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Sample records for self-dual einstein spaces

  1. New Self-Dual Einstein Metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casteill, P. Y.; Valent, G.

    A new family of euclidean Einstein metrics with self-dual Weyl tensor have been obtained using ideas from extended supersymmetries1,2. The basic supersymmetric formalism3, known as harmonic superspace, was adapted to the computation of self-dual Einstein metrics in 4. The resulting metric depends on 4 parameters besides the Einstein constant and has for isometry group U(1) × U(1), with hypersurface generating Killing vectors. In the limit of vanishing Einstein constant we recover a family of hyperkähler metrics within the Multicentre family 5 (in fact the most general one with two centres). Our results include the metrics of Plebanski and Demianski6 when these ones are restricted to be self-dual Weyl. From Flaherty's equivalence 7 these metrics can also be interpreted as a solution of the coupled Einstein-Maxwell field equations, for which we have given the Maxwell field strength forms2.

  2. Self-dual Yang-Mills fields in an Einstein universe

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlov, A. )

    1992-12-01

    Instanton solutions of Yang-Mills fields in flat Euclidean space have importance in studying the guage field vacuum. The authors find exact solutions of the self-consistent Einstein-Yang-Mills system of equations. These solutions are self-dual Yang-Mills fields in I[sup 1] [times] S[sup 3] space-time. The self-dual solutions have trivial topology and do not belong to instatons. The results of this study may help in understanding the vacuum structure of the fields under consideration. 4 refs.

  3. Self-dual solutions of Yang-Mills theory on Euclidean AdS space

    SciTech Connect

    Sarioglu, Oezguer; Tekin, Bayram

    2009-05-15

    We find nontrivial, time-dependent solutions of the (anti) self-dual Yang-Mills equations in the four-dimensional Euclidean anti-de Sitter space. In contrast to the Euclidean flat space, the action depends on the moduli parameters and the charge can take any noninteger value.

  4. Volume-preserving diffeomorphisms in integrable deformations of self-dual gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takasaki, Kanehisa

    1992-07-01

    A group of volume-preserving diffeomorphisms in 3D turns out to play a key role in an Einstein-Maxwell theory whose Weyl tensor is self-dual and whose Maxwell tensor has an algebraically general anti-self-dual part. This model was first introduced by Flaherty and recently studied by Park as an integrable deformation of self-dual gravity. A twisted volume form on the corresponding twistor space is shown to be the origin of volume-preserving diffeomorphisms. An immediate consequence is the existence of an infinite number of symmetries as a generalization of w 1 + ∞ symmetries in self-dual gravity. A possible relation to Witten's 2D string theory is pointed out.

  5. Segmentation of medical images by feature tracing in a self-dual morphological scale-space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzler, Volker H.; Thies, Christian; Lehmann, Thomas M.

    2001-07-01

    The multiscale approach derives a segmentation from the evolution of appropriate signal-descriptive features in scale-space. Features that are stable for a wide range of scales are assumed to belong to visually sensible regions. To compensate the well-known drawbacks of linear scale- spaces, the shape-preserving properties of morphological scale-space filtering are utilized. The limiting duality of morphological filters is overcome by a selfdual morphological approach considering both light and dark structures in either the opening or the closing branch of the scale-space. Reconstructive opening/closing-filters enable the scale=analysis of 2D signals, since they are causal with respect to regional maxima/minima. This allows to identify important regions in scale=space via their extrema. Each extremum is assigned a region by a gradient watershed of the corresponding scale. Due to morphological filtering, the scale behavior of the regions is representable by a tree structure describing the spatial inter- and intra-scale relations among regions. The significance of a watershed region is automatically derived from its scale behavior by considering various attributes describing scale-dependent, morphological, and statistical properties of the region. The most significant regions from the segmentation of the image. The algorithm was verified for various medical image domains, such as cytological micrographs, bone x-rays, and cranial NMR slices.

  6. Self-dual electromagnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chubykalo, Andrew E.; Espinoza, Augusto; Kosyakov, B. P.

    2010-08-01

    We demonstrate the utility of self-dual fields in electrodynamics. Stable configurations of free electromagnetic fields can be represented as superpositions of standing waves, each possessing zero Poynting vector and zero orbital angular momentum. The standing waves are themselves superpositions of self-dual and anti-self-dual solutions. The idea of self-duality provides additional insights into the geometrical and spectral properties of stable electromagnetic configurations, such as those responsible for the formation of ball lightning.

  7. Space-time curvature signatures in Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matos, Tonatiuh; Gomez, Eduardo

    2015-05-01

    We derive a generalized Gross-Pitaevski (GP) equation for a Bose Einstein Condensate (BEC) immersed in a weak gravitational field starting from the covariant Complex Klein-Gordon field in a curved space-time. We compare it with the traditional GP equation where the gravitational field is added by hand as an external potential. We show that there is a small difference of order gz/c2 between them that could be measured in the future using Bose-Einstein Condensates. This represents the next order correction to the Newtonian gravity in a curved space-time.

  8. Einstein spaces modeling nonminimal modified gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elizalde, Emilio; Vacaru, Sergiu I.

    2015-06-01

    Off-diagonal vacuum and nonvacuum configurations in the Einstein gravity can mimic physical effects of modified gravitational theories of f( R, T, R μν T μν ) type. To prove this statement, exact and approximate solutions are constructed in the paper, which encode certain models of covariant Hořava-type gravity with dynamical Lorentz symmetry breaking. The corresponding FLRW cosmological dynamics with possible nonholonomic deformations and the reconstruction procedure of certain actions closely related with the standard ΛCDM universe are studied. Off-diagonal generalizations of de Sitter universes are constructed which are generated through nonlinear gravitational polarization of fundamental physical constants and which model interactions with nonconstant exotic fluids and effective matter. The problem of possible matter instability for such off-diagonal deformations in (modified) gravity theories is briefly discussed.

  9. Class of Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton-axion space-times

    SciTech Connect

    Matos, Tonatiuh; Miranda, Galaxia; Sanchez-Sanchez, Ruben; Wiederhold, Petra

    2009-06-15

    We use the harmonic maps ansatz to find exact solutions of the Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton-axion (EMDA) equations. The solutions are harmonic maps invariant to the symplectic real group in four dimensions Sp(4,R){approx}O(5). We find solutions of the EMDA field equations for the one- and two-dimensional subspaces of the symplectic group. Specially, for illustration of the method, we find space-times that generalize the Schwarzschild solution with dilaton, axion, and electromagnetic fields.

  10. Einstein's Symphony: A Gravitational Wave Voyage Through Space and Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro Key, Joey; Yunes, Nico; Grimberg, Irene

    2015-01-01

    Einstein's Symphony: A Gravitational Wave Voyage Through Space and Time is a gravitational wave astronomy planetarium show in production by a collaboration of scientists, filmmakers, and artisits from the Center for Gravitational Wave Astonomy (CGWA) at the University of Texas at Brownsville (UTB) and Montana State University (MSU). The project builds on the success of the interdisciplinary Celebrating Einstein collaboration. The artists and scientists who created the A Shout Across Time original film and the Black (W)hole immersive art installation for Celebrating Einstein are teaming with the Museum of the Rockies Taylor Planetarium staff and students to create a new full dome Digistar planetarium show that will be freely and widely distributed to planetaria in the US and abroad. The show uses images and animations filmed and collected for A Shout Across Time and for Black (W)hole as well as new images and animations and a new soundtrack composed and produced by the MSU School of Music to use the full capability of planetarium sound systems. The planetarium show will be narrated with ideas drawn from the Celebrating Einstein danced lecture on gravitational waves that the collaboration produced. The combination of products, resources, and team members assembled for this project allows us to create an original planetarium show for a fraction of the cost of a typical show. In addition, STEM education materials for G6-12 students and teachers will be provided to complement and support the show. This project is supported by the Texas Space Grant Consortium (TSGC), Montana Space Grant Consortium (MSGC), and the American Physical Society (APS).

  11. Emergent Space-Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapline, George

    It has been shown that a nonlinear Schrödinger equation in 2+1 dimensions equipped with an SU(N) Chern-Simons gauge field can provide an exact description of certain self-dual Einstein spaces in the limit N-=∞. Ricci flat Einstein spaces can then be viewed as arising from a quantum pairing of the classical self-dual and anti-self-dual solutions. In this chapter, we will outline how this theory of empty space-time might be generalized to include matter and vacuum energy by transplanting the nonlinear Schrödinger equation used to construct Einstein spaces to the 25+1-dimensional Lorentzian Leech lattice. If the distinguished 2 spatial dimensions underlying the construction of Einstein spaces are identified with a hexagonal lattice section of the Leech lattice, the wave-function becomes an 11 × 11 matrix that can represent fermion and boson degrees of freedom (DOF) associated with 2-form and Yang-Mills gauge symmetries. The resulting theory of gravity and matter in 3+1 dimensions is not supersymmetric, which provides an entry for a vacuum energy. Indeed, in the case of a Lemaitre cosmological model, the emergent space-time will naturally have a vacuum energy on the order of the observed cosmological constant.

  12. Loop quantum cosmology with self-dual variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson-Ewing, Edward

    2015-12-01

    Using the complex-valued self-dual connection variables, the loop quantum cosmology of a closed Friedmann space-time coupled to a massless scalar field is studied. It is shown how the reality conditions can be imposed in the quantum theory by choosing a particular inner product for the kinematical Hilbert space. While holonomies of the self-dual Ashtekar connection are not well defined in the kinematical Hilbert space, it is possible to introduce a family of generalized holonomylike operators of which some are well defined; these operators in turn are used in the definition of the Hamiltonian constraint operator where the scalar field can be used as a relational clock. The resulting quantum theory is closely related, although not identical, to standard loop quantum cosmology constructed from the Ashtekar-Barbero variables with a real Immirzi parameter. Effective Friedmann equations are derived which provide a good approximation to the full quantum dynamics for sharply peaked states whose volume remains much larger than the Planck volume, and they show that for these states quantum gravity effects resolve the big-bang and big-crunch singularities and replace them by a nonsingular bounce. Finally, the loop quantization in self-dual variables of a flat Friedmann space-time is recovered in the limit of zero spatial curvature and is identical to the standard loop quantization in terms of the real-valued Ashtekar-Barbero variables.

  13. Multimatrix models and tri-Sasaki Einstein spaces

    SciTech Connect

    Herzog, Christopher P.; Pufu, Silviu S.; Tesileanu, Tiberiu; Klebanov, Igor R.

    2011-02-15

    Localization methods reduce the path integrals in N{>=}2 supersymmetric Chern-Simons gauge theories on S{sup 3} to multimatrix integrals. A recent evaluation of such a two-matrix integral for the N=6 superconformal U(N)xU(N) Aharony-Bergman-Jafferis-Maldacena theory produced detailed agreement with the AdS/CFT correspondence, explaining, in particular, the N{sup 3/2} scaling of the free energy. We study a class of p-matrix integrals describing N=3 superconformal U(N){sup p} Chern-Simons gauge theories. We present a simple method that allows us to evaluate the eigenvalue densities and the free energies in the large N limit keeping the Chern-Simons levels k{sub i} fixed. The dual M-theory backgrounds are AdS{sub 4}xY, where Y are seven-dimensional tri-Sasaki Einstein spaces specified by the k{sub i}. The gravitational free energy scales inversely with the square root of the volume of Y. We find a general formula for the p-matrix free energies that agrees with the available results for volumes of the tri-Sasaki Einstein spaces Y, thus providing a thorough test of the corresponding AdS{sub 4}/CFT{sub 3} dualities. This formula is consistent with the Seiberg duality conjectured for Chern-Simons gauge theories.

  14. Stationary axisymmetric four dimensional space-time endowed with Einstein metric

    SciTech Connect

    Hasanuddin; Azwar, A.; Gunara, B. E.

    2015-04-16

    In this paper, we construct Ernst equation from vacuum Einstein field equation for both zero and non-zero cosmological constant. In particular, we consider the case where the space-time admits axisymmetric using Boyer-Lindquist coordinates. This is called Kerr-Einstein solution describing a spinning black hole. Finally, we give a short discussion about the dynamics of photons on Kerr-Einstein space-time.

  15. Einstein's idealism and a new kind of space research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, M. A.

    In 1935, Albert Einstein, Boris Podolsky and Nathan Rosen made an attempt to imagine quantum experimental nonsense or some impossible experiment (EPR-experiment) in order to justify their local realism in physics. However, in the mid-1960s, John Bell showed that it is possible to realize this kind of nonsense in laboratory. Today, when EPR-refutation of local realism is routine in modern experimental physics (Clauser and Freedman [1972]; Aspect, Dalibard and Roger [1982]; Zeilinger et al. [1998]), we must; nevertheless, remark that Albert Einstein was not always a realist. As is known, in his Special Relativitz A. Einstein introduced some pure idealistic principle which K. Godel developed in famous "Remark about the relationship between Relativity theorz and Idealistic Philosophy" (1949). Kurt Godel for the first time showed an existence of special-relativistic solipsism, assuming that objective simultaneity in experimental science "loses its objective meaning". Correspondingly, there is only subjective simultaneity, that is provable by calculations with the finite velocity of light and astronomical observations. In particular, this space solipsism means that when we observe the sun, we can see only what happend on Sun 8.33 minutes ago; in other words, we percieve only certain sensations or a certain collections of ideas of the past, but not the present. Similarly, when astronomers observe galaxies estimated to be two billion light years from the Earth, they see these galaxies as they were two billion light years ago not as they are Now. Thus, in accordance with this, we may await that in this context for some pairs of astronomical objects we cannot prove they exist NOW. Moreover, this new kind of space research could be connected with introduction of the Cognitive Dark Matter, or, what is associated with manifold of the large-scale events of the Universe as a whole which are realizing Now, beyond consciousness of the observers-humans. Because we cannot know

  16. Momentum-space engineering of gaseous Bose-Einstein condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, Mark; Benton, Brandon; Heward, Jeffrey; Clark, Charles W.

    2010-12-15

    We show how the momentum distribution of gaseous Bose-Einstein condensates can be shaped by applying a sequence of standing-wave laser pulses. We present a theory, whose validity was demonstrated in an earlier experiment [L. Deng et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 5407 (1999)], of the effect of a two-pulse sequence on the condensate wavefunction in momentum space. We generalize the previous result to the case of N pulses of arbitrary intensity separated by arbitrary intervals and show how these parameters can be engineered to produce a desired final momentum distribution. We find that several momentum distributions, important in atom-interferometry applications, can be engineered with high fidelity with two or three pulses.

  17. Quantum billiards with branes on product of Einstein spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivashchuk, V. D.

    2016-05-01

    We consider a gravitational model in dimension D with several forms, l scalar fields and a Λ -term. We study cosmological-type block-diagonal metrics defined on a product of an 1-dimensional interval and n oriented Einstein spaces. As an electromagnetic composite brane ansatz is adopted and certain restrictions on the branes are imposed the conformally covariant Wheeler-DeWitt (WDW) equation for the model is studied. Under certain restrictions, asymptotic solutions to the WDW equation are found in the limit of the formation of the billiard walls. These solutions reduce the problem to the so-called quantum billiard in (n + l -1)-dimensional hyperbolic space. Several examples of quantum billiards in the model with electric and magnetic branes, e.g. corresponding to hyperbolic Kac-Moody algebras, are considered. In the case n=2 we find a set of basis asymptotic solutions to the WDW equation and derive asymptotic solutions for the metric in the classical case.

  18. Killing–Yano tensor and supersymmetry of the self-dual Plebański–Demiański solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozawa, Masato; Houri, Tsuyoshi

    2016-06-01

    We explore various aspects of the self-dual Plebański–Demiański (PD) family in the Euclidean Einstein–Maxwell-Λ system. The Killing–Yano tensor which was recently found by Yasui and one of the present authors allows us to prove that the self-dual PD metric can be brought into the self-dual Carter metric by an orientation-reversing coordinate transformation. We show that the self-dual PD solution admits two independent Killing spinors in the framework of N = 2 minimal gauged supergravity, whereas the non-self-dual solution admits only a single Killing spinor. This can be demonstrated by casting the self-dual PD metric into two distinct Przanowski–Tod forms. As a by-product, a new example of the three-dimensional Einstein–Weyl space is presented. We also prove that the self-dual PD metric falls into two different Calderbank–Pedersen families, which are determined by a single function subjected to a linear equation on the two-dimensional hyperbolic space. Furthermore, we consider the hyper-Kähler case for which the metric falls into the Gibbons–Hawking class. We find that the condition for the nonexistence of the Dirac–Misner string enforces the solution with a nonvanishing acceleration parameter to the Eguchi–Hanson space.

  19. RG flows of Quantum Einstein Gravity on maximally symmetric spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demmel, Maximilian; Saueressig, Frank; Zanusso, Omar

    2014-06-01

    We use the Wetterich-equation to study the renormalization group flow of f ( R)-gravity in a three-dimensional, conformally reduced setting. Building on the exact heat kernel for maximally symmetric spaces, we obtain a partial differential equation which captures the scale-dependence of f ( R) for positive and, for the first time, negative scalar curvature. The effects of different background topologies are studied in detail and it is shown that they affect the gravitational RG flow in a way that is not visible in finite-dimensional truncations. Thus, while featuring local background independence, the functional renormalization group equation is sensitive to the topological properties of the background. The detailed analytical and numerical analysis of the partial differential equation reveals two globally well-defined fixed functionals with at most a finite number of relevant deformations. Their properties are remarkably similar to two of the fixed points identified within the R 2-truncation of full Quantum Einstein Gravity. As a byproduct, we obtain a nice illustration of how the functional renormalization group realizes the "integrating out" of fluctuation modes on the three-sphere.

  20. Self-Dual Supergravity from N = 2 Strings

    SciTech Connect

    de Boer, J.; Skenderis, K.

    1997-09-24

    A new heterotic N = 2 string with manifest target space supersymmetry is constructed by combining a conventional N = 2 string in the right-moving sector and a Green-Schwarz-Berkovits type string in the left-moving sector. The corresponding sigma model is then obtained by turning on background fields for the massless excitations. We compute the beta functions and we partially check the OPE's of the superconformal algebra perturbatively in {alpha}{prime}, all in superspace. The resulting field equations describe N = 1 self-dual supergravity.

  1. Saving Space and Time: The Tractor That Einstein Built

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    In 1984, NASA initiated the Gravity Probe B (GP-B) program to test two unverified predictions of Albert Einstein s theory of general relativity, hypotheses about the ways space, time, light, and gravity relate to each other. To test these predictions, the Space Agency and researchers at Stanford University developed an experiment that would check, with extreme precision, tiny changes in the spin direction of four gyroscopes contained in an Earth satellite orbiting at a 400-mile altitude directly over the Earth s poles. When the program first began, the researchers assessed using Global Positioning System (GPS) technology to control the attitude of the GP-B spacecraft accurately. At that time, the best GPS receivers could only provide accuracy to nearly 1 meter, but the GP-B spacecraft required a system 100 times more accurate. To address this concern, researchers at Stanford designed high-performance, attitude-determining hardware that used GPS signals, perfecting a high-precision form of GPS called Carrier-Phase Differential GPS that could provide continuous real-time position, velocity, time, and attitude sensor information for all axes of a vehicle. The researchers came to the realization that controlling the GP-B spacecraft with this new system was essentially no different than controlling an airplane. Their thinking took a new direction: If this technology proved successful, the airlines and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) were ready commercial markets. They set out to test the new technology, the "Integrity Beacon Landing System," using it to automatically land a commercial Boeing 737 over 100 times successfully through Real-Time Kinematic (RTK) GPS technology. The thinking of the researchers shifted again, from automatically landing aircraft, to automating precision farming and construction equipment.

  2. BOOK REVIEW Exact Space-Times in Einstein's General Relativity Exact Space-Times in Einstein's General Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lake, Kayll

    2010-12-01

    The title immediately brings to mind a standard reference of almost the same title [1]. The authors are quick to point out the relationship between these two works: they are complementary. The purpose of this work is to explain what is known about a selection of exact solutions. As the authors state, it is often much easier to find a new solution of Einstein's equations than it is to understand it. Even at first glance it is very clear that great effort went into the production of this reference. The book is replete with beautifully detailed diagrams that reflect deep geometric intuition. In many parts of the text there are detailed calculations that are not readily available elsewhere. The book begins with a review of basic tools that allows the authors to set the notation. Then follows a discussion of Minkowski space with an emphasis on the conformal structure and applications such as simple cosmic strings. The next two chapters give an in-depth review of de Sitter space and then anti-de Sitter space. Both chapters contain a remarkable collection of useful diagrams. The standard model in cosmology these days is the ICDM model and whereas the chapter on the Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker space-times contains much useful information, I found the discussion of the currently popular a representation rather too brief. After a brief but interesting excursion into electrovacuum, the authors consider the Schwarzschild space-time. This chapter does mention the Swiss cheese model but the discussion is too brief and certainly dated. Space-times related to Schwarzschild are covered in some detail and include not only the addition of charge and the cosmological constant but also the addition of radiation (the Vaidya solution). Just prior to a discussion of the Kerr space-time, static axially symmetric space-times are reviewed. Here one can find a very interesting discussion of the Curzon-Chazy space-time. The chapter on rotating black holes is rather brief and, for

  3. Variational principle and one-point functions in three-dimensional flat space Einstein gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detournay, Stephane; Grumiller, Daniel; Schöller, Friedrich; Simón, Joan

    2014-04-01

    We provide a well-defined variational principle for three-dimensional flat space Einstein gravity by adding one-half of the Gibbons-Hawking-York boundary term to the bulk action. We check the zero-point function, recovering consistency with thermodynamics of flat space cosmologies. We then apply our result to calculate the one-point functions in flat space Einstein gravity for the vacuum and all flat space cosmologies. The results are compatible with the ones for the zero-mode charges obtained by canonical analysis.

  4. Near-horizon radiation and self-dual loop quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiller, M.; Noui, K.

    2014-03-01

    We compute the near-horizon radiation of quantum black holes in the context of self-dual loop quantum gravity. For this, we first use the unitary spinor basis of \\textit{SL}(2,\\,{ C}) to decompose states of Lorentzian spin foam models into their self-dual and anti-self-dual parts, and show that the reduced density matrix obtained by tracing over one chiral component describes a thermal state at Unruh temperature. Then, we show that the analytically-continued dimension of the SU(2) Chern-Simons Hilbert space, which reproduces the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy in the large spin limit in agreement with the large spin effective action, takes the form of a partition function for states thermalized at Unruh temperature, with discrete energy levels given by the near-horizon energy of Frodden-Gosh-Perez, and with a degenerate ground state which is holographic and responsible for the entropy.

  5. Exactly solvable self-dual strings

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, R.C. ); Periwal, V. )

    1990-06-25

    Models of random surfaces defined by means of integrals over quaternion-real self-dual random matrices are solved exactly in a double-scaling limit. Coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations are obtained for the specific heat, which takes the form {ital r}+{ital w}{prime}, where {ital r} is the specific heat of the corresponding Hermitian-matrix model, and {ital w} satisfies a nonlinear differential equation depending on {ital r}. It is shown that the {ital k}=2 theory, which may describe a new phase of two-dimensional quantum gravity, is unitary. An alternative method of solution, based on a set of symplectically orthogonal polynomials, is indicated.

  6. Effective Einstein cosmological spaces for non-minimal modified gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elizalde, Emilio; Vacaru, Sergiu I.

    2015-06-01

    Certain off-diagonal vacuum and nonvacuum configurations in Einstein gravity can mimic physical effects of modified gravitational theories of type. We prove this statement by constructing exact and approximate solutions which encode certain models of covariant Hořava type gravity with dynamical Lorentz symmetry breaking. Off-diagonal generalizations of de Sitter and nonholonomic CDM universes are constructed which are generated through nonlinear gravitational polarization of fundamental physical constants and which model interactions with non-constant exotic fluids and effective matter. The problem of possible matter instability for such off-diagonal deformations in (modified) gravity theories is discussed.

  7. Anisotropic loop quantum cosmology with self-dual variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson-Ewing, Edward

    2016-04-01

    A loop quantization of the diagonal class A Bianchi models starting from the complex-valued self-dual connection variables is presented in this paper. The basic operators in the quantum theory correspond to areas and generalized holonomies of the Ashtekar connection, and the reality conditions are implemented via the choice of the inner product on the kinematical Hilbert space. The action of the Hamiltonian constraint operator is given explicitly for the case when the matter content is a massless scalar field (in which case the scalar field can be used as a relational clock), and it is shown that the big bang and big crunch singularities are resolved in the sense that singular and nonsingular states decouple under the action of the Hamiltonian constraint operator.

  8. Bogoliubov space of a Bose-Einstein condensate and quantum spacetime fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Rivas, J. I.; Camacho, A.; Goeklue, E.

    2012-08-24

    We analyze the role that metric fluctuations could have on the features of a Bose-Einstein condensate. Particularly, the Bogoliubov space associated to it is considered and it will be shown that the pressure and the speed of sound of the ground state define an expression allowing us to determine the average size of these fluctuations.

  9. Scale factor self-dual cosmological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camara da Silva, U.; Lima, A. A.; Sotkov, G. M.

    2015-07-01

    We implement a conformal time scale factor duality for Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmological models, which is consistent with the weak energy condition. The requirement for self-duality determines the equations of state for a broad class of barotropic fluids. We study the example of a universe filled with two interacting fluids, presenting an accelerated and a decelerated period, with manifest UV/IR duality. The associated self-dual scalar field interaction turns out to coincide with the "radiation-like" modified Chaplygin gas models. We present an equivalent realization of them as gauged Kähler sigma models (minimally coupled to gravity) with very specific and interrelated Kähler- and super-potentials. Their applications in the description of hilltop inflation and also as quintessence models for the late universe are discussed.

  10. The LISA Pathfinder Mission. Tracing Einstein's Geodesics in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Racca, Giuseppe D.; McNamara, Paul W.

    2010-03-01

    LISA Pathfinder, formerly known as SMART-2, is the second of the European Space Agency’s Small Missions for Advance Research and Technology, and is designed to pave the way for the joint ESA/NASA Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) mission, by testing the core assumption of gravitational wave detection and general relativity: that free particles follow geodesics. The new technologies to be demonstrated in a space environment include: inertial sensors, high precision laser interferometry to free floating mirrors, and micro-Newton proportional thrusters. LISA Pathfinder will be launched on a dedicated launch vehicle in late 2011 into a low Earth orbit. By a transfer trajectory, the sciencecraft will enter its final orbit around the first Sun-Earth Lagrange point. First science results are expected approximately 3 months thereafter. Here, we give an overview of the mission including the technologies being demonstrated.

  11. Magnon Kinetics and Bose-Einstein Condensation Studied in Phase Space

    SciTech Connect

    Demidov, V. E.; Dzyapko, O.; Buchmeier, M.; Demokritov, S. O.; Stockhoff, T.; Schmitz, G.; Melkov, G. A.

    2008-12-19

    Using a novel technique providing simultaneous resolution with respect to the wave vector and frequency of magnons, we observed the formation of a Bose-Einstein condensate documented by the narrowing of the magnon distribution in phase space. Based on the measured width of the distribution we determined the effective correlation length of the condensate, which appears to be anisotropic, reflecting the anisotropy of the magnon dispersion spectrum.

  12. Plebanski-like action for general relativity and anti-self-dual gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celada, Mariano; González, Diego; Montesinos, Merced

    2016-05-01

    We present a new B F -type action for complex general relativity with or without a cosmological constant resembling Plebanski's action, which depends on an SO (3 ,C ) connection, a set of 2-forms, a symmetric matrix, and a 4-form. However, it differs from the Plebanski formulation in the way that the symmetric matrix enters into the action. The advantage of this fact is twofold. First, as compared to Plebanski's action, the symmetric matrix can now be integrated out, which leads to a pure B F -type action principle for general relativity; the canonical analysis of the new action then shows that it has the same phase space of the Ashtekar formalism up to a canonical transformation induced by a topological term. Second, a particular choice of the parameters involved in the formulation produces a B F -type action principle describing conformally anti-self-dual gravity. Therefore, the new action unifies both general relativity and anti-self-dual gravity.

  13. Theory of quantum gravity beyond Einstein and space-time dynamics with quantum inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yue-Liang

    2015-10-01

    In this talk, I present a theory of quantum gravity beyond Einstein. The theory is established based on spinnic and scaling gauge symmetries by treating the gravitational force on the same footing as the electroweak and strong forces. A bi-frame space-time is initiated to describe the laws of nature. One frame space-time is a globally flat coordinate Minkowski space-time that acts as an inertial reference frame for the motions of fields, the other is a locally flat non-coordinate Gravifield space-time that functions as an interaction representation frame for the degrees of freedom of fields. The Gravifield is sided on both the globally flat coordinate space-time and locally flat non-coordinate space-time and characterizes the gravitational force. Instead of the principle of general coordinate invariance in Einstein theory of general relativity, some underlying principles with the postulates of coordinate independence and gauge invariance are motivated to establish the theory of quantum gravity. When transmuting the Gravifield basis into the coordinate basis in Minkowski space-time, it enables us to obtain equations of motion for all quantum fields and derive basic conservation laws for all symmetries. The gravity equation is found to be governed by the total energy-momentum tensor defined in the flat Minkowski space-time. When the spinnic and scaling gauge symmetries are broken down to a background structure that possesses the global Lorentz and scaling symmetries, we arrive at a Lorentz invariant and conformally flat background Gravifield space-time that is characterized by a cosmic vector with a non-zero cosmological mass scale. We also obtain the massless graviton and massive spinnon. The resulting universe is in general not isotropic in terms of conformal proper time and turns out to be inflationary in light of cosmic proper time. The conformal size of the universe has a singular at the cosmological horizon to which the cosmic proper time must be infinitely

  14. Einstein--Weyl space-times with geodesic and shear-free neutrino rays: asymptotic behaviour

    SciTech Connect

    Kolassis, C.A.; Santos, N.O.

    1987-02-15

    We consider a neutrino field with geodesic and shear-free rays, in interaction with a gravitational field according to the Einstein--Weyl field equations. Furthermore we suppose that there exists a Killing vector r/sup ..mu../ whose magnitude is almost everywhere bounded at the future and past endpoints of the neutrino rays. The implications of the asymptotic behavior of r/sup ..mu../ on the structure of space-time are investigated and a useful set of reduced equations is obtained. It is found that under these hypothes the space-time cannot be asymptotically flat if the neutrino field is nonvanishing. All the Demianski--Kerr--NUT-like space-times as well as the space-times which admit a covariantly constant null vector are explicity obtained. copyright 1987 Academic Press, Inc.

  15. Einsteins dream

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, B.

    1986-01-01

    This book discusses the following topics: the search for meaning; Einstein's dream; curved space; Einstein and warped space-time and extreme wraping; early unified field theories; star death; beyond the white dwarf; the early universe; the hadron, Lepton, and Radiation eras; the redshift controversy; other universes; the final fate of the universe; the missing mass; bounce; fate of the open universe; the world of particles and fields; Dirac's equation; Yukawa; gauge theory; quantum chromodynamics; supergravity and superstrings; twistors and heaven; and the new Einstein.

  16. Removal of excitations of Bose-Einstein condensates by space- and time-modulated potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Staliunas, Kestutis

    2011-07-15

    We propose that periodically in space- and time-modulated potentials (dynamic lattices) can efficiently remove the excited (the high-energy and large momentum) components of the trapped Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) and, consequently, can result in efficient cleaning of the BECs. We prove the idea by numerically solving the mean-field models (the Schroedinger equation for noninteracting condensates and the Gross-Pitaevskii equation for interacting condensates of repulsive atoms), and we evaluate parameters and conditions for the efficient removal of excitations.

  17. A New Reduction of the Self-Dual Yang-Mills Equations and its Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yufeng; Wang, Yan

    2016-07-01

    Through imposing on space-time symmetries, a new reduction of the self-dual Yang-Mills equations is obtained for which a Lax pair is established. By a proper exponent transformation, we transform the Lax pair to get a new Lax pair whose compatibility condition gives rise to a set of partial differential equations (PDEs). We solve such PDEs by taking different Lax matrices; we develop a new modified Burgers equation, a generalised type of Kadomtsev-Petviasgvili equation, and the Davey-Stewartson equation, which also generalise some results given by Ablowitz, Chakravarty, Kent, and Newman.

  18. Celebrating Einstein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro Key, Joey; Yunes, Nicolas

    2013-04-01

    The Gravity Group at Montana State University (MSU) hosted Celebrating Einstein, a free public arts and multimedia event celebrating Einstein and his ideas in Bozeman, Montana April 2-6, 2013. The products of our efforts are now available to any party interested in hosting a similar event. Celebrating Einstein is a truly interdisciplinary effort including art, film, dance, music, physics, history, and education. Events included a black hole immersive art installation, a series of public talks by physicists, and Einstein lessons in the public schools leading up to a live free public multimedia performance including a professional dance company, a live interview with a renowned physicist, and an original score composed for the MSU student symphony to be performed with an original film produced by the Science and Natural History film program at MSU. This project is funded by the Montana Space Grant Consortium, Montana State University, and the National Science Foundation.

  19. Quantum random walk of a Bose-Einstein condensate in momentum space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summy, Gil; Wimberger, Sandro

    2016-02-01

    Each step in a quantum random walk is typically understood to have two basic components: a "coin toss" which produces a random superposition of two states, and a displacement which moves each component of the superposition by different amounts. Here we suggest the realization of a walk in momentum space with a spinor Bose-Einstein condensate subject to a quantum ratchet realized with a pulsed, off-resonant optical lattice. By an appropriate choice of the lattice detuning, we show how the atomic momentum can be entangled with the internal spin states of the atoms. For the coin toss, we propose to use a microwave pulse to mix these internal states. We present experimental results showing an optimized quantum ratchet, and through a series of simulations, demonstrate how our proposal gives extraordinary control of the quantum walk. This should allow for the investigation of possible biases, and classical-to-quantum dynamics in the presence of natural and engineered noise.

  20. Quantum tests of the Einstein Equivalence Principle with the STE-QUEST space mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altschul, Brett; Bailey, Quentin G.; Blanchet, Luc; Bongs, Kai; Bouyer, Philippe; Cacciapuoti, Luigi; Capozziello, Salvatore; Gaaloul, Naceur; Giulini, Domenico; Hartwig, Jonas; Iess, Luciano; Jetzer, Philippe; Landragin, Arnaud; Rasel, Ernst; Reynaud, Serge; Schiller, Stephan; Schubert, Christian; Sorrentino, Fiodor; Sterr, Uwe; Tasson, Jay D.; Tino, Guglielmo M.; Tuckey, Philip; Wolf, Peter

    2015-01-01

    We present in detail the scientific objectives in fundamental physics of the Space-Time Explorer and QUantum Equivalence Space Test (STE-QUEST) space mission. STE-QUEST was pre-selected by the European Space Agency together with four other missions for the cosmic vision M3 launch opportunity planned around 2024. It carries out tests of different aspects of the Einstein Equivalence Principle using atomic clocks, matter wave interferometry and long distance time/frequency links, providing fascinating science at the interface between quantum mechanics and gravitation that cannot be achieved, at that level of precision, in ground experiments. We especially emphasize the specific strong interest of performing Equivalence Principle tests in the quantum regime, i.e. using quantum atomic wave interferometry. Although STE-QUEST was finally not selected in early 2014 because of budgetary and technological reasons, its science case was very highly rated. Our aim is to expose that science to a large audience in order to allow future projects and proposals to take advantage of the STE-QUEST experience.

  1. Quantum phase-space picture of Bose-Einstein condensates in a double well

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmud, Khan W.; Perry, Heidi; Reinhardt, William P.

    2005-02-01

    We present a quantum phase-space model of the Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) in a double-well potential. In a quantum two-mode approximation we examine the eigenvectors and eigenvalues and find that the energy correlation diagram indicates a transition from a delocalized to a fragmented regime. Phase-space information is extracted from the stationary quantum states using the Husimi distribution function. We show that the mean-field phase-space characteristics of a nonrigid physical pendulum arises from the exact quantum states, and that only 4-8 particles per well are needed to reach the semiclassical limit. For a driven double-well BEC, we show that the classical chaotic dynamics is manifest in the dynamics of the quantum states. Phase-space analogy also suggests that a {pi} phase-displaced wave packet put on the unstable fixed point on a separatrix bifurcates to create a superposition of two pendulum rotor states--a macroscopic superposition state of BEC. We show that the choice of initial barrier height and ramping, following a {pi} phase imprinting on the condensate, can be used to generate controlled entangled number states with tunable extremity and sharpness.

  2. The kinematic algebra from the self-dual sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteiro, Ricardo; O'Connell, Donal

    2011-07-01

    We identify a diffeomorphism Lie algebra in the self-dual sector of Yang-Mills theory, and show that it determines the kinematic numerators of tree-level MHV amplitudes in the full theory. These amplitudes can be computed off-shell from Feynman diagrams with only cubic vertices, which are dressed with the structure constants of both the Yang-Mills colour algebra and the diffeomorphism algebra. Therefore, the latter algebra is the dual of the colour algebra, in the sense suggested by the work of Bern, Carrasco and Johansson. We further study perturbative gravity, both in the self-dual and in the MHV sectors, finding that the kinematic numerators of the theory are the BCJ squares of the Yang-Mills numerators.

  3. Quantum tunneling radiation from self-dual black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, C. A. S.; Brito, F. A.

    2013-10-01

    Black holes are considered as objects that can reveal quantum aspects of spacetime. Loop Quantum Gravity (LQG) is a theory that propose a way to model the quantum spacetime behavior revealed by a black hole. One recent prediction of this theory is the existence of sub-Planckian black holes, which have the interesting property of self-duality. This property removes the black hole singularity and replaces it with another asymptotically flat region. In this work, we obtain the thermodynamical properties of this kind of black holes, called self-dual black holes, using the Hamilton-Jacobi version of the tunneling formalism. Moreover, using the tools of the tunneling approach, we investigate the emission spectrum of self-dual black holes, and investigate if some information about the black hole initial state can be recovered during the evaporation process. Back-reaction effects are included.

  4. Symmetries, currents and conservation laws of self-dual gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, A. D.; Bordemann, M.; Römer, H.

    1996-02-01

    We describe an infinite-dimensional algebra of hidden symmetries for the self-dual gravity equations. Besides the known diffeomorphism-type symmetries (affine extension of w∞ algebra), this algebra contains new hidden symmetries, which are an affine extension of the Lorentz rotations. The full symmetry algebra has both Kac-Moody and Virasoro-like generators, whose exponentiation maps solutions of the field equations to other solutions. Relations to problems of string theories are briefly discussed.

  5. M-idempotent and self-dual morphological filters.

    PubMed

    Bouaynaya, Nidhal; Charif-Chefchaouni, Mohammed; Schonfeld, Dan

    2012-04-01

    In this paper, we present a comprehensive analysis of self-dual and m-idempotent operators. We refer to an operator as m-idempotent if it converges after m iterations. We focus on an important special case of the general theory of lattice morphology: spatially variant morphology, which captures the geometrical interpretation of spatially variant structuring elements. We demonstrate that every increasing self-dual morphological operator can be viewed as a morphological center. Necessary and sufficient conditions for the idempotence of morphological operators are characterized in terms of their kernel representation. We further extend our results to the representation of the kernel of m-idempotent morphological operators. We then rely on the conditions on the kernel representation derived and establish methods for the construction of m-idempotent and self-dual morphological operators. Finally, we illustrate the importance of the self-duality and m-idempotence properties by an application to speckle noise removal in radar images. PMID:22184254

  6. Quasinormal frequencies of self-dual black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Victor; Maluf, R. V.; Almeida, C. A. S.

    2016-04-01

    One simplified black hole model constructed from a semiclassical analysis of loop quantum gravity (LQG) is called the self-dual black hole. This black hole solution depends on a free dimensionless parameter P known as the polymeric parameter and also on the a0 area related to the minimum area gap of LQG. In the limit of P and a0 going to zero, the usual Schwarzschild solution is recovered. Here we investigate the quasinormal modes (QNMs) of massless scalar perturbations in the self-dual black hole background. We compute the QN frequencies using the sixth-order WKB approximation method and compare them with numerical solutions of the Regge-Wheeler equation. Our results show that, as the parameter P grows, the real part of the QN frequencies suffers an initial increase and then starts to decrease while the magnitude of the imaginary one decreases for fixed area gap a0. This particular feature means that the damping of scalar perturbations in the self-dual black hole spacetimes is slower, and the oscillations are faster or slower according to the value of P .

  7. Einstein's ``Spooky Action at a Distance'' in the Light of Kant's Transcendental Doctrine of Space and Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hacyan, Shahen

    2006-11-01

    Since the famous Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) paper, it is clear that there is a serious incompatibility between local realism and quantum mechanics. Einstein believed that a complete quantum theory should be free of what he once called "spooky actions at distance". However, all experiments in quantum optics and atomic physics performed in the last two decades confirm the existence of quantum correlations that seem to contradict local realism. According to Bohr, the apparent contradictions disclose only the inadequacy of our customary concepts for the description of the quantum world. Are space and time such customary concepts? In this presentation, I argue that the Copenhagen interpretation is compatible with Kant's transcendental idealism and that, in particular, EPR type paradoxes are consistent with Kant's transcendental aesthetics, according to which space and time have no objective reality but are pure forms of sensible intuition.

  8. A Model Space Mission to probe Einstein's Equivalence Principle - The STE-QUEST Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heske, Astrid; Cacciapuoti, Luigi; Gehler, Martin

    Understanding General Relativity at all scales requires, in particular, understanding gravity at quantum level. To attempt this, tests of the most prominent aspect of General Relativity, the Einstein Equivalence Principle, can be performed with the next generation of atomic quantum sensors to significantly improved accuracy. To exploit the ultimate limits of atomic sensors a dedicated space platform is needed; the advantages space offers are, among others, unperturbed free-fall conditions, longer interaction times per measurement and large variations in velocity and gravitational field. In the frame of the third medium class launch opportunity of ESA's Cosmic Vision 2015 - 2025 programme a study was conducted - STE-QUEST (Space-Time Explorer and QUantum Equivalence principle Test), one of the candidates for a medium class mission - and the feasibility of such a mission assessed. The spacecraft would carry two instruments probing the different aspects of the Einstein Equivalence Principle: begin{enumerate} A dual species ( (87) Rb and (85) Rb) atom interferometer to probe the universality of propagation of matter waves. A high-performance time and frequency link dedicated to comparison of atomic clocks on ground. The specific primary science objectives for STE-QUEST are: begin{enumerate} Universality of propagation of matter waves test begin{itemize} Test of the universality of free fall of matter waves to an uncertainty of the Eötvös ratio lower than 2*10 (-15) . Gravitational redshift tests begin{itemize} Sun gravitational red-shift measurement to a fractional uncertainty of 2*10 (-6) , with an ultimate goal of 5*10 (-7) . Moon gravitational red-shift measurement to a fractional uncertainty of 4*10 (-4) , with an ultimate goal of 9*10 (-5) . Such a measurement has never been attempted before. The availability of an atomic clock on-board the spacecraft (optional) would additionally allow testing the Earth gravitational red-shift measurement to a fractional

  9. Minimally modified self-dual 2-forms gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capovilla, Riccardo; Montesinos, Merced; Velázquez, Mercedes

    2010-07-01

    The first-order Plebański formulation of (complex) general relativity (GR) in terms of self-dual 2-forms admits a generalization, proposed by Krasnov, that is qualitatively different from other possible generalizations of GR in terms of metric variables. In this paper, we investigate, within a minimal modification, and in a perturbative approach, the geometrical meaning of the field variables used in the Krasnov generalization, and compare them to the field variables used in the Plebański formulation.

  10. Cosmological solutions on Atiyah-Hitchin space in five-dimensional Einstein-Maxwell-Chern-Simons theory

    SciTech Connect

    Ghezelbash, A. M.

    2010-02-15

    We construct nonstationary exact solutions to five-dimensional Einstein-Maxwell-Chern-Simons theory with positive cosmological constant. The solutions are based on four-dimensional Atiyah-Hitchin space. In asymptotic regions, the solutions approach Gibbons-Perry-Sorkin monopole solutions. On the other hand, near the four-dimensional bolt of Atiyah-Hitchin space, our solutions show a bolt structure in five dimensions. The c function for the solutions shows monotonic increase in time, in agreement with the general expected behavior of the c function in asymptotically de Sitter spacetimes.

  11. Quantum-corrected self-dual black hole entropy in tunneling formalism with GUP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anacleto, M. A.; Brito, F. A.; Passos, E.

    2015-10-01

    In this paper we focus on the Hamilton-Jacobi method to determine the entropy of a self-dual black hole by using linear and quadratic GUPs (generalized uncertainty principles). We have obtained the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy of self-dual black holes and its quantum corrections that are logarithm and also of several other types.

  12. The Adolescence of Relativity: Einstein, Minkowski, and the Philosophy of Space and Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieks, Dennis

    An often repeated account of the genesis of special relativity tells us that relativity theory was to a considerable extent the fruit of an operationalist philosophy of science. Indeed, Einstein's 1905 paper stresses the importance of rods and clocks for giving concrete physical content to spatial and temporal notions. I argue, however, that it would be a mistake to read too much into this. Einstein's operationalist remarks should be seen as serving rhetoric purposes rather than as attempts to promulgate a particular philosophical position - in fact, Einstein never came close to operationalism in any of his philosophical writings. By focussing on what could actually be measured with rods and clocks Einstein shed doubt on the empirical status of a number of pre-relativistic concepts, with the intention to persuade his readers that the applicability of these concepts was not obvious. This rhetoric manoeuvre has not always been rightly appreciated in the philosophy of physics. Thus, the influence of operationalist misinterpretations, according to which associated operations strictly define what a concept means, can still be felt in present-day discussions about the conventionality of simultaneity.The standard story continues by pointing out that Minkowski in 1908 supplanted Einstein's approach with a realist spacetime account that has no room for a foundational role of rods and clocks: relativity theory became a description of a four-dimensional "absolute world." As it turns out, however, it is not at all clear that Minkowski was proposing a substantivalist position with respect to spacetime. On the contrary, it seems that from a philosophical point of view Minkowski's general position was not very unlike the one in the back of Einstein's mind. However, in Minkowski's formulation of special relativity it becomes more explicit that the content of spatiotemporal concepts relates to considerations about the form of physical laws. If accepted, this position has important

  13. Iterative Self-Dual Reconstruction on Radar Image Recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Martins, Charles; Medeiros, Fatima; Ushizima, Daniela; Bezerra, Francisco; Marques, Regis; Mascarenhas, Nelson

    2010-05-21

    Imaging systems as ultrasound, sonar, laser and synthetic aperture radar (SAR) are subjected to speckle noise during image acquisition. Before analyzing these images, it is often necessary to remove the speckle noise using filters. We combine properties of two mathematical morphology filters with speckle statistics to propose a signal-dependent noise filter to multiplicative noise. We describe a multiscale scheme that preserves sharp edges while it smooths homogeneous areas, by combining local statistics with two mathematical morphology filters: the alternating sequential and the self-dual reconstruction algorithms. The experimental results show that the proposed approach is less sensitive to varying window sizes when applied to simulated and real SAR images in comparison with standard filters.

  14. Soft decoding a self-dual (48, 24; 12) code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, G.

    1993-01-01

    A self-dual (48,24;12) code comes from restricting a binary cyclic (63,18;36) code to a 6 x 7 matrix, adding an eighth all-zero column, and then adjoining six dimensions to this extended 6 x 8 matrix. These six dimensions are generated by linear combinations of row permutations of a 6 x 8 matrix of weight 12, whose sums of rows and columns add to one. A soft decoding using these properties and approximating maximum likelihood is presented here. This is preliminary to a possible soft decoding of the box (72,36;15) code that promises a 7.7-dB theoretical coding under maximum likelihood.

  15. Gravity Probe B: Examining Einstein's Spacetime with Gyroscopes. An Educator's Guide with Activities in Space Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Range, Shannon K'doah; Mullins, Jennifer

    This teaching guide introduces a relativity gyroscope experiment aiming to test two unverified predictions of Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity. An introduction to the theory includes the following sections: (1) "Spacetime, Curved Spacetime, and Frame-Dragging"; (2) "'Seeing' Spacetime with Gyroscopes"; (3) "The Gravity Probe B…

  16. Phase space theory of Bose-Einstein condensates and time-dependent modes

    SciTech Connect

    Dalton, B.J.

    2012-10-15

    A phase space theory approach for treating dynamical behaviour of Bose-Einstein condensates applicable to situations such as interferometry with BEC in time-dependent double well potentials is presented. Time-dependent mode functions are used, chosen so that one, two, Horizontal-Ellipsis highly occupied modes describe well the physics of interacting condensate bosons in time dependent potentials at well below the transition temperature. Time dependent mode annihilation, creation operators are represented by time dependent phase variables, but time independent total field annihilation, creation operators are represented by time independent field functions. Two situations are treated, one (mode theory) is where specific mode annihilation, creation operators and their related phase variables and distribution functions are dealt with, the other (field theory) is where only field creation, annihilation operators and their related field functions and distribution functionals are involved. The field theory treatment is more suitable when large boson numbers are involved. The paper focuses on the hybrid approach, where the modes are divided up between condensate (highly occupied) modes and non-condensate (sparsely occupied) modes. It is found that there are extra terms in the Ito stochastic equations both for the stochastic phases and stochastic fields, involving coupling coefficients defined via overlap integrals between mode functions and their time derivatives. For the hybrid approach both the Fokker-Planck and functional Fokker-Planck equations differ from those derived via the correspondence rules, the drift vectors are unchanged but the diffusion matrices contain additional terms involving the coupling coefficients. Results are also presented for the combined approach where all the modes are treated as one set. Here both the Fokker-Planck and functional Fokker-Planck equations are exactly the same as those derived via the correspondence rules. However, although the

  17. Localization of one-photon state in space and Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox in spontaneous parametric down conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penin, A. N.; Reutova, T. A.; Sergienko, A. V.

    1992-01-01

    An experiment on one-photon state localization in space using a correlation technique in Spontaneous Parametric Down Conversion (SPDC) process is discussed. Results of measurements demonstrate an idea of the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) paradox for coordinate and momentum variables of photon states. Results of the experiment can be explained with the help of an advanced wave technique. The experiment is based on the idea that two-photon states of optical electromagnetic fields arising in the nonlinear process of the spontaneous parametric down conversion (spontaneous parametric light scattering) can be explained by quantum mechanical theory with the help of a single wave function.

  18. Beyond Einstein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertz, P.

    2003-03-01

    The Structure and Evolution of the Universe (SEU) theme within NASA's Office of Space Science seeks to explore and understand the dynamic transformations of energy in the Universe - the entire web of biological and physical interactions that determine the evolution of our cosmic habitat. This search for understanding will enrich the human spirit and inspire a new generation of explorers, scientists, and engineers. To that end, NASA's strategic planning process has generated a new Roadmap to enable those goals. Called "Beyond Einstein", this Roadmap identifies three science objectives for the SEU theme: (1) Find out what powered the Big Bang; (2) Observe how black holes manipulate space, time, and matter; and (3) Identify the mysterious dark energy pullingthe Universe apart. These objectives can be realized through a combination of large observatories (Constellation-X, LISA), moderate sized, PI-led missions (the Einstein Probes), and a contuinuing program of technology development, research and analysis, and education/public outreach. In this presentation, NASA's proposed Beyond Einstein Program will be described. The full Roadmap is available at http://universe.nasa.gov/.

  19. Stability of anti-de sitter space in Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity.

    PubMed

    Deppe, Nils; Kolly, Allison; Frey, Andrew; Kunstatter, Gabor

    2015-02-20

    Recently it has been argued that in Einstein gravity anti-de Sitter spacetime is unstable against the formation of black holes for a large class of arbitrarily small perturbations. We examine the effects of including a Gauss-Bonnet term. In five dimensions, spherically symmetric Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity has two key features: Choptuik scaling exhibits a radius gap, and the mass function goes to a finite value as the horizon radius vanishes. These suggest that black holes will not form dynamically if the total mass-energy content of the spacetime is too small, thereby restoring the stability of anti-de Sitter spacetime in this context. We support this claim with numerical simulations and uncover a rich structure in horizon radii and formation times as a function of perturbation amplitude. PMID:25763946

  20. Static properties of Bose-Einstein condensate mixtures in semi-infinite space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thu, Nguyen Van

    2016-08-01

    Using double-parabola approximation (DPA) applied to Gross-Pitaevskii theory, the interfacial tension of Bose-Einstein condensate mixtures in semi-infinite system is obtained and shows that it is not vanishing at demix state K = 1, its value exactly coincides to wall tension of second component. A new kind of wetting phase transition (Antonov transition) is also considered within DPA and phase transition is first-order. Antonov line is thoroughly proved, too.

  1. Albert Einstein: The Violinist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Peregrine

    2005-05-01

    To the press of his time Albert Einstein was two parts renowned scientist, one jigger pacifist and Zionist fundraiser, and a dash amateur musician. These proportions persisted during 1979, the 100th anniversary of his birth, as writers in all media jostled each other as they recounted his achievements. Relativity tended to hog the show. Relatively little space was given to Einstein the musician.

  2. Self-dual Maxwell field in 3D gravity with torsion

    SciTech Connect

    Blagojevic, M.; Cvetkovic, B.

    2008-08-15

    We study the system of a self-dual Maxwell field coupled to 3D gravity with torsion, with the Maxwell field modified by a topological mass term. General structure of the field equations reveals a new, dynamical role of the classical central charges, and gives a simple correspondence between self-dual solutions with torsion and their Riemannian counterparts. We construct two exact self-dual solutions, corresponding to the sectors with a massless and massive Maxwell field, and calculate their conserved charges.

  3. An algorithm to design finite field multipliers using a self-dual normal basis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Charles C.

    1989-01-01

    The concept of using a self-dual normal basis to design the Massey-Omura finite-field multiplier is presented. An algorithm is given to locate a self-dual normal basis for GF(2m) for odd m. A method to construct the product function for designing the Massey-Omura multiplier is developed. It is shown that the construction of the product function based on a self-dual basis is simpler than that based on an arbitrary normal basis.

  4. Conditions for order and chaos in the dynamics of a trapped Bose-Einstein condensate in coordinate and energy space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakhel, Roger R.; Sakhel, Asaad R.; Ghassib, Humam B.; Balaz, Antun

    2016-03-01

    We investigate numerically conditions for order and chaos in the dynamics of an interacting Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) confined by an external trap cut off by a hard-wall box potential. The BEC is stirred by a laser to induce excitations manifesting as irregular spatial and energy oscillations of the trapped cloud. Adding laser stirring to the external trap results in an effective time-varying trapping frequency in connection with the dynamically changing combined external+laser potential trap. The resulting dynamics are analyzed by plotting their trajectories in coordinate phase space and in energy space. The Lyapunov exponents are computed to confirm the existence of chaos in the latter space. Quantum effects and trap anharmonicity are demonstrated to generate chaos in energy space, thus confirming its presence and implicating either quantum effects or trap anharmonicity as its generator. The presence of chaos in energy space does not necessarily translate into chaos in coordinate space. In general, a dynamic trapping frequency is found to promote chaos in a trapped BEC. An apparent means to suppress chaos in a trapped BEC is achieved by increasing the characteristic scale of the external trap with respect to the condensate size.

  5. Self-dual warped AdS3 black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bin; Ning, Bo

    2010-12-01

    We study a new class of solutions of three-dimensional topological massive gravity. These solutions can be taken as nonextremal black holes, with their extremal counterparts being discrete quotients of spacelike warped AdS3 along the U(1)L isometry. We study the thermodynamics of these black holes and show that the first law is satisfied. We also show that for consistent boundary conditions, the asymptotic symmetry generators form only one copy of the Virasoro algebra with central charge cL=(4νℓ)/(G(ν2+3)), with which the Cardy formula reproduces the black hole entropy. We compute the real-time correlators of scalar perturbations and find a perfect match with the dual conformal field theory (CFT) predictions. Our study provides a novel example of warped AdS/CFT correspondence: the self-dual warped AdS3 black hole is dual to a CFT with nonvanishing left central charge. Moreover, our investigation suggests that the quantum topological massive gravity asymptotic to the same spacelike warped AdS3 in different consistent ways may be dual to different two-dimensional CFTs.

  6. Self-dual (48,24;12) codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, G.

    1992-01-01

    Two self-dual (48,24;12) codes are constructed as 6 x 8 matrices whose columns add up to form an extended BCH-Hamming (8,4;4) code and whose rows sum to odd or even parity. The codes constructed have the identical weight structure of the extended quadratic residue code of length 48. Algebraic isomorphisms may exist between pairs of these three codes. However, because of their matrix form, the newly constructed codes are easily correctable for all five-error and many six-error patterns. The first code comes from restricting a binary cyclic (63,18;36) code to a 6 x 7 matrix and then adjoining six dimensions to the extended 6 x 8 matrix. These six dimensions are generated by linear combinations of row permutations of a 6 x 8 matrix of weight 12, whose sums of rows and columns add to one. The second code comes from a slight modification in the parity (eighth) dimension of the Reed-Solomon (8,4;5) code over GF(64). Error correction in both codes uses the row sum parity information to detect errors in the correction algorithm.

  7. Inclusion filters: a class of self-dual connected operators.

    PubMed

    Ray, Nilanjan; Acton, Scott T

    2005-11-01

    In this paper, we define a connected operator that either fills or retains the holes of the connected sets depending on application-specific criteria that are increasing in the set theoretic sense. We refer to this class of connected operators as inclusion filters, which are shown to be increasing, idempotent, and self dual (gray-level inversion invariance). We demonstrate self duality for 8-adjacency on a discrete Cartesian grid. Inclusion filters are defined first for binary-valued images, and then the definition is extended to grayscale imagery. It is also shown that inclusion filters are levelings, a larger class of connected operators. Several important applications of inclusion filters are demonstrated-automatic segmentation of the lung cavities from magnetic resonance imagery, user interactive shape delineation in content-based image retrieval, registration of intravital microscopic video sequences, and detection and tracking of cells from these sequences. The numerical performance measures on 100-cell tracking experiments show that the use of inclusion filter improves the total number of frames successfully tracked by five times and provides a threefold reduction in the overall position error. PMID:16279174

  8. Topological self-dual configurations in a Lorentz-violating gauged O (3 ) sigma model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casana, R.; Farias, C. F.; Ferreira, M. M.

    2015-12-01

    We have studied the existence of topological Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield or self-dual configurations in a Lorentz-violating gauged O (3 ) nonlinear sigma model, where C P T -even Lorentz-violating (LV) terms were introduced in both the gauge and σ -field sectors. As happens in the usual gauged σ model, purely magnetic self-dual configurations are allowed, maintaining some qualitative features of the standard ones. In a more involved configuration, Lorentz violation provides new self-dual magnetic solutions carrying an electric field but a null total electric charge. In both cases, the total energy of the self-dual configurations turns out to be proportional to the topological charge of the model and to the LV parameters introduced in the σ sector. It is shown that the LV terms yield magnetic flux reversion as well.

  9. Reductions of self-dual Yang-Mills fields and classical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakravarty, S.; Ablowitz, M. J.; Clarkson, P. A.

    1990-08-01

    One-dimensional reductions of the self-dual Yang-Mills equations yield various classical systems depending on the choice of the Lie algebra associated with the self-dual fields. Included are the Euler-Arnold equations for rigid bodies in n dimensions, the Kovalevskaya top, and a generalization of the Nahm equation which is related to a classical third-order differential equation possessing a movable natural boundary in the complex plane.

  10. Convergence Rates of the Spectral Distributions of Large Random Quaternion Self-Dual Hermitian Matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Yanqing; Bai, Zhidong

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, convergence rates of the spectral distributions of quaternion self-dual Hermitian matrices are investigated. We show that under conditions of finite 6th moments, the expected spectral distribution of a large quaternion self-dual Hermitian matrix converges to the semicircular law in a rate of and the spectral distribution itself converges to the semicircular law in rates and . Those results include GSE as a special case.

  11. Apparatus to study matter-wave quantum optics in spin space in a sodium spinor Bose-Einstein condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nematollahi, Delaram; Zhang, Qimin; Altermatt, Joseph; Zhong, Shan; Goodman, Matthew; Bhagat, Anita; Schwettmann, Arne

    2016-05-01

    We present our apparatus designed to study matter-wave quantum optics in spin space, including our recently finished vacuum system and laser systems. Microwave-dressed spin-exchange collisions in a sodium spinor Bose-Einstein condensate provide a precisely controllable nonlinear interaction that generates squeezing and acts as a source of entanglement. As a consequence of this entanglement between atoms with magnetic quantum numbers m = +1 and m = -1, the noise of population measurements can be reduced below the shot noise. Versatile microwave pulse sequences will be used to implement an interferometer, a phase-sensitive amplifier and other devices. With an added ion detector to detect Rydberg atoms via pulsed-field ionization, we plan to study the effect of Rydberg excitations on the spin evolution of the ultracold gas.

  12. Localized spatially nonlinear matter waves in atomic-molecular Bose-Einstein condensates with space-modulated nonlinearity.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yu-Qin; Li, Ji; Han, Wei; Wang, Deng-Shan; Liu, Wu-Ming

    2016-01-01

    The intrinsic nonlinearity is the most remarkable characteristic of the Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) systems. Many studies have been done on atomic BECs with time- and space- modulated nonlinearities, while there is few work considering the atomic-molecular BECs with space-modulated nonlinearities. Here, we obtain two kinds of Jacobi elliptic solutions and a family of rational solutions of the atomic-molecular BECs with trapping potential and space-modulated nonlinearity and consider the effect of three-body interaction on the localized matter wave solutions. The topological properties of the localized nonlinear matter wave for no coupling are analysed: the parity of nonlinear matter wave functions depends only on the principal quantum number n, and the numbers of the density packets for each quantum state depend on both the principal quantum number n and the secondary quantum number l. When the coupling is not zero, the localized nonlinear matter waves given by the rational function, their topological properties are independent of the principal quantum number n, only depend on the secondary quantum number l. The Raman detuning and the chemical potential can change the number and the shape of the density packets. The stability of the Jacobi elliptic solutions depends on the principal quantum number n, while the stability of the rational solutions depends on the chemical potential and Raman detuning. PMID:27403634

  13. Localized spatially nonlinear matter waves in atomic-molecular Bose-Einstein condensates with space-modulated nonlinearity

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yu-Qin; Li, Ji; Han, Wei; Wang, Deng-Shan; Liu, Wu-Ming

    2016-01-01

    The intrinsic nonlinearity is the most remarkable characteristic of the Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) systems. Many studies have been done on atomic BECs with time- and space- modulated nonlinearities, while there is few work considering the atomic-molecular BECs with space-modulated nonlinearities. Here, we obtain two kinds of Jacobi elliptic solutions and a family of rational solutions of the atomic-molecular BECs with trapping potential and space-modulated nonlinearity and consider the effect of three-body interaction on the localized matter wave solutions. The topological properties of the localized nonlinear matter wave for no coupling are analysed: the parity of nonlinear matter wave functions depends only on the principal quantum number n, and the numbers of the density packets for each quantum state depend on both the principal quantum number n and the secondary quantum number l. When the coupling is not zero, the localized nonlinear matter waves given by the rational function, their topological properties are independent of the principal quantum number n, only depend on the secondary quantum number l. The Raman detuning and the chemical potential can change the number and the shape of the density packets. The stability of the Jacobi elliptic solutions depends on the principal quantum number n, while the stability of the rational solutions depends on the chemical potential and Raman detuning. PMID:27403634

  14. ADHM construction of (anti-)self-dual instantons in eight dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamula, Atsushi; Sasaki, Shin; Takesue, Koki

    2016-09-01

    We study the ADHM construction of (anti-)self-dual instantons in eight dimensions. We propose a general scheme to construct the (anti-)self-dual gauge field configurations F ∧ F = ±*8 F ∧ F whose finite topological charges are given by the fourth Chern number. We show that our construction reproduces the known SO (8) one-instanton solution. We also construct multi-instanton solutions of the 't Hooft and the Jackiw-Nohl-Rebbi (JNR) types in the dilute instanton gas approximation. The well-separated configurations of multi-instantons reproduce the correct topological charges with high accuracy. We also show that our construction is generalized to (anti-)self-dual instantons in 4n (n = 3 , 4 , …) dimensions.

  15. An algorithm to design finite field multipliers using a self-dual normal basis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, C. C.

    1987-01-01

    Finite field multiplication is central in the implementation of some error-correcting coders. Massey and Omura have presented a revolutionary design for multiplication in a finite field. In their design, a normal base is utilized to represent the elements of the field. The concept of using a self-dual normal basis to design the Massey-Omura finite field multiplier is presented. Presented first is an algorithm to locate a self-dual normal basis for GF(2 sup m) for odd m. Then a method to construct the product function for designing the Massey-Omura multiplier is developed. It is shown that the construction of the product function base on a self-dual basis is simpler than that based on an arbitrary normal base.

  16. Atom interferometry using Bose-Einstein condensates on Earth and in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sackett, C. A.; Leonard, R. H.; Fallon, A.

    2015-03-01

    The Cold Atom Laboratory is a multipurpose ultracold gas experiment currently being developed for operation on the international space station. It will have the ability to demonstrate proof-of-principle atom interferometry experiments in space. By using microgravity, atom interferometry has the potential to achieve extremely good performance in sensing and navigation applications. Terrestrial experiments can be used to explore potential challenges and prior to launch. One issue of concern is the release of cold atoms from a magnetic trap into free space. Although the atoms will not fall, they can acquire relatively large velocities due to technical limitations such as stray magnetic fields. This can limit the time available for measurements and thus the atom interferometer performance.

  17. Einstein-Weyl field equations in a Bianchi type-IX space-time

    SciTech Connect

    Kolassis, C.A.; Le Denmat, G.

    1984-07-15

    It is proved that there exists no solution of the combined gravitational-neutrino field equations in general relativity if the space-time metric admits a group of isometries of Bianchi type IX and the neutrino field has geodesic and shearfree rays.

  18. Extended phase space of AdS black holes in Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity with a quadratic nonlinear electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendi, S. H.; Panahiyan, S.; Momennia, M.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we consider quadratic Maxwell invariant as a correction to the Maxwell theory and study thermodynamic behavior of the black holes in Einstein and Gauss-Bonnet gravities. We consider cosmological constant as a thermodynamic pressure to extend phase space. Next, we obtain critical values in case of variation of nonlinearity and Gauss-Bonnet parameters. Although the general thermodynamical behavior of the black hole solutions is the same as usual Van der Waals system, we show that in special case of the nonlinear electromagnetic field, there will be a turning point for the phase diagrams and usual Van der Waals is not observed. This theory of nonlinear electromagnetic field provides two critical horizon radii. We show that this unusual behavior of phase diagrams is due to existence of second critical horizon radius. It will be pointed out that the power of the gravity and nonlinearity of the matter field modify the critical values. We generalize the study by considering the effects of dimensionality on critical values and make comparisons between our models with their special sub-classes. In addition, we examine the possibility of the existence of the reentrant phase transitions through two different methods.

  19. Study of Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen state for space-time variables in a two photon interference experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Y. H.; Sergienko, A. V.; Rubin, M. H.

    1993-01-01

    A pair of correlated photons generated from parametric down conversion was sent to two independent Michelson interferometers. Second order interference was studied by means of a coincidence measurement between the outputs of two interferometers. The reported experiment and analysis studied this second order interference phenomena from the point of view of Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox. The experiment was done in two steps. The first step of the experiment used 50 psec and 3 nsec coincidence time windows simultaneously. The 50 psec window was able to distinguish a 1.5 cm optical path difference in the interferometers. The interference visibility was measured to be 38 percent and 21 percent for the 50 psec time window and 22 percent and 7 percent for the 3 nsec time window, when the optical path difference of the interferometers were 2 cm and 4 cm, respectively. By comparing the visibilities between these two windows, the experiment showed the non-classical effect which resulted from an E.P.R. state. The second step of the experiment used a 20 psec coincidence time window, which was able to distinguish a 6 mm optical path difference in the interferometers. The interference visibilities were measured to be 59 percent for an optical path difference of 7 mm. This is the first observation of visibility greater than 50 percent for a two interferometer E.P.R. experiment which demonstrates nonclassical correlation of space-time variables.

  20. Numerical construction of initial data for Einstein's equations with static extension to space-like infinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doulis, Georgios; Rinne, Oliver

    2016-04-01

    We describe a numerical method to construct Cauchy data extending to space-like infinity based on Corvino's (2000) gluing method. Adopting the setting of Giulini and Holzegel (2005), we restrict ourselves here to vacuum axisymmetric spacetimes and glue a Schwarzschildean end to Brill-Lindquist data describing two non-rotating black holes. Our numerical implementation is based on pseudo-spectral methods and we carry out extensive convergence tests to check the validity of our numerical results. We also investigate the dependence of the total ADM mass on the details of the gluing construction.

  1. Einstein Toolkit for Relativistic Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collaborative Effort

    2011-02-01

    The Einstein Toolkit is a collection of software components and tools for simulating and analyzing general relativistic astrophysical systems. Such systems include gravitational wave space-times, collisions of compact objects such as black holes or neutron stars, accretion onto compact objects, core collapse supernovae and Gamma-Ray Bursts. The Einstein Toolkit builds on numerous software efforts in the numerical relativity community including CactusEinstein, Whisky, and Carpet. The Einstein Toolkit currently uses the Cactus Framework as the underlying computational infrastructure that provides large-scale parallelization, general computational components, and a model for collaborative, portable code development.

  2. Centenarian Einstein

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-04-25

    Commémoration de A.Einstein avec 4 orateurs pour honnorer sa mémoire: le prof.Weisskopf parlera de l'homme de science engagé, Daniel Amati du climat de la physique aux années 1920, Sergio Fubini de l'heure scientifique d'A.Einstein et le prof.Berob(?)

  3. From Newton to Einstein.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryder, L. H.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the history of scientific thought in terms of the theories of inertia and absolute space, relativity and gravitation. Describes how Sir Isaac Newton used the work of earlier scholars in his theories and how Albert Einstein used Newton's theories in his. (CW)

  4. Einstein's Universe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Eric; Wald, Robert

    1979-01-01

    Presents a guide to be used by students and teachers in conjunction with a television program about Einstein. Provides general information about special and general relativity, and the universe. Includes questions for discussion after each section and a bibliography. (MA)

  5. Vortex dynamics in self-dual Chern-Simons-Higgs systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y. ); Lee, K. )

    1994-02-15

    We consider vortex dynamics in self-dual Chern-Simons-Higgs systems. We show that the naive Aharonov-Bohm phase is the inverse of the statistical phase expected from the vortex spin, and that the self-dual configurations of vortices are degenerate in energy but not in angular momentum. We also use the path integral formalism to derive the dual formulation of Chern-Simons-Higgs systems in which vortices appear as charged particles. We argue that in addition to the electromagnetic interaction, there is an additional interaction between vortices, the so-called Magnus force, and that these forces can be put together into a single dual electromagnetic'' interaction. This dual electromagnetic interaction leads to the right statistical phase. We also derive and study the effective action for slowly moving vortices, which contains terms both linear and quadratic in the vortex velocity. We show that vortices can be bounded to each other by the Magnus force.

  6. New binary quantum stabilizer codes from the binary extremal self-dual code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, WeiLiang; Fan, YangYu; Li, RuiHu

    2015-08-01

    This paper is devoted to constructing binary quantum stabilizer codes based on the binary extremal self-dual code of parameters by Steane's construction. First, we provide an explicit generator matrix for the unique self-dual code to see it as a one-generator quasi-cyclic one and obtain six optimal self-orthogonal codes of parameters for with dual distances from 11 to 7 by puncturing the code. Second, a special type of subcode structures for self-orthogonal codes is investigated, and then ten derived dual chains are designed. Third, twelve binary quantum codes are constructed from these derived dual pairs within dual chains using Steane's construction. Ten of them, , , and , achieve as good parameters as the best known ones with comparable lengths and dimensions. Two other codes of parameters and are record breaking in the sense that they improve on the best known ones with the same lengths and dimensions in terms of distance.

  7. Nonlinear periodic waves solutions of the nonlinear self-dual network equations

    SciTech Connect

    Laptev, Denis V. Bogdan, Mikhail M.

    2014-04-15

    The new classes of periodic solutions of nonlinear self-dual network equations describing the breather and soliton lattices, expressed in terms of the Jacobi elliptic functions have been obtained. The dependences of the frequencies on energy have been found. Numerical simulations of soliton lattice demonstrate their stability in the ideal lattice and the breather lattice instability in the dissipative lattice. However, the lifetime of such structures in the dissipative lattice can be extended through the application of ac driving terms.

  8. Topological quantum codes from self-complementary self-dual graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naghipour, Avaz; Jafarizadeh, Mohammad Ali; Shahmorad, Sedaghat

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we present two new classes of binary quantum codes with minimum distance of at least three, by self-complementary self-dual orientable embeddings of "voltage graphs" and "Paley graphs in the Galois field GF(pr)", where pin {P} and rin {Z}+. The parameters of two new classes of quantum codes are [[(2k'+2)(8k'+7),2(8k'2+7k'),d_min

  9. Einstein Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fine, Leonard

    2005-01-01

    A brief description on the work and life of the great physicist scientist Albert Einstein is presented. The photoelectric paper written by him in 1905 led him to the study of fluctuations in the energy density of radiation and from there to the incomplete nature of the equipartition theorem of classical mechanics, which failed to account for…

  10. Einstein's Mirror

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gjurchinovski, Aleksandar; Skeparovski, Aleksandar

    2008-01-01

    Reflection of light from a plane mirror in uniform rectilinear motion is a century-old problem, intimately related to the foundations of special relativity. The problem was first investigated by Einstein in his famous 1905 paper by using the Lorentz transformations to switch from the mirror's rest frame to the frame where the mirror moves at a…

  11. The NASA Beyond Einstein Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Nicholas E.

    2004-01-01

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) mission is part of NASA s Beyond Einstein program. This program seeks to answer the questions What Powered the Big Bang?, What happens at the edge of a Black Hole?, and What is Dark Energy?. LISA IS the first mission to be launched in this new program. This paper will give an overview of the Beyond Einstein program, its current status and where LISA fits in.

  12. On Lagrangian approach to self-dual gauge fields in spacetime of nontrivial topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandos, Igor

    2014-08-01

    We study the Lagrangian description of chiral bosons, p-form gauge fields with (anti-)self-dual gauge field strengths, in D = 2 p + 2 dimensional spacetime of non-trivial topology. We show that the manifestly Lorentz and diffeomorphism invariant Pasti-Sorokin-Tonin (PST) approach is consistent and produces the (anti-)self-duality equation also in topologically nontrivial spacetime. We discuss in what circumstances the nontrivial topology makes difference between two disconnected, da-timelike and da-spacelike branches of the PST system, the gauge fixed version of which are described by not manifestly invariant Henneaux-Teitelboim (HT) and Perry-Schwarz (PS) actions, respectively.

  13. The NASA Beyond Einstein Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Nicholas E.

    2006-01-01

    Einstein's legacy is incomplete, his theory of General relativity raises -- but cannot answer --three profound questions: What powered the big bang? What happens to space, time, and matter at the edge of a black hole? and What is the mysterious dark energy pulling the Universe apart? The Beyond Einstein program within NASA's Office of Space Science aims to answer these questions, employing a series of missions linked by powerful new technologies and complementary approaches towards shared science goals. The Beyond Einstein program has three linked elements which advance science and technology towards two visions; to detect directly gravitational wave signals from the earliest possible moments of the BIg Bang, and to image the event horizon of a black hole. The central element is a pair of Einstein Great Observatories, Constellation-X and LISA. Constellation-X is a powerful new X-ray observatory dedicated to X-Ray Spectroscopy. LISA is the first spaced based gravitational wave detector. These powerful facilities will blaze new paths to the questions about black holes, the Big Bang and dark energy. The second element is a series of competitively selected Einstein Probes, each focused on one of the science questions and includes a mission dedicated resolving the Dark Energy mystery. The third element is a program of technology development, theoretical studies and education. The Beyond Einstein program is a new element in the proposed NASA budget for 2004. This talk will give an overview of the program and the missions contained within it.

  14. Einstein's Mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gjurchinovski, Aleksandar; Skeparovski, Aleksandar

    2008-10-01

    Reflection of light from a plane mirror in uniform rectilinear motion is a century-old problem, intimately related to the foundations of special relativity.1-4 The problem was first investigated by Einstein in his famous 1905 paper by using the Lorentz transformations to switch from the mirror's rest frame to the frame where the mirror moves at a constant velocity.5 Einstein showed an intriguing fact that the usual law of reflection would not hold in the case of a uniformly moving mirror, that is, the angles of incidence and reflection of the light would not equal each other. Later on, it has been shown that the law of reflection at a moving mirror can be obtained in various alternative ways,6-10 but none of them seems suitable for bringing this interesting subject into the high school classroom.

  15. Beyond Einstein

    SciTech Connect

    Professor Joel Primack

    2007-10-08

    The National Academy of Sciences was commissioned in 2006 to report on how to restart the Beyond Einstein program, which includes missions to understand dark energy, test general relativity, and observe gravity waves from merging supermassive black holes. This colloquium by one of the members of the recently released Academy study will explain the research strategy that the report proposes and its implications for continued U.S. participation in the exploration of the universe.

  16. Extended phase space thermodynamics and P- V criticality: Brans-Dicke-Born-Infeld vs. Einstein-Born-Infeld-dilaton black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendi, S. H.; Tad, R. Moradi; Armanfard, Z.; Talezadeh, M. S.

    2016-05-01

    Motivated by a thermodynamic analogy of black holes and Van der Waals liquid/gas systems, in this paper, we study P- V criticality of both dilatonic Born-Infeld black holes and their conformal solutions, Brans-Dicke-Born-Infeld solutions. Due to the conformal constraint, we have to neglect the old Lagrangian of dilatonic Born-Infeld theory and its black hole solutions, and introduce a new one. We obtain spherically symmetric nonlinearly charged black hole solutions in both Einstein and Jordan frames and then we calculate the related conserved and thermodynamic quantities. After that, we extend the phase space by considering the proportionality of the cosmological constant and thermodynamical pressure. We obtain critical values of the thermodynamic coordinates through numerical methods and plot the relevant P- V and G- T diagrams. Investigation of the mentioned diagrams helps us to study the thermodynamical phase transition. We also analyze the effects of varying different parameters on the phase transition of black holes.

  17. Einstein flow and cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouneiher, J.

    2015-07-01

    The recent evolution of the observational technics and the development of new tools in cosmology and gravitation have a significant impact on the study of the cosmological models. In particular, the qualitative and numerical methods used in dynamical system and elsewhere, enable the resolution of some difficult problems and allow the analysis of different cosmological models even with a limited number of symmetries. On the other hand, following Einstein point of view the manifold ℳ and the metric should be built simultaneously when solving Einstein’s equation Rμν -1 2Rgμν = Tμν. From this point of view, the only kinematic condition imposed is that at each point of space-time, the tangent space is endowed with a metric (which is a Minkowski metric in the physical case of pseudo-Riemannian manifolds and an Euclidean one in the Riemannian analogous problem). Then the field (gμν) describes the way these metrics depend on the point in a smooth way and the Einstein equation is the “dynamical” constraint on gμν. So, we have to imagine an infinite continuous family of copies of the same Minkowski or Euclidean space and to find a way to sew together these infinitesimal pieces into a manifold, by respecting Einstein’s equation. Thus, Einstein field equations do not fix once and for all the global topology. 34 Given this freedom in the topology of the space-time manifold, a question arises as to how free the choice of these topologies may be and how one may hope to determine them, which in turn is intimately related to the observational consequences of the space-time possessing nontrivial topologies. Therefore, in this paper we will use a different qualitative dynamical methods to determine the actual topology of the space-time.

  18. Quasinormal modes of self-dual warped AdS3 black hole in topological massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ran; Ren, Ji-Rong

    2011-03-01

    We consider the scalar, vector and spinor field perturbations in the background of self-dual warped AdS3 black hole of topological massive gravity. The corresponding exact expressions for quasinormal modes are obtained by analytically solving the perturbation equations and imposing the vanishing Dirichlet boundary condition at asymptotic infinity. It is expected that the quasinormal modes agree with the poles of retarded Green’s functions of the CFT dual to self-dual warped AdS3 black hole. Our results provide a quantitative test of the warped AdS/CFT correspondence.

  19. Piecewise linear manifolds: Einstein metrics and Ricci flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrader, Robert

    2016-05-01

    This article provides an attempt to extend concepts from the theory of Riemannian manifolds to piecewise linear (p.l.) spaces. In particular we propose an analogue of the Ricci tensor, which we give the name of an Einstein vector field. On a given set of p.l. spaces we define and discuss (normalized) Einstein flows. p.l. Einstein metrics are defined and examples are provided. Criteria for flows to approach Einstein metrics are formulated. Second variations of the total scalar curvature at a specific Einstein space are calculated. Dedicated to Ludwig Faddeev on the occasion of his 80th birthday.

  20. Conserved charges for black holes in Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity coupled to nonlinear electrodynamics in AdS space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mišković, Olivera; Olea, Rodrigo

    2011-01-01

    Motivated by possible applications within the framework of anti-de Sitter gravity/conformal field theory correspondence, charged black holes with AdS asymptotics, which are solutions to Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity in D dimensions, and whose electric field is described by nonlinear electrodynamics are studied. For a topological static black hole ansatz, the field equations are exactly solved in terms of the electromagnetic stress tensor for an arbitrary nonlinear electrodynamic Lagrangian in any dimension D and for arbitrary positive values of Gauss-Bonnet coupling. In particular, this procedure reproduces the black hole metric in Born-Infeld and conformally invariant electrodynamics previously found in the literature. Altogether, it extends to D>4 the four-dimensional solution obtained by Soleng in logarithmic electrodynamics, which comes from vacuum polarization effects. Falloff conditions for the electromagnetic field that ensure the finiteness of the electric charge are also discussed. The black hole mass and vacuum energy as conserved quantities associated to an asymptotic timelike Killing vector are computed using a background-independent regularization of the gravitational action based on the addition of counterterms which are a given polynomial in the intrinsic and extrinsic curvatures.

  1. AdS/CFT connection between Boltzmann and Einstein equations: Kinetic theory and pure gravity in AdS space

    SciTech Connect

    Iyer, Ramakrishnan; Mukhopadhyay, Ayan

    2010-04-15

    The AdS/CFT correspondence defines a sector with universal strongly coupled dynamics in the field theory as the dual of pure gravity in AdS described by Einstein's equation with a negative cosmological constant. We explain here, from the field-theoretic viewpoint how the dynamics in this sector gets determined by the expectation value of the energy-momentum tensor alone. We first show that the Boltzmann equation has very special solutions which could be functionally completely determined in terms of the energy-momentum tensor alone. We call these solutions conservative solutions. We indicate why conservative solutions should also exist when we refine this kinetic description to go closer to the exact microscopic theory or even move away from the regime of weak coupling so that no kinetic description could be employed. We argue that these conservative solutions form the universal sector dual to pure gravity at strong coupling and large N. Based on this observation, we propose a regularity condition on the energy-momentum tensor so that the dual solution in pure gravity has a smooth future horizon. We also study if irreversibility emerges only at long time scales of observation, unlike the case of the Boltzmann equation.

  2. Conserved charges for black holes in Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity coupled to nonlinear electrodynamics in AdS space

    SciTech Connect

    Miskovic, Olivera; Olea, Rodrigo

    2011-01-15

    Motivated by possible applications within the framework of anti-de Sitter gravity/conformal field theory correspondence, charged black holes with AdS asymptotics, which are solutions to Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity in D dimensions, and whose electric field is described by nonlinear electrodynamics are studied. For a topological static black hole ansatz, the field equations are exactly solved in terms of the electromagnetic stress tensor for an arbitrary nonlinear electrodynamic Lagrangian in any dimension D and for arbitrary positive values of Gauss-Bonnet coupling. In particular, this procedure reproduces the black hole metric in Born-Infeld and conformally invariant electrodynamics previously found in the literature. Altogether, it extends to D>4 the four-dimensional solution obtained by Soleng in logarithmic electrodynamics, which comes from vacuum polarization effects. Falloff conditions for the electromagnetic field that ensure the finiteness of the electric charge are also discussed. The black hole mass and vacuum energy as conserved quantities associated to an asymptotic timelike Killing vector are computed using a background-independent regularization of the gravitational action based on the addition of counterterms which are a given polynomial in the intrinsic and extrinsic curvatures.

  3. Spherically symmetric self-dual Yang-Mills instantons on curved backgrounds in all even dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Radu, Eugen; Tchrakian, D. H.; Yang Yisong

    2008-02-15

    We present several different classes of self-dual Yang-Mills instantons in all even d-dimensional backgrounds with Euclidean signature. In d=4p+2 the only solutions we found are on constant curvature dS (de Sitter) and AdS (anti-de Sitter) backgrounds and are evaluated in closed form. In d=4p an interesting class of instantons are given on black hole backgrounds. One class of solutions are (Euclidean) time-independent and spherically symmetric in d-1 dimensions, and the other class are spherically symmetric in all d dimensions. Some of the solutions in the former class are evaluated numerically, all the rest being given in closed form. Analytic proofs of existence covering all numerically evaluated solutions are given. All instantons studied have finite action and vanishing energy momentum tensor and do not disturb the geometry.

  4. Evolution of the phase-space density and the Jeans scale for dark matter derived from the Vlasov-Einstein equation

    SciTech Connect

    Piattella, O.F.; Rodrigues, D.C.; Fabris, J.C.; Pacheco, J.A. de Freitas E-mail: davi.rodrigues@ufes.br E-mail: pacheco@oca.eu

    2013-11-01

    We discuss solutions of Vlasov-Einstein equation for collisionless dark matter particles in the context of a flat Friedmann universe. We show that, after decoupling from the primordial plasma, the dark matter phase-space density indicator Q = ρ/(σ{sub 1D}{sup 2}){sup 3/2} remains constant during the expansion of the universe, prior to structure formation. This well known result is valid for non-relativistic particles and is not ''observer dependent'' as in solutions derived from the Vlasov-Poisson system. In the linear regime, the inclusion of velocity dispersion effects permits to define a physical Jeans length for collisionless matter as function of the primordial phase-space density indicator: λ{sub J} = (5π/G){sup 1/2}Q{sup −1/3}ρ{sub dm}{sup −1/6}. The comoving Jeans wavenumber at matter-radiation equality is smaller by a factor of 2-3 than the comoving wavenumber due to free-streaming, contributing to the cut-off of the density fluctuation power spectrum at the lowest scales. We discuss the physical differences between these two scales. For dark matter particles of mass equal to 200 GeV, the derived Jeans mass is 4.3 × 10{sup −6}M{sub ⊙}.

  5. Einstein, Bohr, and Bell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellac, Michel Le

    2014-11-01

    The final form of quantum physics, in the particular case of wave mechanics, was established in the years 1925-1927 by Heisenberg, Schrödinger, Born and others, but the synthesis was the work of Bohr who gave an epistemological interpretation of all the technicalities built up over those years; this interpretation will be examined briefly in Chapter 10. Although Einstein acknowledged the success of quantum mechanics in atomic, molecular and solid state physics, he disagreed deeply with Bohr's interpretation. For many years, he tried to find flaws in the formulation of quantum theory as it had been more or less accepted by a large majority of physicists, but his objections were brushed away by Bohr. However, in an article published in 1935 with Podolsky and Rosen, universally known under the acronym EPR, Einstein thought he had identified a difficulty in the by then standard interpretation. Bohr's obscure, and in part beyond the point, answer showed that Einstein had hit a sensitive target. Nevertheless, until 1964, the so-called Bohr-Einstein debate stayed uniquely on a philosophical level, and it was actually forgotten by most physicists, as the few of them aware of it thought it had no practical implication. In 1964, the Northern Irish physicist John Bell realized that the assumptions contained in the EPR article could be tested experimentally. These assumptions led to inequalities, the Bell inequalities, which were in contradiction with quantum mechanical predictions: as we shall see later on, it is extremely likely that the assumptions of the EPR article are not consistent with experiment, which, on the contrary, vindicates the predictions of quantum physics. In Section 3.2, the origin of Bell's inequalities will be explained with an intuitive example, then they will be compared with the predictions of quantum theory in Section 3.3, and finally their experimental status will be reviewed in Section 3.4. The debate between Bohr and Einstein goes much beyond a

  6. Self-dual quantum electrodynamics as boundary state of the three-dimensional bosonic topological insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Cenke; You, Yi-Zhuang

    2015-12-01

    Inspired by recent developments in constructing novel Dirac liquid boundary states of a three-dimensional (3D) topological insulator, we propose one possible two-dimensional boundary state of a 3D bosonic symmetry protected topological state with U (1) e⋊Z2T×U (1) s symmetry. This boundary theory is described by a (2 +1 ) -dimensional quantum electrodynamics (QED3) with two flavors of Dirac fermions (Nf=2 ) coupled with a noncompact U(1) gauge field, L =∑j=12ψ¯jγμ(∂μ-i aμ) ψj-i Aμsψi¯γμτij zψj+i/2 π ɛμ ν ρaμ∂νAρe , where aμ is the internal noncompact U(1) gauge field, and Aμs and Aμe are two external gauge fields that couple to U (1) s and U (1) e global symmetries, respectively. We demonstrate that this theory has a "self-dual" structure, which is a fermionic analog of the self-duality of the noncompact CP1 theory with easy plane anisotropy. Under the self-duality, the boundary action takes exactly the same form except for an exchange between Aμs and Aμe. The self-duality may still hold after we break one of the U(1) symmetries (which makes the system a bosonic topological insulator), with some subtleties that will be discussed.

  7. Self-dual black holes in loop quantum gravity: Theory and phenomenology

    SciTech Connect

    Modesto, Leonardo; Premont-Schwarz, Isabeau

    2009-09-15

    In this paper we have recalled the semiclassical metric obtained from a classical analysis of the loop quantum black hole (LQBH). We show that the regular Reissner-Nordstroem-like metric is self-dual in the sense of T-duality: the form of the metric obtained in loop quantum gravity is invariant under the exchange r{yields}a{sub 0}/r where a{sub 0} is proportional to the minimum area in loop quantum gravity and r is the standard Schwarzschild radial coordinate at asymptotic infinity. Of particular interest, the symmetry imposes that if an observer in r{yields}+{infinity} sees a black hole of mass m an observer in the other asymptotic infinity beyond the horizon (at r{approx_equal}0) sees a dual mass m{sub P}/m. We then show that small LQBH are stable and could be a component of dark matter. Ultralight LQBHs created shortly after the big bang would now have a mass of approximately 10{sup -5}m{sub P} and emit radiation with a typical energy of about 10{sup 13}-10{sup 14} eV but they would also emit cosmic rays of much higher energies, albeit few of them. If these small LQBHs form a majority of the dark matter of the Milky Way's Halo, the production rate of ultra-high-energy-cosmic-rays (UHECR) by these ultralight black holes would be compatible with the observed rate of the Auger detector.

  8. Bäeklund Transformations, Conservation Laws and Linearization of the Self-Dual Yang-Mills and Chiral Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L. C.

    1980-01-01

    Bäecklund Transformations (BT) and the derivation of local conservation laws are first reviewed in the classic case of the Sine-Gordon equation. The BT, conservation laws (local and nonlocal), and the inverse-scattering formulation are discussed for the chiral and the self-dual Yang-Mills fields. Their possible applications to the loop formulation for the Yang-Mills fields are mentioned. 55 references, 1 figure.

  9. The existence of self-dual vortices in a non-Abelian {Phi}{sup 2} Chern-Simons theory

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Shouxin; Wang Ying

    2010-09-15

    Applying the dynamic shooting method, we proved the existence of nontopological radially symmetric n-vortex solutions to the self-dual equation in non-Abelian Chern-Simons gauge theory with a {Phi}{sup 2}-type potential. Moreover, we obtained all possible radially symmetric nontopological bare (or 0-vortex) solutions in the non-Abelian Chern-Simons model. Meanwhile, we established the asymptotic behavior for the solutions as |x|{yields}{infinity}.

  10. Gauges and functional measures in quantum gravity I: Einstein theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, N.; Percacci, R.; Pereira, A. D.

    2016-06-01

    We perform a general computation of the off-shell one-loop divergences in Einstein gravity, in a two-parameter family of path integral measures, corresponding to different ways of parametrizing the graviton field, and a two-parameter family of gauges. Trying to reduce the gauge- and measure-dependence selects certain classes of measures and gauges respectively. There is a choice of two parameters (corresponding to the exponential parametrization and the partial gauge condition that the quantum field be traceless) that automatically eliminates the dependence on the remaining two parameters and on the cosmological constant. We observe that the divergences are invariant under a Z 2 "duality" transformation that (in a particularly important special case) involves the replacement of the densitized metric by a densitized inverse metric as the fundamental quantum variable. This singles out a formulation of unimodular gravity as the unique "self-dual" theory in this class.

  11. Posing Einstein's Question: Questioning Einstein's Pose.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Topper, David; Vincent, Dwight E.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the events surrounding a famous picture of Albert Einstein in which he poses near a blackboard containing a tensor form of his 10 field equations for pure gravity with a question mark after it. Speculates as to the content of Einstein's lecture and the questions he might have had about the equation. (Contains over 30 references.) (WRM)

  12. Schwinger's Approach to Einstein's Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milton, Kim

    2012-05-01

    Albert Einstein was one of Julian Schwinger's heroes, and Schwinger was greatly honored when he received the first Einstein Prize (together with Kurt Godel) for his work on quantum electrodynamics. Schwinger contributed greatly to the development of a quantum version of gravitational theory, and his work led directly to the important work of (his students) Arnowitt, Deser, and DeWitt on the subject. Later in the 1960's and 1970's Schwinger developed a new formulation of quantum field theory, which he dubbed Source Theory, in an attempt to get closer contact to phenomena. In this formulation, he revisited gravity, and in books and papers showed how Einstein's theory of General Relativity emerged naturally from one physical assumption: that the carrier of the gravitational force is a massless, helicity-2 particle, the graviton. (There has been a minor dispute whether gravitational theory can be considered as the massless limit of a massive spin-2 theory; Schwinger believed that was the case, while Van Dam and Veltman concluded the opposite.) In the process, he showed how all of the tests of General Relativity could be explained simply, without using the full machinery of the theory and without the extraneous concept of curved space, including such effects as geodetic precession and the Lense-Thirring effect. (These effects have now been verified by the Gravity Probe B experiment.) This did not mean that he did not accept Einstein's equations, and in his book and full article on the subject, he showed how those emerge essentially uniquely from the assumption of the graviton. So to speak of Schwinger versus Einstein is misleading, although it is true that Schwinger saw no necessity to talk of curved spacetime. In this talk I will lay out Schwinger's approach, and the connection to Einstein's theory.

  13. Einstein as Evaluator?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caulley, Darrel N.

    1982-01-01

    Like any other person, Albert Einstein was an informal evaluator, engaged in placing value on various aspects of his life, work, and the world. Based on Einstein's own statements, this paper speculates about what Einstein would have been like as a connoisseur evaluator, a conceptual evaluator, or a responsive evaluator. (Author/BW)

  14. On homogeneous Einstein (α , β) -metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zaili; Deng, Shaoqiang

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we study homogeneous Einstein (α , β) -metrics. First, we deduce a formula for Ricci curvature of a homogeneous (α , β) -metric. Based on this formula, we obtain a sufficient and necessary condition for a compact homogeneous (α , β) -metric to be Einstein and with vanishing S-curvature. Moreover, we prove that any homogeneous Ricci flat (α , β) space with vanishing S-curvature must be a Minkowski space. Finally, we consider left invariant Einstein (α , β) -metrics on Lie groups with negative Ricci constant. Under some appropriate conditions, we show that the underlying Lie groups must be two step solvable. We also present a more convenient sufficient and necessary condition for the metric to be Einstein in this special case.

  15. Potts model partition functions for self-dual families of strip graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Shu-Chiuan; Shrock, Robert

    2001-12-01

    We consider the q-state Potts model on families of self-dual strip graphs GD of the square lattice of width Ly and arbitrarily great length Lx, with periodic longitudinal boundary conditions. The general partition function Z and the T=0 antiferromagnetic special case P (chromatic polynomial) have the respective forms ∑ j=1 NF, Ly, λcF, Ly, j( λF, Ly, j) Lx, with F= Z, P. For arbitrary Ly, we determine (i) the general coefficient cF, Ly, j in terms of Chebyshev polynomials, (ii) the number nF( Ly, d) of terms with each type of coefficient, and (iii) the total number of terms NF, Ly, λ. We point out interesting connections between the nZ( Ly, d) and Temperley-Lieb algebras, and between the NF, Ly, λ and enumerations of directed lattice animals. Exact calculations of P are presented for 2⩽ Ly⩽4. In the limit of infinite length, we calculate the ground state degeneracy per site (exponent of the ground state entropy), W( q). Generalizing q from Z+ to C, we determine the continuous locus B in the complex q plane where W( q) is singular. We find the interesting result that for all Ly values considered, the maximal point at which B crosses the real q-axis, denoted qc, is the same, and is equal to the value for the infinite square lattice, qc=3. This is the first family of strip graphs of which we are aware that exhibits this type of universality of qc.

  16. Einstein's Biggest Blunder: A Cosmic Mystery Story

    ScienceCinema

    Krauss, Lawrence

    2010-09-01

    The standard model of cosmology built up over 20 years is no longer accepted as accurate. New data suggest that most of the energy density of the universe may be contained in empty space. Remarkably, this is exactly what would be expected if Einstein's cosmological constant really exists. If it does, its origin is the biggest mystery in physics and presents huge challenges for the fundamental theories of elementary particles and fields. Krauss explains Einstein's concept and describes its possible implications.

  17. Einstein's Cosmos (German Title: Einsteins Kosmos)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duerbeck, Hilmar W.; Dick, Wolfgang R.

    The different contributions of the present volume illuminate the interaction between Einstein and his colleagues when the foundations of modern cosmology were laid: First, the relativistic effects in the solar system, the gravitational redshift in the solar spectrum, and Einstein's relations with Freundlich and Eddington. Second, the cosmological models of Einstein, de Sitter, Friedmann, and Lemaître, which were discussed controversely till the end of the 1920s. Other scientists have also widened or critically questioned Einstein's insight and knowledge: Schwarzschild, Selety, Silberstein, and Mandl, whose life and work is discussed in separate articles. In those days, politics more than ever in history had influenced the lifes of scientists. Therefore, some comments on the ``political cosmos'' that has influenced decisively Einstein's life are also given. A special role in popularizing Einstein's world view was played by Archenhold Observatory in Berlin. A list of Einstein memorial places and a bibliographic list conclude the present book. All papers are written in German, and have English abstracts.

  18. Einstein's dream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khrennikov, Andrei

    2007-08-01

    We show that (in contrast to rather common opinion) QM might be not a complete theory. We present a prequantum model with the infinite dimensional phase space such that QM can be considered as an algorithm for approximation of averages with respect to prequantum fluctuations. Such an approximation is based on the asymptotic expansion of classical statistical averages with respect to a small parameter κ. Therefore statistical predictions of QM are only approximative and a better precision of measurements would induce deviations of experimental averages from quantum mechanical ones. In this paper we present a natural physical interpretation of κ as the time scaling parameter (between quantum and prequantum times). We analyse consequences of various choices of the prequantum time scale. Possible connections with attophysics and Grand Unification model are discussed.

  19. Neuromythology of Einstein's brain.

    PubMed

    Hines, Terence

    2014-07-01

    The idea that the brain of the great physicist Albert Einstein is different from "average" brains in both cellular structure and external shape is widespread. This belief is based on several studies examining Einstein's brain both histologically and morphologically. This paper reviews these studies and finds them wanting. Their results do not, in fact, provide support for the claim that the structure of Einstein's brain reflects his intellectual abilities. PMID:24836969

  20. Einstein A to Z

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Karen C.; Keck, Aries

    2004-07-01

    Einstein was the twentieth century's most celebrated scientist - a man who developed the theory of relativity, revolutionised physics and became an iconic genius in the popular imagination. Essays range from the reasonably scientific including the theory of relativity, to the odd and engaging, such as Einstein's brain, his favourite jokes and films. Einstein A to Z provides a vibrant overview of the man and his achievements.

  1. Unifying Einstein and Palatini gravities

    SciTech Connect

    Amendola, Luca; Enqvist, Kari; Koivisto, Tomi

    2011-02-15

    We consider a novel class of f(R) gravity theories where the connection is related to the conformally scaled metric g{sub {mu}{nu}=}C(R)g{sub {mu}{nu}} with a scaling that depends on the scalar curvature R only. We call them C theories and show that the Einstein and Palatini gravities can be obtained as special limits. In addition, C theories include completely new physically distinct gravity theories even when f(R)=R. With nonlinear f(R), C theories interpolate and extrapolate the Einstein and Palatini cases and may avoid some of their conceptual and observational problems. We further show that C theories have a scalar-tensor formulation, which in some special cases reduces to simple Brans-Dicke-type gravity. If matter fields couple to the connection, the conservation laws in C theories are modified. The stability of perturbations about flat space is determined by a simple condition on the Lagrangian.

  2. BOOK REVIEW: Once Upon Einstein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannetto, E.

    2007-07-01

    (pp 17--21, 48--52 and related endnotes): had Henri Poincaré constructed a special relativistic dynamics before Einstein? There is a long debate on this subject in the literature. Damour's answer is negative and his conclusions seem related to the conservation of a myth of Einstein, that is, the rise of special relativity is considered as a creatio ex nihilo within Einstein's mind and Einstein is considered as the only genius able to conceive the relativity of time. Poincaré's texts are undervalued and misunderstood by Damour's cutting quotations from their context. Damour never quotes La Science et l'Hypothèse (1902): we know it was read by Einstein and here Poincaré first (within chapters already published as separate papers in 1900) stated the relativity of time and of simultaneity. Damour never quotes Poincaré's paper published on 5 June 1905, La dynamique de l'èlectron, which presents the first relativistic dynamics, invariant by Lorentz transformations. Poincaré's (July 1905) introduction of a quadrimensional space-time is considered by Damour only a mathematical artifice (p 51) and Damour never said that Minkowski took this idea from Poincaré! Poincaré's interpretation of relativistic time implies that it is not an illusion but a complex net of different real flows related to different processes. Poincaré and Einstein had different conceptions of Nature at the root of special relativity: respectively an electromagnetic conception (Poincaré) and a semi-mechanist one (Einstein). Thus, the (philosophical) meaning of relativity can be very different from the one presented by Damour. Furthermore, Damour accepts Kantian philosophy as a key to understanding relativity and quantum theories. This perspective seems to me very anachronistic and based on a misunderstanding: an interpretation of 20th century physical theories (relativity and quantum physics) is given within the framework of an 18th century philosophical perspective, created to give a foundation

  3. Einstein for Everyone

    ScienceCinema

    Piccioni, Robert

    2014-06-25

    Young Einstein was a rebel who seemed doomed to fail. How did he overcome rejection to become the most famous scientist in history? We will discuss and explain all his theories in plain English and without math, and we will discover how Einstein's achievements impact our lives through DVDs, GPS, iPods, computers and green energy.

  4. Einstein Up in Smoke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisle, John

    2016-01-01

    Albert Einstein's biographers have not explained why he developed the abdominal aortic aneurysm that led to his death. Early conjectures proposed that it was caused by syphilis, without accurate evidence. The present article gives evidence to the contrary, and argues that the principal cause of Einstein's death was smoking.

  5. When Art Meets Einstein

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Scope, 2006

    2006-01-01

    This article deals with a pale blue sculpture entitled "A New World View", as an homage to the most famous scientist in modern history, Albert Einstein. It has 32 bas-relief squares composed of glass and steel that represent one aspect of the life and legacy of Albert Einstein. Images of children's faces peer out from behind the glass squares,…

  6. Einstein for Everyone

    SciTech Connect

    Piccioni, Robert

    2010-10-05

    Young Einstein was a rebel who seemed doomed to fail. How did he overcome rejection to become the most famous scientist in history? We will discuss and explain all his theories in plain English and without math, and we will discover how Einstein's achievements impact our lives through DVDs, GPS, iPods, computers and green energy.

  7. Einstein and Ehrenfest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Martin J.

    2005-03-01

    After Paul Ehrenfest's untimely death, Albert Einstein wrote about their first meeting more than twenty years earlier. ``Within a few hours we were true friends as though our dreams and aspirations were meant for each other.'' In fact, this warm friendship with a fellow theoretical physicist of his own age was unique in Einstein's life. I shall try to characterize it in this talk.

  8. Einstein, Mach, and the Fortunes of Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, David

    2005-04-01

    Early in his life, Albert Einstein considered himself a devoted student of the physicist and philosopher Ernst Mach. Mach's famous critiques of Newton's absolute space and time -- most notably Mach's explanation of Newton's bucket experiment -- held a strong sway over Einstein as he struggled to formulate general relativity. Einstein was convinced that his emerging theory of gravity should be consistent with Mach's principle, which states that local inertial effects arise due to gravitational interactions with distant matter. Once completed, Einstein's general relativity enjoyed two decades of worldwide attention, only to fall out of physicists' interest during the 1930s and 1940s, when topics like nuclear physics claimed center stage. Gravity began to return to the limelight during the 1950s and especially the 1960s, and once again Mach proved to be a major spur: Princeton physicists Carl Brans and Robert Dicke introduced a rival theory of gravity in 1961 which they argued satisfied Mach's principle better than Einstein's general relativity did. The Brans-Dicke theory, and the new generation of experiments designed to test its predictions against those of general relativity, played a major role in bringing Einstein's beloved topic back to the center of physics.

  9. Einstein metrics and Brans-Dicke superfields

    SciTech Connect

    Marques, S.

    1988-01-01

    It is obtained here a space conformal to the Einstein space-time, making the transition from an internal bosonic space, constructed with the Majorana constant spinors in the Majorana representation, to a bosonic ''superspace,'' through the use of Einstein vierbeins. These spaces are related to a Grassmann space constructed with the Majorana spinors referred to above, where the ''metric'' is a function of internal bosonic coordinates. The conformal function is a scale factor in the zone of gravitational radiation. A conformal function dependent on space-time coordinates can be constructed in that region when we introduce Majorana spinors which are functions of those coordinates. With this we obtain a scalar field of Brans-Dicke type. 11 refs.

  10. ...und Einstein hatte doch recht

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Will, Clifford M.; Leuchs, Anne; Leuchs, Gerd

    Keine wissenschaftliche Theorie ist auf solche Faszination auch außerhalb der Wissenschaft gestoßen wie die Allgemeine Relativitätstheorie von Albert Einstein, und keine wurde so nachdrücklich mit den Mitteln der modernen Physik überprüft. Wie hat sie diesen Test mit Raumsonden, Radioastronomie, Atomuhren und Supercomputern standgehalten? Hatte Einstein recht? Mit der Autorität des Fachmanns und dem Flair des unvoreingenommenen Erzählers schildert Clifford Will die Menschen, Ideen und Maschinen hinter den Tests der allgemeinen Relativitätstheorie. Ohne Formeln und Fachjargon wird der leser mit Einsteins Gedanken vertraut und erfährt von der Bestätigung seiner Vorhersagen, angefangen bei der Lichtablenkung im Schwerefeld der Sonne 1919 bis zu den ausgefeilten Kreiselexperimenten auf dem Space Shuttle. Die Allgemeine Relativitätstheorie hat nich nur alle diese Tests bestanden, sie hat darüber hinaus wesentlich beigetragen zu unserem Verständnis von Phänomenen wie Pulsaren, Quasaren, Schwarzen Löchern und Gravitationslinsen. Dieses Buch erzählt lebendig und spannend die Geschichte einer der größten geistigen Leistungen unserer Zeit.

  11. Einstein and Planck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heilbron, John

    2005-03-01

    As an editor of the Annalen der Physik, Max Planck published Einstein's early papers on thermodynamics and on special relativity, which Planck probably was the first major physicist to appreciate. They respected one another not only as physicists but also, for their inspired creation of world pictures, as artists. Planck helped to establish Einstein in a sinecure at the center of German physics, Berlin. Despite their differences in scientific style, social life, politics, and religion, they became fast friends. Their mutual admiration survived World War I, during which Einstein advocated pacifism and Planck signed the infamous Manifesto of the 93 Intellectuals supporting the German invasion of Belgium. It also survived the Weimar Republic, which Einstein favored and Planck disliked. Physics drew them together, as both opposed the Copenhagen Interpretation; so did common decency, as Planck helped to protect Einstein from anti-semitic attacks. Their friendship did not survive the Nazis. As a standing secretary of the Berlin Academy, Planck had to advise Einstein to resign from it before his colleagues, outraged at his criticism of the new Germany from the safety of California, expelled him. Einstein never forgave his old friend and former fellow artist for not protesting publicly against his expulsion and denigration, and other enormities of National Socialism. .

  12. Einstein and Millikan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erwin, Charlotte

    2005-03-01

    Albert Einstein traveled to America by boat during the great depression to consult with scientists at the California Institute of Technology. He was a theoretical physicist, a Nobel Prize winner, and a 20th century folk hero. Few members of the general public understood his theories, but they idolized him all the same. The invitation came from physicist Robert Millikan, who had initiated a visiting-scholars program at Caltech shortly after he became head of the school in 1921. Einstein's visits to the campus in 1931, 1932, and 1933 capped Millikan's campaign to make Caltech one of the physics capitals of the world. Mount Wilson astronomer Edwin Hubble's discovery that redshifts are proportional to their distances from the observer challenged Einstein's cosmological picture of a static universe. The big question at Caltech in 1931 was whether Einstein would give up his cosmological constant and accept the idea of an expanding universe. By day, Einstein discussed his theory and its interpretation at length with Richard Tolman, Hubble, and the other scientists on the campus. By night, Einstein filled his travel diary with his personal impressions. During his third visit, Einstein sidestepped as long as possible the question of whether conditions in Germany might prevent his return there. After the January 30 announcement that Hitler had become chancellor of Germany, the question could no longer be evaded. He postponed his return trip for a few weeks and then went to Belgium for several months instead of to Berlin. In the fall of 1933, Albert Einstein returned to the United States as an emigre and became a charter member of Abraham Flexner's new Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey. Why did Einstein go to Princeton and not Pasadena?

  13. Einstein and 1905

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigden, John

    2005-05-01

    From March 17 to September 29, 1905, just over six months, Einstein wrote five papers that shifted the tectonic foundations of physics and changed the face of Nature. Three of these papers, the March paper presenting the particle of light, the May paper on Brownian motion, and the June paper on the Special Theory of Relativity are universally recognized as fundamental; however, the Brownian motion paper cannot be divorced from Einstein's April paper, A New Determination of the Dimensions of Molecules, and the September paper that gave the world its most famous equation, E = mc^2, cannot be separated from the June paper. These five papers reveal characteristics of Einstein's approach to physics.

  14. Einstein: A Historical Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kormos-Buchwald, Diana

    2015-04-01

    In late 1915, Albert Einstein (1879-1955) completed as series of papers on a generalized theory of gravitation that were to constitute a major conceptual change in the history of modern physics and the crowning achievement of his scientific career. But this accomplishment came after a decade of intense intellectual struggle and was received with muted enthusiasm. Einstein's previously unpublished writings and massive correspondence, edited by the Einstein Papers Project, provide vivid insights into the historical, personal, and scientific context of the formulation, completion, and reception of GR during the first decades of the 20th century.

  15. Albert Einstein:. Opportunity and Perception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chen Ning

    2013-05-01

    The year 1905 has been called Albert Einstein's "Annus Mirabilis." It was during that year that he caused revolutionary changes in man's primordial concepts about the physical world: space, time, energy, light and matter. How could a 26-year-old clerk, previously unknown, cause such profound conceptual changes, and thereby open the door to the era of modern scientific technological world? No one, of course, can answer that question. But one can, perhaps, analyze some factors that were essential to his stepping into such a historic role...

  16. Einstein in Wyoming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliot, Ian

    1996-01-01

    Describes "Einstein's Adventurarium," a science center housed in an empty shopping mall in Gillette, Wyoming, created through school, business, and city-county government partnership. Describes how interactive exhibits allow exploration of life sciences, physics, and paleontology. (KDFB)

  17. Einstein equation at singularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoica, Ovidiu-Cristinel

    2014-02-01

    Einstein's equation is rewritten in an equivalent form, which remains valid at the singularities in some major cases. These cases include the Schwarzschild singularity, the Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker Big Bang singularity, isotropic singularities, and a class of warped product singularities. This equation is constructed in terms of the Ricci part of the Riemann curvature (as the Kulkarni-Nomizu product between Einstein's equation and the metric tensor).

  18. Hypermass generalization of Einstein's gravitation theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmonds, J. D., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The curvilinear invariant quaternion formalism is examined for curved space time. Einstein's gravitation equation is shown to have a simple and natural form in this notation. The hypermass generalization of particle mass, which was generated in our studies of the Dirac equation, is incorporated in gravitation by generalizing Einstein's equation. Covariance requires that the gravitational constant be generalized to an invariant quaternion when the mass is. The modification appears minor and of no importance cosmologically, unless one begins considering time and mass dependence of G.

  19. 2010 Einstein Fellows Chosen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-02-01

    NASA has announced the selection of the 2010 Einstein Fellows who will conduct research related to NASA's Physics of the Cosmos program, which aims to expand our knowledge of the origin, evolution, and fate of the Universe. The Einstein Fellowship provides support to the awardees for three years, and the Fellows may pursue their research at a host university or research center of their choosing in the United States. The new Fellows will begin their programs in the fall of 2010. The new Einstein Fellows and their host institutions are listed below: * Simona Giacintucci (Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, Cambridge, Mass.) * Boaz Katz (Institute for Advanced Studies, Princeton, N.J.) * Matthew Kerr (Stanford University, Palo Alto, Calif.) * Matthew Kistler (California Institute of Technology, Pasadena) * Emily Levesque (University of Colorado, Boulder) * Xin Liu (Harvard, Cambridge, Mass.) * Tony Mroczkowski (University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia) * Ryan O'Leary (University of California at Berkeley) * Dov Poznanski (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Berkeley, Calif.) * Nicolas Yunes (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Mass.) The Einstein Fellowships are administered for NASA by the Chandra X-ray Center in Cambridge, Mass. Along with the Hubble and Sagan Fellowships, the Einstein Fellowships are made possible by the Astrophysics Division within NASA's Science Mission Directorate. More information on the Einstein Fellowships can be found at: http://cxc.harvard.edu/fellows/CfPfellow.2009.html

  20. Einstein studies in Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balashov, Yuri; Vizgin, Vladimir

    This volume presents a selection of the best contributions by Russian scholars - historians and philosophers of science - to the Einstein Studies industry, broadly construed. Many of the papers were first published in Russian, in the Einshteinovskiy Sbornik series (Einstein Studies) initiated by I. Tamm in 1966. This book explores the historical and foundational issues in general relativity and relativistic cosmology, Einstein's contributions to quantum theory of radiation, and the rise of Dirac's quantum electrodynamics. It also includes a detailed description of the physics colloquium Einstein established and coordinated in 1912- 1914 in Zürich. The contributors draw extensively on documentation previously unavailable to most scholars. Materials from various Russian archives shed new light on the famous exchange (regarding the first evolutionary cosmological models) between Einstein and Alexander Friedmann in the early 1920's and on the role of Boris Podolsky and Vladimir Fock in the emergence of quantum electrodynamics. The little-known correspondence between Einstein and a famous German pilot Paul Erhardt suggests that during World War I, the former was involved with aero- and hydrodynamics research and ways of improving airplane design. Other articles introduce new approaches to important foundational questions in general relativity and cosmology. Historians, philosophers, and sociologists of science will find much new and unexpected material in this engaging volume presenting the best of recent Russian scholarship in the field. The book is also very accessible to the general reader.

  1. Curved spaces before Einstein: Karl Schwarzschild's cosmological speculations and the beginnings of relativistic cosmology (German Title: Gekrümmte Universen vor Einstein: Karl Schwarzschilds kosmologische Spekulationen und die Anfänge der relativistischen Kosmologie)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schemmel, Matthias

    In contrast to most of his collegues in astronomy and physics, the German astronomer Karl Schwarzschild immediately recognized the significance of general relativity for physics and astronomy, and played a pioneering role in its early development. In this contribution, it is argued that the clue for understanding Schwarzschild's exceptional reaction to general relativity lies in the study of his prerelativistic work. Long before the rise of general relativity, Schwarzschild occupied himself with foundational problems on the borderline of physics, astronomy, and mathematics that, from today's perspective, belong to the field of problems of that theory. In this contribution, the example of Schwarzschild's early speculations about the non-Euclidean nature of physical space on cosmological scales is presented and their reflection in his reception of general relativity is discussed.

  2. Bose-Einstein condensation in microgravity.

    PubMed

    van Zoest, T; Gaaloul, N; Singh, Y; Ahlers, H; Herr, W; Seidel, S T; Ertmer, W; Rasel, E; Eckart, M; Kajari, E; Arnold, S; Nandi, G; Schleich, W P; Walser, R; Vogel, A; Sengstock, K; Bongs, K; Lewoczko-Adamczyk, W; Schiemangk, M; Schuldt, T; Peters, A; Könemann, T; Müntinga, H; Lämmerzahl, C; Dittus, H; Steinmetz, T; Hänsch, T W; Reichel, J

    2010-06-18

    Albert Einstein's insight that it is impossible to distinguish a local experiment in a "freely falling elevator" from one in free space led to the development of the theory of general relativity. The wave nature of matter manifests itself in a striking way in Bose-Einstein condensates, where millions of atoms lose their identity and can be described by a single macroscopic wave function. We combine these two topics and report the preparation and observation of a Bose-Einstein condensate during free fall in a 146-meter-tall evacuated drop tower. During the expansion over 1 second, the atoms form a giant coherent matter wave that is delocalized on a millimeter scale, which represents a promising source for matter-wave interferometry to test the universality of free fall with quantum matter. PMID:20558713

  3. The Happiest thought of Einstein's Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heller, Michael

    Finally, let us have a closer look at the place of the equivalence principle in the logical scheme of Einstein's general relativity theory. First, Einstein new well, from Minkowski's geometric formulation of his own special relativity, that accelerated motions should be represented as curved lines in a flat space-time. Second, the Galileo principle asserts that all bodies are accelerated in the same way in a given gravitational field, and consequently their motions are represented in the flat space-time by curved lines, all exactly in the same way. Third, since all lines representing free motions are curved exactly in the same way in the flat space-time, one can say that the lines remain straight (as far as possible) but the space-time itself becomes curved. Fourth, and last, since acceleration is (locally) equivalent to a gravitational field (here we have the equivalence principle), one is entitled to assert that it is the gravitational field (and not acceleration) that is represented as the curvature of space-time. This looks almost like an Aristotelian syllogism. However, to put all the pieces of evidence into the logical chain took Einstein a few years of hard thinking. The result has been incorporated into the field equations which quantitatively show how the curvature of space-time and gravity are linked together.

  4. New infinite-dimensional hidden symmetries for the Einstein Maxwell dilaton axion theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Ya-Jun

    2003-11-01

    An Ernst-like 4 × 4 matrix complex potential is introduced and the motion equations of the stationary axisymmetric Einstein Maxwell dilaton axion (EMDA) theory are written as a so-called Hauser Ernst (HE)-like self-dual relation for the matrix potential. Two HE-type linear systems are established and based on which some explicit formulations of new parametrized symmetry transformations for the EMDA theory are constructed. These hidden symmetries are proved to constitute an infinite-dimensional Lie algebra, which is a semidirect product of the Kac Moody algebra sp(4, R) otimes R(t, t-1) and Virasoro algebra (without centre charges). As a part of that, the positive-half sub-Kac Moody algebra sp(4, R) otimes R(t) corresponds to the Geroch-like symmetries for the EMDA theory.

  5. Conversations With Albert Einstein. II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shankland, R. S.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses Einstein's views on the role of Michelson-Morley, Fizeau, and Miller experiments in the development of relativity and his attitude toward the theories of new quantum mechanics. Indicates that Einstein's opposition to quantum mechanics is beyond dispute. (CC)

  6. Gravitational Lensing: Einstein's unfinished symphony

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treu, Tommaso; Ellis, Richard S.

    2015-01-01

    Gravitational lensing - the deflection of light rays by gravitating matter - has become a major tool in the armoury of the modern cosmologist. Proposed nearly a hundred years ago as a key feature of Einstein's theory of general relativity, we trace the historical development since its verification at a solar eclipse in 1919. Einstein was apparently cautious about its practical utility and the subject lay dormant observationally for nearly 60 years. Nonetheless there has been rapid progress over the past twenty years. The technique allows astronomers to chart the distribution of dark matter on large and small scales thereby testing predictions of the standard cosmological model which assumes dark matter comprises a massive weakly-interacting particle. By measuring the distances and tracing the growth of dark matter structure over cosmic time, gravitational lensing also holds great promise in determining whether the dark energy, postulated to explain the accelerated cosmic expansion, is a vacuum energy density or a failure of general relativity on large scales. We illustrate the wide range of applications which harness the power of gravitational lensing, from searches for the earliest galaxies magnified by massive clusters to those for extrasolar planets which temporarily brighten a background star. We summarise the future prospects with dedicated ground and space-based facilities designed to exploit this remarkable physical phenomenon.

  7. Symmetries of the 4D self-dual Yang-Mills equation and the reduction to the 2D KdV equation

    SciTech Connect

    HoSeong La )

    1992-04-01

    The Lie-point and the Lie-Baecklund symmetries of 4D self-dual Yang-Mills equation are investigated as those of differential equations. The Lie-point symmetry is nothing but the gauge symmetry at the level of field equation, but the Lie-Baecklund symmetries are new. In particular, by the symmetry reduction to KdV equation in 2D the corresponding Lie-Baecklund symmetries which reduce to the isospectral symmetries or to the nonisospectral symmetries are identified. Some speculations on the existence of the self-dual Yang-Mills hierarchy as well as the derivation of the 4D analogue of the string equation of the nonperturbative 2D quantum gravity are given.

  8. The Einstein Toolkit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löffler, Frank

    2012-03-01

    The Einstein Toolkit Consortium is developing and supporting open software for relativistic astrophysics. Its aim is to provide the core computational tools that can enable new science, broaden our community, facilitate interdisciplinary research and take advantage of petascale computers and advanced cyberinfrastructure. The Einstein Toolkit currently consists of an open set of over 100 modules for the Cactus framework, primarily for computational relativity along with associated tools for simulation management and visualization. The toolkit includes solvers for vacuum spacetimes as well as relativistic magneto-hydrodynamics, along with modules for initial data, analysis and computational infrastructure. These modules have been developed and improved over many years by many different researchers. The Einstein Toolkit is supported by a distributed model, combining core support of software, tools, and documentation in its own repositories and through partnerships with other developers who contribute open software and coordinate together on development. As of January 2012 it has 68 registered members from 30 research groups world-wide. This talk will present the current capabilities of the Einstein Toolkit and will point to information how to leverage it for future research.

  9. Examining the Enigmatic Einstein

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khoon, Koh Aik

    2007-01-01

    Albert Einstein is the icon of scientific genius. His is one the most recognizable faces in the history of mankind. This paper takes a cursory look at the man who is commonly perceived to be the epitome of eccentricity. We manage to sum up his salient traits which are associated with his name. The traits are based on anecdotal evidence. This…

  10. Einstein and Friedman

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frenkel, Viktor

    The focus of the present article is Friedman's 1922 letter to Einstein accompanied by additional evidence throwing light on their debate, and the great roles played by Yuri Krutkov and Paul Ehrenfest, both of whom Einstein knew very well (see Frenkel 1970). The debate began soon after the appearance of Friedman's first article showing the possibility of a nonstationary solution of the cosmological problem (thus laying the foundation for the theory of an expanding universe). Einstein replied to Friedman with a note in which, as aptly observed by Fock, "he said, somewhat condescendingly, that Friedman's results seemed suspicious to him, and that he had found a mistake in them which, when corrected, reduced Friedman's solution to a stationary one" (Friedman 1966). Great people's delusions are always instructive, especially when dealing with fundamental problems. The honesty of great men can also be exemplary: the debate came to an end after the publication of Einstein's second note, in which he stressed the importance of Friedman's work.

  11. 2011 Einstein Fellows Chosen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-03-01

    ASA has announced the selection of the 2011 Einstein Fellows who will conduct research related to NASA's Physics of the Cosmos program, which aims to expand our knowledge of the origin, evolution, and fate of the Universe. The Einstein Fellowship provides support to the awardees for three years, and the Fellows may pursue their research at a host university or research center of their choosing in the United States. The new Fellows will begin their programs in the fall of 2011. The new Einstein Fellows and their host institutions are listed below: * Akos Bogdan (Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, Cambridge, Mass.) * Samuel Gralla (University of Maryland, College Park, Md.) * Philip Hopkins (University of California at Berkeley) * Matthew Kunz (Princeton University, Princeton, N.J.) * Laura Lopez (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Mass.) * Amy Reines (National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, Virg.) * Rubens Reis (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor) * Ken Shen (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, Calif.) * Jennifer Siegal-Gaskins (California Institute of Technology, Pasadena) * Lorenzo Sironi (Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass.) NASA has two other astrophysics theme-based fellowship programs: the Sagan Fellowship Program, which supports research into exoplanet exploration, and the Hubble Fellowship Program, which supports research into cosmic origins. More information on the Einstein Fellowships can be found at: http://cxc.harvard.edu/fellows/

  12. Einstein in My Hometown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamola, Karl

    2005-12-01

    During the 22 years Albert Einstein lived and worked in the United States, he frequently took long summer vacations. Generally he chose quiet, out-of-the-way vacation spots, and because of his love of sailing, places close to bodies of water. Among other locations, he vacationed at Saranac Lake in upstate New York, the Rhode Island coast, and, during the summers of 1937-39, at Nassau Point on the North Fork of Long Island. Nassau Point is a part of the small town of Cutchogue and is located on Peconic Bay, about 90 miles from New York City. It was an ideal spot for Einstein both because it was off the beaten path and because of the outstanding sailing conditions on Peconic Bay. Einstein rented a cabin just a stone's throw from the bay. I myself have a special interest in Cutchogue because it's the place where I was born and where I spent the first few years of my life. Unfortunately, I came along five or six years too late to have actually seen Einstein there, but he did have encounters with some of my older friends and relatives.

  13. Albert Einstein - Chief Engineer of the Universe: 100 Authors for Einstein Essays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renn, Jürgen

    2005-09-01

    In 1905, Albert Einstein published five scientific articles that fundamentally changed the world-view of physics: The Special Theory of Reativity revolutionized our concept of space and time, E=mc² became the best-known equation in physics. On the occasion of the 100th aniversary of his "annus mirabilis" 1905, the UNESCO declared the year 2005 the "World Year of Physics", in order to draw attention to the impact of physics. The Max Planck Institute for the history of science dedicates an exhibition in the Kronprinzenpalais in Berlin to the probably most important scientist of the 20th century. In this book, 100 authors explain the historical background of Einstein's life and work, shed light on many different aspects of his biography, and on the scientific fields and topics that are connected to Einstein's work. The authors are some of the most renowned Einstein researchers in the world, such as Jürgen Ehlers, Peter Galison, Zeev Rosenkranz, John Stachel and Robert Schulmann. The essays form a bridge between scientific and cultural history, opening up a perspective on Einstein's biography which goes beyond the traditional picture of the exceptional science genius.

  14. Einstein's Real "biggest Blunder"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Homer G.

    2012-10-01

    Albert Einstein's real "biggest blunder" was not the 1917 introduction into his gravitational field equations of a cosmological constant term Λ, rather was his failure in 1916 to distinguish between the entirely different concepts of active gravitational mass and passive gravitational mass. Had he made the distinction, and followed David Hilbert's lead in deriving field equations from a variational principle, he might have discovered a true (not a cut and paste) Einstein-Rosen bridge and a cosmological model that would have allowed him to predict, long before such phenomena were imagined by others, inflation, a big bounce (not a big bang), an accelerating expansion of the universe, dark matter, and the existence of cosmic voids, walls, filaments and nodes.

  15. Bose-Einstein Condensation

    SciTech Connect

    El-Sherbini, Th.M.

    2005-03-17

    This article gives a brief review of Bose-Einstein condensation. It is an exotic quantum phenomenon that was observed in dilute atomic gases for the first time in 1995. It exhibits a new state of matter in which a group of atoms behaves as a single particle. Experiments on this form of matter are relevant to many different areas of physics- from atomic clocks and quantum computing to super fluidity, superconductivity and quantum phase transition.

  16. Einstein's Years in Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plendl, Hans S.

    2005-11-01

    Albert Einstein left Germany, the country of his birth, in 1894 and moved to Switzerland in 1895. He studied, worked and taught there, except for a year's stay in Prague, until1914. That year he returned to Germany, where he lived until his emigration to the United States in 1933. In 1905, while living with his wife Mileva and their first son Hans Albert in Bern and working as a technical expert at the Swiss Patent Office, he published his dissertation on the determination of molecular dimensions, his papers on Brownian Motion that helped to establish the Kinetic Theory of Heat and on the Photo-Electric Effect that validated the Quantum Theory of Light, and the two papers introducing the Special Theory of Relativity. How the young Einstein could help to lay the foundations of these theories while still working on his dissertation, holding a full-time job and helping to raise a family has evoked much discussion among his biographers. In this contribution, the extent to which living within Swiss society and culture could have made this feat possible will be examined. Old and recent photos of places in Switzerland where Einstein has lived and worked will be shown.

  17. Einstein and a century of time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raine, D. J.

    2005-09-01

    In a world overabundant in information, a subject is defined by its iconography. Physics is the falling apple, the planetary atom, the laser, the mushroom cloud and the image of the later Einstein - images that represent, respectively, gravity, atomic theory, quantum theory, mass-energy and the scientist who had a hand in all four. It is therefore appropriate that World Year of Physics is called Einstein Year in the UK. Of course one can argue that progress in science depends on the contributions of many people; that there are other geniuses in physics, even some colourful personalities. Nevertheless there are fundamental reasons why Einstein's early achievements stand out even in their company. When at last the thought came to him that 'time itself was suspect', Einstein had found a new insight into the nature of the physical universe. It is this: that the universal properties of material objects tell us about the nature of space and time, and it is through these properties, not philosophical logic or common sense, that we discover the structure of spacetime. The later Einstein turned this successful formula on its head and sought to use the properties of spacetime to define those of material objects, thereby seeking to abolish matter entirely in favour of geometry. Before I introduce this special feature of European Journal of Physics I will say a few words about what is not here. Like all great geniuses Einstein can be seen as the climax of what went before him and the initiation of what was to follow. Looking back we can see the influence of Mach's positivism, according to which the role of science is to relate observations to other observations; hence only observations can tell us what is 'real'. But Einstein also grew up with the family electromechanical businesses, which testifies to the reality of the Maxwellian electromagnetic fields: thus only theory can tell us what is real! As is well known, Einstein himself refused to accept the full consequences of

  18. The stolen brain of Einstein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modi, Kavan

    2008-03-01

    Pathologist Thomas Stoltz Harvey performed an autopsy on Einstein after his death in 1955. During the autopsy Harvey removed Einstein's brain, took pictures of it and then cut it into several pieces. A lot of scientific attention has been devoted to Einstein' brain, and it still comes up once in a while. We've all heard something or other about Einstein's brain, as it has become somewhat of a folk lore. What is less known is that Harvey in actuality did not have the permission to remove the brain. Only later Harvey convinced Einstein's Hans Albert Einstein son that this was for a good purpose. The brain would only be used for scientific purpose, which will be published reputable journals. I will try to describe in some detail the long journey this brain has taken in last fifty two years.

  19. Stable Solitons in Three Dimensional Free Space without the Ground State: Self-Trapped Bose-Einstein Condensates with Spin-Orbit Coupling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong-Chang; Zhou, Zheng-Wei; Malomed, Boris A; Pu, Han

    2015-12-18

    By means of variational methods and systematic numerical analysis, we demonstrate the existence of metastable solitons in three dimensional (3D) free space, in the context of binary atomic condensates combining contact self-attraction and spin-orbit coupling, which can be engineered by available experimental techniques. Depending on the relative strength of the intra- and intercomponent attraction, the stable solitons feature a semivortex or mixed-mode structure. In spite of the fact that the local cubic self-attraction gives rise to the supercritical collapse in 3D, and hence the setting produces no true ground state, the solitons are stable against small perturbations, motion, and collisions. PMID:26722921

  20. How Einstein Did Not Discover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, John D.

    2016-08-01

    What powered Einstein's discoveries? Was it asking naïve questions, stubbornly? Was it a mischievous urge to break rules? Was it the destructive power of operational thinking? It was none of these. Rather, Einstein made his discoveries through lengthy, mundane investigations, pursued with tenacity and discipline. We have been led to think otherwise in part through Einstein's brilliance at recounting in beguilingly simple terms a few brief moments of transcendent insight, and in part through our need to find a simple trick underlying his achievements. These ideas are illustrated with the examples of Einstein's 1905 discoveries of special relativity and the light quantum.

  1. The Einstein Dossiers: Science and Politics - Einstein's Berlin Period with an Appendix on Einstein's FBI File

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grundmann, Siegfried

    In 1919 the Prussian Ministry of Science, Arts and Culture opened a dossier on "Einstein's Theory of Relativity." It was rediscovered by the author in 1961 and is used in conjunction with numerous other subsequently identified 'Einstein' files as the basis of this fascinating book. In particular, the author carefully scrutinizes Einstein's FBI file from 1950-55 against mostly unpublished material from European including Soviet sources and presents hitherto unknown documentation on Einstein's alleged contacts with the German Communist Party and the Comintern.

  2. Einstein spectra of quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkes, Belinda J.

    1988-01-01

    The results of the initial stage of the CfA survey of quasar energy distributions are reviewed. Einstein imaging proportional counter spectra of 33 quasars have been studied by fitting a single power law slope and absorption by an equivalent column density of neutral hydrogen. Comparison with the higher energy HEAO-A2 data leads to a two-component model for the X-ray spectrum. The X-ray column density is systematically lower than the 21-cm measured Galactic column density along the same line of sight.

  3. de Sitter group and Einstein-Hilbert Lagrangian

    SciTech Connect

    Mahato, Prasanta

    2004-12-15

    Axial-vector torsion in the Einstein-Cartan space U{sub 4} is considered here. By picking a particular term from the SO(4,1) Pontryagin density and then modifying it in a SO(3,1) invariant way, we get a Lagrangian density with Lagrange multipliers. Then considering torsion and torsionless connection as independent fields, it has been found that {kappa} and {lambda} of Einstein-Hilbert Lagrangian, appear as integration constants in such a way that {kappa} has been found to be linked with the topological Nieh-Yan density of U{sub 4} space.

  4. Noncommutative Einstein-Proca spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, Angélica; Linares, Román; Maceda, Marco; Sánchez-Santos, Oscar

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we present a deformed model of Einstein-Proca spacetime based on the replacement of pointlike sources by noncommutative smeared distributions. We discuss the solutions to the set of noncommutative Einstein-Proca equations thus obtained, with emphasis on the issue of singularities and horizons.

  5. Albert Einstein 1879-1955.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Physics Today, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Celebrates the centennial of Einstein's birth with an eight-page pictorial biography and two special articles: (1) Einstein the catalyst; and (2) Unitary field theories. His special and general theories of relativity and his contributions to quantum physics and other topics are also presented. (HM)

  6. Einstein and the "Crucial" Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holton, Gerald

    1969-01-01

    Examines the widespread view that it was the crucial Michelson-Morley experiment that led Einstein to formulate the special relativity theory. From Einstein's writings, evidence is presented that no such direct genetic connection exists. The author suggests that the historian of science must resist the experimenticist's fallacy of imposing a…

  7. Einstein and a century of time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raine, D. J.

    2005-09-01

    In a world overabundant in information, a subject is defined by its iconography. Physics is the falling apple, the planetary atom, the laser, the mushroom cloud and the image of the later Einstein - images that represent, respectively, gravity, atomic theory, quantum theory, mass-energy and the scientist who had a hand in all four. It is therefore appropriate that World Year of Physics is called Einstein Year in the UK. Of course one can argue that progress in science depends on the contributions of many people; that there are other geniuses in physics, even some colourful personalities. Nevertheless there are fundamental reasons why Einstein's early achievements stand out even in their company. When at last the thought came to him that 'time itself was suspect', Einstein had found a new insight into the nature of the physical universe. It is this: that the universal properties of material objects tell us about the nature of space and time, and it is through these properties, not philosophical logic or common sense, that we discover the structure of spacetime. The later Einstein turned this successful formula on its head and sought to use the properties of spacetime to define those of material objects, thereby seeking to abolish matter entirely in favour of geometry. Before I introduce this special feature of European Journal of Physics I will say a few words about what is not here. Like all great geniuses Einstein can be seen as the climax of what went before him and the initiation of what was to follow. Looking back we can see the influence of Mach's positivism, according to which the role of science is to relate observations to other observations; hence only observations can tell us what is 'real'. But Einstein also grew up with the family electromechanical businesses, which testifies to the reality of the Maxwellian electromagnetic fields: thus only theory can tell us what is real! As is well known, Einstein himself refused to accept the full consequences of

  8. Einstein Inflationary Probe (EIP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinshaw, Gary

    2004-01-01

    I will discuss plans to develop a concept for the Einstein Inflation Probe: a mission to detect gravity waves from inflation via the unique signature they impart to the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization. A sensitive CMB polarization satellite may be the only way to probe physics at the grand-unified theory (GUT) scale, exceeding by 12 orders of magnitude the energies studied at the Large Hadron Collider. A detection of gravity waves would represent a remarkable confirmation of the inflationary paradigm and set the energy scale at which inflation occurred when the universe was a fraction of a second old. Even a strong upper limit to the gravity wave amplitude would be significant, ruling out many common models of inflation, and pointing to inflation occurring at much lower energy, if at all. Measuring gravity waves via the CMB polarization will be challenging. We will undertake a comprehensive study to identify the critical scientific requirements for the mission and their derived instrumental performance requirements. At the core of the study will be an assessment of what is scientifically and experimentally optimal within the scope and purpose of the Einstein Inflation Probe.

  9. Diquark Bose-Einstein condensation

    SciTech Connect

    Nawa, K.; Nakano, E.; Yabu, H.

    2006-08-01

    Bose-Einstein condensation of composite diquarks in quark matter (the color superconductor phase) is discussed using the quasichemical equilibrium theory at a relatively low-density region near the deconfinement phase transition, where dynamical quark-pair fluctuations are assumed to be described as bosonic degrees of freedom (diquarks). A general formulation is given for the diquark formation and particle-antiparticle pair-creation processes in the relativistic framework, and some interesting properties are shown, which are characteristic for the relativistic many-body system. Behaviors of transition temperature and phase diagram of the quark-diquark matter are generally presented in model parameter space, and their asymptotic behaviors are also discussed. As an application to the color superconductivity, the transition temperatures and the quark and diquark density profiles are calculated in case with constituent/current quarks, where the diquark is in the bound/resonant state. We obtained T{sub C}{approx}60-80 MeV for constituent quarks and T{sub C}{approx}130 MeV for current quarks at a moderate density ({rho}{sub b}{approx}3{rho}{sub 0}). The method is also developed to include interdiquark interactions into the quasichemical equilibrium theory within a mean-field approximation, and it is found that a possible repulsive diquark-diquark interaction lowers the transition temperature by {approx}50%.

  10. Integrable cosmological models from higher dimensional Einstein equations

    SciTech Connect

    Sano, Masakazu; Suzuki, Hisao

    2007-09-15

    We consider the cosmological models for the higher dimensional space-time which includes the curvatures of our space as well as the curvatures of the internal space. We find that the condition for the integrability of the cosmological equations is that the total space-time dimensions are D=10 or D=11 which is exactly the conditions for superstrings or M theory. We obtain analytic solutions with generic initial conditions in the four-dimensional Einstein frame and study the accelerating universe when both our space and the internal space have negative curvatures.

  11. Two scales in Bose-Einstein correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoze, V. A.; Martin, A. D.; Ryskin, M. G.; Schegelsky, V. A.

    2016-04-01

    We argue that the secondaries produced in high-energy hadron collisions are emitted by small-size sources distributed over a much larger area in impact parameter space occupied by the interaction amplitude. That is, Bose-Einstein correlation of two emitted identical particles should be described by a `two-radii' parametrisation ansatz. We discuss the expected energy, charged multiplicity and transverse momentum of the pair (that is, √{s}, N_ch, k_t) behaviour of both the small and the large size components.

  12. Uniqueness and nonuniqueness in the Einstein constraints.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, Harald P; York, James W

    2005-08-26

    The conformal thin-sandwich (CTS) equations are a set of four of the Einstein equations, which generalize the Laplace-Poisson equation of Newton's theory. We examine numerically solutions of the CTS equations describing perturbed Minkowski space, and find only one solution. However, we find two distinct solutions, one even containing a black hole, when the lapse is determined by a fifth elliptic equation through specification of the mean curvature. While the relationship of the two systems and their solutions is a fundamental property of general relativity, this fairly simple example of an elliptic system with nonunique solutions is also of broader interest. PMID:16197202

  13. Beyond Einstein: From the Big Bang to Black Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    How did the Universe begin? Does time have a beginning and an end? Does space have edges? The questions are clear and simple. They are as old as human curiosity. But the answers have always seemed beyond the reach of science. Until now. In their attempts to understand how space, time, and matter are connected, Einstein and his successors made three predictions. First, space is expanding from a Big Bang; second, space and time can tie themselves into contorted knots called black holes where time actually comes to a halt; third, space itself contains some kind of energy that is pull- ing the Universe apart. Each of these three predictions seemed so fantastic when it was made that everyone, including Einstein himself, regarded them as unlikely. Incredibly, all three have turned out to be true. Yet Einstein's legacy is one of deep mystery, because his theories are silent on three questions raised by his fantastic predictions: (1) What powered the Big Bang? (2) What happens to space, time, and matter at the edge of a black hole? (3) What is the mysterious dark energy pulling the Universe apart? The answers to these questions-which lie at the crux of where our current theories fail us-will lead to a profound, new understanding of the nature of time and space. To find answers, however, we must venture beyond Einstein. The answers require new theories, such as the inflationary Universe and new insights in high-energy particle theory. Like Einstein s theories, these make fantastic predictions that seem hard to believe: unseen dimensions and entire universes beyond our own. We must find facts to confront and guide these new theories. Powerful new technologies now make this possible. And NASA and its partners are developing an armada of space-based observatories to chart the path to discovery. Here is where the Beyond Einstein story begins. By exploring the three questions that are Einstein s legacy, we begin the next revolution in understanding our Universe. We plot our way

  14. The Geometry of Newton's and Einstein's Theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Graham S.

    The aim of this paper is to present a simple, brief, mathematical discussion of the interplay between geometry and physics in the theories of Newton and Einstein. The reader will be assumed to have some familiarity with classical Newtonian theory, the ideas of special and general relativity theory (and differential geometry), and the axiomatic formulation of Euclidean geometry. An attempt will be made to describe the relationship between Galileo's law of inertia (Newton's first law) and Euclid's geometry, which is based on the idea of Newtonian absolute time. Newton's second law and classical gravitation theory will then be introduced through the elegant idea of Cartan and his space-time connection and space metric. This space metric will then be used to introduce Minkowski's metric in special relativity and its subsequent generalization, by Einstein, to incorporate relativistic gravitational theory. The role of the principles of equivalence and covariance will also be discussed. Finally, a brief discussion of cosmology will be given. Stress will be laid on the (geometrical) concepts involved rather than the details of the mathematics, in so far as this is possible.

  15. Einstein's Theory Fights off Challengers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-04-01

    Two new and independent studies have put Einstein's General Theory of Relativity to the test like never before. These results, made using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, show Einstein's theory is still the best game in town. Each team of scientists took advantage of extensive Chandra observations of galaxy clusters, the largest objects in the Universe bound together by gravity. One result undercuts a rival gravity model to General Relativity, while the other shows that Einstein's theory works over a vast range of times and distances across the cosmos. The first finding significantly weakens a competitor to General Relativity known as "f(R) gravity". "If General Relativity were the heavyweight boxing champion, this other theory was hoping to be the upstart contender," said Fabian Schmidt of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, who led the study. "Our work shows that the chances of its upsetting the champ are very slim." In recent years, physicists have turned their attention to competing theories to General Relativity as a possible explanation for the accelerated expansion of the universe. Currently, the most popular explanation for the acceleration is the so-called cosmological constant, which can be understood as energy that exists in empty space. This energy is referred to as dark energy to emphasize that it cannot be directly detected. In the f(R) theory, the cosmic acceleration comes not from an exotic form of energy but from a modification of the gravitational force. The modified force also affects the rate at which small enhancements of matter can grow over the eons to become massive clusters of galaxies, opening up the possibility of a sensitive test of the theory. Schmidt and colleagues used mass estimates of 49 galaxy clusters in the local universe from Chandra observations, and compared them with theoretical model predictions and studies of supernovas, the cosmic microwave background, and the large-scale distribution of galaxies. They

  16. Einstein: The Gourmet of Creativity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Joel

    1979-01-01

    Reports a psychiatrist's analysis of Einstein's personal account of how he developed the theory of relativity. The psychiatrist cites Janusian thinking, actively conceiving two or more opposite concepts simultaneously, as a characteristic of much creative thought in general. (MA)

  17. Classification of a class of minimal semi-Einstein submanifolds with an integrable conullity distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Mirzoyan, V A

    2008-04-30

    A full local classification and a geometric description of normally flat minimal semi-Einstein submanifolds of Euclidean spaces having multiple principal curvature vectors and an integrable conullity distribution are presented. Bibliography: 30 titles.

  18. Some notes on Einstein relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Michael P.; Masters, Andrew J.

    Transport coefficients are often expressed in the form of an Einstein relationship. In this report we point out some possibly surprising properties of the correlation functions appearing in such expressions and we discuss under what conditions the relationships are true. We further consider the Einstein relationship for the shear viscosity proposed by McQuarrie [in Statistical Mechanics (Harper and Row), 1976]. On the basis both of theoretical analysis and computer simulation, we conclude that this expression is incorrect.

  19. Einstein, the Universe, and All That: An Introduction to Relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prescod-Weinstein, Chandra

    2011-01-01

    Black holes) an expanding universe) space and time inextricably tied together) GPS ... What was this Einstein guy thinking?!? In this tutorial) I'll give an overview of Einstein's theories of relativity and the wild things they say about our Universe. What really happens when a particle crosses an event horizon? What is the future of the Universe? And how can we know it? Wh I'll try to touch on these questions and in so doing) give the talks in the Cosmology) Gravitation and Relativity sessions some context.

  20. Quantum and thermal fluctuations of trapped Bose-Einstein condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Kruglov, V.I.; Collett, M.J.; Olsen, M.K.

    2005-09-15

    We quantize a semiclassical system defined by the Hamiltonian obtained from the asymptotic self-similar solution of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation for a trapped Bose-Einstein condensate with a linear gain term. On the basis of a Schroedinger equation derived in a space of ellipsoidal parameters, we analytically calculate the quantum mechanical and thermal variance in the ellipsoidal parameters for Bose-Einstein condensates in various shapes of trap. We show that, except for temperatures close to zero, dimensionless dispersions do not depend on the frequencies of the trap and they have the same dependence on dimensionless temperatures.

  1. Implications of Einstein-Weyl Causality on Quantum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendaniel, David

    A fundamental physical principle that has consequences for the topology of space-time is the principle of Einstein-Weyl causality. This also has quantum mechanical manifestations. Borchers and Sen have rigorously investigated the mathematical implications of Einstein-Weyl causality and shown the denumerable space-time Q2 would be implied. They were left with important philosophical paradoxes regarding the nature of the physical real line E, e.g., whether E = R, the real line of mathematics. In order to remove these paradoxes an investigation into a constructible foundation is suggested. We have pursued such a program and find it indeed provides a dense, denumerable space-time and, moreover, an interesting connection with quantum mechanics. We first show that this constructible theory contains polynomial functions which are locally homeomorphic with a dense, denumerable metric space R* and are inherently quantized. Eigenfunctions governing fields can then be effectively obtained by computational iteration. Postulating a Lagrangian for fields in a compactified space-time, we get a general description of which the Schrodinger equation is a special case. From these results we can then also show that this denumerable space-time is relational (in the sense that space is not infinitesimally small if and only if it contains a quantized field) and, since Q2 is imbedded in R*2, it directly fulfills the strict topological requirements for Einstein-Weyl causality. Therefore, the theory predicts that E = R*.

  2. Euclidean wormhole solutions of Einstein-Yang-Mills theory in diverse dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, K.; Hirenzaki, S. ); Shiraishi, K. )

    1990-09-15

    We solve the Euclidean Einstein equations with non-Abelian gauge fields of sufficiently large symmetry in various dimensions. In higher-dimensional spaces, we find the solutions which are similar to so-called scalar wormholes. In four-dimensional space-time, we find singular wormhole solutions with infinite Euclidean action. Wormhole solutions in the three-dimensional Einstein-Yang-Mills theory with a Chern-Simons term are also constructed.

  3. Minimal extension of Einstein's theory: The quartic gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karasu, Atalay; Kenar, Esin; Tekin, Bayram

    2016-04-01

    We study structure of solutions of the recently constructed minimal extensions of Einstein's gravity in four dimensions at the quartic curvature level. The extended higher derivative theory, just like Einstein's gravity, has only a massless spin-two graviton about its unique maximally symmetric vacuum. The extended theory does not admit the Schwarzschild or Kerr metrics as exact solutions, hence there is no issue of Schwarzschild type singularity but, approximately, outside a source, spherically symmetric metric with the correct Newtonian limit is recovered. We also show that for all Einstein space-times, the square of the Riemann tensor (the Kretschmann scalar or the Gauss-Bonnet invariant) obeys a nonlinear scalar Klein-Gordon equation.

  4. Long Time Convergence of the Bose-Einstein Condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xuguang

    2016-02-01

    We study long time behavior of the Bose-Einstein condensation of measure-valued solutions F_t of the space homogeneous and velocity isotropic Boltzmann equation for Bose-Einstein particles at low temperature. We prove that if F_0≥ 0 is a non-singular Borel measure on R_{≥ 0} satisfying a very low temperature condition and that the ratio F_0([0,\\varepsilon ])/\\varepsilon ^{α } is sufficiently large for all \\varepsilon in (0, R] for some constants 0<α <1, R>0, then there exists a solution F_t of the equation on [0,+∞) with the initial datum F_0 such that F_t({0}) converges to the expected Bose-Einstein condensation as t→ +∞. We also show that such initial data F_0 exist extensively.

  5. Einstein's 1919 View

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goradia, Shantilal

    2012-10-01

    When Rutherford discovered the nuclear force in 1919, he felt the force he discovered reflected some deviation of Newtonian gravity. Einstein too in his 1919 paper published the failure of the general relativity and Newtonian gravity to explain nuclear force and, in his concluding remarks, he retracted his earlier introduction of the cosmological constant. Consistent with his genius, we modify Newtonian gravity as probabilistic gravity using natural Planck units for a realistic study of nature. The result is capable of expressing both (1) nuclear force [strong coupling], and (2) Newtonian gravity in one equation, implying in general, in layman's words, that gravity is the cumulative effect of all quantum mechanical forces which are impossible to measure at long distances. Non discovery of graviton and quantum gravity silently support our findings. Continuing to climb on the shoulders of the giants enables us to see horizons otherwise unseen, as reflected in our book: ``Quantum Consciousness - The Road to Reality,'' and physics/0210040, where we derive the fine structure constant as a function of the age of the universe in Planck times consistent with Gamow's hint, using natural logarithm consistent with Feynman's hint.

  6. The Einstein Slew Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elvis, Martin; Plummer, David; Schachter, Jonathan; Fabbiano, G.

    1992-01-01

    A catalog of 819 sources detected in the Einstein IPC Slew Survey of the X-ray sky is presented; 313 of the sources were not previously known as X-ray sources. Typical count rates are 0.1 IPC count/s, roughly equivalent to a flux of 3 x 10 exp -12 ergs/sq cm s. The sources have positional uncertainties of 1.2 arcmin (90 percent confidence) radius, based on a subset of 452 sources identified with previously known pointlike X-ray sources (i.e., extent less than 3 arcmin). Identifications based on a number of existing catalogs of X-ray and optical objects are proposed for 637 of the sources, 78 percent of the survey (within a 3-arcmin error radius) including 133 identifications of new X-ray sources. A public identification data base for the Slew Survey sources will be maintained at CfA, and contributions to this data base are invited.

  7. Einstein's Radiation Formula and Modifications to the Einstein Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, C. Y.

    1995-12-01

    Einstein's radiation formula is supported by the Taylor-Hulse experiment, but its derivation is not self-consistent. Furthermore, as discovered by Einstein, his radiation formula is not compatible with his field equation. As suggested by Einstein's own remark, modifications to the source tensor are necessary. Based on the Taylor-Hulse experiment, in this paper a theory is developed within the theoretical framework of general relativity within which the radiation formula remains the same for binary stars. Concurrently, it is determined that, because of radiation, the source tensor is not zero in a vacuum. Antigravity coupling, suggested by Pauli as a possibility, is a necessary feature. In addition, it is shown that the current theory of linearized gravity is not valid for radiation.

  8. My Half Hour with Einstein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romer, Robert H.

    2005-03-01

    "So you're studying at Princeton. Would you like to meet Einstein?" That question, during a brief two-body collision at a cocktail party, a collision that was over before I could think of an appropriate response, led—over a year later—to one of the more memorable half hours of my life. It was an elastic collision, we drifted apart, and I thought it had simply been a casual remark until a few days later when the mail brought me a carbon copy [sic] of a letter (dated "25.XII.52") from the speaker, Dr. Tilly Edinger, to Albert Einstein. Accompanying the letter to Einstein was a card that Dr. Edinger advised me to send around to Einstein's home on Mercer Street to request a meeting. (What is perhaps most truly astonishing in connection with this event is that not only do I still have that carbon copy—and the eventual letter from Mercer Street that invited me to Einstein's home—but that I was able to find both documents in my attic!)

  9. Anti-de Sitter-Space/Conformal-Field-Theory Casimir Energy for Rotating Black Holes

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbons, G.W.; Perry, M.J.; Pope, C.N.

    2005-12-02

    We show that, if one chooses the Einstein static universe as the metric on the conformal boundary of Kerr-anti-de Sitter spacetime, then the Casimir energy of the boundary conformal field theory can easily be determined. The result is independent of the rotation parameters, and the total boundary energy then straightforwardly obeys the first law of thermodynamics. Other choices for the metric on the conformal boundary will give different, more complicated, results. As an application, we calculate the Casimir energy for free self-dual tensor multiplets in six dimensions and compare it with that of the seven-dimensional supergravity dual. They differ by a factor of 5/4.

  10. Einstein's ``Zur Elektrodynamik...'' (1905) Revisited, With Some Consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agashe, S. D.

    2006-04-01

    Einstein, in his "Zur Elektrodynamik bewegter Korper", gave a physical (operational) meaning to "time" of a remote event in describing "motion" by introducing the concept of "synchronous stationary clocks located at different places". But with regard to "place" in describing motion, he assumed without analysis the concept of a system of co-ordinates. In the present paper, we propose a way of giving physical (operational) meaning to the concepts of "place" and "co-ordinate system", and show how the observer can define both the place and time of a remote event. Following Einstein, we consider another system "in uniform motion of translation relatively to the former". Without assuming "the properties of homogeneity which we attribute to space and time", we show that the definitions of space and time in the two systems are linearly related. We deduce some novel consequences of our approach regarding faster-than-light observers and particles, "one-way" and "two-way" velocities of light, symmetry, the "group property" of inertial reference frames, length contraction and time dilatation, and the "twin paradox". Finally, we point out a flaw in Einstein's argument in the "Electrodynamical Part" of his paper and show that the Lorentz force formula and Einstein's formula for transformation of field quantities are mutually consistent. We show that for faster-than-light bodies, a simple modification of Planck's formula for mass suffices. (Except for the reference to Planck's formula, we restrict ourselves to Physics of 1905.)

  11. Einstein Session of the Pontifical Academy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science, 1980

    1980-01-01

    The texts of four speeches, given at the 1979 Einstein Session of the Pontifical Academy held in Rome, are presented. Each address relates to some aspect of the life and times of Albert Einstein. (SA)

  12. From Petrov-Einstein to Navier-Stokes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lysov, Vyacheslav

    The fluid/gravity correspondence relates solutions of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equation to metrics which solve the Einstein equations. We propose propose two possible approaches to establish this correspondence: perturbative expansion for shear modes and large mean curvature expansion for algebraically special metrics. We show by explicit construction that for every solution of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equation in p+1 dimensions, there is an associated "dual" solution of the vacuum Einstein equations in p+2 dimensions. The dual geometry has an intrinsically flat time-like boundary segment whose extrinsic curvature is given by the stress tensor of the Navier-Stokes fluid. We consider a "near-horizon" limit in which hypersurface becomes highly accelerated. The near-horizon expansion in gravity is shown to be mathematically equivalent to the hydrodynamic expansion in fluid dynamics, and the Einstein equation reduces to the incompressible Navier-Stokes equation. It is shown that imposing a Petrov type I condition on the hypersurface geometry reduces the degrees of freedom in the extrinsic curvature to those of a fluid. Moreover, expanding around a limit in which the mean curvature of the embedding diverges, the leading-order Einstein constraint equations on hypersurface are shown to reduce to the non-linear incompressible Navier-Stokes equation for a fluid moving in hypersurface. We extend the fluid/gravity correspondence to include the magnetohydrodynamics/gravity correspondence, which translates solutions of the equations of magnetohydrodynamics (describing charged fluids) into geometries that satisfy the Einstein-Maxwell equations. We present an explicit example of this new correspondence in the context of flat Minkowski space. We show that a perturbative deformation of the Rindler wedge satisfies the Einstein-Maxwell equations provided that the parameters appearing in the expansion, which we interpret as fluid fields, satisfy the

  13. Einstein for Schools and the General Public

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johansson, K. E.; Kozma, C; Nilsson, Ch

    2006-01-01

    In April 2005 the World Year of Physics (Einstein Year in the UK and Ireland) was celebrated with an Einstein week in Stockholm House of Science. Seven experiments illustrated Einstein's remarkable work in 1905 on Brownian motion, the photoelectric effect and special relativity. Thirteen school classes with 260 pupils, 30 teachers and 25 members…

  14. Einstein's Math Errors Profoundly Affect Mathematical and Physical Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pressler, David

    2008-04-01

    Einstein treats time as a vector, however, time has no direction associated with it; it is a scalar, it only has magnitude and is specified completely by giving it a number or units. Vectors possess both magnitude and direction. To mathematically equate time with direction is ambiguous and commits a Fallacy of Ambiguity. It is physically impossible to have space with more than three directions. Any theory where time is represented as a forth direction does not represent reality, i.e., (x, y, z, t). Einstein defines the speed of light as a constant, in the equation c = d (distance)/t (time). In this direct proportion Einstein changes the time factor (denominator), when time slows down due to motion but he does not change the distance factor (numerator). This is an error. In reality, time slows down when space contracts in all three directions, in the system of Cartesian coordinates (x, y, z,); or C-Space. Pressler's Law of C-Space: The speed of light will always be measured as a constant, c, in all three directions, in ones own inertial reference frame and the speed of light will always be measured to be different in all other inertial reference frames which are at a different gravity or kinetic energy level. Time is exactly defined as the rate of physical process; how fast things take place. This new paradigm shift redefines the Michelson-Morley where both mirrors move inward toward the center of the interferometer.

  15. Approaching Bose-Einstein Condensation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrari, Loris

    2011-01-01

    Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) is discussed at the level of an advanced course of statistical thermodynamics, clarifying some formal and physical aspects that are usually not covered by the standard pedagogical literature. The non-conventional approach adopted starts by showing that the continuum limit, in certain cases, cancels out the crucial…

  16. Dutch museum marks Einstein anniversary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Calmthout, Matijn

    2016-01-01

    A new painting of Albert Einstein's field equation from his 1915 general theory of relativity was unveiled in a ceremony in November 2015 by the Dutch physicist Robbert Dijkgraaf, who is director of the Princeton Institute for Advanced Study in the US.

  17. MONOPOLES AND DYONS IN THE PURE EINSTEIN YANG MILLS THEORY

    SciTech Connect

    HOSOTANI,Y.; BJORAKER,J.

    1999-08-16

    In the pure Einstein-Yang-Mills theory in four dimensions there exist monopole and dyon solutions. The spectrum of the solutions is discrete in asymptotically flat or de Sitter space, whereas it is continuous in asymptotically anti-de Sitter space. The solutions are regular everywhere and specified with their mass, and non-Abelian electric and magnetic charges. In asymptotically anti-de Sitter space a class of monopole solutions have no node in non-Abelian magnetic fields, and are stable against spherically symmetric perturbations.

  18. Bose-Einstein condensates and scalar fields; exploring the similitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellanos, E.; Macías, A.; Núñez, D.

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the the remarkable analogy between the classical Klein-Gordon equation for a test scalar field in a flat and also in a curved background, and the Gross-Pitaevskii equation for a Bose-Einstein condensate trapped by an external potential. We stress here that the solution associated with the Klein-Gordon equation (KG) in a flat space time has the same mathematical structure, under certain circumstances, to those obtained for the Gross-Pitaevskii equation, that is, a static soliton solution. Additionally, Thomas-Fermi approximation is applied to the 3-dimensional version of this equation, in order to calculate some thermodynamical properties of the system in curved a space-time back ground. Finally, we stress the fact that a gravitational background provides, in some cases, a kind of confining potential for the scalar field, allowing us to remarks even more the possible connection between scalar fields and the phenomenon of Bose-Einstein condensation.

  19. Charged Particle Tunnels from the Einstein-Maxwell Black Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Deyou; Yang, Shuzheng

    Considering the self-gravitation interaction and the unfixed background space-time, we study the Hawking radiation of the Einstein-Maxwell-Dilaton-Axion (EMDA) black hole by the radial geodesic method and the Hamilton-Jacobi method. Both sets of results agree with Parikh and Wilczek's and show that the actual radiation spectrum deviates from the purely thermal one and the tunneling probability is related to the change of Bekenstein-Hawking entropy, which satisfies an underlying unitary theory.

  20. Einstein's equations and a cosmology with finite matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clavelli, L.; Goldstein, Gary R.

    2015-04-01

    We discuss various space-time metrics which are compatible with Einstein's equations and a previously suggested cosmology with a finite total mass.1 In this alternative cosmology, the matter density was postulated to be a spatial delta function at the time of the big bang thereafter diffusing outward with constant total mass. This proposal explores a departure from standard assumptions that the big bang occurred everywhere at once or was just one of an infinite number of previous and later transitions.

  1. Ludwik Silberstein - Einstein's antagonist (German Title: Ludwik Silberstein - Einsteins Antagonist)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duerbeck, Hilmar W.; Flin, Piotr

    We consider the life and work of the physicist Ludwik Silberstein, who corresponded with Einstein, Sommerfeld and other famous physicists and astronomers, and became known by his contributions to relativity and cosmology, among them a treatise on relativity. Silberstein, who had obtained his PhD in Berlin, became assistant in Lemberg, lecturer in mathematical physics in Bologna and Rome, and industrial physicist in London (1913) and with the Eastman Kodak Co. in Rochester, New York (1920). Although he always felt sympathetic with Einstein and his theory of relativity, he often voiced scepticism concerning its results and verification, and did not hesitate to make his doubts public, thereby losing much sympathy among his colleagues. His cosmological studies are also marked by wrong insights and a certain ignorance of astronomical facts; nevertheless his attacks against established opinions show sometimes an astonishing far-sightedness. In the appendix we publish two Silberstein letters: one to Sommerfeld on the discussion of the results of the solar eclipse expeditions of 1919, and another very personal one to Einstein, in which he reveals some details of his life.

  2. HST image of Gravitational Lens G2237 + 305 or 'Einstein Cross'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    European Space Agency (ESA) Faint Object Camera (FOC) science image was taken from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) of Gravitational Lens G2237 + 305 or 'Einstein Cross'. The gravitational lens G2237 + 305 or 'Einstein Cross' shows four images of a very distant quasar which has been multiple-imaged by a relatively nearby galaxy acting as a gravitational lens. The angular separation between the upper and lower images is 1.6 arc seconds. Photo was released from Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) 09-12-90.

  3. Albert Einstein, Cosmos and Religion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djokovic, V.; Grujic, P.

    2007-06-01

    We consider Einstein's attitude regarding religious as such, from both cosmological and epistemological points of view. An attempt to put it into a wider socio-historical perspective was made, with the emphasis on ethnic and religious background. It turns out that the great scientist was neither atheist nor believer in the orthodox sense and the closest labels one might stick to him in this respect would be pantheism/cosmism (ontological aspect) and agnosticism (epistemological aspect). His ideas on divine could be considered as a continuation of line traced by Philo of Alexandria, who himself followed Greek Stoics and (Neo-) Platonists and especially Baruch Spinoza. It turns out that Einstein's both scientific (rational aspects) and religious (intuitive aspects) thinking were deeply rooted in the Hellenic culture. His striving to unravel the secrets of the universe and the roots of cosmological order resembles much the ancient ideas of the role of knowledge in fathoming the divine as such, as ascribed to Gnostics.

  4. Parameterized Beyond-Einstein Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Linder, Eric; Linder, Eric V.; Cahn, Robert N.

    2007-09-17

    A single parameter, the gravitational growth index gamma, succeeds in characterizing the growth of density perturbations in the linear regime separately from the effects of the cosmic expansion. The parameter is restricted to a very narrow range for models of dark energy obeying the laws of general relativity but can take on distinctly different values in models of beyond-Einstein gravity. Motivated by the parameterized post-Newtonian (PPN) formalism for testing gravity, we analytically derive and extend the gravitational growth index, or Minimal Modified Gravity, approach to parameterizing beyond-Einstein cosmology. The analytic formalism demonstrates how to apply the growth index parameter to early dark energy, time-varying gravity, DGP braneworld gravity, and some scalar-tensor gravity.

  5. Euclidean space-time diffeomorphisms and their Fueter subgroups

    SciTech Connect

    Guersey, F.; Jiang, W. )

    1992-02-01

    Holomorphic Fueter functions of the position quaternion form a subgroup of Euclidean space-time diffeomorphisms. An {ital O}(4) covariant treatment of such mappings is presented with the quaternionic argument {ital x} being replaced by either {ital {bar p}x} or {ital x{bar p}} involving self-dual and anti-self-dual structures and {ital p} denoting an arbitrary Euclidean time direction. An infinite group (the quasiconformal group) is exhibited that admits the conformal group SO(5,1) as a subgroup, in analogy to the two-dimensional case in which the Moebius group SO(3,1) is a subgroup of the infinite Virasoro group. The ensuing (3+1) covariant decomposition of diffeomorphisms suggests covariant gauges that throw the metric and the stress tensors in standard forms suitable for canonical quantization, leading to improved'' energy-momentum tensors. Other possible applications to current algebra and gravity will be mentioned.

  6. Could we now convince Einstein?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accardi, Luigi

    2006-01-01

    The present conference takes place in the same year that celebrates the centenary of Albert Einstein. Hence it is a good occasion to reflect on those problems which have been at the core of Einstein's intellectual activity. Undoubtedly the foundation of quantum mechanics (QM) is one of these problems. It is known that Einstein was never convinced by the interpretation of quantum mechanics accepted, in his times and still now, by the majority of physicists. The fact that he was sharing this skepticism with people like Schrödinger and, most of all, the fact that no convincing answer, to the doubts of these people, had emerged in a more than half a century old debate, helped in keeping alive the attention of a growing number of people on this problem. The crucial issue is that the standard interpretation of QM has some physical implications which are experimentally verifiable and which, for several years, have been thought to be incompatible with relativity theory (the so-called "quantum nonlocality"). On the other hand alternative, more intuitive, interpretations (such as the ensemble interpretation) seemed to be ruled out from very well confirmed experimental data. The way out from this impasse has required a deep analysis of the connections between mathematics and physics as well as the emergence of new ideas both in mathematics (non-Kolmogorovian probabilities) and in physics (the theory of adaptive systems). The Einstein centenary is a good occasion for a short survey of these developments with the goal of answering the intriguing question posed in the title of the present paper.

  7. Michelson-Morley in Einstein's elevators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, Fred; Pierce, Ayal

    2010-02-01

    Experiments are proposed in which a Michelson-Morley interferometer is placed in Einstein's thought experiments where elevators are subjected to varied accelerated fields. Unbeknownst to the observers inside the elevators, they are placed in different circumstances: on the surface of the Earth, in free fall, in space distant from any mass, and inside a rotating space station. By use of not one, but two objects, the observer will be challenged to determine the nature and shape of the accelerated field, if any, inside the elevator. It will be demonstrated that the nature of the accelerated field can be determined easily from inside the elevator by the motion of the two objects released by the observer. It will also be shown that, for the elevator on the space station which is generating an ``artificial gravity'' field by rotation, Michelson-Morley would have the same null result as on Earth. However, the Michelson-Morley experiment is adapted so that in addition to the two horizontal arms of the interferometer (parallel to the floor of the elevator) a vertical arm is added perpendicular to the floor facing towards the ceiling. Such a vertical arm added to the Michelson-Morley experiment adds a new dimension to examining each accelerated field, including gravity. )

  8. Analysis of regularizing properties of nonlinear electrodynamics in the Einstein-Born-Infeld theory

    SciTech Connect

    Denisov, V. I. Sokolov, V. A.

    2011-12-15

    New regularizing manifestations of the Einstein-Born-Infeld theory for a massive charged force center in the space-time are considered. The properties of isotropic geodesics in this space are analyzed. It is shown that the charge may exceed the maximum possible charge in the Reissner-Nordstroem solution; the possibility of eliminating one of the metric horizons is also noted.

  9. Detailed discussions and calculations of quantum Regge calculus of Einstein-Cartan theory

    SciTech Connect

    Xue Shesheng

    2010-09-15

    This article presents detailed discussions and calculations of the recent paper 'Quantum Regge calculus of Einstein-Cartan theory' in [9]. The Euclidean space-time is discretized by a four-dimensional simplicial complex. We adopt basic tetrad and spin-connection fields to describe the simplicial complex. By introducing diffeomorphism and local Lorentz invariant holonomy fields, we construct a regularized Einstein-Cartan theory for studying the quantum dynamics of the simplicial complex and fermion fields. This regularized Einstein-Cartan action is shown to properly approach to its continuum counterpart in the continuum limit. Based on the local Lorentz invariance, we derive the dynamical equations satisfied by invariant holonomy fields. In the mean-field approximation, we show that the averaged size of 4-simplex, the element of the simplicial complex, is larger than the Planck length. This formulation provides a theoretical framework for analytical calculations and numerical simulations to study the quantum Einstein-Cartan theory.

  10. Einstein's Math Errors Profoundly Affects Mathematical and Physical Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pressler, David

    2007-05-01

    Einstein treats time as a vector, however time is a scalar. Vectors possess both magnitude and direction. To mathematically equate time with direction is a Fallacy of Ambiguity. It is physically impossible to have space with more than three directions. Any theory where time is represented as a forth direction does not represent reality, i.e., (x, y, z, t). The entire math used in the Special and General Theories of Relativity is meaningless, unreasonable and ambiguous. Second. Einstein defines the speed of light as a constant, in the equation c = d (distance)/t (time). In this direct proportion, c being the constant, change one factor and the other must change as well. Einstein changes the time factor in this formula when time slows down but he does not change the distance factor. In reality, time slows down when space contracts in all three directions or in the system of Cartesian coordinates (x, y, z,) being length, width, and height. The author defines this contraction as C-Space. Pressler's Law of C-Space: The speed of light will always be measured as a constant, c, in all three directions, in ones own inertial reference frame and the speed of light will always be measured to be different in all other inertial reference frames which are at a different gravity or kinetic energy levels. Time is defined as the rate of physical process; how fast things take place. Gravity is the distortion of space in all three directions, c-space. To cite this abstract, use the following reference: http://meetings.aps.org/link/BAPS.2007.OSS07.D2.2

  11. Einstein Gyrogroup as a B-loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suksumran, Teerapong; Wiboonton, Keng

    2015-08-01

    Using the Clifford algebra formalism, we give an algebraic proof that the open unit ball B = v ∈Rn : ‖ v ‖ < 1 } of Rn equipped with Einstein addition ⊕E forms a B-loop or, equivalently, a uniquely 2-divisible gyrocommutative gyrogroup. We obtain a compact formula for Einstein addition in terms of Möbius addition. We then give a characterization of associativity and commutativity of vectors in B with respect to Einstein addition.

  12. Einstein as a Missionary of Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renn, Jürgen

    2013-10-01

    The paper reviews Einstein's engagement as a mediator and popularizer of science. It discusses the formative role of popular scientific literature for the young Einstein, showing that not only his broad scientific outlook but also his internationalist political views were shaped by these readings. Then, on the basis of recent detailed studies, Einstein's travels and their impact on the dissemination of relativity theory are examined. These activities as well as Einstein's own popular writings are interpreted in the context of his understanding of science as part of human culture.

  13. Three-dimensional asymptotically flat Einstein-Maxwell theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnich, Glenn; Lambert, Pierre-Henry; Mao, Pujian

    2015-12-01

    Three-dimensional Einstein-Maxwell theory with non-trivial asymptotics at null infinity is solved. The symmetry algebra is a Virasoro-Kac-Moody type algebra that extends the bms3 algebra of the purely gravitational case. Solution space involves logarithms and provides a tractable example of a polyhomogeneous solution space. The associated surface charges are non-integrable and non-conserved due to the presence of electromagnetic news. As in the four-dimensional purely gravitational case, their algebra involves a field-dependent central charge.

  14. Coherent Ratchets in Driven Bose-Einstein Condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Creffield, C. E.; Sols, F.

    2009-11-13

    We study the response of a Bose-Einstein condensate to an unbiased periodic driving potential. By controlling the space and time symmetries of the driving we show how a directed current can be induced, producing a coherent quantum ratchet. Weak driving induces a regular behavior, and space and time symmetries must both be broken to produce a current. For strong driving, the behavior becomes chaotic and the resulting effective irreversibility means that it is unnecessary to explicitly break time symmetry. Spatial asymmetry alone is then sufficient to produce the ratchet effect, even in the absence of interactions, and although the system remains completely coherent.

  15. Polymer quantization of the Einstein-Rosen wormhole throat

    SciTech Connect

    Kunstatter, Gabor; Peltola, Ari; Louko, Jorma

    2010-01-15

    We present a polymer quantization of spherically symmetric Einstein gravity in which the polymerized variable is the area of the Einstein-Rosen wormhole throat. In the classical polymer theory, the singularity is replaced by a bounce at a radius that depends on the polymerization scale. In the polymer quantum theory, we show numerically that the area spectrum is evenly spaced and in agreement with a Bohr-Sommerfeld semiclassical estimate, and this spectrum is not qualitatively sensitive to issues of factor ordering or boundary conditions except in the lowest few eigenvalues. In the limit of small polymerization scale we recover, within the numerical accuracy, the area spectrum obtained from a Schroedinger quantization of the wormhole throat dynamics. The prospects of recovering from the polymer throat theory a full quantum-corrected spacetime are discussed.

  16. Interferometry with Bose-Einstein condensates in microgravity.

    PubMed

    Müntinga, H; Ahlers, H; Krutzik, M; Wenzlawski, A; Arnold, S; Becker, D; Bongs, K; Dittus, H; Duncker, H; Gaaloul, N; Gherasim, C; Giese, E; Grzeschik, C; Hänsch, T W; Hellmig, O; Herr, W; Herrmann, S; Kajari, E; Kleinert, S; Lämmerzahl, C; Lewoczko-Adamczyk, W; Malcolm, J; Meyer, N; Nolte, R; Peters, A; Popp, M; Reichel, J; Roura, A; Rudolph, J; Schiemangk, M; Schneider, M; Seidel, S T; Sengstock, K; Tamma, V; Valenzuela, T; Vogel, A; Walser, R; Wendrich, T; Windpassinger, P; Zeller, W; van Zoest, T; Ertmer, W; Schleich, W P; Rasel, E M

    2013-03-01

    Atom interferometers covering macroscopic domains of space-time are a spectacular manifestation of the wave nature of matter. Because of their unique coherence properties, Bose-Einstein condensates are ideal sources for an atom interferometer in extended free fall. In this Letter we report on the realization of an asymmetric Mach-Zehnder interferometer operated with a Bose-Einstein condensate in microgravity. The resulting interference pattern is similar to the one in the far field of a double slit and shows a linear scaling with the time the wave packets expand. We employ delta-kick cooling in order to enhance the signal and extend our atom interferometer. Our experiments demonstrate the high potential of interferometers operated with quantum gases for probing the fundamental concepts of quantum mechanics and general relativity. PMID:23496709

  17. Interferometry with Bose-Einstein Condensates in Microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müntinga, H.; Ahlers, H.; Krutzik, M.; Wenzlawski, A.; Arnold, S.; Becker, D.; Bongs, K.; Dittus, H.; Duncker, H.; Gaaloul, N.; Gherasim, C.; Giese, E.; Grzeschik, C.; Hänsch, T. W.; Hellmig, O.; Herr, W.; Herrmann, S.; Kajari, E.; Kleinert, S.; Lämmerzahl, C.; Lewoczko-Adamczyk, W.; Malcolm, J.; Meyer, N.; Nolte, R.; Peters, A.; Popp, M.; Reichel, J.; Roura, A.; Rudolph, J.; Schiemangk, M.; Schneider, M.; Seidel, S. T.; Sengstock, K.; Tamma, V.; Valenzuela, T.; Vogel, A.; Walser, R.; Wendrich, T.; Windpassinger, P.; Zeller, W.; van Zoest, T.; Ertmer, W.; Schleich, W. P.; Rasel, E. M.

    2013-03-01

    Atom interferometers covering macroscopic domains of space-time are a spectacular manifestation of the wave nature of matter. Because of their unique coherence properties, Bose-Einstein condensates are ideal sources for an atom interferometer in extended free fall. In this Letter we report on the realization of an asymmetric Mach-Zehnder interferometer operated with a Bose-Einstein condensate in microgravity. The resulting interference pattern is similar to the one in the far field of a double slit and shows a linear scaling with the time the wave packets expand. We employ delta-kick cooling in order to enhance the signal and extend our atom interferometer. Our experiments demonstrate the high potential of interferometers operated with quantum gases for probing the fundamental concepts of quantum mechanics and general relativity.

  18. Bose–Einstein condensates and scalar fields; exploring the similitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Castellanos, E.; Macías, A.; Núñez, D.

    2014-01-14

    We analyze the the remarkable analogy between the classical Klein–Gordon equation for a test scalar field in a flat and also in a curved background, and the Gross–Pitaevskii equation for a Bose–Einstein condensate trapped by an external potential. We stress here that the solution associated with the Klein–Gordon equation (KG) in a flat space time has the same mathematical structure, under certain circumstances, to those obtained for the Gross–Pitaevskii equation, that is, a static soliton solution. Additionally, Thomas–Fermi approximation is applied to the 3–dimensional version of this equation, in order to calculate some thermodynamical properties of the system in curved a space–time back ground. Finally, we stress the fact that a gravitational background provides, in some cases, a kind of confining potential for the scalar field, allowing us to remarks even more the possible connection between scalar fields and the phenomenon of Bose–Einstein condensation.

  19. Second post-Newtonian approximation of Einstein-aether theory

    SciTech Connect

    Xie Yi; Huang Tianyi

    2008-06-15

    In this paper, second post-Newtonian approximation of Einstein-aether theory is obtained by Chandrasekhar's approach. Five parametrized post-Newtonian parameters in first post-Newtonian approximation are presented after a time transformation and they are identical with previous works, in which {gamma}=1, {beta}=1, and two preferred-frame parameters remain. Meanwhile, in second post-Newtonian approximation, a parameter, which represents third order nonlinearity for gravity, is zero--the same as in general relativity. For an application for future deep space laser ranging missions, we reduce the metric coefficients for light propagation in a case of N point masses as a simplified model of the Solar System. The resulting light deflection angle in second post-Newtonian approximation poses another constraint on the Einstein-aether theory.

  20. Space.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Web Feet K-8, 2001

    2001-01-01

    This annotated subject guide to Web sites and additional resources focuses on space and astronomy. Specifies age levels for resources that include Web sites, CD-ROMS and software, videos, books, audios, and magazines; offers professional resources; and presents a relevant class activity. (LRW)

  1. What Einstein Can Teach Us about Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Denis

    2007-01-01

    People are more likely to associate Einstein with complex scientific theories and mathematical calculations than with education theory. In fact, Einstein's own experiences of schooling and his reflections on the meaning of life and the significance of education are profound and oddly relevant to the situation that pertains in England today. It is…

  2. People Interview: Continuing Einstein's great work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-09-01

    INTERVIEW Continuing Einstein's great work Dr Michio Kaku is a theoretical physicist, bestselling author and popularizer of science. He is the co-founder of string field theory (a branch of string theory) and continues Einstein's search to unite the four fundamental forces of nature into one unified theory. David Smith speaks to him about inspiration and education.

  3. Books on Einstein--Collectors' Delight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khoon, Koh Aik; Jalal, Azman; Abd-Shukor, R.; Yatim, Baharudin; Talib, Ibrahim Abu; Daud, Abdul Razak; Samat, Supian

    2009-01-01

    A survey of thirteen books on Einstein is presented. Its gives an idea on how much is written about the man and how frequent are the publications. The year 2005 saw the most publications. It is the centenary for the Miraculous Year. Interestingly some books can just sustain their readers' interest with just words. Einstein comes alive with the…

  4. Einstein as a Missionary of Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renn, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    The paper reviews Einstein's engagement as a mediator and popularizer of science. It discusses the formative role of popular scientific literature for the young Einstein, showing that not only his broad scientific outlook but also his internationalist political views were shaped by these readings. Then, on the basis of recent detailed…

  5. Albert Einstein's Magic Mountain: An Aarau Education*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunziker, Herbert

    2015-03-01

    For economic reasons, the electrotechnical factory J. Einstein & Cie. (co-owned by Albert Einstein's father Hermann) had to be closed in the summer of 1894. While Albert's parents emigrated to Italy to build a new existence, he remained in Munich to complete his studies at the Gymnasium. Left behind, however, he had a difficult time with what he considered the rigid educational practices at the Munich Luitpold-Gymnasium and quit without a diploma. The present article discusses Einstein's richly winding path to the Aargau Cantonal School (Switzerland), especially its history and educational philosophy during the time of his stay in Aarau. There, Einstein met some outstanding teachers, who could serve him as models of scholars and human beings. In spite of Einstein's distinct independence of mind, these personalities may well have had a significant influence on the alignment of his inner compass.

  6. Astrophysical observations: lensing and eclipsing Einstein's theories.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Charles L

    2005-02-11

    Albert Einstein postulated the equivalence of energy and mass, developed the theory of special relativity, explained the photoelectric effect, and described Brownian motion in five papers, all published in 1905, 100 years ago. With these papers, Einstein provided the framework for understanding modern astrophysical phenomena. Conversely, astrophysical observations provide one of the most effective means for testing Einstein's theories. Here, I review astrophysical advances precipitated by Einstein's insights, including gravitational redshifts, gravitational lensing, gravitational waves, the Lense-Thirring effect, and modern cosmology. A complete understanding of cosmology, from the earliest moments to the ultimate fate of the universe, will require developments in physics beyond Einstein, to a unified theory of gravity and quantum physics. PMID:15705841

  7. Einstein Ring in Distant Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-06-01

    Using ESO's Very Large Telescope, Rémi Cabanac and his European colleagues have discovered an amazing cosmic mirage, known to scientists as an Einstein Ring. This cosmic mirage, dubbed FOR J0332-3557, is seen towards the southern constellation Fornax (the Furnace), and is remarkable on at least two counts. First, it is a bright, almost complete Einstein ring. Second, it is the farthest ever found. ESO PR Photo 20a/05 ESO PR Photo 20a/05 Deep Image of a Region in Fornax (FORS/VLT) [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 434 pix - 60k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 867 pix - 276k] [Full Res - JPEG: 1859 x 2015 pix - 3.8M] ESO PR Photo 20b/05 ESO PR Photo 20b/05 Zoom-in on the Newly Found Einstein Ring (FORS/VLT) [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 575 pix - 168k] [Normal - JPEG: 630 x 906 pix - 880k] Caption: ESO PR Photo 20a/05 is a composite image taken in two bands (B and R) with VLT/FORS1 of a small portion of the sky (field-of-view 7x7' or 1/15th of the area of the full moon). The faintest object seen in the image has a magnitude 26, that is, it is 100 million times fainter than what can be observed with the unaided eye. The bright elliptical galaxy on the lower-left quadrant is a dwarf galaxy part of a large nearby cluster in the Fornax constellation. As for all deep images of the sky, this field shows a variety of objects, the brightest ponctual sources being stars from our Galaxy. By far the field is dominated by thousands of faint background galaxies the colours of which are related to the age of their dominant stellar population, their dust content and their distance. The newly found Einstein ring is visible in the top right part of the image. ESO PR Photo 20b/05 zooms-in on the position of the newly found cosmic mirage. ESO PR Photo 20c/05 ESO PR Photo 20c/05 Einstein Ring in Distant Universe (FORS/VLT) [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 584 pix - 104k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 1168 pix - 292k] [Full Res - JPEG: 1502 x 2192 pix - 684k] Caption of ESO PR Photo 20c/05: The left image is magnified and centred

  8. The Media of Relativity: Einstein and Telecommunications Technologies.

    PubMed

    Canales, Jimena

    2015-07-01

    How are fundamental constants, such as "c" for the speed of light, related to the technological environments that produce them? Relativistic cosmology, developed first by Albert Einstein, depended on military and commercial innovations in telecommunications. Prominent physicists (Hans Reichenbach, Max Born, Paul Langevin, Louis de Broglie, and Léon Brillouin, among others) worked in radio units during WWI and incorporated battlefield lessons into their research. Relativity physicists, working at the intersection of physics and optics by investigating light and electricity, responded to new challenges by developing a novel scientific framework. Ideas about lengths and solid bodies were overhauled because the old Newtonian mechanics assumed the possibility of "instantaneous signaling at a distance." Einstein's universe, where time and space dilated, where the shortest path between two points was often curved and non-Euclidean, followed the rules of electromagnetic "signal" transmission. For these scientists, light's constant speed in the absence of a gravitational field-a fundamental tenet of Einstein's theory-was a lesson derived from communication technologies. PMID:26387524

  9. Geometric properties of the magnetic Laplacian on the Euclidean 4-space

    SciTech Connect

    Kazmierowski, Dominique; Zinoun, Azzouz; Intissar, Ahmed

    2010-12-15

    When the four-dimensional Euclidean space is endowed with a covariant derivative that is either self-dual or antiself-dual and of constant curvature, the corresponding magnetic Laplacian is closely related to the sub-Laplacian of the quaternionic Heisenberg group. Some geometric properties of this operator are studied. In particular, it is proved that there exists a canonical orthogonal complex structure which provides a factorization in the sense of Schroedinger.

  10. The Canarias Einstein ring: a newly discovered optical Einstein ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettinelli, M.; Simioni, M.; Aparicio, A.; Hidalgo, S. L.; Cassisi, S.; Walker, A. R.; Piotto, G.; Valdes, F.

    2016-09-01

    We report the discovery of an optical Einstein ring in the Sculptor constellation, IAC J010127-334319, in the vicinity of the Sculptor dwarf spheroidal galaxy. It is an almost complete ring (˜300°) with a diameter of ˜4.5 arcsec. The discovery was made serendipitously from inspecting Dark Energy Camera (DECam) archive imaging data. Confirmation of the object nature has been obtained by deriving spectroscopic redshifts for both components, lens and source, from observations at the 10.4 m Gran Telescopio CANARIAS (GTC) with the spectrograph OSIRIS. The lens, a massive early-type galaxy, has a redshift of z = 0.581, while the source is a starburst galaxy with redshift of z = 1.165. The total enclosed mass that produces the lensing effect has been estimated to be Mtot = (1.86 ± 0.23) × 1012 M⊙.

  11. Neutral Einstein metrics in four dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, Peter R.

    1991-11-01

    In Matsushita [J. Math. Phys. 22, 979-982 (1981), ibid. 24, 36-40 (1983)], for curvature endomorphisms for the pseudo-Euclidean space R2,2, an analog of the Petrov classification as a basis for applications to neutral Einstein metrics on compact, orientable, four-dimensional manifolds is provided. This paper points out flaws in Matsushita's classification and, moreover, that an error in Chern's [``Pseudo-Riemannian geometry and the Gauss-Bonnet formula,'' Acad. Brasileira Ciencias 35, 17-26 (1963) and Shiing-Shen Chern: Selected Papers (Springer-Verlag, New York, 1978)] Gauss-Bonnet formula for pseudo-Riemannian geometry was incorporated in Matsushita's subsequent analysis. A self-contained account of the subject of the title is presented to correct these errors, including a discussion of the validity of an appropriate analog of the Thorpe-Hitchin inequality of the Riemannian case. When the inequality obtains in the neutral case, the Euler characteristic is nonpositive, in contradistinction to Matsushita's deductions.

  12. Gravity Probe B: Testing Einstein with Gyroscopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geveden, Rex D.; May, Todd

    2003-01-01

    Some 40 years in the making, NASA' s historic Gravity Probe B (GP-B) mission is scheduled to launch aboard a Delta II in 2003. GP-B will test two extraordinary predictions from Einstein's General Relativity: geodetic precession and the Lense-Thirring effect (frame-dragging). Employing tiny, ultra-precise gyroscopes, GP-B features a measurement accuracy of 0.5 milli-arc-seconds per year. The extraordinary measurement precision is made possible by a host of breakthrough technologies, including electro-statically suspended, super-conducting quartz gyroscopes; virtual elimination of magnetic flux; a solid quartz star tracking telescope; helium microthrusters for drag-free control of the spacecraft; and a 2400 liter superfluid helium dewar. This paper will provide an overview of the science, key technologies, flight hardware, integration and test, and flight operations of the GP-B space vehicle. It will also examine some of the technical management challenges of a large-scale, technology-driven, Principal Investigator-led mission.

  13. Gravity Probe B: Testing Einstein with Gyroscopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geveden, Rex D.; May, Todd

    2003-01-01

    Some 40 years in the making, NASA s historic Gravity Probe B (GP-B) mission is scheduled to launch aboard a Delta I1 in 2003. GP-B will test two extraordinary predictions from Einstein s General Relativity: geodetic precession and the Lense-Thirring effect (frame-dragging). Employing tiny, ultra-precise gyroscopes, GP-B features a measurement accuracy of 0.5 milli-arc-seconds per year. The extraordinary measurement precision is made possible by a host of breakthrough technologies, including electro-statically suspended, super-conducting quartz gyroscopes; virtual elimination of magnetic flux; a solid quartz star- tracking telescope; helium microthrusters for drag-free control of the spacecraft; and a 2400 liter superfluid helium dewar. This paper will provide an overview of the science, key technologies, flight hardware, integration and test, and flight operations of the GP-B space vehicle. It will also examine some of the technical management challenges of a large-scale, technology-driven, Principal Investigator-led mission.

  14. Revisiting Einstein's brain in Brain Awareness Week.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hao; Chen, Su; Zeng, Lidan; Zhou, Lin; Hou, Shengtao

    2014-10-01

    Albert Einstein's brain has long been an object of fascination to both neuroscience specialists and the general public. However, without records of advanced neuro-imaging of his brain, conclusions regarding Einstein's extraordinary cognitive capabilities can only be drawn based on the unique external features of his brain and through comparison of the external features with those of other human brain samples. The recent discovery of 14 previously unpublished photographs of Einstein's brain taken at unconventional angles by Dr. Thomas Stoltz Harvey, the pathologist, ignited a renewed frenzy about clues to explain Einstein's genius. Dr. Dean Falk and her colleagues, in their landmark paper published in Brain (2013; 136:1304-1327), described in such details about the unusual features of Einstein's brain, which shed new light on Einstein's intelligence. In this article, we ask what are the unique structures of his brain? What can we learn from this new information? Can we really explain his extraordinary cognitive capabilities based on these unique brain structures? We conclude that studying the brain of a remarkable person like Albert Einstein indeed provides us a better example to comprehensively appreciate the relationship between brain structures and advanced cognitive functions. However, caution must be exercised so as not to over-interpret his intelligence solely based on the understanding of the surface structures of his brain. PMID:25382446

  15. BOOK REVIEW: Einstein's Jury: The Race to Test Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehlers, Jürgen

    2007-10-01

    'I know very well that my theory rests on a shaky foundation. What attracts me to it is that it leads to consequences that seem to be accessible to experiment, and it provides a starting point for the theoretical understanding of gravitation', wrote Einstein in 1911. Einstein's Jury by Jeffrey Crelinsten—well documented, well written, and fascinating to read—describes how, from 1909 on, Einstein's two theories of relativity became known to astronomers, and how the predictions made between 1907 and 1915 were received as challenges to observers. The author gives a non-technical account of the efforts made until 1930 to test these predictions; he focuses on two of the three classical tests, namely gravitational redshift and bending of light; the 'jury' consists mainly of American observers—Adams, Campbell, Curtis, Hale, Perrin, St John, Trumpler and others—working with newly built large telescopes, and the Britons Eddington and Evershed. The major steps which, after a long struggle, convinced the majority of astronomers that Einstein was right, are narrated chronologically in rather great detail, especially the work at Lick Observatory, before and after the famous British observation of 1919, on solar eclipses, and the work at Mount Wilson and the Indian Kodaikanal Observatories to extract the gravitational redshift from the complicated spectrum of the sun. The account of the eclipse work which was carried out between 1918 and 1923 by Lick astronomers corrects the impression suggested by many historical accounts that the British expedition alone settled the light-bending question. Apart from these main topics, the anomalous perihelion advance of Mercury and the ether problem are covered. By concentrating on astronomy rather than on physics this book complements the rich but repetitive literature on Einstein and relativity which appeared in connection with the commemoration of Einstein's annus mirabilis, 2005. The well told stories include curiosities such as

  16. The Beyond Einstein Outreach Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamurthi, Anita

    2006-09-01

    We are currently in the beginning stages of designing an education and public outreach effort for the Beyond Einstein (BE) program. This presentation will discuss opportunities for scientists involved in the BE program to work with us on engaging a variety of audiences on outreach efforts of various scales. These range from being part of a speaker's bureau to promote the science to working with museums, community groups, teachers and school classrooms, etc. We would like to offer our help to scientists who have ROSES awards related to BE science (such as the BEFS grantees) to apply for EPO funding so that we can leverage efforts and build a coherent and vibrant EPO program. Additionally, we have initiated a few efforts that might allow BE scientists to leverage our ongoing programs and take advantage of established infrastructure.

  17. Entanglement Equilibrium and the Einstein Equation.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Ted

    2016-05-20

    A link between the semiclassical Einstein equation and a maximal vacuum entanglement hypothesis is established. The hypothesis asserts that entanglement entropy in small geodesic balls is maximized at fixed volume in a locally maximally symmetric vacuum state of geometry and quantum fields. A qualitative argument suggests that the Einstein equation implies the validity of the hypothesis. A more precise argument shows that, for first-order variations of the local vacuum state of conformal quantum fields, the vacuum entanglement is stationary if and only if the Einstein equation holds. For nonconformal fields, the same conclusion follows modulo a conjecture about the variation of entanglement entropy. PMID:27258860

  18. Entanglement Equilibrium and the Einstein Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, Ted

    2016-05-01

    A link between the semiclassical Einstein equation and a maximal vacuum entanglement hypothesis is established. The hypothesis asserts that entanglement entropy in small geodesic balls is maximized at fixed volume in a locally maximally symmetric vacuum state of geometry and quantum fields. A qualitative argument suggests that the Einstein equation implies the validity of the hypothesis. A more precise argument shows that, for first-order variations of the local vacuum state of conformal quantum fields, the vacuum entanglement is stationary if and only if the Einstein equation holds. For nonconformal fields, the same conclusion follows modulo a conjecture about the variation of entanglement entropy.

  19. The global Utiyama theorem in Einstein-Cartan theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruzzo, Ugo

    1987-09-01

    A global formulation of Utiyama's theorem for Einstein-Cartan-type gravitational theories regarded as gauge theories of the group of space-time diffeomorphisms is given. The local conditions for the Lagrangian to be gauge invariant coincide with those found by other authors [A. Pérez-Rendón Collantes, ``Utiyama type theorems,'' in Poincaré Gauge Approach to Gravity. I, Proceedings Journées Relativistes 1984; A. Pérez-Rendón and J. J. Seisdedos, ``Utiyama type theorems in Poincaré gauge approach to gravity. II, '' Preprints de Mathematicas, Universidad de Salamanca, 1986] in Kibble's and Hehl's approaches.

  20. Composite nature of hadrons and Bose-Einstein correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialas, A.

    2016-07-01

    I am reporting results of two papers, written together with W.Florkowski and K.Zalewski [1, 2], discussing the consequences of the observation [3] that, due to their composite nature and thus finite size, hadrons observed in the HBT measurements must be correlated in space-time. Using the blast-wave model [4] adjusted [1] to ALICE data on the measured HBT radii in pp collisions at 7 TeV [5], the full Bose-Einstein correlation functions in three direction (out, side, long) are evaluated. The results are presented together with some additional comments.

  1. Numerical relativity simulations in the era of the Einstein Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannam, Mark; Hawke, Ian

    2011-02-01

    Numerical-relativity (NR) simulations of compact binaries are expected to be an invaluable tool in gravitational-wave astronomy. The sensitivity of future detectors such as the Einstein Telescope (ET) will place much higher demands on NR simulations than first- and second-generation ground-based detectors. We discuss the issues facing compact-object simulations over the next decade, with an emphasis on estimating where the accuracy and parameter space coverage will be sufficient for ET and where significant work is needed.

  2. Rediscovering Einstein's legacy: How Einstein anticipates Kuhn and Feyerabend on the nature of science.

    PubMed

    Oberheim, Eric

    2016-06-01

    Thomas Kuhn and Paul Feyerabend promote incommensurability as a central component of their conflicting accounts of the nature of science. This paper argues that in so doing, they both develop Albert Einstein's views, albeit in different directions. Einstein describes scientific revolutions as conceptual replacements, not mere revisions, endorsing 'Kant-on-wheels' metaphysics in light of 'world change'. Einstein emphasizes underdetermination of theory by evidence, rational disagreement in theory choice, and the non-neutrality of empirical evidence. Einstein even uses the term 'incommensurable' specifically to apply to challenges posed to comparatively evaluating scientific theories in 1949, more than a decade before Kuhn and Feyerabend. This analysis shows how Einstein anticipates substantial components of Kuhn and Feyerabend's views, and suggests that there are strong reasons to suspect that Kuhn and Feyerabend were directly inspired by Einstein's use of the term 'incommensurable', as well as his more general methodological and philosophical reflections. PMID:27269260

  3. Atom Interferometry on Sounding Rockets with Bose-Einstein Condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, Stephan T.; Becker, Dennis; Lachmann, Maike D.; Herr, Waldemar; Rasel, Ernst M.; Quantus Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    One of the fundamental postulates of our description of nature is the universality of free fall, stating that the force exerted upon an object due to gravity is independent of its constitution. A precise test of this assumption is the comparison of the free fall of two ultra-cold clouds of different atomic species via atom interferometry. Since the sensitivity of the measurement is proportional to the square of the propagation time in the interferometer, it can be increased by performing the experiments in microgravity. In order to fully utilize the potential of the experiments the usage of a Bose-Einstein-Condensate as the initial state is necessary, because it is characterized by a small initial size and a low expansion velocity. As a step towards the transfer of such a system into space three sounding rocket missions with atom interferometers are currently being prepared. The launch of the first mission, aimed at the first demonstration of a Bose-Einstein-Condensate in space and an atom interferometer based on it is planned for 2016 from ESRANGE, Sweden. It will be followed by two more missions that extend the scientific goals to the creation of degenerate mixtures and dual-species atom interferometry. This research is funded by the German Space Agency DLR under Grant Number DLR 50 1131-37.

  4. Stability of the Einstein static universe in Einstein-Cartan theory

    SciTech Connect

    Atazadeh, K.

    2014-06-01

    The existence and stability of the Einstein static solution have been built in the Einstein-Cartan gravity. We show that this solution in the presence of perfect fluid with spin density satisfying the Weyssenhoff restriction is cyclically stable around a center equilibrium point. Thus, study of this solution is interesting because it supports non-singular emergent cosmological models in which the early universe oscillates indeterminately about an initial Einstein static solution and is thus past eternal.

  5. Einstein and General Relativity: Historical Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandrasekhar, S.

    1979-01-01

    This paper presented in the 1978 Oppenheimer Memorial Lecture at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratories on August 17, 1978, discusses Einstein's contributions to physics, in particular, his discovery of the general theory of relativity. (HM)

  6. The happiest thought of Einstein's life.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heller, M.

    It is a commonly told story that Einstein formulated his famous principle of equivalence when thinking about what happens in a freely falling elevator, and that it was an original idea of his genius distinguished by the rare capability to see deep problems in the most ordinary things. In the reading of Einstein's and Ernst Mach's works the author has discovered that it was not a physicist in an elevator which led to the principle of equivalence but rather somebody falling from a roof; moreover, the idea behind the principle was not invented by Einstein himself but rather read by him from the book by Mach entitled The Science of Mechanics. The influence this book had on young Einstein is very well known.

  7. Covariant Conformal Decomposition of Einstein Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourgoulhon, E.; Novak, J.

    It has been shown1,2 that the usual 3+1 form of Einstein's equations may be ill-posed. This result has been previously observed in numerical simulations3,4. We present a 3+1 type formalism inspired by these works to decompose Einstein's equations. This decomposition is motivated by the aim of stable numerical implementation and resolution of the equations. We introduce the conformal 3-``metric'' (scaled by the determinant of the usual 3-metric) which is a tensor density of weight -2/3. The Einstein equations are then derived in terms of this ``metric'', of the conformal extrinsic curvature and in terms of the associated derivative. We also introduce a flat 3-metric (the asymptotic metric for isolated systems) and the associated derivative. Finally, the generalized Dirac gauge (introduced by Smarr and York5) is used in this formalism and some examples of formulation of Einstein's equations are shown.

  8. On algebraic endomorphisms of the Einstein gyrogroup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molnár, Lajos; Virosztek, Dániel

    2015-08-01

    We describe the structure of all continuous algebraic endomorphisms of the open unit ball B of ℝ3 equipped with the Einstein velocity addition. We show that any nonzero such transformation originates from an orthogonal linear transformation on ℝ3.

  9. Recent developments in Bose-Einstein condensation

    SciTech Connect

    Kalman, G.

    1997-09-22

    This paper contains viewgraphs on developments on Bose-Einstein condensation. Some topics covered are: strongly coupled coulomb systems; standard response functions of the first and second kind; dynamical mean field theory; quasi localized charge approximation; and the main equations.

  10. How History Helped Einstein in Special Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Alberto

    2013-04-01

    I will discuss how the German intellectual movement known as ``critical history'' motivated several physicists in the late 1900s to radically analyze the fundamental principles of mechanics, leading eventually to Einstein's special theory of relativity. Eugen Karl Dühring, Johann Bernhard Stallo, Ludwig Lange, and Ernst Mach wrote critical histories of mechanics, some of which emphasized notions of relativity and observation, in opposition to old metaphysical concepts that seemed to infect the foundations of physics. This strand of critical history included the ``genetic method'' of analyzing how concepts develop over time, in our minds, by way of ordinary experiences, which by 1904 was young Albert Einstein's favorite approach for examining fundamental notions. Thus I will discuss how history contributed in Einstein's path to relativity, as well as comment more generally on Einstein's views on history.