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1

Development of Four Self-Report Measures of Job Stressors and Strain: Interpersonal Conflict at Work Scale, Organizational Constraints Scale, Quantitative Workload Inventory, and Physical Symptoms Inventory  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite the widespread use of self-report measures of both job-related stressors and strains, relatively few carefully developed scales for which validity data exist are available. In this article, we discuss 3 job stressor scales (Interpersonal Conflict at Work Scale, Organizational Constraints Scale, and Quantitative Workload Inventory) and 1 job strain scale (Physical Symptoms Inventory). Using meta-analysis, we combined the results

Paul E. Spector; Steve M. Jex

1998-01-01

2

Children' Florida Obsessive Compulsive Inventory: Psychometric Properties and Feasibility of a Self-Report Measure of Obsessive-Compulsive Symptoms in Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report describes the development and psychometric properties of the Children's Florida Obsessive Compulsive Inventory (C-FOCI). Designed specifically as a brief measure for assessing obsessive-compulsive symptoms, the C-FOCI was created for use in both clinical and community settings. Study 1 included 82 children and adolescents diagnosed…

Storch, Eric A.; Khanna, Muniya; Merlo, Lisa J.; Loew, Benjamin A.; Franklin, Martin; Reid, Jeannette M.; Goodman, Wayne K.; Murphy, Tanya K.

2009-01-01

3

Children’s Florida Obsessive Compulsive Inventory: Psychometric Properties and Feasibility of a Self-Report Measure of Obsessive–Compulsive Symptoms in Youth  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report describes the development and psychometric properties of the Children’s Florida Obsessive Compulsive Inventory\\u000a (C-FOCI). Designed specifically as a brief measure for assessing obsessive–compulsive symptoms, the C-FOCI was created for\\u000a use in both clinical and community settings. Study 1 included 82 children and adolescents diagnosed with primary Obsessive–Compulsive\\u000a Disorder, and their parents. The Children’s Yale-Brown Obsessive–Compulsive Scale (CY-BOCS) was

Eric A. Storch; Muniya Khanna; Lisa J. Merlo; Benjamin A. Loew; Martin Franklin; Jeannette M. Reid; Wayne K. Goodman; Tanya K. Murphy

2009-01-01

4

The Self-Report Family Inventory: An Exploratory Factor Analysis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Researchers explored the factor structure of the Self-Report Family Inventory with a sample of heterosexual parents who have a son or daughter who self-identifies as lesbian, gay, or bisexual. Results suggest that a two-factor solution is appropriate. Research and clinical implications are offered. (Contains 1 figure and 2 tables.)

Goodrich, Kristopher M.; Selig, James P.; Trahan, Don P., Jr.

2012-01-01

5

Self-Reported ADHD Symptoms among College Students: Item Positioning Affects Symptom Endorsement Rates  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: The effect of manipulating item positioning on self-reported ADHD symptoms was examined. We assessed whether listing DSM-IV ADHD symptoms serially or interspersed affected (a) the correlation between ADHD symptoms and (b) the rate of symptom endorsement. Method: In Study 1, an undergraduate sample (n = 102) completed a measure that…

Mitchell, John T.; Knouse, Laura E.; Nelson-Gray, Rosemery O.; Kwapil, Thomas R.

2009-01-01

6

Self-Report of Depressive Symptoms in Low Back Pain Patients.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents two studies designed to examine the self-report of depressive symptoms in low back pain patients (N=134). Both studies found that patients were more likely to report somatic than cognitive symptoms of depression. Patients with multiple physical findings were not more likely to report somatic symptoms than patients with few physical…

Crisson, James; And Others

1986-01-01

7

Validation of a self-reported shelf inventory to measure food purchase behavior. — Measures of the Food Environment  

Cancer.gov

A mailed, self-reported shelf inventory was validated for use as a tool in assessing the impact of a community nutrition intervention that included a point-of-purchase component. The self-reported inventory was evaluated for overall accuracy as well as for the effects of gender, age, and shopping responsibility on accuracy. In addition, the food-shelf inventory was compared with a specific food frequency questionnaire. Specificity and sensitivity were calculated for self-reported inventories using an interviewer-completed, same-day inventory as the gold standard.

8

Development and Validation of the Inventory of Depression and Anxiety Symptoms (IDAS)  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors describe a new self-report instrument, the Inventory of Depression and Anxiety Symptoms (IDAS), which was designed to assess specific symptom dimensions of major depression and related anxiety disorders. They created the IDAS by conducting principal factor analyses in 3 large samples (college students, psychiatric patients, community…

Watson, David; O'Hara, Michael W.; Simms, Leonard J.; Kotov, Roman; Chmielewski, Michael; McDade-Montez, Elizabeth A.; Gamez, Wakiza; Stuart, Scott

2007-01-01

9

Development and Validation of the Inventory of Depression and Anxiety Symptoms (IDAS)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors describe a new self-report instrument, the Inventory of Depression and Anxiety Symptoms (IDAS), which was designed to assess specific symptom dimensions of major depression and related anxiety disorders. They created the IDAS by conducting principal factor analyses in 3 large samples (college students, psychiatric patients, community adults); the authors also examined the robustness of its psychometric properties in

David Watson; Michael W. OHara; Leonard J. Simms; Roman Kotov; Michael Chmielewski; Elizabeth A. McDade-Montez; Wakiza Gamez; Scott Stuart

2007-01-01

10

Assessment of Mindfulness by Self-ReportThe Kentucky Inventory of Mindfulness Skills  

Microsoft Academic Search

A self-report inventory for the assessment of mindfulness skills was developed, and its psychometric characteristics and relationships with other constructs were examined. Participants included three samples of undergraduate students and a sample of outpatients with borderline personality disorder. Based on discussions of mindfulness in the current literature, four mindfulness skills were specified: observing, describing, acting with awareness, and accepting without

Ruth A. Baer; Gregory T. Smith; Kristin B. Allen

2004-01-01

11

The Relationship between ADHD Symptoms, Mood Instability, and Self-Reported Offending  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: To investigate the relative importance of ADHD symptoms, mood instability, and antisocial personality disorder traits in predicting self-reported offending. Method: A total of 295 Icelandic students completed two scales of offending behavior and measures of ADHD symptoms, mood instability, and antisocial personality traits. Results:…

Gudjonsson, Gisli H.; Sigurdsson, Jon Fridrik; Adalsteinsson, Tomas F.; Young, Susan

2013-01-01

12

Predictors of Self-Reported Physical Symptoms in Low-Income, Inner-City African American Women: The Role of Optimism, Depressive Symptoms, and Chronic Illness  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this study we examined the association of optimism and depressive symptoms with self-reported physical symptoms in 241 low-income, inner-city African American women with or without a chronic illness (HIV). Although optimism was not a unique predictor of self-reported physical symptoms over and above depressive symptoms, optimism interacted with…

Jones, Deborah J.; O'Connell, Cara; Gound, Mary; Heller, Laurie; Forehand, Rex

2004-01-01

13

Revision of the Padua Inventory of obsessive compulsive disorder symptoms: Distinctions between worry, obsessions, and compulsions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Padua Inventory (PI), a self-report measure of obsessive and compulsive symptoms, is increasingly used in obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) research. Freeston, Ladouceur, Rheaume, Letarte, Gagnon and Thibodeau (1994) [Behaviour Research and Therapy, 32, 29–36], however, recently showed that the PI measures worry in addition to obsessions. In an attempt to solve this measurement problem, this study used a content

G. Leonard Burns; Susan G. Keortge; Gina M. Formea; Lee G. Sternberger

1996-01-01

14

Self-Reported Depressive Symptoms in Lesbian Birth Mothers and Comothers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Despite the frequency of postpartum depression, little is known about the experiences of lesbian birth mothers and their female partners, or comothers. In this modest yet important exploratory investigation, 20 lesbian mothers completed a survey of self-reported postpartum depressive symptoms (PDS) and related risk factors. Results indicate that…

Maccio, Elaine M.; Pangburn, Jaimee A.

2012-01-01

15

Self-Reported Medication Adherence and Symptom Experience in Adults with HIV  

PubMed Central

Symptom burden has been identified as a predictor of medication adherence, but little is known about which symptoms are most strongly implicated. This study examines self-reported adherence in relation to demographic, clinical, and symptom characteristics among 302 adults living with HIV. Only 12% reported missing medication during the 3-day assessment, but 75% gave at least one reason for missing medication in the prior month. Poor adherence was associated with higher viral load and greater symptom burden. Trouble sleeping and difficulty concentrating were strongly associated with poor adherence. Given that “forgetting” was the most common reason for missing medication and nearly one third reported sleeping through dose time, future research should examine the influence of sleep disturbance on adherence. Effective management of common symptoms, such as sleep disturbance, fatigue, and gastrointestinal side effects of medications may result in better adherence, as well as improved clinical outcomes and quality of life. PMID:21377900

Gay, Caryl; Portillo, Carmen J.; Kelly, Ryan; Coggins, Traci; Davis, Harvey; Aouizerat, Bradley E.; Pullinger, Clive R.; Lee, Kathryn A.

2010-01-01

16

A new self-report inventory of dyslexia for students: criterion and construct validity.  

PubMed

The validity of a Dutch self-report inventory of dyslexia was ascertained in two samples of students. Six biographical questions, 20 general language statements and 56 specific language statements were based on dyslexia as a multi-dimensional deficit. Dyslexia and non-dyslexia were assessed with two criteria: identification with test results (Sample 1) and classification using biographical information (both samples). Using discriminant analyses, these criteria were predicted with various groups of statements. All together, 11 discriminant functions were used to estimate classification accuracy of the inventory. In Sample 1, 15 statements predicted the test criterion with classification accuracy of 98%, and 18 statements predicted the biographical criterion with classification accuracy of 97%. In Sample 2, 16 statements predicted the biographical criterion with classification accuracy of 94%. Estimations of positive and negative predictive value were 89% and 99%. Items of various discriminant functions were factor analysed to find characteristic difficulties of students with dyslexia, resulting in a five-factor structure in Sample 1 and a four-factor structure in Sample 2. Answer bias was investigated with measures of internal consistency reliability. Less than 20 self-report items are sufficient to accurately classify students with and without dyslexia. This supports the usefulness of self-assessment of dyslexia as a valid alternative to diagnostic test batteries. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25628151

Tamboer, Peter; Vorst, Harrie C M

2015-02-01

17

Training Attention Improves Decision Making in Individuals with Elevated Self-Reported Depressive Symptoms  

PubMed Central

Depression is often characterized by attentional biases toward negative items and away from positive items, which likely affects reward and punishment processing. Recent work reported that training attention away from negative stimuli reduced this bias and reduced depressive symptoms. However, the effect of attention training on subsequent learning has yet to be explored. In the current study, participants were required to learn to maximize reward during decision-making. Undergraduates with elevated self-reported depressive symptoms received attention training toward positive stimuli prior to performing the decision-making task (n=20; active training). The active training group was compared to two groups: undergraduates with elevated self-reported depressive symptoms who received placebo training (n=22; placebo training) and control subjects with low levels of depressive symptoms (n=33; non-depressive control). The placebo-training depressive group performed worse and switched between options more than non-depressive controls on the reward maximization task. However, depressives that received active training performed as well as non-depressive controls. Computational modeling indicated that the placebo-trained group learned more from negative than from positive prediction errors, leading to more frequent switching. The non-depressive control and active training depressive groups showed similar learning from positive and negative prediction errors, leading to less frequent switching and better performance. Our results indicate that individuals with elevated depressive symptoms are impaired at reward maximization, but that the deficit can be improved with attention training toward positive stimuli. PMID:24197612

Cooper, Jessica A.; Gorlick, Marissa A.; Denny, Taylor; Worthy, Darrell A.; Beevers, Christopher G.; Maddox, W. Todd

2013-01-01

18

The Teaching Perspectives Inventory at 10 Years and 100,000 Respondents: Reliability and Validity of a Teacher Self-Report Inventory  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Teaching Perspectives Inventory (TPI) measures teachers’ profiles on five contrasting views of what it means “to teach.” The inventory can be used in aiding self-reflection, developing statements of teaching philosophy, engendering conversations about teaching, and recognizing legitimate variations on excellence in teaching. Available at www.TeachingPerspectives.com, the TPI is a free, self-report, self-scoring inventory that promotes a pluralistic understanding of

John B. Collins; Daniel D. Pratt

2011-01-01

19

Self-reported psychotic symptoms predict impulsivity among African-American patients in an urban non-psychiatric medical setting  

Microsoft Academic Search

A variety of epidemiological studies have documented self-reported psychotic symptoms among individuals in the general population. Research has not been conducted on the associations between self-reported psychotic symptoms and enduring personality characteristics, such as impulsivity, among participants in non-psychiatric settings. We hypothesized that impulsivity scores, as measured by the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11), would be predicted partly by the presence

Michael T. Compton; Nadine J. Kaslow

2005-01-01

20

Self-reported symptoms associated with exposure to electromagnetic fields: a questionnaire study.  

PubMed

Abstract In the last years, it has been discussed frequently whether there are any harmful effects of electromagnetic fields on human health. Electromagnetic fields are generated by several natural and man-made sources. Part of the electromagnetic spectrum called Radiofrequency is used in communication systems such as mobile (cellular) phone and computer. The aim of our study was to explore different self-reported symptoms that may be associated with exposure to electromagnetic fields. This survey study was conducted, using a questionnaire, on 350 people aged +9 years in Turkey. The chi-square test was used for data analysis. Self-reported symptoms were headache, vertigo/dizziness, fatigue, forgetfulness, sleep disturbance-insomnia, tension-anxiety, joint and bone pain, lacrimation of the eyes, hearing loss and tinnitus. As a result of the survey, the study has shown that users of mobile phone and computer more often complained of headache, joint and bone pain, hearing loss, vertigo/dizziness, tension-anxiety symptoms according to time of daily usage (p?

Küçer, Nermin; Pamukçu, Tu?ba

2014-01-01

21

Longitudinal assessment of chlorpyrifos exposure and self-reported neurological symptoms in adolescent pesticide applicators  

PubMed Central

Objectives Occupational exposure of organophosphorus pesticides, such as chlorpyrifos (CPF), in adolescents is of particular concern because of the potential vulnerability of the developing neurological system. The objectives of this study were to examine how neurological symptoms reported over the application season vary across time, whether these effects are reversible postapplication and if there are associations between CPF biomarkers and neurological symptoms in an adolescent study population. Setting The longitudinal study was conducted in two agricultural districts of Menoufia Governorate, Egypt between April 2010 and January 2011. Participants Male adolescent participants, including CPF applicators (n=57) and non-applicators (n=38), were recruited. Primary and secondary outcome measures Self-reported data for 25 neurological symptoms were collected at 32 time points over the 8-month period before, during and after the application season. Additionally, urine and blood samples were collected to measure urine trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCPy), a CPF-specific biomarker and blood cholinesterase activity. Results Applicators and non-applicators report the highest numbers of symptoms during the application season, followed by a reduction in symptoms after the application ended. Applicators reported a greater percentage of neurological symptoms, relative to baseline, than non-applicators after accounting for potential covariates. Among the applicators, cumulative TCPy was positively and significantly associated with the average percentage of symptoms (B=4.56, 95% CI 3.29 to 5.84; p<0.001). Significant associations (p=0.03–0.07) between the change in butyrylcholinesterase activity from the preapplication to the postapplication season and several domains of neurological symptoms were also found, even after adjusting for potential covariates. Conclusions These observations demonstrate changes in the reporting of symptoms across the application season, showing an increase in symptom reporting during application and recovery following the end of pesticide application. These findings reinforce the growing concern regarding the neurotoxic health effects of CPF in adolescent applicators in developing countries and the need for developing and implementing intervention programmes. PMID:24595133

Khan, Khalid; Ismail, Ahmed A; Abdel Rasoul, Gaafar; Bonner, Matthew R; Lasarev, Michael R; Hendy, Olfat; Al-Batanony, Manal; Crane, Alice L; Singleton, Steven T; Olson, James R; Rohlman, Diane S

2014-01-01

22

A Self-Report Instrument That Describes Urogenital Atrophy Symptoms in Breast Cancer Survivors  

PubMed Central

Urogenital atrophy affects the lower urinary and genital tracts and is responsible for urinary, genital, and sexual symptoms. The accurate identification, measurement, and documentation of symptoms are limited by the absence of reliable and valid instruments. The Urogenital Atrophy Questionnaire was developed to allow self-reporting of symptoms and to provide clinicians and researchers an instrument to identify, measure, and document indicators of urogenital atrophy. A pilot study (n = 30) measured test-retest reliability (p < .05) of the instrument. Subsequently, a survey of women with (n = 168) and without breast cancer (n = 166) was conducted using the Urogenital Atrophy Questionnaire, Female Sexual Function Instrument, and Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy, Breast, Endocrine Scale. Exploratory factor analysis (KMO 0.774; Bartlett’s test of sphericity 0.000) indicated moderate-high relatedness of items. Concurrent (p > .01) and divergent validity (p < .000) were established. A questionnaire resulted that enables women, regardless of sexual orientation, partner status, and levels of sexual activity to accurately report symptoms. PMID:21172922

Lester, Joanne; Bernhard, Linda; Ryan-Wenger, Nancy

2013-01-01

23

Self-Reported Pain and Disease Symptoms Persist in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Despite Treatment Advances  

PubMed Central

Objective To use electronic diaries (e-diaries) to determine whether pain, stiffness, and fatigue continue to be common, disabling symptoms in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) despite the use of aggressive treatments in contemporary medical management. Methods Fifty-nine children with JIA (ages 8–18 years) provided ratings of pain, stiffness, and fatigue intensity and functional limitations using a smartphone e-diary 3 times each day for 1 month. Medication information was collected via parent report and checked for accuracy by chart review. Descriptive analyses were conducted to determine typical symptom intensity, frequency, and variability. Multilevel modeling was used to analyze associations between symptoms and functional outcomes and between medication use and symptom intensity. Results Children reported moments of pain in 66% of e-diary entries. No children were entirely pain-free across the reporting period. In 31% of all e-diary entries the visual analog scale score for pain was >40 (high pain intensity), with 86% of children reporting a high level of pain at least once during the study period. The mean ratings of pain, stiffness, and fatigue intensity were in the mild-to-moderate range. Medication class was not a reliable predictor of differences in symptom intensity, even though 79% of children were prescribed a disease-modifying antirheumatic drug and 47% were prescribed a biologic agent. Moments of higher pain intensity and higher stiffness intensity were each uniquely predictive of higher concurrent functional limitations. Conclusion Self-reported pain, stiffness, and fatigue continue to be common in children with JIA, despite contemporary advances in treatment strategies, including use of biologic agents. These findings are surprisingly consistent with previous results from research using daily paper diaries in the pre-biologics era. There remains a pressing and ongoing need to optimize pain and symptom management in JIA. PMID:24504820

Bromberg, Maggie H.; Connelly, Mark; Anthony, Kelly K.; Gil, Karen M.; Schanberg, Laura E.

2014-01-01

24

Self-reported low back symptoms in urban bus drivers exposed to whole-body vibration.  

PubMed

The prevalence of self-reported low back symptoms was investigated by a postal questionnaire in a group of 234 urban bus drivers exposed to whole-body vibration and postural stress and in a control group of 125 maintenance workers employed at the same bus municipal company. The average vertical whole-body vibration magnitude measured on the seat pan of the buses was 0.4 m/s2. After controlling for potential confounders, the prevalence odds ratios for the bus drivers compared to the controls significantly exceeded 1 for several types of low back symptoms (leg pain, acute low back pain, low back pain). The occurrence of low back symptoms increased with increasing whole-body vibration exposure expressed in terms of total (lifetime) vibration dose (years m2/s4), equivalent vibration magnitude (m/s2), and duration of exposure (years of service). The highest prevalence of disc protrusion was found among the bus drivers with more severe whole-body vibration exposure. Frequent awkward postures at work were also related to some types of low back symptoms. It is concluded that bus driving is associated with an increased risk for low back troubles. This excess risk may be due to both whole-body vibration exposure and prolonged sitting in a constrained posture. The findings of this study also indicated that among the bus drivers low back symptoms occurred at whole-body vibration exposure levels that were lower than the health-based exposure limits proposed by the International Standard ISO 2631/1. PMID:1411756

Bovenzi, M; Zadini, A

1992-09-01

25

The Comorbidity of Self-Reported Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, and Traumatic Symptoms  

PubMed Central

Background Data from primary care and community samples suggest higher rates of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among individuals with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). Objective This study investigated the co-occurrence of CFS, PTSD, and trauma symptoms and assessed the contribution of familial factors to the association of CFS with lifetime PTSD and current traumatic symptoms. Method Data on lifetime CFS and PTSD, as measured by self report of a doctor’s diagnosis of the disorder, and standardized questionnaire data on traumatic symptoms, using the Impact of Events Scale (IES), were obtained from 8,544 female and male twins from the community-based University of Washington Twin Registry. Results Lifetime prevalence of CFS was 2% and lifetime prevalence of PTSD was 4%. Participants who reported a history of PTSD were over 8 times more likely to report a history of CFS. Participants with scores ? 26 on the IES were over 4 times more likely to report CFS than those who had scores ? 25. These associations were attenuated but remained significant after adjusting for familial factors through within-twin pair analyses. Conclusion These results support similar findings that a lifetime diagnosis of CFS is strongly associated with both lifetime PTSD and current traumatic symptoms, although familial factors such as shared genetic and environmental contributions played a limited role in the relationship between CFS, PTSD, and traumatic symptoms. These findings suggest that future research should investigate both the familial and the unique environmental factors that may give rise to both CFS and PTSD. PMID:22296866

Dansie, Elizabeth; Heppner, Pia; Furberg, Helena; Goldberg, Jack; Buchwald, Dedra; Afari, Niloofar

2011-01-01

26

Using existing self-report inventories to measure the psychopathic personality traits of Fearless Dominance and Impulsive Antisociality  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes the creation and initial validation of new self-report measures of the psychopathic traits of Fearless Dominance and Impulsive Antisociality. In Study 1 we created new measures of these traits from the item content of three existing personality inventories: the IPIP-NEO [Johnson, J. A. (2000). Developing a short form of the IPIP-NEO: A report to HGW Consulting. Unpublished

Edward A. Witt; M. Brent Donnellan; Daniel M. Blonigen

2009-01-01

27

Daily and Retrospective Mood and Physical Symptom Self-Reports and Their Relationship to the Menstrual Cycle.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The literature on the relationships between changes in mood and the menstrual cycle reveals many inconsistencies due to the absence of certain control procedures. Daily self-reports of moods and physical symptoms were collected from women with normal cycles, women using oral contraceptives, and men for 35 days in a camouflaged study. Retrospective…

Swandby, Janet R.

28

Agreement Rates between Parent and Self-Report on Past ADHD Symptoms in an Adult Clinical Sample  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: To investigate agreement rates between parent and self-report on childhood symptoms of ADHD. Method: Sixty-eight self-referred treatment-naive adults (33 men, 35 women) were interviewed with a modified version of the Kiddie Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia-Epidemiological Version (K-SADS-E) and asked about past ADHD…

Dias, Gabriela; Mattos, Paulo; Coutinho, Gabriel; Segenreich, Daniel; Saboya, Eloisa; Ayrao, Vanessa

2008-01-01

29

Odor-related Chronic Somatic Symptoms Are Associated with Self-Reported Asthma and Hay Fever: The Hordaland Health Study.  

PubMed

The aetiology behind odor-related chronic somatic symptoms (O-RCSS) is unknown, although both immunological and psychiatric causes have been suggested. The aim of this study was to investigate the occurrence of self-reported asthma and hay fever and psychiatric symptoms in individuals having O-RCSS compared to individuals with similar chronic somatic symptoms (CSS) which were not odors-related, and also compared to healthy controls. Data from the Hordaland Health Study were used. 13,799 individuals, 40-45 years, answered a questionnaire including 16 questions related to somatic symptoms. They also indicated if the symptoms were odor-related, and answered questions about asthma and hay fever. Anxiety and depression were measured with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. 38 (0.6%) men and 106 (1.4%) women had O-RCSS, whereas 88 (1.5%) men and 192 (2.5%) women had CSS. Adjusted logistic regression analyses showed increased odds of self-reported asthma in those with O-RCSS compared to those with CSS (males: 3.81, 1.06-13.8, females: 2.60, 1.05-6.93) and compared to male and female controls (3.56, 1.89-6.68 and 4.81, 1.92-12.1 respectively). Increased odds of self-reported hay fever were in addition seen in females with O-RCSS. There were no differences in psychiatric symptoms between individuals with O-RCSS and CSS, although individuals in both groups showed increased odds compared to male and female controls. Increased occurrence of self-reported asthma was exclusively found among male and females with O-RCSS, compared to CSS and controls. Increased occurrence of psychiatric symptoms was seen both in individuals with O-RCSS and CSS. PMID:25530135

Gundersen, Hilde; Harris, Anette; Bråtveit, Magne; Moen, Bente E

2015-02-01

30

Measuring psychopathic traits in children through self-report. The development of the Youth Psychopathic Traits Inventory-Child Version.  

PubMed

The current article investigates whether self-reports of children provide reliable and valid information concerning psychopathic personality traits and behaviours. For this purpose, we developed a downward extension of an existing adolescent self-report measure; the Youth Psychopathic traits Inventory [YPI; Andershed, H., Kerr, M., Stattin, H., & Levander, S. (2002). Psychopathic traits in non-referred youths: Initial test of a new assessment tool. In E.S. Blaauw, L. (Ed.), Psychopaths: Current international perspectives (pp. 131-158): The Hague: Elsevier], called the Youth Psychopathic traits Inventory-Child Version (YPI-CV). The reliability and validity of the YPI-CV were tested in n=360 children from the general population. The YPI-CV had good internal consistency and a three factor structure similar to the original adolescent version. Test-retest reliability over a 6-month period was adequate. In validating the instrument, both self, teacher and peer report were used. The convergent and divergent validity of the three YPI-CV dimensions was examined by relating each of them to an external criterion measures assessing the same construct. It was concluded that psychopathic traits can be measured reliably and meaningfully through self-report in 9 to 12 year olds and that the YPI-CV is potentially a useful instrument for doing so. PMID:18514316

van Baardewijk, Yoast; Stegge, Hedy; Andershed, Henrik; Thomaes, Sander; Scholte, Evert; Vermeiren, Robert

2008-01-01

31

Psychometric characteristics of the postconcussion symptom inventory in children and adolescents.  

PubMed

Psychometric characteristics of the Postconcussion Symptom Inventory (PCSI) were examined in both concussed (n = 633) and uninjured (n = 1,273) 5 to 18 year olds. Parent- and self-report forms were created with developmentally appropriate wording and content. Factor analyses identified physical, cognitive, emotional, and sleep factors; that did not load strongly or discriminate between groups were eliminated. Internal consistency was strong for the total scales (? = 0.8-0.9). Test-retest reliability for the self-report forms was moderate to strong (intraclass coeffecients, ICCs = 0.65-0.89). Parent and self-report concordance was moderate (r = .44-.65), underscoring the importance of both perspectives. Convergent validity with another symptom measure was good (r = .8). Classification analyses indicated greater discriminability from parent report, but caveats to this are presented. With strong psychometric characteristics, the four versions of the PCSI capture important postconcussion symptoms and can be utilized to track recovery from pediatric concussion and guide treatment recommendations. PMID:24739735

Sady, Maegan D; Vaughan, Christopher G; Gioia, Gerard A

2014-06-01

32

Mediating roles of medication –taking self-efficacy and depressive symptoms on self-reported medication adherence in persons with HIV: A questionnaire survey  

PubMed Central

Summary What is already known about the topic? Highly active antiretroviral therapy has dramatically decreased morbidity and mortality and improved the quality of life in persons with HIVMedication-taking self-efficacy beliefs may predict medication adherence in persons with HIV.Depressive symptoms and perceived social support consistently influence medication-taking self-efficacy beliefs What this paper adds. Depressive symptoms mediated the prediction of medication-taking self-efficacy by perceived social support.Medication adherence self-efficacy mediated the prediction of self-reported medication adherence by perceived social support and depressive symptoms as self-efficacy theory suggests.This study provides researchers with increased understanding of the mediating role of medication-taking self-efficacy beliefs between selected psychological variables and self-reported medication adherence in persons with HIV. Background To date, only a few studies have examined the mediating role of self-efficacy on the relationship between depressive symptoms or perceived social support and medication adherence in persons with HIV. Objectives The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of perceived social support, depressive symptoms and medication-taking self-efficacy on self-reported medication adherence in persons with HIV. A proposed comprehensive model included three mediation hypotheses in order to examine the mediating roles of medication-taking self-efficacy and depressive symptoms Method Baseline data from “Adherence to Protease Inhibitors” were used. The 215 persons with HIV aged 19–61 (mean= 40.7, SD= 7.58) were recruited from multiple sites in Pittsburgh, PA (USA) and through self-referral. The participants were assessed using the Beck Depression Inventory, Interpersonal Support Evaluation List, the Medication Taking Self-Efficacy Scale, and the modified Morisky Self-report Medication Taking Scale. Structural equation modeling (EQS version 6.1) was used. The Satorra-Bentler Scaled ?2 test statistics (S-B ?2), comparative fit index (CFI), and the Standardized Root Mean Squared Residual (SRMR) were used to assess the fit of a comprehensive model including three mediation hypotheses. Results A comprehensive model with the three hypotheses showed a good model fit (S-B ?2 (24, N=215) = 69.06, p<.001; CFI=0.95; SRMR=0.057). Medication adherence self-efficacy fully mediated the prediction of self-reported medication adherence by perceived social support and depressive symptoms. Depressive symptoms partially mediated the prediction of medication-taking self-efficacy by perceived social support Conclusions The findings of this study provide researchers with increased understanding of the mediating role of medication-taking self-efficacy beliefs between selected psychological variables and self-reported medication adherence in persons with HIV. Future studies need to test the moderating effect of gender, ethnicity and risk factors for HIV on this model and the intervention effect of self-efficacy beliefs using longitudinal data. PMID:17949723

Cha, EunSeok; Erlen, Judith A.; Kim, Kevin H.; Sereika, Susan M.; Caruthers, Donna

2008-01-01

33

Evidence for shared genetic influences on self-reported ADHD and autistic symptoms in young adult Australian twins.  

PubMed

Recent clinic-based and population-based studies have shown evidence of association between ADHD and autistic symptoms in children and adolescents as well as evidence for genetic overlap between these disorders. The objective of the current study was to confirm the association between autistic and ADHD symptoms in a young adult twin sample assessed by self-report, and investigate whether shared genetic and/or environmental factors can explain the association. We performed twin-based structural equation modeling using self-report data from 11 Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS) items and 12 DSM-IV ADHD inattentive and impulsive symptom items obtained from 674 young adult Australian twins. Phenotypic correlation between autistic and ADHD symptoms was moderate. The most parsimonious univariate models for SRS and ADHD included additive genetic effects and unique environmental effects, without sex differences. ADHD and autistic traits were both moderately heritable. In a bivariate model, genetic correlation (r(g)) between SRS and ADHD was 0.72. Our results suggest that in young adults, a substantial proportion of the genetic influences on self-reported autistic and ADHD symptoms may be shared between the two disorders. PMID:19016613

Reiersen, Angela M; Constantino, John N; Grimmer, Marisa; Martin, Nicholas G; Todd, Richard D

2008-12-01

34

Current Self-Reported Symptoms of Attention Deficit\\/Hyperactivity Disorder Are Associated with Total Brain Volume in Healthy Adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundReduced total brain volume is a consistent finding in children with Attention Deficit\\/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). In order to get a better understanding of the neurobiology of ADHD, we take the first step in studying the dimensionality of current self-reported adult ADHD symptoms, by looking at its relation with total brain volume.Methodology\\/Principal FindingsIn a sample of 652 highly educated adults, the

Martine Hoogman; Mark Rijpkema; Luc Janss; Han Brunner; Guillen Fernandez; Jan Buitelaar; Barbara Franke; Alejandro Arias-Vásquez

2012-01-01

35

Association of Depressive Symptoms With All-Cause and Ischemic Heart Disease Mortality in Adults With Self-Reported Hypertension  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundHypertension (HTN) is a prevalent and important risk factor for both cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. Depression is often present in hypertensive patients and has also been associated with increased mortality risk. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of depressive symptoms with all-cause mortality and ischemic heart disease (IHD) mortality among adults with self-reported HTN.MethodsWe studied 10,025

R. Neal Axon; Yumin Zhao; Leonard E. Egede

2010-01-01

36

Chronic low-level mercury exposure, BDNF polymorphism, and associations with self-reported symptoms and mood.  

PubMed

Recent reports have described neurobehavioral impairments in human subjects carrying a V66M polymorphism in the gene encoding brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Inasmuch as ventral nervous system (CNS) deficits associated with this BDNF polymorphism are similar to those observed among subjects with chronic exposure to elemental mercury (Hg degrees ), we examined the potential effect of this BDNF polymorphism on symptoms and mood in an established cohort of dental practitioners with chronic low-level Hg degrees exposure. Self-reported symptoms and mood were obtained by computerized questionnaire from 193 male dentists (DTs) and 230 female dental assistants (DAs). Spot urine samples were analyzed for mercury concentrations to evaluate recent exposure. Detailed work histories were obtained to calculate chronic indices of Hg degrees exposure. Buccal cell samples were obtained to identify the V66M polymorphism of BDNF. Scores for 11 current and 12 recent and chronic symptom groups, along with six mood factors, were evaluated with respect to recent and chronic Hg degrees exposure and BDNF polymorphism. Multiple regression analysis controlled for age, race, socioeconomic status, tobacco and alcohol use, self-reported health problems, and medications. Separate evaluations were conducted for DTs and DAs. Twenty-three associations between recent or chronic Hg degrees exposure and BDNF status and self-reported symptoms were observed with p < 0.10. All but three were in the expected direction (symptom scores increasing with Hg degrees exposure or BDNF polymorphism), and all but six were among DAs. All eight correlations between chronic exposure indices and recent and chronic symptoms among DAs were in the expected direction. All seven associations between BDNF and symptoms were in the expected direction and split between DTs and DAs. All three associations with mood factors were among DAs and in the expected direction. These results indicate that among DAs very low levels of occupational Hg degrees exposure are associated with increased symptoms. The BDNF polymorphism is also associated with increased symptom and mood scores. Notably, Hg degrees and BDNF polymorphism were additive with respect to their associations with the same symptom group. PMID:15254338

Heyer, Nicholas J; Echeverria, Diana; Bittner, Alvah C; Farin, Federico M; Garabedian, Claire C; Woods, James S

2004-10-01

37

Genetic and Environmental Contributions to Self-Report Obsessive-Compulsive Symptoms in Dutch Adolescents at Ages 12, 14, and 16  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectiveTo determine the contributions of genetic and environmental influences to variation in self-report of obsessive-compulsive (OC) symptoms in a population-based twin sample of adolescent boys and girls.

Daniël S. Van Grootheest; Meike Bartels; Catarina E. M. Van Beijsterveldt; Daniëlle C. Cath; Aartjan T. Beekman; James J. Hudziak; Dorret I. Boomsma

2008-01-01

38

Development and validation of the Inventory of Depression and Anxiety Symptoms (IDAS).  

PubMed

The authors describe a new self-report instrument, the Inventory of Depression and Anxiety Symptoms (IDAS), which was designed to assess specific symptom dimensions of major depression and related anxiety disorders. They created the IDAS by conducting principal factor analyses in 3 large samples (college students, psychiatric patients, community adults); the authors also examined the robustness of its psychometric properties in 5 additional samples (high school students, college students, young adults, postpartum women, psychiatric patients) who were not involved in the scale development process. The IDAS contains 10 specific symptom scales: Suicidality, Lassitude, Insomnia, Appetite Loss, Appetite Gain, Ill Temper, Well-Being, Panic, Social Anxiety, and Traumatic Intrusions. It also includes 2 broader scales: General Depression (which contains items overlapping with several other IDAS scales) and Dysphoria (which does not). The scales (a) are internally consistent, (b) capture the target dimensions well, and (c) define a single underlying factor. They show strong short-term stability and display excellent convergent validity and good discriminant validity in relation to other self-report and interview-based measures of depression and anxiety. PMID:17845118

Watson, David; O'Hara, Michael W; Simms, Leonard J; Kotov, Roman; Chmielewski, Michael; McDade-Montez, Elizabeth A; Gamez, Wakiza; Stuart, Scott

2007-09-01

39

Are physical symptoms among survivors of a disaster presented to the general practitioner? A comparison between self-reports and GP data  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Most studies examining medically unexplained symptoms (MUS) have been performed in primary or secondary care and have examined symptoms for which patients sought medical attention. Disasters are often described as precipitating factors for MUS. However, health consequences of disasters are typically measured by means of questionnaires, and it is not known whether these self-reported physical symptoms are presented to

Bellis van den Berg; C Joris Yzermans; Peter G van der Velden; Rebecca K Stellato; Erik Lebret; Linda Grievink

2007-01-01

40

Self-reported depressive symptom measures: sensitivity to detecting change in a randomized, controlled trial of chronically depressed, nonpsychotic outpatients.  

PubMed

This study evaluated and compared the performance of three self-report measures: (1) 30-item Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology-Self-Report (IDS-SR30); (2) 16-item Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology-Self-Report (QIDS-SR16); and (3) Patient Global Impression-Improvement (PGI-I) in assessing clinical outcomes in depressed patients during a 12-week, acute phase, randomized, controlled trial comparing nefazodone, cognitive-behavioral analysis system of psychotherapy (CBASP), and the combination in the treatment of chronic depression. The IDS-SR30, QIDS-SR16, PGI-I, and the 24-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS24) ratings were collected at baseline and at weeks 1-4, 6, 8, 10, and 12. Response was defined a priori as a > or =50% reduction in baseline total score for the IDS-SR30 or for the QIDS-SR16 or as a PGI-I score of 1 or 2 at exit. Overall response rates (LOCF) to nefazodone were 41% (IDS-SR30), 45% (QIDS-SR16), 53% (PCI-I), and 47% (HDRS17). For CBASP, response rates were 41% (IDS-SR30), 45% (QIDS-SR16), 48% (PGI-I), and 46% (HDRS17). For the combination, response rates were 68% (IDS-SR30 and QIDS-SR16), 73% (PGI-I), and 76% (HDRS17). Similarly, remission rates were comparable for nefazodone (IDS-SR30=32%, QIDS-SR16=28%, PGI-I=22%, HDRS17=30%), for CBASP (IDS-SR30=32%, QIDS-SR16=30%, PGI-I=21%, HDRS17=32%), and for the combination (IDS-SR30=52%, QIDS-SR16=50%, PGI-I=25%, HDRS17=49%). Both the IDS-SR30 and QIDS-SR16 closely mirrored and confirmed findings based on the HDRS24. These findings raise the possibility that these two self-reports could provide cost- and time-efficient substitutes for clinician ratings in treatment trials of outpatients with nonpsychotic MDD without cognitive impairment. Global patient ratings such as the PGI-I, as opposed to specific item-based ratings, provide less valid findings. PMID:15578008

Rush, A John; Trivedi, Madhukar H; Carmody, Thomas J; Ibrahim, Hisham M; Markowitz, John C; Keitner, Gabor I; Kornstein, Susan G; Arnow, Bruce; Klein, Daniel N; Manber, Rachel; Dunner, David L; Gelenberg, Alan J; Kocsis, James H; Nemeroff, Charles B; Fawcett, Jan; Thase, Michael E; Russell, James M; Jody, Darlene N; Borian, Frances E; Keller, Martin B

2005-02-01

41

Development and Initial Psychometric Properties of the Computer Assisted Maltreatment Inventory (CAMI): A Comprehensive Self-Report Measure of Child Maltreatment History  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objectives: The present study reports on the development and initial psychometric properties of the Computer Assisted Maltreatment Inventory (CAMI), a web-based self-report measure of child maltreatment history, including sexual and physical abuse, exposure to interparental violence, psychological abuse, and neglect. Methods: The CAMI was…

DiLillo, David; Hayes-Skelton, Sarah A.; Fortier, Michelle A.; Perry, Andrea R.; Evans, Sarah E.; Messman Moore, Terri L.; Walsh, Kate; Nash, Cindy; Fauchier, Angele

2010-01-01

42

Longitudinal Construct Validity of Brief Symptom Inventory Subscales in Schizophrenia  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Longitudinal validity of Brief Symptom Inventory subscales was examined in a sample (N = 318) with schizophrenia-related illness measured at baseline and every 6 months for 3 years. Nonlinear factor analysis of items was used to test graded response models (GRMs) for subscales in isolation. The models varied in their within-time and between-times…

Long, Jeffrey D.; Harring, Jeffrey R.; Brekke, John S.; Test, Mary Ann; Greenberg, Jan

2007-01-01

43

Dissimilarity in Vulnerability: Self-Reported Symptoms Among Children with Experiences of Intimate Partner Violence  

Microsoft Academic Search

Children with experiences of intimate partner violence (IPV) are at risk. Not all children, however, display symptoms, and\\u000a differences connected to gender and age have been demonstrated. In this exploratory study, children’s own reports of symptoms\\u000a were used. The 41 recruited children, between 7 and 19 years old, were entered into a group program specially directed toward\\u000a children with experiences of

Anna Georgsson; Kjerstin Almqvist; Anders G. Broberg

44

Self-reported parkinsonian symptoms in the EPIC-Norfolk cohort  

E-print Network

, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.Page 1 of 9 (page number not for citation purposes) spective cohort study, progression in gait disturbance, measured with the UPDRS, was associated with mortality proportions of reported... signs and symptoms. Several studies have reported the presence of parkinsonian signs BMC Neurology 2005, 5:15 http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2377/5/15 and symptoms in elderly individuals without a diagnosis of PD [1,4-11]. The diagnosis of PD is based...

Ishihara, Lianna S; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Luben, Robert; Bingham, Sheila; Welch, Ailsa; Day, Nicholas E; Brayne, Carol

2005-08-24

45

Self-Reported Autism Symptoms in Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Scores on the autism spectrum quotient (AQ) were examined in 65 adults with ASD. Maternal reports of symptoms were collected simultaneously using the autism diagnostic interview-revised (ADI-R) and the Vineland Screener. A slightly revised AQ administration procedure was used to accommodate adults with below average IQ. AQ scores were lower than…

Bishop, Somer L.; Seltzer, Marsha Mailick

2012-01-01

46

Exploratory factor analysis of self-reported symptoms in a large, population-based military cohort  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: US military engagements have consistently raised concern over the array of health outcomes experienced by service members postdeployment. Exploratory factor analysis has been used in studies of 1991 Gulf War-related illnesses, and may increase understanding of symptoms and health outcomes associated with current military conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. The objective of this study was to use exploratory factor

Molly L Kelton; Cynthia A LeardMann; Besa Smith; Edward J Boyko; Tomoko I Hooper; Gary D Gackstetter; Paul D Bliese; Charles W Hoge; Tyler C Smith

2010-01-01

47

The relationship between self-reported cocaine withdrawal symptoms and history of depression  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the relationship between cocaine withdrawal and lifetime history of depression (major depression, dysthymia). Participants with a history of regular cocaine use (n=146) were administered the Structured Clinical Interview for the DSM-IV (SCID) and were asked to recall whether they experienced any of the six DSM-IV cocaine withdrawal symptoms. Results of bivariate analyses demonstrated that those meeting criteria

Todd C. Helmus; Karen K. Downey; Lee M. Wang; Gary L. Rhodes; Charles R. Schuster

2001-01-01

48

Dietary Patterns and Self-Reported Associations of Diet with Symptoms of Inflammatory Bowel Disease  

PubMed Central

Background There are insufficient data to make firm dietary recommendations for patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Yet patients frequently report that specific food items influence their symptoms. In this study, we describe patients’ perceptions about the benefits and harms of selected foods and patients’ dietary patterns. Methods CCFA Partners is an ongoing internet-based cohort study of patients with IBD. We used a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire to measure dietary consumption patterns and open-ended questions to elicit responses from patients about food items they believe ameliorate or exacerbate IBD. We categorized patients into four mutually exclusive disease categories: CD without an ostomy or pouch (CD), UC without an ostomy or pouch (UC), CD with an ostomy (CD-ostomy), and UC with a pouch (UC-pouch). Results Yogurt, rice, and bananas were more frequently reported to improve symptoms whereas non-leafy vegetables, spicy foods, fruit, nuts, leafy vegetables, fried foods, milk, red meat, soda, popcorn, dairy, alcohol, high-fiber foods, corn, fatty foods, seeds, coffee, and beans were more frequently reported to worsen symptoms. Compared to CD patients, CD-ostomy patients reported significantly greater consumption of cheese (odds ratio (OR) 1.56, 95% CI 1.03–2.36), sweetened beverages (OR 2.14, 95% CI 1.02–1.03), milk (OR 1.84, 95% CI 1.35–2.52), pizza (OR 1.57, 95% CI 1.12–2.20), and processed meats (OR 1.40; 95% CI 1.04–1.89). Conclusions Patients identified foods that they believe worsen symptoms and restricted their diet. Patients with ostomies ate a more liberal diet. Prospective studies are needed to determine whether diet influences disease course. PMID:22923336

Cohen, Aaron B.; Lee, Dale; Long, Millie D.; Kappelman, Michael D.; Martin, Christopher F.; Sandler, Robert S.; Lewis, James D.

2012-01-01

49

Biological alterations and self-reported symptoms among insecticides-exposed workers in Burkina Faso  

PubMed Central

Occupationally exposed workers, farm workers and plant protection agents in the Sahel region of Burkina Faso were interviewed to assess adverse health effects of insecticides. The subjects were also examined for changes in both hematological and biochemical parameters. The prevalence of liver and kidney dysfunction was found to be quite high among insecticide applicators, especially among plant protection agents. The prevalence of biochemical alterations seems to be correlated to the frequency of insecticide use. However, no significant differences were found between the hematological parameters among farm workers and plant protection agents. The hematological parameters of all the insecticide applicators were normal. The great majority of insecticide applicators (85%) reported symptoms related to insecticide exposure. The use of insecticides in the agriculture of Burkina Faso is threatening to human health. PMID:22783149

Toe, Adama M.; Ilboudo, Sylvain; Ouedraogo, Moustapha; Guissou, Pierre I.

2012-01-01

50

Brief Report: The Use of Self-Report Measures in Young People with Autism Spectrum Disorder to Access Symptoms of Anxiety, Depression and Negative Thoughts  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aims of this study were two-fold; firstly, to investigate whether self-report measures are useful and reflect parent-reported psychiatric symptoms in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and secondly, to investigate whether children with ASD are able to access and report their cognitions, a prerequisite skill for cognitive behavior…

Ozsivadjian, Ann; Hibberd, Charlotte; Hollocks, Matthew J.

2014-01-01

51

Clinical characteristics and outcomes of end-stage renal disease patients with self-reported pruritus symptoms  

PubMed Central

One of the most common conditions affecting end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients undergoing hemodialysis (HD) is pruritus. Studies report that itchy and dry skin, symptoms of pruritus, affect 40%–90% of ESRD patients. Yet, in clinical practice the condition is often underdiagnosed resulting in inadequate management and an underappreciated impact on patient outcomes. Two retrospective analyses were conducted: a preliminary analysis of ESRD patients with pruritus symptoms (n=73,124) undergoing HD or peritoneal dialysis at a large dialysis provider and a subsequent detailed analysis of a homogenous subset of patients undergoing in-center HD (n=38,315). The goal was to better understand the clinical burden of pruritus as it relates to patient characteristics, quality of life, medication use, and HD compliance. This population is commonly burdened by multiple comorbidities and related polypharmaceutical management; identifying the relationship of pruritus to these ailments can help guide future research and resource allocation. The detailed analysis confirmed trends observed in the preliminary analysis: 30% reported being “moderately” to “extremely bothered” by itchiness. The HD patient population with the highest severity of self-reported pruritus also had a consistent trend in overall increased resource utilization – higher monthly doses of erythropoietin-stimulating agents (53,397.1 to 63,405.4 units) and intravenous (IV) iron (237.2 to 247.6 units) and higher use of IV antibiotics (14.1% to 20.7%), as well as poorer quality-of-life measures (25-point reductions in Burden of Disease Score and Effects on Daily Life subscales of the Kidney Disease Quality of Life-36 survey). These results highlight the need to better identify and manage ESRD patients impacted by pruritus, as this symptom is associated with negative clinical outcomes and increased resource utilization. Further studies are needed to evaluate the current economic burden of pruritus in ESRD patients and create possible options for an improved pharmacoeconomic profile in this patient population. PMID:24379689

Ramakrishnan, Karthik; Bond, T Christopher; Claxton, Ami; Sood, Vipan C; Kootsikas, Maria; Agnese, Wendy; Sibbel, Scott

2014-01-01

52

Associations of Ambient Hydrogen Sulfide Exposure with Self-Reported Asthma and Asthma Symptoms  

PubMed Central

Background Whether long-term, low-level hydrogen sulfide (H2S) gas is a cause of health effects, including asthma, is uncertain. Rotorua city, New Zealand, has the largest population exposed, from geothermal sources, to relatively high ambient levels of H2S. In a cross-sectional study, the authors investigated associations with asthma in this population. Methods A total of 1,637 adults, aged 18-65 years, were enrolled during 2008-2010. Residences and workplaces were geocoded. H2S exposures at homes and workplaces were estimated using city-wide networks of passive H2S samplers and kriging to create exposure surfaces. Exposure metrics were based on (1) time-weighted exposures at home and work; and (2) the maximum exposure (home or work). Exposure estimates were entered as quartiles into log-binomial regression models, with covariate data. Results Neither exposure metric showed evidence of increased asthma risk from H2S. However, some suggestion of exposure-related reduced risks for diagnosed asthma and asthma symptoms, particularly wheezing during the last 12 months, emerged. With the maximum exposure metric, the prevalence ratio for wheeze in the highest exposure quartile was 0.80 (0.65, 0.99) and, for current asthma treatment, 0.75 (0.52, 1.08). There was no evidence that this was caused by a “survivor effect”. Conclusions The study provided no evidence that asthma risk increases with H2S exposure. Suggestions of a reduced risk in the higher exposure areas are consistent with recent evidence that H2S has signaling functions in the body, including induction of smooth muscle relaxation and reduction of inflammation. Study limitations, including possible confounding, preclude definitive conclusions. PMID:23453847

Bates, Michael N; Garrett, Nick; Crane, Julian; Balmes, John

2013-01-01

53

The Latent Symptom Structure of the Beck Depression Inventory-II in Outpatients with Major Depression  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) is a self-report instrument frequently used in clinical and research settings to assess depression severity. Although investigators have examined the factor structure of the BDI-II, a clear consensus on the best fitting model has not yet emerged, resulting in different recommendations regarding how to best…

Quilty, Lena C.; Zhang, K. Anne; Bagby, R. Michael

2010-01-01

54

Somatic Symptoms among Children and Adolescents in Poland: A Confirmatory Factor Analytic Study of the Children Somatization Inventory  

PubMed Central

The aim of the present study was to examine the factor structure and psychometric properties of the short version of the Children’s Somatization Inventory (CSI-24) in Poland. The CSI-24 is a self-report questionnaire designed to assess somatic symptoms in children and adolescents. A total of 733 children and adolescents, aged 12–17?years, participated in this research. The participants for this study were recruited from urban and suburban schools of Opole province in South Western Poland. In addition to the CSI-24, all participants completed the Spence Children’s Anxiety Scale (SCAS) and the Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ). The correlated four-factor model that included four-correlated dimensions (pain/weakness, gastrointestinal problems, cardiovascular symptoms, and pseudoneurological problems) showed a better fit compared to the single-factor model. The Cronbach’s Alpha for the CSI-24 was 0.91. Somatic symptoms correlated significantly highly with the SCAS total scores and the SDQ emotional subscale, suggesting good construct validity. Somatic symptoms had low correlation with the SDQ behavioral problems symptoms, suggesting adequate discriminant validity. The CSI-24 reliably measured somatic symptoms in children and adolescents in Poland. PMID:24400299

Essau, Cecilia A.; Olaya, Beatriz; Bokszczanin, Anna; Gilvarry, Catherine; Bray, Diane

2013-01-01

55

Caregiver and self-report of mental health symptoms in 9-year old children with prenatal cocaine exposure  

PubMed Central

Objective To assess the effect of prenatal cocaine exposure on mental health symptoms in 9-year old children controlling for potential confounders. Methods 332 children (170 prenatally cocaine-exposed (PCE), 162 non cocaine-exposed (NCE) were assessed using self (Dominic Interactive; DI) and caregiver report (Child Behavior Checklist; CBCL). Results Higher levels of PCE were associated with caregiver report of clinically elevated aggressive and delinquent behavior. With each increased unit of PCE, children were 1.3 times more likely to be rated as aggressive (OR=1.30, 95% CI: 1.02–1.67, p<0.04). For each increased unit of PCE, girls were 2 times more likely to be rated as having delinquent behavior (OR=2.08, 95% CI: 1.46–2.96, p<0.0001). PCE status was also associated with increased odds of delinquent behavior (OR=2.41; 95% CI: 1.16–4.97, p=0.02), primarily due to the increased risk among girls with PCE. While girls with PCE status were 7 times more likely than NCE girls to have delinquent behaviors (OR=7.42; 95% CI: 2.03–27.11, p<0.002) boys with PCE did not demonstrate increased risk (OR=0.98; 95% CI: 0.36–2.65, p>0.97). Foster or adoptive parents were more likely to rate their PCE children as having more thought problems, inattention, delinquent behavior, aggression, externalizing and overall problems (p<0.05) than biologic mothers or relative caregivers. Higher 2nd trimester tobacco exposure was associated with increased odds of caregiver reported anxiety (OR=1.73; 95% CI 1.06–2.81, p<0.03) and marijuana exposure increased the odds of thought problems (OR=1.68; 95% CI 1.01–2.79, p<0.05). Children with PCE self-reported fewer symptoms of oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) compared to NCE children (OR=0.44, 95% CI: 0.21–0.92, p<0.03). Greater tobacco exposure was associated with increased odds of child reported ODD (OR=1.24; 95% CI 1.03–1.78, p<0.03). Conclusion Higher PCE was associated with disruptive behaviors including aggression and delinquent behavior among girls by caregiver report, but not child report. These findings highlight the need for early behavioral assessment using multiple informants in multi-risk children. PMID:21764256

McLaughlin, Annamaria Aguirre; Minnes, Sonia; Singer, Lynn T.; Min, Meeyoung; Short, Elizabeth J.; Scott, Teresa Linares; Satayathum, Sudtida

2013-01-01

56

Post-Migration Stress as a Moderator Between Traumatic Exposure and Self-Reported Mental Health Symptoms in a Sample of Somali Refugees  

Microsoft Academic Search

The current study examined the potentially moderating influence of post-migration living difficulties on the relationship between pre-migration traumatic exposure and self-reported symptomatology in a sample of 74 adult Somali refugees residing in the United States. Results suggest that post-migration psychosocial stressors exacerbate depressive symptoms (?R  = .068, p = .017) for those exposed to low levels of trauma relative to other posttraumatic psychological

Jacob A. Bentley; John W. Thoburn; David G. Stewart; Lorin D. Boynton

2012-01-01

57

Self-reported psychopathological symptoms in recreational ecstasy (MDMA) users are mainly associated with regular cannabis use: further evidence from a combined cross-sectional\\/longitudinal investigation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rationale 3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, ecstasy) has become a widely used recreational drug among young people. This is of great concern, since MDMA is neurotoxic in animal studies and its use has been associated with psychological distress and a variety of self-reported psychiatric symptoms. However, exploring the origins of psychopathology in ecstasy users is hampered by the frequent polydrug use and by

Jörg Daumann; Gernot Hensen; Bastian Thimm; Markus Rezk; Bianca Till; Euphrosyne Gouzoulis-Mayfrank

2004-01-01

58

New onset and persistent symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder self reported after deployment and combat exposures: prospective population based US military cohort study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective To describe new onset and persistence of self reported post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms in a large population based military cohort, many of whom were deployed in support of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.Design Prospective cohort analysis.Setting and participants Survey enrolment data from the millennium cohort (July 2001 to June 2003) obtained before the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Tyler C Smith; Margaret A K Ryan; Deborah L Wingard; Donald J Slymen; James F Sallis; Donna Kritz-Silverstein

2008-01-01

59

Impaired response inhibition is associated with self-reported symptoms of depression, anxiety, and ADHD in female FMR1 premutation carriers.  

PubMed

Fragile X Mental Retardation 1 (FMR1) premutation carriers (PM-carriers) have a defective trinucleotide expansion on the FMR1 gene that is associated with continuum of neuropsychological and mental disorders. Currently, little is known about the distinct subcomponents of executive function potentially impaired in female PM-carriers, and there have been no investigations into associations between executive function and incidences of mental disorders. A total of 35 female PM-carriers confirmed by Asuragen triple primed PCR DNA testing and 35 age- and intelligence-matched controls completed tests of executive function (i.e., response inhibition and working memory) and self-reported on social anxiety, depression, and ADHD predominantly inattentive (ADHD-PI) symptoms. Compared to controls, PM-carriers were significantly elevated on self-reported social anxiety and ADHD-PI symptoms. Irrespective of mental symptoms, female PM-carries performed significantly worse than controls on a response inhibition test, and further investigations revealed significant correlations between executive function performance and self-reported symptoms of anxiety, depression and ADHD-PI. Critically, among PM-carriers with good executive function performance, no women exceeded threshold markers for probable caseness of mental disorder. However, rates of probable caseness were elevated in those with average performance (response inhibition: social anxiety: 41.7%; depression: 20%; ADHD: 44.4%; working memory: social anxiety: 27.3%; depression: 9.1%; ADHD: 18.2%) and highly elevated for those with poor executive function performance (response inhibition: social anxiety: 58.3%; depression: 80%; ADHD: 55.6%; working memory: social anxiety: 100%; depression: 50%; ADHD: 83.3%). These data suggest that subtle executive dysfunction may be a useful neuropsychological indicator for a range of mental disorders previously reported in female PM-carriers. PMID:24166828

Kraan, Claudine M; Hocking, Darren R; Georgiou-Karistianis, Nellie; Metcalfe, Sylvia A; Archibald, Alison D; Fielding, Joanne; Trollor, Julian; Bradshaw, John L; Cohen, Jonathan; Cornish, Kim M

2014-01-01

60

Assessing Older Adults' Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Symptoms: Psychometric Characteristics of the Obsessive Compulsive Inventory-Revised.  

PubMed

The lack of Obsessive-Compulsive disorder (OCD) symptom measures validated for use with older adults has hindered research and treatment development for the age group. We evaluated the Obsessive-Compulsive Inventory-Revised (OCI-R; Foa et al., 2002) with participants aged 65 and older (N = 180) to determine if the measure was an effective tool for evaluating obsessional symptoms. Participants completed the OCI-R and a comprehensive assessment battery up to four times over approximately 18 months. Results supported the well-replicated latent structure of the OCI-R (i.e., Washing, Checking, Ordering, Obsessing, Hoarding, and Neutralizing.). OCI-R total score was robustly associated with OCD symptoms assessed 18 months later by clinical interview, while scores on self-report measures of worry, general anxiety, and depression were not. Results indicate the OCI-R is an effective OCD symptom measure for older adults, although replication with additional older adult samples is needed. PMID:24949284

Calamari, John E; Woodard, John L; Armstrong, Kerrie M; Molino, Alma; Pontarelli, Noelle K; Socha, Jami; Longley, Susan L

2014-04-01

61

The Teaching Perspectives Inventory at 10 Years and 100,000 Respondents: Reliability and Validity of a Teacher Self-Report Inventory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Teaching Perspectives Inventory (TPI) measures teachers' profiles on five contrasting views of what it means "to teach." The inventory can be used in aiding self-reflection, developing statements of teaching philosophy, engendering conversations about teaching, and recognizing legitimate variations on excellence in teaching. Available at…

Collins, John B.; Pratt, Daniel D.

2011-01-01

62

A Cohort Study on Self-Reported Respiratory Symptoms of Toner-Handling Workers: Cross-Sectional and Longitudinal Analysis from 2003 to 2008  

PubMed Central

This study examines the relationship between toner-handling work and its health effects on self-reported respiratory symptoms. The subjects were 1,504 male workers in a Japanese toner and photocopier manufacturing company. Personal exposure measurement, pulmonary function tests, chest X-ray examination, measurement of biomarkers, and a questionnaire about self-reported respiratory symptoms were performed annually. This study discusses the questionnaire results. We found that the toner-handling group showed significantly higher prevalence of breathlessness than the never-toner-handling group. The significant reduction of pulmonary function and fibrosis change in the chest X-ray examination associated with breathlessness were not observed. However the morbidity of asthma was higher compared to the Japanese population in both of the toner-handling group and the never-toner handling group, the effect of toner exposure was not clarified. Nevertheless, while the toner exposure levels in the current well-controlled working environment may be sufficiently low to prevent adverse health effects, further studies are needed to assess the more long-term latent health effects of toner exposure. PMID:24719889

Terunuma, Niina; Kurosaki, Shizuka; Hata, Koichi; Kochi, Takeshi; Yanagi, Nobuaki; Murase, Tadashi; Ogami, Akira; Higashi, Toshiaki

2014-01-01

63

Examining the Effects of Self-reported PTSD Symptoms and Positive Relations With Others on Self-regulated Learning for Student Service Members/Veterans.  

PubMed

Abstract Objectives: To examine the relationships between self-reported post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, perceived positive relations with others, self-regulation strategy use, and academic motivation among student service members/veterans (SSM/V) enrolled in post-secondary education. Participants: SSM/V (N = 214), defined as veterans, active duty, or National Guard/Reservists of the U.S. military, enrolled at five different institutions in fall 2012. Methods: Data were collected using an online questionnaire that included standardized measures of PTSD symptoms, perceived quality of personal relations, academic self-regulation strategy use and motivation. Results: PTSD symptoms were associated with lower self-efficacy for learning and maladaptive academic goal orientation. Additionally, PTSD symptoms were associated with lower effort regulation (i.e., persistence) during academic work. Endorsement of more positive relations moderated the deleterious relationship between PTSD symptoms and maladaptive goal orientation. Conclusion: The results suggest post-secondary personnel adopt a social-cognitive framework to develop social, mental health and academic supports for SSM/V with PTSD. PMID:25337851

Ness, Bryan M; Middleton, Michael J; Hildebrandt, Michael J

2014-10-22

64

Characterization of Residential Pesticide Use and Chemical Formulations through Self-Report and Household Inventory: The Northern California Childhood Leukemia Study  

PubMed Central

Background: Home and garden pesticide use has been linked to cancer and other health outcomes in numerous epidemiological studies. Exposure has generally been self-reported, so the assessment is potentially limited by recall bias and lack of information on specific chemicals. Objectives: As part of an integrated assessment of residential pesticide exposure, we identified active ingredients and described patterns of storage and use. Methods: During a home interview of 500 residentially stable households enrolled in the Northern California Childhood Leukemia Study during 2001–2006, trained interviewers inventoried residential pesticide products and queried participants about their storage and use. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency registration numbers, recorded from pesticide product labels, and pesticide chemical codes were matched to public databases to obtain information on active ingredients and chemical class. Poisson regression was used to identify independent predictors of pesticide storage. Analyses were restricted to 259 participating control households. Results: Ninety-five percent (246 of 259) of the control households stored at least one pesticide product (median, 4). Indicators of higher sociodemographic status predicted more products in storage. We identified the most common characteristics: storage areas (garage, 40%; kitchen, 20%), pests treated (ants, 33%; weeds, 20%), pesticide types (insecticides, 46%; herbicides, 24%), chemical classes (pyrethroids, 77%; botanicals, 50%), active ingredients (pyrethrins, 43%) and synergists (piperonyl butoxide, 42%). Products could contain multiple active ingredients. Conclusions: Our data on specific active ingredients and patterns of storage and use will inform future etiologic analyses of residential pesticide exposures from self-reported data, particularly among households with young children. PMID:23110983

Guha, Neela; Ward, Mary H.; Gunier, Robert; Colt, Joanne S.; Lea, C. Suzanne; Buffler, Patricia A.

2012-01-01

65

Screening for Obsessive and Compulsive Symptoms: Validation of the Clark-Beck Obsessive-Compulsive Inventory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The 25-item Clark-Beck Obsessive-Compulsive Inventory (CBOCI) was developed to assess the frequency and severity of obsessive and compulsive symptoms. The measure uses a graded-response format to assess core symptom features of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) based on Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed.; American…

Clark, David A.; Antony, Martin M.; Beck, Aaron T.; Swinson, Richard P.; Steer, Robert A.

2005-01-01

66

Performance and comparison of self-reported STI symptoms among high-risk populations - MSM, sex workers, persons living with HIV/AIDS - in El Salvador.  

PubMed

Summary Resource-limited countries have limited laboratory capability and rely on syndromic management to diagnose sexually transmitted infections (STIs). We aimed to estimate the sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value (PPV) of STI syndromic management when used as a screening method within a study setting. Men who have sex with men (MSM), female sex workers (FSWs) and people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) participated in a behavioural surveillance study. Data were obtained on demographics, sexual behaviours, STI history and service utilisation. Biological specimens were tested for genital inflammatory infections (Neisseria gonorrhoeae [GC], Chlamydia trachomatis [CT], Mycoplasma genitalium [MG], Trichomonas vaginalis [TV]) and genital ulcerative infection (syphilis and Herpes simplex virus-2). There was a high prevalence of Herpes simplex virus-2 (MSM 48.1%, FSW 82.0% and PLWHA 84.4%). Most participants reported no ulcerative symptoms and the majority of men reported no inflammatory symptoms. Sensitivity and PPV were poor for inflammatory infections among PLWHA and MSM. Sensitivity in FSWs for inflammatory infections was 75%. For ulcerative infections, sensitivity was poor, but specificity and PPV were high. Reliance on self-reported symptoms may not be an effective screening strategy for these populations. STI prevention studies should focus on symptom recognition and consider routine screening and referral for high-risk populations. PMID:24616119

Shah, Neha S; Kim, Evelyn; de Maria Hernández Ayala, Flor; Guardado Escobar, Maria Elena; Nieto, Ana Isabel; Kim, Andrea A; Paz-Bailey, Gabriela

2014-12-01

67

The Prosocial and Aggressive Driving Inventory (PADI): a self-report measure of safe and unsafe driving behaviors.  

PubMed

Surveys of 1217 undergraduate students supported the reliability (inter-item and test-retest) and validity of the Prosocial and Aggressive Driving Inventory (PADI). Principal component analyses on the PADI items yielded two scales: Prosocial Driving (17 items) and Aggressive Driving (12 items). Prosocial Driving was associated with fewer reported traffic accidents and violations, with participants who were older and female, and with lower Boredom Susceptibility and Hostility scores, and higher scores on Agreeableness, Conscientiousness, Openness, and Neuroticism. Aggressive Driving was associated with more frequent traffic violations, with female participants, and with higher scores on Competitiveness, Sensation Seeking, Hostility, and Extraversion, and lower scores on Conscientiousness, Agreeableness, and Openness. The theoretical and practical implications of the PADI's dual focus on safe and unsafe driving are discussed. PMID:25000297

Harris, Paul B; Houston, John M; Vazquez, Jose A; Smither, Janan A; Harms, Amanda; Dahlke, Jeffrey A; Sachau, Daniel A

2014-11-01

68

The Clinical Relevance of Self-Reported Premenstrual Worsening of Depressive Symptoms in the Management of Depressed Outpatients: A STAR*D Report  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objective To determine the incidence, clinical and demographic correlates, and relationship to treatment outcome of self-reported premenstrual exacerbation of depressive symptoms in premenopausal women with major depressive disorder who are receiving antidepressant medication. Method This post-hoc analysis used clinical trial data from treatment-seeking, premenopausal, adult female outpatients with major depression who were not using hormonal contraceptives. For this report, citalopram was used as the first treatment step. We also used data from the second step in which one of three new medications were used (bupropion-SR [sustained release], venlafaxine-XR [extended release], or sertraline). Treatment-blinded assessors obtained baseline treatment outcomes data. We hypothesized that those with reported premenstrual depressive symptom exacerbation would have more general medical conditions, longer index depressive episodes, lower response or remission rates, and shorter times-to-relapse with citalopram, and that they would have a better outcome with sertraline than with bupropion-SR. Results At baseline, 66% (n=545/821) of women reported premenstrual exacerbation. They had more general medical conditions, more anxious features, longer index episodes, and shorter times-to-relapse (41.3 to 47.1 weeks, respectively). Response and remission rates to citalopram, however, were unrelated to reported premenstrual exacerbation. Reported premenstrual exacerbation was also unrelated to differential benefit with sertraline and bupropion-SR. Conclusions Self-reported premenstrual exacerbation has moderate clinical utility in the management of depressed patients, although it is not predictive of overall treatment response. Factors that contribute to a more chronic or relapsing course may also play a role in premenstrual worsening of major depressive disorder (MDD). PMID:23480315

Haley, Charlotte L.; Rush, A. John; Trivedi, Madhukar H.; Wisniewski, Stephen R.; Luther, James F.; Kornstein, Susan G.

2013-01-01

69

Reliability, Validity, and Utility of Instruments for Self-Report and Informant Report Concerning Symptoms of ADHD in Adult Patients  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: To study the correlation between symptoms of ADHD in adults, obtained with different methods and from different sources. Method: Information was obtained from 120 adults with ADHD, their partners, and their parents, using the ADHD Rating Scale, the Conners' Adult ADHD Rating Scales (CAARS), the Brown Attention-Deficit Disorder Scale…

Kooij, J. J. Sandra; Boonstra, A. Marije; Swinkels, S. H. N.; Bekker, Evelijne M.; de Noord, Ineke; Buitelaar, Jan K.

2008-01-01

70

Parental Reports of Global Physical Health at Ages 3 and 6 Predict Self-Reported Depressive Symptoms 17 Years Later  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research studies testing longitudinal relations between childhood physical health measures and adulthood sub-clinical depressive symptoms are rare. In the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study, longitudinal relations of parental reports of the global physical health of the child (1 = good, 2 = moderately good, 3 = average/not good) and of…

Raikkonen, Katri; Schubert, Carla; Pesonen, Anu-Katriina; Heinonen, Kati; Viikari, Jorma; Keltikangas-Jarvinen, Liisa

2004-01-01

71

Self-report of stroke, transient ischemic attack, or stroke symptoms and risk of future stroke in the REasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) Study  

PubMed Central

Background and Purpose History of stroke and Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) are documented risk factors for subsequent stroke and all-cause mortality. Recent reports suggest increased risk among those reporting stroke symptoms absent stroke or TIA. However, the relative magnitude of increased stroke risk has not been described across the symptomatic spectrum: 1) asymptomatic (Asx), 2) stroke symptoms only (SS), 3) TIA, 4) stroke in the distant past (DS), and 5) recent stroke (RS). Methods Between 2003–2007 the REasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) study enrolled 30,239 black and white Americans aged 45+. DS and RS were defined as self-report of physician diagnosis of stroke >5 or <5 years before baseline, respectively. SS was defined as a history of any of six sudden onset stroke symptoms absent TIA/stroke diagnosis. Kaplan-Meier and proportional hazards analysis were used to contrast stroke risk differences. Results Over 5.0 ± 1.72 years of follow up, 737 strokes were validated. Compared to Asx persons, those with SS, TIA, DS and RS all had increased risk of future stroke. After adjustment for age, race, sex, income, education, alcohol intake, current smoking, and a history of diabetes, hypertension, myocardial infarction, atrial fibrillation, and dyslipidemia, there was 1.20-fold (not statistically significant) increased stroke risk for SS (95% CI 0.96, 1.51), 1.73-fold for TIA (95% CI 1.27, 2.36), 2.23-fold for DS (95% CI 1.61, 3.09) and 2.85-fold for RS (95% CI 2.16, 3.76). Discussion Results suggest a spectrum of risk from stroke symptoms to TIA, distant stroke, and recent stroke, and imply a need for establishing these categories in health screenings to manage risk for future stroke, reinforcing the clinical importance of stroke history including the presence of stroke symptoms. PMID:23233382

Judd, Suzanne E; Kleindorfer, Dawn O; McClure, Leslie A; Rhodes, J. David; Howard, George; Cushman, Mary; Howard, Virginia J.

2013-01-01

72

Risk factors associated with self-reported symptoms of digital ischemia in elite male volleyball players in the Netherlands.  

PubMed

One in every four elite male volleyball players in the Netherlands reported blue or pale digits in the dominant hand. Little is known about risk factors. To assess whether personal-, sports-, and work-related risk factors are associated with these symptoms in these volleyball players, a survey was performed among elite male volleyball players in the Dutch national top league and in the Dutch beach volleyball team. The questionnaire assessed the presence of symptoms and risk factors. Binary logistic regression was performed to calculate odds ratios (ORs). A total of 99 of the 107 athletes participated - a response rate of 93%. Two sports-related risk factors were associated with symptoms of blue or pale digits: 18-30 years playing volleyball [OR?=?6.70; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.12-29.54] and often/always performing weight training to increase dominant limb strength (OR?=?2.70; 95% CI 1.05-6.92). No significant other sports-, personal-, or work-related risk factors were found. Playing volleyball for more than 17?years and often/always performing weight training to increase dominant limb strength were independently associated with an increased risk on ischemia-related complaints of the dominant hand in elite male volleyball players. PMID:24224476

van de Pol, D; Kuijer, P P F M; Langenhorst, T; Maas, M

2013-11-14

73

Pesticide Use and Self-Reported Symptoms of Acute Pesticide Poisoning among Aquatic Farmers in Phnom Penh, Cambodia.  

PubMed

Organophosphates and carbamates (OPs/CMs) are known for their acetylcholinesterase inhibiting character. A cross-sectional study of pesticide handling practices and self-perceived symptoms of acute pesticide poisoning was conducted using questionnaire-based interviews with 89 pesticide sprayers in Boeung Cheung Ek (BCE) Lake, Phnom Penh, Cambodia. The study showed that 50% of the pesticides used belonged to WHO class I + II and personal protection among the farmers were inadequate. A majority of the farmers (88%) had experienced symptoms of acute pesticide poisoning, and this was significantly associated with the number of hours spent spraying with OPs/CMs (OR = 1.14, CI 95%: 1.02-1.28). The higher educated farmers reduced their risk of poisoning by 55% for each extra personal protective measure they adapted (OR = 0.45, CI 95%: 0.22-0.91). These findings suggest that improving safe pesticide management practices among the farmers and enforcing the effective banning of the most toxic pesticides will considerably reduce the number of acute pesticide poisoning episodes. PMID:21234245

Jensen, Hanne Klith; Konradsen, Flemming; Jørs, Erik; Petersen, Jørgen Holm; Dalsgaard, Anders

2011-01-01

74

Less depressed or less forthcoming? Self-report of depression symptoms in women preparing for in vitro fertilization  

PubMed Central

PURPOSE While depression has been associated with infertility treatments, it is not routinely assessed in women prior to undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF) treatment. Findings are mixed regarding the degree to which women report depression prior to IVF. The purpose of this study was to: 1) examine response profiles in women preparing for IVF, and 2) compare responses to those of postpartum, primary care, and general population groups. METHODS Female IVF patients (n=321; 19 – 45 years) completed the PHQ-9 at their first visit. Clinical, demographic characteristics, and incidence of major depressive disorder (MDD) and other depressive disorder (ODD) were examined. Overall score distributions of the IVF group were compared to those of local postpartum patients, and published primary care and general populations. RESULTS Demographic or clinical characteristics did not account for response differences within the IVF group. The IVF group had lower incidences of MDD and ODD than a PHQ-9 normative group. Women in the IVF group reported no depressive symptoms significantly more than postpartum, primary care, and general population groups. CONCLUSIONS Women preparing to undergo IVF report fewer symptoms of depression than multiple comparison groups. Specific quality of life measures may be needed to assess distress in this population. PMID:23138273

Lewis, Adam M.; Liu, Dawei; Stuart, Scott P.; Ryan, Ginny

2012-01-01

75

Somatic symptoms beyond those generally associated with a whiplash injury are increased in self-reported chronic whiplash. A population-based cross sectional study: the Hordaland Health Study (HUSK)  

PubMed Central

Background Chronic whiplash leads to considerable patient suffering and substantial societal costs. There are two competing hypothesis on the etiology of chronic whiplash. The traditional organic hypothesis considers chronic whiplash and related symptoms a result of a specific injury. In opposition is the hypothesis that chronic whiplash is a functional somatic syndrome, and related symptoms a result of society-induced expectations and amplification of symptoms. According to both hypotheses, patients reporting chronic whiplash are expected to have more neck pain, headache and symptoms of anxiety and depression than the general population. Increased prevalence of somatic symptoms beyond those directly related to a whiplash neck injury is less investigated. The aim of this study was to test an implication derived from the functional hypothesis: Is the prevalence of somatic symptoms as seen in somatization disorder, beyond symptoms related to a whiplash neck injury, increased in individuals self-reporting chronic whiplash? We further aimed to explore recall bias by comparing the symptom profile displayed by individuals self-reporting chronic whiplash to that among those self-reporting a non-functional injury: fractures of the hand or wrist. We explored symptom load, etiologic origin could not be investigated in this study. Methods Data from the Norwegian population-based “Hordaland Health Study” (HUSK, 1997–99); N?=?13,986 was employed. Chronic whiplash was self-reported by 403 individuals and fractures by 1,746. Somatization tendency was measured using a list of 17 somatic symptoms arising from different body parts and organ systems, derived from the research criteria for somatization disorder (ICD-10, F45). Results Chronic whiplash was associated with an increased level of all 17 somatic symptoms investigated (p<0.05). The association was moderately strong (group difference of 0.60 standard deviation), only partly accounted for by confounding. For self-reported fractures symptoms were only slightly elevated. Recent whiplash was more commonly reported than whiplash-injury a long time ago, and the association of interest weakly increased with time since whiplash (r?=?0.016, p?=?0.032). Conclusions The increased prevalence of somatic symptoms beyond symptoms expected according to the organic injury model for chronic whiplash, challenges the standard injury model for whiplash, and is indicative evidence of chronic whiplash being a functional somatic syndrome. PMID:22935146

2012-01-01

76

Simulation of Traumatic Brain Injury Symptoms on the Personality Assessment Inventory: An Analogue Study.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to characterize the operating characteristics of the Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI) validity scales in distinguishing simulators feigning symptoms of traumatic brain injury (TBI) while completing the PAI (n = 84) from a clinical sample of patients with TBI who achieved adequate scores on performance validity tests (n = 112). The simulators were divided into two groups: (a) Specific Simulators feigning cognitive and somatic symptoms only or (b) Global Simulators feigning cognitive, somatic, and psychiatric symptoms. The PAI overreporting scales were indeed sensitive to the simulation of TBI symptoms in this analogue design. However, these scales were less sensitive to the feigning of somatic and cognitive TBI symptoms than the feigning of a broad range of cognitive, somatic, and emotional symptoms often associated with TBI. The relationships of TBI simulation to consistency and underreporting scales are also explored. PMID:24965838

Keiski, Michelle A; Shore, Douglas L; Hamilton, Joanna M; Malec, James F

2014-06-24

77

The Four-Dimensional Symptom Questionnaire (4DSQ): a validation study of a multidimensional self-report questionnaire to assess distress, depression, anxiety and somatization  

PubMed Central

Background The Four-Dimensional Symptom Questionnaire (4DSQ) is a self-report questionnaire that has been developed in primary care to distinguish non-specific general distress from depression, anxiety and somatization. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate its criterion and construct validity. Methods Data from 10 different primary care studies have been used. Criterion validity was assessed by comparing the 4DSQ scores with clinical diagnoses, the GPs' diagnosis of any psychosocial problem for Distress, standardised psychiatric diagnoses for Depression and Anxiety, and GPs' suspicion of somatization for Somatization. ROC analyses and logistic regression analyses were used to examine the associations. Construct validity was evaluated by investigating the inter-correlations between the scales, the factorial structure, the associations with other symptom questionnaires, and the associations with stress, personality and social functioning. The factorial structure of the 4DSQ was assessed through confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). The associations with other questionnaires were assessed with Pearson correlations and regression analyses. Results Regarding criterion validity, the Distress scale was associated with any psychosocial diagnosis (area under the ROC curve [AUC] 0.79), the Depression scale was associated with major depression (AUC = 0.83), the Anxiety scale was associated with anxiety disorder (AUC = 0.66), and the Somatization scale was associated with the GPs' suspicion of somatization (AUC = 0.65). Regarding the construct validity, the 4DSQ scales appeared to have considerable inter-correlations (r = 0.35-0.71). However, 30–40% of the variance of each scale was unique for that scale. CFA confirmed the 4-factor structure with a comparative fit index (CFI) of 0.92. The 4DSQ scales correlated with most other questionnaires measuring corresponding constructs. However, the 4DSQ Distress scale appeared to correlate with some other depression scales more than the 4DSQ Depression scale. Measures of stress (i.e. life events, psychosocial problems, and work stress) were mainly associated with Distress, while Distress, in turn, was mainly associated with psychosocial dysfunctioning, including sick leave. Conclusion The 4DSQ seems to be a valid self-report questionnaire to measure distress, depression, anxiety and somatization in primary care patients. The 4DSQ Distress scale appears to measure the most general, most common, expression of psychological problems. PMID:16925825

Terluin, Berend; van Marwijk, Harm WJ; Adèr, Herman J; de Vet, Henrica CW; Penninx, Brenda WJH; Hermens, Marleen LM; van Boeijen, Christine A; van Balkom, Anton JLM; van der Klink, Jac JL; Stalman, Wim AB

2006-01-01

78

Autism Spectrum Disorders and Self-reports: Testing Validity and Reliability Using the NEO-PI-R.  

PubMed

Although self-reported measures are frequently used to assess adults with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), the validity of self-reports is under-researched in ASD. The core symptoms of ASD may negatively affect the psychometric properties of self-reported measures. The aim of the present study was to test the validity and reliability of self-reported data using the NEO personality inventory-revised (NEO-PI-R). Forty-eight adults with ASD and 53 controls completed the NEO-PI-R and a psychiatric interview. Results indicate satisfactory internal consistency of the NEO-PI-R, a satisfactory factor structure, predicted correlations with clinician ratings in the ASD group, and predicted differences in personality between the ASD group and controls. In conclusion, the present results support the use of self-reported measures when assessing adults with ASD . PMID:25326256

Hesselmark, Eva; Eriksson, Jonna M; Westerlund, Joakim; Bejerot, Susanne

2014-10-18

79

Clinical Utility of Autism Spectrum Disorder Scoring Algorithms for the Child Symptom Inventory4  

Microsoft Academic Search

Few studies examine the clinical utility of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) rating scales for screening referrals to child\\u000a psychiatry clinics. Parents\\/teachers from Long Island, NY, completed the Child Symptom Inventory-4, a DSM-IV-referenced rating\\u000a scale for 6- to 12-year-old clinical referrals with an ASD (N = 317) or nonASD psychiatric (N = 191) diagnosis. Two separate groups of children attending public school, regular education classes

Kenneth D. Gadow; Joseph Schwartz; Carla DeVincent; Greg Strong; Simone Cuva

2008-01-01

80

Self-report measures to identify post traumatic stress disorder and/or mild traumatic brain injury and associated symptoms in military veterans of Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF)/Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF).  

PubMed

Individuals serving in Iraq and Afghanistan sustain injuries associated with physical and psychological trauma. Among such injuries, mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) and post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are common. Self-report measures are frequently used to identify mTBI and/or PTSD and symptoms associated with these conditions. In addition to providing information regarding mTBI and PTSD, the goal of this literature review was to identify and present information on the psychometric properties of measures used to obtain information regarding these common conditions among Veterans who have returned from Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF)/Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF). A comprehensive review of studies in which self-report measures were used to evaluate mTBI, PTSD, and associated symptoms among OEF/OIF Veterans is presented. Findings suggest that additional work is needed to identify psychometrically sound and clinically useful self-report measures that assess mTBI and PTSD and associated symptoms among OEF/OIF Veterans. PMID:22350740

Betthauser, Lisa M; Bahraini, Nazanin; Krengel, Maxine H; Brenner, Lisa A

2012-03-01

81

Comparing the validity of the self reporting questionnaire and the Afghan symptom checklist: dysphoria, aggression, and gender in transcultural assessment of mental health  

PubMed Central

Background The relative performance of local and international assessment instruments is subject to ongoing discussion in transcultural research on mental health and psychosocial support. We examined the construct and external validity of two instruments, one developed for use in Afghanistan, the other developed by the World Health Organization for use in resource-poor settings. Methods We used data collected on 1003 Afghan adults (500 men, 503 women) randomly sampled at three sites in Afghanistan. We compared the 22-item Afghan Symptom Checklist (ASCL), a culturally-grounded assessment of psychosocial wellbeing, with Pashto and Dari versions of the 20-item Self-Reporting Questionnaire (SRQ-20). We derived subscales using exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses (EFA and CFA) and tested total and subscale scores for external validity with respect to lifetime trauma and household wealth using block model regressions. Results EFA suggested a three-factor structure for SRQ-20 - somatic complaints, negative affect, and emotional numbing - and a two-factor structure for ASCL - jigar khun (dysphoria) and aggression. Both factor models were supported by CFA in separate subsamples. Women had higher scores for each of the five subscales than men (p?

2014-01-01

82

Eliciting parental report following pediatric traumatic brain injury: Preliminary findings on the pediatric inventory of neurobehavioral symptoms  

Microsoft Academic Search

The current article presents preliminary normative data for the Pediatric Inventory of Neurobehavioral Symptoms (PINS), a parent rating scale consisting of symptoms associated with post-traumatic cerebral dysfunction, such as disinhibition, perseveration, reduced spontaneity, inappropriate affective responses, episodic phenomena, and disruptions of biologic function. Comparison data from a sample of 50 elementary age children who had sustained traumatic brain injury (TBI)

Mary Ann Roberts; Ann Furuseth

1997-01-01

83

Incremental Validity of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 and Symptom Checklist-90-Revised with Mental Health Inpatients  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study evaluated the incremental validity of scores from the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2) and the Symptom Checklist-90-Revised (SCL-90-R) in a sample of mental health inpatients originally published by Archer, Griffin, and Aiduk (1995). The incremental validity of scores from the SCL-90-R primary symptom dimensions…

Simonds, Elise C.; Handel, Richard W.; Archer, Robert P.

2008-01-01

84

[Assessment of psychosocial functioning in multiple sclerosis: psychometric characteristics of four self-report measures].  

PubMed

Major and subsyndromic depression are highly prevalent in multiple sclerosis(MS). Assessment of psychosocial functioning in MS requires sound psychometric instruments. Self-report measures offer several advantages, but a valid and reliable depression self-report diagnostic measure is lacking. Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and General Health Questionnaire (GHQ) have been validated and widely used in Brazilian neuropsychological context. BDI use in MS may confound depressive symptoms with somatic disease manifestations. We examined the psychometric properties of the BDI, QSG and two additional self-report measures of fatigue (CPF-MS) and self-efficacy (MSSE). All scales presented excellent reliability coefficients. BDI and GHG discriminated MS from control participants. Intercorrelations were observed between depression, general mental health, fatigue and self-efficacy scores, but not between these and traditional indices of neurological impairment such as AI and EDSS. Depressive symptoms and fatigue may represent a different dimension of neurological impairment, unrelated to sensory and motor deficits. Self-report scales are useful in diagnosing subsyndromic distress symptoms in a MS sample. PMID:15235732

Haase, Vitor Geraldi; Lacerda, Shirley Silva; Lima, Eduardo de Paula; Corrêa, Tatiana de Deus; Brito, Daniela Cristina Sampaio de; Lana-Peixoto, Marco Aurélio

2004-06-01

85

Symptom Profiles in Depersonalization and Anxiety Disorders: An Analysis of the Beck Anxiety Inventory.  

PubMed

Background: Depersonalization disorder (DPD) entails distressing alterations in self-experiencing. However, it has long been recognized that depersonalisation symptoms occur in other disorders, particularly anxiety and panic. One strand of research proposes that depersonalization phenomenology arises through altered autonomic arousal in response to stress. Sampling and Methods: We sought to examine profiles of anxiety symptoms through a secondary data analysis of individual items and factor subscales on the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), comparing two relatively large patient samples with DPD or with a variety of anxiety conditions, respectively. The DPD sample (n = 106) had a lower overall BAI score than the combined anxiety disorders group (n = 525). Results: After controlling for this as well as for potential confounders such as age and gender, the DPD group presented significantly lower scores on the panic subscale, marginally lower scores on the autonomic subscale and significantly higher scores on the neurophysiological subscale of the BAI. Conclusions: These differences imply similarities between the cognitive components of DPD and anxiety disorders while physiological experiences diverge. The findings encourage future research looking at direct physiological measures and longitudinal designs to confirm the mechanisms underlying different clinical manifestations of anxiety. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel. PMID:25401973

Nestler, Steffen; Jay, Emma-Louise; Sierra, Mauricio; David, Anthony S

2014-11-12

86

Cross-Ethnic Measurement Invariance of the Brief Symptom Inventory for Individuals with Severe and Persistent Mental Illness  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to test the measurement invariance of the Brief Symptom Inventory's (BSI) secondary factor model across African, white, and Latino Americans using multiple-group confirmatory factor analyses. This study provides an examination of the BSI's validity for use in mental health service research for people with severe and…

Hoe, Maanse; Brekke, John S.

2008-01-01

87

Depressive Symptoms and Cigarette Smoking in a College Sample  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective and Participants: The authors examined (1) the relationship between depressive symptoms and cigarette smoking in a college sample and (2) the role of smoking self-efficacy (one's perceived ability to abstain from smoking) in explaining the relationship between depressive symptoms and cigarette smoking. Methods: Predominantly first-year college students at a large public university completed a self-report inventory indexing depressive symptoms,

Brent A. Kenney; Charles J. Holahan

2008-01-01

88

Self-reported workplace related ergonomic conditions as prognostic factors for musculoskeletal symptoms: the "BIT" follow up study on office workers  

PubMed Central

Aims: To identify prognostic ergonomic and work technique factors for musculoskeletal symptoms among office workers and in a subgroup with highly monotonous repetitive computer work. Methods: A baseline questionnaire was delivered to 5033 office workers in 11 Danish companies in the first months of 1999, and a follow up questionnaire was mailed in the last months of 2000 to 3361 respondents. A subgroup with highly monotonous repetitive computer work was formed including those that were repeating the same movements and/or tasks for at least 75% of the work time. The questionnaire contained questions on ergonomic factors and factors related to work technique. The outcome variables were based on the frequency of musculoskeletal symptoms during the last 12 months. Logistic regression analyses were used to identify prognostic factors for symptoms in the three body regions. Results: In total, 39%, 47%, and 51% of the symptomatic subjects had a reduced frequency of symptom days in the neck/shoulder, low back, or elbow/hand region, respectively. In all regions more men than women had reduced symptoms. In the multivariate logistic regression analyses, working no more than 75% of the work time with the computer was a prognostic factor for musculoskeletal symptoms in the neck/shoulder and elbow/hand, and a high influence on the speed of work was a prognostic factor for symptoms in the low back. In the subgroup with highly monotonous repetitive computer work, the odds ratios of the prognostic factors were similar to those for the whole group of office workers. Conclusion: When organising computer work it is important to allow for physical variation with other work tasks, thereby avoiding working with the computer during all the work time, and further to consider the worker's own influence on the speed of work. PMID:15723884

Juul-Kristensen, B; Jensen, C

2005-01-01

89

explored the impact of a single massage session on self-reported symptoms in an outpatient setting at a large academic cancer  

E-print Network

re- ported symptoms at initial massage (first visit) included: Sleep 82.7%, Well-Being 82.7%, Fatigue massage included: Sleep [3.8; n = 480]; Fatigue [3.3; n = 491]; and Well-Being [3.2; n = 480]. An initial for Fatigue [ - 1.20], Well Being [ - 1.14], and Pain [ - 1.08] (all p's

Schwartz, Eric L.

90

Factorial Structure of the Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI)-18 among Chinese Drug Users  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND Although the Brief Symptom Inventory-18 (BSI-18) has been widely used for mental health screenings in both clinical and non-clinical populations, the validation of its application to Chinese populations has been very limited. The objective of this research is to assess the factorial structure of the BSI-18 within a Chinese drug using population. METHODS AND RESULTS A total sample of 303 drug users recruited via Respondent Driven Sampling (RDS) from Changsha, China was used for the study. Our results show: 1) The BSI-18 item scores are highly skewed; 2) With dichotomous items measures (1-problem at least moderately caused respondent discomfort during the past week; 0-otherwise), our findings support the designed 3-factor solution of the BSI-18 (somatization, depression, and anxiety); 3) The BSI-18 has a hierarchical factorial structure with 3 first-order factors and an underlying second-order factor (general psychological distress); 4) Tentative support should also be given to a single dimension of general psychological distress in Chinese drug using populations. Our study recommends a useful alternative approach for evaluating the factorial structure of the BSI-18 – i.e. CFA with dichotomous item measures. Both the total BSI-18 score and the three subscales (SOM, DEP, and ANX) can be used in applications of the BSI-18. CONCLUSION Overall, our findings suggest the BSI-18 is useful with Chinese drug users, and shows potential for use with non-Western and substance using populations more generally. PMID:23906998

Wang, Jichuan; Kelly, Brian C; Liu, Tieqiao; Zhang, Guanbai; Hao, Wei

2013-01-01

91

Self-reporting of symptom development from exposure to radiofrequency fields of wireless smart meters in victoria, australia: a case series.  

PubMed

Context • In 2006, the government in the state of Victoria, Australia, mandated the rollout of smart meters in Victoria, which effectively removed a whole population's ability to avoid exposure to human-made high-frequency nonionizing radiation. This issue appears to constitute an unprecedented public health challenge for Victoria. By August 2013, 142 people had reported adverse health effects from wireless smart meters by submitting information on an Australian public Web site using its health and legal registers. Objective • The study evaluated the information in the registers to determine the types of symptoms that Victorian residents were developing from exposure to wireless smart meters. Design • In this case series, the registers' managers eliminated those cases that did not clearly identify the people providing information by name, surname, postal address, and/or e-mail to make sure that they were genuine registrants. Then they obtained consent from participants to have their deidentified data used to compile the data for the case series. The author later removed any individual from outside of Victoria. Participants • The study included 92 residents of Victoria, Australia. Outcome Measures • The author used her medical experience and judgment to group symptoms into clinically relevant clusters (eg, pain in the head was grouped with headache, tinnitus was grouped with ringing in the ears). The author stayed quite close to the wording used in the original entries. She then calculated total numbers and percentages for each symptom cluster. Percentages were rounded to the nearest whole number.Results • The most frequently reported symptoms from exposure to smart meters were (1) insomnia, (2) headaches, (3) tinnitus, (4) fatigue, (5) cognitive disturbances, (6) dysesthesias (abnormal sensation), and (7) dizziness. The effects of these symptoms on people's lives were significant. Conclusions • Review of some key studies, both recent and old (1971), reveals that the participants' symptoms were the same as those reported by people exposed to radiofrequency fields emitted by devices other than smart meters. Interestingly, the vast majority of Victorian cases did not state that they had been sufferers of electromagnetic hypersensitivity syndrome (EHS) prior to exposure to the wireless meters, which points to the possibility that smart meters may have unique characteristics that lower people's threshold for symptom development. PMID:25478801

Lamech, Federica

2014-11-01

92

Child Development Inventory Assessment of Children's Development, Symptoms, and Behavior Problems.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Child Development Inventory (CDI), a restandardized version of the Minnesota Child Development Inventory, is completed by parents to measure the developmental progress of their children ages 15 months to 6 years or children judged to be functioning in that age range. It measures present development in eight areas: social, self-help, gross…

Ireton, Harold R.

93

The Utility and Comparative Incremental Validity of the MMPI-2 and Trauma Symptom Inventory Validity Scales in the Detection of Feigned PTSD  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors examined the comparative predictive capacity of the Trauma Symptom Inventory (TSI) Atypical Response Scale (ATR) and the standard set of Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2) fake-bad validity scales (i.e., F, F[subscript B[prime

Efendov, Adele A.; Sellbom, Martin; Bagby, R. Michael

2008-01-01

94

Self-Reported Sleep Correlates with Prefrontal-Amygdala Functional Connectivity and Emotional Functioning  

PubMed Central

Study Objectives: Prior research suggests that sleep deprivation is associated with declines in some aspects of emotional intelligence and increased severity on indices of psychological disturbance. Sleep deprivation is also associated with reduced prefrontal-amygdala functional connectivity, potentially reflecting impaired top-down modulation of emotion. It remains unknown whether this modified connectivity may be observed in relation to more typical levels of sleep curtailment. We examined whether self-reported sleep duration the night before an assessment would be associated with these effects. Design: Participants documented their hours of sleep from the previous night, completed the Bar-On Emotional Quotient Inventory (EQ-i), Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT), and Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI), and underwent resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Setting: Outpatient neuroimaging center at a private psychiatric hospital. Participants: Sixty-five healthy adults (33 men, 32 women), ranging in age from 18-45 y. Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: Greater self-reported sleep the preceding night was associated with higher scores on all scales of the EQ-i but not the MSCEIT, and with lower symptom severity scores on half of the psychopathology scales of the PAI. Longer sleep was also associated with stronger negative functional connectivity between the right ventromedial prefrontal cortex and amygdala. Moreover, greater negative connectivity between these regions was associated with higher EQ-i and lower symptom severity on the PAI. Conclusions: Self-reported sleep duration from the preceding night was negatively correlated with prefrontal-amygdala connectivity and the severity of subjective psychological distress, while positively correlated with higher perceived emotional intelligence. More sleep was associated with higher emotional and psychological strength. Citation: Killgore WDS. Self-reported sleep correlates with prefrontal-amygdala functional connectivity and emotional functioning. SLEEP 2013;36(11):1597-1608. PMID:24179291

Killgore, William D. S.

2013-01-01

95

Reliability and Concurrent Validity of the Palliative Outcome Scale, the Rotterdam Symptom Checklist, and the Brief Pain Inventory  

PubMed Central

Abstract Background Some domains of the questionnaires used to measure symptoms and quality of life (QOL) in patients with advanced cancer seem to measure similar dimensions or constructs, so it would be useful for clinicians to demonstrate the interchangeability of equivalent domains of the questionnaires in measuring the same constructs. Objective This study investigated the reliability and concurrent validity of the Palliative Outcome Scale (POS), the Rotterdam Symptom Checklist (RSCL), and the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI), used to measure symptom control in patients with advanced cancer. Design This was an evaluative study. Setting/Subjects Subjects were patients with advanced cancer attended by Spanish primary care physicians. Measurements Secondary analysis was performed of 117 outpatients who completed the POS, BPI, and RSCL at two different times, with an interval of 7 to 10 days. Bland and Altman analyses and plot, repeatability coefficient, as well as Spearman correlations were carried out. Results There were 117 included patients. Mean age was 69.4 (11.5) years, gender was 60% male, 37.6% completed only elementary school, diagnoses were mainly digestive and lung cancer, with a low functional rate and presence of oncologic pain. First and second questionnaire rounds showed significant correlations and agreement. Agreement was shown between pain intensity of BPI and pain and physical scales of RSCL, and between physical symptoms of RSCL and of POS, with significant correlations in equivalent dimensions. Conclusion BPI, POS, and RSCL have shown adequate reliability and moderate concurrent validity among them. PMID:23808642

Perez-Hoyos, Santiago; Agra-Varela, Yolanda

2013-01-01

96

Extreme Appraisals of Internal States and Bipolar Symptoms: The Hypomanic Attitudes and Positive Predictions Inventory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Hypomanic Attitudes and Positive Predictions Inventory (HAPPI; W. Mansell, 2006) was developed to assess multiple, extreme, self-relevant appraisals of internal states. The present study aimed to validate the HAPPI in a clinical sample. Participants (N = 50) with a diagnosis of bipolar disorder (confirmed by a structured clinical interview)…

Dodd, Alyson L.; Mansell, Warren; Morrison, Anthony P.; Tai, Sara

2011-01-01

97

The Diabetes Symptom Self-Care Inventory: Development and Psychometric Testing with Mexican Americans  

PubMed Central

Context Type 2 diabetes is prevalent throughout the world. In previous studies of Mexican Americans with type 2 diabetes, 95-97% of those sampled reported having symptoms they believe were caused by diabetes and most self-treated their symptoms. To more accurately capture Mexican Americans’ symptom prevalence and their self-treatments, the Diabetes Symptom Self-Care Instrument (DSSCI) was adapted from the Diabetes Self-Care Instrument. Objectives This paper describes the modification process used to perfect the DSSCI for use in improving self-care among people with Type 2 diabetes. Methods This instrumentation study used qualitative and quantitative methods. The study was completed in four phases that used focus groups, cognitive interviews, and survey administration. Four convenience samples were drawn from community-based Mexican American adults, aged 25-75, with type 2 diabetes in an urban area and a rural location in Texas. Results Phase I: Seven focus groups (n=45) generated data for revising items. Phase II: Cognitive interviews with 16 participants were used to evaluate four revisions of the questionnaire. Phase III: Surveys were administered to 81 participants. Total number of symptoms on the DSSCI correlated with scores on the Centers for Epidemiological Studies-Depression scale (r=.65, p < .001), Illness Perception Questionnaire-Revised Diabetes symptom subscale (r=.57, p < .001), and Audit of Diabetes-Dependent Quality of Life scale (r= -.42, p < .001). Minor revisions followed. Phase IV: Test-retest stability was demonstrated (n = 44). Conclusion The DSSCI is a culturally-relevant, sound measure of Mexican Americans’ diabetes symptoms and the actions they take to address them. PMID:21276705

García, Alexandra A.

2010-01-01

98

Convergent and Discriminant Validity of Psychopathy Factors Assessed Via Self-Report  

PubMed Central

Psychopathy has been conceptualized as a personality disorder with distinctive interpersonal-affective and behavioral deviance features. The authors examine correlates of the factors of the Psychopathic Personality Inventory (PPI), Self-Report Psychopathy–II (SRP-II) scale, and Antisocial Process Screening Device (APSD) to understand similarities and differences among the constructs embodied in these instruments. PPI Fearless Dominance and SRP-II Factor 1 were negatively related to most personality disorder symptoms and were both predicted by high Dominance and low Neuroticism. In addition, PPI Fearless Dominance correlated positively with antisocial personality features, although SRP-II Factor 1 did not. In contrast, PPI Impulsive Antisociality, SRP-II Factor 2, and both APSD factors correlated with antisocial personality features and symptoms of nearly all personality disorders, and were predicted by low Love. Results suggest ways in which the measurement of the constructs in each instrument may be improved. PMID:16123248

Benning, Stephen D.; Patrick, Christopher J.; Salekin, Randall T.; Leistico, Anne-Marie R.

2008-01-01

99

Symptoms  

MedlinePLUS

... swallowing Shortness of breath or wheezing Turning blue Drop in blood pressure (feeling faint, confused, weak, passing ... Resources About Anaphylaxis Allergens Peanut Tree Nuts Milk Egg Wheat Soy Fish Shellfish Other Symptoms Diagnosis & Testing ...

100

Diagnostic Hit Rates of High Point Codes for the Diagnostic Inventory of Personality and Symptoms Using Random Assignment, Base Rates, and Probability Scales.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Diagnostic hit rates for the Diagnostic Inventory of Personality and Symptoms were compared to diagnosis by psychiatrists of the same patients. The Probability Scale employing Bayesian concepts and base rates correctly classified 70% of the patients and was more accurate by far than the other two methods used. (Author/ABB)

Duthie, Bruce; Vincent, Ken R.

1986-01-01

101

A Preliminary Investigation of the Validity and Reliability of the Brief-Symptom Inventory-18 in Economically Disadvantaged Latina American Mothers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of the present study was to examine the construct validity and reliability of the Brief Symptom Inventory-18 (BSI-18) in 1,115 low-income Latina mothers. Exploratory factor analyses conducted in half of the sample supported a one-factor solution, which was subsequently confirmed in the remainder of the sample using confirmatory factor…

Prelow, Hazel M.; Weaver, Scott R.; Swenson, Rebecca R.; Bowman, Marvella A.

2005-01-01

102

An Evaluation of the Brief Symptom Inventory-18 Using Item Response Theory: Which Items Are Most Strongly Related to Psychological Distress?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The psychometric structure of the Brief Symptom Inventory-18 (BSI-18; Derogatis, 2001) was investigated using Mokken scaling and parametric item response theory. Data of 487 outpatients, 266 students, and 207 prisoners were analyzed. Results of the Mokken analysis indicated that the BSI-18 formed a strong Mokken scale for outpatients and…

Meijer, Rob R.; de Vries, Rivka M.; van Bruggen, Vincent

2011-01-01

103

Effect of Symptom Information and Intelligence in Dissimulation. An Examination of Faking Response Styles by Inmates on the Basic Personality Inventory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study employed the Basic Personality Inventory (BPI) to differentiate various types of dis-simulation, including malingered psychopathology and faking good, by inmates. In particular, the role of intelligence in utilizing symptom information to successfully malinger was examined. On admission to a correctional facility, 161 inmates completed…

Steffan, Jarrod S.; Kroner, Daryl G.; Morgan, Robert D.

2007-01-01

104

Psychosocial predictors of self-reported fatigue in patients with moderate to severe irritable bowel syndrome  

PubMed Central

The objective of this study was to assess the level, impact, and predictors of fatigue in patients with moderate to severe irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). One hundred seventy five patients meeting Rome III criteria for IBS completed a variety of measures including the vitality scale of the SF-12, IBS-Symptom Severity Scale, IBS-QOL, Brief Symptom Inventory-18, Screening for Somatoform Symptoms (SOMS-7), and a semi structured clinical interview (IBS-PRO) as part of a pretreatment evaluation of an NIH funded clinical trial of cognitive behavior therapy for IBS. Fatigue was the third most common somatic complaint, reported by 61% of the patients. Levels of fatigue were associated with both somatic (more severe IBS symptoms, greater number of unexplained medical symptoms), behavioral (frequency of restorative experiences) and psychological (e.g., trait anxiety, depression) outcomes after holding constant confounding variables. The final model in multiple regression analyses accounted for 41.6% of the variance in self-reported fatigue scores with significant predictors including anxiety sensitivity, perceived stress, IBS symptom severity, restorative activities and depression. The clinical implications of data as they relate to both IBS and CBT in general are discussed in the context of attention restoration theory. PMID:23578499

Lackner, Jeffrey M.; Gudleski, Gregory D.; DiMuro, Jennifer; Keefer, Laurie; Brenner, Darren M.

2013-01-01

105

The causal link between self-reported trauma and dissociation: a critical review  

Microsoft Academic Search

The idea that traumatic experiences cause dissociative symptoms is a recurrent theme in clinical literature. The present article summarizes evidence that cast doubts on the commonly voiced view that the connection between self-reported trauma and dissociation is a simple and robust one. It is argued that: (1) the correlations between self-reported traumatic experiences and dissociative symptoms reported in the literature

Harald Merckelbach; Peter Muris

2001-01-01

106

Parents with Psychosis: A Pilot Study Examining Self-Report Measures Related to Family Functioning.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines the utility of various self-report instruments related to family functioning in families where a parent has a psychotic disorder, and explores associations between these instruments and symptoms in the parent. There were significant associations between objective measures of negative symptoms and self-report scores related to problems in…

Plant, Karen; Byrne, Linda; Barkla, Joanne; McLean, Duncan; Hearle, Jenny; McGrath, John

2002-01-01

107

Cognitive Abilities Relate to Self-Reported Hearing Disability  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: In this explorative study, the authors investigated the relationship between auditory and cognitive abilities and self-reported hearing disability. Method: Thirty-two adults with mild to moderate hearing loss completed the Amsterdam Inventory for Auditory Disability and Handicap (AIADH; Kramer, Kapteyn, Festen, & Tobi, 1996) and…

Zekveld, Adriana A.; George, Erwin L. J.; Houtgast, Tammo; Kramer, Sophia E.

2013-01-01

108

Concordance of the Mini-Psychiatric Assessment Schedule for Adults Who Have Developmental Disabilities (PASADD) and the Brief Symptom Inventory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: When assessing the mental health needs of people who have intellectual disabilities (ID) it is important to use measures that have good validity and reliability to ensure accurate case recognition and reliable and valid outcome data. Measures developed for this purpose tend to be self-report or by informant report. Multi-trait…

Beail, N.; Mitchell, K.; Vlissides, N.; Jackson, T.

2015-01-01

109

Screening for major depression disorders in medical inpatients with the Beck Depression Inventory for Primary Care  

Microsoft Academic Search

To ascertain how effective the Beck Depression Inventory for Primary Care (BDI-PC) was for differentiating medical inpatients who were and were not diagnosed with DSM-IV major depression disorders (MDD), this 7-item self-report instrument composed of cognitive and affective symptoms was administered to 50 medical inpatients along with the Depression subscale (HDS) from the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (Zigmond &

Aaron T. Beck; David Guth; Robert A. Steer; Roberta Ball

1997-01-01

110

Decline in Self-Reported Dysphoria After Treatment Entry in Inner-City Cocaine Addicts  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined self-reported dysphoria in 82 consecutive admissions to intensive outpatient treatment for cocaine abuse on whom data for the Beck scales for depression, anxiety, and hopelessness were available for intake and 4 subsequent weeks with no more than 1 missing data point. Mean scores on the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) decreased significantly

Stephen D. Husband; Douglas B. Marlowe; R. J. Lamb; Martin Y. Iguchi; Donald A. Bux; Kimberly C. Kirby; Jerome J. Platt

1996-01-01

111

Irritability and impulsiveness: relationship to self-reported impulsive aggression  

Microsoft Academic Search

Impulsive aggressive behavior was assessed in a group of 214 college students through self-report. All subjects completed the Anger Attack Questionnaire, Buss-Durkee Hostility Inventory (BDHI) and the Barratt Impulsiveness Questionnaire (BIS-11). Fifty-one subjects (24%) were classified as impulsive aggressive. Analysis of the BDHI and BIS-11 found that impulsive aggressive subjects scored significantly higher than nonaggressives on impulsiveness (BIS-11) and all

Matthew S. Stanford; Kevin W. Greve; Theodore J. Dickens

1995-01-01

112

Schizotypal traits, obsessive-compulsive symptoms, and social functioning in adolescents  

Microsoft Academic Search

The relationship between self-reported social functioning, schizotypal traits, and obsessive-compulsive symptoms (OCS) was studied in a sample of 508 adolescents, of which 49.8% were male adolescents, with a mean age of 14.9 (SD, 1.6). The Schizotypal Personality Questionnaire–Brief, Maudsley Obsessive-Compulsive Inventory and Social Adaptation Self-evaluation Scale was administered. The results showed that schizotypal personality in adolescents consists of 4 factors

Eduardo Fonseca-Pedrero; Serafín Lemos-Giráldez; Mercedes Paíno-Piñeiro; Ursula Villazón-García; José Muñiz

2010-01-01

113

An evaluation of the Brief Symptom Inventory-18 using item response theory: which items are most strongly related to psychological distress?  

PubMed

The psychometric structure of the Brief Symptom Inventory-18 (BSI-18; Derogatis, 2001) was investigated using Mokken scaling and parametric item response theory. Data of 487 outpatients, 266 students, and 207 prisoners were analyzed. Results of the Mokken analysis indicated that the BSI-18 formed a strong Mokken scale for outpatients and prisoners, indicating strong unidimensionality. For students, only the depression and anxiety items formed a medium Mokken scale. Parametric item response theory analyses showed that the best discriminating items came from the depression and anxiety subscales. PMID:21280957

Meijer, Rob R; de Vries, Rivka M; van Bruggen, Vincent

2011-03-01

114

Sleep difficulties are associated with increased symptoms of psychopathology.  

PubMed

Sleep problems often co-occur with psychopathological conditions and affective dysregulation. Individuals with mood disorders have significantly higher rates of sleep disturbances than healthy individuals, and among those with mood disorders, sleep problems are associated with lower rates of remission and response to treatment. Sleep disruption may itself be a risk factor for various forms of psychopathology, as experimental sleep deprivation has been found to lead to increased affective, cognitive, and somatic symptoms within healthy volunteers. However, little is known about the relationship between recurring sleep complaints in a naturalistic environment and symptoms of psychopathology among healthy individuals. In the present study, 49 healthy adults (21 males and 28 females) reported sleep quality and completed the Personality Assessment Inventory, a standardized self-report assessment of symptoms of psychopathology. Consistent with prior published findings during total sleep deprivation, individuals endorsing self-reported naturally occurring sleep problems showed higher scores on scales measuring somatic complaints, anxiety, and depression. Furthermore, the reported frequency of sleep disturbance was closely linked with the severity of self-reported symptoms. While causal directionality cannot be inferred, these findings support the notion that sleep and emotional functioning are closely linked. PMID:24496489

Tkachenko, Olga; Olson, Elizabeth A; Weber, Mareen; Preer, Lily A; Gogel, Hannah; Killgore, William D S

2014-05-01

115

Scrupulosity and obsessive-compulsive symptoms: Confirmatory factor analysis and validity of the Penn Inventory of Scrupulosity  

Microsoft Academic Search

The current study examined scrupulosity in 352 unselected college students as measured by the 19-item Penn Inventory of Scrupulosity (PIOS). Confirmatory factor analysis yielded support for a two-factor model of the 19-item PIOS. However, item-level analyses provided preliminary support for the validity of a 15-item PIOS (PIOS-R) secondary to the removal of items 2, 6, 15, and 10. The two

Bunmi O. Olatunji; Jonathan S. Abramowitz; Nathan L. Williams; Kevin M. Connolly; Jeffrey M. Lohr

2007-01-01

116

A pilot study examining effects of group-based Cognitive Strategy Training treatment on self-reported cognitive problems, psychiatric symptoms, functioning, and compensatory strategy use in OIF/OEF combat veterans with persistent mild cognitive disorder and history of traumatic brain injury.  

PubMed

We aimed to determine whether group-based Cognitive Strategy Training (CST) for combat veterans with mild cognitive disorder and a history of traumatic brain injury (TBI) has significant posttreatment effects on self-reported compensatory strategy usage, functioning, and psychiatric symptoms. Participants included 21 veterans returning from conflicts in Iraq or Afghanistan with a diagnosis of Cognitive Disorder, Not Otherwise Specified and a history of combat-related TBI. Participants attended 6- to 8-week structured CST groups designed to provide them training in and practice with a variety of compensatory cognitive strategies, including day planner usage. Of the participants, 16 completed pre- and posttreatment assessment measures. Following CST, participants reported significantly increased use of compensatory cognitive strategies and day planners; an increased perception that these strategies were useful to them; increased life satisfaction; and decreased depressive, memory, and cognitive symptom severity. Group-based CST is a promising intervention for veterans with mild cognitive disorder, and randomized controlled trials are required to further evaluate its efficacy. PMID:20437326

Huckans, Marilyn; Pavawalla, Shital; Demadura, Theresa; Kolessar, Michael; Seelye, Adriana; Roost, Noah; Twamley, Elizabeth W; Storzbach, Daniel

2010-01-01

117

The cumulative effect of different childhood trauma types on self-reported symptoms of adult male depression and PTSD, substance abuse and health-related quality of life in a large active-duty military cohort.  

PubMed

History of childhood trauma (CT) is highly prevalent and may lead to long-term consequences on physical and mental health. This study investigated the independent association of CT with symptoms of adult depression and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), mental and physical health-related quality of life (HRQoL), as well as current tobacco consumption and alcohol abuse in a large homogenous cohort of 1254 never-deployed, young male Marines enrolled in the Marine Resiliency Study. Independent effects of CT history, number and type of CT on outcomes were analyzed using hierarchical multivariate logistic regression models. Our results suggested dose-dependent negative effect of an increasing number of trauma types of CT on depression, PTSD and HRQoL. Experience of single CT type demonstrated overall weak effects, while history of multiple CT types distinctively increased the likelihood of adult PTSD symptomology (OR: 3.1, 95% CI: 1.5-6.2), poor mental (OR: 2.3, 95% CI: 1.7-3.1) and physical HRQoL (OR: 1.4, 95% CI: 1.1-1.9). Risk for depression symptoms was similar for both single and multiple CT (OR: 2.2, 95% CI: 1.3-3.8 and OR: 2.1, 95% CI: 1.2-3.5 respectively). CT history had no effects on current tobacco use and alcohol abuse. Our study thus provides evidence for substantial additive effect of different CT types on adult mental and physical health with increasing levels of exposure. PMID:25139009

Agorastos, Agorastos; Pittman, James O E; Angkaw, Abigail C; Nievergelt, Caroline M; Hansen, Christian J; Aversa, Laura H; Parisi, Sarah A; Barkauskas, Donald A; Baker, Dewleen G

2014-11-01

118

Utility of the Mild Brain Injury Atypical Symptoms Scale to detect symptom exaggeration: an analogue simulation study.  

PubMed

Brief self-report symptom checklists are often used to screen for postconcussional disorder (PCD) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and are highly susceptible to symptom exaggeration. This study examined the utility of the five-item Mild Brain Injury Atypical Symptoms Scale (mBIAS) designed for use with the Neurobehavioral Symptom Inventory (NSI) and the PTSD Checklist-Civilian (PCL-C). Participants were 85 Australian undergraduate students who completed a battery of self-report measures under one of three experimental conditions: control (i.e., honest responding, n?=?24), feign PCD (n?=?29), and feign PTSD (n?=?32). Measures were the mBIAS, NSI, PCL-C, Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2, Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF), and the Structured Inventory of Malingered Symptomatology (SIMS). Participants instructed to feign PTSD and PCD had significantly higher scores on the mBIAS, NSI, PCL-C, and MMPI-2-RF than did controls. Few differences were found between the feign PCD and feign PTSD groups, with the exception of scores on the NSI (feign PCD > feign PTSD) and PCL-C (feign PTSD > feign PCD). Optimal cutoff scores on the mBIAS of ?8 and ?6 were found to reflect "probable exaggeration" (sensitivity = .34; specificity = 1.0; positive predictive power, PPP = 1.0; negative predictive power, NPP = .74) and "possible exaggeration" (sensitivity = .72; specificity = .88; PPP = .76; NPP = .85), respectively. Findings provide preliminary support for the use of the mBIAS as a tool to detect symptom exaggeration when administering the NSI and PCL-C. PMID:23419145

Lange, Rael T; Edmed, Shannon L; Sullivan, Karen A; French, Louis M; Cooper, Douglas B

2013-01-01

119

Self-reported versus behavioral self-handicapping: empirical evidence for a theoretical distinction.  

PubMed

The present study was an investigation of how Ss would respond when given 2 self-handicapping options, 1 behavioral (withdrawal of practice effort) and 1 self-reported (reporting high levels of stress). Ss anticipating a diagnostic test of intellectual ability were given different instructions regarding the effects of stress and practice on test performance. Ss were told that (a) stress only, (b) practice only, (c) both stress and practice, or (d) neither stress nor practice affected test scores. Ss were then given the opportunity to self-report a handicap on a stress inventory and to behaviorally self-handicap by failing to practice before the test. High self-handicapping men and women showed evidence of self-reported handicapping, but only high self-handicapping men behaviorally self-handicapped. However, when both self-handicaps were viable, both high self-handicapping men and women preferred the self-reported over the behavioral self-handicap. PMID:1774635

Hirt, E R; Deppe, R K; Gordon, L J

1991-12-01

120

The Preliminary Development of a New Self-Report Measure for OCD in Young People.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study seeks to develop a reliable self-report instrument to assess obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) in young people. The children's Obsessional Compulsive Inventory had good internal consistency, criterion validity and was significantly correlated with the Children's Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale. This preliminary new measure could…

Shafran, Roz; Frampton, Ian; Heyman, Isobel; Reynolds, Martina; Teachman, Bethany; Rachman, S.

2003-01-01

121

Reliability and Validity of Two Self-Report Measures of Psychopathy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present study assessed the psychometric properties and construct validity of two self-report measures of psychopathy in a male-college sample: the Levenson Psychopathy scales (LPS; Levenson, Kiehl, & Fitzpatrick, 1995) and the Psychopathic Personality Inventory (PPI; Lilienfeld & Andrews, 1996). Both the LPS and the PPI demonstrated good…

Falkenbach, Diana; Poythress, Norman; Falki, Marielle; Manchak, Sarah

2007-01-01

122

How large is the gap between self-report and assessed mental health and does it impact older adult mental health service utilization?  

PubMed

We examined the relationship between self-reported and assessed mental health status and service use, using data from the Health and Retirement Study (N = 9,547). Twelve percent and thirty percent had inaccurate perceptions of their mood and memory status, respectively. No significant difference was found in the likelihood of service use between older adults who were unaware of current depressive symptoms and those who self-reported problems but had no assessed symptoms. Older adults who scored low in cognitive test were more likely to use services, regardless of self-reported memory status. Discrepancies between self-reported and assessed status may contribute to service utilization. PMID:24971776

Lee, Hyo Jung; Dugan, Elizabeth

2015-01-01

123

The Vancouver Obsessional Compulsive Inventory (VOCI)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The original Maudsley Obsessional Compulsive Inventory (MOCI) has been widely used and is considered to be one of the best available self-report instruments for measuring observable obsessive–compulsive problems such as washing and checking. However, it has several limitations and requires updating. Our revision of the MOCI, the Vancouver Obsessional Compulsive Inventory (VOCI), was designed to provide assessment of a range

Dana S. Thordarson; Adam S. Radomsky; S. Rachman; Roz Shafran; Craig N. Sawchuk; A. Ralph Hakstian

2004-01-01

124

A pilot evaluation of associations between displayed depression references on Facebook and self-reported depression using a clinical scale.  

PubMed

The objective of this study was to determine associations between displayed depression symptoms on Facebook and self-reported depression symptoms using a clinical screen. Public Facebook profiles of undergraduates from two universities were examined for displayed depression references. Profiles were categorized as depression symptom displayers or non-displayers. Participants completed an online PHQ-9 depression scale. Analyses examined associations between PHQ-9 score and depression symptom displayers versus non-displayers. The mean PHQ-9 score for non-displayers was 4.7 (SD?=?4.0), the mean PHQ-9 score for depression symptom displayers was 6.4 (SD?=?5.1; p?=?0.018). A trend approaching significance was noted that participants who scored into a depression category by their PHQ-9 score were more likely to display depression symptom references. Displayed references to depression symptoms were associated with self-reported depression symptoms. PMID:21863354

Moreno, Megan Andreas; Christakis, Dimitri A; Egan, Katie G; Jelenchick, Lauren A; Cox, Elizabeth; Young, Henry; Villiard, Hope; Becker, Tara

2012-07-01

125

High Prevalence of Self-Reported Photophobia in Adult ADHD  

PubMed Central

Many adult outpatients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) report an oversensitivity to light. We explored the link between ADHD and photophobia in an online survey (N?=?494). Self-reported photophobia was prevalent in 69% of respondents with, and in 28% of respondents without, ADHD (symptoms). The ADHD (symptoms) group wore sunglasses longer during daytime in all seasons. Photophobia may be related to the functioning of the eyes, which mediate dopamine and melatonin production systems in the eye. In the brain, dopamine and melatonin are involved in both ADHD and circadian rhythm disturbances. Possibly, the regulation of the dopamine and melatonin systems in the eyes and in the brain are related. Despite the study’s limitations, the results are encouraging for further study on the pathophysiology of ADHD, eye functioning, and circadian rhythm disturbances.

Kooij, J. J. Sandra; Bijlenga, Denise

2014-01-01

126

Technical Adequacy of the Disruptive Behavior Rating Scale-2nd Edition--Self-Report  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study provides preliminary analysis of the Disruptive Behavior Rating Scale-2nd Edition--Self-Report, which was designed to screen individuals aged 10 years and older for anxiety and behavior symptoms. Score reliability and internal and external facets of validity were good for a screening-level test.

Erford, Bradley T.; Miller, Emily M.; Isbister, Katherine

2015-01-01

127

Perceived Motivational Climates and Self-Reported Emotional and Behavioural Problems among Norwegian Secondary School Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigates the relationship between perceived motivational climates and self-reported emotional and behavioural problems (EBP: symptoms of depression, lack of on-task-orientation and disruptive behaviour), among 1171 Norwegian 8th grade secondary school students from 65 school classes. Statistical analyses showed significant…

Stornes, Tor; Bru, Edvin

2011-01-01

128

Assessing AD/HD in College Students: Psychometric Properties of the Barkley Self-Report Form  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Barkley Current Symptoms Scale (BCSS)--Self-Report Form was designed to assess attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. The purpose of the current study was to add to BCSS psychometric literature in a sample of university students. Comparisons with normative data are provided, and implications for these findings are offered. (Contains 5…

Ladner, Jennifer M.; Schulenberg, Stefan E.; Smith, C. Veronica; Dunaway, Marcella H.

2011-01-01

129

Does self-reported posttraumatic growth reflect genuine positive change?  

PubMed

In this study, we evaluated the validity of self-reported posttraumatic growth (PTG) by assessing the relation between perceived growth and actual growth from pre- to posttrauma. Undergraduate students completed measures tapping typical PTG domains at Time 1 and Time 2 (2 months later). We compared change in those measures with scores on the Posttraumatic Growth Inventory (PTGI; Tedeschi & Calhoun, 1996) for those participants who reported a traumatic event between Time 1 and Time 2 (n= 122). PTGI scores generally were unrelated to actual growth in PTG-related domains. Moreover, perceived growth was associated with increased distress from pre- to posttrauma, whereas actual growth was related to decreased distress, a pattern suggesting that perceived and actual growth reflect different processes. Finally, perceived (but not actual) growth was related to positive reinterpretation coping. Thus, the PTGI, and perhaps other retrospective measures, does not appear to measure actual pre- to posttrauma change. PMID:19515115

Frazier, Patricia; Tennen, Howard; Gavian, Margaret; Park, Crystal; Tomich, Patricia; Tashiro, Ty

2009-07-01

130

Assessing agreement of self-reported and observed physical exposures of the upper extremity  

PubMed Central

Assessment of workplace physical exposures by self-reported questionnaires has logistical advantages in population studies but is subject to exposure misclassification. This study measured agreement between eight self-reported and observer-rated physical exposures to the hands and wrists, and evaluated predictors of inter-method agreement. Workers (n=341) from three occupational categories (clerical/technical, construction, and service) completed self-administered questionnaires and worksite assessments. Analyses compared self-reported and observed ratings using a weighted kappa coefficient. Personal and psychosocial factors, presence of upper extremity symptoms and job type were evaluated as predictors of agreement. Weighted kappa values were substantial for lifting (0.67) and holding vibrating tools (0.61), moderate for forceful grip (0.58) and fair to poor for all other exposures. Upper extremity symptoms did not predict greater disagreement between self-reported and observed exposures. Occupational category was the only significant predictor of inter-method agreement. Self-reported exposures may provide a useful estimate of some work exposures for population studies. PMID:20166314

Dale, Ann Marie; Strickland, Jaime; Gardner, Bethany; Symanzik, Jürgen; Evanoff, Bradley

2012-01-01

131

Social Desirability, Non-Response Bias and Reliability in a Long Self-Report Measure: Illustrations from the MMPI-2 Administered to Brunei Student Teachers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The survey investigated the problems of social desirability (SD), non-response bias (NRB) and reliability in the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory--Revised (MMPI-2) self-report inventory administered to Brunei student teachers. Bruneians scored higher on all the validity scales than the normative US sample, thereby threatening the…

Mundia, Lawrence

2011-01-01

132

Tablet-Based Screening of Depressive Symptoms in Quito, Ecuador: Efficiency in Primary Care  

PubMed Central

Depression is a frequent yet overlooked occurrence in primary health care clinics worldwide. Depression and related health screening instruments are available but are rarely used consistently. The availability of technologically based instruments in the assessments offers novel approaches for gathering, storing, and assessing data that includes self-reported symptom severity from the patients themselves as well as clinician recorded information. In a suburban primary health care clinic in Quito, Ecuador, we tested the feasibility and utility of computer tablet-based assessments to evaluate clinic attendees for depression symptoms with the goal of developing effective screening and monitoring tools in the primary care clinics. We assessed individuals using the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire, the Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptoms-Self-Report, the 12-item General Health Questionnaire, the Clinical Global Impression Severity, and a DSM-IV checklist of symptoms. We found that 20% of individuals had a PHQ9 of 8 or greater. There was good correlation between the symptom severity assessments. We conclude that the tablet-based PHQ9 is an excellent and efficient method of screening for depression in attendees at primary health care clinics and that one in five people should be assessed further for depressive illness and possible intervention. PMID:24693425

Grunauer, Michelle; Schrock, David; Jimenez, Gabriela; Miller, Aimee; Lai, Zongshan; Kilbourne, Amy; McInnis, Melvin G.

2014-01-01

133

Using the PCL-R to Help Estimate the Validity of Two Self-Report Measures of Psychopathy with Offenders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Two self-report measures of psychopathy, Levenson's Primary and Secondary Psychopathy scales (LPSP) and the Psychopathic Personality Inventory (PPI), were administered to a large sample of 1,603 offenders. The most widely researched measure of criminal psychopathy, the Hare Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL-R), served as a provisional referent…

Poythress, Norman G.; Lilienfeld, Scott O.; Skeem, Jennifer L.; Douglas, Kevin S.; Edens, John F.; Epstein, Monica; Patrick, Christopher J.

2010-01-01

134

Depressive symptoms among help-seeking Latinas in a disadvantaged, urban, northeastern community mental health center.  

PubMed

This study examined racial/ethnic differences in self-reported depressive symptoms in a clinical population at a northeastern community mental health center. Two hundred eighty-two individuals presenting for mental health intake completed the Beck Depression Inventory-II in either English or Spanish. Latinas reported higher severity of depressive symptoms compared to both African Americans and non-Latina whites. Latinas showed higher levels on both the somatic and the affective/cognitive scales of the BDI-II. These findings differ somewhat from previous reports, some of which suggest that Latinas exhibit elevation specifically in somatic symptoms. Findings are discussed in terms of their implications for assessment and treatment. PMID:24193296

Liefland, Linda; Roberts, David L; Ford, Ralph; Stevens, B Jamie

2014-04-01

135

Self-Reported Reliance on Nonverbal Behavior.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recently, there have been several convincing demonstrations that nonverbal behaviors are key elements in influencing client judgments of counselor credibility. A study was conducted to examine the sensitivity of the self-reported reliance on nonverbal behaviors, as assessed by the Verbal/Nonverbal Reliance Questionnaire (VNRQ), to the actual…

Uhlemann, Max R.; Lee, Dong Yul

136

Development and initial validation of the Iowa Sleep Disturbances Inventory.  

PubMed

The Iowa Sleep Disturbances Inventory (ISDI) is a new measure of self-reported sleep difficulties, which was designed to help facilitate research on the overlap of sleep disturbances and psychopathology. This instrument was developed in two large student samples using principal factor analyses; the psychometric properties of the scales were then examined in three additional samples (students, psychiatric patients, sleep disorder patients). The ISDI consists of 11 specific scales (Nightmares, Initial Insomnia, Fatigue, Fragmented Sleep, Nonrestorative Sleep, Anxiety at Night, Light Sleep, Movement at Night, Sensations at Night, Excessive Sleep, Irregular Schedule) and 1 general scale (Daytime Disturbances). The structure of the ISDI generalizes across both patient and nonpatient samples. In addition, the ISDI scales are internally consistent, show good retest reliability, demonstrate convergent and discriminant validity with widely used measures of sleep disturbances, and display criterion validity in relation to psychiatric patient status and specific symptoms of depression and anxiety. PMID:20484713

Koffel, Erin; Watson, David

2010-12-01

137

Assessment of strategies for identifying diagnosed cases of systemic lupus erythematosus through self-report.  

PubMed

The objective of this work was to assess the optimal way to identify potential systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) cases in large epidemiologic studies through self-reported information about diagnosis of SLE, symptoms and medications, and to investigate the utility of a criteria checklist sent directly to participants' physicians. We used data collected in 1997 from 53322 participants in a study of African-American women, the Black Women's Health Study, including a lupus screening questionnaire (LSQ) and questions about SLE diagnosis and medications. We confirmed self-reported SLE through medical records and criteria checklists sent to participants' physicians. Among those for whom we received medical records and/or criteria checklists, we compared the predictive value and proportion of missed cases of several algorithms using combinations of self-reported SLE diagnosis, LSQ score and medication use to self-reported SLE diagnosis alone. We obtained a physician checklist or medical chart for 251 individuals who reported SLE, of whom 212 (84%) fulfilled ACR criteria for definite or probable SLE, or had clinical lupus (SLE diagnosis recorded in medical charts plus appropriate medication use). The use of LSQ score or medication use in addition to self-report of SLE tended to decrease the false positive rate but also to reduce the proportion of true cases identified. Checklists of ACR criteria completed by subjects' physicians documented more criteria than medical records. In conclusion, among participants who consented to medical record review, SLE prediction algorithms using questions about lupus symptoms and medications offered slightly higher predictive value for detecting cases than self-reported diagnosis alone, but at the cost of case detection. SLE case confirmation strategies can be complemented by the use of criteria checklists sent directly to participants' physicians. PMID:14596424

McAlindon, T E; Formica, M; Palmer, J R; Lafyatis, R; Rosenberg, L

2003-01-01

138

A Pilot Evaluation of Associations Between Displayed Depression References on Facebook and Self-reported Depression Using a Clinical Scale  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this study was to determine associations between displayed depression symptoms on Facebook and self-reported\\u000a depression symptoms using a clinical screen. Public Facebook profiles of undergraduates from two universities were examined\\u000a for displayed depression references. Profiles were categorized as depression symptom displayers or non-displayers. Participants\\u000a completed an online PHQ-9 depression scale. Analyses examined associations between PHQ-9 score and

Megan Andreas Moreno; Dimitri A. Christakis; Katie G. Egan; Lauren A. Jelenchick; Elizabeth Cox; Henry Young; Hope Villiard; Tara Becker

139

Types or Modes of Malingering? A Confirmatory Factor Analysis of Performance and Symptom Validity Tests.  

PubMed

Recently, the dichotomy between performance validity tests (PVT) and symptom validity tests (SVT) has been suggested to differentiate between invalid performance and invalid self-report, respectively. PVTs are typically used to identify malingered cognitive impairment, while SVTs identify malingered psychological or somatic symptoms. It is assumed that people can malinger different types of problems, but the impact of modes of reporting invalidly has been largely unexplored. A mixed neurological sample (n = 130) was tested with the Test of Memory Malingering, the Forced Recognition part of the California Verbal Learning Test, and the self-report Structured Inventory of Malingered Symptoms (SIMS). Confirmatory factor analyses testing both method- and content-based factor models found best fit for the method-based division. Regression analyses of other self-rating and performance-based tests provided further support for the importance of type of methods used to collect information. While acknowledging the types of symptoms malingered, the clinician is advised also to consider how information is gathered by using both PVTs and SVTs. SIMS is a good candidate for a stand-alone SVT, although the utility of the Low Intelligence subscale is questionable as a validity measure. PMID:25275555

Egeland, Jens; Andersson, Stein; Sundseth, Oyvind Østberg; Schanke, Anne-Kristine

2014-10-01

140

Physical symptoms of depression.  

PubMed

The incidence of physical symptoms in depression was studied in 51 drug-free patients and in an age and sex-matched control group. Mean symptom intensity and number of symptoms were significantly higher in the patient than in the control group. The subjects' personality structure and relationships between their symptoms and degrees of depression and anxiety were examined using the Eysenck Personality Inventory (EPI), the Beck Depression Inventory, and the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, respectively. Of the variables studied, only the N score of the EPI was shown to influence the symptoms significantly. The effect of such non-specific factors as age, gender, use of alcohol, coffee, tea, and cigarettes was also evaluated and found to be minimal. PMID:7326538

Mathew, R J; Weinman, M L; Mirabi, M

1981-10-01

141

Alcohol Misuse among College Athletes: Self-Medication for Psychiatric Symptoms?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Surveys a collegiate athlete population for alcohol abuse as well as self-reported depression, anxiety, and other psychiatric symptoms. Significant correlations were found between reported alcohol abuse and self-reported symptoms of depression and general psychiatric symptoms. Findings suggest a possible link between psychopathology and serious…

Miller, B. E.; Miller, M. N.; Verhegge, R.; Linville, H. H.; Pumariega, A. J.

2002-01-01

142

Interformat Reliability of Digital Psychiatric Self-Report Questionnaires: A Systematic Review  

PubMed Central

Background Research on Internet-based interventions typically use digital versions of pen and paper self-report symptom scales. However, adaptation into the digital format could affect the psychometric properties of established self-report scales. Several studies have investigated differences between digital and pen and paper versions of instruments, but no systematic review of the results has yet been done. Objective This review aims to assess the interformat reliability of self-report symptom scales used in digital or online psychotherapy research. Methods Three databases (MEDLINE, Embase, and PsycINFO) were systematically reviewed for studies investigating the reliability between digital and pen and paper versions of psychiatric symptom scales. Results From a total of 1504 publications, 33 were included in the review, and interformat reliability of 40 different symptom scales was assessed. Significant differences in mean total scores between formats were found in 10 of 62 analyses. These differences were found in just a few studies, which indicates that the results were due to study effects and sample effects rather than unreliable instruments. The interformat reliability ranged from r=.35 to r=.99; however, the majority of instruments showed a strong correlation between format scores. The quality of the included studies varied, and several studies had insufficient power to detect small differences between formats. Conclusions When digital versions of self-report symptom scales are compared to pen and paper versions, most scales show high interformat reliability. This supports the reliability of results obtained in psychotherapy research on the Internet and the comparability of the results to traditional psychotherapy research. There are, however, some instruments that consistently show low interformat reliability, suggesting that these conclusions cannot be generalized to all questionnaires. Most studies had at least some methodological issues with insufficient statistical power being the most common issue. Future studies should preferably provide information about the transformation of the instrument into digital format and the procedure for data collection in more detail. PMID:25472463

Hursti, Timo

2014-01-01

143

Odometer Versus Self-Reported Estimates of Vehicle Miles Traveled  

EIA Publications

The findings described here compare odometer readings with self-reported estimates of Vehicle Miles Traveled (VMT) to investigate to what extent self-reported VMT is a reliable surrogate for odometer-based VMT.

2000-01-01

144

Development of a self-reporting tool to obtain a Combined Index of Severity of Fibromyalgia (ICAF*)  

PubMed Central

Background Fibromyalgia is a syndrome with heterogeneous symptoms. The evaluation in the clinical setting usually fails to cover the complexity of the syndrome. This study aims to determine how different aspects of fibromyalgia are inter-related when measured by means of a self-reporting tool. The objective is to develop a more complete evaluation model adjusted to the complexity and multi-dimensional nature of the syndrome. Methods Application was made of the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the Brief Pain Inventory, the Fatigue Assessment Scale, the Health Assessment Questionnaire, the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28), the Chronic Pain Coping Inventory, the Arthritis Self-efficacy Scale and the Sleep Quality Scale. An assessment was made, on the basis of clinical interviews, case histories and specific tests, of the patient sociodemographic data, comorbidity, physical exploration and other clinical indexes. An exploratory factor analysis was made, with comparisons of the clinical index scores in extreme groups of patients. Results The ICAF composed of 59 items was obtained, offering four factors that explain 64% of the variance, and referred to as Emotional Factor (33.7%), Physical-Activity (15%), Active Coping (9%) and Passive Coping (6.3%). A t-test between the extreme scores of these factors in the 301 patients revealed statistically significant differences in occupational status, medically unexplained syndromes, number of tender points, the six-minutes walk test, comorbidity and health care costs. Conclusions This study offers a tool allowing more complete and rapid evaluation of patients with fibromyalgia. The test intrinsically evaluates the emotional aspects: anxiety and depression, and their impact upon social aspects. It also evaluates patient functional capacity, fatigue, sleep quality, pain, and the way in which the patient copes with the disease. This is achieved by means of a self-assessment questionnaire based on elements from well known tests. PMID:20055985

2010-01-01

145

Using the Academic Skills Inventory to Assess the Biology Major  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Academic Skills Inventory (Kruger and Zechmeister, 2001) was developed at Loyola University of Chicago and originally designed for use with psychology majors. It was later extended for use in a variety of academic programs. The Academic Skills Inventory (ASI) assesses student self-reports of behaviors in 10 skill areas: (1) written and oral…

Seifert, Kyle; Hurney, Carol A.; Wigtil, Clifton J.; Sundre, Donna L.

2009-01-01

146

Retirement Resources Inventory: Construction, Factor Structure and Psychometric Properties  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The scientific investigation of the relationship between resources and retirement well-being is impeded by the lack of proper measurement of resources. This study reports on the development of an inventory that assesses resources relevant to retirement well-being. The 35-item Retirement Resources Inventory (RRI) is a self-report measure consisting…

Leung, Cindy S. Y.; Earl, Joanne K.

2012-01-01

147

Mild depressive symptoms do not influence cognitive functioning in patients with type 2 diabetes.  

PubMed

Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) is associated both with cognitive decrements and depressive symptoms. Since depression in itself has been associated with cognitive decrements we aimed to investigate the influence of depressive symptoms on the relation between T2DM and cognitive functioning. Data were derived from three independent studies on cognitive functioning in patients with T2DM (n=366) and controls without diabetes (n=204), two with longitudinal and one with only cross-sectional assessments. Depressive symptoms were measured with self-report inventories (CES-D or BDI-II). The composite z-score of the domains memory, information-processing speed, and attention and executive function was the primary cognitive outcome measure. Mixed linear regression analyses were used in a stepped approach to compare cognitive functioning between (1) patients with T2DM and controls (cross-sectionally and longitudinally), (2) participants with and without depressive symptoms, separately for patients and controls, and (3) patients and controls after adjustment for depressive symptoms. In addition the mediating effect of depressive symptoms was assessed with a bootstrapping technique. Depressive symptoms were present in 11% of the patients with T2DM and in 7% of controls (p=0.15). Cognitive performance in patients with T2DM was worse than in controls (overall difference composite z-score -0.13). However, T2DM was not associated with accelerated cognitive decline over three years of follow-up relative to controls. Controls with depressive symptoms performed worse than those without depressive symptoms, although not statistically significant. Performance in patients with T2DM with and without depressive symptoms was similar. Adjustment for depressive symptoms and estimation of the mediating effect showed that the difference between patients and controls was not mediated by depressive symptoms. In conclusion, the modest cognitive decrements that are associated with T2DM are not due to the presence of mild depressive symptoms. PMID:22818834

Koekkoek, Paula S; Rutten, Guy E H M; Ruis, Carla; Reijmer, Yael D; van den Berg, Esther; Gorter, Kees J; Stehouwer, Coen D A; Dekker, Jacqueline M; Nijpels, Giel; Kappelle, L Jaap; Biessels, Geert Jan

2013-03-01

148

Underreporting of bestiality among juvenile sex offenders: polygraph versus self-report.  

PubMed

Juvenile sex offenders (JSO) are a specific subset of delinquent adolescents that are receiving more attention because of the crimes they commit and the issues surrounding how to successfully treat their deviant behaviors. Given JSO are such predominant treatment concerns in society, it is essential to identify and target key risk factors. One sexual behavior, bestiality, may be of particular importance to address in treatment. In a meta-analysis conducted by Seto and Lalumiere, a 14% rate of bestiality among JSO was reported. This current study examined the differences in JSO (n = 32) who admitted bestiality based upon a self-report measure, the Multiphasic Sexual Inventory-II (MSI-II), compared to information elicited by polygraphs. The results indicated extensive underreporting of bestiality behaviors between these two sources of information (MSI-II = 37.5%; polygraph = 81.25%). These findings are important given the reliance treatment programs place on information elicited from self-report tools. PMID:24502368

Schenk, Allison M; Cooper-Lehki, Christi; Keelan, Colleen M; Fremouw, William J

2014-03-01

149

Neuropsychiatric Symptoms in Nursing Home Patients: Factor Structure Invariance of the Dutch Nursing Home Version of the Neuropsychiatric Inventory in Different Stages of Dementia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background\\/Aims: To examine the influence of dementia stage and psychoactive medication use on the factor structure of the Neuropsychiatric Inventory-Nursing Home version (NPI-NH) in Dutch nursing home patients. Methods: The NPI-NH was administered to a large sample of 1,437 patients with mild to severe dementia receiving nursing home care. Exploratory factor analysis was used to examine behavioural dimensions underlying neuropsychiatric

Sytse U. Zuidema; Jos F. M. de Jonghe; Frans R. J. Verhey; Raymond T. C. M. Koopmans

2007-01-01

150

The relationship between parental depressive symptoms, family type, and adolescent functioning.  

PubMed

It is evident that parental depressive symptoms negatively influence adolescent behavior and various psychosocial outcomes. Certain family types like families with a chronically ill parent and single parent families are more vulnerable to parental depressive symptoms. However, the relationship between these symptoms, family type, and adolescent functioning remains largely unclear. This study examined relations between self-report of parental depressive symptoms and adolescent functioning in 86 two-parent families including a parent with a chronic medical condition, 94 families with healthy single parents, and 69 families with 2 healthy parents (comparison group). Parents completed the Beck Depression Inventory. Adolescents filled in the Youth Self-Report measuring problem behavior, and other instruments measuring psychosocial outcomes (stress, grade point average, school problems, and self-esteem). Multilevel analyses were used to examine the effects of family type, parental depressive symptoms, adolescents' gender and age, and interaction effects on adolescent functioning. The results indicated that adolescents with chronically ill and single parents had a lower grade point average (p<.01) than the comparison group. Adolescents of single parents reported more internalizing problems (p<.01) and externalizing problems (p<.05) than children from the other family types. Parental depressive symptoms were strongly related to child report of stress (p<.001). Adolescents of depressed chronically ill parents were particularly vulnerable to internalizing problems (interaction effect, p<.05). Older children and girls, and especially older girls, displayed more internalizing problems and stress. It can be concluded that growing up with a chronically ill parent in a family with 2 parents may have less impact on adolescent problem behavior than growing up in a single parent family. Health practitioners are encouraged to be attentive to the unique and combined influence of family type and parental depressive symptoms on adolescent functioning. Older and female adolescents deserve particular attention. PMID:24260457

Sieh, Dominik Sebastian; Sieh, Dominik Sebstian; Visser-Meily, Johanna Maria Augusta; Meijer, Anne Marie

2013-01-01

151

The Relationship between Parental Depressive Symptoms, Family Type, and Adolescent Functioning  

PubMed Central

It is evident that parental depressive symptoms negatively influence adolescent behavior and various psychosocial outcomes. Certain family types like families with a chronically ill parent and single parent families are more vulnerable to parental depressive symptoms. However, the relationship between these symptoms, family type, and adolescent functioning remains largely unclear. This study examined relations between self-report of parental depressive symptoms and adolescent functioning in 86 two-parent families including a parent with a chronic medical condition, 94 families with healthy single parents, and 69 families with 2 healthy parents (comparison group). Parents completed the Beck Depression Inventory. Adolescents filled in the Youth Self-Report measuring problem behavior, and other instruments measuring psychosocial outcomes (stress, grade point average, school problems, and self-esteem). Multilevel analyses were used to examine the effects of family type, parental depressive symptoms, adolescents' gender and age, and interaction effects on adolescent functioning. The results indicated that adolescents with chronically ill and single parents had a lower grade point average (p<.01) than the comparison group. Adolescents of single parents reported more internalizing problems (p<.01) and externalizing problems (p<.05) than children from the other family types. Parental depressive symptoms were strongly related to child report of stress (p<.001). Adolescents of depressed chronically ill parents were particularly vulnerable to internalizing problems (interaction effect, p<.05). Older children and girls, and especially older girls, displayed more internalizing problems and stress. It can be concluded that growing up with a chronically ill parent in a family with 2 parents may have less impact on adolescent problem behavior than growing up in a single parent family. Health practitioners are encouraged to be attentive to the unique and combined influence of family type and parental depressive symptoms on adolescent functioning. Older and female adolescents deserve particular attention. PMID:24260457

Sieh, Dominik Sebstian; Visser-Meily, Johanna Maria Augusta; Meijer, Anne Marie

2013-01-01

152

The Sexual Interaction Inventory: A new instrument for assessment of sexual dysfunction  

Microsoft Academic Search

A paper-and-pencil self-report inventory for assessing the sexual adjustment and sexual satisfaction of heterosexual couples is described. Other sexual assessment procedures are reviewed, and the rationale for the format of the Sexual Interaction Inventory is explained. Data from four different client and “normal” samples are presented, detailing the reliability and validity of the inventory.

Joseph LoPiccolo; Jeffrey C. Steger

1974-01-01

153

Pre-Adoption Adversity and Self-Reported Behavior Problems in 7 Year-Old International Adoptees  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To further investigate the long-term impact of pre-adoption adversity on international adoptees, externalizing and internalizing symptoms were assessed using a self-report measure at school-age in addition to mothers' reports. The sample consisted of 95 adopted children and their mothers. Children's health and developmental status were assessed…

Gagnon-Oosterwaal, Noemi; Cossette, Louise; Smolla, Nicole; Pomerleau, Andree; Malcuit, Gerard; Chicoine, Jean-Francois; Jeliu, Gloria; Belhumeur, Celine; Berthiaume, Claude

2012-01-01

154

Validating a Self-report Measure of Global Subjective Well-being to Predict Adverse Clinical Outcomes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: To examine the relationship between a single-item indicator of subjective well-being (SWB) and (1) medical conditions frequently\\u000a associated with adverse clinical outcomes, (2) health-related quality of life and depressive symptoms, (3) global self-rated\\u000a health (SRH), and (4) increased risk of adverse clinical outcomes. Methods: Self-reports of depressive symptoms and HRQoL were obtained by mail surveys from 2317 men and

L. Douglas Ried; Michael J. Tueth; Eileen Handberg; Harry Nyanteh

2006-01-01

155

Measuring mental health and wellbeing outcomes for children and adolescents to inform practice and policy: a review of child self-report measures.  

PubMed

There is a growing appetite for mental health and wellbeing outcome measures that can inform clinical practice at individual and service levels, including use for local and national benchmarking. Despite a varied literature on child mental health and wellbeing outcome measures that focus on psychometric properties alone, no reviews exist that appraise the availability of psychometric evidence and suitability for use in routine practice in child and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS) including key implementation issues. This paper aimed to present the findings of the first review that evaluates existing broadband measures of mental health and wellbeing outcomes in terms of these criteria. The following steps were implemented in order to select measures suitable for use in routine practice: literature database searches, consultation with stakeholders, application of inclusion and exclusion criteria, secondary searches and filtering. Subsequently, detailed reviews of the retained measures' psychometric properties and implementation features were carried out. 11 measures were identified as having potential for use in routine practice and meeting most of the key criteria: 1) Achenbach System of Empirically Based Assessment, 2) Beck Youth Inventories, 3) Behavior Assessment System for Children, 4) Behavioral and Emotional Rating Scale, 5) Child Health Questionnaire, 6) Child Symptom Inventories, 7) Health of the National Outcome Scale for Children and Adolescents, 8) Kidscreen, 9) Pediatric Symptom Checklist, 10) Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire, 11) Youth Outcome Questionnaire. However, all existing measures identified had limitations as well as strengths. Furthermore, none had sufficient psychometric evidence available to demonstrate that they could reliably measure both severity and change over time in key groups. The review suggests a way of rigorously evaluating the growing number of broadband self-report mental health outcome measures against standards of feasibility and psychometric credibility in relation to use for practice and policy. PMID:24834111

Deighton, Jessica; Croudace, Tim; Fonagy, Peter; Brown, Jeb; Patalay, Praveetha; Wolpert, Miranda

2014-01-01

156

Personality and self-reported use of mobile phones for games.  

PubMed

Mobile phones are popular devices that may generate problems for a section of the community. A previous study using the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire found that extraverts with low self-esteem reported more problems with their mobile phone use. The present study used the NEO FI and Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory to predict the self reported mobile phone use of 112 participants. Multiple regression found that people low on agreeableness were more likely to use their mobile phones to play games. The findings imply an interplay between personality traits and excessive or problematic use on mobile phones that is relevant to proposed innovations such as gambling on mobile phones. PMID:17201601

Phillips, James G; Butt, Sarah; Blaszczynski, Alex

2006-12-01

157

Structure and validity of people in my life: A self-report measure of attachment in late childhood  

PubMed Central

No self-report measure of attachment is well validated for middle-childhood. This study examined the validity and factor structure of the People in My Life (PIML) measure in 320 urban, fifth and sixth graders. Validity analyses consisted of correlational analyses between PIML subscales and the Child Behavior Checklist, Delinquency Rating Scale for Self and Others, Heath Resources Inventory, and Reynolds Child Depression Scale. Validity correlations were consistent with a-priori hypotheses. Confirmatory factor analyses consisted of comparison of model fit indices between seven models. Two models fit the data well and both models were consistent with the traditionally used PIML scoring protocol. Moreover, both models were consistent with the Inventory of Parent and Peer Attachment (IPPA), on which the PIML is modeled, as well as the theoretical underpinnings of attachment in childhood. The PIML and IPPA provide instruments for obtaining a continuous self-report measure of attachment from middle-childhood through adulthood. PMID:17476310

Ridenour, T. A.; Cook, E. T.

2007-01-01

158

Self-reported psychopathic traits in sexually offending juveniles compared with generally offending juveniles and general population youth.  

PubMed

The aim of the current study is to gain a better insight into the relationship between sexually aggressive behaviour and psychopathy in youths; juveniles who sexually offended (JSOs) were compared with generally offending youths and a general population group. Seventy-one JSOs, 416 detained general offenders, and 331 males from the general population were assessed by means of the Youth Psychopathic traits Inventory (YPI), a self-report instrument. Sexually and generally offending juveniles had significantly lower levels of self-reported psychopathic traits than youths from the general population. Juvenile sexual offenders and generally offending juveniles did not differ in self-reported psychopathic traits. Furthermore, no differences in self-reported psychopathic traits were found between subgroups of JSOs (i.e., child molesters, solo offenders, and group offenders). The finding that self-reported psychopathic traits are less prevalent in offending juveniles than in general population youths raises questions about the usefulness of the YPI when comparing psychopathic traits between clinical samples and general-population samples. PMID:24170186

Boonmann, Cyril; Jansen, Lucres M C; 't Hart-Kerkhoffs, Lisette A; Vahl, Pauline; Hillege, Sanne L; Doreleijers, Theo A H; Vermeiren, Robert R J M

2015-01-01

159

The accuracy of self-reported Pap smear utilisation  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study assessed the accuracy of self-reported Pap smear utilisation over four different time frames, examining the magnitude of errors in self-report and sociodemographic predictors of accuracy. Self-report data on women's cervical screening was collected by interview in a random household survey (Hunter Region, NSW, Australia), with pathology laboratory data collected by a search of records within laboratories. The magnitude

Jennifer Ann Bowman; Rob Sanson-Fisher; Sally Redman

1997-01-01

160

Psychometric properties of seven self-report measures of posttraumatic stress disorder in college students with mixed civilian trauma exposure  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study psychometric properties of seven self-report measures of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) were compared. The seven scales evaluated were the Davidson Trauma Scale (DTS), the PTSD Checklist (PCL), the Posttraumatic Stress Diagnostic Scale (PDS), the Civilian Mississippi Scale (CMS), the Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R), the Penn Inventory for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (Penn), and the PK scale of

Jennifer W. Adkins; Frank W. Weathers; Meghan McDevitt-Murphy; Jennifer B. Daniels

2008-01-01

161

Co-Occurring Psychosocial Distress and Substance Abuse in Community Clients: Initial Validity and Reliability of Self-Report Measures  

Microsoft Academic Search

The current study examines the self-reports of 227 community support clients using a paper and pencil questionnaire that included the South Shore Problem Inventory-revised (a brief multidimensional psychosocial distress scale), a one-item index of self-rated substance abuse (SRSA), a quantity-frequency index for alcohol consumption (QFI), and a one-item index measuring the frequency of marijuana use. Results support the factor structure

Thomas O'Hare; Jerold Cutler; Margaret V. Sherrer; Tia May McCall; Kristine N. Dominique; Kathleen Garlick

2001-01-01

162

Pain Catastrophizing Mediates the Relation Between Self-Reported Strenuous Exercise Involvement and Pain Ratings: The Moderating Role of Anxiety Sensitivity  

PubMed Central

Objective Exercise involvement has been shown to have hypoalgesic effects and cognitive factors may partially explain this effect. Particularly, alterations in pain catastrophizing have been found to mediate the positive pain outcomes of multidisciplinary treatments incorporating exercise. Further, recent evidence suggests that exercise involvement and anxiety sensitivity may act together, as interacting factors, to exert an effect on catastrophizing and pain outcomes; however, further research is needed to clarify the nature of this interaction. In this study we developed a model to investigate the cross-sectional associations among self-reported weekly strenuous exercise bouts, anxiety sensitivity, and their interaction with pain catastrophizing and pain responses to the cold pressor task (CPT) in healthy, ethnically diverse young adults (N = 79). Methods Prior to the CPT, participants were asked to complete the Godin Leisure-Time Exercise Questionnaire, the Beck Depression Inventory, and the Anxiety Sensitivity Index. Following the CPT participants completed a modified version of the Pain Catastrophizing Scale and the Short Form-McGill Pain Questionnaire. Results At a high level of anxiety sensitivity, controlling for depressive symptoms, CPT immersion time, and sex differences, a bias-corrected (BC), bootstrapped confidence interval revealed that pain catastrophizing significantly mediated the relation between self-reported weekly strenuous exercise bouts and pain response (95% BC Confidence Interval: (?9.558, ?0.800) with 1000 resamples). At intermediate and low levels of anxiety sensitivity, no significant mediation effects were found. Conclusions These findings support that for pain catastrophizing to mediate the strenuous exercise-pain response relation, individuals must possess a high level of anxiety sensitivity. PMID:19779141

Goodin, Burel R.; McGuire, Lynanne M.; Stapleton, Laura M.; Quinn, Noel B.; Fabian, Lacy A.; Haythornthwaite, Jennifer A.; Edwards, Robert R.

2009-01-01

163

The Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale (ASRS): utility in college students with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder  

PubMed Central

Background. The number of students with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) enrolled in colleges and universities has increased markedly over the past few decades, giving rise to questions about how best to document symptoms and impairment in the post-secondary setting. The aim of the present study was to investigate the utility and psychometric properties of a widely-used rating scale for adults with ADHD, the Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale (ASRS-V1.1), in a sample of post-secondary students with ADHD. Methods. A total of 135 college students (mean age = 24, 42% males) with ADHD were recruited from Student Disability Services in post-secondary institutions. We compared informant responses on the ASRS administered via different modalities. First, students’ self-report was ascertained using the ASRS Screener administered via telephone interview, in which they were asked to provide real-life examples of behavior for each of the six items. Next, students self-reported symptoms on the 18-item paper version of the ASRS Symptom Checklist administered about 1–2 weeks later, and a collateral report using an online version of the 18-item ASRS Symptom Checklist. Students also completed self-report measures of everyday cognitive failure (CFQ) and executive functioning (BDEFS). Results. Results revealed moderate to good congruency between the 18-item ASRS-Self and ASRS-Collateral reports (correlation = .47), and between student self-report on the 6-item telephone-based and paper versions of the ASRS, with the paper version administered two weeks later (correlation = .66). The full ASRS self-report was related to impairment, such as in executive functioning (correlation = .63) and everyday cognitive failure (correlation = .74). Executive functioning was the only significant predictor of ASRS total scores. Discussion. Current findings suggest that the ASRS provides an easy-to-use, reliable, and cost-effective approach for gathering information about current symptoms of ADHD in college and university students. Collateral reports were moderately related to self-reports, although we note the difficulty in obtaining informant reports for this population. Use of a telephone interview to elicit behavioral descriptions for each item may be useful in future research that is required to specifically test the utility of the ASRS in, for example, documenting and confirming current reports of impairment due to ADHD symptoms and its positive and negative predictive power for diagnosis. PMID:24711973

Gray, Sarah; Woltering, Steven; Mawjee, Karizma

2014-01-01

164

Student Self-Regulated Learning in an Urban High School: Predictive Validity and Relations between Teacher Ratings and Student Self-Reports  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the predictive validity of a teacher rating scale called the Self-Regulation Strategy Inventory-Teacher Rating Scale (SRSI-TRS) and its level of convergence with several student self-report measures of self-regulated learning (SRL). Eighty-seven high school students enrolled in one of four sections of a mathematics course in an…

Cleary, Timothy J.; Callan, Gregory L.

2014-01-01

165

The Relationship among Self-Report and Measured Report of Psychological Abuse, and Depression for a Sample of Women Involved in Intimate Relationships with Male Partners  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the relationship between level of depression and level of psychological abuse in women. In addition, the relationship between the use of self-report and measured report of psychological abuse within an intimate relationship was assessed. One hundred women were surveyed using the Psychological Maltreatment of Women Inventory

Kelly, Virginia; Warner, Kelly; Trahan, Courtenay; Miscavage, Karen

2009-01-01

166

Self-reported musculoskeletal complaints among garment workers.  

PubMed

One hundred forty-four sewing machine operators answered questionnaires concerning occupational history and musculoskeletal symptoms adapted from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. They were matched for age within 5 years, race, and sex with persons completing the HANES I Augmentation Survey, and the prevalence of self-reported musculoskeletal morbidity was compared. Operators complained significantly more often of knee pain (prevalence odds ratio [POR] = 1.84, p = .0001) and knee swelling (POR = 9.98, p less than .00001), although they were no more likely to have had knee surgery. Similar increases were reported for upper-back pain (POR = 2.13, p = .002) joint ache, and joint swelling (both were significant for fingers, wrists, elbows, and shoulders at p less than .05 levels). No differences in low-back pain or in hospitalization for joint conditions were noted. Ergonomic redesign of sewing machines needs to address knee and upper-back movements as well as the arm, wrist, and finger movements. PMID:2786337

Sokas, R K; Spiegelman, D; Wegman, D H

1989-01-01

167

After a Concussion, Which Teens Will Have Emotional Symptoms?  

MedlinePLUS

... 22 teens had emotional symptoms such as irritability, aggression, anxiety, depression, apathy, frequent mood changes or excessive ... than those without anxiety, while teens with irritability/aggression were 35 percent more likely to self-report ...

168

Symptom Identification in the Chronically Critically Ill  

PubMed Central

Ascertaining the symptom experience of chronically critically ill (CCI) patients is difficult due to communication impairment and fluctuations in patient cognition and physiological conditions. The use of checklist self report ratings is hampered by the inability of most CCI patients to respond verbally to symptom queries. In addition to the communication problems caused by mechanical ventilation, the apparently diverse idioms of symptom expression add to the potential for miscommunication regarding symptom experience. Although patient communication impairment is a major barrier to symptom identification, symptom assessment and treatment are fundamental components of nursing care for CCI. This paper reviews and describes the unique constellation of symptoms experienced by many critically ill patients. We report our observations of symptom communication among CCI patients and nurses and discuss inconsistency in the language of symptom expression among nurses and patients. Clinically applicable strategies to improve nurse-patient symptom communication and suggestions for refinement of symptom assessment in chronic critical illness are provided. PMID:20118706

Campbell, Grace B.; Happ, Mary Beth

2010-01-01

169

Self-Reported GPA and SAT Scores. ERIC Digest.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This digest investigates the methodological practice of relying on self-reported Scholastic Assessment Test (SAT) and grade point average (GPA) scores on educational-psychological research, explores the differential reliability of self-reported SAT and GPA values, and examines trends of deviation in a sample of midwestern teacher education…

Cassady, Jerrell C.

170

Obsessive–Compulsive Symptoms and the Expression of Anger  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study investigates the association between Obsessive–Compulsive (OC) symptoms and the expression of anger in a sample of 131 undergraduates. Participants were divided into two groups based on their self-reported OC symptoms and compared on their tendency to suppress anger inwardly, express anger outwardly, and control their anger. In addition, the associations between anger and specific OC symptoms were

Stephen P. Whiteside; Jonathan S. Abramowitz

2004-01-01

171

Inventory Management  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Known as MRO for Maintenance, Repair and Operating supplies, Tropicana Products, Inc.'s automated inventory management system is an adaptation of the Shuttle Inventory Management System (SIMS) developed by NASA to assure adequate supply of every item used in support of the Space Shuttle. The Tropicana version monitors inventory control, purchasing receiving and departmental costs for eight major areas of the company's operation.

1983-01-01

172

OMERACT-based fibromyalgia symptom subgroups: an exploratory cluster analysis.  

PubMed

IntroductionThis study aimed to identify subsets of patients with fibromyalgia with similar symptom profiles using the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) core symptom domains.MethodsFemale patients with a diagnosis of fibromyalgia and now meeting fibromyalgia research survey criteria completed the Brief Pain Inventory, the 30-item Profile of Mood States, the Medical Outcomes Sleep Scale, the Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory, the Multiple Ability Self-Report Questionnaire, the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire-Revised (FIQ-R), and the Short Form-36 between 1 June 2011 and 31 October 2011. Hierarchical agglomerative clustering was used to identify subgroups of patients with similar symptom profiles. To validate the results from this sample, hierarchical agglomerative clustering was repeated in an external sample of female patients with fibromyalgia with similar inclusion criteria.ResultsA total of 581 females with a mean age of 55.1 (range 20.1 to 90.2) years were included. A four-cluster solution best fit the data and each clustering variable differed significantly (P <0.0001) among the four clusters. The four clusters divided the sample into severity levels: Cluster 1 reflects the lowest average levels across all symptoms; Cluster 4 reflects the highest average levels. Clusters 2 and 3 capture moderate symptoms levels. Clusters 2 and 3 differed mainly on profiles of anxiety and depression, with Cluster 2 having lower levels of depression and anxiety than Cluster 3, despite higher levels of pain. Results of the cluster analysis of the external sample (N¿=¿478) looked very similar to those found in the original cluster analysis, except for a slight difference in sleep problems. This was despite having patients in the validation sample who were significantly younger (P¿<¿.0001) with more severe symptoms (higher FIQ-total scores (P¿=¿.0004)).ConclusionsOur study incorporated core OMERACT symptom domains, which allowed for clustering based on a comprehensive symptom profile. While our exploratory cluster solution needs longitudinal study, this approach could provide rationale to support the study of individualized clinical evaluation and intervention. PMID:25318839

Vincent, Ann; Hoskin, Tanya L; Whipple, Mary O; Clauw, Daniel J; Barton, Debra L; Benzo, Roberto P; Williams, David A

2014-10-16

173

Clinically Determined and Self-Reported Dental Caries Status During and After Pregnancy Among Low-Income Hispanic Women  

PubMed Central

Objectives This analysis assessed, during and one-year after pregnancy: 1) the prevalence of and relationship between self-reported and clinically determined dental caries and oral health status, and whether self-reports are a potential proxy for professional determination; 2) factors associated with high levels of professionally determined or self-reported oral disease. Methods Data are from a randomized clinical trial of 301 pregnant, low-income Hispanic women at the California-Mexico border to compare two interventions to prevent early childhood caries. Interviews and dental examinations were conducted at enrollment (second trimester) and one-year post-partum (PP). Results During pregnancy and PP, 93% had untreated caries and most had gingival inflammation. Sensitivity and specificity of self-reported measures compared to dentists’ determinations were modest (ranging from 45–80% for sensitivity and 41–77% for specificity at both time points); positive predictive values for women reporting current tooth decay or fair/poor oral health were high (>94%), but negative predictive values were low (<23%). In a bivariate GEE model, factors associated with fair/poor self-reported oral health during and after pregnancy included self-reported dental symptoms (current tooth decay, bleeding gums without brushing), dental behaviors (not flossing) and number of decayed tooth surfaces. In a logistic regression model, the only significant factor PP associated with less extensive untreated disease was if women ever had their teeth cleaned professionally (OR=0.44). Conclusions There is a great need for dental treatment in this underserved population both during pregnancy and PP. Women may not be able to accurately recognize or act on their treatment needs. At baseline and PP, few demographic or behavioral factors were associated with either self-reported or clinically-determined oral disease (e.g., being less educated or acculturated and not flossing) in the bivariate analyses. Ever having a professional teeth cleaning significantly predicted less disease PP. PMID:23889689

Weintraub, Jane A.; Gansky, Stuart A.; Santo, William; Ramos-Gomez, Francisco

2014-01-01

174

Satisfaction with Life of Schizophrenia Outpatients and Their Caregivers: Differences between Patients with and without Self-Reported Sleep Complaints  

PubMed Central

Patients with schizophrenia often present sleep complaints, but its relationship with general satisfaction with life (SWL) and burden for caregivers has been understudied. We aimed to assess the differences in SWL between patients with and without self-reported sleep disturbances and that of their caregivers. In a noninterventional study, 811 schizophrenia adult outpatients were screened for their subjective perception of having (or not) sleep disturbances and evaluated with the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Patients self-reporting sleep disturbances were significantly more symptomatic (P < 0.001), presented significantly worse family support (P = 0.0236), and self-reported worse SWL in all domains. Caregivers of patients with schizophrenia self-reporting sleep disturbances also reported worse SWL in all domains, as compared to caregivers of patients without subjective sleep disturbances. Patient and caregivers' SWL was significantly correlated to patients' quality of sleep (P < 0.0001 for all domains). Patient' and caregivers' SWL was negatively affected by patients' poor quality of sleep. We found that patients self-reporting sleep disturbances showed greater symptom severity, worse quality of sleep, worse SWL, and less caregiver support. SWL was also worse for caregivers of patients with schizophrenia reporting sleep disturbances. PMID:24288609

Afonso, Pedro; Cañas, Fernando; Bobes, Julio; Bernardo Fernandez, Ivan; Guzman, Carlos

2013-01-01

175

The Credibility of Self-reported Pain Among Institutional Older People with Different Degrees of Cognitive Function in Taiwan.  

PubMed

Despite many studies conducted to validate the self-reported pain of vulnerable patients, it is unclear at what level of cognitive impairment individuals still can provide reliable information. The aims of this study were to examine the reliability and validity of self-reported pain by degree of patients' cognitive function and to determine important predictors of self-reported pain in cognitively impaired residents in long-term care facilities. The 414 participants were divided into four groups according to their scores on the Mini-Mental State Examination (nonimpaired, mild, moderate, and severe cognitive impairment). Multifaceted measures were performed to validate residents' pain reports. Self-reported pain and pain behaviors were measured using the Verbal Descriptor Scale and the Doloplus-2 scale. Known correlates of pain including functional disability, depression, and agitation were compared, using the Barthel Index, the Cornell scale, and the Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory. Intra-rater and interrater reliability were generally acceptable in groups with no impairment to moderate cognitive impairment. The relationships between residents' self-reported pain and the known correlates of pain were almost all significant across groups with no impairment to moderate cognitive impairment, but fewer were significant in the severely impaired group. Regression analyses revealed that multiple pain indicators together were significantly better predictors of self-reported pain in moderately and severely impaired residents. The findings from this study support residents with cognitive impairment up to a moderate level can report pain reliably. However, for those in later stages of dementia, a multifaceted approach is suggested to help in pain recognition. PMID:25194480

Chen, Yi-Heng; Lin, Li-Chan

2014-09-01

176

Self-reported attachment, interpersonal aggression, and personality disorder in a prospective community sample of adolescents and adults.  

PubMed

Anxious and avoidant attachment were assessed in the Children in the Community (CIC) Study during adolescence and adulthood using self-report scales developed for this prospective study. The convergent and discriminant validity of the new CIC attachment scales were evaluated and their stability was assessed across a 17-year interval. Attachment scales predicted DSM-IV personality disorders in theoretically coherent and clinically meaningful ways, especially when supplemented with a separate measure of interpersonal aggression. Cluster B and C personality disorder symptoms were associated with elevated anxious attachment. Avoidant attachment was positively associated with Cluster A symptoms and inversely associated with Cluster B and C symptoms. Interpersonal aggression was higher in Cluster B symptoms and lower in Cluster C symptoms, thus differentiating between these symptom clusters. PMID:16901258

Crawford, Thomas N; Shaver, Phillip R; Cohen, Patricia; Pilkonis, Paul A; Gillath, Omri; Kasen, Stephanie

2006-08-01

177

Depressive Symptoms in African-American Women.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examined the prevalence of depressive symptoms in an African American female college student sample (n=78) using the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI2) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). MMPI-2 was a more conservative scale than BDI in identifying depressive symptom levels. Discusses stress inoculation methods to assist…

Reed, Michael K.; And Others

1996-01-01

178

Website design: technical, social and medical issues for self-reporting by elderly patients.  

PubMed

There is growing interest in the use of the Internet for interacting with patients, both in terms of healthcare information provision and information gathering. In this article, we examine the issues in designing healthcare websites for elderly users. In particular, this article uses a year-long case study of the development of a web-based system for self-reporting of symptoms and quality of life with a view to examine the issues relating to website design for elderly users. The issues identified included the technical, social and medical aspects of website design for elderly users. The web-based system developed was based on the European Quality of Life 5-Dimensions health-status questionnaire, a commonly used tool for patient self-reporting of quality of life, and the more specific coronary revascularisation outcome questionnaire. Currently, self-reporting is generally administered in the form of paper-based questionnaires to be completed in the outpatient clinic or at home. There are a variety of issues relating to elderly users, which imply that websites for elderly patients may involve different design considerations to other types of websites. PMID:24047573

Taylor, Mark J; Stables, Rod; Matata, Bashir; Lisboa, Paulo J G; Laws, Andy; Almond, Peter

2014-06-01

179

Relationships of impulsiveness and depressive symptoms in alcohol dependence  

PubMed Central

Background Depressive symptoms as well as high levels of impulsivity are subjects of special interest in alcohol dependence, as these factors are considered to influence the course of this disorder. However, until now mutual relationships between impulsivity and depression have not been investigated thoroughly in alcohol-dependent patients. Methods By means of the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11) and stop-signal task, levels of impulsivity among 304 alcohol-dependent patients were measured. The stop-signal task was used as a manipulation-free method of estimating the level of behavioral impulsiveness, and the BIS-11 is a self report measure of global as well as cognitive impulsivity. Patients were also asked to complete the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Hopelessness Scale (BHS). The results were analyzed in order to examine relationships between impulsiveness and depressive symptoms. Results Statistical analyses revealed significant associations between impulsiveness and severity of depressive symptoms. Individuals with higher scores on the BDI were more impulsive on the BIS-11, whereas patients with higher scores on the BHS were more impulsive on both the stop-signal task and BIS-11. The strongest correlations were found with the attention impulsivity subscale of BIS-11. Adjusting for other variables, a linear regression analysis revealed that cognitive impulsivity was the strongest predictor of depression severity. Limitations The main limitation of the study is a not fully representative sample, with exclusion of patients with active mood disorders Conclusions The results indicate a strong association between depressive symptoms and impulsivity in alcohol-dependent patients, and suggest an important distinction between hopelessness and other depressive symptoms. PMID:22030134

Jakubczyk, Andrzej; Klimkiewicz, Anna; Topolewska-Wochowska, Aleksandra; Serafin, Piotr; Sadowska-Mazuryk, Joanna; Pupek-Pyzio?, Julia; Brower, Kirk J.; Wojnar, Marcin

2011-01-01

180

Prevalence of Radiographic Osteoarthritis of the Knee and Its Relationship to Self-Reported Pain  

PubMed Central

Background and Aim Osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee is one of the most common skeletal disorders, yet little data are available in Asian populations. We sought to assess the prevalence and pattern of radiographic OA of the knee, and its relationship to self-reported pain in a Vietnamese population. Methods The study was based on a sample of 170 men and 488 women aged ?40 years who were randomly sampled from the Ho Chi Minh City (Vietnam). Radiographs of the knee were graded from 0 to 4 according to the Kellgren and Lawrence scale. Osteoarthritis was defined as being present in a knee if radiographic grades of 2 or higher were detected. Knee pain and symptoms were ascertained by direct interview using a structured questionnaire. Results The point prevalence of radiographic OA of the knee was 34.2%, with women having higher rate than men (35.3% vs 31.2%). The prevalence of knee OA increased with advancing age: 8% among those aged 40–49 years, 30% in those aged 50–59 years, and 61.1% in those aged ?60 years. Greater BMI was associated with higher risk of knee OA. Self-reported knee pain was found in 35% of men and 62% of women. There was a statistically significant association between self-reported knee pain and knee OA (prevalence ratio 3.1; 95% CI 2.0 to 4.6). Conclusions These data indicate that approximately a third of Vietnamese men and women have radiographic OA in the knee, and that self-reported knee pain may be used as an indicator of knee osteoarthritis. PMID:24722559

Ho-Pham, Lan T.; Lai, Thai Q.; Mai, Linh D.; Doan, Minh C.; Pham, Hoa N.; Nguyen, Tuan V.

2014-01-01

181

Irrational beliefs and bulimia symptoms  

Microsoft Academic Search

The psychological correlates of bulimia include affective disorder and emotional liability. In addition, emotional liability appears to precipitate binge-purge episodes. It has been proposed that emotional liability is a function of irrational beliefs regarding personal performance, interpersonal relationships and self-control. Irrational beliefs and bulimia symptoms were assessed with psychometrically valid self-report measures. Correlational analyses showed that the irrational beliefs of

Jeffrey M. Lohr; Donna L. Parkinson

1989-01-01

182

What Do Self-Reported, Objective, Measures of Health Measure?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many researchers consider survey reports of the incidence of chronic conditions to be more objective than self-assessed measures of global well being. The hypothesis was evaluated by attempting to validate the ''objective, self reported'' measures of health.

Baker, Michael; Stabile, Mark; Deri, Chatherine

2004-01-01

183

Self-reported and self-monitored smoking patterns.  

PubMed

Individual differences in smoking patterns are usually assessed with self-report measures such as Horn's Reasons for Smoking Test, which have not been systematically validated. This paper compares results from several self-report scales with self-monitoring data obtained from 164 smoking clinic subjects who monitored their smoking for at least two days. Self-monitoring data were factor-analyzed and correlated with self-report measures. Most of the hypothesized relationships failed to appear. The Sedative Smoking (tension-reduction) factor of the Reasons for Smoking Test received the strongest support. In general, however, the results did not support the validity of commonly-used self-report scales of smoking motives and situations. PMID:3369331

Shiffman, S; Prange, M

1988-01-01

184

Self-Report of Crimes Committed by Sex Offenders  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using a computer-administered interview, self-reports of past criminal behavior were obtained from 99 institutionalized sex offenders. The sample contained both rapists and child molesters who had been mandated to receive specialized treatment. Offenders disclosed an enormous amount of undetected sexual aggression, a finding consistent with other self-report studies. Also striking was the high rate and variety of nonsex offenses. According

MARK R. WEINROTT; MAUREEN SAYLOR

1991-01-01

185

From trust on intimacy: A new inventory for examining erikson's stages of psychosocial development  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new inventory for examining the first six of Erikson's psychosocial stages is described. The self-report questionnaire, developed in a pilot study of 97 adolescents and tested in a study of 622 adolescents, has 12 items for each subscale. Measures of reliability and validity are reported. It is concluded that the Erikson Psychosocial Stage Inventory (EPSI) is a useful measure

Doreen A. Rosenthal; Ross M. Gurney; Susan M. Moore

1981-01-01

186

Contrast effects and sex influence maternal and self-report dimensional measures of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder.  

PubMed

The heritability of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is higher for children than adults. This may be due to increasing importance of environment in symptom variation, measurement inaccuracy when two raters report behavior of a twin-pair, a contrast effect resulting from parental comparison of siblings and/or dimensionality of measures. We examine rater contrast and sex effects in ADHD subtypes using a dimensional scale and compare the aetiology of self, versus maternal-report. Data were collected using the Strengths and Weaknesses of ADHD and Normal Behaviour Scale (SWAN): maternal-report for 3,223 twins and siblings (mean age 21.2, SD = 6.3) and self-report for 1,617 twins and siblings (mean age 25.5, SD = 3.2). Contrast effects and magnitude of genetic and environmental contributions to variance of ADHD phenotypes (inattention, hyperactivity-impulsivity, combined behaviours) were examined using structural equation modeling. Contrast effects were evident for maternal-report hyperactivity-impulsivity (b = -0.04) and self-report inattention (-0.09) and combined ADHD (-0.08). Dominant genetic effects were shared by raters for inattention, hyperactivity-impulsivity and combined ADHD. Broad-sense heritability was equal across sex for maternal-report inattention, hyperactivity-impulsivity and combined ADHD (0.72, 0.83, 0.80). Heritability for corresponding subtypes in self-reported data were best represented by sex (0.46, 0.30, 0.39 for males; 0.69, 0.41, 0.65 for females). Heritability difference between maternal and self-report ADHD was due to greater variance of male specific environment in self-report data. Self-reported ADHD differed across sex by magnitude of specific environment and genetic effects. PMID:25151025

Ebejer, J L; Medland, S E; van der Werf, J; J Wright, M; Henders, A K; Gillespie, N A; Hickie, I B; Martin, N G; Duffy, D L

2015-01-01

187

Prevalence of DSM-IV symptoms of ADHD in adult licensed drivers: Implications for clinical diagnosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study reports on the prevalence of the DSM-IV symptoms for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in a sample of 720 adults applying for or renewing their driver's licenses in central Massachusetts (ages 17-84 years). Symptoms were assessed using two self- report rating scales: One for current symptoms and a second for retrospective recall of child hood symptoms (ages

K. Murphy; R. A. Barkley

1996-01-01

188

Is Violent Radicalisation Associated with Poverty, Migration, Poor Self-Reported Health and Common Mental Disorders?  

PubMed Central

Background Doctors, lawyers and criminal justice agencies need methods to assess vulnerability to violent radicalization. In synergy, public health interventions aim to prevent the emergence of risk behaviours as well as prevent and treat new illness events. This paper describes a new method of assessing vulnerability to violent radicalization, and then investigates the role of previously reported causes, including poor self-reported health, anxiety and depression, adverse life events, poverty, and migration and socio-political factors. The aim is to identify foci for preventive intervention. Methods A cross-sectional survey of a representative population sample of men and women aged 18–45, of Muslim heritage and recruited by quota sampling by age, gender, working status, in two English cities. The main outcomes include self-reported health, symptoms of anxiety and depression (common mental disorders), and vulnerability to violent radicalization assessed by sympathies for violent protest and terrorist acts. Results 2.4% of people showed some sympathy for violent protest and terrorist acts. Sympathy was more likely to be articulated by the under 20s, those in full time education rather than employment, those born in the UK, those speaking English at home, and high earners (>£75,000 a year). People with poor self-reported health were less likely to show sympathies for violent protest and terrorism. Anxiety and depressive symptoms, adverse life events and socio-political attitudes showed no associations. Conclusions Sympathies for violent protest and terrorism were uncommon among men and women, aged 18–45, of Muslim heritage living in two English cities. Youth, wealth, and being in education rather than employment were risk factors. PMID:24599058

Bhui, Kamaldeep; Warfa, Nasir; Jones, Edgar

2014-01-01

189

The Daily Stress Inventory: Validity and effect of repeated administration  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Daily Stress Inventory (DSI) is a self-report measure of minor stressors which is administered daily. One test of the validity of a measure of daily stress is its sensitivity to the difference between the stressors of workdays and those of weekends. A second concern in establishing the validity of a test administered repeatedly is that self-monitoring may influence the

Phillip J. Brantley; Thomas B. Cocke; Glenn N. Jones; Anthony J. Goreczny

1988-01-01

190

Development and Initial Validation of the Iowa Sleep Disturbances Inventory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Iowa Sleep Disturbances Inventory (ISDI) is a new measure of self-reported sleep difficulties, which was designed to help facilitate research on the overlap of sleep disturbances and psychopathology. This instrument was developed in two large student samples using principal factor analyses; the psychometric properties of the scales were then…

Koffel, Erin; Watson, David

2010-01-01

191

Factor Structure of the Adolescent Clinical Sexual Behavior Inventory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The primary goal of this study was to determine if the Adolescent Clinical Sexual Behavior Inventory-Self-Report conformed to the five-factor scale format that was initially used with a clinical sample that included adolescents referred for sexual abuse evaluations. Participants were 141 teenagers, ages 12-19 (M = 15.11, SD = 1.4), and their…

Wherry, Jeffrey N.; Berres, Ashley K.; Sim, Leslie; Friedrich, William N.

2009-01-01

192

Development and Initial Validation of the Iowa Sleep Disturbances Inventory  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Iowa Sleep Disturbances Inventory (ISDI) is a new measure of self-reported sleep difficulties, which was designed to help facilitate research on the overlap of sleep disturbances and psychopathology. This instrument was developed in two large student samples using principal factor analyses; the psychometric properties of the scales were then examined in three additional samples (students, psychiatric patients, sleep disorder

Erin Koffel; David Watson

2010-01-01

193

Depressive Symptoms and Impaired Respiration in Sleep.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Associations between depression and impaired respiration in sleep are frequently noted clinically. This relationship was documented psychometrically with the Geriatric Depression Scale, a self-report measure of nonsomatic depressive symptoms. Mean values and effect size suggest that impaired respiration in sleep was associated with only relatively…

Bliwise, Donald L.; And Others

1986-01-01

194

Characteristics of Insomniacs with Self-Reported Morning and Evening Chronotypes  

PubMed Central

Study Objectives: This study examines the relevance of self-reported morning and evening chronotypes in treatment-seeking insomniacs presenting to a tertiary sleep clinic setting. Design: Using a cross-sectional design, patients were categorized as morning, intermediate, and evening chronotypes based upon scores on the Morningness-Eveningness Composite Scale (MECS). Group comparisons were made on self-report measures of nocturnal sleep, sleep period variability, and waking correlates and consequences of insomnia. Setting: Sleep disorders clinic Patients: The sample consisted of 312 patients who presented to a group cognitive-behavior therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) at the sleep clinic. Measurements and Results: Participants completed the MECS, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Dysfunctional Beliefs and Attitudes about Sleep Scale (DBAS), and one week of sleep diary prior to treatment. Even after adjusting for total wake time as an index of insomnia severity, differences between the three chronotypes were present on several measures. Compared to the morning and intermediate types, evening types reported more total sleep time, more time in bed, greater variability in the time out of bed, and higher levels of distress on the DBAS and BDI. Conclusions: These results indicate that insomniacs presenting to a sleep specialist who endorse an evening chronotype report sleep/wake irregularities and waking distress greater than expected in association with the level of insomnia severity. These factors may serve to perpetuate the insomnia disorder and might be particularly important to consider when treating this subgroup of insomniacs. Citations: Ong J; Huang J; Kuo T et al. Characteristics of insomniacs with self-reported morning and evening chronotypes. J Clin Sleep Med 2007;3(3):289–294 PMID:17561599

Ong, Jason C.; Huang, Jennifer S.; Kuo, Tracy F.; Manber, Rachel

2007-01-01

195

Association of Depressive Symptoms with Hippocampal Volume in 1936 Adults  

PubMed Central

Hippocampal atrophy is reported in major depressive disorder (MDD). However, sample sizes were generally modest, and participant characteristics, including age, differed between studies. This study used a community sample to examine relationships between current depressive symptom severity and hippocampal volume across the adult lifespan. A total of 1936 adults with magnetic resonance images of the brain and Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology Self-Report (QIDS-SR) scores were included. Brain volumes were quantified using the FSL program. Multiple linear regressions were performed using left, right, and total hippocampal volume as criterion variables, and predictor variables of QIDS-SR total, total brain volume, age, gender, education, psychotropic medications, alcohol use, and race/ethnicity. Post hoc analyses were conducted in participants with QIDS-SR scores ?11 (moderate or greater depressive symptom severity) and <11, and older and younger adults. In the primary analysis (sample as a whole) QIDS-SR was inversely associated with total hippocampal volume (b=?0.044, p=0.032, (CI?0.019 to ?0.001)) but not with left or right hippocampal volume evaluated individually. In participants with QIDS-SR scores of <11, hippocampal volumes were not associated with QIDS-SR scores. In those with QIDS-SR scores ?11 total, right, and left hippocampal volumes were modestly, but significantly, associated with QIDS-SR scores. The association between QIDS-SR scores and the hippocampal volume was much stronger in older persons. Findings suggest smaller hippocampal volumes among those with greater reported depressive symptom severity—an association that is strongest in people with at least moderate depressive symptom levels. PMID:24220026

Brown, E Sherwood; Hughes, Carroll W; McColl, Roderick; Peshock, Ronald; King, Kevin S; Rush, A John

2014-01-01

196

Respiratory symptoms and diseases among construction painters  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To study the self-reported prevalence of respiratory symptoms and diseases among construction painters and estimate the potential risk for this group compared with a representative group of carpenters sharing the construction work environment but without significant exposure to paint. Methods: A questionnaire study was conducted on 1,000 male Finnish construction painters and 1,000 carpenters (mean response rate 60.5%). Symptoms

Ari Kaukiainen; Riitta Riala; Rami Martikainen; Kari Reijula; Hilkka Riihimäki; Lauri Tammilehto

2005-01-01

197

Passive smoking by self report and serum cotinine and the prevalence of respiratory and coronary heart disease in the Scottish heart health study  

Microsoft Academic Search

STUDY OBJECTIVE--To explore the relationship between self reported environmental tobacco smoke exposure (or passive smoking), the serum cotinine concentration, and evidence of respiratory or coronary disease in men and women who have never smoked. DESIGN--Cross sectional random population survey identifying disease markers and relating them to measures of passive smoking. Disease markers were previous medical diagnoses, response to standard symptom

H Tunstall-Pedoe; C A Brown; M Woodward; R Tavendale

1995-01-01

198

Inventory control.  

PubMed

By establishing clear inventory ordering targets and following the guidelines outlined in this column, the staff member handling the process will understand the high and low levels of inventory control and be able to maintain an accurate system. Inventory control represents approximately 6 to 8 percent of practice purchasing. The main goal of the advice in this column is not to reduce the cost, unless there is waste involved, but rather to establish a process that allows the practice to purchase supplies on a regular basis, avoid mistakes and maintain a steady expense level. PMID:15493397

Levin, Roger

2004-09-01

199

Sweet taste threshold for sucrose inversely correlates with depression symptoms in female college students in the luteal phase.  

PubMed

Influences of depression symptoms on the sweet taste threshold were investigated in healthy college students (30 males and 40 females). Depression symptoms were scored by SDS (Self-Rating Depression Scale), and anxiety levels by STAI (State- and Trait-Anxiety Inventory). Recognition thresholds for sucrose were determined. In female students, the menstrual phase on the day of the experiment was self-reported. Depression symptoms, anxiety levels, and the recognition threshold for sucrose were not different among the 3 groups, i.e. males, females in the follicular phase, and females in the luteal phase. Depression symptoms were positively correlated with state and trait anxiety in all groups. The sweet taste threshold was inversely correlated with depression symptoms (r=-0.472, p=0.031) and trait anxiety (r=-0.506, p=0.019) in females in the luteal phase. In males as well as females in the follicular phase, however, no correlation between sweet taste threshold and depression was found. The results show that the recognition threshold for sucrose reduces with increased depression in females with a higher anxiety trait, but only in the luteal phase. It is hypothesized that brain regions, which spatially overlap and are responsible for both aversive emotions and gustatory processing, are susceptible to periodic changes in gonadal hormones due to the menstrual cycle. PMID:25576640

Nagai, Masanori; Matsumoto, Sayaka; Endo, Junko; Sakamoto, Reiko; Wada, Maki

2015-03-15

200

The Nomological Network of Self-Reported Distress Tolerance.  

PubMed

Distress tolerance (DT), or the ability to withstand psychological distress, is a popular construct in the psychological literature. However, research has not specified the nomological network of DT across self-report measures. The purpose of the current investigation was to understand what personality features, environmental stressors, current affective states, and behaviors contribute to DT in two different samples: college students and those in residential substance use treatment. Correlations revealed that self-reported DT was most strongly associated with trait negative emotionality, state negative affect, impulsivity, and perceived stress. In comparisons across samples, self-harm exhibited a stronger relationship with self-reported DT in the drug treatment than in the student sample, whereas perceived stress had a stronger association in the student sample. Correlations between self-report and behavioral measures of DT were nonsignificant. To understand this lack of associations, associations of outcomes with behavioral measures were assessed. In contrast to self-reported DT, behavioral DT was more closely related to achievement orientation, state negative affect, and state positive affect, but was not significantly related to psychopathology and maladaptive behaviors. It is necessary to continue investigating the construct validity of behavioral DT measures via the use of incremental utility analyses and experimental approaches. PMID:25475104

Kiselica, Andrew M; Rojas, Elizabeth; Bornovalova, Marina A; Dube, Chad

2014-12-01

201

Medically unexplained symptoms and psychological problems before and after disasters  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Medically unexplained symptoms (MUS) may be a major public health problem, especially after disasters. What is the course of MUS in the aftermath of a disaster? Is there a difference between self-reported symptoms and those presented to the general practitioner (GP)? Is there an association between MUS and psychological problems? Methods: Data was collected in the context of two

C. J. Yzermans; B. van den Berg

2007-01-01

202

Pubertal Maturation and African American Children's Internalizing and Externalizing Symptoms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The association of pubertal maturation with internalizing and externalizing symptoms was examined with a sample of 867 African-American 10-12-year-old children. Children reported their pubertal development status and timing using a self-report questionnaire, and symptoms were assessed through diagnostic interviews with the children and their…

Ge, Xiaojia; Brody, Gene H.; Conger, Rand D.; Simons, Ronald L.

2006-01-01

203

Physical Symptoms and Psychological Distress among Inhalant Users.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Among 110 Mexican-American adolescents with varying drug use histories, self-reported physical health problems were not related to inhalant use history, but blood analyses indicated a relationship between extensive inhalant use and liver problems. Psychological distress symptoms were related to inhalant use and physical symptoms. Contains 23…

Joe, George W.; And Others

1991-01-01

204

Prediction of posttraumatic stress symptoms in children after Hurricane Andrew  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors used an integrative conceptual model to examine the emergence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in 568 elementary school-age children 3 months after Hurricane An- drew. The model included 4 primary factors: Exposure to Traumatic Events, Child Characteristics, Access to Social Support, and Children's Coping. Overall, 62% of the variance in children's self- reported PTSD symptoms was accounted

Eric M. Vernberg; Annette M. La Greca; Wendy K. Silverman; Mitchell J. Prinstein

1996-01-01

205

Depressive symptoms associated with sexual assault  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Beck Depression Inventory was used to assess depressive symptoms in 178 sexual assault survivors and 50 control subjects who had never been sexually assaulted. The sexual assault survivors reported significantly more depressive symptoms than the control subjects, and further analyses strongly suggested that the depressive symptoms were caused by the sexual assault. Investigation of the relationships between depression scores

Judith V. Becker; Linda J. Skinner; Gene G. Abel; Roz Axelrod; Eileen C. Treacy

1984-01-01

206

Symptom Management  

Cancer.gov

Symptom Management & Quality of Life Concept Design This video covers a variety of practical considerations for developing a symptom management concept for clinical research.. Co-sponsored by the National Cancer Institute Symptom Management and Health

207

An Evaluation of the Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology and the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression: A Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression Trial Report  

PubMed Central

Background Nine DSM-IV-TR criterion symptom domains are evaluated to diagnose major depressive disorder (MDD). The Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (QIDS) provides an efficient assessment of these domains and is available as a clinician rating (QIDS-C16), a self-report (QIDS-SR16), and in an automated, interactive voice response (IVR) (QIDS-IVR16) telephone system. This report compares the performance of these three versions of the QIDS and the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD17). Methods Data were acquired at baseline and exit from the first treatment step (citalopram) in the Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression (STAR*D) trial. Outpatients with nonpsychotic MDD who completed all four ratings within ±2 days were identified from the first 1500 STAR*D subjects. Both item response theory and classical test theory analyses were conducted. Results The three methods for obtaining QIDS data produced consistent findings regarding relationships between the nine symptom domains and overall depression, demonstrating interchangeability among the three methods. The HRSD17, while generally satisfactory, rarely utilized the full range of item scores, and evidence suggested multidimensional measurement properties. Conclusions In nonpsychotic MDD outpatients without overt cognitive impairment, clinician assessment of depression severity using either the QIDS-C16 or HRSD17 may be successfully replaced by either the self-report or IVR version of the QIDS. PMID:16199008

Rush, A. John; Bernstein, Ira H.; Trivedi, Madhukar H.; Carmody, Thomas J.; Wisniewski, Stephen; Mundt, James C.; Shores-Wilson, Kathy; Biggs, Melanie M.; Woo, Ada; Nierenberg, Andrew A.; Fava, Maurizio

2010-01-01

208

The Construct Validity of Three Self-Report Instruments Hypothesized to Measure the Degree of Resolution for Each of the First Six Stage Crises in Erikson's Developmental Theory of Personality  

Microsoft Academic Search

For a sample of 160 university students (56 males and 104 females) the major purpose of this study was to obtain evidence for the construct validity of each of three self-report inventories that had been designed to reflect the degree of successful or unsuccessful resolution of each of the first six of Erikson's eight stage crises within a theory of

Kenneth C. Caillet; William B. Michael

1983-01-01

209

Weight misperception, self-reported physical fitness, dieting and some psychological variables as risk factors for eating disorders.  

PubMed

The aims of the current study were to explore possible gender differences in weight misperception, self-reported physical fitness, and dieting, and to analyze the relationship between these variables and others, such as self-esteem, body appreciation, general mental health, and eating- and body image-related variables among adolescents. In addition, the specific risk for eating disorders was examined, as well as the possible clusters with respect to the risk status. The sample comprised 655 students, 313 females and 342 males, aged 16.22 ± 4.58. Different scales of perceived overweight, self-reported physical fitness and dieting together with the Body Mass Index (BMI) were considered along with instruments such as the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ), General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28), Self-Esteem Scale (SES), Body Appreciation Scale (BAS) and Eating Disorders Inventory-2 (EDI-2). Since some gender differences were found with respect to these adolescent groups, it is necessary to design prevention programs that not only focus on traditional factors such as BMI or body image, but also on elements like weight perception, self-reported fitness and nutritional education. PMID:24232917

Jáuregui-Lobera, Ignacio; Ezquerra-Cabrera, Mercedes; Carbonero-Carreño, Rocío; Ruiz-Prieto, Inmaculada

2013-11-01

210

Weight Misperception, Self-Reported Physical Fitness, Dieting and Some Psychological Variables as Risk Factors for Eating Disorders  

PubMed Central

The aims of the current study were to explore possible gender differences in weight misperception, self-reported physical fitness, and dieting, and to analyze the relationship between these variables and others, such as self-esteem, body appreciation, general mental health, and eating- and body image-related variables among adolescents. In addition, the specific risk for eating disorders was examined, as well as the possible clusters with respect to the risk status. The sample comprised 655 students, 313 females and 342 males, aged 16.22 ± 4.58. Different scales of perceived overweight, self-reported physical fitness and dieting together with the Body Mass Index (BMI) were considered along with instruments such as the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ), General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28), Self-Esteem Scale (SES), Body Appreciation Scale (BAS) and Eating Disorders Inventory-2 (EDI-2). Since some gender differences were found with respect to these adolescent groups, it is necessary to design prevention programs that not only focus on traditional factors such as BMI or body image, but also on elements like weight perception, self-reported fitness and nutritional education. PMID:24232917

Jáuregui-Lobera, Ignacio; Ezquerra-Cabrera, Mercedes; Carbonero-Carreño, Rocío; Ruiz-Prieto, Inmaculada

2013-01-01

211

RESEARCH Open Access Relationship between self-reported dietary intake  

E-print Network

RESEARCH Open Access Relationship between self-reported dietary intake and physical activity levels and physical activity behavior, the two most important lifestyle behaviors influencing our energy balance, nutrient and food intake and the physical activity level among a large group of European adolescents

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

212

Validity of self-reports of marital violence  

Microsoft Academic Search

The most commonly used and practiced method for assessing spouse abuse is the individual's self-report of engaging in or being a victim of physical aggression. However, the socially undesirable nature of relationship violence raises questions regarding the likelihood that it is accurately reported. The current investigation found that a socially desirable response set is related to willingness to report one's

Ileana Arias; Steven R. H. Beach

1987-01-01

213

Am I dyslexic? Parental self-report of literacy difficulties.  

PubMed

In the absence of criteria for the diagnosis of dyslexia, considerable weight is given to self-report, in particular in studies of children at family risk of dyslexia. The present paper uses secondary data from a previous study to compare parents who self-report as dyslexic and those who do not, in relation to objectively determined levels of ability. In general, adults are more likely to self-report as 'dyslexic' if they have poorer reading and spelling skills and also if there is a discrepancy between IQ and measured literacy. However, parents of higher social status who have mild literacy difficulties are more likely to self-report as dyslexic than parents who have weaker literacy skills but are less socially advantaged. Together the findings suggest that the judgement as to whether or not a parent considers themselves 'dyslexic' is made relative to others in the same social sphere. Those who are socially disadvantaged may, in turn, be less likely to seek support for their children. PMID:25185509

Leavett, Ruth; Nash, Hannah M; Snowling, Margaret J

2014-11-01

214

Auditory Brainstem Response to Complex Sounds Predicts Self-Reported  

E-print Network

JSLHR Article Auditory Brainstem Response to Complex Sounds Predicts Self-Reported Speech: To compare the ability of the auditory brainstem response to complex sounds (cABR) to predict subjective linear regression analysis indicated that the inclusion of brainstem variables in a model with Quick

215

Validity study of self-reported pesticide exposure among orchardists  

Microsoft Academic Search

Self-reported work histories are often the only means of estimating occupational exposures in epidemiologic research. The objective of this study was to examine the accuracy of recall of historical pesticide use among orchardists. All 185 orchardists in this study had participated previously in a cohort study of men occupationally exposed to pesticides. In that study (1972 to 1976), subjects were

LAWRENCE S ENGEL; NOAH S SEIXAS; MATTHEW C KEIFER; W T LONGSTRETH JR; HAVEY CHECKOWAY

2001-01-01

216

Investigating Social Desirability Bias in Student Self-Report Surveys  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The frequent use of self-report student surveys in higher education calls into question the possibility of social desirability having an unwanted influence on responses. This research explores the potential presence of social desirability bias with the National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE), a widely used assessment of student behaviors.…

Miller, Angie L.

2011-01-01

217

Anxiety Self Report (ASR (1,2,3,4,). X  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Anxiety Self Report (ASR 1,2,3,4) is provided, followed by information about the report. The ASR is discussed as to its development, description, response bias, scoring procedures, reliability, stability, validity, and correlation between the ASR and the Manifest Anxiety Scale. (For related documents, see TM 002 928, 929.) (DB)

Parsons, Jane S.

218

Accuracy of self-reported smoking cessation during pregnancy.  

PubMed

Evidence of bias of self-reported smoking cessation during pregnancy is reported in high-income countries but not elsewhere. We sought to evaluate self-reported smoking cessation during pregnancy using biochemical verification and to compare characteristics of women with and without biochemically confirmed cessation in Argentina and Uruguay. In a cross-sectional study from October 2011 to May 2012, women who attended one of 21 prenatal clinics and delivered at selected hospitals in Buenos Aires, Argentina and Montevideo, Uruguay, were surveyed about their smoking cessation during pregnancy. We tested saliva collected from women <12 h after delivery for cotinine to evaluate self-reported smoking cessation during pregnancy. Overall, 10.0% (44/441) of women who self-reported smoking cessation during pregnancy had biochemical evidence of continued smoking. Women who reported quitting later in pregnancy had a higher percentage of nondisclosure (17.2%) than women who reported quitting when learning of their pregnancy (6.4%). PMID:25350478

Tong, Van T; Althabe, Fernando; Alemán, Alicia; Johnson, Carolyn C; Dietz, Patricia M; Berrueta, Mabel; Morello, Paola; Colomar, Mercedes; Buekens, Pierre; Sosnoff, Connie S; Farr, Sherry L; Mazzoni, Agustina; Ciganda, Alvaro; Becú, Ana; Bittar Gonzalez, Maria G; Llambi, Laura; Gibbons, Luz; Smith, Ruben A; Belizán, José M

2015-01-01

219

Self-Report Measure of Psychological Abuse of Older Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: This study tested key psychometric properties of the Older Adult Psychological Abuse Measure (OAPAM), one self-report scale of the Older Adult Mistreatment Assessment (OAMA). Design and Methods: Items and theory were developed in a prior concept mapping study. Subsequently, the measures were administered to 226 substantiated clients by 22…

Conrad, Kendon J.; Iris, Madelyn; Ridings, John W.; Langley, Kate; Anetzberger, Georgia J.

2011-01-01

220

A self-report comorbidity questionnaire for haemodialysis patients  

PubMed Central

Background Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) have multiple comorbid conditions. Obtaining comorbidity data from medical records is cumbersome. A self-report comorbidity questionnaire is a useful alternative. Our aim in this study was to examine the predictive value of a self-report comorbidity questionnaire in terms of survival in ESRD patients. Methods We studied a prospective cross-sectional cohort of 282 haemodialysis (HD) patients in a single centre. Participants were administered the self-report questionnaire during an HD session. Information on their comorbidities was subsequently obtained from an examination of the patient’s medical records. Levels of agreement between parameters derived from the questionnaire, and from the medical records, were examined. Participants were followed-up for 18 months to collect survival data. The influence on survival of comorbidity scores derived from the self-report data (the Composite Self-report Comorbidity Score [CSCS]) and from medical records data - the Charlson Comorbidity Index [CCI] were compared. Results The level of agreement between the self-report items and those obtained from medical records was almost perfect with respect the presence of diabetes (Kappa score ? 0.97), substantial for heart disease and cancer (? 0.62 and ? 0.72 respectively), moderate for liver disease (? 0.51), only fair for lung disease, arthritis, cerebrovascular disease, and depression (? 0.34, 0.35, 0.34 and 0.29 respectively). The CSCS was strongly predictive of survival in regression models (Nagelkerke R2 value 0.202), with a predictive power similar to that of the CCI (Nagelkerke R2 value 0.211). The influences of these two parameters were additive in the models – suggesting that these parameters make different contributions to the assessment of comorbidity. Conclusion This self-report comorbidity questionnaire is a viable tool to collect comorbidity data and may have a role in the prediction of short-term survival in patients with end-stage renal disease on haemodialysis. Further work is required in this setting to refine the tool and define its role. PMID:25135668

2014-01-01

221

Sexual Compulsivity Scale, Compulsive Sexual Behavior Inventory, and Hypersexual Disorder Screening Inventory: Translation, Adaptation, and Validation for Use in Brazil.  

PubMed

Epidemiological, behavioral, and clinical data on sexual compulsivity in Brazil are very limited. This study sought to adapt and validate the Sexual Compulsivity Scale (SCS), the 22-item version of the Compulsive Sexual Behavior Inventory (CSBI-22), and the Hypersexual Disorder Screening Inventory (HDSI) for use in Brazil. A total of 153 participants underwent psychiatric assessment and completed self-reported measures. The adaptation process of the instruments from English to Portuguese followed the guidelines of the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research. The reliability and validity of the HDSI criteria were evaluated and the construct validity of all measures was examined. For the SCS and HDSI, factor analysis revealed one factor for each measure. For the CSBI-22, four factors were retained although we only calculated the scores of two factors (control and violence). All scores had good internal consistency (alpha >.75), presented high temporal stability (>.76), discriminated between patients and controls, and presented strong (? > .81) correlations with the Sexual Addiction Screening Test (except for the violence domain = .40) and moderate correlations with the Impulsive Sensation Seeking domain of the Zuckerman Kuhlman Personality Questionnaire (? between .43 and .55). The sensitivity of the HDSI was 71.93 % and the specificity was 100 %. All measures showed very good psychometric properties. The SCS, the HDSI, and the control domain of the CSBI-22 seemed to measure theoretically similar constructs, as they were highly correlated (? > .85). The findings support the conceptualization of hypersexuality as a cluster of problematic symptoms that are highly consistent across a variety of measures. PMID:25348356

Scanavino, Marco de T; Ventuneac, Ana; Rendina, H Jonathon; Abdo, Carmita H N; Tavares, Hermano; Amaral, Maria L S do; Messina, Bruna; Reis, Sirlene C Dos; Martins, João P L B; Gordon, Marina C; Vieira, Julie C; Parsons, Jeffrey T

2014-10-28

222

Reliability of a self-reported health questionnaire in a periodontal disease study.  

PubMed

This study assesses the reliability of a self-reported health questionnaire completed by 413 subjects aged 25-74 yr in the Erie County Periodontal Disease (ECPD) Study. Specific questions on general and oral health conditions were completed by each subject during a first visit and at a follow-up examination 2 yr later, and the two compared. Results showed that the overall measure of agreement between the two visits is substantial (average kappa, kappa = 0.80). Variation by gender and age were minimal. Questions regarding allergy to medications, oral treatment, reason for tooth extraction, health symptoms and history of systemic diseases exhibited high levels of agreement (kappa ranged from 0.71-0.90). Information on vitamin and mineral intake yielded kappa = 0.63. Oral conditions scored the lowest but were still acceptable (kappa = 0.57). These findings indicate that there were no significant discrepancies in self-reported responses to the health questionnaire used in the ECPD Study. Although the information provided by the subject may not be as accurate as compared to laboratory testing, it is nevertheless a reliable source of information which can be utilized cost-effectively in research studies. PMID:9409459

Ho, A W; Grossi, S G; Dunford, R G; Genco, R J

1997-11-01

223

Construct validity of a short, self report instrument assessing emotional dysregulation.  

PubMed

There is a need for a brief measure of emotion dysregulation that can be used in large-scale studies. This study evaluated the construct validity of a short, self-report instrument of emotion dysregulation. Subjects (N=2197) were recruited from primary care clinics of an urban public hospital as part of a study of trauma-related risk and resilience. Emotion dysregulation was measured using the Emotion Dysregulation Scale, short version (EDS-short), a12-item self-report measure assessing emotional experiencing, cognition, and behavior. EDS-short was first compared with the Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale (DERS). Then, the construct validity of the EDS-short in predicting depression, posttraumatic stress, substance abuse, borderline pathology, suicide attempts, psychiatric hospitalizations, positive affect, and resiliency was assessed. We found a significant positive correlation between EDS-short and DERS. The EDS-short was significantly predictive of higher reported depressive, posttraumatic stress, substance abuse, and borderline symptoms, and lower reported positive affect and resiliency, over and above demographic characteristics and negative affect. Our results demonstrate that the EDS-short is a useful instrument for measuring emotion dysregulation in traumatized populations. A brief measure of emotion dysregulation is critical as the field moves forward in studying the wide ranging negative effects of emotion dysregulation across psychiatric disorders and outcomes. PMID:25468625

Powers, Abigail; Stevens, Jennifer; Fani, Negar; Bradley, Bekh

2015-01-30

224

Increased self-reported and objectively assessed physical activity predict sleep quality among adolescents.  

PubMed

Both scientists and the general public assume that physical activity (PA) is an effective, non-pharmacological approach to improvement in sleep quality. However, objective and reliable data on this relationship are scarce, particularly for adolescents. Therefore, the aims of the present study were to test the relationship by assessing both PA and sleep subjectively and objectively. A total of 56 adolescent vocational school students (Mean age=17.98, SD=1.36; 28 males, 28 females) participated in the study. Sleep and PA were subjectively assessed via questionnaires. Accelerometers objectively assessed PA, while sleep-EEG devices objectively assessed sleep. The data supported our prediction that adolescents with high PA levels would have longer TST, fewer wakening at night (WASO), fewer symptoms of insomnia, and higher sleep quality. However, gender influenced this pattern of results in that significant findings were only found between high self-reported PA levels and shorter perceived sleep onset latency (SOL). Though self-reported PA levels were a better predictor of good sleep than objectively assessed PA levels, gender was associated with sleep complaints; females reported more sleep complaints. Results indicate that among a non-clinical sample of adolescents increased PA is favorably associated with restoring sleep. Therefore, PA seems beneficial not only for physical and mental health, but also for sleep restoration. PMID:23851332

Lang, Christin; Brand, Serge; Feldmeth, Anne Karina; Holsboer-Trachsler, Edith; Pühse, Uwe; Gerber, Markus

2013-08-15

225

The Dimensionality of a Modified Form of the Maslach Burnout Inventory for University Students in a TeacherTraining Program  

Microsoft Academic Search

For a sample of 147 fifth-year students enrolled in a teacher training program at the elementary school level, both exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses involving orthogonal and oblique solutions were carried out on a correlation matrix of scores on 22 items from a self-report inventory of teacher burnout that was adapted with permission from the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI). The

Yvonne Gold; Patricia Bachelor; William B. Michael

1989-01-01

226

Drug treatment of urological symptoms: estimating the magnitude of unmet need in a community-based sample  

PubMed Central

Objective To examine, in a community-based sample, the use of prescription drugs for lower urinary tract symptoms/benign prostatic hyperplasia (LUTS/BPH), overactive bladder, erectile dysfunction, urinary incontinence, and painful bladder syndrome; and to determine whether the use of recommended medications varied by sociodemographics, symptom severity, access to care, and other factors. Subjects and methods In a cross-sectional analysis of data obtained from 5503 men and women residents participating in the Boston Area Community Health Survey of Boston, MA, urological symptoms were ascertained by in-person interviews conducted during 2002–2005, using validated symptom scales. Medication use in the past 4 weeks was captured using a combination of drug-inventory methods and self-report. Results Compared to the prevalence of symptoms, the prevalence of use of medications for urological conditions was very low among men and women. The highest prevalence of use was among men with moderate-to-severe LUTS/BPH symptoms, where 9.6% used recommended drugs. Use of medications did not vary consistently by race/ethnicity or socioeconomic status, but was often associated with symptom severity. More frequent and more recent use of medical care was also associated with greater use of urological medications. Conclusions Only a small proportion of community-dwelling men and women with urological symptoms are receiving recommended effective drug treatments for urological conditions. While not all persons are candidates for drug treatment, our results suggest that there is a substantial unmet need in the general population. PMID:19549122

Hall, Susan A.; Link, Carol L.; Hu, Jim C.; Eggers, Paul W.; McKinlay, John B.

2009-01-01

227

Relationship Between Obsessive Beliefs and Obsessive–Compulsive Symptoms  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between symptom presentation in obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD) and dysfunctional beliefs hypothesized to relate to OCD. Five-hundred sixty two undergraduates completed self-report measures of OCD symptoms and OCD-related beliefs, as well as measures of social anxiety and depression. The tendency to overestimate threat significantly predicted the OCD symptom domains of washing,

David F. Tolin; Carol M. Woods; Jonathan S. Abramowitz

2003-01-01

228

Obsessive–compulsive symptoms in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The goals of this work were to: (1) determine the prevalence of clinically significant obsessive–compulsive (OC) symptoms in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), (2) characterize the differences in self-reported OC symptoms in patients with TLE and a normative control group, and (3) compare the severity of OC symptoms in right and left hemisphere TLE patients. Patients with TLE (n=30)

Keren L. Isaacs; John W. Philbeck; William B. Barr; Orrin Devinsky; Kenneth Alperb

2004-01-01

229

Rumination and negative symptoms in schizophrenia.  

PubMed

Rumination is thought to be an important maintaining factor in depression. Depressive symptomatology is also a prominent feature in schizophrenia. However, little is known about the relationship between rumination and symptoms, such as depression and negative symptoms, in schizophrenia. The present study examined associations between rumination and symptoms in a group of 37 stable medicated patients with schizophrenia. All participants were clinically assessed on their symptoms and completed self-reported measures of depression and rumination. The findings showed that negative symptoms, especially emotional withdrawal and stereotyped thinking, but not depressive symptomatology, were associated with rumination in the present sample of patients with schizophrenia. If the findings are replicated, interventions that reduce rumination and rigid thinking might be helpful to reduce some negative symptoms of psychosis. PMID:19752652

Halari, Rozmin; Premkumar, Preethi; Farquharson, Lorna; Fannon, Dominic; Kuipers, Elizabeth; Kumari, Veena

2009-09-01

230

Antenatal Maternal Anxiety is Related to HPA-Axis Dysregulation and Self-Reported Depressive Symptoms  

E-print Network

investigated maternal anxiety at 12­22, 23­32, and 32­40 weeks of pregnancy (wp) with the State Trait Anxiety and potentially stressful period, the risk of developing depression increases and the prevalence among females or maternal anxiety) could predispose the individual for somatic and mental diseases. This especially holds

231

Factors associated with self-reported symptoms of acute pesticide poisoning among farmers in northwestern Jamaica  

PubMed Central

Pesticide poisoning is a major public health concern in developing countries. We conducted a population survey among farmers in three parishes of northwestern Jamaica to determine the occurrence of acute pesticide poisoning and to identify factors associated with pesticide poisoning. Approximately 16% of 359 farmers who participated in the study reported one or more incidents of acute pesticide poisoning within the last two years. Only 25% of the farmers reported ever receiving training in pesticide handling or safety. The majority (68%) of farmers who reported pesticide poisoning never sought medical attention for poisoning. The factors found to be associated with pesticide poisoning in this study indicate that implementation of specific intervention strategies and education of farmers is needed in order to improve safe handling, use and disposal of pesticides and reduce incidents of acute pesticide poisoning. PMID:24484363

Ncube, Ngqabutho M.; Fogo, Christopher; Bessler, Patricia; Jolly, Curtis M.; Jolly, Pauline E.

2011-01-01

232

Childhood Inattention and Hyperactivity Symptoms Self-Reported by Adults with Asperger Syndrome  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Increasing public awareness of the adult manifestations of developmental neuropsychiatric disorders, like Asperger syndrome and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), has provoked an increasing number of persons to seek assessment for the first time in adulthood. As these disorders have their origin in childhood, instruments for retrospective evaluation of childhood behavior are needed. Sampling and Methods: In this preliminary

Pekka Tani; Nina Lindberg; Björn Appelberg; Taina Nieminen-von Wendt; Lennart von Wendt; Tarja Porkka-Heiskanen

2006-01-01

233

Self-reported physical exposure association with medial and lateral epicondylitis incidence in a large longitudinal study  

PubMed Central

Introduction Although previous studies have related occupational exposure and epicondylitis, the evidence is moderate, and mostly based on cross-sectional studies. Suspected physical exposures were tested over a three year period in a large longitudinal cohort study of workers in the United States. Method In a population-based study including a variety of industries, 1107 newly employed workers were examined; only workers without elbow symptoms at baseline were included. Baseline questionnaires collected information on personal characteristics and self-reported physical work exposures and psychosocial measures for the current or most recent job at 6 months. Epicondylitis (lateral and medial) was the main outcome, assessed at 36 months based on symptoms and physical examination (palpation or provocation test). Logistic models included the most relevant associated variables. Results Of 699 workers tested after 36 months who did not have elbow symptoms at baseline, 48 suffered from medial or lateral epicondylitis (6.9%), with 34 cases of lateral epicondylitis (4.9%), 30 cases of medial epicondylitis (4.3%), and 16 workers who had both. After adjusting for age, lack of social support, and obesity, consistent associations were observed between self-reported wrist bending/twisting and forearm twisting/rotating/screwing motion and future cases of medial or lateral epicondylitis (odds ratios 2.8 [1.2;6.2] and 3.6 [1.2;11.0] respectively in men and women). Conclusion Self-reported physical exposures that implicate repetitive and extensive/prolonged wrist bend/twisting and forearm movements were associated with incident cases of lateral and medial epicondylitis in a large longitudinal study, although other studies are needed to better specify the exposures involved. PMID:23825198

Descatha, Alexis; Dale, Ann Marie; Jaegers, Lisa; Herquelot, Eléonore; Evanoff, Bradley

2014-01-01

234

Construct Validity of Self-reported Historical Physical Activity  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to determine the construct-related validity of self-reported historical walking, running, and jogging (WRJ) activity on the basis of data from the Aerobics Center Longitudinal Study (Dallas, Texas). A total of 4,100 men and 963 women underwent at least one medical examination between 1976 and 1985 and completed a follow-up questionnaire in 1986. Levels of

Heather R. Bowles; Shannon J. FitzGerald; James R. Morrow; Allen W. Jackson; Steven N. Blair

235

Black tea improves attention and self-reported alertness  

Microsoft Academic Search

Tea has previously been demonstrated to better help sustain alertness throughout the day in open-label studies. We investigated whether tea improves attention and self-reported alertness in two double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled, crossover studies. Participants received black tea (made from commercially available tea bags) in one condition and placebo tea (hot water with food colours and flavours) similar in taste and appearance

E. A. De Bruin; M. J. Rowson; L. Van Buren; J. A. Rycroft; G. N. Owen

2011-01-01

236

Self-reported medication non-compliance in the elderly  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To assess self-reported compliance with prescribed medications in a population of elderly patients prior to their hospital\\u000a admission in an attempt to understand further the factors which influence drug-taking patterns.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods: Information which, based on personal clinical experience and published research, may impact on compliance was collected\\u000a for patients by way of a chart review within 3 days of

J. C. McElnay; C. R. McCallion; F. Al-Deagi; M. Scott

1997-01-01

237

Self-reported sexual orientation and earnings: Evidence from California  

Microsoft Academic Search

Researchers using the 1988-96 General Social Survey (GSS) have found that behaviorally gay\\/bisexual men earn 15-30% less, and behaviorally lesbian\\/ bisexual women earn 20-30% more, than similar heterosexuals. This study uses confidential data on self-reported sexual orientation for 50,000 adults in California in 2001, providing more than five times as many respondents who identify themselves as sexual minorities as does

Christopher S. Carpenter

2005-01-01

238

Death Attitudes and Self-reported Health-relevant Behaviors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two studies are presented investigating the role of attitudes toward death in self-reported health-protective behavior. The Multidimensional Death Attitudes Scale (MDAS), based on three existing measures of death attitudes, was administered to a group of health professionals (N 5 348). A principal components analysis revealed five factors, labeled Acceptance, Fear, Death as Passage, Death as Relief and Avoidance. The five-factor

Chloé D. Martin; Peter Salovey

1996-01-01

239

Social Factors Associated with Self-reported Dietary Change  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigated the reasons for dietary change and whether these self-reported changes result in health-promoting dietary patterns. A cross-sectional survey was conducted of 421 individuals between the ages of 18 and 74, selected randomly from a U.K. Family Health Services Register. Respondents were interviewed using a researcher-administered, structured questionnaire. A subsample of 75 respondents was subsequently interviewed in depth.

Cheryl Haslam; Emma Sherratt; Michelle Holdsworth; Alan Beardsworth; Teresa Keil; Jackie Goode

2000-01-01

240

periodontologySelf-reporting of periodontal health status  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective The objective was to develop a self-reporting questionnaire for use as an epidemiological measure of periodontal status.Design Oral survey.Subjects and methods 100 (out of 102 who were approached) non-referred patients attending Dundee Dental Hospital and School agreed to complete a questionnaire concerning factors related to periodontal disease and then undergo a standardised periodontal examination in which four indicators were

A D Gilbert; N M Nuttall

1999-01-01

241

Incest: Self?report findings from a nonclinical sample  

Microsoft Academic Search

Self?reports of incest experiences from a nonpatient, nonoffender sample of 100 individuals are described. The purpose is to document the wide range of incest types by correlating the negative?to?positive perceived outcome of the experience with sex, age, exploitation, and guilt. A 23?item questionnaire was administered to respondents contacted through nationally circulated classified advertisements. Respondents, were categorized as perpetrators, victims, and

Joan A. Nelson

1986-01-01

242

Self-report prospective memory problems in people with stroke.  

PubMed

Abstract Background and purpose: Prospective memory (PM) is a common problem which can limit performance of basic and instrumental activities of daily living in patients with stroke. This study compared self-report PM failures between older and younger people with stroke, examined differences in perceptions of PM failures between people with stroke and relatives, relationships between these PM failures and functional performance. Methods: A total of 105 patients with stroke, 65 relatives and 112 healthy controls were recruited. Both the patients with stroke and controls were further divided into an older (age?>?55 years) and a younger (age???55 years) group. Data for patients with stroke and relatives were obtained via the Brief Assessment of Prospective Memory (BAPM), Basic Activity of Daily Living (BADL) related Modified Barthel Index (MBI) and Lawton Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (Lawton IADL) Scale. Healthy controls' data were also collected. Results: The older stroke group had significantly higher BAPM total scores and BADL and IADL sub-scale scores than the younger group. Difference in perceptions of the patients' self-report of PM failures and their relatives' report was significant for the IADL sub-scale. Self-report of PM failure was significantly related to functional BADL and IADL measures. Conclusions: Results highlight the impact of PM failures in patients with stroke and their assessment, management and rehabilitation of these patients. PMID:25356927

Man, David; Yip, Calvin; Lee, Grace; Fleming, Jennifer; Shum, David

2014-10-30

243

Inventory management.  

PubMed

As dentistry continues to evolve, the best management systems of the business world need to be incorporated into each practice. As always, my goal in these columns is to bring and modify the best business principles available to readers of The Journal of the American Dental Association. Just in Time ordering and inventory control is one of the best, as evidenced by the fact that top-performing companies worldwide have adopted it. PMID:15270164

Levin, Roger

2004-06-01

244

Measuring juvenile delinquency: How do self-reports compare with official police statistics?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The accuracy of measuring the prevalence of delinquency by means of self-reported questionnaires is difficult to evaluate. This study assesses the differential validity of self-reported delinquency in adolescents and, more specifically, self-reported police contacts because of suspected misconduct. This study was conducted as part of the Rotterdam Youth Monitor, a youth health surveillance system. Self-report data of pupils (mainly 12–15

Tamara van Batenburg-Eddes; Dick Butte; Petra van de Looij-Jansen; Wiet Schiethart; Hein Raat; Frouwkje de Waart; Wilma Jansen

2012-01-01

245

Challenges in Evaluating Relationships Between Quantitative Data (Carbon Dioxide) and Qualitative Data (Self-Reported Visual Changes)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Understanding the nuances in clinical data is critical in developing a successful data analysis plan. Carbon dioxide (CO2) data are collected on board the International Space Station (ISS) in a continuous stream. Clinical data on ISS are primarily collected via conversations between individual crewmembers and NASA Flight Surgeons during weekly Private Medical Conferences (PMC). Law, et.al, 20141 demonstrated a statistically significant association between weekly average CO2 levels on ISS and self-reported headaches over the reporting period from March 14, 2001 to May 31, 2012. The purpose of this analysis is to describe the evaluation of a possible association between visual changes and CO2 levels on ISS and to discuss challenges in developing an appropriate analysis plan. METHODS & PRELIMINARY RESULTS: A first analysis was conducted following the same study design as the published work on CO2 and self-reported headaches1; substituting self-reported changes in visual acuity in place of self-reported headaches. The analysis demonstrated no statistically significant association between visual impairment characterized by vision symptoms self-reported during PMCs and ISS average CO2 levels over ISS missions. Closer review of the PMC records showed that vision outcomes are not well-documented in terms of clinical severity, timing of onset, or timing of resolution, perhaps due to the incipient nature of vision changes. Vision has been monitored in ISS crewmembers, pre- and post-flight, using standard optometry evaluations. In-flight visual assessments were limited early in the ISS program, primarily consisting of self-perceived changes reported by crewmembers. Recently, on-orbit capabilities have greatly improved. Vision data ranges from self-reported post-flight changes in visual acuity, pre- to postflight changes identified during fundoscopic examination, and in-flight progression measured by advanced on-orbit clinical imaging capabilities at predetermined testing intervals. In contrast, CO2 data are recorded in a continuous stream over time; however, for the initial analysis this data was categorized into weekly averages.

Mendez, C. M.; Foy, M.; Mason, S.; Wear, M. L.; Meyers, V.; Law, J.; Alexander, D.; Van Baalen, M.

2014-01-01

246

Long-term prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms in patients after secondary peritonitis  

PubMed Central

Introduction The aim of this study was to determine the long-term prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptomology in patients following secondary peritonitis and to determine whether the prevalence of PTSD-related symptoms differed between patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) and patients admitted only to the surgical ward. Method A retrospective cohort of consecutive patients treated for secondary peritonitis was sent a postal survey containing a self-report questionnaire, namely the Post-traumatic Stress Syndrome 10-question inventory (PTSS-10). From a database of 278 patients undergoing surgery for secondary peritonitis between 1994 and 2000, 131 patients were long-term survivors (follow-up period at least four years) and were eligible for inclusion in our study, conducted at a tertiary referral hospital in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Results The response rate was 86%, yielding a cohort of 100 patients; 61% of these patients had been admitted to the ICU. PTSD-related symptoms were found in 24% (95% confidence interval 17% to 33%) of patients when a PTSS-10 score of 35 was chosen as the cutoff, whereas the prevalence of PTSD symptomology when borderline patients scoring 27 points or more were included was 38% (95% confidence interval 29% to 48%). In a multivariate analyses controlling for age, sex, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) score, number of relaparotomies and length of hospital stay, the likelihood of ICU-admitted patients having PTSD symptomology was 4.3 times higher (95% confidence interval 1.11 to 16.5) than patients not admitted to the ICU, using a PTSS-10 score cutoff of 35 or greater. Older patients and males were less likely to report PTSD symptoms. Conclusion Nearly a quarter of patients receiving surgical treatment for secondary peritonitis developed PTSD symptoms. Patients admitted to the ICU were at significantly greater risk for having PTSD symptoms after adjusting for baseline differences, in particular age. PMID:17319937

Boer, Kimberly R; Mahler, Cecilia W; Unlu, Cagdas; Lamme, Bas; Vroom, Margreeth B; Sprangers, Mirjam A; Gouma, Dirk J; Reitsma, Johannes B; De Borgie, Corianne A; Boermeester, Marja A

2007-01-01

247

Self-Reported Inattention in Early Adolescence in a Community Sample  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: Inattention is typically associated with ADHD, but less research has been done to examine the correlates of self-reported inattention in youth in a community sample. Method: Associations among self-reported inattention, parent-reported inattention, and self-reported psychopathology in children aged 10 to 11 years are examined.…

Connors, Laura L.; Connolly, Jennifer; Toplak, Maggie E.

2012-01-01

248

Predicting Drug Use at Electronic Music Dance Events: Self-Reports and Biological Measurement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Most information on the prevalence of drug use comes from self-report surveys. The sensitivity of such information is cause for concern about the accuracy of self-report measures. In this study, self-reported drug use in the last 48 hr is compared to results from biological assays of saliva samples from 371 young adults entering clubs. The…

Johnson, Mark B.; Voas, Robert A.; Miller, Brenda A.; Holder, Harold D.

2009-01-01

249

Identifying High-Functioning Dyslexics: Is Self-Report of Early Reading Problems Enough?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We used a questionnaire to identify university students with self-reported difficulties in reading acquisition during elementary school (self-report; n = 31). The performance of the self-report group on standardized measures of word and non-word reading and fluency, passage comprehension and reading rate, and phonological awareness was compared to…

Deacon, S. Helene; Cook, Kathryn; Parrila, Rauno

2012-01-01

250

Utility of the structured inventory of malingered symptomatology (SIMS) and the assessment of depression inventory (ADI) in screening for malingering among disability seeking outpatients.  

E-print Network

??Sixty-four individuals undergoing a social security disability evaluation were administered the Structured Interview of Reported Symptoms (SIRS), Structured Inventory of Malingered Symptomatology (SIMS), and Assessment… (more)

Clegg, Carl B., 1977-

2007-01-01

251

Comparison of clinician- and self-assessments of posttraumatic stress symptoms in older versus younger veterans.  

PubMed

Assessment of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in older adults has received limited investigation. The purpose of this study was to compare the severity of PTSD symptoms in treatment-seeking older and younger U.S. veterans with PTSD. Participants were 360 male and 284 female veterans enrolled in 2 separate clinical trials of psychotherapy for PTSD. About 4% of the participants were age 60 years or older. Symptoms were assessed before treatment using clinician-rated and self-report measures. For men, only numbing symptoms were lower in older veterans; this was so in clinician ratings, d = 0.76, and self-reports, d = 0.65. For women, clinician-rated hyperarousal symptoms were lower in older veterans, d = 0.57. Clinician-rated and self-reported symptoms were strongly related, Bs = 0.95 and 0.80 in the male and female samples, respectively. Among men, clinician-rated and self-reported reexperiencing and hyperarousal symptoms were associated only in younger veterans. Accurate assessment of PTSD symptoms in older adults is essential to identifying and implementing effective treatment. Our findings suggest that some symptoms may be lower in older men, and that some symptoms of PTSD may be underdetected in older women. Future research should assess the combined effect of gender and age on PTSD symptom presentation. PMID:24700623

Lunney, Carole A; Schnurr, Paula P; Cook, Joan M

2014-04-01

252

Citrus Inventory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Florida's Charlotte County Property Appraiser is using an aerial color infrared mapping system for inventorying citrus trees for valuation purposes. The ACIR system has significantly reduced the time and manpower required for appraisal. Aerial photographs are taken and interpreted by a video system which makes it possible to detect changes from previous years. Potential problems can be identified. KSC's TU Office has awarded a contract to the Citrus Research and Education Center to adapt a prototype system which would automatically count trees and report totals.

1986-01-01

253

Baseline self reported functional health and vulnerability to post-traumatic stress disorder after combat deployment: prospective US military cohort study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective To determine if baseline functional health status, as measured by SF-36 (veterans), predicts new onset symptoms or diagnosis of post-traumatic stress disorder among deployed US military personnel with combat exposure.Design Prospective cohort analysis.Setting Millennium Cohort.Participants Combat deployed members who completed baseline (2001-3) and follow-up (2004-6) questionnaires. Self reported and electronic data used to examine the relation between functional health

Cynthia A LeardMann; Tyler C Smith; Besa Smith; Timothy S Wells; Margaret A K Ryan

2009-01-01

254

Individual, Family, School, and Community Risk and Protective Factors for Depressive Symptoms in Adolescents: A Comparison of Risk Profiles for Substance Use and Depressive Symptoms  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examines the relationship between adolescent depressive symptoms and risk and protective factors identified for substance use. A questionnaire, developed to measure these factors in a young person’s community, family, school, peer group, and individual characteristics for substance use, was used to assess associations with self-reported depressive symptoms. Data were provided by a representative sample of 8984 secondary school

Lyndal Bond; John W. Toumbourou; Lyndal Thomas; Richard F. Catalano; George Patton

2005-01-01

255

Sleep deprivation disrupts prepulse inhibition and induces psychosis-like symptoms in healthy humans.  

PubMed

Translational biomarkers, such as prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the acoustic startle response, are playing an increasingly important role in the development of antipsychotic drugs for schizophrenia and related conditions. However, attempts to reliably induce a PPI deficit by psychotomimetic drugs have not been successful, leaving an unmet need for a cross-species psychosis model sensitive to this widely studied surrogate treatment target. Sleep deprivation (SD) might be such a model as it has previously been shown to induce PPI deficits in rats, which could be selectively prevented with antipsychotic but not anxiolytic or antidepressant compounds. Here, in a first proof-of-concept study we tested whether SD induces a deficit in PPI and an increase in psychosis-like symptoms in healthy humans. In two counterbalanced sessions, acoustic PPI and self-reported psychosis-like symptoms (Psychotomimetic States Inventory) were measured in 24 healthy human volunteers after a normal night's sleep and after a night of total SD. SD decreased PPI (p = 0.001) without affecting the magnitude or habituation of the startle response (all p > 0.13). SD also induced perceptual distortions, cognitive disorganization, and anhedonia (all p < 0.02). Thus, extending previous rodent work, we conclude that SD, in combination with the PPI biomarker, might be a promising translational surrogate model for psychosis as this method represents a possibility to partially and reversibly mimic the pathogenesis of psychotic states. PMID:24990933

Petrovsky, Nadine; Ettinger, Ulrich; Hill, Antje; Frenzel, Leonie; Meyhöfer, Inga; Wagner, Michael; Backhaus, Jutta; Kumari, Veena

2014-07-01

256

Obsessive compulsive symptom dimensions and neuroticism: An examination of shared genetic and environmental risk.  

PubMed

Individuals with obsessive compulsive disorder can display diverse and heterogeneous patterns of symptoms. Little is known about the relationship between obsessive-compulsive symptom (OCS) dimensions and normal personality traits, particularly those that increase risk for other internalizing disorders. In this study of 1,382 individuals from female-female twin pairs, we examined the relationship between self-report OCS dimensions derived from the Padua Inventory and Eysenck's personality traits neuroticism and extraversion. We conducted factor analysis to determine their phenotypic structure followed by twin analyses to determine their genetic and environmental sources of covariation. A three-factor solution, with dimensions corresponding to checking, aggressive obsessions, and contamination, was the best fit for the Padua OCS items. These dimensions were significantly and somewhat variably associated with neuroticism but negligibly associated with extraversion. The genetic correlations between neuroticism and these three OCS dimensions were moderate to high (0.66 with checking, 0.89 with aggressive obsessions, and 0.40 with contamination). However, the estimated genetic correlation between neuroticism and a unified latent OCS construct was smaller (0.32). Overall this study suggests that genetic, and to a smaller extent environmental, factors underlying neuroticism may act differentially as risk factors for OCS dimensions. PMID:25231027

Bergin, Jocilyn; Verhulst, Brad; Aggen, Steven H; Neale, Michael C; Kendler, Kenneth S; Bienvenu, Oscar J; Hettema, John M

2014-12-01

257

A Population-Based Investigation into the Self-Reported Reasons for Sleep Problems  

PubMed Central

Typologies of sleep problems have usually relied on identifying underlying causes or symptom clusters. In this study the value of using the patient's own reasons for sleep disturbance are explored. Using secondary data analysis of a nationally representative psychiatric survey the patterning of the various reasons respondents provided for self-reported sleep problems were examined. Over two thirds (69.3%) of respondents could identify a specific reason for their sleep problem with worry (37.9%) and illness (20.1%) representing the most commonly reported reasons. And while women reported more sleep problems for almost every reason compared with men, the patterning of reasons by age showed marked variability. Sleep problem symptoms such as difficulty getting to sleep or waking early also showed variability by different reasons as did the association with major correlates such as worry, depression, anxiety and poor health. While prevalence surveys of ‘insomnia’ or ‘poor sleep’ often assume the identification of an underlying homogeneous construct there may be grounds for recognising the existence of different sleep problem types particularly in the context of the patient's perceived reason for the problem. PMID:24983754

Armstrong, David; Dregan, Alex

2014-01-01

258

Ethnic variation in whether dissociation mediates the relation between traumatic life events and attenuated positive psychotic symptoms.  

PubMed

Abstract The present study sought to determine whether dissociative experiences mediated the relationship between traumatic life events and attenuated positive psychotic symptoms in a non-treatment-seeking sample of racial and ethnic minority young adults. Participants (n=549) completed a self-report inventory for psychosis risk (i.e., prodromal questionnaire (PQ; Loewy, Bearden, Johnson, Raine, & Cannon, 2005), from which a total number of attenuated positive psychotic symptoms was assessed. Participants also completed a checklist of potentially traumatic life events and a traumatic dissociation scale. Hierarchical linear regression models and bootstrapping results indicated dissociation mediated the relationship between traumatic life events and attenuated positive psychotic symptoms. Stratified analyses in Black, Asian, and Hispanic subgroups revealed that full mediation was only evident in the Black subgroup of young adults. Partial mediation was found among the Hispanic group and no mediation occurred in the Asian subgroup. For the latter, traumatic life events was not significantly associated with dissociative experiences. A dissociative response style may be particularly relevant to trauma-exposed Black young adults exhibiting subclinical psychotic experiences and less so for Asian young adults. Trauma-induced dissociative experiences should be assessed further in clinical high risk studies, especially among Black traumatized youth. PMID:25365538

Anglin, Deidre M; Polanco-Roman, Lillian; Lui, Florence

2014-11-01

259

An exploration of psychopathy in self-report measures among juvenile sex offenders.  

PubMed

Researchers have indicated that adult psychopathy often originates in childhood or adolescence. It has also been established that psychopathic traits are linked to disruptive behavior, criminality, and violence. As knowledge about psychopathy and its manifestations in juvenile sex offender populations remains limited, several instruments have been developed in an effort to measure the construct. In this study, we assessed how the relationship of diverse scales of psychopathy related to characteristics of sexual aggression, and determined which scales were most correlated to sexual and nonsexual delinquency. We utilized four measures of juvenile psychopathy: the Modified Childhood Psychopathy Scale (mCPS; Lynam, 1997), the Antisocial Process Screening Device (APSD; Frick & Hare, 2001; Frick, O'Brien, Wootton, & McBurnett, 1994), the Millon Adolescent Clinical Inventory (MACI; Millon & Davis, 1993; using two derived psychopathy scales), and the Inventory of Callous and Unemotional (ICU) Traits (Frick, 2003), in a sample of 191 incarcerated adolescent sex offenders located in juvenile detention facilities across a Midwestern state. We found that of the four instruments and seven subscales, only the APSD Narcissism and Impulsivity Scale was significantly correlated to a characteristic of sexual crime (i.e., number of victims, level of crime severity). No subscales were found to predict sexual crime at a significant level. However, several scales were correlated to the total delinquency score as measured by the Self-Reported Delinquency Measure. In a series of multiple regressions, the MACI Factor 2 and ICU total score were determined as the best fit to total nonsexual delinquency. Implications are offered. PMID:23525176

Morrell, Laura M; Burton, David L

2014-05-01

260

Corticostriatal-limbic Gray Matter Morphology in Adolescents with Self-Reported Exposure to Childhood Maltreatment  

PubMed Central

Objective To study the relationship between self-reported childhood maltreatment and cerebral gray matter in adolescents without psychiatric diagnoses. Design Associations between childhood maltreatment (measured by a childhood trauma self-report questionnaire for physical, emotional and sexual abuse, and physical and emotional neglect) and regional gray matter were examined. Setting University hospital. Participants 42 adolescents without psychiatric disorders. Outcome Measures Correlations between childhood trauma questionnaire scores and regional gray matter volume were assessed in voxel-based analyses of structural magnetic resonance scans. Relationships between gray matter volume and childhood maltreatment subtypes and gender where explored. Results Total childhood trauma questionnaire scores correlated negatively (p<0.005) with gray matter volumes in prefrontal cortex, striatum, amygdala, sensory association cortices and cerebellum. Physical abuse, physical neglect and emotional neglect were associated with rostral prefrontal reductions. Additionally, decreases in dorsolateral and orbitofrontal cortices, insula, and ventral striatum were associated with physical abuse, in cerebellum with physical neglect, and in dorsolateral, orbitofrontal and subgenual prefrontal cortices, striatum, amygdala, hippocampus and cerebellum with emotional neglect. These latter emotion regulation regions were also associated with childhood trauma questionnaire scores in females, while caudate reductions, which may relate to impulse dyscontrol, were seen in males. Conclusions Childhood maltreatment was associated with corticostriatal-limbic gray matter reductions in adolescents. These findings suggest that even if adolescents reporting childhood maltreatment exposure do not present with symptoms that meet full criteria for psychiatric disorders, they may have corticostriatal-limbic changes that place them at risk for behavioral difficulties. Vulnerabilities may be moderated by gender and maltreatment subtype. PMID:22147775

Edmiston, Erin E.; Wang, Fei; Mazure, Carolyn M.; Guiney, Joanne; Sinha, Rajita; Mayes, Linda C.; Blumberg, Hilary P.

2013-01-01

261

Scientists’ Perceptions of Organizational Justice and Self-Reported Misbehaviors  

PubMed Central

policymakers concerned about maintaining the integrity of science have recently expanded their attention from a focus on misbehaving individuals to characteristics of the environments in which scientists work. Little empirical evidence exists about the role of organizational justice in promoting or hindering scientific integrity. Our findings indicate that when scientists believe they are being treated unfairly they are more likely to behave in ways that compromise the integrity of science. Perceived violations of distributive and procedural justice were positively associated with self-reports of misbehavior among scientists. PMID:16810337

Martinson, Brian C.; Anderson, Melissa S.; Crain, A. Lauren; De Vries, Raymond

2006-01-01

262

Self-Reported Experiences of Discrimination and Cardiovascular Disease  

PubMed Central

Researchers have long speculated that exposure to discrimination may increase cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk but compared to other psychosocial risk factors, large-scale epidemiologic and community based studies examining associations between reports of discrimination and CVD risk have only emerged fairly recently. This review summarizes findings from studies of self-reported experiences of discrimination and CVD risk published between 2011–2013. We document the innovative advances in recent work, the notable heterogeneity in these studies, and the considerable need for additional work with objective clinical endpoints other than blood pressure. Implications for the study of racial disparities in CVD and clinical practice are also discussed. PMID:24729825

Lewis, Tené T.; Williams, David R.; Tamene, Mahader; Clark, Cheryl R.

2014-01-01

263

Validation of the Cancer Care Monitor Items for Physical Symptoms and Treatment Side Effects Using Expert Oncology Nurse Evaluation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Cancer Care Monitor (CCM) is a tablet computer-based multidimensional measure of symptom burden and quality of life. This study examined individual item validity for 42 items measuring general physical symptoms and treatment side effects. Patients (40 females and 20 males) completed the CCM and a blinded nurse interview. In general, patient self-reported symptoms on the CCM corresponded well to

Barry Fortner; Scott Baldwin; Lee Schwartzberg; Arthur C. Houts

2006-01-01

264

Relations Between Posttraumatic Stress Symptom Dimensions and Substance Dependence in a Community-Recruited Sample of Substance-Abusing Women  

Microsoft Academic Search

The factor structure of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, and correlations between PTSD dimensions and substance dependence, were examined in 295 substance-abusing women. Participants completed self-report measures of trauma exposure, PTSD symptoms, and alcohol dependence and underwent interviews regarding dependence on prescription anxiolytics and analgesics. Overall, PTSD symptoms were moderate in intensity, and 46% of the sample met criteria for

Sherry H. Stewart; Patricia J. Conrod; Robert O. Pihl; Maurice Dongier

1999-01-01

265

The relationship between workers’ self-reported changes in health and their attitudes towards a workplace intervention: lessons from smoke-free legislation across the UK hospitality industry  

PubMed Central

Background The evaluation of smoke-free legislation (SFL) in the UK examined the impacts on exposure to second-hand smoke, workers’ attitudes and changes in respiratory health. Studies that investigate changes in the health of groups of people often use self-reported symptoms. Due to the subjective nature it is of interest to determine whether workers’ attitudes towards the change in their working conditions may be linked to the change in health they report. Methods Bar workers were recruited before the introduction of the SFL in Scotland and England with the aim of investigating their changes to health, attitudes and exposure as a result of the SFL. They were asked about their attitudes towards SFL and the presence of respiratory and sensory symptoms both before SFL and one year later. Here we examine the possibility of a relationship between initial attitudes and changes in reported symptoms, through the use of regression analyses. Results There was no difference in the initial attitudes towards SFL between those working in Scotland and England. Bar workers who were educated to a higher level tended to be more positive towards SFL. Attitude towards SFL was not found to be related to change in reported symptoms for bar workers in England (Respiratory, p?=?0.755; Sensory, p?=?0.910). In Scotland there was suggestion of a relationship with reporting of respiratory symptoms (p?=?0.042), where those who were initially more negative to SFL experienced a greater improvement in self-reported health. Conclusions There was no evidence that workers who were more positive towards SFL reported greater improvements in respiratory and sensory symptoms. This may not be the case in all interventions and we recommend examining subjects’ attitudes towards the proposed intervention when evaluating possible health benefits using self-reported methods. PMID:22551087

2012-01-01

266

The Influence of Depressive Symptoms on Suicidal Ideation Among U.S. Vietnam-Era and Afghanistan/Iraq-Era Veterans With Posttraumatic Stress Disorder  

PubMed Central

Major depressive disorder (MDD) co-occurs frequently with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and both disorders are linked to suicidal ideation. An emergent literature examines suicidal ideation in U.S. Afghanistan/Iraq-era veterans. Little research, however, has studied the role of PTSD and comorbid MDD on suicidal ideation across service eras. Therefore, this study aimed to examine the impact of depression on suicidal ideation in Afghanistan/Iraq-era and Vietnam-era veterans with PTSD. The sample included 164 Vietnam and 98 Afghanistan/Iraq veterans diagnosed with PTSD at a VA outpatient PTSD Clinic. Using structured interviews, 63% of the Vietnam sample and 45% of the Afghanistan/Iraq sample were diagnosed with comorbid current MDD. Measures included self-report assessments of PTSD and depressive symptoms and the Personality Assessment Inventory. Results of analyses suggested that in veterans of both eras, PTSD, MDD, and their interaction were significantly related to suicidal ideation (PTSD: ?2 = .01; MDD: ?2 = .10; PTSD × MDD: ?2 = .02). For veterans reporting greater depressive symptoms, there was a stronger relationship between PTSD symptoms and suicidal ideation. These results suggest that veterans from both eras display a similar clinical presentation and highlight the need to consider depressive symptoms when assessing veterans with PTSD. Future research should examine suicidal ideation and behaviors as they change over time in these two cohorts. PMID:23047458

Pukay-Martin, Nicole D.; Pontoski, Kristin E.; Maxwell, Melissa A.; Calhoun, Patrick S.; Dutton, Courtney E.; Clancy, Carolina P.; Hertzberg, Michael A.; Collie, Claire F.; Beckham, Jean C.

2013-01-01

267

ADHD Symptom Levels and Romantic Relationship Quality in College Students.  

PubMed

Abstract. Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine whether ADHD symptom levels in college undergraduates are associated with poorer romantic relationship quality, and to test whether emotion regulation difficulties, perceived stress, and hostile relationship conflict mediate this association. Participants: The sample consisted of 189 undergraduate students ages 18 to 25. Methods: Self-report measures of ADHD symptoms, relationship quality, and the proposed mediators were collected via online survey from May through August of 2011. Results: Participants who reported clinically significant levels of both hyperactivity-impulsivity and inattentiveness (consistent with ADHD-C) had lower relationship quality than those whose self-reported symptoms indicated no ADHD diagnosis. Further, for women only, both hyperactive/impulsive and inattentive symptom levels were negatively associated with relationship quality. Emotion regulation problems and hostile relationship conflict mediated this association. Conclusion: Findings suggest that ADHD impairs relationship quality among young adults, and suggest mechanisms through which this impairment might occur. PMID:25350392

Bruner, Michael R; Kuryluk, Amanda D; Whitton, Sarah W

2014-10-28

268

Life Stress: Related Symptoms, Subjective Appraisal and Coping Styles.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Stress and its influence upon physiological and emotional functioning has been well documented in research literature. In order to extend this research to study the relationship between accumulated life stress, symptoms, and coping responses, 202 college graduates and undergraduates, (144 females and 58 males) responded to three self-report

Kantner, James E.; And Others

269

Symptom differences in moderate to severe IBS patients based on predominant bowel habit  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE:We sought to determine if irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients with different bowel habit predominance differ in self-reported viscerosensory symptoms related to the upper and lower gastrointestinal (GI) tract, somatosensory symptoms, and constitutional functions.METHODS:Six hundred and twenty-five Rome criteria-positive IBS patients completed a bowel symptom questionnaire (BSQ), psychological symptom checklist (SCL-90), and health status (SF-36). Bowel habit predominance for IBS

Max Schmulson; Oh-Young Lee; Lin Chang; Bruce Naliboff; Emeran A Mayer

1999-01-01

270

Inventory Control Related Sites  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Inventory Control Related Sites is a straightforward index of Websites dealing with inventory control, created by Kyle Thill, a 20-year veteran of inventory control. The sites are fully annotated and cover Census Bureau information, articles, and other metasites.

271

The Youth Form of the Motivators of and Barriers to Health-Smart Behaviors Inventory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: To develop a youth form of the Motivators of and Barriers to Health-Smart Behaviors Inventory (MB-HSBI--Youth) for use in identifying self-reported motivators of and barriers to the following health-promoting behaviors (called "health-smart" behaviors): eating a healthy breakfast, eating healthy foods and snacks, drinking healthy…

Tucker, Carolyn M.; Rice, Kenneth G.; Desmond, Frederic F.; Hou, Wei; Kaye, Lillian B.; Smith, Tasia M.

2012-01-01

272

Development of the Motivators of and Barriers to Health-Smart Behaviors Inventory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Motivators of and Barriers to Health-Smart Behaviors Inventory (MB-HSBI) was developed for use in identifying self-reported motivators of and barriers to the following health-promoting behaviors (called "health-smart behaviors") that should occur daily to help promote health and overcome illnesses/diseases: eating a healthy breakfast, eating…

Tucker, Carolyn M.; Rice, Kenneth G.; Hou, Wei; Kaye, Lillian B.; Nolan, Sarah E. M.; Grandoit, Delphia J.; Gonzales, Lucia; Smith, Mary B.; Desmond, Frederic F.

2011-01-01

273

The multidimensional Fatigue Inventory (MFI) psychometric qualities of an instrument to assess fatigue  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory (MFI) is a 20-item self-report instrument designed to measure fatigue. It covers the following dimensions: General Fatigue, Physical Fatigue, Mental Fatigue, Reduced Motivation and Reduced Activity. This new instrument was tested for its psychometric properties in cancer patients receiving radiotherapy, patients with the chronic fatigue syndrome, psychology students, medical students, army recruits and junior physicians. We

E. M. A. Smets; B. Garssen; B. Bonke

1995-01-01

274

Effect of the Range of Response Options on Answers to Biographical Inventory Items  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The range of response options has been shown to influence the answers given in self-report instruments that measure behaviors ranging from television viewing to sexual partners. The current research extends this line of inquiry to 36 quantitative items extracted from a biographical inventory used in personnel selection. A total of 92…

Kirnan, Jean Powell; Edler, Erin; Carpenter, Allison

2007-01-01

275

Reliability of the ecSatter Inventory as a Tool to Measure Eating Competence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: To examine the reliability of the ecSatter Inventory (ecSI), a measure of eating competence. Design: Self-report questionnaires were administered in person or by mail. Retesting occurred 2 to 6 weeks after completion of the first questionnaire. Participants: Both administrations of the questionnaire were completed by 259 participants…

Stotts, Jodi L.; Lohse, Barbara

2007-01-01

276

The Latent Structure of Multiphasic Sex Inventory-Assessed Pedophilic Interest  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Multiphasic Sex Inventory (MSI; Nichols & Molinder, 1984) is a self-report measure frequently used in the assessment of sex offenders. Scores on the MSI are often used to assess levels of pedophilic interest. However, the question of whether men with pedophilia represent a unique group distinguished by their sexual interests, or whether they…

Mackaronis, Julia E.; Strassberg, Donald S.; Marcus, David K.

2011-01-01

277

Measuring Personal Growth Attributed to a Semester of College Life Using the Posttraumatic Growth Inventory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this descriptive exploratory study, the Posttraumatic Growth Inventory (PTGI; Tedeschi & Calhoun, 1996) was used to measure levels of personal growth attributed by college students (N = 117) to a semester of university life in retrospective self-reports. Results reflect attributions of substantial total growth in the range reported in the…

Anderson, Walter P., Jr.; Lopez-Baez, Sandra I.

2011-01-01

278

The Strengths Assessment Inventory: Reliability of a New Measure of Psychosocial Strengths for Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A new measure, the Strengths Assessment Inventory-Youth self-report (SAI-Y), was recently developed to assess the strengths of children and adolescents between the ages of 10 and 18 years. The SAI-Y differs from similar measures in that it provides a comprehensive assessment of strengths that are intrinsic to the individual as well as strengths…

Brazeau, James N.; Teatero, Missy L.; Rawana, Edward P.; Brownlee, Keith; Blanchette, Loretta R.

2012-01-01

279

Concurrent Validity of the Bem Sex Role Inventory: A Person-Environment Approach.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Subjects read a situation description and rated the likelihood of their taking the response designated as appropriate. Regression analyses revealed the contributions of sex and the traits of instrumentality and emotional expressiveness (as measures earlier by the Bem Sex Role Inventory) to self-reported instrumentality and emotional…

Taylor, Dawn

1984-01-01

280

The social conflict inventory (SCI): A measure of beliefs about classroom peer conflicts  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study describes the development of the Social Conflict Inventory (SCI), a self?report teacher belief scale for assessing beliefs about young children's classroom peer conflicts. Three phases were involved in the construction of the SCI: item development, initial testing with one sample (n = 218), and follow?up field test with a second sample (n = 395) that also addressed the

Dora W. Chen; Kenneth E. Smith

2002-01-01

281

The Inventory of Pre-Marital Conflict: Clinical and Educational Applications.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Inventory of Pre-Marital Conflict (IPMC) is a systematic procedure for the diagnosis and assessment of pre-marital conflict and related issues. The self-report component of the IPMC involves a series of 18 hypothetical conflict situations. The individual responds to each of these by evaluating who is primarily responsible for the problem, and…

Fournier, David G.; And Others

282

The Validation of a New Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Scale: The Obsessive-Compulsive Inventory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Obsessive-Compulsive Inventory (OCI), a new self-report measure for determining the diagnosis and severity of obsessive- compulsive disorder (OCD), was validated with 141 patients with OCD, 58 with social phobia, 44 with posttraumatic stress disorder, and 194 nonpatients. The OCI exhibited satisfactory reliability and validity with all four…

Foa, Edna B.; Kozak, Michael J.; Salkovskis, Paul M.; Coles, Meredith E.; Amir, Nader

1998-01-01

283

Psychometric properties of the problem solving inventory in a group of Turkish university students  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Problem Solving Inventory (PSI; Heppner & Petersen, 1982) is a widely used self-report measure of applied problem solving in the United States. This study examined the psychometric properties of the PSI in a Turkish cultural context, specifically with regard to normative, reliability, and validity information. Subjects were 244 Turkish university students (153 women, 71 men) who completed the Turkish

Nail Sahin; Nesrin H. Sahin; P. Paul Heppner

1993-01-01

284

Rasch Modeling of the Self-Deception Scale of the Balanced Inventory of Desirable Responding  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Self-deception has become a construct of great interest in individual differences research because it has been associated with levels of resilience and mental health. The Balanced Inventory of Desirable Responding (BIDR) is a self-report measure used for quantifying self-deception. In this study we used Rasch modeling to examine the properties of…

Cervellione, Kelly L.; Lee, Young-Sun; Bonanno, George A.

2009-01-01

285

Genome-Wide Association Analysis of Eating Disorder-Related Symptoms, Behaviors, and Personality Traits  

PubMed Central

Eating disorders (EDs) are common, complex psychiatric disorders thought to be caused by both genetic and environmental factors. They share many symptoms, behaviors, and personality traits, which may have overlapping heritability. The aim of the present study is to perform a genome-wide association scan (GWAS) of six ED phenotypes comprising three symptom traits from the Eating Disorders Inventory 2 [Drive for Thinness (DT), Body Dissatisfaction (BD), and Bulimia], Weight Fluctuation symptom, Breakfast Skipping behavior and Childhood Obsessive-Compulsive Personality Disorder trait (CHIRP). Investigated traits were derived from standardized self-report questionnaires completed by the TwinsUK population-based cohort. We tested 283,744 directly typed SNPs across six phenotypes of interest in the TwinsUK discovery dataset and followed-up signals from various strata using a two-stage replication strategy in two independent cohorts of European ancestry. We meta-analyzed a total of 2,698 individuals for DT, 2,680 for BD, 2,789 (821 cases/1,968 controls) for Bulimia, 1,360 (633 cases/727 controls) for Childhood Obsessive-Compulsive Personality Disorder trait, 2,773 (761 cases/2,012 controls) for Breakfast Skipping, and 2,967 (798 cases/2,169 controls) for Weight Fluctuation symptom. In this GWAS analysis of six ED-related phenotypes, we detected association of eight genetic variants with P < 10?5. Genetic variants that showed suggestive evidence of association were previously associated with several psychiatric disorders and ED-related phenotypes. Our study indicates that larger-scale collaborative studies will be needed to achieve the necessary power to detect loci underlying ED-related traits. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:22911880

Boraska, Vesna; Davis, Oliver SP; Cherkas, Lynn F; Helder, Sietske G; Harris, Juliette; Krug, Isabel; Pei-Chi Liao, Thomas; Treasure, Janet; Ntalla, Ioanna; Karhunen, Leila; Keski-Rahkonen, Anna; Christakopoulou, Danai; Raevuori, Anu; Shin, So-Youn; Dedoussis, George V; Kaprio, Jaakko; Soranzo, Nicole; Spector, Tim D; Collier, David A; Zeggini, Eleftheria

2012-01-01

286

The Value of Suppressor Effects in Explicating the Construct Validity of Symptom Measures  

PubMed Central

Suppressor effects are operating when the addition of a predictor increases the predictive power of another variable. We argue that suppressor effects can play a valuable role in explicating the construct validity of symptom measures by bringing into clearer focus opposing elements that are inherent—but largely hidden—in the measure’s overall score. We illustrate this point using theoretically grounded, replicated suppressor effects that have emerged in analyses of the original Inventory of Depression and Anxiety Symptoms (IDAS; Watson et al., 2007) and its expanded second version (IDAS-II; Watson et al., 2012). In Study 1, we demonstrate that the IDAS-II Appetite Gain and Appetite Loss scales contain both (a) a shared distress component that creates a positive correlation between them and (b) a specific symptom component that produces a natural negative association between them (i.e., people who recently have experienced decreased interest in food/loss of appetite are less likely to report a concomitant increase in appetite/weight). In Study 2, we establish that mania scales also contain two distinct elements—namely, high energy/positive emotionality and general distress/dysfunction—that oppose each another in many instances. In both studies, we obtained evidence of suppression effects that were highly robust across different types of respondents (e.g., clinical outpatients, community adults, college students) and using both self-report and interview-based measures. These replicable suppressor effects establish that many homogeneous, unidimensional symptom scales actually contain distinguishable components with distinct—at times, even antagonistic—properties. PMID:23795886

Watson, David; Clark, Lee Anna; Chmielewski, Michael; Kotov, Roman

2013-01-01

287

Obsessive compulsive symptoms at initial presentation of adolescent eating disorders  

Microsoft Academic Search

An association between obsessive compulsive disorder and eating disorders has often been reported in the literature. It has\\u000a been suggested that the association may be accounted for by depression, starvation or family factors but the literature remains\\u000a inconclusive. In this study self-report scales were used to measure eating attitudes, obsessional symptoms, depressive symptoms\\u000a and family functioning in an eating disordered

E. Cassidy; M. Allsopp; T. Williams

1999-01-01

288

Dissociative symptoms and amnesia in Dutch concentration camp survivors  

Microsoft Academic Search

We examined to what extent dissociative phenomena in concentration camp survivors are related to post-traumatic stress symptoms. Self-reports of amnesia for traumatic war events and other dissociative experiences were studied in a sample of 31 Dutch survivors of World War II (WWII) Japanese concentration camps. Seventeen survivors treated for war-related psychiatric symptoms were compared to 14 concentration camp survivors who

Harald Merckelbach; Theo Dekkers; Ineke Wessel; Anne Roefs

2003-01-01

289

Depressive Symptoms in Mothers and Children: Preschool Attachment as a Moderator of Risk  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Drawing from transactional models, the authors examined whether attachment security measured at age 3 (a potential source of differential vulnerability) interacts with the course of maternal depressive symptoms over an 8-year period (a potential source of differential exposure) in predicting children's self-reported depressive symptoms at age 11.…

Milan, Stephanie; Snow, Stephanie; Belay, Sophia

2009-01-01

290

Persistent Nonmedical Use of Prescription Stimulants among College Students: Possible Association with ADHD Symptoms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: To investigate the possible association between untreated ADHD symptoms (as measured by the Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale) and persistent nonmedical use of prescription stimulants. Method: Multinomial regression modeling was used to compare ADHD symptoms among three groups of college students enrolled in a longitudinal study over 4…

Arria, Amelia M.; Garnier-Dykstra, Laura M.; Caldeira, Kimberly M.; Vincent, Kathryn B.; O'Grady, Kevin E.; Wish, Eric D.

2011-01-01

291

Depression as a Moderator of Sociocultural Influences on Eating Disorder Symptoms in Adolescent Females and Males  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study aimed to explore the role of depression as a moderator of sociocultural influences on eating disorder symptoms. A sample of 509 adolescents (56% female) completed self-report questionnaires assessing depression, body dissatisfaction, drive for thinness, bulimic symptoms and sociocultural influences on appearance from family, peers and…

Rodgers, Rachel F.; Paxton, Susan J.; Chabrol, Henri

2010-01-01

292

Rotavirus Symptoms  

MedlinePLUS

... Rotavirus Vaccine Program American Academy of Pediatrics Symptoms Language: English Español (Spanish) Share Compartir Español: SÃntomas Rotavirus ... PATH's Rotavirus Vaccine Program American Academy of Pediatrics Language: English Español (Spanish) File Formats Help: How do I ...

293

Syphilis Symptoms  

MedlinePLUS

... JavaScript on. Read more information on enabling JavaScript. Syphilis Skip Content Marketing Share this: Main Content Area ... occurs in four stages that sometimes overlap. Primary Syphilis The first symptom of primary syphilis is often ...

294

Characteristics of self-reported memory compensation in older adults.  

PubMed

Self-reported efforts to compensate for memory impairments in everyday life were examined. In seven scales, the Memory Compensation Questionnaire (MCQ) measures five mechanisms of memory compensation, as well as motivation to compensate and awareness of need to compensate. The MCQ was administered twice, at a 3-year interval, to a large sample of healthy older adults (aged initially 55-85 years) from the Victoria Longitudinal Study. Concurrent analyses (n = 854) revealed an excellent set of psychometric properties for the MCQ and its scales. Two-wave longitudinal analyses (n = 629) revealed overall short-term stability of compensatory strategy use. Although all groups reported a similar pattern of relative frequencies of compensatory mechanism use, select qualifications of age and gender were detected. Applications of the MCQ to investigate awareness, motivation, and implementation of compensatory memory strategies in various populations are discussed. PMID:11778642

Dixon, R A; de Frias, C M; Bäckman, L

2001-10-01

295

Self-reported Magic Eye™ stereogram skill predicts stereoacuity  

PubMed Central

Autostereograms—commonly known as Magic Eye™ stereograms (MESs)—are two-dimensional images that support stereoscopic depth perception given an appropriate crossing or uncrossing of the eyes. We find that self-reported MES skill is highly predictive of stereoacuity as measured by a standard clinical test (r142 = 0.45, p < 0.0001; TNO test). Indeed, in our sample of 194 individuals, those who report poor MES skill have a five-fold increased risk of stereo impairment. Those who report poor MES skill also require on average five times greater binocular disparity to perceive stereoscopic depth than those who report good MES skill. Reported MES skill thus carries significant information about stereoacuity. PMID:18853564

Wilmer, Jeremy B; Backus, Benjamin T

2008-01-01

296

Seat belt use among rear passengers: validity of self-reported versus observational measures  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The effects of seat belt laws and public education campaigns on seat belt use are assessed on the basis of observational or self-reported data on seat belt use. Previous studies focusing on front seat occupants have shown that self-reports indicate a greater seat belt usage than observational findings. Whether this over-reporting in self reports applies to rear seat belt

Francesco Zambon; Ugo Fedeli; Maria Marchesan; Elena Schievano; Antonio Ferro; Paolo Spolaore

2008-01-01

297

Self-Reported and Actual Savings in a Water Conservation Campaign  

Microsoft Academic Search

Data from a survey questionnaire and from water utility billing records are used to compare self-reported and actual water savings for 471 households during a conservation campaign. Self-reports are only weakly related to actual changes in water consumption. Errors are widespread, and not wholly random: The accuracy of self-reports increases with household socioeconomic status and with the extent of conservation

Lawrence C. Hamilton

1985-01-01

298

Comparison of Self-Reported and Physician-Reported Antidepressant Medication Use  

Microsoft Academic Search

PURPOSE: Self-reported medication histories obtained in pharmacoepidemiologic case-control studies are subject to non-differential misclassification and to recall bias. The accuracy of self-reported antidepressant medication use has never been evaluated, but it is important in light of the hypothesis that antidepressant medications may be associated with cancer risk.METHODS: Within a case-control study of several cancer sites, we compared self-reported antidepressant medication

Michelle Cotterchio; Nancy Kreiger; Gerarda Darlington; Allan Steingart

1999-01-01

299

Construct Validity of Three Self-Report Measures of Creativity.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Relations were examined among the CPI Creativity Scale (CPI-CT), the MBTI Creativity Index (MBTI-CI), and the Kirton Adaption-Innovation Inventory (KAI; a style measure of behavioral preference) for samples of 431 to 12,115 managers. KAI scores were related to CPI-CT and MBTI-CI creativity levels. (SLD)

Fleenor, John W.; Taylor, Sylvester

1994-01-01

300

Body Awareness: Construct and Self-Report Measures  

PubMed Central

Objectives Heightened body awareness can be adaptive and maladaptive. Improving body awareness has been suggested as an approach for treating patients with conditions such as chronic pain, obesity and post-traumatic stress disorder. We assessed the psychometric quality of selected self-report measures and examined their items for underlying definitions of the construct. Data sources PubMed, PsychINFO, HaPI, Embase, Digital Dissertations Database. Review methods Abstracts were screened; potentially relevant instruments were obtained and systematically reviewed. Instruments were excluded if they exclusively measured anxiety, covered emotions without related physical sensations, used observer ratings only, or were unobtainable. We restricted our study to the proprioceptive and interoceptive channels of body awareness. The psychometric properties of each scale were rated using a structured evaluation according to the method of McDowell. Following a working definition of the multi-dimensional construct, an inter-disciplinary team systematically examined the items of existing body awareness instruments, identified the dimensions queried and used an iterative qualitative process to refine the dimensions of the construct. Results From 1,825 abstracts, 39 instruments were screened. 12 were included for psychometric evaluation. Only two were rated as high standard for reliability, four for validity. Four domains of body awareness with 11 sub-domains emerged. Neither a single nor a compilation of several instruments covered all dimensions. Key domains that might potentially differentiate adaptive and maladaptive aspects of body awareness were missing in the reviewed instruments. Conclusion Existing self-report instruments do not address important domains of the construct of body awareness, are unable to discern between adaptive and maladaptive aspects of body awareness, or exhibit other psychometric limitations. Restricting the construct to its proprio- and interoceptive channels, we explore the current understanding of the multi-dimensional construct and suggest next steps for further research. PMID:19440300

Mehling, Wolf E.; Gopisetty, Viranjini; Daubenmier, Jennifer; Price, Cynthia J.; Hecht, Frederick M.; Stewart, Anita

2009-01-01

301

Distribution and Correlates of Self-Reported Crimes of Trust  

PubMed Central

This study examines the distribution and correlates of a special class of property crimes, crimes of trust, using longitudinal and cross sectional self-report data from a national sample. We begin by defining crimes of trust and consider their conceptual relationship to “conventional” property crimes, which we here characterize as crimes of stealth, and to white collar crimes, which are defined in terms of the social status of the perpetrators. Crimes of trust are here defined as property crimes that typically involve deliberate contact with the victim or, where there is more than one victim, with at least one or more victims, in which there is typically more of a focus on concealing the fact that a crime has been committed than on concealing the identity of the perpetrator (as is the case in crimes of stealth), without regard to the socioeconomic status of the perpetrator (thus including but not limited to white collar crimes). The focus here is on crimes of trust committed by individuals (as opposed to corporate crime). We first examine their distribution by sociodemographic characteristics, then examine the correlation of crimes of trust with other types of illegal behavior, using data from the National Youth Survey Family Study, including (1) longitudinal self-report data from a nationally representative panel of individuals who were 11–18 years old in 1976–77 and who were followed through early middle age (ages 36–44) in 2002–2003, plus (2) cross-sectional data on these individuals plus their parents, spouses, and children age 11 and older in 2002–2003 (total age range 11–88). The results suggest that crimes of trust have a different age-crime curve from conventional crimes, and that they are not as strongly correlated with problem substance use, gender, and other socioeconomic indicators as conventional crimes. PMID:22347761

Menard, Scott; Morris, Robert G.; Gerber, Jurg; Covey, Herbert C.

2012-01-01

302

Psychometric Properties of the Geriatric Anxiety Scale: Comparison to the Beck Anxiety Inventory and Geriatric Anxiety Inventory  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study explored the convergent and discriminant validity of the Geriatric Anxiety Scale (GAS), a new measure of anxiety symptoms for older adults. The GAS, Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), Geriatric Anxiety Inventory (GAI), Beck Depression Inventory, Second Edition (BDI-II), and Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) were administered to 117 community-dwelling, predominantly White, older adults (62% female; M age = 74.75 years,

Brian P. Yochim; Anne E. Mueller; Andrea June; Daniel L. Segal

2010-01-01

303

Self-reported hearing loss among workers potentially exposed to industrial noise-United States  

SciTech Connect

Noise-induced loss of hearing has been recognized as an occupational health problem since the 18th century. Occupational deafness is an irreversible, sensorineural condition that results from damage to the nerve cells of the inner ear. Recent estimates from surveys indicate that between 7.4 and 10.2 million people work at sites where the level of noise presents an increased risk of hearing loss (85 decibels (dBA) or higher). During the period of 1978-1987, an estimated $835 million was paid in workers' compensation claims for occupationally induced hearing impairment. To assess the prevalence of hearing-loss symptoms among adult workers in the United States, investigators from the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) recently analyzed data collected during the 1971 and 1977 National Health Interview Surveys (NHIS) conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS). For this study, the prevalence of self-reported hearing loss was obtained for all persons over 17 years of age who were in the labor force at the time of interview. Data from the 1972-1974 National Occupational Hazard Survey (NOHS) were used to classify worksites by noise level. NOHS was conducted by NIOSH from 1972 to 1974 on a probability sample of approximately 5000 workplaces across the United States. The survey provides information on potential exposures of workers to chemical and physical agents. These data identified industries and occupations in which employees are exposed to continuous noise.

Not Available

1988-04-15

304

Tai chi training reduces self-report of inattention in healthy young adults  

PubMed Central

It is important to identify effective non-pharmacological alternatives to stimulant medications that reduce symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). In this study of healthy young adults, we measured the effects of training in tai chi, which involves mindful attention to the body during movement. Using a non-randomized, controlled, parallel design, students in a 15-week introductory tai chi course (n = 28) and control participants (n = 44) were tested for ADHD indicators and cognitive function at three points over the course of the 15-weeks. The tai chi students’ self-report of attention, but not hyperactivity–impulsivity, improved compared to controls. At baseline, inattention correlated positively with reaction time variability in an affective go/no-go task across all participants, and improvements in attention correlated with reductions in reaction time variability across the tai chi students. Affective bias changed in the tai chi students, as reaction times to positive- and negative-valenced words equalized over time. These results converge to suggest that tai chi training may help improve attention in healthy young adults. Further studies are needed to confirm these results and to evaluate tai chi as therapy for individuals with ADHD. PMID:24478679

Converse, Alexander K.; Ahlers, Elizabeth O.; Travers, Brittany G.; Davidson, Richard J.

2014-01-01

305

Psychometric validation study of the liebowitz social anxiety scale - self-reported version for Brazilian Portuguese.  

PubMed

Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD) is prevalent and rarely diagnosed due to the difficulty in recognizing its symptoms as belonging to a disorder. Therefore, the evaluation/screening scales are of great importance for its detection, with the most used being the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale (LSAS). Thus, this study proposed to evaluate the psychometric properties of internal consistency and convergent validity, as well as the confirmatory factorial analysis and reliability of the self-reported version of the LSAS (LSAS-SR), translated into Brazilian Portuguese, in a sample of the general population (N?=?413) and in a SAD clinical sample (N?=?252). The convergent validity with specific scales for the evaluation of SAD and a general anxiety scale presented correlations ranging from 0.21 to 0.84. The confirmatory factorial analysis did not replicate the previously indicated findings of the literature, with the difficulty being in obtaining a consensus factorial structure common to the diverse cultures in which the instrument was studied. The LSAS-SR presented excellent internal consistency (??=?0.90-0.96) and test-retest reliability (Intraclass Correlation Coefficient?=?0.81; Pearson's?=?0.82). The present findings support those of international studies that attest to the excellent psychometric properties of the LSAS-SR, endorsing its status as the gold standard. PMID:23922961

Forni dos Santos, Larissa; Loureiro, Sonia Regina; Crippa, José Alexandre de Souza; Osório, Flávia de Lima

2013-01-01

306

Functional Impairments as Symptoms in the Symptom Cluster Analysis of Patients Newly Diagnosed With Advanced Cancer  

PubMed Central

Context Symptoms and subsequent functional impairment have been associated with the biological processes of a disease, including the interaction between the disease and treatment in a measurement model of symptoms. However, hitherto cluster analysis has primarily focused on symptoms. Objectives This study among patients within 100 days of diagnosis with advanced cancer explored whether self-reported physical symptoms and functional impairments formed clusters at the time of diagnosis. Methods We applied the cluster analysis to self-reported symptoms and activities of daily living of 111 patients newly diagnosed with advanced gastrointestinal (GI), gynecological, head and neck, and lung cancers. Based on the content, expert evaluations, the best techniques, variables were identified, yielding the best solution. Results The best cluster solution used a K-means algorithm and cosine similarity and yielded five clusters of physical as well as emotional symptoms and functional impairments. Cancer site formed the predominant organizing principle of composition for each cluster. The top five symptoms and functional impairments in each cluster were Cluster 1 (GI): outlook, insomnia, appearance, concentration, and eating/feeding; Cluster 2 (GI): appetite, bowel, insomnia, eating/feeding, and appearance; Cluster 3 (gynecological): nausea, insomnia, eating/feeding, concentration, and pain; Cluster 4 (head and neck): dressing, eating/feeding, bathing, toileting, and walking; and Cluster 5 (lung): cough, walking, eating/feeding, breathing, and insomnia. Conclusion Functional impairments in patients newly diagnosed with late-stage cancers behave as symptoms during the diagnostic phase. Health care providers need to expand their assessments to include both symptoms and functional impairments. Early recognition of the functional changes may accelerate diagnosis at an earlier cancer stage. PMID:23380336

Fodeh, Samah J.; Lazenby, Mark; Bai, Mei; Ercolano, Elizabeth; Murphy, Terrence; McCorkle, Ruth

2015-01-01

307

Self-Reported Anger Among Traumatized Children and Adolescents  

Microsoft Academic Search

This investigation sought to establish if anger is associated with PTSD among children and adolescents or with trauma exposure\\u000a in the absence of PTSD. The State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory (STAXI) was administered to youth with PTSD (n=24), traumatized youth without PTSD (n=58), and a non-traumatized control group (n=38). In the absence of potentially confounding major comorbid disorders, the PTSD group

Philip A. Saigh; Anastasia E. Yasik; Richard Oberfield; Phill V. Halamandaris

2007-01-01

308

The Healthy Aging Brain Care (HABC) Monitor: validation of the Patient Self-Report Version of the clinical tool designed to measure and monitor cognitive, functional, and psychological health  

PubMed Central

Background Primary care providers need an inexpensive, simple, user-friendly, easily standardized, sensitive to change, and widely available multidomain instrument to measure the cognitive, functional, and psychological symptoms of patients suffering from multiple chronic conditions. We previously validated the Caregiver Report Version of the Healthy Aging Brain Care Monitor (HABC Monitor) for measuring and monitoring the severity of symptoms through caregiver reports. The purpose of this study was to assess the reliability and validity of the Patient Self-Report Version of the HABC Monitor (Self-Report HABC Monitor). Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Primary care clinics affiliated with a safety net urban health care system in Indianapolis, Indiana, USA. Subjects A total of 291 subjects aged ?65 years with a mean age of 72.7 (standard deviation 6.2) years, 76% female, and 56% African Americans. Analysis Psychometric validity and reliability of the Self-Report HABC Monitor. Results Among 291 patients analyzed, the Self-Report HABC Monitor demonstrated excellent fit for the confirmatory factor analysis model (root mean square error of approximation =0.030, comparative fit index =0.974, weighted root mean square residual =0.837) and good internal consistency (0.78–0.92). Adequate convergent–divergent validity (differences between the Telephone Interview for Cognitive Status test-based cognitive function impairment versus nonimpairment groups) was demonstrated only when patients were removed from analysis if they had both cognitive function test impairment and suspiciously perfect self-report HABC Monitor cognitive floor scores of 0. Conclusion The Self-Report HABC Monitor demonstrates good reliability and validity as a clinically practical multidimensional tool for measuring symptoms. The tool can be used along with its caregiver version to provide useful feedback (via monitoring of symptoms) for modifying care plans. Determining the validity of HABC Monitor scores from patients who self-report a perfect cognitive score of 0 requires cognitive function test results (eg, Telephone Interview for Cognitive Status or Mini Mental State Examination) or Caregiver Report HABC Monitor scores or further clinical examination to rule out the possibility that the patient is denying or unaware of their cognitive symptoms. PMID:25584024

Monahan, Patrick O; Alder, Catherine A; Khan, Babar A; Stump, Timothy; Boustani, Malaz A

2014-01-01

309

Usefulness of Self-Report Instruments in Assessing Men Accused of Domestic Violence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Clinical assessment of domestic violence has traditionally relied on self-report methods of data collection, using structured interviews and lengthy questionnaires such as the MMPI-2. However, in certain situations such as court-ordered domestic violence evaluations, information obtained through self-report methods may be tainted because of…

Helfritz, Laura E.; Stanford, Matthew S.; Conklin, Sarah M.; Greve, Kevin W.; Villemarette-Pittman, Nicole R.; Houston, Rebecca J.

2006-01-01

310

Validation of Self-Report on Smoking among University Students in Korea  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: To validate the self-reported smoking status of Korean university students. Methods: Subjects included 322 Korean university in Korea, who participated in an annual health screening. Data on smoking were collected through a self-reported questionnaire and urine test. The data were analyzed by the McNemar test. Results: In the…

Lee, Chung Yul; Shin, Sunmi; Lee, Hyeon Kyeong; Hong, Yoon Mi

2009-01-01

311

A Comparison of Diversity, Frequency, and Severity Self-Reported Offending Scores among Female Offending Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Despite general consensus over the value of measuring self-reported offending, discrepancies exist in methods of scoring self-reported offending and the length of the reference period over which offending is assessed. This analysis compared the concurrent interassociations and longitudinal predictive strength of diversity, frequency, and severity…

Oudekerk, Barbara A.; Erbacher, Monica K.; Reppucci, N. Dickon

2012-01-01

312

Development and Validation of the Cultural Competence of Program Evaluators (CCPE) Self-Report Scale  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

No self-report measure of cultural competence currently exists in program evaluation. Adapting items from cultural competence measures in fields such as counseling and nursing, the researchers developed the Cultural Competence of Program Evaluators (CCPE) self-report scale. The goals of this study were to validate the CCPE and to assess…

Dunaway, Krystall E.; Morrow, Jennifer A.; Porter, Bryan E.

2012-01-01

313

Correction Equations to Adjust Self-Reported Height and Weight for Obesity Estimates among College Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purposes of this study were to generate correction equations for self-reported height and weight quartiles and to test the accuracy of the body mass index (BMI) classification based on corrected self-reported height and weight among 739 male and 434 female college students. The BMIqc (from height and weight quartile-specific, corrected…

Mozumdar, Arupendra; Liguori, Gary

2011-01-01

314

Congruence of Self-Reported Medications with Pharmacy Prescription Records in Low-Income Older Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: This study examined the congruence of self-reported medications with computerized pharmacy records. Design and Methods: Pharmacy records and self-reported medications were obtained for 294 members of a state pharmaceutical assistance program who also participated in ACTIVE, a clinical trial on cognitive training in nondemented elderly…

Caskie, Grace I. L.; Willis, Sherry L.

2004-01-01

315

Global Self-Esteem, Appearance Satisfaction, and Self-Reported Dieting in Early Adolescence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Global self-esteem, appearance satisfaction, and self-reported dieting are interrelated. This study examines the temporal ordering of global self-esteem and appearance satisfaction across the early adolescence transition, from age 10 to age 14, as well as the independent associations of self-esteem and appearance satisfaction on self-reported

Barker, Erin T.; Bornstein, Marc H.

2010-01-01

316

Using College Students' Self-Reported Learning Outcomes in Scholarly Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this chapter, the author examines the adequacy and appropriateness of self-report data using the lens of construct validity (Kane, 2006; Messick, 1989). Because construct validity focuses on the appropriateness of data for specific uses or interpretations, he limits his discussion to the use of self-report data in scholarly research. Other…

Pike, Gary R.

2011-01-01

317

Comparison of Child Self-Report and Parent Report on the Sibling Need and Involvement Profile  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Considering the needs of siblings is an important component of family-centered practice for children with developmental disabilities. A syntactically and semantically simplified version of the "Sibling Need and Involvement Profile" (SNIP) was developed to allow self-report. Total profile scores for the self-report version correlated well with the…

Senner, Jill E.; Fish, Thomas

2012-01-01

318

Inconsistent Self-Report of Delinquency by Adolescents and Young Adults with ADHD  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of the current study was to test the ability of adolescents and young adults with childhood ADHD to reliably self-report delinquency history. Data were examined from the Pittsburgh ADHD Longitudinal Study (PALS), a follow-up study of children diagnosed with ADHD between 1987 and 1996. Self-report of lifetime delinquency history was…

Sibley, Margaret H.; Pelham, William E.; Molina, Brooke S. G.; Waschbusch, Daniel A.; Gnagy, Elizabeth M.; Babinski, Dara E.; Biswas, Aparajita

2010-01-01

319

Menopausal symptoms  

PubMed Central

Introduction Menopause is a physiological event. In the UK, the median age for onset of menopausal symptoms is 45.5 to 47.5 years. Although endocrine changes are permanent, menopausal symptoms such as hot flushes, which are experienced by about 70% of women, usually resolve with time, although they can persist for decades in some women. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of medical treatments for menopausal symptoms? What are the effects of non-prescribed treatments for menopausal symptoms? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to March 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 68 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: agnus castus, antidepressants, black cohosh, clonidine, oestrogens, phyto-oestrogens, progestogens, testosterone, and tibolone. PMID:21718582

2010-01-01

320

Menopausal symptoms  

PubMed Central

Introduction Menopause is a physiological event. In the UK, the median age for onset of menopausal symptoms is 45.5 to 47.5 years. Although endocrine changes are permanent, menopausal symptoms such as hot flushes, which are experienced by about 70% of women, usually resolve with time, although they can persist for decades in some women. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of medical treatments for menopausal symptoms? What are the effects of non-prescribed treatments for menopausal symptoms? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to June 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 79 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: agnus castus, antidepressants, black cohosh, clonidine, oestrogens, phyto-oestrogens, progestogens, testosterone, and tibolone. PMID:21696644

2011-01-01

321

The relationship between symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder and pain, affective disturbance and disability among patients with accident and non-accident related pain  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent studies have reported a high prevalence of symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among individuals with chronic pain. Studies suggest that persons with pain and PTSD also display higher levels of affective disturbance. In the present study we examined self-reports of pain, affective disturbance, and disability among pain patients with and without symptoms of PTSD. Patients without PTSD symptoms

Michael E. Geisser; Randy S. Roth; Jan E. Bachman; Thomas A. Eckert

1996-01-01

322

Predictors of Chronic Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms Following Burn Injury: Results of a Longitudinal Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors' goal was to examine the course and predictors of posttraumatic stress symptoms among persons hospitalized for burns. A total of 301 participants completed self-report measures assessing peritraumatic mental state, anxiety related to pain, and posttraumatic stress symptoms. Twenty-six percent of the participants were suffering from posttraumatic stress symptoms at 2–3 weeks postburn and 15% of them at 12

N. E. E. Van Loey; C. J. M. Maas; A. W. Faber; L. A. Taal

2003-01-01

323

Cognitive Pretesting and the Developmental Validity of Child Self-Report Instruments: Theory and Applications  

PubMed Central

Objective In the context of the importance of valid self-report measures to research and evidence-based practice in social work, an argument-based approach to validity is presented and the concept of developmental validity introduced. Cognitive development theories are applied to the self-report process of children and cognitive pretesting is reviewed as a methodology to advance the validity of self-report instruments for children. An application of cognitive pretesting is presented in the development of the Elementary School Success Profile. Method Two phases of cognitive pretesting were completed to gather data about how children read, interpret and answer self-report items. Results Cognitive pretesting procedures identified validity problems with numerous items leading to modifications. Conclusions Cognitive pretesting framed by an argument-based approach to validity holds significant potential to improve the developmental validity of child self-report instruments. PMID:21709820

Woolley, Michael E.; Bowen, Gary L.; Bowen, Natasha K.

2011-01-01

324

Colorectal cancer and self-reported tooth agenesis  

PubMed Central

Background Germline mutations in APC and AXIN2 are both associated with colon neoplasia as well as anomalous dental development. We tested the hypothesis that congenitally missing teeth may occur more commonly in individuals diagnosed with colorectal cancer than in individuals without this diagnosis. Methods Via a survey conducted on 1636 individuals with colorectal cancer (CRC) and 2788 individuals with no colorectal cancer from the Colon Cancer Family Registry, self-reported information on congenitally missing teeth was collected. The frequency of missing teeth between cases and controls was compared using Pearson’s chi-squared test or Fisher’s exact test. Results 4.8% of cases and 5.7% of controls reported having at least one missing tooth (p?=?0.20). When we stratified by recruitment site, gender, and mutation status where available, frequency of missing teeth was not statistically significantly different between cases and controls. Conclusions This study did not provide support for there being a general predisposition to missing teeth among a large cohort of CRC patients. The study neither addresses nor excludes the possibility, however, that individuals presenting with notable hypodontia/oligodontia might still have an increased risk for colorectal neoplasia. PMID:24607150

2014-01-01

325

Online Self-Reporting of Pencil-and-Paper Homework  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Physics teachers are most effective when their students are active learners who think and participate in every class. This extends beyond the classroom too: ideally, students would tackle challenging questions and exercises after every class—not just before the exam or the night before the weekly homework is due. Just-in-Time-Teaching2 was developed to encourage this by having students submit daily homework online; their answers can be quickly graded (by hand) and then used as a springboard for class discussions that day. More recently, online homework services have become available that can automate the grading process and provide instantaneous feedback to students. Unfortunately in both of these cases, the range of possible questions is limited to what can be easily answered via computer. But while pencil and paper is still an easier medium for expressing diagrams and equations, daily collection of paper homework is cumbersome and does not allow same-day feedback. This paper describes a hybrid strategy in which students solve what may be "standard" pencil-and-paper homework problems, and then use a simple online form to self-report their degree of success.

Trawick, Matthew L.

2010-02-01

326

Time-course of the DSM-5 cannabis withdrawal symptoms in poly-substance abusers  

PubMed Central

Background Evidence is accumulating that a cannabis withdrawal syndrome is common, of clinical significance, and has a clear time course. Up till now, very limited data exist on the cannabis withdrawal symptoms in patients with co-morbid substance use disorders, other than cannabis use and tobacco use. Methods Symptoms of withdrawal were assessed through patient self-reports during detoxification in Danish residential rehabilitation centers. Patients (n?=?90) completed booklets three times during their first month at the treatment centre. Self-reported withdrawal symptoms was rated using the DSM-5 Withdrawal Symptom Check List with withdrawal symptoms from all classes of substances, with no indication that the described symptoms should be attributed to withdrawal. Self-reported time since last use of cannabis was used as a predictor of cannabis withdrawal severity. Results With the exception of loss of appetite, time since last use of cannabis was associated with all types of withdrawal symptoms listed in the DSM-5. Only four of 19 symptoms intended to measure withdrawal from other substances were related to time since last use of cannabis, including vivid, unpleasant dreams. Conclusions The findings yield strong support to the notion of a cannabis withdrawal syndrome, and gives further evidence for the inclusion of the criterion of vivid, unpleasant dreams. Further, the findings speak against the significance of demand characteristics in determining the course of the symptoms of cannabis withdrawal. PMID:24118963

2013-01-01

327

Merlino-Perkins Father-Daughter Relationship Inventory (MP-FDI): Construction, Reliability, Validity, and Implications for Counseling and Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Merlino-Perkins Father-Daughter Relationship Inventory, a self-report instrument, assesses women's childhood interactions with supportive, doting, distant, controlling, tyrannical, physically abusive, absent, and seductive fathers. Item and scale development, psychometric findings drawn from factor analyses, reliability assessments, and…

Merlino Perkins, Rose J.

2008-01-01

328

One-Year Test-Retest Reliability of the Inventory of Statements about Self-Injury (ISAS)  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) is a growing public health problem among adolescents and young adults. The Inventory of Statements About Self-Injury (ISAS) is a self-report measure designed to assess NSSI behaviors and functions. The current study examines the one-year test-retest reliability of the ISAS in a sample of young adult self-injurers.…

Glenn, Catherine R.; Klonsky, E. David

2011-01-01

329

Assessing the Affective Features of Psychopathy in Adolescence: A Further Validation of the Inventory of Callous and Unemotional Traits  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To provide an extended assessment of the affective features of psychopathy, Frick developed the Inventory of Callous and Unemotional Traits (ICU), which is a multi-informant questionnaire. Previous studies have provided initial support for the self-report version. The aim of the present study is to investigate the validity of self- as well as…

Roose, Annelore; Bijttebier, Patricia; Decoene, Stefaan; Claes, Laurence; Frick, Paul J.

2010-01-01

330

The Brief Obsessive–Compulsive Scale (BOCS): A self-report scale for OCD and obsessive–compulsive related disorders  

PubMed Central

Background The Brief Obsessive Compulsive Scale (BOCS), derived from the Yale–Brown Obsessive–Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS) and the children’s version (CY-BOCS), is a short self-report tool used to aid in the assessment of obsessive–compulsive symptoms and diagnosis of obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD). It is widely used throughout child, adolescent and adult psychiatry settings in Sweden but has not been validated up to date. Aim The aim of the current study was to examine the psychometric properties of the BOCS amongst a psychiatric outpatient population. Method The BOCS consists of a 15-item Symptom Checklist including three items (hoarding, dysmorphophobia and self-harm) related to the DSM-5 category “Obsessive–compulsive related disorders”, accompanied by a single six-item Severity Scale for obsessions and compulsions combined. It encompasses the revisions made in the Y-BOCS-II severity scale by including obsessive–compulsive free intervals, extent of avoidance and excluding the resistance item. 402 adult psychiatric outpatients with OCD, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, autism spectrum disorder and other psychiatric disorders completed the BOCS. Results Principal component factor analysis produced five subscales titled “Symmetry”, “Forbidden thoughts”, “Contamination”, “Magical thoughts” and “Dysmorphic thoughts”. The OCD group scored higher than the other diagnostic groups in all subscales (P < 0.001). Sensitivities, specificities and internal consistency for both the Symptom Checklist and the Severity Scale emerged high (Symptom Checklist: sensitivity = 85%, specificities = 62–70% Cronbach’s ? = 0.81; Severity Scale: sensitivity = 72%, specificities = 75–84%, Cronbach’s ? = 0.94). Conclusions The BOCS has the ability to discriminate OCD from other non-OCD related psychiatric disorders. The current study provides strong support for the utility of the BOCS in the assessment of obsessive–compulsive symptoms in clinical psychiatry. PMID:24568661

Edman, Gunnar; Anckarsäter, Henrik; Berglund, Gunilla; Gillberg, Christopher; Hofvander, Björn; Humble, Mats B.; Mörtberg, Ewa; Råstam, Maria; Ståhlberg, Ola; Frisén, Louise

2014-01-01

331

Greenhouse Gas Emissions Inventory  

E-print Network

Greenhouse Gas Emissions Inventory Volume 1: Fiscal Years 1990-2009 Published: October 2009 #12 The production of the first Greenhouse Gas Emissions Inventory for Washington University in St. Louis (WUSTL;Washington University in St. Louis i GHG Emissions Inventory (Vol. 1: FY1990-2009) ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

Subramanian, Venkat

332

Clinical Validity of the Counseling Center Assessment of Psychological Symptoms-62 (CCAPS-62): Further Evaluation and Clinical Applications  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Self-report instruments of psychological symptoms are increasingly used in counseling centers but rely on rigorous evaluation of their clinical validity. Three studies reported here (total N = 26,886) investigated the validity of the Counseling Center Assessment of Psychological Symptoms-62 (CCAPS-62; Locke et al., 2011) as an assessment and…

McAleavey, Andrew A.; Nordberg, Samuel S.; Hayes, Jeffrey A.; Castonguay, Louis G.; Locke, Benjamin D.; Lockard, Allison J.

2012-01-01

333

Effects of Depressive Symptoms and Experimentally Adopted Schemas on Sexual Arousal and Affect in Sexually Healthy Women  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study examined the effects of depressive mood symptoms and experimentally adopted sexual schemas on women's sexual arousal and affect. Women's vaginal response, subjective sexual arousal, and affect were measured in response to sexually explicit visual material in a laboratory setting. At baseline on a self-report measure, women with depressive mood symptoms (n?=?28) reported significantly lower sexual desire than

Stephanie W. Kuffel; Julia R. Heiman

2006-01-01

334

The Comorbid Psychiatric Symptoms of Internet Addiction: Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), Depression, Social Phobia, and Hostility  

Microsoft Academic Search

PurposeTo: (1) determine the association between Internet addiction and depression, self-reported symptoms of attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), social phobia, and hostility for adolescents; and (2) evaluate the sex differences of association between Internet addiction and the above-mentioned psychiatric symptoms among adolescents.

Ju-Yu Yen; Chih-Hung Ko; Cheng-Fang Yen; Hsiu-Yueh Wu; Ming-Jen Yang

2007-01-01

335

Stress-Reactive Rumination, Negative Cognitive Style, and Stressors in Relationship to Depressive Symptoms in Non-Clinical Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The role of cognitive vulnerability in the development of depressive symptoms in youth might depend on age and gender. The current study examined cognitive vulnerability models in relationship to depressive symptoms from a developmental perspective. For that purpose, 805 youth (aged 10-18, 59.9% female) completed self-report measures.…

Rood, Lea; Roelofs, Jeffrey; Bogels, Susan M.; Meesters, Cor

2012-01-01

336

Differences in Psychological Symptoms and Self-Competencies in Non-Suicidal Self-Injurious Flemish Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of the present study was to examine differences in psychological symptoms and sense of self-competence between adolescents with and without non-suicidal self-injurious behavior. We collected data in a sample of 281 Flemish adolescents. Psychological symptoms and self-competencies were assessed by means of the Youth Self-Report (YSR) and…

Baetens, Imke; Claes, Laurence; Muehlenkamp, Jennifer; Grietens, Hans; Onghena, Patrick

2012-01-01

337

Validation of Self-Report Pain Scales in Children  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The Faces Pain Scale–Revised (FPS-R) and Color Analog Scale (CAS) are self-report pain scales commonly used in children but insufficiently validated in the emergency department setting. Our objectives were to determine the psychometric properties (convergent validity, discriminative validity, responsivity, and reliability) of the FPS-R and CAS, and to determine whether degree of validity varied based on age, sex, and ethnicity. METHODS: We conducted a prospective, observational study of English- and Spanish-speaking children ages 4 to 17 years. Children with painful conditions indicated their pain severity on the FPS-R and CAS before and 30 minutes after analgesia. We assessed convergent validity (Pearson correlations, Bland-Altman method), discriminative validity (comparing pain scores in children with pain against those without pain), responsivity (comparing pain scores pre- and postanalgesia), and reliability (Pearson correlations, repeatability coefficient). RESULTS: Of 620 patients analyzed, mean age was 9.2 ± 3.8 years, 291(46.8%) children were girls, 341(55%) were Hispanic, and 313(50.5%) were in the younger age group (<8 years). Pearson correlation was 0.85, with higher correlation in older children and girls. Lower convergent validity was noted in children <7 years of age. All subgroups based on age, sex, and ethnicity demonstrated discriminative validity and responsivity for both scales. Reliability was acceptable for both the FPS-R and CAS. CONCLUSIONS: The FPS-R and CAS overall demonstrate strong psychometric properties in children ages 4 to 17 years, and between subgroups based on age, sex, and ethnicity. Convergent validity was questionable in children <7 years old. PMID:23999954

von Baeyer, Carl L.; Bulloch, Blake; Dayan, Peter S.

2013-01-01

338

Transgender Transitioning and Change of Self-Reported Sexual Orientation  

PubMed Central

Objective Sexual orientation is usually considered to be determined in early life and stable in the course of adulthood. In contrast, some transgender individuals report a change in sexual orientation. A common reason for this phenomenon is not known. Methods We included 115 transsexual persons (70 male-to-female “MtF” and 45 female-to-male “FtM”) patients from our endocrine outpatient clinic, who completed a questionnaire, retrospectively evaluating the history of their gender transition phase. The questionnaire focused on sexual orientation and recalled time points of changes in sexual orientation in the context of transition. Participants were further asked to provide a personal concept for a potential change in sexual orientation. Results In total, 32.9% (n?=? 23) MtF reported a change in sexual orientation in contrast to 22.2% (n?=? 10) FtM transsexual persons (p?=? 0.132). Out of these patients, 39.1% (MtF) and 60% (FtM) reported a change in sexual orientation before having undergone any sex reassignment surgery. FtM that had initially been sexually oriented towards males (?=?androphilic), were significantly more likely to report on a change in sexual orientation than gynephilic, analloerotic or bisexual FtM (p ?=? 0.012). Similarly, gynephilic MtF reported a change in sexual orientation more frequently than androphilic, analloerotic or bisexual MtF transsexual persons (p ?=? 0.05). Conclusion In line with earlier reports, we reveal that a change in self-reported sexual orientation is frequent and does not solely occur in the context of particular transition events. Transsexual persons that are attracted by individuals of the opposite biological sex are more likely to change sexual orientation. Qualitative reports suggest that the individual's biography, autogynephilic and autoandrophilic sexual arousal, confusion before and after transitioning, social and self-acceptance, as well as concept of sexual orientation itself may explain this phenomenon. PMID:25299675

Höhne, Nina; Stalla, Günter K.; Sievers, Caroline

2014-01-01

339

Measuring Symptoms in Community-dwelling Older Adults: The Psychometric Properties of a Brief Symptom Screen  

PubMed Central

Background With aging, the probability of experiencing multiple chronic conditions is increased, along with symptoms associated with these conditions. Symptoms form a central component of illness burden and distress. To date, most symptom measures have focused on a particular disease population. Objective We sought to develop and evaluate a simple symptom screen using data obtained from a representative sample of community-dwelling older adults. Methods Psychometric analyses were conducted on 10 self-reported dichotomous symptom indicators collected during in-person interviews from a sample of 1000 community-dwelling older adults. Symptoms included shortness of breath, feeling tired or fatigued, problems with balance or dizziness, perceived weakness in legs, constipation, daily pain, stiffness, poor appetite, anxiety, and anhedonia. Results Over one-third of the sample (37.4%) had 5 or more concurrent symptoms. Stiffness and feeling tired were the most common symptoms. Confirmatory factor analyses were performed on the 10 symptoms for single factor and bifactor (physical and affective) models of symptom reporting. Goodness of fit indices indicated better fit for the bifactor model (?2df=10=89.6, p<0.001) but the practical significance of the improvement in fit was negligible. Differential item functioning (DIF) analyses showed some differences of relatively high magnitude in location parameters by race; however, because the DIF was in different directions, the impact on the overall measure was most likely lessened. Conclusion Among community-dwelling older adults, a large proportion experienced multiple co-occurring symptoms. This Brief Symptom Screen can be used to quickly measure overall symptom load in older adult populations, including those with multiple chronic conditions. PMID:23969593

Ritchie, Christine S; Hearld, Kristine R; Gross, Alden; Allman, Richard; Sawyer, Patricia; Sheppard, Kendra; Salanitro, Amanda; Locher, Julie; Brown, Cynthia J.; Roth, David L.

2014-01-01

340

Gender-Specificity of Women's and Men's Self-Reported Attention to Sexual Stimuli.  

PubMed

Men's sexual arousal is largely dependent on the actor's gender in a sexual stimulus (gender-specific), whereas for women, particularly androphilic women, arousal is less dependent on gender (gender-nonspecific). According to information-processing models of sexual response, sexual arousal requires that attention be directed toward sexual cues. We evaluated whether men's and women's self-reported attention to sexual stimuli of men or women were consistent with genital responses and self-reported arousal. We presented gynephilic men (n = 21) and women (n = 22) and androphilic men (n = 16) and women (n = 33) with audiovisual stimuli depicting men or women engaged in sexual activities. Genital responses were continuously recorded and, following each stimulus, participants reported the amount of attention paid to the video and feelings of sexual arousal. Self-reported attention was gender-specific for men and gender-nonspecific for women, and generally mirrored genital responses and self-reported arousal. Gender-specificity of genital responses significantly predicted gender-specificity of self-reported arousal; however, for men only, this effect was significantly mediated by gender-specificity of self-reported attention. Gender differences in gender-specificity of sexual arousal may be partially accounted for by differences in gender-specificity of self-reported attention, although attention may play a greater role in men's sexual arousal than women's. PMID:25255838

Huberman, Jackie S; Maracle, Amanda C; Chivers, Meredith L

2014-09-25

341

The structure of obsessive-compulsive symptoms  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the present study, the structure of obsessive-compulsive symptoms was investigated by means of the Padua Inventory (PI). Simultaneous Components Analysis on data from obsessive-compulsives (n = 206), patients with other anxiety disorders (n = 222), and a non clinical sample (n = 430) revealed a five-factor solution. These factors are: (I) impulses; (II) washing; (III) checking; (IV) rumination; and

Patricia Van Oppen; Rense J. Hoekstra; Paul M. G. Emmelkamp

1995-01-01

342

Hoarding and Obsessive-Compulsive Symptoms.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Researches the relation between hoarding and obsessive-compulsive disorders (OCD). In both college student and community samples, hoarding was associated with higher scores on the Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale. Hoarding also was associated with higher levels of general psychopathology as measured by the Brief Symptom Inventory. Results…

Frost, Randy O.; And Others

1996-01-01

343

Development and Validation of the Youth Obsessive-Compulsive Symptoms Scale (YOCSS).  

PubMed

From the existing self-report measures for youth Obsessive-Compulsive (OC) symptoms, several challenges can be delineated to further improve the assessment of youth OC-related pathology. The current manuscript incorporates these challenges and reports on the development and validation of a new self-report OC scale for younger age groups, that was labeled the Youth Obsessive-Compulsive Symptoms Scale (YOCSS), assessing OC symptoms and impairment in adolescents (three independent samples: N = 336; N = 289; and N = 209). Study 1 reports on the construction of the items and facets, and their higher-order structure, whereas Study 2 focuses on the confirmation of this structure, measurement invariance across age, and on the convergent and incremental predictive validity. These psychometric analyses resulted in ten symptom facets (structured in three domains) and one impairment facet, and further suggest that the YOCSS is a promising tool for describing early OC symptoms along a dimensional perspective. PMID:24374598

De Caluwé, Elien; De Clercq, Barbara

2014-12-01

344

Psychological symptoms and drug use severity among Israeli adolescents presenting for outpatient drug abuse treatment.  

PubMed

The objective of this study was to assess the rates of externalizing and internalizing symptoms, and the relation between psychological symptoms and drug use severity, among 117 Israeli adolescents presenting for outpatient drug abuse treatment. Psychological symptoms were assessed via both adolescent self-report and parent report. Drug use was assessed using both adolescent self-report and urinalysis. Results showed that 58% of the sample evidenced clinical levels of psychological symptoms, with girls evidencing higher rates of externalizing and mixed symptomatology than boys. Parents' report of adolescents' internalizing symptoms predicted severity of drug use. These findings suggest that treatment for this population should be multidimensional, and address not only drug use per se, but also psychological risk factors. PMID:16022884

Diamond, Gary M; Izzard, Miriam C; Kedar, Tami; Hutlzer, Anat; Mell, Haim

2005-08-01

345

Improving the self-report of HIV antiretroviral medication adherence: Is the glass half full or half empty?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Self-reports are the most widely used method for measuring antiretroviral adherence. The association between self-reports\\u000a and viral loads has been repeatedly demonstrated, but this association does not address how well self-reports measure actual\\u000a medication-taking behaviors. Understanding adherence self-reports requires studying the science of memory and the reporting\\u000a of behaviors. In the first section of this review, we discuss research in

Ira B. Wilson; Amanda E. Carter; Karina M. Berg

2009-01-01

346

Validity of self-reported vaccination status among French healthcare students.  

PubMed

Data on validity of self-reported vaccinations are scarce. This study, performed on healthcare students in Paris (France), aimed to evaluate this validity for occupational vaccinations. The validity of self-reported vaccination status was compared with written information. A total of 432 students were enrolled. Sensitivity rates for BCG, hepatitis B and measles were over 74%. For diphtheria-tetanus-polio and pertussis, sensitivity was below 50%. Specificity was between 70 and 95% for dTP-pertussis, and below 35% for all others. Overall, the validity of self-reported information was low, meaning that checking medical records remains the preferable strategy for assessing immunization status. PMID:25040583

Loulergue, P; Pulcini, C; Massin, S; Bernhard, M; Fonteneau, L; Levy-Brühl, D; Guthmann, J-P; Launay, O

2014-12-01

347

Methodological considerations for the quantification of self-reported caffeine use  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rationale  The field of research regarding the effects of habitual caffeine use is immense and frequently utilizes self-report measures\\u000a of caffeine use. However, various self-report measures have different methodologies, and the accuracy of these different methods\\u000a has not been compared.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Materials and methods  Self-reported caffeine use was estimated from two methods (a retrospective interview of weekly caffeine use and a 7-day prospective

Merideth A. Addicott; Lucie L. Yang; Ann M. Peiffer; Paul J. Laurienti

2009-01-01

348

Assessing Dependency using Self-report and Indirect Measures: Examining the Significance of Discrepancies  

PubMed Central

The present study addressed convergence between self-report and indirect approaches to assessing dependency. The study was moderately successful in validating an implicit measure, which was found to be reliable, orthogonal to two self-report instruments, and predictive of external criteria. This study also examined discrepancies between scores on self-report and implicit measures, and has implications for their significance. The possibility that discrepancies themselves are pathological was not supported, although discrepancies were associated with particular personality profiles. Finally, this study offered additional evidence for the relation between dependency and depressive symptomatology, and identified implicit dependency as contributing unique variance in predicting past major depression. PMID:20552505

Cogswell, Alex; Alloy, Lauren B.; Karpinski, Andrew; Grant, David

2011-01-01

349

Self-reported adverse drug reactions and their influence on highly active antiretroviral therapy in HIV infected patients: a cross sectional study  

PubMed Central

Background Patients on antiretroviral therapy have higher risk of developing adverse drug reactions (ADRs). The impact of ADRs on treatment adherence, treatment outcomes and future treatment options is quiet considerable. Thus, the purpose of this study was to describe the common self-reported ADRs and their impact on antiretroviral treatment. Methods Cross-sectional study was conducted at antiretroviral therapy (ART) clinic of Gondar University Hospital. Semi-structured interview questionnaire was used to extract self-reported ADRs, socio-demographic, and psycho-social variables. Variables related to antiretroviral medication, laboratory values and treatment changes were obtained from medical charts. Chi-square and odds ratio with 95% confidence interval were used to determine the associations of dependent variables. Result A total of 384 participants were enrolled. At least one adverse drug reaction was reported by 345 (89.8%) study participants and the mean number of ADRs reported was 3.7 (±0.2). The most frequently reported ADRs were nausea (56.5%) and headache (54.9%). About 114 (31.0%) participants considered antiretroviral therapy to be unsuccessful if ADRs occurred and only 10 (2.6%) decided to skip doses as ADRs were encountered. Based on chart review, treatment was changed for 78 (20.3%) patients and from which 79% were due to documented ADRs (p = 0.00). Among them, CNS symptoms (27.4%) and anemia (16.1%) were responsible for the majority of changes. Around four percent of patients were non-adherent to ART. Non-adhered participants and those on treatment changes were not statistically associated with self-reported ADRs. Only unemployment status (AOR = 1.76 (1.15 - 2.70), p = 0.01) and ADR duration of less than one month (AOR = 1.95 (1.28-2.98), p = 0.001) were significantly associated with self-reported adverse effects of three or more in the multivariate analysis. Conclusion Self-reported ADRs to antiretroviral therapy are quite common. More of the reactions were of short lasting and their impact on adherence and treatment change were less likely. However, documented ADRs were the most prevalent reasons for ART switch. Moreover, the level of unemployment was a strong predictor of self-reported ADRs. PMID:24957052

2014-01-01

350

Validating Self-Reported Language Proficiency by Testing Performance in an Immigrant Community: The Wellington Indo-Fijians.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examined the validity of aural and oral self-report scales for determining the Fiji Hindi proficiency of new adolescent immigrants in New Zealand. Participants completed self-reports and performance tests (oral interviews, listening-comprehension tests, and vocabulary tests). Performance tests correlated strongly with self-reports. Respondents…

Shameem, Nikhat

1998-01-01

351

Psychiatric symptoms in vertiginous patients.  

PubMed

Backgrounds: Psychiatric comorbidity is common in vertiginous patients. The risk of psychiatric disorder is increased in patients with previous mental problems, but earlier mentally healthy may develop symptoms as well. Especially in chronic phase of vertigo, psychological factors have a significant role in the morbidity. Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of psychiatric problems in vertiginous patients in a community sample. Methods: A prospective evaluation of psychiatric symptoms based on self-rating scales [Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Zung Anxiety Scale (SAS), DSM-IV and ICD-10 Personality Questionnaire (DIP-Q)] in a community sample of 100 vertiginous subjects in the Academic Tertiary Otolaryngology Department at the Helsinki University Hospital, Finland. Results: The prevalence of any psychiatric problem was 68% (68 patients); 19% had depressiveness and 12% symptoms of anxiety. Altogether 63 (63%) patients met the criteria of personality disorder. The most prevalent personality disorder was obsessive-compulsive (46 patients). Personality disorder alone seems not to affect functional capacity and is of importance only when comorbid with symptoms of anxiety and depression. The prevalence of psychiatric symptoms did not correlate with severity of vertigo symptoms or other co-occurring diseases. Conclusions: The prevalence of any psychiatric symptoms was high among vertiginous patients. In the chronic phase of vertigo, it seems that vertigo symptoms themselves do not influence on subjective feelings of debilitation. Psychiatric disorders worsen the clinical picture of vertigo along a more debilitating and disabling course. Psychiatric differential diagnoses should accompany the neuro-otology diagnostic procedure in patients with a chronic state of vertigo and greater disability. PMID:25394373

Ketola, Sirpa; Havia, Mari; Appelberg, Björn; Kentala, Erna

2014-11-14

352

Reduced severity and improved control of self-reported asthma in Finland during 2001-2010  

PubMed Central

Background Asthma and allergies are common and cause substantial burden in symptoms and suffering, hospitalizations and medication costs. However, despite the high prevalence, asthma burden has already decreased in Finland in 2000s. Objective We carried out an asthma barometer survey in all Finnish pharmacies to study changes in asthma severity and control, and use of health care services from 2001 to 2010. Methods Asthma severity, comorbid allergic conditions, and use of medication and health care services were assessed in subjects who purchased asthma or allergy medication from the pharmacies all across the country during one week in 2001 and again in 2010. In 2001, 3,062 patients (mean age, 49 years), and in 2010, 1,114 patients (mean age, 51 years) participated. Results In 2001 90% and in 2010 73% of the respondents reported physician-diagnosed asthma and were entitled to special reimbursement for their drug costs, i.e., they needed regular maintenance treatment. In 2001, 10% of the asthmatics regarded their disease as severe, compared with 4% in 2010, while the figures for mild asthma were 45% and 62%, respectively (p < 0.001). The proportion of patients needing emergency care during the last year decreased from 34% (2001) to 14% (2010) (p < 0.001) and the need for hospitalizations from 18% to 6% (p < 0.001). Smoking reduced from 24% to 18% among asthmatics ( p = 0.002). In 2010, risk factors for severe asthma were older age, comorbid atopic eczema, and food allergy. Conclusion During ten years, self-reported asthma severity has reduced and disease control improved in Finland. PMID:25653918

Peura, Sirpa; Salimäki, Johanna; Järvenpää, Salme; Linna, Miika; Haahtela, Tari

2015-01-01

353

Phenotypic, genetic, and environmental relationships between self-reported talents and measured intelligence.  

PubMed

The relationship between self-report abilities and measured intelligence was examined at both the phenotypic (zero-order) level as well as at the genetic and environmental levels. Twins and siblings (N = 516) completed a timed intelligence test and a self-report ability questionnaire, which has previously been found to produce 10 factors, including: politics, interpersonal relationships, practical tasks, intellectual pursuits, academic skills, entrepreneur/business, domestic skills, vocal abilities, and creativity. At the phenotypic level, the correlations between the ability factor scores and intelligence ranged from 0.01 to 0.42 (between self-report academic abilities and verbal intelligence). Further analyses found that some of the phenotypic relationships between self-report ability scores and measured intelligence also had significant correlations at the genetic and environmental levels, suggesting that some of the observed relationships may be due to common genetic and/or environmental factors. PMID:25662420

Schermer, Julie Aitken; Johnson, Andrew M; Jang, Kerry L; Vernon, Philip A

2015-02-01

354

Development of a self-report measure of environmental spatial ability  

E-print Network

in revised form 25 February 2002; accepted 6 March 2002 Abstract Environmental spatial abilities are involved. Self-report measures of environmental abilities, e.g., asking people to rate their ``sense of direction on different factors tha

Montello, Daniel R.

355

OBSERVED, GIS, AND SELF-REPORTED ENVIRONMENTAL FEATURES AND ADOLESCENT PHYSICAL ACTIVITY  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Purpose: Examine associations among observed, self-reported, and Geographical Information Systems (GIS) environmental features and physical activity among adolescent males. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Boy Scout troops and neighborhoods in Houston, Texas. Subjects: Two hundred and ten ...

356

Dynamics of Positive Emotion Regulation: Associations with Youth Depressive Symptoms.  

PubMed

Depression is frequently considered a disorder of impaired affect regulation with deficits across both positive and negative affective systems. However, where deficits in emotion regulation occur in youth, specifically regarding regulation of positive emotions, is relatively unknown. The current study tested whether deficits in broad (felt and expressed) and specific (up-regulation and maintenance) positive emotion processes are associated with youth depressive symptoms. Adolescents (n?=?134; 65 girls) in grades 7 to 9 completed a self-report measure of depressive symptoms prior to participating in two parent-child interactions tasks, a rewarding trivia task and a problem-solving conflict task. During the interaction tasks, adolescent's overall self-reported experience and observed expression of positive affect (PA) was examined. Following the reward task, youth's ability to up-regulate PA (PA response) and maintain PA while buffering against NA (PA persistence) was explored observationally. Results suggested that reduced experience and expression of PA was associated with depression symptoms, but only in a context that elicited negative emotions. No association was found between PA response and depression symptoms; however, shorter PA persistence was associated with elevated depressive symptoms. Youth higher in depressive symptoms appear able to respond similarly to rewarding events, but fail to maintain PA and ward off NA when transitioning from a positive to negative task. PMID:25070360

Fussner, Lauren M; Luebbe, Aaron M; Bell, Debora J

2014-07-30

357

A Review of Self-Report and Alternative Approaches in the Measurement of Student Motivation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Within psychological and educational research, self-report methodology dominates the study of student motivation. The present\\u000a review argues that the scope of motivation research can be expanded by incorporating a wider range of methodologies and measurement\\u000a tools. Several authors have suggested that current study of motivation is overly reliant on self-report measures, warranting\\u000a a move toward alternative approaches. This review critiques

Sara M. Fulmer; Jan C. Frijters

2009-01-01

358

Correction of the self-reported BMI in a teenage population  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the issue of systematic bias in self-reported weight and height, and produce a simple procedure which can be used to correct reporting bias.DESIGN: Cross-sectional, with self-reported questionnaires.SUBJECTS: A sub-sample (n=143) of secondary school students in Siena, Italy, taken from the Food Behaviour Survey (sample size, n=779).RESULTS: In the teenage sub-sample, both males and females under-reported their weight

M Giacchi; R Mattei; S Rossi; Dott. Mariano Giacchi

1998-01-01

359

A comparison of self-reported and measured height, weight and BMI in Australian adolescents  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To explore the relationship between self-reported weight and height to actual weight and height in older Australian adolescents. Method: Weights and heights of 572 adolescents aged 15-19 years who participated in the 1995 Australian National Health Survey (NHS) and National Nutrition Survey (NNS) were examined. Results: Self-reported heights were significantly higher than measured heights in participants. There were no

Zaimin Wang; Carla M. Patterson; Andrew P. Hills

2002-01-01

360

Validity of self reports in a cohort of Swedish adolescent smokers and smokeless tobacco (snus) users  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To validate self reports of cigarette and smokeless tobacco (snus) use in a prospective cohort of adolescents.Design: A cross sectional analysis of a cohort sub-sample.Setting: County of Stockholm, Sweden.Subjects: 520 adolescents in the final grade of junior high school (mean age 15.0 years).Main outcome measure: Concordance between self reported tobacco use and saliva cotinine concentration.Results: Using a cut point

A Post; H Gilljam; I Rosendahl; L Meurling; S Bremberg; M R Galanti

2005-01-01

361

Self-reported height and weight and prevalence of obesity. Study in a Spanish population.  

PubMed

The objective of this investigation was to evaluate the usefulness of self-reported measures of height and weight under the hypothesis that they under-estimate the prevalence of obesity. A cross-sectional study was carried out on a random sample of the adult population of the province of León, Spain. The study involved 572 participants (262 men and 310 women). All participants were interviewed and questioned about socio-cultural characteristics plus their weight and height. All respondents were later weighted and measured for height using standard methods. A Quetelet or body mass index (BMI) > or = 30 kg/m2 was used as the index for obesity. Many people were unaware of their weight and/or height. Self-reported BMI could not be calculated in 40 men (15%) and 107 women participants (35%). This occurrence was more frequent in women than in men (chi 2 = 3.98; P < 0.05). The prevalence of obesity, based on measured weight and height, was 1.8 times that from self-reported values in men and 2.5 times that from self-reported values in women. If we consider only the measured values for those individuals who supplied self-reported heights and weights, these prevalences fall to 1.7 and 1.6 times those from self-reported values respectively. In addition, the difference between measured and self-reported height increase with age. All these differences are statistically significant. We believe that the use of self-reported values of weight and height in epidemiological studies should be avoided in an elderly population. These measurements could, however, be used on a younger population. PMID:8281225

Alvarez-Torices, J C; Franch-Nadal, J; Alvarez-Guisasola, F; Hernandez-Mejia, R; Cueto-Espinar, A

1993-11-01

362

Self-Reported Psychological Well-Being and Disease-Related Strains among Adults with Diabetes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The study was designed to describe self-reported psychological well-being among adults with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes and to explore associations of psychological well-being with disease-related strains, such as self-reported long-term complications, frequency of hypoglycaemia and disablement or sick-leave. A sample comprising 534 Norwegian adults with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes aged 25-70 years participated in the study.

BjØrg Karlsen; Edvin Bru; Berit Rokne Hanestad

2002-01-01

363

Capturing the Four-Factor Structure of Psychopathy in College Students Via Self-Report  

Microsoft Academic Search

A number of self-report psychopathy scales have been used successfully in both clinical and nonclinical settings. However, their factor structure does not adequately capture the four factors (Interpersonal, Affective, Lifestyle, and Antisocial) recently identified in the Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL-R; Hare, 2003) and related measures. This deficit was addressed by upgrading the Self Report Psychopathy Scale (SRP-II; Hare, Hemphill, & Harpur,

Kevin M. Williams; Delroy L. Paulhus; Robert D. Hare

2007-01-01

364

Reliability and Validity of Retrospective Behavioral Self-Report By Narcotics Addicts  

Microsoft Academic Search

Issues related to the reliability and validity of self-reported behavior within a deviant population are examined using data obtained from narcotics addicts in two face-to-face interviews conducted 10 years apart. The same measures of behavioral self-report for an overlapping period of 4-5 years were collected at each interview and were analyzed within a test-retest design. Agreement between measures obtained at

M. Douglas Anglin; Yih-Ing Hser; Chih-Ping Chou

1993-01-01

365

Validity of self-reported weight and height in the French GAZEL cohort  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE: To examine the validity of self-reported weight and height and the resulting body mass index (BMI), and to explore the associations between demographic, socioeconomic, and health-related factors on the one hand and bias in self-reported weight and height on the other, in order to determine the groups most likely to exhibit bias.DESIGN: Prospective cohort study.SUBJECTS: 7350 middle-aged subjects, 5445

I Niedhammer; I Bugel; S Bonenfant; M Goldberg; A Leclerc

2000-01-01

366

Effects of Age on Validity of Self-Reported Height, Weight, and Body Mass Index  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective To compare self-reported to measured heights and weights of adults examined in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III), and to determine to what extent body mass index (BMI) calculated from self-reported heights and weights affects estimates of overweight prevalence compared with BMI calculated from measured values.Design A complex sample design was used in NHANES III

MARIE FANELLI KUCZMARSKI; ROBERT J KUCZMARSKI; MATTHEW NAJJAR

2001-01-01

367

Measuring the biases in self-reported disability status: evidence from aggregate data  

Microsoft Academic Search

Self-reported health status measures are generally used to analyse Social Security Disability Insurance's (SSDI) application and award decisions as well as the relationship between its generosity and labour force participation. Due to endogeneity and measurement error, the use of self-reported health and disability indicators as explanatory variables in economic models is problematic. We employ county-level aggregate data, instrumental variables and

Naoko Akashi-Ronquest; Paul Carrillo; Bruce Dembling; Steven Stern

2011-01-01

368

The reliability, validity, and accuracy of self-reported absenteeism from work: A meta-analysis.  

PubMed

Because of a variety of access limitations, self-reported absenteeism from work is often employed in research concerning health, organizational behavior, and economics, and it is ubiquitous in large scale population surveys in these domains. Several well established cognitive and social-motivational biases suggest that self-reports of absence will exhibit convergent validity with records-based measures but that people will tend to underreport the behavior. We used meta-analysis to summarize the reliability, validity, and accuracy of absence self-reports. The results suggested that self-reports of absenteeism offer adequate test-retest reliability and that they exhibit reasonably good rank order convergence with organizational records. However, people have a decided tendency to underreport their absenteeism, although such underreporting has decreased over time. Also, self-reports were more accurate when sickness absence rather than absence for any reason was probed. It is concluded that self-reported absenteeism might serve as a valid measure in some correlational research designs. However, when accurate knowledge of absolute absenteeism levels is essential, the tendency to underreport could result in flawed policy decisions. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:25181281

Johns, Gary; Miraglia, Mariella

2015-01-01

369

Moral disengagement in self-reported and peer-nominated school bullying.  

PubMed

This study examined the relation between moral disengagement and different self-reported and peer-nominated positions in school bullying. The aims of this study were to (1) investigate moral disengagement among children for whom self-reported and peer-nominated bully status diverged and (2) compare levels of disengagement among self-reported and peer-nominated pure bullies, pure victims, bully-victims, and children not involved in bullying. A sample of 739 Danish sixth grade and seventh grade children (mean age 12.6) was included in the study. Moral disengagement was measured using a Danish version of the Moral Disengagement Scale and bullying was measured using both self-reports and peer nominations. Results revealed that both self-reported and peer-nominated bullying were related to moral disengagement, and that both pure bullies and bully-victims displayed higher moral disengagement than outsiders. Discrepancies between self-reported and peer-nominated bullying involvement indicates that a person's social reputation has a stronger association with moral disengagement than so far expected. Implications are discussed, highlighting the importance of further research and theory development. PMID:21274851

Obermann, Marie-Louise

2011-01-01

370

The accuracy of self-reported drug ingestion histories in emergency department patients.  

PubMed

Inaccuracies in self-reports may lead to duplication of therapy, failure to appreciate non-compliance leading to exacerbation of chronic medical conditions, or inaccurate research conclusions. Our objective is to determine the accuracy of self-reported drug ingestion histories in patients presenting to an urban academic emergency department (ED). We conducted a prospective cohort study in ED patients presenting for pain or nausea. We obtained a structured drug ingestion history including all prescription drugs, over-the-counter medication (OTC) drugs, and illicit drugs for the 48?hours prior to ED presentation. We obtained urine comprehensive drug screens (CDS) and determined self-report/CDS concordance. Fifty-five patients were enrolled. Self-reported drug ingestion histories were poor in these patients; only 17 (30.9%) of histories were concordant with the CDS. For the individual drug classes, prescription drug-CDS was concordant in 32 (58.2%), OTC-CDS was concordant in 33 (60%), and illicit drug-CDS was concordant in 45 (81.8%) of subjects. No demographic factors predicted an accurate self-reported drug history. Sixteen patients had drugs detected by CDS that were unreported by history. Nine of these 16 included an unreported opioid. In conclusion, self-reported drug ingestion histories are often inaccurate and resources are needed to confirm compliance and ensure unreported drugs are not overlooked. PMID:25052325

Monte, Andrew A; Heard, Kennon J; Hoppe, Jason A; Vasiliou, Vasilis; Gonzalez, Frank J

2015-01-01

371

Childhood predictors and age 48 outcomes of self-reports and official records of offending  

PubMed Central

Background The key question is: are self-reports and official records equally valid indicators of criminal offending? Aims We examine the correspondence between self-reports and official records of offending, the similarity of childhood and adolescent individual and contextual predictors of both measures of offending, and the similarity of age 48 correlates of both measures of offending. Methods Men (N = 436) from the Columbia County Longitudinal Study, a sample of all 3rd graders in Columbia County, New York, in 1959–60, participated. The youth, their peers and their parents were interviewed when the youth were age 8; the youth were later interviewed at ages 19, 30 and 48. Results We found moderate to high correspondence between self-reports of having been in trouble with the law and official arrest records. Lifetime self-reports and official records of offending were generally predicted by the same childhood and adolescent variables, and were correlated with many of the same adult outcome measures. By age 48, life-course non-offenders defined by either self-reports or official records had better outcomes than offenders. Conclusions The results validate the use of adolescent and adult self-reports of offending, and the early identification of individuals at risk for adult criminal behaviour through childhood parent and peer reports and adolescent self and peer reports. PMID:25294162

DUBOW, ERIC F.; HUESMANN, L. ROWELL; BOXER, PAUL; SMITH, CATHY

2014-01-01

372

Validation of a self-reported shelf inventory to measure food purchase behavior. — Measures of the Food Environment  

Cancer.gov

Skip to Main Content at the National Institutes of Health | www.cancer.gov Print Page E-mail Page Search: Please wait while this form is being loaded.... Home Browse by Resource Type Browse by Area of Research Research Networks Funding Information About

373

Interactive effects of corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1 gene and childhood adversity on depressive symptoms in young adults: findings from a longitudinal study.  

PubMed

Accumulating research suggests a moderating role for the corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1 gene (CRHR1) in the association between childhood adversity and adult depression. The present study aims to replicate recent findings using different genetic variants and measures of early adversity assessed both prospectively and retrospectively. Data were collected in the context of an ongoing epidemiological cohort study following the outcome of early risk factors from birth into adulthood. 300 participants (137 males, 163 females) were genotyped for four CRHR1 SNPs (rs7209436, rs110402, rs242924, and rs17689882) and completed the Beck Depression Inventory at ages 19, 22 and 23 years. Childhood adversity was assessed using the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire and by a standardized parent interview yielding an index of family adversity. Our results indicate that CRHR1 and childhood adversity interacted to predict depressive symptoms in young adults. Specifically, we found that the impact of childhood maltreatment on adult depressive symptoms was significantly higher in individuals (i) with two copies of the CRHR1 TAT haplotype, and (ii) homozygous for the G allele of rs17689882. The interaction was demonstrated for exposure to childhood maltreatment as assessed by retrospective self-report, but not to prospectively ascertain objective family adversity. The present study partially replicates recent findings of a CRHR1 by childhood adversity interaction with regard to adult depression highlighting the subjective characteristics of the environmental pathogen that is operative in this interaction. PMID:22748421

Laucht, Manfred; Treutlein, Jens; Blomeyer, Dorothea; Buchmann, Arlette F; Schmidt, Martin H; Esser, Günter; Jennen-Steinmetz, Christine; Rietschel, Marcella; Banaschewski, Tobias

2013-05-01

374

Symptom Checklist 90-Revised in neurological outpatients.  

PubMed

The Symptom Checklist 90-Revised (SCL-90-R) is an international, widely used, self-report questionnaire of multidimensional complaints with normative data for healthy control subjects and psychiatric patients. The questionnaire is also often used in neurological patients. Little is known about the amount and pattern of complaints in this group, and normative data are lacking. We therefore analyzed self-reported symptoms on the SCL-90-R of a neurological population (N = 600). Moreover, we compared the answer patterns of five subgroups: neurodegenerative disease, cerebrovascular disease, epilepsy, brain tumor, and traumatic brain injury. Neurological outpatients scored significantly higher in comparison with normative data from healthy control subjects, with most pronounced scores on Inadequacy of Thinking and Acting, Depression, and Somatization (p < .01, effect sizes 1.69, 0.83, and 0.83). No differences between the various pathologies were found. Although it is difficult to determine whether the complaints arise directly from the neurological disease or more indirectly from psychiatric disturbances accompanying the disease, simply comparing a neurological patient to normative data for healthy control subjects can lead to inappropriate classifications. Complaints of our patients should not be directly interpreted as psychopathology. A two-step procedure in which scores on the SCL-90-R are first compared to healthy control subjects and secondly to neurological patients can be helpful in the interpretation. PMID:24479727

Ruis, Carla; van den Berg, Esther; van Stralen, Haike E; Huenges Wajer, Irene M C; Biessels, Geert Jan; Kappelle, L Jaap; Postma, Albert; van Zandvoort, Martine J E

2014-01-01

375

Modern inventory analysis techniques.  

PubMed

Modern techniques for managing pharmacy inventories are described. Pharmacists should rely on modern techniques, such as sort-based and activity-based analyses, for managing pharmacy inventories, containing drug costs, performing replacement-and-elimination analysis, and monitoring the health system's operations. Unit price and quantity are the two basic inventory-control approaches; however, modern techniques recognize quantity as the more useful of the two. The primary areas of the pharmacy's activities must be taken into consideration. Pharmacists must learn to divide inventory analysis problems into sets of smaller issues. Modern inventory analyses that take into account annual quantity, unit price, total annual cost, and the health system's unique activities provide the pharmacist with a practical basis for inventory management. PMID:10714973

Salamie, D

2000-02-15

376

ICE Biological Inventories Databases  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Information Center for the Environment (ICE) is a cooperative effort between scientists at University of California -- Davis and collaborators from over thirty organizations involved in environmental protection." The ICE Biological Inventory Databases contain "documented, taxonomically standardized species inventories of plants and animals reported from the world's protected areas." New to the Scout Report, these online databases have been updated recently to include botanical inventories from protected areas in Costa Rica and South Africa.

377

Interactive inventory monitoring  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Method and system for monitoring present location and/or present status of a target inventory item, where the inventory items are located on one or more inventory shelves or other inventory receptacles that communicate with an inventory base station through use of responders such as RFIDs. A user operates a hand held interrogation and display (IAD) module that communicates with, or is part of, the base station, to provide an initial inquiry. Information on location(s) of the target inventory item is also indicated visibly and/or audibly on the receptacle(s) for the user. Status information includes an assessment of operation readiness and a time, if known, that the specified inventory item or class was last removed or examined or modified. Presentation of a user access level may be required for access to the target inventory item. Another embodiment provides inventory information for a stack as a sight-impaired or hearing-impaired person passes adjacent to that stack.

Spremo, Stevan M. (Inventor); Udoh, Usen E. (Inventor)

2009-01-01

378

The Peritraumatic Distress Inventory: A Proposed Measure of PTSD Criterion A2  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: Meeting criterion A2 for the diagnosis of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in DSM-IV requires that an individ- ual have high levels of distress during or after the traumatic event. Because of the paucity of valid and reliable instruments for assessing such responses, the authors developed a 13-item self-report measure, the Peritraumatic Distress Inventory, to obtain a quantitative measure of

Alain Brunet; Daniel S. Weiss; Thomas J. Metzler; M. A. Suzanne; Thomas C. Neylan; Cynthia Rogers; Jeffrey Fagan; Charles R. Marmar

2001-01-01

379

Rasch Modeling of the Self-Deception Scale of the Balanced Inventory of Desirable Responding  

Microsoft Academic Search

Self-deception has become a construct of great interest in individual differences research because it has been associated with levels of resilience and mental health. The Balanced Inventory of Desirable Responding (BIDR) is a self-report measure used for quantifying self-deception. In this study we used Rasch modeling to examine the properties of the self-deception scale of the BIDR in terms of

Kelly L. Cervellione; Young-Sun Lee; George A. Bonanno

2009-01-01

380

Caring for relatives with serious mental illness: the development of the Experience of Caregiving Inventory  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to develop a practical, comprehensive, and valid self-report measure of the experience of caring for a relative with a serious mental illness. The notion of caregiver ‘burden’ was rejected; instead caregiving was conceptualised within a ‘stress-appraisal-coping’ framework. A 66-item version of the Experience of Caregiving Inventory (ECI) was derived from analyses of responses from

G. I. Szmukler; P. Burgess; H. Herrman; S. Bloch; A. Benson; S. Colusa

1996-01-01

381

The Risk-Taking and Self-Harm Inventory for Adolescents: Development and Psychometric Evaluation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this study, we report on the development and psychometric evaluation of the Risk-Taking (RT) and Self-Harm (SH) Inventory for Adolescents (RTSHIA), a self-report measure designed to assess adolescent RT and SH in community and clinical settings. 651 young people from secondary schools in England ranging in age from 11.6 years to 18.7 years and…

Vrouva, Ioanna; Fonagy, Peter; Fearon, Pasco R. M.; Roussow, Trudie

2010-01-01

382

The Validation of a New Obsessive–Compulsive Disorder Scale: The Obsessive–Compulsive Inventory  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Obsessive–Compulsive Inventory (OCI) is a new self-report instrument developed to address the problems inherent in available instruments for determining the diagnosis and severity of obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD). The OCI consists of 42 items composing 7 subscales: Washing, Checking, Doubting, Ordering, Obsessing (i.e., having obsessional thoughts), Hoarding, and Mental Neutralizing. Each item is rated on a 5-point (0–4) Likert scale

Edna B. Foa; Michael J. Kozak; Paul M. Salkovskis; Meredith E. Coles; Nader Amir

1998-01-01

383

Does the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire - self report yield invariant measurements across different nations? Data from the International Child Mental Health Study Group.  

PubMed

Aims. This study evaluated the measurement invariance of the strengths and difficulties questionnaire (SDQ) self-report among adolescents from seven different nations. Methods. Data for 2367 adolescents, aged 13-18 years, from India, Indonesia, Nigeria, Serbia, Turkey, Bulgaria and Croatia were available for a series of factor analyses. Results. The five-factor model including original SDQ scales emotional symptoms, conduct problems, hyperactivity-inattention problems, peer problems and prosocial behaviour generated inadequate fit degree in all countries. A bifactor model with three factors (i.e., externalising, internalising and prosocial) and one general problem factor yielded adequate degree of fit in India, Nigeria, Turkey and Croatia. The prosocial behaviour, emotional symptoms and conduct problems factor were found to be common for all nations. However, originally proposed items loaded saliently on other factors besides the proposed ones or only some of them corresponded to proposed factors in all seven countries. Conclusions. Due to the lack of a common acceptable model across all countries, namely the same numbers of factors (i.e., dimensional invariance), it was not possible to perform the metric and scalar invariance test, what indicates that the SDQ self-report models tested lack appropriate measurement invariance across adolescents from these seven nations and it needs to be revised for cross-country comparisons. PMID:24785706

Stevanovic, D; Urbán, R; Atilola, O; Vostanis, P; Singh Balhara, Y P; Avicenna, M; Kandemir, H; Knez, R; Franic, T; Petrov, P

2014-04-30

384

The Relationship between Trait Anxiety and Driving Behavior with Regard to Self-reported Iranian Accident Involving Drivers  

PubMed Central

Background: The aims of this study included: Determination of the most common driver behavior in drivers and also analyzing the relationship between trait anxiety (TA) with subscale of driving behavior (lapses, errors, ordinary and aggressive violations). Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 168 drivers that having crash. The self-reporting of the drivers was determined by using Manchester driving behavior questionnaire (DBQ) and Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. Results: Independent t-test showed that violations factor (ordinary and aggressive) are the most common behavior in drivers, Pearson correlation revealed that TA had a significant direct positive relation with all DBQ subscales especially error and lapses factor (P < 0.01) also Pearson correlation showed that age had a negative significant relation with factors of DBQ. Conclusions: It can be concluded from the results (according to the relation between TA with error and lapses factor) that the rate of TA is destructive effective on the memory performance and process in the drivers and cause absent minded and memory imperfect function and process in these people during the driving. PMID:24319550

Pourabdian, Siamak; Azmoon, Hiva

2013-01-01

385

ADHD Symptoms and Associated Psychopathology in a Community Sample of Adolescents From the European North of Russia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To assess the prevalence of ADHD symptoms and their relationship to psychopathology in adolescents from the European North of Russia. Method: The prevalence of ADHD symptoms is assessed by teacher reports in 536 adolescents. Internalizing and externalizing problems are assessed by teacher ratings and student self-reports. Results: Prevalence of individual ADHD symptoms ranges between 3.3% and 35%. Only 8.9%

Vladislav Ruchkin; Boris Lorberg; Roman Koposov; Mary Schwab-Stone; Denis G. Sukhodolsky

2008-01-01

386

Ecstasy (MDMA) and high prevalence psychiatric symptomatology: somatic anxiety symptoms are associated with polydrug, not ecstasy, use  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although previous studies have examined anxiety and depression in ecstasy (±3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine; MDMA) users, it remains unclear whether symptoms are associated specifically with ecstasy or with polydrug use in general. We compared mean symptomatology and clinically significant symptoms in 45 ecstasy polydrug, 48 cannabis polydrug and 40 legal drug users, who completed standardised self-report anxiety and depression symptom measures. We further

G. Bedi; NT Van Dam; J. Redman

2010-01-01

387

Coping with Perceived Peer Stress: Gender-Specific and Common Pathways to Symptoms of Psychopathology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated gender differences in the moderating and mediating effects of responses to stress on the association between perceived peer stress and symptoms of psychopathology. A sample of 295 middle school students (63.7% female; M[subscript age] = 12.39 years, SD = 0.99) completed self-report surveys on stress, coping, and behavioral…

Sontag, Lisa M.; Graber, Julia A.

2010-01-01

388

Association of cocaine withdrawal symptoms with more severe dependence and enhanced subjective response to cocaine  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this two part study was to better characterize cocaine users based on self-reported cocaine withdrawal symptoms by examining screening data and response to smoked cocaine in the human laboratory. The first study sample included male and female non-treatment seeking cocaine users who were screened as potential subjects for inpatient studies. Of the 555 subjects, 462 (82%) endorsed

Mehmet Sofuoglu; Susan Dudish-Poulsen; Scott B Brown; Dorothy K Hatsukami

2003-01-01

389

Learning Styles and the Relationship to Attachment Styles and Psychological Symptoms in College Women  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined relationships between specific learning styles, attachment styles and psychological symptoms in a sample of female college students (N=246). The participants in this study were assessed on the above variables through completion of several self-report instruments measuring these variables. Significant relationships between…

Vaughn, Lisa M.; Battle, Julie V.; Taylor, Trisha; Dearman, Laura

2009-01-01

390

Influence of a Family-Focused Substance Use Preventive Intervention on Growth in Adolescent Depressive Symptoms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Preparing for the Drug Free Years (PDFY) is a preventive intervention that targets parenting behaviors, family interaction patterns, and adolescent substance use, factors that have been shown to predict depression among teenagers. Effects of PDFY on trajectories of self-reported adolescent depressive symptoms from 6th through 12th grade were…

Mason, W. Alex; Kosterman, Rick; Hawkins, J. David; Haggerty, Kevin P.; Spoth, Richard L.; Redmond, Cleve

2007-01-01

391

Parent-Child Agreement of Anxiety Symptoms in Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Best practice for assessment of anxiety symptoms in children suggests that child self-report is an important element to consider. Yet, it is not known if it is a reliable assessment method for children with high-functioning autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). The present study examines the extent to which verbally fluent children with ASD and their…

Blakeley-Smith, Audrey; Reaven, Judy; Ridge, Katherine; Hepburn, Susan

2012-01-01

392

Traumatic Stress Symptoms of Women Exposed to Different Forms of Childhood Victimization and Intimate Partner Violence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Interviews of women with (n = 193) and without (n = 170) recent exposure to intimate partner violence (IPV) were used to examine how IPV and past exposure to child abuse influence self-reports of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms. The measurement of IPV included assessing psychological, physical, escalated physical, and sexual abuse.…

Becker, Kimberly D.; Stuewig, Jeffrey; McCloskey, Laura A.

2010-01-01

393

Parenting Style, Depressive Symptoms, and Substance Use in Mexican American Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study of 151 Mexican American adolescents ages 12 to 15 examined the relationship between parenting and adolescents' self-reported level of depressive symptoms and substance use 6 months and 1 year later. Adolescents and their parents were recruited from a large health-maintenance organization and interviewed at three time points. Lower…

Ozer, Emily J.; Flores, Elena; Tschann, Jeanne M.; Pasch, Lauri A.

2013-01-01

394

Maternal and Paternal Depressive Symptoms and Child Maladjustment: The Mediating Role of Parental Behavior  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined parental behaviors as mediators in links between depressive symptoms in mothers and fathers and child adjustment problems. Participants were 4,184 parents and 6,048 10- to 15-year-olds enrolled in the 1998 and 2000 cycles of the Canadian National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth. Mothers and fathers self-reported

Elgar, Frank J.; Mills, Rosemary S. L.; McGrath, Patrick J.; Waschbusch, Daniel A.; Brownridge, Douglas A.

2007-01-01

395

Bullying and Victimization in Adolescence: Concurrent and Stable Roles and Psychological Health Symptoms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

From an initial sample of 1,278 Italian students, the authors selected 537 on the basis of their responses to a self-report bully and victim questionnaire. Participants' ages ranged from 13 to 20 years (M = 15.12 years, SD = 1.08 years). The authors compared the concurrent psychological symptoms of 4 participant groups (bullies, victims,…

Menesini, Ersilia; Modena, Marco; Tani, Franca

2009-01-01

396

Interaction Effects between Maternal Lifetime Depressive/Anxiety Disorders and Correlates of Children's Externalizing Symptoms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We investigated the interaction effects between mother's lifetime depressive/anxiety disorders and psychosocial correlates of 6 to 11 year-old children's self-reported externalizing symptoms in the Quebec Child Mental Health Survey. A representative subsample of 1,490 Quebec children aged 6 to 11 years was selected from the original sample. We…

Piche, Genevieve; Bergeron, Lise; Cyr, Mireille; Berthiaume, Claude

2011-01-01

397

Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms in Korean Conflict and World War II Combat Veterans Seeking Outpatient Treatment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Given important differences in the Korean conflict and World War II, samples of treatment-seeking combat veterans from these wars (30 Korea, 83 World War II) were compared on the prevalence and severity of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). With age, ethnicity, and combat exposure taken into account, the Korean veterans reported significantly more severe symptoms on both interview and self-report PTSD

Edward W. McCranie; Leon A. Hyer

2000-01-01

398

Association of adolescent risk behaviors with mental health symptoms in high school students  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: To examine the hypothesis that self-reported symptoms of depression and stress may be associated with other risk behaviors.Methods: A secondary data analysis of the 1992 Massachusetts Adolescent Health Survey involving a representative sample of 2224 ninth and twelfth grade students was performed. The dichotomous dependent variable was positive if the adolescent reported feeling depressed or stressed for 10 or

Traci L Brooks; Sion Kim Harris; Jeannie S Thrall; Elizabeth R Woods

2002-01-01

399

Treatment Sensitivity of a Brief Rating Scale for Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) Symptoms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the treatment sensitivity of the ADHD Questionnaire (ADHD-Q), which is a brief rating scale for measuring symptoms of inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity in children. Parent, teacher, and child self-report data of the ADHD-Q were obtained for 17 clinically referred children with ADHD on the three occasions: (1) during…

Muris, Peter; Vaesen, Hilde; Roodenrijs, Dorien; Kelgtermans, Lut

2006-01-01

400

Parental Divorce and Offspring Depressive Symptoms: Dutch Developmental Trends during Early Adolescence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this study, we investigated if the association between parental divorce and depressive symptoms changes during early adolescence and if developmental patterns are similar for boys and girls. Data were collected in a prospective population cohort of Dutch adolescents (N = 2,149), aged 10 - 15 years. Outcome variables were self-reported and…

Oldehinkel, Albertine J.; Ormel, Johan; Veenstra, Rene; De Winter, Andrea F.; Verhulst, Frank C.

2008-01-01

401

Emotional Reactivity and Emotion Regulation among Adults with a History of Self-Harm: Laboratory Self-Report and fMRI Evidence  

PubMed Central

Intentionally hurting one’s own body (deliberate self-harm; DSH) is theorized to be associated with high negative emotional reactivity and poor emotion regulation ability. However, little research has assessed the relationship between these potential risk factors and DSH using laboratory measures. Therefore, we conducted two studies using laboratory measures of negative emotional reactivity and emotion regulation ability. Study 1 assessed self-reported negative emotions during a sad film clip (Reactivity) and during a sad film clip for which participants were instructed to use reappraisal (Regulation). Those with a history of DSH were compared to two control groups without a history of DSH matched on key demographics: one healthy group low in depression and anxiety symptoms and one group matched to the DSH group on depression and anxiety symptoms. Study 2 extended Study 1 by assessing neural responding to negative images (Reactivity) and negative images for which participants were instructed to use reappraisal (Regulation). Those with a history of DSH were compared to a control group matched to the DSH group on demographics, depression, and anxiety symptoms. Compared to control groups, participants with a history of DSH did not exhibit greater negative emotional reactivity but did exhibit lower ability to regulate emotion with reappraisal (greater self-reported negative emotions in Study 1 and greater amygdala activation in Study 2 during regulation). These results suggest that poor emotion regulation ability, but not necessarily greater negative emotional reactivity, is a correlate of and may be a risk factor for DSH, even when controlling for mood disorder symptoms. PMID:24865373

Davis, Tchiki S.; Mauss, Iris B.; Lumian, Daniel; Troy, Allison S.; Shallcross, Amanda J.; Zarolia, Paree; Ford, Brett Q.; McRae, Kateri

2014-01-01

402

Validity and Reliability of Stillbirth Data Using Linked Self-Reported and Administrative Datasets  

PubMed Central

Background A high rate of stillbirth was previously observed in the Australian Longitudinal Study of Women’s Health (ALSWH). Our primary objective was to test the validity and reliability of self-reported stillbirth data linked to state-based administrative datasets. Methods Self-reported data, collected as part of the ALSWH cohort born in 1973–1978, were linked to three administrative datasets for women in New South Wales, Australia (n = 4374): the Midwives Data Collection; Admitted Patient Data Collection; and Perinatal Death Review Database. Linkages were obtained from the Centre for Health Record Linkage for the period 1996–2009. True cases of stillbirth were defined by being consistently recorded in two or more independent data sources. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, percent agreement, and kappa statistics were calculated for each dataset. Results Forty-nine women reported 53 stillbirths. No dataset was 100% accurate. The administrative datasets performed better than self-reported data, with high accuracy and agreement. Self-reported data showed high sensitivity (100%) but low specificity (30%), meaning women who had a stillbirth always reported it, but there was also over-reporting of stillbirths. About half of the misreported cases in the ALSWH were able to be removed by identifying inconsistencies in longitudinal data. Conclusions Data linkage provides great opportunity to assess the validity and reliability of self-reported study data. Conversely, self-reported study data can help to resolve inconsistencies in administrative datasets. Quantifying the strengths and limitations of both self-reported and administrative data can improve epidemiological research, especially by guiding methods and interpretation of findings.

Hure, Alexis J.; Chojenta, Catherine L.; Powers, Jennifer R.; Byles, Julie E.; Loxton, Deborah

2015-01-01

403

Validity of prepregnancy weight status estimated from self-reported height and weight.  

PubMed

The Institute of Medicine's gestational weight gain guidelines are intended to reduce pregnancy complications, poor birth outcomes and excessive postpartum weight retention. The specific weight gain guidelines vary by prepregnancy weight status. We evaluated the validity of prepregnancy weight status (underweight, normal weight, overweight and obesity) classified from self-reported prepregnancy height and weight in reference to those from measured data during the first trimester of pregnancy and imputed data for both pregnant and age-matched non-pregnant women included in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2003-2006. Self-reported prepregnancy weight status was validated by two ideal references: imputed data with the number of imputations as 10 (n = 5,040) using the data of age-matched non-pregnant women who had both self-reported and measured data, and weight status based on height and weight measured during the first trimester (n = 95). Mean differences, Pearson's correlations (r), and Kappa statistics (?) were used to examine the strength of agreement between self-reported data and the two reference measures. Mean (standard error of the mean) differences between self-reported versus imputed prepregnancy weight was -1.7 (0.1) kg with an r = 0.98 (p < 0.001), and ? = 0.78 which indicate substantial agreement for the 504 pregnant women. Mean (SEM) differences between self-reported prepregnancy weight versus measured weight in the first trimester was -2.3 (0.7) kg with r = 0.98 (p < 0.001), and ? = 0.76, which also showed substantial agreements in 95 pregnant women. Prepregnancy weight status classified based on self-reported prepregnancy height and weight was valid. PMID:24337814

Shin, Dayeon; Chung, Hwan; Weatherspoon, Lorraine; Song, Won O

2014-09-01

404

Daily Collection of Self-Reporting Sleep Disturbance Data via a Smartphone App in Breast Cancer Patients Receiving Chemotherapy: A Feasibility Study  

PubMed Central

Background Improvements in mobile telecommunication technologies have enabled clinicians to collect patient-reported outcome (PRO) data more frequently, but there is as yet limited evidence regarding the frequency with which PRO data can be collected via smartphone applications (apps) in breast cancer patients receiving chemotherapy. Objective The primary objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of an app for sleep disturbance-related data collection from breast cancer patients receiving chemotherapy. A secondary objective was to identify the variables associated with better compliance in order to identify the optimal subgroups to include in future studies of smartphone-based interventions. Methods Between March 2013 and July 2013, patients who planned to receive neoadjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer at Asan Medical Center who had access to a smartphone app were enrolled just before the start of their chemotherapy and asked to self-report their sleep patterns, anxiety severity, and mood status via a smartphone app on a daily basis during the 90-day study period. Push notifications were sent to participants daily at 9 am and 7 pm. Data regarding the patients’ demographics, interval from enrollment to first self-report, baseline Beck’s Depression Inventory (BDI) score, and health-related quality of life score (as assessed using the EuroQol Five Dimensional [EQ5D-3L] questionnaire) were collected to ascertain the factors associated with compliance with the self-reporting process. Results A total of 30 participants (mean age 45 years, SD 6; range 35-65 years) were analyzed in this study. In total, 2700 daily push notifications were sent to these 30 participants over the 90-day study period via their smartphones, resulting in the collection of 1215 self-reporting sleep-disturbance data items (overall compliance rate=45.0%, 1215/2700). The median value of individual patient-level reporting rates was 41.1% (range 6.7-95.6%). The longitudinal day-level compliance curve fell to 50.0% at day 34 and reached a nadir of 13.3% at day 90. The cumulative longitudinal compliance curve exhibited a steady decrease by about 50% at day 70 and continued to fall to 45% on day 90. Women without any form of employment exhibited the higher compliance rate. There was no association between any of the other patient characteristics (ie, demographics, and BDI and EQ5D-3L scores) and compliance. The mean individual patient-level reporting rate was higher for the subgroup with a 1-day lag time, defined as starting to self-report on the day immediately after enrollment, than for those with a lag of 2 or more days (51.6%, SD 24.0 and 29.6%, SD 25.3, respectively; P=.03). Conclusions The 90-day longitudinal collection of daily self-reporting sleep-disturbance data via a smartphone app was found to be feasible. Further research should focus on how to sustain compliance with this self-reporting for a longer time and select subpopulations with higher rates of compliance for mobile health care. PMID:24860070

Min, Yul Ha; Shin, Yong-Wook; Jo, Min-Woo; Sohn, Guiyun; Lee, Jae-Ho; Lee, Guna; Jung, Kyung Hae; Sung, Joohon; Ko, Beom Seok; Yu, Jong-Han; Kim, Hee Jeong; Son, Byung Ho; Ahn, Sei Hyun

2014-01-01

405

Correlation of Symptoms to Function in Older Adults with Comorbidity  

PubMed Central

Objectives To (1) describe the relationship between symptom scores and mobility function measures, (2) assess whether symptom scores and disease scores are similarly associated with mobility function, and (3) identify clusters of symptoms that are most strongly associated with functional status in older adults Design Secondary analysis of cross-sectional data from three cohorts Setting Academic medical center Participants 195 community-dwelling subjects with poor flexibility or cardiorespiratory fitness (fitness cohort), 211 female retirement community residents with vertebral fractures (VF cohort), and 61 subjects with Parkinson's disease (PD cohort) Measurements 20-item self-reported symptom scale, 17-item self-reported disease scale, Short Form 36 (SF-36) Physical Functioning Scale, 5-item Nagi Disability scale, 10-meter walk time, supine to stand time Results Symptom scores correlated with mobility function measures (Spearman correlation coefficients range from 0.222 to 0.509) at least as strongly as, if not more strongly than did disease scores. Symptom scores remained associated with functional outcomes after controlling for disease score and demographic variables. Adding symptom scores to models that contained disease scores significantly increased the association with functional outcomes. In the fitness cohort, muscle weakness was the most explanatory single symptom, associated with an average decrease of 17.8 points on the Physical Functioning Scale. A model that included only muscle weakness, pain, and shortness of breath accounted for 21.2% of the variability in the Physical Functioning Score. Conclusion Symptoms represent useful indicators of disability burden in older adults and are promising targets for interventions to improve function in complex patients. PMID:19392960

Whitson, Heather E; Sanders, Linda L; Pieper, Carl F; Morey, Miriam C; Oddone, Eugene Z; Gold, Deborah T; Cohen, Harvey Jay

2009-01-01

406

Gender differences in panic disorder symptoms and illicit drug use among young people in Hungary  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors have investigated the frequency of illicit drug use, and spontaneous and drug-provoked panic disorder symptoms in Hungarian youths. A semi-structured self-reporting questionnaire (with questions about drug usage and the persistence of some DSM-IV panic disorder symptoms) was filled out in discos\\/nightclubs, secondary schools and universities. Almost 17% of the total sample (n = 1298) reported on illicit drug-use at least

I Kecskés; Z Rihmer; K Kiss; T Sárai; A Szabó; G. H Kiss

2002-01-01

407

Fresh fruit intake and asthma symptoms in young British adults: confounding or effect modification by smoking?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fresh fruit intake and asthma symptoms in young British adults: confounding or effect modification by smoking? B.K. Butland, D.P. Strachan, H.R. Anderson. #ERS Journals Ltd 1999. ABSTRACT: Antioxidant vitamins have been postulated as a protective factor in asthma. The associations between the frequency of fresh fruit consumption in summer, and the prevalence of self-reported asthma symptoms were investigated. The analysis

B. K. Butland; D. P. Strachan; H. R. Anderson

1999-01-01

408

Parent Resources Inventory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This resource inventory is for the use of parent groups and others who are concerned with parent education and support services. The inventory contains the titles of articles, copies of which are available through the Alberta Education Response Centre. The articles and publications listed cover a wide range of topics related to child development…

Alberta Education Response Centre, Edmonton.

409

World Glacier Inventory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) provides the World Glacier Inventory data, which was collected by the World Glacier Monitoring Service. This inventory contains geographic location, area, length, orientation, elevation, and classification of morphological type and moraines of more than 67,000 glaciers throughout the world. The data may be downloaded via FTP or through form-based queries.

410

Measuring the accuracy of self-reported height and weight in a community-based sample of young people  

PubMed Central

Background Self-reported anthropometric data are commonly used to estimate prevalence of obesity in population and community-based studies. We aim to: 1) Determine whether survey participants are able and willing to self-report height and weight; 2) Assess the accuracy of self-reported compared to measured anthropometric data in a community-based sample of young people. Methods Participants (16–29 years) of a behaviour survey, recruited at a Melbourne music festival (January 2011), were asked to self-report height and weight; researchers independently weighed and measured a sub-sample. Body Mass Index was calculated and overweight/obesity classified as ?25kg/m2. Differences between measured and self-reported values were assessed using paired t-test/Wilcoxon signed ranks test. Accurate report of height and weight were defined as <2cm and <2kg difference between self-report and measured values, respectively. Agreement between classification of overweight/obesity by self-report and measured values was assessed using McNemar’s test. Results Of 1405 survey participants, 82% of males and 72% of females self-reported their height and weight. Among 67 participants who were also independently measured, self-reported height and weight were significantly less than measured height (p=0.01) and weight (p<0.01) among females, but no differences were detected among males. Overall, 52% accurately self-reported height, 30% under-reported, and 18% over-reported; 34% accurately self-reported weight, 52% under-reported and 13% over-reported. More females (70%) than males (35%) under-reported weight (p=0.01). Prevalence of overweight/obesity was 33% based on self-report data and 39% based on measured data (p=0.16). Conclusions Self-reported measurements may underestimate weight but accurately identified overweight/obesity in the majority of this sample of young people. PMID:23170838

2012-01-01

411

The Effect of Music-Assisted Progressive Muscle Relaxation on the Self-Reported Symptoms of Women with Primary Dysmenorrhoea  

E-print Network

more than simply an annoyance. Upwards of 60% of women may have primary dysmenorrhoea (Burnett et al, 2005; Coco, 1999), which is defined as painful periods that cannot be explained from having another diagnosis, such as endometriosis (Weissman... be the result of organic factors, such as growths, an underlying disease such as endometriosis, or another disorder. Although the exact cause of primary dysmenorrhoea is not exactly understood, most physicians attribute primary dysmenorrhoea to heightened...

Memmott, Jenny

2009-06-02

412

Which symptoms matter? Self-report and observer discrepancies in repressors and high-anxious women with metastatic breast cancer.  

PubMed

Clinicians working with cancer patients listen to them, observe their behavior, and monitor their physiology. How do we proceed when these indicators do not align? Under self-relevant stress, non-cancer repressors respond with high arousal but report low anxiety; the high-anxious report high anxiety but often have lower arousal. This study extends discrepancy research on repressors and the high-anxious to a metastatic breast cancer sample and examines physician rating of coping. Before and during a Trier Social Stress Test (TSST), we assessed affect, autonomic reactivity, and observers coded emotional expression from TSST videotapes. We compared non-extreme (N = 40), low-anxious (N = 16), high-anxious (N = 19), and repressors (N = 19). Despite reported low anxiety, repressors expressed significantly greater Tension or anxiety cues. Despite reported high anxiety, the high-anxious expressed significantly greater Hostile Affect rather than Tension. Physicians rated both groups as coping significantly better than others. Future research might productively study physician-patient interaction in these groups. PMID:23085787

Giese-Davis, Janine; Tamagawa, Rie; Yutsis, Maya; Twirbutt, Suzanne; Piemme, Karen; Neri, Eric; Taylor, C Barr; Spiegel, David

2014-02-01

413

Are students' symptoms and health complaints associated with perceived stress at university? Perspectives from the United Kingdom and Egypt.  

PubMed

This cross-sectional survey assessed and compared by country, the levels and correlates of 21 self-reported symptoms/health complaints. We examined the associations between self-reported symptoms and perceived stress. Data was collected from universities in the United Kingdom and Egypt (N = 3706 and 3271 undergraduates, respectively). A self-administered questionnaire assessed a range of self-reported symptoms, perceived stress, sociodemographic (gender, age, marital status, year of study, living arrangements during semester, income sufficiency), lifestyle (tobacco smoking, illicit drug/s use, alcohol consumption frequency), and health variables (subjective health status, health awareness, BMI), along with religiosity, and quality of life. Factor analysis categorized the 21 self-reported symptoms into four components. Correlation analysis and linear regression tested the associations between the self-reported symptoms and stress. Factor analysis of the health symptoms generated four symptom groups for each of the UK and Egypt (psychological; circulatory/breathing; gastrointestinal; and, pains/aches), and factor loadings were quite similar for both countries. Whilst the two samples showed similarities as to the kind of symptoms most frequently reported by students, the Egyptian sample had significantly higher frequency than the UK for every symptom. Frequent complaints (both countries) included difficulties to concentrate, fatigue, headaches, nervousness/anxiety, and back pain (UK) and mood swings (Egypt). Significantly more Egyptian students reported ? 4 symptoms over the past year than the UK. For each of the UK and Egypt, across each of the four symptom groups, there was a stepladder appearance whereby the frequency of symptoms increased with increasing quartiles of perceived stress. Not controlling for other variables, for both countries, there were significant positive correlations between each of the four symptom groups and stress; the highest correlation was for psychological symptoms. After controlling for sex, age country, and other symptom groups, stress was highly and significantly associated with psychological symptoms and also with pain & aches symptoms in both countries. UK students were generally less stressed than their counterparts in Egypt. Age and female gender were also associated with stress; the younger the student was the more likely to suffer from stress. Interactions were not significant. Across both countries, the levels of stress among students and the associations between perceived stress and health complaints suggest the need for a multiple approaches in order to understand the sources of stress; how college students experience stress; and, the coping mechanisms that different students employ to mitigate stress. Interventions aimed at both preventing, treating and caring for students' distress, and also preventive strategies to help minimize the impact of stressful situations are required. Strategies that address both physical and psychological complaints may be beneficial for this population. PMID:25264677

El Ansari, Walid; Oskrochi, Reza; Haghgoo, Ghollamreza

2014-01-01

414

Are Students’ Symptoms and Health Complaints Associated with Perceived Stress at University? Perspectives from the United Kingdom and Egypt  

PubMed Central

This cross-sectional survey assessed and compared by country, the levels and correlates of 21 self-reported symptoms/health complaints. We examined the associations between self-reported symptoms and perceived stress. Data was collected from universities in the United Kingdom and Egypt (N = 3706 and 3271 undergraduates, respectively). A self-administered questionnaire assessed a range of self-reported symptoms, perceived stress, sociodemographic (gender, age, marital status, year of study, living arrangements during semester, income sufficiency), lifestyle (tobacco smoking, illicit drug/s use, alcohol consumption frequency), and health variables (subjective health status, health awareness, BMI), along with religiosity, and quality of life. Factor analysis categorized the 21 self-reported symptoms into four components. Correlation analysis and linear regression tested the associations between the self-reported symptoms and stress. Factor analysis of the health symptoms generated four symptom groups for each of the UK and Egypt (psychological; circulatory/breathing; gastrointestinal; and, pains/aches), and factor loadings were quite similar for both countries. Whilst the two samples showed similarities as to the kind of symptoms most frequently reported by students, the Egyptian sample had significantly higher frequency than the UK for every symptom. Frequent complaints (both countries) included difficulties to concentrate, fatigue, headaches, nervousness/anxiety, and back pain (UK) and mood swings (Egypt). Significantly more Egyptian students reported ?4 symptoms over the past year than the UK. For each of the UK and Egypt, across each of the four symptom groups, there was a stepladder appearance whereby the frequency of symptoms increased with increasing quartiles of perceived stress. Not controlling for other variables, for both countries, there were significant positive correlations between each of the four symptom groups and stress; the highest correlation was for psychological symptoms. After controlling for sex, age country, and other symptom groups, stress was highly and significantly associated with psychological symptoms and also with pain & aches symptoms in both countries. UK students were generally less stressed than their counterparts in Egypt. Age and female gender were also associated with stress; the younger the student was the more likely to suffer from stress. Interactions were not significant. Across both countries, the levels of stress among students and the associations between perceived stress and health complaints suggest the need for a multiple approaches in order to understand the sources of stress; how college students experience stress; and, the coping mechanisms that different students employ to mitigate stress. Interventions aimed at both preventing, treating and caring for students’ distress, and also preventive strategies to help minimize the impact of stressful situations are required. Strategies that address both physical and psychological complaints may be beneficial for this population. PMID:25264677

El Ansari, Walid; Oskrochi, Reza; Haghgoo, Ghollamreza

2014-01-01

415

Fluid Models in Inventory Control  

E-print Network

Fluid Models in Inventory Control Introduction Limiting behavior Optimal ordering policies Future research Stochastic Fluid Models in Inventory Control Problems Vidyadhar G. Kulkarni (Joint work with Keqi in Inventory Control Introduction Limiting behavior Optimal ordering policies Future research Outline 1

Kulkarni, Vidyadhar G.

416

The Association between Emotional and Behavioral Problems and Gastrointestinal Symptoms among Children with High-Functioning Autism  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated the association between gastrointestinal symptoms and a broad set of emotional and behavioral concerns in 95 children with high-functioning autism and IQ scores = 80. Gastrointestinal symptoms were assessed via the Autism Treatment Network's Gastrointestinal Symptom Inventory, and data were gathered on autism symptom

Mazefsky, Carla A.; Schreiber, Dana R.; Olino, Thomas M.; Minshew, Nancy J.

2014-01-01

417

Race/ethnicity and validity of self-reported pneumococcal vaccination  

PubMed Central

Background National and state surveys show large disparities in pneumococcal vaccination status among Whites, Blacks and Latinos aged ? 65. The purpose of this study is to determine whether there is any difference in the validity of self-report for pneumococcal vaccination by race/ethnicity that might contribute to the substantial disparities observed in population-level coverage estimates. Methods Self-reported vaccination status was compared with medical record documentation for samples of White, Black, and Latino members of a large health plan to examine whether differences in validity of self-report contribute to observed disparities. Results Sensitivity was significantly lower for Blacks (0.849, 95% CI 0.818–0.876) and Latinos (0.869, 95% CI 0.847–0.889) than for Whites (0.931 95% CI 0.918–0.942). Specificity was somewhat higher for Blacks than for Latinos and Whites, but the differences were not statistically significant. Coverage for Whites, Blacks and Latinos, respectively, was 84.3%, 73.5%, and 82.3% based on self-report, but 74.8%, 71.9%, and 84.2% based on medical records. Conclusion The results of this study suggest that differential self-report error, i.e., summative effect of over-reporting and under-reporting within a race-ethnic group, may contribute to the size and direction of race-ethnic disparities in pneumococcal vaccination observed in surveys. PMID:18598363

Gordon, Nancy P; Wortley, Pascale M; Singleton, James A; Lin, Teresa Y; Bardenheier, Barbara H

2008-01-01

418

Nurses' assessment of postoperative pain: can it be an alternative to patients' self-reports?  

PubMed Central

This study was designed to evaluate whether the nurses' assessment of postoperative pain can be an alternative to patients' self-reporting. We examined 187 patients receiving postoperative intravenous patient-controlled analgesia. The nurses assessed the patients' pain with three pain indices (therapeutic efficacy, pain intensity, and facial pain expression) 8 hr after operation. The patients recorded their resting and movement pain using 100-mm visual analog scales immediately following the nurses' assessment. There was an acceptable correlation between overall pain measurement assessed by patients and that assessed by nurses (canonical correlation coefficient=0.72, p=0.0001). The resting pain was more reliably reflected than the movement pain in overall measurement assessed both by nurses and by patients. Among the three pain indices assessed by nurses, the pain intensity most reliably reflected the patients' self-reports. The pain intensity assessed with a simple verbal descriptor scale therefore is believed to be an effective alternative to the patients' self-reports of postoperative pain at rest. However, it mirrored the patients' self-reports during movement less reliably. Therapeutic efficacy and facial pain expression indices were not effective alternatives to patients' self-reporting. PMID:11748363

Chung, I. S.; Sim, W. S.; Kim, G. S.; Park, S. H.; Park, Y. S.; Cha, K. J.; Park, Y. S.; Lim, Y. J.; Lee, S. C.; Kim, Y. C.

2001-01-01

419

Weight Stigma Mediates the Association Between BMI and Self-Reported Health.  

PubMed

Objective: Weight stigma is pervasive in the United States. We tested the hypothesis that stigma may be a mechanism through which obesity negatively affects self-reported health. Two studies examined whether perceived weight-based discrimination and concerns over weight stigma mediated the association between BMI and self-reported psychological health (Study 1) and physical health (Study 2). Method: In 2 online studies, adult community members completed measures of stigma-relevant mediators (perceived weight discrimination, weight stigma concerns) and provided their height and weight. In Study 1 (N = 171) participants also completed measures of psychological health (depression, self-esteem, quality of life), whereas participants in Study 2 (N = 194) also completed a measure of self-reported physical health. Process modeling was used to simultaneously test for mediation through perceived discrimination and stigma concerns independently as well as for serial mediation through both variables. Results: Across both studies, we hypothesized and found support for serial mediation such that BMI was indirectly related to poorer self-reported health through its effect on perceived discrimination and concerns about stigma. Additionally, concerns about stigma mediated the association between BMI and health independent of perceived discrimination. Conclusions: Weight stigma is an important mediator of the association between BMI and self-reported health. Furthermore, results indicate that concerns about facing stigma in the future mediate the link between perceived past experiences of discrimination and psychological and physical health. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:25133837

Hunger, Jeffrey M; Major, Brenda

2014-08-18

420

Metric Properties of the Neighborhood Inventory for Environmental Typology (NIfETy): An Environmental Assessment Tool for Measuring Indicators of Violence, Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drug Exposures  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objectives: Establish metric properties of the Neighborhood Inventory for Environmental Typology (NIfETy). Method: A total of 919 residential block faces were assessed by paired raters using the NIfETy. Reliability was evaluated via interrater and internal consistency reliability; validity by comparing NIfETy data with youth self-reported

Furr-Holden, C. D. M.; Campbell, K. D. M.; Milam, A. J.; Smart, M. J.; Ialongo, N. A.; Leaf, P. J.

2010-01-01

421

The Test Anxiety Inventory for Children and Adolescents (TAICA): Examination of the Psychometric Properties of a New Multidimensional Measure of Test Anxiety among Elementary and Secondary School Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Test Anxiety Inventory for Children and Adolescents (TAICA) is a new multidimensional measure used to assess test anxiety in elementary and secondary school students. The TAICA is a 45-item self-report measure consisting of a Total Test Anxiety scale, four debilitating test anxiety subscales (Cognitive Obstruction/Inattention, Physiological…

Lowe, Patricia A.; Lee, Steven W.; Witteborg, Kristin M.; Prichard, Keri W.; Luhr, Megan E.; Cullinan, Christopher M.; Mildren, Bethany A.; Raad, Jennifer M.; Cornelius, Rebecca A.; Janik, Melissa

2008-01-01

422

The Relationship between Psychopathic Traits Measured by the Youth Psychopathic Trait Inventory and Psychopathology in a UK Sample of Conduct Disordered Boys  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Youth Psychopathy traits Inventory (YPI) is a newly developed self-report measure of psychopathy. There are no studies looking at the validity of this measure in UK samples. We assessed 115 male adolescents (mean age 16.22 years) with DSM-IV conduct disorder on a range of measures including the YPI, Child Behaviour Checklist (CBCL) and the…

Dolan, Mairead C.; Rennie, Charlotte E.

2007-01-01

423

The Professional Context as a Predictor for Response Distortion in the Adaption-Innovation Inventory--An Investigation Using Mixture Distribution Item Response Theory Models  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Adaption-Innovation Inventory (AII), originally developed by Kirton (1976), is a widely used self-report instrument for measuring problem-solving styles at work. The present study investigates how scores on the AII are affected by different response styles. Data are collected from a combined sample (N = 738) of students, employees, and…

Fischer, Sebastian; Freund, Philipp Alexander

2014-01-01

424

The Relationships between Negative Life Events, Perceived Support in the School Environment and Depressive Symptoms among Norwegian Senior High School Students: A Prospective Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present study prospectively explored the main and interactive effect of negative life events and social support from teachers and classroom peers on depressive symptoms in a sample of 198 (111 females, 87 males) students in a Norwegian senior high school. In the longitudinal multivariate analyses, self-reported depressive symptom levels at…

Murberg, Terje A.; Bru, Edvin

2009-01-01

425

Urinary Estrogen Metabolites and Self-Reported Infertility in Women Infected with Schistosoma haematobium  

PubMed Central

Background Schistosomiasis is a neglected tropical disease, endemic in 76 countries, that afflicts more than 240 million people. The impact of schistosomiasis on infertility may be underestimated according to recent literature. Extracts of Schistosoma haematobium include estrogen-like metabolites termed catechol-estrogens that down regulate estrogen receptors alpha and beta in estrogen responsive cells. In addition, schistosome derived catechol-estrogens induce genotoxicity that result in estrogen-DNA adducts. These catechol estrogens and the catechol-estrogen-DNA adducts can be isolated from sera of people infected with S. haematobium. The aim of this study was to study infertility in females infected with S. haematobium and its association with the presence of schistosome-derived catechol-estrogens. Methodology/Principal Findings A cross-sectional study was undertaken of female residents of a region in Bengo province, Angola, endemic for schistosomiasis haematobia. Ninety-three women and girls, aged from two (parents interviewed) to 94 years were interviewed on present and previous urinary, urogenital and gynecological symptoms and complaints. Urine was collected from the participants for egg-based parasitological assessment of schistosome infection, and for liquid chromatography diode array detection electron spray ionization mass spectrometry (LC/UV-DAD/ESI-MSn) to investigate estrogen metabolites in the urine. Novel estrogen-like metabolites, potentially of schistosome origin, were detected in the urine of participants who were positive for eggs of S. haematobium, but not detected in urines negative for S. haematobium eggs. The catechol-estrogens/ DNA adducts were significantly associated with schistosomiasis (OR 3.35; 95% CI 2.32–4.84; P?0.001). In addition, presence of these metabolites was positively associated with infertility (OR 4.33; 95% CI 1.13–16.70; P?0.05). Conclusions/Significance Estrogen metabolites occur widely in diverse metabolic pathways. In view of the statistically significant association between catechol-estrogens/ DNA adducts and self-reported infertility, we propose that an estrogen-DNA adduct mediated pathway in S. haematobium-induced ovarian hormonal deregulation could be involved. In addition, the catechol-estrogens/ DNA adducts described here represent potential biomarkers for schistosomiasis haematobia. PMID:24848950

Santos, Júlio; Gouveia, Maria João; Vale, Nuno; Delgado, Maria de Lurdes; Gonçalves, Ana; da Silva, José M. Teixeira.; Oliveira, Cristiano; Xavier, Pedro; Gomes, Paula; Santos, Lúcio L.; Lopes, Carlos; Barros, Alberto; Rinaldi, Gabriel; Brindley, Paul J.; da Costa, José M. Correia; Sousa, Mário; Botelho, Mónica C.

2014-01-01

426

Improving the Self-Report of HIV Antiretroviral Medication Adherence: Is the Glass Half Full or Half Empty?  

PubMed Central

Self-reports are the most widely used method for measuring antiretroviral adherence. The association between self-reports and viral loads has been repeatedly demonstrated, but this association does not address how well self-reports measure actual medication-taking behaviors. Understanding adherence self-reports requires studying the science of memory and the reporting of behaviors. In the first section of this review, we discuss research in cognitive psychology that pertains to adherence self-reports, focusing primarily on studies that examine cognitive processes respondents use to answer survey questions. In the second section, we review recent articles examining the relationship between self-reports and objective measures of adherence, highlighting the strength of associations and key methodologic issues. We conclude with key questions for future research and methodologic recommendations. PMID:19849960

Wilson, Ira B.; Carter, Amanda E.; Berg, Karina M.

2013-01-01

427

Improving the self-report of HIV antiretroviral medication adherence: is the glass half full or half empty?  

PubMed

Self-reports are the most widely used method for measuring antiretroviral adherence. The association between self-reports and viral loads has been repeatedly demonstrated, but this association does not address how well self-reports measure actual medication-taking behaviors. Understanding adherence self-reports requires studying the science of memory and the reporting of behaviors. In the first section of this review, we discuss research in cognitive psychology that pertains to adherence self-reports, focusing primarily on studies that examine cognitive processes respondents use to answer survey questions. In the second section, we review recent articles examining the relationship between self-reports and objective measures of adherence, highlighting the strength of associations and key methodologic issues. We conclude with key questions for future research and methodologic recommendations. PMID:19849960

Wilson, Ira B; Carter, Amanda E; Berg, Karina M

2009-11-01

428

Cognitive processes in self-report responses: tests of item context effects in work attitude measures.  

PubMed

Much applied research relies on multi-item, self-report instruments. Drawing from recent cognitive theories, it was hypothesized that the items preceding a self-report item, its item context, can generate cognitive carryover and prompt context-consistent responses. These hypotheses were tested in 2 investigations: a field experiment involving 431 employees of a nonprofit urban hospital and a laboratory replication involving 245 undergraduate business students who held full- or part-time jobs. In both studies, evaluatively neutral items were placed in specially arranged blocks of uniformly positive, uniformly negative, or randomly mixed items on 3 modified Job Descriptive Index scales. Responses to the neutral items differed across the 3 forms, but scale-level psychometric properties remained unchanged. The implications of these item- and scale-level results for a variety of self-report measures in organizations are discussed. PMID:8449851

Harrison, D A; McLaughlin, M E

1993-02-01

429

Parents' self-reported attachment styles: a review of links with parenting behaviors, emotions, and cognitions.  

PubMed

For decades, attachment scholars have been investigating how parents' adult attachment orientations relate to the ways in which they parent. Traditionally, this research has been conducted by developmental and clinical psychologists who typically employ the Adult Attachment Interview (AAI) to measure adult attachment. However, dating back to the mid-1990s, social and personality psychologists have been investigating how self-reported adult attachment styles relate to various facets of parenting. The literature on self-reported attachment and parenting has received less attention than AAI research on the same topic and, to date, there is no comprehensive review of this literature. In this article, we review more than 60 studies of the links between self-reported attachment styles and parenting, integrate the findings to reach general conclusions, discuss unresolved questions, and suggest future directions. Finally, we discuss the potential benefits to the study of parenting of collaborations among researchers from the developmental and social attachment research traditions. PMID:25024278

Jones, Jason D; Cassidy, Jude; Shaver, Phillip R

2015-02-01

430

Methodological Challenges in Research on Sexual Risk Behavior: II. Accuracy of Self-Reports  

PubMed Central

Assessing sexual behavior with self-report is essential to research on a variety of health topics, including pregnancy and infertility, sexually transmitted infections, and sexual health and functioning. Recent methodological research has provided new insights regarding the accuracy of self-reports of sexual behavior. In this paper, we review these studies paying particular attention to a promising new development, namely, the use of computer-assisted assessments. The collection of sexual risk behavior data with computers has increased dramatically in recent years, but little is known about the accuracy of such assessments. We summarize the evidence, discuss methodological issues that arise in studies evaluating the accuracy of self-reports, and offer recommendations for future research. PMID:14534028

Schroder, Kerstin E. E.; Carey, Michael P.; Vanable, Peter A.

2008-01-01

431

Diagnosing underweight in adolescent girls: should we rely on self-reported height and weight?  

PubMed

This study examines the reliability of self-reported height, weight and weight change in underweight versus normal weight adolescent females. Self-reported height and weight were obtained from 162 schoolgirls without an eating disorder (12-16 years), and compared to objective measurements afterwards. Weight change was assessed 4 months later. The influence of age and current BMI on the reliability of self-reports was analyzed by linear regression analyses. With increasing age, height and BMI were reported more accurately. With increasing BMI, the underestimation of weight increased. Underweight girls overestimated their weight significantly compared to normal weight girls. Only 41% of the girls with a weight loss (>1 kg) in the past 4 months reported this accurately. Therefore, especially in younger girls with low body weight, information on height and weight as well as weight changes should be obtained objectively to identify a developing or subthreshold anorexia nervosa. PMID:22177388

Ohlmer, Ricarda; Jacobi, Corinna; Fittig, Eike

2012-01-01

432

Prevalence of and Risk Factors for Self-reported Sexually Transmitted Infections in Slovenia in 2000  

PubMed Central

Aim To estimate the prevalence of self-reported sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and examine the associations between self-reported STIs and sociodemographic and behavioral factors among sexually active Slovenians aged 18-49 years. Methods Data were collected during 1999-2001 from a probability sample of the general population at respondents’ homes by a combination of face-to-face interviews and anonymous self-administered questionnaires. Statistical methods for complex survey data were used to account for stratification, clustered sampling, and weighing. Results The proportion of sexually active Slovenian population that reported ever being diagnosed with an STI, excluding pelvic inflammatory disease and vaginal discharge for women, was 5.5% for men and 5.1% for women. Gonorrhea was the most commonly self-reported STI among men (3.7%) and hepatitis B among women (1.7%). Independent risk factors associated with self-reported STIs included having concurrent heterosexual relationships during lifetime [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) for men 3.3 (CI 1.3-8.6) and for women 2.3 (CI 1.0-5.3)], ever having paid for sex for men (AOR 4.0, CI 1.5-10.7), and having at least 10 lifetime heterosexual partners for women (AOR 4.7, CI 1.7-13.0). Conclusion Our estimates of lifetime prevalence of self-reported STIs in a probability sample of Slovenian men and women aged 18 to 49 indicate a substantial national burden of STIs. The results could be used in shaping national STI prevention and control policies and strategies. Identification of risk factors associated with self-reported STIs provide a basis for targeting prevention and control efforts to individuals at higher risk. PMID:17042064

Grgi?-Vitek, Marta; Švab, Igor; Klavs, Irena

2006-01-01

433

Validity of a Self-reported History of a Positive Tuberculin Skin Test  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE To define the prevalence of and factors associated with having a negative purified protein derivative (PPD) among persons who self-report a prior positive PPD and to define the safety of repeat testing in such persons. DESIGN Observational cohort study. SETTING Methadone maintenance program with onsite primary care. PATIENTS/PARTICIPANTS Current or former drug users enrolled in methadone maintenance treatment. INTERVENTIONS Structured interview, tuberculin skin testing regardless of self-reported PPD status, and anergy testing. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS Nearly one third (31%) of participants who self-reported a prior positive PPD had a negative measured PPD, despite receipt of a “booster” PPD. A single participant (0.5%) blistered in response to the PPD without lasting ill effect. Participants with PPD results discordant from their history were more likely to be HIV-seropositive and nonreactive to the anergy panel. The discordance rate among HIV-infected participants was 43%, and was largely attributable to immune dysfunction. Among HIV-seronegative participants, the discordance rate was 27%. Recent crack-cocaine use was independently associated with discordance in the absence of HIV infection. CONCLUSIONS We confirmed that planting a PPD in patients who self-report a positive PPD history confers minimal risk. Substantial rates of discordance exist between self-reported history of a positive PPD and measured PPD status. Further research is needed to define the optimal management of PPD-negative patients who self-report a prior positive PPD and who have not received prior treatment for latent tuberculosis. PMID:15482557

Kunins, Hillary V; Howard, Andrea A; Klein, Robert S; Arnsten, Julia H; Litwin, Alain H; Schoenbaum, Ellie E; Gourevitch, Marc N

2004-01-01

434

Risk factors of self-reported adverse drug events among Medicare enrollees before and after Medicare Part D  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: Quantify risk factors for self-reported adverse drug events (ADEs) after the implementation of Medicare Part D, quantify self- reported ADEs before and after Medicare Part D and quantify the association between self-reported ADEs and increased use of prescription medication. Methods: The design was a longitudinal study including an internet survey before Medicare Part D in 2005 (n=1220) and a

OLayinka O. Shiyanbola; Karen B. Farris; Julie M. Urmie; William R. Doucette

2009-01-01

435

Comparison of measured and self-reported weight and height in a cross-sectional sample of young adolescents  

Microsoft Academic Search

AIM: To explore the relationship between self-reported weight and height to actual weight and height in a cross-sectional nationally representative sample of young adolescents.METHODS: Weights and heights were obtained on 1932 adolescents aged 12–16 y enrolled in the NHANES III study. Self-reported weights and heights were available on 1657 of the adolescents (86%).RESULTS: Correlation between self-reported weight and actual weight

RS Strauss

1999-01-01

436

Caregiving, residence, race, and depressive symptoms  

PubMed Central

The objective of this study is to evaluate the psychological responses to caregiving between black and white dementia caregivers measured by self-reports of depressive symptoms evaluating the impact of sub-components of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) and residential arrangements of the caregiving dyad. The method included 87 intergenerational family caregivers enrolled in the Duke Caregiver Study (50 white and 37 black). Total CES-D and the four sub-components were modeled as dependent measures in separate linear regressions. Three models were examined. The first model tested race, living arrangements, and their interaction. The second model adjusted for age, gender, education, income, health status, cultural justification for caregiving, crime concerns, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and glycosylated hemoglobin. A third model added adjustment for caregiver burden. The results showed that there was a significant race by residence interaction for CES-D, somatic symptoms and depressive affect such that when the dyads are living apart – with the care recipient in their own home or in an institutional setting – whites reported more depressive symptoms than blacks. When the dyads lived together, this was reversed, and blacks reported higher depressive symptoms than whites. To conclude, all the parameters such as race, living arrangements, and the components of depression need to be taken into account to understand the impact of caregiving on the emotional health of caregivers. PMID:20635234

Siegler, Ilene C.; Brummett, Beverly H.; Williams, Redford B.; Haney, Thomas L.; Dilworth-Anderson, Peggye

2011-01-01

437

The World Glacier Inventory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This web site is part of the National Snow and Ice Data Center's World Glacier Monitoring Service. The World Glacier Inventory contains information for over 67,000 glaciers throughout the world. Parameters within the inventory include: geographic location, area, length, orientation, elevation, and classification of morphological type and moraines. The inventory entries are based upon a single observation in time and can be viewed as a "snapshot" of the glacier at this time. These data are collected and digitized by the World Glacier Monitoring Service, Zurich. A point and click map of the world will also take users to the region of interest with a list of glaciated areas.

C. Haggerty

438

Self reported risk taking and risk compensation in skiers and snowboarders are associated with sensation seeking.  

PubMed

In alpine skiing, a controversial discussion has been taking place regarding the potential influence of wearing a ski helmet on the individual level of risk taking behaviour. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether self reported risk taking behaviour and self reported risk compensation are associated with the personality trait sensation seeking (SS) in alpine skiing and snowboarding. In total, 683 persons (36% males and 64% females) completed an online-survey about attitudes and use of protective gear in winter sports including the German version of the sensation seeking scale form V. A logistic regression analysis including gender, age, nationality, preferred winter sport, self reported skiing ability, mean skiing time per season, use of ski helmets, and SS total score was used to estimated adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and their 95% confidence intervals (95 CI) for self reported risk taking behaviour. Regression analysis revealed that a more risky behaviour increased with male gender (OR: 2.7), with an age<25 years (OR: 1.6), with skiing (OR: 1.3), higher skill level (OR: 5.7), and a mean skiing time>28 days per season (OR: 2.2). In addition, SS total score was significantly higher in more risky compared to more cautious people (23.8 vs. 20.3, p<.001). Ski helmet use was not found to be predictive for a more risky behaviour (p>.05). Also, skiers and snowboarders with self reported risk compensation while wearing a ski helmet had higher SS total scores compared to those who did not report risk compensation (23.8 vs. 20.9, p=.001). In addition, self reported risk compensation in helmet wearers increased with an age<25 years (OR: 2.2), a higher skill level (OR: 2.5) and a mean skiing time>28 days per season (OR: 2.1). In conclusion, self reported risk taking and self reported risk compensation are associated with higher sensation seeking total scores. The personality trait sensation seeking, not wearing of a ski helmet, appears to be associated with riskier behaviour on the ski slopes. PMID:22664693

Ruedl, Gerhard; Abart, Markus; Ledochowski, Larissa; Burtscher, Martin; Kopp, Martin

2012-09-01

439

Validity of self-reported exposure to second-hand smoke in hospitality venues.  

PubMed

The aim was to assess the validity of self-reported exposure to second-hand smoke (SHS) in 50 hospitality venues of Madrid (Spain) in 2010, taking as a reference vapour-phase nicotine measured by active sampling. The questions posed in the questionnaire permitted distinguishing between the different levels of SHS. However, the moderate relationship found (Spearman?s correlation=0.387, p<0.001) suggests that intensity of exposure to SHS in hospitality venues, based solely on self-reported information, should be used with caution. PMID:24906061

Galán, Iñaki; Mayo, Elga; López, María J; Pérez-Ríos, Mónica; Fu, Marcela; Martínez-Sánchez, Jose M; Schiaffino, Anna; Moncada, Albert; Montes, Agustín; Nebot, Manel; Fernández, Esteve

2014-08-01

440

The occurrence of panic and obsessive compulsive symptoms in women with postpartum dysphoria: a prospective study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  \\u000a \\u000a Objective: This study investigated the prevalence of panic and obsessive compulsive symptoms in a sample of postpartum women who endorsed\\u000a high levels of dysphoria on a self-report depression measure.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Method: A community-based sample of 788 postpartum women with self-reported depressive symptomatology completed an interview assessing\\u000a major depression, panic disorder, and obsessive compulsive disorder.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Results: An estimated 11% of the

A. Wenzel; L. L. Gorman; M. W. O'Hara; S. Stuart

2001-01-01

441

Self-reported measures versus objective measures of physical activity and sedentary behaviour : impacts of cardiovascular fitness and physical activity.  

E-print Network

??Includes abstract. Physical activity (PA) and sedentary behaviour (SB) can be quantified with both self-report and objective measures, using questionnaires and accelerometers, respectively. There is… (more)

Tomaz, Simone Annabella

2014-01-01

442

Re-examination of the Controversial Coexistence of Traumatic Brain Injury and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: Misdiagnosis and Self-Report Measures  

PubMed Central

The coexistence of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) remains a controversial issue in the literature. To address this controversy, we focused primarily on the civilian-related literature of TBI and PTSD. Some investigators have argued that individuals who had been rendered unconscious or suffered amnesia due to a TBI are unable to develop PTSD because they would be unable to consciously experience the symptoms of fear, helplessness, and horror associated with the development of PTSD. Other investigators have reported that individuals who sustain TBI, regardless of its severity, can develop PTSD even in the context of prolonged unconsciousness. A careful review of the methodologies employed in these studies reveals that investigators who relied on clinical interviews of TBI patients to diagnose PTSD found little or no evidence of PTSD. In contrast, investigators who relied on PTSD questionnaires to diagnose PTSD found considerable evidence of PTSD. Further analysis revealed that many of the TBI patients who were initially diagnosed with PTSD according to self-report questionnaires did not meet the diagnostic criteria for PTSD upon completion of a clinical interview. In particular, patients with severe TBI were often misdiagnosed with PTSD. A number of investigators found that many of the severe TBI patients failed to follow the questionnaire instructions and erroneously endorsed PTSD symptoms because of their cognitive difficulties. Because PTSD questionnaires are not designed to discriminate between PTSD and TBI symptoms or determine whether a patient's responses are accurate or exaggerated, studies that rely on self-report questionnaires to evaluate PTSD in TBI patients are at risk of misdiagnosing PTSD. Further research should evaluate the degree to which misdiagnosis of PTSD occurs in individuals who have sustained mild TBI. PMID:20927197

Ruff, Ronald M.

2010-01-01

443

Ethnic Differences in Somatic Symptom Reporting in Children With Asthma and Their Parents  

PubMed Central

Objectives The purpose of this study is to examine the association between child and parent somatic symptom reporting and pediatric asthma morbidity in Latino and non-Latino white children. Method The study consists of 786 children, 7 to 15 years of age, in Rhode Island (RI) and Puerto Rico. Children’s and parents’ levels of general somatic symptoms were assessed with well-established self-report measures. Clinician-determined asthma severity was based on reported medication use, asthma symptom history, and spirometry results. Asthma-related health care use and functional morbidity was obtained via parent self-report. Results Child and parent reports of general somatic symptoms were significantly related to pediatric asthma functional morbidity when controlling for poverty, parent education, child’s age, and asthma severity. In controlling for covariates, Latino children in RI reported higher levels of somatic symptoms than Island Puerto Rican children, and RI Latino parents reported more somatic symptoms than RI non-Latino white parents (p < .05). Conclusions This study replicates and extends to children in previous research showing higher levels of symptom reporting in Latinos relative to whites. Results also provide new insight into the relation between general somatic symptom reports and pediatric asthma. Ethnic differences in somatic symptom reporting may be an important factor underlying asthma disparities between Latino and non-Latino white children. PMID:19564802

VASQUEZ, JUAN C.; FRITZ, GREGORY K.; KOPEL, SHERYL J.; SEIFER, RONALD; McQUAID, ELIZABETH L.; CANINO, GLORISA

2012-01-01

444

Prevalence, Severity and Risk Factors for Depressive Symptoms and Insomnia in College Undergraduates.  

PubMed

Although the college years represent a high-risk period for depressive symptoms and insomnia, little research has explored their prevalence, comorbidities and risk factors within this developmental period. Two studies were conducted; the first evaluated the prevalence and comorbidity of depressive symptoms and insomnia in 1338 students (ages 18-23?years) from a large Southwestern University. Mild depressive symptoms were endorsed by 19% of students and 14.5% reported moderate to severe symptoms. Forty-seven percent of students reported mild insomnia and 22.5% endorsed moderate to severe insomnia severity. A second study investigated perceived stress as a potential mediator of the relation between self-reported childhood adversity and concurrent depressive symptoms and insomnia. Undergraduates (N?=?447) from a Southwestern and Southeastern University reported prior childhood adversity, current perceived stress, insomnia and depressive symptoms. Self-reported childhood adversity predicted higher levels of depressive symptoms and insomnia severity, partially mediated by perceived stress. Results support the high prevalence of depressive symptoms and insomnia among undergraduates. The risk for depressive and insomnia symptoms may be increased among students who experienced greater levels of childhood adversity. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:23897800

Gress-Smith, Jenna L; Roubinov, Danielle S; Andreotti, Charissa; Compas, Bruce E; Luecken, Linda J

2013-07-30

445

Symptoms of Pneumocystis pneumonia  

MedlinePLUS

... gov . Fungal Diseases Share Compartir Symptoms of Pneumocystis pneumonia The symptoms of PCP are fever, dry cough, ... Diagnosis & Testing Treatment & Outcomes Statistics Additional Information Pneumocystis pneumonia Definition Symptoms People at Risk & Prevention Sources Diagnosis & ...

446

Make a Financial Inventory  

MedlinePLUS

... be found Key people to contact The following worksheets may help you get started. Once completed, keep ... relative or friend where you keep them. Financial Worksheets Make an inventory of your finances My Financial ...

447

NATIONAL HEALTH PROVIDER INVENTORY  

EPA Science Inventory

The National Health Provider Inventory provides data on services, location, staff, capacity, and other characteristics of selected health care providers in the United States. Information is collected via mail questionnaire with telephone follow up to all providers (100% census) o...

448

Shuttle Inventory Management  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Inventory Management System (SIMS) consists of series of integrated support programs providing supply support for both Shuttle program and Kennedy Space Center base opeations SIMS controls all supply activities and requirements from single point. Programs written in COBOL.

1983-01-01

449

TOXICS RELEASE INVENTORY (TRI)  

EPA Science Inventory

The Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) site is designed to provide information on toxic chemical releases including collected data, guidance documents, program planning, background, history, and, program contacts, among other things. The data included in this homepage have been submi...

450

Rate and predictors of psychotic symptoms after Kashmir earthquake.  

PubMed

Psychotic symptoms are more common in general population than validated diagnosis of psychosis. There is evidence to suggest that these symptoms, hallucinations, paranoia, elated mood, thought insertion, are part of a spectrum of psychosis and may have association with the same risk factors that determine development of psychosis. These symptoms have an association with exposure to psychological trauma, post-traumatic stress disorder, anxiety and depression. The aim of this study was to explore the prevalence of psychotic symptoms in the population affected by a natural disaster, earthquake in this case and possible correlates of these symptoms. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of a population sample affected by the disaster, comprising of 1,291 individuals, 18 months after 2005 earthquake in Northern Pakistan and Kashmir to look at the prevalence of these symptoms and their correlates. Screening Instrument for Traumatic Stress in Earthquake Survivors and Self-Reporting Questionnaire and Psychosis Screening Questionnaire were used as tools. We examined association between the symptoms of anxiety, depression, PTSD and psychotic symptoms. We performed logistic regression analysis where hallucinations and delusions were dependent variables and demographic and trauma exposure variables were independent variables. The prevalence of psychotic symptoms ranged between 16.8 and 30.4 %. They were directly correlated with symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder as well as concurrent symptoms of anxiety and depression. Lower level of education had a strong association in all the regression models. For hallucinations, living in a joint family had a negative association and participation in rescue, history of exposure to previous trauma and past psychiatric history had positive association. Paranoia was associated with female gender. Any psychiatric symptom was associated death of a family member, history of past psychiatric illness and living in a tent at the time of interview. Pattern of association of psychotic symptoms is consistent with prior literature and can be understood in the light of stress vulnerability model. PMID:25421792

Ayub, Muhammad; Saeed, Khalid; Kingdon, David; Naeem, Farooq

2014-11-25

451

Symptoms of Parkinson's  

MedlinePLUS

... Secondary Motor Symptoms Nonmotor Symptoms Causes Progression Medications & Treatments Clinical Trials Statistics on Parkinson's Chasing the Cure National HelpLine Educational Publications Online ...

452