venomous animals shows that, despite eventual differences in Cys assignment, the key-residues for the protease inhibitory activity in all of them occupy similar positions in primary sequence. The key-residues for the K+ channel blocking activity was also compared. PMID:23771044

  14. Proteases at work: cues for understanding neural development and degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Saftig, Paul; Bovolenta, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Proteolytical processing of membrane bound molecules is a fundamental mechanism for the degradation of these proteins as well as for controlling cell-to-cell communication, which is at the basis of tissue development and homeostasis. Members of families of metalloproteinases and intra-membrane proteases are major effectors of these events. A recent workshop in Baeza, Spain, was devoted to discuss how this mechanism coordinates brain development and how its dysfunction leads to brain pathologies. Herein we summarize the findings presented during this workshop, which illuminate the role of metalloproteinases, including matrix metalloproteinase, A Disintegrin and Metalloproteinase-proteases and intra-membrane proteases, in the regulation of neurogenesis, axon guidance, and synaptogenesis as well as in neurodegeneration. Indeed, there is increasing evidence that proteolysis at the membrane is directly linked to neuropathologies such as Alzheimer Disease and autism spectrum or prion disorders. These proteolytic events are tightly regulated and we are just at the beginning of understanding how these processes could be exploited to design therapeutic treatments aimed at alleviating psychiatric and neurodegenerative pathologies. PMID:25999813

  15. X-Ray Crystallographic Structure of the Norwalk Virus Protease at 1.5-Å Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Zeitler, Corinne E.; Estes, Mary K.; Venkataram Prasad, B. V.

    2006-01-01

    Norwalk virus (NV), a member of the Caliciviridae family, is the major cause of acute, epidemic, viral gastroenteritis. The NV genome is a positive sense, single-stranded RNA that encodes three open reading frames (ORFs). The first ORF produces a polyprotein that is processed by the viral cysteine protease into six nonstructural proteins. We have determined the structure of the NV protease to 1.5 and 2.2 Å from crystals grown in the absence or presence, respectively, of the protease inhibitor AEBSF [4-(2-aminoethyl)-benzenesulfonyl fluoride]. The protease, which crystallizes as a stable dimer, exhibits a two-domain structure similar to those of other viral cysteine proteases with a catalytic triad composed of His 30, Glu 54, and Cys 139. The native structure of the protease reveals strong hydrogen bond interactions between His 30 and Glu 54, in the favorable syn configuration, indicating a role of Glu 54 during proteolysis. Mutation of this residue to Ala abolished the protease activity, in a fluorogenic peptide substrate assay, further substantiating the role of Glu 54 during proteolysis. These observations contrast with the suggestion, from a previous study of another norovirus protease, that this residue may not have a prominent role in proteolysis (K. Nakamura, Y. Someya, T. Kumasaka, G. Ueno, M. Yamamoto, T. Sato, N. Takeda, T. Miyamura, and N. Tanaka, J. Virol. 79:13685-13693, 2005). In the structure from crystals grown in the presence of AEBSF, Glu 54 undergoes a conformational change leading to disruption of the hydrogen bond interactions with His 30. Since AEBSF was not apparent in the electron density map, it is possible that these conformational changes are due to subtle changes in pH caused by its addition during crystallization. PMID:16641296

  16. Functional and Structural Characterization of Vibrio cholerae Extracellular Serine Protease B, VesB*

    PubMed Central

    Gadwal, Shilpa; Korotkov, Konstantin V.; Delarosa, Jaclyn R.; Hol, Wim G. J.; Sandkvist, Maria

    2014-01-01

    The chymotrypsin subfamily A of serine proteases consists primarily of eukaryotic proteases, including only a few proteases of bacterial origin. VesB, a newly identified serine protease that is secreted by the type II secretion system in Vibrio cholerae, belongs to this subfamily. VesB is likely produced as a zymogen because sequence alignment with trypsinogen identified a putative cleavage site for activation and a catalytic triad, His-Asp-Ser. Using synthetic peptides, VesB efficiently cleaved a trypsin substrate, but not chymotrypsin and elastase substrates. The reversible serine protease inhibitor, benzamidine, inhibited VesB and served as an immobilized ligand for VesB affinity purification, further indicating its relationship with trypsin-like enzymes. Consistent with this family of serine proteases, N-terminal sequencing implied that the propeptide is removed in the secreted form of VesB. Separate mutagenesis of the activation site and catalytic serine rendered VesB inactive, confirming the importance of these features for activity, but not for secretion. Similar to trypsin but, in contrast to thrombin and other coagulation factors, Na+ did not stimulate the activity of VesB, despite containing the Tyr250 signature. The crystal structure of catalytically inactive pro-VesB revealed that the protease domain is structurally similar to trypsinogen. The C-terminal domain of VesB was found to adopt an immunoglobulin (Ig)-fold that is structurally homologous to Ig-folds of other extracellular Vibrio proteins. Possible roles of the Ig-fold domain in stability, substrate specificity, cell surface association, and type II secretion of VesB, the first bacterial multidomain trypsin-like protease with known structure, are discussed. PMID:24459146

  17. Genome-wide identification, evolutuionary and expression analysis of aspartic proteases gene superfamily in grape

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspartic proteases (APs) are a large family of proteolytic enzymes in vertebrates, plants, yeast, nematodes, parasites, fungi, and viruses. In plants, they are involved in many biological processes, such as plant senescence, stress response, programmed cell death, and reproduction. Prior to the pr...

  18. Vibrio cholerae hemagglutinin(HA)/protease: An extracellular metalloprotease with multiple pathogenic activities.

    PubMed

    Benitez, Jorge A; Silva, Anisia J

    2016-06-01

    Vibrio cholerae of serogroup O1 and O139, the etiological agent of the diarrheal disease cholera, expresses the extracellular Zn-dependent metalloprotease hemagglutinin (HA)/protease also reported as vibriolysin. This enzyme is also produced by non-O1/O139 (non-cholera) strains that cause mild, sporadic illness (i.e. gastroenteritis, wound or ear infections). Orthologs of HA/protease are present in other members of the Vibrionaceae family pathogenic to humans and fish. HA/protease belongs to the M4 neutral peptidase family and displays significant amino acid sequence homology to Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase (LasB) and Bacillus thermoproteolyticus thermolysin. It exhibits a broad range of potentially pathogenic activities in cell culture and animal models. These activities range from the covalent modification of other toxins, the degradation of the protective mucus barrier and disruption of intestinal tight junctions. Here we review (i) the structure and regulation of HA/protease expression, (ii) its interaction with other toxins and the intestinal mucosa and (iii) discuss the possible role(s) of HA/protease in the pathogenesis of cholera. PMID:26952544

  19. Production, characterization, gene cloning, and nematocidal activity of the extracellular protease from Stenotrophomonas maltophilia N4.

    PubMed

    Jankiewicz, Urszula; Larkowska, Ewa; Swiontek Brzezinska, Maria

    2016-06-01

    A rhizosphere strain of the bacterium Stenotrophomonas maltophilia N4 secretes the serine protease PN4, whose molecular mass is approximately 42 kDa. The optimal temperature for the enzyme activity of the 11-fold purified protein was 50°C and the optimal pH was 10.5. The activity of the enzyme was strongly inhibited by specific serine protease inhibitors, which allowed for its classification as an alkaline serine protease family. Ca(2+) ions stimulated the activity of the protease PN4, while Mg(2+) ions stabilized its activity, and Zn(2+) and Cd(2+) ions strongly inhibited its activity. The enzyme has broad substrate specificity. For example, it is able to hydrolyse casein, keratin, albumin, haemoglobin, and gelatin, as well as the insoluble modified substrates azure keratin and azocoll. The gene that encodes the 1740 bp precursor form of the enzyme (accession number: LC031815) was cloned. We then deduced that its amino acid sequence includes the region of the conserved domain of the S8 family of peptidases as well as the catalytic triad Asp/His/Ser. The bacterial culture fluid as well as the purified protease PN4 demonstrated biocidal activity with regard to the nematodes Caenorhabditis elegans and Panagrellus spp. PMID:26896861

  20. Tissue dissociation enzyme neutral protease assessment.

    PubMed

    Breite, A G; Dwulet, F E; McCarthy, R C

    2010-01-01

    Neutral proteases, essential components of purified tissue dissociation enzymes required for successful human islet isolation, show variable activities and effects of substrate on their activities. Initially we used a spectrophotometric endpoint assay with azocasein substrate to measure neutral protease activity. After critical review of the results, we observed these data to be inconsistent and not correlating expected differences in specific activities between thermolysin and Bacillus polymyxa proteases. This observation led to the development of a fluorescent microplate assay using fluorescein isothyocyanate-conjugated bovine serum albumin (FITC-BSA) as the substrate. This simpler, more flexible method offered a homogeneous, kinetic enzyme assay allowing determination of steady state reaction rates of sample replicates at various dilutions. The assay had a linear range of 4- to 8-fold and interassay coefficients of variation for B polymyxa protease and thermolysin of <9% and <15%, respectively, which were lower than those using the spectrophotometric endpoint assay, namely, 54% and 36%, respectively. This format allowed for incorporation of enzyme inhibitors, as illustrated by addition of sulfhydryl protease inhibitors, which, consistent with earlier reports, strongly indicated that the main contaminant in purified collagenase preparations was clostripain. Determination of the specific activities for several purified neutral proteases showed that the B polymyxa and Clostridium histolyticum proteases had approximately 40% and 15% specific activities, respectively, of those obtained with purified thermolysin, indicating the different characteristics of neutral protease enzymes for cell isolation procedures. PMID:20692405

  1. Protease-degradable electrospun fibrous hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wade, Ryan J.; Bassin, Ethan J.; Rodell, Christopher B.; Burdick, Jason A.

    2015-03-01

    Electrospun nanofibres are promising in biomedical applications to replicate features of the natural extracellular matrix (ECM). However, nearly all electrospun scaffolds are either non-degradable or degrade hydrolytically, whereas natural ECM degrades proteolytically, often through matrix metalloproteinases. Here we synthesize reactive macromers that contain protease-cleavable and fluorescent peptides and are able to form both isotropic hydrogels and electrospun fibrous hydrogels through a photoinitiated polymerization. These biomimetic scaffolds are susceptible to protease-mediated cleavage in vitro in a protease dose-dependent manner and in vivo in a subcutaneous mouse model using transdermal fluorescent imaging to monitor degradation. Importantly, materials containing an alternate and non-protease-cleavable peptide sequence are stable in both in vitro and in vivo settings. To illustrate the specificity in degradation, scaffolds with mixed fibre populations support selective fibre degradation based on individual fibre degradability. Overall, this represents a novel biomimetic approach to generate protease-sensitive fibrous scaffolds for biomedical applications.

  2. Progress and prospects on DENV protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Timiri, Ajay Kumar; Sinha, Barij Nayan; Jayaprakash, Venkatesan

    2016-07-19

    New treatments are desperately required to combat increasing rate of dengue fever cases reported in tropical and sub-tropical parts of the world. Among the ten proteins (structural and non-structural) encoded by dengue viral genome, NS2B-NS3 protease is an ideal target for drug discovery. It is responsible for the processing of poly protein that is required for genome replication of the virus. Moreover, inhibitors designed against proteases were found successful in Human Immuno-deficiency Virus (HIV) and Hepatitis C Virus (HCV). Complete molecular mechanism and a survey of inhibitors reported against dengue protease will be helpful in designing effective and potent inhibitors. This review provides an insight on molecular mechanism of dengue virus protease and covers up-to-date information on different inhibitors reported against dengue proteases with medicinal chemistry perspective. PMID:27092412

  3. HIV-1 protease mutations and protease inhibitor cross-resistance.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Soo-Yon; Taylor, Jonathan; Fessel, W Jeffrey; Kaufman, David; Towner, William; Troia, Paolo; Ruane, Peter; Hellinger, James; Shirvani, Vivian; Zolopa, Andrew; Shafer, Robert W

    2010-10-01

    The effects of many protease inhibitor (PI)-selected mutations on the susceptibility to individual PIs are unknown. We analyzed in vitro susceptibility test results on 2,725 HIV-1 protease isolates. More than 2,400 isolates had been tested for susceptibility to fosamprenavir, indinavir, nelfinavir, and saquinavir; 2,130 isolates had been tested for susceptibility to lopinavir; 1,644 isolates had been tested for susceptibility to atazanavir; 1,265 isolates had been tested for susceptibility to tipranavir; and 642 isolates had been tested for susceptibility to darunavir. We applied least-angle regression (LARS) to the 200 most common mutations in the data set and identified a set of 46 mutations associated with decreased PI susceptibility of which 40 were not polymorphic in the eight most common HIV-1 group M subtypes. We then used least-squares regression to ascertain the relative contribution of each of these 46 mutations. The median number of mutations associated with decreased susceptibility to each PI was 28 (range, 19 to 32), and the median number of mutations associated with increased susceptibility to each PI was 2.5 (range, 1 to 8). Of the mutations with the greatest effect on PI susceptibility, I84AV was associated with decreased susceptibility to eight PIs; V32I, G48V, I54ALMSTV, V82F, and L90M were associated with decreased susceptibility to six to seven PIs; I47A, G48M, I50V, L76V, V82ST, and N88S were associated with decreased susceptibility to four to five PIs; and D30N, I50L, and V82AL were associated with decreased susceptibility to fewer than four PIs. This study underscores the greater impact of nonpolymorphic mutations compared with polymorphic mutations on decreased PI susceptibility and provides a comprehensive quantitative assessment of the effects of individual mutations on susceptibility to the eight clinically available PIs. PMID:20660676

  4. Protease proteomics: revealing protease in vivo functions using systems biology approaches.

    PubMed

    Doucet, Alain; Overall, Christopher M

    2008-10-01

    Proteases irreversibly modify proteins by cleaving their amide bonds and are implicated in virtually every important biological process such as immunity, development and tissue repair. Accordingly, it is easy to see that deregulated proteolysis is a pathognomic feature of many diseases. Most of the current information available on proteases was acquired using in vitro methods, which reveals molecular structure, enzyme kinetics and active-site specificity. However, considerably less is known about the relevant biological functions and combined roles of proteases in moulding the proteome. Although models using genetically modified animals are powerful, they are slow to develop, they can be difficult to interpret, and while useful, they remain only models of human disease. Therefore, to understand how proteases accomplish their tasks in organisms and how they participate in pathology, we need to elucidate the protease degradome-the repertoire of proteases expressed by a cell, a tissue or an organism at a particular time-their expression level, activation state, their biological substrates, also known as the substrate degradome-the repertoire of substrates for each protease-and the effect of the activity of each protease on the pathways of the system under study. Achieving this goal is challenging because several proteases might cleave the same protein, and proteases also form pathways and interact to form the protease web [Overall, C.M., Kleifeld, O., 2006. Tumour microenvironment - opinion: validating matrix metalloproteinases as drug targets and anti-targets for cancer therapy. Nat. Rev. Cancer 6 (3), 227-239]. Hence, the net proteolytic potential of the degradome at a particular time on a substrate and pathway must also be understood. Proteomics offers one of the few routes to the understanding of proteolysis in complex in vivo systems and especially in man where genetic manipulations are impossible. The aim of this chapter is to review methods and tools that allow

  5. Extracellular proteases of Trichoderma species. A review.

    PubMed

    Kredics, L; Antal, Zsuzsanna; Szekeres, A; Hatvani, L; Manczinger, L; Vágvölgyi, Cs; Nagy, Erzsébet

    2005-01-01

    Cellulolytic, xylanolytic, chitinolytic and beta-1,3-glucanolytic enzyme systems of species belonging to the filamentous fungal genus Trichoderma have been investigated in details and are well characterised. The ability of Trichoderma strains to produce extracellular proteases has also been known for a long time, however, the proteolytic enzyme system is relatively unknown in this genus. Fortunately, in the recent years more and more attention is focused on the research in this field. The role of Trichoderma proteases in the biological control of plant pathogenic fungi and nematodes has been demonstrated, and it is also suspected that they may be important for the competitive saprophytic ability of green mould isolates and may represent potential virulence factors of Trichoderma strains as emerging fungal pathogens of clinical importance. The aim of this review is to summarize the information available about the extracellular proteases of Trichoderma. Numerous studies are available about the extracellular proteolytic enzyme profiles of Trichoderma strains and about the effect of abiotic environmental factors on protease activities. A number of protease enzymes have been purified to homogeneity and some protease encoding genes have been cloned and characterized. These results will be reviewed and the role of Trichoderma proteases in biological control as well as their advantages and disadvantages in biotechnology will be discussed. PMID:16003937

  6. Regulation of protease production in Clostridium sporogenes.

    PubMed Central

    Allison, C; Macfarlane, G T

    1990-01-01

    The physiological and nutritional factors that regulate protease synthesis in Clostridium sporogenes C25 were studied in batch and continuous cultures. Formation of extracellular proteases occurred at the end of active growth and during the stationary phase in batch cultures. Protease production was inversely related to growth rate in glucose-excess and glucose-limited chemostats over the range D = 0.05 to 0.70 h-1. In pulse experiments, glucose, ammonia, phosphate, and some amino acids (tryptophan, proline, tyrosine, and isoleucine) strongly repressed protease synthesis. This repression was not relieved by addition of 4 mM cyclic AMP, cyclic GMP, or dibutyryl cyclic AMP. Protease formation was markedly inhibited by 4 mM ATP and ADP, but GTP and GDP had little effect on the process. It is concluded that protease production by C. sporogenes is strongly influenced by the amount of energy available to the cells, with the highest levels of protease synthesis occurring under energy-limiting conditions. PMID:2268158

  7. A biotechnology perspective of fungal proteases

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Paula Monteiro; Bittencourt, Mona Lisa de Assis; Caprara, Carolina Canielles; de Freitas, Marcela; de Almeida, Renata Paula Coppini; Silveira, Dâmaris; Fonseca, Yris Maria; Ferreira, Edivaldo Ximenes; Pessoa, Adalberto; Magalhães, Pérola Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    Proteases hydrolyze the peptide bonds of proteins into peptides and amino acids, being found in all living organisms, and are essential for cell growth and differentiation. Proteolytic enzymes have potential application in a wide number of industrial processes such as food, laundry detergent and pharmaceutical. Proteases from microbial sources have dominated applications in industrial sectors. Fungal proteases are used for hydrolyzing protein and other components of soy beans and wheat in soy sauce production. Proteases can be produced in large quantities in a short time by established methods of fermentation. The parameters such as variation in C/N ratio, presence of some sugars, besides several other physical factors are important in the development of fermentation process. Proteases of fungal origin can be produced cost effectively, have an advantage faster production, the ease with which the enzymes can be modified and mycelium can be easily removed by filtration. The production of proteases has been carried out using submerged fermentation, but conditions in solid state fermentation lead to several potential advantages for the production of fungal enzymes. This review focuses on the production of fungal proteases, their distribution, structural-functional aspects, physical and chemical parameters, and the use of these enzymes in industrial applications. PMID:26273247

  8. A biotechnology perspective of fungal proteases.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Paula Monteiro; Bittencourt, Mona Lisa de Assis; Caprara, Carolina Canielles; de Freitas, Marcela; de Almeida, Renata Paula Coppini; Silveira, Dâmaris; Fonseca, Yris Maria; Ferreira Filho, Edivaldo Ximenes; Pessoa Junior, Adalberto; Magalhães, Pérola Oliveira

    2015-06-01

    Proteases hydrolyze the peptide bonds of proteins into peptides and amino acids, being found in all living organisms, and are essential for cell growth and differentiation. Proteolytic enzymes have potential application in a wide number of industrial processes such as food, laundry detergent and pharmaceutical. Proteases from microbial sources have dominated applications in industrial sectors. Fungal proteases are used for hydrolyzing protein and other components of soy beans and wheat in soy sauce production. Proteases can be produced in large quantities in a short time by established methods of fermentation. The parameters such as variation in C/N ratio, presence of some sugars, besides several other physical factors are important in the development of fermentation process. Proteases of fungal origin can be produced cost effectively, have an advantage faster production, the ease with which the enzymes can be modified and mycelium can be easily removed by filtration. The production of proteases has been carried out using submerged fermentation, but conditions in solid state fermentation lead to several potential advantages for the production of fungal enzymes. This review focuses on the production of fungal proteases, their distribution, structural-functional aspects, physical and chemical parameters, and the use of these enzymes in industrial applications. PMID:26273247

  9. Isolation of the human PC6 gene encoding the putative host protease for HIV-1 gp160 processing in CD4+ T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, L; Wolf, J; Pichuantes, S; Duke, R; Franzusoff, A

    1996-01-01

    Production of infectious HIV-1 virions is dependent on the processing of envelope glycoprotein gp160 by a host cell protease. The protease in human CD4+ T lymphocytes has not been unequivocally identified, yet members of the family of mammalian subtilisin-like protein convertases (SPCs), which are soluble or membrane-bound proteases of the secretory pathway, best fulfill the criteria. These proteases are required for proprotein maturation and cleave at paired basic amino acid motifs in numerous cellular and viral glycoprotein precursors, both in vivo and in vitro. To identify the gp160 processing protease, we have used reverse transcription-PCR and Northern blot analyses to ascertain the spectrum of SPC proteases in human CD4+ T cells. We have cloned novel members of the SPC family, known as the human PC6 genes. Two isoforms of the hPC6 protease are expressed in human T cells, hPC6A and the larger hPC6B. The patterns of SPC gene expression in human T cells has been compared with the furin-defective LoVo cell line, both of which are competent in the production of infectious HIV virions. This comparison led to the conclusion that the hPC6 gene products are the most likely candidates for the host cell protease responsible for HIV-1 gp160 processing in human CD4+ T cells. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:8755538

  10. An Alkaline Protease from Bacillus pumilus MP 27: Functional Analysis of Its Binding Model toward Its Applications As Detergent Additive

    PubMed Central

    Baweja, Mehak; Tiwari, Rameshwar; Singh, Puneet K.; Nain, Lata; Shukla, Pratyoosh

    2016-01-01

    A proteolytic strain of Bacillus pumilus MP 27 was isolated from water samples of Southern ocean produced alkaline protease. Since protease production need expensive ingredients, an economically viable process was developed by using low cost carbon source, wheat straw, supplemented with peptone. This protease was active within temperature ranges 10–70°C at pH 9. This process was optimized by response surface methodology using a Box Bekhman design by Design Expert 7.0 software that increased the protease activity to 776.5 U/ml. Moreover, the enzyme was extremely stable at a broad range of temperature and pH retaining 69% of its activity at 50°C and 70% at pH 11. The enzyme exhibited excellent compatibility with surfactants and commercial detergents, showing 87% stability with triton X-100 and 100% stability with Tide commercial detergent. The results of the wash performance analysis demonstrated considerably good de-staining at 50 and 4°C with low supplementation (109 U/ml). Molecular modeling of the protease revealed the presence of serine proteases, subtilase family and serine active site and further docking supported the association of catalytic site with the various substrates. Certainly, such protease can be considered as a good detergent additive in detergent industry with a possibility to remove the stains effectively even in a cold wash. PMID:27536284

  11. An Alkaline Protease from Bacillus pumilus MP 27: Functional Analysis of Its Binding Model toward Its Applications As Detergent Additive.

    PubMed

    Baweja, Mehak; Tiwari, Rameshwar; Singh, Puneet K; Nain, Lata; Shukla, Pratyoosh

    2016-01-01

    A proteolytic strain of Bacillus pumilus MP 27 was isolated from water samples of Southern ocean produced alkaline protease. Since protease production need expensive ingredients, an economically viable process was developed by using low cost carbon source, wheat straw, supplemented with peptone. This protease was active within temperature ranges 10-70°C at pH 9. This process was optimized by response surface methodology using a Box Bekhman design by Design Expert 7.0 software that increased the protease activity to 776.5 U/ml. Moreover, the enzyme was extremely stable at a broad range of temperature and pH retaining 69% of its activity at 50°C and 70% at pH 11. The enzyme exhibited excellent compatibility with surfactants and commercial detergents, showing 87% stability with triton X-100 and 100% stability with Tide commercial detergent. The results of the wash performance analysis demonstrated considerably good de-staining at 50 and 4°C with low supplementation (109 U/ml). Molecular modeling of the protease revealed the presence of serine proteases, subtilase family and serine active site and further docking supported the association of catalytic site with the various substrates. Certainly, such protease can be considered as a good detergent additive in detergent industry with a possibility to remove the stains effectively even in a cold wash. PMID:27536284

  12. Isolation and characterization of two serine proteases from metagenomic libraries of the Gobi and Death Valley deserts.

    PubMed

    Neveu, Julie; Regeard, Christophe; DuBow, Michael S

    2011-08-01

    The screening of environmental DNA metagenome libraries for functional activities can provide an important source of new molecules and enzymes. In this study, we identified 17 potential protease-producing clones from two metagenomic libraries derived from samples of surface sand from the Gobi and Death Valley deserts. Two of the proteases, DV1 and M30, were purified and biochemically examined. These two proteases displayed a molecular mass of 41.5 kDa and 45.7 kDa, respectively, on SDS polyacrylamide gels. Alignments with known protease sequences showed less than 55% amino acid sequence identity. These two serine proteases appear to belong to the subtilisin (S8A) family and displayed several unique biochemical properties. Protease DV1 had an optimum pH of 8 and an optimal activity at 55°C, while protease M30 had an optimum pH >11 and optimal activity at 40°C. The properties of these enzymes make them potentially useful for biotechnological applications and again demonstrate that metagenomic approaches can be useful, especially when coupled with the study of novel environments such as deserts. PMID:21494865

  13. HIV-1 Protease: Structure, Dynamics and Inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Louis, John M.; Ishima, R.; Torchia, D.A.; Weber, Irene T.

    2008-06-03

    The HIV-1 protease is synthesized as part of a large Gag-Pol precursor protein. It is responsible for its own release from the precursor and the processing of the Gag and Gag-Pol polyproteins into the mature structural and functional proteins required for virus maturation. Because of its indispensable role, the mature HIV-1 protease dimer has proven to be a successful target for the development of antiviral agents. In the last 5 years, a major emphasis in protease research has been to improve inhibitor design and treatment regimens.

  14. Cysteine protease antigens cleave CD123, the α subunit of murine IL-3 receptor, on basophils and suppress IL-3-mediated basophil expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Nishikado, Hideto; Fujimura, Tsutomu; Taka, Hikari; Mineki, Reiko; Ogawa, Hideoki; Okumura, Ko; Takai, Toshiro

    2015-05-01

    Th2 type immune responses are essential for protective immunity against parasites and play crucial roles in allergic disorders. Helminth parasites secrete a variety of proteases for their infectious cycles including for host entry, tissue migration, and suppression of host immune effector cell function. Furthermore, a number of pathogen-derived antigens, as well as allergens such as papain, belong to the family of cysteine proteases. Although the link between protease activity and Th2 type immunity is well documented, the mechanisms by which proteases regulate host immune responses are largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the cysteine proteases papain and bromelain selectively cleave the α subunit of the IL-3 receptor (IL-3Rα/CD123) on the surface of murine basophils. The decrease in CD123 expression on the cell surface, and the degradation of the extracellular domain of recombinant CD123 were dependent on the protease activity of papain and bromelain. Pre-treatment of murine basophils with papain resulted in inhibition of IL-3-IL-3R signaling and suppressed IL-3- but not thymic stromal lymphopoietin-induced expansion of basophils in vitro. Our unexpected findings illuminate a novel mechanism for the regulation of basophil functions by protease antigens. Because IL-3 plays pivotal roles in the activation and proliferation of basophils and in protective immunity against helminth parasites, pathogen-derived proteases might contribute to the pathogenesis of infections by regulating IL-3-mediated functions in basophils. - Highlights: • We identified the murine IL3R as a novel target of papain-family cysteine proteases. • Papain-family cysteine proteases cleaved IL3Rα/CD123 on murine basophils. • Papain suppressed IL3- but not TSLP-induced expansion of murine basophils. • The inactivation of IL3R might be a strategy for pathogens to suppress host immunity.

  15. Design of a Selective Substrate and Activity Based Probe for Human Neutrophil Serine Protease 4.

    PubMed

    Kasperkiewicz, Paulina; Poreba, Marcin; Snipas, Scott J; Lin, S Jack; Kirchhofer, Daniel; Salvesen, Guy S; Drag, Marcin

    2015-01-01

    Human neutrophil serine protease 4 (NSP4), also known as PRSS57, is a recently discovered fourth member of the neutrophil serine proteases family. Although its biological function is not precisely defined, it is suggested to regulate neutrophil response and innate immune reactions. To create optimal substrates and visualization probes for NSP4 that distinguish it from other NSPs we have employed a Hybrid Combinatorial Substrate Library approach that utilizes natural and unnatural amino acids to explore protease subsite preferences. Library results were validated by synthesizing individual substrates, leading to the identification of an optimal substrate peptide. This substrate was converted to a covalent diphenyl phosphonate probe with an embedded biotin tag. This probe demonstrated high inhibitory activity and stringent specificity and may be suitable for visualizing NSP4 in the background of other NSPs. PMID:26172376

  16. Characterization of the ATP-Dependent Lon-Like Protease in Methanobrevibacter smithii

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Jihua; Yan, Jianfang

    2016-01-01

    The Lon protease is highly evolutionarily conserved. However, little is known about Lon in the context of gut microbial communities. A gene encoding a Lon-like protease (Lon-like-Ms) was identified and characterized from Methanobrevibacter smithii, the predominant archaeon in the human gut ecosystem. Phylogenetic and sequence analyses showed that Lon-like-Ms and its homologs are newly identified members of the Lon family. A recombinant form of the enzyme was purified by affinity chromatography, and its catalytic properties were examined. Recombinant Lon-like-Ms exhibited ATPase activity and cleavage activity toward fluorogenic peptides and casein. The peptidase activity of Lon-like-Ms relied strictly on Mg2+ (or other divalent cations) and ATP. These results highlight a new type of Lon-like protease that differs from its bacterial counterpart. PMID:27239160

  17. Structural and functional characterization of cleavage and inactivation of human serine protease inhibitors by the bacterial SPATE protease EspPα from enterohemorrhagic E. coli.

    PubMed

    Weiss, André; Joerss, Hanna; Brockmeyer, Jens

    2014-01-01

    EspPα and EspI are serine protease autotransporters found in enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli. They both belong to the SPATE autotransporter family and are believed to contribute to pathogenicity via proteolytic cleavage and inactivation of different key host proteins during infection. Here, we describe the specific cleavage and functional inactivation of serine protease inhibitors (serpins) by EspPα and compare this activity with the related SPATE EspI. Serpins are structurally related proteins that regulate vital protease cascades, such as blood coagulation and inflammatory host response. For the rapid determination of serpin cleavage sites, we applied direct MALDI-TOF-MS or ESI-FTMS analysis of coincubations of serpins and SPATE proteases and confirmed observed cleavage positions using in-gel-digest of SDS-PAGE-separated degradation products. Activities of both serpin and SPATE protease were assessed in a newly developed photometrical assay using chromogenic peptide substrates. EspPα cleaved the serpins α1-protease inhibitor (α1-PI), α1-antichymotrypsin, angiotensinogen, and α2-antiplasmin. Serpin cleavage led to loss of inhibitory function as demonstrated for α1-PI while EspPα activity was not affected. Notably, EspPα showed pronounced specificity and cleaved procoagulatory serpins such as α2-antiplasmin while the anticoagulatory antithrombin III was not affected. Together with recently published research, this underlines the interference of EspPα with hemostasis or inflammatory responses during infection, while the observed interaction of EspI with serpins is likely to be not physiologically relevant. EspPα-mediated serpin cleavage occurred always in flexible loops, indicating that this structural motif might be required for substrate recognition. PMID:25347319

  18. Structural and Functional Characterization of Cleavage and Inactivation of Human Serine Protease Inhibitors by the Bacterial SPATE Protease EspPα from Enterohemorrhagic E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, André; Joerss, Hanna; Brockmeyer, Jens

    2014-01-01

    EspPα and EspI are serine protease autotransporters found in enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli. They both belong to the SPATE autotransporter family and are believed to contribute to pathogenicity via proteolytic cleavage and inactivation of different key host proteins during infection. Here, we describe the specific cleavage and functional inactivation of serine protease inhibitors (serpins) by EspPα and compare this activity with the related SPATE EspI. Serpins are structurally related proteins that regulate vital protease cascades, such as blood coagulation and inflammatory host response. For the rapid determination of serpin cleavage sites, we applied direct MALDI-TOF-MS or ESI-FTMS analysis of coincubations of serpins and SPATE proteases and confirmed observed cleavage positions using in-gel-digest of SDS-PAGE-separated degradation products. Activities of both serpin and SPATE protease were assessed in a newly developed photometrical assay using chromogenic peptide substrates. EspPα cleaved the serpins α1-protease inhibitor (α1-PI), α1-antichymotrypsin, angiotensinogen, and α2-antiplasmin. Serpin cleavage led to loss of inhibitory function as demonstrated for α1-PI while EspPα activity was not affected. Notably, EspPα showed pronounced specificity and cleaved procoagulatory serpins such as α2-antiplasmin while the anticoagulatory antithrombin III was not affected. Together with recently published research, this underlines the interference of EspPα with hemostasis or inflammatory responses during infection, while the observed interaction of EspI with serpins is likely to be not physiologically relevant. EspPα-mediated serpin cleavage occurred always in flexible loops, indicating that this structural motif might be required for substrate recognition. PMID:25347319

  19. Protease and protease inhibitory activity in pregnant and postpartum involuting uterus

    SciTech Connect

    Milwidsky, A.; Beller, U.; Palti, Z.; Mayer, M.

    1982-08-15

    The presence of two distinct proteolytic activities in the rat uterus was confirmed with /sup 14/C-labeled globin used as a sensitive protein substrate and following release of label into the trichloroacetic acid-soluble supernatant fraction. Protease I is a cytoplasmic acid protease while protease II is associated with the pellet fraction, can be extracted by 0.6 M sodium chloride, and is active at pH 7.0. Protease I activity is low during pregnancy and markedly increases at term achieving maximal activity at day 3 post partum with a subsequent decline to preterm activity values. Lactation did not affect the uterine protease I activity. Protease II activity is not significantly different during pregnancy, at term, and post partum. The presence of an inhibitor of protease I was suggested by a decrease in enzyme activity with an increased cytosolic protein concentration. The inhibitor also lessened bovine trypsin activity but had no effect on protease II. Although its inhibitory potency on trypsin fluctuated during the various uterine physiologic stages, these changes appeared to be statistically insignificant. Human uterine samples were also found to contain the two protease activities with similar changes in protease I post partum. It is suggested that, both in the rat and in man, uterine involution post partum is associated with a marked increase in activity of acid cytosolic protease, while a particulate neutral protease and a soluble inhibitor of trypsin, which are also present in uterine cells, do not appear to play a significant role in the dissolution of uterine tissues after parturition.

  20. Substrate specificity of rhomboid intramembrane proteases is governed by helix-breaking residues in the substrate transmembrane domain.

    PubMed

    Urban, Sinisa; Freeman, Matthew

    2003-06-01

    Rhomboid intramembrane proteases initiate cell signaling during Drosophila development and Providencia bacterial growth by cleaving transmembrane ligand precursors. We have determined how specificity is achieved: Drosophila Rhomboid-1 is a site-specific protease that recognizes its substrate Spitz by a small region of the Spitz transmembrane domain (TMD). This substrate motif is necessary and sufficient for cleavage and is composed of residues known to disrupt helices. Rhomboids from diverse organisms including bacteria and vertebrates recognize the same substrate motif, suggesting that they use a universal targeting strategy. We used this information to search for other rhomboid substrates and identified a family of adhesion proteins from the human parasite Toxoplasma gondii, the TMDs of which were efficient substrates for rhomboid proteases. Intramembrane cleavage of these proteins is required for host cell invasion. These results provide an explanation of how rhomboid proteases achieve specificity, and allow some rhomboid substrates to be predicted from sequence information. PMID:12820957

  1. Lung protease/anti-protease network and modulation of mucus production and surfactant activity.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Verdugo, Ignacio; Descamps, Delphyne; Chignard, Michel; Touqui, Lhousseine; Sallenave, Jean-Michel

    2010-11-01

    Lung epithelium guarantees gas-exchange (performed in the alveoli) and protects from external insults (pathogens, pollutants…) present within inhaled air. Both functions are facilitated by secretions lining airway surface liquid, mucus (in the upper airways) and pulmonary surfactant (in the alveoli). Mucins, the main glycoproteins present within the mucus, are responsible for its rheologic properties and participate in lung defense mechanisms. In parallel, lung collectins are pattern recognition molecules present in pulmonary surfactant that also modulate lung defense. During chronic airways diseases, excessive protease activity can promote mucus hypersecretion and degradation of lung collectins and therefore contribute to the pathophysiology of these diseases. Importantly, secretion of local and systemic anti-proteases might be crucial to equilibrate the protease/anti-protease unbalance and therefore preserve the function of lung host defense compounds and airway surface liquid homeostasis. In this review we will present information relative to proteases able to modulate mucin production and lung collectin integrity, two important compounds of innate immune defense. One strategy to preserve physiological mucus production and collectin integrity during chronic airways diseases might be the over-expression of local 'alarm' anti-proteases such as SLPI and elafin. Interestingly, a cross-talk between lung collectins and anti-protease activity has recently been described, implicating the presence within the lung of a complex network between proteases, anti-proteases and pattern recognition molecules, which aims to keep or restore homeostasis in resting or inflamed lungs. PMID:20493919

  2. Biochemical characterization of a detergent-stable serine alkaline protease from Caldicoprobacter guelmensis.

    PubMed

    Bouacem, Khelifa; Bouanane-Darenfed, Amel; Laribi-Habchi, Hassiba; Elhoul, Mouna Ben; Hmida-Sayari, Aïda; Hacene, Hocine; Ollivier, Bernard; Fardeau, Marie-Laure; Jaouadi, Bassem; Bejar, Samir

    2015-11-01

    Caldicoprobacter guelmensis isolated from the hydrothermal hot spring of Guelma (Algeria) produced high amounts of extracellular thermostable serine alkaline protease (called SAPCG) (23,000U/mL). The latter was purified by ammonium sulphate precipitation, UNO Q-6 FPLC and Zorbex PSM 300 HPLC, and submitted to biochemical characterization assays. Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS) analysis revealed that the purified enzyme was a monomer, with a molecular mass of 55,824.19Da. The 19 N-terminal residue sequence of SAPCG showed high homology with those of microbial proteases. The enzyme was completely inhibited by phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride (PMSF) and diiodopropyl fluorophosphates (DFP), which suggested its belonging to the serine protease family. It showed optimum protease activity at pH 10 and 70°C with casein as a substrate. The thermoactivity and thermostability of SAPCG were enhanced in the presence of 2mM Ca(2+). Its half-life times at 80 and 90°C were 180 and 60min, respectively. Interestingly, the SAPCG protease exhibited significant compatibility with iSiS and Persil, and wash performance analysis revealed that it could remove blood-stains effectively. Overall, SAPCG displayed a number of attractive properties that make it a promising candidate for future applications as an additive in detergent formulations. PMID:26261082

  3. Activation of Bacteroides fragilis toxin by a novel bacterial protease contributes to anaerobic sepsis in mice.

    PubMed

    Choi, Vivian M; Herrou, Julien; Hecht, Aaron L; Teoh, Wei Ping; Turner, Jerrold R; Crosson, Sean; Bubeck Wardenburg, Juliane

    2016-05-01

    Bacteroides fragilis is the leading cause of anaerobic bacteremia and sepsis. Enterotoxigenic strains that produce B. fragilis toxin (BFT, fragilysin) contribute to colitis and intestinal malignancy, yet are also isolated in bloodstream infection. It is not known whether these strains harbor unique genetic determinants that confer virulence in extra-intestinal disease. We demonstrate that BFT contributes to sepsis in mice, and we identify a B. fragilis protease called fragipain (Fpn) that is required for the endogenous activation of BFT through the removal of its auto-inhibitory prodomain. Structural analysis of Fpn reveals a His-Cys catalytic dyad that is characteristic of C11-family cysteine proteases that are conserved in multiple pathogenic Bacteroides spp. and Clostridium spp. Fpn-deficient, enterotoxigenic B. fragilis has an attenuated ability to induce sepsis in mice; however, Fpn is dispensable in B. fragilis colitis, wherein host proteases mediate BFT activation. Our findings define a role for B. fragilis enterotoxin and its activating protease in the pathogenesis of bloodstream infection, which indicates a greater complexity of cellular targeting and activity of BFT than previously recognized. The expression of fpn by both toxigenic and nontoxigenic strains suggests that this protease may contribute to anaerobic sepsis in ways that extend beyond its role in toxin activation. It could thus potentially serve as a target for disease modification. PMID:27089515

  4. Comprehensive Analysis of a Vibrio parahaemolyticus Strain Extracellular Serine Protease VpSP37

    PubMed Central

    Bennici, Carmelo; Quatrini, Paola; Catania, Valentina; Mazzola, Salvatore; Ghersi, Giulio; Cuttitta, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Proteases play an important role in the field of tissue dissociation combined with regenerative medicine. During the years new sources of proteolytic enzymes have been studied including proteases from different marine organisms both eukaryotic and prokaryotic. Herein we have purified a secreted component of an isolate of Vibrio parahaemolyticus, with electrophoretic mobilities corresponding to 36 kDa, belonging to the serine proteases family. Sequencing of the N-terminus enabled the in silico identification of the whole primary structure consisting of 345 amino acid residues with a calculated molecular mass of 37.4 KDa. The purified enzyme, named VpSP37, contains a Serine protease domain between residues 35 and 276 and a canonical Trypsin/Chimotrypsin 3D structure. Functional assays were performed to evaluate protease activity of purified enzyme. Additionally the performance of VpSP37 was evaluated in tissue dissociations experiments and the use of such enzyme as a component of enzyme blend for tissue dissociation procedures is strongly recommended. PMID:26162075

  5. Quantitative Correlation of Conformational Binding Enthalpy with Substrate Specificity of Serine Proteases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Members of the same protease family show different substrate specificity, even if they share identical folds, depending on the physiological processes they are part of. Here, we investigate the key factors for subpocket and global specificity of factor Xa, elastase, and granzyme B which despite all being serine proteases and sharing the chymotrypsin-fold show distinct substrate specificity profiles. We determined subpocket interaction potentials with GRID for static X-ray structures and an in silico generated ensemble of conformations. Subpocket interaction potentials determined for static X-ray structures turned out to be insufficient to explain serine protease specificity for all subpockets. Therefore, we generated conformational ensembles using molecular dynamics simulations. We identified representative binding site conformations using distance-based hierarchical agglomerative clustering and determined subpocket interaction potentials for each representative conformation of the binding site. Considering the differences in subpocket interaction potentials for these representative conformations as well as their abundance allowed us to quantitatively explain subpocket specificity for the nonprime side for all three example proteases on a molecular level. The methods to identify key regions determining subpocket specificity introduced in this study are directly applicable to other serine proteases, and the results provide starting points for new strategies in rational drug design. PMID:26709959

  6. MALT1 Protease Activity Controls the Expression of Inflammatory Genes in Keratinocytes upon Zymosan Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Anja; Grondona, Paula; Maier, Tabea; Brändle, Marc; Schönfeld, Caroline; Jäger, Günter; Kosnopfel, Corinna; Eberle, Franziska C; Schittek, Birgit; Schulze-Osthoff, Klaus; Yazdi, Amir S; Hailfinger, Stephan

    2016-04-01

    The protease activity of the paracaspase mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma translocation gene 1 (MALT1) plays an important role in antigen receptor-mediated lymphocyte activation by controlling the activity of the transcription factor nuclear factor-κB and is thus essential for the expression of inflammatory target genes. MALT1 is not only present in cells of the hematopoietic lineage, but is ubiquitously expressed. Here we report that stimulation with zymosan or Staphylococcus aureus induced MALT1 protease activity in human primary keratinocytes. Inhibition of the Src family of kinases or novel protein kinase C isoforms as well as silencing of CARMA2 or BCL10 interfered with activation of MALT1 protease. Silencing or inhibition of MALT1 protease strongly decreased the expression of important inflammatory genes such as TNFα, IL-17C, CXCL8 and HBD-2. MALT1-inhibited cells were unable to mount an antimicrobial response upon zymosan stimulation or phorbolester/ionomycin treatment, demonstrating a central role of MALT1 protease activity in keratinocyte immunity and suggesting MALT1 as a potential target in inflammatory skin diseases. PMID:26767426

  7. Structure, Mechanism and Inhibition of γ-Secretase and Presenilin-Like Proteases

    PubMed Central

    Wolfe, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    Presenilin is the catalytic component of γ-secretase, a complex aspartyl protease and a founding member of intramembrane-cleaving proteases. γ-Secretase is involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease and a top target for therapeutic intervention. However, the protease complex processes a variety of transmembrane substrates, including the Notch receptor, raising concerns about toxicity. Nevertheless, γ-secretase inhibitors and modulators have been identified that allow Notch processing and signalling to continue, and promising compounds are entering clinical trials. Molecular and biochemical studies offer a model for how this protease hydrolyzes transmembrane domains in the confines of the lipid bilayer. Progress has also been made toward structure elucidation of presenilin and the γ-secretase complex by electron microscopy as well as by studying cysteine-mutant presenilins. The signal peptide peptidase (SPP) family of proteases are distantly related to presenilins. However, the SPPs work as single polypeptides without the need for cofactors and otherwise appear to be simple model systems for presenilin in the γ-secretase complex. SPP biology, structure, and inhibition will also be discussed. PMID:20482315

  8. Structural Evidence for Regulation and Specificity of Flaviviral Proteases and Evolution of the Flaviviridae Fold

    SciTech Connect

    Aleshin,A.; Shiryaev, S.; Strongin, A.; Liddington, R.

    2007-01-01

    Pathogenic members of the flavivirus family, including West Nile Virus (WNV) and Dengue Virus (DV), are growing global threats for which there are no specific treatments. The two-component flaviviral enzyme NS2B-NS3 cleaves the viral polyprotein precursor within the host cell, a process that is required for viral replication. Here, we report the crystal structure of WNV NS2B-NS3pro both in a substrate-free form and in complex with the trypsin inhibitor aprotinin/BPTI. We show that aprotinin binds in a substrate-mimetic fashion in which the productive conformation of the protease is fully formed, providing evidence for an 'induced fit' mechanism of catalysis and allowing us to rationalize the distinct substrate specificities of WNV and DV proteases. We also show that the NS2B cofactor of WNV can adopt two very distinct conformations and that this is likely to be a general feature of flaviviral proteases, providing further opportunities for regulation. Finally, by comparing the flaviviral proteases with the more distantly related Hepatitis C virus, we provide insights into the evolution of the Flaviviridae fold. Our work should expedite the design of protease inhibitors to treat a range of flaviviral infections.

  9. Synthesis of amino heterocycle aspartyl protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Chambers, Rachel K; Khan, Tanweer A; Olsen, David B; Sleebs, Brad E

    2016-06-14

    Aspartyl proteases are important pharmacological targets. Historically aspartyl proteases have been commonly targeted with transition state derived peptidomimetics. The strategy to develop aspartyl protease inhibitors has undertaken a dramatic paradigm shift in the last 10 years. The pharmaceutical industry in 2005 disclosed several scaffolds or "head groups" that prompted the field to move beyond peptidomimetic derived inhibitors. Since the discovery of the first amino heterocycle aspartyl protease inhibitor, the amino hydantoin, industry and academia have positioned themselves for a foothold on the new molecular space, designing a variety of related "head groups". Both the design and synthetic efforts involved in constructing these scaffolds are varied and complex. Here we highlight the synthetic strategies used to access these amino heterocycle scaffolds. PMID:27143279

  10. A radiometric assay for HIV-1 protease

    SciTech Connect

    Hyland, L.J.; Dayton, B.D.; Moore, M.L.; Shu, A.Y.; Heys, J.R.; Meek, T.D. )

    1990-08-01

    A rapid, high-throughput radiometric assay for HIV-1 protease has been developed using ion-exchange chromatography performed in 96-well filtration plates. The assay monitors the activity of the HIV-1 protease on the radiolabeled form of a heptapeptide substrate, (tyrosyl-3,5-3H)Ac-Ser-Gln-Asn-Tyr-Pro-Val-Val-NH2, which is based on the p17-p24 cleavage site found in the viral polyprotein substrate Pr55gag. Specific cleavage of this uncharged heptapeptide substrate by HIV-1 protease releases the anionic product (tyrosyl-3,5-3H)Ac-Ser-Gln-Asn-Tyr, which is retained upon minicolumns of the anion-exchange resin AG1-X8. Protease activity is determined from the recovery of this radiolabeled product following elution with formic acid. This facile and highly sensitive assay may be utilized for steady-state kinetic analysis of the protease, for measurements of enzyme activity during its purification, and as a routine assay for the evaluation of protease inhibitors from natural product or synthetic sources.

  11. Neutral serine proteases of neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Kettritz, Ralph

    2016-09-01

    Neutrophil serine proteases (NSPs) exercise tissue-degrading and microbial-killing effects. The spectrum of NSP-mediated functions grows continuously, not least because of methodological progress. Sensitive and specific FRET substrates were developed to study the proteolytic activity of each NSP member. Advanced biochemical methods are beginning to characterize common and specific NSP substrates. The resulting novel information indicates that NSPs contribute not only to genuine inflammatory neutrophil functions but also to autoimmunity, metabolic conditions, and cancer. Tight regulatory mechanisms control the proteolytic potential of NSPs. However, not all NSP functions depend on their enzymatic activity. Proteinase-3 (PR3) is somewhat unique among the NSPs for PR3 functions as an autoantigen. Patients with small-vessel vasculitis develop autoantibodies to PR3 that bind their target antigens on the neutrophil surface and trigger neutrophil activation. These activated cells subsequently contribute to vascular necrosis with life-threatening multiorgan failure. This article discusses various aspects of NSP biology and highlights translational aspects with strong clinical implications. PMID:27558338

  12. Modulation of the LDL receptor and LRP levels by HIV protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tran, Huan; Robinson, Susan; Mikhailenko, Irina; Strickland, Dudley K

    2003-10-01

    Inhibitors of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 protease have proven to be effective antiretroviral drugs. However, patients receiving these drugs develop serious metabolic abnormalities, including hypercholesterolemia. The objective of the present study was to identify mechanisms by which HIV protease inhibitors increase plasma cholesterol levels. We hypothesized that HIV protease inhibitors may affect gene regulation of certain LDL receptor (LDLR) family members, thereby altering the catabolism of cholesterol-containing lipoproteins. In this present study we investigated the effect of several HIV protease inhibitors (ABT-378, Amprenavir, Indinavir, Nelfinavir, Ritonavir, and Saquinavir) on mRNA, protein, and functional levels of LDLR family members. Our results demonstrate that one of these drugs, Nelfinavir, significantly decreases LDLR and LDLR-related protein (LRP) mRNA and protein levels, resulting in the reduced functional activity of these two receptors. Nelfinavir exerts its effect by reducing levels of active SREBP1 in the nucleus. The finding that Nelfinavir reduces the levels of two key receptors (LRP and LDLR) involved in lipoprotein catabolism and maintenance of vessel wall integrity identifies a mechanism that causes hypercholesterolemia complications in HIV patients treated with this drug and raises concerns about the atherogenic nature of Nelfinavir. PMID:12837856

  13. Carbohydrate protease conjugates: Stabilized proteases for peptide synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Wartchow, C.A.; Wang, Peng; Bednarski, M.D.; Callstrom, M.R. |

    1995-12-31

    The synthesis of oligopeptides using stable carbohydrate protease conjugates (CPCs) was examined in acetonitrile solvent systems. CPC[{alpha}-chymotrypsin] was used for the preparation of peptides containing histidine, phenylalanine, tryptophan in the P{sub 1} position in 60-93% yield. The CPC[{alpha}-chymotrypsin]-catalyzed synthesis of octamer Z-Gly-Gly-Phe-Gly-Gly-Phe-Gly-Gly-OEt from Z-Gly-Gly-Phe-Gly-Gly-Phe-OMe was achieved in 71% yield demonstrating that synthesis peptides containing both hydrophylic and hydrophobic amino acids. The P{sub 2} specificity of papain for aromatic residues was utilized for the 2 + 3 coupling of Z-Tyr-Gly-OMe to H{sub 2}N-Gly-Phe-Leu-OH to generate the leucine enkephalin derivative in 79% yield. Although papain is nonspecific for the hydrolysis of N-benzyloxycarbonyl amino acid methyl esters in aqueous solution, the rates of synthesis for these derivitives with nucleophile leucine tert-butyl ester differed by nearly 2 orders of magnitude. CPC[thermolysin] was used to prepare the aspartame precursor Z-Asp-Phe-OMe in 90% yield. The increased stability of CPCs prepared from periodate-modified poly(2-methacryl- amido-2-deoxy-D-glucose), poly(2-methacrylamido-2-deoxy-D-galactose), and poly(5-methacryl-amido-5-deoxy-D-ribose), carbohydrate materials designed to increase the aldehyde concentration in aqueous solution, suggests that the stability of CPCs is directly related to the aldehyde concentration of the carbohydrate material. Periodate oxidation of poly(2-methacrylamido-2-deoxy-D-glucose) followed by covalent attachment to {alpha}-chymotrypsin gave a CPC with catalytic activity in potassium phosphate buffer at 90{degrees}C for 2 h. 1 fig., 1 tab., 40 refs.

  14. Protease inhibitors targeting coronavirus and filovirus entry.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yanchen; Vedantham, Punitha; Lu, Kai; Agudelo, Juliet; Carrion, Ricardo; Nunneley, Jerritt W; Barnard, Dale; Pöhlmann, Stefan; McKerrow, James H; Renslo, Adam R; Simmons, Graham

    2015-04-01

    In order to gain entry into cells, diverse viruses, including Ebola virus, SARS-coronavirus and the emerging MERS-coronavirus, depend on activation of their envelope glycoproteins by host cell proteases. The respective enzymes are thus excellent targets for antiviral intervention. In cell culture, activation of Ebola virus, as well as SARS- and MERS-coronavirus can be accomplished by the endosomal cysteine proteases, cathepsin L (CTSL) and cathepsin B (CTSB). In addition, SARS- and MERS-coronavirus can use serine proteases localized at the cell surface, for their activation. However, it is currently unclear which protease(s) facilitate viral spread in the infected host. We report here that the cysteine protease inhibitor K11777, ((2S)-N-[(1E,3S)-1-(benzenesulfonyl)-5-phenylpent-1-en-3-yl]-2-{[(E)-4-methylpiperazine-1-carbonyl]amino}-3-phenylpropanamide) and closely-related vinylsulfones act as broad-spectrum antivirals by targeting cathepsin-mediated cell entry. K11777 is already in advanced stages of development for a number of parasitic diseases, such as Chagas disease, and has proven to be safe and effective in a range of animal models. K11777 inhibition of SARS-CoV and Ebola virus entry was observed in the sub-nanomolar range. In order to assess whether cysteine or serine proteases promote viral spread in the host, we compared the antiviral activity of an optimized K11777-derivative with that of camostat, an inhibitor of TMPRSS2 and related serine proteases. Employing a pathogenic animal model of SARS-CoV infection, we demonstrated that viral spread and pathogenesis of SARS-CoV is driven by serine rather than cysteine proteases and can be effectively prevented by camostat. Camostat has been clinically used to treat chronic pancreatitis, and thus represents an exciting potential therapeutic for respiratory coronavirus infections. Our results indicate that camostat, or similar serine protease inhibitors, might be an effective option for treatment of SARS and

  15. From Protease to Decarboxylase: THE MOLECULAR METAMORPHOSIS OF PHOSPHATIDYLSERINE DECARBOXYLASE.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae-Yeon; Duraisingh, Manoj T; Marti, Matthias; Ben Mamoun, Choukri; Voelker, Dennis R

    2015-04-24

    Phosphatidylserine decarboxylase (PSDs) play a central role in the synthesis of phosphatidylethanolamine in numerous species of prokaryotes and eukaryotes. PSDs are unusual decarboxylase containing a pyruvoyl prosthetic group within the active site. The covalently attached pyruvoyl moiety is formed in a concerted reaction when the PSD proenzyme undergoes an endoproteolytic cleavage into a large β-subunit, and a smaller α-subunit, which harbors the prosthetic group at its N terminus. The mechanism of PSD proenzyme cleavage has long been unclear. Using a coupled in vitro transcription/translation system with the soluble Plasmodium knowlesi enzyme (PkPSD), we demonstrate that the post-translational processing is inhibited by the serine protease inhibitor, phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride. Comparison of PSD sequences across multiple phyla reveals a uniquely conserved aspartic acid within an FFXRX6RX12PXD motif, two uniquely conserved histidine residues within a PXXYHXXHXP motif, and a uniquely conserved serine residue within a GS(S/T) motif, suggesting that PSDs belong to the D-H-S serine protease family. The function of the conserved D-H-S residues was probed using site-directed mutagenesis of PkPSD. The results from these mutagenesis experiments reveal that Asp-139, His-198, and Ser-308 are all essential for endoproteolytic processing of PkPSD, which occurs in cis. In addition, within the GS(S/T) motif found in all PSDs, the Gly-307 residue is also essential, but the Ser/Thr-309 is non-essential. These results define the mechanism whereby PSDs begin their biochemical existence as proteases that execute one autoendoproteolytic cleavage reaction to give rise to a mature PSD harboring a pyruvoyl prosthetic group. PMID:25724650

  16. New soluble ATP-dependent protease, Ti, in Escherichia coli that is distinct from protease La

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, C.H.; Hwang, B.J.; Park, W.J.; Goldberg, A.L.

    1987-05-01

    E. coli must contain other ATP-requiring proteolytic systems in addition to protease La (the lon gene product). A new ATP-dependent protease was purified from lon cells which lack protease La, as shown by immuno-blotting. This enzyme hydrolyzes (TH)casein to acid-soluble products in the presence of ATP (or dATP) and MgS . Nonhydrolyzable ATP analogs, other nucleoside triphosphates and AMP can not replace ATP. Therefore, ATP hydrolysis appears necessary for proteolysis. The enzyme appears to be a serine protease, but also contains essential thiol residues. Unlike protease La, it is not inhibited by vanadate, heparin, or the defective R9 subunit of protease La. On gel filtration, this enzyme has an apparent Mr of 340,000 and is comprised of two components of 190,000D and 130,000D, which can be separated by phosphocellulose chromatography. By themselves, these components do not show ATP-dependent proteolysis, but when mixed, full activity is restored. These finding and similar ones of Maurizi and Gottesman indicate that E. coli contain two soluble ATP-dependent proteases, which function by different mechanisms. This new enzyme may contribute to the rapid breakdown of abnormal polypeptides or of normal proteins during starvation. The authors propose to name it protease Ti.

  17. Escherichia coli contains a soluble ATP-dependent protease (Ti) distinct from protease La

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, B.J.; Park, W.J.; Chung, C.H.; Goldberg, A.L.

    1987-08-01

    The energy requirement for protein breakdown in Escherichia coli has generally been attributed to the ATP-dependence of protease La, the lon gene product. The authors have partially purified another ATP-dependent protease from lon/sup -/ cells that lack protease La (as shown by immunoblotting). This enzyme hydrolyzes (/sup 3/H)methyl-casein to acid-soluble products in the presence of ATP and Mg/sup 2 +/. ATP hydrolysis appears necessary for proteolytic activity. Since this enzyme is inhibited by diisopropyl fluorophosphate, it appears to be a serine protease, but it also contains essential thiol residues. They propose to name this enzyme protease Ti. It differs from protease La in nucleotide specificity, inhibitor sensitivity, and subunit composition. On gel filtration, protease Ti has an apparent molecular weight of 370,000. It can be fractionated by phosphocellulose chromatography or by DEAE chromatography into two components with apparent molecular weights of 260,000 and 140,000. When separated, they do not show preteolytic activity. One of these components, by itself, has ATPase activity and is labile in the absence of ATP. The other contains the diisopropyl fluorophosphate-sensitive proteolytic site. These results and the similar findings of Katayama-Fujimura et al. indicate that E. coli contains two ATP-hydrolyzing proteases, which differ in many biochemical features and probably in their physiological roles.

  18. A Novel Bioluminescent Protease Assay Using Engineered Firefly Luciferase

    PubMed Central

    Wigdal, Susan S; Anderson, Jessica L; Vidugiris, Gediminas J; Shultz, John; Wood, Keith V; Fan, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Proteases play important roles in a variety of disease processes. Understanding their biological functions underpins the efforts of drug discovery. We have developed a bioluminescent protease assay using a circularly permuted form of firefly luciferase, wherein the native enzyme termini were joined by a peptide containing a protease site of interest. Protease cleavage of these mutant luciferases greatly activates the enzyme, typically over 100 fold. The mutant luciferase substrates are easily generated by molecular cloning and cell-free translation reactions and thus the protease substrates do not need to be chemically synthesized or purchased. The assay has broad applicability using a variety of proteases and their cognate sites and can sensitively detect protease activity. In this report we further demonstrate its utility for the evaluation of protease recognition sequence specificity and subsequent establishment of an optimized assay for the identification and characterization of protease inhibitors using high throughput screening. PMID:20161840

  19. Extracellular acid proteases from Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed Central

    Lindberg, R A; Rhodes, W G; Eirich, L D; Drucker, H

    1982-01-01

    Three electrophoretically distinct acid proteases appear in culture filtrates of Neurospora crassa. Like the previously investigated alkaline and neutral proteases, these enzymes require induction by an exogenous protein. But in contrast to alkaline and neutral proteases, which are synthesized and secreted in response to limitation of any one of three nutrilites (carbon, nitrogen or sulfur), extracellular elaboration of the acidic proteases is more specifically a function of the missing nutrilite. AcP, a pepstatin-inhibitable enzyme similar to other fungal carboxyl proteases, was secreted in large amounts when protein was the sole source of sulfur. Only trace amounts were secreted when nitrogen was the limiting nutrilite, and it was undetectable under carbon limitation. M-1, a chelator-sensitive protease, was secreted when nitrogen or carbon was limiting. M-2, also chelator sensitive, was present only when nitrogen or sulfur was limiting. The evidence presented suggests that the differential regulation of the acidic proteases with respect to nutrilite deprivation may not occur at the level of transcription. AcP and M-2 were partially purified from nitrogen-derepressed cultures by ultrafiltration, cation-exchange chromatography, and gel filtration. AcP has a molecular weight of 66,000, is stable from pH 3.0 to 6.0, and is optimally active toward bovine serum albumin at pH 4.0. M-2 has a molecular weight of 18,000, is stable from pH 1.6 to 5.5, and has optimal activity at pH 4.5. Images PMID:6210687

  20. Extracellular acid proteases from Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Lindberg, R A; Rhodes, W G; Eirich, L D; Drucker, H

    1982-06-01

    Three electrophoretically distinct acid proteases appear in culture filtrates of Neurospora crassa. Like the previously investigated alkaline and neutral proteases, these enzymes require induction by an exogenous protein. But in contrast to alkaline and neutral proteases, which are synthesized and secreted in response to limitation of any one of three nutrilites (carbon, nitrogen or sulfur), extracellular elaboration of the acidic proteases is more specifically a function of the missing nutrilite. AcP, a pepstatin-inhibitable enzyme similar to other fungal carboxyl proteases, was secreted in large amounts when protein was the sole source of sulfur. Only trace amounts were secreted when nitrogen was the limiting nutrilite, and it was undetectable under carbon limitation. M-1, a chelator-sensitive protease, was secreted when nitrogen or carbon was limiting. M-2, also chelator sensitive, was present only when nitrogen or sulfur was limiting. The evidence presented suggests that the differential regulation of the acidic proteases with respect to nutrilite deprivation may not occur at the level of transcription. AcP and M-2 were partially purified from nitrogen-derepressed cultures by ultrafiltration, cation-exchange chromatography, and gel filtration. AcP has a molecular weight of 66,000, is stable from pH 3.0 to 6.0, and is optimally active toward bovine serum albumin at pH 4.0. M-2 has a molecular weight of 18,000, is stable from pH 1.6 to 5.5, and has optimal activity at pH 4.5. PMID:6210687

  1. Extracellular acid proteases from Neurospora crassa

    SciTech Connect

    Lindberg, R.A.; Rhodes, W.G.; Eirich, L.D.; Drucker, H.

    1982-06-01

    Three electrophoretically distinct acid proteases appear in culture filtrates of Neurospora crassa. Like the previously investigated alkaline and neutral proteases, these enzymes require induction by an exogenous protein. But in contrast to alkaline and neutral proteases, which are synthesized and secreted in response to limitation of any one of three nutrilites (carbon, nitrogen or sulfur), extracellular elaboration of the acidic proteases is more specifically a function of the missing nutrilite. AcP, a pepstatin-inhibitable enzyme similar to other fungal carboxyl proteases, was secreted in large amounts when protein was the sole source of sulfur. Only trace amounts were secreted when nitrogen was the limiting nutrilite, and it was undetectable under carbon limitation. M-1, a chelator-sensitive protease, was secreted when nitrogen or carbon was limiting. M-2, also chelator sensitive, was present only when nitrogen or sulfur was limiting. The evidence presented suggests that the differential regulation of the acidic proteases with respect to nutrilite deprivation may not occur at the level of transcription. AcP and M-2 were partially purified from nitrogen-derepressed cultures by ultrafiltration, cation-exchange chromatography, and gel filtration. AcP has a molecular weight of 66,000, is stable from pH 3.0 to 6.0, and is optimally active toward bovine serum albumin at pH 4.0. M-2 has a molecular weight of 18,000, is stable from pH 1.6 to 5.5, and has optimal activity at pH 4.5.

  2. Cysteine protease antigens cleave CD123, the α subunit of murine IL-3 receptor, on basophils and suppress IL-3-mediated basophil expansion.

    PubMed

    Nishikado, Hideto; Fujimura, Tsutomu; Taka, Hikari; Mineki, Reiko; Ogawa, Hideoki; Okumura, Ko; Takai, Toshiro

    2015-05-01

    Th2 type immune responses are essential for protective immunity against parasites and play crucial roles in allergic disorders. Helminth parasites secrete a variety of proteases for their infectious cycles including for host entry, tissue migration, and suppression of host immune effector cell function. Furthermore, a number of pathogen-derived antigens, as well as allergens such as papain, belong to the family of cysteine proteases. Although the link between protease activity and Th2 type immunity is well documented, the mechanisms by which proteases regulate host immune responses are largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the cysteine proteases papain and bromelain selectively cleave the α subunit of the IL-3 receptor (IL-3Rα/CD123) on the surface of murine basophils. The decrease in CD123 expression on the cell surface, and the degradation of the extracellular domain of recombinant CD123 were dependent on the protease activity of papain and bromelain. Pre-treatment of murine basophils with papain resulted in inhibition of IL-3-IL-3R signaling and suppressed IL-3- but not thymic stromal lymphopoietin-induced expansion of basophils in vitro. Our unexpected findings illuminate a novel mechanism for the regulation of basophil functions by protease antigens. Because IL-3 plays pivotal roles in the activation and proliferation of basophils and in protective immunity against helminth parasites, pathogen-derived proteases might contribute to the pathogenesis of infections by regulating IL-3-mediated functions in basophils. PMID:25778870

  3. Identification of covalent active site inhibitors of dengue virus protease

    PubMed Central

    Koh-Stenta, Xiaoying; Joy, Joma; Wang, Si Fang; Kwek, Perlyn Zekui; Wee, John Liang Kuan; Wan, Kah Fei; Gayen, Shovanlal; Chen, Angela Shuyi; Kang, CongBao; Lee, May Ann; Poulsen, Anders; Vasudevan, Subhash G; Hill, Jeffrey; Nacro, Kassoum

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) protease is an attractive target for drug development; however, no compounds have reached clinical development to date. In this study, we utilized a potent West Nile virus protease inhibitor of the pyrazole ester derivative class as a chemical starting point for DENV protease drug development. Compound potency and selectivity for DENV protease were improved through structure-guided small molecule optimization, and protease-inhibitor binding interactions were validated biophysically using nuclear magnetic resonance. Our work strongly suggests that this class of compounds inhibits flavivirus protease through targeted covalent modification of active site serine, contrary to an allosteric binding mechanism as previously described. PMID:26677315

  4. Venomous protease of aphid soldier for colony defense.

    PubMed

    Kutsukake, Mayako; Shibao, Harunobu; Nikoh, Naruo; Morioka, Mizue; Tamura, Tomohiro; Hoshino, Tamotsu; Ohgiya, Satoru; Fukatsu, Takema

    2004-08-01

    In social aphids, morphological, behavioral, and physiological differences between soldiers and normal insects are attributed to differences in gene expression between them, because they are clonal offspring parthenogenetically produced by the same mothers. By using cDNA subtraction, we identified a soldier-specific cysteine protease of the family cathepsin B in a social aphid, Tuberaphis styraci, with a second-instar soldier caste. The cathepsin B gene was specifically expressed in soldiers and first-instar nymphs destined to be soldiers. The cathepsin B protein was preferentially produced in soldiers and showed a protease activity typical of cathepsin B. The cathepsin B mRNA and protein were localized in the midgut of soldiers. For colony defense, soldiers attack enemies with their stylet, which causes paralysis and death of the victims. Notably, after soldiers attacked moth larvae, the cathepsin B protein was detected from the paralyzed larvae. Injection of purified recombinant cathepsin B protein certainly killed the recipient moth larvae. From these results, we concluded that the cathepsin B protein is a major component of the aphid venom produced by soldiers of T. styraci. Soldier-specific expression of the cathepsin B gene was found in other social aphids of the genus Tuberaphis. The soldier-specific cathepsin B gene showed an accelerated molecular evolution probably caused by the action of positive selection, which had been also known from venomous proteins of other animals. PMID:15277678

  5. Function of site-2 proteases in bacteria and bacterial pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Jessica S.; Glickman, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    Site-2 Proteases (S2Ps) are a class of intramembrane metalloproteases named after the founding member of this protein family, human S2P, which cleaves Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Proteins which control cholesterol and fatty acid biosynthesis. S2Ps are widely distributed in bacteria and participate in diverse pathways that control such diverse functions as membrane integrity, sporulation, lipid biosynthesis, pheromone production, virulence, and others. The most common signaling mechanism mediated by S2Ps is the coupled degradation of transmembrane anti-Sigma factors to activate ECF Sigma factor regulons. However, additional signaling mechanisms continue to emerge as more prokaryotic S2Ps are characterized, including direct proteolysis of membrane embedded transcription factors and proteolysis of non-transcriptional membrane proteins or membrane protein remnants. In this review we seek to comprehensively review the functions of S2Ps in bacteria and bacterial pathogens and attempt to organize these proteases into conceptual groups that will spur further study. PMID:24099002

  6. Production of alkaline protease from Cellulosimicrobium cellulans

    PubMed Central

    Ferracini-Santos, Luciana; Sato, Hélia H

    2009-01-01

    Cellulosimicrobium cellulans is one of the microorganisms that produces a wide variety of yeast cell wall-degrading enzymes, β-1,3-glucanase, protease and chitinase. Dried cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were used as carbon and nitrogen source for cell growth and protease production. The medium components KH2PO4, KOH and dried yeast cells showed a significant effect (p<0.05) on the factorial fractional design. A second design was prepared using two factors: pH and percentage of dried yeast cells. The results showed that the culture medium for the maximum production of protease was 0.2 g/l of MgSO4.7H2O, 2.0 g/l of (NH4)2SO4 and 8% of dried yeast cells in 0.15M phosphate buffer at pH 8.0. The maximum alkaline protease production was 7.0 ± 0.27 U/ml over the center point. Crude protease showed best activity at 50ºC and pH 7.0-8.0, and was stable at 50ºC. PMID:24031317

  7. A novel detergent-stable solvent-tolerant serine thiol alkaline protease from Streptomyces koyangensis TN650.

    PubMed

    Ben Elhoul, Mouna; Zaraî Jaouadi, Nadia; Rekik, Hatem; Bejar, Wacim; Boulkour Touioui, Souraya; Hmidi, Maher; Badis, Abdelmalek; Bejar, Samir; Jaouadi, Bassem

    2015-08-01

    An alkaline proteinase (STAP) was produced from strain TN650 isolated from a Tunisian off-shore oil field and assigned as Streptomyces koyangensis strain TN650 based on physiological and biochemical properties and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS) analysis revealed that the purified enzyme was a monomer with a molecular mass of 45125.17-Da. The enzyme had an NH2-terminal sequence of TQSNPPSWGLDRIDQTTAFTKACSIKY, thus sharing high homology with those of Streptomyces proteases. The results showed that this protease was completely inhibited by phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride (PMSF), diiodopropyl fluorophosphates (DFP), and partially inhibited by 5,5-dithio-bis-(2-nitro benzoic acid) (DTNB), which strongly suggested its belonging to the serine thiol protease family. Using casein as a substrate, the optimum pH and temperature values for protease activity were pH 10 and 70 °C, respectively. The protease was stable at pH 7-10 and 30-60 °C for 24 h. STAP exhibited high catalytic efficiency, significant detergent stability, and elevated organic solvent resistance compared to the SG-XIV proteases from S. griseus and KERAB from Streptomyces sp. AB1. The stap gene encoding STAP was isolated, and its DNA sequence was determined. These properties make STAP a potential candidate for future application in detergent formulations and non-aqueous peptide biocatalysis. PMID:26056991

  8. The Occurrence of Type S1A Serine Proteases in Sponge and Jellyfish

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rojas, Ana; Doolittle, Russell F.

    2003-01-01

    Although serine proteases are found in all kinds of cellular organisms and many viruses, the classic "chymotrypsin family" (Group S1A by th e 1998 Barrett nomenclature) has an unusual phylogenetic distribution , being especially common in animals, entirely absent from plants and protists, and rare among fungi. The distribution in Bacteria is larg ely restricted to the genus Streptomyces, although a few isolated occ urrences in other bacteria have been reported. The family may be enti rely absent from Archaea. Although more than a thousand sequences have been reported for enzymes of this type from animals, none of them ha ve been from early diverging phyla like Porifera or Cnidaria, We now report the existence of Group SlA serine proteases in a sponge (phylu m Porifera) and a jellyfish (phylum Cnidaria), making it safe to conc lude that all animal groups possess these enzymes.

  9. Peptidyl cyclopropenones: Reversible inhibitors, irreversible inhibitors, or substrates of cysteine proteases?

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Meital; Bretler, Uriel; Albeck, Amnon

    2013-01-01

    Peptidyl cyclopropenones were previously introduced as selective cysteine protease reversible inhibitors. In the present study we synthesized one such peptidyl cyclopropenone and investigated its interaction with papain, a prototype cysteine protease. A set of kinetics, biochemical, HPLC, MS, and 13C-NMR experiments revealed that the peptidyl cyclopropenone was an irreversible inhibitor of the enzyme, alkylating the catalytic cysteine. In parallel, this cyclopropenone also behaved as an alternative substrate of the enzyme, providing a product that was tentatively suggested to be either a spiroepoxy cyclopropanone or a gamma-lactone. Thus, a single family of compounds exhibits an unusual variety of activities, being reversible inhibitors, irreversible inhibitors and alternative substrates towards enzymes of the same family. PMID:23553793

  10. Design and synthesis of new substrates of HtrA2 protease.

    PubMed

    Wysocka, Magdalena; Wojtysiak, Anna; Okońska, Małgorzata; Gruba, Natalia; Jarząb, Mirosław; Wenta, Tomasz; Lipińska, Barbara; Grzywa, Reneta; Sieńczyk, Marcin; Rolka, Krzysztof; Lesner, Adam

    2015-04-15

    HtrA2 belongs to the HtrA (high temperature requirement A) family of ATP-independent serine proteases. The primary function of HtrA2 includes maintaining the mitochondria homeostasis, cell death (by apoptosis, necrosis, or anoikis), and contribution to the cell signaling. Several recent reports have shown involvement of HtrA2 in development of cancer and neurodegenerative disorders. Here, we describe the profiling of HtrA2 protease substrate specificity via the combinatorial chemistry approach that led to the selection of novel intramolecularly quenched substrates. For all synthesized compounds, the highest HtrA2-mediated hydrolysis efficiency and selectivity among tested HtrA family members was observed for ABZ-Ile-Met-Thr-Abu-Tyr-Met-Phe-Tyr(3-NO2)-NH2, which displayed a specificity constant kcat/KM value of 14,535M(-1)s(-1). PMID:25640585

  11. Inhibition of kallikrein-related peptidases by the serine protease inhibitor of Kazal-type 6.

    PubMed

    Kantyka, Tomasz; Fischer, Jan; Wu, Zhihong; Declercq, Wim; Reiss, Karina; Schröder, Jens-Michael; Meyer-Hoffert, Ulf

    2011-06-01

    Kallikrein-related peptidases (KLKs) are a group of serine proteases, expressed in several tissues. Their activity is regulated by inhibitors including members of the serine protease of Kazal-type (SPINK) family. Recently, we discovered that SPINK6 is expressed in human skin and inhibits KLK5, KLK7, KLK14 but not KLK8. In this study we tested whether SPINK6 inhibits other members of the KLK family and caspase-14. Using chromogenic substrates, SPINK6 exhibited inhibitory activity against KLK12 and KLK13 with K(i) around 1nM, KLK4 with K(i)=27.3nM, KLK6 with K(i)=140nM, caspase-14 with a K(i) approximating 1μM and no activity against KLK1, KLK3 and KLK11. Taken together, SPINK6 is a potent inhibitor of distinct KLKs members. PMID:21439340

  12. Highly stable glycosylated serine protease from the medicinal plant Euphorbia milii.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Subhash C; Pande, Monu; Jagannadham, M V

    2006-07-01

    A serine protease, named as "Milin" was purified to homogeneity from the latex of Euphorbia milii, a medicinal plant of Euphorbiaceae family. The molecular mass (SDS-PAGE), optimum pH and temperature of the enzyme were 51kDa, pH 8.0 and 60 degrees C, respectively. Milin retains full proteolytic activity over a wide range of pH (5.5-12) and temperature (up to 65 degrees C) with casein and azoalbumin as substrates. The activity of milin is inhibited by serine proteases inhibitors like PMSF, APMSF and DFP, but not by any other protease inhibitors such as E-64 and PCMB. Like the other serine proteases from the genus Euphorbia, the activity of milin was not inhibited by the proteinaceous inhibitor soyabean trypsin inhibitor (SBTI) even at very high concentrations that is naturally present in plants. The specific extinction coefficient (epsilon(280 nm)(1%)), molar extinction coefficient (a(m)) and isoelectric point of the enzyme were found to be 29, 152,500 M(-1) cm(-1) and pH 7.2, respectively. The enzyme is a glycoprotein with detectable carbohydrate moiety (7-8%) in its constitution, which is essential for the activity. The numbers of tryptophan, tyrosine and cysteine residues in the sequence of milin were estimated chemically and are 23, 14 and 14, respectively. Of the 14-cysteine residues, 12 constituted 6-disulfide linkages while two are free cysteines. The N-terminal sequence (first 12 amino acid residues) was determined and does not match with any sequence of known plant serine proteases. Perturbation studies by temperature, pH and chaotropes of the enzyme also reveal its high stability as seen by CD, fluorescence and proteolytic activity. Thus, this serine protease may have potential applications in food industry. PMID:16839575

  13. Identification and characterization of a cathepsin L-like cysteine protease from Gnathostoma spinigerum.

    PubMed

    Kongkerd, Natthawan; Uparanukraw, Pichart; Morakote, Nimit; Sajid, Mohammed; McKerrow, James H

    2008-08-01

    Gnathostoma spinigerum is a causative agent of human gnathostomiasis, a common parasitic disease involving skin and visceral organs, especially the central nervous system. In this study, we identified a cDNA encoding a cathepsin L-like cysteine protease (GsCL1) from the lambdaZAP cDNA library of G. spinigerum advanced third-stage larva (aL3) and characterized the biochemical properties of the recombinant enzyme. The cloned cDNA of 1484bp encoded 398 amino acids which contained a typical signal peptide sequence (23 amino acids), a pro-domain (156 amino acids), and a mature domain (219 amino acids) with an approximate molecular weight of 24kDa. The deduced amino acid sequence of GsCL1 gene showed 53-64% identity to cathepsin L proteases of various organisms including a cathepsin L family member (cpl-1) of Caenorhabditis elegans. Recombinant proGsCL1 expressed in Pichia pastoris showed typical biochemical characteristics of cysteine proteases. The expressed enzyme displayed optimal protease activity toward Z-Phe-Arg-AMC substrate at pH 6.0 but not toward Z-Arg-Arg-AMC. The activity was sensitive to cysteine protease inhibitors E-64 and K11777. The preference for large hydrophilic and aromatic residues in the P2 position (I, L, F, W, U, V) was typical of cathepsin L proteases. Mouse anti-GST-proGsCL1 serum showed reactivity with 35-, 38- and 45-kDa proteins in the aL3 extracts. These proteins were shown to localize inside the intestinal cells of aL3. PMID:18554733

  14. Serine protease inhibitors of parasitic helminths.

    PubMed

    Molehin, Adebayo J; Gobert, Geoffrey N; McManus, Donald P

    2012-05-01

    Serine protease inhibitors (serpins) are a superfamily of structurally conserved proteins that inhibit serine proteases and play key physiological roles in numerous biological systems such as blood coagulation, complement activation and inflammation. A number of serpins have now been identified in parasitic helminths with putative involvement in immune regulation and in parasite survival through interference with the host immune response. This review describes the serpins and smapins (small serine protease inhibitors) that have been identified in Ascaris spp., Brugia malayi, Ancylostoma caninum Onchocerca volvulus, Haemonchus contortus, Trichinella spiralis, Trichostrongylus vitrinus, Anisakis simplex, Trichuris suis, Schistosoma spp., Clonorchis sinensis, Paragonimus westermani and Echinococcus spp. and discusses their possible biological functions, including roles in host-parasite interplay and their evolutionary relationships. PMID:22310379

  15. Dataset of cocoa aspartic protease cleavage sites.

    PubMed

    Janek, Katharina; Niewienda, Agathe; Wöstemeyer, Johannes; Voigt, Jürgen

    2016-09-01

    The data provide information in support of the research article, "The cleavage specificity of the aspartic protease of cocoa beans involved in the generation of the cocoa-specific aroma precursors" (Janek et al., 2016) [1]. Three different protein substrates were partially digested with the aspartic protease isolated from cocoa beans and commercial pepsin, respectively. The obtained peptide fragments were analyzed by matrix-assisted laser-desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS/MS) and identified using the MASCOT server. The N- and C-terminal ends of the peptide fragments were used to identify the corresponding in-vitro cleavage sites by comparison with the amino acid sequences of the substrate proteins. The same procedure was applied to identify the cleavage sites used by the cocoa aspartic protease during cocoa fermentation starting from the published amino acid sequences of oligopeptides isolated from fermented cocoa beans. PMID:27508221

  16. Coagulation, Protease Activated Receptors and Viral Myocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Antoniak, Silvio; Mackman, Nigel

    2013-01-01

    The coagulation protease cascade plays an essential role in hemostasis. In addition, a clot contributes to host defense by limiting the spread of pathogens. Coagulation proteases induce intracellular signaling by cleavage of cell surface receptors called protease-activated receptors (PARs). These receptors allow cells to sense changes in the extracellular environment, such as infection. Viruses activate the coagulation cascade by inducing tissue factor expression and by disrupting the endothelium. Virus infection of the heart can cause myocarditis, cardiac remodeling and heart failure. Recent studies using a mouse model have shown that tissue factor, thrombin and PAR-1 signaling all positively regulate the innate immune during viral myocarditis. In contrast, PAR-2 signaling was found to inhibit interferon-β expression and the innate immune response. These observations suggest that anticoagulants may impair the innate immune response to viral infection and that inhibition of PAR-2 may be a new target to reduce viral myocarditis.. PMID:24203054

  17. Chromosomal mapping of cell death proteases CPP32, MCH2, and MCH3

    SciTech Connect

    Bullrich, F.; Fernandes-Alnemri, T.; Litwack, G.

    1996-09-01

    Apoptosis may involve a specialized proteolytic cascade catalyzed by interleukin-1{beta}-converting enzyme-like proteases. We have recently identified three new members of this family (CPP32, MCH2, MCH3) and shown that they play an important role in promoting cell death. Here we report the chromosomal mapping of CPP32 to 4q34, MCH2 to 4q25, and MCH3 to 10q25. 16 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  18. RC1339/APRc from Rickettsia conorii is a novel aspartic protease with properties of retropepsin-like enzymes.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Rui; Huesgen, Pitter; Riley, Sean P; Wlodawer, Alexander; Faro, Carlos; Overall, Christopher M; Martinez, Juan J; Simões, Isaura

    2014-08-01

    Members of the species Rickettsia are obligate intracellular, gram-negative, arthropod-borne pathogens of humans and other mammals. The life-threatening character of diseases caused by many Rickettsia species and the lack of reliable protective vaccine against rickettsioses strengthens the importance of identifying new protein factors for the potential development of innovative therapeutic tools. Herein, we report the identification and characterization of a novel membrane-embedded retropepsin-like homologue, highly conserved in 55 Rickettsia genomes. Using R. conorii gene homologue RC1339 as our working model, we demonstrate that, despite the low overall sequence similarity to retropepsins, the gene product of rc1339 APRc (for Aspartic Protease from Rickettsia conorii) is an active enzyme with features highly reminiscent of this family of aspartic proteases, such as autolytic activity impaired by mutation of the catalytic aspartate, accumulation in the dimeric form, optimal activity at pH 6, and inhibition by specific HIV-1 protease inhibitors. Moreover, specificity preferences determined by a high-throughput profiling approach confirmed common preferences between this novel rickettsial enzyme and other aspartic proteases, both retropepsins and pepsin-like. This is the first report on a retropepsin-like protease in gram-negative intracellular bacteria such as Rickettsia, contributing to the analysis of the evolutionary relationships between the two types of aspartic proteases. Additionally, we have also shown that APRc is transcribed and translated in R. conorii and R. rickettsii and is integrated into the outer membrane of both species. Finally, we demonstrated that APRc is sufficient to catalyze the in vitro processing of two conserved high molecular weight autotransporter adhesin/invasion proteins, Sca5/OmpB and Sca0/OmpA, thereby suggesting the participation of this enzyme in a relevant proteolytic pathway in rickettsial life-cycle. As a novel bona fide member

  19. RC1339/APRc from Rickettsia conorii Is a Novel Aspartic Protease with Properties of Retropepsin-Like Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Rui; Huesgen, Pitter; Riley, Sean P.; Wlodawer, Alexander; Faro, Carlos; Overall, Christopher M.; Martinez, Juan J.; Simões, Isaura

    2014-01-01

    Members of the species Rickettsia are obligate intracellular, gram-negative, arthropod-borne pathogens of humans and other mammals. The life-threatening character of diseases caused by many Rickettsia species and the lack of reliable protective vaccine against rickettsioses strengthens the importance of identifying new protein factors for the potential development of innovative therapeutic tools. Herein, we report the identification and characterization of a novel membrane-embedded retropepsin-like homologue, highly conserved in 55 Rickettsia genomes. Using R. conorii gene homologue RC1339 as our working model, we demonstrate that, despite the low overall sequence similarity to retropepsins, the gene product of rc1339 APRc (for Aspartic Protease from Rickettsia conorii) is an active enzyme with features highly reminiscent of this family of aspartic proteases, such as autolytic activity impaired by mutation of the catalytic aspartate, accumulation in the dimeric form, optimal activity at pH 6, and inhibition by specific HIV-1 protease inhibitors. Moreover, specificity preferences determined by a high-throughput profiling approach confirmed common preferences between this novel rickettsial enzyme and other aspartic proteases, both retropepsins and pepsin-like. This is the first report on a retropepsin-like protease in gram-negative intracellular bacteria such as Rickettsia, contributing to the analysis of the evolutionary relationships between the two types of aspartic proteases. Additionally, we have also shown that APRc is transcribed and translated in R. conorii and R. rickettsii and is integrated into the outer membrane of both species. Finally, we demonstrated that APRc is sufficient to catalyze the in vitro processing of two conserved high molecular weight autotransporter adhesin/invasion proteins, Sca5/OmpB and Sca0/OmpA, thereby suggesting the participation of this enzyme in a relevant proteolytic pathway in rickettsial life-cycle. As a novel bona fide member

  20. Proteolytic Activation of the Essential Parasitophorous Vacuole Cysteine Protease SERA6 Accompanies Malaria Parasite Egress from Its Host Erythrocyte*

    PubMed Central

    Ruecker, Andrea; Shea, Michael; Hackett, Fiona; Suarez, Catherine; Hirst, Elizabeth M. A.; Milutinovic, Katarina; Withers-Martinez, Chrislaine; Blackman, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    The malaria parasite replicates within an intraerythrocytic parasitophorous vacuole (PV). The PV and host cell membranes eventually rupture, releasing merozoites in a process called egress. Certain inhibitors of serine and cysteine proteases block egress, indicating a crucial role for proteases. The Plasmodium falciparum genome encodes nine serine-repeat antigens (SERAs), each of which contains a central domain homologous to the papain-like (clan CA, family C1) protease family. SERA5 and SERA6 are indispensable in blood-stage parasites, but the function of neither is known. Here we show that SERA6 localizes to the PV where it is precisely cleaved just prior to egress by an essential serine protease called PfSUB1. Mutations that replace the predicted catalytic Cys of SERA6, or that block SERA6 processing by PfSUB1, could not be stably introduced into the parasite genomic sera6 locus, indicating that SERA6 is an essential enzyme and that processing is important for its function. We demonstrate that cleavage of SERA6 by PfSUB1 converts it to an active cysteine protease. Our observations reveal a proteolytic activation step in the malarial PV that may be required for release of the parasite from its host erythrocyte. PMID:22984267

  1. Subtilases: the superfamily of subtilisin-like serine proteases.

    PubMed Central

    Siezen, R. J.; Leunissen, J. A.

    1997-01-01

    Subtilases are members of the clan (or superfamily) of subtilisin-like serine proteases. Over 200 subtilases are presently known, more than 170 of which with their complete amino acid sequence. In this update of our previous overview (Siezen RJ, de Vos WM, Leunissen JAM, Dijkstra BW, 1991, Protein Eng 4:719-731), details of more than 100 new subtilases discovered in the past five years are summarized, and amino acid sequences of their catalytic domains are compared in a multiple sequence alignment. Based on sequence homology, a subdivision into six families is proposed. Highly conserved residues of the catalytic domain are identified, as are large or unusual deletions and insertions. Predictions have been updated for Ca(2+)-binding sites, disulfide bonds, and substrate specificity, based on both sequence alignment and three-dimensional homology modeling. PMID:9070434

  2. Enteroviral proteases: structure, host interactions and pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Laitinen, Olli H; Svedin, Emma; Kapell, Sebastian; Nurminen, Anssi; Hytönen, Vesa P; Flodström-Tullberg, Malin

    2016-07-01

    Enteroviruses are common human pathogens, and infections are particularly frequent in children. Severe infections can lead to a variety of diseases, including poliomyelitis, aseptic meningitis, myocarditis and neonatal sepsis. Enterovirus infections have also been implicated in asthmatic exacerbations and type 1 diabetes. The large disease spectrum of the closely related enteroviruses may be partially, but not fully, explained by differences in tissue tropism. The molecular mechanisms by which enteroviruses cause disease are poorly understood, but there is increasing evidence that the two enteroviral proteases, 2A(pro) and 3C(pro) , are important mediators of pathology. These proteases perform the post-translational proteolytic processing of the viral polyprotein, but they also cleave several host-cell proteins in order to promote the production of new virus particles, as well as to evade the cellular antiviral immune responses. Enterovirus-associated processing of cellular proteins may also contribute to pathology, as elegantly demonstrated by the 2A(pro) -mediated cleavage of dystrophin in cardiomyocytes contributing to Coxsackievirus-induced cardiomyopathy. It is likely that improved tools to identify targets for these proteases will reveal additional host protein substrates that can be linked to specific enterovirus-associated diseases. Here, we discuss the function of the enteroviral proteases in the virus replication cycle and review the current knowledge regarding how these proteases modulate the infected cell in order to favour virus replication, including ways to avoid detection by the immune system. We also highlight new possibilities for the identification of protease-specific cellular targets and thereby a way to discover novel mechanisms contributing to disease. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27145174

  3. German cockroach proteases and protease-activated receptor-2 regulate chemokine production and dendritic cell recruitment.

    PubMed

    Day, Scottie B; Ledford, John R; Zhou, Ping; Lewkowich, Ian P; Page, Kristen

    2012-01-01

    We recently showed that serine proteases in German cockroach (GC) feces (frass) decreased experimental asthma through the activation of protease-activated receptor (PAR)-2. Since dendritic cells (DCs) play an important role in the initiation of asthma, we queried the role of GC frass proteases in modulating CCL20 (chemokine C-C motif ligand 20) and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) production, factors that regulate pulmonary DCs. A single exposure to GC frass resulted in a rapid, but transient, increase in GM-CSF and a steady increase in CCL20 in the airways of mice. Instillation of protease-depleted GC frass or instillation of GC frass in PAR-2-deficient mice significantly decreased chemokine release. A specific PAR-2-activating peptide was also sufficient to induce CCL20 production. To directly assess the role of the GC frass protease in chemokine release, we enriched the protease from GC frass and confirmed that the protease was sufficient to induce both GM-CSF and CCL20 production in vivo. Primary airway epithelial cells produced both GM-CSF and CCL20 in a protease- and PAR-2-dependent manner. Finally, we show a decreased percentage of myeloid DCs in the lung following allergen exposure in PAR-2-deficient mice compared to wild-type mice. However, there was no difference in GC frass uptake. Our data indicate that, through the activation of PAR-2, allergen-derived proteases are sufficient to induce CCL20 and GM-CSF production in the airways. This leads to increased recruitment and/or differentiation of myeloid DC populations in the lungs and likely plays an important role in the initiation of allergic airway responses. PMID:21876326

  4. Detection of protease and protease activity using a single nanoscrescent SERS probe

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Gang L.; Ellman, Jonathan A.; Lee, Luke P.; Chen, Fanqing Frank

    2013-01-29

    This invention pertains to the in vitro detection of proteases using a single peptide-conjugate nanocrescent surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) probes with at least nanomolar sensitivity. The probe enables detection of proteolytic activity in extremely small volume and at low concentration. In certain embodiments the probes comprise an indicator for the detection of an active protease, where the indicator comprises a nanocrescent attached to a peptide, where said peptide comprises a recognition site for the protease and a Raman tag attached to the peptide.

  5. Structure of haptoglobin heavy chain and other serine protease homologs by comparative model building

    SciTech Connect

    Grer, J.

    1980-10-01

    Proteins often occur in families whose structure is closely similar, even though the proteins may come from widely different sources and have quite distinct functions. It would be useful to be able to construct the three-dimensional structure of these proteins from the known structure of one or more of them without having to solve the structure of each protein ab initio. We have been using comparative model building to derive the structure of an unusual protein of the trypsin-like serine protease family. We have recently extended this comparison to include other serine protease homologs for which a primary structure is available. To generate structures for the different members of the serine protease family, it is necessary to extract the common structural features of the molecule. Fortunately, three independently determined protein structures are available: schymotrypsin, trypsin, and elastase. These three structures were compared in detail and the structurally conserved regions in all three, mainly the BETA-sheet and the ..cap alpha..-helix, were identified. The variable portions occur in the loops on the surface of the molecule. By using these structures, the primary sequences of these three proteins were aligned. From this alignment, it is clear that sequence homology between the proteins occurs mainly in the structurally conserved regions of the molecule, while the variable portions show very little sequence homology.

  6. Cleavage Specificity Analysis of Six Type II Transmembrane Serine Proteases (TTSPs) Using PICS with Proteome-Derived Peptide Libraries

    PubMed Central

    Béliveau, François; Leduc, Richard; Overall, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Type II transmembrane serine proteases (TTSPs) are a family of cell membrane tethered serine proteases with unclear roles as their cleavage site specificities and substrate degradomes have not been fully elucidated. Indeed just 52 cleavage sites are annotated in MEROPS, the database of proteases, their substrates and inhibitors. Methodology/Principal Finding To profile the active site specificities of the TTSPs, we applied Proteomic Identification of protease Cleavage Sites (PICS). Human proteome-derived database searchable peptide libraries were assayed with six human TTSPs (matriptase, matriptase-2, matriptase-3, HAT, DESC and hepsin) to simultaneously determine sequence preferences on the N-terminal non-prime (P) and C-terminal prime (P’) sides of the scissile bond. Prime-side cleavage products were isolated following biotinylation and identified by tandem mass spectrometry. The corresponding non-prime side sequences were derived from human proteome databases using bioinformatics. Sequencing of 2,405 individual cleaved peptides allowed for the development of the family consensus protease cleavage site specificity revealing a strong specificity for arginine in the P1 position and surprisingly a lysine in P1′ position. TTSP cleavage between R↓K was confirmed using synthetic peptides. By parsing through known substrates and known structures of TTSP catalytic domains, and by modeling the remainder, structural explanations for this strong specificity were derived. Conclusions Degradomics analysis of 2,405 cleavage sites revealed a similar and characteristic TTSP family specificity at the P1 and P1′ positions for arginine and lysine in unfolded peptides. The prime side is important for cleavage specificity, thus making these proteases unusual within the tryptic-enzyme class that generally has overriding non-prime side specificity. PMID:25211023

  7. Isolation of a psychrotrophic Exiguobacterium sp. SKPB5 (MTCC 7803) and characterization of its alkaline protease.

    PubMed

    Kasana, Ramesh C; Yadav, Sudesh K

    2007-03-01

    Out of nine psychrotrophic bacterial strains isolated from cold environments of the Western Himalayas, SKPB5 was selected for protease purification and characterization because it had the largest zone of clearance on plate assay. On the basis of the phenotypic and biochemical characterization and 16S rRNA gene-sequencing studies, isolate was identified as Exiguobacterium sp. SKPB5. The protease was purified near to homogeneity with a purification fold of 7.1, and its molecular weight was determined to be 36 kDa. The enzyme exhibited maximum stability at 50 degrees C and an optimal pH of 8.0. Metal ions Mg2+, Ca2+, Zn2+, and Mn2+ enhanced the enzyme activity, whereas Cu2+ had no effect. Phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid did not show any effect on the activity of the enzyme, whereas a 20% increase in activity was observed when it was incubated in presence of reducing agents such as beta-mercaptoethanol and dithiothreitol. This suggests that the protease isolated from psychrotrophic Exiguobacterium sp. SKPB5 belongs to the cysteine family. The results highlight the relevance of unexplored microbes from cold environments of Western Himalayas for the isolation of protease enzymes active at wide range of temperature and pH. PMID:17294327

  8. Crystal structure of a novel cysteinless plant Kunitz-type protease inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Daiane; Macedo-Ribeiro, Sandra; Verissimo, Paula; Yoo Im, Sonia; Sampaio, Misako Uemura; Oliva, Maria Luiza Vilela . E-mail: olivaml.bioq@epm.br

    2007-09-07

    Bauhinia bauhinioides Cruzipain Inhibitor (BbCI) is a cysteine protease inhibitor highly homologous to plant Kunitz-type inhibitors. However, in contrast to classical Kunitz family inhibitors it lacks cysteine residues and therefore disulfide bridges. BbCI is also distinct in the ability to inactivate enzymes belonging to two different classes, cysteine and serine proteases. Besides inhibiting the cysteine protease cruzipain, BbCI also inhibits cathepsin L and the serine proteases HNE (human neutrophil elastase) and PPE (porcine pancreatic elastase). Monoclinic crystals of the recombinant inhibitor that diffract to 1.7 A resolution were obtained using hanging drop method by vapor diffusion at 18 {sup o}C. The refined structure shows the conservative {beta}-trefoil fold features of the Kunitz inhibitors. In BbCI, one of the two characteristic S-S bonds is replaced by the water-mediated interaction between Tyr125 and Gly132. In this work we explore the structural differences between Kunitz-type inhibitors and analyze the essential interactions that maintain the protein structural stability preserving its biological function.

  9. Active site conformational changes of prostasin provide a new mechanism of protease regulation by divalent cations

    SciTech Connect

    Spraggon, Glen; Hornsby, Michael; Shipway, Aaron; Tully, David C.; Bursulaya, Badry; Danahay, Henry; Harris, Jennifer L.; Lesley, Scott A.

    2010-01-12

    Prostasin or human channel-activating protease 1 has been reported to play a critical role in the regulation of extracellular sodium ion transport via its activation of the epithelial cell sodium channel. Here, the structure of the extracellular portion of the membrane associated serine protease has been solved to high resolution in complex with a nonselective d-FFR chloromethyl ketone inhibitor, in an apo form, in a form where the apo crystal has been soaked with the covalent inhibitor camostat and in complex with the protein inhibitor aprotinin. It was also crystallized in the presence of the divalent cation Ca{sup +2}. Comparison of the structures with each other and with other members of the trypsin-like serine protease family reveals unique structural features of prostasin and a large degree of conformational variation within specificity determining loops. Of particular interest is the S1 subsite loop which opens and closes in response to basic residues or divalent ions, directly binding Ca{sup +2} cations. This induced fit active site provides a new possible mode of regulation of trypsin-like proteases adapted in particular to extracellular regions with variable ionic concentrations such as the outer membrane layer of the epithelial cell.

  10. Catalytic Properties of Intramembrane Aspartyl Protease Substrate Hydrolysis Evaluated Using a FRET Peptide Cleavage Assay.

    PubMed

    Naing, Swe-Htet; Vukoti, Krishna M; Drury, Jason E; Johnson, Jennifer L; Kalyoncu, Sibel; Hill, Shannon E; Torres, Matthew P; Lieberman, Raquel L

    2015-09-18

    Chemical details of intramembrane proteolysis remain elusive despite its prevalence throughout biology. We developed a FRET peptide assay for the intramembrane aspartyl protease (IAP) from Methanoculleus marisnigri JR1 in combination with quantitative mass spectrometry cleavage site analysis. IAP can hydrolyze the angiotensinogen sequence, a substrate for the soluble aspartyl protease renin, at a predominant cut site, His-Thr. Turnover is slow (min(-1) × 10(-3)), affinity and Michaelis constant (Km) values are in the low micromolar range, and both catalytic rates and cleavage sites are the same in detergent as reconstituted into bicelles. Three well-established, IAP-directed inhibitors were directly confirmed as competitive, albeit with modest inhibitor constant (Ki) values. Partial deletion of the first transmembrane helix results in a biophysically similar but less active enzyme than full-length IAP, indicating a catalytic role. Our study demonstrates previously unappreciated similarities with soluble aspartyl proteases, provides new biochemical features of IAP and inhibitors, and offers tools to study other intramembrane protease family members in molecular detail. PMID:26118406

  11. Mirolase, a novel subtilisin-like serine protease from the periodontopathogen Tannerella forsythia

    PubMed Central

    Ksiazek, Miroslaw; Karim, Abdulkarim Y.; Bryzek, Danuta; Enghild, Jan J.; Thøgersen, Ida B.; Koziel, Joanna; Potempa, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The genome of Tannerella forsythia, an etiologic factor of chronic periodontitis, contains several genes encoding putative proteases. Here, we characterized a subtilisin-like serine protease of T. forsythia referred to as mirolase. Recombinant full-length latent promirolase (85 kDa, without its signal peptide) processed itself through sequential autoproteolytic cleavages into a mature enzyme of 40 kDa. Mirolase latency was driven by the N-terminal prodomain (NTP). In stark contrast to almost all known subtilases, the cleaved NTP remained non-covalently associated with mirolase, inhibiting its proteolytic, but not amidolytic, activity. Full activity was observed only after the NTP was gradually, and fully, degraded. Both activity and processing was absolutely dependent on calcium ions, which were also essential for enzyme stability. As a consequence, both serine protease inhibitors and calcium ions chelators inhibited mirolase activity. Activity assays using an array of chromogenic substrates revealed that mirolase specificity is driven not only by the substrate-binding subsite S1, but also by other subsites. Taken together mirolase is a calcium-dependent serine protease of the S8 family with the unique mechanism of activation that may contribute to T. forsythia pathogenicity by degradation of fibrinogen, hemoglobin and the antimicrobial peptide LL-37. PMID:25391881

  12. Small Molecule Pan-dengue and West Nile Virus NS3 Protease Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Cregar-Hernandez, Lynne; Jiao, Guan-Sheng; Johnson, Alan T.; Lehrer, Axel T.; Wong, Teri Ann S.; Margosiak, Stephen A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Dengue fever, dengue hemorrhagic fever, and dengue shock syndrome are caused by infections with any of the four serotypes of the dengue virus (DENV) and are an increasing global health risk. The related West Nile Virus (WNV) causes significant morbidity and mortality as well and continues to be a threat in endemic areas. Currently no FDA approved vaccines or therapeutics are available to prevent or treat any of these infections. Like the other members of the Flaviviridae family, DENV and WNV encode a protease (NS3) which is essential for viral replication and therefore is a promising target for developing therapies to treat dengue and West Nile infections. Methods Flaviviral protease inhibitors were identified and biologically characterized for mechanism of inhibition and DENV anti-viral activity. Results A guanidinylated 2, 5-dideoxystreptamine class of compounds was identified that competitively inhibited the NS3 protease from DENV(1-4) and WNV with IC50 values in the 1-70 μM range. Cytotoxicity was low; however, antiviral activity versus DENV-2 on VERO cells was not detectable. Conclusions This class of compounds is the first to demonstrate competitive pan-dengue and WNV NS3 protease inhibition and, given the sequence conservation among flavivirus NS3 proteins, suggests that developing a pan-dengue or possibly pan-flavivirus therapeutic is feasible. PMID:21566267

  13. Family Preservation & Family Functioning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCroskey, Jacquelyn; Meezan, William

    This book reports a study of the outcomes of home-based family preservation services for abusive and neglectful families in Los Angeles County. Using the Family Assessment Form, the research project evaluated services provided by two voluntary agencies, and focused on changes in family functioning between the opening and closing of services during…

  14. Transient ECM protease activity promotes synaptic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Magnowska, Marta; Gorkiewicz, Tomasz; Suska, Anna; Wawrzyniak, Marcin; Rutkowska-Wlodarczyk, Izabela; Kaczmarek, Leszek; Wlodarczyk, Jakub

    2016-01-01

    Activity-dependent proteolysis at a synapse has been recognized as a pivotal factor in controlling dynamic changes in dendritic spine shape and function; however, excessive proteolytic activity is detrimental to the cells. The exact mechanism of control of these seemingly contradictory outcomes of protease activity remains unknown. Here, we reveal that dendritic spine maturation is strictly controlled by the proteolytic activity, and its inhibition by the endogenous inhibitor (Tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases-1 - TIMP-1). Excessive proteolytic activity impairs long-term potentiation of the synaptic efficacy (LTP), and this impairment could be rescued by inhibition of protease activity. Moreover LTP is altered persistently when the ability of TIMP-1 to inhibit protease activity is abrogated, further demonstrating the role of such inhibition in the promotion of synaptic plasticity under well-defined conditions. We also show that dendritic spine maturation involves an intermediate formation of elongated spines, followed by their conversion into mushroom shape. The formation of mushroom-shaped spines is accompanied by increase in AMPA/NMDA ratio of glutamate receptors. Altogether, our results identify inhibition of protease activity as a critical regulatory mechanism for dendritic spines maturation. PMID:27282248

  15. Proteases and Peptidases of Castor Bean Endosperm

    PubMed Central

    Tully, Raymond E.; Beevers, Harry

    1978-01-01

    The endosperm of castor bean seeds (Ricinus communis L.) contains two —SH-dependent aminopeptidases, one hydrolyzing l-leucine-β-naphthylamide optimally at pH 7.0, and the other hydrolyzing l-proline-β-naphthylamide optimally at pH 7.5. After germination the endosperm contains in addition an —SH-dependent hemoglobin protease, a serine-dependent carboxypeptidase, and at least two —SH-dependent enzymes hydrolyzing the model substrate α-N-benzoyl-dl-arginine-β-naphthylamide (BANA). The carboxypeptidase is active on a variety of N-carbobenzoxy dipeptides, especially N-carbobenzoxy-L-phenylalanine-l-alanine and N-carbobenzoxy-l-tyrosine-l-leucine. The pH optima for the protease, carboxypeptidase, and BANAase acivities are 3.5 to 4.0, 5.0 to 5.5, and 6 to 8, respectively. The two aminopeptidases increased about 4-fold in activity during the first 4 days of growth, concurrent with the period of rapid depletion of storage protein. Activities then declined as the endosperm senesced, but were still evident after 6 days. Senescence was complete by day 7 to 8. Hemoglobin protease, carboxypeptidase, and BANAase activities appeared in the endosperm at day 2 to 3, and reached peak activity at day 5 to 6. The data indicate that the aminopeptidases are involved in the early mobilization of endosperm storage protein, whereas protease, carboxypeptidase, and BANAase may take part in later turnover and/or senescence. PMID:16660598

  16. Transient ECM protease activity promotes synaptic plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Magnowska, Marta; Gorkiewicz, Tomasz; Suska, Anna; Wawrzyniak, Marcin; Rutkowska-Wlodarczyk, Izabela; Kaczmarek, Leszek; Wlodarczyk, Jakub

    2016-01-01

    Activity-dependent proteolysis at a synapse has been recognized as a pivotal factor in controlling dynamic changes in dendritic spine shape and function; however, excessive proteolytic activity is detrimental to the cells. The exact mechanism of control of these seemingly contradictory outcomes of protease activity remains unknown. Here, we reveal that dendritic spine maturation is strictly controlled by the proteolytic activity, and its inhibition by the endogenous inhibitor (Tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases-1 – TIMP-1). Excessive proteolytic activity impairs long-term potentiation of the synaptic efficacy (LTP), and this impairment could be rescued by inhibition of protease activity. Moreover LTP is altered persistently when the ability of TIMP-1 to inhibit protease activity is abrogated, further demonstrating the role of such inhibition in the promotion of synaptic plasticity under well-defined conditions. We also show that dendritic spine maturation involves an intermediate formation of elongated spines, followed by their conversion into mushroom shape. The formation of mushroom-shaped spines is accompanied by increase in AMPA/NMDA ratio of glutamate receptors. Altogether, our results identify inhibition of protease activity as a critical regulatory mechanism for dendritic spines maturation. PMID:27282248

  17. Protease IV, a quorum sensing-dependent protease of Pseudomonas aeruginosa modulates insect innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Park, Su-Jin; Kim, Soo-Kyoung; So, Yong-In; Park, Ha-Young; Li, Xi-Hui; Yeom, Doo Hwan; Lee, Mi-Nan; Lee, Bok-Luel; Lee, Joon-Hee

    2014-12-01

    In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, quorum sensing (QS) plays an essential role in pathogenesis and the QS response controls many virulence factors. Using a mealworm, Tenebrio molitor as a host model, we found that Protease IV, a QS-regulated exoprotease of P. aeruginosa functions as a key virulence effector causing the melanization and death of T. molitor larvae. Protease IV was able to degrade zymogens of spätzle processing enzyme (SPE) and SPE-activating enzyme (SAE) without the activation of the antimicrobial peptide (AMP) production. Since SPE and SAE function to activate spätzle, a ligand of Toll receptor in the innate immune system of T. molitor, we suggest that Protease IV may interfere with the activation of the Toll signaling. Independently of the Toll pathway, the melanization response, another innate immunity was still generated, since Protease IV directly converted Tenebrio prophenoloxidase into active phenoloxidase. Protease IV also worked as an important factor in the virulence to brine shrimp and nematode. These results suggest that Protease IV provides P. aeruginosa with a sophisticated way to escape the immune attack of host by interfering with the production of AMPs. PMID:25315216

  18. A novel protease activity assay using a protease-responsive chaperone protein

    SciTech Connect

    Sao, Kentaro; Murata, Masaharu; Fujisaki, Yuri; Umezaki, Kaori; Mori, Takeshi; Niidome, Takuro; Katayama, Yoshiki; Hashizume, Makoto

    2009-06-05

    Protease activity assays are important for elucidating protease function and for developing new therapeutic agents. In this study, a novel turbidimetric method for determining the protease activity using a protease-responsive chaperone protein is described. For this purpose, a recombinant small heat-shock protein (sHSP) with an introduced Factor Xa protease recognition site was synthesized in bacteria. This recombinant mutant, FXa-HSP, exhibited chaperone-like activity at high temperatures in cell lysates. However, the chaperone-like activity of FXa-HSP decreased dramatically following treatment with Factor Xa. Protein precipitation was subsequently observed in the cell lysates. The reaction was Factor Xa concentration-dependent and was quantitatively suppressed by a specific inhibitor for Factor Xa. Protein aggregation was detected by a simple method based on turbidimetry. The results clearly demonstrate that this assay is an effective, easy-to-use method for determining protease activities without the requirement of labeling procedures and the use of radioisotopes.

  19. Coagulation factor XII protease domain crystal structure

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, M; Wilmann, P; Awford, J; Li, C; Hamad, BK; Fischer, PM; Dreveny, I; Dekker, LV; Emsley, J

    2015-01-01

    Background Coagulation factor XII is a serine protease that is important for kinin generation and blood coagulation, cleaving the substrates plasma kallikrein and FXI. Objective To investigate FXII zymogen activation and substrate recognition by determining the crystal structure of the FXII protease domain. Methods and results A series of recombinant FXII protease constructs were characterized by measurement of cleavage of chromogenic peptide and plasma kallikrein protein substrates. This revealed that the FXII protease construct spanning the light chain has unexpectedly weak proteolytic activity compared to β-FXIIa, which has an additional nine amino acid remnant of the heavy chain present. Consistent with these data, the crystal structure of the light chain protease reveals a zymogen conformation for active site residues Gly193 and Ser195, where the oxyanion hole is absent. The Asp194 side chain salt bridge to Arg73 constitutes an atypical conformation of the 70-loop. In one crystal form, the S1 pocket loops are partially flexible, which is typical of a zymogen. In a second crystal form of the deglycosylated light chain, the S1 pocket loops are ordered, and a short α-helix in the 180-loop of the structure results in an enlarged and distorted S1 pocket with a buried conformation of Asp189, which is critical for P1 Arg substrate recognition. The FXII structures define patches of negative charge surrounding the active site cleft that may be critical for interactions with inhibitors and substrates. Conclusions These data provide the first structural basis for understanding FXII substrate recognition and zymogen activation. PMID:25604127

  20. Cloning and nucleotide sequence of the Vibrio cholerae hemagglutinin/protease (HA/protease) gene and construction of an HA/protease-negative strain.

    PubMed Central

    Häse, C C; Finkelstein, R A

    1991-01-01

    The structural gene hap for the extracellular hemagglutinin/protease (HA/protease) of Vibrio cholerae was cloned and sequenced. The cloned DNA fragment contained a 1,827-bp open reading frame potentially encoding a 609-amino-acid polypeptide. The deduced protein contains a putative signal sequence followed by a large propeptide. The extracellular HA/protease consists of 414 amino acids with a computed molecular weight of 46,700. In the absence of protease inhibitors, this is processed to the 32-kDa form which is usually isolated. The deduced amino acid sequence of the mature HA/protease showed 61.5% identity with the Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase. The cloned hap gene was inactivated and introduced into the chromosome of V. cholerae by recombination to construct the HA/protease-negative strain HAP-1. The cloned fragment containing the hap gene was then shown to complement the mutant strain. Images PMID:2045361

  1. Proteases from the Regenerating Gut of the Holothurian Eupentacta fraudatrix

    PubMed Central

    Lamash, Nina E.; Dolmatov, Igor Yu

    2013-01-01

    Four proteases with molecular masses of 132, 58, 53, and 47 kDa were detected in the digestive system of the holothurian Eupentacta fraudatrix. These proteases displayed the gelatinase activity and characteristics of zinc metalloproteinases. The 58 kDa protease had similar protease inhibitor sensitivity to that of mammalian matrix metalloproteinases. Zymographic assay revealed different lytic activities of all four proteases during intestine regeneration in the holothurian. The 132 kDa protease showed the highest activity at the first stage. During morphogenesis (stages 2–4 of regeneration), the highest activity was measured for the 53 and 58 kDa proteases. Inhibition of protease activity exerts a marked effect on regeneration, which was dependent on the time when 1,10-phenanthroline injections commenced. When metalloproteinases were inhibited at the second stage of regeneration, the restoration rates were decreased. However, such an effect proved to be reversible, and when inhibition ceased, the previous rate of regeneration was recovered. When protease activity is inhibited at the first stage, regeneration is completely abolished, and the animals die, suggesting that early activation of the proteases is crucial for triggering the regenerative process in holothurians. The role of the detected proteases in the regeneration processes of holothurians is discussed. PMID:23505505

  2. Comparative study on the protease inhibitors from fish eggs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ustadi; Kim, K. Y.; Kim, S. M.

    2005-07-01

    The protease inhibitor was purified from five different fish eggs. The molecular weights of Pacific herring, chum salmon, pond smelt, glassfish, and Alaska pollock egg protease inhibitors were 120, 89, 84.5, 17, and l6.8kDa, respectively. The specific inhibitory activity of glassfish egg protease inhibitor was the highest followed by those of Pacific herring and Alaska pollock in order. The specific inhibitory activity and purity of glassfish egg protease inhibitor were 19.70 Umg-1 protein and 164.70 folds of purification, respectively. Glassfish egg protease inhibitor was reasonably stable at 50-65°C and pH 8, which was more stable at high temperature and pH than protease inhibitors from the other fish species. Glassfish egg protease inhibitor was noncompetitive with inhibitor constant ( K i) of 4.44 nmolL-1.

  3. New directions for protease inhibitors directed drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Yoshio; Kiso, Yoshiaki

    2016-11-01

    Proteases play crucial roles in various biological processes, and their activities are essential for all living organisms-from viruses to humans. Since their functions are closely associated with many pathogenic mechanisms, their inhibitors or activators are important molecular targets for developing treatments for various diseases. Here, we describe drugs/drug candidates that target proteases, such as malarial plasmepsins, β-secretase, virus proteases, and dipeptidyl peptidase-4. Previously, we reported inhibitors of aspartic proteases, such as renin, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease, human T-lymphotropic virus type I protease, plasmepsins, and β-secretase, as drug candidates for hypertension, adult T-cell leukaemia, human T-lymphotropic virus type I-associated myelopathy, malaria, and Alzheimer's disease. Our inhibitors are also described in this review article as examples of drugs that target proteases. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 563-579, 2016. PMID:26584340

  4. Expression and characterization of Drosophila signal peptide peptidase-like (sppL), a gene that encodes an intramembrane protease.

    PubMed

    Casso, David J; Liu, Songmei; Biehs, Brian; Kornberg, Thomas B

    2012-01-01

    Intramembrane proteases of the Signal Peptide Peptidase (SPP) family play important roles in developmental, metabolic and signaling pathways. Although vertebrates have one SPP and four SPP-like (SPPL) genes, we found that insect genomes encode one Spp and one SppL. Characterization of the Drosophila sppL gene revealed that the predicted SppL protein is a highly conserved structural homolog of the vertebrate SPPL3 proteases, with a predicted nine-transmembrane topology, an active site containing aspartyl residues within a transmembrane region, and a carboxy-terminal PAL domain. SppL protein localized to both the Golgi and ER. Whereas spp is an essential gene that is required during early larval stages and whereas spp loss-of-function reduced the unfolded protein response (UPR), sppL loss of function had no apparent phenotype. This was unexpected given that genetic knockdown phenotypes in other organisms suggested significant roles for Spp-related proteases. PMID:22439002

  5. Leader Peptide-Free In Vitro Reconstitution of Microviridin Biosynthesis Enables Design of Synthetic Protease-Targeted Libraries.

    PubMed

    Reyna-González, Emmanuel; Schmid, Bianca; Petras, Daniel; Süssmuth, Roderich D; Dittmann, Elke

    2016-08-01

    Microviridins are a family of ribosomally synthesized and post-translationally modified peptides with a highly unusual architecture featuring non-canonical lactone as well as lactam rings. Individual variants specifically inhibit different types of serine proteases. Here we have established an efficient in vitro reconstitution approach based on two ATP-grasp ligases that were constitutively activated using covalently attached leader peptides and a GNAT-type N-acetyltransferase. The method facilitates the efficient in vitro one-pot transformation of microviridin core peptides to mature microviridins. The engineering potential of the chemo-enzymatic technology was demonstrated for two synthetic peptide libraries that were used to screen and optimize microviridin variants targeting the serine proteases trypsin and subtilisin. Successive analysis of intermediates revealed distinct structure-activity relationships for respective target proteases. PMID:27336908

  6. Molecular characterization of protease activity in Serratia sp. strain SCBI and its importance in cytotoxicity and virulence.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Lauren M; Tisa, Louis S

    2014-11-01

    A newly recognized Serratia species, termed South African Caenorhabditis briggsae isolate (SCBI), is both a mutualist of the nematode Caenorhabditis briggsae KT0001 and a pathogen of lepidopteran insects. Serratia sp. strain SCBI displays high proteolytic activity, and because secreted proteases are known virulence factors for many pathogens, the purpose of this study was to identify genes essential for extracellular protease activity in Serratia sp. strain SCBI and to determine what role proteases play in insect pathogenesis and cytotoxicity. A bank of 2,100 transposon mutants was generated, and six SCBI mutants with defective proteolytic activity were identified. These mutants were also defective in cytotoxicity. The mutants were found defective in genes encoding the following proteins: alkaline metalloprotease secretion protein AprE, a BglB family transcriptional antiterminator, an inosine/xanthosine triphosphatase, GidA, a methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein, and a PIN domain protein. Gene expression analysis on these six mutants showed significant downregulation in mRNA levels of several different types of predicted protease genes. In addition, transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis provided insight into how inactivation of AprE, GidA, and a PIN domain protein influences motility and virulence, as well as protease activity. Using quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) to further characterize expression of predicted protease genes in wild-type Serratia sp. SCBI, the highest mRNA levels for the alkaline metalloprotease genes (termed prtA1 to prtA4) occurred following the death of an insect host, while two serine protease and two metalloprotease genes had their highest mRNA levels during active infection. Overall, these results indicate that proteolytic activity is essential for cytotoxicity in Serratia sp. SCBI and that its regulation appears to be highly complex. PMID:25182493

  7. Isolation and identification of an extracellular subtilisin-like serine protease secreted by the bat pathogen Pseudogymnoascus destructans.

    PubMed

    Pannkuk, Evan L; Risch, Thomas S; Savary, Brett J

    2015-01-01

    White nose syndrome (WNS) is a cutaneous fungal disease of bats. WNS is responsible for unprecedented mortalities in North American cave bat populations. There have been few descriptions of enzyme activities that may function in WNS host/pathogen interactions, while no study has isolated and described secreted proteases. To address the hypothesis that Pseudogymnoascus destructans secretes extracellular proteases that function in wing necrosis during WNS infection, the object of this study was to culture P. destructans on various media, then isolate and structurally identify those proteases accumulated stably in the culture medium. We found a single dominant protease activity on minimal nutrient broth enriched with protein substrates, which was strongly inhibited by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride. This P. destructans serine protease (PdSP1) was isolated by preparative isoelectric focusing and concanavalin A lectin affinity chromatography. PdSP1 showed a molecular weight 27,900 (estimated by SDS-PAGE), broad pH optimum 6-8, and temperature optimum 60°C. Structural characterization of PdSP1 by MALDI-TOF MS, Orbitrap MS/MS, and Edman amino-terminal peptide sequencing matched it directly to a hypothetical protein accession from the sequenced P. destructans genome that is further identified as a MEROPS family S8A subtilisin-like serine peptidase. Two additional isoforms, PdSP2 and PdSP3, were identified in the P. destructans genome with 90% and 53% homology, respectively. P. destructans S8A serine proteases showed closer sequence conservation to P. pannorum and plant pathogenic fungi than to human pathogenic dermatophytes. Peptide-specific polyclonal antibodies developed from the PdSP1 sequence detected the protein in western blots. These subtilisin-like serine proteases are candidates for further functional studies in WNS host-pathogen interaction. PMID:25785714

  8. Isolation and Identification of an Extracellular Subtilisin-Like Serine Protease Secreted by the Bat Pathogen Pseudogymnoascus destructans

    PubMed Central

    Pannkuk, Evan L.; Risch, Thomas S.; Savary, Brett J.

    2015-01-01

    White nose syndrome (WNS) is a cutaneous fungal disease of bats. WNS is responsible for unprecedented mortalities in North American cave bat populations. There have been few descriptions of enzyme activities that may function in WNS host/pathogen interactions, while no study has isolated and described secreted proteases. To address the hypothesis that Pseudogymnoascus destructans secretes extracellular proteases that function in wing necrosis during WNS infection, the object of this study was to culture P. destructans on various media, then isolate and structurally identify those proteases accumulated stably in the culture medium. We found a single dominant protease activity on minimal nutrient broth enriched with protein substrates, which was strongly inhibited by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride. This P. destructans serine protease (PdSP1) was isolated by preparative isoelectric focusing and concanavalin A lectin affinity chromatography. PdSP1 showed a molecular weight 27,900 (estimated by SDS-PAGE), broad pH optimum 6-8, and temperature optimum 60°C. Structural characterization of PdSP1 by MALDI-TOF MS, Orbitrap MS/MS, and Edman amino-terminal peptide sequencing matched it directly to a hypothetical protein accession from the sequenced P. destructans genome that is further identified as a MEROPS family S8A subtilisin-like serine peptidase. Two additional isoforms, PdSP2 and PdSP3, were identified in the P. destructans genome with 90% and 53% homology, respectively. P. destructans S8A serine proteases showed closer sequence conservation to P. pannorum and plant pathogenic fungi than to human pathogenic dermatophytes. Peptide-specific polyclonal antibodies developed from the PdSP1 sequence detected the protein in western blots. These subtilisin-like serine proteases are candidates for further functional studies in WNS host-pathogen interaction. PMID:25785714

  9. Molecular Characterization of Protease Activity in Serratia sp. Strain SCBI and Its Importance in Cytotoxicity and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Lauren M.

    2014-01-01

    A newly recognized Serratia species, termed South African Caenorhabditis briggsae isolate (SCBI), is both a mutualist of the nematode Caenorhabditis briggsae KT0001 and a pathogen of lepidopteran insects. Serratia sp. strain SCBI displays high proteolytic activity, and because secreted proteases are known virulence factors for many pathogens, the purpose of this study was to identify genes essential for extracellular protease activity in Serratia sp. strain SCBI and to determine what role proteases play in insect pathogenesis and cytotoxicity. A bank of 2,100 transposon mutants was generated, and six SCBI mutants with defective proteolytic activity were identified. These mutants were also defective in cytotoxicity. The mutants were found defective in genes encoding the following proteins: alkaline metalloprotease secretion protein AprE, a BglB family transcriptional antiterminator, an inosine/xanthosine triphosphatase, GidA, a methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein, and a PIN domain protein. Gene expression analysis on these six mutants showed significant downregulation in mRNA levels of several different types of predicted protease genes. In addition, transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis provided insight into how inactivation of AprE, GidA, and a PIN domain protein influences motility and virulence, as well as protease activity. Using quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) to further characterize expression of predicted protease genes in wild-type Serratia sp. SCBI, the highest mRNA levels for the alkaline metalloprotease genes (termed prtA1 to prtA4) occurred following the death of an insect host, while two serine protease and two metalloprotease genes had their highest mRNA levels during active infection. Overall, these results indicate that proteolytic activity is essential for cytotoxicity in Serratia sp. SCBI and that its regulation appears to be highly complex. PMID:25182493

  10. Luteoloside Acts as 3C Protease Inhibitor of Enterovirus 71 In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Zeyu; Ding, Yue; Ke, Zhipeng; Cao, Liang; Li, Na; Ding, Gang; Wang, Zhenzhong; Xiao, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Luteoloside is a member of the flavonoids family that exhibits several bioactivities including anti-microbial and anti-cancer activities. However, the antiviral activity of luteoloside against enterovirus 71 (EV71) and the potential mechanism(s) responsible for this effect remain unknown. In this study, the antiviral potency of luteoloside against EV71 and its inhibitory effects on 3C protease activity were evaluated. First, we investigated the cytotoxicity of luteoloside against rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) cells, which was the cell line selected for an in vitro infection model. In a subsequent antiviral assay, the cytopathic effect of EV71 was significantly and dose-dependently relieved by the administration of luteoloside (EC50 = 0.43 mM, selection index = 5.3). Using a plaque reduction assay, we administered luteoloside at various time points and found that the compound reduced EV71 viability in RD cells rather than increasing defensive mobilization or viral absorption. Moreover, biochemical studies focused on VP1 (a key structural protein of EV71) mRNA transcript and protein levels also revealed the inhibitory effects of luteoloside on the EV71 viral yield. Finally, we performed inhibition assays using luteoloside to evaluate its effect on recombinant 3C protease activity. Our results demonstrated that luteoloside blocked 3C protease enzymatic activity in a dose-dependent manner (IC50 = 0.36 mM) that was similar to the effect of rutin, which is a well-known C3 protease inhibitor. Collectively, the results from this study indicate that luteoloside can block 3C protease activity and subsequently inhibit EV71 production in vitro. PMID:26870944

  11. Luteoloside Acts as 3C Protease Inhibitor of Enterovirus 71 In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zeyu; Ding, Yue; Ke, Zhipeng; Cao, Liang; Li, Na; Ding, Gang; Wang, Zhenzhong; Xiao, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Luteoloside is a member of the flavonoids family that exhibits several bioactivities including anti-microbial and anti-cancer activities. However, the antiviral activity of luteoloside against enterovirus 71 (EV71) and the potential mechanism(s) responsible for this effect remain unknown. In this study, the antiviral potency of luteoloside against EV71 and its inhibitory effects on 3C protease activity were evaluated. First, we investigated the cytotoxicity of luteoloside against rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) cells, which was the cell line selected for an in vitro infection model. In a subsequent antiviral assay, the cytopathic effect of EV71 was significantly and dose-dependently relieved by the administration of luteoloside (EC50 = 0.43 mM, selection index = 5.3). Using a plaque reduction assay, we administered luteoloside at various time points and found that the compound reduced EV71 viability in RD cells rather than increasing defensive mobilization or viral absorption. Moreover, biochemical studies focused on VP1 (a key structural protein of EV71) mRNA transcript and protein levels also revealed the inhibitory effects of luteoloside on the EV71 viral yield. Finally, we performed inhibition assays using luteoloside to evaluate its effect on recombinant 3C protease activity. Our results demonstrated that luteoloside blocked 3C protease enzymatic activity in a dose-dependent manner (IC50 = 0.36 mM) that was similar to the effect of rutin, which is a well-known C3 protease inhibitor. Collectively, the results from this study indicate that luteoloside can block 3C protease activity and subsequently inhibit EV71 production in vitro. PMID:26870944

  12. HIV-protease inhibitors block the replication of both vesicular stomatitis and influenza viruses at an early post-entry replication step

    SciTech Connect

    Federico, Maurizio

    2011-08-15

    The inhibitors of HIV-1 protease (PIs) have been designed to block the activity of the viral aspartyl-protease. However, it is now accepted that this family of inhibitors can also affect the activity of cell proteases. Since the replication of many virus species requires the activity of host cell proteases, investigating the effects of PIs on the life cycle of viruses other than HIV would be of interest. Here, the potent inhibition induced by saquinavir and nelfinavir on the replication of both vesicular stomatitis and influenza viruses is described. These are unrelated enveloped RNA viruses infecting target cells upon endocytosis and intracellular fusion. The PI-induced inhibition was apparently a consequence of a block at the level of the fusion between viral envelope and endosomal membranes. These findings would open the way towards the therapeutic use of PIs against enveloped RNA viruses other than HIV.

  13. Structure of protease-cleaved Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin reveals a putative mechanism of conformational activation for protease entrapment

    PubMed Central

    Fyfe, Cameron D.; Grinter, Rhys; Josts, Inokentijs; Mosbahi, Khedidja; Roszak, Aleksander W.; Cogdell, Richard J.; Wall, Daniel M.; Burchmore, Richard J. S.; Byron, Olwyn; Walker, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial α-2-macroglobulins have been suggested to function in defence as broad-spectrum inhibitors of host proteases that breach the outer membrane. Here, the X-ray structure of protease-cleaved Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin is described, which reveals a putative mechanism of activation and conformational change essential for protease inhibition. In this competitive mechanism, protease cleavage of the bait-region domain results in the untethering of an intrinsically disordered region of this domain which disrupts native interdomain interactions that maintain E. coli α-2-macroglobulin in the inactivated form. The resulting global conformational change results in entrapment of the protease and activation of the thioester bond that covalently links to the attacking protease. Owing to the similarity in structure and domain architecture of Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin and human α-2-macro­globulin, this protease-activation mechanism is likely to operate across the diverse members of this group. PMID:26143919

  14. Using in silico techniques: Isolation and characterization of an insect cuticle-degrading-protease gene from Beauveria bassiana.

    PubMed

    Khan, Sehroon; Nadir, Sadia; Wang, Xuewen; Khan, Afsar; Xu, Jianchu; Li, Meng; Tao, Lihong; Khan, Siraj; Karunarathna, Samantha C

    2016-08-01

    Cuticle-degrading-proteases (CDPs) secreted by Beauveria spp. are pivotal biocontrol substances, possessing commercial potential for developing bio-pesticides. Therefore, a thoughtful and contemplative understanding and assessment of the structural and functional features of these proteases would markedly assist the development of biogenic pesticides. Computational molecular biology is a new facile alternative approach to the tedious experimental molecular biology; therefore, by using bioinformatics tools, we isolated and characterized an insect CDP gene from Beauveria bassiana 70 s.l. genomic DNA. The CDP gene (1240 bp with GeneBank accession no. KT804651.1) consisted of three introns and four CDS exons, and shared 74-100% sequence identity to the reference CDP genes. Its phylogenetic tree results showed a unique evolution pattern, and the predicted amino acid peptide (PAAP) consisted of 344 amino acid residues with pI, molecular weight, instability index, grand average hydropathicity value and aliphatic index of 7.2, 35.4 kDa, 24.45, -0.149, and 76.63, respectively. The gene possessed 74-89% amino acid sequence similarity to the 12 reference strains. Three motifs (Peptidase_S8 subtilase family) were detected in the PAAP, and the computed 3D structure possessed 79.09% structural identity to alkaline serine proteases. The PAAP had four (three serine proteases and one Pyridoxal-dependent decarboxylase) conserved domains, a disulfide bridge, two calcium binding sites, MY domain, and three predicted active sites in the serine family domains. These results will set the groundwork for further exploitation of proteases and understanding the mechanism of disease caused by cuticle-degrading-serine-proteases from entomopathogenic fungi. PMID:27287496

  15. MASP-1, a promiscuous complement protease: structure of its catalytic region reveals the basis of its broad specificity.

    PubMed

    Dobó, József; Harmat, Veronika; Beinrohr, László; Sebestyén, Edina; Závodszky, Péter; Gál, Péter

    2009-07-15

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL)-associated serine protease (MASP)-1 is an abundant component of the lectin pathway of complement. The related enzyme, MASP-2 is capable of activating the complement cascade alone. Though the concentration of MASP-1 far exceeds that of MASP-2, only a supporting role of MASP-1 has been identified regarding lectin pathway activation. Several non-complement substrates, like fibrinogen and factor XIII, have also been reported. MASP-1 belongs to the C1r/C1s/MASP family of modular serine proteases; however, its serine protease domain is evolutionary different. We have determined the crystal structure of the catalytic region of active MASP-1 and refined it to 2.55 A resolution. Unusual features of the structure are an internal salt bridge (similar to one in factor D) between the S1 Asp189 and Arg224, and a very long 60-loop. The functional and evolutionary differences between MASP-1 and the other members of the C1r/C1s/MASP family are reflected in the crystal structure. Structural comparison of the protease domains revealed that the substrate binding groove of MASP-1 is wide and resembles that of trypsin rather than early complement proteases explaining its relaxed specificity. Also, MASP-1's multifunctional behavior as both a complement and a coagulation enzyme is in accordance with our observation that antithrombin in the presence of heparin is a more potent inhibitor of MASP-1 than C1 inhibitor. Overall, MASP-1 behaves as a promiscuous protease. The structure shows that its substrate binding groove is accessible; however, its reactivity could be modulated by an unusually large 60-loop and an internal salt bridge involving the S1 Asp. PMID:19564340

  16. HvPap-1 C1A protease actively participates in barley proteolysis mediated by abiotic stresses.

    PubMed

    Velasco-Arroyo, Blanca; Diaz-Mendoza, Mercedes; Gandullo, Jacinto; Gonzalez-Melendi, Pablo; Santamaria, M Estrella; Dominguez-Figueroa, Jose D; Hensel, Goetz; Martinez, Manuel; Kumlehn, Jochen; Diaz, Isabel

    2016-07-01

    Protein breakdown and mobilization from old or stressed tissues to growing and sink organs are some of the metabolic features associated with abiotic/biotic stresses, essential for nutrient recycling. The massive degradation of proteins implies numerous proteolytic events in which cysteine-proteases are the most abundant key players. Analysing the role of barley C1A proteases in response to abiotic stresses is crucial due to their impact on plant growth and grain yield and quality. In this study, dark and nitrogen starvation treatments were selected to induce stress in barley. Results show that C1A proteases participate in the proteolytic processes triggered in leaves by both abiotic treatments, which strongly induce the expression of the HvPap-1 gene encoding a cathepsin F-like protease. Differences in biochemical parameters and C1A gene expression were found when comparing transgenic barley plants overexpressing or silencing the HvPap-1 gene and wild-type dark-treated leaves. These findings associated with morphological changes evidence a lifespan-delayed phenotype of HvPap-1 silenced lines. All these data elucidate on the role of this protease family in response to abiotic stresses and the potential of their biotechnological manipulation to control the timing of plant growth. PMID:27217548

  17. Structural Insight into Serine Protease Rv3671c that Protects M. tuberculosis from Oxidative and Acidic Stress

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Tapan; Small, Jennifer; Vandal, Omar; Odaira, Toshiko; Deng, Haiteng; Ehrt, Sabine; Tsodikov, Oleg V.

    2010-11-15

    Rv3671c, a putative serine protease, is crucial for persistence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the hostile environment of the phagosome. We show that Rv3671c is required for M. tuberculosis resistance to oxidative stress in addition to its role in protection from acidification. Structural and biochemical analyses demonstrate that the periplasmic domain of Rv3671c is a functional serine protease of the chymotrypsin family and, remarkably, that its activity increases on oxidation. High-resolution crystal structures of this protease in an active strained state and in an inactive relaxed state reveal that a solvent-exposed disulfide bond controls the protease activity by constraining two distant regions of Rv3671c and stabilizing it in the catalytically active conformation. In vitro biochemical studies confirm that activation of the protease in an oxidative environment is dependent on this reversible disulfide bond. These results suggest that the disulfide bond modulates activity of Rv3671c depending on the oxidative environment in vivo.

  18. Structural insight into serine protease Rv3671c that protects M. tuberculosis from oxidative and acidic stress

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Tapan; Small, Jennifer; Vandal, Omar; Odaira, Toshiko; Deng, Haiteng; Ehrt, Sabine; Tsodikov, Oleg V.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Rv3671c, a putative serine protease, is crucial for persistence of M. tuberculosis in the hostile environment of the phagosome. We show that Rv3671c is required for M. tuberculosis resistance to oxidative stress in addition to its role in protection from acidification. Structural and biochemical analyses demonstrate that the periplasmic domain of Rv3671c is a functional serine protease of the chymotrypsin family and, remarkably, that its activity increases upon oxidation. High-resolution crystal structures of this protease in an active strained state and in an inactive relaxed state reveal that a solvent-exposed disulfide bond controls the protease activity by constraining two distant regions of Rv3671c and stabilizing it in the catalytically active conformation. In vitro biochemical studies confirm that activation of the protease in an oxidative environment is dependent on this reversible disulfide bond. These results suggest that the disulfide bond modulates activity of Rv3671c depending on the oxidative environment in vivo. PMID:20947023

  19. Enzymatic characterization of germination-specific cysteine protease-1 expressed transiently in cotyledons during the early phase of germination.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Akihiko; Tsukamoto, Kana; Iwamoto, Keiko; Ito, Yuka; Yuasa, Keizo

    2013-01-01

    Papain-like cysteine protease activity that shows a unique transient expression profile in cotyledons of daikon radish during germination was detected. The enzyme showed a distinct elution pattern on DEAE-cellulose compared with cathepsin B-like and Responsive to dessication-21 cysteine protease. Although this activity was not detected in seed prior to imbibition, the activity increased markedly and reached a maximum at 2 days after imbibition and then decreased rapidly and completely disappeared after 5 days. Using cystatin-Sepharose, the 26 kDa cysteine protease (DRCP26) was isolated from cotyledons at 2 days after imbibition. The deduced amino acid sequence from the cDNA nucleotide sequence indicated that DRCP26 is an orthologue of Arabidopsis unidentified protein, germination-specific cysteine protease-1, belonging to the C1 family of cysteine protease predicted from genetic information. In an effort to characterize the enzymatic properties of DRCP26, the enzyme was purified to homogeneity from cotyledons at 48 h after imbibition. The best synthetic substrate for the enzyme was carbobenzoxy-Phe-Arg-4-methylcoumaryl-7-amide. All model peptides were digested to small peptides by the enzyme, suggesting that DRCP26 possesses broad cleavage specificity. These results indicated that DRCP26 plays a role in the mobilization of storage proteins in the early phase of seed germination. PMID:23112094

  20. Type II transmembrane serine proteases as potential targets for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Murray, Andrew S; Varela, Fausto A; List, Karin

    2016-09-01

    Carcinogenesis is accompanied by increased protein and activity levels of extracellular cell-surface proteases that are capable of modifying the tumor microenvironment by directly cleaving the extracellular matrix, as well as activating growth factors and proinflammatory mediators involved in proliferation and invasion of cancer cells, and recruitment of inflammatory cells. These complex processes ultimately potentiate neoplastic progression leading to local tumor cell invasion, entry into the vasculature, and metastasis to distal sites. Several members of the type II transmembrane serine protease (TTSP) family have been shown to play critical roles in cancer progression. In this review the knowledge collected over the past two decades about the molecular mechanisms underlying the pro-cancerous properties of selected TTSPs will be summarized. Furthermore, we will discuss how these insights may facilitate the translation into clinical settings in the future by specifically targeting TTSPs as part of novel cancer treatment regimens. PMID:27078673

  1. Reaching the Melting Point: Degradative Enzymes and Protease Inhibitors Involved in Baculovirus Infection and Dissemination

    PubMed Central

    Ishimwe, Egide; Hodgson, Jeffrey J.; Clem, Rollie J.; Passarelli, A. Lorena

    2015-01-01

    Baculovirus infection of a host insect involves several steps, beginning with initiation of virus infection in the midgut, followed by dissemination of infection from the midgut to other tissues in the insect, and finally culminating in “melting” or liquefaction of the host, which allows for horizontal spread of infection to other insects. While all of the viral gene products are involved in ultimately reaching this dramatic infection endpoint, this review focuses on two particular types of baculovirus-encoded proteins: degradative enzymes and protease inhibitors. Neither of these types of proteins is commonly found in other virus families, but they both play important roles in baculovirus infection. The types of degradative enzymes and protease inhibitors encoded by baculoviruses are discussed, as are the roles of these proteins in the infection process. PMID:25724418

  2. Type II transmembrane serine proteases as potential targets for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Andrew S.; Varela, Fausto A.

    2016-01-01

    Carcinogenesis is accompanied by increased protein and activity levels of extracellular cell-surface proteases that are capable of modifying the tumor micro-environment by directly cleaving the extracellular matrix, as well as activating growth factors and proinflammatory mediators involved in proliferation and invasion of cancer cells, and recruitment of inflammatory cells. These complex processes ultimately potentiate neoplastic progression leading to local tumor cell invasion, entry into the vasculature, and metastasis to distal sites. Several members of the type II transmembrane serine protease (TTSP) family have been shown to play critical roles in cancer progression. In this review the knowledge collected over the past two decades about the molecular mechanisms underlying the pro-cancerous properties of selected TTSPs will be summarized. Furthermore, we will discuss how these insights may facilitate the translation into clinical settings in the future by specifically targeting TTSPs as part of novel cancer treatment regimens. PMID:27078673

  3. Reaching the melting point: Degradative enzymes and protease inhibitors involved in baculovirus infection and dissemination.

    PubMed

    Ishimwe, Egide; Hodgson, Jeffrey J; Clem, Rollie J; Passarelli, A Lorena

    2015-05-01

    Baculovirus infection of a host insect involves several steps, beginning with initiation of virus infection in the midgut, followed by dissemination of infection from the midgut to other tissues in the insect, and finally culminating in "melting" or liquefaction of the host, which allows for horizontal spread of infection to other insects. While all of the viral gene products are involved in ultimately reaching this dramatic infection endpoint, this review focuses on two particular types of baculovirus-encoded proteins: degradative enzymes and protease inhibitors. Neither of these types of proteins is commonly found in other virus families, but they both play important roles in baculovirus infection. The types of degradative enzymes and protease inhibitors encoded by baculoviruses are discussed, as are the roles of these proteins in the infection process. PMID:25724418

  4. Arabidopsis AtSerpin1, Crystal Structure and in Vivo Interaction with Its Target Protease RESPONSIVE TO DESICCATION-21 (RD21)*

    PubMed Central

    Lampl, Nardy; Budai-Hadrian, Ofra; Davydov, Olga; Joss, Tom V.; Harrop, Stephen J.; Curmi, Paul M. G.; Roberts, Thomas H.; Fluhr, Robert

    2010-01-01

    In animals, protease inhibitors of the serpin family are associated with many physiological processes, including blood coagulation and innate immunity. Serpins feature a reactive center loop (RCL), which displays a protease target sequence as a bait. RCL cleavage results in an irreversible, covalent serpin-protease complex. AtSerpin1 is an Arabidopsis protease inhibitor that is expressed ubiquitously throughout the plant. The x-ray crystal structure of recombinant AtSerpin1 in its native stressed conformation was determined at 2.2 Å. The electrostatic surface potential below the RCL was found to be highly positive, whereas the breach region critical for RCL insertion is an unusually open structure. AtSerpin1 accumulates in plants as a full-length and a cleaved form. Fractionation of seedling extracts by nonreducing SDS-PAGE revealed the presence of an additional slower migrating complex that was absent when leaves were treated with the specific cysteine protease inhibitor l-trans-epoxysuccinyl-l-leucylamido (4-guanidino)butane. Significantly, RESPONSIVE TO DESICCATION-21 (RD21) was the major protease labeled with the l-trans-epoxysuccinyl-l-leucylamido (4-guanidino)butane derivative DCG-04 in wild type extracts but not in extracts of mutant plants constitutively overexpressing AtSerpin1, indicating competition. Fractionation by nonreducing SDS-PAGE followed by immunoblotting with RD21-specific antibody revealed that the protease accumulated both as a free enzyme and in a complex with AtSerpin1. Importantly, both RD21 and AtSerpin1 knock-out mutants lacked the serpin-protease complex. The results establish that the major Arabidopsis plant serpin interacts with RD21. This is the first report of the structure and in vivo interaction of a plant serpin with its target protease. PMID:20181955

  5. Arabidopsis AtSerpin1, Crystal Structure and in Vivo Interaction with Its Target Protease RESPONSIVE TO DESICCATION-21 (RD21)

    SciTech Connect

    Lampl, Nardy; Budai-Hadrian, Ofra; Davydov, Olga; Joss, Tom V.; Harrop, Stephen J.; Curmi, Paul M.G.; Roberts, Thomas H.; Fluhr, Robert

    2010-05-25

    In animals, protease inhibitors of the serpin family are associated with many physiological processes, including blood coagulation and innate immunity. Serpins feature a reactive center loop (RCL), which displays a protease target sequence as a bait. RCL cleavage results in an irreversible, covalent serpin-protease complex. AtSerpin1 is an Arabidopsis protease inhibitor that is expressed ubiquitously throughout the plant. The x-ray crystal structure of recombinant AtSerpin1 in its native stressed conformation was determined at 2.2 {angstrom}. The electrostatic surface potential below the RCL was found to be highly positive, whereas the breach region critical for RCL insertion is an unusually open structure. AtSerpin1 accumulates in plants as a full-length and a cleaved form. Fractionation of seedling extracts by nonreducing SDS-PAGE revealed the presence of an additional slower migrating complex that was absent when leaves were treated with the specific cysteine protease inhibitor l-trans-epoxysuccinyl-l-leucylamido (4-guanidino)butane. Significantly, RESPONSIVE TO DESICCATION-21 (RD21) was the major protease labeled with the l-trans-epoxysuccinyl-l-leucylamido (4-guanidino)butane derivative DCG-04 in wild type extracts but not in extracts of mutant plants constitutively overexpressing AtSerpin1, indicating competition. Fractionation by nonreducing SDS-PAGE followed by immunoblotting with RD21-specific antibody revealed that the protease accumulated both as a free enzyme and in a complex with AtSerpin1. Importantly, both RD21 and AtSerpin1 knock-out mutants lacked the serpin-protease complex. The results establish that the major Arabidopsis plant serpin interacts with RD21. This is the first report of the structure and in vivo interaction of a plant serpin with its target protease.

  6. Dysregulation of protease and protease inhibitors in a mouse model of human pelvic organ prolapse.

    PubMed

    Budatha, Madhusudhan; Silva, Simone; Montoya, Teodoro Ignacio; Suzuki, Ayako; Shah-Simpson, Sheena; Wieslander, Cecilia Karin; Yanagisawa, Masashi; Word, Ruth Ann; Yanagisawa, Hiromi

    2013-01-01

    Mice deficient for the fibulin-5 gene (Fbln5(-/-)) develop pelvic organ prolapse (POP) due to compromised elastic fibers and upregulation of matrix metalloprotease (MMP)-9. Here, we used casein zymography, inhibitor profiling, affinity pull-down, and mass spectrometry to discover additional protease upregulated in the vaginal wall of Fbln5(-/-) mice, herein named V1 (25 kDa). V1 was a serine protease with trypsin-like activity similar to protease, serine (PRSS) 3, a major extrapancreatic trypsinogen, was optimum at pH 8.0, and predominantly detected in estrogenized vaginal epithelium of Fbln5(-/-) mice. PRSS3 was (a) localized in epithelial secretions, (b) detected in media of vaginal organ culture from both Fbln5(-/-) and wild type mice, and (c) cleaved fibulin-5 in vitro. Expression of two serine protease inhibitors [Serpina1a (α1-antitrypsin) and Elafin] was dysregulated in Fbln5(-/-) epithelium. Finally, we confirmed that PRSS3 was expressed in human vaginal epithelium and that SERPINA1 and Elafin were downregulated in vaginal tissues from women with POP. These data collectively suggest that the balance between proteases and their inhibitors contributes to support of the pelvic organs in humans and mice. PMID:23437119

  7. A potential Kazal-type serine protease inhibitor involves in kinetics of protease inhibition and bacteriostatic activity.

    PubMed

    Kumaresan, Venkatesh; Harikrishnan, Ramaswamy; Arockiaraj, Jesu

    2015-02-01

    Kazal-type serine protease inhibitor (KSPI) is a pancreatic secretary trypsin inhibitor which involves in various cellular component regulations including development and defense process. In this study, we have characterized a KSPI cDNA sequence of freshwater striped murrel fish Channa striatus (Cs) at molecular level. Cellular location analysis predicted that the CsKSPI was an extracellular protein. The domain analysis showed that the CsKSPI contains a Kazal domain at 47-103 along with its family signature between 61 and 83. Phylogenetically, CsKSPI is closely related to KSPI from Maylandia zebra and formed a sister group with mammals. The 2D structure of CsKSPI showed three α-helical regions which are connected with random coils, one helix at signal sequence and two at the Kazal domain region. The relative gene expression showed that the CsKSPI was highly expressed in gills and its expression was induced upon fungus (Aphanomyces invadans), bacteria (Aeromonas hydrophila) and poly I:C (a viral analogue) challenge. The CsKSPI recombinant protein was produced to characterize and study the CsKSPI gene specific functions. The recombinant CsKSPI strongly inhibited trypsin compared to other tested proteases. The results of the kinetic activity of CsKSPI against trypsin was V(max)s = 1.62 nmol/min, K(M)s = 0.21 mM and K(i)s = 15.37 nM. Moreover, the recombinant CsKSPI inhibited the growth of Gram-negative bacteria A. hydrophila at 20 μM and Gram-positive bacteria Bacillus subtilis at the MIC50 of 15 μM. Overall, the study indicated that the CsKSPI was a potential trypsin inhibitor which involves in antimicrobial activity. PMID:25433138

  8. Sequence conservation, phylogenetic relationships, and expression profiles of nondigestive serine proteases and serine protease homologs in Manduca sexta.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiaolong; He, Yan; Hu, Yingxia; Zhang, Xiufeng; Wang, Yang; Zou, Zhen; Chen, Yunru; Blissard, Gary W; Kanost, Michael R; Jiang, Haobo

    2015-07-01

    Serine protease (SP) and serine protease homolog (SPH) genes in insects encode a large family of proteins involved in digestion, development, immunity, and other processes. While 68 digestive SPs and their close homologs are reported in a companion paper (Kuwar et al., in preparation), we have identified 125 other SPs/SPHs in Manduca sexta and studied their structure, evolution, and expression. Fifty-two of them contain cystine-stabilized structures for molecular recognition, including clip, LDLa, Sushi, Wonton, TSP, CUB, Frizzle, and SR domains. There are nineteen groups of genes evolved from relatively recent gene duplication and sequence divergence. Thirty-five SPs and seven SPHs contain 1, 2 or 5 clip domains. Multiple sequence alignment and molecular modeling of the 54 clip domains have revealed structural diversity of these regulatory modules. Sequence comparison with their homologs in Drosophila melanogaster, Anopheles gambiae and Tribolium castaneum allows us to classify them into five subfamilies: A are SPHs with 1 or 5 group-3 clip domains, B are SPs with 1 or 2 group-2 clip domains, C, D1 and D2 are SPs with a single clip domain in group-1a, 1b and 1c, respectively. We have classified into six categories the 125 expression profiles of SP-related proteins in fat body, brain, midgut, Malpighian tubule, testis, and ovary at different stages, suggesting that they participate in various physiological processes. Through RNA-Seq-based gene annotation and expression profiling, as well as intragenomic sequence comparisons, we have established a framework of information for future biochemical research of nondigestive SPs and SPHs in this model species. PMID:25530503

  9. Proteases of human rhinovirus: role in infection.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Lora M; Walker, Erin J; Jans, David A; Ghildyal, Reena

    2015-01-01

    Human rhinoviruses (HRV) are the major etiological agents of the common cold and asthma exacerbations, with significant worldwide health and economic impact. Although large-scale population vaccination has proved successful in limiting or even eradicating many viruses, the more than 100 distinct serotypes mean that conventional vaccination is not a feasible strategy to combat HRV. An alternative strategy is to target conserved viral proteins such as the HRV proteases, 2A(pro) and 3C(pro), the focus of this review. Necessary for host cell shutoff, virus replication, and pathogenesis, 2A(pro) and 3C(pro) are clearly viable drug targets, and indeed, 3C(pro) has been successfully targeted for treating the common cold in experimental infection. 2A(pro) and 3C(pro) are crucial for virus replication due to their role in polyprotein processing as well as cleavage of key cellular proteins to inhibit cellular transcription and translation. Intriguingly, the action of the HRV proteases also disrupts nucleocytoplasmic trafficking, contributing to HRV cytopathic effects. Improved understanding of the protease-cell interactions should enable new therapeutic approaches to be identified for drug development. PMID:25261311

  10. Corruption of Innate Immunity by Bacterial Proteases

    PubMed Central

    Potempa, Jan; Pike, Robert N.

    2009-01-01

    The innate immune system of the human body has developed numerous mechanisms to control endogenous and exogenous bacteria and thus prevent infections by these microorganisms. These mechanisms range from physical barriers such as the skin or mucosal epithelium to a sophisticated array of molecules and cells that function to suppress or prevent bacterial infection. Many bacteria express a variety of proteases, ranging from non-specific and powerful enzymes that degrade many proteins involved in innate immunity to proteases that are extremely precise and specific in their mode of action. Here we have assembled a comprehensive picture of how bacterial proteases affect the host’s innate immune system to gain advantage and cause infection. This picture is far from being complete since the numbers of mechanisms utilized are as astonishing as they are diverse, ranging from degradation of molecules vital to innate immune mechanisms to subversion of the mechanisms to allow the bacterium to hide from the system or take advantage of it. It is vital that such mechanisms are elucidated to allow strategies to be developed to aid the innate immune system in controlling bacterial infections. PMID:19756242

  11. Four Amino Acid Changes in HIV-2 Protease Confer Class-Wide Sensitivity to Protease Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Robert A.; Gottlieb, Geoffrey S.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Protease is essential for retroviral replication, and protease inhibitors (PI) are important for treating HIV infection. HIV-2 exhibits intrinsic resistance to most FDA-approved HIV-1 PI, retaining clinically useful susceptibility only to lopinavir, darunavir, and saquinavir. The mechanisms for this resistance are unclear; although HIV-1 and HIV-2 proteases share just 38 to 49% sequence identity, all critical structural features of proteases are conserved. Structural studies have implicated four amino acids in the ligand-binding pocket (positions 32, 47, 76, and 82). We constructed HIV-2ROD9 molecular clones encoding the corresponding wild-type HIV-1 amino acids (I32V, V47I, M76L, and I82V) either individually or together (clone PRΔ4) and compared the phenotypic sensitivities (50% effective concentration [EC50]) of mutant and wild-type viruses to nine FDA-approved PI. Single amino acid replacements I32V, V47I, and M76L increased the susceptibility of HIV-2 to multiple PI, but no single change conferred class-wide sensitivity. In contrast, clone PRΔ4 showed PI susceptibility equivalent to or greater than that of HIV-1 for all PI. We also compared crystallographic structures of wild-type HIV-1 and HIV-2 proteases complexed with amprenavir and darunavir to models of the PRΔ4 enzyme. These models suggest that the amprenavir sensitivity of PRΔ4 is attributable to stabilizing enzyme-inhibitor interactions in the P2 and P2′ pockets of the protease dimer. Together, our results show that the combination of four amino acid changes in HIV-2 protease confer a pattern of PI susceptibility comparable to that of HIV-1, providing a structural rationale for intrinsic HIV-2 PI resistance and resolving long-standing questions regarding the determinants of differential PI susceptibility in HIV-1 and HIV-2. IMPORTANCE Proteases are essential for retroviral replication, and HIV-1 and HIV-2 proteases share a great deal of structural similarity. However, only three of nine

  12. Crystal structure of the cysteine protease inhibitor 2 from Entamoeba histolytica: Functional convergence of a common protein fold

    SciTech Connect

    Casados-Vázquez, Luz E.; Lara-González, Samuel; Brieb, Luis G.

    2012-04-18

    Cysteine proteases (CP) are key pathogenesis and virulence determinants of protozoan parasites. Entamoeba histolytica contains at least 50 cysteine proteases; however, only three (EhCP1, EhCP2 and EhCP5) are responsible for approximately 90% of the cysteine protease activity in this parasite. CPs are expressed as inactive zymogens. Because the processed proteases are potentially cytotoxic, protozoan parasites have developed mechanisms to regulate their activity. Inhibitors of cysteine proteases (ICP) of the chagasin-like inhibitor family (MEROPS family I42) were recently identified in bacteria and protozoan parasites. E. histolytica contains two ICP-encoding genes of the chagasin-like inhibitor family. EhICP1 localizes to the cytosol, whereas EhICP2 is targeted to phagosomes. Herein, we report two crystal structures of EhICP2. The overall structure of EhICP2 consists of eight {beta}-strands and closely resembles the immunoglobulin fold. A comparison between the two crystal forms of EhICP2 indicates that the conserved BC, DE and FG loops form a flexible wedge that may block the active site of CPs. The positively charged surface of the wedge-forming loops in EhICP2 contrasts with the neutral surface of the wedge-forming loops in chagasin. We postulate that the flexibility and positive charge observed in the DE and FG loops of EhICP2 may be important to facilitate the initial binding of this inhibitor to the battery of CPs present in E. histolytica.

  13. High Throughput Substrate Phage Display for Protease Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Ratnikov, Boris; Cieplak, Piotr; Smith, Jeffrey W.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The interplay between a protease and its substrates is controlled at many different levels, including coexpression, colocalization, binding driven by ancillary contacts, and the presence of natural inhibitors. Here we focus on the most basic parameter that guides substrate recognition by a protease, the recognition specificity at the catalytic cleft. An understanding of this substrate specificity can be used to predict the putative substrates of a protease, to design protease activated imaging agents, and to initiate the design of active site inhibitors. Our group has characterized protease specificities of several matrix metalloproteinases using substrate phage display. Recently, we have adapted this method to a semiautomated platform that includes several high-throughput steps. The semiautomated platform allows one to obtain an order of magnitude more data, thus permitting precise comparisons among related proteases to define their functional distinctions. PMID:19377968

  14. High throughput substrate phage display for protease profiling.

    PubMed

    Ratnikov, Boris; Cieplak, Piotr; Smith, Jeffrey W

    2009-01-01

    The interplay between a protease and its substrates is controlled at many different levels, including coexpression, colocalization, binding driven by ancillary contacts, and the presence of natural inhibitors. Here we focus on the most basic parameter that guides substrate recognition by a protease, the recognition specificity at the catalytic cleft. An understanding of this substrate specificity can be used to predict the putative substrates of a protease, to design protease activated imaging agents, and to initiate the design of active site inhibitors. Our group has characterized protease specificities of several matrix metalloproteinases using substrate phage display. Recently, we have adapted this method to a semiautomated platform that includes several high-throughput steps. The semiautomated platform allows one to obtain an order of magnitude more data, thus permitting precise comparisons among related proteases to define their functional distinctions. PMID:19377968

  15. Protein protease inhibitors in insects and comparison with mammalian inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Eguchi, M

    1993-01-01

    1. Studies on insect protein protease inhibitors are summarized. Biochemical, genetic and physiological investigations of the silkworm are performed. 2. In addition, the properties and characteristics of fungal protease inhibitors from the silkworm (Bombyx mori) are described and their importance as defensive functions is emphasized. 3. This review also concerns comparative and evolutionary studies of protease inhibitors from various sources. 4. The biological significance of inhibitors is discussed in view of the extensive experimental results. PMID:8365101

  16. Economic Methods of Ginger Protease'sextraction and Purification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Yuanyuan; Tong, Junfeng; Wei, Siqing; Du, Xinyong; Tang, Xiaozhen

    This article reports the ginger protease extraction and purification methods from fresh ginger rhizome. As to ginger protease extraction, we adapt the steps of organic solvent dissolving, ammonium sulfate depositing and freeze-drying, and this method can attain crude enzyme powder 0.6% weight of fresh ginger rhizome. The purification part in this study includes two steps: cellulose ion exchange (DEAE-52) and SP-Sephadex 50 chromatography, which can purify crude ginger protease through ion and molecular weight differences respectively.

  17. Role of Protease-Inhibitors in Ocular Diseases.

    PubMed

    Pescosolido, Nicola; Barbato, Andrea; Pascarella, Antonia; Giannotti, Rossella; Genzano, Martina; Nebbioso, Marcella

    2014-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that the balance between proteases and protease-inhibitors system plays a key role in maintaining cellular and tissue homeostasis. Indeed, its alteration has been involved in many ocular and systemic diseases. In particular, research has focused on keratoconus, corneal wounds and ulcers, keratitis, endophthalmitis, age-related macular degeneration, Sorsby fundus dystrophy, loss of nerve cells and photoreceptors during optic neuritis both in vivo and in vitro models. Protease-inhibitors have been extensively studied, rather than proteases, because they may represent a therapeutic approach for some ocular diseases. The protease-inhibitors mainly involved in the onset of the above-mentioned ocular pathologies are: α2-macroglobulin, α1-proteinase inhibitor (α1-PI), metalloproteinase inhibitor (TIMP), maspin, SERPINA3K, SERPINB13, secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI), and calpeptin. This review is focused on the several characteristics of dysregulation of this system and, particularly, on a possible role of proteases and protease-inhibitors in molecular remodeling that may lead to some ocular diseases. Recently, researchers have even hypothesized a possible therapeutic effect of the protease-inhibitors in the treatment of injured eye in animal models. PMID:25493637

  18. Fibrin(ogen)olytic activity of bumblebee venom serine protease

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu Yuling; Choo, Young Moo; Yoon, Hyung Joo; Jia Jingming; Cui Zheng; Wang Dong; Kim, Doh Hoon; Sohn, Hung Dae; Jin, Byung Rae

    2011-09-01

    Bee venom is a rich source of pharmacologically active components; it has been used as an immunotherapy to treat bee venom hypersensitivity, and venom therapy has been applied as an alternative medicine. Here, we present evidence that the serine protease found in bumblebee venom exhibits fibrin(ogen)olytic activity. Compared to honeybee venom, bumblebee venom contains a higher content of serine protease, which is one of its major components. Venom serine proteases from bumblebees did not cross-react with antibodies against the honeybee venom serine protease. We provide functional evidence indicating that bumblebee (Bombus terrestris) venom serine protease (Bt-VSP) acts as a fibrin(ogen)olytic enzyme. Bt-VSP activates prothrombin and directly degrades fibrinogen into fibrin degradation products. However, Bt-VSP is not a plasminogen activator, and its fibrinolytic activity is less than that of plasmin. Taken together, our results define roles for Bt-VSP as a prothrombin activator, a thrombin-like protease, and a plasmin-like protease. These findings offer significant insight into the allergic reaction sequence that is initiated by bee venom serine protease and its potential usefulness as a clinical agent in the field of hemostasis and thrombosis. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: > Bumblebee venom serine protease (Bt-VSP) is a fibrin(ogen)olytic enzyme. > Bt-VSP activates prothrombin. > Bt-VSP directly degrades fibrinogen into fibrin degradation products. > Bt-VSP is a hemostatically active protein that is a potent clinical agent.

  19. Structure of protease-cleaved Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin reveals a putative mechanism of conformational activation for protease entrapment

    SciTech Connect

    Fyfe, Cameron D.; Grinter, Rhys; Josts, Inokentijs; Mosbahi, Khedidja; Roszak, Aleksander W.; Cogdell, Richard J.; Wall, Daniel M.; Burchmore, Richard J. S.; Byron, Olwyn; Walker, Daniel

    2015-06-30

    The X-ray structure of protease-cleaved E. coli α-2-macroglobulin is described, which reveals a putative mechanism of activation and conformational change essential for protease inhibition. Bacterial α-2-macroglobulins have been suggested to function in defence as broad-spectrum inhibitors of host proteases that breach the outer membrane. Here, the X-ray structure of protease-cleaved Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin is described, which reveals a putative mechanism of activation and conformational change essential for protease inhibition. In this competitive mechanism, protease cleavage of the bait-region domain results in the untethering of an intrinsically disordered region of this domain which disrupts native interdomain interactions that maintain E. coli α-2-macroglobulin in the inactivated form. The resulting global conformational change results in entrapment of the protease and activation of the thioester bond that covalently links to the attacking protease. Owing to the similarity in structure and domain architecture of Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin and human α-2-macroglobulin, this protease-activation mechanism is likely to operate across the diverse members of this group.

  20. Origin and Diversification of Meprin Proteases.

    PubMed

    Marín, Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    Meprins are astacin metalloproteases with a characteristic, easily recognizable structure, given that they are the only proteases with both MAM and MATH domains plus a transmembrane region. So far assumed to be vertebrate-specific, it is shown here, using a combination of evolutionary and genomic analyses, that meprins originated before the urochordates/vertebrates split. In particular, three genes encoding structurally typical meprin proteins are arranged in tandem in the genome of the urochordate Ciona intestinalis. Phylogenetic analyses showed that the protease and MATH domains present in the meprin-like proteins encoded by the Ciona genes are very similar in sequence to the domains found in vertebrate meprins, which supports them having a common origin. While many vertebrates have the two canonical meprin-encoding genes orthologous to human MEP1A and MEP1B (which respectively encode for the proteins known as meprin α and meprin β), a single gene has been found so far in the genome of the chondrichthyan fish Callorhinchus milii, and additional meprin-encoding genes are present in some species. Particularly, a group of bony fish species have genes encoding highly divergent meprins, here named meprin-F. Genes encoding meprin-F proteins, derived from MEP1B genes, are abundant in some species, as the Amazon molly, Poecilia formosa, which has 7 of them. Finally, it is confirmed that the MATH domains of meprins are very similar to the ones in TRAF ubiquitin ligases, which suggests that meprins originated when protease and TRAF E3-encoding sequences were combined. PMID:26288188

  1. Reversible Unfolding of Rhomboid Intramembrane Proteases.

    PubMed

    Panigrahi, Rashmi; Arutyunova, Elena; Panwar, Pankaj; Gimpl, Katharina; Keller, Sandro; Lemieux, M Joanne

    2016-03-29

    Denaturant-induced unfolding of helical membrane proteins provides insights into their mechanism of folding and domain organization, which take place in the chemically heterogeneous, anisotropic environment of a lipid membrane. Rhomboid proteases are intramembrane proteases that play key roles in various diseases. Crystal structures have revealed a compact helical bundle with a buried active site, which requires conformational changes for the cleavage of transmembrane substrates. A dimeric form of the rhomboid protease has been shown to be important for activity. In this study, we examine the mechanism of refolding for two distinct rhomboids to gain insight into their secondary structure-activity relationships. Although helicity is largely abolished in the unfolded states of both proteins, unfolding is completely reversible for HiGlpG but only partially reversible for PsAarA. Refolding of both proteins results in reassociation of the dimer, with a 90% regain of catalytic activity for HiGlpG but only a 70% regain for PsAarA. For both proteins, a broad, gradual transition from the native, folded state to the denatured, partly unfolded state was revealed with the aid of circular dichroism spectroscopy as a function of denaturant concentration, thus arguing against a classical two-state model as found for many globular soluble proteins. Thermal denaturation has irreversible destabilizing effects on both proteins, yet reveals important functional details regarding substrate accessibility to the buried active site. This concerted biophysical and functional analysis demonstrates that HiGlpG, with a simple six-transmembrane-segment organization, is more robust than PsAarA, which has seven predicted transmembrane segments, thus rendering HiGlpG amenable to in vitro studies of membrane-protein folding. PMID:27028647

  2. Origin and Diversification of Meprin Proteases

    PubMed Central

    Marín, Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    Meprins are astacin metalloproteases with a characteristic, easily recognizable structure, given that they are the only proteases with both MAM and MATH domains plus a transmembrane region. So far assumed to be vertebrate-specific, it is shown here, using a combination of evolutionary and genomic analyses, that meprins originated before the urochordates/vertebrates split. In particular, three genes encoding structurally typical meprin proteins are arranged in tandem in the genome of the urochordate Ciona intestinalis. Phylogenetic analyses showed that the protease and MATH domains present in the meprin-like proteins encoded by the Ciona genes are very similar in sequence to the domains found in vertebrate meprins, which supports them having a common origin. While many vertebrates have the two canonical meprin-encoding genes orthologous to human MEP1A and MEP1B (which respectively encode for the proteins known as meprin α and meprin β), a single gene has been found so far in the genome of the chondrichthyan fish Callorhinchus milii, and additional meprin-encoding genes are present in some species. Particularly, a group of bony fish species have genes encoding highly divergent meprins, here named meprin-F. Genes encoding meprin-F proteins, derived from MEP1B genes, are abundant in some species, as the Amazon molly, Poecilia formosa, which has 7 of them. Finally, it is confirmed that the MATH domains of meprins are very similar to the ones in TRAF ubiquitin ligases, which suggests that meprins originated when protease and TRAF E3-encoding sequences were combined. PMID:26288188

  3. Deregulated hepsin protease activity confers oncogenicity by concomitantly augmenting HGF/MET signalling and disrupting epithelial cohesion.

    PubMed

    Tervonen, T A; Belitškin, D; Pant, S M; Englund, J I; Marques, E; Ala-Hongisto, H; Nevalaita, L; Sihto, H; Heikkilä, P; Leidenius, M; Hewitson, K; Ramachandra, M; Moilanen, A; Joensuu, H; Kovanen, P E; Poso, A; Klefström, J

    2016-04-01

    Hepsin belongs to a family of cell-surface serine proteases, which have sparked interest as therapeutic targets because of the accessibility of extracellular protease domain for inhibitors. Hepsin is frequently amplified and/or overexpressed in epithelial cancers, but it is not clear how enhanced hepsin expression confers a potential for oncogenicity. We show that hepsin is consistently overexpressed in more than 40% of examined breast cancers, including all major biological subtypes. The effects of doxycycline-induced hepsin overexpression were examined in mammary epithelial organoids, and we found that induced hepsin acutely downmodulates its cognate inhibitor, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) activator inhibitor type 1 (HAI-1). Hepsin-induced depletion of cellular HAI-1 led to a sharp increase in pericellular serine protease activity. The derepressed hepsin proteolytically activated downstream serine proteases, augmented HGF/MET signalling and caused deterioration of desmosomes and hemidesmosomes; structures important for cell cohesion and cell-basement membrane interaction. Moreover, chronic induction of hepsin considerably shortened the latency of Myc-dependent tumourigenesis in the mouse mammary gland. The serine protease and uPA system inhibitor WX-UK1, identified as a micromolar range hepsin inhibitor, prevented hepsin from augmenting HGF/MET signalling and disrupting desmosomes and hemidesmosomes. The findings suggest that the oncogenic activity of hepsin arises not only from elevated expression level but also from depletion of HAI-1, events which together trigger gain-of-function activity impacting HGF/MET signalling and epithelial cohesion. Thus, hepsin overexpression is a major oncogenic conferrer to a serine protease activity involved in breast cancer dissemination. PMID:26165838

  4. Hemostatic, milk clotting and blood stain removal potential of cysteine proteases from Calotropis gigantea (L.) R. Br. Latex

    PubMed Central

    Bindhu, Omana Sukumaran; Singh, Maheshwari Kumari

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Plant latex is a natural source of biologically active compounds and several hydrolytic enzymes responsible for their diverse health benefits. Recent past has witnessed substantial progress in understanding their supplementary industrial and pharmaceutical utility. Calotropis gigantea is one of the important latex producing plants belonging to asclepediaceae family with wide ethnopharmacological applications and is rich in proteolytic enzymes. Present study investigates hemostatic, milk clotting and blood stain removal potential of C. gigantea latex proteases. Materials and Methods: The protease activity of crude enzyme (CE), obtained by centrifugation followed by ammonium sulphate precipitation and dialysis, was assayed using casein as the substrate. Effect of pH, temperature and specific inhibitors on protease activity was determined. Native PAGE and in gel protease activity of CE was performed. Hemostatic (Fibrinogen polymerization, fibrinogen agarose plate and blood clot lysis assays), milk clotting and blood stain removal efficacies of CE were determined. Results: CE exhibited high caseinolytic activity. Enzyme activity was optimum at 37-50ºC and pH 8.0. Fibrinogen polymerization assay showed concentration dependent increase in turbidity indicating thrombin like activity which was further confirmed by fibrinogen agarose plate assays. Clot lysis assay indicated 92.41% thrombolysis by CE in 90 min. CE also revealed significantly high ratio of milk clotting to protease activity (Milk Clotting Index, MCI = 827.59 ± 1.52). Complete destaining of blood stained fabric was observed when incubated with 1% detergent incorporated with 0.1mg/ml CE. The study highlights and validates the compound application potential of latex cysteine proteases from C. gigantea. PMID:24991114

  5. Isolation and characterization of a cysteine protease from the latex of Araujia hortorum fruits.

    PubMed

    Priolo, N; Morcelle del Valle, S; Arribére, M C; López, L; Caffini, N

    2000-01-01

    A new protease (araujiain h I) was purified to mass spectroscopy homogeneity from the latex of Araujia hortorum Fourn. (Asclepiadaceae) fruits by ultracentrifugation and ion exchange chromatography. The enzyme has a molecular mass of 24,031 (mass spectrometry) and an iso-electric point higher than 9.3. The optimum pH range for casein hydrolysis was 8.0-9.5. The enzyme showed remarkable caseinolytic activity at high temperatures, although its thermal stability decayed rapidly. The proteinase was activated by thiol compounds and inhibited by common thiol-blocking reagents, particularly E-64 and HgCl2, suggesting the enzyme belongs to the cysteine protease family. The concentration of active sites as determined by titration with E-64 was 3.3 microM. When assayed on N-alpha-CBZ-amino acid-p-nitrophenyl esters, the enzyme showed higher preference for the glutamine derivative, followed by those of alanine, asparagine, glycine, and leucine, in decreasing order. Partial homology (36-48%) with other plant cysteine proteinases was observed in an internal fragment obtained by Protease V8 treatment. PMID:10882171

  6. Characterization of a novel otubain-like protease with deubiquitination activity from Nosema bombycis (Microsporidia).

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Dang, Xiaoqun; Luo, Bo; Li, Chunfeng; Long, Mengxian; Li, Tian; Li, Zhi; Pan, Guoqing; Zhou, Zeyang

    2015-10-01

    Otubains are a recently identified family of deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs). They are involved in diverse biological processes including protein degradation, signal transduction, and cell immune response. Several microsporidian genomes have been published in the last decade; however, little is known about the otubain-like protease in these widely-spread obligate intracellular parasites. Here, we characterized a 25 kDa otubain-like protease (NbOTU1) from the microsporidian Nosema bombycis, the pathogen causing pebrine disease in the economically important insect Bombyx mori. Sequence analysis showed that this protein contained a conserved catalytic triad of otubains composed of aspartate, cysteine, and histidine residues. The expression of Nbotu1 began on day 3 postinfection as determined by the RT-PCR method. Immunofluorescence analysis indicated that NbOTU1 is localized on the spore wall of N. bombycis. The subcellular localization of the NbOTU1 was further detected with immunoelectron microscopy, which showed that NbOTU1 is localized at the regions around endospore wall and plasma membrane. Deubiquitination analysis confirmed that the recombinant NbOTU1 possessed deubiquitination activity in vitro. Taken together, a novel microsporidian otubain-like protease NbOTU1 was partially characterized in N. bombycis, demonstrating its subcellular location and deubiquitination activity. This study provided a basic reference for further dissecting the function of otubains in microsporidia. PMID:26177898

  7. Midgut serine proteases and alternative host plant utilization in Pieris brassicae L.

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rakesh; Bhardwaj, Usha; Kumar, Pawan; Mazumdar-Leighton, Sudeshna

    2015-01-01

    Pieris brassicae L. is a serious pest of cultivated crucifers in several parts of the world. Larvae of P. brassicae also feed prolifically on garden nasturtium (Tropaeolum majus L., of the family Tropaeolaceae). Proteolytic digestion was studied in larvae feeding on multiple hosts. Fourth instars were collected from cauliflower fields before transfer onto detached, aerial tissues of selected host plants in the lab. Variable levels of midgut proteases were detected in larvae fed on different hosts using protein substrates (casein and recombinant RBCL cloned from cauliflower) and diagnostic, synthetic substrates. Qualitative changes in midgut trypsin activities and quantitative changes in midgut chymotrypsin activities were implicated in physiological adaptation of larvae transferred to T. majus. Midgut proteolytic activities were inhibited to different extents by serine protease inhibitors, including putative trypsin inhibitors isolated from herbivore-attacked and herbivore-free leaves of cauliflower (CfTI) and T. majus (TpTI). Transfer of larvae to T. majus significantly influenced feeding parameters but not necessarily when transferred to different tissues of the same host. Results obtained are relevant for devising sustainable pest management strategies, including transgenic approaches using genes encoding plant protease inhibitors. PMID:25873901

  8. Counter Selection Substrate Library Strategy for Developing Specific Protease Substrates and Probes.

    PubMed

    Poreba, Marcin; Solberg, Rigmor; Rut, Wioletta; Lunde, Ngoc Nguyen; Kasperkiewicz, Paulina; Snipas, Scott J; Mihelic, Marko; Turk, Dusan; Turk, Boris; Salvesen, Guy S; Drag, Marcin

    2016-08-18

    Legumain (AEP) is a lysosomal cysteine protease that was first characterized in leguminous seeds and later discovered in higher eukaryotes. AEP upregulation is linked to a number of diseases including inflammation, arteriosclerosis, and tumorigenesis. Thus this protease is an excellent molecular target for the development of new chemical markers. We deployed a hybrid combinatorial substrate library (HyCoSuL) approach to obtain P1-Asp fluorogenic substrates and biotin-labeled inhibitors that targeted legumain. Since this approach led to probes that were also recognized by caspases, we introduced a Counter Selection Substrate Library (CoSeSuL) approach that biases the peptidic scaffold against caspases, thus delivering highly selective legumain probes. The selectivity of these tools was validated using M38L and HEK293 cells. We also propose that the CoSeSuL methodology can be considered as a general principle in the design of selective probes for other protease families where selectivity is difficult to achieve by conventional sequence-based profiling. PMID:27478158

  9. Cysteine proteases from the Asclepiadaceae plants latex exhibited thrombin and plasmin like activities.

    PubMed

    Shivaprasad, H V; Riyaz, M; Venkatesh Kumar, R; Dharmappa, K K; Tarannum, Shaista; Siddesha, J M; Rajesh, R; Vishwanath, B S

    2009-10-01

    In the present study we evaluated the presence of cysteine protease from the latex of four plants Asclepias curassavica L., Calotropis gigantea R.Br., Pergularia extensa R.Br. and Cynanchum puciflorum R.Br. belongs to the family Asclepiadaceae. Cysteine proteases from these plants latex exhibited both thrombin and plasmin like activities. Latex enzyme fraction in a concentration dependent manner induced the formation of clot in citrated blood plasma. Direct incubation of fibrinogen with latex enzyme fraction resulted in the formation of fibrin clot similar to thrombin enzyme. However prolonged incubation resulted in degradation of the formed fibrin clot suggesting plasmin like activity. Latex enzyme fraction preferentially hydrolyzed Aalpha and Bbeta chains of fibrinogen to form fibrin clot. Latex enzyme fraction also hydrolyzed the subunits of fully cross linked fibrin efficiently, the order of hydrolysis was alpha-polymer > alpha-chains > beta-chain and gamma-gamma dimer. Cysteine proteases from all the four Asclepiadaceae plants latex exhibited similar action on fibrinogen and fibrin. This study scientifically validate the use of plant latex in stop bleeding and wound healing by traditional healers all over the world. PMID:18979066

  10. Staphylococcus aureus secretes a unique class of neutrophil serine protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Stapels, Daphne A C; Ramyar, Kasra X; Bischoff, Markus; von Köckritz-Blickwede, Maren; Milder, Fin J; Ruyken, Maartje; Eisenbeis, Janina; McWhorter, William J; Herrmann, Mathias; van Kessel, Kok P M; Geisbrecht, Brian V; Rooijakkers, Suzan H M

    2014-09-01

    Neutrophils are indispensable for clearing infections with the prominent human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. Here, we report that S. aureus secretes a family of proteins that potently inhibits the activity of neutrophil serine proteases (NSPs): neutrophil elastase (NE), proteinase 3, and cathepsin G. The NSPs, but not related serine proteases, are specifically blocked by the extracellular adherence protein (Eap) and the functionally orphan Eap homologs EapH1 and EapH2, with inhibitory-constant values in the low-nanomolar range. Eap proteins are together essential for NSP inhibition by S. aureus in vitro and promote staphylococcal infection in vivo. The crystal structure of the EapH1/NE complex showed that Eap molecules constitute a unique class of noncovalent protease inhibitors that occlude the catalytic cleft of NSPs. These findings increase our insights into the complex pathogenesis of S. aureus infections and create opportunities to design novel treatment strategies for inflammatory conditions related to excessive NSP activity. PMID:25161283

  11. Staphylococcus aureus secretes a unique class of neutrophil serine protease inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Stapels, Daphne A. C.; Ramyar, Kasra X.; Bischoff, Markus; von Köckritz-Blickwede, Maren; Milder, Fin J.; Ruyken, Maartje; Eisenbeis, Janina; McWhorter, William J.; Herrmann, Mathias; van Kessel, Kok P. M.; Geisbrecht, Brian V.; Rooijakkers, Suzan H. M.

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophils are indispensable for clearing infections with the prominent human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. Here, we report that S. aureus secretes a family of proteins that potently inhibits the activity of neutrophil serine proteases (NSPs): neutrophil elastase (NE), proteinase 3, and cathepsin G. The NSPs, but not related serine proteases, are specifically blocked by the extracellular adherence protein (Eap) and the functionally orphan Eap homologs EapH1 and EapH2, with inhibitory-constant values in the low-nanomolar range. Eap proteins are together essential for NSP inhibition by S. aureus in vitro and promote staphylococcal infection in vivo. The crystal structure of the EapH1/NE complex showed that Eap molecules constitute a unique class of noncovalent protease inhibitors that occlude the catalytic cleft of NSPs. These findings increase our insights into the complex pathogenesis of S. aureus infections and create opportunities to design novel treatment strategies for inflammatory conditions related to excessive NSP activity. PMID:25161283

  12. Cell Surface Human Airway Trypsin-Like Protease Is Lost During Squamous Cell Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    DUHAIME, MICHAEL J.; PAGE, KHALIPH O.; VARELA, FAUSTO A.; MURRAY, ANDREW S.; SILVERMAN, MICHAEL E.; ZORATTI, GINA L.; LIST, KARIN

    2016-01-01

    Cancer progression is accompanied by increased levels of extracellular proteases that are capable of remodeling the extracellular matrix, as well as cleaving and activating growth factors and receptors that are involved in pro-cancerous signaling pathways. Several members of the type II transmembrane serine protease (TTSP) family have been shown to play critical roles in cancer progression, however, the expression or function of the TTSP Human Airway Trypsin-like protease (HAT) in carcinogenesis has not been examined. In the present study we aimed to determine the expression of HAT during squamous cell carcinogenesis. HAT transcript is present in several tissues containing stratified squamous epithelium and decreased expression is observed in carcinomas. We determined that HAT protein is consistently expressed on the cell surface in suprabasal/apical layers of squamous cells in healthy cervical and esophageal epithelia. To assess whether HAT protein is differentially expressed in normal tissue versus tissue in different stages of carcinogenesis, we performed a comprehensive immunohistochemical analysis of HAT protein expression levels and localization in arrays of paraffin embedded human cervical and esophageal carcinomas compared to the corresponding normal tissue. We found that HAT protein is expressed in the non-proliferating, differentiated cellular strata and is lost during the dedifferentiation of epithelial cells, a hallmark of squamous cell carcinogenesis. Thus, HAT expression may potentially be useful as a marker for clinical grading and assessment of patient prognosis in squamous cell carcinomas. PMID:26297835

  13. Differential Signaling by Protease-Activated Receptors: Implications for Therapeutic Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Sidhu, Tejminder S.; French, Shauna L.; Hamilton, Justin R.

    2014-01-01

    Protease-activated receptors (PARs) are a family of four G protein-coupled receptors that exhibit increasingly appreciated differences in signaling and regulation both within and between the receptor class. By nature of their proteolytic self-activation mechanism, PARs have unique processes of receptor activation, “ligand” binding, and desensitization/resensitization. These distinctive aspects have presented both challenges and opportunities in the targeting of PARs for therapeutic benefit—the most notable example of which is inhibition of PAR1 on platelets for the prevention of arterial thrombosis. However, more recent studies have uncovered further distinguishing features of PAR-mediated signaling, revealing mechanisms by which identical proteases elicit distinct effects in the same cell, as well as how distinct proteases produce different cellular consequences via the same receptor. Here we review this differential signaling by PARs, highlight how important distinctions between PAR1 and PAR4 are impacting on the progress of a new class of anti-thrombotic drugs, and discuss how these more recent insights into PAR signaling may present further opportunities for manipulating PAR activation and signaling in the development of novel therapies. PMID:24733067

  14. Amino acid sequence alignment of bacterial and mammalian pancreatic serine proteases based on topological equivalences.

    PubMed

    James, M N; Delbaere, L T; Brayer, G D

    1978-06-01

    The three-dimensional structures of the bacterial serine proteases SGPA, SGPB, and alpha-lytic protease have been compared with those of the pancreatic enzymes alpha-chymotrypsin and elastase. This comparison shows that approximately 60% (55-64%) of the alpha-carbon atom positions of the bacterial serine proteases are topologically equivalent to the alpha-carbon atom positions of the pancreatic enzymes. The corresponding value for a comparison of the bacterial enzymes among themselves is approximately 84%. The results of these topological comparisons have been used to deduce an experimentally sound sequence alignment for these several enzymes. This alignment shows that there is extensive tertiary structural homology among the bacteria and pancreatic enzymes without significant primary sequence identity (less than 21%). The acquisition of a zymogen function by the pancreatic enzymes is accompanied by two major changes to the bacterial enzymes' architecture: an insertion of 9 residues to increase the length of the N-terminal loop, and one of 12 residues to a loop near the activation salt bridge. In addition, in these two enzyme families, the methionine loop (residues 164-182) adopts very different comformations which are associated with their altered substrate specificities. PMID:96920

  15. Cell Surface Human Airway Trypsin-Like Protease Is Lost During Squamous Cell Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Duhaime, Michael J; Page, Khaliph O; Varela, Fausto A; Murray, Andrew S; Silverman, Michael E; Zoratti, Gina L; List, Karin

    2016-07-01

    Cancer progression is accompanied by increased levels of extracellular proteases that are capable of remodeling the extracellular matrix, as well as cleaving and activating growth factors and receptors that are involved in pro-cancerous signaling pathways. Several members of the type II transmembrane serine protease (TTSP) family have been shown to play critical roles in cancer progression, however, the expression or function of the TTSP Human Airway Trypsin-like protease (HAT) in carcinogenesis has not been examined. In the present study we aimed to determine the expression of HAT during squamous cell carcinogenesis. HAT transcript is present in several tissues containing stratified squamous epithelium and decreased expression is observed in carcinomas. We determined that HAT protein is consistently expressed on the cell surface in suprabasal/apical layers of squamous cells in healthy cervical and esophageal epithelia. To assess whether HAT protein is differentially expressed in normal tissue versus tissue in different stages of carcinogenesis, we performed a comprehensive immunohistochemical analysis of HAT protein expression levels and localization in arrays of paraffin embedded human cervical and esophageal carcinomas compared to the corresponding normal tissue. We found that HAT protein is expressed in the non-proliferating, differentiated cellular strata and is lost during the dedifferentiation of epithelial cells, a hallmark of squamous cell carcinogenesis. Thus, HAT expression may potentially be useful as a marker for clinical grading and assessment of patient prognosis in squamous cell carcinomas. PMID:26297835

  16. Identification of a new soybean Kunitz trypsin inhibitor mutation and its effect on Bowman-Birk protease inhibitor content in soybean seed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean seeds possess anti-nutritional compounds which inactivate digestive proteases, principally corresponding to two families: Kunitz Trypsin Inhibitors (KTi) and Bowman-Birk Inhibitors (BBI). High levels of raw soybeans/soybean meal in feed mixtures can cause poor weight gain and pancreatic abno...

  17. Identification and Characterization of IgdE, a Novel IgG-degrading Protease of Streptococcus suis with Unique Specificity for Porcine IgG.

    PubMed

    Spoerry, Christian; Seele, Jana; Valentin-Weigand, Peter; Baums, Christoph G; von Pawel-Rammingen, Ulrich

    2016-04-01

    Streptococcus suisis a major endemic pathogen of pigs causing meningitis, arthritis, and other diseases. ZoonoticS. suisinfections are emerging in humans causing similar pathologies as well as severe conditions such as toxic shock-like syndrome. Recently, we discovered an IdeS family protease ofS. suisthat exclusively cleaves porcine IgM and represents the first virulence factor described, linkingS. suisto pigs as their natural host. Here we report the identification and characterization of a novel, unrelated protease ofS. suisthat exclusively targets porcine IgG. This enzyme, designated IgdE forimmunoglobulinG-degradingenzyme ofS. suis, is a cysteine protease distinct from previous characterized streptococcal immunoglobulin degrading proteases of the IdeS family and mediates efficient cleavage of the hinge region of porcine IgG with a high degree of specificity. The findings that allS. suisstrains investigated possess the IgG proteolytic activity and that piglet serum samples contain specific antibodies against IgdE strongly indicate that the protease is expressedin vivoduring infection and represents a novel and putative important bacterial virulence/colonization determinant, and a thus potential therapeutic target. PMID:26861873

  18. The yeast ubiquitin protease, Ubp3p, promotes protein stability.

    PubMed Central

    Brew, Christine T; Huffaker, Tim C

    2002-01-01

    Stu1p is a microtubule-associated protein required for spindle assembly. In this article we show that the temperature-sensitive stu1-5 allele is synthetically lethal in combination with ubp3, gim1-gim5, and kem1 mutations. The primary focus of this article is on the stu1-5 ubp3 interaction. Ubp3 is a deubiquitination enzyme and a member of a large family of cysteine proteases that cleave ubiquitin moieties from protein substrates. UBP3 is the only one of 16 UBP genes in yeast whose loss is synthetically lethal with stu1-5. Stu1p levels in stu1-5 cells are several-fold lower than the levels in wild-type cells and the stu1-5 temperature sensitivity can be rescued by additional copies of stu1-5. These results indicate that the primary effect of the stu1-5 mutation is to make the protein less stable. The levels of Stu1p are even lower in ubp3Delta stu1-5 cells, suggesting that Ubp3p plays a role in promoting protein stability. We also found that ubp3Delta produces growth defects in combination with mutations in other genes that decrease protein stability. Overall, these data support the idea that Ubp3p has a general role in the reversal of protein ubiquitination. PMID:12454057

  19. The periplasmic serine protease inhibitor ecotin protects bacteria against neutrophil elastase.

    PubMed Central

    Eggers, Christopher T; Murray, Iain A; Delmar, Valerie A; Day, Anthony G; Craik, Charles S

    2004-01-01

    Ecotin is a dimeric periplasmic protein from Escherichia coli that has been shown to inhibit potently many trypsin-fold serine proteases of widely varying substrate specificity. To help elucidate the physiological function of ecotin, we examined the family of ecotin orthologues, which are present in a subset of Gram-negative bacteria. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that ecotin has an exogenous target, possibly neutrophil elastase. Recombinant protein was expressed and purified from E. coli, Yersinia pestis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, all species that encounter the mammalian immune system, and also from the plant pathogen Pantoea citrea. Notably, the Pa. citrea variant inhibits neutrophil elastase 1000-fold less potently than the other orthologues. All four orthologues are dimeric proteins that potently inhibit (<10 pM) the pancreatic digestive proteases trypsin and chymotrypsin, while showing more variable inhibition (5 pM to 24 microM) of the blood proteases Factor Xa, thrombin and urokinase-type plasminogen activator. To test whether ecotin does, in fact, protect bacteria from neutrophil elastase, an ecotin-deficient strain was generated in E. coli. This strain is significantly more sensitive in cell-killing assays to human neutrophil elastase, which causes increased permeability of the outer membrane that persists even during renewed bacterial growth. Ecotin affects primarily the ability of E. coli to recover and grow following treatment with neutrophil elastase, rather than the actual rate of killing. This suggests that an important part of the antimicrobial mechanism of neutrophil elastase may be a periplasmic bacteriostatic effect of protease that has translocated across the damaged outer membrane. PMID:14705961

  20. A NOVEL APPROACH TO REGULATE NITROGEN MINERALIZATION USING PROTEASE INHIBITORS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mineralization of organic N sources by extracellular proteases affects both the availability of inorganic N to plants and losses of N to the environment. We hypothesized that (i) application of purified protease inhibitors would slow down soil N mineralization, and (ii) elevated concentrations of pr...

  1. Effect of proteases on the. beta. -thromboglobulin radioimmunoassay

    SciTech Connect

    Donlon, J.A.; Helgeson, E.A.; Donlon, M.A.

    1985-02-11

    Rat peritoneal mast cells and mast cell granules were evaluated by radioimmunoassay for the presence of ..beta..-thromboglobulin and platelet factor 4. The initial assays indicated that a ..beta..-thromboglobulin cross reacting material was released from mast cells by compound 48/80 in a similar dose-dependent manner as histamine release. The material was also found to be associated with purified granules. However, the use of protease inhibitors in the buffers completely abolished the positive assays. Further evaluation of the effects of various proteases on the ..beta..-thromboglobulin assay indicated that elastase would also generate a false positive assay which could then be neutralized by the use of ..cap alpha../sub 1/-antitrypsin as a protease inhibitor. There was no protease effect on the platelet factor 4 radioimmunoassay which always showed no detectable amounts with mast cells, granules or proteases. These results clearly indicate the artifactual positive assays which can arise when using certain radioimmunoassay tests in the presence of cell proteases. The use of protease inhibitors is a necessary control when applying a radioimmunoassay to a system with potentially active proteases. 24 references, 2 figures, 4 tables.

  2. Broad-Spectrum Allosteric Inhibition of Herpesvirus Proteases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Herpesviruses rely on a homodimeric protease for viral capsid maturation. A small molecule, DD2, previously shown to disrupt dimerization of Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus protease (KSHV Pr) by trapping an inactive monomeric conformation and two analogues generated through carboxylate bioisosteric replacement (compounds 2 and 3) were shown to inhibit the associated proteases of all three human herpesvirus (HHV) subfamilies (α, β, and γ). Inhibition data reveal that compound 2 has potency comparable to or better than that of DD2 against the tested proteases. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and a new application of the kinetic analysis developed by Zhang and Poorman [Zhang, Z. Y., Poorman, R. A., et al. (1991) J. Biol. Chem. 266, 15591–15594] show DD2, compound 2, and compound 3 inhibit HHV proteases by dimer disruption. All three compounds bind the dimer interface of other HHV proteases in a manner analogous to binding of DD2 to KSHV protease. The determination and analysis of cocrystal structures of both analogues with the KSHV Pr monomer verify and elaborate on the mode of binding for this chemical scaffold, explaining a newly observed critical structure–activity relationship. These results reveal a prototypical chemical scaffold for broad-spectrum allosteric inhibition of human herpesvirus proteases and an approach for the identification of small molecules that allosterically regulate protein activity by targeting protein–protein interactions. PMID:24977643

  3. Expression and characterization of Coprothermobacter proteolyticus alkaline serine protease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    TECHNICAL ABSTRACT A putative protease gene (aprE) from the thermophilic bacterium Coprothermobacter proteolyticus was cloned and expressed in Bacillus subtilis. The enzyme was determined to be a serine protease based on inhibition by PMSF. Biochemical characterization demonstrated the enzyme had...

  4. Cathepsin Protease Inhibition Reduces Endometriosis Lesion Establishment.

    PubMed

    Porter, Kristi M; Wieser, Friedrich A; Wilder, Catera L; Sidell, Neil; Platt, Manu O

    2016-05-01

    Endometriosis is a gynecologic disease characterized by the ectopic presence of endometrial tissue on organs within the peritoneal cavity, causing debilitating abdominal pain and infertility. Current treatments alleviate moderate pain symptoms associated with the disorder but exhibit limited ability to prevent new or recurring lesion establishment and growth. Retrograde menstruation has been implicated for introducing endometrial tissue into the peritoneal cavity, but molecular mechanisms underlying attachment and invasion are not fully understood. We hypothesize that cysteine cathepsins, a group of powerful extracellular matrix proteases, facilitate endometrial tissue invasion and endometriosis lesion establishment in the peritoneal wall and inhibiting this activity would decrease endometriosis lesion implantation. To test this, we used an immunocompetent endometriosis mouse model and found that endometriotic lesions exhibited a greater than 5-fold increase in active cathepsins compared to tissue from peritoneal wall or eutopic endometrium, with cathepsins L and K specifically implicated. Human endometriosis lesions also exhibited greater cathepsin activity than adjacent peritoneum tissue, supporting the mouse results. Finally, we tested the hypothesis that inhibiting cathepsin activity could block endometriosis lesion attachment and implantation in vivo. Intraperitoneal injection of the broad cysteine cathepsin inhibitor, E-64, significantly reduced the number of attached endometriosis lesions in our murine model compared to vehicle-treated controls demonstrating that cathepsin proteases contribute to endometriosis lesion establishment, and their inhibition may provide a novel, nonhormonal therapy for endometriosis. PMID:26482207

  5. Allosteric antibody inhibition of human hepsin protease.

    PubMed

    Koschubs, Tobias; Dengl, Stefan; Dürr, Harald; Kaluza, Klaus; Georges, Guy; Hartl, Christiane; Jennewein, Stefan; Lanzendörfer, Martin; Auer, Johannes; Stern, Alvin; Huang, Kuo-Sen; Packman, Kathryn; Gubler, Ueli; Kostrewa, Dirk; Ries, Stefan; Hansen, Silke; Kohnert, Ulrich; Cramer, Patrick; Mundigl, Olaf

    2012-03-15

    Hepsin is a type II transmembrane serine protease that is expressed in several human tissues. Overexpression of hepsin has been found to correlate with tumour progression and metastasis, which is so far best studied for prostate cancer, where more than 90% of such tumours show this characteristic. To enable improved future patient treatment, we have developed a monoclonal humanized antibody that selectively inhibits human hepsin and does not inhibit other related proteases. We found that our antibody, hH35, potently inhibits hepsin enzymatic activity at nanomolar concentrations. Kinetic characterization revealed non-linear, slow, tight-binding inhibition. This correlates with the crystal structure we obtained for the human hepsin-hH35 antibody Fab fragment complex, which showed that the antibody binds hepsin around α3-helix, located far from the active centre. The unique allosteric mode of inhibition of hH35 is distinct from the recently described HGFA (hepatocyte growth factor activator) allosteric antibody inhibition. We further explain how a small change in the antibody design induces dramatic structural rearrangements in the hepsin antigen upon binding, leading to complete enzyme inactivation. PMID:22132769

  6. Viral proteases as targets for drug design.

    PubMed

    Skoreński, Marcin; Sieńczyk, Marcin

    2013-01-01

    In order to productively infect a host, viruses must enter the cell and force host cell replication mechanisms to produce new infectious virus particles. The success of this process unfortunately results in disease progression and, in the case of infection with many viral species, may cause mortality. The discoveries of Louis Pasteur and Edward Jenner led to one of the greatest advances in modern medicine - the development of vaccines that generate long-lasting memory immune responses to combat viral infection. Widespread use of vaccines has reduced mortality and morbidity associated with viral infection and, in some cases, has completely eradicated virus from the human population. Unfortunately, several viral species maintain a significant ability to mutate and "escape" vaccine-induced immune responses. Thus, novel anti-viral agents are required for treatment and prevention of viral disease. Targeting proteases that are crucial in the viral life cycle has proven to be an effective method to control viral infection, and this avenue of investigation continues to generate anti-viral treatments. Herein, we provide the reader with a brief history as well as a comprehensive review of the most recent advances in the design and synthesis of viral protease inhibitors. PMID:23016690

  7. Purification and characterization of an alkaline protease from Acetes chinensis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jiachao; Liu, Xin; Li, Zhaojie; Xu, Jie; Xue, Changhu; Gao, Xin

    2005-07-01

    An alkaline protease from Acetes chinensis was purified and characterized in this study. The steps of purification include ammonium sulfate precipitation, ion-exchange chromatography with Q-sepharose Fast Flow, gel filtration chromatography with S300 and the second ion-exchange chromatography with Q-sepharose Fast Flow. The protease was isolated and purified, which was present and active on protein substrates (azocasein and casein). The specific protease activity was 17.15 folds and the recovery was 4.67. The molecular weight of the protease was estimated at 23.2 kD by SDS-PAGE. With azocasein as the susbstrate, the optimal temperature was 55°C and the optimal pH value was 5.5. Ion Ca2+ could enhance the proteolytic activity of the protease, while Cu2+, EDTA and PMSF could inhibit its activity.

  8. Phosphoramidates as novel activity-based probes for serine proteases.

    PubMed

    Haedke, Ute R; Frommel, Sandra C; Hansen, Fabian; Hahne, Hannes; Kuster, Bernhard; Bogyo, Matthew; Verhelst, Steven H L

    2014-05-26

    Activity-based probes (ABPs) are small molecules that exclusively form covalent bonds with catalytically active enzymes. In the last decade, they have especially been used in functional proteomics studies of proteases. Here, we present phosphoramidate peptides as a novel type of ABP for serine proteases. These molecules can be made in a straightforward manner by standard Fmoc-based solid-phase peptide synthesis, allowing rapid diversification. The resulting ABPs covalently bind different serine proteases, depending on the amino acid recognition element adjacent to the reactive group. A reporter tag enables downstream gel-based analysis or LC-MS/MS-mediated identification of the targeted proteases. Overall, we believe that these readily accessible probes will provide new avenues for the functional study of serine proteases in complex proteomes. PMID:24817682

  9. Fluorous-based Peptide Microarrays for Protease Screening

    PubMed Central

    Collet, Beatrice Y. M.; Nagashima, Tadamichi; Yu, Marvin S.; Pohl, Nicola L. B.

    2009-01-01

    As ever more protease sequences are uncovered through genome sequencing projects, efficient parallel methods to discover the potential substrates of these proteases becomes crucial. Herein we describe the first use of fluorous-based microarrays to probe peptide sequences and begin to define the scope and limitations of fluorous microarray technologies for the screening of proteases. Comparison of a series of serine proteases showed that their ability to cleave peptide substrates in solution was maintained upon immobilization of these substrates onto fluorous-coated glass slides. The fluorous surface did not serve to significantly inactivate the enzymes. However, addition of hydrophilic components to the peptide sequences could induce lower rates of substrate cleavage with enzymes such as chymotrypsin with affinities to hydrophobic moieties. This work represents the first step to creating robust protease screening platforms using noncovalent microarray interface that can easily incorporate a range of compounds on the same slide. PMID:20161483

  10. Alkaline protease production by a strain of marine yeasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ping, Wang; Zhenming, Chi; Chunling, Ma

    2006-07-01

    Yeast strain 10 with high yield of protease was isolated from sediments of saltern near Qingdao, China. The protease had the highest activity at pH 9.0 and 45°C. The optimal medium for the maximum alkaline protease production of strain 10 was 2.5g soluble starch and 2.0g NaNO3 in 100mL seawater with initial pH 6.0. The optimal cultivation conditions for the maximum protease production were temperature 24.5°C, aeration rate 8.0L min-1 and agitation speed 150r min-1 Under the optimal conditions, 623.1 U mg-1 protein of alkaline protease was reached in the culture within 30h of fermentation.

  11. A symmetric inhibitor binds HIV-1 protease asymmetrically.

    PubMed

    Dreyer, G B; Boehm, J C; Chenera, B; DesJarlais, R L; Hassell, A M; Meek, T D; Tomaszek, T A; Lewis, M

    1993-01-26

    Potential advantages of C2-symmetric inhibitors designed for the symmetric HIV-1 protease include high selectivity, potency, stability, and bioavailability. Pseudo-C2-symmetric monools and C2-symmetric diols, containing central hydroxymethylene and (R,R)-dihydroxyethylene moieties flanked by a variety of hydrophobic P1/P1' side chains, were studied as HIV-1 protease inhibitors. The monools and diols were synthesized in 8-10 steps from D-(+)-arabitol and D-(+)-mannitol, respectively. Monools with ethyl or isobutyl P1/P1' side chains were weak inhibitors of recombinant HIV-1 protease (Ki > 10 microM), while benzyl P1/P1' side chains afforded a moderately potent inhibitor (apparent Ki = 230 nM). Diols were 100-10,000x more potent than analogous monools, and a wider range of P1/P1' side chains led to potent inhibition. Both classes of compounds exhibited lower apparent Ki values under high-salt conditions. Surprisingly, monool and diol HIV-1 protease inhibitors were potent inhibitors of porcine pepsin, a prototypical asymmetric monomeric aspartic protease. These results were evaluated in the context of the pseudosymmetric structure of monomeric aspartic proteases and their evolutionary kinship with the retroviral proteases. The X-ray crystal structure of HIV-1 protease complexed with a symmetric diol was determined at 2.6 A. Contrary to expectations, the diol binds the protease asymmetrically and exhibits 2-fold disorder in the electron density map. Molecular dynamics simulations were conducted beginning with asymmetric and symmetric HIV-1 protease/inhibitor model complexes. A more stable trajectory resulted from the asymmetric complex, in agreement with the observed asymmetric binding mode. A simple four-point model was used to argue more generally that van der Waals and electrostatic force fields can commonly lead to an asymmetric association between symmetric molecules. PMID:8422397

  12. Secretory expression, functional characterization, and molecular genetic analysis of novel halo-solvent-tolerant protease from Bacillus gibsonii.

    PubMed

    Deng, Aihua; Zhang, Guoqiang; Shi, Nana; Wu, Jie; Lu, Fuping; Wen, Tingyi

    2014-02-28

    A novel protease gene from Bacillus gibsonii, aprBG, was cloned, expressed in B. subtilis, and characterized. High-level expression of aprBG was achieved in the recombinant strain when a junction was present between the promoter and the target gene. The purified recombinant enzyme exhibited similar N-terminal sequences and catalytic properties to the native enzyme, including high affinity and hydrolytic efficiency toward various substrates and a superior performance when exposed to various metal ions, surfactants, oxidants, and commercial detergents. AprBG was remarkably stable in 50% organic solvents and retained 100% activity and stability in 0-4 M NaCl, which is better than the characteristics of previously reported proteases. AprBG was most closely related to the high-alkaline proteases of the subtilisin family with a 57-68% identity. The secretion and maturation mechanism of AprBG was dependent on the enzyme activity, as analyzed by site-directed mutagenesis. Thus, when taken together, the results revealed that the halo-solvent-tolerant protease AprBG displays significant activity and stability under various extreme conditions, indicating its potential for use in many biotechnology applications. PMID:24150493

  13. Identification of two new keratinolytic proteases from a Bacillus pumilus strain using protein analysis and gene sequencing.

    PubMed

    Fellahi, Soltana; Chibani, Abdelwaheb; Feuk-Lagerstedt, Elisabeth; Taherzadeh, Mohammad J

    2016-12-01

    The Bacillus strain (CCUG 66887) has a high capacity to excrete keratinase with the ability to degrade both alpha- and beta keratin. In this study we aimed to show the characteristics of the keratinolytic protease and to identify its gene by using liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry methods (nanoHPLC-ESI-MS/MS) followed by Mascot data base search. The results showed that the enzyme in fact consists of two different keratinases, both with a molecular mass of 38 kDa. Further, DNA sequencing generated the open reading frame (ORF) of one of the genes (Ker1), and de novo genome sequencing identified the ORF of the second gene (Ker2). The two keratinase genes contain 1153 base pairs each and have a gene similarity of 67 %. In addition, the Bacillus strain was classified as Bacillus pumilus and its genes were annotated in the GeneBank at NCBI (accession: CP011109.1). Amino acid sequences alignment with known B. pumilus proteases indicated that the two keratinases of B. pumilus strain C4 are subtilisin-like serine proteases belonging to the Protease S8 family. Taken together, these result suggest the two keratinases as promising candidates for enzymatic processing of keratinous wastes in waste refinery. PMID:27363997

  14. IrSPI, a tick serine protease inhibitor involved in tick feeding and Bartonella henselae infection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiang Ye; de la Fuente, Jose; Cote, Martine; Galindo, Ruth C; Moutailler, Sara; Vayssier-Taussat, Muriel; Bonnet, Sarah I

    2014-07-01

    Ixodes ricinus is the most widespread and abundant tick in Europe, frequently bites humans, and is the vector of several pathogens including those responsible for Lyme disease, Tick-Borne Encephalitis, anaplasmosis, babesiosis and bartonellosis. These tick-borne pathogens are transmitted to vertebrate hosts via tick saliva during blood feeding, and tick salivary gland (SG) factors are likely implicated in transmission. In order to identify such tick factors, we characterized the transcriptome of female I. ricinus SGs using next generation sequencing techniques, and compared transcriptomes between Bartonella henselae-infected and non-infected ticks. High-throughput sequencing of I. ricinus SG transcriptomes led to the generation of 24,539 isotigs. Among them, 829 and 517 transcripts were either significantly up- or down-regulated respectively, in response to bacterial infection. Searches based on sequence identity showed that among the differentially expressed transcripts, 161 transcripts corresponded to nine groups of previously annotated tick SG gene families, while the others corresponded to genes of unknown function. Expression patterns of five selected genes belonging to the BPTI/Kunitz family of serine protease inhibitors, the tick salivary peptide group 1 protein, the salp15 super-family, and the arthropod defensin family, were validated by qRT-PCR. IrSPI, a member of the BPTI/Kunitz family of serine protease inhibitors, showed the highest up-regulation in SGs in response to Bartonella infection. IrSPI silencing impaired tick feeding, as well as resulted in reduced bacterial load in tick SGs. This study provides a comprehensive analysis of I. ricinus SG transcriptome and contributes significant genomic information about this important disease vector. This in-depth knowledge will enable a better understanding of the molecular interactions between ticks and tick-borne pathogens, and identifies IrSPI, a candidate to study now in detail to estimate its

  15. PEGylated substrates of NSP4 protease: A tool to study protease specificity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wysocka, Magdalena; Gruba, Natalia; Grzywa, Renata; Giełdoń, Artur; Bąchor, Remigiusz; Brzozowski, Krzysztof; Sieńczyk, Marcin; Dieter, Jenne; Szewczuk, Zbigniew; Rolka, Krzysztof; Lesner, Adam

    2016-03-01

    Herein we present the synthesis of a novel type of peptidomimetics composed of repeating diaminopropionic acid residues modified with structurally diverse heterobifunctional polyethylene glycol chains (abbreviated as DAPEG). Based on the developed compounds, a library of fluorogenic substrates was synthesized. Further library deconvolution towards human neutrophil serine protease 4 (NSP4) yielded highly sensitive and selective internally quenched peptidomimetic substrates. In silico analysis of the obtained peptidomimetics revealed the presence of an interaction network with distant subsites located on the enzyme surface.

  16. Laundry detergent compatibility of the alkaline protease from Bacillus cereus.

    PubMed

    Banik, Rathindra Mohan; Prakash, Monika

    2004-01-01

    The endogenous protease activity in various commercially available laundry detergents of international companies was studied. The maximum protease activity was found at 50 degrees C in pH range 10.5-11.0 in all the tested laundry detergents. The endogenous protease activity in the tested detergents retained up to 70% on incubation at 40 degrees C for 1 h, whereas less than 30% activity was only found on incubation at 50 degrees C for 1 h. The alkaline protease from an alkalophilic strain of Bacillus cereus was studied for its compatibility in commercial detergents. The cell free fermented broth from shake flask culture of the organism showed maximum activity at pH 10.5 and 50 degrees C. The protease from B. cereus showed much higher residual activity (more than 80%) on incubation with laundry detergents at 50 degrees C for 1 h or longer. The protease enzyme from B. cereus was found to be superior over the endogenous proteases present in the tested commercial laundry detergents in comparison to the enzyme stability during the washing at higher temperature, e.g., 40-50 degrees C. PMID:15293947

  17. Protease production by Streptococcus sanguis associated with subacute bacterial endocarditis.

    PubMed Central

    Straus, D C

    1982-01-01

    A viridans streptococcus (Streptococcus sanguis biotype II) isolated from the blood of a patient with subacute bacterial endocarditis was examined for protease production. In broth culture, extracellular proteolytic enzymes were not produced by this organism until after the early exponential phase of growth, with maximal protease production occurring during the stationary phase. Four distinct proteases were isolated and purified from the supernatant fluids of stationary-phase cultures, employing a combination of ion-exchange column chromatography, gel filtration column chromatography, and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. All four proteases could be eluted from a diethylaminoethyl cellulose column at a sodium chloride gradient concentration of 0.25 M but were separable by gel filtration chromatography on a Sephadex G-100 column. They varied in molecular weights as determined by gel filtration and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis from approximately 13,000 to 230,000. All four proteases had pH optima of between 8.0 and 9.0, and two of the proteases were active against casein, human serum albumin, and gelatin but were not active against elastin and collagen. The remaining two proteases were able to degrade only casein and gelatin. These results show that S. sanguis is able to excrete maximal levels of potentially destructive enzymes when the organisms are not actively multiplying. This finding may explain some of the damage caused in heart tissue by these organisms during subacute bacterial endocarditis. Images PMID:6759404

  18. Screening and characterization of protease producing actinomycetes from marine saltern.

    PubMed

    Suthindhiran, Krish; Jayasri, Mangalam Achuthananda; Dipali, Dipa; Prasar, Apurva

    2014-10-01

    In the course of systematic screening program for bioactive actinomycetes, an alkaline protease producing halophilic strain Actinopolyspora sp. VITSDK2 was isolated from marine saltern, Southern India. The strain was identified as Actinopolyspora based on its phenotypic and phylogenetic characters. The protease was partially purified using ammonium sulfate precipitation and subsequently by DEAE cellulose column chromatography. The enzyme was further purified using HPLC and the molecular weight was found to be 22 kDa as determined by SDS-PAGE analysis. The purified protease exhibited pH stability in a wide range of 4-12 with optimum at 10.0. The enzyme was found to be stable between 25 and 80 °C and displayed a maximum activity at 60 °C. The enzyme activity was increased marginally in presence of Mn(2+) , Mg(2+) , and Ca(2+) and decreased in presence of Cu(2+) . PMSF and DFP completely inhibited the activity suggesting it belongs to serine protease. Further, the proteolytic activity was abolished in presence of N-tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone suggesting this might be chymotrypsin-like serine protease. The protease was 96% active when kept for 10 days at room temperature. The results indicate that the enzyme belong to chymotrypsin-like serine protease exhibiting both pH and thermostability, which can be used for various applications in industries. PMID:24136565

  19. Exploring a new serine protease from Cucumis sativus L.

    PubMed

    Nafeesa, Zohara; Shivalingu, B R; Vivek, H K; Priya, B S; Swamy, S Nanjunda

    2015-03-01

    Coagulation is an important physiological process in hemostasis which is activated by sequential action of proteases. This study aims to understand the involvement of aqueous fruit extract of Cucumis sativus L. (AqFEC) European burp less variety in blood coagulation cascade. AqFEC hydrolyzed casein in a dose-dependent manner. The presence of protease activity was further confirmed by casein zymography which revealed the possible presence of two high molecular weight protease(s). The proteolytic activity was inhibited only by phenyl methyl sulphonyl fluoride suggesting the presence of serine protease(s). In a dose-dependent manner, AqFEC also hydrolysed Aα and Bβ subunits of fibrinogen, whereas it failed to degrade the γ subunit of fibrinogen even at a concentration as high as 100 μg and incubation time up to 4 h. AqFEC reduced the clotting time of citrated plasma by 87.65%. The protease and fibrinogenolytic activity of AqFEC suggests its possible role in stopping the bleeding and ensuing wound healing process. PMID:25577345

  20. Characterization of protease IV expression in Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Conibear, Tim C R; Willcox, Mark D P; Flanagan, Judith L; Zhu, Hua

    2012-02-01

    Expression of protease IV by Pseudomonas aeruginosa during ocular infections contributes significantly to tissue damage. However, several P. aeruginosa strains isolated from ocular infections or inflammatory events produce very low levels of protease IV. The aim of the present study was to characterize, genetically and phenotypically, the presence and expression of the protease IV gene in a group of clinical isolates that cause adverse ocular events of varying degrees, and to elucidate the possible control mechanisms of expression associated with this virulence factor. Protease IV gene sequences from seven clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa were determined and compared to P. aeruginosa strains PAO1 and PA103-29. Production and enzyme activity of protease IV were measured in test strains and compared to that of quorum-sensing gene (lasRI) mutants and the expression of other virulence factors. Protease IV gene sequence similarities between the isolates were 97.5-99.5 %. The strains were classified into two distinct phylogenetic groups that correlated with the presence of exo-enzymes from type three secretion systems (TTSS). Protease IV concentrations produced by PAOΔlasRI mutants and the two clinical isolates with a lasRI gene deficiency were restored to levels comparable to strain PAO1 following complementation of the quorum-sensing gene deficiencies. The protease IV gene is highly conserved in P. aeruginosa clinical isolates that cause a range of adverse ocular events. Observed variations within the gene sequence appear to correlate with presence of specific TTSS genes. Protease IV expression was shown to be regulated by the Las quorum-sensing system. PMID:21921113

  1. Protease inhibition as new therapeutic strategy for GI diseases

    PubMed Central

    Vergnolle, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    The GI tract is the most exposed organ to proteases, both in physiological and pathophysiological conditions. For digestive purposes, the lumen of the upper GI tract contains large amounts of pancreatic proteases, but studies have also demonstrated increased proteolytic activity into mucosal tissues (both in the upper and lower GI tract), associated with pathological conditions. This review aims at outlining the evidences for dysregulated proteolytic homeostasis in GI diseases and the pathogenic mechanisms of increased proteolytic activity. The therapeutic potential of protease inhibition in GI diseases is discussed, with a particular focus on IBDs, functional GI disorders and colorectal cancer. PMID:27196587

  2. Protease-associated cellular networks in malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Malaria continues to be one of the most severe global infectious diseases, responsible for 1-2 million deaths yearly. The rapid evolution and spread of drug resistance in parasites has led to an urgent need for the development of novel antimalarial targets. Proteases are a group of enzymes that play essential roles in parasite growth and invasion. The possibility of designing specific inhibitors for proteases makes them promising drug targets. Previously, combining a comparative genomics approach and a machine learning approach, we identified the complement of proteases (degradome) in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum and its sibling species [1-3], providing a catalog of targets for functional characterization and rational inhibitor design. Network analysis represents another route to revealing the role of proteins in the biology of parasites and we use this approach here to expand our understanding of the systems involving the proteases of P. falciparum. Results We investigated the roles of proteases in the parasite life cycle by constructing a network using protein-protein association data from the STRING database [4], and analyzing these data, in conjunction with the data from protein-protein interaction assays using the yeast 2-hybrid (Y2H) system [5], blood stage microarray experiments [6-8], proteomics [9-12], literature text mining, and sequence homology analysis. Seventy-seven (77) out of 124 predicted proteases were associated with at least one other protein, constituting 2,431 protein-protein interactions (PPIs). These proteases appear to play diverse roles in metabolism, cell cycle regulation, invasion and infection. Their degrees of connectivity (i.e., connections to other proteins), range from one to 143. The largest protease-associated sub-network is the ubiquitin-proteasome system which is crucial for protein recycling and stress response. Proteases are also implicated in heat shock response, signal peptide processing, cell cycle

  3. In vitro digestion with proteases producing MHC class II ligands.

    PubMed

    Tohmé, Mira; Maschalidi, Sophia; Manoury, Bénédicte

    2013-01-01

    Proteases generate peptides that bind to MHC class II molecules to interact with a wide diversity of CD4(+) T cells. They are expressed in dedicated organelles: endosomes and lysosomes of professional antigen presenting cells (pAPCs) such as B cells, macrophages, and dendritic cells. The identification of endosomal proteases which produce antigenic peptides is important, for example, for better vaccination and to prevent autoimmune diseases. Here, we describe a panel of technics (in vitro digestion assays of protein with recombinant proteases or purified endosomes/lysosomes, T cell stimulation) to monitor the production of MHC class II ligands. PMID:23329510

  4. Protease inhibition as new therapeutic strategy for GI diseases.

    PubMed

    Vergnolle, Nathalie

    2016-07-01

    The GI tract is the most exposed organ to proteases, both in physiological and pathophysiological conditions. For digestive purposes, the lumen of the upper GI tract contains large amounts of pancreatic proteases, but studies have also demonstrated increased proteolytic activity into mucosal tissues (both in the upper and lower GI tract), associated with pathological conditions. This review aims at outlining the evidences for dysregulated proteolytic homeostasis in GI diseases and the pathogenic mechanisms of increased proteolytic activity. The therapeutic potential of protease inhibition in GI diseases is discussed, with a particular focus on IBDs, functional GI disorders and colorectal cancer. PMID:27196587

  5. Detection of Legume Protease Inhibitors by the Gel-X-ray Film Contact Print Technique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulimani, Veerappa H.; Sudheendra, Kulkarni; Giri, Ashok P.

    2002-01-01

    Redgram (Cajanus cajan L.) extracts have been analyzed for the protease inhibitors using a new, sensitive, simple, and rapid method for detection of electrophoretically separated protease inhibitors. The detection involves equilibrating the gel successively in the protease assay buffer and protease solution, rinsing the gel in assay buffer, and…

  6. Protease inhibitor expression in soybean roots exhibiting susceptible and resistance reactions to soybean cyst nematode

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protease inhibitors play a role in regulating proteases during cellular development and in plant defense against insects and nematodes. We identified, cloned and sequenced cDNAs encoding six protease inhibitors expressed in soybean roots infected with soybean cyst nematode. Four of these protease in...

  7. 21 CFR 184.1027 - Mixed carbohydrase and protease enzyme product.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Mixed carbohydrase and protease enzyme product... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1027 Mixed carbohydrase and protease enzyme product. (a) Mixed carbohydrase and protease enzyme product is an enzyme preparation that includes carbohydrase and protease...

  8. Characteristic Features in the Structure and Collagen-Binding Ability of a Thermophilic Collagenolytic Protease from the Thermophile Geobacillus collagenovorans MO-1

    PubMed Central

    Itoi, Yuichi; Horinaka, Mano; Tsujimoto, Yoshiyuki; Matsui, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Kunihiko

    2006-01-01

    A collagen-degrading thermophile, Geobacillus collagenovorans MO-1, extracellularly produces a collagenolytic protease with a large molecular mass. Complete nucleotide sequencing of this gene after gene cloning revealed that the collagenolytic protease is a member of the subtilisin family of serine proteases and consists of a signal sequence for secretion, a prosequence for maturation, a catalytic region, 14 direct repeats of 20 amino acids at the C terminus, and a region with unknown function intervening between the catalytic region and the numerous repeats. Since the unusual repeats are most likely to be cleaved in the secreted form of the enzyme, the intervening region was investigated to determine whether it participates in collagen binding to facilitate collagen degradation. It was found that the mature collagenolytic protease containing the intervening region at the C terminus bound collagen but not the other insoluble proteins, elastin and keratin. Furthermore, the intervening region fused with glutathione S-transferase showed a collagen-binding ability comparable to that of the mature collagenolytic protease. The collagen-binding ability was finally attributed to two-thirds of the intervening region which is rich in β-strands and is approximately 35 kDa in molecular mass. In the collagenolytic protease from strain MO-1, hydrogen bonds most likely predominate over the hydrophobic interaction for collagen binding, since a higher concentration of NaCl released collagen from the enzyme surface but a nonionic detergent could not. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a thermophilic collagenolytic protease containing the collagen-binding segment. PMID:16952949

  9. Structural Insights into the Protease-like Antigen Plasmodium falciparum SERA5 and Its Noncanonical Active-Site Serine

    SciTech Connect

    Hodder, Anthony N.; Malby, Robyn L.; Clarke, Oliver B.; Fairlie, W. Douglas; Colman, Peter M.; Crabb, Brendan S.; Smith, Brian J.

    2009-08-28

    The sera genes of the malaria-causing parasite Plasmodium encode a family of unique proteins that are maximally expressed at the time of egress of parasites from infected red blood cells. These multi-domain proteins are unique, containing a central papain-like cysteine-protease fragment enclosed between the disulfide-linked N- and C-terminal domains. However, the central fragment of several members of this family, including serine repeat antigen 5 (SERA5), contains a serine (S596) in place of the active-site cysteine. Here we report the crystal structure of the central protease-like domain of Plasmodium falciparum SERA5, revealing a number of anomalies in addition to the putative nucleophilic serine: (1) the structure of the putative active site is not conducive to binding substrate in the canonical cysteine-protease manner; (2) the side chain of D594 restricts access of substrate to the putative active site; and (3) the S{sub 2} specificity pocket is occupied by the side chain of Y735, reducing this site to a small depression on the protein surface. Attempts to determine the structure in complex with known inhibitors were not successful. Thus, despite having revealed its structure, the function of the catalytic domain of SERA5 remains an enigma.

  10. Expression, purification and crystallization of a birnavirus-encoded protease, VP4, from blotched snakehead virus (BSNV)

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jaeyong; Feldman, Anat R.; Delmas, Bernard; Paetzel, Mark

    2006-04-01

    The expression, purification and crystallization of a viral protease from the blotched snakehead virus (BSNV) are described and the diffraction data collected to 2.5 Å from two different crystal forms are reported. Blotched snakehead virus (BSNV) is a member of the Birnaviridae family that requires a virally encoded protease known as VP4 in order to process its polyprotein into viral capsid protein precursors (pVP2 and VP3). VP4 belongs to a family of serine proteases that utilize a serine/lysine catalytic dyad mechanism. A mutant construct of VP4 with a short C-terminal truncation was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity for crystallization. Using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method at room temperature, protein crystals with two distinct morphologies were observed. Cubic crystals grown in PEG 2000 MME and magnesium acetate at pH 8.5 belong to space group I23, with unit-cell parameters a = b = c = 143.8 Å. Trigonal crystals grown in ammonium sulfate and glycerol at pH 8.5 belong to space group P321/P312, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 158.2, c = 126.4 Å.

  11. Antiviral Potential of a Novel Compound CW-33 against Enterovirus A71 via Inhibition of Viral 2A Protease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ching-Ying; Huang, An-Cheng; Hour, Mann-Jen; Huang, Su-Hua; Kung, Szu-Hao; Chen, Chao-Hsien; Chen, I-Chieh; Chang, Yuan-Shiun; Lien, Jin-Cherng; Lin, Cheng-Wen

    2015-06-01

    Enterovirus A71 (EV-A71) in the Picornaviridae family causes hand-foot-and-mouth disease, aseptic meningitis, severe central nervous system disease, even death. EV-A71 2A protease cleaves Type I interferon (IFN)-α/β receptor 1 (IFNAR1) to block IFN-induced Jak/STAT signaling. This study investigated anti-EV-A7l activity and synergistic mechanism(s) of a novel furoquinoline alkaloid compound CW-33 alone and in combination with IFN-β Anti-EV-A71 activities of CW-33 alone and in combination with IFN-β were evaluated by inhibitory assays of virus-induced apoptosis, plaque formation, and virus yield. CW-33 showed antiviral activities with an IC50 of near 200 µM in EV-A71 plaque reduction and virus yield inhibition assays. While, anti-EV-A71 activities of CW-33 combined with 100 U/mL IFN-β exhibited a synergistic potency with an IC50 of approximate 1 µM in plaque reduction and virus yield inhibition assays. Molecular docking revealed CW-33 binding to EV-A71 2A protease active sites, correlating with an inhibitory effect of CW33 on in vitro enzymatic activity of recombinant 2A protease IC50 = 53.1 µM). Western blotting demonstrated CW-33 specifically inhibiting 2A protease-mediated cleavage of IFNAR1. CW-33 also recovered Type I IFN-induced Tyk2 and STAT1 phosphorylation as well as 2\\',5\\'-OAS upregulation in EV-A71 infected cells. The results demonstrated CW-33 inhibiting viral 2A protease activity to reduce Type I IFN antagonism of EV-A71. Therefore, CW-33 combined with a low-dose of Type I IFN could be applied in developing alternative approaches to treat EV-A71 infection. PMID:26090728

  12. The structures of Arabidopsis Deg5 and Deg8 reveal new insights into HtrA proteases

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Wei; Gao, Feng; Fan, Haitian; Shan, Xiaoyue; Sun, Renhua; Liu, Lin; Gong, Weimin

    2013-05-01

    The crystal structures of Arabidopsis Deg5 and Deg8 have been determined to resolutions of 2.6 and 2.0 Å, respectively, revealing novel structural features of HtrA proteases. Plant Deg5 and Deg8 are two members of the HtrA proteases, a family of oligomeric serine endopeptidases that are involved in a variety of protein quality-control processes. These two HtrA proteases are located in the thylakoid lumen and participate in high-light stress responses by collaborating with other chloroplast proteins. Deg5 and Deg8 degrade photodamaged D1 protein of the photosystem II reaction centre, allowing its in situ replacement. Here, the crystal structures of Arabidopsis thaliana Deg5 (S266A) and Deg8 (S292A) are reported at 2.6 and 2.0 Å resolution, respectively. The Deg5 trimer contains two calcium ions in a central channel, suggesting a link between photodamage control and calcium ions in chloroplasts. Previous structures of HtrA proteases have indicated that their regulation usually requires C-terminal PDZ domain(s). Deg5 is unique in that it contains no PDZ domain and the trimeric structure of Deg5 (S266A) reveals a novel catalytic triad conformation. A similar triad conformation is observed in the hexameric structure of the single PDZ-domain-containing Deg8 (S292A). These findings suggest a novel activation mechanism for plant HtrA proteases and provide structural clues to their function in light-stress response.

  13. A novel organic solvent- and detergent-stable serine alkaline protease from Trametes cingulata strain CTM10101.

    PubMed

    Omrane Benmrad, Maroua; Moujehed, Emna; Ben Elhoul, Mouna; Zaraî Jaouadi, Nadia; Mechri, Sondes; Rekik, Hatem; Kourdali, Sidali; El Hattab, Mohamed; Badis, Abdelmalek; Sayadi, Sami; Bejar, Samir; Jaouadi, Bassem

    2016-10-01

    A protease-producing fungus was isolated from an alkaline wastewater of chemical industries and identified as Trametes cingulata strain CTM10101 on the basis of the ITS rDNA gene-sequencing. It was observed that the fungus strongly produce extracellular protease grown at 30°C in potato-dextrose-broth (PDB) optimized media (13500U/ml). The pure serine protease isolated by Trametes cingulata (designated SPTC) was purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation-dialysis followed by heat-treatment and UNO S-1 FPLC cation-exchange chromatography. The chemical characterization carried on include phisico-chemical determination and spectroscopie analysis. The MALDI-TOF/MS analysis revealed that the purified enzyme was a monomer with a molecular mass of 31405.16-Da. The enzyme had an NH2-terminal sequence of ALTTQTEAPWALGTVSHKGQAST, thus sharing high homology with those of fungal-proteases. The optimum pH and temperature values of its proteolytic activity were pH 9 and 60°C, respectively, and its half-life times at 60 and 70°C were 9 and 5-h, respectively. It was completely inhibited by PMSF and DFP, which strongly suggested its belonging to the serine protease family. Compared to Flavourzyme(®)500L from Aspergillus oryzae and Thermolysin typeX from Geobacillus stearothermophilus, SPTC displayed higher levels of hydrolysis, substrate specificity, and catalytic efficiency as well as elevated organic solvent tolerance and considerable detergent stability. Finally, SPTC could potentially be used in peptide synthesis and detergent formulations. PMID:27296442

  14. Family Meals

    MedlinePlus

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Family Meals KidsHealth > For Parents > Family Meals Print A ... even more important as kids get older. Making Family Meals Happen It can be a big challenge ...

  15. Family History

    MedlinePlus

    Your family history includes health information about you and your close relatives. Families have many factors in common, including their genes, ... as heart disease, stroke, and cancer. Having a family member with a disease raises your risk, but ...

  16. Family Arguments

    MedlinePlus

    ... Spread the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Adoption & Foster Care ... Life Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Family Arguments Page Content Article Body We seem to ...

  17. Family History

    MedlinePlus

    ... CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Family Health History Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... visit this page: About CDC.gov . Family Health History The Basics Family Health History & Chronic Disease Planning ...

  18. Family Folklore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kotkin, Amy J.; Baker, Holly C.

    1977-01-01

    Discusses the Family Folklore Program of the Smithsonian Institution's annual Festival of American Folklife, in which the whole family can be involved in tracing family history through story telling, photographs, etc. (MS)

  19. Effects of Mutational Loss of Specific Intracellular Proteases on the Sporulation of Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Hageman, James H.; Carlton, Bruce C.

    1973-01-01

    Two protease-deficient mutants of Bacillus subtilis 168 (Trp−) were isolated and compared with the parental strain with respect to production of intracellular proteases and sporulation. A mutant lacking the metal-requiring “neutral” protease intracellularly sporulated as well as the parental strain. A second mutant, deficient in an as yet uncharacterized intracellular protease, failed to sporulate normally. It is proposed that this new protease is also involved in intracellular protein turnover. Images PMID:4196247

  20. HtrA, a Temperature- and Stationary Phase-Activated Protease Involved in Maturation of a Key Microbial Virulence Determinant, Facilitates Borrelia burgdorferi Infection in Mammalian Hosts.

    PubMed

    Ye, Meiping; Sharma, Kavita; Thakur, Meghna; Smith, Alexis A; Buyuktanir, Ozlem; Xiang, Xuwu; Yang, Xiuli; Promnares, Kamoltip; Lou, Yongliang; Yang, X Frank; Pal, Utpal

    2016-08-01

    High-temperature requirement protease A (HtrA) represents a family of serine proteases that play important roles in microbial biology. Unlike the genomes of most organisms, that of Borrelia burgdorferi notably encodes a single HtrA gene product, termed BbHtrA. Previous studies identified a few substrates of BbHtrA; however, their physiological relevance could not be ascertained, as targeted deletion of the gene has not been successful. Here we show that BbhtrA transcripts are induced during spirochete growth either in the stationary phase or at elevated temperature. Successful generation of a BbhtrA deletion mutant and restoration by genetic complementation suggest a nonessential role for this protease in microbial viability; however, its remarkable growth, morphological, and structural defects during cultivation at 37°C confirm a high-temperature requirement for protease activation and function. The BbhtrA-deficient spirochetes were unable to establish infection of mice, as evidenced by assessment of culture, PCR, and serology. We show that transcript abundance as well as proteolytic processing of a borrelial protein required for cell fission and infectivity, BB0323, is impaired in BbhtrA mutants grown at 37°C, which likely contributed to their inability to survive in a mammalian host. Together, these results demonstrate the physiological relevance of a unique temperature-regulated borrelial protease, BbHtrA, which further enlightens our knowledge of intriguing aspects of spirochete biology and infectivity. PMID:27271745

  1. Purification and characterization of thermostable serine proteases encoded by the genes ttha0099 and ttha01320 from Thermus thermophilus HB8.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Sun, Yajie; Jiao, Xue; Wang, Honglin; Zhu, Hu

    2016-07-01

    As an important class of proteases, serine proteases are required to show high activity under diverse conditions, especially at high temperatures. In the current study, two serine proteases SP348 and SP404 were analyzed by different bioinformatics tools. Both proteins are comprised of a trypsin domain and a PDZ domain, and belong to the trypsin family of proteases. The proteins were successfully expressed with Trx-tags as soluble proteins in the specialized Escherichia coli Rosetta-gami B(DE3)pLysS strain. A simple three-step purification protocol involving heat treatment, Ni-NTA purification and gel filtration was adopted to purify SP404. The molecular weight of recombinant SP404 was about 64 kDa. According to the circular dichroism spectroscopy analysis, SP404 is thermostable at 70 °C with alpha-helix, beta-sheet and random coil contents of about 8, 22 and 70 %, respectively. Our findings may broaden the range of microorganism-derived proteases and have a wide potential for industrial and fundamental studies. PMID:27215206

  2. Mini review: ATP-dependent proteases in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Bittner, Lisa-Marie; Arends, Jan; Narberhaus, Franz

    2016-08-01

    AAA(+) proteases are universal barrel-like and ATP-fueled machines preventing the accumulation of aberrant proteins and regulating the proteome according to the cellular demand. They are characterized by two separate operating units, the ATPase and peptidase domains. ATP-dependent unfolding and translocation of a substrate into the proteolytic chamber is followed by ATP-independent degradation. This review addresses the structure and function of bacterial AAA(+) proteases with a focus on the ATP-driven mechanisms and the coordinated movements in the complex mainly based on the knowledge of ClpXP. We conclude by discussing strategies how novel protease substrates can be trapped by mutated AAA(+) protease variants. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 505-517, 2016. PMID:26971705

  3. A new cuticle scale hydrolysing protease from Beauveria brongniartii.

    PubMed

    Erlacher, A; Sousa, F; Schroeder, M; Jus, S; Kokol, V; Cavaco-Paulo, A; Guebitz, G M

    2006-05-01

    From a screening for the production of new proteases specific for cuticle scales, Beauveria brongniartii was selected producing an alkaline Ca(++) dependent protease. The purified had a molecular weight of 27 kDa and a pI value of 8.0. Substrate specificities of model substrates (wool with partially removed cuticles treated with SDS) were analyzed by protein release, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and nitrogen analysis. The C/N ratio of released material turned out to be a good parameter to determine the site of action of proteases on fibres. Compared to other enzymes, the fungal protease preferentially hydrolyzed cuticle scales and has thus a potential for anti-shrinking pre-treatment of wool fabrics. PMID:16791724

  4. Improving Viral Protease Inhibitors to Counter Drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Kurt Yilmaz, Nese; Swanstrom, Ronald; Schiffer, Celia A

    2016-07-01

    Drug resistance is a major problem in health care, undermining therapy outcomes and necessitating novel approaches to drug design. Extensive studies on resistance to viral protease inhibitors, particularly those of HIV-1 and hepatitis C virus (HCV) protease, revealed a plethora of information on the structural and molecular mechanisms underlying resistance. These insights led to several strategies to improve viral protease inhibitors to counter resistance, such as exploiting the essential biological function and leveraging evolutionary constraints. Incorporation of these strategies into structure-based drug design can minimize vulnerability to resistance, not only for viral proteases but for other quickly evolving drug targets as well, toward designing inhibitors one step ahead of evolution to counter resistance with more intelligent and rational design. PMID:27090931

  5. A Kazal-Type Serine Protease Inhibitor from the Defense Gland Secretion of the Subterranean Termite Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki

    PubMed Central

    Negulescu, Horia; Guo, Youzhong; Garner, Thomas P.; Goodwin, Octavia Y.; Henderson, Gregg; Laine, Roger A.; Macnaughtan, Megan A.

    2015-01-01

    Coptotermes formosanus is an imported, subterranean termite species with the largest economic impact in the United States. The frontal glands of the soldier caste termites comprising one third of the body mass, contain a secretion expelled through a foramen in defense. The small molecule composition of the frontal gland secretion is well-characterized, but the proteins remain to be identified. Herein is reported the structure and function of one of several proteins found in the termite defense gland secretion. TFP4 is a 6.9 kDa, non-classical group 1 Kazal-type serine protease inhibitor with activity towards chymotrypsin and elastase, but not trypsin. The 3-dimensional solution structure of TFP4 was solved with nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and represents the first structure from the taxonomic family, Rhinotermitidae. Based on the structure of TFP4, the protease inhibitor active loop (Cys8 to Cys16) was identified. PMID:25978745

  6. A Kazal-Type Serine Protease Inhibitor from the Defense Gland Secretion of the Subterranean Termite Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki.

    PubMed

    Negulescu, Horia; Guo, Youzhong; Garner, Thomas P; Goodwin, Octavia Y; Henderson, Gregg; Laine, Roger A; Macnaughtan, Megan A

    2015-01-01

    Coptotermes formosanus is an imported, subterranean termite species with the largest economic impact in the United States. The frontal glands of the soldier caste termites comprising one third of the body mass, contain a secretion expelled through a foramen in defense. The small molecule composition of the frontal gland secretion is well-characterized, but the proteins remain to be identified. Herein is reported the structure and function of one of several proteins found in the termite defense gland secretion. TFP4 is a 6.9 kDa, non-classical group 1 Kazal-type serine protease inhibitor with activity towards chymotrypsin and elastase, but not trypsin. The 3-dimensional solution structure of TFP4 was solved with nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and represents the first structure from the taxonomic family, Rhinotermitidae. Based on the structure of TFP4, the protease inhibitor active loop (Cys(8) to Cys(16)) was identified. PMID:25978745

  7. Proteases in cardiometabolic diseases: Pathophysiology, molecular mechanisms and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Hua, Yinan; Nair, Sreejayan

    2015-02-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the U.S. and other developed countries. Metabolic syndrome, including obesity, diabetes/insulin resistance, hypertension and dyslipidemia is a major threat for public health in the modern society. It is well established that metabolic syndrome contributes to the development of cardiovascular disease collective called as cardiometabolic disease. Despite documented studies in the research field of cardiometabolic disease, the underlying mechanisms are far from clear. Proteases are enzymes that break down proteins, many of which have been implicated in various diseases including cardiac disease. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP), calpain, cathepsin and caspase are among the major proteases involved in cardiac remodeling. Recent studies have also implicated proteases in the pathogenesis of cardiometabolic disease. Elevated expression and activities of proteases in atherosclerosis, coronary heart disease, obesity/insulin-associated heart disease as well as hypertensive heart disease have been documented. Furthermore, transgenic animals that are deficient in or over-express proteases allow scientists to understand the causal relationship between proteases and cardiometabolic disease. Mechanistically, MMPs and cathepsins exert their effect on cardiometabolic diseases mainly through modifying the extracellular matrix. However, MMP and cathepsin are also reported to affect intracellular proteins, by which they contribute to the development of cardiometabolic diseases. On the other hand, activation of calpain and caspases has been shown to influence intracellular signaling cascade including the NF-κB and apoptosis pathways. Clinically, proteases are reported to function as biomarkers of cardiometabolic diseases. More importantly, the inhibitors of proteases are credited with beneficial cardiometabolic profile, although the exact molecular mechanisms underlying these salutary effects are still under investigation. A better

  8. Current strategies for probing substrate specificity of proteases.

    PubMed

    Poreba, M; Drag, M

    2010-01-01

    In this review we describe in detail the available technologies used for investigating the substrate specificity of proteases. Critical comparison of the available detection methods and their choice for certain type of screening is discussed. We present successful strategies along with appropriate examples for the design and synthesis of combinatorial libraries of substrates using both chemical and biological approaches. Proteomic tools for the identification of natural substrates of proteases are also discussed. PMID:20939826

  9. Characterization of the immunoglobulin A protease of Ureaplasma urealyticum.

    PubMed Central

    Spooner, R K; Russell, W C; Thirkell, D

    1992-01-01

    Ureaplasma urealyticum strains of all serotypes express a specific human immunoglobulin A1 protease that cleaves immunoglobulin A1 to produce intact Fab and Fc fragments. The use of a variety of inhibitors suggests that the enzyme is a serine protease. N-terminal sequencing of the Fc digestion product showed that the enzyme cleaves between the proline and threonine residues 235 and 236 in the hinge region of the heavy chain of immunoglobulin A1. Images PMID:1587621

  10. Proteases in cardiometabolic diseases: Pathophysiology, molecular mechanisms and clinical applications

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Yinan; Nair, Sreejayan

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the U.S. and other developed country. Metabolic syndrome, including obesity, diabetes/insulin resistance, hypertension and dyslipidemia is major threat for public health in the modern society. It is well established that metabolic syndrome contributes to the development of cardiovascular disease collective called as cardiometabolic disease. Despite documented studies in the research field of cardiometabolic disease, the underlying mechanisms are far from clear. Proteases are enzymes that break down proteins, many of which have been implicated in various diseases including cardiac disease. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP), calpain, cathepsin and caspase are among the major proteases involved in cardiac remodeling. Recent studies have also implicated proteases in the pathogenesis of cardiometabolic disease. Elevated expression and activities of proteases in atherosclerosis, coronary heart disease, obesity/insulin-associated heart disease as well as hypertensive heart disease have been documented. Furthermore, transgenic animals that are deficient in or overexpress proteases allow scientists to understand the causal relationship between proteases and cardiometabolic disease. Mechanistically, MMPs and cathepsins exert their effect on cardiometabolic diseases mainly through modifying the extracellular matrix. However, MMP and cathepsin are also reported to affect intracellular proteins, by which they contribute to the development of cardiometabolic diseases. On the other hand, activation of calpain and caspases has been shown to influence intracellular signaling cascade including the NF-κB and apoptosis pathways. Clinically, proteases are reported to function as biomarkers of cardiometabolic diseases. More importantly, the inhibitors of proteases are credited with beneficial cardiometabolic profile, although the exact molecular mechanisms underlying these salutary effects are still under investigation. A better

  11. Autocatalytic processing of m-AAA protease subunits in mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Koppen, Mirko; Bonn, Florian; Ehses, Sarah; Langer, Thomas

    2009-10-01

    m-AAA proteases are ATP-dependent proteolytic machines in the inner membrane of mitochondria which are crucial for the maintenance of mitochondrial activities. Conserved nuclear-encoded subunits, termed paraplegin, Afg3l1, and Afg3l2, form various isoenzymes differing in their subunit composition in mammalian mitochondria. Mutations in different m-AAA protease subunits are associated with distinct neuronal disorders in human. However, the biogenesis of m-AAA protease complexes or of individual subunits is only poorly understood. Here, we have examined the processing of nuclear-encoded m-AAA protease subunits upon import into mitochondria and demonstrate autocatalytic processing of Afg3l1 and Afg3l2. The mitochondrial processing peptidase MPP generates an intermediate form of Afg3l2 that is matured autocatalytically. Afg3l1 or Afg3l2 are also required for maturation of newly imported paraplegin subunits after their cleavage by MPP. Our results establish that mammalian m-AAA proteases can act as processing enzymes in vivo and reveal overlapping activities of Afg3l1 and Afg3l2. These findings might be of relevance for the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders associated with mutations in different m-AAA protease subunits. PMID:19656850

  12. Isolation and molecular characterisation of alkaline protease producing Bacillus thuringiensis.

    PubMed

    Agasthya, Annapurna S; Sharma, Naresh; Mohan, Anand; Mahal, Prabhpreet

    2013-05-01

    Proteases are of particular interest because of their action on insoluble keratin substrates and generally on a broad range of protein substrates. Proteases are one of the most important groups of industrial enzymes used in detergent, protein, brewing, meat, photographic, leather, dairy, pharmaceutical and food industry. In the present study, the organism isolated from the protein rich soil sample was identified by biochemical and molecular characterisation as Bacillus thuringiensis and further optimum conditions for alkaline protease synthesis were determined. The growth conditions for B. thuringiensis was optimised by inoculating into yeast extract casein medium at different pH and incubating at different temperatures. The maximum protease production occurred at pH 8 and at 37 °C. B. thuringiensis showed proteolytic activity at various culture conditions. Optimum conditions for the protease activity were found to be 47 °C and pH 8. In the later stage, the blood removing action of crude and partially purified protease was found to be effective within 25 min in the presence of commercial detergents indicating the possible use of this enzyme in detergent industry. Enzyme also showed good activity against hair substrate keratin and can be used for dehairing. PMID:22826099

  13. Signaling pathways activated by a protease allergen in basophils

    PubMed Central

    Rosenstein, Rachel K.; Bezbradica, Jelena S.; Yu, Shuang; Medzhitov, Ruslan

    2014-01-01

    Allergic diseases represent a significant burden in industrialized countries, but why and how the immune system responds to allergens remain largely unknown. Because many clinically significant allergens have proteolytic activity, and many helminths express proteases that are necessary for their life cycles, host mechanisms likely have evolved to detect the proteolytic activity of helminth proteases, which may be incidentally activated by protease allergens. A cysteine protease, papain, is a prototypic protease allergen that can directly activate basophils and mast cells, leading to the production of cytokines, including IL-4, characteristic of the type 2 immune response. The mechanism of papain’s immunogenic activity remains unknown. Here we have characterized the cellular response activated by papain in basophils. We find that papain-induced IL-4 production requires calcium flux and activation of PI3K and nuclear factor of activated T cells. Interestingly, papain-induced IL-4 production was dependent on the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) adaptor protein Fc receptor γ-chain, even though the canonical ITAM signaling was not activated by papain. Collectively, these data characterize the downstream signaling pathway activated by a protease allergen in basophils. PMID:25369937

  14. Delay of Iris flower senescence by protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Pak, Caroline; van Doorn, Wouter G

    2005-02-01

    Visible senescence of the flag tepals in Iris x hollandica (cv. Blue Magic) was preceded by a large increase in endoprotease activity. Just before visible senescence about half of total endoprotease activity was apparently due to cysteine proteases, somewhat less than half to serine proteases, with a minor role of metalloproteases. Treatment of isolated tepals with the purported serine protease inhibitors AEBSF [4-(2-aminoethyl)-benzenesulfonyl fluoride] or DFP (diisopropyl-fluorophosphate) prevented the increase in endoprotease activity and considerably delayed or prevented the normal senescence symptoms. The specific cysteine protease-specific E-64d reduced maximum endoprotease activity by 30%, but had no effect on the time to visible senescence. Zinc chloride and aprotinin reduced maximum endoprotease activity by c. 50 and 40%, respectively, and slightly delayed visible senescence. A proteasome inhibitor (Z-leu-leu-Nva-H) slightly delayed tepal senescence, which indicates that protein degradation in the proteasome may play a role in induction of the visible senescence symptoms. It is concluded that visible senescence is preceded by large-scale protein degradation, which is apparently mainly due to cysteine- and serine protease activity, and that two (unspecific) inhibitors of serine proteases considerably delay the senescence symptoms. PMID:15720658

  15. Characterizing Protease Specificity: How Many Substrates Do We Need?

    PubMed Central

    Schauperl, Michael; Fuchs, Julian E.; Waldner, Birgit J.; Huber, Roland G.; Kramer, Christian; Liedl, Klaus R.

    2015-01-01

    Calculation of cleavage entropies allows to quantify, map and compare protease substrate specificity by an information entropy based approach. The metric intrinsically depends on the number of experimentally determined substrates (data points). Thus a statistical analysis of its numerical stability is crucial to estimate the systematic error made by estimating specificity based on a limited number of substrates. In this contribution, we show the mathematical basis for estimating the uncertainty in cleavage entropies. Sets of cleavage entropies are calculated using experimental cleavage data and modeled extreme cases. By analyzing the underlying mathematics and applying statistical tools, a linear dependence of the metric in respect to 1/n was found. This allows us to extrapolate the values to an infinite number of samples and to estimate the errors. Analyzing the errors, a minimum number of 30 substrates was found to be necessary to characterize substrate specificity, in terms of amino acid variability, for a protease (S4-S4’) with an uncertainty of 5 percent. Therefore, we encourage experimental researchers in the protease field to record specificity profiles of novel proteases aiming to identify at least 30 peptide substrates of maximum sequence diversity. We expect a full characterization of protease specificity helpful to rationalize biological functions of proteases and to assist rational drug design. PMID:26559682

  16. Effect of protease inhibitors on the sense of taste.

    PubMed

    Schiffman, S S; Zervakis, J; Heffron, S; Heald, A E

    1999-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the taste properties of protease inhibitors which are essential components of drug regimes used to treat human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. In this study, the taste properties of four protease inhibitors (indinavir, ritonavir, saquinavir, and nelfinavir) were investigated in unmedicated HIV-infected patients and healthy controls. Three of the four protease inhibitors (indinavir, ritonavir, and saquinavir) were found to be predominantly bitter (with additional qualities of medicinal, metallic, astringent, sour, and burning). Nelfinavir was found to be relatively tasteless. HIV-infected and uninfected control subjects detected protease inhibitors at similar concentrations, but HIV-infected subjects perceived suprathreshold concentrations as more bitter than controls. Detection thresholds ranged from 0.0061 mM for saquinavir in HIV-infected patients to 0.0702 mM for ritonavir in uninfected control subjects. Suprathreshold studies indicated that protease inhibitors modified the taste perception of a variety of other taste compounds. These results are consistent with clinical findings that protease inhibitors produce taste complaints that can impact patient compliance. PMID:10501290

  17. Protease inhibitors decrease the resistance of Vitaceae to Plasmopara viticola.

    PubMed

    Gindro, Katia; Berger, Valentine; Godard, Sophie; Voinesco, Francine; Schnee, Sylvain; Viret, Olivier; Alonso-Villaverde, Virginia

    2012-11-01

    Plasmopara viticola must successfully infect susceptible grapevine cultivars to complete its biological cycle. In resistant grapevine varieties, P. viticola is blocked by the activation of defense mechanisms; these defense mechanisms produce hypersensitive reactions, which are related to programmed cell death. In animals, programmed cell death is dependent on caspase activities. In plants, different caspase-like proteases assume the same functions. To examine the roles of caspase-like proteases in P. viticola-grapevine interactions, three varieties of grapevine with different levels of P. viticola resistance were chosen. These grapevine varieties were treated with either PMSF, a serine protease inhibitor, or E-64, a cysteine protease inhibitor. The development of the pathogen was followed microscopically, and the plant defense reactions were estimated through stilbene quantification. Both protease inhibitor treatments increased the infection rate in the resistant and immune varieties, diminished the production of toxic stilbenes and changed the level of the plants' susceptibility to the pathogen. In particular, after either protease treatment, the cultivar that was originally immune became resistant (hyphae and haustoria were observed), the resistant cultivar reached the level of a susceptible cultivar (sporulation was observed) and the susceptible cultivar became more sensitive (P. viticola colonized the entirety of the leaf mesophyll). PMID:22906813

  18. PEGylated substrates of NSP4 protease: A tool to study protease specificity.

    PubMed

    Wysocka, Magdalena; Gruba, Natalia; Grzywa, Renata; Giełdoń, Artur; Bąchor, Remigiusz; Brzozowski, Krzysztof; Sieńczyk, Marcin; Dieter, Jenne; Szewczuk, Zbigniew; Rolka, Krzysztof; Lesner, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Herein we present the synthesis of a novel type of peptidomimetics composed of repeating diaminopropionic acid residues modified with structurally diverse heterobifunctional polyethylene glycol chains (abbreviated as DAPEG). Based on the developed compounds, a library of fluorogenic substrates was synthesized. Further library deconvolution towards human neutrophil serine protease 4 (NSP4) yielded highly sensitive and selective internally quenched peptidomimetic substrates. In silico analysis of the obtained peptidomimetics revealed the presence of an interaction network with distant subsites located on the enzyme surface. PMID:26955973

  19. PEGylated substrates of NSP4 protease: A tool to study protease specificity

    PubMed Central

    Wysocka, Magdalena; Gruba, Natalia; Grzywa, Renata; Giełdoń, Artur; Bąchor, Remigiusz; Brzozowski, Krzysztof; Sieńczyk, Marcin; Dieter, Jenne; Szewczuk, Zbigniew; Rolka, Krzysztof; Lesner, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Herein we present the synthesis of a novel type of peptidomimetics composed of repeating diaminopropionic acid residues modified with structurally diverse heterobifunctional polyethylene glycol chains (abbreviated as DAPEG). Based on the developed compounds, a library of fluorogenic substrates was synthesized. Further library deconvolution towards human neutrophil serine protease 4 (NSP4) yielded highly sensitive and selective internally quenched peptidomimetic substrates. In silico analysis of the obtained peptidomimetics revealed the presence of an interaction network with distant subsites located on the enzyme surface. PMID:26955973

  20. Retrovirus Entry by Endocytosis and Cathepsin Proteases

    PubMed Central

    Kubo, Yoshinao; Hayashi, Hideki; Matsuyama, Toshifumi; Sato, Hironori; Yamamoto, Naoki

    2012-01-01

    Retroviruses include infectious agents inducing severe diseases in humans and animals. In addition, retroviruses are widely used as tools to transfer genes of interest to target cells. Understanding the entry mechanism of retroviruses contributes to developments of novel therapeutic approaches against retrovirus-induced diseases and efficient exploitation of retroviral vectors. Entry of enveloped viruses into host cell cytoplasm is achieved by fusion between the viral envelope and host cell membranes at either the cell surface or intracellular vesicles. Many animal retroviruses enter host cells through endosomes and require endosome acidification. Ecotropic murine leukemia virus entry requires cathepsin proteases activated by the endosome acidification. CD4-dependent human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is thought to occur via endosomes, but endosome acidification is not necessary for the entry whereas entry of CD4-independent HIVs, which are thought to be prototypes of CD4-dependent viruses, is low pH dependent. There are several controversial results on the retroviral entry pathways. Because endocytosis and endosome acidification are complicatedly controlled by cellular mechanisms, the retrovirus entry pathways may be different in different cell lines. PMID:23304142

  1. Protease Production by Different Thermophilic Fungi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macchione, Mariana M.; Merheb, Carolina W.; Gomes, Eleni; da Silva, Roberto

    A comparative study was carried out to evaluate protease production in solid-state fermentation (SSF) and submerged fermentation (SmF) by nine different thermophilic fungi — Thermoascus aurantiacus Miehe, Thermomyces lanuginosus, T. lanuginosus TO.03, Aspergillus flavus 1.2, Aspergillus sp. 13.33, Aspergillus sp. 13.34, Aspergillus sp. 13.35, Rhizomucor pusillus 13.36 and Rhizomucor sp. 13.37 — using substrates containing proteins to induce enzyme secretion. Soybean extract (soybean milk), soybean flour, milk powder, rice, and wheat bran were tested. The most satisfactory results were obtained when using wheat bran in SSF. The fungi that stood out in SSF were T. lanuginosus, T. lanuginosus TO.03, Aspergillus sp. 13.34, Aspergillus sp. 13.35, and Rhizomucor sp. 13.37, and those in SmF were T. aurantiacus, T. lanuginosus TO.03, and 13.37. In both fermentation systems, A. flavus 1.2 and R. pusillus 13.36 presented the lowest levels of proteolytic activity.

  2. Family Privilege

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seita, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Family privilege is defined as "strengths and supports gained through primary caring relationships." A generation ago, the typical family included two parents and a bevy of kids living under one roof. Now, every variation of blended caregiving qualifies as family. But over the long arc of human history, a real family was a…

  3. Protoporphyrins Enhance Oligomerization and Enzymatic Activity of HtrA1 Serine Protease

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Hakryul; Patterson, Victoria; Stoessel, Sean; Kuan, Chia-Yi; Hoh, Josephine

    2014-01-01

    High temperature requirement protein A1 (HtrA1), a secreted serine protease of the HtrA family, is associated with a multitude of human diseases. However, the exact functions of HtrA1 in these diseases remain poorly understood. We seek to unravel the mechanisms of HtrA1 by elucidating its interactions with chemical or biological modulators. To this end, we screened a small molecule library of 500 bioactive compounds to identify those that alter the formation of extracellular HtrA1 complexes in the cell culture medium. An initial characterization of two novel hits from this screen showed that protoporphyrin IX (PPP-IX), a precursor in the heme biosynthetic pathway, and its metalloporphyrin (MPP) derivatives fostered the oligomerization of HtrA1 by binding to the protease domain. As a result of the interaction with MPPs, the proteolytic activity of HtrA1 against Fibulin-5, a specific HtrA1 substrate in age-related macular degeneration (AMD), was increased. This physical interaction could be abolished by the missense mutations of HtrA1 found in patients with cerebral autosomal recessive arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CARASIL). Furthermore, knockdown of HtrA1 attenuated apoptosis induced by PPP-IX. These results suggest that PPP-IX, or its derivatives, and HtrA1 may function as co-factors whereby porphyrins enhance oligomerization and the protease activity of HtrA1, while active HtrA1 elevates the pro-apoptotic actions of porphyrin derivatives. Further analysis of this interplay may shed insights into the pathogenesis of diseases such as AMD, CARASIL and protoporphyria, as well as effective therapeutic development. PMID:25506911

  4. Structural and Functional Analysis of the CspB Protease Required for Clostridium Spore Germination

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Chloe M.; Eckenroth, Brian E.; Putnam, Emily E.; Doublié, Sylvie; Shen, Aimee

    2013-01-01

    Spores are the major transmissive form of the nosocomial pathogen Clostridium difficile, a leading cause of healthcare-associated diarrhea worldwide. Successful transmission of C. difficile requires that its hardy, resistant spores germinate into vegetative cells in the gastrointestinal tract. A critical step during this process is the degradation of the spore cortex, a thick layer of peptidoglycan surrounding the spore core. In Clostridium sp., cortex degradation depends on the proteolytic activation of the cortex hydrolase, SleC. Previous studies have implicated Csps as being necessary for SleC cleavage during germination; however, their mechanism of action has remained poorly characterized. In this study, we demonstrate that CspB is a subtilisin-like serine protease whose activity is essential for efficient SleC cleavage and C. difficile spore germination. By solving the first crystal structure of a Csp family member, CspB, to 1.6 Å, we identify key structural domains within CspB. In contrast with all previously solved structures of prokaryotic subtilases, the CspB prodomain remains tightly bound to the wildtype subtilase domain and sterically occludes a catalytically competent active site. The structure, combined with biochemical and genetic analyses, reveals that Csp proteases contain a unique jellyroll domain insertion critical for stabilizing the protease in vitro and in C. difficile. Collectively, our study provides the first molecular insight into CspB activity and function. These studies may inform the development of inhibitors that can prevent clostridial spore germination and thus disease transmission. PMID:23408892

  5. A Trichomonas vaginalis Rhomboid Protease and Its Substrate Modulate Parasite Attachment and Cytolysis of Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Riestra, Angelica M.; Gandhi, Shiv; Sweredoski, Michael J.; Moradian, Annie; Hess, Sonja; Urban, Sinisa; Johnson, Patricia J.

    2015-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is an extracellular eukaryotic parasite that causes the most common, non-viral sexually transmitted infection worldwide. Although disease burden is high, molecular mechanisms underlying T. vaginalis pathogenesis are poorly understood. Here, we identify a family of putative T. vaginalis rhomboid proteases and demonstrate catalytic activity for two, TvROM1 and TvROM3, using a heterologous cell cleavage assay. The two T. vaginalis intramembrane serine proteases display different subcellular localization and substrate specificities. TvROM1 is a cell surface membrane protein and cleaves atypical model rhomboid protease substrates, whereas TvROM3 appears to localize to the Golgi apparatus and recognizes a typical model substrate. To identify TvROM substrates, we interrogated the T. vaginalis surface proteome using both quantitative proteomic and bioinformatic approaches. Of the nine candidates identified, TVAG_166850 and TVAG_280090 were shown to be cleaved by TvROM1. Comparison of amino acid residues surrounding the predicted cleavage sites of TvROM1 substrates revealed a preference for small amino acids in the predicted transmembrane domain. Over-expression of TvROM1 increased attachment to and cytolysis of host ectocervical cells. Similarly, mutations that block the cleavage of a TvROM1 substrate lead to its accumulation on the cell surface and increased parasite adherence to host cells. Together, these data indicate a role for TvROM1 and its substrate(s) in modulating attachment to and lysis of host cells, which are key processes in T. vaginalis pathogenesis. PMID:26684303

  6. SepM, a Streptococcal Protease Involved in Quorum Sensing, Displays Strict Substrate Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Saswati; Cao, Luyang; Kim, Albert

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Streptococcus mutans, a causative agent of dental caries, relies on multiple quorum-sensing (QS) pathways that coordinate the expression of factors needed for colonization in the oral cavity. S. mutans uses small peptides as QS signaling molecules that typically are secreted into the outside milieu. Competence-stimulating peptide (CSP) is one such QS signaling molecule that functions through the ComDE two-component signal transduction pathway. CSP is secreted through NlmTE, a dedicated ABC transporter that cleaves off the N-terminal leader peptide to generate a mature peptide that is 21 residues long (CSP-21). We recently identified a surface-localized protease, SepM, which further cleaves the CSP-21 peptide at the C-terminal end and removes the last 3 residues to generate CSP-18. CSP-18 is the active QS molecule that interacts with the ComD sensor kinase to activate the QS pathway. In this study, we show that SepM specifically cleaves CSP-21 between the Ala18 and Leu19 residues. We also show that SepM recognizes only Ala at position 18 and Leu at position 19, although some CSP-18 variants with a substitution at position 18 can function equally as well as the QS peptide. Furthermore, we demonstrate that SepM homologs from other streptococci are capable of processing CSP-21 to generate functional CSP-18. IMPORTANCE SepM is a membrane-associated streptococcal protease that processes competence-stimulating peptide (CSP) to generate an active quorum-sensing molecule in S. mutans. SepM belongs to the S16 family of serine proteases, and in this study, we found that SepM behaves as an endopeptidase. SepM displays strict substrate specificity and cleaves the peptide bond between the Ala and Leu residues. This is the first report of an endopeptidase that specifically cleaves these two residues. PMID:26553848

  7. Abrogation of IFN-γ mediated epithelial barrier disruption by serine protease inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Willemsen, LEM; Hoetjes, JP; Van Deventer, SJH; Van Tol, EAF

    2005-01-01

    The intestinal barrier function is often impaired in a variety of diseases including chronic inflammatory bowel disease. Increased intestinal permeability during episodes of active disease correlates with destruction or rearrangement of the tight junction protein complex. IFN-γ has been widely studied for its effect on barrier function and tight junction structures but its mode of action remains unclear. Since the claudin family of tight junction proteins is proposed to be involved in barrier maintenance we studied the effect of IFN-γ on claudin expression in relation to epithelial barrier function. Cycloheximide and protease inhibitors were used to study mechanisms of IFN-γ mediated barrier disruption. Intestinal epithelial cells were exposed to IFN-γ and permeability was evaluated by horse radish peroxidase (HRP) and 4 kD FITC-dextran fluxes. Occludin and claudin-1, -2, -3, and -4 tight junction protein expression was determined by Western blotting. Occludin and claudin-2 protein expression was dramatically reduced after IFN-γ exposure, which correlated with increased permeability for HRP and FITC-dextran. Interestingly, cleavage of claudin-2 was observed after incubation with IFN-γ. Serine protease inhibitor AEBSF completely abrogated IFN-γ mediated barrier disruption which was associated with preservation of claudin-2 expression. Moreover, IFN-γ induced loss of barrier integrity was found to affect claudin-2 and occludin expression through different mechanisms. Since inhibition of serine protease activity abrogates IFN-γ mediated barrier disruption this may be an important target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:16232214

  8. A new multigene superfamily of Kunitz-type protease inhibitors from sea anemone Heteractis crispa.

    PubMed

    Isaeva, Marina P; Chausova, Victoriya E; Zelepuga, Elena A; Guzev, Konstantin V; Tabakmakher, Valentin M; Monastyrnaya, Margarita M; Kozlovskaya, Emma P

    2012-03-01

    Despite a considerable number of publications devoted to isolation and physicochemical properties of protease inhibitors from sea anemones, virtually nothing is known about the structure of the genes, and the nature of their isoforms diversity. Using the PCR-based cloning approach we discovered the Kunitz-type multigene superfamily composed of distinct gene families (GS-, RG-, GG-, and GN-gene families). It has been identified only three full-length GS-transcripts indicating a much greater variety of Kunitz homologs in Heteractis crispa. We have examined an exon-intron structure of GS-genes; an open reading frame is interrupted by a single intron located at the middle of the signal peptide. 33 deduced mature GS-polypeptides have been categorized into three groups according to the nature of a P1 residue. Some of them corresponded to native Kunitz-type protease inhibitors earlier isolated from H. crispa. The deduced GS-polypeptide sequences demonstrated diverse charge distribution ranging from the local point charges forms to the overall positive ones. We have suggested that the GS-gene family has evolved through gene tandem duplication followed by adaptive divergence of the P1 residue in the reactive site selected for divergent functions in paralogs. The expansion of this Kunitz-type multigene superfamily during evolution is lineage-specific, providing the tropical sea anemone H. crispa with the ability to interact an increasing diversity of the preys and predators. Our results show that the Kunitz-type polypeptides are encoded by a multigene superfamily and realized via a combinatory Kunitz-type library in the H. crispa tentacles venom. PMID:22001835

  9. Cell-specific and developmental expression of lectican-cleaving proteases in mouse hippocampus and neocortex.

    PubMed

    Levy, C; Brooks, J M; Chen, J; Su, J; Fox, M A

    2015-03-01

    Mounting evidence has demonstrated that a specialized extracellular matrix exists in the mammalian brain and that this glycoprotein-rich matrix contributes to many aspects of brain development and function. The most prominent supramolecular assemblies of these extracellular matrix glycoproteins are perineuronal nets, specialized lattice-like structures that surround the cell bodies and proximal neurites of select classes of interneurons. Perineuronal nets are composed of lecticans, a family of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans that includes aggrecan, brevican, neurocan, and versican. These lattice-like structures emerge late in postnatal brain development, coinciding with the ending of critical periods of brain development. Despite our knowledge of the presence of lecticans in perineuronal nets and their importance in regulating synaptic plasticity, we know little about the development or distribution of the extracellular proteases that are responsible for their cleavage and turnover. A subset of a large family of extracellular proteases (called a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs [ADAMTS]) is responsible for endogenously cleaving lecticans. We therefore explored the expression pattern of two aggrecan-degrading ADAMTS family members, ADAMTS15 and ADAMTS4, in the hippocampus and neocortex. Here, we show that both lectican-degrading metalloproteases are present in these brain regions and that each exhibits a distinct temporal and spatial expression pattern. Adamts15 mRNA is expressed exclusively by parvalbumin-expressing interneurons during synaptogenesis, whereas Adamts4 mRNA is exclusively generated by telencephalic oligodendrocytes during myelination. Thus, ADAMTS15 and ADAMTS4 not only exhibit unique cellular expression patterns but their developmental upregulation by these cell types coincides with critical aspects of neural development. PMID:25349050

  10. Cell-specific and developmental expression of lectican-cleaving proteases in mouse hippocampus and neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Levy, C.; Brooks, J.M.; Chen, J.; Su, J.; Fox, M.A.

    2014-01-01

    Mounting evidence has demonstrated that a specialized extracellular matrix exists in the mammalian brain, and this glycoprotein-rich matrix contributes to many aspects of brain development and function. The most prominent supramolecular assembly of these ECM glycoproteins are perineuronal nets, specialized lattice-like structures that surround the cell bodies and proximal neurites of select classes of interneurons. Perineuronal nets are composed of lecticans – a family of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans [CSPGs] that includes aggrecan, brevican, neurocan, and versican. The presence of these lattice-like structures emerge late in postnatal brain development and coincides with the ending of critical periods of brain development. Despite our knowledge of the presence of lecticans in perineuronal nets and their importance in regulating synaptic plasticity, we know little about the development or distribution of extracellular proteases that are responsible for their cleavage and turnover. A subset of the large “A Disintegrin and Metalloproteinase with Thrombospondin Motifs” (ADAMTS) family of extracellular proteases is responsible for endogenously cleaving lecticans. We therefore explored the expression pattern of 2 aggrecan-degrading ADAMTS family members, ADAMTS15 and ADAMTS4, in hippocampus and neocortex. Here, we show that both lectican-degrading metalloproteases are present in these brain regions and each exhibits a distinct temporal and spatial expression pattern. Adamts15 mRNA is expressed exclusively by Parvalbumin-expressing interneurons during synaptogenesis, whereas, Adamts4 mRNA is exclusively generated by telencephalic oligodendrocytes during myelination. Thus, ADAMTS15 and ADAMTS4 not only exhibit unique cellular expression patterns but their developmental upregulation by these cell types coincides with critical aspects of neural development. PMID:25349050

  11. Expression, purification and molecular modeling of the NIa protease of Cardamom mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Jebasingh, T; Pandaranayaka, Eswari P J; Mahalakshmi, A; Kasin Yadunandam, A; Krishnaswamy, S; Usha, R

    2013-01-01

    The NIa protease of Potyviridae is the major viral protease that processes potyviral polyproteins. The NIa protease coding region of Cardamom mosaic virus (CdMV) is amplified from the viral cDNA, cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. NIa protease forms inclusion bodies in E.coli. The inclusion bodies are solubilized with 8 M urea, refolded and purified by Nickel-Nitrilotriacetic acid affinity chromatography. Three-dimensional modeling of the CdMV NIa protease is achieved by threading approach using the homologous X-ray crystallographic structure of Tobacco etch mosaic virus NIa protease. The model gave an insight in to the substrate specificities of the NIa proteases and predicted the complementation of nearby residues in the catalytic triad (H42, D74 and C141) mutants in the cis protease activity of CdMV NIa protease. PMID:22888800

  12. The structure of a universally employed enzyme: V8 protease from Staphylococcus aureus

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, Lata; Leduc, Yvonne; Hayakawa, Koto; Delbaere, Louis T.J.

    2008-06-27

    V8 protease, an extracellular protease of Staphylococcus aureus, is related to the pancreatic serine proteases. The enzyme cleaves peptide bonds exclusively on the carbonyl side of aspartate and glutamate residues. Unlike the pancreatic serine proteases, V8 protease possesses no disulfide bridges. This is a major evolutionary difference, as all pancreatic proteases have at least two disulfide bridges. The structure of V8 protease shows structural similarity with several other serine proteases, specifically the epidermolytic toxins A and B from S. aureus and trypsin, in which the conformation of the active site is almost identical. V8 protease is also unique in that the positively charged N-terminus is involved in determining the substrate-specificity of the enzyme.

  13. A substitution at His-120 in the LasA protease of Pseudomonas aeruginosa blocks enzymatic activity without affecting propeptide processing or extracellular secretion.

    PubMed Central

    Gustin, J K; Kessler, E; Ohman, D E

    1996-01-01

    The LasA protease of Pseudomonas aeruginosa can degrade elastin and is an important contributor to the pathogenesis of this organism. LasA (20 kDa) is a member of the beta-lytic endopeptidase family of extracellular bacterial proteases, and it shows high-level staphylolytic activity. We sequenced the lasA gene from strain FRD1 and overexpressed it in Escherichia coli. The lasA gene encodes a precursor, known as pre-proLasA, of 45,582 Da. Amino-terminal sequence analysis allowed the identification of the signal peptidase cleavage site and revealed that the 31-amino-acid signal peptide was removed in E. coli. The remaining proLasA (42 kDa) did not undergo autoproteolytic processing and showed little staphylolytic activity. However, it was readily processed to a 20-kDa active staphylolytic protease by incubation with trypsin or with the culture filtrate of a P. aeruginosa lasAdelta mutant. Thus, removal of the propeptide (22 kDa) was required to convert proLasA into an active protease. Although LasA protease was critical for staphylolytic activity, other proteases like elastase were found to enhance staphylolysis. Under the control of an inducible trc promoter, lasA was overexpressed in P. aeruginosa and the processing intermediates were examined. Compared with wild-type cells, the overproducing cells accumulated more 42-kDa proLasA species, and the culture supernatants of the overproducing cells showed increased levels of active 20-kDa LasA protease. Small amounts of a 25-kDa extracellular LasA-related protein, which could represent a potential processing intermediate, were also observed. To better understand the structure-function relationships in LasA protease, we tested whether His-120-X-His-122 in the mature portion of LasA plays a role in activity. This motif and surrounding sequences are conserved in the related beta-lytic protease of Achromobacter lyticus. Oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis was used to change His-120 to Ala-120, thus forming the lasA5 allele

  14. Cancer, Families, and Family Counselors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffy, Maureen; Gillig, Scott

    2003-01-01

    Examines the role of the family counselor in working with cancer patients and their families. Suggests ways in which the family counselor can work proactively with families in the area of cancer prevention and helping them cope more effectively with its impact on their lives. Uses a clinical case example to illustrate intervention with cancer…

  15. Family therapy by family doctors

    PubMed Central

    Neighbour, R.

    1982-01-01

    The experiences of a group of general practitioners learning and attempting family therapy are described. Three principles for working with whole families — facilitation, formulation and focussing — are illustrated by case histories. Family therapy in general practice can be effective for patients and worthwhile for family doctors. PMID:7153974

  16. Kinetics of alkaline protease production by Streptomyces griseoflavus PTCC1130

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Seyed Vesal; Saffari, Zahra; Farhanghi, Ali; Atyabi, Seyed Mohammad; Norouzian, Dariush

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Proteases are a group of enzymes that catalyze the degradation of proteins resulting in the production of their amino acid constituents. They are the most important group of industrial enzymes which account for about 60% of total enzymes in the market and produced mainly by microorganisms. The attempts were made to study the kinetic parameters of protease produced by Streptomyces griseoflavus PTCC1130. Materials and Methods: Streptomyces griseoflavus PTCC1130 was grown on casein agar. Different media such as BM1, BM2, BM3 and BM4 were prepared. Data obtained from growth and protease production were subjected to kinetics evaluation. Casein was used as substrate for protease activity and the released soluble peptide bearing aromatic amino acid were quantified by Folin Cioclateaue reagent. Protein content of the enzyme and the sugar utilized by the organism were estimated by Bradford and Miller’s methods respectively. Results: Basal Medium named as BM1, BM2, BM3 and BM4(50 mL in 250 mL Erlen Meyer flasks) were screened out to evaluate protease production by Streptomyces griseoflavus PTCC1130. They were inoculated with known amount of seed culture and kept on rotary shaker. To obtain the specific growth rate, wet weight of biomass was plotted against the time. The clarified supernatant was used for the analysis of protease by measuring the soluble peptide containing aromatic amino acid residues employing Folin Cioclateaue reagent. Our results showed that maximum level of enzyme production (14035 U/L) was occurred at late exponential phase using Basal Medium supplemented with zinc sulfate (0.5g/L), casein (10g/L) at pH 6.5. Conclusions: A kinetic study of protease production by Streptomyces griseoflavus PTCC1130 provided highly quantitative information regarding the behavior of a system, which is essential to study the fermentation process. Exploitation of such kinetics analysis would be useful in commercialization of microbial enzyme

  17. Characterization of an extracellular serine protease of Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis.

    PubMed

    Silva-Lopez, R E; Coelho, M G Pinto; De Simone, S G

    2005-07-01

    A serine protease was purified 942-fold from culture supernatant of L. amazonensis promastigotes using (NH4)2SO4 precipitation followed by affinity chromatography on aprotinin-agarose and continuous elution electrophoresis by Prep Cell, yielding a total recovery of 61%. The molecular mass of the active enzyme estimated by SDS-PAGE under conditions of reduction was 56 kDa and 115 kDa under conditions of non-reduction, suggesting that the protease is a dimeric protein. Additionally, it was found to be a non-glycosylated enzyme, with a pI of 5.0. The optimal pH and temperature of the enzyme were 7.5 and 28 degrees C respectively, using alpha-N-rho-tosyl-L-arginine-methyl ester (L-TAME) as substrate. Assays of thermal stability indicated that 61% of the enzyme activity was preserved after 1 h of pre-treatment at 42 degrees C. Haemoglobin, bovine serum albumin (BSA), ovalbumin, fibrinogen, collagen, gelatin and peptide substrates containing arginine in an ester bond and amide substrates containing hydrophobic residues at the P1 site were hydrolysed by this extracellular protease. The insulin beta-chain was also hydrolysed by the enzyme and many peptidic bonds were susceptible to the protease action, and 4 of them (L11-V12, E3-A14, L15-Y16 and Y16-L17) were identified. Inhibition studies suggested that the enzyme belongs to the serine protease class inhibited by calcium and manganese and activated by zinc. These findings show that this enzyme of L. amazonensis is a novel serine protease, which differs from all known flagellate proteases characterized. PMID:16038400

  18. Salt stress represses production of extracellular proteases in Bacillus pumilus.

    PubMed

    Liu, R F; Huang, C L; Feng, H

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus pumilus is able to secrete subtilisin-like prote-ases, one of which has been purified and characterized biochemically, demonstrating great potential for use in industrial applications. In the current study, the biosynthesis and transcription of extracellular pro-teases in B. pumilus (BA06) under salt stress were investigated using various methods, including a proteolytic assay, zymogram analysis, and real-time PCR. Our results showed that total extracellular proteolytic activity, both in fermentation broth and on milk-containing agar plates, was considerably repressed by salt in a dosage-dependent manner. As Bacillus species usually secret multiple extracellular proteases, a vari-ety of individual extracellular protease encoding genes were selected for real-time PCR analysis. It was shown that proteases encoded by the aprE and aprX genes were the major proteases in the fermentation broth in terms of their transcripts in B. pumilus. Further, transcription of aprE, aprX, and epr genes was indeed repressed by salt stress. In con-trast, transcription of other genes (e.g., vpr and wprA) was not repressed or significantly affected by the salt. Conclusively, salt stress represses total extracellular proteolytic activity in B. pumilus, which can largely be ascribed to suppression of the major protease-encoding genes (aprE, aprX) at the transcriptional level. In contrast, transcription of other pro-tease-encoding genes (e.g., vpr, wprA) was not repressed by salt stress. PMID:25966269

  19. Protease nexin-1 regulates retinal vascular development.

    PubMed

    Selbonne, Sonia; Francois, Deborah; Raoul, William; Boulaftali, Yacine; Sennlaub, Florian; Jandrot-Perrus, Martine; Bouton, Marie-Christine; Arocas, Véronique

    2015-10-01

    We recently identified protease nexin-1 (PN-1) or serpinE2, as a possibly underestimated player in maintaining angiogenic balance. Here, we used the well-characterized postnatal vascular development of newborn mouse retina to further investigate the role and the mechanism of action of PN-1 in physiological angiogenesis. The development of retinal vasculature was analysed by endothelial cell staining with isolectin B4. PN-1-deficient (PN-1(-/-)) retina displayed increased vascularization in the postnatal period, with elevated capillary thickness and density, compared to their wild-type littermate (WT). Moreover, PN-1(-/-) retina presented more veins/arteries than WT retina. The kinetics of retinal vasculature development, retinal VEGF expression and overall retinal structure were similar in WT and PN-1(-/-) mice, but we observed a hyperproliferation of vascular cells in PN-1(-/-) retina. Expression of PN-1 was analysed by immunoblotting and X-Gal staining of retinas from mice expressing beta-galactosidase under a PN-1 promoter. PN-1 was highly expressed in the first week following birth and then progressively decreased to a low level in adult retina where it localized on the retinal arteries. PCR arrays performed on mouse retinal RNA identified two angiogenesis-related factors, midkine and Smad5, that were overexpressed in PN-1(-/-) newborn mice and this was confirmed by RT-PCR. Both the higher vascularization and the overexpression of midkine and Smad5 mRNA were also observed in gastrocnemius muscle of PN-1(-/-) mice, suggesting that PN-1 interferes with these pathways. Together, our results demonstrate that PN-1 strongly limits physiological angiogenesis and suggest that modulation of PN-1 expression could represent a new way to regulate angiogenesis. PMID:26109427

  20. HIV-1 protease-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Apoptosis is one of the presumptive causes of CD4+ T cell depletion during HIV infection and progression to AIDS. However, the precise role of HIV-1 in this process remains unexplained. HIV-1 protease (PR) has been suggested as a possible factor, but a direct link between HIV-1 PR enzymatic activity and apoptosis has not been established. Results Here, we show that expression of active HIV-1 PR induces death in HeLa and HEK-293 cells via the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. This conclusion is based on in vivo observations of the direct localization of HIV-1 PR in mitochondria, a key player in triggering apoptosis. Moreover, we observed an HIV-1 PR concentration-dependent decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential and the role of HIV-1 PR in activation of caspase 9, PARP cleavage and DNA fragmentation. In addition, in vitro data demonstrated that HIV-1 PR mediates cleavage of mitochondrial proteins Tom22, VDAC and ANT, leading to release of AIF and Hsp60 proteins. By using yeast two-hybrid screening, we also identified a new HIV-1 PR interaction partner, breast carcinoma-associated protein 3 (BCA3). We found that BCA3 accelerates p53 transcriptional activity on the bax promoter, thus elevating the cellular level of pro-apoptotic Bax protein. Conclusion In summary, our results describe the involvement of HIV-1 PR in apoptosis, which is caused either by a direct effect of HIV-1 PR on mitochondrial membrane integrity or by its interaction with cellular protein BCA3. PMID:24886575

  1. Regulation of distinct pools of amyloid β-protein by multiple cellular proteases.

    PubMed

    Leissring, Malcolm A; Turner, Anthony J

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive, age-related neurodegenerative disorder characterized by extracellular and intracellular deposition of the amyloid β-protein (Aβ). The study of rare, familial forms of AD has shown that sustained elevations in the production of Aβ (either all forms or specific pathogenic variants thereof) are sufficient to trigger the full spectrum of cognitive and histopathological features of the disease. Although the exact cause or causes remain unknown, emerging evidence suggests that impairments in the clearance of Aβ, after it is produced, may underlie the vast majority of sporadic AD cases. This review focuses on Aβ-degrading proteases (AβDPs), which have emerged as particularly important mediators of Aβ clearance. A wide variety of proteases that - by virtue of their particular regional and subcellular localization profiles - define distinct pools of Aβ have been identified. Different pools of Aβ, in turn, may contribute differentially to the pathogenesis of the disease. The study of individual AβDPs, therefore, promises to offer new insights into the mechanistic basis of AD pathogenesis and, ultimately, may facilitate the development of effective methods for its prevention or treatment or both. PMID:23953275

  2. Regulation of distinct pools of amyloid β-protein by multiple cellular proteases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a progressive, age-related neurodegenerative disorder characterized by extracellular and intracellular deposition of the amyloid β-protein (Aβ). The study of rare, familial forms of AD has shown that sustained elevations in the production of Aβ (either all forms or specific pathogenic variants thereof) are sufficient to trigger the full spectrum of cognitive and histopathological features of the disease. Although the exact cause or causes remain unknown, emerging evidence suggests that impairments in the clearance of Aβ, after it is produced, may underlie the vast majority of sporadic AD cases. This review focuses on Aβ-degrading proteases (AβDPs), which have emerged as particularly important mediators of Aβ clearance. A wide variety of proteases that – by virtue of their particular regional and subcellular localization profiles – define distinct pools of Aβ have been identified. Different pools of Aβ, in turn, may contribute differentially to the pathogenesis of the disease. The study of individual AβDPs, therefore, promises to offer new insights into the mechanistic basis of AD pathogenesis and, ultimately, may facilitate the development of effective methods for its prevention or treatment or both. PMID:23953275

  3. Cloning and expression analysis of cysteine protease gene (MwCP) in Agropyron mongolicum Keng.

    PubMed

    Ao, T G B Y; Lang, M L; Li, Y Q; Zhao, Y; Wang, L C; Yang, X J

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a cysteine protease gene (MwCP) from Agropyron mongolicum Keng was isolated using RACE. Sequence analysis indicated that MwCP was 1473 bp, and it contained a 1134-bp open reading frame, which encoded 377 amino acids with a 24-amino acid N-terminal signal peptide. The results indicated that the MwCP protein was a new member of the papain C1A family, and it was predicted to be an extracellular, secretory stable hydrophilic protein. The secondary structure of MwCP was mainly composed of α-helices and random coils, and the space structure primarily contained α-helices, β-sheets, and β-turns. Homology analyses showed the 98% homology between MwCP amino acids and a cysteine protease found in Triticum aestivum (GenBank accession No. AAW21813.1). Analysis of mRNA using semi-quantitative RT-PCR indicated that during a 48-h drought stress period, MwCP was expressed during the 4th hour, and the expression level peaked during the 6th hour before declining to the original level. The results revealed that MwCP was involved in drought-resistant physiological processes of A. mongolicum. Moreover, the MwCP expression levels were highest in leaves, intermediate in roots, and lowest in stems. PMID:26909915

  4. Staphylococcal SplB serine protease utilizes a novel molecular mechanism of activation.

    PubMed

    Pustelny, Katarzyna; Zdzalik, Michal; Stach, Natalia; Stec-Niemczyk, Justyna; Cichon, Przemyslaw; Czarna, Anna; Popowicz, Grzegorz; Mak, Pawel; Drag, Marcin; Salvesen, Guy S; Wladyka, Benedykt; Potempa, Jan; Dubin, Adam; Dubin, Grzegorz

    2014-05-30

    Staphylococcal SplB protease belongs to the chymotrypsin family. Chymotrypsin zymogen is activated by proteolytic processing at the N terminus, resulting in significant structural rearrangement at the active site. Here, we demonstrate that the molecular mechanism of SplB protease activation differs significantly and we characterize the novel mechanism in detail. Using peptide and protein substrates we show that the native signal peptide, or any N-terminal extension, has an inhibitory effect on SplB. Only precise N-terminal processing releases the full proteolytic activity of the wild type analogously to chymotrypsin. However, comparison of the crystal structures of mature SplB and a zymogen mimic show no rearrangement at the active site whatsoever. Instead, only the formation of a unique hydrogen bond network, distant form the active site, by the new N-terminal glutamic acid of mature SplB is observed. The importance of this network and influence of particular hydrogen bond interactions at the N terminus on the catalytic process is demonstrated by evaluating the kinetics of a series of mutants. The results allow us to propose a consistent model where changes in the overall protein dynamics rather than structural rearrangement of the active site are involved in the activation process. PMID:24713703

  5. Extracellular granzyme K mediates endothelial activation through the cleavage of protease-activated receptor-1.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Mehul; Merkulova, Yulia; Raithatha, Sheetal; Parkinson, Leigh G; Shen, Yue; Cooper, Dawn; Granville, David J

    2016-05-01

    Granzymes are a family of serine proteases that were once thought to function exclusively as mediators of cytotoxic lymphocyte-induced target cell death. However, non-apoptotic roles for granzymes, including granzyme K (GzK), have been proposed. As recent studies have observed elevated levels of GzK in the plasma of patients diagnosed with clinical sepsis, we hypothesized that extracellular GzK induces a proinflammatory response in endothelial cells. In the present study, extracellular GzK proteolytically activated protease-activated receptor-1 leading to increased interleukin 6 and monocyte chemotactic protein 1 production in endothelial cells. Enhanced expression of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 along with an increased capacity for adherence of THP-1 cells was also observed. Characterization of downstream pathways implicated the mitogen-activated protein kinase p38 pathway for intercellular adhesion molecule 1 expression, and both the p38 and the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases 1 and 2 pathways in cytokine production. GzK also increased tumour necrosis factor α-induced inflammatory adhesion molecule expression. Furthermore, the physiological inhibitor of GzK, inter-α-inhibitor protein, significantly inhibited GzK activity in vitro. In summary, extracellular GzK promotes a proinflammatory response in endothelial cells. PMID:26936634

  6. Protease inhibitors clitocypin and macrocypin are differentially expressed within basidiomycete fruiting bodies.

    PubMed

    Sabotič, Jerica; Kilaru, Sreedhar; Budič, Maruška; Gašparič, Meti Buh; Gruden, Kristina; Bailey, Andy M; Foster, Gary D; Kos, Janko

    2011-10-01

    Clitocypin and macrocypin are cysteine protease inhibitors of the mycocypin family which is unique to basidiomycetes. We have established that Clitocybe nebularis and Macrolepiota procera each contain genes for both macrocypin and clitocypin. Both are expressed in M. procera but only clitocypin in C. nebularis. Further analysis of mycocypin expression at the mRNA and protein levels in mature fruiting bodies of M. procera revealed that clitocypin is expressed evenly throughout the fruiting body, while the level of expression of macrocypins varies, and, at the protein level, is much higher in the veil fragments and the ring. The expression patterns of various mycocypins were determined in Coprinopsis cinerea, using promoters linked to a reporter gene. The expression profile of the clitocypin promoter was similar to that of the constitutive promoter gpdII from Agaricus bisporus, while that of the macrocypin 4 promoter was limited to the outer edges of the fruiting body throughout development. In addition, the activity of the macrocypin 3 promoter was different, indicating different regulation of expression for different macrocypin genes. The complex, tissue specific expression patterns for mycocypin genes suggest different biological roles for the products, either in regulation of endogenous proteases or in defense against pathogens or predators. PMID:21672601

  7. The Molecular Basis for Ubiquitin and Ubiquitin-like Specificities in Bacterial Effector Proteases.

    PubMed

    Pruneda, Jonathan N; Durkin, Charlotte H; Geurink, Paul P; Ovaa, Huib; Santhanam, Balaji; Holden, David W; Komander, David

    2016-07-21

    Pathogenic bacteria rely on secreted effector proteins to manipulate host signaling pathways, often in creative ways. CE clan proteases, specific hydrolases for ubiquitin-like modifications (SUMO and NEDD8) in eukaryotes, reportedly serve as bacterial effector proteins with deSUMOylase, deubiquitinase, or, even, acetyltransferase activities. Here, we characterize bacterial CE protease activities, revealing K63-linkage-specific deubiquitinases in human pathogens, such as Salmonella, Escherichia, and Shigella, as well as ubiquitin/ubiquitin-like cross-reactive enzymes in Chlamydia, Rickettsia, and Xanthomonas. Five crystal structures, including ubiquitin/ubiquitin-like complexes, explain substrate specificities and redefine relationships across the CE clan. Importantly, this work identifies novel family members and provides key discoveries among previously reported effectors, such as the unexpected deubiquitinase activity in Xanthomonas XopD, contributed by an unstructured ubiquitin binding region. Furthermore, accessory domains regulate properties such as subcellular localization, as exemplified by a ubiquitin-binding domain in Salmonella Typhimurium SseL. Our work both highlights and explains the functional adaptations observed among diverse CE clan proteins. PMID:27425412

  8. The role of protease-activated receptor type 2 in nociceptive signaling and pain.

    PubMed

    Mrozkova, P; Palecek, J; Spicarova, D

    2016-07-18

    Protease-activated receptors (PARs) belong to the G-protein-coupled receptor family, that are expressed in many body tissues especially in different epithelial cells, mast cells and also in neurons and astrocytes. PARs play different physiological roles according to the location of their expression. Increased evidence supports the importance of PARs activation during nociceptive signaling and in the development of chronic pain states. This short review focuses on the role of PAR2 receptors in nociceptive transmission with the emphasis on the modulation at the spinal cord level. PAR2 are cleaved and subsequently activated by endogenous proteases such as tryptase and trypsin. In vivo, peripheral and intrathecal administration of PAR2 agonists induces thermal and mechanical hypersensitivity that is thought to be mediated by PAR2-induced release of pronociceptive neuropeptides and modulation of different receptors. PAR2 activation leads also to sensitization of transient receptor potential channels (TRP) that are crucial for nociceptive signaling and modulation. PAR2 receptors may play an important modulatory role in the development and maintenance of different pathological pain states and could represent a potential target for new analgesic treatments. PMID:27070742

  9. Mapping Inhibitor Binding Modes on an Active Cysteine Protease via NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gregory M.; Balouch, Eaman; Goetz, David H.; Lazic, Ana; McKerrow, James H.; Craik, Charles S.

    2013-01-01

    Cruzain is a member of the papain/cathepsin-L family of cysteine proteases, and the major cysteine protease of the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas’ disease. We report an auto-induction methodology that provides soluble-cruzain at high yields (> 30 mg per liter in minimal media). These increased yields provide sufficient quantities of active enzyme for use in NMR-based ligand mapping. Using CD and NMR spectroscopy, we also examined the solution-state structural dynamics of the enzyme in complex with a covalently bound vinyl sulfone inhibitor (K777). We report the backbone amide and side chain carbon chemical shift assignments of cruzain in complex with K777. These resonance assignments were used to identify and map residues located in the substrate binding pocket, including the catalytic Cys25 and His162. Selective 15N-Cys, 15N-His, and 13C-Met labeling was performed to quickly assess cruzain-ligand interactions for a set of eight low molecular weight compounds exhibiting micromolar binding or inhibition. Chemical shift perturbation mapping verifies that six of the eight compounds bind to cruzain at the active site. Three different binding modes were delineated for the compounds, namely covalent, non-covalent, and non-interacting. These results provide examples of how NMR spectroscopy can be used to screen compounds for fast evaluation of enzyme-inhibitor interactions in order to facilitate lead compound identification and subsequent structural studies. PMID:23181936

  10. The serine protease hepsin mediates urinary secretion and polymerisation of Zona Pellucida domain protein uromodulin

    PubMed Central

    Brunati, Martina; Perucca, Simone; Han, Ling; Cattaneo, Angela; Consolato, Francesco; Andolfo, Annapaola; Schaeffer, Céline; Olinger, Eric; Peng, Jianhao; Santambrogio, Sara; Perrier, Romain; Li, Shuo; Bokhove, Marcel; Bachi, Angela; Hummler, Edith; Devuyst, Olivier; Wu, Qingyu; Jovine, Luca; Rampoldi, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Uromodulin is the most abundant protein in the urine. It is exclusively produced by renal epithelial cells and it plays key roles in kidney function and disease. Uromodulin mainly exerts its function as an extracellular matrix whose assembly depends on a conserved, specific proteolytic cleavage leading to conformational activation of a Zona Pellucida (ZP) polymerisation domain. Through a comprehensive approach, including extensive characterisation of uromodulin processing in cellular models and in specific knock-out mice, we demonstrate that the membrane-bound serine protease hepsin is the enzyme responsible for the physiological cleavage of uromodulin. Our findings define a key aspect of uromodulin biology and identify the first in vivo substrate of hepsin. The identification of hepsin as the first protease involved in the release of a ZP domain protein is likely relevant for other members of this protein family, including several extracellular proteins, as egg coat proteins and inner ear tectorins. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08887.001 PMID:26673890

  11. Chondroadherin Fragmentation Mediated by the Protease HTRA1 Distinguishes Human Intervertebral Disc Degeneration from Normal Aging*

    PubMed Central

    Akhatib, Bashar; Önnerfjord, Patrik; Gawri, Rahul; Ouellet, Jean; Jarzem, Peter; Heinegård, Dick; Mort, John; Roughley, Peter; Haglund, Lisbet

    2013-01-01

    Chondroadherin, a member of the leucine-rich repeat family, has previously been demonstrated to be fragmented in some juveniles with idiopathic scoliosis. This observation led us to investigate adults with disc degeneration. Immunoblotting analysis demonstrated that non-degenerate discs from three different age groups show no chondroadherin fragmentation. Furthermore, the chondroadherin fragments in adult degenerate disc and the juvenile scoliotic disc were compared via immunoblot analysis and appeared to have a similar size. We then investigated whether or not chondroadherin fragmentation increases with the severity of disc degeneration. Three different samples with different severities were chosen from the same disc, and chondroadherin fragmentation was found to be more abundant with increasing severity of degeneration. This observation led us to the creation of a neoepitope antibody to the cleavage site observed. We then observed that the cleavage site in adult degenerate discs and juvenile scoliotic discs was identical as confirmed by the neoepitope antibody. Consequently, investigation of the protease capable of cleaving chondroadherin at this site was necessary. In vitro digests of disc tissue demonstrated that ADAMTS-4 and -5; cathepsins K, B, and L; and MMP-3, -7, -12, and -13 were incapable of cleavage of chondroadherin at this site and that HTRA1 was indeed the only protease capable. Furthermore, increased protein levels of the processed form of HTRA1 were demonstrated in degenerate disc tissues via immunoblotting. The results suggest that chondroadherin fragmentation can be used as a biomarker to distinguish the processes of disc degeneration from normal aging. PMID:23673665

  12. FAMILIAL SUICIDE

    PubMed Central

    Unni, K.E. Sadanaandan

    1996-01-01

    Seven completed suicides in a family of lower socioeconomic status and suburban domicile in Pondicherry are reported. The presence of bipolar affective disorder in the family members and the absence of exogenous factors are illustrated by utilising both family history method and family study method. The details collected formed the basis for the terminology ‘familial suicide’. The management of the index case, one of the only three surviving male members of the family, who presented with suicidal ruminations and depressive features, is described. PMID:21584122

  13. Regulation of Extracellular Protease Production in Bacillus cereus T: Characterization of Mutants Producing Altered Amounts of Protease

    PubMed Central

    Aronson, A. I.; Angelo, N.; Holt, S. C.

    1971-01-01

    Twenty-nine mutants of Bacillus cereus T were selected on casein agar for their inability to produce large amounts of extracellular protease. They all formed spores, and 27 were also auxotrophs for purines or pyrimidines. Upon reversion to prototrophy, a large fraction regained the capacity to produce protease. Conversely, reversion to normal protease production resulted in loss of the purine or pyrimidine requirement in a large fraction of the revertants. One spontaneous low-protease-producing pyrimidine auxotroph studied in detail grew as well as the wild type and produced spores which were identical to those produced by the wild type on the basis of heat resistance, dipicolinic acid content, density, and appearance in the electron microscope. The rate of protein turnover in the mutant was the same as the wild type. The mutant did grow poorly, however, when casein was the principal carbon source. A mutant excreting 5 to 10 times as much protease as the wild type was isolated as a secondary mutation from the hypoproducer discussed above. Loss of the pyrimidine requirement in this case did not alter the regulation of protease production. Although the secondary mutant grew somewhat faster in most media than the wild type, the final cell yield was lower. The spores of this mutant appeared to have excess coat on the basis of both electron microscopic and chemical studies. There appear to be closely related but distinct catabolic controls for both extracellular protease and spore formation. These controls can be dissociated as for the hypoproducers but can also appear integrated as for the hyperprotease producer. Images PMID:4104235

  14. Protein unfolding and degradation by the AAA+ Lon protease.

    PubMed

    Gur, Eyal; Vishkautzan, Marina; Sauer, Robert T

    2012-02-01

    AAA+ proteases employ a hexameric ring that harnesses the energy of ATP binding and hydrolysis to unfold native substrates and translocate the unfolded polypeptide into an interior compartment for degradation. What determines the ability of different AAA+ enzymes to unfold and thus degrade different native protein substrates is currently uncertain. Here, we explore the ability of the E. coli Lon protease to unfold and degrade model protein substrates beginning at N-terminal, C-terminal, or internal degrons. Lon has historically been viewed as a weak unfoldase, but we demonstrate robust and processive unfolding/degradation of some substrates with very stable protein domains, including mDHFR and titin(I27) . For some native substrates, Lon is a more active unfoldase than related AAA+ proteases, including ClpXP and ClpAP. For other substrates, this relationship is reversed. Thus, unfolding activity does not appear to be an intrinsic enzymatic property. Instead, it depends on the specific protease and substrate, suggesting that evolution has diversified rather than optimized the protein unfolding activities of different AAA+ proteases. PMID:22162032

  15. Genetics of Extracellular Protease Production in SACCHAROMYCOPSIS LIPOLYTICA

    PubMed Central

    Ogrydziak, David M.; Mortimer, Robert K.

    1977-01-01

    Mutants of Saccharomycopsis lipolytica with reduced ability to produce zones of clearing on skim-milk agar plates were isolated and their properties studied. For 18 mutants it was possible to score unambiguously segregants of crosses between these mutants and wild type for extracellular protease production. These mutants all produce reduced levels of extracellular protease in liquid culture. The mutations are recessive and are in nuclear genes. The 18 mutations define 10 or 11 complementation groups, no two of which are closely linked. Mutants in four of the complementation groups also produced reduced levels of extracellular RNAse, and the reduced levels of extracellular protease and RNAse production segregate together. Five of the mutants exhibited reduced mating frequency, and one mutant was osmotic remedial for extracellular protease production. These results demonstrate that many genes can affect extracellular protease production. Besides mutations in the structural gene and in regulatory genes, mutations are likely to be in genes involved in steps common to the production of several extracellular enzymes or in genes coding for cell wall or membrane components necessary for extracellular enzyme production. PMID:17248782

  16. Natural products from Garcinia brasiliensis as Leishmania protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Ivan O; Assis, Diego M; Juliano, Maria A; Cunha, Rodrigo L O R; Barbieri, Clara L; do Sacramento, Luis V S; Marques, Marcos J; dos Santos, Marcelo H

    2011-06-01

    The infections by protozoans of the genus Leishmania are a major worldwide health problem, with high endemicity in developing countries. The drugs of choice for the treatment of leishmaniasis are the pentavalent antimonials, which cause renal and cardiac toxicity. As part of a search for new drugs against leishmaniasis, we evaluated the in vitro Leishmania protease inhibition activity of extracts (hexanic, ethyl-acetate, and ethanolic) and fukugetin, a bioflavonoid purified from the ethyl-acetate extract of the pericarp of the fruit of Garcinia brasiliensis, a tree native to Brazilian forests. The isolated compound was characterized by using spectral analyses with nuclear magnetic resonance, mass spectroscopy, ultraviolet, and infrared techniques. The ethyl-acetate extract and the compound fukugetin showed significant activity as inhibitors of Leishmania's proteases, with mean (±SD) IC(50) (50% inhibition concentration of protease activity) values of 15.0±1.3 μg/mL and 3.2±0.5 μM/mL, respectively, characterizing a bioguided assay. In addition, this isolated compound showed no activity against promastigote and amastigote forms of L. (L.) amazonensis and mammalian cells. These results suggest that fukugetin is a potent protease inhibitor of L. (L.) amazonensis and does not cause toxicity in mammalian or Leishmania cells in vitro. This study provides new perspectives on the development of novel drugs that have leishmanicidal activity obtained from natural products and that target the parasite's proteases. PMID:21554130

  17. Extracellular proteases are released by ciliates in defined seawater microcosms.

    PubMed

    Thao, Ngo Vy; Nozawa, Akino; Obayashi, Yumiko; Kitamura, Shin-Ichi; Yokokawa, Taichi; Suzuki, Satoru

    2015-08-01

    The biodegradation of proteins in seawater requires various proteases which are commonly thought to be mainly derived from heterotrophic bacteria. We, however, found that protists showed a high protease activity and continuously produced trypsin-type enzymes. The free-living marine heterotrophic ciliate Paranophrys marina together with an associated bacterium was isolated and used for microcosm incubation with different concentrations of killed bacteria as food for 10 days. The results showed that the co-existence of the ciliate with its associated bacterium produced a significant protease activity in both cell-associated and cell-free fractions while that in the associated bacterium only microcosm was negligible. The protease profiles are different between cell-associated and cell-free fractions, and a trypsin-type enzyme hydrolyzing Boc-Val-Leu-Lys-MCA was detected throughout the period in the presence of ciliates. This suggests that ciliates release proteases into the surrounding environment which could play a role in protein digestion outside cells. It has been previously suggested that bacteria are the major transformers in seawater. We here present additional data which indicates that protists, or at least ciliates with their specific enzymes, are a potential player in organic matter degradation in water columns. PMID:26115436

  18. Protease Inhibitors in View of Peptide Substrate Databases

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Protease substrate profiling has nowadays almost become a routine task for experimentalists, and the knowledge on protease peptide substrates is easily accessible via the MEROPS database. We present a shape-based virtual screening workflow using vROCS that applies the information about the specificity of the proteases to find new small-molecule inhibitors. Peptide substrate sequences for three to four substrate positions of each substrate from the MEROPS database were used to build the training set. Two-dimensional substrate sequences were converted to three-dimensional conformations through mutation of a template peptide substrate. The vROCS query was built from single amino acid queries for each substrate position considering the relative frequencies of the amino acids. The peptide-substrate-based shape-based virtual screening approach gives good performance for the four proteases thrombin, factor Xa, factor VIIa, and caspase-3 with the DUD-E data set. The results show that the method works for protease targets with different specificity profiles as well as for targets with different active-site mechanisms. As no structure of the target and no information on small-molecule inhibitors are required to use our approach, the method has significant advantages in comparison with conventional structure- and ligand-based methods. PMID:27247997

  19. Revisiting rubisco as a protein substrate for insect midgut proteases.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Usha; Bhardwaj, Amit; Kumar, Rakesh; Leelavathi, Sadhu; Reddy, Vanga Siva; Mazumdar-Leighton, Sudeshna

    2014-01-01

    Gene fragments encoding the large subunit (LS) of Rubisco (RBCL) were cloned from various species of host plants of phytophagous Lepidoptera and expressed as recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli. Recombinant RBCLs were compared among each other along with casein and native Rubisco as proteinaceous substrates for measuring total midgut protease activities of fourth instar larvae of Helicoverpa armigera feeding on casein, Pieris brassicae feeding on cauliflower, and Antheraea assamensis feeding on Litsea monopetala and Persea bombycina. Cognate rRBCL (from the pertinent host plant species) substrates performed similar to noncognate rRBCL reflecting the conserved nature of encoding genes and the versatile use of these recombinant proteins. Casein and recombinant RBCL generally outperformed native Rubisco as substrates, except where inclusion of a reducing agent in the enzyme assay likely unfolded the plant proteins. Levels of total midgut protease activities detected in A. assamensis larvae feeding on two primary host species were similar, suggesting that the suite(s) of digestive enzymes in these insects could hydrolyze a plant protein efficiently. Protease activities detected in the presence of protease inhibitors and the reducing agent dithiothreitol (DTT) suggested that recombinant RBCL was a suitable protein substrate for studying insect proteases using in vitro enzyme assays and substrate zymography. PMID:24338735

  20. Characterization, biomedical and agricultural applications of protease inhibitors: A review.

    PubMed

    Shamsi, Tooba Naz; Parveen, Romana; Fatima, Sadaf

    2016-10-01

    This review describes Protease Inhibitors (PIs) which target or inhibit proteases, protein digesting enzymes. These proteases play a crucial task in many biological events including digestion, blood coagulation, apoptosis etc. Regardless of their crucial roles, they need to be checked regularly by PIs as their excess may possibly damage host organism. On basis of amino acid composition of PIs where Protease-PI enzymatic reactions occur i.e. serine, cysteine, and aspartic acid, they are classified. Nowadays, various PIs are being worked upon to fight various parasitic or viral diseases including malaria, schistosomiasis, colds, flu', dengue etc. They prevent an ongoing process begun by carcinogen exposure by keeping a check on metastasis. They also possess potential to reduce carcinogen-induced, increased levels of gene amplification to almost normal levels. Some PIs can principally be used for treatment of hypertension and congestive heart failure by blocking conversion of angiotensin I to angiotensin II for example Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs). Also PIs target amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) level in brain which is prime responsible for development of Alzheimer's Disease (AD). Also, PIs inhibit enzymatic activity of HIV-1 Protease Receptor (PR) by preventing cleavage events in Gag and Gag-Pol that result in production of non-virulent virus particles. PMID:26955746

  1. Mitochondrial cereblon functions as a Lon-type protease

    PubMed Central

    Kataoka, Kosuke; Nakamura, China; Asahi, Toru; Sawamura, Naoya

    2016-01-01

    Lon protease plays a major role in the protein quality control system in mammalian cell mitochondria. It is present in the mitochondrial matrix, and degrades oxidized and misfolded proteins, thereby protecting the cell from various extracellular stresses, including oxidative stress. The intellectual disability-associated and thalidomide-binding protein cereblon (CRBN) contains a large, highly conserved Lon domain. However, whether CRBN has Lon protease-like function remains unknown. Here, we determined if CRBN has a protective function against oxidative stress, similar to Lon protease. We report that CRBN partially distributes in mitochondria, suggesting it has a mitochondrial function. To specify the mitochondrial role of CRBN, we mitochondrially expressed CRBN in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. The resulting stable SH-SY5Y cell line showed no apparent effect on the mitochondrial functions of fusion, fission, and membrane potential. However, mitochondrially expressed CRBN exhibited protease activity, and was induced by oxidative stress. In addition, stably expressed cells exhibited suppressed neuronal cell death induced by hydrogen peroxide. These results suggest that CRBN functions specifically as a Lon-type protease in mitochondria. PMID:27417535

  2. Alkaline protease from Thermoactinomyces sp. RS1 mitigates industrial pollution.

    PubMed

    Verma, Amit; Ansari, Mohammad W; Anwar, Mohmmad S; Agrawal, Ruchi; Agrawal, Sanjeev

    2014-05-01

    Proteases have found a wide application in the several industrial processes, such as laundry detergents, protein recovery or solubilization, prion degradation, meat tenderizations, and in bating of hides and skins in leather industries. But the main hurdle in industrial application of proteases is their economical production on a large scale. The present investigation aimed to exploit the locally available inexpensive agricultural and household wastes for alkaline protease production using Thermoactinomyces sp. RS1 via solid-state fermentation (SSF) technique. The alkaline enzyme is potentially useful as an additive in commercial detergents to mitigate pollution load due to extensive use of caustic soda-based detergents. Thermoactinomyces sp. RS1 showed good protease production under SSF conditions of 55 °C, pH 9, and 50 % moisture content with potato peels as solid substrate. The presented findings revealed that crude alkaline protease produced by Thermoactinomyces sp. RS1 via SSF is of potential application in silver recovery from used X-ray films. PMID:24122212

  3. Protease Inhibitors in View of Peptide Substrate Databases.

    PubMed

    Waldner, Birgit J; Fuchs, Julian E; Schauperl, Michael; Kramer, Christian; Liedl, Klaus R

    2016-06-27

    Protease substrate profiling has nowadays almost become a routine task for experimentalists, and the knowledge on protease peptide substrates is easily accessible via the MEROPS database. We present a shape-based virtual screening workflow using vROCS that applies the information about the specificity of the proteases to find new small-molecule inhibitors. Peptide substrate sequences for three to four substrate positions of each substrate from the MEROPS database were used to build the training set. Two-dimensional substrate sequences were converted to three-dimensional conformations through mutation of a template peptide substrate. The vROCS query was built from single amino acid queries for each substrate position considering the relative frequencies of the amino acids. The peptide-substrate-based shape-based virtual screening approach gives good performance for the four proteases thrombin, factor Xa, factor VIIa, and caspase-3 with the DUD-E data set. The results show that the method works for protease targets with different specificity profiles as well as for targets with different active-site mechanisms. As no structure of the target and no information on small-molecule inhibitors are required to use our approach, the method has significant advantages in comparison with conventional structure- and ligand-based methods. PMID:27247997

  4. Hydrophobic Core Flexibility Modulates Enzyme Activity in HIV-1 Protease

    SciTech Connect

    Mittal, Seema; Cai, Yufeng; Nalam, Madhavi N.L.; Bolon, Daniel N.A.; Schiffer, Celia A.

    2012-09-11

    Human immunodeficiency virus Type-1 (HIV-1) protease is crucial for viral maturation and infectivity. Studies of protease dynamics suggest that the rearrangement of the hydrophobic core is essential for enzyme activity. Many mutations in the hydrophobic core are also associated with drug resistance and may modulate the core flexibility. To test the role of flexibility in protease activity, pairs of cysteines were introduced at the interfaces of flexible regions remote from the active site. Disulfide bond formation was confirmed by crystal structures and by alkylation of free cysteines and mass spectrometry. Oxidized and reduced crystal structures of these variants show the overall structure of the protease is retained. However, cross-linking the cysteines led to drastic loss in enzyme activity, which was regained upon reducing the disulfide cross-links. Molecular dynamics simulations showed that altered dynamics propagated throughout the enzyme from the engineered disulfide. Thus, altered flexibility within the hydrophobic core can modulate HIV-1 protease activity, supporting the hypothesis that drug resistant mutations distal from the active site can alter the balance between substrate turnover and inhibitor binding by modulating enzyme activity.

  5. Streptomyces serine protease (SAM-P20): recombinant production, characterization, and interaction with endogenous protease inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Taguchi, S; Suzuki, M; Kojima, S; Miura, K; Momose, H

    1995-01-01

    Previously, we isolated a candidate for an endogenous target enzyme(s) of the Streptomyces subtilisin inhibitor (SSI), termed SAM-P20, from a non-SSI-producing mutant strain (S. Taguchi, A. Odaka, Y. Watanabe, and H. Momose, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 61:180-186, 1995). In this study, in order to investigate the detailed enzymatic properties of this protease, an overproduction system of recombinant SAM-P20 was established in Streptomyces coelicolor with the SSI gene promoter. The recombinant SAM-P20 was purified by salting out and by two successive ion-exchange chromatographies to give a homogeneous band by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Partial peptide mapping and amino acid composition analysis revealed that the recombinant SAM-P20 was identical to natural SAM-P20. From the results for substrate specificity and inhibitor sensitivity, SAM-P20 could be categorized as a chymotrypsin-like protease with an arginine-cleavable activity, i.e., a serine protease with broad substrate specificity. For proteolytic activity, the optimal pH was 10.0 and the optimal temperature was shifted from 50 to 80 degrees C by the addition of 10 mM calcium ion. The strong stoichiometric inhibition of SAM-P20 activity by SSI dimer protein occurred in a subunit molar ratio of these two proteins of about 1, and an inhibitor constant of SSI toward SAM-P20 was estimated to be 8.0 x 10(-10) M. The complex formation of SAM-P20 and SSI was monitored by analytical gel filtration, and a complex composed of two molecules of SAM-P20 and one dimer molecule of SSI was detected, in addition to a complex of one molecule of SAM-P20 bound to one dimer molecule of SSI. The reactive site of SSI toward SAM-P20 was identified as Met-73-Val-74 by sequence analysis of the modified form of SSI, which was produced by the acidification of the complex of SSI and SAM-P20. This reactive site is the same that toward an exogenous target enzyme, subtilisin BPN'. PMID:7592444

  6. Active site gating regulates substrate selectivity in a chymotrypsin-like serine protease. The structure of Haemophilus influenzae IgA1 protease†

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Troy A.; Qiu, Jiazhou; Plaut, Andrew G.; Holyoak, Todd

    2009-01-01

    We report here the first structure of a member of the IgA protease family at 1.75Å resolution. This protease is a founding member of the Type V (autotransporter) secretion system and is considered a virulence determinant among the bacteria expressing the enzyme. The structure of the enzyme fits that of a classical autotransporter in which several unique domains necessary for protein function are appended to a central, 100 Å long β-helical domain. The N-terminal domain of the IgA protease is found to possess a chymotrypsin-like fold. However, this catalytic domain contains a unique loop D that extends over the active site acting as a lid, gating substrate access. The data presented provide a structural basis for the known ability of IgA proteases to only cleave the P/S/T rich hinge peptide unique to IgA1 in the context of the intact fold of the immunoglobulin. Based upon the structural data as well as molecular modeling, a model is presented that suggests the unique, extended loop D in this IgA protease sterically occludes the active site binding cleft in the absence of immunoglobulin binding. Only in the context of binding of the IgA1 immunoglobulin Fc domain in a valley formed between the N-terminal protease domain and another domain appended to the β-helix spine (domain-2) is the lid stabilized in an open conformation. The stabilization of this open conformation through Fc association subsequently allows access of the hinge peptide to the active site resulting in recognition and cleavage of the substrate. PMID:19393662

  7. Diversity of cultivable protease-producing bacteria in sediments of Jiaozhou Bay, China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xi-Ying; Han, Xiao-Xu; Chen, Xiu-Lan; Dang, Hong-Yue; Xie, Bin-Bin; Qin, Qi-Long; Shi, Mei; Zhou, Bai-Cheng; Zhang, Yu-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Although protease-producing bacteria are key players in the degradation of organic nitrogen and essential for the nitrogen recycling in marine sediments, diversity of both these bacteria and their extracellular proteases is still largely unknown. This study investigated the diversity of the cultivable protease-producing bacteria and their extracellular proteases in the sediments of the eutrophied Jiaozhou Bay, China through phylogenetic analysis and protease inhibitor tests. The abundance of the cultivable protease-producing bacteria was up to 104 cells/g in all six sediment samples. The cultivated protease-producing bacteria mostly belonged to the phyla Proteobacteria and Firmicutes with the predominant genera being Photobacterium (39.4%), Bacillus (25.8%), and Vibrio (19.7%). Protease inhibitor tests revealed that extracellular proteases secreted by the bacteria were mainly serine proteases and/or metalloproteases with relatively low proportions of cysteine proteases. This study represents the first comprehensive analysis on the diversity of protease-producing bacteria and their extracellular proteases in sediments of a eutrophic bay. PMID:26441943

  8. Role of RopB in growth phase expression of the SpeB cysteine protease of Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Neely, Melody N; Lyon, William R; Runft, Donna L; Caparon, Michael

    2003-09-01

    The Rgg family of transcription regulators is widely distributed among gram-positive bacteria; however, how the members of this family control transcription is poorly understood. In the pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes, the Rgg family member RopB is required for transcription of the gene that encodes the secreted SpeB cysteine protease. Expression of the protease follows distinct kinetics that involves control of transcription in response to the growth phase. In this study, the contribution of RopB to growth phase control was examined. The gene encoding the protease (speB) and ropB are transcribed divergently from a 940-bp intergenic region. Primer extension analyses, in conjunction with reporter fusion studies, revealed that the major region controlling the transcription of both speB and ropB is adjacent to ropB and that the promoters for the two genes likely overlap. Furthermore, it was found that RopB is a DNA-binding protein that specifically binds to sequences in this control region. The interrelationship between ropB and speB expression was further reflected in the observation that transcription of ropB itself is subject to growth phase control. However, while expression of ropB from a promoter expressed during the early logarithmic phase of growth could complement a ropB deletion mutant, ectopic expression of ropB did not uncouple the expression of speB from its growth phase signal. These data implicate other factors in growth phase control and suggest that regulation of ropB expression itself is not the central mechanism of control. PMID:12923089

  9. Role of RopB in Growth Phase Expression of the SpeB Cysteine Protease of Streptococcus pyogenes

    PubMed Central

    Neely, Melody N.; Lyon, William R.; Runft, Donna L.; Caparon, Michael

    2003-01-01

    The Rgg family of transcription regulators is widely distributed among gram-positive bacteria; however, how the members of this family control transcription is poorly understood. In the pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes, the Rgg family member RopB is required for transcription of the gene that encodes the secreted SpeB cysteine protease. Expression of the protease follows distinct kinetics that involves control of transcription in response to the growth phase. In this study, the contribution of RopB to growth phase control was examined. The gene encoding the protease (speB) and ropB are transcribed divergently from a 940-bp intergenic region. Primer extension analyses, in conjunction with reporter fusion studies, revealed that the major region controlling the transcription of both speB and ropB is adjacent to ropB and that the promoters for the two genes likely overlap. Furthermore, it was found that RopB is a DNA-binding protein that specifically binds to sequences in this control region. The interrelationship between ropB and speB expression was further reflected in the observation that transcription of ropB itself is subject to growth phase control. However, while expression of ropB from a promoter expressed during the early logarithmic phase of growth could complement a ropB deletion mutant, ectopic expression of ropB did not uncouple the expression of speB from its growth phase signal. These data implicate other factors in growth phase control and suggest that regulation of ropB expression itself is not the central mechanism of control. PMID:12923089

  10. Multiple sequence signals direct recognition and degradation of protein substrates by the AAA+ protease HslUV.

    PubMed

    Sundar, Shankar; McGinness, Kathleen E; Baker, Tania A; Sauer, Robert T

    2010-10-29

    Proteolysis is important for protein quality control and for the proper regulation of many intracellular processes in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Discerning substrates from other cellular proteins is a key aspect of proteolytic function. The Escherichia coli HslUV protease is a member of a major family of ATP-dependent AAA+ degradation machines. HslU hexamers recognize and unfold native protein substrates and then translocate the polypeptide into the degradation chamber of the HslV peptidase. Although a wealth of structural information is available for this system, relatively little is known about mechanisms of substrate recognition. Here, we demonstrate that mutations in the unstructured N-terminal and C-terminal sequences of two model substrates alter HslUV recognition and degradation kinetics, including changes in V(max). By introducing N- or C-terminal sequences that serve as recognition sites for specific peptide-binding proteins, we show that blocking either terminus of the substrate interferes with HslUV degradation, with synergistic effects when both termini are obstructed. These results support a model in which one terminus of the substrate is tethered to the protease and the other terminus is engaged by the translocation/unfolding machinery in the HslU pore. Thus, degradation appears to consist of discrete steps, which involve the interaction of different terminal sequence signals in the substrate with different receptor sites in the HslUV protease. PMID:20837023

  11. Differential in vitro and in vivo effect of barley cysteine and serine protease inhibitors on phytopathogenic microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Carrillo, Laura; Herrero, Ignacio; Cambra, Inés; Sánchez-Monge, Rosa; Diaz, Isabel; Martinez, Manuel

    2011-10-01

    Protease inhibitors from plants have been involved in defence mechanisms against pests and pathogens. Phytocystatins and trypsin/α-amylase inhibitors are two of the best characterized protease inhibitor families in plants. In barley, thirteen cystatins (HvCPI-1 to 13) and the BTI-CMe trypsin inhibitor have been previously studied. Their capacity to inhibit pest digestive proteases, and the negative in vivo effect caused by plants expressing these inhibitors on pests support the defence function of these proteins. Barley cystatins are also able to inhibit in vitro fungal growth. However, the antifungal effect of these inhibitors in vivo had not been previously tested. Moreover, their in vitro and in vivo effect on plant pathogenous bacteria is still unknown. In order to obtain new insights on this feature, in vitro assays were made against different bacterial and fungal pathogens of plants using the trypsin inhibitor BTI-CMe and the thirteen barley cystatins. Most barley cystatins and the BTI-CMe inhibitor were able to inhibit mycelial growth but no bacterial growth. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants independently expressing the BTI-CMe inhibitor and the cystatin HvCPI-6 were tested against the same bacterial and fungal pathogens. Neither the HvCPI-6 expressing transgenic plants nor the BTI-CMe ones were more resistant to plant pathogen fungi and bacteria than control Arabidopsis plants. The differences observed between the in vitro and in planta assays against phytopathogenic fungi are discussed. PMID:21482127

  12. Inhibitors of HGFA, Matriptase, and Hepsin Serine Proteases: A Nonkinase Strategy to Block Cell Signaling in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Han, Zhenfu; Harris, Peter K W; Jones, Darin E; Chugani, Ryan; Kim, Tommy; Agarwal, Manjula; Shen, Wei; Wildman, Scott A; Janetka, James W

    2014-11-13

    Hepatocyte growth factor activators (HGFA), matriptase, and hepsin are S1 family trypsin-like serine proteases. These proteases proteolytically cleave the single-chain zymogen precursors, pro-HGF (hepatocyte growth factor), and pro-MSP (macrophage stimulating protein) into active heterodimeric forms. HGF and MSP are activating ligands for the oncogenic receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), c-MET and RON, respectively. We have discovered the first substrate-based ketothiazole inhibitors of HGFA, matriptase and hepsin. The compounds were synthesized using a combination of solution and solid-phase peptide synthesis (SPPS). Compounds were tested for protease inhibition using a kinetic enzyme assay employing fluorogenic peptide substrates. Highlighted HGFA inhibitors are Ac-KRLR-kt (5g), Ac-SKFR-kt (6c), and Ac-SWLR-kt (6g) with K is = 12, 57, and 63 nM, respectively. We demonstrated that inhibitors block the conversion of native pro-HGF and pro-MSP by HGFA with equivalent potency. Finally, we show that inhibition causes a dose-dependent decrease of c-MET signaling in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. This preliminary investigation provides evidence that HGFA is a promising therapeutic target in breast cancer and other tumor types driven by c-MET and RON. PMID:25408834

  13. Inhibitors of HGFA, Matriptase, and Hepsin Serine Proteases: A Nonkinase Strategy to Block Cell Signaling in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor activators (HGFA), matriptase, and hepsin are S1 family trypsin-like serine proteases. These proteases proteolytically cleave the single-chain zymogen precursors, pro-HGF (hepatocyte growth factor), and pro-MSP (macrophage stimulating protein) into active heterodimeric forms. HGF and MSP are activating ligands for the oncogenic receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), c-MET and RON, respectively. We have discovered the first substrate-based ketothiazole inhibitors of HGFA, matriptase and hepsin. The compounds were synthesized using a combination of solution and solid-phase peptide synthesis (SPPS). Compounds were tested for protease inhibition using a kinetic enzyme assay employing fluorogenic peptide substrates. Highlighted HGFA inhibitors are Ac-KRLR-kt (5g), Ac-SKFR-kt (6c), and Ac-SWLR-kt (6g) with Kis = 12, 57, and 63 nM, respectively. We demonstrated that inhibitors block the conversion of native pro-HGF and pro-MSP by HGFA with equivalent potency. Finally, we show that inhibition causes a dose-dependent decrease of c-MET signaling in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. This preliminary investigation provides evidence that HGFA is a promising therapeutic target in breast cancer and other tumor types driven by c-MET and RON. PMID:25408834

  14. The cell envelope-associated protein, LytR, regulates the cysteine protease SpeB in Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Minami, Masaaki; Ichikawa, Mariko; Ohta, Michio; Hasegawa, Tadao

    2012-05-01

    The LytR family of cell envelope-associated transcriptional attenuators in bacteria has been brought into focus of scientific interest on the expression of various virulence factors, as well as bacterial cell envelope maintenance. However, this protein of Streptococcus pyogenes has been only described as cell surface-associated protein, and its function is completely unknown. We created lytR mutant strains from two independent S. pyogenes strains to analyze the function of LytR. The protease assay in culture supernatant showed that lytR mutant had the higher cysteine protease activity than wild-type. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and western blotting analysis revealed that the amount of cysteine protease, SpeB in lytR mutant was more compared with that in wild-type. The level of speB mRNA in lytR mutant also increased compared with that of wild-type. The membrane integrity and potential in lytR mutant also were decreased compared with that of wild-type. Murine infection model showed that less survival was detected in mice inoculated with lytR mutant than that with wild-type, and the size of wound lesion of mice with lytR mutant was larger than that with wild-type. Our data suggest that the lytR regulates the expression of SpeB in S. pyogenes with relation to membrane integrity. PMID:22515297

  15. The crystal structure of the secreted aspartic protease 1 from Candida parapsilosis in complex with pepstatin A

    SciTech Connect

    Dostál, Jiří; Brynda, Jiří; Hrušková-Heidingsfeldová, Olga; Sieglová, Irena; Pichová, Iva; Řezáčová, Pavlína

    2010-09-01

    Opportunistic pathogens of the genus Candida cause infections representing a major threat to long-term survival of immunocompromised patients. Virulence of the Candida pathogens is enhanced by production of extracellular proteolytic enzymes and secreted aspartic proteases (Saps) are therefore studied as potential virulence factors and possible targets for therapeutic drug design. Candida parapsilosis is less invasive than C. albicans, however, it is one of the leading causative agents of yeast infections. We report three-dimensional crystal structure of Sapp1p from C. parapsilosis in complex with pepstatin A, the classical inhibitor of aspartic proteases. The structure of Sapp1p was determined from protein isolated from its natural source and represents the first structure of Sap from C. parapsilosis. Overall fold and topology of Sapp1p is very similar to the archetypic fold of monomeric aspartic protease family and known structures of Sap isoenzymes from C. albicans and Sapt1p from C. tropicalis. Structural comparison revealed noticeable differences in the structure of loops surrounding the active site. This resulted in differential character, shape, and size of the substrate binding site explaining divergent substrate specificities and inhibitor affinities. Determination of structures of Sap isoenzymes from various species might contribute to the development of new Sap-specific inhibitors.

  16. Design, Synthesis, Evaluation and Thermodynamics of 1-Substituted Pyridylimidazo[1,5-a]Pyridine Derivatives as Cysteine Protease Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Mohd Sajid; Baig, Mohd Hassan; Ahmad, Saheem; Siddiqui, Shapi Ahmad; Srivastava, Ashwini Kumar; Srinivasan, Kumar Venkatraman; Ansari, Irfan A.

    2013-01-01

    Targeting papain family cysteine proteases is one of the novel strategies in the development of chemotherapy for a number of diseases. Novel cysteine protease inhibitors derived from 1-pyridylimidazo[1,5-a]pyridine representing pharmacologically important class of compounds are being reported here for the first time. The derivatives were initially designed and screened in silico by molecular docking studies against papain to explore the possible mode of action. The molecular interaction between the compounds and cysteine protease (papain) was found to be very similar to the interactions observed with the respective epoxide inhibitor (E-64c) of papain. Subsequently, compounds were synthesized to validate their efficacy in wet lab experiments. When characterized kinetically, these compounds show their Ki and IC50 values in the range of 13.75 to 99.30 µM and 13.40 to 96.50 µM, respectively. The thermodynamics studies suggest their binding with papain hydrophobically and entropically driven. These inhibitors also inhibit the growth of clinically important different types of Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria having MIC50 values in the range of 0.6–1.4 µg/ml. Based on Lipinski’s rule of Five, we also propose these compounds as potent antibacterial prodrugs. The most active antibacterial compound was found to be 1-(2-pyridyl)-3-(2-hydroxyphenyl)imidazo[1,5-a]pyridine (3a). PMID:23940536

  17. Isolation and Biochemical Characterization of a New Thrombin-Like Serine Protease from Bothrops pirajai Snake Venom

    PubMed Central

    Zaqueo, Kayena D.; Kayano, Anderson M.; Simões-Silva, Rodrigo; Moreira-Dill, Leandro S.; Fernandes, Carla F. C.; Fuly, André L.; Maltarollo, Vinícius G.; Honório, Kathia M.; da Silva, Saulo L.; Acosta, Gerardo; Caballol, Maria Antonia O.; de Oliveira, Eliandre; Albericio, Fernando; Calderon, Leonardo A.; Soares, Andreimar M.; Stábeli, Rodrigo G.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a novel serine protease (SP) isolated from Bothrops pirajai, a venomous snake found solely in Brazil that belongs to the Viperidae family. The identified SP, named BpirSP-39, was isolated by three chromatographic steps (size exclusion, bioaffinity, and reverse phase chromatographies). The molecular mass of BpirSP-39 was estimated by SDS-PAGE and confirmed by mass spectrometry (39,408.32 Da). The protein was able to form fibrin networks, which was not observed in the presence of serine protease inhibitors, such as phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF). Furthermore, BpirSP-39 presented considerable thermal stability and was apparently able to activate factor XIII of the blood coagulation cascade, unlike most serine proteases. BpirSP-39 was capable of hydrolyzing different chromogenic substrates tested (S-2222, S-2302, and S-2238) while Cu2+ significantly diminished BspirSP-39 activity on the three tested substrates. The enzyme promoted platelet aggregation and also exhibited fibrinogenolytic, fibrinolytic, gelatinolytic, and amidolytic activities. The multiple alignment showed high sequence similarity to other thrombin-like enzymes from snake venoms. These results allow us to conclude that a new SP was isolated from Bothrops pirajai snake venom. PMID:24719874

  18. Rice OVERLY TOLERANT TO SALT 1 (OTS1) SUMO protease is a positive regulator of seed germination and root development.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Anjil Kumar; Zhang, Cunjin; Sadanandom, Ari

    2016-05-01

    Salinity is one of the major environmental stresses affecting rice production worldwide. Improving rice salt tolerance is a critical step for sustainable food production. Posttranslational modifications of proteins greatly expand proteome diversity, increase functionality and allow quick responses to environmental stresses, all at low cost to the cell. SUMO mediated modification of substrate proteins is a highly dynamic process governed by the balance of activities of SUMO E3 ligases and deconjugating SUMO proteases. In recent years, SUMO (Small Ubiquitin like Modifier) conjugation of proteins has emerged as an influential regulator of stress signaling in the model plant Arabidopsis. However SUMOylation remain largely under studied in crop plants. We recently identified the SUMO protease gene family in rice and demonstrated a role for OsOTS1 SUMO proteases in salt stress. Interestingly, rice plants silencing OsOTS1 also show significantly reduced germination rate. Knockdown of OsOTS1 gene expression affects root growth by primarily reducing cell size rather than cell division. PMID:27119209

  19. Inhibition of human kallikreins 5 and 7 by the serine protease inhibitor lympho-epithelial Kazal-type inhibitor (LEKTI).

    PubMed

    Schechter, Norman M; Choi, Eun-Jung; Wang, Zhe-Mei; Hanakawa, Yasushi; Stanley, John R; Kang, Ya'an; Clayman, Gary L; Jayakumar, Arumugam

    2005-11-01

    LEKTI is a 120-kDa protein that plays an important role in skin development, as mutations affecting LEKTI synthesis underlie Netherton syndrome, an inherited skin disorder producing severe scaling. Its primary sequence indicates that the protein consists of 15 domains, all resembling a Kazal-type serine protease inhibitor. LEKTI and two serine proteases belonging to the human tissue kallikrein (hK) family (hK5 and hK7) are expressed in the granular layer of skin. In this study, we characterize the interaction of two recombinant LEKTI fragments containing three or four intact Kazal domains (domains 6-8 and 9-12) with recombinant rhK5, a trypsin-like protease, and recombinant rhK7, a chymotrypsin-like protease. Both fragments inhibited rhK5 similarly in binding and kinetic studies performed at pH 8.0, as well as pH 5.0, the pH of the stratum corneum where both LEKTI and proteases may function. Inhibition equilibrium constants (Ki) measured either directly in concentration-dependent studies or calculated from measured association (kass) and dissociation (kdis) rate constants were 1.2-5.5 nM at pH 8.0 and 10-20 nM at pH 5.0. At pH 8.0, kass and kdis values were 4.7 x 10(5) M(-1) s(-1) and 5.5 x 10(-4) s(-1), and at pH 5.0 they were 4.0 x 10(4) M(-1) s(-1) and 4.3 x 10(-4) s(-1), respectively. The low Ki and kdis values (t1/2 of 20-25 min) indicate tight and specific association. Only fragment 6-9' was a good inhibitor of rhK7, demonstrating a Ki of 11 nM at pH 8.0 in a reaction that was rapidly reversible. These results show that LEKTI, at least in fragment form, is a potent inhibitor of rhK5 and that this protease may be a target of LEKTI in human skin. PMID:16307483

  20. Evidence for Reduced Drug Susceptibility without Emergence of Major Protease Mutations following Protease Inhibitor Monotherapy Failure in the SARA Trial

    PubMed Central

    Sutherland, Katherine A.; Parry, Chris M.; McCormick, Adele; Kapaata, Anne; Lyagoba, Fred; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Gilks, Charles F.; Goodall, Ruth; Spyer, Moira; Kityo, Cissy; Pillay, Deenan; Gupta, Ravindra K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Major protease mutations are rarely observed following failure with protease inhibitors (PI), and other viral determinants of failure to PI are poorly understood. We therefore characterized Gag-Protease phenotypic susceptibility in subtype A and D viruses circulating in East Africa following viral rebound on PIs. Methods Samples from baseline and treatment failure in patients enrolled in the second line LPV/r trial SARA underwent phenotypic susceptibility testing. Data were expressed as fold-change in susceptibility relative to a LPV-susceptible reference strain. Results We cloned 48 Gag-Protease containing sequences from seven individuals and performed drug resistance phenotyping from pre-PI and treatment failure timepoints in seven patients. For the six patients where major protease inhibitor resistance mutations did not emerge, mean fold-change EC50 to LPV was 4.07 fold (95% CI, 2.08–6.07) at the pre-PI timepoint. Following viral failure the mean fold-change in EC50 to LPV was 4.25 fold (95% CI, 1.39–7.11, p = 0.91). All viruses remained susceptible to DRV. In our assay system, the major PI resistance mutation I84V, which emerged in one individual, conferred a 10.5-fold reduction in LPV susceptibility. One of the six patients exhibited a significant reduction in susceptibility between pre-PI and failure timepoints (from 4.7 fold to 9.6 fold) in the absence of known major mutations in protease, but associated with changes in Gag: V7I, G49D, R69Q, A120D, Q127K, N375S and I462S. Phylogenetic analysis provided evidence of the emergence of genetically distinct viruses at the time of treatment failure, indicating ongoing viral evolution in Gag-protease under PI pressure. Conclusions Here we observe in one patient the development of significantly reduced susceptibility conferred by changes in Gag which may have contributed to treatment failure on a protease inhibitor containing regimen. Further phenotype-genotype studies are required to elucidate genetic

  1. Family Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wieck, Colleen, Ed.; McBride, Marijo, Ed.

    1990-01-01

    This "Feature Issue" of the quarterly journal "Impact" presents 19 brief articles on family support systems in the United States for persons with developmental disabilities and their families. Emphasis is on provisions of Public Law 99-457. Articles include: "Family Support in the United States: Setting a Course for the 1990s" (James Knoll);…

  2. Family Matters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mainor, Peggy

    2001-01-01

    Describes a Kellogg Family Collaborative project that involves the University of Montana and four tribal colleges in a family-strengths approach to improving student retention and achievement. States that the project is grounded in social work theory and research that recognize and reinforce family and student resilience through promotion of…

  3. Rural Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goetz, Kathy, Ed.

    1992-01-01

    This "special focus" journal issue consists of 13 individual articles on the theme of rural family programs relating to school, health services, church, and other institutions. It includes: (1) "Towards a Rural Family Policy" (Judith K. Chynoweth and Michael D. Campbell); (2) "Montana: Council for Families Collaborates for Prevention (Jean…

  4. Lvserpin3 is involved in shrimp innate immunity via the inhibition of bacterial proteases and proteases involved in prophenoloxidase system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongjie; Liu, Tao; Hou, Fujun; Wang, Xianzong; Liu, Xiaolin

    2016-01-01

    Serine protease inhibitor, represented by serpin, plays an important inhibitory role on proteases involved in the immune responses. To clarify the immune characterizations of serpin, a novel serpin (Lvserpin3) encoding for 410 amino acids with a 23-amino acid signal peptide and a serpin domain was identified from the Pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei. Lvserpin3 expressed strongest in hepatopancreas, and was significantly up-regulated in the early stage upon Vibrio anguillarum, Micrococcus lysodeikticus or White Spot Syndrome Virus (WSSV) infection. Suppression of Lvserpin3 by dsRNA led to a significant increase in the transcripts of LvPPAF, LvproPO and phenoloxidase (PO) activity, and also led to the high cumulative mortality. The recombinant Lvserpin3 protein (rLvserpin3) inhibited the proteases secreted by M. lysodeikticus and Bacillus subtilis, and further exhibited inhibitory role on the growth of B. subtilis and M. lysodeikticu. Moreover, rLvserpin3 was found to be able to block the activation of prophenoloxidase system. Taken together, the results imply that Lvserpin3 may be involved in shrimp innate immunity via the inhibition of bacterial proteases and proteases involved in prophenoloxidase system. PMID:26432049

  5. (Processing and targeting of the thiol protease aleurain)

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.C.

    1990-01-01

    Our goal for work during the past two years under this Grant was to characterize the barley thiol protease, aleurain, to determine if it is secreted or retained intracellularly in aleurone cells, and to begin to elucidate structural features that might control targeting of the protein to its final destination. We have shown that aleurain is synthesized as a proenzyme with two N-linked oligosaccharide chains, one high mannose-type and one complex-type. Aleurain undergoes processing to mature form by removal of an Nterminal prosegment, and is retained intracellularly; it cannot be detected among proteins secreted from aleurone cells. Treatment of aleurone cells with tunicamycin to prevent glycosylation of aleurain does not prevent processing of the unglycosylated form. The N-terminal portion of aleurain's prosegment is homologous to the comparable region in two yeast vacuolar proteases, where that region is known to contain the signal necessary for targeting the proteases to the vacuole. 18 refs., 7 figs.

  6. Acid phosphatase and protease activities in immobilized rat skeletal muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witzmann, F. A.; Troup, J. P.; Fitts, R. H.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of hind-limb immobilization on selected Iysosomal enzyme activities was studied in rat hing-limb muscles composed primarily of type 1. 2A, or 2B fibers. Following immobilization, acid protease and acid phosphatase both exhibited signifcant increases in their activity per unit weight in all three fiber types. Acid phosphatase activity increased at day 14 of immobilization in the three muscles and returned to control levels by day 21. Acid protease activity also changed biphasically, displaying a higher and earlier rise than acid phosphatase. The pattern of change in acid protease, but not acid phosphatase, closely parallels observed muscle wasting. The present data therefore demonstrate enhanced proteolytic capacity of all three fiber types early during muscular atrophy. In addition, the data suggest a dependence of basal hydrolytic and proteolytic activities and their adaptive response to immobilization on muscle fiber composition.

  7. The emerging roles of serine protease cascades in the epidermis.

    PubMed

    Ovaere, Petra; Lippens, Saskia; Vandenabeele, Peter; Declercq, Wim

    2009-09-01

    It has become clear in recent years that serine proteases have an important role in epidermal homeostasis, and the signaling cascades are gradually being identified. For example, matriptase, prostasin and furin are implicated in a cascade that could activate ENaC, leading to epidermal barrier formation and hydration, probably in part through their involvement in filaggrin processing. Kallikreins can form a signaling cascade to coordinate corneocyte desquamation. Knowledge is also emerging about how endogenous inhibitors, calcium and pH control these cascades. It is becoming clear that some skin pathologies are associated with deregulated serine protease activity. Therefore, a deeper knowledge of the regulation of these serine protease cascades could form the basis for development of appropriate treatments for skin disorders such as Netherton syndrome. PMID:19726197

  8. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency: Beyond the Protease/Antiprotease Paradigm.

    PubMed

    Cosio, Manuel G; Bazzan, Erica; Rigobello, Chiara; Tinè, Mariaenrica; Turato, Graziella; Baraldo, Simonetta; Saetta, Marina

    2016-08-01

    From the discovery that alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) was an effective inhibitor of neutrophil elastase originated the classic paradigm of protease/antiprotease imbalance, linking lung destruction to the unopposed effect of proteases in patients with the deficiency. Notwithstanding its importance as an antiprotease, it has become evident that alpha-1 antitrypsin has important antiinflammatory and immune-regulatory activities, which may be critically involved in lung destruction. We review here recent evidence showing that, indeed, an important adaptive immune reaction is present in lungs with AAT deficiency, similar to the one seen in severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with normal AAT. On the basis of recent evidence from epidemiological, clinical, and pathogenetic studies, it is likely time to move on from the original protease/antiprotease hypothesis for the production of emphysema toward a more complex paradigm, involving the antiinflammatory and immune modulating functions of AAT. PMID:27564665

  9. Cleaning protocols for crystallization robots: preventing protease contamination.

    PubMed

    Naschberger, Andreas; Fürnrohr, Barbara G; Dunzendorfer-Matt, Theresia; Bonagura, Christopher A; Wright, David; Scheffzek, Klaus; Rupp, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    The protease in the commonly used commercial low-foam enzyme cleaner Zymit cannot be completely blocked by EDTA, a widely used inhibitor of metalloproteases, at concentrations of up to 5 mM. Severe protein degradation was observed in crystallization drops after EDTA-containing wash steps unless residual Zymit protease was removed with NaOH at a concentration of at least 0.1 M. Wash steps with 0.1% SDS were also ineffective in completely removing the remaining Zymit activity. Protocols including wash steps with at least 0.1 M NaOH, as for example specified in the original ZENM protocol, are recommended to completely deactivate Zymit protease activity. PMID:25615978

  10. Tobacco Etch Virus protease: A shortcut across biotechnologies.

    PubMed

    Cesaratto, Francesca; Burrone, Oscar R; Petris, Gianluca

    2016-08-10

    About thirty years ago, studies on the RNA genome of Tobacco Etch Virus revealed the presence of an efficient and specific protease, called Tobacco Etch Virus protease (TEVp), that was part of the Nuclear Inclusion a (NIa) enzyme. TEVp is an efficient and specific protease of 27kDa that has become a valuable biotechnological tool. Nowadays TEVp is a unique endopeptidase largely exploited in biotechnology from industrial applications to in vitro and in vivo cellular studies. A number of TEVp mutants with different rate of cleavage, stability and specificity have been reported. Similarly, a panel of different target cleavage sites, derived from the canonical ENLYFQ-G/S site, has been established. In this review we describe these aspects of TEVp and some of its multiple applications. A particular focus is on the use and molecular biology of TEVp in living cells and organisms. PMID:27312702

  11. Fighting an enemy within: cytoplasmic inhibitors of bacterial cysteine proteases.

    PubMed

    Potempa, Jan; Golonka, Ewa; Filipek, Renata; Shaw, Lindsey N

    2005-08-01

    The genes encoding secreted, broad-spectrum activity cysteine proteases of Staphylococcus spp. (staphopains) and Streptococcus pyogenes (streptopain, SpeB) are genetically linked to genes encoding cytoplasmic inhibitors. While staphopain inhibitors have lipocalin-like folds, streptopain is inhibited by a protein bearing the scaffold of the enzyme profragment. Bioinformatic analysis of other prokaryotic genomes has revealed that two more species may utilize this same genetic arrangement to control streptopain-like proteases with lipocalin-like inhibitors, while three other species may employ a C-terminally located domain that resembles the profragment. This apparently represents a novel system that bacteria use to control the intracellular activity of their proteases. PMID:16045606

  12. Protease-specific nanosensors for magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Schellenberger, Eyk; Rudloff, Franziska; Warmuth, Carsten; Taupitz, Matthias; Hamm, Bernd; Schnorr, Jörg

    2008-12-01

    Imaging of enzyme activity is a central goal of molecular imaging. With the introduction of fluorescent smart probes, optical imaging has become the modality of choice for experimental in vivo detection of enzyme activity. Here, we present a novel high-relaxivity nanosensor that is suitable for in vivo imaging of protease activity by magnetic resonance imaging. Upon specific protease cleavage, the nanoparticles rapidly switch from a stable low-relaxivity stealth state to become adhesive, aggregating high-relaxivity particles. To demonstrate the principle, we chose a cleavage motif of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9), an enzyme important in inflammation, atherosclerosis, tumor progression, and many other diseases with alterations of the extracellular matrix. On the basis of clinically tested very small iron oxide particles (VSOP), the MMP-9-activatable protease-specific iron oxide particles (PSOP) have a hydrodynamic diameter of only 25 nm. PSOP are rapidly activated, resulting in aggregation and increased T2*-relaxivity. PMID:19007261

  13. New therapeutic strategies in HCV: second-generation protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Clark, Virginia C; Peter, Joy A; Nelson, David R

    2013-02-01

    Telaprevir and boceprevir are the first direct-acting antiviral agents approved for use in HCV treatment and represent a significant advance in HCV therapy. However, these first-generation drugs also have significant limitations related to thrice-daily dosing, clinically challenging side-effect profiles, low barriers to resistance and a lack of pan-genotype activity. A second wave of protease inhibitors are in phase II and III trials and promise to provide a drug regimen with a better dosing schedule and improved tolerance. These second-wave protease inhibitors will probably be approved in combination with PEG-IFN and Ribavirin (RBV), as well as future all-oral regimens. The true second-generation protease inhibitors are in earlier stages of development and efficacy data are anxiously awaited as they may provide pan-genotypic antiviral activity and a high genetic barrier to resistance. PMID:23286850

  14. Evolution of Primary Protease Inhibitor Resistance Mutations during Protease Inhibitor Salvage Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kantor, Rami; Fessel, W. Jeffrey; Zolopa, Andrew R.; Israelski, Dennis; Shulman, Nancy; Montoya, Jose G.; Harbour, Michael; Schapiro, Jonathan M.; Shafer, Robert W.

    2002-01-01

    In order to track the evolution of primary protease inhibitor (PI) resistance mutations in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates, baseline and follow-up protease sequences were obtained from patients undergoing salvage PI therapy who presented initially with isolates containing a single primary PI resistance mutation. Among 78 patients meeting study selection criteria, baseline primary PI resistance mutations included L90M (42% of patients), V82A/F/T (27%), D30N (21%), G48V (6%), and I84V (4%). Despite the switching of treatment to a new PI, primary PI resistance mutations present at the baseline persisted in 66 of 78 (85%) patients. D30N persisted less frequently than L90M (50% versus 100%, respectively; P < 0.001) and V82A/F/T (50% versus 81%, respectively; P = 0.05). HIV-1 isolates from 38 (49%) patients failing PI salvage therapy developed new primary PI resistance mutations including L90M, I84V, V82A, and G48V. Common combinations of primary and secondary PI resistance mutations after salvage therapy included mutations at amino acid positions 10, 82, and 46 and/or 54 in 16 patients; 10, 90, and 71 and/or 73 in 14 patients; 10, 73, 84, 90, and 46 and/or 54 in 5 patients; 10, 48, and 82 in 5 patients; and 30, 88 and 90 in 5 patients. In summary, during salvage PI therapy, most HIV-1 isolates with a single primary PI resistance mutation maintained their original mutations, and 49% developed additional primary PI resistance mutations. The persistence of L90M, V82A/F/T, G48V, and I84V during salvage therapy suggests that these mutations play a role in clinical resistance to multiple PIs. PMID:11897594

  15. HIV-1 Protease Mutations and Protease Inhibitor Cross-Resistance▿ † ‡

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Soo-Yon; Taylor, Jonathan; Fessel, W. Jeffrey; Kaufman, David; Towner, William; Troia, Paolo; Ruane, Peter; Hellinger, James; Shirvani, Vivian; Zolopa, Andrew; Shafer, Robert W.

    2010-01-01

    The effects of many protease inhibitor (PI)-selected mutations on the susceptibility to individual PIs are unknown. We analyzed in vitro susceptibility test results on 2,725 HIV-1 protease isolates. More than 2,400 isolates had been tested for susceptibility to fosamprenavir, indinavir, nelfinavir, and saquinavir; 2,130 isolates had been tested for susceptibility to lopinavir; 1,644 isolates had been tested for susceptibility to atazanavir; 1,265 isolates had been tested for susceptibility to tipranavir; and 642 isolates had been tested for susceptibility to darunavir. We applied least-angle regression (LARS) to the 200 most common mutations in the data set and identified a set of 46 mutations associated with decreased PI susceptibility of which 40 were not polymorphic in the eight most common HIV-1 group M subtypes. We then used least-squares regression to ascertain the relative contribution of each of these 46 mutations. The median number of mutations associated with decreased susceptibility to each PI was 28 (range, 19 to 32), and the median number of mutations associated with increased susceptibility to each PI was 2.5 (range, 1 to 8). Of the mutations with the greatest effect on PI susceptibility, I84AV was associated with decreased susceptibility to eight PIs; V32I, G48V, I54ALMSTV, V82F, and L90M were associated with decreased susceptibility to six to seven PIs; I47A, G48M, I50V, L76V, V82ST, and N88S were associated with decreased susceptibility to four to five PIs; and D30N, I50L, and V82AL were associated with decreased susceptibility to fewer than four PIs. This study underscores the greater impact of nonpolymorphic mutations compared with polymorphic mutations on decreased PI susceptibility and provides a comprehensive quantitative assessment of the effects of individual mutations on susceptibility to the eight clinically available PIs. PMID:20660676

  16. Effect of synthesized inhibitors on babesipain-1, a new cysteine protease from the bovine piroplasm Babesia bigemina.

    PubMed

    Martins, T M; Gonçalves, L M D; Capela, R; Moreira, R; do Rosário, V E; Domingos, A

    2010-04-01

    Papain-like cysteine proteases (CP) have been shown to have essential roles in parasitic protozoa and are under study as promising drug targets. One gene was identified by sequence similarity search to be homologous to the CP family in the ongoing Babesia bigemina genome sequencing project database. The newly identified CP gene, called babesipain-1, was cloned and expressed as a fusion protein, and the effect of different inhibitors on proteolytic activity was tested. A series of new artemisinin-vinyl sulfone hybrid molecules were tested as inhibitors being effective on the range of 0.3-30 microm, depending on the core-containing molecule. PMID:20537109

  17. The Role of Calcium Activated Protease Calpain in Experimental Retinal Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Azuma, M.; Shearer, T.R.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to present the recent evidence linking the family of ubiquitous proteases called calpains (EC 3.4.22.17) to neuropathologies of the retina. The hypothesis being tested in such studies is that over-activation of calpains by elevated intracellular calcium contributes to retinal cell death produced by conditions such as elevated intraocular pressure and hypoxia. Recent x-ray diffraction studies have provided insight into the molecular events causing calpain activation. Further, x-ray diffraction data has provided details on how side chains on calpain inhibitors affect docking into the active site of calpain 1. This opens the possibility of testing calpain-specific inhibitors, such as SJA6017 and SNJ1945, for human safety and as a site-directed form of treatment for retinal pathologies. PMID:18348880

  18. Ubiquitin-dependent intramembrane rhomboid protease promotes ERAD of membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Fleig, Lina; Bergbold, Nina; Sahasrabudhe, Priyanka; Geiger, Beate; Kaltak, Lejla; Lemberg, Marius K

    2012-08-24

    The ER-associated degradation (ERAD) pathway serves as an important cellular safeguard by directing incorrectly folded and unassembled proteins from the ER to the proteasome. Still, however, little is known about the components mediating ERAD of membrane proteins. Here we show that the evolutionary conserved rhomboid family protein RHBDL4 is a ubiquitin-dependent ER-resident intramembrane protease that is upregulated upon ER stress. RHBDL4 cleaves single-spanning and polytopic membrane proteins with unstable transmembrane helices, leading to their degradation by the canonical ERAD machinery. RHBDL4 specifically binds the AAA+-ATPase p97, suggesting that proteolytic processing and dislocation into the cytosol are functionally linked. The phylogenetic relationship between rhomboids and the ERAD factor derlin suggests that substrates for intramembrane proteolysis and protein dislocation are recruited by a shared mechanism. PMID:22795130

  19. Taspase1: a 'misunderstood' protease with translational cancer relevance.

    PubMed

    Wünsch, D; Hahlbrock, A; Jung, S; Schirmeister, T; van den Boom, J; Schilling, O; Knauer, S K; Stauber, R H

    2016-06-30

    Proteolysis is not only a critical requirement for life, but the executing enzymes also play important roles in numerous pathological conditions, including cancer. Therefore, targeting proteases is clearly relevant for improving cancer patient care. However, to effectively control proteases, a profound knowledge of their mechanistic function as well as their regulation and downstream signalling in health and disease is required. The highly conserved protease Threonine Aspartase1 (Taspase1) is overexpressed in numerous liquid and solid malignancies and was characterized as a 'non-oncogene addiction' protease. Although Taspase1 was shown to cleave various regulatory proteins in humans as well as leukaemia provoking mixed lineage leukaemia fusions, our knowledge on its detailed functions and the underlying mechanisms contributing to cancer is still incomplete. Despite superficial similarity to type 2 asparaginases as well as Ntn proteases, such as the proteasome, Taspase1-related research so far gives us the picture of a unique protease exhibiting special features. Moreover, neither effective genetic nor chemical inhibitors for this enzyme are available so far, thus hampering not only to further dissect Taspase1's pathobiological functions but also precluding the assessment of its clinical impact. Based on recent insights, we here critically review the current knowledge of Taspase1's structure-function relationship and its mechanistic relevance for tumorigenesis obtained from in vitro and in vivo cancer models. We provide a comprehensive overview of tumour entities for which Taspase1 might be of predictive and therapeutic value, and present the respective experimental evidence. To stimulate progress in the field, a comprehensive overview of Taspase1 targeting approaches is presented, including coverage of Taspase1-related patents. We conclude by discussing future inhibition strategies and relevant challenges, which need to be resolved by the field. PMID:26657154

  20. Analysis of the immunoglobulin A protease gene of Streptococcus sanguis.

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, J V; Plaut, A G; Wright, A

    1991-01-01

    The amino acid sequence T-P-P-T-P-S-P-S is tandemly duplicated in the heavy chain of human immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1), the major antibody in secretions. The bacterial pathogen Streptococcus sanguis, a precursor to dental caries and a cause of bacterial endocarditis, yields IgA protease that cleaves only the Pro-Thr peptide bond in the left duplication, while the type 2 IgA proteases of the genital pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae and the respiratory pathogen Haemophilus influenzae cleave only the P-T bond in the right half. We have sequenced the entire S. sanguis iga gene cloned into Escherichia coli. A segment consisting of 20 amino acids tandemly repeated 10 times, of unknown function, occurs near the amino-terminal end of the enzyme encoded in E. coli. Identification of a predicted zinc-binding region in the S. sanguis enzyme and the demonstration that mutations in this region result in production of a catalytically inactive protein support the idea that the enzyme is a metalloprotease. The N. gonorrhoeae and H. influenzae enzymes were earlier shown to be serine-type proteases, while the Bacteroides melaninogenicus IgA protease was shown to be a cysteine-type enzyme. The streptococcal IgA protease amino acid sequence has no significant homology with either of the two previously determined IgA protease sequences, that of type 2 N. gonorrhoeae and type 1 H. influenzae. The differences in both structure and mechanism among these functionally analogous enzymes underscore their role in the infectious process and offer some prospect of therapeutic intervention. Images PMID:1987065

  1. Trichuris suis: thiol protease activity from adult worms.

    PubMed

    Hill, D E; Sakanari, J A

    1997-01-01

    Trichuris suis, the whipworm of swine, causes anemia, weight loss, anorexia, mucohemorrhagic diarrhea, and death in heavy infections. A zinc metalloprotease has been suggested to play a role in the severe enteric pathology associated with infection and the infiltration of opportunistic bacteria into deeper tissues in the swine colon. In this study, a thiol protease from gut extracts of adult T. suis and from excretory/secretory components (E/S) of adult worms was characterized using fluorogenic peptide substrates and protein substrate gels. The protease cleaved the fluorogenic substrate Z-Phe-Arg-AMC, and this cleavage was completely inhibited by the thiol protease inhibitors E-64, leupeptin, Z-Phe-Ala-CH2F, and Z-Phe-Arg-CH2F. Gelatin substrate gels and fluorescence assays using both the gut and the stichosome extracts and E/S revealed enhanced activity when 2 mM dithiothreitol or 5 mM cysteine was included in the incubation buffer, and optimal activity was seen over a pH range of 5.5 to 8.5. Incubation of gut extracts or E/S material with inhibitors of aspartic, serine, or metalloproteases had no effect on the cleavage of Z-Phe-Arg-AMC. Thiol protease activity was found in extracts of gut tissue but not in the extracts of stichocytes of adult worms. N-terminal amino acid sequencing of the protease revealed sequence homologies with cathepsin B-like thiol protease identified from parasitic and free-living nematodes. PMID:9024202

  2. The Kunitz-Type Protein ShPI-1 Inhibits Serine Proteases and Voltage-Gated Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    García-Fernández, Rossana; Peigneur, Steve; Pons, Tirso; Alvarez, Carlos; González, Lidice; Chávez, María A.; Tytgat, Jan

    2016-01-01

    The bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI)-Kunitz-type protein ShPI-1 (UniProt: P31713) is the major protease inhibitor from the sea anemone Stichodactyla helianthus. This molecule is used in biotechnology and has biomedical potential related to its anti-parasitic effect. A pseudo wild-type variant, rShPI-1A, with additional residues at the N- and C-terminal, has a similar three-dimensional structure and comparable trypsin inhibition strength. Further insights into the structure-function relationship of rShPI-1A are required in order to obtain a better understanding of the mechanism of action of this sea anemone peptide. Using enzyme kinetics, we now investigated its activity against other serine proteases. Considering previous reports of bifunctional Kunitz-type proteins from anemones, we also studied the effect of rShPI-1A on voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels. rShPI-1A binds Kv1.1, Kv1.2, and Kv1.6 channels with IC50 values in the nM range. Hence, ShPI-1 is the first member of the sea anemone type 2 potassium channel toxins family with tight-binding potency against several proteases and different Kv1 channels. In depth sequence analysis and structural comparison of ShPI-1 with similar protease inhibitors and Kv channel toxins showed apparent non-sequence conservation for known key residues. However, we detected two subtle patterns of coordinated amino acid substitutions flanking the conserved cysteine residues at the N- and C-terminal ends. PMID:27089366

  3. The Kunitz-Type Protein ShPI-1 Inhibits Serine Proteases and Voltage-Gated Potassium Channels.

    PubMed

    García-Fernández, Rossana; Peigneur, Steve; Pons, Tirso; Alvarez, Carlos; González, Lidice; Chávez, María A; Tytgat, Jan

    2016-04-01

    The bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI)-Kunitz-type protein ShPI-1 (UniProt: P31713) is the major protease inhibitor from the sea anemone Stichodactyla helianthus. This molecule is used in biotechnology and has biomedical potential related to its anti-parasitic effect. A pseudo wild-type variant, rShPI-1A, with additional residues at the N- and C-terminal, has a similar three-dimensional structure and comparable trypsin inhibition strength. Further insights into the structure-function relationship of rShPI-1A are required in order to obtain a better understanding of the mechanism of action of this sea anemone peptide. Using enzyme kinetics, we now investigated its activity against other serine proteases. Considering previous reports of bifunctional Kunitz-type proteins from anemones, we also studied the effect of rShPI-1A on voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels. rShPI-1A binds Kv1.1, Kv1.2, and Kv1.6 channels with IC50 values in the nM range. Hence, ShPI-1 is the first member of the sea anemone type 2 potassium channel toxins family with tight-binding potency against several proteases and different Kv1 channels. In depth sequence analysis and structural comparison of ShPI-1 with similar protease inhibitors and Kv channel toxins showed apparent non-sequence conservation for known key residues. However, we detected two subtle patterns of coordinated amino acid substitutions flanking the conserved cysteine residues at the N- and C-terminal ends. PMID:27089366

  4. Autocatalytic Cleavage within Classical Swine Fever Virus NS3 Leads to a Functional Separation of Protease and Helicase

    PubMed Central

    Lamp, Benjamin; Riedel, Christiane; Wentz, Eveline; Tortorici, Maria-Alejandra

    2013-01-01

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is a positive-stranded RNA virus belonging to the genus Pestivirus within the Flaviviridae family. Pivotal for processing of a large portion of the viral polyprotein is a serine protease activity within nonstructural protein 3 (NS3) that also harbors helicase and NTPase activities essential for RNA replication. In CSFV-infected cells, NS3 appears as two forms, a fully processed NS3 of 80 kDa and the precursor molecule NS2-3 of 120 kDa. Here we report the identification and mapping of additional autocatalytic intramolecular cleavages. One cleavable peptide bond occurs between Leu1781 and Met1782, giving rise to a helicase subunit of 55 kDa and, depending on the substrate, a NS2-3 fragment of 78 kDa (NS2-3p) or a NS3 protease subunit of 26 kDa (NS3p). In trans-cleavage assays using NS4-5 as a substrate, NS3p acts as a fully functional protease that is able to process the polyprotein. NS3p comprises the minimal essential protease, as deletion of Leu1781 results in inactivation. A second intramolecular cleavage was mapped to the Leu1748/Lys1749 peptide bond that yields a proteolytically inactive NS3 fragment. Deletion of either of the cleavage site residues resulted in a loss of RNA infectivity, indicating the functional importance of amino acid identity at the respective positions. Our data suggest that internal cleavage within the NS3 moiety is a common process that further extends the functional repertoires of the multifunctional NS2-3 or NS3 and represents another level of the complex polyprotein processing of Flaviviridae. PMID:23986594

  5. Peptidyl inverse esters of p-methoxybenzoic acid: a novel class of potent inactivator of the serine proteases.

    PubMed Central

    Lynas, J; Walker, B

    1997-01-01

    A series of novel synthetic peptides, containing a C-terminal beta-amino alcohol linked to p-methoxybenzoic acid via an ester linkage, have been prepared and tested as inhibitors against typical members of the serine protease family. For example, the sequences Ac-Val-Pro-NH-CH-(CH2-C6H5)-CH2O-CO-C6H4-OCH3 (I) and Ac-Val-Pro-NH-CH-[CH-(CH3)2]-CH2O-CO-C6H4-OCH3 (II), which fulfil the known primary and secondary specificity requirements of chymotrypsin and elastase respectively, have been found to behave as exceptionally potent irreversible inactivators of their respective target protease. Thus I was found to inactivate chymotrypsin with an overall second-order rate constant (k2/Ki) of approx. 6.6x10(6) M-1. s-1, whereas II is an even more potent inactivator of human neutrophil elastase, exhibiting a second-order rate constant of inactivation of approx. 1.3x10(7) M-1.s-1. These values represent the largest rate constants ever reported for the inactivation of these proteases with synthetic peptide-based inactivators. On prolonged incubation in substrate-containing buffers, samples of the inactivated proteases were found to regain activity slowly. The first-order rate constants for the regeneration of enzymic activity from chymotrypsin and human neutrophil elastase inactivated by I and II respectively were determined to be approx. 5.8x10(-5) s-1 and approx. 4.3x10(-4) s-1. We believe that the most likely mechanism for the inactivation and regeneration of enzymic activity involves the formation and subsequent slow hydrolysis of long-lived acyl enzyme intermediates. PMID:9271079

  6. Purification and biochemical characterization of two detergent-stable serine alkaline proteases from Streptomyces sp. strain AH4.

    PubMed

    Touioui, Souraya Boulkour; Jaouadi, Nadia Zaraî; Boudjella, Hadjira; Ferradji, Fatma Zohra; Belhoul, Mouna; Rekik, Hatem; Badis, Abdelmalek; Bejar, Samir; Jaouadi, Bassem

    2015-07-01

    Streptomyces sp. strain AH4 exhibited a high ability to produce two extracellular proteases when cultured on a yeast malt-extract (ISP2)-casein-based medium. Pure proteins were obtained after heat treatment (30 min at 70 °C) and ammonium sulphate fractionation (30-60 %), followed by size exclusion HPLC column. Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry analysis revealed that the purified enzymes (named SAPS-P1 and SAPS-P2) were monomers with molecular masses of 36,417.13 and 21,099.10 Da, respectively. Their identified N-terminal amino acid displayed high homologies with those of Streptomyces proteases. While SAPS-P1 was optimally active at pH 12.0 and 70 °C, SAPS-P2 showed optimum activity at pH 10.0 and 60 °C. Both enzymes were completely stable within a wide range of temperature (45-75 °C) and pH (8.0-11.5). They were noted to be completely inhibited by phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride and diisopropyl fluorophosphates, which confirmed their belonging to the serine proteases family. Compared to SAPS-P2, SAPS-P1 showed high thermostability and excellent stability towards bleaching, denaturing, and oxidizing agents. Both enzymes displayed marked stability and compatibility with a wide range of commercial laundry detergents and significant catalytic efficiencies compared to Subtilisin Carlsberg and Protease SG-XIV. Overall, the results indicated that SAPS-P1 and SAPS-P2 can be considered as potential promising candidates for future application as bioadditives in detergent formulations. PMID:26002109

  7. Proteomic protease specificity profiling of clostridial collagenases reveals their intrinsic nature as dedicated degraders of collagen☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Eckhard, Ulrich; Huesgen, Pitter F.; Brandstetter, Hans; Overall, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Clostridial collagenases are among the most efficient degraders of collagen. Most clostridia are saprophytes and secrete proteases to utilize proteins in their environment as carbon sources; during anaerobic infections, collagenases play a crucial role in host colonization. Several medical and biotechnological applications have emerged utilizing their high collagenolytic efficiency. However, the contribution of the functionally most important peptidase domain to substrate specificity remains unresolved. We investigated the active site sequence specificity of the peptidase domains of collagenase G and H from Clostridium histolyticum and collagenase T from Clostridium tetani. Both prime and non-prime cleavage site specificity were simultaneously profiled using Proteomic Identification of protease Cleavage Sites (PICS), a mass spectrometry-based method utilizing database searchable proteome-derived peptide libraries. For each enzyme we identified > 100 unique-cleaved peptides, resulting in robust cleavage logos revealing collagen-like specificity patterns: a strong preference for glycine in P3 and P1′, proline at P2 and P2′, and a slightly looser specificity at P1, which in collagen is typically occupied by hydroxyproline. This specificity for the classic collagen motifs Gly-Pro-X and Gly-X-Hyp represents a remarkable adaptation considering the complex requirements for substrate unfolding and presentation that need to be fulfilled before a single collagen strand becomes accessible for cleavage. Biological significance We demonstrate the striking sequence specificity of a family of clostridial collagenases using proteome derived peptide libraries and PICS, Proteomic Identification of protease Cleavage Sites. In combination with the previously published crystal structures of these proteases, our results represent an important piece of the puzzle in understanding the complex mechanism underlying collagen hydrolysis, and pave the way for the rational design of

  8. Purification and properties of an extracellular protease from Myxococcus virescens.

    PubMed Central

    Gnosspelius, G

    1978-01-01

    An extracellular protease from Myxococcus virescens was purified by phosphate precipitation, gel exclusion, and ion-exchange chromatography. The enzyme appeared homogeneous upon disc electrophoresis. The molecular weight of the protease was estimated to be 26,000. The enzyme was rapidly inactivated by ethylenediaminetetraacetate, but the activity could be partially restored by divalent cations. Diisopropylphosphorofluoridate inhibited enzyme activity completely. Michaelis-Menten kinetics were obeyed with casein and hemoglobin as substrates. First-order kinetics were obtained with elastin as the substrate, provided trypsin was in excess. Petidolytic activity indicated that the peptide bonds hydrolyzed by the enzyme were mainly those involving amino acids with nonpolar side chains. PMID:22536

  9. CLIP proteases and Plasmodium melanization in Anopheles gambiae.

    PubMed

    Barillas-Mury, Carolina

    2007-07-01

    Melanization is a potent immune response mediated by phenoloxidase (PO). Multiple Clip-domain serine proteases (CLIP) regulate PO activation as part of a complex cascade of proteases that are cleaved sequentially. The role of several CLIP as key activators or suppressors of the melanization responses of Anopheles gambiae to Plasmodium berghei (murine malaria) has been established recently using a genome-wide reverse genetics approach. Important differences in regulation of PO activation between An. gambiae strains were also identified. This review summarizes these findings and discusses our current understanding of the An. gambiae melanization responses to Plasmodium. PMID:17512801

  10. Optimization of some additives to improve protease production under SSF.

    PubMed

    Tunga, R; Banerjee, R; Bhattacharyya, B C

    2001-11-01

    In a locally isolated Rhizopus oryzae strain highest-production of protease (388.54/g wheat bran) was observed in presence of Tween-80 and dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate individually at 40mg/g wheat bran concentration. Under solid state fermentation biotin (0.0025mg/g wheat bran); Ca2+ (0.05mg/g wheat bran) and 1-Naphthyl acetic acid (0.01mg/g wheat bran) also showed some inducing effect on the synthesis of the enzyme protease by solid state fermentation. PMID:11906108

  11. Surface location of a Bacteroides gingivalis glycylprolyl protease.

    PubMed Central

    Grenier, D; McBride, B C

    1989-01-01

    Various immunological methods were used to localize a glycylprolyl protease previously isolated from Bacteroides gingivalis ATCC 33277. The results obtained by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, indirect immunofluorescence staining, and indirect immunogold labeling suggest that the glycylprolyl protease is present on the surface of the cell outer membrane and is specific to B. gingivalis strains. The enzyme was removed from the cell envelope by treatment of the whole cells with sodium dodecyl sulfate, Triton X-100, sodium deoxycholate, and proteinase K. Images PMID:2807524

  12. Scabies mite inactive serine proteases are potent inhibitors of the human complement lectin pathway.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Simone L; Pike, Robert N; Mika, Angela; Blom, Anna M; Hofmann, Andreas; Wijeyewickrema, Lakshmi C; Kemp, Dave; Fischer, Katja

    2014-05-01

    Scabies is an infectious skin disease caused by the mite Sarcoptes scabiei and has been classified as one of the six most prevalent epidermal parasitic skin diseases infecting populations living in poverty by the World Health Organisation. The role of the complement system, a pivotal component of human innate immunity, as an important defence against invading pathogens has been well documented and many parasites have an arsenal of anti-complement defences. We previously reported on a family of scabies mite proteolytically inactive serine protease paralogues (SMIPP-Ss) thought to be implicated in host defence evasion. We have since shown that two family members, SMIPP-S D1 and I1 have the ability to bind the human complement components C1q, mannose binding lectin (MBL) and properdin and are capable of inhibiting all three human complement pathways. This investigation focused on inhibition of the lectin pathway of complement activation as it is likely to be the primary pathway affecting scabies mites. Activation of the lectin pathway relies on the activation of MBL, and as SMIPP-S D1 and I1 have previously been shown to bind MBL, the nature of this interaction was examined using binding and mutagenesis studies. SMIPP-S D1 bound MBL in complex with MBL-associated serine proteases (MASPs) and released the MASP-2 enzyme from the complex. SMIPP-S I1 was also able to bind MBL in complex with MASPs, but MASP-1 and MASP-2 remained in the complex. Despite these differences in mechanism, both molecules inhibited activation of complement components downstream of MBL. Mutagenesis studies revealed that both SMIPP-Ss used an alternative site of the molecule from the residual active site region to inhibit the lectin pathway. We propose that SMIPP-Ss are potent lectin pathway inhibitors and that this mechanism represents an important tool in the immune evasion repertoire of the parasitic mite and a potential target for therapeutics. PMID:24854034

  13. Recombinant expression, refolding, purification and characterization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa protease IV in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Mingzhi; Cai, Man; Wu, Feilin; Zhang, Yao; Xiong, Zhi; Xu, Ping

    2016-10-01

    Several protease IV enzymes are widely used in proteomic research. Specifically, protease IV from Pseudomonas aeruginosa has lysyl endopeptidase activity. Here, we report the recombinant expression, refolding, activation, and purification of this protease in Escherichia coli. Proteolytic instability of the activated intermediate, a major obstacle for efficient production, is controlled through ammonium sulfate precipitation. The purified protease IV exhibits superior lysyl endopeptidase activity compared to a commercial product. PMID:27260967

  14. Gastrointestinal absorption and biological activities of serine and cysteine proteases of animal and plant origin: review on absorption of serine and cysteine proteases

    PubMed Central

    Lorkowski, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    Research has confirmed that peptides and larger protein molecules pass through the mucosal barrier of the gastrointestinal tract. Orally administered serine and cysteine proteases of plant and animal origin also reach blood and lymph as intact, high molecular weight and physiologically active protein molecules. Their absorption may be supported by a self-enhanced paracellular transport mechanism resulting in sub-nanomolar concentration of transiently free protease molecules or, in a complex with anti-proteases, at higher concentrations. Data from pharmacokinetic investigations reveals dose linearity for maximum plasma levels of free proteases not unusual for body proteases and a high inter-individual variability. There is no interference with each other after oral administration of protease combinations, and absorption follows an unusual invasion and elimination kinetic due to slow velocity of absorption and a fast 100% protein binding to anti-proteases. Oral application of proteases leads to increased proteolytic serum activity and increased plasma concentrations of the corresponding anti-proteases. Their biological activity is determined by their proteolytic activity as free proteases on soluble peptides/proteins or cell surface receptors (e.g. protease activated receptors) and their activity in the complex formed with their specific and/or unspecific anti-proteases. The anti-protease-complexes, during immune reaction and injuries often loaded with different cytokines, are cleared from body fluids and tissue by receptor mediated endocytosis on hepatocytes and/or blood cells. Oral administration of enteric coated tablets containing proteolytic enzymes of plant and animal origin may be a safe method to stabilize, positively influence or enhance physiological and immunological processes during disease processes and in healthy consumers. PMID:22461953

  15. Prognostic Value of Protease Activated Receptor-1 in Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Hagag, Adel A.; Nosair, Nahla A.; Ghaith, Fatma M.; Elshenawy, Eman H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute Lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a malignant disorder of lymphoid progenitor cells that proliferate and replace the normal hematopoietic cells of the bone marrow. Protease-activated receptors (PARs) comprise a family of trans-membrane G-protein coupled receptors. Protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR-1) is a typical member of this family of receptors that mediate cellular responses to thrombin and related proteases. PAR1 is expressed by a wide range of tumor cells and can promote tumor growth, invasion and metastasis. The aim of this work was to study the role of PAR-1 expression in newly diagnosed ALL patients. Patients and methods This study was conducted on 44 children with newly diagnosed ALL who were admitted to Hematology Unit, Pediatric department, Tanta University Hospital including 24 males and 20 females with their age ranged from 4–17 years and their mean age value of 9.06±3.26. All patients were subjected to complete history taking, thorough clinical examination, bone marrow aspiration and flow cytometric analysis for detection of PAR-1 expression by malignant cells. Results PAR-1 was positive in 18 cases (41%) and negative in 26 cases (59%) of studied patients. This study showed no significant relation between PAR-1 expression and age, sex and most of the clinical data including hepatomegaly, splenomegaly and purpura while generalized lymphadenopathy was significantly higher in PAR-1 positive group. PAR-1 positive expression was associated with some bad prognostic laboratory parameters including higher hemoglobin, higher white blood cells, higher peripheral blood and bone marrow blast cells, higher serum LDH and lower platelets count. No significant association was detected between PAR-1 expression and immunophenotyping. There were significantly higher remission rates in PAR-1 negative group and significantly higher relapse and death rates in PAR-1 positive group. Conclusion From this study, it could be concluded that PAR-1 expression

  16. Isolation of cDNA from Jacaratia mexicana encoding a mexicain-like cysteine protease gene.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Martínez, Erick M; Herrera-Ramírez, Alejandra C; Badillo-Corona, Jesús Agustín; Garibay-Orijel, Claudio; González-Rábade, Nuria; Oliver-Salvador, María Del Carmen

    2012-07-01

    Cysteine proteases (CPs) from the C1 family, which are similar to papain, can be found in animals and plants, as well as some viruses and prokaryotes. These enzymes have diverse physiological functions and are thus very attractive for science and industry. Jacaratia mexicana, a member of the Caricaceae plant family, contains several CPs, the principal being mexicain, found to favorably compete against papain for many industrial applications due to its high stability and specific activity. In this study, leaves of J. mexicana were used to isolate a CP-coding gene, similar to those that code for mexicain and chymomexicain. By using rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) as well as oligonucleotide design from papain-like conserved amino acids (aa), a sequence of 1404 bp consisting of a 5' terminal untranslated region (UTR) of 153 bp, a 3' terminal UTR of 131 bp, with a polyadenylation (poly(A)) signal sequence and a poly(A) tail, and an open reading frame (ORF) of 1046 bp, was obtained by overlapping three partial sequences. Two full-length cDNA sequences that encode for mexicain-like proteases were cloned from mRNA (JmCP4 and JmCP5). JmCP4 is predicted to have an ORF of 1044 bp, which codifies for polypeptides that have a 26 aa signal peptide region, a 108 aa propeptide region and a mature enzyme of 214 aa. A 969 bp fragment (JmCP5) encodes for a partial sequence of a CP gene, without the signal peptide region but with a full-length propeptide region. The sequence analysis showed that this protease presented a high similarity to other plant CPs from J. mexicana, Vasconcellea cundinamarcensis, Vasconcellea stipulata, and Carica papaya, among others, mainly at the conserved catalytic site. Obtaining the sequence of this CP gene from J. mexicana provides an alternative for production in a standard system and could be an initial step towards the commercialization of this enzyme. PMID:22543019

  17. Antibody Responses to Norovirus Genogroup GI.1 and GII.4 Proteases in Volunteers Administered Norwalk Virus

    PubMed Central

    Ajami, Nadim J.; Barry, Meagan A.; Carrillo, Berenice; Muhaxhiri, Zana; Neill, Frederick H.; Prasad, B. V. Venkataram; Opekun, Antone R.; Gilger, Mark A.; Graham, David Y.; Atmar, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    An assay was developed to detect antibodies against two norovirus proteases among participants in a Norwalk virus (GI.1) challenge study. Prechallenge seroprevalence was lower against the protease from the homologous GI.1 virus than against protease from a heterologous GII.4 strain. Seroresponses were detected for 14 of 19 (74%) infected persons. PMID:23035177

  18. Teaching Foundational Topics and Scientific Skills in Biochemistry within the Conceptual Framework of HIV Protease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, R. Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    HIV protease has served as a model protein for understanding protein structure, enzyme kinetics, structure-based drug design, and protein evolution. Inhibitors of HIV protease are also an essential part of effective HIV/AIDS treatment and have provided great societal benefits. The broad applications for HIV protease and its inhibitors make it a…

  19. Heterologous expression of Cenchritis muricatus protease inhibitor II (CmPI-II) in Pichia pastoris system: Purification, isotopic labeling and preliminary characterization.

    PubMed

    Cabrera-Muñoz, Aymara; Rojas, Laritza; Gil, Dayrom F; González-González, Yamile; Mansur, Manuel; Camejo, Ayamey; Pires, José R; Alonso-Del-Rivero Antigua, Maday

    2016-10-01

    Cenchritis muricatus protease inhibitor II (CmPI-II) is a tight-binding serine protease inhibitor of the Kazal family with an atypical broad specificity, being active against several proteases such as bovine pancreatic trypsin, human neutrophil elastase and subtilisin A. CmPI-II 3D structures are necessary for understanding the molecular basis of its activity. In the present work, we describe an efficient and straightforward recombinant expression strategy, as well as a cost-effective procedure for isotope labeling for NMR structure determination purposes. The vector pCM101 containing the CmPI-II gene, under the control of Pichia pastoris AOX1 promoter was constructed. Methylotrophic Pichia pastoris strain KM71H was then transformed with the plasmid and the recombinant protein (rCmPI-II) was expressed in benchtop fermenter in unlabeled or (15)N-labeled forms using ammonium chloride ((15)N, 99%) as the sole nitrogen source. Protein purification was accomplished by sequential cation exchange chromatography in STREAMLINE DirectHST, anion exchange chromatography on Hitrap Q-Sepharose FF and gel filtration on Superdex 75 10/30, yielding high quantities of pure rCmPI-II and (15)N rCmPI-II. Recombinant proteins displayed similar functional features as compared to the natural inhibitor and NMR spectra indicated folded and homogeneously labeled samples, suitable for further studies of structure and protease-inhibitor interactions. PMID:27353494

  20. Identification of lympho-epithelial Kazal-type inhibitor 2 in human skin as a kallikrein-related peptidase 5-specific protease inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Meyer-Hoffert, Ulf; Wu, Zhihong; Schröder, Jens-Michael

    2009-01-01

    Kallikreins-related peptidases (KLKs) are serine proteases and have been implicated in the desquamation process of the skin. Their activity is tightly controlled by epidermal protease inhibitors like the lympho-epithelial Kazal-type inhibitor (LEKTI). Defects of the LEKTI-encoding gene serine protease inhibitor Kazal type (Spink)5 lead to the absence of LEKTI and result in the genodermatose Netherton syndrome, which mimics the common skin disease atopic dermatitis. Since many KLKs are expressed in human skin with KLK5 being considered as one of the most important KLKs in skin desquamation, we proposed that more inhibitors are present in human skin. Herein, we purified from human stratum corneum by HPLC techniques a new KLK5-inhibiting peptide encoded by a member of the Spink family, designated as Spink9 located on chromosome 5p33.1. This peptide is highly homologous to LEKTI and was termed LEKTI-2. Recombinant LEKTI-2 inhibited KLK5 but not KLK7, 14 or other serine proteases tested including trypsin, plasmin and thrombin. Spink9 mRNA expression was detected in human skin samples and in cultured keratinocytes. LEKTI-2 immune-expression was focally localized at the stratum granulosum and stratum corneum at palmar and plantar sites in close localization to KLK5. At sites of plantar hyperkeratosis, LEKTI-2 expression was increased. We suggest that LEKTI-2 contributes to the regulation of the desquamation process in human skin by specifically inhibiting KLK5. PMID:19190773

  1. Hydrogen peroxide induces lysosomal protease alterations in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Daniel C; Mason, Ceceile W; Goodman, Carl B; Holder, Maurice S; Kirksey, Otis W; Womble, Tracy A; Severs, Walter B; Palm, Donald E

    2007-09-01

    Alterations in lysosomal proteases have been implicated in many neurodegenerative diseases. The current study demonstrates a concentration-dependent decrease in PC12 cell viability and transient changes in cystatin C (CYSC), cathepsin B (CATB), cathepsin D (CATD) and caspase-3 following exposure to H2O2. Furthermore, activation of CATD occurred following exposure to H2O2 and cysteine protease suppression, while inhibition of CATD with pepstatin A significantly improved cell viability. Additionally, significant PARP cleavage, suggestive of caspase-3-like activity, was observed following H2O2 exposure, while inhibition of caspase-3 significantly increased cell viability compared to H2O2 administration alone. Collectively, our data suggest that H2O2 induced cell death is regulated at least in part by caspase-3 and CATD. Furthermore, cysteine protease suppression increases CATD expression and activity. These studies provide insight for alternate pathways and potential therapeutic targets of cell death associated with oxidative stress and lysosomal protease alterations. PMID:17440810

  2. Design, synthesis, and activity of nanocellulosic protease sensors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Here we contrast the molecular assembly, and biochemical utility of nanocellulosic materials prepared from cotton and wood as protease sensors. The cotton-based nanocellulosic substrates were prepared in a variety of ways to produce nanocrystals, films and aerogels, which were derivatized with eithe...

  3. Processing and targeting of the thiol protease aleurain: Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.C.

    1988-01-01

    This study addresses the processing and targeting of the thiol protease aleurain in monocots. A probe derived from the aleurain cDNA specific for the 5'-most 400 bp (a region encoding the first 140 amino acids of the preprotein hybridized to at least 3 separate elements in the barley genome; only one represented the aleurain gene. In contrast, a probe specific for the remaining 2/23 of the cDNA (representing the protease domain) hybridized to only a single copy sequence. To know if this pattern pertained in other, closely related, monocots, we probed Southern blots of genomic DNA from maize, rye, oats, sorghum, and pearl millet with each probe. In each instance except for maize DNA, the 5' domain probe hybridizes to several fragments in addition to those identified by the protease domain probe. Presumable the darkest hybridization in each represents the fragment carrying the sequences homologous to barley aleurain. The fragments from a given restriction enzyme identified by the protease domain probe in sorghum, millet, and maize, were indistinguishable in size indicating that the gene sequences, as well as flanking DNA, are so well conserved among the group that the location of the hexanucleotide sequences have not diverged. (3 refs., 3 figs.)

  4. Botulinum neurotoxin: a deadly protease with applications to human medicine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are some of the most potent biological toxins to humans. They are synthesized by the gram-positive, spore-forming bacterium Clostridium botulinum. BoNT is secreted from the bacterium as a ~150 kDa polypeptide which is cleaved by bacterial or host proteases into a ~50 kD...

  5. Hepatitis C Virus NS3/4A Protease Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    López-Labrador, Francesc-Xavier

    2008-11-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus infection is a global problem worldwide due to the lack of an effective therapy (the current standard of care treatment is effective in about 40-50% of the cases), and the difficulties in developing a protective vaccine. Chronic infection progresses to end-stage liver disease and liver failure in a considerable number of infected individuals. Once liver function is compromised, the only reliable therapeutic intervention is liver transplantation. Unfortunately, re-infection of the graft is unavoidable, and a new chronic hepatitis is early established in transplant recipients, that can result in graft loss. Thus, there is an urgent need for new, specifically targeted therapies for the treatment of HCV chronic infection. Among the viral proteins, the NS3/4A protease and the NS5b RNA-dependent RNA-polymerase, essential for the virus life cycle, have concentrated the efforts in the development of new antivirals, and some promising ones have already entered clinical trials. In particular, inhibitors of the HCV NS3/4A protease are the most advanced in clinical development. This review summarizes the available data for the most important HCV NS3/4A protease inhibitors in development, the most recent patents of these type of compounds, the envisioned options for future HCV therapies, and the eventual impact of HCV genetic variability on resistance to new NS3/4A protease inhibitors. PMID:18991798

  6. Flap Dynamics in Aspartic Proteases: A Computational Perspective.

    PubMed

    Mahanti, Mukul; Bhakat, Soumendranath; Nilsson, Ulf J; Söderhjelm, Pär

    2016-08-01

    Recent advances in biochemistry and drug design have placed proteases as one of the critical target groups for developing novel small-molecule inhibitors. Among all proteases, aspartic proteases have gained significant attention due to their role in HIV/AIDS, malaria, Alzheimer's disease, etc. The binding cleft is covered by one or two β-hairpins (flaps) which need to be opened before a ligand can bind. After binding, the flaps close to retain the ligand in the active site. Development of computational tools has improved our understanding of flap dynamics and its role in ligand recognition. In the past decade, several computational approaches, for example molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, coarse-grained simulations, replica-exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) and metadynamics, have been used to understand flap dynamics and conformational motions associated with flap movements. This review is intended to summarize the computational progress towards understanding the flap dynamics of proteases and to be a reference for future studies in this field. PMID:26872937

  7. THE ROLE OF CYSTEINE PROTEASE IN ALZHEIMER DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Hasanbasic, Samra; Jahic, Alma; Karahmet, Emina; Sejranic, Asja; Prnjavorac, Besim

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Cysteine protease are biological catalysts which play a pivotal role in numerous biological reactions in organism. Much of the literature is inscribed to their biochemical significance, distribution and mechanism of action. Many diseases, e.g. Alzheimer’s disease, develop due to enzyme balance disruption. Understanding of cysteine protease’s disbalance is therefor a key to unravel the new possibilities of treatment. Cysteine protease are one of the most important enzymes for protein disruption during programmed cell death. Whether protein disruption is part of cell deaths is not enough clear in any cases. Thereafter, any tissue disruption, including proteolysis, generate more or less inflammation appearance. Review: This review briefly summarizes the current knowledge about pathological mechanism’s that results in AD, with significant reference to the role of cysteine protease in it. Based on the summary, new pharmacological approach and development of novel potent drugs with selective toxicity targeting cysteine protease will be a major challenge in years to come. PMID:27482169

  8. Post-translational control of genetic circuits using Potyvirus proteases.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Rodriguez, Jesus; Voigt, Christopher A

    2016-07-27

    Genetic engineering projects often require control over when a protein is degraded. To this end, we use a fusion between a degron and an inactivating peptide that can be added to the N-terminus of a protein. When the corresponding protease is expressed, it cleaves the peptide and the protein is degraded. Three protease:cleavage site pairs from Potyvirus are shown to be orthogonal and active in exposing degrons, releasing inhibitory domains and cleaving polyproteins. This toolbox is applied to the design of genetic circuits as a means to control regulator activity and degradation. First, we demonstrate that a gate can be constructed by constitutively expressing an inactivated repressor and having an input promoter drive the expression of the protease. It is also shown that the proteolytic release of an inhibitory domain can improve the dynamic range of a transcriptional gate (200-fold repression). Next, we design polyproteins containing multiple repressors and show that their cleavage can be used to control multiple outputs. Finally, we demonstrate that the dynamic range of an output can be improved (8-fold to 190-fold) with the addition of a protease-cleaved degron. Thus, controllable proteolysis offers a powerful tool for modulating and expanding the function of synthetic gene circuits. PMID:27298256

  9. Lon protease: A key enzyme controlling mitochondrial bioenergetics in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Quirós, Pedro M; Bárcena, Clea; López-Otín, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    We have recently explored the in vivo functional and oncologic relevance of Lon protease (LONP1), an enzyme involved in mitochondrial quality control. We found that LONP1 is an essential protein for life and that it also performs a critical function in tumorigenesis by regulating the bioenergetics of cancer cells. PMID:27308364

  10. Protease Inhibitors Do Not Affect Antibody Responses to Pneumococcal Vaccination.

    PubMed

    De La Rosa, Indhira; Munjal, Iona M; Rodriguez-Barradas, Maria; Yu, Xiaoying; Pirofski, Liise-Anne; Mendoza, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    HIV(+) subjects on optimal antiretroviral therapy have persistently impaired antibody responses to pneumococcal vaccination. We explored the possibility that this effect may be due to HIV protease inhibitors (PIs). We found that in humans and mice, PIs do not affect antibody production in response to pneumococcal vaccination. PMID:27074938

  11. Local and spatial factors determining HIV-1 protease substrate recognition.

    PubMed Central

    Hazebrouck, S; Machtelinckx-Delmas, V; Kupiec, J J; Sonigo, P

    2001-01-01

    Insertional mutagenesis of the Escherichia coli thymidylate synthase (TS) was used to address substrate recognition of HIV-1 protease in a well characterized structural context. By modifying the TS conformation while maintaining its enzymic activity, we investigated the influence of protein folding on protease-substrate recognition. A slight destabilization of the TS structure permitted the cleavage of a target site, which was resistant in the native TS. This result supports a dynamic interpretation of HIV-1 protease specificity. Exposure time of the potential cleavage site, which depends on the stability of the global conformation, must be compatible with the cleavage kinetics, which are determined by the local sequence. Cleavage specificity has been described as the consequence of cumulative interactions, globally favourable, between at least six amino acids around the cleavage site. To investigate influence of local sequence, we introduced insertions of variable lengths in two exposed loops of the TS. In both environments, insertion of only two amino acids could determine specific cleavage. We then inserted libraries of dipeptides naturally cleaved by the HIV-1 protease in order to assess the limitations of established classifications of substrates in different conformational contexts. PMID:11513751

  12. Protease inhibitors interfere with the necessary factors of carcinogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Troll, W

    1989-01-01

    Many tumor promoters are inflammatory agents that stimulate the formation of oxygen radicals (.O2-) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in phagocytic neutrophils. The neutrophils use the oxygen radicals to kill bacteria, which are recognized by the cell membrane of phagocytic cells causing a signal to mount the oxygen response. The tumor promoter isolated from croton oil, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), mimics the signal, causing an oxygen radical release that is intended to kill bacteria; instead, it injures cells in the host. Oxygen radicals cause single strand breaks in DNA and modify DNA bases. These damaging reactions appear to be related to tumor promotion, as three types of chemopreventive agents, retinoids, onion oil, and protease inhibitors, suppress the induction of oxygen radicals in phagocytic neutrophils and suppress tumor promotion in skin cancer in mice. Protease inhibitors also suppress breast and colon cancers in mice. Protease inhibitors capable of inhibiting chymotrypsin show a greater suppression of the oxygen effect and are better suppressors of tumor promotion. In addition, oxygen radicals may be one of the many agents that cause activation of oncogenes. Since retinoids and protease inhibitors suppress the expression of the ras oncogene in NIH 3T3 cells, NIH 3T3 cells may serve as a relatively facile model for finding and measuring chemopreventive agents that interfere with the carcinogenic process. PMID:2667986

  13. Protease-activated-receptor-2 affects protease-activated-receptor-1-driven breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Jaber, Mohammad; Maoz, Miriam; Kancharla, Arun; Agranovich, Daniel; Peretz, Tamar; Grisaru-Granovsky, Sorina; Uziely, Beatrice; Bar-Shavit, Rachel

    2014-07-01

    Mammalian protease-activated-receptor-1 and -2 (PAR1 and PAR2) are activated by proteases found in the flexible microenvironment of a tumor and play a central role in breast cancer. We propose in the present study that PAR1 and PAR2 act together as a functional unit during malignant and physiological invasion processes. This notion is supported by assessing pro-tumor functions in the presence of short hairpin; shRNA knocked-down hPar2 or by the use of a truncated PAR2 devoid of the entire cytoplasmic tail. Silencing of hPar2 by shRNA-attenuated thrombin induced PAR1 signaling as recapitulated by inhibiting the assembly of Etk/Bmx or Akt onto PAR1-C-tail, by thrombin-instigated colony formation and invasion. Strikingly, shRNA-hPar2 also inhibited the TFLLRN selective PAR1 pro-tumor functions. In addition, while evaluating the physiological invasion process of placenta extravillous trophoblast (EVT) organ culture, we observed inhibition of both thrombin or the selective PAR1 ligand; TFLLRNPNDK induced EVT invasion by shRNA-hPar2 but not by scrambled shRNA-hPar2. In parallel, when a truncated PAR2 was utilized in a xenograft mouse model, it inhibited PAR1-PAR2-driven tumor growth in vivo. Similarly, it also attenuated the interaction of Etk/Bmx with the PAR1-C-tail in vitro and decreased markedly selective PAR1-induced Matrigel invasion. Confocal images demonstrated co-localization of PAR1 and PAR2 in HEK293T cells over-expressing YFP-hPar2 and HA-hPar1. Co-immuno-precipitation analyses revealed PAR1-PAR2 complex formation but no PAR1-CXCR4 complex was formed. Taken together, our observations show that PAR1 and PAR2 act as a functional unit in tumor development and placenta-uterus interactions. This conclusion may have significant consequences on future breast cancer therapeutic modalities and improved late pregnancy outcome. PMID:24177339

  14. Highly efficient and easy protease-mediated protein purification.

    PubMed

    Last, Daniel; Müller, Janett; Dawood, Ayad W H; Moldenhauer, Eva J; Pavlidis, Ioannis V; Bornscheuer, Uwe T

    2016-02-01

    As both research on and application of proteins are rarely focused on the resistance towards nonspecific proteases, this property remained widely unnoticed, in particular in terms of protein purification and related fields. In the present study, diverse aspects of protease-mediated protein purification (PMPP) were explored on the basis of the complementary proteases trypsin and proteinase K as well as the model proteins green fluorescent protein (GFP) from Aequorea victoria, lipase A from Candida antarctica (CAL-A), a transaminase from Aspergillus fumigatus (AspFum), quorum quenching lactonase AiiA from Bacillus sp., and an alanine dehydrogenase from Thermus thermophilus (AlaDH). While GFP and AiiA were already known to be protease resistant, the thermostable enzymes CAL-A, AspFum, and AlaDH were selected due to the documented correlation between thermostability and protease resistance. As proof of principle for PMPP, recombinant GFP remained unaffected whereas most Escherichia coli (E. coli) host proteins were degraded by trypsin. PMPP was highly advantageous compared to the widely used heat-mediated purification of commercial CAL-A. The resistance of AspFum towards trypsin was improved by rational protein design introducing point mutation R20Q. Trypsin also served as economical and efficient substitute for site-specific endopeptidases for the removal of a His-tag fused to AiiA. Moreover, proteolysis of host enzymes with interfering properties led to a strongly improved sensitivity and accuracy of the NADH assay in E. coli cell lysate for AlaDH activity measurements. Thus, PMPP is an attractive alternative to common protein purification methods and facilitates also enzyme characterization in cell lysate. PMID:26671615

  15. Nematicidal bacteria associated to pinewood nematode produce extracellular proteases.

    PubMed

    Paiva, Gabriel; Proença, Diogo Neves; Francisco, Romeu; Verissimo, Paula; Santos, Susana S; Fonseca, Luís; Abrantes, Isabel M O; Morais, Paula V

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria associated with the nematode Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, a pathogen of trees and the causal agent of pine wilt disease (PWD) may play a role in the disease. In order to evaluate their role (positive or negative to the tree), strains isolated from the track of nematodes from infected Pinus pinaster trees were screened, in vitro, for their nematicidal potential. The bacterial products, from strains more active in killing nematodes, were screened in order to identify and characterize the nematicidal agent. Forty-seven strains were tested and, of these, 21 strains showed capacity to produce extracellular products with nematicidal activity. All Burkholderia strains were non-toxic. In contrast, all Serratia strains except one exhibited high toxicity. Nematodes incubated with Serratia strains showed, by SEM observation, deposits of bacteria on the nematode cuticle. The most nematicidal strain, Serratia sp. A88copa13, produced proteases in the supernatant. The use of selective inhibitors revealed that a serine protease with 70 kDa was majorly responsible for the toxicity of the supernatant. This extracellular serine protease is different phylogenetically, in size and biochemically from previously described proteases. Nematicidal assays revealed differences in nematicidal activity of the proteases to different species of Bursaphelenchus, suggesting its usefulness in a primary screen of the nematodes. This study offers the basis for further investigation of PWD and brings new insights on the role bacteria play in the defense of pine trees against B. xylophilus. Understanding all the factors involved is important in order to develop strategies to control B. xylophilus dispersion. PMID:24244546

  16. Nematicidal Bacteria Associated to Pinewood Nematode Produce Extracellular Proteases

    PubMed Central

    Francisco, Romeu; Verissimo, Paula; Santos, Susana S.; Fonseca, Luís; Abrantes, Isabel M. O.; Morais, Paula V.

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria associated with the nematode Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, a pathogen of trees and the causal agent of pine wilt disease (PWD) may play a role in the disease. In order to evaluate their role (positive or negative to the tree), strains isolated from the track of nematodes from infected Pinus pinaster trees were screened, in vitro, for their nematicidal potential. The bacterial products, from strains more active in killing nematodes, were screened in order to identify and characterize the nematicidal agent. Forty-seven strains were tested and, of these, 21 strains showed capacity to produce extracellular products with nematicidal activity. All Burkholderia strains were non-toxic. In contrast, all Serratia strains except one exhibited high toxicity. Nematodes incubated with Serratia strains showed, by SEM observation, deposits of bacteria on the nematode cuticle. The most nematicidal strain, Serratia sp. A88copa13, produced proteases in the supernatant. The use of selective inhibitors revealed that a serine protease with 70 kDa was majorly responsible for the toxicity of the supernatant. This extracellular serine protease is different phylogenetically, in size and biochemically from previously described proteases. Nematicidal assays revealed differences in nematicidal activity of the proteases to different species of Bursaphelenchus, suggesting its usefulness in a primary screen of the nematodes. This study offers the basis for further investigation of PWD and brings new insights on the role bacteria play in the defense of pine trees against B. xylophilus. Understanding all the factors involved is important in order to develop strategies to control B. xylophilus dispersion. PMID:24244546

  17. Properties of Hemolysin and Protease Produced by Aeromonas trota

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Eizo; Ozaki, Haruka; Fujii, Yoshio; Kobayashi, Hidetomo; Yamanaka, Hiroyasu; Arimoto, Sakae; Negishi, Tomoe; Okamoto, Keinosuke

    2014-01-01

    We examined the properties of exotoxins produced by Aeromonas trota (A. enteropelogenes), one of the diarrheagenic species of Aeromonadaceae. Nine of 19 A. trota isolates that grew on solid media containing erythrocytes showed hemolytic activity. However, the hemolytic activities of the culture supernatants of these hemolytic strains of A. trota were markedly lower than those of A. sobria when cultured in liquid medium, and the amount of hemolysin detected by immunoblotting using antiserum against the hemolysin produced by A. sobria was also low. A mouse intestine loop assay using living bacterial cells showed that A. trota 701 caused the significant accumulation of fluid, and antiserum against the hemolysin produced suppressed the enterotoxic action of A. trota 701. These results indicated that A. trota 701 was diarrheagenic and the hemolysin produced was the causative agent of the enterotoxic activity of A. trota. The hemolysin in A. sobria was previously shown to be secreted in a preform (inactive form) and be activated when the carboxy-terminal domain was cleaved off by proteases in the culture supernatant. Since mature hemolysin was detected in the culture supernatants of A. trota, we analyzed the extracellular protease produced by A. trota. Fifteen of 19 A. trota isolates that grew on solid media containing skim milk showed proteolytic activity. We subsequently found that most A. trota isolates possessed the serine protease gene, but not the metalloprotease gene. Therefore, we determined the nucleotide sequence of the serine protease gene and its chaperone A. trota gene. The results obtained revealed that the deduced amino acid sequences of serine protease and the chaperone were homologous to those of A. sobria with identities of 83.0% and 75.8%, respectively. PMID:24633045

  18. IgA Protease Activity in Haemophilus parasuis in the Absence of a Recognizable IgA Protease Gene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background. Haemophilus parasuis, the bacterium responsible for Glasser’s disease, is a pathogen of significant concern in modern high-health swine production systems. Little is known regarding the molecular mechanisms of H. parasuis infection. In some Pasteurellaceae species, IgA proteases aid in d...

  19. A Role in Immunity for Arabidopsis Cysteine Protease RD21, the Ortholog of the Tomato Immune Protease C14

    PubMed Central

    Shindo, Takayuki; Misas-Villamil, Johana C.; Hörger, Anja C.; Song, Jing; van der Hoorn, Renier A. L.

    2012-01-01

    Secreted papain-like Cys proteases are important players in plant immunity. We previously reported that the C14 protease of tomato is targeted by cystatin-like EPIC proteins that are secreted by the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora infestans (Pinf) during infection. C14 has been under diversifying selection in wild potato species coevolving with Pinf and reduced C14 levels result in enhanced susceptibility for Pinf. Here, we investigated the role C14-EPIC-like interactions in the natural pathosystem of Arabidopsis with the oomycete pathogen Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis (Hpa). In contrast to the Pinf-solanaceae pathosystem, the C14 orthologous protease of Arabidopsis, RD21, does not evolve under diversifying selection in Arabidopsis, and rd21 null mutants do not show phenotypes upon compatible and incompatible Hpa interactions, despite the evident lack of a major leaf protease. Hpa isolates express highly conserved EPIC-like proteins during infections, but it is unknown if these HpaEPICs can inhibit RD21 and one of these HpaEPICs even lacks the canonical cystatin motifs. The rd21 mutants are unaffected in compatible and incompatible interactions with Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato, but are significantly more susceptible for the necrotrophic fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea, demonstrating that RD21 provides immunity to a necrotrophic pathogen. PMID:22238602

  20. Characterization of the Protease Activity of Detergents: Laboratory Practicals for Studying the Protease Profile and Activity of Various Commercial Detergents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valls, Cristina; Pujadas, Gerard; Garcia-Vallve, Santi; Mulero, Miquel

    2011-01-01

    Detergent enzymes account for about 30% of the total worldwide production of enzymes and are one of the largest and most successful applications of modern industrial biotechnology. Proteases can improve the wash performance of household, industrial, and institutional laundry detergents used to remove protein-based stains such as blood, grass, body…

  1. Purification and biochemical characterization of an alkaline protease from marine bacteria Pseudoalteromonas sp. 129-1.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shimei; Liu, Ge; Zhang, Dechao; Li, Chaoxu; Sun, Chaomin

    2015-12-01

    An extracellular alkaline protease produced by marine bacteria strain Pseudoalteromonas sp. 129-1 was purified by ammonium sulphate precipitation, anion exchange chromatography, and gel filtration. The purity of the protease was confirmed by SDS-PAGE and molecular mass was estimated to be 35 kDa. The protease maintained considerable activity and stability at a wide temperature range of 10-60 °C and pH range of 6-11, and optimum activity was detected at temperature of 50 °C and pH of 8. Metallo-protease inhibitor, EDTA, had no inhibitory effect on protease activity even at concentration up to 15 mM, whereas 15 mM PMSF, a common serine protease inhibitor, greatly inactivated the protease. The high stability of the protease in the presence of surfactants (SDS, Tween 80, and Triton X-100), oxidizing agent H(2)O(2), and commercial detergents was observed. Moreover, the protease was tolerant to most of the tested organic solvents, and saline tolerant up to 30%. Interestingly, biofilm of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 was greatly reduced by 0.01 mg ml(-1) of the protease, and nearly completely abolished with the concentration of 1 mg ml(-1). Collectively, the protease showed valuable feathers as an additive in laundry detergent and non-toxic anti-biofilm agent. PMID:26213994

  2. Characterization of up-regulated proteases in an industrial recombinant Escherichia coli fermentation.

    PubMed

    Jordan, G L; Harcum, S W

    2002-02-01

    Proteolytic degradation of recombinant proteins is an industry-wide challenge in host organisms such as Escherichia coli. These proteases have been linked to stresses, such as the stringent and heat-shock responses. This study reports the dramatic up-regulation of protease activity in an industrial recombinant E. coli fermentation upon induction. The objective of this project was to detect and characterize up-regulated proteases due to recombinant AXOKINE overexpression upon IPTG induction. AXOKINE is a 22-kDa protein currently in clinical trials as a therapeutic for obesity associated with diabetes. AXOKINE was expressed in both the soluble and inclusion body fractions in E. coli. Sodium dodecyl sulfate gelatin-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-GPAGE) was used to analyze the up-regulated protease activity. Western blot analysis showed degraded AXOKINE in both the soluble and insoluble fractions. Protease inhibitors were used to characterize the proteases. The proteases were ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) sensitive. The protease activity increased in the presence of phenyl-methyl sulfonyl-fluoride (PMSF), a serine protease inhibitor. The incubation buffer composition was varied with respect to Mg2+ and ATP, and the protease activity was ATP independent and Mg2+ dependent. A two-dimensional electrophoresis technique was used to estimate the pI of the proteases to be between 2.9 and 4.0. PMID:12074055

  3. Proteases of Wood Rot Fungi with Emphasis on the Genus Pleurotus.

    PubMed

    Inácio, Fabíola Dorneles; Ferreira, Roselene Oliveira; de Araujo, Caroline Aparecida Vaz; Brugnari, Tatiane; Castoldi, Rafael; Peralta, Rosane Marina; de Souza, Cristina Giatti Marques

    2015-01-01

    Proteases are present in all living organisms and they play an important role in physiological conditions. Cell growth and death, blood clotting, and immune defense are all examples of the importance of proteases in maintaining homeostasis. There is growing interest in proteases due to their use for industrial purposes. The search for proteases with specific characteristics is designed to reduce production costs and to find suitable properties for certain industrial sectors, as well as good producing organisms. Ninety percent of commercialized proteases are obtained from microbial sources and proteases from macromycetes have recently gained prominence in the search for new enzymes with specific characteristics. The production of proteases from saprophytic basidiomycetes has led to the identification of various classes of proteases. The genus Pleurotus has been extensively studied because of its ligninolytic enzymes. The characteristics of this genus are easy cultivation techniques, high yield, low nutrient requirements, and excellent adaptation. There are few studies in the literature about proteases of Pleurotus spp. This review gathers together information about proteases, especially those derived from basidiomycetes, and aims at stimulating further research about fungal proteases because of their physiological importance and their application in various industries such as biotechnology and medicine. PMID:26180792

  4. Copper inhibits the HIV-1 protease by both oxygen-dependent and oxygen-independent mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Karlstroem, A.R.; Levine, R.L. )

    1991-03-11

    The protease encoded by HIV-1 is essential for the processing of the viral polyproteins encoded by the gag and pol genes into mature viral proteins. Mutation or deletion of the protease gene blocks replication of the virus, making the protease an attractive target for antiviral therapy. The authors found that the HIV-1 protease is inhibited by micromolar concentrations of Cu{sup 2+}. Protease was 50% inhibited by exposure to 5 {mu}M copper for 5 min while exposure to 25 {mu}M caused complete inhibition. This inhibition was not oxygen-dependent and was not reversed by treatment with EDTA, presumably due to the slow off-rate of copper from the protease. Consistent with this interpretation, enzyme activity was recovered after denaturation and refolding of the copper exposed protease. Titration of the inactivated enzyme with Ellman's reagent demonstrated a loss of one of the two sulfhydryl groups present in the molecule, suggesting that copper inhibition was mediated through binding to a cysteine. This was confirmed in studies with a chemically synthesize, mutant protease in which the two cysteine residues were replaced by {alpha}-amino butyrate: The mutant protease was not inhibited by copper. However, both the wild-type and mutant protease were inactivated when exposed to copper, oxygen, and dithiothreitol. This inactivation required oxygen. Thus, the protease can also be inactivated by metal catalyzed oxidation (MCO), a presumably irreversible covalent modification.

  5. Proteases of Wood Rot Fungi with Emphasis on the Genus Pleurotus

    PubMed Central

    Inácio, Fabíola Dorneles; Ferreira, Roselene Oliveira; de Araujo, Caroline Aparecida Vaz; Brugnari, Tatiane; Castoldi, Rafael; Peralta, Rosane Marina; de Souza, Cristina Giatti Marques

    2015-01-01

    Proteases are present in all living organisms and they play an important role in physiological conditions. Cell growth and death, blood clotting, and immune defense are all examples of the importance of proteases in maintaining homeostasis. There is growing interest in proteases due to their use for industrial purposes. The search for proteases with specific characteristics is designed to reduce production costs and to find suitable properties for certain industrial sectors, as well as good producing organisms. Ninety percent of commercialized proteases are obtained from microbial sources and proteases from macromycetes have recently gained prominence in the search for new enzymes with specific characteristics. The production of proteases from saprophytic basidiomycetes has led to the identification of various classes of proteases. The genus Pleurotus has been extensively studied because of its ligninolytic enzymes. The characteristics of this genus are easy cultivation techniques, high yield, low nutrient requirements, and excellent adaptation. There are few studies in the literature about proteases of Pleurotus spp. This review gathers together information about proteases, especially those derived from basidiomycetes, and aims at stimulating further research about fungal proteases because of their physiological importance and their application in various industries such as biotechnology and medicine. PMID:26180792

  6. FAMILY LYGISTORRHINIDAE.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Sarah Siqueira; Amorim, Dalton De Souza

    2016-01-01

    The Lygistorrhinidae are a family belonging to the suborder Bibionomorpha, with no previous record from Colombia. This paper refers for the first time to the occurrence of the family in the country, an undetermined species of the genus Lygistorrhina (Probolaeus) Williston. PMID:27395260

  7. Family Potyviridae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The International Committee on the Taxonomy of Viruses potyvirus study group has revised the description of the family Potyviridae for inclusion in the ICTV 9th report. Characteristic features of each genus within the family is presented. Revised criteria for demarcation and nomenclature of viral sp...

  8. Family Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naturescope, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Focuses on various aspects of mammal family life ranging from ways different species are born to how different mammals are raised. Learning activities include making butter from cream, creating birth announcements for mammals, and playing a password game on family life. (ML)

  9. Family Empowerment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinclair, Mary F., Ed.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    This feature issue of IMPACT focuses on the empowerment of families with a member who has a developmental disability. It presents strategies and models for a collaborative, respectful approach to service provision, and presents the experiences of families in seeking support and assistance. Feature articles include "Two Generations of Disability: A…

  10. Family Workshops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Dave; Rees-Jones, Tanny

    1978-01-01

    A Family Workshop is an informal, multidisciplined educational program for adults and children, organized by a team of teachers. This article discusses the Lavender Hill Family Workshop, one of many, which attempts to provide education in various subject areas for adults and for children while also integrating both objectives in order to educate…

  11. Development of marine biotechnology as a resource for novel proteases and their role in modern biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Homaei, Ahmad; Lavajoo, Fatemeh; Sariri, Reyhaneh

    2016-07-01

    Marine environment consists of the largest sources diversified genetic pool of material with an enormous potential for a wide variety of enzymes including proteases. A protease hydrolyzes the peptide bond and most of proteases possess many industrial applications. Marine proteases differ considerably from those found in internal or external organs of invertebrates and vertebrates. In common with all enzymes, external factors such as temperature, pH and type of media are important for the activity, catalytic efficiency, stability and proper functioning of proteases. In this review valuable characteristics of proteases in marine organisms and their applications are gathered from a wide literature survey. Considering their biochemical significance and their increasing importance in biotechnology, a thorough understanding of marine proteases functioning could be of prime importance. PMID:27086293

  12. A novel carboxyl-terminal protease derived from Paenibacillus lautus CHN26 exhibiting high activities at multiple sites of substrates

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Carboxyl-terminal protease (CtpA) plays essential functions in posttranslational protein processing in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. To date, only a few bacterial ctpA genes have been characterized. Here we cloned and characterized a novel CtpA. The encoding gene, ctpAp (ctpA of Paenibacillus lautus), was derived from P. lautus CHN26, a Gram-positive bacterium isolated by functional screening. Recombinant protein was obtained from protein over-expression in Escherichia coli and the biochemical properties of the enzyme were investigated. Results Screening of environmental sediment samples with a skim milk-containing medium led to the isolation of a P. lautus CHN26 strain that exhibited a high proteolytic activity. A gene encoding a carboxyl-terminal protease (ctpAp) was cloned from the isolate and characterized. The deduced mature protein contains 466 aa with a calculated molecular mass of 51.94 kDa, displaying 29-38% amino acid sequence identity to characterized bacterial CtpA enzymes. CtpAp contains an unusual catalytic dyad (Ser309-Lys334) and a PDZ substrate-binding motif, characteristic for carboxyl-terminal proteases. CtpAp was expressed as a recombinant protein and characterized. The purified enzyme showed an endopeptidase activity, which effectively cleaved α S1- and β- casein substrates at carboxyl-terminus as well as at multiple internal sites. Furthermore, CtpAp exhibited a high activity at room temperature and strong tolerance to conventional protease inhibitors, demonstrating that CtpAp is a novel endopeptidase. Conclusions Our work on CtpA represents the first investigation of a member of Family II CtpA enzymes. The gene was derived from a newly isolated P. lautus CHN26 strain exhibiting a high protease activity in the skim milk assay. We have demonstrated that CtpAp is a novel endopeptidase with distinct cleavage specificities, showing a strong potential in biotechnology and industry applications. PMID:24161150

  13. MAP-1 and IAP-1, two novel AAA proteases with catalytic sites on opposite membrane surfaces in mitochondrial inner membrane of Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Klanner, C; Prokisch, H; Langer, T

    2001-09-01

    Eukaryotic AAA proteases form a conserved family of membrane-embedded ATP-dependent proteases but have been analyzed functionally only in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we have identified two novel members of this protein family in the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa, which were termed MAP-1 and IAP-1. Both proteins are localized to the inner membrane of mitochondria. They are part of two similar-sized high molecular mass complexes, but expose their catalytic sites to opposite membrane surfaces, namely, the intermembrane and the matrix space. Disruption of iap-1 by repeat-induced point mutation caused a slow growth phenotype at high temperature and stabilization of a misfolded inner membrane protein against degradation. IAP-1 could partially substitute for functions of its yeast homolog Yme1, demonstrating functional conservation. However, respiratory growth at 37 degrees C was not restored. Our results identify two components of the quality control system of the mitochondrial inner membrane in N. crassa and suggest that AAA proteases with catalytic sites exposed to opposite membrane surfaces are present in mitochondria of all eukaryotic cells. PMID:11553723

  14. Family Health and Family Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Health Organization, Copenhagen (Denmark). Regional Office for Europe.

    This document is made up of a selection of some of the papers distributed to participants in courses on "Family Health and Family Planning" which have been organized each year since 1973 by the International Children's Center and the World Health Organization Regional Office for Europe. Six courses, held between 1973 and 1978, brought together a…

  15. Bioinformatic analyses of male and female Amblyomma americanum tick expressed serine protease inhibitors (serpins)

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Lindsay; Radulovic, Zeljko; Kim, Tae; Braz, Gloria R. C.; Da Silva Vaz, Itabajara; Mulenga, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Serine protease inhibitors (serpins) are a diverse family of proteins that is conserved across taxa. The diversity of Amblyomma americanum serpins (AAS) is far more complex than previously thought as revealed by discovery of 57 and 33 AAS transcripts that are respectively expressed in male and female A. americanum ticks, with 30 found in both. While distinct reproductively, both male and female metastriate ticks, such as A. americanum, require a blood meal. Thus, 30 AAS sequences found in both male and female ticks could play important role(s) in regulating tick feeding and thus represent attractive candidates for anti-tick vaccine development. Of significant interest, 19 AAS sequences expressed in male and female ticks are also part of the 48 AAS sequences expressed in fed female tick salivary glands or midguts; two organs through which the tick interacts with host blood and immune response factors. Considered the most important domain for serpin function, the reactive center loop (RCL) is further characterized by a single ‘P1’ site amino acid residue, which is central to determining the protease regulated by the serpin. In this study, a diversity of 17 different P1 site amino acid residues were predicted, suggesting that A. americanum serpins potentially regulate a large number of proteolytic pathways. Our data also indicate that some serpins in this study could regulate target protease common to all tick species, in that more than 40% of AAS show 58–97% inter-species amino acid conservation. Of significance, 24% of AAS showed 62–100% inter-species conservation within the functional RCL domain, with 10 RCLs showing ≥90–100% conservation. In vertebrates, serpins with basic residues at the P1 site regulate key host defense pathways, which the tick must evade to feed successfully. Interestingly, we found that AAS sequences with basic or polar uncharged residues at the putative P1 site are more likely to be conserved across tick species. Another notable

  16. Antimicrobial Peptide Conformation as a Structural Determinant of Omptin Protease Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Brannon, John R.; Thomassin, Jenny-Lee; Gruenheid, Samantha

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacterial proteases contribute to virulence by cleaving host or bacterial proteins to promote survival and dissemination. Omptins are a family of proteases embedded in the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria that cleave various substrates, including host antimicrobial peptides, with a preference for cleaving at dibasic motifs. OmpT, the enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) omptin, cleaves and inactivates the human cathelicidin LL-37. Similarly, the omptin CroP, found in the murine pathogen Citrobacter rodentium, which is used as a surrogate model to study human-restricted EHEC, cleaves the murine cathelicidin-related antimicrobial peptide (CRAMP). Here, we compared the abilities of OmpT and CroP to cleave LL-37 and CRAMP. EHEC OmpT degraded LL-37 and CRAMP at similar rates. In contrast, C. rodentium CroP cleaved CRAMP more rapidly than LL-37. The different cleavage rates of LL-37 and CRAMP were independent of the bacterial background and substrate sequence specificity, as OmpT and CroP have the same preference for cleaving at dibasic sites. Importantly, LL-37 was α-helical and CRAMP was unstructured under our experimental conditions. By altering the α-helicity of LL-37 and CRAMP, we found that decreasing LL-37 α-helicity increased its rate of cleavage by CroP. Conversely, increasing CRAMP α-helicity decreased its cleavage rate. This structural basis for CroP substrate specificity highlights differences between the closely related omptins of C. rodentium and E. coli. In agreement with previous studies, this difference in CroP and OmpT substrate specificity suggests that omptins evolved in response to the substrates present in their host microenvironments. IMPORTANCE Omptins are recognized as key virulence factors for various Gram-negative pathogens. Their localization to the outer membrane, their active site facing the extracellular environment, and their unique catalytic mechanism make them attractive targets for novel therapeutic strategies

  17. Human prostate-specific antigen: structural and functional similarity with serine proteases.

    PubMed Central

    Watt, K W; Lee, P J; M'Timkulu, T; Chan, W P; Loor, R

    1986-01-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of the prostate-specific antigen (PA) from human seminal plasma has been determined from analyses of the peptides generated by cyanogen bromide, hydroxylamine, endoproteinases Arg-C and Lys-C. The single polypeptide chain of PA contains 240-amino acid residues and has a calculated Mr of 26,496. An N-linked carbohydrate side chain is predicted at asparagine-45, and O-linked carbohydrate side chains are possibly attached to serine-69, threonine-70, and serine-71. The primary structure of PA shows a high degree of sequence homology with other serine proteases of the kallikrein family. The active site residues of histidine, aspartic acid, and serine comprising the charge-relay system of typical serine proteases were found in similar positions in PA (histidine-41, aspartic acid-96, and serine-192). At pH 7.8, PA hydrolyzed insulin A and B chains, recombinant interleukin 2, and--to a lesser extent--gelatin, myoglobin, ovalbumin, and fibrinogen. The cleavage sites of these proteins by PA were chemically analyzed as the alpha-carboxyl side of some hydrophobic residues, tyrosine, leucine, valine, and phenylalanine, and of basic residues histidine, lysine, and arginine. The chymotrypsin-like activity of PA exhibited with the chromogenic substrate N-succinyl-L-alanyl-L-alanyl-L-prolyl-L-phenylalanine p-nitroanilide yielded a specific activity of 9.21 microM per min per mg of PA and Km and kcat values of 15.3 mM and 0.075s-1, respectively. "Trypsin-like" activity of PA was also detected with N alpha-benzoyl-DL-arginine p-nitroanilide and gave a specific activity of 1.98 microM per min per mg of PA. Protease inhibitors such as phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, diisopropyl fluorophosphate, L-1-tosylamido-2-phenylethyl chloromethyl ketone, aprotinin, leupeptin, soybean trypsin inhibitor as well as Zn2+ and spermidine were effective inhibitors of PA enzymatic activity. PMID:2422647

  18. The subtilisin-like protease SBT3 contributes to insect resistance in tomato.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Michael; Huttenlocher, Franziska; Cedzich, Anna; Procopio, Susanne; Stroeder, Jasper; Pau-Roblot, Corinne; Lequart-Pillon, Michelle; Pelloux, Jérôme; Stintzi, Annick; Schaller, Andreas

    2016-07-01

    Subtilisin-like proteases (SBTs) constitute a large family of extracellular plant proteases, the function of which is still largely unknown. In tomato plants, the expression of SBT3 was found to be induced in response to wounding and insect attack in injured leaves but not in healthy systemic tissues. The time course of SBT3 induction resembled that of proteinase inhibitor II and other late wound response genes suggesting a role for SBT3 in herbivore defense. Consistent with such a role, larvae of the specialist herbivore Manduca sexta performed better on transgenic plants silenced for SBT3 expression (SBT3-SI). Supporting a contribution of SBT3 to systemic wound signaling, systemic induction of late wound response genes was attenuated in SBT3-SI plants. The partial loss of insect resistance may thus be explained by a reduction in systemic defense gene expression. Alternatively, SBT3 may play a post-ingestive role in plant defense. Similar to other anti-nutritive proteins, SBT3 was found to be stable and active in the insect's digestive system, where it may act on unidentified proteins of insect or plant origin. Finally, a reduction in the level of pectin methylesterification that was observed in transgenic plants with altered levels of SBT3 expression suggested an involvement of SBT3 in the regulation of pectin methylesterases (PMEs). While such a role has been described in other systems, PME activity and the degree of pectin methylesterification did not correlate with the level of insect resistance in SBT3-SI and SBT3 overexpressing plants and are thus unrelated to the observed resistance phenotype. PMID:27259555

  19. Biochemical analysis of a papain-like protease isolated from the latex of Asclepias curassavica L.

    PubMed

    Liggieri, Constanza; Obregon, Walter; Trejo, Sebastian; Priolo, Nora

    2009-02-01

    Most of the species belonging to Asclepiadaceae family usually secrete an endogenous milk-like fluid in a network of laticifer cells in which sub-cellular organelles intensively synthesize proteins and secondary metabolites. A new papain-like endopeptidase (asclepain c-II) has been isolated and characterized from the latex extracted from petioles of Asclepias curassavica L. (Asclepiadaceae). Asclepain c-II was the minor proteolytic component in the latex, but showed higher specific activity than asclepain c-I, the main active fraction previously studied. Both enzymes displayed quite distinct biochemical characteristics, confirming that they are different enzymes. Crude extract was purified by cation exchange chromatography (FPLC). Two active fractions, homogeneous by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, were isolated. Asclepain c-II displayed a molecular mass of 23,590 Da, a pI higher than 9.3, maximum proteolytic activity at pH 9.4-10.2, and showed poor thermostability. The activity of asclepain c-II is inhibited by cysteine proteases inhibitors like E-64, but not by any other protease inhibitors such as 1,10-phenantroline, phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride, and pepstatine. The Nterminal sequence (LPSFVDWRQKGVVFPIRNQGQCGSCWTFSA) showed a high similarity with those of other plant cysteine proteinases. When assayed on N-alpha-CBZ-amino acid-p-nitrophenyl esters, the enzyme exhibited higher preference for the glutamine derivative. Determinations of kinetic parameters were performed with N-alpha-CBZ-L-Gln-p-nitrophenyl ester as substrate: K(m)=0.1634 mM, k(cat)=121.48 s(-1), and k(cat)/K(m)=7.4 x 10(5) s(-1)/mM. PMID:19204833

  20. Crystal structure of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus leader protease Nsp1alpha.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuna; Xue, Fei; Guo, Yu; Ma, Ming; Hao, Ning; Zhang, Xuejun C; Lou, Zhiyong; Li, Xuemei; Rao, Zihe

    2009-11-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) virus (PRRSV), a positive-strand RNA virus that belongs to the Arteriviridae family of Nidovirales, has been identified as the causative agent of PRRS. Nsp1alpha is the amino (N)-terminal protein in a polyprotein encoded by the PRRSV genome and is reported to be crucial for subgenomic mRNA synthesis, presumably by serving as a transcription factor. Before functioning in transcription, nsp1alpha proteolytically releases itself from nsp1beta. However, the structural basis for the self-releasing and biological functions of nsp1alpha remains elusive. Here we report the crystal structure of nsp1alpha of PRRSV (strain XH-GD) in its naturally self-processed form. Nsp1alpha contains a ZF domain (which may be required for its biological function), a papain-like cysteine protease (PCP) domain with a zinc ion unexpectedly bound at the active site (which is essential for proteolytic self-release of nsp1alpha), and a carboxyl-terminal extension (which occupies the substrate binding site of the PCP domain). Furthermore, we determined the exact location of the nsp1alpha self-processing site at Cys-Ala-Met180 downward arrowAla-Asp-Val by use of crystallographic data and N-terminal amino acid sequencing. The crystal structure also suggested an in cis self-processing mechanism for nsp1alpha. Furthermore, nsp1alpha appears to have a dimeric architecture both in solution and as a crystal, with a hydrophilic groove on the molecular surface that may be related to nsp1alpha's biological function. Compared with existing structure and function data, our results suggest that PRRSV nsp1alpha functions differently from other reported viral leader proteases, such as that of foot-and-mouth disease. PMID:19706710

  1. Serine Protease-mediated Host Invasion by the Parasitic Nematode Steinernema carpocapsae*

    PubMed Central

    Toubarro, Duarte; Lucena-Robles, Miguel; Nascimento, Gisela; Santos, Romana; Montiel, Rafael; Veríssimo, Paula; Pires, Euclides; Faro, Carlos; Coelho, Ana V.; Simões, Nelson

    2010-01-01

    Steinernema carpocapsae is an insect parasitic nematode used in biological control, which infects insects penetrating by mouth and anus and invading the hemocoelium through the midgut wall. Invasion has been described as a key factor in nematode virulence and suggested to be mediated by proteases. A serine protease cDNA from the parasitic stage was sequenced (sc-sp-1); the recombinant protein was produced in an Escherichia coli system, and a native protein was purified from the secreted products. Both proteins were confirmed by mass spectrometry to be encoded by the sc-sp-1 gene. Sc-SP-1 has a pI of 8.7, a molecular mass of 27.3 kDa, a catalytic efficiency of 22.2 × 104 s−1 m−1 against N-succinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe-pNA, and is inhibited by chymostatin (IC 0.07) and PMSF (IC 0.73). Sc-SP-1 belongs to the chymotrypsin family, based on sequence and biochemical analysis. Only the nematode parasitic stage expressed sc-sp-1. These nematodes in the midgut lumen, prepared to invade the insect hemocoelium, expressed higher levels than those already in the hemocoelium. Moreover, parasitic nematode sense insect peritrophic membrane and hemolymph more quickly than they do other tissues, which initiates sc-sp-1 expression. Ex vivo, Sc-SP-1 was able to bind to insect midgut epithelium and to cause cell detachment from basal lamina. In vitro, Sc-SP-1 formed holes in an artificial membrane model (Matrigel), whereas Sc-SP-1 treated with PMSF did not, very likely because it hydrolyzes matrix glycoproteins. These findings highlight the S. carpocapsae-invasive process that is a key step in the parasitism thus opening new perspectives for improving nematode virulence to use in biological control. PMID:20656686

  2. Structure of the N-terminal fragment of Escherichia coli Lon protease

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Mi; Gustchina, Alla; Rasulova, Fatima S.; Melnikov, Edward E.; Maurizi, Michael R.; Rotanova, Tatyana V.; Dauter, Zbigniew; Wlodawer, Alexander

    2010-08-01

    The medium-resolution structure of the N-terminal fragment of E. coli Lon protease shows that this part of the enzyme consists of two compact domains and a very long α-helix. The structure of a recombinant construct consisting of residues 1–245 of Escherichia coli Lon protease, the prototypical member of the A-type Lon family, is reported. This construct encompasses all or most of the N-terminal domain of the enzyme. The structure was solved by SeMet SAD to 2.6 Å resolution utilizing trigonal crystals that contained one molecule in the asymmetric unit. The molecule consists of two compact subdomains and a very long C-terminal α-helix. The structure of the first subdomain (residues 1–117), which consists mostly of β-strands, is similar to that of the shorter fragment previously expressed and crystallized, whereas the second subdomain is almost entirely helical. The fold and spatial relationship of the two subdomains, with the exception of the C-terminal helix, closely resemble the structure of BPP1347, a 203-amino-acid protein of unknown function from Bordetella parapertussis, and more distantly several other proteins. It was not possible to refine the structure to satisfactory convergence; however, since almost all of the Se atoms could be located on the basis of their anomalous scattering the correctness of the overall structure is not in question. The structure reported here was also compared with the structures of the putative substrate-binding domains of several proteins, showing topological similarities that should help in defining the binding sites used by Lon substrates.

  3. Characterization of a papain-like cysteine protease essential for the survival of Babesia ovis merozoites.

    PubMed

    Carletti, Tamara; Barreto, Carmo; Mesplet, Maria; Mira, Anabela; Weir, William; Shiels, Brian; Oliva, Abel Gonzalez; Schnittger, Leonhard; Florin-Christensen, Monica

    2016-02-01

    Babesia ovis, a tick-transmitted intraerythrocytic protozoan parasite, causes severe infections in small ruminants from Southern Europe, Middle East, and Northern Africa. With the aim of finding potential targets for the development of control methods against this parasite, sequence analysis of its genome led to the identification of four putative cysteine proteases of the C1A family. Orthology between B. ovis, B. bovis, T. annulata, and T. parva sequences showed that each B. ovis C1A peptidase sequence clustered within one of the four ortholog groups previously reported for these piroplasmids. The ortholog of bovipain-2 of B. bovis and falcipain-2 of Plasmodium falciparum, respectively, was designated "ovipain-2" and further characterized. In silico analysis showed that ovipain-2 has the typical topology of papain-like cysteine peptidases and a highly similar predicted three dimensional structure to bovipain-2 and falcipain-2, suggesting susceptibility to similar inhibitors. Immunoblotting using antibodies raised against a recombinant form of ovipain-2 (r-ovipain-2) demonstrated expression of ovipain-2 in in vitro cultured B. ovis merozoites. By immunofluorescence, these antibodies reacted with merozoites and stained the cytoplasm of infected erythrocytes. This suggests that ovipain-2 is secreted by the parasite and could be involved in intra- and extracellular digestion of hemoglobin and/or cleavage of erythrocyte proteins facilitating parasite egress. A significant reduction in the percentage of parasitized erythrocytes was obtained upon incubation of B. ovis in vitro cultures with anti-r-ovipain-2 antibodies, indicating an important functional role for ovipain-2 in the intra erythrocytic development cycle of this parasite. Finally, studies of the reactivity of sera from B. ovis-positive and negative sheep against r-ovipain-2 showed that this protease is expressed in vivo, and can be recognized by host antibodies. The results of this study suggest that ovipain-2

  4. Analysis of binding properties and specificity through identification of the interface forming residues (IFR) for serine proteases in silico docked to different inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Enzymes belonging to the same super family of proteins in general operate on variety of substrates and are inhibited by wide selection of inhibitors. In this work our main objective was to expand the scope of studies that consider only the catalytic and binding pocket amino acids while analyzing enzyme specificity and instead, include a wider category which we have named the Interface Forming Residues (IFR). We were motivated to identify those amino acids with decreased accessibility to solvent after docking of different types of inhibitors to sub classes of serine proteases and then create a table (matrix) of all amino acid positions at the interface as well as their respective occupancies. Our goal is to establish a platform for analysis of the relationship between IFR characteristics and binding properties/specificity for bi-molecular complexes. Results We propose a novel method for describing binding properties and delineating serine proteases specificity by compiling an exhaustive table of interface forming residues (IFR) for serine proteases and their inhibitors. Currently, the Protein Data Bank (PDB) does not contain all the data that our analysis would require. Therefore, an in silico approach was designed for building corresponding complexes The IFRs are obtained by "rigid body docking" among 70 structurally aligned, sequence wise non-redundant, serine protease structures with 3 inhibitors: bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI), ecotine and ovomucoid third domain inhibitor. The table (matrix) of all amino acid positions at the interface and their respective occupancy is created. We also developed a new computational protocol for predicting IFRs for those complexes which were not deciphered experimentally so far, achieving accuracy of at least 0.97. Conclusions The serine proteases interfaces prefer polar (including glycine) residues (with some exceptions). Charged residues were found to be uniquely prevalent at the interfaces between the

  5. Identification of a Novel Host-Specific IgM Protease in Streptococcus suis

    PubMed Central

    Seele, Jana; Singpiel, Alena; Spoerry, Christian; von Pawel-Rammingen, Ulrich; Valentin-Weigand, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus suis serotype 2 is a highly invasive, extracellular pathogen in pigs with the capacity to cause severe infections in humans. This study was initiated by the finding that IgM degradation products are released after opsonization of S. suis. The objective of this work was to identify the bacterial factor responsible for IgM degradation. The results of this study showed that a member of the IdeS family, designated IdeSsuis (Immunoglobulin M-degrading enzyme of S. suis), is responsible and sufficient for IgM cleavage. Recombinant IdeSsuis was found to degrade only IgM but neither IgG nor IgA. Interestingly, Western blot analysis revealed that IdeSsuis is host specific, as it exclusively cleaves porcine IgM but not IgM from six other species, including a closely related member of the Suidae family. As demonstrated by flow cytometry and immunofluorescence microscopy, IdeSsuis modulates binding of IgM to the bacterial surface. IdeSsuis is the first prokaryotic IgM-specific protease described, indicating that this enzyme is involved in a so-far-unknown mechanism of host-pathogen interaction at an early stage of the host immune response. Furthermore, cleavage of porcine IgM by IdeSsuis is the first identified phenotype reflecting functional adaptation of S. suis to pigs as the main host. PMID:23243300

  6. Enzymatic milk clotting activity in artichoke (Cynara scolymus) leaves and alpine thistle (Carduus defloratus) flowers. Immobilization of alpine thistle aspartic protease.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Marilena; Di Pierro, Prospero; Dejonghe, Winnie; Mariniello, Loredana; Porta, Raffaele

    2016-08-01

    Two different milk clotting enzymes, belonging to the aspartic protease family, were extracted from both artichoke leaves and alpine thistle flowers, and the latter was covalently immobilized by using a polyacrylic support containing polar epoxy groups. Our findings showed that the alpine thistle aspartic protease was successfully immobilized at pH 7.0 on Immobeads IB-150P beads and that, under these experimental conditions, an immobilization yield of about 68% and a recovery of about 54% were obtained. Since the enzyme showed an optimal pH of 5.0, a value very similar to the one generally used for milk clotting during cheese making, and exhibited a satisfactory stability over time, the use of such immobilized vegetable rennet for the production of novel dairy products is suggested. PMID:26988483

  7. Quality control of a molybdoenzyme by the Lon protease.

    PubMed

    Redelberger, David; Genest, Olivier; Arabet, Dallel; Méjean, Vincent; Ilbert, Marianne; Iobbi-Nivol, Chantal

    2013-12-11

    Molybdoenzymes contain a molybdenum cofactor in their active site to catalyze various redox reactions in all domains of life. To decipher crucial steps during their biogenesis, the TorA molybdoenzyme of Escherichia coli had played a major role to understand molybdoenzyme maturation process driven by specific chaperones. TorD, the specific chaperone of TorA, is also involved in TorA protection. Here, we show that immature TorA (apoTorA) is degraded in vivo and in vitro by the Lon protease. Lon interacts with apoTorA but not with holoTorA. Lon and TorD compete for apoTorA binding but TorD binding protects apoTorA against degradation. Lon is the first protease shown to eliminate an immature or misfolded molybdoenzyme probably by targeting its inactive catalytic site. PMID:24211448

  8. Occurrence of aspartyl proteases in brine after herring marinating.

    PubMed

    Szymczak, Mariusz; Lepczyński, Adam

    2016-03-01

    Herrings are marinated in a brine consisting of salt and acetic acid. During marinating, various nitrogen fractions diffuse from fish flesh to the brine, causing significant nutritional quality losses of the raw material. In this study, it has been demonstrated for the first time that proteases diffuse from the fish to the marinating brine. Using ammonium sulphate precipitation and affinity chromatography on pepstatin-A agarose bed the aspartyl proteases were purified and concentrated over 2600-fold from a marinating brine. Pepstatin-A completely inhibited the activity of the purified preparation. The preparation was active against fluorogenic substrates specific for cathepsin D and E and inactive against substrates specific for cysteine cathepsins. Depending on incubation time, the preparation showed pH-optimum at 2.0 or 4.5. The 2D SDS-PAGE separation demonstrated the presence of a few proteins with molecular weights and pI values typical of cathepsin D, E and pepsin. PMID:26471581

  9. Cloning, heterologous expression and antigenicity of a schistosome cercarial protease.

    PubMed

    Price, H P; Doenhoff, M J; Sayers, J R

    1997-05-01

    A gene coding for the 30 kDa Schistosoma mansoni cercarial protease was amplified using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from genomic DNA templates. Cloning and sequencing of several independent PCR clones revealed the presence of an intron additional to the one described in the original cloning of the gene. The 3 exons were cloned into expression vectors so that they could be expressed as separate glutathione-S-transferase (GST) translational fusions. Recombinant bacteria carrying these expression plasmids expressed the fusion proteins at high levels. Western blotting of bacterial lysates with sera raised against the native S. mansoni cercarial protease showed that all 3 exons were recognized. Thus we have produced recombinant bacteria capable of providing large amounts of an S. mansoni antigen for immunological studies and evaluation as a candidate vaccine. PMID:9149415

  10. Bacterial proteases: production, isolation and utilization in animal nutrition.

    PubMed

    Michalík, I; Szabová, E; Poláková, A; Urminská, D

    1997-01-01

    Under conditions of submerged fermentation of Bacillus licheniformis strain L-3 in 15-L MBR-Schulzer bioreactor, the maximum production of proteolytic enzymes was achieved in the nutrient medium which contained 1% milk powder, 0.3% yeast autolysate, 0.5% corn starch and malt (20 ml per 100 ml of the medium). The preparation obtained of extracellular alkaline bacterial Ser-protease of the subtilisin type is characterized by optimum pH 9.8-10.2 good up to a temperature stability (65 degrees C) and has molecular weight cca of 26 kDa. The use of chemical mutagens (HNO2, 5-bromouracil) has enabled to select new strains (L-3N and L-3U) whose protease activity is 1.8-2.2 times higher as compared to the original Bacillus licheniformis strain L-3. The addition of these enzymes to the fodder has a positive effect on the retention of nitrogen substances. PMID:9505358

  11. Protease-dependent mechanisms of complement evasion by bacterial pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Potempa, Michal; Potempa, Jan

    2012-01-01

    The human immune system has evolved a variety of mechanisms for the primary task of neutralizing and eliminating microbial intruders. As the first line of defense, the complement system is responsible for rapid recognition and opsonisation of bacteria, presentation to phagocytes and bacterial cell killing by direct lysis. All successful human pathogens have mechanisms of circumventing the antibacterial activity of the complement system and escaping this stage of the immune response. One of the ways in which pathogens achieve this is the deployment of proteases. Based on the increasing number of recent publications in this area, it appears that proteolytic inactivation of the antibacterial activities of the complement system is a common strategy of avoiding targeting by this arm of host innate immune defense. In this review, we focus on those bacteria that deploy proteases capable of degrading complement system components into non-functional fragments, thus impairing complement-dependent antibacterial activity and facilitating pathogen survival inside the host. PMID:22944688

  12. Intestinal proteases of free-living and parasitic astigmatid mites.

    PubMed

    Holt, Deborah C; Burgess, Stewart T G; Reynolds, Simone L; Mahmood, Wajahat; Fischer, Katja

    2013-02-01

    Among arthropod pests, mites are responsible for considerable damage to crops, humans and other animals. However, detailed physiological data on these organisms remain sparse, mainly because of their small size but possibly also because of their extreme diversity. Focusing on intestinal proteases, we draw together information from three distinct mite species that all feed on skin but have separately adapted to a free-living, a strictly ecto-parasitic and a parasitic lifestyle. A wide range of studies involving immunohistology, molecular biology, X-ray crystallography and enzyme biochemistry of mite gut proteases suggests that these creatures have diverged considerably as house dust mites, sheep scab mites and scabies mites. Each species has evolved a particular variation of a presumably ancestral repertoire of digestive enzymes that have become specifically adapted to their individual environmental requirements. PMID:22427061

  13. Stabilization of proteases by entrapment in a new composite hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Markvicheva, E A; Tkachuk, N E; Kuptsova, S V; Dugina, T N; Strukova, S M; Kirsh YuE; Zubov, V P; Rumsh, L D

    1996-01-01

    A new one-step procedure for entrapping proteases into a polymeric composite calcium alginate-poly(N-vinyl caprolactam) hydrogel was developed that provided 75-90% retention of the activity of entrapped enzymes compared to soluble ones. Properties of entrapped carboxypeptidase B, trypsin, and thrombin were investigated. The immobilized enzymes were active within a wide pH range. The temperature optima of entrapped trypsin and carboxypeptidase B were approx 25 degrees C higher than that of the soluble enzymes, and the resistance to heating was also increased. The effects of various polar and nonpolar organic solvents on the entrapped proteases were investigated. The immobilized enzymes retained their activity within a wide concentration range (up to 90%) of organic solvents. Gel-entrapped trypsin and carboxypeptidase (CPB) were successfully used for obtaining human insulin from recombinant proinsulin. The developed stabilization method can be used to catalyze various reactions proceeding within wide pH and temperature ranges. PMID:9100346

  14. Unusual families.

    PubMed

    Golombok, Susan

    2005-03-01

    The introduction of assisted reproduction has led to unusual forms of procreation. This article describes the social consequences of lesbian motherhood and of families headed by single heterosexual mothers. PMID:15819999

  15. FAMILY RHAGIONIDAE.

    PubMed

    Santos, Charles Morphy D; Carmo, Daniel D D

    2016-01-01

    The family Rhagionidae is one of the oldest Brachyeran lineages. Its monophyly is still uncertain. There are four rhagionid genera distributed in Neotropical Region but only three species of Chrysopilus are found in Colombia. PMID:27395270

  16. FAMILY BIBIONIDAE.

    PubMed

    Falaschi, Rafaela Lopes; Oliveira, Sarah Siqueira; Amorim, Dalton De Souza

    2016-01-01

    The Bibionidae are a family belonging to the suborder Bibionomorpha with four genera and 17 species known from Colombia. This work expands the distribution of these species to other localities in the country. PMID:27395253

  17. Tomorrow's Family

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickett, Robert S.

    1977-01-01

    Author states that "...the traditional form of family which has been the norm in recent times in the West will persist, but will be forced to "move over" to accommodate other forms of domestic life." (Author)

  18. Family Issues

    MedlinePlus

    ... not mean that everyone gets along all the time. Conflicts are a part of family life. Many things can lead to conflict, such as illness, disability, addiction, job loss, school problems, and marital issues. Listening to ...

  19. Characterization of a membrane-associated serine protease in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, S.M.; St. John, A.C.

    1987-04-01

    Three membrane-associated proteolytic activities in Escherichia coli were resolved by DEAE-cellulose chromatography from detergent extracts of the total envelope fraction. On the basis of substrate specificity for the hydrolysis of chromogenic amino acid ester substrates, the first two eluting activities were determined previously to be protease V and protease IV, respectively. The third proteolytic activity eluting from the DEAE-cellulose column was further purified by affinity chromatography on benzamidine-Sepharose 6B. They termed this enzyme protease VI. Protease VI did not hydrolyze any of the chromogenic substrates used in the detection of protease IV and protease V. However, all three enzymes generated acid-soluble fragments from a mixture of E. coli membrane proteins which were biosynthetically labeled with radioactive amino acids. The activity of protease VI was sensitive to serine protease inhibitors. Using (/sup 3/H)diisopropylfluorophosphate as an active-site labeling reagent, they determined that protease VI has an apparent molecular weight of 43,000 in polyacrylamide gels. All three membrane-associated serine proteases were insensitive to inhibition by Ecotin, an endogenous, periplasmic inhibitor of trypsin.

  20. Multiple Classes of Immune-Related Proteases Associated with the Cell Death Response in Pepper Plants

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Chungyun; Kim, Su-min; Lee, Dong Ju; Choi, Doil

    2013-01-01

    Proteases regulate a large number of biological processes in plants, such as metabolism, physiology, growth, and defense. In this study, we carried out virus-induced gene silencing assays with pepper cDNA clones to elucidate the biological roles of protease superfamilies. A total of 153 representative protease genes from pepper cDNA were selected and cloned into a Tobacco rattle virus-ligation independent cloning vector in a loss-of-function study. Silencing of 61 proteases resulted in altered phenotypes, such as the inhibition of shoot growth, abnormal leaf shape, leaf color change, and lethality. Furthermore, the silencing experiments revealed that multiple proteases play a role in cell death and immune response against avirulent and virulent pathogens. Among these 153 proteases, 34 modulated the hypersensitive cell death response caused by infection with an avirulent pathogen, and 16 proteases affected disease symptom development caused by a virulent pathogen. Specifically, we provide experimental evidence for the roles of multiple protease genes in plant development and immune defense following pathogen infection. With these results, we created a broad sketch of each protease function. This information will provide basic information for further understanding the roles of the protease superfamily in plant growth, development, and defense. PMID:23696830