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1

Children' Florida Obsessive Compulsive Inventory: Psychometric Properties and Feasibility of a Self-Report Measure of Obsessive-Compulsive Symptoms in Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report describes the development and psychometric properties of the Children's Florida Obsessive Compulsive Inventory (C-FOCI). Designed specifically as a brief measure for assessing obsessive-compulsive symptoms, the C-FOCI was created for use in both clinical and community settings. Study 1 included 82 children and adolescents diagnosed…

Storch, Eric A.; Khanna, Muniya; Merlo, Lisa J.; Loew, Benjamin A.; Franklin, Martin; Reid, Jeannette M.; Goodman, Wayne K.; Murphy, Tanya K.

2009-01-01

2

Children’s Florida Obsessive Compulsive Inventory: Psychometric Properties and Feasibility of a Self-Report Measure of Obsessive–Compulsive Symptoms in Youth  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report describes the development and psychometric properties of the Children’s Florida Obsessive Compulsive Inventory\\u000a (C-FOCI). Designed specifically as a brief measure for assessing obsessive–compulsive symptoms, the C-FOCI was created for\\u000a use in both clinical and community settings. Study 1 included 82 children and adolescents diagnosed with primary Obsessive–Compulsive\\u000a Disorder, and their parents. The Children’s Yale-Brown Obsessive–Compulsive Scale (CY-BOCS) was

Eric A. Storch; Muniya Khanna; Lisa J. Merlo; Benjamin A. Loew; Martin Franklin; Jeannette M. Reid; Wayne K. Goodman; Tanya K. Murphy

2009-01-01

3

Assessing the Readability Levels of Self-Report Assertion Inventories.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reading grade levels were obtained for 11 commonly employed self-report assertion inventories by use of the Flesch Reading Ease Formula. Directions for the inventories ranged from the seventh-grade to college graduate reading grade level. Inventory items were more readable, with scores ranging from the seventh- to the twelfth-grade level. (Author)

Andrasik, Frank; And Others

1981-01-01

4

Determining remission from depression on two self-report symptom scales: a comparison of the Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology and the Clinically Useful Depression Outcome Scale.  

PubMed

To answer fundamental questions regarding the effectiveness of treatments for depression in real-world clinical practice, it is necessary to incorporate the measurement of outcome. Self-report questionnaires are a cost-effective option to systematically, reliably, and validly evaluate clinical status because they are inexpensive in terms of professional time needed for administration, and do not require special training for administration. While there are many self-administered depression scales, only a limited number cover all of the diagnostic criteria for major depressive disorder (MDD) and have had cutoff scores derived corresponding to the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D) definition of remission. In the present study from the Rhode Island Methods to Improve Diagnostic Assessment and Services project, we compared 2 scales in their respective ability to identify remission as defined by the HAM-D. We administered the 17-item HAM-D to 274 depressed outpatients in ongoing treatment. The patients completed the Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (QIDS) and the Clinically Useful Depression Outcome Scale (CUDOS). Based on the cutoffs recommended by the developers of the scales to identify remission, the 2 scales performed similarly overall though the sensitivity was higher for the QIDS than the CUDOS (95.5% vs. 78.7%), whereas specificity was higher for the CUDOS than the QIDS (73.0% vs. 50.0%). On the CUDOS, the cutoff that maximized the sum of sensitivity and specificity was similar to cutoff initially derived for this purpose; however, for the QIDS, the optimal cutoff was higher than the cutoff originally derived for this purpose. In conclusion, the CUDOS and the QIDS were equally highly related to the HAM-D definition of remission. The CUDOS takes less time to complete than the QIDS and, therefore, may be preferable to use in routine clinical practice. PMID:22520091

Zimmerman, Mark; Martinez, Jennifer; Attiullah, Naureen; Friedman, Michael; Toba, Cristina; Boerescu, Daniela A; Rahgeb, Moataz

2012-10-01

5

The Development and Validation of the Self-Regulation Strategy Inventory--Self-Report  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The primary purpose of this study was to develop and gather initial psychometric information regarding the Self-Regulation Strategy Inventory--Self-Report (SRSI-SR), a self-report measure of students' use of specific self-regulation strategies. Information regarding the scales' factor structure, convergent and discriminant validity, differential…

Cleary, Timothy J.

2006-01-01

6

Correlates of Self-Reported Depressive Symptoms: A Study of Older Persons of Punjab, Pakistan  

PubMed Central

This paper examines the prevalence and correlates of depressive symptoms among older persons of Punjab, the largest Province of Pakistan. Data were gathered from 4191 older persons aged 60+ using Probability Proportional to Size (PPS) of population. A version of the CES-D Scale adapted for low-literate populations was used to measure self reported depressive symptoms. Various independent factors, including socioeconomic factors, self-reported health conditions, and functional impairments were examined to see their net effect on depressive symptoms among older persons. Results of logistic regression analysis showed that region, area, living index, independent source of income, self-reported health conditions, and functional impairment were significant factors affecting self-reported depressive symptoms among older persons in Punjab. An important cross-cultural difference was a lower risk of depressive symptoms among older women, which may reflect the buffering effects of family co-residence and the position of seniors in extended families. PMID:23242697

Maqsood, Fauzia; Flatt, Jason D.; Albert, Steven M.; Maqsood, Sidra; Nizamuddin, Mohammad

2012-01-01

7

Correlates of self-reported depressive symptoms: a study of older persons of Punjab, Pakistan.  

PubMed

This paper examines the prevalence and correlates of depressive symptoms among older persons of Punjab, the largest Province of Pakistan. Data were gathered from 4191 older persons aged 60+ using Probability Proportional to Size (PPS) of population. A version of the CES-D Scale adapted for low-literate populations was used to measure self reported depressive symptoms. Various independent factors, including socioeconomic factors, self-reported health conditions, and functional impairments were examined to see their net effect on depressive symptoms among older persons. Results of logistic regression analysis showed that region, area, living index, independent source of income, self-reported health conditions, and functional impairment were significant factors affecting self-reported depressive symptoms among older persons in Punjab. An important cross-cultural difference was a lower risk of depressive symptoms among older women, which may reflect the buffering effects of family co-residence and the position of seniors in extended families. PMID:23242697

Maqsood, Fauzia; Flatt, Jason D; Albert, Steven M; Maqsood, Sidra; Nizamuddin, Mohammad

2013-03-01

8

Self-Report of ADHD Symptoms in College Students and Repetition Effects  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The research in this article focuses on the relation between self-report of attention deficit disorder (ADD) symptoms and performance on a two-alternative forced-choice task that measures repetition effects. The ADD/Hyperactive Adolescent Self-Report Scale--Short Form is administered to college students after they completed the repetition effects…

Marczinski, Cecile A.

2005-01-01

9

Self-Reported Adult Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Symptoms among College Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: Report the distribution of scores from the Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale (ASRS) and estimate the prevalence of self-reported attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms as compared to clinical diagnoses. Participants: Participants were 1,080 college students, divided into 3 groups: (1) no ADHD diagnosis (n = 972), (2)…

Garnier-Dykstra, Laura M.; Pinchevsky, Gillian M.; Caldeira, Kimberly M.; Vincent, Kathryn B.; Arria, Amelia M.

2010-01-01

10

Development and Validation of the Inventory of Depression and Anxiety Symptoms (IDAS)  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors describe a new self-report instrument, the Inventory of Depression and Anxiety Symptoms (IDAS), which was designed to assess specific symptom dimensions of major depression and related anxiety disorders. They created the IDAS by conducting principal factor analyses in 3 large samples (college students, psychiatric patients, community…

Watson, David; O'Hara, Michael W.; Simms, Leonard J.; Kotov, Roman; Chmielewski, Michael; McDade-Montez, Elizabeth A.; Gamez, Wakiza; Stuart, Scott

2007-01-01

11

Validation of a self-reported shelf inventory to measure food purchase behavior. — Measures of the Food Environment  

Cancer.gov

A mailed, self-reported shelf inventory was validated for use as a tool in assessing the impact of a community nutrition intervention that included a point-of-purchase component. The self-reported inventory was evaluated for overall accuracy as well as for the effects of gender, age, and shopping responsibility on accuracy. In addition, the food-shelf inventory was compared with a specific food frequency questionnaire. Specificity and sensitivity were calculated for self-reported inventories using an interviewer-completed, same-day inventory as the gold standard.

12

Self-Reported versus Informant-Reported Depressive Symptoms in Adults with Mild Intellectual Disability  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Virtually nothing is known about potential differences in the types of depression symptoms reported by adults with mild intellectual disability (ID) on self-reported questionnaires as compared with the types of symptoms reported by caregivers on informant questionnaires. Moreover, little is known about how the presentation of…

Mileviciute, I.; Hartley, S. L.

2015-01-01

13

The Relationship between ADHD Symptoms, Mood Instability, and Self-Reported Offending  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: To investigate the relative importance of ADHD symptoms, mood instability, and antisocial personality disorder traits in predicting self-reported offending. Method: A total of 295 Icelandic students completed two scales of offending behavior and measures of ADHD symptoms, mood instability, and antisocial personality traits. Results:…

Gudjonsson, Gisli H.; Sigurdsson, Jon Fridrik; Adalsteinsson, Tomas F.; Young, Susan

2013-01-01

14

Self-reported Adult Attention-Deficit\\/Hyperactivity Disorder Symptoms Among College Students  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: Report the distribution of scores from the Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale (ASRS) and estimate the prevalence of self-reported attention-deficit\\/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms as compared to clinical diagnoses. Participants: Participants were 1,080 college students, divided into 3 groups: (1) no ADHD diagnosis (n = 972), (2) diagnosed with ADHD but no current pharmacologic treatment (n = 54), and (3) diagnosed

Laura M. Garnier-Dykstra; Gillian M. Pinchevsky; Kimberly M. Caldeira; Kathryn B. Vincent; Amelia M. Arria

2010-01-01

15

The 16Item quick inventory of depressive symptomatology (QIDS), clinician rating (QIDS-C), and self-report (QIDS-SR): a psychometric evaluation in patients with chronic major depression  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundThe 16-item Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (QIDS), a new measure of depressive symptom severity derived from the 30-item Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (IDS), is available in both self-report (QIDS-SR16) and clinician-rated (QIDS-C16) formats.

A. John Rush; Madhukar H Trivedi; Hicham M Ibrahim; Thomas J Carmody; Bruce Arnow; Daniel N Klein; John C Markowitz; Philip T Ninan; Susan Kornstein; Rachel Manber; Michael E Thase; James H Kocsis; Martin B Keller

2003-01-01

16

Revision of the Padua Inventory of obsessive compulsive disorder symptoms: Distinctions between worry, obsessions, and compulsions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Padua Inventory (PI), a self-report measure of obsessive and compulsive symptoms, is increasingly used in obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) research. Freeston, Ladouceur, Rheaume, Letarte, Gagnon and Thibodeau (1994) [Behaviour Research and Therapy, 32, 29–36], however, recently showed that the PI measures worry in addition to obsessions. In an attempt to solve this measurement problem, this study used a content

G. Leonard Burns; Susan G. Keortge; Gina M. Formea; Lee G. Sternberger

1996-01-01

17

Psychosocial Factors in Adolescent and Young Adult Self-Reported Depressive Symptoms: Causal or Correlational Associations?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using a large longitudinal representative community sample, this study identified three groups of subjects who were depressed either in pre-adolescence, late adolescence or early adulthood, and matched by age and gender to controls without depression. The 90th percentile on one or two self-reported symptom scales [i. e. the Center for…

Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph; Haslimeier, Claudia; Metzke, Christa Winkler

2007-01-01

18

Self-Reported Depressive Symptoms in Lesbian Birth Mothers and Comothers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Despite the frequency of postpartum depression, little is known about the experiences of lesbian birth mothers and their female partners, or comothers. In this modest yet important exploratory investigation, 20 lesbian mothers completed a survey of self-reported postpartum depressive symptoms (PDS) and related risk factors. Results indicate that…

Maccio, Elaine M.; Pangburn, Jaimee A.

2012-01-01

19

Influence of poor effort on self-reported symptoms and neurocognitive test performance following mild traumatic brain injury  

Microsoft Academic Search

When considering a diagnosis of postconcussion syndrome, clinicians must systematically evaluate and eliminate the possible contribution of many differential diagnoses, comorbidities, and factors that may cause or maintain self-reported symptoms long after mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI). One potentially significant contributing factor is symptom exaggeration. The purpose of the study is to examine the influence of poor effort on self-reported

Rael T. Lange; Grant L. Iverson; Brian L. Brooks; V. Lynn Ashton Rennison

2010-01-01

20

Inventory of complicated grief: A scale to measure maladaptive symptoms of loss  

Microsoft Academic Search

Certain symptoms of grief have been shown 1.(a) to be distinct from bereavement-related depression and anxiety, and2.(b) to predict long-term functional impairments. We termed these symptoms of “complicated grief” and developed the Inventory of Complicated Grief (ICG) to assess them. Data were derived from 97 conjugally bereaved elders who completed the ICG, along with other self-report scales measuring grief, depression,

Holly G. Prigerson; Paul K. Maciejewski; Charles F. Reynolds; Andrew J. Bierhals; Jason T. Newsom; Amy Fasiczka; Ellen Frank; Jack Doman; Mark Miller

1995-01-01

21

A new self-report inventory of dyslexia for students: criterion and construct validity.  

PubMed

The validity of a Dutch self-report inventory of dyslexia was ascertained in two samples of students. Six biographical questions, 20 general language statements and 56 specific language statements were based on dyslexia as a multi-dimensional deficit. Dyslexia and non-dyslexia were assessed with two criteria: identification with test results (Sample 1) and classification using biographical information (both samples). Using discriminant analyses, these criteria were predicted with various groups of statements. All together, 11 discriminant functions were used to estimate classification accuracy of the inventory. In Sample 1, 15 statements predicted the test criterion with classification accuracy of 98%, and 18 statements predicted the biographical criterion with classification accuracy of 97%. In Sample 2, 16 statements predicted the biographical criterion with classification accuracy of 94%. Estimations of positive and negative predictive value were 89% and 99%. Items of various discriminant functions were factor analysed to find characteristic difficulties of students with dyslexia, resulting in a five-factor structure in Sample 1 and a four-factor structure in Sample 2. Answer bias was investigated with measures of internal consistency reliability. Less than 20 self-report items are sufficient to accurately classify students with and without dyslexia. This supports the usefulness of self-assessment of dyslexia as a valid alternative to diagnostic test batteries. PMID:25628151

Tamboer, Peter; Vorst, Harrie C M

2015-02-01

22

The relationship of malingering test failure to self-reported symptoms and neuropsychological findings in adults referred for ADHD evaluation.  

PubMed

Diagnosis of adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) adults is difficult, as neither symptom report nor neuropsychological findings are specific to ADHD. Few studies address the possibility that noncredible performance influences both symptom report and neuropsychological findings. The present study utilized archival data from young adults referred for concerns about ADHD, divided into three groups: (1) those who failed a measure of noncredible performance (the Word Memory Test; WMT), (2) those who met diagnostic criteria for ADHD, and (3) controls with psychological symptoms but no ADHD. Results showed a 31% failure rate on the WMT. Those who failed the WMT showed clinical levels of self-reported ADHD symptoms and impaired neuropsychological performance. Neither self-report measures nor neuropsychological tests could distinguish ADHD from psychological controls, with the exception of self-reported current hyperactive/impulsive symptoms and Stroop interference. Results underscore the effect of noncredible performance on both self-report and cognitive measures in ADHD. PMID:18562158

Suhr, Julie; Hammers, Dustin; Dobbins-Buckland, Katy; Zimak, Eric; Hughes, Carrie

2008-09-01

23

Self-reported symptoms associated with exposure to electromagnetic fields: a questionnaire study.  

PubMed

Abstract In the last years, it has been discussed frequently whether there are any harmful effects of electromagnetic fields on human health. Electromagnetic fields are generated by several natural and man-made sources. Part of the electromagnetic spectrum called Radiofrequency is used in communication systems such as mobile (cellular) phone and computer. The aim of our study was to explore different self-reported symptoms that may be associated with exposure to electromagnetic fields. This survey study was conducted, using a questionnaire, on 350 people aged +9 years in Turkey. The chi-square test was used for data analysis. Self-reported symptoms were headache, vertigo/dizziness, fatigue, forgetfulness, sleep disturbance-insomnia, tension-anxiety, joint and bone pain, lacrimation of the eyes, hearing loss and tinnitus. As a result of the survey, the study has shown that users of mobile phone and computer more often complained of headache, joint and bone pain, hearing loss, vertigo/dizziness, tension-anxiety symptoms according to time of daily usage (p?

Küçer, Nermin; Pamukçu, Tu?ba

2014-01-01

24

Building a new Rasch-based self-report inventory of depression  

PubMed Central

This paper illustrates a sequential item development process to create a new self-report instrument of depression refined with Rasch analysis from a larger pool of potential diagnostic items elicited through a consensus approach by clinical experts according to the latest edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders criteria for major depression. A 51-item pool was administered to a sample of 529 subjects (300 healthy community-dwelling adults and 229 psychiatric outpatients). Item selection resulted in a 21-item set, named the Teate Depression Inventory, with an excellent Person Separation Index and no evidence of bias due to an item–trait interaction (?2=147.71; df =168; P=0.48). Additional support for the unidimensionality, local independence, appropriateness of the response format, and discrimination ability between clinical and nonclinical subjects was provided. No substantial differential item functioning by sex was observed. The Teate Depression Inventory shows considerable promise as a unidimensional tool for the screening of depression. Finally, advantages and disadvantages of this methodology will be discussed in terms of subsequent possible mathematical analyses, statistical tests, and implications for clinical investigations. PMID:24511231

Balsamo, Michela; Giampaglia, Giuseppe; Saggino, Aristide

2014-01-01

25

The relationship between self-reported cocaine withdrawal symptoms and history of depression.  

PubMed

This study examined the relationship between cocaine withdrawal and lifetime history of depression (major depression, dysthymia). Participants with a history of regular cocaine use (n = 146) were administered the Structured Clinical Interview for the DSM-IV (SCID) and were asked to recall whether they experienced any of the six DSM-IV cocaine withdrawal symptoms. Results of bivariate analyses demonstrated that those meeting criteria for the cocaine withdrawal syndrome (dysphoria plus two or more other symptoms), in comparison to those who did not, were significantly (P<.001) more likely to have a lifetime history of depression. Lifetime history of depression was also more common in those individuals reporting the withdrawal symptoms of "dysphoria" (P<.001), "insomnia/hypersomnia" (P<.05), "vivid unpleasant dreams" (P<.01), and "psychomotor agitation/retardation" (P<.01). These relationships remained significant after controlling for demographics, severity of addiction, and the presence of opiate, alcohol and cannabis dependence or abuse. The withdrawal symptoms of "fatigue" and "increased appetite" were not associated with mood history. Results suggest that lifetime history of depression is strongly related to whether or not a cocaine abuser self-reports withdrawal symptoms. Several competing hypotheses regarding the nature of this relationship are discussed. PMID:11436938

Helmus, T C; Downey, K K; Wang, L M; Rhodes, G L; Schuster, C R

2001-01-01

26

Are Happy People Healthier? The Specific Role of Positive Affect in Predicting Self-Reported Health Symptoms  

Microsoft Academic Search

Previous empirical work sought to establish relationships between psychological variables and physical health. Research investigating the associations between positive and negative affectivity and physical health have produced mixed results, often suggesting that negative affectivity generally is more strongly associated with health symptoms. We investigated the role of both positive and negative affectivity in predicting self-reported health symptoms. Positive affectivity emerged

Jeremy W. Pettit; John P. Kline; Tulin Gencoz; Faruk Gencoz; Thomas E. Joiner

2001-01-01

27

Correspondence Between the Psychopathic Personality Inventory and the Psychopathic Personality Inventory-Revised: a Look At Self-Reported Personality Traits  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors examined the correspondence between the Psychopathic Personality Inventory (PPI) and a recent revision of this measure, the Psychopathic Personality Inventory—Revised (PPI-R) in a sample of 85 male and female offenders in a community-based residential drug treatment program. Participants completed the PPI and PPI-R along with self-report measures of narcissism, aggression, emotional intelligence, and negative emotionality. Analyses focused on

James V. Ray; John W. Weir; Norman G. Poythress; Angela Rickelm

2011-01-01

28

Self-reported low back symptoms in urban bus drivers exposed to whole-body vibration.  

PubMed

The prevalence of self-reported low back symptoms was investigated by a postal questionnaire in a group of 234 urban bus drivers exposed to whole-body vibration and postural stress and in a control group of 125 maintenance workers employed at the same bus municipal company. The average vertical whole-body vibration magnitude measured on the seat pan of the buses was 0.4 m/s2. After controlling for potential confounders, the prevalence odds ratios for the bus drivers compared to the controls significantly exceeded 1 for several types of low back symptoms (leg pain, acute low back pain, low back pain). The occurrence of low back symptoms increased with increasing whole-body vibration exposure expressed in terms of total (lifetime) vibration dose (years m2/s4), equivalent vibration magnitude (m/s2), and duration of exposure (years of service). The highest prevalence of disc protrusion was found among the bus drivers with more severe whole-body vibration exposure. Frequent awkward postures at work were also related to some types of low back symptoms. It is concluded that bus driving is associated with an increased risk for low back troubles. This excess risk may be due to both whole-body vibration exposure and prolonged sitting in a constrained posture. The findings of this study also indicated that among the bus drivers low back symptoms occurred at whole-body vibration exposure levels that were lower than the health-based exposure limits proposed by the International Standard ISO 2631/1. PMID:1411756

Bovenzi, M; Zadini, A

1992-09-01

29

Self-reported depressive symptoms in women hospitalized for acute coronary syndrome.  

PubMed

The purpose of this cross-sectional observational study was to explore depressive symptoms, among 377 women, during hospitalization for acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Women were screened for depressive symptoms using the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II). Pearson chi-squared tests for independence were used for comparisons between categorical variables and t-tests for independent samples were used for comparisons between continuous variables. Tukey's honestly significant difference test along with one-way anova test was used to conduct multiple comparisons between the three defined age groups ranging from 29-49, 50-64 to ?65 years. A total of 118 women screened positive for depression (BDI-II score ? 14). The percentage of women that met the criteria for a positive depression screening was significantly different between the three age groups. The proportion of depressed women who reported feelings of sadness, past failures, punishment, self-dislike, agitation, worthlessness, sleep disturbances and irritability varied significantly by age group. Study findings indicate that symptom experience and severity may differ across a lifetime. These results support the need to understand the complexity of depressive symptoms experienced by women. The ability to understand and recognize depressive symptoms in women, with ACS, may assist healthcare professionals with the management of a modifiable cardiovascular risk factor. PMID:23379757

Sanner, J E; Frazier, L; Udtha, M

2013-12-01

30

Daily and Retrospective Mood and Physical Symptom Self-Reports and Their Relationship to the Menstrual Cycle.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The literature on the relationships between changes in mood and the menstrual cycle reveals many inconsistencies due to the absence of certain control procedures. Daily self-reports of moods and physical symptoms were collected from women with normal cycles, women using oral contraceptives, and men for 35 days in a camouflaged study. Retrospective…

Swandby, Janet R.

31

Agreement Rates between Parent and Self-Report on Past ADHD Symptoms in an Adult Clinical Sample  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: To investigate agreement rates between parent and self-report on childhood symptoms of ADHD. Method: Sixty-eight self-referred treatment-naive adults (33 men, 35 women) were interviewed with a modified version of the Kiddie Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia-Epidemiological Version (K-SADS-E) and asked about past ADHD…

Dias, Gabriela; Mattos, Paulo; Coutinho, Gabriel; Segenreich, Daniel; Saboya, Eloisa; Ayrao, Vanessa

2008-01-01

32

Course of self-reported symptoms of attention deficit and hyperactivity in substance abusers during early treatment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder has been associated with poor outcome in studies of substance use disorders. This study aimed to assess the course of self-reported symptoms of both attention deficit and hyperactivity among adults presenting for treatment for substance use disorders. A sample of 75 substance abusers were assessed after they were admitted to a centralized intake unit, and

Morten Hesse

2010-01-01

33

Personality in Adulthood: A Six-Year Longitudinal Study of Self-Reports and Spouse Ratings on the NEO Personality Inventory  

Microsoft Academic Search

Previous longitudinal studies of personality in adulthood have been limited in the range of traits examined, have chiefly made use of self-reports, and have frequently included only men. In this study, self-reports (N = 983) and spouse ratings (N = 167) were gathered on the NEO Personality Inventory (Costa & McCrae, 1985b), which measures all five of the major dimensions

Paul T. Costa; Robert R. McCrae

1988-01-01

34

Agreement Rates Between Parent and Self-Report on Past ADHD Symptoms in an Adult Clinical Sample  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To investigate agreement rates between parent and self-report on childhood symptoms of ADHD. Method: Sixty-eight self-referred treatment-naïve adults (33 men, 35 women) were interviewed with a modified version of the Kiddie Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia—Epidemiological Version (K-SADS-E) and asked about past ADHD symptoms, using modified Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th edition; DSM-IV) criteria (at

Gabriela Dias; Paulo Mattos; Gabriel Coutinho; Daniel Segenreich; Eloisa Saboya; Vanessa Ayrão

2008-01-01

35

The Psychological Inventory of Criminal Thinking Styles and Level of Service Inventory-Revised: Screening Version as Predictors of Official and Self-reported Disciplinary Infractions  

Microsoft Academic Search

A total of 159 male inmates screened with the Psychological Inventory of Criminal Thinking Styles (PICTS) and Level of Service\\u000a Inventory-Revised: Screening Version (LSI-R:SV) were followed for a period of 24 months for evidence of disciplinary infractions\\u000a (incident reports). Eighty-three of these inmates also furnished a self-report of disciplinary infractions occurring during\\u000a the 24-month follow-up. The PICTS General Criminal Thinking (GCT)

Glenn D. Walters; Charles Schlauch

2008-01-01

36

Odor-related Chronic Somatic Symptoms Are Associated with Self-Reported Asthma and Hay Fever: The Hordaland Health Study.  

PubMed

The aetiology behind odor-related chronic somatic symptoms (O-RCSS) is unknown, although both immunological and psychiatric causes have been suggested. The aim of this study was to investigate the occurrence of self-reported asthma and hay fever and psychiatric symptoms in individuals having O-RCSS compared to individuals with similar chronic somatic symptoms (CSS) which were not odors-related, and also compared to healthy controls. Data from the Hordaland Health Study were used. 13,799 individuals, 40-45 years, answered a questionnaire including 16 questions related to somatic symptoms. They also indicated if the symptoms were odor-related, and answered questions about asthma and hay fever. Anxiety and depression were measured with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. 38 (0.6%) men and 106 (1.4%) women had O-RCSS, whereas 88 (1.5%) men and 192 (2.5%) women had CSS. Adjusted logistic regression analyses showed increased odds of self-reported asthma in those with O-RCSS compared to those with CSS (males: 3.81, 1.06-13.8, females: 2.60, 1.05-6.93) and compared to male and female controls (3.56, 1.89-6.68 and 4.81, 1.92-12.1 respectively). Increased odds of self-reported hay fever were in addition seen in females with O-RCSS. There were no differences in psychiatric symptoms between individuals with O-RCSS and CSS, although individuals in both groups showed increased odds compared to male and female controls. Increased occurrence of self-reported asthma was exclusively found among male and females with O-RCSS, compared to CSS and controls. Increased occurrence of psychiatric symptoms was seen both in individuals with O-RCSS and CSS. PMID:25530135

Gundersen, Hilde; Harris, Anette; Bråtveit, Magne; Moen, Bente E

2015-02-01

37

Brief report: The use of self-report measures in young people with autism spectrum disorder to access symptoms of anxiety, depression and negative thoughts.  

PubMed

The aims of this study were two-fold; firstly, to investigate whether self-report measures are useful and reflect parent-reported psychiatric symptoms in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and secondly, to investigate whether children with ASD are able to access and report their cognitions, a prerequisite skill for cognitive behavior therapies. Thirty children with ASD and 21 comparison children without ASD completed the Spence Children's Anxiety Scale and the Children's Depression Inventory, with parents completing the parent version of both questionnaires. Intraclass correlations revealed that there was good agreement between ASD children and their parents on both measures, but only on the depression measure in non-ASD children. The children in both groups also completed the Children's Automatic Thoughts Questionnaires; multiple regression analyses indicated that within the ASD group, child-rated scores on the CATS questionnaire were positively related to increased self-reported symptoms of anxiety and depression, but not in the comparison group, suggesting that children with ASD are able to accurately report their anxious and depressed cognitions. The implications of these results for both the practice and theory of CBT for children with ASD are discussed. PMID:24014195

Ozsivadjian, Ann; Hibberd, Charlotte; Hollocks, Matthew J

2014-04-01

38

Self-Reported Physical Symptoms in Intensive Care Unit (ICU) Survivors: Pilot Exploration Over Four Months Post-ICU Discharge  

PubMed Central

Context Survivors of critical illness must overcome persistent physical and psychological challenges. Few studies have longitudinally examined self-reported physical symptoms in ICU survivors. Objectives To describe prevalence and severity of self-reported symptoms in 28 adult medical ICU survivors during the first 4 months post-ICU discharge and their associations with family caregiver responses. Methods Patients completed the Modified Given Symptom Assessment Scale. Caregivers completed Shortened 10-item Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale, Brief Zarit Burden Score, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and Caregiver Health Behavior. Data at ICU discharge (? 2 weeks), and 2 and 4 months post-ICU discharge were analyzed. Results Across the time points, the majority of patients reported one or more symptoms (88.5 – 97%), with sleep disturbance, fatigue, weakness and pain the most prevalent. For these four highest prevalent symptoms, there were: 1) moderate correlations among symptom severity at 2 and 4 months post-ICU discharge; 2) no difference in prevalence or severity by patients’ disposition (home vs. institution), except worse fatigue in patients at home ? 2 weeks post-ICU discharge. Patients’ overall symptom burden showed significant correlation with caregivers’ depressive symptoms ? 2 weeks post-ICU discharge. There were trends of moderate correlations between patients’ overall symptom burden and caregivers’ health risk behaviors and sleep quality at 2 and 4 months post-ICU discharge. Conclusion In our sample, sleep disturbance, fatigue, weakness, and pain were the four key symptoms during first 4 months post-ICU discharge. Future studies focusing on these four symptoms are necessary to promote quality in post-ICU symptom management. PMID:23856099

Choi, JiYeon; Hoffman, Leslie A.; Schulz, Richard; Tate, Judith A.; Donahoe, Michael P.; Ren, Dianxu; Given, Barbara A.; Sherwood, Paula R.

2013-01-01

39

The structure and correlates of self-reported symptoms in 11-year-old children  

Microsoft Academic Search

Self-reports of DSM-III symptomatology were obtained from 792 11-year-old children using the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children (DISC). We report results concerning 13 subscales derived from the DISC. Factor-analysis of the subscales suggested a broad distinction between “externalizing” and “internalizing” disorder for boys' self-report. For girls, two separate internalizing factors representing anxiety and depression emerged. We also found sex differences

Sheila Williams; Rob McGee; Jessie Anderson; Phil A. Silva

1989-01-01

40

Concussion symptom inventory: an empirically derived scale for monitoring resolution of symptoms following sport-related concussion.  

PubMed

Self-report post-concussion symptom scales have been a key method for monitoring recovery from sport-related concussion, to assist in medical management, and return-to-play decision-making. To date, however, item selection and scaling metrics for these instruments have been based solely upon clinical judgment, and no one scale has been identified as the "gold standard". We analyzed a large set of data from existing scales obtained from three separate case-control studies in order to derive a sensitive and efficient scale for this application by eliminating items that were found to be insensitive to concussion. Baseline data from symptom checklists including a total of 27 symptom variables were collected from a total of 16,350 high school and college athletes. Follow-up data were obtained from 641 athletes who subsequently incurred a concussion. Symptom checklists were administered at baseline (preseason), immediately post-concussion, post-game, and at 1, 3, and 5 days post-injury. Effect-size analyses resulted in the retention of only 12 of the 27 variables. Receiver-operating characteristic analyses were used to confirm that the reduction in items did not reduce sensitivity or specificity. The newly derived Concussion Symptom Inventory is presented and recommended as a research and clinical tool for monitoring recovery from sport-related concussion. PMID:19549721

Randolph, Christopher; Millis, Scott; Barr, William B; McCrea, Michael; Guskiewicz, Kevin M; Hammeke, Thomas A; Kelly, James P

2009-05-01

41

Short-term change in self-reported COPD symptoms after smoking cessation in an internet sample.  

PubMed

Smoking is the first risk factor for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Some recent reports suggest that, unexpectedly, some respiratory symptoms may increase transiently after smoking cessation, but there is a dearth of short-term data to test this hypothesis. The aim of the present study was to assess the validity of an online screening tool and to describe short-term associations between smoking behaviour and self-reported respiratory symptoms, in cross-sectional and longitudinal data. An internet survey was conducted in 2003-2009, on a smoking cessation website, with a follow-up survey after 30 days. There were 15,916 participants at baseline and 1,831 at follow-up. In the 252 baseline smokers who had quit smoking at 30-day follow-up, there was a substantial decrease in the proportion of participants who declared that they often coughed even without a cold (from 51.6% at baseline to 15.5% at follow-up), expectorated when they coughed in the morning (from 47.6% to 19.4%), were out of breath after climbing stairs or after a quick walk (from 75.0% to 48.4%), and who had a wheezing respiration (from 33.7% to 10.3%) (p<0.001 for all before/after comparisons). In participants who did not change their smoking behaviour between assessments, the test-retest reliability was r = 0.87 for a score summing these four symptoms. Smoking cessation was followed by a rapid and substantial improvement in self-reported respiratory symptoms. COPD is largely underdiagnosed and undertreated. Internet screening is reliable and may allow for the early detection of COPD symptoms at a large scale, in patients who may otherwise have no access to COPD case-finding efforts. PMID:19926745

Etter, J-F

2010-06-01

42

Self-reported aural symptoms, headache and temporomandibular disorders in Japanese young adults  

PubMed Central

Background To investigate the associations of aural symptoms, headache and depression with the presence of temporomandibular disorder (TMD) symptoms in a young adult population in Japan. Methods A personal interview survey was conducted on first-year university students (n?=?1,930) regarding symptoms of TMD, aural problems, headache, shoulder pain and depression. Logistic regression was applied to assess the associations of these problems with the presence of TMD symptoms after controlling for age and gender. Results Among the 1,930 students, 543 students exhibited TMD symptoms and were classified into 7 groups: clicking only (Group I, n?=?319), pain in the TMJ only (Group II, n?=?21), difficulty in mouth opening only (Group III, n?=?18), clicking and pain (Group IV, n?=?29), clicking and difficulty in mouth opening (Group V, n?=?48), difficulty in mouth opening and pain (Group VI, n?=?11), and combination of three symptoms (Group VII, n?=?97). The control group (n?=?1,387) were subjects without any TMD symptoms. After adjusting for age and gender, a strong association was observed between TMD symptoms (Group II and IV) and tinnitus (OR?=?12.1 and 13.2, respectively). TMD symptoms (Group I, II and III) were also associated with vertigo and headache. Otalgia and depression were significantly associated with the presence of clicking only. Conclusions TMD symptoms were significantly correlated to aural symptoms and headache. A functional evaluation of the stomatognathic system should be considered in subjects with unexplained aural symptoms and headache. PMID:23384362

2013-01-01

43

Development and Initial Psychometric Properties of the Computer Assisted Maltreatment Inventory (CAMI): A Comprehensive Self-Report Measure of Child Maltreatment History  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objectives: The present study reports on the development and initial psychometric properties of the Computer Assisted Maltreatment Inventory (CAMI), a web-based self-report measure of child maltreatment history, including sexual and physical abuse, exposure to interparental violence, psychological abuse, and neglect. Methods: The CAMI was…

DiLillo, David; Hayes-Skelton, Sarah A.; Fortier, Michelle A.; Perry, Andrea R.; Evans, Sarah E.; Messman Moore, Terri L.; Walsh, Kate; Nash, Cindy; Fauchier, Angele

2010-01-01

44

Self-reported symptoms of sleep disturbance and inflammation, coagulation, insulin resistance and psychosocial distress: Evidence for gender disparity  

PubMed Central

Self-reported ratings of sleep quality and symptoms of poor sleep have been linked to increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), Type 2 diabetes, and hypertension with recent evidence suggesting stronger associations in women. At this time, the mechanisms of action that underlie these gender-specific associations are incompletely defined. The current study examined whether gender moderates the relation of subjective sleep and sleep-related symptoms to indices of inflammation, coagulation, insulin resistance (IR), and psychosocial distress, factors associated with increased risk of cardiovascular and metabolic disorders. Subjects were 210 healthy men and women without a history of sleep disorders. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) was used to assess sleep quality and frequency of sleep symptoms. In multivariate-adjusted models, overall poor sleep quality, more frequent problems falling asleep (? 2 night/week), and longer periods to fall asleep (? 30 min) were associated with greater psychosocial distress, higher fasting insulin, fibrinogen and inflammatory biomarkers, but only for women. The data suggest that subjective ratings of poor sleep, greater frequency of sleep-related symptoms, and longer period of time to fall asleep are associated with a mosaic of biobehavioral mechanisms in women and that these gender-specific associations have direct implications to recent observations suggesting gender differences in the association between symptoms of poor sleep and cardiovascular disease. PMID:18328671

Suarez, Edward C.

2013-01-01

45

Self-Reported Symptoms of ADHD among College Students in China and the United States  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: The present study examined ADHD symptoms among college students in China and the United States. Method: A total of 283 (45%) American and 343 (55%) Chinese students completed the Wender Utah Rating Scale (WURS) and the Current Symptoms Scale (CSS), in addition to other measures. Results: Both of the ADHD measures appear to be reliable…

Norvilitis, Jill M.; Ingersoll, Travis; Zhang, Jie; Jia, Shuhua

2008-01-01

46

Brain injury severity, litigation status, and self-report of postconcussive symptoms  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Postconcussive Symptom Questionnaire (PCSQ) was developed to assess the symptoms associated with the controversial diagnosis of postconcussion syndrome. We examined item endorsement on the PCSQ in two groups. The first group was made up of individuals diagnosed with moderate to severe traumatic brain injury. The second group was made up of individuals meeting criteria for mild traumatic brain injury

John Tsanadis; Eduardo Montoya; Robin A. Hanks; Scott R. Millis; Norman L. Fichtenberg; Bradley N. Axelrod

2008-01-01

47

The feasibility and validity of ambulatory self-report of psychotic symptoms using a smartphone software application  

PubMed Central

Background Semi-structured interview scales for psychosis are the gold standard approach to assessing psychotic and other symptoms. However, such assessments have limitations such as recall bias, averaging, insensitivity to change and variable interrater reliability. Ambulant, real-time self-report assessment devices may hold advantages over interview measures, but it needs to be shown that the data thus collected are valid, and the collection method is acceptable, feasible and safe. We report on a monitoring system for the assessment of psychosis using smartphone technology. The primary aims were to: i) assess validity through correlations of item responses with those on widely accepted interview assessments of psychosis, and ii) examine compliance to the procedure in individuals with psychosis of varying severity. Methods A total of 44 participants (acute or remitted DSM-4 schizophrenia and related disorders, and prodromal) completed 14 branching self-report items concerning key psychotic symptoms on a touch-screen mobile phone when prompted by an alarm at six pseudo-random times, each day, for one week. Face to face PANSS and CDS interviews were conducted before and after the assessment period blind to the ambulant data. Results Compliance as defined by completion of at least 33% of all possible data-points over seven days was 82%. In the 36 compliant participants, 5 items (delusions, hallucinations, suspiciousness, anxiety, hopelessness) showed moderate to strong (rho 0.6-0.8) associations with corresponding items from interview rating scales. Four items showed no significant correlation with rating scales: each was an item based on observable behaviour. Ambulant ratings showed excellent test-retest reliability and sensitivity to change. Conclusions Ambulatory monitoring of symptoms several times daily using smartphone software applications represents a feasible and valid way of assessing psychotic phenomena for research and clinical management purposes. Further evaluation required over longer assessment periods, in clinical trials and service settings. PMID:23075387

2012-01-01

48

Association of self-reported painful symptoms with clinical and neurophysiologic signs in HIV-associated sensory neuropathy  

PubMed Central

Sensory neuropathy (HIV-SN) is a common cause of pain in HIV-infected people. Establishing a diagnosis of HIV-SN is important, especially when contemplating opioid use in high risk populations. However physical findings of HIV-SN may be subtle, and sensitive diagnostic tools require specialized expertise. We investigated the association between self-report of distal neuropathic pain and/or paresthesias (DNPP) and objective signs of HIV-SN. Data were obtained from the Central Nervous System HIV Antiretroviral Therapy Effects Research (CHARTER) study. Out of 237 participants, 101 (43%) reported DNPP. Signs of HIV-SN were measured by a modified Total Neuropathy Score (TNS), composed of 6 objective sensory subscores (pin sensibility, vibration sensibility, deep tendon reflexes, quantitative sensory testing for cooling and vibration, and sural sensory amplitude). Self-report of DNPP was associated with all 6 TNS items in univariate analysis and with 4 TNS items in multivariate analysis. The sensitivity and specificity of self-report of DNPP in detecting the presence of a sensory abnormality was 52% and 92% respectively with a PPV of 96% and a NPV of 34%. Increasing intensity of pain measured on a visual analog scale was associated with increasing severity of sensory abnormality. In summary, our results suggest that HIV-infected patients reporting symptoms consistent with HIV-SN, such as tingling, pins and needles, or aching or stabbing pain in the distal lower extremities, usually have objective evidence of HIV-SN on neurologic examination or with neurophysiologic testing. This finding holds true regardless of demographic factors, depression or substance use history. PMID:20851521

Robinson-Papp, J.; Morgello, S.; Vaida, F.; Fitzsimons, C.; Simpson, D.M.; Elliott, K.J.; Al-Lozi, M.; Gelman, B.B.; Clifford, D.; Marra, C.M.; McCutchan, J.A.; Atkinson, J.H.; Dworkin, R.H.; Grant, I.; Ellis, R.

2010-01-01

49

Self-reported parkinsonian symptoms in the EPIC-Norfolk cohort  

E-print Network

walking (34%), smaller handwriting (micrographia- 9%), and less acute sense of smell (olfactory dysfunction- 9%). The presence of individual symptoms increased with age except for difficulty getting out of a chair. Conclusion The results support previous...

Ishihara, Lianna S; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Luben, Robert; Bingham, Sheila; Welch, Ailsa; Day, Nicholas E; Brayne, Carol

2005-08-24

50

Antenatal Maternal Anxiety is Related to HPA-Axis Dysregulation and Self-Reported Depressive Symptoms  

E-print Network

Symptoms in Adolescence: A Prospective Study on the Fetal Origins of Depressed Mood Bea RH Van den Bergh*,1, maternal postnatal anxiety and puberty phase. Our prospective study demonstrates, for the first time

51

Prevalence of self-reported specific phobia symptoms in an Israeli sample of young conscripts.  

PubMed

Specific phobia is a very prevalent disorder with high comorbidity rates. The aim of this study was to assess prevalence of specific phobia symptoms in a sample of Israeli young adults. Eight hundred fifty young Israeli soldiers participated in the study. Measures included a questionnaire on specific phobias and a socio-demographic questionnaire. Data on eight specific fears representing DSM-IV-TR specific phobias were analyzed to evaluate prevalence of phobic symptoms and find potential socio-demographic correlates. Prevalence of fears and specific phobic symptoms was 49.1 and 8.7%, respectively. Most frequent phobic symptoms were from animals, being alone, heights, injury and closed places. The following variables were accompanied by more phobic symptoms: male gender, role of mechanic, not having completed the matriculation exams, lack of friends and romantic relationships, therapy prior to enlistment or during the military service and having received psychotropic drugs in the past. Based on a stepwise regression analysis, the following variables contributed significantly to the prediction of phobic symptoms: lack of friends and romantic relationships, school absenteeism and role of mechanic. Our findings corroborate results from other studies in the Western world regarding the high prevalence of specific phobia symptomatology, as well as its distribution and socio-demographic correlates. PMID:17134869

Iancu, Iulian; Levin, Jennifer; Dannon, Pinhas N; Poreh, Amir; Yehuda, Yoram Ben; Kotler, Moshe

2007-01-01

52

Parent–Youth Agreement on Self-Reported Competencies of Youth With Depressive and Suicidal Symptoms  

PubMed Central

Objective: A multi-informant approach is often used in child psychiatry. The Achenbach System of Empirically Based Assessment uses this approach, gathering parent reports on the Child Behaviour Checklist (CBCL) and youth reports on the Youth Self-Report (YSR), which contain scales assessing both the child’s problems and competencies. Agreement between parent and youth perceptions of their competencies on these forms has not been studied to date. Method: Our study examined the parent–youth agreement of competencies on the CBCL and YSR from a sample of 258 parent–youth dyads referred to a specialized outpatient clinic for depressive and suicidal disorders. Intraclass correlation coefficients were calculated for all competency scales (activity, social, and academic), with further examinations based on youth’s sex, age, and type of problem. Results: Weak-to-moderate parent–youth agreements were reported on the activities and social subscales. For the activities subscale, boys’ ratings had a strong correlation with parents’ ratings, while it was weak for girls. Also, agreement on activities and social subscales was stronger for dyads with the youth presenting externalizing instead of internalizing problems. Conclusion: Agreement on competencies between parents and adolescents varied based on competency and adolescent sex, age, and type of problem.

Mbekou, Valentin; MacNeil, Sasha; Gignac, Martin; Renaud, Johanne

2015-01-01

53

Self-reported symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: rate of endorsement and association with neuropsychological performance in an adult psychiatric sample.  

PubMed

The lack of specificity of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms represents a diagnostic challenge, especially when assessing psychiatric patients reporting a wide range of complaints. Rate of endorsement of ADHD symptoms, and their association with neuropsychological performance, was examined in a psychiatric sample of 71 adults, who had been referred for a neuropsychological evaluation. Patients completed two self-report measures of ADHD symptoms, the ADHD Self-Report Scale (ADHD-SR) and the Wender Utah Rating Scale-Short Form, as well as measures of attention, executive functioning, visuoconstructional ability, and verbal learning and memory. On the ADHD-SR, 74.6% of the sample met the cutoff for inattention or hyperactivity, while 81.7% met the cutoff for impulsivity. Neuropsychological performance was weakly associated with self-reported symptoms. Our results suggest that psychiatric patients commonly report symptoms of inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity. Assessment utilizing multiple sources is necessary to confirm whether self-reported symptoms are indicative of ADHD or reflect other causes. PMID:25851625

Schneider, Brooke C; Thoering, Teresa; Cludius, Barbara; Moritz, Steffen

2015-05-01

54

Prevalence of self-reported respiratory disease symptoms among veterinarians in the Southern Netherlands  

Microsoft Academic Search

In June 1991, 831 veterinarians registered in the Southern Netherlands were mailed a questionnaire to obtain details of work practice and health problems. One hundred fifty-two veterinarians were not eligible (retired or not working regularly), 497 practitioners returned a complete questionnaire (73% response rate). The purpose was to assess the prevalence of respiratory disease symptoms (RDS) and to compare the

Martin J. M. Tielen; Armin R. W. Elbers; Mirjam Snijdelaar; Paul J. M. M. van Gulick; Liesbeth Preller; Pieter J. Blaauw

1996-01-01

55

Hyperactive-Impulsive Symptoms Associated With Self-Reported Sleep Quality in Nonmedicated Adults With ADHD  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: Individuals with ADHD often report sleep problems. Though most studies on ADHD and sleep examined children or nonclinically diagnosed adults, the present study specifically examines nonmedicated adults with ADHD to determine whether inattentive and hyperactive-impulsive symptoms are associated with sleep problems. Method: A total of 22 nonmedicated adults diagnosed with ADHD are assessed with a DSM-IV-based interview and the

Neha Mahajan; Nuong Hong; Timothy L. Wigal; Jean-G. Gehricke

2010-01-01

56

Somatic symptom overlap in Beck Depression Inventory–II scores following myocardial infarction  

PubMed Central

Background Depression measures that include somatic symptoms may inflate severity estimates among medically ill patients, including those with cardiovascular disease. Aims To evaluate whether people receiving in-patient treatment following acute myocardial infarction (AMI) had higher somatic symptom scores on the Beck Depression Inventory–II (BDI–II) than a non-medically ill control group matched on cognitive/affective scores. Method Somatic scores on the BDI–II were compared between 209 patients admitted to hospital following an AMI and 209 psychiatry out-patients matched on gender, age and cognitive/affective scores, and between 366 post-AMI patients and 366 undergraduate students matched on gender and cognitive/affective scores. Results Somatic symptoms accounted for 44.1% of total BDI–II score for the 209 post-AMI and psychiatry out-patient groups, 52.7% for the 366 post-AMI patients and 46.4% for the students. Post-AMI patients had somatic scores on average 1.1 points higher than the students (P<0.001). Across groups, somatic scores accounted for approximately 70% of low total scores (BDI–II <4) v. approximately 35% in patients with total BDI–II scores of 12 or more. Conclusions Our findings contradict assertions that self-report depressive symptom measures inflate severity scores in post-AMI patients. However, the preponderance of somatic symptoms at low score levels across groups suggests that BDI–II scores may include a small amount of somatic symptom variance not necessarily related to depression in post-AMI and non-medically ill respondents. PMID:20592436

Thombs, Brett D.; Ziegelstein, Roy C.; Pilote, Louise; Dozois, David J. A.; Beck, Aaron T.; Dobson, Keith S.; Fuss, Samantha; de Jonge, Peter; Grace, Sherry L.; Stewart, Donne E.; Ormel, Johan; Abbey, Susan E.

2010-01-01

57

Brief Report: The Use of Self-Report Measures in Young People with Autism Spectrum Disorder to Access Symptoms of Anxiety, Depression and Negative Thoughts  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aims of this study were two-fold; firstly, to investigate whether self-report measures are useful and reflect parent-reported psychiatric symptoms in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and secondly, to investigate whether children with ASD are able to access and report their cognitions, a prerequisite skill for cognitive behavior…

Ozsivadjian, Ann; Hibberd, Charlotte; Hollocks, Matthew J.

2014-01-01

58

Clinical characteristics and outcomes of end-stage renal disease patients with self-reported pruritus symptoms.  

PubMed

One of the most common conditions affecting end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients undergoing hemodialysis (HD) is pruritus. Studies report that itchy and dry skin, symptoms of pruritus, affect 40%-90% of ESRD patients. Yet, in clinical practice the condition is often underdiagnosed resulting in inadequate management and an underappreciated impact on patient outcomes. Two retrospective analyses were conducted: a preliminary analysis of ESRD patients with pruritus symptoms (n=73,124) undergoing HD or peritoneal dialysis at a large dialysis provider and a subsequent detailed analysis of a homogenous subset of patients undergoing in-center HD (n=38,315). The goal was to better understand the clinical burden of pruritus as it relates to patient characteristics, quality of life, medication use, and HD compliance. This population is commonly burdened by multiple comorbidities and related polypharmaceutical management; identifying the relationship of pruritus to these ailments can help guide future research and resource allocation. The detailed analysis confirmed trends observed in the preliminary analysis: 30% reported being "moderately" to "extremely bothered" by itchiness. The HD patient population with the highest severity of self-reported pruritus also had a consistent trend in overall increased resource utilization - higher monthly doses of erythropoietin-stimulating agents (53,397.1 to 63,405.4 units) and intravenous (IV) iron (237.2 to 247.6 units) and higher use of IV antibiotics (14.1% to 20.7%), as well as poorer quality-of-life measures (25-point reductions in Burden of Disease Score and Effects on Daily Life subscales of the Kidney Disease Quality of Life-36 survey). These results highlight the need to better identify and manage ESRD patients impacted by pruritus, as this symptom is associated with negative clinical outcomes and increased resource utilization. Further studies are needed to evaluate the current economic burden of pruritus in ESRD patients and create possible options for an improved pharmacoeconomic profile in this patient population. PMID:24379689

Ramakrishnan, Karthik; Bond, T Christopher; Claxton, Ami; Sood, Vipan C; Kootsikas, Maria; Agnese, Wendy; Sibbel, Scott

2013-01-01

59

Clinical characteristics and outcomes of end-stage renal disease patients with self-reported pruritus symptoms  

PubMed Central

One of the most common conditions affecting end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients undergoing hemodialysis (HD) is pruritus. Studies report that itchy and dry skin, symptoms of pruritus, affect 40%–90% of ESRD patients. Yet, in clinical practice the condition is often underdiagnosed resulting in inadequate management and an underappreciated impact on patient outcomes. Two retrospective analyses were conducted: a preliminary analysis of ESRD patients with pruritus symptoms (n=73,124) undergoing HD or peritoneal dialysis at a large dialysis provider and a subsequent detailed analysis of a homogenous subset of patients undergoing in-center HD (n=38,315). The goal was to better understand the clinical burden of pruritus as it relates to patient characteristics, quality of life, medication use, and HD compliance. This population is commonly burdened by multiple comorbidities and related polypharmaceutical management; identifying the relationship of pruritus to these ailments can help guide future research and resource allocation. The detailed analysis confirmed trends observed in the preliminary analysis: 30% reported being “moderately” to “extremely bothered” by itchiness. The HD patient population with the highest severity of self-reported pruritus also had a consistent trend in overall increased resource utilization – higher monthly doses of erythropoietin-stimulating agents (53,397.1 to 63,405.4 units) and intravenous (IV) iron (237.2 to 247.6 units) and higher use of IV antibiotics (14.1% to 20.7%), as well as poorer quality-of-life measures (25-point reductions in Burden of Disease Score and Effects on Daily Life subscales of the Kidney Disease Quality of Life-36 survey). These results highlight the need to better identify and manage ESRD patients impacted by pruritus, as this symptom is associated with negative clinical outcomes and increased resource utilization. Further studies are needed to evaluate the current economic burden of pruritus in ESRD patients and create possible options for an improved pharmacoeconomic profile in this patient population. PMID:24379689

Ramakrishnan, Karthik; Bond, T Christopher; Claxton, Ami; Sood, Vipan C; Kootsikas, Maria; Agnese, Wendy; Sibbel, Scott

2014-01-01

60

Symptoms of Anxiety, Depression, and Aggression in Non-clinical Children: Relationships with Self-report and Performance-based Measures of Attention and Effortful Control  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigated the relation between the regulative trait of effortful control, and in particular attention control,\\u000a and psychopathological symptoms in a sample of 207 non-clinical children aged 8–12 years. For this purpose, children completed\\u000a self-report scales for measuring regulative traits and various types of psychopathological symptoms (i.e., anxiety, depression,\\u000a and aggression) and were tested with a neuropsychological battery for

Peter Muris; Els van der Pennen; Rianne Sigmond; Birgit Mayer

2008-01-01

61

Associations of Ambient Hydrogen Sulfide Exposure with Self-Reported Asthma and Asthma Symptoms  

PubMed Central

Background Whether long-term, low-level hydrogen sulfide (H2S) gas is a cause of health effects, including asthma, is uncertain. Rotorua city, New Zealand, has the largest population exposed, from geothermal sources, to relatively high ambient levels of H2S. In a cross-sectional study, the authors investigated associations with asthma in this population. Methods A total of 1,637 adults, aged 18-65 years, were enrolled during 2008-2010. Residences and workplaces were geocoded. H2S exposures at homes and workplaces were estimated using city-wide networks of passive H2S samplers and kriging to create exposure surfaces. Exposure metrics were based on (1) time-weighted exposures at home and work; and (2) the maximum exposure (home or work). Exposure estimates were entered as quartiles into log-binomial regression models, with covariate data. Results Neither exposure metric showed evidence of increased asthma risk from H2S. However, some suggestion of exposure-related reduced risks for diagnosed asthma and asthma symptoms, particularly wheezing during the last 12 months, emerged. With the maximum exposure metric, the prevalence ratio for wheeze in the highest exposure quartile was 0.80 (0.65, 0.99) and, for current asthma treatment, 0.75 (0.52, 1.08). There was no evidence that this was caused by a “survivor effect”. Conclusions The study provided no evidence that asthma risk increases with H2S exposure. Suggestions of a reduced risk in the higher exposure areas are consistent with recent evidence that H2S has signaling functions in the body, including induction of smooth muscle relaxation and reduction of inflammation. Study limitations, including possible confounding, preclude definitive conclusions. PMID:23453847

Bates, Michael N; Garrett, Nick; Crane, Julian; Balmes, John

2013-01-01

62

Social desirability in personality inventories: Symptoms, diagnosis and prescribed cure  

PubMed Central

An analysis of social desirability in personality assessment is presented. Starting with the symptoms, Study 1 showed that mean ratings of graded personality items are moderately to strongly linearly related to social desirability (Self Deception, Impression formation, and the first Principal Component), suggesting that item popularity may be a useful heuristic tool for identifying items which elicit socially desirable responding. We diagnose the cause of socially desirable responding as an interaction between the evaluative content of the item and enhancement motivation in the rater. Study 2 introduced a possible cure; evaluative neutralization of items. To test the feasibility of the method lay psychometricians (undergraduates) reformulated existing personality test items according to written instructions. The new items were indeed lower in social desirability while essentially retaining the five factor structure and reliability of the inventory. We conclude that although neutralization is no miracle cure, it is simple and has beneficial effects. PMID:23252410

Bäckström, Martin; Björklund, Fredrik

2013-01-01

63

Post-Migration Stress as a Moderator Between Traumatic Exposure and Self-Reported Mental Health Symptoms in a Sample of Somali Refugees  

Microsoft Academic Search

The current study examined the potentially moderating influence of post-migration living difficulties on the relationship between pre-migration traumatic exposure and self-reported symptomatology in a sample of 74 adult Somali refugees residing in the United States. Results suggest that post-migration psychosocial stressors exacerbate depressive symptoms (?R  = .068, p = .017) for those exposed to low levels of trauma relative to other posttraumatic psychological

Jacob A. Bentley; John W. Thoburn; David G. Stewart; Lorin D. Boynton

2012-01-01

64

Prevalence of self-reported stomach symptoms after consuming milk among indigenous Sami and non-Sami in Northern- and Mid-Norway – the SAMINOR study  

PubMed Central

Objective The main purpose of this work was to identify the prevalence of self-reported stomach symptoms after consuming milk among Sami and non-Sami adults. Study design A cross-sectional population-based study (the SAMINOR study). Data were collected by self-administrated questionnaires. Method SAMINOR is a population-based study of health and living conditions conducted in 24 municipalities in Northern Norway during 2003 and 2004. The present study included 15,546 individuals aged between 36 and 79, whose ethnicity was categorized as Sami (33.4%), Kven (7.3%) and Norwegian majority population (57.2%). Results Sami respondents had a higher prevalence of self-reported stomach symptoms after consuming milk than the Norwegian majority population. The reporting was highest among Sami females (27.1%). Consumption of milk and dairy products (yoghurt and cheese) was high among all the ethnic groups. However, significantly more Sami than non-Sami never (or rarely) consume milk or cheese, and individuals who reported stomach symptoms after consuming milk had an significant lower intake of dairy products than those not reporting stomach symptoms after consuming dairy products. Sami reported general abdominal pain more often than the majority population. The adjusted models show a significant effect of Sami ethnicity in both men and women on self-reported stomach symptoms after consuming milk. In females, the odds ratio (OR)=1.77 (p=0.001) and in males OR=1.64 (p=0.001). Conclusion Our study shows that the Sami population reported more stomach symptoms after consuming milk, suggesting a higher prevalence of milk intolerance among the Sami population than the Norwegian majority population. PMID:25694052

Hansen, Ketil Lenert; Brustad, Magritt; Johnsen, Knut

2015-01-01

65

Dimensional structure of the Brief Symptom Inventory with Spanish college students  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Brief Symptom Inventory is designed to assess symptoms of psychological disorders in adole- scents and adults. The dimensional structure of the inventory, using exploratory and confirmatory fac- tor analyses, was examined with a cross-sectional design in a Spanish sample of college students (N = 1,033, aged between 18 and 30 years old). Two hypotheses were tested: the original distribution

Noemí Pereda; Maria Forns; Maribel Peró

2007-01-01

66

Comparisons among the Holden Psychological Screening Inventory (HPSI), the Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI), and the Balanced Inventory of Desirable Responding (BIDR).  

PubMed

Issues of reliability, item latent structure, and faking on the Holden Psychological Screening Inventory (HPSI), the Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI), and the Balanced Inventory of Desirable Responding (BIDR) were examined with a sample of 300 university undergraduates. Reliability analyses indicated that scales from all inventories had acceptable internal consistency. Confirmatory item principal component analyses supported the structures and scoring keys of the HPSI and the BIDR, but not the BSI. Although all inventories were susceptible to faking, validity indices of the HPSI and the BIDR could correctly classify over two-thirds of test respondents as either responding honestly or as faking. PMID:10868254

Holden, R R; Starzyk, K B; McLeod, L D; Edwards, M J

2000-06-01

67

Self-reported neurological symptoms in relation to CO emissions due to problem gas appliance installations in London: a cross-sectional survey  

PubMed Central

Background Previous research by the authors found evidence that up to 10% of particular household categories may be exposed to elevated carbon monoxide (CO) concentrations from poor quality gas appliance installations. The literature suggests certain neurological symptoms are linked to exposure to low levels of CO. This paper addresses the hypothesis that certain self-reported neurological symptoms experienced by a householder are linked to an estimate of their CO exposure. Methods Between 27 April and 27 June 2006, 597 homes with a mains supply of natural gas were surveyed, mainly in old, urban areas of London. Qualified gas engineers tested all gas appliances (cooker, boiler, gas fire, and water heater) and reported, according to the Gas Industry Unsafe Situations Procedure, appliances considered At Risk (AR), Immediately Dangerous (ID) or Not to Current Standards (NCS). Five exposure risk categories were defined based on measurement of CO emitted by the appliance, its features and its use, with "high or very high" exposure category where occupants were considered likely to be exposed to levels greater than 26 ppm for one hour. The prevalence of symptoms at each level of exposure was compared with that at lowest level of exposure. Results Of the households, 6% were assessed as having a "high or very high" risk of exposure to CO. Of the individuals, 9% reported at least one neurological symptom. There was a statistically significant association between "high or very high" exposure risk to CO and self-reported symptoms compared to "no exposure" likelihood, for households not in receipt of benefit, controlling for "number of residents" and presence of pensioners, OR = 3.23 (95%CI: 1.28, 8.15). Risk ratios across all categories of exposure likelihood indicate a dose-response pattern. Those households in receipt of benefit showed no dose-response pattern. Conclusion This study found an association between risk of CO exposure at low concentration, and prevalence of self-reported neurological symptoms in the community for those households not in receipt of benefit. As health status was self-reported, this association requires further investigation. PMID:18593476

Croxford, Ben; Leonardi, Giovanni S; Kreis, Irene

2008-01-01

68

Kindergarteners' self-reported social inhibition and observed social reticence: moderation by adult-reported social inhibition and social anxiety disorder symptoms.  

PubMed

Prevention of later anxiety problems would best be accomplished by identifying at-risk children early in development. For example, children who develop Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD) may show social withdrawal in the form of social inhibition (i.e., shyness with unfamiliar adults and peers) at school entry. Although the use of children's perceptions of their own social inhibition would provide insight into early risk, the utility of young children's self-reports remains unclear. The current study examined whether children deemed more extreme on social inhibition or social anxiety by adult report provided self-report of social inhibition that related to observed social reticence in the laboratory. Participants included 85 kindergarten children (36 female, 49 male), their parents, and their teachers. Moderation analyses revealed that children's self-reported social inhibition related significantly to observed social reticence under the conditions of high parent-reported social inhibition, high teacher-reported social inhibition, and high SAD symptoms. These results suggest that the most inhibited children are aware of their behavior and can report it in a meaningfully way as young as kindergarten age. PMID:25113397

Kiel, Elizabeth J; Buss, Kristin A; Molitor, Joseph G

2015-04-01

69

Diagnostic Validity of the Eppendorf Schizophrenia Inventory (ESI): A Self-Report Screen for Ultrahigh Risk and Acute Psychosis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Providers of mental health services need tools to screen for acute psychosis and ultrahigh risk (UHR) for transition to psychosis in help-seeking individuals. In this study, the Eppendorf Schizophrenia Inventory (ESI) was examined as a screening tool and for its ability to correctly predict diagnostic group membership (e.g., help seeking, mild…

Niessen, Maurice A. J.; Dingemans, Peter M. A. J.; van de Fliert, Reinaud; Becker, Hiske E.; Nieman, Dorien H.; Linszen, Don

2010-01-01

70

Older Breast Cancer Survivors: Factors Associated with Self-reported Symptoms of Persistent Lymphedema Over 7-years of Follow-up  

PubMed Central

Introduction Lymphedema of the arm is a common complication of breast cancer with symptoms that can persist over long periods of time. For older women (over 50% of breast cancer cases) it means living with the potential for long-term complications of persistent lymphedema in conjunction with the common diseases and disabilities of aging over survivorship. Methods We identified women ?65-years diagnosed with primary stage I-IIIA breast cancer. Data were collected over 7-years of follow-up from consenting patients’ medical records and telephone interviews. Data collected included self-reported symptoms of persistent lymphedema, breast cancer characteristics, and selected sociodemographic and health-related characteristics. Results The overall prevalence of symptoms of persistent lymphedema was 36% over 7-years of follow-up. Having stage II or III (OR=1.77, 95%CI 1.07–2.93) breast cancer and having a BMI>30 (OR=3.04, 95%CI 1.69–5.45) were statistically significantly predictive of symptoms of persistent lymphedema. Women ?80-years were less likely to report symptoms of persistent lymphedema when compared to younger women (OR=0.44, 95%CI 0.18–0.95). Women with symptoms of persistent lymphedema consistently reported worse general mental health and physical function. Conclusion Symptoms of persistent lymphedema were common in this population of older breast cancer survivors and had a noticeable effect on both physical function and general mental health. Our findings provide evidence of the impact of symptoms of persistent lymphedema on the quality of survivorship of older women. Clinical and research efforts focused on risk factors for symptoms of persistent lymphedema in older breast cancer survivors may lead to preventative and therapeutic measures that help maintain their health and well-being over increasing periods of survivorship. PMID:19968661

Clough-Gorr, Kerri M.; Ganz, Patricia A.; Silliman, Rebecca A.

2009-01-01

71

Convergent Validity of Three Posttraumatic Symptoms Inventories Among Adult Sexual Abuse Survivors  

Microsoft Academic Search

We examined the convergent validity of three posttraumatic symptoms inventories, the civilian version of the Mississippi Scale for Combat-Related PTSD (CM-PTSD), the Trauma Symptom Checklist-40 (TSC-40), and the Response to Childhood Incest Questionnaire (RCIQ), in a sample of 52 adult sexual abuse survivors. The significant and moderate to strong correlations (r = .6 or higher) among these inventories supported their

Jeffrey W. Gold; Etzel Cardeña

1998-01-01

72

[The Somatic Symptoms Experiences Questionnaire (SSEQ): a new self-report instrument for the assessment of psychological characteristics of patients with somatoform disorder].  

PubMed

Psychological symptoms of somatoform disorders will be part of their new definition in DSM-5. We developed the Somatic Symptoms Experiences Questionnaire (SSEQ) as a self-report questionnaire to assess important psychological characteristics of patients with somatoform disorders. Item selection and identification of factor structure, as well as reliability and validity have been checked in a sample of N=453 psychsomatic outpatients. Results of a principal components analysis with Promax-rotation suggested 4 factors (health worries, illness experience, difficulties in interaction with doctors, impact of illness). Validity analyses confirmed associations between the SSEQ-Scores and the physical disability of patients. Although further assessments of psychometric qualities are needed, the questionnaire appears to be well-suited for future assessment of relevant psychological features of somatoform disorders. PMID:23864304

Herzog, Annabel; Voigt, Katharina; Meyer, Björn; Rief, Winfried; Henningsen, Peter; Hausteiner-Wiehle, Constanze; Löwe, Bernd

2014-03-01

73

Examining the Effects of Self-reported PTSD Symptoms and Positive Relations With Others on Self-regulated Learning for Student Service Members/Veterans.  

PubMed

Abstract Objectives: To examine the relationships between self-reported post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, perceived positive relations with others, self-regulation strategy use, and academic motivation among student service members/veterans (SSM/V) enrolled in post-secondary education. Participants: SSM/V (N = 214), defined as veterans, active duty, or National Guard/Reservists of the U.S. military, enrolled at five different institutions in fall 2012. Methods: Data were collected using an online questionnaire that included standardized measures of PTSD symptoms, perceived quality of personal relations, academic self-regulation strategy use and motivation. Results: PTSD symptoms were associated with lower self-efficacy for learning and maladaptive academic goal orientation. Additionally, PTSD symptoms were associated with lower effort regulation (i.e., persistence) during academic work. Endorsement of more positive relations moderated the deleterious relationship between PTSD symptoms and maladaptive goal orientation. Conclusion: The results suggest post-secondary personnel adopt a social-cognitive framework to develop social, mental health and academic supports for SSM/V with PTSD. PMID:25337851

Ness, Bryan M; Middleton, Michael J; Hildebrandt, Michael J

2014-10-22

74

Characterization of Residential Pesticide Use and Chemical Formulations through Self-Report and Household Inventory: The Northern California Childhood Leukemia Study  

PubMed Central

Background: Home and garden pesticide use has been linked to cancer and other health outcomes in numerous epidemiological studies. Exposure has generally been self-reported, so the assessment is potentially limited by recall bias and lack of information on specific chemicals. Objectives: As part of an integrated assessment of residential pesticide exposure, we identified active ingredients and described patterns of storage and use. Methods: During a home interview of 500 residentially stable households enrolled in the Northern California Childhood Leukemia Study during 2001–2006, trained interviewers inventoried residential pesticide products and queried participants about their storage and use. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency registration numbers, recorded from pesticide product labels, and pesticide chemical codes were matched to public databases to obtain information on active ingredients and chemical class. Poisson regression was used to identify independent predictors of pesticide storage. Analyses were restricted to 259 participating control households. Results: Ninety-five percent (246 of 259) of the control households stored at least one pesticide product (median, 4). Indicators of higher sociodemographic status predicted more products in storage. We identified the most common characteristics: storage areas (garage, 40%; kitchen, 20%), pests treated (ants, 33%; weeds, 20%), pesticide types (insecticides, 46%; herbicides, 24%), chemical classes (pyrethroids, 77%; botanicals, 50%), active ingredients (pyrethrins, 43%) and synergists (piperonyl butoxide, 42%). Products could contain multiple active ingredients. Conclusions: Our data on specific active ingredients and patterns of storage and use will inform future etiologic analyses of residential pesticide exposures from self-reported data, particularly among households with young children. PMID:23110983

Guha, Neela; Ward, Mary H.; Gunier, Robert; Colt, Joanne S.; Lea, C. Suzanne; Buffler, Patricia A.

2012-01-01

75

Screening for Obsessive and Compulsive Symptoms: Validation of the Clark-Beck Obsessive-Compulsive Inventory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The 25-item Clark-Beck Obsessive-Compulsive Inventory (CBOCI) was developed to assess the frequency and severity of obsessive and compulsive symptoms. The measure uses a graded-response format to assess core symptom features of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) based on Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed.; American…

Clark, David A.; Antony, Martin M.; Beck, Aaron T.; Swinson, Richard P.; Steer, Robert A.

2005-01-01

76

Performance and comparison of self-reported STI symptoms among high-risk populations - MSM, sex workers, persons living with HIV/AIDS - in El Salvador.  

PubMed

Resource-limited countries have limited laboratory capability and rely on syndromic management to diagnose sexually transmitted infections (STIs). We aimed to estimate the sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value (PPV) of STI syndromic management when used as a screening method within a study setting. Men who have sex with men (MSM), female sex workers (FSWs) and people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) participated in a behavioural surveillance study. Data were obtained on demographics, sexual behaviours, STI history and service utilisation. Biological specimens were tested for genital inflammatory infections (Neisseria gonorrhoeae [GC], Chlamydia trachomatis [CT], Mycoplasma genitalium [MG], Trichomonas vaginalis [TV]) and genital ulcerative infection (syphilis and Herpes simplex virus-2). There was a high prevalence of Herpes simplex virus-2 (MSM 48.1%, FSW 82.0% and PLWHA 84.4%). Most participants reported no ulcerative symptoms and the majority of men reported no inflammatory symptoms. Sensitivity and PPV were poor for inflammatory infections among PLWHA and MSM. Sensitivity in FSWs for inflammatory infections was 75%. For ulcerative infections, sensitivity was poor, but specificity and PPV were high. Reliance on self-reported symptoms may not be an effective screening strategy for these populations. STI prevention studies should focus on symptom recognition and consider routine screening and referral for high-risk populations. PMID:24616119

Shah, Neha S; Kim, Evelyn; de Maria Hernández Ayala, Flor; Guardado Escobar, Maria Elena; Nieto, Ana Isabel; Kim, Andrea A; Paz-Bailey, Gabriela

2014-12-01

77

Is There a Relationship Between Parental Self-Reported Psychopathology and Symptom Severity in Adolescents with Anorexia Nervosa?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The current study aimed to screen for indications of psychopathology displayed by the parents of adolescents diagnosed with Anorexia Nervosa (AN), and examine the relationship between severity of adolescent eating disorder symptoms and parental psychopathology. Sixty female adolescents diagnosed with DSM-IV-TR AN (restricting-type and binge-purge-type) were administered the Eating Disorder Examination (EDE) and parents completed the Symptom Checklist 90-Revised (SCL-90-R).

Sheila Ravi; Sarah Forsberg; Kara Fitzpatrick; James Lock

2008-01-01

78

Cancer-Related Symptom Assessment in Russia: Validation and Utility of the Russian M. D. Anderson Symptom Inventory  

Microsoft Academic Search

This multicenter cross-sectional study (n=226) validated the Russian-language M. D. Anderson Symptom Inventory (MDASI-R) in Russian cancer patients with hematological malignancies or solid tumors. The Russian-language Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36-R) also was used for validation. Factor analysis found three underlying constructs for symptom items—general, treatment-related, and affective symptoms—with Cronbach alphas of 0.86, 0.68, and 0.90, respectively.

Maria O. Ivanova; Tatyana I. Ionova; Svetlana A. Kalyadina; Olga S. Uspenskaya; Anton V. Kishtovich; Hong Guo; Tito R. Mendoza; Andrei Novik; Charles S. Cleeland; Xin S. Wang

2005-01-01

79

The diagnostic strength of the 24-h pad test for self-reported symptoms of urinary incontinence in pregnancy and after childbirth.  

PubMed

The clinical impact of incontinence in pregnancy and after childbirth is growing because some studies report the efficacy of physiotherapy in pregnancy and because obstetric choices are supposed to have significant impact on post-reproductive urinary function (Goldberg et al. in Am J Obstet Gynecol 188:1447-1450, 2003). Thus, the need for objective measurement of urinary incontinence in pregnancy is growing. Data on pad testing in pregnancy are lacking. We assessed the clinical relevance of the 24-h pad test during pregnancy and after childbirth, compared with data on self-reported symptoms of urinary incontinence and visual analogue score. According to the receiver operating characteristic curve, the diagnostic value of pad testing for measuring (severity of) self-reported incontinence during pregnancy is not of clinical relevance. However, for the purposes of research, pad tests, combined with subjective/qualitative considerations, play a critical role in allowing comparisons across studies, quantifying the amount of urine loss and establishing a measure of severity. PMID:17928932

Wijma, Jacobus; Weis Potters, Annemarie E; Tinga, Dick J; Aarnoudse, Jan G

2008-04-01

80

Physical capacity and psychological mood in association with self-reported work ability in vibration-exposed patients with hand symptoms  

PubMed Central

Background The aim of this study was to investigate whether self-reports of work ability correlated to the results of quantitative tests measuring physical capacity and a questionnaire assessing psychological mood in vibration-exposed patients with hand symptoms. Methods The participants comprised 47 patients (36 men and eleven women) with exposure to hand vibration and vascular and/or neurological symptoms in the hands. They performed several quantitative tests (manual dexterity, hand grip strength, finger strength) and completed the Work Ability Index (WAI) and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) questionnaires. Results Correlation analysis revealed statistically significant associations between the WAI results, the HADS indices, hand grip and finger strength, and manual dexterity measured using the Purdue Pegboard®. Multiple regression analysis revealed age and HADS indices as the strongest predictors of work ability. Conclusions The patient’s age and psychological mood may be stronger predictors of work ability compared with results from tests measuring physical capacity of the hands in vibration-exposed patients with hand symptoms. When using the WAI as an instrument for assessing work ability in these patients, health care providers need to be more aware of the impact of the psychological mood. PMID:23136907

2012-01-01

81

Early Adolescent Depression Symptoms and School Dropout: Mediating Processes Involving Self-Reported Academic Competence and Achievement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research on adolescent well-being has shown that students with depression have an increased risk of facing academic failure, yet few studies have looked at the implications of adolescent depression in the process of school dropout. This study examined mediation processes linking depression symptoms, self-perceived academic competence, and…

Quiroga, Cintia V.; Janosz, Michel; Bisset, Sherri; Morin, Alexandre J. S.

2013-01-01

82

Parental Reports of Global Physical Health at Ages 3 and 6 Predict Self-Reported Depressive Symptoms 17 Years Later  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research studies testing longitudinal relations between childhood physical health measures and adulthood sub-clinical depressive symptoms are rare. In the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study, longitudinal relations of parental reports of the global physical health of the child (1 = good, 2 = moderately good, 3 = average/not good) and of…

Raikkonen, Katri; Schubert, Carla; Pesonen, Anu-Katriina; Heinonen, Kati; Viikari, Jorma; Keltikangas-Jarvinen, Liisa

2004-01-01

83

The Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology, clinician rated and self-report: a psychometric assessment in Chinese Americans with major depressive disorder.  

PubMed

This study aimed to investigate the psychometric properties of the Chinese translations of the Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (QIDS(16)), including the Clinician-Rated (QIDS-C(16)), Self-report (QIDS-SR(16)), and Interactive Voice Response (QIDS-SR-IVR(16)) formats. Thirty depressed Chinese Americans were assessed with Chinese translations of the QIDS-SR(16), QIDS-SR-IVR(16), and QIDS-C(16). Cronbach alpha estimates of internal scale consistency on the QIDS-SR(16), QIDS-SR-IVR(16), and QIDS-C(16) were 0.70, 0.74, and 0.79, respectively. Intercorrelations among the measures were QIDS-SR(16) and QIDS-SR-IVR(16), r = 0.79; QIDS-SR(16) and QIDS-C(16), r = 0.61; and QIDS-SR-IVR(16) and QIDS-C(16), r = 0.69 (all p values < 0.01). The areas under the curve for the receiver operating characteristics of the QIDS-SR(16) and QIDS-SR-IVR(16) were 0.78 (95% confidence interval, 0.61-0.95) and 0.81 (95% confidence interval, 0.65-0.96), respectively. The respective screening sensitivities/specificities were 0.73/0.74 and 0.86/0.58. The Chinese translations of the QIDS(16) have adequate psychometric properties and may be useful tools for depression screening. PMID:22850307

Yeung, Albert; Feldman, Gregory; Pedrelli, Paola; Hails, Kate; Fava, Maurizio; Reyes, Tracy; Mundt, James C

2012-08-01

84

Cross-sectional study of self-reported ADHD symptoms and psychological comorbidity among college students in Chandigarh, India  

PubMed Central

Background: Existence of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in adults is scantily researched in India. There is dearth of information on prevalence of ADHD in college students worldwide. Further, fewer studies in the past have evaluated the impact of ADHD on the psychological well-being of college students. Aims: To study the prevalence of ADHD among college students and psychological problems related to ADHD. Design: Cross-sectional study. Subjects and Methods: A total of 237 students were recruited from various medical, engineering, and commerce and arts colleges of Chandigarh, India. They were administered the Adult ADHD Self Report Scale v1.1(ASRS) and the Wender Utah Rating Scale (WURS) to diagnose adult ADHD. To assess comorbidities; General Health Questionnaire-12 (GHQ); Zung Depression Rating Scale (ZDRS); Rosenberg's Self-Esteem Scale (RSES);and questions on emotional stability, social problems, and substance use (alcohol, tobacco, and cannabis) were administered on all participants. Results: A total of 13 students (5.48%) fulfilled the criteria for adult ADHD. These students experienced significantly higher emotional instability and low self-esteem than those without ADHD (N = 224). The occurrence of psychological problems, depression, social problems, and substance abuse was comparable in students with and without ADHD. Conclusions: ADHD is prevalent among the college students studying in the most competitive institutes as well. Students with ADHD experience higher emotional instability and poor self-esteem than others. It has little effect on their psychological well-being and social adjustment. Prompt detection and management of ADHD in college students may help them deal with these problems effectively. PMID:25788800

Jhambh, Ishani; Arun, Priti; Garg, Jasmin

2014-01-01

85

Convergent validity of three posttraumatic symptoms inventories among adult sexual abuse survivors.  

PubMed

We examined the convergent validity of three posttraumatic symptoms inventories, the civilian version of the Mississippi Scale for Combat-Related PTSD (CM-PTSD), the Trauma Symptom Checklist-40 (TSC-40), and the Response to Childhood Incest Questionnaire (RCIQ), in a sample of 52 adult sexual abuse survivors. The significant and moderate to strong correlations (r = .6 or higher) among these inventories supported their convergent validity. Comparison with other studies also suggests that these instruments can adequately discriminate clinical from nonclinical populations. PMID:9479686

Gold, J W; Cardeña, E

1998-01-01

86

Somatic symptoms beyond those generally associated with a whiplash injury are increased in self-reported chronic whiplash. A population-based cross sectional study: the Hordaland Health Study (HUSK)  

PubMed Central

Background Chronic whiplash leads to considerable patient suffering and substantial societal costs. There are two competing hypothesis on the etiology of chronic whiplash. The traditional organic hypothesis considers chronic whiplash and related symptoms a result of a specific injury. In opposition is the hypothesis that chronic whiplash is a functional somatic syndrome, and related symptoms a result of society-induced expectations and amplification of symptoms. According to both hypotheses, patients reporting chronic whiplash are expected to have more neck pain, headache and symptoms of anxiety and depression than the general population. Increased prevalence of somatic symptoms beyond those directly related to a whiplash neck injury is less investigated. The aim of this study was to test an implication derived from the functional hypothesis: Is the prevalence of somatic symptoms as seen in somatization disorder, beyond symptoms related to a whiplash neck injury, increased in individuals self-reporting chronic whiplash? We further aimed to explore recall bias by comparing the symptom profile displayed by individuals self-reporting chronic whiplash to that among those self-reporting a non-functional injury: fractures of the hand or wrist. We explored symptom load, etiologic origin could not be investigated in this study. Methods Data from the Norwegian population-based “Hordaland Health Study” (HUSK, 1997–99); N?=?13,986 was employed. Chronic whiplash was self-reported by 403 individuals and fractures by 1,746. Somatization tendency was measured using a list of 17 somatic symptoms arising from different body parts and organ systems, derived from the research criteria for somatization disorder (ICD-10, F45). Results Chronic whiplash was associated with an increased level of all 17 somatic symptoms investigated (p<0.05). The association was moderately strong (group difference of 0.60 standard deviation), only partly accounted for by confounding. For self-reported fractures symptoms were only slightly elevated. Recent whiplash was more commonly reported than whiplash-injury a long time ago, and the association of interest weakly increased with time since whiplash (r?=?0.016, p?=?0.032). Conclusions The increased prevalence of somatic symptoms beyond symptoms expected according to the organic injury model for chronic whiplash, challenges the standard injury model for whiplash, and is indicative evidence of chronic whiplash being a functional somatic syndrome. PMID:22935146

2012-01-01

87

The Incremental Value of Self-Reported Mental Health Measures in Predicting Functional Outcomes of Veterans  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research on patient-centered care supports use of patient\\/consumer self-report measures in monitoring health outcomes. This\\u000a study examined the incremental value of self-report mental health measures relative to a clinician-rated measure in predicting\\u000a functional outcomes among mental health service recipients. Participants (n?=?446) completed the Behavior and Symptom Identification Scale, the Brief Symptom Inventory, and the Veterans\\/Rand Short\\u000a Form-36 at enrollment in

Susan V. Eisen; Kathryn A. Bottonari; Mark E. Glickman; Avron Spiro; Mark R. Schultz; Lawrence Herz; Robert Rosenheck; Ethan S. Rofman

2011-01-01

88

Simulation of traumatic brain injury symptoms on the personality assessment inventory: an analogue study.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to characterize the operating characteristics of the Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI) validity scales in distinguishing simulators feigning symptoms of traumatic brain injury (TBI) while completing the PAI (n = 84) from a clinical sample of patients with TBI who achieved adequate scores on performance validity tests (n = 112). The simulators were divided into two groups: (a) Specific Simulators feigning cognitive and somatic symptoms only or (b) Global Simulators feigning cognitive, somatic, and psychiatric symptoms. The PAI overreporting scales were indeed sensitive to the simulation of TBI symptoms in this analogue design. However, these scales were less sensitive to the feigning of somatic and cognitive TBI symptoms than the feigning of a broad range of cognitive, somatic, and emotional symptoms often associated with TBI. The relationships of TBI simulation to consistency and underreporting scales are also explored. PMID:24965838

Keiski, Michelle A; Shore, Douglas L; Hamilton, Joanna M; Malec, James F

2015-04-01

89

Validation of the Trauma Symptom Inventory in a Canadian Sample of University Women  

Microsoft Academic Search

A group of 775 women from a medium-size western Canadian university completed the Trauma Symptom Inventory (TSI) along with assessments of childhood sexual abuse and physical maltreatment and a number of other psychological and behavioral measures. Multivariate analyses determined that women with a history of either form of child maltreatment had significantly higher scores on the TSI than did nonmaltreated

Marsha G. Runtz; Diane N. Roche

1999-01-01

90

Principal domains of behavioral psychopathology identified by the Bipolar Inventory of Signs and Symptoms Scale (BISS)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Current symptom rating scales and diagnostic categories for bipolar disorder (BD) do not provide dimensional profiles of the types of behavior disturbed in this complex disorder. To overcome these limitations we identified the principal domains of behavioral symptomatology in bipolar individuals, including all mood states, and used a more comprehensive rating scale for BD: the Bipolar Inventory of Signs and

Peter M. Thompson; Jodi M. Gonzalez; Vivek Singh; John D. Schoolfield; Martin M. Katz; Charles L. Bowden

2010-01-01

91

Adaptation and Validation of the Spanish-Language Trauma Symptom Inventory in Puerto Rico  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: This research was conducted to assess the Spanish-language Trauma Symptom Inventory's (Briere, 1995) suitability for use with a Puerto Rican sample. Minor revisions were made to the original instrument following a comprehensive appraisal involving a bilingual committee and pilot focus group. The present study outlines the review and…

Gutierrez Wang, Lisa; Cosden, Merith; Bernal, Guillermo

2011-01-01

92

Do Web-Based and Clinic Samples of Gay Men Living With HIV Differ on Self-Reported Physical and Psychological Symptoms? A Comparative Analysis  

PubMed Central

Background Although the Internet is commonly used to recruit samples in studies of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related risk behaviors, it has not been used to measure patient-reported well-being. As the burden of long-term chronic HIV infection rises, the Internet may offer enormous potential for recruitment to research and interventions. Objective This study aimed to compare two samples of gay men living with HIV, one recruited via the Web and the other recruited in outpatient settings, in terms of self-reported physical and psychological symptom burden. Methods The Internet sample was recruited from a UK-wide Web-based survey of gay men with diagnosed HIV. Of these, 154 respondents identified themselves as resident in London and were included in this analysis. The HIV clinic sample was recruited from five HIV outpatient clinics. Of these participants, 400 gay men recruited in London clinics were included in this analysis. Results The Web-based sample was younger than the clinic sample (37.3 years, SD 7.0 vs 40.9 years, SD 8.3), more likely to be in paid employment (72.8%, 99/136 vs 60.1%, 227/378), less likely to be on antiretroviral therapy (ART) (58.4%, 90/154 vs 68.0%, 266/391), and had worse mean psychological symptom burden compared to the clinic sample (mean scores: 1.61, SD 1.09 vs 1.36, SD 0.96) but similar physical symptom burden (mean scores: 0.78, SD 0.65 vs 0.70, SD 0.74). In multivariable logistic regression, for the physical symptom burden model, adjusted for age, ethnicity, employment status, and ART use, the recruitment setting (ie, Web-based vs clinic) was not significantly associated with high physical symptom score. The only variable that remained significantly associated with high physical symptom score was employment status, with those in employment being less likely to report being in the upper (worst) physical symptom tertile versus the other two tertiles (adjusted OR 0.41, 95% CI 0.28-0.62, P<.001). For the psychological symptom burden model, those recruited via the Web were significantly more likely to report being in the upper (worst) tertile (adjusted OR 2.20, 95% CI 1.41-3.44, P=.001). In addition, those in employment were less likely to report being in the upper (worst) psychological symptom tertile compared to those not in employment (adjusted OR 0.32, 95% CI 0.21-0.49, P<.001). Conclusions Our data have revealed a number of differences. Compared to the clinic sample, the Web-based sample had worse psychological symptom burden, younger average age, higher prevalence of employment, and a lower proportion on ART. For future research, we recommend that Web-based data collection should include the demographic variables that we note differed between samples. In addition, we recognize that each recruitment method may bring inherent sampling bias, with clinic populations differing by geographical location and reflecting those accessing regular medical care, and Web-based sampling recruiting those with greater Internet access and identifying survey materials through specific searches and contact with specific websites. PMID:25793749

Lampe, Fiona; Molloy, Tim; Sherr, Lorraine

2015-01-01

93

The electronic self report assessment and intervention for cancer: promoting patient verbal reporting of symptom and quality of life issues in a randomized controlled trial  

PubMed Central

Background The electronic self report assessment - cancer (ESRA-C), has been shown to reduce symptom distress during cancer therapy The purpose of this analysis was to evaluate aspects of how the ESRA-C intervention may have resulted in lower symptom distress (SD). Methods Patients at two cancer centers were randomized to ESRA-C assessment only (control) or the Web-based ESRA-C intervention delivered to patients’ homes or to a tablet in clinic. The intervention allowed patients to self-monitor symptom and quality of life (SxQOL) between visits, receive self-care education and coaching to report SxQOL to clinicians. Summaries of assessments were delivered to clinicians in both groups. Audio-recordings of clinic visits made 6 weeks after treatment initiation were coded for discussions of 26 SxQOL issues, focusing on patients’/caregivers’ coached verbal reports of SxQOL severity, pattern, alleviating/aggravating factors and requests for help. Among issues identified as problematic, two measures were defined for each patient: the percent SxQOL reported that included a coached statement, and an index of verbalized coached statements per SxQOL. The Wilcoxon rank test was used to compare measures between groups. Clinician responses to problematic SxQOL were compared. A mediation analysis was conducted, exploring the effect of verbal reports on SD outcomes. Results 517 (256 intervention) clinic visits were audio-recorded. General discussion of problematic SxQOL was similar in both groups. Control group patients reported a median 75% of problematic SxQOL using any specific coached statement compared to a median 85% in the intervention group (p = .0009). The median report index of coached statements was 0.25 for the control group and 0.31 for the intervention group (p = 0.008). Fatigue, pain and physical function issues were reported significantly more often in the intervention group (all p < .05). Clinicians' verbalized responses did not differ between groups. Patients' verbal reports did not mediate final SD outcomes (p = .41). Conclusions Adding electronically-delivered, self-care instructions and communication coaching to ESRA-C promoted specific patient descriptions of problematic SxQOL issues compared with ESRA-C assessment alone. However, clinician verbal responses were no different and subsequent symptom distress group differences were not mediated by the patients' reports. Trial registration NCT00852852; 26 Feb 2009 PMID:25014995

2014-01-01

94

Self-Report Measures of Family Competence.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes and compares two self-report measures of family competence: the Family Awareness Scales (FAS) (Green and Kolevzon, late 1970s) and the Self-Report Family Inventory (SFI) (Beavers, 1983). Discusses reliability and validity. Their focus on the "insider" (family member) is different from the traditional examination of family competence from…

Green, Robert G.

1987-01-01

95

Autism Spectrum Disorders and Self-reports: Testing Validity and Reliability Using the NEO-PI-R.  

PubMed

Although self-reported measures are frequently used to assess adults with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), the validity of self-reports is under-researched in ASD. The core symptoms of ASD may negatively affect the psychometric properties of self-reported measures. The aim of the present study was to test the validity and reliability of self-reported data using the NEO personality inventory-revised (NEO-PI-R). Forty-eight adults with ASD and 53 controls completed the NEO-PI-R and a psychiatric interview. Results indicate satisfactory internal consistency of the NEO-PI-R, a satisfactory factor structure, predicted correlations with clinician ratings in the ASD group, and predicted differences in personality between the ASD group and controls. In conclusion, the present results support the use of self-reported measures when assessing adults with ASD . PMID:25326256

Hesselmark, Eva; Eriksson, Jonna M; Westerlund, Joakim; Bejerot, Susanne

2015-05-01

96

The Use of Immersive Virtual Reality (VR) to Predict the Occurrence 6 Months Later of Paranoid Thinking and Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms Assessed by Self-Report and Interviewer Methods: A Study of Individuals Who Have Been Physically Assaulted  

PubMed Central

Presentation of social situations via immersive virtual reality (VR) has the potential to be an ecologically valid way of assessing psychiatric symptoms. In this study we assess the occurrence of paranoid thinking and of symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in response to a single neutral VR social environment as predictors of later psychiatric symptoms assessed by standard methods. One hundred six people entered an immersive VR social environment (a train ride), presented via a head-mounted display, 4 weeks after having attended hospital because of a physical assault. Paranoid thinking about the neutral computer-generated characters and the occurrence of PTSD symptoms in VR were assessed. Reactions in VR were then used to predict the occurrence 6 months later of symptoms of paranoia and PTSD, as assessed by standard interviewer and self-report methods. Responses to VR predicted the severity of paranoia and PTSD symptoms as assessed by standard measures 6 months later. The VR assessments also added predictive value to the baseline interviewer methods, especially for paranoia. Brief exposure to environments presented via virtual reality provides a symptom assessment with predictive ability over many months. VR assessment may be of particular benefit for difficult to assess problems, such as paranoia, that have no gold standard assessment method. In the future, VR environments may be used in the clinic to complement standard self-report and clinical interview methods. PMID:24708073

2014-01-01

97

The use of immersive virtual reality (VR) to predict the occurrence 6 months later of paranoid thinking and posttraumatic stress symptoms assessed by self-report and interviewer methods: a study of individuals who have been physically assaulted.  

PubMed

Presentation of social situations via immersive virtual reality (VR) has the potential to be an ecologically valid way of assessing psychiatric symptoms. In this study we assess the occurrence of paranoid thinking and of symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in response to a single neutral VR social environment as predictors of later psychiatric symptoms assessed by standard methods. One hundred six people entered an immersive VR social environment (a train ride), presented via a head-mounted display, 4 weeks after having attended hospital because of a physical assault. Paranoid thinking about the neutral computer-generated characters and the occurrence of PTSD symptoms in VR were assessed. Reactions in VR were then used to predict the occurrence 6 months later of symptoms of paranoia and PTSD, as assessed by standard interviewer and self-report methods. Responses to VR predicted the severity of paranoia and PTSD symptoms as assessed by standard measures 6 months later. The VR assessments also added predictive value to the baseline interviewer methods, especially for paranoia. Brief exposure to environments presented via virtual reality provides a symptom assessment with predictive ability over many months. VR assessment may be of particular benefit for difficult to assess problems, such as paranoia, that have no gold standard assessment method. In the future, VR environments may be used in the clinic to complement standard self-report and clinical interview methods. PMID:24708073

Freeman, Daniel; Antley, Angus; Ehlers, Anke; Dunn, Graham; Thompson, Claire; Vorontsova, Natasha; Garety, Philippa; Kuipers, Elizabeth; Glucksman, Edward; Slater, Mel

2014-09-01

98

Japanese version of the MD Anderson Symptom Inventory: a validation study.  

PubMed

Cancer patients frequently suffer from a myriad of symptoms. The development and application of comprehensive assessment tools is essential to the effective management of these symptoms. The M.D. Anderson Symptom Inventory (MDASI), developed in English, is a brief, self-rating multiple symptom assessment scale that consists of 13 symptom items and 6 interference items. We examined the validity and reliability of the Japanese version of this scale (MDASI-J) by evaluating 252 randomly selected cancer patients. They were asked to self-administer the MDASI-J and the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-C 30. Construct, criterion, convergent and discriminant validity, and reliability of the MDASI-J were evaluated and compared with corresponding data obtained in the previous study conducted in the United States. The results indicated that the MDASI-J is a valid and practical measure for assessing multiple symptoms in Japanese cancer patients. Both factor analysis and cluster analysis showed the consistency of the statistical structure of the English and Japanese versions, indicating the cross-cultural validity of the scale. PMID:14654261

Okuyama, Toru; Wang, Xin Shelley; Akechi, Tatsuo; Mendoza, Tito R; Hosaka, Takashi; Cleeland, Charles S; Uchitomi, Yosuke

2003-12-01

99

Trauma Symptoms and Life Skill Needs of Domestic Violence Victims  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study identified the trauma symptoms and life skill needs of 84 domestic violence victims from three domestic violence programs. Women completed two self-report tools: Trauma Symptom Inventory (TSI) and Occupational Self Assessment (OSA). Staff members participated in focus groups regarding their perceptions of the womens needs. Women scored…

Gorde, Mrugaya W.; Helfrich, Christine A.; Finlayson, Marcia L.

2004-01-01

100

[Physical symptoms of Parkinson's disease and the score on Beck's Depression Inventory].  

PubMed

In patients with Parkinson's disease high prevalence of depression has been estimated. This prevalence may be overestimated since the commonly used assessment of depressive complaints neglects the correspondence with physical symptoms of Parkinson's disease and psychosomatic symptoms in depression. To evaluate the effect of this contamination, we presented a frequently used questionnaire for assessing depressive complaints, Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI), to eight neurologists specialized in Parkinson's disease. We asked them to select those items on which Parkinson patients might receive high scores merely because of the physical symptoms of their disease. Based on their consistent judgments, a BDI-version corrected for somatic items was constructed. Next, the scores of the original and the corrected version were computed for 27 outpatients with Parkinson's disease (from mild to very severe) and 52 psychiatric inpatients who were being treated for depression. Prevalence of depression were 74% (original BDI) and 48% (corrected BDI) for the Parkinson group and 75% and 81% respectively for the psychiatric group. Results indicate that great care should be taken in interpreting scores on depression inventories in patients with Parkinson's disease. In general, the results raise doubts on the validity of somatic complaints as indicators of depression in patients with Parkinson's disease. PMID:1926297

Emanuels-Zuurveen, E S; Brouwer, W H; Lakke, J P; Bouhuys, A L

1991-08-01

101

Incremental Validity of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 and Symptom Checklist-90-Revised with Mental Health Inpatients  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study evaluated the incremental validity of scores from the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2) and the Symptom Checklist-90-Revised (SCL-90-R) in a sample of mental health inpatients originally published by Archer, Griffin, and Aiduk (1995). The incremental validity of scores from the SCL-90-R primary symptom dimensions…

Simonds, Elise C.; Handel, Richard W.; Archer, Robert P.

2008-01-01

102

Validating the M. D. Anderson Symptom Inventory (MDASI) for use in patients with ovarian cancer  

PubMed Central

Objective The M. D. Anderson Symptom Inventory (MDASI) captures the severity of common cancer symptoms from the patients’ perspective. We describe the validity and sensitivity of a module of the MDASI to be used with patients having ovarian cancer (MDASI-OC). Methods Ovarian cancer–specific module items were developed from 14 qualitative patient interviews. 128 patients with invasive epithelial ovarian, peritoneal, or fallopian-tube cancer treated at MD Anderson Cancer Center were recruited. Patients completed the MDASI-OC, socio-demographic questionnaires, the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Ovary (FACT-O), and a global quality-of-life (QOL) item. Reliability was assessed using Cronbach ? and sensitivity using known group was assessed. Construct validity was tested using exploratory factor analysis. Results The sample was primarily white (85.2%), had a mean age of 57.5 years (±12.7 years), and had previously been treated with chemotherapy (75.0%) and/or surgery (93.8%). Approximately 30% of patients reported disturbed sleep, fatigue, or numbness/tingling of at least moderate severity (?5 on a 0–10 scale). On the ovarian-cancer-specific symptoms, approximately 20% reported back pain, feeling bloated, or constipation of at least moderate severity. Factor analysis revealed six underlying constructs (pain/sleep; cognitive; disease-related and numbness; treatment-related; affective; gastrointestinal-specific). MDASI-OC symptom and interference items had Cronbach ? values of 0.90 and 0.89, respectively. The MDASI-OC was sensitive to symptom severity by performance status (p=0.009), QOL (p=0.002), and FACT-O scores (p<0.001). Conclusions The 27-item MDASI-OC meets common criteria for validation and reliability and is sensitive to expected changes in symptoms related to differences in disease and treatment status. PMID:23685012

Sailors, Mary H.; Bodurka, Diane C.; Gning, Ibrahima; Ramondetta, Lois M.; Williams, Loretta A.; Mendoza, Tito R.; Agarwal, Sonika; Sun, Charlotte C.; Cleeland, Charles S.

2013-01-01

103

Are self-reported symptoms of executive dysfunction associated with objective executive function performance following mild to moderate traumatic brain injury?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background and objective: We examined the relationship between self-reported pre- and post-injury changes in executive dysfunction, apathy, disinhibition, and depression, and performance on neuropsychological tests of executive function, attention\\/processing speed, and memory in relation to mood levels and effort test performance in individuals in the early stages of recovery from mild to moderate traumatic brain injury (TBI). Method: Participants were

Dawn M. Schiehser; Dean C. Delis; J. Vincent Filoteo; Lisa Delano-Wood; S. Duke Han; Amy J. Jak; Angela I. Drake; Mark W. Bondi

2011-01-01

104

Portuguese validation of the Symptom Inventory of the M.D. Anderson Cancer Center.  

PubMed

Objective To analyze the reliability and validity of the psychometric properties of the Brazilian version of the instrument for symptom assessment, titled MD Anderson Symptom Inventory - core. Method A cross-sectional study with 268 cancer patients in outpatient treatment, in the municipality of Ijuí, state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Results The Cronbach's alpha for the MDASI general, symptoms and interferences was respectively (0.857), (0.784) and (0.794). The factor analysis showed adequacy of the data (0.792). In total, were identified four factors of the principal components related to the symptoms. Factor I: sleep problems, distress (upset), difficulties in remembering things and sadness. Factor II: dizziness, nausea, lack of appetite and vomiting. Factor III: drowsiness, dry mouth, numbness and tingling. Factor IV: pain, fatigue and shortness of breath. A single factor was revealed in the component of interferences with life (0.780), with prevalence of activity in general (59.7%), work (54.9%) and walking (49.3%). Conclusion The Brazilian version of the MD Anderson Symptom Inventory - core showed adequate psychometric properties in the studied population.Objetivo Analisar a confiabilidade e a validade das propriedades psicométricas da versão brasileira do instrumento de avaliação de sintomas, intitulado Inventário de Sintomas do M.D. Anderson - core. Método Estudo transversal do qual participaram 268 pacientes com câncer em tratamento ambulatorial, do Município de Ijuí, Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil. Resultados O Alfa de Cronbach MDASI geral, os sintomas e as interferências foram respectivamente (0,857), (0,784) e (0,794). A análise fatorial demonstrou adequação dos dados (0,792). Identificaram-se quatro fatores dos principais componentes relacionados aos sintomas. Fator I: problemas de sono, preocupações, dificuldades de lembrar-se das coisas e tristeza. Fator II: enjoo, náuseas, falta de apetite e vômito. Fator III: sonolência, boca seca, dormência e formigamento. Fator IV: dor, fadiga e falta de ar. Evidenciou-se um único fator no componente interferências na vida (0,780), prevalecendo para atividade em geral (59,7%), trabalho (54,9%) e para caminhar (49,3%). Conclusão A versão brasileira do Inventário de M.D. Anderson-core mostrou propriedades psicométricas adequadas na população avaliada. PMID:25626498

Kolankiewicz, Adriane Cristina Bernat; Domenico, Edvane Birelo Lopes De; Lopes, Luís Felipe Dias; Magnago, Tânia Solange Bosi de Souza

2014-12-01

105

Principal domains of behavioral psychopathology identified by the Bipolar Inventory of Signs and Symptoms Scale (BISS).  

PubMed

Current symptom rating scales and diagnostic categories for bipolar disorder (BD) do not provide dimensional profiles of the types of behavior disturbed in this complex disorder. To overcome these limitations we identified the principal domains of behavioral symptomatology in bipolar individuals, including all mood states, and used a more comprehensive rating scale for BD: the Bipolar Inventory of Signs and Symptoms Scale (BISS). A total of 246 patients with BD (196 with BD type I, and 50 with BD type II) were interviewed using the BISS. Exploratory factor analysis was performed on the BISS results using the maximum likelihood factor extraction method, followed by oblique rotation of the extracted factor loadings. We determined the strength of relationships between factor scores using the Pearson correlation coefficient. The following five factors were extracted: mania, depression, irritability, anxiety and psychosis. Anxiety was significantly correlated with depression and irritability. The mania factor score was only weakly associated with the other four factors. The domains of the BISS capture both the historical categories of depression and mania, plus irritability, psychosis, and an additional principal domain, anxiety. Despite the common occurrence of anxiety in BD, it has not been identified in most prior factor analyses, in part due to limited coverage of anxiety symptoms in the source scales. PMID:20022384

Thompson, Peter M; Gonzalez, Jodi M; Singh, Vivek; Schoolfield, John D; Katz, Martin M; Bowden, Charles L

2010-02-28

106

Development of the family symptom inventory: a psychosocial screener for children with hematology/oncology conditions.  

PubMed

A growing body of literature has begun to underscore the importance of integrating family-based comprehensive psychological screening into standard medical care for children with oncology and hematology conditions. There are no known family-based measures designed to screen for clinically significant emotional and behavioral concerns in pediatric oncology and hematology patients. The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate the Family Symptom Inventory (FSI), a brief screener of patient and family member psychological symptoms. The FSI also screens for common comorbid physical symptoms (pain and sleep disturbance) and is designed for use at any point during treatment and follow-up. A total of 488 caregivers completed the FSI during regular hematology/oncology visits for 193 cancer, 219 sickle cell disease, and 76 hematology pediatric patients. Exploratory factor analysis, confirmatory factor analysis, and tests of reliability and preliminary validity were conducted. Exploratory factor analysis suggested a 34-item, 4-factor solution, which was confirmed in an independent sample using confirmatory factor analysis (factor loadings=0.49 to 0.88). The FSI demonstrated good internal reliability (?'s=0.86 to 0.92) and good preliminary validity. Regular psychosocial screening throughout the course of treatment and follow-up may lead to improved quality of care for children with oncology and hematology conditions. PMID:25692615

Karlson, Cynthia W; Haynes, Stacey; Faith, Melissa A; Elkin, Thomas D; Smith, Maria L; Megason, Gail

2015-03-01

107

Utility of the Trauma Symptom Inventory's Atypical Response Scale in Detecting Malingered Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors examined the Trauma Symptom Inventorys (TSI) ability to discriminate 88 student post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) simulators screened for genuine PTSD from 48 clinical PTSD-diagnosed outpatients. Results demonstrated between-group differences on several TSI clinical scales and the Atypical Response (ATR) validity scale.…

Elhai, Jon D.; Gray, Matthew J.; Naifeh, James A.; Butcher, Jimmie J.; Davis, Joanne L.; Falsetti, Sherry A.; Best, Connie L.

2005-01-01

108

Cross-Ethnic Measurement Invariance of the Brief Symptom Inventory for Individuals with Severe and Persistent Mental Illness  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to test the measurement invariance of the Brief Symptom Inventory's (BSI) secondary factor model across African, white, and Latino Americans using multiple-group confirmatory factor analyses. This study provides an examination of the BSI's validity for use in mental health service research for people with severe and…

Hoe, Maanse; Brekke, John S.

2008-01-01

109

Validation of a Provider Self-Report Inventory for Measuring Patient-Centered Cultural Sensitivity in Health Care Using a Sample of Medical Students  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper describes the construction and initial evaluation of the new Tucker-Culturally Sensitive Health Care Inventory (T-CSHCI)\\u000a Provider Form, which was developed to address the shortcomings of existing similar measures. Two hundred seventeen (217) 3rd\\u000a and 4th year medical students completed the T-CSHCI-Provider Form. Factor analysis was used to identify non-overlapping items.\\u000a The final solution produced five factors: patient-centeredness, interpersonal

Anca Mirsu-PaunCarolyn; Carolyn M. Tucker; Keith C. Herman; Caridad A. Hernandez

2010-01-01

110

Bifactor structural model of symptom checklists: SCL-90-R and Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI) in a non-clinical community sample.  

PubMed

The Derogatis symptom checklist (SCL-90-R) and its short version, the Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI), are widely used instruments, despite the fact that their factor structures were not clearly confirmed. The goals of this research were to compare four measurement models of these instruments including one-factor, nine-factor, a second-ordered factor model and a bifactor model, in addition to testing the gender difference in symptom factors in a community sample. SCL-90-R was assessed in a large community survey which included 2710 adults who represent the population of Hungary. Statistical analyses included a series of confirmatory factor analyses and multiple indicator multiple cause (MIMIC modeling). The responses to items were treated as ordinal scales. The analysis revealed that the bifactor model yielded the closest fit in both the full SCL-90-R and BSI; however the nine-factor model also had an acceptable level of fit. As for the gender differences, women scored higher on global severity, somatization, obsession-compulsion, interpersonal sensitivity, depression and anxiety factors. Men scored higher on hostility and psychoticism. The bifactor model of symptom checklist supports the concept of global symptom severity and specific symptom factors. Global symptom severity explains the large correlations between symptom factors. PMID:24524946

Urbán, Róbert; Kun, Bernadette; Farkas, Judit; Paksi, Borbála; Kökönyei, Gyöngyi; Unoka, Zsolt; Felvinczi, Katalin; Oláh, Attila; Demetrovics, Zsolt

2014-04-30

111

The influence of self-efficacy, pre-stroke depression and perceived social support on self-reported depressive symptoms during stroke rehabilitation.  

PubMed

Post-stroke depression (PSD) is the most common mental disorder following stroke; however, little is known about its pathogenesis. We investigated the predictive value and mutual relationship of psychological factors such as self-efficacy and social support and known risk factors such as pre-stroke depression, activities of daily living (ADL), cognitive functioning, and age for the emergence of depressive symptoms in the acute phase after stroke. Ninety-six ischaemic stroke inpatients residing at a rehabilitation centre completed an interview about 6.5 weeks post-stroke. The interview included demographic data, psychiatric anamnesis, the Barthel Index, Mini-Mental State Examination, Social Support Questionnaire, Generalized Self-Efficacy Scale, Stroke Self-Efficacy Questionnaire, and the Geriatric Depression Scale. A multiple regression analysis was performed to ascertain the predictive value of the factors on depressive symptoms. High self-efficacy, no history of pre-stroke depression, and high levels of perceived social support were the strongest protective factors for depressive symptoms. The influence of cognitive functioning on depressive symptoms was fully mediated by general self-efficacy, and general self-efficacy was a stronger predictor than stroke-specific self-efficacy. Neither ADL nor age significantly predicted depressive symptoms. Our findings suggest that consideration of self-efficacy and perceived social support in the inpatient rehabilitation setting may help prevent PSD. PMID:23656456

Lewin, A; Jöbges, M; Werheid, K

2013-01-01

112

The Early Childhood Inventory4 and Child Symptom Inventory4 as screening measures for pervasive developmental disorders: A validity study  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study seeks to validate a psychiatric checklist for parents and teachers that clinicians could use for early screening of children with Pervasive Developmental Disorder (PDD). The Early Childhood Inventory-4 (ECI-4) (Gadow & Sprafkin, 1997) is a DSM-IV-referenced behavior checklist that has been found to show sensitivity to a wide range of psychiatric symptomatology. This checklist is designed to assess

Jane Lindsay Gudaitis

2002-01-01

113

Comparison of the Patient Health Questionnaire and the Older Adult Health and Mood Questionnaire for Self-Reported Depressive Symptoms After Spinal Cord Injury  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To directly compare estimates of potential depressive disorders and clinically significant depressive symptoms using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) and Older Adult Health and Mood Questionnaire (OAHMQ) among participants with spinal cord injury (SCI). Research Design: 727 participants from a hospital in the Southeastern United States were administered the PHQ-9 and OAHMQ during a follow-up survey. We compared the

James S. Krause; Lee L. Saunders; Karla S. Reed; Jennifer Coker; Yusheng Zhai; Emily Johnson

2009-01-01

114

The Utility and Comparative Incremental Validity of the MMPI-2 and Trauma Symptom Inventory Validity Scales in the Detection of Feigned PTSD  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors examined the comparative predictive capacity of the Trauma Symptom Inventory (TSI) Atypical Response Scale (ATR) and the standard set of Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2) fake-bad validity scales (i.e., F, F[subscript B[prime

Efendov, Adele A.; Sellbom, Martin; Bagby, R. Michael

2008-01-01

115

Depressive symptoms and observed eating in youth.  

PubMed

Depressive symptoms in youth may be a risk factor for obesity, with altered eating behaviors as one possible mechanism. We tested whether depressive symptoms were associated with observed eating patterns expected to promote excessive weight gain in two separate samples. In Study 1, 228 non-treatment-seeking youth, ages 12-17y (15.3±1.4y; 54.7% female), self-reported depressive symptoms using the Beck Depression Inventory. Energy intake was measured as consumption from a 10,934-kcal buffet meal served at 11:00am after an overnight fast. In Study 2, 204 non-treatment-seeking youth, ages 8-17y (13.0±2.8y; 49.5% female), self-reported depressive symptoms using the Children's Depression Inventory. Energy intake was measured as consumption from a 9835-kcal buffet meal served at 2:30pm after a standard breakfast. In Study 1, controlling for body composition and other relevant covariates, depressive symptoms were positively related to total energy intake in girls and boys. In Study 2, adjusting for the same covariates, depressive symptoms among girls only were positively associated with total energy intake. Youth high in depressive symptoms and dietary restraint consumed the most energy from sweets. In both studies, the effects of depressive symptoms on intake were small. Nevertheless, depressive symptoms were associated with significantly greater consumption of total energy and energy from sweet snack foods, which, over time, could be anticipated to promote excess weight gain. PMID:24424352

Mooreville, Mira; Shomaker, Lauren B; Reina, Samantha A; Hannallah, Louise M; Adelyn Cohen, L; Courville, Amber B; Kozlosky, Merel; Brady, Sheila M; Condarco, Tania; Yanovski, Susan Z; Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian; Yanovski, Jack A

2014-04-01

116

Self-Reported Sleep Correlates with Prefrontal-Amygdala Functional Connectivity and Emotional Functioning  

PubMed Central

Study Objectives: Prior research suggests that sleep deprivation is associated with declines in some aspects of emotional intelligence and increased severity on indices of psychological disturbance. Sleep deprivation is also associated with reduced prefrontal-amygdala functional connectivity, potentially reflecting impaired top-down modulation of emotion. It remains unknown whether this modified connectivity may be observed in relation to more typical levels of sleep curtailment. We examined whether self-reported sleep duration the night before an assessment would be associated with these effects. Design: Participants documented their hours of sleep from the previous night, completed the Bar-On Emotional Quotient Inventory (EQ-i), Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT), and Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI), and underwent resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Setting: Outpatient neuroimaging center at a private psychiatric hospital. Participants: Sixty-five healthy adults (33 men, 32 women), ranging in age from 18-45 y. Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: Greater self-reported sleep the preceding night was associated with higher scores on all scales of the EQ-i but not the MSCEIT, and with lower symptom severity scores on half of the psychopathology scales of the PAI. Longer sleep was also associated with stronger negative functional connectivity between the right ventromedial prefrontal cortex and amygdala. Moreover, greater negative connectivity between these regions was associated with higher EQ-i and lower symptom severity on the PAI. Conclusions: Self-reported sleep duration from the preceding night was negatively correlated with prefrontal-amygdala connectivity and the severity of subjective psychological distress, while positively correlated with higher perceived emotional intelligence. More sleep was associated with higher emotional and psychological strength. Citation: Killgore WDS. Self-reported sleep correlates with prefrontal-amygdala functional connectivity and emotional functioning. SLEEP 2013;36(11):1597-1608. PMID:24179291

Killgore, William D. S.

2013-01-01

117

Association study of monoamine oxidase-A gene promoter polymorphism (MAOA-uVNTR) with self-reported anxiety and other psychopathological symptoms in a community sample of early adolescents.  

PubMed

The polymorphism upstream of the gene for monoamine oxidase A (MAOA-uVNTR) is reported to be an important enzyme involved in human physiology and behavior. With a sample of 228 early-adolescents from a community sample (143 girls) and adjusting for environmental variables, we examined the influence of MAOA-uVNTR alleles on the scores obtained in the Screen for Childhood Anxiety and Related Emotional Disorders and in the Child Symptom Inventory-4. Our results showed that girls with the high-activity MAOA allele had higher scores for generalized and total anxiety than their low-activity peers, whereas boys with the low-activity allele had higher social phobia scores than boys with the high-activity allele. Results for conduct disorder symptoms did not show a significant relationship between the MAOA alleles and the presence of these symptoms. Our findings support a possible association, depending on gender, between the MAOA-uVNTR polymorphism and psychopathological disorders such as anxiety, which affects high rates of children and adolescents. PMID:25747527

Voltas, Núria; Aparicio, Estefania; Arija, Victoria; Canals, Josefa

2015-04-01

118

Extreme Appraisals of Internal States and Bipolar Symptoms: The Hypomanic Attitudes and Positive Predictions Inventory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Hypomanic Attitudes and Positive Predictions Inventory (HAPPI; W. Mansell, 2006) was developed to assess multiple, extreme, self-relevant appraisals of internal states. The present study aimed to validate the HAPPI in a clinical sample. Participants (N = 50) with a diagnosis of bipolar disorder (confirmed by a structured clinical interview)…

Dodd, Alyson L.; Mansell, Warren; Morrison, Anthony P.; Tai, Sara

2011-01-01

119

Symptoms  

MedlinePLUS

... Wheat Soy Fish Shellfish Other Symptoms Diagnosis & Testing Proven Methods Skin Prick Tests Blood Tests Oral Food ... Wheat Soy Fish Shellfish Other Symptoms Diagnosis & Testing Proven Methods Skin Prick Tests Blood Tests Oral Food ...

120

The Validity and Utility of the M. D. Anderson Symptom Inventory in Patients With Breast Cancer: Evidence From the Symptom Outcomes and Practice Patterns Data From the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group  

PubMed Central

The M. D. Anderson Symptom Inventory assesses the severity and impact of multiple symptoms related to cancer and its treatment. Psychometric analysis of data from a national multicenter study of 1544 patients with breast cancer showed the M. D. Anderson Symptom Inventory to be a valid, reliable, sensitive symptom-assessment instrument that can enhance descriptive and clinical studies of symptom status in this patient population. Background The M. D. Anderson Symptom Inventory (MDASI) is a psychometrically validated patient-reported outcome measurement that assesses the severity and impact of multiple symptoms related to cancer and its treatment. With the MDASI, patients rate 13 common “core” symptoms and 6 items that reflect symptom interference with functioning. Several MDASI modules (core symptom and interference items plus additional symptoms specific to a particular cancer type or treatment modality) have been developed. Although the original MDASI validation study encompassed various cancer types, the instrument's psychometric properties have not been examined in a homogenous sample of patients with breast cancer in a national multicenter study. Materials and Methods We performed a secondary analysis of data from an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group study to establish the reliability, validity, and sensitivity of the MDASI in a large sample of patients with breast cancer (n = 1544), 78% of whom were receiving treatment. The instrument was administered twice, approximately 1 month apart. Results Internal consistency and test-retest reliability were adequate, with Cronbach ? values ? 0.85 and intraclass correlations ? 0.76 for all subscales. Known-group validity was evaluated by using performance status, tumor response, and disease stage. Sensitivity to change in patient-reported quality of life was established. Conclusion The MDASI is a valid, reliable, and sensitive symptom-assessment instrument that can enhance descriptive and clinical studies of symptom status in patients with breast cancer. Future studies might include cognitive debriefing and qualitative interviews to identify additional disease-specific items for inclusion in a MDASI breast cancer module. PMID:23816985

Mendoza, Tito R.; Zhao, Fengmin; Cleeland, Charles S.; Wagner, Lynne I.; Patrick-Miller, Linda J.; Fisch, Michael J.

2013-01-01

121

Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI)-derived psychopathology subtypes among former prisoners of war (POWs): Replication and extension  

Microsoft Academic Search

Psychopathology and symptom patterns identified among former prisoners of war (POWs) by Sutker, Winstead, Goist, Malow, and Allain (1986) were replicated in an independent sample of 51 former POWs with similar personal backgrounds and military experiences. Data collection instruments included the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI), self-report measures of anxiety and depression, and a structured clinical interview including a POW

Patricia B. Sutker; Albert N. Allain; Patrice A. Motsinger

1988-01-01

122

Convergent and Discriminant Validity of Psychopathy Factors Assessed Via Self-Report  

PubMed Central

Psychopathy has been conceptualized as a personality disorder with distinctive interpersonal-affective and behavioral deviance features. The authors examine correlates of the factors of the Psychopathic Personality Inventory (PPI), Self-Report Psychopathy–II (SRP-II) scale, and Antisocial Process Screening Device (APSD) to understand similarities and differences among the constructs embodied in these instruments. PPI Fearless Dominance and SRP-II Factor 1 were negatively related to most personality disorder symptoms and were both predicted by high Dominance and low Neuroticism. In addition, PPI Fearless Dominance correlated positively with antisocial personality features, although SRP-II Factor 1 did not. In contrast, PPI Impulsive Antisociality, SRP-II Factor 2, and both APSD factors correlated with antisocial personality features and symptoms of nearly all personality disorders, and were predicted by low Love. Results suggest ways in which the measurement of the constructs in each instrument may be improved. PMID:16123248

Benning, Stephen D.; Patrick, Christopher J.; Salekin, Randall T.; Leistico, Anne-Marie R.

2008-01-01

123

Depressive Symptoms and Academic Self-Image in Adolescence  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this paper was to specifically analyse the relationship between the different components of academic self-image, defined as the way adolescents represent themselves as students, and self-reported depressive symptoms, assessed with the Children’s Depression Inventory (CDI), in a non-clinical sample of 298 adolescents. We considered both adolescents’ beliefs about their own cognitive functioning in academic performance and beliefs

Gabriele Masi; Francesco Tomaiuolo; Barbara Sbrana; Paola Poli; Graziella Baracchini; Carlo A. Pruneti; Letizia Favilla; Chiara Floriani; Mara Marcheschi

2001-01-01

124

Factorial Invariance of the Brief Symptom Inventory-18 (BSI-18) for Adults of Mexican Descent across Nativity Status, Language Format, and Gender  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The cultural equivalence of psychological outcome measures remains a major area of investigation. The current study sought to test the factor structure and factorial invariance of the Brief Symptom Inventory-18 (BSI-18) with a sample of adult individuals of Mexican descent (N = 923) across nativity status (U.S.- vs. foreign-born), language format…

Torres, Lucas; Miller, Matthew J.; Moore, Kelly M.

2013-01-01

125

Neuropsychiatric Symptoms in Korean Patients with Alzheimer’s Disease: Exploratory Factor Analysis and Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Neuropsychiatric Inventory  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background\\/Aims: We designed this study to examine subsyndromes in Korean patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) using exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). Methods: Initial participants were 778 AD patients recruited from the Clinical Research Center for Dementia of South Korea and assessed via the Korean Neuropsychiatric Inventory. Those with ?1 neuropsychiatric symptom were randomly divided into groups.

Hyo Shin Kang; Inn Sook Ahn; Ji Hae Kim; Doh Kwan Kim

2010-01-01

126

An Evaluation of the Brief Symptom Inventory-18 Using Item Response Theory: Which Items Are Most Strongly Related to Psychological Distress?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The psychometric structure of the Brief Symptom Inventory-18 (BSI-18; Derogatis, 2001) was investigated using Mokken scaling and parametric item response theory. Data of 487 outpatients, 266 students, and 207 prisoners were analyzed. Results of the Mokken analysis indicated that the BSI-18 formed a strong Mokken scale for outpatients and…

Meijer, Rob R.; de Vries, Rivka M.; van Bruggen, Vincent

2011-01-01

127

The causal link between self-reported trauma and dissociation: a critical review  

Microsoft Academic Search

The idea that traumatic experiences cause dissociative symptoms is a recurrent theme in clinical literature. The present article summarizes evidence that cast doubts on the commonly voiced view that the connection between self-reported trauma and dissociation is a simple and robust one. It is argued that: (1) the correlations between self-reported traumatic experiences and dissociative symptoms reported in the literature

Harald Merckelbach; Peter Muris

2001-01-01

128

Cognitive Abilities Relate to Self-Reported Hearing Disability  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: In this explorative study, the authors investigated the relationship between auditory and cognitive abilities and self-reported hearing disability. Method: Thirty-two adults with mild to moderate hearing loss completed the Amsterdam Inventory for Auditory Disability and Handicap (AIADH; Kramer, Kapteyn, Festen, & Tobi, 1996) and…

Zekveld, Adriana A.; George, Erwin L. J.; Houtgast, Tammo; Kramer, Sophia E.

2013-01-01

129

The Relation Between Self-Report Mindfulness and Performance on Tasks of Sustained Attention  

Microsoft Academic Search

Validation of self-report mindfulness measures has been promising, although comparisons with non-self-report instruments are\\u000a lacking. Because past research suggests that mindfulness training is associated with improved attention, this study predicted\\u000a that higher self-report mindfulness would be positively related to performance on tasks of sustained attention. Fifty undergraduates\\u000a completed the Mindful Attention Awareness Scale (MAAS), the Kentucky Inventory of Mindfulness Skills

Stefan K. Schmertz; Page L. Anderson; Diana L. Robins

2009-01-01

130

Depressive Symptoms and Observed Eating in Youth  

PubMed Central

Depressive symptoms in youth may be a risk factor for obesity, with altered eating behaviors as one possible mechanism. We tested whether depressive symptoms were associated with observed eating patterns expected to promote excessive weight gain in two separate samples. In Study 1, 228 non-treatment-seeking youth, ages 12–17y (15.3 ± 1.4y; 54.7% female), self-reported depressive symptoms using the Beck Depression Inventory. Energy intake was measured as consumption from a 10,934-kcal buffet meal served at 11:00am after an overnight fast. In Study 2, 204 non-treatment-seeking youth, ages 8–17y (13.0 ± 2.8; 49.5% female), self-reported depressive symptoms using the Children’s Depression Inventory. Energy intake was measured as consumption from a 9,835-kcal buffet meal served at 2:30pm after a standard breakfast. In Study 1, controlling for body composition and other relevant covariates, depressive symptoms were positively related to total energy intake in girls and boys. In Study 2, adjusting for the same covariates, depressive symptoms among girls only were positively associated with total energy intake. Youth high in depressive symptoms and dietary restraint consumed the most energy from sweets. In both studies, the effects of depressive symptoms on intake were small. Nevertheless, depressive symptoms were associated with significantly greater consumption of total energy and energy from sweet snack foods, which, over time, could be anticipated to promote excess weight gain. PMID:24424352

Mooreville, Mira; Shomaker, Lauren B.; Reina, Samantha A.; Hannallah, Louise M.; Cohen, L. Adelyn; Courville, Amber B.; Kozlosky, Merel; Brady, Sheila M.; Condarco, Tania; Yanovski, Susan Z.; Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian; Yanovski, Jack A.

2014-01-01

131

Concordance of the Mini-Psychiatric Assessment Schedule for Adults Who Have Developmental Disabilities (PASADD) and the Brief Symptom Inventory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: When assessing the mental health needs of people who have intellectual disabilities (ID) it is important to use measures that have good validity and reliability to ensure accurate case recognition and reliable and valid outcome data. Measures developed for this purpose tend to be self-report or by informant report. Multi-trait…

Beail, N.; Mitchell, K.; Vlissides, N.; Jackson, T.

2015-01-01

132

Factor Structure of the Brief Symptom Inventory—18 in Adult Survivors of Childhood Cancer: Results From the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

The factor structure of the Brief Symptom Inventory—18 (BSI–18; L. R. Derogatis, 2000) was investigated in a sample of adult survivors of childhood cancer enrolled in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS; N = 8,945). An exploratory factor analysis with a randomly chosen subsample supported a 3-factor structure closely corresponding to the 3 BSI–18 subscales: Depression, Anxiety, and Somatization. Confirmatory

Christopher J. Recklitis; Susan K. Parsons; Mei-Chiung Shih; Ann Mertens; Leslie L. Robison; Lonnie Zeltzer

2006-01-01

133

Symptom Validity Testing in Claimants with Alleged Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: Comparing the Morel Emotional Numbing Test, the Structured Inventory of Malingered Symptomatology, and the Word Memory Test  

Microsoft Academic Search

In independent medical examinations, unjustified claims of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are to be expected at an increased\\u000a rate. In a prospective study, consecutive cases of patients claiming PTSD who underwent independent neuropsychiatric evaluation\\u000a were analyzed. For 61 adult patients, results of three symptom validity tests (Morel Emotional Numbing Test, Structured Inventory\\u000a of Malingered Symptomatology, and Word Memory Test) were

Thomas Merten; Elisabeth Thies; Katrin Schneider; Andreas Stevens

2009-01-01

134

Using Cluster Analysis to Segment Students Based on Self-Reported Emotionally Intelligent Leadership Behaviors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using emotionally intelligent leadership (EIL) as the model, the authors identify behaviors that three levels of leaders engage in based on a self-report inventory (Emotionally Intelligent Leadership for Students-Inventory). Three clusters of students are identified: those that are "Less-involved, Less Others-oriented," "Self-Improvers," and…

Facca, Tina M.; Allen, Scott J.

2011-01-01

135

Correspondence between self-report and interview-based assessments of antisocial personality disorder.  

PubMed

Antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) is associated with suicide, violence, and risk-taking behavior and can slow response to first-line treatment for Axis I disorders. ASPD may be assessed infrequently because few efficient diagnostic tools are available. This study evaluated 2 promising self-report measures for assessing ASPD--the ASPD scale of the Personality Diagnostic Questionnaire-4 (PDQ-4; S. E. Hyler, 1994) and the Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI; L. Morey, 1991, 2007)--as well as the ASPD module of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis II (SCID-II; M. B. First, R. L. Spitzer, M. Gibbon, J. B. W. Williams, & L. S. Benjamin, 1997). The measures were administered to 1,345 offenders in court-mandated residential substance abuse treatment programs and prisons. PDQ-4 and PAI scores related strongly to SCID-II symptom counts (rs = .67 and .51, respectively), indicating these measures convey useful clinical information about the severity of offenders' ASPD pathology. The dimensional association between the measures was relatively invariant across gender, race, and site, although differences in mean scores were observed. Levels of agreement of the SCID-II with the PDQ-4 (kappa = .31) and PAI (kappa = .32) in classifying participants as ASPD was limited. Alternative thresholds for both self-report measures were identified and cross-validated. PMID:18315398

Guy, Laura S; Poythress, Norman G; Douglas, Kevin S; Skeem, Jennifer L; Edens, John F

2008-03-01

136

Depressive Symptoms and Concussions in Aging Retired NFL Players  

PubMed Central

We examined the relationship between a remote history of concussions with current symptoms of depression in retired professional athletes. Thirty retired National Football League (NFL) athletes with a history of concussion and 29 age- and IQ-matched controls without a history of concussion were recruited. We found a significant correlation between the number of lifetime concussions and depressive symptom severity using the Beck Depression Inventory II. Upon investigating a three-factor model of depressive symptoms (affective, cognitive, and somatic; Buckley et al., 2001) from the BDI-II, the cognitive factor was the only factor that was significantly related to concussions. In general, NFL players endorsed more symptoms of depression on all three Buckley factors compared with matched controls. Findings suggest that the number of self-reported concussions may be related to later depressive symptomology (particularly cognitive symptoms of depression). PMID:23644673

Didehbani, Nyaz; Munro Cullum, C.; Mansinghani, Sethesh; Conover, Heather; Hart, John

2013-01-01

137

Depressive symptoms and concussions in aging retired NFL players.  

PubMed

We examined the relationship between a remote history of concussions with current symptoms of depression in retired professional athletes. Thirty retired National Football League (NFL) athletes with a history of concussion and 29 age- and IQ-matched controls without a history of concussion were recruited. We found a significant correlation between the number of lifetime concussions and depressive symptom severity using the Beck Depression Inventory II. Upon investigating a three-factor model of depressive symptoms (affective, cognitive, and somatic; Buckley et al., 2001) from the BDI-II, the cognitive factor was the only factor that was significantly related to concussions. In general, NFL players endorsed more symptoms of depression on all three Buckley factors compared with matched controls. Findings suggest that the number of self-reported concussions may be related to later depressive symptomology (particularly cognitive symptoms of depression). PMID:23644673

Didehbani, Nyaz; Munro Cullum, C; Mansinghani, Sethesh; Conover, Heather; Hart, John

2013-08-01

138

An evaluation of the Brief Symptom Inventory-18 using item response theory: which items are most strongly related to psychological distress?  

PubMed

The psychometric structure of the Brief Symptom Inventory-18 (BSI-18; Derogatis, 2001) was investigated using Mokken scaling and parametric item response theory. Data of 487 outpatients, 266 students, and 207 prisoners were analyzed. Results of the Mokken analysis indicated that the BSI-18 formed a strong Mokken scale for outpatients and prisoners, indicating strong unidimensionality. For students, only the depression and anxiety items formed a medium Mokken scale. Parametric item response theory analyses showed that the best discriminating items came from the depression and anxiety subscales. PMID:21280957

Meijer, Rob R; de Vries, Rivka M; van Bruggen, Vincent

2011-03-01

139

Prevalence of Self-report Photosensitivity in Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus  

PubMed Central

Background Little is known about the prevalence of self-reported photosensitivity and its effects on quality of life in a U.S. cutaneous lupus population Objective We sought to determine the prevalence of self-reported photosensitivity among a cutaneous lupus population and to examine its impact on quality of life Methods 169 subjects with lupus were interviewed about photosensitivity symptoms and completed the modified Skindex-29+3, a quality of life survey. A complete skin exam was conducted and the Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus Disease Area and Severity Index (CLASI) was completed. Results 68% of subjects reported some symptoms of photosensitivity (PS). The PS group (subjects who reported a history of and current photosensitivity) scored worse on photosensitivity-related items of the modified Skindex-29+3 and had higher cutaneous disease activity as determined by the CLASI. Photosensitive patients had worse symptoms and emotions and experienced significant functional impairments compared to patients with cutaneous lupus but without photosensitivity. Limitations This study was done at a single-referral center Conclusions Self-reported photosensitivity is very common among cutaneous lupus patients and is associated with significant impairments related to symptoms, emotions, and daily functioning. PMID:21742409

Foering, Kristen; Goreshi, Renato; Klein, Rachel; Okawa, Joyce; Rose, Mathew; Cucchiara, Andrew; Werth, Victoria P.

2011-01-01

140

Anxious by Maternal - versus Self-Report: Are They the Same Children?  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Assessing childhood anxiety is complicated by differences between informants, particularly parents and children. We examined factors associated with mother- and child-report, to understand how children identified by each might differ. Method: Eighty-five children with anxiety disorders diagnosed by semi-structured interview, and 45 children without such disorders and their mothers completed a standardized anxiety questionnaire. Predictors of questionnaire scores by mother- and child-report were examined, and a comparison of children high- and low- on self- report was done. Results: Child anxiety self-reports were best predicted by depressive symptoms, maternal psychopathology (self-report), and a support-seeking coping style (adjusted R2 = .299). Maternal reports were best predicted by child functioning (clinician-rated) and maternal psychopathology (self-report) (adjusted R2 = .305). Children high on self-report showed higher depressive symptoms (p = .001) and reported higher use of avoidant (p < .05) and support-seeking (p < .01) coping strategies than low self-reporters. Diagnosis was more significantly linked to maternal- than child-report (chi-square = 49.99, p <.001 for mother; 4.27, p<.05 for child). Conclusion: Depressive symptoms and coping style appear to predict children’s self-reported anxiety, but clinicians may place greater emphasis on maternal report in assigning diagnoses, potentially missing some children with significant anxiety. PMID:19495430

Manassis, Katharina; Tannock, Rosemary; Monga, Suneeta

2009-01-01

141

Weight Bias Internalization, Depression, and Self-Reported Health Among Overweight Binge Eating Disorder Patients  

PubMed Central

Objective This study aimed to examine the relationship between internalization of weight bias, which has been linked to specific negative mental health outcomes, and overall mental and physical health among overweight patients with binge eating disorder (BED). The role of depressive symptoms as a potential mediator in this relationship was also tested. Design and Methods In a cross-sectional study, 255 individuals who were overweight and seeking treatment for BED completed the Weight Bias Internalization Scale (WBIS), Short-Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36), and Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI). Regression analyses were conducted to evaluate the relationship between the WBIS and the SF-36, and bootstrapping mediation analyses were conducted to test whether BDI scores mediated this relationship. Results Higher weight bias internalization was associated with poorer self-reported health on all scales of the SF-36, and BDI scores mediated the relationship. Additional analyses revealed that WBIS scores also mediated the relationship between BDI scores and three SF-36 scales. Conclusions Weight bias internalization is associated with poorer overall mental and physical health, and depressive symptoms may play a role in accounting for this relationship in treatment-seeking overweight patients with BED. PMID:24039219

Pearl, Rebecca L.; White, Marney A.; Grilo, Carlos M.

2013-01-01

142

A comparison of self-reported emotional and trauma-related concerns among sexually abused children with and without sexual behavior problems.  

PubMed

Numerous studies document concomitant features of sexual behavior problems (SBPs) among children 12 years of age or younger, but rarely does research involve child self-report assessments. This study provides the most comprehensive examination to date of self-reported concerns among children with SBP, using a large sample (N = 392) of clinically referred participants who reported sexual abuse histories. Children between the ages of 8 and 12 were categorized as demonstrating SBP (n = 203) or not demonstrating SBP (n = 189) as determined by scores on the Child Sexual Behavior Inventory. Children completed the Trauma Symptom Checklist for Children, and caregivers completed the Child Behavior Checklist. Self-reports of children showed that those with SBP reported significantly greater concerns in all areas, including sexual preoccupation and sexual distress, than their peers not demonstrating SBP. Caregivers of children in the SBP group reported greater concerns of internalizing and externalizing problems than the caregivers of children who did not have SBP. Implications for clinical practice and future research are discussed. Specifically, it is recommended that future research improve on the manner in which sexual abuse and SBPs were defined and assessed. PMID:25601939

Allen, Brian; Thorn, Brian L; Gully, Kevin J

2015-05-01

143

Self-Report Problem Scales and Subscales and Behavioral Ratings Provided by Peers: Unique Evidence of Test Validity  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The relationship between children's self-reported problems on the Personality Inventory for Youth (PIY) and peer descriptors derived from the Pupil Evaluation Inventory was examined in a regular education sample of 156 children in fourth through eighth grade. The relative contributions of the PIY scales and subscales to the prediction of peer…

Wrobel, Nancy Howells; Lachar, David; Wrobel, Thomas A.

2005-01-01

144

Utility of the Mild Brain Injury Atypical Symptoms Scale to detect symptom exaggeration: an analogue simulation study.  

PubMed

Brief self-report symptom checklists are often used to screen for postconcussional disorder (PCD) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and are highly susceptible to symptom exaggeration. This study examined the utility of the five-item Mild Brain Injury Atypical Symptoms Scale (mBIAS) designed for use with the Neurobehavioral Symptom Inventory (NSI) and the PTSD Checklist-Civilian (PCL-C). Participants were 85 Australian undergraduate students who completed a battery of self-report measures under one of three experimental conditions: control (i.e., honest responding, n?=?24), feign PCD (n?=?29), and feign PTSD (n?=?32). Measures were the mBIAS, NSI, PCL-C, Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2, Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF), and the Structured Inventory of Malingered Symptomatology (SIMS). Participants instructed to feign PTSD and PCD had significantly higher scores on the mBIAS, NSI, PCL-C, and MMPI-2-RF than did controls. Few differences were found between the feign PCD and feign PTSD groups, with the exception of scores on the NSI (feign PCD > feign PTSD) and PCL-C (feign PTSD > feign PCD). Optimal cutoff scores on the mBIAS of ?8 and ?6 were found to reflect "probable exaggeration" (sensitivity = .34; specificity = 1.0; positive predictive power, PPP = 1.0; negative predictive power, NPP = .74) and "possible exaggeration" (sensitivity = .72; specificity = .88; PPP = .76; NPP = .85), respectively. Findings provide preliminary support for the use of the mBIAS as a tool to detect symptom exaggeration when administering the NSI and PCL-C. PMID:23419145

Lange, Rael T; Edmed, Shannon L; Sullivan, Karen A; French, Louis M; Cooper, Douglas B

2013-01-01

145

The Preliminary Development of a New Self-Report Measure for OCD in Young People.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study seeks to develop a reliable self-report instrument to assess obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) in young people. The children's Obsessional Compulsive Inventory had good internal consistency, criterion validity and was significantly correlated with the Children's Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale. This preliminary new measure could…

Shafran, Roz; Frampton, Ian; Heyman, Isobel; Reynolds, Martina; Teachman, Bethany; Rachman, S.

2003-01-01

146

Reliability and Validity of Two Self-Report Measures of Psychopathy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present study assessed the psychometric properties and construct validity of two self-report measures of psychopathy in a male-college sample: the Levenson Psychopathy scales (LPS; Levenson, Kiehl, & Fitzpatrick, 1995) and the Psychopathic Personality Inventory (PPI; Lilienfeld & Andrews, 1996). Both the LPS and the PPI demonstrated good…

Falkenbach, Diana; Poythress, Norman; Falki, Marielle; Manchak, Sarah

2007-01-01

147

Reliability and Validity of Two Self-Report Measures of Psychopathy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study assessed the psychometric properties and construct validity of two self-report measures of psychopathy in a male-college sample: the Levenson Psychopathy scales (LPS; Levenson, Kiehl, & Fitzpatrick, 1995) and the Psychopathic Personality Inventory (PPI; Lilienfeld & Andrews, 1996). Both the LPS and the PPI demonstrated good internal consistency, although selected items from the PPI correlated weakly with their

Diana Falkenbach; Norman Poythress; Marielle Falki; Sarah Manchak

2007-01-01

148

Using the PCL-R to Help Estimate the Validity of Two Self-Report Measures of Psychopathy With Offenders  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two self-report measures of psychopathy, Levenson’s Primary and Secondary Psychopathy scales (LPSP) and the Psychopathic Personality Inventory (PPI), were administered to a large sample of 1,603 offenders. The most widely researched measure of criminal psychopathy, the Hare Psychopathy Checklist—Revised (PCL-R), served as a provisional referent for estimating the construct validity of these self-report measures with offenders. Compared with the LPSP,

Norman G. Poythress; Scott O. Lilienfeld; Jennifer L. Skeem; Kevin S. Douglas; John F. Edens; Monica Epstein; Christopher J. Patrick

2010-01-01

149

Readability and Comprehension of Self-Report Binge Eating Measures  

PubMed Central

The validity of self-report binge eating instruments among individuals with limited literacy is uncertain. This study aims to evaluate reading grade level and multiple domains of comprehension of 13 commonly used self-report assessments of binge eating for use in low-literacy populations. We evaluated self-report binge eating measures with respect to reading grade levels, measure length, formatting and linguistic problems. Results: All measures were written at a reading grade level higher than is recommended for patient materials (above the 5th to 6th grade level), and contained several challenging elements related to comprehension. Correlational analyses suggested that readability and comprehension elements were distinct contributors to measure difficulty. Individuals with binge eating who have low levels of educational attainment or limited literacy are often underrepresented in measure validation studies. Validity of measures and accurate assessment of symptoms depends on an individual's ability to read and comprehend instructions and items, and these may be compromised in populations with lower levels of literacy. PMID:23557814

Richards, Lauren K.; McHugh, R. Kathryn; Pratt, Elizabeth M.; Thompson-Brenner, Heather

2013-01-01

150

Psychopathic-like traits in detained adolescents: clinical usefulness of self-report.  

PubMed

Studies have demonstrated that self-report tools can be used to reliably and validly examine psychopathic-like traits in adolescents. However, it is unclear if self-report instruments are still reliable and valid when confidentiality cannot be guaranteed, such as during routine assessments in juvenile detention centres. To address this issue, the current study used data from the routine mental health screening of 365 detained male adolescents (12-18 years) in two juvenile detention centres. With the intention of gaining insight in the clinical usefulness of self-reported psychopathic-like traits, we examined relations known from literature with emotional and behavioural features. Self-reported psychopathic-like traits, measured by the Youth Psychopathic Traits Inventory-Short version (YPI-S), were uniquely associated with substance abuse, anger/irritability, conduct problems and hyperactivity, but not with internalizing problems. YPI-S-dimensions showed several specific relationships with variables of interest. For example, only the callous unemotional dimension was negatively related with prosocial behaviour and only the behavioural dimension was positively related with hyperactivity. In conclusion, self-reported psychopathic-like traits showed expected relations with relevant variables. These findings suggest that self-report can be used to identify detained youths with high levels of psychopathic-like traits outside a research context, thus, even when anonymity and confidentiality are not guaranteed. PMID:24327266

Vahl, Pauline; Colins, Olivier F; Lodewijks, Henny P B; Markus, Monica T; Doreleijers, Theo A H; Vermeiren, Robert R J M

2014-08-01

151

Factor Structure and Psychometric Properties of the Brief Symptom Inventory–18 in Women: A MACS Approach to Testing for Invariance Across Racial/Ethnic Groups  

PubMed Central

This study used data from 3 sites to examine the invariance and psychometric characteristics of the Brief Symptom Inventory–18 across Black, Hispanic, and White mothers of 5th graders (N = 4,711; M = 38.07 years of age, SD = 7.16). Internal consistencies were satisfactory for all subscale scores of the instrument regardless of ethnic group membership. Mean and covariance structures analysis indicated that the hypothesized 3-factor structure of the instrument was not robust across ethnic groups. It provided a reasonable approximation to the data for Black and White women but not for Hispanic women. Tests for differential item functioning (DIF) were therefore conducted for only Black and White women. Analyses revealed no more than trivial instances of nonuniform DIF but more substantial evidence of uniform DIF for 3 of the 18 items. After having established partial strong factorial invariance of the instrument, latent factor means were found to be significantly higher for Black than for White women on all 3 subscales (somatization, depression, anxiety). In conclusion, the instrument may be used for mean comparisons between Black and White women. PMID:21133550

Wiesner, Margit; Chen, Vincent; Windle, Michael; Elliott, Marc N.; Grunbaum, Jo Anne; Kanouse, David E.; Schuster, Mark A.

2014-01-01

152

Anxiety, Depression, & Behavioral Symptoms of Executive Dysfunction in Ecstasy Users: Contributions of Polydrug Use  

PubMed Central

Background Given ecstasy’s (MDMA) potential serotonergic neurotoxicity, it is plausible that regular ecstasy users would have an elevated prevalence of behavioral executive dysfunction or mood symptoms. However, recent studies have found that the relationship between ecstasy use and psychological symptoms was no longer significant after controlling for marijuana use (e.g., Morgan et al., 2002). The goal of the present study was to examine the relationship between ecstasy exposure and self-reported executive functioning and psychological symptoms after controlling for gender, ethnicity, and other drug use. Methods Data were collected from 65 men and women with a wide range of ecstasy use (including 17 marijuana-using controls). Participants were administered the Frontal Systems Behavioral Scale, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory for adults, and the Beck Depression Inventory-2nd Edition. Results Although 19–63% of the ecstasy users demonstrated clinically elevated psychological symptoms, frequency of ecstasy use did not predict the psychological symptoms. No gender differences or interactions were observed. Conclusions These results revealed that, although ecstasy users demonstrate elevated levels of psychological symptoms and executive dysfunction, these symptoms are not statistically associated with their ecstasy consumption. Instead, other drug use (alcohol, marijuana, opioids, and inhalants) significantly predict psychological symptoms in this sample of polydrug users. PMID:17074449

Medina, Krista Lisdahl; Shear, Paula K.

2007-01-01

153

The Child and Adolescent Symptom Inventory-Progress Monitor: a brief Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition-referenced parent-report scale for children and adolescents.  

PubMed

The Child and Adolescent Symptom Inventory-Progress Monitor-Parent Form (CASI-PM-P) is a 29-item rating scale designed to evaluate symptom change for commonly referred child and adolescent disorders. Its intended applications include monitoring longer-term changes in clinical status and assessing intervention responsiveness. To enhance practicality, there is one version of the CASI-PM-P for all age groups with a common set of norms for both genders. Scoring procedures allow clinicians to assess whether observed symptom changes exceeded chance fluctuations. Using a clinical sample of 2,693 children ages 3-17 years, the 29 symptom-related items were identified that had the best item-to-total minus item correlations on the three age-appropriate scales of the Symptom Inventories. Item-to-total minus item correlations of similar magnitude were also obtained for those items with the standardization sample. In clinical samples, the CASI-PM-P scores had both high levels of internal consistency and test-retest reliability and were sensitive to change in a treated sample. Collectively, the findings support the reliability and validity of the CASI-PM-P as a measure of behavioral change in clinical settings, while continued research will be necessary to improve clinical utility and provide better documentation of the scale's strengths and weaknesses. PMID:19519259

Lavigne, John V; Cromley, Taya; Sprafkin, Joyce; Gadow, Kenneth D

2009-06-01

154

High Prevalence of Self-Reported Photophobia in Adult ADHD  

PubMed Central

Many adult outpatients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) report an oversensitivity to light. We explored the link between ADHD and photophobia in an online survey (N?=?494). Self-reported photophobia was prevalent in 69% of respondents with, and in 28% of respondents without, ADHD (symptoms). The ADHD (symptoms) group wore sunglasses longer during daytime in all seasons. Photophobia may be related to the functioning of the eyes, which mediate dopamine and melatonin production systems in the eye. In the brain, dopamine and melatonin are involved in both ADHD and circadian rhythm disturbances. Possibly, the regulation of the dopamine and melatonin systems in the eyes and in the brain are related. Despite the study’s limitations, the results are encouraging for further study on the pathophysiology of ADHD, eye functioning, and circadian rhythm disturbances. PMID:25540636

Kooij, J. J. Sandra; Bijlenga, Denise

2014-01-01

155

Assessing AD/HD in College Students: Psychometric Properties of the Barkley Self-Report Form  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Barkley Current Symptoms Scale (BCSS)--Self-Report Form was designed to assess attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. The purpose of the current study was to add to BCSS psychometric literature in a sample of university students. Comparisons with normative data are provided, and implications for these findings are offered. (Contains 5…

Ladner, Jennifer M.; Schulenberg, Stefan E.; Smith, C. Veronica; Dunaway, Marcella H.

2011-01-01

156

Psychometric Properties of the Dominic Interactive Assessment: A Computerized Self-Report for Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The reliability and validity of the Dominic Interactive (DI) assessment were evaluated. The DI is a computerized self-report measure for children, which assesses symptom presence for seven DSM-IV diagnoses. The participants were 322 children (169 cocaine exposed, 153 noncocaine exposed) who were recruited at birth for a prospective longitudinal…

Scott, Teresa J. Linares; Short, Elizabeth J.; Singer, Lynn T.; Russ, Sandra W.; Minnes, Sonia

2006-01-01

157

Technical Adequacy of the Disruptive Behavior Rating Scale-2nd Edition--Self-Report  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study provides preliminary analysis of the Disruptive Behavior Rating Scale-2nd Edition--Self-Report, which was designed to screen individuals aged 10 years and older for anxiety and behavior symptoms. Score reliability and internal and external facets of validity were good for a screening-level test.

Erford, Bradley T.; Miller, Emily M.; Isbister, Katherine

2015-01-01

158

Does self-reported posttraumatic growth reflect genuine positive change?  

PubMed

In this study, we evaluated the validity of self-reported posttraumatic growth (PTG) by assessing the relation between perceived growth and actual growth from pre- to posttrauma. Undergraduate students completed measures tapping typical PTG domains at Time 1 and Time 2 (2 months later). We compared change in those measures with scores on the Posttraumatic Growth Inventory (PTGI; Tedeschi & Calhoun, 1996) for those participants who reported a traumatic event between Time 1 and Time 2 (n= 122). PTGI scores generally were unrelated to actual growth in PTG-related domains. Moreover, perceived growth was associated with increased distress from pre- to posttrauma, whereas actual growth was related to decreased distress, a pattern suggesting that perceived and actual growth reflect different processes. Finally, perceived (but not actual) growth was related to positive reinterpretation coping. Thus, the PTGI, and perhaps other retrospective measures, does not appear to measure actual pre- to posttrauma change. PMID:19515115

Frazier, Patricia; Tennen, Howard; Gavian, Margaret; Park, Crystal; Tomich, Patricia; Tashiro, Ty

2009-07-01

159

Assessing agreement of self-reported and observed physical exposures of the upper extremity.  

PubMed

Assessment of workplace physical exposures by self-reported questionnaires has logistical advantages in population studies, but is subject to exposure misclassification. This study measured agreement between eight self-reported and observer-rated physical exposures to the hands and wrists, and evaluated predictors of intermethod agreement. Workers (n = 341) from three occupational categories (clerical/technical, construction, and service) completed self-administered questionnaires and worksite assessments. Analyses compared self-reported and observed ratings using a weighted kappa coefficient. Personal and psychosocial factors, presence of upper extremity symptoms, andjob type were evaluated as predictors of agreement. Weighted kappa values were substantial for lifting (0.67) and holding vibrating tools (0.61), moderate for forceful grip (0.58), and fair to poor for all other exposures. Upper extremity symptoms did not predict greater disagreement between self-reported and observed exposures. Occupational category was the only significant predictor of inter-method agreement. Self-reported exposures may provide a useful estimate of some work exposures for population studies. PMID:20166314

Dale, Ann Marie; Strickland, Jaime; Gardner, Bethany; Symanzik, Juergen; Evanoff, Bradley Allen

2010-01-01

160

Tablet-Based Screening of Depressive Symptoms in Quito, Ecuador: Efficiency in Primary Care  

PubMed Central

Depression is a frequent yet overlooked occurrence in primary health care clinics worldwide. Depression and related health screening instruments are available but are rarely used consistently. The availability of technologically based instruments in the assessments offers novel approaches for gathering, storing, and assessing data that includes self-reported symptom severity from the patients themselves as well as clinician recorded information. In a suburban primary health care clinic in Quito, Ecuador, we tested the feasibility and utility of computer tablet-based assessments to evaluate clinic attendees for depression symptoms with the goal of developing effective screening and monitoring tools in the primary care clinics. We assessed individuals using the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire, the Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptoms-Self-Report, the 12-item General Health Questionnaire, the Clinical Global Impression Severity, and a DSM-IV checklist of symptoms. We found that 20% of individuals had a PHQ9 of 8 or greater. There was good correlation between the symptom severity assessments. We conclude that the tablet-based PHQ9 is an excellent and efficient method of screening for depression in attendees at primary health care clinics and that one in five people should be assessed further for depressive illness and possible intervention. PMID:24693425

Grunauer, Michelle; Schrock, David; Jimenez, Gabriela; Miller, Aimee; Lai, Zongshan; Kilbourne, Amy; McInnis, Melvin G.

2014-01-01

161

Korean Self-Report Version of the Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale: Factor Structure, Reliability, and Validity  

PubMed Central

Objective Although several self-report versions of the Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS) have been developed and used widely, few psychometric studies have established the construct validity of this measure. Therefore, we developed Korean self-report version of the Y-BOCS and evaluated its factor structure, reliability, and validity. Methods A non-clinical student sample (n=206) and a clinical OCD sample (n=199) completed the Korean self-report version and other measures of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), depression, and anxiety. Results Consistent with the originally proposed structure, confirmatory factor analyses supported a factor structure comprised of Obsessions and Compulsions factors in the Korean self-report version. Two subscale scores and the total score of the Korean self-report version showed good internal consistency and convergent validity, but relatively poor discriminant validity. Applying a cutoff score of 16, 84% of OCD patients and 93% of the non-clinical sample were classified correctly. Conclusion Korean self-report version of the Y-BOCS is a psychometrically sound and valid measure for assessing OCD symptoms as compared with the clinician-administered version. The originally proposed division of OCD severity into obsessions and compulsions appears accurate in the Korean self-report version. The cutoff score for the Korean self-report version needs adjustment based on further researches. PMID:23482407

Seol, Soon-Ho; Kwon, Jun Soo

2013-01-01

162

The Relationship of Self-Reported Sex-Role Characteristics and Attitudes Toward Homosexuality  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study investigated the relationship between self-reported sex-role characteristics and attitudes toward homosexuality using the Bem Sex Role Inventory, the Personal Attributes Questionnaire and the Attitudes toward Homosexuality Scale. Relationships occur for both males and females who are exhibiting greater amounts of cross-sex traits. Females with more instrumental characteristics were more accepting while males with more expressive characteristics were

Kathryn N. Black; Michael R. Stevenson

1984-01-01

163

Self-Reported Sexual Arousability in Women with Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia  

Microsoft Academic Search

As part of a larger study of psychosexual development and sexual functioning in women with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH), we assessed self-reported sexual arousability with the Sexual Arousability Inventory-Short Form (SAI-SF; Hoon & Chambless, 1998). Compared to their unaffected sisters\\/female cousins (n = 15), women with CAH (n = 30) reported significantly lower sexual arousability on the SAI, with an

KENNETH J. ZUCKER; SUSAN J. BRADLEY; GILLIAN OLIVER; JENNIFER BLAKE; SUSAN FLEMING; JANE HOOD

2004-01-01

164

The preliminary development of a new self-report measure for OCD in young people.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to develop a reliable self-report instrument to assess obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) in young people. The children's Obsessional Compulsive Inventory (CHOCI) had good internal consistency, criterion validity and was significantly correlated with the Children's Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (CY-BOCS). This preliminary new measure could serve to provide a more efficient and accessible way of assessing OCD in young people. PMID:12550826

Shafran, Roz; Frampton, Ian; Heyman, Isobel; Reynolds, Martina; Teachman, Bethany; Rachman, S

2003-02-01

165

Assessing conflict communication in couples: comparing the validity of self-report, partner-report, and observer ratings.  

PubMed

This study of married couples investigated the short-term predictive validity of the partner-report and self-report scales of the Conflict Communication Inventory and compared the validity of these scales with the validity of observer ratings. A sample of 83 married couples completed two problem-solving conversations. Self-report, partner-report, and observer ratings from Conversation 1 were used to predict behavior in Conversation 2, as rated by a separate panel of observers. The short-term predictive validity of partner-report ratings was extremely high and indistinguishable from the validity of observer ratings. Self-report ratings also demonstrated good validity, albeit slightly lower than other methods. Both partner-report and self-report scores explained a substantial amount of variance in concurrent observer ratings of communication after controlling for relationship satisfaction. PMID:20438192

Sanford, Keith

2010-04-01

166

Social desirability and self-reported health risk behaviors in web-based research: three longitudinal studies  

PubMed Central

Background These studies sought to investigate the relation between social desirability and self-reported health risk behaviors (e.g., alcohol use, drug use, smoking) in web-based research. Methods Three longitudinal studies (Study 1: N = 5612, 51% women; Study 2: N = 619, 60%; Study 3: N = 846, 59%) among randomly selected members of two online panels (Dutch; German) using several social desirability measures (Marlowe-Crowne Scale; Balanced Inventory of Desirable Responding; The Social Desirability Scale-17) were conducted. Results Social desirability was not associated with self-reported current behavior or behavior frequency. Socio-demographics (age; sex; education) did not moderate the effect of social desirability on self-reported measures regarding health risk behaviors. Conclusions The studies at hand provided no convincing evidence to throw doubt on the usefulness of the Internet as a medium to collect self-reports on health risk behaviors. PMID:21092267

2010-01-01

167

Should Unexplained Painful Physical Symptoms be Considered within the Spectrum of Depressive Symptoms?  

PubMed Central

Objective: To examine whether painful physical symptoms (PPS) can be considered within the spectrum of depressive symptoms. Methods: Data for this post-hoc analysis were taken from a 6-month observational study mostly conducted in East Asia, Mexico, and the Middle East of 1,549 depressed patients without sexual dysfunction at baseline. Both explanatory and confirmatory factor analyses (EFA and CFA) were performed on the combined items of the 16-item Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology Self-Report and the Somatic Symptom Inventory (seven pain-related items only). An additional second-order CFA was also conducted to examine an association between retained factors and the overall “depressive symptoms” factor. In addition, Spearman’s correlation was used to assess levels of correlation between retained factors and depression severity as well as quality of life. Results: Both EFA and CFA suggested and validated a four-factor solution, which included a pain factor. The other three factors identified were a mood/cognitive factor, a sleep disturbance factor, and an appetite/weight disturbance factor. All four factors were significantly associated with the overall factor of depression. They were also highly correlated to depression severity and quality of life (p<0.001 for all). The levels of correlations with the pain factor were generally greater than those with the appetite/weight factor and similar to those with the sleep factor. Conclusion: It may be reasonable to consider PPS within a broad spectrum of depressive symptoms. At least, they should be routinely assessed in patients with depression. Further research is warranted to validate these preliminary findings.

Hong, Jihyung; Novick, Diego; Montgomery, William; Aguado, Jaume; Dueñas, Héctor; Peng, Xiaomei; Haro, Josep Maria

2015-01-01

168

Structure and validity of people in my life: A self-report measure of attachment in late childhood  

Microsoft Academic Search

No self-report measure of attachment is well validated for middle-childhood. This study examined the validity and factor structure of the People in My Life (PIML) measure in 320 urban, fifth and sixth graders. Validity analyses consisted of correlational analyses between PIML subscales and the Child Behavior Checklist, Delinquency Rating Scale for Self and Others, Heath Resources Inventory, and Reynolds Child

Ty A. Ridenour; Mark T. Greenberg; Elizabeth T. Cook

2006-01-01

169

Convergent and Discriminant Validity of Psychopathy Factors Assessed via Self-Report: A Comparison of Three Instruments  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Psychopathy has been conceptualized as a personality disorder with distinctive interpersonal-affective and behavioral deviance features. The authors examine correlates of the factors of the Psychopathic Personality Inventory (PPI), Self-Report Psychopathy-II (SRP-II) scale, and Antisocial Process Screening Device (APSD) to understand similarities…

Benning, Stephen D.; Patrick, Christopher J.; Salekin, Randall T.; Leistico, Anne-Marie R.

2005-01-01

170

Using the PCL-R to Help Estimate the Validity of Two Self-Report Measures of Psychopathy with Offenders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Two self-report measures of psychopathy, Levenson's Primary and Secondary Psychopathy scales (LPSP) and the Psychopathic Personality Inventory (PPI), were administered to a large sample of 1,603 offenders. The most widely researched measure of criminal psychopathy, the Hare Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL-R), served as a provisional referent…

Poythress, Norman G.; Lilienfeld, Scott O.; Skeem, Jennifer L.; Douglas, Kevin S.; Edens, John F.; Epstein, Monica; Patrick, Christopher J.

2010-01-01

171

Prevalence of self reported musculoskeletal diseases is high  

PubMed Central

Objectives: To present the prevalence of self reported musculoskeletal diseases, the coexistence of these diseases, the test-retest reliability with six months in between, and the association with musculoskeletal pain symptoms. Methods: Twelve layman descriptions of common musculoskeletal diseases were part of the questionnaires of a prospective cohort study of a random sample in the general Dutch population aged 25 years or more (baseline: n=3664, follow up after six months: n=2338). Data collection also included information about pain relating to five different anatomical areas. Results: Osteoarthritis of the knee (men 10.1%, women 13.6%) was amongst the most reported musculoskeletal diseases, whereas the figures for self reported rheumatoid arthritis (RA) were 1.6% and 4.6% for men and women, respectively. The coexistence of these diseases is high: 47 of the 66 combinations were reported more often than would be expected if they were independent of each other (p<0.05). For most diseases the test-retest reliability was good (? between 0.6 and 0.8), but for repetitive strain injury (?=0.37) and chronic arthritis other than RA (?=0.44) the agreement was fair to moderate. All complaints of pain were more often reported by those with musculoskeletal diseases than those without those diseases, and the pain pattern was disease-specific. Conclusions: Self reported musculoskeletal diseases are highly prevalent, with a fair to good reliability and a disease-specific pain pattern. Health surveys are a limited but valuable source of information for this group of health problems, which is not available from most other sources of information. PMID:12810427

Picavet, H; Hazes, J

2003-01-01

172

Drug use, self report and urinalysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Stimulated by the ever present demand to consider the financial implications in management decisions, this study examines the use of urinalysis and self-report in the treatment of drug users, to question if urinalysis, rather than being a routine investigation, could be used with greater discrimination without jeopardising its effectiveness. It concludes that urinalysis remains of importance, as an adjunct to

Bridget Kilpatrick; Mary Howlett; Philip Sedgwick; A. Hamid Ghodse

2000-01-01

173

Predictors of self?reported prison misconduct  

Microsoft Academic Search

Which incoming prisoner characteristics assist in identifying those likely to commit disciplinary infractions? The authors answer this question using data on six categories of self?reported rule infractions from the 1997 Survey of Inmate in State and Federal Correctional Facilities. Logistic regression analyses run on these data showed that gender?male, evidence of mental problems, prior drug use, previous adult and juvenile

Attapol Kuanliang; Jon Sorensen

2008-01-01

174

How should residual symptoms be defined in depressed patients who have remitted?  

PubMed

Symptomatic remission has been defined as a complete or near-complete absence of symptoms. Just as the distinction between remitters and nonremitters among treatment responders has clinical significance, the distinction between a complete and near-complete absence of symptoms itself might be important. Recent studies have reported a high frequency of residual symptoms in patients who are presumably in remission, and this raises questions about how residual symptoms are defined. In the present report from the Rhode Island Methods to Improve Diagnostic Assessment and Services project, we compared the prevalence of residual symptoms based on different cutoff scores on 2 self-report measures of depression and then determined the association between residual symptoms and indices of psychosocial morbidity. We administered the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression to 274 psychiatric outpatients diagnosed as having DSM-IV major depressive disorder who were in ongoing treatment. The patients completed the Clinically Useful Depression Outcome Scale (CUDOS) and Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (QIDS) and measures of psychosocial functioning and quality of life. We examined the frequency of residual symptoms in the 142 patients scoring in the remission range on the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression. For both the CUDOS and QIDS, the threshold to define symptom presence strongly impacted on the prevalence of residual symptoms. The association between residual symptoms, psychosocial functioning, and quality of life varied according to the threshold used to define the symptoms. On the QIDS, a cutoff of 1 was a more valid indicator of the presence of residual symptoms than a cutoff of 2, whereas on the CUDOS, we recommend a cutoff of 2 be used to indicate the presence of residual symptoms. Examination of the frequency of specific symptoms suggests that the choice of scale might impact on which residual symptoms are considered the most frequent in treatment remitters. PMID:22901599

Zimmerman, Mark; Martinez, Jennifer; Attiullah, Naureen; Friedman, Michael; Toba, Cristina; Boerescu, Daniela A

2013-02-01

175

Risk perception bias, self-reporting of illness, and the validity of reported results in an epidemiologic study of recreational water associated illnesses  

Microsoft Academic Search

Epidemiologic studies of water associated illness often have to rely on self-reported symptoms of the outcome illness(es) under study. Individual participant’s perception of risk, in theory, can affect the validity of self-reported symptoms. The magnitude and effect of possible “risk perception bias” was evaluated as part of a series of randomized trials designed to assess infectious disease transmission via exposure

Jay M. Fleisher; David Kay

2006-01-01

176

Types or modes of malingering? A confirmatory factor analysis of performance and symptom validity tests.  

PubMed

Recently, the dichotomy between performance validity tests (PVT) and symptom validity tests (SVT) has been suggested to differentiate between invalid performance and invalid self-report, respectively. PVTs are typically used to identify malingered cognitive impairment, while SVTs identify malingered psychological or somatic symptoms. It is assumed that people can malinger different types of problems, but the impact of modes of reporting invalidly has been largely unexplored. A mixed neurological sample (n = 130) was tested with the Test of Memory Malingering, the Forced Recognition part of the California Verbal Learning Test, and the self-report Structured Inventory of Malingered Symptoms (SIMS). Confirmatory factor analyses testing both method- and content-based factor models found best fit for the method-based division. Regression analyses of other self-rating and performance-based tests provided further support for the importance of type of methods used to collect information. While acknowledging the types of symptoms malingered, the clinician is advised also to consider how information is gathered by using both PVTs and SVTs. SIMS is a good candidate for a stand-alone SVT, although the utility of the Low Intelligence subscale is questionable as a validity measure. PMID:25275555

Egeland, Jens; Andersson, Stein; Sundseth, Øyvind Østberg; Schanke, Anne-Kristine

2015-01-01

177

Reliability and validity of two self-report measures of cognitive flexibility.  

PubMed

Neuropsychological testing currently represents the gold standard in assessing cognitive flexibility. However, this format presents some challenges in terms of time and skills required for administration, scoring, and interpretation. Two self-report measures of cognitive flexibility have been developed to measure aspects of cognitive flexibility in everyday settings, although neither has been validated in an older sample. In this study, we investigated the psychometric properties of 2 self-report measures of cognitive flexibility, the Cognitive Flexibility Inventory (CFI; Dennis & Vander Wal, 2010) and the Cognitive Flexibility Scale (CFS; Martin & Rubin, 1995), against neuropsychological measures of cognitive flexibility in a clinical sample of 47 older adults with comorbid anxiety and depression and a nonclinical sample of 53 community-dwelling older adults. Internal consistency was good for the CFS and CFI in all samples. The clinical sample reported poorer cognitive flexibility than did the nonclinical sample on self-report measures and performed more poorly on some neuropsychological measures. There was evidence of convergent validity between the 2 self-report measures but little relationship between the self-report and neuropsychological measures of cognitive flexibility, suggesting that self-report measures assess a different aspect of cognitive flexibility than does neuropsychological testing. Divergent validity was weak from measures of anxiety and depression in the combined and nonclinical samples but acceptable in the clinical sample. Results suggest that these measures are suitable for use with an older adult sample but do not assess the same aspects of cognitive flexibility as are assessed by neuropsychological assessment. PMID:25265414

Johnco, Carly; Wuthrich, Viviana M; Rapee, Ronald M

2014-12-01

178

Alcohol Misuse among College Athletes: Self-Medication for Psychiatric Symptoms?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Surveys a collegiate athlete population for alcohol abuse as well as self-reported depression, anxiety, and other psychiatric symptoms. Significant correlations were found between reported alcohol abuse and self-reported symptoms of depression and general psychiatric symptoms. Findings suggest a possible link between psychopathology and serious…

Miller, B. E.; Miller, M. N.; Verhegge, R.; Linville, H. H.; Pumariega, A. J.

2002-01-01

179

Family relations, stressful events and internalizing symptoms in adolescence: a longitudinal study.  

PubMed

This study aimed to examine how emotional and behavioral problems of parents and children and the characteristics of family relationships can be predictors of internalizing symptoms manifested by children after one year. This was a quantitative research study, of the longitudinal type, with a one year interval between the first and second evaluation. Participants were 139 adolescents, and their parents, with ages ranged from 11 to 16 years (M age = 12.90, SD = 1.07). The instruments used were: a Socio-Demographic Data Sheet, Youth Self-Report of 11 to 18 years old (YSR), Adult Self-Report of 18 to 59 years old (ASR), Familiogram (FG), the Family Climate Inventory (FCI) and Inventory of Stressful Events in Adolescence (ISEA). Results indicated that family relationships did not have a significant explanatory power in relation to internalizing symptoms of the adolescent after a year. Based on this study, it is possible to think that during adolescence, the power of the family to influence becomes more restricted in comparison with social and peer influence. PMID:24230920

Hess, Adriana Raquel Binsfeld; Teodoro, Maycoln Leoni Martins; Falcke, Denise

2013-01-01

180

Residual symptoms in depressed outpatients who respond by 50% but do not remit to antidepressant medication.  

PubMed

Little is known about the quantity or quality of residual depressive symptoms in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) who have responded but not remitted with antidepressant treatment. This report describes the residual symptom domains and individual depressive symptoms in a large representative sample of outpatients with nonpsychotic MDD who responded without remitting after up to 12 weeks of citalopram treatment in the Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression (STAR*D) study. Response was defined as 50% or greater reduction in baseline 16-item Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology--Self-Report (QIDS-SR??) by treatment exit, and remission as a final QIDS-SR?? of less than 6. Residual symptom domains and individual symptoms were based on the QIDS-SR?? and classified as either persisting from baseline or emerging during treatment. Most responders who did not remit endorsed approximately 5 residual symptom domains and 6 to 7 residual depressive symptoms. The most common domains were insomnia (94.6%), sad mood (70.8%), and decreased concentration (69.6%). The most common individual symptoms were midnocturnal insomnia (79.0%), sad mood (70.8%), and decreased concentration/decision making (69.6%). The most common treatment-emergent symptoms were midnocturnal insomnia (51.4%) and decreased general interest (40.0%). The most common persistent symptoms were midnocturnal insomnia (81.6%), sad mood (70.8%), and decreased concentration/decision making (70.6%). Suicidal ideation was the least common treatment-emergent symptom (0.7%) and the least common persistent residual symptom (17.1%). These findings suggest that depressed outpatients who respond by 50% without remitting to citalopram treatment have a broad range of residual symptoms. Individualized treatments are warranted to specifically address each patient's residual depressive symptoms. PMID:21346613

McClintock, Shawn M; Husain, Mustafa M; Wisniewski, Stephen R; Nierenberg, Andrew A; Stewart, Jonathan W; Trivedi, Madhukar H; Cook, Ian; Morris, David; Warden, Diane; Rush, Augustus John

2011-04-01

181

The relationship between insomnia and depressive symptoms: genuine or artifact?  

PubMed Central

Background: Somatic symptom overlap between depression and insomnia has emerged as a major concern. Self-report measures such as the Beck Depression Inventory Second Edition (BDI-II) include somatic symptoms related to depression that are also present in the research diagnostic criteria for insomnia. This study aimed firstly to examine the relationship between the cognitive and somatic factors of the BDI-II and global scores on the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) in individuals presenting for insomnia treatment and secondly to examine whether treating insomnia in depressed individuals with insomnia will lead to a reduction in their depressive symptoms and whether this reduction is related to a decrease in the somatic or cognitive factors of depressive symptoms. Methods: A total of 379 individuals (133 males and 246 females), with a mean (M) age of 49.95 (standard deviation [SD] = 14.15) years, were used to address the first aim. To address the second aim, a total of 64 participants (27 males and 37 females) with both insomnia and depressive symptoms were treated for their insomnia. Their ages ranged between 22 and 87 (M = 50.97, SD = 15.13) years. Results: A significant relationship was found between both the cognitive and somatic factors of the BDI-II and global scores on the PSQI. Furthermore, although results in this study are only suggestive, they lend support to the idea that the relationship between insomnia and depression is not due to somatic symptom overlap. Results may also support the hypothesis that insomnia is primary to the presentation of depressive symptoms. Conclusion: Clinicians and health care providers could initially treat insomnia in individuals suffering from insomnia who also experience depressive symptoms, as this will not only remit insomnia but also abate the accompanying depressive symptoms. PMID:21430795

Isaac, Fadia; Greenwood, Kenneth Mark

2011-01-01

182

Interformat Reliability of Digital Psychiatric Self-Report Questionnaires: A Systematic Review  

PubMed Central

Background Research on Internet-based interventions typically use digital versions of pen and paper self-report symptom scales. However, adaptation into the digital format could affect the psychometric properties of established self-report scales. Several studies have investigated differences between digital and pen and paper versions of instruments, but no systematic review of the results has yet been done. Objective This review aims to assess the interformat reliability of self-report symptom scales used in digital or online psychotherapy research. Methods Three databases (MEDLINE, Embase, and PsycINFO) were systematically reviewed for studies investigating the reliability between digital and pen and paper versions of psychiatric symptom scales. Results From a total of 1504 publications, 33 were included in the review, and interformat reliability of 40 different symptom scales was assessed. Significant differences in mean total scores between formats were found in 10 of 62 analyses. These differences were found in just a few studies, which indicates that the results were due to study effects and sample effects rather than unreliable instruments. The interformat reliability ranged from r=.35 to r=.99; however, the majority of instruments showed a strong correlation between format scores. The quality of the included studies varied, and several studies had insufficient power to detect small differences between formats. Conclusions When digital versions of self-report symptom scales are compared to pen and paper versions, most scales show high interformat reliability. This supports the reliability of results obtained in psychotherapy research on the Internet and the comparability of the results to traditional psychotherapy research. There are, however, some instruments that consistently show low interformat reliability, suggesting that these conclusions cannot be generalized to all questionnaires. Most studies had at least some methodological issues with insufficient statistical power being the most common issue. Future studies should preferably provide information about the transformation of the instrument into digital format and the procedure for data collection in more detail. PMID:25472463

Hursti, Timo

2014-01-01

183

Odometer Versus Self-Reported Estimates of Vehicle Miles Traveled  

EIA Publications

The findings described here compare odometer readings with self-reported estimates of Vehicle Miles Traveled (VMT) to investigate to what extent self-reported VMT is a reliable surrogate for odometer-based VMT.

2000-01-01

184

Self-Reported Psychopathic Traits in Children: Their Stability and Concurrent and Prospective Association with Conduct Problems and Aggression  

Microsoft Academic Search

The current study investigated the 18-month stability of self-reported psychopathic traits measured through the Youth Psychopathic\\u000a traits Inventory–Child Version (YPI-CV) and their concurrent and prospective associations with conduct problems and aggression\\u000a in a sample of 9–12 year olds (n?=?159, 52% boys) from the community. Self-reported psychopathy scores were moderately to highly stable and traits were positively\\u000a related to conduct problems both

Yoast van Baardewijk; Robert Vermeiren; Hedy Stegge; Theo Doreleijers

2011-01-01

185

Retirement Resources Inventory: Construction, Factor Structure and Psychometric Properties  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The scientific investigation of the relationship between resources and retirement well-being is impeded by the lack of proper measurement of resources. This study reports on the development of an inventory that assesses resources relevant to retirement well-being. The 35-item Retirement Resources Inventory (RRI) is a self-report measure consisting…

Leung, Cindy S. Y.; Earl, Joanne K.

2012-01-01

186

Eating disorder symptoms in runners, cyclists, and paddlers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To differentiate groups of highly conditioned, competitive athletes on the basis of Exercise Orientation Questionnaire (EOQ) scores and self-reported psychiatric symptoms. Method: A total of 99 runners, 36 cyclists, and 55 paddlers were administered the EOQ and a symptom checklist. Results: Analysis of variance and chi-square associated self-loathing subscale (SLSS) scores with self-reported eating disorder (ED) symptoms for the

Alayne Yates; Jeanne D Edman; Marjorie Crago; Douglas Crowell

2003-01-01

187

The Validation of a Self-Report Measure of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: The Posttraumatic Diagnostic Scale  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present article reports on the development and validation of a self-report measure of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), the Posttraumatic Diagnostic Scale (PTDS), that yields both a PTSD diagnosis according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed.; American Psychiatric Association, 1994; DSM–IV) criteria and a measure of PTSD symptom severity. Two-hundred forty-eight participants who had experienced a

Edna B. Foa; Laurie Cashman; Lisa Jaycox; Kevin Perry

1997-01-01

188

Subclinical depressive symptoms during pregnancy and birth outcome--a pilot study in a healthy German sample.  

PubMed

There is a high prevalence of depression in Germany and all over the world. Maternal depressive symptoms during pregnancy have been shown in some studies to be associated with an increased risk of preterm birth and low birth weight. The influence of maternal depressive symptoms during pregnancy on preterm delivery and fetal birth weight was investigated in a prospective single-centre study. A sample of 273 healthy pregnant women was assessed for symptoms of antepartum depression. Symptoms were measured using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) and the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ). Symptoms of anxiety were assessed using the State/Trait Anxiety Inventory. Patients who scored above the cutoff were contacted by phone for a Structured Clinical Diagnostic interview. Neonatal measurements were obtained from the birth registry of the Department of Obstetrics. Baseline data were assessed with a self-styled data sheet. Prevalence of elevated depressive symptoms was 13.2% when measured with the EPDS and 8.4% with the PHQ. According to DSM-IV criteria, only four (EPDS) respective two (PHQ-D) of these patients could be diagnosed with a depressive disorder and ten (EPDS) respective seven (PHQ) with an anxiety disorder. There was no significant influence on preterm birth or birth weight. Maternal depressive symptoms are self-reported. Elevated subclinical symptoms of depression and anxiety during pregnancy are common. However, this study showed no evidence that these symptoms are associated with adverse pregnancy outcome. PMID:23263748

Gawlik, S; Waldeier, L; Müller, M; Szabo, A; Sohn, C; Reck, C

2013-04-01

189

Development of the Academic Stereotype Threat Inventory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors describe the development and preliminary validation of the Academic Stereotype Threat Inventory, a self-report measurement of math-related stereotype threat among women. A preliminary version of the instrument was administered to 308 undergraduate women. Principal component analysis yielded a 3-factor solution. Convergent and…

Pseekos, A. Chantelle; Dahlen, Eric R.; Levy, Jacob J.

2008-01-01

190

Underreporting of bestiality among juvenile sex offenders: polygraph versus self-report.  

PubMed

Juvenile sex offenders (JSO) are a specific subset of delinquent adolescents that are receiving more attention because of the crimes they commit and the issues surrounding how to successfully treat their deviant behaviors. Given JSO are such predominant treatment concerns in society, it is essential to identify and target key risk factors. One sexual behavior, bestiality, may be of particular importance to address in treatment. In a meta-analysis conducted by Seto and Lalumiere, a 14% rate of bestiality among JSO was reported. This current study examined the differences in JSO (n = 32) who admitted bestiality based upon a self-report measure, the Multiphasic Sexual Inventory-II (MSI-II), compared to information elicited by polygraphs. The results indicated extensive underreporting of bestiality behaviors between these two sources of information (MSI-II = 37.5%; polygraph = 81.25%). These findings are important given the reliance treatment programs place on information elicited from self-report tools. PMID:24502368

Schenk, Allison M; Cooper-Lehki, Christi; Keelan, Colleen M; Fremouw, William J

2014-03-01

191

The Relationship between Parental Depressive Symptoms, Family Type, and Adolescent Functioning  

PubMed Central

It is evident that parental depressive symptoms negatively influence adolescent behavior and various psychosocial outcomes. Certain family types like families with a chronically ill parent and single parent families are more vulnerable to parental depressive symptoms. However, the relationship between these symptoms, family type, and adolescent functioning remains largely unclear. This study examined relations between self-report of parental depressive symptoms and adolescent functioning in 86 two-parent families including a parent with a chronic medical condition, 94 families with healthy single parents, and 69 families with 2 healthy parents (comparison group). Parents completed the Beck Depression Inventory. Adolescents filled in the Youth Self-Report measuring problem behavior, and other instruments measuring psychosocial outcomes (stress, grade point average, school problems, and self-esteem). Multilevel analyses were used to examine the effects of family type, parental depressive symptoms, adolescents' gender and age, and interaction effects on adolescent functioning. The results indicated that adolescents with chronically ill and single parents had a lower grade point average (p<.01) than the comparison group. Adolescents of single parents reported more internalizing problems (p<.01) and externalizing problems (p<.05) than children from the other family types. Parental depressive symptoms were strongly related to child report of stress (p<.001). Adolescents of depressed chronically ill parents were particularly vulnerable to internalizing problems (interaction effect, p<.05). Older children and girls, and especially older girls, displayed more internalizing problems and stress. It can be concluded that growing up with a chronically ill parent in a family with 2 parents may have less impact on adolescent problem behavior than growing up in a single parent family. Health practitioners are encouraged to be attentive to the unique and combined influence of family type and parental depressive symptoms on adolescent functioning. Older and female adolescents deserve particular attention. PMID:24260457

Sieh, Dominik Sebstian; Visser-Meily, Johanna Maria Augusta; Meijer, Anne Marie

2013-01-01

192

Self-reported post-exertional fatigue in Gulf War veterans: roles of autonomic testing  

PubMed Central

To determine if objective evidence of autonomic dysfunction exists from a group of Gulf War veterans with self-reported post-exertional fatigue, we evaluated 16 Gulf War ill veterans and 12 Gulf War controls. Participants of the ill group had self- reported, unexplained chronic post-exertional fatigue and the illness symptoms had persisted for years until the current clinical study. The controls had no self-reported post-exertional fatigue either at the time of initial survey nor at the time of the current study. We intended to identify clinical autonomic disorders using autonomic and neurophysiologic testing in the clinical context. We compared the autonomic measures between the 2 groups on cardiovascular function at both baseline and head-up tilt, and sudomotor function. We identified 1 participant with orthostatic hypotension, 1 posture orthostatic tachycardia syndrome, 2 distal small fiber neuropathy, and 1 length dependent distal neuropathy affecting both large and small fiber in the ill group; whereas none of above definable diagnoses was noted in the controls. The ill group had a significantly higher baseline heart rate compared to controls. Compound autonomic scoring scale showed a significant higher score (95% CI of mean: 1.72–2.67) among ill group compared to controls (0.58–1.59). We conclude that objective autonomic testing is necessary for the evaluation of self-reported, unexplained post-exertional fatigue among some Gulf War veterans with multi-symptom illnesses. Our observation that ill veterans with self-reported post-exertional fatigue had objective autonomic measures that were worse than controls warrants validation in a larger clinical series. PMID:24431987

Li, Mian; Xu, Changqing; Yao, Wenguo; Mahan, Clare M.; Kang, Han K.; Sandbrink, Friedhelm; Zhai, Ping; Karasik, Pamela A.

2014-01-01

193

Validating a Self-Report Screen for ADHD in Early Adulthood Using Childhood Parent and Teacher Ratings  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: This article evaluates the diagnostic utility of a self-report screening tool for adults based on "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (4th ed.; "DSM-IV") ADHD criteria. Method: Children with speech/language (S/L) impairment and typically developing controls had ADHD symptoms rated by parents and teachers at ages 5…

Brownlie, E. B.; Lazare, Kim; Beitchman, Joseph

2012-01-01

194

The CES-D ScaleA Self-Report Depression Scale for Research in the General Population  

Microsoft Academic Search

The CES-D scale is a short self-report scale designed to measure depressive symptomatology in the general population. The items of the scale are symptoms associated with depression which have been used in previously validated longer scales. The new scale was tested in household interview surveys and in psychiatric settings. It was found to have very high internal consistency and adequate

Lenore Sawyer Radloff

1977-01-01

195

Measuring mental health and wellbeing outcomes for children and adolescents to inform practice and policy: a review of child self-report measures  

PubMed Central

There is a growing appetite for mental health and wellbeing outcome measures that can inform clinical practice at individual and service levels, including use for local and national benchmarking. Despite a varied literature on child mental health and wellbeing outcome measures that focus on psychometric properties alone, no reviews exist that appraise the availability of psychometric evidence and suitability for use in routine practice in child and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS) including key implementation issues. This paper aimed to present the findings of the first review that evaluates existing broadband measures of mental health and wellbeing outcomes in terms of these criteria. The following steps were implemented in order to select measures suitable for use in routine practice: literature database searches, consultation with stakeholders, application of inclusion and exclusion criteria, secondary searches and filtering. Subsequently, detailed reviews of the retained measures’ psychometric properties and implementation features were carried out. 11 measures were identified as having potential for use in routine practice and meeting most of the key criteria: 1) Achenbach System of Empirically Based Assessment, 2) Beck Youth Inventories, 3) Behavior Assessment System for Children, 4) Behavioral and Emotional Rating Scale, 5) Child Health Questionnaire, 6) Child Symptom Inventories, 7) Health of the National Outcome Scale for Children and Adolescents, 8) Kidscreen, 9) Pediatric Symptom Checklist, 10) Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire, 11) Youth Outcome Questionnaire. However, all existing measures identified had limitations as well as strengths. Furthermore, none had sufficient psychometric evidence available to demonstrate that they could reliably measure both severity and change over time in key groups. The review suggests a way of rigorously evaluating the growing number of broadband self-report mental health outcome measures against standards of feasibility and psychometric credibility in relation to use for practice and policy. PMID:24834111

2014-01-01

196

Measuring mental health and wellbeing outcomes for children and adolescents to inform practice and policy: a review of child self-report measures.  

PubMed

There is a growing appetite for mental health and wellbeing outcome measures that can inform clinical practice at individual and service levels, including use for local and national benchmarking. Despite a varied literature on child mental health and wellbeing outcome measures that focus on psychometric properties alone, no reviews exist that appraise the availability of psychometric evidence and suitability for use in routine practice in child and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS) including key implementation issues. This paper aimed to present the findings of the first review that evaluates existing broadband measures of mental health and wellbeing outcomes in terms of these criteria. The following steps were implemented in order to select measures suitable for use in routine practice: literature database searches, consultation with stakeholders, application of inclusion and exclusion criteria, secondary searches and filtering. Subsequently, detailed reviews of the retained measures' psychometric properties and implementation features were carried out. 11 measures were identified as having potential for use in routine practice and meeting most of the key criteria: 1) Achenbach System of Empirically Based Assessment, 2) Beck Youth Inventories, 3) Behavior Assessment System for Children, 4) Behavioral and Emotional Rating Scale, 5) Child Health Questionnaire, 6) Child Symptom Inventories, 7) Health of the National Outcome Scale for Children and Adolescents, 8) Kidscreen, 9) Pediatric Symptom Checklist, 10) Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire, 11) Youth Outcome Questionnaire. However, all existing measures identified had limitations as well as strengths. Furthermore, none had sufficient psychometric evidence available to demonstrate that they could reliably measure both severity and change over time in key groups. The review suggests a way of rigorously evaluating the growing number of broadband self-report mental health outcome measures against standards of feasibility and psychometric credibility in relation to use for practice and policy. PMID:24834111

Deighton, Jessica; Croudace, Tim; Fonagy, Peter; Brown, Jeb; Patalay, Praveetha; Wolpert, Miranda

2014-01-01

197

The relationship of self-reported sex-role characteristics and attitudes toward homosexuality.  

PubMed

The present study investigated the relationship between self-reported sex-role characteristics and attitudes toward homosexuality using the Bem Sex Role Inventory, the Personal Attributes Questionnaire and the Attitudes toward Homosexuality Scale. Relationships occur for both males and females who are exhibiting greater amounts of cross-sex traits. Females with more instrumental characteristics were more accepting while males with more expressive characteristics were more rejecting. These findings are discussed in relation to those of Weinberger and Millham (1979) who also investigated this relationship, as well as to research investigating the relationship between attitudes toward homosexuality and attitudes toward sex roles and feminism. PMID:6520390

Black, K N; Stevenson, M R

1984-01-01

198

“Let’s Talk about OA Pain”: A Qualitative Analysis of the Perceptions of People Suffering from OA. Towards the Development of a Specific Pain OA-Related Questionnaire, the Osteoarthritis Symptom Inventory Scale (OASIS)  

PubMed Central

Introduction Pain is the primary outcome measurement in osteoarthritis, and its assessment is mostly based on its intensity. The management of this difficult chronic condition could be improved by using pain descriptors to improve analyses of painful sensations. This should help to define subgroups of patients based on pain phenotype, for more adapted treatment. This study draws upon patients’ descriptions of their pain, to identify and understand their perception of osteoarthritis pain and to categorize pain dimensions. Methods This qualitative study was conducted with representative types of patients suffering from osteoarthritis. Two focus groups were conducted with a sample of 14 participants, with either recent or chronic OA, at one or multiple sites. Focus groups were semi-structured and used open-ended questions addressing personal experiences to explore the experiences of patients with OA pain and the meanings they attributed to these pains. Results Two main points emerged from content analyses: -A major difficulty in getting patients to describe their osteoarthritis pain: perception that nobody wants to hear about it; necessity to preserve one’s self and social image; notion of self-imposed stoicism; and perception of osteoarthritis as a complex, changing, illogical disease associated with aging. -Osteoarthritis pains were numerous and differed in intensity, duration, depth, type of occurrence, impact and rhythm, but also in painful sensations and associated symptoms. Based on analyses of the verbatim interviews, seven dimensions of OA pain emerged: pain sensory description, OA-related symptoms, pain variability profile, pain-triggering factors, pain and physical activity, mood and image, general physical symptoms. Summary In osteoarthritis, pain analysis should not be restricted to intensity. Our qualitative study identified pain descriptors and defined seven dimensions of osteoarthritis pain. Based on these dimensions, we aim to develop a specific questionnaire on osteoarthritis pain quality for osteoarthritis pain phenotyping: the OsteoArthritis Symptom Inventory Scale (OASIS). PMID:24244589

Cedraschi, Christine; Delézay, Sylvie; Marty, Marc; Berenbaum, Francis; Bouhassira, Didier; Henrotin, Yves; Laroche, Françoise; Perrot, Serge

2013-01-01

199

Accelerometry and Self-report in Sedentary Populations  

PubMed Central

Objectives To determine whether self-reported exercise duration and intensity matched accelerometer data in sedentary endometrial cancer survivors and age-matched controls. Methods Participants were asked to wear an accelerometer and self-report exercise bouts, duration, and intensity for one week. Self-reported duration was compared with accelerometer data. Results Self-reported exercise-bout duration matched accelerometer duration 93% for survivors and 99% for controls. Self-reported exercise-bout intensity matched accelerometer intensity 70% for survivors and 66% for controls. There were no significant differences between groups. Conclusions Sedentary endometrial cancer survivors and controls self-reported duration and intensity of physical activity consistent with accelerometer data. PMID:20950160

Jovanovic, Jennifer L.; Hughes, Daniel C.; Baum, George P.; Carmack, Cindy; Greisinger, Anthony J.; Basen-Engquist, Karen

2014-01-01

200

Lead Burden and Psychiatric Symptoms and the Modifying Influence of the ?-Aminolevulinic Acid Dehydratase (ALAD) Polymorphism  

PubMed Central

The authors evaluated the association between lead burden and psychiatric symptoms and its potential modification by a ?-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD) polymorphism. Lead measurements in blood or bone and self-reported ratings on the Brief Symptom Inventory from 1991 to 2002 were available for 1,075 US men participating in the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Normative Aging Study. The authors estimated the prevalence odds ratio for the association between interquartile-range lead and abnormal symptom score, adjusting for potential confounders. An interquartile increment in tibia lead (14 µg/g) was associated with 21% higher odds of somatization (95% confidence interval of the odds ratio: 1.01, 1.46). An interquartile increment in patella lead (20 µg/g) corresponded to a 23% increase in the odds of global distress (95% confidence interval of the odds ratio: 1.02, 1.47). An interquartile increment in blood lead (2.8 µg/dl) was associated with 14% higher odds of hostility (95% confidence interval of the odds ratio: 1.02, 1.27). In all other analyses, lead was nonsignificantly associated with psychiatric symptoms. The adverse association of lead with abnormal mood scores was generally stronger among ALAD 1-1 carriers than 1-2/2-2 carriers, particularly regarding phobic anxiety symptoms (pinteraction= 0.004). These results augment evidence of a deleterious association between lead and psychiatric symptoms. PMID:17823382

Rajan, Pradeep; Kelsey, Karl T.; Schwartz, Joel D.; Bellinger, David C.; Weuve, Jennifer; Sparrow, David; Spiro, Avron; Smith, Thomas J.; Nie, Huiling; Hu, Howard; Wright, Robert O.

2008-01-01

201

Course of Depressive Symptoms and Treatment in the Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery (LABS-2) Study  

PubMed Central

Objective To examine changes in depressive symptoms and treatment in the first three years following bariatric surgery. Design and Methods The Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery-2 is an observational cohort study of adults (n=2,458) who underwent a bariatric surgical procedure at one of ten US hospitals between 2006–9. This study includes 2,148 participants who completed the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) at baseline and ? one follow-up visit in years 1–3. Results At baseline, 40.4% self-reported treatment for depression. At least mild depressive symptoms (BDI score?10) were reported by 28.3%; moderate (BDI score 19–29) and severe (BDI score ?30) symptoms were uncommon (4.2% and 0.5%, respectively). Mild-to-severe depressive symptoms independently increased the odds (OR=1.75; p=.03) of a major adverse event within 30 days of surgery. Compared with baseline, symptom severity was significantly lower at all follow-up time points (e.g., mild-to-severe symptomatology was 8.9%, 6 months; 8.4%, 1yr; 12.2%, 2yrs; 15.6%, 3yrs; ps<.001), but increased between 1 and 3 years postoperatively (p<.01). Change in depressive symptoms was significantly related to change in body mass index (r=.42; p<0001). Conclusion Bariatric surgery has a positive impact on depressive features. However, data suggest some deterioration in improvement after the first postoperative year. PMID:24634371

Mitchell, James E.; King, Wendy C.; Chen, Jia-Yuh; Devlin, Michael J.; Flum, David; Garcia, Luis; Pender, John R.; Kalarchian, Melissa A.; Khandelwal, Saurabh; Marcus, Marsha D.; Schrope, Beth; Strain, Gladys; Wolfe, Bruce; Yanovski, Susan

2014-01-01

202

The Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale (ASRS): utility in college students with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder  

PubMed Central

Background. The number of students with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) enrolled in colleges and universities has increased markedly over the past few decades, giving rise to questions about how best to document symptoms and impairment in the post-secondary setting. The aim of the present study was to investigate the utility and psychometric properties of a widely-used rating scale for adults with ADHD, the Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale (ASRS-V1.1), in a sample of post-secondary students with ADHD. Methods. A total of 135 college students (mean age = 24, 42% males) with ADHD were recruited from Student Disability Services in post-secondary institutions. We compared informant responses on the ASRS administered via different modalities. First, students’ self-report was ascertained using the ASRS Screener administered via telephone interview, in which they were asked to provide real-life examples of behavior for each of the six items. Next, students self-reported symptoms on the 18-item paper version of the ASRS Symptom Checklist administered about 1–2 weeks later, and a collateral report using an online version of the 18-item ASRS Symptom Checklist. Students also completed self-report measures of everyday cognitive failure (CFQ) and executive functioning (BDEFS). Results. Results revealed moderate to good congruency between the 18-item ASRS-Self and ASRS-Collateral reports (correlation = .47), and between student self-report on the 6-item telephone-based and paper versions of the ASRS, with the paper version administered two weeks later (correlation = .66). The full ASRS self-report was related to impairment, such as in executive functioning (correlation = .63) and everyday cognitive failure (correlation = .74). Executive functioning was the only significant predictor of ASRS total scores. Discussion. Current findings suggest that the ASRS provides an easy-to-use, reliable, and cost-effective approach for gathering information about current symptoms of ADHD in college and university students. Collateral reports were moderately related to self-reports, although we note the difficulty in obtaining informant reports for this population. Use of a telephone interview to elicit behavioral descriptions for each item may be useful in future research that is required to specifically test the utility of the ASRS in, for example, documenting and confirming current reports of impairment due to ADHD symptoms and its positive and negative predictive power for diagnosis. PMID:24711973

Gray, Sarah; Woltering, Steven; Mawjee, Karizma

2014-01-01

203

Self-Reported quality of life in adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and executive function impairment treated with lisdexamfetamine dimesylate: a randomized, double-blind, multicenter, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study  

PubMed Central

Background This study examined the effects of lisdexamfetamine dimesylate (LDX) on quality of life (QOL) in adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and clinically significant executive function deficits (EFD). Methods This report highlights QOL findings from a 10-week randomized placebo-controlled trial of LDX (30–70 mg/d) in adults (18–55 years) with ADHD and EFD (Behavior Rating Inventory of EF-Adult, Global Executive Composite [BRIEF-A GEC] ?65). The primary efficacy measure was the self-reported BRIEF-A; a key secondary measure was self-reported QOL on the Adult ADHD Impact Module (AIM-A). The clinician-completed ADHD Rating Scale version IV (ADHD-RS-IV) with adult prompts and Clinical Global Impressions-Severity (CGI-S) were also employed. The Adult ADHD QoL (AAQoL) was added while the study was in progress. A post hoc analysis examined the subgroup having evaluable results from both AIM-A and AAQoL. Results Of 161 randomized (placebo, 81; LDX, 80), 159 were included in the safety population. LDX improved AIM-A multi-item domain scores versus placebo; LS mean difference for Performance and Daily Functioning was 21.6 (ES, 0.93, P<.0001); Impact of Symptoms: Daily Interference was 14.9 (ES, 0.62, P<.0001); Impact of Symptoms: Bother/Concern was 13.5 (ES, 0.57, P=.0003); Relationships/Communication was 7.8 (ES, 0.31, P=.0302); Living With ADHD was 9.1 (ES, 0.79, P<.0001); and General Well-Being was 10.8 (ES, 0.70, P<.0001). AAQoL LS mean difference for total score was 21.0; for subscale: Life Productivity was 21.0; Psychological Health was 12.1; Life Outlook was 12.5; and Relationships was 7.3. In a post hoc analysis of participants with both AIM-A and AAQoL scores, AIM-A multi-item subgroup analysis scores numerically improved with LDX, with smaller difference for Impact of Symptoms: Daily Interference. The safety profile of LDX was consistent with amphetamine use in previous studies. Conclusions Overall, adults with ADHD/EFD exhibited self-reported improvement on QOL, using the AIM-A and AAQoL scales in line with medium/large ES; these improvements were paralleled by improvements in EF and ADHD symptoms. The safety profile of LDX was similar to previous studies. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01101022 PMID:24106804

2013-01-01

204

Student Self-Regulated Learning in an Urban High School: Predictive Validity and Relations between Teacher Ratings and Student Self-Reports  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the predictive validity of a teacher rating scale called the Self-Regulation Strategy Inventory-Teacher Rating Scale (SRSI-TRS) and its level of convergence with several student self-report measures of self-regulated learning (SRL). Eighty-seven high school students enrolled in one of four sections of a mathematics course in an…

Cleary, Timothy J.; Callan, Gregory L.

2014-01-01

205

Factors associated with inconsistency in self-reported mild traumatic brain injury over time among military personnel in Iraq.  

PubMed

Background Estimates of the prevalence of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) among military personnel and combat veterans rely almost exclusively on retrospective self-reports; however, reliability of these reports has received little attention. Aims To examine the consistency of reporting of mTBI over time and identify factors associated with inconsistent reporting. Method A longitudinal cohort of 948 US National Guard Soldiers deployed to Iraq completed self-report questionnaire screening for mTBI and psychological symptoms while in-theatre 1 month before returning home (time 1, T1) and 1 year later (time 2, T2). Results Most respondents (n = 811, 85.5%) were consistent in their reporting of mTBI across time. Among those who were inconsistent in their reports (n = 137, 14.5%), the majority denied mTBI at T1 and affirmed mTBI at T2 (n = 123, 89.8%). Respondents rarely endorsed mTBI in-theatre and later denied mTBI (n = 14, 10.2% of those with inconsistent reports). Post-deployment post-traumatic stress symptoms and non-specific physical complaints were significantly associated with inconsistent report of mTBI. Conclusions Military service members' self-reports of mTBI are generally consistent over time; however, inconsistency in retrospective self-reporting of mTBI status is associated with current post-traumatic stress symptoms and non-specific physical health complaints. PMID:25614533

Nelson, Nathaniel W; Anderson, Carolyn R; Thuras, Paul; Kehle-Forbes, Shannon M; Arbisi, Paul A; Erbes, Christopher R; Polusny, Melissa A

2015-03-01

206

Acute Stress Disorder Scale: a self-report measure of acute stress disorder.  

PubMed

The Acute Stress Disorder Scale (ASDS) is a self-report inventory that (a) indexes acute stress disorder (ASD) and (b) predicts posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The ASDS is a 19-item inventory that is based on Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed.; DSM-IV, American Psychiatric Association, 1994) criteria. The ASDS possessed good sensitivity (95%) and specificity (83%) for identifying ASD against the ASD Interview on 99 civilian trauma survivors. Test-retest reliability of the ASDS scores between 2 and 7 days was strong (r = .94). The ASDS predicted 91% of bushfire survivors who developed PTSD and 93% of those who did not; one third of those identified by the ASDS as being at risk did not develop PTSD, however. The ASDS shows promise as a screening instrument to identify acutely traumatized individuals who warrant more thorough assessment for risk of PTSD. PMID:10752364

Bryant, R A; Moulds, M L; Guthrie, R M

2000-03-01

207

After a Concussion, Which Teens Will Have Emotional Symptoms?  

MedlinePLUS

... 22 teens had emotional symptoms such as irritability, aggression, anxiety, depression, apathy, frequent mood changes or excessive ... than those without anxiety, while teens with irritability/aggression were 35 percent more likely to self-report ...

208

Self-reported musculoskeletal complaints among garment workers.  

PubMed

One hundred forty-four sewing machine operators answered questionnaires concerning occupational history and musculoskeletal symptoms adapted from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. They were matched for age within 5 years, race, and sex with persons completing the HANES I Augmentation Survey, and the prevalence of self-reported musculoskeletal morbidity was compared. Operators complained significantly more often of knee pain (prevalence odds ratio [POR] = 1.84, p = .0001) and knee swelling (POR = 9.98, p less than .00001), although they were no more likely to have had knee surgery. Similar increases were reported for upper-back pain (POR = 2.13, p = .002) joint ache, and joint swelling (both were significant for fingers, wrists, elbows, and shoulders at p less than .05 levels). No differences in low-back pain or in hospitalization for joint conditions were noted. Ergonomic redesign of sewing machines needs to address knee and upper-back movements as well as the arm, wrist, and finger movements. PMID:2786337

Sokas, R K; Spiegelman, D; Wegman, D H

1989-01-01

209

Neuropsychological performance following a history of multiple self-reported concussions: a meta-analysis.  

PubMed

Debate continues about the long-term neuropsychological impact of multiple mild traumatic brain injuries (MTBI). A meta-analysis of the relevant literature was conducted to determine the impact of having a history of more than one self-reported MTBI (versus just one MTBI) across seven cognitive domains, as well as symptom complaints. The analysis was based on 8 studies, all conducted with athletes, involving 614 cases of multiple MTBI and 926 control cases of a single MTBI. The overall effect of multiple MTBI on neuropsychological functioning was minimal and not significant (d = 0.06). However, follow-up analyses revealed that multiple self-reported MTBI was associated with poorer performance on measures of delayed memory and executive functioning. The implications and limitations of these findings are discussed. PMID:20003581

Belanger, Heather G; Spiegel, Eric; Vanderploeg, Rodney D

2010-03-01

210

Nomothetic and Idiographic Symptom Change Trajectories in Acute-Phase Cognitive Therapy for Recurrent Depression  

PubMed Central

Objective We tested nomothetic and idiographic convergence and change in three symptom measures during acute-phase cognitive therapy (CT) for depression and compared outcomes among patients showing different change patterns. Method Outpatients (N = 362; 69% women; 85% white; age mean = 43 years) with DSM-IV recurrent major depressive disorder completed the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (Hamilton, 1960), Beck Depression Inventory (Beck, Ward, Mendelson, Mock, & Erbaugh 1961), and Inventory for Depressive Symptomatology—Self-Report (Rush, Gullion, Basco, Jarrett, & Trivedi, 1996) on 14 occasions, and pre-/post-CT measures of social-interpersonal functioning and negative cognitive content. Results The three symptom measures marked the same severity and change constructs, and we offer improved formulas for inter-measure score conversions via their common factor. Pre-post CT symptom reductions were large (ds 1.71-1.92), and nomothetic symptom curves were log-linear (larger improvements earlier and smaller improvements later in CT). Nonetheless, only 30% of individual patients showed clear log-linear changes, whereas other patients showed linear (e.g., steady decreases; 20%), one-step (e.g., a quick drop; 16%), and unclassified (34%) patterns. Log-linear, linear, and one-step patients were generally similar to one another and superior to unclassified patients post-CT in symptom levels, response and stable remission rates, social-interpersonal functioning, and cognitive content (median d = 0.69). Conclusions Reaching a low-symptom “destination” at the end of CT via any coherent “path” is more important in the short-term than which path patients take. We discuss implications for theories of change, clinical monitoring of individuals’ progress in CT, and the need to investigate long-term outcomes of patients with differing symptom change patterns. PMID:23627652

Vittengl, Jeffrey R.; Clark, Lee Anna; Thase, Michael E.; Jarrett, Robin B.

2013-01-01

211

Symptom Identification in the Chronically Critically Ill  

PubMed Central

Ascertaining the symptom experience of chronically critically ill (CCI) patients is difficult due to communication impairment and fluctuations in patient cognition and physiological conditions. The use of checklist self report ratings is hampered by the inability of most CCI patients to respond verbally to symptom queries. In addition to the communication problems caused by mechanical ventilation, the apparently diverse idioms of symptom expression add to the potential for miscommunication regarding symptom experience. Although patient communication impairment is a major barrier to symptom identification, symptom assessment and treatment are fundamental components of nursing care for CCI. This paper reviews and describes the unique constellation of symptoms experienced by many critically ill patients. We report our observations of symptom communication among CCI patients and nurses and discuss inconsistency in the language of symptom expression among nurses and patients. Clinically applicable strategies to improve nurse-patient symptom communication and suggestions for refinement of symptom assessment in chronic critical illness are provided. PMID:20118706

Campbell, Grace B.; Happ, Mary Beth

2010-01-01

212

Self-reported crime rates of women prisoners  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents findings from the first study of female prisoners' self-reports of criminal activity. Using the criminal career paradigm to frame the analysis, self-reported estimates of crime participation and frequency rates were examined for eight felony crimes. Important similarities between women and men were found in overall patterns of crime. Specifically, a small proportion ofboth women and men described

Kim English

1993-01-01

213

Self-Report as an Approach to Measuring Communication Competence.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Self-report measures of perceived communication competence used properly can help build understanding of communication behavior, but used as indications of communication performance can only retard such efforts. Not all uses of such instruments are either legitimate or appropriate--for example, using self-report measures to determine an…

McCroskey, James C.; McCroskey, Linda L.

214

Improving Accuracy of Sleep Self-Reports through Correspondence Training  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Sleep insufficiency is a major public health concern, yet the accuracy of self-reported sleep measures is often poor. Self-report may be useful when direct measurement of nonverbal behavior is impossible, infeasible, or undesirable, as it may be with sleep measurement. We used feedback and positive reinforcement within a small-n multiple-baseline…

St. Peter, Claire C.; Montgomery-Downs, Hawley E.; Massullo, Joel P.

2012-01-01

215

Depressive symptoms among patients receiving varenicline and bupropion for smoking cessation.  

PubMed

While the combination therapy of varenicline and sustained release bupropion (bupropion SR) for cigarette smoking cessation can increase smoking abstinence rates, it has also been associated with increases in self-reported depressive symptoms. We conducted an analysis of the Beck Depression Inventory, second edition (BDI-II), data completed by 505 patients from a large randomized clinical trial, evaluating the efficacy of 12weeks of combination therapy (varenicline+bupropion SR) compared to varenicline alone. At medication treatment week 2 (1week after target quit date [TQD]), increased depressive symptoms were observed in patients receiving combination therapy (effect estimate=0.61, 95% CI [0.03, 1.19], P=.039) and those with a history of depression (effect estimate=0.82, 95% CI [0.07, 1.57], P=.033). For treatment weeks 2 to 4, smokers with a history of depression on combination therapy had a greater decline in depressive symptoms compared to those on varenicline alone (effect estimate=-1.99, 95% CI [-3.99, 0.00], P=.050). After treatment week 4, no significant effects of treatment or depression history on BDI-II scores were observed. A history of depression did not moderate the efficacy of combination therapy for smoking abstinence. Our study suggests that for combination therapy with varenicline and bupropion SR, an increase in depressive symptoms over the first 2weeks may be observed; however, the effects on depressive symptoms do not last beyond 4weeks. We conclude that among smokers without active moderate or severe depression, the decision to use this combination treatment approach should not be based upon a self-reported history of depression. PMID:25530426

Hong, Arthur S; Elrashidi, Muhamad Y; Schroeder, Darrell R; Ebbert, Jon O

2015-05-01

216

Clinically Determined and Self-Reported Dental Caries Status During and After Pregnancy Among Low-Income Hispanic Women  

PubMed Central

Objectives This analysis assessed, during and one-year after pregnancy: 1) the prevalence of and relationship between self-reported and clinically determined dental caries and oral health status, and whether self-reports are a potential proxy for professional determination; 2) factors associated with high levels of professionally determined or self-reported oral disease. Methods Data are from a randomized clinical trial of 301 pregnant, low-income Hispanic women at the California-Mexico border to compare two interventions to prevent early childhood caries. Interviews and dental examinations were conducted at enrollment (second trimester) and one-year post-partum (PP). Results During pregnancy and PP, 93% had untreated caries and most had gingival inflammation. Sensitivity and specificity of self-reported measures compared to dentists’ determinations were modest (ranging from 45–80% for sensitivity and 41–77% for specificity at both time points); positive predictive values for women reporting current tooth decay or fair/poor oral health were high (>94%), but negative predictive values were low (<23%). In a bivariate GEE model, factors associated with fair/poor self-reported oral health during and after pregnancy included self-reported dental symptoms (current tooth decay, bleeding gums without brushing), dental behaviors (not flossing) and number of decayed tooth surfaces. In a logistic regression model, the only significant factor PP associated with less extensive untreated disease was if women ever had their teeth cleaned professionally (OR=0.44). Conclusions There is a great need for dental treatment in this underserved population both during pregnancy and PP. Women may not be able to accurately recognize or act on their treatment needs. At baseline and PP, few demographic or behavioral factors were associated with either self-reported or clinically-determined oral disease (e.g., being less educated or acculturated and not flossing) in the bivariate analyses. Ever having a professional teeth cleaning significantly predicted less disease PP. PMID:23889689

Weintraub, Jane A.; Gansky, Stuart A.; Santo, William; Ramos-Gomez, Francisco

2014-01-01

217

The Credibility of Self-reported Pain Among Institutional Older People with Different Degrees of Cognitive Function in Taiwan.  

PubMed

Despite many studies conducted to validate the self-reported pain of vulnerable patients, it is unclear at what level of cognitive impairment individuals still can provide reliable information. The aims of this study were to examine the reliability and validity of self-reported pain by degree of patients' cognitive function and to determine important predictors of self-reported pain in cognitively impaired residents in long-term care facilities. The 414 participants were divided into four groups according to their scores on the Mini-Mental State Examination (nonimpaired, mild, moderate, and severe cognitive impairment). Multifaceted measures were performed to validate residents' pain reports. Self-reported pain and pain behaviors were measured using the Verbal Descriptor Scale and the Doloplus-2 scale. Known correlates of pain including functional disability, depression, and agitation were compared, using the Barthel Index, the Cornell scale, and the Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory. Intra-rater and interrater reliability were generally acceptable in groups with no impairment to moderate cognitive impairment. The relationships between residents' self-reported pain and the known correlates of pain were almost all significant across groups with no impairment to moderate cognitive impairment, but fewer were significant in the severely impaired group. Regression analyses revealed that multiple pain indicators together were significantly better predictors of self-reported pain in moderately and severely impaired residents. The findings from this study support residents with cognitive impairment up to a moderate level can report pain reliably. However, for those in later stages of dementia, a multifaceted approach is suggested to help in pain recognition. PMID:25194480

Chen, Yi-Heng; Lin, Li-Chan

2014-09-01

218

Self-reported mental health and its gender differences as a predictor of suicide in the middle-aged.  

PubMed

Studies of clinical cohorts and retrospective reports have identified psychiatric disorders as paramount risk factors for suicide. Much less is known about how self-reported mental health is related to completed suicide. To study the relation between self-reported mental health and risk of completed suicide, the authors prospectively followed a population-based Norwegian cohort of 61,588 men and 69,774 women aged 39-44 years for an average of 10.4 years between 1994 and 2007. Self-reported mental health was measured using an instrument based on the Hopkins Symptom Checklist and the General Health Questionnaire. Completed suicides were registered in the official Norwegian Cause of Death Registry. Females reported higher levels of mental distress than males. In comparison with persons reporting the fewest mental health symptoms, the adjusted hazard ratio for suicide increased from 1.8 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.1, 2.9) in the moderately depressed group to 8.9 (95% CI: 4.4, 18.2) in the most depressed group. The risk difference was greatest in males. At each level of the mental health index, males had double the risk of suicide of females (hazard ratio = 2.3, 95% CI: 1.5, 3.3). This study shows a dose-response effect of self-reported mental health problems on completed suicide and replicates the gender paradox observed in the general population with prospective data. PMID:20519262

Bramness, Jørgen G; Walby, Fredrik A; Hjellvik, Vidar; Selmer, Randi; Tverdal, Aage

2010-07-15

219

Eating disorder symptoms and parenting styles.  

PubMed

This study aimed to examine associations between symptoms of eating disorders and parenting style, in a non-clinical sample. One hundred and five mothers completed self-report measures of eating disorder symptoms and parenting style. Higher levels of eating disorder symptoms were associated with more authoritarian and permissive parenting styles. Authoritative parenting was not significantly related to eating disorder symptoms. The findings demonstrate that eating disorder symptoms in non-clinical individuals are related to less adaptive parenting styles. These findings have potential implications for clinicians working with mothers with eating disorders. PMID:19932143

Haycraft, Emma; Blissett, Jackie

2010-02-01

220

Website design: technical, social and medical issues for self-reporting by elderly patients.  

PubMed

There is growing interest in the use of the Internet for interacting with patients, both in terms of healthcare information provision and information gathering. In this article, we examine the issues in designing healthcare websites for elderly users. In particular, this article uses a year-long case study of the development of a web-based system for self-reporting of symptoms and quality of life with a view to examine the issues relating to website design for elderly users. The issues identified included the technical, social and medical aspects of website design for elderly users. The web-based system developed was based on the European Quality of Life 5-Dimensions health-status questionnaire, a commonly used tool for patient self-reporting of quality of life, and the more specific coronary revascularisation outcome questionnaire. Currently, self-reporting is generally administered in the form of paper-based questionnaires to be completed in the outpatient clinic or at home. There are a variety of issues relating to elderly users, which imply that websites for elderly patients may involve different design considerations to other types of websites. PMID:24047573

Taylor, Mark J; Stables, Rod; Matata, Bashir; Lisboa, Paulo J G; Laws, Andy; Almond, Peter

2014-06-01

221

Utility of the Leyton Obsessional Inventory to distinguish OCD and OCPD.  

PubMed

The Leyton Obsessional Inventory (LOI) is a self-report questionnaire that assesses obsessional symptoms. The ability of the LOI to distinguish between obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and obsessive-compulsive personality disorder (OCPD) has not been adequately addressed. Our purpose is to identify dimensions of obsessional symptoms from the LOI and determine how well they distinguish between OCD and OCPD. The LOI was completed by 488 participants diagnosed by trained clinicians. Factor analysis was performed on responses to the interference items of the LOI. The relationship between the factors, OCD and OCPD was evaluated using logistic regression. Five factors underlying the LOI were identified: (I) obsessional ruminations and compulsions, (II) ordering and arranging, (III) organizing activities, (IV) contamination, and (V) parsimony. Factors I, III, and IV were strongly associated with OCD. Only Factor II was associated with OCPD. Factor IV was negatively associated with obsessive-compulsive personality traits. LOI factors are useful in discriminating between OCD and OCPD. Obsessional ruminations and compulsions, organizing activities, and contamination fears may indicate OCD, and ordering and arranging symptoms may indicate OCPD rather than OCD. Parsimony may indicate neither disorder, and contamination, the absence of OCPD traits compared with the other LOI factors. These findings may contribute to effective diagnosis and treatment by allowing the LOI to screen for OCD and OCPD in a population exhibiting obsessional symptoms and traits. PMID:17099877

Wellen, David; Samuels, Jack; Bienvenu, O Joseph; Grados, Marco; Cullen, Bernadette; Riddle, Mark; Liang, Kung-Yee; Nestadt, Gerald

2007-01-01

222

Naturalistically Observed Conflict and Youth Asthma Symptoms.  

PubMed

Objective: To investigate the links between naturalistically observed conflict, self-reported caregiver-youth conflict, and youth asthma symptoms. Method: Fifty-four youth with asthma (age range: 10-17 years) wore the Electronically Activated Recorder (EAR) for a 4-day period to assess interpersonal conflict and caregiver-youth conflict as they occur in daily life. Conflict also was assessed with baseline self-report questionnaires and daily diaries completed by youth participants and their caregivers. Asthma symptoms were assessed using daily diaries, baseline self-reports, and wheezing, as coded from the EAR. Results: EAR-observed measures of conflict were strongly associated with self-reported asthma symptoms (both baseline and daily diaries) and wheezing coded from the EAR. Further, when entered together in regression analyses, youth daily reports of negative caregiver-youth interactions and EAR-observed conflict uniquely predicted asthma symptoms; only EAR-observed conflict was associated with EAR-observed wheezing. Conclusion: These findings demonstrate the potential impact of daily conflict on youth asthma symptoms and the importance of assessing conflict as it occurs in everyday life. More broadly, they point to the importance of formulating a clear picture of family interactions outside of the lab, which is essential for understanding how family relationships "get under the skin" to affect youth health. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:25222090

Tobin, Erin T; Kane, Heidi S; Saleh, Daniel J; Naar-King, Sylvie; Poowuttikul, Pavadee; Secord, Elizabeth; Pierantoni, Wayne; Simon, Valerie A; Slatcher, Richard B

2014-09-15

223

Consensually Defined Facets of Personality as Prospective Predictors of Change in Depression Symptoms.  

PubMed

Depression has robust associations with personality, showing a strong relation with neuroticism and more moderate associations with extraversion and conscientiousness. In addition, each Big Five domain can be decomposed into narrower facets. However, we currently lack consensus as to the contents of Big Five facets, with idiosyncrasies across instruments; moreover, few studies have examined associations with depression. In the current study, community participants completed six omnibus personality inventories; self-reported depressive symptoms were assessed at baseline and 5 years later. Exploratory factor analyses suggested three to five facets in each domain, and these facets served as prospective predictors of depression in hierarchical regressions, after accounting for baseline and trait depression. In these analyses, high anger (from neuroticism), low positive emotionality (extraversion), low conventionality (conscientiousness), and low culture (openness to experiences) were significant prospective predictors of depression. Results are discussed in regard to personality structure and assessment, as well as personality-psychopathology associations. PMID:24671734

Naragon-Gainey, Kristin; Watson, David

2014-03-26

224

Prevalence of Radiographic Osteoarthritis of the Knee and Its Relationship to Self-Reported Pain  

PubMed Central

Background and Aim Osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee is one of the most common skeletal disorders, yet little data are available in Asian populations. We sought to assess the prevalence and pattern of radiographic OA of the knee, and its relationship to self-reported pain in a Vietnamese population. Methods The study was based on a sample of 170 men and 488 women aged ?40 years who were randomly sampled from the Ho Chi Minh City (Vietnam). Radiographs of the knee were graded from 0 to 4 according to the Kellgren and Lawrence scale. Osteoarthritis was defined as being present in a knee if radiographic grades of 2 or higher were detected. Knee pain and symptoms were ascertained by direct interview using a structured questionnaire. Results The point prevalence of radiographic OA of the knee was 34.2%, with women having higher rate than men (35.3% vs 31.2%). The prevalence of knee OA increased with advancing age: 8% among those aged 40–49 years, 30% in those aged 50–59 years, and 61.1% in those aged ?60 years. Greater BMI was associated with higher risk of knee OA. Self-reported knee pain was found in 35% of men and 62% of women. There was a statistically significant association between self-reported knee pain and knee OA (prevalence ratio 3.1; 95% CI 2.0 to 4.6). Conclusions These data indicate that approximately a third of Vietnamese men and women have radiographic OA in the knee, and that self-reported knee pain may be used as an indicator of knee osteoarthritis. PMID:24722559

Ho-Pham, Lan T.; Lai, Thai Q.; Mai, Linh D.; Doan, Minh C.; Pham, Hoa N.; Nguyen, Tuan V.

2014-01-01

225

From Trust to Intimacy: A New Inventory for Examining Erikson's Stages of Psychosocial Development.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A new inventory for examining the first six of Erikson's psychosocial stages is described. It is concluded that the Erikson Psychosocial Stage Inventory (EPSI), a self-report questionnaire, is a useful measure for researchers interested in development from early adolescence and in mapping changes as a function of life events. (Author/GK)

Rosenthal, Doreen A.; And Others

1981-01-01

226

From trust on intimacy: A new inventory for examining erikson's stages of psychosocial development  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new inventory for examining the first six of Erikson's psychosocial stages is described. The self-report questionnaire, developed in a pilot study of 97 adolescents and tested in a study of 622 adolescents, has 12 items for each subscale. Measures of reliability and validity are reported. It is concluded that the Erikson Psychosocial Stage Inventory (EPSI) is a useful measure

Doreen A. Rosenthal; Ross M. Gurney; Susan M. Moore

1981-01-01

227

Self-reported ability assessment in rock climbing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Level of ability within rock climbing is generally expressed in terms of a “best ascent”, rated using various grading systems within the sport. The most common method of obtaining this information is via self-report. The aim of this study was to examine the validity of self-reported climbing grades. Twenty-nine competitive rock climbers (17 males, 12 females) were first asked to

Nick Draper; Tabitha Dickson; Gavin Blackwell; Simon Fryer; Sefton Priestley; David Winter; Greg Ellis

2011-01-01

228

Validation of Self-reported Periodontal Disease: A Systematic Review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Self-report is an efficient and accepted means of assessing many population characteristics, risk factors, and diseases, but has rarely been used for periodontal disease (chronic periodontitis). The availability of valid self-reported measures of periodontal disease would facilitate epidemiologic studies on a much larger scale, allow for integration of new studies of periodontal disease within large ongoing studies, and facilitate lower-cost

B. Blicher; K. Joshipura; P. Eke

2005-01-01

229

Reliability of self-report of health in juvenile offenders  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of the present study was to investigate the accuracy of self-reports of juvenile offenders on physical factors (e.g. sleep difficulties, weight-related behaviours and weight perceptions), health risk behaviours (e.g. alcohol use), trauma history (e.g. physical and sexual abuse) and psychological factors (e.g. anxiety, suicidal and self-harm behaviours). Self-reports obtained via a Health Questionnaire from 242 incarcerated juvenile offenders

Dianna T Kenny; Jennifer Grant

2007-01-01

230

Personality predictors of self-reported offending in Icelandic students  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between self-reported offending and personality. A total of 1603 students in further education in Iceland completed the Mak Self-Reported Delinquency Scale as well as a number of psychological tests, namely the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ and IVE), the Gough Socialisation Scale, the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, and the Gudjonsson Compliance Scale.

Gisli H. Gudjonsson; Emil Einarsson; Ólafur Örn Bragason; Jon Fridrik Sigurdsson

2006-01-01

231

Prevalence of DSM-IV symptoms of ADHD in adult licensed drivers: Implications for clinical diagnosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study reports on the prevalence of the DSM-IV symptoms for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in a sample of 720 adults applying for or renewing their driver's licenses in central Massachusetts (ages 17-84 years). Symptoms were assessed using two self- report rating scales: One for current symptoms and a second for retrospective recall of child hood symptoms (ages

K. Murphy; R. A. Barkley

1996-01-01

232

Contrast effects and sex influence maternal and self-report dimensional measures of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder.  

PubMed

The heritability of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is higher for children than adults. This may be due to increasing importance of environment in symptom variation, measurement inaccuracy when two raters report behavior of a twin-pair, a contrast effect resulting from parental comparison of siblings and/or dimensionality of measures. We examine rater contrast and sex effects in ADHD subtypes using a dimensional scale and compare the aetiology of self, versus maternal-report. Data were collected using the Strengths and Weaknesses of ADHD and Normal Behaviour Scale (SWAN): maternal-report for 3,223 twins and siblings (mean age 21.2, SD = 6.3) and self-report for 1,617 twins and siblings (mean age 25.5, SD = 3.2). Contrast effects and magnitude of genetic and environmental contributions to variance of ADHD phenotypes (inattention, hyperactivity-impulsivity, combined behaviours) were examined using structural equation modeling. Contrast effects were evident for maternal-report hyperactivity-impulsivity (b = -0.04) and self-report inattention (-0.09) and combined ADHD (-0.08). Dominant genetic effects were shared by raters for inattention, hyperactivity-impulsivity and combined ADHD. Broad-sense heritability was equal across sex for maternal-report inattention, hyperactivity-impulsivity and combined ADHD (0.72, 0.83, 0.80). Heritability for corresponding subtypes in self-reported data were best represented by sex (0.46, 0.30, 0.39 for males; 0.69, 0.41, 0.65 for females). Heritability difference between maternal and self-report ADHD was due to greater variance of male specific environment in self-report data. Self-reported ADHD differed across sex by magnitude of specific environment and genetic effects. PMID:25151025

Ebejer, J L; Medland, S E; van der Werf, J; J Wright, M; Henders, A K; Gillespie, N A; Hickie, I B; Martin, N G; Duffy, D L

2015-01-01

233

Is Violent Radicalisation Associated with Poverty, Migration, Poor Self-Reported Health and Common Mental Disorders?  

PubMed Central

Background Doctors, lawyers and criminal justice agencies need methods to assess vulnerability to violent radicalization. In synergy, public health interventions aim to prevent the emergence of risk behaviours as well as prevent and treat new illness events. This paper describes a new method of assessing vulnerability to violent radicalization, and then investigates the role of previously reported causes, including poor self-reported health, anxiety and depression, adverse life events, poverty, and migration and socio-political factors. The aim is to identify foci for preventive intervention. Methods A cross-sectional survey of a representative population sample of men and women aged 18–45, of Muslim heritage and recruited by quota sampling by age, gender, working status, in two English cities. The main outcomes include self-reported health, symptoms of anxiety and depression (common mental disorders), and vulnerability to violent radicalization assessed by sympathies for violent protest and terrorist acts. Results 2.4% of people showed some sympathy for violent protest and terrorist acts. Sympathy was more likely to be articulated by the under 20s, those in full time education rather than employment, those born in the UK, those speaking English at home, and high earners (>£75,000 a year). People with poor self-reported health were less likely to show sympathies for violent protest and terrorism. Anxiety and depressive symptoms, adverse life events and socio-political attitudes showed no associations. Conclusions Sympathies for violent protest and terrorism were uncommon among men and women, aged 18–45, of Muslim heritage living in two English cities. Youth, wealth, and being in education rather than employment were risk factors. PMID:24599058

Bhui, Kamaldeep; Warfa, Nasir; Jones, Edgar

2014-01-01

234

Taking Inventory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A science kit inventory introduces students to tools and vocabulary, paving the way for successful science experiences. While it is an effective strategy for all students, it is especially useful for English Learners. This article describes how kit inventories are conducted and what role each step plays in both conceptual development and the internalization of academic vocabulary.

Leslie Garrison

2006-01-01

235

Neuropsychological performance, impulsivity, ADHD symptoms, and novelty seeking in compulsive buying disorder  

PubMed Central

We examined the neuropsychological performance of people with compulsive buying disorder (CBD) and control subjects, along with trait impulsivity, symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and selected personality characteristics. Subjects received a comprehensive neuropsychological test battery, depression and ADHD symptom assessment, the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale, and a version of the Temperament and Character Inventory. Persons with CBD (n=26) and controls (n=32) were comparable in terms of age, sex, and years of education. Subjects with CBD had a mean age of 36.3 years (S.D.=15.7) and an age at onset of 19.7 years (S.D.=7.0). Compulsive buyers had more lifetime mood, anxiety, and impulse control disorders. People with Compulsive buying performed significantly better on the Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence Picture Completion task, a test of visual perception; otherwise, there were no consistent differences in neuropsychological measures. They also had elevated levels of self-reported depression, ADHD symptoms, trait impulsivity, and novelty seeking. In conclusion, compulsive buyers have greater lifetime psychiatric comorbidity than controls, and higher levels of self-rated depression, ADHD symptoms, trait impulsivity, and novelty seeking. The present study does not support the notion that there is a pattern of neuropsychological deficits associated with CBD. PMID:22766012

Black, Donald Wayne; Shaw, Martha; McCormick, Brett; Bayless, John David; Allen, Jeff

2013-01-01

236

The Differentiation of Self Inventory: Development and Initial Validation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The development and initial validation of a new self-report instrument, the Differentiation of Self Inventory (DSI), are presented. The DSI represents the first attempt to create a multidimensional measure of differentiation based on Bowen Theory, focusing specifically on adults (aged over 25 years), their current significant relationships, and…

Skowron, Elizabeth A.; Friedlander, Myrna L.

237

Issues and recommendations regarding use of the Beck Depression Inventory  

Microsoft Academic Search

Issues concerning use of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) for the self-report of depressive symptomatology are raised and considered. Discussion includes the stability of depression and the need for multiple assessment periods, specificity and the need for multiple assessment measures, and selection cut scores and the need for terminological accuracy. Recommendations for the continued use of the BDI, designed to

Philip C. Kendall; Steven D. Hollon; Aaron T. Beck; Constance L. Hammen; Rick E. Ingram

1987-01-01

238

Development and Initial Validation of the Iowa Sleep Disturbances Inventory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Iowa Sleep Disturbances Inventory (ISDI) is a new measure of self-reported sleep difficulties, which was designed to help facilitate research on the overlap of sleep disturbances and psychopathology. This instrument was developed in two large student samples using principal factor analyses; the psychometric properties of the scales were then…

Koffel, Erin; Watson, David

2010-01-01

239

Penn Inventory for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: Psychometric Properties.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A three-phase study was conducted to develop and validate the Penn Inventory for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), a 26-item self-report measure. Results with 83 and 98 combat veterans and with 76 general population patients and disaster survivors support usefulness of the measure. (SLD)

Hammarberg, Melvyn

1992-01-01

240

Development and Validation of the Food-Craving Inventory  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: The primary aim of this study was to develop and validate the Food-Craving Inventory (FCI), a self-report measure of specific food cravings.Research Methods and Procedures: In a preliminary study, participants (n = 474) completed the initial version of the FCI. The results from this study were used in developing the revised FCI. Participants (n = 379) completed the revised

Marney A. White; Brooke L. Whisenhunt; Donald A. Williamson; Frank L. Greenway; Richard G. Netemeyer

2002-01-01

241

Interrelation of self-report, behavioural and electrophysiological measures assessing pain-related information processing  

PubMed Central

INTRODUCTION: A number of variables reflecting attentional and emotional mechanisms of processing pain-related information have recently attracted interest, ie, fear of pain, pain catastrophizing, hypervigilance and attentional bias to pain. These variables can be assessed by explicit measures based on conscious self-report, or by implicit measures assessing mainly preconscious stages of information processing such as behavioural or electrophysiological tests. Convergent validity within implicit measures was assumed to be high, as was the discriminant validity between implicit and explicit measures. METHOD: In the present study, two implicit measures (the dot-probe task for pain words and a word-processing task for pain words allowing event-related brain potential recordings) and three self-report measures (Pain Catastrophizing Scale, Pain Anxiety Symptoms Scale, and Pain Hypervigilance and Awareness Questionnaire) were administered to 27 healthy participants. RESULTS: No significant associations were found between the implicit measures, or between the event-related brain potentials of pain words and the explicit measures. A single significant positive correlation was found between the dot-probe pain bias and the Pain Anxiety Symptoms Scale. CONCLUSION: All variables appeared to be only weakly associated. The attempt to organize the field of variables targeting attentional and emotional mechanisms of processing pain-related information using concepts such as implicit and explicit measures failed as far as the present test on convergent/discriminant validity proved. PMID:21369539

Dittmar, Oliver; Krehl, Rüdiger; Lautenbacher, Stefan

2011-01-01

242

Association of Depressive Symptoms with Hippocampal Volume in 1936 Adults  

PubMed Central

Hippocampal atrophy is reported in major depressive disorder (MDD). However, sample sizes were generally modest, and participant characteristics, including age, differed between studies. This study used a community sample to examine relationships between current depressive symptom severity and hippocampal volume across the adult lifespan. A total of 1936 adults with magnetic resonance images of the brain and Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology Self-Report (QIDS-SR) scores were included. Brain volumes were quantified using the FSL program. Multiple linear regressions were performed using left, right, and total hippocampal volume as criterion variables, and predictor variables of QIDS-SR total, total brain volume, age, gender, education, psychotropic medications, alcohol use, and race/ethnicity. Post hoc analyses were conducted in participants with QIDS-SR scores ?11 (moderate or greater depressive symptom severity) and <11, and older and younger adults. In the primary analysis (sample as a whole) QIDS-SR was inversely associated with total hippocampal volume (b=?0.044, p=0.032, (CI?0.019 to ?0.001)) but not with left or right hippocampal volume evaluated individually. In participants with QIDS-SR scores of <11, hippocampal volumes were not associated with QIDS-SR scores. In those with QIDS-SR scores ?11 total, right, and left hippocampal volumes were modestly, but significantly, associated with QIDS-SR scores. The association between QIDS-SR scores and the hippocampal volume was much stronger in older persons. Findings suggest smaller hippocampal volumes among those with greater reported depressive symptom severity—an association that is strongest in people with at least moderate depressive symptom levels. PMID:24220026

Brown, E Sherwood; Hughes, Carroll W; McColl, Roderick; Peshock, Ronald; King, Kevin S; Rush, A John

2014-01-01

243

Association of depressive symptoms with hippocampal volume in 1936 adults.  

PubMed

Hippocampal atrophy is reported in major depressive disorder (MDD). However, sample sizes were generally modest, and participant characteristics, including age, differed between studies. This study used a community sample to examine relationships between current depressive symptom severity and hippocampal volume across the adult lifespan. A total of 1936 adults with magnetic resonance images of the brain and Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology Self-Report (QIDS-SR) scores were included. Brain volumes were quantified using the FSL program. Multiple linear regressions were performed using left, right, and total hippocampal volume as criterion variables, and predictor variables of QIDS-SR total, total brain volume, age, gender, education, psychotropic medications, alcohol use, and race/ethnicity. Post hoc analyses were conducted in participants with QIDS-SR scores ?11 (moderate or greater depressive symptom severity) and <11, and older and younger adults. In the primary analysis (sample as a whole) QIDS-SR was inversely associated with total hippocampal volume (b=-0.044, p=0.032, (CI-0.019 to -0.001)) but not with left or right hippocampal volume evaluated individually. In participants with QIDS-SR scores of <11, hippocampal volumes were not associated with QIDS-SR scores. In those with QIDS-SR scores ?11 total, right, and left hippocampal volumes were modestly, but significantly, associated with QIDS-SR scores. The association between QIDS-SR scores and the hippocampal volume was much stronger in older persons. Findings suggest smaller hippocampal volumes among those with greater reported depressive symptom severity-an association that is strongest in people with at least moderate depressive symptom levels. PMID:24220026

Brown, E Sherwood; Hughes, Carroll W; McColl, Roderick; Peshock, Ronald; King, Kevin S; Rush, A John

2014-02-01

244

Passive smoking by self report and serum cotinine and the prevalence of respiratory and coronary heart disease in the Scottish heart health study  

Microsoft Academic Search

STUDY OBJECTIVE--To explore the relationship between self reported environmental tobacco smoke exposure (or passive smoking), the serum cotinine concentration, and evidence of respiratory or coronary disease in men and women who have never smoked. DESIGN--Cross sectional random population survey identifying disease markers and relating them to measures of passive smoking. Disease markers were previous medical diagnoses, response to standard symptom

H Tunstall-Pedoe; C A Brown; M Woodward; R Tavendale

1995-01-01

245

Validity of Self-Reported Substance Use In MSM  

PubMed Central

Purpose To understand the validity of self-reported recent drug use in men who have sex with men (MSM). Methods We obtained a probability sample of Chicago men who have sex with men(MSM; n=216) and administered urine and saliva drug testing following a self-administered interview. Analyses examined participation in drug testing, the agreement between self-reported past month drug use and drug test results, correlates of underreporting, and the relative utility of drug testing vs. self-reports in identifying recent marijuana and cocaine use. For marijuana and cocaine, findings were compared with those obtained from a general population sample of men (n=241). Results Over three quarters of the participants in both samples provided at least one specimen for drug testing. Self reports in both samples showed a high degree of correspondence with drug tests for marijuana, but not for cocaine. Sensitivity for cocaine use reporting was 60% for the MSM sample and 40% for the general population males. Conditional kappa and sensitivity statistics for marijuana, cocaine, MDMA and methamphetamine suggested that self reports among MSMare provided with a high degree of validity. Underreporting was a correlate of social class (education, income and employment) in the general population, but not in the MSM sample. The utility of drug testing was dependent on social class in the general population sample. Conclusions Drug testing is feasible in epidemiological surveys of drug use. Self reports among MSM are at least as valid as those provided by a general population sample of males. In some instances (e. g. , cocaine use), they may actually be of higher quality. Although the findings support the merit of epidemiological studies of MSM drug use that have relied completely on self-report, drug tests may be useful for clarifying club drug ingestion patterns. PMID:18693041

Fendrich, Michael; Mackesy-Amiti, Mary Ellen; Johnson, Timothy P.

2008-01-01

246

Identifying causes of disagreement between self-reports and spouse ratings of personality.  

PubMed

Self-reports and spouse ratings of personality traits typically show less-than-perfect agreement, but powerful moderators of agreement have not yet been identified. In Study 1, 47 married couples completed the Revised NEO Personality Inventory to describe themselves and their spouses. Extent of agreement was not consistently moderated by response sets; the age, intelligence, or education of the respondent; or the length or quality of the relationship. In Study 2 these couples were interviewed about reasons for substantial disagreements, and an audiotape was content-analyzed. Sixteen reasons were reliably coded, including idiosyncratic understanding of items, reference to different time frames or roles, and unavailability of covert experience to the spouse. Faking good, assumed similarity, and other variables prominent in the psychometric literature were relatively unimportant. Findings (1) suggest that attempts to improve the validity of self-reports and ratings may need to be refocused and (2) underscore the desirability of routinely obtaining multiple sources of information on personality. PMID:9615420

McCrae, R R; Stone, S V; Fagan, P J; Costa, P T

1998-06-01

247

Deficient fear conditioning and self-reported psychopathy: the role of fearless dominance.  

PubMed

The role of the two dimensions of psychopathy-dispositional fearlessness (theorized to reflect variations in reactivity of the brain's defensive system) and externalizing proneness (presumed to reflect variations in function of anterior regulatory systems)-in fear learning was examined in a sample of undergraduates assessed using the Psychopathic Personality Inventory-Revised (PPI-R) who participated in a differential aversive conditioning task. Only scores on self-reported "fearless dominance," irrespective of scores on "impulsive antisociality," were related to diminished acquisition of physiological fear. Consistent with dual-process accounts of psychopathy proposing divergent etiological pathways for the interpersonal/affective and the social deviance features of the disorder, our results lend support to the existence of a deficit in reactivity of the brain's defensive system underlying the fearlessness dimension of psychopathy. PMID:23240559

López, Raúl; Poy, Rosario; Patrick, Christopher J; Moltó, Javier

2013-02-01

248

Reliability and validity of two self-report measures of psychopathy.  

PubMed

The present study assessed the psychometric properties and construct validity of two self-report measures of psychopathy in a male-college sample: the Levenson Psychopathy scales (LPS; Levenson, Kiehl, & Fitzpatrick, 1995) and the Psychopathic Personality Inventory (PPI; Lilienfeld & Andrews, 1996). Both the LPS and the PPI demonstrated good internal consistency, although selected items from the PPI correlated weakly with their respective factor scores, suggesting the need for further investigation of the factors' item content. The PPI showed stronger validity than the LPS in terms of convergent and discriminant validity of its factor scores and factor associations with two criterion variables, aggression, and anxiety. Overall, the current study provides greater support for the use of the PPI over the LPS in studies investigating psychopathic traits in nonclinical and nonforensic samples. PMID:17986652

Falkenbach, Diana; Poythress, Norman; Falki, Marielle; Manchak, Sarah

2007-12-01

249

Sweet taste threshold for sucrose inversely correlates with depression symptoms in female college students in the luteal phase.  

PubMed

Influences of depression symptoms on the sweet taste threshold were investigated in healthy college students (30 males and 40 females). Depression symptoms were scored by SDS (Self-Rating Depression Scale), and anxiety levels by STAI (State- and Trait-Anxiety Inventory). Recognition thresholds for sucrose were determined. In female students, the menstrual phase on the day of the experiment was self-reported. Depression symptoms, anxiety levels, and the recognition threshold for sucrose were not different among the 3 groups, i.e. males, females in the follicular phase, and females in the luteal phase. Depression symptoms were positively correlated with state and trait anxiety in all groups. The sweet taste threshold was inversely correlated with depression symptoms (r=-0.472, p=0.031) and trait anxiety (r=-0.506, p=0.019) in females in the luteal phase. In males as well as females in the follicular phase, however, no correlation between sweet taste threshold and depression was found. The results show that the recognition threshold for sucrose reduces with increased depression in females with a higher anxiety trait, but only in the luteal phase. It is hypothesized that brain regions, which spatially overlap and are responsible for both aversive emotions and gustatory processing, are susceptible to periodic changes in gonadal hormones due to the menstrual cycle. PMID:25576640

Nagai, Masanori; Matsumoto, Sayaka; Endo, Junko; Sakamoto, Reiko; Wada, Maki

2015-03-15

250

Symptom Characteristics of Counseling Center and Mental Health Service Clients.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Students requesting personal counseling at a counseling center and a university mental health service were administered the SCL-90, a self-report symptom rating scale. Results indicate no significant difference between users of the counseling center and of the mental health service when compared on distress associated with presenting symptoms.…

Aniskiewicz, Albert S.

1979-01-01

251

Physical Symptoms and Psychological Distress among Inhalant Users.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Among 110 Mexican-American adolescents with varying drug use histories, self-reported physical health problems were not related to inhalant use history, but blood analyses indicated a relationship between extensive inhalant use and liver problems. Psychological distress symptoms were related to inhalant use and physical symptoms. Contains 23…

Joe, George W.; And Others

1991-01-01

252

Social Support and Symptom Etiology: Implications for Patient Education  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study evaluated the relationship between organic involvement in symptom etiologies and levels of self-reported loneliness. Among 107 students visiting a university health center, a negative correlation was found between levels of loneliness and suspected organic involvement in symptom etiology (r = -.267, p = .01). Findings from this study support the use of loneliness assessments as part of initial

Steven R. Hawks; Amy Ann Croney

253

Prediction of posttraumatic stress symptoms in children after Hurricane Andrew  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors used an integrative conceptual model to examine the emergence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in 568 elementary school-age children 3 months after Hurricane An- drew. The model included 4 primary factors: Exposure to Traumatic Events, Child Characteristics, Access to Social Support, and Children's Coping. Overall, 62% of the variance in children's self- reported PTSD symptoms was accounted

Eric M. Vernberg; Annette M. La Greca; Wendy K. Silverman; Mitchell J. Prinstein

1996-01-01

254

PTSD Symptoms in Abused Latino Children  

Microsoft Academic Search

This exploratory study looks at a sample of abused Latino children and evaluates the relationship of PTSD symptoms to other symptoms, characteristics of the abuse, and demographics. The results indicate that Latino children have a wide range of distress, with some children being highly symptomatic and others with few symptoms. The scores on the PTSD Inventory were related to scores

Ferol E. Mennen

2004-01-01

255

An investigation of the factor structure of the beck depression inventory-II in anorexia nervosa.  

PubMed

Symptoms of depression frequently co-occur with eating disorders and have been associated with negative outcomes. Self-report measures such as the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) are commonly used to assess for the presence of depressive symptoms in eating disorders, but the instrument's factor structure in this population has not been examined. The purposes of this study were to explore the factor structure of the BDI-II in a sample of individuals (N?=?437) with anorexia nervosa undergoing inpatient treatment and to examine changes in depressive symptoms on each of the identified factors following a course of treatment for anorexia nervosa in order to provide evidence supporting the construct validity of the measure. Exploratory factor analysis revealed that a three-factor model reflected the best fit for the data. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to validate this model against competing models and the three-factor model exhibited strong model fit characteristics. BDI-II scores were significantly reduced on all three factors following inpatient treatment, which supported the construct validity of the scale. The BDI-II appears to be reliable in this population, and the factor structure identified through this analysis may offer predictive utility for identifying individuals who may have more difficulty achieving weight restoration in the context of inpatient treatment. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association. PMID:25504530

Fuss, Samantha; Trottier, Kathryn; Carter, Jacqueline

2015-01-01

256

Self-reported ability assessment in rock climbing.  

PubMed

Level of ability within rock climbing is generally expressed in terms of a "best ascent", rated using various grading systems within the sport. The most common method of obtaining this information is via self-report. The aim of this study was to examine the validity of self-reported climbing grades. Twenty-nine competitive rock climbers (17 males, 12 females) were first asked to report their current (defined as within the last 12 months) best on-sight lead ascent grade (Aus/NZ). The participants then climbed a specifically designed indoor route, under on-sight conditions (one attempt, no route practice or preview), to obtain an assessed grade. The route increased in difficulty, and was such that the distance achieved by the climber corresponded to a particular grade. The mean (±standard deviation) self-reported and assessed grade was 22.6 ± 3.4 and 22.0 ± 3.0 (Aus/NZ) respectively. Despite slight over- and underestimations in males and females respectively, there was no statistically significant difference between self-reported and assessed on-sight climbing grades. The results of this study suggest that self-reported climbing grades provide a valid and accurate reflection of climbing ability. PMID:21491325

Draper, Nick; Dickson, Tabitha; Blackwell, Gavin; Fryer, Simon; Priestley, Sefton; Winter, David; Ellis, Greg

2011-05-01

257

The Nomological Network of Self-Reported Distress Tolerance.  

PubMed

Distress tolerance (DT), or the ability to withstand psychological distress, is a popular construct in the psychological literature. However, research has not specified the nomological network of DT across self-report measures. The purpose of the current investigation was to understand what personality features, environmental stressors, current affective states, and behaviors contribute to DT in two different samples: college students and those in residential substance use treatment. Correlations revealed that self-reported DT was most strongly associated with trait negative emotionality, state negative affect, impulsivity, and perceived stress. In comparisons across samples, self-harm exhibited a stronger relationship with self-reported DT in the drug treatment than in the student sample, whereas perceived stress had a stronger association in the student sample. Correlations between self-report and behavioral measures of DT were nonsignificant. To understand this lack of associations, associations of outcomes with behavioral measures were assessed. In contrast to self-reported DT, behavioral DT was more closely related to achievement orientation, state negative affect, and state positive affect, but was not significantly related to psychopathology and maladaptive behaviors. It is necessary to continue investigating the construct validity of behavioral DT measures via the use of incremental utility analyses and experimental approaches. PMID:25475104

Kiselica, Andrew M; Rojas, Elizabeth; Bornovalova, Marina A; Dube, Chad

2014-12-01

258

Signal-detection properties of verbal self-reports.  

PubMed Central

The bias (B'H) and discriminability (A') of college students' self-reports about choices made in a delayed identity matching-to-sample task were studied as a function of characteristics of the response about which they reported. Each matching-to-sample trial consisted of two, three, or four simultaneously presented sample stimuli, a 1-s retention interval, and two, three, or four comparison stimuli. One sample stimulus was always reproduced among the comparisons, and choice of the matching comparison in less than 800 ms produced points worth chances in a drawing for money. After each choice, subjects pressed either a "yes" or a "no" button to answer a computer-generated query about whether the choice met the point contingency. The number of sample and comparison stimuli was manipulated across experimental conditions. Rates of successful matching-to-sample choices were negatively correlated with the number of matching-to-sample stimuli, regardless of whether samples or comparisons were manipulated. As in previous studies, subjects exhibited a pronounced bias for reporting successful responses. Self-report bias tended to become less pronounced as matching-to-sample success became less frequent, an outcome consistent with signal-frequency effects in psychophysical research. The bias was also resistant to change, suggesting influences other than signal frequency that remain to be identified. Self-report discriminability tended to decrease with the number of sample stimuli and increase with the number of comparison stimuli, an effect not attributable to differential effects of the two manipulations on matching-to-sample performance. Overall, bias and discriminability indices revealed effects that were not evident in self-report accuracy scores. The results indicate that analyses based on signal-detection theory can improve the description of correspondence between self-reports and their referents and thus contribute to the identification of environmental sources of control over verbal self-reports. PMID:8283146

Critchfield, T S

1993-01-01

259

Symptom Management  

Cancer.gov

Symptom Management & Quality of Life Concept Design This video covers a variety of practical considerations for developing a symptom management concept for clinical research.. Co-sponsored by the National Cancer Institute Symptom Management and Health

260

Self-reported tinnitus and noise sensitivity among adolescents in Sweden.  

PubMed

It seems to be a common opinion among researchers within the field of audiology that the prevalence of tinnitus will increase as a consequence of environmental factors, for example exposure to loud noise. Young people are exposed to loud sounds, more than any other age group, especially during leisure time activities, i.e. at pop concerts, discotheques and gyms. A crucial factor for the prevention of hearing impairments and hearing-related symptoms in the young population is the use of hearing protection. The focus of the present study is use of hearing protection and self-reported hearing-related symptoms, such as tinnitus and noise sensitivity in a young population of high-school students (N=1285), aged 13 to 19 years. The results show that the prevalence of permanent tinnitus and noise sensitivity, reported in the total group, was 8.7% and 17.1% respectively. Permanent tinnitus was not significantly related to level of socio-economic status, but age-related differences in the prevalence rates of experienced tinnitus and noise sensitivity were found to be significant. Older students reported such symptoms to a greater extent than younger students did. Those who reported tinnitus and other hearing-related symptoms protected their hearing to the highest extent and were the ones most worried. PMID:15703147

Widén, S E Olsen; Erlandsson, S I

2004-01-01

261

The Construct Validity of Three Self-Report Instruments Hypothesized to Measure the Degree of Resolution for Each of the First Six Stage Crises in Erikson's Developmental Theory of Personality  

Microsoft Academic Search

For a sample of 160 university students (56 males and 104 females) the major purpose of this study was to obtain evidence for the construct validity of each of three self-report inventories that had been designed to reflect the degree of successful or unsuccessful resolution of each of the first six of Erikson's eight stage crises within a theory of

Kenneth C. Caillet; William B. Michael

1983-01-01

262

Development and preliminary validation of a self-report measure of psychopathic personality traits in noncriminal populations.  

PubMed

Research on psychopathology has been hindered by persisting difficulties and controversies regarding its assessment. The primary goals of this set of studies were to (a) develop, and initiate the construct validation of, a self-report measure that assesses the major personality traits of psychopathy in noncriminal populations and (b) clarify the nature of these traits via an exploratory approach to test construction. This measure, the Psychopathic Personality Inventory (PPI), was developed by writing items to assess a large number of personality domains relevant to psychopathy and performing successive item-level factor analyses and revisions on three undergraduate samples. The PPI total score and its eight subscales were found to possess satisfactory internal consistency and test-retest reliability. In four studies with undergraduates, the PPI and its subscales exhibited a promising pattern of convergent and discriminant validity with self-report, psychiatric interview, observer rating, and family history data. In addition, the PPI total score demonstrated incremental validity relative to several commonly used self-report psychopathy-related measures. Future construct validation studies, unresolved conceptual issues regarding the assessment of psychopathy, and potential research uses of the PPI are outlined. PMID:8667144

Lilienfeld, S O; Andrews, B P

1996-06-01

263

Weight Misperception, Self-Reported Physical Fitness, Dieting and Some Psychological Variables as Risk Factors for Eating Disorders  

PubMed Central

The aims of the current study were to explore possible gender differences in weight misperception, self-reported physical fitness, and dieting, and to analyze the relationship between these variables and others, such as self-esteem, body appreciation, general mental health, and eating- and body image-related variables among adolescents. In addition, the specific risk for eating disorders was examined, as well as the possible clusters with respect to the risk status. The sample comprised 655 students, 313 females and 342 males, aged 16.22 ± 4.58. Different scales of perceived overweight, self-reported physical fitness and dieting together with the Body Mass Index (BMI) were considered along with instruments such as the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ), General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28), Self-Esteem Scale (SES), Body Appreciation Scale (BAS) and Eating Disorders Inventory-2 (EDI-2). Since some gender differences were found with respect to these adolescent groups, it is necessary to design prevention programs that not only focus on traditional factors such as BMI or body image, but also on elements like weight perception, self-reported fitness and nutritional education. PMID:24232917

Jáuregui-Lobera, Ignacio; Ezquerra-Cabrera, Mercedes; Carbonero-Carreño, Rocío; Ruiz-Prieto, Inmaculada

2013-01-01

264

Sexual Compulsivity Scale, Compulsive Sexual Behavior Inventory, and Hypersexual Disorder Screening Inventory: Translation, Adaptation, and Validation for Use in Brazil.  

PubMed

Epidemiological, behavioral, and clinical data on sexual compulsivity in Brazil are very limited. This study sought to adapt and validate the Sexual Compulsivity Scale (SCS), the 22-item version of the Compulsive Sexual Behavior Inventory (CSBI-22), and the Hypersexual Disorder Screening Inventory (HDSI) for use in Brazil. A total of 153 participants underwent psychiatric assessment and completed self-reported measures. The adaptation process of the instruments from English to Portuguese followed the guidelines of the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research. The reliability and validity of the HDSI criteria were evaluated and the construct validity of all measures was examined. For the SCS and HDSI, factor analysis revealed one factor for each measure. For the CSBI-22, four factors were retained although we only calculated the scores of two factors (control and violence). All scores had good internal consistency (alpha >.75), presented high temporal stability (>.76), discriminated between patients and controls, and presented strong (? > .81) correlations with the Sexual Addiction Screening Test (except for the violence domain = .40) and moderate correlations with the Impulsive Sensation Seeking domain of the Zuckerman Kuhlman Personality Questionnaire (? between .43 and .55). The sensitivity of the HDSI was 71.93 % and the specificity was 100 %. All measures showed very good psychometric properties. The SCS, the HDSI, and the control domain of the CSBI-22 seemed to measure theoretically similar constructs, as they were highly correlated (? > .85). The findings support the conceptualization of hypersexuality as a cluster of problematic symptoms that are highly consistent across a variety of measures. PMID:25348356

Scanavino, Marco de T; Ventuneac, Ana; Rendina, H Jonathon; Abdo, Carmita H N; Tavares, Hermano; Amaral, Maria L S do; Messina, Bruna; Reis, Sirlene C Dos; Martins, João P L B; Gordon, Marina C; Vieira, Julie C; Parsons, Jeffrey T

2014-10-28

265

Relationship between anxiety, anxiety sensitivity and conduct disorder symptoms in children and adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).  

PubMed

Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is often comorbid with anxiety disorders and previous studies observed that anxiety could have an impact on the clinical course of ADHD and comorbid disruptive behavioral disorders (conduct disorders and oppositional-defiant disorders). Anxiety sensitivity (AS) is a different concept from anxiety per se and it is believed to represent the constitutionally based sensitivity of individuals to anxiety and anxiety symptoms. We aimed to assess the associations between anxiety, AS and symptoms of disruptive behavioral disorders (DBD) in a clinical sample of children and adolescents with ADHD. The sample consisted of 274 treatment naive children with ADHD aged 8-17 years. The severity of ADHD symptoms and comorbid DBD were assessed via parent rated Turgay DSM-IV-Based Child and Adolescent Behavioral Disorders Screening and Rating Scale (T-DSM-IV-S), Conners' Parent Rating Scale (CPRS), and Conners' Teacher Rating Scale (CTRS). AS and severity of anxiety symptoms of children were evaluated by self-report inventories. The association between anxiety, AS, and DBD was evaluated using structural equation modeling. Analyses revealed that AS social subscale scores negatively predicted symptoms of conduct disorder (CD) reported in T-DSM-IV-S. On the other hand, CD symptoms positively predicted severity of anxiety. No direct relationships were detected between anxiety, AS and oppositional-defiant behavior scores in any scales. These results may suggest a protective effect of AS social area on the development of conduct disorder in the presence of a diagnosis of ADHD, while the presence of symptoms of CD may be a vulnerability factor for the development of anxiety symptoms in children and adolescents with ADHD. PMID:23460041

Bilgiç, Ayhan; Türko?lu, Serhat; Ozcan, Ozlem; Tufan, Ali Evren; Y?lmaz, Sava?; Yüksel, Tu?ba

2013-09-01

266

Validity of self-reports of marital violence  

Microsoft Academic Search

The most commonly used and practiced method for assessing spouse abuse is the individual's self-report of engaging in or being a victim of physical aggression. However, the socially undesirable nature of relationship violence raises questions regarding the likelihood that it is accurately reported. The current investigation found that a socially desirable response set is related to willingness to report one's

Ileana Arias; Steven R. H. Beach

1987-01-01

267

Am I dyslexic? Parental self-report of literacy difficulties.  

PubMed

In the absence of criteria for the diagnosis of dyslexia, considerable weight is given to self-report, in particular in studies of children at family risk of dyslexia. The present paper uses secondary data from a previous study to compare parents who self-report as dyslexic and those who do not, in relation to objectively determined levels of ability. In general, adults are more likely to self-report as 'dyslexic' if they have poorer reading and spelling skills and also if there is a discrepancy between IQ and measured literacy. However, parents of higher social status who have mild literacy difficulties are more likely to self-report as dyslexic than parents who have weaker literacy skills but are less socially advantaged. Together the findings suggest that the judgement as to whether or not a parent considers themselves 'dyslexic' is made relative to others in the same social sphere. Those who are socially disadvantaged may, in turn, be less likely to seek support for their children. PMID:25185509

Leavett, Ruth; Nash, Hannah M; Snowling, Margaret J

2014-11-01

268

Anxiety Self Report (ASR (1,2,3,4,). X  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Anxiety Self Report (ASR 1,2,3,4) is provided, followed by information about the report. The ASR is discussed as to its development, description, response bias, scoring procedures, reliability, stability, validity, and correlation between the ASR and the Manifest Anxiety Scale. (For related documents, see TM 002 928, 929.) (DB)

Parsons, Jane S.

269

Transparency of Self-Report Racial Attitude Scales  

Microsoft Academic Search

Researchers frequently use self-report prejudice scales to assess predictors and outcomes. Responding to evidence that such instruments are vulnerable to social desirability pressures and diverge from implicit attitude measures, researchers have developed instruments intended to be less transparent in their social implications. The purpose of this study was to assess the transparency of a sample of such instruments. Participants completed

Jeffrey D. Holmes

2009-01-01

270

Validity Assessment of Self-Reported Construction Tasks  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study assessed agreement between workers’ and observers’ daily estimates of exposure to construction work tasks. The ultimate aimwas to develop a valid method and instrument for the collection of self-reported data on duration of exposure to a priori identified work tasks for use in characterizing exposure in settings with substantial task variability. Forty-nine shop workers and 52 construction site

Katherine L. Hunting; Elizabeth Haile; Lisa Nessel; Laura S. Welch

2010-01-01

271

Personality, Organizational Orientations and Self-Reported Learning Outcomes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: To identify competencies connecting personality, organizational orientations and self-reported learning outcomes (as measured by concise Likert-type scales), for individuals who are learning for their organizations. Design/methodology/approach: Five concise factor scales were constructed to represent aspects of personality. Three further…

Bamber, David; Castka, Pavel

2006-01-01

272

Measurement of self reported active exposure to cigarette smoke  

Microsoft Academic Search

STUDY OBJECTIVEThe number of cigarettes smoked per day is an imprecise indicator of exposure to cigarette smoke, and biochemical assessment of exposure is not always feasible. The aim of this study was to develop more accurate measures of self reported active exposure to cigarette smoke.DESIGNMail survey in 386 smokers, retest at one month in 94 participants (24%), analysis of saliva

J-F Etter; T V Perneger

2001-01-01

273

Variations in College Women's Self-Reported Heterosexual Aggression  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to provide an examination of differences in college women's self-reported heterosexual aggression between two samples. One sample of college women was drawn from three colleges in and around New York city (East; N = 212) and one was drawn from a midsized commuter university in Louisiana (South; N = 249). The respondents were questioned

Peter B. Anderson

1998-01-01

274

Self-reported offending, maturational reform, and the Easterlin hypothesis  

Microsoft Academic Search

The maturational reform hypothesis and the Easterlin cohort size hypothesis are used to specify models in which age, period, and cohort effects on self-reported crime and delinquency are estimated. Curvilinear effects, logarithmic transformations, and the distinction between prevalence and frequency of offending are considered. The maturational reform hypothesis is supported for general delinquency but not for serious (Index) delinquency, for

Scott Menard; Delbert S. Elliott

1990-01-01

275

Self-Report Measure of Financial Exploitation of Older Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: This study was designed to improve the measurement of financial exploitation (FE) by testing psychometric properties of the older adult financial exploitation measure (OAFEM), a client self-report instrument. Design and Methods: Rasch item response theory and traditional validation approaches were used. Questionnaires were administered by…

Conrad, Kendon J.; Iris, Madelyn; Ridings, John W.; Langley, Kate; Wilber, Kathleen H.

2010-01-01

276

Self-Report and Psychophysiological Responses to Fear Appeals  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study was designed to assess the relationship between self-report and psychophysiological responses to fear appeals and behavioral changes elicited by these. Ninety-two subjects watched one of four messages that varied in level of threat (high vs. low) and efficacy (high vs. low). Concomitantly, psychophysiological measures (heart rate and…

Ordonana, Juan R.; Gonzalez-Javier, Francisca; Espin-Lopez, Laura; Gomez-Amor, Jesus

2009-01-01

277

Differences of self-reported osteoarthritis disability and race.  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND: Differences in self-reported disability may be found for older black and white adults with knee osteoarthritis (OA). METHODS: This secondary analysis of data from a randomized single-blind clinical trial examined race differences in the relationship between self-reports and timed performance tests of walking. Study participants were 518 older adults (131 blacks, 387 whites), including 363 women and 155 men, with an average age of 68.6 years. RESULTS: Older black and white adults with radiographically documented knee OA reported equivalent functional ability and pain severity. However, both blacks' OA severity rating and tested performance were significantly worse than those of whites. Self-report and tested walking performance were significantly less correlated among black older adults than among white older adults. Analyses of potential confounding variables documented that the difference was not due to marital status, gender, education, income, body mass index, comorbidity, pain level, OA severity or general health. CONCLUSIONS: Self-reports of OA disability were less related to tested performance for walking among black older adults. Clinicians' knowledge of black patients' underestimation of their disability has compelling potential for improving clinical treatment and enhancing diagnostic approaches to care of older adults. PMID:17913116

Burns, Robert; Graney, Marshall J.; Lummus, Allan C.; Nichols, Linda O.; Martindale-Adams, Jennifer

2007-01-01

278

Information processing difficulty long after self-reported concussion  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recovery of cognitive function after mild head injury (MHI) is thought to be relatively swift and complete. The present study replicates and extends previous work in which university students with self-reported concussion demonstrated reduced P300 amplitude on a set of easy and difficult attention tasks, in addition to performing more poorly than controls on demanding cognitive tasks many years after

DANIEL M. BERNSTEIN

2002-01-01

279

A test of the construct validity of the Five-Factor Narcissism Inventory.  

PubMed

The Five-Factor Narcissism Inventory (FFNI) is a new self-report measure that was developed to assess traits associated with grandiose and vulnerable narcissism from a Five-factor model (FFM) perspective. In a sample of undergraduates (N = 283), the relations among the FFNI scales, grandiose and vulnerable dimensions, and an array of relevant criteria were examined including self- and informant reports of the Big Five domains, measures of the Dark Triad, ratings of the interpersonal circumplex, externalizing and internalizing behaviors and symptoms, and romantic and attachment styles. The FFNI grandiose and vulnerable dimensions demonstrated good convergent and criterion validity. The FFNI grandiose and vulnerable dimensions manifested converging (e.g., disagreeableness, low love/communion, psychopathy, Machiavellianism, Ludus/Manic love styles) and diverging (e.g., neuroticism, extraversion, dominance, externalizing, internalizing, attachment anxiety) relations in a manner largely consistent with predictions. The FFNI joins the Pathological Narcissism Inventory as a measure that can simultaneously assess both grandiose and vulnerable dimensions of narcissism. PMID:23186210

Miller, Joshua D; Gentile, Brittany; Campbell, W Keith

2013-01-01

280

A chinese translation of the inventory of interpersonal problems-short circumplex.  

PubMed

The Inventory of Interpersonal Problems-Short Circumplex (IIP-SC) is a self-report measure of subjective distress linked to behavioral excesses and inhibitions in social relationships. The IIP-SC exhibits circumplex structure reflecting the underlying dimensions of dominance-submissiveness and warmth-coldness. We translated the IIP-SC into Mandarin Chinese using rigorous translation and back-translation methods with independent native speakers. University students in the People's Republic of China (N = 401) completed the translated IIP-SC and the Chinese Personality Assessment Inventory (CPAI-2), an omnibus measure of indigenous personality trait dimensions and symptoms of psychopathology. The circumplex structure of the Chinese IIP-SC was confirmed using principal components analysis, a randomization test for hypothesized order relations, and confirmatory circumplex analysis. The validity of the Chinese IIP-SC was evaluated by examining its associations with the CPAI-2 scales. Validity evidence for Chinese translation of the IIP-SC extends its use for clinical assessment to native Chinese speakers, although ongoing work to improve its reliability is needed. PMID:25365777

Wu, Leila Z; Roche, Michael J; Dowgwillo, Emily A; Wang, Shuo; Pincus, Aaron L

2015-01-01

281

Reliability of a self-reported health questionnaire in a periodontal disease study.  

PubMed

This study assesses the reliability of a self-reported health questionnaire completed by 413 subjects aged 25-74 yr in the Erie County Periodontal Disease (ECPD) Study. Specific questions on general and oral health conditions were completed by each subject during a first visit and at a follow-up examination 2 yr later, and the two compared. Results showed that the overall measure of agreement between the two visits is substantial (average kappa, kappa = 0.80). Variation by gender and age were minimal. Questions regarding allergy to medications, oral treatment, reason for tooth extraction, health symptoms and history of systemic diseases exhibited high levels of agreement (kappa ranged from 0.71-0.90). Information on vitamin and mineral intake yielded kappa = 0.63. Oral conditions scored the lowest but were still acceptable (kappa = 0.57). These findings indicate that there were no significant discrepancies in self-reported responses to the health questionnaire used in the ECPD Study. Although the information provided by the subject may not be as accurate as compared to laboratory testing, it is nevertheless a reliable source of information which can be utilized cost-effectively in research studies. PMID:9409459

Ho, A W; Grossi, S G; Dunford, R G; Genco, R J

1997-11-01

282

Multiwave Associations Between Depressive Symptoms and Endothelial Function in Adolescent and Young Adult Females  

PubMed Central

Objective Depression has been linked to endothelial dysfunction, and some research suggests that past depressive episodes are associated with a lasting, negative impact on the endothelium. However, investigations in this area have been predominantly cross-sectional, raising questions about the direction of these associations. Using a multiwave design, we sought to extend previous research in this area by examining whether depressive symptoms have a lasting negative influence on endothelial function. Methods A total of 135 adolescent and young adult females with no known or suspected major health problems were followed for 2½ years. Endothelial function was assessed at three time points throughout the study. The Beck Depression Inventory was administered, and information about health practices was collected every 6 months. Results Self-reported depressive symptoms covaried with endothelial functioning on a within-person basis (? = ?0.23, p < .05). As a participant’s depression symptoms rose beyond her typical level, her endothelial function declined commensurately. This association persisted after controlling for health practices and adiposity. There was no evidence that depressive symptoms predicted endothelial function at later time points or interacted with time to predict the trajectories of endothelial function over the follow-up period. Conclusions Depressive symptoms were concurrently associated with endothelial function in this cohort of healthy adolescent girls and young women. On visits when participants endorsed depressive symptoms that were higher than their mean level of depression, they tended to have worse endothelial function. We did not observe a lasting negative effect of depression on endothelial function. PMID:21715299

Tomfohr, Lianne M.; Murphy, Michael L.M.; Miller, Gregory E.; Puterman, Eli

2011-01-01

283

A self-report comorbidity questionnaire for haemodialysis patients  

PubMed Central

Background Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) have multiple comorbid conditions. Obtaining comorbidity data from medical records is cumbersome. A self-report comorbidity questionnaire is a useful alternative. Our aim in this study was to examine the predictive value of a self-report comorbidity questionnaire in terms of survival in ESRD patients. Methods We studied a prospective cross-sectional cohort of 282 haemodialysis (HD) patients in a single centre. Participants were administered the self-report questionnaire during an HD session. Information on their comorbidities was subsequently obtained from an examination of the patient’s medical records. Levels of agreement between parameters derived from the questionnaire, and from the medical records, were examined. Participants were followed-up for 18 months to collect survival data. The influence on survival of comorbidity scores derived from the self-report data (the Composite Self-report Comorbidity Score [CSCS]) and from medical records data - the Charlson Comorbidity Index [CCI] were compared. Results The level of agreement between the self-report items and those obtained from medical records was almost perfect with respect the presence of diabetes (Kappa score ? 0.97), substantial for heart disease and cancer (? 0.62 and ? 0.72 respectively), moderate for liver disease (? 0.51), only fair for lung disease, arthritis, cerebrovascular disease, and depression (? 0.34, 0.35, 0.34 and 0.29 respectively). The CSCS was strongly predictive of survival in regression models (Nagelkerke R2 value 0.202), with a predictive power similar to that of the CCI (Nagelkerke R2 value 0.211). The influences of these two parameters were additive in the models – suggesting that these parameters make different contributions to the assessment of comorbidity. Conclusion This self-report comorbidity questionnaire is a viable tool to collect comorbidity data and may have a role in the prediction of short-term survival in patients with end-stage renal disease on haemodialysis. Further work is required in this setting to refine the tool and define its role. PMID:25135668

2014-01-01

284

Self-reported quality of life and diabetic foot infections.  

PubMed

Foot infections in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) are serious complications that can result in hospitalization, the need for amputation, and premature mortality. To the best of our knowledge, no published studies have specifically investigated the effect of diabetic foot infection (DFI) on patient quality of life. The aim of the present study was to compare the self-reported assessments of quality of life in patients hospitalized with DFIs with those from a group of patients without foot infections. We evaluated a study group of 47 patients who had been hospitalized with DFIs and a control group of 47 patients with DM who did not have any complaints referable to their foot or ankle. The self-reported outcomes were assessed using the Medical Outcomes Study short form 36-item health survey (SF-36) and the Foot and Ankle Ability Measurement. Patients hospitalized with DFIs had significantly reduced self-reported SF-36 scores in all 8 subscales compared with the cohort of patients with DM without foot complaints. The SF-36 physical component and mental component scores were significantly reduced in patients with DFIs, indicating a negative effect on overall health. Self-reported lower extremity function was also negatively affected with significantly lower Foot and Ankle Measurement activity of daily living and sports scores for patients with DFI. The present study has demonstrated the profoundly negative affect that moderate and severe DFIs have on self-reported quality of life, affecting both physical and mental well-being and lower extremity function. PMID:25128305

Raspovic, Katherine M; Wukich, Dane K

2014-01-01

285

Associations between chronotype, sleep quality, suicidality, and depressive symptoms in patients with major depression and healthy controls.  

PubMed

Research interest concerning associations between sleep characteristics and suicidality in psychopathology has been growing. However, possible linkages of suicidality to sleep characteristics in terms of sleep quality and chronotypes among depressive patients have not been well documented. In the current study, the authors investigated the possible effects of sleep quality and chronotype on the severity of depressive symptoms and suicide risk in patients with depressive disorder and healthy controls. The study was conducted on 80 patients clinically diagnosed with major depression and 80 healthy subjects who were demographically matched with the patient group. All participants completed a questionnaire package containing self-report measures, including the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire (MEQ), and Suicide Ideation Scale (SIS), and subjects were interviewed with the suicidality section of the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI). Results are as follows: (a) logistic regression analyses revealed that poor sleep quality and depression symptom severity significantly predicted onset of major depression; (b) morningness-type circadian rhythm may play as a significant relief factor after onset of major depression; (c) sleep variables of chronotype and sleep quality did not significantly predict suicide ideation after controlling for depressive symptoms in the major depression group; and (d) suicide ideation and poor sleep quality were antecedents of depression symptom severity in patients with major depression, and in healthy controls. Findings are discussed under the theoretical assumptions concerning possible relations between chronotype, sleep quality, depression, and suicidality. PMID:20969525

Selvi, Yavuz; Aydin, Adem; Boysan, Murat; Atli, Abdullah; Agargun, Mehmed Yucel; Besiroglu, Lutfullah

2010-10-01

286

Psychological Symptoms and Drug Use Severity among Israeli Adolescents Presenting for Outpatient Drug Abuse Treatment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The objective of this study was to assess the rates of externalizing and internalizing symptoms, and the relation between psychological symptoms and drug use severity, among 117 Israeli adolescents presenting for outpatient drug abuse treatment. Psychological symptoms were assessed via both adolescent self-report and parent report. Drug use was…

Diamond, G.M.; Izzard, M.C.; Kedar, T.; Hutlzer, A.; Mell, H.

2005-01-01

287

Aerobic Exercise Training for Depressive Symptom Management in Adults Living With HIV Infection  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aerobic exercise training may help prevent or reduce depressive symptoms experienced by persons living with HIV infection. However, the psychological effects of aerobic exercise have not been studied exten- sively. This study evaluated the effects of an aerobic exercise training program on self-reported symptoms of depression in HIV-infected adults and examined the convergent validity of two widely used depressive symptom

Judith L. Neidig; Barbara A. Smith; Dale E. Brashers

2003-01-01

288

Emotion Regulation Skills Mediate the Effects of Shame on Eating Disorder Symptoms in Women  

Microsoft Academic Search

We examined the impact of negative affectivity, chronic shame, and emotion regulation skills on eating disorder symptoms in undergraduate women (N = 154). We hypothesized that self-reported emotion regulation skills would mediate the well-documented relationship between chronic shame and eating disorder symptoms. Results revealed that chronic shame predicted eating disorder symptoms over and above general negative affectivity. Further, difficulties with

Sumati Gupta; M. Zachary Rosenthal; Anthony D. Mancini; Jennifer S. Cheavens; Thomas R. Lynch

2008-01-01

289

The relation between self-reported psychopathic traits and distorted response styles: a meta-analytic review.  

PubMed

A concern among researchers is that self-report measures may not be valid indicators of psychopathic traits due to the core features of psychopathy (e.g., lying, deception/manipulation). The current study addresses this issue by combining effects sizes from studies published on or before March 31, 2010 to examine the relation between scores of 3 widely used self-report psychopathy measures--the Psychopathic Personality Inventory (PPI; Lilienfeld & Andrews, 1996) and its revised version (PPI-R; Lilienfeld & Widows, 2005) and Levenson's Self-Report Psychopathy scale (LSRP; Levenson, Kiehl, & Fitzpatrick, 1995) and scores on measures assessing response style (i.e., faking good and faking bad). Effect sizes were obtained from 45 studies for total, Factor 1, and Factor 2 scores (faking good: k = 54, 55, and 55, respectively; faking bad: k = 51, 50, and 50, respectively). Based on a random effects model, a significant negative association was found between social desirability/faking good and both total (r(w) = -.11, p < .01) and F2 (r(w) = -.16, p < .01) scores, and moderation analyses suggested that effect sizes varied as a function of psychopathy scale and validity scale used. Significant positive associations were also found between faking bad and both total (r(w) = .27, p < .05) and F2 (r(w) = .32, p < .05) scores. Also, moderation analyses suggested that effect sizes varied as a function of study location, psychopathy scale, and validity scale. Despite several limitations (e.g., inclusion of only published studies, limited moderators, exclusion of other measures), the general findings temper concerns of positive response bias and underscore the validity of self-report psychopathy scales. PMID:22452779

Ray, James V; Hall, Jason; Rivera-Hudson, Nicole; Poythress, Norman G; Lilienfeld, Scott O; Morano, Mario

2013-01-01

290

Children's and parents' daily stressful events and psychological symptoms  

Microsoft Academic Search

Associations of children's daily stressful events and their parents' daily hassles and psychological symptoms with children's emotional\\/behavioral problems were examined in a sample of fourth- and fifth-grade children and their parents. Correlational analyses indicated that children's self-reports of depressive symptoms were associated with children's daily stressors and mothers' daily hassles, and children's selfreports of anxiety symptoms were associated with children's

Gerard A. Banez; Bruce E. Compas

1990-01-01

291

Self-reported concussion history: impact of providing a definition of concussion  

PubMed Central

Background In recent years, the understanding of concussion has evolved in the research and medical communities to include more subtle and transient symptoms. The accepted definition of concussion in these communities has reflected this change. However, it is unclear whether this shift is also reflected in the understanding of the athletic community. What is known about the subject Self-reported concussion history is an inaccurate assessment of someone’s lifetime exposure to concussive brain trauma. However, unfortunately, in many cases it is the only available tool. Hypothesis/purpose We hypothesize that athletes’ self-reported concussion histories will be significantly greater after reading them the current definition of concussion, relative to the reporting when no definition was provided. An increase from baseline to post-definition response will suggest that athletes are unaware of the currently accepted medical definition. Study design Cross-sectional study of 472 current and former athletes. Methods Investigators conducted structured telephone interviews with current and former athletes between January 2010 and January 2013, asking participants to report how many concussions they had received in their lives. Interviewers then read participants a current definition of concussion, and asked them to re-estimate based on that definition. Results The two estimates were significantly different (Wilcoxon signed rank test: z=15.636, P<0.001). Comparison of the baseline and post-definition medians (7 and 15, respectively) indicated that the post-definition estimate was approximately twice the baseline. Follow-up analyses indicated that this effect was consistent across all levels of competition examined and across type of sport (contact versus non-contact). Conclusion Our results indicate that athletes’ current understandings of concussions are not consistent with a currently accepted medical definition. We strongly recommend that clinicians and researchers preface requests for self-reported concussion history with a definition. In addition, it is extremely important that researchers report the definition they used in published manuscripts of their work. What this study adds to existing knowledge Our study shows that unprompted reporting of concussion history produces results that are significantly different from those provided after a definition has been given, suggesting one possible mechanism to improve the reliability of self-reported concussion history across multiple individuals. PMID:24891816

Robbins, Clifford A; Daneshvar, Daniel H; Picano, John D; Gavett, Brandon E; Baugh, Christine M; Riley, David O; Nowinski, Christopher J; McKee, Ann C; Cantu, Robert C; Stern, Robert A

2014-01-01

292

Self-reported outcome following anterior transposition of ulnar nerve in the elderly.  

PubMed

Cubital tunnel syndrome is a common entrapment neuropathy of the upper limb. This condition can result in significant sensory disturbances and motor deficits in the distribution of the ulnar nerve. Surgical management of cubital tunnel syndrome is indicated when non-operative measures fail. However, in the elderly population, there may be a tendency to avoid surgery as nerve healing has been found to be poor. In our study, we reviewed the results of anterior transposition of ulnar nerve in patients 60 years of age and older. Our results were based on a self-reported outcome at a minimum of one year after surgery - 94.7% of our surgeries resulted in some improvement in symptoms experienced by the patients while there was an overall satisfaction rate of 83.3%. Based on our results, we recommend ulnar nerve transposition in the management of cubital tunnel syndrome in this group of patients if non-operative measures fail. PMID:21089190

Sreedharan, S; Yam, A K T; Tay, S C

2010-01-01

293

Self-reported musculoskeletal pain and working conditions among employees in the Swedish public sector.  

PubMed

Musculoskeletal disorders constitute a considerable public health problem, often resulting in sickness absence, particularly in public sector employees. Increased knowledge on how this is related to individual and work-related factors is required. The objective of this study was to investigate the associations between self-reported musculoskeletal pain and the following factors: physical and psychosocial work conditions, lifestyle, psychosomatic symptoms and sick leave. A comprehensive questionnaire was completed by a total of 2523 people, of which 87% were women and 13% men. The participants were employed in public hospitals, educational institutions, home care services for the elderly and domestic/catering services in a Swedish county. The response rate was 92%. Multiple logistic regression analyses showed that the high level of self-reported musculoskeletal pain was highly associated with strenuous physical and psychosocial work conditions. The physical factor with the highest odds ratio (OR) was working in a forward-bent position. High work demands was the most prominent psychosocial factor and distinctly associated with musculoskeletal pain among men. Physical work strain and other demanding working conditions, which were associated with musculoskeletal pain, were frequent among employees in home care services for the elderly and domestic/catering services. There was a strong association between long-term sick leave and high musculoskeletal pain. Furthermore, there was a strong association between a high level of musculoskeletal pain and the exhibition of psychosomatic symptoms in both women and men; this is an interaction that may intensify the total experience of illness and thus needs to be further investigated. PMID:17264418

Fjell, Ylva; Alexanderson, Kristina; Karlqvist, Lena; Bildt, Carina

2007-01-01

294

Social factors in childhood and risk of depressive symptoms among adolescents ¿ a longitudinal study in Stockholm, Sweden.  

PubMed

BackgroundIn Sweden, self-reported depressive symptoms have increased among young people of both genders, but little is known about social differences in the risk of depressive symptoms among adolescents in welfare states, where such differences can be less pronounced. Therefore, the aim was to investigate whether multiple measures of low social status in childhood affect depressive symptoms in adolescence. A secondary aim was to explore potential gender effect modification.MethodsParticipants were recruited in 1998 for a longitudinal study named BROMS. The study population at baseline consisted of 3020 children, 11¿12 years-old, from 118 schools in Stockholm County, followed up through adolescence. This study is based on 1880 adolescents answering the follow-up survey in 2004, at age 17¿18 (62% of the initial cohort). Parental education, occupation, country of birth, employment status and living arrangements were reported at baseline, by parents and adolescents. Depressive symptoms were self-reported by the adolescents in 2004, using a 12-item inventory. The associations between childhood social status and depressive symptoms in adolescence are presented as Odds Ratios (OR), estimated through logistic regression. Gender interaction with social factors was estimated through Synergy Index (SI).ResultsIncreased risk of depressive symptoms was found among adolescents whose parents had low education (OR 1.8, CI¿=¿1.1-3.1), were unskilled workers (OR 2.1, CI¿=¿1.2-3.7), intermediate non-manual workers (OR 1.8, CI¿=¿1.0-3.0), or self-employed (OR 2.2, CI¿=¿1.2-3.7), compared to parents with high education and high non-manual work. In addition, adolescents living exclusively with one adult had an increased risk compared to those living with two (OR 2.8, CI¿=¿1.1-7.5), while having foreign-born parents was not associated with depressive symptoms. An interaction effect was seen between gender and social factors, with an increased risk for girls of low-educated parents (SI¿=¿3.4, CI¿=¿1.3-8.9) or living exclusively with one adult (SI¿=¿4.9, CI¿=¿1.4-6.8).ConclusionsThe low social position in childhood may increase the risk of depressive symptoms among adolescents even in countries with small social differences and a highly developed welfare system, such as Sweden. Girls with low educated parents or living exclusively with one adult may be particularly vulnerable. This knowledge is of importance when planning preventive interventions or treatment. PMID:25384415

Wirback, Therese; Möller, Jette; Larsson, Jan-Olov; Galanti, Maria; Engström, Karin

2014-11-11

295

Self-reported Halitosis and Gastro-esophageal Reflux Disease in the General Population  

PubMed Central

Background Patients with halitosis contact primary care practitioners, dentists, and gastroenterologists alike. Objectives It is unclear whether gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a risk factor for halitosis. Design and Patients/Participants We studied this possible relationship in the general population using the cross-sectional Study of Health in Pomerania (SHIP). Employing structured interviews, self-reported halitosis was assessed among 417 edentulous (toothless) subjects aged 40 to 81 years and among 2,588 dentate subjects aged 20 to 59 years. The presence of heartburn or acid regurgitation (GERD-related symptoms) at 4 levels (absent, mild, moderate, severe) was taken as exposure and used for logistic regression. Analyses were adjusted for relevant confounders, such as age, sex, depressive symptoms, history of chronic gastritis, history of gastric or duodenal ulcer, smoking, school education, and dental status. Measurements and Main Results We found a strong positive association between GERD-related symptoms and halitosis (odds ratio 12.94, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.66–63.09, P = 0.002 for severe compared to no GERD-related symptoms) in denture-wearing subjects and a moderate, positive association between GERD-related symptoms and halitosis (odds ratio 2.24, 95% CI 1.27–3.92, P = 0.005) in dentate subjects with a clear dose–effect relationship. Conclusions The present study provides clear evidence for an association between GERD and halitosis. As there are effective treatments for GERD, these results suggest treatment options, such as proton pump inhibitors, for halitosis. These should be studied in randomized controlled trials. PMID:18196351

Struch, Franziska; Wallaschofski, Henri; Grabe, Hans J.; Völzke, Henry; Lerch, Markus M.; Meisel, Peter; Kocher, Thomas

2008-01-01

296

Childhood Inattention and Hyperactivity Symptoms Self-Reported by Adults with Asperger Syndrome  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Increasing public awareness of the adult manifestations of developmental neuropsychiatric disorders, like Asperger syndrome and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), has provoked an increasing number of persons to seek assessment for the first time in adulthood. As these disorders have their origin in childhood, instruments for retrospective evaluation of childhood behavior are needed. Sampling and Methods: In this preliminary

Pekka Tani; Nina Lindberg; Björn Appelberg; Taina Nieminen-von Wendt; Lennart von Wendt; Tarja Porkka-Heiskanen

2006-01-01

297

Estimated Prevalence of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Symptoms among College Freshmen: Gender, Race, and Rater Effects  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Group differences and prevalence rates for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms in a matched sample of college freshmen (n = 956) and their parents (n = 956) were investigated for gender and race (African American and Caucasian) effects using current self-report and retrospective parent-report ratings. On self-report, compared…

Lee, Dong Hun; Oakland, Thomas; Jackson, Gina; Glutting, Joseph

2008-01-01

298

Do response options influence self-reports of alcohol use?  

PubMed

The influence of response options on self-reported frequency of alcohol use was evaluated in an experimental study of 350 students at a west coast university. Respondents were asked about their frequency of alcohol use in the last 7 days, 30 days, 90 days, and 180 days with three methodological factors randomized: 1) how quantitative the response options were; 2) order of presentation of close-ended response options; and 3) relative placement of alcohol use items in the questionnaire. Results indicate that the quantitativeness of response options and the location of items within the questionnaire have minimal effects on the average frequency of alcohol use and number of inconsistent responses over a wide range of time frames. However, presenting higher frequency response options prior to lower frequency response options increased self-reported frequency of having consumed 2 or more drinks in the last 30 days and frequency of alcohol use over the last 180 days. PMID:7890448

Hays, R D; Bell, R M; Damush, T; Hill, L; DiMatteo, M R; Marshall, G N

1994-12-01

299

The hierarchical structure of self-reported impulsivity  

PubMed Central

The hierarchical structure of 95 self-reported impulsivity items, along with delay-discount rates for money, was examined. A large sample of college students participated in the study (N = 407). Items represented every previously proposed dimension of self-reported impulsivity. Exploratory PCA yielded at least 7 interpretable components: Prepared/Careful, Impetuous, Divertible, Thrill and Risk Seeking, Happy-Go-Lucky, Impatiently Pleasure Seeking, and Reserved. Discount rates loaded on Impatiently Pleasure Seeking, and correlated with the impulsiveness and venturesomeness scales from the I7 (Eysenck, Pearson, Easting, & Allsopp, 1985). The hierarchical emergence of the components was explored, and we show how this hierarchical structure may help organize conflicting dimensions found in previous analyses. Finally, we argue that the discounting model (Ainslie, 1975) provides a qualitative framework for understanding the dimensions of impulsivity. PMID:20224803

Kirby, Kris N.; Finch, Julia C.

2010-01-01

300

Black tea improves attention and self-reported alertness  

Microsoft Academic Search

Tea has previously been demonstrated to better help sustain alertness throughout the day in open-label studies. We investigated whether tea improves attention and self-reported alertness in two double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled, crossover studies. Participants received black tea (made from commercially available tea bags) in one condition and placebo tea (hot water with food colours and flavours) similar in taste and appearance

E. A. De Bruin; M. J. Rowson; L. Van Buren; J. A. Rycroft; G. N. Owen

2011-01-01

301

Body Awareness: Construct and Self-Report Measures  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectivesHeightened body awareness can be adaptive and maladaptive. Improving body awareness has been suggested as an approach for treating patients with conditions such as chronic pain, obesity and post-traumatic stress disorder. We assessed the psychometric quality of selected self-report measures and examined their items for underlying definitions of the construct.Data sourcesPubMed, PsychINFO, HaPI, Embase, Digital Dissertations Database.Review methodsAbstracts were screened;

Wolf E. Mehling; Viranjini Gopisetty; Jennifer Daubenmier; Cynthia J. Price; Frederick M. Hecht; Anita Stewart; Antonio Verdejo García

2009-01-01

302

Monitoring Athletes Through Self-Report: Factors Influencing Implementation  

PubMed Central

Monitoring athletic preparation facilitates the evaluation and adjustment of practices to optimize performance outcomes. Self-report measures such as questionnaires and diaries are suggested to be a simple and cost-effective approach to monitoring an athlete’s response to training, however their efficacy is dependent on how they are implemented and used. This study sought to identify the perceived factors influencing the implementation of athlete self-report measures (ASRM) in elite sport settings. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with athletes, coaches and sports science and medicine staff at a national sporting institute (n = 30). Interviewees represented 20 different sports programs and had varying experience with ASRM. Purported factors influencing the implementation of ASRM related to the measure itself (e.g., accessibility, timing of completion), and the social environment (e.g., buy-in, reinforcement). Social environmental factors included individual, inter-personal and organizational levels which is consistent with a social ecological framework. An adaptation of this framework was combined with the factors associated with the measure to illustrate the inter-relations and influence upon compliance, data accuracy and athletic outcomes. To improve implementation of ASRM and ultimately athletic outcomes, a multi-factorial and multi-level approach is needed. Key points Effective implementation of a self-report measure for monitoring athletes requires a multi-factorial and multi-level approach which addresses the particular measure used and the surrounding social environment. A well-designed self-report measure should obtain quality data with minimal burden on athletes and staff. A supportive social environment involves buy-in and coordination of all parties, at both an individual and organization level. PMID:25729301

Saw, Anna E.; Main, Luana C.; Gastin, Paul B.

2015-01-01

303

Standardized Self-Report Measures of Civilian Trauma and PTSD  

Microsoft Academic Search

This chapter reviews 24 standardized self-report measures for traumatic stress that are suitable, with some modification, for use with adults by professional or lay interviewers or in paper-and-pencil questionnaires. Each scale is de- scribed in terms of its content, number of items, and response formats and is evaluated in terms of the available evidence regarding its reliability and valid- ity.

FRAN H. NORRIS; JESSICA L. HAMBLEN

304

International variation in socioeconomic inequalities in self reported health  

Microsoft Academic Search

STUDY OBJECTIVE--To assess the extent to which the size of socioeconomic inequalities in self reported health varies among industrialised countries. DESIGN--Cross sectional data on the association between educational level and several health indicators were obtained from national health interview surveys. This association was quantified by means of an inequality index based on logistic regression analysis. SETTING--The national, non-institutionalised populations of

A E Kunst; J J Geurts; J van den Berg

1995-01-01

305

Monitoring athletes through self-report: factors influencing implementation.  

PubMed

Monitoring athletic preparation facilitates the evaluation and adjustment of practices to optimize performance outcomes. Self-report measures such as questionnaires and diaries are suggested to be a simple and cost-effective approach to monitoring an athlete's response to training, however their efficacy is dependent on how they are implemented and used. This study sought to identify the perceived factors influencing the implementation of athlete self-report measures (ASRM) in elite sport settings. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with athletes, coaches and sports science and medicine staff at a national sporting institute (n = 30). Interviewees represented 20 different sports programs and had varying experience with ASRM. Purported factors influencing the implementation of ASRM related to the measure itself (e.g., accessibility, timing of completion), and the social environment (e.g., buy-in, reinforcement). Social environmental factors included individual, inter-personal and organizational levels which is consistent with a social ecological framework. An adaptation of this framework was combined with the factors associated with the measure to illustrate the inter-relations and influence upon compliance, data accuracy and athletic outcomes. To improve implementation of ASRM and ultimately athletic outcomes, a multi-factorial and multi-level approach is needed. Key pointsEffective implementation of a self-report measure for monitoring athletes requires a multi-factorial and multi-level approach which addresses the particular measure used and the surrounding social environment.A well-designed self-report measure should obtain quality data with minimal burden on athletes and staff.A supportive social environment involves buy-in and coordination of all parties, at both an individual and organization level. PMID:25729301

Saw, Anna E; Main, Luana C; Gastin, Paul B

2015-03-01

306

How Large is the Bias is Self-Reported Disability?  

Microsoft Academic Search

A pervasive concern with the use of self-reported health and disability measures in behavioral models is that they are biased and endogenous. A commonly suggested explanation is that survey respondents exaggerate the severity of health problems and incidence of disabilities in order to rationalize labor force non-participation, application for disability benefits and\\/or receipt of those benefits. This paper re-examines this

Hugo Benitez Silva; Moshe Buchinsky; Hiu Man Chan; John Rust

2000-01-01

307

How large is the bias in self-reported disability  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract A pervasive concern with the use of self-reported health and disability measures in behavioral models is that they are biased and endogenous. A commonly,suggested explanation is that survey respondents exaggerate the severity of health problems,and incidence of disabilities in order to rationalize labor force non-participation, application for disability benefits and\\/or receipt of those benefits. This paper re-examines,this issue using

H. Benitez-silva; M. Buschinski; H. M. Chan; S. Cheidvasser; J. Rust

1999-01-01

308

Self-reported sleep quality, strain and health in relation to perceived working conditions in females.  

PubMed

Self-reported sleep quality, strain and health in relation to perceived working conditions in females The aims of this study were to examine self-reported sleep quality, perceived strain and health in relation to working conditions; the prevalence and severity of sleep disturbances and daytime distress arising from poor sleep in women on different work shifts. Furthermore, to see whether females with gastrointestinal symptoms, joint-, back- or muscle-pain and who are dissatisfied with working hours differ with regard to the above aspects. Finally, degree of strain-related symptoms and sleep difficulties were tested as predictors of sleep quality and general health outcome. Important research questions are whether registered nurses and those on rotating work shifts have greater sleep problems than others. A total of 156 females, aged 20-59 years, working at three different casualty departments, answered structured questionnaires. The results showed a persistently high rate of psycho-physiological long-term effects of stress related to working conditions. Thirty-four per cent were dissatisfied with their working hours, and exhibited significantly more mental strain, fatigue/excessive tiredness and inability to relax after work because of involuntary thoughts, in relation to working conditions than others did. Sixty-two females (39.7%) complained of insufficient sleep. The sleep quality outcome was significantly predicted by difficulty falling asleep (odds ratio 8.4), difficulty in falling asleep after nocturnal awakening (odds ratio 3.4) and perceived exhaustion (odds ratio 2.6). Females suffering from gastrointestinal symptoms and joint-, back- and muscle symptoms for several days in a week or even everyday were especially sensitive to worse sleep quality. Independent of work shifts, registered nurses exhibited a higher degree of mental strain and prolonged recovery in comparison with others. In conclusions, sleep initiation difficulties, troubled sleep and exhaustion significantly predicted reduced sleep quality outcome with decreased resilience to stress and vulnerability to psycho-physiological disorders in females working within the health care system. PMID:12000672

Edéll-Gustafsson, Ulla M; Kritz, Eivor I K; Bogren, I Kristina

2002-06-01

309

Self-reported efficacy of neurofeedback treatment in a clinical randomized controlled study of ADHD children and adolescents  

PubMed Central

Background Many non-pharmacological treatments for children and adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have been attempted, but reports indicate that most are ineffective. Although neurofeedback (NF) is a treatment approach for children with ADHD that remains promising, a variety of appropriate measures have been used in reporting and evaluating its effect. Objective To report the self-evaluations of NF treatment by children and adolescents with ADHD. Methods Randomized controlled trial in 91 children and adolescents with ADHD, aged less than 18 years (mean, 11.2 years) participated in a 30-session program of intensive NF treatment. Participants were randomized and allocated by sequentially numbered sealed envelopes into three groups: methylphenidate (MPH) as an active control group, and two trial groups NF with MPH, and NF alone. ADHD core symptoms and school performance were given on a scale of 1 to 10 using a self-reporting questionnaire, and the changes in these scores after treatment were used as the self-reported evaluation. Basic statistical methods (descriptive, analyses of variance, exact ?2 test, and paired t-test) were used to investigate the baseline data. Changes in ADHD core symptoms and treatment effects were investigated using a general linear model for repeated measures. Results Eighty participants completed the treatment study and 73 (91%) responded sufficiently on the self-reporting questionnaires. The treatment groups were comparable in age, sex, and cognition as well as in the baseline levels of core ADHD symptoms. All treatments resulted in significant improvements regarding attention and hyperactivity (P<0.001), and did not differ from each other in effectiveness. However, a significant treatment effect in school performance was observed (P=0.042), in which only the NF group showed a significant improvement. Conclusion The self-reported improvements in ADHD core symptoms and school performance shortly after treatment indicate NF treatment being promising in comparison with medication, suggesting NF as an alternative treatment for children and adolescents who do not respond to MPH, or who suffer side effects. Further long-term follow-up is needed. PMID:25214789

Duric, Nezla S; Aßmus, Jörg; Elgen, Irene B

2014-01-01

310

Measurement of Pubertal Status with a Chinese Self-report Pubertal Development Scale  

Microsoft Academic Search

This cross sectional study of 290 Chinese children aged 8–18 years, evaluated a Chinese version of the self-reported Pubertal\\u000a Development Scale (PDS) against both raters’ and self-reported Tanner assessment of pubertal status. Children completed both\\u000a the self-reported PDS and self-reported Tanner pubertal questionnaire prior to physical examination through visual depiction\\u000a by a same gender rater. Puberty Category Scores (PCS) which were

Noel P. T. Chan; Rita Y. T. Sung; E. Anthony S. Nelson; Hung K. So; Yee K. Tse; Alice P. S. Kong

2010-01-01

311

Syphilis Symptoms  

MedlinePLUS

... the infection will move to the next stages. Latent syphilis The latent (hidden) stage of syphilis begins when symptoms of secondary syphilis are over. In early latent syphilis, you might notice that signs and symptoms ...

312

Symptom Management  

MedlinePLUS

... TBI Educational Materials Research DVBIC Locations Press Symptom Management A brain injury can affect a person physically ... Diagnosis and Assessment Treatment and Recovery Caregiving Symptom Management Life After TBI Defense and Veterans Brain Injury ...

313

Challenges in Evaluating Relationships Between Quantitative Data (Carbon Dioxide) and Qualitative Data (Self-Reported Visual Changes)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Understanding the nuances in clinical data is critical in developing a successful data analysis plan. Carbon dioxide (CO2) data are collected on board the International Space Station (ISS) in a continuous stream. Clinical data on ISS are primarily collected via conversations between individual crewmembers and NASA Flight Surgeons during weekly Private Medical Conferences (PMC). Law, et.al, 20141 demonstrated a statistically significant association between weekly average CO2 levels on ISS and self-reported headaches over the reporting period from March 14, 2001 to May 31, 2012. The purpose of this analysis is to describe the evaluation of a possible association between visual changes and CO2 levels on ISS and to discuss challenges in developing an appropriate analysis plan. METHODS & PRELIMINARY RESULTS: A first analysis was conducted following the same study design as the published work on CO2 and self-reported headaches1; substituting self-reported changes in visual acuity in place of self-reported headaches. The analysis demonstrated no statistically significant association between visual impairment characterized by vision symptoms self-reported during PMCs and ISS average CO2 levels over ISS missions. Closer review of the PMC records showed that vision outcomes are not well-documented in terms of clinical severity, timing of onset, or timing of resolution, perhaps due to the incipient nature of vision changes. Vision has been monitored in ISS crewmembers, pre- and post-flight, using standard optometry evaluations. In-flight visual assessments were limited early in the ISS program, primarily consisting of self-perceived changes reported by crewmembers. Recently, on-orbit capabilities have greatly improved. Vision data ranges from self-reported post-flight changes in visual acuity, pre- to postflight changes identified during fundoscopic examination, and in-flight progression measured by advanced on-orbit clinical imaging capabilities at predetermined testing intervals. In contrast, CO2 data are recorded in a continuous stream over time; however, for the initial analysis this data was categorized into weekly averages.

Mendez, C. M.; Foy, M.; Mason, S.; Wear, M. L.; Meyers, V.; Law, J.; Alexander, D.; Van Baalen, M.

2014-01-01

314

Inventory management.  

PubMed

A critical aspect of blood transfusion is the timely provision of high quality blood products. This task remains a significant challenge for many blood services and blood systems reflecting the difficulty of balancing the recruitment of sufficient donors, the optimal utilization of the donor's gift, the increasing safety related restrictions on blood donation, a growing menu of specialized blood products and an ever-growing imperative to increase the efficiency of blood product provision from a cost perspective. As our industry now faces questions about our standard practices including whether or not the age of blood has a negative impact on recipients, it is timely to take a look at our collective inventory management practices. This International Forum represents an effort to get a snap shot of inventory management practices around the world, and to understand the range of different products provided for patients. In addition to sharing current inventory management practices, this Forum is intended to foster an exchange of ideas around where we see our field moving with respect to various issues including specialty products, new technologies, and reducing recipient risk from blood transfusion products. PMID:20432515

Devine, D V; Sher, G D; Reesink, H W; Panzer, S; Hetzel, P A S; Wong, J K; Horvath, M; Leitner, G C; Schennach, H; Nussbaumer, W; Genoe, K; Cioffi, J M; Givisiez, F N; Rogerson, M; Howe, D; Delage, G; Sarappa, C; Charbonneau; Fu, Y; Sarlija, D; Vuk, T; Strauss Patko, M; Balija, M; Juki?, I; Ali, A; Auvinen, M-K; Jaakonsalo, E; Cazenave, J-P; Waller, C; Kientz, D; David, B; Walther-Wenke, G; Heiden, M; Lin, C K; Tsoi, W C; Lee, C K; Barotine-Toth, K; Sawant, R B; Murphy, W; Quirke, B; Bowler, P; Shinar, E; Yahalom, V; Aprili, G; Piccoli, P; Gandini, G; Tadokaro, K; Nadarajan, V S; de Kort, W; Jansen, N; Flanagan, P; Forsberg, P-O; Hervig, T; Letowska, M; Lachert, E; Dudziak, K; Antoniewicz-Papis, J; de Olim, G; Nascimento, F; Hindawi, S; Teo, D; Reddy, R; Scholtz, J; Swanevelder, R; Rovira, L P; Sauleda, S; Carasa, M A V; Vaquero, M P; Ania, M A; Gulliksson, H; Holdsworth, S; Cotton, S; Howell, C; Baldwin, C; Cusick, R M; Geele, G A; Paden, C; McEvoy, P; Gottschall, J L; McLaughlin, L S; Benjamin, R J; Eder, A; Draper, N L; AuBuchon, J P; León de González, G

2010-04-01

315

Genetic moderation of child maltreatment effects on depression and internalizing symptoms by serotonin transporter linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), norepinephrine transporter (NET), and corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1 (CRHR1) genes in African American children.  

PubMed

Genetic moderation of the effects of child maltreatment on depression and internalizing symptoms was investigated in a sample of low-income maltreated and nonmaltreated African American children (N = 1,096). Lifetime child maltreatment experiences were independently coded from Child Protective Services records and maternal report. Child depression and internalizing problems were assessed in the context of a summer research camp by self-report on the Children's Depression Inventory and adult counselor report on the Teacher Report Form. DNA was obtained from buccal cell or saliva samples and genotyped for polymorphisms of the following genes: serotonin transporter linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), norepinephrine transporter, and corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1. Analyses of covariance with age and gender as covariates were conducted, with maltreatment status and respective polymorphism as main effects and their Gene × Environment (G × E) interactions. Maltreatment consistently was associated with higher Children's Depression Inventory and Teacher Report Form symptoms. The results for child self-report symptoms indicated a G × E interaction for BDNF and maltreatment. In addition, BDNF and triallelic 5-HTTLPR interacted with child maltreatment in a G × G × E interaction. Analyses for counselor report of child anxiety/depression symptoms on the Teacher Report Form indicated moderation of child maltreatment effects by triallelic 5-HTTLPR. These effects were elaborated based on variation in developmental timing of maltreatment experiences. Norepinephrine transporter was found to further moderate the G × E interaction of 5-HTTLPR and maltreatment status, revealing a G × G × E interaction. This G × G × E was extended by consideration of variation in maltreatment subtype experiences. Finally, G × G × E effects were observed for the co-action of BDNF and the corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1 haplotype. The findings illustrate the variable influence of specific genotypes in G × E interactions based on variation in maltreatment experiences and the importance of a multigenic approach for understanding influences on depression and internalizing symptoms among African American children. PMID:25422957

Cicchetti, Dante; Rogosch, Fred A

2014-11-01

316

Identifying High-Functioning Dyslexics: Is Self-Report of Early Reading Problems Enough?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We used a questionnaire to identify university students with self-reported difficulties in reading acquisition during elementary school (self-report; n = 31). The performance of the self-report group on standardized measures of word and non-word reading and fluency, passage comprehension and reading rate, and phonological awareness was compared to…

Deacon, S. Helene; Cook, Kathryn; Parrila, Rauno

2012-01-01

317

Predicting Drug Use at Electronic Music Dance Events: Self-Reports and Biological Measurement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Most information on the prevalence of drug use comes from self-report surveys. The sensitivity of such information is cause for concern about the accuracy of self-report measures. In this study, self-reported drug use in the last 48 hr is compared to results from biological assays of saliva samples from 371 young adults entering clubs. The…

Johnson, Mark B.; Voas, Robert A.; Miller, Brenda A.; Holder, Harold D.

2009-01-01

318

Clinical validity of the Me and My School questionnaire: a self-report mental health measure for children and adolescents  

PubMed Central

Background The Me and My School Questionnaire (M&MS) is a self-report measure for children aged eight years and above that measures emotional difficulties and behavioural difficulties, and has been previously validated in a community sample. The present study aimed to assess its clinical sensitivity to justify its utility as a screening tool in schools. Methods Data were collected from service-users (n?=?91, 8–15 years) and accompanying parent/carer in outpatient mental health services in England. A matched community sample (N?=?91) were used to assess the measure’s ability to discriminate between low- and high-risk samples. Results Receiver operating curves (area under the curve, emotional difficulties?=?.79; behavioural difficulties?=?.78), mean comparisons (effect size, emotional difficulties d?=?1.17, behavioural difficulties?=?1.12) and proportions above clinical thresholds indicate that the measure satisfactorily discriminates between the samples. The scales have good internal reliability (emotional difficulties ??=?.84; behavioural difficulties ??=?.82) and cross-informant agreement with parent-reported symptoms is comparable to existing measures (r?=?.30). Conclusion The findings of this study indicate that the M&MS sufficiently discriminates between high-risk (clinic) and low-risk (community) samples, has good internal reliability, compares favourably with existing self-report measures of mental health and has comparable levels of agreement between parent-report and self-report to other measures. Alongside existing validation of the M&MS, these findings justify the measures use as a self-report screening tool for mental health problems in community settings for children aged as young as 8 years. PMID:24963344

2014-01-01

319

Shamed into anger? The relation of shame and guilt to anger and self-reported aggression.  

PubMed

The relation of shame and guilt to anger and aggression has been the focus of considerable theoretical discussion, but empirical findings have been inconsistent. Two recently developed measures of affective style were used to examine whether shame-proneness and guilt-proneness are differentially related to anger, hostility, and aggression. In 2 studies, 243 and 252 undergraduates completed the Self-Conscious Affect and Attribution Inventory, the Symptom Checklist 90, and the Spielberger Trait Anger Scale. Study 2 also included the Test of Self-Conscious Affect and the Buss-Durkee Hostility Inventory. Shame-proneness was consistently correlated with anger arousal, suspiciousness, resentment, irritability, a tendency to blame others for negative events, and indirect (but not direct) expressions of hostility. Proneness to "shame-free" guilt was inversely related to externalization of blame and some indices of anger, hostility, and resentment. PMID:1583590

Tangney, J P; Wagner, P; Fletcher, C; Gramzow, R

1992-04-01

320

Ethnic variation in whether dissociation mediates the relation between traumatic life events and attenuated positive psychotic symptoms.  

PubMed

The present study sought to determine whether dissociative experiences mediated the relationship between traumatic life events and attenuated positive psychotic symptoms in a non-treatment-seeking sample of racial and ethnic minority young adults. Participants (n = 549) completed a self-report inventory for psychosis risk (i.e., the Prodromal Questionnaire; R. L. Loewy, C. E. Bearden, J. K. Johnson, A. Raine, & T. D. Cannon, 2005), from which a total number of attenuated positive psychotic symptoms was assessed. Participants also completed a checklist of potentially traumatic life events and a traumatic dissociation scale. Hierarchical linear regression models and bootstrapping results indicated that dissociation mediated the relationship between traumatic life events and attenuated positive psychotic symptoms. Stratified analyses of Black, Asian, and Hispanic subgroups revealed that full mediation was only evident in the Black subgroup of young adults. Partial mediation was found among the Hispanic group, and no mediation occurred in the Asian subgroup. For the latter, traumatic life events were not significantly associated with dissociative experiences. A dissociative response style may be particularly relevant to trauma-exposed Black young adults exhibiting subclinical psychotic experiences and less so for Asian young adults. Trauma-induced dissociative experiences should be assessed further in clinical high-risk studies, especially among Black traumatized youth. PMID:25365538

Anglin, Deidre M; Polanco-Roman, Lillian; Lui, Florence

2015-01-01

321

Citrus Inventory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Florida's Charlotte County Property Appraiser is using an aerial color infrared mapping system for inventorying citrus trees for valuation purposes. The ACIR system has significantly reduced the time and manpower required for appraisal. Aerial photographs are taken and interpreted by a video system which makes it possible to detect changes from previous years. Potential problems can be identified. KSC's TU Office has awarded a contract to the Citrus Research and Education Center to adapt a prototype system which would automatically count trees and report totals.

1986-01-01

322

The Vancouver Obsessional Compulsive Inventory (VOCI).  

PubMed

The original Maudsley Obsessional Compulsive Inventory (MOCI) has been widely used and is considered to be one of the best available self-report instruments for measuring observable obsessive-compulsive problems such as washing and checking. However, it has several limitations and requires updating. Our revision of the MOCI, the Vancouver Obsessional Compulsive Inventory (VOCI), was designed to provide assessment of a range of obsessions, compulsions, avoidance behaviour, and personality characteristics of known or theoretical importance in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). The development of the VOCI is described, and we provide evidence of its reliability and validity. Our findings in samples of people with OCD, people with other anxiety disorders or depression, community adults, and undergraduate students suggest that the VOCI is a promising new measure. We anticipate that, like its predecessor, the VOCI will have widespread use in both research and clinical settings. PMID:15381439

Thordarson, Dana S; Radomsky, Adam S; Rachman, S; Shafran, Roz; Sawchuk, Craig N; Ralph Hakstian, A

2004-11-01

323

An exploration of psychopathy in self-report measures among juvenile sex offenders.  

PubMed

Researchers have indicated that adult psychopathy often originates in childhood or adolescence. It has also been established that psychopathic traits are linked to disruptive behavior, criminality, and violence. As knowledge about psychopathy and its manifestations in juvenile sex offender populations remains limited, several instruments have been developed in an effort to measure the construct. In this study, we assessed how the relationship of diverse scales of psychopathy related to characteristics of sexual aggression, and determined which scales were most correlated to sexual and nonsexual delinquency. We utilized four measures of juvenile psychopathy: the Modified Childhood Psychopathy Scale (mCPS; Lynam, 1997), the Antisocial Process Screening Device (APSD; Frick & Hare, 2001; Frick, O'Brien, Wootton, & McBurnett, 1994), the Millon Adolescent Clinical Inventory (MACI; Millon & Davis, 1993; using two derived psychopathy scales), and the Inventory of Callous and Unemotional (ICU) Traits (Frick, 2003), in a sample of 191 incarcerated adolescent sex offenders located in juvenile detention facilities across a Midwestern state. We found that of the four instruments and seven subscales, only the APSD Narcissism and Impulsivity Scale was significantly correlated to a characteristic of sexual crime (i.e., number of victims, level of crime severity). No subscales were found to predict sexual crime at a significant level. However, several scales were correlated to the total delinquency score as measured by the Self-Reported Delinquency Measure. In a series of multiple regressions, the MACI Factor 2 and ICU total score were determined as the best fit to total nonsexual delinquency. Implications are offered. PMID:23525176

Morrell, Laura M; Burton, David L

2014-05-01

324

Hair testing and self-report of cocaine use.  

PubMed

Hair analysis is a useful tool in both clinical and forensic fields: it allows information about drugs of abuse (DOA) consumption to be obtained. However, in spite of analytical results, sometimes patients continue to deny using drugs or, on the contrary, insist on describing themselves as severe drug addicts; indeed there are often considerable difficulties in getting truthful statements about the real amount of drugs used. In this study we have tried to compare cocaine concentration in hair samples with self-reported drug intake. We enrolled 113 subjects (61 Africans, 52 Caucasians) who had been recently sent to jail. They were asked to tell about their use of illicit drugs during the last three months and then submitted to hair analysis. Hair segments (3 cm) were analyzed by GC-MS for amphetamines, cocaine and opiates. Useful data was obtained from 82 subjects, separated into two main groups on account of ethnic origin (African or Caucasian) and divided further into daily, weekly and monthly users. The results showed qualitative results and self-reported consumption to be in good agreement, although the correlation between frequency of consumption and concentration in hair revealed sometimes higher concentrations in contrast with the admission of low consumption. There was a definite separation between occasional and daily use (especially in Caucasian people), while concentrations found where weekly use was reported were more variable. Concentrations of cocaine measured in Africans' hair were much higher than in Caucasians'. Even if this study is exclusively based on self-report, it provides some interesting information in order to differentiate the frequency of consumption, and especially underlines the great importance of ethnic bias on hair analysis. PMID:21645979

Vignali, Claudia; Stramesi, Cristiana; Vecchio, Micol; Groppi, Angelo

2012-02-10

325

Accuracy of physician self-report of Spanish language proficiency.  

PubMed

As health systems strive to meet the needs of linguistically diverse patient populations, determining a physician's non-English language proficiency is becoming increasingly important. However, brief, validated measures are lacking. To determine if any of four self-reported measures of physician Spanish language proficiency are useful measures of fluency in Spanish. Physician self-report of Spanish proficiency was compared to Spanish-speaking patients' report of their physicians' language proficiency. 110 Spanish-speaking patients and their 46 physicians in two public hospital clinics with professional interpreters available. Physicians rated their Spanish fluency with four items: one general fluency question, two clinically specific questions, and one question on interpreter use. Patients were asked if their doctor speaks Spanish ("yes/no"). Concordance, sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values (PPV, NPV) were calculated for each of the items, and receiver operating (ROC) curves were used to compare performance characteristics. Concordance between physician and patient reports of physician Spanish proficiency ranged from 84 to 91%. The PPV for each of the four items ranged from 91 to 99%, the NPV from 60 to 90%, and the area under their ROC curves from 90 to 95%. The general fluency question gave the best combination of PPV and NPV, and the item on holding sensitive discussions had the highest PPV, 99%. Physicians who reported fluency as "fair" were as likely to have patients report they did not speak Spanish as that they did. Physician self-report of Spanish language proficiency is highly correlated with patient report, except when physicians report "fair" general fluency. In settings where no financial or other incentives are linked to language skills, simple questions may be a useful way to assess physician language proficiency. PMID:20151191

Rosenthal, Anne; Wang, Frances; Schillinger, Dean; Pérez Stable, Eliseo J; Fernandez, Alicia

2011-04-01

326

Scientists’ Perceptions of Organizational Justice and Self-Reported Misbehaviors  

PubMed Central

policymakers concerned about maintaining the integrity of science have recently expanded their attention from a focus on misbehaving individuals to characteristics of the environments in which scientists work. Little empirical evidence exists about the role of organizational justice in promoting or hindering scientific integrity. Our findings indicate that when scientists believe they are being treated unfairly they are more likely to behave in ways that compromise the integrity of science. Perceived violations of distributive and procedural justice were positively associated with self-reports of misbehavior among scientists. PMID:16810337

Martinson, Brian C.; Anderson, Melissa S.; Crain, A. Lauren; De Vries, Raymond

2006-01-01

327

Self-Reported Experiences of Discrimination and Cardiovascular Disease  

PubMed Central

Researchers have long speculated that exposure to discrimination may increase cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk but compared to other psychosocial risk factors, large-scale epidemiologic and community based studies examining associations between reports of discrimination and CVD risk have only emerged fairly recently. This review summarizes findings from studies of self-reported experiences of discrimination and CVD risk published between 2011–2013. We document the innovative advances in recent work, the notable heterogeneity in these studies, and the considerable need for additional work with objective clinical endpoints other than blood pressure. Implications for the study of racial disparities in CVD and clinical practice are also discussed. PMID:24729825

Lewis, Tené T.; Williams, David R.; Tamene, Mahader; Clark, Cheryl R.

2014-01-01

328

The relationship between workers’ self-reported changes in health and their attitudes towards a workplace intervention: lessons from smoke-free legislation across the UK hospitality industry  

PubMed Central

Background The evaluation of smoke-free legislation (SFL) in the UK examined the impacts on exposure to second-hand smoke, workers’ attitudes and changes in respiratory health. Studies that investigate changes in the health of groups of people often use self-reported symptoms. Due to the subjective nature it is of interest to determine whether workers’ attitudes towards the change in their working conditions may be linked to the change in health they report. Methods Bar workers were recruited before the introduction of the SFL in Scotland and England with the aim of investigating their changes to health, attitudes and exposure as a result of the SFL. They were asked about their attitudes towards SFL and the presence of respiratory and sensory symptoms both before SFL and one year later. Here we examine the possibility of a relationship between initial attitudes and changes in reported symptoms, through the use of regression analyses. Results There was no difference in the initial attitudes towards SFL between those working in Scotland and England. Bar workers who were educated to a higher level tended to be more positive towards SFL. Attitude towards SFL was not found to be related to change in reported symptoms for bar workers in England (Respiratory, p?=?0.755; Sensory, p?=?0.910). In Scotland there was suggestion of a relationship with reporting of respiratory symptoms (p?=?0.042), where those who were initially more negative to SFL experienced a greater improvement in self-reported health. Conclusions There was no evidence that workers who were more positive towards SFL reported greater improvements in respiratory and sensory symptoms. This may not be the case in all interventions and we recommend examining subjects’ attitudes towards the proposed intervention when evaluating possible health benefits using self-reported methods. PMID:22551087

2012-01-01

329

Scoring rules and rating formats of Self-report Depression Questionnaires: a comparison of approaches.  

PubMed

Self-report measures of depression differ in their construction and scoring rules. In the present study from the Rhode Island Methods to Improve Diagnostic Assessment and Services (MIDAS) project we tested the hypothesis that the loss of information due to scoring rules or rating formats reduces the validity of depression severity assessment. One hundred fifty-three outpatients with DSM-IV major depressive disorder (MDD) who presented for treatment or who were in ongoing treatment and had their medication changed due to lack of efficacy completed the Clinically Useful Depression Outcome Scale (CUDOS), Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (QIDS) and Remission from Depression Questionnaire (RDQ) at the initiation of treatment and 4 month follow-up. The patients were evaluated with the 17-item Hamilton Depression scale (HAMD). The CUDOS and RDQ were equally highly correlated with the HAMD at baseline and follow-up. There was no significant difference in the correlations between the modified and original scoring algorithms of the QIDS with the HAMD at baseline and the follow-up. On each scale, the patients showed significant levels of improvement from baseline to 4 months, and the effect sizes were similar. These findings suggest that the loss of information due to the scoring rules of the QIDS or the rating format of the RDQ did not reduce the validity of depression severity assessment. PMID:24745466

Zimmerman, Mark; D'Avanzato, Catherine; Attiullah, Naureen; Friedman, Michael; Toba, Cristina; Boerescu, Daniela A

2014-08-15

330

Symptom differences in moderate to severe IBS patients based on predominant bowel habit  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE:We sought to determine if irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients with different bowel habit predominance differ in self-reported viscerosensory symptoms related to the upper and lower gastrointestinal (GI) tract, somatosensory symptoms, and constitutional functions.METHODS:Six hundred and twenty-five Rome criteria-positive IBS patients completed a bowel symptom questionnaire (BSQ), psychological symptom checklist (SCL-90), and health status (SF-36). Bowel habit predominance for IBS

Max Schmulson; Oh-Young Lee; Lin Chang; Bruce Naliboff; Emeran A Mayer

1999-01-01

331

Childhood Stress, Behavioural Symptoms and Mother-Daughter Pubertal Development.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Daughter's early childhood stress, conflict in the family environment, childhood behavioral symptoms, early puberty, and early dating behavior are related to mothers' early menarche and sexual involvement by a retrospective self-report survey (21 mothers; 28 daughters). Intended as a test of Belsky's theory, alternative explanations for findings…

Kim, Kenneth; Smith, Peter K.

1998-01-01

332

Differences Between Native Americans and Whites on the California Psychological Inventory  

Microsoft Academic Search

Minimal data exist regarding the performance of Native Americans on standardized self-report personality instruments. In this study, the California Psychological Inventory (CPI) was administered to a nonpsychiatric sample of 70 Native American adults and 100 White adults of equivalent age, educational background, and socioeconomic status. Native Americans scored significantly lower than the equivalent White sample on a number of CPI

Gary L. Davis; Richard G. Hoffman; Kathleen S. Nelson

1990-01-01

333

Development of the Motivators of and Barriers to Health-Smart Behaviors Inventory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Motivators of and Barriers to Health-Smart Behaviors Inventory (MB-HSBI) was developed for use in identifying self-reported motivators of and barriers to the following health-promoting behaviors (called "health-smart behaviors") that should occur daily to help promote health and overcome illnesses/diseases: eating a healthy breakfast, eating…

Tucker, Carolyn M.; Rice, Kenneth G.; Hou, Wei; Kaye, Lillian B.; Nolan, Sarah E. M.; Grandoit, Delphia J.; Gonzales, Lucia; Smith, Mary B.; Desmond, Frederic F.

2011-01-01

334

The Youth Form of the Motivators of and Barriers to Health-Smart Behaviors Inventory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: To develop a youth form of the Motivators of and Barriers to Health-Smart Behaviors Inventory (MB-HSBI--Youth) for use in identifying self-reported motivators of and barriers to the following health-promoting behaviors (called "health-smart" behaviors): eating a healthy breakfast, eating healthy foods and snacks, drinking healthy…

Tucker, Carolyn M.; Rice, Kenneth G.; Desmond, Frederic F.; Hou, Wei; Kaye, Lillian B.; Smith, Tasia M.

2012-01-01

335

Effect of the Range of Response Options on Answers to Biographical Inventory Items  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The range of response options has been shown to influence the answers given in self-report instruments that measure behaviors ranging from television viewing to sexual partners. The current research extends this line of inquiry to 36 quantitative items extracted from a biographical inventory used in personnel selection. A total of 92…

Kirnan, Jean Powell; Edler, Erin; Carpenter, Allison

2007-01-01

336

The Validation of a New Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Scale: The Obsessive-Compulsive Inventory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Obsessive-Compulsive Inventory (OCI), a new self-report measure for determining the diagnosis and severity of obsessive- compulsive disorder (OCD), was validated with 141 patients with OCD, 58 with social phobia, 44 with posttraumatic stress disorder, and 194 nonpatients. The OCI exhibited satisfactory reliability and validity with all four…

Foa, Edna B.; Kozak, Michael J.; Salkovskis, Paul M.; Coles, Meredith E.; Amir, Nader

1998-01-01

337

The Latent Structure of Multiphasic Sex Inventory-Assessed Pedophilic Interest  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Multiphasic Sex Inventory (MSI; Nichols & Molinder, 1984) is a self-report measure frequently used in the assessment of sex offenders. Scores on the MSI are often used to assess levels of pedophilic interest. However, the question of whether men with pedophilia represent a unique group distinguished by their sexual interests, or whether they…

Mackaronis, Julia E.; Strassberg, Donald S.; Marcus, David K.

2011-01-01

338

Test Reviews: Loranger, A. W. (2001). "OMNI Personality Inventory." Lutz, FL: Psychological Assessment Resources  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The OMNI Personality Inventory (OMNI) is a self-report questionnaire designed for use with adolescents and adults between 18 and 74 years of age. The questionnaire is not based on a particular theory, consistent with current trends in test development, according to the author. An abbreviated form of the OMNI, the OMNI-IV Personality Disorder…

Guess, Pamela

2006-01-01

339

Measuring Foster Parent Potential: Casey Foster Parent Inventory-Applicant Version  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: The Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A) is a new standardized self-report measure designed to assess the potential to foster parent successfully. The CFAI-A is described, and results concerning its psychometric properties are presented. Method: Data from a sample of 304 foster mothers from 35 states are analyzed.…

Orme, John G.; Cuddeback, Gary S.; Buehler, Cheryl; Cox, Mary Ellen; Le Prohn, Nicole S.

2007-01-01

340

Make a Financial Inventory  

MedlinePLUS

... Financial Inventory List Allow Others to Handle Your Finances Take Care of the People You Care About ... them. Financial Worksheets Make an inventory of your finances My Financial Inventory Worksheet [PDF] Determine where you ...

341

Inventory Control Related Sites  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Inventory Control Related Sites is a straightforward index of Websites dealing with inventory control, created by Kyle Thill, a 20-year veteran of inventory control. The sites are fully annotated and cover Census Bureau information, articles, and other metasites.

342

Predicting schizophrenia outcome with self-report measures of family interaction.  

PubMed

This study is based on 18 patients admitted to a psychiatric hospital with a DSM-III-R diagnosis of schizophrenia who currently were living with one or both parents. Patients and parents completed several questionnaire, including the Parental Bonding Index (PBI), the Family Environment Scale (FES), the Hostility and Direction of Hostility Questionnaire (HDHQ), and the Brief Symptoms Inventory. Observer ratings of patients' symptoms also were made. Outcome was predicted best by patients' ratings of mothers on the PBI and by mothers' scores on the HDHQ Criticism of Others scale. Other significant outcome predictors were the number of previous admissions to hospital, patients' scores on the HDHQ Projected Hostility scale and the FES Expressiveness scale, and fathers' scores on the FES Achievement-Orientation scale. PMID:2026776

Hafner, R J; Miller, R M

1991-01-01

343

Genome-Wide Association Analysis of Eating Disorder-Related Symptoms, Behaviors, and Personality Traits  

PubMed Central

Eating disorders (EDs) are common, complex psychiatric disorders thought to be caused by both genetic and environmental factors. They share many symptoms, behaviors, and personality traits, which may have overlapping heritability. The aim of the present study is to perform a genome-wide association scan (GWAS) of six ED phenotypes comprising three symptom traits from the Eating Disorders Inventory 2 [Drive for Thinness (DT), Body Dissatisfaction (BD), and Bulimia], Weight Fluctuation symptom, Breakfast Skipping behavior and Childhood Obsessive-Compulsive Personality Disorder trait (CHIRP). Investigated traits were derived from standardized self-report questionnaires completed by the TwinsUK population-based cohort. We tested 283,744 directly typed SNPs across six phenotypes of interest in the TwinsUK discovery dataset and followed-up signals from various strata using a two-stage replication strategy in two independent cohorts of European ancestry. We meta-analyzed a total of 2,698 individuals for DT, 2,680 for BD, 2,789 (821 cases/1,968 controls) for Bulimia, 1,360 (633 cases/727 controls) for Childhood Obsessive-Compulsive Personality Disorder trait, 2,773 (761 cases/2,012 controls) for Breakfast Skipping, and 2,967 (798 cases/2,169 controls) for Weight Fluctuation symptom. In this GWAS analysis of six ED-related phenotypes, we detected association of eight genetic variants with P < 10?5. Genetic variants that showed suggestive evidence of association were previously associated with several psychiatric disorders and ED-related phenotypes. Our study indicates that larger-scale collaborative studies will be needed to achieve the necessary power to detect loci underlying ED-related traits. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:22911880

Boraska, Vesna; Davis, Oliver SP; Cherkas, Lynn F; Helder, Sietske G; Harris, Juliette; Krug, Isabel; Pei-Chi Liao, Thomas; Treasure, Janet; Ntalla, Ioanna; Karhunen, Leila; Keski-Rahkonen, Anna; Christakopoulou, Danai; Raevuori, Anu; Shin, So-Youn; Dedoussis, George V; Kaprio, Jaakko; Soranzo, Nicole; Spector, Tim D; Collier, David A; Zeggini, Eleftheria

2012-01-01

344

The Value of Suppressor Effects in Explicating the Construct Validity of Symptom Measures  

PubMed Central

Suppressor effects are operating when the addition of a predictor increases the predictive power of another variable. We argue that suppressor effects can play a valuable role in explicating the construct validity of symptom measures by bringing into clearer focus opposing elements that are inherent—but largely hidden—in the measure’s overall score. We illustrate this point using theoretically grounded, replicated suppressor effects that have emerged in analyses of the original Inventory of Depression and Anxiety Symptoms (IDAS; Watson et al., 2007) and its expanded second version (IDAS-II; Watson et al., 2012). In Study 1, we demonstrate that the IDAS-II Appetite Gain and Appetite Loss scales contain both (a) a shared distress component that creates a positive correlation between them and (b) a specific symptom component that produces a natural negative association between them (i.e., people who recently have experienced decreased interest in food/loss of appetite are less likely to report a concomitant increase in appetite/weight). In Study 2, we establish that mania scales also contain two distinct elements—namely, high energy/positive emotionality and general distress/dysfunction—that oppose each another in many instances. In both studies, we obtained evidence of suppression effects that were highly robust across different types of respondents (e.g., clinical outpatients, community adults, college students) and using both self-report and interview-based measures. These replicable suppressor effects establish that many homogeneous, unidimensional symptom scales actually contain distinguishable components with distinct—at times, even antagonistic—properties. PMID:23795886

Watson, David; Clark, Lee Anna; Chmielewski, Michael; Kotov, Roman

2013-01-01

345

Using the PCL-R to help estimate the validity of two self-report measures of psychopathy with offenders.  

PubMed

Two self-report measures of psychopathy, Levenson's Primary and Secondary Psychopathy scales (LPSP) and the Psychopathic Personality Inventory (PPI), were administered to a large sample of 1,603 offenders. The most widely researched measure of criminal psychopathy, the Hare Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL-R), served as a provisional referent for estimating the construct validity of these self-report measures with offenders. Compared with the LPSP, the PPI displayed higher zero-order correlations with the PCL-R, better convergent and discriminant validity, and more consistent incremental utility in predicting PCL-R scores. Furthermore, using a variant of Westen and Rosenthal's approach to evaluating the construct validity of a new measure, compared with the LPSP, the PPI's pattern of associations with measures of 35 external criterion variables was more similar to the pattern observed for the PCL-R. Results generally provide stronger support for the validity of the PPI than the LPSP in offender populations using the PCL-R as a provisional benchmark, particularly for assessing interpersonal and affective features of psychopathy. PMID:19915197

Poythress, Norman G; Lilienfeld, Scott O; Skeem, Jennifer L; Douglas, Kevin S; Edens, John F; Epstein, Monica; Patrick, Christopher J

2010-06-01

346

Depressive Symptoms Among Reservation-based Pregnant American Indian Adolescents  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives To examine rates and correlates of depressive symptoms among pregnant reservation-based American Indian (AI) adolescents\\u000a from the Southwestern United States (N = 53). Methods Data were derived from a study evaluating a home-visiting program designed to promote positive parenting among young families.\\u000a Participants included a volunteer, convenience sample of expectant mothers who completed behavioral and mental health self-report\\u000a questionnaires. Depressive symptoms

Golda S. Ginsburg; Elena Varipatis Baker; Britta C. Mullany; Allison Barlow; Novalene Goklish; Ranelda Hastings; Audrey E. Thurm; Kristen Speakman; Raymond Reid; John Walkup

2008-01-01

347

Readability of Self-Report Alcohol Misuse Measures  

PubMed Central

Objective: Self-report measures of alcohol misuse and alcohol use disorders are valuable assessment tools for both research and clinical practice settings. However, readability is often overlooked when establishing the validity of these measures, which may result in measures written at a reading-grade level that is higher than the ability level of many potential respondents. The aim of the current study was to estimate the reading-grade level of validated measures of alcohol misuse and associated problems. Method: A total of 45 measures were identified, and reading-grade level was calculated using three validated readability formulas. Results: The majority of measures were written above the recommended reading-grade level for patient materials (5th–6th grade), with particularly poor readability for measure instructions. Conclusions: Given that many self-report alcohol misuse measures are written at a high reading-grade level, the consideration of readability is important when selecting measures for use in research and practice settings. Moreover, the development or modification of measures to target low-literacy populations may facilitate the broader applicability of these instruments. PMID:24650827

McHugh, R Kathryn; Sugarman, Dawn E; Kaufman, Julia S; Park, Sara; Weiss, Roger D; Greenfield, Shelly F

2014-01-01

348

HIV Symptoms  

MedlinePLUS

... Submit Home > HIV/AIDS > What is HIV/AIDS? HIV/AIDS This information in Spanish ( en español ) HIV symptoms Photo courtesy of AIDS.gov Facing AIDS ... and brain Return to top More information on HIV symptoms Explore other publications and websites Basic Information ...

349

Are estimates of socioeconomic inequalities in chronic disease artefactually narrowed by self-reported measures of prevalence in low-income and middle-income countries? Findings from the WHO-SAGE survey  

PubMed Central

Background The use of self-reported measures of chronic disease may substantially underestimate prevalence in low-income and middle-income country settings, especially in groups with lower socioeconomic status (SES). We sought to determine whether socioeconomic inequalities in the prevalence of non-communicable chronic diseases (NCDs) differ if estimated by using symptom-based or criterion-based measures compared with self-reported physician diagnoses. Methods Using population-representative data sets of the WHO Study of Global Ageing and Adult Health (SAGE), 2007–2010 (n=42?464), we calculated wealth-related and education-related concentration indices of self-reported diagnoses and symptom-based measures of angina, hypertension, asthma/chronic lung disease, visual impairment and depression in three ‘low-income and lower middle-income countries’—China, Ghana and India—and three ‘upper-middle-income countries’—Mexico, Russia and South Africa. Results SES gradients in NCD prevalence tended to be positive for self-reported diagnoses compared with symptom-based/criterion-based measures. In China, Ghana and India, SES gradients were positive for hypertension, angina, visual impairment and depression when using self-reported diagnoses, but were attenuated or became negative when using symptom-based/criterion-based measures. In Mexico, Russia and South Africa, this distinction was not observed consistently. For example, concentration index of self-reported versus symptom-based angina were: in China: 0.07 vs ?0.11, Ghana: 0.04 vs ?0.21, India: 0.02 vs ?0.16, Mexico: 0.19 vs ?0.22, Russia: ?0.01 vs ?0.02 and South Africa: 0.37 vs 0.02. Conclusions Socioeconomic inequalities in NCD prevalence tend to be artefactually positive when using self-report compared with symptom-based or criterion-based diagnostic criteria, with greater bias occurring in low-income countries. Using standardised, symptom-based measures would provide more valid estimates of NCD inequalities. PMID:25550454

Vellakkal, Sukumar; Millett, Christopher; Basu, Sanjay; Khan, Zaky; Aitsi-Selmi, Amina; Stuckler, David; Ebrahim, Shah

2015-01-01

350

Explaining the Covariance Between Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Symptoms and Depressive Symptoms: The Role of Hedonic Responsivity  

PubMed Central

Objective The aim of this study was to examine low hedonic responsivity, a facet of hedonic capacity, as a potential explanatory variable in the relationship between attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms and depressive symptoms. Method One hundred ninety-eight undergraduate students (mean age = 21.3, standard deviation = 4.6; 59.6% women) from a large, public university completed self-report measures for this cross-sectional study. Results Results indicated that ADHD symptoms were significantly associated with depressive symptoms, and that low hedonic responsivity partially accounted for this association. This effect was statistically significant for total ADHD symptoms and inattentive symptoms, but not for hyperactive-impulsive symptoms. Conclusions Findings are consistent with the possibility that impaired hedonic responsiveness may be a common endophenotype for depression and the inattentive symptoms of ADHD. Implications for future research and clinical work are discussed. PMID:22777931

Meinzer, Michael C.; Pettit, Jeremy W.; Leventhal, Adam M.; Hill, Ryan M.

2014-01-01

351

Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 revised form Symptom Validity Scale-Revised (MMPI-2-RF FBS-r; also known as Fake Bad Scale): psychometric characteristics in a nonlitigation neuropsychological setting.  

PubMed

This study examined fundamental psychometric characteristics of the Symptom Validity Scale-Revised (FBS-r) in a nonforensic sample of 303 neuropsychological referrals. FBS-r had a reliability (internal consistency) of .747 and two higher order factoral dimensions (Somatic Complaints and Optimism/Virtue). FBS-r had a discordant factor structure: Optimism/Virtue (7 items) was negatively related to Somatic Complaints (21 items) and undercut FBS-r measurement consistency (reliability). FBS-r scores, which purportedly reflect symptom exaggeration, are affected by as much as 23 T-score points on test items that are negatively related to symptom reporting. These data suggest that the FBS-r produces ambiguous scores reflecting two underlying dimensions that warrant additional research. PMID:22384793

Gass, Carlton S; Odland, Anthony P

2012-01-01

352

An Ecological Risk/Protective Factor Approach to Understanding Depressive Symptoms in Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We applied an ecological multiple risk/protective factor model to study factors related to depressive symptoms among adolescents. Participants were 39,740 adolescents who self-reported risk factors, protective factors, and depressive symptoms on a school-based survey. Results indicate that an index of multiple risk was related to increased…

Olson, Jonathan; Goddard, H. Wallace

2010-01-01

353

Effects of Essential Oils on Symptoms of Exercising Women with Fibromyalgia  

E-print Network

:self reported symptom intensity on exercise days for pain,fatigue,stiffness,and stress (numeric rating scalesEffects of Essential Oils on Symptoms of Exercising Women with Fibromyalgia Background,these treatments may enhance effects of nonpharmacologic interventions such as exercise. Exercise interventions

de Lijser, Peter

354

Classifying Clinically Referred Adolescent Substance Abusers by Level of Externalizing and Internalizing Symptoms  

Microsoft Academic Search

Adolescent substance abusers demonstrate numerous emotional and behavioral difficulties in conjunction with drug problems. In this study, 236 clinically referred substance abusing adolescents were grouped on level of self-reported and parent-reported internalizing and externalizing symptoms and compared on important variables. Three groups emerged: Externalizers, Exclusive Substance Abusers, and Mixed (adolescents with both internalizing and externalizing symptoms). Exclusive Substance Abusers showed

Cynthia L. Rowe; Howard A. Liddle; Gayle A. Dakof

2001-01-01

355

Depression as a Moderator of Sociocultural Influences on Eating Disorder Symptoms in Adolescent Females and Males  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study aimed to explore the role of depression as a moderator of sociocultural influences on eating disorder symptoms. A sample of 509 adolescents (56% female) completed self-report questionnaires assessing depression, body dissatisfaction, drive for thinness, bulimic symptoms and sociocultural influences on appearance from family, peers and…

Rodgers, Rachel F.; Paxton, Susan J.; Chabrol, Henri

2010-01-01

356

Persistent Nonmedical Use of Prescription Stimulants among College Students: Possible Association with ADHD Symptoms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: To investigate the possible association between untreated ADHD symptoms (as measured by the Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale) and persistent nonmedical use of prescription stimulants. Method: Multinomial regression modeling was used to compare ADHD symptoms among three groups of college students enrolled in a longitudinal study over 4…

Arria, Amelia M.; Garnier-Dykstra, Laura M.; Caldeira, Kimberly M.; Vincent, Kathryn B.; O'Grady, Kevin E.; Wish, Eric D.

2011-01-01

357

Persistent Nonmedical Use of Prescription Stimulants Among College Students: Possible Association With ADHD Symptoms  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To investigate the possible association between untreated ADHD symptoms (as measured by the Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale) and persistent nonmedical use of prescription stimulants. Method: Multinomial regression modeling was used to compare ADHD symptoms among three groups of college students enrolled in a longitudinal study over 4 years: (1) persistent nonmedical users of prescription stimulants, (2) persistent users of

Amelia M. Arria; Laura M. Garnier-Dykstra; Kimberly M. Caldeira; Kathryn B. Vincent; Kevin E. OGrady; Eric D. Wish

2011-01-01

358

Bullying in adolescence: psychiatric problems in victims and bullies as measured by the Youth Self Report (YSR) and the Depression Self-Rating Scale (DSRS).  

PubMed

Adolescents in junior high school (n = 237), completed a questionnaire on bullying as it relates to victim and to perpetrator status, suicidality and biographical data. Psychological symptoms were assessed by the Youth Self Report (YSR) and the Depression Self-Rating Scale (DSRS) supplemented by school health officers blind assessments. Bullying was common: bully only (18%), victim only (10%) and victim and bully (9%). Bullies had mainly externalizing symptoms (delinquency and aggression) and those of the victim and bully group both externalizing and internalizing symptoms as well as high levels of suicidality. Adolescents in the bully only group were more likely to be boys and to have attention problems. Moreover, a substantial proportion of the adolescents in the victim only group were judged by school health officer to have psychiatric symptoms and to function socially less well. PMID:16757465

Ivarsson, Tord; Broberg, Anders G; Arvidsson, Tomas; Gillberg, Christopher

2005-01-01

359

A review of the validity of self-reported arrests among persons with mental illness  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose of review The use of self-report as a measure of involvement with the criminal justice system is widespread in mental health services research. However, the accuracy of the self-reporting of sensitive information is questionable. Complicating the issue further is that self-reports from persons with serious mental illness may be influenced by cognitive distortions. Consequently, questions about the accuracy of

Annette Crisanti; Ranilo Laygo; John Junginger

360

Self-Reported and Actual Savings in a Water Conservation Campaign  

Microsoft Academic Search

Data from a survey questionnaire and from water utility billing records are used to compare self-reported and actual water savings for 471 households during a conservation campaign. Self-reports are only weakly related to actual changes in water consumption. Errors are widespread, and not wholly random: The accuracy of self-reports increases with household socioeconomic status and with the extent of conservation

Lawrence C. Hamilton

1985-01-01

361

A twin study of self-reported psychopathic personality traits  

Microsoft Academic Search

Previous twin studies attempting to assess the origins of psychopathic personality traits have mainly focused on an overt behavioral conceptualization of the syndrome as defined by a history of chronic antisocial behaviors. This investigation instead focused on a personality-based approach which emphasizes maladaptive personality traits as central to the syndrome. Psychopathic traits were indexed by the Psychopathic Personality Inventory (PPI),

Daniel M. Blonigen; Scott R. Carlson; Robert F. Krueger; Christopher J. Patrick

2003-01-01

362

Familial Risk for Alcoholism and Self-Reported Psychopathology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Three groups of young men varying in familial alcoholism risk (high density, high risk [HDHR]; low density, high risk [LDHR]; and low risk [LR]) were compared on the 11 clinical scales of the Personality Assessment Inventory. Significant group differences were found on 9 scales, with scores of the HDHR group exceeding those of the other 2 groups. No differences were

Arthur I. Alterman; Bobbi J. Renner; John S. Cacciola; Frank D. Mulvaney; Megan J. Rutherford

2000-01-01

363

Clinical Presentation and Self-Reported Patterns of Pain and Function in Patients with Plantar Heel Pain  

PubMed Central

Background Plantar heel pain is a common disorder of the foot for which patients seek medical treatment. The purpose of this study is to explore the relationship between duration of symptoms in plantar fasciitis patients and demographic factors, the intensity and location of pain, extent of previous treatment and self reported pain and function. Methods The charts of patients presenting with plantar heel pain between June 2008 and October 2010 were reviewed retrospectively and 182 patients with a primary diagnosis of plantar fasciitis were identified. Patients with symptoms less than 6 months were identified as acute and patients with symptoms greater than or equal to six months were defined as having chronic symptoms. Comparisons based on duration of symptoms were performed for age, gender, BMI, comorbidities, pain location and intensity, and a functional score measured by the Foot and Ankle Ability Measure (FAAM). Results The two groups were similar in age, BMI, gender, and comorbidities. Pain severity, as measured by a VAS, was not statistically significant between the two groups (6.6 and 6.2). The acute and chronic groups of patients reported similar levels of function on both the activity of daily living (62 and 65) and sports (47 and 45) subscales of the FAAM. Patients in the chronic group were more likely to have seen more providers and tried more treatment options for this condition. Conclusion As plantar fasciitis symptoms extend beyond 6 months, patients do not experience increasing pain intensity or functional limitation. No specific risk factors have been identified to indicate a risk of developing chronic symptoms. PMID:22995253

Klein, Sandra E.; Dale, Ann Marie; Hayes, Marcie Harris; Johnson, Jeffrey E.; McCormick, Jeremy J.; Racette, Brad A.

2014-01-01

364

Self-reported ageism in social work practitioners and students.  

PubMed

In this study, we focus on self-reported ageism in college students and social service providers using the Relating to Older People Evaluation (ROPE; Cherry & Palmore, 2008). The ROPE is a 20-item questionnaire that measures positive and negative ageist behaviors that people engage in during everyday life. Participants included undergraduate and graduate social work students and practicing social service providers in the nursing home and mental health setting. Findings indicate that people of varying educational backgrounds and occupational experience in social services readily admit to positive ageist behaviors. Item analyses revealed similarities and differences between groups in the most and least frequent forms of ageism endorsed. Ageism as a social phenomenon with implications related to social work policy and practice is discussed. PMID:19197635

Allen, Priscilla D; Cherry, Katie E; Palmore, Erdman

2009-01-01

365

Regional Analysis of Self-Reported Personality Disorder Criteria  

PubMed Central

Building on the theoretical work of Louis Guttman, we propose that the core problem facing research into the multidimensional structure of the personality disorders is not the identification of factorial simple structure but rather detailed characterization of the multivariate configuration of the diagnostic criteria. Dimensions rotated to orthogonal or oblique simple structure are but one way out of many to characterize a multivariate map, and their current near universal application represents a choice for a very particular set of interpretive advantages and disadvantages. We use multidimensional scaling and regional interpretation to investigate the structure of 78 self-reported personality disorder criteria from a large sample of military recruits and college students. Results suggest that the criteria have a three-dimensional radex structure that conforms only loosely to the 10 existing personality disorder (PD) categories. Regional interpretation in three dimensions elucidates several important aspects of PDs and their interrelationships. PMID:19012659

Turkheimer, Eric; Ford, Derek C.; Oltmanns, Thomas F.

2010-01-01

366

Plague Symptoms  

MedlinePLUS

... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Plague Plague Ecology & Transmission Symptoms Diagnosis & Treatment Maps & Statistics Info ... Clinicians Public Health Officials Veterinarians Prevention History of Plague Resources FAQ Related Links USGS National Wildlife Health ...

367

Norovirus Symptoms  

MedlinePLUS

... Norovirus Infection, National Institutes of Health NoroCORE Food Virology Symptoms Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Prevent ... Norovirus Infection, National Institutes of Health NoroCORE Food Virology File Formats Help: How do I view different ...

368

Glaucoma Symptoms  

MedlinePLUS

... angle, there are no discernible symptoms until the optic nerve is damaged and side (peripheral) vision is ... eye builds up gradually. At some point, the optic nerve is damaged and side vision (peripheral vision) ...

369

A comparison of retrospective self-report versus ecological momentary assessment measures of affective lability in the examination of its relationship with bulimic symptomatology  

PubMed Central

Affective lability has been linked to several maladaptive behaviors (Anestis et al., 2009; Coccaro, 1991). Methodology for measuring affective lability varies and includes retrospective self-report and ecological momentary assessment (EMA). In this study, we sought to test these methodologies by examining which better predicted binge eating episodes and general eating disorder symptoms in a sample (n = 131) of women diagnosed with bulimia nervosa (BN). We hypothesized that, while the two forms of measurement would be correlated with one another and predict binge eating episodes, EMA affective lability would be the stronger predictor. Results supported several hypotheses. Specifically, both EMA affective lability and retrospective self-report affective lability significantly predicted global eating disorder symptoms, even when controlling for depression, age, body mass index, and level of education, EMA affective lability exhibited a significantly stronger correlation with binge eating episodes than did retrospective self-report affective lability, and EMA affective lability predicted number of binge eating episodes on any given day controlling for the same list of covariates. Limitations include the use of a clinical sample that may limit the generalizability of our findings. Findings highlight the importance of affect in such behavior. PMID:20392437

Anestis, Michael D.; Selby, Edward A.; Crosby, Ross D.; Wonderlich, Stephen A.; Engel, Scott G.; Joiner, Thomas E.

2010-01-01

370

Respiratory symptoms questionnaire for asthma epidemiology: validity and reproducibility.  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND: There is a need for a new respiratory symptoms questionnaire for use in epidemiological research in asthma. METHOD: A questionnaire was designed following a pilot study in 78 subjects. It contains nine questions on symptoms such as wheeze and difficulty with breathing in defined circumstances such as exercise and sleep. It was completed by 211 adults and validated by comparison with a self reported history of asthma and with bronchial hyperresponsiveness to histamine. Its short term reproducibility was measured by three repeat administrations over two weeks. RESULTS: Subjects with asthma (n = 33), particularly those having had an asthma attack in the last year (n = 23), were more likely to report any symptom and to report a greater number of symptoms than those without asthma. The same relationship was found for bronchial hyperresponsiveness and symptoms. Either two or more, or three or more, symptoms appeared to be good indices of self reported asthma and bronchial hyperresponsiveness, or both, with a high sensitivity (65-91%) and specificity (85-96%). Reproducibility was good, with few subjects changing the number of symptoms reported by more than one symptom and none by more than four symptoms. The results compared favourably with those from questions on phlegm production from the MRC questionnaire and were better than those reported for the MRC wheeze questions. CONCLUSIONS: The questionnaire will be useful for epidemiological research on asthma and could form part of a new standardised questionnaire with wide applications. PMID:8497818

Venables, K M; Farrer, N; Sharp, L; Graneek, B J; Newman Taylor, A J

1993-01-01

371

Distribution and Correlates of Self-Reported Crimes of Trust  

PubMed Central

This study examines the distribution and correlates of a special class of property crimes, crimes of trust, using longitudinal and cross sectional self-report data from a national sample. We begin by defining crimes of trust and consider their conceptual relationship to “conventional” property crimes, which we here characterize as crimes of stealth, and to white collar crimes, which are defined in terms of the social status of the perpetrators. Crimes of trust are here defined as property crimes that typically involve deliberate contact with the victim or, where there is more than one victim, with at least one or more victims, in which there is typically more of a focus on concealing the fact that a crime has been committed than on concealing the identity of the perpetrator (as is the case in crimes of stealth), without regard to the socioeconomic status of the perpetrator (thus including but not limited to white collar crimes). The focus here is on crimes of trust committed by individuals (as opposed to corporate crime). We first examine their distribution by sociodemographic characteristics, then examine the correlation of crimes of trust with other types of illegal behavior, using data from the National Youth Survey Family Study, including (1) longitudinal self-report data from a nationally representative panel of individuals who were 11–18 years old in 1976–77 and who were followed through early middle age (ages 36–44) in 2002–2003, plus (2) cross-sectional data on these individuals plus their parents, spouses, and children age 11 and older in 2002–2003 (total age range 11–88). The results suggest that crimes of trust have a different age-crime curve from conventional crimes, and that they are not as strongly correlated with problem substance use, gender, and other socioeconomic indicators as conventional crimes. PMID:22347761

Menard, Scott; Morris, Robert G.; Gerber, Jurg; Covey, Herbert C.

2012-01-01

372

Self-reported sleep disturbances in renal transplant recipients  

PubMed Central

Background Poor sleep quality (SQ) and daytime sleepiness (DS) are common in renal transplant (RTx) recipients; however, related data are rare. This study describes the prevalence and frequency of self-reported sleep disturbances in RTx recipients. Methods This cross-sectional study included 249 RTx recipients transplanted at three Swiss transplant centers. All had reported poor SQ and / or DS in a previous study. With the Survey of Sleep (SOS) self-report questionnaire, we screened for sleep and health habits, sleep history, main sleep problems and sleep-related disturbances. To determine a basis for preliminary sleep diagnoses according to the International Classification of Sleep Disorders (ICSD), 164 subjects were interviewed (48 in person, 116 via telephone and 85 refused). Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the data and to determine the frequencies and prevalences of specific sleep disorders. Results The sample had a mean age of 59.1?±?11.6 years (60.2% male); mean time since Tx was 11.1?±?7.0 years. The most frequent sleep problem was difficulty staying asleep (49.4%), followed by problems falling asleep (32.1%). The most prevalent sleep disturbance was the need to urinate (62.9%), and 27% reported reduced daytime functionality. Interview data showed that most suffered from the first ICSD category: insomnias. Conclusion Though often disregarded in RTx recipients, sleep is an essential factor of wellbeing. Our findings show high prevalences and incidences of insomnias, with negative impacts on daytime functionality. This indicates a need for further research on the clinical consequences of sleep disturbances and the benefits of insomnia treatment in RTx recipients. PMID:24112372

2013-01-01

373

Distribution and Correlates of Self-Reported Crimes of Trust.  

PubMed

This study examines the distribution and correlates of a special class of property crimes, crimes of trust, using longitudinal and cross sectional self-report data from a national sample. We begin by defining crimes of trust and consider their conceptual relationship to "conventional" property crimes, which we here characterize as crimes of stealth, and to white collar crimes, which are defined in terms of the social status of the perpetrators. Crimes of trust are here defined as property crimes that typically involve deliberate contact with the victim or, where there is more than one victim, with at least one or more victims, in which there is typically more of a focus on concealing the fact that a crime has been committed than on concealing the identity of the perpetrator (as is the case in crimes of stealth), without regard to the socioeconomic status of the perpetrator (thus including but not limited to white collar crimes). The focus here is on crimes of trust committed by individuals (as opposed to corporate crime). We first examine their distribution by sociodemographic characteristics, then examine the correlation of crimes of trust with other types of illegal behavior, using data from the National Youth Survey Family Study, including (1) longitudinal self-report data from a nationally representative panel of individuals who were 11-18 years old in 1976-77 and who were followed through early middle age (ages 36-44) in 2002-2003, plus (2) cross-sectional data on these individuals plus their parents, spouses, and children age 11 and older in 2002-2003 (total age range 11-88). The results suggest that crimes of trust have a different age-crime curve from conventional crimes, and that they are not as strongly correlated with problem substance use, gender, and other socioeconomic indicators as conventional crimes. PMID:22347761

Menard, Scott; Morris, Robert G; Gerber, Jurg; Covey, Herbert C

2011-11-01

374

Body Awareness: Construct and Self-Report Measures  

PubMed Central

Objectives Heightened body awareness can be adaptive and maladaptive. Improving body awareness has been suggested as an approach for treating patients with conditions such as chronic pain, obesity and post-traumatic stress disorder. We assessed the psychometric quality of selected self-report measures and examined their items for underlying definitions of the construct. Data sources PubMed, PsychINFO, HaPI, Embase, Digital Dissertations Database. Review methods Abstracts were screened; potentially relevant instruments were obtained and systematically reviewed. Instruments were excluded if they exclusively measured anxiety, covered emotions without related physical sensations, used observer ratings only, or were unobtainable. We restricted our study to the proprioceptive and interoceptive channels of body awareness. The psychometric properties of each scale were rated using a structured evaluation according to the method of McDowell. Following a working definition of the multi-dimensional construct, an inter-disciplinary team systematically examined the items of existing body awareness instruments, identified the dimensions queried and used an iterative qualitative process to refine the dimensions of the construct. Results From 1,825 abstracts, 39 instruments were screened. 12 were included for psychometric evaluation. Only two were rated as high standard for reliability, four for validity. Four domains of body awareness with 11 sub-domains emerged. Neither a single nor a compilation of several instruments covered all dimensions. Key domains that might potentially differentiate adaptive and maladaptive aspects of body awareness were missing in the reviewed instruments. Conclusion Existing self-report instruments do not address important domains of the construct of body awareness, are unable to discern between adaptive and maladaptive aspects of body awareness, or exhibit other psychometric limitations. Restricting the construct to its proprio- and interoceptive channels, we explore the current understanding of the multi-dimensional construct and suggest next steps for further research. PMID:19440300

Mehling, Wolf E.; Gopisetty, Viranjini; Daubenmier, Jennifer; Price, Cynthia J.; Hecht, Frederick M.; Stewart, Anita

2009-01-01

375

Psychometric properties of the Peters et al Delusions Inventory 21 in college students.  

PubMed

Delusions show high prevalence in the general population and can be considered a risk marker for psychotic disorders. Although the assessment of these experiences has made considerable progress in recent years, there is still room for improvement in the measurement quality of the self-reports available for such assessment. The goal of the present work was to analyze the measurement quality of the Peters et al Delusions Inventory 21 (PDI-21) in Spanish college students. The final sample was made up of 660 participants (29.5% men) with a mean age of 20.3 years (SD, 2.6 years). The results revealed that a high percentage of the sample reported some symptom of paranoia. Analysis of the internal structure of the PDI-21 by means of exploratory factor analysis based on the tetrachoric correlation matrix yielded an essentially unidimensional solution. Cronbach ? for the total score was .91. Scores on the PDI-21 correlated in a statistically significant fashion with trait and state anxiety and negative affect. These results provide new evidence of the validity of the PDI-21 and endorse its use as a measurement instrument for assessing the extended psychosis phenotype in nonclinical population. PMID:22440833

Fonseca-Pedrero, Eduardo; Paino, Mercedes; Santarén-Rosell, Marta; Lemos-Giráldez, Serafín; Muñiz, José

2012-08-01

376

Adolescent caffeine consumption and self-reported violence and conduct disorder.  

PubMed

Caffeine is the most widely used psychoactive substance in the world and currently the only one legally available to children and adolescents. The sale and use of caffeinated beverages has increased markedly among adolescents during the last decade. However, research on caffeine use and behaviors among adolescents is scarce. We investigate the relationship between adolescent caffeine use and self-reported violent behaviors and conduct disorders in a population-based cross-sectional sample of 3,747 10th grade students (15-16 years of age, 50.2 % girls) who were enrolled in the Icelandic national education system during February 2012. Through a series of multiple regression models, while controlling for background factors, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder symptoms and current medication and peer delinquency, and including measures on substance use, our findings show robust additive explanatory power of caffeine for both violent behaviors and conduct disorders. In addition, the association of caffeine to the outcomes is significantly stronger for girls than boys for both violent behaviors and conduct disorders. Future studies are needed to examine to what extent, if at all, these relationships are causal. Indication of causal connections between caffeine consumption and negative outcomes such as those reported here would call into question the acceptability of current policies concerning the availability of caffeine to adolescents and the targeting of adolescence in the marketing of caffeine products. PMID:23358888

Kristjansson, Alfgeir L; Sigfusdottir, Inga Dora; Frost, Stephanie S; James, Jack E

2013-07-01

377

Tai chi training reduces self-report of inattention in healthy young adults  

PubMed Central

It is important to identify effective non-pharmacological alternatives to stimulant medications that reduce symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). In this study of healthy young adults, we measured the effects of training in tai chi, which involves mindful attention to the body during movement. Using a non-randomized, controlled, parallel design, students in a 15-week introductory tai chi course (n = 28) and control participants (n = 44) were tested for ADHD indicators and cognitive function at three points over the course of the 15-weeks. The tai chi students’ self-report of attention, but not hyperactivity–impulsivity, improved compared to controls. At baseline, inattention correlated positively with reaction time variability in an affective go/no-go task across all participants, and improvements in attention correlated with reductions in reaction time variability across the tai chi students. Affective bias changed in the tai chi students, as reaction times to positive- and negative-valenced words equalized over time. These results converge to suggest that tai chi training may help improve attention in healthy young adults. Further studies are needed to confirm these results and to evaluate tai chi as therapy for individuals with ADHD. PMID:24478679

Converse, Alexander K.; Ahlers, Elizabeth O.; Travers, Brittany G.; Davidson, Richard J.

2014-01-01

378

Self-reported hearing loss among workers potentially exposed to industrial noise-United States  

SciTech Connect

Noise-induced loss of hearing has been recognized as an occupational health problem since the 18th century. Occupational deafness is an irreversible, sensorineural condition that results from damage to the nerve cells of the inner ear. Recent estimates from surveys indicate that between 7.4 and 10.2 million people work at sites where the level of noise presents an increased risk of hearing loss (85 decibels (dBA) or higher). During the period of 1978-1987, an estimated $835 million was paid in workers' compensation claims for occupationally induced hearing impairment. To assess the prevalence of hearing-loss symptoms among adult workers in the United States, investigators from the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) recently analyzed data collected during the 1971 and 1977 National Health Interview Surveys (NHIS) conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS). For this study, the prevalence of self-reported hearing loss was obtained for all persons over 17 years of age who were in the labor force at the time of interview. Data from the 1972-1974 National Occupational Hazard Survey (NOHS) were used to classify worksites by noise level. NOHS was conducted by NIOSH from 1972 to 1974 on a probability sample of approximately 5000 workplaces across the United States. The survey provides information on potential exposures of workers to chemical and physical agents. These data identified industries and occupations in which employees are exposed to continuous noise.

Not Available

1988-04-15

379

Tai chi training reduces self-report of inattention in healthy young adults.  

PubMed

It is important to identify effective non-pharmacological alternatives to stimulant medications that reduce symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). In this study of healthy young adults, we measured the effects of training in tai chi, which involves mindful attention to the body during movement. Using a non-randomized, controlled, parallel design, students in a 15-week introductory tai chi course (n = 28) and control participants (n = 44) were tested for ADHD indicators and cognitive function at three points over the course of the 15-weeks. The tai chi students' self-report of attention, but not hyperactivity-impulsivity, improved compared to controls. At baseline, inattention correlated positively with reaction time variability in an affective go/no-go task across all participants, and improvements in attention correlated with reductions in reaction time variability across the tai chi students. Affective bias changed in the tai chi students, as reaction times to positive- and negative-valenced words equalized over time. These results converge to suggest that tai chi training may help improve attention in healthy young adults. Further studies are needed to confirm these results and to evaluate tai chi as therapy for individuals with ADHD. PMID:24478679

Converse, Alexander K; Ahlers, Elizabeth O; Travers, Brittany G; Davidson, Richard J

2014-01-01

380

Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS): efficient, standardized tools to measure self-reported health and quality of life.  

PubMed

All nurses are interested in the effects of diseases and treatments on individuals. Patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures are used to obtain self-reported information about symptoms, function, perceptions, and experiences. However, there are challenges to their use, including multiple measures of the same concept, widely varying quality, excessive length and complexity, and difficulty comparing findings across studies and conditions. To address these challenges, the National Institutes of Health funded the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS), a web-based repository of valid and reliable PRO measures of health concepts relevant to clinician and researchers. Through the PROMIS Assessment Center, clinicians and researchers can access PRO measures, administer computerized adaptive tests, collect self-report data, and report instant health assessments. The purpose of this article was to summarize the development and validation of the PROMIS measures and to describe its current functionality as it relates to nursing science. PMID:25015409

Bevans, Margaret; Ross, Alyson; Cella, David

2014-01-01

381

Neuropathic sensory symptoms: association with pain and psychological factors  

PubMed Central

Background A large number of population-based studies of chronic pain have considered neuropathic sensory symptoms to be associated with a high level of pain intensity and negative affectivity. The present study examines the question of whether this association previously found in non-selected samples of chronic pain patients can also be found in chronic pain patients with underlying pathology of neuropathic sensory symptoms. Methods Neuropathic sensory symptoms in 306 patients with chronic pain diagnosed as typical neuropathic pain, radiculopathy, fibromyalgia, or nociceptive back pain were assessed using the Pain DETECT Questionnaire. Two separate cluster analyses were performed to identify subgroups of patients with different levels of self-reported neuropathic sensory symptoms and, furthermore, to identify subgroups of patients with distinct patterns of neuropathic sensory symptoms (adjusted for individual response bias regarding specific symptoms). Results ANOVA (analysis of variance) results in typical neuropathic pain, radiculopathy, and fibromyalgia showed no significant differences between the three levels of neuropathic sensory symptoms regarding pain intensity, pain chronicity, pain catastrophizing, pain acceptance, and depressive symptoms. However, in nociceptive back pain patients, significant differences were found for all variables except pain chronicity. When controlling for the response bias of patients in ratings of symptoms, none of the patterns of neuropathic sensory symptoms were associated with pain and psychological factors. Conclusion Neuropathic sensory symptoms are not closely associated with higher levels of pain intensity and cognitive-emotional evaluations in chronic pain patients with underlying pathology of neuropathic sensory symptoms. The findings are discussed in term of differential response bias in patients with versus without verified neuropathic sensory symptoms by clinical examination, medical tests, or underlying pathology of disease. Our results lend support to the importance of using adjusted scores, thereby eliminating the response bias, when investigating self-reported neuropathic symptoms by patients. PMID:24899808

Shaygan, Maryam; Böger, Andreas; Kröner-Herwig, Birgit

2014-01-01

382

Evaluation of the self-reported SDQ in a clinical setting: Do self-reports tell us more than ratings by adult informants?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the German self-reported Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) in a clinical setting. We also investigated whether this additional information gathered directly from older children and adolescents improves the prediction of clinical status when external ratings from their parents and\\/or teachers are already available. Methods: SDQ self-reports were collected from 214 in-

Andreas Becker; Nicola Hagenberg; Veit Roessner; Wolfgang Woerner; Aribert Rothenberger

2004-01-01

383

Comparing Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy and Traditional Cognitive Behavior Therapy With Treatments as Usual on Reduction of Major Depressive Disorder Symptoms  

PubMed Central

Background In this studyMindfulness and CBT were combined to investigate the enhance of psychotropic work. Both therapies have integrated acceptance-based mindfulness approaches with change-based cognitive behavioral therapies to create efficacious treatments. That is, introduce use of MBCT in active phase of treatment and chronic depression. Objectives This study was done to evaluate efficacy of Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) and traditional Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT) with Treatments as usual (TAU) to reduce psychiatric symptoms in a sample of patients with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). Materials and Methods 90 patients who were referred to clinics of university of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences and Tehran University Counseling Centre and met DSM-IV criteria for MDD were selected. They were randomly assigned to MBCT (n = 30), CBT (n = 30), or TAU (n = 30). They were aged between 18 and 45 years (M = 28, SD = 8), with an average of two previous depression episodes. They were interviewed through the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV and self-report by Brief Symptom Inventory, pre and post treatment. Patients in MBCT and CBT group received the treatment, while TAU group continued therapy (anti-depressant). Results The results indicated that MBCT and CBT groups have significant efficacy on reduction of MDD symptoms. Conclusions MBCT appears to be as effective as CBT in the treatment of current depression. PMID:23682326

Omidi, Abdollah; Mohammadkhani, Parvaneh; Mohammadi, Abolfazl; Zargar, Fatemeh

2013-01-01

384

Functional Impairments as Symptoms in the Symptom Cluster Analysis of Patients Newly Diagnosed With Advanced Cancer  

PubMed Central

Context Symptoms and subsequent functional impairment have been associated with the biological processes of a disease, including the interaction between the disease and treatment in a measurement model of symptoms. However, hitherto cluster analysis has primarily focused on symptoms. Objectives This study among patients within 100 days of diagnosis with advanced cancer explored whether self-reported physical symptoms and functional impairments formed clusters at the time of diagnosis. Methods We applied the cluster analysis to self-reported symptoms and activities of daily living of 111 patients newly diagnosed with advanced gastrointestinal (GI), gynecological, head and neck, and lung cancers. Based on the content, expert evaluations, the best techniques, variables were identified, yielding the best solution. Results The best cluster solution used a K-means algorithm and cosine similarity and yielded five clusters of physical as well as emotional symptoms and functional impairments. Cancer site formed the predominant organizing principle of composition for each cluster. The top five symptoms and functional impairments in each cluster were Cluster 1 (GI): outlook, insomnia, appearance, concentration, and eating/feeding; Cluster 2 (GI): appetite, bowel, insomnia, eating/feeding, and appearance; Cluster 3 (gynecological): nausea, insomnia, eating/feeding, concentration, and pain; Cluster 4 (head and neck): dressing, eating/feeding, bathing, toileting, and walking; and Cluster 5 (lung): cough, walking, eating/feeding, breathing, and insomnia. Conclusion Functional impairments in patients newly diagnosed with late-stage cancers behave as symptoms during the diagnostic phase. Health care providers need to expand their assessments to include both symptoms and functional impairments. Early recognition of the functional changes may accelerate diagnosis at an earlier cancer stage. PMID:23380336

Fodeh, Samah J.; Lazenby, Mark; Bai, Mei; Ercolano, Elizabeth; Murphy, Terrence; McCorkle, Ruth

2015-01-01

385

Personality traits influencing somatization symptoms and social inhibition in the elderly  

PubMed Central

Purpose Somatization is a common symptom among the elderly, and even though personality disorders have been found to be associated with somatization, personality traits have not yet been explored with regard to this symptom. The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between personality traits and somatization, and social inhibition. Patients and methods As part of a cross-sectional study of a community sample, 126 elderly Thais aged 60 years or over completed self-reporting questionnaires related to somatization and personality traits. Somatization was elicited from the somatization subscale when using the Symptom Checklist SCL-90 instrument. Personality traits were drawn from the 16 Personality Factor Questionnaire and social inhibition was identified when using the inventory of interpersonal problems. In addition, path analysis was used to establish the influence of personality traits on somatization and social inhibition. Results Of the 126 participants, 51% were male, 55% were married, and 25% were retired. The average number of years in education was 7.6 (standard deviation =5.2). “Emotional stability” and “dominance” were found to have a direct effect on somatization, as were age and number of years in education, but not sex. Also, 35% of the total variance could be explained by the model, with excellent fit statistics. Dominance was found to have an indirect effect, via vigilance, on social inhibition, which was also influenced by number of years in education and emotional stability. Social inhibition was not found to have any effect on somatization, although hypothetically it should. Conclusion “Emotional stability”, “dominance”, and “vigilance”, as well as age and the number of years in education, were found to have an effect on somatization. Attention should be paid to these factors in the elderly with somatization. PMID:24477217

Wongpakaran, Tinakon; Wongpakaran, Nahathai

2014-01-01

386

The Healthy Aging Brain Care (HABC) Monitor: validation of the Patient Self-Report Version of the clinical tool designed to measure and monitor cognitive, functional, and psychological health  

PubMed Central

Background Primary care providers need an inexpensive, simple, user-friendly, easily standardized, sensitive to change, and widely available multidomain instrument to measure the cognitive, functional, and psychological symptoms of patients suffering from multiple chronic conditions. We previously validated the Caregiver Report Version of the Healthy Aging Brain Care Monitor (HABC Monitor) for measuring and monitoring the severity of symptoms through caregiver reports. The purpose of this study was to assess the reliability and validity of the Patient Self-Report Version of the HABC Monitor (Self-Report HABC Monitor). Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Primary care clinics affiliated with a safety net urban health care system in Indianapolis, Indiana, USA. Subjects A total of 291 subjects aged ?65 years with a mean age of 72.7 (standard deviation 6.2) years, 76% female, and 56% African Americans. Analysis Psychometric validity and reliability of the Self-Report HABC Monitor. Results Among 291 patients analyzed, the Self-Report HABC Monitor demonstrated excellent fit for the confirmatory factor analysis model (root mean square error of approximation =0.030, comparative fit index =0.974, weighted root mean square residual =0.837) and good internal consistency (0.78–0.92). Adequate convergent–divergent validity (differences between the Telephone Interview for Cognitive Status test-based cognitive function impairment versus nonimpairment groups) was demonstrated only when patients were removed from analysis if they had both cognitive function test impairment and suspiciously perfect self-report HABC Monitor cognitive floor scores of 0. Conclusion The Self-Report HABC Monitor demonstrates good reliability and validity as a clinically practical multidimensional tool for measuring symptoms. The tool can be used along with its caregiver version to provide useful feedback (via monitoring of symptoms) for modifying care plans. Determining the validity of HABC Monitor scores from patients who self-report a perfect cognitive score of 0 requires cognitive function test results (eg, Telephone Interview for Cognitive Status or Mini Mental State Examination) or Caregiver Report HABC Monitor scores or further clinical examination to rule out the possibility that the patient is denying or unaware of their cognitive symptoms. PMID:25584024

Monahan, Patrick O; Alder, Catherine A; Khan, Babar A; Stump, Timothy; Boustani, Malaz A

2014-01-01

387

Self-reported efficacy of cannabis and other complementary medicine modalities by Parkinson's disease patients in colorado.  

PubMed

Introduction. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is frequently used by Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. We sought to provide information on CAM use and efficacy in PD patients in the Denver metro area with particular attention to cannabis use given its recent change in legal status. Methods. Self-administered surveys on CAM use and efficacy were completed by PD patients identified in clinics and support groups across the Denver metro area between 2012 and 2013. Results. 207 patients (age 69 ± 11; 60% male) completed the survey. Responses to individual CAM therapy items showed that 85% of respondents used at least one form of CAM. The most frequently reported CAMs were vitamins (66%), prayer (59%), massage (45%), and relaxation (32%). Self-reported improvement related to the use of CAM was highest for massage, art therapy, music therapy, and cannabis. While only 4.3% of our survey responders reported use of cannabis, it ranked among the most effective CAM therapies. Conclusions. Overall, our cross-sectional study was notable for a high rate of CAM utilization amongst PD patients and high rates of self-reported efficacy across most CAM modalities. Cannabis was rarely used in our population but users reported high efficacy, mainly for nonmotor symptoms. PMID:25821504

Finseth, Taylor Andrew; Hedeman, Jessica Louise; Brown, Robert Preston; Johnson, Kristina I; Binder, Matthew Sean; Kluger, Benzi M

2015-01-01

388

Self-Reported Efficacy of Cannabis and Other Complementary Medicine Modalities by Parkinson's Disease Patients in Colorado  

PubMed Central

Introduction. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is frequently used by Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. We sought to provide information on CAM use and efficacy in PD patients in the Denver metro area with particular attention to cannabis use given its recent change in legal status. Methods. Self-administered surveys on CAM use and efficacy were completed by PD patients identified in clinics and support groups across the Denver metro area between 2012 and 2013. Results. 207 patients (age 69 ± 11; 60% male) completed the survey. Responses to individual CAM therapy items showed that 85% of respondents used at least one form of CAM. The most frequently reported CAMs were vitamins (66%), prayer (59%), massage (45%), and relaxation (32%). Self-reported improvement related to the use of CAM was highest for massage, art therapy, music therapy, and cannabis. While only 4.3% of our survey responders reported use of cannabis, it ranked among the most effective CAM therapies. Conclusions. Overall, our cross-sectional study was notable for a high rate of CAM utilization amongst PD patients and high rates of self-reported efficacy across most CAM modalities. Cannabis was rarely used in our population but users reported high efficacy, mainly for nonmotor symptoms. PMID:25821504

Finseth, Taylor Andrew; Hedeman, Jessica Louise; Brown, Robert Preston; Johnson, Kristina I.; Binder, Matthew Sean; Kluger, Benzi M.

2015-01-01

389

Acculturation, Discrimination and Depressive Symptoms Among Korean Immigrants in New York City  

PubMed Central

Immigrant mental health issues, especially depression in relation to discrimination and acculturation, are reported to be serious problems in the United States. The current study examines the prevalence of depressive symptoms among Korean immigrants in New York City (NYC) and its relation to self-reported discrimination and acculturation. A sample of 304 Korean immigrants residing in NYC completed a survey utilizing the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale—Korean version, Discrimination Scale, and Acculturation Stress Scale. Results indicated that 13.2% of the sample population demonstrated some symptoms of depression and that variable such as living alone, marital status, education, years in US and income impact high depression scores. Results also indicate that higher self-reported exposure to discrimination and lower self-reported language proficiency were related to higher depressive symptoms. In a regression analysis, discrimination and English language proficiency were significant predictors of depression, but acculturation stress was not significantly related to depression. PMID:19888652

Bernstein, Kunsook Song; Park, So-Youn; Shin, Jinah; Cho, Sunhee; Park, Yeddi

2010-01-01

390

Criterion validity of the Holden Psychological Screening Inventory Social Symptomatology scale in a prison sample.  

PubMed

The 36-item, self-report Holden Psychological Screening Inventory (HPSI; R. R. Holden, 1996) and the Psychopathy Checklist--Revised (PCL-R; R. D. Hare, 1991) were administered to 214 male, adult prison inmates in Canadian federal correctional facilities. The 12-item HPSI Social Symptomatology scale, a measure of antisocial behavior, demonstrated a large effect size in significantly differentiating between PCL-R-identified psychopaths and nonpsychopaths. HPSI scales not theoretically related to psychopathic behavior showed no such significant effects. Findings are interpreted as supporting the criterion validity of the Social Symptomatology scale and suggest that this brief, self-report screen has research and clinical merit. PMID:11433799

Book, A S; Knap, M A; Holden, R R

2001-06-01

391

Developing a Self-Reported Physical Fitness Survey  

PubMed Central

Physical fitness measures indicate health status and could be used to improve management of overall health. Purpose To describe the development of a Self-Reported Fitness (SRFit) survey intended to estimate fitness in adults aged ?40 years across four domains; 1) muscular strength and endurance, 2) cardiovascular fitness, 3) flexibility, and 4) body composition. Methods SRFit items were developed from the previously validated Rikli and Jones Senior Fitness Test battery of physical tests. Face-to-face participant interviews were used to refine SRFit item wording. Data from a pilot administration of the SRFit survey were used to guide further revisions of SRFit items. The Senior Fitness Test battery was used to evaluate the four fitness domains. The BodPod was used to measure body composition. Height, weight, and resting blood pressure were measured and the revised SRFit survey was administered to 108 participants. Results Forty-five percent of the participants were female and 37% reported being Black or in the “other” race category. Mean age was 53.5±8.0 years and mean body mass index (BMI) was 30.6±8.8 kg/m2. SRFit summary score means (SD) and correlations found between summary score means (SD) and fitness test scores were: Upper body strength m=12.8 (2.4), r=0.59, p<0.001; lower body strength m=12.6 (2.6), r=0.68, p<0.001; upper body flexibility left-side m=12.3 (2.8), r=0.47, p<0.001; right-side m=12.4 (2.8), r=0.67, p<0.001; lower body flexibility m=17.4 (3.8), r = 0.55, p<0.001; cardiovascular endurance m=12.9 (2.6), r=0.66, p<0.001; BMI m=7.7 (2.23), r=0.79, p<0.001; and percent body fat m=7.7 (2.2), r=0.78, p<0.001. Conclusion SRFit survey items in each fitness domain were correlated with analogous Senior Fitness Test items indicating that participants could accurately use the SRFit survey to self-report physical fitness. PMID:22297807

Keith, NiCole R.; Stump, Timothy E.; Clark, Daniel O.

2012-01-01

392

Comparison of Child Self-Report and Parent Report on the Sibling Need and Involvement Profile  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Considering the needs of siblings is an important component of family-centered practice for children with developmental disabilities. A syntactically and semantically simplified version of the "Sibling Need and Involvement Profile" (SNIP) was developed to allow self-report. Total profile scores for the self-report version correlated well with the…

Senner, Jill E.; Fish, Thomas

2012-01-01

393

Usefulness of Self-Report Instruments in Assessing Men Accused of Domestic Violence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Clinical assessment of domestic violence has traditionally relied on self-report methods of data collection, using structured interviews and lengthy questionnaires such as the MMPI-2. However, in certain situations such as court-ordered domestic violence evaluations, information obtained through self-report methods may be tainted because of…

Helfritz, Laura E.; Stanford, Matthew S.; Conklin, Sarah M.; Greve, Kevin W.; Villemarette-Pittman, Nicole R.; Houston, Rebecca J.

2006-01-01

394

Examining Systematic Errors in Predictors of College Student Self-Reported Gains  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

College student self-reported gains are used frequently in institutional research and in general research on college outcomes (Gonyea, 2005). These self-report measures serve not only to identify experiences and programs associated with student growth but also to draw comparisons across colleges and universities. The vast majority of institutions…

Bowman, Nicholas A.

2011-01-01

395

A Comparison of Diversity, Frequency, and Severity Self-Reported Offending Scores among Female Offending Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Despite general consensus over the value of measuring self-reported offending, discrepancies exist in methods of scoring self-reported offending and the length of the reference period over which offending is assessed. This analysis compared the concurrent interassociations and longitudinal predictive strength of diversity, frequency, and severity…

Oudekerk, Barbara A.; Erbacher, Monica K.; Reppucci, N. Dickon

2012-01-01

396

Global Self-Esteem, Appearance Satisfaction, and Self-Reported Dieting in Early Adolescence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Global self-esteem, appearance satisfaction, and self-reported dieting are interrelated. This study examines the temporal ordering of global self-esteem and appearance satisfaction across the early adolescence transition, from age 10 to age 14, as well as the independent associations of self-esteem and appearance satisfaction on self-reported

Barker, Erin T.; Bornstein, Marc H.

2010-01-01

397

Using College Students' Self-Reported Learning Outcomes in Scholarly Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this chapter, the author examines the adequacy and appropriateness of self-report data using the lens of construct validity (Kane, 2006; Messick, 1989). Because construct validity focuses on the appropriateness of data for specific uses or interpretations, he limits his discussion to the use of self-report data in scholarly research. Other…

Pike, Gary R.

2011-01-01

398

Recommendations to improve the accuracy of estimates of physical activity derived from self report  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Assessment of physical activity using self-report has the potential for measurement error that can lead to incorrect inferences about physical activity behaviors and bias study results. To provide recommendations to improve the accuracy of physical activity derived from self report. We provide an ov...

399

Self-Reported versus Professionally Assessed Functional Limitations in Community-Dwelling Very Old Individuals  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between self-reported and professionally assessed functional limitations in community-dwelling very old individuals. In total, 306 single-living adults aged 81-90 years were included in this cross-sectional study. The main outcome measure was the presence and absence of self-reported and…

Carlsson, Gunilla; Haak, Maria; Nygren, Carita; Iwarsson, Susanne

2012-01-01

400

Cigarette smoking and self-reported health in China Steven T. YEN a,  

E-print Network

Cigarette smoking and self-reported health in China Steven T. YEN a, , W. Douglass SHAW b , Yan The effect of cigarette smoking on self-reported or assessed health (SAH) has been considered in several studies, with some surprising results, but smoking behavior has received less attention in studies

Shaw, W. Douglass

401

Congruence of Self-Reported Medications with Pharmacy Prescription Records in Low-Income Older Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: This study examined the congruence of self-reported medications with computerized pharmacy records. Design and Methods: Pharmacy records and self-reported medications were obtained for 294 members of a state pharmaceutical assistance program who also participated in ACTIVE, a clinical trial on cognitive training in nondemented elderly…

Caskie, Grace I. L.; Willis, Sherry L.

2004-01-01

402

Reliability and Validity of a New Physical Activity Self-Report Measure for Younger Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to assess the test-retest reliability and validity of a new Youth Physical Activity Self-Report measure. Heart rate and direct observation were employed as criterion measures with a sample of 79 children (aged 7-9 years). Spearman's rho correlation between self reported activity intensity and heart rate was 0.87 for…

Belton, Sarahjane; Mac Donncha, Ciaran

2010-01-01

403

Comparison of Self-Reported and Measured Height and Weight in Eighth-Grade Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The goal of this study was to evaluate the relationships between self-reported and measured height, weight, and body mass index (BMI) in a sample of eighth-grade students. The study population consisted of eighth-grade students in eastern North Carolina who completed a cross-sectional survey, self-reported their height and weight, and had their…

Morrissey, Susan L.; Whetstone, Lauren M.; Cummings, Doyle M.; Owen, Lynda J.

2006-01-01

404

Correlation between adherence rates measured by MEMS and self-reported questionnaires: a meta-analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

PURPOSE: It is vital to understand the associations between the medication event monitoring systems (MEMS) and self-reported questionnaires (SRQs) because both are often used to measure medication adherence and can produce different results. In addition, the economic implication of using alternative measures is important as the cost of electronic monitoring devices is not covered by insurance, while self-reports are the

Lizheng Shi; Jinan Liu; Vivian Fonseca; Philip Walker; Anupama Kalsekar; Manjiri Pawaskar

2010-01-01

405

The relationship between symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder and pain, affective disturbance and disability among patients with accident and non-accident related pain  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent studies have reported a high prevalence of symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among individuals with chronic pain. Studies suggest that persons with pain and PTSD also display higher levels of affective disturbance. In the present study we examined self-reports of pain, affective disturbance, and disability among pain patients with and without symptoms of PTSD. Patients without PTSD symptoms

Michael E. Geisser; Randy S. Roth; Jan E. Bachman; Thomas A. Eckert

1996-01-01

406

Self-criticism, dependency and depressive symptoms in a nationwide sample of Norwegian physicians  

Microsoft Academic Search

This cross-sectional study examines the associations between dysfunctional beliefs concerning self-criticism and dependency and self-reported depressive symptoms in a nationwide representative sample of Norwegian physicians (N=836). The dysfunctional beliefs were measured by the Dysfunctional Attitudes Scale (DAS), and depressive symptoms by the “severe depression” subscale of the General Health Questionnaire. Women reported more depressive symptoms than men, whereas men reported

Per Vaglum; Erik Falkum

1999-01-01

407

Conceptualizing the Prospective Relationship Between Social Support, Stress, and Depressive Symptoms Among Adolescents  

Microsoft Academic Search

The goal of the current study is to examine the relationship amongst social support, stress, and depressive symptoms within\\u000a a transactional and diathesis-stress framework using a multi-wave, longitudinal design. At the initial assessment, adolescents\\u000a (n?=?258) completed self-report measures assessing social support (peer, classmate, parent, and total), dependent interpersonal\\u000a stress, anxious symptoms, and depressive symptoms. Additionally, participants reported stress and symptomology

Randy Patrick Auerbach; Joseph S. Bigda-Peyton; Nicole K. Eberhart; Christian A. Webb; Moon-Ho Ringo Ho

2011-01-01

408

Cigarette smoking predicts development of depressive symptoms among U.S. Adolescents  

Microsoft Academic Search

To examine whether adolescent cigarette smoking predicts the development of depressive symptoms, we used a longitudinal follow-up\\u000a survey of 6,863 adolescents ages 12 to 18 in the U.S. who did not report notable depressive symptoms at baseline. This study\\u000a used a self-report measure of six depressive symptoms experienced within the past twelve months at follow-up as the outcome\\u000a of interest.

Won S. Choi; Christi A. Patten; J. Christian Gillin; Robert M. Kaplan; John P. Pierce

1997-01-01

409

Depression as a Moderator of Sociocultural Influences on Eating Disorder Symptoms in Adolescent Females and Males  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study aimed to explore the role of depression as a moderator of sociocultural influences on eating disorder symptoms.\\u000a A sample of 509 adolescents (56% female) completed self-report questionnaires assessing depression, body dissatisfaction,\\u000a drive for thinness, bulimic symptoms and sociocultural influences on appearance from family, peers and the media. Both girls\\u000a and boys displaying high levels of depressive symptoms perceived

Rachel F. Rodgers; Susan J. Paxton; Henri Chabrol

2010-01-01

410

Mindfulness based stress reduction in post-treatment breast cancer patients: an examination of symptoms and symptom clusters  

Microsoft Academic Search

To investigate prevalence and severity of symptoms and symptom clustering in breast cancer survivors who attended MBSR(BC).\\u000a Women were randomly assigned into MBSR(BC) or Usual Care (UC). Eligible women were ? 21 years, had been diagnosed with breast\\u000a cancer and completed treatment within 18 months of enrollment. Symptoms and interference with daily living were measured pre-\\u000a and post-MBSR(BC) using the M.D. Anderson Symptom Inventory.

Cecile A. LengacherRichard; Richard R. Reich; Janice Post-White; Manolete Moscoso; Melissa M. Shelton; Michelle Barta; Nancy Le; Pinky Budhrani

411

Life events, self-reported psychopathology and sense of coherence among young men--a population-based study.  

PubMed

The aim is to study the associations between sense of coherence (SOC), and psychopathology and major life events among adolescent boys. The study population consisted of 2314 Finnish boys born during 1981 who attended military call-up (79% of the original sample). At military call-up in 1999, the boys filled in the Young Adult Self-Report (YASR) and Antonovsky's Orientation to Life Questionnaire (SOC-13), which measure SOC. In univariate analysis, low parental education level, death and serious illness of parent, parental divorce and high symptom level in all YASR scales were associated with poor SOC. In multivariate analysis, most YASR syndrome scales and father's education level were independently associated with SOC. The study demonstrates the sensitivity of the SOC-13 scale to a wide range of mental health problems. The results offer additional support to the argument that SOC may be an important global measure for use in both clinical and research purposes in adolescent psychiatry. PMID:18846443

Ristkari, T; Sourander, A; Rønning, J A; Nikolakaros, G; Helenius, H

2008-01-01

412

The INDDEP study: inpatient and day hospital treatment for depression – symptom course and predictors of change  

PubMed Central

Background Depression can be treated in an outpatient, inpatient or day hospital setting. In the German health care system, episodes of inpatient or day hospital treatment are common, but there is a lack of studies evaluating effectiveness in routine care and subgroups of patients with a good or insufficient treatment response. Our study aims at identifying prognostic and prescriptive outcome predictors as well as comparative effectiveness in psychosomatic inpatient and day hospital treatment in depression. Methods/Design In a naturalistic study, 300 consecutive inpatient and 300 day hospital treatment episodes in seven psychosomatic hospitals in Germany will be included. Patients are assessed at four time points of measurement (admission, discharge, 3-months follow-up, 12-months follow-up) including a broad range of variables (self-report and expert ratings). First, the whole sample will be analysed to identify prognostic and prescriptive predictors of outcome (primary outcome criterion: Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptoms QIDS-total score, expert rating). Secondly, for a comparison of inpatient and day hospital treatment, samples will be matched according to known predictors of outcome. Discussion Naturalistic studies with good external validity are needed to assess treatment outcome in depression in routine care and to identify subgroups of patients with different therapeutic needs. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN20317064 PMID:23531019

2013-01-01

413

Leadership: validation of a self-report scale.  

PubMed

The aim of this paper was to propose and test the factor structure of a new self-report questionnaire on leadership. A sample of 373 school principals in the Province of Quebec, Canada completed the initial 46-item version of the questionnaire. In order to obtain a questionnaire of minimal length, a four-step procedure was retained. First, items analysis was performed using Classical Test Theory. Second, Rasch analysis was used to identify non-fitting or overlapping items. Third, a confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) using structural equation modelling was performed on the 21 remaining items to verify the factor structure of the scale. Results show that the model with a single third-order dimension (leadership), two second-order dimensions (transactional and transformational leadership), and one first-order dimension (laissez-faire leadership) provides a good fit to the data. Finally, invariance of factor structure was assessed with a second sample of 222 vice-principals in the Province of Quebec, Canada. This model is in agreement with the theoretical model developed by Bass (1985), upon which the questionnaire is based. PMID:23833872

Dussault, Marc; Frenette, Eric; Fernet, Claude

2013-04-01

414

Self-Reported Versus Objectively Assessed Exercise Adherence  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE. We examined agreement of data between self-reported and objectively assessed exercise adherence among women with systemic lupus erythematosus. METHOD. Eleven participants completed weekly exercise logs on date and duration of exercise during a 10-wk Wii Fit™ home-based program. Afterward, exercise data from the log were compared with those recorded in the Wii console. RESULTS. Of the paired data, the mean duration of exercise recorded in the Wii was 29.5 min and that recorded in the log was 33.3 min. The composite intraclass correlation for exercise duration between exercise log and the Wii Fit was 0.4. The 95% limits of agreement indicated large between-subjects variability. CONCLUSION. Exercise logs exhibit a marginally acceptable agreement with Wii estimation of exercise duration at a group level. However, caution should be applied when using the exercise log as a measure of a person’s exercise behavior because of the tendency to overreport. PMID:23791324

Wang, Ed; Holthaus, Katy; Vogtle, Laura K.; Sword, David; Breland, Hazel L.; Kamen, Diane L.

2013-01-01

415

Colorectal cancer and self-reported tooth agenesis  

PubMed Central

Background Germline mutations in APC and AXIN2 are both associated with colon neoplasia as well as anomalous dental development. We tested the hypothesis that congenitally missing teeth may occur more commonly in individuals diagnosed with colorectal cancer than in individuals without this diagnosis. Methods Via a survey conducted on 1636 individuals with colorectal cancer (CRC) and 2788 individuals with no colorectal cancer from the Colon Cancer Family Registry, self-reported information on congenitally missing teeth was collected. The frequency of missing teeth between cases and controls was compared using Pearson’s chi-squared test or Fisher’s exact test. Results 4.8% of cases and 5.7% of controls reported having at least one missing tooth (p?=?0.20). When we stratified by recruitment site, gender, and mutation status where available, frequency of missing teeth was not statistically significantly different between cases and controls. Conclusions This study did not provide support for there being a general predisposition to missing teeth among a large cohort of CRC patients. The study neither addresses nor excludes the possibility, however, that individuals presenting with notable hypodontia/oligodontia might still have an increased risk for colorectal neoplasia. PMID:24607150

2014-01-01

416

Validation of Self-Reported Sleep Against Actigraphy  

PubMed Central

Background Self-report remains the most practical and cost-effective method for epidemiologic sleep studies involving large population-based samples. Several validated questionnaires have been developed to assess sleep, but these tools are lengthy to administer and may be impractical for epidemiologic studies. We examined whether a 3-item sleep questionnaire, similar to those typically used in epidemiologic studies, closely corresponded with objective measures of sleep as assessed using actigraphy monitoring. Methods Eligible participants were Western Australian women aged 18 to 80 years. Participants completed a sleep questionnaire, wore a wrist actigraph for 7 nights, and completed a brief daily sleep log. Objective actigraphy measurements for 56 participants were summarized by mean and mode and compared with the subjective reports, using weighted kappa and delta. Results Data collected from the questionnaire showed poor agreement with objectively measured sleep, with kappas ranging from ?0.19 to 0.14. Conclusions Our results indicate that sleep questions typically used in epidemiologic studies do not closely correspond with objective measures of sleep as assessed using actigraphy. The findings have implications for studies that have used such sleep questions. A means of appropriately measuring sleep as a risk factor in epidemiologic studies remains to be determined. PMID:22850546

Girschik, Jennifer; Fritschi, Lin; Heyworth, Jane; Waters, Flavie

2012-01-01

417

Merlino-Perkins Father-Daughter Relationship Inventory (MP-FDI): Construction, Reliability, Validity, and Implications for Counseling and Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Merlino-Perkins Father-Daughter Relationship Inventory, a self-report instrument, assesses women's childhood interactions with supportive, doting, distant, controlling, tyrannical, physically abusive, absent, and seductive fathers. Item and scale development, psychometric findings drawn from factor analyses, reliability assessments, and…

Merlino Perkins, Rose J.

2008-01-01

418

The inventory of parent and peer attachment: Individual differences and their relationship to psychological well-being in adolescence  

Microsoft Academic Search

The results of two studies are reported. Study I involved the development of the Inventory of Parent and Peer Attachment (IPPA), a self-report instrument for use with adolescents. Subject were 179 college students aged 16–20 years. Item content of the instrument was suggested by attachment theory's formulations concerning the nature of feelings toward attachment figures. In Study II, the convergent

Gay C. Armsden; Mark T. Greenberg

1987-01-01

419

Further Validation of the Learning Alliance Inventory: The Roles of Working Alliance, Rapport, and Immediacy in Student Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study further examined the reliability and validity of the Learning Alliance Inventory (LAI), a self-report measure designed to assess the working alliance between a student and a teacher. The LAI was found to have good internal consistency and test--retest reliability, and it demonstrated the predicted convergence with measures of immediacy…

Rogers, Daniel T.

2015-01-01

420

Convergent Validity of the Youth Psychopathic Traits Inventory (YPI): Association with the Psychopathy Checklist: Youth Version (PCL:YV)  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigates the relationship between the self-report Youth Psychopathic Traits Inventory (YPI) and the clinician-rated Psychopathy Checklist: Youth Version (PCL:YV). A representative sample of 92 girls and 70 boys, 12 to 20 years of age (mean age, 17 years), who received services at a clinic for adolescents with substance misuse…

Andershed, Henrik; Hodgins, Sheilagh; Tengstrom, Anders

2007-01-01

421

Norms and Screening Utility of the Dutch Version of the Children's Depression Inventory in Clinical and Nonclinical Youths  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study aimed to (a) assess relationships between the Children's Depression Inventory (CDI) and "DSM"-oriented depression and anxiety scales of the Youth Self Report, (b) develop reliable norms for the CDI, and (c) determine CDI cutoff scores for selecting youngsters at risk for depression and anxiety. A total of 3,073 nonclinical and 511…

Roelofs, Jeffrey; Braet, Caroline; Rood, Lea; Timbremont, Benedikte; van Vlierberghe, Leen; Goossens, Lien; van Breukelen, Gerard

2010-01-01

422

Assessing the Affective Features of Psychopathy in Adolescence: A Further Validation of the Inventory of Callous and Unemotional Traits  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To provide an extended assessment of the affective features of psychopathy, Frick developed the Inventory of Callous and Unemotional Traits (ICU), which is a multi-informant questionnaire. Previous studies have provided initial support for the self-report version. The aim of the present study is to investigate the validity of self- as well as…

Roose, Annelore; Bijttebier, Patricia; Decoene, Stefaan; Claes, Laurence; Frick, Paul J.

2010-01-01

423

Predictors and Consequences of Developmental Changes in Adolescent Girls’ Self-Reported Quality of Attachment to their Primary Caregiver  

PubMed Central

In an at-risk community sample of 2,101 girls, we examined trajectories, predictors, and consequences of changes in a central aspect of adolescents’ perceived quality of attachment (QOA), i.e., their reported trust in the availability and supportiveness of the primary caregiver. Results demonstrated two distinct epochs of change in this aspect of girls’ perceived QOA, with a significant linear decrease in early adolescence (ages 11 to 14) followed by a plateau from 14 to 16. Baseline parent-reported harsh punishment, low parental involvement, single parent status, and child-reported depression symptoms predicted steeper decreases in attachment during early adolescence, which in turn predicted greater child-reported depression and conduct disorder symptoms in later adolescence. Results suggest that both parent and child factors contribute to trajectories of self-reported QOA in adolescence, and a faster rate of decrease in girls’ perceived QOA to caregivers during early adolescence may increase risk for both internalizing and externalizing symptoms. PMID:24011095

Scott, Lori N.; Whalen, Diana J.; Zalewski, Maureen; Beeney, Joseph E.; Pilkonis, Paul A.; Hipwell, Alison E.; Stepp, Stephanie D.

2013-01-01

424

NARSTO EMISSION INVENTORY ASSESSMENT  

EPA Science Inventory

The NARSTO Ozone and Particulate Matter Assessments emphasized that emission inventories are critical to the success of air quality management programs and that emissions inventories in Canada, Mexico, and the United States need improvement to meet expectations for quality, timel...

425

Personality Assessment Inventory internalizing and externalizing structure in veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder: associations with aggression.  

PubMed

Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is associated with aggressive behavior in veterans, and difficulty controlling aggressive urges has been identified as a primary postdeployment readjustment concern. Yet only a fraction of veterans with PTSD commit violent acts. The goals of this study were to (1) examine the higher-order factor structure of Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI) scales in a sample of U.S. military veterans seeking treatment for PTSD; and (2) to evaluate the incremental validity of higher-order latent factors of the PAI over PTSD symptom severity in modeling aggression. The study sample included male U.S. Vietnam (n?=?433) and Iraq/Afghanistan (n?=?165) veterans who were seeking treatment for PTSD at an outpatient Veterans Affairs (VA) clinic. Measures included the Clinician Administered PTSD Scale, the PAI, and the Conflict Tactics Scale. The sample was randomly split into two equal subsamples (n's?=?299) to allow for cross-validation of statistically derived factors. Parallel analysis, variable clustering analysis, and confirmatory factor analyses were used to evaluate the factor structure, and regression was used to examine the association of factor scores with self-reports of aggression over the past year. Three factors were identified: internalizing, externalizing, and substance abuse. Externalizing explained unique variance in aggression beyond PTSD symptom severity and demographic factors, while internalizing and substance abuse did not. Service era was unrelated to reports of aggression. The constructs of internalizing versus externalizing dimensions of PTSD may have utility in identifying characteristics of combat veterans in the greatest need of treatment to help manage aggressive urges. PMID:25131806

Van Voorhees, Elizabeth E; Dennis, Paul A; Elbogen, Eric B; Clancy, Carolina P; Hertzberg, Michael A; Beckham, Jean C; Calhoun, Patrick S

2014-01-01

426

Targeted peer victimization and the construction of positive and negative self-cognitions: connections to depressive symptoms in children.  

PubMed

The goal was to examine the relation of covert/relational and overt/physical targeted peer victimization (TPV) to each other, to positive and negative self-cognitions, and to symptoms of depression. In a sample of elementary and middle school children, TPV was assessed by self-report, peer-nomination, and parent report in a multitrait-multimethod study. Positive and negative self-cognitions and depressive symptoms were assessed by self-report. Confirmatory factor analytic results support the convergent and discriminant validity of these two types of TPV. Both kinds of TPV were significantly related to positive and negative self-cognitions as well as self-reported depressive symptoms; however, structural equation modeling revealed that the effects of covert/relational TPV accounted for the effects of overt/physical TPV. In exploratory analyses, positive and negative self-cognitions explained the relation between TPV and depressive symptoms. PMID:20419582

Cole, David A; Maxwell, Melissa A; Dukewich, Tammy L; Yosick, Rachel

2010-01-01

427

CD4 count and physical symptoms among urban African American mothers with HIV: an examination of the role of optimism and depressive symptoms.  

PubMed

The current study examined the link between immune functioning (CD4 count) and physical symptoms, as well as the moderating role of optimism and depressive symptoms, in a sample of 99 low income, inner city African American women with HIV. Although there was no main effect of CD4 count on physical symptoms, depressive symptoms moderated the association between CD4 count and physical symptoms. More compromised immune functioning (lower CD4 count) was associated with more physical symptoms under conditions of higher levels of depressive symptoms, but not lower levels of depressive symptoms. This finding was observed using both a self-report measure and a clinician-rating of women's depressive symptoms. There were no main or interactive effects for optimism. Clinical implications and future research directions are presented. PMID:19104990

O'Connell-Edwards, Cara; Jones, Deborah J; Forehand, Rex; Larkin, Kevin

2008-12-01

428

Pain and Pain Catastrophizing Among Internal Medicine Outpatients With Borderline Personality Symptomatology: A Cross-Sectional Self-Report Survey  

PubMed Central

Objective: The extant literature indicates that individuals with borderline personality disorder generally report higher levels of pain than individuals without this disorder. This study examined relationships between borderline personality symptomatology, pain, and pain catastrophizing (a related aspect of the pain experience). Method: Using a cross-sectional consecutive sample of internal medicine outpatients (N = 238) and a self-report survey methodology, we examined relationships between borderline personality symptomatology as measured by the Personality Diagnostic Questionnaire–4 and the Self-Harm Inventory; pain levels “now,” “over the past week,” and “over the past year”; and scores on the Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS) and its subscales (rumination, magnification, helplessness). Data were collected during November 2012. Results: Scores on both measures of borderline personality disorder individually exhibited statistically significant correlations with self-reported pain levels at the time of the survey, during the past week, and over the past year (P < .001), as well as with total scores on the PCS and each of its subscales (P < .001). Participants who were positive on both measures of borderline personality disorder (a conservative indicator of borderline personality disorder) also demonstrated statistically significantly higher pain ratings now, over the past week, and over the past year, as well as higher scores on the total PCS (P < .001) compared with those who were negative on both measures or scored positively on only 1 measure. Conclusions: Regardless of the measure used, individuals with borderline personality disorder symptomatology consistently demonstrated higher pain scores at all time points, as well as higher levels of pain catastrophizing. PMID:24511448

Watts, Daron A.; Wiederman, Michael W.

2013-01-01

429

Adherence to Healthy Dietary Guidelines and Future Depressive Symptoms: Evidence for Gender Differentials in the Whitehall II Study  

E-print Network

a Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale score16 or self-reported use of10 antidepressants1 Adherence to Healthy Dietary Guidelines and Future Depressive Symptoms: Evidence for Gender of the manuscript. Short Running Title: Overall Diet and Future Depressive Symptoms The present research

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

430

Differences in Psychological Symptoms and Self-Competencies in Non-Suicidal Self-Injurious Flemish Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of the present study was to examine differences in psychological symptoms and sense of self-competence between adolescents with and without non-suicidal self-injurious behavior. We collected data in a sample of 281 Flemish adolescents. Psychological symptoms and self-competencies were assessed by means of the Youth Self-Report (YSR) and…

Baetens, Imke; Claes, Laurence; Muehlenkamp, Jennifer; Grietens, Hans; Onghena, Patrick

2012-01-01

431

Clinical Validity of the Counseling Center Assessment of Psychological Symptoms-62 (CCAPS-62): Further Evaluation and Clinical Applications  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Self-report instruments of psychological symptoms are increasingly used in counseling centers but rely on rigorous evaluation of their clinical validity. Three studies reported here (total N = 26,886) investigated the validity of the Counseling Center Assessment of Psychological Symptoms-62 (CCAPS-62; Locke et al., 2011) as an assessment and…

McAleavey, Andrew A.; Nordberg, Samuel S.; Hayes, Jeffrey A.; Castonguay, Louis G.; Locke, Benjamin D.; Lockard, Allison J.

2012-01-01

432

Stress-Reactive Rumination, Negative Cognitive Style, and Stressors in Relationship to Depressive Symptoms in Non-Clinical Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The role of cognitive vulnerability in the development of depressive symptoms in youth might depend on age and gender. The current study examined cognitive vulnerability models in relationship to depressive symptoms from a developmental perspective. For that purpose, 805 youth (aged 10-18, 59.9% female) completed self-report measures.…

Rood, Lea; Roelofs, Jeffrey; Bogels, Susan M.; Meesters, Cor

2012-01-01

433

Relationship Quality and Depressive Symptoms among Adolescents: A Short-Term Multiwave Investigation of Longitudinal, Reciprocal Associations  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study used a multiwave design to examine the short-term longitudinal and bidirectional associations between depressive symptoms and peer relationship qualities among a sample of early to middle adolescents (N = 350, 6th-10th graders). Youth completed self-report measures of relationship quality and depressive symptoms at three time points…

Oppenheimer, Caroline W.; Hankin, Benjamin L.

2011-01-01

434

Symptoms of Aspergillosis  

MedlinePLUS

... Share Compartir Symptoms of Aspergillosis Symptoms of allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) are similar to asthma The different ... cause different symptoms. 1 The symptoms of allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) are similar to asthma symptoms, including: ...

435

Gender-Specificity of Women's and Men's Self-Reported Attention to Sexual Stimuli.  

PubMed

Men's sexual arousal is largely dependent on the actor's gender in a sexual stimulus (gender-specific), whereas for women, particularly androphilic women, arousal is less dependent on gender (gender-nonspecific). According to information-processing models of sexual response, sexual arousal requires that attention be directed toward sexual cues. We evaluated whether men's and women's self-reported attention to sexual stimuli of men or women were consistent with genital responses and self-reported arousal. We presented gynephilic men (n = 21) and women (n = 22) and androphilic men (n = 16) and women (n = 33) with audiovisual stimuli depicting men or women engaged in sexual activities. Genital responses were continuously recorded and, following each stimulus, participants reported the amount of attention paid to the video and feelings of sexual arousal. Self-reported attention was gender-specific for men and gender-nonspecific for women, and generally mirrored genital responses and self-reported arousal. Gender-specificity of genital responses significantly predicted gender-specificity of self-reported arousal; however, for men only, this effect was significantly mediated by gender-specificity of self-reported attention. Gender differences in gender-specificity of sexual arousal may be partially accounted for by differences in gender-specificity of self-reported attention, although attention may play a greater role in men's sexual arousal than women's. PMID:25255838

Huberman, Jackie S; Maracle, Amanda C; Chivers, Meredith L

2014-09-25

436

Towards an understanding of self-reports of sleep.  

PubMed

Sleep research has made extensive use of self-report measures relying on a response format that requires respondents to provide single, specific numerical estimates. The cognitive processes involved in storing and retrieving sleep-related information allow only approximate numeric estimates of sleep behavior. Based on a fuzzy set model of survey responses, a response format is proposed to better capture the inherent vagueness of quantitative estimates of sleep behavior. Ninety-three adults (mean age 29.3 years) participated in two interviews, 1 month apart, consisting of questions about health-related behaviors. Questions were asked in both traditional point estimate and fuzzy response formats. A subset of questions was repeated at the end of each interview to examine test-retest reliability. Subjects filled out daily diaries each morning during the month between interviews. Quantitative estimates of usual sleep behavior were found to be highly reliable. Point estimates differed significantly from fuzzy boundary estimates. Differences between lower and upper boundary estimates in