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Sample records for semi-automated high-throughput fluorescent

  1. Development of a semi-automated high throughput transient transfection system.

    PubMed

    Bos, Aaron B; Duque, Joseph N; Bhakta, Sunil; Farahi, Farzam; Chirdon, Lindsay A; Junutula, Jagath R; Harms, Peter D; Wong, Athena W

    2014-06-20

    Transient transfection of mammalian cells provides a rapid method of producing protein for research purposes. Combining the transient transfection protein expression system with new automation technologies developed for the biotechnology industry would enable a high throughput protein production platform that could be utilized to generate a variety of different proteins in a short amount of time. These proteins could be used for an assortment of studies including proof of concept, antibody development, and biological structure and function. Here we describe such a platform: a semi-automated process for PEI-mediated transient protein production in tubespins at a throughput of 96 transfections at a time using a Biomek FX(P) liquid handling system. In one batch, 96 different proteins can be produced in milligram amounts by PEI transfection of HEK293 cells cultured in 50 mL tubespins. Methods were developed for the liquid handling system to automate the different processes associated with transient transfections such as initial cell seeding, DNA:PEI complex activation and DNA:PEI complex addition to the cells. Increasing DNA:PEI complex incubation time resulted in lower protein expression. To minimize protein production variability, the methods were further optimized to achieve consistent cell seeding, control the DNA:PEI incubation time and prevent cross-contamination among different tubespins. This semi-automated transfection process was applied to express 520 variants of a human IgG1 (hu IgG1) antibody. PMID:24704608

  2. A semi-automated high-throughput approach to the generation of transposon insertion mutants in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Duverger, Yohann; Belougne, Jérôme; Scaglione, Sarah; Brandli, Dominique; Beclin, Christophe; Ewbank, Jonathan J

    2007-01-01

    The generation of a large collection of defined transposon insertion mutants is of general interest to the Caenorhabditis elegans research community and has been supported by the European Union. We describe here a semi-automated high-throughput method for mutant production and screening, using the heterologous transposon Mos1. The procedure allows routine culture of several thousand independent nematode strains in parallel for multiple generations before stereotyped molecular analyses. Using this method, we have already generated >17 500 individual strains carrying Mos1 insertions. It could be easily adapted to forward and reverse genetic screens and may influence researchers faced with making a choice of model organism. PMID:17164286

  3. Fluorescent Approaches to High Throughput Crystallography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc L.; Forsythe, Elizabeth; Achari, Aniruddha

    2006-01-01

    We have shown that by covalently modifying a subpopulation, less than or equal to 1%, of a macromolecule with a fluorescent probe, the labeled material will add to a growing crystal as a microheterogeneous growth unit. Labeling procedures can be readily incorporated into the final stages of purification, and the presence of the probe at low concentrations does not affect the X-ray data quality or the crystallization behavior. The presence of the trace fluorescent label gives a number of advantages when used with high throughput crystallizations. The covalently attached probe will concentrate in the crystal relative to the solution, and under fluorescent illumination crystals show up as bright objects against a dark background. Non-protein structures, such as salt crystals, will not incorporate the probe and will not show up under fluorescent illumination. Brightly fluorescent crystals are readily found against less bright precipitated phases, which under white light illumination may obscure the crystals. Automated image analysis to find crystals should be greatly facilitated, without having to first define crystallization drop boundaries as the protein or protein structures is all that shows up. Fluorescence intensity is a faster search parameter, whether visually or by automated methods, than looking for crystalline features. We are now testing the use of high fluorescence intensity regions, in the absence of clear crystalline features or "hits", as a means for determining potential lead conditions. A working hypothesis is that kinetics leading to non-structured phases may overwhelm and trap more slowly formed ordered assemblies, which subsequently show up as regions of brighter fluorescence intensity. Preliminary experiments with test proteins have resulted in the extraction of a number of crystallization conditions from screening outcomes based solely on the presence of bright fluorescent regions. Subsequent experiments will test this approach using a wider

  4. Robofurnace: A semi-automated laboratory chemical vapor deposition system for high-throughput nanomaterial synthesis and process discovery

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, C. Ryan; Westrick, William; Koehler, Jeremy; Brieland-Shoultz, Anna; Anagnostopoulos-Politis, Ilias; Cruz-Gonzalez, Tizoc; Hart, A. John

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory research and development on new materials, such as nanostructured thin films, often utilizes manual equipment such as tube furnaces due to its relatively low cost and ease of setup. However, these systems can be prone to inconsistent outcomes due to variations in standard operating procedures and limitations in performance such as heating and cooling rates restrict the parameter space that can be explored. Perhaps more importantly, maximization of research throughput and the successful and efficient translation of materials processing knowledge to production-scale systems, relies on the attainment of consistent outcomes. In response to this need, we present a semi-automated lab-scale chemical vapor deposition (CVD) furnace system, called “Robofurnace.” Robofurnace is an automated CVD system built around a standard tube furnace, which automates sample insertion and removal and uses motion of the furnace to achieve rapid heating and cooling. The system has a 10-sample magazine and motorized transfer arm, which isolates the samples from the lab atmosphere and enables highly repeatable placement of the sample within the tube. The system is designed to enable continuous operation of the CVD reactor, with asynchronous loading/unloading of samples. To demonstrate its performance, Robofurnace is used to develop a rapid CVD recipe for carbon nanotube (CNT) forest growth, achieving a 10-fold improvement in CNT forest mass density compared to a benchmark recipe using a manual tube furnace. In the long run, multiple systems like Robofurnace may be linked to share data among laboratories by methods such as Twitter. Our hope is Robofurnace and like automation will enable machine learning to optimize and discover relationships in complex material synthesis processes. PMID:24289435

  5. Robofurnace: A semi-automated laboratory chemical vapor deposition system for high-throughput nanomaterial synthesis and process discovery

    SciTech Connect

    Oliver, C. Ryan; Westrick, William; Koehler, Jeremy; Brieland-Shoultz, Anna; Anagnostopoulos-Politis, Ilias; Cruz-Gonzalez, Tizoc; Hart, A. John

    2013-11-15

    Laboratory research and development on new materials, such as nanostructured thin films, often utilizes manual equipment such as tube furnaces due to its relatively low cost and ease of setup. However, these systems can be prone to inconsistent outcomes due to variations in standard operating procedures and limitations in performance such as heating and cooling rates restrict the parameter space that can be explored. Perhaps more importantly, maximization of research throughput and the successful and efficient translation of materials processing knowledge to production-scale systems, relies on the attainment of consistent outcomes. In response to this need, we present a semi-automated lab-scale chemical vapor deposition (CVD) furnace system, called “Robofurnace.” Robofurnace is an automated CVD system built around a standard tube furnace, which automates sample insertion and removal and uses motion of the furnace to achieve rapid heating and cooling. The system has a 10-sample magazine and motorized transfer arm, which isolates the samples from the lab atmosphere and enables highly repeatable placement of the sample within the tube. The system is designed to enable continuous operation of the CVD reactor, with asynchronous loading/unloading of samples. To demonstrate its performance, Robofurnace is used to develop a rapid CVD recipe for carbon nanotube (CNT) forest growth, achieving a 10-fold improvement in CNT forest mass density compared to a benchmark recipe using a manual tube furnace. In the long run, multiple systems like Robofurnace may be linked to share data among laboratories by methods such as Twitter. Our hope is Robofurnace and like automation will enable machine learning to optimize and discover relationships in complex material synthesis processes.

  6. Robofurnace: a semi-automated laboratory chemical vapor deposition system for high-throughput nanomaterial synthesis and process discovery.

    PubMed

    Oliver, C Ryan; Westrick, William; Koehler, Jeremy; Brieland-Shoultz, Anna; Anagnostopoulos-Politis, Ilias; Cruz-Gonzalez, Tizoc; Hart, A John

    2013-11-01

    Laboratory research and development on new materials, such as nanostructured thin films, often utilizes manual equipment such as tube furnaces due to its relatively low cost and ease of setup. However, these systems can be prone to inconsistent outcomes due to variations in standard operating procedures and limitations in performance such as heating and cooling rates restrict the parameter space that can be explored. Perhaps more importantly, maximization of research throughput and the successful and efficient translation of materials processing knowledge to production-scale systems, relies on the attainment of consistent outcomes. In response to this need, we present a semi-automated lab-scale chemical vapor deposition (CVD) furnace system, called "Robofurnace." Robofurnace is an automated CVD system built around a standard tube furnace, which automates sample insertion and removal and uses motion of the furnace to achieve rapid heating and cooling. The system has a 10-sample magazine and motorized transfer arm, which isolates the samples from the lab atmosphere and enables highly repeatable placement of the sample within the tube. The system is designed to enable continuous operation of the CVD reactor, with asynchronous loading∕unloading of samples. To demonstrate its performance, Robofurnace is used to develop a rapid CVD recipe for carbon nanotube (CNT) forest growth, achieving a 10-fold improvement in CNT forest mass density compared to a benchmark recipe using a manual tube furnace. In the long run, multiple systems like Robofurnace may be linked to share data among laboratories by methods such as Twitter. Our hope is Robofurnace and like automation will enable machine learning to optimize and discover relationships in complex material synthesis processes. PMID:24289435

  7. Fluorescent Approaches to High Throughput Crystallography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc L.; Forsythe, Elizabeth; Achari, Amiruddha

    2005-01-01

    X-ray crystallography remains the primary method for determining the structure of macromolecules. The first requirement is to have crystals, and obtaining them is often the rate-limiting step. The numbers of crystallization trials that are set up for any one protein for structural genomics, and the rate at which they are being set up, now overwhelm the ability for strictly human analysis of the results. Automated analysis methods are now being implemented with varying degrees of success, but these typically cannot reliably extract intermediate results. By covalently modifying a subpopulation, less than or = 1 %, of a macromolecule solution with a fluorescent probe, the labeled material will add to a growing crystal as a microheterogeneous growth unit. Labeling procedures can be readily incorporated into the final stages of purification. The covalently attached probe will concentrate in the crystal relative to the solution, and under fluorescent illumination the crystals show up as bright objects against a dark background. As crystalline packing is more dense than amorphous precipitate, the fluorescence intensity can be used as a guide in distinguishing different types of precipitated phases, even in the absence of obvious crystalline features, widening the available potential lead conditions in the absence of clear "hits." Non-protein structures, such as salt crystals, will not incorporate the probe and will not show up under fluorescent illumination. Also, brightly fluorescent crystals are readily found against less fluorescent precipitated phases, which under white light illumination may serve to obscure the crystals. Automated image analysis to find crystals should be greatly facilitated, without having to first define crystallization drop boundaries and by having the protein or protein structures all that show up. The trace fluorescently labeled crystals will also emit with sufficient intensity to aid in the automation of crystal alignment using relatively low

  8. Fluorescent Approaches to High Throughput Crystallography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc L.; Forsythe, Elizabeth

    2005-01-01

    X-ray crystallography remains the primary method for determining the structure of macromolecules. The first requirement is to have crystals, and obtaining them is often the rate-limiting step. The numbers of crystallization trials that are set up for any one protein for structural genomics, and the rate at which they are being set up, now overwhelm the ability for strictly human analysis of the results. Automated analysis methods are now being implemented with varying degrees of success, but these typically cannot reliably extract intermediate results. By covalently modifying a subpopulation, 51%, of a macromolecule solution with a fluorescent probe, the labeled material will add to a growing crystal as a microheterogeneous growth unit. Labeling procedures can be readily incorporated into the final stages of purification. The covalently attached probe will concentrate in the crystal relative to the solution, and under fluorescent illumination the crystals show up as bright objects against a dark background. As crystalline packing is more dense than amorphous precipitate, the fluorescence intensity can be used as a guide in distinguishing different types of precipitated phases, even in the absence of obvious crystalline features, widening the available potential lead conditions in the absence of clear hits. Non-protein structures, such as salt crystals, will not incorporate the probe and will not show up under fluorescent illumination. Also, brightly fluorescent crystals are readily found against less fluorescent precipitated phases, which under white light illumination may serve to obscure the crystals. Automated image analysis to find crystals should be greatly facilitated, without having to first define crystallization drop boundaries and by having the protein or protein structures all that show up. The trace fluorescently labeled crystals will also emit with sufficient intensity to aid in the automation of crystal alignment using relatively low cost optics

  9. Fluorescent Approaches to High Throughput Crystallography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minamitani, Elizabeth Forsythe; Pusey, Marc L.

    2004-01-01

    X-ray crystallography remains the primary method for determining the structure of macromolecules. The first requirement is to have crystals, and obtaining them is often the rate-limiting step. The numbers of crystallization trials that are set up for any one protein for structural genomics, and the rate at which they are being set up, now overwhelm the ability for strictly human analysis of the results. Automated analysis methods are now being implemented with varying degrees of success, but these typically cannot reliably extract intermediate results. By covalently modifying a subpopulation, less than or = 1%, of a macromolecule solution with a fluorescent probe, the labeled material will add to a growing crystal as a microheterogeneous growth unit. Labeling procedures can be readily incorporated into the final stages of a macromolecules purification. The covalently attached probe will concentrate in the crystal relative to the solution, and under fluorescent illumination the crystals will show up as bright objects against a dark background. As crystalline packing is more dense than amorphous precipitate, the fluorescence intensity can be used as a guide in distinguishing different types of precipitated phases, even in the absence of obvious crystalline features, widening the available potential lead conditions in the absence of clear "bits." Non-protein structures, such as salt crystals, will not incorporate the probe and will not show up under fluorescent illumination. Also, brightly fluorescent crystals are readily found against less fluorescent precipitated phases, which under white light illumination may serve to obscure the crystals. Automated image analysis to find crystals should be greatly facilitated, without having to first define crystallization drop boundaries and by having the protein or protein structures all that show up. The trace fluorescently labeled crystals will also emit with sufficient intensity to aid in the automation of crystal alignment

  10. Fluorescent Approaches to High Throughput Crystallography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc L.; Forsythe, Elizabeth

    2004-01-01

    X-ray crystallography remains the primary method for determining the structure of macromolecules. The first requirement is to have crystals, and obtaining them is often the rate-limiting step. The numbers of crystallization trials that are set up for any one protein for structural genomics, and the rate at which they are being set up, now overwhelm the ability for strictly human analysis of the results. Automated analysis methods are now being implemented with varying degrees of success, but these typically can not reliably extract intermediate results. By covalently modifying a subpopulation, less than or = 1%, of a macromolecule solution with a fluorescent probe, the labeled material will add to a growing crystal as a microheterogeneous growth unit. Labeling procedures can be readily incorporated into the final stages of purification. The covalently attached probe will concentrate in the crystal relative to the solution, and under fluorescent illumination the crystals show up as bright objects against a dark background. As crystalline packing is more dense than amorphous precipitate, the fluorescence intensity can be used as a guide in distinguishing different types of precipitated phases, even in the absence of obvious crystalline features, widening the available potential lead conditions in the absence of clear "hits." Non-protein structures, such as salt crystals, will not incorporate the probe and will not show up under fluorescent illumination. Also, brightly fluorescent crystals are readily found against less fluorescent precipitated phases, which under white light illumination may serve to obscure the crystals. Automated image analysis to find crystals should be greatly facilitated, without having to first define crystallization drop boundaries and by having the protein or protein structures all that show up. The trace fluorescently labeled crystals will also emit with sufficient intensity to aid in the automation of crystal alignment using relatively low

  11. Semi-automated imaging of tissue-specific fluorescence in zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    Romano, Shannon N; Gorelick, Daniel A

    2014-01-01

    Zebrafish embryos are a powerful tool for large-scale screening of small molecules. Transgenic zebrafish that express fluorescent reporter proteins are frequently used to identify chemicals that modulate gene expression. Chemical screens that assay fluorescence in live zebrafish often rely on expensive, specialized equipment for high content screening. We describe a procedure using a standard epifluorescence microscope with a motorized stage to automatically image zebrafish embryos and detect tissue-specific fluorescence. Using transgenic zebrafish that report estrogen receptor activity via expression of GFP, we developed a semi-automated procedure to screen for estrogen receptor ligands that activate the reporter in a tissue-specific manner. In this video we describe procedures for arraying zebrafish embryos at 24-48 hours post fertilization (hpf) in a 96-well plate and adding small molecules that bind estrogen receptors. At 72-96 hpf, images of each well from the entire plate are automatically collected and manually inspected for tissue-specific fluorescence. This protocol demonstrates the ability to detect estrogens that activate receptors in heart valves but not in liver. PMID:24894681

  12. Semi-automated Imaging of Tissue-specific Fluorescence in Zebrafish Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Shannon N.; Gorelick, Daniel A.

    2014-01-01

    Zebrafish embryos are a powerful tool for large-scale screening of small molecules. Transgenic zebrafish that express fluorescent reporter proteins are frequently used to identify chemicals that modulate gene expression. Chemical screens that assay fluorescence in live zebrafish often rely on expensive, specialized equipment for high content screening. We describe a procedure using a standard epifluorescence microscope with a motorized stage to automatically image zebrafish embryos and detect tissue-specific fluorescence. Using transgenic zebrafish that report estrogen receptor activity via expression of GFP, we developed a semi-automated procedure to screen for estrogen receptor ligands that activate the reporter in a tissue-specific manner. In this video we describe procedures for arraying zebrafish embryos at 24-48 hours post fertilization (hpf) in a 96-well plate and adding small molecules that bind estrogen receptors. At 72-96 hpf, images of each well from the entire plate are automatically collected and manually inspected for tissue-specific fluorescence. This protocol demonstrates the ability to detect estrogens that activate receptors in heart valves but not in liver. PMID:24894681

  13. High-throughput screening with micro-x-ray fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havrilla, George J.; Miller, Thomasin C.

    2005-06-01

    Micro-x-ray fluorescence (MXRF) is a useful characterization tool for high-throughput screening of combinatorial libraries. Due to the increasing threat of use of chemical warfare (CW) agents both in military actions and against civilians by terrorist extremists, there is a strong push to improve existing methods and develop means for the detection of a broad spectrum of CW agents in a minimal amount of time to increase national security. This paper describes a combinatorial high-throughput screening technique for CW receptor discovery to aid in sensor development. MXRF can screen materials for elemental composition at the mesoscale level (tens to hundreds of micrometers). The key aspect of this work is the use of commercial MXRF instrumentation coupled with the inherent heteroatom elements within the target molecules of the combinatorial reaction to provide rapid and specific identification of lead species. The method is demonstrated by screening an 11-mer oligopeptide library for selective binding of the degradation products of the nerve agent VX. The identified oligopeptides can be used as selective molecular receptors for sensor development. The MXRF screening method is nondestructive, requires minimal sample preparation or special tags for analysis, and the screening time depends on the desired sensitivity.

  14. High-throughput screening with micro-x-ray fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Havrilla, George J.; Miller, Thomasin C.

    2005-06-15

    Micro-x-ray fluorescence (MXRF) is a useful characterization tool for high-throughput screening of combinatorial libraries. Due to the increasing threat of use of chemical warfare (CW) agents both in military actions and against civilians by terrorist extremists, there is a strong push to improve existing methods and develop means for the detection of a broad spectrum of CW agents in a minimal amount of time to increase national security. This paper describes a combinatorial high-throughput screening technique for CW receptor discovery to aid in sensor development. MXRF can screen materials for elemental composition at the mesoscale level (tens to hundreds of micrometers). The key aspect of this work is the use of commercial MXRF instrumentation coupled with the inherent heteroatom elements within the target molecules of the combinatorial reaction to provide rapid and specific identification of lead species. The method is demonstrated by screening an 11-mer oligopeptide library for selective binding of the degradation products of the nerve agent VX. The identified oligopeptides can be used as selective molecular receptors for sensor development. The MXRF screening method is nondestructive, requires minimal sample preparation or special tags for analysis, and the screening time depends on the desired sensitivity.

  15. Scanning fluorescence detector for high-throughput DNA genotyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusch, Terry L.; Petsinger, Jeremy; Christensen, Carl; Vaske, David A.; Brumley, Robert L., Jr.; Luckey, John A.; Weber, James L.

    1996-04-01

    A new scanning fluorescence detector (SCAFUD) was developed for high-throughput genotyping of short tandem repeat polymorphisms (STRPs). Fluorescent dyes are incorporated into relatively short DNA fragments via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and are separated by electrophoresis in short, wide polyacrylamide gels (144 lanes with well to read distances of 14 cm). Excitation light from an argon laser with primary lines at 488 and 514 nm is introduced into the gel through a fiber optic cable, dichroic mirror, and 40X microscope objective. Emitted fluorescent light is collected confocally through a second fiber. The confocal head is translated across the bottom of the gel at 0.5 Hz. The detection unit utilizes dichroic mirrors and band pass filters to direct light with 10 - 20 nm bandwidths to four photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). PMT signals are independently amplified with variable gain and then sampled at a rate of 2500 points per scan using a computer based A/D board. LabView software (National Instruments) is used for instrument operation. Currently, three fluorescent dyes (Fam, Hex and Rox) are simultaneously detected with peak detection wavelengths of 543, 567, and 613 nm, respectively. The detection limit for fluorescein-labeled primers is about 100 attomoles. Planned SCAFUD upgrades include rearrangement of laser head geometry, use of additional excitation lasers for simultaneous detection of more dyes, and the use of detector arrays instead of individual PMTs. Extensive software has been written for automatic analysis of SCAFUD images. The software enables background subtraction, band identification, multiple- dye signal resolution, lane finding, band sizing and allele calling. Whole genome screens are currently underway to search for loci influencing such complex diseases as diabetes, asthma, and hypertension. Seven production SCAFUDs are currently in operation. Genotyping output for the coming year is projected to be about one million total genotypes (DNA

  16. Semi-automated discrimination of retinal pigmented epithelial cells in two-photon fluorescence images of mouse retinas.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Nathan S; Palczewska, Grazyna; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2015-08-01

    Automated image segmentation is a critical step toward achieving a quantitative evaluation of disease states with imaging techniques. Two-photon fluorescence microscopy (TPM) has been employed to visualize the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) and provide images indicating the health of the retina. However, segmentation of RPE cells within TPM images is difficult due to small differences in fluorescence intensity between cell borders and cell bodies. Here we present a semi-automated method for segmenting RPE cells that relies upon multiple weak features that differentiate cell borders from the remaining image. These features were scored by a search optimization procedure that built up the cell border in segments around a nucleus of interest. With six images used as a test, our method correctly identified cell borders for 69% of nuclei on average. Performance was strongly dependent upon increasing retinosome content in the RPE. TPM image analysis has the potential of providing improved early quantitative assessments of diseases affecting the RPE. PMID:26309765

  17. Semi-automated Volumetric and Morphological Assessment of Glioblastoma Resection with Fluorescence-Guided Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Cordova, J. Scott; Gurbani, Saumya S.; Holder, Chad A.; Olson, Jeffrey J.; Schreibmann, Eduard; Shi, Ran; Guo, Ying; Shu, Hui-Kuo G.; Shim, Hyunsuk; Hadjipanayis, Costas G.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Glioblastoma (GBM) neurosurgical resection relies on contrast-enhanced MRI-based neuronavigation. However, it is well-known that infiltrating tumor extends beyond contrast enhancement. Fluorescence-guided surgery (FGS) using 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) was evaluated to improve extent of resection (EOR) of GBMs. Pre-operative morphological tumor metrics were also assessed. Procedures Thirty patients from a Phase II trial evaluating 5-ALA FGS in newly diagnosed GBM were assessed. Tumors were segmented pre-operatively to assess morphological features as well as post-operatively to evaluate EOR and residual tumor volume (RTV). Results Median EOR and RTV were 94.3% and 0.821 cm3, respectively. Pre-operative surface area to volume ratio and RTV were significantly associated with overall survival, even when controlling for the known survival confounders. Conclusions This study supports claims that 5-ALA FGS is helpful at decreasing tumor burden and prolonging survival in GBM. Moreover, morphological indices are shown to impact both resection and patient survival. PMID:26463215

  18. High-throughput screening assay of hepatitis C virus helicase inhibitors using fluorescence-quenching phenomenon

    SciTech Connect

    Tani, Hidenori; Akimitsu, Nobuyoshi; Fujita, Osamu; Matsuda, Yasuyoshi; Miyata, Ryo; Tsuneda, Satoshi; Igarashi, Masayuki; Sekiguchi, Yuji; Noda, Naohiro

    2009-02-20

    We have developed a novel high-throughput screening assay of hepatitis C virus (HCV) nonstructural protein 3 (NS3) helicase inhibitors using the fluorescence-quenching phenomenon via photoinduced electron transfer between fluorescent dyes and guanine bases. We prepared double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) with a 5'-fluorescent-dye (BODIPY FL)-labeled strand hybridized with a complementary strand, the 3'-end of which has guanine bases. When dsDNA is unwound by helicase, the dye emits fluorescence owing to its release from the guanine bases. Our results demonstrate that this assay is suitable for quantitative assay of HCV NS3 helicase activity and useful for high-throughput screening for inhibitors. Furthermore, we applied this assay to the screening for NS3 helicase inhibitors from cell extracts of microorganisms, and found several cell extracts containing potential inhibitors.

  19. Cosputtered composition-spread reproducibility established by high-throughput x-ray fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Gregoire, John M.; Dale, Darren; Kazimirov, Alexander; DiSalvo, Francis J.; Dover, R. Bruce van

    2010-09-15

    We describe the characterization of sputtered yttria-zirconia composition spread thin films by x-ray fluorescence (XRF). We also discuss our automated analysis of the XRF data, which was collected in a high throughput experiment at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source. The results indicate that both the composition reproducibility of the library deposition and the composition measurements have a precision of better than 1 atomic percent.

  20. Flat field correction for high-throughput imaging of fluorescent samples.

    PubMed

    Kask, Peet; Palo, Kaupo; Hinnah, Chris; Pommerencke, Thora

    2016-09-01

    Vignetting of microscopic images impacts both the visual impression of the images and any image analysis applied to it. Especially in high-throughput screening high demands are made on an automated image analysis. In our work we focused on fluorescent samples and found that two profiles (background and foreground) for each imaging channel need to be estimated to achieve a sufficiently flat image after correction. We have developed a method which runs completely unsupervised on a wide range of assays. By adding a reliable internal quality control we mitigate the risk of introducing artefacts into sample images through correction. The method requires hundreds of images for the foreground profile, thus limiting its application to high-throughput screening where this requirement is fulfilled in routine operation. PMID:27028041

  1. Development of fluorescence-based high-throughput screening assays: choice of appropriate instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, David J.; Alder, Elisabeth; Fan, Yi-Hong; McKeegan, Evelyn; Warrior, Usha; Beutel, Bruce

    1998-04-01

    Fluorescence-based assays have become increasingly popular in high throughput screening for a variety of reasons (e.g. sensitivity). However, new screening technologies are pushing the limits of conventional fluorescence plate readers. For example, instruments that have optical sensitivities beyond most of the commercially available plate readers are required to reproducibly measure the fluorescence generated by the green fluorescent protein (GFP)--a novel reporter gene. Also, miniaturization of screening formats (with densities higher than the conventional 96-well plate) requires high resolution instrumentation to measure fluorescence. Several assays based on optical fluorescence measurements have been developed and screened in our Biological Screening group. These assays include various fluorescence-based protease assays (standard end-point and kinetic modes) and a functional cell-based screen using the green fluorescent protein as a reporter gene. The choice of instrumentation was the critical factor in the performance and success of each of these arrays. Data will be presented for the cell- based reporter assay including the type of instrumentation (fluorescence plate readers; fluorescence imaging systems) used for detection of GFP fluorescence.

  2. [Rapid and high throughput measurement of lipase thermo-stability through ANS fluorescence signal assay].

    PubMed

    Feng, Weizong; Lin, Junhan; Cai, Shaoli; Zou, Youtu; Chen, Guoren; Huang, Ping; Lin, Yajing; Wang, Bingbing; Lin, Lin

    2011-04-01

    We have developed a rapid and high throughput lipase-ANS (8-Anilino-l-naphthalenesulfonic acid) assay to evaluate the thermo-stability of lipases based on the ANS fluorescence signal's increasing and shifting when this small fluorescence probes binds to lipase. The testing lipase samples were incubated at a temperature range of 25 degrees C to 65 degrees C for 30 min before mixed with ANS solution (0.20 mg/mL lipase and 0.05 mmol/L ANS in the buffer of 20 mmol/L Tris-HCl, 100 mmol/L NaCl, pH 7.2) in a cuvette or microplate. Fluorescence signals of the samples were measured at EX 378 nm, EM 465 nm with a fluorescence photometer or a plate reader, and Tm was calculated with the software of GraphPad Prism5.0. The Tm values of several mutants of Penicillium expansum lipase (PEL) were measured with this ANS assay and conventional method simultaneously and the results show that Tm values are comparative and consistent between these methods, suggesting that the lipase-ANS assay is a reliable, rapid and high throughput method for lipase thermo-stability measurement. PMID:21847993

  3. Identification of Adiponectin Receptor Agonist Utilizing a Fluorescence Polarization Based High Throughput Assay

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yiyi; Zang, Zhihe; Zhong, Ling; Wu, Min; Su, Qing; Gao, Xiurong; Zan, Wang; Lin, Dong; Zhao, Yan; Zhang, Zhonglin

    2013-01-01

    Adiponectin, the adipose-derived hormone, plays an important role in the suppression of metabolic disorders that can result in type 2 diabetes, obesity, and atherosclerosis. It has been shown that up-regulation of adiponectin or adiponectin receptor has a number of therapeutic benefits. Given that it is hard to convert the full size adiponectin protein into a viable drug, adiponectin receptor agonists could be designed or identified using high-throughput screening. Here, we report on the development of a two-step screening process to identify adiponectin agonists. First step, we developed a high throughput screening assay based on fluorescence polarization to identify adiponectin ligands. The fluorescence polarization assay reported here could be adapted to screening against larger small molecular compound libraries. A natural product library containing 10,000 compounds was screened and 9 hits were selected for validation. These compounds have been taken for the second-step in vitro tests to confirm their agonistic activity. The most active adiponectin receptor 1 agonists are matairesinol, arctiin, (-)-arctigenin and gramine. The most active adiponectin receptor 2 agonists are parthenolide, taxifoliol, deoxyschizandrin, and syringin. These compounds may be useful drug candidates for hypoadiponectin related diseases. PMID:23691032

  4. Identification of adiponectin receptor agonist utilizing a fluorescence polarization based high throughput assay.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yiyi; Zang, Zhihe; Zhong, Ling; Wu, Min; Su, Qing; Gao, Xiurong; Zan, Wang; Lin, Dong; Zhao, Yan; Zhang, Zhonglin

    2013-01-01

    Adiponectin, the adipose-derived hormone, plays an important role in the suppression of metabolic disorders that can result in type 2 diabetes, obesity, and atherosclerosis. It has been shown that up-regulation of adiponectin or adiponectin receptor has a number of therapeutic benefits. Given that it is hard to convert the full size adiponectin protein into a viable drug, adiponectin receptor agonists could be designed or identified using high-throughput screening. Here, we report on the development of a two-step screening process to identify adiponectin agonists. First step, we developed a high throughput screening assay based on fluorescence polarization to identify adiponectin ligands. The fluorescence polarization assay reported here could be adapted to screening against larger small molecular compound libraries. A natural product library containing 10,000 compounds was screened and 9 hits were selected for validation. These compounds have been taken for the second-step in vitro tests to confirm their agonistic activity. The most active adiponectin receptor 1 agonists are matairesinol, arctiin, (-)-arctigenin and gramine. The most active adiponectin receptor 2 agonists are parthenolide, taxifoliol, deoxyschizandrin, and syringin. These compounds may be useful drug candidates for hypoadiponectin related diseases. PMID:23691032

  5. Multispot live-image autofocusing for high-throughput microscopy of fluorescently stained bacteria.

    PubMed

    Zeder, M; Pernthaler, J

    2009-09-01

    Screening by automated high-throughput microscopy has become a valuable research tool. An essential component of such systems is the autonomous acquisition of focused images. Here we describe the implementation of a high-precision autofocus routine for imaging of fluorescently stained bacteria on a commercially available microscope. We integrated various concepts and strategies that together substantially enhance the performance of autonomous image acquisition. These are (i) nested focusing in bright-field and fluorescence illumination, (ii) autofocusing by continuous life-image acquisition during movement in z-direction rather than at distinct z-positions, (iii) assessment of the quality and topology of a field of view (FOV) by multispot focus measurements, and (iv) acquisition of z-stacks and application of an extended depth of field algorithm to compensate for FOV unevenness. The freely provided program and documented source code allow ready adaptation of the here presented approach to various platforms and scientific questions. PMID:19658173

  6. Fluorescence lifetime plate reader: Resolution and precision meet high-throughput

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Karl J.; Peterson, Kurt C.; Muretta, Joseph M.; Higgins, Sutton E.; Gillispie, Gregory D.; Thomas, David D.

    2014-11-01

    We describe a nanosecond time-resolved fluorescence spectrometer that acquires fluorescence decay waveforms from each well of a 384-well microplate in 3 min with signal-to-noise exceeding 400 using direct waveform recording. The instrument combines high-energy pulsed laser sources (5-10 kHz repetition rate) with a photomultiplier and high-speed digitizer (1 GHz) to record a fluorescence decay waveform after each pulse. Waveforms acquired from rhodamine or 5-((2-aminoethyl)amino) naphthalene-1-sulfonic acid dyes in a 384-well plate gave lifetime measurements 5- to 25-fold more precise than the simultaneous intensity measurements. Lifetimes as short as 0.04 ns were acquired by interleaving with an effective sample rate of 5 GHz. Lifetime measurements resolved mixtures of single-exponential dyes with better than 1% accuracy. The fluorescence lifetime plate reader enables multiple-well fluorescence lifetime measurements with an acquisition time of 0.5 s per well, suitable for high-throughput fluorescence lifetime screening applications.

  7. Fluorescence lifetime plate reader: Resolution and precision meet high-throughput

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Karl J.; Peterson, Kurt C.; Muretta, Joseph M.; Higgins, Sutton E.; Gillispie, Gregory D.; Thomas, David D.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a nanosecond time-resolved fluorescence spectrometer that acquires fluorescence decay waveforms from each well of a 384-well microplate in 3 min with signal-to-noise exceeding 400 using direct waveform recording. The instrument combines high-energy pulsed laser sources (5–10 kHz repetition rate) with a photomultiplier and high-speed digitizer (1 GHz) to record a fluorescence decay waveform after each pulse. Waveforms acquired from rhodamine or 5-((2-aminoethyl)amino) naphthalene-1-sulfonic acid dyes in a 384-well plate gave lifetime measurements 5- to 25-fold more precise than the simultaneous intensity measurements. Lifetimes as short as 0.04 ns were acquired by interleaving with an effective sample rate of 5 GHz. Lifetime measurements resolved mixtures of single-exponential dyes with better than 1% accuracy. The fluorescence lifetime plate reader enables multiple-well fluorescence lifetime measurements with an acquisition time of 0.5 s per well, suitable for high-throughput fluorescence lifetime screening applications. PMID:25430092

  8. Application of a High-throughput Fluorescent Acetyltransferase Assay to Identify Inhibitors of Homocitrate Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Bulfer, Stacie L.; McQuade, Thomas J.; Larsen, Martha J.; Trievel, Raymond C.

    2011-01-01

    Homocitrate synthase (HCS) catalyzes the first step of L-lysine biosynthesis in fungi by condensing acetyl-Coenzyme A and 2-oxoglutarate to form 3R-homocitrate and Coenzyme A. Due to its conservation in pathogenic fungi, HCS has been proposed as a candidate for antifungal drug design. Here we report the development and validation of a robust, fluorescent assay for HCS that is amenable to high-throughput screening for inhibitors in vitro. Using this assay, Schizosaccharomyces pombe HCS was screened against a diverse library of ~41,000 small molecules. Following confirmation, counter screens, and dose-response analysis, we prioritized over 100 compounds for further in vitro and in vivo analysis. This assay can be readily adapted to screen for small molecule modulators of other acyl-CoA-dependent acyltransferases or enzymes that generate a product with a free sulfhydryl group, including histone acetyltransferases, aminoglycoside N-acetyltransferases, thioesterases and enzymes involved in lipid metabolism. PMID:21073853

  9. Novel Phenotypic Fluorescent Three-Dimensional Platforms for High-throughput Drug Screening and Personalized Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Fang, Changge; Avis, Ingalill; Salomon, David; Cuttitta, Frank

    2013-01-01

    We have developed novel phenotypic fluorescent three-dimensional co-culture platforms that efficiently and economically screen anti-angiogenic/anti-metastatic drugs on a high-throughput scale. Individual cell populations can be identified and isolated for protein/gene expression profiling studies and cellular movement/interactions can be tracked by time-lapse cinematography. More importantly, these platforms closely parallel the in vivo angiogenic and metastatic outcomes of a given tumor xenograft in the nude mouse model but, unlike in vivo models, our co-culture platforms produce comparable results in five to nine days. Potentially, by incorporating cancer patient biopsies, the co-culture platforms should greatly improve the effectiveness and efficiency of personalized chemotherapy. PMID:23833685

  10. Fluorescence polarization assays in high-throughput screening and drug discovery: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Matthew D.; Yasgar, Adam; Peryea, Tyler; Braisted, John C.; Jadhav, Ajit; Simeonov, Anton; Coussens, Nathan P.

    2016-06-01

    The sensitivity of fluorescence polarization (FP) and fluorescence anisotropy (FA) to molecular weight changes has enabled the interrogation of diverse biological mechanisms, ranging from molecular interactions to enzymatic activity. Assays based on FP/FA technology have been widely utilized in high-throughput screening (HTS) and drug discovery due to the homogenous format, robust performance and relative insensitivity to some types of interferences, such as inner filter effects. Advancements in assay design, fluorescent probes, and technology have enabled the application of FP assays to increasingly complex biological processes. Herein we discuss different types of FP/FA assays developed for HTS, with examples to emphasize the diversity of applicable targets. Furthermore, trends in target and fluorophore selection, as well as assay type and format, are examined using annotated HTS assays within the PubChem database. Finally, practical considerations for the successful development and implementation of FP/FA assays for HTS are provided based on experience at our center and examples from the literature, including strategies for flagging interference compounds among a list of hits.

  11. A fluorescent hydrogel-based flow cytometry high-throughput screening platform for hydrolytic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Pitzler, Christian; Wirtz, Georgette; Vojcic, Ljubica; Hiltl, Stephanie; Böker, Alexander; Martinez, Ronny; Schwaneberg, Ulrich

    2014-12-18

    Screening throughput is a key in directed evolution experiments and enzyme discovery. Here, we describe a high-throughput screening platform based on a coupled reaction of glucose oxidase and a hydrolase (Yersinia mollaretii phytase [YmPh]). The coupled reaction produces hydroxyl radicals through Fenton's reaction, acting as initiator of poly(ethyleneglycol)-acrylate-based polymerization incorporating a fluorescent monomer. As a consequence, a fluorescent hydrogel is formed around Escherichia coli cells expressing active YmPh. We achieve five times enrichment of active cell population through flow cytometry analysis and sorting of mixed populations. Finally, we validate the performance of the fluorescent polymer shell (fur-shell) technology by directed phytase evolution that yielded improved variants starting from a library containing 10(7) phytase variants. Thus, fur-shell technology represents a rapid and nonlaborious way of identifying the most active variants from vast populations, as well as a platform for generation of polymer-hybrid cells for biobased interactive materials. PMID:25525992

  12. Identification of Fluorescent Compounds with Non-Specific Binding Property via High Throughput Live Cell Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Sangeeta; Spencer, Virginia A.; Han, Ju; Chang, Hang; Zhang, Kai; Fontenay, Gerald V.; Anderson, Charles; Hyman, Joel M.; Nilsen-Hamilton, Marit; Chang, Young-Tae; Parvin, Bahram

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Compounds exhibiting low non-specific intracellular binding or non-stickiness are concomitant with rapid clearing and in high demand for live-cell imaging assays because they allow for intracellular receptor localization with a high signal/noise ratio. The non-stickiness property is particularly important for imaging intracellular receptors due to the equilibria involved. Method Three mammalian cell lines with diverse genetic backgrounds were used to screen a combinatorial fluorescence library via high throughput live cell microscopy for potential ligands with high in- and out-flux properties. The binding properties of ligands identified from the first screen were subsequently validated on plant root hair. A correlative analysis was then performed between each ligand and its corresponding physiochemical and structural properties. Results The non-stickiness property of each ligand was quantified as a function of the temporal uptake and retention on a cell-by-cell basis. Our data shows that (i) mammalian systems can serve as a pre-screening tool for complex plant species that are not amenable to high-throughput imaging; (ii) retention and spatial localization of chemical compounds vary within and between each cell line; and (iii) the structural similarities of compounds can infer their non-specific binding properties. Conclusion We have validated a protocol for identifying chemical compounds with non-specific binding properties that is testable across diverse species. Further analysis reveals an overlap between the non-stickiness property and the structural similarity of compounds. The net result is a more robust screening assay for identifying desirable ligands that can be used to monitor intracellular localization. Several new applications of the screening protocol and results are also presented. PMID:22242152

  13. High throughput quantitative phenotyping of plant resistance using chlorophyll fluorescence image analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In order to select for quantitative plant resistance to pathogens, high throughput approaches that can precisely quantify disease severity are needed. Automation and use of calibrated image analysis should provide more accurate, objective and faster analyses than visual assessments. In contrast to conventional visible imaging, chlorophyll fluorescence imaging is not sensitive to environmental light variations and provides single-channel images prone to a segmentation analysis by simple thresholding approaches. Among the various parameters used in chlorophyll fluorescence imaging, the maximum quantum yield of photosystem II photochemistry (Fv/Fm) is well adapted to phenotyping disease severity. Fv/Fm is an indicator of plant stress that displays a robust contrast between infected and healthy tissues. In the present paper, we aimed at the segmentation of Fv/Fm images to quantify disease severity. Results Based on the Fv/Fm values of each pixel of the image, a thresholding approach was developed to delimit diseased areas. A first step consisted in setting up thresholds to reproduce visual observations by trained raters of symptoms caused by Xanthomonas fuscans subsp. fuscans (Xff) CFBP4834-R on Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Flavert. In order to develop a thresholding approach valuable on any cultivars or species, a second step was based on modeling pixel-wise Fv/Fm-distributions as mixtures of Gaussian distributions. Such a modeling may discriminate various stages of the symptom development but over-weights artifacts that can occur on mock-inoculated samples. Therefore, we developed a thresholding approach based on the probability of misclassification of a healthy pixel. Then, a clustering step is performed on the diseased areas to discriminate between various stages of alteration of plant tissues. Notably, the use of chlorophyll fluorescence imaging could detect pre-symptomatic area. The interest of this image analysis procedure for assessing the levels of

  14. Micro x-ray fluorescence as a high throughput screening method for metal chelating compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minogue, Edel M.; Havrilla, George J.; Taylor, Tammy P.; Burrell, Anthony K.; Warner, Benjamin P.

    2005-06-01

    Micro X-ray Fluorescence (MXRF) has proven to be a powerful tool in the rapid and quantitative means of screening oliogpeptides. MXRF is a non-destructive method of analysis, which can detect elemental composition of a sample by measuring its characteristic X-ray emission wavelengths or energies. An effective high throughput screening technique is described for the rapid screening of bead-based libraries by MXRF in order to identify suitable chelating agents that will bind metals found in radioactive dispersive devices. It is a sensitive technique which in conjunction with the wide range of chemistry inherent in peptide libraries (e.g. varying charge, length, hydrophobicity, aromaticity etc.), provides a rapid and quantitative means for screening chelator-ion binding. The method involves the selection of a suitable library of ligands; in this case it is a bead-based library of peptides. The library is exposed to the cation of interest and immobilized on to a microarray. The array is then analyzed by MXRF enabling rapid identification of chelating agents. This enables the screening of approximately 27,500 sequences per day. Initial experiments carried out successfully identified sequences that are selective for Co under certain binding conditions. This involved the screening of 8,400 sequences in adverse environmental conditions containing possible interferences (e.g. Ca, Fe, Al, Cs, Ir), which could be encountered in our application.

  15. Development of a Fluorescent Quenching Based High Throughput Assay to Screen for Calcineurin Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Abhisek; Syeb, Kathleen; Concannon, John; Callegari, Keri; Soto, Claudio; Glicksman, Marcie A

    2015-01-01

    Currently there is no effective treatment available for major neurodegenerative disorders associated to protein misfolding, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. One of most promising therapeutic approaches under development focuses on inhibiting the misfolding and aggregation pathway. However, it is likely that by the time clinical symptoms appear, there is a large accumulation of misfolded aggregates and a very substantial damage to the brain. Thus, it seems that at the clinical stage of the disease it is necessary also to develop strategies aiming to prevent the neuronal damage produced by already formed misfolded aggregates. Chronic activation of calcineurin (CaN), a type IIB phosphatase, has been implicated as a pivotal molecule connecting synaptic loss and neuronal damage to protein misfolding. The fact that the crystal structure of CaN is also well established makes it an ideal target for drug discovery. CaN activity assays for High Throughput Screening (HTS) reported so far are based on absorbance. In this article we report the development of a fluorescent quenching based CaN activity assay suitable for robotic screening of large chemical libraries to find novel inhibitors. The assay yielded a Z score of 0.84 with coefficient of variance ≤ 15%. Our results also show that this assay can be used to identify CaN inhibitors with a wide range of potencies. PMID:26176772

  16. Pulsed laser activated cell sorter (PLACS) for high-throughput fluorescent mammalian cell sorting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yue; Wu, Ting-Hsiang; Chung, Aram; Kung, Yu-Chung; Teitell, Michael A.; Di Carlo, Dino; Chiou, Pei-Yu

    2014-09-01

    We present a Pulsed Laser Activated Cell Sorter (PLACS) realized by exciting laser induced cavitation bubbles in a PDMS microfluidic channel to create high speed liquid jets to deflect detected fluorescent samples for high speed sorting. Pulse laser triggered cavitation bubbles can expand in few microseconds and provide a pressure higher than tens of MPa for fluid perturbation near the focused spot. This ultrafast switching mechanism has a complete on-off cycle less than 20 μsec. Two approaches have been utilized to achieve 3D sample focusing in PLACS. One is relying on multilayer PDMS channels to provide 3D hydrodynamic sheath flows. It offers accurate timing control of fast (2 m sec-1) passing particles so that synchronization with laser bubble excitation is possible, an critically important factor for high purity and high throughput sorting. PLACS with 3D hydrodynamic focusing is capable of sorting at 11,000 cells/sec with >95% purity, and 45,000 cells/sec with 45% purity using a single channel in a single step. We have also demonstrated 3D focusing using inertial flows in PLACS. This sheathless focusing approach requires 10 times lower initial cell concentration than that in sheath-based focusing and avoids severe sample dilution from high volume sheath flows. Inertia PLACS is capable of sorting at 10,000 particles sec-1 with >90% sort purity.

  17. Development of a Fluorescent Quenching Based High Throughput Assay to Screen for Calcineurin Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Abhisek; Syeb, Kathleen; Concannon, John; Callegari, Keri; Soto, Claudio; Glicksman, Marcie A.

    2015-01-01

    Currently there is no effective treatment available for major neurodegenerative disorders associated to protein misfolding, including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson's disease. One of most promising therapeutic approaches under development focuses on inhibiting the misfolding and aggregation pathway. However, it is likely that by the time clinical symptoms appear, there is a large accumulation of misfolded aggregates and a very substantial damage to the brain. Thus, it seems that at the clinical stage of the disease it is necessary also to develop strategies aiming to prevent the neuronal damage produced by already formed misfolded aggregates. Chronic activation of calcineurin (CaN), a type IIB phosphatase, has been implicated as a pivotal molecule connecting synaptic loss and neuronal damage to protein misfolding. The fact that the crystal structure of CaN is also well established makes it an ideal target for drug discovery. CaN activity assays for High Throughput Screening (HTS) reported so far are based on absorbance. In this article we report the development of a fluorescent quenching based CaN activity assay suitable for robotic screening of large chemical libraries to find novel inhibitors. The assay yielded a Z score of 0.84 with coefficient of variance ≤ 15%. Our results also show that this assay can be used to identify CaN inhibitors with a wide range of potencies. PMID:26176772

  18. High-throughput genotyping of CRISPR/Cas9-mediated mutants using fluorescent PCR-capillary gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Ramlee, Muhammad Khairul; Yan, Tingdong; Cheung, Alice M S; Chuah, Charles T H; Li, Shang

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in the engineering of sequence-specific synthetic nucleases provide enormous opportunities for genetic manipulation of gene expression in order to study their cellular function in vivo. However, current genotyping methods to detect these programmable nuclease-induced insertion/deletion (indel) mutations in targeted human cells are not compatible for high-throughput screening of knockout clones due to inherent limitations and high cost. Here, we describe an efficient method of genotyping clonal CRISPR/Cas9-mediated mutants in a high-throughput manner involving the use of a direct lysis buffer to extract crude genomic DNA straight from cells in culture, and fluorescent PCR coupled with capillary gel electrophoresis. This technique also allows for genotyping of multiplexed gene targeting in a single clone. Overall, this time- and cost-saving technique is able to circumvent the limitations of current genotyping methods and support high-throughput screening of nuclease-induced mutants. PMID:26498861

  19. High-throughput genotyping of CRISPR/Cas9-mediated mutants using fluorescent PCR-capillary gel electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Ramlee, Muhammad Khairul; Yan, Tingdong; Cheung, Alice M. S.; Chuah, Charles T. H.; Li, Shang

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in the engineering of sequence-specific synthetic nucleases provide enormous opportunities for genetic manipulation of gene expression in order to study their cellular function in vivo. However, current genotyping methods to detect these programmable nuclease-induced insertion/deletion (indel) mutations in targeted human cells are not compatible for high-throughput screening of knockout clones due to inherent limitations and high cost. Here, we describe an efficient method of genotyping clonal CRISPR/Cas9-mediated mutants in a high-throughput manner involving the use of a direct lysis buffer to extract crude genomic DNA straight from cells in culture, and fluorescent PCR coupled with capillary gel electrophoresis. This technique also allows for genotyping of multiplexed gene targeting in a single clone. Overall, this time- and cost-saving technique is able to circumvent the limitations of current genotyping methods and support high-throughput screening of nuclease-induced mutants. PMID:26498861

  20. A fluorescence high throughput screening method for the detection of reactive electrophiles as potential skin sensitizers.

    PubMed

    Avonto, Cristina; Chittiboyina, Amar G; Rua, Diego; Khan, Ikhlas A

    2015-12-01

    Skin sensitization is an important toxicological end-point in the risk assessment of chemical allergens. Because of the complexity of the biological mechanisms associated with skin sensitization, integrated approaches combining different chemical, biological and in silico methods are recommended to replace conventional animal tests. Chemical methods are intended to characterize the potential of a sensitizer to induce earlier molecular initiating events. The presence of an electrophilic mechanistic domain is considered one of the essential chemical features to covalently bind to the biological target and induce further haptenation processes. Current in chemico assays rely on the quantification of unreacted model nucleophiles after incubation with the candidate sensitizer. In the current study, a new fluorescence-based method, 'HTS-DCYA assay', is proposed. The assay aims at the identification of reactive electrophiles based on their chemical reactivity toward a model fluorescent thiol. The reaction workflow enabled the development of a High Throughput Screening (HTS) method to directly quantify the reaction adducts. The reaction conditions have been optimized to minimize solubility issues, oxidative side reactions and increase the throughput of the assay while minimizing the reaction time, which are common issues with existing methods. Thirty-six chemicals previously classified with LLNA, DPRA or KeratinoSens™ were tested as a proof of concept. Preliminary results gave an estimated 82% accuracy, 78% sensitivity, 90% specificity, comparable to other in chemico methods such as Cys-DPRA. In addition to validated chemicals, six natural products were analyzed and a prediction of their sensitization potential is presented for the first time. PMID:26455772

  1. Microelectrophoresis devices with integrated fluorescence detectors and reactors for high-throughput DNA sequencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soper, Steven A.; Ford, Sean M.; Davies, Jack; Williams, Daryl C.; Cheng, Benxu; Klopf, J. Michael; Calderon, Gina M.; Saile, Volker

    1997-05-01

    This work describes the development of micro-devices for high-throughput DNA sequencing applications. Basically, two research efforts will be discussed; (1) fabrication and characterization of micro-reactors to prepare Sanger chain terminated DNA sequencing fragments on a nanoliter scale and; (2) x-ray photolithography of PMMA substrates for the high aspect ratio preparation of electrophoresis devices. The micro-reactor consisted of a 5'-biotinylated catfish olfactory gene, which was amplified by PCR, and attached to the interior wall of an aminoalkylisilane derivatized fused- silica capillary tube via a streptavidin/biotin linkage. Coverage of the interior capillary wall with biotinylated DNA averaged 77 percent. Stability of the anchored template under pressure and electroosmotic rinsing was favorable, requiring approximately 150 h of continuous rinsing to reduce the coverage by only 50 percent. The capillary micro- reactor was placed inside an air thermocycler to control temperature during Sanger ddNTP chain extension and directly coupled to a capillary separation column filled with a LPA solution via low dead volume capillary interlocks. The complimentary DNA fragments generated in the reactor were heat denatured from the immobilized template and directly injected onto a gel-filled capillary using electropumping for size fractionation and detection using NIR-LIF analysis. The total amount of termination fragments in the 31 nL reactor volume was estimated to be 5.2 X 1013 moles and sequencing was shown to produce read lengths on the order to 400 bases. Work will also be described concerning the development of micro-electrophoresis devices in x-ray sensitive photoresists using LIGA techniques. An electrophoresis device with an integrated fluorescence detector was constructed for the high resolution separation of DNA oligonucleotides. The choice of substrate for the electrophoresis was PMMA, due to its intrinsic low electroosmotic flow. Using x-ray lithography in

  2. Laser-Induced Fluorescence Detection in High-Throughput Screening of Heterogeneous Catalysts and Single Cells Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hui Su

    2001-05-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence detection is one of the most sensitive detection techniques and it has found enormous applications in various areas. The purpose of this research was to develop detection approaches based on laser-induced fluorescence detection in two different areas, heterogeneous catalysts screening and single cell study. First, we introduced laser-induced imaging (LIFI) as a high-throughput screening technique for heterogeneous catalysts to explore the use of this high-throughput screening technique in discovery and study of various heterogeneous catalyst systems. This scheme is based on the fact that the creation or the destruction of chemical bonds alters the fluorescence properties of suitably designed molecules. By irradiating the region immediately above the catalytic surface with a laser, the fluorescence intensity of a selected product or reactant can be imaged by a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera to follow the catalytic activity as a function of time and space. By screening the catalytic activity of vanadium pentoxide catalysts in oxidation of naphthalene, we demonstrated LIFI has good detection performance and the spatial and temporal resolution needed for high-throughput screening of heterogeneous catalysts. The sample packing density can reach up to 250 x 250 subunits/cm{sub 2} for 40-{micro}m wells. This experimental set-up also can screen solid catalysts via near infrared thermography detection.

  3. Semi-Automated Hydrophobic Interaction Chromatography Column Scouting Used in the Two-Step Purification of Recombinant Green Fluorescent Protein

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Patrick J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) most commonly requires experimental determination (i.e., scouting) in order to select an optimal chromatographic medium for purifying a given target protein. Neither a two-step purification of untagged green fluorescent protein (GFP) from crude bacterial lysate using sequential HIC and size exclusion chromatography (SEC), nor HIC column scouting elution profiles of GFP, have been previously reported. Methods and Results Bacterial lysate expressing recombinant GFP was sequentially adsorbed to commercially available HIC columns containing butyl, octyl, and phenyl-based HIC ligands coupled to matrices of varying bead size. The lysate was fractionated using a linear ammonium phosphate salt gradient at constant pH. Collected HIC eluate fractions containing retained GFP were then pooled and further purified using high-resolution preparative SEC. Significant differences in presumptive GFP elution profiles were observed using in-line absorption spectrophotometry (A395) and post-run fluorimetry. SDS-PAGE and western blot demonstrated that fluorometric detection was the more accurate indicator of GFP elution in both HIC and SEC purification steps. Comparison of composite HIC column scouting data indicated that a phenyl ligand coupled to a 34 µm matrix produced the highest degree of target protein capture and separation. Conclusions Conducting two-step protein purification using the preferred HIC medium followed by SEC resulted in a final, concentrated product with >98% protein purity. In-line absorbance spectrophotometry was not as precise of an indicator of GFP elution as post-run fluorimetry. These findings demonstrate the importance of utilizing a combination of detection methods when evaluating purification strategies. GFP is a well-characterized model protein, used heavily in educational settings and by researchers with limited protein purification experience, and the data and strategies presented here may aid in

  4. Long-term detection of fluorescently labeled human mesenchymal stem cell in vitro and in vivo by semi-automated microscopy.

    PubMed

    Polzer, Hans; Volkmer, Elias; Saller, Maximilian M; Prall, Wolf C; Haasters, Florian; Drosse, Inga; Anz, David; Mutschler, Wolf; Schieker, Matthias

    2012-02-01

    The use of seeded scaffolds in regenerative medicine is limited by the low survival of transplanted mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). Current approaches aim at improving cell viability but require an adequate long-term detection of the transplanted cells. Unfortunately, commonly performed labeling techniques have not been validated for this purpose, and studies often reveal inconclusive results. Consequently, we intended to identify the most suitable method for long-term detection of human MSC (hMSC) in vitro and in vivo. hMSC were labeled using the vital stainings PKH26 and carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFDA-SE) as well as enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) transduction. Metabolic activity and relative fluorescence intensity (RFI) were quantified in vitro over 21 days at 8 time points using standardized semi-automated microscopy and flow cytometry. In vivo, cell seeded scaffolds were subcutaneously implanted in nude mice, and RFI was analyzed over 42 days at 5 time points. In vitro, PKH26 and CFDA-SE significantly reduced metabolic activity. RFI of both stainings significantly decreased after 1 day and further faded to <1% after 7 days. In contrast, labeling with eGFP showed no metabolic effect on hMSC, and no significant reduction of RFI over the total period of 21 days. In vivo, RFI of eGFP labeled cells reached a plateau phase after 21 days and displayed a 3.8-fold higher RFI compared with PKH26 and CFDA-SE on day 42 evaluated in 280 field of views per scaffold using three scaffolds for each labeling technique and time point. We conclude that PKH26 and CFDA-SE are unsuitable for long-term detection of hMSC. eGFP transduction, in turn, allows long-term detection of hMSC in vitro and in vivo. Our results suggest that eGFP is currently the best option among the fluorescent labeling techniques to follow the fate of transplanted hMSC. PMID:21951128

  5. Laser-Induced Fluorescence Detection in High-Throughput Screening of Heterogeneous Catalysts and Single Cells Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hui Su

    2001-05-25

    Laser-induced fluorescence detection is one of the most sensitive detection techniques and it has found enormous applications in various areas. The purpose of this research was to develop detection approaches based on laser-induced fluorescence detection in two different areas, heterogeneous catalysts screening and single cell study. First, the author introduced laser-induced imaging (LIFI) as a high-throughput screening technique for heterogeneous catalysts to explore the use of this high-throughput screening technique in discovery and study of various heterogeneous catalyst systems. This scheme is based on the fact that the creation or the destruction of chemical bonds alters the fluorescence properties of suitably designed molecules. By irradiating the region immediately above the catalytic surface with a laser, the fluorescence intensity of a selected product or reactant can be imaged by a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera to follow the catalytic activity as a function of time and space. By screening the catalytic activity of vanadium pentoxide catalysts in oxidation of naphthalene, they demonstrated LIFI has good detection performance and the spatial and temporal resolution needed for high-throughput screening of heterogeneous catalysts. The sample packing density can reach up to 250 x 250 subunits/cm{sup 2} for 40-{micro}m wells. This experimental set-up also can screen solid catalysts via near infrared thermography detection. In the second part of this dissertation, the author used laser-induced native fluorescence coupled with capillary electrophoresis (LINF-CE) and microscope imaging to study the single cell degranulation. On the basis of good temporal correlation with events observed through an optical microscope, they have identified individual peaks in the fluorescence electropherograms as serotonin released from the granular core on contact with the surrounding fluid.

  6. A fluorescence-based high throughput assay for the determination of small molecule–human serum albumin protein binding

    PubMed Central

    McCallum, Megan M.; Pawlak, Alan J.; Shadrick, William R.; Simeonov, Anton; Jadhav, Ajit; Yasgar, Adam; Maloney, David J.; Arnold, Leggy A.

    2014-01-01

    Herein, we describe the development of a fluorescence-based high throughput assay to determine the small molecule binding towards human serum albumin (HSA). This innovative competition assay is based on the use of a novel fluorescent small molecule Red Mega 500 with unique spectroscopic and binding properties. The commercially available probe displays a large fluorescence intensity difference between the protein-bound and protein-unbound state. The competition of small molecules for HSA binding in the presence of probe resulted in low fluorescence intensities. The assay was evaluated with the LOPAC small molecule library of 1280 compounds identifying known high protein binders. The small molecule competition of HSA–Red Mega 500 binding was saturable at higher compound concentrations and exhibited IC50 values between 3–24 μM. The compound affinity towards HSA was confirmed by isothermal titration calorimetry indicating that the new protein binding assay is a valid high throughput assay to determine plasma protein binding. PMID:24390461

  7. Fluorescence imaging technology (FI) for high-throughput screening of selenide-modified nano-TiO2 catalysts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liping; Lee, Jianchao; Zhang, Meijuan; Duan, Qiannan; Zhang, Jiarui; Qi, Hailang

    2016-02-18

    A high-throughput screening (HTS) method based on fluorescence imaging (FI) was implemented to evaluate the catalytic performance of selenide-modified nano-TiO2. Chemical ink-jet printing (IJP) technology was reformed to fabricate a catalyst library comprising 1405 (Ni(a)Cu(b)Cd(c)Ce(d)In(e)Y(f))Se(x)/TiO2 (M6Se/Ti) composite photocatalysts. Nineteen M6Se/Tis were screened out from the 1405 candidates efficiently. PMID:26777131

  8. A yellow fluorescent protein-based assay for high-throughput screening of glycine and GABAA receptor chloride channels.

    PubMed

    Kruger, Wade; Gilbert, Daniel; Hawthorne, Rebecca; Hryciw, Deanne H; Frings, Stephan; Poronnik, Philip; Lynch, Joseph W

    2005-06-01

    There is a significant clinical need to identify novel ligands with high selectivity and potency for GABA(A), GABA(C) and glycine receptor Cl- channels. Two recently developed, yellow fluorescent protein variants (YFP-I152L and YFP-V163S) are highly sensitive to quench by small anions and are thus suited to reporting anionic influx into cells. The aim of this study was to establish the optimal conditions for using these constructs for high-throughput screening of GABA(A), GABA(C) and glycine receptors transiently expressed in HEK293 cells. We found that a 70% fluorescence reduction was achieved by quenching YFP-I152L with a 10 s influx of I- ions, driven by an external I- concentration of at least 50 mM. The fluorescence quench was rapid, with a mean time constant of 3 s. These responses were similar for all anion receptor types studied. We also show the assay is sufficiently sensitive to measure agonist and antagonist concentration-responses using either imaging- or photomultiplier-based detection systems. The robustness, sensitivity and low cost of this assay render it suited for high-throughput screening of transiently expressed anionic ligand-gated channels. PMID:15862914

  9. A high-throughput fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based endothelial cell apoptosis assay and its application for screening vascular disrupting agents

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Xiaoming; Fu, Afu; Luo, Kathy Qian

    2012-02-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An endothelial cell apoptosis assay using FRET-based biosensor was developed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The fluorescence of the cells changed from green to blue during apoptosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This method was developed into a high-throughput assay in 96-well plates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This assay was applied to screen vascular disrupting agents. -- Abstract: In this study, we developed a high-throughput endothelial cell apoptosis assay using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based biosensor. After exposure to apoptotic inducer UV-irradiation or anticancer drugs such as paclitaxel, the fluorescence of the cells changed from green to blue. We developed this method into a high-throughput assay in 96-well plates by measuring the emission ratio of yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) to cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) to monitor the activation of a key protease, caspase-3, during apoptosis. The Z Prime factor for this assay was above 0.5 which indicates that this assay is suitable for a high-throughput analysis. Finally, we applied this functional high-throughput assay for screening vascular disrupting agents (VDA) which could induce endothelial cell apoptosis from our in-house compounds library and dioscin was identified as a hit. As this assay allows real time and sensitive detection of cell apoptosis, it will be a useful tool for monitoring endothelial cell apoptosis in living cell situation and for identifying new VDA candidates via a high-throughput screening.

  10. A high-throughput screening strategy for accurate quantification of menaquinone based on fluorescence-activated cell sorting.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Xue, Zheng-Lian; Chen, Shao-Peng; Wang, Zhou; Zhang, Yong; Gong, Wei-Liang; Zheng, Zhi-Ming

    2016-06-01

    To enhance the screening efficiency and accuracy of a high-yield menaquinone (vitamin K2, MK) bacterial strain, a novel, quantitative method by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) was developed. The staining technique was optimized to maximize the differences in fluorescence signals between spontaneous and MK-accumulating cells. The fluorescence carrier rhodamine 123 (Rh123), with its ability to reflect membrane potential, proved to be an appropriate fluorescent dye to connect the MK content with fluorescence signal quantitatively. To promote adequate access of the fluorescent molecule to the target and maintain higher cell survival rates, staining and incubation conditions were optimized. The results showed that 10 % sucrose facilitated uptake of Rh123, while maintaining a certain level of cell viability. The pre-treatment of cells with MgCl2 before staining with Rh123 also improved cell viability. Using FACS, 50 thousands cells can easily be assayed in less than 1 h. The optimized staining protocol yielded a linear response for the mean fluorescence against high performance liquid chromatography-measured MK content. We have developed a novel and useful staining protocol in the high-throughput evaluation of Flavobacterium sp. mutant libraries, using FACS to identify mutants with increased MK-accumulating properties. This study also provides reference for the screening of other industrial microbial strains. PMID:27001261

  11. High throughput identification of promiscuous inhibitors from screening libraries with the use of a thiol-containing fluorescent probe

    PubMed Central

    McCallum, Megan M.; Nandhikonda, Premchendar; Temmer, Jonathan J.; Eyermann, Charles; Simeonov, Anton; Jadhav, Ajit; Yasgar, Adam; Maloney, David; Arnold, Leggy A.

    2013-01-01

    Testing small molecules for their ability to modify cysteine residues of proteins in the early stages of drug discovery is expected to accelerate our ability to develop more selective drugs with lesser side effects. In addition, this approach also enables the rapid evaluation of the mode of binding of new drug candidates in respect to thiol-reactivity and metabolism by glutathione. Herein, we describe the development of a fluorescence-based high throughput assay that allows the identification of thiol-reactive compounds. A thiol-containing fluorescent probe MSTI was synthesized and used to evaluate small molecules from the LOPAC collection of bioactive molecules. LOPAC compounds that are known to react with sulfur nucleophiles were identified with this assay, for example, irreversible protease inhibitors, nitric oxide releasing compounds, and proton-pump inhibitors. The results confirm that both electrophilic and redox reactive compounds can be quickly identified in a high throughput manner enabling the assessment of screening libraries in respect to thiol-reactive compounds. PMID:23446699

  12. High-throughput fluorescence polarization assay to identify small molecule inhibitors of BRCT domains of breast cancer gene 1.

    PubMed

    Lokesh, G L; Rachamallu, Aparna; Kumar, G D Kishore; Natarajan, Amarnath

    2006-05-01

    The C-terminus region of the 1863 residue early onset of breast cancer gene 1 (BRCA1) nuclear protein contains a tandem globular carboxy terminus domain termed BRCT. The BRCT repeats in BRCA1 are phosphoserine- and/or phosphothreonine-specific binding modules. The interaction of the BRCT(BRCA1) domains with phosphorylated BRCA1-associated carboxyl terminal helicase (BACH1) is cell cycle regulated and is essential for DNA damage-induced checkpoint control during the transition from the G(2) phase to the M phase of the cell cycle. Development of a competitive, homogeneous, high-throughput fluorescence polarization (FP) assay to identify small molecule inhibitors of BRCT(BRCA1)-BACH1 interaction is reported here. The FP assay was used for measuring binding affinities and inhibition constants of BACH1 peptides and small molecule inhibitors of BRCT(BRCA1) domains, respectively. A fluorescently labeled wild-type BACH1 decapeptide (BDP1) containing the critical phosphoserine, a phenylalanine at (P+3), and a GST-BRCT fusion protein were used to establish the FP assay. BDP1 has a dissociation constant (K(d)) of 1.58+/-0.01microM and a dynamic range (DeltamP) of 164.9+/-1.9. The assay tolerates 20% dimethyl sulfoxide, which enables screening poorly soluble compounds. Under optimized conditions, a Z' factor of 0.87 was achieved in a 384-well format for high-throughput screening. PMID:16500609

  13. Protein Traffic Disorders: an Effective High-Throughput Fluorescence Microscopy Pipeline for Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Botelho, Hugo M.; Uliyakina, Inna; Awatade, Nikhil T.; Proença, Maria C.; Tischer, Christian; Sirianant, Lalida; Kunzelmann, Karl; Pepperkok, Rainer; Amaral, Margarida D.

    2015-01-01

    Plasma membrane proteins are essential molecules in the cell which mediate interactions with the exterior milieu, thus representing key drug targets for present pharma. Not surprisingly, protein traffic disorders include a large range of diseases sharing the common mechanism of failure in the respective protein to reach the plasma membrane. However, specific therapies for these diseases are remarkably lacking. Herein, we report a robust platform for drug discovery applied to a paradigmatic genetic disorder affecting intracellular trafficking – Cystic Fibrosis. This platform includes (i) two original respiratory epithelial cellular models incorporating an inducible double-tagged traffic reporter; (ii) a plasma membrane protein traffic assay for high-throughput microscopy screening; and (iii) open-source image analysis software to quantify plasma membrane protein traffic. By allowing direct scoring of compounds rescuing the basic traffic defect, this platform enables an effective drug development pipeline, which can be promptly adapted to any traffic disorder-associated protein and leverage therapy development efforts. PMID:25762484

  14. Protein traffic disorders: an effective high-throughput fluorescence microscopy pipeline for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Botelho, Hugo M; Uliyakina, Inna; Awatade, Nikhil T; Proença, Maria C; Tischer, Christian; Sirianant, Lalida; Kunzelmann, Karl; Pepperkok, Rainer; Amaral, Margarida D

    2015-01-01

    Plasma membrane proteins are essential molecules in the cell which mediate interactions with the exterior milieu, thus representing key drug targets for present pharma. Not surprisingly, protein traffic disorders include a large range of diseases sharing the common mechanism of failure in the respective protein to reach the plasma membrane. However, specific therapies for these diseases are remarkably lacking. Herein, we report a robust platform for drug discovery applied to a paradigmatic genetic disorder affecting intracellular trafficking - Cystic Fibrosis. This platform includes (i) two original respiratory epithelial cellular models incorporating an inducible double-tagged traffic reporter; (ii) a plasma membrane protein traffic assay for high-throughput microscopy screening; and (iii) open-source image analysis software to quantify plasma membrane protein traffic. By allowing direct scoring of compounds rescuing the basic traffic defect, this platform enables an effective drug development pipeline, which can be promptly adapted to any traffic disorder-associated protein and leverage therapy development efforts. PMID:25762484

  15. Use of fluorescence for the high-throughput evaluation of synergistic thermal and photo stabilizer interactions in poly (vinyl chloride)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chunyong; Wicks, Douglas A.

    2005-06-01

    The selection of thermal and photo stabilizers for poly (vinyl chloride) (PVC) using conventional methods is a time-consuming process. The high-throughput screening method developed in this research demonstrates rapid and efficient ways to quantify the effectiveness of PVC stabilizers with respect to raw plastic materials, stabilizers, levels of use, and testing conditions. An experimental protocol using liquid sampling and fluorescence measurement was developed to determine the effectiveness of formulations. This was used to evaluate the performance of stabilizers based on the change of fluorescence emission at 440nm after thermal aging or ultraviolet (UV) radiation. The performance of PVC formulations using six different types of stabilizers was successfully mapped for both PVC resin and flexible PVC.

  16. Use of fluorescence for the high-throughput evaluation of synergistic thermal and photo stabilizer interactions in poly (vinyl chloride)

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Chunyong; Wicks, Douglas A.

    2005-06-15

    The selection of thermal and photo stabilizers for poly (vinyl chloride) (PVC) using conventional methods is a time-consuming process. The high-throughput screening method developed in this research demonstrates rapid and efficient ways to quantify the effectiveness of PVC stabilizers with respect to raw plastic materials, stabilizers, levels of use, and testing conditions. An experimental protocol using liquid sampling and fluorescence measurement was developed to determine the effectiveness of formulations. This was used to evaluate the performance of stabilizers based on the change of fluorescence emission at 440 nm after thermal aging or ultraviolet (UV) radiation. The performance of PVC formulations using six different types of stabilizers was successfully mapped for both PVC resin and flexible PVC.

  17. High-Throughput Isolation of Giant Viruses in Liquid Medium Using Automated Flow Cytometry and Fluorescence Staining

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Jacques Y. B.; Robert, Stephane; Reteno, Dorine G.; Andreani, Julien; Raoult, Didier; La Scola, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    The isolation of giant viruses using amoeba co-culture is tedious and fastidious. Recently, the procedure was successfully associated with a method that detects amoebal lysis on agar plates. However, the procedure remains time-consuming and is limited to protozoa growing on agar. We present here advances for the isolation of giant viruses. A high-throughput automated method based on flow cytometry and fluorescent staining was used to detect the presence of giant viruses in liquid medium. Development was carried out with the Acanthamoeba polyphaga strain widely used in past and current co-culture experiments. The proof of concept was validated with virus suspensions: artificially contaminated samples but also environmental samples from which viruses were previously isolated. After validating the technique, and fortuitously isolating a new Mimivirus, we automated the technique on 96-well plates and tested it on clinical and environmental samples using other protozoa. This allowed us to detect more than 10 strains of previously known species of giant viruses and seven new strains of a new virus lineage. This automated high-throughput method demonstrated significant time saving, and higher sensitivity than older techniques. It thus creates the means to isolate giant viruses at high speed. PMID:26858703

  18. High-Throughput Isolation of Giant Viruses in Liquid Medium Using Automated Flow Cytometry and Fluorescence Staining.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Jacques Y B; Robert, Stephane; Reteno, Dorine G; Andreani, Julien; Raoult, Didier; La Scola, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    The isolation of giant viruses using amoeba co-culture is tedious and fastidious. Recently, the procedure was successfully associated with a method that detects amoebal lysis on agar plates. However, the procedure remains time-consuming and is limited to protozoa growing on agar. We present here advances for the isolation of giant viruses. A high-throughput automated method based on flow cytometry and fluorescent staining was used to detect the presence of giant viruses in liquid medium. Development was carried out with the Acanthamoeba polyphaga strain widely used in past and current co-culture experiments. The proof of concept was validated with virus suspensions: artificially contaminated samples but also environmental samples from which viruses were previously isolated. After validating the technique, and fortuitously isolating a new Mimivirus, we automated the technique on 96-well plates and tested it on clinical and environmental samples using other protozoa. This allowed us to detect more than 10 strains of previously known species of giant viruses and seven new strains of a new virus lineage. This automated high-throughput method demonstrated significant time saving, and higher sensitivity than older techniques. It thus creates the means to isolate giant viruses at high speed. PMID:26858703

  19. High-Throughput Universal DNA Curtain Arrays for Single-Molecule Fluorescence Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Gallardo, Ignacio F.; Pasupathy, Praveenkumar; Brown, Maxwell; Manhart, Carol M.; Neikirk, Dean P.; Alani, Eric; Finkelstein, Ilya J.

    2015-01-01

    Single-molecule studies of protein–DNA interactions have shed critical insights into the molecular mechanisms of nearly every aspect of DNA metabolism. The development of DNA curtains—a method for organizing arrays of DNA molecules on a fluid lipid bilayer—has greatly facilitated these studies by increasing the number of reactions that can be observed in a single experiment. However, the utility of DNA curtains is limited by the challenges associated with depositing nanometer-scale lipid diffusion barriers onto quartz microscope slides. Here, we describe a UV lithography-based method for large-scale fabrication of chromium (Cr) features and organization of DNA molecules at these features for high-throughput single-molecule studies. We demonstrate this approach by assembling 792 independent DNA arrays (containing >900 000 DNA molecules) within a single microfluidic flowcell. As a first proof of principle, we track the diffusion of Mlh1-Mlh3—a heterodimeric complex that participates in DNA mismatch repair and meiotic recombination. To further highlight the utility of this approach, we demonstrate a two-lane flowcell that facilitates concurrent experiments on different DNA substrates. Our technique greatly reduces the challenges associated with assembling DNA curtains and paves the way for the rapid acquisition of large statistical data sets from individual single-molecule experiments. PMID:26325477

  20. High-throughput screening of large volumes of whole blood using structured illumination and fluorescent on-chip imaging

    PubMed Central

    Arpali, Serap Altay; Arpali, Caglar; Coskun, Ahmet F.; Chiang, Hsin-Hao; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2012-01-01

    Undiluted blood samples are difficult to image in large volumes since blood constitutes a highly absorbing and scattering medium. As a result of this limitation, optical imaging of rare cells (e.g., circulating tumour cells) within unprocessed whole blood remains a challenge, demanding the use of special micro-fluidic technologies. Here we demonstrate a new fluorescent on-chip imaging modality that can rapidly screen large volumes of absorbing and scattering media such as undiluted whole blood samples for detection of fluorescent micro-objects at low concentrations (for example ≤ 50–100 particles/mL). In this high-throughput imaging modality, a large area micro-fluidic device (e.g., 7–18 cm2), which contains for example ~0.3–0.7 mL of undiluted whole blood sample, is directly positioned onto a wide-field opto-electronic sensor-array such that the fluorescent emission within the micro-channel can be detected without the use of any imaging lenses. This micro-fluidic device is then illuminated and laterally scanned with an array of Gaussian excitation spots, which is generated through a spatial light modulator. For each scanning position of this excitation array, a lensfree fluorescent image of the blood sample is captured using the opto-electronic sensor-array, resulting in a sequence of images (e.g., 144 lensfree frames captured in ~36 seconds) for the same sample chip. Digitally merging these lensfree fluorescent images based on a Maximum Intensity Projection (MIP) algorithm enabled us to significantly boost the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast of the fluorescent micro-objects within whole blood, which normally remain undetected (i.e., hidden) using conventional uniform excitation schemes, involving plane wave illumination. This high-throughput on-chip imaging platform based on structured excitation could be useful for rare cell research by enabling rapid screening of large volume micro-fluidic devices that process whole blood and other optically

  1. Large-scale drug screening against Babesia divergens parasite using a fluorescence-based high-throughput screening assay.

    PubMed

    Rizk, Mohamed Abdo; El-Sayed, Shimaa Abd El-Salam; AbouLaila, Mahmoud; Tuvshintulga, Bumduuren; Yokoyama, Naoaki; Igarashi, Ikuo

    2016-08-30

    The validation of a fluorescence-based high-throughput screening (HTS) assay for determining the efficacies of large chemical libraries against Babesia divergens (bovine strain) in in vitro cultures was evaluated in this study. Hematocrits (HCTs) of 2.5%, 5%, and 10% were used for the in vitro culture at 1% parasitemia without daily replacement of the medium. Linearity and HTS assay results revealed that the best HCTs were 5% and 10%. The obtained IC50 values of diminazene aceturate, either by fluorescence-based HTS assay with and without daily replacement of medium or by fluorescence- and microscopy-based methods, did not differ significantly at 5% HCT. Actinonin and chloroquine diphosphate were the most effective drugs against the in vitro growth of B. divergens, followed by pyronaridine tetraphosphate- and luteolin-treated cultures. On contrary, tetracycline hydrochloride and (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate from green tea exhibited poor activity as compared with diminazene aceturate (positive control drug). The data indicated that 5% HCT without daily replacement of the culture medium mixed with bovine serum in vitro using a fluorescence-based HTS assay creates the best conditions for large-scale drug screening against B. divergens that infect cattle. PMID:27523944

  2. Two Variants of a High-Throughput Fluorescent Microplate Assay of Polysaccharide Endotransglycosylases.

    PubMed

    Kováčová, Kristína; Farkaš, Vladimír

    2016-04-01

    Polysaccharide endotransglycosylases (PETs) are the cell wall-modifying enzymes of fungi and plants. They catalyze random endo-splitting of the polysaccharide donor molecule and transfer of the newly formed reducing sugar residue to the nonreducing end of an acceptor molecule which can be a polysaccharide or an oligosaccharide. Owing to their important role in the cell wall formation, the inhibition of PETs represents an attractive strategy in the fight against fungal infections. We have elaborated two variants of a versatile high-throughput microplate fluorimetric assay that could be used for effective identification of PETs and screening of their inhibitors. Both assays use the respective polysaccharides as the donors and sulforhodamine-labeled oligosaccharides as the acceptors but differ from each other by mode of how the labeled polysaccharide products of transglycosylation are separated from the unreacted oligosaccharide acceptors. In the first variant, the reactions take place in a layer of agar gel laid on the bottoms of the wells of a microtitration plate. After the reaction, the high-Mr transglycosylation products are precipitated with 66 % ethanol and retained within the gel while the low-Mr products and the unreacted acceptors are washed out. In the second variant, the donor polysaccharides are adsorbed to the surface of a microplate well and remain adsorbed there also after becoming labeled in the course of the transglycosylation reaction whereas the unused low-Mr acceptors are washed out. As a proof of versatility, assays of heterologously expressed transglycosylases ScGas1, ScCrh1, and ScCrh2 from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, CaPhr1 and CaPhr2 from Candida albicans, and of a plant xyloglucan endotransglycosylase (XET) are demonstrated. PMID:26754421

  3. Novel inhibitors for PRMT1 discovered by high-throughput screening using activity-based fluorescence polarization.

    PubMed

    Dillon, Myles B C; Bachovchin, Daniel A; Brown, Steven J; Finn, M G; Rosen, Hugh; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Mowen, Kerri A

    2012-07-20

    Protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) catalyze the posttranslational methylation of arginine using S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) as a methyl-donor. The PRMT family is widely expressed and has been implicated in biological functions such as RNA splicing, transcriptional control, signal transduction, and DNA repair. Therefore, specific inhibitors of individual PRMTs have potentially significant research and therapeutic value. In particular, PRMT1 is responsible for >85% of arginine methyltransferase activity, but currently available inhibitors of PRMT1 lack specificity, efficacy, and bioavailability. To address this limitation, we developed a high-throughput screening assay for PRMT1 that utilizes a hyper-reactive cysteine within the active site, which is lacking in almost all other PRMTs. This assay, which monitors the kinetics of the fluorescence polarization signal increase upon PRMT1 labeling by a rhodamine-containing cysteine-reactive probe, successfully identified two novel inhibitors selective for PRMT1 over other SAM-dependent methyltransferases. PMID:22506763

  4. High-throughput platform for real-time monitoring of biological processes by multicolor single-molecule fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jin; Dalal, Ravindra V.; Petrov, Alexey N.; Tsai, Albert; O’Leary, Seán E.; Chapin, Karen; Cheng, Janice; Ewan, Mark; Hsiung, Pei-Lin; Lundquist, Paul; Turner, Stephen W.; Hsu, David R.; Puglisi, Joseph D.

    2014-01-01

    Zero-mode waveguides provide a powerful technology for studying single-molecule real-time dynamics of biological systems at physiological ligand concentrations. We customized a commercial zero-mode waveguide-based DNA sequencer for use as a versatile instrument for single-molecule fluorescence detection and showed that the system provides long fluorophore lifetimes with good signal to noise and low spectral cross-talk. We then used a ribosomal translation assay to show real-time fluidic delivery during data acquisition, showing it is possible to follow the conformation and composition of thousands of single biomolecules simultaneously through four spectral channels. This instrument allows high-throughput multiplexed dynamics of single-molecule biological processes over long timescales. The instrumentation presented here has broad applications to single-molecule studies of biological systems and is easily accessible to the biophysical community. PMID:24379388

  5. A high-throughput fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based endothelial cell apoptosis assay and its application for screening vascular disrupting agents.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaoming; Fu, Afu; Luo, Kathy Qian

    2012-02-24

    In this study, we developed a high-throughput endothelial cell apoptosis assay using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based biosensor. After exposure to apoptotic inducer UV-irradiation or anticancer drugs such as paclitaxel, the fluorescence of the cells changed from green to blue. We developed this method into a high-throughput assay in 96-well plates by measuring the emission ratio of yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) to cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) to monitor the activation of a key protease, caspase-3, during apoptosis. The Z' factor for this assay was above 0.5 which indicates that this assay is suitable for a high-throughput analysis. Finally, we applied this functional high-throughput assay for screening vascular disrupting agents (VDA) which could induce endothelial cell apoptosis from our in-house compounds library and dioscin was identified as a hit. As this assay allows real time and sensitive detection of cell apoptosis, it will be a useful tool for monitoring endothelial cell apoptosis in living cell situation and for identifying new VDA candidates via a high-throughput screening. PMID:22290227

  6. Identification of Pregnane X Receptor Ligands Using Time-Resolved Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer and Quantitative High-Throughput Screening

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Sunita J.; Nguyen, Dac-Trung; MacArthur, Ryan; Simeonov, Anton; Frazee, William J.; Hallis, Tina M.; Marks, Bryan D.; Singh, Upinder; Eliason, Hildegard C.; Printen, John; Austin, Christopher P.; Inglese, James

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The human pregnane X nuclear receptor (PXR) is a xenobiotic-regulated receptor that is activated by a range of diverse chemicals, including antibiotics, antifungals, glucocorticoids, and herbal extracts. PXR has been characterized as an important receptor in the metabolism of xenobiotics due to induction of cytochrome P450 isozymes and activation by a large number of prescribed medications. Developing methodologies that can efficiently detect PXR ligands will be clinically beneficial to avoid potential drug–drug interactions. To facilitate the identification of PXR ligands, a time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) assay was miniaturized to a 1,536-well microtiter plate format to employ quantitative high-throughput screening (qHTS). The optimized 1,536-well TR-FRET assay showed Z′-factors of ≥0.5. Seven- to 15-point concentration–response curves (CRCs) were generated for 8,280 compounds using both terbium and fluorescein emission data, resulting in the generation of 241,664 data points. The qHTS method allowed us to retrospectively examine single concentration screening datasets to assess the sensitivity and selectivity of the PXR assay at different compound screening concentrations. Furthermore, nonspecific assay artifacts such as concentration-based quenching of the terbium signal and compound fluorescence were identified through the examination of CRCs for specific emission channels. The CRC information was also used to define chemotypes associated with PXR ligands. This study demonstrates the feasibility of profiling thousands of compounds against PXR using the TR-FRET assay in a high-throughput format. PMID:19505231

  7. High-throughput single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy using parallel detection

    PubMed Central

    Michalet, X.; Colyer, R. A.; Scalia, G.; Kim, T.; Levi, Moran; Aharoni, Daniel; Cheng, Adrian; Guerrieri, F.; Arisaka, Katsushi; Millaud, Jacques; Rech, I.; Resnati, D.; Marangoni, S.; Gulinatti, A.; Ghioni, M.; Tisa, S.; Zappa, F.; Cova, S.; Weiss, S.

    2011-01-01

    Solution-based single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy is a powerful new experimental approach with applications in all fields of natural sciences. The basic concept of this technique is to excite and collect light from a very small volume (typically femtoliter) and work in a concentration regime resulting in rare burst-like events corresponding to the transit of a single-molecule. Those events are accumulated over time to achieve proper statistical accuracy. Therefore the advantage of extreme sensitivity is somewhat counterbalanced by a very long acquisition time. One way to speed up data acquisition is parallelization. Here we will discuss a general approach to address this issue, using a multispot excitation and detection geometry that can accommodate different types of novel highly-parallel detector arrays. We will illustrate the potential of this approach with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and single-molecule fluorescence measurements obtained with different novel multipixel single-photon counting detectors. PMID:21625288

  8. Fluorescence techniques for determination of the membrane potentials in high throughput screening.

    PubMed

    Przybylo, Magda; Borowik, Tomasz; Langner, Marek

    2010-11-01

    The characterization of small molecules requires identification and evaluation of several predictive parameters, when selecting compounds for pharmacological applications and/or determining their toxicity. A number of them are correlated with the compound interaction with biological membranes and/or capacity to cross them. The knowledge of the extent of adsorption, partition coefficient and permeability along with the compound ability to alter membrane properties are critical for such studies. Lipid bilayers are frequently used as the adequate experimental models of a biological membrane despite their simple structure and a limited number of components. A significant number of the biologically relevant lipid bilayer properties are related to its electrostatics. Three electrostatic potentials were defined for the lipid bilayer; the intrinsic or induced surface electrostatic potential, the dipole potential and the membrane potential. Each of them was measured with dedicated methodologies. The complex measurement protocols and technically demanding instrumentation made the development of efficient HTS approaches for complete characterization of membrane electrostatics practically impossible. However, the rapid development of fluorescence techniques accompanied by rapid growth in diversity and number of dedicated fluorescent probes enabled characterization of lipid bilayer electrostatics in a moderately simple manner. Technically advanced, compact and automated workstations, capable of measuring practically all fluorescence parameters, are now available. Therefore, the proper selection of fluorescent probes with measuring procedures can be designed to evaluate drug candidates in context of their ability to alter membrane electrostatics. In the paper we present a critical review of available fluorescence methods, useful for the membrane electrostatics evaluation and discuss the feasibility of their adaptation to HTS procedures. The significance of the presented

  9. High-Throughput Screening for Internalizing Antibodies by Homogeneous Fluorescence Imaging of a pH-Activated Probe

    PubMed Central

    Riedl, Thilo; van Boxtel, Egon; Bosch, Martijn; Parren, Paul W. H. I.; Gerritsen, Arnout F.

    2016-01-01

    Antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) represent a rapidly growing class of biotherapeutics that deliver drugs specifically to target cells by binding of the antibody component to surface receptors. The majority of ADCs require receptor internalization depending on intrinsic features of the specific ADC-antigen interaction. The development of potent ADCs would greatly benefit from the identification of efficiently internalizing antibodies at early stages of discovery. We developed a highly sensitive and rapid antibody internalization assay using an indirect Cypher5E label. The pH-activated CypHer5E label becomes fluorescent upon internalization into the acidic environment of endocytic organelles, whereas background fluorescence of noninternalized CypHer5E is minimal. The pH-dependency of the CypHer5E signal enables robust discrimination of antibody internalization from surface binding. The favorable signal-over-background ratio allows a homogeneous assay design with high-throughput fluorescence imaging in 384- and 1536-well formats. The biophysical readout of the primary internalization event substantially shortens incubation times compared to killing assays using toxin internalization. The assay was validated with tumor-relevant targets, including receptor tyrosine kinases (EGFR and HER2) and a class II cytokine receptor (TF) expressed by A431, AU565, and SKOV-3 cells and transient expression systems (CHO-S). Our method enables functional screening of large antibody libraries to identify therapeutic antibody candidates with internalization characteristics favorable for the development of ADCs. PMID:26518032

  10. Toward Fluorescence-Based High-Throughput Screening for Enantiomeric Excess in Amines and Amino Acid Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Shcherbakova, Elena G; Brega, Valentina; Minami, Tsuyoshi; Sheykhi, Sara; James, Tony D; Anzenbacher, Pavel

    2016-07-11

    A highly accurate and reliable screening method for enantiomeric excess of amine derivatives in the presence of water is reported. The fluorescence-based screening system has been realized by self-assembly of chiral diol-type dyes (BINOL, VANOL and VAPOL), 2-formylphenylboronic acid, and chiral amines forming iminoboronate esters. The structure and chirality of the amine analytes determine the stability of the diastereomeric iminoboronate esters, which in turn display differential fluorescence. The fluorescence signal reflects the enantiomeric purity of the chiral amines and was utilized in high-throughput arrays. The arrays were able to recognize enantiomeric excess of amines, amino esters, and amino alcohols. In addition to qualitative analysis, quantitative experiments were successfully performed. Studies of the role of additives such as water or citrate were carried out to gain insight into the stability of the iminoboronate esters. It is shown that the above additives destabilize less stable esters while the stable esters remain unchanged. Thus, the presence of water and citrate leads to increased difference between the diastereomeric iminoboronates and contributes to the enantiodiscrimination of the chiral amines. PMID:27271215

  11. Fluorescent probe for high-throughput screening of membrane protein expression

    PubMed Central

    Backmark, A E; Olivier, N; Snijder, A; Gordon, E; Dekker, N; Ferguson, A D

    2013-01-01

    Screening of protein variants requires specific detection methods to assay protein levels and stability in crude mixtures. Many strategies apply fluorescence-detection size-exclusion chromatography (FSEC) using green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion proteins to qualitatively monitor expression, stability, and monodispersity. However, GFP fusion proteins have several important disadvantages; including false-positives, protein aggregation after proteolytic removal of GFP, and reductions in protein yields without the GFP fusion. Here we describe a FSEC screening strategy based on a fluorescent multivalent NTA probe that interacts with polyhistidine-tags on target proteins. This method overcomes the limitations of GFP fusion proteins, and can be used to rank protein production based on qualitative and quantitative parameters. Domain boundaries of the human G-protein coupled adenosine A2a receptor were readily identified from crude detergent-extracts of a library of construct variants transiently produced in suspension-adapted HEK293-6E cells. Well expressing clones of MraY, an important bacterial infection target, could be identified from a library of 24 orthologs. This probe provides a highly sensitive tool to detect target proteins to expression levels down to 0.02 mg/L in crude lysate, and requires minimal amounts of cell culture. PMID:23776061

  12. Automated High-Throughput Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy to Detect Protein-Protein Interactions.

    PubMed

    Guzmán, Camilo; Oetken-Lindholm, Christina; Abankwa, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) is widely used to study conformational changes of macromolecules and protein-protein, protein-nucleic acid, and protein-small molecule interactions. FRET biosensors can serve as valuable secondary assays in drug discovery and for target validation in mammalian cells. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) allows precise quantification of the FRET efficiency in intact cells, as FLIM is independent of fluorophore concentration, detection efficiency, and fluorescence intensity. We have developed an automated FLIM system using a commercial frequency domain FLIM attachment (Lambert Instruments) for wide-field imaging. Our automated FLIM system is capable of imaging and analyzing up to 50 different positions of a slide in less than 4 min, or the inner 60 wells of a 96-well plate in less than 20 min. Automation is achieved using a motorized stage and controller (Prior Scientific) coupled with a Zeiss Axio Observer body and full integration into the Lambert Instruments FLIM acquisition software. As an application example, we analyze the interaction of the oncoprotein Ras and its effector Raf after drug treatment. In conclusion, our automated FLIM imaging system requires only commercial components and may therefore allow for a broader use of this technique in chemogenomics projects. PMID:26384400

  13. A high throughput fluorescence polarization assay for inhibitors of the GoLoco motif/G-alpha interaction.

    PubMed

    Kimple, Adam J; Yasgar, Adam; Hughes, Mark; Jadhav, Ajit; Willard, Francis S; Muller, Robin E; Austin, Christopher P; Inglese, James; Ibeanu, Gordon C; Siderovski, David P; Simeonov, Anton

    2008-06-01

    The GoLoco motif is a short Galpha-binding polypeptide sequence. It is often found in proteins that regulate cell-surface receptor signaling, such as RGS12, as well as in proteins that regulate mitotic spindle orientation and force generation during cell division, such as GPSM2/LGN. Here, we describe a high throughput fluorescence polarization (FP) assay using fluorophore-labeled GoLoco motif peptides for identifying inhibitors of the GoLoco motif interaction with the G-protein alpha subunit Galpha (i1). The assay exhibits considerable stability over time and is tolerant to DMSO up to 5%. The Z'-factors for robustness of the GPSM2 and RGS12 GoLoco motif assays in a 96-well plate format were determined to be 0.81 and 0.84, respectively; the latter assay was run in a 384-well plate format and produced a Z'-factor of 0.80. To determine the screening factor window (Z-factor) of the RGS12 GoLoco motif screen using a small molecule library, the NCI Diversity Set was screened. The Z-factor was determined to be 0.66, suggesting that this FP assay would perform well when developed for 1,536-well format and scaled up to larger libraries. We then miniaturized to a 4 microL final volume a pair of FP assays utilizing fluorescein- (green) and rhodamine- (red) labeled RGS12 GoLoco motif peptides. In a fully-automated run, the Sigma-Aldrich LOPAC(1280) collection was screened three times with every library compound being tested over a range of concentrations following the quantitative high throughput screening (qHTS) paradigm; excellent assay performance was noted with average Z-factors of 0.84 and 0.66 for the green- and red-label assays, respectively. PMID:18537560

  14. Ribonuclease activity of vaccinia DNA topoisomerase IB: kinetic and high-throughput inhibition studies using a robust continuous fluorescence assay.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Keehwan; Nagarajan, Rajesh; Stivers, James T

    2004-11-30

    Vaccinia type I DNA topoisomerase exhibits a strong site-specific ribonuclease activity when provided a DNA substrate that contains a single uridine ribonucleotide within a duplex DNA containing the sequence 5' CCCTU 3'. The reaction involves two steps: attack of the active site tyrosine nucleophile of topo I at the 3' phosphodiester of the uridine nucleotide to generate a covalent enzyme-DNA adduct, followed by nucleophilic attack of the uridine 2'-hydroxyl to release the covalently tethered enzyme. Here we report the first continuous spectroscopic assay for topoisomerase that allows monitoring of the ribonuclease reaction under multiple-turnover conditions. The assay is especially robust for high-throughput screening applications because sensitive molecular beacon technology is utilized, and the topoisomerase is released during the reaction to allow turnover of multiple substrate molecules by a single molecule of enzyme. Direct computer simulation of the fluorescence time courses was used to obtain the rate constants for substrate binding and release, covalent complex formation, and formation of the 2',3'-cyclic phosphodiester product of the ribonuclease reaction. The assay allowed rapid screening of a 500 member chemical library from which several new inhibitors of topo I were identified with IC(50) values in the range of 2-100 microM. Three of the most potent hits from the high-throughput screening were also found to inhibit plasmid supercoil relaxation by the enzyme, establishing the utility of the assay in identifying inhibitors of the biologically relevant DNA relaxation reaction. One of the most potent inhibitors of the vaccinia enzyme, 3-benzo[1,3]dioxol-5-yl-2-oxoproprionic acid, did not inhibit the closely related human enzyme. The inhibitory mechanism of this compound is unique and involves a step required for recycling the enzyme for steady-state turnover. PMID:15554707

  15. An improved high-throughput Nile red fluorescence assay for estimating intracellular lipids in a variety of yeast species

    PubMed Central

    Sitepu, I.R.; Ignatia, L.; Franz, A. K.; Wong, D. M.; Faulina, S.A.; Tsui, M.; Kanti, A.; Boundy-Mills, K.

    2012-01-01

    A rapid and inexpensive method for estimating lipid content of yeasts is needed for screening large numbers of yeasts samples. Nile red is a fluorescent lipophilic dye used for detection and quantification of intracellular lipid droplets in various biological system including algae, yeasts and filamentous fungi. However, a published assay for yeast is affected by variable diffusion across the cell membrane, and variation in the time required to reach maximal fluorescence emission. In this study, parameters that may influence the emission were varied to determine optimal assay conditions. An improved assay with a high-throughput capability was developed that includes the addition of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) solvent to improve cell permeability, elimination of the washing step, the reduction of Nile red concentration, kinetic readings rather than single time-point reading, and utilization of a black 96-well microplate. The improved method was validated by comparison to gravimetric determination of lipid content of a broad variety of ascomycete and basidiomycete yeast species. PMID:22985718

  16. Identification of selective inhibitors of uncharacterized enzymes by high-throughput screening with fluorescent activity-based probes.

    PubMed

    Bachovchin, Daniel A; Brown, Steven J; Rosen, Hugh; Cravatt, Benjamin F

    2009-04-01

    High-throughput screening to discover small-molecule modulators of enzymes typically relies on highly tailored substrate assays, which are not available for poorly characterized enzymes. Here we report a general, substrate-free method for identifying inhibitors of uncharacterized enzymes. The assay measures changes in the kinetics of covalent active-site labeling with broad-spectrum, fluorescent probes in the presence of inhibitors by monitoring the fluorescence polarization signal. We show that this technology is applicable to enzymes from at least two mechanistic classes, regardless of their degree of functional annotation, and can be coupled with secondary proteomic assays that use competitive activity-based profiling to rapidly determine the specificity of screening hits. Using this method, we identify the bioactive alkaloid emetine as a selective inhibitor of the uncharacterized cancer-associated hydrolase RBBP9. Furthermore, we show that the detoxification enzyme GSTO1, also implicated in cancer, is inhibited by several electrophilic compounds found in public libraries, some of which display high selectivity for this protein. PMID:19329999

  17. Development of a highly sensitive, high-throughput assay for glycosyltransferases using enzyme-coupled fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Kazuo; Kojima, Hirotatsu; Okabe, Takayoshi; Nagano, Tetsuo

    2014-02-15

    Glycosyltransferases catalyze transfer of sugar moieties from activated donor molecules to specific acceptor molecules, forming glycosidic bonds. Identification of selective modulators of glycosyltransferases is important both to provide new tools for investigating pathophysiological roles of glycosylation reactions in cells and tissues, and as new leads in drug discovery. Here we describe a universal enzyme-coupled fluorescence assay for glycosyltransferases, based on quantification of nucleotides produced in the glycosyl transfer reaction. GDP, UDP, and CMP are phosphorylated with nucleotide kinase in the presence of excess ATP, generating ADP. Via coupled enzyme reactions involving ADP-hexokinase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, and diaphorase, the ADP is utilized for conversion of resazurin to resorufin, which is determined by fluorescence measurement. The method was validated by comparison with an HPLC method, and employed to screen the LOPAC1280 library for inhibitors in a 384-well plate format. The assay performed well, with a Z'-factor of 0.80. We identified 12 hits for human galactosyltransferase B4GALT1 after elimination of false positives that inhibited the enzyme-coupled assay system. The assay components are all commercially available and the reagent cost is only 2 to 10 US cents per well. This method is suitable for low-cost, high-throughput assay of various glycosyltransferases and screening of glycosyltransferase modulators. PMID:24299989

  18. A high throughput drug screen based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) for anticancer activity of compounds from herbal medicine

    PubMed Central

    Tian, H; Ip, L; Luo, H; Chang, D C; Luo, K Q

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: We report the development of a very efficient cell-based high throughput screening (HTS) method, which utilizes a novel bio-sensor that selectively detects apoptosis based on the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technique. Experimental approach: We generated a stable HeLa cell line expressing a FRET-based bio-sensor protein. When cells undergo apoptosis, they activate a protease called ‘caspase-3'. Activation of this enzyme will cleave our sensor protein and cause its fluorescence emission to shift from a wavelength of 535 nm (green) to 486 nm (blue). A decrease in the green/blue emission ratio thus gives a direct indication of apoptosis. The sensor cells are grown in 96-well plates. After addition of different chemical compounds to each well, a fluorescence profile can be measured at various time-points using a fluorescent plate reader. Compounds that can trigger apoptosis are potential candidates as anti-cancer drugs. Key results: This novel cell-based HTS method is highly effective in identifying anti-cancer compounds. It was very sensitive in detecting apoptosis induced by various known anti-cancer drugs. Further, this system detects apoptosis, but not necrosis, and is thus more useful than the conventional cell viability assays, such as those using MTT. Finally, we used this system to screen compounds, isolated from two plants used in Chinese medicine, and identified several effective compounds for inducing apoptosis. Conclusions and Implications: This FRET-based HTS method is a powerful tool for identifying anti-cancer compounds and can serve as a highly efficient platform for drug discovery. PMID:17179946

  19. Fluorescent-magnetic dual-encoded nanospheres: a promising tool for fast-simultaneous-addressable high-throughput analysis.

    PubMed

    Xie, Min; Hu, Jun; Wen, Cong-Ying; Zhang, Zhi-Ling; Xie, Hai-Yan; Pang, Dai-Wen

    2012-01-27

    Bead-based optical encoding or magnetic encoding techniques are promising in high-throughput multiplexed detection and separation of numerous species under complicated conditions. Therefore, a self-assembly strategy implemented in an organic solvent is put forward to fabricate fluorescent-magnetic dual-encoded nanospheres. Briefly, hydrophobic trioctylphosphine oxide-capped CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) and oleic acid-capped nano-γ-Fe2O3 magnetic particles are directly, selectively and controllably assembled on branched poly(ethylene imine)-coated nanospheres without any pretreatment, which is crucial to keep the high quantum yield of QDs and good dispersibility of γ-Fe2O3. Owing to the tunability of coating amounts of QDs and γ-Fe2O3 as well as controllable fluorescent emissions of deposited-QDs, dual-encoded nanospheres with different photoluminescent emissions and gradient magnetic susceptibility are constructed. Using this improved layer-by-layer self-assembly approach, deposition of hydrophobic nanoparticles onto hydrophilic carriers in organic media can be easily realized; meanwhile, fluorescent-magnetic dual-functional nanospheres can be further equipped with readable optical and magnetic addresses. The resultant fluorescent-magnetic dual-encoded nanospheres possess both the unique optical properties of QDs and the superparamagnetic properties of γ-Fe2O3, exhibiting good monodispersibility, huge encoding capacity and nanoscale particle size. Compared with the encoded microbeads reported by others, the nanometre scale of the dual-encoded nanospheres gives them minimum steric hindrance and higher flexibility. PMID:22173487

  20. Ultrasensitive and High-Throughput Fluorescence Analysis of Droplet Contents with Orthogonal Line Confocal Excitation

    PubMed Central

    Jeffries, Gavin D.M.; Lorenz, Robert M.; Chiu, Daniel T.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a simple modification to traditional confocal fluorescence detection that greatly improves signal-to-noise (S/N) for the high-speed analysis of droplet streams. Rather than using the conventional epi geometry, illumination of the droplet was in the form of a line that is orthogonal to both the direction of flow and the light-collection objective. In contrast to the epi geometry where we observed high levels of scattering background from the droplets, we detected more than 10-fold less background (depending on the laser power used) when orthogonal-line-confocal illumination was used. We characterized this improvement using a standard microfluidic platform over a range of analyte concentrations, and observed an improvement in limits of detection of greater than 10. Using this method, we were able to analyze pico-molar concentrations of analytes contained within picoliter-volume droplets at a rate of greater than 350 droplets per second. PMID:21062029

  1. A HIGH-THROUGHPUT FLUORESCENCE ACTIVATED NANOSCALE SUBCELLULAR SORTER WITH SINGLE-MOLECULE SENSITIVITY

    PubMed Central

    Schiro, Perry G.; Gadd, Jennifer C.; Yen, Gloria S.; Chiu, Daniel T.

    2012-01-01

    Recent single-cell and single-molecule studies have shown that a variety of subpopulations exist within biological systems, such as synaptic vesicles, that have previously been overlooked in common bulk studies. By isolating and enriching these various subpopulations, detailed analysis with a variety of analytical techniques can be done to further understand the role that various subpopulations play in cellular dynamics and how alterations to these subpopulations affect the overall function of the biological system. Previous sorters lack the sensitivity, sorting speed, and efficiency to isolate synaptic vesicles and other nanoscale systems. This paper describes the development of a fluorescence activated nanoscale subcellular sorter that can sort nearly 10 million objects per hour with single-molecule sensitivity. Utilizing a near-nanoscale channel system, we were able to achieve upwards of 91% recovery of desired objects with a 99.7% purity. PMID:22574902

  2. A simple, rapid, and high-throughput fluorescence polarization immunoassay for simultaneous detection of organophosphorus pesticides in vegetable and environmental water samples

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A simple, rapid, and high-throughput fluorescent polarization immunoassay (FPIA) for simultaneous determination of organophosphorus pesticides (OPs) was developed. Three haptens were labeled with a fluorescein probe and used as tracers to develop a homogenous FPIA using a broad-specificity monoclon...

  3. Dealing with reduced data acquisition times in Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS) for High-Throughput Screening (HTS) applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Lloyd M.; Ball, David A.; Williams, Peter E.; Swift, Kerry M.; Matayoshi, Edmund D.

    2003-07-01

    Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS) may be used to assay the binding of drug-like ligands to signaling proteins and other bio-particles. For High Throughput Screening (HTS), a competitive format is typically used in which binding of an unlabeled compound results in displacement of a fluorescently labeled ligand. Unweighted curve-fitting of the normalized autocorrelation function (ACF) to a two-diffusion-component model can resolve the fractions of free and bound ligand if the diffusion rates differ sufficiently and if the experimentally estimated ACF has adequate precision. However, for HTS (and also for intracellular FCS studies) it is desirable to minimize the experimental data collection time. In this case, the precision of the ACF is limited and it becomes important to account for the statistical features of the ACF estimate when designing an assay. The errors at different points in the estimated ACF are correlated and hence least-squares fitting methods are not strictly statistically rigorous. We compare different methods for estimating and curve-fitting the ACF from the raw data of short duration FCS measurements. The methods are applied to data from experiments to assay binding of Alexa-488-labeled Bak peptide with Bcl-xL, which is an intracellular protein that acts to protect against programmed cell death. We present results from a detailed Monte Carlo simulation of the experiment, which is useful for validating short-duration assay capabilities. We also discuss the measurement of changes in steady state fluorescence anisotropy due to restricted rotational diffusion upon binding, which provides a complementary assay method.

  4. A High-Throughput Fluorescence-Based Assay System for Appetite-Regulating Gene and Drug Screening

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, Yasuhito; Hirano, Minoru; Nishimura, Yuhei; Tanaka, Toshio

    2012-01-01

    The increasing number of people suffering from metabolic syndrome and obesity is becoming a serious problem not only in developed countries, but also in developing countries. However, there are few agents currently approved for the treatment of obesity. Those that are available are mainly appetite suppressants and gastrointestinal fat blockers. We have developed a simple and rapid method for the measurement of the feeding volume of Danio rerio (zebrafish). This assay can be used to screen appetite suppressants and enhancers. In this study, zebrafish were fed viable paramecia that were fluorescently-labeled, and feeding volume was measured using a 96-well microplate reader. Gene expression analysis of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (bdnf), knockdown of appetite-regulating genes (neuropeptide Y, preproinsulin, melanocortin 4 receptor, agouti related protein, and cannabinoid receptor 1), and the administration of clinical appetite suppressants (fluoxetine, sibutramine, mazindol, phentermine, and rimonabant) revealed the similarity among mechanisms regulating appetite in zebrafish and mammals. In combination with behavioral analysis, we were able to evaluate adverse effects on locomotor activities from gene knockdown and chemical treatments. In conclusion, we have developed an assay that uses zebrafish, which can be applied to high-throughput screening and target gene discovery for appetite suppressants and enhancers. PMID:23300705

  5. An Ultra-High Fluorescence Enhancement and High Throughput Assay for Revealing Expression and Internalization of Chemokine Receptor CXCR4.

    PubMed

    He, Hua; Wang, Xiaojuan; Cheng, Tiantian; Xia, Yongqing; Lao, Jun; Ge, Baosheng; Ren, Hao; Khan, Naseer Ullah; Huang, Fang

    2016-04-18

    Revealing chemokine receptor CXCR4 expression, distribution, and internalization levels in different cancers helps to evaluate cancer progression or prognosis and to set personalized treatment strategy. We here describe a sensitive and high-throughput immunoassay for determining CXCR4 expression and distribution in cancer cells. The assay is accessible to a wide range of users in an ordinary lab only by dip-coating poly(styrene-co-N-isopropylacrylamide) spheres on the glass substrate. The self- assembled spheres form three-dimensional photonic colloidal crystals which enhance the fluorescence of CF647 and Alexa Fluor 647 by a factor of up to 1000. CXCR4 in cells is detected by using the sandwich immunoassay, where the primary antibody recognizes CXCR4 and the secondary antibody is labeled with CF647. With the newly established assay, we quantified the total expression of CXCR4, its distribution on the cell membrane and cytoplasm, and revealed their internalization level upon SDF-1α activation in various cancer cells, even for those with extremely low expression level. PMID:26879206

  6. High-Throughput Growth Prediction for Lactuca sativa L. Seedlings Using Chlorophyll Fluorescence in a Plant Factory with Artificial Lighting

    PubMed Central

    Moriyuki, Shogo; Fukuda, Hirokazu

    2016-01-01

    Poorly grown plants that result from differences in individuals lead to large profit losses for plant factories that use large electric power sources for cultivation. Thus, identifying and culling the low-grade plants at an early stage, using so-called seedlings diagnosis technology, plays an important role in avoiding large losses in plant factories. In this study, we developed a high-throughput diagnosis system using the measurement of chlorophyll fluorescence (CF) in a commercial large-scale plant factory, which produces about 5000 lettuce plants every day. At an early stage (6 days after sowing), a CF image of 7200 seedlings was captured every 4 h on the final greening day by a high-sensitivity CCD camera and an automatic transferring machine, and biological indices were extracted. Using machine learning, plant growth can be predicted with a high degree of accuracy based on biological indices including leaf size, amount of CF, and circadian rhythms in CF. Growth prediction was improved by addition of temporal information on CF. The present data also provide new insights into the relationships between growth and temporal information regulated by the inherent biological clock. PMID:27242805

  7. Development of a fluorescent microsphere-based multiplexed high-throughput assay system for profiling of transcription factor activation.

    PubMed

    Yaoi, Takuro; Jiang, Xin; Li, Xianqiang

    2006-06-01

    Transcription factors (TFs), which play crucial roles in the regulation of gene expression in the human genome, are highly regulated by a variety of mechanisms. A single extracellular stimulus can trigger multiple signaling pathways, and these in turn can activate multiple TFs to mediate the inducible expression of target genes. Alterations in the activities of TFs are often associated with human diseases, such as altered activating factor 1, estrogen receptor, and p53 function in cancer, nuclear factor kappaB in inflammatory diseases, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma in obesity. A systematic assay for profiling the activation of TFs will aid in elucidating the mechanisms of TF activation, reveal altered TFs associated with human diseases, and aid in developing assays for drug discovery. Here, we developed a 24-plex fluorescent microsphere-based TF activation assay system with a 96-well plate format. The assay system enabled high-throughput profiling of the DNA binding activity of TFs in multiple samples with high sensitivity. PMID:16834534

  8. High-Throughput Growth Prediction for Lactuca sativa L. Seedlings Using Chlorophyll Fluorescence in a Plant Factory with Artificial Lighting.

    PubMed

    Moriyuki, Shogo; Fukuda, Hirokazu

    2016-01-01

    Poorly grown plants that result from differences in individuals lead to large profit losses for plant factories that use large electric power sources for cultivation. Thus, identifying and culling the low-grade plants at an early stage, using so-called seedlings diagnosis technology, plays an important role in avoiding large losses in plant factories. In this study, we developed a high-throughput diagnosis system using the measurement of chlorophyll fluorescence (CF) in a commercial large-scale plant factory, which produces about 5000 lettuce plants every day. At an early stage (6 days after sowing), a CF image of 7200 seedlings was captured every 4 h on the final greening day by a high-sensitivity CCD camera and an automatic transferring machine, and biological indices were extracted. Using machine learning, plant growth can be predicted with a high degree of accuracy based on biological indices including leaf size, amount of CF, and circadian rhythms in CF. Growth prediction was improved by addition of temporal information on CF. The present data also provide new insights into the relationships between growth and temporal information regulated by the inherent biological clock. PMID:27242805

  9. High energy x-ray diffraction/x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy for high-throughput analysis of composition spread thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Gregoire, John M.; Dale, Darren; Kazimirov, Alexander; DiSalvo, Francis J.; Dover, R. Bruce van

    2009-12-15

    High-throughput crystallography is an important tool in materials research, particularly for the rapid assessment of structure-property relationships. We present a technique for simultaneous acquisition of diffraction images and fluorescence spectra on a continuous composition spread thin film using a 60 keV x-ray source. Subsequent noninteractive data processing provides maps of the diffraction profiles, thin film fiber texture, and composition. Even for highly textured films, our diffraction technique provides detection of diffraction from each family of Bragg reflections, which affords direct comparison of the measured profiles with powder patterns of known phases. These techniques are important for high throughput combinatorial studies as they provide structure and composition maps which may be correlated with performance trends within an inorganic library.

  10. High-Throughput Screening for Small Molecule Inhibitors of LARG-Stimulated RhoA Nucleotide Binding via a Novel Fluorescence Polarization Assay

    PubMed Central

    Evelyn, Chris R.; Ferng, Timothy; Rojas, Rafael J.; Larsen, Martha J.; Sondek, John; Neubig, Richard R.

    2009-01-01

    Guanine nucleotide-exchange factors (GEFs) stimulate guanine nucleotide exchange and the subsequent activation of Rho-family proteins in response to extracellular stimuli acting upon cytokine, tyrosine kinase, adhesion, integrin, and G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). Upon Rho activation, several downstream events occur, such as morphological and cytokskeletal changes, motility, growth, survival, and gene transcription. The RhoGEF Leukemia-Associated RhoGEF (LARG) is a member of the Regulators of G-protein Signaling Homology Domain (RH) family of GEFs originally identified as a result of chromosomal translocation in acute myeloid leukemia. Using a novel fluorescence polarization guanine nucleotide binding assay utilizing BODIPY-Texas Red-GTPγS (BODIPY-TR-GTPγS), we performed a ten-thousand compound high-throughput screen for inhibitors of LARG-stimulated RhoA nucleotide binding. Five compounds identified from the high-throughput screen were confirmed in a non-fluorescent radioactive guanine nucleotide binding assay measuring LARG-stimulated [35S] GTPγS binding to RhoA, thus ruling out non-specific fluorescent effects. All five compounds selectively inhibited LARG-stimulated RhoA [35S] GTPγS binding, but had little to no effect upon RhoA or Gαo [35S] GTPγS binding. Therefore, these five compounds should serve as promising starting points for the development of small molecule inhibitors of LARG-mediated nucleotide exchange as both pharmacological tools and therapeutics. In addition, the fluorescence polarization guanine nucleotide binding assay described here should serve as a useful approach for both high-throughput screening and general biological applications. PMID:19196702

  11. A novel cell-based duplex high-throughput screening assay combining fluorescent Ca(2+) measurement with homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence technology.

    PubMed

    Kiss, László; Cselenyák, Attila; Varga, Ágnes; Visegrády, András

    2016-08-15

    Cell-based assays for G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) activation applied in high-throughput screening (HTS) monitor various readouts for second messengers or intracellular effectors. Recently, our understanding of diverging signaling pathways downstream of receptor activation and the capability of small molecules to selectively modulate signaling routes has increased substantially, underlining the importance of selecting appropriate readouts in cellular functional screens. To minimize the rate of false negatives in large-scale screening campaigns, it is crucial to maximize the chance of a ligand being detected, and generally applicable methods for detecting multiple analytes from a single well might serve this purpose. The few assays developed so far based on multiplexed GPCR readouts are limited to only certain applications and usually rely on genetic manipulations hindering screening in native or native-like cellular systems. Here we describe a more generally applicable and HTS-compatible homogeneous assay based on the combination of fluorometric detection of [Ca(2+)] with subsequent homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence (HTRF) cAMP readout in the same well. Besides describing development and validation of the assay, using a cell line recombinantly expressing the human PTH1 receptor screening of a small library is also presented, demonstrating the robustness and HTS compatibility of the novel paradigm. PMID:27235172

  12. The Design, Synthesis and Potential Utility of Fluorescence Probes that Target DFG-out Conformation of p38[alpha] for High Throughput Screening Binding Assay

    SciTech Connect

    Tecle, Haile; Feru, Frederic; Liu, Hu; Kuhn, Cyrille; Rennie, Glen; Morris, Mark; Shao, Jiangxing; Cheng, Alan C.; Gikunju, Diana; Miret, Juan; Coli, Rocco; Xi, Simon; Clugston, Susan L.; Low, Simon; Kazmirski, Steven; Ding, Yuan-Hua; Cao, Qing; Johnson, Theresa L.; Deshmukh, Gayatri D.; DiNitto, Jonathan P.; Wu, Joe C.; English, Jessie M.; Pfizer

    2010-10-18

    The design, synthesis and utility of fluorescence probes that bind to the DFG-out conformation of p38{alpha} kinase are described. Probes that demonstrate good affinity for p38{alpha}, have been identified and one of the probes, PF-04438255, has been successfully used in an high throughput screening (HTS) assay to identify two novel non-classical p38{alpha} inhibitors. In addition, a cascade activity assay was utilized to validate the selective binding of these non-classical kinase inhibitors to the unactive form of the enzyme.

  13. Structure-guided design of fluorescent S-adenosylmethionine analogs for a high-throughput screen to target SAM-I riboswitch RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Hickey, Scott F.; Hammond, Ming C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Many classes of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM)-binding RNAs and proteins are of interest as potential drug targets in diverse therapeutic areas, from infectious diseases to cancer. In the former case, the SAM-I riboswitch is an attractive target because this structured RNA element is found only in bacterial mRNAs and regulates multiple genes in several human pathogens. Here we describe the synthesis of stable and fluorescent analogs of SAM in which the fluorophore is introduced through a functionalizable linker to the ribose. A Cy5-labeled SAM analog was shown to bind several SAM-I riboswitches via in-line probing and fluorescence polarization (FP) assays, including one from Staphylococcus aureus that controls the expression of SAM synthetase in this organism. A fluorescent ligand displacement assay was developed and validated for high-throughput screening of compounds to target the SAM-I riboswitch class. PMID:24560607

  14. High-throughput analysis of lipid hydroperoxides in edible oils and fats using the fluorescent reagent diphenyl-1-pyrenylphosphine.

    PubMed

    Santas, Jonathan; Guzmán, Yeimmy J; Guardiola, Francesc; Rafecas, Magdalena; Bou, Ricard

    2014-11-01

    A fluorometric method for the determination of hydroperoxides (HP) in edible oils and fats using the reagent diphenyl-1-pyrenylphosphine (DPPP) was developed and validated. Two solvent media containing 100% butanol or a mixture of chloroform/methanol (2:1, v/v) can be used to solubilise lipid samples. Regardless of the solvent used to solubilise the sample, the DPPP method was precise, accurate, sensitive and easy to perform. The HP content of 43 oil and fat samples was determined and the results were compared with those obtained by means of the AOCS Official Method for the determination of peroxide value (PV) and the ferrous oxidation-xylenol orange (FOX) method. The proposed method not only correlates well with the PV and FOX methods, but also presents some advantages such as requiring low sample and solvent amounts and being suitable for high-throughput sample analysis. PMID:24874381

  15. High-Throughput Analysis With 96-Capillary Array Electrophoresis and Integrated Sample Preparation for DNA Sequencing Based on Laser Induced Fluorescence Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Gang Xue

    2001-12-31

    The purpose of this research was to improve the fluorescence detection for the multiplexed capillary array electrophoresis, extend its use beyond the genomic analysis, and to develop an integrated micro-sample preparation system for high-throughput DNA sequencing. The authors first demonstrated multiplexed capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) and micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) separations in a 96-capillary array system with laser-induced fluorescence detection. Migration times of four kinds of fluoresceins and six polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are normalized to one of the capillaries using two internal standards. The relative standard deviations (RSD) after normalization are 0.6-1.4% for the fluoresceins and 0.1-1.5% for the PAHs. Quantitative calibration of the separations based on peak areas is also performed, again with substantial improvement over the raw data. This opens up the possibility of performing massively parallel separations for high-throughput chemical analysis for process monitoring, combinatorial synthesis, and clinical diagnosis. The authors further improved the fluorescence detection by step laser scanning. A computer-controlled galvanometer scanner is adapted for scanning a focused laser beam across a 96-capillary array for laser-induced fluorescence detection. The signal at a single photomultiplier tube is temporally sorted to distinguish among the capillaries. The limit of detection for fluorescein is 3 x 10{sup -11} M (S/N = 3) for 5-mW of total laser power scanned at 4 Hz. The observed cross-talk among capillaries is 0.2%. Advantages include the efficient utilization of light due to the high duty-cycle of step scan, good detection performance due to the reduction of stray light, ruggedness due to the small mass of the galvanometer mirror, low cost due to the simplicity of components, and flexibility due to the independent paths for excitation and emission.

  16. Time-Domain Microfluidic Fluorescence Lifetime Flow Cytometry for High-Throughput Förster Resonance Energy Transfer Screening

    PubMed Central

    Nedbal, Jakub; Visitkul, Viput; Ortiz-Zapater, Elena; Weitsman, Gregory; Chana, Prabhjoat; Matthews, Daniel R; Ng, Tony; Ameer-Beg, Simon M

    2015-01-01

    Sensing ion or ligand concentrations, physico-chemical conditions, and molecular dimerization or conformation change is possible by assays involving fluorescent lifetime imaging. The inherent low throughput of imaging impedes rigorous statistical data analysis on large cell numbers. We address this limitation by developing a fluorescence lifetime-measuring flow cytometer for fast fluorescence lifetime quantification in living or fixed cell populations. The instrument combines a time-correlated single photon counting epifluorescent microscope with microfluidics cell-handling system. The associated computer software performs burst integrated fluorescence lifetime analysis to assign fluorescence lifetime, intensity, and burst duration to each passing cell. The maximum safe throughput of the instrument reaches 3,000 particles per minute. Living cells expressing spectroscopic rulers of varying peptide lengths were distinguishable by Förster resonant energy transfer measured by donor fluorescence lifetime. An epidermal growth factor (EGF)-stimulation assay demonstrated the technique's capacity to selectively quantify EGF receptor phosphorylation in cells, which was impossible by measuring sensitized emission on a standard flow cytometer. Dual-color fluorescence lifetime detection and cell-specific chemical environment sensing were exemplified using di-4-ANEPPDHQ, a lipophilic environmentally sensitive dye that exhibits changes in its fluorescence lifetime as a function of membrane lipid order. To our knowledge, this instrument opens new applications in flow cytometry which were unavailable due to technological limitations of previously reported fluorescent lifetime flow cytometers. The presented technique is sensitive to lifetimes of most popular fluorophores in the 0.5–5 ns range including fluorescent proteins and is capable of detecting multi-exponential fluorescence lifetime decays. This instrument vastly enhances the throughput of experiments involving

  17. A lipophilic fluorescent LipidGreen1-based quantification method for high-throughput screening analysis of intracellular poly-3-hydroxybutyrate.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ji Eun; Na, Hye Young; Yang, Taek Ho; Rhee, Sung-Keun; Song, Jae Kwang

    2015-12-01

    Poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB), the most abundant type of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) is synthesized inside a variety of microorganisms as a primary candidate for industrial PHB production. Lipophilic dyes such as Nile red and BODIPY have been used to quantify intracellular PHB, but their uses have often been limited in terms of sensitivity and accuracy. In this study, a newly developed lipophilic fluorescent dye LipidGreen1 was used to quantify intracellular PHB. LipidGreen1 stained viable colonies by adding the dye into the medium which enabled the effective selection of PHB-positive cells. Furthermore, the fluorescence intensity of LipidGreen1 maintained its fluorescence intensity much longer than that of Nile red. The fluorescence intensities of intracellular PHB stained by LipidGreen1 accurately agreed with PHB contents measured by gas chromatography. In addition, internalization of LipidGreen1 in Escherichia coli cell was not necessary to obtain quantitative measurements. PHB-synthase mutants were differentiated by fluorescence intensities with a good correlation to increased levels of PHB production. These results show that LipidGreen1 is sensitive and accurate in high-throughput screening of newly isolated and genetically modified bacteria with enhanced PHB production. PMID:26253390

  18. A high-throughput time-resolved mini-silicon photomultiplier with embedded fluorescence lifetime estimation in 0.13 μm CMOS.

    PubMed

    Tyndall, David; Rae, Bruce R; Li, David Day-Uei; Arlt, Jochen; Johnston, Abigail; Richardson, Justin A; Henderson, Robert K

    2012-12-01

    We describe a miniaturized, high-throughput, time-resolved fluorescence lifetime sensor implemented in a 0.13 m CMOS process, combining single photon detection, multiple channel timing and embedded pre-processing of fluorescence lifetime estimations on a single device. Detection is achieved using an array of single photon avalanche diodes (SPADs) arranged in a digital silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) architecture with 400 ps output pulses and a 10% fill-factor. An array of time-to-digital converters (TDCs) with ≈50 ps resolution records up to 8 photon events during each excitation period. Data from the TDC array is then processed using a centre-of-mass method (CMM) pre-calculation to produce fluorescence lifetime estimations in real-time. The sensor is believed to be the first reported implementation of embedded fluorescence lifetime estimation. The system is demonstrated in a practical laboratory environment with measurements of a variety of fluorescent dyes with different single exponential lifetimes, successfully showing the sensor's ability to overcome the classic pile-up limitation of time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) by over an order of magnitude. PMID:23853257

  19. A high-throughput screening-compatible homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence assay measuring the glycohydrolase activity of human poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase.

    PubMed

    Stowell, Alexandra I J; James, Dominic I; Waddell, Ian D; Bennett, Neil; Truman, Caroline; Hardern, Ian M; Ogilvie, Donald J

    2016-06-15

    Poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) polymers are transient post-translational modifications, and their formation is catalyzed by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) enzymes. A number of PARP inhibitors are in advanced clinical development for BRCA-mutated breast cancer, and olaparib has recently been approved for BRCA-mutant ovarian cancer; however, there has already been evidence of developed resistance mechanisms. Poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) catalyzes the hydrolysis of the endo- and exo-glycosidic bonds within the PAR polymers. As an alternative strategy, PARG is a potentially attractive therapeutic target. There is only one PARG gene, compared with 17 known PARP family members, and therefore a PARG inhibitor may have wider application with fewer compensatory mechanisms. Prior to the initiation of this project, there were no known existing cell-permeable small molecule PARG inhibitors for use as tool compounds to assess these hypotheses and no suitable high-throughput screening (HTS)-compatible biochemical assays available to identify start points for a drug discovery project. The development of this newly described high-throughput homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence (HTRF) assay has allowed HTS to proceed and, from this, the identification and advancement of multiple validated series of tool compounds for PARG inhibition. PMID:27036617

  20. Novel KCNQ2 channel activators discovered using fluorescence-based and automated patch-clamp-based high-throughput screening techniques

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Jin-feng; Qiao, Guan-hua; Liu, Ni; Nan, Fa-jun; Gao, Zhao-bing

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To establish an improved, high-throughput screening techniques for identifying novel KCNQ2 channel activators. Methods: KCNQ2 channels were stably expressed in CHO cells (KCNQ2 cells). Thallium flux assay was used for primary screening, and 384-well automated patch-clamp IonWorks Barracuda was used for hit validation. Two validated activators were characterized using a conventional patch-clamp recording technique. Results: From a collection of 80 000 compounds, the primary screening revealed a total of 565 compounds that potentiated the fluorescence signals in thallium flux assay by more than 150%. When the 565 hits were examined in IonWorks Barracuda, 38 compounds significantly enhanced the outward currents recorded in KCNQ2 cells, and were confirmed as KCNQ2 activators. In the conventional patch-clamp recordings, two validated activators ZG1732 and ZG2083 enhanced KCNQ2 currents with EC50 values of 1.04±0.18 μmol/L and 1.37±0.06 μmol/L, respectively. Conclusion: The combination of thallium flux assay and IonWorks Barracuda assay is an efficient high-throughput screening (HTS) route for discovering KCNQ2 activators. PMID:26725738

  1. High throughput optical scanner

    DOEpatents

    Basiji, David A.; van den Engh, Gerrit J.

    2001-01-01

    A scanning apparatus is provided to obtain automated, rapid and sensitive scanning of substrate fluorescence, optical density or phosphorescence. The scanner uses a constant path length optical train, which enables the combination of a moving beam for high speed scanning with phase-sensitive detection for noise reduction, comprising a light source, a scanning mirror to receive light from the light source and sweep it across a steering mirror, a steering mirror to receive light from the scanning mirror and reflect it to the substrate, whereby it is swept across the substrate along a scan arc, and a photodetector to receive emitted or scattered light from the substrate, wherein the optical path length from the light source to the photodetector is substantially constant throughout the sweep across the substrate. The optical train can further include a waveguide or mirror to collect emitted or scattered light from the substrate and direct it to the photodetector. For phase-sensitive detection the light source is intensity modulated and the detector is connected to phase-sensitive detection electronics. A scanner using a substrate translator is also provided. For two dimensional imaging the substrate is translated in one dimension while the scanning mirror scans the beam in a second dimension. For a high throughput scanner, stacks of substrates are loaded onto a conveyor belt from a tray feeder.

  2. High-throughput profiling of tissue and tissue model microarrays: Combined transmitted light and 3-color fluorescence digital pathology

    PubMed Central

    Nederlof, Michel; Watanabe, Shigeo; Burnip, Bill; Taylor, D. Lansing; Critchley-Thorne, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    For many years pathologists have used Hematoxylin and Eosin (H&E), single marker immunohistochemistry (IHC) and in situ hybridization with manual analysis by microscopy or at best simple digital imaging. There is a growing trend to update pathology to a digital workflow to improve objectivity and productivity, as has been done in radiology. There is also a need for tissue-based multivariate biomarker assays to improve the accuracy of diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive testing. Multivariate tests are not compatible with the traditional single marker, manual analysis pathology methods but instead require a digital platform with brightfield and fluorescence imaging, quantitative image analysis, and informatics. Here we describe the use of the Hamamatsu NanoZoomer Digital Pathology slide scanner with HCImage software for combined brightfield and multiplexed fluorescence biomarker analysis and highlight its applications in biomarker research and pathology testing. This combined approach will be an important aid to pathologists in making critical diagnoses. PMID:22200032

  3. Development and implementation of a miniaturized high-throughput time-resolved fluorescence energy transfer assay to identify small molecule inhibitors of polo-like kinase 1.

    PubMed

    Sharlow, Elizabeth R; Leimgruber, Stephanie; Shun, Tong Ying; Lazo, John S

    2007-12-01

    Polo-like kinase (Plk) 1 is a key enzyme involved in regulating the mammalian cell cycle that is also a validated anticancer drug target. Nonetheless, there are relatively few readily available potent and selective small molecule inhibitors of Plk1. To increase the availability of pharmacologically valuable Plk1 inhibitors, we describe herein the development, variability assessment, validation, and implementation of a 384-well automated, miniaturized high-throughput time-resolved fluorescence energy transfer screening assay designed to identify Plk1 kinase inhibitors. Using a small molecule library of pharmaceutically active compounds to gauge high-throughput assay robustness and reproducibility, we found nine general kinase inhibitors, including H-89, which was selected as the minimum control. We then interrogated a 97,101 compound library from the National Institutes of Health repository for small molecule inhibitors of Plk1 kinase activity. The initial primary hit rate in a single 10 microM concentration format was 0.21%. Hit compounds were subjected to concentration-response confirmation and interference assays. Identified in the screen were seven compounds with 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) values below 1 microM, 20 compounds with IC50 values between 1 microM and 5 microM, and eight compounds with IC50 values between 5 and 10 microM, which could be assigned to seven distinct chemotype classes. Hit compounds were also examined for their ability to inhibit other kinases such as protein kinase D, focal adhesion kinase, rho-associated coiled coil protein kinase 2, c-jun NH2-terminal kinase 3, and protein kinase A via experimentation or data-mining. These compounds should be useful as probes for the biological activity of Plk1 and as leads for the development of new selective inhibitors of Plk1. PMID:18181689

  4. High-throughput detection of food-borne pathogenic bacteria using oligonucleotide microarray with quantum dots as fluorescent labels.

    PubMed

    Huang, Aihua; Qiu, Zhigang; Jin, Min; Shen, Zhiqiang; Chen, Zhaoli; Wang, Xinwei; Li, Jun-Wen

    2014-08-18

    Bacterial pathogens are mostly responsible for food-borne diseases, and there is still substantial room for improvement in the effective detection of these organisms. In the present study, we explored a new method to detect target pathogens easily and rapidly with high sensitivity and specificity. This method uses an oligonucleotide microarray combined with quantum dots as fluorescent labels. Oligonucleotide probes targeting the 16SrRNA gene were synthesized to create an oligonucleotide microarray. The PCR products labeled with biotin were subsequently hybridized using an oligonucleotide microarray. Following incubation with CdSe/ZnS quantum dots coated with streptavidin, fluorescent signals were detected with a PerkinElmer Gx Microarray Scanner. The results clearly showed specific hybridization profiles corresponding to the bacterial species assessed. Two hundred and sixteen strains of food-borne bacterial pathogens, including standard strains and isolated strains from food samples, were used to test the specificity, stability, and sensitivity of the microarray system. We found that the oligonucleotide microarray combined with quantum dots used as fluorescent labels can successfully discriminate the bacterial organisms at the genera or species level, with high specificity and stability as well as a sensitivity of 10 colony forming units (CFU)/mL of pure culture. We further tested 105 mock-contaminated food samples and achieved consistent results as those obtained from traditional biochemical methods. Together, these results indicate that the quantum dot-based oligonucleotide microarray has the potential to be a powerful tool in the detection and identification of pathogenic bacteria in foods. PMID:24927399

  5. Rapid high-throughput assessment of aerobic bacteria in complex samples by fluorescence-based oxygen respirometry.

    PubMed

    O'Mahony, Fiach C; Papkovsky, Dmitri B

    2006-02-01

    A simple method has been developed for the analysis of aerobic bacteria in complex samples such as broth and food homogenates. It employs commercial phosphorescent oxygen-sensitive probes to monitor oxygen consumption of samples containing bacteria using standard microtiter plates and fluorescence plate readers. As bacteria grow in aqueous medium, at certain points they begin to deplete dissolved oxygen, which is seen as an increase in probe fluorescence above baseline signal. The time required to reach threshold signal is used to either enumerate bacteria based on a predetermined calibration or to assess the effects of various effectors on the growth of test bacteria by comparison with an untreated control. This method allows for the sensitive (down to a single cell), rapid (0.5 to 12 h) enumeration of aerobic bacteria without the need to conduct lengthy (48 to 72 h) and tedious colony counts on agar plates. It also allows for screening a wide range of chemical and environmental samples for their toxicity. These assays have been validated with different bacteria, including Escherichia coli, Micrococcus luteus, and Pseudomonas fluorescens, with the enumeration of total viable counts in broth and industrial food samples (packaged ham, chicken, and mince meat), and comparison with established agar plating and optical-density-at-600-nm assays has been given. PMID:16461677

  6. High-throughput fluorescence screening assay for the identification and comparison of antimicrobial peptides' activity on various yeast species.

    PubMed

    Kodedová, Marie; Sychrová, Hana

    2016-09-10

    New antifungal compounds that circumvent the resistance of the pathogen by directly damaging yeast cell surface structures are promising agents for the treatment of fungal infections, due to their different mechanism of action from current clinically used antifungal drugs. We present here a rapid and cost-effective fluorescence method suitable for identifying new potent drugs that directly target yeast cell surface structures, causing cell permeabilization and thus bypassing the multidrug resistance mechanisms of pathogens. The fluorescence assay enabled us to detect with high sensitivity damage to the Candida plasma membrane (its hyperpolarization and permeabilization) as a result of short-term exposure to the antifungal compounds. Results can be obtained in 1-2h with minimal effort and consumption of the tested compounds, also 96 samples can be analysed simultaneously. We used this method to study antimicrobial peptides isolated from the venom of bees and their synthetic analogs, compare the potency of the peptides and determine their minimal effective concentrations. The antimicrobial peptides were able to kill yeast cells at low concentrations within a 15-min treatment, the LL-III peptide exhibited a broad spectrum of antifungal activity on various Saccharomyces, pathogenic Candida and osmotolerant yeast species. PMID:27369550

  7. Automatic Tumor-Stroma Separation in Fluorescence TMAs Enables the Quantitative High-Throughput Analysis of Multiple Cancer Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Lahrmann, Bernd; Halama, Niels; Sinn, Hans-Peter; Schirmacher, Peter; Jaeger, Dirk; Grabe, Niels

    2011-01-01

    The upcoming quantification and automation in biomarker based histological tumor evaluation will require computational methods capable of automatically identifying tumor areas and differentiating them from the stroma. As no single generally applicable tumor biomarker is available, pathology routinely uses morphological criteria as a spatial reference system. We here present and evaluate a method capable of performing the classification in immunofluorescence histological slides solely using a DAPI background stain. Due to the restriction to a single color channel this is inherently challenging. We formed cell graphs based on the topological distribution of the tissue cell nuclei and extracted the corresponding graph features. By using topological, morphological and intensity based features we could systematically quantify and compare the discrimination capability individual features contribute to the overall algorithm. We here show that when classifying fluorescence tissue slides in the DAPI channel, morphological and intensity based features clearly outpace topological ones which have been used exclusively in related previous approaches. We assembled the 15 best features to train a support vector machine based on Keratin stained tumor areas. On a test set of TMAs with 210 cores of triple negative breast cancers our classifier was able to distinguish between tumor and stroma tissue with a total overall accuracy of 88%. Our method yields first results on the discrimination capability of features groups which is essential for an automated tumor diagnostics. Also, it provides an objective spatial reference system for the multiplex analysis of biomarkers in fluorescence immunohistochemistry. PMID:22164226

  8. Evaluation of Impermeant, DNA-Binding Dye Fluorescence as a Real-Time Readout of Eukaryotic Cell Toxicity in a High Throughput Screening Format

    PubMed Central

    Chiaraviglio, Lucius

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Interpretation of high throughput screening (HTS) data in cell-based assays may be confounded by cytotoxic properties of screening compounds. Therefore, assessing cell toxicity in real time during the HTS process itself would be highly advantageous. Here, we investigate the potential of putatively impermeant, fluorescent, DNA-binding dyes to give cell toxicity readout during HTS. Amongst 19 DNA-binding dyes examined, three classes were identified that were (1) permeant, (2) cytotoxic, or (3) neither permeant nor cytotoxic during 3-day incubation with a macrophage cell line. In the last class, four dyes (SYTOX Green, CellTox Green, GelGreen, and EvaGreen) gave highly robust cytotoxicity data in 384-well screening plates. As proof of principle, successful combination with a luminescence-based assay in HTS format was demonstrated. Here, both intracellular growth of Legionella pneumophila (luminescence) and host cell viability (SYTOX Green exclusion) were assayed in the same screening well. Incorporation of membrane-impermeant, DNA-binding, fluorescent dyes in HTS assays should prove useful by allowing evaluation of cytotoxicity in real time, eliminating reagent addition steps and effort associated with endpoint cell viability analysis, and reducing the need for follow-up cytotoxicity screening. PMID:24831788

  9. High-throughput drug profiling with voltage- and calcium-sensitive fluorescent probes in human iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Bedut, Stephane; Seminatore-Nole, Christine; Lamamy, Veronique; Caignard, Sarah; Boutin, Jean A; Nosjean, Olivier; Stephan, Jean-Philippe; Coge, Francis

    2016-07-01

    Cardiomyocytes derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) or induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are increasingly used for in vitro assays and represent an interesting opportunity to increase the data throughput for drug development. In this work, we describe a 96-well recording of synchronous electrical activities from spontaneously beating hiPSC-derived cardiomyocyte monolayers. The signal was obtained with a fast-imaging plate reader using a submillisecond-responding membrane potential recording assay, FluoVolt, based on a newly derived voltage-sensitive fluorescent dye. In our conditions, the toxicity of the dye was moderate and compatible with episodic recordings for >3 h. We show that the waveforms recorded from a whole well or from a single cell-sized zone are equivalent and make available critical functional parameters that are usually accessible only with gold standard techniques like intracellular microelectrode recording. This approach allows accurate identification of the electrophysiological effects of reference drugs on the different phases of the cardiac action potential as follows: fast depolarization (lidocaine), early repolarization (nifedipine, Bay K8644, and veratridine), late repolarization (dofetilide), and diastolic slow depolarization (ivabradine). Furthermore, the data generated with the FluoVolt dye can be pertinently complemented with a calcium-sensitive dye for deeper characterization of the pharmacological responses. In a semiautomated plate reader, the two probes used simultaneously in 96-well plates provide an easy and powerful multiparametric assay to rapidly and precisely evaluate the cardiotropic profile of compounds for drug discovery or cardiac safety. PMID:27199128

  10. High throughput protein production screening

    DOEpatents

    Beernink, Peter T.; Coleman, Matthew A.; Segelke, Brent W.

    2009-09-08

    Methods, compositions, and kits for the cell-free production and analysis of proteins are provided. The invention allows for the production of proteins from prokaryotic sequences or eukaryotic sequences, including human cDNAs using PCR and IVT methods and detecting the proteins through fluorescence or immunoblot techniques. This invention can be used to identify optimized PCR and WT conditions, codon usages and mutations. The methods are readily automated and can be used for high throughput analysis of protein expression levels, interactions, and functional states.

  11. Homogeneous Time-Resolved Fluorescence-Based Assay to Monitor Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase Signaling in a High-Throughput Format

    PubMed Central

    Ayoub, Mohammed Akli; Trebaux, Julien; Vallaghe, Julie; Charrier-Savournin, Fabienne; Al-Hosaini, Khaled; Gonzalez Moya, Arturo; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Pfleger, Kevin D. G.; Trinquet, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs) are key components of multiple important cell signaling pathways regulating diverse biological responses. This signaling is characterized by phosphorylation cascades leading to ERK1/2 activation and promoted by various cell surface receptors including G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). We report the development of a new cell-based Phospho-ERK1/2 assay (designated Phospho-ERK), which is a sandwich proximity-based assay using the homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence technology. We have validated the assay on endogenously expressed ERK1/2 activated by the epidermal growth factor as a prototypical RTK, as well as various GPCRs belonging to different classes and coupling to different heterotrimeric G proteins. The assay was successfully miniaturized in 384-well plates using various cell lines endogenously, transiently, or stably expressing the different receptors. The validation was performed for agonists, antagonists, and inhibitors in dose–response as well as kinetic analysis, and the signaling and pharmacological properties of the different receptors were reproduced. Furthermore, the determination of a Z′-factor value of 0.7 indicates the potential of the Phospho-ERK assay for high-throughput screening of compounds that may modulate ERK1/2 signaling. Finally, our study is of great interest in the current context of investigating ERK1/2 signaling with respect to the emerging concepts of biased ligands, G protein-dependent/independent ERK1/2 activation, and functional transactivation between GPCRs and RTKs, illustrating the importance of considering the ERK1/2 pathway in cell signaling PMID:25002860

  12. High-throughput Tetrad Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ludlow, Catherine L.; Scott, Adrian C.; Cromie, Gareth A.; Jeffery, Eric W.; Sirr, Amy; May, Patrick; Lin, Jake; Gilbert, Teresa L.; Hays, Michelle; Dudley, Aimée M.

    2013-01-01

    Tetrad analysis has been a gold standard genetic technique for several decades. Unfortunately, the manual nature of the process has relegated its application to small-scale studies and limited its integration with rapidly evolving DNA sequencing technologies. We have developed a rapid, high-throughput method, called Barcode Enabled Sequencing of Tetrads (BEST), that replaces the manual processes of isolating, disrupting and spacing tetrads. BEST uses a meiosis-specific GFP fusion protein to isolate tetrads by fluorescence-activated cell sorting and molecular barcodes that are read during genotyping to identify spores derived from the same tetrad. Maintaining tetrad information allows accurate inference of missing genetic markers and full genotypes of missing (and presumably nonviable) individuals. By removing the bottleneck of manual dissection, hundreds or even thousands of tetrads can be isolated in minutes. We demonstrate the approach in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, but BEST is readily transferable to microorganisms in which meiotic mapping is significantly more laborious. PMID:23666411

  13. High-Throughput Proteomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhaorui; Wu, Si; Stenoien, David L.; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana

    2014-06-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS)-based high-throughput proteomics is the core technique for large-scale protein characterization. Due to the extreme complexity of proteomes, sophisticated separation techniques and advanced MS instrumentation have been developed to extend coverage and enhance dynamic range and sensitivity. In this review, we discuss the separation and prefractionation techniques applied for large-scale analysis in both bottom-up (i.e., peptide-level) and top-down (i.e., protein-level) proteomics. Different approaches for quantifying peptides or intact proteins, including label-free and stable-isotope-labeling strategies, are also discussed. In addition, we present a brief overview of different types of mass analyzers and fragmentation techniques as well as selected emerging techniques.

  14. High throughput continuous cryopump

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, C.A.

    1986-01-01

    A cryocondensation pump with a unique regeneration mechanism that allows continuous operation has been constructed and tested. The pump features a device referred to as the ''Snail'' which removes the cryofrost layer as it is moved over the pumping surfaces. A forepump pumps the sublimed gas generated inside the Snail. The compression ratio of the pump is the ratio of the cryopump speed to the leakage conductance of the Snail. Deuterium had been pumped continuously at 30 torr.L/s at a speed of 2000 L/s and a compression ratio of 100. The pump, being all metal sealed and free of lubricating fluids, has many potential applications where untraclean high throughput pumping is desirable. Since the pump regenerates on a time scale of 60 seconds, the inventory in the pump is minimized - an important consideration when pumping radioactive materials such as tritium. Test data and a videotape of the Snail removing the cryofrost will be shown.

  15. Determination of urine cofilin-1 level in acute kidney injury using a high-throughput localized surface plasmon-coupled fluorescence biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ying-Feng; Chao, Cheng-Han; Lin, Lih-Yuan; Tsai, Cheng-Han; Chou, Chien; Lee, Yi-Jang

    2014-01-01

    The actin-depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin protein family has been reported to be associated with ischemia-induced renal disorders. We examine whether cofilin-1 is associated with acute kidney injury (AKI) using human urine samples. We exploited a 96-well based high-throughput biosensor that uses gold nanoparticles and a sandwich immunoassay to detect the urine cofilin-1 level of AKI patients. The mean urine cofilin-1 level of the AKI patients (n=37 from 47 cases analyzed) was twofold higher than that of healthy adults (n=21 from 29 cases analyzed). The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve showed that cofilin-1 was acceptable for discriminating AKI patients from healthy adults. However, an increase of the sample size is required to conclude the importance of urine cofilin-1 on AKI diagnosis, and the high-throughput ultrasensitive biosensor used in this study would greatly accelerate the measurement of urine cofilin-1 in an increased sample size.

  16. A semi-automated method for purification of milligram quantities of proteins on the QIAcube

    PubMed Central

    McGraw, J; Tatipelli, VK; Traore, MC; Feyijinmi, O; Eangoor, P; Lane, S; Stollar, EJ

    2015-01-01

    A growing number of studies require the purification of multiple proteins simultaneously and the development of simple economical high-throughput purification methods is essential. We have tested the purification of two related proteins in a variety of conditions to benchmark the semi-automated affinity chromatography method for the QIAcube that we have developed. We find that this new QIAcube method can successfully purify milligram quantities of proteins with minimal user involvement and performs as well as methods based on gravity. The method could easily be adapted to other chromatography resins and should prove to be a versatile method for optimizing protein expression or purification conditions for multiple proteins while obtaining sufficient amounts for subsequent biochemical analyses. PMID:24508590

  17. Path Planning for Semi-automated Simulated Robotic Neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Danying; Gong, Yuanzheng; Hannaford, Blake; Seibel, Eric J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper considers the semi-automated robotic surgical procedure for removing the brain tumor margins, where the manual operation is a tedious and time-consuming task for surgeons. We present robust path planning methods for robotic ablation of tumor residues in various shapes, which are represented in point-clouds instead of analytical geometry. Along with the path plans, corresponding metrics are also delivered to the surgeon for selecting the optimal candidate in the automated robotic ablation. The selected path plan is then executed and tested on RAVEN™ II surgical robot platform as part of the semi-automated robotic brain tumor ablation surgery in a simulated tissue phantom. PMID:26705501

  18. Accurate and semi-automated analysis of bacterial association with mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Murphy, C M; Paré, S; Galea, G; Simpson, J C; Smith, S G J

    2016-03-01

    To efficiently and accurately quantify the interactions of bacteria with mammalian cells, a reliable fluorescence microscopy assay was developed. Bacteria were engineered to become rapidly and stably fluorescent using Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) expressed from an inducible Tet promoter. Upon application of the fluorescent bacteria onto a monolayer, extracellular bacteria could be discriminated from intracellular bacteria by antibody staining and microscopy. All bacteria could be detected by GFP expression. External bacteria stained orange, whereas internalised bacteria did not. Internalised bacteria could thus be discriminated from external bacteria by virtue of being green but not orange fluorescent. Image acquisition and counting of various fluorophore-stained entities were accomplished with a high-content screening platform. This allowed for semi-automated and accurate counting of intracellular and extracellular bacteria. PMID:26769557

  19. CellSegm - a MATLAB toolbox for high-throughput 3D cell segmentation.

    PubMed

    Hodneland, Erlend; Kögel, Tanja; Frei, Dominik Michael; Gerdes, Hans-Hermann; Lundervold, Arvid

    2013-01-01

    : The application of fluorescence microscopy in cell biology often generates a huge amount of imaging data. Automated whole cell segmentation of such data enables the detection and analysis of individual cells, where a manual delineation is often time consuming, or practically not feasible. Furthermore, compared to manual analysis, automation normally has a higher degree of reproducibility. CellSegm, the software presented in this work, is a Matlab based command line software toolbox providing an automated whole cell segmentation of images showing surface stained cells, acquired by fluorescence microscopy. It has options for both fully automated and semi-automated cell segmentation. Major algorithmic steps are: (i) smoothing, (ii) Hessian-based ridge enhancement, (iii) marker-controlled watershed segmentation, and (iv) feature-based classfication of cell candidates. Using a wide selection of image recordings and code snippets, we demonstrate that CellSegm has the ability to detect various types of surface stained cells in 3D. After detection and outlining of individual cells, the cell candidates can be subject to software based analysis, specified and programmed by the end-user, or they can be analyzed by other software tools. A segmentation of tissue samples with appropriate characteristics is also shown to be resolvable in CellSegm. The command-line interface of CellSegm facilitates scripting of the separate tools, all implemented in Matlab, offering a high degree of flexibility and tailored workflows for the end-user. The modularity and scripting capabilities of CellSegm enable automated workflows and quantitative analysis of microscopic data, suited for high-throughput image based screening. PMID:23938087

  20. High throughput screening technologies for ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hai-bo; Li, Min; Wang, Wei-ping; Wang, Xiao-liang

    2016-01-01

    Ion channels are involved in a variety of fundamental physiological processes, and their malfunction causes numerous human diseases. Therefore, ion channels represent a class of attractive drug targets and a class of important off-targets for in vitro pharmacological profiling. In the past decades, the rapid progress in developing functional assays and instrumentation has enabled high throughput screening (HTS) campaigns on an expanding list of channel types. Chronologically, HTS methods for ion channels include the ligand binding assay, flux-based assay, fluorescence-based assay, and automated electrophysiological assay. In this review we summarize the current HTS technologies for different ion channel classes and their applications. PMID:26657056

  1. Semi-automated microplate monitoring of protein polymerization and aggregation.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Veronica M; Rowlett, Veronica W; Margolin, William; Morano, Kevin A

    2016-09-01

    Static light scattering (SLS) is a commonly used technique for monitoring dynamics of high molecular weight protein complexes such as protein oligomers or aggregates. However, traditional methods are limited to testing a single condition and typically require large amounts of protein and specialized equipment. We show that a standard microplate reader can be used to characterize the molecular dynamics of different types of protein complexes, with the multiple advantages of microscale experimental volumes, semi-automated protocols and highly parallel processing. PMID:27251433

  2. Semi-Automated, Occupationally Safe Immunofluorescence Microtip Sensor for Rapid Detection of Mycobacterium Cells in Sputum

    PubMed Central

    Soelberg, Scott D.; Weigel, Kris M.; Hiraiwa, Morgan; Cairns, Andrew; Lee, Hyun-Boo; Furlong, Clement E.; Oh, Kieseok; Lee, Kyong-Hoon; Gao, Dayong; Chung, Jae-Hyun; Cangelosi, Gerard A.

    2014-01-01

    An occupationally safe (biosafe) sputum liquefaction protocol was developed for use with a semi-automated antibody-based microtip immunofluorescence sensor. The protocol effectively liquefied sputum and inactivated microorganisms including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, while preserving the antibody-binding activity of Mycobacterium cell surface antigens. Sputum was treated with a synergistic chemical-thermal protocol that included moderate concentrations of NaOH and detergent at 60°C for 5 to 10 min. Samples spiked with M. tuberculosis complex cells showed approximately 106-fold inactivation of the pathogen after treatment. Antibody binding was retained post-treatment, as determined by analysis with a microtip immunosensor. The sensor correctly distinguished between Mycobacterium species and other cell types naturally present in biosafe-treated sputum, with a detection limit of 100 CFU/mL for M. tuberculosis, in a 30-minute sample-to-result process. The microtip device was also semi-automated and shown to be compatible with low-cost, LED-powered fluorescence microscopy. The device and biosafe sputum liquefaction method opens the door to rapid detection of tuberculosis in settings with limited laboratory infrastructure. PMID:24465845

  3. Semi-Automated Digital Image Analysis of Pick's Disease and TDP-43 Proteinopathy.

    PubMed

    Irwin, David J; Byrne, Matthew D; McMillan, Corey T; Cooper, Felicia; Arnold, Steven E; Lee, Edward B; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M; Xie, Sharon X; Lee, Virginia M-Y; Grossman, Murray; Trojanowski, John Q

    2016-01-01

    Digital image analysis of histology sections provides reliable, high-throughput methods for neuropathological studies but data is scant in frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), which has an added challenge of study due to morphologically diverse pathologies. Here, we describe a novel method of semi-automated digital image analysis in FTLD subtypes including: Pick's disease (PiD, n=11) with tau-positive intracellular inclusions and neuropil threads, and TDP-43 pathology type C (FTLD-TDPC, n=10), defined by TDP-43-positive aggregates predominantly in large dystrophic neurites. To do this, we examined three FTLD-associated cortical regions: mid-frontal gyrus (MFG), superior temporal gyrus (STG) and anterior cingulate gyrus (ACG) by immunohistochemistry. We used a color deconvolution process to isolate signal from the chromogen and applied both object detection and intensity thresholding algorithms to quantify pathological burden. We found object-detection algorithms had good agreement with gold-standard manual quantification of tau- and TDP-43-positive inclusions. Our sampling method was reliable across three separate investigators and we obtained similar results in a pilot analysis using open-source software. Regional comparisons using these algorithms finds differences in regional anatomic disease burden between PiD and FTLD-TDP not detected using traditional ordinal scale data, suggesting digital image analysis is a powerful tool for clinicopathological studies in morphologically diverse FTLD syndromes. PMID:26538548

  4. High-throughput tetrad analysis.

    PubMed

    Ludlow, Catherine L; Scott, Adrian C; Cromie, Gareth A; Jeffery, Eric W; Sirr, Amy; May, Patrick; Lin, Jake; Gilbert, Teresa L; Hays, Michelle; Dudley, Aimée M

    2013-07-01

    Tetrad analysis has been a gold-standard genetic technique for several decades. Unfortunately, the need to manually isolate, disrupt and space tetrads has relegated its application to small-scale studies and limited its integration with high-throughput DNA sequencing technologies. We have developed a rapid, high-throughput method, called barcode-enabled sequencing of tetrads (BEST), that uses (i) a meiosis-specific GFP fusion protein to isolate tetrads by FACS and (ii) molecular barcodes that are read during genotyping to identify spores derived from the same tetrad. Maintaining tetrad information allows accurate inference of missing genetic markers and full genotypes of missing (and presumably nonviable) individuals. An individual researcher was able to isolate over 3,000 yeast tetrads in 3 h, an output equivalent to that of almost 1 month of manual dissection. BEST is transferable to other microorganisms for which meiotic mapping is significantly more laborious. PMID:23666411

  5. High-throughput continuous cryopump

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, C.A.

    1986-01-01

    A cryopump with a unique method of regeneration which allows continuous operation at high throughput has been constructed and tested. Deuterium was pumped continuously at a throughput of 30 Torr.L/s at a speed of 2000 L/s and a compression ratio of 200. Argon was pumped at a throughput of 60 Torr.L/s at a speed of 1275 L/s. To produce continuous operation of the pump, a method of regeneration that does not thermally cycle the pump is employed. A small chamber (the ''snail'') passes over the pumping surface and removes the frost from it either by mechanical action with a scraper or by local heating. The material removed is topologically in a secondary vacuum system with low conductance into the primary vacuum; thus, the exhaust can be pumped at pressures up to an effective compression ratio determined by the ratio of the pumping speed to the leakage conductance of the snail. The pump, which is all-metal-sealed and dry and which regenerates every 60 s, would be an ideal system for pumping tritium. Potential fusion applications are for mpmp limiters, for repeating pneumatic pellet injection lines, and for the centrifuge pellet injector spin tank, all of which will require pumping tritium at high throughput. Industrial applications requiring ultraclean pumping of corrosive gases at high throughput, such as the reactive ion etch semiconductor process, may also be feasible.

  6. Development of a sensitive and reliable high performance liquid chromatography method with fluorescence detection for high-throughput analysis of multi-class mycotoxins in Coix seed.

    PubMed

    Kong, Wei-Jun; Li, Jun-Yuan; Qiu, Feng; Wei, Jian-He; Xiao, Xiao-He; Zheng, Yuguo; Yang, Mei-Hua

    2013-10-17

    As an edible and medicinal plant, Coix seed is readily contaminated by more than one group of mycotoxins resulting in potential risk to human health. A reliable and sensitive method has been developed to determine seven mycotoxins (aflatoxins B1, B2, G1, G2, zearalenone, α-zearalenol, and β-zearalenol) simultaneously in 10 batches of Coix seed marketed in China. The method is based on a rapid ultrasound-assisted solid-liquid extraction (USLE) using methanol/water (80/20) followed by immunoaffinity column (IAC) clean-up, on-line photochemical derivatization (PCD), and high performance liquid chromatography coupled with fluorescence detection (HPLC-FLD). Careful optimization of extraction, clean-up, separation and detection conditions was accomplished to increase sample throughput and to attain rapid separation and sensitive detection. Method validation was performed by analyzing samples spiked at three different concentrations for the seven mycotoxins. Recoveries were from 73.5% to 107.3%, with relative standard deviations (RSDs) lower than 7.7%. The intra- and inter-day precisions, expressed as RSDs, were lower than 4% for all studied analytes. Limits of detection and quantification ranged from 0.01 to 50.2 μg kg(-1), and from 0.04 to 125.5 μg kg(-1), respectively, which were below the tolerance levels for mycotoxins set by the European Union. Samples that tested positive were further analyzed by HPLC tandem electrospray ionization mass spectrometry for confirmatory purposes. This is the first application of USLE-IAC-HPLC-PCD-FLD for detecting the occurrence of multi-class mycotoxins in Coix seed. PMID:24091376

  7. Toward high-throughput genotyping: dynamic and automatic software for manipulating large-scale genotype data using fluorescently labeled dinucleotide markers.

    PubMed

    Li, J L; Deng, H; Lai, D B; Xu, F; Chen, J; Gao, G; Recker, R R; Deng, H W

    2001-07-01

    To efficiently manipulate large amounts of genotype data generated with fluorescently labeled dinucleotide markers, we developed a Microsoft database management system, named. offers several advantages. First, it accommodates the dynamic nature of the accumulations of genotype data during the genotyping process; some data need to be confirmed or replaced by repeat lab procedures. By using, the raw genotype data can be imported easily and continuously and incorporated into the database during the genotyping process that may continue over an extended period of time in large projects. Second, almost all of the procedures are automatic, including autocomparison of the raw data read by different technicians from the same gel, autoadjustment among the allele fragment-size data from cross-runs or cross-platforms, autobinning of alleles, and autocompilation of genotype data for suitable programs to perform inheritance check in pedigrees. Third, provides functions to track electrophoresis gel files to locate gel or sample sources for any resultant genotype data, which is extremely helpful for double-checking consistency of raw and final data and for directing repeat experiments. In addition, the user-friendly graphic interface of renders processing of large amounts of data much less labor-intensive. Furthermore, has built-in mechanisms to detect some genotyping errors and to assess the quality of genotype data that then are summarized in the statistic reports automatically generated by. The can easily handle >500,000 genotype data entries, a number more than sufficient for typical whole-genome linkage studies. The modules and programs we developed for the can be extended to other database platforms, such as Microsoft SQL server, if the capability to handle still greater quantities of genotype data simultaneously is desired. PMID:11435414

  8. Semi-automated Image Processing for Preclinical Bioluminescent Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Slavine, Nikolai V; McColl, Roderick W

    2015-01-01

    Objective Bioluminescent imaging is a valuable noninvasive technique for investigating tumor dynamics and specific biological molecular events in living animals to better understand the effects of human disease in animal models. The purpose of this study was to develop and test a strategy behind automated methods for bioluminescence image processing from the data acquisition to obtaining 3D images. Methods In order to optimize this procedure a semi-automated image processing approach with multi-modality image handling environment was developed. To identify a bioluminescent source location and strength we used the light flux detected on the surface of the imaged object by CCD cameras. For phantom calibration tests and object surface reconstruction we used MLEM algorithm. For internal bioluminescent sources we used the diffusion approximation with balancing the internal and external intensities on the boundary of the media and then determined an initial order approximation for the photon fluence we subsequently applied a novel iterative deconvolution method to obtain the final reconstruction result. Results We find that the reconstruction techniques successfully used the depth-dependent light transport approach and semi-automated image processing to provide a realistic 3D model of the lung tumor. Our image processing software can optimize and decrease the time of the volumetric imaging and quantitative assessment. Conclusion The data obtained from light phantom and lung mouse tumor images demonstrate the utility of the image reconstruction algorithms and semi-automated approach for bioluminescent image processing procedure. We suggest that the developed image processing approach can be applied to preclinical imaging studies: characteristics of tumor growth, identify metastases, and potentially determine the effectiveness of cancer treatment. PMID:26618187

  9. Automated cognome construction and semi-automated hypothesis generation.

    PubMed

    Voytek, Jessica B; Voytek, Bradley

    2012-06-30

    Modern neuroscientific research stands on the shoulders of countless giants. PubMed alone contains more than 21 million peer-reviewed articles with 40-50,000 more published every month. Understanding the human brain, cognition, and disease will require integrating facts from dozens of scientific fields spread amongst millions of studies locked away in static documents, making any such integration daunting, at best. The future of scientific progress will be aided by bridging the gap between the millions of published research articles and modern databases such as the Allen brain atlas (ABA). To that end, we have analyzed the text of over 3.5 million scientific abstracts to find associations between neuroscientific concepts. From the literature alone, we show that we can blindly and algorithmically extract a "cognome": relationships between brain structure, function, and disease. We demonstrate the potential of data-mining and cross-platform data-integration with the ABA by introducing two methods for semi-automated hypothesis generation. By analyzing statistical "holes" and discrepancies in the literature we can find understudied or overlooked research paths. That is, we have added a layer of semi-automation to a part of the scientific process itself. This is an important step toward fundamentally incorporating data-mining algorithms into the scientific method in a manner that is generalizable to any scientific or medical field. PMID:22584238

  10. High-Throughput Sequencing Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Reuter, Jason A.; Spacek, Damek; Snyder, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The human genome sequence has profoundly altered our understanding of biology, human diversity and disease. The path from the first draft sequence to our nascent era of personal genomes and genomic medicine has been made possible only because of the extraordinary advancements in DNA sequencing technologies over the past ten years. Here, we discuss commonly used high-throughput sequencing platforms, the growing array of sequencing assays developed around them as well as the challenges facing current sequencing platforms and their clinical application. PMID:26000844

  11. Semi-automated object tracking methods in biological imaging.

    PubMed

    Davis, Michael A; Praěský, Ondřej; Sysko, Laura R

    2015-01-01

    Time-lapse imaging is a rich data source offering potential kinetic information of cellular activity and behavior. Tracking and extracting measurements of objects from time-lapse datasets are challenges that result from the complexity and dynamics of each object's motion and intensity or the appearance of new objects in the field of view. A wide range of strategies for proper data sampling, object detection, image analysis, and post-analysis interpretation are available. Theory and methods for single-particle tracking, spot detection, and object linking are discussed in this unit, as well as examples with step-by-step procedures for utilizing semi-automated software and visualization tools for achieving tracking results and interpreting this output. PMID:25559222

  12. Observer performance in semi-automated microbleed detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuijf, Hugo J.; Brundel, Manon; de Bresser, Jeroen; Viergever, Max A.; Biessels, Geert Jan; Geerlings, Mirjam I.; Vincken, Koen L.

    2013-03-01

    Cerebral microbleeds are small bleedings in the human brain, detectable with MRI. Microbleeds are associated with vascular disease and dementia. The number of studies involving microbleed detection is increasing rapidly. Visual rating is the current standard for detection, but is a time-consuming process, especially at high-resolution 7.0 T MR images, has limited reproducibility and is highly observer dependent. Recently, multiple techniques have been published for the semi-automated detection of microbleeds, attempting to overcome these problems. In the present study, a 7.0 T dual-echo gradient echo MR image was acquired in 18 participants with microbleeds from the SMART study. Two experienced observers identified 54 microbleeds in these participants, using a validated visual rating scale. The radial symmetry transform (RST) can be used for semi-automated detection of microbleeds in 7.0 T MR images. In the present study, the results of the RST were assessed by two observers and 47 microbleeds were identified: 35 true positives and 12 extra positives (microbleeds that were missed during visual rating). Hence, after scoring a total number of 66 microbleeds could be identified in the 18 participants. The use of the RST increased the average sensitivity of observers from 59% to 69%. More importantly, inter-observer agreement (ICC and Dice's coefficient) increased from 0.85 and 0.64 to 0.98 and 0.96, respectively. Furthermore, the required rating time was reduced from 30 to 2 minutes per participant. By fine-tuning the RST, sensitivities up to 90% can be achieved, at the cost of extra false positives.

  13. Fast semi-automated lesion demarcation in stroke

    PubMed Central

    de Haan, Bianca; Clas, Philipp; Juenger, Hendrik; Wilke, Marko; Karnath, Hans-Otto

    2015-01-01

    Lesion–behaviour mapping analyses require the demarcation of the brain lesion on each (usually transverse) slice of the individual stroke patient's brain image. To date, this is generally thought to be most precise when done manually, which is, however, both time-consuming and potentially observer-dependent. Fully automated lesion demarcation methods have been developed to address these issues, but these are often not practicable in acute stroke research where for each patient only a single image modality is available and the available image modality differs over patients. In the current study, we evaluated a semi-automated lesion demarcation approach, the so-called Clusterize algorithm, in acute stroke patients scanned in a range of common image modalities. Our results suggest that, compared to the standard of manual lesion demarcation, the semi-automated Clusterize algorithm is capable of significantly speeding up lesion demarcation in the most commonly used image modalities, without loss of either lesion demarcation precision or lesion demarcation reproducibility. For the three investigated acute datasets (CT, DWI, T2FLAIR), containing a total of 44 patient images obtained in a regular clinical setting at patient admission, the reduction in processing time was on average 17.8 min per patient and this advantage increased with increasing lesion volume (up to 60 min per patient for the largest lesion volumes in our datasets). Additionally, our results suggest that performance of the Clusterize algorithm in a chronic dataset with 11 T1 images was comparable to its performance in the acute datasets. We thus advocate the use of the Clusterize algorithm, integrated into a simple, freely available SPM toolbox, for the precise, reliable and fast preparation of imaging data for lesion–behaviour mapping analyses. PMID:26413473

  14. LeafJ: an ImageJ plugin for semi-automated leaf shape measurement.

    PubMed

    Maloof, Julin N; Nozue, Kazunari; Mumbach, Maxwell R; Palmer, Christine M

    2013-01-01

    High throughput phenotyping (phenomics) is a powerful tool for linking genes to their functions (see review and recent examples). Leaves are the primary photosynthetic organ, and their size and shape vary developmentally and environmentally within a plant. For these reasons studies on leaf morphology require measurement of multiple parameters from numerous leaves, which is best done by semi-automated phenomics tools. Canopy shade is an important environmental cue that affects plant architecture and life history; the suite of responses is collectively called the shade avoidance syndrome (SAS). Among SAS responses, shade induced leaf petiole elongation and changes in blade area are particularly useful as indices. To date, leaf shape programs (e.g. SHAPE, LAMINA, LeafAnalyzer, LEAFPROCESSOR) can measure leaf outlines and categorize leaf shapes, but can not output petiole length. Lack of large-scale measurement systems of leaf petioles has inhibited phenomics approaches to SAS research. In this paper, we describe a newly developed ImageJ plugin, called LeafJ, which can rapidly measure petiole length and leaf blade parameters of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. For the occasional leaf that required manual correction of the petiole/leaf blade boundary we used a touch-screen tablet. Further, leaf cell shape and leaf cell numbers are important determinants of leaf size. Separate from LeafJ we also present a protocol for using a touch-screen tablet for measuring cell shape, area, and size. Our leaf trait measurement system is not limited to shade-avoidance research and will accelerate leaf phenotyping of many mutants and screening plants by leaf phenotyping. PMID:23380664

  15. High-Throughput Analysis of Enzyme Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Guoxin Lu

    2007-12-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) techniques have been applied to many research fields nowadays. Robot microarray printing technique and automation microtiter handling technique allows HTS performing in both heterogeneous and homogeneous formats, with minimal sample required for each assay element. In this dissertation, new HTS techniques for enzyme activity analysis were developed. First, patterns of immobilized enzyme on nylon screen were detected by multiplexed capillary system. The imaging resolution is limited by the outer diameter of the capillaries. In order to get finer images, capillaries with smaller outer diameters can be used to form the imaging probe. Application of capillary electrophoresis allows separation of the product from the substrate in the reaction mixture, so that the product doesn't have to have different optical properties with the substrate. UV absorption detection allows almost universal detection for organic molecules. Thus, no modifications of either the substrate or the product molecules are necessary. This technique has the potential to be used in screening of local distribution variations of specific bio-molecules in a tissue or in screening of multiple immobilized catalysts. Another high-throughput screening technique is developed by directly monitoring the light intensity of the immobilized-catalyst surface using a scientific charge-coupled device (CCD). Briefly, the surface of enzyme microarray is focused onto a scientific CCD using an objective lens. By carefully choosing the detection wavelength, generation of product on an enzyme spot can be seen by the CCD. Analyzing the light intensity change over time on an enzyme spot can give information of reaction rate. The same microarray can be used for many times. Thus, high-throughput kinetic studies of hundreds of catalytic reactions are made possible. At last, we studied the fluorescence emission spectra of ADP and obtained the detection limits for ADP under three different

  16. Semi-Automated Segmentation of Microbes in Color Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Chandankumar K.; Liu, Feng-I.; Dazzo, Frank B.

    2003-01-01

    The goal of this work is to develop a system that can semi-automate the detection of multicolored foreground objects in digitized color images that also contain complex and very noisy backgrounds. Although considered a general problem of color image segmentation, our application is microbiology where various colored stains are used to reveal information on the microbes without cultivation. Instead of providing a simple threshold, the proposed system offers an interactive environment whereby the user chooses multiple sample points to define the range of color pixels comprising the foreground microbes of interest. The system then uses the color and spatial distances of these target points to segment the microbes from the confusing background of pixels whose RGB values lie outside the newly defined range and finally finds each cell's boundary using region-growing and mathematical morphology. Some other image processing methods are also applied to enhance the resultant image containing the colored microbes against a noise-free background. The prototype performs with 98% accuracy on a test set compared to ground truth data. The system described here will have many applications in image processing and analysis where one needs to segment typical pixel regions of similar but non-identical colors.

  17. A Semi-automated Abundance Survey of Ap Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Martin P.; Kurtz, Don; Elkin, Vladimir; Bruntt, Hans

    2015-08-01

    We have carried out an abundance analysis on the high-resolution spectra of approximately 350 Ap stars collected between 2007 and 2010 on the FEROS Echelle (Fibre-led, Extended Range, Echelle ) spectrograph housed at the 2.2-m telescope at European Southern Observatory at La Silla, Chile. We employed the VWA package (vsin I, wavelength shift, abundance analysis) for preliminary selection of spectral lines, and a semi-automated set of routines which we developed in the programming language IDL, to calculate the equivalent widths and abundances of ions of Iron and the rare earth elements Neodymium and Praseodymium using the WIDTH program and NEMO model atmospheres. Initial results are presented, which reinforce the correlation between iron abundance and effective temperature, from an over-abundance in the late Bp stars, to under-abundant in the early F stars. Results also suggest that the disequilibrium in abundances of the first and second ionisation stages of these ions in the rapidly oscillating Ap (roAp) stars may a consequence of the relatively cool temperatures of those stars, rather than a signature of pulsation.

  18. Semi-automated software service integration in virtual organisations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afsarmanesh, Hamideh; Sargolzaei, Mahdi; Shadi, Mahdieh

    2015-08-01

    To enhance their business opportunities, organisations involved in many service industries are increasingly active in pursuit of both online provision of their business services (BSs) and collaborating with others. Collaborative Networks (CNs) in service industry sector, however, face many challenges related to sharing and integration of their collection of provided BSs and their corresponding software services. Therefore, the topic of service interoperability for which this article introduces a framework is gaining momentum in research for supporting CNs. It contributes to generation of formal machine readable specification for business processes, aimed at providing their unambiguous definitions, as needed for developing their equivalent software services. The framework provides a model and implementation architecture for discovery and composition of shared services, to support the semi-automated development of integrated value-added services. In support of service discovery, a main contribution of this research is the formal representation of services' behaviour and applying desired service behaviour specified by users for automated matchmaking with other existing services. Furthermore, to support service integration, mechanisms are developed for automated selection of the most suitable service(s) according to a number of service quality aspects. Two scenario cases are presented, which exemplify several specific features related to service discovery and service integration aspects.

  19. Semi-Automated Discovery of Application Session Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Kannan, J.; Jung, J.; Paxson, V.; Koksal, C.

    2006-09-07

    While the problem of analyzing network traffic at the granularity of individual connections has seen considerable previous work and tool development, understanding traffic at a higher level---the structure of user-initiated sessions comprised of groups of related connections---remains much less explored. Some types of session structure, such as the coupling between an FTP control connection and the data connections it spawns, have prespecified forms, though the specifications do not guarantee how the forms appear in practice. Other types of sessions, such as a user reading email with a browser, only manifest empirically. Still other sessions might exist without us even knowing of their presence, such as a botnet zombie receiving instructions from its master and proceeding in turn to carry them out. We present algorithms rooted in the statistics of Poisson processes that can mine a large corpus of network connection logs to extract the apparent structure of application sessions embedded in the connections. Our methods are semi-automated in that we aim to present an analyst with high-quality information (expressed as regular expressions) reflecting different possible abstractions of an application's session structure. We develop and test our methods using traces from a large Internet site, finding diversity in the number of applications that manifest, their different session structures, and the presence of abnormal behavior. Our work has applications to traffic characterization and monitoring, source models for synthesizing network traffic, and anomaly detection.

  20. Automated Cognome Construction and Semi-automated Hypothesis Generation

    PubMed Central

    Voytek, Jessica B.; Voytek, Bradley

    2012-01-01

    Modern neuroscientific research stands on the shoulders of countless giants. PubMed alone contains more than 21 million peer-reviewed articles with 40–50,000 more published every month. Understanding the human brain, cognition, and disease will require integrating facts from dozens of scientific fields spread amongst millions of studies locked away in static documents, making any such integration daunting, at best. The future of scientific progress will be aided by bridging the gap between the millions of published research articles and modern databases such as the Allen Brain Atlas (ABA). To that end, we have analyzed the text of over 3.5 million scientific abstracts to find associations between neuroscientific concepts. From the literature alone, we show that we can blindly and algorithmically extract a “cognome”: relationships between brain structure, function, and disease. We demonstrate the potential of data-mining and cross-platform data-integration with the ABA by introducing two methods for semiautomated hypothesis generation. By analyzing statistical “holes” and discrepancies in the literature we can find understudied or overlooked research paths. That is, we have added a layer of semi-automation to a part of the scientific process itself. This is an important step toward fundamentally incorporating data-mining algorithms into the scientific method in a manner that is generalizable to any scientific or medical field. PMID:22584238

  1. Literature classification for semi-automated updating of biological knowledgebases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background As the output of biological assays increase in resolution and volume, the body of specialized biological data, such as functional annotations of gene and protein sequences, enables extraction of higher-level knowledge needed for practical application in bioinformatics. Whereas common types of biological data, such as sequence data, are extensively stored in biological databases, functional annotations, such as immunological epitopes, are found primarily in semi-structured formats or free text embedded in primary scientific literature. Results We defined and applied a machine learning approach for literature classification to support updating of TANTIGEN, a knowledgebase of tumor T-cell antigens. Abstracts from PubMed were downloaded and classified as either "relevant" or "irrelevant" for database update. Training and five-fold cross-validation of a k-NN classifier on 310 abstracts yielded classification accuracy of 0.95, thus showing significant value in support of data extraction from the literature. Conclusion We here propose a conceptual framework for semi-automated extraction of epitope data embedded in scientific literature using principles from text mining and machine learning. The addition of such data will aid in the transition of biological databases to knowledgebases. PMID:24564403

  2. High-Throughput Screening in Primary Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Punita; Ando, D. Michael; Daub, Aaron; Kaye, Julia A.; Finkbeiner, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Despite years of incremental progress in our understanding of diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), Huntington's disease (HD), and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), there are still no disease-modifying therapeutics. The discrepancy between the number of lead compounds and approved drugs may partially be a result of the methods used to generate the leads and highlights the need for new technology to obtain more detailed and physiologically relevant information on cellular processes in normal and diseased states. Our high-throughput screening (HTS) system in a primary neuron model can help address this unmet need. HTS allows scientists to assay thousands of conditions in a short period of time which can reveal completely new aspects of biology and identify potential therapeutics in the span of a few months when conventional methods could take years or fail all together. HTS in primary neurons combines the advantages of HTS with the biological relevance of intact, fully differentiated neurons which can capture the critical cellular events or homeostatic states that make neurons uniquely susceptible to disease-associated proteins. We detail methodologies of our primary neuron HTS assay workflow from sample preparation to data reporting. We also discuss our adaptation of our HTS system into high-content screening (HCS), a type of HTS that uses multichannel fluorescence images to capture biological events in situ, and is uniquely suited to study dynamical processes in living cells. PMID:22341232

  3. High-throughput screening in primary neurons.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Punita; Ando, D Michael; Daub, Aaron; Kaye, Julia A; Finkbeiner, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Despite years of incremental progress in our understanding of diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), Huntington's disease (HD), and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), there are still no disease-modifying therapeutics. The discrepancy between the number of lead compounds and approved drugs may partially be a result of the methods used to generate the leads and highlights the need for new technology to obtain more detailed and physiologically relevant information on cellular processes in normal and diseased states. Our high-throughput screening (HTS) system in a primary neuron model can help address this unmet need. HTS allows scientists to assay thousands of conditions in a short period of time which can reveal completely new aspects of biology and identify potential therapeutics in the span of a few months when conventional methods could take years or fail all together. HTS in primary neurons combines the advantages of HTS with the biological relevance of intact, fully differentiated neurons which can capture the critical cellular events or homeostatic states that make neurons uniquely susceptible to disease-associated proteins. We detail methodologies of our primary neuron HTS assay workflow from sample preparation to data reporting. We also discuss the adaptation of our HTS system into high-content screening (HCS), a type of HTS that uses multichannel fluorescence images to capture biological events in situ, and is uniquely suited to study dynamical processes in living cells. PMID:22341232

  4. Evaluation of a semi-automated platelet-counting system.

    PubMed

    Rowan, R M; Fraser, C; Gray, J H; McDonald, G A

    1977-04-01

    Coulter Electronics Ltd have produced a semi-automated platelet-counting system. Platelet-rich plasma may be obtained either by tube sedimentation or by means of the Thrombo-fuge, the latter being an instrument designed to produce accelerated sedimentation. The instrument is linear over the entire range of platelet counts, and machine reproducibility is good. Comparison of machine-rated with visual counts satisfied statistical evaluation. The technique can be handled by one operator and platelet counts can be achieved at the rate of 30 per hour by both methods although individual counts on the Thrombo-fuge may be obtained in approximately one-quarter of the time required for tube sedimentation. The throughput using the Thrombo-fuge could certainly be doubled were two sample plates supplied. Few problems were encountered during the evaluation and most could be avoided by meticulous technique. Visual counts must be performed when the sample haematocrit is greater than 50%-Discrepant counts have been obtained in patients with white cell counts exceeding 50 X 10(9)/1 and in patients with giant platelets. ESR elevation for any reason does not lead to serious discrepancy in results. The incidence of platelet clumping due to the presence of platelet agglutinins and of microclot formation due to inadequate mixing is probably much higher than is commonly thought, and certainly peripheral blood film scrutiny should never be omitted in patients with low counts. Careful examination of peripheral blood films must be combined with instrument counting for some time lest further causes of discrepant counting emerge. PMID:856881

  5. High-throughput Protein Purification and Quality Assessment for Crystallization

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Youngchang; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Jedrzejczak, Robert; Eschenfeldt, William H.; Li, Hui; Maltseva, Natalia; Hatzos-Skintges, Catherine; Gu, Minyi; Makowska-Grzyska, Magdalena; Wu, Ruiying; An, Hao; Chhor, Gekleng; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    The ultimate goal of structural biology is to understand the structural basis of proteins in cellular processes. In structural biology, the most critical issue is the availability of high-quality samples. “Structural biology-grade” proteins must be generated in the quantity and quality suitable for structure determination using X-ray crystallography or nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The purification procedures must reproducibly yield homogeneous proteins or their derivatives containing marker atom(s) in milligram quantities. The choice of protein purification and handling procedures plays a critical role in obtaining high-quality protein samples. With structural genomics emphasizing a genome-based approach in understanding protein structure and function, a number of unique structures covering most of the protein folding space have been determined and new technologies with high efficiency have been developed. At the Midwest Center for Structural Genomics (MCSG), we have developed semi-automated protocols for high-throughput parallel protein expression and purification. A protein, expressed as a fusion with a cleavable affinity tag, is purified in two consecutive immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) steps: (i) the first step is an IMAC coupled with buffer-exchange, or size exclusion chromatography (IMAC-I), followed by the cleavage of the affinity tag using the highly specific Tobacco Etch Virus (TEV) protease; [1] the second step is IMAC and buffer exchange (IMAC-II) to remove the cleaved tag and tagged TEV protease. These protocols have been implemented on multidimensional chromatography workstations and, as we have shown, many proteins can be successfully produced in large-scale. All methods and protocols used for purification, some developed by MCSG, others adopted and integrated into the MCSG purification pipeline and more recently the Center for Structural Genomics of Infectious Diseases (CSGID) purification pipeline, are

  6. MouseMove: an open source program for semi-automated analysis of movement and cognitive testing in rodents

    PubMed Central

    Samson, Andre L.; Ju, Lining; Ah Kim, Hyun; Zhang, Shenpeng R.; Lee, Jessica A. A.; Sturgeon, Sharelle A.; Sobey, Christopher G.; Jackson, Shaun P.; Schoenwaelder, Simone M.

    2015-01-01

    The Open Field (OF) test is one of the most commonly used assays for assessing exploratory behaviour and generalised locomotor activity in rodents. Nevertheless, the vast majority of researchers still rely upon costly commercial systems for recording and analysing OF test results. Consequently, our aim was to design a freely available program for analysing the OF test and to provide an accompanying protocol that was minimally invasive, rapid, unbiased, without the need for specialised equipment or training. Similar to commercial systems, we show that our software—called MouseMove—accurately quantifies numerous parameters of movement including travel distance, speed, turning and curvature. To assess its utility, we used MouseMove to quantify unilateral locomotor deficits in mice following the filament-induced middle cerebral artery occlusion model of acute ischemic stroke. MouseMove can also monitor movement within defined regions-of-interest and is therefore suitable for analysing the Novel Object Recognition test and other field-related cognitive tests. To the best of our knowledge, MouseMove is the first open source software capable of providing qualitative and quantitative information on mouse locomotion in a semi-automated and high-throughput fashion, and hence MouseMove represents a sound alternative to commercial movement analysis systems. PMID:26530459

  7. Semi-Automated Diagnosis, Repair, and Rework of Spacecraft Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Struk, Peter M.; Oeftering, Richard C.; Easton, John W.; Anderson, Eric E.

    2008-01-01

    NASA's Constellation Program for Exploration of the Moon and Mars places human crews in extreme isolation in resource scarce environments. Near Earth, the discontinuation of Space Shuttle flights after 2010 will alter the up- and down-mass capacity for the International Space Station (ISS). NASA is considering new options for logistics support strategies for future missions. Aerospace systems are often composed of replaceable modular blocks that minimize the need for complex service operations in the field. Such a strategy however, implies a robust and responsive logistics infrastructure with relatively low transportation costs. The modular Orbital Replacement Units (ORU) used for ISS requires relatively large blocks of replacement hardware even though the actual failed component may really be three orders of magnitude smaller. The ability to perform in-situ repair of electronics circuits at the component level can dramatically reduce the scale of spares and related logistics cost. This ability also reduces mission risk, increases crew independence and improves the overall supportability of the program. The Component-Level Electronics Assembly Repair (CLEAR) task under the NASA Supportability program was established to demonstrate the practicality of repair by first investigating widely used soldering materials and processes (M&P) performed by modest manual means. The work will result in program guidelines for performing manual repairs along with design guidance for circuit reparability. The next phase of CLEAR recognizes that manual repair has its limitations and some highly integrated devices are extremely difficult to handle and demand semi-automated equipment. Further, electronics repairs require a broad range of diagnostic capability to isolate the faulty components. Finally repairs must pass functional tests to determine that the repairs are successful and the circuit can be returned to service. To prevent equipment demands from exceeding spacecraft volume

  8. Rapid Methods for High-Throughput Detection of Sulfoxides▿

    PubMed Central

    Shainsky, Janna; Derry, Netta-Lee; Leichtmann-Bardoogo, Yael; Wood, Thomas K.; Fishman, Ayelet

    2009-01-01

    Enantiopure sulfoxides are prevalent in drugs and are useful chiral auxiliaries in organic synthesis. The biocatalytic enantioselective oxidation of prochiral sulfides is a direct and economical approach for the synthesis of optically pure sulfoxides. The selection of suitable biocatalysts requires rapid and reliable high-throughput screening methods. Here we present four different methods for detecting sulfoxides produced via whole-cell biocatalysis, three of which were exploited for high-throughput screening. Fluorescence detection based on the acid activation of omeprazole was utilized for high-throughput screening of mutant libraries of toluene monooxygenases, but no active variants have been discovered yet. The second method is based on the reduction of sulfoxides to sulfides, with the coupled release and measurement of iodine. The availability of solvent-resistant microtiter plates enabled us to modify the method to a high-throughput format. The third method, selective inhibition of horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase, was used to rapidly screen highly active and/or enantioselective variants at position V106 of toluene ortho-monooxygenase in a saturation mutagenesis library, using methyl-p-tolyl sulfide as the substrate. A success rate of 89% (i.e., 11% false positives) was obtained, and two new mutants were selected. The fourth method is based on the colorimetric detection of adrenochrome, a back-titration procedure which measures the concentration of the periodate-sensitive sulfide. Due to low sensitivity during whole-cell screening, this method was found to be useful only for determining the presence or absence of sulfoxide in the reaction. The methods described in the present work are simple and inexpensive and do not require special equipment. PMID:19465532

  9. IRAS: High-Throughput Identification of Novel Alternative Splicing Regulators.

    PubMed

    Zheng, S

    2016-01-01

    Alternative splicing is a fundamental regulatory process of gene expression. Defects in alternative splicing can lead to various diseases, and modification of disease-causing splicing events presents great therapeutic promise. Splicing outcome is commonly affected by extracellular stimuli and signaling cascades that converge on RNA-binding splicing regulators. These trans-acting factors recognize cis-elements in pre-mRNA transcripts to affect spliceosome assembly and splice site choices. Identification of these splicing regulators and/or upstream modulators has been difficult and traditionally done by piecemeal. High-throughput screening strategies to find multiple regulators of exon splicing have great potential to accelerate the discovery process, but typically confront low sensitivity and low specificity of screening assays. Here we describe a unique screening strategy, IRAS (identifying regulators of alternative splicing), using a pair of dual-output minigene reporters to allow for sensitive detection of exon splicing changes. Each dual-output reporter produces green fluorescent protein (GFP) and red fluorescent protein (RFP) fluorescent signals to assay the two spliced isoforms exclusively. The two complementary minigene reporters alter GFP/RFP output ratios in the opposite direction in response to splicing change. Applying IRAS in cell-based high-throughput screens allows sensitive and specific identification of splicing regulators and modulators for any alternative exons of interest. In comparison to previous high-throughput screening methods, IRAS substantially enhances the specificity of the screening assay. This strategy significantly eliminates false positives without sacrificing sensitive identification of true regulators of splicing. PMID:27241759

  10. NeuronMetrics: Software for Semi-Automated Processing of Cultured-Neuron Images

    PubMed Central

    Narro, Martha L.; Yang, Fan; Kraft, Robert; Wenk, Carola; Efrat, Alon; Restifo, Linda L.

    2007-01-01

    Using primary cell culture to screen for changes in neuronal morphology requires specialized analysis software. We developed NeuronMetrics™ for semi-automated, quantitative analysis of two-dimensional (2D) images of fluorescently labeled cultured neurons. It skeletonizes the neuron image using two complementary image-processing techniques, capturing fine terminal neurites with high fidelity. An algorithm was devised to span wide gaps in the skeleton. NeuronMetrics uses a novel strategy based on geometric features called faces to extract a branch-number estimate from complex arbors with numerous neurite-to-neurite contacts, without creating a precise, contact-free representation of the neurite arbor. It estimates total neurite length, branch number, primary neurite number, territory (the area of the convex polygon bounding the skeleton and cell body), and Polarity Index (a measure of neuronal polarity). These parameters provide fundamental information about the size and shape of neurite arbors, which are critical factors for neuronal function. NeuronMetrics streamlines optional manual tasks such as removing noise, isolating the largest primary neurite, and correcting length for self-fasciculating neurites. Numeric data are output in a single text file, readily imported into other applications for further analysis. Written as modules for ImageJ, NeuronMetrics provides practical analysis tools that are easy to use and support batch processing. Depending on the need for manual intervention, processing time for a batch of ~60 2D images is 1.0–2.5 hours, from a folder of images to a table of numeric data. NeuronMetrics’ output accelerates the quantitative detection of mutations and chemical compounds that alter neurite morphology in vitro, and will contribute to the use of cultured neurons for drug discovery. PMID:17270152

  11. An integrated, semi-automated approach to thermochemical conversion research for sustainable farming systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An integrated, semi-automated system is presented for the rapid and efficient testing and production of research-scale quantities of biochar. This biochar, produced from agricultural waste materials, can easily be incorporated in future sustainable livestock farming systems. These farming systems wi...

  12. Design and development of a semi-automated module for the preparation of metallic PET radionuclides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trejo-Ballado, F.; Lopez-Rodriguez, V.; Gaspar-Carcamo, R. E.; Hurtado-Chong, G.; Avila-Rodriguez, Miguel A.

    2012-12-01

    The method for the production of metallic radionuclides has been widely reported, and most of them share a common ion chromatography purification technique. The aim of this work is to design and develop a semi-automated remotely controlled module for the purification of metallic PET radionuclides via cation exchange chromatography.

  13. High-Throughput Massively Parallel Sequencing for Fetal Aneuploidy Detection from Maternal Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Džakula, Željko; Kim, Sung K.; Mazloom, Amin R.; Zhu, Zhanyang; Tynan, John; Lu, Tim; McLennan, Graham; Palomaki, Glenn E.; Canick, Jacob A.; Oeth, Paul; Deciu, Cosmin; van den Boom, Dirk; Ehrich, Mathias

    2013-01-01

    Background Circulating cell-free (ccf) fetal DNA comprises 3–20% of all the cell-free DNA present in maternal plasma. Numerous research and clinical studies have described the analysis of ccf DNA using next generation sequencing for the detection of fetal aneuploidies with high sensitivity and specificity. We sought to extend the utility of this approach by assessing semi-automated library preparation, higher sample multiplexing during sequencing, and improved bioinformatic tools to enable a higher throughput, more efficient assay while maintaining or improving clinical performance. Methods Whole blood (10mL) was collected from pregnant female donors and plasma separated using centrifugation. Ccf DNA was extracted using column-based methods. Libraries were prepared using an optimized semi-automated library preparation method and sequenced on an Illumina HiSeq2000 sequencer in a 12-plex format. Z-scores were calculated for affected chromosomes using a robust method after normalization and genomic segment filtering. Classification was based upon a standard normal transformed cutoff value of z = 3 for chromosome 21 and z = 3.95 for chromosomes 18 and 13. Results Two parallel assay development studies using a total of more than 1900 ccf DNA samples were performed to evaluate the technical feasibility of automating library preparation and increasing the sample multiplexing level. These processes were subsequently combined and a study of 1587 samples was completed to verify the stability of the process-optimized assay. Finally, an unblinded clinical evaluation of 1269 euploid and aneuploid samples utilizing this high-throughput assay coupled to improved bioinformatic procedures was performed. We were able to correctly detect all aneuploid cases with extremely low false positive rates of 0.09%, <0.01%, and 0.08% for trisomies 21, 18, and 13, respectively. Conclusions These data suggest that the developed laboratory methods in concert with improved bioinformatic

  14. A high throughput system for the preparation of single stranded templates grown in microculture.

    PubMed

    Kolner, D E; Guilfoyle, R A; Smith, L M

    1994-01-01

    A high throughput system for the preparation of single stranded M13 sequencing templates is described. Supernatants from clones grown in 48-well plates are treated with a chaotropic agent to dissociate the phage coat protein. Using a semi-automated cell harvester, the free nucleic acid is bound to a glass fiber filter in the presence of chaotrope and then washed with ethanol by aspiration. Individual glass fiber discs are punched out on the cell harvester and dried briefly. The DNA samples are then eluted in water by centrifugation. The processing time from 96 microcultures to sequence quality templates is approximately 1 hr. Assuming the ability to sequence 400 bases per clone, a 0.5 megabase per day genome sequencing facility will require 6250 purified templates a week. Toward accomplishing this goal we have developed a procedure which is a modification of a method that uses a chaotropic agent and glass fiber filter (Kristensen et al., 1987). By exploiting the ability of a cell harvester to uniformly aspirate and wash 96 samples, a rapid system for high quality template preparation has been developed. Other semi-automated systems for template preparation have been developed using commercially available robotic workstations like the Biomek (Mardis and Roe, 1989). Although minimal human intervention is required, processing time is at least twice as long. Custom systems based on paramagnetic beads (Hawkins et al., 1992) produce DNA in insufficient quantity for direct sequencing and therefore require cycle sequencing. These systems require custom programing, have a fairly high initial cost and have not proven to be as fast as the method reported here. PMID:7987011

  15. Microfluidics for High-Throughput Quantitative Studies of Early Development.

    PubMed

    Levario, Thomas J; Lim, Bomyi; Shvartsman, Stanislav Y; Lu, Hang

    2016-07-11

    Developmental biology has traditionally relied on qualitative analyses; recently, however, as in other fields of biology, researchers have become increasingly interested in acquiring quantitative knowledge about embryogenesis. Advances in fluorescence microscopy are enabling high-content imaging in live specimens. At the same time, microfluidics and automation technologies are increasing experimental throughput for studies of multicellular models of development. Furthermore, computer vision methods for processing and analyzing bioimage data are now leading the way toward quantitative biology. Here, we review advances in the areas of fluorescence microscopy, microfluidics, and data analysis that are instrumental to performing high-content, high-throughput studies in biology and specifically in development. We discuss a case study of how these techniques have allowed quantitative analysis and modeling of pattern formation in the Drosophila embryo. PMID:26928208

  16. Construction of biological networks from unstructured information based on a semi-automated curation workflow.

    PubMed

    Szostak, Justyna; Ansari, Sam; Madan, Sumit; Fluck, Juliane; Talikka, Marja; Iskandar, Anita; De Leon, Hector; Hofmann-Apitius, Martin; Peitsch, Manuel C; Hoeng, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Capture and representation of scientific knowledge in a structured format are essential to improve the understanding of biological mechanisms involved in complex diseases. Biological knowledge and knowledge about standardized terminologies are difficult to capture from literature in a usable form. A semi-automated knowledge extraction workflow is presented that was developed to allow users to extract causal and correlative relationships from scientific literature and to transcribe them into the computable and human readable Biological Expression Language (BEL). The workflow combines state-of-the-art linguistic tools for recognition of various entities and extraction of knowledge from literature sources. Unlike most other approaches, the workflow outputs the results to a curation interface for manual curation and converts them into BEL documents that can be compiled to form biological networks. We developed a new semi-automated knowledge extraction workflow that was designed to capture and organize scientific knowledge and reduce the required curation skills and effort for this task. The workflow was used to build a network that represents the cellular and molecular mechanisms implicated in atherosclerotic plaque destabilization in an apolipoprotein-E-deficient (ApoE(-/-)) mouse model. The network was generated using knowledge extracted from the primary literature. The resultant atherosclerotic plaque destabilization network contains 304 nodes and 743 edges supported by 33 PubMed referenced articles. A comparison between the semi-automated and conventional curation processes showed similar results, but significantly reduced curation effort for the semi-automated process. Creating structured knowledge from unstructured text is an important step for the mechanistic interpretation and reusability of knowledge. Our new semi-automated knowledge extraction workflow reduced the curation skills and effort required to capture and organize scientific knowledge. The

  17. High throughput network for multiprocessor interconnections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raatikainen, Pertti; Zidbeck, Juha

    1993-05-01

    Multiprocessor architectures are needed to support modern broadband applications, since traditional bus structures are not capable of providing high throughput. New bus structures are needed, especially in the area of network components and terminals. A study to find an efficient and cost effective interconnection topology for the future high speed products is presented. The most common bus topologies are introduced, and their characteristics are estimated to decide which one of them offers best performance and lowest implementation cost. The ring topology is chosen to be studied in more detail. Four competing bus access schemes for the high throughput ring are introduced as well as simulation models for each of them. Using transfer delay and throughput results, as well as keeping the implementation point of view in mind, the best candidate is selected to be studied and experimented in the succeeding research project.

  18. High-throughput screening methods for nitrilases.

    PubMed

    Xue, Ya-Ping; Yang, Yue-Kai; Lv, Sheng-Zhi; Liu, Zhi-Qiang; Zheng, Yu-Guo

    2016-04-01

    Nitrilases have been widely acknowledged as important alternatives to chemical catalysts, as they have been proved to transform an immense variety of nitriles under mild conditions and often in a stereoselective or regioselective manner. In the discovery of new nitrilases to establish viable industrial processes, screening plays an important role in identifying which subset of candidates contains a nitrilase of interest from a collection of organisms, clone banks, or enzyme libraries. However, the traditional methods for evaluating the nitrilases are a time-consuming, laborious, and costly process and have been regarded as a bottleneck in developing these nitrilases as industrial biocatalysts. In the past few years, a number of high-throughput screening methods have been developed for rapid evaluation and identification of nitrilases. Here, we review the various methodologies developed for high-throughput screening of nitrilases and focus on their advantages and limitations. PMID:26894402

  19. High-Throughput Investigation of Delafossite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haycock, Barry; Kylee Underwood, M.; Lekse, Jonathan; Matranga, Christopher; Lewis, James P.

    2013-03-01

    We present the application of high-throughput calculations to the intriguing problem of the forbidden optical transition in the CuGa1-xFexO2 delafossites, which is prototypical of many delafossite systems. When 5% or more of the Ga sites are replaced with Fe, there is a sudden shift to an optical band gap of 1.5eV from 2.5eV. Using high-throughput calculations and data mining techniques, we show the most likely positional configurations for x = 0.00 through x = 0.10 of the Fe atoms relative to one another. Implications of this result and applications of the techniques used are discussed, including the development of candidate materials via high-throughput analysis of constituent search-space. Funded by the National Science Foundation through NSF DMR 09-03225 and a subcontract from NETL (URS RES) for Work Activity 0004000.6.600.007.002.420.000.005 ARRA ICMI Project.

  20. A Novel High-Throughput Viscometer.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Suraj; Bishop, Matthew T; Dermody, Daniel; Dietsche, Laura; Kuo, Tzu-Chi; Mushrush, Melissa; Harris, Keith; Zieman, Jonathan; Morabito, Paul; Orvosh, Brian; Patrick, Don

    2016-07-11

    A novel, rapid, parallel, and high-throughput system for measuring viscosity of materials under different conditions of shear rate, temperature, time, etc., has been developed. This unique system utilizes the transient flow of a complex fluid through pipettes. This approach offers significant practical advantages over microfluidic-based devices for viscosity screening: no cleanup is required, the method is high throughput (<1 h for 100 samples), and only small sample volumes (<1 mL) are used. This paper details for the first time the experimental and modeling efforts to implement this mass- and pressure-based viscosity measurement concept as a robust viscosity estimation tool. This approach is very well-suited for viscosity measurements in high-throughput formulation workflows, as it is rapid and parallel and operates directly on samples in various microtiter plate formats. We present systematic experimental observations together with numerical and analytical modeling approaches to characterize instrument capabilities and limitations. The complex transient flow of fluids through these pipettes leads to data-rich pressure profiles. Numerical and analytical modeling is then used to extract viscosity and other rheological parameters from these pressure profiles. We have successfully utilized this viscosity screening tool for a multitude of complex fluids including oils, paints, solvents, and detergents. PMID:27259016

  1. Image-based high-throughput screening for inhibitors of angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Evensen, Lasse; Link, Wolfgang; Lorens, James B

    2013-01-01

    Automated multicolor fluorescence microscopy facilitates high-throughput quantitation of cellular parameters of complex, organotypic systems. In vitro co-cultured vascular cells form capillary-like networks that model facets of angiogenesis, making it an attractive alternative for anti-angiogenic drug discovery. We have adapted this angiogenesis assay system to a high-throughput format to enable automated image-based high-throughput screening of live primary human vascular cell co-cultures with chemical libraries for anti-angiogenic drug discovery. Protocols are described for setup of a fluorescence-based co-culture assay, live cell image acquisition, image analysis of morphological parameters, and screening data handling. PMID:23027002

  2. Semi-automated and fully automated mammographic density measurement and breast cancer risk prediction.

    PubMed

    Llobet, Rafael; Pollán, Marina; Antón, Joaquín; Miranda-García, Josefa; Casals, María; Martínez, Inmaculada; Ruiz-Perales, Francisco; Pérez-Gómez, Beatriz; Salas-Trejo, Dolores; Pérez-Cortés, Juan-Carlos

    2014-09-01

    The task of breast density quantification is becoming increasingly relevant due to its association with breast cancer risk. In this work, a semi-automated and a fully automated tools to assess breast density from full-field digitized mammograms are presented. The first tool is based on a supervised interactive thresholding procedure for segmenting dense from fatty tissue and is used with a twofold goal: for assessing mammographic density (MD) in a more objective and accurate way than via visual-based methods and for labeling the mammograms that are later employed to train the fully automated tool. Although most automated methods rely on supervised approaches based on a global labeling of the mammogram, the proposed method relies on pixel-level labeling, allowing better tissue classification and density measurement on a continuous scale. The fully automated method presented combines a classification scheme based on local features and thresholding operations that improve the performance of the classifier. A dataset of 655 mammograms was used to test the concordance of both approaches in measuring MD. Three expert radiologists measured MD in each of the mammograms using the semi-automated tool (DM-Scan). It was then measured by the fully automated system and the correlation between both methods was computed. The relation between MD and breast cancer was then analyzed using a case-control dataset consisting of 230 mammograms. The Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC) was used to compute reliability among raters and between techniques. The results obtained showed an average ICC=0.922 among raters when using the semi-automated tool, whilst the average correlation between the semi-automated and automated measures was ICC=0.838. In the case-control study, the results obtained showed Odds Ratios (OR) of 1.38 and 1.50 per 10% increase in MD when using the semi-automated and fully automated approaches respectively. It can therefore be concluded that the automated and semi-automated

  3. High Throughput Screening For Hazard and Risk of Environmental Contaminants

    EPA Science Inventory

    High throughput toxicity testing provides detailed mechanistic information on the concentration response of environmental contaminants in numerous potential toxicity pathways. High throughput screening (HTS) has several key advantages: (1) expense orders of magnitude less than an...

  4. Methods of high throughput biophysical characterization in biopharmaceutical development.

    PubMed

    Razinkov, Vladimir I; Treuheit, Michael J; Becker, Gerald W

    2013-03-01

    Discovery and successful development of biopharmaceutical products depend on a thorough characterization of the molecule both before and after formulation. Characterization of a formulated biotherapeutic, typically a protein or large peptide, requires a rigorous assessment of the molecule's physical stability. Stability of a biotherapeutic includes not only chemical stability, i.e., degradation of the molecule to form undesired modifications, but also structural stability, including the formation of aggregates. In this review, high throughput biophysical characterization techniques are described according to their specific applications during biopharmaceutical discovery, development and manufacturing. The methods presented here are classified according to these attributes, and include spectroscopic assays based on absorbance, polarization, intrinsic and extrinsic fluorescence, surface plasmon resonance instrumentation, calorimetric methods, dynamic and static light scattering techniques, several visible particle counting and sizing methods, new viscosity assay, based on light scattering and mass spectrometry. Several techniques presented here are already implemented in industry; but, many high throughput biophysical methods are still in the initial stages of implementation or even in the prototype stage. Each technique in this report is judged by the specific application of the method through the biopharmaceutical development process. PMID:22725690

  5. High-throughput assays for DNA gyrase and other topoisomerases.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Anthony; Burton, Nicolas P; O'Hagan, Natasha

    2006-01-01

    We have developed high-throughput microtitre plate-based assays for DNA gyrase and other DNA topoisomerases. These assays exploit the fact that negatively supercoiled plasmids form intermolecular triplexes more efficiently than when they are relaxed. Two assays are presented, one using capture of a plasmid containing a single triplex-forming sequence by an oligonucleotide tethered to the surface of a microtitre plate and subsequent detection by staining with a DNA-specific fluorescent dye. The other uses capture of a plasmid containing two triplex-forming sequences by an oligonucleotide tethered to the surface of a microtitre plate and subsequent detection by a second oligonucleotide that is radiolabelled. The assays are shown to be appropriate for assaying DNA supercoiling by Escherichia coli DNA gyrase and DNA relaxation by eukaryotic topoisomerases I and II, and E.coli topoisomerase IV. The assays are readily adaptable to other enzymes that change DNA supercoiling (e.g. restriction enzymes) and are suitable for use in a high-throughput format. PMID:16936317

  6. Reconfigurable microfluidic dilution for high-throughput quantitative assays.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jinzhen; Li, Baoqing; Xing, Siyuan; Pan, Tingrui

    2015-06-21

    This paper reports a reconfigurable microfluidic dilution device for high-throughput quantitative assays, which can easily produce discrete logarithmic/binary concentration profiles ranging from 1 to 100-fold dilution in parallel from a fixed sample volume (e.g., 10 μL) without any assistance of continuous fluidic pump or robotic automation. The integrated dilution generation chip consists of switchable distribution and collection channels, metering reservoirs, reaction chambers, and pressure-activatable Laplace valves. Following the sequential loading of a sample, a diluent, and a detection reagent into their individual metering chambers, the top microfluidic layer can be reconfigured to collect the metered chemicals into the reaction chambers in parallel, where detection will be conducted. To facilitate mixing and reaction in the microchambers, two acoustic microstreaming actuation mechanisms have been investigated for easy integrability and accessibility. Furthermore, the microfluidic dilution generator has been characterized by both colorimetric and fluorescent means. A further demonstration of the generic usage of the quantitative dilution chip has utilized the commonly available bicinchoninic acid (BCA) assay to analyse the protein concentrations of human tissue extracts. In brief, the microfluidic dilution generator offers a high-throughput high-efficiency quantitative analytical alternative to conventional quantitative assay platforms, by simple manipulation of a minute amount of chemicals in a compact microfluidic device with minimal equipment requirement, which can serve as a facile tool for biochemical and biological analyses in regular laboratories, point-of-care settings and low-resource environments. PMID:25994379

  7. A high throughput glucocerebrosidase assay using the natural substrate glucosylceramide.

    PubMed

    Motabar, Omid; Goldin, Ehud; Leister, William; Liu, Ke; Southall, Noel; Huang, Wenwei; Marugan, Juan J; Sidransky, Ellen; Zheng, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Glucocerebrosidase is a lysosomal enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of glucosylceramide to form ceramide and glucose. A deficiency of lysosomal glucocerebrosidase due to genetic mutations results in Gaucher disease, in which glucosylceramide accumulates in the lysosomes of certain cell types. Although enzyme replacement therapy is currently available for the treatment of type 1 Gaucher disease, the neuronopathic forms of Gaucher disease are still not treatable. Small molecule drugs that can penetrate the blood-brain barrier, such as pharmacological chaperones and enzyme activators, are new therapeutic approaches for Gaucher disease. Enzyme assays for glucocerebrosidase are used to screen compound libraries to identify new lead compounds for drug development for the treatment of Gaucher disease. But the current assays use artificial substrates that are not physiologically relevant. We developed a glucocerebrosidase assay using the natural substrate glucosylceramide coupled to an Amplex-red enzyme reporting system. This assay is in a homogenous assay format and has been miniaturized in a 1,536-well plate format for high throughput screening. The assay sensitivity and robustness is similar to those seen with other glucocerebrosidase fluorescence assays. Therefore, this new glucocerebrosidase assay is an alternative approach for high throughput screening. PMID:22033823

  8. A high throughput glucocerebrosidase assay using the natural substrate glucosylceramide

    PubMed Central

    Motabar, Omid; Goldin, Ehud; Leister, William; Liu, Ke; Southall, Noel; Huang, Wenwei; Marugan, Juan J.; Sidransky, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    Glucocerebrosidase is a lysosomal enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of glucosylceramide to form ceramide and glucose. A deficiency of lysosomal glucocerebrosidase due to genetic mutations results in Gaucher disease, in which glucosylceramide accumulates in the lysosomes of certain cell types. Although enzyme replacement therapy is currently available for the treatment of type 1 Gaucher disease, the neuronopathic forms of Gaucher disease are still not treatable. Small molecule drugs that can penetrate the blood-brain barrier, such as pharmacological chaperones and enzyme activators, are new therapeutic approaches for Gaucher disease. Enzyme assays for glucocerebrosidase are used to screen compound libraries to identify new lead compounds for drug development for the treatment of Gaucher disease. But the current assays use artificial substrates that are not physiologically relevant. We developed a glucocerebrosidase assay using the natural substrate glucosylceramide coupled to an Amplex-red enzyme reporting system. This assay is in a homogenous assay format and has been miniaturized in a 1,536-well plate format for high throughput screening. The assay sensitivity and robustness is similar to those seen with other glucocerebrosidase fluorescence assays. Therefore, this new glucocerebrosidase assay is an alternative approach for high throughput screening. PMID:22033823

  9. Automated High Throughput Drug Target Crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Rupp, B

    2005-02-18

    The molecular structures of drug target proteins and receptors form the basis for 'rational' or structure guided drug design. The majority of target structures are experimentally determined by protein X-ray crystallography, which as evolved into a highly automated, high throughput drug discovery and screening tool. Process automation has accelerated tasks from parallel protein expression, fully automated crystallization, and rapid data collection to highly efficient structure determination methods. A thoroughly designed automation technology platform supported by a powerful informatics infrastructure forms the basis for optimal workflow implementation and the data mining and analysis tools to generate new leads from experimental protein drug target structures.

  10. Clustering of High Throughput Gene Expression Data

    PubMed Central

    Pirim, Harun; Ekşioğlu, Burak; Perkins, Andy; Yüceer, Çetin

    2012-01-01

    High throughput biological data need to be processed, analyzed, and interpreted to address problems in life sciences. Bioinformatics, computational biology, and systems biology deal with biological problems using computational methods. Clustering is one of the methods used to gain insight into biological processes, particularly at the genomics level. Clearly, clustering can be used in many areas of biological data analysis. However, this paper presents a review of the current clustering algorithms designed especially for analyzing gene expression data. It is also intended to introduce one of the main problems in bioinformatics - clustering gene expression data - to the operations research community. PMID:23144527

  11. High throughput chemical munitions treatment system

    DOEpatents

    Haroldsen, Brent L.; Stofleth, Jerome H.; Didlake, Jr., John E.; Wu, Benjamin C-P

    2011-11-01

    A new High-Throughput Explosive Destruction System is disclosed. The new system is comprised of two side-by-side detonation containment vessels each comprising first and second halves that feed into a single agent treatment vessel. Both detonation containment vessels further comprise a surrounding ventilation facility. Moreover, the detonation containment vessels are designed to separate into two half-shells, wherein one shell can be moved axially away from the fixed, second half for ease of access and loading. The vessels are closed by means of a surrounding, clam-shell type locking seal mechanisms.

  12. Quantitative high-throughput population dynamics in continuous-culture by automated microscopy.

    PubMed

    Merritt, Jason; Kuehn, Seppe

    2016-01-01

    We present a high-throughput method to measure abundance dynamics in microbial communities sustained in continuous-culture. Our method uses custom epi-fluorescence microscopes to automatically image single cells drawn from a continuously-cultured population while precisely controlling culture conditions. For clonal populations of Escherichia coli our instrument reveals history-dependent resilience and growth rate dependent aggregation. PMID:27616752

  13. A semi-automated micro-method for the histological assessment of fat embolism.

    PubMed

    Busuttil, A; Hanley, J J

    1994-01-01

    A method of quantitatively determining the volume of fat emboli in a tissue using an image analysis system (I.B.A.S.) was developed. This procedure is an interactive, semi-automated tool allowing the quick and accurate gathering of large quantities of data from sections of different tissue samples stained by osmium tetroxide. The development of this procedure was aimed at producing a system which is reliable, reproducible and semi-automated thereby enabling epidemiological and serial studies to be made of a large number of histological sections from different tissues. The system was tested in a study of tissue sections from a series of fatalities from an aircraft crash in an attempt at correlating the incidence of fat emboli with the presence of multiple fractures and soft tissue injuries, the correlation to be made being between the quantitative presence of fat emboli and the extent and severity of injuries suffered. PMID:7529546

  14. Semi-automated continuous-flow enzyme immunoassay for antiepileptic drugs in serum.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, S; Kurooka, S; Arisue, K; Kohda, K; Hayashi, C

    1983-10-01

    We have developed a semi-automated method for measuring five kinds of antiepileptic drugs in serum by successfully adapting commercial competitive-binding enzyme immunoassay kits (MARKIT; Dainippon) for use with a continuous-flow analyzer (Technicon AutoAnalyzer II equipped with a dialyzer). The free enzyme-labeled drug is automatically separated by a microfilter from the competitive immunoreaction mixture between labeled and unlabeled drug for anti-drug immunoglobulin coupled to bacterial cell walls. The concentrations of the antiepileptic drugs in serum samples can be determined by automated measurement of enzyme activity of the enzyme-labeled drugs. Results of the semi-automated method correlated well with those obtained by manual enzyme immunoassay, gas-liquid chromatography, and "high-pressure" liquid chromatography. The correlation coefficients were all greater than 0.95, showing the practicality of this method for therapeutic monitoring of antiepileptic drugs. PMID:6352086

  15. Reducing Fuel Consumption through Semi-Automated Platooning with Class 8 Tractor Trailer Combinations (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Lammert, M.; Gonder, J.

    2014-07-01

    This poster describes the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's evaluation of the fuel savings potential of semi-automated truck platooning. Platooning involves reducing aerodynamic drag by grouping vehicles together and decreasing the distance between them through the use of electronic coupling, which allows multiple vehicles to accelerate or brake simultaneously. The NREL study addressed the need for data on American style line-haul sleeper cabs with modern aerodynamics and over a range of trucking speeds common in the United States.

  16. High-throughput screening of binary catalysts for oxygen electroreduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing Hua; Jeon, Min Ku; Woo, Seong Ihl

    2006-01-01

    A series of Pt based and non-Pt catalysts for proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) and direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) have been evaluated towards oxygen reduction, by high-throughput optical screening. Fluorescein was first used as pH indicator for detecting pH change of the electrolyte in the vicinity of cathode caused by oxygen reduction. Arrays of catalyst spot comprised of binary catalysts and pure Pt were prepared by using robotic micro-dispenser. The analysis of fluorescence images has showed that some of Pt based catalysts including PtBi, PtCu, PtSe, PtTe and PtIr, as well as RuFe, as a non-Pt catalyst, exhibited higher activities and methanol tolerance than pure Pt. Moreover, acceptable stability of these catalysts at high potential in acid environment suits them to the requirements of cathode catalyst in PEMFC or DMFC.

  17. Preliminary High-Throughput Metagenome Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Dusheyko, Serge; Furman, Craig; Pangilinan, Jasmyn; Shapiro, Harris; Tu, Hank

    2007-03-26

    Metagenome data sets present a qualitatively different assembly problem than traditional single-organism whole-genome shotgun (WGS) assembly. The unique aspects of such projects include the presence of a potentially large number of distinct organisms and their representation in the data set at widely different fractions. In addition, multiple closely related strains could be present, which would be difficult to assemble separately. Failure to take these issues into account can result in poor assemblies that either jumble together different strains or which fail to yield useful results. The DOE Joint Genome Institute has sequenced a number of metagenomic projects and plans to considerably increase this number in the coming year. As a result, the JGI has a need for high-throughput tools and techniques for handling metagenome projects. We present the techniques developed to handle metagenome assemblies in a high-throughput environment. This includes a streamlined assembly wrapper, based on the JGI?s in-house WGS assembler, Jazz. It also includes the selection of sensible defaults targeted for metagenome data sets, as well as quality control automation for cleaning up the raw results. While analysis is ongoing, we will discuss preliminary assessments of the quality of the assembly results (http://fames.jgi-psf.org).

  18. Economic consequences of high throughput maskless lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartley, John G.; Govindaraju, Lakshmi

    2005-11-01

    Many people in the semiconductor industry bemoan the high costs of masks and view mask cost as one of the significant barriers to bringing new chip designs to market. All that is needed is a viable maskless technology and the problem will go away. Numerous sites around the world are working on maskless lithography but inevitably, the question asked is "Wouldn't a one wafer per hour maskless tool make a really good mask writer?" Of course, the answer is yes, the hesitation you hear in the answer isn't based on technology concerns, it's financial. The industry needs maskless lithography because mask costs are too high. Mask costs are too high because mask pattern generators (PG's) are slow and expensive. If mask PG's become much faster, mask costs go down, the maskless market goes away and the PG supplier is faced with an even smaller tool demand from the mask shops. Technical success becomes financial suicide - or does it? In this paper we will present the results of a model that examines some of the consequences of introducing high throughput maskless pattern generation. Specific features in the model include tool throughput for masks and wafers, market segmentation by node for masks and wafers and mask cost as an entry barrier to new chip designs. How does the availability of low cost masks and maskless tools affect the industries tool makeup and what is the ultimate potential market for high throughput maskless pattern generators?

  19. A semi-automated tool for treatment plan-quality evaluation and clinical trial quality assurance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiazhou; Chen, Wenzhou; Studenski, Matthew; Cui, Yunfeng; Lee, Andrew J.; Xiao, Ying

    2013-07-01

    The goal of this work is to develop a plan-quality evaluation program for clinical routine and multi-institutional clinical trials so that the overall evaluation efficiency is improved. In multi-institutional clinical trials evaluating the plan quality is a time-consuming and labor-intensive process. In this note, we present a semi-automated plan-quality evaluation program which combines MIMVista, Java/MATLAB, and extensible markup language (XML). More specifically, MIMVista is used for data visualization; Java and its powerful function library are implemented for calculating dosimetry parameters; and to improve the clarity of the index definitions, XML is applied. The accuracy and the efficiency of the program were evaluated by comparing the results of the program with the manually recorded results in two RTOG trials. A slight difference of about 0.2% in volume or 0.6 Gy in dose between the semi-automated program and manual recording was observed. According to the criteria of indices, there are minimal differences between the two methods. The evaluation time is reduced from 10-20 min to 2 min by applying the semi-automated plan-quality evaluation program.

  20. A semi-automated method of monitoring dam passage of American Eels Anguilla rostrata

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Welsh, Stuart; Aldinger, Joni L.

    2014-01-01

    Fish passage facilities at dams have become an important focus of fishery management in riverine systems. Given the personnel and travel costs associated with physical monitoring programs, automated or semi-automated systems are an attractive alternative for monitoring fish passage facilities. We designed and tested a semi-automated system for eel ladder monitoring at Millville Dam on the lower Shenandoah River, West Virginia. A motion-activated eel ladder camera (ELC) photographed each yellow-phase American Eel Anguilla rostrata that passed through the ladder. Digital images (with date and time stamps) of American Eels allowed for total daily counts and measurements of eel TL using photogrammetric methods with digital imaging software. We compared physical counts of American Eels with camera-based counts; TLs obtained with a measuring board were compared with TLs derived from photogrammetric methods. Data from the ELC were consistent with data obtained by physical methods, thus supporting the semi-automated camera system as a viable option for monitoring American Eel passage. Time stamps on digital images allowed for the documentation of eel passage time—data that were not obtainable from physical monitoring efforts. The ELC has application to eel ladder facilities but can also be used to monitor dam passage of other taxa, such as crayfishes, lampreys, and water snakes.

  1. A high-throughput chemically induced inflammation assay in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Studies on innate immunity have benefited from the introduction of zebrafish as a model system. Transgenic fish expressing fluorescent proteins in leukocyte populations allow direct, quantitative visualization of an inflammatory response in vivo. It has been proposed that this animal model can be used for high-throughput screens aimed at the identification of novel immunomodulatory lead compounds. However, current assays require invasive manipulation of fish individually, thus preventing high-content screening. Results Here we show that specific, noninvasive damage to lateral line neuromast cells can induce a robust acute inflammatory response. Exposure of fish larvae to sublethal concentrations of copper sulfate selectively damages the sensory hair cell population inducing infiltration of leukocytes to neuromasts within 20 minutes. Inflammation can be assayed in real time using transgenic fish expressing fluorescent proteins in leukocytes or by histochemical assays in fixed larvae. We demonstrate the usefulness of this method for chemical and genetic screens to detect the effect of immunomodulatory compounds and mutations affecting the leukocyte response. Moreover, we transformed the assay into a high-throughput screening method by using a customized automated imaging and processing system that quantifies the magnitude of the inflammatory reaction. Conclusions This approach allows rapid screening of thousands of compounds or mutagenized zebrafish for effects on inflammation and enables the identification of novel players in the regulation of innate immunity and potential lead compounds toward new immunomodulatory therapies. We have called this method the chemically induced inflammation assay, or ChIn assay. See Commentary article: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7007/8/148. PMID:21176202

  2. High-throughput single-molecule force spectroscopy for membrane proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosshart, Patrick D.; Casagrande, Fabio; Frederix, Patrick L. T. M.; Ratera, Merce; Bippes, Christian A.; Müller, Daniel J.; Palacin, Manuel; Engel, Andreas; Fotiadis, Dimitrios

    2008-09-01

    Atomic force microscopy-based single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) is a powerful tool for studying the mechanical properties, intermolecular and intramolecular interactions, unfolding pathways, and energy landscapes of membrane proteins. One limiting factor for the large-scale applicability of SMFS on membrane proteins is its low efficiency in data acquisition. We have developed a semi-automated high-throughput SMFS (HT-SMFS) procedure for efficient data acquisition. In addition, we present a coarse filter to efficiently extract protein unfolding events from large data sets. The HT-SMFS procedure and the coarse filter were validated using the proton pump bacteriorhodopsin (BR) from Halobacterium salinarum and the L-arginine/agmatine antiporter AdiC from the bacterium Escherichia coli. To screen for molecular interactions between AdiC and its substrates, we recorded data sets in the absence and in the presence of L-arginine, D-arginine, and agmatine. Altogether ~400 000 force-distance curves were recorded. Application of coarse filtering to this wealth of data yielded six data sets with ~200 (AdiC) and ~400 (BR) force-distance spectra in each. Importantly, the raw data for most of these data sets were acquired in one to two days, opening new perspectives for HT-SMFS applications.

  3. PALM and STORM: Into large fields and high-throughput microscopy with sCMOS detectors.

    PubMed

    Almada, Pedro; Culley, Siân; Henriques, Ricardo

    2015-10-15

    Single Molecule Localization Microscopy (SMLM) techniques such as Photo-Activation Localization Microscopy (PALM) and Stochastic Optical Reconstruction Microscopy (STORM) enable fluorescence microscopy super-resolution: the overcoming of the resolution barrier imposed by the diffraction of light. These techniques are based on acquiring hundreds or thousands of images of single molecules, locating them and reconstructing a higher-resolution image from the high-precision localizations. These methods generally imply a considerable trade-off between imaging speed and resolution, limiting their applicability to high-throughput workflows. Recent advancements in scientific Complementary Metal-Oxide Semiconductor (sCMOS) camera sensors and localization algorithms reduce the temporal requirements for SMLM, pushing it toward high-throughput microscopy. Here we outline the decisions researchers face when considering how to adapt hardware on a new system for sCMOS sensors with high-throughput in mind. PMID:26079924

  4. A High-Throughput Radiometric Kinase Assay.

    PubMed

    Duong-Ly, Krisna C; Peterson, Jeffrey R

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant kinase signaling has been implicated in a number of diseases. While kinases have become attractive drug targets, only a small fraction of human protein kinases have validated inhibitors. Screening of libraries of compounds against a kinase or kinases of interest is routinely performed during kinase inhibitor development to identify promising scaffolds for a particular target and to identify kinase targets for compounds of interest. Screening of more focused compound libraries may also be conducted in the later stages of inhibitor development to improve potency and optimize selectivity. The dot blot kinase assay is a robust, high-throughput kinase assay that can be used to screen a number of small-molecule compounds against one kinase of interest or several kinases. Here, a protocol for a dot blot kinase assay used for measuring insulin receptor kinase activity is presented. This protocol can be readily adapted for use with other protein kinases. PMID:26501904

  5. High-Throughput Cell Toxicity Assays.

    PubMed

    Murray, David; McWilliams, Lisa; Wigglesworth, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Understanding compound-driven cell toxicity is vitally important for all drug discovery approaches. With high-throughput screening (HTS) being the key strategy to find hit and lead compounds for drug discovery projects in the pharmaceutical industry [1], an understanding of the cell toxicity profile of hit molecules from HTS activities is fundamentally important. Recently, there has been a resurgence of interest in phenotypic drug discovery and these cell-based assays are now being run in HTS labs on ever increasing numbers of compounds. As the use of cell assays increases the ability to measure toxicity of compounds on a large scale becomes increasingly important to ensure that false hits are not progressed and that compounds do not carry forward a toxic liability that may cause them to fail at later stages of a project. Here we describe methods employed in the AstraZeneca HTS laboratory to carry out very large scale cell toxicity screening. PMID:27317000

  6. High throughput assays for analyzing transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Li, Xianqiang; Jiang, Xin; Yaoi, Takuro

    2006-06-01

    Transcription factors are a group of proteins that modulate the expression of genes involved in many biological processes, such as cell growth and differentiation. Alterations in transcription factor function are associated with many human diseases, and therefore these proteins are attractive potential drug targets. A key issue in the development of such therapeutics is the generation of effective tools that can be used for high throughput discovery of the critical transcription factors involved in human diseases, and the measurement of their activities in a variety of disease or compound-treated samples. Here, a number of innovative arrays and 96-well format assays for profiling and measuring the activities of transcription factors will be discussed. PMID:16834538

  7. High-throughput cellular RNA device engineering.

    PubMed

    Townshend, Brent; Kennedy, Andrew B; Xiang, Joy S; Smolke, Christina D

    2015-10-01

    Methods for rapidly assessing sequence-structure-function landscapes and developing conditional gene-regulatory devices are critical to our ability to manipulate and interface with biology. We describe a framework for engineering RNA devices from preexisting aptamers that exhibit ligand-responsive ribozyme tertiary interactions. Our methodology utilizes cell sorting, high-throughput sequencing and statistical data analyses to enable parallel measurements of the activities of hundreds of thousands of sequences from RNA device libraries in the absence and presence of ligands. Our tertiary-interaction RNA devices performed better in terms of gene silencing, activation ratio and ligand sensitivity than optimized RNA devices that rely on secondary-structure changes. We applied our method to build biosensors for diverse ligands and determine consensus sequences that enable ligand-responsive tertiary interactions. These methods advance our ability to develop broadly applicable genetic tools and to elucidate the underlying sequence-structure-function relationships that empower rational design of complex biomolecules. PMID:26258292

  8. Origin and evolution of high throughput screening

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, D A; Williams, J A

    2007-01-01

    This article reviews the origin and evolution of high throughput screening (HTS) through the experience of an individual pharmaceutical company, revealing some of the mysteries of the early stages of drug discovery to the wider pharmacology audience. HTS in this company (Pfizer, Groton, USA) had its origin in natural products screening in 1986, by substituting fermentation broths with dimethyl sulphoxide solutions of synthetic compounds, using 96-well plates and reduced assay volumes of 50-100μl. A nominal 30mM source compound concentration provided high μM assay concentrations. Starting at 800 compounds each week, the process reached a steady state of 7200 compounds per week by 1989. Screening in the Applied Biotechnology and Screening Group was centralized with screens operating in lock-step to maximize efficiency. Initial screens were full files run in triplicate. Autoradiography and image analysis were introduced for 125I receptor ligand screens. Reverse transcriptase (RT) coupled with quantitative PCR and multiplexing addressed several targets in a single assay. By 1992 HTS produced ‘hits' as starting matter for approximately 40% of the Discovery portfolio. In 1995, the HTS methodology was expanded to include ADMET targets. ADME targets required each compound to be physically detected leading to the development of automated high throughput LC-MS. In 1996, 90 compounds/week were screened in microsomal, protein binding and serum stability assays. Subsequently, the mutagenic Ames assay was adapted to a 96-well plate liquid assay and novel algorithms permitted automated image analysis of the micronucleus assay. By 1999 ADME HTS was fully integrated into the discovery cycle. PMID:17603542

  9. High-Throughput Methods for Electron Crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Stokes, David L.; Ubarretxena-Belandia, Iban; Gonen, Tamir; Engel, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Membrane proteins play a tremendously important role in cell physiology and serve as a target for an increasing number of drugs. Structural information is key to understanding their function and for developing new strategies for combating disease. However, the complex physical chemistry associated with membrane proteins has made them more difficult to study than their soluble cousins. Electron crystallography has historically been a successful method for solving membrane protein structures and has the advantage of providing the natural environment of a lipid membrane. Specifically, when membrane proteins form two-dimensional arrays within a lipid bilayer, images and diffraction can be recorded by electron microscopy. The corresponding data can be combined to produce a three-dimensional reconstruction which, under favorable conditions, can extend to atomic resolution. Like X-ray crystallography, the quality of the structures are very much dependent on the order and size of the crystals. However, unlike X-ray crystallography, high-throughput methods for screening crystallization trials for electron crystallography are not in general use. In this chapter, we describe two alternative and potentially complementary methods for high-throughput screening of membrane protein crystallization within the lipid bilayer. The first method relies on the conventional use of dialysis for removing detergent and thus reconstituting the bilayer; an array of dialysis wells in the standard 96-well format allows the use of a liquid-handling robot and greatly increases throughput. The second method relies on detergent complexation by cyclodextrin; a specialized pipetting robot has been designed not only to titrate cyclodextrin, but to use light scattering to monitor the reconstitution process. In addition, the use of liquid-handling robots for making negatively stained grids and methods for automatically imaging samples in the electron microscope are described. PMID:23132066

  10. Use of a Recombinant Fluorescent Substrate with Cleavage Sites for All Botulinum Neurotoxins in High-Throughput Screening of Natural Product Extracts for Inhibitors of Serotypes A, B, and E▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Hines, Harry B.; Kim, Alexander D.; Stafford, Robert G.; Badie, Shirin S.; Brueggeman, Ernst E.; Newman, David J.; Schmidt, James J.

    2008-01-01

    The seven serotypes of botulinum neurotoxin (BoNTs) are zinc metalloproteases that cleave and inactivate proteins critical for neurotransmission. The synaptosomal protein of 25 kDa (SNAP-25) is cleaved by BoNTs A, C, and E, while vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP) is the substrate for BoNTs B, D, F, and G. BoNTs not only are medically useful drugs but also are potential bioterrorist and biowarfare threat agents. Because BoNT protease activity is required for toxicity, inhibitors of that activity might be effective for antibotulinum therapy. To expedite inhibitor discovery, we constructed a hybrid gene encoding (from the N terminus to the C terminus, with respect to the expressed product) green fluorescent protein, then a SNAP-25 fragment encompassing residues Met-127 to Gly-206, and then VAMP residues Met-1 to Lys-94. Cysteine was added as the C terminus. The expressed product, which contained the protease cleavage sites for all seven botulinum serotypes, was purified and coupled covalently through the C-terminal sulfhydryl group to maleimide-activated 96-well plates. The substrate was readily cleaved by BoNTs A, B, D, E, and F. Using this assay and an automated 96-well pipettor, we screened 528 natural product extracts for inhibitors of BoNT A, B, and E protease activities. Serotype-specific inhibition was found in 30 extracts, while 5 others inhibited two serotypes. PMID:18083881

  11. High-throughput microcavitation bubble induced cellular mechanotransduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compton, Jonathan Lee

    inhibitor to IP 3 induced Ca2+ release. This capability opens the development of a high-throughput screening platform for molecules that modulate cellular mechanotransduction. We have applied this approach to screen the effects of a small set of small molecules, in a 96-well plate in less than an hour. These detailed studies offer a basis for the design, development, and implementation of a novel high-throughput mechanotransduction assay to rapidly screen the effect of small molecules on cellular mechanotransduction at high throughput.

  12. Data Analysis for High-Throughput RNAi Screening.

    PubMed

    Azorsa, David O; Turnidge, Megan A; Arora, Shilpi

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput RNA interference (HT-RNAi) screening is an effective technology to help identify important genes and pathways involved in a biological process. Analysis of high-throughput RNAi screening data is a critical part of this technology, and many analysis methods have been described. Here, we summarize the workflow and types of analyses commonly used in high-throughput RNAi screening. PMID:27581298

  13. High Throughput Screening and Selection Methods for Directed Enzyme Evolution

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Successful evolutionary enzyme engineering requires a high throughput screening or selection method, which considerably increases the chance of obtaining desired properties and reduces the time and cost. In this review, a series of high throughput screening and selection methods are illustrated with significant and recent examples. These high throughput strategies are also discussed with an emphasis on compatibility with phenotypic analysis during directed enzyme evolution. Lastly, certain limitations of current methods, as well as future developments, are briefly summarized. PMID:26074668

  14. Ultrasound measurements of carotid intima-media thickness by two semi-automated analysis systems.

    PubMed

    Ring, M; Eriksson, M J; Jogestrand, T; Caidahl, K

    2016-09-01

    Increased carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) is associated with an increased risk of cardiac events and stroke. Several semi-automated edge-detection techniques for measuring cIMT are used for research and in clinical practice. Our aim was to compare two currently available semi-automated techniques for the measurement of cIMT. Carotid ultrasound recordings were obtained from 99 subjects (mean age 54·4 ± 8·9 years, range 33-69) without known cardiovascular diseases using a General Electric (GE) Vivid 7 ultrasound scanner, 8-MHz transducer. The far-wall cIMT was evaluated 1-2 cm proximal to the carotid bulb. Three diastolic images (ECG R-wave) from the left and three images from the right common carotid arteries were analysed using GE and Artery Measurement System (AMS) semi-automated softwares. Mean systolic and diastolic blood pressures were 120 ± 13 and 76 ± 8 mmHg, respectively. The cIMTmean (left + right)/2 by GE and cIMTmean (left + right)/2 AMS were highly correlated (r = 0·92, P<0·001). Higher values were measured by GE (0·72 ± 0·12 mm) compared with AMS (0·69 ± 0·12 mm), and this was significant (P<0·001). The coefficients of variation for the intra-observer variability of cIMTmean (left + right)/2 were 1·0% (GE) and 2·2% (AMS). cIMTmean measured by GE's semi-automated edge-detection method correlated well with that measured by AMS. However, there were small but significant systematic differences between the cIMTmean values measured by the two techniques. Thus, the use of only one type of measurement program seems favourable in follow-up studies and when evaluating treatment effects. PMID:26046377

  15. A semi-automated computer tool for the analysis of retinal vessel diameter dynamics.

    PubMed

    Euvrard, Guillaume; Genevois, Olivier; Rivals, Isabelle; Massin, Pascale; Collet, Amélie; Sahel, José-Alain; Paques, Michel

    2013-06-01

    Retinal vessels are directly accessible to clinical observation. This has numerous potential interests for medical investigations. Using the Retinal Vessel Analyzer, a dedicated eye fundus camera enabling dynamic, video-rate recording of micrometric changes of the diameter of retinal vessels, we developed a semi-automated computer tool that extracts the heart beat rate and pulse amplitude values from the records. The extracted data enabled us to show that there is a decreasing relationship between heart beat rate and pulse amplitude of arteries and veins. Such an approach will facilitate the modeling of hemodynamic interactions in small vessels. PMID:23566397

  16. Viscoelasticity as a Biomarker for High-Throughput Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Sawetzki, Tobias; Eggleton, Charles D.; Desai, Sanjay A.; Marr, David W.M.

    2013-01-01

    The mechanical properties of living cells are a label-free biophysical marker of cell viability and health; however, their use has been greatly limited by low measurement throughput. Although examining individual cells at high rates is now commonplace with fluorescence activated cell sorters, development of comparable techniques that nondestructively probe cell mechanics remains challenging. A fundamental hurdle is the signal response time. Where light scattering and fluorescence signatures are virtually instantaneous, the cell stress relaxation, typically occurring on the order of seconds, limits the potential speed of elastic property measurement. To overcome this intrinsic barrier to rapid analysis, we show here that cell viscoelastic properties measured at frequencies far higher than those associated with cell relaxation can be used as a means of identifying significant differences in cell phenotype. In these studies, we explore changes in erythrocyte mechanical properties caused by infection with Plasmodium falciparum and find that the elastic response alone fails to detect malaria at high frequencies. At timescales associated with rapid assays, however, we observe that the inelastic response shows significant changes and can be used as a reliable indicator of infection, establishing the dynamic viscoelasticity as a basis for nondestructive mechanical analogs of current high-throughput cell classification methods. PMID:24268140

  17. High-throughput analysis and protein engineering using microcapillary arrays.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bob; Lim, Sungwon; Kannan, Arvind; Alford, Spencer C; Sunden, Fanny; Herschlag, Daniel; Dimov, Ivan K; Baer, Thomas M; Cochran, Jennifer R

    2016-02-01

    We describe a multipurpose technology platform, termed μSCALE (microcapillary single-cell analysis and laser extraction), that enables massively parallel, quantitative biochemical and biophysical measurements on millions of protein variants expressed from yeast or bacteria. μSCALE spatially segregates single cells within a microcapillary array, enabling repeated imaging, cell growth and protein expression. We performed high-throughput analysis of cells and their protein products using a range of fluorescent assays, including binding-affinity measurements and dynamic enzymatic assays. A precise laser-based extraction method allows rapid recovery of live clones and their genetic material from microcapillaries for further study. With μSCALE, we discovered a new antibody against a clinical cancer target, evolved a fluorescent protein biosensor and engineered an enzyme to reduce its sensitivity to its inhibitor. These protein analysis and engineering applications each have unique assay requirements and different host organisms, highlighting the flexibility and technical capabilities of the μSCALE platform. PMID:26641932

  18. High throughput sample processing and automated scoring.

    PubMed

    Brunborg, Gunnar; Jackson, Petra; Shaposhnikov, Sergey; Dahl, Hildegunn; Azqueta, Amaya; Collins, Andrew R; Gutzkow, Kristine B

    2014-01-01

    The comet assay is a sensitive and versatile method for assessing DNA damage in cells. In the traditional version of the assay, there are many manual steps involved and few samples can be treated in one experiment. High throughput (HT) modifications have been developed during recent years, and they are reviewed and discussed. These modifications include accelerated scoring of comets; other important elements that have been studied and adapted to HT are cultivation and manipulation of cells or tissues before and after exposure, and freezing of treated samples until comet analysis and scoring. HT methods save time and money but they are useful also for other reasons: large-scale experiments may be performed which are otherwise not practicable (e.g., analysis of many organs from exposed animals, and human biomonitoring studies), and automation gives more uniform sample treatment and less dependence on operator performance. The HT modifications now available vary largely in their versatility, capacity, complexity, and costs. The bottleneck for further increase of throughput appears to be the scoring. PMID:25389434

  19. High-throughput rod-induced electrospinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Dezhi; Xiao, Zhiming; Teh, Kwok Siong; Han, Zhibin; Luo, Guoxi; Shi, Chuan; Sun, Daoheng; Zhao, Jinbao; Lin, Liwei

    2016-09-01

    A high throughput electrospinning process, directly from flat polymer solution surfaces induced by a moving insulating rod, has been proposed and demonstrated. Different rods made of either phenolic resin or paper with a diameter of 1–3 cm and a resistance of about 100–500 MΩ, has been successfully utilized in the process. The rod is placed approximately 10 mm above the flat polymer solution surface with a moving speed of 0.005–0.4 m s‑1 this causes the solution to generate multiple liquid jets under an applied voltage of 15–60 kV for the tip-less electrospinning process. The local electric field induced by the rod can boost electrohydrodynamic instability in order to generate Taylor cones and liquid jets. Experimentally, it is found that a large rod diameter and a small solution-to-rod distance can enhance the local electrical field to reduce the magnitude of the applied voltage. In the prototype setup with poly (ethylene oxide) polymer solution, an area of 5 cm  ×  10 cm and under an applied voltage of 60 kV, the maximum throughput of nanofibers is recorded to be approximately144 g m‑2 h‑1.

  20. High-Throughput Enzyme Kinetics Using Microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Guoxin Lu; Edward S. Yeung

    2007-11-01

    We report a microanalytical method to study enzyme kinetics. The technique involves immobilizing horseradish peroxidase on a poly-L-lysine (PLL)- coated glass slide in a microarray format, followed by applying substrate solution onto the enzyme microarray. Enzyme molecules are immobilized on the PLL-coated glass slide through electrostatic interactions, and no further modification of the enzyme or glass slide is needed. In situ detection of the products generated on the enzyme spots is made possible by monitoring the light intensity of each spot using a scientific-grade charged-coupled device (CCD). Reactions of substrate solutions of various types and concentrations can be carried out sequentially on one enzyme microarray. To account for the loss of enzyme from washing in between runs, a standard substrate solution is used for calibration. Substantially reduced amounts of substrate solution are consumed for each reaction on each enzyme spot. The Michaelis constant K{sub m} obtained by using this method is comparable to the result for homogeneous solutions. Absorbance detection allows universal monitoring, and no chemical modification of the substrate is needed. High-throughput studies of native enzyme kinetics for multiple enzymes are therefore possible in a simple, rapid, and low-cost manner.

  1. High throughput sample processing and automated scoring

    PubMed Central

    Brunborg, Gunnar; Jackson, Petra; Shaposhnikov, Sergey; Dahl, Hildegunn; Azqueta, Amaya; Collins, Andrew R.; Gutzkow, Kristine B.

    2014-01-01

    The comet assay is a sensitive and versatile method for assessing DNA damage in cells. In the traditional version of the assay, there are many manual steps involved and few samples can be treated in one experiment. High throughput (HT) modifications have been developed during recent years, and they are reviewed and discussed. These modifications include accelerated scoring of comets; other important elements that have been studied and adapted to HT are cultivation and manipulation of cells or tissues before and after exposure, and freezing of treated samples until comet analysis and scoring. HT methods save time and money but they are useful also for other reasons: large-scale experiments may be performed which are otherwise not practicable (e.g., analysis of many organs from exposed animals, and human biomonitoring studies), and automation gives more uniform sample treatment and less dependence on operator performance. The HT modifications now available vary largely in their versatility, capacity, complexity, and costs. The bottleneck for further increase of throughput appears to be the scoring. PMID:25389434

  2. Orthogonal NGS for High Throughput Clinical Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Chennagiri, Niru; White, Eric J.; Frieden, Alexander; Lopez, Edgardo; Lieber, Daniel S.; Nikiforov, Anastasia; Ross, Tristen; Batorsky, Rebecca; Hansen, Sherry; Lip, Va; Luquette, Lovelace J.; Mauceli, Evan; Margulies, David; Milos, Patrice M.; Napolitano, Nichole; Nizzari, Marcia M.; Yu, Timothy; Thompson, John F.

    2016-01-01

    Next generation sequencing is a transformative technology for discovering and diagnosing genetic disorders. However, high-throughput sequencing remains error-prone, necessitating variant confirmation in order to meet the exacting demands of clinical diagnostic sequencing. To address this, we devised an orthogonal, dual platform approach employing complementary target capture and sequencing chemistries to improve speed and accuracy of variant calls at a genomic scale. We combined DNA selection by bait-based hybridization followed by Illumina NextSeq reversible terminator sequencing with DNA selection by amplification followed by Ion Proton semiconductor sequencing. This approach yields genomic scale orthogonal confirmation of ~95% of exome variants. Overall variant sensitivity improves as each method covers thousands of coding exons missed by the other. We conclude that orthogonal NGS offers improvements in variant calling sensitivity when two platforms are used, better specificity for variants identified on both platforms, and greatly reduces the time and expense of Sanger follow-up, thus enabling physicians to act on genomic results more quickly. PMID:27090146

  3. A Novel High-Throughput Approach to Measure Hydroxyl Radicals Induced by Airborne Particulate Matter

    PubMed Central

    Son, Yeongkwon; Mishin, Vladimir; Welsh, William; Lu, Shou-En; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Kipen, Howard; Meng, Qingyu

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is one of the key mechanisms linking ambient particulate matter (PM) exposure with various adverse health effects. The oxidative potential of PM has been used to characterize the ability of PM induced oxidative stress. Hydroxyl radical (•OH) is the most destructive radical produced by PM. However, there is currently no high-throughput approach which can rapidly measure PM-induced •OH for a large number of samples with an automated system. This study evaluated four existing molecular probes (disodium terephthalate, 3′-p-(aminophenyl)fluorescein, coumarin-3-carboxylic acid, and sodium benzoate) for their applicability to measure •OH induced by PM in a high-throughput cell-free system using fluorescence techniques, based on both our experiments and on an assessment of the physicochemical properties of the probes reported in the literature. Disodium terephthalate (TPT) was the most applicable molecular probe to measure •OH induced by PM, due to its high solubility, high stability of the corresponding fluorescent product (i.e., 2-hydroxyterephthalic acid), high yield compared with the other molecular probes, and stable fluorescence intensity in a wide range of pH environments. TPT was applied in a high-throughput format to measure PM (NIST 1648a)-induced •OH, in phosphate buffered saline. The formed fluorescent product was measured at designated time points up to 2 h. The fluorescent product of TPT had a detection limit of 17.59 nM. The soluble fraction of PM contributed approximately 76.9% of the •OH induced by total PM, and the soluble metal ions of PM contributed 57.4% of the overall •OH formation. This study provides a promising cost-effective high-throughput method to measure •OH induced by PM on a routine basis. PMID:26516887

  4. Agile based "Semi-"Automated Data ingest process : ORNL DAAC example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santhana Vannan, S. K.; Beaty, T.; Cook, R. B.; Devarakonda, R.; Hook, L.; Wei, Y.; Wright, D.

    2015-12-01

    The ORNL DAAC archives and publishes data and information relevant to biogeochemical, ecological, and environmental processes. The data archived at the ORNL DAAC must be well formatted, self-descriptive, and documented, as well as referenced in a peer-reviewed publication. The ORNL DAAC ingest team curates diverse data sets from multiple data providers simultaneously. To streamline the ingest process, the data set submission process at the ORNL DAAC has been recently updated to use an agile process and a semi-automated workflow system has been developed to provide a consistent data provider experience and to create a uniform data product. The goals of semi-automated agile ingest process are to: 1.Provide the ability to track a data set from acceptance to publication 2. Automate steps that can be automated to improve efficiencies and reduce redundancy 3.Update legacy ingest infrastructure 4.Provide a centralized system to manage the various aspects of ingest. This talk will cover the agile methodology, workflow, and tools developed through this system.

  5. Semi-automated based ground-truthing GUI for airborne imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phan, Chung; Lydic, Rich; Moore, Tim; Trang, Anh; Agarwal, Sanjeev; Tiwari, Spandan

    2005-06-01

    Over the past several years, an enormous amount of airborne imagery consisting of various formats has been collected and will continue into the future to support airborne mine/minefield detection processes, improve algorithm development, and aid in imaging sensor development. The ground-truthing of imagery is a very essential part of the algorithm development process to help validate the detection performance of the sensor and improving algorithm techniques. The GUI (Graphical User Interface) called SemiTruth was developed using Matlab software incorporating signal processing, image processing, and statistics toolboxes to aid in ground-truthing imagery. The semi-automated ground-truthing GUI is made possible with the current data collection method, that is including UTM/GPS (Universal Transverse Mercator/Global Positioning System) coordinate measurements for the mine target and fiducial locations on the given minefield layout to support in identification of the targets on the raw imagery. This semi-automated ground-truthing effort has developed by the US Army RDECOM CERDEC Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate (NVESD), Countermine Division, Airborne Application Branch with some support by the University of Missouri-Rolla.

  6. Validation of a New Semi-Automated Technique to Evaluate Muscle Capillarization.

    PubMed

    Ballak, Sam B; Yap, Moi H; Harding, Peter J; Degens, Hans

    2016-01-01

    The method of capillary domains has often been used to study capillarization of skeletal and heart muscle. However, the conventional data processing method using a digitizing tablet is an arduous and time-consuming task. Here we compare a new semi-automated capillary domain data collection and analysis in muscle tissue with the standard capillary domain method. The capillary density (1481±59 vs. 1447±54 caps mm(-2); R2:0.99; P<0.01) and heterogeneity of capillary spacing (0.085±0.002 vs. 0.085±0.002; R2:0.95; P<0.01) were similar in both methods. The fiber cross-sectional area correlated well between the methods (R2:0.84; P<0.01) and did not differ significantly (~8% larger in the old than new method at P=0.08). The latter was likely due to differences in outlining the contours between the two methods. In conclusion, the semi-automated method gives quantitatively and qualitatively similar data as the conventional method and saves a considerable amount of time. PMID:26782199

  7. von Willebrand Factor multimers profiling with a semi-automated system.

    PubMed

    Pasotti, Fabio; Martini, Giuliana; Caimi, Luigi; Ricotta, Doris

    2013-03-01

    Abnormalities in plasma von Willebrand factor (vWF) concentration and function result in von Willebrand disease (vWD). The diagnosis requires a battery of tests such as screening procedures, confirmatory tests, phenotypic characterization, and genotyping. The phenotypic testing (multimer pattern analysis) is important in order to subclassify the hereditary and the acquired forms of vWD. Only few laboratories are skilled to perform this analysis. The extreme range of protein size from 250 kDa monomer to over 20,000 kDa multimers requires a time-consuming procedure (3-4 days) and presents many technical difficulties. To standardize the method and to overcome technical difficulties, we developed a rapid and sensitive semi-automated method to visualize the multimeric structure of vWF. The semi-automated method we present performs the electrophoresis of patient's plasma in 120 min on a precast gel. Gels are suitable for the G26 Interlab instrumentation. After gel blotting, the method allows visualization of the vWF multimer pattern directly on the membrane. We reduced the time required from 72 to 8 h and we propose this test for the first level screening of vWF multimer deficiency. PMID:23334940

  8. High-Throughput Baculovirus Expression System for Membrane Protein Production.

    PubMed

    Kalathur, Ravi C; Panganiban, Marinela; Bruni, Renato

    2016-01-01

    The ease of use, robustness, cost-effectiveness, and posttranslational machinery make baculovirus expression system a popular choice for production of eukaryotic membrane proteins. This system can be readily adapted for high-throughput operations. This chapter outlines the techniques and procedures for cloning, transfection, small-scale production, and purification of membrane protein samples in a high-throughput manner. PMID:27485337

  9. SPIM-fluid: open source light-sheet based platform for high-throughput imaging.

    PubMed

    Gualda, Emilio J; Pereira, Hugo; Vale, Tiago; Estrada, Marta Falcão; Brito, Catarina; Moreno, Nuno

    2015-11-01

    Light sheet fluorescence microscopy has recently emerged as the technique of choice for obtaining high quality 3D images of whole organisms/embryos with low photodamage and fast acquisition rates. Here we present an open source unified implementation based on Arduino and Micromanager, which is capable of operating Light Sheet Microscopes for automatized 3D high-throughput imaging on three-dimensional cell cultures and model organisms like zebrafish, oriented to massive drug screening. PMID:26601007

  10. SPIM-fluid: open source light-sheet based platform for high-throughput imaging

    PubMed Central

    Gualda, Emilio J.; Pereira, Hugo; Vale, Tiago; Estrada, Marta Falcão; Brito, Catarina; Moreno, Nuno

    2015-01-01

    Light sheet fluorescence microscopy has recently emerged as the technique of choice for obtaining high quality 3D images of whole organisms/embryos with low photodamage and fast acquisition rates. Here we present an open source unified implementation based on Arduino and Micromanager, which is capable of operating Light Sheet Microscopes for automatized 3D high-throughput imaging on three-dimensional cell cultures and model organisms like zebrafish, oriented to massive drug screening. PMID:26601007

  11. High-throughput measurements of the optical redox ratio using a commercial microplate reader

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannon, Taylor M.; Shah, Amy T.; Walsh, Alex J.; Skala, Melissa C.

    2015-01-01

    There is a need for accurate, high-throughput, functional measures to gauge the efficacy of potential drugs in living cells. As an early marker of drug response in cells, cellular metabolism provides an attractive platform for high-throughput drug testing. Optical techniques can noninvasively monitor NADH and FAD, two autofluorescent metabolic coenzymes. The autofluorescent redox ratio, defined as the autofluorescence intensity of NADH divided by that of FAD, quantifies relative rates of cellular glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation. However, current microscopy methods for redox ratio quantification are time-intensive and low-throughput, limiting their practicality in drug screening. Alternatively, high-throughput commercial microplate readers quickly measure fluorescence intensities for hundreds of wells. This study found that a commercial microplate reader can differentiate the receptor status of breast cancer cell lines (p<0.05) based on redox ratio measurements without extrinsic contrast agents. Furthermore, microplate reader redox ratio measurements resolve response (p<0.05) and lack of response (p>0.05) in cell lines that are responsive and nonresponsive, respectively, to the breast cancer drug trastuzumab. These studies indicate that the microplate readers can be used to measure the redox ratio in a high-throughput manner and are sensitive enough to detect differences in cellular metabolism that are consistent with microscopy results.

  12. Fluorometric High-Throughput Screening Assay for Secreted Phospholipases A2 Using Phospholipid Vesicles.

    PubMed

    Ewing, Heather; Fernández-Vega, Virneliz; Spicer, Timothy P; Chase, Peter; Brown, Steven; Scampavia, Louis; Roush, William R; Riley, Sean; Rosen, Hugh; Hodder, Peter; Lambeau, Gerard; Gelb, Michael H

    2016-08-01

    There is interest in developing inhibitors of human group III secreted phospholipase A2 (hGIII-sPLA2) because this enzyme plays a role in mast cell maturation. There are no potent inhibitors for hGIII-sPLA2 reported to date, so we adapted a fluorescence-based enzyme activity monitoring method to a high-throughput screening format. We opted to use an assay based on phospholipid substrate present in phospholipid vesicles since this matrix more closely resembles the natural substrate of hGIII-sPLA2, as opposed to phospholipid/detergent mixed micelles. The substrate is a phospholipid analogue containing BODIPY fluorophores dispersed as a minor component in vesicles of nonfluorescent phospholipids. Action of hGIII-sPLA2 liberates a free fatty acid from the phospholipid, leading to a reduction in quenching of the fluorophore and hence an increase in fluorescence. The assay uses optical detection in a 1536-well plate format with an excitation wavelength far away from the UV range so as to minimize false-positive library hits that result from quenching of the fluorescence. The high-throughput screen was successfully carried out on a library of 370,276 small molecules. Several hits were discovered, and data have been uploaded to PubChem. This study describes the first high-throughput optical screening assay for secreted phospholipase A2 inhibitors based on a phospholipid vesicle substrate. PMID:27146384

  13. A High-Throughput Screen for Antibiotic Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Scanlon, Thomas C.; Dostal, Sarah M.; Griswold, Karl E.

    2014-01-01

    We describe an ultra-high-throughput screening platform enabling discovery and/or engineering of natural product antibiotics. The methodology involves creation of hydrogel-in-oil emulsions in which recombinant microorganisms are co-emulsified with bacterial pathogens; antibiotic activity is assayed by use of a fluorescent viability dye. We have successfully utilized both bulk emulsification and microfluidic technology for the generation of hydrogel microdroplets that are size-compatible with conventional flow cytometry. Hydrogel droplets are ~25 pL in volume, and can be synthesized and sorted at rates exceeding 3,000 drops/s. Using this technique, we have achieved screening throughputs exceeding 5 million clones/day. Proof-of-concept experiments demonstrate efficient selection of antibiotic-secreting yeast from a vast excess of negative controls. In addition, we have successfully used this technique to screen a metagenomic library for secreted antibiotics that kill the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. Our results establish the practical utility of the screening platform, and we anticipate that the accessible nature of our methods will enable others seeking to identify and engineer the next generation of antibacterial biomolecules. PMID:23955804

  14. High-throughput microfluidic line scan imaging for cytological characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutcheson, Joshua A.; Powless, Amy J.; Majid, Aneeka A.; Claycomb, Adair; Fritsch, Ingrid; Balachandran, Kartik; Muldoon, Timothy J.

    2015-03-01

    Imaging cells in a microfluidic chamber with an area scan camera is difficult due to motion blur and data loss during frame readout causing discontinuity of data acquisition as cells move at relatively high speeds through the chamber. We have developed a method to continuously acquire high-resolution images of cells in motion through a microfluidics chamber using a high-speed line scan camera. The sensor acquires images in a line-by-line fashion in order to continuously image moving objects without motion blur. The optical setup comprises an epi-illuminated microscope with a 40X oil immersion, 1.4 NA objective and a 150 mm tube lens focused on a microfluidic channel. Samples containing suspended cells fluorescently stained with 0.01% (w/v) proflavine in saline are introduced into the microfluidics chamber via a syringe pump; illumination is provided by a blue LED (455 nm). Images were taken of samples at the focal plane using an ELiiXA+ 8k/4k monochrome line-scan camera at a line rate of up to 40 kHz. The system's line rate and fluid velocity are tightly controlled to reduce image distortion and are validated using fluorescent microspheres. Image acquisition was controlled via MATLAB's Image Acquisition toolbox. Data sets comprise discrete images of every detectable cell which may be subsequently mined for morphological statistics and definable features by a custom texture analysis algorithm. This high-throughput screening method, comparable to cell counting by flow cytometry, provided efficient examination including counting, classification, and differentiation of saliva, blood, and cultured human cancer cells.

  15. Using Tomoauto: A Protocol for High-throughput Automated Cryo-electron Tomography.

    PubMed

    Morado, Dustin R; Hu, Bo; Liu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Cryo-electron tomography (Cryo-ET) is a powerful three-dimensional (3-D) imaging technique for visualizing macromolecular complexes in their native context at a molecular level. The technique involves initially preserving the sample in its native state by rapidly freezing the specimen in vitreous ice, then collecting a series of micrographs from different angles at high magnification, and finally computationally reconstructing a 3-D density map. The frozen-hydrated specimen is extremely sensitive to the electron beam and so micrographs are collected at very low electron doses to limit the radiation damage. As a result, the raw cryo-tomogram has a very low signal to noise ratio characterized by an intrinsically noisy image. To better visualize subjects of interest, conventional imaging analysis and sub-tomogram averaging in which sub-tomograms of the subject are extracted from the initial tomogram and aligned and averaged are utilized to improve both contrast and resolution. Large datasets of tilt-series are essential to understanding and resolving the complexes at different states, conditions, or mutations as well as obtaining a large enough collection of sub-tomograms for averaging and classification. Collecting and processing this data can be a major obstacle preventing further analysis. Here we describe a high-throughput cryo-ET protocol based on a computer-controlled 300kV cryo-electron microscope, a direct detection device (DDD) camera and a highly effective, semi-automated image-processing pipeline software wrapper library tomoauto developed in-house. This protocol has been effectively utilized to visualize the intact type III secretion system (T3SS) in Shigella flexneri minicells. It can be applicable to any project suitable for cryo-ET. PMID:26863591

  16. GiA Roots: software for the high throughput analysis of plant root system architecture

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Characterizing root system architecture (RSA) is essential to understanding the development and function of vascular plants. Identifying RSA-associated genes also represents an underexplored opportunity for crop improvement. Software tools are needed to accelerate the pace at which quantitative traits of RSA are estimated from images of root networks. Results We have developed GiA Roots (General Image Analysis of Roots), a semi-automated software tool designed specifically for the high-throughput analysis of root system images. GiA Roots includes user-assisted algorithms to distinguish root from background and a fully automated pipeline that extracts dozens of root system phenotypes. Quantitative information on each phenotype, along with intermediate steps for full reproducibility, is returned to the end-user for downstream analysis. GiA Roots has a GUI front end and a command-line interface for interweaving the software into large-scale workflows. GiA Roots can also be extended to estimate novel phenotypes specified by the end-user. Conclusions We demonstrate the use of GiA Roots on a set of 2393 images of rice roots representing 12 genotypes from the species Oryza sativa. We validate trait measurements against prior analyses of this image set that demonstrated that RSA traits are likely heritable and associated with genotypic differences. Moreover, we demonstrate that GiA Roots is extensible and an end-user can add functionality so that GiA Roots can estimate novel RSA traits. In summary, we show that the software can function as an efficient tool as part of a workflow to move from large numbers of root images to downstream analysis. PMID:22834569

  17. Semi-automated identification of cones in the human retina using circle Hough transform

    PubMed Central

    Bukowska, Danuta M.; Chew, Avenell L.; Huynh, Emily; Kashani, Irwin; Wan, Sue Ling; Wan, Pak Ming; Chen, Fred K

    2015-01-01

    A large number of human retinal diseases are characterized by a progressive loss of cones, the photoreceptors critical for visual acuity and color perception. Adaptive Optics (AO) imaging presents a potential method to study these cells in vivo. However, AO imaging in ophthalmology is a relatively new phenomenon and quantitative analysis of these images remains difficult and tedious using manual methods. This paper illustrates a novel semi-automated quantitative technique enabling registration of AO images to macular landmarks, cone counting and its radius quantification at specified distances from the foveal center. The new cone counting approach employs the circle Hough transform (cHT) and is compared to automated counting methods, as well as arbitrated manual cone identification. We explore the impact of varying the circle detection parameter on the validity of cHT cone counting and discuss the potential role of using this algorithm in detecting both cones and rods separately. PMID:26713186

  18. Semi-automated identification of cones in the human retina using circle Hough transform.

    PubMed

    Bukowska, Danuta M; Chew, Avenell L; Huynh, Emily; Kashani, Irwin; Wan, Sue Ling; Wan, Pak Ming; Chen, Fred K

    2015-12-01

    A large number of human retinal diseases are characterized by a progressive loss of cones, the photoreceptors critical for visual acuity and color perception. Adaptive Optics (AO) imaging presents a potential method to study these cells in vivo. However, AO imaging in ophthalmology is a relatively new phenomenon and quantitative analysis of these images remains difficult and tedious using manual methods. This paper illustrates a novel semi-automated quantitative technique enabling registration of AO images to macular landmarks, cone counting and its radius quantification at specified distances from the foveal center. The new cone counting approach employs the circle Hough transform (cHT) and is compared to automated counting methods, as well as arbitrated manual cone identification. We explore the impact of varying the circle detection parameter on the validity of cHT cone counting and discuss the potential role of using this algorithm in detecting both cones and rods separately. PMID:26713186

  19. Semi-Automated Atlas-based Analysis of Brain Histological Sections

    PubMed Central

    Kopec, Charles D.; Bowers, Amanda C.; Pai, Shraddha; Brody, Carlos D.

    2011-01-01

    Quantifying the location and/or number of features in a histological section of the brain currently requires one to first, manually register a corresponding section from a tissue atlas onto the experimental section and second, count the features. No automated method exists for the first process (registering), and most automated methods for the second process (feature counting) operate reliably only in a high signal-to-noise regime. To reduce experimenter bias and inconsistencies and increase the speed of these analyses, we developed Atlas Fitter, a semi-automated, open-source MatLab-based software package that assists in rapidly registering atlas panels onto histological sections. We also developed CellCounter, a novel fully-automated cell counting algorithm that is designed to operate on images with non-uniform background intensities and low signal-to-noise ratios. PMID:21194546

  20. Semantic enrichment of medical forms - semi-automated coding of ODM-elements via web services.

    PubMed

    Breil, Bernhard; Watermann, Andreas; Haas, Peter; Dziuballe, Philipp; Dugas, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Semantic interoperability is an unsolved problem which occurs while working with medical forms from different information systems or institutions. Standards like ODM or CDA assure structural homogenization but in order to compare elements from different data models it is necessary to use semantic concepts and codes on an item level of those structures. We developed and implemented a web-based tool which enables a domain expert to perform semi-automated coding of ODM-files. For each item it is possible to inquire web services which result in unique concept codes without leaving the context of the document. Although it was not feasible to perform a totally automated coding we have implemented a dialog based method to perform an efficient coding of all data elements in the context of the whole document. The proportion of codable items was comparable to results from previous studies. PMID:22874367

  1. Improving Perceived and Actual Text Difficulty for Health Information Consumers using Semi-Automated Methods

    PubMed Central

    Leroy, Gondy; Endicott, James E.; Mouradi, Obay; Kauchak, David; Just, Melissa L.

    2012-01-01

    We are developing algorithms for semi-automated simplification of medical text. Based on lexical and grammatical corpus analysis, we identified a new metric, term familiarity, to help estimate text difficulty. We developed an algorithm that uses term familiarity to identify difficult text and select easier alternatives from lexical resources such as WordNet, UMLS and Wiktionary. Twelve sentences were simplified to measure perceived difficulty using a 5-point Likert scale. Two documents were simplified to measure actual difficulty by posing questions with and without the text present (information understanding and retention). We conducted a user study by inviting participants (N=84) via Amazon Mechanical Turk. There was a significant effect of simplification on perceived difficulty (p<.001). We also saw slightly improved understanding with better question-answering for simplified documents but the effect was not significant (p=.097). Our results show how term familiarity is a valuable component in simplifying text in an efficient and scalable manner. PMID:23304324

  2. SCOUSE: Semi-automated multi-COmponent Universal Spectral-line fitting Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henshaw, J. D.; Longmore, S. N.; Kruijssen, J. M. D.; Davies, B.; Bally, J.; Barnes, A.; Battersby, C.; Burton, M.; Cunningham, M. R.; Dale, J. E.; Ginsburg, A.; Immer, K.; Jones, P. A.; Kendrew, S.; Mills, E. A. C.; Molinari, S.; Moore, T. J. T.; Ott, J.; Pillai, T.; Rathborne, J.; Schilke, P.; Schmiedeke, A.; Testi, L.; Walker, D.; Walsh, A.; Zhang, Q.

    2016-01-01

    The Semi-automated multi-COmponent Universal Spectral-line fitting Engine (SCOUSE) is a spectral line fitting algorithm that fits Gaussian files to spectral line emission. It identifies the spatial area over which to fit the data and generates a grid of spectral averaging areas (SAAs). The spatially averaged spectra are fitted according to user-provided tolerance levels, and the best fit is selected using the Akaike Information Criterion, which weights the chisq of a best-fitting solution according to the number of free-parameters. A more detailed inspection of the spectra can be performed to improve the fit through an iterative process, after which SCOUSE integrates the new solutions into the solution file.

  3. Development of a semi-automated workcell for repair of printed circuit boards

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, D.W.; Evans, M.S.

    1990-08-01

    Printed circuit boards that comprise US Army electronic systems are repaired at Army depots. An existing automated diagnostic system determines the area of failure; either by identifying failed components or failed board traces. Currently, repairs are performed manually by trained technicians. A system is being developed for repair of through-hole printed circuit boards. It is comprised of many automated and operator-assisted functions to perform the multiple operations related to replacement of failed components. When completed, this system will demonstrate economic payback by reducing skilled labor requirements and decreasing rework. The semi-automated system integrates human operators into the process while maintaining high productivity. After several fully automated systems were conceived and modelled, it was found that the configuration that provided the best return on investment was comprised of a mix of autonomous and operator-assisted functions. 1 ref., 1 fig.

  4. Using tomoauto – a protocol for high-throughput automated cryo-electron tomography

    PubMed Central

    Morado, Dustin R.; Hu, Bo; Liu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    We present a protocol on how to utilize high-throughput cryo-electron tomography to determine high resolution in situ structures of molecular machines. The protocol permits large amounts of data to be processed, avoids common bottlenecks and reduces resource downtime, allowing the user to focus on important biological questions. Cryo-electron tomography (Cryo-ET) is a powerful three-dimensional (3-D) imaging technique for visualizing macromolecular complexes in their native context at a molecular level. The technique involves initially preserving the sample in its native state by rapidly freezing the specimen in vitreous ice, then collecting a series of micrographs from different angles at high magnification, and finally computationally reconstructing a 3-D density map. The frozen-hydrated specimen is extremely sensitive to the electron beam and so micrographs are collected at very low electron doses to limit the radiation damage. As a result, the raw cryo-tomogram has a very low signal to noise ratio characterized by an intrinsically noisy image. To better visualize subjects of interest, conventional imaging analysis and sub-tomogram averaging in which sub-tomograms of the subject are extracted from the initial tomogram and aligned and averaged are utilized to improve both contrast and resolution. Large datasets of tilt-series are essential to understanding and resolving the complexes at different states, conditions, or mutations as well as obtaining a large enough collection of sub-tomograms for averaging and classification. Collecting and processing this data can be a major obstacle preventing further analysis. Here we describe a high-throughput cryo-ET protocol based on a computer-controlled 300kV cryo-electron microscope, a direct detection device (DDD) camera and a highly effective, semi-automated image-processing pipeline software wrapper library tomoauto developed in-house. This protocol has been effectively utilized to visualize the intact type III

  5. Performance evaluation of the PROCLEIX West Nile virus assay on semi-automated and automated systems.

    PubMed

    Linnen, Jeffrey M; Deras, Michael L; Cline, Janice; Wu, Wen; Broulik, Amy S; Cory, Robin E; Knight, James L; Cass, Michelle M J; Collins, Cynthia S; Giachetti, Cristina

    2007-09-01

    The PROCLEIX West Nile virus assay (WNV assay) is a qualitative nucleic acid test based on transcription-mediated amplification (TMA). The assay was used under an investigational protocol in the United States to screen blood donations for West Nile virus (WNV) RNA starting in the summer of 2003, and was licensed by the FDA in December 2005 for use on the PROCLEIX System, also known as the enhanced semi-automated system (eSAS). Performance characteristics for the assay were determined on both eSAS and the fully automated PROCLEIX TIGRIS (TIGRIS) System. Detection of both lineage 1 and lineage 2 WNV was demonstrated on both systems. For lineage 1, the 95% detection limit was 8.2 copies/ml for eSAS and 9.8 copies/ml for the TIGRIS system. For lineage 2, > or =95% detection was seen at > or =30 copies/ml on both systems. The overall specificity of the assay was >99.9% in fresh and frozen plasma specimens. Reproducibility studies on the TIGRIS system yielded > or =99.1% agreement with expected results for the 3-member panel tested (0, 30, and 100 copies/ml). The WNV assay exhibited robust performance in cadaveric specimens and specimens representing various donor and donation conditions, including specimens from different plasma collection tubes that were subjected to multiple freeze/thaw cycles; specimens with elevated levels of endogenous substances; specimens containing other viruses and microorganisms; and specimens from patients with autoimmune and other diseases. Overall, these studies demonstrate high sensitivity, specificity, and reproducibility of the WNV assay on both the semi-automated and automated systems. PMID:17607786

  6. An Interactive Tool For Semi-automated Statistical Prediction Using Earth Observations and Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaitchik, B. F.; Berhane, F.; Tadesse, T.

    2015-12-01

    We developed a semi-automated statistical prediction tool applicable to concurrent analysis or seasonal prediction of any time series variable in any geographic location. The tool was developed using Shiny, JavaScript, HTML and CSS. A user can extract a predictand by drawing a polygon over a region of interest on the provided user interface (global map). The user can select the Climatic Research Unit (CRU) precipitation or Climate Hazards Group InfraRed Precipitation with Station data (CHIRPS) as predictand. They can also upload their own predictand time series. Predictors can be extracted from sea surface temperature, sea level pressure, winds at different pressure levels, air temperature at various pressure levels, and geopotential height at different pressure levels. By default, reanalysis fields are applied as predictors, but the user can also upload their own predictors, including a wide range of compatible satellite-derived datasets. The package generates correlations of the variables selected with the predictand. The user also has the option to generate composites of the variables based on the predictand. Next, the user can extract predictors by drawing polygons over the regions that show strong correlations (composites). Then, the user can select some or all of the statistical prediction models provided. Provided models include Linear Regression models (GLM, SGLM), Tree-based models (bagging, random forest, boosting), Artificial Neural Network, and other non-linear models such as Generalized Additive Model (GAM) and Multivariate Adaptive Regression Splines (MARS). Finally, the user can download the analysis steps they used, such as the region they selected, the time period they specified, the predictand and predictors they chose and preprocessing options they used, and the model results in PDF or HTML format. Key words: Semi-automated prediction, Shiny, R, GLM, ANN, RF, GAM, MARS

  7. Semi-automated protocol for purification of Mycobacterium leprae from tissues using the gentleMACS™ Octo Dissociator.

    PubMed

    Williams, Diana L; Adams, Linda B; Lahiri, Ramanuj

    2014-10-01

    Mycobacterium leprae, etiologic agent of leprosy, is propagated in athymic nude mouse footpads (FPs). The current purification protocol is tedious and physically demanding. A simpler, semi-automated protocol was developed using gentleMACS™ Octo Dissociator. The gentleMACS protocol provided a very effective means for purification of highly viable M. leprae from tissue. PMID:25019518

  8. High-Throughput Pharmacokinetics for Environmental Chemicals (SOT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    High throughput screening (HTS) promises to allow prioritization of thousands of environmental chemicals with little or no in vivo information. For bioactivity identified by HTS, toxicokinetic (TK) models are essential to predict exposure thresholds below which no significant bio...

  9. Evaluating Rapid Models for High-Throughput Exposure Forecasting (SOT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    High throughput exposure screening models can provide quantitative predictions for thousands of chemicals; however these predictions must be systematically evaluated for predictive ability. Without the capability to make quantitative, albeit uncertain, forecasts of exposure, the ...

  10. MIPHENO: Data normalization for high throughput metabolic analysis.

    EPA Science Inventory

    High throughput methodologies such as microarrays, mass spectrometry and plate-based small molecule screens are increasingly used to facilitate discoveries from gene function to drug candidate identification. These large-scale experiments are typically carried out over the course...

  11. HIGH THROUGHPUT ASSESSMENTS OF CONVENTIONAL AND ALTERNATIVE COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    High throughput approaches for quantifying chemical hazard, exposure, and sustainability have the potential to dramatically impact the pace and nature of risk assessments. Integrated evaluation strategies developed at the US EPA incorporate inherency,bioactivity,bioavailability, ...

  12. High throughput growth and characterization of thin film materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Samuel S.

    2013-09-01

    It usually takes more than 10 years for a new material from initial research to its first commercial application. Therefore, accelerating the pace of discovery of new materials is critical to tackling challenges in areas ranging from clean energy to national security. As discovery of new materials has not kept pace with the product design cycles in many sectors of industry, there is a pressing need to develop and utilize high throughput screening and discovery technologies for the growth and characterization of new materials. This article presents two distinctive types of high throughput thin film material growth approaches, along with a number of high throughput characterization techniques, established in the author's group. These approaches include a second-generation "discrete" combinatorial semiconductor discovery technology that enables the creation of arrays of individually separated thin film semiconductor materials of different compositions, and a "continuous" high throughput thin film material screening technology that enables the realization of ternary alloy libraries with continuously varying elemental ratios.

  13. High-throughput detection method for influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pawan; Bartoszek, Allison E; Moran, Thomas M; Gorski, Jack; Bhattacharyya, Sanjib; Navidad, Jose F; Thakar, Monica S; Malarkannan, Subramaniam

    2012-01-01

    Influenza virus is a respiratory pathogen that causes a high degree of morbidity and mortality every year in multiple parts of the world. Therefore, precise diagnosis of the infecting strain and rapid high-throughput screening of vast numbers of clinical samples is paramount to control the spread of pandemic infections. Current clinical diagnoses of influenza infections are based on serologic testing, polymerase chain reaction, direct specimen immunofluorescence and cell culture (1,2). Here, we report the development of a novel diagnostic technique used to detect live influenza viruses. We used the mouse-adapted human A/PR/8/34 (PR8, H1N1) virus (3) to test the efficacy of this technique using MDCK cells (4). MDCK cells (10(4) or 5 x 10(3) per well) were cultured in 96- or 384-well plates, infected with PR8 and viral proteins were detected using anti-M2 followed by an IR dye-conjugated secondary antibody. M2 (5) and hemagglutinin (1) are two major marker proteins used in many different diagnostic assays. Employing IR-dye-conjugated secondary antibodies minimized the autofluorescence associated with other fluorescent dyes. The use of anti-M2 antibody allowed us to use the antigen-specific fluorescence intensity as a direct metric of viral quantity. To enumerate the fluorescence intensity, we used the LI-COR Odyssey-based IR scanner. This system uses two channel laser-based IR detections to identify fluorophores and differentiate them from background noise. The first channel excites at 680 nm and emits at 700 nm to help quantify the background. The second channel detects fluorophores that excite at 780 nm and emit at 800 nm. Scanning of PR8-infected MDCK cells in the IR scanner indicated a viral titer-dependent bright fluorescence. A positive correlation of fluorescence intensity to virus titer starting from 10(2)-10(5) PFU could be consistently observed. Minimal but detectable positivity consistently seen with 10(2)-10(3) PFU PR8 viral titers demonstrated the high

  14. High-throughput Detection Method for Influenza Virus

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Pawan; Bartoszek, Allison E.; Moran, Thomas M.; Gorski, Jack; Bhattacharyya, Sanjib; Navidad, Jose F.; Thakar, Monica S.; Malarkannan, Subramaniam

    2012-01-01

    Influenza virus is a respiratory pathogen that causes a high degree of morbidity and mortality every year in multiple parts of the world. Therefore, precise diagnosis of the infecting strain and rapid high-throughput screening of vast numbers of clinical samples is paramount to control the spread of pandemic infections. Current clinical diagnoses of influenza infections are based on serologic testing, polymerase chain reaction, direct specimen immunofluorescence and cell culture 1,2. Here, we report the development of a novel diagnostic technique used to detect live influenza viruses. We used the mouse-adapted human A/PR/8/34 (PR8, H1N1) virus 3 to test the efficacy of this technique using MDCK cells 4. MDCK cells (104 or 5 x 103 per well) were cultured in 96- or 384-well plates, infected with PR8 and viral proteins were detected using anti-M2 followed by an IR dye-conjugated secondary antibody. M2 5 and hemagglutinin 1 are two major marker proteins used in many different diagnostic assays. Employing IR-dye-conjugated secondary antibodies minimized the autofluorescence associated with other fluorescent dyes. The use of anti-M2 antibody allowed us to use the antigen-specific fluorescence intensity as a direct metric of viral quantity. To enumerate the fluorescence intensity, we used the LI-COR Odyssey-based IR scanner. This system uses two channel laser-based IR detections to identify fluorophores and differentiate them from background noise. The first channel excites at 680 nm and emits at 700 nm to help quantify the background. The second channel detects fluorophores that excite at 780 nm and emit at 800 nm. Scanning of PR8-infected MDCK cells in the IR scanner indicated a viral titer-dependent bright fluorescence. A positive correlation of fluorescence intensity to virus titer starting from 102-105 PFU could be consistently observed. Minimal but detectable positivity consistently seen with 102-103 PFU PR8 viral titers demonstrated the high sensitivity of the near

  15. High-throughput sequencing of cytosine methylation in plant DNA

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Cytosine methylation is a significant and widespread regulatory factor in plant systems. Methods for the high-throughput sequencing of methylation have allowed a greatly improved characterisation of the methylome. Here we discuss currently available methods for generation and analysis of high-throughput sequencing of methylation data. We also discuss the results previously acquired through sequencing plant methylomes, and highlight remaining challenges in this field. PMID:23758782

  16. Nile Red Detection of Bacterial Hydrocarbons and Ketones in a High-Throughput Format

    SciTech Connect

    Pinzon, NM; Aukema, KG; Gralnick, JA; Wackett, LP

    2011-06-28

    A method for use in high-throughput screening of bacteria for the production of long-chain hydrocarbons and ketones by monitoring fluorescent light emission in the presence of Nile red is described. Nile red has previously been used to screen for polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) and fatty acid esters, but this is the first report of screening for recombinant bacteria making hydrocarbons or ketones. The microtiter plate assay was evaluated using wild-type and recombinant strains of Shewanella oneidensis and Escherichia coli expressing the enzyme OleA, previously shown to initiate hydrocarbon biosynthesis. The strains expressing exogenous Stenotrophomonas maltophilia oleA, with increased levels of ketone production as determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, were distinguished with Nile red fluorescence. Confocal microscopy images of S. oneidensis oleA-expressing strains stained with Nile red were consistent with a membrane localization of the ketones. This differed from Nile red staining of bacterial PHB or algal lipid droplets that showed intracellular inclusion bodies. These results demonstrated the applicability of Nile red in a high-throughput technique for the detection of bacterial hydrocarbons and ketones. IMPORTANCE In recent years, there has been renewed interest in advanced biofuel sources such as bacterial hydrocarbon production. Previous studies used solvent extraction of bacterial cultures followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to detect and quantify ketones and hydrocarbons (Beller HR, Goh EB, Keasling JD, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 76: 1212-1223, 2010; Sukovich DJ, Seffernick JL, Richman JE, Gralnick JA, Wackett LP, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 76: 3850-3862, 2010). While these analyses are powerful and accurate, their labor-intensive nature makes them intractable to high-throughput screening; therefore, methods for rapid identification of bacterial strains that are overproducing hydrocarbons are needed. The use of high-throughput

  17. Towards Chip Scale Liquid Chromatography and High Throughput Immunosensing

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, J.

    2000-09-21

    This work describes several research projects aimed towards developing new instruments and novel methods for high throughput chemical and biological analysis. Approaches are taken in two directions. The first direction takes advantage of well-established semiconductor fabrication techniques and applies them to miniaturize instruments that are workhorses in analytical laboratories. Specifically, the first part of this work focused on the development of micropumps and microvalves for controlled fluid delivery. The mechanism of these micropumps and microvalves relies on the electrochemically-induced surface tension change at a mercury/electrolyte interface. A miniaturized flow injection analysis device was integrated and flow injection analyses were demonstrated. In the second part of this work, microfluidic chips were also designed, fabricated, and tested. Separations of two fluorescent dyes were demonstrated in microfabricated channels, based on an open-tubular liquid chromatography (OT LC) or an electrochemically-modulated liquid chromatography (EMLC) format. A reduction in instrument size can potentially increase analysis speed, and allow exceedingly small amounts of sample to be analyzed under diverse separation conditions. The second direction explores the surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) as a signal transduction method for immunoassay analysis. It takes advantage of the improved detection sensitivity as a result of surface enhancement on colloidal gold, the narrow width of Raman band, and the stability of Raman scattering signals to distinguish several different species simultaneously without exploiting spatially-separated addresses on a biochip. By labeling gold nanoparticles with different Raman reporters in conjunction with different detection antibodies, a simultaneous detection of a dual-analyte immunoassay was demonstrated. Using this scheme for quantitative analysis was also studied and preliminary dose-response curves from an immunoassay of a

  18. High Throughput Screening for Drugs that Modulate Intermediate Filament Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jingyuan; Groppi, Vincent E.; Gui, Honglian; Chen, Lu; Xie, Qing; Liu, Li

    2016-01-01

    Intermediate filament (IF) proteins have unique and complex cell and tissue distribution. Importantly, IF gene mutations cause or predispose to more than 80 human tissue-specific diseases (IF-pathies), with the most severe disease phenotypes being due to mutations at conserved residues that result in a disrupted IF network. A critical need for the entire IF-pathy field is the identification of drugs that can ameliorate or cure these diseases, particularly since all current therapies target the IF-pathy complication, such as diabetes or cardiovascular disease, rather than the mutant IF protein or gene. We describe a high throughput approach to identify drugs that can normalize disrupted IF proteins. This approach utilizes transduction of lentivirus that expresses green-fluorescent-protein-tagged keratin 18 (K18) R90C in A549 cells. The readout is drug ‘hits’ that convert the dot-like keratin filament distribution, due to the R90C mutation, to a wildtype-like filamentous array. A similar strategy can be used to screen thousands of compounds and can be utilized for practically any IF protein with a filament-disrupting mutation, and could therefore potentially target many IF-pathies. ‘Hits’ of interest require validation in cell culture then using in vivo experimental models. Approaches to study the mechanism of mutant-IF normalization by potential drugs of interest are also described. The ultimate goal of this drug screening approach is to identify effective and safe compounds that can potentially be tested for clinical efficacy in patients. PMID:26795471

  19. A high-throughput approach to identify genomic variants of bacterial metabolite producers at the single-cell level.

    PubMed

    Binder, Stephan; Schendzielorz, Georg; Stäbler, Norma; Krumbach, Karin; Hoffmann, Kristina; Bott, Michael; Eggeling, Lothar

    2012-01-01

    We present a novel method for visualizing intracellular metabolite concentrations within single cells of Escherichia coli and Corynebacterium glutamicum that expedites the screening process of producers. It is based on transcription factors and we used it to isolate new L-lysine producing mutants of C. glutamicum from a large library of mutagenized cells using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). This high-throughput method fills the gap between existing high-throughput methods for mutant generation and genome analysis. The technology has diverse applications in the analysis of producer populations and screening of mutant libraries that carry mutations in plasmids or genomes. PMID:22640862

  20. A high-throughput approach to identify genomic variants of bacterial metabolite producers at the single-cell level

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We present a novel method for visualizing intracellular metabolite concentrations within single cells of Escherichia coli and Corynebacterium glutamicum that expedites the screening process of producers. It is based on transcription factors and we used it to isolate new L-lysine producing mutants of C. glutamicum from a large library of mutagenized cells using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). This high-throughput method fills the gap between existing high-throughput methods for mutant generation and genome analysis. The technology has diverse applications in the analysis of producer populations and screening of mutant libraries that carry mutations in plasmids or genomes. PMID:22640862

  1. Quantifying cellular interaction dynamics in 3-D fluorescence microscopy data

    PubMed Central

    Klauschen, Frederick; Ishii, Masaru; Qi, Hai; Bajénoff, Marc; Egen, Jackson G.; Germain, Ronald N.; Meier-Schellersheim, Martin

    2012-01-01

    The wealth of information available from advanced fluorescence imaging techniques used to analyze biological processes with high spatial and temporal resolution calls for high-throughput image analysis methods. Here, we describe a fully automated approach to analyzing cellular interaction behavior in 3-D fluorescence microscopy images. As example application we present the analysis of drug-induced and S1P1-knock-out-related changes in bone-osteoclast interactions. Moreover, we apply our approach to images showing the spatial association of dendritic cells with the fibroblastic reticular cell network within lymph nodes and to microscopy data about T-B lymphocyte synapse formation. Such analyses that yield important information about the molecular mechanisms determining cellular interaction behavior would be very difficult to perform with approaches that rely on manual/semi-automated analyses. This protocol integrates adaptive threshold segmentation, object detection, adaptive color channel merging and neighborhood analysis and permits rapid, standardized, quantitative analysis and comparison of the relevant features in large data sets. PMID:19696749

  2. Semi-automated DIRSIG scene modeling from three-dimensional lidar and passive imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lach, Stephen R.

    The Digital Imaging and Remote Sensing Image Generation (DIRSIG) model is an established, first-principles based scene simulation tool that produces synthetic multispectral and hyperspectral images from the visible to long wave infrared (0.4 to 20 microns). Over the last few years, significant enhancements such as spectral polarimetric and active Light Detection and Ranging (lidar) models have also been incorporated into the software, providing an extremely powerful tool for multi-sensor algorithm testing and sensor evaluation. However, the extensive time required to create large-scale scenes has limited DIRSIG's ability to generate scenes "on demand." To date, scene generation has been a laborious, time-intensive process, as the terrain model, CAD objects and background maps have to be created and attributed manually. To shorten the time required for this process, this research developed an approach to reduce the man-in-the-loop requirements for several aspects of synthetic scene construction. Through a fusion of 3D lidar data with passive imagery, we were able to semi-automate several of the required tasks in the DIRSIG scene creation process. Additionally, many of the remaining tasks realized a shortened implementation time through this application of multi-modal imagery. Lidar data is exploited to identify ground and object features as well as to define initial tree location and building parameter estimates. These estimates are then refined by analyzing high-resolution frame array imagery using the concepts of projective geometry in lieu of the more common Euclidean approach found in most traditional photogrammetric references. Spectral imagery is also used to assign material characteristics to the modeled geometric objects. This is achieved through a modified atmospheric compensation applied to raw hyperspectral imagery. These techniques have been successfully applied to imagery collected over the RIT campus and the greater Rochester area. The data used

  3. High-Content and Semi-Automated Quantification of Responses to Estrogenic Chemicals Using a Novel Translucent Transgenic Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Green, Jon M; Metz, Jeremy; Lee, Okhyun; Trznadel, Maciej; Takesono, Aya; Brown, A Ross; Owen, Stewart F; Kudoh, Tetsuhiro; Tyler, Charles R

    2016-06-21

    Rapid embryogenesis, together with genetic similarities with mammals, and the desire to reduce mammalian testing, are major incentives for using the zebrafish model in chemical screening and testing. Transgenic zebrafish, engineered for identifying target gene expression through expression of fluorophores, have considerable potential for both high-content and high-throughput testing of chemicals for endocrine activity. Here we generated an estrogen responsive transgenic zebrafish model in a pigment-free "Casper" phenotype, facilitating identification of target tissues and quantification of these responses in whole intact fish. Using the ERE-GFP-Casper model we show chemical type and concentration dependence for green fluorescent protein (GFP) induction and both spatial and temporal responses for different environmental estrogens tested. We also developed a semiautomated (ArrayScan) imaging and image analysis system that we applied to quantify whole body fluorescence responses for a range of different estrogenic chemicals in the new transgenic zebrafish model. The zebrafish model developed provides a sensitive and highly integrative system for identifying estrogenic chemicals, their target tissues and effect concentrations for exposures in real time and across different life stages. It thus has application for chemical screening to better direct health effects analysis of environmental estrogens and for investigating the functional roles of estrogens in vertebrates. PMID:27227508

  4. Automated High Throughput Protein Crystallization Screening at Nanoliter Scale and Protein Structural Study on Lactate Dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Fenglei Li

    2006-08-09

    The purposes of our research were: (1) To develop an economical, easy to use, automated, high throughput system for large scale protein crystallization screening. (2) To develop a new protein crystallization method with high screening efficiency, low protein consumption and complete compatibility with high throughput screening system. (3) To determine the structure of lactate dehydrogenase complexed with NADH by x-ray protein crystallography to study its inherent structural properties. Firstly, we demonstrated large scale protein crystallization screening can be performed in a high throughput manner with low cost, easy operation. The overall system integrates liquid dispensing, crystallization and detection and serves as a whole solution to protein crystallization screening. The system can dispense protein and multiple different precipitants in nanoliter scale and in parallel. A new detection scheme, native fluorescence, has been developed in this system to form a two-detector system with a visible light detector for detecting protein crystallization screening results. This detection scheme has capability of eliminating common false positives by distinguishing protein crystals from inorganic crystals in a high throughput and non-destructive manner. The entire system from liquid dispensing, crystallization to crystal detection is essentially parallel, high throughput and compatible with automation. The system was successfully demonstrated by lysozyme crystallization screening. Secondly, we developed a new crystallization method with high screening efficiency, low protein consumption and compatibility with automation and high throughput. In this crystallization method, a gas permeable membrane is employed to achieve the gentle evaporation required by protein crystallization. Protein consumption is significantly reduced to nanoliter scale for each condition and thus permits exploring more conditions in a phase diagram for given amount of protein. In addition

  5. A Protocol for a High-Throughput Multiplex Cell Viability Assay.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Daniel F; Boutros, Michael

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput cell viability assays are broadly used in RNAi and small molecule screening experiments to identify compounds that selectively kill cancer cells or as counter screens to exclude the compounds that have a generic effect on cell growth. While there are several assaying techniques available, cellular fitness is often assessed on the basis of one single and often rather indirect physiological indicator. This can lead to inconsistencies and poor correspondence between cell viability screening experiments, conducted under comparable conditions but with different viability indicators. Multiplexing, i.e., the combination of different individual assaying techniques in one experiment and subsequent comparative analysis of multiparametric data can decrease inter-assay variability and increase dataset concordance. Here, we describe a protocol for a multiplexing approach for high-throughput cell viability screening to address the issues encountered in the classical strategy using a single fitness indicator described above. The method combines a biochemical, luminescence-based approach and two fluorescence-based assay types. The biochemical method assesses cellular fitness by quantifying intracellular ATP concentration. Calcein labeling reflects cell fitness through membrane integrity and indirect measurement of ATP-dependent enzymatic esterase activity. Hoechst DNA stain correlates cell fitness with cellular DNA content. The presented multiplexing approach is suitable for low, medium and high-throughput screening and has the potential to decrease inter-assay variability and increase dataset concordance as well as reproducibility of experimental results. PMID:27581285

  6. Identification of inhibitors of a bacterial sigma factor using a new high-throughput screening assay.

    PubMed

    El-Mowafi, S A; Sineva, E; Alumasa, J N; Nicoloff, H; Tomsho, J W; Ades, S E; Keiler, K C

    2015-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria are formidable pathogens because their cell envelope presents an adaptable barrier to environmental and host-mediated challenges. The stress response pathway controlled by the alternative sigma factor σ(E) is critical for maintenance of the cell envelope. Because σ(E) is required for the virulence or viability of several Gram-negative pathogens, it might be a useful target for antibiotic development. To determine if small molecules can inhibit the σ(E) pathway, and to permit high-throughput screening for antibiotic lead compounds, a σ(E) activity assay that is compatible with high-throughput screening was developed and validated. The screen employs a biological assay with positive readout. An Escherichia coli strain was engineered to express yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) under negative regulation by the σ(E) pathway, such that inhibitors of the pathway increase the production of YFP. To validate the screen, the reporter strain was used to identify σ(E) pathway inhibitors from a library of cyclic peptides. Biochemical characterization of one of the inhibitory cyclic peptides showed that it binds σ(E), inhibits RNA polymerase holoenzyme formation, and inhibits σ(E)-dependent transcription in vitro. These results demonstrate that alternative sigma factors can be inhibited by small molecules and enable high-throughput screening for inhibitors of the σ(E) pathway. PMID:25331704

  7. A high throughput array microscope for the mechanical characterization of biomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cribb, Jeremy; Osborne, Lukas D.; Hsiao, Joe Ping-Lin; Vicci, Leandra; Meshram, Alok; O'Brien, E. Tim; Spero, Richard Chasen; Taylor, Russell; Superfine, Richard

    2015-02-01

    In the last decade, the emergence of high throughput screening has enabled the development of novel drug therapies and elucidated many complex cellular processes. Concurrently, the mechanobiology community has developed tools and methods to show that the dysregulation of biophysical properties and the biochemical mechanisms controlling those properties contribute significantly to many human diseases. Despite these advances, a complete understanding of the connection between biomechanics and disease will require advances in instrumentation that enable parallelized, high throughput assays capable of probing complex signaling pathways, studying biology in physiologically relevant conditions, and capturing specimen and mechanical heterogeneity. Traditional biophysical instruments are unable to meet this need. To address the challenge of large-scale, parallelized biophysical measurements, we have developed an automated array high-throughput microscope system that utilizes passive microbead diffusion to characterize mechanical properties of biomaterials. The instrument is capable of acquiring data on twelve-channels simultaneously, where each channel in the system can independently drive two-channel fluorescence imaging at up to 50 frames per second. We employ this system to measure the concentration-dependent apparent viscosity of hyaluronan, an essential polymer found in connective tissue and whose expression has been implicated in cancer progression.

  8. Flow-Based Single Cell Deposition for High-Throughput Screening of Protein Libraries

    PubMed Central

    Kalber, Tammy; Badar, Adam; Lythgoe, Mark; Pule, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The identification and engineering of proteins having refined or novel characteristics is an important area of research in many scientific fields. Protein modelling has enabled the rational design of unique proteins, but high-throughput screening of large libraries is still required to identify proteins with potentially valuable properties. Here we report on the development and evaluation of a novel fluorescent activated cell sorting based screening platform. Single bacterial cells, expressing a protein library to be screened, are electronically sorted and deposited onto plates containing solid nutrient growth media in a dense matrix format of between 44 and 195 colonies/cm2. We show that this matrix format is readily applicable to machine interrogation (<30 seconds per plate) and subsequent bioinformatic analysis (~60 seconds per plate) thus enabling the high-throughput screening of the protein library. We evaluate this platform and show that bacteria containing a bioluminescent protein can be spectrally analysed using an optical imager, and a rare clone (0.5% population) can successfully be identified, picked and further characterised. To further enhance this screening platform, we have developed a prototype electronic sort stream multiplexer, that when integrated into a commercial flow cytometric sorter, increases the rate of colony deposition by 89.2% to 24 colonies per second. We believe that the screening platform described here is potentially the foundation of a new generation of high-throughput screening technologies for proteins. PMID:26536118

  9. Flow-Based Single Cell Deposition for High-Throughput Screening of Protein Libraries.

    PubMed

    Stowe, Cassandra; Pizzey, Arnold; Kalber, Tammy; Badar, Adam; Lythgoe, Mark; Pule, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The identification and engineering of proteins having refined or novel characteristics is an important area of research in many scientific fields. Protein modelling has enabled the rational design of unique proteins, but high-throughput screening of large libraries is still required to identify proteins with potentially valuable properties. Here we report on the development and evaluation of a novel fluorescent activated cell sorting based screening platform. Single bacterial cells, expressing a protein library to be screened, are electronically sorted and deposited onto plates containing solid nutrient growth media in a dense matrix format of between 44 and 195 colonies/cm2. We show that this matrix format is readily applicable to machine interrogation (<30 seconds per plate) and subsequent bioinformatic analysis (~60 seconds per plate) thus enabling the high-throughput screening of the protein library. We evaluate this platform and show that bacteria containing a bioluminescent protein can be spectrally analysed using an optical imager, and a rare clone (0.5% population) can successfully be identified, picked and further characterised. To further enhance this screening platform, we have developed a prototype electronic sort stream multiplexer, that when integrated into a commercial flow cytometric sorter, increases the rate of colony deposition by 89.2% to 24 colonies per second. We believe that the screening platform described here is potentially the foundation of a new generation of high-throughput screening technologies for proteins. PMID:26536118

  10. A high throughput array microscope for the mechanical characterization of biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Cribb, Jeremy; Osborne, Lukas D.; Hsiao, Joe Ping-Lin; Vicci, Leandra; Meshram, Alok; O’Brien, E. Tim; Spero, Richard Chasen; Taylor, Russell; Superfine, Richard

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade, the emergence of high throughput screening has enabled the development of novel drug therapies and elucidated many complex cellular processes. Concurrently, the mechanobiology community has developed tools and methods to show that the dysregulation of biophysical properties and the biochemical mechanisms controlling those properties contribute significantly to many human diseases. Despite these advances, a complete understanding of the connection between biomechanics and disease will require advances in instrumentation that enable parallelized, high throughput assays capable of probing complex signaling pathways, studying biology in physiologically relevant conditions, and capturing specimen and mechanical heterogeneity. Traditional biophysical instruments are unable to meet this need. To address the challenge of large-scale, parallelized biophysical measurements, we have developed an automated array high-throughput microscope system that utilizes passive microbead diffusion to characterize mechanical properties of biomaterials. The instrument is capable of acquiring data on twelve-channels simultaneously, where each channel in the system can independently drive two-channel fluorescence imaging at up to 50 frames per second. We employ this system to measure the concentration-dependent apparent viscosity of hyaluronan, an essential polymer found in connective tissue and whose expression has been implicated in cancer progression. PMID:25725856