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Sample records for sensory nerve function

  1. Sensory and Motor Peripheral Nerve Function and Incident Mobility Disability

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Rachel E.; Boudreau, Robert M.; Caserotti, Paolo; Harris, Tamara B.; Zivkovic, Sasa; Goodpaster, Bret H.; Satterfield, Suzanne; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Schwartz, Ann V.; Vinik, Aaron I.; Cauley, Jane A.; Simonsick, Eleanor M.; Newman, Anne B.; Strotmeyer, Elsa S.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Objectives Peripheral nerve impairments are highly prevalent in older adults and are associated with poor lower-extremity function. Whether sensorimotor nerve function predicts incident mobility disability has not been determined. We assessed the relationship between sensorimotor nerve function and incident mobility disability over 10 years. Design Prospective cohort study with longitudinal analysis. Setting Two U.S. clinical sites. Participants Population-based sample of community-dwelling older adults with no mobility disability at 2000/01 exam (N = 1680; mean SD: age = 76.5 2.9, BMI = 27.1 4.6; 50.2% women, 36.6% black and 10.7% with diabetes). Measurements Motor nerve conduction amplitude (poor: <1 mV) and velocity (poor: <40 m/s) were measured on the deep peroneal nerve. Sensory nerve function was measured using 10-g and 1.4-g monofilaments and vibration detection threshold at the toe. Lower-extremity symptoms included numbness or tingling and sudden stabbing, burning, pain or aches. Incident mobility disability assessed semiannually over 8.5 years (IQR: 4.59.6) was defined as two consecutive self-reports of a lot of difficulty or inability to walk mile or climb 10 steps. Results Nerve impairments were detected in 55% of participants and 30% developed mobility disability. Worse motor amplitude (HR = 1.29 per SD, 95% CI: 1.161.44), vibration detection threshold (HR = 1.13 per SD, 95% CI: 1.041.23), symptoms (HR = 1.65, 95% CI: 1.362.17), 2 motor (HR = 2.10, 95% CI: 1.433.09), 2 sensory (HR = 1.91, 95% CI: 1.372.68), and ?3 nerve impairments (HR = 2.33, 95% CI: 1.543.53) predicted incident mobility disability, after adjustment. Quadriceps strength mediated relationships between certain nerve impairments and mobility disability, although most remained significant. Conclusion Poor sensorimotor nerve function independently predicted mobility disability. Future work should investigate modifiable risk factors and interventions like strength training for preventing disability and improving function in older adults with poor nerve function. PMID:25482096

  2. Transient Alterations of Cutaneous Sensory Nerve Function by Noninvasive Cryolipolysis.

    PubMed

    Garibyan, Lilit; Cornelissen, Laura; Sipprell, William; Pruessner, Joachim; Elmariah, Sarina; Luo, Tuan; Lerner, Ethan A; Jung, Yookyung; Evans, Conor; Zurakowski, David; Berde, Charles B; Rox Anderson, R

    2015-11-01

    Cryolipolysis is a noninvasive, skin cooling treatment for local fat reduction that causes prolonged hypoesthesia over the treated area. We tested the hypothesis that cryolipolysis can attenuate nociception of a range of sensory stimuli, including stimuli that evoke itch. The effects of cryolipolysis on sensory phenomena were evaluated by quantitative sensory testing (QST) in 11 healthy subjects over a period of 56 days. Mechanical and thermal pain thresholds were measured on treated and contralateral untreated (control) flanks. Itch duration was evaluated following histamine iontophoresis. Unmyelinated epidermal nerve fiber and myelinated dermal nerve fiber densities were quantified in skin biopsies from six subjects. Cryolipolysis produced a marked decrease in mechanical and thermal pain sensitivity. Hyposensitivity started between two to seven days after cryolipolysis and persisted for at least thirty-five days post treatment. Skin biopsies revealed that cryolipolysis decreased epidermal nerve fiber density, as well as dermal myelinated nerve fiber density, which persisted throughout the study. In conclusion, cryolipolysis causes significant and prolonged decreases in cutaneous sensitivity. Our data suggest that controlled skin cooling to specifically target cutaneous nerve fibers has the potential to be useful for prolonged relief of cutaneous pain and might have a use as a research tool to isolate and study cutaneous itch-sensing nerves in human skin. PMID:26099028

  3. Impaired sensory nerve function and axon morphology in mice with diabetic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Lennertz, Richard C.; Medler, Karen A.; Bain, James L.; Wright, Douglas E.

    2011-01-01

    Diabetes is the most prevalent metabolic disorder in the United States, and between 50% and 70% of diabetic patients suffer from diabetes-induced neuropathy. Yet our current knowledge of the functional changes in sensory nerves and their distal terminals caused by diabetes is limited. Here, we set out to investigate the functional and morphological consequences of diabetes on specific subtypes of cutaneous sensory nerves in mice. Diabetes was induced in C57Bl/6 mice by a single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin. After 68 wk, mice were characterized for behavioral sensitivity to mechanical and heat stimuli followed by analysis of sensory function using teased nerve fiber recordings and histological assessment of nerve fiber morphology. Diabetes produced severe functional impairment of C-fibers and rapidly adapting A?-fibers, leading to behavioral hyposensitivity to both mechanical and heat stimuli. Electron microscopy images showed that diabetic nerves have axoplasm with more concentrated organelles and frequent axon-myelin separations compared with control nerves. These changes were restricted to the distal nerve segments nearing their innervation territory. Furthermore, the relative proportion of A?-fibers was reduced in diabetic skin-nerve preparations compared with nondiabetic control mice. These data identify significant deficits in sensory nerve terminal function that are associated with distal fiber loss, morphological damage, and behavioral hyposensitivity in diabetic C57Bl/6 mice. These findings suggest that diabetes damages sensory nerves, leading to functional deficits in sensory signaling that underlie the loss of tactile acuity and pain sensation associated with insensate diabetic neuropathy. PMID:21653724

  4. The relationship of nerve fibre pathology to sensory function in entrapment neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Annina B; Bland, Jeremy D P; Bhat, Manzoor A; Bennett, David L H

    2014-12-01

    Surprisingly little is known about the impact of entrapment neuropathy on target innervation and the relationship of nerve fibre pathology to sensory symptoms and signs. Carpal tunnel syndrome is the most common entrapment neuropathy; the aim of this study was to investigate its effect on the morphology of small unmyelinated as well as myelinated sensory axons and relate such changes to somatosensory function and clinical symptoms. Thirty patients with a clinical and electrophysiological diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome [17 females, mean age (standard deviation) 56.4 (15.3)] and 26 age and gender matched healthy volunteers [18 females, mean age (standard deviation) 51.0 (17.3)] participated in the study. Small and large fibre function was examined with quantitative sensory testing in the median nerve territory of the hand. Vibration and mechanical detection thresholds were significantly elevated in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (P<0.007) confirming large fibre dysfunction and patients also presented with increased thermal detection thresholds (P<0.0001) indicative of C and Aδ-fibre dysfunction. Mechanical and thermal pain thresholds were comparable between groups (P>0.13). A skin biopsy was taken from a median nerve innervated area of the proximal phalanx of the index finger. Immunohistochemical staining for protein gene product 9.5 and myelin basic protein was used to evaluate morphological features of unmyelinated and myelinated axons. Evaluation of intraepidermal nerve fibre density showed a striking loss in patients (P<0.0001) confirming a significant compromise of small fibres. The extent of Meissner corpuscles and dermal nerve bundles were comparable between groups (P>0.07). However, patients displayed a significant increase in the percentage of elongated nodes (P<0.0001), with altered architecture of voltage-gated sodium channel distribution. Whereas neither neurophysiology nor quantitative sensory testing correlated with patients' symptoms or function deficits, the presence of elongated nodes was inversely correlated with a number of functional and symptom related scores (P<0.023). Our findings suggest that carpal tunnel syndrome does not exclusively affect large fibres but is associated with loss of function in modalities mediated by both unmyelinated and myelinated sensory axons. We also document for the first time that entrapment neuropathies lead to a clear reduction in intraepidermal nerve fibre density, which was independent of electrodiagnostic test severity. The presence of elongated nodes in the target tissue further suggests that entrapment neuropathies affect nodal structure/myelin well beyond the focal compression site. Interestingly, nodal lengthening may be an adaptive phenomenon as it inversely correlates with symptom severity. PMID:25348629

  5. Roles of Sensory Nerves in the Regulation of Radiation-Induced Structural and Functional Changes in the Heart

    SciTech Connect

    Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Tripathi, Preeti; Sharma, Sunil; Moros, Eduardo G.; Zheng, Junying; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Boerma, Marjan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD) is a chronic severe side effect of radiation therapy of intrathoracic and chest wall tumors. The heart contains a dense network of sensory neurons that not only are involved in monitoring of cardiac events such as ischemia and reperfusion but also play a role in cardiac tissue homeostasis, preconditioning, and repair. The purpose of this study was to examine the role of sensory nerves in RIHD. Methods and Materials: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were administered capsaicin to permanently ablate sensory nerves, 2 weeks before local image-guided heart x-ray irradiation with a single dose of 21 Gy. During the 6 months of follow-up, heart function was assessed with high-resolution echocardiography. At 6 months after irradiation, cardiac structural and molecular changes were examined with histology, immunohistochemistry, and Western blot analysis. Results: Capsaicin pretreatment blunted the effects of radiation on myocardial fibrosis and mast cell infiltration and activity. By contrast, capsaicin pretreatment caused a small but significant reduction in cardiac output 6 months after irradiation. Capsaicin did not alter the effects of radiation on cardiac macrophage number or indicators of autophagy and apoptosis. Conclusions: These results suggest that sensory nerves, although they play a predominantly protective role in radiation-induced cardiac function changes, may eventually enhance radiation-induced myocardial fibrosis and mast cell activity.

  6. Pharmacologic rescue of motor and sensory function by the neuroprotective compound P7C3 following neonatal nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Kemp, S W P; Szynkaruk, M; Stanoulis, K N; Wood, M D; Liu, E H; Willand, M P; Morlock, L; Naidoo, J; Williams, N S; Ready, J M; Mangano, T J; Beggs, S; Salter, M W; Gordon, T; Pieper, A A; Borschel, G H

    2015-01-22

    Nerve injuries cause pain, paralysis and numbness that can lead to major disability, and newborns often sustain nerve injuries during delivery that result in lifelong impairment. Without a pharmacologic agent to enhance functional recovery from these injuries, clinicians rely solely on surgery and rehabilitation to treat patients. Unfortunately, patient outcomes remain poor despite application of the most advanced microsurgical and rehabilitative techniques. We hypothesized that the detrimental effects of traumatic neonatal nerve injury could be mitigated with pharmacologic neuroprotection, and tested whether the novel neuroprotective agent P7C3 would block peripheral neuron cell death and enhance functional recovery in a rat neonatal nerve injury model. Administration of P7C3 after sciatic nerve crush injury doubled motor and sensory neuron survival, and also promoted axon regeneration in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment with P7C3 also enhanced behavioral and muscle functional recovery, and reversed pathological mobilization of spinal microglia after injury. Our findings suggest that the P7C3 family of neuroprotective compounds may provide a basis for the development of a new neuroprotective drug to enhance recovery following peripheral nerve injury. PMID:25313000

  7. Purines and sensory nerves.

    PubMed

    Burnstock, Geoffrey

    2009-01-01

    P2X and P2Y nucleotide receptors are described on sensory neurons and their peripheral and central terminals in dorsal root, nodose, trigeminal, petrosal, retinal and enteric ganglia. Peripheral terminals are activated by ATP released from local cells by mechanical deformation, hypoxia or various local agents in the carotid body, lung, gut, bladder, inner ear, eye, nasal organ, taste buds, skin, muscle and joints mediating reflex responses and nociception. Purinergic receptors on fibres in the dorsal spinal cord and brain stem are involved in reflex control of visceral and cardiovascular activity, as well as relaying nociceptive impulses to pain centres. Purinergic mechanisms are enhanced in inflammatory conditions and may be involved in migraine, pain, diseases of the special senses, bladder and gut, and the possibility that they are also implicated in arthritis, respiratory disorders and some central nervous system disorders is discussed. Finally, the development and evolution of purinergic sensory mechanisms are considered. PMID:19655112

  8. Substance P released from sensory nerve endings influences tear secretion and goblet cell function in the rat.

    PubMed

    Kovcs, Ills; Ludny, Andrea; Koszegi, Tams; Fehr, Jnos; Kovcs, Blint; Szolcsnyi, Jnos; Pintr, Erika

    2005-08-01

    The aim of this study was to present morphological and functional evidence to evaluate whether tear secretion is influenced by neuropeptides released from sensory nerve endings of the conjunctiva. Following unilateral electrical stimulation of the trigeminal ganglion, tears were collected at both sides and assessed for volume and protein concentration; as well as gel electrophoresis and luminol chemiluminescence with immunostaining to immunoglobulin A and lysozyme measurements. Goblet cell density (goblet cells/100 basal cells) was recorded during histopathological examination of removed lids. Rats were pretreated with atropine to block parasympathetic; guanethidine to block sympathetic neuronal pathways; or hexamethonium to block synaptic transmission in ganglia. Capsaicin was used to deplete neurotransmitters from sensory nerve endings or SR140333 to block substance P tachykinin NK1 receptor mediated responses. Effects of inadequate electrode position or incidental lesion of trigeminal ganglion were examined by placing the electrode in false position, or no stimulation at a correct position. Electrical stimulation resulted in 380% increase of tear secretion (p < 0.001) and 30% decrease of goblet cell density (p < 0.001) on the the stimulated side compared to the unstimulated side. Atropine, guanethidine and hexamethonium pretreatments had no effect (p > 0.05), but capsaicin and SR140333 inhibited the effect of stimulation (by 96% and 72%, respectively, p < 0.001). Inadequate stimulation did not increase the tear secretion (p < 0.05). Protein concentration decreased, whilst tear volume and total secreted protein increased (p < 0.005) after stimulation. Electrophoresis showed no difference in protein pattern between stimulated and control side and analysis of equivalent amount of tear protein with luminol chemiluminescence indicated no difference in immunoglobulin A and lysozyme ratio following stimulation (p>0.05). We conclude that antidromic electrical activation of conjunctival sensory nerve endings significantly increases water, mucus and protein phases of tear. It is suggested that the sensory neuropeptide substance P plays a pivotal role in this neurogenic regulatory mechanism. PMID:15992924

  9. Sensory nerve recording for closed-loop control to restore motor functions.

    PubMed

    Popovi?, D B; Stein, R B; Jovanovi?, K L; Dai, R; Kostov, A; Armstrong, W W

    1993-10-01

    A method is developed for using neural recordings to control functional electrical stimulation (FES) to nerves and muscles. Experiments were done in chronic cats with a goal of designing a rule-based controller to generate rhythmic movements of the ankle joint during treadmill locomotion. Neural signals from the tibial and superficial peroneal nerves were recorded with cuff electrodes and processed simultaneously with muscular signals from ankle flexors and extensors in the cat's hind limb. Cuff electrodes are an effective method for long-term chronic recording in peripheral nerves without causing discomfort or damage to the nerve. For real-time operation we designed a low-noise amplifier with a blanking circuit to minimize stimulation artifacts. We used threshold detection to design a simple rule-based control and compared its output to the pattern determined using adaptive neural networks. Both the threshold detection and adaptive networks are robust enough to accommodate the variability in neural recordings. The adaptive logic network used for this study is effective in mapping transfer functions and therefore applicable for determination of gait invariants to be used for closed-loop control in an FES system. Simple rule-bases will probably be chosen for initial applications to human patients. However, more complex FES applications require more complex rule-bases and better mapping of continuous neural recordings and muscular activity. Adaptive neural networks have promise for these more complex applications. PMID:8294127

  10. Capsaicin-sensitive sensory nerves exert complex regulatory functions in the serum-transfer mouse model of autoimmune arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Borbly, va; Botz, Blint; Blcskei, Kata; Kenyr, Tibor; Kereskai, Lszl; Kiss, Tams; Szolcsnyi, Jnos; Pintr, Erika; Csepregi, Janka Zsfia; Mcsai, Attila; Helyes, Zsuzsanna

    2015-01-01

    Objective The K/BxN serum-transfer arthritis is a widely-used translational mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis, in which the immunological components have thoroughly been investigated. In contrast, little is known about the role of sensory neural factors and the complexity of neuroimmune interactions. Therefore, we analyzed the involvement of capsaicin-sensitive peptidergic sensory nerves in autoantibody-induced arthritis with integrative methodology. Methods Arthritogenic K/BxN or control serum was injected to non-pretreated mice or resiniferatoxin (RTX)-pretreated animals where capsaicin-sensitive nerves were inactivated. Edema, touch sensitivity, noxious heat threshold, joint function, body weight and clinical arthritis severity scores were determined repeatedly throughout two weeks. Micro-CT and in vivo optical imaging to determine matrix-metalloproteinase (MMP) and neutrophil-derived myeloperoxidase (MPO) activities, semiquantitative histopathological scoring and radioimmunoassay to measure somatostatin in the joint homogenates were also performed. Results In RTX-pretreated mice, the autoantibody-induced joint swelling, arthritis severity score, MMP and MPO activities, as well as histopathological alterations were significantly greater compared to non-pretreated animals. Self-control quantification of the bone mass revealed decreased values in intact female mice, but significantly greater arthritis-induced pathological bone formation after RTX-pretreatment. In contrast, mechanical hyperalgesia from day 10 was smaller after inactivating capsaicin-sensitive afferents. Although thermal hyperalgesia did not develop, noxious heat threshold was significantly higher following RTX pretreatment. Somatostatin-like immunoreactivity elevated in the tibiotarsal joints in non-pretreated, which was significantly less in RTX-pretreated mice. Conclusions Although capsaicin-sensitive sensory nerves mediate mechanical hyperalgesia in the later phase of autoantibody-induced chronic arthritis, they play important anti-inflammatory roles at least partially through somatostatin release. PMID:25524130

  11. Differential motor and sensory functional recovery in male but not female adult rats is associated with remyelination rather than axon regeneration after sciatic nerve crush.

    PubMed

    Tong, Ling-Ling; Ding, You-Quan; Jing, Hong-Bo; Li, Xuan-Yang; Qi, Jian-Guo

    2015-05-01

    Peripheral nerve functional recovery after injuries relies on both axon regeneration and remyelination. Both axon regeneration and remyelination require intimate interactions between regenerating neurons and their accompanying Schwann cells. Previous studies have shown that motor and sensory neurons are intrinsically different in their regeneration potentials. Moreover, denervated Schwann cells accompanying myelinated motor and sensory axons have distinct gene expression profiles for regeneration-associated growth factors. However, it is unknown whether differential motor and sensory functional recovery exists. If so, the particular one among axon regeneration and remyelination responsible for this difference remains unclear. Here, we aimed to establish an adult rat sciatic nerve crush model with the nonserrated microneedle holders and measured rat motor and sensory functions during regeneration. Furthermore, axon regeneration and remyelination was evaluated by morphometric analysis of electron microscopic images on the basis of nerve fiber classification. Our results showed that A? fiber-mediated motor function was successfully recovered in both male and female rats. A? fiber-mediated sensory function was partially restored in male rats, but completely recovered in female littermates. For both male and female rats, the numbers of regenerated motor and sensory axons were quite comparable. However, remyelination was diverse among myelinated motor and sensory nerve fibers. In detail, A? and A? fibers incompletely remyelinated in male, but not female rats, whereas A? fibers fully remyelinated in both sexes. Our result indicated that differential motor and sensory functional recovery in male but not female adult rats is associated with remyelination rather than axon regeneration after sciatic nerve crush. PMID:25830493

  12. Inhibitory activity of the novel CB2 receptor agonist, GW833972A, on guinea-pig and human sensory nerve function in the airways

    PubMed Central

    Belvisi, M G; Patel, H J; Freund-Michel, V; Hele, D J; Crispino, N; Birrell, M A

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Sensory nerves regulate central and local reflexes such as airway plasma protein leakage, bronchoconstriction and cough. Sensory nerve activity may be enhanced during inflammation such that these protective effects become exacerbated and deleterious. Cannabinoids are known to inhibit airway sensory nerve function. However, there is still controversy surrounding which receptor is involved in eliciting these effects. Experimental approach: We have adopted a pharmacological approach, including using a novel, more selective CB2 receptor agonist, GW 833972A (1000-fold selective CB2/CB1), and receptor selective antagonists to investigate the inhibitory activity of cannabinoids on sensory nerve activity in vitro and in vivo in guinea-pig models of cough and plasma extravasation. Key results: GW 833972A inhibited capsaicin-induced depolarization of the human and guinea-pig and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and hypertonic saline-induced depolarization of the guinea-pig isolated vagus nerve in vitro. GW 833972A also inhibited citric acid-induced cough but not plasma extravasation in the guinea-pig and this effect was blocked by a CB2 receptor antagonist. Conclusions and implications: This confirms and extends previous studies highlighting the role of CB2 receptors in the modulation of sensory nerve activity elicited both by the exogenous ligands capsaicin and hypertonic saline but also by endogenous modulators such as PGE2 and low pH stimuli. These data establish the CB2 receptor as an interesting target for the treatment of chronic cough. PMID:18695648

  13. Effect of Ranirestat on Sensory and Motor Nerve Function in Japanese Patients with Diabetic Polyneuropathy: A Randomized Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Satoh, Jo; Kohara, Nobuo; Sekiguchi, Kenji; Yamaguchi, Yasuyuki

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a 26-week oral-administration study of ranirestat (an aldose reductase inhibitor) at a once-daily dose of 20?mg to evaluate its efficacy and safety in Japanese patients with diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN). The primary endpoint was summed change in sensory nerve conduction velocity (NCV) for the bilateral sural and proximal median sensory nerves. The sensory NCV was significantly (P = 0.006) improved by ranirestat. On clinical symptoms evaluated with the use of modified Toronto Clinical Neuropathy Score (mTCNS), obvious efficacy was not found in total score. However, improvement in the sensory test domain of the mTCNS was significant (P = 0.037) in a subgroup of patients diagnosed with neuropathy according to the TCNS severity classification. No clinically significant effects on safety parameters including hepatic and renal functions were observed. Our results indicate that ranirestat is effective on DPN (Japic CTI-121994). PMID:26881251

  14. Neuropathic Pain: Sensory Nerve Injury or Motor Nerve Injury?

    PubMed

    Liu, Xian-Guo; Pang, Rui-Ping; Zhou, Li-Jun; Wei, Xu-Hong; Zang, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury often induces chronic neuropathic pain. Peripheral nerve is consisted of sensory fibers and motor fibers, it is questioned injury to which type of fibers is responsible for generation of neuropathic pain? Because neuropathic pain is sensory disorder, it is generally believed that the disease should be induced by injury to sensory fibers. In recent years, however, emergent evidence shows that motor fiber injury but not sensory fiber injury is necessary and sufficient for induction of neuropathic pain. Motor fiber injury leads to neuropathic pain by upregulating pro-inflammatory cytokines and brain-derived neurotrophic factor in pain pathway. PMID:26900063

  15. Natural history of sensory nerve recovery after cutaneous nerve injury following foot and ankle surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Lu; Han, Yan-ni; Zhang, Wen-tao; Huang, Wei; Zhang, Hong-lei

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous nerve injury is the most common complication following foot and ankle surgery. However, clinical studies including long-term follow-up data after cutaneous nerve injury of the foot and ankle are lacking. In the current retrospective study, we analyzed the clinical data of 279 patients who underwent foot and ankle surgery. Subjects who suffered from apparent paresthesia in the cutaneous sensory nerve area after surgery were included in the study. Patients received oral vitamin B12 and methylcobalamin. We examined final follow-up data of 17 patients, including seven with sural nerve injury, five with superficial peroneal nerve injury, and five with plantar medial cutaneous nerve injury. We assessed nerve sensory function using the Medical Research Council Scale. Follow-up immediately, at 6 weeks, 3, 6 and 9 months, and 1 year after surgery demonstrated that sensory function was gradually restored in most patients within 6 months. However, recovery was slow at 9 months. There was no significant difference in sensory function between 9 months and 1 year after surgery. Painful neuromas occurred in four patients at 9 months to 1 year. The results demonstrated that the recovery of sensory function in patients with various cutaneous nerve injuries after foot and ankle surgery required at least 6 months. PMID:25788928

  16. Role of mast cells and sensory nerves in skin inflammation.

    PubMed

    Harvima, I T; Nilsson, G; Naukkarinen, A

    2010-04-01

    Mast cells are powerful inflammatory cells which are in close functional and anatomical association with sensory nerves in the skin. During psychological stress the neuroendocrine system and peripheral sensory nerves are activated leading to release of mediators, such as neuropeptides, neurotrophins, corticotropin-releasing hormone and a-melanocyte-stimulating hormone, which are capable of activating mast cells. On the other hand, mast cell mediators released, e.g. histamine, tryptase and nerve growth factor, can in turn excite and stimulate surrounding neuropeptide-containing C-fibers possibly resulting in feedforward loop and potentiation of neurogenic inflammation. In these mechanisms, proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines are released from mast cells. In chronic skin diseases, psoriasis, atopic dermatitis and palmoplantar pustulosis, the contacts between tryptase-positive mast cells and sensory nerves are increased in number, which provides the morphological basis for increased mast cell - sensory nerve interaction in chronically inflamed skin. Hence, in this review the current understanding of the role of cutaneous mast cells and sensory nerves and their activation in psychic stress is discussed. PMID:20467393

  17. Paclitaxel alters sensory nerve biomechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Bober, Brian G; Shah, Sameer B

    2015-10-15

    Paclitaxel is an effective chemotherapeutic that, despite its common use, frequently causes debilitating peripheral sensory neuropathy. Paclitaxel binds to and stabilizes microtubules, and through unknown mechanisms, causes abnormal microtubule aggregation. Given that microtubules contribute to the mechanical properties of cells, we tested the hypothesis that paclitaxel treatment would alter the stiffness of sensory nerves. Rat sural nerves were excised and soaked in Ringer's solution with or without paclitaxel. Nerves were secured between a force transducer and actuator, and linearly strained. Stress-strain curves were generated, from which elastic moduli were calculated. Paclitaxel treated nerves exhibited significantly higher moduli in both linear and transition regions of the curve. A composite-tissue model was then generated to estimate the stiffness increase in the cellular fraction of the nerve following paclitaxel treatment. This model was supported experimentally by data on mechanical properties of sural nerves stripped of their epineurium, and area fractions of the cellular and connective tissue components of the rat sural nerve, calculated from immunohistochemical images. Model results revealed that the cellular components of the nerve must stiffen 12x to 115x, depending on the initial axonal modulus assumed, in order to achieve the observed tissue level mechanical changes. Consistent with such an increase, electron microscopy showed increased microtubule aggregation and cytoskeletal packing, suggestive of a more cross-linked cytoskeleton. Overall, our data suggests that paclitaxel treatment induces increased microtubule bundling in axons, which leads to alterations in tissue-level mechanical properties. PMID:26321364

  18. Use of the sensory nerve stimulator to accelerate healing of a venous leg ulcer with sensory nerve dysfunction: a case study.

    PubMed

    Ogrin, Rajna; Darzins, Peteris; Khalil, Zeinab

    2005-09-01

    A new therapy using sensory nerve stimulation [International Patent Application Number PCT/AU2004/001079: "nerve function and tissue healing" (Khalil, Z)] has been developed in our vascular physiology laboratory. This treatment has been found to improve the deficient sensory nerve function and associated deficient wound healing of older persons to levels seen in young people. An 82-year-old man with a small but persistent venous leg ulcer for 18 months, despite apparently appropriate wound dressings and compression therapy, was seen in a specialist wound management service. The patient's sensory and microvascular function was assessed in great detail using the vascular physiology laboratory techniques, and he was provided the sensory nerve stimulation therapy in addition to conventional therapy. His wound healed after 4 weeks. We report the case here. Prior to nerve stimulation therapy, cutaneous sensation, microvascular blood flow and oxygen tension were found to be reduced near the ulcer when compared with the opposite, non ulcerated leg. After therapy, oxygen tension and microvascular blood flow had improved. This case provides further evidence that sensory nerve stimulation therapy at the stipulated parameters improves wound healing. The observation that sensory nerve function improved provides support for the notion that improvement in healing is mediated by improved nerve function. PMID:16618329

  19. Leptin-sensitive sensory nerves innervate white fat.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Keegan T; Schwartz, Gary J; Nguyen, Ngoc Ly T; Mendez, Jennifer M; Ryu, Vitaly; Bartness, Timothy J

    2013-06-15

    Leptin, the primary white adipose tissue (WAT) adipokine, is thought to convey lipid reserve information to the brain via the circulation. Because WAT responds to environmental/internal signals in a fat pad-specific (FPS) manner, systemic signals such as leptin would fail to communicate such distinctive information. Saturation of brain leptin transport systems also would fail to convey increased lipid levels beyond that point. WAT possesses sensory innervation exemplified by proven sensory-associated peptides in nerves within the tissue and by viral sensory nerve-specific transneuronal tract tracer, H129 strain of herpes simplex virus 1 labeling of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) pseudounipolar neurons, spinal cord and central sensory circuits. Leptin as a paracrine factor activating WAT sensory innervation could supply the brain with FPS information. Therefore, we tested for and found the presence of the long form of the leptin receptor (Ob-Rb) on DRG pseudounipolar neurons immunohistochemically labeled after injections of Fluorogold, a retrograde tract tracer, into inguinal WAT (IWAT). Intra-IWAT leptin injections (300 ng) significantly elevated IWAT nerve spike rate within 5 min and persisted for at least 30 min. Intra-IWAT leptin injections also induced significant c-Fos immunoreactivity (ir), indicating neural activation across DRG pseudounipolar sensory neurons labeled with Fluorogold IWAT injections. Intraperitoneal leptin injection did not increase c-Fos-ir in DRG or the arcuate nucleus, nor did it increase arcuate signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 phosphorylation-ir. Collectively, these results strongly suggest that endogenous leptin secreted from white adipocytes functions as a paracrine factor to activate spinal sensory nerves innervating the tissue. PMID:23612999

  20. Study of Electrophysiological Changes in Sensory Nerves Among Diabetic Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Moinuddin, Arsalan; Ahsan, Akif; Goel, Ashish

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Neuropathy is one of the most troublesome complication affecting individuals with diabetes. The resultant loss of function in peripheral nerves causes loss of protective sensations and impairs patient’s ability to perceive incipient or even apparent ulcerations in the feet. Aim This study was undertaken to test the hypothesis of alteration in electrophysiological parameters of nerve before actual manifestations of neuropathy in type 2 diabetic patients and to analyse the effect of smoking on Sensory Nerve Conduction Velocity (SNCV) of diabetic subjects. Materials and Methods One hundred and twenty diagnosed diabetics were taken as cases while 30 healthy non diabetics were taken as control. Case group was divided into diabetic non-smoker and diabetic smoker. Diabetic smoker were further subdivided into light smoker, moderate smoker and heavy smoker according to smoking index. After detailed history and physical examination SNCV of median and ulnar nerve in upper limb and sural nerve in lower limb was performed. Results On comparison of SNCV of median and ulnar nerve of upper limb and sural nerve of lower limb between control and diabetic non-smoker only sural nerve of diabetic non smoker showed significant bilateral decrease. There was significant bilateral decrease in SNCV of median and ulnar nerve of diabetic heavy smoker when compared to control and diabetic non smoker. Similarly, SNCV of sural nerve of diabetic heavy smoker was significantly decreased when compared with control, diabetic non-smoker, diabetic light and moderate smoker. A negative and statistically significant correlation was found between SNCV and smoking index. Conclusion Present study indicates that nerves of lower limbs are more susceptible to diabetic assault as compared to upper limb suggesting that long nerves are commonly affected. Also, apart from duration and severity of diabetes, smoking itself is an independent factor for diabetic neuropathy. PMID:26894060

  1. Tissue Preparation and Immunostaining of Mouse Sensory Nerve Fibers Innervating Skin and Limb Bones

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, Andrew J.; Mohapatra, Durga P.

    2012-01-01

    Detection and primary processing of physical, chemical and thermal sensory stimuli by peripheral sensory nerve fibers is key to sensory perception in animals and humans. These peripheral sensory nerve fibers express a plethora of receptors and ion channel proteins which detect and initiate specific sensory stimuli. Methods are available to characterize the electrical properties of peripheral sensory nerve fibers innervating the skin, which can also be utilized to identify the functional expression of specific ion channel proteins in these fibers. However, similar electrophysiological methods are not available (and are also difficult to develop) for the detection of the functional expression of receptors and ion channel proteins in peripheral sensory nerve fibers innervating other visceral organs, including the most challenging tissues such as bone. Moreover, such electrophysiological methods cannot be utilized to determine the expression of non-excitable proteins in peripheral sensory nerve fibers. Therefore, immunostaining of peripheral/visceral tissue samples for sensory nerve fivers provides the best possible way to determine the expression of specific proteins of interest in these nerve fibers. So far, most of the protein expression studies in sensory neurons have utilized immunostaining procedures in sensory ganglia, where the information is limited to the expression of specific proteins in the cell body of specific types or subsets of sensory neurons. Here we report detailed methods/protocols for the preparation of peripheral/visceral tissue samples for immunostaining of peripheral sensory nerve fibers. We specifically detail methods for the preparation of skin or plantar punch biopsy and bone (femur) sections from mice for immunostaining of peripheral sensory nerve fibers. These methods are not only key to the qualitative determination of protein expression in peripheral sensory neurons, but also provide a quantitative assay method for determining changes in protein expression levels in specific types or subsets of sensory fibers, as well as for determining the morphological and/or anatomical changes in the number and density of sensory fibers during various pathological states. Further, these methods are not confined to the staining of only sensory nerve fibers, but can also be used for staining any types of nerve fibers in the skin, bones and other visceral tissue. PMID:22314687

  2. Palm to Finger Ulnar Sensory Nerve Conduction.

    PubMed

    Davidowich, Eduardo; Nascimento, Osvaldo J M; Orsini, Marco; Pupe, Camila; Pessoa, Bruno; Bittar, Caroline; Pires, Karina Lebeis; Bruno, Carlos; Coutinho, Bruno Mattos; de Souza, Olivia Gameiro; Ribeiro, Pedro; Velasques, Bruna; Bittencourt, Juliana; Teixeira, Silmar; Bastos, Victor Hugo

    2015-12-29

    Ulnar neuropathy at the wrist (UNW) is rare, and always challenging to localize. To increase the sensitivity and specificity of the diagnosis of UNW many authors advocate the stimulation of the ulnar nerve (UN) in the segment of the wrist and palm. The focus of this paper is to present a modified and simplified technique of sensory nerve conduction (SNC) of the UN in the wrist and palm segments and demonstrate the validity of this technique in the study of five cases of type III UNW. The SNC of UN was performed antidromically with fifth finger ring recording electrodes. The UN was stimulated 14 cm proximal to the active electrode (the standard way) and 7 cm proximal to the active electrode. The normal data from amplitude and conduction velocity (CV) ratios between the palm to finger and wrist to finger segments were obtained. Normal amplitude ratio was 1.4 to 0.76. Normal CV ratio was 0.8 to 1.23.We found evidences of abnormal SNAP amplitude ratio or substantial slowing of UN sensory fibers across the wrist in 5 of the 5 patients with electrophysiological-definite type III UNW. PMID:26788268

  3. Palm to Finger Ulnar Sensory Nerve Conduction

    PubMed Central

    Davidowich, Eduardo; Orsini, Marco; Pupe, Camila; Pessoa, Bruno; Bittar, Caroline; Pires, Karina Lebeis; Bruno, Carlos; Coutinho, Bruno Mattos; de Souza, Olivia Gameiro; Ribeiro, Pedro; Velasques, Bruna; Bittencourt, Juliana; Teixeira, Silmar; Bastos, Victor Hugo

    2015-01-01

    Ulnar neuropathy at the wrist (UNW) is rare, and always challenging to localize. To increase the sensitivity and specificity of the diagnosis of UNW many authors advocate the stimulation of the ulnar nerve (UN) in the segment of the wrist and palm. The focus of this paper is to present a modified and simplified technique of sensory nerve conduction (SNC) of the UN in the wrist and palm segments and demonstrate the validity of this technique in the study of five cases of type III UNW. The SNC of UN was performed antidromically with fifth finger ring recording electrodes. The UN was stimulated 14 cm proximal to the active electrode (the standard way) and 7 cm proximal to the active electrode. The normal data from amplitude and conduction velocity (CV) ratios between the palm to finger and wrist to finger segments were obtained. Normal amplitude ratio was 1.4 to 0.76. Normal CV ratio was 0.8 to 1.23.We found evidences of abnormal SNAP amplitude ratio or substantial slowing of UN sensory fibers across the wrist in 5 of the 5 patients with electrophysiological-definite type III UNW. PMID:26788268

  4. Sensory Nerve Induced Inflammation Contributes to Heterotopic Ossification

    PubMed Central

    Salisbury, Elizabeth; Rodenberg, Eric; Sonnet, Corinne; Hipp, John; Gannon, Francis H.; Vadakkan, Tegy J.; Dickinson, Mary E.; Olmsted-Davis, Elizabeth A.; Davis, Alan R.

    2012-01-01

    Heterotopic ossification (HO), or bone formation in soft tissues, is often the result of traumatic injury. Much evidence has linked the release of BMPs (bone morphogenetic proteins) upon injury to this process. HO was once thought to be a rare occurrence, but recent statistics from the military suggest that as many as 60% of traumatic injuries, resulting from bomb blasts, have associated HO. In this study, we attempt to define the role of peripheral nerves in this process. Since BMP2 has been shown previously to induce release of the neuroinflammatory molecules, substance P (SP) and calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP), from peripheral, sensory neurons, we examined this process in vivo. SP and CGRP are rapidly expressed upon delivery of BMP2 and remain elevated throughout bone formation. In animals lacking functional sensory neurons (TRPV1−/−), BMP2-mediated increases in SP and CGRP were suppressed as compared to the normal animals, and HO was dramatically inhibited in these deficient mice, suggesting that neuroinflammation plays a functional role. Mast cells, known to be recruited by SP and CGRP, were elevated after BMP2 induction. These mast cells were localized to the nerve structures and underwent degranulation. When degranulation was inhibited using cromolyn, HO was again reduced significantly. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed nerves expressing the stem cell markers nanog and Klf4, as well as the osteoblast marker osterix, after BMP2 induction, in mice treated with cromolyn. The data collectively suggest that BMP2 can act directly on sensory neurons to induce neurogenic inflammation, resulting in nerve remodeling and the migration/release of osteogenic and other stem cells from the nerve. Further, blocking this process significantly reduces HO, suggesting that the stem cell population contributes to bone formation. PMID:21678472

  5. Patterns of slow transport in sensory nerves

    SciTech Connect

    Stromska, D.P.; Ochs, S.

    1981-09-01

    An examination of the pattern of outflow of radioactivity in sciatic nerves was made at times from 1 to 82 days in the rat and up to 132 days in the cat after injecting the L5 and L7 dorsal root ganglia, respectively, with 3H-leucine. Slow waves moving at a rate of 1-2 mm/day were looked for on the basis of their reported presence in the motor fibers of the rat. A consistent pattern of slow waves was not seen in the cat or rat sensory fibers of the sciatic nerves nor was evidence of a slow wave found in the cat dorsal columns. Irregularities in the pattern of outflow which at times appeared as waves did so in an irregular fashion, a pattern inconsistent with a steady progression of slow waves in the fibers. The decrease of radioactivity appearing first near the ganglia helps create the impression of a wave along with irregular decreases in the overall levels of radio-activity with time. The results were explained on the basis of the unitary hypothesis. The labeled components are considered to be moved down the fiber by the fast transport mechanism, those components dropping off locally in the fibers early on, constituting the slow wave. As those components turn over locally in the various organelles of fiber and are further redistributed, they may at times give rise to what appears as waves.

  6. Parkinson Disease Affects Peripheral Sensory Nerves in the Pharynx

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Liancai; Sobotka, Stanislaw; Chen, Jingming; Su, Hungxi; Sanders, Ira; Nyirenda, Themba; Adler, Charles H.; Shill, Holly A.; Caviness, John N.; Samanta, Johan E.; Sue, Lucia I.; Beach, Thomas G.

    2013-01-01

    Dysphagia is very common in patients with Parkinsons disease (PD) and often leads to aspiration pneumonia, the most common cause of death in PD. Unfortunately, current therapies are largely ineffective for dysphagia. As pharyngeal sensation normally triggers the swallowing reflex, we examined pharyngeal sensory nerves in PD for Lewy pathology. Sensory nerves supplying the pharynx were excised from autopsied pharynges obtained from patients with clinically diagnosed and neuropathologically confirmed PD (n = 10) and healthy age-matched controls (n = 4). We examined: the glossopharyngeal nerve (IX); the pharyngeal sensory branch of the vagus nerve (PSB-X); and the internal superior laryngeal nerve (ISLN) innervating the laryngopharynx. Immunohistochemistry for phosphorylated ?-synuclein was used to detect potential Lewy pathology. Axonal ?-synuclein aggregates in the pharyngeal sensory nerves were identified in all of the PD subjects but not in the controls. The density of ?-synuclein-positive lesions was significantly greater in PD subjects with documented dysphagia compared to those without dysphagia. In addition, ?-synuclein-immunoreactive nerve fibers in the ISLN were much more abundant than those in the IX and PSBX. These findings suggest that pharyngeal sensory nerves are directly affected by the pathologic process of PD. This anatomic pathology may decrease pharyngeal sensation impairing swallowing and airway protective reflexes, thereby contributing to dysphagia and aspiration. PMID:23771215

  7. Sensory outcomes of the anterior tongue after lingual nerve repair in oropharyngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    Elfring, T T; Boliek, C A; Seikaly, H; Harris, J; Rieger, J M

    2012-03-01

    Primary treatment of oropharyngeal cancer often involves surgical resection and reconstruction of the affected area. However, during base of tongue reconstruction the lingual nerve is often severed on one or both sides, affecting sensation in the preserved tissue of the anterior tongue. The loss of specific tongue sensations could negatively affect a person's oral function and quality of life. The aim of this study was to explore the effects of different types of lingual nerve intervention on sensory function for patients with base of tongue cancer as compared to healthy, age-matched adults. Subjects included 30 patients who had undergone primary oropharyngeal reconstruction with a radial forearm free-flap and 30 matched controls. Sensations tested were temperature, two-point discrimination, light touch, taste, oral stereognosis and texture on the anterior two-thirds of the tongue. Results indicated that type of surgical nerve repair may not have a significant impact on overall sensory outcomes, providing mixed results for either nerve repair technique. Sensations for the nonoperated tongue side and operated side with lingual nerve intact were comparable to matched controls, with mixed outcomes for nerve repair. The poorest sensory outcomes were observed in patients with the lingual nerve severed, while all patients with lingual nerve intervention exhibited deteriorated taste sensation on the affected tongue side. Overall, patients in this study who had undergone oropharyngeal reconstruction with lingual nerve intervention exhibited decreased levels of sensation on the operated tongue side, with minimal differences between types of lingual nerve repair. PMID:21923892

  8. Intrafascicular stimulation of monkey arm nerves evokes coordinated grasp and sensory responses

    PubMed Central

    Ledbetter, Noah M.; Ethier, Christian; Oby, Emily R.; Hiatt, Scott D.; Wilder, Andrew M.; Ko, Jason H.; Agnew, Sonya P.; Miller, Lee E.

    2013-01-01

    High-count microelectrode arrays implanted in peripheral nerves could restore motor function after spinal cord injury or sensory function after limb loss. In this study, we implanted Utah Slanted Electrode Arrays (USEAs) intrafascicularly at the elbow or shoulder in arm nerves of rhesus monkeys (n = 4) under isoflurane anesthesia. Input-output curves indicated that pulse-width-modulated single-electrode stimulation in each arm nerve could recruit single muscles with little or no recruitment of other muscles. Stimulus trains evoked specific, natural, hand movements, which could be combined via multielectrode stimulation to elicit coordinated power or pinch grasp. Stimulation also elicited short-latency evoked potentials (EPs) in primary somatosensory cortex, which might be used to provide sensory feedback from a prosthetic limb. These results demonstrate a high-resolution, high-channel-count interface to the peripheral nervous system for restoring hand function after neural injury or disruption or for examining nerve structure. PMID:23076108

  9. Nerve injury induces the expression of syndecan-1 heparan sulfate proteoglycan in primary sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Murakami, K; Tanaka, T; Bando, Y; Yoshida, S

    2015-08-01

    Heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) have important functions in development of the central nervous system; however, their functions in nerve injury are not yet fully understood. We previously reported the expression of syndecan-1, a type of HSPG, in cranial motor neurons after nerve injury, suggesting the importance of syndecan-1 in the pathology of motor nerve injury. In this study, we examined the expression of syndecan-1, a type of HSPG, in primary sensory neurons after nerve injury in mice. Sciatic nerve axotomy strongly induced the expression of syndecan-1 in a subpopulation of injured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, which were small in size and had CGRP- or isolectin B4-positive fibers. Syndecan-1 was also distributed in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord ipsilateral to the axotomy, and located on the membrane of axons in lamina II of the dorsal horn. Not only sciatic nerve axotomy, infraorbital nerve axotomy also induced the expression of syndecan-1 in trigeminal ganglion neurons. Moreover, syndecan-1 knockdown in cultured DRG neurons induced a shorter neurite extension. These results suggest that syndecan-1 expression in injured primary sensory neurons may have functional roles in nerve regeneration and synaptic plasticity, resulting in the development of neuropathic pain. PMID:26002314

  10. Normal threshold values for a monofilament sensory test in sural and radial cutaneous nerves in Indian and Nepali volunteers.

    PubMed

    Wagenaar, Inge; Brandsma, Wim; Post, Erik; Richardus, Jan Hendrik

    2014-12-01

    The monofilament test (MFT) is a reliable method to assess sensory nerve function in leprosy and other neuropathies. Assessment of the radial cutaneous and sural nerves, in addition to nerves usually tested, can help improve diagnosis and monitoring of nerve function impairment (NFI). To enable the detection of impairments in leprosy patients, it is essential to know the monofilament threshold of these two nerves in normal subjects. The radial cutaneous, sural, ulnar, median and posterior tibial nerves of 245 volunteers were tested. All nerves were tested at three sites on both left and right sides. Normal monofilament thresholds were calculated per test-site and per nerve. We assessed 490 radial cutaneous and 482 sural nerves. The normal monofilament was 2 g (Filament Index Number (FIN) 4.31) for the radial cutaneous and 4 g (FIN 4.56) for the sural nerve, although heavy manual laborers demonstrated a threshold of 10 g (FIN 5.07) for the sural nerve. For median and ulnar nerves, the 200 mg (FIN 3.61) filament was confirmed as normal while the 4 g (FIN 4.56) filament was normal for the posterior tibial. Age and occupation have an effect on the mean touch sensitivity but do not affect the normal threshold for the radial cutaneous and sural nerves. The normal thresholds for the radial cutaneous and sural nerves are determined as the 2 g (FIN 4.31) and the 4 g (FIN 4.56) filaments, respectively. The addition of the radial cutaneous and sural nerve to sensory nerve assessment may improve the diagnosis of patients with impaired sensory nerve function. PMID:25675652

  11. Facial nerve dysfunction in hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy type I and III.

    PubMed

    Glocker, F X; Rösler, K M; Linden, D; Heinen, F; Hess, C W; Lücking, C H

    1999-09-01

    Facial nerve function was studied in 19 patients with hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy type I (HMSN I) and 2 patients with hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy type III (HMSN III, Déjérine-Sottas), and compared to that in 24 patients with Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). The facial nerve was stimulated electrically at the stylomastoid fossa, and magnetically in its proximal intracanalicular segment. Additionally, the face-associated motor cortex was stimulated magnetically. The facial nerve motor neurography was abnormal in 17 of 19 HMSN I patients and in both HMSN III patients, revealing moderate to marked conduction slowing in both the extracranial and intracranial nerve segments, along with variable reductions of compound muscle action potential (CMAP) amplitudes. The facial nerve conduction slowing paralleled that of limb nerves, but was not associated with clinical dysfunction of facial muscles, because none of the HMSN I patients had facial palsy. Conduction slowing was most severe in the HMSN III patients, but only slight facial weakness was present. In GBS, conduction slowing was less marked, but facial weakness exceeded that in HMSN patients in all cases. We conclude that involvement of the facial nerve is common in HMSN I and HMSN III. It affects the intra- and extracranial part of the facial nerve and is mostly subclinical. PMID:10454715

  12. Painful nerve injury increases plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase activity in axotomized sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase (PMCA) is the principal means by which sensory neurons expel Ca2+ and thereby regulate the concentration of cytoplasmic Ca2+ and the processes controlled by this critical second messenger. We have previously found that painful nerve injury decreases resting cytoplasmic Ca2+ levels and activity-induced cytoplasmic Ca2+ accumulation in axotomized sensory neurons. Here we examine the contribution of PMCA after nerve injury in a rat model of neuropathic pain. Results PMCA function was isolated in dissociated sensory neurons by blocking intracellular Ca2+ sequestration with thapsigargin, and cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration was recorded with Fura-2 fluorometry. Compared to control neurons, the rate at which depolarization-induced Ca2+ transients resolved was increased in axotomized neurons after spinal nerve ligation, indicating accelerated PMCA function. Electrophysiological recordings showed that blockade of PMCA by vanadate prolonged the action potential afterhyperpolarization, and also decreased the rate at which neurons could fire repetitively. Conclusion We found that PMCA function is elevated in axotomized sensory neurons, which contributes to neuronal hyperexcitability. Accelerated PMCA function in the primary sensory neuron may contribute to the generation of neuropathic pain, and thus its modulation could provide a new pathway for peripheral treatment of post-traumatic neuropathic pain. PMID:22713297

  13. Sensory transduction in peripheral nerve axons elicits ectopic action potentials.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Tal; Sauer, Susanne K; Horch, Raymund E; Reeh, Peter W

    2008-06-11

    Sensory properties of unmyelinated axons in the isolated rat sciatic nerve have been revealed previously by measuring stimulated neuropeptide release in response to noxious stimuli. In addition, axonal sensitization by inflammatory mediators has been demonstrated and shown to depend on the heat- and proton-activated ion channel transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor-1. It was unclear whether this responsiveness is accompanied by ectopic generation of action potentials, which may play a crucial role in painful neuropathies. We explored this hypothesis using the isolated mouse skin-nerve preparation. This method enabled us to directly compare the sensory properties of axons in the peripheral nerve with their characterized cutaneous terminals in the receptive field using propagated action potentials as an index of axonal activation. Single-fiber recordings from 51 mechanosensitive mouse C-fibers revealed that a majority of the polymodal nociceptors responded with an encoding discharge rate to graded heating of the cutaneous receptive field (n = 38) as well as of the saphenous nerve carrying the fiber under investigation (n = 25; 66%). Axonal heat responses paralleled those of the receptive fields with regard to thresholds and discharge rates (41.5 +/- 4.3 degrees C; 7.7 +/- 9.6 spikes in a 20 s 32-48 degrees C ranged stimulation). In contrast, axonal mechanosensitivity was poor and noxious cold sensitivity more rarely encountered. In conclusion, peripheral nerve axons exhibit sensory transduction capacities similar to their nociceptive terminals in the skin with respect to noxious heat, although not to mechanical and cold sensitivity. This may become a source of ectopic discharge and pain if axonal heat threshold drops to body temperature, as may be the case during inflammation-like processes in peripheral nerves. PMID:18550771

  14. White adipose tissue sensory nerve denervation mimics lipectomy-induced compensatory increases in adiposity.

    PubMed

    Shi, Haifei; Bartness, Timothy J

    2005-08-01

    The sensory innervation of white adipose tissue (WAT) is indicated by the labeling of sensory bipolar neurons in the dorsal root ganglion after retrograde dye placement into WAT. In addition, immunoreactivity (ir) for sensory-associated neuropeptides such as calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and substance P in WAT pads also supports the notion of WAT sensory innervation. The function of this sensory innervation is unknown but could involve conveying the degree of adiposity to the brain. In tests of total body fat regulation, partial surgical lipectomy triggers compensatory increases in the mass of nonexcised WAT, ultimately resulting in restoration of total body fat levels in Siberian hamsters and other animals. The signal that triggers this compensation is unknown but could involve disruption of WAT sensory innervation that accompanies lipectomy. Therefore, a local and selective sensory denervation was accomplished by microinjecting the sensory nerve neurotoxin capsaicin bilaterally into epididymal WAT (EWAT) of Siberian hamsters, whereas controls received vehicle injections. Additional hamsters had bilateral EWAT lipectomy (EWATx) or sham lipectomy. As seen previously, EWATx resulted in significantly increased retroperitoneal WAT (RWAT) and inguinal WAT (IWAT) masses. Capsaicin treatment significantly decreased CGRP- but not tyrosine hydroxylase-ir, attesting to the diminished and selective sensory innervation. Capsaicin-treated hamsters also had increased RWAT and, to a lesser degree, IWAT mass largely mimicking the WAT mass increases seen after lipectomy. Collectively, these data suggest the possibility that information related to peripheral lipid stores may be conveyed to the brain via the sensory innervation of WAT. PMID:15860651

  15. Functions of the Renal Nerves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koepke, John P.; DiBona, Gerald F.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses renal neuroanatomy, renal vasculature, renal tubules, renin secretion, renorenal reflexes, and hypertension as related to renal nerve functions. Indicates that high intensitites of renal nerve stimulation have produced alterations in several renal functions. (A chart with various stimulations and resultant renal functions and 10-item,

  16. Sensory outcome of fingertip replantations without nerve repair.

    PubMed

    Ozcelik, Ismail Bulent; Tuncer, Serdar; Purisa, Husrev; Sezer, Ilker; Mersa, Berkan; Kabakas, Fatih; Celikdelen, Pinar

    2008-01-01

    The sensory recovery outcomes of fingertip replantations without nerve repair were retrospectively studied. Between 2000 and 2006, 112 fingertip replantations with only arterial repair were carried out in 98 patients. About 76 of the replants survived totally, with a success rate of 67.8%. Evaluation of sensory recovery was possible in 31 patients (38 replantations). Sensory evaluation was made with Semmes-Weinstein, static and dynamic two-point discrimination, and vibration sense tests. Fingertip atrophy, nail deformities, and return to work were also evaluated. According to the Semmes-Weinstein test, 29.0% (11/38) of the fingers had normal sense, 60.5% (23/38) had diminished light touch, 7.9% (3/38) had diminished protective sensation, and 2.6% (1/38) had loss of protective sensation. Mean static and dynamic two-point discriminations were 7.2 mm (3-11 mm), and 4.60 mm (3-6 mm), respectively. Vibratory testing revealed increased vibration in 42.1% of the fingers, decreased vibration in 36.8%, and equal vibration when compared with the non-injured fingers in 21.1%. Atrophy was present in 14 (36.8%) fingers and negatively affected the results. Nail deformities, cold intolerance, return to work, and the effect of sensory education were investigated. Comparison of crush and clean cut injuries did not yield any significant difference in any of the parameters. Patients who received sensory education had significantly better results in sensory testing. The results were classified as excellent, good, and poor based on results of two-point discrimination tests. The outcome was excellent in 18 fingers and good in 20 fingers. Overall, satisfactory sensory recovery was achieved in fingertip replantations without nerve repair. PMID:18683863

  17. CAPSAICIN-SENSITIVE SENSORY NERVE FIBERS CONTRIBUTE TO THE GENERATION AND MAINTENANCE OF SKELETAL FRACTURE PAIN

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez-Andrade, Juan Miguel; Bloom, Aaron P.; Mantyh, William G.; Koewler, Nathan J.; Freeman, Katie T.; Delong, David; Ghilardi, Joseph R.; Kuskowski, Michael A.; Mantyh, Patrick W.

    2009-01-01

    Although skeletal pain can have a marked impact on a patients functional status and quality of life, relatively little is known about the specific populations of peripheral nerve fibers that drive non-malignant bone pain. In the present report, neonatal male Sprague Dawley rats were treated with capsaicin or vehicle and femoral fracture was produced when the animals were young adults (1516 weeks old). Capsaicin treatment, but not vehicle, resulted in a significant (>70%) depletion in the density of calcitonin-gene related peptide positive (CGRP+) sensory nerve fibers, but not 200 kD neurofilament H positive (NF200+) sensory nerve fibers in the periosteum. The periosteum is a thin, cellular and fibrous tissue that tightly adheres to the outer surface of all but the articulated surface of bone and appears to play a pivotal role in driving fracture pain. In animals treated with capsaicin, but not vehicle, there was a 50% reduction in the severity, but no change in the time course, of fracture-induced skeletal pain related behaviors as measured by spontaneous flinching, guarding and weight bearing. These results suggest that both capsaicin-sensitive (primarily CGRP+ C-fibers) and capsaicin-insensitive (primarily NF200+ A-delta fibers) sensory nerve fibers participate in driving skeletal fracture pain. Skeletal pain can be a significant impediment to functional recovery following trauma-induced fracture, osteoporosis-induced fracture and orthopedic surgery procedures such as knee and hip replacement. Understanding the specific populations of sensory nerve fibers that need to be targeted to inhibit the generation and maintenance of skeletal pain may allow the development of more specific mechanism-based therapies that can effectively attenuate acute and chronic skeletal pain. PMID:19486928

  18. Uses of skin biopsy for sensory and autonomic nerve assessment.

    PubMed

    Myers, M Iliza; Peltier, Amanda C

    2013-01-01

    Skin biopsy is a valuable diagnostic tool for small-fiber-predominant neuropathy by the quantification of intraepidermal nerve fiber density (IENFD). It has the unique advantage of being a minimally invasive procedure with the potential for longitudinal evaluation of both sensory and autonomic fibers. Unmyelinated small fibers are not otherwise quantified objectively with such a level of sensitivity as has been reported with IENFD. Recent advances include an expansion of the skin punch biopsy technique to evaluate larger myelinated fibers and mechanoreceptors, and recent work has also focused on additional methods of quantifying dermal fibers and densely innervated autonomic structures. This review discusses current work using skin biopsy for the pathologic analysis of peripheral nerve fibers in neuropathy of various causes as well as its use in clinical trials. PMID:23250768

  19. Sickle cell disease in mice is associated with sensitization of sensory nerve fibers.

    PubMed

    Kenyon, Nicholas; Wang, Li; Spornick, Nicholas; Khaibullina, Alfia; Almeida, Luis Ef; Cheng, Yao; Wang, Jichuan; Guptill, Virginia; Finkel, Julia C; Quezado, Zenaide M N

    2015-01-01

    The pain phenotype in sickle cell disease (SCD) patients is highly variable. A small percentage of SCD patients experience many vaso-occlusive crises/year, 5% of patients account for over 30% of pain episodes, while 39% report few episodes of severe pain. Clearly, a better understanding of the pathobiology of SCD is needed to improve its therapy. Humanized sickle cell mice recapitulate several phenotypes of SCD patients and provide a model for the study of SCD pain. Researchers have shown that one strain of humanized SCD mice, the BERK strain, has abnormal pain phenotype. However, the nociception phenotype of another humanized SCD mouse strain, the Townes strain, has not been described. In a large cross-sectional study of BERK and Townes SCD mice, we examined thermosensory response and sensory nerve fiber function using sine-wave electrical stimulation at 2000, 250, and 5?Hz to stimulate preferentially A?, A?, and C sensory nerve fibers, respectively. We found that BERK and Townes mice, compared to respective controls, had decreases in 2000, 250, and 5?Hz current vocalization thresholds in patterns that suggest sensitization of a broad spectrum of sensory nerve fibers. In addition, the pattern of sensitization of sensory fibers varied according to strain, sex, age, and mouse genotype. In a similarly variable pattern, Townes and BERKs also had significantly altered sensitivity to noxious thermal stimuli in agreement with what has been shown by others. In summary, the analysis of somatosensory function using sine-wave electrical stimulation in humanized sickle cell mice suggests that in SCD, both myelinated and unmyelinated, fibers are sensitized. The pattern of sensory fiber sensitization is distinct from that observed in pain models of neuropathic and inflammatory pain. These findings raise the possibility that sensitization of a broad spectrum of sensory fibers might contribute to the altered and variable nociception phenotype in SCD. PMID:25070860

  20. Altered Bone Development in a Mouse Model of Peripheral Sensory Nerve Inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Heffner, Mollie A.; Anderson, Matthew J.; Yeh, Gregory C.; Genetos, Damian C.; Christiansen, Blaine A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The present study sought to determine the effects of decreased peripheral sensory nerve function on skeletal development and bone metabolism in mice. Methods C57BL/6 neonatal mice were treated with capsaicin to induce peripheral sensory nerve degeneration, and compared to vehicle-treated controls at 4, 8 and 12 weeks of age. Changes in bone structure were assessed using micro-computed tomography, mechanical properties and fracture resistance were assessed using three-point bending of radii, and bone turnover was assessed using dynamic histomorphometry and serum biomarkers. Results Capsaicin treatment resulted in small but significant decreases in bone structure, particularly affecting trabecular bone. Capsaicin-treated mice exhibited lower trabecular thickness at the femoral metaphysis and L5 vertebral body compared with vehicle-treated mice. However, capsaicin- and vehicle-treated mice had similar mechanical properties and bone turnover rates. Conclusion Neonatal capsaicin treatment affected trabecular bone during development; however these small changes may not be meaningful with respect to bone strength under normal loading conditions. It is possible that capsaicin-sensitive neurons may be more important for bone under stress conditions such as increased mechanical loading or injury. Future studies will investigate this potential role of peripheral sensory nerves in bone adaptation. PMID:24583535

  1. Photostimulation of sensory neurons of the rat vagus nerve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhee, Albert Y.; Li, Gong; Wells, Jonathon; Kao, Joseph P. Y.

    2008-02-01

    We studied the effect of infrared (IR) stimulation on rat sensory neurons. Primary sensory neurons were prepared by enzymatic dissociation of the inferior (or "nodose") ganglia from the vagus nerves of rats. The 1.85-?m output of a diode laser, delivered through a 200-?m silica fiber, was used for photostimulation. Nodose neurons express the vanilloid receptor, TRPV1, which is a non-selective cation channel that opens in response to significant temperature jumps above 37 C. Opening TRPV1 channels allows entry of cations, including calcium (Ca 2+), into the cell to cause membrane depolarization. Therefore, to monitor TRPV1 activation consequent to photostimulation, we used fura-2, a fluorescent Ca 2+ indicator, to monitor the rise in intracellular Ca 2+ concentration ([Ca 2+]i). Brief trains of 2-msec IR pulses activated TRPV1 rapidly and reversibly, as evidenced by transient rises in [Ca 2+]i (referred to as Ca 2+ transients). Consistent with the Ca 2+ transients arising from influx of Ca 2+, identical photostimulation failed to evoke Ca 2+ responses in the absence of extracellular Ca 2+. Furthermore, the photo-induced Ca 2+ signals were abolished by capsazepine, a specific blocker of TRPV1, indicating that the responses were indeed mediated by TRPV1. We discuss the feasibility of using focal IR stimulation to probe neuronal circuit properties in intact neural tissue, and compare IR stimulation with another photostimulation technique-focal photolytic release of "caged" molecules.

  2. Sensory Recovery Outcome after Digital Nerve Repair in Relation to Different Reconstructive Techniques: Meta-Analysis and Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Petra; Harder, Yves; Kern, Yasmin; Paprottka, Philipp M.; Machens, Hans-Günther; Lohmeyer, Jörn A.

    2013-01-01

    Good clinical outcome after digital nerve repair is highly relevant for proper hand function and has a significant socioeconomic impact. However, level of evidence for competing surgical techniques is low. The aim is to summarize and compare the outcomes of digital nerve repair with different methods (end-to-end and end-to-side coaptations, nerve grafts, artificial conduit-, vein-, muscle, and muscle-in-vein reconstructions, and replantations) to provide an aid for choosing an individual technique of nerve reconstruction and to create reference values of standard repair for nonrandomized clinical studies. 87 publications including 2,997 nerve repairs were suitable for a precise evaluation. For digital nerve repairs there was practically no particular technique superior to another. Only end-to-side coaptation had an inferior two-point discrimination in comparison to end-to-end coaptation or nerve grafting. Furthermore, this meta-analysis showed that youth was associated with an improved sensory recovery outcome in patients who underwent digital replantation. For end-to-end coaptations, recent publications had significantly better sensory recovery outcomes than older ones. Given minor differences in outcome, the main criteria in choosing an adequate surgical technique should be gap length and donor site morbidity caused by graft material harvesting. Our clinical experience was used to provide a decision tree for digital nerve repair. PMID:23984064

  3. Arnold's nerve cough reflex: evidence for chronic cough as a sensory vagal neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Nicole M; Gibson, Peter G; Birring, Surinder S

    2014-10-01

    Arnold's nerve ear-cough reflex is recognised to occur uncommonly in patients with chronic cough. In these patients, mechanical stimulation of the external auditory meatus can activate the auricular branch of the vagus nerve (Arnold's nerve) and evoke reflex cough. This is an example of hypersensitivity of vagal afferent nerves, and there is now an increasing recognition that many cases of refractory or idiopathic cough may be due to a sensory neuropathy of the vagus nerve. We present two cases where the cause of refractory chronic cough was due to sensory neuropathy associated with ear-cough reflex hypersensitivity. In both cases, the cough as well as the Arnold's nerve reflex hypersensitivity were successfully treated with gabapentin, a treatment that has previously been shown to be effective in the treatment of cough due to sensory laryngeal neuropathy (SLN). PMID:25383210

  4. Changes in sensory activity of ocular surface sensory nerves during allergic keratoconjunctivitis.

    PubMed

    Acosta, M Carmen; Luna, Carolina; Quirce, Susana; Belmonte, Carlos; Gallar, Juana

    2013-11-01

    Peripheral neural mechanisms underlying the sensations of irritation, discomfort, and itch accompanying the eye allergic response have not been hitherto analyzed. We explored this question recording the changes in the electrical activity of corneoconjunctival sensory nerve fibers of the guinea pig after an ocular allergic challenge. Sensitization was produced by i.p. ovalbumin followed by repeated application in the eye of 10% ovalbumin on days 14 to 18. Blinking and tearing rate were measured. Spontaneous and stimulus-evoked (mechanical, thermal, chemical) impulse activity was recorded from mechanonociceptor, polymodal nociceptor and cold corneoscleral sensory afferent fibers. After a single (day 14) or repeated daily exposures to the allergen during the following 3 to 4days, tearing and blinking rate increased significantly. Also, sensitization was observed in mechanonociceptors (transient reduction of mechanical threshold only on day 14) and in polymodal nociceptors (sustained enhancement of the impulse response to acidic stimulation). In contrast, cold thermoreceptors showed a significant decrease in basal ongoing activity and in the response to cooling. Treatment with the TRPV1 and TRPA1 blockers capsazepine and HC-030031 reversed the augmented blinking. Only capsazepine attenuated tearing rate increase and sensitization of the polymodal nociceptors response to CO2. Capsazepine also prevented the decrease in cold thermoreceptor activity caused by the allergic challenge. We conclude that changes in nerve impulse activity accompanying the ocular allergic response, primarily mediated by activation of nociceptor's TRPV1 and to a lesser degree by activation of TRPA1 channels, explain the eye discomfort sensations accompanying allergic episodes. PMID:23867735

  5. Sensory capacity of reinnervated skin after redirection of amputated upper limb nerves to the chest

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Aimee E.; Kuiken, Todd A.

    2009-01-01

    Targeted reinnervation is a new neural-machine interface that has been developed to help improve the function of new-generation prosthetic limbs. Targeted reinnervation is a surgical procedure that takes the nerves that once innervated a severed limb and redirects them to proximal muscle and skin sites. The sensory afferents of the redirected nerves reinnervate the skin overlying the transfer site. This creates a sensory expression of the missing limb in the amputee's reinnervated skin. When these individuals are touched on this reinnervated skin they feel as though they are being touched on their missing limb. Targeted reinnervation takes nerves that once served the hand, a skin region of high functional importance, and redirects them to less functionally relevant skin areas adjacent to the amputation site. In an effort to better understand the sensory capacity of the reinnervated target skin following this procedure, we examined grating orientation thresholds and point localization thresholds on two amputees who had undergone the targeted reinnervation surgery. Grating orientation thresholds and point localization thresholds were also measured on the contralateral normal skin of the targeted reinnervation amputees and on analogous sites in able-bodied controls. Grating orientation thresholds for the reinnervated skin of the targeted reinnervation amputees were found to be similar to normal ranges for both the amputees’ contralateral skin and also for the control population. Point localization thresholds for these amputees were found to be lower for their reinnervated skin than for their contralateral skin. Reinnervated point localization thresholds values were also lower in comparison to homologous chest sites on the control population. Mechanisms appear to be in place to maximize re-established touch input in targeted reinnervation amputees. It seems that sound sensory function is provided to the denervated skin of the residual limb when connected to afferent pathways once serving highly functionally relevant regions of the brain. This suggests that tactile interface devices could be used to give a physiologically appropriate sense of touch to a prosthetic limb, which would likely help with better functional utilization of the prosthetic device and possibly help to more effectively integrate the device with the user's self-image. PMID:19369486

  6. Enhanced sensory recovery after median nerve repair using cortical audio-tactile interaction. A randomised multicentre study.

    PubMed

    Rosén, B; Lundborg, G

    2007-02-01

    The "Sensor Glove System" offers an alternate afferent inflow from the hand early after nerve repair in the forearm, mediated through the hearing sense, implying that deprivation of one sense can be compensated by another sense. This sensory "by-pass" was used early after repair of the median nerve with the intention of improving recovery of functional sensibility by maintaining an active sensory map of the hand in the somatosensory cortex during the deafferentation period. In a prospective multicentre clinical study, one group (n=14) started early after surgery with sensory re-education using the Sensor Glove System and the control group (n=12) received conventional sensory re-education, starting 3 months postoperatively. The patients were checked regularly during a 1-year period, with focus on recovery of tactile gnosis. After 12, months, tactile gnosis was significantly better in the Sensor Glove System group. This highlights the timing for introduction of training after nerve repair, focusing on the importance of immediate sensory re-learning. PMID:17134797

  7. Interaction between TRPA1 and TRPV1: Synergy on pulmonary sensory nerves.

    PubMed

    Lee, Lu-Yuan; Hsu, Chun-Chun; Lin, Yu-Jung; Lin, Ruei-Lung; Khosravi, Mehdi

    2015-12-01

    Transient receptor potential ankyrin type 1 (TRPA1) and vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptors are co-expressed in vagal pulmonary C-fiber sensory nerves. Because both these ligand-gated non-selective cation channels are sensitive to a number of endogenous inflammatory mediators, it is highly probable that they can be activated simultaneously during airway inflammation. Studies were carried out to investigate whether there is an interaction between these two polymodal transducers upon simultaneous activation, and how it modulates the activity of vagal pulmonary C-fiber sensory nerves. Our studies showed a distinct potentiating effect induced abruptly by simultaneous activations of TRPA1 and TRPV1 by their respective selective agonists, allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) and capsaicin (Cap), at near-threshold concentrations. This synergistic effect was demonstrated in the studies of single-unit recording of vagal bronchopulmonary C-fiber afferents and the reflex responses elicited by activation of these afferents in intact animals, as well as in the isolated nodose and jugular bronchopulmonary sensory neurons. This potentiating effect was absent when either AITC or Cap was replaced by non-TRPA1 and non-TRPV1 chemical activators of these neurons, demonstrating the selectivity of the interaction between these two TRP channels. Furthermore, the synergism was dependent upon the extracellular Ca(2+), and the rapid onset of the action further suggests that the interaction probably occurred locally at the sites of these channels. These findings suggest that the TRPA1-TRPV1 interaction may play an important role in regulating the function and excitability of pulmonary sensory neurons during airway inflammation, but the mechanism underlying this positive interaction is not yet fully understood. PMID:26283426

  8. Neurilemmoma of Deep Peroneal Nerve Sensory Branch : Thermographic Findings with Compression Test.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Seung Jun; Zhang, Ho Yeol

    2015-09-01

    We report a case of neurilemmoma of deep peroneal nerve sensory branch that triggered sensory change with compression test on lower extremity. After resection of tumor, there are evoked thermal changes on pre- and post-operative infrared (IR) thermographic images. A 52-year-old female presented with low back pain, sciatica, and sensory change on the dorsal side of the right foot and big toe that has lasted for 9 months. She also presented with right tibial mass sized 1.2 cm by 1.4 cm. Ultrasonographic imaging revealed a peripheral nerve sheath tumor arising from the peroneal nerve. IR thermographic image showed hyperthermia when the neurilemoma induced sensory change with compression test on the fibular area, dorsum of foot, and big toe. After surgery, the symptoms and thermographic changes were relieved and disappeared. The clinical, surgical, radiographic, and thermographic perspectives regarding this case are discussed. PMID:26539275

  9. Myelinated sensory and alpha motor axon regeneration in peripheral nerve neuromas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macias, M. Y.; Lehman, C. T.; Sanger, J. R.; Riley, D. A.

    1998-01-01

    Histochemical staining for carbonic anhydrase and cholinesterase (CE) activities was used to analyze sensory and motor axon regeneration, respectively, during neuroma formation in transected and tube-encapsulated peripheral nerves. Median-ulnar and sciatic nerves in the rodent model permitted testing whether a 4 cm greater distance of the motor neuron soma from axotomy site or intrinsic differences between motor and sensory neurons influenced regeneration and neuroma formation 10, 30, and 90 days later. Ventral root radiculotomy confirmed that CE-stained axons were 97% alpha motor axons. Distance significantly delayed axon regeneration. When distance was negligible, sensory axons grew out sooner than motor axons, but motor axons regenerated to a greater quantity. These results indicate regeneration differences between axon subtypes and suggest more extensive branching of motor axons within the neuroma. Thus, both distance from injury site to soma and inherent motor and sensory differences should be considered in peripheral nerve repair strategies.

  10. Neurilemmoma of Deep Peroneal Nerve Sensory Branch : Thermographic Findings with Compression Test

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Seung Jun

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of neurilemmoma of deep peroneal nerve sensory branch that triggered sensory change with compression test on lower extremity. After resection of tumor, there are evoked thermal changes on pre- and post-operative infrared (IR) thermographic images. A 52-year-old female presented with low back pain, sciatica, and sensory change on the dorsal side of the right foot and big toe that has lasted for 9 months. She also presented with right tibial mass sized 1.2 cm by 1.4 cm. Ultrasonographic imaging revealed a peripheral nerve sheath tumor arising from the peroneal nerve. IR thermographic image showed hyperthermia when the neurilemoma induced sensory change with compression test on the fibular area, dorsum of foot, and big toe. After surgery, the symptoms and thermographic changes were relieved and disappeared. The clinical, surgical, radiographic, and thermographic perspectives regarding this case are discussed. PMID:26539275

  11. Differential Gene Expression in Motor and Sensory Schwann Cells in the Rat Femoral Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Jesuraj, Nithya J.; Nguyen, Peter K.; Wood, Matthew D.; Moore, Amy M.; Borschel, Gregory H.; Mackinnon, Susan E.; Sakiyama-Elbert, Shelly E.

    2011-01-01

    Phenotypic differences in Schwann cells (SCs) may help guide axonal regeneration down motor or sensory specific pathways following peripheral nerve injury. The goal of this study was to identify phenotypic markers for SCs harvested from the cutaneous (sensory) and quadriceps (motor) branches of the rat femoral nerve and to study the effects of expansion culture on the expression patterns of these motor or sensory phenotypic markers. RNA was extracted from SCs harvested from the motor and sensory branches of the rat femoral nerve and analyzed using Affymetrix Gene Chips© (Rat Genome 230 v2.0 Array A). Genes that were upregulated in motor SCs compared to the sensory SCs or vice versa were identified, and the results were verified for a subset of genes using quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). The expression levels of the “phenotype-specific” genes were then evaluated in SC expansion cultures at various timepoints over 30 days by qRT-PCR to determine the effect of expansion on SC phenotype. Expression levels of the phenotype-specific genes were significantly altered after expansion culture for both the motor and sensory markers compared to fresh nerve tissue. These results indicate that both motor and sensory SC gene expression patterns are disrupted during expansion in vitro and may affect the ability of SCs to express phenotype specific genes after transplantation. PMID:21932366

  12. Degeneration of proprioceptive sensory nerve endings in mice harboring amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-causing mutations.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Sydney K; Kemp, Zachary; Hatzipetros, Theo; Vieira, Fernando; Valdez, Gregorio

    2015-12-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease that primarily targets the motor system. Although much is known about the effects of ALS on motor neurons and glial cells, little is known about its effect on proprioceptive sensory neurons. This study examines proprioceptive sensory neurons in mice harboring mutations associated with ALS, in SOD1(G93A) and TDP43(A315T) transgenic mice. In both transgenic lines, we found fewer proprioceptive sensory neurons containing fluorescently tagged cholera toxin in their soma five days after injecting this retrograde tracer into the tibialis anterior muscle. We asked whether this is due to neuronal loss or selective degeneration of peripheral nerve endings. We found no difference in the total number and size of proprioceptive sensory neuron soma between symptomatic SOD1(G93A) and control mice. However, analysis of proprioceptive nerve endings in muscles revealed early and significant alterations at Ia/II proprioceptive nerve endings in muscle spindles before the symptomatic phase of the disease. Although these changes occur alongside those at ?-motor axons in SOD1(G93A) mice, Ia/II sensory nerve endings degenerate in the absence of obvious alterations in ?-motor axons in TDP43(A315T) transgenic mice. We next asked whether proprioceptive nerve endings are similarly affected in the spinal cord and found that nerve endings terminating on ?-motor neurons are affected during the symptomatic phase and after peripheral nerve endings begin to degenerate. Overall, we show that Ia/II proprioceptive sensory neurons are affected by ALS-causing mutations, with pathological changes starting at their peripheral nerve endings. J. Comp. Neurol. 523:2477-2494, 2015. 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26424446

  13. Degeneration of proprioceptive sensory nerve endings in mice harboring amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-causing mutations.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Sydney K; Kemp, Zachary; Hatzipetros, Theo; Vieira, Fernando; Valdez, Gregorio

    2015-12-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease that primarily targets the motor system. Although much is known about the effects of ALS on motor neurons and glial cells, little is known about its effect on proprioceptive sensory neurons. This study examines proprioceptive sensory neurons in mice harboring mutations associated with ALS, in SOD1(G93A) and TDP43(A315T) transgenic mice. In both transgenic lines, we found fewer proprioceptive sensory neurons containing fluorescently tagged cholera toxin in their soma five days after injecting this retrograde tracer into the tibialis anterior muscle. We asked whether this is due to neuronal loss or selective degeneration of peripheral nerve endings. We found no difference in the total number and size of proprioceptive sensory neuron soma between symptomatic SOD1(G93A) and control mice. However, analysis of proprioceptive nerve endings in muscles revealed early and significant alterations at Ia/II proprioceptive nerve endings in muscle spindles before the symptomatic phase of the disease. Although these changes occur alongside those at ?-motor axons in SOD1(G93A) mice, Ia/II sensory nerve endings degenerate in the absence of obvious alterations in ?-motor axons in TDP43(A315T) transgenic mice. We next asked whether proprioceptive nerve endings are similarly affected in the spinal cord and found that nerve endings terminating on ?-motor neurons are affected during the symptomatic phase and after peripheral nerve endings begin to degenerate. Overall, we show that Ia/II proprioceptive sensory neurons are affected by ALS-causing mutations, with pathological changes starting at their peripheral nerve endings. PMID:26136049

  14. Loss of Corneal Sensory Nerve Fibers in SIV-Infected Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Dorsey, Jamie L.; Mangus, Lisa M.; Oakley, Jonathan D.; Beck, Sarah E.; Kelly, Kathleen M.; Queen, Suzanne E.; Metcalf Pate, Kelly A.; Adams, Robert J.; Marfurt, Carl F.; Mankowski, Joseph L.

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is the most frequent neurological complication of HIV infection, affecting more than one-third of infected patients, including patients treated with antiretroviral therapy. Although emerging noninvasive techniques for corneal nerve assessments are increasingly being used to diagnose and monitor peripheral neuropathies, corneal nerve alterations have not been characterized in HIV. Here, to determine whether SIV infection leads to corneal nerve fiber loss, we immunostained corneas for the nerve fiber marker ?III tubulin. We developed and applied both manual and automated methods to measure nerves in the corneal subbasal plexus. These counting methods independently indicated significantly lower subbasal corneal nerve fiber density among SIV-infected animals that rapidly progressed to AIDS compared with slow progressors. Concomitant with decreased corneal nerve fiber density, rapid progressors had increased levels of SIV RNA and CD68-positive macrophages and expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein by glial satellite cells in the trigeminal ganglia, the location of the neuronal cell bodies of corneal sensory nerve fibers. In addition, corneal nerve fiber density was directly correlated with epidermal nerve fiber length. These findings indicate that corneal nerve assessment has great potential to diagnose and monitor HIV-induced peripheral neuropathy and to set the stage for introducing noninvasive techniques to measure corneal nerve fiber density in HIV clinical settings. PMID:24828391

  15. BREAST CANCER-INDUCED BONE REMODELING, SKELETAL PAIN AND SPROUTING OF SENSORY NERVE FIBERS

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, Aaron P.; Jimenez-Andrade, Juan M.; Taylor, Reid N.; Castaeda-Corral, Gabriela; Kaczmarska, Magdalena J.; Freeman, Katie T.; Coughlin, Kathleen A.; Ghilardi, Joseph R.; Kuskowski, Michael A.; Mantyh, Patrick W.

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer metastasis to bone is frequently accompanied by pain. What remains unclear is why this pain tends to become more severe and difficult to control with disease progression. Here we test the hypothesis that with disease progression sensory nerve fibers that innervate the breast cancer bearing bone undergo a pathological sprouting and reorganization, which in other non-malignant pathologies has been shown to generate and maintain chronic pain. Injection of human breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231-BO) into the femoral intramedullary space of female athymic nude mice induces sprouting of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP+) sensory nerve fibers. Nearly all CGRP+ nerve fibers that undergo sprouting also co-express tropomyosin receptor kinase A (TrkA+) and growth associated protein-43 (GAP43+). This ectopic sprouting occurs in periosteal sensory nerve fibers that are in close proximity to breast cancer cells, tumor-associated stromal cells and remodeled cortical bone. Therapeutic treatment with an antibody that sequesters nerve growth factor (NGF), administered when the pain and bone remodeling were first observed, blocks this ectopic sprouting and attenuates cancer pain. The present data suggest that the breast cancer cells and tumor-associated stromal cells express and release NGF, which drives bone pain and the pathological reorganization of nearby CGRP+ / TrkA+ / GAP43+ sensory nerve fibers. PMID:21497141

  16. Sensory cutaneous nerve fine-needle aspiration in Hansen's disease: A retrospective analysis of our experience

    PubMed Central

    Prasoon, Dev; Mandal, Swapan Kumar; Agrawal, Parimal

    2015-01-01

    Background: Leprosy affects peripheral nerves. As Mycobacterium leprae has unique tropism for Schwann cells, thickened sensory cutaneous nerves provide an easy target for the detection of lepra bacilli and other changes associated with the disease. Materials and Methods: The data of patients with sensory cutaneous nerve involvement were retrieved from our record for the period January 2006 to December 2014. The hematoxylin and eosin (H and E)- and May-Grünwald-Giemsa (MGG)-stained slides were screened for Schwann cells, granuloma, and necrosis. Modified Ziehl-Neelsen (ZN)-stained smears were searched for lepra bacilli and globi. Morphological index was calculated in multibacillary lesions. Result: Twenty-nine sensory cutaneous nerves were aspirated in 23 patients. While 15 cases showed skin and nerve involvement, 8 cases showed only nerve involvement. Terminal cutaneous branch of the radial nerve was most often aspirated. No motor loss was observed after aspiration. Five cytologic pictures were seen — Epithelioid cell granuloma only in 6 cases, epithelioid cell granuloma with necrosis in 1 case, epithelioid cell granuloma with lepra bacilli in 3 cases, necrosis with lepra bacilli in 1 case, and only lepra bacilli in 12 cases. Morphological index ranged from 20% to 80%. Conclusion: Sensory cutaneous nerve fine-needle aspiration (FNA) is a feasible, viable, effective, and safe procedure. It adds to diagnostic FNA yield in patients with concomitant skin involvement and offers a way to evaluate patients with only nerve involvement. Calculation of morphological index allows prognostication and may have a role in assessing response to therapy and/or relapse. PMID:26729977

  17. Distribution of sensory nerve endings around the human sinus tarsi: a cadaver study

    PubMed Central

    Rein, Susanne; Manthey, Suzanne; Zwipp, Hans; Witt, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the pattern of sensory nerve endings and blood vessels around the sinus tarsi. The superficial and deep parts of the fat pads at the inferior extensor retinaculum (IER) as well as the subtalar joint capsule inside the sinus tarsi from 13 cadaver feet were dissected. The distribution of the sensory nerve endings and blood vessels were analysed in the resected specimens as the number per cm2 after staining with haematoxylin-eosin, S100 protein, low-affinity neurotrophin receptor p75, and protein gene product 9.5 using the classification of Freeman and Wyke. Free nerve endings were the predominant sensory ending (P < 0.001). Ruffini and Golgi-like endings were rarely found and no Pacini corpuscles were seen. Significantly more free nerve endings (P < 0.001) and blood vessels (P = 0.01) were observed in the subtalar joint capsule than in the superficial part of the fat pad at the IER. The deep part of the fat pad at the IER had significantly more blood vessels than the superficial part of the fat pad at the IER (P = 0.012). Significantly more blood vessels than free nerve endings were seen in all three groups (P < 0.001). No significant differences in distribution were seen in terms of right or left side, except for free nerve endings in the superficial part of the fat pad at the IER (P = 0.003). A greater number of free nerve endings correlated with a greater number of blood vessels. The presence of sensory nerve endings between individual fat cells supports the hypothesis that the fat pad has a proprioceptive role monitoring changes and that it is a source of pain in sinus tarsi syndrome due to the abundance of free nerve endings. PMID:24472004

  18. Neuroplasticity of Sensory and Sympathetic Nerve Fibers in the Painful Arthritic Joint

    PubMed Central

    Ghilardi, Joseph R.; Freeman, Katie T.; Jimenez-Andrade, Juan M.; Coughlin, Kathleen; Kaczmarska, Magdalena J.; Castaneda-Corral, Gabriela; Bloom, Aaron P.; Kuskowski, Michael A.; Mantyh, Patrick W.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Many forms of arthritis are accompanied by significant chronic joint pain. Here we studied whether there is significant sprouting of sensory and sympathetic nerve fibers in the painful arthritic knee joint and whether nerve growth factor (NGF) drives this pathological reorganization. Methods A painful arthritic knee joint was produced by injection of complete Freunds adjuvant (CFA) into the knee joint of young adult mice. CFA-injected mice were then treated systemically with vehicle or anti-NGF antibody. Pain behaviors were assessed and at 28 days following the initial CFA injection, the knee joints were processed for immunohistochemistry using antibodies raised against calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP; sensory nerve fibers), neurofilament 200 kDa (NF200; sensory nerve fibers), growth associated protein-43 (GAP43; sprouted nerve fibers), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH; sympathetic nerve fibers), CD31 (endothelial cells) or CD68 (monocytes/macrophages). Results In CFA-injected mice, but not vehicle-injected mice, there was a significant increase in the density of CD68+ macrophages, CD31+ blood vessels, CGRP+, NF200+, GAP43+, and TH+ nerve fibers in the synovium as well as joint pain-related behaviors. Administration of anti-NGF reduced these pain-related behaviors and the ectopic sprouting of nerve fibers, but had no significant effect on the increase in density of CD31+ blood vessels or CD68+ macrophages. Conclusions Ectopic sprouting of sensory and sympathetic nerve fibers occurs in the painful arthritic joint and may be involved in the generation and maintenance of arthritic pain. PMID:22246649

  19. Electrophysiological evaluation of nerve function in inferior alveolar nerve injury: relationship between nerve action potentials and histomorphometric observations.

    PubMed

    Murayama, M; Sasaki, K; Shibahara, T

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to improve the accuracy of diagnosis of inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) injury by determining degrees of nerve disturbance using the sensory nerve action potential (SNAP) and sensory nerve conduction velocity (SCV). Crush and partial and complete nerve amputation injuries were applied to the IAN of rabbits, then SNAPs and histomorphometric observations were recorded at 1, 5, and 10 weeks. For crush injury, most nerves were smaller in diameter at 5 weeks than at 1 week, however after 10 weeks, extensive nerve regeneration was observed. The SNAP showed a decrease in SCV at weeks 1 and 5, followed by an increase at week 10. For partial nerve amputation, small to medium-sized nerve fibres were observed at weeks 1 and 5, then larger nerves were seen at week 10. Minimal changes in SCV were observed at weeks 1 and 5, however SCV increased at week 10. For complete nerve amputation, nerve fibres were sparse at week 1, but gradual nerve regeneration was observed at weeks 5 and 10. SNAPs were detectable from week 10, however the SCV was extremely low. This study showed SCV to be an effective factor in the evaluation of nerve injury and regeneration. PMID:26433750

  20. Morphology and Nanomechanics of Sensory Neurons Growth Cones following Peripheral Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Szabo, Vivien; Végh, Attila-Gergely; Lucas, Olivier; Cloitre, Thierry; Scamps, Frédérique; Gergely, Csilla

    2013-01-01

    A prior peripheral nerve injury in vivo, promotes a rapid elongated mode of sensory neurons neurite regrowth in vitro. This in vitro model of conditioned axotomy allows analysis of the cellular and molecular mechanisms leading to an improved neurite re-growth. Our differential interference contrast microscopy and immunocytochemistry results show that conditioned axotomy, induced by sciatic nerve injury, did not increase somatic size of adult lumbar sensory neurons from mice dorsal root ganglia sensory neurons but promoted the appearance of larger neurites and growth cones. Using atomic force microscopy on live neurons, we investigated whether membrane mechanical properties of growth cones of axotomized neurons were modified following sciatic nerve injury. Our data revealed that neurons having a regenerative growth were characterized by softer growth cones, compared to control neurons. The increase of the growth cone membrane elasticity suggests a modification in the ratio and the inner framework of the main structural proteins. PMID:23418549

  1. Sensory feedback by peripheral nerve stimulation improves task performance in individuals with upper limb loss using a myoelectric prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiefer, Matthew; Tan, Daniel; Sidek, Steven M.; Tyler, Dustin J.

    2016-02-01

    Objective. Tactile feedback is critical to grip and object manipulation. Its absence results in reliance on visual and auditory cues. Our objective was to assess the effect of sensory feedback on task performance in individuals with limb loss. Approach. Stimulation of the peripheral nerves using implanted cuff electrodes provided two subjects with sensory feedback with intensity proportional to forces on the thumb, index, and middle fingers of their prosthetic hand during object manipulation. Both subjects perceived the sensation on their phantom hand at locations corresponding to the locations of the forces on the prosthetic hand. A bend sensor measured prosthetic hand span. Hand span modulated the intensity of sensory feedback perceived on the thenar eminence for subject 1 and the middle finger for subject 2. We performed three functional tests with the blindfolded subjects. First, the subject tried to determine whether or not a wooden block had been placed in his prosthetic hand. Second, the subject had to locate and remove magnetic blocks from a metal table. Third, the subject performed the Southampton Hand Assessment Procedure (SHAP). We also measured the subject’s sense of embodiment with a survey and his self-confidence. Main results. Blindfolded performance with sensory feedback was similar to sighted performance in the wooden block and magnetic block tasks. Performance on the SHAP, a measure of hand mechanical function and control, was similar with and without sensory feedback. An embodiment survey showed an improved sense of integration of the prosthesis in self body image with sensory feedback. Significance. Sensory feedback by peripheral nerve stimulation improved object discrimination and manipulation, embodiment, and confidence. With both forms of feedback, the blindfolded subjects tended toward results obtained with visual feedback.

  2. Effect of helium-neon laser irradiation on peripheral sensory nerve latency

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder-Mackler, L.; Bork, C.E.

    1988-02-01

    The purpose of this randomized, double-blind study was to determine the effect of a helium-neon (He-Ne) laser on latency of peripheral sensory nerve. Forty healthy subjects with no history of right upper extremity pathological conditions were assigned to either a Laser or a Placebo Group. Six 1-cm2 blocks along a 12-cm segment of the subjects' right superficial radial nerve received 20-second applications of either the He-Ne laser or a placebo. We assessed differences between pretest and posttest latencies with t tests for correlated and independent samples. The Laser Group showed a statistically significant increase in latency that corresponded to a decrease in sensory nerve conduction velocity. Short-duration He-Ne laser application significantly increased the distal latency of the superficial radial nerve. This finding provides information about the mechanism of the reported pain-relieving effect of the He-Ne laser.

  3. Effect of pulsed infrared lasers on neural conduction and axoplasmic transport in sensory nerves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesselmann, Ursula; Rymer, William Z.; Lin, Shien-Fong

    1990-06-01

    Over the past ten years there has been an increasing interest in the use of lasers for neurosurgical and neurological procedures. Novel recent applications range from neurosurgical procedures such as dorsal root entry zone lesions made with argon and carbon dioxide microsurgical lasers to pain relief by low power laser irradiation of the appropriate painful nerve or affected region1 '2 However, despite the widespread clinical applications of laser light, very little is known about the photobiological interactions between laser light and nervous tissue. The present studies were designed to evaluate the effects of pulsed Nd:YAG laser light on neural impulse conduction and axoplasmic transport in sensory nerves in rats and cats. Our data indicate that Q-switched Nd:YAG laser irradiation can induce a preferential impairment of (1) the synaptic effects of small afferent fibers on dorsal horn cells in the spinal cord and of (2) small slow conducting sensory nerve fibers in dorsal roots and peripheral nerves. These results imply that laser light might have selective effects on impulse conduction in slow conducting sensory nerve fibers. In agreement with our elecirophysiological observations recent histological data from our laboratory show, that axonal transport of the enzyme horseradish peroxidase is selectively impaired in small sensory nerve fibers. In summary these data indicate, that Q-switched Nd:YAG laser irradiation can selectively impair neural conduction and axoplasmic transport in small sensory nerve fibers as compared to fast conducting fibers. A selective influence of laser irradiation on slow conducting fibers could have important clinical applications, especially for the treatment of chronic pain.

  4. Lentiviral-mediated transfer of CDNF promotes nerve regeneration and functional recovery after sciatic nerve injury in adult rats

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Lei; Liu, Yi; Zhao, Hua; Zhang, Wen; Guo, Ying-Jun; Nie, Lin

    2013-10-18

    Highlights: •CDNF was successfully transfected by a lentiviral vector into the distal sciatic nerve. •CDNF improved S-100, NF200 expression and nerve regeneration after sciatic injury. •CDNF improved the remyelination and thickness of the regenerated sciatic nerve. •CDNF improved gastrocnemius muscle weight and sciatic functional recovery. -- Abstract: Peripheral nerve injury is often followed by incomplete and unsatisfactory functional recovery and may be associated with sensory and motor impairment of the affected limb. Therefore, a novel method is needed to improve the speed of recovery and the final functional outcome after peripheral nerve injuries. This report investigates the effect of lentiviral-mediated transfer of conserved dopamine neurotrophic factor (CDNF) on regeneration of the rat peripheral nerve in a transection model in vivo. We observed notable overexpression of CDNF protein in the distal sciatic nerve after recombinant CDNF lentiviral vector application. We evaluated sciatic nerve regeneration after surgery using light and electron microscopy and the functional recovery using the sciatic functional index and target muscle weight. HE staining revealed better ordered structured in the CDNF-treated group at 8 weeks post-surgery. Quantitative analysis of immunohistochemistry of NF200 and S-100 in the CDNF group revealed significant improvement of axonal and Schwann cell regeneration compared with the control groups at 4 weeks and 8 weeks after injury. The thickness of the myelination around the axons in the CDNF group was significantly higher than in the control groups at 8 weeks post-surgery. The CDNF group displayed higher muscle weights and significantly increased sciatic nerve index values. Our findings suggest that CDNF gene therapy could provide durable and stable CDNF protein concentration and has the potential to enhance peripheral nerve regeneration, morphological and functional recovery following nerve injury, which suggests a promising strategy for peripheral nerve repair.

  5. A pilot study of sensory feedback by transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation to improve manipulation deficit caused by severe sensory loss after stroke

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Sensory disturbance is common following stroke and can exacerbate functional deficits, even in patients with relatively good motor function. In particular, loss of appropriate sensory feedback in severe sensory loss impairs manipulation capability. We hypothesized that task-oriented training with sensory feedback assistance would improve manipulation capability even without sensory pathway recovery. Methods We developed a system that provides sensory feedback by transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (SENS) for patients with sensory loss, and investigated the feasibility of the system in a stroke patient with severe sensory impairment and mild motor deficit. The electrical current was modulated by the force exerted by the fingertips so as to allow the patient to identify the intensity. The patient had severe sensory loss due to a right thalamic hemorrhage suffered 27months prior to participation in the study. The patient first practiced a cylindrical grasp task with SENS for 1hour daily over 29days. Pressure information from the affected thumb was fed back to the unaffected shoulder. The same patient practiced a tip pinch task with SENS for 1hour daily over 4days. Pressure information from the affected thumb and index finger was fed back to the unaffected and affected shoulders, respectively. We assessed the feasibility of SENS and examined the improvement of manipulation capability after training with SENS. Results The fluctuation in fingertip force during the cylindrical grasp task gradually decreased as the training progressed. The patient was able to maintain a stable grip force after training, even without SENS. Pressure exerted by the tip pinch of the affected hand was unstable before intervention with SENS compared with that of the unaffected hand. However, they were similar to each other immediately after SENS was initiated, suggesting that the somatosensory information improved tip pinch performance. The patients manipulation capability assessed by the Box and Block Test score improved through SENS intervention and was partly maintained after SENS was removed, until at least 7months after the intervention. The sensory test score, however, showed no recovery after intervention. Conclusions We conclude that the proposed system would be useful in the rehabilitation of patients with sensory loss. PMID:23764012

  6. Heightened motor and sensory (mirror-touch) referral induced by nerve block or topical anesthetic.

    PubMed

    Case, Laura K; Gosavi, Radhika; Ramachandran, Vilayanur S

    2013-08-01

    Mirror neurons allow us to covertly simulate the sensation and movement of others. If mirror neurons are sensory and motor neurons, why do we not actually feel this simulation- like "mirror-touch synesthetes"? Might afferent sensation normally inhibit mirror representations from reaching consciousness? We and others have reported heightened sensory referral to phantom limbs and temporarily anesthetized arms. These patients, however, had experienced illness or injury of the deafferented limb. In the current study we observe heightened sensory and motor referral to the face after unilateral nerve block for routine dental procedures. We also obtain double-blind, quantitative evidence of heightened sensory referral in healthy participants completing a mirror-touch confusion task after topical anesthetic cream is applied. We suggest that sensory and motor feedback exist in dynamic equilibrium with mirror representations; as feedback is reduced, the brain draws more upon visual information to determine- perhaps in a Bayesian manner- what to feel. PMID:23791606

  7. Phenotyping sensory nerve endings in vitro in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Katharina; Hein, Alexander; Hager, Ulrich; Kaczmarek, Jan Stefan; Turnquist, Brian P; Clapham, David E; Reeh, Peter W

    2014-01-01

    This protocol details methods to identify and record from cutaneous primary afferent axons in an isolated mammalian skinsaphenous nerve preparation. The method is based on extracellular recordings of propagated action potentials from single-fiber receptive fields. Cutaneous nerve endings show graded sensitivities to various stimulus modalities that are quantified by adequate and controlled stimulation of the superfused skin with heat, cold, touch, constant punctate pressure or chemicals. Responses recorded from single-fibers are comparable with those obtained in previous in vivo experiments on the same species. We describe the components and the setting-up of the basic equipment of a skinnerve recording station (few days), the preparation of the skin and the adherent saphenous nerve in the mouse (1545 min) and the isolation and recording of neurons (approximately 13 h per recording). In addition, stimulation techniques, protocols to achieve single-fiber recordings, issues of data acquisition and action potential discrimination are discussed in detail. PMID:19180088

  8. Changes induced by peripheral nerve injury in the morphology and nanomechanics of sensory neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benzina, Ouafa; Szabo, Vivien; Lucas, Olivier; Saab, Marie-belle; Cloitre, Thierry; Scamps, Frdrique; Gergely, Csilla; Martin, Marta

    2013-06-01

    Peripheral nerve injury in vivo promotes a regenerative growth in vitro characterized by an improved neurite regrowth. Knowledge of the conditioning injury effects on both morphology and mechanical properties of live sensory neurons could be instrumental to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms leading to this regenerative growth. In the present study, we use differential interference contrast microscopy, fluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) to show that conditioned axotomy, induced by sciatic nerve injury, does not increase somatic size of sensory neurons from adult mice lumbar dorsal root ganglia but promotes the appearance of longer and larger neurites and growth cones. AFM on live neurons is also employed to investigate changes in morphology and membrane mechanical properties of somas of conditioned neurons following sciatic nerve injury. Mechanical analysis of the soma allows distinguishing neurons having a regenerative growth from control ones, although they show similar shapes and sizes.

  9. Precision pinch performance in patients with sensory deficits of the median nerve at the carpal tunnel.

    PubMed

    Yen, Wei-Jang; Kuo, Yao-Lung; Kuo, Li-Chieh; Chen, Shu-Min; Kuan, Ta-Shen; Hsu, Hsiu-Yun

    2014-01-01

    To investigate how sensory symptoms impact the motor control of hands, in this study we examined the differences in conventional sensibility assessments and pinch force control in the pinch-holding-up activity (PHUA) test between carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) patients and healthy controls. CTS patients (n = 82) with 122 affected hands and an equal number of control subjects were recruited to participate in the threshold, discrimination, and PHUA tests. The patients showed significantly poorer hand sensibility and lower efficiency of force adjustment in the PHUA test as compared with the control subjects. Baseline pinch strength and the percentage of maximal pinch strength for the PHUA were significantly higher for the subgroup of sensory nerve action potential (SNAP) of <16 ?V than for the subgroup of SNAP of ?16 ?V. Using a PHUA perspective to analyze the efficiency of force-adjustment could assist the clinical detection of sensory nerve dysfunction. PMID:24496877

  10. Electrical neurostimulation for chronic pain: On selective relay of sensory neural activities in myelinated nerve fibers.

    PubMed

    Sacre, Pierre; Sarma, Sridevi V; Yun Guan; Anderson, William S

    2015-08-01

    Chronic pain affects about 100 million adults in the US. Despite their great need, neuropharmacology and neurostimulation therapies for chronic pain have been associated with suboptimal efficacy and limited long-term success, as their mechanisms of action are unclear. Yet current computational models of pain transmission suffer from several limitations. In particular, dorsal column models do not include the fundamental underlying sensory activity traveling in these nerve fibers. We developed a (simple) simulation test bed of electrical neurostimulation of myelinated nerve fibers with underlying sensory activity. This paper reports our findings so far. Interactions between stimulation-evoked and underlying activities are mainly due to collisions of action potentials and losses of excitability due to the refractory period following an action potential. In addition, intuitively, the reliability of sensory activity decreases as the stimulation frequency increases. This first step opens the door to a better understanding of pain transmission and its modulation by neurostimulation therapies. PMID:26737344

  11. Modulation of sympathetic nerve activity by perivascular sensory nerves in the arterioles of the guinea-pig small intestine.

    PubMed

    Coffa; Kotecha

    1999-09-24

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to assess the role of perivascular sensory nerves in modulating constrictions of intestinal submucosal arterioles. METHODS: Arteriole constrictions were induced either by nerve released adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) or exogenous ATP or phenylephrine (PE). Individual nerve shocks were used to elicit excitatory junction potentials (EJPs) in the arteriole smooth muscle whereas trains of stimuli were used to evoke transient constrictions of the arteriole. Effects of the sensory neurotoxin, capsaicin, were examined on constrictions and EJPs. RESULTS: Pre-treatment of the arteriole preparation with capsaicin did not cause any significant change in the amplitude of arteriole constrictions to exogenously applied ATP or PE. However, there was a significant increase in the amplitude of neurally evoked arteriole constrictions and EJPs, without a significant change in the decay time constant (tau(decay)) of the EJPs. Exogenous application of calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) significantly decreased tau(decay) of the EJPs without affecting their amplitude, whereas substance P (SP) significantly decreased the amplitude of EJPs without affecting tau(decay). Both, CGRP and SP, decreased the amplitude of neurally evoked and ATP induced constrictions. Whilst the inhibitory effects of CGRP on evoked and ATP induced constrictions were not significantly different, the reduction in evoked constrictions obtained with SP was significantly greater than the reduction in ATP induced constrictions. SP antagonist significantly increased the amplitude of neurally evoked constrictions. CONCLUSIONS: It is concluded that capsaicin-sensitive afferents inhibit the release of transmitter from perivascular sympathetic nerves via the prejunctional modulatory action of SP. The other putative sensory neurotransmitter, CGRP, appears to act postjunctionally on the arteriole smooth muscle. PMID:11130956

  12. Autoradiographic location of sensory nerve endings in dentin of monkey teeth

    SciTech Connect

    Byers, M.R.; Dong, W.K.

    1983-04-01

    We have used the autoradiographic method to locate trigeminal nerve endings in monkey teeth. The nerve endings were labeled in two adult female Macaca fascicularis by 20 hours of axonal transport of radioactive protein (/sup 3/H-L-proline). We found a few labeled axons in contralateral mandibular central incisors and one mandibular canine. In ipsilateral teeth, numerous myelinated and unmyelinated axons were labeled; they formed a few terminal branches in the roots but primarily branched in the crown to form the peripheral plexus of Raschkow and to terminate as free endings in the odontoblast layer, predentin, and as far as 120 micrometers into dentinal tubules. Electron microscopic autoradiography showed that the radioactive axonally transported protein was confined to sensory axons and endings; odontoblasts and dentin matrix were not significantly labeled. Labeled free nerve endings were closely apposed to odontoblasts in dentin but did not form distinctive junctions with them. Nerve endings were most numerous in the regular tubular dentin of the crown adjacent to the tip of the pulp horn, occurring in at least half of the dentinal tubules there. Our results show tha dentinal sensory nerve endings in primate teeth can be profuse, sparse, or absent depending on the location and structure of dentin and its adjacent pulp. When dentin was innervated, the tubules were straight and contained odontoblast processes, the predentin was wide, the odontoblast cell bodies were relatively columnar, and there was an adjacent cell-free zone and pulpal nerve plexus.

  13. Reappraisal of Supraorbital Sensory Nerve Conduction Recordings: Orthodromic and Antidromic Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyeun Jun; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Lee, Se Kwang; Lee, Hang Jae

    2016-01-01

    Objective To establish a supraorbital nerve sensory conduction recording method and assess its usefulness. Methods Thirty-one healthy subjects without a history of trauma or neurological disease were recruited. For the orthodromic procedure, the recording electrode was attached immediately superior to the supraorbital notch. The stimulation electrode was placed on points along the hairline which evoked the largest sensory nerve action potentials (SNAPs). The antidromic sensory response was recorded after switching the recording and stimulating electrodes. The measured parameters were onset latency, peak latency, and baseline to peak amplitude of the SNAPs. The electrophysiological parameters of the bilateral supraorbital nerves were compared. We also recruited two patients who had sensory deficits on one side of their foreheads because of laceration injuries. Results The parameters of orthodromically recorded SNAPs were as follows: onset latency 1.21±0.22 ms (range, 0.9–1.6 ms), peak latency 1.54±0.23 ms (range, 1.2–2.2 ms), and baseline to peak amplitude 4.16±1.92 µV (range, 1.4–10 µV). Those of antidromically recorded SNAPs were onset latency 1.31±0.27 ms (range, 0.8–1.7 ms), peak latency 1.62±0.29 ms (range, 1.3–2.2 ms), and baseline to peak amplitude 4.00±1.89 µV (range, 1.5–9.0 µV). There was no statistical difference in onset latency, peak latency, or baseline to peak amplitude between the responses obtained using the orthodromic and antidromic methods, and the parameters also revealed no statistical difference between the supraorbital nerves on both sides. Conclusion We have successfully recorded supraorbital SNAPs. This conduction technique could be quite useful in evaluating patients with supraorbital nerve lesions. PMID:26949668

  14. Low-level laser treatment improves longstanding sensory aberrations in the inferior alveolar nerve following surgical trauma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khullar, Shelley M.; Brodin, P.; Barkvoll, P.; Haanoes, H. R.

    1996-01-01

    The incidence of inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) damage following removal of 3rd molar teeth or saggital split osteotomy has been reported as high as up to 5.5% and 100% respectively. Sensory aberrations in the IAN persisting for longer than 6 months leave some degree of permanent defect. Low level laser treatment (LLL) has a reported beneficial effect on regeneration of traumatically injured nerves. The purpose of this double blind clinical trial was to examine the effects of LLL using a GaAlAs laser (820 nm, Ronvig, Denmark) on touch and temperature sensory perception following a longstanding post surgical IAN injury. Thirteen patients were divided into two groups, one of which received real LLL (4 by 6 J per treatment along the distribution of the IAN to a total of 20 treatments during a time period between 36 - 69 days) and the other equivalent placebo LLL. The degree of mechanoreceptor injury as assessed by Semmes Weinstein Monofilaments (North Coast Medical, USA) were comparable in the two groups prior to treatment (p equals 0.9). Subsequent to LLL the real laser treatment group showed a significant improvement in mechanoreceptor sensory testing (p equals 0.01) as manifested by a decrease in load threshold (g) necessary to elicit a response from the most damaged area. The placebo LLL group showed no significant improvement, In addition, the real LLL group reported a subjective improvement in sensory function too. The degree of thermal sensitivity disability as assessed using a thermotester (Philips, Sweden) was comparable between the two groups prior to LLL p equals 0.5). However, there was no significant improvement in thermal sensitivity post LLL for either the real or placebo laser treated groups. In conclusion, GaAlAs LLL can improve mechanoreceptor perception in longstanding sensory aberration in the IAN.

  15. Sensory Neuron Downregulation of the Kv9.1 Potassium Channel Subunit Mediates Neuropathic Pain following Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tsantoulas, Christoforos; Zhu, Lan; Shaifta, Yasin; Grist, John; Ward, Jeremy P. T.; Raouf, Ramin; Michael, Gregory J.; McMahon, Stephen B.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic neuropathic pain affects millions of individuals worldwide, is typically long-lasting, and remains poorly treated with existing therapies. Neuropathic pain arising from peripheral nerve lesions is known to be dependent on the emergence of spontaneous and evoked hyperexcitability in damaged nerves. Here, we report that the potassium channel subunit Kv9.1 is expressed in myelinated sensory neurons, but is absent from small unmyelinated neurons. Kv9.1 expression was strongly and rapidly downregulated following axotomy, with a time course that matches the development of spontaneous activity and pain hypersensitivity in animal models. Interestingly, siRNA-mediated knock-down of Kv9.1 in naive rats led to neuropathic pain behaviors. Diminished Kv9.1 function also augmented myelinated sensory neuron excitability, manifested as spontaneous firing, hyper-responsiveness to stimulation, and persistent after-discharge. Intracellular recordings from ex vivo dorsal root ganglion preparations revealed that Kv9.1 knock-down was linked to lowered firing thresholds and increased firing rates under physiologically relevant conditions of extracellular potassium accumulation during prolonged activity. Similar neurophysiological changes were detected in animals subjected to traumatic nerve injury and provide an explanation for neuropathic pain symptoms, including poorly understood conditions such as hyperpathia and paresthesias. In summary, our results demonstrate that Kv9.1 dysfunction leads to spontaneous and evoked neuronal hyperexcitability in myelinated fibers, coupled with development of neuropathic pain behaviors. PMID:23197740

  16. Osseoperception: sensory function and proprioception.

    PubMed

    Klineberg, I; Murray, G

    1999-06-01

    Tooth loss and its replacement have significant functional and psychosocial consequences. The removal of intra-dental and periodontal mechanoreception accompanying tooth loss changes the fine proprioceptive control of jaw function and influences the precision of magnitude, direction, and rate of occlusal load application. With the loss of all teeth, complete denture restoration is a compromise replacement which only partially restores function. Implant-supported prostheses restore jaw function more appropriately, with improved psychophysiological discriminatory ability and oral stereognosis. Osseoperception is defined as depending on central influences from corollary discharge from cortico-motor commands to jaw muscles, and contributions from peripheral mechanoreceptors in orofacial and temporomandibular tissues. The processing of central influences is considered with the recognition of the plasticity of neuromotor mechanisms that occurs to accommodate the loss of dental and periodontal inputs. PMID:11276734

  17. Structural and functional assessment of skin nerve fibres in small-fibre pathology.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, P; Nyengaard, J R; Polydefkis, M; Jensen, T S

    2015-09-01

    Damage to nociceptor nerve fibres may give rise to peripheral neuropathies, some of which are pain free and some are painful. A hallmark of many peripheral neuropathies is the loss of small nerve fibres in the epidermis, a condition called small-fibre neuropathy (SFN) when it is predominantly the small nerve fibres that are damaged. Historically, SFN has been very difficult to diagnose as clinical examination and nerve conduction studies mainly detect large nerve fibres, and quantitative sensory testing is not sensitive enough to detect small changes in small nerve fibres. However, taking a 3-mm punch skin biopsy from the distal leg and quantification of the nerve fibre density has proven to be a useful method to diagnose SFN. However, the correlation between the nerve fibre loss and other test results varies greatly. Recent studies have shown that it is possible not only to extract information about the nerve fibre density from the biopsies but also to get an estimation of the nerve fibre length density using stereology, quantify sweat gland innervation and detect morphological changes such as axonal swelling, all of which may be additional parameters indicating diseased small fibres relating to symptoms reported by the patients. In this review, we focus on available tests to assess structure and function of the small nerve fibres, and summarize recent advances that have provided new possibilities to more specifically relate structural findings with symptoms and function in patients with SFN. PMID:25546653

  18. Amplitude of sensory nerve action potential in early stage diabetic peripheral neuropathy: an analysis of 500 cases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yunqian; Li, Jintao; Wang, Tingjuan; Wang, Jianlin

    2014-01-01

    Early diagnosis of diabetic peripheral neuropathy is important for the successful treatment of diabetes mellitus. In the present study, we recruited 500 diabetic patients from the Fourth Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University in China from June 2008 to September 2013: 221 cases showed symptoms of peripheral neuropathy (symptomatic group) and 279 cases had no symptoms of peripheral impairment (asymptomatic group). One hundred healthy control subjects were also recruited. Nerve conduction studies revealed that distal motor latency was longer, sensory nerve conduction velocity was slower, and sensory nerve action potential and amplitude of compound muscle action potential were significantly lower in the median, ulnar, posterior tibial and common peroneal nerve in the diabetic groups compared with control subjects. Moreover, the alterations were more obvious in patients with symptoms of peripheral neuropathy. Of the 500 diabetic patients, neural conduction abnormalities were detected in 358 cases (71.6%), among which impairment of the common peroneal nerve was most prominent. Sensory nerve abnormality was more obvious than motor nerve abnormality in the diabetic groups. The amplitude of sensory nerve action potential was the most sensitive measure of peripheral neuropathy. Our results reveal that varying degrees of nerve conduction changes are present in the early, asymptomatic stage of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. PMID:25221597

  19. Sensory Attenuation Assessed by Sensory Evoked Potentials in Functional Movement Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Macerollo, Antonella; Chen, Jui-Cheng; Pares, Isabel; Kassavetis, Panagiotis; Kilner, James Morvan; Edwards, Mark John

    2015-01-01

    Background Functional (psychogenic) movement disorders (FMD) have features associated with voluntary movement (e.g. distractibility) but patients report movements to be out of their control. One explanation for this phenomenon is that sense of agency for movement is impaired. The phenomenon of reduction in the intensity of sensory experience when movement is self-generated and a reduction in sensory evoked potentials (SEPs) amplitude at the onset of self-paced movement (sensory attenuation) have been linked to sense of agency for movement. Methods We compared amplitude of SEPs from median nerve stimulation at rest and at the onset of a self-paced movement of the thumb in 17 patients with FMD and 17 healthy controls. Results Patients showed lack of attenuation of SEPs at the onset of movement compared to reduction in amplitude of SEPs in controls. FMD patients had significantly different ratios of movement onset to rest SEPs than did healthy controls at each electrode: 0.79 in healthy controls and 1.35 in patients at F3 (t = -4.22, p<0.001), 0.78 in healthy controls and 1.12 at patients C3 (t = -3.15, p = 0.004) and 0.77 in healthy controls and 1.05 at patients P3 (t = -2.88, p = 0.007). Conclusions Patients with FMD have reduced sensory attenuation as measured by SEPs at onset of self-paced movement. This finding can be plausibly linked to impairment of sense of agency for movement in these patients. PMID:26091500

  20. On the identification of sensory information from mixed nerves by using single-channel cuff electrodes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Several groups have shown that the performance of motor neuroprostheses can be significantly improved by detecting specific sensory events related to the ongoing motor task (e.g., the slippage of an object during grasping). Algorithms have been developed to achieve this goal by processing electroneurographic (ENG) afferent signals recorded by using single-channel cuff electrodes. However, no efforts have been made so far to understand the number and type of detectable sensory events that can be differentiated from whole nerve recordings using this approach. Methods To this aim, ENG afferent signals, evoked by different sensory stimuli were recorded using single-channel cuff electrodes placed around the sciatic nerve of anesthetized rats. The ENG signals were digitally processed and several features were extracted and used as inputs for the classification. The work was performed on integral datasets, without eliminating any noisy parts, in order to be as close as possible to real application. Results The results obtained showed that single-channel cuff electrodes are able to provide information on two to three different afferent (proprioceptive, mechanical and nociceptive) stimuli, with reasonably good discrimination ability. The classification performances are affected by the SNR of the signal, which in turn is related to the diameter of the fibers encoding a particular type of neurophysiological stimulus. Conclusions Our findings indicate that signals of acceptable SNR and corresponding to different physiological modalities (e.g. mediated by different types of nerve fibers) may be distinguished. PMID:20423488

  1. Effects of Acute Organophosphorus Poisoning on Function of Peripheral Nerves: A Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Jayasinghe, Sudheera S.; Pathirana, Kithsiri D.; Buckley, Nick A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Following acute organophosphorus (OP) poisoning patients complain of numbness without objective sensory abnormalities or other features of OP induced delayed polyneuropathy. The aim of this study was to measure peripheral nerve function after acute exposure to OP. Methods A cohort study was conducted with age, gender and occupation matched controls. Motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV), amplitude and area of compound muscle action potential (CMAP), sensory nerve conduction velocity (SNCV), F- waves and electromyography (EMG) on the deltoid and the first dorsal interosseous muscles on the dominant side were performed, following acute OP poisoning. All neurophysiological assessments except EMG were performed on the controls. Assessments were performed on the day of discharge from the hospital (the first assessment) and six weeks (the second assessment) after the exposure. The controls were assessed only once. Results There were 70 patients (50 males) and 70 controls. Fifty-three patients attended for the second assessment. In the first assessment MNCV of all the motor nerves examined, CMAP amplitude and SNCV of ulnar nerve, median and ulnar F-wave occurrence in the patients were significantly reduced compared to the controls. In the second assessment significant reduction was found in SNCV of both sensory nerves examined, MNCV of ulnar nerve, CMAP amplitude of common peroneal nerve, F-wave occurrence of median and ulnar nerves. No abnormalities were detected in the patients when compared to the standard cut-off values of nerve conduction studies except F-wave occurrence. EMG studies did not show any abnormality. Conclusion There was no strong evidence of irreversible peripheral nerve damage following acute OP poisoning, however further studies are required. PMID:23185328

  2. Comparison of skin sensory thresholds using pre-programmed or single-frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jong Ho

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to compare the sensory thresholds of healthy subjects using pre-programmed or single-frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation. [Subjects] Ninety healthy adult subjects were randomly assigned to pre-programmed or single-frequency stimulation groups, each consisting of 45 participants. [Methods] Sensory thresholds were measured in the participants’ forearms using von Frey filaments before and after pre-programmed or single-frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, and the result in values were analyzed. [Results] Significant increases in sensory threshold after stimulation were observed in both groups. However, there were no significant differences between the two groups in sensory thresholds after stimulation or in the magnitude of threshold increases following stimulation. [Conclusion] Our results show that there are no differences between sensory threshold increases induced by pre-programmed and single-frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation. PMID:26834358

  3. Functional evaluation of peripheral nerve regeneration and target reinnervation in animal models: a critical overview.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Xavier

    2016-02-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries usually lead to severe loss of motor, sensory and autonomic functions in the patients. Due to the complex requirements for adequate axonal regeneration, functional recovery is often poorly achieved. Experimental models are useful to investigate the mechanisms related to axonal regeneration and tissue reinnervation, and to test new therapeutic strategies to improve functional recovery. Therefore, objective and reliable evaluation methods should be applied for the assessment of regeneration and function restitution after nerve injury in animal models. This review gives an overview of the most useful methods to assess nerve regeneration, target reinnervation and recovery of complex sensory and motor functions, their values and limitations. The selection of methods has to be adequate to the main objective of the research study, either enhancement of axonal regeneration, improving regeneration and reinnervation of target organs by different types of nerve fibres, or increasing recovery of complex sensory and motor functions. It is generally recommended to use more than one functional method for each purpose, and also to perform morphological studies of the injured nerve and the reinnervated targets. PMID:26228942

  4. Cortical brain mapping of peripheral nerves using functional magnetic resonance imaging in a rodent model.

    PubMed

    Cho, Younghoon R; Jones, Seth R; Pawela, Christopher P; Li, Rupeng; Kao, Dennis S; Schulte, Marie L; Runquist, Matthew L; Yan, Ji-Geng; Hudetz, Anthony G; Jaradeh, Safwan S; Hyde, James S; Matloub, Hani S

    2008-11-01

    The regions of the body have cortical and subcortical representation in proportion to their degree of innervation. The rat forepaw has been studied extensively in recent years using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), typically by stimulation using electrodes directly inserted into the skin of the forepaw. Here we stimulate the nerve directly using surgically implanted electrodes. A major distinction is that stimulation of the skin of the forepaw is mostly sensory, whereas direct nerve stimulation reveals not only the sensory system but also deep brain structures associated with motor activity. In this article, we seek to define both the motor and sensory cortical and subcortical representations associated with the four major nerves of the rodent upper extremity. We electrically stimulated each nerve (median, ulnar, radial, and musculocutaneous) during fMRI acquisition using a 9.4-T Bruker scanner (Bruker BioSpin, Billerica, MA). A current level of 0.5 to 1.0 mA and a frequency of 5 Hz were used while keeping the duration constant. A distinct pattern of cortical activation was found for each nerve that can be correlated with known sensorimotor afferent and efferent pathways to the rat forepaw. This direct nerve stimulation rat model can provide insight into peripheral nerve injury. PMID:18924070

  5. Effect of Collateral Sprouting on Donor Nerve Function After Nerve Coaptation: A Study of the Brachial Plexus

    PubMed Central

    Reichert, Paweł; Kiełbowicz, Zdzisław; Dzięgiel, Piotr; Puła, Bartosz; Wrzosek, Marcin; Bocheńska, Aneta; Gosk, Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of the present study was to evaluate the donor nerve from the C7 spinal nerve of the rabbit brachial plexus after a coaptation procedure. Assessment was performed of avulsion of the C5 and C6 spinal nerves treated by coaptation of these nerves to the C7 spinal nerve. Material/Methods After nerve injury, fourteen rabbits were treated by end-to-side coaptation (ETS), and fourteen animals were treated by side-to-side coaptation (STS) on the right brachial plexus. Electrophysiological and histomorphometric analyses and the skin pinch test were used to evaluate the outcomes. Results There was no statistically significant difference in the G-ratio proximal and distal to the coaptation in the ETS group, but the differences in the axon, myelin sheath and fiber diameters were statistically significant. The comparison of the ETS and STS groups distal to the coaptation with the controls demonstrated statistically significant differences in the fiber, axon, and myelin sheath diameters. With respect to the G-ratio, the ETS group exhibited no significant differences relative to the control, whereas the G-ratio in the STS group and the controls differed significantly. In the electrophysiological study, the ETS and STS groups exhibited major changes in the biceps and subscapularis muscles. Conclusions The coaptation procedure affects the histological structure of the nerve donor, but it does not translate into changes in nerve conduction or the sensory function of the limb. The donor nerve lesion in the ETS group is transient and has minimal clinical relevance. PMID:26848925

  6. Effect of Collateral Sprouting on Donor Nerve Function After Nerve Coaptation: A Study of the Brachial Plexus.

    PubMed

    Reichert, Pawel; Kie?bowicz, Zdzis?aw; Dzi?giel, Piotr; Pu?a, Bartosz; Wrzosek, Marcin; Boche?ska, Aneta; Gosk, Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The aim of the present study was to evaluate the donor nerve from the C7 spinal nerve of the rabbit brachial plexus after a coaptation procedure. Assessment was performed of avulsion of the C5 and C6 spinal nerves treated by coaptation of these nerves to the C7 spinal nerve. MATERIAL AND METHODS After nerve injury, fourteen rabbits were treated by end-to-side coaptation (ETS), and fourteen animals were treated by side-to-side coaptation (STS) on the right brachial plexus. Electrophysiological and histomorphometric analyses and the skin pinch test were used to evaluate the outcomes. RESULTS There was no statistically significant difference in the G-ratio proximal and distal to the coaptation in the ETS group, but the differences in the axon, myelin sheath and fiber diameters were statistically significant. The comparison of the ETS and STS groups distal to the coaptation with the controls demonstrated statistically significant differences in the fiber, axon, and myelin sheath diameters. With respect to the G-ratio, the ETS group exhibited no significant differences relative to the control, whereas the G-ratio in the STS group and the controls differed significantly. In the electrophysiological study, the ETS and STS groups exhibited major changes in the biceps and subscapularis muscles. CONCLUSIONS The coaptation procedure affects the histological structure of the nerve donor, but it does not translate into changes in nerve conduction or the sensory function of the limb. The donor nerve lesion in the ETS group is transient and has minimal clinical relevance. PMID:26848925

  7. Sensory and sympathetic nerve fibers undergo sprouting and neuroma formation in the painful arthritic joint of geriatric mice

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Although the prevalence of arthritis dramatically increases with age, the great majority of preclinical studies concerning the mechanisms that drive arthritic joint pain have been performed in young animals. One mechanism hypothesized to contribute to arthritic pain is ectopic nerve sprouting; however, neuroplasticity is generally thought to be greater in young versus old nerves. Here we explore whether sensory and sympathetic nerve fibers can undergo a significant ectopic nerve remodeling in the painful arthritic knee joint of geriatric mice. Methods Vehicle (saline) or complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) was injected into the knee joint of 27- to 29-month-old female mice. Pain behaviors, macrophage infiltration, neovascularization, and the sprouting of sensory and sympathetic nerve fibers were then assessed 28 days later, when significant knee-joint pain was present. Knee joints were processed for immunohistochemistry by using antibodies raised against CD68 (monocytes/macrophages), PECAM (endothelial cells), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP; sensory nerve fibers), neurofilament 200 kDa (NF200; sensory nerve fibers), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH; sympathetic nerve fibers), and growth-associated protein 43 (GAP43; nerve fibers undergoing sprouting). Results At 4 weeks after initial injection, CFA-injected mice displayed robust pain-related behaviors (which included flinching, guarding, impaired limb use, and reduced weight bearing), whereas animals injected with vehicle alone displayed no significant pain-related behaviors. Similarly, in the CFA-injected knee joint, but not in the vehicle-injected knee joint, a remarkable increase was noted in the number of CD68+ macrophages, density of PECAM+ blood vessels, and density and formation of neuroma-like structures by CGRP+, NF200+, and TH+ nerve fibers in the synovium and periosteum. Conclusions Sensory and sympathetic nerve fibers that innervate the aged knee joint clearly maintain the capacity for robust nerve sprouting and formation of neuroma-like structures after inflammation/injury. Understanding the factors that drive this neuroplasticity, whether this pathologic reorganization of nerve fibers contributes to chronic joint pain, and how the phenotype of sensory and sympathetic nerves changes with age may provide pharmacologic insight and targets for better controlling aging-related joint pain. PMID:22548760

  8. Sensory Sensitivities and Performance on Sensory Perceptual Tasks in High-Functioning Individuals with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minshew, Nancy J.; Hobson, Jessica A.

    2008-01-01

    Most reports of sensory symptoms in autism are second hand or observational, and there is little evidence of a neurological basis. Sixty individuals with high-functioning autism and 61 matched typical participants were administered a sensory questionnaire and neuropsychological tests of elementary and higher cortical sensory perception. Thirty-two…

  9. Sensory Sensitivities and Performance on Sensory Perceptual Tasks in High-Functioning Individuals with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minshew, Nancy J.; Hobson, Jessica A.

    2008-01-01

    Most reports of sensory symptoms in autism are second hand or observational, and there is little evidence of a neurological basis. Sixty individuals with high-functioning autism and 61 matched typical participants were administered a sensory questionnaire and neuropsychological tests of elementary and higher cortical sensory perception. Thirty-two

  10. Secretion of Growth Hormone in Response to Muscle Sensory Nerve Stimulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grindeland, Richard E.; Roy, R. R.; Edgerton, V. R.; Gosselink, K. L.; Grossman, E. J.; Sawchenko, P. E.; Wade, Charles E. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) secretion is stimulated by aerobic and resistive exercise and inhibited by exposure to actual or simulated (bedrest, hindlimb suspension) microgravity. Moreover, hypothalamic growth hormone-releasing factor (GRF) and preproGRF mRNA are markedly decreased in spaceflight rats. These observations suggest that reduced sensory input from inactive muscles may contribute to the reduced secretion of GH seen in "0 G". Thus, the aim of this study was to determine the effect of muscle sensory nerve stimulation on secretion of GH. Fed male Wistar rats (304 +/- 23 g) were anesthetized (pentobarbital) and the right peroneal (Pe), tibial (T), and sural (S) nerves were cut. Electrical stimulation of the distal (D) or proximal (P) ends of the nerves was implemented for 15 min. to mimic the EMG activity patterns of ankle extensor muscles of a rat walking 1.5 mph. The rats were bled by cardiac puncture and their anterior pituitaries collected. Pituitary and plasma bioactive (BGH) and immunoactive (IGH) GH were measured by bioassay and RIA.

  11. Evaluation of the function status of the ulnar nerve in carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Liu, N; Wang, Y W; Zhang, Z C; Zheng, L N; Zhu, J

    2015-01-01

    Many carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) patients have symptoms in both the median and ulnar digits more frequently than in the median digits alone. This is possibly because of close anatomical contiguity of the carpal tunnel and Guyon's canal, and the high pressure may also affect the latter, causing indirect compression of ulnar nerve fibers. Thus, we evaluated the functional status of the ulnar nerve in patients with CTS in order to investigate the relationship between ulnar nerve impairment and sensory symptoms of the ulnar territory. Electrophysiological studies were conducted in CTS patients and healthy controls. CTS patients were divided into the mild/moderate group and severe group; they were further divided into the symptomatic and asymptomatic subgroups according to the sensory symptom of the fifth digit region. The findings suggest that CTS patients could have coexisting ulnar nerve wrist entrapments that might exacerbate the severity of CTS. Sensory impairment in the ulnar territory was observed more frequently in the mild/moderate stage of CTS, which is associated with ulnar nerve involvement. These findings also suggest that damage to the ulnar nerve fibers caused by compression forces in Guyon's canal may underlie the ulnar spread of symptoms in CTS. PMID:25966136

  12. Peripheral nerve regeneration and NGF-dependent neurite outgrowth of adult sensory neurons converge on STAT3 phosphorylation downstream of neuropoietic cytokine receptor gp130.

    PubMed

    Quarta, Serena; Baeumer, Bastian E; Scherbakov, Nadja; Andratsch, Manfred; Rose-John, Stefan; Dechant, Georg; Bandtlow, Christine E; Kress, Michaela

    2014-09-24

    After nerve injury, adult sensory neurons can regenerate peripheral axons and reconnect with their target tissue. Initiation of outgrowth, as well as elongation of neurites over long distances, depends on the signaling of receptors for neurotrophic growth factors. Here, we investigated the importance of gp130, the signaling subunit of neuropoietic cytokine receptors in peripheral nerve regeneration. After sciatic nerve crush, functional recovery in vivo was retarded in SNS-gp130(-/-) mice, which specifically lack gp130 in sensory neurons. Correspondingly, a significantly reduced number of free nerve endings was detected in glabrous skin from SNS-gp130(-/-) compared with control mice after nerve crush. Neurite outgrowth and STAT3 activation in vitro were severely reduced in cultures in gp130-deficient cultured neurons. Surprisingly, in neurons obtained from SNS-gp130(-/-) mice the increase in neurite length was reduced not only in response to neuropoietic cytokine ligands of gp130 but also to nerve growth factor (NGF), which does not bind to gp130-containing receptors. Neurite outgrowth in the absence of neurotrophic factors was partially rescued in gp130-deficient neurons by leptin, which activates STAT3 downstream of leptic receptor and independent of gp130. The neurite outgrowth response of gp130-deficient neurons to NGF was fully restored in the presence of leptin. Based on these findings, gp130 signaling via STAT3 activation is suggested not only to be an important regulator of peripheral nerve regeneration in vitro and in vivo, but as determining factor for the growth promoting action of NGF in adult sensory neurons. PMID:25253866

  13. Sensory disturbances of buccal and lingual nerve by muscle compression: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Alvira-González, Joaquín

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Several studies on cadavers dissection have shown that collateral branches of the trigeminal nerve cross muscle bundles on their way, being a possible etiological factor of some nerve disturbances. Case Report A 45-year-old man attended to the Temporomandibular Joint and Orofacial Pain Unit of the Master of Oral Surgery and Implantology in Hospital Odontològic of Barcelona University, referring tingling in the left hemifacial región and ipsilateral lingual side for one year, with discomfort when shaving or skin compression. Discussion Several branches of the trigeminal nerve follow a path through the masticatory muscles, being the lingual nerve and buccal nerve the most involved. The hyperactivity of the muscle bundles that are crossed by nerve structures generates a compression that could explain certain orofacial neuropathies (numbness and / or pain) in which a clear etiologic factor can not be identified. Key words:Buccal nerve, paresthesia, idiopathic trigeminal sensory neuropathy. PMID:26855715

  14. Cutaneous sensory nerve as a substitute for auditory nerve in solving deaf-mutes' hearing problem: an innovation in multi-channel-array skin-hearing technology.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianwen; Li, Yan; Zhang, Ming; Ma, Weifang; Ma, Xuezong

    2014-08-15

    The current use of hearing aids and artificial cochleas for deaf-mute individuals depends on their auditory nerve. Skin-hearing technology, a patented system developed by our group, uses a cutaneous sensory nerve to substitute for the auditory nerve to help deaf-mutes to hear sound. This paper introduces a new solution, multi-channel-array skin-hearing technology, to solve the problem of speech discrimination. Based on the filtering principle of hair cells, external voice signals at different frequencies are converted to current signals at corresponding frequencies using electronic multi-channel bandpass filtering technology. Different positions on the skin can be stimulated by the electrode array, allowing the perception and discrimination of external speech signals to be determined by the skin response to the current signals. Through voice frequency analysis, the frequency range of the band-pass filter can also be determined. These findings demonstrate that the sensory nerves in the skin can help to transfer the voice signal and to distinguish the speech signal, suggesting that the skin sensory nerves are good candidates for the replacement of the auditory nerve in addressing deaf-mutes' hearing problems. Scientific hearing experiments can be more safely performed on the skin. Compared with the artificial cochlea, multi-channel-array skin-hearing aids have lower operation risk in use, are cheaper and are more easily popularized. PMID:25317171

  15. Cutaneous sensory nerve as a substitute for auditory nerve in solving deaf-mutes’ hearing problem: an innovation in multi-channel-array skin-hearing technology

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jianwen; Li, Yan; Zhang, Ming; Ma, Weifang; Ma, Xuezong

    2014-01-01

    The current use of hearing aids and artificial cochleas for deaf-mute individuals depends on their auditory nerve. Skin-hearing technology, a patented system developed by our group, uses a cutaneous sensory nerve to substitute for the auditory nerve to help deaf-mutes to hear sound. This paper introduces a new solution, multi-channel-array skin-hearing technology, to solve the problem of speech discrimination. Based on the filtering principle of hair cells, external voice signals at different frequencies are converted to current signals at corresponding frequencies using electronic multi-channel bandpass filtering technology. Different positions on the skin can be stimulated by the electrode array, allowing the perception and discrimination of external speech signals to be determined by the skin response to the current signals. Through voice frequency analysis, the frequency range of the band-pass filter can also be determined. These findings demonstrate that the sensory nerves in the skin can help to transfer the voice signal and to distinguish the speech signal, suggesting that the skin sensory nerves are good candidates for the replacement of the auditory nerve in addressing deaf-mutes’ hearing problems. Scientific hearing experiments can be more safely performed on the skin. Compared with the artificial cochlea, multi-channel-array skin-hearing aids have lower operation risk in use, are cheaper and are more easily popularized. PMID:25317171

  16. Store-operated calcium entry in vagal sensory nerves is independent of Orai channels.

    PubMed

    Hooper, Justin Shane; Hadley, Stephen H; Mathews, Adithya; Taylor-Clark, Thomas E

    2013-03-29

    Vagal sensory nerves innervate the majority of visceral organs (e.g., heart, lungs, GI tract, etc) and their activation is critical for defensive and regulatory reflexes. Intracellular Ca(2+) is a key regulator of neuronal excitability and is largely controlled by the Ca(2+) stores of the endoplasmic reticulum. In other cell types store-operated channels (SOC) have been shown to contribute to the homeostatic control of intracellular Ca(2+). Here, using Ca(2+) imaging, we have shown that ER depletion in vagal sensory neurons (using thapsigargin or caffeine) in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+) evoked Ca(2+) influx upon re-introduction of Ca(2+) into the extracellular buffer. This store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) was observed in approximately 25-40% of vagal neurons, equally distributed among nociceptive and non-nociceptive sensory subtypes. SOCE was blocked by Gd(3+) but not by the Orai channel blocker SKF96365. We found Orai channel mRNA in extracts from whole vagal ganglia, but when using single cell RT-PCR analysis we found only 3 out of 34 neurons expressed Orai channel mRNA, indicating that Orai channel expression in the vagal ganglia was likely derived from non-neuronal cell types. Confocal microscopy of vagal neurons in 3 day cultures demonstrated rich ER tracker fluorescence throughout axonal and neurite structures and ER store depletion (thapsigargin) evoked Ca(2+) transients from these structures. However, no SOCE could be detected in the axonal/neurite structures of vagal neurons. We conclude that SOCE occurs in vagal sensory neuronal cell bodies through non-Orai mechanisms but is absent at nerve terminals. PMID:23399679

  17. Sensory nerves contribute to cutaneous vasodilator response to cathodal stimulation in healthy rats.

    PubMed

    Gohin, Stphanie; Decorps, Johanna; Sigaudo-Roussel, Dominique; Fromy, Brengre

    2015-09-01

    Cutaneous current-induced vasodilation (CIV) in response to galvanic current application is an integrative model of neurovascular interaction that relies on capsaicin-sensitive fiber activation. The upstream and downstream mechanisms related to the activation of the capsaicin-sensitive fibers involved in CIV are not elucidated. In particular, the activation of cutaneous transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1 (TRPV1) channels and/or acid-sensing ion channels (ASIC) (activators mechanisms) and the release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and substance P (SP) (effector mechanisms) have been tested. To assess cathodal CIV, we measured cutaneous blood flow using laser Doppler flowmetry for 20min following cathodal current application (240s, 100?A) on the skin of the thigh in anesthetized healthy rats for 20min. CIV was studied in rats treated with capsazepine and amiloride to inhibit TRPV1 and ASIC channels, respectively; CGRP8-37 and SR140333 to antagonize CGRP and neurokinin-1 (NK1) receptors, respectively; compared to their respective controls. Cathodal CIV was attenuated by capsazepine (122% vs 546%, P<0.001), amiloride (198% vs 616%, P<0.01), CGRP8-37 (156% vs 616%, P<0.001) and SR140333 (95% vs 546%, P<0.001) without changing local acidification. This is the first integrative study performed in healthy rats showing that cutaneous vasodilation in response to cathodal stimulation is initiated by activation of cutaneous TRPV1 and ASIC channels likely through local acidification. The involvement of CGRP and NK1 receptors suggests that cathodal CIV is the result of CGRP and SP released through activated capsaicin-sensitive fibers. Therefore cathodal CIV could be a valuable method to assess sensory neurovascular function in the skin, which would be particularly relevant to evaluate the presence of small nerve fiber disorders and the effectiveness of treatments. PMID:26205659

  18. Psychometric functions for efficient and effective psychophysical testing of sensory function.

    PubMed

    Vriens, J P M; Strijbos, S A; van der Glas, H W

    2011-08-01

    An efficient test for sensory function has been reported using random order pairs of real and sham stimuli. The constant magnitude of the real stimulus is chosen such that the first error in a patient's forced-choice report on the order of real and sham stimulation, immediately indicates abnormal sensory function. This magnitude just exceeds a critical large percentile of the psychometric function (i.e. the relationship between percentage of detection and stimulus magnitude in healthy subjects). The aim was to determine psychometric functions for one tongue site and six facial sites for adjusting three variants of the real/sham stimulus method (i.e. for light touch, cold sensation and for two-point discrimination). All 150 healthy subjects participated in testing for light touch sensation, 100 subjects additionally participated in testing two-point discrimination and 50 subjects participated additionally in testing cold sensation. The stimulus magnitude was varied using a staircase-limits procedure. Following curve fitting with a Boltzmann function, 90th, 95th or 99th percentiles of the psychometric functions were determined. A set of at least two real/sham tests, one testing the function of large nerve fibres and one for small fibres, allows quick assessment of a patient's disturbed sensory function including its fibre pathology. PMID:21600735

  19. Sensory sensitivities and performance on sensory perceptual tasks in high-functioning individuals with autism

    PubMed Central

    Minshew, Nancy J.; Hobson, Jessica A.

    2011-01-01

    Despite extensive reports of sensory symptoms in autism, there is little empirical support for their neurological basis. Sixty individuals with high-functioning autism and 61 matched typical comparison participants were administered a sensory questionnaire and standardized neuropsychological tests of elementary and higher cortical sensory perception. Thirty-two per cent of participants with autism endorsed more sensory sensitivity items than any of the participants in the comparison group. On the sensory perceptual exam, both groups made few errors on elementary sensory perception items. Controls made few errors on higher cortical sensory perception items, but 30% of the participants with autism made high numbers of errors, though there was no evidence of the neglect syndrome. There was little correlation between the sensory sensitivities and the sensory perceptual deficits, likely due to the low correspondence between the measures. These results support the common occurrence of disturbances in sensory experiences in high functioning individuals with autism based on first person report, and the presence of neurological abnormalities in higher cortical sensory perception. PMID:18302014

  20. Identifying motor and sensory myelinated axons in rabbit peripheral nerves by histochemical staining for carbonic anhydrase and cholinesterase activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Danny A.; Sanger, James R.; Matloub, Hani S.; Yousif, N. John; Bain, James L. W.

    1988-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) and cholinesterase (CE) histochemical staining of rabbit spinal nerve roots and dorsal root ganglia demonstrated that among the reactive myeliated axons, with minor exceptions, sensory axons were CA positive and CE negative whereas motor axons were CA negative and CE positive. The high specificity was achieved by adjusting reaction conditions to stain subpopulations of myelinated axons selectively while leaving 50 percent or so unstained. Fixation with glutaraldehyde appeared necessary for achieving selectivity. Following sciatic nerve transection, the reciprocal staining pattern persisted in damaged axons and their regenerating processes which formed neuromas within the proximal nerve stump. Within the neuromas, CA-stained sensory processes were elaborated earlier and in greater numbers than CE-stained regenerating motor processes. The present results indicate that histochemical axon typing can be exploited to reveal heterogeneous responses of motor and sensory axons to injury.

  1. Angiotensinergic innervation of the kidney: Localization and relationship with catecholaminergic postganglionic and sensory nerve fibers.

    PubMed

    Bohlender, Jürgen; Pfarrer, Beat; Patil, Jaspal; Nussberger, Jürg; Thalmann, Georg N; Imboden, Hans

    2012-11-01

    We describe an angiotensin (Ang) II-containing innervation of the kidney. Cryosections of rat, pig and human kidneys were investigated for the presence of Ang II-containing nerve fibers using a mouse monoclonal antibody against Ang II (4B3). Co-staining was performed with antibodies against synaptophysin, tyrosine 3-hydroxylase, and dopamine beta-hydroxylase to detect catecholaminergic efferent fibers and against calcitonin gene-related peptide to detect sensory fibers. Tagged secondary antibodies and confocal light or laser scanning microscopy were used for immunofluorescence detection. Ang II-containing nerve fibers were densely present in the renal pelvis, the subepithelial layer of the urothelium, the arterial nervous plexus, and the peritubular interstitium of the cortex and outer medulla. They were infrequent in central veins and the renal capsule and absent within glomeruli and the renal papilla. Ang II-positive fibers represented phenotypic subgroups of catecholaminergic postganglionic or sensory fibers with different morphology and intrarenal distribution compared to their Ang II-negative counterparts. The Ang II-positive postganglionic fibers were thicker, produced typically fusiform varicosities and preferentially innervated the outer medulla and periglomerular arterioles. Ang II-negative sensory fibers were highly varicose, prevailing in the pelvis and scarce in the renal periphery compared to the rarely varicose Ang II-positive fibers. Neurons within renal microganglia displayed angiotensinergic, catecholaminergic, or combined phenotypes. Our results suggest that autonomic fibers may be an independent source of intrarenal Ang II acting as a neuropeptide co-transmitter or neuromodulator. The angiotensinergic renal innervation may play a distinct role in the neuronal control of renal sodium reabsorption, vasomotion and renin secretion. PMID:23018241

  2. Mechanical sensitization of cutaneous sensory fibers in the spared nerve injury mouse model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The spared nerve injury (SNI) model of neuropathic pain produces robust and reproducible behavioral mechanical hypersensitivity. Although this rodent model of neuropathic pain has been well established and widely used, peripheral mechanisms underlying this phenotype remain incompletely understood. Here we investigated the role of cutaneous sensory fibers in the maintenance of mechanical hyperalgesia in mice post-SNI. Findings SNI produced robust, long-lasting behavioral mechanical hypersensitivity compared to sham and nave controls beginning by post-operative day (POD) 1 and continuing through at least POD 180. We performed teased fiber recordings on single cutaneous fibers from the spared sural nerve using ex vivo skin-nerve preparations. Recordings were made between POD 1642 after SNI or sham surgery. A?-mechanoreceptors (AM) and C fibers, many of which are nociceptors, from SNI mice fired significantly more action potentials in response to suprathreshold mechanical stimulation than did fibers from either sham or nave control mice. However, there was no increase in spontaneous activity. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first study evaluating the contribution of primary afferent fibers in the SNI model. These data suggest that enhanced suprathreshold firing in AM and C fibers may play a role in the marked, persistent mechanical hypersensitivity observed in this model. These results may provide insight into mechanisms underlying neuropathic pain in humans. PMID:24286165

  3. Stem cells and related factors involved in facial nerve function regeneration.

    PubMed

    Nelke, Kamil H; ?uczak, Klaudiusz; Pawlak, Wojciech; ?ysenko, Lidia; Gerber, Hanna

    2015-01-01

    The facial nerve (VII) is one of the most important cranial nerves for head and neck surgeons. Its function is closely related to facial expressions that are individual for every person. After its injury or palsy, its functions can be either impaired or absent. Because of the presence of motor, sensory and parasympathetic fibers, the biology of its repair and function restoration depends on many factors. In order to achieve good outcome, many different therapies can be performed in order to restore as much of the nerve function as possible. When rehabilitation and physiotherapy are not sufficient, additional surgical procedures and therapies are taken into serious consideration. The final outcome of many of them is discussable, depending on nerve damage etiology. Stem cells in facial nerve repair are used, but long-term outcomes and results are still not fully known. In order to understand this therapeutic approach, clinicians and surgeons should understand the immunobiology of nerve repair and regeneration. In this review, potential stem cell usage in facial nerve regeneration procedures is discussed. PMID:26400886

  4. Peripheral Nerve Function and Lower Extremity Muscle Power in Older Men

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Rachel E.; Caserotti, Paolo; Faulkner, Kimberly; Boudreau, Robert M.; Zivkovic, Sasa; Lee, Christine; Goodpaster, Bret H.; Cawthon, Peggy M.; Newman, Anne B.; Cauley, Jane A.; Strotmeyer, Elsa S.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess whether sensorimotor peripheral nerve function is associated with muscle power in community-dwelling older men. DESIGN Longitudinal cohort study with 2.3 0.3 years of follow-up. SETTING One clinical site. PARTICIPANTS Three hundred seventy-two participants at the Pittsburgh site of the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) Study (N = 5994, age = 77.2 5.1 years, 99.5% white, BMI = 27.9 3.7kg/m2, power = 1.88 0.6watts/kg). INTERVENTIONS Not applicable. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES A nerve function ancillary study was performed 4.6 0.4 years after baseline. Muscle power was measured using a power rig. Peroneal motor nerve conduction amplitude, distal motor latency, and mean f-wave latency were measured. Sensory nerve function was assessed using 10-g and 1.4-g monofilaments and sural sensory nerve conduction amplitude and distal latency. Peripheral neuropathy symptoms at the leg and feet were assessed by self-report. RESULTS Adjusting for age, height, total body lean and fat mass, one standard deviation lower motor (? = ?0.07, p<0.05) and sensory amplitude (? = ?0.09, p<0.05) and 1.4-g (? = -0.11, p<0.05) and 10-g monofilament insensitivity (? = ?0.17 both p<0.05) were associated with lower muscle power/kg. Compared to the effect of age on muscle power (? per year = ?0.05 , p<0.0001), this was equivalent to aging 1.4 years for motor amplitude, 1.8 years for sensory amplitude, 2.2 years for 1.4-g monofilament detection, and 3.4 years for 10-g detection. Baseline 1.4-g monofilament detection predicted greater decline in power/kg. Short-term change in nerve function was not associated with concurrent short-term change in power/kg. CONCLUSION Worse sensory and motor nerve function were associated with lower power/kg and are likely important for impaired muscle function in older men. Monofilament sensitivity was associated with greater decline in power/kg and screening may identify early risk for muscle function decline in late-life, which has implications for disability. PMID:24355427

  5. Neurotrophin and GDNF family ligand receptor expression in vagal sensory nerve subtypes innervating the adult guinea pig respiratory tract

    PubMed Central

    Lieu, TinaMarie; Kollarik, Marian; Myers, Allen C.

    2011-01-01

    We combined retrograde tracing techniques with single-neuron RT-PCR to compare the expression of neurotrophic factor receptors in nodose vs. jugular vagal sensory neurons. The neurons were further categorized based on location of their terminals (tracheal or lungs) and based on expression of the ionotropic capsaicin receptor TRPV1. Consistent with functional studies, nearly all jugular neurons innervating the trachea and lungs expressed TRPV1. With respect to the neurotrophin receptors, the TRPV1-expressing jugular C-fiber neurons innervating both the trachea and lung compartments preferentially expressed tropomyosin-receptor kinase A (TrkA), with only a minority of neurons expressing TrkB or TrkC. The nodose neurons that express TRPV1 (presumed nodose C-fibers) innervate mainly intrapulmonary structures. These neurons preferentially expressed TrkB, with only a minority expressing TrkA or TrkC. The expression pattern in tracheal TRPV1-negative neurons, nodose tracheal presumed A?-fiber neurons as well as the intrapulmonary TRPV1-negative presumed A?-fiber neurons, was similar to that observed in the nodose C-fiber neurons. We also evaluated the expression of GFR? receptors and RET (receptors for the GDNF family ligands). Virtually all vagal sensory neurons innervating the respiratory tract expressed RET and GFR?1. The jugular neurons also categorically expressed GFR?3, as well as ?50% of the nodose neurons. GFR?2 was expressed in ?50% of the neurons irrespective of subtype. The results reveal that Trk receptor expression in vagal afferent neurons innervating the adult respiratory tract depends more on the location of the cell bodies (jugular vs. nodose ganglion) than either the location of the terminals or the functional phenotype of the nerve. The data also reveal that in addition to neurotrophins, the GDNF family ligands may be important neuromodulators of vagal afferent nerves innervating the adult respiratory tract. PMID:21335521

  6. The importance of sensory nerve endings as sites of drug action.

    PubMed

    Ginzel, K H

    1975-01-01

    The role that sensory nerve endings can play in drug action and the strategy used for its experimental analysis and proof is first exemplified by three effects of nicotine which are seen when the lowest effective doses of the drug are given intravenously in the cat: (1) a vasopressor effect due to arterial chemoreceptor stimulation; (2) a triad of bradycardia, hypotension and apnea, and (3) a depressant effect upon somatic motor activity, both of which are traced to vagal afferent endings in the pulmonary circulation. While receptors in the lung are responsible at least for the initial phase of the reflex responses listed in (2) and (3), sensory endings in heart, aorta, and carotid sinus region may be recruited into action as the drug reaches them. Several of these reflex effects can also be elicited by other sensory stimulant agents such as phenyldiguanide, 5-hydroxytryptamine, and veratrum alkaloids. In the second part, a general outline is given of what may be classified as 'Afferent Pharmacology', dealing with drug action upon sensory receptors and with the resulting remote drug effects. The action upon sensory receptors can either be a direct one ('primary' drug effect) consisting of stimulation, sensitization, desensitization, depression or combinations thereof, or an indirect ('secondary') effect brought about by a variety of drug-induced changes in the tissues surrounding the receptors. Depending on the nature of the primary or secondary action, the remote drug effect can be either an initiation, modification or impairment of those reflexes which have their origin in the sensory endings acted upon. Indeed, the grossly observable pharmacological actions of 'afferent drugs' are generally those relating to the reflex response. To avoid blurring of the boundaries of afferent pharmacology, drugs acting on central synapses of reflex pathways, or on the elaborate efferent control system of afferent input, are not included. A discussion follows of the topics of investigation, the influence of experimental conditions and anesthesia, various approaches and methods, the physiological and pharmacological importance of inquiry in this area, and some of the therapeutic aspects. Finally, brief mention is made of certain features and problems which appear to be characteristic of afferent pharmacology. PMID:1099463

  7. Diphtheritic neuropathy, an analysis based on muscle and nerve biopsy and repeated neurophysiological and autonomic function tests.

    PubMed Central

    Solders, G; Nennesmo, I; Persson, A

    1989-01-01

    A patient with diphtheritic neuropathy was investigated with repeated tests of parasympathetic and sympathetic vasomotor and sudomotor functions for one year after the onset of symptoms. Somatic nerve function was tested with nerve conduction studies and an index based on ten variables was used to follow the course of the neuropathy. Sural nerve and anterior tibial muscle biopsies were performed. A severe but shortlasting impairment of the parasympathetic vagal reflex arc was found. The recovery of this function paralleled the clinical course. Sympathetic functions were normal. The neurophysiological variables of somatic nerve function showed signs of a mainly demyelinating mixed sensory/motor neuropathy. The recovery of these variables was slow. The nerve and muscle biopsies demonstrated mild changes consistent with a mixed, demyelinating, non-inflammatory neuropathy. Images PMID:2549201

  8. Self-powered sensory nerve system for civil structures using hybrid forisome actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoureshi, Rahmat A.; Shen, Amy

    2006-03-01

    In order to provide a true distributed sensor and control system for civil structures, we have developed a Structural Nervous System that mimics key attributes of a human nervous system. This nervous system is made up of building blocks that are designed based on mechanoreceptors as a fundamentally new approach for the development of a structural health monitoring and diagnostic system that utilizes the recently discovered plant-protein forisomes, a novel non-living biological material capable of sensing and actuation. In particular, our research has been focused on producing a sensory nervous system for civil structures by using forisomes as the mechanoreceptors, nerve fibers, neuronal pools, and spinocervical tract to the nodal and central processing units. This paper will present up to date results of our research, including the design and analysis of the structural nervous system.

  9. The effect of aging on the density of the sensory nerve fiber innervation of bone and acute skeletal pain

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez-Andrade, Juan M.; Mantyh, William G.; Bloom, Aaron P.; Freeman, Katie T.; Ghilardi, Joseph R.; Kuskowski, Michael A.; Mantyh, Patrick W.

    2010-01-01

    As humans age there is a decline in most sensory systems including vision, hearing, taste, smell, and tactile acuity. In contrast, the frequency and severity of musculoskeletal pain generally increases with age. To determine whether the density of sensory nerve fibers that transduce skeletal pain changes with age, calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) and neurofilament 200 kDa (NF200) sensory nerve fibers that innervate the femur were examined in the femurs of young (4 month old), middle-aged (13 month) and old (36 month) male F344/BNF1 rats. Whereas the bone quality showed a significant age-related decline, the density of CGRP+ and NF200+ nerve fibers that innervate the bone remained remarkably unchanged as well as the severity of acute skeletal fracture pain. Thus, while bone mass, quality and strength undergo a significant decline with age, the density of sensory nerve fibers that transduce noxious stimuli remain largely intact. These data may in part explain why musculoskeletal pain increases with age. PMID:20947214

  10. Capsaicin and carbon dioxide act by distinct mechanisms on sensory nerve terminals in the cat cornea.

    PubMed

    Chen, X; Belmonte, C; Rang, H P

    1997-03-01

    The discharge of single afferent units recorded from filaments of the mixed ciliary nerve of anaesthetised cats was used to study the effects of CO2, capsaicin and the capsaicin antagonist, capsazepine, on sensory nerve terminals in the cornea. Units were selected on the basis of their sensitivity to CO2 (98.5% applied to the cornea for 30 s in a moist gas stream). Of these units, about 50% (18/38) also responded to capsaicin (0.1 microM applied as droplet and washed off after 20 s), with a discharge of similar magnitude to that produced by CO2. The other CO2-sensitive units (20/38) did not respond to capsaicin. Capsaicin-sensitive units responded more rapidly to CO2 (mean latency to first spike 0.7 +/- 0.2 s) than capsaicin-insensitive units (mean latency to first spike 5.1 +/- 1.2 s). On the basis of their conduction velocity, both the capsaicin-sensitive and the capsaicin-insensitive groups included both A- and C-fibres. Application of capsazepine (10 microM for 5-20 min) to the cornea reversibly blocked the response of the units to capsaicin without affecting responses to CO2. Units that were acutely desensitised by exposure to capsaicin (0.1 microM) for 30 s, during which time the discharge evoked by capsaicin declined to zero, still responded to CO2, though the response was reduced by 44% compared with controls. It is concluded that activation of sensory afferents in the cat cornea by capsaicin and by CO2 appear to involve distinct mechanisms, since: (a) many CO2- sensitive units are not excited by capsaicin; (b) capsazepine selectively blocks excitation by capsaicin without affecting responses to CO2; and (c) desensitisation to capsaicin impairs only partially the responsiveness to CO2. PMID:9106806

  11. Nerve allograft transplantation for functional restoration of the upper extremity: case series

    PubMed Central

    Elkwood, Andrew I.; Holland, Neil R.; Arbes, Spiros M.; Rose, Michael I.; Kaufman, Matthew R.; Ashinoff, Russell L.; Parikh, Mona A.; Patel, Tushar R.

    2011-01-01

    Background Major trauma to the spinal cord or upper extremity often results in severe sensory and motor disturbances from injuries to the brachial plexus and its insertion into the spinal cord. Functional restoration with nerve grafting neurotization and tendon transfers is the mainstay of treatment. Results may be incomplete due to a limited supply of autologous material for nerve grafts. The factors deemed most integral for success are early surgical intervention, reconstruction of all levels of injury, and maximization of the number of axonal conduits per nerve repair. Objective To report the second series of nerve allograft transplantation using cadaveric nerve graft and our experience with living-related nerve transplants. Participants Eight patients, seven men and one woman, average age 23 years (range 18–34), with multi-level brachial plexus injuries were selected for transplantation using either cadaveric allografts or living-related donors. Methods Grafts were harvested and preserved in the University of Wisconsin Cold Storage Solution at 5°C for up to 7 days. The immunosuppressive protocol was initiated at the time of surgery and was discontinued at approximately 1 year, or when signs of regeneration were evident. Parameters for assessment included mechanism of injury, interval between injury and treatment, level(s) of deficit, post-operative return of function, pain relief, need for revision surgery, complications, and improvement in quality of life. Results Surgery was performed using living-related donor grafts in six patients, and cadaveric grafts in two patients. Immunosuppression was tolerated for the duration of treatment in all but one patient in whom early termination occurred due to non-compliance. There were no cases of graft rejection as of most recent follow-up. Seven patients showed signs of regeneration, demonstrated by return of sensory and motor function and/or a migrating Tinel's sign. One patient was non-compliant with the post-operative regimen and experienced minimal return of function despite a reduction in pain. Conclusions Despite the small number of subjects, it appears that nerve allograft transplantation may be performed safely, permitting non-prioritized repair of long-segment peripheral nerve defects and maximizing the number of axonal conduits per nerve repair. For patients with long, multi-level brachial plexus injuries or combined upper and lower extremity nerve deficits, the use of nerve allograft allows a more complete repair that may translate into greater functional restoration than autografting alone. PMID:21675363

  12. Implementation of linear sensory signaling via multiple coordinated mechanisms at central vestibular nerve synapses

    PubMed Central

    McElvain, Lauren E.; Faulstich, Michael; Jeanne, James M.; Moore, Jeffrey D.; du Lac, Sascha

    2015-01-01

    Summary Signal transfer in neural circuits is dynamically modified by the recent history of neuronal activity. Short-term plasticity endows synapses with nonlinear transmission properties, yet synapses in sensory and motor circuits are capable of signaling linearly over a wide range of presynaptic firing rates. How do such synapses achieve rate-invariant transmission despite history-dependent nonlinearities? Here, ultrastructural, biophysical, and computational analyses demonstrate that concerted molecular, anatomical, and physiological refinements are required for central vestibular nerve synapses to linearly transmit rate-coded sensory signals. Vestibular synapses operate in a physiological regime of steady-state depression imposed by tonic firing. Rate-invariant transmission relies on brief presynaptic action potentials that delimit calcium influx, large pools of rapidly mobilized vesicles, multiple low-probability release sites, robust postsynaptic receptor sensitivity, and efficient transmitter clearance. Broadband linear synaptic filtering of head motion signals is thus achieved by coordinately tuned synaptic machinery that maintains physiological operation within inherent cell biological limitations. PMID:25704949

  13. Implementation of linear sensory signaling via multiple coordinated mechanisms at central vestibular nerve synapses.

    PubMed

    McElvain, Lauren E; Faulstich, Michael; Jeanne, James M; Moore, Jeffrey D; du Lac, Sascha

    2015-03-01

    Signal transfer in neural circuits is dynamically modified by the recent history of neuronal activity. Short-term plasticity endows synapses with nonlinear transmission properties, yet synapses in sensory and motor circuits are capable of signaling linearly over a wide range of presynaptic firing rates. How do such synapses achieve rate-invariant transmission despite history-dependent nonlinearities? Here, ultrastructural, biophysical, and computational analyses demonstrate that concerted molecular, anatomical, and physiological refinements are required for central vestibular nerve synapses to linearly transmit rate-coded sensory signals. Vestibular synapses operate in a physiological regime of steady-state depression imposed by tonic firing. Rate-invariant transmission relies on brief presynaptic action potentials that delimit calcium influx, large pools of rapidly mobilized vesicles, multiple low-probability release sites, robust postsynaptic receptor sensitivity, and efficient transmitter clearance. Broadband linear synaptic filtering of head motion signals is thus achieved by coordinately tuned synaptic machinery that maintains physiological operation within inherent cell biological limitations. PMID:25704949

  14. THE MAJORITY OF MYELINATED AND UNMYELINATED SENSORY NERVE FIBERS THAT INNERVATE BONE EXPRESS THE TROPOMYOSIN RECEPTOR KINASE A

    PubMed Central

    Castañeda-Corral, Gabriela; Jimenez-Andrade, Juan M.; Bloom, Aaron P.; Taylor, Reid N.; Mantyh, William G.; Kaczmarska, Magdalena J.; Ghilardi, Joseph R.; Mantyh, Patrick W.

    2011-01-01

    Although skeletal pain is a leading cause of chronic pain and disability, relatively little is known about the specific populations of nerve fibers that innervate the skeleton. Recent studies have reported that therapies blocking nerve growth factor (NGF) or its cognate receptor, tropomyosin receptor kinase A (TrkA) are efficacious in attenuating skeletal pain. A potential factor to consider when assessing the analgesic efficacy of targeting NGF-TrkA signaling in a pain state is the fraction of NGF-responsive TrkA+ nociceptors that innervate the tissue from which the pain is arising, as this innervation and the analgesic efficacy of targeting NGF-TrkA signaling may vary considerably from tissue to tissue. To explore this in the skeleton, tissue slices and whole mount preparations of the normal, adult mouse femur were analyzed using immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy. Analysis of these preparations revealed that 80% of the unmyelinated/thinly myelinated sensory nerve fibers that express calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and innervate the periosteum, mineralized bone and bone marrow also express TrkA. Similarly, the majority of myelinated sensory nerve fibers that express neurofilament 200 kDa (NF200) which innervate the periosteum, mineralized bone and bone marrow also co-express TrkA. In the normal femur, the relative density of CGRP+, NF200+ and TrkA+ sensory nerve fibers per unit volume is: periosteum > bone marrow > mineralized bone > cartilage with the respective relative densities being 100: 2: 0.1: 0. The observation that the majority of sensory nerve fibers innervating the skeleton express TrkA+, may in part explain why therapies that block NGF/TrkA pathway are highly efficacious in attenuating skeletal pain. PMID:21277945

  15. Timeline: exorcizing the animal spirits: Jan Swammerdam on nerve function.

    PubMed

    Cobb, M

    2002-05-01

    For more than 1,500 years, nerves were thought to function through the action of 'animal spirits'. In the seventeenth century, Ren Descartes conceived of these 'spirits' as liquids or gases, and used the idea to explain reflex action. But he was rapidly proven wrong by a young Dutchman, Jan Swammerdam. Swammerdam's elegant experiments pioneered the frog nerve muscle preparation and laid the foundation of our modern understanding of nerve function. PMID:11988778

  16. Bladder sensory physiology: neuroactive compounds and receptors, sensory transducers, and target-derived growth factors as targets to improve function

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Eric J.; Merrill, Liana

    2014-01-01

    Urinary bladder dysfunction presents a major problem in the clinical management of patients suffering from pathological conditions and neurological injuries or disorders. Currently, the etiology underlying altered visceral sensations from the urinary bladder that accompany the chronic pain syndrome, bladder pain syndrome (BPS)/interstitial cystitis (IC), is not known. Bladder irritation and inflammation are histopathological features that may underlie BPS/IC that can change the properties of lower urinary tract sensory pathways (e.g., peripheral and central sensitization, neurochemical plasticity) and contribute to exaggerated responses of peripheral bladder sensory pathways. Among the potential mediators of peripheral nociceptor sensitization and urinary bladder dysfunction are neuroactive compounds (e.g., purinergic and neuropeptide and receptor pathways), sensory transducers (e.g., transient receptor potential channels) and target-derived growth factors (e.g., nerve growth factor). We review studies related to the organization of the afferent limb of the micturition reflex and discuss neuroplasticity in an animal model of urinary bladder inflammation to increase the understanding of functional bladder disorders and to identify potential novel targets for development of therapeutic interventions. Given the heterogeneity of BPS/IC and the lack of consistent treatment benefits, it is unlikely that a single treatment directed at a single target in micturition reflex pathways will have a mass benefit. Thus, the identification of multiple targets is a prudent approach, and use of cocktail treatments directed at multiple targets should be considered. PMID:24760999

  17. The effect of treatment with BRX-220, a co-inducer of heat shock proteins, on sensory fibers of the rat following peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Kalmar, B; Greensmith, L; Malcangio, M; McMahon, S B; Csermely, P; Burnstock, G

    2003-12-01

    In this study, we examined the effect BRX-220, a co-inducer of heat shock proteins, in injury-induced peripheral neuropathy. Following sciatic nerve injury in adult rats and treatment with BRX-220, the following features of the sensory system were studied: (a) expression of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP); (b) binding of isolectin B4 (IB4) in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and spinal cord; (c) stimulation-evoked release of substance P (SP) in an in vitro spinal cord preparation and (d) nociceptive responses of partially denervated rats. BRX-220 partially reverses axotomy-induced changes in the sensory system. In vehicle-treated rats there is a decrease in IB4 binding and CGRP expression in injured neurones, while in BRX-220-treated rats these markers were better preserved. Thus, 7.0 +/- 0.6% of injured DRG neurones bound IB4 in vehicle-treated rats compared to 14.4 +/- 0.9% in BRX-220-treated animals. Similarly, 4.5 +/- 0.5% of DRG neurones expressed CGRP in the vehicle-treated group, whereas 9.0 +/- 0.3% were positive in the BRX-220-treated group. BRX-220 also partially restored SP release from spinal cord sections to electrical stimulation of primary sensory neurones. Behavioural tests carried out on partially denervated animals showed that BRX-220 treatment did not prevent the emergence of mechanical or thermal hyperalgesia. However, oral treatment for 4 weeks lead to reduced pain-related behaviour suggesting either slowly developing analgesic actions or enhancement of recovery processes. Thus, the morphological improvement seen in sensory neurone markers was accompanied by restored functional activity. Therefore, treatment with BRX-220 promotes restoration of morphological and functional properties in the sensory system following peripheral nerve injury. PMID:14769355

  18. How does morphology relate to function in sensory arbors?

    PubMed

    Hall, David H; Treinin, Millet

    2011-09-01

    Sensory dendrites fall into many different morphological and functional classes. Polymodal nociceptors are one subclass of sensory neurons, which are of particular note owing to their elaborate dendritic arbors. Complex developmental programs are required to form these arbors and there is striking conservation of morphology, function and molecular determinants between vertebrate and invertebrate polymodal nociceptors. Based on these studies, we argue that arbor morphology plays an important role in the function of polymodal nociceptors. Similar associations between form and function might explain the plethora of dendrite morphologies seen among all sensory neurons. PMID:21840610

  19. Decellularized Nerves for Upper Limb Nerve Reconstruction: A Systematic Review of Functional Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Deslivia, Maria Florencia; Lee, Hyun-Joo; Adikrishna, Arnold; Jeon, In-Ho

    2015-11-01

    Background?This is a systematic review for evaluating the evidence for functional outcomes after decellularized nerve use in clinical setting. Decellularized nerves are allografts whose antigenic components have been removed, leaving only a scaffold that promotes the full regeneration of axons. Methods?Literature research was performed using the PubMed/MEDLINE database for English language studies with the keywords "decellularized nerve" and "processed nerve allograft." Inclusion criteria were prospective and retrospective case reviews in clinical settings. Exclusion criteria were case reports and case series. Results?We retrieved six level VIII studies and one level VI study (classified according to the Jovell and Navarro-Rubio scale) with a total of 131 reconstructions. The basic data ranges of the studies were as follows: patient age, 18 to 86 years; duration between initial injury and nerve reconstruction procedure, 8 hours to 4 years; and follow-up period, 40 days to 2 years. The maximum lengths of the nerve gap for chemically washed decellularized nerves and cryopreserved decellularized nerves were 50 and 100?mm, respectively. Quantitatively, the functional outcome ranges were as follows: static two-point discrimination, 3 to 5?mm; and moving two-point discrimination, 2 to 15 mm. For motor assessment, all patients had a?>?M3 Medical Research Council score. It is also important to notice that a large variability occurs in almost every factor in the reviewed studies. Conclusion?Our study is the first to summarize the clinical results of decellularized nerves. Decellularized nerves have been used to bridge nerve gaps ranging from 5 to 100?mm with associated satisfactory outcomes in static and moving two-point discriminations. PMID:26280520

  20. VEGF induces sensory and motor peripheral plasticity, alters bladder function, and promotes visceral sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background This work tests the hypothesis that bladder instillation with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) modulates sensory and motor nerve plasticity, and, consequently, bladder function and visceral sensitivity. In addition to C57BL/6J, ChAT-cre mice were used for visualization of bladder cholinergic nerves. The direct effect of VEGF on the density of sensory nerves expressing the transient receptor potential vanilloid subfamily 1 (TRPV1) and cholinergic nerves (ChAT) was studied one week after one or two intravesical instillations of the growth factor. To study the effects of VEGF on bladder function, mice were intravesically instilled with VEGF and urodynamic evaluation was assessed. VEGF-induced alteration in bladder dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons was performed on retrogradly labeled urinary bladder afferents by patch-clamp recording of voltage gated Na+ currents. Determination of VEGF-induced changes in sensitivity to abdominal mechanostimulation was performed by application of von Frey filaments. Results In addition to an overwhelming increase in TRPV1 immunoreactivity, VEGF instillation resulted in an increase in ChAT-directed expression of a fluorescent protein in several layers of the urinary bladder. Intravesical VEGF caused a profound change in the function of the urinary bladder: acute VEGF (1 week post VEGF treatment) reduced micturition pressure and longer treatment (2 weeks post-VEGF instillation) caused a substantial reduction in inter-micturition interval. In addition, intravesical VEGF resulted in an up-regulation of voltage gated Na+ channels (VGSC) in bladder DRG neurons and enhanced abdominal sensitivity to mechanical stimulation. Conclusions For the first time, evidence is presented indicating that VEGF instillation into the mouse bladder promotes a significant increase in peripheral nerve density together with alterations in bladder function and visceral sensitivity. The VEGF pathway is being proposed as a key modulator of neural plasticity in the pelvis and enhanced VEGF content may be associated with visceral hyperalgesia, abdominal discomfort, and/or pelvic pain. PMID:23249422

  1. Differentiation of peripheral nerve functions and properties with spectral analysis and Karnovsky-Roots staining: a preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qintong; Chen, Zenggan; Li, Qiong; Liu, Haifei; Zhang, Jian; Yao, Wenhua; Zhang, Ren; Li, Qingli; Liu, Hongying; Zhang, Feng; Lineaweaver, William C

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to explore the possibility for analyzing and differentiating between motor and sensory functions of peripheral nerve axons using spectral technology. Methods: 10 ?m slide section of S1 anterior and posterior rabbit spinal nerve roots were made and then stained with Karnovsky-Roots method for molecular hyperspectral imaging microscopy analysis. In addition, Raman spectra data of nerve axons on each slide was collected after Karnovsky-Roots staining for 30 minutes. Results: Motor axons were differentiated from sensory axons in a nerve axon section hyperspectral image via Spectral angle mapper algorithm. Raman scatterings could be detected near 2110 cm-1, and 2155 cm-1 in motor axons after Karnvosky-Roots staining. The value of I2100/I1440 in motor axons are significantly different (P0.001) than in sensory axons after staining for 30 minutes. Conclusions: Motor and sensory nerve axons can be differentiated from their counterparts in 30 minutes by using Raman micro-spectroscopy analysis assisted with Karnovsky-Roots staining. PMID:25419356

  2. Effect of Delayed Peripheral Nerve Repair on Nerve Regeneration, Schwann Cell Function and Target Muscle Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Jonsson, Samuel; Wiberg, Rebecca; McGrath, Aleksandra M.; Novikov, Lev N.; Wiberg, Mikael; Novikova, Liudmila N.; Kingham, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Despite advances in surgical techniques for peripheral nerve repair, functional restitution remains incomplete. The timing of surgery is one factor influencing the extent of recovery but it is not yet clearly defined how long a delay may be tolerated before repair becomes futile. In this study, rats underwent sciatic nerve transection before immediate (0) or 1, 3, or 6 months delayed repair with a nerve graft. Regeneration of spinal motoneurons, 13 weeks after nerve repair, was assessed using retrograde labeling. Nerve tissue was also collected from the proximal and distal stumps and from the nerve graft, together with the medial gastrocnemius (MG) muscles. A dramatic decline in the number of regenerating motoneurons and myelinated axons in the distal nerve stump was observed in the 3- and 6-months delayed groups. After 3 months delay, the axonal number in the proximal stump increased 2–3 folds, accompanied by a smaller axonal area. RT-PCR of distal nerve segments revealed a decline in Schwann cells (SC) markers, most notably in the 3 and 6 month delayed repair samples. There was also a progressive increase in fibrosis and proteoglycan scar markers in the distal nerve with increased delayed repair time. The yield of SC isolated from the distal nerve segments progressively fell with increased delay in repair time but cultured SC from all groups proliferated at similar rates. MG muscle at 3- and 6-months delay repair showed a significant decline in weight (61% and 27% compared with contra-lateral side). Muscle fiber atrophy and changes to neuromuscular junctions were observed with increased delayed repair time suggestive of progressively impaired reinnervation. This study demonstrates that one of the main limiting factors for nerve regeneration after delayed repair is the distal stump. The critical time point after which the outcome of regeneration becomes too poor appears to be 3-months. PMID:23409189

  3. Mammalian nerve globins in search of functions.

    PubMed

    Ascenzi, Paolo; Gustincich, Stefano; Marino, Maria

    2014-04-01

    Nerve globins are present in nonvertebrates and vertebrates, the first nerve globin having been recognized in the nerve cord of the polychaete annelid Aphrodite aculeata in 1872. Later, in 2000, the first vertebrate nerve globin, named neuroglobin (Ngb), has been identified in neuronal tissues of humans and mice. Recently, cytoglobin, hemoglobin, and myoglobin have also been reported to be expressed in the mammalian nervous system. The concentration of mammalian nerve globins is ~1 μM, with the exception of Ngb that reaches approximately 100-200 μM only in the retina rod cells. Mammalian nerve globins have been hypothesized to be involved in the excitability of the nervous system, in the metabolism of reactive nitrogen and oxygen species, and in intracellular signaling pathways leading to the neuronal cell survival. Only in retina cells, mammalian Ngb may help to sustain O2 supply to mitochondria, thereby supporting the visual process in the eye. Here, the putative roles of mammalian nerve globins are reviewed. PMID:24753139

  4. Alpha-Synuclein Pathology in Sensory Nerve Terminals of the Upper Aerodigestive Tract of Parkinson’s Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Liancai; Chen, Jingming; Sobotka, Stanislaw; Nyirenda, Themba; Benson, Brian; Gupta, Fiona; Sanders, Ira; Adler, Charles H.; Caviness, John N.; Shill, Holly A.; Sabbagh, Marwan; Samanta, Johan E.; Sue, Lucia I.; Beach, Thomas G.

    2015-01-01

    Dysphagia is common in Parkinson’s disease (PD) and causes significant morbidity and mortality. PD dysphagia has usually been explained as dysfunction of central motor control, much like other motor symptoms that are characteristic of the disease. However, PD dysphagia does not correlate with severity of motor symptoms nor does it respond to motor therapies. It is known that PD patients have sensory deficits in the pharynx, and that impaired sensation may contribute to dysphagia. However, the underlying cause of the pharyngeal sensory deficits in PD is not known. We hypothesized that PD dysphagia with sensory deficits may be due to degeneration of the sensory nerve terminals in the upper aerodigestive tract (UAT). We have previously shown that Lewy-type synucleinopathy (LTS) is present in the main pharyngeal sensory nerves of PD patients, but not in controls. In this study, the sensory terminals in UAT mucosa were studied to discern the presence and distribution of LTS. Whole-mount specimens (tongue-pharynx-larynx-upper esophagus) were obtained from 10 deceased human subjects with clinically diagnosed and neuropathologically confirmed PD (five with dysphagia and five without) and four age-matched healthy controls. Samples were taken from six sites and immunostained for phosphorylated α-synuclein (PAS). The results showed the presence of PAS-immunoreactive (PAS-ir) axons in all the PD subjects and in none of the controls. Notably, PD patients with dysphagia had more PAS-ir axons in the regions that are critical for initiating the swallowing reflex. These findings suggest that Lewy pathology affects mucosal sensory axons in specific regions of the UAT and may be related to PD dysphagia. PMID:26041249

  5. Luteolin improves the impaired nerve functions in diabetic neuropathy: behavioral and biochemical evidences

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming; Li, Qiang; Zhao, Qingsong; Zhang, Jinchao; Lin, Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathies are a major cause of morbidity in patients with diabetes mellitus. Up to now, drugs for improving the impaired nerve functions has been lacking for diabetic neuropathy. The antioxidant and neuroprotective effects of luteolin make it an attractive candidate for diabetic neuropathy. The present study was designed to investigate the putative beneficial effect of luteolin on diabetic neuropathy. Diabetic rats were intraperitoneally treated with daily luteolin (50 mg/kg, 100 mg/kg and 200 mg/kg) or vehicle for 3 weeks from the 28th day after streptozotocin injection. Behavioral, electrophysiological and biochemical studies were performed to evaluate the effect of luteolin on the impaired nerve functions in diabetic neuropathy. It was found that luteolin dose dependently alleviated abnormal sensation, improved nerve conduction velocities and nerve blood flow in diabetic rats. Biochanical analysis showed that luteolin significantly lowered the reactive oxygen species production and malondialdehyde level, as well as increased antioxidants activities in a dose dependent manner. In addition, luteolin significantly up-regulated the protein levels of nuclear factor-E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in diabetic nerves. Taken together, luteolin is capable of improving diabetes-induced deficit in motor and sensory functions, which could be attributable, at least in part, to its Nrf2-dependent antioxidant capacity. The findings in the present study highlight the therapeutic value of luteolin for diabetic neuropathy. PMID:26617718

  6. Edaravone promotes functional recovery after mechanical peripheral nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Teng; Li, Zhengwei; Dong, Jianli; Nan, Feng; Li, Tao; Yu, Qing

    2014-01-01

    Edaravone has been shown to reduce ischemia/reperfusion-induced peripheral nerve injury. However, the therapeutic effect of edaravone on peripheral nerve injury caused by mechanical factors is unknown. In the present study, we established a peripheral nerve injury model by crushing the sciatic nerve using hemostatic forceps, and then administered edaravone 3 mg/kg intraperitoneally. The sciatic functional index and superoxide dismutase activity of the sciatic nerve were increased, and the malondialdehyde level was decreased in animals in the edaravone group compared with those in the model group. Bcl-2 expression was increased, but Bax expression was decreased in anterior horn cells of the L4-6 spinal cord segments. These results indicated that edaravone has a neuroprotective effect following peripheral nerve injury caused by mechanical factors through alleviating free radical damage to cells and inhibiting lipid peroxidation, as well as regulating apoptosis-related protein expression. PMID:25374594

  7. Functional and mechanical evaluation of nerve stretch injury.

    PubMed

    Rickett, Todd; Connell, Sean; Bastijanic, Jennifer; Hegde, Satya; Shi, Riyi

    2011-10-01

    Peripheral nerves undergo tensile loading in common physiological conditions, but stretch can also induce nerve pathology, impairing electrophysiological conduction. The level of strain nerves can tolerate and the functional deficits which result from exceeding this threshold are not thoroughly understood. To examine these phenomena, a novel system for tensile electrophysiology was created using a grease gap-recording chamber paired with a computerized micromanipulator and load cell. Guinea pig sciatic nerves were stretched beyond their maximum physiologic length to examine the effects of tension on signal conduction. Mechanical and electrophysiological data such as load, position, compound action potential amplitude, and signal latency were recorded in real-time. While 5% strain did not affect conduction, further elongation decreased amplitude approximately linearly with strain. These experiments verify the findings of prior studies into nerve stretch, and demonstrate the utility of this apparatus for investigating the mechanical and electrophysiological properties of nerves undergoing strain. PMID:20703726

  8. Polysialic acid glycomimetics promote myelination and functional recovery after peripheral nerve injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Mehanna, Ali; Mishra, Bibhudatta; Kurschat, Nina; Schulze, Christian; Bian, Shan; Loers, Gabriele; Irintchev, Andrey; Schachner, Melitta

    2009-06-01

    alpha2,8 Polysialic acid (PSA) is a carbohydrate attached to the glycoprotein backbone of the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) and implicated in nervous system development and repair. Here, we investigated whether PSA can improve functional recovery after peripheral nerve lesion in adult mice. We applied a functional PSA mimicking peptide or a control peptide in a polyethylene cuff used to surgically reconnect the severed stumps of the femoral nerve before it bifurcates into the motor and sensory branches. Using video-based motion analysis to monitor motor recovery over a 3 month postoperative period, we observed a better functional outcome in the PSA mimetic-treated than in control mice receiving a control peptide or phosphate buffered saline. Retrograde tracing of regenerated motoneurons and morphometric analyses showed that motoneuron survival, motoneuron soma size and axonal diameters were not affected by treatment with the PSA mimetic. However, remyelination of regenerated axons distal to the injury site was considerably improved by the PSA mimetic indicating that effects on Schwann cells in the denervated nerve may underlie the functional effects seen in motor recovery. In line with this notion was the observation that the PSA mimetic enhanced the elongation of Schwann cell processes and Schwann cell proliferation in vitro, when compared with the control peptide. Moreover, Schwann cell proliferation in vivo was enhanced in both motor and sensory branches of the femoral nerve by application of the PSA mimetic. These effects were likely mediated by NCAM through its interaction with the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR), since they were not observed when the PSA mimetic was applied to NCAM-deficient Schwann cells, and since application of two different FGFR inhibitors reduced process elongation from Schwann cells in vitro. Our results indicate the potential of PSA mimetics as therapeutic agents promoting motor recovery and myelination after peripheral nerve injury. PMID:19454531

  9. Phenotyping the Function of TRPV1-Expressing Sensory Neurons by Targeted Axonal Silencing

    PubMed Central

    Brenneis, Christian; Kistner, Katrin; Puopolo, Michelino; Segal, David; Roberson, David; Sisignano, Marco; Labocha, Sandra; Ferreirós, Nerea; Strominger, Amanda; Cobos, Enrique J.; Ghasemlou, Nader; Geisslinger, Gerd; Reeh, Peter W.; Bean, Bruce P.; Woolf, Clifford J.

    2013-01-01

    Specific somatosensations may be processed by different subsets of primary afferents. C-fibers expressing heat-sensitive TRPV1 channels are proposed, for example, to be heat but not mechanical pain detectors. To phenotype in rats the sensory function of TRPV1+ afferents, we rapidly and selectively silenced only their activity, by introducing the membrane-impermeant sodium channel blocker QX-314 into these axons via the TRPV1 channel pore. Using tandem mass spectrometry we show that upon activation with capsaicin, QX-314 selectively accumulates in the cytosol only of TRPV1-expressing cells, and not in control cells. Exposure to QX-314 and capsaicin induces in small DRG neurons a robust sodium current block within 30 s. In sciatic nerves, application of extracellular QX-314 with capsaicin persistently reduces C-fiber but not A-fiber compound action potentials and this effect does not occur in TRPV1−/− mice. Behavioral phenotyping after selectively silencing TRPV1+ sciatic nerve axons by perineural injections of QX-314 and capsaicin reveals deficits in heat and mechanical pressure but not pinprick or light touch perception. The response to intraplantar capsaicin is substantially reduced, as expected. During inflammation, silencing TRPV1+ axons abolishes heat, mechanical, and cold hyperalgesia but tactile and cold allodynia remain following peripheral nerve injury. These results indicate that TRPV1-expressing sensory neurons process particular thermal and mechanical somatosensations, and that the sensory channels activated by mechanical and cold stimuli to produce pain in naive/inflamed rats differ from those in animals after peripheral nerve injury. PMID:23283344

  10. Phenotyping the function of TRPV1-expressing sensory neurons by targeted axonal silencing.

    PubMed

    Brenneis, Christian; Kistner, Katrin; Puopolo, Michelino; Segal, David; Roberson, David; Sisignano, Marco; Labocha, Sandra; Ferreirs, Nerea; Strominger, Amanda; Cobos, Enrique J; Ghasemlou, Nader; Geisslinger, Gerd; Reeh, Peter W; Bean, Bruce P; Woolf, Clifford J

    2013-01-01

    Specific somatosensations may be processed by different subsets of primary afferents. C-fibers expressing heat-sensitive TRPV1 channels are proposed, for example, to be heat but not mechanical pain detectors. To phenotype in rats the sensory function of TRPV1(+) afferents, we rapidly and selectively silenced only their activity, by introducing the membrane-impermeant sodium channel blocker QX-314 into these axons via the TRPV1 channel pore. Using tandem mass spectrometry we show that upon activation with capsaicin, QX-314 selectively accumulates in the cytosol only of TRPV1-expressing cells, and not in control cells. Exposure to QX-314 and capsaicin induces in small DRG neurons a robust sodium current block within 30 s. In sciatic nerves, application of extracellular QX-314 with capsaicin persistently reduces C-fiber but not A-fiber compound action potentials and this effect does not occur in TRPV1(-/-) mice. Behavioral phenotyping after selectively silencing TRPV1(+) sciatic nerve axons by perineural injections of QX-314 and capsaicin reveals deficits in heat and mechanical pressure but not pinprick or light touch perception. The response to intraplantar capsaicin is substantially reduced, as expected. During inflammation, silencing TRPV1(+) axons abolishes heat, mechanical, and cold hyperalgesia but tactile and cold allodynia remain following peripheral nerve injury. These results indicate that TRPV1-expressing sensory neurons process particular thermal and mechanical somatosensations, and that the sensory channels activated by mechanical and cold stimuli to produce pain in naive/inflamed rats differ from those in animals after peripheral nerve injury. PMID:23283344

  11. Surgical and conservative methods for restoring impaired motor function - facial nerve, spinal accessory nerve, hypoglossal nerve (not including vagal nerve or swallowing)

    PubMed Central

    Laskawi, R.; Rohrbach, S.

    2005-01-01

    The present review gives a survey of rehabilitative measures for disorders of the motor function of the mimetic muscles (facial nerve), and muscles innervated by the spinal accessory and hypoglossal nerves. The dysfunction can present either as paralysis or hyperkinesis (hyperkinesia). Conservative and surgical treatment options aimed at restoring normal motor function and correcting the movement disorders are described. Static reanimation techniques are not dealt with. The final section describes the use of botulinum toxin in the therapy of dysphagia. PMID:22073058

  12. Glycomimetic functionalized collagen hydrogels for peripheral nerve repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masand, Shirley Narain

    Despite the innate regenerative potential of the peripheral nervous system, functional recovery is often limited. The goal of this dissertation was to develop a clinically relevant biomaterial strategy to (1) encourage the regrowth of axons and (2) direct them down their appropriate motor tracts. To this end, we use peptide mimics of two glycans, polysialic acid (PSA) and an epitope first discovered on human natural killer cells (HNK-1), to functionalize type I collagen hydrogels. Previous studies have shown that these molecules, in their glycan and glycomimetic form, are associated with acceleration of neurite outgrowth, glial cell proliferation, and motoneuron targeting. In vitro, we demonstrated the retained functionality of the peptide glycomimetics after conjugation to a type I collagen backbone. While HNK-functionalized collagen increased motor neurite outgrowth, PSA-functionalized collagen encouraged motor and sensory neurite outgrowth and Schwann cell extension and proliferation. When we introduce these glycomimetic-functionalized collagen hydrogels into a critical gap femoral nerve model, we show that both PSA and HNK-functionalized hydrogels yielded a significant increase in functional recovery when compared to saline, native and scramble-coupled hydrogels. However, there was an interesting divergence in the morphological results: PSA-functionalized hydrogels increased axon count and HNK-functionalized hydrogels increased motoneuron targeting and myelination. We believed that these differences may be attributed to distinct mechanisms by which the glycomimetics impart their benefit. Interestingly, however, we found no synergistic gain in recovery with the use of our composite hydrogels which we speculated may be due to an inadequate dose of the individual glycomimetic. To address this possibility, we show that increasing the amount of functionalized peptide functionalized in our composite hydrogels led to increases in axon count and area of regeneration, but does not affect the degree of functional recovery. Finally, in order to assess potential mechanisms by which our glycomimetics impart benefit, we describe a novel platform for studying neural cell/biomaterial interaction through the use of two types of motoneuron cultures, dissociated spinal cord neurons and organotypic spinal cord slices. We show promising evidence that this strategy can be used to probe signaling pathways potentially involved in the action of these bioactives.

  13. The structure and function of cutaneous sensory receptors.

    PubMed

    Munger, B L; Ide, C

    1988-03-01

    The present review of cutaneous sensory receptors begins with a consideration of free nerve endings (FNEs) that can be considered as sensory terminals evidencing the least structural specialization of the axon and associated cells. Using the criteria established by Kruger et al (1981), FNEs of both A delta and C fibers can be identified on the basis of ultrastructural characteristics that include an intimate relationship between axons and the associated epithelium, the lack of a complete Schwann cell investment, the accumulation of numerous vesicles and other cytoplasmic organelles, and for A delta terminals a 1:1 relationship between axon and investing Schwann cell. Using these criteria, the so-called genital end bulbs of the human glans penis are merely a skein of FNEs based on the ultrastructural study of Halata and Munger (1986). Hair follicles of most species studied to date (the exception being the rabbit and to some extent the guinea pig) are multiply innervated with lanceolate, Ruffini and FNEs. The lanceolate terminals are the rapidly adapting terminals that are numerous in guard hairs. Ruffini terminals of hairs resemble those of the periodontal ligament or joint capsules and both are remarkably similar to Golgi tendon organs in terms of ultrastructural characteristics. The key ultrastructural characteristic is the encircling of collagen bundles by axons and associated Schwann and connective tissue cells. Axons frequently enter the epidermis either to terminate as FNEs or become associated with Merkel cells in glabrous skin at the base of the papillary ridges or in clusters of Merkel cells in hairy skin in touch domes or Haarscheiben. Merkel cells have clusters of apparent secretory granules polarized toward the axon and the axon is typically a slowly adapting mechanoreceptor. The function of the granules is not known. Pacinian corpuscles are the largest of the corpuscular receptors of the dermis and are characterized by an elaborate inner core of stacks of numerous thin lamellae arranged in a bilaterally symmetrical manner. Based on the fact that the lamellae are coupled with gap junctions and the outer core lamellae isolated by numerous tight junctions, the authors have proposed that the unique ionic environment may be in part responsible for the remarkable sensitivity of Pacinian corpuscles (Munger and Ide, 1987). Meissner corpuscles are a typical corpuscular receptor of murine (Ide, 1976, 1977), marsupial and primate glabrous skin (Munger, 1971). The axons typically weave back and forth between stacks of lamellae.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:3137944

  14. Curcumin promotes nerve regeneration and functional recovery after sciatic nerve crush injury in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Ma, Junxiong; Yu, Hailong; Liu, Jun; Chen, Yu; Wang, Qi; Xiang, Liangbi

    2016-01-01

    Curcumin is capable of promoting peripheral nerve regeneration in normal condition. However, it is unclear whether its beneficial effect on nerve regeneration still exists under diabetic mellitus. The present study was designed to investigate such a possibility. Diabetes in rats was developed by a single dose of streptozotocin at 50mg/kg. Immediately after nerve crush injury, the diabetic rats were intraperitoneally administrated daily for 4 weeks with curcumin (50mg/kg, 100mg/kg and 300mg/kg), or normal saline, respectively. The axonal regeneration was investigated by morphometric analysis and retrograde labeling. The functional recovery was evaluated by electrophysiological studies and behavioral analysis. Axonal regeneration and functional recovery was significantly enhanced by curcumin, which were significantly better than those in vehicle saline group. In addition, high doses of curcumin (100mg/kg and 300mg/kg) achieved better axonal regeneration and functional recovery than low dose (50mg/kg). In conclusion, curcumin is capable of promoting nerve regeneration after sciatic nerve crush injury in diabetes mellitus, highlighting its therapeutic values as a neuroprotective agent for peripheral nerve injury repair in diabetes mellitus. PMID:26552010

  15. The contribution of sensory nerves to the onset threshold for cutaneous vasodilatation during gradual local skin heating of the forearm and leg.

    PubMed

    Hodges, Gary J; McGarr, Gregory W; Mallette, Matthew M; Del Pozzi, Andrew T; Cheung, Stephen S

    2016-05-01

    During local skin heating, the temporal onset of vasodilatation is delayed in the leg compared to the forearm, and sensory nerve blockade abolishes these differences. However, previous work using rapid skin heating did not allow for determination of sensory nerve influences on temperature thresholds for vasodilatation. Two sites were examined on both the forearm and leg, one control (CTRL), and one treated for sensory nerve blockade (EMLA). Skin blood flux was monitored using laser-Doppler probes, with heaters controlling local skin temperature (Tloc). Tloc was increased from 32-44°C (+1°C·10min(-1)). Stimulus-response curves were constructed by fitting a four-parameter logistic function. EMLA significantly increased Tloc onset in the forearm (CTRL=35.3±0.4°C; EMLA=36.8±0.7°C) and leg (CTRL=36.5±0.4°C; EMLA=38.4±0.5°C; both P<0.05). At both CTRL and EMLA, Tloc onset was higher in the leg compared to the forearm (both P<0.05). In the forearm, median effective temperature to elicit 50% vasodilatation (ET50) was similar between sites (CTRL=39.7±0.3°C; EMLA=40.2±0.4°C; P=0.09); however, in the leg, EMLA significantly increased ET50 (CTRL=40.2±0.3°C; EMLA=41.0±0.3°C)(P<0.05). At CTRL sites, no limb difference was observed for ET50 (P=0.06); however, with EMLA, ET50 was significantly higher in the leg (P<0.05). EMLA significantly increased the gain of the slope at the forearm, (CTRL=0.31±0.01%CVCmax·°C(-1); EMLA=0.45±0.07%CVCmax·°C(-1)), and leg (CTRL=0.37±0.05%CVCmax·°C(-1); EMLA=0.54±0.04%CVCmax·°C(-1))(both P<0.05). At CTRL sites, the gain was significantly higher in the leg (P<0.05); however, for EMLA, no significant limb difference existed (P=0.10). These data indicate that the onset of vasodilatation occurs at a lower temperature in the forearm than the legs, and sensory nerves play an important role in both limbs. PMID:26679388

  16. Differential myelinated and unmyelinated sensory and autonomic skin nerve fiber involvement in patients with ophthalmic postherpetic neuralgia

    PubMed Central

    Truini, Andrea; Haanpaa, Maija; Provitera, Vincenzo; Biasiotta, Antonella; Stancanelli, Annamaria; Caporaso, Giuseppe; Santoro, Lucio; Cruccu, Giorgio; Nolano, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Postherpetic neuralgia (PHN) is a common and exceptionally drug-resistant neuropathic pain condition. In this cross-sectional skin biopsy study, seeking information on the responsible pathophysiological mechanisms we assessed how ophthalmic PHN affects sensory and autonomic skin innervation. We took 2-mm supraorbital punch skin biopsies from the affected and unaffected sides in 10 patients with ophthalmic PHN. Using indirect immunofluorescence and a large panel of antibodies including protein gene product (PGP) 9.5 we quantified epidermal unmyelinated, dermal myelinated and autonomic nerve fibers. Although skin biopsy showed reduced epidermal and dermal myelinated fiber density in specimens from the affected side, the epidermal/dermal myelinated nerve fiber ratio was lower in the affected than in the unaffected side (p < 0.001), thus suggesting a predominant epidermal unmyelinated nerve fiber loss. Conversely, autonomic skin innervation was spared. Our study showing that ophthalmic PHN predominantly affects unmyelinated nerve fiber and spares autonomic nerve fiber might help to understand the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying this difficult-to-treat condition. PMID:26300742

  17. Motor and sensory conduction velocities and amplitude of nerve or muscle potentials in the normal rat according to age.

    PubMed

    Hort-Legrand, C; Lestrade, R; Behar, A

    2001-01-01

    The relative changes in sensory and motor nerve conductions and SNAP and CMAP amplitudes were studied on the sural and tibial posterior nerves in anesthetized male rats, between the 1st and the 23rd month. Neural growth was controlled with the measure of the nerve path length on the skin, between stimulating and recording cathodes for the sural nerve and proximal and distal stimulating cathodes for the tibial posterior nerve. The sural SCV and SNAP amplitude are consistent with a more accurate method than the H-reflex one. Similar changes were observed in both parameters. During the maturation of the peripheral nervous system, between the 1st and the 5th month, parameters rapidly increased. Over 14 months old, parameters decrease: the diminution of SNAP and CMAP amplitudes is characteristic of aging. The results were analyzed through quadratic and linear regression and were similar to those in young and elderly human patients. Parabola curves fitted the best way to represent the evolution of parameters. Moreover, the linear regression permitted to divide the rat life in 3 parts and to distinguish a period between the 6th and 13th months during which studied parameters are considered as constant. SCV, MCV, SNAP and CMAP amplitudes from the 1st to the 5th, from 6th to 13th and over the 14th month, could be used as reference. PMID:12162582

  18. Effect of Remote Sensory Noise on Hand Function Post Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Na Jin; Kosmopoulos, Marcella Lyn; Enders, Leah R.; Hur, Pilwon

    2014-01-01

    Hand motor impairment persists after stroke. Sensory inputs may facilitate recovery of motor function. This pilot study tested the effectiveness of tactile sensory noise in improving hand motor function in chronic stroke survivors with tactile sensory deficits, using a repeated measures design. Sensory noise in the form of subthreshold, white noise, mechanical vibration was applied to the wrist skin during motor tasks. Hand dexterity assessed by the Nine Hole Peg Test and the Box and Block Test and pinch strength significantly improved when the sensory noise was turned on compared with when it was turned off in chronic stroke survivors. The subthreshold sensory noise to the wrist appears to induce improvements in hand motor function possibly via neuronal connections in the sensoriomotor cortex. The approach of applying concomitant, unperceivable mechanical vibration to the wrist during hand motor tasks is easily adoptable for clinic use as well as unsupervised home use. This pilot study suggests a potential for a wristband-type assistive device to complement hand rehabilitation for stroke survivors with sensorimotor deficit. PMID:25477806

  19. Continuous Femoral Nerve Blocks: The Impact of Catheter Tip Location Relative to the Femoral Nerve (Anterior Versus Posterior) on Quadriceps Weakness and Cutaneous Sensory Block

    PubMed Central

    Ilfeld, Brian M.; Loland, Vanessa J.; Sandhu, NavParkash S.; Suresh, Preetham J.; Bishop, Michael J.; Donohue, Michael C.; Ferguson, Eliza J.; Madison, Sarah J.

    2012-01-01

    Background During a continuous femoral nerve block, the influence of catheter tip position relative to the femoral nerve on infusion characteristics remains unknown. Methods We inserted bilateral femoral perineural catheters in volunteers (ultrasound-guided, needle in-plane). Subjects dominant side was randomized to have the catheter tip placed either anterior or posterior to the femoral nerve. The contralateral limb received the alternative position. Ropivacaine 0.1% was administered through both catheters concurrently for 6 hours (4 mL/h). Outcome measures included the maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) of the quadriceps femoris muscle and tolerance to cutaneous electrical current over to the distal quadriceps tendon. Measurements were performed at Hour 0 (baseline), and on the hour until Hour 9, as well as Hour 22. The primary endpoint was the MVIC of the quadriceps at Hour 6. Results As a percentage of the baseline measurement, quadriceps MVIC for limbs with anterior (n=16) and posterior (n=16) catheter tip placement did not differ to a statistically significant degree at Hour 6 (mean [SD] 29% [26] vs. 30% [28], respectively; 95% CI: ?22% to 20%; p=0.931), or at any other time point. However, the maximum tolerance to cutaneous electrical current was higher in limbs with anterior compared to posterior catheter tip placement at Hour 6 (20 [23] vs. 6 [4] mA, respectively; 95% CI: 1 mA to 27 mA; p=0.035), as well as at Hours 1, 7, 8, and 9 (p<0.04). Conclusions This study documents the significant (7080%) quadriceps femoris weakness induced by a continuous femoral nerve block infusion at a relatively low dose of ropivacaine (4 mg/h) delivered through a perineural catheter located both anterior and posterior to the femoral nerve. In contrast, an anterior placement increases cutaneous sensory block compared with a posterior insertion, without a concurrent relative increase in motor block. PMID:22745116

  20. Peripheral nerve lengthening as a regenerative strategy

    PubMed Central

    Vaz, Kenneth M.; Brown, Justin M.; Shah, Sameer B.

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury impairs motor, sensory, and autonomic function, incurring substantial financial costs and diminished quality of life. For large nerve gaps, proximal lesions, or chronic nerve injury, the prognosis for recovery is particularly poor, even with autografts, the current gold standard for treating small to moderate nerve gaps. In vivo elongation of intact proximal stumps towards the injured distal stumps of severed peripheral nerves may offer a promising new strategy to treat nerve injury. This review describes several nerve lengthening strategies, including a novel internal fixator device that enables rapid and distal reconnection of proximal and distal nerve stumps. PMID:25317163

  1. Degeneration of the primary snout sensory afferents in the cervical spinal cords following the infraorbital nerve transection in some mammals.

    PubMed

    Chang, C M; Kubota, K; Lee, M S; Iseki, H; Sonoda, Y; Narita, N; Shibanai, S; Nagae, K; Ohkubo, K

    1988-01-01

    To obtain the neuroanatomical information on the role of the snout sensory input in mastication, the present study was conducted on young and adult mice, young Wistar rats and adult Japanese shrew-moles. The animals were subjected to unilateral and bilateral infraorbital nerve transection. Transganglionic degeneration was studied by the Nauta method and electron microscopy including HRP application to the neck muscles. Transganglionic degeneration was found in every experimental case. 1. Transganglionic degeneration of the fibers was found not only in the main sensory nucleus and spinal tract nucleus of the trigeminal nerve but throughout the cervical and the upper part of the thoracic spinal cord. 2. These transganglionically degenerated fibers descended bilaterally through the cuneate nucleus and then caudally through the posterior funiculus at the obex level. They then entered the dorsal and ventral horns to make a synaptic contact with the degenerated synapses on the dorsal horn cells and with the multipolar cells in the ventral horns. This neuroanatomical information suggests: 1) that the trigemino-neck muscle reflex will be generated monosynaptically by the primary neurons arising from the snout sensory organs and 2) that these primary neurons may play a large role as a neuronal bridge in connecting the masticatory reflex system and the cranio-neck reflex system. PMID:3189847

  2. [Sensory functions and Alzheimer's disease: a multi-disciplinary approach].

    PubMed

    Kenigsberg, Paul-Ariel; Aquino, Jean-Pierre; Berard, Alain; Boucart, Muriel; Bouccara, Didier; Brand, Gérard; Charras, Kevin; Garcia-Larrea, Luis; Gzil, Fabrice; Krolak-Salmon, Pierre; Madjlessi, Arach; Malaquin-Pavan, Évelyne; Penicaud, Luc; Platel, Hervé; Pozzo, Thierry; Reintjens, Christophe; Salmon, Éric; Vergnon, Laurent; Robert, Philippe

    2015-09-01

    Relations between sensory functions and Alzheimer's disease are still under-explored. To understand them better, the Fondation Médéric Alzheimer has brought together a multi-disciplinary expert group. Aristote's five senses must be enhanced by today's knowledge of proprioception, motor cognition and pain perception. When cognition breaks down, the person with dementia perceives the world around her with her sensory experience, yet is unable to integrate all this information to understand the context. The treatment of multiple sensory inputs by the brain is closely linked to cognitive processes. Sensory deficits reduce considerably the autonomy of people with dementia in their daily life and their relations with others, increase their social isolation and the risk of accidents. Professionals involved with neurodegenerative diseases remain poorly aware of sensory deficits, which can bias the results of cognitive tests. However, there are simple tools to detect these deficits, notably for vision, hearing and balance disorders, which can be corrected. Many interventions for cognitive rehabilitation or quality of life improvement are based on sensory functions. The environment of people with dementia must be adapted to become understandable, comfortable, safe and eventually therapeutic. PMID:26395297

  3. Assessing nerves in leprosy.

    PubMed

    Garbino, José Antonio; Heise, Carlos Otto; Marques, Wilson

    2016-01-01

    Leprosy neuropathy is dependent on the patient's immune response and expresses itself as a focal or multifocal neuropathy with asymmetric involvement. Leprosy neuropathy evolves chronically but recurrently develops periods of exacerbation during type 1 or type 2 reactions, leading to acute neuropathy. Nerve enlargement leading to entrapment syndromes is also a common manifestation. Pain may be either of inflammatory or neuropathic origin. A thorough and detailed evaluation is mandatory for adequate patient follow-up, including nerve palpation, pain assessment, graded sensory mapping, muscle power testing, and autonomic evaluation. Nerve conduction studies are a sensitive tool for nerve dysfunction, including new lesions during reaction periods or development of entrapment syndromes. Nerve ultrasonography is also a very promising method for nerve evaluation in leprosy. The authors propose a composite nerve clinical score for nerve function assessment that can be useful for longitudinal evaluation. PMID:26773623

  4. Microelectronic neural bridging of toad nerves to restore leg function.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiaoyan; Wang, Zhigong; Lv, Xiaoying; Huang, Zonghao

    2013-02-25

    The present study used a microelectronic neural bridge comprised of electrode arrays for neural signal detection, functional electrical stimulation, and a microelectronic circuit including signal amplifying, processing, and functional electrical stimulation to bridge two separate nerves, and to restore the lost function of one nerve. The left leg of one spinal toad was subjected to external mechanical stimulation and functional electrical stimulation driving. The function of the left leg of one spinal toad was regenerated to the corresponding leg of another spinal toad using a microelectronic neural bridge. Oscilloscope tracings showed that the electromyographic signals from controlled spinal toads were generated by neural signals that controlled the spinal toad, and there was a delay between signals. This study demonstrates that microelectronic neural bridging can be used to restore neural function between different injured nerves. PMID:25206698

  5. Steady State Responses: Electrophysiological Assessment of Sensory Function in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, Colleen A.; Krishnan, Giri P.; Vohs, Jenifer L.; Ahn, Woo-Young; Hetrick, William P.; Morzorati, Sandra L.; O'Donnell, Brian F.

    2009-01-01

    Persons with schizophrenia experience subjective sensory anomalies and objective deficits on assessment of sensory function. Such deficits could be produced by abnormal signaling in the sensory pathways and sensory cortex or later stage disturbances in cognitive processing of such inputs. Steady state responses (SSRs) provide a noninvasive method to test the integrity of sensory pathways and oscillatory responses in schizophrenia with minimal task demands. SSRs are electrophysiological responses entrained to the frequency and phase of a periodic stimulus. Patients with schizophrenia exhibit pronounced auditory SSR deficits within the gamma frequency range (35–50 Hz) in response to click trains and amplitude-modulated tones. Visual SSR deficits are also observed, most prominently in the alpha and beta frequency ranges (7–30 Hz) in response to high-contrast, high-luminance stimuli. Visual SSR studies that have used the psychophysical properties of a stimulus to target specific visual pathways predominantly report magnocellular-based deficits in those with schizophrenia. Disruption of both auditory and visual SSRs in schizophrenia are consistent with neuropathological and magnetic resonance imaging evidence of anatomic abnormalities affecting the auditory and visual cortices. Computational models suggest that auditory SSR abnormalities at gamma frequencies could be secondary to γ-aminobutyric acid–mediated or N-methyl-D-aspartic acid dysregulation. The pathophysiological process in schizophrenia encompasses sensory processing that probably contributes to alterations in subsequent encoding and cognitive processing. The developmental evolution of these abnormalities remains to be characterized. PMID:19726534

  6. Steady state responses: electrophysiological assessment of sensory function in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Colleen A; Krishnan, Giri P; Vohs, Jenifer L; Ahn, Woo-Young; Hetrick, William P; Morzorati, Sandra L; O'Donnell, Brian F

    2009-11-01

    Persons with schizophrenia experience subjective sensory anomalies and objective deficits on assessment of sensory function. Such deficits could be produced by abnormal signaling in the sensory pathways and sensory cortex or later stage disturbances in cognitive processing of such inputs. Steady state responses (SSRs) provide a noninvasive method to test the integrity of sensory pathways and oscillatory responses in schizophrenia with minimal task demands. SSRs are electrophysiological responses entrained to the frequency and phase of a periodic stimulus. Patients with schizophrenia exhibit pronounced auditory SSR deficits within the gamma frequency range (35-50 Hz) in response to click trains and amplitude-modulated tones. Visual SSR deficits are also observed, most prominently in the alpha and beta frequency ranges (7-30 Hz) in response to high-contrast, high-luminance stimuli. Visual SSR studies that have used the psychophysical properties of a stimulus to target specific visual pathways predominantly report magnocellular-based deficits in those with schizophrenia. Disruption of both auditory and visual SSRs in schizophrenia are consistent with neuropathological and magnetic resonance imaging evidence of anatomic abnormalities affecting the auditory and visual cortices. Computational models suggest that auditory SSR abnormalities at gamma frequencies could be secondary to gamma-aminobutyric acid-mediated or N-methyl-D-aspartic acid dysregulation. The pathophysiological process in schizophrenia encompasses sensory processing that probably contributes to alterations in subsequent encoding and cognitive processing. The developmental evolution of these abnormalities remains to be characterized. PMID:19726534

  7. A comparison between complete immobilisation and protected active mobilisation in sensory nerve recovery following isolated digital nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Henry, F P; Farkhad, R I; Butt, F S; O'Shaughnessy, M; O'Sullivan, S T

    2012-06-01

    Post-operative immobilisation following isolated digital nerve repair remains a controversial issue amongst the microsurgical community. Protocols differ from unit to unit and even, as evidenced in our unit, may differ from consultant to consultant. We undertook a retrospective review of 46 patients who underwent isolated digital nerve repair over a 6-month period. Follow-up ranged from 6 to 18 months. Twenty-four were managed with protected active mobilisation over a 4-week period while 22 were immobilised over the same period. Outcomes such as return to work, cold intolerance, two-point discrimination and temperature differentiation were used as indicators of clinical recovery. Our results showed that there was no significant difference noted in either clinical assessment of recovery or return to work following either post-operative protocol, suggesting that either regime may be adopted, tailored to the patient's needs and resources of the unit. PMID:22147643

  8. Differences between nerve terminal impulses of polymodal nociceptors and cold sensory receptors of the guinea-pig cornea.

    PubMed

    Brock, J A; Pianova, S; Belmonte, C

    2001-06-01

    1. Extracellular recording techniques were used to study nerve terminal impulses (NTIs) recorded from single polymodal nociceptors and cold-sensitive receptors in guinea-pig cornea isolated in vitro. 2. The amplitude and time course of NTIs recorded from polymodal nociceptors was different from those of cold-sensitive receptors. 3. Bath application of tetrodotoxin (1 microM) changed the time course of spontaneous NTIs recorded from both polymodal and cold-sensitive receptors. 4. Bath application of lignocaine (lidocaine; 1-5 mM) abolished all electrical activity. 5. Local application of lignocaine (2.5 and 20 mM) through the recording electrode changed the time course of the NTIs recorded from polymodal nociceptors but not that of NTIs recorded from cold-sensitive nerve endings. 6. It is concluded that action potentials propagate actively in the sensory nerve endings of polymodal nociceptors. In contrast, cold-sensitive receptor nerve endings appear to be passively invaded from a point more proximal in the axon where the action potential can fail or be initiated. PMID:11389207

  9. Loss of corneal sensory nerve fibers in SIV-infected macaques: an alternate approach to investigate HIV-induced PNS damage.

    PubMed

    Dorsey, Jamie L; Mangus, Lisa M; Oakley, Jonathan D; Beck, Sarah E; Kelly, Kathleen M; Queen, Suzanne E; Metcalf Pate, Kelly A; Adams, Robert J; Marfurt, Carl F; Mankowski, Joseph L

    2014-06-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is the most frequent neurological complication of HIV infection, affecting more than one-third of infected patients, including patients treated with antiretroviral therapy. Although emerging noninvasive techniques for corneal nerve assessments are increasingly being used to diagnose and monitor peripheral neuropathies, corneal nerve alterations have not been characterized in HIV. Here, to determine whether SIV infection leads to corneal nerve fiber loss, we immunostained corneas for the nerve fiber marker ?III tubulin. We developed and applied both manual and automated methods to measure nerves in the corneal subbasal plexus. These counting methods independently indicated significantly lower subbasal corneal nerve fiber density among SIV-infected animals that rapidly progressed to AIDS compared with slow progressors. Concomitant with decreased corneal nerve fiber density, rapid progressors had increased levels of SIV RNA and CD68-positive macrophages and expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein by glial satellite cells in the trigeminal ganglia, the location of the neuronal cell bodies of corneal sensory nerve fibers. In addition, corneal nerve fiber density was directly correlated with epidermal nerve fiber length. These findings indicate that corneal nerve assessment has great potential to diagnose and monitor HIV-induced peripheral neuropathy and to set the stage for introducing noninvasive techniques to measure corneal nerve fiber density in HIV clinical settings. PMID:24828391

  10. Selective decrease of small sensory neurons in lumbar dorsal root ganglia labeled with horseradish peroxidase after ND:YAG laser irradiation of the tibial nerve in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Wesselmann, U.; Lin, S.F.; Rymer, W.Z. )

    1991-02-01

    Recent electrophysiological evidence indicates that Q-switched Nd:YAG laser irradiation might have selective effects on neural impulse transmission in small slow conducting sensory nerve fibers as compared to large diameter afferents. In an attempt to clarify the ultimate fate of sensory neurons after laser application to their peripheral axons, we have used horseradish peroxidase (HRP) as a cell marker to retrogradely label sensory neurons innervating the distal hindlimb in the rat. Pulsed Nd:YAG laser light was applied to the tibial nerve at pulse energies of 70 or 80 mJ/pulse for 5 min in experimental rats. Seven days later HRP was applied to the left (laser-treated) and to the contralateral (untreated) tibial nerve proximal to the site of laser irradiation. In control animals the numbers of HRP-labeled dorsal root ganglion cells were not significantly different between the right and the left side. In contrast, after previous laser irradiation labeling was always less on the laser-treated side (2183 +/- 513 cells, mean +/- SEM) as compared to the untreated side (3937 +/- 225). Analysis of the dimensions of labeled cells suggested that the reduction of labeled cells on the laser-treated side was mainly due to a deficit in small sensory neurons. Since the conduction velocity of nerve fibers is related to the size of their somata, our histological data imply that laser light selectively affects retrograde transport mechanisms for HRP in slow conducting sensory nerve fibers.

  11. Gallic acid and exercise training improve motor function, nerve conduction velocity but not pain sense reflex after experimental sciatic nerve crush in male rats

    PubMed Central

    Hajimoradi, Maryam; Fazilati, Mohammad; Gharib-Naseri, Mohammad Kazem; Sarkaki, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of present study was to evaluate the effects of oral administration of gallic acid (GA) for 21 days alone and in combination with exercise on nerve conduction velocity and sensory and motor functions in rats with sciatic nerve crush. Materials and Methods: Seventy adult male Wistar rats (250-300 g) were divided randomly into 7 groups with 10 in each: 1) Control (Cont), 2) Crushed + Vehicle (Cr +Veh), 3-5) Crushed + gallic acid (Cr+GA) (50, 100, and 200 mg/kg/2 mL, orally), 6) Crushed + exercise (Cr+Exe), and 7) Crushed + exercise + effective dose of gallic acid (Cr+Exe +GA200) for 21 days. In order to establish an animal model of sciatic nerve crush, equivalent to 7 kg of force pressed on 2-3 mm of sciatic nerve for 30 s, three times with 30 s intervals. Pain sense reflex in hot plate, motor coordination in rotarod, and sciatic nerve conduction velocity (SNCV) in all groups were tested. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA followed by Tukeys post hoc test and p<0.05 has assigned as the significant difference. Results: Pain threshold was increased significantly in untreated crushed rats while motor function and SNCV were decreased in all groups with nerve crush (p<0.05, p<0.01, p<0.001 vs. control). Pain reflex latency was not changed in treated groups. Motor coordination and SNCV were improved in groups Cr+GA200 and Cr+Exe + GA200 (p<0.05, p<0.01 vs. Cr+Veh). Conclusion: GA, dose-dependently, may have therapeutic potential to improve the peripheral nerve degeneration, which is most likely related, at least in part, to its antioxidant and therapeutic properties. PMID:26445710

  12. Putative neurotrophic factors and functional recovery from peripheral nerve damage in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Van der Zee, C. E.; Brakkee, J. H.; Gispen, W. H.

    1991-01-01

    1. In rats, recovery of sensory-motor function following a crush lesion of the sciatic or tibial nerve was monitored by measuring foot reflex withdrawal from a local noxious stimulation of the foot sole. 2. Putative neurotrophic compounds were tested on this functional recovery model: melanocortins (peptides derived from ACTH (corticotropin) and alpha-MSH (melanotropin], gangliosides and nimodipine were effective whereas isaxonine and TRH (thyrotropin releasing hormone) were not. 3. Structure-activity studies with melanocortins revealed a similar effectiveness of alpha-MSH, [N-Leu4, D-Phe7]-alpha-MSH, desacetyl-alpha-MSH and the ACTH analogue ORG 2766, questioning the validity of the previously suggested notion that the melanotrophic properties of these peptides are responsible for their neurotrophic effect. 4. As recovery of function after peripheral nerve damage follows a similar time course in hypophysectomized (five days post operation) and sham-operated rats, effective melanocortin therapy does not mimic an endogenous peptide signal in the repair process from pituitary origin. 5. Subcutaneous treatment with ORG 2766 (7.5 micrograms kg-1 48 h-1) facilitates recovery of function following peripheral nerve damage in young (6-7 weeks old), mature (5 month old) and old (20 month old) rats. 6. In view of the diversity in structure of the effective neurotrophic factors and the complexity of nerve repair, the present data support the notion that peripheral nerve repair may be facilitated by different humoral factors likely to be active on different aspects of the recovery process. PMID:1678980

  13. Morphological and functional changes of the optic nerve following traumatic optic nerve injuries in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    XUE, FEI; WU, KUNMING; WANG, TIANYOU; CHENG, YOU; JIANG, MANJIE; JI, JUNFENG

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the morphological changes of the optic nerve following traumatic injuries and decompression at different times after injury, and to observe the changes of the visually evoked potentials, to identify the relevant associations between surgical opportunity and the clinical effect of traumatic optic nerve injuries. Rabbits were chosen as the animal model for the study. All the rabbits were randomly divided into five groups (A-E), representing the normal control, decompression in 48 h, in 1 week, in 2 weeks and non-decompression groups, respectively. The pattern reversal visual evoked potentials (P-VEP) and morphological changes of the optic nerve were observed. The P-VEP of each healthy rabbit revealed typical NPN contours, while NPN waves in the injured rabbits were low and flat. The latent period of the P-wave was lengthened and the amplitude was reduced. The differences of the latent period and amplitude pre- and post-trauma were statistically significant. The morphological changes were also assessed. In the normal control group, the astrocytes of the optic nerve exhibited a cylindrical form and were arranged evenly on the vertical section. The neural fibers were arranged neatly, were even following application of a dye, and the cross section exhibited a normal configuration of the blood vessel. For the 48-h decompression group, the arrangement of the astrocytes was even on the vertical section, and vacuoles, slight swelling of the nerve, exudation around the blood vessel and a small amount of astrocytic hyperplasia were observed in the damaged area. In the non-decompression group there were large areas of necrosis, clear nerve demyelination, serious exudation around the blood vessel and astrocytic hyperplasia were observed. In conclusion, the optic nerve decompression is beneficial to protect the visual function in indirect optic nerve injuries. Visual function may be improved by decompression in 48 h compared to 2 weeks. In order to prevent secondary axon injury and to protect visual functions, the decompression should be performed as soon as possible. PMID:26893836

  14. Neurophysiological assessment of auditory, peripheral nerve, somatosensory, and visual system functions after developmental exposure to ethanol vapors.

    PubMed

    Boyes, William K; Degn, Laura L; Martin, Sheppard A; Lyke, Danielle F; Hamm, Charles W; Herr, David W

    2014-01-01

    Ethanol-blended gasoline entered the market in response to demand for domestic renewable energy sources, and may result in increased inhalation of ethanol vapors in combination with other volatile gasoline constituents. It is important to understand potential risks of inhalation of ethanol vapors by themselves, and also as a baseline for evaluating the risks of ethanol combined with a complex mixture of hydrocarbon vapors. Because sensory dysfunction has been reported after developmental exposure to ethanol, we evaluated the effects of developmental exposure to ethanol vapors on neurophysiological measures of sensory function as a component of a larger project evaluating developmental ethanol toxicity. Pregnant Long-Evans rats were exposed to target concentrations 0, 5000, 10,000, or 21,000 ppm ethanol vapors for 6.5h/day over GD9-GD20. Sensory evaluations of male offspring began between PND106 and PND128. Peripheral nerve function (compound action potentials, nerve conduction velocity (NCV)), somatosensory (cortical and cerebellar evoked potentials), auditory (brainstem auditory evoked responses), and visual evoked responses were assessed. Visual function assessment included pattern elicited visual evoked potentials (VEPs), VEP contrast sensitivity, and electroretinograms recorded from dark-adapted (scotopic), light-adapted (photopic) flashes, and UV flicker and green flicker. No consistent concentration-related changes were observed for any of the physiological measures. The results show that gestational exposure to ethanol vapor did not result in detectable changes in peripheral nerve, somatosensory, auditory, or visual function when the offspring were assessed as adults. PMID:24607749

  15. Sensory functions of motile cilia and implication for bronchiectasis

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Raksha; Javidan-Nejad, Cylen; Alexander-Brett, Jennifer; Horani, Amjad; Cabellon, Michelle C.; Walter, Michael J.; Brody, Steven L.

    2013-01-01

    Cilia are specialized organelles that extend from the surface of cells into the local environment. Airway epithelial cell cilia are motile to provide mucociliary clearance for host defense. On other cells, solitary cilia are specialized to detect chemical or mechanosensory signals. Sensory proteins in motile cilia have recently been identified that detect shear stress, osmotic force, fluid flow, bitter taste and sex hormones. The relationship of sensory function in human motile cilia to disease is now being revealed. One example is polycystin-1 and polycystin-2. As a complex, these proteins function as a flow sensor in cilia and are mutated in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). The polycystins are also expressed in motile cilia of the airways, potentially operating as sensors in the lung. Computed tomography studies from patients with ADPKD revealed radiographic evidence for bronchiectasis, suggesting that polycystin-1 and -2 are important in lung function. The expression of this complex and sensory channel TRPV4, and bitter taste and sex hormones receptors in motile cilia indicate that the cell is wired to interpret environmental cues to regulate cilia beat frequency and other functions. Defective signaling of sensory proteins may result in a ciliopathy that includes lung disease. PMID:22202111

  16. Mesenchymal stem cells and their secretome partially restore nerve and urethral function in a dual muscle and nerve injury stress urinary incontinence model.

    PubMed

    Deng, Kangli; Lin, Dan Li; Hanzlicek, Brett; Balog, Brian; Penn, Marc S; Kiedrowski, Matthew J; Hu, Zhiquan; Ye, Zhangqun; Zhu, Hui; Damaser, Margot S

    2015-01-15

    Childbirth injures muscles and nerves responsible for urinary continence. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) or their secretome given systemically could provide therapeutic benefit for this complex multisite injury. We investigated whether MSCs or their secretome, as collected from cell culture, facilitate recovery from simulated childbirth injury. Age-matched female Sprague-Dawley rats received pudendal nerve crush and vaginal distension (PNC+VD) and a single intravenous (iv) injection of 2 million MSCs or saline. Controls received sham injury and iv saline. Additional rats received PNC+VD and a single intraperitoneal (ip) injection of concentrated media conditioned by MSCs (CCM) or concentrated control media (CM). Controls received a sham injury and ip CM. Urethral and nerve function were assessed with leak point pressure (LPP) and pudendal nerve sensory branch potential (PNSBP) recordings 3 wk after injury. Urethral and pudendal nerve anatomy were assessed qualitatively by blinded investigators. Quantitative data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Holm-Sidak post hoc tests with P < 0.05 indicating significant differences. Both LPP and PNSBP were significantly decreased 3 wk after PNC+VD with saline or CM compared with sham-injured rats, but not with MSC or CCM. Elastic fiber density in the urethra increased and changed in orientation after PNC+VD, with a greater increase in elastic fibers with MSC or CCM. Pudendal nerve fascicles were less dense and irregularly shaped after PNC+VD and had reduced pathology with MSC or CCM. MSC and CCM provide similar protective effects after PNC+VD, suggesting that MSCs act via their secretions in this dual muscle and nerve injury. PMID:25377914

  17. Influence of Breaching the Connective Sheaths of the Donor Nerve on Its Myelinated Sensory Axons and on Their Sprouting into the End-to-Side Coapted Nerve in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Žele, Tilen; Tomšič, Martin; Sketelj, Janez; Bajrović, Fajko F.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The influence of breaching the connective sheaths of the donor sural nerve on axonal sprouting into the end-to-side coapted peroneal nerve was examined in the rat. In parallel, the effect of these procedures on the donor nerve was assessed. The sheaths of the donor nerve at the coaptation site were either left completely intact (group A) or they were breached by epineurial sutures (group B), an epineurial window (group C), or a perineurial window (group D). In group A, the compound action potential (CAP) of sensory axons was detected in ∼10% and 40% of the recipient nerves at 4 and 8 weeks, respectively, which was significantly less frequently than in group D at both recovery periods. In addition, the number of myelinated axons in the recipient nerve was significantly larger in group D than in other groups at 4 weeks. At 8 weeks, the number of axons in group A was only ∼15% of the axon numbers in other groups (p<0.05). Focal subepineurial degenerative changes in the donor nerves were only seen after 4 weeks, but not later. The average CAP area and the total number of myelinated axons in the donor nerves were not different among the experimental groups. In conclusion, myelinated sensory axons are able to penetrate the epiperineurium of donor nerves after end-to-side nerve coaption; however, their ingrowth into recipient nerves is significantly enhanced by breaching the epiperineurial sheets at the coaptation site. Breaching does not cause permanent injury to the donor nerve. PMID:22873667

  18. Parasympathetic Functions in Children with Sensory Processing Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Schaaf, Roseann C.; Benevides, Teal; Blanche, Erna Imperatore; Brett-Green, Barbara A.; Burke, Janice P.; Cohn, Ellen S.; Koomar, Jane; Lane, Shelly J.; Miller, Lucy Jane; May-Benson, Teresa A.; Parham, Diane; Reynolds, Stacey; Schoen, Sarah A.

    2009-01-01

    The overall goal of this study was to determine if parasympathetic nervous system (PsNS) activity is a significant biomarker of sensory processing difficulties in children. Several studies have demonstrated that PsNS activity is an important regulator of reactivity in children, and thus, it is of interest to study whether PsNS activity is related to sensory reactivity in children who have a type of condition associated with sensory processing disorders termed sensory modulation dysfunction (SMD). If so, this will have important implications for understanding the mechanisms underlying sensory processing problems of children and for developing intervention strategies to address them. The primary aims of this project were: (1) to evaluate PsNS activity in children with SMD compared to typically developing (TYP) children, and (2) to determine if PsNS activity is a significant predictor of sensory behaviors and adaptive functions among children with SMD. We examine PsNS activity during the Sensory Challenge Protocol; which includes baseline, the administration of eight sequential stimuli in five sensory domains, recovery, and also evaluate response to a prolonged auditory stimulus. As a secondary aim we examined whether subgroups of children with specific physiological and behavioral sensory reactivity profiles can be identified. Results indicate that as a total group the children with severe SMD demonstrated a trend for low baseline PsNS activity, compared to TYP children, suggesting this may be a biomarker for SMD. In addition, children with SMD as a total group demonstrated significantly poorer adaptive behavior in the communication and daily living subdomains and in the overall Adaptive Behavior Composite of the Vineland than TYP children. Using latent class analysis, the subjects were grouped by severity and the severe SMD group had significantly lower PsNS activity at baseline, tones and prolonged auditory. These results provide preliminary evidence that children who demonstrate severe SMD may have physiological activity that is different from children without SMD, and that these physiological and behavioral manifestations of SMD may affect a child's ability to engage in everyday social, communication, and daily living skills. PMID:20300470

  19. Each sensory nerve arising from the geniculate ganglion expresses a unique fingerprint of neurotrophin and neurotrophin receptor genes.

    PubMed

    Farbman, Albert I; Guagliardo, Nick; Sollars, Suzanne I; Hill, David L

    2004-12-01

    Neurons in the geniculate ganglion, like those in other sensory ganglia, are dependent on neurotrophins for survival. Most geniculate ganglion neurons innervate taste buds in two regions of the tongue and two regions of the palate; the rest are cutaneous nerves to the skin of the ear. We investigated the expression of four neurotrophins, nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), neurotrophin 3 (NT-3), and NT-4, and five neurotrophin receptors, trkA, trkB, trkC, p75, and truncated trkB (Trn-B) in single sensory neurons of the adult rat geniculate ganglion associated with the five innervation fields. For fungiform papillae, a glass pipette containing biotinylated dextran was placed over the target papilla and the tracer was iontophoresed into the target papilla. For the other target fields, Fluoro-Gold was microinjected. After 3 days, geniculate ganglia were harvested, sectioned, and treated histochemically (for biotinylated dextran) or immunohistochemically (for Fluoro-Gold) to reveal the neurons containing the tracer. Single labeled neurons were harvested from the slides and subjected to RNA amplification and RT-PCR to reveal the neurotrophin or neurotrophin receptor genes that were expressed. Neurons projecting from the geniculate ganglion to each of the five target fields had a unique expression profile of neurotrophin and neurotrophic receptor genes. Several individual neurons expressed more than one neurotrophin receptor or more than one neurotrophin gene. Although BDNF is significantly expressed in taste buds, its primary high affinity receptor, trkB, was not prominently expressed in the neurons. The results are consistent with the interpretation that at least some, perhaps most, of the trophic influence on the sensory neurons is derived from the neuronal somata, and the trophic effect is paracrine or autocrine, rather than target derived. The BDNF in the taste bud may also act in a paracrine or autocrine manner on the trkB expressed in taste buds, as shown by others. PMID:15495212

  20. Intracerebroventricular administration of nerve growth factor induces gliogenesis in sensory ganglia, dorsal root, and within the dorsal root entry zone.

    PubMed

    Schlachetzki, Johannes C M; Pizzo, Donald P; Morrissette, Debbi A; Winkler, Jrgen

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies indicated that intracerebroventricular administration of nerve growth factor (NGF) leads to massive Schwann cell hyperplasia surrounding the medulla oblongata and spinal cord. This study was designed to characterize the proliferation of peripheral glial cells, that is, Schwann and satellite cells, in the trigeminal ganglia and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) of adult rats during two weeks of NGF infusion using bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) to label dividing cells. The trigeminal ganglia as well as the cervical and lumbar DRG were analyzed. Along the entire neuraxis a small number of dividing cells were observed within these regions under physiological condition. NGF infusion has dramatically increased the generation of new cells in the neuronal soma and axonal compartments of sensory ganglia and along the dorsal root and the dorsal root entry zone. Quantification of BrdU positive cells within sensory ganglia revealed a 2.3- to 3-fold increase in glial cells compared to controls with a similar response to NGF for the different peripheral ganglia examined. Immunofluorescent labeling with S100? revealed that Schwann and satellite cells underwent mitosis after NGF administration. These data indicate that intracerebroventricular NGF infusion significantly induces gliogenesis in trigeminal ganglia and the spinal sensory ganglia and along the dorsal root entry zone as well as the dorsal root. PMID:24738070

  1. Activin Acts with Nerve Growth Factor to Regulate Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide mRNA in Sensory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Pin; Hall, Alison K.

    2009-01-01

    Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide (CGRP) increases in sensory neurons after inflammation and plays an important role in abnormal pain responses, but how this neuropeptide is regulated is not well understood. Both activin A and Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) increase in skin after inflammation and induce CGRP in neurons in vivo and in vitro. This study was designed to understand how neurons integrate these two signals to regulate the neuropeptide important for inflammatory pain. In adult dorsal root ganglion neurons, NGF but not activin alone produced a dose-dependent increase in CGRP mRNA. When added together with NGF, activin synergistically increased CGRP mRNA, indicating that sensory neurons combine these signals. Studies were then designed to learn if that combination occurred at a common receptor or shared intracellular signals. Studies with Activin IB receptor or trkA inhibitors suggested that each ligand required its cognate receptor to stimulate the neuropeptide. Further, activin did not augment NGF-initiated intracellular MAPK signals but instead stimulated Smad phosphorylation, suggesting these ligands initiated parallel signals in the cytoplasm. Activin synergy required several NGF intracellular signals to be present. Because activin did not further stimulate, but did require NGF intracellular signals, it appears that activin and NGF converge not in receptor or cytoplasmic signals, but in transcriptional mechanisms to regulate CGRP in sensory neurons after inflammation. PMID:17964731

  2. Assessment of Neuromuscular Function Using Percutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Rozand, Vianney; Grosprtre, Sidney; Stapley, Paul J; Lepers, Romuald

    2015-01-01

    Percutaneous electrical nerve stimulation is a non-invasive method commonly used to evaluate neuromuscular function from brain to muscle (supra-spinal, spinal and peripheral levels). The present protocol describes how this method can be used to stimulate the posterior tibial nerve that activates plantar flexor muscles. Percutaneous electrical nerve stimulation consists of inducing an electrical stimulus to a motor nerve to evoke a muscular response. Direct (M-wave) and/or indirect (H-reflex) electrophysiological responses can be recorded at rest using surface electromyography. Mechanical (twitch torque) responses can be quantified with a force/torque ergometer. M-wave and twitch torque reflect neuromuscular transmission and excitation-contraction coupling, whereas H-reflex provides an index of spinal excitability. EMG activity and mechanical (superimposed twitch) responses can also be recorded during maximal voluntary contractions to evaluate voluntary activation level. Percutaneous nerve stimulation provides an assessment of neuromuscular function in humans, and is highly beneficial especially for studies evaluating neuromuscular plasticity following acute (fatigue) or chronic (training/detraining) exercise. PMID:26436986

  3. Microscale Electrode Implantation during Nerve Repair: Effects on Nerve Morphology, Electromyography, and Recovery of Muscle Contractile Function

    PubMed Central

    Urbanchek, Melanie G; Wei, Benjamin; Egeland, Brent M; Abidian, Mohammad R; Kipke, Daryl R; Cederna, Paul S

    2011-01-01

    Background Our goal is to develop a peripheral nerve electrode with long-term stability and fidelity for use in nerve-machine interfaces. Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) use silicon probes that contain multi-channel actuators, sensors, and electronics. We tested the null hypothesis that implantation of MEMS probes do not have a detrimental effect on peripheral nerve function or regeneration. Methods A rat hindlimb, peroneal nerve model was utilized in all experimental groups: a) intact nerve (Control, n= 10); b) nerve division and repair (Repair, n= 9); and c) Nerve division, insertion of MEMS probe, and repair (Repair + Probe, n=9). Nerve morphology, nerve to muscle compound action potential (CMAP) studies, walking tracks, and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle function tests were evaluated following an 80 day recovery. Results Repair and Repair + Probe showed no differences in axon count, axon size, percent non-neural area, CMAP amplitude, latency, muscle mass, muscle force, or walking track scores. Though there was some local fibrosis around each MEMS probe, this did not lead to measurable detrimental effects in any anatomic or functional outcome measurements. Conclusions The lack of a significant difference between Repair and Repair + Probe groups in histology, CMAP, walking tracks, and muscle force suggests that MEMS electrodes are compatible with regenerating axons and show promise for establishing chemical and electrical interfaces with peripheral nerves. PMID:21921739

  4. Olfactory Cilia: Linking Sensory Cilia Function and Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Paul M.; McEwen, Dyke P.

    2009-01-01

    The olfactory system gives us an awareness of our immediate environment by allowing us to detect airborne stimuli. The components necessary for detection of these odorants are compartmentalized in the cilia of olfactory sensory neurons. Cilia are microtubule-based organelles, which can be found projecting from the surface of almost any mammalian cell, and are critical for proper olfactory function. Mislocalization of ciliary proteins and/or the loss of cilia cause impaired olfactory function, which is now recognized as a clinical manifestation of a broad class of human diseases, termed ciliopathies. Future work investigating the mechanisms of olfactory cilia function will provide us important new information regarding the pathogenesis of human sensory perception diseases. PMID:19406873

  5. A biomaterials approach to peripheral nerve regeneration: bridging the peripheral nerve gap and enhancing functional recovery

    PubMed Central

    Daly, W.; Yao, L.; Zeugolis, D.; Windebank, A.; Pandit, A.

    2012-01-01

    Microsurgical techniques for the treatment of large peripheral nerve injuries (such as the gold standard autograft) and its main clinically approved alternative—hollow nerve guidance conduits (NGCs)—have a number of limitations that need to be addressed. NGCs, in particular, are limited to treating a relatively short nerve gap (4 cm in length) and are often associated with poor functional recovery. Recent advances in biomaterials and tissue engineering approaches are seeking to overcome the limitations associated with these treatment methods. This review critically discusses the advances in biomaterial-based NGCs, their limitations and where future improvements may be required. Recent developments include the incorporation of topographical guidance features and/or intraluminal structures, which attempt to guide Schwann cell (SC) migration and axonal regrowth towards their distal targets. The use of such strategies requires consideration of the size and distribution of these topographical features, as well as a suitable surface for cell–material interactions. Likewise, cellular and molecular-based therapies are being considered for the creation of a more conductive nerve microenvironment. For example, hurdles associated with the short half-lives and low stability of molecular therapies are being surmounted through the use of controlled delivery systems. Similarly, cells (SCs, stem cells and genetically modified cells) are being delivered with biomaterial matrices in attempts to control their dispersion and to facilitate their incorporation within the host regeneration process. Despite recent advances in peripheral nerve repair, there are a number of key factors that need to be considered in order for these new technologies to reach the clinic. PMID:22090283

  6. Idiopathic polyneuritis: serial studies of nerve and immune functions1

    PubMed Central

    McQuillen, Michael P.

    1971-01-01

    The clinical features of idiopathic polyneuritis in 22 patients admitted to the University of Kentucky Medical Center between July 1965 and June 1970 are described. Serial studies of peripheral nerve function in 12 patients followed to clinical recovery showed changes in nerve conduction velocity, distal motor latency, and/or muscle action potential amplitude. Six children and one adult, showing a change in all three parameters, exhibited a strong correlation between the degree of slowing and the shortness of their illness. Assessment of immune status, by quantitative measurement of cerebrospinal fluid immunoglobulin G(11 patients) and by the degree of lymphocyte transformation on exposure to specific brain protein and/or a homogenate of sciatic nerve (10 patients), bore no consistent relation to the severity or course of the illness. A double-blind trial of short-term, high dose adrenocorticotrophic hormone has yielded no valid evidence to date for or against the effectiveness of such therapy in this illness. PMID:4330698

  7. SUSTAINED BLOCKADE OF NEUROTROPHIN RECEPTORS TrkA, TrkB AND TrkC REDUCES NON-MALIGNANT SKELETAL PAIN BUT NOT THE MAINTENANCE OF SENSORY AND SYMPATHETIC NERVE FIBERS

    PubMed Central

    Ghilardi, Joseph R.; Freeman, Katie T.; Jimenez-Andrade, Juan M.; Mantyh, William G.; Bloom, Aaron P.; Bouhana, Karyn S.; Trollinger, David; Winkler, James; Lee, Patrice; Andrews, Steven W.; Kuskowski, Michael A.; Mantyh, Patrick W.

    2010-01-01

    Current therapies for treating skeletal pain have significant limitations as available drugs (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and opiates) have significant unwanted side effects. Targeting nerve growth factor or it's cognate receptor Tropomysin receptor kinase A (TrkA) has recently become an attractive target for inhibition of adult skeletal pain. Here we explore whether sustained administration of a selective small molecule Trk inhibitor that blocks TrkA, TrkB and TrkC kinase activity with nanomolar affinity reduces skeletal pain while allowing the maintenance of sensory and sympathetic neurons in the adult mouse. Twice-daily administration of a Trk inhibitor was begun 1 day post fracture and within 8 hours of acute administration fracture pain related behaviors were reduced by 50% without significant sedation, weight gain or inhibition of fracture healing. Following administration of the Trk inhibitor for 7 weeks, there was no significant decline in the density of unmyelinated, myelinated sensory or sympathetic nerve fibers, measures of acute thermal pain, acute mechanical pain, or general neuromuscular function. The present results suggest that sustained administration of a peripherally selective TrkA, B & C inhibitor significantly reduces skeletal pain without having any obvious detrimental effects on adult sensory and sympathetic nerve fibers or early fracture healing. As with any potential therapeutic advance, understanding whether the benefits of NGF blockade by ARRY-470 are associated with any risks or unexpected effects will be required to fully appreciate the patient populations that may benefit from this therapy. PMID:20854944

  8. Molecular pathophysiology of cavernous nerve injury and identification of strategies for nerve function recovery after radical prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Weyne, Emmanuel; Mulhall, John; Albersen, Maarten

    2015-01-01

    Despite nerve-sparing techniques, erectile dysfunction remains commonly observed after radical prostatectomy due to neuropraxia to the cavernous nerves during surgery. Preservation and rehabilitation of erectile function after radical prostatectomy remains challenging and many men stay undertreated with the current armory of therapies available in clinical practice. In this article we provide a comprehensive overview of the pathophysiology of the nerve injury occurring during radical prostatectomy and describe different strategies aimed at enhancing neuroprotection and regeneration of the cavernous nerves in order to improve erectile function recovery. These strategies include immunomodulatory, neurotrophic, growth factor and stem cell therapy have convincingly shown improved erectile function and recovery in rat animal models after cavernous nerve injury. Furthermore we describe the rationale for penile rehabilitation with PDE5i out of a neuronal recovery point of view. Many of these strategies reviewed have the potential to optimize erectile function recovery after radical prostatectomy when translated from pre-clinical models to clinical practice. PMID:25777276

  9. Laminin Functionalized Biomimetic Nanofibers For Nerve Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Junka, Radoslaw; Valmikinathan, Chandra M; Kalyon, Dilhan M; Yu, Xiaojun

    2013-01-01

    Large-gap peripheral nerve injuries present a significant challenge for nerve regeneration due to lack of suitable grafts, insufficient cell penetration, and repair. Biomimetic nanofibrous scaffolds, functionalized on the surface with extracellular matrix proteins, can lead to novel therapies for repair and regeneration of damaged peripheral nerves. Here, nanofibrous scaffolds electrospun from blends of poly(caprolactone) (PCL) and chitosan were fabricated. Taking advantage of the amine groups on the chitosan, the surface of the scaffolds were functionalized with laminin by carbodiimide based crosslinking. Crosslinking allowed laminin to be attached to the surfaces of the PCL-chitosan nanofibers at relatively high concentrations that were not possible using conventional adsorption methods. The nanofibrous meshes were tested for wettability, mechanical properties and cell attachment and proliferation. Blending of chitosan with PCL provided more favorable surfaces for attachment of Schwann cells due to the reduction of the contact angle in comparison to neat PCL. Proliferation rates of Schwann cells grown on PCL-chitosan scaffolds with crosslinked laminin were significantly higher than the rates for PCL-chitosan nanofibrous matrices with adsorbed laminin. PCL-chitosan scaffolds with modified surfaces via crosslinking of laminin could potentially serves as versatile substrates with excellent mechanical and surface properties for in vivo cell delivery for nerve tissue engineering applications. PMID:24083073

  10. A new paradigm of electrical stimulation to enhance sensory neural function.

    PubMed

    Breen, Paul P; Laighin, Gearid; McIntosh, Caroline; Dinneen, Sean F; Quinlan, Leo R; Serrador, Jorge M

    2014-08-01

    The ability to improve peripheral neural transmission would have significant therapeutic potential in medicine. A technology of this kind could be used to restore and/or enhance sensory function in individuals with depressed sensory function, such as older adults or patients with peripheral neuropathies. The goal of this study was to investigate if a new paradigm of subsensory electrical noise stimulation enhances somatosensory function. Vibration (50Hz) was applied with a Neurothesiometer to the plantar aspect of the foot in the presence or absence of subsensory electrical noise (1/f type). The noise was applied at a proximal site, on a defined region of the tibial nerve path above the ankle. Vibration perception thresholds (VPT) of younger adults were measured in control and experimental conditions, in the absence or presence of noise respectively. An improvement of ?16% in VPT was found in the presence of noise. These are the first data to demonstrate that modulation of axonal transmission with externally applied electrical noise improves perception of tactile stimuli in humans. PMID:24894033

  11. Axon glycoprotein routing in nerve polarity, function, and repair.

    PubMed

    Abad-Rodríguez, José; Díez-Revuelta, Natalia

    2015-07-01

    Nervous system function relies on the capacity of neurons to organize specialized domains for impulse reception or transmission. Such a polarized architecture relies on highly discriminatory and efficient mechanisms for the transport and targeting of required molecules to their functional positions. Glycans play a central role in polarized traffic based on their extraordinary capacity to encrypt bio-information. Glycan-based interactions exquisitely regulate cargo selection, trafficking, and targeting to the axon membrane. This generates segregated functional domains, where basal nerve processes such as axon growth, synaptic activity, or myelination take place. Deciphering the details of the glycan structures and carbohydrate-binding molecules that underlie these mechanisms improves our knowledge of nerve physiology and defines novel specific approaches for neurological treatments. PMID:25936977

  12. The impact and specificity of nerve perturbation on novel vibrotactile sensory letter learning.

    PubMed

    Passmore, Steven R; Bosse, Jessica; Murphy, Bernadette; Lee, Timothy D

    2014-12-01

    The purposes of this study were to determine if induced radiating paresthesia interferes with (a) acquisition and/or (b) utilization of complex tactile information, and (c) identify whether interference reflects tactile masking or response competition. Radiating ulnar (experiment 1) and median (experiment 2) nerve paresthesia was quantified on ulnar innervated vibrotactile Morse code letter acquisition and recollection tasks. Induced paresthesia differentially impacted letter acquisition and recollection, but only when presented to the same anatomical spatial location. PMID:24844345

  13. Nerve growth factor enhances the excitability of rat sensory neurons through activation of the atypical protein kinase C isoform, PKM?

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y. H.; Kays, J.; Hodgdon, K. E.; Sacktor, T. C.

    2012-01-01

    Our previous work showed that nerve growth factor (NGF) increased the excitability of small-diameter capsaicin-sensitive sensory neurons by activating the p75 neurotrophin receptor and releasing sphingolipid-derived second messengers. Whole cell patch-clamp recordings were used to establish the signaling pathways whereby NGF augments action potential (AP) firing (i.e., sensitization). Inhibition of MEK1/2 (PD-98059), PLC (U-73122, neomycin), or conventional/novel isoforms of PKC (bisindolylmaleimide I) had no effect on the sensitization produced by NGF. Pretreatment with a membrane-permeable, myristoylated pseudosubstrate inhibitor of atypical PKCs (aPKCs: PKM?, PKC?, and PKC?/?) blocked the NGF-induced increase in AP firing. Inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) also blocked the sensitization produced by NGF. Isolated sensory neurons were also treated with small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeted to PKC?. Both Western blots and quantitative real-time PCR established that PKM?, but neither full-length PKC? nor PKC?/?, was significantly reduced after siRNA exposure. Treatment with these labeled siRNA prevented the NGF-induced enhancement of excitability. Furthermore, consistent with the high degree of catalytic homology for aPKCs, internal perfusion with active recombinant PKC? or PKC? augmented excitability, recapitulating the sensitization produced by NGF. Internal perfusion with recombinant PKC? suppressed the total potassium current and enhanced the tetrodotoxin-resistant sodium current. Pretreatment with the myristoylated pseudosubstrate inhibitor blocked the increased excitability produced by ceramide or internal perfusion with recombinant PKC?. These results demonstrate that NGF leads to the activation of PKM? that ultimately enhances the capacity of small-diameter capsaicin-sensitive sensory neurons to fire APs through a PI3K-dependent signaling cascade. PMID:21975456

  14. Local neurogenic regulation of rat hindlimb circulation: CO2-induced release of calcitonin gene-related peptide from sensory nerves.

    PubMed

    Yamada, M; Ishikawa, T; Yamanaka, A; Fujimori, A; Goto, K

    1997-10-01

    1. The mechanism of release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) from sensory nerves in response to skeletal muscle contraction was investigated in the rat hindlimb in vivo and in vitro. 2. In the anaesthetized rat, sciatic nerve stimulation at 10 Hz for 1 min caused a hyperaemic response in the hindlimb. During the response, partial pressure of CO2 in the venous blood effluent from the hindlimb significantly increased from 43 +/- 3 to 73 +/- 8 mmHg, whereas a small decrease in pH and no appreciable change in partial pressure of O2 were observed. 3. An intra-arterial bolus injection of NaHCO3 (titrated to pH 7.2 with HCl), which elevated PCO2 of the venous blood, caused a sustained increase in regional blood flow of the iliac artery. Capsaicin (0.33 micromol kg(-1), i.a.) and a specific calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonist, CGRP(8-37), (100 nmol kg(-1) min(-1), i.v.) significantly suppressed the hyperaemic response to NaHCO3. Neither ND(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (1 micromol kg(-1) min(-1), i.v.) nor indomethacin (5 mg kg(-1), i.v.) affected the response. 4. The serum level of CGRP-like immunoreactivity in the venous blood was significantly increased by a bolus injection of NaHCO3 (pH = 7.2) from 50 +/- 4 to 196 +/- 16 fmol ml(-1). 5. In the isolated hindlimb perfused with Krebs-Ringer solution, a bolus injection of NaHCO3 (pH = 7.2) caused a decrease in perfusion pressure which was composed of two responses, i.e., an initial transient response and a slowly-developing long-lasting one. CGRP(8-37) significantly inhibited the latter response by 73%. 6. These results suggest that CO2 liberated from exercising skeletal muscle activates capsaicin-sensitive perivascular sensory nerves locally, which results in the release of CGRP from their peripheral endings, and then the released peptide causes local vasodilatation. PMID:9375968

  15. Direct radial to ulnar nerve transfer to restore intrinsic muscle function in combined proximal median and ulnar nerve injury: case report and surgical technique.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Benjamin Z; Franco, Michael J; Yee, Andrew; Tung, Thomas H; Mackinnon, Susan E; Fox, Ida K

    2014-07-01

    A distal median to ulnar nerve transfer for timely restoration of critical intrinsic muscle function is possible in isolated ulnar nerve injuries but not for combined ulnar and median nerve injuries. We used a distal nerve transfer to restore ulnar intrinsic function in the case of a proximal combined median and ulnar nerve injury. Transfer of the nonessential radial nerve branches to the abductor pollicis longus, extensor pollicis brevis, and extensor indicis proprius to the motor branch of the ulnar nerve was performed in a direct end-to-end fashion via an interosseous tunnel. This method safely and effectively restored intrinsic function before terminal muscle degeneration. PMID:24836915

  16. Spatial and Functional Selectivity of Peripheral Nerve Signal Recording With the Transversal Intrafascicular Multichannel Electrode (TIME).

    PubMed

    Badia, Jordi; Raspopovic, Stanisa; Carpaneto, Jacopo; Micera, Silvestro; Navarro, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    The selection of suitable peripheral nerve electrodes for biomedical applications implies a trade-off between invasiveness and selectivity. The optimal design should provide the highest selectivity for targeting a large number of nerve fascicles with the least invasiveness and potential damage to the nerve. The transverse intrafascicular multichannel electrode (TIME), transversally inserted in the peripheral nerve, has been shown to be useful for the selective activation of subsets of axons, both at inter- and intra-fascicular levels, in the small sciatic nerve of the rat. In this study we assessed the capabilities of TIME for the selective recording of neural activity, considering the topographical selectivity and the distinction of neural signals corresponding to different sensory types. Topographical recording selectivity was proved by the differential recording of CNAPs from different subsets of nerve fibers, such as those innervating toes 2 and 4 of the hindpaw of the rat. Neural signals elicited by sensory stimuli applied to the rat paw were successfully recorded. Signal processing allowed distinguishing three different types of sensory stimuli such as tactile, proprioceptive and nociceptive ones with high performance. These findings further support the suitability of TIMEs for neuroprosthetic applications, by exploiting the transversal topographical structure of the peripheral nerves. PMID:26087496

  17. Characterization of Thoracic Motor and Sensory Neurons and Spinal Nerve Roots in Canine Degenerative Myelopathy, a Potential Disease Model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Brandie R.; Coates, Joan R.; Johnson, Gayle C.; Shelton, G. Diane; Katz, Martin L.

    2014-01-01

    Canine Degenerative Myelopathy (DM) is a progressive adult-onset multisystem degenerative disease with many features in common with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). As with some forms of ALS, DM is associated with mutations in superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1). Clinical signs include general proprioceptive ataxia and spastic upper motor neuron paresis in pelvic limbs, which progress to flaccid tetraplegia and dysphagia. The purpose of this study was to characterize DM as a potential disease model for ALS. We previously reported that intercostal muscle atrophy develops in dogs with advanced stage DM. To determine if other components of the thoracic motor unit (MU) also demonstrated morphological changes consistent with dysfunction, histopathologic and morphometric analyses were conducted on thoracic spinal motor neurons (MN) and dorsal root ganglia (DRG), and in motor and sensory nerve root axons from DM-affected Boxers and Pembroke Welsh Corgis (PWCs). No alterations in MNs, or motor root axons were observed in either breed. However, advanced stage PWCs exhibited significant losses of sensory root axons, and numerous DRG sensory neurons displayed evidence of degeneration. These results indicate that intercostal muscle atrophy in DM is not preceded by physical loss of the motor neurons innervating these muscles, or of their axons. Axonal loss in thoracic sensory roots and sensory nerve death suggest sensory involvement may play an important role in DM disease progression. Further analysis of the mechanisms responsible for these morphological findings would aid in the development of therapeutic intervention for DM and some forms of ALS. PMID:24375814

  18. Semantic Relevance, Domain Specificity and the Sensory/Functional Theory of Category-Specificity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sartori, Giuseppe; Gnoato, Francesca; Mariani, Ilenia; Prioni, Sara; Lombardi, Luigi

    2007-01-01

    According to the sensory/functional theory of semantic memory, Living items rely more on Sensory knowledge than Non-living ones. The sensory/functional explanation of category-specificity assumes that semantic features are organised on the basis of their content. We report here a study on DAT patients with impaired performance on Living items and

  19. p75 and TrkA neurotrophin receptors in human skin after spinal cord and peripheral nerve injury, with special reference to sensory corpuscles.

    PubMed

    Lpez, S M; Prez-Prez, M; Mrquez, J M; Naves, F J; Represa, J; Vega, J A

    1998-07-01

    Human skin, including nerves and sensory corpuscles, displays immunoreactivity (IR) for low- (p75) and high-affinity (TrkA-like) receptors for nerve growth factor (NGF), the best characterized member of the family of neurotrophins. This study was designed to analyze the changes induced by spinal cord and peripheral nerve injuries in the expression of neurotrophin receptors in digital skin, with special reference to nerves and sensory corpuscles. Skin biopsy samples were obtained from 1) the hand and toes of normal subjects, 2) below the level of the lesion of patients with spinal cord injury affecting dorsal and lateral funiculi, 3) the cutaneous territory of entrapped peripheral nerves (median and ulnar nerves), and 4) the cutaneous territory of sectioned and grafted nerves (median nerve). The pieces were formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded, cut in serial sections, and processed for immunohistochemistry using antibodies against human p75 and TrkA proteins. The percentage of sensory corpuscles displaying IR for p75 and TrkA-like, as well as the intensity of IR developed within them, was assessed using quantitative image analysis. Spinal cord severance causes a decrease in p75 IR in Meissner and Pacinian corpuscles, whereas TrkA-like IR did not vary. In other nonnervous tissues (i.e., epidermis, sweat glands), both p75 and TrkA-like IR was diminished or even absent. Similar but more severe changes were encountered in the skin from the territory of entrapped nerves. Finally, in subjects with sectioned-grafted nerves, p75 IR was found close to controls in nerves, reduced in Meissner corpuscles, and absent in the inner core of the Pacinian ones; TrkA-like IR was in the perineurium, a small percentage of Meissner corpuscles (about 7%), and the outer core and capsule of the Pacinan corpuscles. In the nonnervous tissues, p75 IR was practically absent, whereas TrkA-like IR did not change. No changes in the expression of neurotrophin receptors were observed in Merkel cells of the different groups. Present results show the following: 1) expression of nerve p75 IR in human cutaneous sensory corpuscles is sensitive to central deafferentation, to blockade or difficulty in axonal transport, and to disruption of axonal continuity independently of possible restoration of axonal integrity due to grafts; 2) expression of TrkA-like IR in nerves and sensory corpuscles is sensitive only to nerve transection; 3) the corpuscular Schwann-related cells are the only cells involved in the above modifications, the perineurial cells remaining unchanged; 4) the expression of p75 and TrkA-like IR by Merkel cells is independent of normal innervation; 5) an adequate innervation of the skin seems to be necessary for the expression of p75 but not TrkA-like in nonneuronal cells, especially in the epidermis. A role for NGF in the maintenance of epidermis integrity is discussed. PMID:9669765

  20. Substitution of natural sensory input by artificial neurostimulation of an amputated trigeminal nerve does not prevent the degeneration of basal forebrain cholinergic circuits projecting to the somatosensory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Herrera-Rincon, Celia; Panetsos, Fivos

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral deafferentation downregulates acetylcholine (ACh) synthesis in sensory cortices. However, the responsible neural circuits and processes are not known. We irreversibly transected the rat infraorbital nerve and implanted neuroprosthetic microdevices for proximal stump stimulation, and assessed cytochrome-oxidase and choline- acetyl-transferase (ChAT) in somatosensory, auditory and visual cortices; estimated the number and density of ACh-neurons in the magnocellular basal nucleus (MBN); and localized down-regulated ACh-neurons in basal forebrain using retrograde labeling from deafferented cortices. Here we show that nerve transection, causes down regulation of MBN cholinergic neurons. Stimulation of the cut nerve reverses the metabolic decline but does not affect the decrease in cholinergic fibers in cortex or cholinergic neurons in basal forebrain. Artifical stimulation of the nerve also has no affect of ACh-innervation of other cortices. Cortical ChAT depletion is due to loss of corticopetal MBN ChAT-expressing neurons. MBN ChAT downregulation is not due to a decrease of afferent activity or to a failure of trophic support. Basalocortical ACh circuits are sensory specific, ACh is provided to each sensory cortex “on demand” by dedicated circuits. Our data support the existence of a modality-specific cortex-MBN-cortex circuit for cognitive information processing. PMID:25452715

  1. Fixture stability and nerve function after transposition and lateralization of the inferior alveolar nerve and fixture installation.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, J M; Brnemark, P I

    1995-10-01

    Twenty-four posterior mandibular segments in 18 patients were operated on placing implants after mobilisation of the neurovascular bundle. Two different surgical techniques, transposition and lateralization was used. The overall survival rate of fixtures was 92.1%. Performing lateralization resulted in 100% success, while transposition resulted in 80% stable fixtures in the involved segments. The mean time to full restoration of nerve function was 3.8 weeks after lateralization and 5.7 weeks after tranposing the nerve. Three patients exhibited persisting slight hyposthesia, but all, subjectively negligible disturbances in nerve function. PMID:8555142

  2. Exuberant sprouting of sensory and sympathetic nerve fibers in nonhealed bone fractures and the generation and maintenance of chronic skeletal pain.

    PubMed

    Chartier, Stephane R; Thompson, Michelle L; Longo, Geraldine; Fealk, Michelle N; Majuta, Lisa A; Mantyh, Patrick W

    2014-11-01

    Skeletal injury is a leading cause of chronic pain and long-term disability worldwide. While most acute skeletal pain can be effectively managed with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and opiates, chronic skeletal pain is more difficult to control using these same therapy regimens. One possibility as to why chronic skeletal pain is more difficult to manage over time is that there may be nerve sprouting in nonhealed areas of the skeleton that normally receive little (mineralized bone) to no (articular cartilage) innervation. If such ectopic sprouting did occur, it could result in normally nonnoxious loading of the skeleton being perceived as noxious and/or the generation of a neuropathic pain state. To explore this possibility, a mouse model of skeletal pain was generated by inducing a closed fracture of the femur. Examined animals had comminuted fractures and did not fully heal even at 90+days post fracture. In all mice with nonhealed fractures, exuberant sensory and sympathetic nerve sprouting, an increase in the density of nerve fibers, and the formation of neuroma-like structures near the fracture site were observed. Additionally, all of these animals exhibited significant pain behaviors upon palpation of the nonhealed fracture site. In contrast, sprouting of sensory and sympathetic nerve fibers or significant palpation-induced pain behaviors was never observed in nave animals. Understanding what drives this ectopic nerve sprouting and the role it plays in skeletal pain may allow a better understanding and treatment of this currently difficult-to-control pain state. PMID:25196264

  3. Functional Recovery Following an End to Side Neurorrhaphy of the Accessory Nerve to the Suprascapular Nerve: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Wilson Z.; Kasukurthi, Rahul; Yee, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    The use of end-to-side neurrorhaphy remains a controversial topic in peripheral nerve surgery. The authors report the long-term functional outcome following a modified end-to-side motor reinnervation using the spinal accessory to innervate the suprascapular nerve following a C5 to C6 avulsion injury. Additionally, functional outcomes of an end-to-end neurotization of the triceps branch to the axillary nerve and double fascicular transfer of the ulnar and medial nerve to the biceps and brachialis are presented. Excellent functional recoveries are found in respect to shoulder abduction and flexion and elbow flexion. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11552-009-9242-3) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:19902308

  4. Endogenous Prostaglandins and Afferent Sensory Nerves in Gastroprotective Effect of Hydrogen Sulfide against Stress-Induced Gastric Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Magierowski, Marcin; Jasnos, Katarzyna; Kwiecien, Slawomir; Drozdowicz, Danuta; Surmiak, Marcin; Strzalka, Malgorzata; Ptak-Belowska, Agata; Wallace, John L.; Brzozowski, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) plays an important role in human physiology, exerting vasodilatory, neuromodulatory and anti-inflammatory effects. H2S has been implicated in the mechanism of gastrointestinal integrity but whether this gaseous mediator can affect hemorrhagic lesions induced by stress has been little elucidated. We studied the effect of the H2S precursor L-cysteine, H2S-donor NaHS, the H2S synthesizing enzyme (CSE) activity inhibitor- D,L-propargylglycine (PAG) and the gastric H2S production by CSE/CBS/3-MST activity in water immersion and restraint stress (WRS) ulcerogenesis and the accompanying changes in gastric blood flow (GBF). The role of endogenous prostaglandins (PGs) and sensory afferent nerves releasing calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in the mechanism of gastroprotection induced by H2S was examined in capsaicin-denervated rats and those pretreated with capsazepine to inhibit activity of vanilloid receptors (VR-1). Rats were pretreated with vehicle, NaHS, the donor of H2S and or L-cysteine, the H2S precursor, with or without the concurrent treatment with 1) nonselective (indomethacin) and selective cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 (SC-560) or COX-2 (rofecoxib) inhibitors. The expression of mRNA and protein for COX-1 and COX-2 were analyzed in gastric mucosa pretreated with NaHS with or without PAG. Both NaHS and L-cysteine dose-dependently attenuated severity of WRS-induced gastric lesions and significantly increased GBF. These effects were significantly reduced by pretreatment with PAG and capsaicin denervation. NaHS increased gastric H2S production via CSE/CBS but not 3-MST activity. Inhibition of COX-1 and COX-2 activity significantly diminished NaHS- and L-cysteine-induced protection and hyperemia. NaHS increased expression of COX-1, COX-2 mRNAs and proteins and raised CGRP mRNA expression. These effects of NaHS on COX-1 and COX-2 protein contents were reversed by PAG and capsaicin denervation. We conclude that H2S exerts gastroprotection against WRS-induced gastric lesions by the mechanism involving enhancement in gastric microcirculation mediated by endogenous PGs, sensory afferent nerves releasing CGRP and the activation of VR-1 receptors. PMID:25774496

  5. Endogenous prostaglandins and afferent sensory nerves in gastroprotective effect of hydrogen sulfide against stress-induced gastric lesions.

    PubMed

    Magierowski, Marcin; Jasnos, Katarzyna; Kwiecien, Slawomir; Drozdowicz, Danuta; Surmiak, Marcin; Strzalka, Malgorzata; Ptak-Belowska, Agata; Wallace, John L; Brzozowski, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) plays an important role in human physiology, exerting vasodilatory, neuromodulatory and anti-inflammatory effects. H2S has been implicated in the mechanism of gastrointestinal integrity but whether this gaseous mediator can affect hemorrhagic lesions induced by stress has been little elucidated. We studied the effect of the H2S precursor L-cysteine, H2S-donor NaHS, the H2S synthesizing enzyme (CSE) activity inhibitor- D,L-propargylglycine (PAG) and the gastric H2S production by CSE/CBS/3-MST activity in water immersion and restraint stress (WRS) ulcerogenesis and the accompanying changes in gastric blood flow (GBF). The role of endogenous prostaglandins (PGs) and sensory afferent nerves releasing calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in the mechanism of gastroprotection induced by H2S was examined in capsaicin-denervated rats and those pretreated with capsazepine to inhibit activity of vanilloid receptors (VR-1). Rats were pretreated with vehicle, NaHS, the donor of H2S and or L-cysteine, the H2S precursor, with or without the concurrent treatment with 1) nonselective (indomethacin) and selective cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 (SC-560) or COX-2 (rofecoxib) inhibitors. The expression of mRNA and protein for COX-1 and COX-2 were analyzed in gastric mucosa pretreated with NaHS with or without PAG. Both NaHS and L-cysteine dose-dependently attenuated severity of WRS-induced gastric lesions and significantly increased GBF. These effects were significantly reduced by pretreatment with PAG and capsaicin denervation. NaHS increased gastric H2S production via CSE/CBS but not 3-MST activity. Inhibition of COX-1 and COX-2 activity significantly diminished NaHS- and L-cysteine-induced protection and hyperemia. NaHS increased expression of COX-1, COX-2 mRNAs and proteins and raised CGRP mRNA expression. These effects of NaHS on COX-1 and COX-2 protein contents were reversed by PAG and capsaicin denervation. We conclude that H2S exerts gastroprotection against WRS-induced gastric lesions by the mechanism involving enhancement in gastric microcirculation mediated by endogenous PGs, sensory afferent nerves releasing CGRP and the activation of VR-1 receptors. PMID:25774496

  6. Relationship of estimated dietary intake of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids from fish with peripheral nerve function after adjusting for mercury exposure

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Goodrich, Jaclyn M.; Werner, Robert; Gillespie, Brenda; Basu, Niladri; Franzblau, Alfred

    2013-01-01

    Background Some clinical studies have suggested that ingestion of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) has neuroprotective effects on peripheral nerve function. However, few epidemiological studies have examined the effect of dietary n-3 PUFA intake from fish consumption on peripheral nerve function, and none have controlled for co-occurrence of methylmercury exposure from fish consumption. Objectives We evaluated the effect of estimated dietary n-3 PUFA intake on peripheral nerve function after adjusting for biomarkers of methylmercury and elemental mercury in a convenience sample of 515 dental professionals. Methods We measured sensory nerve conduction (peak latency and amplitude) of the median, ulnar and sural nerves and total mercury concentrations in hair and urine samples. We estimated daily intake (mg/day) of the total n-3 PUFA, n-3 docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and n-3 eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) based on a self-administrated fish consumption frequency questionnaire. We also collected information on mercury exposure, demographics and other covariates. Results The estimated median intakes of total n-3 PUFA, n-3 EPA, and n-3 DHA were 447, 105, and 179 mg/day, respectively. The mean mercury concentrations in urine (1.05?g/L) and hair (0.49?g/g) were not significantly different from the US general population. We found no consistent association between n-3 PUFA intake and sensory nerve conduction after adjusting for mercury concentrations in hair and urine although some positive associations were observed with the sural nerve. Conclusions In a convenience sample of dental professionals, we found little evidence suggesting that dietary intake of n-3 PUFAs from fish has any impact on peripheral nerve function after adjustment for methylmercury exposure from fish and elemental mercury exposure from dental amalgam. PMID:23538138

  7. Evaluation of greater petrosal nerve function in patients with acute peripheral facial paralysis: comparison of soft palate electrogustometry and Schirmer's tear test.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Hidetoshi; Ikeda, Minoru

    2002-01-01

    We tested sensory and secretomotor function of the greater petrosal nerve (GPN) by means of electrogustometry (EGM) of the soft palate and Schirmer's tear test in 115 patients (59 males, 56 females) with acute peripheral facial paralysis. Facial paralysis was caused by Bell's palsy in 78 cases, Ramsay Hunt syndrome in 27 cases and zoster sine herpetic lesions in 10. All patients had dysfunction of the stapedial nerve. An electrogustometer was used to test taste (GPN sensory function), and elevation of the threshold by > 6 dB on the affected side was considered abnormal. Schirmer's test was used to evaluate lacrimal (GPN secretomotor) function, which was considered abnormal when tear secretion on the affected side was < 50% of secretion on the non-affected side. Of the 78 patients with Bell's palsy, 28.2% had altered taste on the soft palate (sensory dysfunction) and 10.3% had lacrimal dysfunction, indicating that EGM of the soft palate is more sensitive than Schirmer's test for identifying dysfunction of the GPN in patients with facial paralysis due to Bell's palsy. Of the total of 115 patients, 32 (28%) had taste dysfunction and 9 (28.1%) of these 32 patients also had lacrimal dysfunction. This finding indicates that facial paralysis has different effects on the sensory and secretory nerve fibers of the GPN. The results of Schirmer's test were more closely related to the severity of, and prognosis for, facial paralysis than the results of EGM. PMID:12132607

  8. Evolutionary origins of sensation in metazoans: functional evidence for a new sensory organ in sponges

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background One of the hallmarks of multicellular organisms is the ability of their cells to trigger responses to the environment in a coordinated manner. In recent years primary cilia have been shown to be present as ‘antennae’ on almost all animal cells, and are involved in cell-to-cell signaling in development and tissue homeostasis; how this sophisticated sensory system arose has been little-studied and its evolution is key to understanding how sensation arose in the Animal Kingdom. Sponges (Porifera), one of the earliest evolving phyla, lack conventional muscles and nerves and yet sense and respond to changes in their fluid environment. Here we demonstrate the presence of non-motile cilia in sponges and studied their role as flow sensors. Results Demosponges excrete wastes from their body with a stereotypic series of whole-body contractions using a structure called the osculum to regulate the water-flow through the body. In this study we show that short cilia line the inner epithelium of the sponge osculum. Ultrastructure of the cilia shows an absence of a central pair of microtubules and high speed imaging shows they are non-motile, suggesting they are not involved in generating flow. In other animals non-motile, ‘primary’, cilia are involved in sensation. Here we show that molecules known to block cationic ion channels in primary cilia and which inhibit sensory function in other organisms reduce or eliminate sponge contractions. Removal of the cilia using chloral hydrate, or removal of the whole osculum, also stops the contractions; in all instances the effect is reversible, suggesting that the cilia are involved in sensation. An analysis of sponge transcriptomes shows the presence of several transient receptor potential (TRP) channels including PKD channels known to be involved in sensing changes in flow in other animals. Together these data suggest that cilia in sponge oscula are involved in flow sensation and coordination of simple behaviour. Conclusions This is the first evidence of arrays of non-motile cilia in sponge oscula. Our findings provide support for the hypothesis that the cilia are sensory, and if true, the osculum may be considered a sensory organ that is used to coordinate whole animal responses in sponges. Arrays of primary cilia like these could represent the first step in the evolution of sensory and coordination systems in metazoans. PMID:24410880

  9. Effects of Local Compression on Peroneal Nerve Function in Humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hargens, Alan R.; Botte, Michael J.; Swenson, Michael R.; Gelberman, Richard H.; Rhoades, Charles E.; Akeson, Wayne H.

    1993-01-01

    A new apparatus was developed to compress the anterior compartment selectively and reproducibly in humans. Thirty-five normal volunteers were studied to determine short-term thresholds of local tissue pressure that produce significant neuromuscular dysfunction. Local tissue fluid pressure adjacent to the deep peroneal nerve was elevated by the compression apparatus and continuously monitored for 2-3 h by the slit catheter technique. Elevation of tissue fluid pressure to within 35-40 mm Hg of diastolic blood pressure (approx. 40 mm Hg of in situ pressure in our subjects) elicited a consistent progression of neuromuscular deterioration including, in order, (a) gradual loss of sensation, as assessed by Semmes-Weinstein monofilaments, (b) subjective complaints, (c) reduced nerve conduction velocity, (d) decreased action potential amplitude of the extensor digitorum brevis muscle, and (e) motor weakness of muscles within the anterior compartment. Generally, higher intracompartment at pressures caused more rapid deterioration of neuromuscular function. In two subjects, when in situ compression levels were 0 and 30 mm Hg, normal neuromuscular function was maintained for 3 h. Threshold pressures for significant dysfunction were not always the same for each functional parameter studied, and the magnitudes of each functional deficit did not always correlate with compression level. This variable tolerance to elevated pressure emphasizes the need to monitor clinical signs and symptoms carefully in the diagnosis of compartment syndromes. The nature of the present studies was short term; longer term compression of myoneural tissues may result in dysfunction at lower pressure thresholds.

  10. Rehabilitation of the trigeminal nerve

    PubMed Central

    Iro, Heinrich; Bumm, Klaus; Waldfahrer, Frank

    2005-01-01

    When it comes to restoring impaired neural function by means of surgical reconstruction, sensory nerves have always been in the role of the neglected child when compared with motor nerves. Especially in the head and neck area, with its either sensory, motor or mixed cranial nerves, an impaired sensory function can cause severe medical conditions. When performing surgery in the head and neck area, sustaining neural function must not only be highest priority for motor but also for sensory nerves. In cases with obvious neural damage to sensory nerves, an immediate neural repair, if necessary with neural interposition grafts, is desirable. Also in cases with traumatic trigeminal damage, an immediate neural repair ought to be considered, especially since reconstructive measures at a later time mostly require for interposition grafts. In terms of the trigeminal neuralgia, commonly thought to arise from neurovascular brainstem compression, a pharmaceutical treatment is considered as the state of the art in terms of conservative therapy. A neurovascular decompression of the trigeminal root can be an alternative in some cases when surgical treatment is sought after. Besides the above mentioned therapeutic options, alternative treatments are available. PMID:22073060

  11. Low-Level Laser Irradiation Improves Functional Recovery and Nerve Regeneration in Sciatic Nerve Crush Rat Injury Model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chau-Zen; Chen, Yi-Jen; Wang, Yan-Hsiung; Yeh, Ming-Long; Huang, Mao-Hsiung; Ho, Mei-Ling; Liang, Jen-I; Chen, Chia-Hsin

    2014-01-01

    The development of noninvasive approaches to facilitate the regeneration of post-traumatic nerve injury is important for clinical rehabilitation. In this study, we investigated the effective dose of noninvasive 808-nm low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on sciatic nerve crush rat injury model. Thirty-six male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into 6 experimental groups: a normal group with or without 808-nm LLLT at 8 J/cm2 and a sciatic nerve crush injury group with or without 808-nm LLLT at 3, 8 or 15 J/cm2. Rats were given consecutive transcutaneous LLLT at the crush site and sacrificed 20 days after the crush injury. Functional assessments of nerve regeneration were analyzed using the sciatic functional index (SFI) and hindlimb range of motion (ROM). Nerve regeneration was investigated by measuring the myelin sheath thickness of the sciatic nerve using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and by analyzing the expression of growth-associated protein 43 (GAP43) in sciatic nerve using western blot and immunofluorescence staining. We found that sciatic-injured rats that were irradiated with LLLT at both 3 and 8 J/cm2 had significantly improved SFI but that a significant improvement of ROM was only found in rats with LLLT at 8 J/cm2. Furthermore, the myelin sheath thickness and GAP43 expression levels were significantly enhanced in sciatic nerve-crushed rats receiving 808-nm LLLT at 3 and 8 J/cm2. Taken together, these results suggest that 808-nm LLLT at a low energy density (3 J/cm2 and 8 J/cm2) is capable of enhancing sciatic nerve regeneration following a crush injury. PMID:25119457

  12. Low-level laser irradiation improves functional recovery and nerve regeneration in sciatic nerve crush rat injury model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chau-Zen; Chen, Yi-Jen; Wang, Yan-Hsiung; Yeh, Ming-Long; Huang, Mao-Hsiung; Ho, Mei-Ling; Liang, Jen-I; Chen, Chia-Hsin

    2014-01-01

    The development of noninvasive approaches to facilitate the regeneration of post-traumatic nerve injury is important for clinical rehabilitation. In this study, we investigated the effective dose of noninvasive 808-nm low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on sciatic nerve crush rat injury model. Thirty-six male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into 6 experimental groups: a normal group with or without 808-nm LLLT at 8 J/cm(2) and a sciatic nerve crush injury group with or without 808-nm LLLT at 3, 8 or 15 J/cm(2). Rats were given consecutive transcutaneous LLLT at the crush site and sacrificed 20 days after the crush injury. Functional assessments of nerve regeneration were analyzed using the sciatic functional index (SFI) and hindlimb range of motion (ROM). Nerve regeneration was investigated by measuring the myelin sheath thickness of the sciatic nerve using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and by analyzing the expression of growth-associated protein 43 (GAP43) in sciatic nerve using western blot and immunofluorescence staining. We found that sciatic-injured rats that were irradiated with LLLT at both 3 and 8 J/cm(2) had significantly improved SFI but that a significant improvement of ROM was only found in rats with LLLT at 8 J/cm(2). Furthermore, the myelin sheath thickness and GAP43 expression levels were significantly enhanced in sciatic nerve-crushed rats receiving 808-nm LLLT at 3 and 8 J/cm(2). Taken together, these results suggest that 808-nm LLLT at a low energy density (3 J/cm(2) and 8 J/cm(2)) is capable of enhancing sciatic nerve regeneration following a crush injury. PMID:25119457

  13. Assessment of Brainstem Function with Auricular Branch of Vagus Nerve Stimulation in Parkinsons Disease

    PubMed Central

    Weise, David; Adamidis, Melanie; Pizzolato, Fabio; Rumpf, Jost-Julian; Fricke, Christopher; Classen, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Background The efferent dorsal motor nucleus of the vagal nuclei complex may degenerate early in the course of Parkinsons disease (PD), while efferent nucleus ambiguous, the principal source of parasympathetic vagal neurons innervating the heart, and afferent somatosensory nuclei remain intact. Objective To obtain neurophysiological evidence related to this pattern, we tested processing of afferent sensory information transmitted via the auricular branch of the vagus nerve (ABVN) which is known to be connected to autonomic regulation of cardiac rhythm. Methods In this cross-sectional observational study, we recorded (i) somatosensory evoked potentials (ABVN-SEP) and (ii) cutaneo-cardioautonomic response elicited by stimulation of the ABVN (modulation of heart-rate variability (HRV index; low frequency power, ln(LF), high frequency power, ln(HF); ln(LF/HF) ratio)) in 50 PD patients and 50 age and sex matched healthy controls. Additionally, auditory evoked potentials and trigeminal nerve SEP were assessed. Results Neither ABVN-SEP nor any of the other functional brainstem parameters differed between patients and controls. Although HRV index was decreased in PD patients, modulation of ln(LF/HF) by ABVN-stimulation, likely indicating cardiac parasympathetic activation, did not differ between both groups. Conclusions Findings do not point to prominent dysfunction of processing afferent information from ABVN and its connected parasympathetic cardiac pathway in PD. They are consistent with the known pattern of degeneration of the vagal nuclei complex of the brainstem. PMID:25849807

  14. Sensory Processing in Preterm Preschoolers and Its Association with Executive Function

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Jenna N.; Feldman, Heidi M.; Huffman, Lynne C.; Loe, Irene M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Symptoms of abnormal sensory processing have been related to preterm birth, but have not yet been studied specifically in preterm preschoolers. The degree of association between sensory processing and other domains is important for understanding the role of sensory processing symptoms in the development of preterm children. Aims To test two related hypotheses: (1) preterm preschoolers have more sensory processing symptoms than full term preschoolers and (2) sensory processing is associated with both executive function and adaptive function in preterm preschoolers. Study Design Cross-sectional study Subjects Preterm children (≤34 weeks of gestation; n = 54) and full term controls (≥37 weeks of gestation; n = 73) ages 3-5 years. Outcome Measures Sensory processing was assessed with the Short Sensory Profile. Executive function was assessed with (1) parent ratings on the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function- Preschool version and (2) a performance-based battery of tasks. Adaptive function was assessed with the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales-II. Results Preterm preschoolers showed significantly more sensory symptoms than full term controls. A higher percentage of preterm than full term preschoolers had elevated numbers of sensory symptoms (37% vs. 12%). Sensory symptoms in preterm preschoolers were associated with scores on executive function measures, but were not significantly associated with adaptive function. Conclusions Preterm preschoolers exhibited more sensory symptoms than full term controls. Preterm preschoolers with elevated numbers of sensory symptoms also showed executive function impairment. Future research should further examine whether sensory processing and executive function should be considered independent or overlapping constructs. PMID:25706317

  15. Non-canonical functions of the peripheral nerve.

    PubMed

    Kauck, Markta; Adameyko, Igor

    2014-02-01

    The peripheral nervous system (PNS) is complex and omnipresent. The PNS targets all parts of the body starting from early stages of embryonic development, and in large part, is derived from multipotent migratory neural crest stem cells. Current opinion mostly perceives the PNS as a means of communication and information exchange between the central nervous system, the rest of the body and the environment. Additionally, the PNS is largely associated with autonomic control. Being an "alternative brain" it provides local regulation of processes in organs. However, it has become evident in recent years that in addition to these main canonical functions the PNS possesses a number of other important roles in development and homeostasis of targeted tissues, for instance, in nerve-dependent regeneration. The PNS represents a niche that hosts neural crest-derived peripheral glial cells, or, in other words, neural crest-like multipotent cells throughout the entire body. These multipotent nerve-adjacent cells can be reprogrammed in vivo and play a number of roles from creating pigmentation to controlling regeneration of a limb in amphibians or skin in rodents. In the current review we outline newly emerged, non-canonical functions of the PNS and briefly describe cellular and molecular aspects of these alternative functions. PMID:24140263

  16. Electrophysiological assessment of sensory and cognitive function in children exposed to lead: a review

    SciTech Connect

    Otto, D.A.

    1987-09-01

    Studies of the effects of lead absorption on sensory evoked and slow brain potentials in children are reviewed. Studies of slow-wave voltage in children during sensory conditioning indicated a linear relationship to blood lead level in two studies; an effect that could not be replicated in an independent sample of children. Results of a fourth study indicated that slow-voltage measures were more sensitive to lead during active rather than passive conditioning. Conflicting evidence of lead effects on pattern-reversal visual evoked potentials in children was found in three studies. Evidence of increased latencies of brainstorm auditory evoked potentials at blood lead levels above 25/dl were reported in two studies. Sensory evoked potentials hold considerable promise as noninvasive, clinically valid, culture-free measures of the effects of lead exposure on sensory-nerve conduction, but further study is needed in humans and animals to clarify inconsistencies in the existing literature.

  17. An Investigation of Modifying Effects of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in Metabolism-related Genes on the Relationship between Peripheral Nerve Function and Mercury Levels in Urine and Hair

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Goodrich, Jaclyn M.; Werner, Robert; Gillespie, Brenda; Basu, Niladri; Franzblau, Alfred

    2012-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a potent neurotoxicant. We hypothesized that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes coding glutathione-related proteins, selenoproteins and metallothioneins may modify the relationship of mercury biomarkers with changes in peripheral nerve function. Dental professionals (n=515) were recruited in 2009 and 2010. Sensory nerve function (onset latency, peak latency and amplitude) of the median, ulnar and sural nerves were recorded. Samples of urine, hair and DNA were collected. Covariates related to demographics, nerve function and elemental and methyl- mercury exposure were also collected. Subjects included 244 dentists (47.4%) and 269 non-dentists (52.2%; mostly dental hygienists and dental assistants). The mean mercury levels in urine (1.06μg/L) and hair (0.51μg/g) were not significantly different from the US general population (0.95 μg/L and 0.47μg/g, respectively). In multivariate linear models predicting nerve function adjusting for covariates, only 3 out of a total of 504 models showed stable and statistically significant interaction of SNPs with mercury biomarkers. Overall, given the possibility of false positives, the results suggested little evidence of effect modification of the SNPs on the relationship between mercury biomarkers with peripheral nerve function at exposure levels that are relevant to the general US population. PMID:22236634

  18. Functional evaluation of regenerated and misrouted low threshold mechanoreceptors and polymodal nociceptors in the skin of rat hindfeet after crush lesions to the sciatic nerve.

    PubMed

    Hansson, Thomas; Povlsen, Bo

    2005-01-01

    Tracer studies on motor axons after nerve crush injuries have indicated that misrouting may occur even when the endoneurium is intact. Misrouting of regenerated polymodal nociceptive C-fibres and low threshold mechanoreceptive axons have been studied functionally in 50 rats three months after unilateral crush lesions to the sciatic nerve. Two weeks before evaluation the tibial fascicle (or the peroneal fascicle) above the lesion was cut and tied off. In this way only functional regeneration of misrouted axons was tested. Misrouted low threshold mechanoreceptive axons and polymodal nociceptor C-fibres were found after regeneration in both glabrous and hairy skin. We conclude that functional misdirection of both myelinated and unmyelinated sensory axons innervating either glabrous or hairy skin can occur after a crush lesion to a peripheral nerve in rats. PMID:16320400

  19. Long-Term Functional Recovery after Facial Nerve Transection and Repair in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Banks, Caroline A.; Knox, Christopher; Hunter, Daniel A.; Mackinnon, Susan E.; Hohman, Marc H.; Hadlock, Tessa A.

    2015-01-01

    Background The rodent model is commonly used to study facial nerve injury. Because of the exceptional regenerative capacity of the rodent facial nerve, it is essential to consider the timing when studying facial nerve regeneration and functional recovery. Short-term functional recovery data following transection and repair of the facial nerve has been documented by our laboratory. However, because of the limitations of the head fixation device, there is a lack of long-term data following facial nerve injury. The objective of this study was to elucidate the long-term time course and functional deficit following facial nerve transection and repair in a rodent model. Methods Adult rats were divided into group 1 (controls) and group 2 (experimental). Group 1 animals underwent head fixation, followed by a facial nerve injury, and functional testing was performed from day 7 to day 70. Group 2 animals underwent facial nerve injury, followed by delayed head fixation, and then underwent functional testing from months 6 to 8. Results There was no statistical difference between the average whisking amplitudes in group 1 and group 2 animals. Conclusion Functional whisking recovery 6 months after facial nerve injury is comparable to recovery within 1 to 4 months of transection and repair, thus the ideal window for evaluating facial nerve recovery falls within the 4 months after injury. PMID:25629206

  20. Dissociation between biochemical and functional effects of the aldose reductase inhibitor, ponalrestat, on peripheral nerve in diabetic rats.

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, N. E.; Cotter, M. A.

    1992-01-01

    1. The aim of the study was to examine the effects in rats of two different doses of the aldose reductase inhibitor, ponalrestat, on functional measures of nerve conduction and sciatic nerve biochemistry. 2. After 1 month, streptozotocin-induced diabetes produced 22%, 23% and 15% deficits in conduction velocity of sciatic nerves supplying gastrocnemius and tibialis anterior muscles and saphenous sensory nerve respectively compared to controls. These deficits were maintained over 2 months diabetes. 3. Slower-conducting motor fibres supplying the interosseus muscles of the foot did not show a diabetic deficit compared to onset controls, however, there was a 13% reduction in conduction velocity after 2 months diabetes relative to age-matched controls, indicating a maturation deficit. 4. Resistance to hypoxic conduction failure was investigated for sciatic nerve trunks in vitro. There was an increase in the duration of hypoxia necessary for an 80% reduction in compound action potential amplitude with diabetes. This was progressive; after 1 month, hypoxia time was increased by 22% and after 2 months by 57%. 5. The effect of 1-month treatment with the aldose reductase inhibitor, ponalrestat, on the abnormalities caused by an initial month of untreated diabetes was examined. Two doses of ponalrestat were employed, 8 mg kg-1 day-1 (which is equivalent to, or greater than, the blockade employed in clinical trials), and 100 mg kg-1 day-1. 6. Sciatic nerve sorbitol content was increased 7 fold by diabetes. Both doses were effective in reducing this; 70% for 8 mg kg-1 day-1, and to within the control range for 100 mg kg-1 day-1.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1467842

  1. Divergent effects of painful nerve injury on mitochondrial Ca(2+) buffering in axotomized and adjacent sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Quinn H; Sprick, Chelsea; Guo, Yuan; Mueller, Samantha; Bienengraeber, Martin; Pan, Bin; Wu, Hsiang-En

    2014-11-17

    Mitochondria critically regulate cytoplasmic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]c), but the effects of sensory neuron injury have not been examined. Using FCCP (1M) to eliminate mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake combined with oligomycin (10M) to prevent ATP depletion, we first identified features of depolarization-induced neuronal [Ca(2+)]c transients that are sensitive to blockade of mitochondrial Ca(2+) buffering in order to assess mitochondrial contributions to [Ca(2+)]c regulation. This established the loss of a shoulder during the recovery of the depolarization (K(+))-induced transient, increased transient peak and area, and elevated shoulder level as evidence of diminished mitochondrial Ca(2+) buffering. We then examined transients in Control neurons and neurons from the 4th lumbar (L4) and 5th lumbar (L5) dorsal root ganglia after L5 spinal nerve ligation (SNL). The SNL L4 neurons showed decreased transient peak and area compared to control neurons, while the SNL L5 neurons showed increased shoulder level. Additionally, SNL L4 neurons developed shoulders following transients with lower peaks than Control neurons. Application of FCCP plus oligomycin elevated resting [Ca(2+)]c in SNL L4 neurons more than in Control neurons. Whereas application of FCCP plus oligomycin 2s after neuronal depolarization initiated mitochondrial Ca(2+) release in most Control and SNL L4 neurons, this usually failed to release mitochondrial Ca(2+) from SNL L5 neurons. For comparable cytoplasmic Ca(2+) loads, the releasable mitochondrial Ca(2+) in SNL L5 neurons was less than Control while it was increased in SNL L4 neurons. These findings show diminished mitochondrial Ca(2+) buffering in axotomized SNL L5 neurons but enhanced Ca(2+) buffering by neurons in adjacent SNL L4 neurons. PMID:25251590

  2. Sensory and autonomic nerve changes in the monosodium glutamate-treated rat: a model of type II diabetes.

    PubMed

    Morrison, John F B; Shehab, Safa; Sheen, Rajan; Dhanasekaran, Subramanian; Shaffiullah, Mohammed; Mensah-Brown, Eric

    2008-02-01

    Rats that had been injected with monosodium glutamate (MSG) neonatally were studied for up to 70 weeks and compared with age-matched control rats to study changes in glucose tolerance and in sympathetic and sensory nerves. At 61 and 65 weeks of age, there were significant differences in glucose tolerance between the MSG and control groups, and the MSG group had raised fasting blood glucose. These changes were not associated with changes in the number of beta-cells in the islets of Langerhans. In addition, the diabetic MSG-treated rats had central obesity and cataracts. Hypoalgesia to thermal stimuli was present in MSG-treated rats as early as 6 weeks and persisted at 70 weeks. However, no differences were observed in the distribution of substance P, the neurokinin-1 receptor or calcitonin gene-related peptide in the dorsal horn of L3-L5 at this age (70 weeks). Diabetic MSG-treated animals at 65 and 70 weeks of age had significantly reduced noradrenaline concentrations in the heart, tail artery and ileum, while concentrations in the adrenal gland and corpus cavernosum were significantly increased. There was also a significant increase in adrenal adrenaline, dopamine and serotonin, largely attributable to changes in weight of the adrenal gland in the MSG-treated animals. The results indicate that MSG-treated animals develop a form of type II diabetes by about 60 weeks of age, and that there are significant changes in amine levels in various tissues associated with these developments. PMID:17911358

  3. Relationships among Repetitive Behaviors, Sensory Features, and Executive Functions in High Functioning Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyd, Brian A.; McBee, Matthew; Holtzclaw, Tia; Baranek, Grace T.; Bodfish, James W.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between repetitive behaviors and sensory processing issues in school-aged children with high functioning autism (HFA). Children with HFA (N = 61) were compared to healthy, typical controls (N = 64) to determine the relationship between these behavioral classes and to examine whether executive dysfunction

  4. Biomechanical and functional variation in rat sciatic nerve following cuff electrode implantation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Nerve cuff electrodes are commonly and successfully used for stimulating peripheral nerves. On the other hand, they occasionally induce functional and morphological changes following chronic implantation, for reasons not always clear. We hypothesize that restriction of nerve mobility due to cuff implantation may alter nerve conduction. Methods We quantified acute changes in nerve-muscle electrophysiology, using electromyography, and nerve kinematics in anesthetized Sprague Dawley rat sciatic nerves during controlled hindlimb joint movement. We compared electrophysiological and biomechanical response in uncuffed nerves and those secured within a cuff electrode using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and regression analysis. Results Tethering resulting from cuff implantation resulted in altered nerve strain and a complex biomechanical environment during joint movement. Coincident with biomechanical changes, electromyography revealed significantly increased variability in the response of conduction latency and amplitude in cuffed, but not free, nerves following joint movement. Conclusion Our findings emphasize the importance of the mechanical interface between peripheral nerves and their devices on neurophysiological performance. This work has implications for nerve device design, implantation, and prediction of long-term efficacy. PMID:24758405

  5. Function of sural nerve reflexes during human walking.

    PubMed

    Zehr, E P; Stein, R B; Komiyama, T

    1998-02-15

    1. The functions of ipsilateral cutaneous reflexes were studied with short trains of stimuli presented pseudorandomly to the sural nerve during human walking. Electromyograms (EMG) of lower (tibialis anterior (TA), soleus, lateral (LG) and medial (MG) gastrocnemius) and upper leg (vastus lateralis and biceps femoris) muscles were recorded, together with ankle, knee and hip joint angles. Net reflex EMG responses were quantified in each of the sixteen parts of the step cycle. The kinematic measurements included ankle eversion- inversion, and ankle, knee and hip flexion-extension. 2. The function of the sural reflexes depended upon the part of the step cycle in which the nerve was stimulated and the intensity of stimulation. During stance, reflexes in MG and TA muscles in response to a medium intensity of stimulation (1.9 x radiating threshold, x RT) were closely associated with ankle eversion and dorsiflexion responses, respectively. These responses could assist in accommodation to uneven terrain that applies pressure to the lateral side of the foot (sural innervation area). Non-noxious, high intensity (2.3 x RT) stimulation resulted in strong suppression of LG and MG during stance which was correlated to a small reduction in ankle plantarflexion. At this higher intensity the response would function to prevent the foot from moving more forcefully onto a potentially harmful obstacle. 3. During swing, ankle dorsiflexion increased and was significantly correlated to the net TA EMG response after both medium and high intensity stimulation. Knee flexion was increased throughout swing at both intensities of stimulation. These responses may serve in an avoidance response in which the swing limb is brought past an obstacle without destabilizing contact. 4. The net EMG and kinematic responses suggest that cutaneous reflexes stabilize human gait against external perturbations produced by an uneven surface in stance or obstacles encountered during swing. PMID:9490858

  6. Relationship between Social Competence and Sensory Processing in Children with High Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilton, Claudia; Graver, Kathleen; LaVesser, Patricia

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This study examines the relationship between social competence and sensory processing in children with high functioning autism spectrum disorders. Methodology: Children, ages 6-10 (N = 36), with high functioning autism spectrum disorders were assessed using the Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS) and the Sensory Profile (SP). A bivariate

  7. Exuberant sprouting of sensory and sympathetic nerve fibers in nonhealed bone fractures and the generation and maintenance of chronic skeletal pain

    PubMed Central

    Chartier, Stephane R.; Thompson, Michelle L.; Longo, Geraldine; Fealk, Michelle N.; Majuta, Lisa A.; Mantyh, Patrick W.

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal injury is a leading cause of chronic pain and long-term disability worldwide. While most acute skeletal pain can be effectively managed with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and opiates, chronic skeletal pain is more difficult to control using these same therapy regimens. One possibility as to why chronic skeletal pain is more difficult to manage over time is that there may be nerve sprouting in non-healed areas of the skeleton that normally receive little (mineralized bone) to no (articular cartilage) innervation. If such ectopic sprouting did occur, it could result in normally nonnoxious loading of the skeleton being perceived as noxious and/or the generation of a neuropathic pain state. To explore this possibility, a mouse model of skeletal pain was generated by inducing a closed fracture of the femur. Examined animals had comminuted fractures and did not fully heal even at 90+ days post fracture. In all mice with nonhealed fractures, exuberant sensory and sympathetic nerve sprouting, an increase in the density of nerve fibers, and the formation of neuroma-like structures near the fracture site were observed. Additionally, all of these animals exhibited significant pain behaviors upon palpation of the nonhealed fracture site. In contrast, sprouting of sensory and sympathetic nerve fibers or significant palpation-induced pain behaviors was never observed in nave animals. Understanding what drives this ectopic nerve sprouting and the role it plays in skeletal pain may allow a better understanding and treatment of this currently difficult-to-control pain state. PMID:25196264

  8. Dexamethasone enhanced functional recovery after sciatic nerve crush injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xinhong; Yuan, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Dexamethasone is currently used for the treatment of peripheral nerve injury, but its mechanisms of action are not completely understood. Inflammation/immune response at the site of nerve lesion is known to be an essential trigger of the pathological changes that have a critical impact on nerve repair and regeneration. In this study, we observed the effects of various doses of dexamethasone on the functional recovery after sciatic nerve crush injury in a rat model. Motor functional recovery was monitored by walking track analysis and gastrocnemius muscle mass ratio. The myelinated axon number was counted by morphometric analysis. Rats administered dexamethasone by local intramuscular injection had a higher nerve function index value, increased gastrocnemius muscle mass ratio, reduced Wallerian degeneration severity, and enhanced regenerated myelinated nerve fibers. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed for CD3 expression, which is a marker for T-cell activation, and infiltration in the sciatic nerve. Dexamethasone-injected rats had fewer CD3-positive cells compared to controls. Furthermore, we found increased expression of GAP-43, which is a factor associated with development and plasticity of the nervous system, in rat nerves receiving dexamethasone. These results provide strong evidence that dexamethasone enhances sciatic nerve regeneration and function recovery in a rat model of sciatic nerve injury through immunosuppressive and potential neurotrophic effects. PMID:25839037

  9. Sensory Function: Insights From Wave 2 of the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project

    PubMed Central

    Kern, David W.; Wroblewski, Kristen E.; Chen, Rachel C.; Schumm, L. Philip; McClintock, Martha K.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. Sensory function, a critical component of quality of life, generally declines with age and influences health, physical activity, and social function. Sensory measures collected in Wave 2 of the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project (NSHAP) survey focused on the personal impact of sensory function in the home environment and included: subjective assessment of vision, hearing, and touch, information on relevant home conditions and social sequelae as well as an improved objective assessment of odor detection. Method. Summary data were generated for each sensory category, stratified by age (6290 years of age) and gender, with a focus on function in the home setting and the social consequences of sensory decrements in each modality. Results. Among both men and women, older age was associated with self-reported impairment of vision, hearing, and pleasantness of light touch. Compared with women, men reported significantly worse hearing and found light touch less appealing. There were no gender differences for vision. Overall, hearing loss seemed to have a greater impact on social function than did visual impairment. Discussion. Sensory function declines across age groups, with notable gender differences for hearing and light touch. Further analysis of sensory measures from NSHAP Wave 2 may provide important information on how sensory declines are related to health, social function, quality of life, morbidity, and mortality in this nationally representative sample of older adults. PMID:25360015

  10. Capsaicin Induces Degeneration of Cutaneous Autonomic Nerve Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, Christopher H; Wang, Ningshan; Freeman, Roy

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine the effects of topical application of capsaicin on cutaneous autonomic nerves. Methods Thirty-two healthy subjects underwent occlusive application of 0.1% capsaicin cream (or placebo) for 48 hours. Subjects were followed for 6 months with serial assessments of sudomotor, vasomotor, pilomotor and sensory function with simultaneous assessment of innervation through skin biopsies. Results There were reductions in sudomotor, vasomotor, pilomotor and sensory function in capsaicin- treated subjects (p<0.01 vs. placebo). Sensory function declined more rapidly than autonomic function; reaching a nadir by day 6 while autonomic function reached a nadir by day 16. There were reductions in sudomotor, vasomotor, pilomotor and sensory nerve fiber densities in capsaicin treated subjects (p<0.01 vs. placebo). Intra-epidermal nerve fiber density declined maximally by 6 days while autonomic nerve fiber densities reached maximal degeneration by day 16. Conversely, autonomic nerves generally regenerated more rapidly than sensory nerves, requiring 4050 days to return to baseline levels while sensory fibers required 140150 days to return to baseline. Interpretation Topical capsaicin leads to degeneration of sudomotor, vasomotor and pilomotor nerves accompanied by impairment of sudomotor, vasomotor and pilomotor function. These results suggest the susceptibility and/or pathophysiologic mechanisms of nerve damage may differ between autonomic and sensory nerve fibers treated with capsaicin and enhances the capsaicin model for the study of disease modifying agents. The data suggest caution should be taken when topical capsaicin is applied to skin surfaces at risk for ulceration, particularly in neuropathic conditions characterized by sensory and autonomic impairment. PMID:21061393

  11. Investigations on neurotoxicity of chemical substances at the workplace. V. Determination of the motor and sensory nerve conduction velocity in persons occupationally exposed to lead.

    PubMed

    Triebig, G; Weltle, D; Valentin, H

    1984-01-01

    A cross-sectional study was performed in order to investigate the influence of chronic lead-exposure on the peripheral nervous system. We examined 148 male workers of a storage battery manufacturing plant, who had been exposed to lead metal and inorganic lead compounds for 1 to 28 years (mean 11 years). Fifteen workers with non-occupational risks of peripheral neuropathy (former diseases, alcohol abuse, medication) were excluded from the study. The investigation program comprised: case history, physical examination, analyses of blood- and urine-samples and determination of maximal motor, mixed and sensory conduction velocity (NCV) of the ulnar and median nerve of the right forearm. Objectively no worker showed any signs of health effects related to lead exposure. The "Biological Monitoring" included the determination of (1) Blood-lead level (Pb-B), (2) Free erythrocyte porphyrins (FEP), (3) delta-Aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALA-D) and (4) delta-Aminolevulinic acid in urine (ALA-U). Further "time-weighted-average (TWA)"-values of Pb-B were calculated on the basis of several determinations over the period 1975-1981. The following "actual" ("TWA") median values resulted: Pb-B 53 micrograms/dl (54 micrograms/dl), ALA-U 5.6 mg/l (8.4 mg/l), FEP 2.0 mg/l (2.0 mg/l). The "Biologischer Arbeitsstoff Toleranz Wert (BAT)" of 70 micrograms/dl for Pb-B was exceeded in 15 workers (11%), and of 15 mg/l for ALA-U in 30 cases (23%). In comparison with age-matched controls, the lead workers showed a mild slowing of NCV with mean values between 0.8 and 2.0 m/s. Multiple stepwise regression analyses revealed statistically significant correlations between the four NCV and age as well as Pb-B. There were better correlations by using "TWA" than "actual" data of Pb-B. Consideration of the results of the regression analyses, together with an evaluation of the individual neurophysiological status as a function of internal lead exposure, a "dose-effect-relationship" was found only in the case of Pb-B exceeding 70 micrograms/dl. From our study it is concluded that chronic lead exposure resulting in blood-lead levels of below 70 micrograms/dl is no occupational risk causing a functionally significant slowing of nerve conduction velocities. PMID:6323322

  12. Functional motor recovery is improved due to local placement of GDNF microspheres after delayed nerve repair.

    PubMed

    Wood, Matthew D; Gordon, Tessa; Kemp, Stephen W P; Liu, Edward H; Kim, Howard; Shoichet, Molly S; Borschel, Gregory H

    2013-05-01

    The majority of bioengineering strategies to promote peripheral nerve regeneration after injury have focused on therapies to bridge large nerve defects while fewer therapies are being developed to treat other nerve injuries, such as nerve transection. We constructed delivery systems using fibrin gels containing either free GDNF or polylactide-glycolic acid (PLGA) microspheres with GDNF to treat delayed nerve repair, where ELISA verified GDNF release. We determined the formulation of microspheres containing GDNF that optimized nerve regeneration and functional recovery in a rat model of delayed nerve repair. Experimental groups underwent delayed nerve repair and treatment with GDNF microspheres in fibrin glue at the repair site or control treatments (empty microspheres or free GDNF without microspheres). Contractile muscle force, muscle mass, and MUNE were measured 12 weeks following treatment, where GDNF microspheres (2 weeks formulation) were superior compared to either no GDNF or short-term release of free GDNF to nerve. Nerve histology distal to the repair site demonstrated increased axon counts and fiber diameters due to GDNF microspheres (2 weeks formulation). GDNF microspheres partially reversed the deleterious effects of chronic nerve injury, and recovery was slightly favored with the 2 weeks formulation compared to the 4 weeks formulation. PMID:23239194

  13. Advances of Peripheral Nerve Repair Techniques to Improve Hand Function: A Systematic Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    P, Mafi; S, Hindocha; M, Dhital; M, Saleh

    2012-01-01

    Concepts of neuronal damage and repair date back to ancient times. The research in this topic has been growing ever since and numerous nerve repair techniques have evolved throughout the years. Due to our greater understanding of nerve injuries and repair we now distinguish between central and peripheral nervous system. In this review, we have chosen to concentrate on peripheral nerve injuries and in particular those involving the hand. There are no reviews bringing together and summarizing the latest research evidence concerning the most up-to-date techniques used to improve hand function. Therefore, by identifying and evaluating all the published literature in this field, we have summarized all the available information about the advances in peripheral nerve techniques used to improve hand function. The most important ones are the use of resorbable poly[(R)-3-hydroxybutyrate] (PHB), epineural end-to-end suturing, graft repair, nerve transfer, side to side neurorrhaphy and end to side neurorrhaphy between median, radial and ulnar nerves, nerve transplant, nerve repair, external neurolysis and epineural sutures, adjacent neurotization without nerve suturing, Agee endoscopic operation, tourniquet induced anesthesia, toe transfer and meticulous intrinsic repair, free auto nerve grafting, use of distal based neurocutaneous flaps and tubulization. At the same time we found that the patient’s age, tension of repair, time of repair, level of injury and scar formation following surgery affect the prognosis. Despite the thorough findings of this systematic review we suggest that further research in this field is needed. PMID:22431951

  14. Fluorescently Labeled Peptide Increases Identification of Degenerated Facial Nerve Branches during Surgery and Improves Functional Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Timon; Mastrodimos, Melina B.; Raju, Sharat C.; Glasgow, Heather L.; Whitney, Michael; Friedman, Beth; Moore, Jeffrey D.; Kleinfeld, David; Steinbach, Paul; Messer, Karen; Pu, Minya; Tsien, Roger Y.; Nguyen, Quyen T.

    2015-01-01

    Nerve degeneration after transection injury decreases intraoperative visibility under white light (WL), complicating surgical repair. We show here that the use of fluorescently labeled nerve binding probe (F-NP41) can improve intraoperative visualization of chronically (up to 9 months) denervated nerves. In a mouse model for the repair of chronically denervated facial nerves, the intraoperative use of fluorescent labeling decreased time to nerve identification by 40% compared to surgeries performed under WL alone. Cumulative functional post-operative recovery was also significantly improved in the fluorescence guided group as determined by quantitatively tracking of the recovery of whisker movement at time intervals for 6 weeks post-repair. To our knowledge, this is the first description of an injectable probe that increases visibility of chronically denervated nerves during surgical repair in live animals. Future translation of this probe may improve functional outcome for patients with chronic denervation undergoing surgical repair. PMID:25751149

  15. Ravages of Diabetes on Gastrointestinal Sensory-Motor Function: Implications for Pathophysiology and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Gregersen, Hans; Liao, Donghua; Drewes, Anne Mohr; Drewes, Asbjrn Mohr; Zhao, Jingbo

    2016-01-01

    Symptoms related to functional and sensory abnormalities are frequently encountered in patients with diabetes mellitus. Most symptoms are associated with impaired gastric and intestinal function. In this review, we discuss basic concepts of sensory-motor dysfunction and how they relate to clinical findings and gastrointestinal abnormalities that are commonly seen in diabetes. In addition, we review techniques that are available for investigating the autonomic nervous system, neuroimaging and neurophysiology of sensory-motor function. Such technological advances, while not readily available in the clinical setting, may facilitate stratification and individualization of therapy in diabetic patients in the future. Unraveling the structural, mechanical, and sensory remodeling in diabetes disease is based on a multidisciplinary approach that can bridge the knowledge from a variety of scientific disciplines. The final goal is to increase the understanding of the damage to GI structures and to sensory processing of symptoms, in order to assist clinicians with developing an optimal mechanics based treatment. PMID:26768896

  16. Relationship between sensory descriptive juiciness measurements and functionality parameters of broiler breast fillets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Relationships between Sensory Descriptive Juiciness Measurements and Functionality Parameters of Broiler Breast Fillets H. Zhuang and E. M. Savage Quality and Safety Assessment Research Unit, ARS-USDA, Russell Research Center, P. O. Box 5677, Athens, GA 30604-5677 Sensory moisture characteristics...

  17. Functionally Approached Body (FAB) Strategies for Young Children Who Have Behavioral and Sensory Processing Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pagano, John

    2005-01-01

    Functionally Approached Body (FAB) Strategies offer a clinical approach to help parents of young children with behavioral and sensory processing strategies. This article introduces the FAB Strategies, clinical strategies developed by the author for understanding and addressing young children's behavioral and sensory processing challenges. The FAB

  18. Ocular Motor and Sensory Function in Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Almer, Zina; Klein, Kathyrn S.; Marsh, Laura; Gerstenhaber, Melissa; Repka, Michael X.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the effect of dopaminergic medication and deep brain stimulation on ocular function in Parkinson disease (PD) and to measure vision-related quality of life in subjects with PD. Design Prospective comparative case series. Participants and Controls Twenty-seven PD and 16 control subjects were recruited. Methods We measured visual acuity, ocular motor function, convergence, and vision-related quality of life using the Visual Function Questionnaire–25 (VFQ-25). Visual sensory and motor measurements were made during the “on” and “off” states of PD dopaminergic treatment. Main Outcome Measures Convergence ability and vision related quality of life. Results The PD subjects had a mean age of 58.8 years; 30% were female. Their mean duration of PD was 10.9 ± 6.8 years. The control subjects had a mean age of 61.6 years; 56% were female. There was no difference in visual acuity, contrast sensitivity or color vision of the PD subjects in their “on” state compared with controls. Convergence amplitudes measured with base-out prism were significantly poorer in PD subjects compared with controls (24.1 ± 8 Δ vs 14.8 ±10.3 Δ; P=0.003). The mean composite VFQ-25 score was significantly worse in the PD subjects compared with the controls (87.1 ± 8.69 vs 96.6 ± 3.05; P=0.0001). Comparing the PD subjects in their “on” with their “off” states, there was no difference in distance exodeviation, near exodeviation or ocular ductions. Mean convergence amplitudes and near point of convergence were better in the “on” state compared with the “off” state, 14.8±10.3 Δ vs 10.7±9.0 Δ, (P=0.0006), and 13.1±9.1 cm vs 18.1±12.2, (P=0.002), respectively. Conclusions Convergence ability is significantly poorer in PD subjects in both their “on” and “off” states compared with controls, but significantly improves with systemic dopaminergic treatment. Ocular motor function in PD subjects fluctuates in response to treatment, which complicates ophthalmic management. PD subjects have a significant reduction in vision-related quality of life, especially near activities, that is not associated with visual acuity. PMID:21959370

  19. Nerve coaptation studies with and without a gap in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, J; Shibata, M; Takahashi, H

    1996-03-01

    Appropriate matching of proximal and distal fibers is a major objective when suturing a lacerated nerve. Recent studies suggest that neurotropic factors may influence motor/sensory specificity and affect the functional outcome. This was studied in animal models by direct coaptation of cut nerve ends inside a 5-mm collagen tube with and without appropriate sensory/motor alignment, as well as in models where the cut nerve ends were placed in a 10-mm collagen tube with a 5-mm gap, with and without appropriate sensory/motor alignment. The radial nerve of 49 New Zealand white rabbits was chosen because it has distinct motor and sensory divisions. The animals were killed at 24 weeks and electrophysiologic, histologic, and muscle contraction studies were performed. Axon counts and diameters were measured from the distal motor and sensory stumps. Nerve conduction velocity, dry muscle weight, and motor axon counts were not statistically different between the groups. The malaligned group without a gap had better regeneration in sensory nerves than other groups. The muscle contraction force of the malaligned group without a gap was significantly less than the other groups. The malaligned group with a 5-mm gap had the same muscle contraction force as the aligned group without a gap. In this study, a short nerve gap lessened the misdirection of motor fibers after nerve-end coaptation. PMID:8683059

  20. Comparison of functional characteristics of intradental A- and C-nerve fibres in dental pain.

    PubMed

    Ngassapa, D N

    1996-03-01

    The sensory nerve fibres in the pulp consist of myelinated A- and unmyelinated C-fibres which conduct nerve impulses. The A-fibres are larger in diameter and fast conducting. Most of the A-fibres are in the A-delta group, but also the existence of very fast A-beta fibres has been demonstrated. C-fibres are small and slow conducting. When natural stimuli such as heat, cold, drilling or drying of dentine with air blasts are applied on the tooth, the only sensation perceived seems to be that of pain. On the other hand perception of pain symptoms in clinical situations varies from sharp and piercing to dull and poorly localised. A- but not C-fibres respond to dentine stimulation, and therefore responsible for dentine sensitivity. When heat is applied to the tooth, there is a two-phase response. First there is an immediate A-fibre response followed by a C-fibre response. The A-fibres could be responsible for the sharp well localised pain in human subjects while C-fibres could be responsible for the dull pain radiating to other parts of the face. A-fibres are activated at a higher level of electrical stimulation than C-fibres. C-fibres, but not A-fibres respond to application of bradykinin and histamin. The functional differences in A- and C-fibres may be one explanation for the change in the pain symptoms which at the beginning of pulpitis are mediated by A-fibres and in advanced pulpitis by C-fibres. PMID:8698025

  1. Hydrogen-rich saline promotes motor functional recovery following peripheral nerve autografting in rats

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, YONG-GUANG; SHENG, QING-SONG; WANG, ZHI-JUN; LV, LI; ZHAO, WEI; CHEN, JIAN-MEI; XU, HAO

    2015-01-01

    Despite the application of nerve grafts and considerable microsurgical innovations, the functional recovery across a long peripheral nerve gap is generally partial and unsatisfactory. Thus, additional strategies are required to improve nerve regeneration across long nerve gaps. Hydrogen possesses antioxidant and anti-apoptotic properties, which could be neuroprotective in the treatment of peripheral nerve injury; however, such a possibility has not been experimentally tested in vivo. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effectiveness of hydrogen-rich saline in promoting nerve regeneration after 10-mm sciatic nerve autografting in rats. The rats were randomly divided into two groups and intraperitoneally administered a daily regimen of 5 ml/kg hydrogen-rich or normal saline. Axonal regeneration and functional recovery were assessed through a combination of behavioral analyses, electrophysiological evaluations, Fluoro-Gold retrograde tracings and histomorphological observations. The data showed that rats receiving hydrogen-rich saline achieved better axonal regeneration and functional recovery than those receiving normal saline. These findings indicated that hydrogen-rich saline promotes nerve regeneration across long gaps, suggesting that hydrogen-rich saline could be used as a neuroprotective agent for peripheral nerve injury therapy. PMID:26622383

  2. Presynaptic Inhibition of Olfactory Sensory Neurons: New Mechanisms and Potential Functions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Presynaptic inhibition is the suppression of neurotransmitter release from a neuron by inhibitory input onto its presynaptic terminal. In the olfactory system, the primary sensory afferents from the olfactory neuroepithelium to the brain’s olfactory bulb are strongly modulated by a presynaptic inhibition that has been studied extensively in brain slices and in vivo. In rodents, this inhibition is mediated by γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) and dopamine released from bulbar interneurons. The specialized GABAergic circuit is now well understood to include a specific subset of GAD65-expressing periglomerular interneurons that stimulate presynaptic GABAB receptors to reduce presynaptic calcium conductance. This inhibition is organized to permit the selective modulation of neurotransmitter release from specific populations of olfactory sensory neurons based on their odorant receptor expression, includes specialized microcircuits to create a tonically active inhibition and a separate feedback inhibition evoked by sensory input, and can be modulated by centrifugal projections from other brain regions. Olfactory nerve output can also be modulated by dopaminergic circuitry, but this literature is more difficult to interpret. Presynaptic inhibition of olfactory afferents may extend their dynamic range but could also create state-dependent or odorant-specific sensory filters on primary sensory representations. New directions exploring this circuit’s role in olfactory processing are discussed. PMID:23761680

  3. Biomagnetic functional localization of a peripheral nerve in man.

    PubMed Central

    Trahms, L; Erné, S N; Trontelj, Z; Curio, G; Aust, P

    1989-01-01

    The first detection of the magnetic field of a stimulated peripheral nerve in man is presented. The measurement was performed noninvasively and in vivo on a healthy subject. The spatio-temporal field distribution is utilized to calculate the location of bioelectric activity on the basis of the equivalent current dipole model. The localization of the active nerve tissue is confirmed by a computer tomography image of the upper arm cross-section. Furthermore, a calculation of the total current distribution in the nerve explains the observed morphology of the signal. Images FIGURE 5 PMID:2765652

  4. L-carnitine alleviates sciatic nerve crush injury in rats: functional and electron microscopy assessments

    PubMed Central

    Avsar, mm Zeynep; Avsar, Umit; Aydin, Ali; Yayla, Muhammed; Ozturkkaragoz, Berna; Un, Harun; Saritemur, Murat; Mercantepe, Tolga

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that L-carnitine exhibits neuroprotective effects on injured sciatic nerve of rats with diabetes mellitus. It is hypothesized that L-carnitine exhibits neuroprotective effects on injured sciatic nerve of rats. Rat sciatic nerve was crush injured by a forceps and exhibited degenerative changes. After intragastric administration of 50 and 100 mg/kg L-carnitine for 30 days, axon area, myelin sheath area, axon diameter, myelin sheath diameter, and numerical density of the myelinated axons of injured sciatic nerve were similar to normal, and the function of injured sciatic nerve also improved significantly. These findings suggest that L-carnitine exhibits neuroprotective effects on sciatic nerve crush injury in rats. PMID:25206754

  5. Ablation of TRPV1 Abolishes Endothelin Induced Increases in Afferent Renal Nerve Activity: Mechanisms and Functional Significance

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Chaoqin; Wang, Donna H.

    2009-01-01

    Endothelin 1 (ET-1) and its receptors, ETA and ETB, play an important role in regulating renal function and blood pressure, and these components are expressed in sensory nerves. Activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channels expressed in sensory nerves innervating the renal pelvis enhances afferent renal nerve activity (ARNA), diuresis, and natriuresis. We test the hypothesis that ET1 increases ARNA via activation of ETB, whereas ETA counter-balances ETB in wild type (WT) but not TRPV1-null mutant (TRPV?/?) mice. ET-1 alone or with BQ123, an ETA antagonist, perfused into the left renal pelvis increased ipsilaterel ARNA in WT but not TRPV?/? mice, and ARNA increases were greater in the latter. [Ala1, 3,11,15]-endothelin 1 (4 Ala-ET-1), an ETB agonist, increased ARNA that was greater than that induced by ET-1 in WT mice only. 4 Ala-ET-1-induced increases in ARNA were abolished by chelerythrine (CHE), a protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor, but not by H89, a protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor. Neither CHE, H89, nor BQ788, an ETB antagonist, affected ARNA triggered by capsaicin (CAP) in WT mice. Substance P (SP) release from the renal pelvis was increased by 4 Ala-ET-1 in WT mice only, and the increase was abolished by CHE but not by H89. Neither CHE, H89, nor BQ788 affected CAP-induced SP release. Our data show that ET1 increases ARNA via activation of ETB whereas ETA counter-balances ETB in WT but not TRPV?/? mice, suggesting that TRPV1 mediates ETB-dependent increases in ARNA, diuresis, and natriuresis via possibly the PKC pathway. PMID:19858408

  6. Effect of concurrent mental nerve reconstruction at the same time as mandibular reconstruction using a fibula osteoseptocutaneous flap.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Fumiaki; Ooatari, Miwako; Uehara, Miyuki; Takahashi, Yoshihiro; Kawano, Kenji

    2015-09-01

    The damage of inferior alveolar nerve causes some functional problem including numbness of lower lip and drooling. During segmental mandibulectomy, inferior alveolar nerve commonly resected, therefore, it is ideal to reconstruct the nerve to get better functional result. Sensory recovery was assessed after mandibular reconstruction using free fibula osteoseptocutaneous flap in thirteen cases. In six cases, the mental nerve reconstruction was performed simultaneously, and in seven cases, the mental nerve reconstruction was not performed. In the case that the mental nerve was reconstructed simultaneously, unilateral mental nerve reconstruction was performed in five cases, and bilateral mental nerve reconstruction was performed in one cases. More than one year after the reconstruction, sensory recovery was assessed and compared between the group that the mental nerve was reconstructed and the group that was not reconstructed. Our results showed almost a normal sensory recovery of the lips on the reconstructed side more than one year after the reconstruction in reconstructed group. In contrast, sensory recovery was poor in non-reconstructed group and non-reconstructed side. These results showed that mental nerve reconstruction at the same time as mandibular reconstruction affects the postoperative mandibular function. The sural nerve can be harvested from the same donor site of the free fibula osteoseptocutaneous flap and such mental nerve reconstruction with nerve grafting can be completed within an hour. Most cases of mandibular reconstruction using a free fibula osteoseptocutaneous flap transfer can therefore be candidates for mental nerve reconstruction at the time of mandibular reconstruction. PMID:26051850

  7. Behavioral, perceptual, and neural alterations in sensory and multisensory function in autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Baum, Sarah H; Stevenson, Ryan A; Wallace, Mark T

    2015-11-01

    Although sensory processing challenges have been noted since the first clinical descriptions of autism, it has taken until the release of the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) in 2013 for sensory problems to be included as part of the core symptoms of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in the diagnostic profile. Because sensory information forms the building blocks for higher-order social and cognitive functions, we argue that sensory processing is not only an additional piece of the puzzle, but rather a critical cornerstone for characterizing and understanding ASD. In this review we discuss what is currently known about sensory processing in ASD, how sensory function fits within contemporary models of ASD, and what is understood about the differences in the underlying neural processing of sensory and social communication observed between individuals with and without ASD. In addition to highlighting the sensory features associated with ASD, we also emphasize the importance of multisensory processing in building perceptual and cognitive representations, and how deficits in multisensory integration may also be a core characteristic of ASD. PMID:26455789

  8. Sensory fusion in Physarum polycephalum and implementing multi-sensory functional computation.

    PubMed

    Whiting, James G H; de Lacy Costello, Ben P J; Adamatzky, Andrew

    2014-05-01

    Surface electrical potential and observational growth recordings were made of a protoplasmic tube of the slime mould Physarum polycephalum in response to a multitude of stimuli with regards to sensory fusion or multisensory integration. Each stimulus was tested alone and in combination in order to evaluate for the first time the effect that multiple stimuli have on the frequency of streaming oscillation. White light caused a decrease in frequency whilst increasing the temperature and applying a food source in the form of oat flakes both increased the frequency. Simultaneously stimulating P. polycephalum with light and oat flake produced no net change in frequency, while combined light and heat stimuli showed an increase in frequency smaller than that observed for heat alone. When the two positive stimuli, oat flakes and heat, were combined, there was a net increase in frequency similar to the cumulative increases caused by the individual stimuli. Boolean logic gates were derived from the measured frequency change. PMID:24695059

  9. Stimuli of Sensory-Motor Nerves Terminate Arterial Contractile Effects of Endothelin-1 by CGRP and Dissociation of ET-1/ETA-Receptor Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Meens, Merlijn J. P. M. T.; Compeer, Matthijs G.; Hackeng, Tilman M.; van Zandvoort, Marc A.; Janssen, Ben J. A.; De Mey, Jo G. R.

    2010-01-01

    Background Endothelin-1 (ET-1), a long-acting paracrine mediator, is implicated in cardiovascular diseases but clinical trials with ET-receptor antagonists were not successful in some areas. We tested whether the quasi-irreversible receptor-binding of ET-1 (i) limits reversing effects of the antagonists and (ii) can be selectively dissociated by an endogenous counterbalancing mechanism. Methodology/Principal findings In isolated rat mesenteric resistance arteries, ETA-antagonists, endothelium-derived relaxing factors and synthetic vasodilators transiently reduced contractile effects of ET-1 but did not prevent persistent effects of the peptide. Stimuli of peri-vascular vasodilator sensory-motor nerves such as capsaicin not only reduced but also terminated long-lasting effects of ET-1. This was prevented by CGRP-receptor antagonists and was mimicked by exogenous calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). Using 2-photon laser scanning microscopy in vital intact arteries, capsaicin and CGRP, but not ETA-antagonism, were observed to promote dissociation of pre-existing ET-1/ETA-receptor complexes. Conclusions Irreversible binding and activation of ETA-receptors by ET-1 (i) occur at an antagonist-insensitive site of the receptor and (ii) are selectively terminated by endogenously released CGRP. Hence, natural stimuli of sensory-motor nerves that stimulate release of endogenous CGRP can be considered for therapy of diseases involving ET-1. PMID:20532232

  10. Different effects of blocked potassium channels on action potentials, accommodation, adaptation and anode break excitation in human motor and sensory myelinated nerve fibres: computer simulations.

    PubMed

    Stephanova, D I; Mileva, K

    2000-08-01

    Action potentials and electrotonic responses to 300-ms depolarizing and hyperpolarizing currents for human motor and sensory myelinated nerve fibres have been simulated on the basis of double cable models. The effects of blocked nodal or internodal potassium (fast or slow) channels on the fibre action potentials, early and late adaptations to 30-ms suprathreshold slowly increasing depolarizing stimuli have been examined. The effects of the same channels on accommodation after the termination of a prolonged (100 ms) hyperpolarizing current pulse have also been investigated. By removing the nodal fast potassium conductance the action potentials of the sensory fibres are considerably broader than those of the motor neurons. For both types of fibres, the blocked nodal slow potassium channels have a substantially smaller effect on the action potential repolarization. When the suprathreshold depolarizing current intensity is increased, the onset of the spike burst occurs sooner, which is common in the behaviour of the fibres. The most striking differences in the burst activity during early adaptation have been found between the fibres when the nodal fist potassium channels are blocked. The results obtained confirm the fact that the motor fibres adapt more quickly to sustained depolarizing current pulses than the sensory ones. The results also show that normal human motor and sensory fibres cannot be excited by a 100-ms hyperpolarizing current pulse, even at the threshold level. When removing the potassium channels in the nodal or internodal axolemma, the posthyperpolarization increase in excitability is small, which is common in the behaviour of the fibres. However, anode break excitation can be simulated in the fibres with simultaneous removal of the potassium channels under the myelin sheath, and this is more pronounced in the human sensory fibres than in motor fibres. This phenomenon can also be found when the internodal and some of the nodal (fast or slow) potassium channels are simultaneously blocked. PMID:10966055

  11. Specific ?- and ?-Tubulin Isotypes Optimize the Functions of Sensory Cilia in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Hurd, Daryl D.; Miller, Renee M.; Nez, Lizbeth; Portman, Douglas S.

    2010-01-01

    Primary cilia have essential roles in transducing signals in eukaryotes. At their core is the ciliary axoneme, a microtubule-based structure that defines cilium morphology and provides a substrate for intraflagellar transport. However, the extent to which axonemal microtubules are specialized for sensory cilium function is unknown. In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, primary cilia are present at the dendritic ends of most sensory neurons, where they provide a specialized environment for the transduction of particular stimuli. Here, we find that three tubulin isotypesthe ?-tubulins TBA-6 and TBA-9 and the ?-tubulin TBB-4are specifically expressed in overlapping sets of C. elegans sensory neurons and localize to the sensory cilia of these cells. Although cilia still form in mutants lacking tba-6, tba-9, and tbb-4, ciliary function is often compromised: these mutants exhibit a variety of sensory deficits as well as the mislocalization of signaling components. In at least one case, that of the CEM cephalic sensory neurons, cilium architecture is disrupted in mutants lacking specific ciliary tubulins. While there is likely to be some functional redundancy among C. elegans tubulin genes, our results indicate that specific tubulins optimize the functional properties of C. elegans sensory cilia. PMID:20421600

  12. Evidence for the role of lipid rafts and sphingomyelin in Ca2+-gating of Transient Receptor Potential channels in trigeminal sensory neurons and peripheral nerve terminals.

    PubMed

    Sághy, Éva; Szőke, Éva; Payrits, Maja; Helyes, Zsuzsanna; Börzsei, Rita; Erostyák, János; Jánosi, Tibor Zoltán; Sétáló, György; Szolcsányi, János

    2015-10-01

    Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) cation channels, such as TRP Vanilloid 1 and TRP Ankyrin repeat domain 1 (TRPV1 and TRPA1) are nocisensors playing important role to signal pain. Two "melastatin" TRP receptors, like TRPM8 and TRPM3 are also expressed in a subgroup of primary sensory neurons. These channels serve as thermosensors with unique thermal sensitivity ranges and are activated also by several exogenous and endogenous chemical ligands inducing conformational changes from various allosteric ("multisteric") sites. We analysed the role of plasma membrane microdomains of lipid rafts on isolated trigeminal (TRG) neurons and TRPV1-expressing CHO cell line by measuring agonist-induced Ca2+ transients with ratiometric technique. Stimulation-evoked calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) release from sensory nerve endings of the isolated rat trachea by radioimmunoassay was also measured. Lipid rafts were disrupted by cleaving sphingomyelin (SM) with sphingomyelinase (SMase), cholesterol depletion with methyl β-cyclodextrin (MCD) and ganglioside breakdown with myriocin. It has been revealed that intracellular Ca2+ increase responses evoked by the TRPV1 agonist capsaicin, the TRPA1 agonsits allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) and formaldehyde as well as the TRPM8 activator icilin were inhibited after SMase, MCD and myriocin incubation but the response to the TRPM3 agonist pregnenolon sulphate was not altered. Extracellular SMase treatment did not influence the thapsigargin-evoked Ca2+-release from intracellular stores. Besides the cell bodies, SMase also inhibited capsaicin- or AITC-evoked CGRP release from peripheral sensory nerve terminals, this provides the first evidence for the importance of lipid raft integrity in TRPV1 and TRPA1 gating on capsaicin-sensitive nerve terminals. SM metabolites, ceramide and sphingosine, did not influence TRPA1 and TRPV1 activation on TRG neurons, TRPV1-expressing CHO cell line, and nerve terminals. We suggest, that the hydrophobic interactions between TRP receptors and membrane lipid raft interfaces modulate the opening properties of these channels and therefore, targeting this interaction might be a promising tool for drug developmental purposes. PMID:26238178

  13. Sensory ability in the narwhal tooth organ system.

    PubMed

    Nweeia, Martin T; Eichmiller, Frederick C; Hauschka, Peter V; Donahue, Gretchen A; Orr, Jack R; Ferguson, Steven H; Watt, Cortney A; Mead, James G; Potter, Charles W; Dietz, Rune; Giuseppetti, Anthony A; Black, Sandie R; Trachtenberg, Alexander J; Kuo, Winston P

    2014-04-01

    The erupted tusk of the narwhal exhibits sensory ability. The hypothesized sensory pathway begins with ocean water entering through cementum channels to a network of patent dentinal tubules extending from the dentinocementum junction to the inner pulpal wall. Circumpulpal sensory structures then signal pulpal nerves terminating near the base of the tusk. The maxillary division of the fifth cranial nerve then transmits this sensory information to the brain. This sensory pathway was first described in published results of patent dentinal tubules, and evidence from dissection of tusk nerve connection via the maxillary division of the fifth cranial nerve to the brain. New evidence presented here indicates that the patent dentinal tubules communicate with open channels through a porous cementum from the ocean environment. The ability of pulpal tissue to react to external stimuli is supported by immunohistochemical detection of neuronal markers in the pulp and gene expression of pulpal sensory nerve tissue. Final confirmation of sensory ability is demonstrated by significant changes in heart rate when alternating solutions of high-salt and fresh water are exposed to the external tusk surface. Additional supporting information for function includes new observations of dentinal tubule networks evident in unerupted tusks, female erupted tusks, and vestigial teeth. New findings of sexual foraging divergence documented by stable isotope and fatty acid results add to the discussion of the functional significance of the narwhal tusk. The combined evidence suggests multiple tusk functions may have driven the tooth organ system's evolutionary development and persistence. PMID:24639076

  14. Analysis of osm-6, a gene that affects sensory cilium structure and sensory neuron function in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed Central

    Collet, J; Spike, C A; Lundquist, E A; Shaw, J E; Herman, R K

    1998-01-01

    Mutation in the Caenorhabditis elegans gene osm-6 was previously shown to result in defects in the ultrastructure of sensory cilia and defects in chemosensory and mechanosensory behaviors. We have cloned osm-6 by transposon tagging and transformation rescue and have identified molecular lesions associated with five osm-6 mutations. The osm-6 gene encodes a protein that is 40% identical in amino acid sequence to a predicted mammalian protein of unknown function. We fused osm-6 with the gene for green fluorescent protein (GFP); the fusion gene rescued the osm-6 mutant phenotype and showed accumulation of GFP in ciliated sensory neurons exclusively. The OSM-6::GFP protein was localized to cytoplasm, including processes and dendritic endings where sensory cilia are situated. Mutations in other genes known to cause ciliary defects led to changes in the appearance of OSM-6::GFP in dendritic endings or, in the case of daf-19, reduced OSM-6::GFP accumulation. We conclude from an analysis of genetic mosaics that osm-6 acts cell autonomously in affecting cilium structure. PMID:9475731

  15. 3D multi-channel bi-functionalized silk electrospun conduits for peripheral nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Dinis, T M; Elia, R; Vidal, G; Dermigny, Q; Denoeud, C; Kaplan, D L; Egles, C; Marin, F

    2015-01-01

    Despite technological advances over the past 25 years, a complete recovery from peripheral nerve injuries remains unsatisfactory today. The autograft is still considered the "gold standard" in clinical practice; however, postoperative complications and limited availability of nerve tissue have motivated the development of alternative approaches. Among them, the development of biomimetic nerve graft substitutes is one of the most promising strategies. In this study, multichanneled silk electrospun conduits bi-functionalized with Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) and Ciliary Neurotropic Factor (CNTF) were fabricated to enhance peripheral nerve regeneration. These bioactive guides consisting of longitudinally oriented channels and aligned nanofibers were designed in order to mimic the fascicular architecture and fibrous extracellular matrix found in native nerve. The simple use of the electrospinning technique followed by a manual manipulation to manufacture these conduits provides tailoring of channel number and diameter size to create perineurium-like structures. Functionalization of the silk fibroin nanofiber did not affect its secondary structure and chemical property. ELISA assays showed the absence of growth factors passive release from the functionalized fibers avoiding the topical accumulation of proteins. In addition, our biomimetic multichanneled functionalized nerve guides displayed a mechanical behavior comparable to that of rat sciatic nerve with an ultimate peak stress of 4.0 0.6 MPa and a corresponding elongation at failure of 156.8 46.7%. Taken together, our results demonstrate for the first time our ability to design and characterize a bi-functionalized nerve conduit consisting of electrospun nanofibers with multichannel oriented and nanofibers aligned for peripheral regeneration. Our bioactive silk tubes thus represent a new and promising technique towards the creation of a biocompatible nerve guidance conduit. PMID:25460402

  16. Cochlear nerve projections to the small cell shell of the cochlear nucleus: the neuroanatomy of extremely thin sensory axons.

    PubMed

    Hurd, L B; Hutson, K A; Morest, D K

    1999-08-01

    Labeling cochlear nerve fibers in the inner ear of chinchillas with biotinylated dextran polyamine was used to trace the thin fibers (Type II), which likely innervate outer hair cells. These axons, 0. 1-0.5 microm in diameter, were distinguished from the thicker Type I, fibers innervating inner hair cells, and traced to small-cell clusters in the cochlear nucleus. This study provided two major new insights into the outer hair cell connections in the cochlear nucleus and the potential significance of very thin axons and synaptic nests, which are widespread in the CNS. 1) EM serial reconstructions of labeled and unlabeled material revealed that Type II axons rarely formed synapses with conventional features (vesicles gathered at junctions). Rather, their endings contained arrays of endoplasmic reticulum and small spherical vesicles without junctions. 2) Type II axons projected predominantly to synaptic nests, where they contacted other endings and dendrites of local interneurons (small stellate and mitt cells, but not granule cells). Synaptic nests lacked intrinsic glia and, presumably, their high-affinity amino acid transporters. As functional units, nests and their Type II inputs from outer hair cells may contribute to an analog processing mode, which is slower, more diffuse, longer-lasting, and potentially more plastic than the digital processors addressed by inner hair cells. PMID:10400889

  17. Activation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 5 is essential for cystitis- and nerve growth factor-induced calcitonin gene-related peptide expression in sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cystitis causes considerable neuronal plasticity in the primary afferent pathways. The molecular mechanism and signal transduction underlying cross talk between the inflamed urinary bladder and sensory sensitization has not been investigated. Results In a rat cystitis model induced by cyclophosphamide (CYP) for 48 h, the mRNA and protein levels of the excitatory neurotransmitter calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) are increased in the L6 dorsal root ganglia (DRG) in response to bladder inflammation. Cystitis-induced CGRP expression in L6 DRG is triggered by endogenous nerve growth factor (NGF) because neutralization of NGF with a specific NGF antibody reverses CGRP up-regulation during cystitis. CGRP expression in the L6 DRG neurons is also enhanced by retrograde NGF signaling when NGF is applied to the nerve terminals of the ganglion-nerve two-compartmented preparation. Characterization of the signaling pathways in cystitis- or NGF-induced CGRP expression reveals that the activation (phosphorylation) of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK)5 but not Akt is involved. In L6 DRG during cystitis, CGRP is co-localized with phospho-ERK5 but not phospho-Akt. NGF-evoked CGRP up-regulation is also blocked by inhibition of the MEK/ERK pathway with specific MEK inhibitors U0126 and PD98059, but not by inhibition of the PI3K/Akt pathway with inhibitor LY294002. Further examination shows that cystitis-induced cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB) activity is expressed in CGRP bladder afferent neurons and is co-localized with phospho-ERK5 but not phospho-Akt. Blockade of NGF action in vivo reduces the number of DRG neurons co-expressing CGRP and phospho-CREB, and reverses cystitis-induced increases in micturition frequency. Conclusions A specific pathway involving NGF-ERK5-CREB axis plays an essential role in cystitis-induced sensory activation. PMID:22742729

  18. Functional identification of sensory mechanisms required for developmental song learning

    PubMed Central

    London, Sarah E; Clayton, David F

    2008-01-01

    A young male zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) learns to sing by copying the vocalizations of an older tutor in a process that parallels human speech acquisition. Brain pathways that control song production are well defined, but little is known about the sites and mechanisms of tutor song memorization. Here we test the hypothesis that molecular signaling in a sensory brain area outside of the song system is required for developmental song learning. Using controlled tutoring and a pharmacological inhibitor, we transiently suppressed the extracellular signal–regulated kinase signaling pathway in a portion of the auditory forebrain specifically during tutor song exposure. On maturation, treated birds produced poor copies of tutor song, whereas controls copied the tutor song effectively. Thus the foundation of normal song learning, the formation of a sensory memory of tutor song, requires a conserved molecular pathway in a brain area that is distinct from the circuit for song motor control. PMID:18391944

  19. Effect of skilled and unskilled training on nerve regeneration and functional recovery

    PubMed Central

    Pagnussat, A.S.; Michaelsen, S.M.; Achaval, M.; Ilha, J.; Hermel, E.E.S.; Back, F.P.; Netto, C.A.

    2012-01-01

    The most disabling aspect of human peripheral nerve injuries, the majority of which affect the upper limbs, is the loss of skilled hand movements. Activity-induced morphological and electrophysiological remodeling of the neuromuscular junction has been shown to influence nerve repair and functional recovery. In the current study, we determined the effects of two different treatments on the functional and morphological recovery after median and ulnar nerve injury. Adult Wistar male rats weighing 280 to 330?g at the time of surgery (N = 8-10 animals/group) were submitted to nerve crush and 1 week later began a 3-week course of motor rehabilitation involving either skilled (reaching for small food pellets) or unskilled (walking on a motorized treadmill) training. During this period, functional recovery was monitored weekly using staircase and cylinder tests. Histological and morphometric nerve analyses were used to assess nerve regeneration at the end of treatment. The functional evaluation demonstrated benefits of both tasks, but found no difference between them (P > 0.05). The unskilled training, however, induced a greater degree of nerve regeneration as evidenced by histological measurement (P < 0.05). These data provide evidence that both of the forelimb training tasks used in this study can accelerate functional recovery following brachial plexus injury. PMID:22584636

  20. Nuptial gifts of male spiders function as sensory traps.

    PubMed

    Stålhandske, Pia

    2002-05-01

    While nuptial food gifts come in various forms in arthropods, their evolutionary origins are unclear. A previous study on insects has shown that such gifts may arise as a sensory trap that exploits a female's underlying motivation to feed. Here I present independent evidence of a sensory trap in spiders. In certain visually oriented spiders, I suggest that males initially exploit the maternal care instinct by producing a nuptial gift that closely resembles the female egg sac. Males of the spider Pisaura mirabilis cover their prey gift with a silk layer, transforming it into a white round object. In a laboratory experiment I tested whether the colour of the gift affected the rate that females accepted males displaying their gifts. I found that the brighter and the more alike the nuptial gift to a female's egg sac, the faster the female responded by grabbing the gift. My results support the hypothesis that the nuptial gift in P. mirabilis works as a sensory trap. PMID:12028772

  1. Vascularized Nerve Grafts and Vascularized Fascia for Upper Extremity Nerve Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Kostopoulos, Vasileios K.

    2009-01-01

    Since 1976, experimental and clinical studies have suggested the superiority of vascularized nerve grafts. In this study, a 27-year experience of the senior author is presented regarding vascularized nerve grafts and fascia for complex upper extremity nerve reconstruction. The factors influencing outcomes as well as a comparison with conventional nerve grafts is presented. Since 1981, 21 vascularized nerve grafts, other than vascularized ulnar nerve, were used for reconstruction of nerve injuries in the upper extremity. Indications were prolonged denervation time, failure of the previously used conventional nerve grafts, and excessive scar in the recipient site. Injury was in the hand/wrist area (n = 5), in the forearm (n = 4), in the elbow (n = 2), in the arm (n = 4), or in the plexus (n = 6). Vascularized sural (n = 9), saphenous (n = 8), superficial radial (n = 3), and peroneal (superficial and deep) nerves were used. The mean follow-up was 31.4 months. Vascularized nerve grafts for upper extremity injuries provided good to excellent sensory return in severely scarred upper extremities in patients in whom conventional nerve grafts had failed. They have also provided relief of causalgia after painful neuroma resection and motor function recovery in selective cases even for above the elbow injuries. Small diameter vascularized nerve grafts should be considered for bridging long nerve gaps in regions of excessive scar or for reconstructions where conventional nerve grafts have failed. PMID:19381727

  2. A Functional Role for VEGFR1 Expressed in Peripheral Sensory Neurons in Cancer Pain

    PubMed Central

    Selvaraj, Deepitha; Gangadharan, Vijayan; Michalski, Christoph W.; Kurejova, Martina; Stösser, Sebastian; Srivastava, Kshitij; Schweizerhof, Matthias; Waltenberger, Johannes; Ferrara, Napoleone; Heppenstall, Paul; Shibuya, Masabumi; Augustin, Hellmut G.; Kuner, Rohini

    2015-01-01

    Summary Cancer pain is a debilitating disorder and a primary determinant of the poor quality of life. Here, we report a non-vascular role for ligands of the Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) family in cancer pain. Tumor-derived VEGF-A, PLGF-2, and VEGF-B augment pain sensitivity through selective activation of VEGF receptor 1 (VEGFR1) expressed in sensory neurons in human cancer and mouse models. Sensory-neuron-specific genetic deletion/silencing or local or systemic blockade of VEGFR1 prevented tumor-induced nerve remodeling and attenuated cancer pain in diverse mouse models in vivo. These findings identify a therapeutic potential for VEGFR1-modifying drugs in cancer pain and suggest a palliative effect for VEGF/VEGFR1-targeting anti-angiogenic tumor therapies. PMID:26058077

  3. A Functional Role for VEGFR1 Expressed in Peripheral Sensory Neurons in Cancer Pain.

    PubMed

    Selvaraj, Deepitha; Gangadharan, Vijayan; Michalski, Christoph W; Kurejova, Martina; Stsser, Sebastian; Srivastava, Kshitij; Schweizerhof, Matthias; Waltenberger, Johannes; Ferrara, Napoleone; Heppenstall, Paul; Shibuya, Masabumi; Augustin, Hellmut G; Kuner, Rohini

    2015-06-01

    Cancer pain is a debilitating disorder and a primary determinant of the poor quality of life. Here, we report a non-vascular role for ligands of the Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) family in cancer pain. Tumor-derived VEGF-A, PLGF-2, and VEGF-B augment pain sensitivity through selective activation of VEGF receptor 1 (VEGFR1) expressed in sensory neurons in human cancer and mouse models. Sensory-neuron-specific genetic deletion/silencing or local or systemic blockade of VEGFR1 prevented tumor-induced nerve remodeling and attenuated cancer pain in diverse mouse models in vivo. These findings identify a therapeutic potential for VEGFR1-modifying drugs in cancer pain and suggest a palliative effect for VEGF/VEGFR1-targeting anti-angiogenic tumor therapies. PMID:26058077

  4. Assessment of functional recovery of sciatic nerve in rats submitted to low-level laser therapy with different fluences. An experimental study: laser in functional recovery in rats.

    PubMed

    Marcolino, Alexandre Marcio; Barbosa, Rafael Incio; das Neves, Lais Mara Siqueira; Mazzer, Nilton; de Jesus Guirro, Rinaldo Roberto; de Cssia Registro Fonseca, Marisa

    2013-12-01

    Peripheral nerve lesions caused sensory and motor deficits along the distribution of the injured nerve. Numerous researches have been carried out to enhance and/or accelerate the recovery of such lesions. The objective of this study was to assess the functional recovery of sciatic nerve in rats subjected to different fluences of low-level laser therapy (LLLT). Thirty-six animals were randomly divided into four groups: one consisting of sham rats and three others irradiated with progressive fluencies of 10J/cm(2), 40J/cm(2) and 80J/cm(2) of laser AsGaAl (830nm) for 21 consecutive days. They were evaluated by the Sciatic Functional Index (SFI) method. The crush injury was performed by using a portable device with dead weight of 5,000g whose load was applied for 10min. A digital camera was used to record the footprints left on the acrylic track, before surgery and after, on the 7th, 14th, and 21st days. The results also showed that on the 7th day, there was a difference between the groups irradiated with 40J/cm(2), when compared with the sham group (p??0.05). It was possible to observe that the LLLT at fluency of 40J/cm(2) and 80J/cm(2) had a positive influence on the acceleration of the functional nerve recovery. PMID:24426674

  5. Alterations of sensori-motor functions of the digestive tract in the pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Delvaux, Michel

    2004-08-01

    Pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is based upon multiple factors that have been organised in a comprehensive model centred around the brain-gut axis. The brain-gut axis encompasses nerve pathways linking the enteric and the central nervous systems and contains a large proportion of afferent fibres. Functionally and anatomically, visceral nerves are divided in to two categories: the parasympathetic pathways distributing to the upper gut through the vagi and to the hindgut, through the pelvic and pudendal nerves, and the sympathetic pathways, arising form the spinal cord and distributing to the midgut via the paravertebral ganglia. Several abnormalities of gut sensori-motor function have been described in patients with IBS. Abnormal motility patterns have been described at the intestinal and colonic levels. Changes in colonic motility are mainly related to bowel disturbances linked to IBS but do not correlate with pain. More recently, visceral hypersensitivity has been recognised as a main characteristic of patients with IBS. It is defined by an exaggerated perception of luminal distension of various segments of the gut and related to peripheral changes in the processing of visceral sensations as well as modulation of perception by centrally acting factors including mood and stress. Viscero-visceral reflexes link the two edges of the brain-gut axis and may account for the origin of symptoms in some pathological conditions. Recent advances in the understanding of the role of myenteric plexus allowed recognition of several neurotransmitters involved at the level of both the afferent and efferent pathways. Targeting the receptors of these neurotransmitters is a promising way for development of new treatments for IBS. PMID:15324712

  6. Localized and Sustained Delivery of Erythropoietin from PLGA Microspheres Promotes Functional Recovery and Nerve Regeneration in Peripheral Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Gao, Yuan; Zhou, Yan; Liu, Jianheng; Zhang, Licheng; Long, Anhua; Zhang, Lihai; Tang, Peifu

    2015-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) has been demonstrated to exert neuroprotective effects on peripheral nerve injury recovery. Though daily intraperitoneal injection of EPO during a long period of time was effective, it was a tedious procedure. In addition, only limited amount of EPO could reach the injury sites by general administration, and free EPO is easily degraded in vivo. In this study, we encapsulated EPO in poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) microspheres. Both in vitro and in vivo release assays showed that the EPO-PLGA microspheres allowed sustained release of EPO within a period of two weeks. After administration of such EPO-PLGA microspheres, the peripheral nerve injured rats had significantly better recovery compared with those which received daily intraperitoneal injection of EPO, empty PLGA microspheres, or saline treatments. This was supported by the functional, electrophysiological, and histological evaluations of the recovery done at week 8 postoperatively. We conclude that sustained delivery of EPO could be achieved by using EPO-PLGA microspheres, and such delivery method could further enhance the recovery function of EPO in nerve injury recovery. PMID:25821803

  7. Differential function of RNCAM isoforms in precise target selection of olfactory sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Alenius, Mattias; Bohm, Staffan

    2003-03-01

    Olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) are individually specified to express one odorant receptor (OR) gene among approximately 1000 different and project with precision to topographically defined convergence sites, the glomeruli, in the olfactory bulb. Although ORs partially determine the location of convergence sites, the mechanism ensuring that axons with different OR identities do not co-converge is unknown. RNCAM (OCAM, NCAM2) is assumed to regulate a broad zonal segregation of projections by virtue of being a homophilic cell adhesion molecule that is selectively expressed on axons terminating in a defined olfactory bulb region. We have identified NADPH diaphorase activity as being an independent marker for RNCAM-negative axons. Analyses of transgenic mice that ectopically express RNCAM in NADPH diaphorase-positive OSNs show that the postulated function of RNCAM in mediating zone-specific segregation of axons is unlikely. Instead, analyses of one OR-specific OSN subpopulation (P2) reveal that elevated RNCAM levels result in an increased number of P2 axons that incorrectly co-converge with axons of other OR identities. Both Gpi-anchored and transmembrane-bound RNCAM isoforms are localized on axons in the nerve layer, while the transmembrane-bound RNCAM is the predominant isoform on axon terminals within glomeruli. Overexpressing transmembrane-bound RNCAM results in co-convergence events close to the correct target glomeruli. By contrast, overexpression of Gpi-anchored RNCAM results in axons that can bypass the correct target before co-converging on glomeruli located at a distance. The phenotype specific for Gpi-anchored RNCAM is suppressed in mice overexpressing both isoforms, which suggests that two distinct RNCAM isoform-dependent activities influence segregation of OR-defined axon subclasses. PMID:12538518

  8. Three-dimensional Reconstruction of Peripheral Nerve Internal Fascicular Groups.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yingchun; Wang, Liping; Dong, Jianghui; Zhang, Yi; Luo, Peng; Qi, Jian; Liu, Xiaolin; Xian, Cory J

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral nerves are important pathways for receiving afferent sensory impulses and sending out efferent motor instructions, as carried out by sensory nerve fibers and motor nerve fibers. It has remained a great challenge to functionally reconnect nerve internal fiber bundles (or fascicles) in nerve repair. One possible solution may be to establish a 3D nerve fascicle visualization system. This study described the key technology of 3D peripheral nerve fascicle reconstruction. Firstly, fixed nerve segments were embedded with position lines, cryostat-sectioned continuously, stained and imaged histologically. Position line cross-sections were identified using a trained support vector machine method, and the coordinates of their central pixels were obtained. Then, nerve section images were registered using the bilinear method, and edges of fascicles were extracted using an improved gradient vector flow snake method. Subsequently, fascicle types were identified automatically using the multi-directional gradient and second-order gradient method. Finally, a 3D virtual model of internal fascicles was obtained after section images were processed. This technique was successfully applied for 3D reconstruction for the median nerve of the hand-wrist and cubital fossa regions and the gastrocnemius nerve. This nerve internal fascicle 3D reconstruction technology would be helpful for aiding peripheral nerve repair and virtual surgery. PMID:26596642

  9. Three-dimensional Reconstruction of Peripheral Nerve Internal Fascicular Groups

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Yingchun; Wang, Liping; Dong, Jianghui; Zhang, Yi; Luo, Peng; Qi, Jian; Liu, Xiaolin; Xian, Cory J.

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral nerves are important pathways for receiving afferent sensory impulses and sending out efferent motor instructions, as carried out by sensory nerve fibers and motor nerve fibers. It has remained a great challenge to functionally reconnect nerve internal fiber bundles (or fascicles) in nerve repair. One possible solution may be to establish a 3D nerve fascicle visualization system. This study described the key technology of 3D peripheral nerve fascicle reconstruction. Firstly, fixed nerve segments were embedded with position lines, cryostat-sectioned continuously, stained and imaged histologically. Position line cross-sections were identified using a trained support vector machine method, and the coordinates of their central pixels were obtained. Then, nerve section images were registered using the bilinear method, and edges of fascicles were extracted using an improved gradient vector flow snake method. Subsequently, fascicle types were identified automatically using the multi-directional gradient and second-order gradient method. Finally, a 3D virtual model of internal fascicles was obtained after section images were processed. This technique was successfully applied for 3D reconstruction for the median nerve of the hand-wrist and cubital fossa regions and the gastrocnemius nerve. This nerve internal fascicle 3D reconstruction technology would be helpful for aiding peripheral nerve repair and virtual surgery. PMID:26596642

  10. Maturation of Sensori-Motor Functional Responses in the Preterm Brain.

    PubMed

    Allievi, Alessandro G; Arichi, Tomoki; Tusor, Nora; Kimpton, Jessica; Arulkumaran, Sophie; Counsell, Serena J; Edwards, A David; Burdet, Etienne

    2016-01-01

    Preterm birth engenders an increased risk of conditions like cerebral palsy and therefore this time may be crucial for the brain's developing sensori-motor system. However, little is known about how cortical sensori-motor function matures at this time, whether development is influenced by experience, and about its role in spontaneous motor behavior. We aimed to systematically characterize spatial and temporal maturation of sensori-motor functional brain activity across this period using functional MRI and a custom-made robotic stimulation device. We studied 57 infants aged from 30 + 2 to 43 + 2 weeks postmenstrual age. Following both induced and spontaneous right wrist movements, we saw consistent positive blood oxygen level-dependent functional responses in the contralateral (left) primary somatosensory and motor cortices. In addition, we saw a maturational trend toward faster, higher amplitude, and more spatially dispersed functional responses; and increasing integration of the ipsilateral hemisphere and sensori-motor associative areas. We also found that interhemispheric functional connectivity was significantly related to ex-utero exposure, suggesting the influence of experience-dependent mechanisms. At term equivalent age, we saw a decrease in both response amplitude and interhemispheric functional connectivity, and an increase in spatial specificity, culminating in the establishment of a sensori-motor functional response similar to that seen in adults. PMID:26491066

  11. Maturation of Sensori-Motor Functional Responses in the Preterm Brain

    PubMed Central

    Allievi, Alessandro G.; Arichi, Tomoki; Tusor, Nora; Kimpton, Jessica; Arulkumaran, Sophie; Counsell, Serena J.; Edwards, A. David; Burdet, Etienne

    2016-01-01

    Preterm birth engenders an increased risk of conditions like cerebral palsy and therefore this time may be crucial for the brain's developing sensori-motor system. However, little is known about how cortical sensori-motor function matures at this time, whether development is influenced by experience, and about its role in spontaneous motor behavior. We aimed to systematically characterize spatial and temporal maturation of sensori-motor functional brain activity across this period using functional MRI and a custom-made robotic stimulation device. We studied 57 infants aged from 30 + 2 to 43 + 2 weeks postmenstrual age. Following both induced and spontaneous right wrist movements, we saw consistent positive blood oxygen level–dependent functional responses in the contralateral (left) primary somatosensory and motor cortices. In addition, we saw a maturational trend toward faster, higher amplitude, and more spatially dispersed functional responses; and increasing integration of the ipsilateral hemisphere and sensori-motor associative areas. We also found that interhemispheric functional connectivity was significantly related to ex-utero exposure, suggesting the influence of experience-dependent mechanisms. At term equivalent age, we saw a decrease in both response amplitude and interhemispheric functional connectivity, and an increase in spatial specificity, culminating in the establishment of a sensori-motor functional response similar to that seen in adults. PMID:26491066

  12. On sex-related differences in auditory and visual sensory functioning.

    PubMed

    Rammsayer, Thomas H; Troche, Stefan J

    2012-06-01

    The present study was designed to elucidate sex-related differences in two basic auditory and one basic visual aspect of sensory functioning, namely sensory discrimination of pitch, loudness, and brightness. Although these three aspects of sensory functioning are of vital importance in everyday life, little is known about whether men and women differ from each other in these sensory functions. Participants were 100 male and 100 female volunteers ranging in age from 18 to 30years. Since sensory sensitivity may be positively related to individual levels of intelligence and musical experience, measures of psychometric intelligence and musical background were also obtained. Reliably better performance for men compared to women was found for pitch and loudness, but not for brightness discrimination. Furthermore, performance on loudness discrimination was positively related to psychometric intelligence, while pitch discrimination was positively related to both psychometric intelligence and levels of musical training. Additional regression analyses revealed that each of three predictor variables (sex, psychometric intelligence, and musical training) accounted for a statistically significant portion of unique variance in pitch discrimination. With regard to loudness discrimination, regression analysis yielded a statistically significant portion of unique variance for sex as a predictor variable, whereas psychometric intelligence just failed to reach statistical significance. The potential influence of sex hormones on sex-related differences in sensory functions is discussed. PMID:22183583

  13. Sensory Functions for Degenerin/Epithelial Sodium Channels (DEG/ENaC)

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Shahar, Yehuda

    2012-01-01

    All animals use a sophisticated array of receptor proteins to sense their external and internal environments. Major advances have been made in recent years in understanding the molecular and genetic bases for sensory transduction in diverse modalities, indicating that both metabotropic and ionotropic pathways are important in sensory functions. Here, I review the historical background and recent advances in understanding the roles of a relatively newly discovered family of receptors, the degenerin/epithelial sodium channels (DEG/ENaC). These animal-specific cation channels show a remarkable sequence and functional diversity in different species and seem to exert their functions in diverse sensory modalities. Functions for DEG/ENaC channels have been implicated in mechanosensation as well as chemosensory transduction pathways. In spite of overall sequence diversity, all family members share a unique protein topology that includes just two transmembrane domains and an unusually large and highly structured extracellular domain, that seem to be essential for both their mechanical and chemical sensory functions. This review will discuss many of the recent discoveries and controversies associated with sensory function of DEG/ENaC channels in both vertebrate and invertebrate model systems, covering the role of family members in taste, mechanosensation, and pain. PMID:22099690

  14. Altered Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Responses to Nonpainful Sensory Stimulation in Fibromyalgia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lpez-Sol, Marina; Pujol, Jesus; Wager, Tor D.; Garcia-Fontanals, Alba; Blanco-Hinojo, Laura; Garcia-Blanco, Susana; Poca-Dias, Violant; Harrison, Ben J.; Contreras-Rodrguez, Oren; Monfort, Jordi; Garcia-Fructuoso, Ferran; Deus, Joan

    2015-01-01

    Objective Fibromyalgia (FM) is a disorder characterized by chronic pain and enhanced responses to acute noxious events. However, the sensory systems affected in FM may extend beyond pain itself, as FM patients show reduced tolerance to non-nociceptive sensory stimulation. Characterizing the neural substrates of multisensory hypersensitivity in FM may thus provide important clues about the underlying pathophysiology of the disorder. The aim of this study was to characterize brain responses to non-nociceptive sensory stimulation in FM patients and their relationship to subjective sensory sensitivity and clinical pain severity. Methods Functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to assess brain response to auditory, visual, and tactile motor stimulation in 35 women with FM and 25 matched controls. Correlation and mediation analyses were performed to establish the relationship between brain responses and 3 types of outcomes: subjective hypersensitivity to daily sensory stimulation, spontaneous pain, and functional disability. Results Patients reported increased subjective sensitivity (increased unpleasantness) in response to multisensory stimulation in daily life. Functional MRI revealed that patients showed reduced task-evoked activation in primary/secondary visual and auditory areas and augmented responses in the insula and anterior lingual gyrus. Reduced responses in visual and auditory areas were correlated with subjective sensory hypersensitivity and clinical severity measures. Conclusion FM patients showed strong attenuation of brain responses to nonpainful events in early sensory cortices, accompanied by an amplified response at later stages of sensory integration in the insula. These abnormalities are associated with core FM symptoms, suggesting that they may be part of the pathophysiology of the disease. PMID:25220783

  15. In vivo studies of silk based gold nano-composite conduits for functional peripheral nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Das, Suradip; Sharma, Manav; Saharia, Dhiren; Sarma, Kushal Konwar; Sarma, Monalisa Goswami; Borthakur, Bibhuti Bhusan; Bora, Utpal

    2015-09-01

    We report a novel silk-gold nanocomposite based nerve conduit successfully tested in a neurotmesis grade sciatic nerve injury model in rats over a period of eighteen months. The conduit was fabricated by adsorbing gold nanoparticles onto silk fibres and transforming them into a nanocomposite sheet by electrospinning which is finally given a tubular structure by rolling on a stainless steel mandrel of chosen diameter. The conduits were found to promote adhesion and proliferation of Schwann cells in vitro and did not elicit any toxic or immunogenic responses in vivo. We also report for the first time, the monitoring of muscular regeneration post nerve conduit implantation by recording motor unit potentials (MUPs) through needle electromyogram. Pre-seeding the conduits with Schwann cells enhanced myelination of the regenerated tissue. Histo-morphometric and electrophysiological studies proved that the nanocomposite based conduits pre-seeded with Schwann cells performed best in terms of structural and functional regeneration of severed sciatic nerves. The near normal values of nerve conduction velocity (50 m/sec), compound muscle action potential (29.7 mV) and motor unit potential (133 μV) exhibited by the animals implanted with Schwann cell loaded nerve conduits in the present study are superior to those observed in previous reports with synthetic materials as well as collagen based nerve conduits. Animals in this group were also able to perform complex locomotory activities like stretching and jumping with excellent sciatic function index (SFI) and led a normal life. PMID:26026910

  16. Anatomical relations of the superficial sensory branches of the radial nerve: a cadaveric study with clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Anatomically, it is difficult to give a systematic description of the superficial branch of the radial nerve (SBRN). Our aim was to describe the exact relationship of the SBRN to fixed bony points of radial styloid and Lister's tubercle, and to the cephalic vein. We also compared our data with other international studies. Methods The study was a descriptive anatomical study. Twenty-five forearms were dissected. Measurements were made from predefined fixed reference points. Results The mean distance to the point of emergence of the nerve from the radial styloid was 8.54 cm (SD = 1.32). The nerve branched at a mean distance of 5.57 cm (SD = 1.43) from the radial styloid. The mean distance to the point where the most medial and most lateral branches of the nerve crossing the wrist joint, measured from the Lister's tubercle were 2.51 cm (SD = 0.53) and 3.90 cm (SD = 0.64). In 17 specimens(68%) cephalic vein crossed the SBRN superficially once. Mean distance from the radial styloid to the most distal point where the vein crossed the nerve was 5.10 cm. Diffefrence between mean distance to the point of emergence and branching point, when compared with other international studies were not statistically significant. (P value > 0.05) Conclusions We recommend avoiding transverse incisions in the snuffbox region between 2.51 cm and 3.90 cm from the Listers tubercle. We also recommend avoiding cannulation of the cephalic vein in the distal forearm. PMID:22054296

  17. Kv7.2 regulates the function of peripheral sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    King, Chih H.; Lancaster, Eric; Salomon, Daniela; Peles, Elior; Scherer, Steven S.

    2014-01-01

    The Kv7 (KCNQ) family of voltage-gated K+ channels regulates cellular excitability. The functional role of Kv7.2 has been hampered by the lack of a viable Kcnq2-null animal model. In this study, we generated homozygous Kcnq2-null sensory neurons using the Cre-Lox system; in these mice, Kv7.2 expression is absent in the peripheral sensory neurons, whereas the expression of other molecular components of nodes (including Kv7.3), paranodes, and juxtaparanodes is not altered. The conditional Kcnq2-null animals exhibit normal motor performance, but have increased thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia. Whole cell patch recording technique demonstrates that Kcnq2-null sensory neurons have increased excitability and reduced spike frequency adaptation. Taken together, our results suggest that the loss of Kv7.2 activity increases the excitability of primary sensory neurons. PMID:24687876

  18. Kv7.2 regulates the function of peripheral sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    King, Chih H; Lancaster, Eric; Salomon, Daniela; Peles, Elior; Scherer, Steven S

    2014-10-01

    The Kv7 (KCNQ) family of voltage-gated K(+) channels regulates cellular excitability. The functional role of Kv7.2 has been hampered by the lack of a viable Kcnq2-null animal model. In this study, we generated homozygous Kcnq2-null sensory neurons using the Cre-Lox system; in these mice, Kv7.2 expression is absent in the peripheral sensory neurons, whereas the expression of other molecular components of nodes (including Kv7.3), paranodes, and juxtaparanodes is not altered. The conditional Kcnq2-null animals exhibit normal motor performance but have increased thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia. Whole-cell patch recording technique demonstrates that Kcnq2-null sensory neurons have increased excitability and reduced spike frequency adaptation. Taken together, our results suggest that the loss of Kv7.2 activity increases the excitability of primary sensory neurons. PMID:24687876

  19. Dysregulation of the Descending Pain System in Temporomandibular Disorders Revealed by Low-Frequency Sensory Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation: A Pupillometric Study

    PubMed Central

    Monaco, Annalisa; Cattaneo, Ruggero; Mesin, Luca; Ortu, Eleonora; Giannoni, Mario; Pietropaoli, Davide

    2015-01-01

    Using computerized pupillometry, our previous research established that the autonomic nervous system (ANS) is dysregulated in patients suffering from temporomandibular disorders (TMDs), suggesting a potential role for ANS dysfunction in pain modulation and the etiology of TMD. However, pain modulation hypotheses for TMD are still lacking. The periaqueductal gray (PAG) is involved in the descending modulation of defensive behavior and pain through ?, ?, and ? opioid receptors. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) has been extensively used for pain relief, as low-frequency stimulation can activate receptors. Our aim was to use pupillometry to evaluate the effect of low-frequency TENS stimulation of ? receptors on opioid descending pathways in TMD patients. In accordance with the Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD, 18 females with myogenous TMD and 18 matched-controls were enrolled. All subjects underwent subsequent pupillometric evaluations under dark and light conditions before, soon after (end of stimulation) and long after (recovery period) sensorial TENS. The overall statistics derived from the darkness condition revealed no significant differences in pupil size between cases and controls; indeed, TENS stimulation significantly reduced pupil size in both groups. Controls, but not TMD patients, displayed significant differences in pupil size before compared with after TENS. Under light conditions, TMD patients presented a smaller pupil size compared with controls; the pupil size was reduced only in the controls. Pupil size differences were found before and during TENS and before and after TENS in the controls only. Pupillometry revealed that stimulating the descending opioid pathway with low-frequency sensory TENS of the fifth and seventh pairs of cranial nerves affects the peripheral target. The TMD patients exhibited a different pattern of response to TENS stimulation compared with the controls, suggesting that impaired modulation of the descending pain system may be involved in TMD. PMID:25905862

  20. Intrinsic and therapeutic factors determining the recovery of motor function after peripheral nerve transection.

    PubMed

    Skouras, Emmanouil; Ozsoy, Umut; Sarikcioglu, Levent; Angelov, Doychin N

    2011-07-01

    Insufficient recovery after peripheral nerve injury has been attributed to (i) poor pathfinding of regrowing axons, (ii) excessive collateral axonal branching at the lesion site and (iii) polyneuronal innervation of the neuromuscular junctions (NMJ). The facial nerve transection model has been used initially to measure restoration of function after varying therapies and to examine the mechanisms underlying their effects. Since it is very difficult to control the navigation of several thousand axons, efforts concentrated on collateral branching and NMJ-polyinnervation. Treatment with antibodies against trophic factors to combat branching improved the precision of reinnervation, but had no positive effects on functional recovery. This suggested that polyneuronal reinnervation--rather than collateral branching--may be the critical limiting factor. The former could be reduced by pharmacological agents known to perturb microtubule assembly and was followed by recovery of function. Because muscle polyinnervation is activity-dependent and can be manipulated, attempts to design a clinically feasible therapy were performed by electrical stimulation or by soft tissue massage. Electrical stimulation applied to the transected facial nerve or to paralysed facial muscles did not improve vibrissal motor performance and failed to diminish polyinnervation. In contrast, gentle stroking of the paralysed muscles (vibrissal, orbicularis oculi, tongue musculature) resulted in full recovery of function. This manual stimulation was also effective after hypoglossal-facial nerve suture and after interpositional nerve grafting, but not after surgical reconstruction of the median nerve. All these findings raise hopes that clinically feasible and effective therapies could be soon designed and tested. PMID:21458252

  1. Functional stimulation of graft nerves has minor effects on insulin release from transplanted rat pancreatic islets

    PubMed Central

    Kampf, Caroline; Kllskog, rjan

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Morphological evidence for reinnervation of pancreatic islet grafts is plentiful. However, to what extent intra-graft nerves influence the endocrine functions of the islet transplant is largely unknown. We therefore aimed to directly stimulate nerves leading to islet grafts with electrodes and measure insulin secretion in response to this. Methods. We implanted syngeneic islets under the renal capsule of rats, and examined them 1 or 79 months later. In anesthetized rats blood samples were collected from the renal vein and femoral artery, respectively, during electrode stimulation of the nerves leading to the islet grafts. Results. As expected, nerve stimulation decreased renal blood flow. However, serum insulin concentrations in samples derived from the renal vein or femoral artery changed in concert with one another, both during normoglycemia and acute hyperglycemia. Conclusion. Reinnervation which occurs after islet transplantation under the renal capsule has minor effects on graft endocrine function. PMID:23977866

  2. A silk sericin/silicone nerve guidance conduit promotes regeneration of a transected sciatic nerve.

    PubMed

    Xie, Hongjian; Yang, Wen; Chen, Jianghai; Zhang, Jinxiang; Lu, Xiaochen; Zhao, Xiaobo; Huang, Kun; Li, Huili; Chang, Panpan; Wang, Zheng; Wang, Lin

    2015-10-28

    Peripheral nerve gap defects lead to significant loss of sensory or motor function. Tissue engineering has become an important alternative to nerve repair. Sericin, a major component of silk, is a natural protein whose value in tissue engineering has just begun to be explored. Here, the first time use of sericin in vivo is reported as a long-term implant for peripheral nerve regeneration. A sericin nerve guidance conduit is designed and fabricated. This conduit is highly porous with mechanical strength matching peripheral nerve tissue. It supports Schwann cell proliferation and is capable of up-regulating the transcription of glial cell derived neurotrophic factor and nerve growth factor in Schwann cells. The sericin conduit wrapped with a silicone conduit (sericin/silicone double conduits) is used for bridging repair of a 5 mm gap in a rat sciatic nerve transection model. The sericin/silicone double conduits achieve functional recovery comparable to that of autologous nerve grafting as evidenced by drastically improved nerve function and morphology. Importantly, this improvement is mainly attributed to the sericin conduit as the silicone conduit alone only produces marginal functional recovery. This sericin/silicone-double-conduit strategy offers an efficient and valuable alternative to autologous nerve grafting for repairing damaged peripheral nerve. PMID:26332703

  3. AB157. The correlation between nNOS positive small branches of dorsal penis nerve and erectile function in bilateral cavernous nerve crush model of rat

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yen-Lin; Wu, Yi-No; Liao, Chun-Hou; Lin, Ying-Hung; Wu, Chien-Chih; Chiang, Han-Sun

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Cadavers evidences showed cavernous nerve (CN), a parasympathetic nerve, joint dorsal penis nerve (DPN) in the penis level. However, no reports elucidate the importance of the main or the small branches of the DPN in this model. The aim of the current study is to evaluate the association between nNOS positive small branches of DPN and erectile function in rat model. Materials and methods Totally, 20 SD male rats were divided into five groups: the sham group and BCNC in 7, 14, 21 and 28 days. Erectile function was assessed by CN electrostimulation, and penile tissue was collected for histology. Immunohistochemical stains for the confirmation of nerve types were done. Finally, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) for Schwann cell damage and other detailed morphological changes were also performed. Results Erectile function was significantly decreased in injury group with the lowest after 14 days of BCNC. Partial recovery of the erectile function was noted within the next 14 days. In H&E stain, mean diameter, number of neuritis, inflammatory cells infiltration of the largest branch of DPN were similar in both sham group and injury group after different days of observation. No correlation was seen in the total number of nerve branches, sympathetic nerve branches and erectile function. However, nNOS positive small branches, parasympathetic nerve branches, showed significant positive correlation between the nerve number and erectile function. TEM showed Schwann cell damage and abnormalities of myelin sheath. Conclusions Morphological changes after BCNC were seen in DPN in both light microscope and TEM. The current study support the evidences of CN, at least partially, joint with DPN in rat. In addition, small branches loss may be a representative feature of BCNC in DPN by light microscope. In addition, nNOS positive nerve branches were positively correlated with erectile function in rat.

  4. AB85. The correlation between nNOS positive small branches of dorsal penis nerve and erectile function in bilateral cavernous nerve crush model of rat

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yen-Lin; Wu, Yi-No; Liao, Chun-Hou; Lin, Ying-Hung; Wu, Chien-Chih; Chiang, Han-Sun

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Cadavers evidences showed cavernous nerve (CN), a parasympathetic nerve, joint dorsal penis nerve (DPN) in the penis level. However, no reports elucidate the importance of the main or the small branches of the DPN in this model. The aim of the current study is to evaluate the association between nNOS positive small branches of DPN and erectile function in rat model Materials and methods Totally, 20 SD male rats were divided into five groups: the sham group and BCNC in 7 days, 14 days, 21 days and 28 days. Erectile function was assessed by CN electrostimulation, and penile tissue was collected for histology. Immunohistochemical stains for the confirmation of nerve types were done. Finally, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) for Schwann cell damage and other detailed morphological changes were also performed. Results Erectile function was significantly decreased in injury group with the lowest after 14 days of BCNC. Partial recovery of the erectile function was noted within the next 14 days. In H&E stain, mean diameter, number of neuritis, inflammatory cells infiltration of the largest branch of DPN were similar in both sham group and injury group after different days of observation. No correlation was seen in the total number of nerve branches, sympathetic nerve branches and erectile function. However, nNOS positive small branches, parasympathetic nerve branches, showed significant positive correlation between the nerve number and erectile function. TEM showed Schwann cell damage and abnormalities of myelin sheath. Conclusions Morphological changes after BCNC were seen in DPN in both light microscope and TEM. The current study support the evidences of CN, at least partially, joint with DPN in rat. In addition, small branches loss may be a representative feature of BCNC in DPN by light microscope. In addition, nNOS positive nerve branches were positively correlated with erectile function in rat.

  5. The relationship of vitamin B6 status to median nerve function and carpal tunnel syndrome among active industrial workers.

    PubMed

    Franzblau, A; Rock, C L; Werner, R A; Albers, J W; Kelly, M P; Johnston, E C

    1996-05-01

    Case reports and small case series suggest that vitamin B6 deficiency is an important etiologic factor in carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). This hypothesis has never examined in a randomly selected study population, particularly among active workers. We examined 125 randomly selected active workers from two industrial plants. Each worker completed a self-administered symptom questionnaire and underwent electrodiagnostic testing of the median and ulnar sensory nerves. Laboratory biochemical analyses of vitamin B6 status were also performed using the erythrocyte glutamic pyruvic transaminase assay, and quantification of plasma pyridoxal-5'-phosphate. Measurements of vitamin B6 status were unrelated to self-reported symptoms potentially consistent with CTS, electrophysiologically determined median or ulnar nerve function, and CTS defined on the basis of self-reported symptoms and electrophysiologic measurements. These results suggest that CTS among active industrial workers is unrelated to vitamin B6 status. Furthermore, in our opinion, empiric prescription of vitamin B6 to patients with CTS is unwarranted and potentially hazardous. PMID:8733640

  6. Improved gold chloride staining method for anatomical analysis of sensory nerve endings in the shoulder capsule and labrum as examples of loose and dense fibrous tissues

    PubMed Central

    Witherspoon, J W; Smirnova, IV; McIff, TE

    2014-01-01

    Consistency in gold chloride staining is essential for anatomical analysis of sensory nerve endings. The gold chloride stain for this purpose has been modified by many investigators, but often yields inconsistent staining, which makes it difficult to differentiate structures and to determine nerve ending distribution in large tissue samples. We introduce additional steps and major changes to the modified Gairns protocol. We controlled the temperature and mixing rate during tissue staining to achieve consistent staining and complete solution penetration. We subjected samples to sucrose dehydration to improve cutting efficiency. We then exposed samples to a solution containing lemon juice, formic acid and paraformaldehyde to produce optimal tissue transparency with minimal tissue deformity. We extended the time for gold chloride impregnation 1.5 fold. Gold chloride was reduced in the labrum using 25% formic acid in water for 18 h and in the capsule using 25% formic acid in citrate phosphate buffer for 2 h. Citrate binds gold nanoparticles, which minimizes aggregation in the tissue. We stored samples in fresh ultrapure water at 4 C to slow reduction and to maintain color contrast in the tissue. Tissue samples were embedded in Tissue Tek and sectioned at 80 and 100 ?m instead of using glycerin and teasing the tissue apart as in Gairns modified gold chloride method. We attached sections directly to gelatin subbed slides after sectioning with a cryostat. The slides then were processed and coverslipped with Permount. Staining consistency was demonstrated throughout the tissue sections and neural structures were clearly identifiable. PMID:24476562

  7. Differential upregulation in DRG neurons of an ?2?-1 splice variant with a lower affinity for gabapentin after peripheral sensory nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Lana, Beatrice; Schlick, Bettina; Martin, Stuart; Pratt, Wendy S.; Page, Karen M.; Goncalves, Leonor; Rahman, Wahida; Dickenson, Anthony H.; Bauer, Claudia S.; Dolphin, Annette C.

    2014-01-01

    The ?2?-1 protein is an auxiliary subunit of voltage-gated calcium channels, critical for neurotransmitter release. It is upregulated in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons following sensory nerve injury, and is also the therapeutic target of the gabapentinoid drugs, which are efficacious in both experimental and human neuropathic pain conditions. ?2?-1 has 3 spliced regions: A, B, and C. A and C are cassette exons, whereas B is introduced via an alternative 3? splice acceptor site. Here we have examined the presence of ?2?-1 splice variants in DRG neurons, and have found that although the main ?2?-1 splice variant in DRG is the same as that in brain (?2?-1 ?A+B+C), there is also another ?2?-1 splice variant (?A+B?C), which is expressed in DRG neurons and is differentially upregulated compared to the main DRG splice variant ?2?-1 ?A+B+C following spinal nerve ligation. Furthermore, this differential upregulation occurs preferentially in a small nonmyelinated DRG neuron fraction, obtained by density gradient separation. The ?2?-1 ?A+B?C splice variant supports CaV2 calcium currents with unaltered properties compared to ?2?-1 ?A+B+C, but shows a significantly reduced affinity for gabapentin. This variant could therefore play a role in determining the efficacy of gabapentin in neuropathic pain. PMID:24315988

  8. A bioengineered peripheral nerve construct using aligned peptide amphiphile nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Li, Andrew; Hokugo, Akishige; Yalom, Anisa; Berns, Eric J; Stephanopoulos, Nicholas; McClendon, Mark T; Segovia, Luis A; Spigelman, Igor; Stupp, Samuel I; Jarrahy, Reza

    2014-10-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries can result in lifelong disability. Primary coaptation is the treatment of choice when the gap between transected nerve ends is short. Long nerve gaps seen in more complex injuries often require autologous nerve grafts or nerve conduits implemented into the repair. Nerve grafts, however, cause morbidity and functional loss at donor sites, which are limited in number. Nerve conduits, in turn, lack an internal scaffold to support and guide axonal regeneration, resulting in decreased efficacy over longer nerve gap lengths. By comparison, peptide amphiphiles (PAs) are molecules that can self-assemble into nanofibers, which can be aligned to mimic the native architecture of peripheral nerve. As such, they represent a potential substrate for use in a bioengineered nerve graft substitute. To examine this, we cultured Schwann cells with bioactive PAs (RGDS-PA, IKVAV-PA) to determine their ability to attach to and proliferate within the biomaterial. Next, we devised a PA construct for use in a peripheral nerve critical sized defect model. Rat sciatic nerve defects were created and reconstructed with autologous nerve, PLGA conduits filled with various forms of aligned PAs, or left unrepaired. Motor and sensory recovery were determined and compared among groups. Our results demonstrate that Schwann cells are able to adhere to and proliferate in aligned PA gels, with greater efficacy in bioactive PAs compared to the backbone-PA alone. In vivo testing revealed recovery of motor and sensory function in animals treated with conduit/PA constructs comparable to animals treated with autologous nerve grafts. Functional recovery in conduit/PA and autologous graft groups was significantly faster than in animals treated with empty PLGA conduits. Histological examinations also demonstrated increased axonal and Schwann cell regeneration within the reconstructed nerve gap in animals treated with conduit/PA constructs. These results indicate that PA nanofibers may represent a promising biomaterial for use in bioengineered peripheral nerve repair. PMID:25064803

  9. A bioengineered peripheral nerve construct using aligned peptide amphiphile nanofibers

    PubMed Central

    Yalom, Anisa; Berns, Eric J.; Stephanopoulos, Nicholas; McClendon, Mark T.; Segovia, Luis A.; Spigelman, Igor; Stupp, Samuel I.; Jarrahy, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries can result in lifelong disability. Primary coaptation is the treatment of choice when the gap between transected nerve ends is short. Long nerve gaps seen in more complex injuries often require autologous nerve grafts or nerve conduits implemented into the repair. Nerve grafts, however, cause morbidity and functional loss at donor sites, which are limited in number. Nerve conduits, in turn, lack an internal scaffold to support and guide axonal regeneration, resulting in decreased efficacy over longer nerve gap lengths. By comparison, peptide amphiphiles (PAs) are molecules that can self-assemble into nanofibers, which can be aligned to mimic the native architecture of peripheral nerve. As such, they represent a potential substrate for use in a bioengineered nerve graft substitute. To examine this, we cultured Schwann cells with bioactive PAs (RGDS-PA, IKVAV-PA) to determine their ability to attach to and proliferate within the biomaterial. Next, we devised a PA construct for use in a peripheral nerve critical sized defect model. Rat sciatic nerve defects were created and reconstructed with autologous nerve, PLGA conduits filled with various forms of aligned PAs, or left unrepaired. Motor and sensory recovery were determined and compared among groups. Our results demonstrate that Schwann cells are able to adhere to and proliferate in aligned PA gels, with greater efficacy in bioactive PAs compared to the backbone-PA alone. In vivo testing revealed recovery of motor and sensory function in animals treated with conduit/PA constructs comparable to animals treated with autologous nerve grafts. Functional recovery in conduit/PA and autologous graft groups was significantly faster than in animals treated with empty PLGA conduits. Histological examinations also demonstrated increased axonal and Schwann cell regeneration within the reconstructed nerve gap in animals treated with conduit/PA constructs. These results indicate that PA nanofibers may represent a promising biomaterial for use in bioengineered peripheral nerve repair. PMID:25064803

  10. Changes of cutaneous sensory thresholds induced by non-painful transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation in normal subjects and in subjects with chronic pain.

    PubMed Central

    Zoppi, M; Francini, F; Maresca, M; Procacci, P

    1981-01-01

    Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) of the nervi cutaneus surae medialis was applied to 59 healthy subjects and 30 patients suffering from chronic myofascial pain in one lower limb, with an intensity of current that induced a well tolerated tingling sensation. Each period of stimulation lasted 24 minutes. The thresholds of the tactile, tingling and painful sensations were tested at fixed intervals before, during and after stimulation. Trains of constant current square waves in the distribution area of the stimulated nerve (local thresholds) and in other areas (general thresholds) were used. In all subjects repeated changes of the current were necessary in order to maintain constant tingling during the first period of TENS (changing phase); after that few if any changes of the current were necessary (steady phase). There were changes in thresholds within the territory of the electrically stimulated nerve, and marked changes elsewhere and generally in the body. In healthy subjects local thresholds increased during both phases of TENS; general thresholds decreased during the changing phase and increased during the steady phase. After TENS, thresholds showed the same trend as during the steady phase. Trends of the sensory thresholds during and after TENS differed in different subjects according to their thresholds before TENS. Thresholds did not return to normal for more than 20 minutes after TENS. In the group of 30 patients there was a significant difference between thresholds on the two sides of the body. The difference between the two sides was reduced by TENS. Pain relief induced by TENS may be related to this fact. PMID:6975355

  11. Spontaneous intraneural hematoma of the sural nerve.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Shawn S; McLawhorn, Alexander S; Mintz, Douglas N; DiCarlo, Edward F; Weiland, Andrew J

    2015-04-01

    Symptomatic intraneural hemorrhage occurs rarely. It presents with pain and/or weakness in the distribution following the anatomic innervation pattern of the involved nerve. When a purely sensory nerve is affected, the symptoms can be subtle. We present a previously healthy 36-year-old female who developed an atraumatic, spontaneous intraneural hematoma of her sural nerve. Sural dysfunction was elicited from the patient's history and physical examination. The diagnosis was confirmed with magnetic resonance imaging, and surgical decompression provided successful resolution of her preoperative symptoms. To our knowledge, this entity has not been reported previously. Our case highlights the importance of having a high index of suspicion for nerve injury or compression in patients whose complaints follow a typical peripheral nerve distribution. Prior studies have shown that the formation of intraneural hematoma and associated compression of nerve fibers result in axonal degeneration, and surgical decompression decreases axonal degeneration and aids functional recovery. PMID:25311865

  12. Recovery of laryngeal function after intraoperative injury to the recurrent laryngeal nerve

    PubMed Central

    Hydman, Jonas; Svensson, Mikael

    2015-01-01

    Loss of function in the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) during thyroid/parathyroid surgery, despite a macroscopically intact nerve, is a challenge which highlights the sensitivity and complexity of laryngeal innervation. Furthermore, the uncertain prognosis stresses a lack of capability to diagnose the reason behind the impaired function. There is a great deal of literature considering risk factors, surgical technique and mechanisms outside the nerve affecting the incidence of RLN paresis during surgery. To be able to prognosticate recovery in cases of laryngeal dysfunction and voice changes after thyroid surgery, the surgeon would first need to define the presence, location, and type of laryngeal nerve injury. There is little data describing the events within the nerve and the neurobiological reasons for the impaired function related to potential recovery and prognosis. In addition, very little data has been presented in order to clarify any differences between the transient and permanent injury of the RLN. This review aims, from an anatomical and neurobiological perspective, to provide an update on the current understandings of surgically-induced injury to the laryngeal nerves. PMID:25713777

  13. Nerve growth factor-induced synapse-like structures in contralateral sensory ganglia contribute to chronic mirror-image pain.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chau-Fu; Cheng, Jen-Kun; Chen, Chih-Yang; Rau, Ruey-Horng; Chang, Yu-Cheng; Tsaur, Meei-Ling

    2015-11-01

    Elevated nerve growth factor (NGF) in the contralateral dorsal root ganglion (DRG) mediates mirror-image pain after peripheral nerve injury, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Using intrathecal injection of NGF antibodies, we found that NGF is required for the development of intra-DRG synapse-like structures made by neurite sprouts of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP(+)) nociceptors and sympathetic axons onto neurite sprouts of Kv4.3(+) nociceptors. These synapse-like structures are formed near NGF-releasing satellite glia surrounding large DRG neurons. Downregulation of the postsynaptic protein PSD95 with a specific shRNA largely eliminates these synapse-like structures, suppresses activities of Kv4.3(+) but not CGRP(+) nociceptors, and attenuates mirror-image pain. Furthermore, neutralizing the neurotransmitter norepinephrine or CGRP in the synapse-like structures by antibodies has similar analgesic effect. Thus, elevated NGF after peripheral nerve injury induces neurite sprouting and the formation of synapse-like structures within the contralateral DRG, leading to the development of chronic mirror-image pain. PMID:26121254

  14. Sciatic nerve injury induces functional pro-nociceptive chemokine receptors in bladder-associated primary afferent neurons in the rat.

    PubMed

    Foster, R; Jung, J; Farooq, A; McClung, C; Ripsch, M S; Fitzgerald, M P; White, F A

    2011-06-01

    Visceral sensory afferents during disease or following injury often produce vague, diffuse body sensations, and pain referred to somatic targets. Alternatively, injury due to trauma or disease of somatic nerve targets can also lead to referred pain in visceral targets via a somatovisceral reflex. Both phenomenons are thought to be due to convergence of visceral and somatic afferents within the spinal cord. To investigate a potential peripheral influence for referred pain in visceral targets following somatic nerve injury, we examined whether a sciatic nerve injury known to produce hindpaw tactile hyperalgesia alters the frequency of micturition and the sensitivity of bladder-associated sensory neurons to pro-nociceptive chemokines. Adult female Sprague-Dawley rats received injections of cholera toxin B subunit conjugated to 555 into urinary bladder wall to retrogradely label visceral primary afferent neurons. After 7 days, the right sciatic nerve of these animals was subjected to a lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC)-induced focal demyelination injury. Pre- and post-injury tactile sensitivity in the hind paw and micturition frequency were assayed. Animals were allowed to survive for 14-28 days. Lumbosacral and lumbar dorsal root ganglia (DRG) ipsilateral to the nerve injury were acutely dissociated from sham and nerve injured animals. Bladder wall-associated sensory neurons identified via the retrograde marker were assayed for fluxes in intracellular calcium following administration of pro-nociceptive chemokines. The assayed chemokines included monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP1/CCL2) and stromal cell derived factor-1 alpha (SDF1/CXCL12). LPC nerve injured animals exhibited tactile hyperalgesia and increased micturition frequency for at least 28 days. Focal demyelination of the sciatic nerve also increased the number of injured L?L? and non-injured L?-S? bladder-associated sensory neurons that responded to MCP1 and SDF1 when compared with sensory neurons derived from uninjured nave and sham-injured control animals. Taken together, these data suggest that some visceral hypersensitivity states may have a somatic origin. More importantly, nociceptive somatovisceral sensation may be mediated by upregulation of chemokine signaling in visceral sensory neurons. PMID:21458542

  15. Ultrastructural Changes in Spinal Motoneurons and Locomotor Functional Study after Sciatic Nerve Repair in Conduit Tube

    PubMed Central

    Delaviz, Hamdollah; Faghihi, Abolfazel; Mohamadi, Jamshid; Roozbehi, Amrollah

    2012-01-01

    Objective(s) Motor deficit and neuron degeneration is seen after nerve transection. The aim of this study is to determine whether a poled polyvinelidene fluoride (PVDF) tube with other supportive strategies can protect the neuronal morphology and motor function after sciatic nerve transaction in rats. Materials and Methods After transection of the left sciatic nerve in 60 male Wistar rats (200-250 g), the epineural group was sutured end to end. In the autograft rats, a 10 mm piece of sciatic nerve was rotated 180 C and sutured back into the nerve gap. In the nerve guidance channel (NGC) group, polarized piezoelectric PVDF tube containing NGF and collagen gel was sutured in the gap. In control group sciatic nerve was removed (10 mm) without repair. After one, four and eight weeks, the L4-L6 spinal cord segment was removed for histological study using transmission electron microscope. Functional outcome was assessed using the Basso, Bresnahan and Beattie (BBB) locomotor scale at both four and eight weeks after the lesion. Results Chromatin condensation was seen after 4 weeks in the repair groups. Cell membrane shrinkage and mitochondrial degeneration was observed after 4 and 8 weeks respectively, in the autografted and NGC rats. In the control group, chromatin condensation, cell membrane shrinkage with mitochondrial degeneration and vacuolization of perikaryon was seen after 1, 4 and 8 weeks, respectively. At 56 days, the functional recovery of the epineural rats significantly increased in comparison to the other groups (P< 0.05). Conclusion The epineural suture has more efficacies, and NGC may be used as a proper substitute for autograft in nerve injury. PMID:23492837

  16. Stem cell salvage of injured peripheral nerve.

    PubMed

    Grimoldi, Nadia; Colleoni, Federica; Tiberio, Francesca; Vetrano, Ignazio G; Cappellari, Alberto; Costa, Antonella; Belicchi, Marzia; Razini, Paola; Giordano, Rosaria; Spagnoli, Diego; Pluderi, Mauro; Gatti, Stefano; Morbin, Michela; Gaini, Sergio M; Rebulla, Paolo; Bresolin, Nereo; Torrente, Yvan

    2015-01-01

    We previously developed a collagen tube filled with autologous skin-derived stem cells (SDSCs) for bridging long rat sciatic nerve gaps. Here we present a case report describing a compassionate use of this graft for repairing the polyinjured motor and sensory nerves of the upper arms of a patient. Preclinical assessment was performed with collagen/SDSC implantation in rats after sectioning the sciatic nerve. For the patient, during the 3-year follow-up period, functional recovery of injured median and ulnar nerves was assessed by pinch gauge test and static two-point discrimination and touch test with monofilaments, along with electrophysiological and MRI examinations. Preclinical experiments in rats revealed rescue of sciatic nerve and no side effects of patient-derived SDSC transplantation (30 and 180 days of treatment). In the patient treatment, motor and sensory functions of the median nerve demonstrated ongoing recovery postimplantation during the follow-up period. The results indicate that the collagen/SDSC artificial nerve graft could be used for surgical repair of larger defects in major lesions of peripheral nerves, increasing patient quality of life by saving the upper arms from amputation. PMID:24268028

  17. Immunohistochemical, Ultrastructural and Functional Analysis of Axonal Regeneration through Peripheral Nerve Grafts Containing Schwann Cells Expressing BDNF, CNTF or NT3

    PubMed Central

    Godinho, Maria João; Teh, Lip; Pollett, Margaret A.; Goodman, Douglas; Hodgetts, Stuart I.; Sweetman, Iain; Walters, Mark; Verhaagen, Joost; Plant, Giles W.; Harvey, Alan R.

    2013-01-01

    We used morphological, immunohistochemical and functional assessments to determine the impact of genetically-modified peripheral nerve (PN) grafts on axonal regeneration after injury. Grafts were assembled from acellular nerve sheaths repopulated ex vivo with Schwann cells (SCs) modified to express brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a secretable form of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), or neurotrophin-3 (NT3). Grafts were used to repair unilateral 1 cm defects in rat peroneal nerves and 10 weeks later outcomes were compared to normal nerves and various controls: autografts, acellular grafts and grafts with unmodified SCs. The number of regenerated βIII-Tubulin positive axons was similar in all grafts with the exception of CNTF, which contained the fewest immunostained axons. There were significantly lower fiber counts in acellular, untransduced SC and NT3 groups using a PanNF antibody, suggesting a paucity of large caliber axons. In addition, NT3 grafts contained the greatest number of sensory fibres, identified with either IB4 or CGRP markers. Examination of semi- and ultra-thin sections revealed heterogeneous graft morphologies, particularly in BDNF and NT3 grafts in which the fascicular organization was pronounced. Unmyelinated axons were loosely organized in numerous Remak bundles in NT3 grafts, while the BDNF graft group displayed the lowest ratio of umyelinated to myelinated axons. Gait analysis revealed that stance width was increased in rats with CNTF and NT3 grafts, and step length involving the injured left hindlimb was significantly greater in NT3 grafted rats, suggesting enhanced sensory sensitivity in these animals. In summary, the selective expression of BDNF, CNTF or NT3 by genetically modified SCs had differential effects on PN graft morphology, the number and type of regenerating axons, myelination, and locomotor function. PMID:23950907

  18. The effect of memantine on functional recovery of the facial nerve after crush injury.

    PubMed

    Topdag, Murat; Topdag, Deniz Ozlem; Ila, Kadri; Muezzinoglu, Bahar; Yaprak, Busra; Ozturk, Murat; Caliskan, Sebla; Iseri, Mete

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this study is to establish whether memantine is an alternative and effective treatment on facial nerve recovery after crush injury, and also to analyze the effective doses of this promising agent. This is a randomized controlled animal study. 40 rats underwent crush injury to left main trunk of the facial nerve, and divided into 4 groups; (1) control (saline treated), (2) 5-mg/kg memantine, (3) 10-mg/kg memantine, and (4) 20-mg/kg memantine group. Facial nerve functions were evaluated by eye reflex, and whisker movement compared to the unaffected side. They were scored on a 3-point scale. On day 28, the rats were sacrificed, and the facial nerves were dissected. The paraffin sections were studied with caspase-3 immunostaining. According to statistical data, the recovery in Group 4 began significantly earlier than the other groups on the basis of restoring eye blink reflexes and whisker movement. Groups 2 and 3 showed faster recovery than Group 1 on the basis of whisker movement. The caspase-3 positive staining was rarely detected in all groups. The KruskalWallis test revealed that Group 4 showed fewer apoptotic cells than other groups; this was statistically significant. However, the MannWhitney U test with the Bonferroni correction did not reveal any significant difference between the groups. In conclusion, this study revealed that memantine acted to restore facial nerve functions, and accelerate recovery after facial nerve injury by inhibiting apoptosis. PMID:24659363

  19. Regeneration of functional nerves within full thickness collagen-phosphorylcholine corneal substitute implants in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Christopher R; Acosta, M Carmen; Luna, Carolina; Liu, Wenguang; Belmonte, Carlos; Griffith, M; Gallar, Juana

    2010-04-01

    Our objective was to evaluate promotion of tissue and nerve regeneration by extracellular matrix (ECM) mimics, using corneal implantation as a model system. Porcine type I collagen and 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) were crosslinked using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethyl aminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC) and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) and moulded into appropriate corneal dimensions to serve as substitutes for natural corneal ECM. These were implanted as full thickness grafts by penetrating keratoplasty into the corneas of guinea pigs after removal of the host tissue, and tracked over eight months, by clinical examination, slit-lamp biomicroscopy, and esthesiometry. Histopathology and ex vivo nerve terminal impulse recordings were performed at three months and at eight months. The implants promoted regeneration of corneal cells, nerves and the tear film, while retaining optical clarity. After three months, electrophysiological recordings showed evidence of mechano-nociceptors, and polymodal units inside the implants, while cold-sensitive units were present only on the peripheral host cornea. Following eight months, the incidence of nerve activity and the frequency of spontaneous firing were higher than in control eyes as reported for regenerating fibers. Active cold nerve terminals also innervated the implant area. We show that ECM mimetic materials can promote regeneration of corneal cells and functional nerves. The simplicity in fabrication and demonstrated functionality shows potential for ECM substitutes in future clinical applications. PMID:20042235

  20. An implantable wireless system for muscle afferent recording from the sciatic nerve during functional electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Song, Kang-Il; Shon, Ahnsei; Chu, Jun-Uk; Choi, Kuiwon; Hwang, Dosik; Youn, Inchan

    2013-01-01

    An implantable wireless system was developed for recording muscle afferent activity and stimulating peripheral nerves with cuff electrodes. The proposed system was fabricated into the nerve cuff electrode, neural amplifier, neural stimulator, and wireless communication system with battery power. The nerve cuff electrode and neural amplifier were designed to improve the signal-to-interference ratio and signal-to-noise ratio. The wireless communication system was designed based on the medical implant communication service regulations to be suitable for implantation. The main function of this system was to extract muscle afferent activity from peripheral nerve during functional electrical stimulation. The cuff electrodes were chronically implanted on the sciatic nerve for recording and on the tibial and peroneal nerves for stimulation. When the extension and flexion movements of ankle joint were elicited from alternative electrical stimuli, the corresponding neural signals and ankle angles were recorded simultaneously. The muscle afferent activity was then extracted from the recorded neural signal through a simple blanking process. The experimental results showed that the ankle movements could be detected from the extracted muscle afferent activity. PMID:24110511

  1. A Requirement for Commissureless2 Function during Dipteran Insect Nerve Cord Development

    PubMed Central

    Sarro, Joseph; Andrews, Emily; Sun, Longhua; Behura, Susanta K.; Tan, John C.; Zeng, Erliang; Severson, David W.; Duman-Scheel, Molly

    2013-01-01

    Background In Drosophila melanogaster, commissureless (comm) function is required for proper nerve cord development. Although comm orthologs have not been identified outside of Drosophila species, some insects possess orthologs of Drosophila comm2, which may also regulate embryonic nerve cord development. Here, this hypothesis is explored through characterization of comm2 genes in two disease vector mosquitoes. Results Culex quinquefasciatus (West Nile and lymphatic filiariasis vector) has three comm2 genes that are expressed in the developing nerve cord. Aedes aegypti (dengue and yellow fever vector) has a single comm2 gene that is expressed in commissural neurons projecting axons toward the midline. Loss of comm2 function in both A. aegypti and D. melanogaster was found to result in loss of commissure defects that phenocopy the frazzled (fra) loss of function phenotypes observed in both species. Loss of fra function in either insect was found to result in decreased comm2 transcript levels during nerve cord development. Conclusions The results of this investigation suggest that Fra downregulates repulsion in precrossing commissural axons by regulating comm2 levels in both A. aegypti and D. melanogaster, both of which require Comm2 function for proper nerve cord development, PMID:24026811

  2. Misdirection of Regenerating Axons and Functional Recovery Following Sciatic Nerve Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Shirley K.; Hinkle, Marcus L.; Nicolini, Jennifer; Rambo, Lindsay N.; Rexwinkle, April M.; Rose, Sam J.; Sabatier, Manning J.; Backus, Deborah; English, Arthur W.

    2013-01-01

    Poor functional recovery found after peripheral nerve injury has been attributed to the misdirection of regenerating axons to reinnervate functionally inappropriate muscles. We applied brief electrical stimulation (ES) to the common fibular (CF) but not the tibial (Tib) nerve just prior to transection and repair of the entire rat sciatic nerve, to attempt to influence the misdirection of its regenerating axons. The specificity with which regenerating axons reinnervated appropriate targets was evaluated physiologically using compound muscle action potentials (M responses) evoked from stimulation of the two nerve branches above the injury site. Functional recovery was assayed using the timing of electromyography (EMG) activity recorded from the tibialis anterior (TA) and soleus (Sol) muscles during treadmill locomotion and kinematic analysis of hindlimb locomotor movements. Selective ES of the CF nerve resulted in restored M-responses at earlier times than in unstimulated controls in both TA and Sol muscles. Stimulated CF axons reinnervated inappropriate targets to a greater extent than unstimulated Tib axons. During locomotion, functional antagonist muscles, TA and Sol, were coactivated both in stimulated rats and in unstimulated but injured rats. Hindlimb kinematics in stimulated rats were comparable to untreated rats, but significantly different from intact controls. Selective ES promotes enhanced axon regeneration but does so with decreased fidelity of muscle reinnervation. Functional recovery is neither improved nor degraded, suggesting that compensatory changes in the outputs of the spinal circuits driving locomotion may occur irrespective of the extent of misdirection of regenerating axons in the periphery. PMID:21120925

  3. Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Receptor Type O regulates development and function of the sensory nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Brito, Manuel R.; Bixby, John L.

    2009-01-01

    The roles of protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) in differentiation and axon targeting by dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons are essentially unknown. The type III transmembrane PTP, PTPRO, is expressed in DRG neurons, and is implicated in the guidance of motor and retinal axons. We examined the role of PTPRO in DRG development and function using PTPRO-/- mice. The number of peptidergic nociceptive neurons in the DRG of PTPRO-/- mice was significantly decreased, while the total number of sensory neurons appeared unchanged. In addition, spinal pathfinding by both peptidergic and proprioceptive neurons was abnormal in PTPRO-/- mice. Lastly, PTPRO-/- mice performed abnormally on tests of thermal pain and sensorimotor coordination, suggesting that both nociception and proprioception were perturbed. Our data indicate that PTPRO is required for peptidergic differentiation and process outgrowth of sensory neurons, as well as mature sensory function, and provide the first evidence that RPTPs regulate DRG development. PMID:19800005

  4. Time-course of Changes in Activation Among Facial Nerve Injury: A Functional Imaging Study.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Fu-Long; Gao, Pei-Yi; Sui, Bin-Bin; Wan, Hong; Lin, Yan; Xue, Jing; Zhou, Jian; Qian, Tian-Yi; Wang, Shiwei; Li, Dezhi; Liu, Song

    2015-10-01

    Patients suffering different intervals of facial nerve injury were investigated by functional magnetic resonance imaging to study changes in activation within cortex.Forty-five patients were divided into 3 groups based on intervals of facial nerve injury. Another 16 age and sex-matched healthy participants were included as a control group. Patients and healthy participants underwent task functional magnetic resonance imaging (eye blinking and lip pursing) examination.Functional reorganization after facial nerve injury is dynamic and time-dependent. Correlation between activation in sensorimotor area and intervals of facial nerve injury was significant, with a Pearson correlation coefficient of -0.951 (P < 0.001) in the left sensorimotor area and a Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.333 (P = 0.025) in the right sensorimotor area.Increased activation in integration areas, such as supramarginal gyrus and precunes lobe, could be detected in the early-middle stage of facial dysfunction compared with normal individuals. Decreased activation in sensorimotor area contralateral to facial nerve injury could be found in late stage of facial dysfunction compared with normal individuals. Dysfunction in the facial nerve has devastating effects on the activity of sensorimotor areas, whereas enhanced intensity in the sensorimotor area ipsilateral to the facial nerve injury in middle stage of facial dysfunction suggests the possible involvement of interhemispheric reorganization. Behavioral or brain stimulation technique treatment in this stage could be applied to alter reorganization within sensorimotor area in the rehabilitation of facial function, monitoring of therapeutic efficacy, and improvement in therapeutic intervention along the course of recovery. PMID:26512554

  5. Emotional processing, p50 sensory gating, and social functioning in bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Vuillier, Laura; Hermens, Daniel F; Chitty, Kate; Wang, Chenyu; Kaur, Manreena; Ward, Philip B; Degabriele, Rachael; Hickie, Ian B; Lagopoulos, Jim

    2015-04-01

    Emotional processing has been reported to effect sensory gating as measured by the event-related potential known as P50. Because both P50 and emotional processing are dysfunctional in bipolar disorder (BD), we sought to investigate the impact that concurrent emotional processing has on sensory gating in this psychiatric population. P50 was recorded using a paired-click paradigm. Peak-to-peak amplitudes for stimulus 1 (S1) and stimulus 2 (S2) were acquired during the presentation of disgust and neutral faces to young adults with BD (n = 19) and controls (n = 20). Social functioning and quality-of-life self-reported measures were also obtained. The BD group had significantly larger P50 amplitudes elicited by the S2-disgust response compared with controls, but no significant difference in overall P50 sensory gating was found between the groups. There were also no differences between groups in S1-disgust or in either of the neutral P50 amplitudes. The BD group showed significant associations between sensory gating to disgust and measures of social functioning. Importantly, BD showed impaired filtering of auditory information when paired with an emotionally salient image. Thus, it appears that patients with the greatest impairment in sensory gating also have the most difficulty engaging in social situations. PMID:24824630

  6. Peripheral Nerve Reconstruction after Injury: A Review of Clinical and Experimental Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Grinsell, D.; Keating, C. P.

    2014-01-01

    Unlike other tissues in the body, peripheral nerve regeneration is slow and usually incomplete. Less than half of patients who undergo nerve repair after injury regain good to excellent motor or sensory function and current surgical techniques are similar to those described by Sunderland more than 60 years ago. Our increasing knowledge about nerve physiology and regeneration far outweighs our surgical abilities to reconstruct damaged nerves and successfully regenerate motor and sensory function. It is technically possible to reconstruct nerves at the fascicular level but not at the level of individual axons. Recent surgical options including nerve transfers demonstrate promise in improving outcomes for proximal nerve injuries and experimental molecular and bioengineering strategies are being developed to overcome biological roadblocks limiting patient recovery. PMID:25276813

  7. Nerve growth factor acts through the TrkA receptor to protect sensory neurons from the damaging effects of the HIV-1 viral protein, Vpr.

    PubMed

    Webber, C A; Salame, J; Luu, G-L S; Acharjee, S; Ruangkittisakul, A; Martinez, J A; Jalali, H; Watts, R; Ballanyi, K; Guo, G F; Zochodne, D W; Power, C

    2013-11-12

    Distal sensory polyneuropathy (DSP) with associated neuropathic pain is the most common neurological disorder affecting patients with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS). Viral protein R (Vpr) is a neurotoxic protein encoded by HIV-1 and secreted by infected macrophages. Vpr reduces neuronal viability, increases cytosolic calcium and membrane excitability of cultured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) sensory neurons, and is associated with mechanical allodynia in vivo. A clinical trial with HIV/AIDS patients demonstrated that nerve growth factor (NGF) reduced the severity of DSP-associated neuropathic pain, a problem linked to damage to small diameter, potentially NGF-responsive fibers. Herein, the actions of NGF were investigated in our Vpr model of DSP and we demonstrated that NGF significantly protected sensory neurons from the effects of Vpr. Footpads of immunodeficient Vpr transgenic (vpr/RAG1(-/-)) mice displayed allodynia (p<0.05), diminished epidermalinnervation (p<0.01) and reduced NGF mRNA expression (p<0.001) compared to immunodeficient (wildtype/RAG1(-/-)) littermate control mice. Compartmented cultures confirmed recombinant Vpr exposure to the DRG neuronal perikarya decreased distal neurite extension (p<0.01), whereas NGF exposure at these distal axons protected the DRG neurons from the Vpr-induced effect on their cell bodies. NGF prevented Vpr-induced attenuation of the phosphorylated glycogen synthase-3 axon extension pathway and tropomyosin-related kinase A (TrkA) receptor expression in DRG neurons (p<0.05) and it directly counteracted the cytosolic calcium burst caused by Vpr exposure to DRG neurons (p<0.01). TrkA receptor agonist indicated that NGFacted through the TrkA receptor to block the Vpr-mediated decrease in axon outgrowth in neonatal and adult rat and fetal human DRG neurons (p<0.05). Similarly, inhibiting the lower affinity NGF receptor, p75, blocked Vpr's effect on DRG neurons. Overall, NGF/TrkA signaling or p75 receptor inhibition protects somatic sensory neurons exposed to Vpr, thus laying the groundwork for potential therapeutic options for HIV/AIDS patients suffering from DSP. PMID:23912036

  8. In vivo characterization of regenerative peripheral nerve interface function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ursu, Daniel C.; Urbanchek, Melanie G.; Nedic, Andrej; Cederna, Paul S.; Gillespie, R. Brent

    2016-04-01

    Objective. Regenerative peripheral nerve interfaces (RPNIs) are neurotized free autologous muscle grafts equipped with electrodes to record myoelectric signals for prosthesis control. Viability of rat RPNI constructs have been demonstrated using evoked responses. In vivo RPNI characterization is the next critical step for assessment as a control modality for prosthetic devices. Approach. Two RPNIs were created in each of two rats by grafting portions of free muscle to the ends of divided peripheral nerves (peroneal in the left and tibial in the right hind limb) and placing bipolar electrodes on the graft surface. After four months, we examined in vivo electromyographic signal activity and compared these signals to muscular electromyographic signals recorded from autologous muscles in two rats serving as controls. An additional group of two rats in which the autologous muscles were denervated served to quantify cross-talk in the electrode recordings. Recordings were made while rats walked on a treadmill and a motion capture system tracked the hind limbs. Amplitude and periodicity of signals relative to gait were quantified, correlation between electromyographic and motion recording were assessed, and a decoder was trained to predict joint motion. Main Results. Raw RPNI signals were active during walking, with amplitudes of 1 mVPP, and quiet during standing, with amplitudes less than 0.1 mVPP. RPNI signals were periodic and entrained with gait. A decoder predicted bilateral ankle motion with greater than 80% reliability. Control group signal activity agreed with literature. Denervated group signals remained quiescent throughout all evaluations. Significance. In vivo myoelectric RPNI activity encodes neural activation patterns associated with gait. Signal contamination from muscles adjacent to the RPNI is minimal, as demonstrated by the low amplitude signals obtained from the Denervated group. The periodicity and entrainment to gait of RPNI recordings suggests the transduced signals were generated via central nervous system control.

  9. Importance of Tissue Morphology Relative to Patient Reports of Symptoms and Functional Limitations Resulting From Median Nerve Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Kevin D.; Li, Xiaobai; Sommerich, Carolyn M.; Case-Smith, Jane

    2013-01-01

    Significant data exist for the personal, environmental, and occupational risk factors for carpal tunnel syndrome. Few data, however, explain the interrelationship of tissue morphology to these factors among patients with clinical presentation of median nerve pathology. Therefore, our primary objective was to examine the relationship of various risk factors that may be predictive of subjective reports of symptoms or functional deficits accounting for median nerve morphology. Using diagnostic ultrasonography, we observed real-time median nerve morphology among 88 participants with varying reports of symptoms or functional limitations resulting from median nerve pathology. Body mass index, educational level, and nerve morphology were the primary predictive factors. Monitoring median nerve morphology with ultrasonography may provide valuable information for clinicians treating patients with symptoms of median nerve pathology. Sonographic measurements may be a useful clinical tool for improving treatment planning and provision, documenting patient status, or measuring clinical outcomes of prevention and rehabilitation interventions. PMID:23245784

  10. Functional and anatomical basis for brain plasticity in facial palsy rehabilitation using the masseteric nerve.

    PubMed

    Buendia, Javier; Loayza, Francis R; Luis, Elkin O; Celorrio, Marta; Pastor, Maria A; Hontanilla, Bernardo

    2016-03-01

    Several techniques have been described for smile restoration after facial nerve paralysis. When a nerve other than the contralateral facial nerve is used to restore the smile, some controversy appears because of the nonphysiological mechanism of smile recovering. Different authors have reported natural results with the masseter nerve. The physiological pathways which determine whether this is achieved continue to remain unclear. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, brain activation pattern measuring blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signal during smiling and jaw clenching was recorded in a group of 24 healthy subjects (11 females). Effective connectivity of premotor regions was also compared in both tasks. The brain activation pattern was similar for smile and jaw-clenching tasks. Smile activations showed topographic overlap though more extended for smile than clenching. Gender comparisons during facial movements, according to kinematics and BOLD signal, did not reveal significant differences. Effective connectivity results of psychophysiological interaction (PPI) from the same seeds located in bilateral facial premotor regions showed significant task and gender differences (p < 0.001). The hypothesis of brain plasticity between the facial nerve and masseter nerve areas is supported by the broad cortical overlap in the representation of facial and masseter muscles. PMID:26683008

  11. Olfactory stimulatory with grapefruit and lavender oils change autonomic nerve activity and physiological function.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Katsuya; Niijima, Akira; Horii, Yuko; Shen, Jiao; Tanida, Mamoru

    2014-10-01

    This review summarizes the effects of olfactory stimulation with grapefruit and lavender oils on autonomic nerve activity and physiological function. Olfactory stimulation with the scent of grapefruit oil (GFO) increases the activity of sympathetic nerves that innervate white and brown adipose tissues, the adrenal glands, and the kidneys, decreases the activity of the gastric vagal nerve in rats and mice. This results in an increase in lipolysis, thermogenesis, and blood pressure, and a decrease in food intake. Olfactory stimulation with the scent of lavender oil (LVO) elicits the opposite changes in nerve activity and physiological variables. Olfactory stimulation with scent of limonene, a component of GFO, and linalool, a component of LVO, has similar effects to stimulation with GFO and LVO, respectively. The histamine H1-receptor antagonist, diphenhydramine, abolishes all GFO-induced changes in nerve activity and physiological variables, and the hitstamine H3-receptor antagonist, thioperamide, eliminates all LVO-induced changes. Lesions to the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus and anosmic treatment with ZnSO4 also abolish all GFO- and LVO-induced changes. These findings indicate that limonene and linalool might be the active substances in GFO and LVO, and suggest that the suprachiasmatic nucleus and histamine are involved in mediating the GFO- and LVO-induced changes in nerve activity and physiological variables. PMID:25002406

  12. Schwann cell-specific JAM-C-deficient mice reveal novel expression and functions for JAM-C in peripheral nerves

    PubMed Central

    Colom, Bartomeu; Poitelon, Yannick; Huang, Wenlong; Woodfin, Abigail; Averill, Sharon; Del Carro, Ubaldo; Zambroni, Desirée; Brain, Susan D.; Perretti, Mauro; Ahluwalia, Amrita; Priestley, John V.; Chavakis, Triantafyllos; Imhof, Beat A.; Feltri, M. Laura; Nourshargh, Sussan

    2012-01-01

    Junctional adhesion molecule-C (JAM-C) is an adhesion molecule expressed at junctions between adjacent endothelial and epithelial cells and implicated in multiple inflammatory and vascular responses. In addition, we recently reported on the expression of JAM-C in Schwann cells (SCs) and its importance for the integrity and function of peripheral nerves. To investigate the role of JAM-C in neuronal functions further, mice with a specific deletion of JAM-C in SCs (JAM-C SC KO) were generated. Compared to wild-type (WT) controls, JAM-C SC KO mice showed electrophysiological defects, muscular weakness, and hypersensitivity to mechanical stimuli. In addressing the underlying cause of these defects, nerves from JAM-C SC KO mice were found to have morphological defects in the paranodal region, exhibiting increased nodal length as compared to WTs. The study also reports on previously undetected expressions of JAM-C, namely on perineural cells, and in line with nociception defects of the JAM-C SC KO animals, on finely myelinated sensory nerve fibers. Collectively, the generation and characterization of JAM-C SC KO mice has provided unequivocal evidence for the involvement of SC JAM-C in the fine organization of peripheral nerves and in modulating multiple neuronal responses.—Colom, B., Poitelon, Y., Huang, W., Woodfin, A., Averill, S., Del Carro, U., Zambroni, D., Brain, S. D., Perretti, M., Ahluwalia, A., Priestley, J. V., Chavakis, T., Imhof, B. A., Feltri, M. L., Nourshargh, S. Schwann cell-specific JAM-C-deficient mice reveal novel expression and functions for JAM-C in peripheral nerves. PMID:22090315

  13. Reinnervated nerves contribute to the secretion function and regeneration of denervated submandibular glands in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Si-en; Su, Yu-xiong; Zheng, Guang-sen; Liang, Yu-jie; Liao, Gui-qing

    2014-12-01

    This study aimed to investigate the contribution of redistributed nerves in the secretory function and regeneration of a denervated submandibular gland (SMG). The postganglionic parasympathetic and sympathetic denervated SMGs of rabbits were wrapped in polyester or acellular dermal matrices to block nerve regeneration either partially or completely. Submandibular glands were removed 4, 8, 16, and 24 wk after the operation and examined histologically. Furthermore, the aquaporin-5 (AQP5), muscarinic-3 (M3), and ?1-adrenergic receptors were evaluated by immunofluorescence and western blot analysis. After denervation, salivary flow was decreased and acinar cells were atrophic, and the expression levels of the M3, ?1-adrenergic, and AQP5 receptors were decreased. However, both impaired secretion function and atrophic parenchyma were gradually ameliorated with the growing redistribution of parasympathetic and sympathetic nerves. Apoptosis was markedly inhibited and expression of the M3, ?1-adrenergic, and AQP5 receptors was increased after reinnervation. In contrast, SMGs without reinnervated nerves maintained hyposecretion and atrophic parenchyma. In conclusion, reinnervated nerves in a rabbit's denervated SMG played an important role in the secretion function and regeneration of SMGs via up-regulation of the expression of neurotransmitter receptors and AQP5. PMID:25363784

  14. EFFECTS OF 2,4-DITHIOBIURET ON SENSORY AND MOTOR FUNCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    2,4-Dithiobiuret exposure causes a delayed onset muscle weakness in rats that has been attributed to depressed neuromuscular transmission. he present study compares the effects of DTB on sensory and motor function in rats. dult male Long-Evans hooded rats were exposed to saline, ...

  15. Peripheral Nerve Repair in Rats Using Composite Hydrogel-Filled Aligned Nanofiber Conduits with Incorporated Nerve Growth Factor

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Jenny; Limburg, Sonja; Joshi, Sunil K.; Landman, Rebeccah; Park, Michelle; Zhang, Qia; Kim, Hubert T.

    2013-01-01

    Repair of peripheral nerve defects with current synthetic, tubular nerve conduits generally shows inferior recovery when compared with using nerve autografts, the current gold standard. We tested the ability of composite collagen and hyaluronan hydrogels, with and without the nerve growth factor (NGF), to stimulate neurite extension on a promising aligned, nanofiber poly-L-lactide-co-caprolactone (PLCL) scaffold. In vitro, the hydrogels significantly increased neurite extension from dorsal root ganglia explants. Consistent with these results, the addition of hydrogels as luminal fillers within aligned, nanofiber tubular PLCL conduits led to improved sensory function compared to autograft repair in a critical-size defect in the sciatic nerve in a rat model. Sensory recovery was assessed 3 and 12 weeks after repair using a withdrawal assay from thermal stimulation. The addition of hydrogel did not enhance recovery of motor function in the rat model. The NGF led to dose-dependent improvements in neurite out-growth in vitro, but did not have a significant effect in vivo. In summary, composite collagen/hyaluronan hydrogels enhanced sensory neurite outgrowth in vitro and sensory recovery in vivo. The use of such hydrogels as luminal fillers for tubular nerve conduits may therefore be useful in assisting restoration of protective sensation following peripheral nerve injury. PMID:23659607

  16. Model-based analysis and design of nerve cuff electrodes for restoring bladder function by selective stimulation of the pudendal nerve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, Alexander R.; Grill, Warren M.

    2013-06-01

    Objective. Electrical stimulation of the pudendal nerve (PN) is being developed as a means to restore bladder function in persons with spinal cord injury. A single nerve cuff electrode placed on the proximal PN trunk may enable selective stimulation of distinct fascicles to maintain continence or evoke micturition. The objective of this study was to design a nerve cuff that enabled selective stimulation of the PN. Approach. We evaluated the performance of both flat interface nerve electrode (FINE) cuff and round cuff designs, with a range of FINE cuff heights and number of contacts, as well as multiple contact orientations. This analysis was performed using a computational model, in which the nerve and fascicle cross-sectional positions from five human PN trunks were systematically reshaped within the nerve cuff. These cross-sections were used to create finite element models, with electric potentials calculated and applied to a cable model of a myelinated axon to evaluate stimulation selectivity for different PN targets. Subsequently, the model was coupled to a genetic algorithm (GA) to identify solutions that used multiple contact activation to maximize selectivity and minimize total stimulation voltage. Main results. Simulations did not identify any significant differences in selectivity between FINE and round cuffs, although the latter required smaller stimulation voltages for target activation due to preserved localization of targeted fascicle groups. Further, it was found that a ten contact nerve cuff generated sufficient selectivity for all PN targets, with the degree of selectivity dependent on the relative position of the target within the nerve. The GA identified solutions that increased fitness by 0.7-45.5% over single contact activation by decreasing stimulation of non-targeted fascicles. Significance. This study suggests that using an optimal nerve cuff design and multiple contact activation could enable selective stimulation of the human PN trunk for restoration of bladder function.

  17. Rehabilitation of peripheral nerve injuries.

    PubMed

    Frykman, G K; Waylett, J

    1981-04-01

    Rehabilitation of the patient with a peripheral nerve injury requires knowledge, understanding, and cooperation between the patient, the physician, and the therapist. Careful documentation of the patient's status prior to beginning rehabilitation and periodic follow-up assessments are of utmost importance. We have presented a detailed scheme for initial and follow-up evaluation. Prevention of unnecessary stiffness, swelling, and contractures is emphasized. Education of the patient to prevent the individual from doing further damage to the anesthetic area is important. Proper splinting techniques, from the postoperative splint and cast to splints that prevent deformities as well as overcome established contractures and improve function, will aid in the patient's recovery. Desensitization is an important aspect of sensory recovery, and sensory reeducation will aid in recovery of sensibility. Early tendon transfers are found to be particularly advantageous for high radial and median nerve palsies to gain functional recovery earlier and to allow the patient to become brace-free sooner. PMID:7243244

  18. Failure of action potential propagation in sensory neurons: mechanisms and loss of afferent filtering in C-type units after painful nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Gemes, Geza; Koopmeiners, Andrew; Rigaud, Marcel; Lirk, Philipp; Sapunar, Damir; Bangaru, Madhavi Latha; Vilceanu, Daniel; Garrison, Sheldon R; Ljubkovic, Marko; Mueller, Samantha J; Stucky, Cheryl L; Hogan, Quinn H

    2013-01-01

    The T-junction of sensory neurons in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) is a potential impediment to action potential (AP) propagation towards the CNS. Using intracellular recordings from rat DRG neuronal somata during stimulation of the dorsal root, we determined that the maximal rate at which all of 20 APs in a train could successfully transit the T-junction (following frequency) was lowest in C-type units, followed by A-type units with inflected descending limbs of the AP, and highest in A-type units without inflections. In C-type units, following frequency was slower than the rate at which AP trains could be produced in either dorsal root axonal segments or in the soma alone, indicating that the T-junction is a site that acts as a low-pass filter for AP propagation. Following frequency was slower for a train of 20 APs than for two, indicating that a cumulative process leads to propagation failure. Propagation failure was accompanied by diminished somatic membrane input resistance, and was enhanced when Ca2+-sensitive K+ currents were augmented or when Ca2+-sensitive Cl? currents were blocked. After peripheral nerve injury, following frequencies were increased in axotomized C-type neurons and decreased in axotomized non-inflected A-type neurons. These findings reveal that the T-junction in sensory neurons is a regulator of afferent impulse traffic. Diminished filtering of AP trains at the T-junction of C-type neurons with axotomized peripheral processes could enhance the transmission of activity that is ectopically triggered in a neuroma or the neuronal soma, possibly contributing to pain generation. PMID:23148321

  19. Functional transplant of photoactivated adenylyl cyclase (PAC) into Aplysia sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Nagahama, Tatsumi; Suzuki, Takeshi; Yoshikawa, Shinya; Iseki, Mineo

    2007-09-01

    In neural mechanisms of animal learning, intracellular cAMP has been known to play an important role. In the present experiments we attempted functional transplant of a photoactivated adenylyl cyclase (PAC) isolated from Euglena into Aplysia neurons, and explored whether PAC can produce cAMP in the neurons by light stimulation. Serotonergic modulation of mechanoafferent sensory neurons in Aplysia pleural ganglia has been reported to increase intracellular cAMP level and promotes synaptic transmission to motor neurons by increasing spike width of sensory neurons. When cAMP was directly injected into the sensory neurons, spike amplitude temporarily decreased while spike width temporarily increased. This effect was not substituted by injection of 5'AMP, and maintained longer in a bath solution containing IBMX, the phosphodiesterase inhibitor. We, therefore, explored these changes as indicators of appearance of the PAC function. PAC or the PAC expression vector (pNEX-PAC) was injected into cell bodies of sensory neurons. Spike amplitude decreased in both cases and spike width increased in the PAC injection when the neurons were stimulated with light, suggesting that the transplanted PAC works well in Aplysia neurons. These results indicate that we can control cAMP production in specific neurons with light by the functional transplant of PAC. PMID:17624456

  20. Structure/Function assessment of synapses at motor nerve terminals

    PubMed Central

    Johnstone, A. F. M.; Viele, K.; Cooper, R. L.

    2010-01-01

    The release of transmitter at neuromuscular junctions (NMJ) of the opener muscle in crayfish is quantal in nature. This NMJ offers the advantage of being able to record quantal events at specific visually identified release sites, thus allowing measurement of the physiological parameters of vesicle release and its response to be directly correlated with synaptic structure. These experiments take advantage of areas between the varicosities on the nerve terminal that we define as stems. Stems were chosen as the region to study because of their low synaptic output due to fewer synaptic sites. Through 3-D reconstruction from hundreds of serial sections, obtained by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), at a site in which focal macropatch recordings were obtained, the number of synapses and AZs are revealed. Thus, physiological profiles with various stimulation conditions can be assessed in regards to direct synaptic structure. Here we used the properties of the quantal shape to determine if distinct subsets of quantal signatures existed and if differences in the distributions are present depending on the frequency of stimulation. Such a quantal signature could come about by parameters of area, rise time, peak amplitude, latency and tau decay. In this study, it is shown that even at defined sites on the stem, with few active zones, synaptic transmission is still complex and the quantal responses appear to be variable even for a given synapse over time. In this study we could not identify a quantal signature for the conditions utilized. PMID:20730805

  1. Piezoelectric materials mimic the function of the cochlear sensory epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Inaoka, Takatoshi; Shintaku, Hirofumi; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Kawano, Satoyuki; Ogita, Hideaki; Sakamoto, Tatsunori; Hamanishi, Shinji; Wada, Hiroshi; Ito, Juichi

    2011-01-01

    Cochlear hair cells convert sound vibration into electrical potential, and loss of these cells diminishes auditory function. In response to mechanical stimuli, piezoelectric materials generate electricity, suggesting that they could be used in place of hair cells to create an artificial cochlear epithelium. Here, we report that a piezoelectric membrane generated electrical potentials in response to sound stimuli that were able to induce auditory brainstem responses in deafened guinea pigs, indicating its capacity to mimic basilar membrane function. In addition, sound stimuli were transmitted through the external auditory canal to a piezoelectric membrane implanted in the cochlea, inducing it to vibrate. The application of sound to the middle ear ossicle induced voltage output from the implanted piezoelectric membrane. These findings establish the fundamental principles for the development of hearing devices using piezoelectric materials, although there are many problems to be overcome before practical application. PMID:22025702

  2. Reappraisal of nerve repair.

    PubMed

    Millesi, H

    1981-04-01

    In every case of acute injury involving the nerve, the surgeon must decide whether a primary repair of an elective early secondary repair is the treatment of choice. In a clean-cut nerve without defect, immediate primary repair, using trunk-to-trunk coaptation with epineurial sutures, offers an optimal solution. In the periphery of the median and the ulnar nerves, in which motor and sensory fascicles are already separated, fascicular dissection is performed, and coaptation of fascicle groups should be done. In medical centers with excellent facilities, such nerve repair will give good results even in very severe lesions. This repair can be performed also as a delayed primary procedure. If there is a nerve defect, a primary grafting procedure must be considered. We do not recommend this as a routine procedure because the nerve grafts might be lost if a complication occurs. The decision to perform a planned early secondary repair is an equally good alternative, especially in cases of a nerve defect, severe concomitant injuries, or both. In case of a combined nerve and tendon lesion in the carpal tunnel, the nerve repair can be performed at a later procedure without exposing the repaired flexor tendons, thus avoiding adhesion between tendons and nerves. If a decision is made in favor of an early secondary repair, the two stumps can be approximated by stitches to prevent retraction, if this can be achieved without tension. Approximation under tension in case of a larger defect would damage the two stumps and create an even larger defect. Marking the nerve ends by sutures is not necessary because exploration with always start in normal tissue, exposing the nerves from the proximal or the distal segments. Early secondary repair is performed during the third week, or later if this is demanded by local conditions. When indicated, plastic surgical procedures can eliminate constricting scars and provide an optimal soft tissue environment. After exploration and preparation of the two stumps, the surgeon must decide whether direct suturing or a nerve graft is indicated. If after very limited mobilization and slight flexion the nerve stumps cannot be coapted easily, a nerve graft should be used. The quality of motor recovery decreases steadily after a 6 month delay of repair. Late secondary repairs or reoperation of failure of primary repair should be performed within this time limit, although this does not mean that motor recovery cannot occur after a longer time interval. Useful motor recovery was achieved in certain cases after 18 months or more. Obviously the results might have been better if the time interval had been shorter. If a patient is seen with a nerve lesion after a long time interval, nerve repair is still indicated if sensibility is the main functional objective. In other long-standing cases, the nerve repair is combined with tendon transfer or capsulorrhaphy. After a particularly long time interval or in old patients, only palliative surgery is indicated. PMID:7233326

  3. Functional diversity among sensory receptors in a Drosophila olfactory circuit

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Dennis; Martelli, Carlotta; Kelley-Swift, Elizabeth; Brusalis, Christopher; Gershow, Marc; Samuel, Aravinthan D. T.; Emonet, Thierry; Carlson, John R.

    2013-01-01

    The ability of an animal to detect, discriminate, and respond to odors depends on the function of its olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs), which in turn depends ultimately on odorant receptors. To understand the diverse mechanisms used by an animal in olfactory coding and computation, it is essential to understand the functional diversity of its odor receptors. The larval olfactory system of Drosophila melanogaster contains 21 ORNs and a comparable number of odorant receptors whose properties have been examined in only a limited way. We systematically screened them with a panel of ?500 odorants, yielding >10,000 receptorodorant combinations. We identify for each of 19 receptors an odorant that excites it strongly. The responses elicited by each of these odorants are analyzed in detail. The odorants elicited little cross-activation of other receptors at the test concentration; thus, low concentrations of many of these odorants in nature may be signaled by a single ORN. The receptors differed dramatically in sensitivity to their cognate odorants. The responses showed diverse temporal dynamics, with some odorants eliciting supersustained responses. An intriguing question in the field concerns the roles of different ORNs and receptors in driving behavior. We found that the cognate odorants elicited behavioral responses that varied across a broad range. Some odorants elicited strong physiological responses but weak behavioral responses or weak physiological responses but strong behavioral responses. PMID:23690583

  4. Nerve growth factor and neurotrophin-3 modulate the rabies infection of adult sensory neurons in primary cultures.

    PubMed

    Castellanos, J E; Martnez, M; Acosta, O; Hurtado, H

    2000-07-14

    With the aim of determining if the proportion of rabies virus (RV)-infected adult neurons from dorsal root ganglion are affected by in vitro treatment with different neurotrophins, experiments using Nerve Growth Factor (NGF), Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) or Neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) as supplements for cells in culture were performed. Cultures treated with three different concentrations of each of the neurotrophins mentioned were infected with Challenge Virus Standard RV strain. An indirect immunoperoxidase technique was performed for the detection and counting of infected cells. NGF (2 ngml(-1) and 10 ngml(-1)) and NT-3 (1 ngml(-1) and 5 ngml(-1)) induced a significant reduction of infected neurons. None of the cultures treated with BDNF showed changes in the percentage of infected neurons. Likewise, the proportion of infected non-neuronal cells (Schwann cells and fibroblasts) was not altered by the treatment with neurotrophins. In addition, morphometric analysis of total and virus-immunoreactive neurons in culture were carried out, the neurotrophin treatment induced variations in the profile of neurons preferentially infected, since cell diameters in the infected cell population are different in the presence of NGF and NT-3. Data presented here could indicate a putative participation of neurotrophin receptor or biochemical modifications induced by neurotrophin treatment that affect the infection. The primary culture of dorsal root ganglion cells from adult mice is a very useful model for studying the basic phenomena of the RV-neuron interaction. PMID:10882791

  5. Pre-differentiation of mesenchymal stromal cells in combination with a microstructured nerve guide supports peripheral nerve regeneration in the rat sciatic nerve model.

    PubMed

    Boecker, Arne Hendrik; van Neerven, Sabien Geraldine Antonia; Scheffel, Juliane; Tank, Julian; Altinova, Haktan; Seidensticker, Katrin; Deumens, Ronald; Tolba, Rene; Weis, Joachim; Brook, Gary Anthony; Pallua, Norbert; Bozkurt, Ahmet

    2016-02-01

    Many bioartificial nerve guides have been investigated pre-clinically for their nerve regeneration-supporting function, often in comparison to autologous nerve transplantation, which is still regarded as the current clinical gold standard. Enrichment of these scaffolds with cells intended to support axonal regeneration has been explored as a strategy to boost axonal regeneration across these nerve guides Ansselin et al. (1998). In the present study, 20 mm rat sciatic nerve defects were implanted with a cell-seeded microstructured collagen nerve guide (Perimaix) or an autologous nerve graft. Under the influence of seeded, pre-differentiated mesenchymal stromal cells, axons regenerated well into the Perimaix nerve guide. Myelination-related parameters, like myelin sheath thickness, benefitted from an additional seeding with pre-differentiated mesenchymal stromal cells. Furthermore, both the number of retrogradely labelled sensory neurons and the axon density within the implant were elevated in the cell-seeded scaffold group with pre-differentiated mesenchymal stromal cells. However, a pre-differentiation had no influence on functional recovery. An additional cell seeding of the Perimaix nerve guide with mesenchymal stromal cells led to an extent of functional recovery, independent of the differentiation status, similar to autologous nerve transplantation. These findings encourage further investigations on pre-differentiated mesenchymal stromal cells as a cellular support for peripheral nerve regeneration. PMID:26296589

  6. Immediate and delayed nerve repair: improved muscle mass and function with leukemia inhibitory factor.

    PubMed

    Brown, David L; Bennett, Timothy M; Dowsing, Bruce J; Hayes, Alan; Abate, Massimo; Morrison, Wayne A

    2002-11-01

    In this study we examined the effect of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) on delayed repair of injured nerves. In a standard entubulation gap repair model of sciatic nerve in the rat, repair was performed immediately and after delays of 1 day, 1 week, and 4 weeks. Repaired nerves were treated with either LIF (10 ng) or saline, and assessment was by muscle mass and force contraction at 12 weeks after repair. After immediate nerve repair LIF administration resulted in 2.5- to 3-fold improvements compared with saline. In the 1-day delayed group, both saline and LIF treatment groups were comparable with that achieved with immediate repair combined with LIF. This result is consistent with the concept of preconditioning. In the 1-week delayed repair groups with LIF, muscle mass recovery and maximum force contraction were improved by 32% and 55%, respectively, compared with saline, whereas repairs delayed for 4 weeks showed increases of 50% and 36%. All delayed repairs treated with LIF were more effective than immediate repair with saline, but not as effective as primary repair with LIF. Our findings support the view that factors such as LIF may be efficacious for improving recovery of function in cases of delayed peripheral nerve repair. PMID:12457356

  7. IgSF8: a developmentally and functionally regulated cell adhesion molecule in olfactory sensory neuron axons and synapses

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Arundhati; Treloar, Helen B.

    2012-01-01

    Here, we investigated an Immunoglobulin (Ig) superfamily protein IgSF8 which is abundantly expressed in olfactory sensory neuron (OSN) axons and their developing synapses. We demonstrate that expression of IgSF8 within synaptic neuropil is transitory, limited to the period of glomerular formation. Glomerular expression decreases after synaptic maturation and compartmental glomerular organization is achieved, although expression is maintained at high levels within the olfactory nerve layer (ONL). Immunoprecipitations indicate that IgSF8 interacts with tetraspanin CD9 in the olfactory bulb (OB). CD9 is a component of tetraspanin-enriched microdomains (TEMs), specialized microdomains of the plasma membrane known to regulate cell morphology, motility, invasion, fusion and signaling, in both the nervous and immune systems, as well as in tumors. In vitro, both IgSF8 and CD9 localize to puncta within axons and growth cones of OSNs, consistent with TEM localization. When the olfactory epithelium (OE) was lesioned, forcing OSN regeneration en masse, IgSF8 was once again able to be detected in OSN axons terminals as synapses were reestablished. Finally, we halted synaptic maturation within glomeruli by unilaterally blocking functional activity and found that IgSF8 did not undergo exclusion from this subcellular compartment and instead continued to be detected in adult glomeruli. These data support the hypothesis that IgSF8 facilitates OSN synapse formation. PMID:22687584

  8. Sensory development.

    PubMed

    Clark-Gambelunghe, Melinda B; Clark, David A

    2015-04-01

    Sensory development is complex, with both morphologic and neural components. Development of the senses begins in early fetal life, initially with structures and then in-utero stimulation initiates perception. After birth, environmental stimulants accelerate each sensory organ to nearly complete maturity several months after birth. Vision and hearing are the best studied senses and the most crucial for learning. This article focuses on the cranial senses of vision, hearing, smell, and taste. Sensory function, embryogenesis, external and genetic effects, and common malformations that may affect development are discussed, and the corresponding sensory organs are examined and evaluated. PMID:25836703

  9. Functional compartmentalization of opioid desensitization in primary sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Samoriski, G M; Gross, R A

    2000-08-01

    The cellular correlates of desensitization or tolerance are poorly understood. To address this, we studied acute and long-term mu-opioid desensitization, with respect to Ca(2+) currents, in cultured rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Exposure of DRG neurons to the mu-agonist [D-Ala(2),N-MePhe(4), Gly-ol(5)]-enkephalin (DAMGO; 3 microM) reduced whole-cell currents approximately 35%, but with continued agonist application, 52% of the response was lost over 10 to 12 min. In contrast, exposure of DRG neurons to DAMGO for 24 h resulted in a nearly complete loss of Ca(2+) channel regulation after washing and re-exposure to DAMGO. Responses to the gamma-aminobutyric acid(B) agonist baclofen were not affected in these neurons. Acute desensitization preferentially affected the voltage-sensitive component of mu-opioid and gamma-aminobutyric acid(B) responses. Facilitation of both the DAMGO- and baclofen-inhibited current by a strong depolarizing prepulse was significantly attenuated in acutely desensitized neurons. Because G(betagamma)-subunits mediate neurotransmitter-induced changes in channel voltage-dependent properties, these data suggest an altered interaction of the G(betagamma)-subunit with the Ca(2+) channel. Block of N-type Ca(2+) channels with omega-conotoxin GVIA revealed a component of the opioid response that did not desensitize over 10 min. We conclude that acute and long-term mu-opioid desensitization in DRG neurons occurs by different mechanisms. Acute desensitization is heterologous and functionally compartmentalized: the pathway targeting non-N-type channels is relatively resistant to the early effects of continuous agonist exposure; the pathway targeting N-type channels in a largely voltage-insensitive manner is partially desensitized; and the pathway targeting N-type channels in a largely voltage-sensitive manner is completely desensitized. PMID:10900225

  10. Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Progenitors Assist Functional Sensory Axon Regeneration after Dorsal Root Avulsion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hoeber, Jan; Trolle, Carl; Konig, Niclas; Du, Zhongwei; Gallo, Alessandro; Hermans, Emmanuel; Aldskogius, Hakan; Shortland, Peter; Zhang, Su-Chun; Deumens, Ronald; Kozlova, Elena N.

    2015-01-01

    Dorsal root avulsion results in permanent impairment of sensory functions due to disconnection between the peripheral and central nervous system. Improved strategies are therefore needed to reconnect injured sensory neurons with their spinal cord targets in order to achieve functional repair after brachial and lumbosacral plexus avulsion injuries. Here, we show that sensory functions can be restored in the adult mouse if avulsed sensory fibers are bridged with the spinal cord by human neural progenitor (hNP) transplants. Responses to peripheral mechanical sensory stimulation were significantly improved in transplanted animals. Transganglionic tracing showed host sensory axons only in the spinal cord dorsal horn of treated animals. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed that sensory fibers had grown through the bridge and showed robust survival and differentiation of the transplants. Section of the repaired dorsal roots distal to the transplant completely abolished the behavioral improvement. This demonstrates that hNP transplants promote recovery of sensorimotor functions after dorsal root avulsion, and that these effects are mediated by spinal ingrowth of host sensory axons. These results provide a rationale for the development of novel stem cell-based strategies for functionally useful bridging of the peripheral and central nervous system. PMID:26053681

  11. Redox and Nitric Oxide-Mediated Regulation of Sensory Neuron Ion Channel Function

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS, respectively) can intimately control neuronal excitability and synaptic strength by regulating the function of many ion channels. In peripheral sensory neurons, such regulation contributes towards the control of somatosensory processing; therefore, understanding the mechanisms of such regulation is necessary for the development of new therapeutic strategies and for the treatment of sensory dysfunctions, such as chronic pain. Recent Advances: Tremendous progress in deciphering nitric oxide (NO) and ROS signaling in the nervous system has been made in recent decades. This includes the recognition of these molecules as important second messengers and the elucidation of their metabolic pathways and cellular targets. Mounting evidence suggests that these targets include many ion channels which can be directly or indirectly modulated by ROS and NO. However, the mechanisms specific to sensory neurons are still poorly understood. This review will therefore summarize recent findings that highlight the complex nature of the signaling pathways involved in redox/NO regulation of sensory neuron ion channels and excitability; references to redox mechanisms described in other neuron types will be made where necessary. Critical Issues: The complexity and interplay within the redox, NO, and other gasotransmitter modulation of protein function are still largely unresolved. Issues of specificity and intracellular localization of these signaling cascades will also be addressed. Future Directions: Since our understanding of ROS and RNS signaling in sensory neurons is limited, there is a multitude of future directions; one of the most important issues for further study is the establishment of the exact roles that these signaling pathways play in pain processing and the translation of this understanding into new therapeutics. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 486–504. PMID:24735331

  12. Differential fiber-specific block of nerve conduction in mammalian peripheral nerves using kilohertz electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Patel, Yogi A; Butera, Robert J

    2015-06-01

    Kilohertz electrical stimulation (KES) has been shown to induce repeatable and reversible nerve conduction block in animal models. In this study, we characterized the ability of KES stimuli to selectively block specific components of stimulated nerve activity using in vivo preparations of the rat sciatic and vagus nerves. KES stimuli in the frequency range of 5-70 kHz and amplitudes of 0.1-3.0 mA were applied. Compound action potentials were evoked using either electrical or sensory stimulation, and block of components was assessed through direct nerve recordings and muscle force measurements. Distinct observable components of the compound action potential had unique conduction block thresholds as a function of frequency of KES. The fast component, which includes motor activity, had a monotonically increasing block threshold as a function of the KES frequency. The slow component, which includes sensory activity, showed a nonmonotonic block threshold relationship with increasing KES frequency. The distinct trends with frequency of the two components enabled selective block of one component with an appropriate choice of frequency and amplitude. These trends in threshold of the two components were similar when studying electrical stimulation and responses of the sciatic nerve, electrical stimulation and responses of the vagus nerve, and sensorimotor stimulation and responses of the sciatic nerve. This differential blocking effect of KES on specific fibers can extend the applications of KES conduction block to selective block and stimulation of neural signals for neuromodulation as well as selective control of neural circuits underlying sensorimotor function. PMID:25878155

  13. A Novel Internal Fixator Device for Peripheral Nerve Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Ting-Hsien; Wilson, Robin E.; Love, James M.; Fisher, John P.

    2013-01-01

    Recovery from peripheral nerve damage, especially for a transected nerve, is rarely complete, resulting in impaired motor function, sensory loss, and chronic pain with inappropriate autonomic responses that seriously impair quality of life. In consequence, strategies for enhancing peripheral nerve repair are of high clinical importance. Tension is a key determinant of neuronal growth and function. In vitro and in vivo experiments have shown that moderate levels of imposed tension (strain) can encourage axonal outgrowth; however, few strategies of peripheral nerve repair emphasize the mechanical environment of the injured nerve. Toward the development of more effective nerve regeneration strategies, we demonstrate the design, fabrication, and implementation of a novel, modular nerve-lengthening device, which allows the imposition of moderate tensile loads in parallel with existing scaffold-based tissue engineering strategies for nerve repair. This concept would enable nerve regeneration in two superposed regimes of nerve extensiontraditional extension through axonal outgrowth into a scaffold and extension in intact regions of the proximal nerve, such as that occurring during growth or limb-lengthening. Self-sizing silicone nerve cuffs were fabricated to grip nerve stumps without slippage, and nerves were deformed by actuating a telescoping internal fixator. Poly(lactic co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) constructs mounted on the telescoping rods were apposed to the nerve stumps to guide axonal outgrowth. Neuronal cells were exposed to PLGA using direct contact and extract methods, and they exhibited no signs of cytotoxic effects in terms of cell morphology and viability. We confirmed the feasibility of implanting and actuating our device within a sciatic nerve gap and observed axonal outgrowth following device implantation. The successful fabrication and implementation of our device provides a novel method for examining mechanical influences on nerve regeneration. PMID:23102114

  14. Testing sensory and multisensory function in children with autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Baum, Sarah H; Stevenson, Ryan A; Wallace, Mark T

    2015-01-01

    In addition to impairments in social communication and the presence of restricted interests and repetitive behaviors, deficits in sensory processing are now recognized as a core symptom in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Our ability to perceive and interact with the external world is rooted in sensory processing. For example, listening to a conversation entails processing the auditory cues coming from the speaker (speech content, prosody, syntax) as well as the associated visual information (facial expressions, gestures). Collectively, the "integration" of these multisensory (i.e., combined audiovisual) pieces of information results in better comprehension. Such multisensory integration has been shown to be strongly dependent upon the temporal relationship of the paired stimuli. Thus, stimuli that occur in close temporal proximity are highly likely to result in behavioral and perceptual benefits--gains believed to be reflective of the perceptual system's judgment of the likelihood that these two stimuli came from the same source. Changes in this temporal integration are expected to strongly alter perceptual processes, and are likely to diminish the ability to accurately perceive and interact with our world. Here, a battery of tasks designed to characterize various aspects of sensory and multisensory temporal processing in children with ASD is described. In addition to its utility in autism, this battery has great potential for characterizing changes in sensory function in other clinical populations, as well as being used to examine changes in these processes across the lifespan. PMID:25938209

  15. Functional recovery of odor representations in regenerated sensory inputs to the olfactory bulb

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Man C.; Jang, Woochan; Schwob, James E.; Wachowiak, Matt

    2014-01-01

    The olfactory system has a unique capacity for recovery from peripheral damage. After injury to the olfactory epithelium (OE), olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) regenerate and re-converge on target glomeruli of the olfactory bulb (OB). Thus far, this process has been described anatomically for only a few defined populations of OSNs. Here we characterize this regeneration at a functional level by assessing how odor representations carried by OSN inputs to the OB recover after massive loss and regeneration of the sensory neuron population. We used chronic imaging of mice expressing synaptopHluorin in OSNs to monitor odor representations in the dorsal OB before lesion by the olfactotoxin methyl bromide and after a 12 week recovery period. Methyl bromide eliminated functional inputs to the OB, and these inputs recovered to near-normal levels of response magnitude within 12 weeks. We also found that the functional topography of odor representations recovered after lesion, with odorants evoking OSN input to glomerular foci within the same functional domains as before lesion. At a finer spatial scale, however, we found evidence for mistargeting of regenerated OSN axons onto OB targets, with odorants evoking synaptopHluorin signals in small foci that did not conform to a typical glomerular structure but whose distribution was nonetheless odorant-specific. These results indicate that OSNs have a robust ability to reestablish functional inputs to the OB and that the mechanisms underlying the topography of bulbar reinnervation during development persist in the adult and allow primary sensory representations to be largely restored after massive sensory neuron loss. PMID:24431990

  16. The rules of tool incorporation: Tool morpho-functional & sensori-motor constraints.

    PubMed

    Cardinali, L; Brozzoli, C; Finos, L; Roy, A C; Farnè, A

    2016-04-01

    Previous studies showed that using tools modifies the agent's body and space representation. However, it is still not clear which rules govern those remapping processes. Here, we studied the differential role played by the morpho-functional characteristics of a tool and the sensori-motor constraints that a tool imposes on the hand. To do so, we asked a group of participants to reach and grasp an object using, in different conditions, two different tools: Pliers, to be acted upon by the index and thumb fingertips, and Sticks, taped to the same two digits. The two tools were equivalent in terms of morpho-functional characteristics, providing index finger and thumb with the same amount of elongation. Crucially, however, they imposed different sensori-motor constraints on the acting fingers. We measured and compared the kinematic profile of free-hand movements performed before and after the use of both devices. As predicted on the basis of their equivalent morpho-functional characteristics, both tools induced similar changes in the fingers (but not the arm) kinematics compatible with the hand being represented as bigger. Furthermore, the different sensori-motor constraints imposed by Pliers and Sticks over the hand, induced differential updates of the hand representation. In particular, the Sticks selectively affected the kinematics of the two fingers they were taped on, whereas Pliers had a more global effect, affecting the kinematics of hand movements not performed during the use of the tool. These results suggest that tool-use induces a rapid update of the hand representation in the brain, not only on the basis of the morpho-functional characteristics of the tool, but also depending on the specific sensori-motor constraints imposed by the tool. PMID:26774102

  17. Improved regeneration after femoral nerve injury in mice lacking functional T- and B-lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Mehanna, Ali; Szpotowicz, Emanuela; Schachner, Melitta; Jakovcevski, Igor

    2014-11-01

    The immune system plays important functional roles in regeneration after injury to the mammalian central and peripheral nervous systems. After damage to the peripheral nerve several types of immune cells, invade the nerve within hours after the injury. To gain insights into the contribution of T- and B-lymphocytes to recovery from injury we used the mouse femoral nerve injury paradigm. RAG2-/- mice lacking mature T- and B-lymphocytes due to deletion of the recombination activating gene 2 were subjected to resection and surgical reconstruction of the femoral nerve, with the wild-type mice of the same inbred genetic background serving as controls. According to single frame motion analyses, RAG2-/- mice showed better motor recovery in comparison to control mice at four and eight weeks after injury. Retrograde tracing of regrown/sprouted axons of spinal motoneurons showed increased numbers of correctly projecting motoneurons in the lumbar spinal cord of RAG2-/- mice compared with controls. Whereas there was no difference in the motoneuron soma size between genotypes, RAG2-/- mice displayed fewer cholinergic and inhibitory synaptic terminals around somata of spinal motoneurons both prior to and after injury, compared with wild-type mice. Extent of myelination of regrown axons in the motor branch of the femoral nerve measured as g-ratio was more extensive in RAG2-/- than in control mice eight weeks after injury. We conclude that activated T- and B-lymphocytes restrict motor recovery after femoral nerve injury, associated with the increased survival of motoneurons and improved remyelination. PMID:24967682

  18. Loudness function derives from data on electrical discharge rates in auditory nerve fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howes, W. L.

    1973-01-01

    Judgements of the loudness of pure-tone sound stimuli yield a loudness function which relates perceived loudness to stimulus amplitude. A loudness function is derived from physical evidence alone without regard to human judgments. The resultant loudness function is L=K(q-q0), where L is loudness, q is effective sound pressure (specifically q0 at the loudness threshold), and K is generally a weak function of the number of stimulated auditory nerve fibers. The predicted function is in agreement with loudness judgment data reported by Warren, which imply that, in the suprathreshold loudness regime, decreasing the sound-pressure level by 6 db results in halving the loudness.

  19. Rootletin organizes the ciliary rootlet to achieve neuron sensory function in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jieyan V; Kao, Ling-Rong; Jana, Swadhin C; Sivan-Loukianova, Elena; Mendona, Susana; Cabrera, Oscar A; Singh, Priyanka; Cabernard, Clemens; Eberl, Daniel F; Bettencourt-Dias, Monica; Megraw, Timothy L

    2015-10-26

    Cilia are essential for cell signaling and sensory perception. In many cell types, a cytoskeletal structure called the ciliary rootlet links the cilium to the cell body. Previous studies indicated that rootlets support the long-term stability of some cilia. Here we report that Drosophila melanogaster Rootletin (Root), the sole orthologue of the mammalian paralogs Rootletin and C-Nap1, assembles into rootlets of diverse lengths among sensory neuron subtypes. Root mutant neurons lack rootlets and have dramatically impaired sensory function, resulting in behavior defects associated with mechanosensation and chemosensation. Root is required for cohesion of basal bodies, but the cilium structure appears normal in Root mutant neurons. We show, however, that normal rootlet assembly requires centrioles. The N terminus of Root contains a conserved domain and is essential for Root function in vivo. Ectopically expressed Root resides at the base of mother centrioles in spermatocytes and localizes asymmetrically to mother centrosomes in neuroblasts, both requiring Bld10, a basal body protein with varied functions. PMID:26483560

  20. Raman microspectroscopy for visualization of peripheral nerves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minamikawa, Takeo; Harada, Yoshinori; Koizumi, Noriaki; Takamatsu, Tetsuro

    2013-02-01

    The peripheral nervous system plays an important role in motility, sensory, and autonomic functions of the human body. Preservation of peripheral nerves in surgery is essential for improving quality of life of patients. To preserve peripheral nerves, detection of ne peripheral nerves that cannot be identi ed by human eye or under white light imaging is necessary. In this study, we sought to provide a proof-of-principle demonstration of a label-free detection technique of peripheral nerve tissues against adjacent tissues that employs spontaneous Raman microspectroscopy. A line-illumination confocal Raman microscope was used for the experiment. A laser operating at the wavelength of 532 nm was used as an excitation laser light. We obtained Raman spectra of peripheral nerve, brous connective tissue, skeletal muscle, blood vessel, and adipose tissue of Wistar rats, and extracted speci c spectral features of peripheral nerves and adjacent tissues. By applying multivariate image analysis, peripheral nerves were clearly detected against adjacent tissues without any preprocessing neither xation nor staining. These results suggest the potential of the Raman spectroscopic observation for noninvasive and label-free nerve detection, and we expect this method could be a key technique for nerve-sparing surgery.

  1. Ablation of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 abolishes endothelin-induced increases in afferent renal nerve activity: mechanisms and functional significance.

    PubMed

    Xie, Chaoqin; Wang, Donna H

    2009-12-01

    Endothelin 1 (ET-1) and its receptors, ETA and ETB, play important roles in regulating renal function and blood pressure, and these components are expressed in sensory nerves. Activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) 1 channels expressed in sensory nerves innervating the renal pelvis enhances afferent renal nerve activity (ARNA), diuresis, and natriuresis. We tested the hypothesis that ET-1 increases ARNA via activation of ETB, whereas ETA counterbalances ETB in wild-type (WT) but not TRPV1-null mutant mice. ET-1 alone or with BQ123, an ETA antagonist, perfused into the left renal pelvis increased ipsilateral ARNA in WT but not in TRPV1-null mutant mice, and ARNA increases were greater in the latter. [Ala1, 3,11,15]-endothelin 1, an ETB agonist, increased ARNA that was greater than that induced by ET-1 in WT mice only. [Ala1, 3,11,15]-endothelin 1-induced increases in ARNA were abolished by chelerythrine, a protein kinase C inhibitor, but not by H89, a protein kinase A inhibitor. Chelerythrine, H89, and BQ788, an ETB antagonist, did not affect ARNA triggered by capsaicin in WT mice. Substance P release from the renal pelvis was increased by [Ala1, 3,11,15]-endothelin 1 in WT mice only, and the increase was abolished by chelerythrine but not by H89. Chelerythrine, H89, and BQ788 did not affect capsaicin-induced substance P release. Our data show that ET1 increases ARNA via activation of ETB, whereas ETA counterbalances ETB in WT but not in TRPV1-null mutant mice, suggesting that TRPV1 mediates ETB-dependent increases in ARNA, diuresis, and natriuresis possibly via the protein kinase C pathway. PMID:19858408

  2. Sensory regulation of swallowing and airway protection: a role for the internal superior laryngeal nerve in humans

    PubMed Central

    Jafari, Samah; Prince, Rebecca A; Kim, Daniel Y; Paydarfar, David

    2003-01-01

    During swallowing, the airway is protected from aspiration of ingested material by brief closure of the larynx and cessation of breathing. Mechanoreceptors innervated by the internal branch of the superior laryngeal nerve (ISLN) are activated by swallowing, and connect to central neurones that generate swallowing, laryngeal closure and respiratory rhythm. This study was designed to evaluate the hypothesis that the ISLN afferent signal is necessary for normal deglutition and airway protection in humans. In 21 healthy adults, we recorded submental electromyograms, videofluoroscopic images of the upper airway, oronasal airflow and respiratory inductance plethysmography. In six subjects we also recorded pressures in the hypopharynx and upper oesophagus. We analysed swallows that followed a brief infusion (45 ml) of liquid barium onto the tongue, or a sip (118 ml) from a cup. In 16 subjects, the ISLN was anaesthetised by transcutaneous injection of bupivacaine into the paraglottic compartment. Saline injections using the identical procedure were performed in six subjects. Endoscopy was used to evaluate upper airway anatomy, to confirm ISLN anaesthesia, and to visualise vocal cord movement and laryngeal closure. Comparisons of swallowing and breathing were made within subjects (anaesthetic or saline injection vs. control, i.e. no injection) and between subjects (anaesthetic injection vs. saline injection). In the non-anaesthetised condition (saline injection, 174 swallows in six subjects; no injection, 522 swallows in 20 subjects), laryngeal penetration during swallowing was rare (1.4 %) and tracheal aspiration was never observed. During ISLN anaesthesia (16 subjects, 396 swallows), all subjects experienced effortful swallowing and an illusory globus sensation in the throat, and 15 subjects exhibited penetration of fluid into the larynx during swallowing. The incidence of laryngeal penetration in the anaesthetised condition was 43 % (P < 0.01, compared with either saline or no injection) and of these penetrations, 56 % led to tracheal aspiration (without adverse effects). We further analysed the swallow cycle to evaluate the mechanism(s) by which fluid entered the larynx. Laryngeal penetration was not caused by premature spillage of oral fluid into the hypopharynx, delayed clearance of fluid from the hypopharynx, or excessive hypopharyngeal pressure generated by swallowing. Furthermore, there was no impairment in the ability of swallowing to halt respiratory airflow during the period of pharyngeal bolus flow. Rather, our observations suggest that loss of airway protection was due to incomplete closure of the larynx during the pharyngeal phase of swallowing. In contrast to the insufficient closure during swallowing, laryngeal closure was robust during voluntary challenges with the Valsalva, Mller and cough manoeuvres under ISLN anaesthesia. We suggest that an afferent signal arising from the ISLN receptor field is necessary for normal deglutition, especially for providing feedback to central neural circuits that facilitate laryngeal closure during swallowing. The ISLN afferent signal is not essential for initiating and sequencing the swallow cycle, for co-ordinating swallowing with breathing, or for closing the larynx during voluntary manoeuvres. PMID:12754311

  3. Peripheral nerve blocks for distal extremity surgery.

    PubMed

    Offierski, Chris

    2013-10-01

    Peripheral nerve block is well suited for distal extremity surgery. Blocking the nerves at the distal extremity is easily done. It does not require ultrasound or stimulators to identify the nerve. Blocking nerves in the distal extremity is safe with low risk of toxicity. The effect of the nerve block is limited to the distribution of the nerve. The distal nerves in the lower extremity are sensory branches of the sciatic nerve. This provides a sensory block only. This has the advantage of allowing the patient to actively contract tendons in the foot and ambulate more quickly after surgery. PMID:24093651

  4. Expression of leukemia inhibitory factor in human nerve following injury.

    PubMed

    Dowsing, B J; Romeo, R; Morrison, W A

    2001-11-01

    In animal models of peripheral nerve injury, leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) is normally expressed at very low levels. Following nerve injury, its expression is rapidly increased in the nerve at the injury site and promotes both sensory and motor neuron survival. Once normal nerve function is restored, LIF expression returns to negligible levels. For this reason, LIF is considered to be a peripheral nerve trauma factor. We wished to determine whether LIF is also upregulated in human nerves following trauma and whether it is expressed in neuromas of varying age. Immunohistochemical staining for the presence of LIF was performed on injured and control human nerves from a number of subjects. Results demonstrate that LIF expression is increased in nerves within hours of injury and, in the case of neuroma formation, can persist for several years. LIF immunoreactivity was consistently found in Schwann cells, in peripheral nerve axons, and, at stages when an inflammatory response was present, also in neutrophils, mast cells, macrophages, and blood vessel walls. The level of staining within the connective tissue of injured nerves was elevated compared to control nerves, which may be due to the presence of LIF bound to the soluble secreted form of the LIF receptor. Whether the continued expression of LIF is unhealed injured nerves promotes the development of neuromas remains to be resolved. PMID:11721746

  5. Microelectronic neural bridge for signal regeneration and function rebuilding over two separate nerves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiaoyan, Shen; Zhigong, Wang; Xiaoying, L; Shushan, Xie; Zonghao, Huang

    2011-06-01

    According to the feature of neural signals, a micro-electronic neural bridge (MENB) has been designed. It consists of two electrode arrays for neural signal detection and functional electrical stimulation (FES), and a microelectronic circuit for signal amplifying, processing, and FES driving. The core of the system is realized in 0.5-?m CMOS technology and used in animal experiments. A special experimental strategy has been designed to demonstrate the feasibility of the system. With the help of the MENB, the withdrawal reflex function of the left/right leg of one spinal toad has been rebuilt in the corresponding leg of another spinal toad. According to the coherence analysis between the source and regenerated neural signals, the controlled spinal toad's sciatic nerve signal is delayed by 0.72 ms in relation to the sciatic nerve signal of the source spinal toad and the cross-correlation function reaches a value of 0.73. This shows that the regenerated signal is correlated with the source sciatic signal significantly and the neural activities involved in reflex function have been regenerated. The experiment demonstrates that the MENB is useful in rebuilding the neural function between nerves of different bodies.

  6. An animal model of peripheral nerve regeneration after the application of a collagen-polyvinyl alcohol scaffold and mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Marinescu, Silviu Adrian; Z?rnescu, Otilia; Mihai, Ioana Ruxandra; Giuglea, Carmen; Sinescu, Ruxandra Diana

    2014-01-01

    Extensive nerve injuries often leading to nerve gaps can benefit, besides the gold standard represented by autologous nerve grafts, by the inciting field of tissue engineering. To enhance the role of biomaterials in nerve regeneration, the nerve conduits are associated with Schwann or Schwann-like cells. In this study, we evaluated rat sciatic nerve regeneration, by using a biodegradable nerve guide composed of Collagen (COL) and Polyvinyl Alcohol (PVA), associated with mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). After the exposure of the rat sciatic nerve, a nerve gap was created by excising 1 cm of the nerve. Three experimental groups were used for nerve gap bridging: autografts, nerve conduits filled with medium culture and nerve conduits filled with MSC. The methods of sensory and motor assessment consisted of the functional evaluation of sciatic nerve recovery - toe-spread, pinprick tests and gastrocnemius muscle index (GMI). The histological and immunocytochemical analysis of the probes that were harvested from the repair site was performed at 12 weeks. Successful nerve regeneration was noted in all three groups at the end of the 12th week. The functional and immunocytochemical results suggested that COL-PVA tubes supported with mesenchymal stem cells could be considered similar to autologous nerve grafts in peripheral nerve regeneration, without the drawbacks of the last ones. The functional results were better for the autografts and the ultrastructural data were better for the nerve conduits, but there were not noticed any statistical differences. PMID:25329117

  7. Acetyl salicylic acid locally enhances functional recovery after sciatic nerve transection in rat.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Rahim; Amini, Keyvan; Abdollahi-Pirbazari, Mehdi; Yousefi, Alireza

    2013-01-01

    Local effect of acetyl salicylic acid (ASA) on peripheral nerve regeneration was studied using a rat sciatic nerve transection model. Forty-five male healthy White Wistar rats were divided into three experimental groups (n = 15), randomly: Sham-operation (SHAM), control (SIL), and ASA-treated (SIL/ASA) groups. In SHAM group after anesthesia left sciatic nerve was exposed through a gluteal muscle incision and after homeostasis the muscle was sutured. In SIL group the left sciatic nerve was exposed the same way and transected proximal to tibio-peroneal bifurcation leaving a 10-mm gap. Proximal and distal stumps were each inserted into a silicone tube and filled with 10 ?l phosphate buffered solution. In SIL/ASA group defect was bridged using a silicone tube filled with 10 ?l acetyl salisylic acid (0.1 mg/ml). Each group was subdivided into three subgroups of five animals each and were studied 4, 8, and 12 weeks after surgery. Data were analyzed statistically by factorial analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the Bonferroni test for pair-wise comparisons. Functional study confirmed faster and better recovery of regenerated axons in SIL/ASA than in SIL group (p < 0.05). Gastrocnemius muscle mass in SIL/ASA was significantly more than in SIL group. Morphometric indices of regenerated fibers showed that the number and diameter of the myelinated fibers in SIL/ASA were significantly higher than in control group. In immuohistochemistry, location of reactions to S-100 in SIL/ASA was clearly more positive than in SIL group. Response to local treatment of ASA demonstrates that it influences and improves functional recovery of peripheral nerve regeneration. PMID:24140781

  8. Visualization of nerve fibers and their relationship to peripheral nerve tumors by diffusion tensor imaging.

    PubMed

    Cage, Tene A; Yuh, Esther L; Hou, Stephanie W; Birk, Harjus; Simon, Neil G; Noss, Roger; Rao, Anuradha; Chin, Cynthia T; Kliot, Michel

    2015-09-01

    OBJECT The majority of growing and/or symptomatic peripheral nerve tumors are schwannomas and neurofibromas. They are almost always benign and can usually be resected while minimizing motor and sensory deficits if approached with the proper expertise and techniques. Intraoperative electrophysiological stimulation and recording techniques allow the surgeon to map the surface of the tumor in an effort to identify and thus avoid damaging functioning nerve fibers. Recently, MR diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) techniques have permitted the visualization of axons, because of their anisotropic properties, in peripheral nerves. The object of this study was to compare the distribution of nerve fibers as revealed by direct electrical stimulation with that seen on preoperative MR DTI. METHODS The authors conducted a retrospective chart review of patients with a peripheral nerve or nerve root tumor between March 2012 and January 2014. Diffusion tensor imaging and intraoperative data had been prospectively collected for patients with peripheral nerve tumors that were resected. Preoperative identification of the nerve fiber location in relation to the nerve tumor surface as seen on DTI studies was compared with the nerve fiber's intraoperative localization using electrophysiological stimulation and recordings. RESULTS In 23 patients eligible for study there was good correlation between nerve fiber location on DTI and its anatomical location seen intraoperatively. Diffusion tensor imaging demonstrated the relationship of nerve fibers relative to the tumor with 95.7% sensitivity, 66.7% specificity, 75% positive predictive value, and 93.8% negative predictive value. CONCLUSIONS Preoperative DTI techniques are useful in helping the peripheral nerve surgeon to both determine the risks involved in resecting a nerve tumor and plan the safest surgical approach. PMID:26323818

  9. Experimental study of the functional reserve of median nerve in rats

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jianli; Gong, Xu; Jiang, Ziping; Yu, Xin; Liu, Yuejiao; Lu, Laijin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To study the functional changes of median nerve after removing a certain bundle of it and to explore the functional reserve of median nerves. Methods: 220 three-month old SD rats were randomly divided into experimental groups and sham groups. And the experimental group was further divided as 1/8 group, 1/4 group, 1/3 group, 1/2 group, and 2/3 group according to ratio of the resection portion, with 22 rats in each group. The section of the lowest level on median nerve trunks were exposed, and a certain portion of it were separated and resected in experimental group, while in sham groups, the nerve was only separated without resection. The general state of health of all rats were observed, and the α motor neurons in cornu anterior medullae spinalis were studied 1 week, 2 weeks and 2 months postoperatively. Neuro-electrophysiology and function of dominated muscles were studied 2 weeks, 2 months, 3 months, and 4 months postoperatively. Results: All rats survived without infection and obvious ulcer. The number of the α motor neurons in cornuanterior medullae spinalis didn’t change (P>0.05), and obvious superstructure changes were observed in early stage in 1/2 and 2/3 group, but restored after 2 months. There was no significant changes in latencies of motor neuron evoked potentials between experimental groups and sham group (P>0.05), however, there is significant difference if the 2 week group was compared with 2 month, 3 month and 4 month group (P<0.05). Moreover, there is also significant difference in terms of the wave amplitude of evoked potential of motor neurons, the maximum wave amplitude and the persistence time of its innervated muscle if the 2 week group was compared with those in 2 month, 3 month and 4 month group (P<0.05), and there is significant difference between different proportion resection groups (P<0.05). Conclusions: Median nerve has a certain amount of functional reserve, and the quantity of the functional reserve of median nerve without compromise is the 1/3 of the whole trunk. PMID:26629106

  10. Thalamic cholinergic innervation and postural sensory integration function in Parkinsons disease

    PubMed Central

    Albin, Roger L.; Kotagal, Vikas; Koeppe, Robert A.; Scott, Peter J.H.; Frey, Kirk A.; Bohnen, Nicolaas I.

    2013-01-01

    The pathophysiology of postural instability in Parkinsons disease remains poorly understood. Normal postural function depends in part on the ability of the postural control system to integrate visual, proprioceptive, and vestibular sensory information. Degeneration of cholinergic neurons in the brainstem pedunculopontine nucleus complex and their thalamic efferent terminals has been implicated in postural control deficits in Parkinsons disease. Our aim was to investigate the relationship of cholinergic terminal loss in thalamus and cortex, and nigrostriatal dopaminergic denervation, on postural sensory integration function in Parkinsons disease. We studied 124 subjects with Parkinsons disease (32 female/92 male; 65.5 7.4 years old; 6.0 4.2 years motor disease duration; modified Hoehn and Yahr mean stage 2.4 0.5) and 25 control subjects (10 female/15 male, 66.8 10.1 years old). All subjects underwent 11C-dihydrotetrabenazine vesicular monoaminergic transporter type 2 and 11C-methylpiperidin-4-yl propionate acetylcholinesterase positron emission tomography and the sensory organization test balance platform protocol. Measures of dopaminergic and cholinergic terminal integrity were obtained, i.e. striatal vesicular monoaminergic transporter type 2 binding (distribution volume ratio) and thalamic and cortical acetylcholinesterase hydrolysis rate per minute (k3), respectively. Total centre of pressure excursion (speed), a measure of total sway, and sway variability were determined for individual sensory organization test conditions. Based on normative data, principal component analysis was performed to reduce postural sensory organization functions to robust factors for regression analysis with the dopaminergic and cholinergic terminal data. Factor analysis demonstrated two factors with eigenvalues >2 that explained 52.2% of the variance, mainly reflecting postural sway during sensory organization test Conditions 13 and 5, respectively. Regression analysis of the Conditions 13 postural sway-related factor [R2adj = 0.123, F(5,109) = 4.2, P = 0.002] showed that decreased thalamic cholinergic innervation was associated with increased centre of pressure sway speed (? = ?0.389, t = ?3.4, P = 0.001) while controlling for covariate effects of cognitive capacity and parkinsonian motor impairments. There was no significant effect of cortical cholinergic terminal deficits or striatal dopaminergic terminal deficits. This effect could only be found for the subjects with Parkinsons disease. We conclude that postural sensory integration function of subjects with Parkinsons disease is modulated by pedunculopontine nucleus-thalamic but not cortical cholinergic innervation. Impaired integrity of pedunculopontine nucleus cholinergic neurons and their thalamic efferents play a role in postural control in patients with Parkinsons disease, possibly by participating in integration of multimodal sensory input information. PMID:24056537

  11. Mutation of OPA1 gene causes deafness by affecting function of auditory nerve terminals.

    PubMed

    Huang, Taosheng; Santarelli, Rosamaria; Starr, Arnold

    2009-12-01

    Autosomal dominant optic atrophy (DOA) is a retinal neuronal degenerative disease characterized by a progressive bilateral visual loss. We report on two affected members of a family with dominantly inherited neuropathy of both optic and auditory nerves expressed by impaired visual acuity, moderate pure tone hearing loss, and marked loss of speech perception. We investigated cochlear abnormalities accompanying the hearing loss and the effects of cochlear implantation. We sequenced OPA1 gene and recorded cochlear receptor and neural potentials before cochlear implantation. Genetic analysis identified R445H mutation in OPA1 gene. Audiological studies showed preserved cochlear receptor outer hair cell activities (otoacoustic emissions) and absent or abnormally delayed auditory brainstem responses (ABRs). Trans-tympanic electrocochleography (ECochG) showed prolonged low amplitude negative potentials without auditory nerve compound action potentials. The latency of onset of the cochlear potentials was within the normal range found for inner hair cell summating receptor potentials. The duration of the negative potential was reduced to normal during rapid stimulation consistent with adaptation of neural sources generating prolonged cochlear potentials. Both subjects had cochlear implants placed with restoration of hearing thresholds, speech perception, and synchronous activity in auditory brainstem pathways. The results suggest that deafness accompanying this OPA1 mutation is due to altered function of terminal unmyelinated portions of auditory nerve. Electrical stimulation of the cochlea activated proximal myelinated portions of auditory nerve to restore hearing. PMID:19733158

  12. Doxycycline-regulated GDNF expression promotes axonal regeneration and functional recovery in transected peripheral nerve.

    PubMed

    Shakhbazau, Antos; Mohanty, Chandan; Shcharbin, Dzmitry; Bryszewska, Maria; Caminade, Anne-Marie; Majoral, Jean-Pierre; Alant, Jacob; Midha, Rajiv

    2013-12-28

    Increased production of neurotrophic factors (NTFs) is one of the key responses seen following peripheral nerve injury, making them an attractive choice for pro-regenerative gene therapies. However, the downside of over-expression of certain NTFs, including glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), was earlier found to be the trapping and misdirection of regenerating axons, the so-called 'candy-store' effect. We report a proof-of-principle study on the application of conditional GDNF expression system in injured peripheral nerve. We engineered Schwann cells (SCs) using dendrimers or lentiviral transduction with the vector providing doxycycline-regulated GDNF expression. Injection of GDNF-modified cells into the injured peripheral nerve followed by time-restricted administration of doxycycline demonstrated that GDNF expression in SCs can also be controlled locally in the peripheral nerves of the experimental animals. Cell-based GDNF therapy was shown to increase the extent of axonal regeneration, while controlled deactivation of GDNF effectively prevented trapping of regenerating axons in GDNF-enriched areas, and was associated with improved functional recovery. PMID:24140746

  13. Grading Facial Nerve Function Following Combined Static and Mimetic Surgical Techniques.

    PubMed

    Leonetti, John P; Marzo, Sam J; Anderson, Douglas A; Sappington, Joshua M

    2015-12-01

    Objective?To present a grading scale to assess the functional recovery of the facial nerve in patients who have undergone mimetic and static surgical techniques for facial reanimation. Study design?This is a proposed new facial nerve grading system that will be demonstrated with specific case presentations. All patients underwent a variety of neural grafting, microvascular free-flap reconstruction, or surgical static procedures. Results?The proposed facial nerve grading scale is one that has not been described previously in the literature and is applicable to a unique patient population. Its ease of use in this patient population will allow otolaryngologists to assess facial recovery accurately and quickly in cases where the facial nerve is not anatomically intact. Conclusion?The proposed facial recovery grading scale provides an efficient means of grading facial recovery for a unique group of patients who previously could not be followed. The proposed scale is practical and easy to use in a clinical setting. PMID:26682119

  14. Glycemic responses and sensory characteristics of whole yellow pea flour added to novel functional foods.

    PubMed

    Marinangeli, Christopher P F; Kassis, Amira N; Jones, Peter J H

    2009-01-01

    A fundamental understanding regarding postprandial glycemic responses to foods containing whole yellow-pea flour (WYPF) remains unknown. This, alongside concerns that WYPF possesses unfavorable sensory characteristics has limited the incorporation of WYPF into new functional food products as a healthy novel ingredient. The objective of this study was to evaluate how WYPF modulates postprandial glycemic responses as well as sensory characteristics in novel foods. In a single-blind crossover trial, the present study assessed postprandial glycemic responses of banana bread, biscotti, and spaghetti containing either WYPF or whole wheat flour (WWF). Boiled yellow peas (BYP) and white bread (WB) were used as positive and negative controls, respectively. On day 1, subjects evaluated appearance, taste, texture, smell as well as overall acceptance of each WYPF and WWF food on a 5-point hedonic scale. WYPF banana bread (97.9 +/- 17.8 mmol x min/L) and biscotti (83 +/- 13 mmol x min/L), as well as BYP (112.3 +/- 19.9 mmol x min/L), reduced (P < 0.05) glycemic responses compared to WB (218.1 +/- 29.5 mmol x min/L). The glycemic response of WYPF pasta (160.7 +/- 19.4 mmol x min/L) was comparable to WB. WYPF biscotti produced a lower (P = 0.019) postprandial glycemic response compared to WWF biscotti (117.2 +/- 13.1 mmol x min/L). Hedonic responses between corresponding foods were similar except for the WYPF pasta (2.9 +/- 0.9) which possessed a lower sensory score (P = 0.02) for smell compared to WWF pasta (3.6 +/- 1). WYPF can be used to produce low-glycemic functional foods possessing sensory attributes that are comparable to identical food products containing WWF. PMID:20492127

  15. Bradykinin Controls Pool Size of Sensory Neurons Expressing Functional ?-Opioid Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Pettinger, Louisa; Gigout, Sylvain; Linley, John E.

    2013-01-01

    Analgesics targeting the ?-opioid receptor (DOR) may lead to fewer side effects than conventional opioid drugs, which mainly act on ?-opioid receptors (MOR), because of the less abundant expression of DOR in the CNS compared with MOR. Analgesic potential of DOR agonists increases after inflammation, an effect that may be mediated by DOR expressed in the peripheral sensory fibers. However, the expression of functional DOR at the plasma membrane of sensory neurons is controversial. Here we have used patch-clamp recordings and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy to study the functional expression of DOR in sensory neurons from rat trigeminal (TG) and dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Real-time total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy revealed that treatment of TG and DRG cultures with the inflammatory mediator bradykinin (BK) caused robust trafficking of heterologously expressed GFP-tagged DOR to the plasma membrane. By contrast, treatment of neurons with the DOR agonist [d-Ala2, d-Leu5]-enkephalin (DADLE) caused a decrease in the membrane abundance of DOR, suggesting internalization of the receptor after agonist binding. Patch-clamp experiments revealed that DADLE inhibited voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCCs) in 23% of small-diameter TG neurons. Pretreatment with BK resulted in more than twice as many DADLE responsive neurons (54%) but did not affect the efficacy of VGCC inhibition by DADLE. Our data suggest that inflammatory mediator-induced membrane insertion of DOR into the plasma membrane of peripheral sensory neurons may underlie increased DOR analgesia in inflamed tissue. Furthermore, the majority of BK-responsive TG neurons may have a potential to become responsive to DOR ligands in inflammatory conditions. PMID:23804098

  16. Outcome following Nerve Repair of High Isolated Clean Sharp Injuries of the Ulnar Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Post, René; de Boer, Kornelis S.; Malessy, Martijn J. A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective The detailed outcome of surgical repair of high isolated clean sharp (HICS) ulnar nerve lesions has become relevant in view of the recent development of distal nerve transfer. Our goal was to determine the outcome of HICS ulnar nerve repair in order to create a basis for the optimal management of these lesions. Methods High ulnar nerve lesions are defined as localized in the area ranging from the proximal forearm to the axilla just distal to the branching of the medial cord of the brachial plexus. A meta-analysis of the literature concerning high ulnar nerve injuries was performed. Additionally, a retrospective study of the outcome of nerve repair of HICS ulnar nerve injuries at our institution was performed. The Rotterdam Intrinsic Hand Myometer and the Rosén-Lundborg protocol were used. Results The literature review identified 46 papers. Many articles presented outcomes of mixed lesion groups consisting of combined ulnar and median nerves, or the outcome of high and low level injuries was pooled. In addition, outcome was expressed using different scoring systems. 40 patients with HICS ulnar nerve lesions were found with sufficient data for further analysis. In our institution, 15 patients had nerve repair with a median interval between trauma and reconstruction of 17 days (range 0–516). The mean score of the motor and sensory domain of the Rosen's Scale instrument was 58% and 38% of the unaffected arm, respectively. Two-point discrimination never reached less then 12 mm. Conclusion From the literature, it was not possible to draw a definitive conclusion on outcome of surgical repair of HICS ulnar nerve lesions. Detailed neurological function assessment of our own patients showed that some ulnar nerve function returned. Intrinsic muscle strength recovery was generally poor. Based on this study, one might cautiously argue that repair strategies of HICS ulnar nerve lesions need to be improved. PMID:23082230

  17. Rules to limp by: joint compensation conserves limb function after peripheral nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Bauman, Jay M.; Chang, Young-Hui

    2013-01-01

    Locomotion persists across all manner of internal and external perturbations. The objective of this study was to identify locomotor compensation strategies in rodent models of peripheral nerve injury. We found that hip-to-toe limb length and limb angle was preferentially preserved over individual joint angles after permanent denervation of rat ankle extensor muscles. These findings promote further enquiry into the significance of limb-level function for neuromechanical control of legged locomotion. PMID:23945208

  18. Concentrated growth factor increases Schwanncellproliferation and neurotrophic factorsecretionandpromotes functional nerve recovery in vivo.

    PubMed

    Qin, Jie; Wang, Lin; Sun, Yue; Sun, Xiaolin; Wen, Chaoju; Shahmoradi, Mahdi; Zhou, Yanmin

    2016-02-01

    Concentrated growth factor(CGF) is a newly generated complex that comprises a fibrin matrix incorporating growth factors and plasmatic and leukocyte cytokines. It has been widely used in bone regenerative medicine. However, the effect of CGF on peripheral nerve regeneration had not been previously investigated. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the possibility of using CGF for nerve regeneration by i)investigating the effect of CGF on the proliferation of Schwann cells(SCs) and secretion of neurotrophic factors nerve growth factor(NGF) and glial cell line?derived neurotrophic factor(GDNF) invitro; and ii)analyzing the effect of CGF on functional nerve recovery after nerve injury invivo. CGF was prepared from venous blood taken from rats, and using scanning electron microscopy(SEM) we noted that it featured a fiber?like appearance with pore size ranging from 0.1 to 1.0m. The soluble component of CGF was used to produce conditioned media with which to treat the Schwann cell line. A cell counting kit-8 assay and cell cycle analysis were both used to study the proliferative effect of CGF on SCs. Reverse transcription-quantitative PCR and western blot analysis demonstrated that there was an increase in the mRNA and protein expression of NGF and GDNF, both of which are markers of SC neurotrophic secretion. A model of sciatic nerve crush injury was established for the invivo experiment, and CGF was found to increase the sciatic functional index (indicative of nerve function). We noted that CGF increased SC proliferation and secretion of neurotrophic factors invitro, and promoted functional recovery after peripheral nerve injuries invivo. These results suggest that CGF is a promising candidate biomaterial for peripheral nerve regeneration, and may potentially be utilized to repair nerve injuries. PMID:26709397

  19. Dual regulation of ?-opioid receptor function by arachidonic acid metabolites in rat peripheral sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Laura C; Berg, Kelly A; Clarke, William P

    2015-04-01

    The regulation of opioid receptor system function in peripheral sensory neurons is not well understood. Opioid agonist efficacy to inhibit nociceptor function and to promote antinociception is generally weak under basal conditions and frequently no response occurs. However, in response to a cyclooxygenase-dependent metabolite of arachidonic acid (AA) after exposure to inflammatory mediators, such as bradykinin (BK) or exogenous AA, peripheral opioid receptor systems become much more responsive to opioid agonists. In this study, we examined the time course for the induction and maintenance of functional competence of the ?-opioid receptor (DOR) system in adult rat nociceptors in culture and in vivo. We found that the responsive state of DOR after pretreatment with BK or exogenous AA is transient (30-60 minutes) and persists for 15-30 minutes after a 15-minute exposure of nociceptors to BK or AA. Interestingly, whereas functional competence of the DOR system could be reinduced with a second application of BK 60 minutes after the first, responsiveness of the DOR system could not be reinduced after an initial exposure to AA. This nonresponsive state of DOR after exogenous AA was mediated by a lipoxygenase (LOX)-dependent metabolite of AA. Intraplantar carrageenan also produced transient DOR functional competence and responsiveness was also reinduced by inhibition of LOX. Thus, the DOR system expressed by peripheral sensory neurons is under dual regulation by cyclooxygenase- and LOX-dependent metabolites of AA. PMID:25637601

  20. Influence of lower extremity sensory function on locomotor adaptation following stroke: a review.

    PubMed

    Wutzke, Clinton J; Mercer, Vicki S; Lewek, Michael D

    2013-01-01

    Following stroke, people commonly demonstrate locomotor impairments including reduced walking speed and spatiotemporal asymmetry. Rehabilitation programs have been effective in increasing gait speed, but spatiotemporal asymmetry has been more resistant to change. The inability to modify gait patterns for improved symmetry may be related, in part, to impairments in lower extremity sensation. Assessment of lower extremity sensory impairments in people post stroke, including cutaneous and proprioceptive sensation, has been insufficiently studied. Conventional rehabilitation programs, including body weight-supported walking or robotic assistance, that modify sensory feedback intended to alter lower extremity movement patterns have shown limited success in improving gait symmetry. Rehabilitation programs that amplify specific gait asymmetries have demonstrated the potential to ultimately produce more symmetric gait, presumably by allowing individuals post stroke to more readily perceive their gait asymmetry. The effectiveness of such error augmentation paradigms, however, may be influenced by lower extremity sensation and the ability of the central nervous system to be aware of altered lower extremity movement. The purpose of this review is to critically examine the literature on lower extremity sensory function and its influence on gait adaptation in people post stroke. PMID:23841971

  1. Functional and sensory properties of hen eggs with modified fatty acid compositions.

    PubMed

    Aro, H; Rokka, T; Valaja, J; Hiidenhovi, J; Huopalahti, R; Ryhänen, E-L

    2011-11-01

    Foaming, emulsifying, gelling, and sensory properties of fresh and stored hen eggs fed with a diet supplemented with flax oil (FO), rapeseed oil (RO), fish oil (FISH), and by-product from black currant processing (BC) were investigated. With these diets, the ω6/ω3 fatty acid ratio of eggs varied from 1.5 to 5.8, while the ratio for eggs in the control group was 6.2. Compared to eggs in the control group, FO supplementation in the feed had statistically significant influences on the foaming properties of the fresh eggs. Eggs stored for 21 days lost part of their foaming properties in FISH oil supplemented group, but the foaming properties in all test groups were technically acceptable. The emulsifying properties of eggs in FO and FISH supplemented feeding groups were statistically different compared to control group. In boiled eggs, flax oil and fish oil supplementation induced off flavours in eggs, but no changes between the control group and test groups were found in the sensory properties of mayonnaise preparations. These results suggest that the egg processing industry may produce egg-based products using oil-supplemented eggs without major problems in functional or sensory properties. PMID:21984041

  2. Concurrent functional magnetic resonance imaging and electroencephalography assessment of sensory gating in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Bak, Nikolaj; Rostrup, Egill; Larsson, Henrik B W; Glenthøj, Birte Y; Oranje, Bob

    2014-08-01

    Schizophrenia is frequently accompanied by deficits in basic information processing, such as sensory gating. The sources behind deficient sensory gating in schizophrenia patients are, however, still largely unclear. The aim of the current study was to identify the brain structures involved in deficient sensory gating in schizophrenia patients. Twenty healthy male volunteers and 23 male schizophrenia patients were initially assessed in a somatosensory P50 suppression paradigm using concurrent electroencephalography (EEG)/functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) methodology. The trials consisted of single stimuli or pairs of identical stimuli with either 500 ms or 1,000 ms interstimulus intervals. Not all subjects showed a P50 waveform as a result of the somatosensory stimuli: It was detected in 13 schizophrenia patients and 15 control subjects. Significant P50 suppression was found in the 500 ms trials in controls only. Region of interest analyses were performed for a priori chosen regions. Significant negative correlations between P50 ratios and the BOLD response were found bilaterally in the hippocampus, thalamus, anterior and posterior superior temporal gyrus (STG), and in the left inferior frontal gyrus pars opercularis. However, significant group differences were found in the hippocampus and the thalamus only. This is the first study in which P50 suppression was assessed in schizophrenia patients with concurrent fMRI/EEG methodology. The data support that the STG, thalamus, inferior frontal gyrus, and the hippocampus are involved in P50 suppression. However, of these structures only the hippocampus and thalamus appeared involved in the altered sensory processing found in schizophrenia. PMID:24375687

  3. Effect of combined nicotine and shrapnel exposure on pain measures and gait after nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Rittenhouse, Bradley; Hill-Pryor, Crystal D; McConathy, Adam; Parker, Peter; Franco, Nelson; Toussaint, Esra; Barker, Darrell; Prasad, Balakrishna; Pizarro, Jose M

    2011-11-01

    A significant fraction of military soldiers sustain nerve injury and use tobacco or nicotine containing products. Healing of nerve injuries is influenced by many factors, such as degree of original injury, healing potential of the nerve, and general health of patient. However, recently, it has been demonstrated that the presence of retained insoluble metal fragments decreases healing. The effects of systemic nicotine administration, with or without metal fragments at the site of nerve injury, were evaluated. Both the nicotine-administered groups (nicotine, nicotine + shrapnel) showed significant increase in the peroneal function compared with untreated controls, as assessed by paw area (p < 0.05). Furthermore, to test possible role of altered sensory function, we used the hot plate assay. Latency to withdraw paw from a hot plate was significantly shorter in nicotine groups (p < 0.05). These data indicate that nicotine improves sensory and motor aspects of nerve function, in the presence or absence of shrapnel. PMID:22165666

  4. Mitochondrial dysfunction in distal axons contribute to HIV sensory neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Helmar C.; Chen, Weiran; Borzan, Jasenka; Mankowski, Joseph; Hke, Ahmet

    2010-01-01

    Objective Accumulation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage has been associated with aging and abnormal oxidative metabolism. We hypothesized that in human immunodeficiency virus associated sensory neuropathy (HIV-SN), damaged mtDNA accumulates in distal nerve segments and that a spatial pattern of mitochondrial dysfunction contribute to the distal degeneration of sensory nerve fibers. Methods We measured levels of common deletion mutations in mtDNA and expression levels of mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes of matched proximal and distal nerve specimens from patients with and without HIV-SN. In mitochondria isolated from peripheral nerves of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infected macaques, a model of HIV-SN, we measured mitochondrial function and generation of reactive oxygen species. Results We identified increased levels of mtDNA common deletion mutation in post-mortem sural nerves of patients with HIV-SN as compared to uninfected patients or HIV patients without sensory neuropathy. Furthermore, we found that common deletion mutation in mtDNA was more prevalent in distal sural nerves compared to dorsal root ganglia. In a primate model of HIV-SN, freshly isolated mitochondria from sural nerves of macaques infected with a neurovirulent strain of SIV showed impaired mitochondrial function compared to mitochondria from proximal nerve segments. Interpretation Our findings suggest that mtDNA damage accumulates in distal mitochondria of long axons, especially in patients with HIV-SN, and that this may lead to reduced mitochondrial function in distal nerves relative to proximal segments. Although our findings are based on HIV-SN, if confirmed in other neuropathies, these observations could explain the length-dependent nature of most axonal peripheral neuropathies. PMID:21280080

  5. Intrinsic Functional Plasticity of the Sensory-Motor Network in Patients with Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, F. Q.; Tan, Y. M.; Wu, L.; Zhuang, Y.; He, L. C.; Gong, H. H.

    2015-01-01

    Several neuroimaging studies have suggested brain reorganisation in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM); however, the changes in spontaneous neuronal activity that are associated with connectedness remain largely unknown. In this study, functional connectivity strength (FCS), a data-driven degree centrality method based on a theoretical approach, was applied for the first time to investigate changes in the sensory-motor network (SMN) at the voxel level. Comparatively, CSM not only showed significantly decreased FCS in the operculum-integrated regions, which exhibited reduced resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) around the Rolandic sulcus, but it also showed increased FCS in the premotor, primary somatosensory, and parietal-integrated areas, which primarily showed an enhanced rsFC pattern. Correlation analysis showed that altered FCS (in the left premotor-ventral/precentral-operculum, right operculum-parietale 4, and right S1) was associated with worsening Japanese Orthopaedic Association scores and that the rsFC pattern was influenced by cervical cord micro-structural damage at the C2 level. Together, these findings suggest that during myelopathy, the intrinsic functional plasticity of the SMN responds to the insufficient sensory and motor experience in CSM patients. This knowledge may improve our understanding of the comprehensive functional defects found in CSM patients and may inspire the development of new therapeutic strategies in the future. PMID:25897648

  6. Functional and anatomical characteristics of the nerve-brown adipose interaction in the rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flaim, K. E.; Horowitz, J. M.; Horwitz, B. A.

    1976-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on 12 male rats to study the coupling of signals from the sympathetic nervous system to the brown adipose tissue. Analysis of electron photomicrographs revealed considerable morphological heterogeneity among the nerves entering and leaving the interscapular fat pad. In response to electrical simulation of the nerves, the temperature of the brown fat increased following a rapid but transient temperature drop. Such changes were observed only on the ipsilateral side, indicating that the innervation to the interscapular brown fat of the rat is functionally bilateral rather than diffuse. The finding that brown fat is capable of responding in a graded fashion correlates well with observations suggesting that clusters of brown adipocytes may be electrically coupled.

  7. Successful tactile based visual sensory substitution use functions independently of visual pathway integrity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Vincent K.; Nau, Amy C.; Laymon, Charles; Chan, Kevin C.; Rosario, Bedda L.; Fisher, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Neuronal reorganization after blindness is of critical interest because it has implications for the rational prescription of artificial vision devices. The purpose of this study was to distinguish the microstructural differences between perinatally blind (PB), acquired blind (AB), and normally sighted controls (SCs) and relate these differences to performance on functional tasks using a sensory substitution device (BrainPort). Methods: We enrolled 52 subjects (PB n = 11; AB n = 35; SC n = 6). All subjects spent 15 h undergoing BrainPort device training. Outcomes of light perception, motion, direction, temporal resolution, grating, and acuity were tested at baseline and after training. Twenty-six of the subjects were scanned with a three Tesla MRI scanner for diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), and with a positron emission tomography (PET) scanner for mapping regional brain glucose consumption during sensory substitution function. Non-parametric models were used to analyze fractional anisotropy (FA; a DTI measure of microstructural integrity) of the brain via region-of-interest (ROI) analysis and tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS). Results: At baseline, all subjects performed all tasks at chance level. After training, light perception, time resolution, location and grating acuity tasks improved significantly for all subject groups. ROI and TBSS analyses of FA maps show areas of statistically significant differences (p ≤ 0.025) in the bilateral optic radiations and some visual association connections between all three groups. No relationship was found between FA and functional performance with the BrainPort. Discussion: All subjects showed performance improvements using the BrainPort irrespective of nature and duration of blindness. Definite brain areas with significant microstructural integrity changes exist among PB, AB, and NC, and these variations are most pronounced in the visual pathways. However, the use of sensory substitution devices is feasible irrespective of microstructural integrity of the primary visual pathways between the eye and the brain. Therefore, tongue based devices devices may be usable for a broad array of non-sighted patients. PMID:24860473

  8. Functional Self-Assembling Peptide Nanofiber Hydrogels Designed for Nerve Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuqiao; Li, Wen; Wu, Xiaoli; Zhang, Na; Zhang, Yongnu; Ouyang, Songying; Song, Xiyong; Fang, Xinyu; Seeram, Ramakrishna; Xue, Wei; He, Liumin; Wu, Wutian

    2016-01-27

    Self-assembling peptide (SAP) RADA16-I (Ac-(RADA)4-CONH2) has been suffering from a main drawback associated with low pH, which damages cells and host tissues upon direct exposure. In this study, we presented a strategy to prepare nanofiber hydrogels from two designer SAPs at neutral pH. RADA16-I was appended with functional motifs containing cell adhesion peptide RGD and neurite outgrowth peptide IKVAV. The two SAPs were specially designed to have opposite net charges at neutral pH, the combination of which created a nanofiber hydrogel (-IKVAV/-RGD) characterized by significantly higher G' than G″ in a viscoelasticity examination. Circular dichroism, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and Raman measurements were performed to investigate the secondary structure of the designer SAPs, indicating that both the hydrophobic/hydrophilic properties and electrostatic interactions of the functional motifs play an important role in the self-assembling behavior of the designer SAPs. The neural progenitor cells (NPCs)/stem cells (NSCs) fully embedded in the 3D-IKVAV/-RGD nanofiber hydrogel survived, whereas those embedded within the RADA 16-I hydrogel hardly survived. Moreover, the -IKVAV/-RGD nanofiber hydrogel supported NPC/NSC neuron and astrocyte differentiation in a 3D environment without adding extra growth factors. Studies of three nerve injury models, including sciatic nerve defect, intracerebral hemorrhage, and spinal cord transection, indicated that the designer -IKVAV/-RGD nanofiber hydrogel provided a more permissive environment for nerve regeneration than the RADA 16-I hydrogel. Therefore, we reported a new mechanism that might be beneficial for the synthesis of SAPs for in vitro 3D cell culture and nerve regeneration. PMID:26720334

  9. Serum albumin is associated with peripheral nerve function in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Li, Lu; Liu, Bo; Lu, Jingyi; Jiang, Lan; Zhang, Yinan; Shen, Yingdi; Wang, Congrong; Jia, Weiping

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the association between serum albumin concentrations and nerve conduction (NC) parameters in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). A total of 409 T2DM patients were enrolled between October 2010 and April 2014. All participants underwent nerve conduction studies. The composite Z scores for NC parameters including conduction velocity (CV), amplitude, and latency were calculated as well. Serum albumin was measured by Bromcresol Green dye-binding method. The composite Z scores of CV and amplitude increased with the increasing albumin tertiles (test for trend, both P<0.001), while the composite Z score of latency decreased with increasing albumin tertiles (test for trend, P<0.001). After adjusting for age, sex, duration, and HbA1c, higher serum albumin concentrations were associated with higher composite Z scores of CV (?=0.314, P<0.001), amplitude (?=0.279, P<0.001), and lower composite Z score of latency (?=-0.279, P<0.001). When participants were stratified into albuminuria and normoalbuminuria group, we found the associations of serum albumin with composite Z scores of NC parameters remained significant only in the albuminuria group (CV Z score: ?=0.253, P=0.002; amplitude Z score: ?=0.233, P=0.006; latency Z score: ?=-0.217 P=0.013) after further adjustment for urinary albumin to creatinine ratio. The optimal cutoff point of serum albumin to indicate abnormal peripheral nerve function was 36.75g/L in T2DM patients with albuminuria, with a sensitivity of 65.6% and a specificity of 78.0%. Serum albumin was independently associated with peripheral nerve function in T2DM patients, especially in those with albuminuria. Serum albumin could be a potential biomarker for diabetic peripheral neuropathy. PMID:25860885

  10. (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) attenuates functional deficits and morphological alterations by diminishing apoptotic gene overexpression in skeletal muscles after sciatic nerve crush injury.

    PubMed

    Renno, Waleed M; Al-Maghrebi, May; Al-Banaw, Anwar

    2012-08-01

    Muscle degeneration and impairment following nerve injury could lead to apoptosis as a result of increased levels of reactive oxygen species. This activates the apoptotic cascade through mitochondrial dysfunction and damage to lipids, proteins, and DNA. In considering of the multifactorial protective properties of green tea polyphenols (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), this study investigates whether EGCG treatment does improve skeletal muscle function impairments, induced by crushing of the sciatic nerve. Compared to the saline-treated injured group of animals, EGCG treatment of axonotomized animals showed significant motor enhancement in the toe spread and foot positioning analysis and gain in the percentage motor deficit. The proprioceptive function expressed by the hopping response showed significant progression in the EGCG-treated group. Recovery of sensory innervation was followed by a slowly retreating neuropathic pain-like syndrome in the EGCG-treated animals. Muscle tissues from injured limb showed severe histopathological alterations that were significantly attenuated by EGCG treatment at the end of week3 post-surgery. Semi-quantitative desmin immunohistochemistry revealed intense staining in the saline-treated injured animals, whereas EGCG treatment decreased the desmin immunoreactivity back to sham control levels. Using RT-PCR, EGCG treatment induced a significant anti-apoptotic effect in injured muscle tissues by normalizing the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio back to baseline levels and inhibiting overexpression of the p53 apoptotic gene at days3 and 7 post-surgery. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that EGCG enhances functional recovery, protects muscle fibers from cellular death by activating anti-apoptotic signaling pathway, and improves morphological recovery in skeletal muscle after nerve injuries. PMID:22573016

  11. Intramuscular nerve distribution in bladder and the relationship between intramuscular ganglia and bladder function in man and dog

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zeju; Xu, Qian; Lu, Li; Luo, Xu; Fu, Xiaoyun

    2014-01-01

    In clinical, the relationship between bladder intramuscular nerve and function is also elusive. This study aims to compare the bladder intramuscular nerve distribution and its characteristics and significance in human and dog. Eleven dogs bladders were stained by Sihlers and HE techniques. Fifteen human bladders were adopted by Sihlers staining, using 10% formaldehyde to fix 12 weeks, 7 by HE dyeing fixes 24 hours. Results indicated that mans bladder was triangularpyramid-shaped. While dogs bladder was spherical-shaped and its muscle fibers arrange were irregularly shaped. Longitudinal muscle of the outer layer is fleshy, the terminal is at the bladder neck without exception, and vesical trigone has relatively obvious three layers of structure. After dyeing dogs bladder was transparent jelly, the nerve was purple color, enter bladder at the ureter-bladder junction with different forms. Mans bladder nerves, no ganglion, were more trivial than that of dogs, and with smaller branches, the large nerve ganglion. The links with the nerve fibers and forms the network on the dogs bladder wall, and the nerve fibers crosses comparatively little on both the left and right sides in the midline. The right nerve branch gains advantage on the mans bladder wall, the situations is opposite on the dogs. In conclusion, bladder nerves which scatter to the bladder wall have branches to lower ureter at the ureter-bladder junction, the structure and distribution of intramuscular nerves are different, the existence of intramuscular ganglia is relating to the bladder function both in man and dog. PMID:25664008

  12. Novel Roles for Osteopontin and Clusterin in Peripheral Motor and Sensory Axon Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Mi, Ruifa; Connor, Emmalynn; Reed, Nicole; Vyas, Alka; Alspalter, Manula; Coppola, Giovanni; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Brushart, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that Schwann cells (SCs) express distinct motor and sensory phenotypes, which impact the ability of these pathways to selectively support regenerating neurons. In the present study, unbiased microarray analysis was used to examine differential gene expression in denervated motor and sensory pathways in rats. Several genes that were significantly upregulated in either denervated sensory or motor pathways were identified and two secreted factors were selected for further analysis: osteopontin (OPN) and clusterin (CLU) which were upregulated in denervated motor and sensory pathways, respectively. Sciatic nerve transection induced upregulation of OPN and CLU and expression of both returned to baseline levels with ensuing regeneration. In vitro analysis using exogenously applied OPN induced outgrowth of motor but not sensory neurons. CLU, however, induced outgrowth of sensory neurons, but not motor neurons. To assess the functional importance of OPN and CLU, peripheral nerve regeneration was examined in OPN and CLU−/− mice. When compared with OPN+/+ mice, motor neuron regeneration was reduced in OPN−/− mice. Impaired regeneration through OPN−/− peripheral nerves grafted into OPN+/+ mice indicated that loss of OPN in SCs was responsible for reduced motor regeneration. Sensory neuron regeneration was impaired in CLU−/− mice following sciatic nerve crush and impaired regeneration nerve fibers through CLU−/− nerve grafts transplanted into CLU+/+ mice indicated that reduced sensory regeneration is likely due to SC-derived CLU. Together, these studies suggest unique roles for SC-derived OPN and CLU in regeneration of peripheral motor and sensory axons. PMID:24478351

  13. Prospective Study of Motor, Sensory, Psychological and Autonomic Functions in Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Camilleri, Michael; McKinzie, Sanna; Busciglio, Irene; Low, Phillip A.; Sweetser, Seth; Burton, Duane; Baxter, Kari; Ryks, Michael; Zinsmeister, Alan R.

    2008-01-01

    Background/Aim To assess pathophysiology in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Methods 122 IBS patients (3 male) and 41 healthy females underwent: questionnaires (symptoms, psychology), autonomic, gut transit, gastric volumes (GV), satiation, rectal compliance and sensation (thresholds and pain ratings) testing. Proportions of patients with abnormal (<10th and >90th percentiles) motor or sensory functions according to bowel symptoms [constipation (C), diarrhea (D), mixed (M)], pain/bloat and number of primary symptoms were estimated. Results IBS subgroups (C, D, M) were similar in age, gastric and small bowel transit, satiation, GV, rectal compliance, sensory thresholds or pain ratings. IBS was associated with BMI, somatic symptoms, anxiety and depression scores. Significant associations were observed with colonic transit (IBS-C [p=0.078] and IBS-D [p<0.05] at 24 h; IBS-D [p<0.01] and IBS-M [p=0.056] at 48 h): 32% IBS had abnormal colonic transit: 20.5% at 24 h and 11.5% at 48 h. Overall, 20.5% IBS patients had increased sensation to distensions: hypersensitivity (<10th percentile thresholds) in 7.6%, and hyperalgesia (pain sensation ratings to distension >90th percentile for ratings in health) in 13%. Conversely, 16.5% of IBS patients had reduced rectal sensation. Pain >6 times per year and bloating were not significantly associated with motor, satiation, or sensory functions. Endorsing 1–2 or 3–4 primary IBS symptoms were associated with abnormal transit and sensation in IBS. Conclusion In tertiary referral (predominantly female) patients with IBS, colonic transit (32%) is the most prevalent physiological abnormality; 21% had increased and 17% decreased rectal pain sensations. Comprehensive physiological assessment may help optimize management in IBS. PMID:18456567

  14. Biophysical and functional consequences of receptor-mediated nerve fiber transformation.

    PubMed Central

    Tanelian, D L; Markin, V S

    1997-01-01

    Stimulation of the nervous system by substance P, a G protein-coupled receptor, and subsequent receptor internalization causes dendrites to change their shape from homogeneous cylinders to a heterogeneous string of swollen varicosities (beads) connected by thin segments. In this paper we have analyzed this phenomenon and propose quantitative mechanisms to explain this type of physical shape transformation. We developed a mathematical solution to describe the relationship between the initial radius of a cylindrical nerve fiber and the average radii of the subsequently created varicosities and connecting segments, as well as the periodicity of the varicosities along the nerve fiber. Theoretical predictions are in good agreement with our own and published experimental data from dorsal root ganglion neurons, spinal cord, and brain. Modeling the electrical properties of these beaded fibers has led to an understanding of the functional biophysical consequences of nerve fiber transformation. Several hypotheses for how this shape transformation can be used to process information within the nervous system have been put forth. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 6 PMID:9138558

  15. Early Interfaced Neural Activity from Chronic Amputated Nerves

    PubMed Central

    Garde, Kshitija; Keefer, Edward; Botterman, Barry; Galvan, Pedro; Romero, Mario I.

    2009-01-01

    Direct interfacing of transected peripheral nerves with advanced robotic prosthetic devices has been proposed as a strategy for achieving natural motor control and sensory perception of such bionic substitutes, thus fully functionally replacing missing limbs in amputees. Multi-electrode arrays placed in the brain and peripheral nerves have been used successfully to convey neural control of prosthetic devices to the user. However, reactive gliosis, micro hemorrhages, axonopathy and excessive inflammation currently limit their long-term use. Here we demonstrate that enticement of peripheral nerve regeneration through a non-obstructive multi-electrode array, after either acute or chronic nerve amputation, offers a viable alternative to obtain early neural recordings and to enhance long-term interfacing of nerve activity. Non-restrictive electrode arrays placed in the path of regenerating nerve fibers allowed the recording of action potentials as early as 8 days post-implantation with high signal-to-noise ratio, as long as 3 months in some animals, and with minimal inflammation at the nerve tissue-metal electrode interface. Our findings suggest that regenerative multi-electrode arrays of open design allow early and stable interfacing of neural activity from amputated peripheral nerves and might contribute towards conveying full neural control and sensory feedback to users of robotic prosthetic devices. PMID:19506704

  16. Temporary Neurotrophin Treatment Prevents Deafness-Induced Auditory Nerve Degeneration and Preserves Function.

    PubMed

    Ramekers, Dyan; Versnel, Huib; Strahl, Stefan B; Klis, Sjaak F L; Grolman, Wilko

    2015-09-01

    After substantial loss of cochlear hair cells, exogenous neurotrophins prevent degeneration of the auditory nerve. Because cochlear implantation, the current therapy for profound sensorineural hearing loss, depends on a functional nerve, application of neurotrophins is being investigated. We addressed two questions important for fundamental insight into the effects of exogenous neurotrophins on a degenerating neural system, and for translation to the clinic. First, does temporary treatment with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) prevent nerve degeneration on the long term? Second, how does a BDNF-treated nerve respond to electrical stimulation? Deafened guinea pigs received a cochlear implant, and their cochleas were infused with BDNF for 4 weeks. Up to 8 weeks after treatment, their cochleas were analyzed histologically. Electrically evoked compound action potentials (eCAPs) were recorded using stimulation paradigms that are informative of neural survival. Spiral ganglion cell (SGC) degeneration was prevented during BDNF treatment, resulting in 1.9 times more SGCs than in deafened untreated cochleas. Importantly, SGC survival was almost complete 8 weeks after treatment cessation, when 2.6 times more SGCs were observed. In four eCAP characteristics (three involving alteration of the interphase gap of the biphasic current pulse and one involving pulse trains), we found large and statistically significant differences between normal-hearing and deaf controls. Importantly, for BDNF-treated animals, these eCAP characteristics were near normal, suggesting healthy responsiveness of BDNF-treated SGCs. In conclusion, clinically practicable short-term neurotrophin treatment is sufficient for long-term survival of SGCs, and it can restore or preserve SGC function well beyond the treatment period. Significance statement: Successful restoration of hearing in deaf subjects by means of a cochlear implant requires a healthy spiral ganglion cell population. Deafness-induced degeneration of these cells can be averted with neurotrophic factors. In the present study in deafened guinea pigs, we investigated the long-term effects of temporary (i.e., clinically practicable) treatment with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). We show that, after treatment cessation, the neuroprotective effect remains for at least 8 weeks. Moreover, for the first time, it is shown that the electrical responsiveness of BDNF-treated spiral ganglion cells is preserved during this period as well. These findings demonstrate that treatment of the auditory nerve with neurotrophic factors may be relevant for cochlear implant users. PMID:26354903

  17. Cavernosal nerve functionality evaluation after magnetic resonance imaging-guided transurethral ultrasound treatment of the prostate

    PubMed Central

    Sammet, Steffen; Partanen, Ari; Yousuf, Ambereen; Sammet, Christina L; Ward, Emily V; Wardrip, Craig; Niekrasz, Marek; Antic, Tatjana; Razmaria, Aria; Farahani, Keyvan; Sokka, Shunmugavelu; Karczmar, Gregory; Oto, Aytekin

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the feasibility of using therapeutic ultrasound as an alternative treatment option for organ-confined prostate cancer. METHODS: In this study, a trans-urethral therapeutic ultrasound applicator in combination with 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guidance was used for real-time multi-planar MRI-based temperature monitoring and temperature feedback control of prostatic tissue thermal ablation in vivo. We evaluated the feasibility and safety of MRI-guided trans-urethral ultrasound to effectively and accurately ablate prostate tissue while minimizing the damage to surrounding tissues in eight canine prostates. MRI was used to plan sonications, monitor temperature changes during therapy, and to evaluate treatment outcome. Real-time temperature and thermal dose maps were calculated using the proton resonance frequency shift technique and were displayed as two-dimensional color-coded overlays on top of the anatomical images. After ultrasound treatment, an evaluation of the integrity of cavernosal nerves was performed during prostatectomy with a nerve stimulator that measured tumescence response quantitatively and indicated intact cavernous nerve functionality. Planned sonication volumes were visually correlated to MRI ablation volumes and corresponding histo-pathological sections after prostatectomy. RESULTS: A total of 16 sonications were performed in 8 canines. MR images acquired before ultrasound treatment were used to localize the prostate and to prescribe sonication targets in all canines. Temperature elevations corresponded within 1 degree of the targeted sonication angle, as well as with the width and length of the active transducer elements. The ultrasound treatment procedures were automatically interrupted when the temperature in the target zone reached 56 °C. In all canines erectile responses were evaluated with a cavernous nerve stimulator post-treatment and showed a tumescence response after stimulation with an electric current. These results indicated intact cavernous nerve functionality. In all specimens, regions of thermal ablation were limited to areas within the prostate capsule and no damage was observed in periprostatic tissues. Additionally, a visual analysis of the ablation zones on contrast-enhanced MR images acquired post ultrasound treatment correlated excellent with the ablation zones on thermal dose maps. All of the ablation zones received a consensus score of 3 (excellent) for the location and size of the correlation between the histologic ablation zone and MRI based ablation zone. During the prostatectomy and histologic examination, no damage was noted in the bladder or rectum. CONCLUSION: Trans-urethral ultrasound treatment of the prostate with MRI guidance has potential to safely, reliably, and accurately ablate prostatic regions, while minimizing the morbidities associated with conventional whole-gland resection or therapy. PMID:26753067

  18. Unexpected motor axons in the distal superficial radial and posterior interosseous nerves: a cadaver study.

    PubMed

    Okwueze, Martina I; Cardwell, Nancy L; Wolfort, Sean L; Nanney, Lillian B

    2007-10-01

    The prevalence of motor variations in the nerves supplying muscles of the first web space was evaluated by a visual dissection and immunohistochemical analysis from 56 cadaver hands. By microscopic visualization, 30% of the superficial radial nerves (SRNs) sent branches into muscles of the first web space. Since these unexpected penetrating branches were expected to be sensory or proprioceptive, markers of sensory and motor axons were used for confirmation. Positive identifications of motor axons (as identified by positive immunostaining for choline acetyltransferase) were made in 30% of SRNs and in 28.5% of posterior interosseous nerves. Classical teachings that the SRNs and PINs are exclusively sensory have been brought into question. Our data are in agreement with the rare clinical finding that motor function occasionally persists following devastating injury to both the ulnar and median nerves. Anatomic prevalence for this variation appears much higher than previous descriptions have indicated. PMID:17708562

  19. Sensory and Functionality Differences of Whey Protein Isolate Bleached by Hydrogen or Benzoyl Peroxide.

    PubMed

    Smith, Tucker J; Foegeding, E Allen; Drake, MaryAnne

    2015-10-01

    Whey protein is a highly functional food ingredient used in a wide variety of applications. A large portion of fluid whey produced in the United States is derived from Cheddar cheese manufacture and contains annatto (norbixin), and therefore must be bleached. The objective of this study was to compare sensory and functionality differences between whey protein isolate (WPI) bleached by benzoyl peroxide (BP) or hydrogen peroxide (HP). HP and BP bleached WPI and unbleached controls were manufactured in triplicate. Descriptive sensory analysis and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry were conducted to determine flavor differences between treatments. Functionality differences were evaluated by measurement of foam stability, protein solubility, SDS-PAGE, and effect of NaCl concentration on gelation relative to an unbleached control. HP bleached WPI had higher concentrations of lipid oxidation and sulfur containing volatile compounds than both BP and unbleached WPI (P < 0.05). HP bleached WPI was characterized by high aroma intensity, cardboard, cabbage, and fatty flavors, while BP bleached WPI was differentiated by low bitter taste. Overrun and yield stress were not different among WPI (P < 0.05). Soluble protein loss at pH 4.6 of WPI decreased by bleaching with either hydrogen peroxide or benzoyl peroxide (P < 0.05), and the heat stability of WPI was also distinct among WPI (P < 0.05). SDS PAGE results suggested that bleaching of whey with either BP or HP resulted in protein degradation, which likely contributed to functionality differences. These results demonstrate that bleaching has flavor effects as well as effects on many of the functionality characteristics of whey proteins. PMID:26317318

  20. Propofol Disrupts Functional Interactions between Sensory and High-Order Processing of Auditory Verbal Memory

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaolin; Lauer, Kathryn K.; Ward, Barney D.; Rao, Stephen M.; Li, Shi-Jiang; Hudetz, Anthony G.

    2011-01-01

    Current theories suggest that disrupting cortical information integration may account for the mechanism of general anesthesia in suppressing consciousness. Human cognitive operations take place in hierarchically structured neural organizations in the brain. The process of low-order neural representation of sensory stimuli becoming integrated in high-order cortices is also known as cognitive binding. Combining neuroimaging, cognitive neuroscience, and anesthetic manipulation, we examined how cognitive networks involved in auditory verbal memory are maintained in wakefulness, disrupted in propofol-induced deep sedation, and re-established in recovery. Inspired by the notion of cognitive binding, an fMRI-guided connectivity analysis was utilized to assess the integrity of functional interactions within and between different levels of the task-defined brain regions. Task-related responses persisted in the primary auditory cortex (PAC), but vanished in the inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) and premotor areas in deep sedation. For connectivity analysis, seed regions representing sensory and high-order processing of the memory task were identified in the PAC and IFG. Propofol disrupted connections from the PAC seed to the frontal regions and thalamus, but not the connections from the IFG seed to a set of widely distributed brain regions in the temporal, frontal, and parietal lobes (with exception of the PAC). These later regions have been implicated in mediating verbal comprehension and memory. These results suggest that propofol disrupts cognition by blocking the projection of sensory information to high-order processing networks and thus preventing information integration. Such findings contribute to our understanding of anesthetic mechanisms as related to information and integration in the brain. PMID:21932265

  1. Functional selectivity of kappa opioid receptor agonists in peripheral sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Jamshidi, Raehannah J; Jacobs, Blaine A; Sullivan, Laura C; Chavera, Teresa A; Saylor, Rachel M; Prisinzano, Thomas E; Clarke, William P; Berg, Kelly A

    2015-11-01

    Activation of kappa opioid receptors (KORs) expressed by peripheral sensory neurons that respond to noxious stimuli (nociceptors) can reduce neurotransmission of pain stimuli from the periphery to the central nervous system. We have previously shown that the antinociception dose-response curve for peripherally restricted doses of the KOR agonist (-)-(trans)-3,4-dichloro-N-methyl-N-[2-(1-pyrrolidinyl)cyclohexyl]benzeneacetamide (U50488) has an inverted U shape. Here, we found that the downward phase of the U50488 dose-response curve was blocked by an inhibitor of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation U0126. Local administration of the selective KOR agonist salvinorin A (Sal-A), also resulted in an inverted U-shaped curve; however, the downward phase was insensitive to U0126. By contrast, inhibition of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) partially blocked the downward phase of the dose-response curve to Sal-A, suggesting a role for JNK. In cultures of peripheral sensory neurons, U50488 and Sal-A inhibited adenylyl cyclase activity with similar efficacies; however, their ability to activate ERK and JNK differed. Whereas U50488 activated ERK but not JNK, Sal-A activated JNK but not ERK. Moreover, although both U50488 and Sal-A produced homologous desensitization, desensitization to U50488 was blocked by inhibition of ERK activation, whereas desensitization to Sal-A was blocked by inhibition of JNK. Substitution of an ethoxymethyl ether for the C2 position acetyl group of Sal-A reduced stimulation of JNK, prevented desensitization by ethoxymethyl ether for the C2 position acetyl group of Sal-A, and resulted in a monotonic antinociception dose-response curve. Collectively, these data demonstrate the functional selectivity of KOR ligands for signaling in peripheral sensory neurons, which results in differential effects on behavioral responses in vivo. PMID:26297384

  2. Treadmill exercise induced functional recovery after peripheral nerve repair is associated with increased levels of neurotrophic factors.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae-Sung; Hke, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    Benefits of exercise on nerve regeneration and functional recovery have been reported in both central and peripheral nervous system disease models. However, underlying molecular mechanisms of enhanced regeneration and improved functional outcomes are less understood. We used a peripheral nerve regeneration model that has a good correlation between functional outcomes and number of motor axons that regenerate to evaluate the impact of treadmill exercise. In this model, the median nerve was transected and repaired while the ulnar nerve was transected and prevented from regeneration. Daily treadmill exercise resulted in faster recovery of the forelimb grip function as evaluated by grip power and inverted holding test. Daily exercise also resulted in better regeneration as evaluated by recovery of compound motor action potentials, higher number of axons in the median nerve and larger myofiber size in target muscles. Furthermore, these observations correlated with higher levels of neurotrophic factors, glial derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), in serum, nerve and muscle suggesting that increase in muscle derived neurotrophic factors may be responsible for improved regeneration. PMID:24618564

  3. Conserved Dopamine Neurotrophic Factor-Transduced Mesenchymal Stem Cells Promote Axon Regeneration and Functional Recovery of Injured Sciatic Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yi; Nie, Lin; Zhao, Hua; Zhang, Wen; Zhang, Yuan-Qiang; Wang, Shuai-Shuai; Cheng, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury (PNI) is a common disease that often results in axonal degeneration and the loss of neurons, ultimately leading to limited nerve regeneration and severe functional impairment. Currently, there are no effective treatments for PNI. In the present study, we transduced conserved dopamine neurotrophic factor (CDNF) into mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in collagen tubes to investigate their regenerative effects on rat peripheral nerves in an in vivo transection model. Scanning electron microscopy of the collagen tubes demonstrated their ability to be resorbed in vivo. We observed notable overexpression of the CDNF protein in the distal sciatic nerve after application of CDNF-MSCs. Quantitative analysis of neurofilament 200 (NF200) and S100 immunohistochemistry showed significant enhancement of axonal and Schwann cell regeneration in the group receiving CDNF-MSCs (CDNF-MSCs group) compared with the control groups. Myelination thickness, axon diameter and the axon-to fiber diameter ratio (G-ratio) were significantly higher in the CDNF-MSCs group at 8 and 12 weeks after nerve transection surgery. After surgery, the sciatic functional index, target muscle weight, wet weight ratio of gastrocnemius muscle and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) tracing demonstrated functional recovery. Light and electron microscopy confirmed successful regeneration of the sciatic nerve. The greater numbers of HRP-labeled neuron cell bodies and increased sciatic nerve index values (SFI) in the CDNF-MSCs group suggest that CDNF exerts neuroprotective effects in vivo. We also observed higher target muscle weights and a significant improvement in muscle atrophism in the CDNF-MSCs group. Collectively, these findings indicate that CDNF gene therapy delivered by MSCs is capable of promoting nerve regeneration and functional recovery, likely because of the significant neuroprotective and neurotrophic effects of CDNF and the superior environment offered by MSCs and collagen tubes. PMID:25343619

  4. Synergistic effects of low-level laser and mesenchymal stem cells on functional recovery in rats with crushed sciatic nerves.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chen-Chia; Wang, John; Chen, Shyh-Chang; Hsieh, Yueh-Ling

    2016-02-01

    Transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has been proposed to exert beneficial effects on peripheral nerve regeneration after a peripheral nerve injury, but the functional recovery in the denervated limb is still limited. In this study, we used low-level laser therapy (LLLT) as an adjunct therapy for MSC transplantation on the functional recovery of crushed sciatic nerve in rats. Peripheral nerve injury was induced in 48 Sprague-Dawley rats by crushing the unilateral sciatic nerve, using a vessel clamp. The animals with crushed injury were randomly divided into four groups: control group, with no treatment; MSC group, treated with MSC alone; LLLT group, treated with LLLT alone; and MSCLLLT group, treated with a combination of MSC and LLLT. The sciatic function index (SFI), vertical activity of locomotion (VA) and ankle angle (AA) of rats were examined for functional assessments after treatment. Electrophysiological, morphological and S100 immunohistochemical studies were also conducted. The MSCLLLT group showed a greater recovery in SFI, VA and AA, with significant difference from MSC, LLLT and control groups (p?function and expression of S100 immunoreactivity, as well as fewer inflammatory cells and less vacuole formation were also demonstrated after nerve crush injury in the MSCLLLT group when compared with the groups receiving a single treatment (p?functional recovery than a conventional treatment of MSC or LLLT alone. LLLT has a synergistic effect in providing greater functional recovery with MSC transplantation after nerve crush injury. Copyright 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:23468370

  5. Transplantation of Olfactory Ensheathing Cells to Evaluate Functional Recovery after Peripheral Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Guerout, Nicolas; Paviot, Alexandre; Bon-Mardion, Nicolas; Honor, Axel; OBongo, Rais; Duclos, Clia; Marie, Jean-Paul

    2014-01-01

    Olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) are neural crest cells which allow growth and regrowth of the primary olfactory neurons. Indeed, the primary olfactory system is characterized by its ability to give rise to new neurons even in adult animals. This particular ability is partly due to the presence of OECs which create a favorable microenvironment for neurogenesis. This property of OECs has been used for cellular transplantation such as in spinal cord injury models. Although the peripheral nervous system has a greater capacity to regenerate after nerve injury than the central nervous system, complete sections induce misrouting during axonal regrowth in particular after facial of laryngeal nerve transection. Specifically, full sectioning of the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) induces aberrant axonal regrowth resulting in synkinesis of the vocal cords. In this specific model, we showed that OECs transplantation efficiently increases axonal regrowth. OECs are constituted of several subpopulations present in both the olfactory mucosa (OM-OECs) and the olfactory bulbs (OB-OECs). We present here a model of cellular transplantation based on the use of these different subpopulations of OECs in a RLN injury model. Using this paradigm, primary cultures of OB-OECs and OM-OECs were transplanted in Matrigel after section and anastomosis of the RLN. Two months after surgery, we evaluated transplanted animals by complementary analyses based on videolaryngoscopy, electromyography (EMG), and histological studies. First, videolaryngoscopy allowed us to evaluate laryngeal functions, in particular muscular cocontractions phenomena. Then, EMG analyses demonstrated richness and synchronization of muscular activities. Finally, histological studies based on toluidine blue staining allowed the quantification of the number and profile of myelinated fibers. All together, we describe here how to isolate, culture, identify and transplant OECs from OM and OB after RLN section-anastomosis and how to evaluate and analyze the efficiency of these transplanted cells on axonal regrowth and laryngeal functions. PMID:24637657

  6. Use of Vein Conduit and Isolated Nerve Graft in Peripheral Nerve Repair: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Imran; Akhtar, Md. Sohaib

    2014-01-01

    Aims and Objectives. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of vein conduit in nerve repair compared with isolated nerve graft. Materials and Methods. This retrospective study was conducted at author's centre and included a total of 40 patients. All the patients had nerve defect of more than 3 cm and underwent nerve repair using nerve graft from sural nerve. In 20 cases, vein conduit (study group) was used whereas no conduit was used in other 20 cases. Patients were followed up for 2 years at the intervals of 3 months. Results. Patients had varying degree of recovery. Sensations reached to all the digits at 1 year in study groups compared to 18 months in control group. At the end of second year, 84% patients of the study group achieved 2-point discrimination of <10 mm compared to 60% only in control group. In terms of motor recovery, 82% patients achieved satisfactory hand function in study group compared to 56% in control group (P < .05). Conclusions. It was concluded that the use of vein conduit in peripheral nerve repair is more effective method than isolated nerve graft providing good sensory and motor recovery. PMID:25405029

  7. Storage influence on the functional, sensory and keeping quality of quality protein maize flour.

    PubMed

    Shobha, D; Kumar, H V Dileep; Sreeramasetty, T A; Puttaramanaik; Gowda, K T Pandurange; Shivakumar, G B

    2014-11-01

    Apart from nutritional values functional and sensory properties affect the behavior of food system and its acceptability for consumption during storage. Hence keeping quality of maize flour (HQPM-7) with and without lime treatment(control) was studied in terms of functional (bulk density, pH, swelling capacity, water and oil absorption capacity, least gelation concentration, peroxide value), sensory (appearance, color, taste, texture, mouth feel and overall acceptability) and rolling parameters (water absorption by flour, rolling quality, diameter after baking ) for a period of 6 months under room temperature (25 ± 5 °C) in two types of packages viz, LDPE cover (P) and plastic box (B). Physical parameters such as length, breadth and thickness (11.26-10.52 mm, 9.67-9.14 mm, & 4.72-3.95 mm) were reduced in lime treated grains compared to control. Significant increase (p ≤ 0.05) in ash content of lime treated flour (1.67 ± 0.01 g) was observed compared to control (1.5 ± 0.02 g). Calcium content of lime treated maize flour increased significantly (p ≤ 0.05) from 48 to 136 mg. There is a significant reduction in functional properties of flour after 3 and 2 months irrespective in polyethylene cover and plastic box. The properties like rolling quality, diameter after baking and water uptake by the flour were reduced significantly (p ≤ 0.05) after 4 months of storage in treated and after 1 month in control samples. Sensory scores of roti (dry pan cake) decreased significantly after 3 months of storage with an overall acceptability score of 4.0 and 3.4. In control samples mean taste (3.6), mouth feel (3.8) as well as OAA scores (3.8) decreased after second month. Hence lime treated maize flour with added nutritional benefits is suitable for making rotis of good palatability and can be stored in LDPE covers up to 3 months. PMID:26396307

  8. Ultrasonography of MADSAM neuropathy: focal nerve enlargements at sites of existing and resolved conduction blocks.

    PubMed

    Scheidl, Erika; Bhm, Josef; Sim, Magdolna; Rzsa, Csilla; Bereznai, Benjamin; Kovcs, Tibor; Arnyi, Zsuzsanna

    2012-07-01

    Using the emerging technique of peripheral nerve ultrasonography, multiple focal nerve swellings corresponding to sites of existing conduction blocks have been described in demyelinating polyneuropathies. We report two cases of multifocal acquired demyelinating sensory and motor neuropathy (MADSAM). In the first, multiple focal nerve enlargements were detected by ultrasound at sites of previous conduction blocks, well after complete clinical and electrophysiological resolution. In the second case, existing proximal conduction blocks could be localized by ultrasound. Our cases highlight the importance of nerve ultrasound in identifying conduction blocks and demonstrate that ultrasonographic morphological changes may outlast functional recovery in demyelinating neuropathies. PMID:22513319

  9. Glaucoma Progression Detection Using Structural Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Measurements and Functional Visual Field Points

    PubMed Central

    Yousefi, Siamak; Goldbaum, Michael H.; Balasubramanian, Madhusudhanan; Jung, Tzyy-Ping; Weinreb, Robert N.; Medeiros, Felipe A.; Zangwill, Linda M.; Liebmann, Jeffrey M.; Girkin, Christopher A.

    2014-01-01

    Machine learning classifiers were employed to detect glaucomatous progression using longitudinal series of structural data extracted from retinal nerve fiber layer thickness measurements and visual functional data recorded from standard automated perimetry tests. Using the collected data, a longitudinal feature vector was created for each patients eye by computing the norm 1 difference vector of the data at the baseline and at each follow-up visit. The longitudinal features from each patients eye were then fed to the machine learning classifier to classify each eye as stable or progressed over time. This study was performed using several machine learning classifiers including Bayesian, Lazy, Meta, and Tree, composing different families. Combinations of structural and functional features were selected and ranked to determine the relative effectiveness of each feature. Finally, the outcomes of the classifiers were assessed by several performance metrics and the effectiveness of structural and functional features were analyzed. PMID:24658239

  10. [Study of the function of nerve growth factor in the olfactory tract of the mouse].

    PubMed

    Uramoto, N; Miwa, T; Donjyo, T; Ishimaru, T; Furukawa, M

    1998-07-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the function of nerve growth factor (BGF) in the olfactory tract of mice. Using the mice which had received unilateral olfactory bulbectomy and in which antibodies to NGF had been continuously infused with into the contralateral olfactory blub, three kinds of analysis were performed: histological analysis of the olfactory epithelium by HE staining, immunohistochemical analysis of the olfactory epithelium using polyclonal antibodies to trk which forms the NGF receptor, and olfactory-mediated behavioral analysis with cycloheximide. These animals had been sacrificed at day 1, 3, 7, 14, 21 or 28. Several findings were obtained as a result of the above analysis. Degeneration of the olfactory epithelium and trk expression by the olfactory cells were observed on day 7, and the olfactory epithelium was incompletely regenerated on day 28. However, trk expression by the olfactory cell was still recognized and the olfactory function was not restored by day 28. These examinations suggest that NGF produced in the olfactory bulb was transported retrogradely to olfactory cells through the olfactory nerves, and was associated with sustaining the existence of those cells and with regenerating the olfactory tract after injury. PMID:9745266

  11. NEUROPHYSIOLOGICAL EVALUATION OF SENSORY SYSTEMS'

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to many neurotoxic compounds has been shown to produce a sensory system dysfunction. Neurophysiological assessment of sensory function in humans and animal models often uses techniques known as sensory evoked potentials. Because both humans and animals show analogous res...

  12. Recovery of semantic word processing in transcortical sensory aphasia: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Zahn, Roland; Huber, Walter; Drews, Eva; Specht, Karsten; Kemeny, Stefan; Reith, Wolfgang; Willmes, Klaus; Schwarz, Michael

    2002-01-01

    In a previous functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study with normal subjects, we demonstrated regions related to conceptual-semantic word processing around the first frontal sulcus (BA 9) and the posterior parietal lobe (BA 7/40) in agreement with several previous reports. We had the possibility, using the same fMRI paradigm, to study two consecutive cases with left middle cerebral artery (MCA) infarction (RC and HP) and lesions affecting either solely the pre-frontal (HP) or both the pre-frontal and posterior parietal part of the network activated in normal subjects (RC). Both patients showed transcortical sensory aphasia (TSA) on acute assessment. This contradicts classical disconnection accounts of the syndrome stating intact conceptual representations in TSA. Their recovery of language comprehension was associated with activation of a left hemispheric network. Mainly activations of left perilesional pre-frontal regions (RC), left Wernicke's area (RC and HP) or the left posterior middle and inferior temporal cortex (HP) were demonstrated in the TSA patients. The latter findings suggest that in our cases of TSA functional take-over has occurred in regions with related functions ('redundancy recovery') rather than in previously unrelated areas ('vicarious functioning'). Our data support distributed models of conceptual-semantic word processing and multiple left hemispheric representations of closely related functions. PMID:12499412

  13. Anxiety dissociates the adaptive functions of sensory and motor response enhancements to social threats.

    PubMed

    El Zein, Marwa; Wyart, Valentin; Grèzes, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Efficient detection and reaction to negative signals in the environment is essential for survival. In social situations, these signals are often ambiguous and can imply different levels of threat for the observer, thereby making their recognition susceptible to contextual cues - such as gaze direction when judging facial displays of emotion. However, the mechanisms underlying such contextual effects remain poorly understood. By computational modeling of human behavior and electrical brain activity, we demonstrate that gaze direction enhances the perceptual sensitivity to threat-signaling emotions - anger paired with direct gaze, and fear paired with averted gaze. This effect arises simultaneously in ventral face-selective and dorsal motor cortices at 200 ms following face presentation, dissociates across individuals as a function of anxiety, and does not reflect increased attention to threat-signaling emotions. These findings reveal that threat tunes neural processing in fast, selective, yet attention-independent fashion in sensory and motor systems, for different adaptive purposes. PMID:26712157

  14. Toward the functional oligomerization state of tryptophan-rich sensory proteins

    PubMed Central

    Jaremko, ?ukasz; Jaremko, Mariusz; Becker, Stefan; Zweckstetter, Markus

    2014-01-01

    A conserved family of tryptophan-rich sensory proteins (TspO) mediates the transport of heme degradation intermediates across membranes. In eukaryotes, the homologous mitochondrial translocator protein (TSPO) binds cholesterol and radioligands as monomer. On the basis of the mammalian TSPO structure, bioinformatic analysis, and a 10 resolution electron microscopy map of TspO from Rhodobacter sphaeroides, we developed a model of the tertiary and quaternary structure of TspO that is in agreement with available mutagenesis data. Our study provides insight into the conformational basis for the restricted interaction of bacterial TspO with radioligands and the functional oligomerization state of bacterial TspO proteins. PMID:24817333

  15. Leukemia inhibitory factor enhances the regeneration of transected rat sciatic nerve and the function of reinnervated muscle.

    PubMed

    Tham, S; Dowsing, B; Finkelstein, D; Donato, R; Cheema, S S; Bartlett, P F; Morrison, W A

    1997-01-15

    The cytokine leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) favors the survival and growth of axons in vitro and in vivo. Fibronectin has been shown to enhance nerve regeneration when added in combination with various growth factors including LIF. The goal of this study was to evaluate the effect of LIF plus fibronectin on the regeneration of transected nerve and functional recovery of reinnervated skeletal muscle, in one experimental model of peripheral nerve repair, at two recovery times. The rat sciatic nerve was cut at mid-thigh level and a silicone cuff containing either saline (control), LIF, or LIF plus fibronectin (L+F) was used to bridge the proximal and distal nerve stumps leaving a 1 cm gap between them. Rats were then explored at 6 or 12 weeks following the initial surgery. Regenerating nerves were assessed by measuring the diameter of myelinated axons, conduction velocity, and number of myelinated fibers. Muscle reinnervation was assessed by measuring muscle mass, force of contraction, and histologically for changes in muscle fiber type (type I and type II). In this report we demonstrate that at 6 weeks there were significant increases in 1) nerve conduction velocity, 2) myelinated axon diameter, and 3) number of myelinated axons over that of control (saline-treated) animals. Both LIF groups demonstrated a shift in type II muscle fiber area compared to saline-treated controls, with the L+F group having a significant increase in muscle mass. At 12 weeks there was an improved recovery over and above that demonstrated at 6 weeks. Muscle mass was 65% and 42% greater than control for LIF and L+F, respectively. Force of contraction, conduction velocity, myelinated fiber number, and diameter were also significantly greater for both LIF- and L+F-treated rats than saline-treated rats. These results demonstrate that LIF significantly improves the regeneration of damaged peripheral nerves and the preservation of muscle viability, resulting in greatly enhanced recovery of skeletal muscle function. PMID:9008151

  16. Short-term vagal nerve stimulation improves left ventricular function following chronic heart failure in rats

    PubMed Central

    LI, YAN; XUAN, YAN-HUA; LIU, SHUANG-SHUANG; DONG, JING; LUO, JIA-YING; SUN, ZHI-JUN

    2015-01-01

    Increasing numbers of animal and clinical investigations have demonstrated the effectiveness of long-term electrical vagal nerve stimulation (VNS) on chronic heart failure (CHF). The present study investigated the effects of short-term VNS on the hemodynamics of cardiac remodeling and cardiac excitation-contraction coupling (ECP) in an animal model of CHF following a large myocardial infarction. At 3 weeks subsequent to ligation of the left coronary artery, the surviving rats were randomized into vagal and sham-stimulated groups. The right vagal nerve of the CHF rats was stimulated for 72 h. The vagal nerve was stimulated with rectangular pulses of 40 ms duration at 1 Hz, 5 V. The treated rats, compared with the untreated rats, had significantly higher left ventricular ejection fraction (54.869.73, vs. 45.605.51%; P=0.025) and left ventricular fractional shortening (25.316.30, vs. 15.428.49%; P=0.013), and lower levels of brain natriuretic peptide (10.072.63, vs. 19.955.22 ng/ml; P=0.001). The improvement in cardiac pumping function was accompanied by a decrease in left ventricular end diastolic volume (1.110.50, vs. 1.540.57 cm3; P=0.032) and left ventricular end systolic volume (0.500.28, vs. 0.870.36 cm3; P=0.007). Furthermore, the expression levels of ryanodine receptor type 2 (RyR2) and sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium adenosine triphosphatase (SERCA2) were significantly higher in the treated rats compared with the untreated rats (P=0.011 and P=0.001 for RyR2 and SERCA2, respectively). Therefore, VNS was beneficial to the CHF rats through the prevention of cardiac remodeling and improvement of cardiac ECP. PMID:25873055

  17. Sensing the Underground – Ultrastructure and Function of Sensory Organs in Root-Feeding Melolontha melolontha (Coleoptera: Scarabaeinae) Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Hansson, Bill S.; Hilker, Monika; Reinecke, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Below ground orientation in insects relies mainly on olfaction and taste. The economic impact of plant root feeding scarab beetle larvae gave rise to numerous phylogenetic and ecological studies. Detailed knowledge of the sensory capacities of these larvae is nevertheless lacking. Here, we present an atlas of the sensory organs on larval head appendages of Melolontha melolontha. Our ultrastructural and electrophysiological investigations allow annotation of functions to various sensory structures. Results Three out of 17 ascertained sensillum types have olfactory, and 7 gustatory function. These sensillum types are unevenly distributed between antennae and palps. The most prominent chemosensory organs are antennal pore plates that in total are innervated by approximately one thousand olfactory sensory neurons grouped into functional units of three-to-four. In contrast, only two olfactory sensory neurons innervate one sensillum basiconicum on each of the palps. Gustatory sensilla chaetica dominate the apices of all head appendages, while only the palps bear thermo-/hygroreceptors. Electrophysiological responses to CO2, an attractant for many root feeders, are exclusively observed in the antennae. Out of 54 relevant volatile compounds, various alcohols, acids, amines, esters, aldehydes, ketones and monoterpenes elicit responses in antennae and palps. All head appendages are characterized by distinct olfactory response profiles that are even enantiomer specific for some compounds. Conclusions Chemosensory capacities in M. melolontha larvae are as highly developed as in many adult insects. We interpret the functional sensory units underneath the antennal pore plates as cryptic sensilla placodea and suggest that these perceive a broad range of secondary plant metabolites together with CO2. Responses to olfactory stimulation of the labial and maxillary palps indicate that typical contact chemo-sensilla have a dual gustatory and olfactory function. PMID:22848471

  18. Richard P. Bunge memorial lecture. Nerve injury and repair--a challenge to the plastic brain.

    PubMed

    Lundborg, Göran

    2003-12-01

    Repair and reconstruction of major nerve trunks in the upper extremity is a very challenging surgical problem. Today, there is no surgical repair technique that can assure recovery of tactile discrimination in the hand of an adult patient following nerve repair. In contrast, young individuals usually attain a complete recovery of functional sensibility. The outcome from nerve repair depends mainly on central nervous system factors including functional cortical reorganizational processes caused by misdirection in axonal outgrowth. Deafferentation due to local anesthetic block, amputation or nerve transection in the upper extremity leads to very rapid cortical synaptic remodeling, resulting in a distorted cortical hand representation as well as in enlarged and overlapping cortical receptive fields. Sensory relearning programs are aimed at refinement of these receptive fields to normalize the distorted hand map and improve processing at a high-order cortical level in the context of the 'new language spoken by the hand'. As peripheral nerve repair techniques cannot be further refined, there is a need for new and improved strategies for sensory relearning following nerve repair. We propose the utilization of multimodal capacity of the brain, using another sense (hearing) to substitute for lost hand sensation and to provide an alternate sensory input from the hand early after transection. The purpose was to modulate cortical reorganizations due to deafferentation to preserve cortical hand representation. Preliminary results from a prospective clinical randomized study indicate that the use of a Sensor Glove System, which stereophonically transposes the friction sound elicited by active touch, results in improved recovery of tactile discrimination in the nerve-injured hand. Future strategies for treatment of nerve injuries should promote cellular methods to minimize post-traumatic nerve cell death and to improve axonal outgrowth rate and orientation, but high on the agenda are new strategies for refined sensory relearning following nerve repair. PMID:14641646

  19. The spinal accessory nerve plexus, the trapezius muscle, and shoulder stabilization after radical neck cancer surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, H; Burns, S; Kaiser, C W

    1988-01-01

    A clinical and anatomic study of the spinal accessory, the eleventh cranial nerve, and trapezius muscle function of patients who had radical neck cancer surgery was conducted. This study was done not only to document the indispensibility of the trapezius muscle to shoulder-girdle stability, but also to clarify the role of the eleventh cranial nerve in the variable motor and sensory changes occurring after the loss of this muscle. Seventeen male patients, 49-69 years of age, (average of 60 years of age) undergoing a total of 23 radical neck dissections were examined for upper extremity function, particularly in regard to the trapezius muscle, and for subjective signs of pain. The eleventh nerve, usually regarded as the sole motor innervation to the trapezius, was cut in 17 instances because of tumor involvement. Dissection of four fresh and 30 preserved adult cadavers helped to reconcile the motor and sensory differences in patients who had undergone loss of the eleventh nerve. The dissections and clinical observations corroborate that the trapezius is a key part of a "muscle continuum" that stabilizes the shoulder. Variations in origins and insertions of the trapezius may influence its function in different individuals. As regards the spinal accessory nerve, it is concluded that varying motor and sensory connections form a plexus with the eleventh nerve, accounting, in part, for the variations in motor innervation and function of the trapezius, as well as for a variable spectrum of sensory changes when the eleventh nerve is cut. For this reason, it is suggested that the term "spinal accessory nerve plexus" be used to refer to the eleventh nerve when it is considered in the context of radical neck cancer surgery. Images Fig. 4. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. PMID:3056289

  20. Accelerating axonal growth promotes motor recovery after peripheral nerve injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Chi Him Eddie; Omura, Takao; Cobos, Enrique J.; Latrmolire, Alban; Ghasemlou, Nader; Brenner, Gary J.; van Veen, Ed; Barrett, Lee; Sawada, Tomokazu; Gao, Fuying; Coppola, Giovanni; Gertler, Frank; Costigan, Michael; Geschwind, Dan; Woolf, Clifford J.

    2011-01-01

    Although peripheral nerves can regenerate after injury, proximal nerve injury in humans results in minimal restoration of motor function. One possible explanation for this is that injury-induced axonal growth is too slow. Heat shock protein 27 (Hsp27) is a regeneration-associated protein that accelerates axonal growth in vitro. Here, we have shown that it can also do this in mice after peripheral nerve injury. While rapid motor and sensory recovery occurred in mice after a sciatic nerve crush injury, there was little return of motor function after sciatic nerve transection, because of the delay in motor axons reaching their target. This was not due to a failure of axonal growth, because injured motor axons eventually fully re-extended into muscles and sensory function returned; rather, it resulted from a lack of motor end plate reinnervation. Tg mice expressing high levels of Hsp27 demonstrated enhanced restoration of motor function after nerve transection/resuture by enabling motor synapse reinnervation, but only within 5 weeks of injury. In humans with peripheral nerve injuries, shorter wait times to decompression surgery led to improved functional recovery, and, while a return of sensation occurred in all patients, motor recovery was limited. Thus, absence of motor recovery after nerve damage may result from a failure of synapse reformation after prolonged denervation rather than a failure of axonal growth. PMID:21965333

  1. Vagus Nerve Stimulation Improves Cardiac Function by Preventing Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Obese-Insulin Resistant Rats

    PubMed Central

    Samniang, Bencharunan; Shinlapawittayatorn, Krekwit; Chunchai, Titikorn; Pongkan, Wanpitak; Kumfu, Sirinart; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C.; KenKnight, Bruce H.; Chattipakorn, Nipon

    2016-01-01

    Long-term high-fat diet (HFD) consumption leads to not only obese-insulin resistance, but also impaired left ventricular (LV) function. Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) has been shown to exert cardioprotection. However, its effects on the heart and metabolic parameters under obese-insulin resistant condition is not known. We determined the effects of VNS on metabolic parameters, heart rate variability (HRV) and LV function in obese-insulin resistant rats. Male Wistar rats were fed with HFD for 12 weeks, and were randomly divided into sham and VNS groups. VNS was applied for the next 12 weeks. Echocardiography, blood pressure and HRV were examined. Blood samples were collected for metabolic parameters. At the end, the heart was removed for determination of apoptosis, inflammation, oxidative stress, and cardiac mitochondrial function. VNS for 12 weeks significantly decreased plasma insulin, HOMA index, total cholesterol, triglyceride, LDL and visceral fat. Serum adiponectin was significantly increased in the VNS group. VNS also significantly decreased blood pressure, improved HRV and LV function, decreased cardiac MDA, TNF-α and Bax levels, and improved cardiac mitochondrial function. VNS improves metabolic and hemodynamic parameters, and the LV function via its ability against apoptosis, inflammation and oxidative stress, and preserved cardiac mitochondrial function in obese-insulin resistant rats. PMID:26830020

  2. Laryngeal Adductor Function in Experimental Models of Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Paniello, Randal C.; Rich, Jason T.; Debnath, Nick L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis Most patients with unilateral vocal fold paralysis experience some degree of spontaneous reinnervation, which depends upon the type and severity of recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) injury. After partial recovery, the paretic vocal fold may or may not adduct adequately to allow glottic closure, which in turn affects phonatory and swallowing outcomes. This process was studied in a series of canine laryngeal nerve injury models. Study Design Animal (canine) experiments. Methods Maximum stimulable laryngeal adductor pressure (LAP) was measured pre-treatment (baseline) and at 6 months following experimental RLN injuries (total n=59). The 9 study groups were designed to simulate a range of severities of RLN injury. Results The greatest LAP recovery, at 108% of original baseline, was seen in a 50% transection model; the least recovery was seen when the RLN underwent complete transection with repair, at 56% with precise alignment and 50% with alignment reversed. Intermediate models (partial RLN injuries) gave intermediate results. Crush models recovered 105% of LAP, while a half-transection, half-crush injury recovered 72% and cautery injuries recovered 61%. Controls (complete transection without repair) had no measurable recovery. Conclusions The injured RLN has a strong tendency to recover. Restoration of adductor strength, as determined by the LAP, was predictably related to the severity of RLN injury. The model RLN injuries studied provide a range of expected outcomes that can be used for future experiments exploring interventions that may improve post-injury adductor function. PMID:25283381

  3. Local administration of icariin contributes to peripheral nerve regeneration and functional recovery

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bo; Niu, Su-ping; Wang, Zhi-yong; Wang, Zhen-wei; Deng, Jiu-xu; Zhang, Pei-xun; Yin, Xiao-feng; Han, Na; Kou, Yu-hui; Jiang, Bao-guo

    2015-01-01

    Our previous study showed that systemic administration of the traditional Chinese medicine Epimedium extract promotes peripheral nerve regeneration. Here, we sought to explore the therapeutic effects of local administration of icariin, a major component of Epimedium extract, on peripheral nerve regeneration. A poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) biological conduit sleeve was used to bridge a 5 mm right sciatic nerve defect in rats, and physiological saline, nerve growth factor, icariin suspension, or nerve growth factor-releasing microsphere suspension was injected into the defect. Twelve weeks later, sciatic nerve conduction velocity and the number of myelinated fibers were notably greater in the rats treated with icariin suspension or nerve growth factor-releasing microspheres than those that had received nerve growth factor or physiological saline. The effects of icariin suspension were similar to those of nerve growth factor-releasing microspheres. These data suggest that icariin acts as a nerve growth factor-releasing agent, and indicate that local application of icariin after spinal injury can promote peripheral nerve regeneration. PMID:25788925

  4. Local administration of icariin contributes to peripheral nerve regeneration and functional recovery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bo; Niu, Su-Ping; Wang, Zhi-Yong; Wang, Zhen-Wei; Deng, Jiu-Xu; Zhang, Pei-Xun; Yin, Xiao-Feng; Han, Na; Kou, Yu-Hui; Jiang, Bao-Guo

    2015-01-01

    Our previous study showed that systemic administration of the traditional Chinese medicine Epimedium extract promotes peripheral nerve regeneration. Here, we sought to explore the therapeutic effects of local administration of icariin, a major component of Epimedium extract, on peripheral nerve regeneration. A poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) biological conduit sleeve was used to bridge a 5 mm right sciatic nerve defect in rats, and physiological saline, nerve growth factor, icariin suspension, or nerve growth factor-releasing microsphere suspension was injected into the defect. Twelve weeks later, sciatic nerve conduction velocity and the number of myelinated fibers were notably greater in the rats treated with icariin suspension or nerve growth factor-releasing microspheres than those that had received nerve growth factor or physiological saline. The effects of icariin suspension were similar to those of nerve growth factor-releasing microspheres. These data suggest that icariin acts as a nerve growth factor-releasing agent, and indicate that local application of icariin after spinal injury can promote peripheral nerve regeneration. PMID:25788925

  5. Vascularized Thoracodorsal to Suprascapular Nerve Transfer, a Novel Technique to Restore Shoulder Function in Partial Brachial Plexopathy

    PubMed Central

    Potter, Shirley M.; Ferris, Scott I.

    2016-01-01

    We describe the clinical outcome of a novel nerve transfer to restore active shoulder motion in upper brachial plexus injury. The thoracodorsal nerve (TDN) was successfully used as a vascularized donor nerve to neurotize to the suprascapular nerve (SSN) in a patient with limited donor nerve availability. At 4 years follow-up, he had regained useful external rotation of the injured limb, with no significant donor site morbidity. Shoulder abduction return was less impressive, however, and reasons for this are discussed. We provide a comprehensive review of the literature on this topic and a subsequent discussion on the details of this novel technique. This is the first reported case of TDN to SSN transfer, and also the first reported case of a vascularized TDN transfer in the English language literature. We advocate direct thoracodorsal to SSN transfer as a valid surgical option for the restoration of shoulder function in patients with partial brachial plexus avulsion, when conventional nerve donors are unavailable. PMID:27014699

  6. Changes in nutritional composition, functional, and sensory properties of yam flour as a result of presoaking.

    PubMed

    Obadina, Adewale Olusegun; Babatunde, Bukunola Olaide; Olotu, Ifeoluwa

    2014-11-01

    This study investigated the effect of soaking pretreatments on some of the properties of flour obtained from two varieties of yam namely;Dioscorea alata andDioscorea rotundata with a view of providing information that will enhance their end use. The yam varieties were washed, chipped, parboiled at 50C, soaked for different periods (0, 6, 12, and 18h), dried at 60C, and milled into flour. The flour samples were analyzed for their nutritional composition, pH, color, and functional properties. The flour samples were also made into pastes and were sensorially analyzed and 0h soaked samples were used as control. The protein content of 18h-soakedD. rotundata andD. alata flour samples was significantly different from the control and soaking had no effect (P>0.05) on the fat and ash content but the carbohydrate content of the flour samples ranged from 83.08% to 86.13%. The 18h-soakedD. rotundata flour sample had the lowest peak viscosity, breakdown value, and final viscosity among theD. rotundata variety samples. Pasting temperature ranged from 79.80 to 83.60C and 6-h soakedD. alata flour sample had the lowest water absorption capacity and the highest bulk density. On the basis of sensory analysis, the panelist preferred the taste, texture, color, and appearance of paste made from the 18-h soakedD. rotundata flour to the paste of other flour samples. The results of this study show that D.rotundata should be soaked for 18h prior to drying and milling in order to obtain a good-quality flour and paste. PMID:25493185

  7. Changes in nutritional composition, functional, and sensory properties of yam flour as a result of presoaking

    PubMed Central

    Obadina, Adewale Olusegun; Babatunde, Bukunola Olaide; Olotu, Ifeoluwa

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of soaking pretreatments on some of the properties of flour obtained from two varieties of yam namely;Dioscorea alata andDioscorea rotundata with a view of providing information that will enhance their end use. The yam varieties were washed, chipped, parboiled at 50°C, soaked for different periods (0, 6, 12, and 18 h), dried at 60°C, and milled into flour. The flour samples were analyzed for their nutritional composition, pH, color, and functional properties. The flour samples were also made into pastes and were sensorially analyzed and 0 h soaked samples were used as control. The protein content of 18 h-soakedD. rotundata andD. alata flour samples was significantly different from the control and soaking had no effect (P > 0.05) on the fat and ash content but the carbohydrate content of the flour samples ranged from 83.08% to 86.13%. The 18 h-soakedD. rotundata flour sample had the lowest peak viscosity, breakdown value, and final viscosity among theD. rotundata variety samples. Pasting temperature ranged from 79.80 to 83.60°C and 6-h soakedD. alata flour sample had the lowest water absorption capacity and the highest bulk density. On the basis of sensory analysis, the panelist preferred the taste, texture, color, and appearance of paste made from the 18-h soakedD. rotundata flour to the paste of other flour samples. The results of this study show that D.rotundata should be soaked for 18 h prior to drying and milling in order to obtain a good-quality flour and paste. PMID:25493185

  8. The Molecular Origins and Functional Role of Noise in a Simple Sensory Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pontius, William Vincent

    Biological pathways perform calculations with often-small numbers of constituent molecules, leading to potentially significant variability in their output. In this thesis, I use the chemotaxis pathway of the bacterium Escherichia coli as a model to investigate the molecular origins of large temporal fluctuations and their consequences for cellular behavior. The bacterial chemotaxis pathway is a simple sensory network that performs temporal comparisons of external chemical stimuli, enabling the bacterium to perform a random walk biased toward increasingly favorable conditions. In this thesis, I first analyze experimental measurements of living cells and argue that the statistics of pathway noise and the cellular response to stimuli, which both arise from the same biochemical pathway, are intrinsically linked. I then use simple quantitative models to argue that noise in the bacterial chemotaxis pathway may have significant positive consequences for the behavior of the cell: by coordinating the behavior of independent, stochastically switching flagellar motors, noise may enable the cell to respond more quickly to stimuli, track weak chemoattractant gradients more effectively, and explore sparse environments more efficiently. Finally, I construct a detailed, calibrated stochastic model of the mechanism through which the chemotaxis system adapts to persistent stimuli and identify the specific architectural features---densely clustered chemoreceptors and an enzyme localization mechanism---that give rise to large pathway fluctuations. I further argue that these features giving rise to pathway noise also underlie other well-known properties of the chemotaxis system: precise adaptation and functional robustness to expression levels of the pathway constituents. The simplicity of the bacterial chemotaxis system and the ubiquity of many of its architectural features suggest that these results will be relevant to the study of pathway noise in other sensory systems and throughout biology.

  9. The sensory structures of the antennal flagellum in Hyalesthes obsoletus (Hemiptera: Fulgoromorpha: Cixiidae): a functional reduction?

    PubMed

    Romani, Roberto; Stacconi, Marco Valerio Rossi; Riolo, Paola; Isidoro, Nunzio

    2009-11-01

    Despite their relevance as harmful pests on plants of economic importance, Hemiptera Fulgoromorpha have been poorly studied as regards their antennal sensory structures. In particular, the flagellum has been neglected and, therefore, to date there are no data on its structural organization and sensory equipment. In order to fill this gap, we carried out a study on the sensillum types and distribution on the flagellum of the planthopper Hyalesthes obsoletus Signoret, an efficient vector of the stolbur phytoplasma, the cause of various crop diseases. In this cixiid species the antenna is composed of three segments, the scape, an enlarged pedicel and a long flagellum. This latter is made of a single segment and presents a basal, bulb-like enlargement from which two processes arise, a short spur and a long arista. Combining scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and focused ion beam investigations, we discovered the presence of a total number of 6 sensilla, belonging to 4 different types: a single scolopidium extending from the bulb to the arista, three sensilla styloconica within the cuticular spur and two different sensilla coeloconica inside the bulb. As far as structural data can suggest, these sensilla might be involved in the perception of mechanical stimuli (possibly air-borne vibrations), temperature and humidity variations and CO(2) concentration. The strong reduction in sensillum number in this species is discussed as possible functional specialization of the flagellum itself. The ultrastructure of the sensilla in the flagellum of a species of Fulgoromorpha is here presented for the first time. PMID:19682602

  10. The role of sensory cortex and cortical "hubs" in category-specific executive function.

    PubMed

    James, Thomas; Arcurio, Lindsay; Nikoulina, Anastasia

    2015-09-01

    Human executive functions are sensitive to visual cues that make up the environmental context, but there are few research programs that study this influence or study the impact of changes in sensory neural signals on frontal cortical function. In this talk, I will present findings from studies of people with alcohol use disorders (AUD) that implicate the lateral occipital cortex (LOC) and its connections with the anterior insular cortex (AIC) in impulsive decisions-to-drink when exposed to visual alcohol cues. Specifically, 31 women (15 AUD) were scanned using fMRI while performing a decisions-to-drink task. In that task, they were presented with alcohol and food cues that were normed for attractiveness/desirability. They were asked to imagine themselves in a situation where deciding to drink had a high or low probability of a negative consequence and were asked to rate their likelihood of drinking (or eating) on a 4-point scale. AUD women endorsed alcohol cues more than non-AUD, but not food cues - a category-specific effect on decision making. Differences in BOLD signal between AUD women and non-AUD for alcohol vs food cues were widespread and always greater for AUD. This finding suggests that there was no single neural system (e.g., cognitive control) that accounts for the group difference in behavior. Comparing high- to low-risk scenarios highlighted differences between AUD and non-AUD in the LOC and AIC. A task-based functional connectivity analyses provided further support for the role of LOC and AIC in AUD women producing more impulsive category-specific decisions. In conclusion, widespread differences in decision-related BOLD signal between AUD and non-AUD may originate in the visual cortex (LOC) and cascade throughout the brain by way of network "hubs" such as the AIC. These results highlight the important (but underappreciated) role of sensory cortices in decision making and other executive functions. Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2015. PMID:26326143

  11. Effect of vitamin B12 on functional recovery and histopathologic changes of tibial nerve-crushed rats.

    PubMed

    Tamaddonfard, E; Farshid, A A; Samadi, F; Eghdami, K

    2014-09-01

    Recent studies have suggested a neuroprotective effect for vitamin B12. The present study investigated the effects of vitamin B12, diclofenac and celecoxib in separate and combined treatments on functional recovery of crushed tibial nerve in rats. In ketamine plus xylazin anesthetized rats, right tibial nerve was crushed using a small hemoatatic forceps. Footprints were recorded 1 day before and on days 7, 14 and 21 after induction of nerve injury. Tibial functional index (TFI) was used to evaluate the recovery of tibial nerve function. Histological changes of tibial nerve were investigated by light microscopy. The recovery of TFI values were significantly accelerated with 10 consecutive days treatments with 0.1 and 0.5?mg/kg of vitamin B12, 5?mg/kg of diclofenac and 1 and 5?mg/kg of celecoxib. The severity of Wallerian degeneration was reduced by above-mentioned doses of vitamin B12, diclofenac and celecoxib. Documented effects were observed when 0.1?mg/kg of vitamin B12 was concurrently used with 1?mg/kg of diclofenac and or 0.2?mg/kg of celecoxib. In the present study, vitamin B12, celecoxib and diclofenac (at a high dose) showed neuroprotective effects. Inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX) 1 and 2 pathways may be involved in neuroprotective effect of vitamin B12. PMID:24470311

  12. Exercise dependent increase in axon regeneration into peripheral nerve grafts by propriospinal but not sensory neurons after spinal cord injury is associated with modulation of regeneration-associated genes.

    PubMed

    Sachdeva, Rahul; Theisen, Catherine C; Ninan, Vinu; Twiss, Jeffery L; Houl, John D

    2016-02-01

    Insufficient regeneration of central nervous system (CNS) axons contributes to persisting neurological dysfunction after spinal cord injury (SCI). Peripheral nerve grafts (PNGs) support regeneration by thousands of injured intraspinal axons and help them bypass some of the extracellular barriers that form after SCI. However this number represents but a small portion of the total number of axons that are injured. Here we tested if rhythmic sensory stimulation during cycling exercise would boost the intrinsic regenerative state of neurons to enhance axon regeneration into PNGs after a lower thoracic (T12) spinal transection of adult rats. Using True Blue retrograde tracing, we show that 4weeks of cycling improves regeneration into a PNG from lumbar interneurons but not by primary sensory neurons. The majority of neurons that regenerate their axon are within 5mm of the lesion and their number increased 70% with exercise. Importantly propriospinal neurons in more distant regions (5-20mm from the lesion) that routinely exhibit very limited regeneration responded to exercise by increasing the number of regenerating neurons by 900%. There was no exercise-associated increase in regeneration from sensory neurons. Analyses using fluorescent in situ hybridization showed that this increase in regenerative response is associated with changes in levels of mRNAs encoding the regeneration associated genes (RAGs) GAP43, ?-actin and Neuritin. While propriospinal neurons showed increased mRNA levels in response to SCI alone and then to grafting and exercise, sensory neurons did not respond to SCI, but there was a response to the presence of a PNG. Thus, exercise is a non-invasive approach to modulate gene expression in injured neurons leading to an increase in regeneration. This sets the stage for future studies to test whether exercise will promote axon outgrowth beyond the PNG and reconnection with spinal cord neurons, thereby demonstrating a potential clinical application of this combined therapeutic intervention. PMID:26366525

  13. Nerve Growth Factor-Regulated Emergence of Functional Delta-Opioid Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Bie, Bihua; Zhang, Zhi; Cai, You-Qing; Zhu, Wei; Zhang, Yong; Dai, Jaile; Lowenstein, Charles J.; Weinman, Edward J.; Pan, Zhizhong Z.

    2010-01-01

    Sorting of intracellular G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) either to lysosomes for degradation or to plasma membrane for surface insertion and functional expression is a key process regulating signaling strength of GPCRs across the plasma membrane in adult mammalian cells. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms governing the dynamic process of receptor sorting to the plasma membrane for functional expression under normal and pathological conditions. In this study, we demonstrate that delta-opioid receptor (DOPr), a GPCR constitutively targeted to intracellular compartments, is driven to the surface membrane of central synaptic terminals and becomes functional by the neurotrophin nerve growth factor (NGF) in native brainstem neurons. The NGF-triggered DOPr translocation is predominantly mediated by the signaling pathway involving the tyrosine receptor kinase A, Ca++-mobilizing phospholipase C and Ca++/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II. Importantly, it requires interactions with the cytoplasmic sorting protein Na+/H+ exchange regulatory factor-1 (NHERF-1) and N-Ethyl-maleimide-sensitive factor-regulated exocytosis. In addition, this NGF-mediated mechanism is likely responsible for the emergence of functional DOPr induced by chronic opioids. Thus, NGF may function as a key molecular switch that redirects the sorting of intracellularly targeted DOPr to plasma membrane, resulting in new functional DOPr on central synapses under chronic opioid conditions. PMID:20410114

  14. ELECTROPHYSIOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT OF SENSORY AND COGNITIVE FUNCTION IN CHILDREN EXPOSED TO LEAD: A REVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    Studies of the effects of lead absorption on sensory evoked and slow brain potentials in children are reviewed. Studies of slow wave voltage in children during sensory conditioning indicated a linear relationship to blood lead level in two studies; an effect that could not be rep...

  15. BBS4 and BBS5 show functional redundancy in the BBSome to regulate the degradative sorting of ciliary sensory receptors

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qingwen; Zhang, Yuxia; Wei, Qing; Huang, Yan; Li, Yan; Ling, Kun; Hu, Jinghua

    2015-01-01

    Cilia harbor sensory receptors for various signaling cascades critical for vertebrate development. However, the mechanisms underlying the ciliary homeostasis of sensory receptors remain elusive. Here, we demonstrate that BBS-4 and BBS-5, two distinct BBSome components, show unexpected functional redundancy in the context of cilia in C. elegans. BBS-4 directly interacts with BBS-5 and the interaction can be disrupted by a conserved mutation identified in human BBS4. Surprisingly, we found that BBS-4 and BBS-5 act redundantly in the BBSome to regulate the ciliary removal, rather than the ciliary entry or retrograde IFT transport, of various sensory receptors. Further analyses indicate that co-depletion of BBS-4 and BBS-5 disrupts the lysosome-targeted degradative sorting of ciliary sensory receptors. Moreover, mammalian BBS4 and BBS5 also interact directly and coordinate the ciliary removal of polycystin 2. Hence, we reveal a novel and highly conserved role for the BBSome in fine-tuning ciliary signaling by regulating the ciliary removal of sensory receptors for lysosomal degradation. PMID:26150102

  16. Trapping of organophosphorus chemical nerve agents in water with amino acid functionalized baskets.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Yian; Dalkili, Erdin; Peterson, Paul W; Pandit, Aroh; Dastan, Arif; Brown, Jason D; Polen, Shane M; Hadad, Christopher M; Badji?, Jovica D

    2014-04-01

    We prepared eleven amino-acid functionalized baskets and used (1) H NMR spectroscopy to quantify their affinity for entrapping dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP, 118?(3) ) in aqueous phosphate buffer at pH=7.00.1; note that DMMP guest is akin in size to chemical nerve agent sarin (132?(3) ). The binding interaction (Ka ) was found to vary with the size of substituent groups at the basket's rim. In particular, the degree of branching at the first carbon of each substituent had the greatest effect on the host-guest interaction, as described with the Verloop's B1 steric parameter. The branching at the remote carbons, however, did not perturb the encapsulation, which is important for guiding the design of more effective hosts and catalysts in future. PMID:24616086

  17. Functional restoration after early tendon transfer in high radial nerve paralysis.

    PubMed

    Dabas, V; Suri, T; Surapuraju, P K; Sural, S; Dhal, A

    2011-02-01

    We assessed the effect of an early transfer of pronator teres to extensor carpi radialis brevis on hand function in patients with high radial nerve paralysis. Power grip and precision grip were measured preoperatively and postoperatively using a dynamometer. Fifteen patients were operated on, of which ten could be assessed at the end of 6 months. At 6 months after surgery, there was a median increase of 48% in power grip, 162% in tip pinch, 90% in key pinch and 98% in palmar pinch. Decreased palmar flexion was seen in four patients. Fraying of the periosteal extension and rupture of sutures at the junction site were each seen in one patient, leading to unsatisfactory results. Early tendon transfer quickly restored efficient grip while awaiting reinnervation of wrist extensors, avoiding the need for prolonged external splintage. PMID:20935022

  18. Myelinated retinal nerve fibers (MRNF) Dilemmas related to their influence on visual function

    PubMed Central

    Grzybowski, Andrzej; Winiarczyk, Iwona

    2013-01-01

    Myelinated nerve fibers (MNF) occur in less than 1% of the population, however, they might be responsible for diagnostic dilemmas in cases with visual loss. The case report of an aged pseudophakic patient with visual deterioration in the right eye and MNF in both eyes is presented. The documentation provided by the patient proved recent several examinations of both fundi, and all of them were described as normal. Physical examination revealed the posterior capsule opacification in the right eye, white lesions on the retina of the right eye around the optic disk, and in the left eye the peripheral, which could correspond to the myelinated fibers. Although visual field changes and OCTs corresponded to the NMF, it turned out, however, that visual acuity loss was in fact caused by PCO and was reversed by the YAG capsulotomy procedure. This case shows some problems related to MNF diagnosis and evaluation of their influence on visual function. PMID:25859147

  19. Myelinated retinal nerve fibers (MRNF) - Dilemmas related to their influence on visual function.

    PubMed

    Grzybowski, Andrzej; Winiarczyk, Iwona

    2015-01-01

    Myelinated nerve fibers (MNF) occur in less than 1% of the population, however, they might be responsible for diagnostic dilemmas in cases with visual loss. The case report of an aged pseudophakic patient with visual deterioration in the right eye and MNF in both eyes is presented. The documentation provided by the patient proved recent several examinations of both fundi, and all of them were described as normal. Physical examination revealed the posterior capsule opacification in the right eye, white lesions on the retina of the right eye around the optic disk, and in the left eye - the peripheral, which could correspond to the myelinated fibers. Although visual field changes and OCTs corresponded to the NMF, it turned out, however, that visual acuity loss was in fact caused by PCO and was reversed by the YAG capsulotomy procedure. This case shows some problems related to MNF diagnosis and evaluation of their influence on visual function. PMID:25859147

  20. Cortical plasticity induced by different degrees of peripheral nerve injuries: a rat functional magnetic resonance imaging study under 9.4 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Major peripheral nerve injuries not only result in local deficits but may also cause distal atrophy of target muscles or permanent loss of sensation. Likewise, these injuries have been shown to instigate long-lasting central cortical reorganization. Methods Cortical plasticity changes induced after various types of major peripheral nerve injury using an electrical stimulation technique to the rat upper extremity and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) were examined. Studies were completed out immediately after injury (acute stage) and at two weeks (subacute stage) to evaluate time affect on plasticity. Results After right-side median nerve transection, cortical representation of activation of the right-side ulnar nerve expanded intra-hemispherically into the cortical region that had been occupied by the median nerve representation After unilateral transection of both median and ulnar nerves, cortical representation of activation of the radial nerve on the same side of the body also demonstrated intra-hemispheric expansion. However, simultaneous electrical stimulation of the contralateral uninjured median and ulnar nerves resulted in a representation that had expanded both intra- and inter-hemispherically into the cortical region previously occupied by the two transected nerve representations. Conclusions After major peripheral nerve injury, an adjacent nerve, with similar function to the injured nerve, may become significantly over-activated in the cortex when stimulated. This results in intra-hemispheric cortical expansion as the only component of cortical plasticity. When all nerves responsible for a certain function are injured, the same nerves on the contralateral side of the body are affected and become significantly over-activated during a task. Both intra- and inter-hemispheric cortical expansion exist, while the latter dominates cortical plasticity. PMID:23659705

  1. High lead exposure and auditory sensory-neural function in Andean children.

    PubMed Central

    Counter, S A; Vahter, M; Laurell, G; Buchanan, L H; Ortega, F; Skerfving, S

    1997-01-01

    We investigated blood lead (B-Pb) and mercury (B-Hg) levels and auditory sensory-neural function in 62 Andean school children living in a Pb-contaminated area of Ecuador and 14 children in a neighboring gold mining area with no known Pb exposure. The median B-Pb level for 62 children in the Pb-exposed group was 52.6 micrograms/dl (range 9.9-110.0 micrograms/dl) compared with 6.4 micrograms/dl (range 3.9-12.0 micrograms/dl) for the children in the non-Pb exposed group; the differences were statistically significant (p < 0.001). Auditory thresholds for the Pb-exposed group were normal at the pure tone frequencies of 0.25-8 kHz over the entire range of B-Pb levels, Auditory brain stem response tests in seven children with high B-Pb levels showed normal absolute peak and interpeak latencies. The median B-Hg levels were 0.16 micrograms/dl (range 0.04-0.58 micrograms/dl) for children in the Pb-exposed group and 0.22 micrograms/dl (range 0.1-0.44 micrograms/dl) for children in the non-Pb exposed gold mining area, and showed no significant relationship to auditory function. Images Figure 1. Figure 3. A Figure 3. B PMID:9222138

  2. Improvement of sensorimotor functions in old age by passive sensory stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Kalisch, Tobias; Tegenthoff, Martin; Dinse, Hubert R

    2008-01-01

    Sensorimotor functions decrease in old age. The well-documented loss of tactile acuity in elderly is accompanied by deterioration of haptic performance and fine manipulative movements. Physical training and exercise can maintain sensorimotor fitness into high age. However, regular schedules of training require discipline and physical fitness. We here present an alternative interventional paradigm to enhance tactile, haptic, and fine motor performance based on passive, sensory stimulation by means of tactile coactivation. This approach is based on patterned, synchronous tactile stimulation applied to the fingertips for 3 hours. The stimulation drives plastic reorganizational changes in somatosensory cortex that affect perception and behavior: We demonstrate that following 3 hours of coactivation tactile acuity as well as haptic object exploration and fine motor performance are improved for at least 96 hours. Because this kind of intervention does not require active participation or attention of the subjects, we anticipate that coactivation is a prime candidate for future therapeutic interventions in patients with impaired sensorimotor abilities. It can be assumed that the maintenance and restoration of sensorimotor functions can ensure and preserve independence of daily living. Further optimizing of the stimulation protocol can be assumed to strengthen both the range and durability of its efficacy. PMID:19281060

  3. Molecular Evolution of the Infrared Sensory Gene TRPA1 in Snakes and Implications for Functional Studies

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ke; Zhang, Peng

    2011-01-01

    TRPA1 is a calcium ion channel protein recently identified as the infrared receptor in pit organ-containing snakes. Therefore, understanding the molecular evolution of TRPA1 may help to illuminate the origin of “heat vision” in snakes and reveal the molecular mechanism of infrared sensitivity for TRPA1. To this end, we sequenced the infrared sensory gene TRPA1 in 24 snake species, representing nine snake families and multiple non-snake outgroups. We found that TRPA1 is under strong positive selection in the pit-bearing snakes studied, but not in other non-pit snakes and non-snake vertebrates. As a comparison, TRPV1, a gene closely related to TRPA1, was found to be under strong purifying selection in all the species studied, with no difference in the strength of selection between pit-bearing snakes and non-pit snakes. This finding demonstrates that the adaptive evolution of TRPA1 specifically occurred within the pit-bearing snakes and may be related to the functional modification for detecting infrared radiation. In addition, by comparing the TRPA1 protein sequences, we identified 11 amino acid sites that were diverged in pit-bearing snakes but conserved in non-pit snakes and other vertebrates, 21 sites that were diverged only within pit-vipers but conserved in the remaining snakes. These specific amino acid substitutions may be potentially functional important for infrared sensing. PMID:22163322

  4. Sensory and motor function of teeth and dental implants: a basis for osseoperception.

    PubMed

    Trulsson, Mats

    2005-01-01

    1. When dental implants are loaded mechanically, a sensation, often referred to as osseoperception, is evoked. The sensory signals underlying this phenomenon are qualitatively different from the signals evoked when loading a natural tooth. In contrast with osseointegrated dental implants, natural teeth are equipped with periodontal mechanoreceptors that signal information about tooth loads. In the present review, the functional properties of human periodontal mechanoreceptors will be presented, along with a discussion about their likely functional role in the control of human jaw actions. 2. Microneurographic experiments reveal that human periodontal mechanoreceptors adapt slowly to maintained tooth loads. Populations of periodontal receptors encode information about both which teeth are loaded and the direction of forces applied to individual teeth. 3. Most receptors exhibit a markedly curved relationship between discharge rate and force amplitude, featuring the highest sensitivity to changes in tooth load at surprisingly low forces (below 1 N for anterior teeth and 4 N for posterior teeth). Accordingly, periodontal receptors efficiently encode tooth load when subjects first contact, hold and gently manipulate food by the teeth. In contrast, only a minority of receptors encodes the rapid and strong increase in force generated when biting through food. 4. It is concluded that humans use periodontal afferent signals to control jaw actions associated with intra-oral manipulation of food rather than exertion of jaw power actions. Consequently, patients who lack information from periodontal receptors show an impaired fine motor control of the mandible. PMID:15730446

  5. Disentangling different functional roles of evoked K-complex components: Mapping the sleeping brain while quenching sensory processing.

    PubMed

    Laurino, Marco; Menicucci, Danilo; Piarulli, Andrea; Mastorci, Francesca; Bedini, Remo; Allegrini, Paolo; Gemignani, Angelo

    2014-02-01

    During non-REM sleep the largest EEG response evoked by sensory stimulation is the K-complex (eKC), composed of an initial positive bump (P200) followed by a bistable cortical response: a giant negative deflection (N550) and a large positive one (P900), respectively reflecting down states and up states of < 1 Hz oscillations.Sensory-modality-independent topology of N550 and P900, with maximal detection rate on fronto-central areas, has been consistently reported, suggesting that sensory inputs arise to the cortex avoiding specific primary sensory areas. However, these studies neglected latencies of all KC components as a function of electrode sites.Our aim is to identify, component by component, which topological/dynamical properties of eKCs depend on stimulus modality and which are mainly related to local cortical properties. We measured temporal and morphological features of acoustic, tactile and visual eKCs to disentangle specific sensory excitatory activities from aspecific responses due to local proneness to bistability, measured by means of the N550 descending steepness (synchronization in falling into down state).While confirming the sensory-modality independence of N550 and P900 topology with maximal detection rate in fronto-central areas, four main original results emerge from this study: (i) the topology of P200 latency depends on the sensory modality with earliest waves in the stimulation-related primary sensory areas; (ii) P200 rapidly travels as a cortical excitation; (iii) P200-like excitations when KCs are not evoked are detected over the scalp with significantly smaller amplitudes in fronto-central areas, compared to eKC P200s; and (iv) N550 latency mirrors its mean local steepness which is a function of topological proneness to bistability.From these results we can describe the emergence N550/P900 complex as the interplay between a waxing P200 cortical travel and higher fronto-central proneness to bistability.In conclusion, eKCs exhibit a physiological dichotomy: P200 acts as a traveling cortical excitation whose function is to induce the bistable cortical response (N550/P900), which in turn is crucial for maintaining sleep and unconsciousness. PMID:24513527

  6. Sensory Conversion Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medelius, Pedro

    The human body has five basic sensory functions: touch, vision, hearing, taste, and smell. The effectiveness of one or more of these human sensory functions can be impaired as a result of trauma, congenital defects, or the normal ageing process. Converting one type of function into another, or translating a function to a different part of the body, could result in a better quality of life for a person with diminished sensorial capabilities.

  7. Interhemispheric Plasticity Protects the Deafferented Somatosensory Cortex from Functional Takeover After Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Koretsky, Alan P.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Functional changes across brain hemispheres have been reported after unilateral cortical or peripheral nerve injury. Interhemispheric callosal connections usually underlie this cortico-cortical plasticity. However, the effect of the altered callosal inputs on local cortical plasticity in the adult brain is not well studied. Ipsilateral functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) activation has been reliably detected in the deafferented barrel cortex (BC) at 2 weeks after unilateral infraorbital denervation (IO) in adult rats. The ipsilateral fMRI signal relies on callosal-mediated interhemispheric plasticity. This form of interhemispheric plasticity provides a good chronic model to study the interaction between callosal inputs and local cortical plasticity. The receptive field of forepaw in the primary somatosensory cortex (S1), which is adjacent to the BC, was mapped with fMRI. The S1 receptive field expanded to take over a portion of the BC in 2 weeks after both ascending inputs and callosal inputs were removed in IO rats with ablated contralateral BC (IO+ablation). This expansion, estimated specifically by fMRI mapping, is significantly larger than what has been observed in the IO rats with intact callosal connectivity, as well as in the rats with sham surgery. This work indicates that altered callosal inputs prevent the functional takeover of the deafferented BC from adjacent cortices and may help preserve the functional identity of the BC. PMID:25117691

  8. Prevention of NKCC1 phosphorylation avoids downregulation of KCC2 in central sensory pathways and reduces neuropathic pain after peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Mdol, Laura; Cobianchi, Stefano; Navarro, Xavier

    2014-08-01

    Neuropathic pain after peripheral nerve injury is characterized by loss of inhibition in both peripheral and central pain pathways. In the adult nervous system, the Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) (NKCC1) and neuron-specific K(+)-Cl(-) (KCC2) cotransporters are involved in setting the strength and polarity of GABAergic/glycinergic transmission. After nerve injury, the balance between these cotransporters changes, leading to a decrease in the inhibitory tone. However, the role that NKCC1 and KCC2 play in pain-processing brain areas is unknown. Our goal was to study the effects of peripheral nerve injury on NKCC1 and KCC2 expression in dorsal root ganglia (DRG), spinal cord, ventral posterolateral (VPL) nucleus of the thalamus, and primary somatosensory (S1) cortex. After sciatic nerve section and suture in adult rats, assessment of mechanical and thermal pain thresholds showed evidence of hyperalgesia during the following 2 months. We also found an increase in NKCC1 expression in the DRG and a downregulation of KCC2 in spinal cord after injury, accompanied by later decrease of KCC2 levels in higher projection areas (VPL and S1) from 2 weeks postinjury, correlating with neuropathic pain signs. Administration of bumetanide (30 mg/kg) during 2 weeks following sciatic nerve lesion prevented the previously observed changes in the spinothalamic tract projecting areas and the appearance of hyperalgesia. In conclusion, the present results indicate that changes in NKCC1 and KCC2 in DRG, spinal cord, and central pain areas may contribute to development of neuropathic pain. PMID:24813295

  9. Deficiency in monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1) in mice delays regeneration of peripheral nerves following sciatic nerve crush.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Brett M; Tsingalia, Akivaga; Vidensky, Svetlana; Lee, Youngjin; Jin, Lin; Farah, Mohamed H; Lengacher, Sylvain; Magistretti, Pierre J; Pellerin, Luc; Rothstein, Jeffrey D

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral nerve regeneration following injury occurs spontaneously, but many of the processes require metabolic energy. The mechanism of energy supply to axons has not previously been determined. In the central nervous system, monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1), expressed in oligodendroglia, is critical for supplying lactate or other energy metabolites to axons. In the current study, MCT1 is shown to localize within the peripheral nervous system to perineurial cells, dorsal root ganglion neurons, and Schwann cells by MCT1 immunofluorescence in wild-type mice and tdTomato fluorescence in MCT1 BAC reporter mice. To investigate whether MCT1 is necessary for peripheral nerve regeneration, sciatic nerves of MCT1 heterozygous null mice are crushed and peripheral nerve regeneration was quantified electrophysiologically and anatomically. Compound muscle action potential (CMAP) recovery is delayed from a median of 21 days in wild-type mice to greater than 38 days in MCT1 heterozygote null mice. In fact, half of the MCT1 heterozygote null mice have no recovery of CMAP at 42 days, while all of the wild-type mice recovered. In addition, muscle fibers remain 40% more atrophic and neuromuscular junctions 40% more denervated at 42 days post-crush in the MCT1 heterozygote null mice than wild-type mice. The delay in nerve regeneration is not only in motor axons, as the number of regenerated axons in the sural sensory nerve of MCT1 heterozygote null mice at 4 weeks and tibial mixed sensory and motor nerve at 3 weeks is also significantly reduced compared to wild-type mice. This delay in regeneration may be partly due to failed Schwann cell function, as there is reduced early phagocytosis of myelin debris and remyelination of axon segments. These data for the first time demonstrate that MCT1 is critical for regeneration of both sensory and motor axons in mice following sciatic nerve crush. PMID:25447940

  10. Short‑term vagal nerve stimulation improves left ventricular function following chronic heart failure in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Xuan, Yan-Hua; Liu, Shuang-Shuang; Dong, Jing; Luo, Jia-Ying; Sun, Zhi-Jun

    2015-08-01

    Increasing numbers of animal and clinical investigations have demonstrated the effectiveness of long-term electrical vagal nerve stimulation (VNS) on chronic heart failure (CHF). The present study investigated the effects of short-term VNS on the hemodynamics of cardiac remodeling and cardiac excitation-contraction coupling (ECP) in an animal model of CHF following a large myocardial infarction. At 3 weeks subsequent to ligation of the left coronary artery, the surviving rats were randomized into vagal and sham-stimulated groups. The right vagal nerve of the CHF rats was stimulated for 72 h. The vagal nerve was stimulated with rectangular pulses of 40 ms duration at 1 Hz, 5 V. The treated rats, compared with the untreated rats, had significantly higher left ventricular ejection fraction (54.86 ± 9.73, vs. 45.60 ± 5.51%; P=0.025) and left ventricular fractional shortening (25.31 ± 6.30, vs. 15.42 ± 8.49%; P=0.013), and lower levels of brain natriuretic peptide (10.07 ± 2.63, vs. 19.95 ± 5.22 ng/ml; P=0.001). The improvement in cardiac pumping function was accompanied by a decrease in left ventricular end diastolic volume (1.11 ± 0.50, vs. 1.54 ± 0.57 cm(3); P=0.032) and left ventricular end systolic volume (0.50 ± 0.28, vs. 0.87 ± 0.36 cm(3); P=0.007). Furthermore, the expression levels of ryanodine receptor type 2 (RyR2) and sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium adenosine triphosphatase (SERCA2) were significantly higher in the treated rats compared with the untreated rats (P=0.011 and P=0.001 for RyR2 and SERCA2, respectively). Therefore, VNS was beneficial to the CHF rats through the prevention of cardiac remodeling and improvement of cardiac ECP. PMID:25873055

  11. Chondroitinase ABC reduces time to muscle reinnervation and improves functional recovery after sciatic nerve transection in rats

    PubMed Central

    To, Bao Ngoc; Rose, Samuel; Nicolini, Jennifer; English, Arthur W.

    2012-01-01

    Application of chondroitinase ABC (ChABC) to injured peripheral nerves improves axon regeneration, but it is not known whether functional recovery is also improved. Recordings of EMG activity [soleus (Sol) M response and H reflexes] evoked by nerve stimulation and of Sol and tibialis anterior (TA) EMG activity and hindlimb and foot kinematics during slope walking were made to determine whether ChABC treatment of the sciatic nerve at the time of transection improves functional recovery. Recovery of evoked EMG responses began as multiple small responses with a wide range of latencies that eventually coalesced into one or two more distinctive and consistent responses (the putative M response and the putative H reflex) in both groups. Both the initial evoked responses and the time course of their maturation returned sooner in the ChABC group than in the untreated (UT) group. The reinnervated Sol and TA were coactivated during treadmill locomotion during downslope, level, and upslope walking throughout the study period in both UT and ChABC-treated rats. By 10 wk after nerve transection and repair, locomotor activity in Sol, but not TA, had returned to its pretransection pattern. There was an increased reliance on central control of Sol activation across slopes for both groups as interpreted from elevated prestance Sol EMG activity that was no longer modulated with slope. Limb length and orientation during locomotion were similar to those observed prior to nerve injury during upslope walking only in the ChABC-treated rats. Thus treatment of cut nerves with ChABC leads to improvements in functional recovery. PMID:22049333

  12. Channels Active in the Excitability of Nerves and Skeletal Muscles across the Neuromuscular Junction: Basic Function and Pathophysiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Barbara E.

    2008-01-01

    Ion channels are essential for the basic physiological function of excitable cells such as nerve, skeletal, cardiac, and smooth muscle cells. Mutations in genes that encode ion channels have been identified to cause various diseases and disorders known as channelopathies. An understanding of how individual ion channels are involved in the

  13. Restoration of shoulder function and elbow flexion by nerve transfer for poliomyelitis-like paralysis caused by enterovirus 71 infection.

    PubMed

    Funahashi, S; Nagano, A; Sano, M; Ogihara, H; Omura, T

    2007-02-01

    We report the case of an eight-month-old girl who presented with a poliomyelitis-like paralysis in her left upper limb caused by enterovirus 71 infection. She recovered useful function after nerve transfers performed six months after the onset of paralysis. Early neurotisation can be used successfully in the treatment of poliomyelitis-like paralysis in children. PMID:17322446

  14. Channels Active in the Excitability of Nerves and Skeletal Muscles across the Neuromuscular Junction: Basic Function and Pathophysiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Barbara E.

    2008-01-01

    Ion channels are essential for the basic physiological function of excitable cells such as nerve, skeletal, cardiac, and smooth muscle cells. Mutations in genes that encode ion channels have been identified to cause various diseases and disorders known as channelopathies. An understanding of how individual ion channels are involved in the…

  15. Signals and noise in the octavolateralis systems: what is the impact of human activities on fish sensory function?

    PubMed

    Braun, Christopher B

    2015-01-01

    The octavolateralis systems of fishes include the vestibular, auditory, lateral line and electrosensory systems. They are united by common developmental and neuro-computational features, including hair cell sensors and computations based on cross-neuron analyses of differential hair cell stimulation patterns. These systems also all use both spectral and temporal filters to separate signals from each other and from noise, and the distributed senses (lateral line and electroreception) add spatial filters as well. Like all sensory systems, these sensors must provide the animal with guidance for adaptive behavior within a sensory scene composed of multiple stimuli and varying levels of ambient noise, including that created by human activities. In the extreme, anthropogenic activities impact the octavolateralis systems by destroying or degrading the habitats that provide ecological resources and sensory inputs. At slightly lesser levels of effect, anthropogenic pollutants can be damaging to fish tissues, with sensory organs often the most vulnerable. The exposed sensory cells of the lateral line and electrosensory systems are especially sensitive to aquatic pollution. At still lesser levels of impact, anthropogenic activities can act as both acute and chronic stressors, activating hormonal changes that may affect behavioral and sensory function. Finally, human activities are now a nearly ubiquitous presence in aquatic habitats, often with no obvious effects on the animals exposed to them. Ship noise, indigenous and industrial fishing techniques, and all the ancillary noises of human civilization form a major part of the soundscape of fishes. How fish use these new sources of information about their habitat is a new and burgeoning field of study. PMID:24920543

  16. Function-Triggering Antibodies to the Adhesion Molecule L1 Enhance Recovery after Injury of the Adult Mouse Femoral Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Guseva, Daria; Loers, Gabriele; Schachner, Melitta

    2014-01-01

    L1 is among the few adhesion molecules that favors repair after trauma in the adult central nervous system of vertebrates by promoting neuritogenesis and neuronal survival, among other beneficial features. In the peripheral nervous system, L1 is up-regulated in Schwann cells and regrowing axons after nerve damage, but the functional consequences of this expression remain unclear. Our previous study of L1-deficient mice in a femoral nerve injury model showed an unexpected improved functional recovery, attenuated motoneuronal cell death, and enhanced Schwann cell proliferation, being attributed to the persistent synthesis of neurotrophic factors. On the other hand, transgenic mice over-expressing L1 in neurons led to improved remyelination, but not improved functional recovery. The present study was undertaken to investigate whether the monoclonal L1 antibody 557 that triggers beneficial L1 functions in vitro would trigger these also in femoral nerve repair. We analyzed femoral nerve regeneration in C57BL/6J mice that received this antibody in a hydrogel filled conduit connecting the cut and sutured nerve before its bifurcation, leading to short-term release of antibody by diffusion. Video-based quantitative analysis of motor functions showed improved recovery when compared to mice treated with conduits containing PBS in the hydrogel scaffold, as a vehicle control. This improved recovery was associated with attenuated motoneuron loss, remyelination and improved precision of preferential motor reinnervation. We suggest that function-triggering L1 antibodies applied to the lesion site at the time of injury over a limited time period will not only be beneficial in peripheral, but also central nervous system regeneration. PMID:25393007

  17. Functional Expression of Electron Transport Chain and FoF1-ATP Synthase in Optic Nerve Myelin Sheath.

    PubMed

    Bartolucci, Martina; Ravera, Silvia; Garbarino, Greta; Ramoino, Paola; Ferrando, Sara; Calzia, Daniela; Candiani, Simona; Morelli, Alessandro; Panfoli, Isabella

    2015-11-01

    Our previous studies reported evidence for aerobic ATP synthesis by myelin from both bovine brainstem and rat sciatic nerve. Considering that the optic nerve displays a high oxygen demand, here we evaluated the expression and activity of the five Respiratory Complexes in myelin purified from either bovine or murine optic nerves. Western blot analyses on isolated myelin confirmed the expression of ND4L (subunit of Complex I), COX IV (subunit of Complex IV) and ? subunit of F1Fo-ATP synthase. Moreover, spectrophotometric and in-gel activity assays on isolated myelin, as well as histochemical activity assays on both bovine and murine transversal optic nerve sections showed that the respiratory Complexes are functional in myelin and are organized in a supercomplex. Expression of oxidative phosphorylation proteins was also evaluated on bovine optic nerve sections by confocal and transmission electron microscopy. Having excluded a mitochondrial contamination of isolated myelin and considering the results form in situ analyses, it is proposed that the oxidative phosphorylation machinery is truly resident in optic myelin sheath. Data may shed a new light on the unknown trophic role of myelin sheath. It may be energy supplier for the axon, explaining why in demyelinating diseases and neuropathies, myelin sheath loss is associated with axonal degeneration. PMID:26334391

  18. Senescent Cells Impair Erectile Function through Induction of Endothelial Dysfunction and Nerve Injury in Mice.

    PubMed

    Nishimatsu, Hiroaki; Suzuki, Etsu; Saito, Yasuho; Niimi, Aya; Nomiya, Akira; Fukuhara, Hiroshi; Kume, Haruki; Homma, Yukio

    2015-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a major health problem, particularly in the elderly population, which is rapidly increasing. It is necessary to elucidate the mechanism by which ED occurs in the elderly. Cellular senescence is commonly detected in old tissues, and it is well known that senescent cells not only withdraw from the cell cycle but also remain viable and actively produce a variety of cytokines. We examined the effect of senescent cells on erectile function after injection of senescent cells into the penises of mice. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were infected with an adenovirus expressing a constitutively active mutant of Ras to induce senescence, and were injected into the penises of nude mice. These senescent cells expressed proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1? (IL-1?). Injection of senescent cells impaired erectile function, as assessed by the measurement of intracavernous pressure. Although the structure of the cavernous body did not remarkably change, expression of the catalytically active form of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and that of total neural nitric oxide synthase significantly decreased after injection. The penises injected with the senescent cells expressed human IL-1? and subsequently endogenous proinflammatory cytokines such as mouse IL-1? and tumor necrosis factor-?. These results suggested that senescent cells impaired erectile function through induction of endothelial dysfunction and nerve injury. These effects may be mediated by proinflammatory cytokines produced by senescent cells. PMID:25894557

  19. Senescent Cells Impair Erectile Function through Induction of Endothelial Dysfunction and Nerve Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Yasuho; Niimi, Aya; Nomiya, Akira; Fukuhara, Hiroshi; Kume, Haruki; Homma, Yukio

    2015-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a major health problem, particularly in the elderly population, which is rapidly increasing. It is necessary to elucidate the mechanism by which ED occurs in the elderly. Cellular senescence is commonly detected in old tissues, and it is well known that senescent cells not only withdraw from the cell cycle but also remain viable and actively produce a variety of cytokines. We examined the effect of senescent cells on erectile function after injection of senescent cells into the penises of mice. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were infected with an adenovirus expressing a constitutively active mutant of Ras to induce senescence, and were injected into the penises of nude mice. These senescent cells expressed proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1? (IL-1?). Injection of senescent cells impaired erectile function, as assessed by the measurement of intracavernous pressure. Although the structure of the cavernous body did not remarkably change, expression of the catalytically active form of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and that of total neural nitric oxide synthase significantly decreased after injection. The penises injected with the senescent cells expressed human IL-1? and subsequently endogenous proinflammatory cytokines such as mouse IL-1? and tumor necrosis factor-?. These results suggested that senescent cells impaired erectile function through induction of endothelial dysfunction and nerve injury. These effects may be mediated by proinflammatory cytokines produced by senescent cells. PMID:25894557

  20. Central-peripheral neural network interactions evoked by vagus nerve stimulation: functional consequences on control of cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Ardell, Jeffrey L; Rajendran, Pradeep S; Nier, Heath A; KenKnight, Bruce H; Armour, J Andrew

    2015-11-15

    Using vagus nerve stimulation (VNS), we sought to determine the contribution of vagal afferents to efferent control of cardiac function. In anesthetized dogs, the right and left cervical vagosympathetic trunks were stimulated in the intact state, following ipsilateral or contralateral vagus nerve transection (VNTx), and then following bilateral VNTx. Stimulations were performed at currents from 0.25 to 4.0 mA, frequencies from 2 to 30 Hz, and a 500-?s pulse width. Right or left VNS evoked significantly greater current- and frequency-dependent suppression of chronotropic, inotropic, and lusitropic function subsequent to sequential VNTx. Bradycardia threshold was defined as the current first required for a 5% decrease in heart rate. The threshold for the right vs. left vagus-induced bradycardia in the intact state (2.91 0.18 and 3.47 0.20 mA, respectively) decreased significantly with right VNTx (1.69 0.17 mA for right and 3.04 0.27 mA for left) and decreased further following bilateral VNTx (1.29 0.16 mA for right and 1.74 0.19 mA for left). Similar effects were observed following left VNTx. The thresholds for afferent-mediated effects on cardiac parameters were 0.62 0.04 and 0.65 0.06 mA with right and left VNS, respectively, and were reflected primarily as augmentation. Afferent-mediated tachycardias were maintained following ?-blockade but were eliminated by VNTx. The increased effectiveness and decrease in bradycardia threshold with sequential VNTx suggest that 1) vagal afferents inhibit centrally mediated parasympathetic efferent outflow and 2) the ipsilateral and contralateral vagi exert a substantial buffering capacity. The intact threshold reflects the interaction between multiple levels of the cardiac neural hierarchy. PMID:26371171

  1. Effects of Polysialic Acid on Sensory Innervation of the Cornea

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Xiuli; Zhang, Yuntao; Schwend, Tyler; Conrad, Gary W.

    2014-01-01

    Sensory trigeminal growth cones innervate the cornea in a coordinated fashion during embryonic development. Polysialic acid (polySia) is known for its important roles during nerve development and regeneration. The purpose of this work is to determine whether polySia, present in developing eyefronts and on the surface of sensory nerves, may provide guidance cues to nerves during corneal innervation. Expression and localization of polySia in embryonic day (E)5-14 chick eyefronts and E9 trigeminal ganglia were identified using Western blotting and immunostaining. Effects of polySia removal on trigeminal nerve growth behavior were determined in vivo, using exogenous endoneuraminidase (endoN) treatments to remove polySia substrates during chick cornea development, and in vitro, using neuronal explant cultures. PolySia substrates, made by the physical adsorption of colominic acid to a surface coated with poly-D-lysine (PDL), were used as a model to investigate functions of the polySia expressed in axonal environments. PolySia was localized within developing eyefronts and on trigeminal sensory nerves. Distributions of PolySia in corneas and pericorneal regions are developmentally regulated. PolySia removal caused defasciculation of the limbal nerve trunk in vivo from E7 to E10. Removal of polySia on trigeminal neurites inhibited neurite outgrowth and caused axon defasciculation, but did not affect Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule (NCAM) expression or Schwann cell migration in vitro. PolySia substrates in vitro inhibited outgrowth of trigeminal neurites and promoted their fasciculation. In conclusion, polySia is localized on corneal nerves and in their targeting environment during early developing stages of chick embryos. PolySias promote fasciculation of trigeminal axons in vivo and in vitro, whereas, in contrast, their removal promotes defasciculation. PMID:25478909

  2. Morphological studies of the vestibular nerve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergstroem, B.

    1973-01-01

    The anatomy of the intratemporal part of the vestibular nerve in man, and the possible age related degenerative changes in the nerve were studied. The form and structure of the vestibular ganglion was studied with the light microscope. A numerical analysis of the vestibular nerve, and caliber spectra of the myelinated fibers in the vestibular nerve branches were studied in individuals of varying ages. It was found that the peripheral endings of the vestibular nerve form a complicated pattern inside the vestibular sensory epithelia. A detailed description of the sensory cells and their surface organelles is included.

  3. Engineering Peripheral Nerve Repair

    PubMed Central

    Marquardt, Laura; Sakiyama-Elbert, Shelly E.

    2013-01-01

    Current approaches for treating peripheral nerve injury have resulted in promising, yet insufficient functional recovery compared to the clinical standard of care, autologous nerve grafts. In order to design a construct that can match the regenerative potential of the autograft, all facets of nerve tissue must be incorporated in a combinatorial therapy. Engineered biomaterial scaffolds in the future will have to promote enhanced regeneration and appropriate reinnervation by targeting the highly sensitive response of regenerating nerves to their surrounding microenvironment. PMID:23790730

  4. Relating Retinal Ganglion Cell Function and Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer (RNFL) Retardance to Progressive Loss of RNFL Thickness and Optic Nerve Axons in Experimental Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Fortune, Brad; Cull, Grant; Reynaud, Juan; Wang, Lin; Burgoyne, Claude F.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To relate changes in retinal function and retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) retardance to loss of RNFL thickness and optic nerve axon counts in a nonhuman primate (NHP) model of experimental glaucoma (EG). Methods. Bilateral longitudinal measurements of peripapillary RNFL thickness (spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, SDOCT; Spectralis), retardance (GDxVCC), and multifocal electroretinography (mfERG; VERIS) were performed in 39 NHP at baseline (BL; median, 5 recordings; range, 310) and weekly after induction of unilateral EG by laser photocoagulation of the trabecular meshwork. Multifocal ERG responses were high-pass filtered (>75 Hz)