Science.gov

Sample records for sensory nerve function

  1. Sensory nerve function and auto-mutilation after reconstruction of various gap lengths with nerve guides and autologous nerve grafts.

    PubMed

    den Dunnen, W F; Meek, M F

    2001-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate sensory nerve recovery and auto-mutilation after reconstruction of various lengths of nerve gaps in the sciatic nerve of the rat, using different techniques. Group 4, in which the longest nerve gap (15 mm) was reconstructed with a thin-walled p(DL-lactide-gamma-caprolactone) nerve guide filled with modified denatured muscle tissue, showed the best results in the electro-stimulation tests and signs of severe auto-mutilation were not observed. Even in the control group, in which a 10 mm nerve gap was left open, in two of the five rats improvement of the sensory nerve function was observed, which was caused by re-innervation of the sciatic nerve and not by expansion of the neighboring saphenous nerve. It is hypothesized that a better quality of nerve reconstruction/guidance channel/support results in faster regeneration and hence re-innervation, thereby, preventing auto-mutilation. A thin red glabrous skin, anhydrosis (dryness of the skin), short nails and edema were interpreted as signs of autonomic dysfunction. PMID:11352096

  2. Transient Alterations of Cutaneous Sensory Nerve Function by Noninvasive Cryolipolysis.

    PubMed

    Garibyan, Lilit; Cornelissen, Laura; Sipprell, William; Pruessner, Joachim; Elmariah, Sarina; Luo, Tuan; Lerner, Ethan A; Jung, Yookyung; Evans, Conor; Zurakowski, David; Berde, Charles B; Rox Anderson, R

    2015-11-01

    Cryolipolysis is a noninvasive, skin cooling treatment for local fat reduction that causes prolonged hypoesthesia over the treated area. We tested the hypothesis that cryolipolysis can attenuate nociception of a range of sensory stimuli, including stimuli that evoke itch. The effects of cryolipolysis on sensory phenomena were evaluated by quantitative sensory testing (QST) in 11 healthy subjects over a period of 56 days. Mechanical and thermal pain thresholds were measured on treated and contralateral untreated (control) flanks. Itch duration was evaluated following histamine iontophoresis. Unmyelinated epidermal nerve fiber and myelinated dermal nerve fiber densities were quantified in skin biopsies from six subjects. Cryolipolysis produced a marked decrease in mechanical and thermal pain sensitivity. Hyposensitivity started between two to seven days after cryolipolysis and persisted for at least thirty-five days post treatment. Skin biopsies revealed that cryolipolysis decreased epidermal nerve fiber density, as well as dermal myelinated nerve fiber density, which persisted throughout the study. In conclusion, cryolipolysis causes significant and prolonged decreases in cutaneous sensitivity. Our data suggest that controlled skin cooling to specifically target cutaneous nerve fibers has the potential to be useful for prolonged relief of cutaneous pain and might have a use as a research tool to isolate and study cutaneous itch-sensing nerves in human skin. PMID:26099028

  3. The relationship of nerve fibre pathology to sensory function in entrapment neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Annina B; Bland, Jeremy D P; Bhat, Manzoor A; Bennett, David L H

    2014-12-01

    Surprisingly little is known about the impact of entrapment neuropathy on target innervation and the relationship of nerve fibre pathology to sensory symptoms and signs. Carpal tunnel syndrome is the most common entrapment neuropathy; the aim of this study was to investigate its effect on the morphology of small unmyelinated as well as myelinated sensory axons and relate such changes to somatosensory function and clinical symptoms. Thirty patients with a clinical and electrophysiological diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome [17 females, mean age (standard deviation) 56.4 (15.3)] and 26 age and gender matched healthy volunteers [18 females, mean age (standard deviation) 51.0 (17.3)] participated in the study. Small and large fibre function was examined with quantitative sensory testing in the median nerve territory of the hand. Vibration and mechanical detection thresholds were significantly elevated in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (P<0.007) confirming large fibre dysfunction and patients also presented with increased thermal detection thresholds (P<0.0001) indicative of C and Aδ-fibre dysfunction. Mechanical and thermal pain thresholds were comparable between groups (P>0.13). A skin biopsy was taken from a median nerve innervated area of the proximal phalanx of the index finger. Immunohistochemical staining for protein gene product 9.5 and myelin basic protein was used to evaluate morphological features of unmyelinated and myelinated axons. Evaluation of intraepidermal nerve fibre density showed a striking loss in patients (P<0.0001) confirming a significant compromise of small fibres. The extent of Meissner corpuscles and dermal nerve bundles were comparable between groups (P>0.07). However, patients displayed a significant increase in the percentage of elongated nodes (P<0.0001), with altered architecture of voltage-gated sodium channel distribution. Whereas neither neurophysiology nor quantitative sensory testing correlated with patients' symptoms or

  4. The functions of TRPA1 and TRPV1: moving away from sensory nerves

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, ES; Fernandes, MA; Keeble, JE

    2012-01-01

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 and ankyrin 1 (TRPV1 and TRPA1, respectively) channels are members of the TRP superfamily of structurally related, non-selective cation channels. It is rapidly becoming clear that the functions of TRPV1 and TRPA1 interlink with each other to a considerable extent. This is especially clear in relation to pain and neurogenic inflammation where TRPV1 is coexpressed on the vast majority of TRPA1-expressing sensory nerves and both integrate a variety of noxious stimuli. The more recent discovery that both TRPV1 and TRPA1 are expressed on a multitude of non-neuronal sites has led to a plethora of research into possible functions of these receptors. Non-neuronal cells on which TRPV1 and TRPA1 are expressed vary from vascular smooth muscle to keratinocytes and endothelium. This review will discuss the expression, functionality and roles of these non-neuronal TRP channels away from sensory nerves to demonstrate the diverse nature of TRPV1 and TRPA1 in addition to a direct role in pain and neurogenic inflammation. PMID:22233379

  5. TRPM8 function and expression in vagal sensory neurons and afferent nerves innervating guinea pig esophagus.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaoyun; Hu, Youtian; Ru, Fei; Kollarik, Marian; Undem, Bradley J; Yu, Shaoyong

    2015-03-15

    Sensory transduction in esophageal afferents requires specific ion channels and receptors. TRPM8 is a new member of the transient receptor potential (TRP) channel family and participates in cold- and menthol-induced sensory transduction, but its role in visceral sensory transduction is still less clear. This study aims to determine TRPM8 function and expression in esophageal vagal afferent subtypes. TRPM8 agonist WS-12-induced responses were first determined in nodose and jugular neurons by calcium imaging and then investigated by whole cell patch-clamp recordings in Dil-labeled esophageal nodose and jugular neurons. Extracellular single-unit recordings were performed in nodose and jugular C fiber neurons using ex vivo esophageal-vagal preparations with intact nerve endings in the esophagus. TRPM8 mRNA expression was determined by single neuron RT-PCR in Dil-labeled esophageal nodose and jugular neurons. The TRPM8 agonist WS-12 elicited calcium influx in a subpopulation of jugular but not nodose neurons. WS-12 activated outwardly rectifying currents in esophageal Dil-labeled jugular but not nodose neurons in a dose-dependent manner, which could be inhibited by the TRPM8 inhibitor AMTB. WS-12 selectively evoked action potential discharges in esophageal jugular but not nodose C fibers. Consistently, TRPM8 transcripts were highly expressed in esophageal Dil-labeled TRPV1-positive jugular neurons. In summary, the present study demonstrated a preferential expression and function of TRPM8 in esophageal vagal jugular but not nodose neurons and C fiber subtypes. This provides a distinctive role of TRPM8 in esophageal sensory transduction and may lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms of esophageal sensation and nociception. PMID:25591866

  6. Restoration of sensory and motor function in earthworm escape reflex pathways following ventral nerve cord transplantation.

    PubMed

    Vining, E P; Drewes, C D

    1985-07-01

    Twelve segments of earthworm ventral nerve cord (VNC) were excised from either segments 10-22 (i.e., within the MGF sensory field) or segments 75-87 (i.e., within the LGF sensory field) in donor worms and heterotopically, or homotopically, transplanted into recipient animals. Morphological evidence indicated that by four days after transplantation, peripheral connections were formed between the transplanted VNC and the body wall of the recipient, many of these connections involving novel pathways projecting ventrally from the transplant. Restoration of giant fiber touch sensitivity in the transplant occurred from 4-14 days after transplantation. Regardless of the site of transplantation, the restored sensitivity (i.e., MGF versus LGF sensory field) always reflected the origin of the donor VNC. Restoration of MGF-mediated motor activity in the transplant occurred approximately 17-22 days after transplantation. In the case of heterotopic transplants (i.e., anterior VNC into posterior segments), the restored MGF-mediated muscle potentials were facilitating, indicating at least some tendency for persistence of this feature after transplantation. Behavioral observations suggested that reconnections involving other reflex pathways (e.g., those controlling setal movements and peristaltic locomotion) were made within the transplant region and that properties of the restored reflexes reflected those of the donor VNC. The rapid restoration of sensory and motor connections, despite heterotopic placement, indicates a significant capacity for peripheral regeneration by the transplanted VNC. On the other hand, the maintenance of various properties of reflex function, despite heterotopic transplantation, suggests a limited capacity for rearrangement of established central connections in the transplanted VNC. PMID:4031850

  7. Roles of Sensory Nerves in the Regulation of Radiation-Induced Structural and Functional Changes in the Heart

    SciTech Connect

    Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Tripathi, Preeti; Sharma, Sunil; Moros, Eduardo G.; Zheng, Junying; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Boerma, Marjan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD) is a chronic severe side effect of radiation therapy of intrathoracic and chest wall tumors. The heart contains a dense network of sensory neurons that not only are involved in monitoring of cardiac events such as ischemia and reperfusion but also play a role in cardiac tissue homeostasis, preconditioning, and repair. The purpose of this study was to examine the role of sensory nerves in RIHD. Methods and Materials: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were administered capsaicin to permanently ablate sensory nerves, 2 weeks before local image-guided heart x-ray irradiation with a single dose of 21 Gy. During the 6 months of follow-up, heart function was assessed with high-resolution echocardiography. At 6 months after irradiation, cardiac structural and molecular changes were examined with histology, immunohistochemistry, and Western blot analysis. Results: Capsaicin pretreatment blunted the effects of radiation on myocardial fibrosis and mast cell infiltration and activity. By contrast, capsaicin pretreatment caused a small but significant reduction in cardiac output 6 months after irradiation. Capsaicin did not alter the effects of radiation on cardiac macrophage number or indicators of autophagy and apoptosis. Conclusions: These results suggest that sensory nerves, although they play a predominantly protective role in radiation-induced cardiac function changes, may eventually enhance radiation-induced myocardial fibrosis and mast cell activity.

  8. Pharmacologic rescue of motor and sensory function by the neuroprotective compound P7C3 following neonatal nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Kemp, S W P; Szynkaruk, M; Stanoulis, K N; Wood, M D; Liu, E H; Willand, M P; Morlock, L; Naidoo, J; Williams, N S; Ready, J M; Mangano, T J; Beggs, S; Salter, M W; Gordon, T; Pieper, A A; Borschel, G H

    2015-01-22

    Nerve injuries cause pain, paralysis and numbness that can lead to major disability, and newborns often sustain nerve injuries during delivery that result in lifelong impairment. Without a pharmacologic agent to enhance functional recovery from these injuries, clinicians rely solely on surgery and rehabilitation to treat patients. Unfortunately, patient outcomes remain poor despite application of the most advanced microsurgical and rehabilitative techniques. We hypothesized that the detrimental effects of traumatic neonatal nerve injury could be mitigated with pharmacologic neuroprotection, and tested whether the novel neuroprotective agent P7C3 would block peripheral neuron cell death and enhance functional recovery in a rat neonatal nerve injury model. Administration of P7C3 after sciatic nerve crush injury doubled motor and sensory neuron survival, and also promoted axon regeneration in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment with P7C3 also enhanced behavioral and muscle functional recovery, and reversed pathological mobilization of spinal microglia after injury. Our findings suggest that the P7C3 family of neuroprotective compounds may provide a basis for the development of a new neuroprotective drug to enhance recovery following peripheral nerve injury. PMID:25313000

  9. Capsaicin-sensitive sensory nerves exert complex regulatory functions in the serum-transfer mouse model of autoimmune arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Borbély, Éva; Botz, Bálint; Bölcskei, Kata; Kenyér, Tibor; Kereskai, László; Kiss, Tamás; Szolcsányi, János; Pintér, Erika; Csepregi, Janka Zsófia; Mócsai, Attila; Helyes, Zsuzsanna

    2015-01-01

    Objective The K/BxN serum-transfer arthritis is a widely-used translational mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis, in which the immunological components have thoroughly been investigated. In contrast, little is known about the role of sensory neural factors and the complexity of neuro–immune interactions. Therefore, we analyzed the involvement of capsaicin-sensitive peptidergic sensory nerves in autoantibody-induced arthritis with integrative methodology. Methods Arthritogenic K/BxN or control serum was injected to non-pretreated mice or resiniferatoxin (RTX)-pretreated animals where capsaicin-sensitive nerves were inactivated. Edema, touch sensitivity, noxious heat threshold, joint function, body weight and clinical arthritis severity scores were determined repeatedly throughout two weeks. Micro-CT and in vivo optical imaging to determine matrix-metalloproteinase (MMP) and neutrophil-derived myeloperoxidase (MPO) activities, semiquantitative histopathological scoring and radioimmunoassay to measure somatostatin in the joint homogenates were also performed. Results In RTX-pretreated mice, the autoantibody-induced joint swelling, arthritis severity score, MMP and MPO activities, as well as histopathological alterations were significantly greater compared to non-pretreated animals. Self-control quantification of the bone mass revealed decreased values in intact female mice, but significantly greater arthritis-induced pathological bone formation after RTX-pretreatment. In contrast, mechanical hyperalgesia from day 10 was smaller after inactivating capsaicin-sensitive afferents. Although thermal hyperalgesia did not develop, noxious heat threshold was significantly higher following RTX pretreatment. Somatostatin-like immunoreactivity elevated in the tibiotarsal joints in non-pretreated, which was significantly less in RTX-pretreated mice. Conclusions Although capsaicin-sensitive sensory nerves mediate mechanical hyperalgesia in the later phase of autoantibody

  10. Effects of short-term training on sensory and motor function in severed nerves of long-term human amputees.

    PubMed

    Dhillon, G S; Krüger, T B; Sandhu, J S; Horch, K W

    2005-05-01

    Much has been studied and written about plastic changes in the CNS of humans triggered by events such as limb amputation. However, little is known about the extent to which the original pathways retain residual function after peripheral amputation. Our earlier, acute study on long-term amputees indicated that central pathways associated with amputated peripheral nerves retain at least some sensory and motor function. The purpose of the present study was to determine if these functional connections would be strengthened or improved with experience and training over several days time. To do this, electrodes were implanted within fascicles of severed nerves of long-term human amputees to evaluate the changes in electrically evoked sensations and volitional motor neuron activity associated with attempted phantom limb movements. Nerve stimulation consistently resulted in discrete, unitary, graded sensations of touch/pressure and joint-position sense. There was no significant change in the values of stimulation parameters required to produce these sensations over time. Similarly, while the amputees were able to improve volitional control of motor neuron activity, the rate and pattern of change was similar to that seen with practice in normal individuals on motor tasks. We conclude that the central plasticity seen after amputation is most likely primarily due to unmasking, rather than replacement, of existing synaptic connections. These results also have implications for neural control of prosthetic limbs. PMID:15846000

  11. Differential motor and sensory functional recovery in male but not female adult rats is associated with remyelination rather than axon regeneration after sciatic nerve crush.

    PubMed

    Tong, Ling-Ling; Ding, You-Quan; Jing, Hong-Bo; Li, Xuan-Yang; Qi, Jian-Guo

    2015-05-01

    Peripheral nerve functional recovery after injuries relies on both axon regeneration and remyelination. Both axon regeneration and remyelination require intimate interactions between regenerating neurons and their accompanying Schwann cells. Previous studies have shown that motor and sensory neurons are intrinsically different in their regeneration potentials. Moreover, denervated Schwann cells accompanying myelinated motor and sensory axons have distinct gene expression profiles for regeneration-associated growth factors. However, it is unknown whether differential motor and sensory functional recovery exists. If so, the particular one among axon regeneration and remyelination responsible for this difference remains unclear. Here, we aimed to establish an adult rat sciatic nerve crush model with the nonserrated microneedle holders and measured rat motor and sensory functions during regeneration. Furthermore, axon regeneration and remyelination was evaluated by morphometric analysis of electron microscopic images on the basis of nerve fiber classification. Our results showed that Aα fiber-mediated motor function was successfully recovered in both male and female rats. Aδ fiber-mediated sensory function was partially restored in male rats, but completely recovered in female littermates. For both male and female rats, the numbers of regenerated motor and sensory axons were quite comparable. However, remyelination was diverse among myelinated motor and sensory nerve fibers. In detail, Aβ and Aδ fibers incompletely remyelinated in male, but not female rats, whereas Aα fibers fully remyelinated in both sexes. Our result indicated that differential motor and sensory functional recovery in male but not female adult rats is associated with remyelination rather than axon regeneration after sciatic nerve crush. PMID:25830493

  12. Effect of Ranirestat on Sensory and Motor Nerve Function in Japanese Patients with Diabetic Polyneuropathy: A Randomized Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Satoh, Jo; Kohara, Nobuo; Sekiguchi, Kenji; Yamaguchi, Yasuyuki

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a 26-week oral-administration study of ranirestat (an aldose reductase inhibitor) at a once-daily dose of 20 mg to evaluate its efficacy and safety in Japanese patients with diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN). The primary endpoint was summed change in sensory nerve conduction velocity (NCV) for the bilateral sural and proximal median sensory nerves. The sensory NCV was significantly (P = 0.006) improved by ranirestat. On clinical symptoms evaluated with the use of modified Toronto Clinical Neuropathy Score (mTCNS), obvious efficacy was not found in total score. However, improvement in the sensory test domain of the mTCNS was significant (P = 0.037) in a subgroup of patients diagnosed with neuropathy according to the TCNS severity classification. No clinically significant effects on safety parameters including hepatic and renal functions were observed. Our results indicate that ranirestat is effective on DPN (Japic CTI-121994). PMID:26881251

  13. Paclitaxel alters sensory nerve biomechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Bober, Brian G; Shah, Sameer B

    2015-10-15

    Paclitaxel is an effective chemotherapeutic that, despite its common use, frequently causes debilitating peripheral sensory neuropathy. Paclitaxel binds to and stabilizes microtubules, and through unknown mechanisms, causes abnormal microtubule aggregation. Given that microtubules contribute to the mechanical properties of cells, we tested the hypothesis that paclitaxel treatment would alter the stiffness of sensory nerves. Rat sural nerves were excised and soaked in Ringer's solution with or without paclitaxel. Nerves were secured between a force transducer and actuator, and linearly strained. Stress-strain curves were generated, from which elastic moduli were calculated. Paclitaxel treated nerves exhibited significantly higher moduli in both linear and transition regions of the curve. A composite-tissue model was then generated to estimate the stiffness increase in the cellular fraction of the nerve following paclitaxel treatment. This model was supported experimentally by data on mechanical properties of sural nerves stripped of their epineurium, and area fractions of the cellular and connective tissue components of the rat sural nerve, calculated from immunohistochemical images. Model results revealed that the cellular components of the nerve must stiffen 12x to 115x, depending on the initial axonal modulus assumed, in order to achieve the observed tissue level mechanical changes. Consistent with such an increase, electron microscopy showed increased microtubule aggregation and cytoskeletal packing, suggestive of a more cross-linked cytoskeleton. Overall, our data suggests that paclitaxel treatment induces increased microtubule bundling in axons, which leads to alterations in tissue-level mechanical properties. PMID:26321364

  14. Effects of motor and sensory nerve transplants on amount and specificity of sciatic nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Lago, Natalia; Rodríguez, Francisco J; Guzmán, Mónica S; Jaramillo, Jéssica; Navarro, Xavier

    2007-09-01

    Nerve regeneration after complete transection does not allow for adequate functional recovery mainly because of lack of selectivity of target reinnervation. We assessed if transplanting a nerve segment from either motor or sensory origin may improve specifically the accuracy of sensory and motor reinnervation. For this purpose, the rat sciatic nerve was transected and repaired with a silicone guide containing a predegenerated segment of ventral root (VR) or dorsal root (DR), compared to a silicone guide filled with saline. Nerve regeneration and reinnervation was assessed during 3 months by electrophysiologic and functional tests, and by nerve morphology and immunohistochemistry against choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) for labeling motor axons. Functional tests showed that reinnervation was successful in all the rats. However, the two groups with a root allotransplant reached higher degrees of reinnervation in comparison with the control group. Group VR showed the highest reinnervation of muscle targets, whereas Group DR had higher levels of sensory reinnervation than VR and saline groups. The total number of regenerated myelinated fibers was similar in the three groups, but the number of ChAT+ fibers was slightly lower in the VR group in comparison with DR and saline groups. These results indicate that a predegenerated root nerve allotransplant enhances axonal regeneration, leading to faster and higher levels of functional recovery. Although there is not clear preferential reinnervation, regeneration of motor axons is promoted at early times by a motor graft, whereas reinnervation of sensory pathways is increased by a sensory graft. PMID:17455293

  15. Sensory neuropeptides and airway function.

    PubMed

    Solway, J; Leff, A R

    1991-12-01

    Sensory nerves synthesize tachykinins and calcitonin-gene related peptide and package these neuropeptides together in synaptic vesicles. Stimulation of these C-fibers by a range of chemical and physical factors results in afferent neuronal conduction that elicits central parasympathetic reflexes and in antidromic conduction that results in local release of neuropeptides through the axon reflex. In the airways, sensory neuropeptides act on bronchial smooth muscle, the mucosal vasculature, and submucosal glands to promote airflow obstruction, hyperemia, microvascular hyperpermeability, and mucus hypersecretion. In addition, tachykinins potentiate cholinergic neurotransmission. Proinflammatory effects of these peptides also promote the recruitment, adherence, and activation of granulocytes that may further exacerbate neurogenic inflammation (i.e., neuropeptide-induced plasma extravasation and vasodilation). Enzymatic degradation limits the physiological effects of tachykinins but may be impaired by respiratory infection or other factors. Given their sensitivity to noxious compounds and physical stimuli and their potent effects on airway function, it is possible that neuropeptide-containing sensory nerves play an important role in mediating airway responses in human disease. Supporting this view are the striking phenomenological similarities between hyperpnea-induced bronchoconstriction (HIB) in guinea pigs and HIB in patients with exercise-induced asthma. Endogenous tachykinins released from airway sensory nerves mediate HIB in guinea pigs and also cause hyperpnea-induced bronchovascular hyperpermeability in these animals. On the basis of these observations, it is reasonable to speculate that sensory neuropeptides participate in the pathogenesis of hyperpnea-induced airflow obstruction in human asthmatic subjects as well. PMID:1663932

  16. Nerve Growth Factor Decreases in Sympathetic and Sensory Nerves of Rats with Chronic Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) plays a critical role in the maintenance and survival of both sympathetic and sensory nerves. Also, NGF can regulate receptor expression and neuronal activity in the sympathetic and sensory neurons. Abnormalities in NGF regulation are observed in patients and animals with heart failure (HF). Nevertheless, the effects of chronic HF on the levels of NGF within the sympathetic and sensory nerves are not known. Thus, the ELISA method was used to assess the levels of NGF in the stellate ganglion (SG) and dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons of control rats and rats with chronic HF induced by myocardial infarction. Our data show for the first time that the levels of NGF were significantly decreased (P < 0.05) in the SG and DRG neurons 6–20 weeks after ligation of the coronary artery. In addition, a close relation was observed between the NGF levels and the left ventricular function. In conclusion, chronic HF impairs the expression of NGF in the sympathetic and sensory nerves. Given that sensory afferent nerves are engaged in the sympathetic nervous responses to somatic stimulation (i.e. muscle activity during exercise) via a reflex mechanism, our data indicate that NGF is likely responsible for the development of muscle reflex-mediated abnormal sympathetic responsiveness observed in chronic HF. PMID:24913185

  17. Effect of nedocromil sodium on airway sensory nerves.

    PubMed

    Barnes, P J

    1993-07-01

    There is increasing evidence that the sensory nerves of the airway play a role in the asthmatic response. Nerve endings are exposed by the epithelial shedding that occurs with asthma. They may become sensitized and activated by inflammatory mediators and may release neuropeptides that then spread and amplify the inflammatory process in the airways. Nedocromil sodium may prevent the sensory nerves from becoming sensitized and inhibit their activation. This possibility is suggested because nedocromil is highly effective against several indirect challenges that involve sensory nerve stimulation. Nedocromil sodium was able to inhibit the bronchoconstriction induced in patients with asthma by exposure to bradykinin, sulfur dioxide, metabisulfite, and ultrasonically nebulized water. Cough, which is a prominent symptom of asthma, is believed to be a result of sensory nerve activation. In several long-term clinical studies, nedocromil sodium reduces the severity of cough among patients with asthma. Studies are needed to define how nedocromil sodium acts on the sensory nerves. PMID:8393025

  18. Palm to Finger Ulnar Sensory Nerve Conduction

    PubMed Central

    Davidowich, Eduardo; Orsini, Marco; Pupe, Camila; Pessoa, Bruno; Bittar, Caroline; Pires, Karina Lebeis; Bruno, Carlos; Coutinho, Bruno Mattos; de Souza, Olivia Gameiro; Ribeiro, Pedro; Velasques, Bruna; Bittencourt, Juliana; Teixeira, Silmar; Bastos, Victor Hugo

    2015-01-01

    Ulnar neuropathy at the wrist (UNW) is rare, and always challenging to localize. To increase the sensitivity and specificity of the diagnosis of UNW many authors advocate the stimulation of the ulnar nerve (UN) in the segment of the wrist and palm. The focus of this paper is to present a modified and simplified technique of sensory nerve conduction (SNC) of the UN in the wrist and palm segments and demonstrate the validity of this technique in the study of five cases of type III UNW. The SNC of UN was performed antidromically with fifth finger ring recording electrodes. The UN was stimulated 14 cm proximal to the active electrode (the standard way) and 7 cm proximal to the active electrode. The normal data from amplitude and conduction velocity (CV) ratios between the palm to finger and wrist to finger segments were obtained. Normal amplitude ratio was 1.4 to 0.76. Normal CV ratio was 0.8 to 1.23.We found evidences of abnormal SNAP amplitude ratio or substantial slowing of UN sensory fibers across the wrist in 5 of the 5 patients with electrophysiological-definite type III UNW. PMID:26788268

  19. Sural nerve defects after nerve biopsy or nerve transfer as a sensory regeneration model for peripheral nerve conduit implantation.

    PubMed

    Radtke, C; Kocsis, J D; Reimers, K; Allmeling, C; Vogt, P M

    2013-09-01

    Nerve repair after injury can be effectively accomplished by direct suture approximation of the proximal and distal segments. This is more successful if coadaptation can be achieved without tension. Currently, the gold standard repair of larger deficits is the transplantation of an autologous sensory sural nerve graft. However, a significant disadvantage of this technique is the inevitable donor morbidity (sensory loss, neuroma and scar formation) after harvesting of the sural nerve. Moreover, limitation of autologous donor nerve length and fixed diameter of the available sural nerve are major drawbacks of current autograft treatment. Another approach that was introduced for nerve repair is the implantation of alloplastic nerve tubes made of, for example, poly-L-lactide. In these, nerve stumps of the transected nerves are surgically bridged using the biosynthetic conduit. A number of experimental studies, primarily in rodents, indicate axonal regeneration and remyelination after implantation of various conduits. However, only limited clinical studies with conduit implantation have been performed in acute peripheral nerve injuries particularly on digital nerves. Clinical transfer of animal studies, which can be carefully calibrated for site and extent of injury, to humans is difficult to interpret due to the intrinsic variability in human nerve injuries. This prevents effective quantification of improvement and induces bias in the study. Therefore, standardization of lesion/repair in human studies is warranted. Here we propose to use sural nerve defects, induced due to nerve graft harvesting or from diagnostic nerve biopsies as a model site to enable standardization of nerve conduit implantation. This would help better with the characterization of the implants and its effectiveness in axonal regeneration and remyelination. Nerve regeneration can be assessed, for example, by recovery of sensation, measured non-invasively by threshold to von Frey filaments and cold

  20. A Rare Case of C2 Sensory Blockade with Preserved Phrenic Nerve Function in an Obstetric Patient.

    PubMed

    Coffman, John C; Fiorini, Kasey; Cook, Meghan; Small, Robert H

    2016-01-01

    High neuraxial blockade is a serious complication in obstetric patients and requires prompt recognition and management in order to optimize patient outcomes. In cases of high neuroblockade, patients may present with significant hypotension, dyspnea, agitation, difficulty speaking or inability to speak, or even loss of consciousness. We report the unusual presentation of an obstetric patient that remained hemodynamically stable and had the preserved ability to initiate breaths despite sensory blockade up to C2. The presence of differential motor and sensory block documented in this case helped enable the patient to be managed with noninvasive ventilatory support until the high blockade regressed and we are not aware of any other similar reports in literature. PMID:27559484

  1. A Rare Case of C2 Sensory Blockade with Preserved Phrenic Nerve Function in an Obstetric Patient

    PubMed Central

    Fiorini, Kasey; Cook, Meghan

    2016-01-01

    High neuraxial blockade is a serious complication in obstetric patients and requires prompt recognition and management in order to optimize patient outcomes. In cases of high neuroblockade, patients may present with significant hypotension, dyspnea, agitation, difficulty speaking or inability to speak, or even loss of consciousness. We report the unusual presentation of an obstetric patient that remained hemodynamically stable and had the preserved ability to initiate breaths despite sensory blockade up to C2. The presence of differential motor and sensory block documented in this case helped enable the patient to be managed with noninvasive ventilatory support until the high blockade regressed and we are not aware of any other similar reports in literature. PMID:27559484

  2. Sensory functions in chronic neuralgia.

    PubMed Central

    Lindblom, U; Verrillo, R T

    1979-01-01

    Eleven patients with sustained neuralgia, in most cases after traumatic nerve lesion, were subjected to quantitative sensory testing with thermal and non-noxious mechanical stimuli. Measurements were made in the pain area and at a homologous site on the contralateral normal side. All patients were hypoaesthetic with raised thresholds for warm and cold or touch, or both. Thermal pain thresholds were also raised in some patients but lowered in others indicating hypersensitivity of the nociceptor system or dysaesthesia for thermal input. In six patients single mechanical stimuli produced a painful response above the touch detection threshold. Reaction time measurements indicated that this painful response to suprathreshold mechanical pulses was measured by magnitude estimation as a function of stimulus amplitude. The results were fitted by power functions, as in normal skin, but with steeper slopes on the abnormal side. Suprathreshold hyperaesthesia (recruitment) may exist in the presence of normal threshold functioning. PMID:448382

  3. Role of renal sensory nerves in physiological and pathophysiological conditions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Whether activation of afferent renal nerves contributes to the regulation of arterial pressure and sodium balance has been long overlooked. In normotensive rats, activating renal mechanosensory nerves decrease efferent renal sympathetic nerve activity (ERSNA) and increase urinary sodium excretion, an inhibitory renorenal reflex. There is an interaction between efferent and afferent renal nerves, whereby increases in ERSNA increase afferent renal nerve activity (ARNA), leading to decreases in ERSNA by activation of the renorenal reflexes to maintain low ERSNA to minimize sodium retention. High-sodium diet enhances the responsiveness of the renal sensory nerves, while low dietary sodium reduces the responsiveness of the renal sensory nerves, thus producing physiologically appropriate responses to maintain sodium balance. Increased renal ANG II reduces the responsiveness of the renal sensory nerves in physiological and pathophysiological conditions, including hypertension, congestive heart failure, and ischemia-induced acute renal failure. Impairment of inhibitory renorenal reflexes in these pathological states would contribute to the hypertension and sodium retention. When the inhibitory renorenal reflexes are suppressed, excitatory reflexes may prevail. Renal denervation reduces arterial pressure in experimental hypertension and in treatment-resistant hypertensive patients. The fall in arterial pressure is associated with a fall in muscle sympathetic nerve activity, suggesting that increased ARNA contributes to increased arterial pressure in these patients. Although removal of both renal sympathetic and afferent renal sensory nerves most likely contributes to the arterial pressure reduction initially, additional mechanisms may be involved in long-term arterial pressure reduction since sympathetic and sensory nerves reinnervate renal tissue in a similar time-dependent fashion following renal denervation. PMID:25411364

  4. Cobalt iontophoresis of sensory nerves in the rat lung.

    PubMed

    El-Bermani, A W; Chang, T L

    1979-02-01

    By iontophoretically introducing, first, cobalt and, subsequently, sulfide ions into the vagus nerve, it is possible to trace sensory nerves to their endings in the rat lung. Nerve fibers and terminals are found predominantly in the adventitia of the airways and blood vessels. Some nerves are found in the submucosa of the bronchi and bronchioles. Some are found in the cardiac muscle on the periphery of pulmonary veins, and a few nerves are seen to end among smooth muslces of the blood vessels and the airways. At least three types of nerve endings can be identified at the light microscopic level: (1) free nerve endings; (2) brush-like endings; (3) knob-like terminals. PMID:760496

  5. Sensory nerve conduction deficit in experimental monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Lawlor, M W; Richards, M P; Fisher, M A; Stubbs, E B

    2001-06-01

    An emerging body of evidence from in vitro studies and in vivo animal models supports a pathogenic role of antibodies in the development of peripheral neuropathy associated with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS). Although the assessment of motor and sensory nerve fiber function is of clinical importance, it is seldom applied experimentally. We describe the application of an electrophysiologic method for the evaluation of motor and sensory nerve fiber function using an experimental model of MGUS neuropathy. Supramaximal stimulation of the tibial nerve elicited an early motor response (M-wave, 1.7 +/- 0.1 ms, n = 10) and a late sensory (H-reflex, 7.8 +/- 0.1 ms, n = 10) response that was recorded from the hind foot of anesthetized rats. Intraneural injection of serum antibodies from a MGUS patient with sensorimotor polyneuropathy, but not from an age-matched control subject, produced a marked attenuation of the H-reflex (P < 0.01, n = 10) without affecting the M-wave. Light and electron microscopy of affected nerve showed myelinoaxonal degeneration with sparing of the smaller unmyelinated nerve fibers. The combined electrophysiologic and morphologic findings presented in this study are consistent with a selective sensory conduction deficit in MGUS neuropathy. Selective injury of afferent nerve fibers by this patient's serum antibodies may result from reactivity to neural antigens uniquely expressed by sensory neurons. PMID:11360265

  6. A reversible functional sensory neuropathy model.

    PubMed

    Danigo, Aurore; Magy, Laurent; Richard, Laurence; Sturtz, Franck; Funalot, Benoît; Demiot, Claire

    2014-06-13

    Small-fiber neuropathy was induced in young adult mice by intraperitoneal injection of resiniferatoxin (RTX), a TRPV1 agonist. At day 7, RTX induced significant thermal and mechanical hypoalgesia. At day 28, mechanical and thermal nociception were restored. No nerve degeneration in skin was observed and unmyelinated nerve fiber morphology and density in sciatic nerve were unchanged. At day 7, substance P (SP) was largely depleted in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons, although calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) was only moderately depleted. Three weeks after, SP and CGRP expression was restored in DRG neurons. At the same time, CGRP expression remained low in intraepidermal nerve fibers (IENFs) whereas SP expression had improved. In summary, RTX induced in our model a transient neuropeptide depletion in sensory neurons without nerve degeneration. We think this model is valuable as it brings the opportunity to study functional nerve changes in the very early phase of small fiber neuropathy. Moreover, it may represent a useful tool to study the mechanisms of action of therapeutic strategies to prevent sensory neuropathy of various origins. PMID:24792390

  7. Intrafascicular stimulation of monkey arm nerves evokes coordinated grasp and sensory responses

    PubMed Central

    Ledbetter, Noah M.; Ethier, Christian; Oby, Emily R.; Hiatt, Scott D.; Wilder, Andrew M.; Ko, Jason H.; Agnew, Sonya P.; Miller, Lee E.

    2013-01-01

    High-count microelectrode arrays implanted in peripheral nerves could restore motor function after spinal cord injury or sensory function after limb loss. In this study, we implanted Utah Slanted Electrode Arrays (USEAs) intrafascicularly at the elbow or shoulder in arm nerves of rhesus monkeys (n = 4) under isoflurane anesthesia. Input-output curves indicated that pulse-width-modulated single-electrode stimulation in each arm nerve could recruit single muscles with little or no recruitment of other muscles. Stimulus trains evoked specific, natural, hand movements, which could be combined via multielectrode stimulation to elicit coordinated power or pinch grasp. Stimulation also elicited short-latency evoked potentials (EPs) in primary somatosensory cortex, which might be used to provide sensory feedback from a prosthetic limb. These results demonstrate a high-resolution, high-channel-count interface to the peripheral nervous system for restoring hand function after neural injury or disruption or for examining nerve structure. PMID:23076108

  8. Normal threshold values for a monofilament sensory test in sural and radial cutaneous nerves in Indian and Nepali volunteers.

    PubMed

    Wagenaar, Inge; Brandsma, Wim; Post, Erik; Richardus, Jan Hendrik

    2014-12-01

    The monofilament test (MFT) is a reliable method to assess sensory nerve function in leprosy and other neuropathies. Assessment of the radial cutaneous and sural nerves, in addition to nerves usually tested, can help improve diagnosis and monitoring of nerve function impairment (NFI). To enable the detection of impairments in leprosy patients, it is essential to know the monofilament threshold of these two nerves in normal subjects. The radial cutaneous, sural, ulnar, median and posterior tibial nerves of 245 volunteers were tested. All nerves were tested at three sites on both left and right sides. Normal monofilament thresholds were calculated per test-site and per nerve. We assessed 490 radial cutaneous and 482 sural nerves. The normal monofilament was 2 g (Filament Index Number (FIN) 4.31) for the radial cutaneous and 4 g (FIN 4.56) for the sural nerve, although heavy manual laborers demonstrated a threshold of 10 g (FIN 5.07) for the sural nerve. For median and ulnar nerves, the 200 mg (FIN 3.61) filament was confirmed as normal while the 4 g (FIN 4.56) filament was normal for the posterior tibial. Age and occupation have an effect on the mean touch sensitivity but do not affect the normal threshold for the radial cutaneous and sural nerves. The normal thresholds for the radial cutaneous and sural nerves are determined as the 2 g (FIN 4.31) and the 4 g (FIN 4.56) filaments, respectively. The addition of the radial cutaneous and sural nerve to sensory nerve assessment may improve the diagnosis of patients with impaired sensory nerve function. PMID:25675652

  9. Painful nerve injury increases plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase activity in axotomized sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase (PMCA) is the principal means by which sensory neurons expel Ca2+ and thereby regulate the concentration of cytoplasmic Ca2+ and the processes controlled by this critical second messenger. We have previously found that painful nerve injury decreases resting cytoplasmic Ca2+ levels and activity-induced cytoplasmic Ca2+ accumulation in axotomized sensory neurons. Here we examine the contribution of PMCA after nerve injury in a rat model of neuropathic pain. Results PMCA function was isolated in dissociated sensory neurons by blocking intracellular Ca2+ sequestration with thapsigargin, and cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration was recorded with Fura-2 fluorometry. Compared to control neurons, the rate at which depolarization-induced Ca2+ transients resolved was increased in axotomized neurons after spinal nerve ligation, indicating accelerated PMCA function. Electrophysiological recordings showed that blockade of PMCA by vanadate prolonged the action potential afterhyperpolarization, and also decreased the rate at which neurons could fire repetitively. Conclusion We found that PMCA function is elevated in axotomized sensory neurons, which contributes to neuronal hyperexcitability. Accelerated PMCA function in the primary sensory neuron may contribute to the generation of neuropathic pain, and thus its modulation could provide a new pathway for peripheral treatment of post-traumatic neuropathic pain. PMID:22713297

  10. Factors predicting sensory and motor recovery after the repair of upper limb peripheral nerve injuries

    PubMed Central

    He, Bo; Zhu, Zhaowei; Zhu, Qingtang; Zhou, Xiang; Zheng, Canbin; Li, Pengliang; Zhu, Shuang; Liu, Xiaolin; Zhu, Jiakai

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the factors associated with sensory and motor recovery after the repair of upper limb peripheral nerve injuries. DATA SOURCES: The online PubMed database was searched for English articles describing outcomes after the repair of median, ulnar, radial, and digital nerve injuries in humans with a publication date between 1 January 1990 and 16 February 2011. STUDY SELECTION: The following types of article were selected: (1) clinical trials describing the repair of median, ulnar, radial, and digital nerve injuries published in English; and (2) studies that reported sufficient patient information, including age, mechanism of injury, nerve injured, injury location, defect length, repair time, repair method, and repair materials. SPSS 13.0 software was used to perform univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses and to investigate the patient and intervention factors associated with outcomes. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Sensory function was assessed using the Mackinnon-Dellon scale and motor function was assessed using the manual muscle test. Satisfactory motor recovery was defined as grade M4 or M5, and satisfactory sensory recovery was defined as grade S3+ or S4. RESULTS: Seventy-one articles were included in this study. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses showed that repair time, repair materials, and nerve injured were independent predictors of outcome after the repair of nerve injuries (P < 0.05), and that the nerve injured was the main factor affecting the rate of good to excellent recovery. CONCLUSION: Predictors of outcome after the repair of peripheral nerve injuries include age, gender, repair time, repair materials, nerve injured, defect length, and duration of follow-up. PMID:25206870

  11. Acrolein depletes the neuropeptides CGRP and substance P in sensory nerves in rat respiratory tract.

    PubMed Central

    Springall, D R; Edginton, J A; Price, P N; Swanston, D W; Noel, C; Bloom, S R; Polak, J M

    1990-01-01

    The mammalian respiratory tract is densely innervated by autonomic and sensory nerves around airways and blood vessels. Subsets of these nerves contain a number of putative neurotransmitter peptides, such as substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in sensory nerves and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), possibly serving autonomic functions. CGRP is also found in endocrine cells in rat airway epithelium. These peptides are all pharmacologically potent effectors of bronchial and vascular smooth muscle and bronchial secretion. Their functions in vivo are less well established. We have therefore examined the effects of inhaled acrolein, a sensory irritant, on three pulmonary neuropeptides: CGRP, substance P, and VIP. Groups of rats (n = 3 each) were exposed for 10 min to acrolein in air (Ct = 510, 1858, and 5693 mg.min/m3) or to air alone. Fifteen minutes later they were killed (pentabarbitone IP) and their respiratory tracts were dissected and fixed in 0.4% p-benzoquinone solution. Cryostat sections were stained by indirect immunofluorescence for a general nerve marker (PGP 9.5) and neuropeptides. The acrolein-treated animals had a dose-related decrease in tracheal substance P- and CGRP-immunoreactive nerve fibers compared with controls. No change was seen in total nerve fiber distribution and number (PGP 9.5) or VIP immunoreactivity, nor in CGRP-immunoreactive epithelial endocrine cells. It is concluded that the rat tracheal peptidergic nerves are a sensitive indicator of inhaled irritant substances. Their reduced immunoreactivity may be because of a release of sensory neuropeptides that could play a role in the physiological response to irritant or toxic compounds. Images FIGURE 4. a FIGURE 4. b FIGURE 5. a FIGURE 5. b FIGURE 6. a FIGURE 6. b FIGURE 7. a FIGURE 7. b FIGURE 7. c FIGURE 8. a FIGURE 8. b PMID:1696540

  12. Tachykinins, sensory nerves, and asthma--an overview.

    PubMed

    Lundberg, J M

    1995-07-01

    Tachykinin peptides, substance P (SP) and neurokinin A (NKA), are released from airway sensory nerves upon exposure to irritant chemicals and endogenous agents including bradykinin, prostaglandins, histamine, and protons, The released neuropeptides are potent inducers of a cascade of responses, including vasodilatation, mucus secretion, plasma protein extravasation, leukocyte adhesion--activation, and bronchoconstriction. Neurokinin 1 receptors (preferably activated by SP) seem to be most important for inflammatory actions, while neurokinin 2 receptors (preferably activated by NKA) mediate bronchoconstriction. Species differences exist whereby rat and guinea-pig have a more developed neurogenic inflammation response than normal human airways. However, disease states such as inflammation or viral infections lead to enhanced peptide synthesis and (or) increased sensory nerve excitability. Together with increased neurokinin 1 receptor synthesis and loss of major tachykinin-degrading enzymes such as neutral endopeptidase in airway inflammation, this suggests that recently developed, orally active nonpeptide neurokinin receptor antagonists could have a therapeutic potential in asthmatic patients. PMID:8846429

  13. Recording sensory and motor information from peripheral nerves with Utah Slanted Electrode Arrays.

    PubMed

    Clark, Gregory A; Ledbetter, Noah M; Warren, David J; Harrison, Reid R

    2011-01-01

    Recording and stimulation via high-count penetrating microelectrode arrays implanted in peripheral nerves may help restore precise motor and sensory function after nervous system damage or disease. Although previous work has demonstrated safety and relatively successful stimulation for long-term implants of 100-electrode Utah Slanted Electrode Arrays (USEAs) in feline sciatic nerve [1], two major remaining challenges were 1) to maintain viable recordings of nerve action potentials long-term, and 2) to overcome contamination of unit recordings by myoelectric (EMG) activity in awake, moving animals. In conjunction with improvements to USEAs themselves, we have redesigned several aspects of our USEA containment and connector systems. Although further increases in unit yield and long-term stability remain desirable, here we report considerable progress toward meeting both of these goals: We have successfully recorded unit activity from USEAs implanted intrafascicularly in sciatic nerve for periods up to 4 months (the terminal experimental time point), and we have developed a containment system that effectively eliminates or substantially reduces EMG contamination of unit recordings in the moving animal. In addition, we used a 100-channel wireless recording integrated circuit attached to implanted USEAs to transmit broadband or spike-threshold data from nerve. Neural data thusly obtained during imposed limb movements were decoded blindly to drive a virtual prosthetic limb in real time. These results support the possibility of using USEAs in peripheral nerves to provide motor control and cutaneous or proprioceptive sensory feedback in individuals after limb loss or spinal cord injury. PMID:22255372

  14. [Should biopsy be done on the sensory branch of the radial nerve in leprosy patients? Apropos of 112 cases].

    PubMed

    Grauwin, M Y; Dieye, M; Mane, I; Cartel, J L

    1997-01-01

    Biopsies of the superficial sensory branch of the radial nerve are contested. Some authors mention it to be simple and without harm, but others are formally against this procedure. At ILAD, 274 biopsies were made between 1986 to 1992. We present a review of 112 leprosy patients for whom biopsy was done. On 112 reexamined patients, we observed 2 benign neuroma, hence 2%. The comparison of nerve function before biopsy and after, of 63 of the 112 patients, reexamination shows no significant modification of the functional score. Given even the occurrence of benign neuroma in only 2% of the cases, the authors do not recommend the biopsy of the superficial sensory branch of the radial nerve. For research purposes on neuritis in leprosy, as well as to assure diagnosis in primary neuritic leprosy, we propose the biopsy of the sensory branch of the musculo cutaneous nerve at elbow level. PMID:9131938

  15. Sensory conduction in medial and lateral plantar nerves.

    PubMed Central

    Ponsford, S N

    1988-01-01

    A simple and reliable method of recording medial and lateral plantar nerve sensory action potentials is described. Potentials are recorded with surface electrodes at the ankle using surface electrodes stimulating orthodromically at the sole. The normal values obtained are higher in amplitude than those obtained by the method described by Guiloff and Sherratt and are detectable in older subjects aged over 80 years. The procedure is valuable in the diagnosis of early peripheral neuropathy, mononeuritis multiplex, tarsal tunnel syndrome and in differentiation between pre and post ganglionic L5 S1 lesions. PMID:2831304

  16. Collateral sprouting of sensory axons after end-to-side nerve coaptation--a longitudinal study in the rat.

    PubMed

    Kovacic, Uros; Tomsic, Martin; Sketelj, Janez; Bajrović, Fajko F

    2007-02-01

    The end-to-side nerve coaptation is able to induce collateral sprouting of axons from the donor nerve and to provide functional reinnervation of the target tissue. Sensory axon sprouting and its effects on the donor nerve up to 9 months after the end-to-side nerve coaptation were studied in the rat. Peroneal, tibial and saphenous nerves were transected and ligated, and the distal stump of the transected peroneal nerve was sutured to the side of the uninjured sural nerve. The average skin area of the residual sensitivity to pinch due to the axons sprouting through the recipient peroneal nerve did not change statistically significantly between 4 and 9 months after surgery. Axon counting, measurements of compound action potentials and retrograde neuron labeling indicate that the sprouting of the myelinated sensory axons and unmyelinated axons through the recipient nerve was largely completed by 2 months and 4 months after the end-to-side nerve coaptation, respectively, and remained stable thereafter for at least 9 months. A decrease in the amplitude and area of the CAP of myelinated fibers, observed in the donor nerve up to 4 months after surgery, was probably due to mild degeneration of nerve fibers and a tendency of the diameter of myelinated axons to decline. However, no significant changes in functional, electrophysiological or morphological properties of the donor nerve could be observed at the end of the observational period, indicating that end-to-side nerve coaptation has no detrimental effect on the donor nerve on a long-term scale. PMID:17045263

  17. Nerve Regeneration: Understanding Biology and Its Influence on Return of Function After Nerve Transfers.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Tessa

    2016-05-01

    Poor functional outcomes are frequent after peripheral nerve injuries despite the regenerative support of Schwann cells. Motoneurons and, to a lesser extent, sensory neurons survive the injuries but outgrowth of axons across the injury site is slow. The neuronal regenerative capacity and the support of regenerating axons by the chronically denervated Schwann cells progressively declines with time and distance of the injury from the denervated targets. Strategies, including brief low-frequency electrical stimulation that accelerates target reinnervation and functional recovery, and the insertion of cross-bridges between a donor nerve and a recipient denervated nerve stump, are effective in promoting functional outcomes after complete and incomplete injuries. PMID:27094884

  18. High Ulnar Nerve Injuries: Nerve Transfers to Restore Function.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Jennifer Megan M

    2016-05-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries are challenging problems. Nerve transfers are one of many options available to surgeons caring for these patients, although they do not replace tendon transfers, nerve graft, or primary repair in all patients. Distal nerve transfers for the treatment of high ulnar nerve injuries allow for a shorter reinnervation period and improved ulnar intrinsic recovery, which are critical to function of the hand. PMID:27094893

  19. Long-Standing Motor and Sensory Recovery following Acute Fibrin Sealant Based Neonatal Sciatic Nerve Repair.

    PubMed

    Perussi Biscola, Natalia; Politti Cartarozzi, Luciana; Ferreira Junior, Rui Seabra; Barraviera, Benedito; Leite Rodrigues de Oliveira, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Brachial plexus lesion results in loss of motor and sensory function, being more harmful in the neonate. Therefore, this study evaluated neuroprotection and regeneration after neonatal peripheral nerve coaptation with fibrin sealant. Thus, P2 neonatal Lewis rats were divided into three groups: AX: sciatic nerve axotomy (SNA) without treatment; AX+FS: SNA followed by end-to-end coaptation with fibrin sealant derived from snake venom; AX+CFS: SNA followed by end-to-end coaptation with commercial fibrin sealant. Results were analyzed 4, 8, and 12 weeks after lesion. Astrogliosis, microglial reaction, and synapse preservation were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Neuronal survival, axonal regeneration, and ultrastructural changes at ventral spinal cord were also investigated. Sensory-motor recovery was behaviorally studied. Coaptation preserved synaptic covering on lesioned motoneurons and led to neuronal survival. Reactive gliosis and microglial reaction decreased in the same groups (AX+FS, AX+CFS) at 4 weeks. Regarding axonal regeneration, coaptation allowed recovery of greater number of myelinated fibers, with improved morphometric parameters. Preservation of inhibitory synaptic terminals was accompanied by significant improvement in the motor as well as in the nociceptive recovery. Overall, the present data suggest that acute repair of neonatal peripheral nerves with fibrin sealant results in neuroprotection and regeneration of motor and sensory axons. PMID:27446617

  20. Long-Standing Motor and Sensory Recovery following Acute Fibrin Sealant Based Neonatal Sciatic Nerve Repair

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira Junior, Rui Seabra

    2016-01-01

    Brachial plexus lesion results in loss of motor and sensory function, being more harmful in the neonate. Therefore, this study evaluated neuroprotection and regeneration after neonatal peripheral nerve coaptation with fibrin sealant. Thus, P2 neonatal Lewis rats were divided into three groups: AX: sciatic nerve axotomy (SNA) without treatment; AX+FS: SNA followed by end-to-end coaptation with fibrin sealant derived from snake venom; AX+CFS: SNA followed by end-to-end coaptation with commercial fibrin sealant. Results were analyzed 4, 8, and 12 weeks after lesion. Astrogliosis, microglial reaction, and synapse preservation were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Neuronal survival, axonal regeneration, and ultrastructural changes at ventral spinal cord were also investigated. Sensory-motor recovery was behaviorally studied. Coaptation preserved synaptic covering on lesioned motoneurons and led to neuronal survival. Reactive gliosis and microglial reaction decreased in the same groups (AX+FS, AX+CFS) at 4 weeks. Regarding axonal regeneration, coaptation allowed recovery of greater number of myelinated fibers, with improved morphometric parameters. Preservation of inhibitory synaptic terminals was accompanied by significant improvement in the motor as well as in the nociceptive recovery. Overall, the present data suggest that acute repair of neonatal peripheral nerves with fibrin sealant results in neuroprotection and regeneration of motor and sensory axons. PMID:27446617

  1. Vascularized Nerve Bypass Graft: A Case Report of an Additional Treatment for Poor Sensory Recovery.

    PubMed

    Usami, Satoshi; Tanaka, Kentaro; Ohkubo, Alisa; Okazaki, Mutsumi

    2016-04-01

    End-to-side neurorrhaphy has proven effective in basic research and in clinical application. One of the methods of end-to-side neurorrhaphy, nerve bypass technique, has been reported and axon regeneration has been proven. In clinical application, the utility of the nerve bypass technique has been revealed in some cases; however, these bypasses were performed using nonvascularized nerves. We initially used the vascularized nerve bypass graft technique with the sural nerve as a secondary clinical procedure after median nerve injury in a 61-year-old patient and achieved motor and sensory nerve regeneration, as supported by a nerve conduction study and clinical sensory test. This technique has the potential to become one of the choices for salvage procedure of severe nerve injury. PMID:27200248

  2. Vascularized Nerve Bypass Graft: A Case Report of an Additional Treatment for Poor Sensory Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Kentaro; Ohkubo, Alisa; Okazaki, Mutsumi

    2016-01-01

    Summary: End-to-side neurorrhaphy has proven effective in basic research and in clinical application. One of the methods of end-to-side neurorrhaphy, nerve bypass technique, has been reported and axon regeneration has been proven. In clinical application, the utility of the nerve bypass technique has been revealed in some cases; however, these bypasses were performed using nonvascularized nerves. We initially used the vascularized nerve bypass graft technique with the sural nerve as a secondary clinical procedure after median nerve injury in a 61-year-old patient and achieved motor and sensory nerve regeneration, as supported by a nerve conduction study and clinical sensory test. This technique has the potential to become one of the choices for salvage procedure of severe nerve injury. PMID:27200248

  3. Photostimulation of sensory neurons of the rat vagus nerve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhee, Albert Y.; Li, Gong; Wells, Jonathon; Kao, Joseph P. Y.

    2008-02-01

    We studied the effect of infrared (IR) stimulation on rat sensory neurons. Primary sensory neurons were prepared by enzymatic dissociation of the inferior (or "nodose") ganglia from the vagus nerves of rats. The 1.85-μm output of a diode laser, delivered through a 200-μm silica fiber, was used for photostimulation. Nodose neurons express the vanilloid receptor, TRPV1, which is a non-selective cation channel that opens in response to significant temperature jumps above 37 C. Opening TRPV1 channels allows entry of cations, including calcium (Ca 2+), into the cell to cause membrane depolarization. Therefore, to monitor TRPV1 activation consequent to photostimulation, we used fura-2, a fluorescent Ca 2+ indicator, to monitor the rise in intracellular Ca 2+ concentration ([Ca 2+]i). Brief trains of 2-msec IR pulses activated TRPV1 rapidly and reversibly, as evidenced by transient rises in [Ca 2+]i (referred to as Ca 2+ transients). Consistent with the Ca 2+ transients arising from influx of Ca 2+, identical photostimulation failed to evoke Ca 2+ responses in the absence of extracellular Ca 2+. Furthermore, the photo-induced Ca 2+ signals were abolished by capsazepine, a specific blocker of TRPV1, indicating that the responses were indeed mediated by TRPV1. We discuss the feasibility of using focal IR stimulation to probe neuronal circuit properties in intact neural tissue, and compare IR stimulation with another photostimulation technique-focal photolytic release of "caged" molecules.

  4. The Feline Dorsal Nerve of the Penis Arises from the Deep Perineal Nerve and Not the Sensory Afferent Branch

    PubMed Central

    Mariano, T. Y.; Boger, A. S.; Gustafson, K. J.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The cat has been used extensively as an animal model for urogenital studies involving the pudendal nerve. However, discrepancies persist in the literature regarding the origin of the dorsal nerve of the penis (DNP). This study used gross dissections and serial histological cross sections to demonstrate that the DNP arises from the deep perineal nerve and not the sensory afferent branch as previously reported. This finding indicates a better than previously appreciated neuroanatomical homology between the cat and human. PMID:18479311

  5. Noninvasive peroneal sensory and motor nerve conduction recordings in the rabbit distal hindlimb: feasibility, variability and neuropathy measure.

    PubMed

    Hotson, John R

    2014-01-01

    The peroneal nerve anatomy of the rabbit distal hindlimb is similar to humans, but reports of distal peroneal nerve conduction studies were not identified with a literature search. Distal sensorimotor recordings may be useful for studying rabbit models of length-dependent peripheral neuropathy. Surface electrodes were adhered to the dorsal rabbit foot overlying the extensor digitorum brevis muscle and the superficial peroneal nerve. The deep and superficial peroneal nerves were stimulated above the ankle and the common peroneal nerve was stimulated at the knee. The nerve conduction studies were repeated twice with a one-week intertest interval to determine measurement variability. Intravenous vincristine was used to produce a peripheral neuropathy. Repeat recordings measured the response to vincristine. A compound muscle action potential and a sensory nerve action potential were evoked in all rabbits. The compound muscle action potential mean amplitude was 0.29 mV (SD ± 0.12) and the fibula head to ankle mean motor conduction velocity was 46.5 m/s (SD ± 2.9). The sensory nerve action potential mean amplitude was 22.8 μV (SD ± 2.8) and the distal sensory conduction velocity was 38.8 m/s (SD ± 2.2). Sensorimotor latencies and velocities were least variable between two test sessions (coefficient of variation  =  2.6-5.9%), sensory potential amplitudes were intermediate (coefficient of variation  =  11.1%) and compound potential amplitudes were the most variable (coefficient of variation  = 19.3%). Vincristine abolished compound muscle action potentials and reduced sensory nerve action potential amplitudes by 42-57% while having little effect on velocity. Rabbit distal hindlimb nerve conduction studies are feasible with surface recordings and stimulation. The evoked distal sensory potentials have amplitudes, configurations and recording techniques that are similar to humans and may be valuable for measuring large sensory fiber function in chronic

  6. Sensory Recovery Outcome after Digital Nerve Repair in Relation to Different Reconstructive Techniques: Meta-Analysis and Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Petra; Harder, Yves; Kern, Yasmin; Paprottka, Philipp M.; Machens, Hans-Günther; Lohmeyer, Jörn A.

    2013-01-01

    Good clinical outcome after digital nerve repair is highly relevant for proper hand function and has a significant socioeconomic impact. However, level of evidence for competing surgical techniques is low. The aim is to summarize and compare the outcomes of digital nerve repair with different methods (end-to-end and end-to-side coaptations, nerve grafts, artificial conduit-, vein-, muscle, and muscle-in-vein reconstructions, and replantations) to provide an aid for choosing an individual technique of nerve reconstruction and to create reference values of standard repair for nonrandomized clinical studies. 87 publications including 2,997 nerve repairs were suitable for a precise evaluation. For digital nerve repairs there was practically no particular technique superior to another. Only end-to-side coaptation had an inferior two-point discrimination in comparison to end-to-end coaptation or nerve grafting. Furthermore, this meta-analysis showed that youth was associated with an improved sensory recovery outcome in patients who underwent digital replantation. For end-to-end coaptations, recent publications had significantly better sensory recovery outcomes than older ones. Given minor differences in outcome, the main criteria in choosing an adequate surgical technique should be gap length and donor site morbidity caused by graft material harvesting. Our clinical experience was used to provide a decision tree for digital nerve repair. PMID:23984064

  7. Arnold’s nerve cough reflex: evidence for chronic cough as a sensory vagal neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Peter G.; Birring, Surinder S.

    2014-01-01

    Arnold’s nerve ear-cough reflex is recognised to occur uncommonly in patients with chronic cough. In these patients, mechanical stimulation of the external auditory meatus can activate the auricular branch of the vagus nerve (Arnold’s nerve) and evoke reflex cough. This is an example of hypersensitivity of vagal afferent nerves, and there is now an increasing recognition that many cases of refractory or idiopathic cough may be due to a sensory neuropathy of the vagus nerve. We present two cases where the cause of refractory chronic cough was due to sensory neuropathy associated with ear-cough reflex hypersensitivity. In both cases, the cough as well as the Arnold’s nerve reflex hypersensitivity were successfully treated with gabapentin, a treatment that has previously been shown to be effective in the treatment of cough due to sensory laryngeal neuropathy (SLN). PMID:25383210

  8. Electrical stimulation accelerates nerve regeneration and functional recovery in delayed peripheral nerve injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jinghui; Zhang, Yongguang; Lu, Lei; Hu, Xueyu; Luo, Zhuojing

    2013-12-01

    The present study aims to investigate the potential of brief electrical stimulation (ES; 3 V, 20 Hz, 20 min) in improving functional recovery in delayed nerve injury repair (DNIR). The sciatic nerve of Sprague Dawley rats was transected, and the repair of nerve injury was delayed for different time durations (2, 4, 12 and 24 weeks). Brief depolarizing ES was applied to the proximal nerve stump when the transected nerve stumps were bridged with a hollow nerve conduit (5 mm in length) after delayed periods. We found that the diameter and number of regenerated axons, the thickness of myelin sheath, as well as the number of Fluoro-Gold retrograde-labeled motoneurons and sensory neurons were significantly increased by ES, suggesting that brief ES to proximal nerve stumps is capable of promoting nerve regeneration in DNIR with different delayed durations, with the longest duration of 24 weeks. In addition, the amplitude of compound muscle action potential (gastrocnemius muscle) and nerve conduction velocity were also enhanced, and gastrocnemius muscle atrophy was partially reversed by brief ES, indicating that brief ES to proximal nerve stump was able to improve functional recovery in DNIR. Furthermore, brief ES was capable of increasing brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in the spinal cord in DNIR, suggesting that BDNF-mediated neurotrophin signaling might be one of the contributing factors to the beneficial effect of brief ES on DNIR. In conclusion, the present findings indicate the potential of using brief ES as a useful method to improve functional recovery for delayed repair of peripheral nerve lesions. PMID:24118464

  9. Identification of Changes in Gene expression of rats after Sensory and Motor Nerves Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu; Guo, Zhi-Yuan; Sun, Xun; Lu, Shi-bi; Xu, Wen-Jing; Zhao, Qing; Peng, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Wallerian degeneration is a sequence of events in the distal stump of axotomized nerves. Despite large numbers of researches concentrating on WD, the biological mechanism still remains unclear. Hence we constructed a rat model with both motor and sensory nerves injury and then conducted a RNA-seq analysis. Here the rats were divided into the 4 following groups: normal motor nerves (NMN), injured motor nerves (IMN), normal sensory nerves (NSN) and injured sensory nerves (ISN). The transcriptomes of rats were sequenced by the Illumina HiSeq. The differentially expressed genes (DEGs) of 4 combinations including NMN vs. IMN, NSN vs. ISN, NMN vs. NSN and IMN vs. ISN were identified respectively. For the above 4 combinations, we identified 1666, 1514, 95 and 17 DEGs. We found that NMN vs. IMN shared the most common genes with NSN vs. ISN indicating common mechanisms between motor nerves injury and sensory nerves injury. At last, we performed an enrichment analysis and observed that the DEGs of NMN vs IMN and NSN vs. ISN were significantly associated with binding and activity, immune response, biosynthesis, metabolism and development. We hope our study may shed light on the molecular mechanisms of nerves degeneration and regeneration during WD. PMID:27253193

  10. Identification of Changes in Gene expression of rats after Sensory and Motor Nerves Injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Guo, Zhi-Yuan; Sun, Xun; Lu, Shi-Bi; Xu, Wen-Jing; Zhao, Qing; Peng, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Wallerian degeneration is a sequence of events in the distal stump of axotomized nerves. Despite large numbers of researches concentrating on WD, the biological mechanism still remains unclear. Hence we constructed a rat model with both motor and sensory nerves injury and then conducted a RNA-seq analysis. Here the rats were divided into the 4 following groups: normal motor nerves (NMN), injured motor nerves (IMN), normal sensory nerves (NSN) and injured sensory nerves (ISN). The transcriptomes of rats were sequenced by the Illumina HiSeq. The differentially expressed genes (DEGs) of 4 combinations including NMN vs. IMN, NSN vs. ISN, NMN vs. NSN and IMN vs. ISN were identified respectively. For the above 4 combinations, we identified 1666, 1514, 95 and 17 DEGs. We found that NMN vs. IMN shared the most common genes with NSN vs. ISN indicating common mechanisms between motor nerves injury and sensory nerves injury. At last, we performed an enrichment analysis and observed that the DEGs of NMN vs IMN and NSN vs. ISN were significantly associated with binding and activity, immune response, biosynthesis, metabolism and development. We hope our study may shed light on the molecular mechanisms of nerves degeneration and regeneration during WD. PMID:27253193

  11. Sensory axon regeneration: rebuilding functional connections in the spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Smith, George M.; Falone, Anthony E.; Frank, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Functional regeneration within the adult spinal cord remains a formidable task. A major barrier to regeneration of sensory axons into the spinal cord is the dorsal root entry zone. This region displays many of the inhibitory features characteristic of other central nervous system injuries. Several experimental treatments, including inactivation of inhibitory molecules (such as Nogo and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans) or administration of neurotrophic factors (such as nerve growth factor, neurotrophin3, glial derived neurotrophic factor and artemin), have been found to promote anatomical and functional regeneration across this barrier. There have been relatively few experiments, however, to determine if regenerating axons project back to their appropriate target areas within the spinal cord. This review focuses on recent advances in sensory axon regeneration, including studies assessing the ability of sensory axons to reconnect with their original synaptic targets. PMID:22137336

  12. Extrinsic Sensory Innervation of the Gut: Structure and Function.

    PubMed

    Brookes, Simon; Chen, Nan; Humenick, Adam; Spencer, Nick J; Costa, Marcello

    2016-01-01

    Extrinsic sensory neurons play a key role in the function of the gastrointestinal tract. They are responsible for the sensations that arise in the gut and can initiate automatic reflexes. In some cases, disordered sensation is clinically problematic-pain, bloating, excessive urgency and nausea are well-known examples. Major advances have been made in understanding the function of somatic sensory neurons in the last 50 years. However, the sensory neurons that mediate sensations from the viscera remain less well understood. This is partly because viscera receive a dense autonomic innervation that can be difficult to separate from extrinsic sensory neurons. A key requirement to understand the genesis of sensation is to distinguish the different classes of sensory neurons and the types of stimuli which they encode. The aim of this short paper is to summarise what was known about these matters 30 years ago and highlight some of the major advances in the understanding of the types of extrinsic sensory neurons to the gut. Necessarily, the choice of papers is somewhat idiosyncratic, but they illustrate the range of advances that have been made in distinguishing the different classes of gastrointestinal afferent nerves. PMID:27379635

  13. Neurilemmoma of Deep Peroneal Nerve Sensory Branch : Thermographic Findings with Compression Test.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Seung Jun; Zhang, Ho Yeol

    2015-09-01

    We report a case of neurilemmoma of deep peroneal nerve sensory branch that triggered sensory change with compression test on lower extremity. After resection of tumor, there are evoked thermal changes on pre- and post-operative infrared (IR) thermographic images. A 52-year-old female presented with low back pain, sciatica, and sensory change on the dorsal side of the right foot and big toe that has lasted for 9 months. She also presented with right tibial mass sized 1.2 cm by 1.4 cm. Ultrasonographic imaging revealed a peripheral nerve sheath tumor arising from the peroneal nerve. IR thermographic image showed hyperthermia when the neurilemoma induced sensory change with compression test on the fibular area, dorsum of foot, and big toe. After surgery, the symptoms and thermographic changes were relieved and disappeared. The clinical, surgical, radiographic, and thermographic perspectives regarding this case are discussed. PMID:26539275

  14. Neurilemmoma of Deep Peroneal Nerve Sensory Branch : Thermographic Findings with Compression Test

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Seung Jun

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of neurilemmoma of deep peroneal nerve sensory branch that triggered sensory change with compression test on lower extremity. After resection of tumor, there are evoked thermal changes on pre- and post-operative infrared (IR) thermographic images. A 52-year-old female presented with low back pain, sciatica, and sensory change on the dorsal side of the right foot and big toe that has lasted for 9 months. She also presented with right tibial mass sized 1.2 cm by 1.4 cm. Ultrasonographic imaging revealed a peripheral nerve sheath tumor arising from the peroneal nerve. IR thermographic image showed hyperthermia when the neurilemoma induced sensory change with compression test on the fibular area, dorsum of foot, and big toe. After surgery, the symptoms and thermographic changes were relieved and disappeared. The clinical, surgical, radiographic, and thermographic perspectives regarding this case are discussed. PMID:26539275

  15. Myelinated sensory and alpha motor axon regeneration in peripheral nerve neuromas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macias, M. Y.; Lehman, C. T.; Sanger, J. R.; Riley, D. A.

    1998-01-01

    Histochemical staining for carbonic anhydrase and cholinesterase (CE) activities was used to analyze sensory and motor axon regeneration, respectively, during neuroma formation in transected and tube-encapsulated peripheral nerves. Median-ulnar and sciatic nerves in the rodent model permitted testing whether a 4 cm greater distance of the motor neuron soma from axotomy site or intrinsic differences between motor and sensory neurons influenced regeneration and neuroma formation 10, 30, and 90 days later. Ventral root radiculotomy confirmed that CE-stained axons were 97% alpha motor axons. Distance significantly delayed axon regeneration. When distance was negligible, sensory axons grew out sooner than motor axons, but motor axons regenerated to a greater quantity. These results indicate regeneration differences between axon subtypes and suggest more extensive branching of motor axons within the neuroma. Thus, both distance from injury site to soma and inherent motor and sensory differences should be considered in peripheral nerve repair strategies.

  16. Degeneration of proprioceptive sensory nerve endings in mice harboring amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-causing mutations.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Sydney K; Kemp, Zachary; Hatzipetros, Theo; Vieira, Fernando; Valdez, Gregorio

    2015-12-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease that primarily targets the motor system. Although much is known about the effects of ALS on motor neurons and glial cells, little is known about its effect on proprioceptive sensory neurons. This study examines proprioceptive sensory neurons in mice harboring mutations associated with ALS, in SOD1(G93A) and TDP43(A315T) transgenic mice. In both transgenic lines, we found fewer proprioceptive sensory neurons containing fluorescently tagged cholera toxin in their soma five days after injecting this retrograde tracer into the tibialis anterior muscle. We asked whether this is due to neuronal loss or selective degeneration of peripheral nerve endings. We found no difference in the total number and size of proprioceptive sensory neuron soma between symptomatic SOD1(G93A) and control mice. However, analysis of proprioceptive nerve endings in muscles revealed early and significant alterations at Ia/II proprioceptive nerve endings in muscle spindles before the symptomatic phase of the disease. Although these changes occur alongside those at α-motor axons in SOD1(G93A) mice, Ia/II sensory nerve endings degenerate in the absence of obvious alterations in α-motor axons in TDP43(A315T) transgenic mice. We next asked whether proprioceptive nerve endings are similarly affected in the spinal cord and found that nerve endings terminating on α-motor neurons are affected during the symptomatic phase and after peripheral nerve endings begin to degenerate. Overall, we show that Ia/II proprioceptive sensory neurons are affected by ALS-causing mutations, with pathological changes starting at their peripheral nerve endings. PMID:26136049

  17. Effect of long-term implanted nerve cuff electrodes on the electrophysiological properties of human sensory nerves.

    PubMed

    Slot, P J; Selmar, P; Rasmussen, A; Sinkjaer, T

    1997-03-01

    During a long-term implantation (307 days) of a tripolar split cuff electrode around the palmar digital nerve to the radial side of the left index finger, branching off the median nerve in a medullary lesioned C6 patient, the physiological state of the nerve was intensively monitored. The resulting sensory nerve action potential (SNAP) amplitude was recorded, using both near-nerve electrodes and the implanted cuff electrode. The SNAP amplitude declined within 10 days to approximately 50% of the first SNAP cuff amplitude measured on Day 2 after implantation and recovered to the initial amplitude within 3 months. The SNAP amplitude measurements made with near-nerve electrodes were consistent with the cuff results; the SNAP conduction velocity (CV) recorded by the near-nerve electrodes and the cuff electrode was constant during the whole implantation period. This is in agreement with the results from two other patients: one with a cuff implanted around the sural nerve, and the other with a cuff implanted around a branch of the tibial nerve. These results and animals studies show that the cuff electrode is an electrically stable neural-electrical transducer. PMID:9148706

  18. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type V

    MedlinePlus

    ... that primarily affects the sensory nerve cells (sensory neurons), which transmit information about sensations such as pain, ... in the development and survival of nerve cells (neurons), including sensory neurons. The NGFβ protein functions by ...

  19. Hydrophilic Polymers Enhance Early Functional Outcomes after Nerve Autografting

    PubMed Central

    Sexton, Kevin W.; Pollins, Alonda C.; Cardwell, Nancy L.; Del Corral, Gabriel A.; Bittner, George D.; Shack, R. Bruce; Nanney, Lillian B.; Thayer, Wesley P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Approximately 12% of operations for traumatic neuropathy are for patients with segmental nerve loss and less than 50% of these injuries obtain meaningful functional recovery. Polyethylene glycol (PEG) therapy has been shown to improve functional outcomes after nerve severance and we hypothesized this therapy could also benefit nerve autografting. Methods A segmental rat sciatic nerve injury model was used, whereby a 0.5 cm defect was repaired with an autograft using microsurgery. Experimental animals were treated with solutions containing methylene blue (MB) and PEG; control animals did not receive PEG. Compound Actions Potentials (CAPs) were recorded before nerve transection, after solution therapy, and at 72 hours postoperatively. The animals underwent behavioral testing at 24 and 72 hours postoperatively. After sacrifice, nerves were fixed, sectioned, and immunostained to allow for quantitative morphometric analysis. Results The introduction of hydrophilic polymers greatly improved morphological and functional recovery of rat sciatic axons at 1–3 days following nerve autografting. PEG therapy restored CAPs in all animals and CAPs were still present 72 hours postoperatively. No CAPS were detectable in control animals. Footfall asymmetry scores and sciatic functional index scores were significantly improved for PEG therapy group at all time points (p <0.05 and p<0.001; p <0.001 and p <0.01). Sensory and motor axon counts were increased distally in nerves treated with PEG compared to control (p = 0.0189 and p = 0.0032). Conclusions PEG therapy improves early physiologic function, behavioral outcomes, and distal axonal density after nerve autografting. PMID:22521220

  20. BREAST CANCER-INDUCED BONE REMODELING, SKELETAL PAIN AND SPROUTING OF SENSORY NERVE FIBERS

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, Aaron P.; Jimenez-Andrade, Juan M.; Taylor, Reid N.; Castañeda-Corral, Gabriela; Kaczmarska, Magdalena J.; Freeman, Katie T.; Coughlin, Kathleen A.; Ghilardi, Joseph R.; Kuskowski, Michael A.; Mantyh, Patrick W.

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer metastasis to bone is frequently accompanied by pain. What remains unclear is why this pain tends to become more severe and difficult to control with disease progression. Here we test the hypothesis that with disease progression sensory nerve fibers that innervate the breast cancer bearing bone undergo a pathological sprouting and reorganization, which in other non-malignant pathologies has been shown to generate and maintain chronic pain. Injection of human breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231-BO) into the femoral intramedullary space of female athymic nude mice induces sprouting of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP+) sensory nerve fibers. Nearly all CGRP+ nerve fibers that undergo sprouting also co-express tropomyosin receptor kinase A (TrkA+) and growth associated protein-43 (GAP43+). This ectopic sprouting occurs in periosteal sensory nerve fibers that are in close proximity to breast cancer cells, tumor-associated stromal cells and remodeled cortical bone. Therapeutic treatment with an antibody that sequesters nerve growth factor (NGF), administered when the pain and bone remodeling were first observed, blocks this ectopic sprouting and attenuates cancer pain. The present data suggest that the breast cancer cells and tumor-associated stromal cells express and release NGF, which drives bone pain and the pathological reorganization of nearby CGRP+ / TrkA+ / GAP43+ sensory nerve fibers. PMID:21497141

  1. Sensory cutaneous nerve fine-needle aspiration in Hansen's disease: A retrospective analysis of our experience

    PubMed Central

    Prasoon, Dev; Mandal, Swapan Kumar; Agrawal, Parimal

    2015-01-01

    Background: Leprosy affects peripheral nerves. As Mycobacterium leprae has unique tropism for Schwann cells, thickened sensory cutaneous nerves provide an easy target for the detection of lepra bacilli and other changes associated with the disease. Materials and Methods: The data of patients with sensory cutaneous nerve involvement were retrieved from our record for the period January 2006 to December 2014. The hematoxylin and eosin (H and E)- and May-Grünwald-Giemsa (MGG)-stained slides were screened for Schwann cells, granuloma, and necrosis. Modified Ziehl-Neelsen (ZN)-stained smears were searched for lepra bacilli and globi. Morphological index was calculated in multibacillary lesions. Result: Twenty-nine sensory cutaneous nerves were aspirated in 23 patients. While 15 cases showed skin and nerve involvement, 8 cases showed only nerve involvement. Terminal cutaneous branch of the radial nerve was most often aspirated. No motor loss was observed after aspiration. Five cytologic pictures were seen — Epithelioid cell granuloma only in 6 cases, epithelioid cell granuloma with necrosis in 1 case, epithelioid cell granuloma with lepra bacilli in 3 cases, necrosis with lepra bacilli in 1 case, and only lepra bacilli in 12 cases. Morphological index ranged from 20% to 80%. Conclusion: Sensory cutaneous nerve fine-needle aspiration (FNA) is a feasible, viable, effective, and safe procedure. It adds to diagnostic FNA yield in patients with concomitant skin involvement and offers a way to evaluate patients with only nerve involvement. Calculation of morphological index allows prognostication and may have a role in assessing response to therapy and/or relapse. PMID:26729977

  2. Neuroplasticity of Sensory and Sympathetic Nerve Fibers in the Painful Arthritic Joint

    PubMed Central

    Ghilardi, Joseph R.; Freeman, Katie T.; Jimenez-Andrade, Juan M.; Coughlin, Kathleen; Kaczmarska, Magdalena J.; Castaneda-Corral, Gabriela; Bloom, Aaron P.; Kuskowski, Michael A.; Mantyh, Patrick W.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Many forms of arthritis are accompanied by significant chronic joint pain. Here we studied whether there is significant sprouting of sensory and sympathetic nerve fibers in the painful arthritic knee joint and whether nerve growth factor (NGF) drives this pathological reorganization. Methods A painful arthritic knee joint was produced by injection of complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) into the knee joint of young adult mice. CFA-injected mice were then treated systemically with vehicle or anti-NGF antibody. Pain behaviors were assessed and at 28 days following the initial CFA injection, the knee joints were processed for immunohistochemistry using antibodies raised against calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP; sensory nerve fibers), neurofilament 200 kDa (NF200; sensory nerve fibers), growth associated protein-43 (GAP43; sprouted nerve fibers), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH; sympathetic nerve fibers), CD31 (endothelial cells) or CD68 (monocytes/macrophages). Results In CFA-injected mice, but not vehicle-injected mice, there was a significant increase in the density of CD68+ macrophages, CD31+ blood vessels, CGRP+, NF200+, GAP43+, and TH+ nerve fibers in the synovium as well as joint pain-related behaviors. Administration of anti-NGF reduced these pain-related behaviors and the ectopic sprouting of nerve fibers, but had no significant effect on the increase in density of CD31+ blood vessels or CD68+ macrophages. Conclusions Ectopic sprouting of sensory and sympathetic nerve fibers occurs in the painful arthritic joint and may be involved in the generation and maintenance of arthritic pain. PMID:22246649

  3. Sciatic nerve regeneration in mice and rats: recovery of sensory innervation is followed by a slowly retreating neuropathic pain-like syndrome.

    PubMed

    Vogelaar, Christina F; Vrinten, Dorien H; Hoekman, Marco F M; Brakkee, Jan H; Burbach, J Peter H; Hamers, Frank P T

    2004-11-19

    Peripheral nerve regeneration has been studied extensively in the sciatic nerve crush model, at the level of both function and gene expression. The crush injury allows full recovery of sensory and motor function in about 3 weeks as assessed by the foot reflex withdrawal test and De Medinacelli walking patterns. We used the recently developed CatWalk paradigm to study walking patterns in more detail in mice and rats. We found that, following the recovery of sensory function, the animals developed a state of mechanical allodynia, which retreated slowly over time. The motor function, although fully recovered with the conventional methods, was revealed to be still impaired because the animals did not put weight on their previously injured paw. The development of neuropathic pain following successful sensory recovery has not been described before in crush-lesioned animals and may provide an important new parameter to assess full sensory recovery. PMID:15494158

  4. Selectivity of distal reinnervation of regenerating mixed motor and sensory nerve fibres across muscle grafts in rats.

    PubMed

    Rath, S; Green, C J

    1991-04-01

    This study investigated target specificity during axonal regeneration of a mixed motor and sensory nerve towards respective targets. The femoral nerves in rats were divided and allowed to grow across a 6 mm gap interposed with frozen and thawed muscle grafts towards their distal motor and sensory nerve stumps. Fourteen weeks later the number of motoneurons projecting axons into the motor and sensory branches were determined by retrograde axonal tracing using horse-radish peroxidase. There were significantly higher numbers of motoneurons (p = 0.0034) projecting into the motor nerve than the sensory nerve. Efferent axons of a mixed nerve selectivity grew into motor branches when allowed to regenerate across a 6 mm gap interposed with muscle grafts. It is possible that a deliberately created 'structured gap' during repair of mixed nerves could improve axonal matching by allowing expression of neurotropism. PMID:2025759

  5. Sensory feedback by peripheral nerve stimulation improves task performance in individuals with upper limb loss using a myoelectric prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiefer, Matthew; Tan, Daniel; Sidek, Steven M.; Tyler, Dustin J.

    2016-02-01

    Objective. Tactile feedback is critical to grip and object manipulation. Its absence results in reliance on visual and auditory cues. Our objective was to assess the effect of sensory feedback on task performance in individuals with limb loss. Approach. Stimulation of the peripheral nerves using implanted cuff electrodes provided two subjects with sensory feedback with intensity proportional to forces on the thumb, index, and middle fingers of their prosthetic hand during object manipulation. Both subjects perceived the sensation on their phantom hand at locations corresponding to the locations of the forces on the prosthetic hand. A bend sensor measured prosthetic hand span. Hand span modulated the intensity of sensory feedback perceived on the thenar eminence for subject 1 and the middle finger for subject 2. We performed three functional tests with the blindfolded subjects. First, the subject tried to determine whether or not a wooden block had been placed in his prosthetic hand. Second, the subject had to locate and remove magnetic blocks from a metal table. Third, the subject performed the Southampton Hand Assessment Procedure (SHAP). We also measured the subject’s sense of embodiment with a survey and his self-confidence. Main results. Blindfolded performance with sensory feedback was similar to sighted performance in the wooden block and magnetic block tasks. Performance on the SHAP, a measure of hand mechanical function and control, was similar with and without sensory feedback. An embodiment survey showed an improved sense of integration of the prosthesis in self body image with sensory feedback. Significance. Sensory feedback by peripheral nerve stimulation improved object discrimination and manipulation, embodiment, and confidence. With both forms of feedback, the blindfolded subjects tended toward results obtained with visual feedback.

  6. Neurophysiologic intraoperative monitoring: II. Facial nerve function.

    PubMed

    Niparko, J K; Kileny, P R; Kemink, J L; Lee, H M; Graham, M D

    1989-01-01

    Intraoperative facial nerve monitoring provides a potentially useful adjunct to recent surgical advances in neurotology and neurosurgery. These measures further aid the surgeon in preserving facial nerve function by enhancing visual identification with electrical monitoring of mechanically evoked facial muscle activation. Facial nerve monitoring in neurotologic surgery may achieve the following goals: (1) early recognition of surgical trauma to the facial nerve, with immediate feedback made available to the surgeon through monitoring of mechanical activation; (2) assistance in distinguishing the facial nerve from regional cranial nerves and from adjacent soft tissue and tumor with selective electrical stimulation; (3) facilitation of tumor excision by electrical mapping of portions of tumor that are remote from the facial nerve; (4) confirmation of nerve stimulability at the completion of surgery; and (5) identification of the site and degree of neural dysfunction in patients undergoing nerve exploration for suspected facial nerve neoplasm or undergoing decompression in acute facial palsy. This paper provides an overview of intraoperative facial nerve monitoring principles and methodology and reports a recent clinical investigation that demonstrates the utility of facial nerve monitoring in translabyrinthine acoustic neuroma surgery. PMID:2655465

  7. Effect of helium-neon laser irradiation on peripheral sensory nerve latency

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder-Mackler, L.; Bork, C.E.

    1988-02-01

    The purpose of this randomized, double-blind study was to determine the effect of a helium-neon (He-Ne) laser on latency of peripheral sensory nerve. Forty healthy subjects with no history of right upper extremity pathological conditions were assigned to either a Laser or a Placebo Group. Six 1-cm2 blocks along a 12-cm segment of the subjects' right superficial radial nerve received 20-second applications of either the He-Ne laser or a placebo. We assessed differences between pretest and posttest latencies with t tests for correlated and independent samples. The Laser Group showed a statistically significant increase in latency that corresponded to a decrease in sensory nerve conduction velocity. Short-duration He-Ne laser application significantly increased the distal latency of the superficial radial nerve. This finding provides information about the mechanism of the reported pain-relieving effect of the He-Ne laser.

  8. Functional and topographic segregation of glomeruli revealed by local staining of antennal sensory neurons in the honeybee Apis mellifera.

    PubMed

    Nishino, Hiroshi; Nishikawa, Michiko; Mizunami, Makoto; Yokohari, Fumio

    2009-07-10

    In the primary olfactory center of animals, glomeruli are the relay stations where sensory neurons expressing cognate odorant receptors converge onto interneurons. In cockroaches, moths, and honeybees, sensory afferents from sensilla on the anterodorsal surface and the posteroventral surface of the flagellum form two nerves of almost equal thicknesses. In this study, double labeling of the two nerves, or proximal/distal regions of the nerves, with fluorescent dyes was used to investigate topographic organization of sensory afferents in the honeybee. The sensory neurons of ampullaceal sensilla responsive to CO2, coelocapitular sensilla responsive to hygrosensory, and thermosensory stimuli and coeloconic sensilla of unknown function were characterized with large somata and supplied thick axons exclusively to the ventral nerve. Correspondingly, all glomeruli innervated by sensory tract (T) 4 received thick axonal processes exclusively from the ventral nerve. Almost all T1-3 glomeruli received a similar number of sensory afferents from the two nerves. In the macroglomerular complexes of the drone, termination fields of afferents from the two nerves almost completely overlapped; this differs from moths and cockroaches, which show heterogeneous terminations in the glomerular complex. In T1-3 glomeruli, sensory neurons originating from more distal flagellar segments tended to terminate within the inner regions of the cortical layer. These results suggest that some degree of somatotopic organization of sensory afferents exist in T1-3 glomeruli, and part of T4 glomeruli serve for processing of hygro- and thermosensory signals. PMID:19412930

  9. Electrophysiological evaluation of nerve function in inferior alveolar nerve injury: relationship between nerve action potentials and histomorphometric observations.

    PubMed

    Murayama, M; Sasaki, K; Shibahara, T

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to improve the accuracy of diagnosis of inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) injury by determining degrees of nerve disturbance using the sensory nerve action potential (SNAP) and sensory nerve conduction velocity (SCV). Crush and partial and complete nerve amputation injuries were applied to the IAN of rabbits, then SNAPs and histomorphometric observations were recorded at 1, 5, and 10 weeks. For crush injury, most nerves were smaller in diameter at 5 weeks than at 1 week, however after 10 weeks, extensive nerve regeneration was observed. The SNAP showed a decrease in SCV at weeks 1 and 5, followed by an increase at week 10. For partial nerve amputation, small to medium-sized nerve fibres were observed at weeks 1 and 5, then larger nerves were seen at week 10. Minimal changes in SCV were observed at weeks 1 and 5, however SCV increased at week 10. For complete nerve amputation, nerve fibres were sparse at week 1, but gradual nerve regeneration was observed at weeks 5 and 10. SNAPs were detectable from week 10, however the SCV was extremely low. This study showed SCV to be an effective factor in the evaluation of nerve injury and regeneration. PMID:26433750

  10. Nerve Transfers to Restore Shoulder Function.

    PubMed

    Leechavengvongs, Somsak; Malungpaishorpe, Kanchai; Uerpairojkit, Chairoj; Ng, Chye Yew; Witoonchart, Kiat

    2016-05-01

    The restoration of shoulder function after brachial plexus injury represents a significant challenge facing the peripheral nerve surgeons. This is owing to a combination of the complex biomechanics of the shoulder girdle, the multitude of muscles and nerves that could be potentially injured, and a limited number of donor options. In general, nerve transfer is favored over tendon transfer, because the biomechanics of the musculotendinous units are not altered. This article summarizes the surgical techniques and clinical results of nerve transfers for restoration of shoulder function. PMID:27094888

  11. Lentiviral-mediated transfer of CDNF promotes nerve regeneration and functional recovery after sciatic nerve injury in adult rats

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Lei; Liu, Yi; Zhao, Hua; Zhang, Wen; Guo, Ying-Jun; Nie, Lin

    2013-10-18

    Highlights: •CDNF was successfully transfected by a lentiviral vector into the distal sciatic nerve. •CDNF improved S-100, NF200 expression and nerve regeneration after sciatic injury. •CDNF improved the remyelination and thickness of the regenerated sciatic nerve. •CDNF improved gastrocnemius muscle weight and sciatic functional recovery. -- Abstract: Peripheral nerve injury is often followed by incomplete and unsatisfactory functional recovery and may be associated with sensory and motor impairment of the affected limb. Therefore, a novel method is needed to improve the speed of recovery and the final functional outcome after peripheral nerve injuries. This report investigates the effect of lentiviral-mediated transfer of conserved dopamine neurotrophic factor (CDNF) on regeneration of the rat peripheral nerve in a transection model in vivo. We observed notable overexpression of CDNF protein in the distal sciatic nerve after recombinant CDNF lentiviral vector application. We evaluated sciatic nerve regeneration after surgery using light and electron microscopy and the functional recovery using the sciatic functional index and target muscle weight. HE staining revealed better ordered structured in the CDNF-treated group at 8 weeks post-surgery. Quantitative analysis of immunohistochemistry of NF200 and S-100 in the CDNF group revealed significant improvement of axonal and Schwann cell regeneration compared with the control groups at 4 weeks and 8 weeks after injury. The thickness of the myelination around the axons in the CDNF group was significantly higher than in the control groups at 8 weeks post-surgery. The CDNF group displayed higher muscle weights and significantly increased sciatic nerve index values. Our findings suggest that CDNF gene therapy could provide durable and stable CDNF protein concentration and has the potential to enhance peripheral nerve regeneration, morphological and functional recovery following nerve injury, which suggests a

  12. Sensory nerve conduction in branches of common interdigital nerves: a new technique for normal controls and patients with morton's neuroma.

    PubMed

    Uludag, Burhanettin; Tataroglu, Cengiz; Bademkiran, Fikret; Uludag, Irem Fatma; Ertekin, Cumhur

    2010-06-01

    In this article, a new electrodiagnostic approach is described for patients with Morton's neuroma. The new method is based on the anatomic fact that the two branches of the common plantar interdigital nerves innervate the lateral side of one toe and the medial side the next one. This study included 20 normal subjects (aged 28-58 years, 10 men and 10 women) and 4 patients with Morton's neuroma (aged 44-52 years, 4 women). The branches of adjacent common plantar interdigital nerves that innerve one toe were stimulated superficially and separately with half of one toe covered with a piece of medical tape. The recordings were obtained on the posterior tibial nerve at the medial malleolus with needle electrodes. Thus, the difference in latencies of obtained sensory nerve action potentials on the posterior tibial nerve with needle electrode was measured. From normal subjects' data, it was determined that a latency difference value of above 0.17 milliseconds (mean +/- 2.5 SD) in one toe was abnormal. All of the patients with Morton's neuroma showed abnormal interlatency difference values. This new method, which we have developed, is more sensitive, simple to use, does not require extra equipment, and does not cause excessive pain. We suggest that interlatency difference between branches of the common plantar interdigital nerves is a useful and sensitive method for the diagnosis of Morton's neuroma. PMID:20479659

  13. Heightened motor and sensory (mirror-touch) referral induced by nerve block or topical anesthetic.

    PubMed

    Case, Laura K; Gosavi, Radhika; Ramachandran, Vilayanur S

    2013-08-01

    Mirror neurons allow us to covertly simulate the sensation and movement of others. If mirror neurons are sensory and motor neurons, why do we not actually feel this simulation- like "mirror-touch synesthetes"? Might afferent sensation normally inhibit mirror representations from reaching consciousness? We and others have reported heightened sensory referral to phantom limbs and temporarily anesthetized arms. These patients, however, had experienced illness or injury of the deafferented limb. In the current study we observe heightened sensory and motor referral to the face after unilateral nerve block for routine dental procedures. We also obtain double-blind, quantitative evidence of heightened sensory referral in healthy participants completing a mirror-touch confusion task after topical anesthetic cream is applied. We suggest that sensory and motor feedback exist in dynamic equilibrium with mirror representations; as feedback is reduced, the brain draws more upon visual information to determine- perhaps in a Bayesian manner- what to feel. PMID:23791606

  14. Phenotyping sensory nerve endings in vitro in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Katharina; Hein, Alexander; Hager, Ulrich; Kaczmarek, Jan Stefan; Turnquist, Brian P; Clapham, David E; Reeh, Peter W

    2014-01-01

    This protocol details methods to identify and record from cutaneous primary afferent axons in an isolated mammalian skin–saphenous nerve preparation. The method is based on extracellular recordings of propagated action potentials from single-fiber receptive fields. Cutaneous nerve endings show graded sensitivities to various stimulus modalities that are quantified by adequate and controlled stimulation of the superfused skin with heat, cold, touch, constant punctate pressure or chemicals. Responses recorded from single-fibers are comparable with those obtained in previous in vivo experiments on the same species. We describe the components and the setting-up of the basic equipment of a skin–nerve recording station (few days), the preparation of the skin and the adherent saphenous nerve in the mouse (15–45 min) and the isolation and recording of neurons (approximately 1–3 h per recording). In addition, stimulation techniques, protocols to achieve single-fiber recordings, issues of data acquisition and action potential discrimination are discussed in detail. PMID:19180088

  15. Early social isolation provokes electrophysiological and structural changes in cutaneous sensory nerves of adult male rats.

    PubMed

    Segura, Bertha; Melo, Angel I; Fleming, Alison S; Mendoza-Garrido, Maria Eugenia; González del Pliego, Margarita; Aguirre-Benitez, Elsa L; Hernández-Falcón, Jesús; Jiménez-Estrada, Ismael

    2014-12-01

    Sensory and social deprivation from the mother and littermates during early life disturbs the development of the central nervous system, but little is known about its effect on the development of the peripheral nervous system. To assess peripheral effects of early isolation, male rat pups were reared artificially in complete social isolation (AR); reared artificially with two same-age conspecifics (AR-Social); or reared by their mothers and with littermates (MR). As adults, the electrophysiological properties of the sensory sural (SU) nerve were recorded. We found that the amplitude and normalized area (with respect to body weight) of the compound action potential (CAP) response provoked by single electrical pulses of graded intensity in the SU nerves of AR animals were shorter than the CAP recorded in SU nerves from MR and AR-Social animals. The slope of the stimulus-response curve of AR SU nerves was smaller than that of the other nerves. The histological characterization of axons in the SU nerves was made and showed that the myelin thickness of axons in AR SU nerves was significant lower (2-7µm) than that of the axons in the other nerves. Furthermore, the area and axon diameter of SU nerves of both AR and AR-Social animals were significant lower than in MR animals. This is the first report to show that maternal and littermate deprivation by AR disturbs the development of the myelination and electrophysiological properties of axons in the SU nerve; the replacement of social cues prevents most of the effects. PMID:24897933

  16. Changes induced by peripheral nerve injury in the morphology and nanomechanics of sensory neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benzina, Ouafa; Szabo, Vivien; Lucas, Olivier; Saab, Marie-belle; Cloitre, Thierry; Scamps, Frédérique; Gergely, Csilla; Martin, Marta

    2013-06-01

    Peripheral nerve injury in vivo promotes a regenerative growth in vitro characterized by an improved neurite regrowth. Knowledge of the conditioning injury effects on both morphology and mechanical properties of live sensory neurons could be instrumental to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms leading to this regenerative growth. In the present study, we use differential interference contrast microscopy, fluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) to show that conditioned axotomy, induced by sciatic nerve injury, does not increase somatic size of sensory neurons from adult mice lumbar dorsal root ganglia but promotes the appearance of longer and larger neurites and growth cones. AFM on live neurons is also employed to investigate changes in morphology and membrane mechanical properties of somas of conditioned neurons following sciatic nerve injury. Mechanical analysis of the soma allows distinguishing neurons having a regenerative growth from control ones, although they show similar shapes and sizes.

  17. Electrical neurostimulation for chronic pain: On selective relay of sensory neural activities in myelinated nerve fibers.

    PubMed

    Sacré, Pierre; Sarma, Sridevi V; Guan, Yun; Anderson, William S

    2015-08-01

    Chronic pain affects about 100 million adults in the US. Despite their great need, neuropharmacology and neurostimulation therapies for chronic pain have been associated with suboptimal efficacy and limited long-term success, as their mechanisms of action are unclear. Yet current computational models of pain transmission suffer from several limitations. In particular, dorsal column models do not include the fundamental underlying sensory activity traveling in these nerve fibers. We developed a (simple) simulation test bed of electrical neurostimulation of myelinated nerve fibers with underlying sensory activity. This paper reports our findings so far. Interactions between stimulation-evoked and underlying activities are mainly due to collisions of action potentials and losses of excitability due to the refractory period following an action potential. In addition, intuitively, the reliability of sensory activity decreases as the stimulation frequency increases. This first step opens the door to a better understanding of pain transmission and its modulation by neurostimulation therapies. PMID:26737344

  18. Precision pinch performance in patients with sensory deficits of the median nerve at the carpal tunnel.

    PubMed

    Yen, Wei-Jang; Kuo, Yao-Lung; Kuo, Li-Chieh; Chen, Shu-Min; Kuan, Ta-Shen; Hsu, Hsiu-Yun

    2014-01-01

    To investigate how sensory symptoms impact the motor control of hands, in this study we examined the differences in conventional sensibility assessments and pinch force control in the pinch-holding-up activity (PHUA) test between carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) patients and healthy controls. CTS patients (n = 82) with 122 affected hands and an equal number of control subjects were recruited to participate in the threshold, discrimination, and PHUA tests. The patients showed significantly poorer hand sensibility and lower efficiency of force adjustment in the PHUA test as compared with the control subjects. Baseline pinch strength and the percentage of maximal pinch strength for the PHUA were significantly higher for the subgroup of sensory nerve action potential (SNAP) of <16 μV than for the subgroup of SNAP of 16 μV. Using a PHUA perspective to analyze the efficiency of force-adjustment could assist the clinical detection of sensory nerve dysfunction. PMID:24496877

  19. Nerve Transfers to Restore Elbow Function.

    PubMed

    Bulstra, Liselotte F; Shin, Alexander Y

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the various nerve transfer options for restoration of elbow function. This article describes nerve transfer strategies for elbow flexion and extension including the indications, limitations, and expected outcomes based on current literature. PMID:27094889

  20. Sensory perturbations using suture and sutureless repair of transected median nerve in rats.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Sumaiya; Shortland, Peter; Lauto, Antonio; Barton, Matthew; Morley, John W; Mahns, David A

    2016-03-01

    The effects of changes to cold, mechanical, and heat thresholds following median nerve transection with repair by sutures (Su) or Rose Bengal adhesion (RA) were compared to sham-operated animals. Both nerve-injured groups showed a transient, ipsilateral hyposensitivity to mechanical and heat stimuli followed by a robust and long-lasting hypersensitivity (6-7 weeks) with gradual recovery towards pre-injury levels by 90 days post-repair. Both tactile and thermal hypersensitivity were seen in the contralateral limb that was similar in onset but differed in magnitude and resolved more rapidly compared to the injured limb. Prior to injury, no animals showed any signs of aversion to cold plate temperatures of 4-16 °C. After injury, animals showed cold allodynia, lasting for 7 weeks in RA-repaired rats before recovering towards pre-injury levels, but were still present at 12 weeks in Su-repaired rats. Additionally, sensory recovery in the RA group was faster compared to the Su group in all behavioural tests. Surprisingly, sham-operated rats showed similar bilateral behavioural changes to all sensory stimuli that were comparable in onset and magnitude to the nerve-injured groups but resolved more quickly compared to nerve-injured rats. These results suggest that nerve repair using a sutureless approach produces an accelerated recovery with reduced sensorimotor disturbances compared to direct suturing. They also describe, for the first time, that unilateral forelimb nerve injury produces mirror-image-like sensory perturbations in the contralateral limb, suggesting that the contralateral side is not a true control for sensory testing. The potential mechanisms involved in this altered behaviour are discussed. PMID:26899181

  1. Refining the Sensory and Motor Ratunculus of the Rat Upper Extremity Using fMRI and Direct Nerve Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Younghoon R.; Pawela, Christopher P.; Li, Rupeng; Kao, Dennis; Schulte, Marie L.; Runquist, Matthew L.; Yan, Ji-Geng; Matloub, Hani S.; Jaradeh, Safwan S.; Hudetz, Anthony G.; Hyde, James S.

    2008-01-01

    It is well understood that the different regions of the body have cortical representations in proportion to the degree of innervation. Our current understanding of the rat upper extremity has been enhanced using functional MRI (fMRI), but these studies are often limited to the rat forepaw. The purpose of this study is to describe a new technique that allows us to refine the sensory and motor representations in the cerebral cortex by surgically implanting electrodes on the major nerves of the rat upper extremity and providing direct electrical nerve stimulation while acquiring fMRI images. This technique was used to stimulate the ulnar, median, radial, and musculocutaneous nerves in the rat upper extremity using four different stimulation sequences that varied in frequency (5 Hz vs. 10 Hz) and current (0.5 mA vs. 1.0 mA). A distinct pattern of cortical activation was found for each nerve. The higher stimulation current resulted in a dramatic increase in the level of cortical activation. The higher stimulation frequency resulted in both increases and attenuation of cortical activation in different regions of the brain, depending on which nerve was stimulated. PMID:17969116

  2. Systemic labeling and visualization of dental sensory nerves by the novel fluorescent marker AM1-43.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Sumio

    2006-09-01

    Systemic labeling of sensory nerves was performed by injecting a small amount of the styryl dye AM1-43 subcutaneously to the back skin of 4-week-old mice in order to determine its ability to stain sensory nerves. One or 3 days later, dental tissues were fixed and cryosectioned. Molars showed bright nerve fibers in the periodontal ligament and pulp. Nerve fibers in dentinal tubules approximately 100 microm from the pulp were also labeled. In the incisor, there were only few labelings in the pulp, although free nerve endings and Ruffini-type mechanosensors in the periodontal ligament on the lingual side were brightly labeled. The AM1-43-positive fibers were also labeled by anti-PGP9.5. AM1-43 is an excellent marker for sensory nerves and it may be useful for further investigations of dental innervation and in exploring new analgesics for tooth pain. PMID:16955669

  3. Reappraisal of Supraorbital Sensory Nerve Conduction Recordings: Orthodromic and Antidromic Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyeun Jun; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Lee, Se Kwang; Lee, Hang Jae

    2016-01-01

    Objective To establish a supraorbital nerve sensory conduction recording method and assess its usefulness. Methods Thirty-one healthy subjects without a history of trauma or neurological disease were recruited. For the orthodromic procedure, the recording electrode was attached immediately superior to the supraorbital notch. The stimulation electrode was placed on points along the hairline which evoked the largest sensory nerve action potentials (SNAPs). The antidromic sensory response was recorded after switching the recording and stimulating electrodes. The measured parameters were onset latency, peak latency, and baseline to peak amplitude of the SNAPs. The electrophysiological parameters of the bilateral supraorbital nerves were compared. We also recruited two patients who had sensory deficits on one side of their foreheads because of laceration injuries. Results The parameters of orthodromically recorded SNAPs were as follows: onset latency 1.21±0.22 ms (range, 0.9–1.6 ms), peak latency 1.54±0.23 ms (range, 1.2–2.2 ms), and baseline to peak amplitude 4.16±1.92 µV (range, 1.4–10 µV). Those of antidromically recorded SNAPs were onset latency 1.31±0.27 ms (range, 0.8–1.7 ms), peak latency 1.62±0.29 ms (range, 1.3–2.2 ms), and baseline to peak amplitude 4.00±1.89 µV (range, 1.5–9.0 µV). There was no statistical difference in onset latency, peak latency, or baseline to peak amplitude between the responses obtained using the orthodromic and antidromic methods, and the parameters also revealed no statistical difference between the supraorbital nerves on both sides. Conclusion We have successfully recorded supraorbital SNAPs. This conduction technique could be quite useful in evaluating patients with supraorbital nerve lesions. PMID:26949668

  4. Low-level laser treatment improves longstanding sensory aberrations in the inferior alveolar nerve following surgical trauma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khullar, Shelley M.; Brodin, P.; Barkvoll, P.; Haanoes, H. R.

    1996-01-01

    The incidence of inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) damage following removal of 3rd molar teeth or saggital split osteotomy has been reported as high as up to 5.5% and 100% respectively. Sensory aberrations in the IAN persisting for longer than 6 months leave some degree of permanent defect. Low level laser treatment (LLL) has a reported beneficial effect on regeneration of traumatically injured nerves. The purpose of this double blind clinical trial was to examine the effects of LLL using a GaAlAs laser (820 nm, Ronvig, Denmark) on touch and temperature sensory perception following a longstanding post surgical IAN injury. Thirteen patients were divided into two groups, one of which received real LLL (4 by 6 J per treatment along the distribution of the IAN to a total of 20 treatments during a time period between 36 - 69 days) and the other equivalent placebo LLL. The degree of mechanoreceptor injury as assessed by Semmes Weinstein Monofilaments (North Coast Medical, USA) were comparable in the two groups prior to treatment (p equals 0.9). Subsequent to LLL the real laser treatment group showed a significant improvement in mechanoreceptor sensory testing (p equals 0.01) as manifested by a decrease in load threshold (g) necessary to elicit a response from the most damaged area. The placebo LLL group showed no significant improvement, In addition, the real LLL group reported a subjective improvement in sensory function too. The degree of thermal sensitivity disability as assessed using a thermotester (Philips, Sweden) was comparable between the two groups prior to LLL p equals 0.5). However, there was no significant improvement in thermal sensitivity post LLL for either the real or placebo laser treated groups. In conclusion, GaAlAs LLL can improve mechanoreceptor perception in longstanding sensory aberration in the IAN.

  5. Influence of immobilization and sensory re-education on the sensory recovery after reconstruction of digital nerves with direct suture or muscle-in-vein conduits

    PubMed Central

    Manoli, Theodora; Schiefer, Jennifer Lynn; Schulz, Lukas; Fuchsberger, Thomas; Schaller, Hans-Eberhard

    2016-01-01

    The influence of duration of immobilization and postoperative sensory re-education on the final outcome after reconstruction of digital nerves with direct suture or muscle-in-vein conduits was investigated. The final sensory outcome of 35 patients with 41 digital nerve injuries, who either underwent a direct suture (DS) or a nerve reconstruction with muscle-in-vein conduits (MVC), was assessed the earliest 12 months postoperatively using static and moving two-point discrimination as well as Semmes-Weinstein monofilaments. There was no significant difference in sensory recovery in cases with an immobilization of 3–7 days versus 10 days in the DS or MVC group. Moreover, no statistically significant difference in sensory recovery was found in cases receiving postoperative sensory re-education versus those not receiving in the DS or MVC group. An early mobilization does not seem to have a negative impact on the final outcome after digital nerve reconstruction. The effect of sensory re-education after digital nerve reconstruction should be reconsidered. PMID:27073390

  6. Early sensory re-education of the hand after peripheral nerve repair based on mirror therapy: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Paula, Mayara H.; Barbosa, Rafael I.; Marcolino, Alexandre M.; Elui, Valéria M. C.; Rosén, Birgitta; Fonseca, Marisa C. R.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mirror therapy has been used as an alternative stimulus to feed the somatosensory cortex in an attempt to preserve hand cortical representation with better functional results. OBJECTIVE: To analyze the short-term functional outcome of an early re-education program using mirror therapy compared to a late classic sensory program for hand nerve repair. METHOD: This is a randomized controlled trial. We assessed 20 patients with median and ulnar nerve and flexor tendon repair using the Rosen Score combined with the DASH questionnaire. The early phase group using mirror therapy began on the first postoperative week and lasted 5 months. The control group received classic sensory re-education when the protective sensation threshold was restored. All participants received a patient education booklet and were submitted to the modified Duran protocol for flexor tendon repair. The assessments were performed by the same investigator blinded to the allocated treatment. Mann-Whitney Test and Effect Size using Cohen's d score were used for inter-group comparisons at 3 and 6 months after intervention. RESULTS: The primary outcome (Rosen score) values for the Mirror Therapy group and classic therapy control group after 3 and 6 months were 1.68 (SD=0.5); 1.96 (SD=0.56) and 1.65 (SD=0.52); 1.51 (SD=0.62), respectively. No between-group differences were observed. CONCLUSION: Although some clinical improvement was observed, mirror therapy was not shown to be more effective than late sensory re-education in an intermediate phase of nerve repair in the hand. Replication is needed to confirm these findings. PMID:26786080

  7. Peripheral nerve: from the microscopic functional unit of the axon to the biomechanically loaded macroscopic structure.

    PubMed

    Topp, Kimberly S; Boyd, Benjamin S

    2012-01-01

    Peripheral nerves are composed of motor and sensory axons, associated ensheathing Schwann cells, and organized layers of connective tissues that are in continuity with the tissues of the central nervous system. Nerve fiber anatomy facilitates conduction of electrical impulses to convey information over a distance, and the length of these polarized cells necessitates regulated axonal transport of organelles and structural proteins for normal cell function. Nerve connective tissues serve a protective function as the limb is subjected to the stresses of myriad limb positions and postures. Thus, the tissues are uniquely arranged to control the local nerve fiber environment and modulate physical stresses. In this brief review, we describe the microscopic anatomy and physiology of peripheral nerve and the biomechanical properties that enable nerve to withstand the physical stresses of everyday life. PMID:22133662

  8. Hyperglycemia- and neuropathy-induced changes in mitochondria within sensory nerves

    PubMed Central

    Hamid, Hussein S; Mervak, Colin M; Münch, Alexandra E; Robell, Nicholas J; Hayes, John M; Porzio, Michael T; Singleton, J Robinson; Smith, A Gordon; Feldman, Eva L; Lentz, Stephen I

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study focused on altered mitochondrial dynamics as a potential mechanism for diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). We employed both an in vitro sensory neuron model and an in situ analysis of human intraepidermal nerve fibers (IENFs) from cutaneous biopsies to measure alterations in the size distribution of mitochondria as a result of hyperglycemia and diabetes, respectively. Methods Neurite- and nerve-specific mitochondrial signals within cultured rodent sensory neurons and human IENFs were measured by employing a three-dimensional visualization and quantification technique. Skin biopsies from distal thigh (DT) and distal leg (DL) were analyzed from three groups of patients; patients with diabetes and no DPN, patients with diabetes and confirmed DPN, and healthy controls. Results This analysis demonstrated an increase in mitochondria distributed within the neurites of cultured sensory neurons exposed to hyperglycemic conditions. Similar changes were observed within IENFs of the DT in DPN patients compared to controls. This change was represented by a significant shift in the size frequency distribution of mitochondria toward larger mitochondria volumes within DT nerves of DPN patients. There was a length-dependent difference in mitochondria within IENFs. Distal leg IENFs from control patients had a significant shift toward larger volumes of mitochondrial signal compared to DT IENFs. Interpretation The results of this study support the hypothesis that altered mitochondrial dynamics may contribute to DPN pathogenesis. Future studies will examine the potential mechanisms that are responsible for mitochondrial changes within IENFs and its effect on DPN pathogenesis. PMID:25493271

  9. Emerging Relationships between Exercise, Sensory Nerves, and Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Michael A.; Kluding, Patricia M.; Wright, Douglas E.

    2016-01-01

    The utilization of physical activity as a therapeutic tool is rapidly growing in the medical community and the role exercise may offer in the alleviation of painful disease states is an emerging research area. The development of neuropathic pain is a complex mechanism, which clinicians and researchers are continually working to better understand. The limited therapies available for alleviation of these pain states are still focused on pain abatement and as opposed to treating underlying mechanisms. The continued research into exercise and pain may address these underlying mechanisms, but the mechanisms which exercise acts through are still poorly understood. The objective of this review is to provide an overview of how the peripheral nervous system responds to exercise, the relationship of inflammation and exercise, and experimental and clinical use of exercise to treat pain. Although pain is associated with many conditions, this review highlights pain associated with diabetes as well as experimental studies on nerve damages-associated pain. Because of the global effects of exercise across multiple organ systems, exercise intervention can address multiple problems across the entire nervous system through a single intervention. This is a double-edged sword however, as the global interactions of exercise also require in depth investigations to include and identify the many changes that can occur after physical activity. A continued investment into research is necessary to advance the adoption of physical activity as a beneficial remedy for neuropathic pain. The following highlights our current understanding of how exercise alters pain, the varied pain models used to explore exercise intervention, and the molecular pathways leading to the physiological and pathological changes following exercise intervention. PMID:27601974

  10. Emerging Relationships between Exercise, Sensory Nerves, and Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Michael A; Kluding, Patricia M; Wright, Douglas E

    2016-01-01

    The utilization of physical activity as a therapeutic tool is rapidly growing in the medical community and the role exercise may offer in the alleviation of painful disease states is an emerging research area. The development of neuropathic pain is a complex mechanism, which clinicians and researchers are continually working to better understand. The limited therapies available for alleviation of these pain states are still focused on pain abatement and as opposed to treating underlying mechanisms. The continued research into exercise and pain may address these underlying mechanisms, but the mechanisms which exercise acts through are still poorly understood. The objective of this review is to provide an overview of how the peripheral nervous system responds to exercise, the relationship of inflammation and exercise, and experimental and clinical use of exercise to treat pain. Although pain is associated with many conditions, this review highlights pain associated with diabetes as well as experimental studies on nerve damages-associated pain. Because of the global effects of exercise across multiple organ systems, exercise intervention can address multiple problems across the entire nervous system through a single intervention. This is a double-edged sword however, as the global interactions of exercise also require in depth investigations to include and identify the many changes that can occur after physical activity. A continued investment into research is necessary to advance the adoption of physical activity as a beneficial remedy for neuropathic pain. The following highlights our current understanding of how exercise alters pain, the varied pain models used to explore exercise intervention, and the molecular pathways leading to the physiological and pathological changes following exercise intervention. PMID:27601974

  11. Localization of NADPH Oxidase in Sympathetic and Sensory Ganglion Neurons and Perivascular Nerve Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Xian; Demel, Stacie L.; Quinn, Mark T.; Galligan, James J.; Kreulen, David L.

    2009-01-01

    Superoxide anion (O2−•) production was previously reported to be increased in celiac ganglia (CG) during DOCA-salt hypertension, possibly via activation of the reduced nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase. This suggested a role for neuronal NADPH oxidase in autonomic neurovascular control. However, the expression and localization of NADPH oxidase in the peripheral neurons is not fully known. The purpose of this study was to examine the subcellular localization of NADPH oxidase in sympathetic and sensory ganglion neurons and perivascular nerve fibers. In rat CG, p22phox and neuropeptide Y (NPY) were colocalized in all neurons. P22phox was also localized to dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons that contain calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP). In mesenteric arteries, p22phox and p47phox were colocalized with NPY or CGRP in perivascular nerve terminals. A similar pattern of nerve terminal staining of p22phox and p47phox was also found in cultured CG neurons and nerve growth factor (NGF)-differentiated PC12 cells. These data demonstrate a previously uncharacterized localization of NADPH oxidase in perivascular nerve fibers. The presence of a O2−• – generating enzyme in close vicinity to the sites of neurotransmitter handling in the nerve fibers suggests the possibility of novel redox-mediated mechanisms in peripheral neurovascular control. PMID:19716351

  12. Comparison of skin sensory thresholds using pre-programmed or single-frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jong Ho

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to compare the sensory thresholds of healthy subjects using pre-programmed or single-frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation. [Subjects] Ninety healthy adult subjects were randomly assigned to pre-programmed or single-frequency stimulation groups, each consisting of 45 participants. [Methods] Sensory thresholds were measured in the participants’ forearms using von Frey filaments before and after pre-programmed or single-frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, and the result in values were analyzed. [Results] Significant increases in sensory threshold after stimulation were observed in both groups. However, there were no significant differences between the two groups in sensory thresholds after stimulation or in the magnitude of threshold increases following stimulation. [Conclusion] Our results show that there are no differences between sensory threshold increases induced by pre-programmed and single-frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation. PMID:26834358

  13. Spontaneous pain in partial nerve injury models of neuropathy and the role of nociceptive sensory cover.

    PubMed

    Koplovitch, Pini; Minert, Anne; Devor, Marshall

    2012-07-01

    Spontaneous pain is difficult to measure in animals. One proposed biomarker of spontaneous pain is autotomy, a behavior frequently observed in rats with complete hindpaw denervation (the neuroma model of neuropathic pain). A large body of evidence suggests that this behavior reflects spontaneous dysesthesic sensations akin to phantom limb pain or anesthesia dolorosa. After partial paw denervation, such as in the spared nerve injury (SNI) model of neuropathic pain, autotomy is rare. Does this mean that spontaneous pain is absent? We denervated hindpaws in two stages: SNI surgery completed 7 or 28 days later by transection of the saphenous and sural nerves (SaSu). Minimal autotomy was evoked by the first stage. But it started rapidly after SaSu surgery rendered the limb numb, much more rapidly than after denervation in a single stage (neuroma model). The acceleration was proportional to the delay between the two surgeries. This "priming" effect of the first surgery indicates that the neural substrate of autotomy, spontaneous neuropathic pain, was not initiated by the onset of numbness, but rather by the first, SNI surgery. But the animal's pain experience was occult. The saphenous and sural nerves provided nociceptive sensory cover for the paw, preventing the behavioral expression of the spontaneous pain in the form of autotomy. The results support prior observations suggesting that partial nerve injury triggers spontaneous pain as well as allodynia, and illustrate the importance of nociceptive sensory cover in the prevention of self-inflicted limb injury. PMID:22548979

  14. NT-3 modulates NPY expression in primary sensory neurons following peripheral nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    STERNE, G. D.; BROWN, R. A.; GREEN, C. J.; TERENGHI, G.

    1998-01-01

    Peripheral nerve transection induces significant changes in neuropeptide expression and content in injured primary sensory neurons, possibly due to loss of target derived neurotrophic support. This study shows that neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) delivery to the injured nerve influences neuropeptide Y (NPY) expression within dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons. NT-3 was delivered by grafting impregnated fibronectin (500 ng/ml; NT group) in the axotomised sciatic nerve. Animals grafted with plain fibronectin mats (FN) or nerve grafts (NG) were used as controls. L4 and L5 DRG from operated and contralateral sides were harvested between 5 and 240 d. Using immunohistochemistry and computerised image analysis the percentage, diameter and optical density of neurons expressing calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), substance P (SP), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and NPY were quantified. Sciatic nerve axotomy resulted in significant reduction in expression of CGRP and SP, and significant upregulation of VIP and NPY (P<0.05 for ipsilateral vs contralateral DRG). By d 30, exogenous NT-3 and nerve graft attenuated the upregulation of NPY (P<0.05 for NT and NG vs FN). However, NT-3 administration did not influence the expression of CGRP, SP or VIP. The mean cell diameter of NPY immunoreactive neurons was significantly smaller in the NT-3 group (P<0.05 for NT vs FN and NG) suggesting a differential influence of NT-3 on larger neurons. The optical densities of NPY immunoreactive neurons of equal size were the same in each group at any time point, indicating that the neurons responding to NT-3 downregulate NPY expression to levels not detectable by immunohistochemistry. These results demonstrate that targeted administration of NT-3 regulates the phenotype of a NPY-immunoreactive neuronal subpopulation in the dorsal root ganglia, a further evidence of the trophic role of neurotrophins on primary sensory neurons. PMID:9827642

  15. Sensory Sensitivities and Performance on Sensory Perceptual Tasks in High-Functioning Individuals with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minshew, Nancy J.; Hobson, Jessica A.

    2008-01-01

    Most reports of sensory symptoms in autism are second hand or observational, and there is little evidence of a neurological basis. Sixty individuals with high-functioning autism and 61 matched typical participants were administered a sensory questionnaire and neuropsychological tests of elementary and higher cortical sensory perception. Thirty-two…

  16. Functional evaluation of peripheral nerve regeneration and target reinnervation in animal models: a critical overview.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Xavier

    2016-02-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries usually lead to severe loss of motor, sensory and autonomic functions in the patients. Due to the complex requirements for adequate axonal regeneration, functional recovery is often poorly achieved. Experimental models are useful to investigate the mechanisms related to axonal regeneration and tissue reinnervation, and to test new therapeutic strategies to improve functional recovery. Therefore, objective and reliable evaluation methods should be applied for the assessment of regeneration and function restitution after nerve injury in animal models. This review gives an overview of the most useful methods to assess nerve regeneration, target reinnervation and recovery of complex sensory and motor functions, their values and limitations. The selection of methods has to be adequate to the main objective of the research study, either enhancement of axonal regeneration, improving regeneration and reinnervation of target organs by different types of nerve fibres, or increasing recovery of complex sensory and motor functions. It is generally recommended to use more than one functional method for each purpose, and also to perform morphological studies of the injured nerve and the reinnervated targets. PMID:26228942

  17. Intervertebral disc, sensory nerves and neurotrophins: who is who in discogenic pain?

    PubMed Central

    García-Cosamalón, José; del Valle, Miguel E; Calavia, Marta G; García-Suárez, Olivia; López-Muñiz, Alfonso; Otero, Jesús; Vega, José A

    2010-01-01

    The normal intervertebral disc (IVD) is a poorly innervated organ supplied only by sensory (mainly nociceptive) and postganglionic sympathetic (vasomotor efferents) nerve fibers. Interestingly, upon degeneration, the IVD becomes densely innervated even in regions that in normal conditions lack innervation. This increased innervation has been associated with pain of IVD origin. The mechanisms responsible for nerve growth and hyperinnervation of pathological IVDs have not been fully elucidated. Among the molecules that are presumably involved in this process are some members of the family of neurotrophins (NTs), which are known to have both neurotrophic and neurotropic properties and regulate the density and distribution of nerve fibers in peripheral tissues. NTs and their receptors are expressed in healthy IVDs but much higher levels have been observed in pathological IVDs, thus suggesting a correlation between levels of expression of NTs and density of innervation in IVDs. In addition, NTs also play a role in inflammatory responses and pain transmission by increasing the expression of pain-related peptides and modulating synapses of nociceptive neurons at the spinal cord. This article reviews current knowledge about the innervation of IVDs, NTs and NT receptors, expression of NTs and their receptors in IVDs as well as in the sensory neurons innervating the IVDs, the proinflammatory role of NTs, NTs as nociception regulators, and the potential network of discogenic pain involving NTs. PMID:20456524

  18. Activation of sensory nerves participates in stress-induced histamine release from mast cells in rats.

    PubMed

    Huang, Z L; Mochizuki, T; Watanabe, H; Maeyama, K

    1999-08-01

    To elucidate the mechanism by which stress induces rapid histamine release from mast cells, Wistar rats, pretreated as neonates with capsaicin, were subjected to immobilization stress for 2 h, and histamine release was measured in paws of anesthetized rats by using in vivo microdialysis after activation of sensory nerves by electrical or chemical stimulation. Immobilization stress studies indicated that in control rats stress induced a 2.7-fold increase in the level of plasma histamine compared to that in freely moving rats. Whereas pretreatment with capsaicin significantly decreased stress-induced elevation of plasma histamine. Microdialysis studies showed that electrical stimulation of the sciatic nerve resulted in a 4-fold increase of histamine release in rat paws. However, this increase was significantly inhibited in rats pretreated with capsaicin. Furthermore, injection of capsaicin into rat paw significantly increased histamine release in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that activation of sensory nerves participates in stress-induced histamine release from mast cells. PMID:10462124

  19. Secretion of Growth Hormone in Response to Muscle Sensory Nerve Stimulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grindeland, Richard E.; Roy, R. R.; Edgerton, V. R.; Gosselink, K. L.; Grossman, E. J.; Sawchenko, P. E.; Wade, Charles E. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) secretion is stimulated by aerobic and resistive exercise and inhibited by exposure to actual or simulated (bedrest, hindlimb suspension) microgravity. Moreover, hypothalamic growth hormone-releasing factor (GRF) and preproGRF mRNA are markedly decreased in spaceflight rats. These observations suggest that reduced sensory input from inactive muscles may contribute to the reduced secretion of GH seen in "0 G". Thus, the aim of this study was to determine the effect of muscle sensory nerve stimulation on secretion of GH. Fed male Wistar rats (304 +/- 23 g) were anesthetized (pentobarbital) and the right peroneal (Pe), tibial (T), and sural (S) nerves were cut. Electrical stimulation of the distal (D) or proximal (P) ends of the nerves was implemented for 15 min. to mimic the EMG activity patterns of ankle extensor muscles of a rat walking 1.5 mph. The rats were bled by cardiac puncture and their anterior pituitaries collected. Pituitary and plasma bioactive (BGH) and immunoactive (IGH) GH were measured by bioassay and RIA.

  20. Sensory and sympathetic nerve fibers undergo sprouting and neuroma formation in the painful arthritic joint of geriatric mice

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Although the prevalence of arthritis dramatically increases with age, the great majority of preclinical studies concerning the mechanisms that drive arthritic joint pain have been performed in young animals. One mechanism hypothesized to contribute to arthritic pain is ectopic nerve sprouting; however, neuroplasticity is generally thought to be greater in young versus old nerves. Here we explore whether sensory and sympathetic nerve fibers can undergo a significant ectopic nerve remodeling in the painful arthritic knee joint of geriatric mice. Methods Vehicle (saline) or complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) was injected into the knee joint of 27- to 29-month-old female mice. Pain behaviors, macrophage infiltration, neovascularization, and the sprouting of sensory and sympathetic nerve fibers were then assessed 28 days later, when significant knee-joint pain was present. Knee joints were processed for immunohistochemistry by using antibodies raised against CD68 (monocytes/macrophages), PECAM (endothelial cells), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP; sensory nerve fibers), neurofilament 200 kDa (NF200; sensory nerve fibers), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH; sympathetic nerve fibers), and growth-associated protein 43 (GAP43; nerve fibers undergoing sprouting). Results At 4 weeks after initial injection, CFA-injected mice displayed robust pain-related behaviors (which included flinching, guarding, impaired limb use, and reduced weight bearing), whereas animals injected with vehicle alone displayed no significant pain-related behaviors. Similarly, in the CFA-injected knee joint, but not in the vehicle-injected knee joint, a remarkable increase was noted in the number of CD68+ macrophages, density of PECAM+ blood vessels, and density and formation of neuroma-like structures by CGRP+, NF200+, and TH+ nerve fibers in the synovium and periosteum. Conclusions Sensory and sympathetic nerve fibers that innervate the aged knee joint clearly maintain the capacity for robust

  1. Sensory disturbances of buccal and lingual nerve by muscle compression: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Alvira-González, Joaquín

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Several studies on cadavers dissection have shown that collateral branches of the trigeminal nerve cross muscle bundles on their way, being a possible etiological factor of some nerve disturbances. Case Report A 45-year-old man attended to the Temporomandibular Joint and Orofacial Pain Unit of the Master of Oral Surgery and Implantology in Hospital Odontològic of Barcelona University, referring tingling in the left hemifacial región and ipsilateral lingual side for one year, with discomfort when shaving or skin compression. Discussion Several branches of the trigeminal nerve follow a path through the masticatory muscles, being the lingual nerve and buccal nerve the most involved. The hyperactivity of the muscle bundles that are crossed by nerve structures generates a compression that could explain certain orofacial neuropathies (numbness and / or pain) in which a clear etiologic factor can not be identified. Key words:Buccal nerve, paresthesia, idiopathic trigeminal sensory neuropathy. PMID:26855715

  2. Mustard oils and cannabinoids excite sensory nerve fibres through the TRP channel ANKTM1.

    PubMed

    Jordt, Sven-Eric; Bautista, Diana M; Chuang, Huai-Hu; McKemy, David D; Zygmunt, Peter M; Högestätt, Edward D; Meng, Ian D; Julius, David

    2004-01-15

    Wasabi, horseradish and mustard owe their pungency to isothiocyanate compounds. Topical application of mustard oil (allyl isothiocyanate) to the skin activates underlying sensory nerve endings, thereby producing pain, inflammation and robust hypersensitivity to thermal and mechanical stimuli. Despite their widespread use in both the kitchen and the laboratory, the molecular mechanism through which isothiocyanates mediate their effects remains unknown. Here we show that mustard oil depolarizes a subpopulation of primary sensory neurons that are also activated by capsaicin, the pungent ingredient in chilli peppers, and by Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the psychoactive component of marijuana. Both allyl isothiocyanate and THC mediate their excitatory effects by activating ANKTM1, a member of the TRP ion channel family recently implicated in the detection of noxious cold. These findings identify a cellular and molecular target for the pungent action of mustard oils and support an emerging role for TRP channels as ionotropic cannabinoid receptors. PMID:14712238

  3. Sensory sensitivities and performance on sensory perceptual tasks in high-functioning individuals with autism

    PubMed Central

    Minshew, Nancy J.; Hobson, Jessica A.

    2011-01-01

    Despite extensive reports of sensory symptoms in autism, there is little empirical support for their neurological basis. Sixty individuals with high-functioning autism and 61 matched typical comparison participants were administered a sensory questionnaire and standardized neuropsychological tests of elementary and higher cortical sensory perception. Thirty-two per cent of participants with autism endorsed more sensory sensitivity items than any of the participants in the comparison group. On the sensory perceptual exam, both groups made few errors on elementary sensory perception items. Controls made few errors on higher cortical sensory perception items, but 30% of the participants with autism made high numbers of errors, though there was no evidence of the neglect syndrome. There was little correlation between the sensory sensitivities and the sensory perceptual deficits, likely due to the low correspondence between the measures. These results support the common occurrence of disturbances in sensory experiences in high functioning individuals with autism based on first person report, and the presence of neurological abnormalities in higher cortical sensory perception. PMID:18302014

  4. Cortical Brain Mapping of Peripheral Nerves Using Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging in a Rodent Model

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Younghoon R.; Jones, Seth R.; Pawela, Christopher P.; Li, Rupeng; Kao, Dennis S.; Schulte, Marie L.; Runquist, Matthew L.; Yan, Ji-Geng; Hudetz, Anthony G.; Jaradeh, Safwan S.; Hyde, James S.; Matloub, Hani S.

    2008-01-01

    The regions of the body have cortical and subcortical representation in proportion to their degree of innervation. The rat forepaw has been studied extensively in recent years using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)—typically by stimulation using electrodes directly inserted into the skin of the forepaw. Here, we stimulate using surgically implanted electrodes. A major distinction is that stimulation of the skin of the forepaw is mostly sensory, whereas direct nerve stimulation reveals not only the sensory system but also deep brain structures associated with motor activity. In this paper, we seek to define both the motor and sensory cortical and subcortical representations associated with the four major nerves of the rodent upper extremity. We electrically stimulated each nerve (median, ulnar, radial, and musculocutaneous) during fMRI acquisition using a 9.4T Bruker scanner. A current level of 0.5-1.0 mA and a frequency of 5 Hz were used while keeping the duration constant. A distinct pattern of cortical activation was found for each nerve that can be correlated with known sensorimotor afferent and efferent pathways to the rat forepaw. This direct nerve stimulation rat model can provide insight into peripheral nerve injury. PMID:18924070

  5. Effect of Collateral Sprouting on Donor Nerve Function After Nerve Coaptation: A Study of the Brachial Plexus

    PubMed Central

    Reichert, Paweł; Kiełbowicz, Zdzisław; Dzięgiel, Piotr; Puła, Bartosz; Wrzosek, Marcin; Bocheńska, Aneta; Gosk, Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of the present study was to evaluate the donor nerve from the C7 spinal nerve of the rabbit brachial plexus after a coaptation procedure. Assessment was performed of avulsion of the C5 and C6 spinal nerves treated by coaptation of these nerves to the C7 spinal nerve. Material/Methods After nerve injury, fourteen rabbits were treated by end-to-side coaptation (ETS), and fourteen animals were treated by side-to-side coaptation (STS) on the right brachial plexus. Electrophysiological and histomorphometric analyses and the skin pinch test were used to evaluate the outcomes. Results There was no statistically significant difference in the G-ratio proximal and distal to the coaptation in the ETS group, but the differences in the axon, myelin sheath and fiber diameters were statistically significant. The comparison of the ETS and STS groups distal to the coaptation with the controls demonstrated statistically significant differences in the fiber, axon, and myelin sheath diameters. With respect to the G-ratio, the ETS group exhibited no significant differences relative to the control, whereas the G-ratio in the STS group and the controls differed significantly. In the electrophysiological study, the ETS and STS groups exhibited major changes in the biceps and subscapularis muscles. Conclusions The coaptation procedure affects the histological structure of the nerve donor, but it does not translate into changes in nerve conduction or the sensory function of the limb. The donor nerve lesion in the ETS group is transient and has minimal clinical relevance. PMID:26848925

  6. Effect of Collateral Sprouting on Donor Nerve Function After Nerve Coaptation: A Study of the Brachial Plexus.

    PubMed

    Reichert, Pawel; Kiełbowicz, Zdzisław; Dzięgiel, Piotr; Puła, Bartosz; Wrzosek, Marcin; Bocheńska, Aneta; Gosk, Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The aim of the present study was to evaluate the donor nerve from the C7 spinal nerve of the rabbit brachial plexus after a coaptation procedure. Assessment was performed of avulsion of the C5 and C6 spinal nerves treated by coaptation of these nerves to the C7 spinal nerve. MATERIAL AND METHODS After nerve injury, fourteen rabbits were treated by end-to-side coaptation (ETS), and fourteen animals were treated by side-to-side coaptation (STS) on the right brachial plexus. Electrophysiological and histomorphometric analyses and the skin pinch test were used to evaluate the outcomes. RESULTS There was no statistically significant difference in the G-ratio proximal and distal to the coaptation in the ETS group, but the differences in the axon, myelin sheath and fiber diameters were statistically significant. The comparison of the ETS and STS groups distal to the coaptation with the controls demonstrated statistically significant differences in the fiber, axon, and myelin sheath diameters. With respect to the G-ratio, the ETS group exhibited no significant differences relative to the control, whereas the G-ratio in the STS group and the controls differed significantly. In the electrophysiological study, the ETS and STS groups exhibited major changes in the biceps and subscapularis muscles. CONCLUSIONS The coaptation procedure affects the histological structure of the nerve donor, but it does not translate into changes in nerve conduction or the sensory function of the limb. The donor nerve lesion in the ETS group is transient and has minimal clinical relevance. PMID:26848925

  7. Cutaneous sensory nerve as a substitute for auditory nerve in solving deaf-mutes’ hearing problem: an innovation in multi-channel-array skin-hearing technology

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jianwen; Li, Yan; Zhang, Ming; Ma, Weifang; Ma, Xuezong

    2014-01-01

    The current use of hearing aids and artificial cochleas for deaf-mute individuals depends on their auditory nerve. Skin-hearing technology, a patented system developed by our group, uses a cutaneous sensory nerve to substitute for the auditory nerve to help deaf-mutes to hear sound. This paper introduces a new solution, multi-channel-array skin-hearing technology, to solve the problem of speech discrimination. Based on the filtering principle of hair cells, external voice signals at different frequencies are converted to current signals at corresponding frequencies using electronic multi-channel bandpass filtering technology. Different positions on the skin can be stimulated by the electrode array, allowing the perception and discrimination of external speech signals to be determined by the skin response to the current signals. Through voice frequency analysis, the frequency range of the band-pass filter can also be determined. These findings demonstrate that the sensory nerves in the skin can help to transfer the voice signal and to distinguish the speech signal, suggesting that the skin sensory nerves are good candidates for the replacement of the auditory nerve in addressing deaf-mutes’ hearing problems. Scientific hearing experiments can be more safely performed on the skin. Compared with the artificial cochlea, multi-channel-array skin-hearing aids have lower operation risk in use, are cheaper and are more easily popularized. PMID:25317171

  8. High Median Nerve Injuries.

    PubMed

    Isaacs, Jonathan; Ugwu-Oju, Obinna

    2016-08-01

    The median nerve serves a crucial role in extrinsic and intrinsic motor and sensory function to the radial half of the hand. High median nerve injuries, defined as injuries proximal to the anterior interosseous nerve origin, therefore typically result in significant functional loss prompting aggressive surgical management. Even with appropriate recognition and contemporary nerve reconstruction, however, motor and sensory recovery may be inadequate. With isolated persistent high median nerve palsies, a variety of available tendon transfers can improve key motor functions and salvage acceptable use of the hand. PMID:27387077

  9. Sensory nerves contribute to cutaneous vasodilator response to cathodal stimulation in healthy rats.

    PubMed

    Gohin, Stéphanie; Decorps, Johanna; Sigaudo-Roussel, Dominique; Fromy, Bérengère

    2015-09-01

    Cutaneous current-induced vasodilation (CIV) in response to galvanic current application is an integrative model of neurovascular interaction that relies on capsaicin-sensitive fiber activation. The upstream and downstream mechanisms related to the activation of the capsaicin-sensitive fibers involved in CIV are not elucidated. In particular, the activation of cutaneous transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1 (TRPV1) channels and/or acid-sensing ion channels (ASIC) (activators mechanisms) and the release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and substance P (SP) (effector mechanisms) have been tested. To assess cathodal CIV, we measured cutaneous blood flow using laser Doppler flowmetry for 20min following cathodal current application (240s, 100μA) on the skin of the thigh in anesthetized healthy rats for 20min. CIV was studied in rats treated with capsazepine and amiloride to inhibit TRPV1 and ASIC channels, respectively; CGRP8-37 and SR140333 to antagonize CGRP and neurokinin-1 (NK1) receptors, respectively; compared to their respective controls. Cathodal CIV was attenuated by capsazepine (12±2% vs 54±6%, P<0.001), amiloride (19±8% vs 61±6%, P<0.01), CGRP8-37 (15±6% vs 61±6%, P<0.001) and SR140333 (9±5% vs 54±6%, P<0.001) without changing local acidification. This is the first integrative study performed in healthy rats showing that cutaneous vasodilation in response to cathodal stimulation is initiated by activation of cutaneous TRPV1 and ASIC channels likely through local acidification. The involvement of CGRP and NK1 receptors suggests that cathodal CIV is the result of CGRP and SP released through activated capsaicin-sensitive fibers. Therefore cathodal CIV could be a valuable method to assess sensory neurovascular function in the skin, which would be particularly relevant to evaluate the presence of small nerve fiber disorders and the effectiveness of treatments. PMID:26205659

  10. Mobility-Related Consequences of Reduced Lower-Extremity Peripheral Nerve Function with Age: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Rachel E.; Caserotti, Paolo; Cauley, Jane A.; Boudreau, Robert M.; Goodpaster, Bret H.; Vinik, Aaron I.; Newman, Anne B.; Strotmeyer, Elsa S.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to systematically review the relationship between lower-extremity peripheral nerve function and mobility in older adults. The National Library of Medicine (PubMed) was searched on March 23, 2015 with no limits on publication dates. One reviewer selected original research studies of older adults (≥65 years) that assessed the relationship between lower-extremity peripheral nerve function and mobility-related outcomes. Participants, study design and methods of assessing peripheral nerve impairment were evaluated and results were reported and synthesized. Eight articles were identified, including 6 cross-sectional and 2 longitudinal studies. These articles investigated 6 elderly cohorts (4 from the U.S. and 2 from Italy): 3 community-dwelling (including 1 with only disabled women and 1 without mobility limitations at baseline), 1 with both community-dwelling and institutionalized residents, 1 from a range of residential locations, and 1 of patients with peripheral arterial disease. Mean ages ranged from 71-82 years. Nerve function was assessed by vibration threshold (n=2); sensory measures and clinical signs and symptoms of neuropathy (n=2); motor nerve conduction (n=1); and a combination of both sensory measures and motor nerve conduction (n=3). Each study found that worse peripheral nerve function was related to poor mobility, although relationships varied based on the nerve function measure and mobility domain assessed. Six studies found that the association between nerve function and mobility persisted despite adjustment for diabetes. Evidence suggests that peripheral nerve function impairment at various levels of severity is related to poor mobility independent of diabetes. Relationships varied depending on peripheral nerve measure, which may be particularly important when investigating specific biological mechanisms. Future research needs to identify risk factors for peripheral nerve decline beyond diabetes, especially those

  11. Mobility-Related Consequences of Reduced Lower-Extremity Peripheral Nerve Function with Age: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Ward, Rachel E; Caserotti, Paolo; Cauley, Jane A; Boudreau, Robert M; Goodpaster, Bret H; Vinik, Aaron I; Newman, Anne B; Strotmeyer, Elsa S

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study is to systematically review the relationship between lower-extremity peripheral nerve function and mobility in older adults. The National Library of Medicine (PubMed) was searched on March 23, 2015 with no limits on publication dates. One reviewer selected original research studies of older adults (≥65 years) that assessed the relationship between lower-extremity peripheral nerve function and mobility-related outcomes. Participants, study design and methods of assessing peripheral nerve impairment were evaluated and results were reported and synthesized. Eight articles were identified, including 6 cross-sectional and 2 longitudinal studies. These articles investigated 6 elderly cohorts (4 from the U.S. and 2 from Italy): 3 community-dwelling (including 1 with only disabled women and 1 without mobility limitations at baseline), 1 with both community-dwelling and institutionalized residents, 1 from a range of residential locations, and 1 of patients with peripheral arterial disease. Mean ages ranged from 71-82 years. Nerve function was assessed by vibration threshold (n=2); sensory measures and clinical signs and symptoms of neuropathy (n=2); motor nerve conduction (n=1); and a combination of both sensory measures and motor nerve conduction (n=3). Each study found that worse peripheral nerve function was related to poor mobility, although relationships varied based on the nerve function measure and mobility domain assessed. Six studies found that the association between nerve function and mobility persisted despite adjustment for diabetes. Evidence suggests that peripheral nerve function impairment at various levels of severity is related to poor mobility independent of diabetes. Relationships varied depending on peripheral nerve measure, which may be particularly important when investigating specific biological mechanisms. Future research needs to identify risk factors for peripheral nerve decline beyond diabetes, especially those

  12. Effects of colistin on the sensory nerve conduction velocity and F-wave in mice.

    PubMed

    Dai, Chongshan; Tang, Shusheng; Li, Jichang; Wang, Jiping; Xiao, Xilong

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the changes of sensory nerve conduction velocity (SNCV) and F-wave for colistin-induced peripheral neurotoxicity using a mouse model. Mice were administered with colistin 5, 7.5 and 15 mg/kg/day via a 3-min. intravenous infusion. The sensory nerve conduction velocity (SNCV) and F-wave were measured using the bipolar recording electrodes. The SNCV and F-wave latency changed in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The significant increase of F-wave latency and significant decrease of SNCV appeared on day 3 (p < 0.05 and 0.01, respectively) in the 15 mg/kg/day group, and they were markedly changed on day 7 in the 7.5 mg/kg/day (p < 0.01 and 0.05, respectively) and 15 mg/kg/day groups (both p < 0.01). In addition, F-wave latency also significantly increased on day 7 in the 5 mg/kg/day group (p < 0.05) without any clinical signs. These results indicate that SNCV and F-wave latency were more sensitive in colistin-induced neurotoxicity in mice, which highlights the early monitoring tool of polymyxins neurotoxicity in the clinic. PMID:24861773

  13. Identifying motor and sensory myelinated axons in rabbit peripheral nerves by histochemical staining for carbonic anhydrase and cholinesterase activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Danny A.; Sanger, James R.; Matloub, Hani S.; Yousif, N. John; Bain, James L. W.

    1988-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) and cholinesterase (CE) histochemical staining of rabbit spinal nerve roots and dorsal root ganglia demonstrated that among the reactive myeliated axons, with minor exceptions, sensory axons were CA positive and CE negative whereas motor axons were CA negative and CE positive. The high specificity was achieved by adjusting reaction conditions to stain subpopulations of myelinated axons selectively while leaving 50 percent or so unstained. Fixation with glutaraldehyde appeared necessary for achieving selectivity. Following sciatic nerve transection, the reciprocal staining pattern persisted in damaged axons and their regenerating processes which formed neuromas within the proximal nerve stump. Within the neuromas, CA-stained sensory processes were elaborated earlier and in greater numbers than CE-stained regenerating motor processes. The present results indicate that histochemical axon typing can be exploited to reveal heterogeneous responses of motor and sensory axons to injury.

  14. Clinical and electrophysiological assessment of inferior alveolar nerve function after lateral nerve transposition.

    PubMed

    Nocini, P F; De Santis, D; Fracasso, E; Zanette, G

    1999-04-01

    Inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) transposition surgery may cause some degree of sensory impairment. Accurate and reproducible tests are mandatory to assess IAN conduction capacity following nerve transposition. In this study subjective (heat, pain and tactile-discriminative tests) and objective (electrophysiological) assessments were performed in 10 patients receiving IAN transposition (bilaterally in 8 cases) in order to evaluate any impairment of the involved nerves one year post-operatively. All patients reported a tingling, well-tolerated sensation in the areas supplied by the mental nerve with no anaesthesia or burning paresthesia. Tactile discrimination was affected the most (all but 1 patient). No action potential was recorded in 4 patients' sides (23.5%); 12 sides showed a decreased nerve conduction velocity (NCV) (70.5%) and 1 side normal NCV values (6%). There was no significant difference in NCV decrease between partial and total transposition sides, if examined separately. Nerve conduction findings were related 2-point discrimination scores, but not to changes in pain and heat sensitivity. These findings show that lateral nerve transposition, though resulting in a high percentage of minor IAN injuries, as determined by electrophysiological testing, provides a viable surgical procedure to allow implant placement in the posterior mandible without causing severe sensory complaints. Considering ethical and forensic implications, patients should be fully informed that a certain degree of nerve injury might be expected to occur from the procedure. Electrophysiological evaluation is a reliable way to assess the degree of IAN dysfunction, especially if combined with a clinical examination. Intraoperative monitoring of IAN conduction might help identify the pathogenetic mechanisms of nerve injury and the surgical steps that are most likely to harm nerve integrity. PMID:10219131

  15. Motor and sensory ulnar nerve conduction velocities: effect of elbow position.

    PubMed

    Harding, C; Halar, E

    1983-05-01

    Ulnar motor and sensory nerve conduction velocities (NCV) were studied bilaterally in 20 able-bodied subjects for below elbow (BE) and across elbow (AE) segments to assess the effect of 4 different elbow positions on NCV (0 degrees, 45 degrees, 90 degrees, and 135 degrees). Although constant skin stimulation marker points were used, the AE segment length became progressively longer with increased elbow flexion. At 0 degrees flexion the AE segment motor NCV was found to be slower, and at 45 degrees it was found faster than the BE NCV. At each subsequent elbow flexion position (90 degrees and 135 degrees) there was an erroneous increase in motor and sensory NCV for the AE segments (p less than 0.01). This increase in AE NCV with elbow flexion was mostly due to stretching of skin over the flexed elbow. The nerve itself was observed in 4 cadaver specimens to slide distally with respect to the above elbow skin marker. Since 45 degrees elbow flexion was the position of least variation in motor NCV for AE and BE segments, this degree of elbow flexion appears to be optimum. From these measurements and from literature review neither short AE segment length (less than 10 cm) nor long AE segment length (greater than 15 cm) is optimum for measurement of AE NCV in the assessment of compressive neuropathy at the elbow. Short segments are subject to increased NCV variation while long segments may not detect pathological slowing of NCV only occurring over a short portion of the nerve. PMID:6847360

  16. Morphology and Functional Anatomy of the Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve with Extralaryngeal Terminal Bifurcation

    PubMed Central

    Dogan, Sami

    2016-01-01

    Anatomical variations of the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN), such as an extralaryngeal terminal bifurcation (ETB), threaten the safety of thyroid surgery. Besides the morphology of the nerve branches, intraoperative evaluation of their functional anatomy may be useful to preserve motor activity. We exposed 67 RLNs in 36 patients. The main trunk, bifurcation point, and terminal branches of bifid nerves were macroscopically determined and exposed during thyroid surgery. The functional anatomy of the nerve branches was evaluated by intraoperative nerve monitoring (IONM). Forty-six RLNs with an ETB were intraoperatively exposed. The bifurcation point was located along the prearterial, arterial, and postarterial segments in 11%, 39%, and 50% of bifid RLNs, respectively. Motor activity was determined in all anterior branches. The functional anatomy of terminal branches detected motor activity in 4 (8.7%) posterior branches of 46 bifid RLNs. The motor activity in posterior branches created a wave amplitude at 25–69% of that in the corresponding anterior branches. The functional anatomy of bifid RLNs demonstrated that anterior branches always contained motor fibres while posterior branches seldom contained motor fibres. The motor activity of the posterior branch was weaker than that of the anterior branch. IONM may help to differentiate between motor and sensory functions of nerve branches. The morphology and functional anatomy of all nerve branches must be preserved to ensure a safer surgery. PMID:27493803

  17. Uptake of nerve growth factor along peripheral and spinal axons of primary sensory neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, P.M.; Riopelle, R.J.

    1984-07-01

    To investigate the distribution of nerve growth factor (NGF) receptors on peripheral and central axons, (/sup 125/I)NGF was injected into the sciatic nerve or spinal cord of adult rats. Accumulation of (/sup 125/I)NGF in lumbar dorsal root ganglia was monitored by gamma emission counting and radioautography. (/sup 125/I)NGF, injected endoneurially in small quantities, was taken into sensory axons by a saturable process and was transported retrogradely to their cell bodies at a maximal rate of 2.5 to 7.5 mm/hr. Because very little (/sup 125/I)NGF reached peripheral terminals, the results were interpreted to indicate that receptors for NGF are present on nonterminal segments of sensory axons. The specificity and high affinity of NGF uptake were illustrated by observations that negligible amounts of gamma activity accumulated in lumbar dorsal root ganglia after comparable intraneural injection of (/sup 125/I) cytochrome C or (/sup 125/I)oxidized NGF. Similar techniques were used to demonstrate avid internalization and retrograde transport of (/sup 125/I)NGF by intraspinal axons arising from dorsal root ganglia. Following injection of (/sup 125/I)NGF into lumbar or cervical regions of the spinal cord, neuronal perikarya were clearly labeled in radioautographs of lumbar dorsal root ganglia. Sites for NGF uptake on primary sensory neurons in the adult rat are not restricted to peripheral axon terminals but are extensively distributed along both peripheral and central axons. Receptors on axons provide a mechanism whereby NGF supplied by glia could influence neuronal maintenance or axonal regeneration.

  18. Comparison of regenerative and reinnervating capabilities of different functional types of nerve fibers.

    PubMed

    Navarro, X; Verdú, E; Butí, M

    1994-10-01

    Functional reinnervation of sweat glands (SGs), skin, and muscle in the mouse paw after sciatic nerve lesions was evaluated to allow comparisons of the regeneration efficiency of different functional types of nerve fibers. In four groups of mice the sciatic nerve was crushed, sectioned, and left unrepaired or repaired by suture or tubulization. Reappearance of SG secretion and pinprick responses occurred slightly earlier than recordings of compound muscle and nerve action potentials in all groups. The degree of reinnervation, with respect to preoperative control values, of SGs and skin nociceptors was higher than the amplitude of the action potentials, mainly when the nerve injury was severe. The chances for recovery progressively decreased with the severity of the lesion, affecting the larger nerve fibers most. These results indicate that, after injuries of peripheral nerves, all types of nerve fibers are able to regenerate in the mouse, although small size fibers (sudomotor and nociceptive) allow for a higher degree of functional recovery than large myelinated fibers (skeletomotor and sensory). PMID:7957736

  19. Histochemistry of nerve fibres double labelled with anti-TRPV2 antibodies and sensory nerve marker AM1-43 in the dental pulp of rat molars.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Sumio

    2008-09-01

    AM1-43 can label sensory nerve fibres and sensory neurons. Permeation of non-selective cation channels of the nerve cell membrane is suggested to be the mechanism responsible for labelling. To identify these channels, two candidates, TRPV1 and TRPV2 were examined by immunocytochemistry in the dental pulp and trigeminal ganglion of rats injected with AM1-43. A part of AM1-43-labelled nerve fibres was also positive for anti-TRPV2 antibody but negative for anti-TRPV1 antibody in the dental pulp. In the trigeminal ganglion, a part of the neuron showed both bright AM1-43 labelling and anti-TRPV2 immunolabelling, but neurons double labelled with AM1-43 and TRPV1 were rare. These results suggest that TRPV2 channels, but not TRPV1 channels, contribute to the fluorescent labelling of AM1-43 in the dental pulp. PMID:18405879

  20. [A case of hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy with pyramidal tract sign, optic nerve atrophy and mental retardation].

    PubMed

    Adachi, T; Imaoka, K; Shirasawa, A; Yamaguchi, S; Kobayashi, S

    1998-12-01

    The patient was a 61-year-old man who suffered from gait disturbance since childhood. He also had mental retardation. Gait disturbance was slowly progressive. His mother, sister, brother and son of his sister suffered from gait disturbance. On neurological examination, he showed mental retardation, optic nerve atrophy and neural deafness. He also showed severe muscle atrophy and weakness of bilateral lower limbs associated with pes cavus. Muscle tonus of lower limbs and patellar tendon reflex were increased bilaterally. Achilles tendon reflex was absent. Babinski and Chaddock signs were positive. Superficial and deep sensations were almost normal. There were no cerebellar signs. Blood chemistry was normal. On nerve conduction studies, motor nerve conduction velocity of the upper limbs was normal and that of the posterior tibial nerve was decreased; right 36.0m/sec, left 29.7m/sec. Sensory nerve conduction velocity of the median nerve was slightly decreased; right 36.5m/sec, left 45.2m/sec and sural nerve did not respond to electric stimuli. On sural nerve biopsy, the density of myelinated fibers was severely decreased. Onion bulb formation was not observed. We classified this case as hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (HMSN) type II based on nerve conduction studies and findings from sural nerve biopsy. HMSN with pyramidal tract sign has been classified as type V and HMSN with optic nerve atrophy as type VI. This case had characteristic symptoms as type V and VI. Histopathological findings of HMSN type V and VI have not been established yet. This case might provide an important clue for classification of HMSN. PMID:10349345

  1. [Morphological and functional studies on nerve regeneration after corneal nerve injuries].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z Q; Xie, L X; Dong, X G

    1994-07-01

    Using gold chloride impregnation of nerves and horse-radish peroxidase (HRP) axoplasma retrograde tracing technique, we monitored nerve regeneration over a period of 6 months following penetrating perilimbal incisions and penetrating keratoplasties (PKP) in rabbits. Post-operatively, at 1 month after a 180 degrees perilimbal incision, loose unconnected subepithelial plexus were present in the limbus, at 2 months 1-2 bundles of deep stromal nerve were seen in the stroma and by 6 months only a few stromal nerves regenerated. There was no difference in nerve regeneration between post-operative autograft and allograft PKP. By 6 months, the quantity of HRP-labelled cells in the trigeminal ganglia was less than the normal level. The results indicated that nerve regeneration by 6 months after corneal nerve injuries was inadequate to restore a normal corneal nerve extent and function. PMID:7843026

  2. Function electrical stimulation signals generator circuits for the central nerve and the sciatic nerve.

    PubMed

    Wenyuan, Li; Zhenyu, Zhang; Zhi-Gong, Wang

    2005-01-01

    Circuits for the signal generation of the FES (functional electrical stimulation) of the central nerve and the sciatic nerve have been designed. The circuits were implemented by using discrete devices. The FES circuits consist of two or three operational amplifiers. The bandwidths of the circuits are more than 10 kHz and their gains are variable from 20 dB to 60 dB. To a load of several kilo-ohms, according to the microelectrode with the nerve, the circuit for stimulating central nerve can provide a current signal, and the signal value is more than 1mA. The circuit for stimulating sciatic nerve can provide a stimulating voltage signal of more than 10 Vs. The loads of the circuits are microelectrodes contacted with nerves. The circuits can be used with two kinds of microelectrodes: cuff microelectrodes which for stimulating sciatic nerve and shaft microelectrodes which for stimulating central nerve. PMID:17281443

  3. Somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs); sensory nerve conduction velocity (SNCV) and motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV) in chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Makkar, R K; Kochar, D K

    1994-01-01

    Somatosensory evoked potentials, sensory and motor nerve conduction velocity were studied in 25 patients of chronic renal failure and the results were compared with 15 healthy persons. The values more than +/- 3 S.D. were considered abnormal. SNCV was reduced in 11/25 patients; average reduction being 18 m/s (highly significant, p < 0.001); MNCV was reduced in 11/25 patients, average reduction being 20 m/s (highly significant, p < 0.001). Both SNCV and MNCV in same person were reduced in 6/25 patients. In SSEP N9, N13 and N20 were delayed in almost all the patients (highly significant, p < 0.001). Amplitude of N20 and N13 were reduced in 1 and 4 patients respectively but amplitude of N9 was normal. Out of different IPLS, Ebw-N9 was delayed in 5/25 patients (p < 0.9, insignificant); N9-N13 was delayed in 8/25 patients (p < 0.001, highly significant); N13-N20 was delayed in 1/25 patients (p < 0.01, significant). The evidence of these neurophysiological abnormalities collectively suggest the presence of central-peripheral axonopathy in this disease. PMID:7956880

  4. Activation of EP4 receptors contributes to prostaglandin E2-mediated stimulation of renal sensory nerves.

    PubMed

    Kopp, Ulla C; Cicha, Michael Z; Nakamura, Kazuhiro; Nüsing, Rolf M; Smith, Lori A; Hökfelt, Tomas

    2004-12-01

    Induction of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in the renal pelvic wall increases prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) leading to stimulation of cAMP production, which results in substance P (SP) release and activation of renal mechanosensory nerves. The subtype of PGE receptors involved, EP2 and/or EP4, was studied by immunohistochemistry and renal pelvic administration of agonists and antagonists of EP2 and EP4 receptors. EP4 receptor-like immunoreactivity (LI) was colocalized with calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-LI in dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) at Th(9)-L(1) and in nerve terminals in the renal pelvic wall. Th(9)-L(1) DRG neurons also contained EP3 receptor-LI and COX-2-LI, each of which was colocalized with CGRP-LI in some neurons. No renal pelvic nerves contained EP3 receptor-LI and only very few nerves COX-2-LI. The EP1/EP2 receptor antagonist AH-6809 (20 microM) had no effect on SP release produced by PGE(2) (0.14 microM) from an isolated rat renal pelvic wall preparation. However, the EP4 receptor antagonist L-161,982 (10 microM) blocked the SP release produced by the EP2/EP4 receptor agonist butaprost (10 microM) 12 +/- 2 vs. 2 +/- 1 and PGE(2), 9 +/- 1 vs. 1 +/- 0 pg/min. The SP release by butaprost and PGE(2) was similarly blocked by the EP4 receptor antagonist AH-23848 (30 microM). In anesthetized rats, the afferent renal nerve activity (ARNA) responses to butaprost 700 +/- 100 and PGE(2).780 +/- 100%.s (area under the curve of ARNA vs. time) were unaffected by renal pelvic perfusion with AH-6809. However, 1 microM L-161,982 and 10 microM AH-23848 blocked the ARNA responses to butaprost by 94 +/- 5 and 78 +/- 10%, respectively, and to PGE(2) by 74 +/- 16 and 74 +/- 11%, respectively. L-161,982 also blocked the ARNA response to increasing renal pelvic pressure 10 mmHg, 85 +/- 5%. In conclusion, PGE(2) increases renal pelvic release of SP and ARNA by activating EP4 receptors on renal sensory nerve fibers. PMID:15292051

  5. Electrical stimulation accelerates axonal and functional peripheral nerve regeneration across long gaps.

    PubMed

    Haastert-Talini, Kirsten; Schmitte, Ruth; Korte, Nele; Klode, Dorothee; Ratzka, Andreas; Grothe, Claudia

    2011-04-01

    Short-term low-frequency electrical stimulation (ESTIM) of proximal peripheral nerve stumps prior to end-to-end coaptation or tubular bridging of small distances has been reported to increase preferential motor reinnervation and functional motor recovery in animal models and human patients undergoing carpal tunnel release surgery. We investigated the effects of ESTIM on regeneration across rat sciatic nerve gaps, which exceed distances that allow spontaneous regeneration. Three different reconstruction approaches were combined with ESTIM in the experimental groups. Nerve gaps (13 mm) were bridged using (I) nerve autotransplantation, (II) transplantation of differentially filled silicone tubes, or (III) transplantation of tubular grafts containing fibroblast growth factor-2 overexpressing Schwann cells (SCs) for gene therapy. The regeneration outcome was followed for up to 8 weeks, and functionally as well as histomorphometrically analyzed in comparison to non-stimulated control groups. Combining ESTIM with nerve autotransplantation significantly increased the nerve fiber density in the regenerated nerve, and the grade of functional recovery as detected by electrodiagnostic recordings from the gastrocnemius muscle. The combination of ESTIM with transplantation of naïve SCs increased the regeneration of gap-bridging nerve tissue. Although macroscopic tissue regeneration was not further improved after combining ESTIM with FGF-2(21/23-kD) gene therapy, the latter resulted in a high rate of regenerated nerves that functionally reconnected to the target muscle. Based on our results, brief ESTIM shows high potential to accelerate axonal as well as functional (motor and sensory) outcomes in the clinical setting of peripheral nerve gap reconstruction in human patients. PMID:21265597

  6. Sensory recovery after primary repair of palmar digital nerves using a Revolnerv(®) collagen conduit: a prospective series of 27 cases.

    PubMed

    Arnaout, A; Fontaine, C; Chantelot, C

    2014-09-01

    Despite advances in microsurgery, digital nerve repair remains a challenge due to the lack of reproducible procedures with satisfactory functional results. The aim of this study was to compare the sensory and functional results of direct microsurgical sutures protected by a Revolnerv(®) nerve regeneration conduit, with results of a series of direct sutures without a protective conduit in the literature. From November 2009 to April 2010, 35 patients were treated by direct epiperineural suture for digital nerve injury, protected by a Revolnerv(®) nerve regeneration conduit at the FESUM centre "SOS-mains Lesquin/CHRU de Lille". Sensory recovery was assessed by the static two-point discrimination Weber test (WS) and the Semmes-Weinstein (SW) test at postoperative months 1, 3, and 6. The final evaluation was performed after a minimum follow-up of 6 months. Statistical analysis of sensory results (WS and SW) was mainly performed with non-parametric tests (Wilcoxon, Mann and Whitney). P<0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. One patient was excluded, six were lost to follow-up, and four could not be seen at the 6-month follow-up visit. Finally, 24 patients and 27 nerve sutures were included. Mean age was 38 years old and the ratio of women/men was 1/5. Eighty-five percent of the patients had useful (S3+) or normal (S4) discrimination at 6 months, and the average WS was 10.3 (±3.76). There was a tendency to better WS results in sharp transections compared to jagged lacerations (9.19 vs 11.82). The SW test was satisfactory in 15% of patients and acceptable in 30%. There were no complications from the Revolnerv(®) collagen tube. After 6 months follow-up this study shows that results with the Revolnerv(®) nerve regeneration conduit on direct palmar digital nerve sutures were comparable to but not better than those of uncoated direct sutures. A study including a larger population with longer follow-up is necessary to determine the value of this technique and

  7. Self-powered sensory nerve system for civil structures using hybrid forisome actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoureshi, Rahmat A.; Shen, Amy

    2006-03-01

    In order to provide a true distributed sensor and control system for civil structures, we have developed a Structural Nervous System that mimics key attributes of a human nervous system. This nervous system is made up of building blocks that are designed based on mechanoreceptors as a fundamentally new approach for the development of a structural health monitoring and diagnostic system that utilizes the recently discovered plant-protein forisomes, a novel non-living biological material capable of sensing and actuation. In particular, our research has been focused on producing a sensory nervous system for civil structures by using forisomes as the mechanoreceptors, nerve fibers, neuronal pools, and spinocervical tract to the nodal and central processing units. This paper will present up to date results of our research, including the design and analysis of the structural nervous system.

  8. Promoting plasticity in the spinal cord with chondroitinase improves functional recovery after peripheral nerve repair.

    PubMed

    Galtrey, Clare M; Asher, Richard A; Nothias, Fatiha; Fawcett, James W

    2007-04-01

    Functional recovery after peripheral nerve repair in humans is often disappointing. A major reason for this is the inaccuracy of re-innervation of muscles and sensory structures. We hypothesized that promoting plasticity in the spinal cord, through digestion of chondroitin sulphate proteoglycans (CSPGs) with chondroitinase ABC (ChABC), might allow the CNS to compensate for inaccurate peripheral re-innervation and improve functional recovery. The median and ulnar nerves were injured and repaired to produce three grades of inaccuracy of peripheral re-innervation by (i) crush of both nerves; (ii) correct repair of median to median and ulnar to ulnar; and (iii) crossover of the median and ulnar nerves. Mapping of the motor neuron pool of the flexor carpi radialis muscle showed precise re-innervation after nerve crush, inaccurate regeneration after correct repair, more inaccurate after crossover repair. Recovery of forelimb function, assessed by skilled paw reaching, grip strength and sensory testing varied with accuracy of re-innervation. This was not due to differences in the number of regenerated axons. Single injections of ChABC into the spinal cord led to long-term changes in the extracellular matrix, with hyaluronan and neurocan being removed and not fully replaced after 8 weeks. ChABC treatment produce increased sprouting visualized by MAP1BP staining and improved functional recovery in skilled paw reaching after correct repair and in grip strength after crossover repair. There was no hyperalgesia. Enhanced plasticity in the spinal cord, therefore, allows the CNS to compensate for inaccurate motor and sensory re-innervation of the periphery, and may be a useful adjunct therapy to peripheral nerve repair. PMID:17255150

  9. The effect of aging on the density of the sensory nerve fiber innervation of bone and acute skeletal pain

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez-Andrade, Juan M.; Mantyh, William G.; Bloom, Aaron P.; Freeman, Katie T.; Ghilardi, Joseph R.; Kuskowski, Michael A.; Mantyh, Patrick W.

    2010-01-01

    As humans age there is a decline in most sensory systems including vision, hearing, taste, smell, and tactile acuity. In contrast, the frequency and severity of musculoskeletal pain generally increases with age. To determine whether the density of sensory nerve fibers that transduce skeletal pain changes with age, calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) and neurofilament 200 kDa (NF200) sensory nerve fibers that innervate the femur were examined in the femurs of young (4 month old), middle-aged (13 month) and old (36 month) male F344/BNF1 rats. Whereas the bone quality showed a significant age-related decline, the density of CGRP+ and NF200+ nerve fibers that innervate the bone remained remarkably unchanged as well as the severity of acute skeletal fracture pain. Thus, while bone mass, quality and strength undergo a significant decline with age, the density of sensory nerve fibers that transduce noxious stimuli remain largely intact. These data may in part explain why musculoskeletal pain increases with age. PMID:20947214

  10. Memory Effects and Sensory Integration: An Examination of Sensory Modality Translation Models of Intersensory Functioning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcell, Michael M.; Allen, Terry W.

    1978-01-01

    The sensory modality of a task and the modality of a retroactive interfering activity were systematically covaried in order to test two models of intersensory functioning. Subjects were 40 ten-year-old boys and girls. (BD)

  11. TRESK channel contribution to nociceptive sensory neurons excitability: modulation by nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Neuronal hyperexcitability is a crucial phenomenon underlying spontaneous and evoked pain. In invertebrate nociceptors, the S-type leak K+ channel (analogous to TREK-1 in mammals) plays a critical role of in determining neuronal excitability following nerve injury. Few data are available on the role of leak K2P channels after peripheral axotomy in mammals. Results Here we describe that rat sciatic nerve axotomy induces hyperexcitability of L4-L5 DRG sensory neurons and decreases TRESK (K2P18.1) expression, a channel with a major contribution to total leak current in DRGs. While the expression of other channels from the same family did not significantly change, injury markers ATF3 and Cacna2d1 were highly upregulated. Similarly, acute sensory neuron dissociation (in vitro axotomy) produced marked hyperexcitability and similar total background currents compared with neurons injured in vivo. In addition, the sanshool derivative IBA, which blocked TRESK currents in transfected HEK293 cells and DRGs, increased intracellular calcium in 49% of DRG neurons in culture. Most IBA-responding neurons (71%) also responded to the TRPV1 agonist capsaicin, indicating that they were nociceptors. Additional evidence of a biological role of TRESK channels was provided by behavioral evidence of pain (flinching and licking), in vivo electrophysiological evidence of C-nociceptor activation following IBA injection in the rat hindpaw, and increased sensitivity to painful pressure after TRESK knockdown in vivo. Conclusions In summary, our results clearly support an important role of TRESK channels in determining neuronal excitability in specific DRG neurons subpopulations, and show that axonal injury down-regulates TRESK channels, therefore contributing to neuronal hyperexcitability. PMID:21527011

  12. Sensory nerve endings in the rat oro-facial region labeled by the anterograde and transganglionic transport of horseradish peroxidase: a new method for tracing peripheral nerve fibers.

    PubMed

    Marfurt, C F; Turner, D F

    1983-02-14

    The purpose of the present investigation is to introduce the enzyme horseradish peroxidase (HRP) for the study of the morphology and peripheral distribution of sensory nerve endings. HRP was injected into the trigeminal ganglion or trigeminal brainstem nuclear complex (TBNC) in separate adult rats. HRP injected into the trigeminal ganglion was taken up by the neuronal perikarya and transported anterogradely in massive amounts to sensory nerve endings in the cornea, vibrissal hair follicles, tooth pulps, and periodontal ligaments. HRP injected into the TBNC was taken up by trigeminal primary afferent fibers that terminated there and transported transganglionically, i.e., past or through the trigeminal ganglion, to peripheral sensory endings. The results of the present study demonstrate for the first time that: (1) anterograde HRP transport is a highly successful method of labeling with an intracellular marker trigeminal sensory endings in a variety of oro-facial tissues, and (2) trigeminal primary sensory neurons possess intra-axonal transport mechanisms by which HRP, and possibly other substances, taken up in the central nervous system may be transported to the periphery. PMID:6601506

  13. Methods to evaluate functional nerve recovery in adult rats: walking track analysis, video analysis and the withdrawal reflex.

    PubMed

    Dijkstra, J R; Meek, M F; Robinson, P H; Gramsbergen, A

    2000-03-15

    The aim of this study was to compare different methods for the evaluation of functional nerve recovery. Three groups of adult male Wistar rats were studied. In group A, a 12-mm gap between nerve ends was bridged by an autologous nerve graft; in rats of group B we performed a crush lesion of the sciatic nerve and group C consisted of non-operated control rats. The withdrawal reflex, elicited by an electric stimulus, was used to evaluate the recovery of sensory nerve function. To investigate motor nerve recovery we analyzed the walking pattern. Three different methods were used to obtain data for footprint analysis: photographic paper with thickened film developer on the paws, normal white paper with finger paint, and video recordings. The footprints were used to calculate the sciatic function index (SFI). From the video recordings, we also analyzed stepcycles. The withdrawal reflex is a convenient and reproducible test for the evaluation of global sensory nerve recovery. Recording walking movements on video and the analysis of footplacing is a perfect although time-consuming method for the evaluation of functional aspects of motor nerve recovery. PMID:10720672

  14. Implementation of linear sensory signaling via multiple coordinated mechanisms at central vestibular nerve synapses

    PubMed Central

    McElvain, Lauren E.; Faulstich, Michael; Jeanne, James M.; Moore, Jeffrey D.; du Lac, Sascha

    2015-01-01

    Summary Signal transfer in neural circuits is dynamically modified by the recent history of neuronal activity. Short-term plasticity endows synapses with nonlinear transmission properties, yet synapses in sensory and motor circuits are capable of signaling linearly over a wide range of presynaptic firing rates. How do such synapses achieve rate-invariant transmission despite history-dependent nonlinearities? Here, ultrastructural, biophysical, and computational analyses demonstrate that concerted molecular, anatomical, and physiological refinements are required for central vestibular nerve synapses to linearly transmit rate-coded sensory signals. Vestibular synapses operate in a physiological regime of steady-state depression imposed by tonic firing. Rate-invariant transmission relies on brief presynaptic action potentials that delimit calcium influx, large pools of rapidly mobilized vesicles, multiple low-probability release sites, robust postsynaptic receptor sensitivity, and efficient transmitter clearance. Broadband linear synaptic filtering of head motion signals is thus achieved by coordinately tuned synaptic machinery that maintains physiological operation within inherent cell biological limitations. PMID:25704949

  15. THE MAJORITY OF MYELINATED AND UNMYELINATED SENSORY NERVE FIBERS THAT INNERVATE BONE EXPRESS THE TROPOMYOSIN RECEPTOR KINASE A

    PubMed Central

    Castañeda-Corral, Gabriela; Jimenez-Andrade, Juan M.; Bloom, Aaron P.; Taylor, Reid N.; Mantyh, William G.; Kaczmarska, Magdalena J.; Ghilardi, Joseph R.; Mantyh, Patrick W.

    2011-01-01

    Although skeletal pain is a leading cause of chronic pain and disability, relatively little is known about the specific populations of nerve fibers that innervate the skeleton. Recent studies have reported that therapies blocking nerve growth factor (NGF) or its cognate receptor, tropomyosin receptor kinase A (TrkA) are efficacious in attenuating skeletal pain. A potential factor to consider when assessing the analgesic efficacy of targeting NGF-TrkA signaling in a pain state is the fraction of NGF-responsive TrkA+ nociceptors that innervate the tissue from which the pain is arising, as this innervation and the analgesic efficacy of targeting NGF-TrkA signaling may vary considerably from tissue to tissue. To explore this in the skeleton, tissue slices and whole mount preparations of the normal, adult mouse femur were analyzed using immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy. Analysis of these preparations revealed that 80% of the unmyelinated/thinly myelinated sensory nerve fibers that express calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and innervate the periosteum, mineralized bone and bone marrow also express TrkA. Similarly, the majority of myelinated sensory nerve fibers that express neurofilament 200 kDa (NF200) which innervate the periosteum, mineralized bone and bone marrow also co-express TrkA. In the normal femur, the relative density of CGRP+, NF200+ and TrkA+ sensory nerve fibers per unit volume is: periosteum > bone marrow > mineralized bone > cartilage with the respective relative densities being 100: 2: 0.1: 0. The observation that the majority of sensory nerve fibers innervating the skeleton express TrkA+, may in part explain why therapies that block NGF/TrkA pathway are highly efficacious in attenuating skeletal pain. PMID:21277945

  16. Enhanced release of adenosine in rat hind paw following spinal nerve ligation: involvement of capsaicin-sensitive sensory afferents.

    PubMed

    Liu, X J; White, T D; Sawynok, J

    2002-01-01

    Modulation of endogenous adenosine levels by inhibition of adenosine metabolism produces a peripheral antinociceptive effect in a neuropathic pain model. The present study used microdialysis to investigate the neuronal mechanisms modulating extracellular adenosine levels in the rat hind paw following tight ligation of the L5 and L6 spinal nerves. Subcutaneous injection of 50 microl saline into the nerve-injured paw induced a rapid and short-lasting increase in extracellular adenosine levels in the subcutaneous tissues of the rat hind paw ipsilateral to the nerve injury. Saline injection did not increase adenosine levels in sham-operated rats or non-treated rats. The adenosine kinase inhibitor 5'-amino-5'-deoxyadenosine and the adenosine deaminase inhibitor 2'-deoxycoformycin, at doses producing a peripheral antinociceptive effect, did not further enhance subcutaneous adenosine levels in the nerve-injured paw. Systemic pretreatment with capsaicin, a neurotoxin selective for small-diameter sensory afferents, markedly reduced the saline-evoked release of adenosine in rat hind paw following spinal nerve ligation. Systemic pretreatment with 6-hydroxydopamine, a neurotoxin selective for sympathetic afferent nerves, did not affect release. These results suggest that following nerve injury, peripheral capsaicin-sensitive primary sensory afferent nerve terminals are hypersensitive, and are able to release adenosine following a stimulus that does not normally evoke release in sham-operated or intact rats. Sympathetic postganglionic afferents do not appear to be involved in such release. The lack of effect on such release by the inhibitors of adenosine metabolism suggests an altered peripheral adenosine system following spinal nerve ligation. PMID:12204207

  17. Correlations among autonomic, sensory, and motor neural function tests in untreated non-insulin-dependent diabetic individuals.

    PubMed

    Pfeifer, M A; Weinberg, C R; Cook, D L; Reenan, A; Halar, E; Halter, J B; LaCava, E C; Porte, D

    1985-01-01

    A well-defined group of untreated non-insulin-dependent (NIDD) subjects were evaluated to determine whether involvement of neural function measurements is generalized and symmetrical and to compare the autonomic, sensory, and motor neural measurements. After age adjustment, the sensory and motor neural function measurements were significantly slower in the diabetic group than in normal subjects (P less than 0.01). Similarly, the autonomic nervous system function measurements were also abnormal in the NIDD group (P less than 0.01). Further analysis revealed that each of the specific measurements--median motor nerve conduction velocity (NCV,P less than 0.005), peroneal motor NCV (P less than 0.005), median sensory NCV (P less than 0.005), dark-adapted pupil size after muscarinic blockade (P less than 0.02), pupillary latency time (P less than 0.02), and RR-variation after beta adrenergic blockade (P less than 0.001)--was significantly less by analysis of covariance after age adjustment in the NIDD group than in normal subjects. Thus, there was evidence of motor and sensory neural impairment in the upper and lower extremities as well as evidence of impairment of the reflex arcs involving the parasympathetic nerves to the heart and eye and the sympathetic nerves to the iris. Further analysis revealed that right and left NCV were correlated (P less than 0.01), as were the median motor and median sensory NCV (P less than 0.01), the median motor and peroneal motor NCV (P less than 0.001), and the peroneal motor and median sensory NCV (P less than 0.001). Thus, there was evidence of symmetrical upper and lower limb, as well as motor and sensory proportional involvement of large nerve fiber NCV in this group of NIDD subjects.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:4075943

  18. Nerve allograft transplantation for functional restoration of the upper extremity: case series

    PubMed Central

    Elkwood, Andrew I.; Holland, Neil R.; Arbes, Spiros M.; Rose, Michael I.; Kaufman, Matthew R.; Ashinoff, Russell L.; Parikh, Mona A.; Patel, Tushar R.

    2011-01-01

    Background Major trauma to the spinal cord or upper extremity often results in severe sensory and motor disturbances from injuries to the brachial plexus and its insertion into the spinal cord. Functional restoration with nerve grafting neurotization and tendon transfers is the mainstay of treatment. Results may be incomplete due to a limited supply of autologous material for nerve grafts. The factors deemed most integral for success are early surgical intervention, reconstruction of all levels of injury, and maximization of the number of axonal conduits per nerve repair. Objective To report the second series of nerve allograft transplantation using cadaveric nerve graft and our experience with living-related nerve transplants. Participants Eight patients, seven men and one woman, average age 23 years (range 18–34), with multi-level brachial plexus injuries were selected for transplantation using either cadaveric allografts or living-related donors. Methods Grafts were harvested and preserved in the University of Wisconsin Cold Storage Solution at 5°C for up to 7 days. The immunosuppressive protocol was initiated at the time of surgery and was discontinued at approximately 1 year, or when signs of regeneration were evident. Parameters for assessment included mechanism of injury, interval between injury and treatment, level(s) of deficit, post-operative return of function, pain relief, need for revision surgery, complications, and improvement in quality of life. Results Surgery was performed using living-related donor grafts in six patients, and cadaveric grafts in two patients. Immunosuppression was tolerated for the duration of treatment in all but one patient in whom early termination occurred due to non-compliance. There were no cases of graft rejection as of most recent follow-up. Seven patients showed signs of regeneration, demonstrated by return of sensory and motor function and/or a migrating Tinel's sign. One patient was non-compliant with the post

  19. VEGF induces sensory and motor peripheral plasticity, alters bladder function, and promotes visceral sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background This work tests the hypothesis that bladder instillation with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) modulates sensory and motor nerve plasticity, and, consequently, bladder function and visceral sensitivity. In addition to C57BL/6J, ChAT-cre mice were used for visualization of bladder cholinergic nerves. The direct effect of VEGF on the density of sensory nerves expressing the transient receptor potential vanilloid subfamily 1 (TRPV1) and cholinergic nerves (ChAT) was studied one week after one or two intravesical instillations of the growth factor. To study the effects of VEGF on bladder function, mice were intravesically instilled with VEGF and urodynamic evaluation was assessed. VEGF-induced alteration in bladder dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons was performed on retrogradly labeled urinary bladder afferents by patch-clamp recording of voltage gated Na+ currents. Determination of VEGF-induced changes in sensitivity to abdominal mechanostimulation was performed by application of von Frey filaments. Results In addition to an overwhelming increase in TRPV1 immunoreactivity, VEGF instillation resulted in an increase in ChAT-directed expression of a fluorescent protein in several layers of the urinary bladder. Intravesical VEGF caused a profound change in the function of the urinary bladder: acute VEGF (1 week post VEGF treatment) reduced micturition pressure and longer treatment (2 weeks post-VEGF instillation) caused a substantial reduction in inter-micturition interval. In addition, intravesical VEGF resulted in an up-regulation of voltage gated Na+ channels (VGSC) in bladder DRG neurons and enhanced abdominal sensitivity to mechanical stimulation. Conclusions For the first time, evidence is presented indicating that VEGF instillation into the mouse bladder promotes a significant increase in peripheral nerve density together with alterations in bladder function and visceral sensitivity. The VEGF pathway is being proposed as a key modulator of

  20. Sympathetic sprouting near sensory neurons after nerve injury occurs preferentially on spontaneously active cells and is reduced by early nerve block

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Wenrui; Strong, Judith Ann; Li, Huiqing; Zhang, Jun-Ming

    2006-01-01

    Some chronic pain conditions are maintained or enhanced by sympathetic activity. In animal models of pathological pain, abnormal sprouting of sympathetic fibers around large- and medium-size sensory neurons is observed in dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Large and medium size cells are also more likely to be spontaneously active, suggesting that sprouting may be related to neuron activity. We previously showed that sprouting could be reduced by systemic or locally applied lidocaine. In the complete sciatic nerve transection model in rats, spontaneous activity initially originates in the injury site; later, the DRG become the major source of spontaneous activity. In this study, spontaneous activity reaching the DRG soma was reduced by early nerve blockade (local perfusion of the transected nerve with TTX for the first 7 days after injury). This significantly reduced sympathetic sprouting. Conversely, increasing spontaneous activity by local nerve perfusion with K+ channel blockers increased sprouting. The hyperexcitability and spontaneous activity of DRG neurons observed in this model were also significantly reduced by early nerve blockade. These effects of early nerve blockade on sprouting, excitability, and spontaneous activity were all observed 4 to 5 weeks after the end of early nerve blockade, indicating that the early period of spontaneous activity in the injured nerve is critical for establishing the more long-lasting pathologies observed in the DRG. Individual spontaneously active neurons, labeled with fluorescent dye, were 5–6 times more likely than quiescent cells to be co-localized with sympathetic fibers, suggesting a highly localized correlation of activity and sprouting. PMID:17065247

  1. Sensory nerve fibres from lumbar intervertebral discs pass through rami communicantes. A possible pathway for discogenic low back pain.

    PubMed

    Suseki, K; Takahashi, Y; Takahashi, K; Chiba, T; Yamagata, M; Moriya, H

    1998-07-01

    It has been thought that lumbar intervertebral discs were innervated segmentally. We have previously shown that the L5-L6 intervertebral disc in the rat is innervated bilaterally from the L1 and L2 dorsal root ganglia through the paravertebral sympathetic trunks, but the pathways between the disc and the paravertebral sympathetic trunks were unknown. We have now studied the spines of 17 rats to elucidate the exact pathways. We examined serial sections of the lumbar spine using immunohistochemistry for calcitonin gene-related peptide, a sensory nerve marker. We showed that these nerve fibres from the intervertebral disc ran through the sinuvertebral nerve into the rami communicantes, not into the corresponding segmental spinal nerve. In the rat, sensory information from the lumbar intervertebral discs is conducted through rami communicantes. If this innervation pattern applies to man, simple decompression of the corresponding nerve root will not relieve discogenic pain. Anterior interbody fusion, with the denervation of rami communicantes, may be effective for such low back pain. PMID:9699846

  2. Autologous Fat Grafting Improves Facial Nerve Function

    PubMed Central

    Klinger, Marco; Lisa, Andrea; Caviggioli, Fabio; Maione, Luca; Murolo, Matteo; Vinci, Valeriano; Klinger, Francesco Maria

    2015-01-01

    We describe the case of a 45-year-old male patient who presented a retractile and painful scar in the nasolabial fold due to trauma which determined partial motor impairment of the mouth movements. We subsequently treated him with autologous fat grafting according to Coleman's technique. Clinical assessments were performed at 5 and 14 days and 1, 3, and 6 months after surgical procedure and we observed a progressive release of scar retraction together with an important improvement of pain symptoms. A second procedure was performed 6 months after the previous one. We observed total restoration of mimic movements within one-year follow-up. The case described confirms autologous fat grafting regenerative effect on scar tissue enlightening a possible therapeutic effect on peripheral nerve activity, hypothesizing that its entrapment into scar tissue can determine a partial loss of function. PMID:26167327

  3. Timeline: exorcizing the animal spirits: Jan Swammerdam on nerve function.

    PubMed

    Cobb, M

    2002-05-01

    For more than 1,500 years, nerves were thought to function through the action of 'animal spirits'. In the seventeenth century, René Descartes conceived of these 'spirits' as liquids or gases, and used the idea to explain reflex action. But he was rapidly proven wrong by a young Dutchman, Jan Swammerdam. Swammerdam's elegant experiments pioneered the frog nerve muscle preparation and laid the foundation of our modern understanding of nerve function. PMID:11988778

  4. [Joint and sensory branch block of the obturator and femoral nerves in a case of femoral head osteonecrosis and arthritis].

    PubMed

    Cortiñas-Sáenz, M; Salmerón-Velez, G; Holgado-Macho, I A

    2014-01-01

    The sensory innervation of the hip joint is complex. The joint and sensory branch block of the obturator and femoral nerves is effective for treating the pain caused due to different hip diseases. This could be an option to be considered in certain circumstances such as, being a surgical-anaesthetic high risk, or if there is significant overweight, It could also be useful on other occasions if the traumatoligist considers that it is better to delay hip replacement for a limited period. PMID:24656423

  5. Alpha-Synuclein Pathology in Sensory Nerve Terminals of the Upper Aerodigestive Tract of Parkinson’s Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Liancai; Chen, Jingming; Sobotka, Stanislaw; Nyirenda, Themba; Benson, Brian; Gupta, Fiona; Sanders, Ira; Adler, Charles H.; Caviness, John N.; Shill, Holly A.; Sabbagh, Marwan; Samanta, Johan E.; Sue, Lucia I.; Beach, Thomas G.

    2015-01-01

    Dysphagia is common in Parkinson’s disease (PD) and causes significant morbidity and mortality. PD dysphagia has usually been explained as dysfunction of central motor control, much like other motor symptoms that are characteristic of the disease. However, PD dysphagia does not correlate with severity of motor symptoms nor does it respond to motor therapies. It is known that PD patients have sensory deficits in the pharynx, and that impaired sensation may contribute to dysphagia. However, the underlying cause of the pharyngeal sensory deficits in PD is not known. We hypothesized that PD dysphagia with sensory deficits may be due to degeneration of the sensory nerve terminals in the upper aerodigestive tract (UAT). We have previously shown that Lewy-type synucleinopathy (LTS) is present in the main pharyngeal sensory nerves of PD patients, but not in controls. In this study, the sensory terminals in UAT mucosa were studied to discern the presence and distribution of LTS. Whole-mount specimens (tongue-pharynx-larynx-upper esophagus) were obtained from 10 deceased human subjects with clinically diagnosed and neuropathologically confirmed PD (five with dysphagia and five without) and four age-matched healthy controls. Samples were taken from six sites and immunostained for phosphorylated α-synuclein (PAS). The results showed the presence of PAS-immunoreactive (PAS-ir) axons in all the PD subjects and in none of the controls. Notably, PD patients with dysphagia had more PAS-ir axons in the regions that are critical for initiating the swallowing reflex. These findings suggest that Lewy pathology affects mucosal sensory axons in specific regions of the UAT and may be related to PD dysphagia. PMID:26041249

  6. [Blood-nerve barrier: structure and function].

    PubMed

    Kanda, Takashi

    2011-06-01

    The blood-nerve barrier (BNB) is a dynamic interface between the endoneurial microenvironment and surrounding extracellular space or blood contents, and is localized the innermost layer of multilayered ensheathing perineurium and endoneurial microvessels. Since the BNB is a key structure controlling the internal milieu of the peripheral nerve parenchyma, adequate understanding of the BNB is crucial for developing treatment strategies for human peripheral nervous system disorders, including Guillain-Barré syndrome, chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, and diabetic and various metabolic/toxic neuropathies. However, fewer studies have been conducted on the BNB, if we compare against the number of studies on the blood-brain barrier. This is because of the lack of adequate human cell lines originating from the BNB. In our laboratory, human immortal cell lines from the BNB, namely, the endothelial cell line and pericyte cell line, have recently been established and vigorous investigations of their biological and physiological properties are now underway. Pericytes constituting the BNB were found to possess robust ability of controlling BNB integrity via secretion of various cytokines and growth factors including bFGF, VEGF, GDNF, BDNF, and angiopoietin-1. Unknown soluble factors secreted by pericytes also contribute to the upregulation of claudin-5 in endothelial cells in the BNB and thus, strengthen the barrier function of the BNB. In diabetic neuropathy, pericytes were shown to regulate the vascular basement membrane, while AGEs were shown to induce basement membrane hypertrophy and disrupt the BNB by increasing the autocrine secretion of VEGF and TGF-beta from pericytes. In this review article, we discuss the macroscopic and microscopic anatomy of the human BNB as well as the molecular mechanisms of mononuclear cell infiltration across the BNB. PMID:21613659

  7. Phenotyping the Function of TRPV1-Expressing Sensory Neurons by Targeted Axonal Silencing

    PubMed Central

    Brenneis, Christian; Kistner, Katrin; Puopolo, Michelino; Segal, David; Roberson, David; Sisignano, Marco; Labocha, Sandra; Ferreirós, Nerea; Strominger, Amanda; Cobos, Enrique J.; Ghasemlou, Nader; Geisslinger, Gerd; Reeh, Peter W.; Bean, Bruce P.; Woolf, Clifford J.

    2013-01-01

    Specific somatosensations may be processed by different subsets of primary afferents. C-fibers expressing heat-sensitive TRPV1 channels are proposed, for example, to be heat but not mechanical pain detectors. To phenotype in rats the sensory function of TRPV1+ afferents, we rapidly and selectively silenced only their activity, by introducing the membrane-impermeant sodium channel blocker QX-314 into these axons via the TRPV1 channel pore. Using tandem mass spectrometry we show that upon activation with capsaicin, QX-314 selectively accumulates in the cytosol only of TRPV1-expressing cells, and not in control cells. Exposure to QX-314 and capsaicin induces in small DRG neurons a robust sodium current block within 30 s. In sciatic nerves, application of extracellular QX-314 with capsaicin persistently reduces C-fiber but not A-fiber compound action potentials and this effect does not occur in TRPV1−/− mice. Behavioral phenotyping after selectively silencing TRPV1+ sciatic nerve axons by perineural injections of QX-314 and capsaicin reveals deficits in heat and mechanical pressure but not pinprick or light touch perception. The response to intraplantar capsaicin is substantially reduced, as expected. During inflammation, silencing TRPV1+ axons abolishes heat, mechanical, and cold hyperalgesia but tactile and cold allodynia remain following peripheral nerve injury. These results indicate that TRPV1-expressing sensory neurons process particular thermal and mechanical somatosensations, and that the sensory channels activated by mechanical and cold stimuli to produce pain in naive/inflamed rats differ from those in animals after peripheral nerve injury. PMID:23283344

  8. The structure and function of cutaneous sensory receptors.

    PubMed

    Munger, B L; Ide, C

    1988-03-01

    The present review of cutaneous sensory receptors begins with a consideration of free nerve endings (FNEs) that can be considered as sensory terminals evidencing the least structural specialization of the axon and associated cells. Using the criteria established by Kruger et al (1981), FNEs of both A delta and C fibers can be identified on the basis of ultrastructural characteristics that include an intimate relationship between axons and the associated epithelium, the lack of a complete Schwann cell investment, the accumulation of numerous vesicles and other cytoplasmic organelles, and for A delta terminals a 1:1 relationship between axon and investing Schwann cell. Using these criteria, the so-called genital end bulbs of the human glans penis are merely a skein of FNEs based on the ultrastructural study of Halata and Munger (1986). Hair follicles of most species studied to date (the exception being the rabbit and to some extent the guinea pig) are multiply innervated with lanceolate, Ruffini and FNEs. The lanceolate terminals are the rapidly adapting terminals that are numerous in guard hairs. Ruffini terminals of hairs resemble those of the periodontal ligament or joint capsules and both are remarkably similar to Golgi tendon organs in terms of ultrastructural characteristics. The key ultrastructural characteristic is the encircling of collagen bundles by axons and associated Schwann and connective tissue cells. Axons frequently enter the epidermis either to terminate as FNEs or become associated with Merkel cells in glabrous skin at the base of the papillary ridges or in clusters of Merkel cells in hairy skin in touch domes or Haarscheiben. Merkel cells have clusters of apparent secretory granules polarized toward the axon and the axon is typically a slowly adapting mechanoreceptor. The function of the granules is not known. Pacinian corpuscles are the largest of the corpuscular receptors of the dermis and are characterized by an elaborate inner core of stacks

  9. Presence of sensory nerve corpuscles in the human corpus and cervix uteri during pregnancy and labor as revealed by immunohistochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Tingaker, Berith K; Ekman-Ordeberg, Gunvor; Forsgren, Sture

    2006-01-01

    Background The uterus is exposed to changes such as enlargement and distension during pregnancy and labor. In these processes and in the process of cervical ripening, proprioceptive information is likely to be of great importance. Therefore, we wanted to study the possible existence of sensory nerve corpuscles in uterine corpus and cervix during pregnancy and labor. Studies on this aspect have not previously been perfomed. Methods Biopsies were taken from the upper edge of the hysterotomy during caesarean section at term (n = 8), in labor (n = 5) and from the corresponding area in the non-pregnant uterus after hysterectomy (n = 7). Cervical biopsies were obtained transvaginally from the anterior cervical lip. Serial cryostat sections were prepared for immunohistochemistry using polyclonal antibodies against nerve growth factor receptor p75, protein gene product 9.5 and S-100. Results Structures with the characteristics of sensory nerve corpuscles were observed in several specimens after staining for p75, PGP 9.5 and S-100. They were observed in specimens of the non-pregnant corpus and cervix and also in specimens of the pregnant cervix before onset of labor. However, they were absent in all specimens during labor. Conclusion Sensory corpuscles have here for the first time been detected in the human corpus and cervix uteri. Studies on the importance of the corpuscles in relation to the protective reflex actions that occur in the uterus during pregnancy should be performed in the future. PMID:16938139

  10. Effect of Delayed Peripheral Nerve Repair on Nerve Regeneration, Schwann Cell Function and Target Muscle Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Jonsson, Samuel; Wiberg, Rebecca; McGrath, Aleksandra M.; Novikov, Lev N.; Wiberg, Mikael; Novikova, Liudmila N.; Kingham, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Despite advances in surgical techniques for peripheral nerve repair, functional restitution remains incomplete. The timing of surgery is one factor influencing the extent of recovery but it is not yet clearly defined how long a delay may be tolerated before repair becomes futile. In this study, rats underwent sciatic nerve transection before immediate (0) or 1, 3, or 6 months delayed repair with a nerve graft. Regeneration of spinal motoneurons, 13 weeks after nerve repair, was assessed using retrograde labeling. Nerve tissue was also collected from the proximal and distal stumps and from the nerve graft, together with the medial gastrocnemius (MG) muscles. A dramatic decline in the number of regenerating motoneurons and myelinated axons in the distal nerve stump was observed in the 3- and 6-months delayed groups. After 3 months delay, the axonal number in the proximal stump increased 2–3 folds, accompanied by a smaller axonal area. RT-PCR of distal nerve segments revealed a decline in Schwann cells (SC) markers, most notably in the 3 and 6 month delayed repair samples. There was also a progressive increase in fibrosis and proteoglycan scar markers in the distal nerve with increased delayed repair time. The yield of SC isolated from the distal nerve segments progressively fell with increased delay in repair time but cultured SC from all groups proliferated at similar rates. MG muscle at 3- and 6-months delay repair showed a significant decline in weight (61% and 27% compared with contra-lateral side). Muscle fiber atrophy and changes to neuromuscular junctions were observed with increased delayed repair time suggestive of progressively impaired reinnervation. This study demonstrates that one of the main limiting factors for nerve regeneration after delayed repair is the distal stump. The critical time point after which the outcome of regeneration becomes too poor appears to be 3-months. PMID:23409189

  11. The exceptionally high reactivity of Cys 621 is critical for electrophilic activation of the sensory nerve ion channel TRPA1.

    PubMed

    Bahia, Parmvir K; Parks, Thomas A; Stanford, Katherine R; Mitchell, David A; Varma, Sameer; Stevens, Stanley M; Taylor-Clark, Thomas E

    2016-06-01

    Activation of the sensory nerve ion channel TRPA1 by electrophiles is the key mechanism that initiates nociceptive signaling, and leads to defensive reflexes and avoidance behaviors, during oxidative stress in mammals. TRPA1 is rapidly activated by subtoxic levels of electrophiles, but it is unclear how TRPA1 outcompetes cellular antioxidants that protect cytosolic proteins from electrophiles. Here, using physiologically relevant exposures, we demonstrate that electrophiles react with cysteine residues on mammalian TRPA1 at rates that exceed the reactivity of typical cysteines by 6,000-fold and that also exceed the reactivity of antioxidant enzymes. We show that TRPA1 possesses a complex reactive cysteine profile in which C621 is necessary for electrophile-induced binding and activation. Modeling of deprotonation energies suggests that K620 contributes to C621 reactivity and mutation of K620 alone greatly reduces the effect of electrophiles on TRPA1. Nevertheless, binding of electrophiles to C621 is not sufficient for activation, which also depends on the function of another reactive cysteine (C665). Together, our results demonstrate that TRPA1 acts as an effective electrophilic sensor because of the exceptionally high reactivity of C621. PMID:27241698

  12. Schwann cell mitochondrial metabolism supports long-term axonal survival and peripheral nerve function

    PubMed Central

    Viader, Andreu; Golden, Judith P.; Baloh, Robert H.; Schmidt, Robert E.; Hunter, Daniel A.; Milbrandt, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a common cause of peripheral neuropathies. While the role of neuron and axonal mitochondria in peripheral nerve disease is well appreciated, whether Schwann cell (SC) mitochondrial deficits contribute to peripheral neuropathies is unclear. Here we examine how SC mitochondrial dysfunction affects axonal survival and contributes to the decline of peripheral nerve function by generating mice with SC-specific mitochondrial deficits. These mice (Tfam-SCKOs) were produced through the tissue-specific deletion of the mitochondrial transcription factor A gene (Tfam), which is essential for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) transcription and maintenance. Tfam-SCKOs were viable but, as they aged, they developed a progressive peripheral neuropathy characterized by nerve conduction abnormalities as well as extensive muscle denervation. Morphological examination of Tfam-SCKO nerves revealed early preferential loss of small unmyelinated fibers followed by prominent demyelination and degeneration of larger-caliber axons. Tfam-SCKOs displayed sensory and motor deficits consistent with this pathology. Remarkably, the severe mtDNA depletion and respiratory chain abnormalities in Tfam-SCKO mice did not affect SC proliferation or survival. Mitochondrial function in SCs is therefore essential for maintenance of axonal survival and normal peripheral nerve function, suggesting that SC mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to human peripheral neuropathies. PMID:21752989

  13. Luteolin improves the impaired nerve functions in diabetic neuropathy: behavioral and biochemical evidences

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming; Li, Qiang; Zhao, Qingsong; Zhang, Jinchao; Lin, Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathies are a major cause of morbidity in patients with diabetes mellitus. Up to now, drugs for improving the impaired nerve functions has been lacking for diabetic neuropathy. The antioxidant and neuroprotective effects of luteolin make it an attractive candidate for diabetic neuropathy. The present study was designed to investigate the putative beneficial effect of luteolin on diabetic neuropathy. Diabetic rats were intraperitoneally treated with daily luteolin (50 mg/kg, 100 mg/kg and 200 mg/kg) or vehicle for 3 weeks from the 28th day after streptozotocin injection. Behavioral, electrophysiological and biochemical studies were performed to evaluate the effect of luteolin on the impaired nerve functions in diabetic neuropathy. It was found that luteolin dose dependently alleviated abnormal sensation, improved nerve conduction velocities and nerve blood flow in diabetic rats. Biochanical analysis showed that luteolin significantly lowered the reactive oxygen species production and malondialdehyde level, as well as increased antioxidants activities in a dose dependent manner. In addition, luteolin significantly up-regulated the protein levels of nuclear factor-E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in diabetic nerves. Taken together, luteolin is capable of improving diabetes-induced deficit in motor and sensory functions, which could be attributable, at least in part, to its Nrf2-dependent antioxidant capacity. The findings in the present study highlight the therapeutic value of luteolin for diabetic neuropathy. PMID:26617718

  14. Effect of remote sensory noise on hand function post stroke.

    PubMed

    Seo, Na Jin; Kosmopoulos, Marcella Lyn; Enders, Leah R; Hur, Pilwon

    2014-01-01

    Hand motor impairment persists after stroke. Sensory inputs may facilitate recovery of motor function. This pilot study tested the effectiveness of tactile sensory noise in improving hand motor function in chronic stroke survivors with tactile sensory deficits, using a repeated measures design. Sensory noise in the form of subthreshold, white noise, mechanical vibration was applied to the wrist skin during motor tasks. Hand dexterity assessed by the Nine Hole Peg Test and the Box and Block Test and pinch strength significantly improved when the sensory noise was turned on compared with when it was turned off in chronic stroke survivors. The subthreshold sensory noise to the wrist appears to induce improvements in hand motor function possibly via neuronal connections in the sensoriomotor cortex. The approach of applying concomitant, unperceivable mechanical vibration to the wrist during hand motor tasks is easily adoptable for clinic use as well as unsupervised home use. This pilot study suggests a potential for a wristband-type assistive device to complement hand rehabilitation for stroke survivors with sensorimotor deficit. PMID:25477806

  15. Laterality effects of human pudendal nerve stimulation on corticoanal pathways: evidence for functional asymmetry

    PubMed Central

    Hamdy, S; Enck, P; Aziz, Q; Uengoergil, S; Hobson, A; Thompson, D

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Although motor and sensory pathways to the human external anal sphincter are bilateral, a unilateral pudendal neuropathy may still disrupt anal continence. Anal continence can, however, be preserved despite unilateral pudendal damage, and so to explain those differing observations, we postulated that pudendal innervation might be asymmetric.
AIMS—To explore the individual effects of right and left pudendal nerve stimulation on the corticofugal pathways to the human external anal sphincter and thus assess evidence for functional asymmetric pelvic innervation.
METHODS—In eight healthy subjects, anal sphincter electromyographic responses, evoked to transcranial magnetic stimulation of the motor cortex, were recorded 5-500 msec after digital transrectal electrical conditioning stimuli applied to each pudendal nerve.
RESULTS—Right or left pudendal nerve stimulation evoked anal responses of similar latencies but asymmetric amplitudes in six subjects: dominant responses (>50% contralateral side) from the right pudendal in four subjects and from the left in two. Cortical stimulation also evoked anal responses with amplitude 448 (121) µV and latency 20.9 (1.1) msec. When cortical stimulation was preceded by pudendal nerve stimulation, the cortical responses were facilitated at interstimulus intervals of 5-20 msec. Dominant pudendal nerve stimulation induced greater facilitation of the cortically evoked responses than the non-dominant nerve.
CONCLUSIONS—Cortical pathways to the external anal sphincter are facilitated by pudendal nerve conditioning, in an asymmetric manner. This functional asymmetry may explain the presence and absence of anal incontinence after unilateral pudendal nerve injury.


Keywords: cerebral cortex; continence; electromyography; external anal sphincter; incontinence; magnetic stimulation PMID:10369705

  16. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type IE

    MedlinePlus

    ... by impaired function of nerve cells called sensory neurons, which transmit information about sensations such as pain, ... understood, the enzyme may help regulate nerve cell (neuron) maturation and specialization (differentiation), the ability of neurons ...

  17. Edaravone promotes functional recovery after mechanical peripheral nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Teng; Li, Zhengwei; Dong, Jianli; Nan, Feng; Li, Tao; Yu, Qing

    2014-01-01

    Edaravone has been shown to reduce ischemia/reperfusion-induced peripheral nerve injury. However, the therapeutic effect of edaravone on peripheral nerve injury caused by mechanical factors is unknown. In the present study, we established a peripheral nerve injury model by crushing the sciatic nerve using hemostatic forceps, and then administered edaravone 3 mg/kg intraperitoneally. The sciatic functional index and superoxide dismutase activity of the sciatic nerve were increased, and the malondialdehyde level was decreased in animals in the edaravone group compared with those in the model group. Bcl-2 expression was increased, but Bax expression was decreased in anterior horn cells of the L4-6 spinal cord segments. These results indicated that edaravone has a neuroprotective effect following peripheral nerve injury caused by mechanical factors through alleviating free radical damage to cells and inhibiting lipid peroxidation, as well as regulating apoptosis-related protein expression. PMID:25374594

  18. [Sensory functions and Alzheimer's disease: a multi-disciplinary approach].

    PubMed

    Kenigsberg, Paul-Ariel; Aquino, Jean-Pierre; Berard, Alain; Boucart, Muriel; Bouccara, Didier; Brand, Gérard; Charras, Kevin; Garcia-Larrea, Luis; Gzil, Fabrice; Krolak-Salmon, Pierre; Madjlessi, Arach; Malaquin-Pavan, Évelyne; Penicaud, Luc; Platel, Hervé; Pozzo, Thierry; Reintjens, Christophe; Salmon, Éric; Vergnon, Laurent; Robert, Philippe

    2015-09-01

    Relations between sensory functions and Alzheimer's disease are still under-explored. To understand them better, the Fondation Médéric Alzheimer has brought together a multi-disciplinary expert group. Aristote's five senses must be enhanced by today's knowledge of proprioception, motor cognition and pain perception. When cognition breaks down, the person with dementia perceives the world around her with her sensory experience, yet is unable to integrate all this information to understand the context. The treatment of multiple sensory inputs by the brain is closely linked to cognitive processes. Sensory deficits reduce considerably the autonomy of people with dementia in their daily life and their relations with others, increase their social isolation and the risk of accidents. Professionals involved with neurodegenerative diseases remain poorly aware of sensory deficits, which can bias the results of cognitive tests. However, there are simple tools to detect these deficits, notably for vision, hearing and balance disorders, which can be corrected. Many interventions for cognitive rehabilitation or quality of life improvement are based on sensory functions. The environment of people with dementia must be adapted to become understandable, comfortable, safe and eventually therapeutic. PMID:26395297

  19. A comparison of nerve conduction velocities and current perception thresholds as correlates of clinical severity of diabetic sensory neuropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Rendell, M S; Katims, J J; Richter, R; Rowland, F

    1989-01-01

    Nerve conduction velocities (NCVs) are the standard measurements used to confirm the presence or absence of diabetic neuropathy. NCVs were contrasted with the newer technique of measurement of alternating current perception thresholds (CPTs) in assessing the quantitative level of correlation with severity of diabetic sensory neuropathy. A very detailed, scored neurological history (symptoms) and physical examination, emphasising sensory assessment, was conducted on 71 individuals with diabetic neuropathy of varying degrees of severity. Sensory and motor NCVs and CPTs at 5, 250, and 2000 Hz of the upper and lower extremities were determined for these individuals. In addition, vibration thresholds (VTs) were measured as a third modality. Twenty eight individuals underwent repeated evaluations at 2, 6, 10 and 12 months after the initial procedures. Using the results of 169 complete evaluations, correlations were determined between physical scores (PS) and symptoms scores (SS) and NCVs. NCV correlations with the SS were weaker than with the PS. The strongest of the correlations were found between the PS and motor NCVs of the median nerve (rho = 0.29) and the tibial nerve (rho = 0.38). Normal NCVs were present in the face of very significant historical and physical abnormality. Correlations of the SS and PS with both VTs and CPTs were higher than with the NCVs. CPTs proved the more effective as predictors of both symptomatic and physical impairment. NCVs appear to lack the resolving power necessary to evaluate subtle differences in clinical state of diabetic sensory neuropathy. The supplementary use of current perception testing may improve the quantitative assessment of this condition. PMID:2738593

  20. Blockade of Nogo receptor ligands promotes functional regeneration of sensory axons after dorsal root crush.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Pamela A; Lee, Daniel H S; Qian, Fang; Weinreb, Paul H; Frank, Eric

    2009-05-13

    A major impediment for regeneration of axons within the CNS is the presence of multiple inhibitory factors associated with myelin. Three of these factors bind to the Nogo receptor, NgR, which is expressed on axons. Administration of exogenous blockers of NgR or NgR ligands promotes the regeneration of descending axonal projections after spinal cord hemisection. A more detailed analysis of CNS regeneration can be made by examining the growth of specific classes of sensory axons into the spinal cord after dorsal root crush injury. In this study, we assessed whether administration of a soluble peptide fragment of the NgR (sNgR) that binds to and blocks all three NgR ligands can promote regeneration after brachial dorsal root crush in adult rats. Intraventricular infusion of sNgR for 1 month results in extensive regrowth of myelinated sensory axons into the white and gray matter of the dorsal spinal cord, but unmyelinated sensory afferents do not regenerate. In concert with the anatomical growth of sensory axons into the cord, there is a gradual restoration of synaptic function in the denervated region, as revealed by extracellular microelectrode recordings from the spinal gray matter in response to stimulation of peripheral nerves. These positive synaptic responses are correlated with substantial improvements in use of the forelimb, as assessed by paw preference, paw withdrawal to tactile stimuli and the ability to grasp. These results suggest that sNgR may be a potential therapy for restoring sensory function after injuries to sensory roots. PMID:19439606

  1. Glycomimetic functionalized collagen hydrogels for peripheral nerve repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masand, Shirley Narain

    Despite the innate regenerative potential of the peripheral nervous system, functional recovery is often limited. The goal of this dissertation was to develop a clinically relevant biomaterial strategy to (1) encourage the regrowth of axons and (2) direct them down their appropriate motor tracts. To this end, we use peptide mimics of two glycans, polysialic acid (PSA) and an epitope first discovered on human natural killer cells (HNK-1), to functionalize type I collagen hydrogels. Previous studies have shown that these molecules, in their glycan and glycomimetic form, are associated with acceleration of neurite outgrowth, glial cell proliferation, and motoneuron targeting. In vitro, we demonstrated the retained functionality of the peptide glycomimetics after conjugation to a type I collagen backbone. While HNK-functionalized collagen increased motor neurite outgrowth, PSA-functionalized collagen encouraged motor and sensory neurite outgrowth and Schwann cell extension and proliferation. When we introduce these glycomimetic-functionalized collagen hydrogels into a critical gap femoral nerve model, we show that both PSA and HNK-functionalized hydrogels yielded a significant increase in functional recovery when compared to saline, native and scramble-coupled hydrogels. However, there was an interesting divergence in the morphological results: PSA-functionalized hydrogels increased axon count and HNK-functionalized hydrogels increased motoneuron targeting and myelination. We believed that these differences may be attributed to distinct mechanisms by which the glycomimetics impart their benefit. Interestingly, however, we found no synergistic gain in recovery with the use of our composite hydrogels which we speculated may be due to an inadequate dose of the individual glycomimetic. To address this possibility, we show that increasing the amount of functionalized peptide functionalized in our composite hydrogels led to increases in axon count and area of regeneration

  2. Differential myelinated and unmyelinated sensory and autonomic skin nerve fiber involvement in patients with ophthalmic postherpetic neuralgia

    PubMed Central

    Truini, Andrea; Haanpaa, Maija; Provitera, Vincenzo; Biasiotta, Antonella; Stancanelli, Annamaria; Caporaso, Giuseppe; Santoro, Lucio; Cruccu, Giorgio; Nolano, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Postherpetic neuralgia (PHN) is a common and exceptionally drug-resistant neuropathic pain condition. In this cross-sectional skin biopsy study, seeking information on the responsible pathophysiological mechanisms we assessed how ophthalmic PHN affects sensory and autonomic skin innervation. We took 2-mm supraorbital punch skin biopsies from the affected and unaffected sides in 10 patients with ophthalmic PHN. Using indirect immunofluorescence and a large panel of antibodies including protein gene product (PGP) 9.5 we quantified epidermal unmyelinated, dermal myelinated and autonomic nerve fibers. Although skin biopsy showed reduced epidermal and dermal myelinated fiber density in specimens from the affected side, the epidermal/dermal myelinated nerve fiber ratio was lower in the affected than in the unaffected side (p < 0.001), thus suggesting a predominant epidermal unmyelinated nerve fiber loss. Conversely, autonomic skin innervation was spared. Our study showing that ophthalmic PHN predominantly affects unmyelinated nerve fiber and spares autonomic nerve fiber might help to understand the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying this difficult-to-treat condition. PMID:26300742

  3. Surgical and conservative methods for restoring impaired motor function - facial nerve, spinal accessory nerve, hypoglossal nerve (not including vagal nerve or swallowing)

    PubMed Central

    Laskawi, R.; Rohrbach, S.

    2005-01-01

    The present review gives a survey of rehabilitative measures for disorders of the motor function of the mimetic muscles (facial nerve), and muscles innervated by the spinal accessory and hypoglossal nerves. The dysfunction can present either as paralysis or hyperkinesis (hyperkinesia). Conservative and surgical treatment options aimed at restoring normal motor function and correcting the movement disorders are described. Static reanimation techniques are not dealt with. The final section describes the use of botulinum toxin in the therapy of dysphagia. PMID:22073058

  4. Postnatal Experience Modulates Functional Properties of Mouse Olfactory Sensory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    He, Jiwei; Tian, Huikai; Lee, Anderson C.; Ma, Minghong

    2012-01-01

    Early experience considerably modulates the organization and function of all sensory systems. In the mammalian olfactory system, deprivation of the sensory inputs via neonatal, unilateral naris closure has been shown to induce structural, molecular, and functional changes from the olfactory epithelium to the olfactory bulb and cortex. However, it remains unknown how early experience shapes functional properties of individual olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs), the primary odor detectors in the nose. To address this question, we examined odorant response properties of mouse OSNs in both the closed and open nostril after four weeks of unilateral naris closure with age-matched untreated animals as control. Using patch-clamp technique on genetically-tagged OSNs with defined odorant receptors (ORs), we found that sensory deprivation increased the sensitivity of MOR23 neurons in the closed side while overexposure caused the opposite effect in the open side. We next analyzed the response properties including rise time, decay time, and adaptation induced by repeated stimulation in MOR23 and M71 neurons. Even though these two types of neurons showed distinct properties in dynamic range and response kinetics, sensory deprivation significantly slowed down the decay phase of odorant-induced transduction events in both types. Using western blotting and antibody staining, we confirmed upregulation of several signaling proteins in the closed side as compared with the open side. This study suggests that early experience modulates functional properties of OSNs, probably via modifying the signal transduction cascade. PMID:22703547

  5. Sensory functions of motile cilia and implication for bronchiectasis

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Raksha; Javidan-Nejad, Cylen; Alexander-Brett, Jennifer; Horani, Amjad; Cabellon, Michelle C.; Walter, Michael J.; Brody, Steven L.

    2013-01-01

    Cilia are specialized organelles that extend from the surface of cells into the local environment. Airway epithelial cell cilia are motile to provide mucociliary clearance for host defense. On other cells, solitary cilia are specialized to detect chemical or mechanosensory signals. Sensory proteins in motile cilia have recently been identified that detect shear stress, osmotic force, fluid flow, bitter taste and sex hormones. The relationship of sensory function in human motile cilia to disease is now being revealed. One example is polycystin-1 and polycystin-2. As a complex, these proteins function as a flow sensor in cilia and are mutated in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). The polycystins are also expressed in motile cilia of the airways, potentially operating as sensors in the lung. Computed tomography studies from patients with ADPKD revealed radiographic evidence for bronchiectasis, suggesting that polycystin-1 and -2 are important in lung function. The expression of this complex and sensory channel TRPV4, and bitter taste and sex hormones receptors in motile cilia indicate that the cell is wired to interpret environmental cues to regulate cilia beat frequency and other functions. Defective signaling of sensory proteins may result in a ciliopathy that includes lung disease. PMID:22202111

  6. Natural history of sensory function after herpes zoster.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Karin L; Rowbotham, Michael C

    2010-07-01

    The natural history of sensory function in the first 6months after herpes zoster (HZ) was determined in a cohort of 94 subjects at elevated risk for developing post-herpetic neuralgia (PHN). All four visits included ratings of pain and sensory symptoms, mapping areas of altered sensation and allodynia, and quantitative thermal and mechanical sensory testing. The last three visits included the capsaicin response test. Sensory thresholds in distant control skin were stable. Mirror-image skin was persistently hyperesthetic to warming and mechanical stimuli and hyperalgesic to heat compared to distant control skin. HZ skin showed deficits in all thermal modalities. Sensory recovery was limited and selective. Allodynia area and severity, hyperalgesia to von Frey hair, and cold detection threshold improved, but deficits to warmth and heat pain did not. Capsaicin on HZ skin significantly aggravated pain and allodynia in the majority of subjects at 6-8weeks after HZ onset. At study entry, eventual PHN subjects had significantly more impairment in detecting warmth and cold, a larger area of altered sensation, a larger area of allodynia, and more severe allodynia. The results support the study hypothesis that severity of initial injury predicts PHN, especially impaired cold sensation in HZ skin. The hypothesis that PHN develops because of a failure to recover normal neural function was not supported. Sensory recovery proceeded at the same rate in eventual pain-free and eventual PHN subjects and is not a requirement for pain resolution. Early interventions that reduce neural injury or enhance recovery should be of benefit. PMID:20452122

  7. Assessing nerves in leprosy.

    PubMed

    Garbino, José Antonio; Heise, Carlos Otto; Marques, Wilson

    2016-01-01

    Leprosy neuropathy is dependent on the patient's immune response and expresses itself as a focal or multifocal neuropathy with asymmetric involvement. Leprosy neuropathy evolves chronically but recurrently develops periods of exacerbation during type 1 or type 2 reactions, leading to acute neuropathy. Nerve enlargement leading to entrapment syndromes is also a common manifestation. Pain may be either of inflammatory or neuropathic origin. A thorough and detailed evaluation is mandatory for adequate patient follow-up, including nerve palpation, pain assessment, graded sensory mapping, muscle power testing, and autonomic evaluation. Nerve conduction studies are a sensitive tool for nerve dysfunction, including new lesions during reaction periods or development of entrapment syndromes. Nerve ultrasonography is also a very promising method for nerve evaluation in leprosy. The authors propose a composite nerve clinical score for nerve function assessment that can be useful for longitudinal evaluation. PMID:26773623

  8. Regeneration of putative sensory and sympathetic cutaneous nerve endings in the rat foot after sciatic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Stankovic, N; Johansson, O; Hildebrand, C

    1996-01-01

    The present study examines the occurrence of calcitonin gene-related peptide-, substance P- and tyrosine hydroxylase-like immunoreactive profiles in glabrous and hairy foot skin from normal and nerve-injured rats. After neurotomy/suture, glabrous skin samples contain few calcitonin gene-related peptide-, substance P- and tyrosine hydroxylase-like immunoreactive profies. The number of calcitonin gene-related peptide- and substance P-like immunoreacive profiles in the epidermis is significantly subnormal. Hairy skin from these rats does also contain few calcitonin gene-related peptide-, substance P- and tyrosine hydroxylase-like immunoreactive profiles. In addition, the presence of epidermal calcitonin gene-related peptide-like imunoreactive profiles in glabrous skin is subnormal on the contralateral side. After nerve crush injury, the occurrence of calcitonin gene-related peptide-like, but not substance P-like, immunoreactive profiles in th epidermis of the glabrous skin is significantly subnormal. The occurrence of tyrosine hylase-like immnunoreactive fibres in relation to the digital artery is also subnormal. The occurrence in hairy skin of calcitonin gene-related peptide-like immunoreactive, substance P-like immunoreactive and tyrosine hydroxylase-like immunoreactive profiles is subnormal. In both skin types, the contralateral occurrence of such profiles is subjectively normal. These results show that the occurrence of calcitonin gene-related peptide-, substance P-, and tyrosine hydroxylase-like immunoreactive profiles in glabrous and hairy foot skin is clearly subnormal after neurotomy and suture and less abnormal after nerve crush. After neurotomy and suture the contralateral side is also affected. PMID:10970110

  9. Electrophysiological aspects of sensory conduction velocity in healthy adults. 1. Conduction velocity from digit to palm, from palm to wrist, and across the elbow, as a function of age.

    PubMed Central

    Cruz Martínez, A; Barrio, M; Pérez Conde, M C; Gutiérrez, A M

    1978-01-01

    The sensory conduction velocity from digit to palm and from palm to wrist was determined in median (digit 3) and ulnar (digit 5) nerves in 47 healthy subjects with age range from 21 to 77 years. The decrement of the sensory conduction as a function of age was more marked in the palm to wrist than in the digit to palm segment. Sensory conduction velocity of the ulnar nerve across the elbow was also studied. Irregularities in the shape of the sensory evoked potential recorded above the cubital sulcus were found in 12.76% of cases, especially in subjects over 50 years of age. These results suggest that aging causes decrement in sensory conduction and changes in the shape of the evoked potentials, especially at points where the nerves are more frequently compressed. Images PMID:731254

  10. Limb immobilization alters functional electrophysiological parameters of sciatic nerve.

    PubMed

    Alves, J S M; Leal-Cardoso, J H; Santos-Júnior, F F U; Carlos, P S; Silva, R C; Lucci, C M; Báo, S N; Ceccatto, V M; Barbosa, R

    2013-08-01

    Immobilization, used in clinical practice to treat traumatologic problems, causes changes in muscle, but it is not known whether changes also occur in nerves. We investigated the effects of immobilization on excitability and compound action potential (CAP) and the ultrastructure of the rat sciatic nerve. Fourteen days after immobilization of the right leg of adult male Wistar rats (n=34), animals were killed and the right sciatic nerve was dissected and mounted in a moist chamber. Nerves were stimulated at a baseline frequency of 0.2 Hz and tested for 2 min at 20, 50, and 100 Hz. Immobilization altered nerve excitability. Rheobase and chronaxy changed from 3.13 ± 0.05 V and 52.31 ± 1.95 µs (control group, n=13) to 2.84 ± 0.06 V and 59.71 ± 2.79 µs (immobilized group, n=15), respectively. Immobilization altered the amplitude of CAP waves and decreased the conduction velocity of the first CAP wave (from 93.63 ± 7.49 to 79.14 ± 5.59 m/s) but not of the second wave. Transmission electron microscopy showed fragmentation of the myelin sheath of the sciatic nerve of immobilized limbs and degeneration of the axon. In conclusion, we demonstrated that long-lasting leg immobilization can induce alterations in nerve function. PMID:23969978

  11. Limb immobilization alters functional electrophysiological parameters of sciatic nerve

    PubMed Central

    Alves, J.S.M.; Leal-Cardoso, J.H.; Santos-Júnior, F.F.U.; Carlos, P.S.; Silva, R.C.; Lucci, C.M.; Báo, S.N.; Ceccatto, V.M.; Barbosa, R.

    2013-01-01

    Immobilization, used in clinical practice to treat traumatologic problems, causes changes in muscle, but it is not known whether changes also occur in nerves. We investigated the effects of immobilization on excitability and compound action potential (CAP) and the ultrastructure of the rat sciatic nerve. Fourteen days after immobilization of the right leg of adult male Wistar rats (n=34), animals were killed and the right sciatic nerve was dissected and mounted in a moist chamber. Nerves were stimulated at a baseline frequency of 0.2 Hz and tested for 2 min at 20, 50, and 100 Hz. Immobilization altered nerve excitability. Rheobase and chronaxy changed from 3.13±0.05 V and 52.31±1.95 µs (control group, n=13) to 2.84±0.06 V and 59.71±2.79 µs (immobilized group, n=15), respectively. Immobilization altered the amplitude of CAP waves and decreased the conduction velocity of the first CAP wave (from 93.63±7.49 to 79.14±5.59 m/s) but not of the second wave. Transmission electron microscopy showed fragmentation of the myelin sheath of the sciatic nerve of immobilized limbs and degeneration of the axon. In conclusion, we demonstrated that long-lasting leg immobilization can induce alterations in nerve function. PMID:23969978

  12. Rectal Mechano-sensory Function in Patients with Carcinoid Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Gregersen, Tine; Brock, Christina; Haase, Anne-Mette; Laurberg, Søren; Drewes, Asbjørn M; Grønbæk, Henning; Krogh, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims In patients with neuroendocrine tumors, excessive production of serotonin and other amines may cause the carcinoid syndrome, which is mainly characterized by diarrhea and flushing. Little is known about the pathophysiology of carcinoid diarrhea. In several other groups of patients, diarrhea may be associated with rectal hypersensitivity and increased rectal tone. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to compare rectal sensitivity and compliance in patients with carcinoid diarrhea and in healthy subjects. Methods Twelve patients (6 males, aged 54–78 years, median 65 years), with carcinoid diarrhea and 19 healthy subjects (7 males, aged 50–78 years, median 61 years) were included. Rectal mechanical and heat stimulation was used for assessment of rectal mechano-sensory properties. Results Overall, 5.3% higher temperatures were needed to elicit sensory responses in patients with carcinoid diarrhea than in healthy subjects (P = 0.015). Posthoc analyses revealed that the sensory threshold to heat was 48.1 ± 3.1°C in patients vs 44.7 ± 4.7°C in healthy subjects (P = 0.041). In contrast, patients and healthy subjects showed no overall differences in rectal sensory response to mechanical distension (P = 0.731) or rectal compliance (P = 0.990). Conclusions Patients with carcinoid diarrhea have higher sensory thresholds to heat stimulation in comparison to healthy subjects, but normal rectal sensation to mechanical distension and normal compliance. Therefore, treatment of carcinoid diarrhea should aim at prolonging gastrointestinal transit and decreasing secretion, rather than modifying rectal mechano-sensory function. PMID:26690884

  13. Gallic acid and exercise training improve motor function, nerve conduction velocity but not pain sense reflex after experimental sciatic nerve crush in male rats

    PubMed Central

    Hajimoradi, Maryam; Fazilati, Mohammad; Gharib-Naseri, Mohammad Kazem; Sarkaki, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of present study was to evaluate the effects of oral administration of gallic acid (GA) for 21 days alone and in combination with exercise on nerve conduction velocity and sensory and motor functions in rats with sciatic nerve crush. Materials and Methods: Seventy adult male Wistar rats (250-300 g) were divided randomly into 7 groups with 10 in each: 1) Control (Cont), 2) Crushed + Vehicle (Cr +Veh), 3-5) Crushed + gallic acid (Cr+GA) (50, 100, and 200 mg/kg/2 mL, orally), 6) Crushed + exercise (Cr+Exe), and 7) Crushed + exercise + effective dose of gallic acid (Cr+Exe +GA200) for 21 days. In order to establish an animal model of sciatic nerve crush, equivalent to 7 kg of force pressed on 2-3 mm of sciatic nerve for 30 s, three times with 30 s intervals. Pain sense reflex in hot plate, motor coordination in rotarod, and sciatic nerve conduction velocity (SNCV) in all groups were tested. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey’s post hoc test and p<0.05 has assigned as the significant difference. Results: Pain threshold was increased significantly in untreated crushed rats while motor function and SNCV were decreased in all groups with nerve crush (p<0.05, p<0.01, p<0.001 vs. control). Pain reflex latency was not changed in treated groups. Motor coordination and SNCV were improved in groups Cr+GA200 and Cr+Exe + GA200 (p<0.05, p<0.01 vs. Cr+Veh). Conclusion: GA, dose-dependently, may have therapeutic potential to improve the peripheral nerve degeneration, which is most likely related, at least in part, to its antioxidant and therapeutic properties. PMID:26445710

  14. Genome-wide association study of sensory disturbances in the inferior alveolar nerve after bilateral sagittal split ramus osteotomy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Bilateral sagittal split ramus osteotomy (BSSRO) is a common orthognatic surgical procedure. Sensory disturbances in the inferior alveolar nerve, including hypoesthesia and dysesthesia, are frequently observed after BSSRO, even without distinct nerve injury. The mechanisms that underlie individual differences in the vulnerability to sensory disturbances have not yet been elucidated. Methods The present study investigated the relationships between genetic polymorphisms and the vulnerability to sensory disturbances after BSSRO in a genome-wide association study (GWAS). A total of 304 and 303 patients who underwent BSSRO were included in the analyses of hypoesthesia and dysesthesia, respectively. Hypoesthesia was evaluated using the tactile test 1 week after surgery. Dysesthesia was evaluated by interview 4 weeks after surgery. Whole-genome genotyping was conducted using Illumina BeadChips including approximately 300,000 polymorphism markers. Results Hypoesthesia and dysesthesia occurred in 51 (16.8%) and 149 (49.2%) subjects, respectively. Significant associations were not observed between the clinical data (i.e., age, sex, body weight, body height, loss of blood volume, migration length of bone fragments, nerve exposure, duration of anesthesia, and duration of surgery) and the frequencies of hypoesthesia and dysesthesia. Significant associations were found between hypoesthesia and the rs502281 polymorphism (recessive model: combined χ2 = 24.72, nominal P = 6.633 × 10-7), between hypoesthesia and the rs2063640 polymorphism (recessive model: combined χ2 = 23.07, nominal P = 1.563 × 10-6), and between dysesthesia and the nonsynonymous rs2677879 polymorphism (trend model: combined χ2 = 16.56, nominal P = 4.722 × 10-5; dominant model: combined χ2 = 16.31, nominal P = 5.369 × 10-5). The rs502281 and rs2063640 polymorphisms were located in the flanking region of the ARID1B and ZPLD1 genes on chromosomes 6 and 3, whose official names are “AT rich

  15. Olfactory Cilia: Linking Sensory Cilia Function and Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Paul M.; McEwen, Dyke P.

    2009-01-01

    The olfactory system gives us an awareness of our immediate environment by allowing us to detect airborne stimuli. The components necessary for detection of these odorants are compartmentalized in the cilia of olfactory sensory neurons. Cilia are microtubule-based organelles, which can be found projecting from the surface of almost any mammalian cell, and are critical for proper olfactory function. Mislocalization of ciliary proteins and/or the loss of cilia cause impaired olfactory function, which is now recognized as a clinical manifestation of a broad class of human diseases, termed ciliopathies. Future work investigating the mechanisms of olfactory cilia function will provide us important new information regarding the pathogenesis of human sensory perception diseases. PMID:19406873

  16. Neurophysiological assessment of auditory, peripheral nerve, somatosensory, and visual system functions after developmental exposure to ethanol vapors.

    PubMed

    Boyes, William K; Degn, Laura L; Martin, Sheppard A; Lyke, Danielle F; Hamm, Charles W; Herr, David W

    2014-01-01

    Ethanol-blended gasoline entered the market in response to demand for domestic renewable energy sources, and may result in increased inhalation of ethanol vapors in combination with other volatile gasoline constituents. It is important to understand potential risks of inhalation of ethanol vapors by themselves, and also as a baseline for evaluating the risks of ethanol combined with a complex mixture of hydrocarbon vapors. Because sensory dysfunction has been reported after developmental exposure to ethanol, we evaluated the effects of developmental exposure to ethanol vapors on neurophysiological measures of sensory function as a component of a larger project evaluating developmental ethanol toxicity. Pregnant Long-Evans rats were exposed to target concentrations 0, 5000, 10,000, or 21,000 ppm ethanol vapors for 6.5h/day over GD9-GD20. Sensory evaluations of male offspring began between PND106 and PND128. Peripheral nerve function (compound action potentials, nerve conduction velocity (NCV)), somatosensory (cortical and cerebellar evoked potentials), auditory (brainstem auditory evoked responses), and visual evoked responses were assessed. Visual function assessment included pattern elicited visual evoked potentials (VEPs), VEP contrast sensitivity, and electroretinograms recorded from dark-adapted (scotopic), light-adapted (photopic) flashes, and UV flicker and green flicker. No consistent concentration-related changes were observed for any of the physiological measures. The results show that gestational exposure to ethanol vapor did not result in detectable changes in peripheral nerve, somatosensory, auditory, or visual function when the offspring were assessed as adults. PMID:24607749

  17. Nerve conduction

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... the spinal cord to muscles and sensory receptors. A peripheral nerve is composed of nerve bundles (fascicles) ... two neurons, it must first be converted to a chemical signal, which then crosses a space of ...

  18. Each Sensory Nerve Arising From the Geniculate Ganglion Expresses a Unique Fingerprint of Neurotrophin and Neurotrophin Receptor Genes

    PubMed Central

    Farbman, Albert I.; Guagliardo, Nick; Sollars, Suzanne I.; Hill, David L.

    2009-01-01

    Neurons in the geniculate ganglion, like those in other sensory ganglia, are dependent on neurotrophins for survival. Most geniculate ganglion neurons innervate taste buds in two regions of the tongue and two regions of the palate; the rest are cutaneous nerves to the skin of the ear. We investigated the expression of four neurotrophins, nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), neurotrophin 3 (NT-3), and NT-4, and five neurotrophin receptors, trkA, trkB, trkC, p75, and truncated trkB (Trn-B) in single sensory neurons of the adult rat geniculate ganglion associated with the five innervation fields. For fungiform papillae, a glass pipette containing biotinylated dextran was placed over the target papilla and the tracer was iontophoresed into the target papilla. For the other target fields, Fluoro-Gold was microinjected. After 3 days, geniculate ganglia were harvested, sectioned, and treated histochemically (for biotinylated dextran) or immunohistochemically (for Fluoro-Gold) to reveal the neurons containing the tracer. Single labeled neurons were harvested from the slides and subjected to RNA amplification and RT-PCR to reveal the neurotrophin or neurotrophin receptor genes that were expressed. Neurons projecting from the geniculate ganglion to each of the five target fields had a unique expression profile of neurotrophin and neurotrophic receptor genes. Several individual neurons expressed more than one neurotrophin receptor or more than one neurotrophin gene. Although BDNF is significantly expressed in taste buds, its primary high affinity receptor, trkB, was not prominently expressed in the neurons. The results are consistent with the interpretation that at least some, perhaps most, of the trophic influence on the sensory neurons is derived from the neuronal somata, and the trophic effect is paracrine or autocrine, rather than target derived. The BDNF in the taste bud may also act in a paracrine or autocrine manner on the trkB expressed

  19. Adult sensory capacities as a function of birth risk factors.

    PubMed

    Harland, R E; Coren, S

    1996-06-01

    This study examined the relationship between birth risk factors and sensory capacity in 1245 young adults (mean age = 19.9 years). Nine birth risk factors were included (long labour, breech birth, breathing difficulty, instrument delivery, Caesarian delivery, multiple birth, premature birth, low birth weight, and high-risk birth order) and six sensory capacities were tested (Snellen visual acuity, stereopsis, color discrimination, pure-tone hearing, speech recognition, and sound localization). Mild birth stressors were strongly predictive of reduced visual acuity and stereoscopic discrimination, and mildly predictive for the other sensory measures. The fact that vision was more vulnerable to the effects of birth stress than audition may be due to the slower maturation of the visual system. Of the birth stressors examined, twinning was found to have the largest effect on sensory function, possibly because it often occurs conjointly with other birth stressors such as low birth weight, breech presentation, and breathing difficulty and may involve the use of birthing instruments such as forceps. PMID:8877623

  20. Stimulus electrodiagnosis and motor and functional evaluations during ulnar nerve recovery

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Luciane F. R. M.; Oliveira, Nuno M. L.; Pelet, Danyelle C. S.; Cunha, Agnes F. S.; Grecco, Marco A. S.; Souza, Luciane A. P. S.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Distal ulnar nerve injury leads to impairment of hand function due to motor and sensorial changes. Stimulus electrodiagnosis (SE) is a method of assessing and monitoring the development of this type of injury. OBJECTIVE: To identify the most sensitive electrodiagnostic parameters to evaluate ulnar nerve recovery and to correlate these parameters (Rheobase, Chronaxie, and Accommodation) with motor function evaluations. METHOD: A prospective cohort study of ten patients submitted to ulnar neurorrhaphy and evaluated using electrodiagnosis and motor assessment at two moments of neural recovery. A functional evaluation using the DASH questionnaire (Disability of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand) was conducted at the end to establish the functional status of the upper limb. RESULTS: There was significant reduction only in the Chronaxie values in relation to time of injury and side (with and without lesion), as well as significant correlation of Chronaxie with the motor domain score. CONCLUSION: Chronaxie was the most sensitive SE parameter for detecting differences in neuromuscular responses during the ulnar nerve recovery process and it was the only parameter correlated with the motor assessment. PMID:26786072

  1. Composition and sensory function of the trypanosome flagellar membrane

    PubMed Central

    Maric, Danijela; Epting, Conrad L.; Engman, David M.

    2010-01-01

    Summary A cilium is an extension of the cell that contains an axonemal complex of microtubules and associated proteins bounded by a membrane which is contiguous with the cell body membrane. Cilia may be nonmotile or motile, the latter having additional specific roles in cell or fluid movement. The term flagellum refers to the motile cilium of free-living single cells (e.g., bacteria, archaea, spermatozoa and protozoa). In eukaryotes, both nonmotile and motile cilia possess sensory functions. The ciliary interior (cilioplasm) is separated from the cytoplasm by a selective barrier that prevents passive diffusion of molecules between the two domains. The sensory functions of cilia reside largely in the membrane and signals generated in the cilium are transduced into a variety of cellular responses. In this review we discuss the structure and biogenesis of the cilium, with special attention to the trypanosome flagellar membrane, its lipid and protein composition and its proposed roles in sensing and signaling. PMID:20580599

  2. Sensory and motor neuropathy in a Border Collie.

    PubMed

    Harkin, Kenneth R; Cash, Walter C; Shelton, G Diane

    2005-10-15

    A 5-month-old female Border Collie was evaluated because of progressive hind limb ataxia. The predominant clinical findings suggested a sensory neuropathy. Sensory nerve conduction velocity was absent in the tibial, common peroneal, and radial nerves and was decreased in the ulnar nerve; motor nerve conduction velocity was decreased in the tibial, common peroneal, and ulnar nerves. Histologic examination of nerve biopsy specimens revealed considerable nerve fiber depletion; some tissue sections had myelin ovoids, foamy macrophages, and axonal degeneration in remaining fibers. Marked depletion of most myelinated fibers within the peroneal nerve (a mixed sensory and motor nerve) supported the electrodiagnostic findings indicative of sensorimotor neuropathy. Progressive deterioration in motor function occurred over the following 19 months until the dog was euthanatized. A hereditary link was not established, but a littermate was similarly affected. The hereditary characteristic of this disease requires further investigation. PMID:16266014

  3. The Diagnostic Value of Nerve Ultrasound in an Atypical Palmar Cutaneous Nerve Lesion.

    PubMed

    Zanette, Giampietro; Tamburin, Stefano

    2016-07-01

    Detailed knowledge of the fascicular anatomy of peripheral nerves is important for microsurgical repair and functional electrostimulation.We report a patient with a lesion on the left palmar cutaneous branch of the median nerve (PCBMN) and sensory signs expanding outside the PCBMN cutaneous innervation territory. Nerve conduction study showed the absence of left PCBMN sensory nerve action potential, but apparently, no median nerve (MN) involvement. Nerve ultrasound documented a neuroma of the left PCBMN and a coexistent lateral neuroma of the left MN in the carpal tunnel after the PCBMN left the main nerve trunk.Nerve ultrasound may offer important information in patients with peripheral nerve lesions and atypical clinical and/or nerve conduction study findings. The present case may shed some light on the somatotopy of MN fascicles at the wrist. PMID:26945219

  4. Assessment of Neuromuscular Function Using Percutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Rozand, Vianney; Grosprêtre, Sidney; Stapley, Paul J; Lepers, Romuald

    2015-01-01

    Percutaneous electrical nerve stimulation is a non-invasive method commonly used to evaluate neuromuscular function from brain to muscle (supra-spinal, spinal and peripheral levels). The present protocol describes how this method can be used to stimulate the posterior tibial nerve that activates plantar flexor muscles. Percutaneous electrical nerve stimulation consists of inducing an electrical stimulus to a motor nerve to evoke a muscular response. Direct (M-wave) and/or indirect (H-reflex) electrophysiological responses can be recorded at rest using surface electromyography. Mechanical (twitch torque) responses can be quantified with a force/torque ergometer. M-wave and twitch torque reflect neuromuscular transmission and excitation-contraction coupling, whereas H-reflex provides an index of spinal excitability. EMG activity and mechanical (superimposed twitch) responses can also be recorded during maximal voluntary contractions to evaluate voluntary activation level. Percutaneous nerve stimulation provides an assessment of neuromuscular function in humans, and is highly beneficial especially for studies evaluating neuromuscular plasticity following acute (fatigue) or chronic (training/detraining) exercise. PMID:26436986

  5. A new paradigm of electrical stimulation to enhance sensory neural function.

    PubMed

    Breen, Paul P; ÓLaighin, Gearóid; McIntosh, Caroline; Dinneen, Sean F; Quinlan, Leo R; Serrador, Jorge M

    2014-08-01

    The ability to improve peripheral neural transmission would have significant therapeutic potential in medicine. A technology of this kind could be used to restore and/or enhance sensory function in individuals with depressed sensory function, such as older adults or patients with peripheral neuropathies. The goal of this study was to investigate if a new paradigm of subsensory electrical noise stimulation enhances somatosensory function. Vibration (50Hz) was applied with a Neurothesiometer to the plantar aspect of the foot in the presence or absence of subsensory electrical noise (1/f type). The noise was applied at a proximal site, on a defined region of the tibial nerve path above the ankle. Vibration perception thresholds (VPT) of younger adults were measured in control and experimental conditions, in the absence or presence of noise respectively. An improvement of ∼16% in VPT was found in the presence of noise. These are the first data to demonstrate that modulation of axonal transmission with externally applied electrical noise improves perception of tactile stimuli in humans. PMID:24894033

  6. Thermographic evaluation of hind paw skin temperature and functional recovery of locomotion after sciatic nerve crush in rats

    PubMed Central

    Z. Sacharuk, Viviane; A. Lovatel, Gisele; Ilha, Jocemar; Marcuzzo, Simone; Severo do Pinho, Alexandre; L. Xavier, Léder; A. Zaro, Milton; Achaval, Matilde

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Peripheral nerves are often damaged by direct mechanical injury, diseases, and tumors. The peripheral nerve injuries that result from these conditions can lead to a partial or complete loss of motor, sensory, and autonomic functions, which in turn are related to changes in skin temperature, in the involved segments of the body. The aim of this study was to evaluate the changes in hind paw skin temperature after sciatic nerve crush in rats in an attempt to determine whether changes in skin temperature correlate with the functional recovery of locomotion. METHODS: Wistar rats were divided into three groups: control (n = 7), sham (n = 25), and crush (n = 25). All groups were subjected to thermographic, functional, and histological assessments. RESULTS: ΔT in the crush group was different from the control and sham groups at the 1st, 3rd and 7rd postoperative days (p<0.05). The functional recovery from the crush group returned to normal values between the 3rd and 4th week post-injury, and morphological analysis of the nerve revealed incomplete regeneration at the 4th week after injury. DISCUSSION: This study is the first demonstration that sciatic nerve crush in rats induces an increase in hind paw skin temperature and that skin temperature changes do not correlate closely with functional recovery PMID:21876984

  7. Semantic Relevance, Domain Specificity and the Sensory/Functional Theory of Category-Specificity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sartori, Giuseppe; Gnoato, Francesca; Mariani, Ilenia; Prioni, Sara; Lombardi, Luigi

    2007-01-01

    According to the sensory/functional theory of semantic memory, Living items rely more on Sensory knowledge than Non-living ones. The sensory/functional explanation of category-specificity assumes that semantic features are organised on the basis of their content. We report here a study on DAT patients with impaired performance on Living items and…

  8. Nerve conduction and electromyography studies.

    PubMed

    Kane, N M; Oware, A

    2012-07-01

    Nerve conduction studies (NCS) and electromyography (EMG), often shortened to 'EMGs', are a useful adjunct to clinical examination of the peripheral nervous system and striated skeletal muscle. NCS provide an efficient and rapid method of quantifying nerve conduction velocity (CV) and the amplitude of both sensory nerve action potentials (SNAPs) and compound motor action potentials (cMAPs). The CV reflects speed of propagation of action potentials, by saltatory conduction, along large myelinated axons in a peripheral nerve. The amplitude of SNAPs is in part determined by the number of axons in a sensory nerve, whilst amplitude of cMAPs reflects integrated function of the motor axons, neuromuscular junction and striated muscle. Repetitive nerve stimulation (RNS) can identify defects of neuromuscular junction (NMJ) transmission, pre- or post-synaptic. Needle EMG examination can detect myopathic changes in muscle and signs of denervation. Combinations of these procedures can establish if motor and/or sensory nerve cell bodies or peripheral nerves are damaged (e.g. motor neuronopathy, sensory ganglionopathy or neuropathy), and also indicate if the primary target is the axon or the myelin sheath (i.e. axonal or demyelinating neuropathies). The distribution of nerve damage can be determined as either generalised, multifocal (mononeuropathy multiplex) or focal. The latter often due to compression at the common entrapment sites (such as the carpal tunnel, Guyon's canal, cubital tunnel, radial groove, fibular head and tarsal tunnel, to name but a few of the reported hundred or so 'entrapment neuropathies'). PMID:22614870

  9. Characterization of tests of functional recovery after median and ulnar nerve injury and repair in the rat forelimb.

    PubMed

    Galtrey, Clare M; Fawcett, James W

    2007-03-01

    The majority of human peripheral nerve injuries occur in the upper limb but the majority of studies in the rat are performed in the hindlimb. The upper and lower limbs differ in dexterity and control by supraspinal systems, so an upper limb model is a better representation of the common form of human injury. The purpose of this study was to further develop a rat model involving lesions of the median and ulnar nerves. To produce different degrees of misdirection of axons following nerve repair, we studied nerve crush, cut and repair of the two nerves, and cut and repair with crossover. Assessment of functional recovery was performed using a battery of motor and sensory tests: the staircase test, which assesses skilled forepaw reaching; grip strength meter, which assesses grip strength; pawprint analysis, which assesses toe spread and print length; horizontal ladder, which assesses forepaw placement during skilled locomotion; modified Randall-Selitto device and electronic von Frey probes, which assess fine touch; and cold probes, which assess temperature sensation. All tests revealed deficits in forepaw function after nerve injury except the print length and modified Randall-Selitto device. The time course of functional recovery was observed over 15 weeks. The final degree of functional recovery achieved was related to the misdirection of axon regeneration. The tests that most clearly revealed the effects of axon misdirection on function were the skilled paw reaching and grip strength tests. The lesion model and functional tests that we have developed will be useful in testing therapeutic strategies for treating the consequences of inaccurate axon regeneration following peripheral nerve injury in humans. PMID:17374098

  10. Sensory Processing in Low-Functioning Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Distinct Sensory Profiles and Their Relationships with Behavioral Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Gonthier, Corentin; Longuépée, Lucie; Bouvard, Martine

    2016-09-01

    Sensory processing abnormalities are relatively universal in individuals with autism spectrum disorder, and can be very disabling. Surprisingly, very few studies have investigated these abnormalities in low-functioning adults with autism. The goals of the present study were (a) to characterize distinct profiles of sensory dysfunction, and (b) to understand how sensory dysfunction relates to behavioral disorders in this population. Data were collected for a representative sample of inpatients in autism care centers (N = 148) and a non-clinical control group. Results demonstrated that sensory dysfunction (a) is highly prevalent in low-functioning adults with ASD and differentiates at least four sub-profiles of patients, and (b) predicts specific patterns of behavioral disorders. Implications for care are discussed. PMID:27364513

  11. The influence of vascularization of transplanted processed allograft nerve on return of motor function in rats.

    PubMed

    Giusti, Guilherme; Lee, Joo-Yup; Kremer, Thomas; Friedrich, Patricia; Bishop, Allen T; Shin, Alexander Y

    2016-02-01

    Processed nerve allografts have become an alternative to repair segmental nerve defects, with results comparable with autografts regarding sensory recovery; however, they have failed to reproduce comparable motor recovery. The purpose of this study was to determine how revascularizaton of processed nerve allograft would affect motor recovery. Eighty-eight rats were divided in four groups of 22 animals each. A unilateral 10-mm sciatic nerve defect was repaired with allograft (group I), allograft wrapped with silicone conduit (group II), allograft augmented with vascular endothelial growth factor (group III), or autograft (group IV). Eight animals from each group were sacrificed at 3 days, and the remaining animals at 16 weeks. Revascularization was evaluated by measuring the graft capillary density at 3 days and 16 weeks. Measurements of ankle contracture, compound muscle action potential, tibialis anterior muscle weight and force, and nerve histomorphometry were performed at 16 weeks. All results were normalized to the contralateral side. The results of capillary density at 3 days were 0.99% ± 1.3% for group I, 0.33% ± 0.6% for group II, 0.05% ± 0.1% for group III, and 75.6% ± 45.7% for group IV. At 16 weeks, the results were 69.9% ± 22.4% for group I, 37.0% ± 16.6% for group II, 84.6% ± 46.6% for group III, and 108.3% ± 46.8% for group IV. The results of muscle force were 47.5% ± 14.4% for group I, 21.7% ± 13.5% for group II, 47.1% ± 7.9% for group III, and 54.4% ± 10.6% for group IV. The use of vascular endothelial growth factor in the fashion used in this study improved neither the nerve allograft short-term revascularization nor the functional motor recovery after 16 weeks. Blocking allograft vascularization from surrounding tissues was detrimental for motor recovery. The processed nerve allografts used in this study showed similar functional motor recovery compared with that of the autograft. PMID

  12. Characterization of Thoracic Motor and Sensory Neurons and Spinal Nerve Roots in Canine Degenerative Myelopathy, a Potential Disease Model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Brandie R.; Coates, Joan R.; Johnson, Gayle C.; Shelton, G. Diane; Katz, Martin L.

    2014-01-01

    Canine Degenerative Myelopathy (DM) is a progressive adult-onset multisystem degenerative disease with many features in common with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). As with some forms of ALS, DM is associated with mutations in superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1). Clinical signs include general proprioceptive ataxia and spastic upper motor neuron paresis in pelvic limbs, which progress to flaccid tetraplegia and dysphagia. The purpose of this study was to characterize DM as a potential disease model for ALS. We previously reported that intercostal muscle atrophy develops in dogs with advanced stage DM. To determine if other components of the thoracic motor unit (MU) also demonstrated morphological changes consistent with dysfunction, histopathologic and morphometric analyses were conducted on thoracic spinal motor neurons (MN) and dorsal root ganglia (DRG), and in motor and sensory nerve root axons from DM-affected Boxers and Pembroke Welsh Corgis (PWCs). No alterations in MNs, or motor root axons were observed in either breed. However, advanced stage PWCs exhibited significant losses of sensory root axons, and numerous DRG sensory neurons displayed evidence of degeneration. These results indicate that intercostal muscle atrophy in DM is not preceded by physical loss of the motor neurons innervating these muscles, or of their axons. Axonal loss in thoracic sensory roots and sensory nerve death suggest sensory involvement may play an important role in DM disease progression. Further analysis of the mechanisms responsible for these morphological findings would aid in the development of therapeutic intervention for DM and some forms of ALS. PMID:24375814

  13. Laminin Functionalized Biomimetic Nanofibers For Nerve Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Junka, Radoslaw; Valmikinathan, Chandra M; Kalyon, Dilhan M; Yu, Xiaojun

    2013-01-01

    Large-gap peripheral nerve injuries present a significant challenge for nerve regeneration due to lack of suitable grafts, insufficient cell penetration, and repair. Biomimetic nanofibrous scaffolds, functionalized on the surface with extracellular matrix proteins, can lead to novel therapies for repair and regeneration of damaged peripheral nerves. Here, nanofibrous scaffolds electrospun from blends of poly(caprolactone) (PCL) and chitosan were fabricated. Taking advantage of the amine groups on the chitosan, the surface of the scaffolds were functionalized with laminin by carbodiimide based crosslinking. Crosslinking allowed laminin to be attached to the surfaces of the PCL-chitosan nanofibers at relatively high concentrations that were not possible using conventional adsorption methods. The nanofibrous meshes were tested for wettability, mechanical properties and cell attachment and proliferation. Blending of chitosan with PCL provided more favorable surfaces for attachment of Schwann cells due to the reduction of the contact angle in comparison to neat PCL. Proliferation rates of Schwann cells grown on PCL-chitosan scaffolds with crosslinked laminin were significantly higher than the rates for PCL-chitosan nanofibrous matrices with adsorbed laminin. PCL-chitosan scaffolds with modified surfaces via crosslinking of laminin could potentially serves as versatile substrates with excellent mechanical and surface properties for in vivo cell delivery for nerve tissue engineering applications. PMID:24083073

  14. Age-related changes in the function and structure of the peripheral sensory pathway in mice.

    PubMed

    Canta, Annalisa; Chiorazzi, Alessia; Carozzi, Valentina Alda; Meregalli, Cristina; Oggioni, Norberto; Bossi, Mario; Rodriguez-Menendez, Virginia; Avezza, Federica; Crippa, Luca; Lombardi, Raffaella; de Vito, Giuseppe; Piazza, Vincenzo; Cavaletti, Guido; Marmiroli, Paola

    2016-09-01

    This study is aimed at describing the changes occurring in the entire peripheral nervous system sensory pathway along a 2-year observation period in a cohort of C57BL/6 mice. The neurophysiological studies evidenced significant differences in the selected time points corresponding to childhood, young adulthood, adulthood, and aging (i.e., 1, 7, 15, and 25 months of age), with a parabolic course as function of time. The pathological assessment allowed to demonstrate signs of age-related changes since the age of 7 months, with a remarkable increase in both peripheral nerves and dorsal root ganglia at the subsequent time points. These changes were mainly in the myelin sheaths, as also confirmed by the Rotating-Polarization Coherent-Anti-stokes-Raman-scattering microscopy analysis. Evident changes were also present at the morphometric analysis performed on the peripheral nerves, dorsal root ganglia neurons, and skin biopsies. This extensive, multimodal characterization of the peripheral nervous system changes in aging provides the background for future mechanistic studies allowing the selection of the most appropriate time points and readouts according to the investigation aims. PMID:27459934

  15. Novel targeted sensory reinnervation technique to restore functional hand sensation after transhumeral amputation.

    PubMed

    Hebert, Jacqueline S; Olson, Jaret L; Morhart, Michael J; Dawson, Michael R; Marasco, Paul D; Kuiken, Todd A; Chan, K Ming

    2014-07-01

    We present a case study of a novel variation of the targeted sensory reinnervation technique that provides additional control over sensory restoration after transhumeral amputation. The use of intraoperative somatosensory evoked potentials on individual fascicles of the median and ulnar nerves allowed us to specifically target sensory fascicles to reroute to target cutaneous nerves at a distance away from anticipated motor sites in a transhumeral amputee. This resulted in restored hand maps of the median and ulnar nerve in discrete spatially separated areas. In addition, the subject was able to use native and reinnervated muscle sites to control a robotic arm while simultaneously sensing touch and force feedback from the robotic gripper in a physiologically correct manner. This proof of principle study is the first to demonstrate the ability to have simultaneous dual flow of information (motor and sensory) within the residual limb. In working towards clinical deployment of a sensory integrated prosthetic device, this surgical method addresses the important issue of restoring a usable access point to provide natural hand sensation after upper limb amputation. PMID:24760915

  16. Spatial and Functional Selectivity of Peripheral Nerve Signal Recording With the Transversal Intrafascicular Multichannel Electrode (TIME).

    PubMed

    Badia, Jordi; Raspopovic, Stanisa; Carpaneto, Jacopo; Micera, Silvestro; Navarro, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    The selection of suitable peripheral nerve electrodes for biomedical applications implies a trade-off between invasiveness and selectivity. The optimal design should provide the highest selectivity for targeting a large number of nerve fascicles with the least invasiveness and potential damage to the nerve. The transverse intrafascicular multichannel electrode (TIME), transversally inserted in the peripheral nerve, has been shown to be useful for the selective activation of subsets of axons, both at inter- and intra-fascicular levels, in the small sciatic nerve of the rat. In this study we assessed the capabilities of TIME for the selective recording of neural activity, considering the topographical selectivity and the distinction of neural signals corresponding to different sensory types. Topographical recording selectivity was proved by the differential recording of CNAPs from different subsets of nerve fibers, such as those innervating toes 2 and 4 of the hindpaw of the rat. Neural signals elicited by sensory stimuli applied to the rat paw were successfully recorded. Signal processing allowed distinguishing three different types of sensory stimuli such as tactile, proprioceptive and nociceptive ones with high performance. These findings further support the suitability of TIMEs for neuroprosthetic applications, by exploiting the transversal topographical structure of the peripheral nerves. PMID:26087496

  17. Substitution of natural sensory input by artificial neurostimulation of an amputated trigeminal nerve does not prevent the degeneration of basal forebrain cholinergic circuits projecting to the somatosensory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Herrera-Rincon, Celia; Panetsos, Fivos

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral deafferentation downregulates acetylcholine (ACh) synthesis in sensory cortices. However, the responsible neural circuits and processes are not known. We irreversibly transected the rat infraorbital nerve and implanted neuroprosthetic microdevices for proximal stump stimulation, and assessed cytochrome-oxidase and choline- acetyl-transferase (ChAT) in somatosensory, auditory and visual cortices; estimated the number and density of ACh-neurons in the magnocellular basal nucleus (MBN); and localized down-regulated ACh-neurons in basal forebrain using retrograde labeling from deafferented cortices. Here we show that nerve transection, causes down regulation of MBN cholinergic neurons. Stimulation of the cut nerve reverses the metabolic decline but does not affect the decrease in cholinergic fibers in cortex or cholinergic neurons in basal forebrain. Artifical stimulation of the nerve also has no affect of ACh-innervation of other cortices. Cortical ChAT depletion is due to loss of corticopetal MBN ChAT-expressing neurons. MBN ChAT downregulation is not due to a decrease of afferent activity or to a failure of trophic support. Basalocortical ACh circuits are sensory specific, ACh is provided to each sensory cortex “on demand” by dedicated circuits. Our data support the existence of a modality-specific cortex-MBN-cortex circuit for cognitive information processing. PMID:25452715

  18. Evolutionary origins of sensation in metazoans: functional evidence for a new sensory organ in sponges

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background One of the hallmarks of multicellular organisms is the ability of their cells to trigger responses to the environment in a coordinated manner. In recent years primary cilia have been shown to be present as ‘antennae’ on almost all animal cells, and are involved in cell-to-cell signaling in development and tissue homeostasis; how this sophisticated sensory system arose has been little-studied and its evolution is key to understanding how sensation arose in the Animal Kingdom. Sponges (Porifera), one of the earliest evolving phyla, lack conventional muscles and nerves and yet sense and respond to changes in their fluid environment. Here we demonstrate the presence of non-motile cilia in sponges and studied their role as flow sensors. Results Demosponges excrete wastes from their body with a stereotypic series of whole-body contractions using a structure called the osculum to regulate the water-flow through the body. In this study we show that short cilia line the inner epithelium of the sponge osculum. Ultrastructure of the cilia shows an absence of a central pair of microtubules and high speed imaging shows they are non-motile, suggesting they are not involved in generating flow. In other animals non-motile, ‘primary’, cilia are involved in sensation. Here we show that molecules known to block cationic ion channels in primary cilia and which inhibit sensory function in other organisms reduce or eliminate sponge contractions. Removal of the cilia using chloral hydrate, or removal of the whole osculum, also stops the contractions; in all instances the effect is reversible, suggesting that the cilia are involved in sensation. An analysis of sponge transcriptomes shows the presence of several transient receptor potential (TRP) channels including PKD channels known to be involved in sensing changes in flow in other animals. Together these data suggest that cilia in sponge oscula are involved in flow sensation and coordination of simple behaviour

  19. Evolution of peripheral nerve function in humans: novel insights from motor nerve excitability

    PubMed Central

    Farrar, Michelle A; Park, Susanna B; Lin, Cindy S-Y; Kiernan, Matthew C

    2013-01-01

    While substantial alterations in myelination and axonal growth have been described during maturation, their interactions with the configuration and activity of axonal membrane ion channels to achieve impulse conduction have not been fully elucidated. The present study utilized axonal excitability techniques to compare the changes in nerve function across healthy infants, children, adolescents and adults. Multiple excitability indices (stimulus–response curve, strength–duration time constant, threshold electrotonus, current–threshold relationship and recovery cycle) combined with conventional neurophysiological measures were investigated in 57 subjects (22 males, 35 females; age range 0.46–24 years), stimulating the median motor nerve at the wrist. Maturational changes in conduction velocity were paralleled by significant alterations in multiple excitability parameters, similarly reaching steady values in adolescence. Maturation was accompanied by reductions in threshold (P < 0.005) and rheobase (P= 0.001); depolarizing and hyperpolarizing electrotonus progressively reduced (P < 0.001), or ‘fanned-in’; resting current–threshold slope increased (P < 0.0001); accommodation to depolarizing currents prolonged (P < 0.0001); while greater threshold changes in refractoriness (P= 0.001) and subexcitability (P < 0.01) emerged. Taken together, the present findings suggest that passive membrane conductances and the activity of K+ conductances decrease with formation of the axo-glial junction and myelination. In turn, these functional alterations serve to enhance the efficiency and speed of impulse conduction concurrent with the acquisition of motor skills during childhood, and provide unique insight into the evolution of postnatal human peripheral nerve function. Significantly, these findings bring the dynamics of axonal development to the clinical domain and serve to further illuminate pathophysiological mechanisms that occur during development. PMID:23006483

  20. Sensory Processing in Preterm Preschoolers and Its Association with Executive Function

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Jenna N.; Feldman, Heidi M.; Huffman, Lynne C.; Loe, Irene M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Symptoms of abnormal sensory processing have been related to preterm birth, but have not yet been studied specifically in preterm preschoolers. The degree of association between sensory processing and other domains is important for understanding the role of sensory processing symptoms in the development of preterm children. Aims To test two related hypotheses: (1) preterm preschoolers have more sensory processing symptoms than full term preschoolers and (2) sensory processing is associated with both executive function and adaptive function in preterm preschoolers. Study Design Cross-sectional study Subjects Preterm children (≤34 weeks of gestation; n = 54) and full term controls (≥37 weeks of gestation; n = 73) ages 3-5 years. Outcome Measures Sensory processing was assessed with the Short Sensory Profile. Executive function was assessed with (1) parent ratings on the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function- Preschool version and (2) a performance-based battery of tasks. Adaptive function was assessed with the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales-II. Results Preterm preschoolers showed significantly more sensory symptoms than full term controls. A higher percentage of preterm than full term preschoolers had elevated numbers of sensory symptoms (37% vs. 12%). Sensory symptoms in preterm preschoolers were associated with scores on executive function measures, but were not significantly associated with adaptive function. Conclusions Preterm preschoolers exhibited more sensory symptoms than full term controls. Preterm preschoolers with elevated numbers of sensory symptoms also showed executive function impairment. Future research should further examine whether sensory processing and executive function should be considered independent or overlapping constructs. PMID:25706317

  1. Collagen VI regulates peripheral nerve myelination and function.

    PubMed

    Chen, Peiwen; Cescon, Matilde; Megighian, Aram; Bonaldo, Paolo

    2014-03-01

    Collagen VI is an extracellular matrix protein with broad distribution in several tissues. Although Col6a1 is expressed by Schwann cells, the role of collagen VI in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) is yet unknown. Here we show that Schwann cells, but not axons, contribute to collagen VI deposition in peripheral nerves. By using Col6a1-null mice, in which collagen VI deposition is compromised, we demonstrate that lack of collagen VI leads to increased myelin thickness (P<0.001) along with 60-130% up-regulation in myelin-associated proteins and disorganized C fibers in the PNS. The hypermyelination of PNS in Col6a1(-/-) mice is supported by alterations of signaling pathways involved in myelination, including increase of P-FAK, P-AKT, P-ERK1, P-ERK2, and P-p38 (4.15, 1.67, 2.47, 3.34, and 2.60-fold, respectively) and reduction of vimentin (0.49-fold), P-JNK (0.74-fold), and P-c-Jun (0.50-fold). Pathologically, Col6a1(-/-) mice display an impairment of nerve conduction velocity and motor coordination (P<0.05), as well as a delayed response to acute pain stimuli (P<0.001), indicating that lack of collagen VI causes functional defects of peripheral nerves. Altogether, these results indicate that collagen VI is a critical component of PNS contributing to the structural integrity and proper function of peripheral nerves. PMID:24277578

  2. Effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on quadriceps function in individuals with experimental knee pain.

    PubMed

    Son, S J; Kim, H; Seeley, M K; Feland, J B; Hopkins, J T

    2016-09-01

    Knee joint pain (KJP) is a cardinal symptom in knee pathologies, and quadriceps inhibition is commonly observed among KJP patients. Previously, KJP independently reduced quadriceps strength and activation. However, it remains unknown how disinhibitory transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) will affect inhibited quadriceps motor function. This study aimed at examining changes in quadriceps maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) and central activation ratio (CAR) before and after sensory TENS following experimental knee pain. Thirty healthy participants were assigned to either the TENS or placebo groups. All participants underwent three separate data collection sessions consisting of two saline infusions and one no infusion control in a crossover design. TENS or placebo treatment was administered to each group for 20 min. Quadriceps MVC and CAR were measured at baseline, infusion, treatment, and post-treatment. Perceived knee pain intensity was measured on a 100-mm visual analogue scale. Post-hoc analysis revealed that hypertonic saline infusion significantly reduced the quadriceps MVC and CAR compared with control sessions (P < 0.05). Sensory TENS, however, significantly restored inhibited quadriceps motor function compared with placebo treatment (P < 0.05). There was a negative correlation between changes in MVC and knee pain (r = 0.33, P < 0.001), and CAR and knee pain (r = 0.62, P < 0.001), respectively. PMID:26346597

  3. Evidence for a role of capsaicin-sensitive sensory nerves in the lung oedema induced by Tityus serrulatus venom in rats.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Marcus V M; Souza, Danielle G; de A Castro, Maria Salete; Cunha-Melo, José R; Teixeira, Mauro M

    2002-03-01

    In the most severe cases of human envenoming by Tityus serrulatus, pulmonary oedema is a frequent finding and can be the cause of death. We have previously demonstrated a role for neuropeptides acting on tachykinin NK(1) receptors in the development of lung oedema following i.v. injection of T. serrulatus venom (TsV) in experimental animals. The present work was designed to investigate whether capsaicin-sensitive primary afferent neurons were a potential source of NK(1)-acting neuropeptides. To this end, sensory nerves were depleted of neuropeptides by neonatal treatment of rats with capsaicin. The effectiveness of this strategy at depleting sensory nerves was demonstrated by the inhibition of the neuropeptide-dependent response to intraplantar injection of formalin. Pulmonary oedema, as assessed by the levels of extravasation of Evans blue dye in the bronchoalveolar lavage and in the left lung, was markedly inhibited in capsaicin-treated animals. In contrast, capsaicin treatment failed to alter the increase in arterial blood pressure or the lethality following i.v. injection of TsV. Our results demonstrate an important role for capsaicin-sensitive sensory nerves in the cascade of events leading to lung injury following the i.v. administration of TsV. PMID:11711125

  4. Characterization of thoracic motor and sensory neurons and spinal nerve roots in canine degenerative myelopathy, a potential disease model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Brandie R; Coates, Joan R; Johnson, Gayle C; Shelton, G Diane; Katz, Martin L

    2014-04-01

    Canine degenerative myelopathy (DM) is a progressive, adult-onset, multisystem degenerative disease with many features in common with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). As with some forms of ALS, DM is associated with mutations in superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1). Clinical signs include general proprioceptive ataxia and spastic upper motor neuron paresis in pelvic limbs, which progress to flaccid tetraplegia and dysphagia. The purpose of this study was to characterize DM as a potential disease model for ALS. We previously reported that intercostal muscle atrophy develops in dogs with advanced-stage DM. To determine whether other components of the thoracic motor unit (MU) also demonstrated morphological changes consistent with dysfunction, histopathologic and morphometric analyses were conducted on thoracic spinal motor neurons (MNs) and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and in motor and sensory nerve root axons from DM-affected boxers and Pembroke Welsh corgis (PWCs). No alterations in MNs or motor root axons were observed in either breed. However, advanced-stage PWCs exhibited significant losses of sensory root axons, and numerous DRG sensory neurons displayed evidence of degeneration. These results indicate that intercostal muscle atrophy in DM is not preceded by physical loss of the motor neurons innervating these muscles, nor of their axons. Axonal loss in thoracic sensory roots and sensory neuron death suggest that sensory involvement may play an important role in DM disease progression. Further analysis of the mechanisms responsible for these morphological findings would aid in the development of therapeutic intervention for DM and some forms of ALS. PMID:24375814

  5. Depletion of Calcium Stores in Injured Sensory Neurons: Anatomic and Functional Correlates

    PubMed Central

    Gemes, Geza; Rigaud, Marcel; Weyker, Paul D.; Abram, Stephen E.; Weihrauch, Dorothee; Poroli, Mark; Zoga, Vasiliki; Hogan, Quinn H.

    2010-01-01

    Background Painful nerve injury leads to disrupted Ca2+ signaling in primary sensory neurons, including decreased endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca2+ storage. The present study examines potential causes and functional consequences of Ca2+ store limitation after injury. Methods Neurons were dissociated from axotomized fifth lumbar (L5) and the adjacent L4 dorsal root ganglia following L5 spinal nerve ligation that produced hyperalgesia, and were compared to neurons from control animals. Intracellular Ca2+ levels were measured with Fura-2 microfluorometry, and ER was labeled with probes or antibodies. Ultrastructural morphology was analyzed by electron microscopy of nondissociated dorsal root ganglia, and intracellular electrophysiological recordings were obtained from intact ganglia. Results Live neuron staining with BODIPY FL-X thapsigargin (Invitrogen, Carlsbad, CA) revealed a 40% decrease in sarco-endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase binding in axotomized L5 neurons and a 34% decrease in L4 neurons. Immunocytochemical labeling for the ER Ca2+-binding protein calreticulin was unaffected by injury. Total length of ER profiles in electron micrographs was reduced by 53% in small axotomized L5 neurons, but increased in L4 neurons. Cisternal stacks of ER and aggregation of ribosomes occurred less frequently in axotomized neurons. Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release, examined by microfluorometry with dantrolene, was eliminated in axotomized neurons. Pharmacologic blockade of Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release with dantrolene produced hyperexcitability in control neurons, confirming its functional importance. Conclusions After axotomy, ER Ca2+ stores are reduced by anatomic loss and possibly diminished sarco-endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase. The resulting disruption of Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release and protein synthesis may contribute to the generation of neuropathic pain. PMID:19602957

  6. Rehabilitation of the trigeminal nerve

    PubMed Central

    Iro, Heinrich; Bumm, Klaus; Waldfahrer, Frank

    2005-01-01

    When it comes to restoring impaired neural function by means of surgical reconstruction, sensory nerves have always been in the role of the neglected child when compared with motor nerves. Especially in the head and neck area, with its either sensory, motor or mixed cranial nerves, an impaired sensory function can cause severe medical conditions. When performing surgery in the head and neck area, sustaining neural function must not only be highest priority for motor but also for sensory nerves. In cases with obvious neural damage to sensory nerves, an immediate neural repair, if necessary with neural interposition grafts, is desirable. Also in cases with traumatic trigeminal damage, an immediate neural repair ought to be considered, especially since reconstructive measures at a later time mostly require for interposition grafts. In terms of the trigeminal neuralgia, commonly thought to arise from neurovascular brainstem compression, a pharmaceutical treatment is considered as the state of the art in terms of conservative therapy. A neurovascular decompression of the trigeminal root can be an alternative in some cases when surgical treatment is sought after. Besides the above mentioned therapeutic options, alternative treatments are available. PMID:22073060

  7. Effects of Local Compression on Peroneal Nerve Function in Humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hargens, Alan R.; Botte, Michael J.; Swenson, Michael R.; Gelberman, Richard H.; Rhoades, Charles E.; Akeson, Wayne H.

    1993-01-01

    A new apparatus was developed to compress the anterior compartment selectively and reproducibly in humans. Thirty-five normal volunteers were studied to determine short-term thresholds of local tissue pressure that produce significant neuromuscular dysfunction. Local tissue fluid pressure adjacent to the deep peroneal nerve was elevated by the compression apparatus and continuously monitored for 2-3 h by the slit catheter technique. Elevation of tissue fluid pressure to within 35-40 mm Hg of diastolic blood pressure (approx. 40 mm Hg of in situ pressure in our subjects) elicited a consistent progression of neuromuscular deterioration including, in order, (a) gradual loss of sensation, as assessed by Semmes-Weinstein monofilaments, (b) subjective complaints, (c) reduced nerve conduction velocity, (d) decreased action potential amplitude of the extensor digitorum brevis muscle, and (e) motor weakness of muscles within the anterior compartment. Generally, higher intracompartment at pressures caused more rapid deterioration of neuromuscular function. In two subjects, when in situ compression levels were 0 and 30 mm Hg, normal neuromuscular function was maintained for 3 h. Threshold pressures for significant dysfunction were not always the same for each functional parameter studied, and the magnitudes of each functional deficit did not always correlate with compression level. This variable tolerance to elevated pressure emphasizes the need to monitor clinical signs and symptoms carefully in the diagnosis of compartment syndromes. The nature of the present studies was short term; longer term compression of myoneural tissues may result in dysfunction at lower pressure thresholds.

  8. Traumatic Brain Injury and Neuronal Functionality Changes in Sensory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Carron, Simone F.; Alwis, Dasuni S.; Rajan, Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI), caused by direct blows to the head or inertial forces during relative head-brain movement, can result in long-lasting cognitive and motor deficits which can be particularly consequential when they occur in young people with a long life ahead. Much is known of the molecular and anatomical changes produced in TBI but much less is known of the consequences of these changes to neuronal functionality, especially in the cortex. Given that much of our interior and exterior lives are dependent on responsiveness to information from and about the world around us, we have hypothesized that a significant contributor to the cognitive and motor deficits seen after TBI could be changes in sensory processing. To explore this hypothesis, and to develop a model test system of the changes in neuronal functionality caused by TBI, we have examined neuronal encoding of simple and complex sensory input in the rat’s exploratory and discriminative tactile system, the large face macrovibrissae, which feeds to the so-called “barrel cortex” of somatosensory cortex. In this review we describe the short-term and long-term changes in the barrel cortex encoding of whisker motion modeling naturalistic whisker movement undertaken by rats engaged in a variety of tasks. We demonstrate that the most common form of TBI results in persistent neuronal hyperexcitation specifically in the upper cortical layers, likely due to changes in inhibition. We describe the types of cortical inhibitory neurons and their roles and how selective effects on some of these could produce the particular forms of neuronal encoding changes described in TBI, and then generalize to compare the effects on inhibition seen in other forms of brain injury. From these findings we make specific predictions as to how non-invasive extra-cranial electrophysiology can be used to provide the high-precision information needed to monitor and understand the temporal evolution of changes in neuronal

  9. Low-level laser irradiation improves functional recovery and nerve regeneration in sciatic nerve crush rat injury model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chau-Zen; Chen, Yi-Jen; Wang, Yan-Hsiung; Yeh, Ming-Long; Huang, Mao-Hsiung; Ho, Mei-Ling; Liang, Jen-I; Chen, Chia-Hsin

    2014-01-01

    The development of noninvasive approaches to facilitate the regeneration of post-traumatic nerve injury is important for clinical rehabilitation. In this study, we investigated the effective dose of noninvasive 808-nm low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on sciatic nerve crush rat injury model. Thirty-six male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into 6 experimental groups: a normal group with or without 808-nm LLLT at 8 J/cm(2) and a sciatic nerve crush injury group with or without 808-nm LLLT at 3, 8 or 15 J/cm(2). Rats were given consecutive transcutaneous LLLT at the crush site and sacrificed 20 days after the crush injury. Functional assessments of nerve regeneration were analyzed using the sciatic functional index (SFI) and hindlimb range of motion (ROM). Nerve regeneration was investigated by measuring the myelin sheath thickness of the sciatic nerve using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and by analyzing the expression of growth-associated protein 43 (GAP43) in sciatic nerve using western blot and immunofluorescence staining. We found that sciatic-injured rats that were irradiated with LLLT at both 3 and 8 J/cm(2) had significantly improved SFI but that a significant improvement of ROM was only found in rats with LLLT at 8 J/cm(2). Furthermore, the myelin sheath thickness and GAP43 expression levels were significantly enhanced in sciatic nerve-crushed rats receiving 808-nm LLLT at 3 and 8 J/cm(2). Taken together, these results suggest that 808-nm LLLT at a low energy density (3 J/cm(2) and 8 J/cm(2)) is capable of enhancing sciatic nerve regeneration following a crush injury. PMID:25119457

  10. Relationships among Repetitive Behaviors, Sensory Features, and Executive Functions in High Functioning Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyd, Brian A.; McBee, Matthew; Holtzclaw, Tia; Baranek, Grace T.; Bodfish, James W.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between repetitive behaviors and sensory processing issues in school-aged children with high functioning autism (HFA). Children with HFA (N = 61) were compared to healthy, typical controls (N = 64) to determine the relationship between these behavioral classes and to examine whether executive dysfunction…

  11. New Chemically Functionalized Nanomaterials for Electrical Nerve Agents Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonato, Jean-Pierre; Clavaguera, Simon; Carella, Alexandre; Delalande, Michael; Raoul, Nicolas; Lenfant, Stephane; Vuillaume, Dominique; Dubois, Emmanuel

    2011-08-01

    A chemical receptor specific to traces of organophosphorus nerve agents (OPs) has been synthesized and grafted to carbon nanotubes and silicon nanowires in order to make electrical sensors. Our results show that it is possible to detect efficiently sub-ppm traces of OPs with excellent selectivity notably with the use of silicon nanowires by monitoring the Drain-Source current of the SiNW-FET at an optimum back Gate voltage as a function of time. First developments of a prototype have also been realized.

  12. Nerve Injury Diminishes Opioid Analgesia through Lysine Methyltransferase-mediated Transcriptional Repression of μ-Opioid Receptors in Primary Sensory Neurons.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuhao; Chen, Shao-Rui; Laumet, Geoffroy; Chen, Hong; Pan, Hui-Lin

    2016-04-15

    The μ-opioid receptor (MOR, encoded by Oprm1) agonists are the mainstay analgesics for treating moderate to severe pain. Nerve injury causes down-regulation of MORs in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and diminishes the opioid effect on neuropathic pain. However, the epigenetic mechanisms underlying the diminished MOR expression caused by nerve injury are not clear. G9a (encoded by Ehmt2), a histone 3 at lysine 9 methyltransferase, is a key chromatin regulator responsible for gene silencing. In this study, we determined the role of G9a in diminished MOR expression and opioid analgesic effects in animal models of neuropathic pain. We found that nerve injury in rats induced a long-lasting reduction in the expression level of MORs in the DRG but not in the spinal cord. Nerve injury consistently increased the enrichment of the G9a product histone 3 at lysine 9 dimethylation in the promoter of Oprm1 in the DRG. G9a inhibition or siRNA knockdown fully reversed MOR expression in the injured DRG and potentiated the morphine effect on pain hypersensitivity induced by nerve injury. In mice lacking Ehmt2 in DRG neurons, nerve injury failed to reduce the expression level of MORs and the morphine effect. In addition, G9a inhibition or Ehmt2 knockout in DRG neurons normalized nerve injury-induced reduction in the inhibitory effect of the opioid on synaptic glutamate release from primary afferent nerves. Our findings indicate that G9a contributes critically to transcriptional repression of MORs in primary sensory neurons in neuropathic pain. G9a inhibitors may be used to enhance the opioid analgesic effect in the treatment of chronic neuropathic pain. PMID:26917724

  13. Functional genomics of the cilium, a sensory organelle.

    PubMed

    Blacque, Oliver E; Perens, Elliot A; Boroevich, Keith A; Inglis, Peter N; Li, Chunmei; Warner, Adam; Khattra, Jaswinder; Holt, Rob A; Ou, Guangshuo; Mah, Allan K; McKay, Sheldon J; Huang, Peter; Swoboda, Peter; Jones, Steve J M; Marra, Marco A; Baillie, David L; Moerman, Donald G; Shaham, Shai; Leroux, Michel R

    2005-05-24

    Cilia and flagella play important roles in many physiological processes, including cell and fluid movement, sensory perception, and development. The biogenesis and maintenance of cilia depend on intraflagellar transport (IFT), a motility process that operates bidirectionally along the ciliary axoneme. Disruption in IFT and cilia function causes several human disorders, including polycystic kidneys, retinal dystrophy, neurosensory impairment, and Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS). To uncover new ciliary components, including IFT proteins, we compared C. elegans ciliated neuronal and nonciliated cells through serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) and screened for genes potentially regulated by the ciliogenic transcription factor, DAF-19. Using these complementary approaches, we identified numerous candidate ciliary genes and confirmed the ciliated-cell-specific expression of 14 novel genes. One of these, C27H5.7a, encodes a ciliary protein that undergoes IFT. As with other IFT proteins, its ciliary localization and transport is disrupted by mutations in IFT and bbs genes. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the ciliary structural defect of C. elegans dyf-13(mn396) mutants is caused by a mutation in C27H5.7a. Together, our findings help define a ciliary transcriptome and suggest that DYF-13, an evolutionarily conserved protein, is a novel core IFT component required for cilia function. PMID:15916950

  14. Dual Nerve Transfers for Restoration of Shoulder Function After Brachial Plexus Avulsion Injury.

    PubMed

    Chu, Bin; Wang, Huan; Chen, Liang; Gu, Yudong; Hu, Shaonan

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of shoulder function restoration by dual nerve transfers, spinal accessory nerve to the suprascapular nerve and 2 intercostal nerves to the anterior branch of the axillary nerve, in patients with shoulder paralysis that resulted from brachial plexus avulsion injury. It was a retrospective analysis to assess the impact of a variety of factors on reanimation of shoulder functions with dual nerve transfers. A total of 19 patients were included in this study. Most of these patients sustained avulsions of C5, C6, and C7 nerve roots (16 patients). Three of them had avulsions of C5 and C6 roots only. Through a posterior approach, direct coaptation of the intercostal nerves and the anterior branch of the axillary nerve was performed, along with accessory nerve transfer to the suprascapular nerve. Satisfactory shoulder function recovery (93.83° of shoulder abduction and 54.00° of external rotation on average) was achieved after a 62-month follow-up. This dual nerve transfer procedure provided us with a reliable and effective method for shoulder function reconstruction after brachial plexus root avulsion, especially C5/C6/C7 avulsion. The level of evidence is therapeutic IV. PMID:26835823

  15. Relationship between Social Competence and Sensory Processing in Children with High Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilton, Claudia; Graver, Kathleen; LaVesser, Patricia

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This study examines the relationship between social competence and sensory processing in children with high functioning autism spectrum disorders. Methodology: Children, ages 6-10 (N = 36), with high functioning autism spectrum disorders were assessed using the Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS) and the Sensory Profile (SP). A bivariate…

  16. Sensory Function: Insights From Wave 2 of the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project

    PubMed Central

    Kern, David W.; Wroblewski, Kristen E.; Chen, Rachel C.; Schumm, L. Philip; McClintock, Martha K.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. Sensory function, a critical component of quality of life, generally declines with age and influences health, physical activity, and social function. Sensory measures collected in Wave 2 of the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project (NSHAP) survey focused on the personal impact of sensory function in the home environment and included: subjective assessment of vision, hearing, and touch, information on relevant home conditions and social sequelae as well as an improved objective assessment of odor detection. Method. Summary data were generated for each sensory category, stratified by age (62–90 years of age) and gender, with a focus on function in the home setting and the social consequences of sensory decrements in each modality. Results. Among both men and women, older age was associated with self-reported impairment of vision, hearing, and pleasantness of light touch. Compared with women, men reported significantly worse hearing and found light touch less appealing. There were no gender differences for vision. Overall, hearing loss seemed to have a greater impact on social function than did visual impairment. Discussion. Sensory function declines across age groups, with notable gender differences for hearing and light touch. Further analysis of sensory measures from NSHAP Wave 2 may provide important information on how sensory declines are related to health, social function, quality of life, morbidity, and mortality in this nationally representative sample of older adults. PMID:25360015

  17. Gangliosides are functional nerve cell ligands for myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG), an inhibitor of nerve regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Vyas, Alka A.; Patel, Himatkumar V.; Fromholt, Susan E.; Heffer-Lauc, Marija; Vyas, Kavita A.; Dang, Jiyoung; Schachner, Melitta; Schnaar, Ronald L.

    2002-01-01

    Myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) binds to the nerve cell surface and inhibits nerve regeneration. The nerve cell surface ligand(s) for MAG are not established, although sialic acid-bearing glycans have been implicated. We identify the nerve cell surface gangliosides GD1a and GT1b as specific functional ligands for MAG-mediated inhibition of neurite outgrowth from primary rat cerebellar granule neurons. MAG-mediated neurite outgrowth inhibition is attenuated by (i) neuraminidase treatment of the neurons; (ii) blocking neuronal ganglioside biosynthesis; (iii) genetically modifying the terminal structures of nerve cell surface gangliosides; and (iv) adding highly specific IgG-class antiganglioside mAbs. Furthermore, neurite outgrowth inhibition is mimicked by highly multivalent clustering of GD1a or GT1b by using precomplexed antiganglioside Abs. These data implicate the nerve cell surface gangliosides GD1a and GT1b as functional MAG ligands and suggest that the first step in MAG inhibition is multivalent ganglioside clustering. PMID:12060784

  18. Release of somatostatin and its role in the mediation of the anti-inflammatory effect induced by antidromic stimulation of sensory fibres of rat sciatic nerve.

    PubMed

    Szolcsányi, J; Helyes, Z; Oroszi, G; Németh, J; Pintér, E

    1998-03-01

    1. The effect of antidromic stimulation of the sensory fibres of the sciatic nerve on inflammatory plasma extravasation in various tissues and on cutaneous vasodilatation elicited in distant parts of the body was investigated in rats pretreated with guanethidine (8 mg kg(-1), i.p.) and pipecuronium (200 microg kg(-1), i.v.). 2. Antidromic sciatic nerve stimulation with C-fibre strength (20 V, 0.5 ms) at 5 Hz for 5 min elicited neurogenic inflammation in the innervated area and inhibited by 50.3 +/- 4.67% the development of a subsequent plasma extravasation in response to similar stimulation of the contralateral sciatic nerve. Stimulation at 0.5 Hz for 1 h also evoked local plasma extravasation and inhibited the carrageenin-induced (1%, 100 microl s.c.) cutaneous inflammation by 38.5 +/- 10.0% in the contralateral paw. Excitation at 0.1 Hz for 4 h elicited no local plasma extravasation in the stimulated hindleg but still reduced the carrageenin-induced oedema by 52.1 +/- 9.7% in the paw on the contralateral side. 3. Plasma extravasation in the knee joint in response to carrageenin (2%, 200 microl intra-articular injection) was diminished by 46.1 +/- 12.69% and 40.9 +/- 4.93% when the sciatic nerve was stimulated in the contralateral leg at 0.5 Hz for 1 h or 0.1 Hz for 4 h, respectively. 4. Stimulation of the peripheral stump of the left vagal nerve (20 V, 1 ms, 8 Hz, 10 min) elicited plasma extravasation in the trachea, oesophagus and mediastinal connective tissue in rats pretreated with atropine (2 mg kg(-1), i.v.), guanethidine (8 mg kg(-1), i.p.) and pipecuronium (200 microg kg(-1), i.v.). These responses were inhibited by 37.8 +/- 5.1%, 49.7 +/- 9.9% and 37.6 +/- 4.2%, respectively by antidromic sciatic nerve excitation (5 Hz, 5 min) applied 5 min earlier. 5. Pretreatment with polyclonal somatostatin antiserum (0.5 ml/rat, i.v.) or the selective somatostatin depleting agent cysteamine (280 mg kg(-1), s.c.) prevented the anti-inflammatory effect of sciatic nerve

  19. Exuberant sprouting of sensory and sympathetic nerve fibers in nonhealed bone fractures and the generation and maintenance of chronic skeletal pain

    PubMed Central

    Chartier, Stephane R.; Thompson, Michelle L.; Longo, Geraldine; Fealk, Michelle N.; Majuta, Lisa A.; Mantyh, Patrick W.

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal injury is a leading cause of chronic pain and long-term disability worldwide. While most acute skeletal pain can be effectively managed with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and opiates, chronic skeletal pain is more difficult to control using these same therapy regimens. One possibility as to why chronic skeletal pain is more difficult to manage over time is that there may be nerve sprouting in non-healed areas of the skeleton that normally receive little (mineralized bone) to no (articular cartilage) innervation. If such ectopic sprouting did occur, it could result in normally nonnoxious loading of the skeleton being perceived as noxious and/or the generation of a neuropathic pain state. To explore this possibility, a mouse model of skeletal pain was generated by inducing a closed fracture of the femur. Examined animals had comminuted fractures and did not fully heal even at 90+ days post fracture. In all mice with nonhealed fractures, exuberant sensory and sympathetic nerve sprouting, an increase in the density of nerve fibers, and the formation of neuroma-like structures near the fracture site were observed. Additionally, all of these animals exhibited significant pain behaviors upon palpation of the nonhealed fracture site. In contrast, sprouting of sensory and sympathetic nerve fibers or significant palpation-induced pain behaviors was never observed in naïve animals. Understanding what drives this ectopic nerve sprouting and the role it plays in skeletal pain may allow a better understanding and treatment of this currently difficult-to-control pain state. PMID:25196264

  20. Sensory responsiveness as a predictor of social severity in children with high functioning autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Hilton, Claudia L; Harper, Jacquelyn D; Kueker, Rachel Holmes; Lang, Andrea Runzi; Abbacchi, Anna M; Todorov, Alexandre; LaVesser, Patricia D

    2010-08-01

    This study examines the relationship between sensory responsiveness and social severity in children with high functioning autism spectrum disorders (HFASD; N = 36) and age-matched controls (N = 26) between 6 and 10 years old. Significant relationships were found between social responsiveness scale scores and each of the six sensory profile sensory system scores for children with HFASD and controls. Multivariate regression analyses revealed atypical scores from multisensory responsiveness, and responsiveness of the proximal senses of oral sensory/olfactory and touch as the strongest predictors of greater social impairment in the participants. Findings suggest that the relationship between sensory responsiveness and other autistic traits is more important than previously recognized and addressing sensory modulation issues in children with HFASD may be more critical than previously understood. PMID:20108030

  1. Functionally Approached Body (FAB) Strategies for Young Children Who Have Behavioral and Sensory Processing Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pagano, John

    2005-01-01

    Functionally Approached Body (FAB) Strategies offer a clinical approach to help parents of young children with behavioral and sensory processing strategies. This article introduces the FAB Strategies, clinical strategies developed by the author for understanding and addressing young children's behavioral and sensory processing challenges. The FAB…

  2. Relationship between sensory descriptive juiciness measurements and functionality parameters of broiler breast fillets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Relationships between Sensory Descriptive Juiciness Measurements and Functionality Parameters of Broiler Breast Fillets H. Zhuang and E. M. Savage Quality and Safety Assessment Research Unit, ARS-USDA, Russell Research Center, P. O. Box 5677, Athens, GA 30604-5677 Sensory moisture characteristics...

  3. Sensory Responsiveness as a Predictor of Social Severity in Children with High Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilton, Claudia L.; Harper, Jacquelyn D.; Kueker, Rachel Holmes; Lang, Andrea Runzi; Abbacchi, Anna M.; Todorov, Alexandre; LaVesser, Patricia D.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between sensory responsiveness and social severity in children with high functioning autism spectrum disorders (HFASD; N = 36) and age-matched controls (N = 26) between 6 and 10 years old. Significant relationships were found between social responsiveness scale scores and each of the six sensory profile sensory…

  4. Biomechanical and functional variation in rat sciatic nerve following cuff electrode implantation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Nerve cuff electrodes are commonly and successfully used for stimulating peripheral nerves. On the other hand, they occasionally induce functional and morphological changes following chronic implantation, for reasons not always clear. We hypothesize that restriction of nerve mobility due to cuff implantation may alter nerve conduction. Methods We quantified acute changes in nerve-muscle electrophysiology, using electromyography, and nerve kinematics in anesthetized Sprague Dawley rat sciatic nerves during controlled hindlimb joint movement. We compared electrophysiological and biomechanical response in uncuffed nerves and those secured within a cuff electrode using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and regression analysis. Results Tethering resulting from cuff implantation resulted in altered nerve strain and a complex biomechanical environment during joint movement. Coincident with biomechanical changes, electromyography revealed significantly increased variability in the response of conduction latency and amplitude in cuffed, but not free, nerves following joint movement. Conclusion Our findings emphasize the importance of the mechanical interface between peripheral nerves and their devices on neurophysiological performance. This work has implications for nerve device design, implantation, and prediction of long-term efficacy. PMID:24758405

  5. Dexamethasone enhanced functional recovery after sciatic nerve crush injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xinhong; Yuan, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Dexamethasone is currently used for the treatment of peripheral nerve injury, but its mechanisms of action are not completely understood. Inflammation/immune response at the site of nerve lesion is known to be an essential trigger of the pathological changes that have a critical impact on nerve repair and regeneration. In this study, we observed the effects of various doses of dexamethasone on the functional recovery after sciatic nerve crush injury in a rat model. Motor functional recovery was monitored by walking track analysis and gastrocnemius muscle mass ratio. The myelinated axon number was counted by morphometric analysis. Rats administered dexamethasone by local intramuscular injection had a higher nerve function index value, increased gastrocnemius muscle mass ratio, reduced Wallerian degeneration severity, and enhanced regenerated myelinated nerve fibers. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed for CD3 expression, which is a marker for T-cell activation, and infiltration in the sciatic nerve. Dexamethasone-injected rats had fewer CD3-positive cells compared to controls. Furthermore, we found increased expression of GAP-43, which is a factor associated with development and plasticity of the nervous system, in rat nerves receiving dexamethasone. These results provide strong evidence that dexamethasone enhances sciatic nerve regeneration and function recovery in a rat model of sciatic nerve injury through immunosuppressive and potential neurotrophic effects. PMID:25839037

  6. Dexamethasone Enhanced Functional Recovery after Sciatic Nerve Crush Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xinhong; Yuan, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Dexamethasone is currently used for the treatment of peripheral nerve injury, but its mechanisms of action are not completely understood. Inflammation/immune response at the site of nerve lesion is known to be an essential trigger of the pathological changes that have a critical impact on nerve repair and regeneration. In this study, we observed the effects of various doses of dexamethasone on the functional recovery after sciatic nerve crush injury in a rat model. Motor functional recovery was monitored by walking track analysis and gastrocnemius muscle mass ratio. The myelinated axon number was counted by morphometric analysis. Rats administered dexamethasone by local intramuscular injection had a higher nerve function index value, increased gastrocnemius muscle mass ratio, reduced Wallerian degeneration severity, and enhanced regenerated myelinated nerve fibers. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed for CD3 expression, which is a marker for T-cell activation, and infiltration in the sciatic nerve. Dexamethasone-injected rats had fewer CD3-positive cells compared to controls. Furthermore, we found increased expression of GAP-43, which is a factor associated with development and plasticity of the nervous system, in rat nerves receiving dexamethasone. These results provide strong evidence that dexamethasone enhances sciatic nerve regeneration and function recovery in a rat model of sciatic nerve injury through immunosuppressive and potential neurotrophic effects. PMID:25839037

  7. The Mid-Term Changes of Pulmonary Function Tests After Phrenic Nerve Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Yavari, Masoud; Hassanpour, Seyed Esmail; Khodayari, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background: In the restoration of elbow flexion, the phrenic nerve has proven to be a good donor, but considering the role of the phrenic nerve in respiratory function, we cannot disregard the potential dangers of this method. Objectives: In the current study, we reviewed the results of pulmonary function tests (PFT) in four patients who underwent phrenic nerve transfer. Patients and Methods: We reviewed the results of serial spirometry tests, which were performed before and after phrenic nerve transfer surgery. Results: All patients regained Biceps power to M3 strength or above. None of our patients experienced pulmonary problems or respiratory complaints, but a significant reduction of spirometric parameters occurred after surgery. Conclusions: This study highlights the close link between the role of the phrenic nerve and pulmonary function, such that the use of this nerve as a transfer donor leads to spirometric impairments. PMID:27148498

  8. [Repair and revision 9. Peripheral trigeminal nerve injury].

    PubMed

    Vriens, J P M; van der Glas, H W; Koole, R

    2002-03-01

    A review is given about long-term incidence of sensory disturbance in the areas of innervation of the n. trigeminus for different types of trauma and/or treatment. Diagnosis, clinical course and possible types of treatment are in addition reviewed. Regarding diagnosis, the outcome of a test on sensory function is not always related to the degree of nerve damage because methods differ in the type of afferent nerve fibers of which function is tested, and some specificity might occur in nerve damage, i.e. either thick or thin afferent fibers might be predominantly affected at a particular time. An initial quick testing of sensory function is recommended. This testing includes examining two sensory modalities, which are related to functioning of thick and thin afferent fibers respectively and which have a dichotomous yes/no outcome on the incidence of a pronounced sensory disturbance. PMID:11933529

  9. PARP INHIBITION ALLEVIATES DIABETES-INDUCED SYSTEMIC OXIDATIVE STRESS AND NEURAL TISSUE 4-HYDROXYNONENAL ADDUCT ACCUMULATION: CORRELATION WITH PERIPHERAL NERVE FUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Lupachyk, Sergey; Shevalye, Hanna; Maksimchyk, Yury; Drel, Viktor R.; Obrosova, Irina G.

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the role of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase in systemic oxidative stress and 4-hydoxynonenal adduct accumulation in diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Control and streptozotocin-diabetic rats were maintained with or without treatment with the PARP inhibitor, 1,5-isoquinolinediol, 3 mg kg−1d−1, for 10 weeks after initial 2 weeks. Treatment efficacy was evaluated by poly(ADP-ribosyl)ated protein content in peripheral nerve and spinal cord (Western blot analysis) and dorsal root ganglion neurons and non-neuronal cells (fluorescent immunohistochemistry), as well as by indices of peripheral nerve function. Diabetic rats displayed increased urinary isoprostane and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine excretion (ELISA), 4-hydroxynonenal adduct accumulation in endothelial and Schwann cells of the peripheral nerve, neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes of the spinal cord, and neurons and glial cells of the dorsal root ganglia (double-label fluorescent immunohistochemistry) as well as motor and sensory nerve conduction velocity deficits, thermal hypoalgesia, and tactile allodynia. PARP inhibition counteracted diabetes-induced systemic oxidative stress and 4-hydroxynonenal adduct accumulation in peripheral nerve and spinal cord (Western blot analysis) and dorsal root ganglion neurons (perikarya, fluorescent immunohistochemistry) which correlated with improvement of large and small nerve fiber function. The findings reveal the important role of PARP activation in systemic oxidative stress and 4-hydroxynonenal adduct accumulation in diabetic peripheral neuropathy. PMID:21300148

  10. VEGF-B selectively regenerates injured peripheral neurons and restores sensory and trophic functions

    PubMed Central

    Guaiquil, Victor H.; Pan, Zan; Karagianni, Natalia; Fukuoka, Shima; Alegre, Gemstonn; Rosenblatt, Mark I.

    2014-01-01

    VEGF-B primarily provides neuroprotection and improves survival in CNS-derived neurons. However, its actions on the peripheral nervous system have been less characterized. We examined whether VEGF-B mediates peripheral nerve repair. We found that VEGF-B induced extensive neurite growth and branching in trigeminal ganglia neurons in a manner that required selective activation of transmembrane receptors and was distinct from VEGF-A–induced neuronal growth. VEGF-B–induced neurite elongation required PI3K and Notch signaling. In vivo, VEGF-B is required for normal nerve regeneration: mice lacking VEGF-B showed impaired nerve repair with concomitant impaired trophic function. VEGF-B treatment increased nerve regeneration, sensation recovery, and trophic functions of injured corneal peripheral nerves in VEGF-B–deficient and wild-type animals, without affecting uninjured nerves. These selective effects of VEGF-B on injured nerves and its lack of angiogenic activity makes VEGF-B a suitable therapeutic target to treat nerve injury. PMID:25404333

  11. Behavioral, perceptual, and neural alterations in sensory and multisensory function in autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Baum, Sarah H; Stevenson, Ryan A; Wallace, Mark T

    2015-11-01

    Although sensory processing challenges have been noted since the first clinical descriptions of autism, it has taken until the release of the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) in 2013 for sensory problems to be included as part of the core symptoms of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in the diagnostic profile. Because sensory information forms the building blocks for higher-order social and cognitive functions, we argue that sensory processing is not only an additional piece of the puzzle, but rather a critical cornerstone for characterizing and understanding ASD. In this review we discuss what is currently known about sensory processing in ASD, how sensory function fits within contemporary models of ASD, and what is understood about the differences in the underlying neural processing of sensory and social communication observed between individuals with and without ASD. In addition to highlighting the sensory features associated with ASD, we also emphasize the importance of multisensory processing in building perceptual and cognitive representations, and how deficits in multisensory integration may also be a core characteristic of ASD. PMID:26455789

  12. Functional motor recovery is improved due to local placement of GDNF microspheres after delayed nerve repair.

    PubMed

    Wood, Matthew D; Gordon, Tessa; Kemp, Stephen W P; Liu, Edward H; Kim, Howard; Shoichet, Molly S; Borschel, Gregory H

    2013-05-01

    The majority of bioengineering strategies to promote peripheral nerve regeneration after injury have focused on therapies to bridge large nerve defects while fewer therapies are being developed to treat other nerve injuries, such as nerve transection. We constructed delivery systems using fibrin gels containing either free GDNF or polylactide-glycolic acid (PLGA) microspheres with GDNF to treat delayed nerve repair, where ELISA verified GDNF release. We determined the formulation of microspheres containing GDNF that optimized nerve regeneration and functional recovery in a rat model of delayed nerve repair. Experimental groups underwent delayed nerve repair and treatment with GDNF microspheres in fibrin glue at the repair site or control treatments (empty microspheres or free GDNF without microspheres). Contractile muscle force, muscle mass, and MUNE were measured 12 weeks following treatment, where GDNF microspheres (2 weeks formulation) were superior compared to either no GDNF or short-term release of free GDNF to nerve. Nerve histology distal to the repair site demonstrated increased axon counts and fiber diameters due to GDNF microspheres (2 weeks formulation). GDNF microspheres partially reversed the deleterious effects of chronic nerve injury, and recovery was slightly favored with the 2 weeks formulation compared to the 4 weeks formulation. PMID:23239194

  13. Advances of Peripheral Nerve Repair Techniques to Improve Hand Function: A Systematic Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    P, Mafi; S, Hindocha; M, Dhital; M, Saleh

    2012-01-01

    Concepts of neuronal damage and repair date back to ancient times. The research in this topic has been growing ever since and numerous nerve repair techniques have evolved throughout the years. Due to our greater understanding of nerve injuries and repair we now distinguish between central and peripheral nervous system. In this review, we have chosen to concentrate on peripheral nerve injuries and in particular those involving the hand. There are no reviews bringing together and summarizing the latest research evidence concerning the most up-to-date techniques used to improve hand function. Therefore, by identifying and evaluating all the published literature in this field, we have summarized all the available information about the advances in peripheral nerve techniques used to improve hand function. The most important ones are the use of resorbable poly[(R)-3-hydroxybutyrate] (PHB), epineural end-to-end suturing, graft repair, nerve transfer, side to side neurorrhaphy and end to side neurorrhaphy between median, radial and ulnar nerves, nerve transplant, nerve repair, external neurolysis and epineural sutures, adjacent neurotization without nerve suturing, Agee endoscopic operation, tourniquet induced anesthesia, toe transfer and meticulous intrinsic repair, free auto nerve grafting, use of distal based neurocutaneous flaps and tubulization. At the same time we found that the patient’s age, tension of repair, time of repair, level of injury and scar formation following surgery affect the prognosis. Despite the thorough findings of this systematic review we suggest that further research in this field is needed. PMID:22431951

  14. Fluorescently Labeled Peptide Increases Identification of Degenerated Facial Nerve Branches during Surgery and Improves Functional Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Timon; Mastrodimos, Melina B.; Raju, Sharat C.; Glasgow, Heather L.; Whitney, Michael; Friedman, Beth; Moore, Jeffrey D.; Kleinfeld, David; Steinbach, Paul; Messer, Karen; Pu, Minya; Tsien, Roger Y.; Nguyen, Quyen T.

    2015-01-01

    Nerve degeneration after transection injury decreases intraoperative visibility under white light (WL), complicating surgical repair. We show here that the use of fluorescently labeled nerve binding probe (F-NP41) can improve intraoperative visualization of chronically (up to 9 months) denervated nerves. In a mouse model for the repair of chronically denervated facial nerves, the intraoperative use of fluorescent labeling decreased time to nerve identification by 40% compared to surgeries performed under WL alone. Cumulative functional post-operative recovery was also significantly improved in the fluorescence guided group as determined by quantitatively tracking of the recovery of whisker movement at time intervals for 6 weeks post-repair. To our knowledge, this is the first description of an injectable probe that increases visibility of chronically denervated nerves during surgical repair in live animals. Future translation of this probe may improve functional outcome for patients with chronic denervation undergoing surgical repair. PMID:25751149

  15. Functional identification of sensory mechanisms required for developmental song learning

    PubMed Central

    London, Sarah E; Clayton, David F

    2008-01-01

    A young male zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) learns to sing by copying the vocalizations of an older tutor in a process that parallels human speech acquisition. Brain pathways that control song production are well defined, but little is known about the sites and mechanisms of tutor song memorization. Here we test the hypothesis that molecular signaling in a sensory brain area outside of the song system is required for developmental song learning. Using controlled tutoring and a pharmacological inhibitor, we transiently suppressed the extracellular signal–regulated kinase signaling pathway in a portion of the auditory forebrain specifically during tutor song exposure. On maturation, treated birds produced poor copies of tutor song, whereas controls copied the tutor song effectively. Thus the foundation of normal song learning, the formation of a sensory memory of tutor song, requires a conserved molecular pathway in a brain area that is distinct from the circuit for song motor control. PMID:18391944

  16. Nerve Growth Factor Mediates a Switch in Intracellular Signaling for PGE2-Induced Sensitization of Sensory Neurons from Protein Kinase A to Epac

    PubMed Central

    Vasko, Michael R.; Habashy Malty, Ramy; Guo, Chunlu; Duarte, Djane B.; Zhang, Yihong; Nicol, Grant D.

    2014-01-01

    We examined whether nerve growth factor (NGF), an inflammatory mediator that contributes to chronic hypersensitivity, alters the intracellular signaling that mediates the sensitizing actions of PGE2 from activation of protein kinase A (PKA) to exchange proteins directly activated by cAMP (Epacs). When isolated sensory neurons are grown in the absence of added NGF, but not in cultures grown with 30 ng/ml NGF, inhibiting protein kinase A (PKA) activity blocks the ability of PGE2 to augment capsaicin-evoked release of the neuropeptide CGRP and to increase the number of action potentials (APs) evoked by a ramp of current. Growing sensory neurons in culture in the presence of increasing concentrations of NGF increases the expression of Epac2, but not Epac1. An intradermal injection of complete Freund's adjuvant into the rat hindpaw also increases the expression of Epac2, but not Epac1 in the dorsal root ganglia and spinal cord: an effect blocked by intraplantar administration of NGF antibodies. Treating cultures grown in the presence of 30 ng/ml NGF with Epac1siRNA significantly reduced the expression of Epac1, but not Epac2, and did not block the ability of PGE2 to augment capsaicin-evoked release of CGRP from sensory neurons. Exposing neuronal cultures grown in NGF to Epac2siRNAreduced the expression of Epac2, but not Epac1 and prevented the PGE2-induced augmentation of capsaicin and potassium-evoked CGRP release in sensory neurons and the PGE2-induced increase in the number of APs generated by a ramp of current. In neurons grown with no added NGF, Epac siRNAs did not attenuate PGE2-induced sensitization. These results demonstrate that NGF, through increasing Epac2 expression, alters the signaling cascade that mediates PGE2-induced sensitization of sensory neurons, thus providing a novel mechanism for maintaining PGE2-induced hypersensitivity during inflammation. PMID:25126967

  17. Hydrogen-rich saline promotes motor functional recovery following peripheral nerve autografting in rats

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, YONG-GUANG; SHENG, QING-SONG; WANG, ZHI-JUN; LV, LI; ZHAO, WEI; CHEN, JIAN-MEI; XU, HAO

    2015-01-01

    Despite the application of nerve grafts and considerable microsurgical innovations, the functional recovery across a long peripheral nerve gap is generally partial and unsatisfactory. Thus, additional strategies are required to improve nerve regeneration across long nerve gaps. Hydrogen possesses antioxidant and anti-apoptotic properties, which could be neuroprotective in the treatment of peripheral nerve injury; however, such a possibility has not been experimentally tested in vivo. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effectiveness of hydrogen-rich saline in promoting nerve regeneration after 10-mm sciatic nerve autografting in rats. The rats were randomly divided into two groups and intraperitoneally administered a daily regimen of 5 ml/kg hydrogen-rich or normal saline. Axonal regeneration and functional recovery were assessed through a combination of behavioral analyses, electrophysiological evaluations, Fluoro-Gold™ retrograde tracings and histomorphological observations. The data showed that rats receiving hydrogen-rich saline achieved better axonal regeneration and functional recovery than those receiving normal saline. These findings indicated that hydrogen-rich saline promotes nerve regeneration across long gaps, suggesting that hydrogen-rich saline could be used as a neuroprotective agent for peripheral nerve injury therapy. PMID:26622383

  18. A Functional Role for VEGFR1 Expressed in Peripheral Sensory Neurons in Cancer Pain

    PubMed Central

    Selvaraj, Deepitha; Gangadharan, Vijayan; Michalski, Christoph W.; Kurejova, Martina; Stösser, Sebastian; Srivastava, Kshitij; Schweizerhof, Matthias; Waltenberger, Johannes; Ferrara, Napoleone; Heppenstall, Paul; Shibuya, Masabumi; Augustin, Hellmut G.; Kuner, Rohini

    2015-01-01

    Summary Cancer pain is a debilitating disorder and a primary determinant of the poor quality of life. Here, we report a non-vascular role for ligands of the Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) family in cancer pain. Tumor-derived VEGF-A, PLGF-2, and VEGF-B augment pain sensitivity through selective activation of VEGF receptor 1 (VEGFR1) expressed in sensory neurons in human cancer and mouse models. Sensory-neuron-specific genetic deletion/silencing or local or systemic blockade of VEGFR1 prevented tumor-induced nerve remodeling and attenuated cancer pain in diverse mouse models in vivo. These findings identify a therapeutic potential for VEGFR1-modifying drugs in cancer pain and suggest a palliative effect for VEGF/VEGFR1-targeting anti-angiogenic tumor therapies. PMID:26058077

  19. A prospective study of sensory function in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Sosenko, J M; Kato, M; Soto, R; Bild, D E

    1993-03-01

    Sensory function was prospectively examined in 201 Type 2 diabetic patients over a 2-year period. Quantitative sensory testing for vibration, cool, warm, and pressure perception at the hallux was performed at baseline, 1-month, 1-year, and 2-year visits. There were statistically significant increments of thresholds for all sensory modalities from the baseline visit to the 1-year visit (p < 0.001) and from the 1-year visit to the 2-year visit (p < 0.001). Thirty percent of 77 subjects considered to be at low risk for foot ulceration at baseline progressed to a higher risk category at the 2-year visit. There were no significant differences in mean glycosylated haemoglobin, height, sex distribution, age, or diabetes duration when patients who had a faster progression of insensitivity were compared with patients who had a slower progression. There was a high degree of autocorrelation between baseline and 2-year visits for all sensory modalities (r = 0.83 to r = 0.88, p < 0.001 for all). Also, changes in sensory thresholds from the baseline to 2-year visits for one modality tended to correlate with other modalities (r = 0.36 to r = 0.70, p < 0.001 for all). These data indicate that an appreciable proportion of Type 2 diabetic patients are at risk for a marked rate of decline of sensory function, and suggest a need for at least yearly quantitative sensory testing. PMID:8458186

  20. Effect of concurrent mental nerve reconstruction at the same time as mandibular reconstruction using a fibula osteoseptocutaneous flap.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Fumiaki; Ooatari, Miwako; Uehara, Miyuki; Takahashi, Yoshihiro; Kawano, Kenji

    2015-09-01

    The damage of inferior alveolar nerve causes some functional problem including numbness of lower lip and drooling. During segmental mandibulectomy, inferior alveolar nerve commonly resected, therefore, it is ideal to reconstruct the nerve to get better functional result. Sensory recovery was assessed after mandibular reconstruction using free fibula osteoseptocutaneous flap in thirteen cases. In six cases, the mental nerve reconstruction was performed simultaneously, and in seven cases, the mental nerve reconstruction was not performed. In the case that the mental nerve was reconstructed simultaneously, unilateral mental nerve reconstruction was performed in five cases, and bilateral mental nerve reconstruction was performed in one cases. More than one year after the reconstruction, sensory recovery was assessed and compared between the group that the mental nerve was reconstructed and the group that was not reconstructed. Our results showed almost a normal sensory recovery of the lips on the reconstructed side more than one year after the reconstruction in reconstructed group. In contrast, sensory recovery was poor in non-reconstructed group and non-reconstructed side. These results showed that mental nerve reconstruction at the same time as mandibular reconstruction affects the postoperative mandibular function. The sural nerve can be harvested from the same donor site of the free fibula osteoseptocutaneous flap and such mental nerve reconstruction with nerve grafting can be completed within an hour. Most cases of mandibular reconstruction using a free fibula osteoseptocutaneous flap transfer can therefore be candidates for mental nerve reconstruction at the time of mandibular reconstruction. PMID:26051850

  1. Sensory nerve crush and regeneration and the receptive fields and response properties of neurons in the primary somatosensory cerebral cortex of cats.

    PubMed

    Brandenberg, G A; Mann, M D

    1989-03-01

    Extracellular recordings were made of activity evoked in neurons of the forepaw focus of somatosensory cerebral cortex by electrical stimulation of each paw in control cats and cats that had undergone crush injury of all cutaneous sensory nerves to the contralateral forepaw 31 to 63 days previously. Neurons responding only to stimulation of the contralateral forepaw were classified as sa; neurons responding to stimulation of both forepaws were classified as sb; neurons responding to stimulation of both contralateral paws were classified as sc; and neurons responding to stimulation of at least three paws were classified as m. The ratio sa:sb:sc:m neurons was 46:3:0:0 in control cats and 104:15:3:26 in cats that had undergone nerve crush 1-2 months prior to study. sa neurons from experimental cats had depth distributions similar to those in controls and responded to contralateral forepaw stimulation with more spikes per discharge, longer latency, and higher threshold than sa neurons in control cats. m neurons from experimental cats were distributed deeper in the cortex than sa neurons, and, when compared to experimental sa neurons, they responded with longer latency and poorer frequency-following ability; however, the number of spikes per discharge and threshold were not significantly different. The appearance of wide-field neurons in this tissue may be explained in terms of strengthening of previously sub-threshold inputs to neurons in the somatosensory system. If the neurons in sensory cortex play a requisite role in cutaneous sensations and if changes similar to those reported here occur and persist in human cortex after nerve crush, then "complete" recovery of sensation in such patients may occur against a background of changed cortical neuronal responsiveness. PMID:2920791

  2. L-carnitine alleviates sciatic nerve crush injury in rats: functional and electron microscopy assessments

    PubMed Central

    Avsar, Ümmü Zeynep; Avsar, Umit; Aydin, Ali; Yayla, Muhammed; Ozturkkaragoz, Berna; Un, Harun; Saritemur, Murat; Mercantepe, Tolga

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that L-carnitine exhibits neuroprotective effects on injured sciatic nerve of rats with diabetes mellitus. It is hypothesized that L-carnitine exhibits neuroprotective effects on injured sciatic nerve of rats. Rat sciatic nerve was crush injured by a forceps and exhibited degenerative changes. After intragastric administration of 50 and 100 mg/kg L-carnitine for 30 days, axon area, myelin sheath area, axon diameter, myelin sheath diameter, and numerical density of the myelinated axons of injured sciatic nerve were similar to normal, and the function of injured sciatic nerve also improved significantly. These findings suggest that L-carnitine exhibits neuroprotective effects on sciatic nerve crush injury in rats. PMID:25206754

  3. Inflammatory mediator bradykinin increases population of sensory neurons expressing functional T-type Ca(2+) channels.

    PubMed

    Huang, Dongyang; Liang, Ce; Zhang, Fan; Men, Hongchao; Du, Xiaona; Gamper, Nikita; Zhang, Hailin

    2016-04-29

    T-type Ca(2+) channels are important regulators of peripheral sensory neuron excitability. Accordingly, T-type Ca(2+) currents are often increased in various pathological pain conditions, such as inflammation or nerve injury. Here we investigated effects of inflammation on functional expression of T-type Ca(2+) channels in small-diameter cultured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. We found that overnight treatment of DRG cultures with a cocktail of inflammatory mediators bradykinin (BK), adenosine triphosphate (ATP), norepinephrine (NE) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) strongly increased the population size of the small-diameter neurons displaying low-voltage activated (LVA, T-type) Ca(2+) currents while having no effect on the peak LVA current amplitude. When applied individually, BK and ATP also increased the population size of LVA-positive neurons while NE and PGE2 had no effect. The PLC inhibitor U-73122 and B2 receptor antagonist, Hoe-140, both abolished the increase of the population of LVA-positive DRG neurons. Inflammatory treatment did not affect CaV3.2 mRNA or protein levels in DRG cultures. Furthermore, an ubiquitination inhibitor, MG132, did not increase the population of LVA-positive neurons. Our data suggest that inflammatory mediators BK and ATP increase the abundance of LVA-positive DRG neurons in total neuronal population by stimulating the recruitment of a 'reserve pool' of CaV3.2 channels, particularly in neurons that do not display measurable LVA currents under control conditions. PMID:26944020

  4. Inflammatory mediator bradykinin increases population of sensory neurons expressing functional T-type Ca2+ channels

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Dongyang; Liang, Ce; Zhang, Fan; Men, Hongchao; Du, Xiaona; Gamper, Nikita; Zhang, Hailin

    2016-01-01

    T-type Ca2+ channels are important regulators of peripheral sensory neuron excitability. Accordingly, T-type Ca2+ currents are often increased in various pathological pain conditions, such as inflammation or nerve injury. Here we investigated effects of inflammation on functional expression of T-type Ca2+ channels in small-diameter cultured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. We found that overnight treatment of DRG cultures with a cocktail of inflammatory mediators bradykinin (BK), adenosine triphosphate (ATP), norepinephrine (NE) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) strongly increased the population size of the small-diameter neurons displaying low-voltage activated (LVA, T-type) Ca2+ currents while having no effect on the peak LVA current amplitude. When applied individually, BK and ATP also increased the population size of LVA-positive neurons while NE and PGE2 had no effect. The PLC inhibitor U-73122 and B2 receptor antagonist, Hoe-140, both abolished the increase of the population of LVA-positive DRG neurons. Inflammatory treatment did not affect CaV3.2 mRNA or protein levels in DRG cultures. Furthermore, an ubiquitination inhibitor, MG132, did not increase the population of LVA-positive neurons. Our data suggest that inflammatory mediators BK and ATP increase the abundance of LVA-positive DRG neurons in total neuronal population by stimulating the recruitment of a ‘reserve pool’ of CaV3.2 channels, particularly in neurons that do not display measurable LVA currents under control conditions. PMID:26944020

  5. Maturation of Sensori-Motor Functional Responses in the Preterm Brain

    PubMed Central

    Allievi, Alessandro G.; Arichi, Tomoki; Tusor, Nora; Kimpton, Jessica; Arulkumaran, Sophie; Counsell, Serena J.; Edwards, A. David; Burdet, Etienne

    2016-01-01

    Preterm birth engenders an increased risk of conditions like cerebral palsy and therefore this time may be crucial for the brain's developing sensori-motor system. However, little is known about how cortical sensori-motor function matures at this time, whether development is influenced by experience, and about its role in spontaneous motor behavior. We aimed to systematically characterize spatial and temporal maturation of sensori-motor functional brain activity across this period using functional MRI and a custom-made robotic stimulation device. We studied 57 infants aged from 30 + 2 to 43 + 2 weeks postmenstrual age. Following both induced and spontaneous right wrist movements, we saw consistent positive blood oxygen level–dependent functional responses in the contralateral (left) primary somatosensory and motor cortices. In addition, we saw a maturational trend toward faster, higher amplitude, and more spatially dispersed functional responses; and increasing integration of the ipsilateral hemisphere and sensori-motor associative areas. We also found that interhemispheric functional connectivity was significantly related to ex-utero exposure, suggesting the influence of experience-dependent mechanisms. At term equivalent age, we saw a decrease in both response amplitude and interhemispheric functional connectivity, and an increase in spatial specificity, culminating in the establishment of a sensori-motor functional response similar to that seen in adults. PMID:26491066

  6. On sex-related differences in auditory and visual sensory functioning.

    PubMed

    Rammsayer, Thomas H; Troche, Stefan J

    2012-06-01

    The present study was designed to elucidate sex-related differences in two basic auditory and one basic visual aspect of sensory functioning, namely sensory discrimination of pitch, loudness, and brightness. Although these three aspects of sensory functioning are of vital importance in everyday life, little is known about whether men and women differ from each other in these sensory functions. Participants were 100 male and 100 female volunteers ranging in age from 18 to 30 years. Since sensory sensitivity may be positively related to individual levels of intelligence and musical experience, measures of psychometric intelligence and musical background were also obtained. Reliably better performance for men compared to women was found for pitch and loudness, but not for brightness discrimination. Furthermore, performance on loudness discrimination was positively related to psychometric intelligence, while pitch discrimination was positively related to both psychometric intelligence and levels of musical training. Additional regression analyses revealed that each of three predictor variables (sex, psychometric intelligence, and musical training) accounted for a statistically significant portion of unique variance in pitch discrimination. With regard to loudness discrimination, regression analysis yielded a statistically significant portion of unique variance for sex as a predictor variable, whereas psychometric intelligence just failed to reach statistical significance. The potential influence of sex hormones on sex-related differences in sensory functions is discussed. PMID:22183583

  7. Effect of high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on motor cortical excitability and sensory nerve conduction velocity in subacute-stage incomplete spinal cord injury patients

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Hyun Gyu; Ji, Sang-Goo; Kim, Myoung-Kwon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study was to determine whether repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation can improve sensory recovery of the lower extremities in subacute-stage spinal cord injury patients. [Subjects and Methods] This study was conducted on 20 subjects with diagnosed paraplegia due to spinal cord injury. These 20 subjects were allocated to an experimental group of 10 subjects that underwent active repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation or to a control group of 10 subjects that underwent sham repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation. The SCI patients in the experimental group underwent active repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and conventional rehabilitation therapy, whereas the spinal cord injury patients in the control group underwent sham repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and conventional rehabilitation therapy. Participants in both groups received therapy five days per week for six-weeks. Latency, amplitude, and sensory nerve conduction velocity were assessed before and after the six week therapy period. [Results] A significant intergroup difference was observed for posttreatment velocity gains, but no significant intergroup difference was observed for amplitude or latency. [Conclusion] repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation may be improve sensory recovery of the lower extremities in subacute-stage spinal cord injury patients. PMID:27512251

  8. Effect of high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on motor cortical excitability and sensory nerve conduction velocity in subacute-stage incomplete spinal cord injury patients.

    PubMed

    Cha, Hyun Gyu; Ji, Sang-Goo; Kim, Myoung-Kwon

    2016-07-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study was to determine whether repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation can improve sensory recovery of the lower extremities in subacute-stage spinal cord injury patients. [Subjects and Methods] This study was conducted on 20 subjects with diagnosed paraplegia due to spinal cord injury. These 20 subjects were allocated to an experimental group of 10 subjects that underwent active repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation or to a control group of 10 subjects that underwent sham repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation. The SCI patients in the experimental group underwent active repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and conventional rehabilitation therapy, whereas the spinal cord injury patients in the control group underwent sham repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and conventional rehabilitation therapy. Participants in both groups received therapy five days per week for six-weeks. Latency, amplitude, and sensory nerve conduction velocity were assessed before and after the six week therapy period. [Results] A significant intergroup difference was observed for posttreatment velocity gains, but no significant intergroup difference was observed for amplitude or latency. [Conclusion] repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation may be improve sensory recovery of the lower extremities in subacute-stage spinal cord injury patients. PMID:27512251

  9. Personal and workplace factors and median nerve function in a pooled study of 2396 US workers

    PubMed Central

    Rempel, David; Gerr, Fred; Harris-Adamson, Carisa; Hegmann, Kurt T; Thiese, Matthew S.; Kapellusch, Jay; Garg, Arun; Burt, Susan; Bao, Stephen; Silverstein, Barbara; Merlino, Linda; Dale, Ann Marie; Evanoff, Bradley

    2015-01-01

    Objective Evaluate associations between personal and workplace factors and median nerve conduction latency at the wrist. Methods Baseline data on workplace psychosocial and physical exposures were pooled from five prospective studies of production and service workers (N=2396). During the follow-up period, electrophysiologic measures of median nerve function were collected at regular intervals. Results Significant adjusted associations were observed between age, BMI, gender, peak hand force, duration of forceful hand exertions, TLV for HAL, forceful repetition rate, wrist extension, and decision latitude on median nerve latencies. Conclusions Occupational and non-occupational factors have adverse effects on median nerve function. Measuring median nerve function eliminates possible reporting bias that may affect symptom-based carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) case definitions. These results suggest that previously observed associations between CTS and occupational factors are not the result of such reporting bias. PMID:25563546

  10. Design of a robotic device for assessment and rehabilitation of hand sensory function.

    PubMed

    Lambercy, Olivier; Robles, Alejandro Juárez; Kim, Yeongmi; Gassert, Roger

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the design and implementation of the Robotic Sensory Trainer, a robotic interface for assessment and therapy of hand sensory function. The device can provide three types of well controlled stimuli: (i) angular displacement at the metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint using a remote-center-of-motion double-parallelogram structure, (ii) vibration stimuli at the fingertip, proximal phalange and palm, and (iii) pressure at the fingertip, while recording position, interaction force and feedback from the user over a touch screen. These stimuli offer a novel platform to investigate sensory perception in healthy subjects and patients with sensory impairments, with the potential to assess deficits and actively train detection of specific sensory cues in a standardized manner. A preliminary study with eight healthy subjects demonstrates the feasibility of using the Robotic Sensory Trainer to assess the sensory perception threshold in MCP angular position. An average just noticeable difference (JND) in the MCP joint angle of 2.46° (14.47%) was found, which is in agreement with previous perception studies. PMID:22275636

  11. Sensory Functions for Degenerin/Epithelial Sodium Channels (DEG/ENaC)

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Shahar, Yehuda

    2012-01-01

    All animals use a sophisticated array of receptor proteins to sense their external and internal environments. Major advances have been made in recent years in understanding the molecular and genetic bases for sensory transduction in diverse modalities, indicating that both metabotropic and ionotropic pathways are important in sensory functions. Here, I review the historical background and recent advances in understanding the roles of a relatively newly discovered family of receptors, the degenerin/epithelial sodium channels (DEG/ENaC). These animal-specific cation channels show a remarkable sequence and functional diversity in different species and seem to exert their functions in diverse sensory modalities. Functions for DEG/ENaC channels have been implicated in mechanosensation as well as chemosensory transduction pathways. In spite of overall sequence diversity, all family members share a unique protein topology that includes just two transmembrane domains and an unusually large and highly structured extracellular domain, that seem to be essential for both their mechanical and chemical sensory functions. This review will discuss many of the recent discoveries and controversies associated with sensory function of DEG/ENaC channels in both vertebrate and invertebrate model systems, covering the role of family members in taste, mechanosensation, and pain. PMID:22099690

  12. Altered Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Responses to Nonpainful Sensory Stimulation in Fibromyalgia Patients

    PubMed Central

    López-Solá, Marina; Pujol, Jesus; Wager, Tor D.; Garcia-Fontanals, Alba; Blanco-Hinojo, Laura; Garcia-Blanco, Susana; Poca-Dias, Violant; Harrison, Ben J.; Contreras-Rodríguez, Oren; Monfort, Jordi; Garcia-Fructuoso, Ferran; Deus, Joan

    2015-01-01

    Objective Fibromyalgia (FM) is a disorder characterized by chronic pain and enhanced responses to acute noxious events. However, the sensory systems affected in FM may extend beyond pain itself, as FM patients show reduced tolerance to non-nociceptive sensory stimulation. Characterizing the neural substrates of multisensory hypersensitivity in FM may thus provide important clues about the underlying pathophysiology of the disorder. The aim of this study was to characterize brain responses to non-nociceptive sensory stimulation in FM patients and their relationship to subjective sensory sensitivity and clinical pain severity. Methods Functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to assess brain response to auditory, visual, and tactile motor stimulation in 35 women with FM and 25 matched controls. Correlation and mediation analyses were performed to establish the relationship between brain responses and 3 types of outcomes: subjective hypersensitivity to daily sensory stimulation, spontaneous pain, and functional disability. Results Patients reported increased subjective sensitivity (increased unpleasantness) in response to multisensory stimulation in daily life. Functional MRI revealed that patients showed reduced task-evoked activation in primary/secondary visual and auditory areas and augmented responses in the insula and anterior lingual gyrus. Reduced responses in visual and auditory areas were correlated with subjective sensory hypersensitivity and clinical severity measures. Conclusion FM patients showed strong attenuation of brain responses to nonpainful events in early sensory cortices, accompanied by an amplified response at later stages of sensory integration in the insula. These abnormalities are associated with core FM symptoms, suggesting that they may be part of the pathophysiology of the disease. PMID:25220783

  13. Functional classification of afferent phrenic nerve fibres and diaphragmatic receptors in cats.

    PubMed

    Bałkowiec, A; Kukuła, K; Szulczyk, P

    1995-03-15

    1. Single afferent fibres with receptive fields in the diaphragm (272 units) dissected from the right phrenic nerve were classified according to the following properties: reaction to contraction of the diaphragm, resting activity, conduction velocity, location and properties of receptive fields, and reaction to injection of bradykinin and lactic acid into the internal thoracic artery. Nine additional fibres dissected from the phrenic nerve had receptive fields outside the diaphragm. The experiments were performed on chloralose-anaesthetized cats. 2. Ninety-six fibres (36%) had high resting activity when unloaded by contraction of the diaphragm, had low-threshold receptive fields in the muscle and were mostly group II and III fibres. They probably innervated muscle spindles. 3. Eighty-eight fibres (32%) were vigorously activated by contraction of the diaphragm. They had low-threshold receptive fields located in the musculotendinous border and central tendon. Their conduction velocity was in the range for group II and III fibres. We infer that they may innervate tendon organs. 4. Eighty-eight fibres (32%) were slightly affected or not affected by diaphragmatic contraction. They had low- and high-threshold receptive fields located mostly in the muscular part of the diaphragm, and negligible resting activity. Most of them were group III and IV afferent fibres and were activated when bradykinin and lactic acid were applied to their receptive fields. Possibly these low- and high-threshold receptors innervated diaphragmatic ergo- and nociceptors, respectively. 5. Sensory outflow from the diaphragm was found to be somatotopically organized, so that fibres with receptive fields in the sternocostal portion were predominantly located in the upper phrenic nerve root, and those with lumbar receptive fields were in the lower root. 6. It is concluded that the phrenic nerve contains fibres from several distinct classes of sensory receptors: muscle spindles, tendon organs

  14. Functional classification of afferent phrenic nerve fibres and diaphragmatic receptors in cats.

    PubMed Central

    Bałkowiec, A; Kukuła, K; Szulczyk, P

    1995-01-01

    1. Single afferent fibres with receptive fields in the diaphragm (272 units) dissected from the right phrenic nerve were classified according to the following properties: reaction to contraction of the diaphragm, resting activity, conduction velocity, location and properties of receptive fields, and reaction to injection of bradykinin and lactic acid into the internal thoracic artery. Nine additional fibres dissected from the phrenic nerve had receptive fields outside the diaphragm. The experiments were performed on chloralose-anaesthetized cats. 2. Ninety-six fibres (36%) had high resting activity when unloaded by contraction of the diaphragm, had low-threshold receptive fields in the muscle and were mostly group II and III fibres. They probably innervated muscle spindles. 3. Eighty-eight fibres (32%) were vigorously activated by contraction of the diaphragm. They had low-threshold receptive fields located in the musculotendinous border and central tendon. Their conduction velocity was in the range for group II and III fibres. We infer that they may innervate tendon organs. 4. Eighty-eight fibres (32%) were slightly affected or not affected by diaphragmatic contraction. They had low- and high-threshold receptive fields located mostly in the muscular part of the diaphragm, and negligible resting activity. Most of them were group III and IV afferent fibres and were activated when bradykinin and lactic acid were applied to their receptive fields. Possibly these low- and high-threshold receptors innervated diaphragmatic ergo- and nociceptors, respectively. 5. Sensory outflow from the diaphragm was found to be somatotopically organized, so that fibres with receptive fields in the sternocostal portion were predominantly located in the upper phrenic nerve root, and those with lumbar receptive fields were in the lower root. 6. It is concluded that the phrenic nerve contains fibres from several distinct classes of sensory receptors: muscle spindles, tendon organs

  15. Restoring motor control and sensory feedback in people with upper extremity amputations using arrays of 96 microelectrodes implanted in the median and ulnar nerves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, T. S.; Wark, H. A. C.; Hutchinson, D. T.; Warren, D. J.; O'Neill, K.; Scheinblum, T.; Clark, G. A.; Normann, R. A.; Greger, B.

    2016-06-01

    Objective. An important goal of neuroprosthetic research is to establish bidirectional communication between the user and new prosthetic limbs that are capable of controlling >20 different movements. One strategy for achieving this goal is to interface the prosthetic limb directly with efferent and afferent fibres in the peripheral nervous system using an array of intrafascicular microelectrodes. This approach would provide access to a large number of independent neural pathways for controlling high degree-of-freedom prosthetic limbs, as well as evoking multiple-complex sensory percepts. Approach. Utah Slanted Electrode Arrays (USEAs, 96 recording/stimulating electrodes) were implanted for 30 days into the median (Subject 1-M, 31 years post-amputation) or ulnar (Subject 2-U, 1.5 years post-amputation) nerves of two amputees. Neural activity was recorded during intended movements of the subject’s phantom fingers and a linear Kalman filter was used to decode the neural data. Microelectrode stimulation of varying amplitudes and frequencies was delivered via single or multiple electrodes to investigate the number, size and quality of sensory percepts that could be evoked. Device performance over time was assessed by measuring: electrode impedances, signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs), stimulation thresholds, number and stability of evoked percepts. Main results. The subjects were able to proportionally, control individual fingers of a virtual robotic hand, with 13 different movements decoded offline (r = 0.48) and two movements decoded online. Electrical stimulation across one USEA evoked >80 sensory percepts. Varying the stimulation parameters modulated percept quality. Devices remained intrafascicularly implanted for the duration of the study with no significant changes in the SNRs or percept thresholds. Significance. This study demonstrated that an array of 96 microelectrodes can be implanted into the human peripheral nervous system for up to 1 month durations. Such an

  16. Kv7.2 regulates the function of peripheral sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    King, Chih H.; Lancaster, Eric; Salomon, Daniela; Peles, Elior; Scherer, Steven S.

    2014-01-01

    The Kv7 (KCNQ) family of voltage-gated K+ channels regulates cellular excitability. The functional role of Kv7.2 has been hampered by the lack of a viable Kcnq2-null animal model. In this study, we generated homozygous Kcnq2-null sensory neurons using the Cre-Lox system; in these mice, Kv7.2 expression is absent in the peripheral sensory neurons, whereas the expression of other molecular components of nodes (including Kv7.3), paranodes, and juxtaparanodes is not altered. The conditional Kcnq2-null animals exhibit normal motor performance, but have increased thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia. Whole cell patch recording technique demonstrates that Kcnq2-null sensory neurons have increased excitability and reduced spike frequency adaptation. Taken together, our results suggest that the loss of Kv7.2 activity increases the excitability of primary sensory neurons. PMID:24687876

  17. The repair Schwann cell and its function in regenerating nerves.

    PubMed

    Jessen, K R; Mirsky, R

    2016-07-01

    Nerve injury triggers the conversion of myelin and non-myelin (Remak) Schwann cells to a cell phenotype specialized to promote repair. Distal to damage, these repair Schwann cells provide the necessary signals and spatial cues for the survival of injured neurons, axonal regeneration and target reinnervation. The conversion to repair Schwann cells involves de-differentiation together with alternative differentiation, or activation, a combination that is typical of cell type conversions often referred to as (direct or lineage) reprogramming. Thus, injury-induced Schwann cell reprogramming involves down-regulation of myelin genes combined with activation of a set of repair-supportive features, including up-regulation of trophic factors, elevation of cytokines as part of the innate immune response, myelin clearance by activation of myelin autophagy in Schwann cells and macrophage recruitment, and the formation of regeneration tracks, Bungner's bands, for directing axons to their targets. This repair programme is controlled transcriptionally by mechanisms involving the transcription factor c-Jun, which is rapidly up-regulated in Schwann cells after injury. In the absence of c-Jun, damage results in the formation of a dysfunctional repair cell, neuronal death and failure of functional recovery. c-Jun, although not required for Schwann cell development, is therefore central to the reprogramming of myelin and non-myelin (Remak) Schwann cells to repair cells after injury. In future, the signalling that specifies this cell requires further analysis so that pharmacological tools that boost and maintain the repair Schwann cell phenotype can be developed. PMID:26864683

  18. Neurophysiological assessment of auditory, peripheral nerve, somatosensory, and visual system function after developmental exposure to gasoline, E15, and E85 vapors.

    PubMed

    Herr, David W; Freeborn, Danielle L; Degn, Laura; Martin, Sheppard A; Ortenzio, Jayna; Pantlin, Lara; Hamm, Charles W; Boyes, William K

    2016-01-01

    The use of gasolines blended with a range of ethanol concentrations may result in inhalation of vapors containing a variable combination of ethanol with other volatile gasoline constituents. The possibility of exposure and potential interactions between vapor constituents suggests the need to evaluate the possible risks of this complex mixture. Previously we evaluated the effects of developmental exposure to ethanol vapors on neurophysiological measures of sensory function as a component of a larger project evaluating developmental ethanol toxicity. Here we report an evaluation using the same battery of sensory function testing in offspring of pregnant dams exposed during gestation to condensed vapors of gasoline (E0), gasoline blended with 15% ethanol (E15) or gasoline blended with 85% ethanol (E85). Pregnant Long-Evans rats were exposed to target concentrations 0, 3000, 6000, or 9000ppm total hydrocarbon vapors for 6.5h/day over GD9 - GD20. Sensory evaluations of male offspring began as adults. The electrophysiological testing battery included tests of: peripheral nerve (compound action potentials, nerve conduction velocity [NCV]), somatosensory (cortical and cerebellar evoked potentials), auditory (brainstem auditory evoked responses), and visual functions. Visual function assessment included pattern elicited visual evoked potentials (VEP), VEP contrast sensitivity, dark-adapted (scotopic) electroretinograms (ERGs), light-adapted (photopic) ERGs, and green flicker ERGs. The results included sporadic statistically significant effects, but the observations were not consistently concentration-related and appeared to be statistical Type 1 errors related to multiple dependent measures evaluated. The exposure concentrations were much higher than can be reasonably expected from typical exposures to the general population during refueling or other common exposure situations. Overall the results indicate that gestational exposure of male rats to ethanol/gasoline vapor

  19. Localized and Sustained Delivery of Erythropoietin from PLGA Microspheres Promotes Functional Recovery and Nerve Regeneration in Peripheral Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Gao, Yuan; Zhou, Yan; Liu, Jianheng; Zhang, Licheng; Long, Anhua; Zhang, Lihai; Tang, Peifu

    2015-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) has been demonstrated to exert neuroprotective effects on peripheral nerve injury recovery. Though daily intraperitoneal injection of EPO during a long period of time was effective, it was a tedious procedure. In addition, only limited amount of EPO could reach the injury sites by general administration, and free EPO is easily degraded in vivo. In this study, we encapsulated EPO in poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) microspheres. Both in vitro and in vivo release assays showed that the EPO-PLGA microspheres allowed sustained release of EPO within a period of two weeks. After administration of such EPO-PLGA microspheres, the peripheral nerve injured rats had significantly better recovery compared with those which received daily intraperitoneal injection of EPO, empty PLGA microspheres, or saline treatments. This was supported by the functional, electrophysiological, and histological evaluations of the recovery done at week 8 postoperatively. We conclude that sustained delivery of EPO could be achieved by using EPO-PLGA microspheres, and such delivery method could further enhance the recovery function of EPO in nerve injury recovery. PMID:25821803

  20. Sphenoid sinus mucocele presenting with oculomotor nerve palsy and affecting the functions of trigeminal nerve: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Wei-Wei; Zhou, Shui-Hong; Bao, Yang-Yang

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of first-episode sphenoid mucocele successfully treated via transnasal endoscopic drainage and marsupialization of the mucocele. A 55 year-old female presented with persistent right-side facial numbness (in the areas of the first and second branches of the trigeminal nerve) and right-side ptosis. Computed tomography (CT) imaging and Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed opacification and expansion of the right-side sphenoid sinus lesion. The lesion was diagnosed as right-side sphenoid mucocele affecting the functions of the trigeminal (first and second branches), and oculomotor nerves. Transnasal endoscopic drainage and marsupialization of the mucocele result in rapid regression of these symptoms. PMID:26629234

  1. Three-dimensional Reconstruction of Peripheral Nerve Internal Fascicular Groups

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Yingchun; Wang, Liping; Dong, Jianghui; Zhang, Yi; Luo, Peng; Qi, Jian; Liu, Xiaolin; Xian, Cory J.

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral nerves are important pathways for receiving afferent sensory impulses and sending out efferent motor instructions, as carried out by sensory nerve fibers and motor nerve fibers. It has remained a great challenge to functionally reconnect nerve internal fiber bundles (or fascicles) in nerve repair. One possible solution may be to establish a 3D nerve fascicle visualization system. This study described the key technology of 3D peripheral nerve fascicle reconstruction. Firstly, fixed nerve segments were embedded with position lines, cryostat-sectioned continuously, stained and imaged histologically. Position line cross-sections were identified using a trained support vector machine method, and the coordinates of their central pixels were obtained. Then, nerve section images were registered using the bilinear method, and edges of fascicles were extracted using an improved gradient vector flow snake method. Subsequently, fascicle types were identified automatically using the multi-directional gradient and second-order gradient method. Finally, a 3D virtual model of internal fascicles was obtained after section images were processed. This technique was successfully applied for 3D reconstruction for the median nerve of the hand-wrist and cubital fossa regions and the gastrocnemius nerve. This nerve internal fascicle 3D reconstruction technology would be helpful for aiding peripheral nerve repair and virtual surgery. PMID:26596642

  2. Dysregulation of the Descending Pain System in Temporomandibular Disorders Revealed by Low-Frequency Sensory Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation: A Pupillometric Study

    PubMed Central

    Monaco, Annalisa; Cattaneo, Ruggero; Mesin, Luca; Ortu, Eleonora; Giannoni, Mario; Pietropaoli, Davide

    2015-01-01

    Using computerized pupillometry, our previous research established that the autonomic nervous system (ANS) is dysregulated in patients suffering from temporomandibular disorders (TMDs), suggesting a potential role for ANS dysfunction in pain modulation and the etiology of TMD. However, pain modulation hypotheses for TMD are still lacking. The periaqueductal gray (PAG) is involved in the descending modulation of defensive behavior and pain through μ, κ, and δ opioid receptors. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) has been extensively used for pain relief, as low-frequency stimulation can activate µ receptors. Our aim was to use pupillometry to evaluate the effect of low-frequency TENS stimulation of μ receptors on opioid descending pathways in TMD patients. In accordance with the Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD, 18 females with myogenous TMD and 18 matched-controls were enrolled. All subjects underwent subsequent pupillometric evaluations under dark and light conditions before, soon after (end of stimulation) and long after (recovery period) sensorial TENS. The overall statistics derived from the darkness condition revealed no significant differences in pupil size between cases and controls; indeed, TENS stimulation significantly reduced pupil size in both groups. Controls, but not TMD patients, displayed significant differences in pupil size before compared with after TENS. Under light conditions, TMD patients presented a smaller pupil size compared with controls; the pupil size was reduced only in the controls. Pupil size differences were found before and during TENS and before and after TENS in the controls only. Pupillometry revealed that stimulating the descending opioid pathway with low-frequency sensory TENS of the fifth and seventh pairs of cranial nerves affects the peripheral target. The TMD patients exhibited a different pattern of response to TENS stimulation compared with the controls, suggesting that impaired modulation of the

  3. Dysregulation of the descending pain system in temporomandibular disorders revealed by low-frequency sensory transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation: a pupillometric study.

    PubMed

    Monaco, Annalisa; Cattaneo, Ruggero; Mesin, Luca; Ortu, Eleonora; Giannoni, Mario; Pietropaoli, Davide

    2015-01-01

    Using computerized pupillometry, our previous research established that the autonomic nervous system (ANS) is dysregulated in patients suffering from temporomandibular disorders (TMDs), suggesting a potential role for ANS dysfunction in pain modulation and the etiology of TMD. However, pain modulation hypotheses for TMD are still lacking. The periaqueductal gray (PAG) is involved in the descending modulation of defensive behavior and pain through μ, κ, and δ opioid receptors. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) has been extensively used for pain relief, as low-frequency stimulation can activate µ receptors. Our aim was to use pupillometry to evaluate the effect of low-frequency TENS stimulation of μ receptors on opioid descending pathways in TMD patients. In accordance with the Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD, 18 females with myogenous TMD and 18 matched-controls were enrolled. All subjects underwent subsequent pupillometric evaluations under dark and light conditions before, soon after (end of stimulation) and long after (recovery period) sensorial TENS. The overall statistics derived from the darkness condition revealed no significant differences in pupil size between cases and controls; indeed, TENS stimulation significantly reduced pupil size in both groups. Controls, but not TMD patients, displayed significant differences in pupil size before compared with after TENS. Under light conditions, TMD patients presented a smaller pupil size compared with controls; the pupil size was reduced only in the controls. Pupil size differences were found before and during TENS and before and after TENS in the controls only. Pupillometry revealed that stimulating the descending opioid pathway with low-frequency sensory TENS of the fifth and seventh pairs of cranial nerves affects the peripheral target. The TMD patients exhibited a different pattern of response to TENS stimulation compared with the controls, suggesting that impaired modulation of the

  4. Conventional and Functional MR Imaging of Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumors: Initial Experience

    PubMed Central

    Demehri, S.; Belzberg, A.; Blakeley, J.; Fayad, L.M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Differentiating benign from malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors can be very challenging using conventional MR imaging. Our aim was to test the hypothesis that conventional and functional MR imaging can accurately diagnose malignancy in patients with indeterminate peripheral nerve sheath tumors. MATERIALS AND METHODS This institutional review board–approved, Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act–compliant study retrospectively reviewed 61 consecutive patients with 80 indeterminate peripheral nerve sheath tumors. Of these, 31 histologically proved peripheral nerve sheath tumors imaged with conventional (unenhanced T1, fluid-sensitive, contrast-enhanced T1-weighted sequences) and functional MR imaging (DWI/apparent diffusion coefficient mapping, dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging) were included. Two observers independently assessed anatomic (size, morphology, signal) and functional (ADC values, early arterial enhancement by dynamic contrast-enhanced MR) features to determine interobserver agreement. The accuracy of MR imaging for differentiating malignant from benign was also determined by receiver operating characteristic analysis. RESULTS Of 31 peripheral nerve sheath tumors, there were 9 malignant (9%) and 22 benign ones (81%). With anatomic sequences, average tumor diameter (6.3 ± 1.8 versus 3.9 ± 2.3 mm, P = .009), ill-defined/infiltrative margins (77% versus 32%; P = .04), and the presence of peritumoral edema (66% versus 23%, P = .01) were different for malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors and benign peripheral nerve sheath tumors. With functional sequences, minimum ADC (0.47 ± 0.32 × 10−3 mm2/s versus 1.08 ± 0.26 × 10−3 mm2/s; P [H11021] .0001) and the presence of early arterial enhancement (50% versus 11%; P = .03) were different for malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors and benign peripheral nerve sheath tumors. The minimum ADC (area under receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.89; 95

  5. Morphological and functional aspects of sciatic nerve regeneration after crush injury.

    PubMed

    Răducan, Andreea; Mirică, Silvia; Duicu, Oana; Răducan, S; Muntean, Danina; Fira-Mlădinescu, O; Lighezan, Rodica

    2013-01-01

    Experimental models for the investigation of nerve regeneration are critical in studying new strategies able to promote the repair process. The aim of the present work was to characterize morphological and functional aspects of sciatic nerve regeneration after mechanical crush injury in rodents. Morphological changes were assessed after a four minutes sciatic nerve injury induced by means of a standardized compression clip. Rat nerve samples were collected before injury and after 24 hours, four days, two weeks, and four weeks after injury, respectively. In an additional group with unilateral sciatic nerve injury, animals were evaluated for four weeks using walking track analysis and the sciatic static index (SSI) measured in both rearing and normal standing position. Histological study showed important axonal degeneration at four days and axonal regeneration at four weeks after injury. We observed no significant differences between SSI in rearing and normal standing stance and a strong correlation between SSI values measured in the two positions during the evaluation period. Positive correlations were also found for the footprint parameters. Our data provide a baseline characterization of the sciatic nerve crush injury that will further allow the investigation of peripheral nerve regeneration in the presence of potential neuroprotective agents in post-traumatic nerve repair. PMID:24322020

  6. Functional and morphological assessment of a standardized crush injury of the rat median nerve.

    PubMed

    Ronchi, G; Nicolino, S; Raimondo, S; Tos, P; Battiston, B; Papalia, I; Varejão, A S P; Giacobini-Robecchi, M G; Perroteau, I; Geuna, S

    2009-04-30

    The availability of effective experimental models for investigating nerve regeneration and designing new strategies for promoting this unique repair process is important. The aim of this study was to standardize a rat median nerve crush injury model using a non-serrated clamp exerting a compression force of 17.02 MPa for a duration of 30s. Results showed that functional recovery, evaluated by grasping test, was already detectable at day-12 and progressively increased until day-28 after which animal performance plateaued until the end of testing (day-42), reaching a range of 75-80% of pre-operative values. Morphological analysis on the median nerve segments, distal to the crush lesion, which were withdrawn at the end of the experiment showed that regenerated nerve fibers are significantly more numerous and densely packed; they are also smaller and have a thinner myelin sheath compared to controls. Together, these results provide a baseline characterization of the crush median nerve injury experimental model for its employment in the investigation of nerve regeneration research, especially when a reproducible regeneration process is required, such as for the study of biological mechanisms of peripheral nerve fiber regeneration or development of new therapeutic agents for promoting posttraumatic nerve repair. PMID:19428511

  7. EFFECTS OF HYPERGLYCEMIA ON RAT CAVERNOUS NERVE AXONS: A FUNCTIONAL AND ULTRASTRUCTURAL STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Zotova, Elena G.; Schaumburg, Herbert H.; Raine, Cedric S.; Cannella, Barbara; Tar, Moses; Melman, Arnold; Arezzo, Joseph C.

    2008-01-01

    The present study explored parallel changes in the physiology and structure of myelinated (Aδ) and unmyelinated (C) small diameter axons in the cavernous nerve of rats associated with streptozotocin-induced hyperglycemia. Damage to these axons is thought to play a key role in diabetic autonomic neuropathy and erectile dysfunction, but their pathophysiology has been poorly studied. Velocities in slow conducting fibers were measured by applying multiple unit procedures; histopathology was evaluated with both light and electron microscopy. To our knowledge, these are the initial studies of slow nerve conduction velocities in the distal segments of the cavernous nerve. We report that hyperglycemia is associated with a substantial reduction in the amplitude of the slow conducting response, as well as a slowing of velocities within this very slow range (<2.5 m/sec). Even with prolonged hyperglycemia (> 4 months), histopathological abnormalities were mild and limited to the distal segments of the cavernous nerve. Structural findings included dystrophic changes in nerve terminals, abnormal accumulations of glycogen granules in unmyelinated and preterminal axons, and necrosis of scattered smooth muscle fibers. The onset of slowing of velocity in the distal cavernous nerve occurred subsequent to slowing in somatic nerves in the same rats. The functional changes in the cavernous nerve anticipated and exceeded the axonal degeneration detected by morphology. The physiologic techniques outlined in these studies are feasible in most electrophysiologic laboratories and could substantially enhance our sensitivity to the onset and progression of small fiber diabetic neuropathy. PMID:18687329

  8. An alternative video footprint analysis to assess functional loss following injury to the rat sciatic nerve.

    PubMed

    Bervar, M

    2002-01-01

    The rat sciatic nerve is a well-established animal model for the study of recovery from peripheral nerve injuries. Footprint analysis is the most widely used non-invasive method of measuring functional recovery after injury in this model. We describe a new, alternative video analysis of standing (or static footprint video analysis) to assess functional loss following injury to the rat sciatic nerve, while the animal is standing or at periodic rest on a flat transparent surface. We found that this alternative video analysis is technically easier to perform than the corresponding footprint video analysis while walking, but still preserves all advantages of video versus conventional ink track method: i.e. few non-measurable footprints, better repeatability, high accuracy and more precise quantification of the degree of functional loss after sciatic nerve injury in the rat. PMID:12514995

  9. Differential upregulation in DRG neurons of an α2δ-1 splice variant with a lower affinity for gabapentin after peripheral sensory nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Lana, Beatrice; Schlick, Bettina; Martin, Stuart; Pratt, Wendy S.; Page, Karen M.; Goncalves, Leonor; Rahman, Wahida; Dickenson, Anthony H.; Bauer, Claudia S.; Dolphin, Annette C.

    2014-01-01

    The α2δ-1 protein is an auxiliary subunit of voltage-gated calcium channels, critical for neurotransmitter release. It is upregulated in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons following sensory nerve injury, and is also the therapeutic target of the gabapentinoid drugs, which are efficacious in both experimental and human neuropathic pain conditions. α2δ-1 has 3 spliced regions: A, B, and C. A and C are cassette exons, whereas B is introduced via an alternative 3′ splice acceptor site. Here we have examined the presence of α2δ-1 splice variants in DRG neurons, and have found that although the main α2δ-1 splice variant in DRG is the same as that in brain (α2δ-1 ΔA+B+C), there is also another α2δ-1 splice variant (ΔA+BΔC), which is expressed in DRG neurons and is differentially upregulated compared to the main DRG splice variant α2δ-1 ΔA+B+C following spinal nerve ligation. Furthermore, this differential upregulation occurs preferentially in a small nonmyelinated DRG neuron fraction, obtained by density gradient separation. The α2δ-1 ΔA+BΔC splice variant supports CaV2 calcium currents with unaltered properties compared to α2δ-1 ΔA+B+C, but shows a significantly reduced affinity for gabapentin. This variant could therefore play a role in determining the efficacy of gabapentin in neuropathic pain. PMID:24315988

  10. Functional results of electrical cortical stimulation of the lower sensory strip.

    PubMed

    Tanriverdi, Taner; Al-Jehani, Hosam; Poulin, Nicole; Olivier, Andre

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this paper is to provide functional results obtained from electrical cortical stimulation of the lower postcentral gyrus in patients who underwent either lesional or non-lesional epilepsy surgery. Group I (n=393) included those patients with gliosis or normal tissue and Group II (n=107) included patients with space-occupying lesions. For cortical stimulation, a unipolar voltage-controlled electrode was used. The tongue, lip, and hand/finger sequences over the lower postcentral gyrus lateromedially in both groups were in agreement with classic teaching. The presence of structural lesions, such as tumors and dysplasia, did not affect the vertical representation of the body parts on the lower sensory strip. Individual variations, which included mosaicism over the sensory strip, were frequent. Whether the functional variability and mosaicism within the sensory cortex result from a pathological condition or not remains to be elucidated in healthy humans using advanced non-invasive brain mapping techniques. PMID:19497753

  11. Awake vs. anesthetized: layer-specific sensory processing in visual cortex and functional connectivity between cortical areas

    PubMed Central

    Sellers, Kristin K.; Bennett, Davis V.; Hutt, Axel; Williams, James H.

    2015-01-01

    During general anesthesia, global brain activity and behavioral state are profoundly altered. Yet it remains mostly unknown how anesthetics alter sensory processing across cortical layers and modulate functional cortico-cortical connectivity. To address this gap in knowledge of the micro- and mesoscale effects of anesthetics on sensory processing in the cortical microcircuit, we recorded multiunit activity and local field potential in awake and anesthetized ferrets (Mustela putoris furo) during sensory stimulation. To understand how anesthetics alter sensory processing in a primary sensory area and the representation of sensory input in higher-order association areas, we studied the local sensory responses and long-range functional connectivity of primary visual cortex (V1) and prefrontal cortex (PFC). Isoflurane combined with xylazine provided general anesthesia for all anesthetized recordings. We found that anesthetics altered the duration of sensory-evoked responses, disrupted the response dynamics across cortical layers, suppressed both multimodal interactions in V1 and sensory responses in PFC, and reduced functional cortico-cortical connectivity between V1 and PFC. Together, the present findings demonstrate altered sensory responses and impaired functional network connectivity during anesthesia at the level of multiunit activity and local field potential across cortical layers. PMID:25833839

  12. Awake vs. anesthetized: layer-specific sensory processing in visual cortex and functional connectivity between cortical areas.

    PubMed

    Sellers, Kristin K; Bennett, Davis V; Hutt, Axel; Williams, James H; Fröhlich, Flavio

    2015-06-01

    During general anesthesia, global brain activity and behavioral state are profoundly altered. Yet it remains mostly unknown how anesthetics alter sensory processing across cortical layers and modulate functional cortico-cortical connectivity. To address this gap in knowledge of the micro- and mesoscale effects of anesthetics on sensory processing in the cortical microcircuit, we recorded multiunit activity and local field potential in awake and anesthetized ferrets (Mustela putoris furo) during sensory stimulation. To understand how anesthetics alter sensory processing in a primary sensory area and the representation of sensory input in higher-order association areas, we studied the local sensory responses and long-range functional connectivity of primary visual cortex (V1) and prefrontal cortex (PFC). Isoflurane combined with xylazine provided general anesthesia for all anesthetized recordings. We found that anesthetics altered the duration of sensory-evoked responses, disrupted the response dynamics across cortical layers, suppressed both multimodal interactions in V1 and sensory responses in PFC, and reduced functional cortico-cortical connectivity between V1 and PFC. Together, the present findings demonstrate altered sensory responses and impaired functional network connectivity during anesthesia at the level of multiunit activity and local field potential across cortical layers. PMID:25833839

  13. The Molecular Motor KIF1A Transports the TrkA Neurotrophin Receptor and Is Essential for Sensory Neuron Survival and Function.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yosuke; Niwa, Shinsuke; Dong, Ming; Farkhondeh, Atena; Wang, Li; Zhou, Ruyun; Hirokawa, Nobutaka

    2016-06-15

    KIF1A is a major axonal transport motor protein, but its functional significance remains elusive. Here we show that KIF1A-haploinsufficient mice developed sensory neuropathy. We found progressive loss of TrkA(+) sensory neurons in Kif1a(+/-) dorsal root ganglia (DRGs). Moreover, axonal transport of TrkA was significantly disrupted in Kif1a(+/-) neurons. Live imaging and immunoprecipitation assays revealed that KIF1A bound to TrkA-containing vesicles through the adaptor GTP-Rab3, suggesting that TrkA is a cargo of the KIF1A motor. Physiological measurements revealed a weaker capsaicin response in Kif1a(+/-) DRG neurons. Moreover, these neurons were hyposensitive to nerve growth factor, which could explain the reduced neuronal survival and the functional deficiency of the pain receptor TRPV1. Because phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling significantly rescued these phenotypes and also increased Kif1a mRNA, we propose that KIF1A is essential for the survival and function of sensory neurons because of the TrkA transport and its synergistic support of the NGF/TrkA/PI3K signaling pathway. PMID:27263974

  14. A silk sericin/silicone nerve guidance conduit promotes regeneration of a transected sciatic nerve.

    PubMed

    Xie, Hongjian; Yang, Wen; Chen, Jianghai; Zhang, Jinxiang; Lu, Xiaochen; Zhao, Xiaobo; Huang, Kun; Li, Huili; Chang, Panpan; Wang, Zheng; Wang, Lin

    2015-10-28

    Peripheral nerve gap defects lead to significant loss of sensory or motor function. Tissue engineering has become an important alternative to nerve repair. Sericin, a major component of silk, is a natural protein whose value in tissue engineering has just begun to be explored. Here, the first time use of sericin in vivo is reported as a long-term implant for peripheral nerve regeneration. A sericin nerve guidance conduit is designed and fabricated. This conduit is highly porous with mechanical strength matching peripheral nerve tissue. It supports Schwann cell proliferation and is capable of up-regulating the transcription of glial cell derived neurotrophic factor and nerve growth factor in Schwann cells. The sericin conduit wrapped with a silicone conduit (sericin/silicone double conduits) is used for bridging repair of a 5 mm gap in a rat sciatic nerve transection model. The sericin/silicone double conduits achieve functional recovery comparable to that of autologous nerve grafting as evidenced by drastically improved nerve function and morphology. Importantly, this improvement is mainly attributed to the sericin conduit as the silicone conduit alone only produces marginal functional recovery. This sericin/silicone-double-conduit strategy offers an efficient and valuable alternative to autologous nerve grafting for repairing damaged peripheral nerve. PMID:26332703

  15. Schwann cell-specific JAM-C-deficient mice reveal novel expression and functions for JAM-C in peripheral nerves.

    PubMed

    Colom, Bartomeu; Poitelon, Yannick; Huang, Wenlong; Woodfin, Abigail; Averill, Sharon; Del Carro, Ubaldo; Zambroni, Desirée; Brain, Susan D; Perretti, Mauro; Ahluwalia, Amrita; Priestley, John V; Chavakis, Triantafyllos; Imhof, Beat A; Feltri, M Laura; Nourshargh, Sussan

    2012-03-01

    Junctional adhesion molecule-C (JAM-C) is an adhesion molecule expressed at junctions between adjacent endothelial and epithelial cells and implicated in multiple inflammatory and vascular responses. In addition, we recently reported on the expression of JAM-C in Schwann cells (SCs) and its importance for the integrity and function of peripheral nerves. To investigate the role of JAM-C in neuronal functions further, mice with a specific deletion of JAM-C in SCs (JAM-C SC KO) were generated. Compared to wild-type (WT) controls, JAM-C SC KO mice showed electrophysiological defects, muscular weakness, and hypersensitivity to mechanical stimuli. In addressing the underlying cause of these defects, nerves from JAM-C SC KO mice were found to have morphological defects in the paranodal region, exhibiting increased nodal length as compared to WTs. The study also reports on previously undetected expressions of JAM-C, namely on perineural cells, and in line with nociception defects of the JAM-C SC KO animals, on finely myelinated sensory nerve fibers. Collectively, the generation and characterization of JAM-C SC KO mice has provided unequivocal evidence for the involvement of SC JAM-C in the fine organization of peripheral nerves and in modulating multiple neuronal responses. PMID:22090315

  16. Ciguatoxin reduces regenerative capacity of axotomized peripheral neurons and delays functional recovery in pre-exposed mice after peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Au, Ngan Pan Bennett; Kumar, Gajendra; Asthana, Pallavi; Tin, Chung; Mak, Yim Ling; Chan, Leo Lai; Lam, Paul Kwan Sing; Ma, Chi Him Eddie

    2016-01-01

    Ciguatera fish poisoning (CFP) results from consumption of tropical reef fish containing ciguatoxins (CTXs). Pacific (P)-CTX-1 is among the most potent known CTXs and the predominant source of CFP in the endemic region responsible for the majority of neurological symptoms in patients. Chronic and persistent neurological symptoms occur in some CFP patients, which often result in incomplete functional recovery for years. However, the direct effects of exposure to CTXs remain largely unknown. In present study, we exposed mice to CTX purified from ciguatera fish sourced from the Pacific region. P-CTX-1 was detected in peripheral nerves within hours and persisted for two months after exposure. P-CTX-1 inhibited axonal regrowth from axotomized peripheral neurons in culture. P-CTX-1 exposure reduced motor function in mice within the first two weeks of exposure before returning to baseline levels. These pre-exposed animals exhibited delayed sensory and motor functional recovery, and irreversible motor deficits after peripheral nerve injury in which formation of functional synapses was impaired. These findings are consistent with reduced muscle function, as assessed by electromyography recordings. Our study provides strong evidence that the persistence of P-CTX-1 in peripheral nerves reduces the intrinsic growth capacity of peripheral neurons, resulting in delayed functional recovery after injury. PMID:27229176

  17. Ciguatoxin reduces regenerative capacity of axotomized peripheral neurons and delays functional recovery in pre-exposed mice after peripheral nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Au, Ngan Pan Bennett; Kumar, Gajendra; Asthana, Pallavi; Tin, Chung; Mak, Yim Ling; Chan, Leo Lai; Lam, Paul Kwan Sing; Ma, Chi Him Eddie

    2016-01-01

    Ciguatera fish poisoning (CFP) results from consumption of tropical reef fish containing ciguatoxins (CTXs). Pacific (P)-CTX-1 is among the most potent known CTXs and the predominant source of CFP in the endemic region responsible for the majority of neurological symptoms in patients. Chronic and persistent neurological symptoms occur in some CFP patients, which often result in incomplete functional recovery for years. However, the direct effects of exposure to CTXs remain largely unknown. In present study, we exposed mice to CTX purified from ciguatera fish sourced from the Pacific region. P-CTX-1 was detected in peripheral nerves within hours and persisted for two months after exposure. P-CTX-1 inhibited axonal regrowth from axotomized peripheral neurons in culture. P-CTX-1 exposure reduced motor function in mice within the first two weeks of exposure before returning to baseline levels. These pre-exposed animals exhibited delayed sensory and motor functional recovery, and irreversible motor deficits after peripheral nerve injury in which formation of functional synapses was impaired. These findings are consistent with reduced muscle function, as assessed by electromyography recordings. Our study provides strong evidence that the persistence of P-CTX-1 in peripheral nerves reduces the intrinsic growth capacity of peripheral neurons, resulting in delayed functional recovery after injury. PMID:27229176

  18. EFFECTS OF 2,4-DITHIOBIURET ON SENSORY AND MOTOR FUNCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    2,4-Dithiobiuret exposure causes a delayed onset muscle weakness in rats that has been attributed to depressed neuromuscular transmission. he present study compares the effects of DTB on sensory and motor function in rats. dult male Long-Evans hooded rats were exposed to saline, ...

  19. A bioengineered peripheral nerve construct using aligned peptide amphiphile nanofibers

    PubMed Central

    Yalom, Anisa; Berns, Eric J.; Stephanopoulos, Nicholas; McClendon, Mark T.; Segovia, Luis A.; Spigelman, Igor; Stupp, Samuel I.; Jarrahy, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries can result in lifelong disability. Primary coaptation is the treatment of choice when the gap between transected nerve ends is short. Long nerve gaps seen in more complex injuries often require autologous nerve grafts or nerve conduits implemented into the repair. Nerve grafts, however, cause morbidity and functional loss at donor sites, which are limited in number. Nerve conduits, in turn, lack an internal scaffold to support and guide axonal regeneration, resulting in decreased efficacy over longer nerve gap lengths. By comparison, peptide amphiphiles (PAs) are molecules that can self-assemble into nanofibers, which can be aligned to mimic the native architecture of peripheral nerve. As such, they represent a potential substrate for use in a bioengineered nerve graft substitute. To examine this, we cultured Schwann cells with bioactive PAs (RGDS-PA, IKVAV-PA) to determine their ability to attach to and proliferate within the biomaterial. Next, we devised a PA construct for use in a peripheral nerve critical sized defect model. Rat sciatic nerve defects were created and reconstructed with autologous nerve, PLGA conduits filled with various forms of aligned PAs, or left unrepaired. Motor and sensory recovery were determined and compared among groups. Our results demonstrate that Schwann cells are able to adhere to and proliferate in aligned PA gels, with greater efficacy in bioactive PAs compared to the backbone-PA alone. In vivo testing revealed recovery of motor and sensory function in animals treated with conduit/PA constructs comparable to animals treated with autologous nerve grafts. Functional recovery in conduit/PA and autologous graft groups was significantly faster than in animals treated with empty PLGA conduits. Histological examinations also demonstrated increased axonal and Schwann cell regeneration within the reconstructed nerve gap in animals treated with conduit/PA constructs. These results indicate that PA nanofibers may

  20. A new method of measuring functional recovery after crushing the peripheral nerves in unanesthetized and unrestrained rats.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, K

    1978-02-15

    The distances between the first and fifth digits and between the second and fourth digits of the rat's hind paw were measured after crushing the sciatic nerve. The distances between the digits recovered significantly faster in weak nerve crushing than in strong crushing, and faster in distal nerve crushing than in proximal crushing. These results suggest that this method is available for evaluating the functional recovery after nerve crushing. PMID:624375

  1. Recovery of laryngeal function after intraoperative injury to the recurrent laryngeal nerve

    PubMed Central

    Hydman, Jonas; Svensson, Mikael

    2015-01-01

    Loss of function in the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) during thyroid/parathyroid surgery, despite a macroscopically intact nerve, is a challenge which highlights the sensitivity and complexity of laryngeal innervation. Furthermore, the uncertain prognosis stresses a lack of capability to diagnose the reason behind the impaired function. There is a great deal of literature considering risk factors, surgical technique and mechanisms outside the nerve affecting the incidence of RLN paresis during surgery. To be able to prognosticate recovery in cases of laryngeal dysfunction and voice changes after thyroid surgery, the surgeon would first need to define the presence, location, and type of laryngeal nerve injury. There is little data describing the events within the nerve and the neurobiological reasons for the impaired function related to potential recovery and prognosis. In addition, very little data has been presented in order to clarify any differences between the transient and permanent injury of the RLN. This review aims, from an anatomical and neurobiological perspective, to provide an update on the current understandings of surgically-induced injury to the laryngeal nerves. PMID:25713777

  2. Sensory roles of neuronal cilia: cilia development, morphogenesis, and function in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Bae, Young-Kyung; Barr, Maureen M

    2008-01-01

    In the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, cilia are found on the dendritic endings of sensory neurons. C. elegans cilia are classified as 'primary' or 'sensory' according to the '9+0' axonemal ultrastructure (nine doublet outer microtubules with no central microtubule pair) and lack of motility, characteristics of '9+2' cilia. The C. elegans ciliated nervous system allows the animal to perceive environmental stimuli and make appropriate developmental, physiological, and behavioral decisions. In vertebrates, the biological significance of primary cilia had been largely neglected. Recent findings have placed primary/sensory cilia in the center of cellular signaling and developmental processes. Studies using genetic model organisms such as C. elegans identified the link between ciliary dysfunction and human ciliopathies. Future studies in the worm will address important basic questions regarding ciliary development, morphogenesis, specialization, and signaling functions. PMID:18508635

  3. Delayed functional expression of neuronal chemokine receptors following focal nerve demyelination in the rat: a mechanism for the development of chronic sensitization of peripheral nociceptors

    PubMed Central

    Bhangoo, Sonia; Ren, Dongjun; Miller, Richard J; Henry, Kenneth J; Lineswala, Jayana; Hamdouchi, Chafiq; Li, Baolin; Monahan, Patrick E; Chan, David M; Ripsch, Matthew S; White, Fletcher A

    2007-01-01

    Background Animal and clinical studies have revealed that focal peripheral nerve axon demyelination is accompanied by nociceptive pain behavior. C-C and C-X-C chemokines and their receptors have been strongly implicated in demyelinating polyneuropathies and persistent pain syndromes. Herein, we studied the degree to which chronic nociceptive pain behavior is correlated with the neuronal expression of chemokines and their receptors following unilateral lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC)-induced focal demyelination of the sciatic nerve in rats. Results Focal nerve demyelination increased behavioral reflex responsiveness to mechanical stimuli between postoperative day (POD) 3 and POD28 in both the hindpaw ipsilateral and contralateral to the nerve injury. This behavior was accompanied by a bilateral increase in the numbers of primary sensory neurons expressing the chemokine receptors CCR2, CCR5, and CXCR4 by POD14, with no change in the pattern of CXCR3 expression. Significant increases in the numbers of neurons expressing the chemokines monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2), Regulated on Activation, Normal T Expressed and Secreted (RANTES/CCL5) and interferon γ-inducing protein-10 (IP-10/CXCL10) were also evident following nerve injury, although neuronal expression pattern of stromal cell derived factor-1α (SDF1/CXCL12) did not change. Functional studies demonstrated that acutely dissociated sensory neurons derived from LPC-injured animals responded with increased [Ca2+]i following exposure to MCP-1, IP-10, SDF1 and RANTES on POD 14 and 28, but these responses were largely absent by POD35. On days 14 and 28, rats received either saline or a CCR2 receptor antagonist isomer (CCR2 RA-[R]) or its inactive enantiomer (CCR2 RA-[S]) by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection. CCR2 RA-[R] treatment of nerve-injured rats produced stereospecific bilateral reversal of tactile hyperalgesia. Conclusion These results suggest that the presence of chemokine signaling by both injured

  4. Stem cell salvage of injured peripheral nerve.

    PubMed

    Grimoldi, Nadia; Colleoni, Federica; Tiberio, Francesca; Vetrano, Ignazio G; Cappellari, Alberto; Costa, Antonella; Belicchi, Marzia; Razini, Paola; Giordano, Rosaria; Spagnoli, Diego; Pluderi, Mauro; Gatti, Stefano; Morbin, Michela; Gaini, Sergio M; Rebulla, Paolo; Bresolin, Nereo; Torrente, Yvan

    2015-01-01

    We previously developed a collagen tube filled with autologous skin-derived stem cells (SDSCs) for bridging long rat sciatic nerve gaps. Here we present a case report describing a compassionate use of this graft for repairing the polyinjured motor and sensory nerves of the upper arms of a patient. Preclinical assessment was performed with collagen/SDSC implantation in rats after sectioning the sciatic nerve. For the patient, during the 3-year follow-up period, functional recovery of injured median and ulnar nerves was assessed by pinch gauge test and static two-point discrimination and touch test with monofilaments, along with electrophysiological and MRI examinations. Preclinical experiments in rats revealed rescue of sciatic nerve and no side effects of patient-derived SDSC transplantation (30 and 180 days of treatment). In the patient treatment, motor and sensory functions of the median nerve demonstrated ongoing recovery postimplantation during the follow-up period. The results indicate that the collagen/SDSC artificial nerve graft could be used for surgical repair of larger defects in major lesions of peripheral nerves, increasing patient quality of life by saving the upper arms from amputation. PMID:24268028

  5. Immunohistochemical, Ultrastructural and Functional Analysis of Axonal Regeneration through Peripheral Nerve Grafts Containing Schwann Cells Expressing BDNF, CNTF or NT3

    PubMed Central

    Godinho, Maria João; Teh, Lip; Pollett, Margaret A.; Goodman, Douglas; Hodgetts, Stuart I.; Sweetman, Iain; Walters, Mark; Verhaagen, Joost; Plant, Giles W.; Harvey, Alan R.

    2013-01-01

    We used morphological, immunohistochemical and functional assessments to determine the impact of genetically-modified peripheral nerve (PN) grafts on axonal regeneration after injury. Grafts were assembled from acellular nerve sheaths repopulated ex vivo with Schwann cells (SCs) modified to express brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a secretable form of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), or neurotrophin-3 (NT3). Grafts were used to repair unilateral 1 cm defects in rat peroneal nerves and 10 weeks later outcomes were compared to normal nerves and various controls: autografts, acellular grafts and grafts with unmodified SCs. The number of regenerated βIII-Tubulin positive axons was similar in all grafts with the exception of CNTF, which contained the fewest immunostained axons. There were significantly lower fiber counts in acellular, untransduced SC and NT3 groups using a PanNF antibody, suggesting a paucity of large caliber axons. In addition, NT3 grafts contained the greatest number of sensory fibres, identified with either IB4 or CGRP markers. Examination of semi- and ultra-thin sections revealed heterogeneous graft morphologies, particularly in BDNF and NT3 grafts in which the fascicular organization was pronounced. Unmyelinated axons were loosely organized in numerous Remak bundles in NT3 grafts, while the BDNF graft group displayed the lowest ratio of umyelinated to myelinated axons. Gait analysis revealed that stance width was increased in rats with CNTF and NT3 grafts, and step length involving the injured left hindlimb was significantly greater in NT3 grafted rats, suggesting enhanced sensory sensitivity in these animals. In summary, the selective expression of BDNF, CNTF or NT3 by genetically modified SCs had differential effects on PN graft morphology, the number and type of regenerating axons, myelination, and locomotor function. PMID:23950907

  6. Imaging of the facial nerve.

    PubMed

    Veillona, F; Ramos-Taboada, L; Abu-Eid, M; Charpiot, A; Riehm, S

    2010-05-01

    The facial nerve is responsible for the motor innervation of the face. It has a visceral motor function (lacrimal, submandibular, sublingual glands and secretion of the nose); it conveys a great part of the taste fibers, participates to the general sensory of the auricle (skin of the concha) and the wall of the external auditory meatus. The facial mimic, production of tears, nasal flow and salivation all depend on the facial nerve. In order to image the facial nerve it is mandatory to be knowledgeable about its normal anatomy including the course of its efferent and afferent fibers and about relevant technical considerations regarding CT and MR to be able to achieve high-resolution images of the nerve. PMID:20456888

  7. Peripheral Nerve Reconstruction after Injury: A Review of Clinical and Experimental Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Grinsell, D.; Keating, C. P.

    2014-01-01

    Unlike other tissues in the body, peripheral nerve regeneration is slow and usually incomplete. Less than half of patients who undergo nerve repair after injury regain good to excellent motor or sensory function and current surgical techniques are similar to those described by Sunderland more than 60 years ago. Our increasing knowledge about nerve physiology and regeneration far outweighs our surgical abilities to reconstruct damaged nerves and successfully regenerate motor and sensory function. It is technically possible to reconstruct nerves at the fascicular level but not at the level of individual axons. Recent surgical options including nerve transfers demonstrate promise in improving outcomes for proximal nerve injuries and experimental molecular and bioengineering strategies are being developed to overcome biological roadblocks limiting patient recovery. PMID:25276813

  8. Effect of radiation processing on nutritional, functional, sensory and antioxidant properties of red kidney beans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marathe, S. A.; Deshpande, R.; Khamesra, Arohi; Ibrahim, Geeta; Jamdar, Sahayog N.

    2016-08-01

    In the present study dry red kidney beans (Phaseolus vulgaris), irradiated in the dose range of 0.25-10.0 kGy were evaluated for proximate composition, functional, sensory and antioxidant properties. Radiation processing up to 10 kGy did not affect proximate composition, hydration capacity and free fatty acid value. All the sensory attributes were unaffected at 1.0 kGy dose. The dose of 10 kGy, showed lower values for odor and taste, however, they were in acceptable range. Significant improvement in textural quality and reduction in cooking time was observed at dose of 10 kGy. Antioxidant activity of radiation processed samples was also assessed after normal processing such as soaking and pressure cooking. Both phenolic content and antioxidant activity evaluated in terms of DPPH free radical scavenging assay and inhibition in lipid peroxidation using rabbit erythrocyte ghost system, were marginally improved (5-10%) at the dose of 10 kGy in dry and cooked samples. During storage of samples for six months, no significant change was observed in sensory, cooking and antioxidant properties. Thus, radiation treatment of 1 kGy can be applied to get extended shelf life of kidney beans with improved functional properties without impairing bioactivity; nutritional quality and sensory property.

  9. Poor motor function is associated with reduced sensory processing after stroke.

    PubMed

    Campfens, S Floor; Zandvliet, Sarah B; Meskers, Carel G M; Schouten, Alfred C; van Putten, Michel J A M; van der Kooij, Herman

    2015-04-01

    The possibility to regain motor function after stroke depends on the intactness of motor and sensory pathways. In this study, we evaluated afferent sensory pathway information transfer and processing after stroke with the coherence between cortical activity and a position perturbation (position-cortical coherence, PCC). Eleven subacute stroke survivors participated in this study. Subjects performed a motor task with the affected and non-affected arm while continuous wrist position perturbations were applied. Cortical activity was measured using EEG. PCC was calculated between position perturbation and EEG at the contralateral and ipsilateral sensorimotor area. The presence of PCC was quantified as the number of frequencies where PCC is larger than zero across the sensorimotor area. All subjects showed significant contralateral PCC in affected and non-affected wrist tasks. Subjects with poor motor function had a reduced presence of contralateral PCC compared with subjects with good motor function in the affected wrist tasks. Amplitude of significant PCC did not differ between subjects with good and poor motor function. Our results show that poor motor function is associated with reduced sensory pathway information transfer and processing in subacute stroke subjects. Position-cortical coherence may provide additional insight into mechanisms of recovery of motor function after stroke. PMID:25651979

  10. [Effects of a vitamin B complex on functional recovery after nerve injury (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, K; Mikuni, N; Sakai, Y

    1978-09-01

    Functional recovery after nerve crushing was investigated in the following manner: Under pentobarbital anesthesia the sciatic nerve of the rat was crushed at the level of the hip (proximal crush) or the thigh (distal crush). The recovery processes after the nerve crushing were followed by measuring distances between the first and fifth digits(DBD.1 approximately 5) and between the second and fourth digits (DBD.2 approximately 4) of the hind paw, and by observing changes in "behavior" scored on a scale of 10 according to the degree of behavioral disorder of the hind paw and leg. Results obtained by these methods showed good reproducibility. The DBD values and the scores for behavior recovered significantly faster after weak nerve crushing than after strong crushing, and after distal rather than after proximal crushing. When a segment of the sciatic nerve was resected, there was no recovery. These results suggest that DBD.1 approximately 5, DBD.2 approximately 4, and the behavior observed in these experiments serve as good indices for evaluating the degree of functional recovery after nerve injury in unanesthetized and unrestrained animals. Effects of a preparation of vitamins B1, B6, and B12 (B complex) on these three parameters and on weights of 9 muscles of the hind leg were also studied. These studies showed that the B complex facilitated functional recovery from nerve injury faster than its components, and that on muscle atrophy the B complex had its most effects on the soleus. It was also shown that B1 and B12 by themselves had significant facilitating effects on the functional recovery. PMID:711031

  11. Improved gold chloride staining method for anatomical analysis of sensory nerve endings in the shoulder capsule and labrum as examples of loose and dense fibrous tissues

    PubMed Central

    Witherspoon, J W; Smirnova, IV; McIff, TE

    2014-01-01

    Consistency in gold chloride staining is essential for anatomical analysis of sensory nerve endings. The gold chloride stain for this purpose has been modified by many investigators, but often yields inconsistent staining, which makes it difficult to differentiate structures and to determine nerve ending distribution in large tissue samples. We introduce additional steps and major changes to the modified Gairns’ protocol. We controlled the temperature and mixing rate during tissue staining to achieve consistent staining and complete solution penetration. We subjected samples to sucrose dehydration to improve cutting efficiency. We then exposed samples to a solution containing lemon juice, formic acid and paraformaldehyde to produce optimal tissue transparency with minimal tissue deformity. We extended the time for gold chloride impregnation 1.5 fold. Gold chloride was reduced in the labrum using 25% formic acid in water for 18 h and in the capsule using 25% formic acid in citrate phosphate buffer for 2 h. Citrate binds gold nanoparticles, which minimizes aggregation in the tissue. We stored samples in fresh ultrapure water at 4° C to slow reduction and to maintain color contrast in the tissue. Tissue samples were embedded in Tissue Tek and sectioned at 80 and 100 μm instead of using glycerin and teasing the tissue apart as in Gairns’ modified gold chloride method. We attached sections directly to gelatin subbed slides after sectioning with a cryostat. The slides then were processed and coverslipped with Permount. Staining consistency was demonstrated throughout the tissue sections and neural structures were clearly identifiable. PMID:24476562

  12. In vivo characterization of regenerative peripheral nerve interface function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ursu, Daniel C.; Urbanchek, Melanie G.; Nedic, Andrej; Cederna, Paul S.; Gillespie, R. Brent

    2016-04-01

    Objective. Regenerative peripheral nerve interfaces (RPNIs) are neurotized free autologous muscle grafts equipped with electrodes to record myoelectric signals for prosthesis control. Viability of rat RPNI constructs have been demonstrated using evoked responses. In vivo RPNI characterization is the next critical step for assessment as a control modality for prosthetic devices. Approach. Two RPNIs were created in each of two rats by grafting portions of free muscle to the ends of divided peripheral nerves (peroneal in the left and tibial in the right hind limb) and placing bipolar electrodes on the graft surface. After four months, we examined in vivo electromyographic signal activity and compared these signals to muscular electromyographic signals recorded from autologous muscles in two rats serving as controls. An additional group of two rats in which the autologous muscles were denervated served to quantify cross-talk in the electrode recordings. Recordings were made while rats walked on a treadmill and a motion capture system tracked the hind limbs. Amplitude and periodicity of signals relative to gait were quantified, correlation between electromyographic and motion recording were assessed, and a decoder was trained to predict joint motion. Main Results. Raw RPNI signals were active during walking, with amplitudes of 1 mVPP, and quiet during standing, with amplitudes less than 0.1 mVPP. RPNI signals were periodic and entrained with gait. A decoder predicted bilateral ankle motion with greater than 80% reliability. Control group signal activity agreed with literature. Denervated group signals remained quiescent throughout all evaluations. Significance. In vivo myoelectric RPNI activity encodes neural activation patterns associated with gait. Signal contamination from muscles adjacent to the RPNI is minimal, as demonstrated by the low amplitude signals obtained from the Denervated group. The periodicity and entrainment to gait of RPNI recordings suggests the

  13. Effects of the Nerve Mobilization Technique on Lower Limb Function in Patients with Poststroke Hemiparesis

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Hyun-Kyu; Cho, Hyuk-Shin; Choi, Jong-Duk

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the study was to determine the effects of a sciatic nerve mobilization technique on improvement of lower limb function in patient with poststroke hemiparesis. [Subjects] Twenty- two stroke patients participated in this study. [Methods] They were randomly selected based on selection criteria and divided into two groups. In the subject group (n=10), sciatic nerve mobilization with conventional physical therapy was applied to patients. In the control group (n=10), only conventional physical therapy was applied to stroke patients. [Results] There were significant differences between the two groups in pressure, sway, total pressure, angle of the knee joint, and functional reaching test results in the intervention at two weeks and at four weeks. [Conclusion] The present study showed that sciatic nerve mobilization with conventional physical therapy was more effective for lower limb function than conventional physical therapy alone in patient with poststroke hemiparesis. PMID:25140078

  14. Importance of Tissue Morphology Relative to Patient Reports of Symptoms and Functional Limitations Resulting From Median Nerve Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Kevin D.; Li, Xiaobai; Sommerich, Carolyn M.; Case-Smith, Jane

    2013-01-01

    Significant data exist for the personal, environmental, and occupational risk factors for carpal tunnel syndrome. Few data, however, explain the interrelationship of tissue morphology to these factors among patients with clinical presentation of median nerve pathology. Therefore, our primary objective was to examine the relationship of various risk factors that may be predictive of subjective reports of symptoms or functional deficits accounting for median nerve morphology. Using diagnostic ultrasonography, we observed real-time median nerve morphology among 88 participants with varying reports of symptoms or functional limitations resulting from median nerve pathology. Body mass index, educational level, and nerve morphology were the primary predictive factors. Monitoring median nerve morphology with ultrasonography may provide valuable information for clinicians treating patients with symptoms of median nerve pathology. Sonographic measurements may be a useful clinical tool for improving treatment planning and provision, documenting patient status, or measuring clinical outcomes of prevention and rehabilitation interventions. PMID:23245784

  15. Functional and anatomical basis for brain plasticity in facial palsy rehabilitation using the masseteric nerve.

    PubMed

    Buendia, Javier; Loayza, Francis R; Luis, Elkin O; Celorrio, Marta; Pastor, Maria A; Hontanilla, Bernardo

    2016-03-01

    Several techniques have been described for smile restoration after facial nerve paralysis. When a nerve other than the contralateral facial nerve is used to restore the smile, some controversy appears because of the nonphysiological mechanism of smile recovering. Different authors have reported natural results with the masseter nerve. The physiological pathways which determine whether this is achieved continue to remain unclear. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, brain activation pattern measuring blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signal during smiling and jaw clenching was recorded in a group of 24 healthy subjects (11 females). Effective connectivity of premotor regions was also compared in both tasks. The brain activation pattern was similar for smile and jaw-clenching tasks. Smile activations showed topographic overlap though more extended for smile than clenching. Gender comparisons during facial movements, according to kinematics and BOLD signal, did not reveal significant differences. Effective connectivity results of psychophysiological interaction (PPI) from the same seeds located in bilateral facial premotor regions showed significant task and gender differences (p < 0.001). The hypothesis of brain plasticity between the facial nerve and masseter nerve areas is supported by the broad cortical overlap in the representation of facial and masseter muscles. PMID:26683008

  16. Olfactory stimulatory with grapefruit and lavender oils change autonomic nerve activity and physiological function.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Katsuya; Niijima, Akira; Horii, Yuko; Shen, Jiao; Tanida, Mamoru

    2014-10-01

    This review summarizes the effects of olfactory stimulation with grapefruit and lavender oils on autonomic nerve activity and physiological function. Olfactory stimulation with the scent of grapefruit oil (GFO) increases the activity of sympathetic nerves that innervate white and brown adipose tissues, the adrenal glands, and the kidneys, decreases the activity of the gastric vagal nerve in rats and mice. This results in an increase in lipolysis, thermogenesis, and blood pressure, and a decrease in food intake. Olfactory stimulation with the scent of lavender oil (LVO) elicits the opposite changes in nerve activity and physiological variables. Olfactory stimulation with scent of limonene, a component of GFO, and linalool, a component of LVO, has similar effects to stimulation with GFO and LVO, respectively. The histamine H1-receptor antagonist, diphenhydramine, abolishes all GFO-induced changes in nerve activity and physiological variables, and the hitstamine H3-receptor antagonist, thioperamide, eliminates all LVO-induced changes. Lesions to the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus and anosmic treatment with ZnSO4 also abolish all GFO- and LVO-induced changes. These findings indicate that limonene and linalool might be the active substances in GFO and LVO, and suggest that the suprachiasmatic nucleus and histamine are involved in mediating the GFO- and LVO-induced changes in nerve activity and physiological variables. PMID:25002406

  17. Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Progenitors Assist Functional Sensory Axon Regeneration after Dorsal Root Avulsion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hoeber, Jan; Trolle, Carl; Konig, Niclas; Du, Zhongwei; Gallo, Alessandro; Hermans, Emmanuel; Aldskogius, Hakan; Shortland, Peter; Zhang, Su-Chun; Deumens, Ronald; Kozlova, Elena N.

    2015-01-01

    Dorsal root avulsion results in permanent impairment of sensory functions due to disconnection between the peripheral and central nervous system. Improved strategies are therefore needed to reconnect injured sensory neurons with their spinal cord targets in order to achieve functional repair after brachial and lumbosacral plexus avulsion injuries. Here, we show that sensory functions can be restored in the adult mouse if avulsed sensory fibers are bridged with the spinal cord by human neural progenitor (hNP) transplants. Responses to peripheral mechanical sensory stimulation were significantly improved in transplanted animals. Transganglionic tracing showed host sensory axons only in the spinal cord dorsal horn of treated animals. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed that sensory fibers had grown through the bridge and showed robust survival and differentiation of the transplants. Section of the repaired dorsal roots distal to the transplant completely abolished the behavioral improvement. This demonstrates that hNP transplants promote recovery of sensorimotor functions after dorsal root avulsion, and that these effects are mediated by spinal ingrowth of host sensory axons. These results provide a rationale for the development of novel stem cell-based strategies for functionally useful bridging of the peripheral and central nervous system. PMID:26053681

  18. Peripheral Nerve Repair in Rats Using Composite Hydrogel-Filled Aligned Nanofiber Conduits with Incorporated Nerve Growth Factor

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Jenny; Limburg, Sonja; Joshi, Sunil K.; Landman, Rebeccah; Park, Michelle; Zhang, Qia; Kim, Hubert T.

    2013-01-01

    Repair of peripheral nerve defects with current synthetic, tubular nerve conduits generally shows inferior recovery when compared with using nerve autografts, the current gold standard. We tested the ability of composite collagen and hyaluronan hydrogels, with and without the nerve growth factor (NGF), to stimulate neurite extension on a promising aligned, nanofiber poly-L-lactide-co-caprolactone (PLCL) scaffold. In vitro, the hydrogels significantly increased neurite extension from dorsal root ganglia explants. Consistent with these results, the addition of hydrogels as luminal fillers within aligned, nanofiber tubular PLCL conduits led to improved sensory function compared to autograft repair in a critical-size defect in the sciatic nerve in a rat model. Sensory recovery was assessed 3 and 12 weeks after repair using a withdrawal assay from thermal stimulation. The addition of hydrogel did not enhance recovery of motor function in the rat model. The NGF led to dose-dependent improvements in neurite out-growth in vitro, but did not have a significant effect in vivo. In summary, composite collagen/hyaluronan hydrogels enhanced sensory neurite outgrowth in vitro and sensory recovery in vivo. The use of such hydrogels as luminal fillers for tubular nerve conduits may therefore be useful in assisting restoration of protective sensation following peripheral nerve injury. PMID:23659607

  19. Neuron-Specific Deletion of the Nf2 Tumor Suppressor Impairs Functional Nerve Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Alexander; Büttner, Robert; Toledo, Andrea; Baader, Stephan L.; von Maltzahn, Julia; Irintchev, Andrey; Bauer, Reinhard; Morrison, Helen

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to axons of the central nervous system (CNS), axons of the peripheral nervous system (PNS) show better, but still incomplete and often slow regeneration following injury. The tumor suppressor protein merlin, mutated in the hereditary tumor syndrome Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2), has recently been shown to have RhoA regulatory functions in PNS neurons—in addition to its well-characterized, growth-inhibitory activity in Schwann cells. Here we report that the conditional knockout of merlin in PNS neurons leads to impaired functional recovery of mice following sciatic nerve crush injury, in a gene-dosage dependent manner. Gross anatomical or electrophysiological alterations of sciatic nerves could not be detected. However, correlating with attenuated RhoA activation due to merlin deletion, ultrastructural analysis of nerve samples indicated enhanced sprouting of axons with reduced caliber size and increased myelination compared to wildtype animals. We conclude that deletion of the tumor suppressor merlin in the neuronal compartment of peripheral nerves results in compromised functional regeneration after injury. This mechanism could explain the clinical observation that NF2 patients suffer from higher incidences of slowly recovering facial nerve paralysis after vestibular schwannoma surgery. PMID:27467574

  20. Neuron-Specific Deletion of the Nf2 Tumor Suppressor Impairs Functional Nerve Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Alexander; Büttner, Robert; Toledo, Andrea; Baader, Stephan L; von Maltzahn, Julia; Irintchev, Andrey; Bauer, Reinhard; Morrison, Helen

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to axons of the central nervous system (CNS), axons of the peripheral nervous system (PNS) show better, but still incomplete and often slow regeneration following injury. The tumor suppressor protein merlin, mutated in the hereditary tumor syndrome Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2), has recently been shown to have RhoA regulatory functions in PNS neurons-in addition to its well-characterized, growth-inhibitory activity in Schwann cells. Here we report that the conditional knockout of merlin in PNS neurons leads to impaired functional recovery of mice following sciatic nerve crush injury, in a gene-dosage dependent manner. Gross anatomical or electrophysiological alterations of sciatic nerves could not be detected. However, correlating with attenuated RhoA activation due to merlin deletion, ultrastructural analysis of nerve samples indicated enhanced sprouting of axons with reduced caliber size and increased myelination compared to wildtype animals. We conclude that deletion of the tumor suppressor merlin in the neuronal compartment of peripheral nerves results in compromised functional regeneration after injury. This mechanism could explain the clinical observation that NF2 patients suffer from higher incidences of slowly recovering facial nerve paralysis after vestibular schwannoma surgery. PMID:27467574

  1. Redox and Nitric Oxide-Mediated Regulation of Sensory Neuron Ion Channel Function

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS, respectively) can intimately control neuronal excitability and synaptic strength by regulating the function of many ion channels. In peripheral sensory neurons, such regulation contributes towards the control of somatosensory processing; therefore, understanding the mechanisms of such regulation is necessary for the development of new therapeutic strategies and for the treatment of sensory dysfunctions, such as chronic pain. Recent Advances: Tremendous progress in deciphering nitric oxide (NO) and ROS signaling in the nervous system has been made in recent decades. This includes the recognition of these molecules as important second messengers and the elucidation of their metabolic pathways and cellular targets. Mounting evidence suggests that these targets include many ion channels which can be directly or indirectly modulated by ROS and NO. However, the mechanisms specific to sensory neurons are still poorly understood. This review will therefore summarize recent findings that highlight the complex nature of the signaling pathways involved in redox/NO regulation of sensory neuron ion channels and excitability; references to redox mechanisms described in other neuron types will be made where necessary. Critical Issues: The complexity and interplay within the redox, NO, and other gasotransmitter modulation of protein function are still largely unresolved. Issues of specificity and intracellular localization of these signaling cascades will also be addressed. Future Directions: Since our understanding of ROS and RNS signaling in sensory neurons is limited, there is a multitude of future directions; one of the most important issues for further study is the establishment of the exact roles that these signaling pathways play in pain processing and the translation of this understanding into new therapeutics. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 486–504. PMID:24735331

  2. Detrimental effects of immobilization on functional recovery after sciatic nerve crush.

    PubMed

    Sarikcioglu, Levent; Ozkan, Olcay; Gurer, Elif Inanc

    2005-07-01

    Peripheral-nerve trauma has been a challenge to surgeons, with significant advances in the surgery of repair. Immobilization of the injured limb after repair has been the traditional method of treatment. Although peripheral-nerve regeneration has been studied extensively, the correlation between functional recovery and the immobilization period has not been well-documented. In the present study, the authors studied the effects of immobilization on axonal regeneration after sciatic crush injury. They found a detrimental effect of immobilization on the functional recovery. PMID:15971165

  3. Clinical Evaluation of the Effectiveness of Sensory Integrative and Perceptual Motor Therapy in Improving Sensory Integrative Function in Children with Learning Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphries, Thomas W.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    After 72 sessions for 3 hours per week, significantly more children aged 5-9 receiving sensory integration (SI) therapy (n=35) and perceptual motor training (n=35) showed improvement in SI functioning compared to 33 receiving no treatment. Similar effects were found for subgroups with vestibular dysfunction only (n=11, 13, and 11 respectively).…

  4. Model-based analysis and design of nerve cuff electrodes for restoring bladder function by selective stimulation of the pudendal nerve

    PubMed Central

    Kent, Alexander R; Grill, Warren M

    2013-01-01

    Objective Electrical stimulation of the pudendal nerve (PN) is being developed as a means to restore bladder function in persons with spinal cord injury. A single nerve cuff electrode placed on the proximal PN trunk may enable selective stimulation of distinct fascicles to maintain continence or evoke micturition. The objective of this study was to design a nerve cuff that enabled selective stimulation of the PN. Approach We evaluated the performance of both flat interface nerve electrode (FINE) cuff and round cuff designs, with a range of FINE cuff heights and number of contacts, as well as multiple contact orientations. This analysis was performed using a computational model, in which the nerve and fascicle cross-sectional positions from five human PN trunks were systematically reshaped within the nerve cuff. These cross-sections were used to create finite element models, with electric potentials calculated and applied to a cable model of a myelinated axon to evaluate stimulation selectivity for different PN targets. Subsequently, the model was coupled to a genetic algorithm (GA) to identify solutions that used multiple contact activation to maximize selectivity and minimize total stimulation voltage. Main results Simulations did not identify any significant differences in selectivity between FINE and round cuffs, although the latter required smaller stimulation voltages for target activation due to preserved localization of targeted fascicle groups. Further, it was found that a 10 contact nerve cuff generated sufficient selectivity for all PN targets, with the degree of selectivity dependent on the relative position of the target within the nerve. The GA identified solutions that increased fitness by 0.7–45.5% over single contact activation by decreasing stimulation of non-targeted fascicles. Significance This study suggests that using an optimal nerve cuff design and multiple contact activation could enable selective stimulation of the human PN trunk for

  5. Model-based analysis and design of nerve cuff electrodes for restoring bladder function by selective stimulation of the pudendal nerve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, Alexander R.; Grill, Warren M.

    2013-06-01

    Objective. Electrical stimulation of the pudendal nerve (PN) is being developed as a means to restore bladder function in persons with spinal cord injury. A single nerve cuff electrode placed on the proximal PN trunk may enable selective stimulation of distinct fascicles to maintain continence or evoke micturition. The objective of this study was to design a nerve cuff that enabled selective stimulation of the PN. Approach. We evaluated the performance of both flat interface nerve electrode (FINE) cuff and round cuff designs, with a range of FINE cuff heights and number of contacts, as well as multiple contact orientations. This analysis was performed using a computational model, in which the nerve and fascicle cross-sectional positions from five human PN trunks were systematically reshaped within the nerve cuff. These cross-sections were used to create finite element models, with electric potentials calculated and applied to a cable model of a myelinated axon to evaluate stimulation selectivity for different PN targets. Subsequently, the model was coupled to a genetic algorithm (GA) to identify solutions that used multiple contact activation to maximize selectivity and minimize total stimulation voltage. Main results. Simulations did not identify any significant differences in selectivity between FINE and round cuffs, although the latter required smaller stimulation voltages for target activation due to preserved localization of targeted fascicle groups. Further, it was found that a ten contact nerve cuff generated sufficient selectivity for all PN targets, with the degree of selectivity dependent on the relative position of the target within the nerve. The GA identified solutions that increased fitness by 0.7-45.5% over single contact activation by decreasing stimulation of non-targeted fascicles. Significance. This study suggests that using an optimal nerve cuff design and multiple contact activation could enable selective stimulation of the human PN trunk for

  6. A Pilot Study Examining Activity Participation, Sensory Responsiveness, and Competence in Children with High Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Stacey; Bendixen, Roxanna M.; Lawrence, Tami; Lane, Shelly J.

    2011-01-01

    This pilot study explored activity patterns in children with and without ASD and examined the role of sensory responsiveness in determining children's level of competence in activity performance. Twenty-six children with high functioning ASD and twenty-six typically-developing children 6-12 years old were assessed using the Sensory Profile and the…

  7. The rules of tool incorporation: Tool morpho-functional & sensori-motor constraints.

    PubMed

    Cardinali, L; Brozzoli, C; Finos, L; Roy, A C; Farnè, A

    2016-04-01

    Previous studies showed that using tools modifies the agent's body and space representation. However, it is still not clear which rules govern those remapping processes. Here, we studied the differential role played by the morpho-functional characteristics of a tool and the sensori-motor constraints that a tool imposes on the hand. To do so, we asked a group of participants to reach and grasp an object using, in different conditions, two different tools: Pliers, to be acted upon by the index and thumb fingertips, and Sticks, taped to the same two digits. The two tools were equivalent in terms of morpho-functional characteristics, providing index finger and thumb with the same amount of elongation. Crucially, however, they imposed different sensori-motor constraints on the acting fingers. We measured and compared the kinematic profile of free-hand movements performed before and after the use of both devices. As predicted on the basis of their equivalent morpho-functional characteristics, both tools induced similar changes in the fingers (but not the arm) kinematics compatible with the hand being represented as bigger. Furthermore, the different sensori-motor constraints imposed by Pliers and Sticks over the hand, induced differential updates of the hand representation. In particular, the Sticks selectively affected the kinematics of the two fingers they were taped on, whereas Pliers had a more global effect, affecting the kinematics of hand movements not performed during the use of the tool. These results suggest that tool-use induces a rapid update of the hand representation in the brain, not only on the basis of the morpho-functional characteristics of the tool, but also depending on the specific sensori-motor constraints imposed by the tool. PMID:26774102

  8. Rootletin organizes the ciliary rootlet to achieve neuron sensory function in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Ling-Rong; Jana, Swadhin C.; Sivan-Loukianova, Elena; Mendonça, Susana; Cabrera, Oscar A.; Singh, Priyanka; Cabernard, Clemens; Eberl, Daniel F.; Bettencourt-Dias, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Cilia are essential for cell signaling and sensory perception. In many cell types, a cytoskeletal structure called the ciliary rootlet links the cilium to the cell body. Previous studies indicated that rootlets support the long-term stability of some cilia. Here we report that Drosophila melanogaster Rootletin (Root), the sole orthologue of the mammalian paralogs Rootletin and C-Nap1, assembles into rootlets of diverse lengths among sensory neuron subtypes. Root mutant neurons lack rootlets and have dramatically impaired sensory function, resulting in behavior defects associated with mechanosensation and chemosensation. Root is required for cohesion of basal bodies, but the cilium structure appears normal in Root mutant neurons. We show, however, that normal rootlet assembly requires centrioles. The N terminus of Root contains a conserved domain and is essential for Root function in vivo. Ectopically expressed Root resides at the base of mother centrioles in spermatocytes and localizes asymmetrically to mother centrosomes in neuroblasts, both requiring Bld10, a basal body protein with varied functions. PMID:26483560

  9. Effect of local administration of platelet-derived growth factor B on functional recovery of peripheral nerve regeneration: A sciatic nerve transection model

    PubMed Central

    Golzadeh, Atefeh; Mohammadi, Rahim

    2016-01-01

    Background: Effects of platelet-derived growth factor B (PDGF-B) on peripheral nerve regeneration was studied using a rat sciatic nerve transection model. Materials and Methods: Forty-five male, white Wistar rats were divided into three experimental groups (n = 15), randomly: Normal control group (NC), silicon group (SIL), and PDGF-B treated group (SIL/PDGF). In NC group, left sciatic nerve was exposed through a gluteal muscle incision and after homeostasis muscle was sutured. In the SIL group, the left sciatic nerve was exposed in the same way and transected proximal to tibio-peroneal bifurcation leaving a 10-mm gap. Proximal and distal stumps were each inserted into a silicone conduit and filled with 10 μL phosphate buffered solution. In SIL/PDGF group, the silicon conduit was filled with 10 μL PDGF-B (0.5 ng/mL). Each group was subdivided into three subgroups of five and were studied in 4, 8, 12 weeks after surgery. Results: Behavioral testing, sciatic nerve functional study, gastrocnemius muscle mass, and histomorphometric studies showed earlier regeneration of axons in SIL/PDGF than in SIL group (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Local administration of PDGF-B combined with silicon grafting could accelerate functional recovery and may have clinical implications for the surgical management of patients after facial nerve transection. PMID:27274342

  10. Pre-differentiation of mesenchymal stromal cells in combination with a microstructured nerve guide supports peripheral nerve regeneration in the rat sciatic nerve model.

    PubMed

    Boecker, Arne Hendrik; van Neerven, Sabien Geraldine Antonia; Scheffel, Juliane; Tank, Julian; Altinova, Haktan; Seidensticker, Katrin; Deumens, Ronald; Tolba, Rene; Weis, Joachim; Brook, Gary Anthony; Pallua, Norbert; Bozkurt, Ahmet

    2016-02-01

    Many bioartificial nerve guides have been investigated pre-clinically for their nerve regeneration-supporting function, often in comparison to autologous nerve transplantation, which is still regarded as the current clinical gold standard. Enrichment of these scaffolds with cells intended to support axonal regeneration has been explored as a strategy to boost axonal regeneration across these nerve guides Ansselin et al. (1998). In the present study, 20 mm rat sciatic nerve defects were implanted with a cell-seeded microstructured collagen nerve guide (Perimaix) or an autologous nerve graft. Under the influence of seeded, pre-differentiated mesenchymal stromal cells, axons regenerated well into the Perimaix nerve guide. Myelination-related parameters, like myelin sheath thickness, benefitted from an additional seeding with pre-differentiated mesenchymal stromal cells. Furthermore, both the number of retrogradely labelled sensory neurons and the axon density within the implant were elevated in the cell-seeded scaffold group with pre-differentiated mesenchymal stromal cells. However, a pre-differentiation had no influence on functional recovery. An additional cell seeding of the Perimaix nerve guide with mesenchymal stromal cells led to an extent of functional recovery, independent of the differentiation status, similar to autologous nerve transplantation. These findings encourage further investigations on pre-differentiated mesenchymal stromal cells as a cellular support for peripheral nerve regeneration. PMID:26296589

  11. Activity-dependent silencing reveals functionally distinct itch-generating sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Roberson, David P.; Gudes, Sagi; Sprague, Jared M.; Patoski, Haley A. W.; Robson, Victoria K.; Blasl, Felix; Duan, Bo; Oh, Seog Bae; Bean, Bruce P.; Ma, Qiufu

    2013-01-01

    The peripheral terminals of primary sensory neurons detect histamine and non-histamine itch-provoking ligands through molecularly distinct transduction mechanisms. It remains unclear, however, whether these distinct pruritogens activate the same or different afferent fibers. We utilized a strategy of reversibly silencing specific subsets of murine pruritogen-sensitive sensory axons by targeted delivery of a charged sodium-channel blocker and found that functional blockade of histamine itch did not affect the itch evoked by chloroquine or SLIGRL-NH2, and vice versa. Notably, blocking itch-generating fibers did not reduce pain-associated behavior. However, silencing TRPV1+ or TRPA1+ neurons allowed AITC or capsaicin respectively to evoke itch, implying that certain peripheral afferents may normally indirectly inhibit algogens from eliciting itch. These findings support the presence of functionally distinct sets of itch-generating neurons and suggest that targeted silencing of activated sensory fibers may represent a clinically useful anti-pruritic therapeutic approach for histaminergic and non-histaminergic pruritus. PMID:23685721

  12. The effect of ubiquinone on functional recovery and morphometric indices of sciatic nerve regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Moradi, Z; Azizi, S; Hobbenaghi, R

    2014-01-01

    A common cause of peripheral nerve injury is trauma. The positive effect of antioxidants on the improvement of nerve regeneration has currently become a focus of attention. In this experiment, the effect of intraperitoneal administration of ubiquinone (CoQ10) on an acute experimentally sciatic nerve crush was studied in a rat model. Forty-five male Wistar rats, weighing between 160-180 g were used. The rats were randomly divided into two experimental groups (n=20). Each group was further subdivided into four subgroups of five animals each. Functional studies confirmed the faster recovery of regenerated axons in the treatment group compared to the un-treated group (P<0.05). Morphometric indices of the regenerated fibers showed the number and diameter of the myelinated fibers to be significantly higher in the treatment group than the un-treated group (P<0.05). Intraperitoneal administration of CoQ10 (10 mg/kg/day) in the early inflammatory stage of sciatic nerve crush was found to improve nerve regeneration. PMID:27175137

  13. Bradykinin Controls Pool Size of Sensory Neurons Expressing Functional δ-Opioid Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Pettinger, Louisa; Gigout, Sylvain; Linley, John E.

    2013-01-01

    Analgesics targeting the δ-opioid receptor (DOR) may lead to fewer side effects than conventional opioid drugs, which mainly act on μ-opioid receptors (MOR), because of the less abundant expression of DOR in the CNS compared with MOR. Analgesic potential of DOR agonists increases after inflammation, an effect that may be mediated by DOR expressed in the peripheral sensory fibers. However, the expression of functional DOR at the plasma membrane of sensory neurons is controversial. Here we have used patch-clamp recordings and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy to study the functional expression of DOR in sensory neurons from rat trigeminal (TG) and dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Real-time total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy revealed that treatment of TG and DRG cultures with the inflammatory mediator bradykinin (BK) caused robust trafficking of heterologously expressed GFP-tagged DOR to the plasma membrane. By contrast, treatment of neurons with the DOR agonist [d-Ala2, d-Leu5]-enkephalin (DADLE) caused a decrease in the membrane abundance of DOR, suggesting internalization of the receptor after agonist binding. Patch-clamp experiments revealed that DADLE inhibited voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCCs) in 23% of small-diameter TG neurons. Pretreatment with BK resulted in more than twice as many DADLE responsive neurons (54%) but did not affect the efficacy of VGCC inhibition by DADLE. Our data suggest that inflammatory mediator-induced membrane insertion of DOR into the plasma membrane of peripheral sensory neurons may underlie increased DOR analgesia in inflamed tissue. Furthermore, the majority of BK-responsive TG neurons may have a potential to become responsive to DOR ligands in inflammatory conditions. PMID:23804098

  14. Glycemic responses and sensory characteristics of whole yellow pea flour added to novel functional foods.

    PubMed

    Marinangeli, Christopher P F; Kassis, Amira N; Jones, Peter J H

    2009-01-01

    A fundamental understanding regarding postprandial glycemic responses to foods containing whole yellow-pea flour (WYPF) remains unknown. This, alongside concerns that WYPF possesses unfavorable sensory characteristics has limited the incorporation of WYPF into new functional food products as a healthy novel ingredient. The objective of this study was to evaluate how WYPF modulates postprandial glycemic responses as well as sensory characteristics in novel foods. In a single-blind crossover trial, the present study assessed postprandial glycemic responses of banana bread, biscotti, and spaghetti containing either WYPF or whole wheat flour (WWF). Boiled yellow peas (BYP) and white bread (WB) were used as positive and negative controls, respectively. On day 1, subjects evaluated appearance, taste, texture, smell as well as overall acceptance of each WYPF and WWF food on a 5-point hedonic scale. WYPF banana bread (97.9 +/- 17.8 mmol x min/L) and biscotti (83 +/- 13 mmol x min/L), as well as BYP (112.3 +/- 19.9 mmol x min/L), reduced (P < 0.05) glycemic responses compared to WB (218.1 +/- 29.5 mmol x min/L). The glycemic response of WYPF pasta (160.7 +/- 19.4 mmol x min/L) was comparable to WB. WYPF biscotti produced a lower (P = 0.019) postprandial glycemic response compared to WWF biscotti (117.2 +/- 13.1 mmol x min/L). Hedonic responses between corresponding foods were similar except for the WYPF pasta (2.9 +/- 0.9) which possessed a lower sensory score (P = 0.02) for smell compared to WWF pasta (3.6 +/- 1). WYPF can be used to produce low-glycemic functional foods possessing sensory attributes that are comparable to identical food products containing WWF. PMID:20492127

  15. Exploring the factor on sensory motor function of upper limb associated with executive function in communitydwelling older adults

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Hiroyuki; Nakashima, Daiki; Matsuoka, Hiroka; Iwai, Midori; Nakamura, Shugo; Kubo, Ayumi; Tomiyama, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Exercise, such as cardiovascular fitness training, has been shown to have utility in improving executive function but is difficult for older adults with low mobility to perform. Accordingly, there is interest in the development of regimens other than high mobility exercises for older adults with low mobility. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the association between sensory motor function of the upper limb and executive function in community-dwelling older adults. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 57 right-handed, independent, community-dwelling older adults. Sensory motor function of upper limb, including range of motion, strength, sensation, finger dexterity, and comprehensive hand function was measured in both hands. Executive function was assessed using the Delta Trail Making Test. Multiple regression analysis indicated the finger dexterity of the non-dominant hand as independently associated with executive function (β = –0.414, P < 0.001). The findings of the present study may facilitate the development of exercise regimens for improving executive function that are more suitable for older adults with limited physical fitness levels. As this was a cross-sectional study, further studies are required to validate the efficacy of non-dominant finger dexterity training for improving executive function in older adults. PMID:27578912

  16. Exploring the factor on sensory motor function of upper limb associated with executive function in communitydwelling older adults.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Hiroyuki; Nakashima, Daiki; Matsuoka, Hiroka; Iwai, Midori; Nakamura, Shugo; Kubo, Ayumi; Tomiyama, Naoki

    2016-08-01

    Exercise, such as cardiovascular fitness training, has been shown to have utility in improving executive function but is difficult for older adults with low mobility to perform. Accordingly, there is interest in the development of regimens other than high mobility exercises for older adults with low mobility. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the association between sensory motor function of the upper limb and executive function in community-dwelling older adults. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 57 right-handed, independent, community-dwelling older adults. Sensory motor function of upper limb, including range of motion, strength, sensation, finger dexterity, and comprehensive hand function was measured in both hands. Executive function was assessed using the Delta Trail Making Test. Multiple regression analysis indicated the finger dexterity of the non-dominant hand as independently associated with executive function (β = -0.414, P < 0.001). The findings of the present study may facilitate the development of exercise regimens for improving executive function that are more suitable for older adults with limited physical fitness levels. As this was a cross-sectional study, further studies are required to validate the efficacy of non-dominant finger dexterity training for improving executive function in older adults. PMID:27578912

  17. A pilot study examining activity participation, sensory responsiveness, and competence in children with high functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Stacey; Bendixen, Roxanna M; Lawrence, Tami; Lane, Shelly J

    2011-11-01

    This pilot study explored activity patterns in children with and without ASD and examined the role of sensory responsiveness in determining children's level of competence in activity performance. Twenty-six children with high functioning ASD and twenty-six typically-developing children 6-12 years old were assessed using the Sensory Profile and the Child Behavior Checklist. Results reflect differences in the types of activities and jobs/chores engaged in by children with ASD compared to children without ASD. Significant differences were seen in overall level of competence in activities, social, and school performance. Children demonstrating more frequent Sensory Sensitivity and Sensory Avoiding had significantly lower competence scores than children with fewer behaviors in these domains, suggesting that sensory responsiveness may impact the ability to participate successfully. PMID:21221753

  18. Taurolidine and congeners activate hTRPA1 but not hTRPV1 channels and stimulate CGRP release from mouse tracheal sensory nerves.

    PubMed

    Kichko, Tatjana I; Pfirrmann, Rolf W; Reeh, Peter W

    2016-02-01

    Taurolidine has long been in clinical use as an antimicrobial irrigation that does not impede wound healing. It can even be administered intravenously (30 g/day) to treat sepsis or to exert newly recognized antineoplastic actions. Only one irritant effect is reported, that is, to temporarily induce burning pain of unknown origin when applied to body cavities or peripheral veins. The structure of the molecule suggested the chemoreceptor channel TRPA1 as a potential target, which was verified measuring stimulated CGRP release from sensory nerves of the isolated mouse trachea and calcium influx in hTRPA1-transfected HEK293 cells. With both methods, the concentration-response relationship of taurolidine exceeded the threshold value below 500 μmol/L and 100 μmol/L, respectively, and reached saturation at 1 mmol/L. The clinical 2% taurolidine solution did not evoke greater or longer lasting responses. The reversible tracheal response was abolished in TRPA1(-/-) but retained in TRPV1(-/-) mice. Consistently, hTRPV1-HEK showed no calcium influx as a response, likewise native HEK293 cells and hTRPA1-HEK deprived of extracellular calcium did not respond to taurolidine 1 mmol/L. The metabolite taurultam and its oxathiazine derivative, expected to cause less burning pain, showed weak tracheal irritancy only at 10 mmol/L, acting also through hTRPA1 but not hTRPV1. In conclusion, taurolidine, its metabolite, and a novel derivative showed no unspecific cellular effects but selectively, concentration-dependently and reversibly activated the irritant receptor TRPA1 in CGRP-expressing, thus nociceptive, neurons. The clinical solution of 2% taurolidine (~70 mmol/L) can, thus, rightly be expected to cause transient burning pain and neurogenic inflammation. PMID:26977296

  19. Bioenergetic deficits in peripheral nerve sensory axons during chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain resulting from peroxynitrite-mediated post-translational nitration of mitochondrial superoxide dismutase

    PubMed Central

    Janes, Kali; Doyle, Timothy; Bryant, Leesa; Esposito, Emanuela; Cuzzocrea, Salvatore; Ryerse, Jan; Bennett, Gary J.; Salvemini, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Many of the widely used anticancer drugs induce dose-limiting peripheral neuropathies that undermine their therapeutic efficacy. Animal models of chemotherapy-induced painful peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) evoked by a variety of drug classes, including taxanes, vinca alkaloids, platinum-complexes, and proteasome-inhibitors, suggest that the common underlying mechanism in the development of these neuropathies is mitotoxicity in primary nerve sensory axons (PNSAs) arising from reduced mitochondrial bioenergetics [eg adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production deficits due to compromised respiratory complex I and II activity]. The causative mechanisms of this mitotoxicity remain poorly defined. However, peroxynitrite, an important pro-nociceptive agent, has been linked to mitotoxicity in several disease states and may also drive the mitotoxicity associated with CIPN. Our findings reveal that the development of mechano-hypersensitivity induced by paclitaxel, oxaliplatin, and bortezomib was prevented by administration of the peroxynitrite decomposition catalyst Mn(III) 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(N-n-hexylpyridinium-2-yl)porphyrin (MnTE-2-PyP5+) without interfering with their anti-tumor effects. Peak CIPN was associated with the nitration and inactivation of superoxide dismutase in the mitochondria, but not in the cytosol, as well as a significant decrease in ATP production within the PNSAs; all of these events were attenuated by MnTE-2-PyP5+. Our results provide continued support for the role of mitotoxicity in the development of CIPN across chemotherapeutic drug classes, and identify peroxynitrite as a key mediator in these processes, thereby providing the rationale towards development of “peroxynitrite-targeted” therapeutics for CIPN. PMID:23891899

  20. Concurrent functional magnetic resonance imaging and electroencephalography assessment of sensory gating in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Bak, Nikolaj; Rostrup, Egill; Larsson, Henrik B W; Glenthøj, Birte Y; Oranje, Bob

    2014-08-01

    Schizophrenia is frequently accompanied by deficits in basic information processing, such as sensory gating. The sources behind deficient sensory gating in schizophrenia patients are, however, still largely unclear. The aim of the current study was to identify the brain structures involved in deficient sensory gating in schizophrenia patients. Twenty healthy male volunteers and 23 male schizophrenia patients were initially assessed in a somatosensory P50 suppression paradigm using concurrent electroencephalography (EEG)/functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) methodology. The trials consisted of single stimuli or pairs of identical stimuli with either 500 ms or 1,000 ms interstimulus intervals. Not all subjects showed a P50 waveform as a result of the somatosensory stimuli: It was detected in 13 schizophrenia patients and 15 control subjects. Significant P50 suppression was found in the 500 ms trials in controls only. Region of interest analyses were performed for a priori chosen regions. Significant negative correlations between P50 ratios and the BOLD response were found bilaterally in the hippocampus, thalamus, anterior and posterior superior temporal gyrus (STG), and in the left inferior frontal gyrus pars opercularis. However, significant group differences were found in the hippocampus and the thalamus only. This is the first study in which P50 suppression was assessed in schizophrenia patients with concurrent fMRI/EEG methodology. The data support that the STG, thalamus, inferior frontal gyrus, and the hippocampus are involved in P50 suppression. However, of these structures only the hippocampus and thalamus appeared involved in the altered sensory processing found in schizophrenia. PMID:24375687

  1. Concurrent functional magnetic resonance imaging and electroencephalography assessment of sensory gating in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Bak, Nikolaj; Rostrup, Egill; Larsson, Henrik BW; Glenthøj, Birte Y; Oranje, Bob

    2014-01-01

    Schizophrenia is frequently accompanied by deficits in basic information processing, such as sensory gating. The sources behind deficient sensory gating in schizophrenia patients are, however, still largely unclear. The aim of the current study was to identify the brain structures involved in deficient sensory gating in schizophrenia patients. Twenty healthy male volunteers and 23 male schizophrenia patients were initially assessed in a somatosensory P50 suppression paradigm using concurrent electroencephalography (EEG)/functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) methodology. The trials consisted of single stimuli or pairs of identical stimuli with either 500 ms or 1,000 ms interstimulus intervals. Not all subjects showed a P50 waveform as a result of the somatosensory stimuli: It was detected in 13 schizophrenia patients and 15 control subjects. Significant P50 suppression was found in the 500 ms trials in controls only. Region of interest analyses were performed for a priori chosen regions. Significant negative correlations between P50 ratios and the BOLD response were found bilaterally in the hippocampus, thalamus, anterior and posterior superior temporal gyrus (STG), and in the left inferior frontal gyrus pars opercularis. However, significant group differences were found in the hippocampus and the thalamus only. This is the first study in which P50 suppression was assessed in schizophrenia patients with concurrent fMRI/EEG methodology. The data support that the STG, thalamus, inferior frontal gyrus, and the hippocampus are involved in P50 suppression. However, of these structures only the hippocampus and thalamus appeared involved in the altered sensory processing found in schizophrenia. Hum Brain Mapp 35:3578–3587, 2014. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:24375687

  2. Improved regeneration after femoral nerve injury in mice lacking functional T- and B-lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Mehanna, Ali; Szpotowicz, Emanuela; Schachner, Melitta; Jakovcevski, Igor

    2014-11-01

    The immune system plays important functional roles in regeneration after injury to the mammalian central and peripheral nervous systems. After damage to the peripheral nerve several types of immune cells, invade the nerve within hours after the injury. To gain insights into the contribution of T- and B-lymphocytes to recovery from injury we used the mouse femoral nerve injury paradigm. RAG2-/- mice lacking mature T- and B-lymphocytes due to deletion of the recombination activating gene 2 were subjected to resection and surgical reconstruction of the femoral nerve, with the wild-type mice of the same inbred genetic background serving as controls. According to single frame motion analyses, RAG2-/- mice showed better motor recovery in comparison to control mice at four and eight weeks after injury. Retrograde tracing of regrown/sprouted axons of spinal motoneurons showed increased numbers of correctly projecting motoneurons in the lumbar spinal cord of RAG2-/- mice compared with controls. Whereas there was no difference in the motoneuron soma size between genotypes, RAG2-/- mice displayed fewer cholinergic and inhibitory synaptic terminals around somata of spinal motoneurons both prior to and after injury, compared with wild-type mice. Extent of myelination of regrown axons in the motor branch of the femoral nerve measured as g-ratio was more extensive in RAG2-/- than in control mice eight weeks after injury. We conclude that activated T- and B-lymphocytes restrict motor recovery after femoral nerve injury, associated with the increased survival of motoneurons and improved remyelination. PMID:24967682

  3. CatWalk gait analysis in assessment of functional recovery after sciatic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Bozkurt, A; Deumens, R; Scheffel, J; O'Dey, D M; Weis, J; Joosten, E A; Führmann, T; Brook, G A; Pallua, N

    2008-08-15

    Following peripheral nerve injury repair, improved behavioural outcome may be the most important evidence of functionality of axon regeneration after any repair strategy. A range of behavioural testing paradigms have been developed for peripheral nerve injury research. Complete injury of the adult rat sciatic nerve is frequently used in combination with walking track analysis. Despite its wide-spread use, these walking track analyses are unsuitable for the simultaneous assessment of both dynamic and static gait parameters. Conversely, a novel automated gait analysis system, i.e. CatWalk can simultaneously measure dynamic as well as static gait parameters and, importantly, it's easy to control for the speed of locomotion which can strongly affect gait parameters. In a previous study, CatWalk was already successfully used to examine deficits in both dynamic and static gait parameters using the sciatic nerve lesion model with a 1cm gap characterized by absence of recovery [Deumens R, Jaken RJ, Marcus MA, Joosten EA. The CatWalk gait analysis in assessment of both dynamic and static gait changes after adult rat sciatic nerve resection. J Neurosci Methods 2007;164:120-30]. Using the sciatic nerve crush injury model (validated with the static sciatic index) and a follow-up period of 12 weeks, we now show that CatWalk can also measure behavioural recovery. In particular dynamic gait parameters, coordination measures, and the intensity of paw prints are of interest in detecting recovery as far as these parameters completely return to pre-operative values after crush injury. We conclude that CatWalk can be used as a complementary approach to other behavioural testing paradigms to assess clinically relevant behavioural benefits, with a main advantage that CatWalk demonstrates both static and dynamic gait parameters at the same time. PMID:18577402

  4. Loudness function derives from data on electrical discharge rates in auditory nerve fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howes, W. L.

    1973-01-01

    Judgements of the loudness of pure-tone sound stimuli yield a loudness function which relates perceived loudness to stimulus amplitude. A loudness function is derived from physical evidence alone without regard to human judgments. The resultant loudness function is L=K(q-q0), where L is loudness, q is effective sound pressure (specifically q0 at the loudness threshold), and K is generally a weak function of the number of stimulated auditory nerve fibers. The predicted function is in agreement with loudness judgment data reported by Warren, which imply that, in the suprathreshold loudness regime, decreasing the sound-pressure level by 6 db results in halving the loudness.

  5. Omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids predict accelerated decline of peripheral nerve function in older persons

    PubMed Central

    Lauretani, F.; Bandinelli, S.; Benedetta, B.; Cherubini, A.; Iorio, A. D.; Blè, A.; Giacomini, V.; Corsi, A. M.; Guralnik, J. M.; Ferrucci, L.

    2009-01-01

    Pre-clinical studies suggest that both omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids have beneficial effects on peripheral nerve function. Rats feed a diet rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) showed modification of phospholipid fatty acid composition in nerve membranes and improvement of sciatic nerve conduction velocity (NCV). We tested the hypothesis that baseline plasma omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids levels predict accelerated decline of peripheral nerve function. Changes between baseline and the 3-year follow-up in peripheral nerve function was assessed by standard surface ENG of the right peroneal nerve in 384 male and 443 female participants of the InCHIANTI study (age range: 24–97 years). Plasma concentrations of selected fatty acids assessed at baseline by gas chromatography. Independent of confounders, plasma omega-6 fatty acids and linoleic acid were significantly correlated with peroneal NCV at enrollment. Lower plasma PUFA, omega-6 fatty acids, linoleic acid, ratio omega-6/omega-3, arachidonic acid and docosahexanoic acid levels were significantly predicted a steeper decline in nerve function parameters over the 3-year follow-up. Low plasma omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids levels were associated with accelerated decline of peripheral nerve function with aging. PMID:17594339

  6. Omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids predict accelerated decline of peripheral nerve function in older persons.

    PubMed

    Lauretani, F; Bandinelli, S; Bartali, B; Benedetta, B; Cherubini, A; Iorio, A D; Blè, A; Giacomini, V; Corsi, A M; Guralnik, J M; Ferrucci, L

    2007-07-01

    Pre-clinical studies suggest that both omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids have beneficial effects on peripheral nerve function. Rats feed a diet rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) showed modification of phospholipid fatty acid composition in nerve membranes and improvement of sciatic nerve conduction velocity (NCV). We tested the hypothesis that baseline plasma omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids levels predict accelerated decline of peripheral nerve function. Changes between baseline and the 3-year follow-up in peripheral nerve function was assessed by standard surface ENG of the right peroneal nerve in 384 male and 443 female participants of the InCHIANTI study (age range: 24-97 years). Plasma concentrations of selected fatty acids assessed at baseline by gas chromatography. Independent of confounders, plasma omega-6 fatty acids and linoleic acid were significantly correlated with peroneal NCV at enrollment. Lower plasma PUFA, omega-6 fatty acids, linoleic acid, ratio omega-6/omega-3, arachidonic acid and docosahexanoic acid levels were significantly predicted a steeper decline in nerve function parameters over the 3-year follow-up. Low plasma omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids levels were associated with accelerated decline of peripheral nerve function with aging. PMID:17594339

  7. Androgen induced acceleration of functional recovery after rat sciatic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Brown, Todd J.; Khan, Talat; Jones, Kathryn J.

    1999-01-01

    PURPOSE: Testosterone (T) treatment accelerates recovery from facial paralysis after facial nerve crush in hamsters. In this study, we extended those studies to another injury model and asked the following question: Will T treatment accelerate recovery from lower limb paralysis following sciatic nerve crush in the rat? METHODS: Castrated adult male rats received a right side sciatic nerve crush at the level of the sciatic notch, with the left side serving as control. Half the animals received a subcutaneous implant of a propionated form of T (TP), the others were sham-implanted. Weekly testing using the Sciatic Functional Index (SFI), a quantitative measure of locomotion, was done for 7 weeks postoperative (wpo). RESULTS: Between 3 and 5 weeks post-op, the average SFI score of the TP-treated group was higher than controls. This difference was significant at 4 wpo, indicating an accelerated degree of functional recovery. At these timepoints, the differences were attributable to the footprint or paw length and associated with calf muscle reinnervation rather than the toespreading component associated with intrinsic foot muscle rein-nervation. Beyond 5 wpo, there were no differences in the SFI scores. CONCLUSION: The results indicate that, as with facial nerve regeneration in the hamster, testosterone accelerates functional recovery from hind limb paralysis following sciatic nerve injury in the rat. While the responses of spinal motoneurons to injury can differ from those of cranial motoneurons, in this case it appears that they share a similar response to the trophic actions of androgen. This is important in the context of designing therapeutic strategies for dealing with direct trauma to motoneurons resulting from both peripheral and central nervous system trauma, such as spinal cord injury. PMID:12671219

  8. Raman microspectroscopy for visualization of peripheral nerves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minamikawa, Takeo; Harada, Yoshinori; Koizumi, Noriaki; Takamatsu, Tetsuro

    2013-02-01

    The peripheral nervous system plays an important role in motility, sensory, and autonomic functions of the human body. Preservation of peripheral nerves in surgery is essential for improving quality of life of patients. To preserve peripheral nerves, detection of ne peripheral nerves that cannot be identi ed by human eye or under white light imaging is necessary. In this study, we sought to provide a proof-of-principle demonstration of a label-free detection technique of peripheral nerve tissues against adjacent tissues that employs spontaneous Raman microspectroscopy. A line-illumination confocal Raman microscope was used for the experiment. A laser operating at the wavelength of 532 nm was used as an excitation laser light. We obtained Raman spectra of peripheral nerve, brous connective tissue, skeletal muscle, blood vessel, and adipose tissue of Wistar rats, and extracted speci c spectral features of peripheral nerves and adjacent tissues. By applying multivariate image analysis, peripheral nerves were clearly detected against adjacent tissues without any preprocessing neither xation nor staining. These results suggest the potential of the Raman spectroscopic observation for noninvasive and label-free nerve detection, and we expect this method could be a key technique for nerve-sparing surgery.

  9. Flexor carpi ulnaris transfer for radial nerve palsy: functional testing of long-term results.

    PubMed

    Raskin, K B; Wilgis, E F

    1995-09-01

    Controversy persists over the use of the flexor carpi ulnaris for transfer to the extensor digitorum communis in the treatment of radial nerve palsy. Six patients with complete, irreparable radial nerve palsies were treated in part with the flexor carpi ulnaris to extensor digitorum communis tendon transfer (standard transfers: pronator teres to extensor carpi radialis brevis, flexor carpi ulnaris to extensor digitorum communis, and palmaris longus to the rerouted extensor pollicis longus) and were functionally tested for long-term results. The average follow-up time was 8 years (range, 3-15). A control group was comprised of 10 volunteers of similar demographics. This study evaluates the long-term functional recovery in three categories: range of motion, dynamic power of wrist motion, and functional ability as determined by work simulation techniques. The activities simulated were swinging a hammer, sawing wood, tightening screws, and using pliers. A functional range of motion was maintained in all patients, and the power of wrist motion was sufficient to perform all activities of daily living. The work simulation testing revealed no significant difference between the tendon transfer patients and control group with respect to hand dominance and normal variance. All patients were able to perform the simulated work with the same variance in power as the control group. Despite the obvious anatomic loss, wrist function is not significantly impaired after flexor carpi ulnaris tendon transfer for radial nerve palsy. PMID:8522738

  10. Microelectronic neural bridge for signal regeneration and function rebuilding over two separate nerves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiaoyan, Shen; Zhigong, Wang; Xiaoying, Lü; Shushan, Xie; Zonghao, Huang

    2011-06-01

    According to the feature of neural signals, a micro-electronic neural bridge (MENB) has been designed. It consists of two electrode arrays for neural signal detection and functional electrical stimulation (FES), and a microelectronic circuit for signal amplifying, processing, and FES driving. The core of the system is realized in 0.5-μm CMOS technology and used in animal experiments. A special experimental strategy has been designed to demonstrate the feasibility of the system. With the help of the MENB, the withdrawal reflex function of the left/right leg of one spinal toad has been rebuilt in the corresponding leg of another spinal toad. According to the coherence analysis between the source and regenerated neural signals, the controlled spinal toad's sciatic nerve signal is delayed by 0.72 ms in relation to the sciatic nerve signal of the source spinal toad and the cross-correlation function reaches a value of 0.73. This shows that the regenerated signal is correlated with the source sciatic signal significantly and the neural activities involved in reflex function have been regenerated. The experiment demonstrates that the MENB is useful in rebuilding the neural function between nerves of different bodies.

  11. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type II

    MedlinePlus

    ... that primarily affects the sensory nerve cells (sensory neurons), which transmit information about sensations such as pain, ... the sensations of pain, temperature, and touch (sensory neurons). The mutations involved in HSAN2A result in an ...

  12. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary sensory neuropathy type IA

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions hereditary sensory neuropathy type IA hereditary sensory neuropathy type IA Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... PDF Open All Close All Description Hereditary sensory neuropathy type IA is a condition characterized by nerve ...

  13. Multiple functions of the paranodal junction of myelinated nerve fibers.

    PubMed

    Rosenbluth, Jack

    2009-11-15

    Myelin sheaths include an extraordinary structure, the "paranodal axoglial junction" (PNJ), which attaches the sheath to the axon at each end of each myelin segment. Its size is enormous and its structure unique. Here we review past and current studies showing that this junction can serve multiple functions in maintaining reliable saltatory conduction. The present evidence points to three functions in particular. 1) It seals the myelin sheath to the axon to prevent major shunting of nodal action currents beneath the myelin sheath while still leaving a narrow channel interconnecting the internodal periaxonal space with the perinodal space. This pathway represents a potential route through which juxtaparanodal and internodal channels can influence nodal activity and through which nutrients, such as glucose, and other metabolites can diffuse to and from the internodal periaxonal space. 2) It serves as a mechanism for maintaining discrete, differentiated axolemmal domains at and around the node of Ranvier by acting as a barrier to the lateral movement of ion channel complexes within the axolemma, thus concentrating voltage-gated sodium channels at the node and segregating fast voltage-gated potassium channels to the juxtaparanode under the myelin sheath. 3) It attaches the myelin sheath to the axon on either side of the node and can thus maintain nodal dimensions in the face of mechanical stresses associated with stretch or other local factors that might cause disjunction. It is therefore the likely means for maintaining constancy of nodal surface area and electrical parameters essential for consistency in conduction. PMID:19224642

  14. Acetyl salicylic acid locally enhances functional recovery after sciatic nerve transection in rat.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Rahim; Amini, Keyvan; Abdollahi-Pirbazari, Mehdi; Yousefi, Alireza

    2013-01-01

    Local effect of acetyl salicylic acid (ASA) on peripheral nerve regeneration was studied using a rat sciatic nerve transection model. Forty-five male healthy White Wistar rats were divided into three experimental groups (n = 15), randomly: Sham-operation (SHAM), control (SIL), and ASA-treated (SIL/ASA) groups. In SHAM group after anesthesia left sciatic nerve was exposed through a gluteal muscle incision and after homeostasis the muscle was sutured. In SIL group the left sciatic nerve was exposed the same way and transected proximal to tibio-peroneal bifurcation leaving a 10-mm gap. Proximal and distal stumps were each inserted into a silicone tube and filled with 10 μl phosphate buffered solution. In SIL/ASA group defect was bridged using a silicone tube filled with 10 μl acetyl salisylic acid (0.1 mg/ml). Each group was subdivided into three subgroups of five animals each and were studied 4, 8, and 12 weeks after surgery. Data were analyzed statistically by factorial analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the Bonferroni test for pair-wise comparisons. Functional study confirmed faster and better recovery of regenerated axons in SIL/ASA than in SIL group (p < 0.05). Gastrocnemius muscle mass in SIL/ASA was significantly more than in SIL group. Morphometric indices of regenerated fibers showed that the number and diameter of the myelinated fibers in SIL/ASA were significantly higher than in control group. In immuohistochemistry, location of reactions to S-100 in SIL/ASA was clearly more positive than in SIL group. Response to local treatment of ASA demonstrates that it influences and improves functional recovery of peripheral nerve regeneration. PMID:24140781

  15. Neophobia, sensory and cognitive functions, and hedonic responses in vitamin D receptor mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Minasyan, Anna; Keisala, Tiina; Lou, Yan-Ru; Kalueff, Allan V; Tuohimaa, Pentti

    2007-05-01

    Vitamin D is a seco-steroid hormone with multiple actions in the brain, mediated through the nuclear vitamin D receptor (VDR). We have recently shown that mutant mice lacking functional VDR demonstrate altered emotional behavior and specific motor deficits. Here we further examine phenotype of these mice, testing their novelty responses, as well as cognitive and sensory (olfactory and gustatory) functions in the novel food, two-trial Y-maze and tastant consumption tests. In addition, we study depression-like behavior in these mice, using anhedonia-based sucrose preference test. Overall, VDR mutant mice showed neophobic response in several different tests, but displayed unimpaired olfactory and gustatory functions, spatial memory and baseline hedonic responses. Collectively, these data confirm that mutation of VDR in mice leads to altering emotional/anxiety states, but does not play a major role in depression, as well as in the regulation of some sensory and cognitive processes. These results support the role of the vitamin D/VDR neuroendocrine system in the regulation of behavior, and may have clinical relevance, enabling a better focus on psychiatric and behavioral disorders associated with dysfunctions in this neuroendocrine system. PMID:17482806

  16. Oxidation of a potassium channel causes progressive sensory function loss during ageing

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Shi-Qing; Sesti, Federico

    2009-01-01

    A central question is whether potassium (K+) channels, which are key regulators of neuronal excitability, are targets of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and whether these interactions have a role in the mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration. Here, we show that oxidation of K+ channel KVS-1 during ageing causes sensory function loss in Caenorhabditis elegans, and that protection of this channel from oxidation preserves neuronal function. Chemotaxis, a function controlled by KVS-1, was significantly impaired in worms exposed to oxidizing agents, but only moderately affected in worms harboring an oxidation-resistant KVS-1 mutant (C113S). In ageing C113S transgenic worms, the effects of free radical accumulation were significantly attenuated compared to wild type. Electrophysiological analyses showed that both ROS accumulation during ageing, or acute exposure to oxidizing agents, acted primarily to alter the excitability of the neurons that mediate chemotaxis. Together, these findings establish a pivotal role for ROS-mediated oxidation of voltage-gated K+ channels in sensorial decline during ageing in invertebrates. PMID:19330004

  17. Visualization of nerve fibers and their relationship to peripheral nerve tumors by diffusion tensor imaging.

    PubMed

    Cage, Tene A; Yuh, Esther L; Hou, Stephanie W; Birk, Harjus; Simon, Neil G; Noss, Roger; Rao, Anuradha; Chin, Cynthia T; Kliot, Michel

    2015-09-01

    OBJECT The majority of growing and/or symptomatic peripheral nerve tumors are schwannomas and neurofibromas. They are almost always benign and can usually be resected while minimizing motor and sensory deficits if approached with the proper expertise and techniques. Intraoperative electrophysiological stimulation and recording techniques allow the surgeon to map the surface of the tumor in an effort to identify and thus avoid damaging functioning nerve fibers. Recently, MR diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) techniques have permitted the visualization of axons, because of their anisotropic properties, in peripheral nerves. The object of this study was to compare the distribution of nerve fibers as revealed by direct electrical stimulation with that seen on preoperative MR DTI. METHODS The authors conducted a retrospective chart review of patients with a peripheral nerve or nerve root tumor between March 2012 and January 2014. Diffusion tensor imaging and intraoperative data had been prospectively collected for patients with peripheral nerve tumors that were resected. Preoperative identification of the nerve fiber location in relation to the nerve tumor surface as seen on DTI studies was compared with the nerve fiber's intraoperative localization using electrophysiological stimulation and recordings. RESULTS In 23 patients eligible for study there was good correlation between nerve fiber location on DTI and its anatomical location seen intraoperatively. Diffusion tensor imaging demonstrated the relationship of nerve fibers relative to the tumor with 95.7% sensitivity, 66.7% specificity, 75% positive predictive value, and 93.8% negative predictive value. CONCLUSIONS Preoperative DTI techniques are useful in helping the peripheral nerve surgeon to both determine the risks involved in resecting a nerve tumor and plan the safest surgical approach. PMID:26323818

  18. Functions of adrenergic and cholinergic nerves in canine effectors of seminal emission.

    PubMed

    Arver, S; Sjöstrand, N O

    1982-05-01

    Spontaneous activity responses to acetylcholine (ACh), adrenaline (A), noradrenaline (NA) and barium chloride as well as the effects of various autonomic drugs on effects of field stimulation of nerves and muscle cells of isolated pieces or strips of cauda epididymidis, vas deferens, ampulla ductus deferentis and prostate of dog were studied. The main results and conclusions are: the muscles show little spontaneous activity but rhythmicity can easily be produced by e.g. stimulating agonists. The muscles are contracted by alpha-adrenoceptor stimulants. ACh has usually no or a very weak contractile effect in high concentrations. Muscles of young dogs are more sensitive to ACh. The excitatory innervation of the muscles is adrenergic and completely blocked by adrenergic neuron blockers as well as alpha-adrenoceptor blocking drugs. Stimulation of adrenergic nerves leads to maximum response already at low frequencies (4-6 Hz). This response is very similar to that provoked by a supramaximal dose of NA. Scopolamine enhances neurogenic contractile effects while physostigmine suppresses them. Hence cholinergic nerves may act by muscarinic prejunctional inhibition of the excitatory adrenergic neurotransmission rather than act directly upon the smooth muscle cells. Since secretory cells receive cholinergic innervation prejunctional inhibition of the adrenergic myomotor nerves may be of functional significance in at least the long copulatory events of the dog. PMID:6127870

  19. Supplementary motor area deactivation impacts the recovery of hand function from severe peripheral nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ye-chen; Liu, Han-qiu; Hua, Xu-yun; Shen, Yun-dong; Xu, Wen-dong; Xu, Jian-guang; Gu, Yu-dong

    2016-01-01

    Although some patients have successful peripheral nerve regeneration, a poor recovery of hand function often occurs after peripheral nerve injury. It is believed that the capability of brain plasticity is crucial for the recovery of hand function. The supplementary motor area may play a key role in brain remodeling after peripheral nerve injury. In this study, we explored the activation mode of the supplementary motor area during a motor imagery task. We investigated the plasticity of the central nervous system after brachial plexus injury, using the motor imagery task. Results from functional magnetic resonance imaging showed that after brachial plexus injury, the motor imagery task for the affected limbs of the patients triggered no obvious activation of bilateral supplementary motor areas. This result indicates that it is difficult to excite the supplementary motor areas of brachial plexus injury patients during a motor imagery task, thereby impacting brain remodeling. Deactivation of the supplementary motor area is likely to be a serious problem for brachial plexus injury patients in terms of preparing, initiating and executing certain movements, which may be partly responsible for the unsatisfactory clinical recovery of hand function. PMID:27212933

  20. Erectile Function Outcomes in the Current Era of Anatomic Nerve-Sparing Radical Prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Burnett, Arthur L

    2006-01-01

    The contemporary use of anatomic nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy, which entails preserving the autonomic nerve supply to the penis required for penile erection, has led to improved erectile function outcomes compared with what has been seen historically. However, delay of postoperative recovery of erection for as long as 2 years is common, such that dysfunctional erection status lingers as a major postoperative problem. Several possible strategies to improve overall recovery rates and to hasten postoperative recovery of erectile function are currently being advanced. These include pharmacologic rehabilitation therapy and neuromodulatory therapy. Rigorous basic scientific investigation and clinical assessment of these new strategic approaches are critically important to establish their actual therapeutic benefits. PMID:17021626

  1. A gain-of-function screen for genes that affect the development of the Drosophila adult external sensory organ.

    PubMed Central

    Abdelilah-Seyfried, S; Chan, Y M; Zeng, C; Justice, N J; Younger-Shepherd, S; Sharp, L E; Barbel, S; Meadows, S A; Jan, L Y; Jan, Y N

    2000-01-01

    The Drosophila adult external sensory organ, comprising a neuron and its support cells, is derived from a single precursor cell via several asymmetric cell divisions. To identify molecules involved in sensory organ development, we conducted a tissue-specific gain-of-function screen. We screened 2293 independent P-element lines established by P. Rorth and identified 105 lines, carrying insertions at 78 distinct loci, that produced misexpression phenotypes with changes in number, fate, or morphology of cells of the adult external sensory organ. On the basis of the gain-of-function phenotypes of both internal and external support cells, we subdivided the candidate lines into three classes. The first class (52 lines, 40 loci) exhibits partial or complete loss of adult external sensory organs. The second class (38 lines, 28 loci) is associated with increased numbers of entire adult external sensory organs or subsets of sensory organ cells. The third class (15 lines, 10 loci) results in potential cell fate transformations. Genetic and molecular characterization of these candidate lines reveals that some loci identified in this screen correspond to genes known to function in the formation of the peripheral nervous system, such as big brain, extra macrochaetae, and numb. Also emerging from the screen are a large group of previously uncharacterized genes and several known genes that have not yet been implicated in the development of the peripheral nervous system. PMID:10835395

  2. Enhanced Microbial, Functional and Sensory Properties of Herbal Yogurt Fermented with Korean Traditional Plant Extracts.

    PubMed

    Joung, Jae Yeon; Lee, Ji Young; Ha, Young Sik; Shin, Yong Kook; Kim, Younghoon; Kim, Sae Hun; Oh, Nam Su

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of two Korean traditional plant extracts (Diospyros kaki THUNB. leaf; DK, and Nelumbo nucifera leaf; NN) on the fermentation, functional and sensory properties of herbal yogurts. Compared to control fermentation, all plant extracts increased acidification rate and reduced the time to complete fermentation (pH 4.5). Supplementation of plant extracts and storage time were found to influence the characteristics of the yogurts, contributing to increased viability of starter culture and phenolic compounds. In particular, the increase in the counts of Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus was highest (2.95 and 1.14 Log CFU/mL respectively) in DK yogurt. Furthermore, supplementation of the plant extracts significantly influenced to increase the antioxidant activity and water holding capacity and to produce volatile compounds. The higher antioxidant activity and water holding capacity were observed in NN yogurt than DK yogurt. Moreover, all of the sensory characteristics were altered by the addition of plant extracts. Addition of plant extracts increased the scores related to flavor, taste, and texture from plain yogurt without a plant extract, as a result of volatile compounds analysis. Thus, the overall preference was increased by plant extracts. Consequently, supplementation of DK and NN extracts in yogurt enhanced the antioxidant activity and physical property, moreover increased the acceptability of yogurt. These findings demonstrate the possibility of using plant extracts as a functional ingredient in the manufacture of herbal yogurt. PMID:27499669

  3. Enhanced Microbial, Functional and Sensory Properties of Herbal Yogurt Fermented with Korean Traditional Plant Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Joung, Jae Yeon; Lee, Ji Young; Ha, Young Sik; Shin, Yong Kook; Kim, Younghoon; Kim, Sae Hun; Oh, Nam Su

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of two Korean traditional plant extracts (Diospyros kaki THUNB. leaf; DK, and Nelumbo nucifera leaf; NN) on the fermentation, functional and sensory properties of herbal yogurts. Compared to control fermentation, all plant extracts increased acidification rate and reduced the time to complete fermentation (pH 4.5). Supplementation of plant extracts and storage time were found to influence the characteristics of the yogurts, contributing to increased viability of starter culture and phenolic compounds. In particular, the increase in the counts of Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus was highest (2.95 and 1.14 Log CFU/mL respectively) in DK yogurt. Furthermore, supplementation of the plant extracts significantly influenced to increase the antioxidant activity and water holding capacity and to produce volatile compounds. The higher antioxidant activity and water holding capacity were observed in NN yogurt than DK yogurt. Moreover, all of the sensory characteristics were altered by the addition of plant extracts. Addition of plant extracts increased the scores related to flavor, taste, and texture from plain yogurt without a plant extract, as a result of volatile compounds analysis. Thus, the overall preference was increased by plant extracts. Consequently, supplementation of DK and NN extracts in yogurt enhanced the antioxidant activity and physical property, moreover increased the acceptability of yogurt. These findings demonstrate the possibility of using plant extracts as a functional ingredient in the manufacture of herbal yogurt. PMID:27499669

  4. Novel Roles for Osteopontin and Clusterin in Peripheral Motor and Sensory Axon Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Mi, Ruifa; Connor, Emmalynn; Reed, Nicole; Vyas, Alka; Alspalter, Manula; Coppola, Giovanni; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Brushart, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that Schwann cells (SCs) express distinct motor and sensory phenotypes, which impact the ability of these pathways to selectively support regenerating neurons. In the present study, unbiased microarray analysis was used to examine differential gene expression in denervated motor and sensory pathways in rats. Several genes that were significantly upregulated in either denervated sensory or motor pathways were identified and two secreted factors were selected for further analysis: osteopontin (OPN) and clusterin (CLU) which were upregulated in denervated motor and sensory pathways, respectively. Sciatic nerve transection induced upregulation of OPN and CLU and expression of both returned to baseline levels with ensuing regeneration. In vitro analysis using exogenously applied OPN induced outgrowth of motor but not sensory neurons. CLU, however, induced outgrowth of sensory neurons, but not motor neurons. To assess the functional importance of OPN and CLU, peripheral nerve regeneration was examined in OPN and CLU−/− mice. When compared with OPN+/+ mice, motor neuron regeneration was reduced in OPN−/− mice. Impaired regeneration through OPN−/− peripheral nerves grafted into OPN+/+ mice indicated that loss of OPN in SCs was responsible for reduced motor regeneration. Sensory neuron regeneration was impaired in CLU−/− mice following sciatic nerve crush and impaired regeneration nerve fibers through CLU−/− nerve grafts transplanted into CLU+/+ mice indicated that reduced sensory regeneration is likely due to SC-derived CLU. Together, these studies suggest unique roles for SC-derived OPN and CLU in regeneration of peripheral motor and sensory axons. PMID:24478351

  5. Hyperosmolar Tears Induce Functional and Structural Alterations of Corneal Nerves: Electrophysiological and Anatomical Evidence Toward Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Hirata, Harumitsu; Mizerska, Kamila; Marfurt, Carl F.; Rosenblatt, Mark I.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose In an effort to elucidate possible neural mechanisms underlying diminished tearing in dry eye disease, this study sought to determine if hyperosmolar tears, a ubiquitous sign of dry eye disease, produce functional changes in corneal nerve responses to drying of the cornea and if these changes correlate with alterations in corneal nerve morphology. Methods In vivo extracellular electrophysiological recordings were performed in rat trigeminal ganglion neurons that innervated the cornea before, and up to 3 hours after, the ocular application of continuous hyperosmolar tears or artificial tears. In corollary experiments, immunohistochemical staining was performed to compare corneal nerve morphology in control and in eyes treated with hyperosmolar solutions. Results Our previous studies identified a population of corneal afferents, dry-sensitive neurons that are strongly excited by corneal dessication (“dry response”), a response thought to trigger the lacrimation reflex. In the present study, we found that the dry responses of corneal dry-sensitive neurons were depressed or even completely abolished by hyperosmolar tears in a time- (30 minutes to 3 hours) and dose (450- to 1000-mOsm solutions)-dependent manner. Furthermore, eyes treated with hyperosmolar tears for 3 hours contained large numbers of morphologically abnormal (granular, fragmented, or prominently beaded) subbasal nerves that appeared to be undergoing degeneration. Conclusions These results demonstrate that tear hyperosmolarity, considered to be a “core” mechanism of dry eye disease, significantly decreases physiological sensitivity and morphologic integrity of the corneal nerves important in tear production. These alterations might contribute to the diminished tearing seen clinically in dry eye patients. PMID:26720465

  6. Effect of combined nicotine and shrapnel exposure on pain measures and gait after nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Rittenhouse, Bradley; Hill-Pryor, Crystal D; McConathy, Adam; Parker, Peter; Franco, Nelson; Toussaint, Esra; Barker, Darrell; Prasad, Balakrishna; Pizarro, Jose M

    2011-11-01

    A significant fraction of military soldiers sustain nerve injury and use tobacco or nicotine containing products. Healing of nerve injuries is influenced by many factors, such as degree of original injury, healing potential of the nerve, and general health of patient. However, recently, it has been demonstrated that the presence of retained insoluble metal fragments decreases healing. The effects of systemic nicotine administration, with or without metal fragments at the site of nerve injury, were evaluated. Both the nicotine-administered groups (nicotine, nicotine + shrapnel) showed significant increase in the peroneal function compared with untreated controls, as assessed by paw area (p < 0.05). Furthermore, to test possible role of altered sensory function, we used the hot plate assay. Latency to withdraw paw from a hot plate was significantly shorter in nicotine groups (p < 0.05). These data indicate that nicotine improves sensory and motor aspects of nerve function, in the presence or absence of shrapnel. PMID:22165666

  7. Sensory profile of a model energy drink with varying levels of functional ingredients-caffeine, ginseng, and taurine.

    PubMed

    Tamamoto, Lauren C; Schmidt, Shelly J; Lee, Soo-Yeun

    2010-08-01

    Energy drinks have increased in popularity in recent years due to the claimed energy boost provided by functional ingredients. A multitude of functional ingredients have been utilized; however, there is limited research on their sensory effects in energy drink formulations. A 13-member descriptive analysis panel was conducted to investigate the effects on the sensory and rheological properties of 3 common functional ingredients-caffeine, ginseng, and taurine-in a noncarbonated model energy drink solution. Combinations of these functional ingredients at 3 levels (low, medium, high) were added to create a total of 27 different solutions (3 x 3 x 3 factorial design). Analysis of variance was performed to evaluate the sensory effects of the varying concentrations of functional ingredients in solution. Principal component analysis (PCA) was performed to summarize the relationship among the attributes and solutions. In general, high levels of caffeine in solution resulted in low ratings of fruity attributes and high ratings of bitter tea and fruit bitter attributes. The high level of ginseng in solution was characterized by high ratings of bitter attributes. A horns effect was observed as the sweet, artificial lemon-lime, pear, mango, and pineapple attributes were rated lower in intensity with increased ginseng levels. Taurine levels of up to 416 mg/100 mL had no significant effect on the sensory attribute ratings of the model energy drink solutions. These findings can be utilized to predict the changes in sensory characteristics when formulating energy drinks containing these popular functional ingredients. PMID:20722948

  8. Propofol Disrupts Functional Interactions between Sensory and High-Order Processing of Auditory Verbal Memory

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaolin; Lauer, Kathryn K.; Ward, Barney D.; Rao, Stephen M.; Li, Shi-Jiang; Hudetz, Anthony G.

    2011-01-01

    Current theories suggest that disrupting cortical information integration may account for the mechanism of general anesthesia in suppressing consciousness. Human cognitive operations take place in hierarchically structured neural organizations in the brain. The process of low-order neural representation of sensory stimuli becoming integrated in high-order cortices is also known as cognitive binding. Combining neuroimaging, cognitive neuroscience, and anesthetic manipulation, we examined how cognitive networks involved in auditory verbal memory are maintained in wakefulness, disrupted in propofol-induced deep sedation, and re-established in recovery. Inspired by the notion of cognitive binding, an fMRI-guided connectivity analysis was utilized to assess the integrity of functional interactions within and between different levels of the task-defined brain regions. Task-related responses persisted in the primary auditory cortex (PAC), but vanished in the inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) and premotor areas in deep sedation. For connectivity analysis, seed regions representing sensory and high-order processing of the memory task were identified in the PAC and IFG. Propofol disrupted connections from the PAC seed to the frontal regions and thalamus, but not the connections from the IFG seed to a set of widely distributed brain regions in the temporal, frontal, and parietal lobes (with exception of the PAC). These later regions have been implicated in mediating verbal comprehension and memory. These results suggest that propofol disrupts cognition by blocking the projection of sensory information to high-order processing networks and thus preventing information integration. Such findings contribute to our understanding of anesthetic mechanisms as related to information and integration in the brain. PMID:21932265

  9. Functional selectivity of kappa opioid receptor agonists in peripheral sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Jamshidi, Raehannah J; Jacobs, Blaine A; Sullivan, Laura C; Chavera, Teresa A; Saylor, Rachel M; Prisinzano, Thomas E; Clarke, William P; Berg, Kelly A

    2015-11-01

    Activation of kappa opioid receptors (KORs) expressed by peripheral sensory neurons that respond to noxious stimuli (nociceptors) can reduce neurotransmission of pain stimuli from the periphery to the central nervous system. We have previously shown that the antinociception dose-response curve for peripherally restricted doses of the KOR agonist (-)-(trans)-3,4-dichloro-N-methyl-N-[2-(1-pyrrolidinyl)cyclohexyl]benzeneacetamide (U50488) has an inverted U shape. Here, we found that the downward phase of the U50488 dose-response curve was blocked by an inhibitor of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation U0126. Local administration of the selective KOR agonist salvinorin A (Sal-A), also resulted in an inverted U-shaped curve; however, the downward phase was insensitive to U0126. By contrast, inhibition of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) partially blocked the downward phase of the dose-response curve to Sal-A, suggesting a role for JNK. In cultures of peripheral sensory neurons, U50488 and Sal-A inhibited adenylyl cyclase activity with similar efficacies; however, their ability to activate ERK and JNK differed. Whereas U50488 activated ERK but not JNK, Sal-A activated JNK but not ERK. Moreover, although both U50488 and Sal-A produced homologous desensitization, desensitization to U50488 was blocked by inhibition of ERK activation, whereas desensitization to Sal-A was blocked by inhibition of JNK. Substitution of an ethoxymethyl ether for the C2 position acetyl group of Sal-A reduced stimulation of JNK, prevented desensitization by ethoxymethyl ether for the C2 position acetyl group of Sal-A, and resulted in a monotonic antinociception dose-response curve. Collectively, these data demonstrate the functional selectivity of KOR ligands for signaling in peripheral sensory neurons, which results in differential effects on behavioral responses in vivo. PMID:26297384

  10. High-Resolution Ultrasonography of the Superficial Peroneal Motor and Sural Sensory Nerves May Be a Non-invasive Approach to the Diagnosis of Vasculitic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Üçeyler, Nurcan; Schäfer, Kristina A.; Mackenrodt, Daniel; Sommer, Claudia; Müllges, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution ultrasonography (HRUS) is an emerging new tool in the investigation of peripheral nerves. We set out to assess the utility of HRUS performed at lower extremity nerves in peripheral neuropathies. Nerves of 26 patients with polyneuropathies of different etiologies and 26 controls were investigated using HRUS. Patients underwent clinical, laboratory, electrophysiological assessment, and a diagnostic sural nerve biopsy as part of the routine work-up. HRUS was performed at the sural, tibial, and the common, superficial, and deep peroneal nerves. The superficial peroneal nerve longitudinal diameter (LD) distinguished best between the groups: patients with immune-mediated neuropathies (n = 13, including six with histology-proven vasculitic neuropathy) had larger LD compared to patients with non-immune-mediated neuropathies (p < 0.05) and to controls (p < 0.001). Among all subgroups, patients with vasculitic neuropathy showed the largest superficial peroneal nerve LD (p < 0.001) and had a larger sural nerve cross-sectional area when compared with disease controls (p < 0.001). Enlargement of the superficial peroneal and sural nerves as detected by HRUS may be a useful additional finding in the differential diagnosis of vasculitic and other immune-mediated neuropathies. PMID:27064457

  11. Case report: Double nerve transfer of the anterior and posterior interosseous nerves to treat a high ulnar nerve defect at the elbow.

    PubMed

    Delclaux, S; Aprédoaei, C; Mansat, P; Rongières, M; Bonnevialle, P

    2014-10-01

    Double neurotization of the deep branch of ulnar nerve (DBUN) and superficial branch of ulnar nerve using the anterior interosseous nerve (AIN) and the recurrent (thenar) branch of the median nerve was first described by Battiston and Lanzetta. This article details the postoperative results after 18 months of a patient who underwent this technique using the posterior interosseous nerve (PIN) instead of the recurrent branch of the median nerve for sensory reconstruction. A 35-year-old, right-handed man suffered major trauma to his right upper limb following a serious motor vehicle accident. One year later, a pseudocystic neuroma of the ulnar nerve was evident on ultrasound examination and MRI. After the neuroma had been resected, the nerve defect was estimated at 8 cm. One and a half years after the initial trauma, with the patient still at M0/S0, we transferred the AIN and PIN onto the deep and superficial branches of the ulnar nerve respectively. Nerve recovery was monitored clinically every month and by electromyography (EMG) every three months initially and then every six months. At 18 months postoperative, 5th digit abduction/adduction was 28 mm. Sensation was present at the base of the 5th digit. The patient was graded M3/S2. Clear re-innervation of the abductor digiti minimi was demonstrated by EMG (motor conduction velocity 50 m/s). Given that the ulnar nerve could not be excited at the elbow, this re-innervation had to be the result of the double nerve transfer. Neurotization of the DBUN using the AIN produces functional results as early as 1 year after surgery. Using PIN for sensory neurotization is easy to perform, has no negative consequences for the donor site, and leads to good recovery of sensation (graded as S2) after 18 months. PMID:25260763

  12. Sensory processing during viewing of cinematographic material: computational modeling and functional neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Bordier, Cecile; Puja, Francesco; Macaluso, Emiliano

    2013-02-15

    The investigation of brain activity using naturalistic, ecologically-valid stimuli is becoming an important challenge for neuroscience research. Several approaches have been proposed, primarily relying on data-driven methods (e.g. independent component analysis, ICA). However, data-driven methods often require some post-hoc interpretation of the imaging results to draw inferences about the underlying sensory, motor or cognitive functions. Here, we propose using a biologically-plausible computational model to extract (multi-)sensory stimulus statistics that can be used for standard hypothesis-driven analyses (general linear model, GLM). We ran two separate fMRI experiments, which both involved subjects watching an episode of a TV-series. In Exp 1, we manipulated the presentation by switching on-and-off color, motion and/or sound at variable intervals, whereas in Exp 2, the video was played in the original version, with all the consequent continuous changes of the different sensory features intact. Both for vision and audition, we extracted stimulus statistics corresponding to spatial and temporal discontinuities of low-level features, as well as a combined measure related to the overall stimulus saliency. Results showed that activity in occipital visual cortex and the superior temporal auditory cortex co-varied with changes of low-level features. Visual saliency was found to further boost activity in extra-striate visual cortex plus posterior parietal cortex, while auditory saliency was found to enhance activity in the superior temporal cortex. Data-driven ICA analyses of the same datasets also identified "sensory" networks comprising visual and auditory areas, but without providing specific information about the possible underlying processes, e.g., these processes could relate to modality, stimulus features and/or saliency. We conclude that the combination of computational modeling and GLM enables the tracking of the impact of bottom-up signals on brain activity

  13. Sensory integration dysfunction affects efficacy of speech therapy on children with functional articulation disorders

    PubMed Central

    Tung, Li-Chen; Lin, Chin-Kai; Hsieh, Ching-Lin; Chen, Ching-Chi; Huang, Chin-Tsan; Wang, Chun-Hou

    2013-01-01

    Background Articulation disorders in young children are due to defects occurring at a certain stage in sensory and motor development. Some children with functional articulation disorders may also have sensory integration dysfunction (SID). We hypothesized that speech therapy would be less efficacious in children with SID than in those without SID. Hence, the purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of speech therapy in two groups of children with functional articulation disorders: those without and those with SID. Method: A total of 30 young children with functional articulation disorders were divided into two groups, the no-SID group (15 children) and the SID group (15 children). The number of pronunciation mistakes was evaluated before and after speech therapy. Results: There were no statistically significant differences in age, sex, sibling order, education of parents, and pretest number of mistakes in pronunciation between the two groups (P > 0.05). The mean and standard deviation in the pre- and post-test number of mistakes in pronunciation were 10.5 ± 3.2 and 3.3 ± 3.3 in the no-SID group, and 10.1 ± 2.9 and 6.9 ± 3.5 in the SID group, respectively. Results showed great changes after speech therapy treatment (F = 70.393; P < 0.001) and interaction between the pre/post speech therapy treatment and groups (F = 11.119; P = 0.002). Conclusions: Speech therapy can improve the articulation performance of children who have functional articulation disorders whether or not they have SID, but it results in significantly greater improvement in children without SID. SID may affect the treatment efficiency of speech therapy in young children with articulation disorders. PMID:23355780

  14. Functional and anatomical characteristics of the nerve-brown adipose interaction in the rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flaim, K. E.; Horowitz, J. M.; Horwitz, B. A.

    1976-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on 12 male rats to study the coupling of signals from the sympathetic nervous system to the brown adipose tissue. Analysis of electron photomicrographs revealed considerable morphological heterogeneity among the nerves entering and leaving the interscapular fat pad. In response to electrical simulation of the nerves, the temperature of the brown fat increased following a rapid but transient temperature drop. Such changes were observed only on the ipsilateral side, indicating that the innervation to the interscapular brown fat of the rat is functionally bilateral rather than diffuse. The finding that brown fat is capable of responding in a graded fashion correlates well with observations suggesting that clusters of brown adipocytes may be electrically coupled.

  15. The Relationship between Nerve Conduction Study and Clinical Grading of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cheluvaiah, Janardhan D.; Agadi, Jagadish B.; Nagaraj, Karthik

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS) is the most common nerve entrapment. Subjective sensory symptoms are common place in patients with CTS, but sometimes they are not supported by objective findings in the neurological examination. Electrodiagnostic (EDx) studies are a valid and reliable means of confirming the diagnosis. The amplitudes along with the conduction velocities of the sensory nerve action potential and motor nerve action potential reflect the functional state of axons, and are useful parameters and complement the clinical grading in the assessment of severity of CTS. Aim To conduct median nerve sensory and motor conduction studies on patients with carpal tunnel syndrome and correlate the relationship between nerve conduction study parameters and the clinical severity grading. Materials and Methods Based on clinical assessment, the study patients were divided into 03 groups with mild CTS, moderate CTS and severe CTS respectively as per Mackinnson’s classification. Median and ulnar nerve conduction studies were performed on bilateral upper limbs of 50 patients with symptoms of CTS and 50 age and sex matched healthy control subjects. The relationship between the clinical severity grade and various nerve conduction study parameters were correlated. Results In this prospective case control study, 50 patients with symptoms consistent with CTS and 50 age and sex matched healthy control subjects were examined over a 10 month period. A total of 30 patients had unilateral CTS (right upper limb in 19 and left upper limb in 11) and 20 patients had bilateral CTS. Female to male ratio was 3.54 to 1. Age ranged from 25 to 81 years. The mean age at presentation was 49.68±11.7 years. Tingling paresthesias of hand and first three fingers were the most frequent symptoms 48 (98%). Tinel’s and Phalen’s sign were positive in 36 (72%) and 44 (88%) patients respectively. The mean duration of symptoms at presentation was 52.68±99.81 weeks. 16 patients (32%) had

  16. Corneal confocal microscopy reveals trigeminal small sensory fiber neuropathy in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Giulio; Grisan, Enrico; Scarpa, Fabio; Fazio, Raffaella; Comola, Mauro; Quattrini, Angelo; Comi, Giancarlo; Rama, Paolo; Riva, Nilo

    2014-01-01

    Although subclinical involvement of sensory neurons in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) has been previously demonstrated, corneal small fiber sensory neuropathy has not been reported to-date. We examined a group of sporadic ALS patients with corneal confocal microscopy, a recently developed imaging technique allowing in vivo observation of corneal small sensory fibers. Corneal confocal microscopy (CCM) examination revealed a reduction of corneal small fiber sensory nerve number and branching in ALS patients. Quantitative analysis demonstrated an increase in tortuosity and reduction in length and fractal dimension of ALS patients’ corneal nerve fibers compared to age-matched controls. Moreover, bulbar function disability scores were significantly related to measures of corneal nerve fibers anatomical damage. Our study demonstrates for the first time a corneal small fiber sensory neuropathy in ALS patients. This finding further suggests a link between sporadic ALS and facial-onset sensory and motor neuronopathy (FOSMN) syndrome, a rare condition characterized by early sensory symptoms (with trigeminal nerve distribution), followed by wasting and weakness of bulbar and upper limb muscles. In addition, the finding supports a model of neurodegeneration in ALS as a focally advancing process. PMID:25360111

  17. Task-related training combined with transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation promotes upper limb functions in patients with chronic stroke.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Hoon; In, Tae Sung; Cho, Hwi-young

    2013-01-01

    Severe upper limb paresis is a major contributor to disability after stroke. This study investigated the efficacy of task-related training (TRT) with transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) on recovery of upper limb motor function in chronic-stroke survivors. Thirty patients with chronic stroke were randomly allocated two groups: the TRT+TENS group (n = 15) and the TRT+placebo (TRT+PLBO) group (n = 15). Patients in the TRT+TENS group received TENS stimulation (two to three times the sensory threshold), while subjects in the TRT+PLBO group received TENS without real electrical stimulation. TENS was applied to muscle belly of triceps and wrist extensors, while placebo (PLBO) stimulation was administrated without real electrical stimulation. Both interventions were given for 30 minutes per day, 5 days per week, for a period of 4 weeks. The primary outcomes were assessed with Fugl-Meyer assessment scores (FMA), Manual function test (MFT), Box and block test (BBT), and Modified Ashworth scale (MAS), each of which was performed one day before and one day after intervention. Both groups showed significant improvements in FMA, MFT, and BBT after intervention. When compared with the TRT+PLBO group, the TRT+TENS group showed significantly greater improvements in FMA (p = 0.034), MFT (p = 0.037), and BBT (p = 0.042). In MAS score, significant improvement was observed only in the TRT+TENS group (p = 0.011). Our findings indicate that TRT with TENS can reduce motor impairment and improve motor activity in stroke survivors with chronic upper limb paresis, highlighting the benefits of somatosensory stimulation from TENS. PMID:24097280

  18. Storage influence on the functional, sensory and keeping quality of quality protein maize flour.

    PubMed

    Shobha, D; Kumar, H V Dileep; Sreeramasetty, T A; Puttaramanaik; Gowda, K T Pandurange; Shivakumar, G B

    2014-11-01

    Apart from nutritional values functional and sensory properties affect the behavior of food system and its acceptability for consumption during storage. Hence keeping quality of maize flour (HQPM-7) with and without lime treatment(control) was studied in terms of functional (bulk density, pH, swelling capacity, water and oil absorption capacity, least gelation concentration, peroxide value), sensory (appearance, color, taste, texture, mouth feel and overall acceptability) and rolling parameters (water absorption by flour, rolling quality, diameter after baking ) for a period of 6 months under room temperature (25 ± 5 °C) in two types of packages viz, LDPE cover (P) and plastic box (B). Physical parameters such as length, breadth and thickness (11.26-10.52 mm, 9.67-9.14 mm, & 4.72-3.95 mm) were reduced in lime treated grains compared to control. Significant increase (p ≤ 0.05) in ash content of lime treated flour (1.67 ± 0.01 g) was observed compared to control (1.5 ± 0.02 g). Calcium content of lime treated maize flour increased significantly (p ≤ 0.05) from 48 to 136 mg. There is a significant reduction in functional properties of flour after 3 and 2 months irrespective in polyethylene cover and plastic box. The properties like rolling quality, diameter after baking and water uptake by the flour were reduced significantly (p ≤ 0.05) after 4 months of storage in treated and after 1 month in control samples. Sensory scores of roti (dry pan cake) decreased significantly after 3 months of storage with an overall acceptability score of 4.0 and 3.4. In control samples mean taste (3.6), mouth feel (3.8) as well as OAA scores (3.8) decreased after second month. Hence lime treated maize flour with added nutritional benefits is suitable for making rotis of good palatability and can be stored in LDPE covers up to 3 months. PMID:26396307

  19. NEUROPHYSIOLOGICAL EVALUATION OF SENSORY SYSTEMS'

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to many neurotoxic compounds has been shown to produce a sensory system dysfunction. Neurophysiological assessment of sensory function in humans and animal models often uses techniques known as sensory evoked potentials. Because both humans and animals show analogous res...

  20. Biophysical and functional consequences of receptor-mediated nerve fiber transformation.

    PubMed Central

    Tanelian, D L; Markin, V S

    1997-01-01

    Stimulation of the nervous system by substance P, a G protein-coupled receptor, and subsequent receptor internalization causes dendrites to change their shape from homogeneous cylinders to a heterogeneous string of swollen varicosities (beads) connected by thin segments. In this paper we have analyzed this phenomenon and propose quantitative mechanisms to explain this type of physical shape transformation. We developed a mathematical solution to describe the relationship between the initial radius of a cylindrical nerve fiber and the average radii of the subsequently created varicosities and connecting segments, as well as the periodicity of the varicosities along the nerve fiber. Theoretical predictions are in good agreement with our own and published experimental data from dorsal root ganglion neurons, spinal cord, and brain. Modeling the electrical properties of these beaded fibers has led to an understanding of the functional biophysical consequences of nerve fiber transformation. Several hypotheses for how this shape transformation can be used to process information within the nervous system have been put forth. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 6 PMID:9138558

  1. The conserved proteins CHE-12 and DYF-11 are required for sensory cilium function in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Bacaj, Taulant; Lu, Yun; Shaham, Shai

    2008-02-01

    Sensory neuron cilia are evolutionarily conserved dendritic appendages that convert environmental stimuli into neuronal activity. Although several cilia components are known, the functions of many remain uncharacterized. Furthermore, the basis of morphological and functional differences between cilia remains largely unexplored. To understand the molecular basis of cilia morphogenesis and function, we studied the Caenorhabditis elegans mutants che-12 and dyf-11. These mutants fail to concentrate lipophilic dyes from their surroundings in sensory neurons and are chemotaxis defective. In che-12 mutants, sensory neuron cilia lack distal segments, while in dyf-11 animals, medial and distal segments are absent. CHE-12 and DYF-11 are conserved ciliary proteins that function cell-autonomously and are continuously required for maintenance of cilium morphology and function. CHE-12, composed primarily of HEAT repeats, may not be part of the intraflagellar transport (IFT) complex and is not required for the localization of some IFT components. DYF-11 undergoes IFT-like movement and may function at an early stage of IFT-B particle assembly. Intriguingly, while DYF-11 is expressed in all C. elegans ciliated neurons, CHE-12 expression is restricted to some amphid sensory neurons, suggesting a specific role in these neurons. Our results provide insight into general and neuron-specific aspects of cilium development and function. PMID:18245347

  2. Anxiety dissociates the adaptive functions of sensory and motor response enhancements to social threats.

    PubMed

    El Zein, Marwa; Wyart, Valentin; Grèzes, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Efficient detection and reaction to negative signals in the environment is essential for survival. In social situations, these signals are often ambiguous and can imply different levels of threat for the observer, thereby making their recognition susceptible to contextual cues - such as gaze direction when judging facial displays of emotion. However, the mechanisms underlying such contextual effects remain poorly understood. By computational modeling of human behavior and electrical brain activity, we demonstrate that gaze direction enhances the perceptual sensitivity to threat-signaling emotions - anger paired with direct gaze, and fear paired with averted gaze. This effect arises simultaneously in ventral face-selective and dorsal motor cortices at 200 ms following face presentation, dissociates across individuals as a function of anxiety, and does not reflect increased attention to threat-signaling emotions. These findings reveal that threat tunes neural processing in fast, selective, yet attention-independent fashion in sensory and motor systems, for different adaptive purposes. PMID:26712157

  3. The effects of stress on splenic immune function are mediated by the splenic nerve.

    PubMed

    Wan, W; Vriend, C Y; Wetmore, L; Gartner, J G; Greenberg, A H; Nance, D M

    1993-01-01

    Intermittent footshock (FS) suppresses immune function of spleen cells. To determine if the autonomic nervous system mediates this immunosuppression in spleen cells, we tested whether cutting the splenic nerve, which depletes splenic norepinephrine levels by 98-100% and eliminates catecholamine fibers, blocks the effects of stress. Splenic nerve sections, sham operations, or no surgery were performed on male Sprague-Dawley rats. Ten days later, rats were injected with sheep red blood cells (SRBC). Three days later, rats were placed in a chamber equipped with a shock grid. Foot shock (1.6 mA) was administered for 5 s on a VI 3.5 min schedule for 60 min. Each FS was preceded by a 15-s warning tone. Controls were treated identically except for the FS. The next day spleen cells were harvested and the number of IgM plaque-forming cells (PFCs) determined. For the sham and unoperated control animals, the number of PFCs was reduced for the stressed animals relative to the nonstressed controls, and there was no effect of the sham surgeries. In contrast, there was no difference between the stressed and nonstressed groups in which the splenic nerve had been sectioned, and their PFC response was comparable to the controls. Next we examined the effects of FS on the proliferative response to mitogens (PHA and ConA) following splenic nerve sections or sham operations. One week following surgery, animals were given a 60-min session of FS or exposed to the chamber/tone without FS. Rats were then killed, spleens harvested, and the proliferative response to mitogens determined.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8420618

  4. Early Interfaced Neural Activity from Chronic Amputated Nerves

    PubMed Central

    Garde, Kshitija; Keefer, Edward; Botterman, Barry; Galvan, Pedro; Romero, Mario I.

    2009-01-01

    Direct interfacing of transected peripheral nerves with advanced robotic prosthetic devices has been proposed as a strategy for achieving natural motor control and sensory perception of such bionic substitutes, thus fully functionally replacing missing limbs in amputees. Multi-electrode arrays placed in the brain and peripheral nerves have been used successfully to convey neural control of prosthetic devices to the user. However, reactive gliosis, micro hemorrhages, axonopathy and excessive inflammation currently limit their long-term use. Here we demonstrate that enticement of peripheral nerve regeneration through a non-obstructive multi-electrode array, after either acute or chronic nerve amputation, offers a viable alternative to obtain early neural recordings and to enhance long-term interfacing of nerve activity. Non-restrictive electrode arrays placed in the path of regenerating nerve fibers allowed the recording of action potentials as early as 8 days post-implantation with high signal-to-noise ratio, as long as 3 months in some animals, and with minimal inflammation at the nerve tissue-metal electrode interface. Our findings suggest that regenerative multi-electrode arrays of open design allow early and stable interfacing of neural activity from amputated peripheral nerves and might contribute towards conveying full neural control and sensory feedback to users of robotic prosthetic devices. PMID:19506704

  5. Primary repair of crush nerve injuries by means of biological tubulization with muscle-vein-combined grafts.

    PubMed

    Tos, Pierluigi; Battiston, Bruno; Ciclamini, Davide; Geuna, Stefano; Artiaco, Stefano

    2012-07-01

    Despite extensive research and surgical innovation, the treatment of peripheral nerve injuries remains a complex issue, particularly in nonsharp lesions. The aim of this study was to assess the clinical outcome in a group of 16 patients who underwent, in emergency, a primary repair for crush injury of sensory and mixed nerves of the upper limb with biological tubulization, namely, the muscle-vein-combined graft. The segments involved were sensory digital nerves in eight cases and mixed nerves in another eight cases (four median nerves and four ulnar nerves). The length of nerve defect ranged from 0.5 to 4 cm (mean 1.9 cm). Fifteen of 16 patients showed some degree of functional recovery. Six patients showed diminished light touch (3.61), six had protective sensation (4.31), and three showed loss of protective sensation (4.56) using Semmes-Weinstein monofilament test. All the patients who underwent digital nerve repair had favorable results graded as S4 in one case, S3+ in six cases, and S3 in one case. With respect to mixed nerve repair, we observed two S4, two S3+, two S3, one S2, and one S0 sensory recovery. Less favorable results were observed for motor function with three M4, one M3, two M2, and two M0 recoveries. Altogether, the results of this retrospective study demonstrates that tubulization nerve repair in emergency, in case of short nerve gaps, may restore the continuity of the nerve avoiding secondary nerve grafting. This technique preserves donor nerve and, in case of failure, does not preclude a delayed repair with a nerve graft. PMID:22422438

  6. Tendon Transfers for Combined Peripheral Nerve Injuries.

    PubMed

    Makarewich, Christopher A; Hutchinson, Douglas T

    2016-08-01

    Combined peripheral nerve injuries present a unique set of challenges to the hand surgeon when considering tendon transfers. They are often associated with severe soft tissue trauma, including lacerations to remaining innervated muscles and tendons, significant scar formation, and substantial sensory loss. In the case of combined nerve injuries, there are typically fewer options for tendon transfers due to fewer tendons of shared function that are expendable as well as associated injuries to tendon or muscle bellies. As such, careful preoperative planning must be performed to make the most of remaining muscle tendon units. PMID:27387081

  7. Cavernosal nerve functionality evaluation after magnetic resonance imaging-guided transurethral ultrasound treatment of the prostate

    PubMed Central

    Sammet, Steffen; Partanen, Ari; Yousuf, Ambereen; Sammet, Christina L; Ward, Emily V; Wardrip, Craig; Niekrasz, Marek; Antic, Tatjana; Razmaria, Aria; Farahani, Keyvan; Sokka, Shunmugavelu; Karczmar, Gregory; Oto, Aytekin

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the feasibility of using therapeutic ultrasound as an alternative treatment option for organ-confined prostate cancer. METHODS: In this study, a trans-urethral therapeutic ultrasound applicator in combination with 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guidance was used for real-time multi-planar MRI-based temperature monitoring and temperature feedback control of prostatic tissue thermal ablation in vivo. We evaluated the feasibility and safety of MRI-guided trans-urethral ultrasound to effectively and accurately ablate prostate tissue while minimizing the damage to surrounding tissues in eight canine prostates. MRI was used to plan sonications, monitor temperature changes during therapy, and to evaluate treatment outcome. Real-time temperature and thermal dose maps were calculated using the proton resonance frequency shift technique and were displayed as two-dimensional color-coded overlays on top of the anatomical images. After ultrasound treatment, an evaluation of the integrity of cavernosal nerves was performed during prostatectomy with a nerve stimulator that measured tumescence response quantitatively and indicated intact cavernous nerve functionality. Planned sonication volumes were visually correlated to MRI ablation volumes and corresponding histo-pathological sections after prostatectomy. RESULTS: A total of 16 sonications were performed in 8 canines. MR images acquired before ultrasound treatment were used to localize the prostate and to prescribe sonication targets in all canines. Temperature elevations corresponded within 1 degree of the targeted sonication angle, as well as with the width and length of the active transducer elements. The ultrasound treatment procedures were automatically interrupted when the temperature in the target zone reached 56 °C. In all canines erectile responses were evaluated with a cavernous nerve stimulator post-treatment and showed a tumescence response after stimulation with an electric current. These

  8. Temporary Neurotrophin Treatment Prevents Deafness-Induced Auditory Nerve Degeneration and Preserves Function.

    PubMed

    Ramekers, Dyan; Versnel, Huib; Strahl, Stefan B; Klis, Sjaak F L; Grolman, Wilko

    2015-09-01

    After substantial loss of cochlear hair cells, exogenous neurotrophins prevent degeneration of the auditory nerve. Because cochlear implantation, the current therapy for profound sensorineural hearing loss, depends on a functional nerve, application of neurotrophins is being investigated. We addressed two questions important for fundamental insight into the effects of exogenous neurotrophins on a degenerating neural system, and for translation to the clinic. First, does temporary treatment with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) prevent nerve degeneration on the long term? Second, how does a BDNF-treated nerve respond to electrical stimulation? Deafened guinea pigs received a cochlear implant, and their cochleas were infused with BDNF for 4 weeks. Up to 8 weeks after treatment, their cochleas were analyzed histologically. Electrically evoked compound action potentials (eCAPs) were recorded using stimulation paradigms that are informative of neural survival. Spiral ganglion cell (SGC) degeneration was prevented during BDNF treatment, resulting in 1.9 times more SGCs than in deafened untreated cochleas. Importantly, SGC survival was almost complete 8 weeks after treatment cessation, when 2.6 times more SGCs were observed. In four eCAP characteristics (three involving alteration of the interphase gap of the biphasic current pulse and one involving pulse trains), we found large and statistically significant differences between normal-hearing and deaf controls. Importantly, for BDNF-treated animals, these eCAP characteristics were near normal, suggesting healthy responsiveness of BDNF-treated SGCs. In conclusion, clinically practicable short-term neurotrophin treatment is sufficient for long-term survival of SGCs, and it can restore or preserve SGC function well beyond the treatment period. Significance statement: Successful restoration of hearing in deaf subjects by means of a cochlear implant requires a healthy spiral ganglion cell population. Deafness

  9. Sensing the Underground – Ultrastructure and Function of Sensory Organs in Root-Feeding Melolontha melolontha (Coleoptera: Scarabaeinae) Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Hansson, Bill S.; Hilker, Monika; Reinecke, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Below ground orientation in insects relies mainly on olfaction and taste. The economic impact of plant root feeding scarab beetle larvae gave rise to numerous phylogenetic and ecological studies. Detailed knowledge of the sensory capacities of these larvae is nevertheless lacking. Here, we present an atlas of the sensory organs on larval head appendages of Melolontha melolontha. Our ultrastructural and electrophysiological investigations allow annotation of functions to various sensory structures. Results Three out of 17 ascertained sensillum types have olfactory, and 7 gustatory function. These sensillum types are unevenly distributed between antennae and palps. The most prominent chemosensory organs are antennal pore plates that in total are innervated by approximately one thousand olfactory sensory neurons grouped into functional units of three-to-four. In contrast, only two olfactory sensory neurons innervate one sensillum basiconicum on each of the palps. Gustatory sensilla chaetica dominate the apices of all head appendages, while only the palps bear thermo-/hygroreceptors. Electrophysiological responses to CO2, an attractant for many root feeders, are exclusively observed in the antennae. Out of 54 relevant volatile compounds, various alcohols, acids, amines, esters, aldehydes, ketones and monoterpenes elicit responses in antennae and palps. All head appendages are characterized by distinct olfactory response profiles that are even enantiomer specific for some compounds. Conclusions Chemosensory capacities in M. melolontha larvae are as highly developed as in many adult insects. We interpret the functional sensory units underneath the antennal pore plates as cryptic sensilla placodea and suggest that these perceive a broad range of secondary plant metabolites together with CO2. Responses to olfactory stimulation of the labial and maxillary palps indicate that typical contact chemo-sensilla have a dual gustatory and olfactory function. PMID

  10. Postherniotomy dysejaculation: successful treatment with mesh removal and nerve transection.

    PubMed

    Aasvang, E K; Kehlet, H

    2008-12-01

    Dysejaculation following groin hernia repair can occur in about 1-2% of patients, resulting in impairment of sexual function. We report a case of chronic postherniotomy dysejaculation treated with transection of the ilioinguinal and iliohypogastric nerves and decompression of vas deferens that was embedded and twisted in shrunken mesh and scar tissue. At three months follow-up, there was reduced overall pain and no dysejaculation, and quantitative sensory testing showed reversal of sensory abnormalities, except for sensory loss, compared with preoperative values. PMID:18437287

  11. Treadmill Exercise Induced Functional Recovery after Peripheral Nerve Repair Is Associated with Increased Levels of Neurotrophic Factors

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae-Sung; Höke, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    Benefits of exercise on nerve regeneration and functional recovery have been reported in both central and peripheral nervous system disease models. However, underlying molecular mechanisms of enhanced regeneration and improved functional outcomes are less understood. We used a peripheral nerve regeneration model that has a good correlation between functional outcomes and number of motor axons that regenerate to evaluate the impact of treadmill exercise. In this model, the median nerve was transected and repaired while the ulnar nerve was transected and prevented from regeneration. Daily treadmill exercise resulted in faster recovery of the forelimb grip function as evaluated by grip power and inverted holding test. Daily exercise also resulted in better regeneration as evaluated by recovery of compound motor action potentials, higher number of axons in the median nerve and larger myofiber size in target muscles. Furthermore, these observations correlated with higher levels of neurotrophic factors, glial derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), in serum, nerve and muscle suggesting that increase in muscle derived neurotrophic factors may be responsible for improved regeneration. PMID:24618564

  12. Loss of glycine receptors containing the α3 subunit compromises auditory nerve activity, but not outer hair cell function.

    PubMed

    Dlugaiczyk, Julia; Hecker, Dietmar; Neubert, Christian; Buerbank, Stefanie; Campanelli, Dario; Becker, Cord-Michael; Betz, Heinrich; Knipper, Marlies; Rüttiger, Lukas; Schick, Bernhard

    2016-07-01

    Inhibitory glycine receptors containing the α3 subunit (GlyRα3) regulate sensory information processing in the CNS and retina. In previous work, we demonstrated the presence of postsynaptic GlyRα3 immunoreactivity at efferent synapses of the medial and lateral olivocochlear bundle in the organ of Corti; however, the role of these α3-GlyRs in auditory signalling has remained elusive. The present study analyzes distortion-product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) and auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) of knockout mice with a targeted inactivation of the Glra3 gene (Glra3(-/-)) and their wildtype littermates (Glra3(+/+)) before and seven days after acoustic trauma (AT; 4-16 kHz, 120 dB SPL, 1 h). Before AT, DPOAE thresholds were slightly, but significantly lower, and DPOAE amplitudes were slightly larger in Glra3(-/-) as compared to Glra3(+/+) mice. While click- and f-ABR thresholds were similar in both genotypes before AT, threshold-normalized click-ABR wave I amplitudes were smaller in Glra3(-/-) mice as compared to their wildtype littermates. Following AT, both the decrement of ABR wave I amplitudes and the delay of wave I latencies were more pronounced in Glra3(-/-) than Glra3(+/+) mice. Accordingly, correlation between early click-evoked ABR signals (0-2.5 ms from stimulus onset) before and after AT was significantly reduced for Glra3(-/-) as compared to Glra3(+/+) mice. In summary, these results show that loss of α3-GlyRs compromises suprathreshold auditory nerve activity, but not outer hair cell function. PMID:27208792

  13. Roles of estrogen and progesterone in modulating renal nerve function in the rat kidney

    PubMed Central

    Graceli, J.B.; Cicilini, M.A.; Bissoli, N.S.; Abreu, G.R.; Moysés, M.R.

    2013-01-01

    The maintenance of extracellular Na+ and Cl- concentrations in mammals depends, at least in part, on renal function. It has been shown that neural and endocrine mechanisms regulate extracellular fluid volume and transport of electrolytes along nephrons. Studies of sex hormones and renal nerves suggested that sex hormones modulate renal function, although this relationship is not well understood in the kidney. To better understand the role of these hormones on the effects that renal nerves have on Na+ and Cl- reabsorption, we studied the effects of renal denervation and oophorectomy in female rats. Oophorectomized (OVX) rats received 17β-estradiol benzoate (OVE, 2.0 mg·kg-1·day-1, sc) and progesterone (OVP, 1.7 mg·kg-1·day-1, sc). We assessed Na+ and Cl- fractional excretion (FENa+ and FECl-, respectively) and renal and plasma catecholamine release concentrations. FENa+, FECl-, water intake, urinary flow, and renal and plasma catecholamine release levels increased in OVX vs control rats. These effects were reversed by 17β-estradiol benzoate but not by progesterone. Renal denervation did not alter FENa+, FECl-, water intake, or urinary flow values vs controls. However, the renal catecholamine release level was decreased in the OVP (236.6±36.1 ng/g) and denervated rat groups (D: 102.1±15.7; ODE: 108.7±23.2; ODP: 101.1±22.1 ng/g). Furthermore, combining OVX + D (OD: 111.9±25.4) decreased renal catecholamine release levels compared to either treatment alone. OVE normalized and OVP reduced renal catecholamine release levels, and the effects on plasma catecholamine release levels were reversed by ODE and ODP replacement in OD. These data suggest that progesterone may influence catecholamine release levels by renal innervation and that there are complex interactions among renal nerves, estrogen, and progesterone in the modulation of renal function. PMID:23828583

  14. Conserved dopamine neurotrophic factor-transduced mesenchymal stem cells promote axon regeneration and functional recovery of injured sciatic nerve.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Nie, Lin; Zhao, Hua; Zhang, Wen; Zhang, Yuan-Qiang; Wang, Shuai-Shuai; Cheng, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury (PNI) is a common disease that often results in axonal degeneration and the loss of neurons, ultimately leading to limited nerve regeneration and severe functional impairment. Currently, there are no effective treatments for PNI. In the present study, we transduced conserved dopamine neurotrophic factor (CDNF) into mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in collagen tubes to investigate their regenerative effects on rat peripheral nerves in an in vivo transection model. Scanning electron microscopy of the collagen tubes demonstrated their ability to be resorbed in vivo. We observed notable overexpression of the CDNF protein in the distal sciatic nerve after application of CDNF-MSCs. Quantitative analysis of neurofilament 200 (NF200) and S100 immunohistochemistry showed significant enhancement of axonal and Schwann cell regeneration in the group receiving CDNF-MSCs (CDNF-MSCs group) compared with the control groups. Myelination thickness, axon diameter and the axon-to fiber diameter ratio (G-ratio) were significantly higher in the CDNF-MSCs group at 8 and 12 weeks after nerve transection surgery. After surgery, the sciatic functional index, target muscle weight, wet weight ratio of gastrocnemius muscle and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) tracing demonstrated functional recovery. Light and electron microscopy confirmed successful regeneration of the sciatic nerve. The greater numbers of HRP-labeled neuron cell bodies and increased sciatic nerve index values (SFI) in the CDNF-MSCs group suggest that CDNF exerts neuroprotective effects in vivo. We also observed higher target muscle weights and a significant improvement in muscle atrophism in the CDNF-MSCs group. Collectively, these findings indicate that CDNF gene therapy delivered by MSCs is capable of promoting nerve regeneration and functional recovery, likely because of the significant neuroprotective and neurotrophic effects of CDNF and the superior environment offered by MSCs and collagen tubes. PMID

  15. Conserved Dopamine Neurotrophic Factor-Transduced Mesenchymal Stem Cells Promote Axon Regeneration and Functional Recovery of Injured Sciatic Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yi; Nie, Lin; Zhao, Hua; Zhang, Wen; Zhang, Yuan-Qiang; Wang, Shuai-Shuai; Cheng, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury (PNI) is a common disease that often results in axonal degeneration and the loss of neurons, ultimately leading to limited nerve regeneration and severe functional impairment. Currently, there are no effective treatments for PNI. In the present study, we transduced conserved dopamine neurotrophic factor (CDNF) into mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in collagen tubes to investigate their regenerative effects on rat peripheral nerves in an in vivo transection model. Scanning electron microscopy of the collagen tubes demonstrated their ability to be resorbed in vivo. We observed notable overexpression of the CDNF protein in the distal sciatic nerve after application of CDNF-MSCs. Quantitative analysis of neurofilament 200 (NF200) and S100 immunohistochemistry showed significant enhancement of axonal and Schwann cell regeneration in the group receiving CDNF-MSCs (CDNF-MSCs group) compared with the control groups. Myelination thickness, axon diameter and the axon-to fiber diameter ratio (G-ratio) were significantly higher in the CDNF-MSCs group at 8 and 12 weeks after nerve transection surgery. After surgery, the sciatic functional index, target muscle weight, wet weight ratio of gastrocnemius muscle and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) tracing demonstrated functional recovery. Light and electron microscopy confirmed successful regeneration of the sciatic nerve. The greater numbers of HRP-labeled neuron cell bodies and increased sciatic nerve index values (SFI) in the CDNF-MSCs group suggest that CDNF exerts neuroprotective effects in vivo. We also observed higher target muscle weights and a significant improvement in muscle atrophism in the CDNF-MSCs group. Collectively, these findings indicate that CDNF gene therapy delivered by MSCs is capable of promoting nerve regeneration and functional recovery, likely because of the significant neuroprotective and neurotrophic effects of CDNF and the superior environment offered by MSCs and collagen tubes. PMID

  16. Changes in nutritional composition, functional, and sensory properties of yam flour as a result of presoaking

    PubMed Central

    Obadina, Adewale Olusegun; Babatunde, Bukunola Olaide; Olotu, Ifeoluwa

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of soaking pretreatments on some of the properties of flour obtained from two varieties of yam namely;Dioscorea alata andDioscorea rotundata with a view of providing information that will enhance their end use. The yam varieties were washed, chipped, parboiled at 50°C, soaked for different periods (0, 6, 12, and 18 h), dried at 60°C, and milled into flour. The flour samples were analyzed for their nutritional composition, pH, color, and functional properties. The flour samples were also made into pastes and were sensorially analyzed and 0 h soaked samples were used as control. The protein content of 18 h-soakedD. rotundata andD. alata flour samples was significantly different from the control and soaking had no effect (P > 0.05) on the fat and ash content but the carbohydrate content of the flour samples ranged from 83.08% to 86.13%. The 18 h-soakedD. rotundata flour sample had the lowest peak viscosity, breakdown value, and final viscosity among theD. rotundata variety samples. Pasting temperature ranged from 79.80 to 83.60°C and 6-h soakedD. alata flour sample had the lowest water absorption capacity and the highest bulk density. On the basis of sensory analysis, the panelist preferred the taste, texture, color, and appearance of paste made from the 18-h soakedD. rotundata flour to the paste of other flour samples. The results of this study show that D.rotundata should be soaked for 18 h prior to drying and milling in order to obtain a good-quality flour and paste. PMID:25493185

  17. Synergistic effects of low-level laser and mesenchymal stem cells on functional recovery in rats with crushed sciatic nerves.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chen-Chia; Wang, John; Chen, Shyh-Chang; Hsieh, Yueh-Ling

    2016-02-01

    Transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has been proposed to exert beneficial effects on peripheral nerve regeneration after a peripheral nerve injury, but the functional recovery in the denervated limb is still limited. In this study, we used low-level laser therapy (LLLT) as an adjunct therapy for MSC transplantation on the functional recovery of crushed sciatic nerve in rats. Peripheral nerve injury was induced in 48 Sprague-Dawley rats by crushing the unilateral sciatic nerve, using a vessel clamp. The animals with crushed injury were randomly divided into four groups: control group, with no treatment; MSC group, treated with MSC alone; LLLT group, treated with LLLT alone; and MSCLLLT group, treated with a combination of MSC and LLLT. The sciatic function index (SFI), vertical activity of locomotion (VA) and ankle angle (AA) of rats were examined for functional assessments after treatment. Electrophysiological, morphological and S100 immunohistochemical studies were also conducted. The MSCLLLT group showed a greater recovery in SFI, VA and AA, with significant difference from MSC, LLLT and control groups (p < 0.05). Moreover, markedly enhanced electrophysiological function and expression of S100 immunoreactivity, as well as fewer inflammatory cells and less vacuole formation were also demonstrated after nerve crush injury in the MSCLLLT group when compared with the groups receiving a single treatment (p < 0.05). MSC transplantation combined with LLLT could achieve better results in functional recovery than a conventional treatment of MSC or LLLT alone. LLLT has a synergistic effect in providing greater functional recovery with MSC transplantation after nerve crush injury. PMID:23468370

  18. Hidden surface microstructures on Carboniferous insect Brodioptera sinensis (Megasecoptera) enlighten functional morphology and sensorial perception.

    PubMed

    Prokop, Jakub; Pecharová, Martina; Ren, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Megasecoptera are insects with haustellate mouthparts and petiolate wings closely related to Palaeodictyoptera and one of the few insect groups that didn't survive the Permian-Triassic mass extinction. Recent discovery of Brodioptera sinensis in early Pennsylvanian deposits at Xiaheyan in northern China has increased our knowledge of its external morphology using conventional optical stereomicroscopy. Environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) of structures, such as antennae, mouthparts, wing surfaces, external copulatory organs and cerci have shed light on their micromorphology and supposed function. A comparative study has shown an unexpected dense pattern of setae on the wing membrane of B. sinensis. In addition, unlike the results obtained by stereomicroscopy it revealed that the male and female external genitalia clearly differ in their fine structure and setation. Therefore, the present study resulted in a closer examination of the microstructure and function of previously poorly studied parts of the body of Paleozoic insects and a comparison with homologous structures occurring in other Palaeodictyopteroida, Odonatoptera and Ephemerida. This indicates, that the role and presumptive function of these integumental protuberances is likely to have been a sensory one in the coordination of mouthparts and manipulation of stylets, escape from predators, enhancement of aerodynamic properties and copulatory behaviour. PMID:27321551

  19. Hidden surface microstructures on Carboniferous insect Brodioptera sinensis (Megasecoptera) enlighten functional morphology and sensorial perception

    PubMed Central

    Prokop, Jakub; Pecharová, Martina; Ren, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Megasecoptera are insects with haustellate mouthparts and petiolate wings closely related to Palaeodictyoptera and one of the few insect groups that didn’t survive the Permian-Triassic mass extinction. Recent discovery of Brodioptera sinensis in early Pennsylvanian deposits at Xiaheyan in northern China has increased our knowledge of its external morphology using conventional optical stereomicroscopy. Environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) of structures, such as antennae, mouthparts, wing surfaces, external copulatory organs and cerci have shed light on their micromorphology and supposed function. A comparative study has shown an unexpected dense pattern of setae on the wing membrane of B. sinensis. In addition, unlike the results obtained by stereomicroscopy it revealed that the male and female external genitalia clearly differ in their fine structure and setation. Therefore, the present study resulted in a closer examination of the microstructure and function of previously poorly studied parts of the body of Paleozoic insects and a comparison with homologous structures occurring in other Palaeodictyopteroida, Odonatoptera and Ephemerida. This indicates, that the role and presumptive function of these integumental protuberances is likely to have been a sensory one in the coordination of mouthparts and manipulation of stylets, escape from predators, enhancement of aerodynamic properties and copulatory behaviour. PMID:27321551

  20. Low serum magnesium levels are associated with impaired peripheral nerve function in type 2 diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Chu, Chen; Zhao, Weijing; Zhang, Yinan; Li, Lu; Lu, Jingyi; Jiang, Lan; Wang, Congrong; Jia, Weiping

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between serum magnesium and peripheral nerve function in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). A total of 978 T2DM patients were included in the study. Patients were divided into tertiles according to serum magnesium concentration (low tertile: ≤0.85 mmol/L; medium tertile: 0.85 to 0.92 mmol/L; and high tertile: >0.92 mmol/L). All participants underwent nerve conduction (NC) studies. Composite z scores of conduction velocity, latency, and amplitude were constructed, respectively. The serum magnesium levels were significantly lower in patients with abnormal NC than in those with normal NC (0.87 [0.82, 0.92] vs. 0.88 [0.83, 0.93] mmol/L, P = 0.048). The composite z score of amplitude significantly increased with increasing tertiles of magnesium (-0.60 ± 0.02 vs. -0.57 ± 0.02 vs. -0.48 ± 0.03, P for trend = 0.001). After adjusting for all potential confounders, lower serum magnesium levels were still associated with lower composite z score of amplitude (β = 0.095, P = 0.014). In patients with T2DM, lower serum magnesium levels were significantly associated with lower composite z score of amplitude, indicating magnesium might affect peripheral nerve function through axonal degeneration. PMID:27601013

  1. Low serum magnesium levels are associated with impaired peripheral nerve function in type 2 diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Chen; Zhao, Weijing; Zhang, Yinan; Li, Lu; Lu, Jingyi; Jiang, Lan; Wang, Congrong; Jia, Weiping

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between serum magnesium and peripheral nerve function in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). A total of 978 T2DM patients were included in the study. Patients were divided into tertiles according to serum magnesium concentration (low tertile: ≤0.85 mmol/L; medium tertile: 0.85 to 0.92 mmol/L; and high tertile: >0.92 mmol/L). All participants underwent nerve conduction (NC) studies. Composite z scores of conduction velocity, latency, and amplitude were constructed, respectively. The serum magnesium levels were significantly lower in patients with abnormal NC than in those with normal NC (0.87 [0.82, 0.92] vs. 0.88 [0.83, 0.93] mmol/L, P = 0.048). The composite z score of amplitude significantly increased with increasing tertiles of magnesium (−0.60 ± 0.02 vs. −0.57 ± 0.02 vs. −0.48 ± 0.03, P for trend = 0.001). After adjusting for all potential confounders, lower serum magnesium levels were still associated with lower composite z score of amplitude (β = 0.095, P = 0.014). In patients with T2DM, lower serum magnesium levels were significantly associated with lower composite z score of amplitude, indicating magnesium might affect peripheral nerve function through axonal degeneration. PMID:27601013

  2. Muscle Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor Receptor α Promotes Axonal Regeneration and Functional Recovery Following Peripheral Nerve Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Nancy; Spearry, Rachel P.; Leahy, Kendra M.; Robitz, Rachel; Trinh, Dennis S.; Mason, Carter O.; Zurbrugg, Rebekah J.; Batt, Myra K.; Paul, Richard J.; Maclennan, A. John

    2014-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) administration maintains, protects, and promotes the regeneration of both motor neurons (MNs) and skeletal muscle in a wide variety of models. Expression of CNTF receptor α (CNTFRα), an essential CNTF receptor component, is greatly increased in skeletal muscle following neuromuscular insult. Together the data suggest that muscle CNTFRα may contribute to neuromuscular maintenance, protection, and/or regeneration in vivo. To directly address the role of muscle CNTFRα, we selectively-depleted it in vivo by using a “floxed” CNTFRα mouse line and a gene construct (mlc1f-Cre) that drives the expression of Cre specifically in skeletal muscle. The resulting mice were challenged with sciatic nerve crush. Counting of nerve axons and retrograde tracing of MNs indicated that muscle CNTFRα contributes to MN axonal regeneration across the lesion site. Walking track analysis indicated that muscle CNTFRα is also required for normal recovery of motor function. However, the same muscle CNTFRα depletion unexpectedly had no detected effect on the maintenance or regeneration of the muscle itself, even though exogenous CNTF has been shown to affect these functions. Similarly, MN survival and lesion-induced terminal sprouting were unaffected. Therefore, muscle CNTFRα is an interesting new example of a muscle growth factor receptor that, in vivo under physiological conditions, contributes much more to neuronal regeneration than to the maintenance or regeneration of the muscle itself. This novel form of muscle–neuron interaction also has implications in the therapeutic targeting of the neuromuscular system in MN disorders and following nerve injury. PMID:23504871

  3. Use of Vein Conduit and Isolated Nerve Graft in Peripheral Nerve Repair: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Imran; Akhtar, Md. Sohaib

    2014-01-01

    Aims and Objectives. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of vein conduit in nerve repair compared with isolated nerve graft. Materials and Methods. This retrospective study was conducted at author's centre and included a total of 40 patients. All the patients had nerve defect of more than 3 cm and underwent nerve repair using nerve graft from sural nerve. In 20 cases, vein conduit (study group) was used whereas no conduit was used in other 20 cases. Patients were followed up for 2 years at the intervals of 3 months. Results. Patients had varying degree of recovery. Sensations reached to all the digits at 1 year in study groups compared to 18 months in control group. At the end of second year, 84% patients of the study group achieved 2-point discrimination of <10 mm compared to 60% only in control group. In terms of motor recovery, 82% patients achieved satisfactory hand function in study group compared to 56% in control group (P < .05). Conclusions. It was concluded that the use of vein conduit in peripheral nerve repair is more effective method than isolated nerve graft providing good sensory and motor recovery. PMID:25405029

  4. ELECTROPHYSIOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT OF SENSORY AND COGNITIVE FUNCTION IN CHILDREN EXPOSED TO LEAD: A REVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    Studies of the effects of lead absorption on sensory evoked and slow brain potentials in children are reviewed. Studies of slow wave voltage in children during sensory conditioning indicated a linear relationship to blood lead level in two studies; an effect that could not be rep...

  5. High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging of the lower extremity nerves.

    PubMed

    Burge, Alissa J; Gold, Stephanie L; Kuong, Sharon; Potter, Hollis G

    2014-02-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the nerves, commonly known as MR neurography is increasingly being used as noninvasive means of diagnosing peripheral nerve disease. High-resolution imaging protocols aimed at imaging the nerves of the hip, thigh, knee, leg, ankle, and foot can demonstrate traumatic or iatrogenic injury, tumorlike lesions, or entrapment of the nerves, causing a potential loss of motor and sensory function in the affected area. A thorough understanding of normal MR imaging and gross anatomy, as well as MR findings in the presence of peripheral neuropathies will aid in accurate diagnosis and ultimately help guide clinical management. PMID:24210318

  6. Putative lateral inhibition in sensory processing for directional turns

    PubMed Central

    Yafremava, Liudmila S.

    2011-01-01

    Computing targeted responses is a general problem in goal-directed behaviors. We sought the sensory template for directional turning in the predatory sea slug Pleurobranchaea californica, which calculates precise turn angles by averaging multiple stimulus sites on its chemotactile oral veil (Yafremava LS, Anthony CW, Lane L, Campbell JK, Gillette R. J Exp Biol 210: 561–569, 2007). Spiking responses to appetitive chemotactile stimulation were recorded in the two bilateral pairs of oral veil nerves, the large oral veil nerve (LOVN) and the tentacle nerve (TN). The integrative abilities of the peripheral nervous system were significant. Nerve spiking responses to punctate, one-site stimulation of the oral veil followed sigmoid relations as stimuli moved between lateral tentacle and the midline. Receptive fields of LOVN and TN were unilateral, overlapping, and oppositely weighted for responsiveness across the length of oral veil. Simultaneous two-site stimulation caused responses of amplitudes markedly smaller than the sum of corresponding one-site responses. Plots of two-site nerve responses against the summed approximate distances from midline of each site were markedly linear. Thus the sensory paths in the peripheral nervous system show reciprocal occlusion similar to lateral inhibition. This outcome suggests a novel neural function for lateral inhibitory mechanisms, distinct from simple contrast enhancement, in computation of both sensory maps and targeted motor actions. PMID:21490281

  7. Brief Report: Comparison of Sensory-Motor and Cognitive Function between Autism and Asperger Syndrome in Preschool Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iwanaga, Ryoichiro; Kawasaki, Chisato; Tsuchida, Reiko

    2000-01-01

    This study examined differences in sensory-motor, cognitive, and verbal impairment between 10 Japanese preschool children with Asperger Syndrome (AS) 10 children with high functioning autism (HFA) using the Japanese version of the Miller Assessment for Preschoolers. AS children surpassed HFA children in verbal skills but HFA children were better…

  8. BBS4 and BBS5 show functional redundancy in the BBSome to regulate the degradative sorting of ciliary sensory receptors

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qingwen; Zhang, Yuxia; Wei, Qing; Huang, Yan; Li, Yan; Ling, Kun; Hu, Jinghua

    2015-01-01

    Cilia harbor sensory receptors for various signaling cascades critical for vertebrate development. However, the mechanisms underlying the ciliary homeostasis of sensory receptors remain elusive. Here, we demonstrate that BBS-4 and BBS-5, two distinct BBSome components, show unexpected functional redundancy in the context of cilia in C. elegans. BBS-4 directly interacts with BBS-5 and the interaction can be disrupted by a conserved mutation identified in human BBS4. Surprisingly, we found that BBS-4 and BBS-5 act redundantly in the BBSome to regulate the ciliary removal, rather than the ciliary entry or retrograde IFT transport, of various sensory receptors. Further analyses indicate that co-depletion of BBS-4 and BBS-5 disrupts the lysosome-targeted degradative sorting of ciliary sensory receptors. Moreover, mammalian BBS4 and BBS5 also interact directly and coordinate the ciliary removal of polycystin 2. Hence, we reveal a novel and highly conserved role for the BBSome in fine-tuning ciliary signaling by regulating the ciliary removal of sensory receptors for lysosomal degradation. PMID:26150102

  9. Neuronal porosome - The secretory portal at the nerve terminal: Its structure-function, composition, and reconstitution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jena, Bhanu P.

    2014-09-01

    Cup-shaped secretory portals at the cell plasma membrane called porosomes mediate secretion from cells. Membrane bound secretory vesicles transiently dock and fuse at the cytosolic compartment of the porosome base to expel intravesicular contents to the outside during cell secretion. In the past decade, the structure, isolation, composition, and functional reconstitution of the neuronal porosome complex has been accomplished providing a molecular understanding of its structure-function. Neuronal porosomes are 15 nm cup-shaped lipoprotein structures composed of nearly 40 proteins; compared to the 120 nm nuclear pore complex comprised of over 500 protein molecules composed of 30 different proteins. Being a membrane-associated supramolecular complex has precluded determination of the atomic structure of the porosome. However recent studies using small-angle X-ray solution scattering (SAXS), provide at sub-nanometer resolution, the native 3D structure of the neuronal porosome complex associated with docked synaptic vesicle at the nerve terminal. Additionally, results from the SAXS study and earlier studies using atomic force microscopy, provide the possible molecular mechanism involved in porosome-mediated neurotransmitter release at the nerve terminal.

  10. Functional morphology of the crista ampullaris: with special interests in sensory hairs and cupula: a review.

    PubMed

    Takumida, M

    2001-12-01

    The functional significance of the ciliary interconnections and cupula has been reviewed. The ciliary interconnecting systems are divided into 2 types, i.e. side links and tip links. The side links acts to maintain the regular distance between the cilia thereby keeping the geometrical arrangement of the entire sensory hair bundle intact as well as to prevent close contact between neighbouring cilia. The tip links, stretching upwards from the tips of the shorter stereocilia to their taller neighbouring shafts, are actually involved in mechanoelectrical transduction. The cupula is composed of the cupula and subcupular meshwork. The subcupular meshwork consists of long branching filaments cross-bridged to one another. The cupula would function as a rigid plate and equally distribute the shear force of the cupula to all the ciliary bundles. The subcupular meshwork may play a role in the transmission of the shear strain force of the cupula to the ciliary bundle and may also exert an additional damping effect in order to prevent unwanted vibrations. PMID:12101357

  11. Physiological, Sensory, and Functional Measures in a Model of Wrist Muscle Injury and Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Lindsay; Brant, Aron; Enns, Deborah; Bryden, Pamela J.

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of muscle rehabilitation modalities, it is first necessary to develop a model to test measures that would assess physiological, sensory, and functional muscle recovery. This study attempted to develop such a model for wrist injury. Subjects: Healthy male and female adults (n = 25). Methods: Subjects performed wrist muscle damage assessment, soreness, discomfort, difficulty, and functional motor task tests before and 1, 2, and 7 days after eccentric wrist muscle contractions. Wrist-related motor task tests, including the perception of discomfort and difficulty during performance, were also conducted. Results: At 24 hours post–eccentric exercises, wrist extension and flexion force declined (p < 0.05) and soreness (p < 0.05) and circumference (p < 0.05) increased; all returned to normal by 7 days post-exercise. At 24 and 48 hours post-exercise, perception of discomfort and difficulty was elevated during performance of motor tasks (p < 0.05). The completion speed of motor tasks was unaffected at any time post–eccentric exercise (p > 0.05). Conclusions: Loss of wrist muscle force, increased soreness, task discomfort, and difficulty were noted following eccentric exercise. However, subjects appeared able to compensate, such that the speed of completion of motor tasks was not slowed. Longer or more specific motor tasks may be necessary to mimic real work performance decrement and recovery. PMID:20145740

  12. Intrathecal amantadine for prolonged spinal blockade of sensory and motor functions in rats.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Jann-Inn; Kan, Chung-Dann; Wang, Jieh-Neng; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Lin, Heng-Teng; Hung, Ching-Hsia

    2016-08-01

    We aimed to compare the hypothesized local anesthetic action of amantadine (1-adamantanamine) with that of the known local anesthetic mepivacaine. Motor, proprioceptive, and nociceptive functions were evaluated in rats after intrathecal administration. Amantadine elicited spinal anesthesia in a dose-related fashion and produced a better sensory-selective action over motor blockade (P < 0.01). On the 50% effective dose (ED50 ) basis, the rank of potency on spinal motor, proprioceptive, and nociceptive block was mepivacaine > amantadine (P < 0.01 for the differences). Amantadine (63.5 μmol/kg) and mepivacaine (7.1 μmol/kg) produced complete spinal block of motor function, proprioception, and nociception. On an equipotent basis (ED25 , ED50 , and ED75 ), the duration of amantadine was longer (P < 0.01) than that of mepivacaine on spinal motor, proprioceptive, and nociceptive block. Our preclinical data demonstrated that amantadine was less potent than mepivacaine at producing spinal anesthesia. The spinal block duration produced by amantadine was greater than that produced by mepivacaine. Both amantadine and mepivacaine produced a markedly nociceptive-specific blockade. PMID:27011292

  13. Functional and morphological assessment of a standardized rat sciatic nerve crush injury with a non-serrated clamp.

    PubMed

    Varejão, Artur S P; Cabrita, António M; Meek, Marcel F; Bulas-Cruz, José; Melo-Pinto, Pedro; Raimondo, Stefania; Geuna, Stefano; Giacobini-Robecchi, Maria G

    2004-11-01

    Peripheral nerve researchers frequently use the rat sciatic nerve crush as a model for axonotmesis. Unfortunately, studies from various research groups report results from different crush techniques and by using a variety of evaluation tools, making comparisons between studies difficult. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the sequence of functional and morphologic changes after an acute sciatic nerve crush injury with a non-serrated clamp, giving a final standardized pressure of p = 9 MPa. Functional recovery was evaluated using the sciatic functional index (SFI), the extensor postural thrust (EPT) and the withdrawal reflex latency (WRL), before injury, and then at weekly intervals until week 8 postoperatively. The rats were also evaluated preoperatively and at weeks 2, 4, and 8 by ankle kinematics, toe out angle (TOA), and gait-stance duration. In addition, the motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV) and the gastrocnemius-soleus weight parameters were measured just before euthanasia. Finally, structural, ultrastructural and histomorphometric analyses were carried out on regenerated nerve fibers. At 8 weeks after the crush injury, a full functional recovery was predicted by SFI, EPT, TOA, and gait-stance duration, while all the other parameters were still recovering their original values. On the other hand, only two of the histomorphometric parameters of regenerated nerve fibers, namely myelin thickness/axon diameter ratio and fiber/axon diameter ratio, returned to normal values while all other parameters were significantly different from normal values. The employment of traditional methods of functional evaluation in conjunction with the modern techniques of computerized analysis of gait and histomorphometric analysis should thus be recommended for an overall assessment of recovery in the rat sciatic nerve crush model. PMID:15684656

  14. Significant Differences in Sympathetic Nerve Fiber Density Among the Facial Skin Nerves: A Histologic Study Using Human Cadaveric Specimens.

    PubMed

    Matsubayashi, Tadatoshi; Cho, Kwang Ho; Jang, Hyung Suk; Murakami, Gen; Yamamoto, Masahito; Abe, Shin-Ichi

    2016-08-01

    Sympathetic nerve fibers in the skin nerves are connected with vasomotor, thermoregulatory, sensory input modulatory, and immunologic events; however, to our knowledge, no histological information is available for skin nerves in the human face. Using specimens from 17 donated cadavers (mean age, 86 years), we measured a sectional area of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive fibers in (1) the frontal nerve (V1), (2) the infraorbital nerve (V2), (3) the mental nerve (V3), (4) the greater auricular nerve (C2), (5) the auriculotemporal nerve (ATN), and (6) the zygomatic branch of the facial nerve (VII). The V1, V2, and V3 were obtained at their entrances to the subcutaneous tissue from the bony canal or notch. The V1, C2, ATN, and/or VII usually contained abundant TH-positive fibers (almost 3%-8% of the nerve sectional area), whereas the V2 and V3 consistently carried few TH-positive fibers (<1%). The difference between these two groups was quite significant (P < 0.001). Thus, from the superior cervical ganglion, the sympathetic nerve fibers reached the forehead through the frontal nerve trunk, whereas artery-bounded fibers came to the cheek, nose, and mouth. The sympathetic palsy caused by trigeminal nerve involvement is mainly characterized by the symptoms seen in the distribution of the ophthalmic division of the trigeminal nerve, such as in Horner's syndrome. It suggests that the forehead and the other facial areas are representative parts of those different sympathetic innervations that could be useful for evaluating the sympathetic function of the face in various diseases. Anat Rec, 299:1054-1059, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27072367

  15. Sensory Conversion Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medelius, Pedro

    The human body has five basic sensory functions: touch, vision, hearing, taste, and smell. The effectiveness of one or more of these human sensory functions can be impaired as a result of trauma, congenital defects, or the normal ageing process. Converting one type of function into another, or translating a function to a different part of the body, could result in a better quality of life for a person with diminished sensorial capabilities.

  16. Near infrared (NIr) light increases expression of a marker of mitochondrial function in the mouse vestibular sensory epithelium.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lucy; Tung, Victoria W K; Mathews, Miranda; Camp, Aaron J

    2015-01-01

    Strategies for attenuating decline in balance function with increasing age are predominantly focused on physical therapies including balance tasks and exercise. However, these approaches do not address the underlying causes of balance decline. Using mice, the impact of near infrared light (NIr) on the metabolism of cells in the vestibular sensory epithelium was assessed. Data collected shows that this simple and safe intervention may protect these vulnerable cells from the deleterious effects of natural aging. mRNA was extracted from the isolated peripheral vestibular sensory epithelium (crista ampullaris and utricular macula) and subsequently transcribed into a cDNA library. This library was then probed for the expression of ubiquitous antioxidant (SOD-1). Antioxidant gene expression was then used to quantify cellular metabolism. Using transcranial delivery of NIr in young (4 weeks) and older (8-9 months) mice, and a brief treatment regime (90 sec/day for 5 days), this work suggests NIr alone may be sufficient to improve mitochondrial function in the vestibular sensory epithelium. Since there are currently no available, affordable, non-invasive methods of therapy to improve vestibular hair cell function, the application of external NIr radiation provides a potential strategy to counteract the impact of aging on cellular metabolism inthe vestibular sensory epithelium. PMID:25868009

  17. Netrin-1 overexpression in bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells promotes functional recovery in a rat model of peripheral nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Xianjin; Li, Qian; Xu, Li; Zhang, Ying; Li, Dongmei; Ma, Jianhua; Mao, Xiaoming

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Transplantation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) has been developed as a new method of treating diseases of the peripheral nervous system. While netrin-1 is a critical molecule for axonal path finding and nerve growth, it may also affect vascular network formation. Here, we investigated the effect of transplanting BMSCs that produce netrin-1 in a rat model of sciatic nerve crush injury. We introduced a sciatic nerve crush injury, and then injected 1×106 BMSCs infected by a recombinant adenovirus expressing netrin-1 Ad5-Netrin-1-EGFP or culture medium into the injured part in the next day. At day 7, 14 and 28 after injection, we measured motor nerve conduction and detected mRNA expressions of netrin-1 receptors UNC5B and Deleted in Colorectal Cancer (DCC), and neurotrophic factors brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) by real-time PCR. We also detected protein expressions of BDNF and NGF by Western blotting assays and examined BMSCs that incorporated into myelin and vascellum. The results showed that BMSCs infected by Ad5-Netrin-1-EGFP significantly improved the function of the sciatic nerve, and led to increased expression of BDNF and NGF (P<0.05). Moreover, 28 days after injury, more Schwann cells were found in BMSCs infected by Ad5-Netrin-1-EGFP compared to control BMSCs. In conclusion, transplantation of BMSCs that produce netrin-1 improved the function of the sciatic nerve after injury. This method may be a new treatment of nerve injury. PMID:26445571

  18. Nerve growth factor alters microtubule targeting agent-induced neurotransmitter release but not MTA-induced neurite retraction in sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Pittman, Sherry K; Gracias, Neilia G; Fehrenbacher, Jill C

    2016-05-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a dose-limiting side effect of anticancer treatment with the microtubule-targeted agents (MTAs), paclitaxel and epothilone B (EpoB); however, the mechanisms by which the MTAs alter neuronal function and morphology are unknown. We previously demonstrated that paclitaxel alters neuronal sensitivity, in vitro, in the presence of nerve growth factor (NGF). Evidence in the literature suggests that NGF may modulate the neurotoxic effects of paclitaxel. Here, we examine whether NGF modulates changes in neuronal sensitivity and morphology induced by paclitaxel and EpoB. Neuronal sensitivity was assessed using the stimulated release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), whereas morphology of established neurites was evaluated using a high content screening system. Dorsal root ganglion cultures, maintained in the absence or presence of NGF, were treated from day 7 to day 12 in culture with paclitaxel (300nM) or EpoB (30nM). Following treatment, the release of CGRP was stimulated using capsaicin or high extracellular potassium. In the presence of NGF, EpoB mimicked the effects of paclitaxel: capsaicin-stimulated release was attenuated, potassium-stimulated release was slightly enhanced and the total peptide content was unchanged. In the absence of NGF, both paclitaxel and EpoB decreased capsaicin- and potassium-stimulated release and the total peptide content, suggesting that NGF may reverse MTA-induced hyposensitivity. Paclitaxel and EpoB both decreased neurite length and branching, and this attenuation was unaffected by NGF in the growth media. These differential effects of NGF on neuronal sensitivity and morphology suggest that neurite retraction is not a causative factor to alter neuronal sensitivity. PMID:26883566

  19. 5-Hydroxytryptamine does not reduce sympathetic nerve activity or neuroeffector function in the splanchnic circulation.

    PubMed

    Darios, Emma S; Barman, Susan M; Orer, Hakan S; Morrison, Shaun F; Davis, Robert P; Seitz, Bridget M; Burnett, Robert; Watts, Stephanie W

    2015-05-01

    Infusion of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) in conscious rats results in a sustained (up to 30 days) fall in blood pressure. This is accompanied by an increase in splanchnic blood flow. Because the splanchnic circulation is regulated by the sympathetic nervous system, we hypothesized that 5-HT would: 1) directly reduce sympathetic nerve activity in the splanchnic region; and/or 2) inhibit sympathetic neuroeffector function in splanchnic blood vessels. Moreover, removal of the sympathetic innervation of the splanchnic circulation (celiac ganglionectomy) would reduce 5-HT-induced hypotension. In anaesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats, mean blood pressure was reduced from 101±4 to 63±3mm Hg during slow infusion of 5-HT (25μg/kg/min, i.v.). Pre- and postganglionic splanchnic sympathetic nerve activity were unaffected during 5-HT infusion. In superior mesenteric arterial rings prepared for electrical field stimulation, neither 5-HT (3, 10, 30nM), the 5-HT1B receptor agonist CP 93129 nor 5-HT1/7 receptor agonist 5-carboxamidotryptamine inhibited neurogenic contraction compared to vehicle. 5-HT did not inhibit neurogenic contraction in superior mesenteric venous rings. Finally, celiac ganglionectomy did not modify the magnitude of fall or time course of 5-HT-induced hypotension when compared to animals receiving sham ganglionectomy. We conclude it is unlikely 5-HT interacts with the sympathetic nervous system at the level of the splanchnic preganglionic or postganglionic nerve, as well as at the neuroeffector junction, to reduce blood pressure. These important studies allow us to rule out a direct interaction of 5-HT with the splanchnic sympathetic nervous system as a cause of the 5-HT-induced fall in blood pressure. PMID:25732865

  20. 5-Hydroxytryptamine does not reduce sympathetic nerve activity or neuroeffector function in the splanchnic circulation

    PubMed Central

    Darios, Emma S.; Barman, Susan M.; Orer, Hakan S.; Morrison, Shaun F.; Davis, Robert P.; Seitz, Bridget M.; Burnett, Robert; Watts, Stephanie W.

    2015-01-01

    Infusion of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) in conscious rats results in a sustained (up to 30 days) fall in blood pressure. This is accompanied by an increase in splanchnic blood flow. Because the splanchnic circulation is regulated by the sympathetic nervous system, we hypothesized that 5-HT would: 1) directly reduce sympathetic nerve activity in the splanchnic region; and/or 2) inhibit sympathetic neuroeffector function in splanchnic blood vessels. Moreover, removal of the sympathetic innervation of the splanchnic circulation (celiac ganglionectomy) would reduce 5-HT-induced hypotension. In anaesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats, mean blood pressure was reduced from 101 ± 4 to 63 ± 3 mm Hg during slow infusion of 5-HT (25 μg/kg/min, i.v.). Pre- and postganglionic splanchnic sympathetic nerve activity was unaffected during 5-HT infusion. In superior mesenteric arterial rings prepared for electrical field stimulation, neither 5-HT (3, 10, 30 nM), the 5-HT1B receptor agonist CP 93129 nor 5-HT1/7 receptor agonist 5-carboxamidotryptamine inhibited neurogenic contraction compared to vehicle. 5-HT did not inhibit neurogenic contraction in superior mesenteric venous rings. Finally, celiac ganglionectomy did not modify the magnitude of fall or time course of 5-HT-induced hypotension when compared to animals receiving sham ganglionectomy. We conclude it is unlikely 5-HT interacts with the sympathetic nervous system at the level of the splanchnic preganglionic or postganglionic nerve, as well as at the neuroeffector junction, to reduce blood pressure. These important studies allow us to rule out a direct interaction of 5-HT with the splanchnic sympathetic nervous system as a cause of the 5-HT-induced fall in blood pressure. PMID:25732865

  1. Influence of maturation on infant diaphragm function assessed by magnetic stimulation of phrenic nerves.

    PubMed

    Dimitriou, Gabriel; Greenough, Anne; Moxham, John; Rafferty, Gerrard F

    2003-01-01

    Infant diaphragm function may be adversely affected in a variety of disorders and conditions. Key to establishing an accurate diagnosis are appropriate control data. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of maturation on diaphragm function, using a nonvolitional test. Diaphragm function was assessed by measuring the transdiaphragmatic pressure (Pdi) generated by magnetic stimulation of the phrenic nerves. Ballon catheters were positioned in the lower third of the esophagus and stomach. Esophageal (Pes) and gastric (Pgas) pressure changes were measured using differential pressure transducers. The pressure signals were amplified and displayed in real time on a computer (running Labview trade mark software) and Pdi derived by online subtraction of Pes from Pgas. Twenty-nine infants (14 born preterm), at a median gestational age of 37 (range, 25-42) weeks, were studied at a median postconceptional age (PCA) of 39 (range, 32-44) weeks. At time of measurement, none had respiratory problems or were hyperinflated (functional residual capacity ranged from 23-35 mL/kg). The preterm infants had significantly lower transdiaphragmatic pressures responses following median left (4.0, range 2.5-6.8 cmH(2)O vs. 4.8, range 2.8-7.2 cmH(2)O) and median right phrenic nerve stimulation (3.6, range 2.6-4.8 cmH(2)O vs. 4.3, range 2.7-6.8 cmH(2)O) (P < 0.05) than term infants. Following left and right phrenic nerve stimulation, Pdi correlated significantly with gestational age (r = 0.4, P < 0.05, and r = 0.4, P < 0.05, respectively) and PCA (r = 0.37, P = 0.05, and r = 0.56, P < 0.01, respectively). We conclude that gestational age at birth and postconceptional age at time of measurements must be taken into account when interpreting the results of infant diaphragm function tests. PMID:12461734

  2. Evaluation of a combined index of optic nerve structure and function for glaucoma diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The definitive diagnosis of glaucoma is currently based on congruent damage to both optic nerve structure and function. Given widespread quantitative assessment of both structure (imaging) and function (automated perimetry) in glaucoma, it should be possible to combine these quantitative data to diagnose disease. We have therefore defined and tested a new approach to glaucoma diagnosis by combining imaging and visual field data, using the anatomical organization of retinal ganglion cells. Methods Data from 1499 eyes of glaucoma suspects and 895 eyes with glaucoma were identified at a single glaucoma center. Each underwent Heidelberg Retinal Tomograph (HRT) imaging and standard automated perimetry. A new measure combining these two tests, the structure function index (SFI), was defined in 3 steps: 1) calculate the probability that each visual field point is abnormal, 2) calculate the probability of abnormality for each of the six HRT optic disc sectors, and 3) combine those probabilities with the probability that a field point and disc sector are linked by ganglion cell anatomy. The SFI was compared to the HRT and visual field using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Results The SFI produced an area under the ROC curve (0.78) that was similar to that for both visual field mean deviation (0.78) and pattern standard deviation (0.80) and larger than that for a normalized measure of HRT rim area (0.66). The cases classified as glaucoma by the various tests were significantly non-overlapping. Based on the distribution of test values in the population with mild disease, the SFI may be better able to stratify this group while still clearly identifying those with severe disease. Conclusions The SFI reflects the traditional clinical diagnosis of glaucoma by combining optic nerve structure and function. In doing so, it identifies a different subset of patients than either visual field testing or optic nerve head imaging alone. Analysis of prospective

  3. The spinal accessory nerve plexus, the trapezius muscle, and shoulder stabilization after radical neck cancer surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, H; Burns, S; Kaiser, C W

    1988-01-01

    A clinical and anatomic study of the spinal accessory, the eleventh cranial nerve, and trapezius muscle function of patients who had radical neck cancer surgery was conducted. This study was done not only to document the indispensibility of the trapezius muscle to shoulder-girdle stability, but also to clarify the role of the eleventh cranial nerve in the variable motor and sensory changes occurring after the loss of this muscle. Seventeen male patients, 49-69 years of age, (average of 60 years of age) undergoing a total of 23 radical neck dissections were examined for upper extremity function, particularly in regard to the trapezius muscle, and for subjective signs of pain. The eleventh nerve, usually regarded as the sole motor innervation to the trapezius, was cut in 17 instances because of tumor involvement. Dissection of four fresh and 30 preserved adult cadavers helped to reconcile the motor and sensory differences in patients who had undergone loss of the eleventh nerve. The dissections and clinical observations corroborate that the trapezius is a key part of a "muscle continuum" that stabilizes the shoulder. Variations in origins and insertions of the trapezius may influence its function in different individuals. As regards the spinal accessory nerve, it is concluded that varying motor and sensory connections form a plexus with the eleventh nerve, accounting, in part, for the variations in motor innervation and function of the trapezius, as well as for a variable spectrum of sensory changes when the eleventh nerve is cut. For this reason, it is suggested that the term "spinal accessory nerve plexus" be used to refer to the eleventh nerve when it is considered in the context of radical neck cancer surgery. Images Fig. 4. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. PMID:3056289

  4. Sciatic nerve injection injury.

    PubMed

    Jung Kim, Hyun; Hyun Park, Sang

    2014-06-11

    Nerve injury is a common complication following intramuscular injection and the sciatic nerve is the most frequently affected nerve, especially in children, the elderly and underweight patients. The neurological presentation may range from minor transient pain to severe sensory disturbance and motor loss with poor recovery. Management of nerve injection injury includes drug treatment of pain, physiotherapy, use of assistive devices and surgical exploration. Early recognition of nerve injection injury and appropriate management are crucial in order to reduce neurological deficit and to maximize recovery. Sciatic nerve injection injury is a preventable event. Total avoidance of intramuscular injection is recommended if other administration routes can be used. If the injection has to be administered into the gluteal muscle, the ventrogluteal region (gluteal triangle) has a more favourable safety profile than the dorsogluteal region (the upper outer quadrant of the buttock). PMID:24920643

  5. Accelerating axonal growth promotes motor recovery after peripheral nerve injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Chi Him Eddie; Omura, Takao; Cobos, Enrique J.; Latrémolière, Alban; Ghasemlou, Nader; Brenner, Gary J.; van Veen, Ed; Barrett, Lee; Sawada, Tomokazu; Gao, Fuying; Coppola, Giovanni; Gertler, Frank; Costigan, Michael; Geschwind, Dan; Woolf, Clifford J.

    2011-01-01

    Although peripheral nerves can regenerate after injury, proximal nerve injury in humans results in minimal restoration of motor function. One possible explanation for this is that injury-induced axonal growth is too slow. Heat shock protein 27 (Hsp27) is a regeneration-associated protein that accelerates axonal growth in vitro. Here, we have shown that it can also do this in mice after peripheral nerve injury. While rapid motor and sensory recovery occurred in mice after a sciatic nerve crush injury, there was little return of motor function after sciatic nerve transection, because of the delay in motor axons reaching their target. This was not due to a failure of axonal growth, because injured motor axons eventually fully re-extended into muscles and sensory function returned; rather, it resulted from a lack of motor end plate reinnervation. Tg mice expressing high levels of Hsp27 demonstrated enhanced restoration of motor function after nerve transection/resuture by enabling motor synapse reinnervation, but only within 5 weeks of injury. In humans with peripheral nerve injuries, shorter wait times to decompression surgery led to improved functional recovery, and, while a return of sensation occurred in all patients, motor recovery was limited. Thus, absence of motor recovery after nerve damage may result from a failure of synapse reformation after prolonged denervation rather than a failure of axonal growth. PMID:21965333

  6. Functional recovery from sciatic nerve crush lesion in the rat correlates with individual differences in responses to chronic intermittent stress.

    PubMed

    van Meeteren, N L; Brakkee, J H; Helders, P J; Wiegant, V M; Gispen, W H

    1997-06-15

    The aim of the present study was to monitor the influence of chronic stress on functional recovery from a sciatic nerve crush lesion in the rat. Male Wistar rats underwent standard unilateral sciatic nerve crush. Subsequently, chronic stress was induced during the recovery phase using a daily 30 min shock box session where rats received three electric footshocks each session (0.5 sec, 1 mA). Reduced body weight gain, adrenal gland hypertrophy, and thymus involution indicated that the stress rats were chronically stressed. Evaluation of sensorimotor function revealed significant differences in recovery between control and stress groups. Correlational analysis of individual stress rats indicated that recovery of the walking pattern was negatively correlated with adrenal gland and medulla enlargement, thymus involution, and plasma levels of adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) and corticosterone 45 min following the final stress session. In control rats, the index of sciatic nerve function (SF index, expressed as the difference between the injured paw and the intact contralateral paw as a percentage) was significantly correlated with adrenal medulla weight only. The present study reveals that chronic intermittent footshock stress impedes sensorimotor recovery following a sciatic nerve crush lesion and that the consequences of chronic intermittent stress are individually determined. We suggest that the quality of functional locomotor recovery after nerve crush lesion is related to the adaptive capacity or coping style of the individual rat. PMID:9210522

  7. Effect of an Adipose-Derived Stem Cell and Nerve Growth Factor-Incorporated Hydrogel on Recovery of Erectile Function in a Rat Model of Cavernous Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kim, In Gul; Piao, Shuyu; Lee, Ji Young; Hong, Sung Hoo; Hwang, Tae-Kon; Kim, Sae Woong; Kim, Choung Soo; Ra, Jeong Chan; Noh, Insup

    2013-01-01

    Postprostatectomy erectile dysfunction (ED) is the major problem for patients with clinically localized prostate cancer. Recently, gene and stem cell-based therapy of the corpus cavernosum has been attempted for postprostatectomy ED, but those therapies are limited by rapid blood flow and disruption of the normal architecture of the corpus cavernosum. In this study, we attempted to regenerate the damaged cavernous nerve (CN), which is the main cause of ED. We investigated the effectiveness of human adipose-derived stem cell (hADSC) and nerve growth factor-incorporated hyaluronic acid-based hydrogel (NGF-hydrogel) application on the CN in a rat model of bilateral cavernous nerve crush injury. Four weeks after the operation, erectile function was assessed by detecting the intracavernous pressure (ICP)/arterial pressure level by CN electrostimulation. The ICP was significantly increased by application of hADSC with NGF-hydrogel compared to the other experimental groups. CN and penile tissue were collected for histological examination. PKH-26 labeled hADSC colocalized with beta III tubulin were shown in CN tissue sections. hADSC/NGF-hydrogel treatment prevented smooth muscle atrophy in the corpus cavernosum. In addition, the hADSC/NGF-hydrogel group showed increased endothelial nitric oxide synthase protein expression. This study suggests that application of hADSCs with NGF-hydrogel on the CN might be a promising treatment for postprostatectomy ED. PMID:22834730

  8. Repair of peripheral nerve with vein wrapping*

    PubMed Central

    LEUZZI, S.; ARMENIO, A.; LEONE, L.; DE SANTIS, V.; DI TURI, A.; ANNOSCIA, P.; BUFANO, L.; PASCONE, M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The post–traumatic neuro-anastomosis must be protected from the surrounding environment. This barrier must be biologically inert, biodegradable, not compressing but protecting the nerve. Formation of painful neuroma is one of the major issues with neuro-anastomosis; currently there is no consensus on post-repair neuroma prevention. Aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of neuroanastomosis performed with venous sheath to reduce painful neuromas formation, improve the electrical conductivity of the repaired nerve, and reduce the discrepancies of the sectioned nerve stumps. Patients and methods From a trauma population of 320 patients treated in a single centre between January 2008 and December 2011, twenty-six patients were identified as having an injury to at least one of the peripheral nerves of the arm and enrolled in the study. Patients were divided into two groups. In the group A (16 patients) the end-to-end nerve suture was wrapped in a vein sheath and compared with the group B (10 patients) in which a simple end-to-end neurorrhaphy was performed. The venous segment used to cover the nerve micro-suture was harvested from the superficial veins of the forearm. The parameters analyzed were: functional recovery of motor nerves, sensitivity and pain. Results Average follow-up was 14 months (range: 12–24 months). The group A showed a more rapid motor and sensory recovery and a reduction of the painful symptoms compared to the control group (B). Conclusions The Authors demonstrated that, in their experience, the venous sheath provides a valid solution to avoid the dispersion of the nerve fibres, to prevent adherent scars and painful neuromas formation. Moreover it can compensate the different size of two nerve stumps, allowing, thereby, a more rapid functional and sensitive recovery without expensive devices. PMID:24841688

  9. Vagus Nerve Stimulation Improves Cardiac Function by Preventing Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Obese-Insulin Resistant Rats

    PubMed Central

    Samniang, Bencharunan; Shinlapawittayatorn, Krekwit; Chunchai, Titikorn; Pongkan, Wanpitak; Kumfu, Sirinart; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C.; KenKnight, Bruce H.; Chattipakorn, Nipon

    2016-01-01

    Long-term high-fat diet (HFD) consumption leads to not only obese-insulin resistance, but also impaired left ventricular (LV) function. Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) has been shown to exert cardioprotection. However, its effects on the heart and metabolic parameters under obese-insulin resistant condition is not known. We determined the effects of VNS on metabolic parameters, heart rate variability (HRV) and LV function in obese-insulin resistant rats. Male Wistar rats were fed with HFD for 12 weeks, and were randomly divided into sham and VNS groups. VNS was applied for the next 12 weeks. Echocardiography, blood pressure and HRV were examined. Blood samples were collected for metabolic parameters. At the end, the heart was removed for determination of apoptosis, inflammation, oxidative stress, and cardiac mitochondrial function. VNS for 12 weeks significantly decreased plasma insulin, HOMA index, total cholesterol, triglyceride, LDL and visceral fat. Serum adiponectin was significantly increased in the VNS group. VNS also significantly decreased blood pressure, improved HRV and LV function, decreased cardiac MDA, TNF-α and Bax levels, and improved cardiac mitochondrial function. VNS improves metabolic and hemodynamic parameters, and the LV function via its ability against apoptosis, inflammation and oxidative stress, and preserved cardiac mitochondrial function in obese-insulin resistant rats. PMID:26830020

  10. Laryngeal Adductor Function in Experimental Models of Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Paniello, Randal C.; Rich, Jason T.; Debnath, Nick L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis Most patients with unilateral vocal fold paralysis experience some degree of spontaneous reinnervation, which depends upon the type and severity of recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) injury. After partial recovery, the paretic vocal fold may or may not adduct adequately to allow glottic closure, which in turn affects phonatory and swallowing outcomes. This process was studied in a series of canine laryngeal nerve injury models. Study Design Animal (canine) experiments. Methods Maximum stimulable laryngeal adductor pressure (LAP) was measured pre-treatment (baseline) and at 6 months following experimental RLN injuries (total n=59). The 9 study groups were designed to simulate a range of severities of RLN injury. Results The greatest LAP recovery, at 108% of original baseline, was seen in a 50% transection model; the least recovery was seen when the RLN underwent complete transection with repair, at 56% with precise alignment and 50% with alignment reversed. Intermediate models (partial RLN injuries) gave intermediate results. Crush models recovered 105% of LAP, while a half-transection, half-crush injury recovered 72% and cautery injuries recovered 61%. Controls (complete transection without repair) had no measurable recovery. Conclusions The injured RLN has a strong tendency to recover. Restoration of adductor strength, as determined by the LAP, was predictably related to the severity of RLN injury. The model RLN injuries studied provide a range of expected outcomes that can be used for future experiments exploring interventions that may improve post-injury adductor function. PMID:25283381

  11. Signals and noise in the octavolateralis systems: what is the impact of human activities on fish sensory function?

    PubMed

    Braun, Christopher B

    2015-01-01

    The octavolateralis systems of fishes include the vestibular, auditory, lateral line and electrosensory systems. They are united by common developmental and neuro-computational features, including hair cell sensors and computations based on cross-neuron analyses of differential hair cell stimulation patterns. These systems also all use both spectral and temporal filters to separate signals from each other and from noise, and the distributed senses (lateral line and electroreception) add spatial filters as well. Like all sensory systems, these sensors must provide the animal with guidance for adaptive behavior within a sensory scene composed of multiple stimuli and varying levels of ambient noise, including that created by human activities. In the extreme, anthropogenic activities impact the octavolateralis systems by destroying or degrading the habitats that provide ecological resources and sensory inputs. At slightly lesser levels of effect, anthropogenic pollutants can be damaging to fish tissues, with sensory organs often the most vulnerable. The exposed sensory cells of the lateral line and electrosensory systems are especially sensitive to aquatic pollution. At still lesser levels of impact, anthropogenic activities can act as both acute and chronic stressors, activating hormonal changes that may affect behavioral and sensory function. Finally, human activities are now a nearly ubiquitous presence in aquatic habitats, often with no obvious effects on the animals exposed to them. Ship noise, indigenous and industrial fishing techniques, and all the ancillary noises of human civilization form a major part of the soundscape of fishes. How fish use these new sources of information about their habitat is a new and burgeoning field of study. PMID:24920543

  12. Anxiety dissociates the adaptive functions of sensory and motor response enhancements to social threats

    PubMed Central

    El Zein, Marwa; Wyart, Valentin; Grèzes, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Efficient detection and reaction to negative signals in the environment is essential for survival. In social situations, these signals are often ambiguous and can imply different levels of threat for the observer, thereby making their recognition susceptible to contextual cues – such as gaze direction when judging facial displays of emotion. However, the mechanisms underlying such contextual effects remain poorly understood. By computational modeling of human behavior and electrical brain activity, we demonstrate that gaze direction enhances the perceptual sensitivity to threat-signaling emotions – anger paired with direct gaze, and fear paired with averted gaze. This effect arises simultaneously in ventral face-selective and dorsal motor cortices at 200 ms following face presentation, dissociates across individuals as a function of anxiety, and does not reflect increased attention to threat-signaling emotions. These findings reveal that threat tunes neural processing in fast, selective, yet attention-independent fashion in sensory and motor systems, for different adaptive purposes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10274.001 PMID:26712157

  13. Vascularized Thoracodorsal to Suprascapular Nerve Transfer, a Novel Technique to Restore Shoulder Function in Partial Brachial Plexopathy

    PubMed Central

    Potter, Shirley M.; Ferris, Scott I.

    2016-01-01

    We describe the clinical outcome of a novel nerve transfer to restore active shoulder motion in upper brachial plexus injury. The thoracodorsal nerve (TDN) was successfully used as a vascularized donor nerve to neurotize to the suprascapular nerve (SSN) in a patient with limited donor nerve availability. At 4 years follow-up, he had regained useful external rotation of the injured limb, with no significant donor site morbidity. Shoulder abduction return was less impressive, however, and reasons for this are discussed. We provide a comprehensive review of the literature on this topic and a subsequent discussion on the details of this novel technique. This is the first reported case of TDN to SSN transfer, and also the first reported case of a vascularized TDN transfer in the English language literature. We advocate direct thoracodorsal to SSN transfer as a valid surgical option for the restoration of shoulder function in patients with partial brachial plexus avulsion, when conventional nerve donors are unavailable. PMID:27014699

  14. Differential fiber-specific block of nerve conduction in mammalian peripheral nerves using kilohertz electrical stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Yogi A.

    2015-01-01

    Kilohertz electrical stimulation (KES) has been shown to induce repeatable and reversible nerve conduction block in animal models. In this study, we characterized the ability of KES stimuli to selectively block specific components of stimulated nerve activity using in vivo preparations of the rat sciatic and vagus nerves. KES stimuli in the frequency range of 5–70 kHz and amplitudes of 0.1–3.0 mA were applied. Compound action potentials were evoked using either electrical or sensory stimulation, and block of components was assessed through direct nerve recordings and muscle force measurements. Distinct observable components of the compound action potential had unique conduction block thresholds as a function of frequency of KES. The fast component, which includes motor activity, had a monotonically increasing block threshold as a function of the KES frequency. The slow component, which includes sensory activity, showed a nonmonotonic block threshold relationship with increasing KES frequency. The distinct trends with frequency of the two components enabled selective block of one component with an appropriate choice of frequency and amplitude. These trends in threshold of the two components were similar when studying electrical stimulation and responses of the sciatic nerve, electrical stimulation and responses of the vagus nerve, and sensorimotor stimulation and responses of the sciatic nerve. This differential blocking effect of KES on specific fibers can extend the applications of KES conduction block to selective block and stimulation of neural signals for neuromodulation as well as selective control of neural circuits underlying sensorimotor function. PMID:25878155

  15. Altered rectal sensory response induced by balloon distention in patients with functional abdominal pain syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Functional abdominal pain syndrome (FAPS) has chronic unexplained abdominal pain and is similar to the psychiatric diagnosis of somatoform pain disorder. A patient with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) also has chronic unexplained abdominal pain, and rectal hypersensitivity is observed in a majority of the patients. However, no reports have evaluated the visceral sensory function of FAPS precisely. We aimed to test the hypothesis that FAPS would show altered visceral sensation compared to healthy controls or IBS. The present study determined the rectal perceptual threshold, intensity of sensation using visual analogue scale (VAS), and rectal compliance in response to rectal balloon distention by a barostat in FAPS, IBS, and healthy controls. Methods First, the ramp distention of 40 ml/min was induced and the thresholds of discomfort, pain, and maximum tolerance (mmHg) were measured. Next, three phasic distentions (60-sec duration separated by 30-sec intervals) of 10, 15 and 20 mmHg were randomly loaded. The subjects were asked to mark the VAS in reference to subjective intensity of sensation immediately after each distention. A pressure-volume relationship was determined by plotting corresponding pressures and volumes during ramp distention, and the compliance was calculated over the linear part of the curve by calculating from the slope of the curve using simple regression. Results Rectal thresholds were significantly reduced in IBS but not in FAPS. The VAS ratings of intensity induced by phasic distention (around the discomfort threshold of the controls) were increased in IBS but significantly decreased in FAPS. Rectal compliance was reduced in IBS but not in FAPS. Conclusion An inconsistency of visceral sensitivity between lower and higher pressure distention might be a key feature for understanding the pathogenesis of FAPS. PMID:19925683

  16. Tibial nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... a loss of movement or sensation in the foot from damage to the tibial nerve. ... Tibial nerve dysfunction is an unusual form of peripheral ... the calf and foot muscles. A problem in function with a single ...

  17. Degenerative Nerve Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    Degenerative nerve diseases affect many of your body's activities, such as balance, movement, talking, breathing, and heart function. Many ... viruses. Sometimes the cause is not known. Degenerative nerve diseases include Alzheimer's disease Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis Friedreich's ...

  18. Trapping of organophosphorus chemical nerve agents in water with amino acid functionalized baskets.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Yian; Dalkiliç, Erdin; Peterson, Paul W; Pandit, Aroh; Dastan, Arif; Brown, Jason D; Polen, Shane M; Hadad, Christopher M; Badjić, Jovica D

    2014-04-01

    We prepared eleven amino-acid functionalized baskets and used (1) H NMR spectroscopy to quantify their affinity for entrapping dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP, 118 Å(3) ) in aqueous phosphate buffer at pH=7.0±0.1; note that DMMP guest is akin in size to chemical nerve agent sarin (132 Å(3) ). The binding interaction (Ka ) was found to vary with the size of substituent groups at the basket's rim. In particular, the degree of branching at the first carbon of each substituent had the greatest effect on the host-guest interaction, as described with the Verloop's B1 steric parameter. The branching at the remote carbons, however, did not perturb the encapsulation, which is important for guiding the design of more effective hosts and catalysts in future. PMID:24616086

  19. Effects of Polysialic Acid on Sensory Innervation of the Cornea

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Xiuli; Zhang, Yuntao; Schwend, Tyler; Conrad, Gary W.

    2014-01-01

    Sensory trigeminal growth cones innervate the cornea in a coordinated fashion during embryonic development. Polysialic acid (polySia) is known for its important roles during nerve development and regeneration. The purpose of this work is to determine whether polySia, present in developing eyefronts and on the surface of sensory nerves, may provide guidance cues to nerves during corneal innervation. Expression and localization of polySia in embryonic day (E)5-14 chick eyefronts and E9 trigeminal ganglia were identified using Western blotting and immunostaining. Effects of polySia removal on trigeminal nerve growth behavior were determined in vivo, using exogenous endoneuraminidase (endoN) treatments to remove polySia substrates during chick cornea development, and in vitro, using neuronal explant cultures. PolySia substrates, made by the physical adsorption of colominic acid to a surface coated with poly-D-lysine (PDL), were used as a model to investigate functions of the polySia expressed in axonal environments. PolySia was localized within developing eyefronts and on trigeminal sensory nerves. Distributions of PolySia in corneas and pericorneal regions are developmentally regulated. PolySia removal caused defasciculation of the limbal nerve trunk in vivo from E7 to E10. Removal of polySia on trigeminal neurites inhibited neurite outgrowth and caused axon defasciculation, but did not affect Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule (NCAM) expression or Schwann cell migration in vitro. PolySia substrates in vitro inhibited outgrowth of trigeminal neurites and promoted their fasciculation. In conclusion, polySia is localized on corneal nerves and in their targeting environment during early developing stages of chick embryos. PolySias promote fasciculation of trigeminal axons in vivo and in vitro, whereas, in contrast, their removal promotes defasciculation. PMID:25478909

  20. Cortical plasticity induced by different degrees of peripheral nerve injuries: a rat functional magnetic resonance imaging study under 9.4 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Major peripheral nerve injuries not only result in local deficits but may also cause distal atrophy of target muscles or permanent loss of sensation. Likewise, these injuries have been shown to instigate long-lasting central cortical reorganization. Methods Cortical plasticity changes induced after various types of major peripheral nerve injury using an electrical stimulation technique to the rat upper extremity and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) were examined. Studies were completed out immediately after injury (acute stage) and at two weeks (subacute stage) to evaluate time affect on plasticity. Results After right-side median nerve transection, cortical representation of activation of the right-side ulnar nerve expanded intra-hemispherically into the cortical region that had been occupied by the median nerve representation After unilateral transection of both median and ulnar nerves, cortical representation of activation of the radial nerve on the same side of the body also demonstrated intra-hemispheric expansion. However, simultaneous electrical stimulation of the contralateral uninjured median and ulnar nerves resulted in a representation that had expanded both intra- and inter-hemispherically into the cortical region previously occupied by the two transected nerve representations. Conclusions After major peripheral nerve injury, an adjacent nerve, with similar function to the injured nerve, may become significantly over-activated in the cortex when stimulated. This results in intra-hemispheric cortical expansion as the only component of cortical plasticity. When all nerves responsible for a certain function are injured, the same nerves on the contralateral side of the body are affected and become significantly over-activated during a task. Both intra- and inter-hemispheric cortical expansion exist, while the latter dominates cortical plasticity. PMID:23659705

  1. Human periodontal ligament stem cells repair mental nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bohan; Jung, Hun-Jong; Kim, Soung-Min; Kim, Myung-Jin; Jahng, Jeong Won; Lee, Jong-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Human periodontal ligament stem cells are easily accessible and can differentiate into Schwann cells. We hypothesized that human periodontal ligament stem cells can be used as an alternative source for the autologous Schwann cells in promoting the regeneration of injured peripheral nerve. To validate this hypothesis, human periodontal ligament stem cells (1 × 106) were injected into the crush-injured left mental nerve in rats. Simultaneously, autologous Schwann cells (1 × 106) and PBS were also injected as controls. Real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction showed that at 5 days after injection, mRNA expression of low affinity nerve growth factor receptor was significantaly increased in the left trigeminal ganglion of rats with mental nerve injury. Sensory tests, histomorphometric evaluation and retrograde labeling demonstrated that at 2 and 4 weeks after injection, sensory function was significantly improved, the numbers of retrograde labeled sensory neurons and myelinated axons were significantly increased, and human periodontal ligament stem cells and autologous Schwann cells exhibited similar therapeutic effects. These findings suggest that transplantation of human periodontal ligament stem cells show a potential value in repair of mental nerve injury. PMID:25206604

  2. Delayed Presentation of Sciatic Nerve Injury after Total Hip Arthroplasty: Neurosurgical Considerations, Diagnosis, and Management

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Linda W.; Veeravagu, Anand; Azad, Tej D.; Harraher, Ciara; Ratliff, John K.

    2016-01-01

    Background  Total hip arthroplasty (THA) is an established treatment for end-stage arthritis, congenital deformity, and trauma with good long-term clinical and functional outcomes. Delayed sciatic nerve injury is a rare complication after THA that requires prompt diagnosis and management. Methods  We present a case of sciatic nerve motor and sensory deficit in a 52-year-old patient 2 years after index left THA. Electromyography (EMG) results and imaging with radiographs and CT of the affected hip demonstrated an aberrant acetabular cup screw in the posterior-inferior quadrant adjacent to the sciatic nerve. Case Description  The patient underwent surgical exploration that revealed injury to the peroneal division of the sciatic nerve due to direct injury from screw impingement. A literature review identified 11 patients with late-onset neuropathy after THA. Ten patients underwent surgical exploration and pain often resolved after surgery with 56% of patients recovering sensory function and 25% experiencing full recovery of motor function. Conclusions  Delayed neuropathy of the sciatic nerve is a rare complication after THA that is most often due to hardware irritation, component failure, or wear-related pseudotumor formation. Operative intervention is often pursued to explore and directly visualize the nerve with limited results in the literature showing modest relief of pain and sensory symptoms and poor restoration of motor function. PMID:27602309

  3. Decreased sensory responses in osteocalcin null mutant mice imply neuropeptide function.

    PubMed

    Patterson-Buckendahl, Patricia; Sowinska, Agnieszka; Yee, Stephanie; Patel, Dhara; Pagkalinawan, Stephen; Shahid, Muhammad; Shah, Ankit; Franz, Christopher; Benjamin, Daniel E; Pohorecky, Larissa A

    2012-07-01

    Osteocalcin, the most abundant member of the family of extracellular mineral binding gamma-carboxyglutamic acid proteins is synthesized primarily by osteoblasts. Its affinity for calcium ions is believed to limit bone mineralization. Several of the numerous hormones that regulate synthesis of osteocalcin, including glucocorticoids and parathyroid hormone, are also affected by stressful stimuli that require energy for an appropriate response. Based on our observations of OC responding to stressful sensory stimuli, the expression of OC in mouse and rat sensory ganglia was confirmed. It was thus hypothesized that the behavioral responses of the OC knockout mouse to stressful sensory stimuli would be abnormal. To test this hypothesis, behaviors related to sensory aspects of the stress response were quantified in nine groups of mice, aged 4-14 months, comparing knockout with their wild-type counterparts in six distinctly different behavioral tests. Resulting data indicated the following statistically significant differences: open field grooming frequency following saline injection, wild-type > knockout; paw stimulation with Von Frey fibers, knockout < wild-type; balance beam, knockout mobility < WT; thermal sensitivity to heat (tail flick), knockout < wild-type; and cold, knockout < wild-type. Insignificant differences in hanging wire test indicate that these responses are unrelated to reduced muscle strength. Each of these disparate environmental stimuli provided data indicating alterations of responses in knockout mice that suggest participation of osteocalcin in transmission of information about those sensory stimuli. PMID:22350212

  4. Vagus Nerve Stimulation during Rehabilitative Training Improves Functional Recovery after Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Hays, Seth A.; Khodaparast, Navid; Hulsey, Daniel R.; Ruiz, Andrea; Sloan, Andrew M.; Rennaker, Robert L.; Kilgard, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) delivered during rehabilitative training enhances neuroplasticity and improves recovery in models of cortical ischemic stroke. However, VNS therapy has not been applied in a model of subcortical intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). We hypothesized that VNS paired with rehabilitative training after ICH would enhance recovery of forelimb motor function beyond rehabilitative training alone. Methods Rats were trained to perform an automated, quantitative measure of forelimb function. Once proficient, rats received an intrastriatal injection of bacterial collagenase to induce ICH. Rats then underwent VNS paired with rehabilitative training (VNS+Rehab; N = 14) or rehabilitative training without VNS (Rehab; N = 12). Rehabilitative training began at least 9 days after ICH and continued for 6 weeks. Results VNS paired with rehabilitative training significantly improved recovery of forelimb function compared to rehabilitative training without VNS. The VNS+Rehab group displayed a 77% recovery of function, while the Rehab group only exhibited 29% recovery. Recovery was sustained after cessation of stimulation. Both groups performed similar amounts of trials during rehabilitative and lesion size was not different between groups. Conclusions VNS paired with rehabilitative training confers significantly improved forelimb recovery following ICH compared to rehabilitative training without VNS. PMID:25147331

  5. Interhemispheric Plasticity Protects the Deafferented Somatosensory Cortex from Functional Takeover After Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Koretsky, Alan P.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Functional changes across brain hemispheres have been reported after unilateral cortical or peripheral nerve injury. Interhemispheric callosal connections usually underlie this cortico-cortical plasticity. However, the effect of the altered callosal inputs on local cortical plasticity in the adult brain is not well studied. Ipsilateral functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) activation has been reliably detected in the deafferented barrel cortex (BC) at 2 weeks after unilateral infraorbital denervation (IO) in adult rats. The ipsilateral fMRI signal relies on callosal-mediated interhemispheric plasticity. This form of interhemispheric plasticity provides a good chronic model to study the interaction between callosal inputs and local cortical plasticity. The receptive field of forepaw in the primary somatosensory cortex (S1), which is adjacent to the BC, was mapped with fMRI. The S1 receptive field expanded to take over a portion of the BC in 2 weeks after both ascending inputs and callosal inputs were removed in IO rats with ablated contralateral BC (IO+ablation). This expansion, estimated specifically by fMRI mapping, is significantly larger than what has been observed in the IO rats with intact callosal connectivity, as well as in the rats with sham surgery. This work indicates that altered callosal inputs prevent the functional takeover of the deafferented BC from adjacent cortices and may help preserve the functional identity of the BC. PMID:25117691

  6. Cutaneous tissue damage induces long-lasting nociceptive sensitization and regulation of cellular stress- and nerve injury-associated genes in sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Rau, Kristofer K; Hill, Caitlin E; Harrison, Benjamin J; Venkat, Gayathri; Koenig, Heidi M; Cook, Sarah B; Rabchevsky, Alexander G; Taylor, Bradley K; Hai, Tsonwin; Petruska, Jeffrey C

    2016-09-01

    Tissue damage is one of the major etiological factors in the emergence of chronic/persistent pain, although mechanisms remain enigmatic. Using incision of the back skin of adult rats as a model for tissue damage, we observed sensitization in a nociceptive reflex enduring to 28days post-incision (DPI). To determine if the enduring behavioral changes corresponded with a long-term impact of tissue damage on sensory neurons, we examined the temporal expression profile of injury-regulated genes and the electrophysiological properties of traced dorsal root ganglion (DRG) sensory neurons. The mRNA for the injury/stress-hub gene Activating Transcription Factor 3 (ATF3) was upregulated and peaked within 4 DPI, after which levels declined but remained significantly elevated out to 28 DPI, a time when the initial incision appears healed and tissue-inflammation largely resolved. Accordingly, stereological image analysis indicated that some neurons expressed ATF3 only transiently (mostly medium-large neurons), while in others it was sustained (mostly small neurons), suggesting cell-type-specific responses. In retrogradely-traced ATF3-expressing neurons, Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase type IV (CAMK4) protein levels and isolectin-B4 (IB4)-binding were suppressed whereas Growth Associated Protein-43 (GAP-43) and Neuropeptide Y (NPY) protein levels were enhanced. Electrophysiological recordings from DiI-traced sensory neurons 28 DPI showed a significant sensitization limited to ATF3-expressing neurons. Thus, ATF3 expression is revealed as a strong predictor of single cells displaying enduring pain-related electrophysiological properties. The cellular injury/stress response induced in sensory neurons by tissue damage and indicated by ATF3 expression is positioned to contribute to pain which can occur after tissue damage. PMID:27264359

  7. Onset of cholinergic efferent synaptic function in sensory hair cells of the rat cochlea.

    PubMed

    Roux, Isabelle; Wersinger, Eric; McIntosh, J Michael; Fuchs, Paul A; Glowatzki, Elisabeth

    2011-10-19

    In the developing mammalian cochlea, the sensory hair cells receive efferent innervation originating in the superior olivary complex. This input is mediated by α9/α10 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and is inhibitory due to the subsequent activation of calcium-dependent SK2 potassium channels. We examined the acquisition of this cholinergic efferent input using whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings from inner hair cells (IHCs) in acutely excised apical turns of the rat cochlea from embryonic day 21 to postnatal day 8 (P8). Responses to 1 mm acetylcholine (ACh) were detected from P0 on in almost every IHC. The ACh-activated current amplitude increased with age and demonstrated the same pharmacology as α9-containing nAChRs. Interestingly, at P0, the ACh response was not coupled to SK2 channels, so that the initial cholinergic response was excitatory and could trigger action potentials in IHCs. Coupling to SK current was detected earliest at P1 in a subset of IHCs and by P3 in every IHC studied. Clustered nAChRs and SK2 channels were found on IHCs from P1 on using Alexa Fluor 488 conjugated α-bungarotoxin and SK2 immunohistochemistry. The number of nAChRs clusters increased with age to 16 per IHC at P8. Cholinergic efferent synaptic currents first appeared in a subset of IHCs at P1 and by P3 in every IHC studied, contemporaneously with ACh-evoked SK currents, suggesting that SK2 channels may be necessary at onset of synaptic function. An analogous pattern of development was observed for the efferent synapses that form later (P6-P8) on outer hair cells in the basal cochlea. PMID:22016543

  8. Termino-lateral nerve suture in lesions of the digital nerves: clinical experience and literature review.

    PubMed

    Artiaco, S; Tos, P; Conforti, L G; Geuna, S; Battiston, B

    2010-02-01

    Documented experience of treatment of digital nerve lesions with the termino-lateral (end-to-side) nerve suture is limited. Our clinical experience of this technique is detailed here alongside a systematic review of the previous literature. We performed, from 2002 to 2008, seven termino-lateral sutures with epineural window opening for digital nerve lesions. Functional outcome was analysed using the two-point discrimination test and the Semmes-Weinstein monofilament test. The results showed a sensory recovery of S3+ in six cases and S3 in one case. The mean distance found in the two-point discrimination test was 12.7 mm (range 8-18 mm). After a review of the literature, we were able to obtain homogeneous data from 17 additional patients operated by termino-lateral coaptation. The overall number of cases included in our review was 24. A sensory recovery was observed in 23 out of 24 patients. The functional results were S0 in one case, S3 in one case, S3+ in twenty cases and S4 in two cases. Excluding the one unfavourable case, the mean distance in the two-point discrimination test was 9.7 mm (range 3-18 mm). It can thus be concluded that the treatment of digital nerve lesions with termino-lateral suture showed encouraging results. Based on the results obtained in this current study we believe that in case of loss of substance, end-to-side nerve coaptation may be an alternative to biological and synthetic tubulisation when a digital nerve reconstruction by means of nerve autograft is declined by the patient. PMID:19687081

  9. Analysis of Graph Invariants in Functional Neocortical Circuitry Reveals Generalized Features Common to Three Areas of Sensory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Gururangan, Suchin S.; Sadovsky, Alexander J.; MacLean, Jason N.

    2014-01-01

    Correlations in local neocortical spiking activity can provide insight into the underlying organization of cortical microcircuitry. However, identifying structure in patterned multi-neuronal spiking remains a daunting task due to the high dimensionality of the activity. Using two-photon imaging, we monitored spontaneous circuit dynamics in large, densely sampled neuronal populations within slices of mouse primary auditory, somatosensory, and visual cortex. Using the lagged correlation of spiking activity between neurons, we generated functional wiring diagrams to gain insight into the underlying neocortical circuitry. By establishing the presence of graph invariants, which are label-independent characteristics common to all circuit topologies, our study revealed organizational features that generalized across functionally distinct cortical regions. Regardless of sensory area, random and -nearest neighbors null graphs failed to capture the structure of experimentally derived functional circuitry. These null models indicated that despite a bias in the data towards spatially proximal functional connections, functional circuit structure is best described by non-random and occasionally distal connections. Eigenvector centrality, which quantifies the importance of a neuron in the temporal flow of circuit activity, was highly related to feedforwardness in all functional circuits. The number of nodes participating in a functional circuit did not scale with the number of neurons imaged regardless of sensory area, indicating that circuit size is not tied to the sampling of neocortex. Local circuit flow comprehensively covered angular space regardless of the spatial scale that we tested, demonstrating that circuitry itself does not bias activity flow toward pia. Finally, analysis revealed that a minimal numerical sample size of neurons was necessary to capture at least 90 percent of functional circuit topology. These data and analyses indicated that functional circuitry

  10. Short-term vagal nerve stimulation improves left ventricular function following chronic heart failure in rats

    PubMed Central

    LI, YAN; XUAN, YAN-HUA; LIU, SHUANG-SHUANG; DONG, JING; LUO, JIA-YING; SUN, ZHI-JUN

    2015-01-01

    Increasing numbers of animal and clinical investigations have demonstrated the effectiveness of long-term electrical vagal nerve stimulation (VNS) on chronic heart failure (CHF). The present study investigated the effects of short-term VNS on the hemodynamics of cardiac remodeling and cardiac excitation-contraction coupling (ECP) in an animal model of CHF following a large myocardial infarction. At 3 weeks subsequent to ligation of the left coronary artery, the surviving rats were randomized into vagal and sham-stimulated groups. The right vagal nerve of the CHF rats was stimulated for 72 h. The vagal nerve was stimulated with rectangular pulses of 40 ms duration at 1 Hz, 5 V. The treated rats, compared with the untreated rats, had significantly higher left ventricular ejection fraction (54.86±9.73, vs. 45.60±5.51%; P=0.025) and left ventricular fractional shortening (25.31±6.30, vs. 15.42±8.49%; P=0.013), and lower levels of brain natriuretic peptide (10.07±2.63, vs. 19.95±5.22 ng/ml; P=0.001). The improvement in cardiac pumping function was accompanied by a decrease in left ventricular end diastolic volume (1.11±0.50, vs. 1.54±0.57 cm3; P=0.032) and left ventricular end systolic volume (0.50±0.28, vs. 0.87±0.36 cm3; P=0.007). Furthermore, the expression levels of ryanodine receptor type 2 (RyR2) and sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium adenosine triphosphatase (SERCA2) were significantly higher in the treated rats compared with the untreated rats (P=0.011 and P=0.001 for RyR2 and SERCA2, respectively). Therefore, VNS was beneficial to the CHF rats through the prevention of cardiac remodeling and improvement of cardiac ECP. PMID:25873055

  11. In patients with a tumour invading the phrenic nerve does prophylactic diaphragm plication improve postoperative lung function?

    PubMed

    Beattie, Gwyn W; Dunn, William G; Asif, Mohammed

    2016-09-01

    A best evidence topic in thoracic surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was 'In patients with tumours involving the phrenic nerve, does prophylactic diaphragm plication improve lung function following tumour resection?' Using the reported search, 258 papers were found of which 6 represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. Three case reports and one case series represent 37 patients in the literature along with two relevant animal studies. Patients treated with prophylactic plication at the time of injury or sacrifice of the phrenic nerve had reduced radiological evidence of diaphragm paralysis, lower reported shortness of breath and reduced requirement for ventilatory support. In patients with prophylactic diaphragm plication and a concurrent pulmonary resection, the predicted postoperative lung function correlated closely with the postoperative measured FEV1, FVC and gas transfer. The postoperative measured FEV1 was reported as 86-98%, the FVC 82-89% and gas transfer 97% of the predicted values. Two animal models investigate the mechanics of respiration, spirometry and gas exchange following diaphragmatic plication. A randomized control study in four dogs measured a 50% reduction in tidal volume and respiratory rate, a 40% decrease in arterial PO2 and a 43% increase in arterial CO2 when the phrenic nerve was crushed in animals with a pneumonectomy but without prophylactic diaphragm plication. A further randomized control animal study with 28 dogs found that plicating the diaphragm after unilateral phrenic nerve transection resulted in a significant increase in tidal volume and lung compliance and a significant decrease in respiratory frequency and the work of breathing. Prophylactic diaphragm plication may preserve lung function, reduce the risk of

  12. Influence of putrescine and carnauba wax on functional and sensory quality of pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) fruits during storage.

    PubMed

    Barman, Kalyan; Asrey, Ram; Pal, R K; Kaur, Charanjit; Jha, S K

    2014-01-01

    Functional properties (anthocyanins, antioxidant, ascorbic acid and tannin) and sensory score were determined in pomegranate fruits at two storage temperatures (3 and 5 °C) after treatment with 2 mM putrescine and 1 : 10 carnauba wax (carnauba wax : water). The treatments (putrescine and carnauba wax) were given by immersion method followed by storage up to 60 days. Both treatments retained significantly higher anthocyanins, antioxidant, ascorbic acid, tannin and sensory qualities as compared with control fruits under both the storage conditions. Combined application of putrescine + carnauba wax showed better response in retaining functional properties than putrescine treated or nontreated fruits. The impacts of putrescine and carnauba wax treatments were found more pronounced after 30 days at 3-5 °C storage temperature in retaining functional and sensory qualities. After 60 days of storage, putrescine + carnauba wax retained about 25% higher antioxidant activity both at 3 and 5 °C storage temperatures. PMID:24426055

  13. Methyl-CpG Binding Protein 2 (Mecp2) Regulates Sensory Function Through Sema5b and Robo2

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Wan Y.; Lim, Zhi H.; Korzh, Vladimir; Pietri, Thomas; Goh, Eyleen L. K.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding the MECP2 underlies Rett syndrome, a neurodevelopmental disorder in young females. Although reduced pain sensitivity in Rett syndrome patients and in partial MeCP2 deficient mice had been reported, these previous studies focused predominantly on motor impairments. Therefore, it is still unknown how MeCP2 is involved in these sensory defects. In addition, the human disease manifestations where males with mutations in MECP2 gene normally do not survive and females show typical neurological symptoms only after 18 months of age, is profoundly different in MeCP2-deficient mouse where all animals survived, and males but not females displayed Rett syndrome phenotypes at an early age. Thus, the mecp2-deficient zebrafish serves as an additional animal model to aid in deciphering the role and mechanisms of Mecp2 in neurodevelopment. Here, we used two independent methods of silencing expression of Mecp2 in zebrafish to uncover a novel role of Mecp2 in trigeminal ganglion sensory neurons during the embryonic development. mecp2-null mutation and morpholino-mediated silencing of Mecp2 in the zebrafish embryos resulted in defects in peripheral innervation of trigeminal sensory neurons and consequently affecting the sensory function. These defects were demonstrated to be dependent on the expression of Sema5b and Robo2. The expression of both proteins together could better overcome the defects caused by Mecp2 deficiency as compared to the expression of either Sema5b or Robo2 alone. Sema5b and Robo2 were downregulated upon Mecp2 silencing or in mecp2-null embryos, and Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay using antibody against Mecp2 was able to pull down specific regions of both Sema5b and Robo2 promoters, showing interaction between Mecp2 and the promoters of both genes. In addition, cell-specific expression of Mecp2 can overcome the innervation and sensory response defects in Mecp2 morphants indicating that these MeCP2-mediated defects are cell

  14. Assessment of neonatal diaphragm function using magnetic stimulation of the phrenic nerves.

    PubMed

    Rafferty, G F; Greenough, A; Dimitriou, G; Kavadia, V; Laubscher, B; Polkey, M I; Harris, M L; Moxham, J

    2000-12-01

    A nonvolitional test to assess diaphragm strength in neonates has not been previously described. Our aim was to assess the feasibility of cervical (CMS) and anterior (AMS) magnetic stimulation of the phrenic nerves in neonates. Double circular stimulating coils (90-mm) were used. For CMS, one coil was placed over the cervical spine to bilaterally stimulate the phrenic nerve roots, whereas for AMS the coils were placed on the anterolateral aspect of the neck to allow unilateral and bilateral stimulation. Diaphragm contractility was assessed as transdiaphragmatic pressure (Pdi) measured with balloon catheters positioned in the midesophagus and stomach. Stimulus supramaximality was assessed by examining diaphragm twitch Pdi (TwPdi) across a range of stimulator outputs; 85, 90, 95, and 100% of maximum. Pressure signals were measured by differential pressure transducer and displayed in real time on a computer. Patients were studied supine during sleep. CMS was performed on seven neonates (mean gestational age [GA] 38 wk, range 33 to 40 wk) and AMS on 18 neonates (mean GA 37 wk, range 32 to 41 wk). The mean (SD) TwPdi with CMS was 2.5 (0.8) cm H(2)O. CMS was not supramaximal; reducing the stimulator output below 100% caused marked reductions in TwPdi, also the shape of the pressure waveforms suggested that CMS may not have activated the diaphragm alone. Mean (SD) TwPdi with AMS was 4.5 (1.3) cm H(2)O on the left, 4.1 (0.9) cm H(2)O on the right, and 8.7 (3.9) cm H(2)O for bilateral stimulation. The shape of the pressure waveforms suggested that AMS was more specific and a plateau in TwPdi at higher stimulator outputs indicated supramaximality. We conclude that AMS may provide a useful technique to assess diaphragm function in the neonate. PMID:11112160

  15. Channels Active in the Excitability of Nerves and Skeletal Muscles across the Neuromuscular Junction: Basic Function and Pathophysiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Barbara E.

    2008-01-01

    Ion channels are essential for the basic physiological function of excitable cells such as nerve, skeletal, cardiac, and smooth muscle cells. Mutations in genes that encode ion channels have been identified to cause various diseases and disorders known as channelopathies. An understanding of how individual ion channels are involved in the…

  16. Function-Triggering Antibodies to the Adhesion Molecule L1 Enhance Recovery after Injury of the Adult Mouse Femoral Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Guseva, Daria; Loers, Gabriele; Schachner, Melitta

    2014-01-01

    L1 is among the few adhesion molecules that favors repair after trauma in the adult central nervous system of vertebrates by promoting neuritogenesis and neuronal survival, among other beneficial features. In the peripheral nervous system, L1 is up-regulated in Schwann cells and regrowing axons after nerve damage, but the functional consequences of this expression remain unclear. Our previous study of L1-deficient mice in a femoral nerve injury model showed an unexpected improved functional recovery, attenuated motoneuronal cell death, and enhanced Schwann cell proliferation, being attributed to the persistent synthesis of neurotrophic factors. On the other hand, transgenic mice over-expressing L1 in neurons led to improved remyelination, but not improved functional recovery. The present study was undertaken to investigate whether the monoclonal L1 antibody 557 that triggers beneficial L1 functions in vitro would trigger these also in femoral nerve repair. We analyzed femoral nerve regeneration in C57BL/6J mice that received this antibody in a hydrogel filled conduit connecting the cut and sutured nerve before its bifurcation, leading to short-term release of antibody by diffusion. Video-based quantitative analysis of motor functions showed improved recovery when compared to mice treated with conduits containing PBS in the hydrogel scaffold, as a vehicle control. This improved recovery was associated with attenuated motoneuron loss, remyelination and improved precision of preferential motor reinnervation. We suggest that function-triggering L1 antibodies applied to the lesion site at the time of injury over a limited time period will not only be beneficial in peripheral, but also central nervous system regeneration. PMID:25393007

  17. Differences in autonomic nerve function in patients with silent and symptomatic myocardial ischaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Shakespeare, C. F.; Katritsis, D.; Crowther, A.; Cooper, I. C.; Coltart, J. D.; Webb-Peploe, M. W.

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Autonomic neuropathy provides a mechanism for the absence of symptoms in silent myocardial ischaemia, but characterisation of the type of neuropathy is lacking. AIM--To characterise and compare autonomic nerve function in patients with silent and symptomatic myocardial ischaemia. METHODS AND RESULTS--The Valsalva manoeuvre, heart rate variation (HRV) in response to deep breathing and standing, lower body negative pressure, isometric handgrip, and the cold pressor test were performed by patients with silent (n = 25) and symptomatic (n = 25) ambulatory ischaemia and by controls (n = 21). No difference in parasympathetic efferent function between patients with silent and symptomatic ischaemia was recorded, but both had significantly less HRV in response to standing than the controls (p < 0.005 for silent and p < 0.01 for symptomatic). Patients with silent ischaemia showed an increased propensity for peripheral vasodilatation compared with symptomatic patients (p < 0.02) and controls (p < 0.04). Impaired sympathetic function was found in patients with pure silent ischaemia (n = 4) compared with the remaining patients with silent ischaemia whose pain pathways were presumed to be intact. CONCLUSIONS--Patients with silent ischaemia and pain pathways presumed to be intact have an enhanced peripheral vasodilator response, and if this applied to the coronary vasculature it could provide a mechanism for limiting ischaemia to below the pain threshold. Patients with pure silent ischaemia have evidence of sympathetic autonomic dysfunction. Images PMID:8297687

  18. Parametric transfer function analysis and modeling of blood flow autoregulation in the optic nerve head

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jintao; Liang, Yi; Thompson, Simon; Cull, Grant; Wang, Lin

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to establish a parametric transfer function to describe the relationship between ocular perfusion pressure (OPP) and blood flow (BF) in the optic nerve head (ONH). A third-order parametric theoretical model was proposed to describe the ONH OPP-BF relationship within the lower OPP range of the autoregulation curve (< 80 mmHg) based on experimentally induced BF response to a rapid intraocular pressure (IOP) increase in 6 rhesus monkeys. The theoretical and actual data fitted well and suggest that this parametric third-order transfer function can effectively describe both the linear and nonlinear feature in dynamic and static autoregulation in the ONH within the OPP range studied. It shows that the BF autoregulation fully functions when the OPP was > 40 mmHg and becomes incomplete when the OPP was < 40 mmHg. This model may be used to help investigating the features of autoregulation in the ONH under different experimental conditions. PMID:24665355

  19. Prevention of iatrogenic inferior alveolar nerve injuries in relation to dental procedures.

    PubMed

    Renton, T

    2010-09-01

    This article aims to review current hypotheses on the aetiology and prevention of inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) injuries in relation to dental procedures. The inferior alveolar nerve can be damaged during many dental procedures, including administration of local anaesthetic, implant bed preparation and placement, endodontics, third molar surgery and other surgical interventions. Damage to sensory nerves can result in anaesthesia, paraesthesia, pain, or a combination of the three. Pain is common in inferior alveolar nerve injuries, resulting in significant functional problems. The significant disability associated with these nerve injuries may also result in increasing numbers of medico-legal claims. Many of these iatrogenic nerve injuries can be avoided with careful patient assessment and planning. Furthermore, if the injury occurs there are emerging strategies that may facilitate recovery. The emphasis of this review is on how we may prevent these injuries and facilitate resolution in the early post surgical phase. PMID:21133047

  20. Active compounds and distinctive sensory features provided by American ginseng (Panax quinquefolius L.) extract in a new functional milk beverage.

    PubMed

    Tárrega, A; Salvador, A; Meyer, M; Feuillère, N; Ibarra, A; Roller, M; Terroba, D; Madera, C; Iglesias, J R; Echevarría, J; Fiszman, S

    2012-08-01

    American ginseng (Panax quinquefolius L.) has recognized neurocognitive effects, and a ginsenoside-rich extract of the root of the plant has been shown to improve cognitive functions in young adults. This study aimed at assessing the chemical and sensory profiles of a UHT-treated, low-lactose functional milk containing American ginseng. Individual ginsenosides in the milk were analyzed by HPLC. Descriptive sensory analysis was performed by a trained panel to quantitatively document sensory changes resulting from the addition of ginseng and the UHT process on flavored and unflavored milks. Consumer acceptance of the product was also investigated. Total ginsenoside content in the UHT-treated milk enriched with the ginseng extract after UHT process treatment was 7.52 mg/100 g of milk, corresponding to a recovery of 67.6% compared with the content in the unprocessed extract. The intake of 150 to 300 mL of this ginseng-enriched milk provides the amount of total ginsenosides (11.5 to 23 mg) necessary to improve cognitive function after its consumption. Both the presence of ginsenosides and their thermal treatment affected some sensory properties of the milk, most notably an increase in bitterness and metallic taste, the appearance of a brownish color, and a decrease in milky flavor. Levels of brown color, bitterness, and metallic taste were highest in the industrially processed ginseng-enriched milk. The bitterness attributable to ginseng extract was reduced by addition of vanilla flavor and sucralose. A consumer exploratory study revealed that a niche of consumers exists who are willing to consume this type of product. PMID:22818438

  1. Uterine autonomic nerve innervation plays a crucial role in regulating rat uterine mast cell functions during embryo implantation.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xue-Jun; Huang, Li-Bo; Qiao, Hui-Li; Deng, Ze-Pei; Fa, Jing-Jing

    2009-12-01

    To explore the potential mechanism of how uterine innervations would affect the uterine mast cell (MC) population and functions during the periimplantation. We herein first examined the consequence of uterine neurectomy on embryo implantation events. We observed that amputation of autonomic nerves innervating the uterus led to on-time implantation failure in rats. Exploiting MC culture and ELISA approaches, we then further analyzed the effect of neurectomy on cellular histamine levels and its release from uterine MCs, to elucidate the relation of the autonomic nerves and local cellular immunity in the uterine during early pregnancy. We observed that disconnection of autonomic nerve innervation significantly increased the population of uterine MCs. Most interestingly, these increased number of uterine MCs in neuroectomized rats contained a much reduced cellular level of histamine. Our subsequent challenge experiments revealed that uterine MCs in nerve amputated rats exhibited enhanced histamine releasing rate in response to substance P and antiIgE, suggesting loss of nerve innervation in the uterus not only increases the population of uterine MCs, but also facilitates the release of histamine from MCs, thus subsequently interfere with the normal implantation process. Collectively, our findings provide a new line of evidence supporting the concept that immune-neuro-endocrine network plays important role during pregnancy establishment and maintenance. PMID:19765668

  2. Functional Expression of Electron Transport Chain and FoF1-ATP Synthase in Optic Nerve Myelin Sheath.

    PubMed

    Bartolucci, Martina; Ravera, Silvia; Garbarino, Greta; Ramoino, Paola; Ferrando, Sara; Calzia, Daniela; Candiani, Simona; Morelli, Alessandro; Panfoli, Isabella

    2015-11-01

    Our previous studies reported evidence for aerobic ATP synthesis by myelin from both bovine brainstem and rat sciatic nerve. Considering that the optic nerve displays a high oxygen demand, here we evaluated the expression and activity of the five Respiratory Complexes in myelin purified from either bovine or murine optic nerves. Western blot analyses on isolated myelin confirmed the expression of ND4L (subunit of Complex I), COX IV (subunit of Complex IV) and β subunit of F1Fo-ATP synthase. Moreover, spectrophotometric and in-gel activity assays on isolated myelin, as well as histochemical activity assays on both bovine and murine transversal optic nerve sections showed that the respiratory Complexes are functional in myelin and are organized in a supercomplex. Expression of oxidative phosphorylation proteins was also evaluated on bovine optic nerve sections by confocal and transmission electron microscopy. Having excluded a mitochondrial contamination of isolated myelin and considering the results form in situ analyses, it is proposed that the oxidative phosphorylation machinery is truly resident in optic myelin sheath. Data may shed a new light on the