Science.gov

Sample records for seo proteins results

  1. Metal Vacancy Ordering in an Antiperovskite Resulting in Two Modifications of Fe2 SeO.

    PubMed

    Valldor, Martin; Wright, Taylor; Fitch, Andrew; Prots, Yurii

    2016-08-01

    Small, red Fe2 SeO single crystals in two modifications were obtained from a CsCl flux. The metastable α-phase is pseudo-tetragonal (Cmce, a=16.4492(8) Å, b=11.1392(4) Å, c=11.1392(4) Å), whereas the β-phase is trigonal (P31 , a=9.8349(4) Å, c=6.9591(4) Å)) and thermodynamically stable within a narrow temperature range. Both crystal structures were solved from twinned specimens. The enantiomers of the β-phase appear as racemic mixtures. Selenium and oxygen form two individual interpenetrating primitive cubic lattices, giving a bcc packing. A quasi-octahedrally coordinated iron atom is found close to the center of each surface of the selenium sublattice. The difference between the α- and β-phases is the distribution of iron at 2/3 of the surfaces. α- and β-Fe2 SeO are comparable with metal-vacancy-ordered antiperovskites. Each Fe/O lattice can also be described in terms of vertex-sharing OFe4 tetrahedra, with a crystal structure similar to that of an antisilicate. Iron is divalent and has a high-spin d(6) (S=2) configuration. The β-phase exhibits magnetoelectric coupling. PMID:27309149

  2. Calcium powered phloem protein of SEO gene family "Forisome" functions in wound sealing and act as biomimetic smart materials.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Vineet Kumar; Tuteja, Narendra

    2014-06-01

    Forisomes protein belongs to SEO gene family and is unique to Fabaceae family. These proteins are located in sieve tubes of phloem and function to prevent loss of nutrient-rich photoassimilates, upon mechanical injury/wounding. Forisome protein is also known as ATP independent, mechanically active proteins. Despite the wealth of information role of forisome in plants are not yet fully understood. Recent reports suggest that forisomes protein can act as ideal model to study self assembly mechanism for development of nanotechnological devices like microfluidic system application in space exploration mission. Improvement in micro instrument is highly demanding and has been a key technology by NASA in future space exploration missions. Based on its physical parameters, forisome are found to be ideal biomimetic materials for micro fluidic system because the conformational shifts can be replicated in vitro and are fully reversible over large number of cycles. By the use of protein engineering forisome recombinant protein can be tailored. Due to its unique ability to convert chemical energy into mechanical energy forisome has received much attention. For nanotechnological application and handling biomolecules such as DNA, RNA, protein and cell as a whole microfluidic system will be the most powerful technology. The discovery of new biomimetic smart materials has been a key factor in development of space science and its requirements in such a challenging environment. The field of microfludic, particularly in terms of development of its components along with identification of new biomimetic smart materials, deserves more attention. More biophysical investigation is required to characterize it to make it more suitable under parameters of performance. PMID:24905822

  3. Calcium powered phloem protein of SEO gene family "Forisome" functions in wound sealing and act as biomimetic smart materials.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Vineet Kumar; Tuteja, Narendra

    2014-01-01

    Forisomes protein belongs to SEO gene family and is unique to Fabaceae family. These proteins are located in sieve tubes of phloem and function to prevent loss of nutrient-rich photoassimilates, upon mechanical injury/wounding. Forisome protein is also known as ATP independent, mechanically active proteins. Despite the wealth of information role of forisome in plants are not yet fully understood. Recent reports suggest that forisomes protein can act as ideal model to study self assembly mechanism for development of nanotechnological devices like microfluidic system application in space exploration mission. Improvement in micro instrument is highly demanding and has been a key technology by NASA in future space exploration missions. Based on its physical parameters, forisome are found to be ideal biomimetic materials for micro fluidic system because the conformational shifts can be replicated in vitro and are fully reversible over large number of cycles. By the use of protein engineering forisome recombinant protein can be tailored. Due to its unique ability to convert chemical energy into mechanical energy forisome has received much attention. For nanotechnological application and handling biomolecules such as DNA, RNA, protein and cell as a whole microfluidic system will be the most powerful technology. The discovery of new biomimetic smart materials has been a key factor in development of space science and its requirements in such a challenging environment. The field of microfludic, particularly in terms of development of its components along with identification of new biomimetic smart materials, deserves more attention. More biophysical investigation is required to characterize it to make it more suitable under parameters of performance. PMID:25763691

  4. Calcium powered phloem protein of SEO gene family “Forisome” functions in wound sealing and act as biomimetic smart materials

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Vineet Kumar; Tuteja, Narendra

    2014-01-01

    Forisomes protein belongs to SEO gene family and is unique to Fabaceae family. These proteins are located in sieve tubes of phloem and function to prevent loss of nutrient-rich photoassimilates, upon mechanical injury/wounding. Forisome protein is also known as ATP independent, mechanically active proteins. Despite the wealth of information role of forisome in plants are not yet fully understood. Recent reports suggest that forisomes protein can act as ideal model to study self assembly mechanism for development of nanotechnological devices like microfluidic system application in space exploration mission. Improvement in micro instrument is highly demanding and has been a key technology by NASA in future space exploration missions. Based on its physical parameters, forisome are found to be ideal biomimetic materials for micro fluidic system because the conformational shifts can be replicated in vitro and are fully reversible over large number of cycles. By the use of protein engineering forisome recombinant protein can be tailored. Due to its unique ability to convert chemical energy into mechanical energy forisome has received much attention. For nanotechnological application and handling biomolecules such as DNA, RNA, protein and cell as a whole microfluidic system will be the most powerful technology. The discovery of new biomimetic smart materials has been a key factor in development of space science and its requirements in such a challenging environment. The field of microfludic, particularly in terms of development of its components along with identification of new biomimetic smart materials, deserves more attention. More biophysical investigation is required to characterize it to make it more suitable under parameters of performance. PMID:25763691

  5. Synchronous Earth Observatory Satellite /SEOS/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, L. S.

    1974-01-01

    NASA/GSFC is currently studying the applications and technical requirements for a Synchronous Earth Observations Satellite (SEOS). Such a satellite would combine the relatively high resolution and multi-spectral capability of the Earth Resources Technology Satellite (ERTS) with the on-station continuous monitoring of the Synchronous Meteorological Satellite (SMS). SEOS capability is geared to perform disaster warning of tornadoes and floods as well as to monitor transient phenomena affecting earth resources (e.g., green waves and algae blooms). The heart of the system is a Large Earth Survey Telescope (LEST) which has a designed 1.5 meter diameter. Spectral bands in the visible, near- and far-infrared have been selected to optimize SEOS utility. A microwave sounder will be used in conjunction with the LEST for meteorological applications.

  6. SEOS frame camera applications study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A research and development satellite is discussed which will provide opportunities for observation of transient phenomena that fall within the fixed viewing circle of the spacecraft. The evaluation of possible applications for frame cameras, for SEOS, are studied. The computed lens characteristics for each camera are listed.

  7. CEOS SEO and GISS Meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Killough, Brian; Stover, Shelley

    2008-01-01

    The Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) provides a brief to the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) regarding the CEOS Systems Engineering Office (SEO) and current work on climate requirements and analysis. A "system framework" is provided for the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS). SEO climate-related tasks are outlined including the assessment of essential climate variable (ECV) parameters, use of the "systems framework" to determine relevant informational products and science models and the performance of assessments and gap analyses of measurements and missions for each ECV. Climate requirements, including instruments and missions, measurements, knowledge and models, and decision makers, are also outlined. These requirements would establish traceability from instruments to products and services allowing for benefit evaluation of instruments and measurements. Additionally, traceable climate requirements would provide a better understanding of global climate models.

  8. System trades for the SEOS telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritter, M.

    1975-01-01

    The Synchronous Earth Observation Satellite (SEOS) is a geostationary system which provides unique possibilities for earth surveillance. Questions of SEOS applications are considered, taking into account the employment of the Large Earth Survey Telescope. Aspects of performance and costs are examined. The generation of a value function in connection with a quantitative ranking of the applications is discussed along with an analysis performed to determine those parameter values which will maximize mission performance capability at given levels of system cost.

  9. Earth resources applications of the Synchronous Earth Observatory Satellite (SEOS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowe, D. S.; Cook, J. J.

    1973-01-01

    The results are presented of a four month study to define earth resource applications which are uniquely suited to data collection by a geosynchronous satellite. While such a satellite could also perform many of the functions of ERTS, or its low orbiting successors, those applications were considered in those situations where requirements for timely observation limit the capability of ERTS or EOS. Thus, the application presented could be used to justify a SEOS.

  10. Synthesis, structure, and characterization of two new polar sodium tungsten selenites: Na2(WO3)3(SeO3)·2H2O and Na6(W6O19)(SeO3)2.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Sau Doan; Halasyamani, P Shiv

    2013-03-01

    Two new quaternary sodium tungsten selenites, Na2(WO3)3(SeO3)·2H2O (P31c) and Na6(W6O19)(SeO3)2 (C2), have been synthesized and characterized. The former exhibits a hexagonal tungsten oxide layered structure, whereas the latter has a one-dimensional "ribbon" structure. The layers and "ribbons" consist of distorted WO6 and asymmetric SeO3 polyhedra. The layers in Na2(WO3)3(SeO3)·2H2O and the "ribbons" in Na6(W6O19)(SeO3)2 are separated by Na(+) cations. Powder second-harmonic-generation (SHG) measurements on Na2(WO3)3(SeO3)·2H2O and Na6(W6O19)(SeO3)2 using 1064 nm radiation reveal SHG efficiencies of approximately 450× and 20× α-SiO2, respectively. Particle size versus SHG efficiency measurements indicate that the materials are type 1 non-phase-matchable. Converse piezoelectric measurements result in d33 values of approximately 23 and 12 pm/V, whereas pyroelectric measurements reveal coefficients of -0.41 and -1.10 μC/m(2)·K at 60 °C for Na2(WO3)3(SeO3)·2H2O and Na6(W6O19)(SeO3)2, respectively. Frequency-dependent polarization measurements confirm that the materials are nonferroelectric; i.e., the macroscopic polarization is not reversible, or "switchable". IR and UV-vis spectroscopy, thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis measurements, and electron localization function calculations were also done for the materials. Crystal data: Na2(WO3)3(SeO3)·2H2O, trigonal, space group P31c (No. 159), a = 7.2595(6) Å, b = 7.2595(6) Å, c = 12.4867(13) Å, V = 569.89(9) Å(3), Z = 2; Na6(W6O19)(SeO3)2, monoclinic, space group C2 (No. 5), a = 42.169(8) Å, b = 7.2690(15) Å, c = 6.7494(13) Å, β = 98.48(3)°, V = 2046.2(7) Å(3), Z = 4. PMID:23425251

  11. RNA adducts with Na 2SeO 4 and Na 2SeO 3 - Stability and structural features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nafisi, Shohreh; Manouchehri, Firouzeh; Montazeri, Maryam

    2011-12-01

    Selenium compounds are widely available in dietary supplements and have been extensively studied for their antioxidant and anticancer properties. Low blood Se levels were found to be associated with an increased incidence and mortality from various types of cancers. Although many in vivo and clinical trials have been conducted using these compounds, their biochemical and chemical mechanisms of efficacy are the focus of much current research. This study was designed to examine the interaction of Na 2SeO 4 and Na 2SeO 3 with RNA in aqueous solution at physiological conditions, using a constant RNA concentration (6.25 mM) and various sodium selenate and sodium selenite/polynucleotide (phosphate) ratios of 1/80, 1/40, 1/20, 1/10, 1/5, 1/2 and 1/1. Fourier transform infrared, UV-Visible spectroscopic methods were used to determine the drug binding modes, the binding constants, and the stability of Na 2SeO 4 and Na 2SeO 3-RNA complexes in aqueous solution. Spectroscopic evidence showed that Na 2SeO 4 and Na 2SeO 3 bind to the major and minor grooves of RNA ( via G, A and U bases) with some degree of the Se-phosphate (PO 2) interaction for both compounds with overall binding constants of K(Na 2SeO 4-RNA) = 8.34 × 10 3 and K(Na 2SeO 3-RNA) = 4.57 × 10 3 M -1. The order of selenium salts-biopolymer stability was Na 2SeO 4-RNA > Na 2SeO 3-RNA. RNA aggregations occurred at higher selenium concentrations. No biopolymer conformational changes were observed upon Na 2SeO 4 and Na 2SeO 3 interactions, while RNA remains in the A-family structure.

  12. Rapid, room-temperature synthesis of amorphous selenium/protein composites using Capsicum annuum L extract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shikuo; Shen, Yuhua; Xie, Anjian; Yu, Xuerong; Zhang, Xiuzhen; Yang, Liangbao; Li, Chuanhao

    2007-10-01

    We describe the formation of amorphous selenium (α-Se)/protein composites using Capsicum annuum L extract to reduce selenium ions (SeO32-) at room temperature. The reaction occurs rapidly and the process is simple and easy to handle. A protein with a molecular weight of 30 kDa extracted from Capsicum annuum L not only reduces the SeO32- ions to Se0, but also controls the nucleation and growth of Se0, and even participates in the formation of α-Se/protein composites. The size and shell thickness of the α-Se/protein composites increases with high Capsicum annuum L extract concentration, and decreases with low reaction solution pH. The results suggest that this eco-friendly, biogenic synthesis strategy could be widely used for preparing inorganic/organic biocomposites. In addition, we also discuss the possible mechanism of the reduction of SeO32- ions by Capsicum annuum L extract.

  13. Seos - EARSEL'S Project on Science Education Through Earth Observation for High Schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuter, R.

    2011-09-01

    SEOS is an initiative for using remote sensing in science education curricula in high schools funded under the 6th Framework Programme of the European Commission (EC). Eleven partners from several European countries, in cooperation with the European Space Agency (ESA) and teachers from European high schools, created e-learning tutorials for science students in high schools. The tutorials cover many disciplines such as physics, biology, geography, mathematics and engineering, emphasising the interdisciplinary character of remote sensing. They are the core element of the SEOS Learning Management System, allowing teachers to create their own courses, to distribute already available or new worksheets to the students for homework and to collect the results. Forums are available for teachers, students and other users to exchange information and discuss topics relevant for their study.

  14. On the dielectric susceptibility calculation in the incommensurate phase of K2SeO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslanyan, T. A.

    2010-10-01

    It is shown that the thermodynamic potential of the domain-like incommensurate (IC) phase of the K2SeO4crystal (viewed as a model for the IC-C transition) should be supplemented with a term, taking into account the local, Lorentz electric field. The latter qualitatively changes the result of calculation of the dielectric susceptibility for this IC structure by Nattermann and Trimper, J. Phys. C: Solid State Phys. 14, 1603, (1981), and gives phase transition to the ferroelectric IC phase obtained by Aslanyan, Phys. Rev. B 70, 024102, (2004).

  15. Synthesis and crystal structures of two inorganic-organic hybrid vanadium selenites with layered structures: (DABCOH 2)[(VO 2)(SeO 3)] 2·1.25H 2O and (pipeH 2)[(VO) 2(C 2O 4)(SeO 3) 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Zhaoxun; Zhang, Jiamin; Gu, Yongqing; Wang, Tianxi; Lou, Tianjun

    2009-02-01

    The reactions of SeO 2 with V 2O 5 or VOSO 4 in the presence of different organic amine yield two novel vanadium selenites with layered structures, formulated as (DABCOH 2)[(VO 2)(SeO 3)] 2·1.25H 2O 1 (DABCO = 1,4-diazabicyclooctane) and (pipeH 2)[(VO) 2(C 2O 4)(SeO 3) 2] 2 (pipe = piperazidine). Two compounds are characterized with elemental analysis, FT-IR spectrum, TG-DTA analysis and single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. In compound 1, two symmetry-related VO 6 units share an edge to form a [V 2O 6] cluster. Each [V 2O 6] cluster is bridged by four SeO 3 units to generate a two-dimensional grid structure. In compound 2, VO 6 units and SeO 3 units share corners to result in a ladder motif. Adjacent chains are interlinked by the oxalate ligands, creating a 2D brick-wall structure, which is firstly observed in V/Se/O system. Diprotonated DABCO and lattice water molecules in 1 and diprotonated piperazidine molecules in 2 are located in the interlayer regions and interact with the framework oxygen atoms via hydrogen bonds, respectively.

  16. Raman spectra of haloselenate(IV) ions—the SeO 2Br - anion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milne, John; Lahaie, Pierre

    Compounds of the bromoselenite ion, MSeO 2Br(M + = φ 4Sb +, n-Bu 4N +) have been prepared and their Raman spectra studied. The spectra are consistent with C s symmetry. A normal coordinate analysis of the spectra of SeO 2F -, SeO 2Cl - and SeO 2Br - has been done and force constants determined. The SeX bonds are shown to be remarkably weak.

  17. Fecal Calprotectin is an Accurate Tool and Correlated to Seo Index in Prediction of Relapse in Iranian Patients With Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Seyed Vahid; Jafari, Peyman; Taghavi, Seyed Alireza; Safarpour, Ali Reza; Rezaianzadeh, Abbas; Moini, Maryam; Mehrabi, Manoosh

    2015-01-01

    Background: The natural clinical course of Ulcerative Colitis (UC) is characterized by episodes of relapse and remission. Fecal Calprotectin (FC) is a relatively new marker of intestinal inflammation and is an available, non-expensive tool for predicting relapse of quiescent UC. The Seo colitis activity index is a clinical index for assessment of the severity of UC. Objectives: The present study aimed to evaluate the accuracy of FC and the Seo colitis activity index and their correlation in prediction of UC exacerbation. Patients and Methods: In this prospective cohort study, 157 patients with clinical and endoscopic diagnosis of UC selected randomly from 1273 registered patients in Fars province’s IBD registry center in Shiraz, Iran, were followed from October 2012 to October 2013 for 12 months or shorter, if they had a relapse. Two patients left the study before completion and one patient had relapse because of discontinuation of drugs. The participants' clinical and serum factors were evaluated every three months. Furthermore, stool samples were collected at the beginning of study and every three months and FC concentration (commercially available enzyme linked immunoassay) and the Seo Index were assessed. Then univariate analysis, multiple variable logistic regression, Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC) curve analysis, and Pearson’s correlation test (r) were used for statistical analysis of data. Results: According to the results, 74 patients (48.1%) relapsed during the follow-up (33 men and 41 women). Mean ± SD of FC was 862.82 ± 655.97 μg/g and 163.19 ± 215.85 μg/g in relapsing and non-relapsing patients, respectively (P < 0.001). Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that age, number of previous relapses, FC and the Seo index were significant predictors of relapse. ROC curve analysis of FC level and Seo activity index for prediction of relapse demonstrated area under the curve of 0.882 (P < 0.001) and 0.92 1(P < 0.001), respectively

  18. A physical approach to protein structure prediction: CASP4 results

    SciTech Connect

    Crivelli, Silvia; Eskow, Elizabeth; Bader, Brett; Lamberti, Vincent; Byrd, Richard; Schnabel, Robert; Head-Gordon, Teresa

    2001-02-27

    We describe our global optimization method called Stochastic Perturbation with Soft Constraints (SPSC), which uses information from known proteins to predict secondary structure, but not in the tertiary structure predictions or in generating the terms of the physics-based energy function. Our approach is also characterized by the use of an all atom energy function that includes a novel hydrophobic solvation function derived from experiments that shows promising ability for energy discrimination against misfolded structures. We present the results obtained using our SPSC method and energy function for blind prediction in the 4th Critical Assessment of Techniques for Protein Structure Prediction (CASP4) competition, and show that our approach is more effective on targets for which less information from known proteins is available. In fact our SPSC method produced the best prediction for one of the most difficult targets of the competition, a new fold protein of 240 amino acids.

  19. Ranking protein-protein docking results using steered molecular dynamics and potential of mean force calculations.

    PubMed

    Kingsley, Laura J; Esquivel-Rodríguez, Juan; Yang, Ying; Kihara, Daisuke; Lill, Markus A

    2016-07-01

    Crystallization of protein-protein complexes can often be problematic and therefore computational structural models are often relied on. Such models are often generated using protein-protein docking algorithms, where one of the main challenges is selecting which of several thousand potential predictions represents the most near-native complex. We have developed a novel technique that involves the use of steered molecular dynamics (sMD) and umbrella sampling to identify near-native complexes among protein-protein docking predictions. Using this technique, we have found a strong correlation between our predictions and the interface RMSD (iRMSD) in ten diverse test systems. On two of the systems, we investigated if the prediction results could be further improved using potential of mean force calculations. We demonstrated that a near-native (<2.0 Å iRMSD) structure could be identified in the top-1 ranked position for both systems. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27232548

  20. P-proteins in Arabidopsis are heteromeric structures involved in rapid sieve tube sealing

    PubMed Central

    Jekat, Stephan B.; Ernst, Antonia M.; von Bohl, Andreas; Zielonka, Sascia; Twyman, Richard M.; Noll, Gundula A.; Prüfer, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Structural phloem proteins (P-proteins) are characteristic components of the sieve elements in all dicotyledonous and many monocotyledonous angiosperms. Tobacco P-proteins were recently confirmed to be encoded by the widespread sieve element occlusion (SEO) gene family, and tobacco SEO proteins were shown to be directly involved in sieve tube sealing thus preventing the loss of photosynthate. Analysis of the two Arabidopsis SEO proteins (AtSEOa and AtSEOb) indicated that the corresponding P-protein subunits do not act in a redundant manner. However, there are still pending questions regarding the interaction properties and specific functions of AtSEOa and AtSEOb as well as the general function of structural P-proteins in Arabidopsis. In this study, we characterized the Arabidopsis P-proteins in more detail. We used in planta bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays to confirm the predicted heteromeric interactions between AtSEOa and AtSEOb. Arabidopsis mutants depleted for one or both AtSEO proteins lacked the typical P-protein structures normally found in sieve elements, underlining the identity of AtSEO proteins as P-proteins and furthermore providing the means to determine the role of Arabidopsis P-proteins in sieve tube sealing. We therefore developed an assay based on phloem exudation. Mutants with reduced AtSEO expression levels lost twice as much photosynthate following injury as comparable wild-type plants, confirming that Arabidopsis P-proteins are indeed involved in sieve tube sealing. PMID:23840197

  1. Synthesis of LECBD grown cluster assembled SeO 2 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rath, S.; Das, K.; Sarangi, S. N.; Dash, A. K.; Ray, S. K.; Sahu, S. N.

    2006-12-01

    Cluster assembled selenium oxide (SeO 2) thin films, as a function of oxygen flow pressure (OFP) have been synthesized by a low energy cluster beam deposition (LECBD) technique. The OFP dependent surface morphology leading to well separated nanoclusters (size ranging from 50 to 200 nm) and fractal features are confirmed from transmission electron microscopic (TEM) measurements. A diffusion limited aggregation (DLA) mediated fractal growth with dimension as 1.71 ± 0.01 has been observed for high OFP (60 mbar). Structural analysis by glancing angle X-ray diffraction (GXRD) and selected area diffraction (SAD) studies identify the presence of tetragonal phase SeO 2 in the deposit. Micro-Raman studies indicate the shifts in bending and stretching vibrational phonon modes in cluster assembled SeO 2 as compared to their bulk counter part due to the phonon confinement effect.

  2. Effects of sodium and potassium ions on a novel SeO2-B2O3-SiO2-P2O5-CaO bioactive system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trandafir, D. L.; Ponta, O.; Ciceo-Lucacel, R.; Simon, V.

    2015-01-01

    The study is focused on Na2O and/or K2O influence on a new sol-gel derived SeO2-B2O3-SiO2-P2O5-CaO bioactive system. The structural changes induced by Na2O and/or K2O addition were correlated with the samples behavior in simulated biological media. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy were used to characterize the structure and the type of the chemical bonds. The morphology of the samples was characterized through scanning electron microscopy (SEM). XRD results pointed out a prevalent vitreous structure with an incipient hydroxyapatite (HA) crystalline phase. FTIR results revealed a complex network consisting of silicate, phosphate and borate units, as well as the development of both A- and B-type of carbonate-substituted HA. The bioactivity of the samples was tested in vitro following the evolution of the apatite layers self-assembled on the samples surface in simulated body fluid. Their biocompatibility was investigated after samples surface functionalization with protein. The results indicate that sodium and potassium addition improves the biocompatibility by enhancement of protein adherence on samples surface and without to prevent the samples bioactivity.

  3. Synthesis, structure, and characterization of two new bismuth(III) selenite/tellurite nitrates: [(Bi3O2)(SeO3)2](NO3) and [Bi(TeO3)](NO3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Chang-Yu; Wei, Ming-Fang; Geng, Lei; Hu, Pei-Qing; Yu, Meng-Xia; Cheng, Wen-Dan

    2016-07-01

    Two new bismuth(III) selenite/tellurite nitrates, [(Bi3O2)(SeO3)2](NO3) and [Bi(TeO3)](NO3), have been synthesized by conventional facile hydrothermal method at middle temperature 200 °C and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, powder diffraction, UV-vis-NIR optical absorption spectrum, infrared spectrum and thermal analylsis. Both [(Bi3O2)(SeO3)2](NO3) and [Bi(TeO3)](NO3) crystallize in the monoclinic centronsymmetric space group P21/c with a=9.9403(4) Å, b=9.6857(4) Å, c=10.6864(5) Å, β=93.1150(10)° for [(Bi3O2)(SeO3)2](NO3) and a=8.1489(3) Å, b=9.0663(4) Å, c=7.4729(3) Å, β=114.899(2)° for Bi(TeO3)(NO3), respectively. The two compounds, whose structures are composed of three different asymmetric building units, exhibit two different types of structures. The structure of [(Bi3O2)(SeO3)2](NO3) features a three-dimensional (3D) bismuth(III) selenite cationic tunnel structure [(Bi3O2)(SeO3)2] 3∞ with NO3- anion group filling in the 1D tunnel along b axis. The structure of [Bi(TeO3)](NO3) features 2D bismuth(III) tellurite [Bi(TeO3)2]2∞ layers separated by NO3- anion groups. The results of optical diffuse-reflectance spectrum measurements and electronic structure calculations based on density functional theory methods show that the two compounds are wide band-gap semiconductors.

  4. Network representation of protein interactions-Experimental results.

    PubMed

    Kurzbach, Dennis; Flamm, Andrea G; Sára, Tomáš

    2016-09-01

    A graph theoretical analysis of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data of six different protein interactions has been presented. The representation of the protein interaction data as a graph or network reveals that all of the studied interactions are based on a common functional concept. They all involve a single densely packed hub of functionally correlated residues that mediate the ligand binding events. This is found independent of the kind of protein (folded or unfolded) or ligand (protein, polymer or small molecule). Furthermore, the power of the graph analysis is demonstrated at the examples of the Calmodulin (CaM)/Calcium and the Cold Shock Protein A (CspA)/RNA interaction. The presented approach enables the precise determination of multiple binding sites for the respective ligand molecules. PMID:27272395

  5. Ribosomal Protein Mutations Result in Constitutive p53 Protein Degradation through Impairment of the AKT Pathway.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Ana T; Goos, Yvonne J; Pereboom, Tamara C; Hermkens, Dorien; Wlodarski, Marcin W; Da Costa, Lydie; MacInnes, Alyson W

    2015-07-01

    Mutations in ribosomal protein (RP) genes can result in the loss of erythrocyte progenitor cells and cause severe anemia. This is seen in patients with Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA), a pure red cell aplasia and bone marrow failure syndrome that is almost exclusively linked to RP gene haploinsufficiency. While the mechanisms underlying the cytopenia phenotype of patients with these mutations are not completely understood, it is believed that stabilization of the p53 tumor suppressor protein may induce apoptosis in the progenitor cells. In stark contrast, tumor cells from zebrafish with RP gene haploinsufficiency are unable to stabilize p53 even when exposed to acute DNA damage despite transcribing wild type p53 normally. In this work we demonstrate that p53 has a limited role in eliciting the anemia phenotype of zebrafish models of DBA. In fact, we find that RP-deficient embryos exhibit the same normal p53 transcription, absence of p53 protein, and impaired p53 response to DNA damage as RP haploinsufficient tumor cells. Recently we reported that RP mutations suppress activity of the AKT pathway, and we show here that this suppression results in proteasomal degradation of p53. By re-activating the AKT pathway or by inhibiting GSK-3, a downstream modifier that normally represses AKT signaling, we are able to restore the stabilization of p53. Our work indicates that the anemia phenotype of zebrafish models of DBA is dependent on factors other than p53, and may hold clinical significance for both DBA and the increasing number of cancers revealing spontaneous mutations in RP genes. PMID:26132763

  6. Ribosomal Protein Mutations Result in Constitutive p53 Protein Degradation through Impairment of the AKT Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Hermkens, Dorien; Wlodarski, Marcin W.; Da Costa, Lydie; MacInnes, Alyson W.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in ribosomal protein (RP) genes can result in the loss of erythrocyte progenitor cells and cause severe anemia. This is seen in patients with Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA), a pure red cell aplasia and bone marrow failure syndrome that is almost exclusively linked to RP gene haploinsufficiency. While the mechanisms underlying the cytopenia phenotype of patients with these mutations are not completely understood, it is believed that stabilization of the p53 tumor suppressor protein may induce apoptosis in the progenitor cells. In stark contrast, tumor cells from zebrafish with RP gene haploinsufficiency are unable to stabilize p53 even when exposed to acute DNA damage despite transcribing wild type p53 normally. In this work we demonstrate that p53 has a limited role in eliciting the anemia phenotype of zebrafish models of DBA. In fact, we find that RP-deficient embryos exhibit the same normal p53 transcription, absence of p53 protein, and impaired p53 response to DNA damage as RP haploinsufficient tumor cells. Recently we reported that RP mutations suppress activity of the AKT pathway, and we show here that this suppression results in proteasomal degradation of p53. By re-activating the AKT pathway or by inhibiting GSK-3, a downstream modifier that normally represses AKT signaling, we are able to restore the stabilization of p53. Our work indicates that the anemia phenotype of zebrafish models of DBA is dependent on factors other than p53, and may hold clinical significance for both DBA and the increasing number of cancers revealing spontaneous mutations in RP genes. PMID:26132763

  7. Protein networks identify novel symbiogenetic genes resulting from plastid endosymbiosis.

    PubMed

    Méheust, Raphaël; Zelzion, Ehud; Bhattacharya, Debashish; Lopez, Philippe; Bapteste, Eric

    2016-03-29

    The integration of foreign genetic information is central to the evolution of eukaryotes, as has been demonstrated for the origin of the Calvin cycle and of the heme and carotenoid biosynthesis pathways in algae and plants. For photosynthetic lineages, this coordination involved three genomes of divergent phylogenetic origins (the nucleus, plastid, and mitochondrion). Major hurdles overcome by the ancestor of these lineages were harnessing the oxygen-evolving organelle, optimizing the use of light, and stabilizing the partnership between the plastid endosymbiont and host through retargeting of proteins to the nascent organelle. Here we used protein similarity networks that can disentangle reticulate gene histories to explore how these significant challenges were met. We discovered a previously hidden component of algal and plant nuclear genomes that originated from the plastid endosymbiont: symbiogenetic genes (S genes). These composite proteins, exclusive to photosynthetic eukaryotes, encode a cyanobacterium-derived domain fused to one of cyanobacterial or another prokaryotic origin and have emerged multiple, independent times during evolution. Transcriptome data demonstrate the existence and expression of S genes across a wide swath of algae and plants, and functional data indicate their involvement in tolerance to oxidative stress, phototropism, and adaptation to nitrogen limitation. Our research demonstrates the "recycling" of genetic information by photosynthetic eukaryotes to generate novel composite genes, many of which function in plastid maintenance. PMID:26976593

  8. Protein networks identify novel symbiogenetic genes resulting from plastid endosymbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Méheust, Raphaël; Zelzion, Ehud; Bhattacharya, Debashish; Lopez, Philippe; Bapteste, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The integration of foreign genetic information is central to the evolution of eukaryotes, as has been demonstrated for the origin of the Calvin cycle and of the heme and carotenoid biosynthesis pathways in algae and plants. For photosynthetic lineages, this coordination involved three genomes of divergent phylogenetic origins (the nucleus, plastid, and mitochondrion). Major hurdles overcome by the ancestor of these lineages were harnessing the oxygen-evolving organelle, optimizing the use of light, and stabilizing the partnership between the plastid endosymbiont and host through retargeting of proteins to the nascent organelle. Here we used protein similarity networks that can disentangle reticulate gene histories to explore how these significant challenges were met. We discovered a previously hidden component of algal and plant nuclear genomes that originated from the plastid endosymbiont: symbiogenetic genes (S genes). These composite proteins, exclusive to photosynthetic eukaryotes, encode a cyanobacterium-derived domain fused to one of cyanobacterial or another prokaryotic origin and have emerged multiple, independent times during evolution. Transcriptome data demonstrate the existence and expression of S genes across a wide swath of algae and plants, and functional data indicate their involvement in tolerance to oxidative stress, phototropism, and adaptation to nitrogen limitation. Our research demonstrates the “recycling” of genetic information by photosynthetic eukaryotes to generate novel composite genes, many of which function in plastid maintenance. PMID:26976593

  9. SeO II addition on PVA-based photopolymer for improving photostorage stabilities and diffraction efficiencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Daeheum; Nam, Seungwoong; Yeo, Seungbyung; Lim, Jiyun

    2006-08-01

    Polyvinyl alcohol/Acrylamide(PVA/AA)based photopolymer systems modified with SeO II crystals were prepared and photostorage characteristics mainly including diffraction efficiencies were examined and compared with pure PVA/AA films using green laser light (532nm). The photosensitive films were composed of polymeric film-forming binder (PVA), monomer (acrylamide, AA), photoinitiator (triethanol amine, TEA), photosensitizer (Eosin YR), and SeO II crystals. The best optical recording characteristics were observed at the composition of: polymer binder (PVA) : AA : TEA : SeO II : Eosin Y = 1.0 : 0.3 : 0.225 : 0.1 : 0.0015. Diffraction efficiencies as high as 85% with energetic sensitivity of 0.5 mW/cm2 have been obtained in the photopolymer film, and the photopolymer film with SeO II showed higher diffraction efficiencies and lower initial sensitivity than the photopolymer film without SeO II. The morphology of SeO II was expected to be nano crystals since they didn't scatter optical lights and didn't show any peaks in X-ray diffraction spectra.

  10. Annotation of proteins of unknown function: initial enzyme results.

    PubMed

    McKay, Talia; Hart, Kaitlin; Horn, Alison; Kessler, Haeja; Dodge, Greg; Bardhi, Keti; Bardhi, Kostandina; Mills, Jeffrey L; Bernstein, Herbert J; Craig, Paul A

    2015-03-01

    Working with a combination of ProMOL (a plugin for PyMOL that searches a library of enzymatic motifs for local structural homologs), BLAST and Pfam (servers that identify global sequence homologs), and Dali (a server that identifies global structural homologs), we have begun the process of assigning functional annotations to the approximately 3,500 structures in the Protein Data Bank that are currently classified as having "unknown function". Using a limited template library of 388 motifs, over 500 promising in silico matches have been identified by ProMOL, among which 65 exceptionally good matches have been identified. The characteristics of the exceptionally good matches are discussed. PMID:25630330

  11. Consumption of Milk Protein or Whey Protein Results in a Similar Increase in Muscle Protein Synthesis in Middle Aged Men

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Cameron J.; McGregor, Robin A.; D’Souza, Randall F.; Thorstensen, Eric B.; Markworth, James F.; Fanning, Aaron C.; Poppitt, Sally D.; Cameron-Smith, David

    2015-01-01

    The differential ability of various milk protein fractions to stimulate muscle protein synthesis (MPS) has been previously described, with whey protein generally considered to be superior to other fractions. However, the relative ability of a whole milk protein to stimulate MPS has not been compared to whey. Sixteen healthy middle-aged males ingested either 20 g of milk protein (n = 8) or whey protein (n = 8) while undergoing a primed constant infusion of ring 13C6 phenylalanine. Muscle biopsies were obtained 120 min prior to consumption of the protein and 90 and 210 min afterwards. Resting myofibrillar fractional synthetic rates (FSR) were 0.019% ± 0.009% and 0.021% ± 0.018% h−1 in the milk and whey groups respectively. For the first 90 min after protein ingestion the FSR increased (p < 0.001) to 0.057% ± 0.018% and 0.052% ± 0.024% h−1 in the milk and whey groups respectively with no difference between groups (p = 0.810). FSR returned to baseline in both groups between 90 and 210 min after protein ingestion. Despite evidence of increased rate of digestion and leucine availability following the ingestion of whey protein, there was similar activation of MPS in middle-aged men with either 20 g of milk protein or whey protein. PMID:26506377

  12. Protein crystal growth results from shuttle flight 51-F

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugg, C. E.

    1985-01-01

    The protein crystal growth (PCG) experiments run on 51-F were analyzed. It was found that: (1) sample stability is increased over that observed during the experiments on flight 51-D; (2) the dialysis experiments produced lysozyme crystals that were significantly larger than those obtained in our identical ground-based studies; (3) temperature fluctuations apparently caused problems during the crystallization experiments on 51-F; (4) it is indicated that teflon tape stabilizes droplets on the syringe tips; (5) samples survived during the reentry and landing in glass tips that were not stoppered with plungers; (6) from the ground-based studies, it was expected that equilibration should be complete within 2 to 4 days for all of these vapor-diffusion experiments, thus it appears that the vapor diffusion rates are somewhat slower under microgravity conditions; (7) drop tethering was highly successful, all four of the tethered drops were stable, even though they contained MPD solutions; (8) the PCG experiments on 51-F were done to assess the hardware and experimental procedures that are developed for future flights, when temperature control will be available. Lysozyme crystals obtained by microdialysis are considerably larger than those obtained on the ground, using the identical apparatus and procedures.

  13. 31 CFR 30.3 - Q-3: How are the SEOs and most highly compensated employees identified for purposes of compliance...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Q-3: How are the SEOs and most highly... GOVERNANCE § 30.3 Q-3: How are the SEOs and most highly compensated employees identified for purposes of... income for Federal income tax purposes. (b) Compliance. Regardless of when during the current fiscal...

  14. Silencing of soybean seed storage proteins results in a rebalanced protein composition preserving seed protein content without major collateral changes in the metabolome and transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Monica A; Barbazuk, W Brad; Sandford, Michael; May, Greg; Song, Zhihong; Zhou, Wenxu; Nikolau, Basil J; Herman, Eliot M

    2011-05-01

    The ontogeny of seed structure and the accumulation of seed storage substances is the result of a determinant genetic program. Using RNA interference, the synthesis of soybean (Glycine max) glycinin and conglycinin storage proteins has been suppressed. The storage protein knockdown (SP-) seeds are overtly identical to the wild type, maturing to similar size and weight, and in developmental ontogeny. The SP- seeds rebalance the proteome, maintaining wild-type levels of protein and storage triglycerides. The SP- soybeans were evaluated with systems biology techniques of proteomics, metabolomics, and transcriptomics using both microarray and next-generation sequencing transcript sequencing (RNA-Seq). Proteomic analysis shows that rebalancing of protein content largely results from the selective increase in the accumulation of only a few proteins. The rebalancing of protein composition occurs with small alterations to the seed's transcriptome and metabolome. The selectivity of the rebalancing was further tested by introgressing into the SP- line a green fluorescent protein (GFP) glycinin allele mimic and quantifying the resulting accumulation of GFP. The GFP accumulation was similar to the parental GFP-expressing line, showing that the GFP glycinin gene mimic does not participate in proteome rebalancing. The results show that soybeans make large adjustments to the proteome during seed filling and compensate for the shortage of major proteins with the increased selective accumulation of other proteins that maintains a normal protein content. PMID:21398260

  15. Investigating the importance of Delaunay-based definition of atomic interactions in scoring of protein-protein docking results.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Rahim; Sadeghi, Mehdi; Mirzaie, Mehdi

    2016-05-01

    The approaches taken to represent and describe structural features of the macromolecules are of major importance when developing computational methods for studying and predicting their structures and interactions. This study attempts to explore the significance of Delaunay tessellation for the definition of atomic interactions by evaluating its impact on the performance of scoring protein-protein docking prediction. Two sets of knowledge-based scoring potentials are extracted from a training dataset of native protein-protein complexes. The potential of the first set is derived using atomic interactions extracted from Delaunay tessellated structures. The potential of the second set is calculated conventionally, that is, using atom pairs whose interactions were determined by their separation distances. The scoring potentials were tested against two different docking decoy sets and their performances were compared. The results show that, if properly optimized, the Delaunay-based scoring potentials can achieve higher success rate than the usual scoring potentials. These results and the results of a previous study on the use of Delaunay-based potentials in protein fold recognition, all point to the fact that Delaunay tessellation of protein structure can provide a more realistic definition of atomic interaction, and therefore, if appropriately utilized, may be able to improve the accuracy of pair potentials. PMID:27060891

  16. Tuning of protein-surfactant interaction to modify the resultant structure.

    PubMed

    Mehan, Sumit; Aswal, Vinod K; Kohlbrecher, Joachim

    2015-09-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering and dynamic light scattering studies have been carried out to examine the interaction of bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein with different surfactants under varying solution conditions. We show that the interaction of anionic BSA protein (pH7) with surfactant and the resultant structure are strongly modified by the charge head group of the surfactant, ionic strength of the solution, and mixed surfactants. The protein-surfactant interaction is maximum when two components are oppositely charged, followed by components being similarly charged through the site-specific binding, and no interaction in the case of a nonionic surfactant. This interaction of protein with ionic surfactants is characterized by the fractal structure representing a bead-necklace structure of micellelike clusters adsorbed along the unfolded protein chain. The interaction is enhanced with ionic strength only in the case of site-specific binding of an anionic surfactant with an anionic protein, whereas it is almost unchanged for other complexes of cationic and nonionic surfactants with anionic proteins. Interestingly, the interaction of BSA protein with ionic surfactants is significantly suppressed in the presence of nonionic surfactant. These results with mixed surfactants thus can be used to fold back the unfolded protein as well as to prevent surfactant-induced protein unfolding. For different solution conditions, the results are interpreted in terms of a change in fractal dimension, the overall size of the protein-surfactant complex, and the number of micelles attached to the protein. The interplay of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions is found to govern the resultant structure of complexes. PMID:26465504

  17. Tuning of protein-surfactant interaction to modify the resultant structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehan, Sumit; Aswal, Vinod K.; Kohlbrecher, Joachim

    2015-09-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering and dynamic light scattering studies have been carried out to examine the interaction of bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein with different surfactants under varying solution conditions. We show that the interaction of anionic BSA protein (p H 7 ) with surfactant and the resultant structure are strongly modified by the charge head group of the surfactant, ionic strength of the solution, and mixed surfactants. The protein-surfactant interaction is maximum when two components are oppositely charged, followed by components being similarly charged through the site-specific binding, and no interaction in the case of a nonionic surfactant. This interaction of protein with ionic surfactants is characterized by the fractal structure representing a bead-necklace structure of micellelike clusters adsorbed along the unfolded protein chain. The interaction is enhanced with ionic strength only in the case of site-specific binding of an anionic surfactant with an anionic protein, whereas it is almost unchanged for other complexes of cationic and nonionic surfactants with anionic proteins. Interestingly, the interaction of BSA protein with ionic surfactants is significantly suppressed in the presence of nonionic surfactant. These results with mixed surfactants thus can be used to fold back the unfolded protein as well as to prevent surfactant-induced protein unfolding. For different solution conditions, the results are interpreted in terms of a change in fractal dimension, the overall size of the protein-surfactant complex, and the number of micelles attached to the protein. The interplay of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions is found to govern the resultant structure of complexes.

  18. Structure and polarized IR and Raman spectra of Na 2SeO 4·H 2SeO 3·H 2O crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baran, J.; Lis, T.; Marchewka, M.; Ratajczak, H.

    1991-10-01

    Na 2SeO 4·H 2SeO 3·H 2O crystals are orthorhombic, space group Cmc2 1, with α=9.615(6)Å, b=11.193(12)Å, c=9.615(10)Å and Z=4. The crystal structure was determined from three-di- mensional X-ray diffraction data taken on an automatic diffractometer with MoKa radiation and refined by least-squares techniques to R=0.049 for 775 non-zero reflections. The selenate anions and selenious acid molecules occupy Cs, sites and form infinite chains through hydrogen bonds with an O⋯O distance of 2.622(15)Å. Water molecules of Cs symmetry are attached to the selenious acid molecules by weak hydrogen bonds with an O⋯O distance of 2.957(25)Å. The second proton (H (61)) of the water molecule interacts with two pairs of oxygen atoms belonging to the neighbouring chains. The stretching vibration of the strong hydrogen bonds (2.622 (15)Å) shows a characteristic feature containing two strong bands at ≈ 2800 cm -1 (A) and 2400 cm -1 (B) and a very weak band at ≈ 1500 cm -1 (C), appearing in both IR and Raman spectra. The frequencies of the A and B bands are different in the IR spectra for the X( a) and Z( c) polarizations as well as in the polarized Raman spectra. This is due to a strong interaction /coupling between the νOH vibrations of the nearest hydrogen bonds in the same chain. The transition dipole moment of the νOH is almost parallel to the Se(1)⋯Se(2) direction. The δOH vibration gives bands in the region 1300- 1260 cm -1, while γOH appears at ≈ 790 cm -1. The internal vibrations of the selenate anions and selenious acid molecules are discussed in terms of a site and factor group effect. An assignment of their bands is proposed in terms of the approximate type of motions using the "oriented gas" model approach. The stretching vibrations of the water molecules appear, in fact, to be stretching vibrations of the hydrogen bonds. It is spectroscopically proved that the H (61) protons of water molecules interact with as many as four ozygens.

  19. A single amino acid substitution results in a retinoblastoma protein defective in phosphorylation and oncoprotein binding

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, F.J.; Gerster, J.L. Uniformed Services Univ. of Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD ); Kratzke, R.A. ); Horowitz, J.M. )

    1990-09-01

    The authors have previously identified a small-cell lung cancer cell line (NCI-H209) that expresses an aberrant, underphosphorylated form of the retinoblastoma protein RB1. Molecular analysis of RB1 mRNA from this cell line revealed a single point mutation within exon 21 that resulted in a nonconservative amino acid substitution (cysteine to phenylalanine) at codon 706. Stable expression of this mutant RB1 cDNA in a human cell line lacking endogenous RB1 demonstrated that this amino acid change was sufficient to inhibit phosphorylation. In addition, this cysteine-to-phenylalanine substitution also resulted in loss of RB1 binding to the simian virus 40 large tumor and adenovirus E1A transforming proteins. These results confirm the importance of exon 21 coding sequences and suggest that the cysteine residue at codon 706 may play a role in achieving a specific protein conformation essential for protein-protein interactions.

  20. Recent results and new hardware developments for protein crystal growth in microactivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delucas, L. J.; Long, M. M.; Moore, K. M.; Smith, C.; Carson, M.; Narayana, S. V. L.; Carter, D.; Clark, A. D., Jr.; Nanni, R. G.; Ding, J.

    1993-01-01

    Protein crystal growth experiments have been performed on 16 space shuttle missions since April, 1985. The initial experiments utilized vapor diffusion crystallization techniques similar to those used in laboratories for earth-based experiments. More recent experiments have utilized temperature induced crystallization as an alternative method for growing high quality protein crystals in microgravity. Results from both vapor diffusion and temperature induced crystallization experiments indicate that proteins grown in microgravity may be larger, display more uniform morphologies, and yield diffraction data to significantly higher resolutions than the best crystals of these proteins grown on earth.

  1. Success in Mathematics within a Challenged Minority: The Case of Students of Ethiopian Origin in Israel (SEO)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulat, Tiruwork; Arcavi, Abraham

    2009-01-01

    Many studies have reported on the economical, social, and educational difficulties encountered by Ethiopian Jews since their immigration to Israel. Furthermore, the overall academic underachievement and poor representation of students of Ethiopian origin (SEO) in the advanced mathematics and science classes were highlighted and described. Yet,…

  2. Polar Fixation of Plasmids during Recombinant Protein Production in Bacillus megaterium Results in Population Heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Münch, Karin M; Müller, Johannes; Wienecke, Sarah; Bergmann, Simone; Heyber, Steffi; Biedendieck, Rebekka; Münch, Richard; Jahn, Dieter

    2015-09-01

    During the past 2 decades, Bacillus megaterium has been systematically developed for the gram-per-liter scale production of recombinant proteins. The plasmid-based expression systems employed use a xylose-controlled promoter. Protein production analyses at the single-cell level using green fluorescent protein as a model product revealed cell culture heterogeneity characterized by a significant proportion of less productive bacteria. Due to the enormous size of B. megaterium, such bistable behavior seen in subpopulations was readily analyzed by time lapse microscopy and flow cytometry. Cell culture heterogeneity was not caused simply by plasmid loss: instead, an asymmetric distribution of plasmids during cell division was detected during the exponential-growth phase. Multicopy plasmids are generally randomly distributed between daughter cells. However, in vivo and in vitro experiments demonstrated that under conditions of strong protein production, plasmids are retained at one of the cell poles. Furthermore, it was found that cells with accumulated plasmids and high protein production ceased cell division. As a consequence, the overall protein production of the culture was achieved mainly by the subpopulation with a sufficient plasmid copy number. Based on our experimental data, we propose a model whereby the distribution of multicopy plasmids is controlled by polar fixation under protein production conditions. Thereby, cell lines with fluctuating plasmid abundance arise, which results in population heterogeneity. Our results provide initial insights into the mechanism of cellular heterogeneity during plasmid-based recombinant protein production in a Bacillus species. PMID:26116677

  3. Polar Fixation of Plasmids during Recombinant Protein Production in Bacillus megaterium Results in Population Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Münch, Karin M.; Müller, Johannes; Wienecke, Sarah; Bergmann, Simone; Heyber, Steffi; Biedendieck, Rebekka; Jahn, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    During the past 2 decades, Bacillus megaterium has been systematically developed for the gram-per-liter scale production of recombinant proteins. The plasmid-based expression systems employed use a xylose-controlled promoter. Protein production analyses at the single-cell level using green fluorescent protein as a model product revealed cell culture heterogeneity characterized by a significant proportion of less productive bacteria. Due to the enormous size of B. megaterium, such bistable behavior seen in subpopulations was readily analyzed by time lapse microscopy and flow cytometry. Cell culture heterogeneity was not caused simply by plasmid loss: instead, an asymmetric distribution of plasmids during cell division was detected during the exponential-growth phase. Multicopy plasmids are generally randomly distributed between daughter cells. However, in vivo and in vitro experiments demonstrated that under conditions of strong protein production, plasmids are retained at one of the cell poles. Furthermore, it was found that cells with accumulated plasmids and high protein production ceased cell division. As a consequence, the overall protein production of the culture was achieved mainly by the subpopulation with a sufficient plasmid copy number. Based on our experimental data, we propose a model whereby the distribution of multicopy plasmids is controlled by polar fixation under protein production conditions. Thereby, cell lines with fluctuating plasmid abundance arise, which results in population heterogeneity. Our results provide initial insights into the mechanism of cellular heterogeneity during plasmid-based recombinant protein production in a Bacillus species. PMID:26116677

  4. Sub-MIC Tylosin Inhibits Streptococcus suis Biofilm Formation and Results in Differential Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuai; Yang, Yanbei; Zhao, Yulin; Zhao, Honghai; Bai, Jingwen; Chen, Jianqing; Zhou, Yonghui; Wang, Chang; Li, Yanhua

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus suis (S.suis) is an important zoonotic pathogen that causes severe diseases in humans and pigs. Biofilms of S. suis can induce persistent infections that are difficult to treat. In this study, the effect of tylosin on biofilm formation of S. suis was investigated. 1/2 minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and 1/4 MIC of tylosin were shown to inhibit S. suis biofilm formation in vitro. By using the iTRAQ strategy, we compared the protein expression profiles of S. suis grown with sub-MIC tylosin treatment and with no treatment. A total of 1501 proteins were identified by iTRAQ. Ninety-six differentially expressed proteins were identified (Ratio > ±1.5, p < 0.05). Several metabolism proteins (such as phosphoglycerate kinase) and surface proteins (such as ABC transporter proteins) were found to be involved in biofilm formation. Our results indicated that S. suis metabolic regulation, cell surface proteins, and virulence proteins appear to be of importance in biofilm growth with sub-MIC tylosin treatment. Thus, our data revealed the rough regulation of biofilm formation that may provide a foundation for future research into mechanisms and targets. PMID:27065957

  5. Sub-MIC Tylosin Inhibits Streptococcus suis Biofilm Formation and Results in Differential Protein Expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuai; Yang, Yanbei; Zhao, Yulin; Zhao, Honghai; Bai, Jingwen; Chen, Jianqing; Zhou, Yonghui; Wang, Chang; Li, Yanhua

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus suis (S.suis) is an important zoonotic pathogen that causes severe diseases in humans and pigs. Biofilms of S. suis can induce persistent infections that are difficult to treat. In this study, the effect of tylosin on biofilm formation of S. suis was investigated. 1/2 minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and 1/4 MIC of tylosin were shown to inhibit S. suis biofilm formation in vitro. By using the iTRAQ strategy, we compared the protein expression profiles of S. suis grown with sub-MIC tylosin treatment and with no treatment. A total of 1501 proteins were identified by iTRAQ. Ninety-six differentially expressed proteins were identified (Ratio > ±1.5, p < 0.05). Several metabolism proteins (such as phosphoglycerate kinase) and surface proteins (such as ABC transporter proteins) were found to be involved in biofilm formation. Our results indicated that S. suis metabolic regulation, cell surface proteins, and virulence proteins appear to be of importance in biofilm growth with sub-MIC tylosin treatment. Thus, our data revealed the rough regulation of biofilm formation that may provide a foundation for future research into mechanisms and targets. PMID:27065957

  6. Bioactive protein-based nanofibers interact with intestinal biological components resulting in transepithelial permeation of a therapeutic protein.

    PubMed

    Stephansen, Karen; García-Díaz, María; Jessen, Flemming; Chronakis, Ioannis S; Nielsen, Hanne Mørck

    2015-11-10

    Proteins originating from natural sources may constitute a novel type of material for use in drug delivery. However, thorough understanding of the behavior and effects of such a material when processed into a matrix together with a drug is crucial prior to further development into a drug product. In the present study the potential of using bioactive electrospun fish sarcoplasmic proteins (FSP) as a carrier matrix for small therapeutic proteins was demonstrated in relation to the interactions with biological components of the intestinal tract. The inherent structural and chemical properties of FSP as a biomaterial facilitated interactions with cells and enzymes found in the gastrointestinal tract and displayed excellent biocompatibility. More specifically, insulin was efficiently encapsulated into FSP fibers maintaining its conformation, and subsequent controlled release was obtained in simulated intestinal fluid. The encapsulation of insulin into FSP fibers provided protection against chymotrypsin degradation, and resulted in an increase in insulin transport to around 12% without compromising the cellular viability. This increased transport was driven by interactions upon contact between the nanofibers and the Caco-2 cell monolayer leading to the opening of the tight junction proteins. Overall, electrospun FSP may constitute a novel material for oral delivery of biopharmaceuticals. PMID:26320547

  7. First results from the PROTEIN experiment on board the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decanniere, Klaas; Potthast, Lothar; Pletser, Vladimir; Maes, Dominique; Otalora, Fermin; Gavira, Jose A.; Pati, Luis David; Lautenschlager, Peter; Bosch, Robert

    On March 15 2009 Space Shuttle Discovery was launched, carrying the Process Unit of the Protein Crystallization Diagnostics Facility (PCDF) to the International Space Station. It contained the PROTEIN experiment, aiming at the in-situ observation of nucleation and crystal growth behaviour of proteins. After installation in the European Drawer Rack (EDR) and connection to the PCDF Electronics Unit, experiment runs were performed continuously for 4 months. It was the first time that protein crystallization experiments could be modified on-orbit in near real-time, based on data received on ground. The data included pseudo-dark field microscope images, interferograms, and Dynamic Light Scattering data. The Process Unit with space grown crystals was returned to ground on July 31 2009. Results for the model protein glucose isomerase (Glucy) from Streptomyces rubiginosus crystallized with ammonium sulfate will be reported concerning nucleation and the growth from Protein and Impurities Depletion Zones (PDZs). In addition, results of x-ray analyses for space-grown crystals will be given.

  8. Crystallization Optimum Solubility Screening: using crystallization results to identify the optimal buffer for protein crystal formation

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Bernard; Stevens, Raymond C.; Page, Rebecca

    2005-12-01

    It is shown how protein crystallization results can be used to identify buffers that improve protein solubility and, in turn, crystallization success. An optimal solubility screen is described that uses the results of crystallization trials to identify buffers that improve protein solubility and, in turn, crystallization success. This screen is useful not only for standard crystallization experiments, but also can easily be implemented into any high-throughput structure-determination pipeline. As a proof of principle, the predicted novel-fold protein AF2059 from Archaeoglobus fulgidus, which was known to precipitate in most buffers and particularly during concentration experiments, was selected. Using the crystallization results of 192 independent crystallization trials, it was possible to identify a buffer containing 100 mM CHES pH 9.25 that significantly improves its solubility. After transferring AF2059 into this ‘optimum-solubility’ buffer, the protein was rescreened for crystal formation against these same 192 conditions. Instead of extensive precipitation, as observed initially, it was found that 24 separate conditions produced crystals and the exchange of AF2059 into CHES buffer significantly improved crystallization success. Fine-screen optimization of these conditions led to the production of a crystal suitable for high-resolution (2.2 Å) structure determination.

  9. Ablation of retinal ciliopathy protein RPGR results in altered photoreceptor ciliary composition

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Kollu N.; Li, Linjing; Anand, Manisha; Khanna, Hemant

    2015-01-01

    Cilia regulate several developmental and homeostatic pathways that are critical to survival. Sensory cilia of photoreceptors regulate phototransduction cascade for visual processing. Mutations in the ciliary protein RPGR (retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator) are a prominent cause of severe blindness disorders due to degeneration of mature photoreceptors. However, precise function of RPGR is still unclear. Here we studied the involvement of RPGR in ciliary trafficking by analyzing the composition of photoreceptor sensory cilia (PSC) in Rpgrko retina. Using tandem mass spectrometry analysis followed by immunoblotting, we detected few alterations in levels of proteins involved in proteasomal function and vesicular trafficking in Rpgrko PSC, prior to onset of degeneration. We also found alterations in the levels of high molecular weight soluble proteins in Rpgrko PSC. Our data indicate RPGR regulates entry or retention of soluble proteins in photoreceptor cilia but spares the trafficking of key structural and phototransduction-associated proteins. Given a frequent occurrence of RPGR mutations in severe photoreceptor degeneration due to ciliary disorders, our results provide insights into pathways resulting in altered mature cilia function in ciliopathies. PMID:26068394

  10. Mutations in the nuclear lamin proteins resulting in their aberrant assembly in the cytoplasm.

    PubMed Central

    Loewinger, L; McKeon, F

    1988-01-01

    We have constructed a series of mutations in the human A lamin cDNA to identify and alter the nuclear localization signal using an in vivo functional assay system. The nuclear localization signal in the lamin proteins has both structural and functional similarities with that of the SV40 large T-antigen. Mutations within this functional domain result in the assembly of cytoplasmic tubular structures, and the behavior of these mutants suggests a post-translational dimerization of the lamin proteins prior to their transport into the nucleus. In the course of this work other regions of the carboxy terminus of the A/C lamin proteins have been implicated in the proper assembly and structure of the nuclear envelope. Images PMID:3056713

  11. Interaction of lysozyme protein with different sized silica nanoparticles and their resultant structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Indresh; Aswal, V. K.; Kohlbrecher, J.

    2016-05-01

    The interaction of model protein-lysozyme with three different sized anionic silica nanoparticles has been studied by UV-vis spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering (DLS) and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The surface area and curvature of the nanoparticles change with size, which significantly influence their interaction with protein. The lysozyme adsorbs on the surface of the nanoparticles due to electrostatic attraction and leads to the phase transformation from one phase (clear) to two-phase (turbid) of the nanoparticle-protein system. The dominance of lysozyme induced short-range attraction over long-range electrostatic repulsion between nanoparticles is responsible for phase transformation and modeled by the two-Yukawa potential. The magnitude of the attractive interaction increases with the size of the nanoparticles as a result the phase transformation commences relatively at lower concentration of lysozyme. The structure of the nanoparticle-protein system in two-phase is characterized by the diffusion limited aggregate type of mass fractal morphology.

  12. Diurnal Rhythms Result in Significant Changes in the Cellular Protein Complement in the Cyanobacterium Cyanothece 51142

    SciTech Connect

    Stockel, Jana; Jacobs, Jon M.; Elvitigala, Thanura R.; Liberton, Michelle L.; Welsh, Eric A.; Polpitiya, Ashoka D.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Koppenaal, David W.; Smith, Richard D.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.

    2011-02-22

    Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142 is a diazotrophic cyanobacterium notable for its ability to perform oxygenic photosynthesis and dinitrogen fixation in the same single cell. Previous transcriptional analysis revealed that the existence of these incompatible cellular processes largely depends on tightly synchronized expression programs involving ,30% of genes in the genome. To expand upon current knowledge, we have utilized sensitive proteomic approaches to examine the impact of diurnal rhythms on the protein complement in Cyanothece 51142. We found that 250 proteins accounting for,5% of the predicted ORFs from the Cyanothece 51142 genome and 20% of proteins detected under alternating light/dark conditions exhibited periodic oscillations in their abundances. Our results suggest that altered enzyme activities at different phases during the diurnal cycle can be attributed to changes in the abundance of related proteins and key compounds. The integration of global proteomics and transcriptomic data further revealed that post-transcriptional events are important for temporal regulation of processes such as photosynthesis in Cyanothece 51142. This analysis is the first comprehensive report on global quantitative proteomics in a unicellular diazotrophic cyanobacterium and uncovers novel findings about diurnal rhythms.

  13. Aging results in an unusual expression of Drosophila heat shock proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, J.E.; Walton, J.K.; Dubitsky, R.; Bensch, K.G. )

    1988-06-01

    The authors used high-resolution two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to evaluate the effect of aging on the heat shock response in Drosophila melanogaster. Although the aging process is not well understood at the molecular level, recent observations suggest that quantitative changes in gene expression occur as these fruit flies approach senescence. Such genetic alterations are in accord with our present data, which clearly show marked differences in the synthesis of heat shock proteins between young and old fruit flies. In 10-day-old flies, a heat shock of 20 min results in the expression of 14 new proteins as detectable by two-dimensional electrophoresis of ({sup 35}S)methionine-labeled polypeptides, whereas identical treatment of 45-day-old flies leads to the expression of at least 50 new or highly up-regulated proteins. In addition, there is also a concomitant increase in the rate of synthesis of a number of the normal proteins in the older animals. Microdensitometric determinations of the low molecular weight heat shock polypeptides on autoradiographs of five age groups revealed that their maximum expression occurs at 47 days for a population of flies with a mean life span of 33.7 days. Moreover, a heat shock effect similar to that observed in senescent flies occurs in young flies fed canavanine, an arginine analogue, before heat shock.

  14. Protein crystal growth results from the United States Microgravity Laboratory-1 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delucas, Lawrence J.; Moore, K. M.; Vanderwoerd, M.; Bray, T. L.; Smith, C.; Carson, M.; Narayana, S. V. L.; Rosenblum, W. M.; Carter, D.; Clark, A. D, Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Protein crystal growth experiments have been performed by this laboratory on 18 Space Shuttle missions since April, 1985. In addition, a number of microgravity experiments also have been performed and reported by other investigators. These Space Shuttle missions have been used to grow crystals of a variety of proteins using vapor diffusion, liquid diffusion, and temperature-induced crystallization techniques. The United States Microgravity Laboratory - 1 mission (USML-1, June 25 - July 9, 1992) was a Spacelab mission dedicated to experiments involved in materials processing. New protein crystal growth hardware was developed to allow in orbit examination of initial crystal growth results, the knowledge from which was used on subsequent days to prepare new crystal growth experiments. In addition, new seeding hardware and techniques were tested as well as techniques that would prepare crystals for analysis by x-ray diffraction, a capability projected for the planned Space Station. Hardware that was specifically developed for the USML-1 mission will be discussed along with the experimental results from this mission.

  15. Divergent Evolution of CHD3 Proteins Resulted in MOM1 Refining Epigenetic Control in Vascular Plants

    PubMed Central

    Čaikovski, Marian; Yokthongwattana, Chotika; Habu, Yoshiki; Nishimura, Taisuke; Mathieu, Olivier; Paszkowski, Jerzy

    2008-01-01

    Arabidopsis MOM1 is required for the heritable maintenance of transcriptional gene silencing (TGS). Unlike many other silencing factors, depletion of MOM1 evokes transcription at selected loci without major changes in DNA methylation or histone modification. These loci retain unusual, bivalent chromatin properties, intermediate to both euchromatin and heterochromatin. The structure of MOM1 previously suggested an integral nuclear membrane protein with chromatin-remodeling and actin-binding activities. Unexpected results presented here challenge these presumed MOM1 activities and demonstrate that less than 13% of MOM1 sequence is necessary and sufficient for TGS maintenance. This active sequence encompasses a novel Conserved MOM1 Motif 2 (CMM2). The high conservation suggests that CMM2 has been the subject of strong evolutionary pressure. The replacement of Arabidopsis CMM2 by a poplar motif reveals its functional conservation. Interspecies comparison suggests that MOM1 proteins emerged at the origin of vascular plants through neo-functionalization of the ubiquitous eukaryotic CHD3 chromatin remodeling factors. Interestingly, despite the divergent evolution of CHD3 and MOM1, we observed functional cooperation in epigenetic control involving unrelated protein motifs and thus probably diverse mechanisms. PMID:18725928

  16. Protein levels in beef cattle finishing diets: industry application, university research, and systems results.

    PubMed

    Galyean, M L

    1996-11-01

    Consulting nutritionists were surveyed to determine current formulation and management practices for finishing beef cattle. Among the six consultants surveyed, percentage of CP in finishing diets ranged from 12.5 to 14.4%, with urea levels ranging from .5 to 1.5% of DM. Finishing diets were based primarily on highly processed, rapidly fermented grains (steam-flaked and high-moisture grain), with roughage levels ranging from 3 to 11% of DM. All six consultants considered feed bunk management to be a critical factor affecting feed intake and performance; five of the six consultants used aggressive implant programs based on estrogen + trenbolone acetate. Recent university research was reviewed with respect to CP level and source in finishing diets. Finishing cattle managed on aggressive implant programs seem to respond to higher levels of CP better than would be expected from the factorial calculation approach. Moreover, improvements in performance noted in recent research seemed to be more consistent when supplemental CP was derived from ruminally degraded vs undegraded sources. Calculation of protein requirements with a metabolizable protein (MP) system yielded estimates of protein needs by finishing cattle that agreed more closely with current industry practices than did calculation based on the factorial method. The difference between the MP system and the factorial method was primarily a result of accounting for microbial N needs in the MP system. Reasons for production responses to CP levels that are greater than those calculated by the factorial method include increased accretion of protein by rapidly growing, implanted cattle, particularly during the initial phase of the finishing period, alleviation of a microbial N deficiency, and ruminal and systemic effects of ruminally degraded N on acid-base balance of beef cattle fed rapidly fermented, high-grain diets. Reasons for production responses to supplemental CP need further research. PMID:8923202

  17. Glucocerebrosidase Deficiency in Drosophila Results in α-Synuclein-Independent Protein Aggregation and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Ruth E.; Yu, Selina; Germanos, Alexandre A.; Whitley, Brittany N.; Sardi, Sergio Pablo; Montine, Thomas J.; Pallanck, Leo J.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the glucosidase, beta, acid (GBA1) gene cause Gaucher’s disease, and are the most common genetic risk factor for Parkinson’s disease (PD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) excluding variants of low penetrance. Because α-synuclein-containing neuronal aggregates are a defining feature of PD and DLB, it is widely believed that mutations in GBA1 act by enhancing α-synuclein toxicity. To explore this hypothesis, we deleted the Drosophila GBA1 homolog, dGBA1b, and compared the phenotypes of dGBA1b mutants in the presence and absence of α-synuclein expression. Homozygous dGBA1b mutants exhibit shortened lifespan, locomotor and memory deficits, neurodegeneration, and dramatically increased accumulation of ubiquitinated protein aggregates that are normally degraded through an autophagic mechanism. Ectopic expression of human α-synuclein in dGBA1b mutants resulted in a mild enhancement of dopaminergic neuron loss and increased α-synuclein aggregation relative to controls. However, α-synuclein expression did not substantially enhance other dGBA1b mutant phenotypes. Our findings indicate that dGBA1b plays an important role in the metabolism of protein aggregates, but that the deleterious consequences of mutations in dGBA1b are largely independent of α-synuclein. Future work with dGBA1b mutants should reveal the mechanism by which mutations in dGBA1b lead to accumulation of protein aggregates, and the potential influence of this protein aggregation on neuronal integrity. PMID:27019408

  18. Correlating labeling chemistry and in-vitro test results with the biological behavior of radiolabeled proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.; Meinken, G.E.

    1985-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies possess enormous potential for delivery of therapeutic amounts of radionuclides to target antigens in vivo, in particular for tumor imaging and therapy. Translation of this concept into practice has encountered numerous problems. Specifically whereas general protein radiolabeling methods are applicable to antibodies, immunological properties of the antibodies are often compromised resulting in reduced in-vivo specificity for the target antigens. The bifunctional chelating agent approach shows the most promise, however, development of other agents will be necessary for widespread usefulness of this technique. The effects of labeling chemistry on the in-vivo behavior of several monoclonal antibodies are described. 30 refs., 4 figs., 10 tabs.

  19. Cooking Chicken Breast Reduces Dialyzable Iron Resulting from Digestion of Muscle Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gokhale, Aditya S.; Mahoney, Raymond R.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to study the effect of cooking chicken breast on the production of dialyzable iron (an in vitro indicator of bioavailable iron) from added ferric iron. Chicken breast muscle was cooked by boiling, baking, sautéing, or deep-frying. Cooked samples were mixed with ferric iron and either extracted with acid or digested with pepsin and pancreatin. Total and ferrous dialyzable iron was measured after extraction or digestion and compared to raw chicken samples. For uncooked samples, dialyzable iron was significantly enhanced after both extraction and digestion. All cooking methods led to markedly reduced levels of dialyzable iron both by extraction and digestion. In most cooked, digested samples dialyzable iron was no greater than the iron-only (no sample) control. Cooked samples showed lower levels of histidine and sulfhydryls but protein digestibility was not reduced, except for the sautéed sample. The results showed that, after cooking, little if any dialyzable iron results from digestion of muscle proteins. Our research indicates that, in cooked chicken, residual acid-extractable components are the most important source of dialyzable iron. PMID:26904627

  20. Distinct stress conditions result in aggregation of proteins with similar properties.

    PubMed

    Weids, Alan J; Ibstedt, Sebastian; Tamás, Markus J; Grant, Chris M

    2016-01-01

    Protein aggregation is the abnormal association of proteins into larger aggregate structures which tend to be insoluble. This occurs during normal physiological conditions and in response to age or stress-induced protein misfolding and denaturation. In this present study we have defined the range of proteins that aggregate in yeast cells during normal growth and after exposure to stress conditions including an oxidative stress (hydrogen peroxide), a heavy metal stress (arsenite) and an amino acid analogue (azetidine-2-carboxylic acid). Our data indicate that these three stress conditions, which work by distinct mechanisms, promote the aggregation of similar types of proteins probably by lowering the threshold of protein aggregation. The proteins that aggregate during physiological conditions and stress share several features; however, stress conditions shift the criteria for protein aggregation propensity. This suggests that the proteins in aggregates are intrinsically aggregation-prone, rather than being proteins which are affected in a stress-specific manner. We additionally identified significant overlaps between stress aggregating yeast proteins and proteins that aggregate during ageing in yeast and C. elegans. We suggest that similar mechanisms may apply in disease- and non-disease settings and that the factors and components that control protein aggregation may be evolutionary conserved. PMID:27086931

  1. Distinct stress conditions result in aggregation of proteins with similar properties

    PubMed Central

    Weids, Alan J.; Ibstedt, Sebastian; Tamás, Markus J.; Grant, Chris M.

    2016-01-01

    Protein aggregation is the abnormal association of proteins into larger aggregate structures which tend to be insoluble. This occurs during normal physiological conditions and in response to age or stress-induced protein misfolding and denaturation. In this present study we have defined the range of proteins that aggregate in yeast cells during normal growth and after exposure to stress conditions including an oxidative stress (hydrogen peroxide), a heavy metal stress (arsenite) and an amino acid analogue (azetidine-2-carboxylic acid). Our data indicate that these three stress conditions, which work by distinct mechanisms, promote the aggregation of similar types of proteins probably by lowering the threshold of protein aggregation. The proteins that aggregate during physiological conditions and stress share several features; however, stress conditions shift the criteria for protein aggregation propensity. This suggests that the proteins in aggregates are intrinsically aggregation-prone, rather than being proteins which are affected in a stress-specific manner. We additionally identified significant overlaps between stress aggregating yeast proteins and proteins that aggregate during ageing in yeast and C. elegans. We suggest that similar mechanisms may apply in disease- and non-disease settings and that the factors and components that control protein aggregation may be evolutionary conserved. PMID:27086931

  2. Sonic hedgehog shedding results in functional activation of the solubilized protein.

    PubMed

    Ohlig, Stefanie; Farshi, Pershang; Pickhinke, Ute; van den Boom, Johannes; Höing, Susanne; Jakuschev, Stanislav; Hoffmann, Daniel; Dreier, Rita; Schöler, Hans R; Dierker, Tabea; Bordych, Christian; Grobe, Kay

    2011-06-14

    All Hedgehog (Hh) proteins are released from producing cells despite being synthesized as N- and C-terminally lipidated, membrane-tethered molecules. Thus, a cellular mechanism is needed for Hh solubilization. We previously suggested that a disintegrin and metalloprotease (ADAM)-mediated shedding of Sonic hedgehog (ShhNp) from its lipidated N and C termini results in protein solubilization. This finding, however, seemed at odds with the established role of N-terminal palmitoylation for ShhNp signaling activity. We now resolve this paradox by showing that N-palmitoylation of ShhNp N-terminal peptides is required for their proteolytic removal during solubilization. These peptides otherwise block ShhNp zinc coordination sites required for ShhNp binding to its receptor Patched (Ptc), explaining the essential yet indirect role of N-palmitoylation for ShhNp function. We suggest a functional model in which membrane-tethered multimeric ShhNp is at least partially autoinhibited in trans but is processed into fully active, soluble multimers upon palmitoylation-dependent cleavage of inhibitory N-terminal peptides. PMID:21664575

  3. SANS study of interaction of silica nanoparticles with BSA protein and their resultant structure

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, Indresh Aswal, V. K.; Kohlbrecher, J.

    2014-04-24

    Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) has been carried out to study the interaction of anionic silica nanoparticles (88 Å) with globular protein Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) (M.W. 66.4 kD) in aqueous solution. The measurements have been carried out on fixed concentration (1 wt %) of Ludox silica nanoparticles with varying concentration of BSA (0–5 wt %) at pH7. Results show that silica nanoparticles and BSA coexist as individual entities at low concentration of BSA where electrostatic repulsive interactions between them prevent their aggregation. However, as the concentration of BSA increases (≥ 0.5 wt %), it induces the attractive depletion interaction among nanoparticles leading to finally their aggregation at higher BSA concentration (2 wt %). The aggregates are found to be governed by the diffusion limited aggregation (DLA) morphology of fractal nature having fractal dimension about 2.4.

  4. SANS study of interaction of silica nanoparticles with BSA protein and their resultant structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Indresh; Aswal, V. K.; Kohlbrecher, J.

    2014-04-01

    Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) has been carried out to study the interaction of anionic silica nanoparticles (88 Å) with globular protein Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) (M.W. 66.4 kD) in aqueous solution. The measurements have been carried out on fixed concentration (1 wt %) of Ludox silica nanoparticles with varying concentration of BSA (0-5 wt %) at pH7. Results show that silica nanoparticles and BSA coexist as individual entities at low concentration of BSA where electrostatic repulsive interactions between them prevent their aggregation. However, as the concentration of BSA increases (≥ 0.5 wt %), it induces the attractive depletion interaction among nanoparticles leading to finally their aggregation at higher BSA concentration (2 wt %). The aggregates are found to be governed by the diffusion limited aggregation (DLA) morphology of fractal nature having fractal dimension about 2.4.

  5. Crystallisation of alpha-crustacyanin, the lobster carapace astaxanthin-protein: results from EURECA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagalsky, P. F.; Wright, C. E.; Parsons, M.

    1995-08-01

    Crystallisation of alpha-crustacyanin, the lobster carapace astaxanthin-protein was attempted under microgravity conditions in EURECA satellite using liquid-liquid diffusion with polyethyleneglycol (PEG) as precipitant; in a second reaction chamber phenol and dioxan were used as additives to prevent composite crystal growth. Crystals of alpha-crustacyanin grown under microgravity from PEG were larger than those grown terrestrially in the same apparatus under otherwise identical conditions. On retrieval, the crystals from PEG were shown to be composite and gave a powder diffraction pattern. The second reaction chamber showed leakage on retrieval and had also been subjected to rapid temperature variation during flight. Crystal fragments were nevertheless recovered but showed a powder diffraction pattern. It is concluded, certainly for liquid-liquid diffusion using PEG alone, that, for crustacyanin, although microgravity conditions resulted in an increase in dimensions of crystals, a measurable improvement in molecular ordering was not achieved.

  6. Altered protein prenylation in Sertoli cells is associated with adult infertility resulting from childhood mumps infection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiu-Xing; Ying, Pu; Diao, Fan; Wang, Qiang; Ye, Dan; Jiang, Chen; Shen, Ning; Xu, Na; Chen, Wei-Bo; Lai, Shan-Shan; Jiang, Shan; Miao, Xiao-Li; Feng, Jin; Tao, Wei-Wei; Zhao, Ning-Wei; Yao, Bing; Xu, Zhi-Peng; Sun, Hai-Xiang; Li, Jian-Min; Sha, Jia-Hao; Huang, Xing-Xu; Shi, Qing-Hua; Tang, Hong; Gao, Xiang; Li, Chao-Jun

    2013-07-29

    Mumps commonly affects children 5-9 yr of age, and can lead to permanent adult sterility in certain cases. However, the etiology of this long-term effect remains unclear. Mumps infection results in progressive degeneration of the seminiferous epithelium and, occasionally, Sertoli cell-only syndrome. Thus, the remaining Sertoli cells may be critical to spermatogenesis recovery after orchitis healing. Here, we report that the protein farnesylation/geranylgeranylation balance is critical for patients' fertility. The expression of geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase 1 (GGPPS) was decreased due to elevated promoter methylation in the testes of infertile patients with mumps infection history. When we deleted GGPPS in mouse Sertoli cells, these cells remained intact, whereas the adjacent spermatogonia significantly decreased after the fifth postnatal day. The proinflammatory MAPK and NF-κB signaling pathways were constitutively activated in GGPPS(-/-) Sertoli cells due to the enhanced farnesylation of H-Ras. GGPPS(-/-) Sertoli cells secreted an array of cytokines to stimulate spermatogonia apoptosis, and chemokines to induce macrophage invasion into the seminiferous tubules. Invaded macrophages further blocked spermatogonia development, resulting in a long-term effect through to adulthood. Notably, this defect could be rescued by GGPP administration in EMCV-challenged mice. Our results suggest a novel mechanism by which mumps infection during childhood results in adult sterility. PMID:23825187

  7. P185-M Protein Identification and Validation of Results in Workflows that Integrate over Various Instruments, Datasets, Search Engines

    PubMed Central

    Hufnagel, P.; Glandorf, J.; Körting, G.; Jabs, W.; Schweiger-Hufnagel, U.; Hahner, S.; Lubeck, M.; Suckau, D.

    2007-01-01

    Analysis of complex proteomes often results in long protein lists, but falls short in measuring the validity of identification and quantification results on a greater number of proteins. Biological and technical replicates are mandatory, as is the combination of the MS data from various workflows (gels, 1D-LC, 2D-LC), instruments (TOF/TOF, trap, qTOF or FTMS), and search engines. We describe a database-driven study that combines two workflows, two mass spectrometers, and four search engines with protein identification following a decoy database strategy. The sample was a tryptically digested lysate (10,000 cells) of a human colorectal cancer cell line. Data from two LC-MALDI-TOF/TOF runs and a 2D-LC-ESI-trap run using capillary and nano-LC columns were submitted to the proteomics software platform ProteinScape. The combined MALDI data and the ESI data were searched using Mascot (Matrix Science), Phenyx (GeneBio), ProteinSolver (Bruker and Protagen), and Sequest (Thermo) against a decoy database generated from IPI-human in order to obtain one protein list across all workflows and search engines at a defined maximum false-positive rate of 5%. ProteinScape combined the data to one LC-MALDI and one LC-ESI dataset. The initial separate searches from the two combined datasets generated eight independent peptide lists. These were compiled into an integrated protein list using the ProteinExtractor algorithm. An initial evaluation of the generated data led to the identification of approximately 1200 proteins. Result integration on a peptide level allowed discrimination of protein isoforms that would not have been possible with a mere combination of protein lists.

  8. Preparation and characterization of SeO2/TiO2 composite photocatalyst with excellent performance for sunset yellow azo dye degradation under natural sunlight illumination.

    PubMed

    Rajamanickam, D; Dhatshanamurthi, P; Shanthi, M

    2015-03-01

    To improve the solar light induced photocatalytic application performances of TiO2, in this study, the SeO2 modified TiO2 composite photocatalysts with various ratios of SeO2 to TiO2 were prepared by sol-gel method. The catalyst was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), high resolution scanning electron microscope (HR-SEM), energy dispersive spectra (EDS), diffuse reflectance spectra (DRS), photoluminescence spectra (PL), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area measurement methods. The photocatalytic activity of SeO2/TiO2 was investigated for the degradation of sunset yellow (SY) in aqueous solution using solar light. The SeO2/TiO2 is found to be more efficient than prepared TiO2 and TiO2-P25 at pH 7 for the mineralization of SY. The effects of operational parameters such as the amount of photocatalyst, dye concentration and initial pH on photo mineralization of SY have been analyzed. The degradation was strongly enhanced in the presence of electron acceptors such as oxone, KIO4 and KBrO3. The kinetics of SY photodegradation was found to follow the pseudo-first order rate law and could be described in terms of Langmuir-Hinshelwood model. The mineralization of SY has been confirmed by COD measurements. The catalyst is found to be reusable. PMID:25528508

  9. Preparation and characterization of SeO2/TiO2 composite photocatalyst with excellent performance for sunset yellow azo dye degradation under natural sunlight illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajamanickam, D.; Dhatshanamurthi, P.; Shanthi, M.

    2015-03-01

    To improve the solar light induced photocatalytic application performances of TiO2, in this study, the SeO2 modified TiO2 composite photocatalysts with various ratios of SeO2 to TiO2 were prepared by sol-gel method. The catalyst was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), high resolution scanning electron microscope (HR-SEM), energy dispersive spectra (EDS), diffuse reflectance spectra (DRS), photoluminescence spectra (PL), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area measurement methods. The photocatalytic activity of SeO2/TiO2 was investigated for the degradation of sunset yellow (SY) in aqueous solution using solar light. The SeO2/TiO2 is found to be more efficient than prepared TiO2 and TiO2-P25 at pH 7 for the mineralization of SY. The effects of operational parameters such as the amount of photocatalyst, dye concentration and initial pH on photo mineralization of SY have been analyzed. The degradation was strongly enhanced in the presence of electron acceptors such as oxone, KIO4 and KBrO3. The kinetics of SY photodegradation was found to follow the pseudo-first order rate law and could be described in terms of Langmuir-Hinshelwood model. The mineralization of SY has been confirmed by COD measurements. The catalyst is found to be reusable.

  10. 31 CFR 30.3 - Q-3: How are the SEOs and most highly compensated employees identified for purposes of compliance...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Q-3: How are the SEOs and most highly compensated employees identified for purposes of compliance with this part? 30.3 Section 30.3 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury TARP STANDARDS FOR COMPENSATION AND...

  11. An analysis of surface proteomics results reveals novel candidates for intracellular/surface moonlighting proteins in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wangfei; Jeffery, Constance J

    2016-04-26

    Proteins expressed on the bacterial cell surface play important roles in infection and virulence and can be targets for vaccine development or used as biomarkers. Surprisingly, an increasing number of surface proteins are being found to be identical to intracellular enzymes and chaperones, and a few dozen intracellular/surface moonlighting proteins have been found that have different functions inside the cell and on the cell surface. The results of twenty-two published bacterial surface proteomics studies were analyzed using bioinformatics tools to consider how many additional intracellular proteins are also found on the cell surface. More than 1000 out of the 3619 proteins observed on the cell surface lack the transmembrane alpha-helices or transmembrane beta-barrels found in integral membrane proteins and also lack the signal peptides found in proteins secreted through the Sec pathway. Many of the proteins found on the cell surface are intracellular chaperones or enzymes involved in central metabolic pathways, including some that have previously been shown to have a moonlighting function on the cell surface in at least one species, such as Hsp60/GroEL, DnaK, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, enolase, and fructose 1,6-bisphosphate aldolase. The results of the proteomics studies suggest they could also be moonlighting on the surface of many other species. Hundreds of other intracellular proteins are also found on the cell surface, although a second function on the surface has not yet been demonstrated, for example, glutamine synthetase, gamma-glutamyl phosphate reductase, and cysteine desulfurase. The presence of intracellular proteins on the cell surface is more common than previously expected and suggests that many additional proteins might be candidates for being intracellular/surface moonlighting proteins. PMID:26938107

  12. Influence of protonation, tautomeric, and stereoisomeric states on protein-ligand docking results.

    PubMed

    ten Brink, Tim; Exner, Thomas E

    2009-06-01

    In this work, we present a systematical investigation of the influence of ligand protonation states, stereoisomers, and tautomers on results obtained with the two protein-ligand docking programs GOLD and PLANTS. These different states were generated with a fully automated tool, called SPORES (Structure PrOtonation and Recognition System). First, the most probable protonations, as defined by this rule based system, were compared to the ones stored in the well-known, manually revised CCDC/ASTEX data set. Then, to investigate the influence of the ligand protonation state on the docking results, different protonation states were created. Redocking and virtual screening experiments were conducted demonstrating that both docking programs have problems in identifying the correct protomer for each complex. Therefore, a preselection of plausible protomers or the improvement of the scoring functions concerning their ability to rank different molecules/states is needed. Additionally, ligand stereoisomers were tested for a subset of the CCDC/ASTEX set, showing similar problems regarding the ranking of these stereoisomers as the ranking of the protomers. PMID:19453150

  13. Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zemsky, Robert; Shaman, Susan; Shapiro, Daniel B.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the Collegiate Results Instrument (CRI), which measures a range of collegiate outcomes for alumni 6 years after graduation. The CRI was designed to target alumni from institutions across market segments and assess their values, abilities, work skills, occupations, and pursuit of lifelong learning. (EV)

  14. Hint1 knockout results in a compromised activation of protein kinase C gamma in the brain.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Fang, Zhenfei; Wang, Jia Bei

    2015-10-01

    Previous studies have implicated a role of the histidine triad nucleotide-binding protein 1 (Hint1) in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Protein kinase C gamma (PKCγ) could be potentially involved in the Hint1-implicated pathogenesis since PKCγ was identified as a Hint1 interacting protein. Recently, a debate was brought forward from the understanding how Hint1 affects the expression and activity of PKCγ in the brain. In the present study, we use Hint1 knockout mice and biochemical analysis to define the effect of Hint1 on protein PKCγ. Our data reveal that Hint1-deficiency in mouse brains led to increased protein levels of PKCγ in the cortex and hippocampus, the striatum and thalamus and amygdala. Without stimulation, PKCγ protein in Hint1-deficient brain displayed a basal activity that was reflected by control-leveled phosphorylations of PKCγ T514 and T674 at its kinase domain. Upon psycho-stimulation, both sites of PKCγ T514 and T674 were activated in these brain structures via phosphorylation; however, the phosphorylation level at the site of PKCγ T674 apparently attenuated in Hint1-deficient mice compared to wild-type control. Thus, we conclude that Hint1 deficiency leads to an increased protein level of PKCγ in the brain and a compromised activation response of PKCγ upon stimulation. These findings suggest an inhibitory role of Hint1 on the protein PKCγ in the brain and an impaired PKCγ-mediated phosphorylation signal in Hint1-deficient neuron. PMID:26133792

  15. Next-generation protein-rich potato expressing the seed protein gene AmA1 is a result of proteome rebalancing in transgenic tuber

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Subhra; Chakraborty, Niranjan; Agrawal, Lalit; Ghosh, Sudip; Narula, Kanika; Shekhar, Shubhendu; Naik, Prakash S.; Pande, P. C.; Chakrborti, Swarup Kumar; Datta, Asis

    2010-01-01

    Protein deficiency is the most crucial factor that affects physical growth and development and that increases morbidity and mortality especially in developing countries. Efforts have been made to improve protein quality and quantity in crop plants but with limited success. Here, we report the development of transgenic potatoes with enhanced nutritive value by tuber-specific expression of a seed protein, AmA1 (Amaranth Albumin 1), in seven genotypic backgrounds suitable for cultivation in different agro-climatic regions. Analyses of the transgenic tubers revealed up to 60% increase in total protein content. In addition, the concentrations of several essential amino acids were increased significantly in transgenic tubers, which are otherwise limited in potato. Moreover, the transgenics also exhibited enhanced photosynthetic activity with a concomitant increase in total biomass. These results are striking because this genetic manipulation also resulted in a moderate increase in tuber yield. The comparative protein profiling suggests that the proteome rebalancing might cause increased protein content in transgenic tubers. Furthermore, the data on field performance and safety evaluation indicate that the transgenic potatoes are suitable for commercial cultivation. In vitro and in vivo studies on experimental animals demonstrate that the transgenic tubers are also safe for human consumption. Altogether, these results emphasize that the expression of AmA1 is a potential strategy for the nutritional improvement of food crops. PMID:20855595

  16. Loss of Clcc1 results in ER stress, misfolded protein accumulation, and neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yichang; Jucius, Thomas J; Cook, Susan A; Ackerman, Susan L

    2015-02-18

    Folding of transmembrane and secretory proteins occurs in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) before transportation to the cell surface and is monitored by the unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling pathway. The accumulation of unfolded proteins in the ER activates the UPR that restores ER homeostasis by regulating gene expression that leads to an increase in the protein-folding capacity of the ER and a decrease in the ER protein-folding load. However, prolonged UPR activity has been associated with cell death in multiple pathological conditions, including neurodegeneration. Here, we report a spontaneous recessive mouse mutation that causes progressive cerebellar granule cell death and peripheral motor axon degeneration. By positional cloning, we identify the mutation in this strain as a retrotransposon insertion in the Clcc1 gene, which encodes a putative chloride channel localized to the ER. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the C3H/HeSnJ inbred strain has late onset cerebellar degeneration due to this mutation. Interestingly, acute knockdown of Clcc1 expression in cultured cells increases sensitivity to ER stress. In agreement, GRP78, the major HSP70 family chaperone in the ER, is upregulated in Clcc1-deficient granule cells in vivo, and ubiquitinated proteins accumulate in these neurons before their degeneration. These data suggest that disruption of chloride homeostasis in the ER disrupts the protein-folding capacity of the ER, leading to eventual neuron death. PMID:25698737

  17. Blocking of Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1 during Tubulointerstitial Nephritis Resulted in Delayed Neutrophil Clearance

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ping; Garcia, Gabriela E.; Xia, Yiyang; Wu, Wei; Gersch, Christine; Park, Pyong Woo; Truong, Luan; Wilson, Curtis B.; Johnson, Richard; Feng, Lili

    2005-01-01

    The chemokine monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 has been implicated in the monocyte/macrophage infiltration that occurs during tubulointerstitial nephritis (TIN). We investigated the role of MCP-1 in rats with TIN by administering a neutralizing anti-MCP-1 antibody (Ab). We observed significantly reduced macrophage infiltration and delayed neutrophil clearance in the kidneys of TIN model rats treated with the anti-MCP-1 Ab. To exclude the possibility that an observed immune complex could affect the resolution of apoptotic neutrophils via the Fc receptor, TIN model rats were treated with a peptide-based MCP-1 receptor antagonist (RA). The MCP-1 RA had effects similar to those of the anti-MCP-1 Ab. In addition, MCP-1 did not affect macrophage-mediated phagocytosis of neutrophils in vitro. Deposition of the anti-MCP-1 Ab in rat kidneys resulted from its binding to heparan sulfate-immobilized MCP-1, as demonstrated by the detection of MCP-1 in both pull-down and immunoprecipitation assays. We conclude that induction of chemokines, specifically MCP-1, in TIN corresponds with leukocyte infiltration and that the anti-MCP-1 Ab formed an immune complex with heparan sulfate-immobilized MCP-1 in the kidney. Antagonism of MCP-1 in TIN by Ab or RA may alter the pathological process, most likely through delayed removal of apoptotic neutrophils in the inflammatory loci. PMID:16127145

  18. The Structural Biology Center 19ID undulator beamline: facility specifications and protein crystallographic results

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbaum, Gerd; Alkire, Randy W.; Evans, Gwyndaf; Rotella, Frank J.; Lazarski, Krzystof; Zhang, Rong-Guang; Ginell, Stephan L.; Duke, Norma; Naday, Istvan; Lazarz, Jack; Molitsky, Michael J.; Keefe, Lisa; Gonczy, John; Rock, Larry; Sanishvili, Ruslan; Walsh, Martin A.; Westbrook, Edwin; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2008-01-01

    The 19ID undulator beamline of the Structure Biology Center has been designed and built to take full advantage of the high flux, brilliance and quality of X-ray beams delivered by the Advanced Photon Source. The beamline optics are capable of delivering monochromatic X-rays with photon energies from 3.5 to 20 keV (3.5–0.6 Å wavelength) with fluxes up to 8–18 × 1012 photons s−1 (depending on photon energy) onto cryogenically cooled crystal samples. The size of the beam (full width at half-maximum) at the sample position can be varied from 2.2 mm × 1.0 mm (horizontal × vertical, unfocused) to 0.083 mm × 0.020 mm in its fully focused configuration. Specimen-to-detector distances of between 100 mm and 1500 mm can be used. The high flexibility, inherent in the design of the optics, coupled with a κ-geometry goniometer and beamline control software allows optimal strategies to be adopted in protein crystallographic experiments, thus maximizing the chances of their success. A large-area mosaic 3 × 3 CCD detector allows high-quality diffraction data to be measured rapidly to the crystal diffraction limits. The beamline layout and the X-ray optical and endstation components are described in detail, and the results of representative crystallographic experiments are presented. PMID:16371706

  19. Moderate energy restriction with high protein diet results in healthier outcome in women

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The present study compares two different weight reduction regimens both with a moderately high protein intake on body composition, serum hormone concentration and strength performance in non-competitive female athletes. Methods Fifteen normal weighted women involved in recreational resistance training and aerobic training were recruited for the study (age 28.5 ± 6.3 yr, height 167.0 ± 7.0 cm, body mass 66.3 ± 4.2 kg, body mass index 23.8 ± 1.8, mean ± SD). They were randomized into two groups. The 1 KG group (n = 8; energy deficit 1100 kcal/day) was supervised to reduce body weight by 1 kg per week and the 0.5 KG group (n = 7; energy deficit 550 kcal/day) by 0.5 kg per week, respectively. In both groups protein intake was kept at least 1.4 g/kg body weight/day and the weight reduction lasted four weeks. At the beginning of the study the energy need was calculated using food and training diaries. The same measurements were done before and after the 4-week weight reduction period including total body composition (DXA), serum hormone concentrations, jumping ability and strength measurements Results During the 4-week weight reduction period there were no changes in lean body mass and bone mass, but total body mass, fat mass and fat percentage decreased significantly in both groups. The changes were greater in the 1 KG group than in the 0.5 KG group in total body mass (p < 0.001), fat mass (p < 0.001) and fat percentage (p < 0.01). Serum testosterone concentration decreased significantly from 1.8 ± 1.0 to 1.4 ± 0.9 nmol/l (p < 0.01) in 1 KG and the change was greater in 1 KG (30%, p < 0.001) than in 0.5 KG (3%). On the other hand, SHBG increased significantly in 1 KG from 63.4 ± 17.7 to 82.4 ± 33.0 nmol/l (p < 0.05) during the weight reducing regimen. After the 4-week period there were no changes in strength performance in 0.5 KG group, however in 1 KG maximal strength in bench press decreased (p < 0.05) while endurance strength in squat and counter

  20. The relation between the results of determination of fructosamine and glycosylated proteins of blood serum.

    PubMed

    Adamczyk, A; Szafran, Z; Opyrchał, G

    1991-01-01

    Fructosamine concentration (measured by NBT reduction method) and the concentration of glycosylated proteins (measured by a direct UV spectrophotometry upon separation from nonglycosylated proteins by means of affinity chromatography, have been determined simultaneously in 52 samples of blood serum obtained from 42 children with diabetes mellitus and 10 children without metabolic disorders. A highly significant positive correlation (r = 0.96, p < 0.001) was found between the two parameters. It was concluded that fructosamine determination by NBT reduction test reflects the true concentration of glycosylated proteins of blood serum, provided that the proper correction factor derived from the equation of linear regression is used as shown in the following equation: Concentration of glycosylated proteins of blood serum in milligram = 2.78 x (fructosamine concentration in mmol/l + 1.26). PMID:1364501

  1. Chimeric spider silk proteins mediated by intein result in artificial hybrid silks.

    PubMed

    Lin, Senzhu; Chen, Gefei; Liu, Xiangqin; Meng, Qing

    2016-07-01

    Hybrid silks hold a great potential as specific biomaterials due to its controlled mechanical properties. To produce fibers with tunable properties, here we firstly made chimeric proteins in vitro, called W2C4CT and W2C8CT, with ligation of MaSp repetitive modules (C) with AcSp modules (W) by intein trans splicing technology from smaller precursors without final yield reduction. Intein mediated chimeric proteins form fibers at a low concentration of 0.4 mg/mL in 50 mM K3 PO4 pH 7.5 just drawn by hand. Hybrid fibers show smoother surface, and also have stronger chemical resistance as compared with fibers from W2CT (W fibers) and mixture of W2CT/C8CT (MHF8 fibers). Fibers from chimeric protein W2C4CT (HFH4) have improved mechanical properties than W fibers; however, with more C modules W2C8CT fibers (HFH8) properties decreased, indicates the length proportion of various modules is very important and should be optimized for fibers with specific properties. Generally, hybrid silks generated via chimeric proteins, which can be simplified by intein trans splicing, has greater potential to produce fibers with tunable properties. Our research shows that intein mediated directional protein ligation is a novel way to make large chimeric spider silk proteins and hybrid silks. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 385-392, 2016. PMID:26948769

  2. Changes in structural characteristics of antioxidative soy protein hydrolysates resulting from scavenging of hydroxyl radicals.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Xiong, Youling L; McNear, Dave H

    2013-02-01

    Antioxidant activity of soy protein (SP) and its hydrolyzed peptides has been widely reported. During scavenging of radicals, these antioxidative compounds would be oxidatively modified, but their fate is not understood. The objective of this study was to evaluate the structural characteristics of SP hydrolysates (SPHs), compared to intact SP, when used to neutralize hydroxyl radicals (•OH). SPHs with degree of hydrolysis (DH) 1 to 5 were prepared with Alcalase. Antioxidant activity of SPHs was confirmed by lipid oxidation inhibition measured with thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, ability to scavenge 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) radicals, and ferrous ion chelation capability. Oxidation of SPHs was initiated by reaction with •OH generated from 0.1 mM FeCl(3) , 20 mM H(2) O(2) , and 1.0 mM ascorbate. After oxidative stress, carbonyl content of SPHs increased by 2- to 3-fold and sulfhydryl groups decreased by up to 42% compared to nonoxidized samples (P < 0.05). Methionine, histidine, and lysine residues were significantly reduced as a result of inactivating •OH (P < 0.05). Attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared and circular dichroism spectroscopy suggested the conversion of helical structure to strands and turns. Oxidatively modified SPHs had a lower intrinsic fluorescence intensity but similar solubility when compared to nonoxidized samples. These structural changes due to •OH stress may impact the ingredient interaction and functionality of SPHs in food products. PMID:23331209

  3. Dominant Driving Force for Protein Folding -- A Result from Analyzing the Statistical Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hao; Tang, Chao; Wingreen, Ned

    1997-03-01

    In a statistical approach, the energy of a particular substructure in proteins is related to its number of appearance in the protein structure data bank via a Boltzmann factor. Such knowledge based potentials are widely used in protein structure prediction. A well known example is the inter-residue contact energies between different types of amino acids -- a 20× 20 matrix derived by Miyazawa and Jernigan (MJ). We have analyzed the MJ matrix using the method of eigenvalue decomposition. We find that the MJ matrix can be accurately reconstructed by using only the two largest eigenvalues and the corresponding eigenvectors. The matrix elements can be simply expressed as M_ij=C_0+C_1(q_i+q_j)+C_2q_iq_j, with C's constants, and 20 q values associated with 20 amino acids. We find that this regularity is due to hydrophobic force and a force of demixing, the latter obeying Hildebrand's solubility theory for simple liquids.

  4. Results of a screening programme to identify plants or plant extracts that inhibit ruminal protein degradation.

    PubMed

    Selje, N; Hoffmann, E M; Muetzel, S; Ningrat, R; Wallace, R J; Becker, K

    2007-07-01

    One aim of the EC Framework V project, 'Rumen-up' (QLK5-CT-2001-00 992), was to find plants or plant extracts that would inhibit the nutritionally wasteful degradation of protein in the rumen. A total of 500 samples were screened in vitro using 14C-labelled casein in a 30-min incubation with ruminal digesta. Eight were selected for further investigation using a batch fermentation system and soya protein and bovine serum albumin as proteolysis substrates; proteolysis was monitored over 12 h by the disappearance of soluble protein and the production of branched SCFA and NH3. Freeze-dried, ground foliage of Peltiphyllum peltatum, Helianthemum canum, Arbutus unedo, Arctostaphylos uva-ursi and Knautia arvensis inhibited proteolysis (P < 0.05), while Daucus carota, Clematis vitalba and Erica arborea had little effect. Inhibition by the first four samples appeared to be caused by the formation of insoluble tannin-protein complexes. The samples were rich in phenolics and inhibition was reversed by polyethyleneglycol. In contrast, K. arvensis contained low concentrations of phenolics and no tannins, had no effect in the 30-min assay, yet inhibited the degradation rate of soluble protein (by 14 %, P < 0.0001) and the production of branched SCFA (by 17 %, P < 0.05) without precipitating protein in the 12-h batch fermentation. The effects showed some resemblance to those obtained in parallel incubations containing 3 mum-monensin, suggesting that K. arvensis may be a plant-derived feed additive that can suppress growth and activity of key proteolytic ruminal micro-organisms in a manner similar to that already well known for monensin. PMID:17445338

  5. Deletion of potD, encoding a putative spermidine-binding protein, results in a complex phenotype in Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Nasrallah, Gheyath K; Abdelhady, Hany; Tompkins, Nicholas P; Carson, Kaitlyn R; Garduño, Rafael A

    2014-07-01

    L. pneumophila is an intracellular pathogen that replicates in a membrane-bound compartment known as the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV). We previously observed that the polyamine spermidine, produced by host cells or added exogenously, enhances the intracellular growth of L. pneumophila. To study this enhancing effect and determine whether polyamines are used as nutrients, we deleted potD from L. pneumophila strain JR32. The gene potD encodes a spermidine-binding protein that in other bacteria is essential for the function of the PotABCD polyamine transporter. Deletion of potD did not affect L. pneumophila growth in vitro in the presence or absence of spermidine and putrescine, suggesting that PotD plays a redundant or no role in polyamine uptake. However, deletion of potD resulted in a puzzlingly complex phenotype that included defects in L. pneumophila's ability to form filaments, tolerate Na(+), associate with macrophages and amoeba, recruit host vesicles to the LCV, and initiate intracellular growth. Moreover, the ΔpotD mutant was completely unable to grow in L929 cells treated with a pharmacological inhibitor of spermidine synthesis. These complex and disparate effects suggest that the L. pneumophila potD encodes either: (i) a multifunctional protein, (ii) a protein that interacts with, or regulates a, multifunctional protein, or (iii) a protein that contributes (directly or indirectly) to a regulatory network. Protein function studies with the L. pneumophila PotD protein are thus warranted. PMID:24928741

  6. Native-sized recombinant spider silk protein produced in metabolically engineered Escherichia coli results in a strong fiber.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xiao-Xia; Qian, Zhi-Gang; Ki, Chang Seok; Park, Young Hwan; Kaplan, David L; Lee, Sang Yup

    2010-08-10

    Spider dragline silk is a remarkably strong fiber that makes it attractive for numerous applications. Much has thus been done to make similar fibers by biomimic spinning of recombinant dragline silk proteins. However, success is limited in part due to the inability to successfully express native-sized recombinant silk proteins (250-320 kDa). Here we show that a 284.9 kDa recombinant protein of the spider Nephila clavipes is produced and spun into a fiber displaying mechanical properties comparable to those of the native silk. The native-sized protein, predominantly rich in glycine (44.9%), was favorably expressed in metabolically engineered Escherichia coli within which the glycyl-tRNA pool was elevated. We also found that the recombinant proteins of lower molecular weight versions yielded inferior fiber properties. The results provide insight into evolution of silk protein size related to mechanical performance, and also clarify why spinning lower molecular weight proteins does not recapitulate the properties of native fibers. Furthermore, the silk expression, purification, and spinning platform established here should be useful for sustainable production of natural quality dragline silk, potentially enabling broader applications. PMID:20660779

  7. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-binding protein null mutation results in defective mammary gland development.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yuzhi; Qi, Chao; Zhang, Zhongyi; Zhu, Yiwei Tony; Rao, Sambasiva M; Zhu, Yi-Jun

    2005-03-18

    A conditional null mutation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-binding protein (PBP) gene was generated to understand its role in mammary gland development. PBP-deficient mammary glands exhibited retarded ductal elongation during puberty, and decreased alveolar density during pregnancy and lactation. PBP-deficient mammary glands could not produce milk to nurse pups during lactation. Both the mammary ductal elongation in response to estrogen treatment and the mammary lobuloalveolar proliferation stimulated by estrogen plus progesterone were attenuated in PBP-deficient mammary glands. The proliferation index was decreased in PBP-deficient mammary glands. PBP-deficient mammary epithelial cells expressed abundant beta-casein, whey acidic protein, and WDNM1 mRNA, indicating a relatively intact differentiated function. PBP-deficient epithelial cells were unable to form mammospheres, which were considered to be derived from mammary progenitor/stem cells. We conclude that PBP plays a pivotal role in the normal mammary gland development. PMID:15647257

  8. Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) Systems Engineering Office (SEO). Ocean Surface Topography (OST) Workshop, Ruedesheim an Rhein, Germany. [CEOS SEO Status Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Killough, Brian D., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    The CEOS Systems Engineering Office will present a 2007 status report of the CEOS constellation process, present a new systems engineering framework, and analysis results from the GEO Societal Benefit Area (SBA) assessment and the OST constellation requirements assessment.

  9. Vibrational spectroscopic study of the uranyl selenite mineral derriksite Cu4UO2(SeO3)2(OH)6·H2O.

    PubMed

    Frost, Ray L; Čejka, Jiří; Scholz, Ricardo; López, Andrés; Theiss, Frederick L; Xi, Yunfei

    2014-01-01

    Raman spectrum of the mineral derriksite Cu4UO2(SeO3)2(OH)6⋅H2O was studied and complemented by the infrared spectrum of this mineral. Both spectra were interpreted and partly compared with the spectra of demesmaekerite, marthozite, larisaite, haynesite and piretite. Observed Raman and infrared bands were attributed to the (UO2)(2+), (SeO3)(2-), (OH)(-) and H2O vibrations. The presence of symmetrically distinct hydrogen bonded molecule of water of crystallization and hydrogen bonded symmetrically distinct hydroxyl ions was inferred from the spectra in the derriksite unit cell. Approximate U-O bond lengths in uranyl and O-H···O hydrogen bond lengths were calculated from the Raman and infrared spectra of derriksite. PMID:24018173

  10. Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) Community Observer Program including the Science Enhancement Option Box (SEO Box) - 12 TB On-board Flash Memory for Serendipitous Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schingler, Robert; Villasenor, J. N.; Ricker, G. R.; Latham, D. W.; Vanderspek, R. K.; Ennico, K. A.; Lewis, B. S.; Bakos, G.; Brown, T. M.; Burgasser, A. J.; Charbonneau, D.; Clampin, M.; Deming, L. D.; Doty, J. P.; Dunham, E. W.; Elliot, J. L.; Holman, M. J.; Ida, S.; Jenkins, J. M.; Jernigan, J. G.; Kawai, N.; Laughlin, G. P.; Lissauer, J. J.; Martel, F.; Sasselov, D. D.; Seager, S.; Torres, G.; Udry, S.; Winn, J. N.; Worden, S. P.

    2010-01-01

    The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) will perform an all-sky survey in a low-inclination, low-Earth orbit. TESS's 144 GB of raw data collected each orbit will be stacked, cleaned, cut, compressed and downloaded. The Community Observer Program is a Science Enhancement Option (SEO) that takes advantage of the low-radiation environment, technology advances in flash memory, and the vast amount of astronomical data collected by TESS. The Community Observer Program requires the addition of a 12 TB "SEO Box” inside the TESS Bus. The hardware can be built using low-cost Commercial Off-The-Shelf (COTS) components and fits within TESS's margins while accommodating GSFC gold rules. The SEO Box collects and stores a duplicate of the TESS camera data at a "raw” stage ( 4.3 GB/orbit, after stacking and cleaning) and makes them available for on-board processing. The sheer amount of onboard storage provided by the SEO Box allows the stacking and storing of several months of data, allowing the investigator to probe deeper in time prior to a given event. Additionally, with computation power and data in standard formats, investigators can utilize data-mining techniques to investigate serendipitous phenomenon, including pulsating stars, eclipsing binaries, supernovae or other transient phenomena. The Community Observer Program enables ad-hoc teams of citizen scientists to propose, test, refine and rank algorithms for on-board analysis to support serendipitous science. Combining "best practices” of online collaboration, with careful moderation and community management, enables this `crowd sourced’ participatory exploration with a minimal risk and impact on the core TESS Team. This system provides a powerful and independent tool opening a wide range of opportunity for science enhancement and secondary science. Support for this work has been provided by NASA, the Kavli Foundation, Google, and the Smithsonian Institution.

  11. Inactivation of the protein phosphatase 2A regulatory subunit A results in morphological and transcriptional defects in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    van Zyl, W; Huang, W; Sneddon, A A; Stark, M; Camier, S; Werner, M; Marck, C; Sentenac, A; Broach, J R

    1992-01-01

    We have determined that TPD3, a gene previously identified in a screen for mutants defective in tRNA biosynthesis, most likely encodes the A regulatory subunit of the major protein phosphatase 2A species in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The predicted amino acid sequence of the product of TPD3 is highly homologous to the sequence of the mammalian A subunit of protein phosphatase 2A. In addition, antibodies raised against Tpd3p specifically precipitate a significant fraction of the protein phosphatase 2A activity in the cell, and extracts of tpd3 strains yield a different chromatographic profile of protein phosphatase 2A than do extracts of isogenic TPD3 strains. tpd3 deletion strains generally grow poorly and have at least two distinct phenotypes. At reduced temperatures, tpd3 strains appear to be defective in cytokinesis, since most cells become multibudded and multinucleate following a shift to 13 degrees C. This is similar to the phenotype obtained by overexpression of the protein phosphatase 2A catalytic subunit or by loss of CDC55, a gene that encodes a protein with homology to a second regulatory subunit of protein phosphatase 2A. At elevated temperatures, tpd3 strains are defective in transcription by RNA polymerase III. Consistent with this in vivo phenotype, extracts of tpd3 strains fail to support in vitro transcription of tRNA genes, a defect that can be reversed by addition of either purified RNA polymerase III or TFIIIB. These results reinforce the notion that protein phosphatase 2A affects a variety of biological processes in the cell and provide an initial identification of critical substrates for this phosphatase. Images PMID:1328868

  12. Magnetic, resonance, and optical properties of Cu3Sm (SeO3)2O2Cl : A rare-earth francisite compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, K. V.; Zvereva, E. A.; Markina, M. M.; Stratan, M. I.; Kuznetsova, E. S.; Dunaev, S. F.; Berdonosov, P. S.; Dolgikh, V. A.; Olenev, A. V.; Klimin, S. A.; Mazaev, L. S.; Kashchenko, M. A.; Ahmed, Md. A.; Banerjee, A.; Bandyopadhyay, S.; Iqbal, A.; Rahaman, B.; Saha-Dasgupta, T.; Vasiliev, A. N.

    2016-08-01

    In this combined experimental and theoretical paper, we study the properties of Cu3Sm (SeO3)2O2Cl belonging to the francisite family of compounds, which are novel frustrated layered compounds. Cu3Sm (SeO3)2O2Cl is synthesized through a solid state reaction. Characterizations through measurements of magnetization, specific heat, X-band electron spin resonance, and rare-earth optical spectroscopy, establish that the compound orders antiferromagnetically at TN=35 K and undergoes a spin-reorientation phase transition at TC=8.5 K due to the interplay of anisotropies in transition metal and rare-earth subsystems. The ground state Kramers doublet of Sm is found to split only at T SeO3)2O2Cl .

  13. Simultaneous removal of SO2 and trace SeO2 from flue gas: effect of product layer on mass transfer.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuzhong; Tong, Huiling; Zhuo, Yuqun; Chen, Changhe; Xu, Xuchang

    2006-07-01

    Sulfur dioxide (SO2) and trace elements are all pollutants derived from coal combustion. This study relates to the simultaneous removal of sulfur and trace selenium dioxide (SeO2) by calcium oxide (CaO) adsorption in the medium temperature range, especially the mass transfer effect of sulfate product layer on trace elements. Through experiments on CaO adsorbing different concentrations of SO2 gases, conclusions can be drawn that although the product layer introduces extra mass transfer resistance into the sorbent-gas reaction process, the extent of CaO adsorption ability loss due to this factor decreases with decreasing SO2 concentration. When the gas concentration is at trace level, the loss of CaO adsorption ability can be neglected. Subsequent experiments on CaO adsorbing trace SeO2 gas suggest that the sulfate product layer, whether it is thick or thin, has no obvious effect on the CaO ability to adsorb trace SeO2 gas. PMID:16856751

  14. Lack of the Lysosomal Membrane Protein, GLMP, in Mice Results in Metabolic Dysregulation in Liver

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Xiang Yi; Kase, Eili Tranheim; Herskedal, Anette; Schjalm, Camilla; Damme, Markus; Nesset, Cecilie Kasi; Thoresen, G. Hege; Rustan, Arild C.; Eskild, Winnie

    2015-01-01

    Ablation of glycosylated lysosomal membrane protein (GLMP, formerly known as NCU-G1) has been shown to cause chronic liver injury which progresses into liver fibrosis in mice. Both lysosomal dysfunction and chronic liver injury can cause metabolic dysregulation. Glmpgt/gt mice (formerly known as Ncu-g1gt/gtmice) were studied between 3 weeks and 9 months of age. Body weight gain and feed efficiency of Glmpgt/gt mice were comparable to wild type siblings, only at the age of 9 months the Glmpgt/gt siblings had significantly reduced body weight. Reduced size of epididymal fat pads was accompanied by hepatosplenomegaly in Glmpgt/gt mice. Blood analysis revealed reduced levels of blood glucose, circulating triacylglycerol and non-esterified fatty acids in Glmpgt/gt mice. Increased flux of glucose, increased de novo lipogenesis and lipid accumulation were detected in Glmpgt/gt primary hepatocytes, as well as elevated triacylglycerol levels in Glmpgt/gt liver homogenates, compared to hepatocytes and liver from wild type mice. Gene expression analysis showed an increased expression of genes involved in fatty acid uptake and lipogenesis in Glmpgt/gt liver compared to wild type. Our findings are in agreement with the metabolic alterations observed in other mouse models lacking lysosomal proteins, and with alterations characteristic for advanced chronic liver injury. PMID:26047317

  15. Lack of the Lysosomal Membrane Protein, GLMP, in Mice Results in Metabolic Dysregulation in Liver.

    PubMed

    Kong, Xiang Yi; Kase, Eili Tranheim; Herskedal, Anette; Schjalm, Camilla; Damme, Markus; Nesset, Cecilie Kasi; Thoresen, G Hege; Rustan, Arild C; Eskild, Winnie

    2015-01-01

    Ablation of glycosylated lysosomal membrane protein (GLMP, formerly known as NCU-G1) has been shown to cause chronic liver injury which progresses into liver fibrosis in mice. Both lysosomal dysfunction and chronic liver injury can cause metabolic dysregulation. Glmp gt/gt mice (formerly known as Ncu-g1gt/gt mice) were studied between 3 weeks and 9 months of age. Body weight gain and feed efficiency of Glmp gt/gt mice were comparable to wild type siblings, only at the age of 9 months the Glmp gt/gt siblings had significantly reduced body weight. Reduced size of epididymal fat pads was accompanied by hepatosplenomegaly in Glmp gt/gt mice. Blood analysis revealed reduced levels of blood glucose, circulating triacylglycerol and non-esterified fatty acids in Glmp gt/gt mice. Increased flux of glucose, increased de novo lipogenesis and lipid accumulation were detected in Glmp gt/gt primary hepatocytes, as well as elevated triacylglycerol levels in Glmp gt/gt liver homogenates, compared to hepatocytes and liver from wild type mice. Gene expression analysis showed an increased expression of genes involved in fatty acid uptake and lipogenesis in Glmp gt/gt liver compared to wild type. Our findings are in agreement with the metabolic alterations observed in other mouse models lacking lysosomal proteins, and with alterations characteristic for advanced chronic liver injury. PMID:26047317

  16. Overexpression of Drosophila juvenile hormone esterase binding protein results in anti-JH effects and reduced pheromone abundance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The titer of juvenile hormone (JH), which has wide ranging physiological effects in insects, is regulated in part by JH esterase (JHE). We show that overexpression in Drosophila melanogaster of the JHE binding protein, DmP29 results in a series of apparent anti-JH effects. We hypothesize that DmP29 ...

  17. LIM mineralization protein-1 potentiates bone morphogenetic protein responsiveness via a novel interaction with Smurf1 resulting in decreased ubiquitination of Smads.

    PubMed

    Sangadala, Sreedhara; Boden, Scott D; Viggeswarapu, Manjula; Liu, Yunshan; Titus, Louisa

    2006-06-23

    Development and repair of the skeletal system and other organs is highly dependent on precise regulation of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), their receptors, and their intracellular signaling proteins known as Smads. The use of BMPs clinically to induce bone formation has been limited in part by the requirement of much higher doses of recombinant proteins in primates than were needed in cell culture or rodents. Therefore, control of cellular responsiveness to BMPs is now a critical area that is poorly understood. We determined that LMP-1, a LIM domain protein capable of inducing de novo bone formation, interacts with Smurf1 (Smad ubiquitin regulatory factor 1) and prevents ubiquitination of Smads. In the region of LMP responsible for bone formation, there is a motif that directly interacts with the Smurf1 WW2 domain and can effectively compete with Smad1 and Smad5 for binding. We have shown that small peptides containing this motif can mimic the ability to block Smurf1 from binding Smads. This novel interaction of LMP-1 with the WW2 domain of Smurf1 to block Smad binding results in increased cellular responsiveness to exogenous BMP and demonstrates a novel regulatory mechanism for the BMP signaling pathway. PMID:16611643

  18. Gestational stress induces the unfolded protein response, resulting in heart defects.

    PubMed

    Shi, Hongjun; O'Reilly, Victoria C; Moreau, Julie L M; Bewes, Therese R; Yam, Michelle X; Chapman, Bogdan E; Grieve, Stuart M; Stocker, Roland; Graham, Robert M; Chapman, Gavin; Sparrow, Duncan B; Dunwoodie, Sally L

    2016-07-15

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is an enigma. It is the most common human birth defect and yet, even with the application of modern genetic and genomic technologies, only a minority of cases can be explained genetically. This is because environmental stressors also cause CHD. Here we propose a plausible non-genetic mechanism for induction of CHD by environmental stressors. We show that exposure of mouse embryos to short-term gestational hypoxia induces the most common types of heart defect. This is mediated by the rapid induction of the unfolded protein response (UPR), which profoundly reduces FGF signaling in cardiac progenitor cells of the second heart field. Thus, UPR activation during human pregnancy might be a common cause of CHD. Our findings have far-reaching consequences because the UPR is activated by a myriad of environmental or pathophysiological conditions. Ultimately, our discovery could lead to preventative strategies to reduce the incidence of human CHD. PMID:27436040

  19. Translational infidelity-induced protein stress results from a deficiency in Trm9-catalyzed tRNA modifications

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Ashish; Chan, Clement T.Y.; Dyavaiah, Madhu; Rooney, John P.; Dedon, Peter C.; Begley, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    Correct codon-anticodon pairing promotes translational fidelity, with these interactions greatly facilitated by modified nucleosides found in tRNA. We hypothesized that wobble uridine modifications catalyzed by tRNA methyltransferase 9 (Trm9) are essential for translational fidelity. In support, we have used phenotypic, reporter and protein-based assays to demonstrate increased translational infidelity in trm9Δ Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. Codon reengineering studies suggest that Trm9-catalyzed tRNA modifications promote fidelity during the translation of specific genes, those rich in arginine and glutamic acid codons from mixed boxes. Using quantitative tRNA modification analysis, we determined that trm9Δ cells are only deficient in 2 of 23 tRNA modifications, with those 2, 5-methoxycarbonylmethyluridine (mcm5U) and 5-methoxycarbonylmethyl-2-thiouridine (mcm5s2U), classified as key determinants of translational fidelity. We also show that in the absence of mcm5U and mcm5s2U, the resulting translational infidelity promotes protein errors and activation of unfolded protein and heat shock responses. These data support a model in which Trm9-catalyzed tRNA modifications promote fidelity during the translation of specific transcripts, with decreased wobble base modification leading to translational infidelity, protein errors and activation of protein stress response pathways. PMID:22832247

  20. Biochemical and Biophysical Characterization of the Selenium-binding and Reducing Site in Arabidopsis thaliana Homologue to Mammals Selenium-binding Protein 1*

    PubMed Central

    Schild, Florie; Kieffer-Jaquinod, Sylvie; Palencia, Andrés; Cobessi, David; Sarret, Géraldine; Zubieta, Chloé; Jourdain, Agnès; Dumas, Renaud; Forge, Vincent; Testemale, Denis; Bourguignon, Jacques; Hugouvieux, Véronique

    2014-01-01

    The function of selenium-binding protein 1 (SBP1), present in almost all organisms, has not yet been established. In mammals, SBP1 is known to bind the essential element selenium but the binding site has not been identified. In addition, the SBP family has numerous potential metal-binding sites that may play a role in detoxification pathways in plants. In Arabidopsis thaliana, AtSBP1 over-expression increases tolerance to two toxic compounds for plants, selenium and cadmium, often found as soil pollutants. For a better understanding of AtSBP1 function in detoxification mechanisms, we investigated the chelating properties of the protein toward different ligands with a focus on selenium using biochemical and biophysical techniques. Thermal shift assays together with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry revealed that AtSBP1 binds selenium after incubation with selenite (SeO32−) with a ligand to protein molar ratio of 1:1. Isothermal titration calorimetry confirmed the 1:1 stoichiometry and revealed an unexpectedly large value of binding enthalpy suggesting a covalent bond between selenium and AtSBP1. Titration of reduced Cys residues and comparative mass spectrometry on AtSBP1 and the purified selenium-AtSBP1 complex identified Cys21 and Cys22 as being responsible for the binding of one selenium. These results were validated by site-directed mutagenesis. Selenium K-edge x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy performed on the selenium-AtSBP1 complex demonstrated that AtSBP1 reduced SeO32− to form a R-S-Se(II)-S-R-type complex. The capacity of AtSBP1 to bind different metals and selenium is discussed with respect to the potential function of AtSBP1 in detoxification mechanisms and selenium metabolism. PMID:25274629

  1. CSF Tau proteins reduce misdiagnosis of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease suspected cases with inconclusive 14-3-3 result.

    PubMed

    Leitão, M J; Baldeiras, I; Almeida, M R; Ribeiro, M H; Santos, A C; Ribeiro, M; Tomás, J; Rocha, S; Santana, I; Oliveira, C R

    2016-09-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) 14-3-3 protein supports sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob (sCJD) diagnosis, but often leads to weak-positive results and lacks standardization. In this study, we explored the added diagnostic value of Total Tau (t-Tau) and phosphorylated Tau (p-Tau) in sCJD diagnosis, particularly in the cases with inconclusive 14-3-3 result. 95 definite sCJD and 287 patients without prion disease (non-CJD) were included in this study. CSF samples were collected in routine clinical diagnosis and analysed for 14-3-3 detection by Western blot (WB). CSF t-Tau and p-Tau were quantified by commercial ELISA kits and PRNP and APOE genotyping assessed by PCR-RFLP. In a regression analysis of the whole cohort, 14-3-3 protein revealed an overall accuracy of 82 % (sensitivity = 96.7 %; specificity = 75.6 %) for sCJD. Regarding 14-3-3 clear positive results, we observed no added value either of t-Tau alone or p-Tau/t-Tau ratio in the model. On the other hand, considering 14-3-3 weak-positive cases, t-Tau protein increased the overall accuracy of 14-3-3 alone from 91 to 94 % and specificity from 74 to 93 % (p < 0.05), with no sensitivity improvement. However, inclusion of p-Tau/t-Tau ratio did not significantly improve the first model (p = 0.0595). Globally, t-Tau protein allowed a further discrimination of 65 % within 14-3-3 inconclusive results. Furthermore, PRNP MV genotype showed a trend to decrease 14-3-3 sensitivity (p = 0.051), but such effect was not seen on t-Tau protein. In light of these results, we suggest that t-Tau protein assay is of significant importance as a second marker in identifying 14-3-3 false-positive results among sCJD probable cases. PMID:27357003

  2. An extensively hydrolysed rice protein-based formula in the management of infants with cow's milk protein allergy: preliminary results after 1 month

    PubMed Central

    Vandenplas, Yvan; De Greef, Elisabeth; Hauser, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Background Guidelines recommend extensively hydrolysed cow's milk protein formulas (eHF) in the treatment of infants diagnosed with cow's milk protein allergy (CMPA). Extensively hydrolysed rice protein infant formulas (eRHFs) have recently become available, and could offer a valid alternative. Methods A prospective trial was performed to evaluate the clinical tolerance of a new eRHF in infants with a confirmed CMPA. Patients were followed for 1 month. Clinical tolerance of the eRHF was evaluated with a symptom-based score (SBS) and growth (weight and length) was monitored. Results Thirty-nine infants (mean age 3.4 months, range 0.5–6 months) diagnosed with CMPA were enrolled. All infants tolerated the eRHF and experienced a normal growth. Conclusions In accordance with current guidelines, this eRHF is tolerated by more than 90% of children with proven CMPA with a 95% CI, and is an adequate alternative to cow's milk-based eHF. Trial registration number ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01998074. PMID:24914098

  3. Binding of lithium and boron to human plasma proteins II: results for a bipolar patient not on lithium therapy.

    PubMed

    Clarke, W Brian; Guscott, Richard; Lindstrom, Richard M

    2004-02-01

    We report further measurements of lithium and boron bound to human plasma proteins using the techniques of gel chromatography, thermal-neutron activation, and high-sensitivity helium isotope mass spectrometry. The plasma sample was donated by a bipolar patient who had never been on lithium therapy. The plasma lithium-binding pattern for the bipolar patient is distinctly different from that previously observed in this laboratory for plasma donated by a normal individual. In the bipolar case, virtually all of the lithium is bound to low-molecular-weight proteins (approx 1000 amu), whereas in the normal case, most of the lithium eluted from the gel column was bound to five high-molecular-weight proteins (approx 50,000 amu to approx 1,000,000 amu). The gel elution profiles for boron were roughly similar for the normal and bipolar cases. The lithium results are in agreement with our previous speculation that lithium-binding plasma proteins are missing or exist in very low concentrations in some individuals suffering from affective disorders. PMID:14985622

  4. Protein

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteins are the major structural and functional components of all cells in the body. They are macromolecules that comprise 1 or more chains of amino acids that vary in their sequence and length and are folded into specific 3-dimensional structures. The sizes and conformations of proteins, therefor...

  5. Proteins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doolittle, Russell F.

    1985-01-01

    Examines proteins which give rise to structure and, by virtue of selective binding to other molecules, make genes. Binding sites, amino acids, protein evolution, and molecular paleontology are discussed. Work with encoding segments of deoxyribonucleic acid (exons) and noncoding stretches (introns) provides new information for hypotheses. (DH)

  6. Dihydrotestosterone treatment rescues the decline in protein synthesis as a result of sarcopenia in isolated mouse skeletal muscle fibres

    PubMed Central

    Wendowski, Oskar; Redshaw, Zoe

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Sarcopenia, the progressive decline in skeletal muscle mass and function with age, is a debilitating condition. It leads to inactivity, falls, and loss of independence. Despite this, its cause(s) and the underlying mechanism(s) are still poorly understood. Methods In this study, small skeletal muscle fibre bundles isolated from the extensor digitorum longus (a fast‐twitch muscle) and the soleus (a slow‐twitch muscle) of adult mice of different ages (range 100–900 days old) were used to investigate the effects of ageing and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) treatment on protein synthesis as well as the expression and function of two amino acid transporters; the sodium‐coupled neutral amino acid transporter (SNAT) 2, and the sodium‐independent L‐type amino‐acid transporter (LAT) 2. Results At all ages investigated, protein synthesis was always higher in the slow‐twitch than in the fast‐twitch muscle fibres and decreased with age in both fibre types. However, the decline was greater in the fast‐twitch than in the slow‐twitch fibres and was accompanied by a reduction in the expression of SNAT2 and LAT2 at the protein level. Again, the decrease in the expression of the amino acid transporters was greater in the fast‐twitch than in the slow‐twitch fibres. In contrast, ageing had no effect on SNAT2 and LAT2 expressions at the mRNA level. Treating the muscle fibre bundles with physiological concentrations (~2 nM) of DHT for 1 h completely reversed the effects of ageing on protein synthesis and the expression of SNAT2 and LAT2 protein in both fibre types. Conclusion From the observations that ageing is accompanied by a reduction in protein synthesis and transporter expression and that these effects are reversed by DHT treatment, we conclude that sarcopenia arises from an age‐dependent reduction in protein synthesis caused, in part, by the lack of or by the low bioavailability of the male sex steroid, DHT. PMID:27239418

  7. Synthesis, crystal structure and characterization of Na3H(SO4)1.78(SeO4)0.22

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Hassen, C.; Boujelbene, M.; Mhiri, T.

    2013-05-01

    Synthesis, crystal structure, Raman, IR and TG/DTA characterization are given for Trisodium hydrogen bisulfate selenite Na3H(SO4)1.78(SeO4)0.22. This compound crystallizes in the monoclinic system with space group P21/c and cell parameters: a = 8.6787 (4) Å, b = 9.6631 (6) Å, c = 9.2070 (5) Å, ß = 108.825 (4)°, Z = 4 and V = 730.83 (7) Å3. The refinement of 2492 observed reflections (I > 2σ(I)) leads to R1 = 0.045 and wR2 = 0.125. The structure is characterized by S/SeO4 tetrahedra which are linked into isolated pairs by hydrogen bonds which form dimers of composition [H(SO)2]. The existence of O-H and (S/Se)-O bonds in the structure at room temperature has been confirmed by IR and Raman spectroscopy in the frequency ranges 50-1300 and 500-4000 cm-1, respectively. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential thermal analysis (DTA) measurements have been carried out on Na3H(SO4)1.78(SeO4)0.22 crystal in the temperature range between 50 and 600 °C. Water evolution and major thermal decomposition take place with onset temperatures of approximately 282 °C and 395 °C, respectively. A Raman study of the decomposition of Na3H(SO4)1.78(SeO4)0.22 as a function of temperature supports a reaction sequence and possible intermediates during the process.

  8. Single Amino Acid Deletion in Kindlin-1 Results in Partial Protein Degradation Which Can Be Rescued by Chaperone Treatment.

    PubMed

    Maier, Kristin; He, Yinghong; Esser, Philipp R; Thriene, Kerstin; Sarca, Daniela; Kohlhase, Jürgen; Dengjel, Jörn; Martin, Ludovic; Has, Cristina

    2016-05-01

    Kindler syndrome, a distinct type of epidermolysis bullosa, is a rare disorder caused by mutations in FERMT1, encoding kindlin-1. Most FERMT1 mutations lead to premature termination codons and absence of kindlin-1. Here we investigated the molecular and cellular consequences of a naturally occurring FERMT1 mutation, c.299_301del resulting in a single amino acid deletion, p.R100del. The mutation led to a 50% reduction of FERMT1 mRNA and 90% reduction of kindlin-1 protein in keratinocytes derived from the patient, as compared with control cells. The misfolded p.R100del kindlin-1 mutant was lysosomally degraded and launched a homeostatic unfolded protein response. Sodium-phenylbutyrate significantly increased kindlin-1 mRNA and protein levels and the area of mutant cells, acting as a chemical chaperone and probably also as a histone deacetylase inhibitor. In a recombinant system, low levels of wild-type or p.R100del mutant kindlin-1 were sufficient to improve the cellular phenotype in respect of spreading and proliferation as compared with kindlin-1 negative keratinocytes. The study of this hypomorphic mutation provides evidence that low amounts of kindlin-1 are sufficient to improve the epidermal architecture and Kindler syndrome cellular phenotype and proposes a personalized chaperone therapy for the patient. PMID:26827766

  9. Novel mutations in 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (PHGDH) are distributed throughout the protein and result in altered enzyme kinetics.

    PubMed

    Tabatabaie, L; de Koning, T J; Geboers, A J J M; van den Berg, I E T; Berger, R; Klomp, L W J

    2009-05-01

    Three-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (3-PGDH) deficiency is a rare recessive inborn error in the biosynthesis of the amino acid L-serine characterized clinically by congenital microcephaly, psychomotor retardation, and intractable seizures. The biochemical abnormalities associated with this disorder are low concentrations of L-serine, D-serine, and glycine in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Only two missense mutations (p.V425M and p.V490M) have been identified in PHGDH, the gene encoding 3-PGDH, but it is currently unclear how these mutations in the carboxy-terminal regulatory domain of the protein affect enzyme function. We now describe five novel mutations in five patients with 3-PGDH deficiency; one frameshift mutation (p.G238fsX), and four missense mutations (p.R135W, p.V261M, p.A373T, and p.G377S). The missense mutations were located in the nucleotide binding and regulatory domains of 3-PGDH and did not affect steady-state expression, protein stability, and protein degradation rates. Patients' fibroblasts displayed a significant, but incomplete, reduction in maximal enzyme activities associated with all missense mutations. In transient overexpression studies in HEK293T cells, the p.A373T, p.V425M, and p.V490M mutations resulted in almost undetectable enzyme activities. Molecular modeling of the p.R135W and p.V261M mutations onto the partial crystal structure of 3-PGDH predicted that these mutations affect substrate and cofactor binding. This prediction was confirmed by the results of kinetic measurements in fibroblasts and transiently transfected HEK293T cells, which revealed a markedly decreased V(max) and an increase in K(m) values, respectively. Taken together, these data suggest that missense mutations associated with 3-PGDH deficiency either primarily affect substrate binding or result in very low residual enzymatic activity. PMID:19235232

  10. Enrichment of Functional Redox Reactive Proteins and Identification by Mass Spectrometry Results in Several Terminal Fe(III)-reducing Candidate Proteins in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    SciTech Connect

    Elias, Dwayne A.; Yang, Feng; Mottaz, Heather M.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2007-02-01

    Identification of the proteins directly involved in microbial metal-reduction is important to understanding the biochemistry involved in heavy metal reduction/immobilization and the ultimate cleanup of DOE contaminated sites. Although previous strategies for the identification of these proteins have traditionally required laborious protein purification/characterization of metal-reducing capability, activity is often lost before the final purification step, thus creating a significant knowledge gap. In the current study, subcellular fractions of S. oneidensis MR-1 were enriched for Fe(III)-NTA reducing proteins in a single step using several orthogonal column matrices. The protein content of eluted fractions that demonstrated activity were determined by ultra high pressure liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LCMS/ MS). A comparison of the proteins identified from active fractions in all separations produced 30 proteins that may act as the terminal electron-accepting protein for Fe(III)-reduction. These include MtrA, MtrB, MtrC and OmcA as well as a number of other proteins not previously associated with Fe(III)-reduction. This is the first report of such an approach where the laborious procedures for protein purification are not required for identification of metal-reducing proteins. Such work provides the basis for a similar approach with other cultured organisms as well as analysis of sediment and groundwater samples from biostimulation efforts at contaminated sites.

  11. Na2Cu7(SeO3)4O2Cl4: a selenite chloride compound with Cu7 units showing spin-frustration and a magnetization plateau.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yingying; Guo, Wenbin; Zhang, Suyun; Xiang, Hongping; Cui, Meiyan; He, Zhangzhen

    2016-05-17

    A selenite chloride, Na2Cu7(SeO3)4O2Cl4 (), was prepared via a conventional hydrothermal method. Na2Cu7(SeO3)4O2Cl4 crystallizes in the triclinic space group P1[combining macron] and features an isolated reverse triangular dipyramid Cu7, which is assembled with two corner-shared Cu4 tetrahedral units. Magnetic measurements suggest that shows the spin-frustration effect with antiferromagnetic ordering at ∼5 K, while an unusual magnetization plateau is observed at an applied field of >4 T. PMID:27159358

  12. Disruption of the basal body protein POC1B results in autosomal-recessive cone-rod dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Roosing, Susanne; Lamers, Ideke J C; de Vrieze, Erik; van den Born, L Ingeborgh; Lambertus, Stanley; Arts, Heleen H; Peters, Theo A; Hoyng, Carel B; Kremer, Hannie; Hetterschijt, Lisette; Letteboer, Stef J F; van Wijk, Erwin; Roepman, Ronald; den Hollander, Anneke I; Cremers, Frans P M

    2014-08-01

    Exome sequencing revealed a homozygous missense mutation (c.317C>G [p.Arg106Pro]) in POC1B, encoding POC1 centriolar protein B, in three siblings with autosomal-recessive cone dystrophy or cone-rod dystrophy and compound-heterozygous POC1B mutations (c.199_201del [p.Gln67del] and c.810+1G>T) in an unrelated person with cone-rod dystrophy. Upon overexpression of POC1B in human TERT-immortalized retinal pigment epithelium 1 cells, the encoded wild-type protein localized to the basal body of the primary cilium, whereas this localization was lost for p.Arg106Pro and p.Gln67del variant forms of POC1B. Morpholino-oligonucleotide-induced knockdown of poc1b translation in zebrafish resulted in a dose-dependent small-eye phenotype, impaired optokinetic responses, and decreased length of photoreceptor outer segments. These ocular phenotypes could partially be rescued by wild-type human POC1B mRNA, but not by c.199_201del and c.317C>G mutant human POC1B mRNAs. Yeast two-hybrid screening of a human retinal cDNA library revealed FAM161A as a binary interaction partner of POC1B. This was confirmed in coimmunoprecipitation and colocalization assays, which both showed loss of FAM161A interaction with p.Arg106Pro and p.Gln67del variant forms of POC1B. FAM161A was previously implicated in autosomal-recessive retinitis pigmentosa and shown to be located at the base of the photoreceptor connecting cilium, where it interacts with several other ciliopathy-associated proteins. Altogether, this study demonstrates that POC1B mutations result in a defect of the photoreceptor sensory cilium and thus affect cone and rod photoreceptors. PMID:25018096

  13. Protein crystal's shape and polymorphism prediction within the limits resulting from the exploration of the Miyazawa-Jernigan matrix.

    PubMed

    Siódmiak, Jacek

    2008-12-01

    A computer study of the prediction of the protein crystal's shape and polymorphism of crystal's structures within the limits resulting from the exploration of the Miyazawa-Jernigan matrix is presented. In this study, a coarse-graining procedure was applied to prepare a two-dimensional growth unit, where instead of full atom representation of the protein a two-type (hydrophobic-hydrophilic, HP) aminoacidal representation was used. The interaction energies between hydrophobic (E(HH)) aminoacids were chosen from the well-known HP-type models (E(HH)in[-4,-3,-2.3,-1]), whereas interaction energies between hydrophobic and hydrophilic aminoacids (E(HP)) as well as interaction energies between hydrophilic aminoacids (E(PP)) were chosen from the range: <-1,1>, but not all values from this range fulfiled limitations resulting from the exploration of the Miyazawa-Jernigan matrix. Exploring every positively vetted combinations of energy interactions a polymorphism of the unit cell was observed what led to the fact that different final crystal's shapes were obtained. PMID:18721848

  14. Oxidative modification of brain proteins in Alzheimer's disease: perspective on future studies based on results of redox proteomics studies.

    PubMed

    Sultana, Rukhsana; Butterfield, D Allan

    2013-01-01

    Aging is the major risk factor associated with neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Until now no clear understanding of the mechanisms of initiation and progression of this dementing disorder exists. Based on the studies that have been conducted so far amyloid β-peptide (Aβ), a protein found in senile plaques, one of the key pathological hallmarks of AD, has been reported to be critical in the pathogenesis of AD. Studies from our laboratory and others showed that Aβ can induce oxidative stress, which leads to oxidative modification of biomolecules, thereby diminishing the normal functions of neuronal cells and eventually leading to loss of neurons and AD. In this review paper, we summarize evidence of oxidative stress in brains of AD and mild cognitive impairment patients, as well as the results from redox proteomics studies. The investigations have provided insights into the downstream effects of oxidative modification of key brain proteins in the pathogenesis of AD. Based on these redox proteomics results, we suggest future areas of research that could be considered to better understand this devastating dementing disorder. PMID:22683528

  15. Annealing prion protein amyloid fibrils at high temperature results in extension of a proteinase K-resistant core.

    PubMed

    Bocharova, Olga V; Makarava, Natallia; Breydo, Leonid; Anderson, Maighdlin; Salnikov, Vadim V; Baskakov, Ilia V

    2006-01-27

    Amyloids are highly ordered, rigid beta-sheet-rich structures that appear to have minimal dynamic flexibility in individual polypeptide chains. Here, we demonstrate that substantial conformational rearrangements occur within mature amyloid fibrils produced from full-length mammalian prion protein. The rearrangement results in a substantial extension of a proteinase K-resistant core and is accompanied by an increase in the beta-sheet-rich conformation. The conformational rearrangement was induced in the presence of low concentrations of Triton X-100 either by brief exposure to 80 degrees C or, with less efficacy, by prolonged incubation at 37 degrees C at pH 7.5 and is referred to here as "annealing." Upon annealing, amyloid fibrils acquired a proteinase K-resistant core identical to that found in bovine spongiform encephalopathy-specific scrapie-associated prion protein. Annealing was also observed when amyloid fibrils were exposed to high temperatures in the absence of detergent but in the presence of brain homogenate. These findings suggest that the amyloid fibrils exist in two conformationally distinct states that are separated by a high energy barrier and that yet unknown cellular cofactors may facilitate transition of the fibrils into thermodynamically more stable state. Our studies provide new insight into the complex behavior of prion polymerization and highlight the annealing process, a previously unknown step in the evolution of amyloid structures. PMID:16314415

  16. The failure to express a protein disulphide isomerase-like protein results in a floury endosperm and an endoplasmic reticulum stress response in rice

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xiaohua; Wang, Yihua; Liu, Xi; Jiang, Ling; Ren, Yulong; Liu, Feng; Peng, Cheng; Li, Jingjing; Jin, Ximing; Wu, Fuqing; Wang, Jiulin; Guo, Xiuping; Zhang, Xin; Cheng, Zhijun; Wan, Jianmin

    2012-01-01

    The rice somaclonal mutant T3612 produces small grains with a floury endosperm, caused by the loose packing of starch granules. The positional cloning of the mutation revealed a deletion in a gene encoding a protein disulphide isomerase-like enzyme (PDIL1-1). In the wild type, PDIL1-1 was expressed throughout the plant, but most intensely in the developing grain. In T3612, its expression was abolished, resulting in a decrease in the activity of plastidial phosphorylase and pullulanase, and an increase in that of soluble starch synthase I and ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase. The amylopectin in the T3612 endosperm showed an increase in chains with a degree of polymerization 8–13 compared with the wild type. The expression in the mutant's endosperm of certain endoplasmic reticulum stress-responsive genes was noticeably elevated. PDIL1-1 appears to play an important role in starch synthesis. Its absence is associated with endoplasmic reticulum stress in the endosperm, which is likely to underlie the formation of the floury endosperm in the T3612 mutant. PMID:21984651

  17. The Antagonistic Effect of Selenium on Lead-Induced Inflammatory Factors and Heat Shock Proteins mRNA Expression in Chicken Livers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Li, Shu; Teng, Xiaohua

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of lead (Pb) poisoning on nitric oxide (NO) content, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) activity, the messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of inflammatory factors (nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), prostaglandin E synthases (PTGEs), and iNOS), heat shock proteins (HSPs) (HSP27, HSP40, HSP60, HSP70, and HSP90), and the antagonistic effect of selenium (Se) on Pb in chicken livers. One hundred eighty 7-day-old male chickens were randomly divided into four groups and were fed commercial diet and drinking water, Na2SeO3-added commercial diet and drinking water, commercial diet and (CH3OO)2Pb-added drinking water, and Na2SeO3-added commercial diet and (CH3OO)2Pb-added drinking water, respectively, for 30, 60, and 90 days. Then, NO content, iNOS activity, and the mRNA levels of NF-κB, TNF-α, COX-2, PTGEs, iNOS, HSP27, HSP40, HSP60, HSP70, and HSP90 were examined in chicken livers. The results showed that Pb poisoning induced NO content, iNOS activity, and mRNA expression of inflammation factors and HSPs in chicken livers. In addition, Se alleviated Pb-induced increase of inflammation factor and HSP expression in chicken livers. PMID:26470710

  18. ACUTE EXPOSURE OF THE NEONATAL RAT TO TRIETHYLTIN RESULTS IN PERSISTENT CHANGES IN NEUROTYPIC AND GLIOTYPIC PROTEINS (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Measurements of neuron-specific (neurotypic) and glia-specific (fliotypic) proteins were used to characterize the toxic effects of TET on the developing CNS. Six proteins, each of which is associated with specific aspects of neuronal and glial development, were evaluated as follo...

  19. Phenotypic Consequences Resulting from a Methionine-to-Valine Substitution at Position 48 in the HPr Protein of Streptococcus salivarius

    PubMed Central

    Plamondon, Pascale; Brochu, Denis; Thomas, Suzanne; Fradette, Julie; Gauthier, Lucie; Vaillancourt, Katy; Buckley, Nicole; Frenette, Michel; Vadeboncoeur, Christian

    1999-01-01

    In gram-positive bacteria, the HPr protein of the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS) can be phosphorylated on a histidine residue at position 15 (His15) by enzyme I (EI) of the PTS and on a serine residue at position 46 (Ser46) by an ATP-dependent protein kinase (His∼P and Ser-P, respectively). We have isolated from Streptococcus salivarius ATCC 25975, by independent selection from separate cultures, two spontaneous mutants (Ga3.78 and Ga3.14) that possess a missense mutation in ptsH (the gene encoding HPr) replacing the methionine at position 48 by a valine. The mutation did not prevent the phosphorylation of HPr at His15 by EI nor the phosphorylation at Ser46 by the ATP-dependent HPr kinase. The levels of HPr(Ser-P) in glucose-grown cells of the parental and mutant Ga3.78 were virtually the same. However, mutant cells growing on glucose produced two- to threefold less HPr(Ser-P)(His∼P) than the wild-type strain, while the levels of free HPr and HPr(His∼P) were increased 18- and 3-fold, respectively. The mutants grew as well as the wild-type strain on PTS sugars (glucose, fructose, and mannose) and on the non-PTS sugars lactose and melibiose. However, the growth rate of both mutants on galactose, also a non-PTS sugar, decreased rapidly with time. The M48V substitution had only a minor effect on the repression of α-galactosidase, β-galactosidase, and galactokinase by glucose, but this mutation abolished diauxie by rendering cells unable to prevent the catabolism of a non-PTS sugar (lactose, galactose, and melibiose) when glucose was available. The results suggested that the capacity of the wild-type cells to preferentially metabolize glucose over non-PTS sugars resulted mainly from inhibition of the catabolism of these secondary energy sources via a HPr-dependent mechanism. This mechanism was activated following glucose but not lactose metabolism, and it did not involve HPr(Ser-P) as the only regulatory molecule. PMID:10559156

  20. Deletion of GSTA4-4 results in increased mitochondrial post-translational modification of proteins by reactive aldehydes following chronic ethanol consumption in mice.

    PubMed

    Shearn, Colin T; Fritz, Kristofer S; Shearn, Alisabeth H; Saba, Laura M; Mercer, Kelly E; Engi, Bridgette; Galligan, James J; Zimniak, Piotr; Orlicky, David J; Ronis, Martin J; Petersen, Dennis R

    2016-04-01

    Chronic alcohol consumption induces hepatic oxidative stress resulting in production of highly reactive electrophilic α/β-unsaturated aldehydes that have the potential to modify proteins. A primary mechanism of reactive aldehyde detoxification by hepatocytes is through GSTA4-driven enzymatic conjugation with GSH. Given reports that oxidative stress initiates GSTA4 translocation to the mitochondria, we hypothesized that increased hepatocellular damage in ethanol (EtOH)-fed GSTA4(-/-) mice is due to enhanced mitochondrial protein modification by reactive aldehydes. Chronic ingestion of EtOH increased hepatic protein carbonylation in GSTA4(-/-) mice as evidenced by increased 4-HNE and MDA immunostaining in the hepatic periportal region. Using mass spectrometric analysis of biotin hydrazide conjugated carbonylated proteins, a total of 829 proteins were identified in microsomal, cytosolic and mitochondrial fractions. Of these, 417 were novel to EtOH models. Focusing on mitochondrial fractions, 1.61-fold more carbonylated proteins were identified in EtOH-fed GSTA4(-)(/-) mice compared to their respective WT mice ingesting EtOH. Bioinformatic KEGG pathway analysis of carbonylated proteins from the mitochondrial fractions revealed an increased propensity for modification of proteins regulating oxidative phosphorylation, glucose, fatty acid, glutathione and amino acid metabolic processes in GSTA4(-/-) mice. Additional analysis revealed sites of reactive aldehyde protein modification on 26 novel peptides/proteins isolated from either SV/GSTA4(-/-) PF or EtOH fed mice. Among the peptides/proteins identified, ACSL, ACOX2, MTP, and THIKB contribute to regulation of fatty acid metabolism and ARG1, ARLY, and OAT, which regulate nitrogen and ammonia metabolism having direct relevance to ethanol-induced liver injury. These data define a role for GSTA4-4 in buffering hepatic oxidative stress associated with chronic alcohol consumption and that this GST isoform plays an important

  1. Deletion of GSTA4-4 results in increased mitochondrial post-translational modification of proteins by reactive aldehydes following chronic ethanol consumption in mice

    PubMed Central

    Shearn, Colin T.; Fritz, Kristofer S.; Shearn, Alisabeth H.; Saba, Laura M.; Mercer, Kelly E.; Engi, Bridgette; Galligan, James J.; Zimniak, Piotr; Orlicky, David J.; Ronis, Martin J.; Petersen, Dennis R.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic alcohol consumption induces hepatic oxidative stress resulting in production of highly reactive electrophilic α/β-unsaturated aldehydes that have the potential to modify proteins. A primary mechanism of reactive aldehyde detoxification by hepatocytes is through GSTA4-driven enzymatic conjugation with GSH. Given reports that oxidative stress initiates GSTA4 translocation to the mitochondria, we hypothesized that increased hepatocellular damage in ethanol (EtOH)-fed GSTA4−/− mice is due to enhanced mitochondrial protein modification by reactive aldehydes. Chronic ingestion of EtOH increased hepatic protein carbonylation in GSTA4−/− mice as evidenced by increased 4-HNE and MDA immunostaining in the hepatic periportal region. Using mass spectrometric analysis of biotin hydrazide conjugated carbonylated proteins, a total of 829 proteins were identified in microsomal, cytosolic and mitochondrial fractions. Of these, 417 were novel to EtOH models. Focusing on mitochondrial fractions, 1.61-fold more carbonylated proteins were identified in EtOH-fed GSTA4−/− mice compared to their respective WT mice ingesting EtOH. Bioinformatic KEGG pathway analysis of carbonylated proteins from the mitochondrial fractions revealed an increased propensity for modification of proteins regulating oxidative phosphorylation, glucose, fatty acid, glutathione and amino acid metabolic processes in GSTA4−/− mice. Additional analysis revealed sites of reactive aldehyde protein modification on 26 novel peptides/proteins isolated from either SV/GSTA4−/− PF or EtOH fed mice. Among the peptides/proteins identified, ACSL, ACOX2, MTP, and THIKB contribute to regulation of fatty acid metabolism and ARG1, ARLY, and OAT, which regulate nitrogen and ammonia metabolism having direct relevance to ethanol-induced liver injury. These data define a role for GSTA4-4 in buffering hepatic oxidative stress associated with chronic alcohol consumption and that this GST isoform plays an

  2. Repeated exposures to roadside particulate matter extracts suppresses pulmonary defense mechanisms, resulting in lipid and protein oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Pardo, Michal; Porat, Ziv; Rudich, Assaf; Schauer, James J; Rudich, Yinon

    2016-03-01

    Exposure to particulate matter (PM) pollution in cities and urban canyons can be harmful to the exposed population. However, the underlying mechanisms that lead to health effects are not yet elucidated. It is postulated that exposure to repeated, small, environmentally relevant concentrations can affect lung homeostasis. This study examines the impact of repeated exposures to urban PM on mouse lungs with focus on inflammatory and oxidative stress parameters. Aqueous extracts from collected urban PM were administered to mice by 5 repeated intra-tracheal instillations (IT). Multiple exposures, led to an increase in cytokine levels in both bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and in the blood serum, indicating a systemic reaction. Lung mRNA levels of antioxidant/phase II detoxifying enzymes decreased by exposure to the PM extract, but not when metals were removed by chelation. Finally, disruption of lung tissue oxidant-inflammatory/defense balance was evidenced by increased levels of lipid and protein oxidation. Unlike response to a single IT exposure to the same dose and source of extract, multiple exposures result in lung oxidative damage and a systemic inflammatory reaction. These could be attributed to compromised capacity to activate the protective Nrf2 tissue defense system. It is suggested that water-soluble metals present in urban PM, potentially from break and tire wear, may constitute major drivers of the pulmonary and systemic responses to multiple exposure to urban PM. PMID:26735168

  3. A Gene Trap Knockout of the Tiam-1 Protein Results in Malformation of the Early Embryonic Brain

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Sooyeon; Kim, Yujin; Lee, Haeryung; Park, Sungjeong; Park, Soochul

    2012-01-01

    Tiam-1 has been implicated in the development of the central nervous system. However, the in vivo function of Tiam-1 has not been fully determined in the developing mouse brain. In this study, we generated Tiam-1 knockout mice using a Tiam-1 gene-trapped embryonic stem cell line. Insertion of a gene trap vector into a genomic site downstream of exon 5 resulted in a mutant allele encoding a truncated protein fused with the β-geo LacZ gene. Primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts lacking Tiam-1 revealed a significant decrease in Rac activity and cell proliferation. In addition, whole-mount embryonic LacZ expression analysis demonstrated that Tiam-1 is specifically expressed in regions of the developing brain, such as the caudal telencephalon and rostral diencephalon. More importantly, mouse embryos deficient in Tiam-1 gene expression displayed a severe defect in embryonic brain development, including neural tube closure defects or a dramatic decrease in brain size. These findings suggest that embryonic Tiam-1 expression plays a critical role during early brain development in mice. PMID:22661025

  4. Fukutin-related protein mutations that cause congenital muscular dystrophy result in ER-retention of the mutant protein in cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Esapa, Christopher T; McIlhinney, R A Jeffrey; Blake, Derek J

    2005-01-15

    Mutations in the gene encoding fukutin-related protein (FKRP) cause a spectrum of diseases including congenital muscular dystrophy type 1C (MDC1C), limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2I (LGMD2I) and congenital muscular dystrophies (CMDs) with brain malformations and mental retardation. Although these diseases are associated with abnormal dystroglycan processing, the cellular consequences of the idiosyncratic FKRP mutations have not been determined. Here we show, in cultured cells, that FKRP mutants associated with the more severe disease phenotypes (S221R, A455D, P448L) are retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), whereas the wild-type protein and the mutant L276I that causes LGMD2I are found predominantly in the Golgi apparatus. The ER-retained proteins have a shorter half-life than the wild-type FKRP and are preferentially degraded by the proteasome. Furthermore, calnexin binds preferentially to the ER-retained mutants suggesting that it may participate in the quality control pathway for FKRP. These data provide the first evidence that the ER-retention of mutant FKRP may play a role in the pathogenesis of CMD and potentially explain why the allelic disorder LGMD2I is milder, because the mutated protein is able to reach the Golgi apparatus. PMID:15574464

  5. Molecular structure, vibrational spectra, MEP, HOMO-LUMO and NBO analysis of Hf(SeO3)(SeO4)(H2O)4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yankova, Rumyana; Genieva, Svetlana; Halachev, Nenko; Dimitrova, Ginka

    2016-02-01

    Hf(SeO3)(SeO4)(H2O)4 was obtained with the hydrothermal synthesis. The geometry optimization of this molecule was done by Density Functional Theory (DFT/B3LYP) method with 6-31G(d) basis set and LANL2DZ for Hf. The experimental infrared spectrum was compared with calculated and complete vibrational assignment was provided. The bond orders and the electronic properties of the molecule were calculated. The natural bond orbital analysis (NBO) was performed in order to study the intramolecular bonding interactions among bonds and delocalization of unpaired electrons. The calculated highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) with frontier orbital gap were presented. The electrostatic potential was calculated in order to investigate the reaction properties of the molecule. The thermodynamic properties of the studied compound at different temperatures were calculated.

  6. Simultaneous removal of SO2 and trace SeO2 from flue gas: effect of SO2 on selenium capture and kinetics study.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuzhong; Tong, Huiling; Zhuo, Yuqun; Wang, Shujuan; Xu, Xuchang

    2006-12-15

    Sulfur dioxide (SO2) and trace elements are all pollutants derived from coal combustion. This study relates to the simultaneous removal of SO2 and trace selenium dioxide (SeO2) from flue gas by calcium oxide (CaO) adsorption in the moderate temperature range, especially the effect of SO2 presence on selenium capture. Experiments performed on a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) can reach the following conclusions. When the CaO conversion is relatively low and the reaction rate is controlled by chemical kinetics, the SO2 presence does not affect the selenium capture. When the CaO conversion is very high and the reaction rate is controlled by product layer diffusion, the SO2 presence and the product layer diffusion resistance jointly reduce the selenium capture. On the basis of the kinetics study, a method to estimate the trace selenium removal efficiency using kinetic parameters and the sulfur removal efficiency is developed. PMID:17256549

  7. Attenuation of bone morphogenetic protein signaling during amphibian limb development results in the generation of stage-specific defects.

    PubMed

    Jones, Tamsin E M; Day, Robert C; Beck, Caroline W

    2013-11-01

    The vertebrate limb is one of the most intensively studied organs in the field of developmental biology. Limb development in tetrapod vertebrates is highly conserved and dependent on the interaction of several important molecular pathways. The bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling cascade is one of these pathways and has been shown to be crucial for several aspects of limb development. Here, we have used a Xenopus laevis transgenic line, in which expression of the inhibitor Noggin is under the control of the heat-shock promoter hsp70 to examine the effects of attenuation of BMP signaling at different stages of limb development. Remarkably different phenotypes were produced at different stages, illustrating the varied roles of BMP in development of the limb. Very early limb buds appeared to be refractory to the effects of BMP attenuation, developing normally in most cases. Ectopic limbs were produced by overexpression of Noggin corresponding to a brief window of limb development at about stage 49/50, as recently described by Christen et al. (2012). Attenuation of BMP signaling in stage 51 or 52 tadpoles lead to a reduction in the number of digits formed, resulting in hypodactyly or ectrodactyly, as well as occasional defects in the more proximal tibia-fibula. Finally, inhibition at stage 54 (paddle stage) led to the formation of dramatically shortened digits resulting from loss of distal phalanges. Transcriptome analysis has revealed the possibility that more Noggin-sensitive members of the BMP family could be involved in limb development than previously suspected. Our analysis demonstrates the usefulness of heat-shock-driven gene expression as an effective method for inhibiting a developmental pathway at different times during limb development. PMID:23981117

  8. Synthesis and crystal structure of two synthetic oxofluoride framework compounds--Co2TeO3F2 and Co2SeO3F2.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shichao; Johnsson, Mats

    2012-11-01

    Two new isostructural Co(2+) containing tellurium and selenium oxofluoride compounds Co(2)TeO(3)F(2) and Co(2)SeO(3)F(2) are synthesized and their structures determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction. They crystallize in the orthorhombic space group Pnma with the unit cell parameters a = 7.3810(5) Å, b = 10.1936(7) Å, c = 5.3013(3) Å and a = 7.2655(8) Å, b = 10.0013(13) Å, c = 5.3564(6) Å, respectively. The Co(II) ion has octahedral coordination [CoO(3)F(3)] and builds up a 3D framework by corner- and edge sharing. The Se(IV) and the Te(IV) ions have the coordinations [SeO(3)E] and [TeO(3)E] respectively where E is the lone-pair electrons. The Se(IV) and Te(IV) ions are isolated from each other and bond only to the [CoO(3)F(3)] polyhedra. The electronegative element fluorine takes the role of a network builder like oxygen and helps to form the 3D framework structure. This is a difference compared to many oxohalide compounds containing Cl and Br where the halide ions are terminating ions preventing a 3D network from being formed. Long range antiferromagnetic interactions dominate at temperatures < 20 K. The magnetic susceptibility follows the Curie-Weiss law above 25 K with the Curie constant C = 5.62 emu K mol(-1), the Weiss temperature θ = -56 K and the effective magnetic moment μ(eff) = 4.74 μ(B) per cobalt atom. PMID:22968840

  9. Strong improvement of interfacial properties can result from slight structural modifications of proteins: the case of native and dry-heated lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Desfougères, Yann; Saint-Jalmes, Arnaud; Salonen, Anniina; Vié, Véronique; Beaufils, Sylvie; Pezennec, Stéphane; Desbat, Bernard; Lechevalier, Valérie; Nau, Françoise

    2011-12-20

    Identification of the key physicochemical parameters of proteins that determine their interfacial properties is still incomplete and represents a real stake challenge, especially for food proteins. Many studies have thus consisted in comparing the interfacial behavior of different proteins, but it is difficult to draw clear conclusions when the molecules are completely different on several levels. Here the adsorption process of a model protein, the hen egg-white lysozyme, and the same protein that underwent a thermal treatment in the dry state, was characterized. The consequences of this treatment have been previously studied: net charge and hydrophobicity increase and lesser protein stability, but no secondary and tertiary structure modification (Desfougères, Y.; Jardin, J.; Lechevalier, V.; Pezennec, S.; Nau, F. Biomacromolecules 2011, 12, 156-166). The present study shows that these slight modifications dramatically increase the interfacial properties of the protein, since the adsorption to the air-water interface is much faster and more efficient (higher surface pressure). Moreover, a thick and strongly viscoelastic multilayer film is created, while native lysozyme adsorbs in a fragile monolayer film. Another striking result is that completely different behaviors were observed between two molecular species, i.e., native and native-like lysozyme, even though these species could not be distinguished by usual spectroscopic methods. This suggests that the air-water interface could be considered as a useful tool to reveal very subtle differences between protein molecules. PMID:22040020

  10. Mechanisms of cross-talk between G-protein-coupled receptors resulting in enhanced release of intracellular Ca2+.

    PubMed Central

    Werry, Tim D; Wilkinson, Graeme F; Willars, Gary B

    2003-01-01

    Alteration in [Ca(2+)](i) (the intracellular concentration of Ca(2+)) is a key regulator of many cellular processes. To allow precise regulation of [Ca(2+)](i) and a diversity of signalling by this ion, cells possess many mechanisms by which they are able to control [Ca(2+)](i) both globally and at the subcellular level. Among these are many members of the superfamily of GPCRs (G-protein-coupled receptors), which are characterized by the presence of seven transmembrane domains. Typically, those receptors able to activate PLC (phospholipase C) enzymes cause release of Ca(2+) from intracellular stores and influence Ca(2+) entry across the plasma membrane. It has been well documented that Ca(2+) signalling by one type of GPCR can be influenced by stimulation of a different type of GPCR. Indeed, many studies have demonstrated heterologous desensitization between two different PLC-coupled GPCRs. This is not surprising, given our current understanding of negative-feedback regulation and the likely shared components of the signalling pathway. However, there are also many documented examples of interactions between GPCRs, often coupling preferentially to different signalling pathways, which result in a potentiation of Ca(2+) signalling. Such interactions have important implications for both the control of cell function and the interpretation of in vitro cell-based assays. However, there is currently no single mechanism that adequately accounts for all examples of this type of cross-talk. Indeed, many studies either have not addressed this issue or have been unable to determine the mechanism(s) involved. This review seeks to explore a range of possible mechanisms to convey their potential diversity and to provide a basis for further experimental investigation. PMID:12790797

  11. Bortezomib-induced unfolded protein response increases oncolytic HSV-1 replication resulting in synergistic, anti-tumor effects

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Ji Young; Hurwitz, Brian S; Bolyard, Chelsea; Yu, Jun-Ge; Zhang, Jianying; Selvendiran, Karuppaiyah; Rath, Kellie S; He, Shun; Bailey, Zachary; Eaves, David; Cripe, Timothy P; Parris, Deborah S.; Caligiuri, Michael A.; Yu, Jianhua; Old, Matthew; Kaur, Balveen

    2014-01-01

    Background Bortezomib is an FDA-approved proteasome inhibitor, and oncolytic HSV-1 (oHSV) is a promising therapeutic approach for cancer. We tested the impact of combining bortezomib with oHSV for anti-tumor efficacy. Methods The synergistic interaction between oHSV and bortezomib was calculated using Chou-Talalay analysis. Viral replication was evaluated using plaque assay and immune fluorescence. Western-blot assays were used to evaluate induction of ER stress and unfolded protein response (UPR). Inhibitors targeting Hsp90 were utilized to investigate the mechanism of cell killing. Anti-tumor efficacy in vivo was evaluated using subcutaneous and intracranial tumor xenografts of glioma and head and neck cancer. Survival was analyzed by Kaplan-Meier curves and two-sided log rank test. Results Combination treatment with bortezomib and oHSV, 34.5ENVE, displayed strong synergistic interaction in ovarian cancer, head & neck cancer, glioma, and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) cells. Bortezomib treatment induced ER stress, evident by strong induction of Grp78, CHOP, PERK and IRE1α (western blot analysis) and the UPR (induction of hsp40, 70 and 90). Bortezomib treatment of cells at both sublethal and lethal doses increased viral replication (p value <0.001), but inhibition of Hsp90 ablated this response, reducing viral replication and synergistic cell killing. The combination of bortezomib and 34.5ENVE significantly enhanced anti-tumor efficacy in multiple different tumor models in vivo. Conclusions The dramatic synergy of bortezomib and 34.5ENVE is mediated by bortezomib- induced UPR and warrants future clinical testing in patients. PMID:24815720

  12. Alterations in c-Myc phenotypes resulting from dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1)-mediated mitochondrial fission

    PubMed Central

    Sarin, M; Wang, Y; Zhang, F; Rothermund, K; Zhang, Y; Lu, J; Sims-Lucas, S; Beer-Stolz, D; Van Houten, B E; Vockley, J; Goetzman, E S; Anthony Graves, J; Prochownik, E V

    2013-01-01

    The c-Myc (Myc) oncoprotein regulates numerous phenotypes pertaining to cell mass, survival and metabolism. Glycolysis, oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) and mitochondrial biogenesis are positively controlled by Myc, with myc−/− rat fibroblasts displaying atrophic mitochondria, structural and functional defects in electron transport chain (ETC) components, compromised OXPHOS and ATP depletion. However, while Myc influences mitochondrial structure and function, it is not clear to what extent the reverse is true. To test this, we induced a state of mitochondrial hyper-fission in rat fibroblasts by de-regulating Drp1, a dynamin-like GTPase that participates in the terminal fission process. The mitochondria from these cells showed reduced mass and interconnectivity, a paucity of cristae, a marked reduction in OXPHOS and structural and functional defects in ETC Complexes I and V. High rates of abortive mitochondrial fusion were observed, likely reflecting ongoing, but ultimately futile, attempts to normalize mitochondrial mass. Cellular consequences included reduction of cell volume, ATP depletion and activation of AMP-dependent protein kinase. In response to Myc deregulation, apoptosis was significantly impaired both in the absence and presence of serum, although this could be reversed by increasing ATP levels by pharmacologic means. The current work demonstrates that enforced mitochondrial fission closely recapitulates a state of Myc deficiency and that mitochondrial integrity and function can affect Myc-regulated cellular behaviors. The low intracellular ATP levels that are frequently seen in some tumors as a result of inadequate vascular perfusion could favor tumor survival by countering the pro-apoptotic tendencies of Myc overexpression. PMID:23764851

  13. CSAR Benchmark Exercise 2013: Evaluation of Results from a Combined Computational Protein Design, Docking, and Scoring/Ranking Challenge.

    PubMed

    Smith, Richard D; Damm-Ganamet, Kelly L; Dunbar, James B; Ahmed, Aqeel; Chinnaswamy, Krishnapriya; Delproposto, James E; Kubish, Ginger M; Tinberg, Christine E; Khare, Sagar D; Dou, Jiayi; Doyle, Lindsey; Stuckey, Jeanne A; Baker, David; Carlson, Heather A

    2016-06-27

    Community Structure-Activity Resource (CSAR) conducted a benchmark exercise to evaluate the current computational methods for protein design, ligand docking, and scoring/ranking. The exercise consisted of three phases. The first phase required the participants to identify and rank order which designed sequences were able to bind the small molecule digoxigenin. The second phase challenged the community to select a near-native pose of digoxigenin from a set of decoy poses for two of the designed proteins. The third phase investigated the ability of current methods to rank/score the binding affinity of 10 related steroids to one of the designed proteins (pKd = 4.1 to 6.7). We found that 11 of 13 groups were able to correctly select the sequence that bound digoxigenin, with most groups providing the correct three-dimensional structure for the backbone of the protein as well as all atoms of the active-site residues. Eleven of the 14 groups were able to select the appropriate pose from a set of plausible decoy poses. The ability to predict absolute binding affinities is still a difficult task, as 8 of 14 groups were able to correlate scores to affinity (Pearson-r > 0.7) of the designed protein for congeneric steroids and only 5 of 14 groups were able to correlate the ranks of the 10 related ligands (Spearman-ρ > 0.7). PMID:26419257

  14. Chemical heterogeneity as a result of hydroxylamine cleavage of a fusion protein of human insulin-like growth factor I.

    PubMed Central

    Canova-Davis, E; Eng, M; Mukku, V; Reifsnyder, D H; Olson, C V; Ling, V T

    1992-01-01

    Recombinant DNA techniques were used to biosynthesize human insulin-like growth factor I (hIGF-I) as a fusion protein wherein the fusion polypeptide is an IgG-binding moiety derived from staphylococcal protein A. This fusion protein is produced in Escherichia coli and secreted into the fermentation broth. In order to release mature recombinant-derived hIGF-I (rhIGF-I), the fusion protein is treated with hydroxylamine, which cleaves a susceptible Asn-Gly bond that has been engineered into the fusion protein gene. Reversed-phase h.p.l.c. was used to estimate the purity of the rhIGF-I preparations, especially for the quantification of the methionine sulphoxide-containing variant. It was determined that hydroxylamine cleavage of the fusion protein produced, as a side reaction, hydroxamates of the asparagine and glutamine residues in rhIGF-I. Although isoelectric focusing was effective in detecting, and reversed-phase h.p.l.c. for producing enriched fractions of the hydroxamate variants, ion-exchange chromatography was a more definitive procedure, as it allowed quantification and facile removal of these variants. The identity of the variants as hydroxamates was established by Staphylococcus aureus V8 proteinase digestion, followed by m.s., as the modification was transparent to amino acid and N-terminal sequence analyses. The biological activity of rhIGF-I was established by its ability to incorporate [3H]thymidine into the DNA of BALB/c373 cells and by a radioreceptor assay utilizing human placental membranes. Both assays demonstrate that the native, recombinant and methionine sulphoxide and hydroxamate IGF-I variants are essentially equipotent. Images Fig. 2. PMID:1637301

  15. Bombyx mori Midgut Membrane Protein P252, Which Binds to Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1A, Is a Chlorophyllide-Binding Protein, and the Resulting Complex Has Antimicrobial Activity▿

    PubMed Central

    Pandian, Ganesh N.; Ishikawa, Toshiki; Togashi, Makoto; Shitomi, Yasuyuki; Haginoya, Kohsuke; Yamamoto, Shuhei; Nishiumi, Tadayuki; Hori, Hidetaka

    2008-01-01

    The epithelial cell membrane 252-kDa protein (P252) isolated in our laboratory from Bombyx mori midgut was shown to bind strongly with Cry1Aa, Cry1Ab, and Cry1Ac toxins of Bacillus thuringiensis (15). In the current paper, P252 was shown to bind with chlorophyllide (Chlide) to form red fluorescent protein (RFP) complex, termed Bm252RFP, with absorbance and fluorescence emission peaks at 600 nm and 620 nm, respectively. P252 at a concentration of 1 μM is shown to bind with about 50 μM Chlide in a positively cooperative reaction to form Bm252RFP under aerobic conditions and in the presence of light at 37°C. Various parameters influencing this reaction have been optimized for efficient in vitro chemical synthesis of Bm252RFP. Circular dichroism spectra revealed that P252 is composed of a β-structure (39.8% ± 2.2%, based on 5 samples) with negligible contribution of α-helix structure. When bound to Chlide, the β-structure content in the complex is reduced to 21.6% ± 3.1% (n = 5). Since Chlide had no secondary structure, the observed reduction suggests significant conformational changes of P252 during the formation of Bm252RFP complex. Bm252RFP had antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli, Serratia marcescens, B. thuringiensis, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae with 50% effective concentrations of 2.82, 2.94, 5.88 μM, and 21.6 μM, respectively. This is the first report ever to show clear, concrete binding characteristics of the midgut protein to form an RFP having significant antimicrobial activity. PMID:18192432

  16. A comprehensive platform to investigate protein-metal ion interactions by affinity capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Alhazmi, Hassan A; Nachbar, Markus; Albishri, Hassan M; Abd El-Hady, Deia; Redweik, Sabine; El Deeb, Sami; Wätzig, Hermann

    2015-03-25

    In this work, the behavior of several metal ions with different globular proteins was investigated by affinity capillary electrophoresis. Screening was conducted by applying a proper rinsing protocol developed by our group. The use of 0.1M EDTA in the rinsing solution successfully desorbs metal ions from the capillary wall. The mobility ratio was used to evaluate the precision of the method. Excellent precision for repeated runs was achieved for different protein metal ion interactions (RSD% of 0.05-1.0%). Run times were less than 6 min for all of the investigated interactions. The method has been successfully applied for the interaction study of Li(+), Na(+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Ba(2+), Al(3+), Ga(3+), La(3+), Pd(2+), Ir(3+), Ru(3+), Rh(3+), Pt(2+), Pt(4+), Os(3+), Au(3+), Au(+), Ag(+), Cu(1+), Cu(2+), Fe(2+), Fe(3+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), Cr(3+), V(3+), MoO4(2-) and SeO3(2-) with bovine serum albumin, ovalbumin, β-lactoglobulin and myoglobin. Different interaction values were obtained for most of the tested metal ions even for that in the same metal group. Results were discussed and compared in view of metal and semimetal group's interaction behavior with the tested proteins. The calculated normalized difference of mobility ratios for each protein-metal ion interaction and its sign (positive and negative) has been successfully used to detect the interaction and estimate further coordination of the bound metal ion, respectively. The comprehensive platform summarizes all the obtained interaction results, and is valuable for any future protein-metal ion investigation. PMID:25638307

  17. Covalent attachment of cyclic TAT peptides to GFP results in protein delivery into live cells with immediate bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Nischan, Nicole; Herce, Henry D; Natale, Francesco; Bohlke, Nina; Budisa, Nediljko; Cardoso, M Cristina; Hackenberger, Christian P R

    2015-02-01

    The delivery of free molecules into the cytoplasm and nucleus by using arginine-rich cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) has been limited to small cargoes, while large cargoes such as proteins are taken up and trapped in endocytic vesicles. Based on recent work, in which we showed that the transduction efficiency of arginine-rich CPPs can be greatly enhanced by cyclization, the aim was to use cyclic CPPs to transport full-length proteins, in this study green fluorescent protein (GFP), into the cytosol of living cells. Cyclic and linear CPP-GFP conjugates were obtained by using azido-functionalized CPPs and an alkyne-functionalized GFP. Our findings reveal that the cyclic-CPP-GFP conjugates are internalized into live cells with immediate bioavailability in the cytosol and the nucleus, whereas linear CPP analogues do not confer GFP transduction. This technology expands the application of cyclic CPPs to the efficient transport of functional full-length proteins into live cells. PMID:25521313

  18. Diminished Self-Chaperoning Activity of the ΔF508 Mutant of CFTR Results in Protein Misfolding

    PubMed Central

    Riordan, John R.; Dokholyan, Nikolay V.

    2008-01-01

    The absence of a functional ATP Binding Cassette (ABC) protein called the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) from apical membranes of epithelial cells is responsible for cystic fibrosis (CF). Over 90% of CF patients carry at least one mutant allele with deletion of phenylalanine at position 508 located in the N-terminal nucleotide binding domain (NBD1). Biochemical and cell biological studies show that the ΔF508 mutant exhibits inefficient biosynthetic maturation and susceptibility to degradation probably due to misfolding of NBD1 and the resultant misassembly of other domains. However, little is known about the direct effect of the Phe508 deletion on the NBD1 folding, which is essential for rational design strategies of cystic fibrosis treatment. Here we show that the deletion of Phe508 alters the folding dynamics and kinetics of NBD1, thus possibly affecting the assembly of the complete CFTR. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we find that meta-stable intermediate states appearing on wild type and mutant folding pathways are populated differently and that their kinetic accessibilities are distinct. The structural basis of the increased misfolding propensity of the ΔF508 NBD1 mutant is the perturbation of interactions in residue pairs Q493/P574 and F575/F578 found in loop S7-H6. As a proof-of-principle that the S7-H6 loop conformation can modulate the folding kinetics of NBD1, we virtually design rescue mutations in the identified critical interactions to force the S7-H6 loop into the wild type conformation. Two redesigned NBD1-ΔF508 variants exhibited significantly higher folding probabilities than the original NBD1-ΔF508, thereby partially rescuing folding ability of the NBD1-ΔF508 mutant. We propose that these observed defects in folding kinetics of mutant NBD1 may also be modulated by structures separate from the 508 site. The identified structural determinants of increased misfolding propensity of NBD1-ΔF508 are essential

  19. Diminished self-chaperoning activity of the DeltaF508 mutant of CFTR results in protein misfolding.

    PubMed

    Serohijos, Adrian W R; Hegedus, Tamás; Riordan, John R; Dokholyan, Nikolay V

    2008-02-01

    The absence of a functional ATP Binding Cassette (ABC) protein called the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) from apical membranes of epithelial cells is responsible for cystic fibrosis (CF). Over 90% of CF patients carry at least one mutant allele with deletion of phenylalanine at position 508 located in the N-terminal nucleotide binding domain (NBD1). Biochemical and cell biological studies show that the DeltaF508 mutant exhibits inefficient biosynthetic maturation and susceptibility to degradation probably due to misfolding of NBD1 and the resultant misassembly of other domains. However, little is known about the direct effect of the Phe508 deletion on the NBD1 folding, which is essential for rational design strategies of cystic fibrosis treatment. Here we show that the deletion of Phe508 alters the folding dynamics and kinetics of NBD1, thus possibly affecting the assembly of the complete CFTR. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we find that meta-stable intermediate states appearing on wild type and mutant folding pathways are populated differently and that their kinetic accessibilities are distinct. The structural basis of the increased misfolding propensity of the DeltaF508 NBD1 mutant is the perturbation of interactions in residue pairs Q493/P574 and F575/F578 found in loop S7-H6. As a proof-of-principle that the S7-H6 loop conformation can modulate the folding kinetics of NBD1, we virtually design rescue mutations in the identified critical interactions to force the S7-H6 loop into the wild type conformation. Two redesigned NBD1-DeltaF508 variants exhibited significantly higher folding probabilities than the original NBD1-DeltaF508, thereby partially rescuing folding ability of the NBD1-DeltaF508 mutant. We propose that these observed defects in folding kinetics of mutant NBD1 may also be modulated by structures separate from the 508 site. The identified structural determinants of increased misfolding propensity of NBD1-DeltaF508

  20. RNAi-mediated silencing of the Arabidopsis thaliana ULCS1 gene, encoding a WDR protein, results in cell wall modification impairment and plant infertility.

    PubMed

    Beris, Despoina; Kapolas, Georgios; Livanos, Pantelis; Roussis, Andreas; Milioni, Dimitra; Haralampidis, Kosmas

    2016-04-01

    Ubiquitin mediated protein degradation constitutes one of the most complex post translational gene regulation mechanisms in eukaryotes. This fine-tuned proteolytic machinery is based on a vast number of E3 ubiquitin ligase complexes that mark target proteins with ubiquitin. The specificity is accomplished by a number of adaptor proteins that contain functional binding domains, including the WD40 repeat motif (WDRs). To date, only few of these proteins have been identified in plants. An RNAi mediated silencing approach was used here to functionally characterize the Arabidopsis thaliana ULCS1 gene, which encodes for a small molecular weight WDR protein. AtULCS1 interacts with the E3Cullin Ring Ligase subunit DDB1a, regulating most likely the degradation of specific proteins involved in the manifestation of diverse developmental events. Silencing of AtULCS1 results in sterile plants with pleiotropic phenotypes. Detailed analysis revealed that infertility is the outcome of anther indehiscence, which in turn is due to the impairment of the plants to accomplish secondary wall modifications. Furthermore, IREGULAR XYLEM gene expression and lignification is diminished in anther endothecium and the stem vascular tissue of the silenced plants. These data underline the importance of AtULCS1 in plant development and reproduction. PMID:26940493

  1. A novel mutation, cog, which results in production of a new porin protein (OmpG) of Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    Misra, R; Benson, S A

    1989-01-01

    A mutant of Escherichia coli K-12 which produces a new outer membrane protein, OmpG, was isolated and genetically and biochemically characterized. The presence of OmpG allows growth on maltodextrins in the absence of the LamB maltoporin. The data obtained from in vivo growth and uptake experiments suggested that the presence of the OmpG protein results in an increase in outer membrane permeability for small hydrophilic compounds. In light of these findings, we suggest that OmpG is a porinlike protein. The mutation which results in the expression of OmpG has been termed cog (for control of OmpG) and mapped to 29 min on the E. coli chromosome. Diploid analysis shows that the mutant cog-192 allele is recessive for both the Dex+ and OmpG+ phenotypes. We propose that the cog mutation destroys a negative regulatory function and therefore derepresses ompG expression. Images PMID:2473977

  2. Ligand binding to an Allergenic Lipid Transfer Protein Enhances Conformational Flexibility resulting in an Increase in Susceptibility to Gastroduodenal Proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Syed Umer; Alexeev, Yuri; Johnson, Philip E; Rigby, Neil M; Mackie, Alan R; Dhaliwal, Balvinder; Mills, E N Clare

    2016-01-01

    Non-specific lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) are a family of lipid-binding molecules that are widely distributed across flowering plant species, many of which have been identified as allergens. They are highly resistant to simulated gastroduodenal proteolysis, a property that may play a role in determining their allergenicity and it has been suggested that lipid binding may further increase stability to proteolysis. It is demonstrated that LTPs from wheat and peach bind a range of lipids in a variety of conditions, including those found in the gastroduodenal tract. Both LTPs are initially cleaved during gastroduodenal proteolysis at three major sites between residues 39-40, 56-57 and 79-80, with wheat LTP being more resistant to cleavage than its peach ortholog. The susceptibility of wheat LTP to proteolyic cleavage increases significantly upon lipid binding. This enhanced digestibility is likely to be due to the displacement of Tyr79 and surrounding residues from the internal hydrophobic cavity upon ligand binding to the solvent exposed exterior of the LTP, facilitating proteolysis. Such knowledge contributes to our understanding as to how resistance to digestion can be used in allergenicity risk assessment of novel food proteins, including GMOs. PMID:27458082

  3. Interaction of Snail and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase results in shorter overall survival of ovarian cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Hipp, Susanne; Berg, Daniela; Ergin, Bilge; Schuster, Tibor; Hapfelmeier, Alexander; Walch, Axel; Avril, Stefanie; Schmalfeldt, Barbara; Höfler, Heinz; Becker, Karl-Friedrich

    2010-12-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer is a highly metastatic disease and the leading cause of death among cancer of the female genital tract. Abnormal epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signalling has been shown to be involved in epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), an early step during metastasis. Additionally, over-expression of the E-cadherin repressor Snail, a key regulator of EMT, has previously been found to be associated with unfavourable prognostic features. Thus, the aim of our study was to elucidate the role of EGFR-dependent signalling pathways for Snail expression in ovarian cancer. For this purpose, we analysed 25 formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) primary tumours and their corresponding metastases for the expression of 25 signalling pathway molecules by reverse phase protein arrays. We found a significant correlation of Snail with EGFR((Tyr1086)) and p38 MAPK((Thr180/Tyr182)) in primary ovarian carcinoma and with EGFR((Tyr1086)) in their corresponding metastasis. Additionally, we showed that high expression levels of Snail in primary tumours combined with high expression levels of the phosphorylated p38 MAPK((Thr180/Tyr182)) in metastasis lead to an increased risk for death in ovarian carcinoma patients. Thus, for future combinatorial cancer therapy, drug combinations that best target the deregulated protein network in each individual patient should be selected. PMID:20957493

  4. Ligand binding to an Allergenic Lipid Transfer Protein Enhances Conformational Flexibility resulting in an Increase in Susceptibility to Gastroduodenal Proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Abdullah, Syed Umer; Alexeev, Yuri; Johnson, Philip E.; Rigby, Neil M.; Mackie, Alan R.; Dhaliwal, Balvinder; Mills, E. N. Clare

    2016-01-01

    Non-specific lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) are a family of lipid-binding molecules that are widely distributed across flowering plant species, many of which have been identified as allergens. They are highly resistant to simulated gastroduodenal proteolysis, a property that may play a role in determining their allergenicity and it has been suggested that lipid binding may further increase stability to proteolysis. It is demonstrated that LTPs from wheat and peach bind a range of lipids in a variety of conditions, including those found in the gastroduodenal tract. Both LTPs are initially cleaved during gastroduodenal proteolysis at three major sites between residues 39–40, 56–57 and 79–80, with wheat LTP being more resistant to cleavage than its peach ortholog. The susceptibility of wheat LTP to proteolyic cleavage increases significantly upon lipid binding. This enhanced digestibility is likely to be due to the displacement of Tyr79 and surrounding residues from the internal hydrophobic cavity upon ligand binding to the solvent exposed exterior of the LTP, facilitating proteolysis. Such knowledge contributes to our understanding as to how resistance to digestion can be used in allergenicity risk assessment of novel food proteins, including GMOs. PMID:27458082

  5. Conformational changes of hapten-protein conjugates resulting in improved broad-specificity and sensitivity of an ELISA for organophosphorus pesticides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The type of hapten linkage to the carrier protein can play an important role in determining the nature of the resulting antibody response. Generic haptens using three types of linkers were synthesized (a monocarboxylic acid, an unsaturated hydrocarbon, and a carboxamido spacer). These haptens were...

  6. Ablation of the 14-3-3gamma Protein Results in Neuronal Migration Delay and Morphological Defects in the Developing Cerebral Cortex.

    PubMed

    Wachi, Tomoka; Cornell, Brett; Marshall, Courtney; Zhukarev, Vladimir; Baas, Peter W; Toyo-Oka, Kazuhito

    2016-06-01

    14-3-3 proteins are ubiquitously-expressed and multifunctional proteins. There are seven isoforms in mammals with a high level of homology, suggesting potential functional redundancy. We previously found that two of seven isoforms, 14-3-3epsilon and 14-3-3zeta, are important for brain development, in particular, radial migration of pyramidal neurons in the developing cerebral cortex. In this work, we analyzed the function of another isoform, the protein 14-3-3gamma, with respect to neuronal migration in the developing cortex. We found that in utero 14-3-3gamma-deficiency resulted in delays in neuronal migration as well as morphological defects. Migrating neurons deficient in 14-3-3gamma displayed a thicker leading process stem, and the basal ends of neurons were not able to reach the boundary between the cortical plate and the marginal zone. Consistent with the results obtained from in utero electroporation, time-lapse live imaging of brain slices revealed that the ablation of the 14-3-3gamma proteins in pyramidal neurons slowed down their migration. In addition, the 14-3-3gamma deficient neurons showed morphological abnormalities, including increased multipolar neurons with a thicker leading processes stem during migration. These results indicate that the 14-3-3gamma proteins play an important role in radial migration by regulating the morphology of migrating neurons in the cerebral cortex. The findings underscore the pathological phenotypes of brain development associated with the disruption of different 14-3-3 proteins and will advance the preclinical data regarding disorders caused by neuronal migration defects. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 76: 600-614, 2016. PMID:26297819

  7. Two methods for proteomic analysis of formalin-fixed, paraffin embedded tissue result in differential protein identification, data quality, and cost.

    PubMed

    Luebker, Stephen A; Wojtkiewicz, Melinda; Koepsell, Scott A

    2015-11-01

    Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue is a rich source of clinically relevant material that can yield important translational biomarker discovery using proteomic analysis. Protocols for analyzing FFPE tissue by LC-MS/MS exist, but standardization of procedures and critical analysis of data quality is limited. This study compared and characterized data obtained from FFPE tissue using two methods: a urea in-solution digestion method (UISD) versus a commercially available Qproteome FFPE Tissue Kit method (Qkit). Each method was performed independently three times on serial sections of homogenous FFPE tissue to minimize pre-analytical variations and analyzed with three technical replicates by LC-MS/MS. Data were evaluated for reproducibility and physiochemical distribution, which highlighted differences in the ability of each method to identify proteins of different molecular weights and isoelectric points. Each method replicate resulted in a significant number of new protein identifications, and both methods identified significantly more proteins using three technical replicates as compared to only two. UISD was cheaper, required less time, and introduced significant protein modifications as compared to the Qkit method, which provided more precise and higher protein yields. These data highlight significant variability among method replicates and type of method used, despite minimizing pre-analytical variability. Utilization of only one method or too few replicates (both method and technical) may limit the subset of proteomic information obtained. PMID:26306679

  8. Frustration and Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya anisotropy in the kagome francisites Cu3Bi (SeO3)2 O2X (X = Br , Cl )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousochatzakis, Ioannis; Richter, Johannes; Zinke, Ronald; Tsirlin, Alexander A.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the antiferromagnetic canting instability of the spin-1/2 kagome ferromagnet, as realized in the layered cuprates Cu3Bi (SeO3)2 O2X (X = Br , Cl ). While the local canting can be explained in terms of competing exchange interactions, the direction of the ferrimagnetic order parameter fluctuates strongly even at short distances on account of frustration which gives rise to an infinite ground state degeneracy at the classical level. In analogy with the kagome antiferromagnet, the accidental degeneracy is fully lifted only by nonlinear 1 /S corrections, rendering the selected uniform canted phase very fragile even for spins-1/2, as shown explicitly by coupled-cluster calculations. To account for the observed ordering, we show that the minimal description of these systems must include the microscopic Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya interactions, which we obtain from density-functional band-structure calculations. The model explains all qualitative properties of the kagome francisites, including the detailed nature of the ground state and the anisotropic response under a magnetic field. The predicted magnon excitation spectrum and quantitative features of the magnetization process call for further experimental investigations of these compounds.

  9. Parageorgbokiite, β-Cu5O2(SeO3)2Cl2, a new mineral species from volcanic exhalations, Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergasova, L. P.; Krivovichev, S. V.; Filatov, S. K.; Britvin, S. N.; Burns, P. C.; Anan'ev, V. V.

    2007-12-01

    Parageorgbokiite, β-Cu5O2(SeO3)2Cl2, has been found at the second cinder cone of the Great Fissure Tolbachik Eruption, Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia. Ralstonite, tolbachite, melanothallite, chalcocyanite, euchlorine, Fe oxides, tenorite, native gold, sophiite, Na, Ca, and Mg sulfates, cotunnite, and some copper oxoselenites are associated minerals. The estimated temperature of the mineral formation is 400-625°C. The color is green, with a vitreous luster; the streak is light green. The mineral is brittle, with the Mohs hardness ranging from 3 to 4. Cleavage is not observed. The calculated density is 4.70 g/cm3. Parageorgbokiite is biaxial (+); α = 2.05(1), β = 2.05(1), and γ = 2.08(1); 2 V (meas.) is ˜03, and 2 V (calc.) = 0(5)°. The optical orientation is X = a; other details remain unclear. The mineral is pleochroic, from grass green on X and Y to yellowish green on Z. The empirical formula calculated on the basis of O + Cl = 10 is Cu4.91Pb0.02O1.86(ScO3)2Cl2.14. The simplified formula is Cu5O2(ScO3)2Cl2. Parageorgbokiite pertains to a new structural type of inorganic compounds. Its name points out its dimorphism with georgbokiite, which was named in honor of G.B. Bokii, the prominent Russian crystal chemist (1909-2000).

  10. Conjugation of an anti transferrin receptor IgG3-avidin fusion protein with biotinylated saporin results in significant enhancement of its cytotoxicity against malignant hematopoietic cells.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Tracy R; Ng, Patrick P; Delgado, Tracie; Lynch, Maureen R; Schiller, Gary; Helguera, Gustavo; Penichet, Manuel L

    2007-11-01

    We have previously developed an antibody fusion protein composed of a mouse/human chimeric IgG3 specific for the human transferrin receptor genetically fused to avidin (anti-hTfR IgG3-Av) as a universal delivery system for cancer therapy. This fusion protein efficiently delivers biotinylated FITC into cancer cells via TfR-mediated endocytosis. In addition, anti-hTfR IgG3-Av alone exhibits intrinsic cytotoxic activity and interferes with hTfR recycling, leading to the rapid degradation of the TfR and lethal iron deprivation in certain malignant B-cell lines. We now report on the cytotoxic effects of a conjugate composed of anti-hTfR IgG3-Av and biotinylated saporin 6 (b-SO6), a toxin derived from the plant Saponaria officinalis that inhibits protein synthesis. Conjugation of anti-hTfR IgG3-Av with b-SO6 enhances the cytotoxic effect of the fusion protein in sensitive cells and also overcomes the resistance of malignant cells that show low sensitivity to the fusion protein alone. Our results show for the first time that loading anti-hTfR IgG3-Av with a biotinylated toxin enhances the cytotoxicity of the fusion protein alone. These results suggest that anti-hTfR IgG3-Av has great potential as a therapeutic agent for a wide range of applications due to its intrinsic cytotoxic activity plus its ability to deliver biotinylated molecules into cancer cells. PMID:18025284

  11. Disruption of protein kinase Ceta results in impairment of wound healing and enhancement of tumor formation in mouse skin carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Chida, Kazuhiro; Hara, Takeshi; Hirai, Takaaki; Konishi, Chieko; Nakamura, Kenji; Nakao, Kazuki; Aiba, Atsu; Katsuki, Motoya; Kuroki, Toshio

    2003-05-15

    We have generated a mouse strain lacking protein kinase C (PKC) eta to evaluate its significance in epithelial organization and tumor formation. The PKCeta-deficient mice exhibited increased susceptibility to tumor formation in two-stage skin carcinogenesis by single application of 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) for tumor initiation and repeated applications of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) for tumor promotion. The tumor formation was not enhanced by DMBA or TPA treatment alone, suggesting that PKCeta suppresses tumor promotion. Epidermal hyperplasia induced by topical TPA treatment was prolonged in the mutant mice. The enhanced tumor formation may be closely associated with the prolonged hyperplasia induced by topical TPA treatment. In the mutant mice, after inflicting injury by punch biopsy, wound healing on the dorsal skin, particularly reepithelialization, was significantly delayed and impaired in structure. Impairment of epithelial regeneration in wound healing indicates a possibility that PKCeta plays a role in maintenance of epithelial architecture. Homeostasis in epithelial tissues mediated by PKCeta is important for tumor formation in vivo. We propose that PKCeta is involved in tumor formation modulated by regulation of proliferation and remodeling of epithelial cells in vivo. PMID:12750259

  12. Amino acid substitutions in the coat protein result in loss of insect transmissibility of a plant virus.

    PubMed Central

    Atreya, P L; Atreya, C D; Pirone, T P

    1991-01-01

    Amino acids near the N terminus of the coat protein of tobacco vein mottling virus were deleted or altered by site-directed mutagenesis to determine the effect on aphid transmissibility of the virus. Deletion of a three amino acid sequence Asp-Ala-Gly, which is conserved in aphid-transmissible potyvirus isolates, abolished transmission. The mutation Ala----Thr in this triplet drastically reduced transmission, whereas the mutation Asp----Asn had no effect, and the mutation Asp----Lys consistently reverted to the wild-type residue. The mutation Lys----Glu, in the residue adjacent to the glycine of the triplet, drastically reduced transmission, whereas the mutation Gln----Pro, seven residues downstream from the glycine had no effect. Comparison of the sequences of other potyviruses suggests that the presence of a glycine residue at the third position of the Asp-Ala-Gly triplet is critical for aphid transmissibility and that certain changes in the residues adjacent to this position abolish or greatly reduce aphid transmissibility. PMID:1881922

  13. Intermolecular protein interactions in solutions of calf lens alpha-crystallin. Results from 1/T1 nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion profiles.

    PubMed Central

    Koenig, S H; Brown, R D; Spiller, M; Chakrabarti, B; Pande, A

    1992-01-01

    From analyses of the magnetic field dependence of 1/T1 (NMRD profiles) of water protons in solutions of calf lens alpha-crystallin at several concentrations, we find two regimes of solute behavior in both cortical and nuclear preparations. Below approximately 15% vol/vol protein concentration, the solute molecules appear as compact globular proteins of approximately 1,350 (cortical) and approximately 1,700 (nuclear) kD. At higher concentrations, the effective solute particle size increases, reversibly, as evidenced by the appearance of spectra-like 14N peaks in the NMRD profiles and a change in the field and temperature dependence of 1/T1. At these higher concentrations, the profiles are very similar to those of calf gamma II-crystallin, a crystallin that undergoes an analogous transition near approximately 15% protein (Koenig, S. H., C.F. Beaulieu, R. D. Brown III, and M. Spiller, 1990. Biophys. J. 57:461-469). By comparison with recent analyses of NMRD results for solutions of immobilized proteins as models for the transition from protein solutions to tissue (Koenig, S. H., and R. D. Brown III. 1991. Prog. NMR Spectr. 22:487-567), we argue that alpha-crystallin solute behaves as aggregates approximately greater than 50,000 kD as protein concentration is progressively increased above 15%. Finally, the concentration dependence of the NMRD profiles of alpha- and gamma II-crystallin can readily explain recent osmotic pressure data, in particular the intersection of the respective pressure curves at approximately 23% vol/vol (Vérétout, F., and A. Tardieu. 1989. Eur. Biophys. J. 17:61-68). Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 7 PMID:1504248

  14. The human cytomegalovirus UL11 protein interacts with the receptor tyrosine phosphatase CD45, resulting in functional paralysis of T cells.

    PubMed

    Gabaev, Ildar; Steinbrück, Lars; Pokoyski, Claudia; Pich, Andreas; Stanton, Richard J; Schwinzer, Reinhard; Schulz, Thomas F; Jacobs, Roland; Messerle, Martin; Kay-Fedorov, Penelope C

    2011-12-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (CMV) exerts diverse and complex effects on the immune system, not all of which have been attributed to viral genes. Acute CMV infection results in transient restrictions in T cell proliferative ability, which can impair the control of the virus and increase the risk of secondary infections in patients with weakened or immature immune systems. In a search for new immunomodulatory proteins, we investigated the UL11 protein, a member of the CMV RL11 family. This protein family is defined by the RL11 domain, which has homology to immunoglobulin domains and adenoviral immunomodulatory proteins. We show that pUL11 is expressed on the cell surface and induces intercellular interactions with leukocytes. This was demonstrated to be due to the interaction of pUL11 with the receptor tyrosine phosphatase CD45, identified by mass spectrometry analysis of pUL11-associated proteins. CD45 expression is sufficient to mediate the interaction with pUL11 and is required for pUL11 binding to T cells, indicating that pUL11 is a specific CD45 ligand. CD45 has a pivotal function regulating T cell signaling thresholds; in its absence, the Src family kinase Lck is inactive and signaling through the T cell receptor (TCR) is therefore shut off. In the presence of pUL11, several CD45-mediated functions were inhibited. The induction of tyrosine phosphorylation of multiple signaling proteins upon TCR stimulation was reduced and T cell proliferation was impaired. We therefore conclude that pUL11 has immunosuppressive properties, and that disruption of T cell function via inhibition of CD45 is a previously unknown immunomodulatory strategy of CMV. PMID:22174689

  15. Exposure to vehicle emissions results in altered blood brain barrier permeability and expression of matrix metalloproteinases and tight junction proteins in mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Traffic-generated air pollution-exposure is associated with adverse effects in the central nervous system (CNS) in both human exposures and animal models, including neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration. While alterations in the blood brain barrier (BBB) have been implicated as a potential mechanism of air pollution-induced CNS pathologies, pathways involved have not been elucidated. Objectives To determine whether inhalation exposure to mixed vehicle exhaust (MVE) mediates alterations in BBB permeability, activation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) -2 and −9, and altered tight junction (TJ) protein expression. Methods Apolipoprotein (Apo) E−/− and C57Bl6 mice were exposed to either MVE (100 μg/m3 PM) or filtered air (FA) for 6 hr/day for 30 days and resulting BBB permeability, expression of ROS, TJ proteins, markers of neuroinflammation, and MMP activity were assessed. Serum from study mice was applied to an in vitro BBB co-culture model and resulting alterations in transport and permeability were quantified. Results MVE-exposed Apo E−/− mice showed increased BBB permeability, elevated ROS and increased MMP-2 and −9 activity, compared to FA controls. Additionally, cerebral vessels from MVE-exposed mice expressed decreased levels of TJ proteins, occludin and claudin-5, and increased levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and interleukin (IL)-1β in the parenchyma. Serum from MVE-exposed animals also resulted in increased in vitro BBB permeability and altered P-glycoprotein transport activity. Conclusions These data indicate that inhalation exposure to traffic-generated air pollutants promotes increased MMP activity and degradation of TJ proteins in the cerebral vasculature, resulting in altered BBB permeability and expression of neuroinflammatory markers. PMID:24344990

  16. Nonablative skin rejuvenation devices and the role of heat shock protein 70: results of a human skin explant model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helbig, Doris; Moebius, Anne; Simon, Jan C.; Paasch, Uwe

    2010-05-01

    Nonablative thermal laser therapy with a 1540-nm laser induces controlled, spatially determined thermal damage, allowing subsequent collagen remodeling while preserving the epidermis. A photorejuvenation effect using nonthermal nonablative stimulation of cells with low energy and narrow band light has been termed photomodulation. Light emitting diodes (LEDs) are narrow band emitters that lead to photomodulation via stimulation of mitochondrial cell organelles. In a previous study, we demonstrated in a human skin explant model that heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) plays a pivotal role in the initiation of skin remodeling after ablative fractional photothermolysis. To test its importance in nonablative laser therapy and photomodulation, the spatio-temporal expression of HSP70 is investigated in response to a 1540-nm laser treatment and six different LED therapies. An Er:glass laser is used with a 1-Hz repetition rate, 30-J/cm2 fluence, and a hand piece with a 2-mm spot size. Nonthermal nonablative treatment is performed using two LED (LEDA SCR red light: 635 nm, 40 to 120 W/cm2, 40 to 120 J/cm2 LEDA SCR yellow light: 585 nm, 16 to 35 W/cm2, 20 to 100 J/cm2 spot size 16×10 cm). Immediate responses as well as responses 1, 3, or 7 days postprocedure are studied; untreated skin explants serve as control. Immunohistochemical investigation (HSP70) is performed in all native, nontreated, and Er:glass laser- or LED-treated samples (n=175). Nonablative laser therapy leads to a clear time-dependent induction of epidermally expressed HSP70, peaking between one to three days post-treatment. In contrast, none of the various LED treatments up-regulated the HSP70 expression in our skin explant model. HSP70 is up-regulated by nonablative but thermal laser devices, but does not seem to play a significant role in the induction of skin remodeling induced by photomodulation. The maximum of HSP70 expression is reached later after Er:glass laser intervention compared to ablative fractional

  17. Penicillin-binding protein 2 inactivation in Escherichia coli results in cell division inhibition, which is relieved by FtsZ overexpression.

    PubMed Central

    Vinella, D; Joseleau-Petit, D; Thévenet, D; Bouloc, P; D'Ari, R

    1993-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase mutants of Escherichia coli are resistant to amdinocillin (mecillinam), a beta-lactam antibiotic which specifically binds penicillin-binding protein 2 (PBP2) and prevents cell wall elongation with concomitant cell death. The leuS(Ts) strain, in which leucyl-tRNA synthetase is temperature sensitive, was resistant to amdinocillin at 37 degrees C because of an increased guanosine 5'-diphosphate 3'-diphosphate (ppGpp) pool resulting from partial induction of the stringent response, but it was sensitive to amdinocillin at 25 degrees C. We constructed a leuS(Ts) delta (rodA-pbpA)::Kmr strain, in which the PBP2 structural gene is deleted. This strain grew as spherical cells at 37 degrees C but was not viable at 25 degrees C. After a shift from 37 to 25 degrees C, the ppGpp pool decreased and cell division was inhibited; the cells slowly carried out a single division, increased considerably in volume, and gradually lost viability. The cell division inhibition was reversible when the ppGpp pool increased at high temperature, but reversion required de novo protein synthesis, possibly of septation proteins. The multicopy plasmid pZAQ, overproducing the septation proteins FtsZ, FtsA, and FtsQ, conferred amdinocillin resistance on a wild-type strain and suppressed the cell division inhibition in the leuS(Ts) delta (rodA-pbpA)::Kmr strain at 25 degrees C. The plasmid pAQ, in which the ftsZ gene is inactivated, did not confer amdinocillin resistance. These results lead us to hypothesize that the nucleotide ppGpp activates ftsZ expression and thus couples cell division to protein synthesis. PMID:8407846

  18. Allelic variants of the amylose extender mutation of maize demonstrate phenotypic variation in starch structure resulting from modified protein–protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fushan; Ahmed, Zaheer; Lee, Elizabeth A.; Donner, Elizabeth; Liu, Qiang; Ahmed, Regina; Morell, Matthew K.; Emes, Michael J.; Tetlow, Ian J.

    2012-01-01

    amylose extender (ae−) starches characteristically have modified starch granule morphology resulting from amylopectin with reduced branch frequency and longer glucan chains in clusters, caused by the loss of activity of the major starch branching enzyme (SBE), which in maize endosperm is SBEIIb. A recent study with ae− maize lacking the SBEIIb protein (termed ae1.1 herein) showed that novel protein–protein interactions between enzymes of starch biosynthesis in the amyloplast could explain the starch phenotype of the ae1.1 mutant. The present study examined an allelic variant of the ae− mutation, ae1.2, which expresses a catalytically inactive form of SBEIIb. The catalytically inactive SBEIIb in ae1.2 lacks a 28 amino acid peptide (Val272–Pro299) and is unable to bind to amylopectin. Analysis of starch from ae1.2 revealed altered granule morphology and physicochemical characteristics distinct from those of the ae1.1 mutant as well as the wild-type, including altered apparent amylose content and gelatinization properties. Starch from ae1.2 had fewer intermediate length glucan chains (degree of polymerization 16–20) than ae1.1. Biochemical analysis of ae1.2 showed that there were differences in the organization and assembly of protein complexes of starch biosynthetic enzymes in comparison with ae1.1 (and wild-type) amyloplasts, which were also reflected in the composition of starch granule-bound proteins. The formation of stromal protein complexes in the wild-type and ae1.2 was strongly enhanced by ATP, and broken by phosphatase treatment, indicating a role for protein phosphorylation in their assembly. Labelling experiments with [γ-32P]ATP showed that the inactive form of SBEIIb in ae1.2 was phosphorylated, both in the monomeric form and in association with starch synthase isoforms. Although the inactive SBEIIb was unable to bind starch directly, it was strongly associated with the starch granule, reinforcing the conclusion that its presence in the

  19. Accumulation of PrLeg, a Perilla legumin protein in potato tuber results in enhanced level of sulphur-containing amino acids.

    PubMed

    Goo, Young-Min; Kim, Tae-Won; Lee, Min-Kyung; Lee, Shin-Woo

    2013-09-01

    Potato is the fourth staple food in the world, following rice, wheat, and maize, whereas tubers contain high quality of starch, relatively high amounts of vitamin C and many other important substances. It also contains relatively good quality of protein (about 3 to 6% of the dried weight) and patatin, and 11S globulin is a major storage protein with high level of lysine. However, tuber protein contains relatively low amounts of sulphur-containing amino acids, which may result in low nutritional value. Recently, we cloned a gene encoding PrLeg polypeptide, a seed storage protein from Perilla, which contains relatively higher levels of sulphur-containing amino acids. We transformed PrLeg cDNA into a potato plant to over-express under the direction of the tuber-specific promoter, patatin. Most of the transgenic lines identified through PCR and RT-PCR analyses were able to accumulate high amount of prLeg transcript in their tuber tissue, while very little or no transcript that were detected in their leaf tissues. The level of methionine content was elevated up to three-fold compared to non-transgenic parental line, without any significant changes in other amino acids, suggesting that further research is required to get a deeper insight into their nutritional value. PMID:24161240

  20. Accumulation of radium in ferruginous protein bodies formed in lung tissue: association of resulting radiation hotspots with malignant mesothelioma and other malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Eizo; Makishima, Akio; Hagino, Kyoko; Okabe, Kazunori

    2009-01-01

    While exposure to fibers and particles has been proposed to be associated with several different lung malignancies including mesothelioma, the mechanism for the carcinogenesis is not fully understood. Along with mineralogical observation, we have analyzed forty-four major and trace elements in extracted asbestos bodies (fibers and proteins attached to them) with coexisting fiber-free ferruginous protein bodies from extirpative lungs of individuals with malignant mesothelioma. These observations together with patients’ characteristics suggest that inhaled iron-rich asbestos fibers and dust particles, and excess iron deposited by continuous cigarette smoking would induce ferruginous protein body formation resulting in ferritin aggregates in lung tissue. Chemical analysis of ferruginous protein bodies extracted from lung tissues reveals anomalously high concentrations of radioactive radium, reaching millions of times higher concentration than that of seawater. Continuous and prolonged internal exposure to hotspot ionizing radiation from radium and its daughter nuclides could cause strong and frequent DNA damage in lung tissue, initiate different types of tumour cells, including malignant mesothelioma cells, and may cause cancers. PMID:19644223

  1. Exposure of aconitase to smoking-related oxidants results in iron loss and increased iron response protein-1 activity: potential mechanisms for iron accumulation in human arterial cells.

    PubMed

    Talib, Jihan; Davies, Michael J

    2016-06-01

    Smokers have an elevated risk of cardiovascular disease, but the origin(s) of this increased risk are incompletely defined. Evidence supports an accumulation of the oxidant-generating enzyme myeloperoxidase (MPO) in the inflamed artery wall, and smokers have high levels of SCN(-), a preferred MPO substrate, with this resulting in HOSCN formation. We hypothesised that HOSCN, a thiol-specific oxidant may target the iron-sulphur cluster of aconitase (both isolated, and within primary human coronary artery endothelial cells; HCAEC) resulting in enzyme dysfunction, release of iron, and conversion of the cytosolic isoform to iron response protein-1, which regulates intracellular iron levels. We show that exposure of isolated aconitase to increasing concentrations of HOSCN releases iron from the aconitase [Fe-S]4 cluster, and decreases enzyme activity. This is associated with protein thiol loss and modification of specific Cys residues in, and around, the [Fe-S]4 cluster. Exposure of HCAEC to HOSCN resulted in increased intracellular levels of chelatable iron, loss of aconitase activity and increased iron response protein-1 (IRP-1) activity. These data indicate HOSCN, an oxidant associated with oxidative stress in smokers, can induce aconitase dysfunction in human endothelial cells via Cys oxidation, damage to the [Fe-S]4 cluster, iron release and generation of IRP-1 activity, which modulates ferritin protein levels and results in dysregulation of iron metabolism. These data may rationalise, in part, the presence of increased levels of iron in human atherosclerotic lesions and contribute to increased oxidative damage and endothelial cell dysfunction in smokers. Similar reactions may occur at other sites of inflammation. PMID:26837749

  2. Methotrexate treatment of FraX fibroblasts results in FMR1 transcription but not in detectable FMR1 protein levels

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Fragile X syndrome is caused by the loss of FMRP expression due to methylation of the FMR1 promoter. Treatment of fragile X syndrome patients’ lymphoblastoid cells with 5-azadeoxycytidine results in demethylation of the promoter and reactivation of the gene. The aim of the study was to analyze if methotrexate, an agent which also reduces DNA methylation but with less toxicity than 5-azadeoxycytidine, has therapeutic potential in fragile X syndrome. Methods Fibroblasts of fragile X syndrome patients were treated with methotrexate in concentrations ranging from 1 to 4 μg/ml for up to 14 days. FMR1 and FMRP expression were analyzed by quantitative PCR and western blotting. Results FMR1 mRNA was detected and levels correlated positively with methotrexate concentrations and time of treatment, but western blotting did not show detectable FMRP levels. Conclusions We show that it is possible to reactivate FMR1 transcription in fibroblasts of fragile X syndrome patients by treatment with methotrexate. However, we were not able to show FMRP expression, possibly due to the reduced translation efficacy caused by the triplet repeat extension. Unless FMR1 reactivation is more effective in vivo our results indicate that methotrexate has no role in the treatment of fragile X syndrome. PMID:24020679

  3. soaPDB: a web application for searching the Protein Data Bank, organizing results, and receiving automatic email alerts.

    PubMed

    Lesburg, Charles A; Duca, José S

    2008-07-01

    soaPDB is a web application that allows generation and organization of saved PDB searches, and offers automatic email alerts. This tool is used from a web interface to store PDB searches and results in a backend relational database. Written using the Ruby on Rails open-source web framework, soaPDB is easy to deploy, maintain and customize. soaPDB is freely available upon request for local installation and is also available at http://soapdb.dyndns.org:3000. PMID:18487276

  4. Overexpression of the 14-3-3gamma protein in embryonic mice results in neuronal migration delay in the developing cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Cornell, Brett; Wachi, Tomoka; Zhukarev, Vladimir; Toyo-Oka, Kazuhito

    2016-08-15

    The 14-3-3 protein family is a group of multifunctional proteins that are highly expressed in the brain; however, their functions in brain development are largely unknown. Williams Syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by a deletion in the 7q11.23 chromosome locus, including the gene encoding 14-3-3gamma, resulting in developmental delay, intellectual disabilities and epilepsy. We have previously shown that knocking down the 14-3-3gamma protein in utero in mice results in delays in neuronal migration of pyramidal neurons in the cortex. Importantly, there is a reciprocal duplication syndrome to Williams Syndrome where the 7q11.23 locus is duplicated, resulting in epilepsy and intellectual disabilities. Thus, the deletion or the duplication of the 7q11.23 chromosome locus results in epilepsy. Taken together with the fact that defects in neuronal migration are one of main causes for epilepsy, we analyzed if the overexpression of 14-3-3gamma causes neuronal migration defects. In this work, we found that the overexpression of 14-3-3gamma in utero in the developing mouse cortex results in delays in pyramidal neuron migration, similar to what was previously observed when 14-3-3gamma was knocked down. These results, in conjunction with our previous research, indicate that a balance of 14-3-3gamma expression is required during cortical development to prevent delays in neuronal migration. This work provides clear evidence as to the involvement of 14-3-3gamma in neurodevelopmental disorders and how a disruption in 14-3-3gamma expression may contribute to the neurodevelopmental disorders that manifest when the 7q11.23 locus is altered. PMID:27288018

  5. Partial loss of the DNA repair scaffolding protein, Xrcc1, results in increased brain damage and reduced recovery from ischemic stroke in mice.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Somnath; Canugovi, Chandrika; Yoon, Jeong Seon; Wilson, David M; Croteau, Deborah L; Mattson, Mark P; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2015-07-01

    Oxidative DNA damage is mainly repaired by base excision repair (BER). Previously, our laboratory showed that mice lacking the BER glycosylases 8-oxoguanine glycosylase 1 (Ogg1) or nei endonuclease VIII-like 1 (Neil1) recover more poorly from focal ischemic stroke than wild-type mice. Here, a mouse model was used to investigate whether loss of 1 of the 2 alleles of X-ray repair cross-complementing protein 1 (Xrcc1), which encodes a nonenzymatic scaffold protein required for BER, alters recovery from stroke. Ischemia and reperfusion caused higher brain damage and lower functional recovery in Xrcc1(+/-) mice than in wild-type mice. Additionally, a greater percentage of Xrcc1(+/-) mice died as a result of the stroke. Brain samples from human individuals who died of stroke and individuals who died of non-neurological causes were assayed for various steps of BER. Significant losses of thymine glycol incision, abasic endonuclease incision, and single nucleotide incorporation activities were identified, as well as lower expression of XRCC1 and NEIL1 proteins in stroke brains compared with controls. Together, these results suggest that impaired BER is a risk factor in ischemic brain injury and contributes to its recovery. PMID:25971543

  6. Far-Red Emission of mPlum Fluorescent Protein Results from Excited-State Interconversion between Chromophore Hydrogen-Bonding States.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Eunjin; Konold, Patrick E; Lee, Junghwa; Joo, Taiha; Jimenez, Ralph

    2016-06-16

    Fluorescent proteins with large Stokes shifted emission beyond 600 nm are actively sought for live-cell imaging applications. The mechanism of excited-state relaxation leading to the Stokes shift in the mPlum fluorescent protein, which emits at a peak wavelength of 650 nm, has been previously investigated by both ultrafast spectroscopy and theoretical methods. Here, we report that femtosecond time-resolved area-normalized emission spectra of mPlum show a clear isoemissive point. This feature can only result from a system with two emitting states, rather than a system that undergoes a continuous spectral red shift, for example, as expected from typical solvation. Global analysis of the femtosecond time-resolved fluorescence spectra reveals time constants associated with chromophore relaxation, excited-state population transfer, and an excited-state lifetime of the final state. The observations confirm the findings of recent quantum chemical calculations on mPlum. PMID:27214167

  7. Coupling Peptide Antigens to Virus-Like Particles or to Protein Carriers Influences the Th1/Th2 Polarity of the Resulting Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Pomwised, Rattanaruji; Intamaso, Uraiwan; Teintze, Martin; Young, Mark; Pincus, Seth H.

    2016-01-01

    We have conjugated the S9 peptide, a mimic of the group B streptococcal type III capsular polysaccharide, to different carriers in an effort to elicit an optimal immune response. As carriers, we utilized the soluble protein keyhole limpet hemocyanin and virus-like particles (VLPs) from two plant viruses, Cowpea Chlorotic Mottle Virus and Cowpea Mosaic Virus. We have found that coupling the peptide to the soluble protein elicits a Th2 immune response, as evidenced by the production of the peptide-specific IgG1 antibody and IL-4/IL-10 production in response to antigen stimulation, whereas the peptide conjugated to VLPs elicited a Th1 response (IgG2a, IFN-γ). Because the VLPs used as carriers package RNA during the assembly process, we hypothesize that this effect may result from the presence of nucleic acid in the immunogen, which affects the Th1/Th2 polarity of the response. PMID:27164150

  8. Coupling Peptide Antigens to Virus-Like Particles or to Protein Carriers Influences the Th1/Th2 Polarity of the Resulting Immune Response.

    PubMed

    Pomwised, Rattanaruji; Intamaso, Uraiwan; Teintze, Martin; Young, Mark; Pincus, Seth H

    2016-01-01

    We have conjugated the S9 peptide, a mimic of the group B streptococcal type III capsular polysaccharide, to different carriers in an effort to elicit an optimal immune response. As carriers, we utilized the soluble protein keyhole limpet hemocyanin and virus-like particles (VLPs) from two plant viruses, Cowpea Chlorotic Mottle Virus and Cowpea Mosaic Virus. We have found that coupling the peptide to the soluble protein elicits a Th2 immune response, as evidenced by the production of the peptide-specific IgG1 antibody and IL-4/IL-10 production in response to antigen stimulation, whereas the peptide conjugated to VLPs elicited a Th1 response (IgG2a, IFN-γ). Because the VLPs used as carriers package RNA during the assembly process, we hypothesize that this effect may result from the presence of nucleic acid in the immunogen, which affects the Th1/Th2 polarity of the response. PMID:27164150

  9. Antibodies to the RNA Binding Protein Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein A1 Colocalize to Stress Granules Resulting in Altered RNA and Protein Levels in a Model of Neurodegeneration in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, Joshua N.; Gardner, Lidia A.; Salapa, Hannah E; Levin, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system (CNS). Data suggest that antibodies to CNS targets contribute to the pathogenesis of MS. MS patients produce autoantibodies to heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 (hnRNP A1). hnRNP A1 is an RNA binding protein (RBP) overexpressed in neurons that functions in pre-mRNA splicing, mRNA trafficking, and translation. Previously, we showed that anti-hnRNP A1 antibodies entered neuronal cells (in vitro) via clathrin-mediated endocytosis, caused mislocalization of endogenous hnRNP A1 protein and increased markers of neurodegeneration including decreased ATP concentration and apoptosis. In this study, we hypothesized that anti-hnRNP A1 antibodies might cause stress granule formation and altered levels of RNAs and proteins that bind hnRNP A1. Methods Neuronal cell lines were exposed to anti-hnRNP A1 and isotype-matched control antibodies in vitro and examined for neuronal granule formation, including stress granules, P bodies and transport granules. In addition, RNAs that bound hnRNP A1 were determined. Levels of RNA and their translated proteins were measured upon exposure to the anti-hnRNP A1 antibodies. Results Anti-hnRNP A1 antibodies induced and localized to stress granules, a marker of neurodegeneration, within a neuronal cell line. The anti-hnRNP A1 antibodies did not induce P bodies or neuronal granules. Clinically relevant RNAs were found to bind hnRNP A1. In addition, the anti-hnRNP A1 antibodies caused reduced levels of RNA and protein of the spinal paraplegia genes (SPGs) 4 and 7, which when mutated mimic progressive MS. Conclusions Taken together, these data suggest potential mechanisms by which autoantibodies may contribute to neurodegeneration in MS. PMID:27375925

  10. Acute leukemias of different lineages have similar MLL gene fusions encoding related chimeric proteins resulting from chromosomal translocation

    SciTech Connect

    Corral, J.; Forster, A.; Thompson, S.; Rabbitts, T.H. ); Lampert, F. ); Kaneko, Y. ); Slater, R.; Kroes, W.G. ); Van Der Schoot, C.E. ); Ludwig, W.D. ); Karpas, A. ); Pocock, C.; Cotter, F. )

    1993-09-15

    The MLL gene, on human chromosome 11q23, undergoes chromosomal translocation in acute leukemias, resulting in gene fusion with AF4 (chromosome 4) and ENL (chromosome 19). The authors report here translocation of MLL with nine different chromosomes and two paracentric chromosome 11 deletions in early B cell, B- or T-cell lineage, or nonlymphocytic acute leukemias. The mRNA translocation junction from 22t(4;11) patients, including six adult leukemias, and nine t(11;19) tumors reveals a remarkable conservation of breakpoints within MLL, AF4, or ENL genes, irrespective of tumor phenotype. Typically, the breakpoints are upstream of the zinc-finger region of MLL, and deletion of this region can accompany translocation, supporting the der(11) chromosome as the important component in leukemogenesis. Partial sequence of a fusion between MLL and the AFX1 gene from chromosome X shows the latter to be rich in Ser/Pro codons, like the ENL mRNA. These data suggest that the heterogeneous 11q23 abnormalities might cause attachment of Ser/Pro-rich segments to the NH[sub 2] terminus of MLL, lacking the zinc-finger region, and that translocation occurs in early hematopoietic cells, before commitment to distinct lineages. 36 refs., 2 figs.

  11. Association between Sleep Quality and C-Reactive Protein: Results from National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2005-2008

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Rong; Liu, Xin; Zee, Phyllis C.; Hou, Lifang; Zheng, Zheng; Wei, Yongxiang; Du, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Objective Our objective was to explore the association between poor sleep quality and hs_CRP in an adult U.S. population. Methods This study focused on 9,317 participants in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) from 2005–2008 who were aged 20–85 years, completed a sleep disorder questionnaire, and had available information on serum hs_CRP. Sleep quality was classified into three categories (good, moderate, poor) based on the responses of participants to the NHANES sleep disorder questionnaire. High CRP was defined as hs-CRP >1 md/dL. Linear regression model was applied to investigate the association between poor sleep quality and log-transformed hs_CRP. And logistic regression model was fitted to evaluate the association between sleep quality and the risk of high CRP. Results Females were more likely to report poor sleep quality than males (26% vs. 19%, p<0.0001). Each sleep disorder was significantly associated with increased hs_CRP and correlative to other sleep disorders. In fully-adjusted linear regression model, poor sleep quality was significantly associated with elevated hs_CRP (log transformed) among the overall sample and in females only (β = 0.10, se = 0.03, p<0.01 and β = 0.13, se = 0.04, p<0.01, respectively). In fully-adjusted logistics regression model, poor sleep quality was linked with risk of high CRP(OR: 1.42, 95%CI: 1.15–1.76 in overall sample and OR: 1.59, 95%CI: 1.18–2.14 in females, respectively). Conclusion We found that poor sleep quality was independently associated with elevated hs_CRP in females but not in males in a U.S. adult population. PMID:24663098

  12. Lack of dystrophin protein Dp71 results in progressive cataract formation due to loss of fiber cell organization

    PubMed Central

    Darche, Marie; Sahel, José-Alain; Rendon, Alvaro; Tadayoni, Ramin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Dp71 is the main product of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene in the central nervous system. While studying the impact of its absence on retinal functions, we discovered that mice lacking Dp71 also developed a progressive opacification of the crystalline lens. The purpose of this study was to perform a detailed characterization of the cataract formation in Dp71 knockout (KO-Dp71) mice. Methods Cataract formations in KO-Dp71 mice and wild-type (wt) littermates were assessed in vivo by slit-lamp examination and ex vivo by histological analysis as a function of aging. The expression and cellular localization of the DMD gene products were monitored by western blot and immunohistochemical analysis. Fiber cell integrity was assessed by analyzing the actin cytoskeleton as well as the expression of aquaporin-0 (AQP0). Results As expected, a slit-lamp examination revealed that only one of the 20 tested wt animals presented with a mild opacification of the lens and only at the most advanced age. However, a lack of Dp71 was associated with a 40% incidence of cataracts as early as 2 months of age, which progressively increased to full penetrance by 7 months. A subsequent histological analysis revealed an alteration in the structures of the lenses of KO-Dp71 mice that correlated with the severity of the lens opacity. An analysis of the expression of the different dystrophin gene products revealed that Dp71 was the major DMD gene product expressed in the lens, especially in fiber cells. The role of Dp71 in fiber cells was also suggested by the progressive disorganization of the lens fibers, which was observed in the absence of Dp71 and demonstrated by irregular staining of the actin network and the aqueous channel AQP0. Conclusions While its role in the retina has been well characterized, this study demonstrates for the first time the role played by Dp71 in a different ocular tissue: the crystalline lens. It primarily demonstrates the role that Dp71 plays in the

  13. Differences in folate-protein interactions result in differing inhibition of native rat liver and recombinant glycine N-methyltransferase by 5-methyltetrahydrofolate

    SciTech Connect

    Luka, Zigmund; Pakhomova, Svetlana; Loukachevitch, Lioudmila V; Newcomer, Marcia E; Wagner, Conrad

    2012-06-27

    Glycine N-methyltransferase (GNMT) is a key regulatory enzyme in methyl group metabolism. In mammalian liver it reduces S-adenosylmethionine levels by using it to methylate glycine, producing N-methylglycine (sarcosine) and S-adenosylhomocysteine. GNMT is inhibited by binding two molecules of 5-methyltetrahydrofolate (mono- or polyglutamate forms) per tetramer of the active enzyme. Inhibition is sensitive to the status of the N-terminal valine of GNMT and to polyglutamation of the folate inhibitor. It is inhibited by pentaglutamate form more efficiently compared to monoglutamate form. The native rat liver GNMT contains an acetylated N-terminal valine and is inhibited much more efficiently compared to the recombinant protein expressed in E. coli where the N-terminus is not acetylated. In this work we used a protein crystallography approach to evaluate the structural basis for these differences. We show that in the folate-GNMT complexes with the native enzyme, two folate molecules establish three and four hydrogen bonds with the protein. In the folate-recombinant GNMT complex only one hydrogen bond is established. This difference results in more effective inhibition by folate of the native liver GNMT activity compared to the recombinant enzyme.

  14. Loss of mitochondrial DNA-encoded protein ND1 results in disruption of complex I biogenesis during early stages of assembly.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sze Chern; Hroudová, Jana; Van Bergen, Nicole J; Lopez Sanchez, M Isabel G; Trounce, Ian A; McKenzie, Matthew

    2016-06-01

    Mitochondrial complex I (NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase) must be assembled precisely from 45 protein subunits for it to function correctly. One of its mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) encoded subunits, ND1, is incorporated during the early stages of complex I assembly. However, little is known about how mutations in ND1 affect this assembly process. We found that in human 143B cybrid cells carrying a homoplasmic MT-ND1 mutation, ND1 protein could not be translated. As a result, the early stages of complex I assembly were disrupted, with mature complex I undetectable and complex I-linked respiration severely reduced to 2.0% of control levels. Interestingly, complex IV (ferrocytochrome c:oxygen oxidoreductase) steady-state levels were also reduced to 40.3%, possibly due to its diminished stability in the absence of respiratory supercomplex formation. This was in comparison with 143B cybrid controls (that contained wild-type mtDNA on the same nuclear background), which exhibited normal complex I, complex IV, and supercomplex assembly. We conclude that the loss of ND1 stalls complex I assembly during the early stages of its biogenesis, which not only results in the loss of mature complex I but also disrupts the stability of complex IV and the respiratory supercomplex to cause mitochondrial dysfunction.-Lim, S. C., Hroudová, J., Van Bergen, N. J., Lopez Sanchez, M. I. G., Trounce, I. A., McKenzie, M. Loss of mitochondrial DNA-encoded protein ND1 results in disruption of complex I biogenesis during early stages of assembly. PMID:26929434

  15. Factor VIII A3 domain substitution N1922S results in hemophilia A due to domain-specific misfolding and hyposecretion of functional protein

    PubMed Central

    Summers, Ryan J.; Meeks, Shannon L.; Healey, John F.; Brown, Harrison C.; Parker, Ernest T.; Kempton, Christine L.; Doering, Christopher B.

    2011-01-01

    A point mutation leading to amino acid substitution N1922S in the A3 domain of factor VIII (fVIII) results in moderate to severe hemophilia A. A heterologous expression system comparing N1922S-fVIII and wild-type fVIII (wt-fVIII) demonstrated similar specific coagulant activities but poor secretion of N1922S-fVIII. Immunocytochemical analysis revealed that intracellular levels of N1922S-fVIII were similar to those of wt-fVIII. The specific activity of intracellular N1922S-fVIII was 10% of that of wt-fVIII, indicating the presence of large amounts of a nonfunctional N1922S-fVIII–folding intermediate. wt-fVIII colocalized with both endoplasmic reticulum (ER)– and Golgi-resident proteins. In contrast, N1922S-fVIII colocalized only with ER-resident proteins, indicating a block in transit from the ER to the Golgi. A panel of conformation-dependent monoclonal antibodies was used to determine native or nonnative folding of N1922S-fVIII. Intracellular N1922S-fVIII but not secreted N1922S-fVIII displayed abnormal folding in the A3 and C1 domains, indicating that the A1, A2, and C2 domains fold independently into antigenically intact tertiary structures, but that folding is stalled in the mutant A3 and its contiguous C1 domain. In summary, the N1922S substitution results in poor secretion of a functional protein, and the domain-specific defect in folding and intracellular trafficking of N1922S-fVIII is a novel mechanism for secretion defects leading to hemophilia A. PMID:21217077

  16. Serological diagnosis of hantavirus infections by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay based on detection of immunoglobulin G and M responses to recombinant nucleocapsid proteins of five viral serotypes.

    PubMed

    Elgh, F; Lundkvist, A; Alexeyev, O A; Stenlund, H; Avsic-Zupanc, T; Hjelle, B; Lee, H W; Smith, K J; Vainionpää, R; Wiger, D; Wadell, G; Juto, P

    1997-05-01

    Worldwide, hantaviruses cause more than 100,000 human infections annually. Rapid and accurate methods are important both in monitoring acute infections and for epidemiological studies. We and others have shown that the amino termini of hantavirus nucleocapsid proteins (Ns) are sensitive tools for the detection of specific antibodies in hantavirus disease. Accordingly, we expressed truncated Ns (amino acids 1 to 117) in Escherichia coli from the five hantaviruses known to be pathogenic to man; Hantaan (HTN), Seoul (SEO), Dobrava (DOB), Sin Nombre (SN), and Puumala (PUU) viruses. In order to obtain pure antigens for use in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), the recombinant proteins were purified by polyhistidine-metal chelate affinity chromatography. Polyclonal animal antisera and a panel of serum specimens from hantavirus-infected individuals from Scandinavia, Slovenia, Russia, Korea, China, and the United States were used to evaluate the usefulness of the method. With both human and animal sera, it was possible to designate the antibody response into two groups: those with HTN, SEO, and DOB virus reactivity on the one hand and those with SN and PUU virus reactivity on the other. In sera from Scandinavia, European Russia, and the United States, the antibody response was directed mainly to the PUU and SN virus group. The sera from Asia reacted almost exclusively with the HTN, SEO, and DOB types of viruses. This was true for both the immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG antibody responses, indicating that this type of discrimination can be done during the acute phase of hantavirus infections. Both the HTN, SEO, and DOB virus and the PUU and SN virus types of antibody response patterns were found in patients from the Balkan region (Solvenia). PMID:9114393

  17. Aberrant splicing of androgenic receptor mRNA results in synthesis of a nonfunctional receptor protein in a patient with androgen insensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Ris-Stalpers, C.; Kuiper, G.G.J.M.; Faber, P.W.; van Rooij, H.C.J.; Degenhart, H.J.; Trapman, J.; Brinkmann, A.O. ); Schweikert, H.U. ); Zegers, N.D. ); Hodgins, M.B. )

    1990-10-01

    Androgen insensitivity is a disorder in which the correct androgen response in an androgen target cell is impaired. The clinical symtpoms of this X chromosome-linked syndrome are presumed to be caused by mutations in the androgen receptor gene. The authors report a G {r arrow} T mutation in the splice donor site of intron 4 of the androgen receptor gene of a 46, XY subject lacking detectable androgen binding to the receptor and with the complete form of androgen insensitivity. This point mutation completely abolishes normal RNA splicing at the exon 4/intron 4 boundary and results in the activation of a cryptic splice donor site in exon 4, which leads to the deletion of 123 nucleotides from the mRNA. Translation of the mutant mRNA results in an androgen receptor protein {approx}5 kDa smaller than the wild type. This mutated androgen receptor protein was unable to bind androgens and unable to activate transcription of an androgen-regulated reporter gene construct. This mutation in the human androgen receptor gene demonstrates the importance of an intact steroid-binding domain for proper androgen receptor functioning in vivo.

  18. Knockdown of the Arabidopsis thaliana chloroplast protein disulfide isomerase 6 results in reduced levels of photoinhibition and increased D1 synthesis in high light.

    PubMed

    Wittenberg, Gal; Levitan, Alexander; Klein, Tamir; Dangoor, Inbal; Keren, Nir; Danon, Avihai

    2014-06-01

    A chloroplast protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) was previously proposed to regulate translation of the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii chloroplast psbA mRNA, encoding the D1 protein, in response to light. Here we show that AtPDI6, one of 13 Arabidopsis thaliana PDI genes, also plays a role in the chloroplast. We found that AtPDI6 is targeted and localized to the chloroplast. Interestingly, AtPDI6 knockdown plants displayed higher resistance to photoinhibition than wild-type plants when exposed to a tenfold increase in light intensity. The AtPDI6 knockdown plants also displayed a higher rate of D1 synthesis under a similar light intensity. The increased resistance to photoinhibition may not be rationalized by changes in antenna or non-photochemical quenching. Thus, the increased D1 synthesis rate, which may result in a larger proportion of active D1 under light stress, may led to the decrease in photoinhibition. These results suggest that, although the D1 synthesis rates observed in wild-type plants under high light intensities are elevated, repair can potentially occur faster. The findings implicate AtPDI6 as an attenuator of D1 synthesis, modulating photoinhibition in a light-regulated manner. PMID:24684167

  19. Addiction to MTH1 protein results in intense expression in human breast cancer tissue as measured by liquid chromatography-isotope-dilution tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Coskun, Erdem; Jaruga, Pawel; Jemth, Ann-Sofie; Loseva, Olga; Scanlan, Leona D; Tona, Alessandro; Lowenthal, Mark S; Helleday, Thomas; Dizdaroglu, Miral

    2015-09-01

    MTH1 protein sanitizes the nucleotide pool so that oxidized 2'-deoxynucleoside triphosphates (dNTPs) cannot be used in DNA replication. Cancer cells require MTH1 to avoid incorporation of oxidized dNTPs into DNA that results in mutations and cell death. Inhibition of MTH1 eradicates cancer, validating MTH1 as an anticancer target. By overexpressing MTH1, cancer cells may mediate cancer growth and resist therapy. To date, there is unreliable evidence suggesting that MTH1 is increased in cancer cells, and available methods to measure MTH1 levels are indirect and semi-quantitative. Accurate measurement of MTH1 in disease-free tissues and malignant tumors of patients may be essential for determining if the protein is truly upregulated in cancers, and for the development and use of MTH1 inhibitors in cancer therapy. Here, we present a novel approach involving liquid chromatography-isotope-dilution tandem mass spectrometry to positively identify and accurately quantify MTH1 in human tissues. We produced full length (15)N-labeled MTH1 and used it as an internal standard for the measurements. Following trypsin digestion, seven tryptic peptides of both MTH1 and (15)N-MTH1 were identified by their full scan and product ion spectra. These peptides provided a statistically significant protein score that would unequivocally identify MTH1. Next, we identified and quantified MTH1 in human disease-free breast tissues and malignant breast tumors, and in four human cultured cell lines, three of which were cancer cells. Extreme expression of MTH1 in malignant breast tumors was observed, suggesting that cancer cells are addicted to MTH1 for their survival. The approach described is expected to be applicable to the measurement of MTH1 levels in malignant tumors vs. surrounding disease-free tissues in cancer patients. This attribute may help develop novel treatment strategies and MTH1 inhibitors as potential drugs, and guide therapies. PMID:26202347

  20. A Spontaneous Deletion within the Desmoglein 3 Extracellular Domain of Mice Results in Hypomorphic Protein Expression, Immunodeficiency, and a Wasting Disease Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Kountikov, Evgueni I.; Poe, Jonathan C.; Maclver, Nancie J.; Rathmell, Jeffrey C.; Tedder, Thomas F.

    2016-01-01

    Desmoglein 3 is a transmembrane component of desmosome complexes that mediate epidermal cell-to-cell adhesion and tissue integrity. Antibody blockade of desmoglein 3 function in pemphigus vulgaris patients leads to skin blistering (acantholysis) and oral mucosa lesions. Desmoglein 3 deficiency in mice leads to a phenotype characterized by cyclic alopecia in addition to the dramatic skin and mucocutaneous acantholysis observed in pemphigus patients. In this study, mice that developed an overt squeaky (sqk) phenotype were identified with obstructed airways, cyclic hair loss, and severe immunodeficiency subsequent to the development of oral lesions and malnutrition. Single-nucleotide polymorphism–based quantitative trait loci mapping revealed a genetic deletion that resulted in expression of a hypomorphic desmoglein 3 protein with a truncation of an extracellular cadherin domain. Because hypomorphic expression of a truncated desmoglein 3 protein led to a spectrum of severe pathology not observed in mice deficient in desmoglein 3, similar human genetic alterations may also disrupt desmosome function and induce a disease course distinct from pathogenesis of pemphigus vulgaris. PMID:25542773

  1. Activation of macrophage peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma by diclofenac results in the induction of cyclooxygenase-2 protein and the synthesis of anti-inflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Ayoub, Samir S; Botting, Regina M; Joshi, Amrish N; Seed, Michael P; Colville-Nash, Paul R

    2009-07-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is an inducible isoform of the COX family of enzymes central to the synthesis of pro-inflammatory prostaglandins. Induction of COX-2 is mediated by many endogenous and exogenous molecules that include pro-inflammatory cytokines and bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). It has been demonstrated that COX-2 can also be induced by diclofenac in cultured J774.2 macrophages. This induction was delayed compared to COX-2 induced by LPS and paracetamol selectively inhibited activity of this protein. The aim of the present study was to determine the transcription factor involved in the production of COX-2 after treatment of J774.2 cells with 500 microM diclofenac. Pre-treatment of cells with the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-gamma) antagonists GW9662 (0.1-1 microM) or biphenol A Diglycidyl Ether (100-200 microM) resulted in reduction of the induction of COX-2 by diclofenac, but not by LPS. Induction of COX-2 by the PPAR-gamma agonist 15deoxyDelta(12,14)prostaglandin J(2) was also reduced when the cells were pre-treated with the PPAR-gamma antagonists BADGE or GW9662. On the other hand, pre-treatment of cells with the nuclear factor-kappa-B (NF-kappaB) Super-repressor IkappaBalpha (150-600 nM) reduced the induction of COX-2 by LPS, but not by diclofenac. We, therefore, have identified that PPAR-gamma activation is a requirement for COX-2 induction after diclofenac stimulation of J774.2 cells. These results along with the finding that treatment of J774.2 macrophages with diclofenac resulted in the release of the anti-inflammatory cytokines, interleukin-10 and transforming growth factor-beta suggest that the diclofenac-induced COX-2 protein may possess anti-inflammatory actions. PMID:19219624

  2. Disruption of the protein kinase N gene of Drosophila melanogaster Results in the Recessive delorean Allele (pkndln) With a Negative Impact on Wing Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sass, Georgette L.; Ostrow, Bruce D.

    2014-01-01

    We describe the delorean mutation of the Drosophila melanogaster protein kinase N gene (pkndln) with defects in wing morphology. Flies homozygous for the recessive pkndln allele have a composite wing phenotype that exhibits changes in relative position and shape of the wing blade as well as loss of specific vein and bristle structures. The pkndln allele is the result of a P-element insertion in the first intron of the pkn locus, and the delorean wing phenotype is contingent upon the interaction of insertion-bearing alleles in trans. The presence of the insertion results in production of a novel transcript that initiates from within the 3′ end of the P-element. The delorean-specific transcript is predicted to produce a wild-type PKN protein. The delorean phenotype is not the result of a reduction in pkn expression, as it could not be recreated using a variety of wing-specific drivers of pkn-RNAi expression. Rather, it is the presence of the delorean-specific transcript that correlates with the mutant phenotype. We consider the delorean wing phenotype to be due to a pairing-dependent, recessive mutation that behaves as a dosage-sensitive, gain of function. Our analysis of genetic interactions with basket and nemo reflects an involvement of pkn and Jun-terminal kinase signaling in common processes during wing differentiation and places PKN as a potential effector of Rho1’s involvement in the Jun-terminal kinase pathway. The delorean phenotype, with its associated defects in wing morphology, provides evidence of a role for PKN in adult morphogenetic processes. PMID:24531729

  3. Agricultural illustrations of 19th century Korea: 'Imwon gyeongjeji' (Treatises on Management of Forest and Garden) by Seo Yugu.

    PubMed

    Chung, Hyung-Min

    2011-01-01

    The generative relationship between text and image has long been established. Its structure evolved historically as a result of varying understandings of the functions of art and technology. Agriculture illustration, which emerged in China during the Song dynasty, is a prime example of this creative dialogue in which aspects of both disciplines were combined. Political, technological, and aesthetic concerns informed the reformulations of this new genre. This paper will address agricultural illustrations on nineteenth-century Korea, when notable changes occurred in the visualization of agricultural texts. It will explore changes in the understanding of the roles of agriculture, technology, and labor through an analysis of shifts in modes of illustration and the texts selected. The relationship between technology and visual representations during late Joseon Korea will be contextualized through an exploration of the evolution of technical drawing in East Asia. This paper will suggest that the recognition of imagery's ability to convey textual and technical information provided an important alternative paradigm for the presentation and use of knowledge. PMID:22171414

  4. The G Protein-Coupled Estrogen Receptor-1, GPER-1, Promotes Fibrillogenesis via a Shc-Dependent Pathway Resulting in Anchorage-Independent Growth

    PubMed Central

    Magruder, Hilary T.; Quinn, Jeffrey A.; Schwartzbauer, Jean E.; Reichner, Jonathan; Huang, Allan

    2016-01-01

    The G protein-coupled estrogen receptor-1, GPER-1, coordinates fibronectin (FN) matrix assembly and release of heparan-bound epidermal growth factor (HB-EGF). This mechanism of action results in the recruitment of FN-engaged integrin α5β1 to fibrillar adhesions and the formation of integrin α5β1-Shc adaptor protein complexes. Here, we show that GPER-1 stimulation of murine 4 T1 or human SKBR3 breast cancer cells with 17β-estradiol (E2β) promotes the formation of focal adhesions and actin stress fibers and results in increased cellular adhesion and haptotaxis on FN, but not collagen. These actions are also induced by the xenoestrogen, bisphenol A, and the estrogen receptor (ER) antagonist, ICI 182, 780, but not the inactive stereoisomer, 17α-estradiol (E2α). In addition, we show that GPER-1 stimulation of breast cancer cells allows for FN-dependent, anchorage-independent growth and FN fibril formation in “hanging drop” assays, indicating that these GPER-1-mediated actions occur independently of adhesion to solid substrata. Stable expression of Shc mutant Y317F lacking its primary tyrosyl phosphorylation site disrupts E2β-induced focal adhesion and actin stress fiber formation and abolishes E2β-enhanced haptotaxis on FN and anchorage-dependent growth. Collectively, these data demonstrate that E2β action via GPER-1 enhances cellular adhesivity and FN matrix assembly and allows for anchorage-independent growth, cellular events that may allow for cellular survival, and tumor progression. PMID:25096985

  5. Immune sensitization to methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (MDI) resulting from skin exposure: albumin as a carrier protein connecting skin exposure to subsequent respiratory responses

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (MDI), a reactive chemical used for commercial polyurethane production, is a well-recognized cause of occupational asthma. The major focus of disease prevention efforts to date has been respiratory tract exposure; however, skin exposure may also be an important route for inducing immune sensitization, which may promote subsequent airway inflammatory responses. We developed a murine model to investigate pathogenic mechanisms by which MDI skin exposure might promote subsequent immune responses, including respiratory tract inflammation. Methods Mice exposed via the skin to varying doses (0.1-10% w/v) of MDI diluted in acetone/olive oil were subsequently evaluated for MDI immune sensitization. Serum levels of MDI-specific IgG and IgE were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA), while respiratory tract inflammation, induced by intranasal delivery of MDI-mouse albumin conjugates, was evaluated based on bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). Autologous serum IgG from "skin only" exposed mice was used to detect and guide the purification/identification of skin proteins antigenically modified by MDI exposure in vivo. Results Skin exposure to MDI resulted in specific antibody production and promoted subsequent respiratory tract inflammation in animals challenged intranasally with MDI-mouse albumin conjugates. The degree of (secondary) respiratory tract inflammation and eosinophilia depended upon the (primary) skin exposure dose, and was maximal in mice exposed to 1% MDI, but paradoxically limited in mice receiving 10-fold higher doses (e.g. 10% MDI). The major antigenically-modified protein at the local MDI skin exposure site was identified as albumin, and demonstrated biophysical changes consistent with MDI conjugation. Conclusions MDI skin exposure can induce MDI-specific immune sensitivity and promote subsequent respiratory tract inflammatory responses and thus, may play an important role in MDI asthma pathogenesis. MDI

  6. Overview of the HUPO Plasma Proteome Project: Results from the pilot phase with 35 collaborating laboratories and multiple analytical groups, generating a core dataset of 3020 proteins and a publicly-available database

    SciTech Connect

    Omenn, Gilbert; States, David J.; Adamski, Marcin; Blackwell, Thomas W.; Menon, Rajasree; Hermjakob, Henning; Apweiler, Rolf; Haab, Brian B.; Simpson, Richard; Eddes, James; Kapp, Eugene; Moritz, Rod; Chan, Daniel W.; Rai, Alex J.; Admon, Arie; Aebersold, Ruedi; Eng, Jimmy K.; Hancock, William S.; Hefta, Stanley A.; Meyer, Helmut; Paik, Young-Ki; Yoo, Jong-Shin; Ping, Peipei; Pounds, Joel G.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Qian, Xiaohong; Wang, Rong; Wasinger, Valerie; Wu, Chi Yue; Zhao, Xiaohang; Zeng, Rong; Archakov, Alexander; Tsugita, Akira; Beer, Ilan; Pandey, Akhilesh; Pisano, Michael; Andrews, Philip; Tammen, Harald; Speicher, David W.; Hanash, Samir M.

    2005-08-13

    . These PPP results on complexity, dynamic range, incomplete sampling, false-positive matches, and integration of diverse datasets for plasma and serum proteins lay a foundation for development and validation of circulating protein biomarkers in health and disease.

  7. ValidatorDB: database of up-to-date validation results for ligands and non-standard residues from the Protein Data Bank.

    PubMed

    Sehnal, David; Svobodová Vařeková, Radka; Pravda, Lukáš; Ionescu, Crina-Maria; Geidl, Stanislav; Horský, Vladimír; Jaiswal, Deepti; Wimmerová, Michaela; Koča, Jaroslav

    2015-01-01

    Following the discovery of serious errors in the structure of biomacromolecules, structure validation has become a key topic of research, especially for ligands and non-standard residues. ValidatorDB (freely available at http://ncbr.muni.cz/ValidatorDB) offers a new step in this direction, in the form of a database of validation results for all ligands and non-standard residues from the Protein Data Bank (all molecules with seven or more heavy atoms). Model molecules from the wwPDB Chemical Component Dictionary are used as reference during validation. ValidatorDB covers the main aspects of validation of annotation, and additionally introduces several useful validation analyses. The most significant is the classification of chirality errors, allowing the user to distinguish between serious issues and minor inconsistencies. Other such analyses are able to report, for example, completely erroneous ligands, alternate conformations or complete identity with the model molecules. All results are systematically classified into categories, and statistical evaluations are performed. In addition to detailed validation reports for each molecule, ValidatorDB provides summaries of the validation results for the entire PDB, for sets of molecules sharing the same annotation (three-letter code) or the same PDB entry, and for user-defined selections of annotations or PDB entries. PMID:25392418

  8. Moderate hypoxia followed by reoxygenation results in blood-brain barrier breakdown via oxidative stress-dependent tight-junction protein disruption.

    PubMed

    Zehendner, Christoph M; Librizzi, Laura; Hedrich, Jana; Bauer, Nina M; Angamo, Eskedar A; de Curtis, Marco; Luhmann, Heiko J

    2013-01-01

    Re-canalization of cerebral vessels in ischemic stroke is pivotal to rescue dysfunctional brain areas that are exposed to moderate hypoxia within the penumbra from irreversible cell death. Goal of the present study was to evaluate the effect of moderate hypoxia followed by reoxygenation (MHR) on the evolution of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity in brain endothelial cells (BEC). BBB integrity was assessed in BEC in vitro and in microvessels of the guinea pig whole brain in situ preparation. Probes were exposed to MHR (2 hours 67-70 mmHg O2, 3 hours reoxygenation, BEC) or towards occlusion of the arteria cerebri media (MCAO) with or without subsequent reperfusion in the whole brain preparation. In vitro BBB integrity was evaluated using trans-endothelial electrical resistance (TEER) and transwell permeability assays. ROS in BEC were evaluated using 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCF), MitoSox and immunostaining for nitrotyrosine. Tight-junction protein (TJ) integrity in BEC, stainings for nitrotyrosine and FITC-albumin extravasation in the guinea pig brain preparation were assessed by confocal microscopy. Diphenyleneiodonium (DPI) was used to investigate NADPH oxidase dependent ROS evolution and its effect on BBB parameters in BEC. MHR impaired TJ proteins zonula occludens 1 (ZO-1) and claudin 5 (Cl5), decreased TEER, and significantly increased cytosolic ROS in BEC. These events were blocked by the NADPH oxidase inhibitor DPI. MCAO with or without subsequent reoxygenation resulted in extravasation of FITC-albumin and ROS generation in the penumbra region of the guinea pig brain preparation and confirmed BBB damage. BEC integrity may be impaired through ROS in MHR on the level of TJ and the BBB is also functionally impaired in moderate hypoxic conditions followed by reperfusion in a complex guinea pig brain preparation. These findings suggest that the BBB is susceptible towards MHR and that ROS play a key role in this

  9. Moderate Hypoxia Followed by Reoxygenation Results in Blood-Brain Barrier Breakdown via Oxidative Stress-Dependent Tight-Junction Protein Disruption

    PubMed Central

    Zehendner, Christoph M.; Librizzi, Laura; Hedrich, Jana; Bauer, Nina M.; Angamo, Eskedar A.; de Curtis, Marco; Luhmann, Heiko J.

    2013-01-01

    Re-canalization of cerebral vessels in ischemic stroke is pivotal to rescue dysfunctional brain areas that are exposed to moderate hypoxia within the penumbra from irreversible cell death. Goal of the present study was to evaluate the effect of moderate hypoxia followed by reoxygenation (MHR) on the evolution of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity in brain endothelial cells (BEC). BBB integrity was assessed in BEC in vitro and in microvessels of the guinea pig whole brain in situ preparation. Probes were exposed to MHR (2 hours 67-70 mmHg O2, 3 hours reoxygenation, BEC) or towards occlusion of the arteria cerebri media (MCAO) with or without subsequent reperfusion in the whole brain preparation. In vitro BBB integrity was evaluated using trans-endothelial electrical resistance (TEER) and transwell permeability assays. ROS in BEC were evaluated using 2′,7′-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCF), MitoSox and immunostaining for nitrotyrosine. Tight-junction protein (TJ) integrity in BEC, stainings for nitrotyrosine and FITC-albumin extravasation in the guinea pig brain preparation were assessed by confocal microscopy. Diphenyleneiodonium (DPI) was used to investigate NADPH oxidase dependent ROS evolution and its effect on BBB parameters in BEC. MHR impaired TJ proteins zonula occludens 1 (ZO-1) and claudin 5 (Cl5), decreased TEER, and significantly increased cytosolic ROS in BEC. These events were blocked by the NADPH oxidase inhibitor DPI. MCAO with or without subsequent reoxygenation resulted in extravasation of FITC-albumin and ROS generation in the penumbra region of the guinea pig brain preparation and confirmed BBB damage. BEC integrity may be impaired through ROS in MHR on the level of TJ and the BBB is also functionally impaired in moderate hypoxic conditions followed by reperfusion in a complex guinea pig brain preparation. These findings suggest that the BBB is susceptible towards MHR and that ROS play a key role in

  10. Downregulation of Cellular c-Jun N-Terminal Protein Kinase and NF-κB Activation by Berberine May Result in Inhibition of Herpes Simplex Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Song, Siwei; Qiu, Min; Chu, Ying; Chen, Deyan; Wang, Xiaohui; Su, Airong

    2014-01-01

    Berberine is a quaternary ammonium salt from the protoberberine group of isoquinoline alkaloids. Some reports show that berberine exhibits anti-inflammatory, antitumor, and antiviral properties by modulating multiple cellular signaling pathways, including p53, nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), and mitogen-activated protein kinase. In the present study, we investigated the antiviral effect of berberine against herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection. Current antiherpes medicines such as acyclovir can lessen the recurring activation when used early at infection but are unable to prevent or cure infections where treatment has selected for resistant mutants. In searching for new antiviral agents against herpesvirus infection, we found that berberine reduced viral RNA transcription, protein synthesis, and virus titers in a dose-dependent manner. To elucidate the mechanism of its antiviral activity, the effect of berberine on the individual steps of viral replication cycle of HSV was investigated via time-of-drug addition assay. We found that berberine acted at the early stage of HSV replication cycle, between viral attachment/entry and genomic DNA replication, probably at the immediate-early gene expression stage. We further demonstrated that berberine significantly reduced HSV-induced NF-κB activation, as well as IκB-α degradation and p65 nuclear translocation. Moreover, we found that berberine also depressed HSV-induced c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) phosphorylation but had little effect on p38 phosphorylation. Our results suggest that the berberine inhibition of HSV infection may be mediated through modulating cellular JNK and NF-κB pathways. PMID:24913175

  11. Gene transfer of master autophagy regulator TFEB results in clearance of toxic protein and correction of hepatic disease in alpha-1-anti-trypsin deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Pastore, Nunzia; Blomenkamp, Keith; Annunziata, Fabio; Piccolo, Pasquale; Mithbaokar, Pratibha; Maria Sepe, Rosa; Vetrini, Francesco; Palmer, Donna; Ng, Philip; Polishchuk, Elena; Iacobacci, Simona; Polishchuk, Roman; Teckman, Jeffrey; Ballabio, Andrea; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    Alpha-1-anti-trypsin deficiency is the most common genetic cause of liver disease in children and liver transplantation is currently the only available treatment. Enhancement of liver autophagy increases degradation of mutant, hepatotoxic alpha-1-anti-trypsin (ATZ). We investigated the therapeutic potential of liver-directed gene transfer of transcription factor EB (TFEB), a master gene that regulates lysosomal function and autophagy, in PiZ transgenic mice, recapitulating the human hepatic disease. Hepatocyte TFEB gene transfer resulted in dramatic reduction of hepatic ATZ, liver apoptosis and fibrosis, which are key features of alpha-1-anti-trypsin deficiency. Correction of the liver phenotype resulted from increased ATZ polymer degradation mediated by enhancement of autophagy flux and reduced ATZ monomer by decreased hepatic NFκB activation and IL-6 that drives ATZ gene expression. In conclusion, TFEB gene transfer is a novel strategy for treatment of liver disease of alpha-1-anti-trypsin deficiency. This study may pave the way towards applications of TFEB gene transfer for treatment of a wide spectrum of human disorders due to intracellular accumulation of toxic proteins. PMID:23381957

  12. Fusarochromanone-induced reactive oxygen species results in activation of JNK cascade and cell death by inhibiting protein phosphatases 2A and 5

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Ying; Barzegar, Mansoureh; Chen, Xin; Wu, Yang; Shang, Chaowei; Mahdavian, Elahe; Salvatore, Brian A.; Jiang, Shanxiang; Huang, Shile

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that fusarochromanone (FC101), a mycotoxin, is cytotoxic in a variety of cell lines. However, the molecular mechanism underlying its cytotoxicity remains elusive. Here we found that FC101 induced cell death in COS7 and HEK293 cells in part by activating JNK pathway. This is evidenced by the findings that inhibition of JNK with SP600125 or expression of dominant negative c-Jun partially prevented FC101-induced cell death. Furthermore, we observed that FC101-activated JNK pathway was attributed to induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Pretreatment with N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), a ROS scavenger and antioxidant, suppressed FC101-induced activation of JNK and cell death. Moreover, we noticed that FC101 inhibited the serine/threonine protein phosphatases 2A (PP2A) and 5 (PP5) in the cells, which was abrogated by NAC. Overexpression of PP2A or PP5 partially prevented FC101-induced activation of JNK and cell death. The results indicate that FC101-induced ROS inhibits PP2A and PP5, leading to activation of JNK pathway and consequently resulting in cell death. PMID:26517353

  13. Rats fed soy protein isolate (SPI) have impaired hepatic CYP1A1 induction by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons as a result of interference with aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Consumption of soy diet has been found to reduce cancer incidence in animals and is associated with reduced cancer risk in humans. Previously, we have demonstrated that female Sprague-Dawley rats fed purified AIN-93G diets with soy protein isolate (SPI) as the sole protein source had reduced CYP1A1 ...

  14. Disease Phenotype, Activity and Clinical Course Prediction Based on C-Reactive Protein Levels at Diagnosis in Patients with Crohn’s Disease: Results from the CONNECT Study

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Jee Hye; Im, Jong Pil; Ye, Byong Duk; Cheon, Jae Hee; Jang, Hyun Joo; Lee, Kang Moon; Kim, You Sun; Kim, Sang Wook; Kim, Young Ho; Song, Geun Am; Han, Dong Soo; Kim, Won Ho; Kim, Joo Sung

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims C-reactive protein (CRP) is an easily measured index of disease activity, but its ability to predict clinical course is controversial. We therefore designed a study to determine whether the CRP level at Crohn’s disease (CD) diagnosis is a valuable indicator of the disease phenotype, activity, and clinical course. Methods We retrospectively analyzed 705 CD patients from 32 institutions. The patients were classified into two groups according to CRP level. The patients’ demographic and clinical characteristics and their use of immunosuppressive or biological agents were recorded. Disease location and behavior, hospitalization, and surgery were analyzed. Results A high CRP was associated with younger age, steroid use, colonic or ileocolonic location, high CD activity index, and active inflammation at colonoscopy (p<0.001). As the disease progressed, patients with high CRP were more likely to exhibit strictures (p=0.027). There were significant differences in the use of 5-aminosalicylic acid, antibiotics, corticosteroids, azathioprine, and infliximab (p<0.001, p<0.001, p<0.001, p<0.001, and p=0.023, respectively). Hospitalization was also more frequent in patients with high CRP. Conclusions The CRP level at diagnosis is useful for evaluating the phenotype, activity, and clinical course of CD. Closer follow-up strategies, with early aggressive treatment, could be considered for patients with high CRP. PMID:27021506

  15. Suppression of telomere-binding protein TPP1 resulted in telomere dysfunction and enhanced radiation sensitivity in telomerase-negative osteosarcoma cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, Weiguang; Wu, Qinqin; Zhou, Fuxiang; Xie, Conghua; Wu, Changping; Zhou, Yunfeng

    2014-03-07

    Highlights: • Down-regulation of TPP1 shortened telomere length in telomerase-negative cells. • Down-regulation of TPP1 induced cell apoptosis in telomerase-negative cells. • Down-regulation of TPP1 increased radiosensitivity in telomerase-negative cells. - Abstract: Mammalian telomeres are protected by the shelterin complex that contains the six core proteins POT1, TPP1, TIN2, TRF1, TRF2 and RAP1. TPP1, formerly known as TINT1, PTOP, and PIP1, is a key factor that regulates telomerase recruitment and activity. In addition to this, TPP1 is required to mediate the shelterin assembly and stabilize telomere. Previous work has found that TPP1 expression was elevated in radioresistant cells and that overexpression of TPP1 led to radioresistance and telomere lengthening in telomerase-positive cells. However, the exact effects and mechanism of TPP1 on radiosensitivity are yet to be precisely defined in the ALT cells. Here we report on the phenotypes of the conditional deletion of TPP1 from the human osteosarcoma U2OS cells using ALT pathway to extend the telomeres.TPP1 deletion resulted in telomere shortening, increased apoptosis and radiation sensitivity enhancement. Together, our findings show that TPP1 plays a vital role in telomere maintenance and protection and establish an intimate relationship between TPP1, telomere and cellular response to ionizing radiation, but likely has the specific mechanism yet to be defined.

  16. A Novel Mutation in NFKBIA/IKBA Results in a Degradation-Resistant N-Truncated Protein and Is Associated With Ectodermal Dysplasia With Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Granados, Eduardo; Keenan, Jeffrey E.; Kinney, Matthew C.; Leo, Harvey; Jain, Neal; Ma, Chi A.; Quinones, Ralph; Gelfand, Erwin W.; Jain, Ashish

    2011-01-01

    Alterations in nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) essential modulator (NEMO; HUGO-approved symbol IKBKG) underlie most cases of ectodermal dysplasia with immune deficiency (EDI), a human disorder characterized by anhidrosis with diminished immunity. EDI has also been associated with a single heterozygous mutation at position Ser32 of the NF-κB inhibitor IκBα, one of two phosphorylation sites that are essential for targeting IκBα for proteasomal degradation and hence for activation of NF-κB. We report a novel heterozygous nonsense mutation in the IKBA (HUGO-approved symbol, NFKBIA) gene of a 1-year-old male child with EDI that introduces a premature termination codon at position Glu14. An in-frame methionine downstream of the nonsense mutation allows for reinitiation of translation. The resulting N-terminally truncated protein lacks both serine phosphorylation sites and inhibits NF-κB signaling by functioning as a dominant negative on NF-κB activity in lymphocytes and monocytes. These findings support the scanning model for translation initiation in eukaryotes and confirm the critical role of the NF-κB in the human immune response. PMID:18412279

  17. Slow Proton Transfer Coupled to Unfolding Explains the Puzzling Results of Single-Molecule Experiments on BBL, a Paradigmatic Downhill Folding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Cerminara, Michele; Campos, Luis A.; Ramanathan, Ravishankar; Muñoz, Victor

    2013-01-01

    A battery of thermodynamic, kinetic, and structural approaches has indicated that the small α-helical protein BBL folds-unfolds via the one-state downhill scenario. Yet, single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy offers a more conflicting view. Single-molecule experiments at pH 6 show a unique half-unfolded conformational ensemble at mid denaturation, whereas other experiments performed at higher pH show a bimodal distribution, as expected for two-state folding. Here we use thermodynamic and laser T-jump kinetic experiments combined with theoretical modeling to investigate the pH dependence of BBL stability, folding kinetics and mechanism within the pH 6–11 range. We find that BBL unfolding is tightly coupled to the protonation of one of its residues with an apparent pKa of ∼7. Therefore, in chemical denaturation experiments around neutral pH BBL unfolds gradually, and also converts in binary fashion to the protonated species. Moreover, under the single-molecule experimental conditions (denaturant midpoint and 279 K), we observe that proton transfer is much slower than the ∼15 microseconds folding-unfolding kinetics of BBL. The relaxation kinetics is distinctly biphasic, and the overall relaxation time (i.e. 0.2–0.5 ms) becomes controlled by the proton transfer step. We then show that a simple theoretical model of protein folding coupled to proton transfer explains quantitatively all these results as well as the two sets of single-molecule experiments, including their more puzzling features. Interestingly, this analysis suggests that BBL unfolds following a one-state downhill folding mechanism at all conditions. Accordingly, the source of the bimodal distributions observed during denaturation at pH 7–8 is the splitting of the unique conformational ensemble of BBL onto two slowly inter-converting protonation species. Both, the unprotonated and protonated species unfold gradually (one-state downhill), but they exhibit different degree of unfolding at any

  18. Increased Levels of Macrophage Inflammatory Proteins Result in Resistance to R5-Tropic HIV-1 in a Subset of Elite Controllers

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Wendy E.; Kurscheid, Sebastian; Joshi, Samit; Lopez, Charlie A.; Goh, Gerald; Choi, Murim; Barakat, Lydia; Francis, John; Fisher, Ann; Kozal, Michael; Zapata, Heidi; Shaw, Albert; Lifton, Richard; Fikrig, Erol

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Elite controllers (ECs) are a rare group of HIV seropositive individuals who are able to control viral replication without antiretroviral therapy. The mechanisms responsible for this phenotype, however, have not been fully elucidated. In this study, we examined CD4+ T cell resistance to HIV in a cohort of elite controllers and explored transcriptional signatures associated with cellular resistance. We demonstrate that a subgroup of elite controllers possess CD4+ T cells that are specifically resistant to R5-tropic HIV while remaining fully susceptible to X4-tropic and vesicular stomatitis virus G (VSV-G)-pseudotyped viruses. Transcriptome analysis revealed 17 genes that were differentially regulated in resistant elite controllers relative to healthy controls. Notably, the genes encoding macrophage inflammatory protein 1α (MIP-1α), CCL3 and CCL3L1, were found to be upregulated. The MIP-1α, MIP-1β, and RANTES chemokines are natural ligands of CCR5 and are known to interfere with HIV replication. For three elite controllers, we observed increased production of MIP-1α and/or MIP-1β at the protein level. The supernatant from resistant EC cells contained MIP-1α and MIP-1β and was sufficient to confer R5-tropic resistance to susceptible CD4+ T cells. Additionally, this effect was reversed by using inhibitory anti-MIP antibodies. These results suggest that the T cells of these particular elite controllers may be naturally resistant to HIV infection by blocking R5-tropic viral entry. IMPORTANCE HIV is a pandemic health problem, and the majority of seropositive individuals will eventually progress to AIDS unless antiretroviral therapy (ART) is administered. However, rare patients, termed elite controllers, have a natural ability to control HIV infection in the absence of ART, but the mechanisms by which they achieve this phenotype have not been fully explored. This paper identifies one mechanism that may contribute to this natural resistance: some elite

  19. Infection of a Single Cell Line with Distinct Strains of Human Cytomegalovirus Can Result in Large Variations in Virion Production and Facilitate Efficient Screening of Virus Protein Function

    PubMed Central

    Zavala, Anamaria G.; O'Dowd, John M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Previously, we reported that the absence of the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase, a critical DNA damage response (DDR) signaling component for double-strand breaks, caused no change in HCMV Towne virion production. Later, others reported decreased AD169 viral titers in the absence of ATM. To address this discrepancy, human foreskin fibroblasts (HFF) and three ATM− lines (GM02530, GM05823, and GM03395) were infected with both Towne and AD169. Two additional ATM− lines (GM02052 and GM03487) were infected with Towne. Remarkably, both previous studies' results were confirmed. However, the increased number of cell lines and infections with both lab-adapted strains confirmed that ATM was not necessary to produce wild-type-level titers in fibroblasts. Instead, interactions between individual virus strains and the cellular microenvironment of the individual ATM− line determined efficiency of virion production. Surprisingly, these two commonly used lab-adapted strains produced drastically different titers in one ATM− cell line, GM05823. The differences in titer suggested a rapid method for identifying genes involved in differential virion production. In silico comparison of the Towne and AD169 genomes determined a list of 28 probable candidates responsible for the difference. Using serial iterations of an experiment involving virion entry and input genome nuclear trafficking with a panel of related strains, we reduced this list to four (UL129, UL145, UL147, and UL148). As a proof of principle, reintroduction of UL148 largely rescued genome trafficking. Therefore, use of a battery of related strains offers an efficient method to narrow lists of candidate genes affecting various virus life cycle checkpoints. IMPORTANCE Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection of multiple cell lines lacking ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein produced wild-type levels of infectious virus. Interactions between virus strains and the microenvironment of individual

  20. Reduction in C-reactive protein indicates successful targeting of the IL-1/IL-6 axis resulting in improved survival in early stage multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Lust, John A; Lacy, Martha Q; Zeldenrust, Steven R; Witzig, Thomas E; Moon-Tasson, Laurie L; Dinarello, Charles A; Donovan, Kathleen A

    2016-06-01

    We report the long-term follow-up results of a phase II trial of IL-1 receptor antagonist and low-dose dexamethasone for early stage multiple myeloma (MM). Patients were eligible if they had smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM) or indolent multiple myeloma (IMM) without the need for immediate therapy. Forty seven patients were enrolled and subsequently treated with IL-1Ra; in 25/47 low-dose dexamethasone (20 mg weekly) was added. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS). In the clinical trial, three patients achieved a minor response (MR) to IL-1Ra alone; five patients a partial response (PR) and four patients an MR after addition of dexamethasone. Seven patients showed a decrease in the plasma cell labeling index (PCLI) which paralleled a decrease in the high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP). The median PFS for the 47 patients was 1116 days (37.2 months). The median PFS for patients without (n = 22) and with (n = 25) a decrease in their baseline hs-CRP was 326 days (11 months) vs. 3139 days (104 months) respectively (P <0.0001). The median overall survival (OS) for the 47 patients was 3482 days (9.5 years). The median OS for patients without and with a decrease in their baseline hs-CRP was 2885 days (7.9 years) vs. median not reached, respectively (P = 0.001). In SMM/IMM patients at risk for progression to active myeloma, reduction in the hs-CRP indicates successful targeting of the IL-1/IL-6 axis resulting in improved PFS and OS. (Clinical Trials.gov Identifier: NCT00635154) Am. J. Hematol. 91:571-574, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26945843

  1. Deletion of collapsin response mediator protein 4 results in abnormal layer thickness and elongation of mitral cell apical dendrites in the neonatal olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Tsutiya, Atsuhiro; Watanabe, Hikaru; Nakano, Yui; Nishihara, Masugi; Goshima, Yoshio; Ohtani-Kaneko, Ritsuko

    2016-05-01

    Collapsin response mediator protein 4 (CRMP4), a member of the CRMP family, is involved in the pathogenesis of neurodevelopmental disorders such as schizophrenia and autism. Here, we first compared layer thickness of the olfactory bulb between wild-type (WT) and CRMP4-knockout (KO) mice. The mitral cell layer (MCL) was significantly thinner, whereas the external plexiform layer (EPL) was significantly thicker in CRMP4-KO mice at postnatal day 0 (PD0) compared with WTs. However, differences in layer thickness disappeared by PD14. No apoptotic cells were found in the MCL, and the number of mitral cells (MCs) identified with a specific marker (i.e. Tbx21 antibody) did not change in CRMP4-KO neonates. However, DiI-tracing showed that the length of mitral cell apical dendrites was greater in CRMP4-KO neonates than in WTs. In addition, expression of CRMP4 mRNA in WT mice was most abundant in the MCL at PD0 and decreased afterward. These results suggest that CRMP4 contributes to dendritic elongation. Our in vitro studies showed that deletion or knockdown of CRMP4 resulted in enhanced growth of MAP2-positive neurites, whereas overexpression of CRMP4 reduced their growth, suggesting a new role for CRMP4 as a suppressor of dendritic elongation. Overall, our data suggest that disruption of CRMP4 produces a temporary alteration in EPL thickness, which is constituted mainly of mitral cell apical dendrites, through the enhanced growth of these dendrites. PMID:26739921

  2. N-Octanoyl Dopamine Treatment of Endothelial Cells Induces the Unfolded Protein Response and Results in Hypometabolism and Tolerance to Hypothermia

    PubMed Central

    Stamellou, Eleni; Fontana, Johann; Wedel, Johannes; Ntasis, Emmanouil; Sticht, Carsten; Becker, Anja; Pallavi, Prama; Wolf, Kerstin; Krämer, Bernhard K.; Hafner, Mathias; van Son, Willem J.; Yard, Benito A.

    2014-01-01

    Aim N-acyl dopamines (NADD) are gaining attention in the field of inflammatory and neurological disorders. Due to their hydrophobicity, NADD may have access to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We therefore investigated if NADD induce the unfolded protein response (UPR) and if this in turn influences cell behaviour. Methods Genome wide gene expression profiling, confirmatory qPCR and reporter assays were employed on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) to validate induction of UPR target genes and UPR sensor activation by N-octanoyl dopamine (NOD). Intracellular ATP, apoptosis and induction of thermotolerance were used as functional parameters to assess adaptation of HUVEC. Results NOD, but not dopamine dose dependently induces the UPR. This was also found for other synthetic NADD. Induction of the UPR was dependent on the redox activity of NADD and was not caused by selective activation of a particular UPR sensor. UPR induction did not result in cell apoptosis, yet NOD strongly impaired cell proliferation by attenuation of cells in the S-G2/M phase. Long-term treatment of HUVEC with low NOD concentration showed decreased intracellular ATP concentration paralleled with activation of AMPK. These cells were significantly more resistant to cold inflicted injury. Conclusions We provide for the first time evidence that NADD induce the UPR in vitro. It remains to be assessed if UPR induction is causally associated with hypometabolism and thermotolerance. Further pharmacokinetic studies are warranted to address if the NADD concentrations used in vitro can be obtained in vivo and if this in turn shows therapeutic efficacy. PMID:24926788

  3. Prasugrel Results in Higher Decrease in High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein Level in Patients Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Comparing to Clopidogrel

    PubMed Central

    Hajsadeghi, Shokoufeh; Chitsazan, Mandana; Chitsazan, Mitra; Salehi, Negar; Amin, Ahmad; Bidokhti, Arash Amin; Babaali, Nima; Bordbar, Armin; Hejrati, Maral; Moghadami, Samar

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES A growing body of clinical and laboratory evidence indicates that inflammation plays a crucial role in atherosclerosis. In the present study, we compared the effects of clopidogrel and prasugrel on high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). METHODS The present randomized, double-blind clinical trial included 120 patients who underwent PCI. Eligible patients were randomly assigned 2:1 to one of the two groups: 80 patients in the first group received clopidogrel (Plavix®; loading dose and maintenance dose of 300 and 75 mg daily, respectively) and 40 patients in the second group received prasugrel (Effient®; loading dose and maintenance dose of 60 and 10 mg, respectively) for 12 weeks. The hs-CRP levels between baseline and 12th week were compared. RESULTS Of the 120 patients, 69 patients (57.5%) were male. Pretreatment hs-CRP level was statistically comparable in clopidogrel (median, 15.10 mg/dL; interquartile range [IQR], 9.62–23.75 mg/dL) and prasugrel groups (median, 18 mg/dL; IQR, 14.25–22 mg/dL; P = 0.06). Patients taking clopidogrel showed a significant reduction in hs-CRP level compared with the baseline values (P < 0.001). Prasugrel administration also resulted in a significant reduction in hs-CRP level (P < 0.001). A significant 73% overall reduction in the hs-CRP level was seen with prasugrel compared with 39% overall reduction in hs-CRP level with clopidogrel (P = 0.002). CONCLUSION Prasugrel seems to be superior to clopidogrel in the reduction of hs-CRP in patients undergoing PCI. PMID:27597810

  4. Delivery Mode, Duration of Labor, and Cord Blood Adiponectin, Leptin, and C-Reactive Protein: Results of the Population-Based Ulm Birth Cohort Studies

    PubMed Central

    Logan, Chad A.; Thiel, Larissa; Bornemann, Rebecca; Koenig, Wolfgang; Reister, Frank; Brenner, Hermann; Rothenbacher, Dietrich; Genuneit, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Background Numerous studies have reported associations between delivery mode and health outcomes in infancy and later life. Previous smaller studies indicated a relationship between delivery mode and newborn inflammation potentially constituting a mediating factor. We aimed to determine the influence of delivery mode and duration of labor on cord blood concentrations of adiponectin, leptin, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP). Methods In the Ulm SPATZ Health Study, 934 singleton newborns and their mothers were recruited during their hospital stay in the University Medical Center Ulm, Southern Germany, from 04/2012-05/2013. Inflammatory biomarkers were measured by ELISAs (n = 836). Delivery mode was analyzed categorically (elective cesarean (reference), active labor delivery: emergency cesarean, assisted vaginal, and spontaneous vaginal); duration of labor continuously. Following log-transformation, linear regression was used to estimate geometric means ratios (GMR) adjusted for potential confounders for the effects of delivery mode and duration of labor on each biomarker separately. Independent replication was sought in the similarly conducted Ulm Birth Cohort Study recruited from 11/2000-11/2001. Results Individually, active labor delivery modes as well as increasing duration of labor were associated with higher leptin and hs-CRP concentrations. After mutual adjustment, the associations with delivery modes were attenuated but those for duration of labor remained statistically significant (GMR (95%CI) 1.10 (1.00; 1.21) and 1.15 (1.04; 1.27) for leptin and hs-CRP per hour of labor, respectively). No significant adjusted associations were observed between delivery modes and adiponectin concentrations. These findings were replicated in an independent birth cohort study. Conclusions Cord blood leptin and hs-CRP concentrations were associated with duration of labor rather than delivery mode. Further research is warranted to investigate these associations

  5. Results of a phase I/II open-label, safety and efficacy trial of coagulation factor IX (recombinant), albumin fusion protein in haemophilia B patients

    PubMed Central

    Martinowitz, U; Lissitchkov, T; Lubetsky, A; Jotov, G; Barazani-Brutman, T; Voigt, C; Jacobs, I; Wuerfel, T; Santagostino, E

    2015-01-01

    Introduction rIX-FP is a coagulation factor IX (recombinant), albumin fusion protein with more than fivefold half-life prolongation over other standard factor IX (FIX) products available on the market. Aim This prospective phase II, open-label study evaluated the safety and efficacy of rIX-FP for the prevention of bleeding episodes during weekly prophylaxis and assessed the haemostatic efficacy for on-demand treatment of bleeding episodes in previously treated patients with haemophilia B. Methods The study consisted of a 10–14 day evaluation of rIX-FP pharmacokinetics (PK), and an 11 month safety and efficacy evaluation period with subjects receiving weekly prophylaxis treatment. Safety was evaluated by the occurrence of related adverse events, and immunogenic events, including development of inhibitors. Efficacy was evaluated by annualized spontaneous bleeding rate (AsBR), and the number of injections to achieve haemostasis. Results Seventeen subjects participated in the study, 13 received weekly prophylaxis and 4 received episodic treatment only. No inhibitors were detected in any subject. The mean and median AsBR were 1.25, and 1.13 respectively in the weekly prophylaxis arm. All bleeding episodes were treated with 1 or 2 injections of rIX-FP. Three prophylaxis subjects who were treated on demand prior to study entry had >85% reduction in AsBR compared to the bleeding rate prior to study entry. Conclusion This study demonstrated the efficacy for weekly routine prophylaxis of rIX-FP to prevent spontaneous bleeding episodes and for the treatment of bleeding episodes. In addition no safety issues were detected during the study and an improved PK profile was demonstrated. PMID:25990590

  6. Long-acting recombinant coagulation factor IX albumin fusion protein (rIX-FP) in hemophilia B: results of a phase 3 trial

    PubMed Central

    Martinowitz, Uri; Lissitchkov, Toshko; Pan-Petesch, Brigitte; Hanabusa, Hideji; Oldenburg, Johannes; Boggio, Lisa; Negrier, Claude; Pabinger, Ingrid; von Depka Prondzinski, Mario; Altisent, Carmen; Castaman, Giancarlo; Yamamoto, Koji; Álvarez-Roman, Maria-Teresa; Voigt, Christine; Blackman, Nicole; Jacobs, Iris

    2016-01-01

    A global phase 3 study evaluated the pharmacokinetics, efficacy, and safety of recombinant fusion protein linking coagulation factor IX with albumin (rIX-FP) in 63 previously treated male patients (12-61 years) with severe hemophilia B (factor IX [FIX] activity ≤2%). The study included 2 groups: group 1 patients received routine prophylaxis once every 7 days for 26 weeks, followed by either 7-, 10-, or 14-day prophylaxis regimen for a mean of 50, 38, or 51 weeks, respectively; group 2 patients received on-demand treatment of bleeding episodes for 26 weeks and then switched to a 7-day prophylaxis regimen for a mean of 45 weeks. The mean terminal half-life of rIX-FP was 102 hours, 4.3-fold longer than previous FIX treatment. Patients maintained a mean trough of 20 and 12 IU/dL FIX activity on prophylaxis with rIX-FP 40 IU/kg weekly and 75 IU/kg every 2 weeks, respectively. There was 100% reduction in median annualized spontaneous bleeding rate (AsBR) and 100% resolution of target joints when subjects switched from on-demand to prophylaxis treatment with rIX-FP (P < .0001). The median AsBR was 0.00 for all prophylaxis regimens. Overall, 98.6% of bleeding episodes were treated successfully, including 93.6% that were treated with a single injection. No patient developed an inhibitor, and no safety concerns were identified. These results indicate rIX-FP is safe and effective for preventing and treating bleeding episodes in patients with hemophilia B at dosing regimens of 40 IU/kg weekly and 75 IU/kg every 2 weeks. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT0101496274. PMID:26755710

  7. Long-acting recombinant coagulation factor IX albumin fusion protein (rIX-FP) in hemophilia B: results of a phase 3 trial.

    PubMed

    Santagostino, Elena; Martinowitz, Uri; Lissitchkov, Toshko; Pan-Petesch, Brigitte; Hanabusa, Hideji; Oldenburg, Johannes; Boggio, Lisa; Negrier, Claude; Pabinger, Ingrid; von Depka Prondzinski, Mario; Altisent, Carmen; Castaman, Giancarlo; Yamamoto, Koji; Álvarez-Roman, Maria-Teresa; Voigt, Christine; Blackman, Nicole; Jacobs, Iris

    2016-04-01

    A global phase 3 study evaluated the pharmacokinetics, efficacy, and safety of recombinant fusion protein linking coagulation factor IX with albumin (rIX-FP) in 63 previously treated male patients (12-61 years) with severe hemophilia B (factor IX [FIX] activity ≤2%). The study included 2 groups: group 1 patients received routine prophylaxis once every 7 days for 26 weeks, followed by either 7-, 10-, or 14-day prophylaxis regimen for a mean of 50, 38, or 51 weeks, respectively; group 2 patients received on-demand treatment of bleeding episodes for 26 weeks and then switched to a 7-day prophylaxis regimen for a mean of 45 weeks. The mean terminal half-life of rIX-FP was 102 hours, 4.3-fold longer than previous FIX treatment. Patients maintained a mean trough of 20 and 12 IU/dL FIX activity on prophylaxis with rIX-FP 40 IU/kg weekly and 75 IU/kg every 2 weeks, respectively. There was 100% reduction in median annualized spontaneous bleeding rate (AsBR) and 100% resolution of target joints when subjects switched from on-demand to prophylaxis treatment with rIX-FP (P< .0001). The median AsBR was 0.00 for all prophylaxis regimens. Overall, 98.6% of bleeding episodes were treated successfully, including 93.6% that were treated with a single injection. No patient developed an inhibitor, and no safety concerns were identified. These results indicate rIX-FP is safe and effective for preventing and treating bleeding episodes in patients with hemophilia B at dosing regimens of 40 IU/kg weekly and 75 IU/kg every 2 weeks. This trial was registered atwww.clinicaltrials.govas #NCT0101496274. PMID:26755710

  8. Novel Cell-Ess ® supplement used as a feed or as an initial boost to CHO serum free media results in a significant increase in protein yield and production.

    PubMed

    Elhofy, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Many metrics, including metabolic profiles, have been used to analyze cell health and optimize productivity. In this study, we investigated the ability of a lipid supplement to increase protein yield. At a concentration of 1% (v/v) the lipid supplement caused a significant increase in protein titer (1118 ± 65.4 ng 10(5) cells(- 1) days(- 1)) when compared to cultures grown in the absence of supplementation (819.3 ± 38.1 ng 10(5) cells(- 1) days(- 1); p < 0.05). This equated to a 37% increase in productivity. Furthermore, metabolic profiles of ammonia, glutamate, lactate, and glucose were not significantly altered by the polar lipid supplement. In a separate set of experiments, using the supplement as a feed resulted in 2 notable effects. The first was a 25% increase in protein titer. The second was an extension of peak protein production from 1 day to 2 days. These results suggest that lipid supplementation is a promising avenue for enhancing protein production. In addition, our results also suggest that an increase in protein production may not necessarily require a change in the metabolic state of the cells. PMID:27594979

  9. A single amino acid substitution in the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase protein of Newcastle disease virus results in increased fusion and decreased neuraminidase activities without changes in virus pathotype

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV) attachment to the host cell is mediated by the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN), a multifunctional protein that has receptor recognition, neuraminidase and fusion promotion activities. The process that correlates receptor binding and fusion triggering is poorly understo...

  10. A serine-to-threonine substitution in the triazine herbicide-binding protein in potato cells results in atrazine resistance without impairing productivity.

    PubMed Central

    Smeda, R J; Hasegawa, P M; Goldsbrough, P B; Singh, N K; Weller, S C

    1993-01-01

    A mutation of the psbA gene was identified in photoautotrophic potato (Solanum tuberosum L. cv Superior x U.S. Department of Agriculture line 66-142) cells selected for resistance to 6-chloro-N-ethyl-N'-(1-methylethyl)-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine (atrazine). Photoaffinity labeling with 6-azido-N-ethyl-N'-(1-methylethyl)-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine detected a thylakoid membrane protein with a M(r) of 32,000 in susceptible, but not in resistant, cells. This protein was identified as the secondary quinone acceptor of photosystem II (QB) protein. Atrazine resistance in selected cells was attributable to a mutation from AGT (serine) to ACT (threonine) in codon 264 of the psbA gene that encodes the QB protein. Although the mutant cells exhibited extreme levels of resistance to atrazine, no concomitant reductions in photosynthetic electron transport or cell growth rates compared to the unselected cells were detected. This is in contrast with the losses in productivity observed in atrazine-resistant mutants that contain a glycine-264 alteration. PMID:8022941

  11. Feeding soy protein isolate (SPI) does not result in an estrogenic gene expression profile in the mammary of ovariectomized (OVX) female rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Concerns of increased breast cancer risk in women consuming soy exist because of the perceived estrogenicity of soy isoflavones. Female Sprague-Dawley rats (N equals 20/group) were fed AIN-93G diets with casein or SPI as the protein from PND30. On PND50 rats were OVX and 10/group infused s.c. with 5...

  12. MART-1 peptide vaccination plus IMP321 (LAG-3Ig fusion protein) in patients receiving autologous PBMCs after lymphodepletion: results of a Phase I trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Immunotherapy offers a promising novel approach for the treatment of cancer and both adoptive T-cell transfer and immune modulation lead to regression of advanced melanoma. However, the potential synergy between these two strategies remains unclear. Methods We investigated in 12 patients with advanced stage IV melanoma the effect of multiple MART-1 analog peptide vaccinations with (n = 6) or without (n = 6) IMP321 (LAG-3Ig fusion protein) as an adjuvant in combination with lymphodepleting chemotherapy and adoptive transfer of autologous PBMCs at day (D) 0 (Trial registration No: NCT00324623). All patients were selected on the basis of ex vivo detectable MART-1-specific CD8 T-cell responses and immunized at D0, 8, 15, 22, 28, 52, and 74 post-reinfusion. Results After immunization, a significant expansion of MART-1-specific CD8 T cells was measured in 83% (n = 5/6) and 17% (n = 1/6) of patients from the IMP321 and control groups, respectively (P < 0.02). Compared to the control group, the mean fold increase of MART-1-specific CD8 T cells in the IMP321 group was respectively >2-, >4- and >6-fold higher at D15, D30 and D60 (P < 0.02). Long-lasting MART-1-specific CD8 T-cell responses were significantly associated with IMP321 (P < 0.02). At the peak of the response, MART-1-specific CD8 T cells contained higher proportions of effector (CCR7− CD45RA+/−) cells in the IMP321 group (P < 0.02) and showed no sign of exhaustion (i.e. were mostly PD1−CD160−TIM3−LAG3−2B4+/−). Moreover, IMP321 was associated with a significantly reduced expansion of regulatory T cells (P < 0.04); consistently, we observed a negative correlation between the relative expansion of MART-1-specific CD8 T cells and of regulatory T cells. Finally, although there were no confirmed responses as per RECIST criteria, a transient, 30-day partial response was observed in a patient from the IMP321 group. Conclusions Vaccination with IMP321 as an

  13. A rhizobium selenitireducens protein showing selenite reductase activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biobarriers remove, via precipitation, the metalloid selenite (SeO3–2) from groundwater; a process that involves the biological reduction of soluble SeO3–2 to insoluble elemental red selenium (Se0). The enzymes associated with this reduction process are poorly understood. In Rhizobium selenitiredu...

  14. Research Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-12-01

    Research on Global Carbon Emission and Sequestration NSFC Funded Project Made Significant Progress in Quantum Dynamics Functional Human Blood Protein Obtained from Rice How Giant Pandas Thrive on a Bamboo Diet New Evidence of Interpersonal Violence from 129,000 Years Ago Found in China Aptamer-Mediated Efficient Capture and Release of T Lymphocytes on Nanostructured Surfaces BGI Study Results on Resequencing 50 Accessions of Rice Cast New Light on Molecular Breeding BGI Reports Study Results on Frequent Mutation of Genes Encoding UMPP Components in Kidney Cancer Research on Habitat Shift Promoting Species Diversification

  15. Infection of primary cells by adeno-associated virus type 2 results in a modulation of cell cycle-regulating proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Hermanns, J; Schulze, A; Jansen-Db1urr, P; Kleinschmidt, J A; Schmidt, R; zur Hausen, H

    1997-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that infection of primary human cells with adeno-associated viruses (AAV) leads to a decrease in cellular proliferation and to growth arrest. We analyzed the molecular basis of this phenomenon and observed that infection with AAV type 2 (AAV2) had an effect on several factors engaged in the control of the mammalian cell cycle. In particular, all of the pRB family members, pRB, p107, and p130, which are involved in G1 cell cycle checkpoint control, were affected. After infection, a shift from hyper- to hypophosphorylated forms was observed. Cyclins A and B1, which are required for G1/S transition and progression into mitosis, respectively, were downregulated at the transcriptional level as well as at the protein level, whereas the G1 cyclins D1 and E remained unaffected. In addition, the steady-state levels of cyclin-dependent kinases CDK1 and CDK2 and of transcription factor E2F-1 were diminished. Of all the factors known to be involved in phosphorylation of pRB family proteins, only the CDK inhibitor p21WAF1 exhibited a response to AAV2 infection. p21WAF1 mRNA was quickly and progressively upregulated in a p53-independent manner over at least 72 h. Consistent with the increased p21WAF1 protein levels, cyclin E- and cyclin A-dependent kinase activities declined to low levels and E2F-p130-cyclin-CDK2 complexes were disrupted. From these data, we conclude that the major effect of AAV2 infection on primary human fibroblasts appears to be upregulation of p21WAF1 gene expression and thus cell cycle arrest by the suppression of pRB family protein phosphorylation. PMID:9223493

  16. Rats fed soy protein isolate (SPI) have impaired hepatic CYP1A1 induction by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons as a result of interference with aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Singhal, Rohit; Badger, Thomas M.; Ronis, Martin J.

    2008-03-01

    Consumption of soy diets has been found to reduce cancer incidence in animals and is associated with reduced cancer risk in humans. Previously, we have demonstrated that female Sprague-Dawley rats fed purified AIN-93G diets with soy protein isolate (SPI) as the sole protein source had reduced CYP1A1 induction and basal aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) levels relative to those fed the same diet containing casein (CAS). In the present study, the molecular mechanisms underlying reduced AhR expression have been studied. The SPI-effect on AhR was not observed after feeding diets containing the purified soy isoflavones genistein or daidzein. Rat hepatoma FGC-4 cells were treated with the serum obtained from rats fed CAS- or SPI-containing diets. Reduced AhR levels (P < 0.05) were observed after 24 h exposure to SPI-serum without any changes in the overall expression of chaperone proteins-HSP90 and XAP2. SPI-serum-stimulated AhR degradation was inhibited by treating the cells with the proteasome inhibitor, MG132, and was observed to be preceded by ubiquitination of the receptor. A reduced association of XAP2 with the immunoprecipitated AhR complex was observed. SPI-serum-mediated AhR degradation was preceded by nuclear translocation of the receptor. However, the translocated receptor was found to be unable to heterodimerize with ARNT or to bind to XRE elements on the CYP1A1 enhancer. These data suggest that feeding SPI-containing diets antagonizes AhR signaling by a novel mechanism which differs from those established for known AhR antagonists.

  17. Genotypic Variation under Fe Deficiency Results in Rapid Changes in Protein Expressions and Genes Involved in Fe Metabolism and Antioxidant Mechanisms in Tomato Seedlings (Solanum lycopersicum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Muneer, Sowbiya; Jeong, Byoung Ryong

    2015-01-01

    To investigate Fe deficiency tolerance in tomato cultivars, quantification of proteins and genes involved in Fe metabolism and antioxidant mechanisms were performed in “Roggusanmaru” and “Super Doterang”. Fe deficiency (Moderate, low and –Fe) significantly decreased the biomass, total, and apoplastic Fe concentration of “Roggusanmaru”, while a slight variation was observed in “Super Doterang” cultivar. The quantity of important photosynthetic pigments such as total chlorophyll and carotenoid contents significantly decreased in “Roggusanmaru” than “Super Doterang” cultivar. The total protein profile in leaves and roots determines that “Super Doterang” exhibited an optimal tolerance to Fe deficiency compared to “Roggusanmaru” cultivar. A reduction in expression of PSI (photosystem I), PSII (photosystem II) super-complexes and related thylakoid protein contents were detected in “Roggusanmaru” than “Super Doterang” cultivar. Moreover, the relative gene expression of SlPSI and SlPSII were well maintained in “Super Doterang” than “Roggusanmaru” cultivar. The relative expression of genes involved in Fe-transport (SlIRT1 and SlIRT2) and Fe(III) chelates reductase oxidase (SlFRO1) were relatively reduced in “Roggusanmaru”, while increased in “Super Doterang” cultivar under Fe deficient conditions. The H+-ATPase relative gene expression (SlAHA1) in roots were maintained in “Super Doterang” compared to “Roggusanmaru”. Furthermore, the gene expressions involved in antioxidant defense mechanisms (SlSOD, SlAPX and SlCAT) in leaves and roots showed that these genes were highly increased in “Super Doterang”, whereas decreased in “Roggusanmaru” cultivar under Fe deficiency. The present study suggested that “Super Doterang” is better tomato cultivar than “Roggusanmaru” for calcareous soils. PMID:26602920

  18. Genotypic Variation under Fe Deficiency Results in Rapid Changes in Protein Expressions and Genes Involved in Fe Metabolism and Antioxidant Mechanisms in Tomato Seedlings (Solanum lycopersicum L.).

    PubMed

    Muneer, Sowbiya; Jeong, Byoung Ryong

    2015-01-01

    To investigate Fe deficiency tolerance in tomato cultivars, quantification of proteins and genes involved in Fe metabolism and antioxidant mechanisms were performed in "Roggusanmaru" and "Super Doterang". Fe deficiency (Moderate, low and -Fe) significantly decreased the biomass, total, and apoplastic Fe concentration of "Roggusanmaru", while a slight variation was observed in "Super Doterang" cultivar. The quantity of important photosynthetic pigments such as total chlorophyll and carotenoid contents significantly decreased in "Roggusanmaru" than "Super Doterang" cultivar. The total protein profile in leaves and roots determines that "Super Doterang" exhibited an optimal tolerance to Fe deficiency compared to "Roggusanmaru" cultivar. A reduction in expression of PSI (photosystem I), PSII (photosystem II) super-complexes and related thylakoid protein contents were detected in "Roggusanmaru" than "Super Doterang" cultivar. Moreover, the relative gene expression of SlPSI and SlPSII were well maintained in "Super Doterang" than "Roggusanmaru" cultivar. The relative expression of genes involved in Fe-transport (SlIRT1 and SlIRT2) and Fe(III) chelates reductase oxidase (SlFRO1) were relatively reduced in "Roggusanmaru", while increased in "Super Doterang" cultivar under Fe deficient conditions. The H⁺-ATPase relative gene expression (SlAHA1) in roots were maintained in "Super Doterang" compared to "Roggusanmaru". Furthermore, the gene expressions involved in antioxidant defense mechanisms (SlSOD, SlAPX and SlCAT) in leaves and roots showed that these genes were highly increased in "Super Doterang", whereas decreased in "Roggusanmaru" cultivar under Fe deficiency. The present study suggested that "Super Doterang" is better tomato cultivar than "Roggusanmaru" for calcareous soils. PMID:26602920

  19. Selection for low or high primary dormancy in Lolium rigidum Gaud seeds results in constitutive differences in stress protein expression and peroxidase activity

    PubMed Central

    Goggin, Danica E.; Powles, Stephen B.; Steadman, Kathryn J.

    2011-01-01

    Seed dormancy in wild Lolium rigidum Gaud (annual ryegrass) populations is highly variable and not well characterized at the biochemical level. To identify some of the determinants of dormancy level in these seeds, the proteomes of subpopulations selected for low and high levels of primary dormancy were compared by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of extracts from mature, dry seeds. High-dormancy seeds showed higher expression of small heat shock proteins, enolase, and glyoxalase I than the low-dormancy seeds. The functional relevance of these differences in protein expression was confirmed by the fact that high-dormancy seeds were more tolerant to high temperatures imposed at imbibition and had consistently higher glyoxalase I activity over 0–42 d dark stratification. Higher expression of a putative glutathione peroxidase in low-dormancy seeds was not accompanied by higher activity, but these seeds had a slightly more oxidized glutathione pool and higher total peroxidase activity. Overall, these biochemical and physiological differences suggest that L. rigidum seeds selected for low dormancy are more prepared for rapid germination via peroxidase-mediated cell wall weakening, whilst seeds selected for high dormancy are constitutively prepared to survive environmental stresses, even in the absence of stress during seed development. PMID:20974739

  20. Protein inference: A protein quantification perspective.

    PubMed

    He, Zengyou; Huang, Ting; Liu, Xiaoqing; Zhu, Peijun; Teng, Ben; Deng, Shengchun

    2016-08-01

    In mass spectrometry-based shotgun proteomics, protein quantification and protein identification are two major computational problems. To quantify the protein abundance, a list of proteins must be firstly inferred from the raw data. Then the relative or absolute protein abundance is estimated with quantification methods, such as spectral counting. Until now, most researchers have been dealing with these two processes separately. In fact, the protein inference problem can be regarded as a special protein quantification problem in the sense that truly present proteins are those proteins whose abundance values are not zero. Some recent published papers have conceptually discussed this possibility. However, there is still a lack of rigorous experimental studies to test this hypothesis. In this paper, we investigate the feasibility of using protein quantification methods to solve the protein inference problem. Protein inference methods aim to determine whether each candidate protein is present in the sample or not. Protein quantification methods estimate the abundance value of each inferred protein. Naturally, the abundance value of an absent protein should be zero. Thus, we argue that the protein inference problem can be viewed as a special protein quantification problem in which one protein is considered to be present if its abundance is not zero. Based on this idea, our paper tries to use three simple protein quantification methods to solve the protein inference problem effectively. The experimental results on six data sets show that these three methods are competitive with previous protein inference algorithms. This demonstrates that it is plausible to model the protein inference problem as a special protein quantification task, which opens the door of devising more effective protein inference algorithms from a quantification perspective. The source codes of our methods are available at: http://code.google.com/p/protein-inference/. PMID:26935399

  1. Interactive intoxicating and ameliorating effects of tannic acid, aluminum (Al3+), copper (Cu2+), and selenate (SeO42-) in wheat roots. A descriptive and mathematical assessment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tannic acids and tannins are polyphenolic compounds produced by plants and are important components of soil and water organic matter. Tannic acids and tannins form complexes with proteins, metals, and soil particulate matter and perform several physiological and ecological functions. The tannic ac...

  2. Consumption of a healthy dietary pattern results in significant reductions in C-reactive protein levels in adults: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Neale, E P; Batterham, M J; Tapsell, L C

    2016-05-01

    Consumption of healthy dietary patterns has been associated with reduced risk of cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome. Dietary intervention targets disease prevention, so studies increasingly use biomarkers of underlying inflammation and metabolic syndrome progression to examine the diet-health relationship. The extent to which these biomarkers contribute to the body of evidence on healthy dietary patterns is unknown. The aim of this meta-analysis was to determine the effect of healthy dietary patterns on biomarkers associated with adiposity, insulin resistance, and inflammation in adults. A systematic search of Scopus, PubMed, Web of Science, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (all years to April 2015) was conducted. Inclusion criteria were randomized controlled trials; effects of dietary patterns assessed on C-reactive protein (CRP), total adiponectin, high-molecular-weight adiponectin, tumor necrosis factor-α, adiponectin:leptin, resistin, or retinol binding protein 4. Random effects meta-analyses were conducted to assess the weighted mean differences in change or final mean values for each outcome. Seventeen studies were included in the review. These reflected research on dietary patterns associated with the Mediterranean diet, Nordic diet, Tibetan diet, and the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension diet. Consumption of a healthy dietary pattern was associated with significant reductions in CRP (weighted mean difference, -0.75 [-1.16, -0.35]; P = .0003). Non-significant changes were found for all other biomarkers. This analysis found evidence for favorable effects of healthy dietary patterns on CRP, with limited evidence for other biomarkers. Future research should include additional randomized controlled trials incorporating a greater range of dietary patterns and biomarkers. PMID:27101757

  3. Night-time consumption of protein or carbohydrate results in increased morning resting energy expenditure in active college-aged men.

    PubMed

    Madzima, Takudzwa A; Panton, Lynn B; Fretti, Sarah K; Kinsey, Amber W; Ormsbee, Michael J

    2014-01-14

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether whey protein (WP), casein protein (CP), carbohydrate (CHO) or a non-energy-containing placebo (PLA) consumed before sleep alters morning appetite and resting energy expenditure (REE) in active men. A total of eleven men (age: 23·6 (sem 1·0) years; body fat: 16·3 (sem 2·5) %) participated in this randomised, double-blind, cross-over study. A single dose of WP (30 g), CP (30 g), CHO (33 g) or PLA was consumed 30 min before sleep, and each trial was separated by 48-72 h. The next morning (05.00-08.00 hours), measurements of satiety, hunger and desire to eat and REE were taken. After a 30 min equilibration period, REE in the supine position was measured for 60 min. An analysis of 10 min mean intervals over the final 50 min of the measurement period was conducted. Statistical analyses were conducted using repeated-measures ANOVA for metabolic variables, and a one-way ANOVA was used for measuring changes in appetite markers. Group differences were examined by Tukey's post hoc analysis. There were no significant differences in appetite measures among the groups. There was a main group effect for REE. The predicted REE was significantly greater after consumption of the WP (8151 (sem 67) kJ/d), CP (8126 (sem 67) kJ/d) and CHO (7988 (sem 67) kJ/d) than after that of the PLA (7716 (sem 67) kJ/d, P <0·0001). There were no significant differences between the WP and CP groups in any metabolic measurements. Night-time consumption of WP, CP or CHO, in the hours close to sleep, elicits favourable effects on the next-morning metabolism when compared with that of a PLA in active young men. PMID:23768612

  4. A single Ala139-to-Glu substitution in the Renibacterium salmoninarum virulence-associated protein p57 results in antigenic variation and is associated with enhanced p57 binding to chinook salmon leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Wiens, Gregory D; Pascho, Ron; Winton, James R

    2002-08-01

    The gram-positive bacterium Renibacterium salmoninarum produces relatively large amounts of a 57-kDa protein (p57) implicated in the pathogenesis of salmonid bacterial kidney disease. Antigenic variation in p57 was identified by using monoclonal antibody 4C11, which exhibited severely decreased binding to R. salmoninarum strain 684 p57 and bound robustly to the p57 proteins of seven other R. salmoninarum strains. This difference in binding was not due to alterations in p57 synthesis, secretion, or bacterial cell association. The molecular basis of the 4C11 epitope loss was determined by amplifying and sequencing the two identical genes encoding p57, msa1 and msa2. The 5' and coding sequences of the 684 msa1 and msa2 genes were identical to those of the ATCC 33209 msa1 and msa2 genes except for a single C-to-A nucleotide mutation. This mutation was identified in both the msa1 and msa2 genes of strain 684 and resulted in an Ala(139)-to-Glu substitution in the amino-terminal region of p57. We examined whether this mutation in p57 altered salmonid leukocyte and rabbit erythrocyte binding activities. R. salmoninarum strain 684 extracellular protein exhibited a twofold increase in agglutinating activity for chinook salmon leukocytes and rabbit erythrocytes compared to the activity of the ATCC 33209 extracellular protein. A specific and quantitative p57 binding assay confirmed the increased binding activity of 684 p57. Monoclonal antibody 4C11 blocked the agglutinating activity of the ATCC 33209 extracellular protein but not the agglutinating activity of the 684 extracellular protein. These results indicate that the Ala139-to-Glu substitution altered immune recognition and was associated with enhanced biological activity of R. salmoninarum 684 p57. PMID:12147498

  5. A Single Ala139-to-Glu Substitution in the Renibacterium salmoninarum Virulence-Associated Protein p57 Results in Antigenic Variation and Is Associated with Enhanced p57 Binding to Chinook Salmon Leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wiens, Gregory D.; Pascho, Ron; Winton, James R.

    2002-01-01

    The gram-positive bacterium Renibacterium salmoninarum produces relatively large amounts of a 57-kDa protein (p57) implicated in the pathogenesis of salmonid bacterial kidney disease. Antigenic variation in p57 was identified by using monoclonal antibody 4C11, which exhibited severely decreased binding to R. salmoninarum strain 684 p57 and bound robustly to the p57 proteins of seven other R. salmoninarum strains. This difference in binding was not due to alterations in p57 synthesis, secretion, or bacterial cell association. The molecular basis of the 4C11 epitope loss was determined by amplifying and sequencing the two identical genes encoding p57, msa1 and msa2. The 5′ and coding sequences of the 684 msa1 and msa2 genes were identical to those of the ATCC 33209 msa1 and msa2 genes except for a single C-to-A nucleotide mutation. This mutation was identified in both the msa1 and msa2 genes of strain 684 and resulted in an Ala139-to-Glu substitution in the amino-terminal region of p57. We examined whether this mutation in p57 altered salmonid leukocyte and rabbit erythrocyte binding activities. R. salmoninarum strain 684 extracellular protein exhibited a twofold increase in agglutinating activity for chinook salmon leukocytes and rabbit erythrocytes compared to the activity of the ATCC 33209 extracellular protein. A specific and quantitative p57 binding assay confirmed the increased binding activity of 684 p57. Monoclonal antibody 4C11 blocked the agglutinating activity of the ATCC 33209 extracellular protein but not the agglutinating activity of the 684 extracellular protein. These results indicate that the Ala139-to-Glu substitution altered immune recognition and was associated with enhanced biological activity of R. salmoninarum 684 p57. PMID:12147498

  6. Targeted disruption of the M(r) 46,000 mannose 6-phosphate receptor gene in mice results in misrouting of lysosomal proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Köster, A; Saftig, P; Matzner, U; von Figura, K; Peters, C; Pohlmann, R

    1993-01-01

    Lysosomal enzymes containing mannose 6-phosphate recognition markers are sorted to lysosomes by mannose 6-phosphate receptors (MPRs). The physiological importance of this targeting mechanism is illustrated by I-cell disease, a fatal lysosomal storage disorder caused by the absence of mannose 6-phosphate residues in lysosomal enzymes. Most mammalian cells express two MPRs. Although the binding specificities, subcellular distribution and expression pattern of the two receptors can be differentiated, their coexpression is not understood. The larger of the two receptors with an M(r) of approximately 300,000 (MPR300), which also binds IGFII, appears to have a dominant role in lysosomal enzyme targeting, while the function of the smaller receptor with an M(r) of 46,000 (MPR46) is less clear. To investigate the in vivo function of the MPR46, we generated MPR46-deficient mice using gene targeting in embryonic stem cells. Reduced intracellular retention of newly synthesized lysosomal proteins in cells from MPR46 -/- mice demonstrated an essential sorting function of MPR46. The phenotype of MPR46 -/- mice was normal, indicating mechanisms that compensate the MPR46 deficiency in vivo. Images PMID:8262064

  7. Programmed necrosis induced by asbestos in human mesothelial cells causes high-mobility group box 1 protein release and resultant inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Haining; Rivera, Zeyana; Jube, Sandro; Nasu, Masaki; Bertino, Pietro; Goparaju, Chandra; Franzoso, Guido; Lotze, Michael T.; Krausz, Thomas; Pass, Harvey I.; Bianchi, Marco E.; Carbone, Michele

    2010-01-01

    Asbestos carcinogenesis has been linked to the release of cytokines and mutagenic reactive oxygen species (ROS) from inflammatory cells. Asbestos is cytotoxic to human mesothelial cells (HM), which appears counterintuitive for a carcinogen. We show that asbestos-induced HM cell death is a regulated form of necrosis that links to carcinogenesis. Asbestos-exposed HM activate poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, secrete H2O2, deplete ATP, and translocate high-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, and into the extracellular space. The release of HMGB1 induces macrophages to secrete TNF-α, which protects HM from asbestos-induced cell death and triggers a chronic inflammatory response; both favor HM transformation. In both mice and hamsters injected with asbestos, HMGB1 was specifically detected in the nuclei, cytoplasm, and extracellular space of mesothelial and inflammatory cells around asbestos deposits. TNF-α was coexpressed in the same areas. HMGB1 levels in asbestos-exposed individuals were significantly higher than in nonexposed controls (P < 0.0001). Our findings identify the release of HMGB1 as a critical initial step in the pathogenesis of asbestos-related disease, and provide mechanistic links between asbestos-induced cell death, chronic inflammation, and carcinogenesis. Chemopreventive approaches aimed at inhibiting the chronic inflammatory response, and especially blocking HMGB1, may decrease the risk of malignant mesothelioma among asbestos-exposed cohorts. PMID:20616036

  8. Placental amino acid transport may be regulated by maternal vitamin D and vitamin D-binding protein: results from the Southampton Women's Survey.

    PubMed

    Cleal, J K; Day, P E; Simner, C L; Barton, S J; Mahon, P A; Inskip, H M; Godfrey, K M; Hanson, M A; Cooper, C; Lewis, R M; Harvey, N C

    2015-06-28

    Both maternal 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations during pregnancy and placental amino acid transporter gene expression have been associated with development of the offspring in terms of body composition and bone structure. Several amino acid transporter genes have vitamin D response elements in their promoters suggesting the possible linkage of these two mechanisms. We aimed to establish whether maternal 25(OH)D and vitamin D-binding protein (VDBP) levels relate to expression of placental amino acid transporters. RNA was extracted from 102 placental samples collected in the Southampton Women's Survey, and gene expression was analysed using quantitative real-time PCR. Gene expression data were normalised to the geometric mean of three housekeeping genes, and related to maternal factors and childhood body composition. Maternal serum 25(OH)D and VDBP levels were measured by radioimmunoassay. Maternal 25(OH)D and VDBP levels were positively associated with placental expression of specific genes involved in amino acid transport. Maternal 25(OH)D and VDBP concentrations were correlated with the expression of specific placental amino acid transporters, and thus may be involved in the regulation of amino acid transfer to the fetus. The positive correlation of VDBP levels and placental transporter expression suggests that delivery of vitamin D to the placenta may be important. This exploratory study identifies placental amino acid transporters which may be altered in response to modifiable maternal factors and provides a basis for further studies. PMID:25940599

  9. Prognostic role of serum concentrations of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer: results from the ITACa trial.

    PubMed

    Casadei Gardini, Andrea; Carloni, Silvia; Scarpi, Emanuela; Maltoni, Paolo; Dorizzi, Romolo M; Passardi, Alessandro; Frassineti, Giovanni Luca; Cortesi, Pietro; Giannini, Maria Benedetta; Marisi, Giorgia; Amadori, Dino; Lucchesi, Alessandro

    2016-03-01

    Serum levels of C-reactive protein are (CRP) higher in patients with neoplastic conditions and numerous studies have been performed to clarify the etiologic and prognostic role of the high-sensitivity CRP (hs-CRP) in cancer. Our study was conducted on patients enrolled in the prospective randomized "Italian Trial in Advanced Colorectal Cancer (ITACa)" to assess hs-CRP levels and their impact on overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS). Serum samples from 132 ITACa patients were collected at baseline and 2 months after starting first-line chemotherapy. The supernatant was immediately transferred to cryovials and stored at -80°C. After thawing, hs-CRP was measured with the Cobas c501 analyzer. High levels of hs-CRP (≥ 13.1 mg/L) were associated with poorer median PFS (p < 0.0001) and OS (p < 0.0001) than low hs-CRP levels (< 13.1 mg/L). hs-CRP values in 107 patients were evaluated again after 2 months of therapy, revealing that patients with low hs-CRP levels in both baseline and second serum samples had the best median PFS and OS. Our study confirms the prognostic value of hs-CRP in patients with metastatic colorectal carcinoma. PMID:26848624

  10. Prognostic role of serum concentrations of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer: results from the ITACa trial

    PubMed Central

    Scarpi, Emanuela; Maltoni, Paolo; Dorizzi, Romolo M.; Passardi, Alessandro; Frassineti, Giovanni Luca; Cortesi, Pietro; Giannini, Maria Benedetta; Marisi, Giorgia; Amadori, Dino; Lucchesi, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Serum levels of C-reactive protein are (CRP) higher in patients with neoplastic conditions and numerous studies have been performed to clarify the etiologic and prognostic role of the high-sensitivity CRP (hs-CRP) in cancer. Our study was conducted on patients enrolled in the prospective randomized “Italian Trial in Advanced Colorectal Cancer (ITACa)” to assess hs-CRP levels and their impact on overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS). Serum samples from 132 ITACa patients were collected at baseline and 2 months after starting first-line chemotherapy. The supernatant was immediately transferred to cryovials and stored at −80°C. After thawing, hs-CRP was measured with the Cobas c501 analyzer. High levels of hs-CRP (≥ 13.1 mg/L) were associated with poorer median PFS (p < 0.0001) and OS (p < 0.0001) than low hs-CRP levels (< 13.1 mg/L). hs-CRP values in 107 patients were evaluated again after 2 months of therapy, revealing that patients with low hs-CRP levels in both baseline and second serum samples had the best median PFS and OS. Our study confirms the prognostic value of hs-CRP in patients with metastatic colorectal carcinoma. PMID:26848624

  11. The common missense mutation D489N in TRIM32 causing limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2H leads to loss of the mutated protein in knock-in mice resulting in a Trim32-null phenotype.

    PubMed

    Kudryashova, Elena; Struyk, Arie; Mokhonova, Ekaterina; Cannon, Stephen C; Spencer, Melissa J

    2011-10-15

    Mutations in tripartite motif protein 32 (TRIM32) are responsible for several hereditary disorders that include limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2H (LGMD2H), sarcotubular myopathy (STM) and Bardet Biedl syndrome. Most LGMD2H mutations in TRIM32 are clustered in the NHL β-propeller domain at the C-terminus and are predicted to interfere with homodimerization. To get insight into TRIM32's role in the pathogenesis of LGMD2H and to create an accurate model of disease, we have generated a knock-in mouse (T32KI) carrying the c.1465G > A (p.D489N) mutation in murine Trim32 corresponding to the human LGMD2H/STM pathogenic mutation c.1459G > A (p.D487N). Our data indicate that T32KI mice have both a myopathic and a neurogenic phenotype, very similar to the one described in the Trim32-null mice that we created previously. Analysis of Trim32 gene expression in T32KI mice revealed normal mRNA levels, but a severe reduction in mutant TRIM32 (D489N) at the protein level. Our results suggest that the D489N pathogenic mutation destabilizes the protein, leading to its degradation, and results in the same mild myopathic and neurogenic phenotype as that found in Trim32-null mice. Thus, one potential mechanism of LGMD2H might be destabilization of mutated TRIM32 protein leading to a null phenotype. PMID:21775502

  12. A single amino acid change resulting in loss of fluorescence of eGFP in a viral fusion protein confers fitness and growth advantage to the recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus

    SciTech Connect

    Dinh, Phat X.; Panda, Debasis; Das, Phani B.; Das, Subash C.; Das, Anshuman; Pattnaik, Asit K.

    2012-10-25

    Using a recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus encoding eGFP fused in-frame with an essential viral replication protein, the phosphoprotein P, we show that during passage in culture, the virus mutates the nucleotide C289 within eGFP of the fusion protein PeGFP to A or T, resulting in R97S/C amino acid substitution and loss of fluorescence. The resultant non-fluorescent virus exhibits increased fitness and growth advantage over its fluorescent counterpart. The growth advantage of the non-fluorescent virus appears to be due to increased transcription and replication activities of the PeGFP protein carrying the R97S/C substitution. Further, our results show that the R97S/C mutation occurs prior to accumulation of mutations that can result in loss of expression of the gene inserted at the G-L gene junction. These results suggest that fitness gain is more important for the recombinant virus than elimination of expression of the heterologous gene.

  13. The combination of oligo- and polysaccharides and reticulated protein for the control of symptoms in patients with irritable bowel syndrome: Results of a randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind, parallel group, multicentre clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Alexea, Octavian; Bacarea, Vlad

    2015-01-01

    Background A medical device containing the film-forming agent reticulated protein and a prebiotic mixture of vegetable oligo- and polysaccharides has been developed, recently receiving European approval as MED class III for the treatment of chronic/functional or recidivant diarrhoea due to different causes including irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). In the present paper, we evaluate a protein preparation containing these components in comparison with placebo in adult patients with diarrhoea-predominant IBS. Methods In a randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind, parallel group, multicentre clinical trial, patients were randomly assigned to receive the combination of oligo- and polysaccharides and reticulated protein and placebo (four oral tablets/day for 56 days). Demographic, clinical and quality of life characteristics and presence and intensity of abdominal pain and flatulence (seven-point Likert scale) were assessed at three study visits (baseline and at 28 and 56 days). Stool emissions were recorded on the diary card using the seven-point Bristol Stool Scale. Results A total of 128 patients were randomised to receive either tablets containing the combination (n = 63) or placebo (n = 65). Treatment with oligo- and polysaccharides and reticulated protein was safe and well tolerated. A significant improvement in symptoms across the study was observed in patients treated with oligo- and polysaccharides and reticulated protein between visit 2 and visit 3 in abdominal pain (p = 0.0167) and flatulence (p = 0.0373). We also detected a statistically significant increase in the quality of life of patients receiving the active treatment from baseline to visit 3 (p < 0.0001). Conclusions Treatment with oligo- and polysaccharides and reticulated protein is safe, improving IBS symptoms and quality of life of patients with diarrhoea-predominant IBS. PMID:27403313

  14. Vaccination with a Fusion Protein That Introduces HIV-1 Gag Antigen into a Multitrimer CD40L Construct Results in Enhanced CD8+ T Cell Responses and Protection from Viral Challenge by Vaccinia-Gag

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sachin; Termini, James M.; Raffa, Francesca N.; Williams, Cindi-Ann; Kornbluth, Richard S.

    2014-01-01

    CD40 ligand (CD40L, CD154) is a membrane protein that is important for the activation of dendritic cells (DCs) and DC-induced CD8+ T cell responses. To be active, CD40L must cluster CD40 receptors on responding cells. To produce a soluble form of CD40L that clusters CD40 receptors necessitates the use of a multitrimer construct. With this in mind, a tripartite fusion protein was made from surfactant protein D (SPD), HIV-1 Gag as a test antigen, and CD40L, where SPD serves as a scaffold for the multitrimer protein complex. This SPD-Gag-CD40L protein activated CD40-bearing cells and bone marrow-derived DCs in vitro. Compared to a plasmid for Gag antigen alone (pGag), DNA vaccination of mice with pSPD-Gag-CD40L induced an increased number of Gag-specific CD8+ T cells with increased avidity for major histocompatibility complex class I-restricted Gag peptide and improved vaccine-induced protection from challenge by vaccinia-Gag virus. The importance of the multitrimeric nature of the complex was shown using a plasmid lacking the N terminus of SPD that produced a single trimer fusion protein. This plasmid, pTrimer-Gag-CD40L, was only weakly active on CD40-bearing cells and did not elicit strong CD8+ T cell responses or improve protection from vaccinia-Gag challenge. An adenovirus 5 (Ad5) vaccine incorporating SPD-Gag-CD40L was much stronger than Ad5 expressing Gag alone (Ad5-Gag) and induced complete protection (i.e., sterilizing immunity) from vaccinia-Gag challenge. Overall, these results show the potential of a new vaccine design in which antigen is introduced into a construct that expresses a multitrimer soluble form of CD40L, leading to strongly protective CD8+ T cell responses. PMID:24227853

  15. Lack of CD47 impairs bone cell differentiation and results in an osteopenic phenotype in vivo due to impaired signal regulatory protein α (SIRPα) signaling.

    PubMed

    Koskinen, Cecilia; Persson, Emelie; Baldock, Paul; Stenberg, Åsa; Boström, Ingrid; Matozaki, Takashi; Oldenborg, Per-Arne; Lundberg, Pernilla

    2013-10-11

    Here, we investigated whether the cell surface glycoprotein CD47 was required for normal formation of osteoblasts and osteoclasts and to maintain normal bone formation activity in vitro and in vivo. In parathyroid hormone or 1α,25(OH)2-vitamin D3 (D3)-stimulated bone marrow cultures (BMC) from CD47(-/-) mice, we found a strongly reduced formation of multinuclear tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)(+) osteoclasts, associated with reduced expression of osteoclastogenic genes (nfatc1, Oscar, Trap/Acp, ctr, catK, and dc-stamp). The production of M-CSF and RANKL (receptor activator of nuclear factor κβ ligand) was reduced in CD47(-/-) BMC, as compared with CD47(+/+) BMC. The stromal cell phenotype in CD47(-/-) BMC involved a blunted expression of the osteoblast-associated genes osterix, Alp/Akp1, and α-1-collagen, and reduced mineral deposition, as compared with that in CD47(+/+) BMC. CD47 is a ligand for SIRPα (signal regulatory protein α), which showed strongly reduced tyrosine phosphorylation in CD47(-/-) bone marrow stromal cells. In addition, stromal cells lacking the signaling SIRPα cytoplasmic domain also had a defect in osteogenic differentiation, and both CD47(-/-) and non-signaling SIRPα mutant stromal cells showed a markedly reduced ability to support osteoclastogenesis in wild-type bone marrow macrophages, demonstrating that CD47-induced SIRPα signaling is critical for stromal cell support of osteoclast formation. In vivo, femoral bones of 18- or 28-week-old CD47(-/-) mice showed significantly reduced osteoclast and osteoblast numbers and exhibited an osteopenic bone phenotype. In conclusion, lack of CD47 strongly impairs SIRPα-dependent osteoblast differentiation, deteriorate bone formation, and cause reduced formation of osteoclasts. PMID:23990469

  16. A bivalent Neisseria meningitidis recombinant lipidated factor H binding protein vaccine in young adults: results of a randomised, controlled, dose-escalation phase 1 trial.

    PubMed

    Richmond, P C; Nissen, M D; Marshall, H S; Lambert, S B; Roberton, D; Gruber, W C; Jones, T R; Arora, A

    2012-09-21

    Neisseria meningitidis is a leading cause of meningitis and septicaemia, but a broadly-protective vaccine against endemic serogroup B disease is not licensed and available. The conserved, outer-membrane lipoprotein factor H binding protein (fHBP, also known as LP2086) is expressed as one of two subfamily variants in virtually all meningococci. This study investigated the safety, tolerability, and immunogenicity of a recombinant-expressed bivalent fHBP (r-fHBP) vaccine in healthy adults. Participants (N=103) aged 18-25 years were recruited into three ascending dose level cohorts of 20, 60, and 200μg of a bivalent r-fHBP vaccine formulation and randomised to receive vaccine or placebo at 0, 1, and 6 months. The vaccine was well tolerated. Geometric mean titres (GMTs) for r-fHBP subfamily-specific IgG antibodies increased 19-168-fold from pre-vaccination to post-dose 2 in a dose level-dependent manner. In addition, robust serum bactericidal assay using human complement (hSBA) responses for strains expressing both homologous and heterologous fHBP variants were observed. After three vaccinations, 16-52% of the placebo group and 47-90%, 75-100%, and 88-100%, of the 20, 60, and 200μg dose levels, respectively, had seroprotective (≥ 1:4) hSBA titres against six serogroup B strains. The bivalent r-fHBP vaccine was well tolerated and induced robust bactericidal activity against six diverse serogroup B strains in young adults at the 60 and 200μg dose levels. PMID:22871351

  17. A 10-minute point-of-care assay for detection of blood protein adducts resulting from low level exposure to organophosphate nerve agents.

    PubMed

    VanDine, Robert; Babu, Uma Mahesh; Condon, Peter; Mendez, Arlene; Sambursky, Robert

    2013-03-25

    The OrganoTox test is a rapid, point-of-care assay capable of detecting clinically relevant organophosphate (OP) poisoning after low-level exposure to sarin, soman, tabun, or VX chemical nerve agents. The test utilizes either a finger stick peripheral blood sample or plasma specimen. While high-level nerve agent exposure can quickly lead to death, low-level exposure produces vague, nondescript signs and symptoms that are not easily clinically differentiated from other conditions. In initial testing, the OrganoTox test was used to detect the presence of blood protein-nerve agent adducts in exposed blood samples. In order to mimic the in vivo exposure as closely as possible, nerve agents stored in organic solvents were spiked in minute quantities into whole blood samples. For performance testing, 40 plasma samples were spiked with sarin, soman, tabun, or VX and 10 normal plasma samples were used as the negative control. The 40 nerve agent-spiked plasma samples included 10 replicates of each agent. At the clinically relevant low-level exposure of 10 ng/ml, the OrganoTox test demonstrated 100% sensitivity for soman, tabun, and VX and 80% sensitivity for sarin. The OrganoTox test demonstrated greater than 97% specificity with 150 blood samples obtained from healthy adults. No cross-reactivity or interference from pesticide precursor compounds was found. A rapid test for nerve agent exposure will help identify affected patients earlier in the clinical course and trigger more appropriate medical management in a more timely manner. PMID:23200942

  18. Association of the herpes simplex virus type 1 Us11 gene product with the cellular kinesin light-chain-related protein PAT1 results in the redistribution of both polypeptides.

    PubMed

    Benboudjema, Louisa; Mulvey, Matthew; Gao, Yuehua; Pimplikar, Sanjay W; Mohr, Ian

    2003-09-01

    The herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) Us11 gene encodes a multifunctional double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-binding protein that is expressed late in infection and packaged into the tegument layer of the virus particle. As a tegument component, Us11 associates with nascent capsids after its synthesis late in the infectious cycle and is delivered into newly infected cells at times prior to the expression of viral genes. Us11 is also an abundant late protein that regulates translation through its association with host components and contains overlapping nucleolar retention and nuclear export signals, allowing its accumulation in both nucleoli and the cytosol. Thus, at various times during the viral life cycle and in different intracellular compartments, Us11 has the potential to execute discrete tasks. The analysis of these functions, however, is complicated by the fact that Us11 is not essential for viral replication in cultured cells. To discover new host targets for the Us11 protein, we searched for cellular proteins that interact with Us11 and have identified PAT1 as a Us11-binding protein according to multiple, independent experimental criteria. PAT1 binds microtubules, participates in amyloid precursor protein trafficking, and has homology to the kinesin light chain (KLC) in its carboxyl terminus. The carboxyl-terminal dsRNA-binding domain of Us11, which also contains the nucleolar retention and nuclear export signals, binds PAT1, whereas 149 residues derived from the KLC homology region of PAT1 are important for binding to Us11. Both PAT1 and Us11 colocalize within a perinuclear area in transiently transfected and HSV-1-infected cells. The 149 amino acids derived from the KLC homology region are required for colocalization of the two polypeptides. Furthermore, although PAT1 normally accumulates in the nuclear compartment, Us11 expression results in the exclusion of PAT1 from the nucleus and its accumulation in the perinuclear space. Similarly, Us11 does not

  19. Interfacing protein lysine acetylation and protein phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Hue T.; Uhrig, R. Glen; Nimick, Mhairi; Moorhead, Greg B.

    2012-01-01

    Recognition that different protein covalent modifications can operate in concert to regulate a single protein has forced us to re-think the relationship between amino acid side chain modifications and protein function. Results presented by Tran et al. 2012 demonstrate the association of a protein phosphatase (PP2A) with a histone/lysine deacetylase (HDA14) on plant microtubules along with a histone/lysine acetyltransferase (ELP3). This finding reveals a regulatory interface between two prevalent covalent protein modifications, protein phosphorylation and acetylation, emphasizing the integrated complexity of post-translational protein regulation found in nature. PMID:22827947

  20. Reduced glutathione disrupts the intracellular trafficking of tyrosinase and tyrosinase-related protein-1 but not dopachrome tautomerase and Pmel17 to melanosomes, which results in the attenuation of melanization.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Hiroaki; Nagata, Takeshi; Koga, Shihiro; Imokawa, Genji

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported that treatment of B16 melanotic melanoma cells with reduced glutathione (GSH) converts them to amelanotic cells without any significant down-regulation of tyrosinase activity. To characterize the cellular mechanism(s) involved, we determined the intracellular distribution of melanocyte-specific proteins, especially in melanin synthesis-specific organelles, termed melanosomes by subcellular fractionation followed by Western blotting and confocal laser microscopy (CFLM). In the melanosome-rich large granule fraction and in highly purified melanosome fractions, while GSH-induced amelanotic B16 cells have significantly diminished levels of protein/activity of tyrosinase and tyrosinase-related protein-1 compared with control melanized B16 cells, there was substantially no difference in the distribution and levels of dopachrome tautomerase and the processed isoform of Pmel17 (HMB45) between control melanized and GSH-induced amelanotic B16 cells. Analysis of merged images obtained by CFLM revealed that whereas tyrosinase, Pmel17 and dopachrome tautomerase colocalize with each other in the control melanized B16 cells, tyrosinase does not colocalize with Pmel17 or its processed isoform and with dopachrome tautomerase in GSH-induced amelanotic B16 cells. The sum of these findings suggests that reduced glutathione selectively disrupts the intracellular trafficking of tyrosinase and tyrosinase-related protein-1 but not dopachrome tautomerase and Pmel17 to melanosomes, which results in the attenuation of melanization, probably serving as a putative model for oculocutaneous albinism type 4. PMID:23764898

  1. Attribution of the discrepancy between ELISA and LC-MS/MS assay results of a PEGylated scaffold protein in post-dose monkey plasma samples due to the presence of anti-drug antibodies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shujie J; Wu, Steven T; Gokemeijer, Jochem; Fura, Aberra; Krishna, Murli; Morin, Paul; Chen, Guodong; Price, Karen; Wang-Iverson, David; Olah, Timothy; Weiner, Russell; Tymiak, Adrienne; Jemal, Mohammed

    2012-01-01

    High-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) methods were developed for the quantification of a PEGylated scaffold protein drug in monkey plasma samples. The LC-MS/MS method was based on the extraction of the therapeutic protein with a water-miscible organic solvent and the subsequent trypsin digestion of the extract followed by the detection of a surrogate peptide. The assay was linear over a range of 10-3,000 ng/mL. The ELISA method utilized a therapeutic target-binding format in which the recombinant target antigen was used to capture the drug in the sample, followed by detection with an anti-PEG monoclonal antibody. The assay range was 30-2,000 ng/mL. A correlation study between the two methods was performed by measuring the drug concentrations in plasma samples from a single-dose pharmacokinetic (PK) study in cynomolgus monkeys following a 5-mg/kg subcutaneous administration (n = 4). In the early time points of the PK profile, the drug concentrations obtained by the LC-MS/MS method agreed very well with those obtained by the ELISA method. However, at later time points, the drug concentrations measured by the LC-MS/MS method were consistently higher than those measured by the ELISA method. The PK parameters calculated based on the concentration data showed that the two methods gave equivalent peak exposure (C(max)) at 24-48 h. However, the LC-MS/MS results exhibited about 1.53-fold higher total exposure (AUC(tot)) than the ELISA results. The discrepancy between the LC-MS/MS and ELISA results was investigated by conducting immunogenicity testing, anti-drug antibody (ADA) epitope mapping, and Western blot analysis of the drug concentrations coupled with Protein G separation. The results demonstrated the presence of ADA specific to the engineered antigen-binding region of the scaffold protein drug that interfered with the ability of the drug to bind to the target antigen used in the ELISA

  2. Human recombinant neutralizing antibodies against hantaan virus G2 protein.

    PubMed

    Koch, Joachim; Liang, Mifang; Queitsch, Iris; Kraus, Annette A; Bautz, Ekkehard K F

    2003-03-30

    Old world hantaviruses, causing hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS), still present a public health problem in Asia and Eastern Europe. The majority of cases has been recorded in China. The aim of our study was to generate human recombinant neutralizing antibodies to a hantavirus by phage display technology. To preserve the structural identity of viral protein, the panning procedure was performed on native Hantaan (HTN) (76-118) virus propagated in Vero-E6 cells. In total, five complete human recombinant IgG antibodies were produced in a baculovirus expression system. All of them were able to completely neutralize HTN, and Seoul (SEO) virus in a plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT). Three of these antibodies could also completely neutralize Dobrava (DOB) virus but not Puumala (PUU) virus. All antibodies bind to Hantaan virus G2 protein localized in the virus envelope. The sequence areas within the HTN (76-118)-G2 protein detected by five selected antibodies were mapped using peptide scans. Two partial epitopes, 916-KVMATIDSF-924 and 954-LVTKDIDFD-963, were recognized, which presumably are of paramount importance for docking of the virus to host cell receptors. A consensus motif 916-KVXATIXSF-924 could be identified by mutational analysis. The neutralizing antibodies to the most widely distributed hantaviruses causing HFRS might be promising candidates for the development of an agent for prevention and treatment of HFRS in patients. PMID:12706090

  3. Thermodynamic model for the solubility of BaSeO4(cr) in the aqueous Ba2+-SeO42--Na+-H+-OH--H2O system: Extending to high selenate concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Rai, Dhanpat; Felmy, Andrew R.; Moore, Dean A.; Kitamura, Akira; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Doi, Reisuke; Yoshida, Yasushi

    2014-09-15

    The solubility of Ba(SeO4, SO4) precipitates was determined as a function of the BaSeO4 mole fractions, ranging from 0.0015 to 0.3830, and time with an equilibration period extending to as long as 302 days. Equilibrium/steady state conditions in this system are reached in ≤ 65 days. Pitzer’s ion interaction model was used to calculate solid and aqueous phase activity coefficients. Thermodynamic analyses showed that the data do not satisfy Gibbs-Duhem equation, thereby demonstrating that a single-solid solution phase does not control both the selenate and sulfate concentrations. Our extensive data with log10 [Ba]) ranging from -3.6 to -5.9 mol.kg-1, log10 [SeO4]) ranging from -3.6 to -5.2 mol.kg-1, and log10 [SO4] ranging from -4.0 to -5.3 mol.kg-1 can be explained with the formation of an ideal BaSeO4 solid solution phase that controls the selenium concentrations and a slightly disordered/less-crystalline BaSO4(s) (log10 K0sp = -9.5 instead of -10.05 for barite) that controls the sulfate concentrations. In these experiments the BaSO4 component of the solid solution phase never reaches thermodynamic equilibrium with the aqueous phase. Thermodynamic interpretations of the data show that both the ideal BaSeO4 solid solution phase and less-crystalline BaSO4(s) phase are in equilibrium with each other in the entire range of BaSeO4 mole fractions investigated in this study.

  4. A Marine Protein-based Dietary Supplement for Subclinical Hair Thinning/Loss: Results of a Multisite, Double-blind, Placebo-controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Rizer, Ronald L; Stephens, Thomas J; Herndon, James H; Sperber, Brian R; Murphy, James; Ablon, Glynis R

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Since skin and hair quality are potent vitality signals, and hair growth deficiency can cause significant psychological morbidity. In addition to clearly-defined hair loss disorders, milder forms of hair thinning or hair loss appear to be increasingly common, with a suggestion that sub-optimal diets and stressful lifestyles may be involved. Methods: Here we assess the value of a dietary marine-extract based dietary supplement in premenopausal women with subclinical hair thinning or hair loss conditions. This multi-site, randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial was conducted with impact on hair shedding rate and hair fiber diameter (assessed by phototrichogram) as primary end points upon consumption of the oral supplement compared to a placebo. A total of 96 eligible female subjects were enrolled aged 21–55 years of age from Asian, Caucasian, and Hispanic ethnic backgrounds. Results: This study showed that hair shedding was significantly reduced in the first 3–6 months of daily consumption of the oral supplement. Moreover, phototrichogram image analysis revealed a statistically significant increase in the mean vellus-like hair diameter after 6 months of supplement consumption, when compared to the mean vellus-like hair diameters measured at baseline. Discussion: These results support the view that a nutritional supplement approach may be useful for women in this age group to deal with subclinical hair thinning or hair loss conditions, and those components of this marine extract-based oral supplement may be a useful adjunct. PMID:26903744

  5. A single Alal 39-to-Glu substitution in the Renibacterium salmoninarum virulence-associated protein p57 results in antigenic variation and is associated with enhanced p57 binding to Chinook salmon leukocytes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiens, Gregory D.; Pascho, Ron; Winton, James R.

    2002-01-01

    The gram-positive bacterium Renibacterium salmoninarum produces relatively large amounts of a 57-kDa protein (p57) implicated in the pathogenesis of salmonid bacterial kidney disease. Antigenic variation in p57 was identified by using monoclonal antibody 4C11, which exhibited severely decreased binding to R. salmoninarum strain 684 p57 and bound robustly to the p57 proteins of seven other R. salmoninarum strains. This difference in binding was not due to alterations in p57 synthesis, secretion, or bacterial cell association. The molecular basis of the 4C11 epitope loss was determined by amplifying and sequencing the two identical genes encoding p57, msa1 and msa2. The 5′ and coding sequences of the 684 msa1 and msa2 genes were identical to those of the ATCC 33209 msa1and msa2 genes except for a single C-to-A nucleotide mutation. This mutation was identified in both the msa1 and msa2 genes of strain 684 and resulted in an Ala139-to-Glu substitution in the amino-terminal region of p57. We examined whether this mutation in p57 altered salmonid leukocyte and rabbit erythrocyte binding activities. R. salmoninarum strain 684 extracellular protein exhibited a twofold increase in agglutinating activity for chinook salmon leukocytes and rabbit erythrocytes compared to the activity of the ATCC 33209 extracellular protein. A specific and quantitative p57 binding assay confirmed the increased binding activity of 684 p57. Monoclonal antibody 4C11 blocked the agglutinating activity of the ATCC 33209 extracellular protein but not the agglutinating activity of the 684 extracellular protein. These results indicate that the Ala139-to-Glu substitution altered immune recognition and was associated with enhanced biological activity of R. salmoninarum 684 p57.

  6. Structure−Activity Relationships in Peptide Modulators of β-Amyloid Protein Aggregation: Variation in α,α-Disubstitution Results in Altered Aggregate Size and Morphology

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Neuronal cytotoxicity observed in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is linked to the aggregation of β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) into toxic forms. Increasing evidence points to oligomeric materials as the neurotoxic species, not Aβ fibrils; disruption or inhibition of Aβ self-assembly into oligomeric or fibrillar forms remains a viable therapeutic strategy to reduce Aβ neurotoxicity. We describe the synthesis and characterization of amyloid aggregation mitigating peptides (AAMPs) whose structure is based on the Aβ “hydrophobic core” Aβ17−20, with α,α-disubstituted amino acids (ααAAs) added into this core as potential disrupting agents of fibril self-assembly. The number, positional distribution, and side-chain functionality of ααAAs incorporated into the AAMP sequence were found to influence the resultant aggregate morphology as indicated by ex situ experiments using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). For instance, AAMP-5, incorporating a sterically hindered ααAA with a diisobutyl side chain in the core sequence, disrupted Aβ1−40 fibril formation. However, AAMP-6, with a less sterically hindered ααAA with a dipropyl side chain, altered fibril morphology, producing shorter and larger sized fibrils (compared with those of Aβ1−40). Remarkably, ααAA-AAMPs caused disassembly of existing Aβ fibrils to produce either spherical aggregates or protofibrillar structures, suggesting the existence of equilibrium between fibrils and prefibrillar structures. PMID:22778850

  7. Impact of adjuvants on CD4(+) T cell and B cell responses to a protein antigen vaccine: Results from a phase II, randomized, multicenter trial.

    PubMed

    Leroux-Roels, Geert; Marchant, Arnaud; Levy, Jack; Van Damme, Pierre; Schwarz, Tino F; Horsmans, Yves; Jilg, Wolfgang; Kremsner, Peter G; Haelterman, Edwige; Clément, Frédéric; Gabor, Julian J; Esen, Meral; Hens, Annick; Carletti, Isabelle; Fissette, Laurence; Tavares Da Silva, Fernanda; Burny, Wivine; Janssens, Michel; Moris, Philippe; Didierlaurent, Arnaud M; Van Der Most, Robbert; Garçon, Nathalie; Van Belle, Pascale; Van Mechelen, Marcelle

    2016-08-01

    Immunogenicity and safety of different adjuvants combined with a model antigen (HBsAg) were compared. Healthy HBV-naïve adults were randomized to receive HBs adjuvanted with alum or Adjuvant Systems AS01B, AS01E, AS03A or AS04 at Days 0 and 30. Different frequencies of HBs-specific CD4+ T cells 14days post dose 2 but similar polyfunctionality profiles were induced by the different adjuvants with frequencies significantly higher in the AS01B and AS01E groups than in the other groups. Antibody concentrations 30days post-dose 2 were significantly higher in AS01B, AS01E and AS03A than in other groups. Limited correlations were observed between HBs-specific CD4+ T cell and antibody responses. Injection site pain was the most common solicited local symptom and was more frequent in AS groups than in alum group. Different adjuvants formulated with the same antigen induced different adaptive immune responses and reactogenicity patterns in healthy naïve adults. The results summary for this study (GSK study number 112115 - NCT# NCT00805389) is available on the GSK Clinical Study Register and can be accessed at www.gsk-clinicalstudyregister.com. PMID:27236001

  8. Reduced β-lactoglobulin IgE binding upon in vitro digestion as a result of the interaction of the protein with casein glycomacropeptide.

    PubMed

    Martinez, María J; Martos, Gustavo; Molina, Elena; Pilosof, Ana M R

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of the presence of casein glycomacropeptide (CMP) on the in vitro digestibility and potential allergenicity of β-lactoglobulin (β-lg)-CMP mixtures. The digestion products were analyzed by RP-HPLC and RP-HPLC-ESI-MS/MS. The potential allergenicity of the digestion products was studied by human IgE binding by inhibition ELISA with serum samples from children with clinical allergic symptoms to β-lg. No differences were observed by HPLC in the mixtures hydrolysates due to CMP-β-lg interactions. RP-HPLC-ESI-MS/MS results showed different peptides occurring in the mixtures hydrolysates. Additionally, it was observed a significant reduction of β-lg IgE binding in the presence of CMP. The disappearance of epitopes in the digested mixtures could explain the lower IgE binding observed in these systems compared to β-lg. It can be concluded that the presence of CMP in products containing β-lg may modify the digestion products that may reduce the potential allergenicity of β-lg. PMID:26304433

  9. A Prototype Recombinant-Protein Based Chlamydia pecorum Vaccine Results in Reduced Chlamydial Burden and Less Clinical Disease in Free-Ranging Koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus).

    PubMed

    Waugh, Courtney; Khan, Shahneaz Ali; Carver, Scott; Hanger, Jonathan; Loader, Joanne; Polkinghorne, Adam; Beagley, Kenneth; Timms, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Diseases associated with Chlamydia pecorum infection are a major cause of decline in koala populations in Australia. While koalas in care can generally be treated, a vaccine is considered the only option to effectively reduce the threat of infection and disease at the population level. In the current study, we vaccinated 30 free-ranging koalas with a prototype Chlamydia pecorum vaccine consisting of a recombinant chlamydial MOMP adjuvanted with an immune stimulating complex. An additional cohort of 30 animals did not receive any vaccine and acted as comparison controls. Animals accepted into this study were either uninfected (Chlamydia PCR negative) at time of initial vaccination, or infected (C. pecorum positive) at either urogenital (UGT) and/or ocular sites (Oc), but with no clinical signs of chlamydial disease. All koalas were vaccinated/sampled and then re-released into their natural habitat before re-capturing and re-sampling at 6 and 12 months. All vaccinated koalas produced a strong immune response to the vaccine, as indicated by high titres of specific plasma antibodies. The incidence of new infections in vaccinated koalas over the 12-month period post-vaccination was slightly less than koalas in the control group, however, this was not statistically significant. Importantly though, the vaccine was able to significantly reduce the infectious load in animals that were Chlamydia positive at the time of vaccination. This effect was evident at both the Oc and UGT sites and was stronger at 6 months than at 12 months post-vaccination. Finally, the vaccine was also able to reduce the number of animals that progressed to disease during the 12-month period. While the sample sizes were small (statistically speaking), results were nonetheless striking. This study highlights the potential for successful development of a Chlamydia vaccine for koalas in a wild setting. PMID:26756624

  10. A Prototype Recombinant-Protein Based Chlamydia pecorum Vaccine Results in Reduced Chlamydial Burden and Less Clinical Disease in Free-Ranging Koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus)

    PubMed Central

    Waugh, Courtney; Khan, Shahneaz Ali; Carver, Scott; Hanger, Jonathan; Loader, Joanne; Polkinghorne, Adam; Beagley, Kenneth; Timms, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Diseases associated with Chlamydia pecorum infection are a major cause of decline in koala populations in Australia. While koalas in care can generally be treated, a vaccine is considered the only option to effectively reduce the threat of infection and disease at the population level. In the current study, we vaccinated 30 free-ranging koalas with a prototype Chlamydia pecorum vaccine consisting of a recombinant chlamydial MOMP adjuvanted with an immune stimulating complex. An additional cohort of 30 animals did not receive any vaccine and acted as comparison controls. Animals accepted into this study were either uninfected (Chlamydia PCR negative) at time of initial vaccination, or infected (C. pecorum positive) at either urogenital (UGT) and/or ocular sites (Oc), but with no clinical signs of chlamydial disease. All koalas were vaccinated / sampled and then re-released into their natural habitat before re-capturing and re-sampling at 6 and 12 months. All vaccinated koalas produced a strong immune response to the vaccine, as indicated by high titres of specific plasma antibodies. The incidence of new infections in vaccinated koalas over the 12-month period post-vaccination was slightly less than koalas in the control group, however, this was not statistically significant. Importantly though, the vaccine was able to significantly reduce the infectious load in animals that were Chlamydia positive at the time of vaccination. This effect was evident at both the Oc and UGT sites and was stronger at 6 months than at 12 months post-vaccination. Finally, the vaccine was also able to reduce the number of animals that progressed to disease during the 12-month period. While the sample sizes were small (statistically speaking), results were nonetheless striking. This study highlights the potential for successful development of a Chlamydia vaccine for koalas in a wild setting. PMID:26756624

  11. Designed protein-protein association.

    PubMed

    Grueninger, Dirk; Treiber, Nora; Ziegler, Mathias O P; Koetter, Jochen W A; Schulze, Monika-Sarah; Schulz, Georg E

    2008-01-11

    The analysis of natural contact interfaces between protein subunits and between proteins has disclosed some general rules governing their association. We have applied these rules to produce a number of novel assemblies, demonstrating that a given protein can be engineered to form contacts at various points of its surface. Symmetry plays an important role because it defines the multiplicity of a designed contact and therefore the number of required mutations. Some of the proteins needed only a single side-chain alteration in order to associate to a higher-order complex. The mobility of the buried side chains has to be taken into account. Four assemblies have been structurally elucidated. Comparisons between the designed contacts and the results will provide useful guidelines for the development of future architectures. PMID:18187656

  12. Increasing the metabolizable protein supply enhanced growth performance and led to variable results on innate and humoral immune response of preconditioning beef steers.

    PubMed

    Moriel, P; Artioli, L F A; Poore, M H; Confer, A W; Marques, R S; Cooke, R F

    2015-09-01

    . 100% and 115% MP steers (3.1, 2.4, and 2.5 ± 0.21 log, respectively). Preconditioning MP supply did not affect ( ≥ 0.26) ubsequent finishing growth performance and carcass characteristics. Thus, increasing MP supply from 85% to 115% of daily requirement of preconditioning beef steers had variable results on innate and humoral immune response and enhanced growth performance during a 42-d preconditioning period without affecting carcass characteristics at slaughter. PMID:26440347

  13. Cytotoxicity and Genotoxicity Assessment of Sandalwood Essential Oil in Human Breast Cell Lines MCF-7 and MCF-10A

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Carmen; Morales, Luisa; Sastre, Miguel; Haskins, William E.; Matta, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    Sandalwood essential oil (SEO) is extracted from Santalum trees. Although α-santalol, a main constituent of SEO, has been studied as a chemopreventive agent, the genotoxic activity of the whole oil in human breast cell lines is still unknown. The main objective of this study was to assess the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of SEO in breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7) and nontumorigenic breast epithelial (MCF-10A) cells. Proteins associated with SEO genotoxicity were identified using a proteomics approach. Commercially available, high-purity, GC/MS characterized SEO was used to perform the experiments. The main constituents reported in the oil were (Z)-α-santalol (25.34%), (Z)-nuciferol (18.34%), (E)-β-santalol (10.97%), and (E)-nuciferol (10.46%). Upon exposure to SEO (2–8 μg/mL) for 24 hours, cell proliferation was determined by the MTT assay. Alkaline and neutral comet assays were used to assess genotoxicity. SEO exposure induced single- and double-strand breaks selectively in the DNA of MCF-7 cells. Quantitative LC/MS-based proteomics allowed identification of candidate proteins involved in this response: Ku70 (p = 1.37E − 2), Ku80 (p = 5.8E − 3), EPHX1 (p = 3.3E − 3), and 14-3-3ζ (p = 4.0E − 4). These results provide the first evidence that SEO is genotoxic and capable of inducing DNA single- and double-strand breaks in MCF-7 cells. PMID:27293457

  14. Cytotoxicity and Genotoxicity Assessment of Sandalwood Essential Oil in Human Breast Cell Lines MCF-7 and MCF-10A.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Carmen; Morales, Luisa; Sastre, Miguel; Haskins, William E; Matta, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    Sandalwood essential oil (SEO) is extracted from Santalum trees. Although α-santalol, a main constituent of SEO, has been studied as a chemopreventive agent, the genotoxic activity of the whole oil in human breast cell lines is still unknown. The main objective of this study was to assess the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of SEO in breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7) and nontumorigenic breast epithelial (MCF-10A) cells. Proteins associated with SEO genotoxicity were identified using a proteomics approach. Commercially available, high-purity, GC/MS characterized SEO was used to perform the experiments. The main constituents reported in the oil were (Z)-α-santalol (25.34%), (Z)-nuciferol (18.34%), (E)-β-santalol (10.97%), and (E)-nuciferol (10.46%). Upon exposure to SEO (2-8 μg/mL) for 24 hours, cell proliferation was determined by the MTT assay. Alkaline and neutral comet assays were used to assess genotoxicity. SEO exposure induced single- and double-strand breaks selectively in the DNA of MCF-7 cells. Quantitative LC/MS-based proteomics allowed identification of candidate proteins involved in this response: Ku70 (p = 1.37E - 2), Ku80 (p = 5.8E - 3), EPHX1 (p = 3.3E - 3), and 14-3-3ζ (p = 4.0E - 4). These results provide the first evidence that SEO is genotoxic and capable of inducing DNA single- and double-strand breaks in MCF-7 cells. PMID:27293457

  15. Rhizobium selenitireducens proteins involved in the reduction of selenite to elemental selenium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microbial based bioremediation barriers can remove the metalloid selenite (SeO3–2) from flowing groundwater. The organisms associated with the process include microorganisms from within the bacterial and archaeal domains that can reduce soluble SeO3–2 to the insoluble and reddish-colored elemental ...

  16. Nanotechnologies in protein microarrays.

    PubMed

    Krizkova, Sona; Heger, Zbynek; Zalewska, Marta; Moulick, Amitava; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2015-01-01

    Protein microarray technology became an important research tool for study and detection of proteins, protein-protein interactions and a number of other applications. The utilization of nanoparticle-based materials and nanotechnology-based techniques for immobilization allows us not only to extend the surface for biomolecule immobilization resulting in enhanced substrate binding properties, decreased background signals and enhanced reporter systems for more sensitive assays. Generally in contemporarily developed microarray systems, multiple nanotechnology-based techniques are combined. In this review, applications of nanoparticles and nanotechnologies in creating protein microarrays, proteins immobilization and detection are summarized. We anticipate that advanced nanotechnologies can be exploited to expand promising fields of proteins identification, monitoring of protein-protein or drug-protein interactions, or proteins structures. PMID:26039143

  17. Constitutive or seed-specific overexpression of Arabidopsis G-protein γ subunit 3 (AGG3) results in increased seed and oil production and improved stress tolerance in Camelina sativa.

    PubMed

    Roy Choudhury, Swarup; Riesselman, Adam J; Pandey, Sona

    2014-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G-proteins consisting of Gα, Gβ and Gγ subunits play an integral role in mediating multiple signalling pathways in plants. A novel, recently identified plant-specific Gγ protein, AGG3, has been proposed to be an important regulator of organ size and mediator of stress responses in Arabidopsis, whereas its potential homologs in rice are major quantitative trait loci for seed size and panicle branching. To evaluate the role of AGG3 towards seed and oil yield improvement, the gene was overexpressed in Camelina sativa, an oilseed crop of the Brassicaceae family. Analysis of multiple homozygous T4 transgenic Camelina lines showed that constitutive overexpression of AGG3 resulted in faster vegetative as well as reproductive growth accompanied by an increase in photosynthetic efficiency. Moreover, when expressed constitutively or specifically in seed tissue, AGG3 was found to increase seed size, seed mass and seed number per plant by 15%-40%, effectively resulting in significantly higher oil yield per plant. AGG3 overexpressing Camelina plants also exhibited improved stress tolerance. These observations draw a strong link between the roles of AGG3 in regulating two critical yield parameters, seed traits and plant stress responses, and reveal an effective biotechnological tool to dramatically increase yield in agricultural crops. PMID:24102738

  18. Hydrodynamic effects in proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymczak, Piotr; Cieplak, Marek

    2011-01-01

    Experimental and numerical results pertaining to flow-induced effects in proteins are reviewed. Special emphasis is placed on shear-induced unfolding and on the role of solvent mediated hydrodynamic interactions in the conformational transitions in proteins.

  19. Hydrodynamic effects in proteins.

    PubMed

    Szymczak, Piotr; Cieplak, Marek

    2011-01-26

    Experimental and numerical results pertaining to flow-induced effects in proteins are reviewed. Special emphasis is placed on shear-induced unfolding and on the role of solvent mediated hydrodynamic interactions in the conformational transitions in proteins. PMID:21406855

  20. Toxicity of selenium (Na sub 2 SeO sub 3 ) and mercury (HgCl sub 2 ) on the planarian Dugesia gonocephala

    SciTech Connect

    Congiu, A.M.; Casu, S.; Ugazio, G. )

    1989-10-01

    The toxicity of selenium (Na{sub 2}SeO{sub 3}) and mercury (HgCl{sub 2}) was determined by using a freshwater planarian which is particularly sensitive to pollution, and belongs to a fissiparous breed of Dugesia gonocephala. The mortality and fissiparity frequency of the subjects were studied. They were exposed to intense treatments (48 hours) or for medium to long periods of time (21 days) to either the single compounds or a combination of both, and were fed or fasting. The lethal effect of sodium selenite is correlated to the food intake, whereas the toxicity of mercurous chloride is probably the result of a fixative effect which does not depend on feeding. The 21-day treatment with the first compound has a non-negligible lethal effect which is probably due to an accumulation phenomenon. At doses where an antioxidant effect prevails, fissiparity is stimulated. On the other hand, the second compound reduces reproduction frequency to half the base values. Compared to the Paracentrotus lividus, the Dugesia gonocephala offers various advantages concerning toxicological experiments; besides being easier to handle in the laboratory, it is available all year round and is not subject to seasonal cycles. It is also more susceptible to the toxic effect of mercury, which is a common and highly toxic pollutant, than the sea urchin.

  1. Diets containing soy or rice protein isolate increase insulin sensitivity and improve lipid homeostasis in weanling rats fed high fat, high cholesterol Western diets as a result of activation of PPAR and LXR-mediated pathways

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The current study examined the effects of feeding soy protein isolate (SPI) and rice protein isolate (RPI) on insulin sensitivity and fat breakdown in weanling rats consuming high fat/high cholesterol diets. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were placed on semi-purified diets containing the milk protein case...

  2. Deletion of mitochondrial associated ubiquitin fold modifier protein Ufm1 in Leishmania donovani results in loss of β-oxidation of fatty acids and blocks cell division in the amastigote stage

    PubMed Central

    Gannavaram, Sreenivas; Connelly, Patricia S; Daniels, Mathew P; Duncan, Robert; Salotra, Poonam; Nakhasi, Hira L

    2014-01-01

    Summary Recently, we described the existence of the ubiquitin fold modifier1 (Ufm1) and its conjugation pathway in Leishmania donovani. We demonstrated the conjugation of Ufm1 to proteins such as mitochondrial trifunctional protein (MTP) that catalyzes β-oxidation of fatty acids in L. donovani. To elucidate the biological roles of the Ufm1-mediated modifications, we made an L. donovani Ufm1 null mutant (Ufm1−/−). Loss of Ufm1 and consequently absence of Ufm1 conjugation with MTP resulted in diminished acetyl-CoA, the end product of the β-oxidation in the Ufm1−/− amastigote stage. The Ufm1−/− mutants showed reduced survival in the amastigote stage in vitro and ex vivo in human macrophages. This survival was restored by re-expression of wild type Ufm1 with concomitant induction of acetyl-CoA but not by re-expressing the non-conjugatable Ufm1, indicating the essential nature of Ufm1 conjugation and β-oxidation. Both cell cycle analysis and ultrastructural studies of Ufm1−/− parasites confirmed the role of Ufm1 in amastigote growth. The defect in vitro growth of amstigotes in human macrophages was further substantiated by reduced survival. Therefore, these studies suggest the importance of Ufm1 in Leishmania pathogenesis with larger impact on other organisms and further provide an opportunity to test Ufm1−/− parasites as drug and vaccine targets. PMID:22897198

  3. Protein Crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernov, Alexander A.

    2005-01-01

    Nucleation, growth and perfection of protein crystals will be overviewed along with crystal mechanical properties. The knowledge is based on experiments using optical and force crystals behave similar to inorganic crystals, though with a difference in orders of magnitude in growing parameters. For example, the low incorporation rate of large biomolecules requires up to 100 times larger supersaturation to grow protein, rather than inorganic crystals. Nucleation is often poorly reproducible, partly because of turbulence accompanying the mixing of precipitant with protein solution. Light scattering reveals fluctuations of molecular cluster size, its growth, surface energies and increased clustering as protein ages. Growth most often occurs layer-by-layer resulting in faceted crystals. New molecular layer on crystal face is terminated by a step where molecular incorporation occurs. Quantitative data on the incorporation rate will be discussed. Rounded crystals with molecularly disordered interfaces will be explained. Defects in crystals compromise the x-ray diffraction resolution crucially needed to find the 3D atomic structure of biomolecules. The defects are immobile so that birth defects stay forever. All lattice defects known for inorganics are revealed in protein crystals. Contribution of molecular conformations to lattice disorder is important, but not studied. This contribution may be enhanced by stress field from other defects. Homologous impurities (e.g., dimers, acetylated molecules) are trapped more willingly by a growing crystal than foreign protein impurities. The trapped impurities induce internal stress eliminated in crystals exceeding a critical size (part of mni for ferritin, lysozyme). Lesser impurities are trapped from stagnant, as compared to the flowing, solution. Freezing may induce much more defects unless quickly amorphysizing intracrystalline water.

  4. Bacteriophage protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Häuser, Roman; Blasche, Sonja; Dokland, Terje; Haggård-Ljungquist, Elisabeth; von Brunn, Albrecht; Salas, Margarita; Casjens, Sherwood; Molineux, Ian; Uetz, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Bacteriophages T7, λ, P22, and P2/P4 (from Escherichia coli), as well as ϕ29 (from Bacillus subtilis), are among the best-studied bacterial viruses. This chapter summarizes published protein interaction data of intraviral protein interactions, as well as known phage-host protein interactions of these phages retrieved from the literature. We also review the published results of comprehensive protein interaction analyses of Pneumococcus phages Dp-1 and Cp-1, as well as coliphages λ and T7. For example, the ≈55 proteins encoded by the T7 genome are connected by ≈43 interactions with another ≈15 between the phage and its host. The chapter compiles published interactions for the well-studied phages λ (33 intra-phage/22 phage-host), P22 (38/9), P2/P4 (14/3), and ϕ29 (20/2). We discuss whether different interaction patterns reflect different phage lifestyles or whether they may be artifacts of sampling. Phages that infect the same host can interact with different host target proteins, as exemplified by E. coli phage λ and T7. Despite decades of intensive investigation, only a fraction of these phage interactomes are known. Technical limitations and a lack of depth in many studies explain the gaps in our knowledge. Strategies to complete current interactome maps are described. Although limited space precludes detailed overviews of phage molecular biology, this compilation will allow future studies to put interaction data into the context of phage biology. PMID:22748812

  5. Calcium-energized motor protein forisome controls damage in phloem: potential applications as biomimetic "smart" material.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Vineet Kumar; Tuteja, Renu; Tuteja, Narendra

    2015-06-01

    Forisomes are ATP independent, mechanically active proteins from the Fabaceae family (also called Leguminosae). These proteins are located in sieve tubes of phloem and function to prevent loss of nutrient-rich photoassimilates, upon mechanical injury/wounding. Forisomes are SEO (sieve element occlusion) gene family proteins that have recently been shown to be involved in wound sealing mechanism. Recent findings suggest that forisomes could act as an ideal model to study self assembly mechanism for the development of nanotechnological devices like microinstruments, the microfluidic system frequently used in space exploration missions. Technology enabling improvement in micro instruments has been identified as a key technology by NASA in future space exploration missions. Forisomes are designated as biomimetic smart materials which are calcium-energized motor proteins. Since forisomes are biomolecules from plant systems it can be doctored through genetic engineering. In contrast, "smart" materials which are not derived from plants are difficult to modify in their properties. Current levels of understanding about forisomes conformational shifts with respect to calcium ions and pH changes requires supplement of future advances with relation to its 3D structure to understand self assembly processes. In plant systems it forms blood clots in the form of occlusions to prevent nutrient fluid leakage and thus proves to be a unique damage control system of phloem tissue. PMID:24020505

  6. The centrality of cancer proteins in human protein-protein interaction network: a revisit.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Wei; Xie, Luyu; Zhou, Shuigeng; Liu, Hui; Guan, Jihong

    2014-01-01

    Topological analysis of protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks has been widely applied to the investigation on cancer mechanisms. However, there is still a debate on whether cancer proteins exhibit more topological centrality compared to the other proteins in the human PPI network. To resolve this debate, we first identified four sets of human proteins, and then mapped these proteins into the yeast PPI network by homologous genes. Finally, we compared these proteins' properties in human and yeast PPI networks. Experiments over two real datasets demonstrated that cancer proteins tend to have higher degree and smaller clustering coefficient than non-cancer proteins. Experimental results also validated that cancer proteins have larger betweenness centrality compared to the other proteins on the STRING dataset. However, on the BioGRID dataset, the average betweenness centrality of cancer proteins is larger than that of disease and control proteins, but smaller than that of essential proteins. PMID:24878726

  7. Protein Condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunton, James D.; Shiryayev, Andrey; Pagan, Daniel L.

    2007-09-01

    Preface; 1. Introduction; 2. Globular protein structure; 3. Experimental methods; 4. Thermodynamics and statistical mechanics; 5. Protein-protein interactions; 6. Theoretical studies of equilibrium; 7. Nucleation theory; 8. Experimental studies of nucleation; 9. Lysozyme; 10. Some other globular proteins; 11. Membrane proteins; 12. Crystallins and cataracts; 13. Sickle hemoglobin and sickle cell anemia; 14, Alzheimer's disease; Index.

  8. Protein Condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunton, James D.; Shiryayev, Andrey; Pagan, Daniel L.

    2014-07-01

    Preface; 1. Introduction; 2. Globular protein structure; 3. Experimental methods; 4. Thermodynamics and statistical mechanics; 5. Protein-protein interactions; 6. Theoretical studies of equilibrium; 7. Nucleation theory; 8. Experimental studies of nucleation; 9. Lysozyme; 10. Some other globular proteins; 11. Membrane proteins; 12. Crystallins and cataracts; 13. Sickle hemoglobin and sickle cell anemia; 14, Alzheimer's disease; Index.

  9. Surface Mediated Protein Disaggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhakrishna, Mithun; Kumar, Sanat K.

    2014-03-01

    Preventing protein aggregation is of both biological and industrial importance. Biologically these aggregates are known to cause amyloid type diseases like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. Protein aggregation leads to reduced activity of the enzymes in industrial applications. Inter-protein interactions between the hydrophobic residues of the protein are known to be the major driving force for protein aggregation. In the current paper we show how surface chemistry and curvature can be tuned to mitigate these inter-protein interactions. Our results calculated in the framework of the Hydrophobic-Polar (HP) lattice model show that, inter-protein interactions can be drastically reduced by increasing the surface hydrophobicity to a critical value corresponding to the adsorption transition of the protein. At this value of surface hydrophobicity, proteins lose inter-protein contacts to gain surface contacts and thus the surface helps in reducing the inter-protein interactions. Further, we show that the adsorption of the proteins inside hydrophobic pores of optimal sizes are most efficient both in reducing inter-protein contacts and simultaneously retaining most of the native-contacts due to strong protein-surface interactions coupled with stabilization due to the confinement. Department of Energy (Grant No DE-FG02-11ER46811).

  10. Mutations in Genes patA and patL of Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120 Result in Similar Phenotypes, and the Proteins Encoded by Those Genes May Interact ▿

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jinjie; Wolk, C. Peter

    2011-01-01

    PatA resembles a response regulator protein with a defective DNA-binding domain, and PatL (All3305) is a pentapeptide repeat protein. A yeast two-hybrid library identified PatL as a protein with which PatA may interact. Heterocysts of patA and patL Anabaena sp. form nearly exclusively terminally in long filaments, further linking the genes. PMID:21890704

  11. A novel intronic splice site deletion of the IL-2 receptor common gamma chain results in expression of a dysfunctional protein and T-cell-positive X-linked Severe combined immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Gray, P E A; Logan, G J; Alexander, I E; Poulton, S; Roscioli, T; Ziegler, J

    2015-02-01

    X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency is caused by mutations in the IL-2 receptor common gamma chain and classically presents in the first 6 months of life with predisposition to bacterial, viral and fungal infections. In most instances, affected individuals are lymphopenic with near complete absence of T cells and NK cells. We report a boy who presented at 12 months of age with Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia and a family history consistent with X-linked recessive inheritance. He had a normal lymphocyte count including the presence of T cells and a broad T-cell-receptor diversity, as well as normal surface expression of the common gamma chain (CD132) protein. He however had profound hypogammaglobulinaemia, and IL-2-induced STAT5 phosphorylation was absent. Sequencing of IL-2RG demonstrated a 12-base pair intronic deletion close to the canonical splice site of exon 5, which resulted in a variety of truncated IL2RG mRNA species. A review of the literature identified 4 other patients with T-cell-positive X-SCID, with the current patient being the first associated with an mRNA splicing defect. This case raises the question of how a dysfunctional protein incapable of mediating STAT5 phosphorylation might nonetheless support T-cell development. Possible explanations are that STAT5-mediated signal transduction may be less relevant to IL7-receptor-mediated T-cell development than are other IL7R-induced intracellular transduction pathways or that a low level of STAT5 phosphorylation, undetectable in the laboratory, may be sufficient to support some T-cell development. PMID:25443657

  12. Mutation of the F-Protein Cleavage Site of Avian Paramyxovirus Type 7 Results in Furin Cleavage, Fusion Promotion, and Increased Replication In Vitro but Not Increased Replication, Tissue Tropism, or Virulence in Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Sa; Khattar, Sunil K.; Subbiah, Madhuri; Collins, Peter L.

    2012-01-01

    We constructed a reverse genetics system for avian paramyxovirus serotype 7 (APMV-7) to investigate the role of the fusion F glycoprotein in tissue tropism and virulence. The AMPV-7 F protein has a single basic residue arginine (R) at position −1 in the F cleavage site sequence and also is unusual in having alanine at position +2 (LPSSR↓FA) (underlining indicates the basic amino acids at the F protein cleavage site, and the arrow indicates the site of cleavage.). APMV-7 does not form syncytia or plaques in cell culture, but its replication in vitro does not depend on, and is not increased by, added protease. Two mutants were successfully recovered in which the cleavage site was modified to mimic sites that are found in virulent Newcastle disease virus isolates and to contain 4 or 5 basic residues as well as isoleucine in the +2 position: (RRQKR↓FI) or (RRKKR↓FI), named Fcs-4B or Fcs-5B, respectively. In cell culture, one of the mutants, Fcs-5B, formed protease-independent syncytia and grew to 10-fold-higher titers compared to the parent and Fcs-4B viruses. This indicated the importance of the single additional basic residue (K) at position −3. Syncytium formation and virus yield of the Fcs-5B virus was impaired by the furin inhibitor decanoyl-RVKR-CMK, whereas parental APMV-7 was not affected. APMV-7 is avirulent in chickens and is limited in tropism to the upper respiratory tract of 1-day-old and 2-week-old chickens, and these characteristics were unchanged for the two mutant viruses. Thus, the acquisition of furin cleavability by APMV-7 resulted in syncytium formation and increased virus yield in vitro but did not alter virus yield, tropism, or virulence in chickens. PMID:22258248

  13. Vaccination with a Live Attenuated Cytomegalovirus Devoid of a Protein Kinase R Inhibitory Gene Results in Reduced Maternal Viremia and Improved Pregnancy Outcome in a Guinea Pig Congenital Infection Model

    PubMed Central

    Bierle, Craig J.; Swanson, Elizabeth C.; McVoy, Michael A.; Wang, Jian Ben; Al-Mahdi, Zainab; Geballe, Adam P.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Development of a vaccine to prevent congenital cytomegalovirus infection is a major public health priority. Live vaccines attenuated through mutations targeting viral mechanisms responsible for evasion of host defense may be both safe and efficacious. Safety and vaccine efficacy were evaluated using a guinea pig cytomegalovirus (GPCMV) model. Recombinant GPCMV with a targeted deletion of gp145 (designated Δ145), a viral protein kinase R (PKR) inhibitor, was generated. Attenuation was evaluated following inoculation of 107 PFU of Δ145 or parental virus into guinea pigs immunosuppressed with cyclophosphamide. Efficacy was evaluated by immunizing GPCMV-naive guinea pigs twice with either 105 or 106 PFU of Δ145, establishing pregnancy, and challenging the guinea pigs with salivary gland-adapted GPCMV. The immune response, maternal viral load, pup mortality, and congenital infection rates in the vaccine and control groups were compared. Δ145 was substantially attenuated for replication in immunocompromised guinea pigs. Vaccination with Δ145 induced enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and neutralizing antibody levels comparable to those achieved in natural infection. In the higher- and lower-dose vaccine groups, pup mortality was reduced to 1/24 (4%) and 4/29 (14%) pups, respectively, whereas it was 26/31 (81%) in unvaccinated control pups (P < 0.0001 for both groups versus the control group). Congenital infection occurred in 20/31 (65%) control pups but only 8/24 (33%) pups in the group vaccinated with 106 PFU (P < 0.05). Significant reductions in the magnitude of maternal DNAemia and pup viral load were noted in the vaccine groups compared to those in the controls. Deletion of a GPCMV genome-encoded PKR inhibitor results in a highly attenuated virus that is immunogenic and protective as a vaccine against transplacental infection. IMPORTANCE Previous attempts to develop successful immunization against cytomegalovirus have largely centered on subunit

  14. Total protein

    MedlinePlus

    The total protein test measures the total amount of two classes of proteins found in the fluid portion of your ... nutritional problems, kidney disease or liver disease . If total protein is abnormal, you will need to have more ...

  15. Storage Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Toru; Nambara, Eiji; Yamagishi, Kazutoshi; Goto, Derek B.; Naito, Satoshi

    2002-01-01

    Plants accumulate storage substances such as starch, lipids and proteins in certain phases of development. Storage proteins accumulate in both vegetative and reproductive tissues and serve as a reservoir to be used in later stages of plant development. The accumulation of storage protein is thus beneficial for the survival of plants. Storage proteins are also an important source of dietary plant proteins. Here, we summarize the genome organization and regulation of gene expression of storage protein genes in Arabidopsis. PMID:22303197

  16. Aromatic interactions impact ligand binding and function at serotonin 5-HT2C G protein-coupled receptors: receptor homology modelling, ligand docking, and molecular dynamics results validated by experimental studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Córdova-Sintjago, Tania; Villa, Nancy; Fang, Lijuan; Booth, Raymond G.

    2014-02-01

    The serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) 5-HT2 G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family consists of types 2A, 2B, and 2C that share ∼75% transmembrane (TM) sequence identity. Agonists for 5-HT2C receptors are under development for psychoses; whereas, at 5-HT2A receptors, antipsychotic effects are associated with antagonists - in fact, 5-HT2A agonists can cause hallucinations and 5-HT2B agonists cause cardiotoxicity. It is known that 5-HT2A TM6 residues W6.48, F6.51, and F6.52 impact ligand binding and function; however, ligand interactions with these residues at the 5-HT2C receptor have not been reported. To predict and validate molecular determinants for 5-HT2C-specific activation, results from receptor homology modelling, ligand docking, and molecular dynamics simulation studies were compared with experimental results for ligand binding and function at wild type and W6.48A, F6.51A, and F6.52A point-mutated 5-HT2C receptors.

  17. [Protein-losing enteropathy].

    PubMed

    Amiot, A

    2015-07-01

    Protein-losing enteropathy is a rare syndrome of gastrointestinal protein loss. The primary causes can be classified into lymphatic leakage due to increased interstitial pressure and increased leakage of protein-rich fluids due to erosive or non-erosive gastrointestinal disorders. The diagnosis of protein-losing enteropathy should be considered in patients with chronic diarrhea and peripheral oedema. The diagnosis of protein-losing enteropathy is most commonly based on the determination of fecal alpha-1 antitrypsin clearance. Most protein-losing enteropathy cases are the result of either lymphatic obstruction or a variety of gastrointestinal disorders and cardiac diseases, while primary intestinal lymphangiectasia (Waldmann's disease) is less common. Treatment of protein-losing enteropathy targets the underlying disease but also includes dietary modification, such as high-protein and low-fat diet along with medium-chain triglyceride supplementation. PMID:25618488

  18. Dietary Proteins

    MedlinePlus

    ... grains and beans. Proteins from meat and other animal products are complete proteins. This means they supply all of the amino acids the body can't make on its own. Most plant proteins are incomplete. You should eat different types of plant proteins every day to get ...

  19. Protein Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Sam K. C.

    Proteins are an abundant component in all cells, and almost all except storage proteins are important for biological functions and cell structure. Food proteins are very complex. Many have been purified and characterized. Proteins vary in molecular mass, ranging from approximately 5000 to more than a million Daltons. They are composed of elements including hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and sulfur. Twenty α-amino acids are the building blocks of proteins; the amino acid residues in a protein are linked by peptide bonds. Nitrogen is the most distinguishing element present in proteins. However, nitrogen content in various food proteins ranges from 13.4 to 19.1% (1) due to the variation in the specific amino acid composition of proteins. Generally, proteins rich in basic amino acids contain more nitrogen.

  20. Solitary Inhibition of the Breast Cancer Resistance Protein Efflux Transporter Results in a Clinically Significant Drug-Drug Interaction with Rosuvastatin by Causing up to a 2-Fold Increase in Statin Exposure.

    PubMed

    Elsby, Robert; Martin, Paul; Surry, Dominic; Sharma, Pradeep; Fenner, Katherine

    2016-03-01

    The intestinal efflux transporter breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) restricts the absorption of rosuvastatin. Of the transporters important to rosuvastatin disposition, fostamatinib inhibited BCRP (IC50 = 50 nM) and organic anion-transporting polypeptide 1B1 (OATP1B1; IC50 > 10 μM), but not organic anion transporter 3, in vitro, predicting a drug-drug interaction (DDI) in vivo through inhibition of BCRP only. Consequently, a clinical interaction study between fostamatinib and rosuvastatin was performed (and reported elsewhere). This confirmed the critical role BCRP plays in statin absorption, as inhibition by fostamatinib resulted in a significant 1.96-fold and 1.88-fold increase in rosuvastatin area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) and Cmax, respectively. An in vitro BCRP inhibition assay, using polarized Caco-2 cells and rosuvastatin as probe substrate, was subsequently validated with literature inhibitors and used to determine BCRP inhibitory potencies (IC50) of the perpetrator drugs eltrombopag, darunavir, lopinavir, clopidogrel, ezetimibe, fenofibrate, and fluconazole. OATP1B1 inhibition was also determined using human embryonic kidney 293-OATP1B1 cells versus estradiol 17β-glucuronide. Calculated parameters of maximum enterocyte concentration [Igut max], maximum unbound hepatic inlet concentration, transporter fraction excreted value, and determined IC50 value were incorporated into mechanistic static equations to compute theoretical increases in rosuvastatin AUC due to inhibition of BCRP and/or OATP1B1. Calculated theoretical increases in exposure correctly predicted the clinically observed changes in rosuvastatin exposure and suggested intestinal BCRP inhibition (not OATP1B1) to be the mechanism underlying the DDIs with these drugs. In conclusion, solitary inhibition of the intestinal BCRP transporter can result in clinically significant DDIs with rosuvastatin, causing up to a maximum 2-fold increase in exposure, which may warrant

  1. [Influence of gravity discharge on the content of isatin-binding proteins in mice: results of ground-based and space research under the program Bion-M №1].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, A S; Medvedev, A E; Buneeva, O A; Gnedenko, O V; Ershov, P V; Mezencev, Y V; Yablokov, E O; Kaluzhsky, L A; Florinskaya, A V; Moskaleva, N E; Zgoda, V G

    2015-01-01

    Isatin-binding activity of mice liver proteins has been investigated in the samples from the control and flight groups by using the methods of biosensor and proteomic analysis. It was found the higher isatin-binding activity in mice of flight group. The content of a number of individual isatin-binding proteins in the samples of the flight groups differ slightly from the ground control. However, in samples from animals which have weekly post-flight adaptation, the level of certain proteins was significantly increased. The latter allows us to assume that the main events in the proteome of mice (at least in subproteome of isatin-binding proteins), occurs in early post-flight period. PMID:26539872

  2. Molecular interactions of agonist and inverse agonist ligands at serotonin 5-HT2C G protein-coupled receptors: computational ligand docking and molecular dynamics studies validated by experimental mutagenesis results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Córdova-Sintjago, Tania C.; Liu, Yue; Booth, Raymond G.

    2015-02-01

    To understand molecular determinants for ligand activation of the serotonin 5-HT2C G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), a drug target for obesity and neuropsychiatric disorders, a 5-HT2C homology model was built according to an adrenergic β2 GPCR (β2AR) structure and validated using a 5-HT2B GPCR crystal structure. The models were equilibrated in a simulated phosphatidyl choline membrane for ligand docking and molecular dynamics studies. Ligands included (2S, 4R)-(-)-trans-4-(3'-bromo- and trifluoro-phenyl)-N,N-dimethyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene-2-amine (3'-Br-PAT and 3'-CF3-PAT), a 5-HT2C agonist and inverse agonist, respectively. Distinct interactions of 3'-Br-PAT and 3'-CF3-PAT at the wild-type (WT) 5-HT2C receptor model were observed and experimental 5-HT2C receptor mutagenesis studies were undertaken to validate the modelling results. For example, the inverse agonist 3'-CF3-PAT docked deeper in the WT 5-HT2C binding pocket and altered the orientation of transmembrane helices (TM) 6 in comparison to the agonist 3'-Br-PAT, suggesting that changes in TM orientation that result from ligand binding impact function. For both PATs, mutation of 5-HT2C residues S3.36, T3.37, and F5.47 to alanine resulted in significantly decreased affinity, as predicted from modelling results. It was concluded that upon PAT binding, 5-HT2C residues T3.37 and F5.47 in TMs 3 and 5, respectively, engage in inter-helical interactions with TMs 4 and 6, respectively. The movement of TMs 5 and 6 upon agonist and inverse agonist ligand binding observed in the 5-HT2C receptor modelling studies was similar to movements reported for the activation and deactivation of the β2AR, suggesting common mechanisms among aminergic neurotransmitter GPCRs.

  3. Mechanism of protein decarbonylation.

    PubMed

    Wong, Chi-Ming; Marcocci, Lucia; Das, Dividutta; Wang, Xinhong; Luo, Haibei; Zungu-Edmondson, Makhosazane; Suzuki, Yuichiro J

    2013-12-01

    Ligand/receptor stimulation of cells promotes protein carbonylation that is followed by the decarbonylation process, which might involve thiol-dependent reduction (C.M. Wong et al., Circ. Res. 102:301-318; 2008). This study further investigated the properties of this protein decarbonylation mechanism. We found that the thiol-mediated reduction of protein carbonyls is dependent on heat-labile biologic components. Cysteine and glutathione were efficient substrates for decarbonylation. Thiols decreased the protein carbonyl content, as detected by 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine, but not the levels of malondialdehyde or 4-hydroxynonenal protein adducts. Mass spectrometry identified proteins that undergo thiol-dependent decarbonylation, which include peroxiredoxins. Peroxiredoxin-2 and -6 were carbonylated and subsequently decarbonylated in response to the ligand/receptor stimulation of cells. siRNA knockdown of glutaredoxin inhibited the decarbonylation of peroxiredoxin. These results strengthen the concept that thiol-dependent decarbonylation defines the kinetics of protein carbonylation signaling. PMID:24044890

  4. Protein solubility modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agena, S. M.; Pusey, M. L.; Bogle, I. D.

    1999-01-01

    A thermodynamic framework (UNIQUAC model with temperature dependent parameters) is applied to model the salt-induced protein crystallization equilibrium, i.e., protein solubility. The framework introduces a term for the solubility product describing protein transfer between the liquid and solid phase and a term for the solution behavior describing deviation from ideal solution. Protein solubility is modeled as a function of salt concentration and temperature for a four-component system consisting of a protein, pseudo solvent (water and buffer), cation, and anion (salt). Two different systems, lysozyme with sodium chloride and concanavalin A with ammonium sulfate, are investigated. Comparison of the modeled and experimental protein solubility data results in an average root mean square deviation of 5.8%, demonstrating that the model closely follows the experimental behavior. Model calculations and model parameters are reviewed to examine the model and protein crystallization process. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  5. Envelope gene of the Friend spleen focus-forming virus: deletion and insertions in 3' gp70/p15E-encoding region have resulted in unique features in the primary structure of its protein product.

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, L; Scolnick, E; Ruscetti, S

    1983-01-01

    A nucleotide sequence was determined for the envelope (env) gene of the polycythemia-inducing strain of the acute leukemia-inducing Friend spleen focus-forming virus (SFFV) and from this the amino acid sequence of its gene product, gp52, was deduced. All major elements of the gene were found to be related to genes of other retroviruses that code for functional glycoproteins. Although the carboxyl terminus of gp52 is encoded by sequences highly related to sequences in its putative parent, ecotropic Friend murine leukemia virus, the majority of the protein (69%), including the amino terminus, is encoded by dualtropic virus-like sequences. Nucleotide sequence comparisons suggest that the nonecotropic region may be more closely related to the 5' substitution in dualtropic mink cell focus-inducing viruses that it is to the 5' end of xenotropic virus env genes. A large deletion and two unique insertions have been located in the env gene of polycythemia-inducing SFFV and may account for some of the unusual structural characteristics, aberrant processing, and pathogenic properties of gp52. As a consequence of the deletion, amino-terminal gp70 and carboxyl-terminal p15E-encoding sequences are juxtaposed and it appears that translation from the p15E region, 3' to the deletion, continues in the standard reading frame used by other retroviruses. Insertions of six base pairs and one base pair at the very 3' end of the gp52-encoding region results in a SFFV-unique amino acid sequence and a premature termination codon. PMID:6308646

  6. Forces Stabilizing Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Pace, C. Nick; Scholtz, J. Martin; Grimsley, Gerald R.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this article is to summarize what has been learned about the major forces stabilizing proteins since the late 1980s when site-directed mutagenesis became possible. The following conclusions are derived from experimental studies of hydrophobic and hydrogen bonding variants. 1. Based on studies of 138 hydrophobic interaction variants in 11 proteins, burying a –CH2– group on folding contributes 1.1 ± 0.5 kcal/mol to protein stability. 2. The burial of nonpolar side chains contributes to protein stability in two ways: first, a term that depends on the removal of the side chains from water and, more importantly, the enhanced London dispersion forces that result from the tight packing in the protein interior. 3. Based on studies of 151 hydrogen bonding variants in 15 proteins, forming a hydrogen bond on folding contributes 1.1 ± 0.8 kcal/mol to protein stability. 4. The contribution of hydrogen bonds to protein stability is strongly context dependent. 5. Hydrogen bonds by side chains and peptide groups make similar contributions to protein stability. 6. Polar group burial can make a favorable contribution to protein stability even if the polar group is not hydrogen bonded. 7. Hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonds both make large contributions to protein stability. PMID:24846139

  7. Challenges of protein extraction from recalcitrant plant tissues for proteomics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteins play an important role in several biological processes. Proteomics encompasses basically four principal applications, namely protein mining, protein expression profiling, protein-network mapping and mapping of protein modifications. The results in these applications depend mostly on the c...

  8. Impact of Protein Supplementation and Care and Support on Body Composition and CD4 Count among HIV-Infected Women Living in Rural India: Results from a Randomized Pilot Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Nyamathi, Adeline; Sinha, Sanjeev; Ganguly, Kalyan K; Ramakrishna, Padma; Suresh, P.; Carpenter, Catherine L

    2013-01-01

    Body composition in HIV-infected individuals is subject to many influences. We conducted a pilot six-month randomized trial of 68 WLA (women living with AIDS) from rural India. High protein intervention combined with education and supportive care delivered by HIV-trained village women (Asha [Activated Social Health Activist] Life [AL]) was compared to standard protein with usual care delivered by village community assistants (Usual Care [UC]). Measurements included CD4 counts, ART adherence, socio-demographics, disease characteristics (questionnaires); and anthropometry (bioimpedance analyzer). Repeated measures analysis of variance modeled associations. AL significantly gained in BMI, muscle mass, fat mass, ART adherence, and CD4 counts compared to UC, with higher weight and muscle mass gains among ART adherent (≥ 66%) participants who had healthier immunity (CD4 ≥ 450). BMI of WLA improved through high protein supplementation combined with education and supportive care. Future research is needed to determine which intervention aspect was most responsible. PMID:23370835

  9. Total protein

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003483.htm Total protein To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The total protein test measures the total amount of two classes ...

  10. Whey Protein

    MedlinePlus

    ... shows that taking whey protein in combination with strength training increases lean body mass, strength, and muscle size. ... grams/kg of whey protein in combination with strength training for 6-10 weeks. For HIV/AIDS-related ...

  11. Use of protein-protein interactions in affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Muronetz, V I; Sholukh, M; Korpela, T

    2001-10-30

    Biospecific recognition between proteins is a phenomenon that can be exploited for designing affinity-chromatographic purification systems for proteins. In principle, the approach is straightforward, and there are usually many alternative ways, since a protein can be always found which binds specifically enough to the desired protein. Routine immunoaffinity chromatography utilizes the recognition of antigenic epitopes by antibodies. However, forces involved in protein-protein interactions as well the forces keeping the three-dimensional structures of proteins intact are complicated, and proteins are easily unfolded by various factors with unpredictable results. Because of this and because of the generally high association strength between proteins, the correct adjustment of binding forces between an immobilized protein and the protein to be purified as well as the release of bound proteins in biologically active form from affinity complexes are the main problem. Affinity systems involving interactions like enzyme-enzyme, subunit-oligomer, protein-antibody, protein-chaperone and the specific features involved in each case are presented as examples. This article also aims to sketch prospects for further development of the use of protein-protein interactions for the purification of proteins. PMID:11694271

  12. Protein Microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricard-Blum, S.

    Proteins are key actors in the life of the cell, involved in many physiological and pathological processes. Since variations in the expression of messenger RNA are not systematically correlated with variations in the protein levels, the latter better reflect the way a cell functions. Protein microarrays thus supply complementary information to DNA chips. They are used in particular to analyse protein expression profiles, to detect proteins within complex biological media, and to study protein-protein interactions, which give information about the functions of those proteins [3-9]. They have the same advantages as DNA microarrays for high-throughput analysis, miniaturisation, and the possibility of automation. Section 18.1 gives a brief overview of proteins. Following this, Sect. 18.2 describes how protein microarrays can be made on flat supports, explaining how proteins can be produced and immobilised on a solid support, and discussing the different kinds of substrate and detection method. Section 18.3 discusses the particular format of protein microarrays in suspension. The diversity of protein microarrays and their applications are then reported in Sect. 18.4, with applications to therapeutics (protein-drug interactions) and diagnostics. The prospects for future developments of protein microarrays are then outlined in the conclusion. The bibliography provides an extensive list of reviews and detailed references for those readers who wish to go further in this area. Indeed, the aim of the present chapter is not to give an exhaustive or detailed analysis of the state of the art, but rather to provide the reader with the basic elements needed to understand how proteins are designed and used.

  13. Protein- protein interaction detection system using fluorescent protein microdomains

    DOEpatents

    Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2010-02-23

    The invention provides a protein labeling and interaction detection system based on engineered fragments of fluorescent and chromophoric proteins that require fused interacting polypeptides to drive the association of the fragments, and further are soluble and stable, and do not change the solubility of polypeptides to which they are fused. In one embodiment, a test protein X is fused to a sixteen amino acid fragment of GFP (.beta.-strand 10, amino acids 198-214), engineered to not perturb fusion protein solubility. A second test protein Y is fused to a sixteen amino acid fragment of GFP (.beta.-strand 11, amino acids 215-230), engineered to not perturb fusion protein solubility. When X and Y interact, they bring the GFP strands into proximity, and are detected by complementation with a third GFP fragment consisting of GFP amino acids 1-198 (strands 1-9). When GFP strands 10 and 11 are held together by interaction of protein X and Y, they spontaneous association with GFP strands 1-9, resulting in structural complementation, folding, and concomitant GFP fluorescence.

  14. Protein Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asmus, Elaine Garbarino

    2007-01-01

    Individual students model specific amino acids and then, through dehydration synthesis, a class of students models a protein. The students clearly learn amino acid structure, primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary structure in proteins and the nature of the bonds maintaining a protein's shape. This activity is fun, concrete, inexpensive and…

  15. Whey protein supplementation does not alter plasma branched-chained amino acid profiles but results in unique metabolomics patterns in obese women enrolled in an 8-week weight loss trial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: It has been suggested that perturbations in branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) catabolism are associated with insulin resistance and contribute to elevated systemic BCAAs. Evidence in rodents suggests dietary protein rich in BCAAs can increase BCAA catabolism, but there is limited evidence...

  16. Solute exclusion by polymer and protein-dominated water: correlation with results of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and calorimetric studies and their significance for the understanding of the physical state of water in living cells.

    PubMed

    Ling, G N

    1988-06-01

    According to the polarized multilayer (PM) theory of cell water proteins with their backbones fully extended and their NHCO groups directly exposed to bulk water, polarize water in multilayers. Experimental testing of the theory led to a new understanding of the uniqueness of gelatin, due to its permanently maintained fully extended conformation and its ability to polarize the bulk phase water in multilayers with reduced solubilities for solutes in a size dependent manner ("size rule"). Other models which behave like gelatin are urea-denatured proteins, synthetic polymers like polyethylene oxide (PEO), and polyvinylpyrrolidine (PVP), but not native proteins. NMR studies showed that the majority of water molecules dominated by these polymers does indeed suffer rotational (and translational) motional restriction as predicted by the PM theory. In conjunction with ultra-high frequency dielectric studies but particularly quasielastic neutron scattering of both model systems (e.g., PEO) and living cells (i.e., brine shrimp cysts and frog muscle), this finding offers confirmation of the PM theory of living cell water and model systems. Studies of the freezing point depression showed that the presence of as much as 50% of native proteins had no effect on the freezing point of water while inclusion of gelatin, PEO, etc., caused concentration-dependent lowering of the freezing temperature. These findings demonstrate the key role of polarized water in the phenomena of freezing point depression and the unusual ice forms seen in living cells. PMID:3041574

  17. Smoking interacts with HLA-DRB1 shared epitope in the development of anti-citrullinated protein antibody-positive rheumatoid arthritis: results from the Malaysian Epidemiological Investigation of Rheumatoid Arthritis (MyEIRA)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a multifactorial autoimmune disease in which genetic and environmental factors interact in the etiology. In this study, we investigated whether smoking and HLA-DRB1 shared-epitope (SE) alleles interact differently in the development of the two major subgroups of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), anti-citrullinated proteins antibody (ACPA)-positive and ACPA-negative disease, in a multiethnic population of Asian descent. Methods A case-control study comprising early diagnosed RA cases was carried out in Malaysia between 2005 and 2009. In total, 1,076 cases and 1,612 matched controls participated in the study. High-resolution HLA-DRB1 genotyping was performed for shared-epitope (SE) alleles. All participants answered a questionnaire on a broad range of issues, including smoking habits. The odds ratio (OR) of developing ACPA-positive and ACPA-negative disease was calculated for smoking and the presence of any SE alleles separately. Potential interaction between smoking history (defined as "ever" and "never" smoking) and HLA-DRB1 SE alleles also was calculated. Results In our multiethnic study, both the SE alleles and smoking were associated with an increased risk of developing ACPA-positive RA (OR SE alleles, 4.7; 95% confidence interval (CI), 3.6 to 6.2; OR smoking, 4.1; 95% CI, 1.9 to 9.2). SE-positive smokers had an odds ratio of ACPA-positive RA of 25.6 (95% CI, 10.4 to 63.4), compared with SE-negative never-smokers. The interaction between smoking and SE alleles was significant (attributable proportion due to interaction (AP) was 0.7 (95% CI, 0.5 to 1.0)). The HLA-DRB1*04:05 SE allele, which is common in Asian populations, but not among Caucasians, was associated with an increased risk of ACPA-positive RA, and this allele also showed signs of interaction with smoking (AP, 0.4; 95% CI, -0.1 to 0.9). Neither smoking nor SE alleles nor their combination was associated with an increased risk of ACPA-negative RA. Conclusions The risk

  18. Protein folds and protein folding

    PubMed Central

    Schaeffer, R. Dustin; Daggett, Valerie

    2011-01-01

    The classification of protein folds is necessarily based on the structural elements that distinguish domains. Classification of protein domains consists of two problems: the partition of structures into domains and the classification of domains into sets of similar structures (or folds). Although similar topologies may arise by convergent evolution, the similarity of their respective folding pathways is unknown. The discovery and the characterization of the majority of protein folds will be followed by a similar enumeration of available protein folding pathways. Consequently, understanding the intricacies of structural domains is necessary to understanding their collective folding pathways. We review the current state of the art in the field of protein domain classification and discuss methods for the systematic and comprehensive study of protein folding across protein fold space via atomistic molecular dynamics simulation. Finally, we discuss our large-scale Dynameomics project, which includes simulations of representatives of all autonomous protein folds. PMID:21051320

  19. Protein oxidation and peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Davies, Michael J

    2016-04-01

    Proteins are major targets for radicals and two-electron oxidants in biological systems due to their abundance and high rate constants for reaction. With highly reactive radicals damage occurs at multiple side-chain and backbone sites. Less reactive species show greater selectivity with regard to the residues targeted and their spatial location. Modification can result in increased side-chain hydrophilicity, side-chain and backbone fragmentation, aggregation via covalent cross-linking or hydrophobic interactions, protein unfolding and altered conformation, altered interactions with biological partners and modified turnover. In the presence of O2, high yields of peroxyl radicals and peroxides (protein peroxidation) are formed; the latter account for up to 70% of the initial oxidant flux. Protein peroxides can oxidize both proteins and other targets. One-electron reduction results in additional radicals and chain reactions with alcohols and carbonyls as major products; the latter are commonly used markers of protein damage. Direct oxidation of cysteine (and less commonly) methionine residues is a major reaction; this is typically faster than with H2O2, and results in altered protein activity and function. Unlike H2O2, which is rapidly removed by protective enzymes, protein peroxides are only slowly removed, and catabolism is a major fate. Although turnover of modified proteins by proteasomal and lysosomal enzymes, and other proteases (e.g. mitochondrial Lon), can be efficient, protein hydroperoxides inhibit these pathways and this may contribute to the accumulation of modified proteins in cells. Available evidence supports an association between protein oxidation and multiple human pathologies, but whether this link is causal remains to be established. PMID:27026395

  20. Protein oxidation and peroxidation

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Proteins are major targets for radicals and two-electron oxidants in biological systems due to their abundance and high rate constants for reaction. With highly reactive radicals damage occurs at multiple side-chain and backbone sites. Less reactive species show greater selectivity with regard to the residues targeted and their spatial location. Modification can result in increased side-chain hydrophilicity, side-chain and backbone fragmentation, aggregation via covalent cross-linking or hydrophobic interactions, protein unfolding and altered conformation, altered interactions with biological partners and modified turnover. In the presence of O2, high yields of peroxyl radicals and peroxides (protein peroxidation) are formed; the latter account for up to 70% of the initial oxidant flux. Protein peroxides can oxidize both proteins and other targets. One-electron reduction results in additional radicals and chain reactions with alcohols and carbonyls as major products; the latter are commonly used markers of protein damage. Direct oxidation of cysteine (and less commonly) methionine residues is a major reaction; this is typically faster than with H2O2, and results in altered protein activity and function. Unlike H2O2, which is rapidly removed by protective enzymes, protein peroxides are only slowly removed, and catabolism is a major fate. Although turnover of modified proteins by proteasomal and lysosomal enzymes, and other proteases (e.g. mitochondrial Lon), can be efficient, protein hydroperoxides inhibit these pathways and this may contribute to the accumulation of modified proteins in cells. Available evidence supports an association between protein oxidation and multiple human pathologies, but whether this link is causal remains to be established. PMID:27026395

  1. Exposure to the three structurally different PCB congeners (PCB 118, 153, and 126) results in decreased protein expression and altered steroidogenesis in the human adrenocortical carcinoma cell line H295R.

    PubMed

    Tremoen, Nina Hårdnes; Fowler, Paul A; Ropstad, Erik; Verhaegen, Steven; Krogenæs, Anette

    2014-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), synthetic, persistent organic pollutants (POP), are detected ubiquitously, in water, soil, air, and sediments, as well as in animals and humans. PCB are associated with range of adverse health effects, such as interference with the immune system and nervous system, reproductive abnormalities, fetotoxicity, carcinogenicity, and endocrine disruption. Our objective was to determine the effects of three structurally different PCB congeners, PCB118, PCB 126, and PCB 153, each at two concentrations, on the steroidogenic capacity and proteome of human adrenocortical carcinoma cell line cultures (H295R) . After 48 h of exposure, cell viability was monitored and estradiol, testosterone, cortisol and progesterone secretion measured to quantify steroidogenic capacity of the cells. Two-dimensional (2D) gel-based proteomics was used to screen for proteome alterations in H295R cells in response to the PCB. Exposure to PCB 118 increased estradiol and cortisol secretion, while exposure to PCB 153 elevated estradiol secretion. PCB 126 was the most potent congener, increasing estradiol, cortisol, and progesterone secretion in exposed H295R cells. Seventy-three of the 711 spots analyzed showed a significant difference in normalized spot volumes between controls (vehicle only) and at least one exposure group. Fourteen of these protein spots were identified by liquid chromatography with mass spectroscopy (LC-MS/MS). Exposure to three PCB congeners with different chemical structure perturbed steroidogenesis and protein expression in the H295R in vitro model. This study represents an initial analysis of the effects on proteins and hormones in the H295R cell model, and additional studies are required in order to obtain a more complete understanding of the pathways disturbed by PCB congeners in H295R cells. Overall, alterations in protein regulation and steroid hormone synthesis suggest that exposure to PCB disturbs several cellular processes, including

  2. DONUT results

    SciTech Connect

    Furukawa, Tomoko

    2008-02-21

    The DONUT experiment succeeded in observing tau-neutrino CC interactions for the first time in 2000. The analysis using total sample is presented in this paper, based on 3.5x10{sup 17} protons on target. The number of identified {nu}{sub {tau}} CC interactions is 9 from 581 neutrino interactions located in the emulsion. The result of the first measurement of {nu}{sub {tau}} CC cross section is consistent with the expectation from the Standard Model.

  3. Physics of protein motility and motor proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.

    2013-09-01

    Motor proteins are enzymatic molecules that transform chemical energy into mechanical motion and work. They are critically important for supporting various cellular activities and functions. In the last 15 years significant progress in understanding the functioning of motor proteins has been achieved due to revolutionary breakthroughs in single-molecule experimental techniques and strong advances in theoretical modelling. However, microscopic mechanisms of protein motility are still not well explained, and the collective efforts of many scientists are needed in order to solve these complex problems. In this special section the reader will find the latest advances on the difficult road to mapping motor proteins dynamics in various systems. Recent experimental developments have allowed researchers to monitor and to influence the activity of single motor proteins with a high spatial and temporal resolution. It has stimulated significant theoretical efforts to understand the non-equilibrium nature of protein motility phenomena. The latest results from all these advances are presented and discussed in this special section. We would like to thank the scientists from all over the world who have reported their latest research results for this special section. We are also grateful to the staff and editors of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter for their invaluable help in handling all the administrative and refereeing activities. The field of motor proteins and protein motility is fast moving, and we hope that this collection of articles will be a useful source of information in this highly interdisciplinary area. Physics of protein motility and motor proteins contents Physics of protein motility and motor proteinsAnatoly B Kolomeisky Identification of unique interactions between the flexible linker and the RecA-like domains of DEAD-box helicase Mss116 Yuan Zhang, Mirkó Palla, Andrew Sun and Jung-Chi Liao The load dependence of the physical properties of a molecular motor

  4. Proteins and glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Frauenfelder, H.

    1997-12-31

    The structure, the energy landscape, and the dynamics of proteins and glasses are similar. Both types of systems display characteristic nonexponential time dependencies of relaxation phenomena. Experiments suggest that both, proteins and glasses, are heterogeneous and that this fact causes the observed time dependence. This result is discussed in terms of the rough energy landscape characteristic of complex systems.

  5. Prediction of protein-protein interactions based on protein-protein correlation using least squares regression.

    PubMed

    Huang, De-Shuang; Zhang, Lei; Han, Kyungsook; Deng, Suping; Yang, Kai; Zhang, Hongbo

    2014-01-01

    In order to transform protein sequences into the feature vectors, several works have been done, such as computing auto covariance (AC), conjoint triad (CT), local descriptor (LD), moran autocorrelation (MA), normalized moreaubroto autocorrelation (NMB) and so on. In this paper, we shall adopt these transformation methods to encode the proteins, respectively, where AC, CT, LD, MA and NMB are all represented by '+' in a unified manner. A new method, i.e. the combination of least squares regression with '+' (abbreviated as LSR(+)), will be introduced for encoding a protein-protein correlation-based feature representation and an interacting protein pair. Thus there are totally five different combinations for LSR(+), i.e. LSRAC, LSRCT, LSRLD, LSRMA and LSRNMB. As a result, we combined a support vector machine (SVM) approach with LSR(+) to predict protein-protein interactions (PPI) and PPI networks. The proposed method has been applied on four datasets, i.e. Saaccharomyces cerevisiae, Escherichia coli, Homo sapiens and Caenorhabditis elegans. The experimental results demonstrate that all LSR(+) methods outperform many existing representative algorithms. Therefore, LSR(+) is a powerful tool to characterize the protein-protein correlations and to infer PPI, whilst keeping high performance on prediction of PPI networks. PMID:25059329

  6. Ultrafiltration of pegylated proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molek, Jessica R.

    There is considerable clinical interest in the use of "second-generation" therapeutics produced by conjugation of a native protein with various polymers including polyethylene glycol (PEG). PEG--protein conjugates, so-called PEGylated proteins, can exhibit enhanced stability, half-life, and bioavailability. One of the challenges in the commercial production of PEGylated proteins is the purification required to remove unreacted polymer, native protein, and in many cases PEGylated proteins with nonoptimal degrees of conjugation. The overall objective of this thesis was to examine the use of ultrafiltration for the purification of PEGylated proteins. This included: (1) analysis of size-based separation of PEGylated proteins using conventional ultrafiltration membranes, (2) use of electrically-charged membranes to exploit differences in electrostatic interactions, and (3) examination of the effects of PEGylation on protein fouling. The experimental results were analyzed using appropriate theoretical models, with the underlying physical properties of the PEGylated proteins evaluated using size exclusion chromatography, capillary electrophoresis, dynamic light scattering, and reverse phase chromatography. PEGylated proteins were produced by covalent attachment of activated PEG to a protein via primary amines on the lysine residues. A simple model was developed for the reaction kinetics, which was used to explore the effect of reaction conditions and mode of operation on the distribution of PEGylated products. The effective size of the PEGylated proteins was evaluated using size exclusion chromatography, with appropriate correlations developed for the size in terms of the molecular weight of the native protein and attached PEG. The electrophoretic mobility of the PEGylated proteins were evaluated by capillary electrophoresis with the data in good agreement with a simple model accounting for the increase in protein size and the reduction in the number of protonated amine

  7. How Many Protein-Protein Interactions Types Exist in Nature?

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Pralay; Zhang, Yang

    2012-01-01

    Protein quaternary structure universe” refers to the ensemble of all protein-protein complexes across all organisms in nature. The number of quaternary folds thus corresponds to the number of ways proteins physically interact with other proteins. This study focuses on answering two basic questions: Whether the number of protein-protein interactions is limited and, if yes, how many different quaternary folds exist in nature. By all-to-all sequence and structure comparisons, we grouped the protein complexes in the protein data bank (PDB) into 3,629 families and 1,761 folds. A statistical model was introduced to obtain the quantitative relation between the numbers of quaternary families and quaternary folds in nature. The total number of possible protein-protein interactions was estimated around 4,000, which indicates that the current protein repository contains only 42% of quaternary folds in nature and a full coverage needs approximately a quarter century of experimental effort. The results have important implications to the protein complex structural modeling and the structure genomics of protein-protein interactions. PMID:22719985

  8. How many protein-protein interactions types exist in nature?

    PubMed

    Garma, Leonardo; Mukherjee, Srayanta; Mitra, Pralay; Zhang, Yang

    2012-01-01

    "Protein quaternary structure universe" refers to the ensemble of all protein-protein complexes across all organisms in nature. The number of quaternary folds thus corresponds to the number of ways proteins physically interact with other proteins. This study focuses on answering two basic questions: Whether the number of protein-protein interactions is limited and, if yes, how many different quaternary folds exist in nature. By all-to-all sequence and structure comparisons, we grouped the protein complexes in the protein data bank (PDB) into 3,629 families and 1,761 folds. A statistical model was introduced to obtain the quantitative relation between the numbers of quaternary families and quaternary folds in nature. The total number of possible protein-protein interactions was estimated around 4,000, which indicates that the current protein repository contains only 42% of quaternary folds in nature and a full coverage needs approximately a quarter century of experimental effort. The results have important implications to the protein complex structural modeling and the structure genomics of protein-protein interactions. PMID:22719985

  9. Protein Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frauenfelder, Hans

    2011-03-01

    Proteins combine properties of solids, liquids, and glasses. Schrödinger anticipated the main features of biomolecules long ago by stating that they had to be solid-like, but able to assume many different conformations. Indeed proteins can assume a gigantic number of conformational substates with the same primary sequence but different conformations. The different substates are described as craters in a very-high-dimensional energy landscape. The energy landscape is organized in a hierarchy of tiers, craters within craters within craters. Protein motions are pictured as transition between substates - jumps from crater to crater. Initially we assumed that these jumps were controlled by internal barriers between substates, but experiments have shown that nature selected a different approach. Proteins are surrounded by one to two layers of water and are embedded in a bulk solvent. Structural motions of the protein are controlled by the alpha fluctuations in the solvent surrounding the protein. Some internal motions most likely involving side chains are controlled electrostatically by beta fluctuations in the hydration shell. The dynamics of proteins is consequently dominated by the environment (H. Frauenfelder et al. PNAS 106, 5129 (2009). One can speculate that this organization permits exchange of information among biomolecules. The energy landscape is not just organized into two tiers, alpha and beta, but cryogenic experiments have revealed more tiers and protein more properties similar to that of glasses. While proteins function at ambient temperatures, cryogenic studies are necessary to understand the physics relevant for biology.

  10. Protein-protein interactions: methods for detection and analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Phizicky, E M; Fields, S

    1995-01-01

    The function and activity of a protein are often modulated by other proteins with which it interacts. This review is intended as a practical guide to the analysis of such protein-protein interactions. We discuss biochemical methods such as protein affinity chromatography, affinity blotting, coimmunoprecipitation, and cross-linking; molecular biological methods such as protein probing, the two-hybrid system, and phage display: and genetic methods such as the isolation of extragenic suppressors, synthetic mutants, and unlinked noncomplementing mutants. We next describe how binding affinities can be evaluated by techniques including protein affinity chromatography, sedimentation, gel filtration, fluorescence methods, solid-phase sampling of equilibrium solutions, and surface plasmon resonance. Finally, three examples of well-characterized domains involved in multiple protein-protein interactions are examined. The emphasis of the discussion is on variations in the approaches, concerns in evaluating the results, and advantages and disadvantages of the techniques. PMID:7708014

  11. Improved method for protein complex detection using bottleneck proteins

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Detecting protein complexes is one of essential and fundamental tasks in understanding various biological functions or processes. Therefore accurate identification of protein complexes is indispensable. Methods For more accurate detection of protein complexes, we propose an algorithm which detects dense protein sub-networks of which proteins share closely located bottleneck proteins. The proposed algorithm is capable of finding protein complexes which allow overlapping with each other. Results We applied our algorithm to several PPI (Protein-Protein Interaction) networks of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Homo sapiens, and validated our results using public databases of protein complexes. The prediction accuracy was even more improved over our previous work which used also bottleneck information of the PPI network, but showed limitation when predicting small-sized protein complex detection. Conclusions Our algorithm resulted in overlapping protein complexes with significantly improved F1 score over existing algorithms. This result comes from high recall due to effective network search, as well as high precision due to proper use of bottleneck information during the network search. PMID:23566214

  12. Interfacial Protein-Protein Associations

    PubMed Central

    Langdon, Blake B.; Kastantin, Mark; Walder, Robert; Schwartz, Daniel K.

    2014-01-01

    While traditional models of protein adsorption focus primarily on direct protein-surface interactions, recent findings suggest that protein-protein interactions may play a central role. Using high-throughput intermolecular resonance energy transfer (RET) tracking, we directly observed dynamic, protein-protein associations of bovine serum albumin on poly(ethylene glycol) modified surfaces. The associations were heterogeneous and reversible, and associating molecules resided on the surface for longer times. The appearance of three distinct RET states suggested a spatially heterogeneous surface – with areas of high protein density (i.e. strongly-interacting clusters) coexisting with mobile monomers. Distinct association states exhibited characteristic behavior, i.e. partial-RET (monomer-monomer) associations were shorter-lived than complete-RET (protein-cluster) associations. While the fractional surface area covered by regions with high protein density (i.e. clusters) increased with increasing concentration, the distribution of contact times between monomers and clusters was independent of solution concentration, suggesting that associations were a local phenomenon, and independent of the global surface coverage. PMID:24274729

  13. Homozygous deletion of EPB41 genuine AUG-containing exons results in mRNA splicing defects, NMD activation and protein 4.1R complete deficiency in hereditary elliptocytosis.

    PubMed

    Baklouti, Faouzi; Morinière, Madeleine; Haj-Khélil, Amel; Fénéant-Thibault, Madeleine; Gruffat, Henri; Couté, Yohann; Ninot, Alain; Guitton, Corinne; Delaunay, Jean

    2011-10-15

    Complete loss of protein 4.1R in red blood cell membrane is a very rare condition in humans. We here explore the third case. The morphological and biochemical observations suggested that the proband suffers from homozygous hereditary elliptocytosis. Both parents, who are consanguineous, have an elliptocytosis with no cell fragmentation, typical of a heterozygous 4.1R deficiency with a silent allele. A genomic deletion was found; it encompasses about 50 kb of genomic DNA, and suppresses the two key exons 2 and 4, which contain the two functional AUG translation initiation sites in erythroid and nonerythroid cells. The alternative first exons are intact, hence preserving the transcription potential of the altered gene. Extensive analysis of 4.1R transcripts revealed multiple splicing defects upstream of the deleted sequences. Importantly, we found that most of the transcripts generated from the altered gene are intercepted by the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay mechanism, suggesting that the massive degradation of the mRNA species jeopardizes the production of shortened but functional protein 4.1R from an alternative translation initiation site downstream of the deletion. PMID:21839655

  14. Protein function annotation using protein domain family resources.

    PubMed

    Das, Sayoni; Orengo, Christine A

    2016-01-15

    As a result of the genome sequencing and structural genomics initiatives, we have a wealth of protein sequence and structural data. However, only about 1% of these proteins have experimental functional annotations. As a result, computational approaches that can predict protein functions are essential in bridging this widening annotation gap. This article reviews the current approaches of protein function prediction using structure and sequence based classification of protein domain family resources with a special focus on functional families in the CATH-Gene3D resource. PMID:26434392

  15. Protein identification and Peptide expression resolver: harmonizing protein identification with protein expression data.

    PubMed

    Kearney, Paul; Butler, Heather; Eng, Kevin; Hugo, Patrice

    2008-01-01

    Proteomic discovery platforms generate both peptide expression information and protein identification information. Peptide expression data are used to determine which peptides are differentially expressed between study cohorts, and then these peptides are targeted for protein identification. In this paper, we demonstrate that peptide expression information is also a powerful tool for enhancing confidence in protein identification results. Specifically, we evaluate the following hypothesis: tryptic peptides originating from the same protein have similar expression profiles across samples in the discovery study. Evidence supporting this hypothesis is provided. This hypothesis is integrated into a protein identification tool, PIPER (Protein Identification and Peptide Expression Resolver), that reduces erroneous protein identifications below 5%. PIPER's utility is illustrated by application to a 72-sample biomarker discovery study where it is demonstrated that false positive protein identifications can be reduced below 5%. Consequently, it is recommended that PIPER methodology be incorporated into proteomic studies where both protein expression and identification data are collected. PMID:18062667

  16. Effect of sepsis on calcium uptake and content in skeletal muscle and regulation in vitro by calcium of total and myofibrillar protein breakdown in control and septic muscle: Results from a preliminary study

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, D.W.; Hasselgren, P.O.; Hiyama, D.T.; James, J.H.; Li, S.; Rigel, D.F.; Fischer, J.E.

    1989-07-01

    Because high calcium concentration in vitro stimulates muscle proteolysis, calcium has been implicated in the pathogenesis of increased muscle breakdown in different catabolic conditions. Protein breakdown in skeletal muscle is increased during sepsis, but the effect of sepsis on muscle calcium uptake and content is not known. In this study the influence of sepsis, induced in rats by cecal ligation and puncture, on muscle calcium uptake and content was studied. Sixteen hours after cecal ligation and puncture or sham operation, calcium content of the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and soleus (SOL) muscles was determined with an atomic absorption spectrometer. Calcium uptake was measured in intact SOL muscles incubated in the presence of calcium 45 (45Ca) for between 1 and 120 minutes. Total and myofibrillar protein breakdown was determined in SOL muscles, incubated in the presence of different calcium concentrations (0; 2.5; 5.0 mmol/L), and measured as release into the incubation medium of tyrosine and 3-methylhistidine (3-MH), respectively. Calcium content was increased by 51% (p less than 0.001) during sepsis in SOL and by 10% (p less than 0.05) in EDL muscle. There was no difference in 45Ca uptake between control and septic muscles during the early phase (1 to 5 minutes) of incubation. During more extended incubation (30 to 120 minutes), muscles from septic rats took up significantly more 45Ca than control muscles (p less than 0.05). Tyrosine release by incubated SOL muscles from control and septic rats was increased when calcium was added to the incubation medium, and at a calcium concentration of 2.5 mmol/L, the increase in tyrosine release was greater in septic than in control muscle. Addition of calcium to the incubation medium did not affect 3-MH release in control or septic muscle.

  17. Protein Attachment on Nanodiamonds.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chung-Lun; Lin, Cheng-Huang; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Su, Meng-Chih

    2015-07-16

    A recent advance in nanotechnology is the scale-up production of small and nonaggregated diamond nanoparticles suitable for biological applications. Using detonation nanodiamonds (NDs) with an average diameter of ∼4 nm as the adsorbents, we have studied the static attachment of three proteins (myoglobin, bovine serum albumin, and insulin) onto the nanoparticles by optical spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and dynamic light scattering, and electrophoretic zeta potential measurements. Results show that the protein surface coverage is predominantly determined by the competition between protein-protein and protein-ND interactions, giving each protein a unique and characteristic structural configuration in its own complex. Specifically, both myoglobin and bovine serum albumin show a Langmuir-type adsorption behavior, forming 1:1 complexes at saturation, whereas insulin folds into a tightly bound multimer before adsorption. The markedly different adsorption patterns appear to be independent of the protein concentration and are closely related to the affinity of the individual proteins for the NDs. The present study provides a fundamental understanding for the use of NDs as a platform for nanomedical drug delivery. PMID:25815400

  18. EDITORIAL: Precision proteins Precision proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2010-06-01

    Since the birth of modern day medicine, during the times of Hippocrates in ancient Greece, the profession has developed from the rudimentary classification of disease into a rigorous science with an inspiring capability to treat and cure. Scientific methodology has distilled clinical diagnostic tools from the early arts of prognosis, which used to rely as much on revelation and prophecy, as intuition and judgement [1]. Over the past decade, research into the interactions between proteins and nanosystems has provided some ingenious and apt techniques for delving into the intricacies of anatomical systems. In vivo biosensing has emerged as a vibrant field of research, as much of medical diagnosis relies on the detection of substances or an imbalance in the chemicals in the body. The inherent properties of nanoscale structures, such as cantilevers, make them well suited to biosensing applications that demand the detection of molecules at very low concentrations. Measurable deflections in cantilevers functionalised with antibodies provide quantitative indicators of the presence of specific antigens when the two react. Such developments have roused mounting interest in the interactions of proteins with nanostructures, such as carbon nanotubes [3], which have demonstrated great potential as generic biomarkers. Plasmonic properties are also being exploited in sensing applications, such as the molecular sentinel recently devised by researchers in the US. The device uses the plasmonic properties of a silver nanoparticle linked to a Raman labelled hairpin DNA probe to signal changes in the probe geometry resulting from interactions with substances in the environment. Success stories so far include the detection of two specific genes associated with breast cancer [4]. A greater understanding of how RNA interference regulates gene expression has highlighted the potential of using this natural process as another agent for combating disease in personalized medicine. However, the

  19. EDITORIAL: Precision proteins Precision proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2010-06-01

    Since the birth of modern day medicine, during the times of Hippocrates in ancient Greece, the profession has developed from the rudimentary classification of disease into a rigorous science with an inspiring capability to treat and cure. Scientific methodology has distilled clinical diagnostic tools from the early arts of prognosis, which used to rely as much on revelation and prophecy, as intuition and judgement [1]. Over the past decade, research into the interactions between proteins and nanosystems has provided some ingenious and apt techniques for delving into the intricacies of anatomical systems. In vivo biosensing has emerged as a vibrant field of research, as much of medical diagnosis relies on the detection of substances or an imbalance in the chemicals in the body. The inherent properties of nanoscale structures, such as cantilevers, make them well suited to biosensing applications that demand the detection of molecules at very low concentrations. Measurable deflections in cantilevers functionalised with antibodies provide quantitative indicators of the presence of specific antigens when the two react. Such developments have roused mounting interest in the interactions of proteins with nanostructures, such as carbon nanotubes [3], which have demonstrated great potential as generic biomarkers. Plasmonic properties are also being exploited in sensing applications, such as the molecular sentinel recently devised by researchers in the US. The device uses the plasmonic properties of a silver nanoparticle linked to a Raman labelled hairpin DNA probe to signal changes in the probe geometry resulting from interactions with substances in the environment. Success stories so far include the detection of two specific genes associated with breast cancer [4]. A greater understanding of how RNA interference regulates gene expression has highlighted the potential of using this natural process as another agent for combating disease in personalized medicine. However, the

  20. Whey Protein

    MedlinePlus

    ... intolerance, for replacing or supplementing milk-based infant formulas, and for reversing weight loss and increasing glutathione ( ... allergic reactions compared to infants who receive standard formula. However, taking why protein might not be helpful ...

  1. Protein based Block Copolymers

    PubMed Central

    Rabotyagova, Olena S.; Cebe, Peggy; Kaplan, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Advances in genetic engineering have led to the synthesis of protein-based block copolymers with control of chemistry and molecular weight, resulting in unique physical and biological properties. The benefits from incorporating peptide blocks into copolymer designs arise from the fundamental properties of proteins to adopt ordered conformations and to undergo self-assembly, providing control over structure formation at various length scales when compared to conventional block copolymers. This review covers the synthesis, structure, assembly, properties, and applications of protein-based block copolymers. PMID:21235251

  2. Correlation of C-reactive protein haplotypes with serum C-reactive protein level and response to anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy in UK rheumatoid arthritis patients: results from the Biologics in Rheumatoid Arthritis Genetics and Genomics Study Syndicate cohort

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction In many European countries, restrictions exist around the prescription of anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) treatments for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Eligibility and response to treatment is assessed by using the disease activity score 28 (DAS28) algorithm, which incorporates one of two inflammatory markers, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) or C-reactive protein (CRP). Although DAS28-CRP provides a more reliable measure of disease activity, functional variants exist within the CRP gene that affect basal CRP production. Therefore, we aimed to determine the relation between functional genetic variants at the CRP gene locus and levels of serum CRP in RA patients, and whether these variants, alone or in combination, are correlated with DAS28-CRP and change in DAS28-CRP after anti-TNF treatment. Methods DNA samples from the Biologics in Rheumatoid Arthritis Genetics and Genomics Study Syndicate (BRAGGSS) were genotyped for rs1205, rs1800947, and rs3091244 by using either TaqMan or the Sequenom MassARRAY iPLEX system. Estimated haplotypes were constructed for each sample by using the expectation maximization algorithm implemented in the haplo.stats package within the R statistical program. CRP values were log transformed, and the association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), haplotypes of SNPs and baseline CRP, baseline DAS28-CRP, and change in DAS28-CRP were evaluated by using linear regression in STATA v.10. Results Baseline CRP measurements were available for 599 samples with 442 also having data 6 months after treatment with an anti-TNF. For these 442 samples, the study had > 80% power to detect a clinically meaningful difference of 0.6 DAS28 Units for an allele frequency of 5%. Estimated haplotype frequencies corresponded with previous frequencies reported in the literature. Overall, no significant association was observed between any of the markers investigated and baseline CRP levels. Further, CRP haplotypes did not correlate

  3. The t(10;11)(p13;q14) in the U937 cell line results in the fusion of the AF10 gene and CALM, encoding a new member of the AP-3 clathrin assembly protein family.

    PubMed Central

    Dreyling, M H; Martinez-Climent, J A; Zheng, M; Mao, J; Rowley, J D; Bohlander, S K

    1996-01-01

    The translocation t(10;11)(p13;q14) is a recurring chromosomal abnormality that has been observed in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia as well as acute myeloid leukemia. We have recently reported that the monocytic cell line U937 has a t(10;11)(p13;q14) translocation. Using a combination of positional cloning and candidate gene approach, we cloned the breakpoint and were able to show that AF10 is fused to a novel gene that we named CALM (Clathrin Assembly Lymphoid Myeloid leukemia gene) located at 11q14. AF10, a putative transcription factor, had recently been cloned as one of the fusion partners of MLL. CALM has a very high homology in its N-terminal third to the murine ap-3 gene which is one of the clathrin assembly proteins. The N-terminal region of ap-3 has been shown to bind to clathrin and to have a high-affinity binding site for phosphoinositols. The identification of the CALM/AF10 fusion gene in the widely used U937 cell line will contribute to our understanding of the malignant phenotype of this line. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:8643484

  4. Delayed formation of zero-valent selenium nanoparticles by Bacillus mycoides SeITE01 as a consequence of selenite reduction under aerobic conditions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Selenite (SeO32−) oxyanion shows severe toxicity to biota. Different bacterial strains exist that are capable of reducing SeO32− to non-toxic elemental selenium (Se0), with the formation of Se nanoparticles (SeNPs). These SeNPs might be exploited for technological applications due to their physico-chemical and biological characteristics. The present paper discusses the reduction of selenite to SeNPs by a strain of Bacillus sp., SeITE01, isolated from the rhizosphere of the Se-hyperaccumulator legume Astragalus bisulcatus. Results Use of 16S rRNA and GyrB gene sequence analysis positioned SeITE01 phylogenetically close to B. mycoides. On agarized medium, this strain showed rhizoid growth whilst, in liquid cultures, it was capable of reducing 0.5 and 2.0 mM SeO32− within 12 and 24 hours, respectively. The resultant Se0 aggregated to form nanoparticles and the amount of Se0 measured was equivalent to the amount of selenium originally added as selenite to the growth medium. A delay of more than 24 hours was observed between the depletion of SeO32 and the detection of SeNPs. Nearly spherical-shaped SeNPs were mostly found in the extracellular environment whilst rarely in the cytoplasmic compartment. Size of SeNPs ranged from 50 to 400 nm in diameter, with dimensions greatly influenced by the incubation times. Different SeITE01 protein fractions were assayed for SeO32− reductase capability, revealing that enzymatic activity was mainly associated with the membrane fraction. Reduction of SeO32− was also detected in the supernatant of bacterial cultures upon NADH addition. Conclusions The selenite reducing bacterial strain SeITE01 was attributed to the species Bacillus mycoides on the basis of phenotypic and molecular traits. Under aerobic conditions, the formation of SeNPs were observed both extracellularly or intracellullarly. Possible mechanisms of Se0 precipitation and SeNPs assembly are suggested. SeO32− is proposed to be enzimatically reduced to

  5. How do chaperonins fold protein?

    PubMed Central

    Motojima, Fumihiro

    2015-01-01

    Protein folding is a biological process that is essential for the proper functioning of proteins in all living organisms. In cells, many proteins require the assistance of molecular chaperones for their folding. Chaperonins belong to a class of molecular chaperones that have been extensively studied. However, the mechanism by which a chaperonin mediates the folding of proteins is still controversial. Denatured proteins are folded in the closed chaperonin cage, leading to the assumption that denatured proteins are completely encapsulated inside the chaperonin cage. In contrast to the assumption, we recently found that denatured protein interacts with hydrophobic residues at the subunit interfaces of the chaperonin, and partially protrude out of the cage. In this review, we will explain our recent results and introduce our model for the mechanism by which chaperonins accelerate protein folding, in view of recent findings.

  6. Tetramer formation in Arabidopsis MADS domain proteins: analysis of a protein-protein interaction network

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background MADS domain proteins are transcription factors that coordinate several important developmental processes in plants. These proteins interact with other MADS domain proteins to form dimers, and it has been proposed that they are able to associate as tetrameric complexes that regulate transcription of target genes. Whether the formation of functional tetramers is a widespread property of plant MADS domain proteins, or it is specific to few of these transcriptional regulators remains unclear. Results We analyzed the structure of the network of physical interactions among MADS domain proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana. We determined the abundance of subgraphs that represent the connection pattern expected for a MADS domain protein heterotetramer. These subgraphs were significantly more abundant in the MADS domain protein interaction network than in randomized analogous networks. Importantly, these subgraphs are not significantly frequent in a protein interaction network of TCP plant transcription factors, when compared to expectation by chance. In addition, we found that MADS domain proteins in tetramer-like subgraphs are more likely to be expressed jointly than proteins in other subgraphs. This effect is mainly due to proteins in the monophyletic MIKC clade, as there is no association between tetramer-like subgraphs and co-expression for proteins outside this clade. Conclusions Our results support that the tendency to form functional tetramers is widespread in the MADS domain protein-protein interaction network. Our observations also suggest that this trend is prevalent, or perhaps exclusive, for proteins in the MIKC clade. Because it is possible to retrodict several experimental results from our analyses, our work can be an important aid to make new predictions and facilitates experimental research on plant MADS domain proteins. PMID:24468197

  7. Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1 and Insulin-Like Growth Factor-Binding Protein 3 in Relation to the Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Results From the EPIC-Potsdam Study.

    PubMed

    Drogan, Dagmar; Schulze, Matthias B; Boeing, Heiner; Pischon, Tobias

    2016-03-15

    Higher levels of insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3) might raise the risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) via binding of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), an insulin-like hormone that is involved in glucose homeostasis. We investigated serum concentrations of IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 and their molar ratio in relation to T2DM incidence in a nested case-cohort study within the European Prospective Investigation Into Cancer and Nutrition-Potsdam Study. We included a randomly selected subcohort of persons without T2DM at the time of blood sampling (n = 2,269) and 776 individuals with incident T2DM identified between 1994 and 2005. For the highest quartile versus lowest, the multivariable-adjusted hazard rate ratios were 0.91 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.68, 1.23; P for trend = 0.31) for IGF-1, 1.33 (95% CI: 1.00, 1.76; P for trend = 0.04) for IGFBP-3, and 0.77 (95% CI: 0.57, 1.03; P for trend = 0.03) for IGF-1:IGFBP-3 ratio. IGFBP-3 level remained positively associated with T2DM incidence-and the ratio of IGF-1 to IGFBP-3 was inversely related with T2DM incidence--in models that included adjustment for IGF-1 concentrations (P for trend < 0.05). Therefore, our findings do not confirm an association between total IGF-1 concentrations and risk of T2DM in the general study population, although higher IGFBP-3 levels might raise T2DM risk independent of IGF-1 levels. PMID:26880678

  8. Elevated levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein are associated with mild cognitive impairment and its subtypes: results of a population-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Dlugaj, Martha; Gerwig, Marcus; Wege, Natalia; Siegrist, Johannes; Mann, Klaus; Bröcker-Preuss, Martina; Dragano, Nico; Moebus, Susanne; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Bokhof, Beate; Möhlenkamp, Stefan; Erbel, Raimund; Weimar, Christian

    2012-01-01

    As high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) seems to be associated with an increased risk of cognitive decline, this nested case-control study examined the relation of hsCRP and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) at different time points. 148 MCI cases (106 amnestic, 42 non-amnestic (aMCI/naMCI)) and 148 matched controls were identified from a prospective population based cohort study of 4,359 participants (aged 50-80). HsCRP levels were measured 5 years before (baseline) and at the time of neuropsychological testing (follow-up). Odds ratios (OR) for hsCRP quartiles serum levels were calculated for the two time points using logistic regression analyses and were adjusted for cardiovascular covariates. In the fully adjusted model, baseline hsCRP levels were significantly associated with both MCI and aMCI (OR = 2.29, 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.01-5.15, first versus fourth quartile, respective OR = 2.73, 95% CI, 1.09-6.84). At follow-up, the fourth hsCRP quartile was associated with MCI (OR = 3.60, 95% CI, 1.55-8.33), aMCI (OR = 3.73, 95% CI, 1.52-9.17) and naMCI (OR = 3.66, 95% CI, 1.00-13.77). Elevated hsCRP levels, even detected five years before diagnosis, are associated with an at least twofold increased probability of MCI. These findings suggest that inflammation plays an important role in the development and presence of cognitive impairment. PMID:22008268

  9. Heat shock proteins: molecular chaperones of protein biogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Craig, E A; Gambill, B D; Nelson, R J

    1993-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (Hsps) were first identified as proteins whose synthesis was enhanced by stresses such as an increase in temperature. Recently, several of the major Hsps have been shown to be intimately involved in protein biogenesis through a direct interaction with a wide variety of proteins. As a reflection of this role, these Hsps have been referred to as molecular chaperones. Hsp70s interact with incompletely folded proteins, such as nascent chains on ribosomes and proteins in the process of translocation from the cytosol into mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum. Hsp60 also binds to unfolded proteins, preventing aggregation and facilitating protein folding. Although less well defined, other Hsps such as Hsp90 also play important roles in modulating the activity of a number of proteins. The function of the proteolytic system is intertwined with that of molecular chaperones. Several components of this system, encoded by heat-inducible genes, are responsible for the degradation of abnormal or misfolded proteins. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has proven very useful in the analysis of the role of molecular chaperones in protein maturation, translocation, and degradation. In this review, results of experiments are discussed within the context of experiments with other organisms in an attempt to describe the current state of understanding of these ubiquitous and important proteins. PMID:8336673

  10. The late addition of core lipids to nascent apolipoprotein B100, resulting in the assembly and secretion of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, is independent of both microsomal triglyceride transfer protein activity and new triglyceride synthesis.

    PubMed

    Pan, Meihui; Liang Js, Jun-shan; Fisher, Edward A; Ginsberg, Henry N

    2002-02-01

    Although microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) and newly synthesized triglyceride (TG) are critical for co-translational targeting of apolipoprotein B (apoB100) to lipoprotein assembly in hepatoma cell lines, their roles in the later stages of lipoprotein assembly remain unclear. Using N-acetyl-Leu-Leu-norleucinal to prevent proteasomal degradation, HepG2 cells were radiolabeled and chased for 0-90 min (chase I). The medium was changed and cells chased for another 150 min (chase II) in the absence (control) or presence of Pfizer MTP inhibitor CP-10447 (CP). As chase I was extended, inhibition of apoB100 secretion by CP during chase II decreased from 75.9% to only 15% of control (no CP during chase II). Additional studies were conducted in which chase I was either 0 or 90 min, and chase II was in the presence of [(3)H]glycerol and either BSA (control), CP (inhibits both MTP activity and TG synthesis),BMS-1976360-1) (BMS) (inhibits only MTP activity), or triacsin C (TC) (inhibits only TG synthesis). When chase I was 0 min, CP, BMS, and TC reduced apoB100 secretion during chase II by 75.3, 73.9, and 53.9%. However, when chase I was 90 min, those agents reduced apoB100 secretion during chase II by only 16.0, 19.2, and 13.9%. Of note, all three inhibited secretion of newly synthesized TG during chase II by 80, 80, and 40%, whether chase I was 0 or 90 min. In both HepG2 cells and McA-RH7777 cells, if chase I was at least 60 min, inhibition of TG synthesis and/or MTP activity did not affect the density of secreted apoB100-lipoproteins under basal conditions. Oleic acid increased secretion of TG-enriched apoB100-lipoproteins similarly in the absence or presence of either of CP, BMS, or TC. We conclude that neither MTP nor newly synthesized TG is necessary for the later stages of apoB100-lipoprotein assembly and secretion in either HepG2 or McA-RH7777 cells. PMID:11704664

  11. Untying knots in proteins.

    PubMed

    Sułkowska, Joanna I; Sułkowski, Piotr; Szymczak, Piotr; Cieplak, Marek

    2010-10-13

    A shoelace can be readily untied by pulling its ends rather than its loops. Attempting to untie a native knot in a protein can also succeed or fail depending on where one pulls. However, thermal fluctuations induced by the surrounding water affect conformations stochastically and may add to the uncertainty of the outcome. When the protein is pulled by the termini, the knot can only get tightened, and any attempt at untying results in failure. We show that, by pulling specific amino acids, one may easily retract a terminal segment of the backbone from the knotting loop and untangle the knot. At still other amino acids, the outcome of pulling can go either way. We study the dependence of the untying probability on the way the protein is grasped, the pulling speed, and the temperature. Elucidation of the mechanisms underlying this dependence is critical for a successful experimental realization of protein knot untying. PMID:20857930

  12. Binding Efficiency of Protein-Protein Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Day, Eric S.; Cote, Shaun M.; Whitty, Adrian

    2012-01-01

    We examine the relationship between binding affinity and interface size for reversible protein-protein interactions (PPI), using cytokines from the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) superfamily and their receptors as a test case. Using surface plasmon resonance, we measured single-site binding affinities for the large receptor TNFR1 binding to its ligands TNFα (KD = 1.4 ± 0.4 nM) and lymphotoxin-α (KD = 50 ± 10 nM), and also for the small receptor Fn14 binding to TWEAK (KD = 70 ± 10 nM). We additionally assembled data for all other TNF/TNFR family complexes for which reliable single site binding affinities have been reported. We used these values to calculate the binding efficiency – defined as binding energy per Å2 of surface area buried at the contact interface – for the nine of these complexes for which co-crystal structures are available, and compared the results to those for a set of 144 protein-protein complexes with published affinity values. The results show that the most efficient PPI complexes generate ~20 cal.mol−1/Å2 of binding energy. A minimum contact area of ~500 Å2 is required for a stable complex, required to generate sufficient interaction energy to pay the entropic cost of co-localizing two proteins from 1 M solution. The most compact and efficient TNF/TNFR complex was BAFF/BR3, which achieved ~80% of the maximum achievable binding efficiency. Other small receptors also gave high binding efficiencies, while the larger receptors generated only 44-49% of this limit despite interacting primarily through just a single small domain. The results provide new insight into how much binding energy can be generated by a PPI interface of a given size, and establish a quantitative method to predict how large a natural or engineered contact interface must be to achieve a given level of binding affinity. PMID:23088250

  13. Proteins interacting with cloning scars: a source of false positive protein-protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Banks, Charles A. S.; Boanca, Gina; Lee, Zachary T.; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    A common approach for exploring the interactome, the network of protein-protein interactions in cells, uses a commercially available ORF library to express affinity tagged bait proteins; these can be expressed in cells and endogenous cellular proteins that copurify with the bait can be identified as putative interacting proteins using mass spectrometry. Control experiments can be used to limit false-positive results, but in many cases, there are still a surprising number of prey proteins that appear to copurify specifically with the bait. Here, we have identified one source of false-positive interactions in such studies. We have found that a combination of: 1) the variable sequence of the C-terminus of the bait with 2) a C-terminal valine “cloning scar” present in a commercially available ORF library, can in some cases create a peptide motif that results in the aberrant co-purification of endogenous cellular proteins. Control experiments may not identify false positives resulting from such artificial motifs, as aberrant binding depends on sequences that vary from one bait to another. It is possible that such cryptic protein binding might occur in other systems using affinity tagged proteins; this study highlights the importance of conducting careful follow-up studies where novel protein-protein interactions are suspected. PMID:25704442

  14. Evolution of Chloroplast J Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Chi-Chou; Chen, Lih-Jen; Su, Pai-Hsiang; Li, Hsou-min

    2013-01-01

    Hsp70 chaperones are involved in multiple biological processes and are recruited to specific processes by designated J domain-containing cochaperones, or J proteins. To understand the evolution and functions of chloroplast Hsp70s and J proteins, we identified the Arabidopsis chloroplast J protein constituency using a combination of genomic and proteomic database searches and individual protein import assays. We show that Arabidopsis chloroplasts have at least 19 J proteins, the highest number of confirmed J proteins for any organelle. These 19 J proteins are classified into 11 clades, for which cyanobacteria and glaucophytes only have homologs for one clade, green algae have an additional three clades, and all the other 7 clades are specific to land plants. Each clade also possesses a clade-specific novel motif that is likely used to interact with different client proteins. Gene expression analyses indicate that most land plant-specific J proteins show highly variable expression in different tissues and are down regulated by low temperatures. These results show that duplication of chloroplast Hsp70 in land plants is accompanied by more than doubling of the number of its J protein cochaperones through adding new J proteins with novel motifs, not through duplications within existing families. These new J proteins likely recruit chloroplast Hsp70 to perform tissue specific functions related to biosynthesis rather than to stress resistance. PMID:23894646

  15. Recombinant protein production technology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recombinant protein production is an important technology for antibody production, biochemical activity study, and structural determination during the post-genomic era. Limiting factors in recombinant protein production include low-level protein expression, protein precipitation, and loss of protein...

  16. Protein crystal growth in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenblum, William M.; Delucas, Lawrence J.; Wilson, William W.

    1989-01-01

    Major advances have been made in several of the experimental aspects of protein crystallography, leaving protein crystallization as one of the few remaining bottlenecks. As a result, it has become important that the science of protein crystal growth is better understood and that improved methods for protein crystallization are developed. Preliminary experiments with both small molecules and proteins indicate that microgravity may beneficially affect crystal growth. For this reason, a series of protein crystal growth experiments using the Space Shuttle was initiated. The preliminary space experiments were used to evolve prototype hardware that will form the basis for a more advanced system that can be used to evaluate effects of gravity on protein crystal growth. Various optical techniques are being utilized to monitor the crystal growth process from the incipient or nucleation stage and throughout the growth phase. The eventual goal of these studies is to develop a system which utilizes optical monitoring for dynamic control of the crystallization process.

  17. Cotton and Protein Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Goheen, Steven C.; Edwards, J. V.; Rayburn, Alfred R.; Gaither, Kari A.; Castro, Nathan J.

    2006-06-30

    The adsorbent properties of important wound fluid proteins and cotton cellulose are reviewed. This review focuses on the adsorption of albumin to cotton-based wound dressings and some chemically modified derivatives targeted for chronic wounds. Adsorption of elastase in the presence of albumin was examined as a model to understand the interactive properties of these wound fluid components with cotton fibers. In the chronic non-healing wound, elastase appears to be over-expressed, and it digests tissue and growth factors, interfering with the normal healing process. Albumin is the most prevalent protein in wound fluid, and in highly to moderately exudative wounds, it may bind significantly to the fibers of wound dressings. Thus, the relative binding properties of both elastase and albumin to wound dressing fibers are of interest in the design of more effective wound dressings. The present work examines the binding of albumin to two different derivatives of cotton, and quantifies the elastase binding to the same derivatives following exposure of albumin to the fiber surface. An HPLC adsorption technique was employed coupled with a colorimetric enzyme assay to quantify the relative binding properties of albumin and elastase to cotton. The results of wound protein binding are discussed in relation to the porosity and surface chemistry interactions of cotton and wound proteins. Studies are directed to understanding the implications of protein adsorption phenomena in terms of fiber-protein models that have implications for rationally designing dressings for chronic wounds.

  18. Stretching to Understand Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieplak, Marek

    2007-03-01

    Mechanical stretching of single proteins has been studied experimentally for about 50 proteins yielding a variety of force patterns and values of the peak forces. We have performed a theoretical survey of 7749 proteins of known native structure and map out the landscape of possible dynamical behaviors unders stretching at constant speed. The model used is constructed based on the native geometry. It is solved by methods of molecular dynamics and validated by comparing the theoretical predictions to experimental results. We characterize the distribution of peak forces and on correlations with the system size and with the structure classification as characterized by the CATH scheme. We identify proteins with the biggest forces and show that they belong to few topology classes. We determine which protein segments act as mechanical clamps and show that, in most cases, they correspond to long stretches of parallel beta-strands, but other mechanisms are also possible. We then consider stretching by fluid flows. We show that unfolding induced by a uniform flow shows a richer behavior than that in the force clamp. The dynamics of unfolding is found to depend strongly on the selection of the amino acid, usually one of the termini, which is anchored. These features offer potentially wider diagnostic tools to investigate structure of proteins compared to experiments based on the atomic force microscopy.

  19. LEA proteins prevent protein aggregation due to water stress

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Kshamata; Walton, Laura J.; Tunnacliffe, Alan

    2005-01-01

    LEA (late embryogenesis abundant) proteins in both plants and animals are associated with tolerance to water stress resulting from desiccation and cold shock. However, although various functions of LEA proteins have been proposed, their precise role has not been defined. Recent bioinformatics studies suggest that LEA proteins might behave as molecular chaperones, and the current study was undertaken to test this hypothesis. Recombinant forms of AavLEA1, a group 3 LEA protein from the anhydrobiotic nematode Aphelenchus avenae, and Em, a group 1 LEA protein from wheat, have been subjected to functional analysis. Heat-stress experiments with citrate synthase, which is susceptible to aggregation at high temperatures, suggest that LEA proteins do not behave as classical molecular chaperones, but they do exhibit a protective, synergistic effect in the presence of the so-called chemical chaperone, trehalose. In contrast, both LEA proteins can independently protect citrate synthase from aggregation due to desiccation and freezing, in keeping with a role in water-stress tolerance; similar results were obtained with lactate dehydrogenase. This is the first evidence of anti-aggregation activity of LEA proteins due to water stress. Again, a synergistic effect of LEA and trehalose was observed, which is significant given that non-reducing disaccharides are known to accumulate during dehydration in plants and nematodes. A model is proposed whereby LEA proteins might act as a novel form of molecular chaperone, or ‘molecular shield’, to help prevent the formation of damaging protein aggregates during water stress. PMID:15631617

  20. Protein-protein interaction network analysis of cirrhosis liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Safaei, Akram; Rezaei Tavirani, Mostafa; Arefi Oskouei, Afsaneh; Zamanian Azodi, Mona; Mohebbi, Seyed Reza; Nikzamir, Abdol Rahim

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Evaluation of biological characteristics of 13 identified proteins of patients with cirrhotic liver disease is the main aim of this research. Background: In clinical usage, liver biopsy remains the gold standard for diagnosis of hepatic fibrosis. Evaluation and confirmation of liver fibrosis stages and severity of chronic diseases require a precise and noninvasive biomarkers. Since the early detection of cirrhosis is a clinical problem, achieving a sensitive, specific and predictive novel method based on biomarkers is an important task. Methods: Essential analysis, such as gene ontology (GO) enrichment and protein-protein interactions (PPI) was undergone EXPASy, STRING Database and DAVID Bioinformatics Resources query. Results: Based on GO analysis, most of proteins are located in the endoplasmic reticulum lumen, intracellular organelle lumen, membrane-enclosed lumen, and extracellular region. The relevant molecular functions are actin binding, metal ion binding, cation binding and ion binding. Cell adhesion, biological adhesion, cellular amino acid derivative, metabolic process and homeostatic process are the related processes. Protein-protein interaction network analysis introduced five proteins (fibroblast growth factor receptor 4, tropomyosin 4, tropomyosin 2 (beta), lectin, Lectin galactoside-binding soluble 3 binding protein and apolipoprotein A-I) as hub and bottleneck proteins. Conclusion: Our result indicates that regulation of lipid metabolism and cell survival are important biological processes involved in cirrhosis disease. More investigation of above mentioned proteins will provide a better understanding of cirrhosis disease. PMID:27099671

  1. Potential application of nonstructural protein NS1 serotype-specific immunoglobulin G enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in the seroepidemiologic study of dengue virus infection: correlation of results with those of the plaque reduction neutralization test.

    PubMed

    Shu, Pei-Yun; Chen, Li-Kuang; Chang, Shu-Fen; Yueh, Yi-Yun; Chow, Ling; Chien, Li-Jung; Chin, Chuan; Yang, Hui-Hua; Lin, Ting-Hsiang; Huang, Jyh-Hsiung

    2002-05-01

    An NS1 serotype-specific indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed to differentiate primary and secondary dengue virus infections and serotypes of primary dengue virus infection. For this report, we carried out retrospective seroepidemiologic studies on serum samples collected from residents of Liuchiu Hsiang, Pingtung County, an isolated island in southern Taiwan during 1997-1998. The results demonstrated that good correlation existed between dengue virus NS1 serotype-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) ELISA and dengue virus plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT). Our data suggested that NS1 serotype-specific IgG ELISA could replace PRNT for seroepidemiologic studies to differentiate Japanese encephalitis and dengue virus infections and for dengue virus serotyping. PMID:11980973

  2. Characterization of Protein Complexes and Subcomplexes in Protein-Protein Interaction Databases

    PubMed Central

    Zaki, Nazar; Mohamed, Elfadil A.; Mora, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The identification and characterization of protein complexes implicated in protein-protein interaction data are crucial to the understanding of the molecular events under normal and abnormal physiological conditions. This paper provides a novel characterization of subcomplexes in protein interaction databases, stressing definition and representation issues, quantification, biological validation, network metrics, motifs, modularity, and gene ontology (GO) terms. The paper introduces the concept of “nested group” as a way to represent subcomplexes and estimates that around 15% of those nested group with the higher Jaccard index may be a result of data artifacts in protein interaction databases, while a number of them can be found in biologically important modular structures or dynamic structures. We also found that network centralities, enrichment in essential proteins, GO terms related to regulation, imperfect 5-clique motifs, and higher GO homogeneity can be used to identify proteins in nested complexes. PMID:25722891

  3. Algorithmic complexity of a protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewey, T. Gregory

    1996-07-01

    The information contained in a protein's amino acid sequence dictates its three-dimensional structure. To quantitate the transfer of information that occurs in the protein folding process, the Kolmogorov information entropy or algorithmic complexity of the protein structure is investigated. The algorithmic complexity of an object provides a means of quantitating its information content. Recent results have indicated that the algorithmic complexity of microstates of certain statistical mechanical systems can be estimated from the thermodynamic entropy. In the present work, it is shown that the algorithmic complexity of a protein is given by its configurational entropy. Using this result, a quantitative estimate of the information content of a protein's structure is made and is compared to the information content of the sequence. Additionally, the mutual information between sequence and structure is determined. It is seen that virtually all the information contained in the protein structure is shared with the sequence.

  4. Effects of dabigatran on the cellular and protein phase of coagulation in patients with coronary artery disease on dual antiplatelet therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel. Results from a prospective, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Franchi, Francesco; Rollini, Fabiana; Cho, Jung Rae; King, Rhodri; Phoenix, Fladia; Bhatti, Mona; DeGroat, Christopher; Tello-Montoliu, Antonio; Zenni, Martin M; Guzman, Luis A; Bass, Theodore A; Ajjan, Ramzi A; Angiolillo, Dominick J

    2016-03-01

    There is growing interest in understanding the effects of adding an oral anticoagulant in patients on dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT). Vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) and clopidogrel represent the most broadly utilised oral anticoagulant and P2Y12 receptor inhibitor, respectively. However, VKAs can interfere with clopidogrel metabolism via the cytochrome P450 (CYP) system which in turn may result in an increase in platelet reactivity. Dabigatran is a direct acting (anti-II) oral anticoagulant which does not interfere with CYP and has favourable safety and efficacy profiles compared with VKAs. The pharmacodynamic (PD) effects on platelet reactivity and clot kinetic of adjunctive dabigatran therapy in patients on DAPT are poorly explored. In this prospective, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled PD study, patients (n=30) on maintenance DAPT with aspirin and clopidogrel were randomised to either dabigatran 150 mg bid or placebo for seven days. PD testing was performed before and after treatment using four different assays exploring multiple pathways of platelet aggregation and fibrin clot kinetics: light transmittance aggregometry (LTA), multiple electrode aggregometry (MEA), kaolin-activated thromboelastography (TEG) and turbidimetric assays. There were no differences in multiple measures of platelet reactivity investigating purinergic and non-purinergic signaling pathways assessed by LTA, MEA and TEG platelet mapping. Dabigatran significantly increased parameters related to thrombin activity and thrombus generation, and delayed fibrin clot formation, without affecting clot structure or fibrinolysis. In conclusion, in patients on DAPT with aspirin and clopidogrel, adjunctive dabigatran therapy is not associated with modulation of profiles of platelet reactivity as determined by several assays assessing multiple platelet signalling pathways. However, dabigatran significantly interferes with parameters related to thrombin activity and delays fibrin clot formation

  5. Development of a Split SNAP-CLIP Double Labeling System for Tracking Proteins Following Dissociation from Protein-Protein Complexes in Living Cells.

    PubMed

    Mie, Masayasu; Naoki, Tatsuhiko; Kobatake, Eiry

    2016-08-16

    The split SNAP-tag protein-fragment complementation assay (PCA) is a useful tool for imaging protein-protein interactions (PPIs) in living cells. In contrast to conventional methods employed for imaging PPIs, the split SNAP-tag PCA enables tracking of proteins following dissociation from protein-protein complexes. A limitation of this system, however, is that it only allows for labeling and tracking of one of the proteins forming the protein-protein complex. To track both proteins forming a protein-protein complex, each protein needs to be appropriately labeled. In this study, a split SNAP-CLIP double labeling system is developed and applied for tracking of each protein forming a protein-protein complex. As a proof-of concept, FM protein for PPIs and protein kinase C alpha (PKCα) for translocation are introduced to a split SNAP-CLIP double labeling system. The results show a split SNAP-CLIP double labeling system enables labeling of both proteins in a protein-protein complex and subsequent tracking of each of the proteins following dissociation from the protein-protein complexes in living cells. PMID:27448142

  6. A new protein structure representation for efficient protein function prediction.

    PubMed

    Maghawry, Huda A; Mostafa, Mostafa G M; Gharib, Tarek F

    2014-12-01

    One of the challenging problems in bioinformatics is the prediction of protein function. Protein function is the main key that can be used to classify different proteins. Protein function can be inferred experimentally with very small throughput or computationally with very high throughput. Computational methods are sequence based or structure based. Structure-based methods produce more accurate protein function prediction. In this article, we propose a new protein structure representation for efficient protein function prediction. The representation is based on three-dimensional patterns of protein residues. In the analysis, we used protein function based on enzyme activity through six mechanistically diverse enzyme superfamilies: amidohydrolase, crotonase, haloacid dehalogenase, isoprenoid synthase type I, and vicinal oxygen chelate. We applied three different classification methods, naïve Bayes, k-nearest neighbors, and random forest, to predict the enzyme superfamily of a given protein. The prediction accuracy using the proposed representation outperforms a recently introduced representation method that is based only on the distance patterns. The results show that the proposed representation achieved prediction accuracy up to 98%, with improvement of about 10% on average. PMID:25343279

  7. The influence of protein coding sequences on protein folding rates of all-β proteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui Fang; Li, Hong

    2011-06-01

    It is currently believed that the protein folding rate is related to the protein structures and its amino acid sequence. However, few studies have been done on the problem that whether the protein folding rate is influenced by its corresponding mRNA sequence. In this paper, we analyzed the possible relationship between the protein folding rates and the corresponding mRNA sequences. The content of guanine and cytosine (GC content) of palindromes in protein coding sequence was introduced as a new parameter and added in the Gromiha's model of predicting protein folding rates to inspect its effect in protein folding process. The multiple linear regression analysis and jack-knife test show that the new parameter is significant. The linear correlation coefficient between the experimental and the predicted values of the protein folding rates increased significantly from 0.96 to 0.99, and the population variance decreased from 0.50 to 0.24 compared with Gromiha's results. The results show that the GC content of palindromes in the corresponding protein coding sequence really influences the protein folding rate. Further analysis indicates that this kind of effect mostly comes from the synonymous codon usage and from the information of palindrome structure itself, but not from the translation information from codons to amino acids. PMID:21613670

  8. Protein-water dynamics in antifreeze protein III activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yao; Bäumer, Alexander; Meister, Konrad; Bischak, Connor G.; DeVries, Arthur L.; Leitner, David M.; Havenith, Martina

    2016-03-01

    We combine Terahertz absorption spectroscopy (THz) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate the underlying molecular mechanism for the antifreeze activity of one class of antifreeze protein, antifreeze protein type III (AFP-III) with a focus on the collective water hydrogen bond dynamics near the protein. After summarizing our previous work on AFPs, we present a new investigation of the effects of cosolutes on protein antifreeze activity by adding sodium citrate to the protein solution of AFP-III. Our results reveal that for AFP-III, unlike some other AFPs, the addition of the osmolyte sodium citrate does not affect the hydrogen bond dynamics at the protein surface significantly, as indicated by concentration dependent THz measurements. The present data, in combination with our previous THz measurements and molecular simulations, confirm that while long-range solvent perturbation is a necessary condition for the antifreeze activity of AFP-III, the local binding affinity determines the size of the hysteresis.

  9. Protein-based ferrogels.

    PubMed

    Mody, Puja; Hart, Cassidy; Romano, Siena; El-Magbri, Mariam; Esson, Moira M; Ibeh, Trisha; Knowlton, Elizabeth D; Zhang, Ming; Wagner, Michael J; Hartings, Matthew R

    2016-06-01

    We present a novel synthesis in which hemoglobin and Fe(2+) react, in the presence of KNO3 and KOH, to produce protein microgels that contain magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. The synthesis results in microgels with polymer properties (denaturing and glass transition temperatures) that are consistent with the dried protein. The iron oxide nanoparticles that exhibit an average diameter of 22nm, are ferrimagnetic, and display properties consistent with Fe3O4. The multiple functional capabilities displayed by these materials: biocompatibility, magnetism, dye uptake and controlled release, and other properties archetypal of hydrogels, will make the magnetic hydrogels attractive for a number of biomedical applications. PMID:26901627

  10. Protein Adsorption in Three Dimensions

    PubMed Central

    Vogler, Erwin A.

    2011-01-01

    initially-adsorbed protein. Interphase protein concentration CI increases as VI decreases, resulting in slow reduction in interfacial energetics. Steady-state is governed by a net partition coefficient P=(/CBCI). In the process of occupying space within the interphase, adsorbing protein molecules must displace an equivalent volume of interphase water. Interphase water is itself associated with surface-bound water through a network of transient hydrogen bonds. Displacement of interphase water thus requires an amount of energy that depends on the adsorbent surface chemistry/energy. This “adsorption-dehydration” step is the significant free-energy cost of adsorption that controls the maximum amount of protein that can be adsorbed at steady state to a unit adsorbent-surface area (the adsorbent capacity). As adsorbent hydrophilicity increases, protein adsorption monotonically decreases because the energetic cost of surface dehydration increases, ultimately leading to no protein adsorption near an adsorbent water wettability (surface energy) characterized by a water contact angle θ → 65°. Consequently, protein does not adsorb (accumulate at interphase concentrations greater than bulk solution) to more hydrophilic adsorbents exhibiting θ < 65° . For adsorbents bearing strong Lewis acid/base chemistry such as ion-exchange resins, protein/surface interactions can be highly favorable, causing protein to adsorb in multilayers in a relatively thick interphase. A straightforward, three-component free energy relationship captures salient features of protein adsorption to all surfaces predicting that the overall free energy of protein adsorption ΔGadso is a relatively small multiple of thermal energy for any surface chemistry (except perhaps for bioengineered surfaces bearing specific ligands for adsorbing protein) because a surface chemistry that interacts chemically with proteins must also interact with water through hydrogen bonding. In this way, water moderates protein

  11. Exosome engineering for efficient intracellular delivery of soluble proteins using optically reversible protein-protein interaction module.

    PubMed

    Yim, Nambin; Ryu, Seung-Wook; Choi, Kyungsun; Lee, Kwang Ryeol; Lee, Seunghee; Choi, Hojun; Kim, Jeongjin; Shaker, Mohammed R; Sun, Woong; Park, Ji-Ho; Kim, Daesoo; Heo, Won Do; Choi, Chulhee

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticle-mediated delivery of functional macromolecules is a promising method for treating a variety of human diseases. Among nanoparticles, cell-derived exosomes have recently been highlighted as a new therapeutic strategy for the in vivo delivery of nucleotides and chemical drugs. Here we describe a new tool for intracellular delivery of target proteins, named 'exosomes for protein loading via optically reversible protein-protein interactions' (EXPLORs). By integrating a reversible protein-protein interaction module controlled by blue light with the endogenous process of exosome biogenesis, we are able to successfully load cargo proteins into newly generated exosomes. Treatment with protein-loaded EXPLORs is shown to significantly increase intracellular levels of cargo proteins and their function in recipient cells in vitro and in vivo. These results clearly indicate the potential of EXPLORs as a mechanism for the efficient intracellular transfer of protein-based therapeutics into recipient cells and tissues. PMID:27447450

  12. Essential protein identification based on essential protein-protein interaction prediction by Integrated Edge Weights.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yuexu; Wang, Yan; Pang, Wei; Chen, Liang; Sun, Huiyan; Liang, Yanchun; Blanzieri, Enrico

    2015-07-15

    Essential proteins play a crucial role in cellular survival and development process. Experimentally, essential proteins are identified by gene knockouts or RNA interference, which are expensive and often fatal to the target organisms. Regarding this, an alternative yet important approach to essential protein identification is through computational prediction. Existing computational methods predict essential proteins based on their relative densities in a protein-protein interaction (PPI) network. Degree, betweenness, and other appropriate criteria are often used to measure the relative density. However, no matter what criterion is used, a protein is actually ordered by the attributes of this protein per se. In this research, we presented a novel computational method, Integrated Edge Weights (IEW), to first rank protein-protein interactions by integrating their edge weights, and then identified sub PPI networks consisting of those highly-ranked edges, and finally regarded the nodes in these sub networks as essential proteins. We evaluated IEW on three model organisms: Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae), Escherichia coli (E. coli), and Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans). The experimental results showed that IEW achieved better performance than the state-of-the-art methods in terms of precision-recall and Jackknife measures. We had also demonstrated that IEW is a robust and effective method, which can retrieve biologically significant modules by its highly-ranked protein-protein interactions for S. cerevisiae, E. coli, and C. elegans. We believe that, with sufficient data provided, IEW can be used to any other organisms' essential protein identification. A website about IEW can be accessed from http://digbio.missouri.edu/IEW/index.html. PMID:25892709

  13. Proteins aggregation and human diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chin-Kun

    2015-04-01

    Many human diseases and the death of most supercentenarians are related to protein aggregation. Neurodegenerative diseases include Alzheimer's disease (AD), Huntington's disease (HD), Parkinson's disease (PD), frontotemporallobar degeneration, etc. Such diseases are due to progressive loss of structure or function of neurons caused by protein aggregation. For example, AD is considered to be related to aggregation of Aβ40 (peptide with 40 amino acids) and Aβ42 (peptide with 42 amino acids) and HD is considered to be related to aggregation of polyQ (polyglutamine) peptides. In this paper, we briefly review our recent discovery of key factors for protein aggregation. We used a lattice model to study the aggregation rates of proteins and found that the probability for a protein sequence to appear in the conformation of the aggregated state can be used to determine the temperature at which proteins can aggregate most quickly. We used molecular dynamics and simple models of polymer chains to study relaxation and aggregation of proteins under various conditions and found that when the bending-angle dependent and torsion-angle dependent interactions are zero or very small, then protein chains tend to aggregate at lower temperatures. All atom models were used to identify a key peptide chain for the aggregation of insulin chains and to find that two polyQ chains prefer anti-parallel conformation. It is pointed out that in many cases, protein aggregation does not result from protein mis-folding. A potential drug from Chinese medicine was found for Alzheimer's disease.

  14. Polarizable protein packing.

    PubMed

    Ng, Albert H; Snow, Christopher D

    2011-05-01

    To incorporate protein polarization effects within a protein combinatorial optimization framework, we decompose the polarizable force field AMOEBA into low order terms. Including terms up to the third-order provides a fair approximation to the full energy while maintaining tractability. We represent the polarizable packing problem for protein G as a hypergraph and solve for optimal rotamers with the FASTER combinatorial optimization algorithm. These approximate energy models can be improved to high accuracy [root mean square deviation (rmsd) < 1 kJ mol(-1)] via ridge regression. The resulting trained approximations are used to efficiently identify new, low-energy solutions. The approach is general and should allow combinatorial optimization of other many-body problems. PMID:21264879

  15. Osmolyte solutions and protein folding

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Char Y; Roesgen, Joerg

    2009-01-01

    In this brief review we discuss the evolution of recent thought regarding the role and mechanism of osmolytes with respect to protein stability. Osmolytes are naturally occurring intracellular compounds that change the protein folding landscape. Contributions from experiments are considered in the context of current theory and simulation results. PMID:19960095

  16. Comparative effects of selenite and selenate on nitrate assimilation in barley seedlings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aslam, M.; Harbit, K. B.; Huffaker, R. C.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of SeO3= and SeO4= on NO3- assimilation in 8-d-old barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) seedlings was studied over a 24-h period. Selenite at 0.1 mol m-3 in the uptake solutions severely inhibited the induction of NO3- uptake and active nitrate reductases. Selenate, at 1.0 mol m-3 in the nutrient solution, had little effect on induction of activities of these systems until after 12 h; however, when the seedlings were pretreated with 1.0 mol m-3 SeO4= for 24 h, subsequent NO3- uptake from SeO4(=) -free solutions was inhibited about 60%. Sulphate partially alleviated the inhibitory effect of SeO3= when supplied together in the ambient solutions, but had no effect in seedlings pretreated with SeO3=. By contrast, SO4= partially alleviated the inhibitory effect of SeO4= even in seedlings pretreated with SeO4=. Since uptake of NO3- by intact seedlings was also inhibited by SO3=, the percentage of the absorbed NO3- that was reduced was not affected. By contrast, SeO4=, which affected NO3- uptake much less, inhibited the percentage reduced of that absorbed. However, when supplied to detached leaves, both SeO3= and SeO4= inhibited the in vivo reduction of NO3- as well as induction of nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase activities. Selenite was more inhibitory than SeO4= ; approximately a five to 10 times higher concentration of SeO4= than SeO3= was required to achieve similar inhibition. In detached leaves, the inhibitory effect of both SeO3= and SeO4= on in vivo NO3- reduction as well as on the induction of nitrate reductase activity was partially alleviated by SO4=. The inhibitory effects of Se salts on the induction of the nitrite reductase were, however, completely alleviated by SO4=. The results show that in barley seedlings SeO3= is more toxic than SeO4=. The reduction of SeO4= to SeO3= may be a rate limiting step in causing Se toxicity.

  17. Benchtop Detection of Proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scardelletti, Maximilian C.; Varaljay, Vanessa

    2007-01-01

    A process, and a benchtop-scale apparatus for implementing the process, have been developed to detect proteins associated with specific microbes in water. The process and apparatus may also be useful for detection of proteins in other, more complex liquids. There may be numerous potential applications, including monitoring lakes and streams for contamination, testing of blood and other bodily fluids in medical laboratories, and testing for microbial contamination of liquids in restaurants and industrial food-processing facilities. A sample can be prepared and analyzed by use of this process and apparatus within minutes, whereas an equivalent analysis performed by use of other processes and equipment can often take hours to days. The process begins with the conjugation of near-infrared-fluorescent dyes to antibodies that are specific to a particular protein. Initially, the research has focused on using near-infrared dyes to detect antigens or associated proteins in solution, which has proven successful vs. microbial cells, and streamlining the technique in use for surface protein detection on microbes would theoretically render similar results. However, it is noted that additional work is needed to transition protein-based techniques to microbial cell detection. Consequently, multiple such dye/antibody pairs could be prepared to enable detection of multiple selected microbial species, using a different dye for each species. When excited by near-infrared light of a suitable wavelength, each dye fluoresces at a unique longer wavelength that differs from those of the other dyes, enabling discrimination among the various species. In initial tests, the dye/antibody pairs are mixed into a solution suspected of containing the selected proteins, causing the binding of the dye/antibody pairs to such suspect proteins that may be present. The solution is then run through a microcentrifuge that includes a membrane that acts as a filter in that it retains the dye/antibody/protein

  18. Nucleation precursors in protein crystallization

    PubMed Central

    Vekilov, Peter G.; Vorontsova, Maria A.

    2014-01-01

    Protein crystal nucleation is a central problem in biological crystallography and other areas of science, technology and medicine. Recent studies have demonstrated that protein crystal nuclei form within crucial precursors. Here, methods of detection and characterization of the precursors are reviewed: dynamic light scattering, atomic force microscopy and Brownian microscopy. Data for several proteins provided by these methods have demonstrated that the nucleation precursors are clusters consisting of protein-dense liquid, which are metastable with respect to the host protein solution. The clusters are several hundred nanometres in size, the cluster population occupies from 10−7 to 10−3 of the solution volume, and their properties in solutions supersaturated with respect to crystals are similar to those in homogeneous, i.e. undersaturated, solutions. The clusters exist owing to the conformation flexibility of the protein molecules, leading to exposure of hydrophobic surfaces and enhanced intermolecular binding. These results indicate that protein conformational flexibility might be the mechanism behind the metastable mesoscopic clusters and crystal nucleation. Investigations of the cluster properties are still in their infancy. Results on direct imaging of cluster behaviors and characterization of cluster mechanisms with a variety of proteins will soon lead to major breakthroughs in protein biophysics. PMID:24598910

  19. Mercuric chloride induced hepatotoxic and hematologic changes in rats: The protective effects of sodium selenite and vitamin E.

    PubMed

    Uzunhisarcikli, Meltem; Aslanturk, Ayse; Kalender, Suna; Apaydin, Fatma Gokce; Bas, Hatice

    2016-09-01

    This study focuses on investigating the possible protective effect of sodium selenite (Na2SeO3) and/or vitamin E against mercuric chloride (HgCl2)-induced hepatotoxicity in rat. Male rats were given HgCl2 (1 mg/kg body weight (bw)) and HgCl2 plus Na2SeO3 (0.25 mg/kg bw) and/or vitamin E (100 mg/kg bw) daily via gavage for 4 weeks. HgCl2-treated groups had significantly higher white blood cell and thrombocyte counts than the control group. Serum activities of alkaline phosphatase, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, γ-glutamyl-transferase, and lactate dehydrogenase significantly increased and serum levels of total protein, albumin, triglyceride, total cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol significantly decreased in the HgCl2-treated groups compared with control group. Malondialdehyde level significantly increased and superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase activities decreased in liver tissue of HgCl2-treated rats. Also, HgCl2 exposure resulted in histopathological changes. Supplementation of Na2SeO3 and/or vitamin E provided partial protection in hematological and biochemical parameters that were altered by HgCl2 As a result, Na2SeO3 and/or vitamin E significantly reduced HgCl2-induced hepatotoxicity, but not protected completely. PMID:25757480

  20. Membrane Protein Solubilization and Composition of Protein Detergent Complexes.

    PubMed

    Duquesne, Katia; Prima, Valérie; Sturgis, James N

    2016-01-01

    Membrane proteins are typically expressed in heterologous systems with a view to in vitro characterization. A critical step in the preparation of membrane proteins after expression in any system is the solubilization of the protein in aqueous solution, typically using detergents and lipids, to obtain the protein in a form suitable for purification, structural or functional analysis. This process is particularly difficult as the objective is to prepare the protein in an unnatural environment, a protein detergent complex, separating it from its natural lipid partners while causing the minimum destabilization or modification of the structure. Although the process is difficult, and relatively hard to master, an increasing number of membrane proteins have been successfully isolated after expression in a wide variety of systems. In this chapter we give a general protocol for preparing protein detergent complexes that is aimed at guiding the reader through the different critical steps. In the second part of the chapter we illustrate how to analyze the composition of protein detergent complexes; this analysis is important as it has been found that compositional variation often causes irreproducible results. PMID:27485340

  1. Novel computational methods to design protein-protein interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Alice Qinhua; O'Hern, Corey; Regan, Lynne

    2014-03-01

    Despite the abundance of structural data, we still cannot accurately predict the structural and energetic changes resulting from mutations at protein interfaces. The inadequacy of current computational approaches to the analysis and design of protein-protein interactions has hampered the development of novel therapeutic and diagnostic agents. In this work, we apply a simple physical model that includes only a minimal set of geometrical constraints, excluded volume, and attractive van der Waals interactions to 1) rank the binding affinity of mutants of tetratricopeptide repeat proteins with their cognate peptides, 2) rank the energetics of binding of small designed proteins to the hydrophobic stem region of the influenza hemagglutinin protein, and 3) predict the stability of T4 lysozyme and staphylococcal nuclease mutants. This work will not only lead to a fundamental understanding of protein-protein interactions, but also to the development of efficient computational methods to rationally design protein interfaces with tunable specificity and affinity, and numerous applications in biomedicine. NSF DMR-1006537, PHY-1019147, Raymond and Beverly Sackler Institute for Biological, Physical and Engineering Sciences, and Howard Hughes Medical Institute.

  2. Protein-protein interface prediction based on hexagon structure similarity.

    PubMed

    Guo, Fei; Ding, Yijie; Li, Shuai Cheng; Shen, Chao; Wang, Lusheng

    2016-08-01

    Studies on protein-protein interaction are important in proteome research. How to build more effective models based on sequence information, structure information and physicochemical characteristics, is the key technology in protein-protein interface prediction. In this paper, we study the protein-protein interface prediction problem. We propose a novel method for identifying residues on interfaces from an input protein with both sequence and 3D structure information, based on hexagon structure similarity. Experiments show that our method achieves better results than some state-of-the-art methods for identifying protein-protein interface. Comparing to existing methods, our approach improves F-measure value by at least 0.03. On a common dataset consisting of 41 complexes, our method has overall precision and recall values of 63% and 57%. On Benchmark v4.0, our method has overall precision and recall values of 55% and 56%. On CAPRI targets, our method has overall precision and recall values of 52% and 55%. PMID:26936323

  3. Methods for analyzing and quantifying protein-protein interaction.

    PubMed

    Syafrizayanti; Betzen, Christian; Hoheisel, Jörg D; Kastelic, Damjana

    2014-02-01

    Genome sequencing has led to the identification of many proteins, which had not been recognized before. In consequence, the basic set of human proteins is generally known. Far less information, however, exists about protein-protein interactions, which are required and responsible for cellular activities and their control. Many protein isoforms that result from mutations, splice-variations and post-translational modifications also come into play. Until recently, interactions of only few protein partners could be analyzed in a single experiment. However, this does not meet the challenge of investigating the highly complex interaction patterns in cellular systems. It is made even more demanding by the need to determine the intensity of interactions quantitatively in order to properly understand protein interplay. Currently available techniques vary with respect to accuracy, reliability, reproducibility and throughput and their performances range from a mere qualitative demonstration of binding to a quantitative characterization of affinities. In this article, an overview is given of the methodologies available for analysis of protein-protein interactions. PMID:24393018

  4. EH domain proteins regulate cardiac membrane protein targeting

    PubMed Central

    Gudmundsson, Hjalti; Hund, Thomas J.; Wright, Patrick J.; Kline, Crystal F.; Snyder, Jedidiah S.; Qian, Lan; Koval, Olha M.; Cunha, Shane R.; George, Manju; Rainey, Mark A.; Kashef, Farshid E.; Dun, Wen; Boyden, Penelope A.; Anderson, Mark E.; Band, Hamid; Mohler, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale Cardiac membrane excitability is tightly regulated by an integrated network of membrane-associated ion channels, transporters, receptors, and signaling molecules. Membrane protein dynamics in health and disease are maintained by a complex ensemble of intracellular targeting, scaffolding, recycling, and degradation pathways. Surprisingly, despite decades of research linking dysfunction in membrane protein trafficking with human cardiovascular disease, essentially nothing is known regarding the molecular identity or function of these intracellular targeting pathways in excitable cardiomyocytes. Objective We sought to discover novel pathways for membrane protein targeting in primary cardiomyocytes. Methods and Results We report the initial characterization of a large family of membrane trafficking proteins in human heart. We employed a tissue-wide screen for novel ankyrin-associated trafficking proteins and identified four members of a unique Eps15 homology (EH) domain-containing protein family (EHD1, EHD2, EHD3, EHD4) that serve critical roles in endosome-based membrane protein targeting in other cell types. We show that EHD1-4 directly associate with ankyrin, provide the first information on the expression and localization of these molecules in primary cardiomyocytes, and demonstrate that EHD1-4 are co-expressed with ankyrin-B in the myocyte perinuclear region. Notably, the expression of multiple EHD proteins is increased in animal models lacking ankyrin-B, and EHD3-deficient cardiomyocytes display aberrant ankyrin-B localization and selective loss of Na/Ca exchanger expression and function. Finally, we report significant modulation of EHD expression following myocardial infarction, suggesting that these proteins may play a key role in regulating membrane excitability in normal and diseased heart. Conclusions Our findings identify and characterize a new class of cardiac trafficking proteins, define the first group of proteins associated with the ankyrin

  5. Protein-protein and protein-salt interactions in aqueous protein solutions containing concentrated electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, R.A.; Blanch, H.W.; Prausnitz, J.M.

    1998-01-05

    Protein-protein and protein-salt interactions have been obtained for ovalbumin in solutions of ammonium sulfate and for lysozyme in solutions of ammonium sulfate, sodium chloride, potassium isothiocyanate, and potassium chloride. The two-body interactions between ovalbumin molecules in concentrated ammonium-sulfate solutions can be described by the DLVO potentials plus a potential that accounts for the decrease in free volume available to the protein due to the presence of the salt ions. The interaction between ovalbumin and ammonium sulfate is unfavorable, reflecting the kosmotropic nature of sulfate anions. Lysozyme-lysozyme interactions cannot be described by the above potentials because anion binding to lysozyme alters these interactions. Lysozyme-isothiocyanate complexes are strongly attractive due to electrostatic interactions resulting from bridging by the isothiocyanate ion. Lysozyme-lysozyme interactions in sulfate solutions are more repulsive than expected, possibly resulting from a larger excluded volume of a lysozyme-sulfate bound complex or perhaps, hydration forces between the lysozyme-sulfate complexes.

  6. Protein denaturing on Nanospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forrest, James; Teichroeb, Jonathan

    2007-03-01

    We have used localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) to monitor the structural changes that accompany thermal denaturing of Bovine Serum Albumin(BSA) adsorbed onto gold nanospheres of size 5nm-60nm. The effect of the protein on the LSPR was monitored by visible extinction spectroscopy. The position of the resonance is affected by the conformation of the adsorbed protein layer, and as such can be used as a very sensitive probe of thermal denaturing that is specific to the adsorbed protein. The results are compared to detailed calculations and show that full calculations can lead to significant increases in knowledge where gold nanospheres are used as biosensors. Thermal denaturing on spheres with diameter > 20 nm show strong similarity to bulk calorimetric studies of BSA in solution. BSA adsorbed on nanospheres with d<= 15 nm shows a qualitative difference in behavior, suggesting a sensitivity of denaturing characteristics on local surface curvature. Studies of isothermal denaturing kinetics were used to obtain an activatiuon barrier for thermal denaturing. This activation barrier also exhibited a strong dependence on nanoparticle size. These results may have important implications for other protein-nanoparticle interactions.

  7. Are protein-protein interfaces special regions on a protein's surface?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonddast-Navaei, Sam; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2015-12-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are involved in many cellular processes. Experimentally obtained protein quaternary structures provide the location of protein-protein interfaces, the surface region of a given protein that interacts with another. These regions are termed half-interfaces (HIs). Canonical HIs cover roughly one third of a protein's surface and were found to have more hydrophobic residues than the non-interface surface region. In addition, the classical view of protein HIs was that there are a few (if not one) HIs per protein that are structurally and chemically unique. However, on average, a given protein interacts with at least a dozen others. This raises the question of whether they use the same or other HIs. By copying HIs from monomers with the same folds in solved quaternary structures, we introduce the concept of geometric HIs (HIs whose geometry has a significant match to other known interfaces) and show that on average they cover three quarters of a protein's surface. We then demonstrate that in some cases, these geometric HI could result in real physical interactions (which may or may not be biologically relevant). The composition of the new HIs is on average more charged compared to most known ones, suggesting that the current protein interface database is biased towards more hydrophobic, possibly more obligate, complexes. Finally, our results provide evidence for interface fuzziness and PPI promiscuity. Thus, the classical view of unique, well defined HIs needs to be revisited as HIs are another example of coarse-graining that is used by nature.

  8. Including Ligand Induced Protein Flexibility into Protein Tunnel Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Kingsley, Laura J.; Lill, Markus A.

    2014-01-01

    In proteins with buried active sites, understanding how ligands migrate through the tunnels that connect the exterior of the protein to the active site can shed light on substrate specificity and enzyme function. A growing body of evidence highlights the importance of protein flexibility in the binding site upon ligand binding; however, the influence of protein flexibility throughout the body of the protein during ligand entry and egress is much less characterized. We have developed a novel tunnel prediction and evaluation method named IterTunnel, which includes the influence of ligand-induced protein flexibility, guarantees ligand egress, and provides detailed free energy information as the ligand proceeds along the egress route. IterTunnel combines geometric tunnel prediction with steered MD in an iterative process to identify tunnels that open as a result of ligand migration and calculates the potential of mean force (PMF) of ligand egress through a given tunnel. Applying this new method to cytochrome P450 2B6 (CYP2B6), we demonstrate the influence of protein flexibility on the shape and accessibility of tunnels. More importantly, we demonstrate that the ligand itself, while traversing through a tunnel, can reshape tunnels due to its interaction with the protein. This process results in the exposure of new tunnels and the closure of pre-existing tunnels as the ligand migrates from the active site. PMID:25043499

  9. Modeling Mercury in Proteins.

    PubMed

    Parks, J M; Smith, J C

    2016-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a naturally occurring element that is released into the biosphere both by natural processes and anthropogenic activities. Although its reduced, elemental form Hg(0) is relatively nontoxic, other forms such as Hg(2+) and, in particular, its methylated form, methylmercury, are toxic, with deleterious effects on both ecosystems and humans. Microorganisms play important roles in the transformation of mercury in the environment. Inorganic Hg(2+) can be methylated by certain bacteria and archaea to form methylmercury. Conversely, bacteria also demethylate methylmercury and reduce Hg(2+) to relatively inert Hg(0). Transformations and toxicity occur as a result of mercury interacting with various proteins. Clearly, then, understanding the toxic effects of mercury and its cycling in the environment requires characterization of these interactions. Computational approaches are ideally suited to studies of mercury in proteins because they can provide a detailed molecular picture and circumvent issues associated with toxicity. Here, we describe computational methods for investigating and characterizing how mercury binds to proteins, how inter- and intraprotein transfer of mercury is orchestrated in biological systems, and how chemical reactions in proteins transform the metal. We describe quantum chemical analyses of aqueous Hg(II), which reveal critical factors that determine ligand-binding propensities. We then provide a perspective on how we used chemical reasoning to discover how microorganisms methylate mercury. We also highlight our combined computational and experimental studies of the proteins and enzymes of the mer operon, a suite of genes that confer mercury resistance in many bacteria. Lastly, we place work on mercury in proteins in the context of what is needed for a comprehensive multiscale model of environmental mercury cycling. PMID:27497164

  10. Electrophoresis of proteins and protein-protein complexes in native polyacrylamide gels using a horizontal gel apparatus.

    PubMed

    Su, C; Wang, F; Ciolek, D; Pan, Y C

    1994-11-15

    Electrophoresis of proteins and protein-protein complexes in polyacrylamide gels under native conditions using a horizontal gel apparatus is described. The advantage of this system is that it permits the detection of both negatively and positively charged proteins as well as protein-protein complexes in the same gel. During electrophoresis, a continuous gel sandwiched between two glass plates is placed horizontally on the platform and submerged in a reservoir buffer. The sample wells are made along the center of the gel, allowing positively and negatively charged proteins to migrate toward the cathode and anode, respectively. Several proteins with varying molecular weights and isoelectric point (pI) values and pairs of proteins capable of forming protein-protein complexes were chosen as model systems to illustrate the methodology. The effects of several parameters on the performance of the gel system including protein molecular weight, pI, and gel concentration were also examined and the results obtained by this method are comparable to those obtained by the vertical system. Following electrophoresis, both negatively and positively charged proteins as well as protein-protein complexes can be transferred by electroblotting onto polyvinylidene difluoride membranes for further analyses. PMID:7695108

  11. Length, protein protein interactions, and complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Taison; Frenkel, Daan; Gupta, Vishal; Deem, Michael W.

    2005-05-01

    The evolutionary reason for the increase in gene length from archaea to prokaryotes to eukaryotes observed in large-scale genome sequencing efforts has been unclear. We propose here that the increasing complexity of protein-protein interactions has driven the selection of longer proteins, as they are more able to distinguish among a larger number of distinct interactions due to their greater average surface area. Annotated protein sequences available from the SWISS-PROT database were analyzed for 13 eukaryotes, eight bacteria, and two archaea species. The number of subcellular locations to which each protein is associated is used as a measure of the number of interactions to which a protein participates. Two databases of yeast protein-protein interactions were used as another measure of the number of interactions to which each S. cerevisiae protein participates. Protein length is shown to correlate with both number of subcellular locations to which a protein is associated and number of interactions as measured by yeast two-hybrid experiments. Protein length is also shown to correlate with the probability that the protein is encoded by an essential gene. Interestingly, average protein length and number of subcellular locations are not significantly different between all human proteins and protein targets of known, marketed drugs. Increased protein length appears to be a significant mechanism by which the increasing complexity of protein-protein interaction networks is accommodated within the natural evolution of species. Consideration of protein length may be a valuable tool in drug design, one that predicts different strategies for inhibiting interactions in aberrant and normal pathways.

  12. Molecular dynamics of membrane proteins.

    SciTech Connect

    Woolf, Thomas B.; Crozier, Paul Stewart; Stevens, Mark Jackson

    2004-10-01

    Understanding the dynamics of the membrane protein rhodopsin will have broad implications for other membrane proteins and cellular signaling processes. Rhodopsin (Rho) is a light activated G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR). When activated by ligands, GPCRs bind and activate G-proteins residing within the cell and begin a signaling cascade that results in the cell's response to external stimuli. More than 50% of all current drugs are targeted toward G-proteins. Rho is the prototypical member of the class A GPCR superfamily. Understanding the activation of Rho and its interaction with its Gprotein can therefore lead to a wider understanding of the mechanisms of GPCR activation and G-protein activation. Understanding the dark to light transition of Rho is fully analogous to the general ligand binding and activation problem for GPCRs. This transition is dependent on the lipid environment. The effect of lipids on membrane protein activity in general has had little attention, but evidence is beginning to show a significant role for lipids in membrane protein activity. Using the LAMMPS program and simulation methods benchmarked under the IBIG program, we perform a variety of allatom molecular dynamics simulations of membrane proteins.

  13. Collective prediction of protein functions from protein-protein interaction networks

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Automated assignment of functions to unknown proteins is one of the most important task in computational biology. The development of experimental methods for genome scale analysis of molecular interaction networks offers new ways to infer protein function from protein-protein interaction (PPI) network data. Existing techniques for collective classification (CC) usually increase accuracy for network data, wherein instances are interlinked with each other, using a large amount of labeled data for training. However, the labeled data are time-consuming and expensive to obtain. On the other hand, one can easily obtain large amount of unlabeled data. Thus, more sophisticated methods are needed to exploit the unlabeled data to increase prediction accuracy for protein function prediction. Results In this paper, we propose an effective Markov chain based CC algorithm (ICAM) to tackle the label deficiency problem in CC for interrelated proteins from PPI networks. Our idea is to model the problem using two distinct Markov chain classifiers to make separate predictions with regard to attribute features from protein data and relational features from relational information. The ICAM learning algorithm combines the results of the two classifiers to compute the ranks of labels to indicate the importance of a set of labels to an instance, and uses an ICA framework to iteratively refine the learning models for improving performance of protein function prediction from PPI networks in the paucity of labeled data. Conclusion Experimental results on the real-world Yeast protein-protein interaction datasets show that our proposed ICAM method is better than the other ICA-type methods given limited labeled training data. This approach can serve as a valuable tool for the study of protein function prediction from PPI networks. PMID:24564855

  14. Mutation analysis of barley malt protein Z4 and protein Z7 on beer foam stability.

    PubMed

    Iimure, Takashi; Kimura, Tatsuji; Araki, Shigeki; Kihara, Makoto; Sato, Masahide; Yamada, Shinji; Shigyou, Tatsuro; Sato, Kazuhiro

    2012-02-15

    Beer foam stability is an important characteristic. It has been suggested that isoforms of protein Z, that is, protein Z4 and protein Z7, contribute to beer foam stability. We investigated the relationship between beer foam stability and protein Z4 and protein Z7 using their deficient mutants. As a protein Z4-deficient mutant, cv. Pirkka was used. Protein Z7 deficiency was screened in 1564 barley accessions in the world collection of Okayama University, Japan. The barley samples from normal, protein Z4-deficient, protein Z7-deficient, and double-deficient were genotyped in F(2) populations and then pooled based on the DNA marker genotypes of protein Z4 and protein Z7. For a brewing trial, F(5) pooled subpopulations were used. After malting and brewing, the foam stability was determined, and the results showed that the levels of foam stability in the four samples were comparable. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was used to investigate the proteome in these beer samples. The results showed that low molecular weight proteins, including lipid transfer protein (LTP2), in the deficient mutants were higher than those in the normal sample. Our results suggest that the contribution of protein Z4 and protein Z7 to beer foam stability was not greater than that of other beer proteins. PMID:22251057

  15. A Proteomic Approach to Characterize Protein Shedding

    SciTech Connect

    Ahram, Mamoun; Adkins, Joshua N.; Auberry, Deanna L.; Wunschel, David S.; Springer, David L.

    2005-01-01

    Shedding (i.e., proteolysis of ectodomains of membrane proteins) plays an important pathophysiological role. In order to study the feasibility of identifying shed proteins, we analyzed serum-free media of human mammary epithelial cells by mass spectrometry following induction of shedding by the phorbol ester, 4β-phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). Different means of sample preparation, including biotinylation of cell surface proteins, isolation of glycosylated proteins, and preparation of crude protein fraction, were carried out to develop the optimal method of sample processing. The collected proteins were digested with trypsin and analyzed by reversed-phase capillary liquid chromatography interfaced to an ion-trap mass spectrometer. The resulting peptide spectra were interpreted using the program SEQUEST. Analyzing the sample containing the crude protein mixture without chemical modification or separation resulted in the greatest number of identifications, including putatively shed proteins. Overall, 93 membrane-associated proteins were identified including 57 that contain at least one transmembrane domain and 36 that indirectly associate with the extracellular surface of the plasma membrane. Of the 57 transmembrane proteins, 43 were identified by extracellular peptides providing strong evidence for them originating from regulated proteolysis or shedding processes. We combined results from the different experiments and used a peptide count method to estimate changes in protein abundance. Using this approach, we identified 2 proteins, syndecan-4 and hepatoma-derived growth factor, whose abundances increased in media of cells treated with PMA. We also detected proteins whose abundances decreased after PMA treatment such as 78-kDa glucose-regulated protein and calreticulin. Further analysis using immunoblotting validated the abundance changes for syndecan-4 and 78-kDa glucose-regulated protein as a result of PMA treatment. These results demonstrate that mass

  16. A proteomic approach to characterize protein shedding.

    PubMed

    Ahram, Mamoun; Adkins, Joshua N; Auberry, Deanna L; Wunschel, David S; Springer, David L

    2005-01-01

    Shedding (i.e. proteolysis of ectodomains of membrane proteins) plays an important pathophysiological role. In order to study the feasibility of identifying shed proteins, we analyzed serum-free media of human mammary epithelial cells by mass spectrometry following induction of shedding by the phorbol ester, 4 beta-phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). Different means of sample preparation, including biotinylation of cell surface proteins, isolation of glycosylated proteins, and preparation of crude protein fractions, were carried out to develop the optimal method of sample processing. The collected proteins were digested with trypsin and analyzed by reversed-phase capillary liquid chromatography interfaced to an ion-trap mass spectrometer. The resulting peptide spectra were interpreted using the program SEQUEST. Analyzing the sample containing the crude protein mixture without chemical modification or separation resulted in the greatest number of identifications, including putatively shed proteins. Overall, 45 membrane-associated proteins were identified including 22 that contain at least one transmembrane domain and 23 that indirectly associate with the extracellular surface of the plasma membrane. Of the 22 transmembrane proteins, 18 were identified by extracellular peptides providing strong evidence they originate from regulated proteolysis or shedding processes. We combined results from the different experiments and used a peptide count method to estimate changes in protein abundance. Using this approach, we identified two proteins, syndecan-4 and hepatoma-derived growth factor, whose abundances increased in media of cells treated with PMA. We also detected proteins whose abundances decreased after PMA treatment such as 78 kDa glucose-regulated protein and lactate dehydrogenase A. Further analysis using immunoblotting validated the abundance changes for syndecan-4 and 78 kDa glucose-regulated protein as a result of PMA treatment. These results demonstrate

  17. Prediction of Protein-Protein Interaction Sites Based on Naive Bayes Classifier

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Haijiang; Lu, Tao; Lin, Xiao; Liu, Yu; Yan, Fangrong

    2015-01-01

    Protein functions through interactions with other proteins and biomolecules and these interactions occur on the so-called interface residues of the protein sequences. Identifying interface residues makes us better understand the biological mechanism of protein interaction. Meanwhile, information about the interface residues contributes to the understanding of metabolic, signal transduction networks and indicates directions in drug designing. In recent years, researchers have focused on developing new computational methods for predicting protein interface residues. Here we creatively used a 181-dimension protein sequence feature vector as input to the Naive Bayes Classifier- (NBC-) based method to predict interaction sites in protein-protein complexes interaction. The prediction of interaction sites in protein interactions is regarded as an amino acid residue binary classification problem by applying NBC with protein sequence features. Independent test results suggested that Naive Bayes Classifier-based method with the protein sequence features as input vectors performed well. PMID:26697220

  18. Proteomic Analysis of Membrane Proteins of Vero Cells: Exploration of Potential Proteins Responsible for Virus Entry

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Donghua; Zhu, Qinghe; Zhang, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Vero cells are highly susceptible to many viruses in humans and animals, and its membrane proteins (MPs) are responsible for virus entry. In our study, the MP proteome of the Vero cells was investigated using a shotgun LC-MS/MS approach. Six hundred twenty-seven proteins, including a total of 1839 peptides, were identified in MP samples of the Vero cells. In 627 proteins, 307 proteins (48.96%) were annotated in terms of biological process of gene ontology (GO) categories; 356 proteins (56.78%) were annotated in terms of molecular function of GO categories; 414 proteins (66.03%) were annotated in terms of cellular components of GO categories. Of 627 identified proteins, seventeen proteins had been revealed to be virus receptor proteins. The resulting protein lists and highlighted proteins may provide valuable information to increase understanding of virus infection of Vero cells. PMID:24286161

  19. TGF-beta signaling proteins and the Protein Ontology

    PubMed Central

    Arighi, Cecilia N; Liu, Hongfang; Natale, Darren A; Barker, Winona C; Drabkin, Harold; Blake, Judith A; Smith, Barry; Wu, Cathy H

    2009-01-01

    Background The Protein Ontology (PRO) is designed as a formal and principled Open Biomedical Ontologies (OBO) Foundry ontology for proteins. The components of PRO extend from a classification of proteins on the basis of evolutionary relationships at the homeomorphic level to the representation of the multiple protein forms of a gene, including those resulting from alternative splicing, cleavage and/or post-translational modifications. Focusing specifically on the TGF-beta signaling proteins, we describe the building, curation, usage and dissemination of PRO. Results PRO is manually curated on the basis of PrePRO, an automatically generated file with content derived from standard protein data sources. Manual curation ensures that the treatment of the protein classes and the internal and external relationships conform to the PRO framework. The current release of PRO is based upon experimental data from mouse and human proteins wherein equivalent protein forms are represented by single terms. In addition to the PRO ontology, the annotation of PRO terms is released as a separate PRO association file, which contains, for each given PRO term, an annotation from the experimentally characterized sub-types as well as the corresponding database identifiers and sequence coordinates. The annotations are added in the form of relationship to other ontologies. Whenever possible, equivalent forms in other species are listed to facilitate cross-species comparison. Splice and allelic variants, gene fusion products and modified protein forms are all represented as entities in the ontology. Therefore, PRO provides for the representation of protein entities and a resource for describing the associated data. This makes PRO useful both for proteomics studies where isoforms and modified forms must be differentiated, and for studies of biological pathways, where representations need to take account of the different ways in which the cascade of events may depend on specific protein

  20. Cholesterol testing and results

    MedlinePlus

    ... lipoprotein (LDL cholesterol) High density lipoprotein (HDL cholesterol) Triglycerides (another type of fat in your blood) Very ... made of fat and protein. They carry cholesterol, triglycerides, and other fats, called lipids, in the blood ...

  1. GECluster: a novel protein complex prediction method

    PubMed Central

    Su, Lingtao; Liu, Guixia; Wang, Han; Tian, Yuan; Zhou, Zhihui; Han, Liang; Yan, Lun

    2014-01-01

    Identification of protein complexes is of great importance in the understanding of cellular organization and functions. Traditional computational protein complex prediction methods mainly rely on the topology of protein–protein interaction (PPI) networks but seldom take biological information of proteins (such as Gene Ontology (GO)) into consideration. Meanwhile, the environment relevant analysis of protein complex evolution has been poorly studied, partly due to the lack of high-precision protein complex datasets. In this paper, a combined PPI network is introduced to predict protein complexes which integrate both GO and expression value of relevant protein-coding genes. A novel protein complex prediction method GECluster (Gene Expression Cluster) was proposed based on a seed node expansion strategy, in which a combined PPI network was utilized. GECluster was applied to a training combined PPI network and it predicted more credible complexes than peer methods. The results indicate that using a combined PPI network can efficiently improve protein complex prediction accuracy. In order to study protein complex evolution within cells due to changes in the living environment surrounding cells, GECluster was applied to seven combined PPI networks constructed using the data of a test set including yeast response to stress throughout a wine fermentation process. Our results showed that with the rise of alcohol concentration, protein complexes within yeast cells gradually evolve from one state to another. Besides this, the number of core and attachment proteins within a protein complex both changed significantly. PMID:26019559

  2. Protein-protein interaction networks (PPI) and complex diseases

    PubMed Central

    Safari-Alighiarloo, Nahid; Taghizadeh, Mohammad; Rezaei-Tavirani, Mostafa; Goliaei, Bahram

    2014-01-01

    The physical interaction of proteins which lead to compiling them into large densely connected networks is a noticeable subject to investigation. Protein interaction networks are useful because of making basic scientific abstraction and improving biological and biomedical applications. Based on principle roles of proteins in biological function, their interactions determine molecular and cellular mechanisms, which control healthy and diseased states in organisms. Therefore, such networks facilitate the understanding of pathogenic (and physiologic) mechanisms that trigger the onset and progression of diseases. Consequently, this knowledge can be translated into effective diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. Furthermore, the results of several studies have proved that the structure and dynamics of protein networks are disturbed in complex diseases such as cancer and autoimmune disorders. Based on such relationship, a novel paradigm is suggested in order to confirm that the protein interaction networks can be the target of therapy for treatment of complex multi-genic diseases rather than individual molecules with disrespect the network. PMID:25436094

  3. Light-Scattering Studies of Protein Solutions: Role of Hydration in Weak Protein-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Paliwal, A.; Asthagiri, D.; Abras, D.; Lenhoff, A. M.; Paulaitis, M. E.

    2005-01-01

    We model the hydration contribution to short-range electrostatic/dispersion protein interactions embodied in the osmotic second virial coefficient, B2, by adopting a quasi-chemical description in which water molecules associated with the protein are identified through explicit molecular dynamics simulations. These water molecules reduce the surface complementarity of highly favorable short-range interactions, and therefore can play an important role in mediating protein-protein interactions. Here we examine this quasi-chemical view of hydration by predicting the interaction part of B2 and comparing our results with those derived from light-scattering measurements of B2 for staphylococcal nuclease, lysozyme, and chymotrypsinogen at 25°C as a function of solution pH and ionic strength. We find that short-range protein interactions are influenced by water molecules strongly associated with a relatively small fraction of the protein surface. However, the effect of these strongly associated water molecules on the surface complementarity of short-range protein interactions is significant, and must be taken into account for an accurate description of B2. We also observe remarkably similar hydration behavior for these proteins despite substantial differences in their three-dimensional structures and spatial charge distributions, suggesting a general characterization of protein hydration. PMID:15980182

  4. Protein mediated membrane adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Andreas; Mahadevan, L.

    2015-05-01

    Adhesion in the context of mechanical attachment, signaling, and movement in cellular dynamics is mediated by the kinetic interactions between membrane-embedded proteins in an aqueous environment. Here, we present a minimal theoretical framework for the dynamics of membrane adhesion that accounts for the kinetics of protein binding, the elastic deformation of the membrane, and the hydrodynamics of squeeze flow in the membrane gap. We analyze the resulting equations using scaling estimates to characterize the spatiotemporal features of the adhesive patterning and corroborate them using numerical simulations. In addition to characterizing aspects of cellular dynamics, our results might also be applicable to a range of phenomena in physical chemistry and materials science where flow, deformation, and kinetics are coupled to each other in slender geometries.

  5. Protein Cross-Linking Capillary Electrophoresis for Protein-Protein Interaction Analysis.

    PubMed

    Ouimet, Claire M; Shao, Hao; Rauch, Jennifer N; Dawod, Mohamed; Nordhues, Bryce; Dickey, Chad A; Gestwicki, Jason E; Kennedy, Robert T

    2016-08-16

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) has been identified as a useful platform for detecting, quantifying, and screening for modulators of protein-protein interactions (PPIs). In this method, one protein binding partner is labeled with a fluorophore, the protein binding partners are mixed, and then, the complex is separated from free protein to allow direct determination of bound to free ratios. Although it possesses many advantages for PPI studies, the method is limited by the need to have separation conditions that both prevent protein adsorption to capillary and maintain protein interactions during the separation. In this work, we use protein cross-linking capillary electrophoresis (PXCE) to overcome this limitation. In PXCE, the proteins are cross-linked under binding conditions and then separated. This approach eliminates the need to maintain noncovalent interactions during electrophoresis and facilitates method development. We report PXCE methods for an antibody-antigen interaction and heterodimer and homodimer heat shock protein complexes. Complexes are cross-linked by short treatments with formaldehyde after reaching binding equilibrium. Cross-linked complexes are separated by electrophoretic mobility using free solution CE or by size using sieving electrophoresis of SDS complexes. The method gives good quantitative results; e.g., a lysozyme-antibody interaction was found to have Kd = 24 ± 3 nM by PXCE and Kd = 17 ± 2 nM using isothermal calorimetry (ITC). Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) in complex with bcl2 associated athanogene 3 (Bag3) was found to have Kd = 25 ± 5 nM by PXCE which agrees with Kd values reported without cross-linking. Hsp70-Bag3 binding site mutants and small molecule inhibitors of Hsp70-Bag3 were characterized by PXCE with good agreement to inhibitory constants and IC50 values obtained by a bead-based flow cytometry protein interaction assay (FCPIA). PXCE allows rapid method development for quantitative analysis of PPIs. PMID:27434096

  6. Cosolvent assisted protein refolding.

    PubMed

    Cleland, J L; Wang, D I

    1990-12-01

    The use of cosolvents in aqueous systems has been shown to enhance protein refolding and decrease aggregation. In this study, we have used polyethylene glycol (PEG) in the molecular weight range of 1000 to 8000 Daltons to effectively increase the rate of refolding and prevent aggregation of the model protein, bovine carbonic anhydrase B (CAB). At concentrations of 3 and 30 g/l, PEG increased the rate of recovery of active protein in the absence of aggregation. Using 3 g/l PEG (3350 MW), the refolding rate was three fold greater than the observed normal refolding rate. The observed rate enhancement was caused by PEG acting on the first intermediate in the CAB refolding pathway to increase the rate of formation of the second intermediate. The interaction of PEG with the first intermediate also prevented its self-association during refolding and at equilibrium. The stabilization of this first intermediate resulted in complete recovery of active protein under normal aggregating conditions. PMID:1367488

  7. Dynamics of protein conformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanova, Maria

    2010-10-01

    A novel theoretical methodology is introduced to identify dynamic structural domains and analyze local flexibility in proteins. The methodology employs a multiscale approach combining identification of essential collective coordinates based on the covariance analysis of molecular dynamics trajectories, construction of the Mori projection operator with these essential coordinates, and analysis of the corresponding generalized Langevin equations [M.Stepanova, Phys.Rev.E 76(2007)051918]. Because the approach employs a rigorous theory, the outcomes are physically transparent: the dynamic domains are associated with regions of relative rigidity in the protein, whereas off-domain regions are relatively soft. This also allows scoring the flexibility in the macromolecule with atomic-level resolution [N.Blinov, M.Berjanskii, D.S.Wishart, and M.Stepanova, Biochemistry, 48(2009)1488]. The applications include the domain coarse-graining and characterization of conformational stability in protein G and prion proteins. The results are compared with published NMR experiments. Potential applications for structural biology, bioinformatics, and drug design are discussed.

  8. [ALR, the multifunctional protein].

    PubMed

    Balogh, Tibor; Szarka, András

    2015-03-29

    ALR is a mystic protein. It has a so called "long" 22 kDa and a "short" 15 kDa forms. It has been described after partial hepatectomy and it has just been considered as a key protein of liver regeneration. At the beginning of the 21st century it has been revealed that the "long" form is localized in the mitochondrial intermembrane space and it is an element of the mitochondrial protein import and disulphide relay system. Several proteins of the substrates of the mitochondrial disulphide relay system are necessary for the proper function of the mitochondria, thus any mutation of the ALR gene leads to mitochondrial diseases. The "short" form of ALR functions as a secreted extracellular growth factor and it promotes the protection, regeneration and proliferation of hepatocytes. The results gained on the recently generated conditional ALR mutant mice suggest that ALR can play an important role in the pathogenesis of alcoholic and non-alcoholic steatosis. Since the serum level of ALR is modified in several liver diseases it can be a promising marker molecule in laboratory diagnostics. PMID:25796277

  9. Effect of phosphorus levels on the protein profiles of secreted protein and root surface protein of rice.

    PubMed

    Shinano, Takuro; Yoshimura, Tomoko; Watanabe, Toshihiro; Unno, Yusuke; Osaki, Mitsuru; Nanjo, Yohei; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2013-11-01

    Plant roots are complicated organs that absorb water and nutrients from the soil. Roots also play an essential role in protecting plants from attack by soil pathogens and develop a beneficial role with some soil microorganisms. Plant-derived rhizosphere proteins (e.g., root secretory proteins and root surface binding proteins) are considered to play important roles in developing mutual relationships in the rhizosphere. In the rhizosphere, where plant roots meet the surrounding environment, it has been suggested that root secretory protein and root surface binding protein are important factors. Furthermore, it is not known how the physiological status of the plant affects the profile of these proteins. In this study, rice plants were grown aseptically, with or without phosphorus nutrition, and proteins were obtained from root bathing solution (designated as root secretory proteins) and obtained using 0.2 M CaCl2 solution (designated as root surface binding proteins). The total number of identified proteins in the root bathing solution was 458, and the number of root surface binding proteins was 256. More than half of the proteins were observed in both fractions. Most of the proteins were categorized as either having signal peptides or no membrane transport helix sites. The functional categorization suggested that most of the proteins seemed to have secretory pathways and were involved in defense/disease-related functions. These characteristics seem to be unique to rhizosphere proteins, and the latter might be part of the plants strategy to defeat pathogens in the soil. The low phosphorus treatment significantly increased the number of pathogenesis-related proteins in the root secretory proteins, whereas the change was small in the case of the root surface binding proteins. The results suggested that the roots are actively and selectively secreting protein into the rhizosphere. PMID:24083427

  10. Non-enzymatic protein acetylation detected by NAPPA protein arrays*

    PubMed Central

    Olia, Adam S.; Barker, Kristi; McCullough, Cheryl E.; Tang, Hsin-Yao; Speicher, David W.; Qiu, Ji; LaBaer, Joshua; Marmorstein, Ronen

    2015-01-01

    Acetylation is a post-translational modification that occurs on thousands of proteins located in many cellular organelles. This process mediates many protein functions and modulates diverse biological processes. In mammalian cells, where acetyl-CoA is the primary acetyl donor, acetylation in the mitochondria is thought to occur by chemical means due to the relatively high concentration of acetyl-CoA located in this organelle. In contrast, acetylation outside of the mitochondria is thought to be mediated predominantly by acetyltransferase enzymes. Here we address the possibility that non-enzymatic chemical acetylation outside of the mitochondria may be more common than previously appreciated. We employed the Nucleic Acid Programmable Protein Array platform to perform an unbiased screen for human proteins that undergo chemical acetylation, which resulted in the identification of a multitude of proteins with diverse functions and cellular localization. Mass spectrometry analysis revealed that basic residues typically precede the acetylated lysine in the −7 to −3 position, and we show by mutagenesis that these basic residues contribute to chemical acetylation capacity. We propose that these basic residues lower the pKa of the substrate lysine for efficient chemical acetylation. Many of the identified proteins reside outside of the mitochondria, and have been previously demonstrated to be acetylated in vivo. As such, our studies demonstrate that chemical acetylation occurs more broadly throughout the eukaryotic cell than previously appreciated, and suggests that this post-translational protein modification may have more diverse roles in protein function and pathway regulation. PMID:26083674

  11. Health Benefits of Texturized Whey Proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Whey proteins are an important class of food ingredients used in many functional foods to boost protein content. Using the extrusion texturization process to partially open the native globular structures of whey proteins changed their conformation to the molten globular state, resulting in a new cla...

  12. Text Mining for Protein Docking

    PubMed Central

    Badal, Varsha D.; Kundrotas, Petras J.; Vakser, Ilya A.

    2015-01-01

    The rapidly growing amount of publicly available information from biomedical research is readily accessible on the Internet, providing a powerful resource for predictive biomolecular modeling. The accumulated data on experimentally determined structures transformed structure prediction of proteins and protein complexes. Instead of exploring the enormous search space, predictive tools can simply proceed to the solution based on similarity to the existing, previously determined structures. A similar major paradigm shift is emerging due to the rapidly expanding amount of information, other than experimentally determined structures, which still can be used as constraints in biomolecular structure prediction. Automated text mining has been widely used in recreating protein interaction networks, as well as in detecting small ligand binding sites on protein structures. Combining and expanding these two well-developed areas of research, we applied the text mining to structural modeling of protein-protein complexes (protein docking). Protein docking can be significantly improved when constraints on the docking mode are available. We developed a procedure that retrieves published abstracts on a specific protein-protein interaction and extracts information relevant to docking. The procedure was assessed on protein complexes from Dockground (http://dockground.compbio.ku.edu). The results show that correct information on binding residues can be extracted for about half of the complexes. The amount of irrelevant information was reduced by conceptual analysis of a subset of the retrieved abstracts, based on the bag-of-words (features) approach. Support Vector Machine models were trained and validated on the subset. The remaining abstracts were filtered by the best-performing models, which decreased the irrelevant information for ~ 25% complexes in the dataset. The extracted constraints were incorporated in the docking protocol and tested on the Dockground unbound benchmark set

  13. Mercury-binding proteins of Mytilus edulis

    SciTech Connect

    Roesijadi, G.; Morris, J.E.; Calabrese, A.

    1981-11-01

    Mytilus edulis possesses low molecular weight, mercury-binding proteins. The predominant protein isolated from gill tissue is enriched in cysteinyl residues (8%) and possesses an amino acid composition similar to cadmium-binding proteins of mussels and oysters. Continuous exposure of mussels to 5 ..mu..g/l mercury results in spillover of mercury from these proteins to high molecular weight proteins. Antibodies to these proteins have been isolated, and development of immunoassays is presently underway. Preliminary studies to determine whether exposure of adult mussels to mercury will result in induction of mercury-binding proteins in offspring suggest that such proteins occur in larvae although additional studies are indicated for a conclusive demonstration.

  14. Shotgun protein sequencing.

    SciTech Connect

    Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Heffelfinger, Grant S.

    2009-06-01

    A novel experimental and computational technique based on multiple enzymatic digestion of a protein or protein mixture that reconstructs protein sequences from sequences of overlapping peptides is described in this SAND report. This approach, analogous to shotgun sequencing of DNA, is to be used to sequence alternative spliced proteins, to identify post-translational modifications, and to sequence genetically engineered proteins.

  15. Protein Crystal Based Nanomaterials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Jeffrey A.; VanRoey, Patrick

    2001-01-01

    This is the final report on a NASA Grant. It concerns a description of work done, which includes: (1) Protein crystals cross-linked to form fibers; (2) Engineering of protein to favor crystallization; (3) Better knowledge-based potentials for protein-protein contacts; (4) Simulation of protein crystallization.

  16. Dual targeting of peroxisomal proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ast, Julia; Stiebler, Alina C.; Freitag, Johannes; Bölker, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Cellular compartmentalization into organelles serves to separate biological processes within the environment of a single cell. While some metabolic reactions are specific to a single organelle, others occur in more than one cellular compartment. Specific targeting of proteins to compartments inside of eukaryotic cells is mediated by defined sequence motifs. To achieve multiple targeting to different compartments cells use a variety of strategies. Here, we focus on mechanisms leading to dual targeting of peroxisomal proteins. In many instances, isoforms of peroxisomal proteins with distinct intracellular localization are encoded by separate genes. But also single genes can give rise to differentially localized proteins. Different isoforms can be generated by use of alternative transcriptional start sites, by differential splicing or ribosomal read-through of stop codons. In all these cases different peptide variants are produced, of which only one carries a peroxisomal targeting signal. Alternatively, peroxisomal proteins contain additional signals that compete for intracellular targeting. Dual localization of proteins residing in both the cytoplasm and in peroxisomes may also result from use of inefficient targeting signals. The recent observation that some bona fide cytoplasmic enzymes were also found in peroxisomes indicates that dual targeting of proteins to both the cytoplasm and the peroxisome might be more widespread. Although current knowledge of proteins exhibiting only partial peroxisomal targeting is far from being complete, we speculate that the metabolic capacity of peroxisomes might be larger than previously assumed. PMID:24151469

  17. Site-directed analysis on protein hydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Chong, Song-Ho; Ham, Sihyun

    2014-07-01

    Hydrophobicity of a protein is considered to be one of the major intrinsic factors dictating the protein aggregation propensity. Understanding how protein hydrophobicity is determined is, therefore, of central importance in preventing protein aggregation diseases and in the biotechnological production of human therapeutics. Traditionally, protein hydrophobicity is estimated based on hydrophobicity scales determined for individual free amino acids, assuming that those scales are unaltered when amino acids are embedded in a protein. Here, we investigate how the hydrophobicity of constituent amino acid residues depends on the protein context. To this end, we analyze the hydration free energy-free energy change on hydration quantifying the hydrophobicity-of the wild-type and 21 mutants of amyloid-beta protein associated with Alzheimer's disease by performing molecular dynamics simulations and integral-equation calculations. From detailed analysis of mutation effects on the protein hydrophobicity, we elucidate how the protein global factor such as the total charge as well as underlying protein conformations influence the hydrophobicity of amino acid residues. Our results provide a unique insight into the protein hydrophobicity for rationalizing and predicting the protein aggregation propensity on mutation, and open a new avenue to design aggregation-resistant proteins as biotherapeutics. PMID:24817476

  18. Dietary protein to support muscle hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    van Loon, Luc J C; Gibala, Martin J

    2011-01-01

    Intact protein, protein hydrolysates, and free amino acids are popular ingredients in contemporary sports nutrition, and have been suggested to augment post-exercise recovery. Protein and/or amino acid ingestion stimulates skeletal muscle protein synthesis, inhibits protein breakdown and, as such, stimulates muscle protein accretion following resistance and endurance type exercise. This has been suggested to lead to a greater adaptive response to each successive exercise bout, resulting in more effective muscle reconditioning. Despite limited evidence, some basic guidelines can be defined regarding the preferred type, amount, and timing of dietary protein that should be ingested to maximize post-exercise muscle protein accretion. Whey protein seems most effective in stimulating muscle protein synthesis during acute post-exercise recovery. This is likely attributable to its rapid digestion and absorption kinetics and specific amino acid composition. Ingestion of approximately 20 g protein during and/or immediately after exercise is sufficient to maximize post-exercise muscle protein synthesis rates. Coingestion of a large amount of carbohydrate or free leucine is not warranted to further augment post- exercise muscle protein synthesis when ample protein is already ingested. Future research should focus on the relevance of the acute anabolic response following exercise to optimize the skeletal muscle adaptive response to exercise training. PMID:22301837

  19. Measurements of Protein Crystal Face Growth Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorti, S.

    2014-01-01

    Protein crystal growth rates will be determined for several hyperthermophile proteins.; The growth rates will be assessed using available theoretical models, including kinetic roughening.; If/when kinetic roughening supersaturations are established, determinations of protein crystal quality over a range of supersaturations will also be assessed.; The results of our ground based effort may well address the existence of a correlation between fundamental growth mechanisms and protein crystal quality.

  20. Biophysical modeling of mismatch repair proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salsbury, Freddie

    2009-03-01

    Mismatch repair proteins play a vital role in the bology of cancer due to their dual functions as repair proteins and as sensors of DNA damage. Computational modeling of mismatch repair proteins in conjunction with biological experimentation has demonstrated the role of long-range communication in the functions of these proteins. Furthermore, different conformations have been shown to be associated with different cellular functions, and these differences are being exploited in drug discovery. The latest results in this modeling will be presented.

  1. Isolation of a Thiamine-binding Protein from Rice Germ and Distribution of Similar Proteins.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, M; Yoshida, T; Toda, T; Iwashima, A; Mitsunaga, T

    1996-01-01

    A thiamine-binding protein was purified from rice germ (Oryza sativa L.) by extraction, salting-out with ammonium sulfate, and column chromatography. From the results of molecular mass, Kd and Bmax values for thiamine-binding, binding specificity for thiamine phosphates and analog, the protein was suggested to be identical to the thiamine-binding protein in rice bran. The thiamine-binding protein w as more efficiently purified from rice germ than from rice bran. The protein was rich in glutamic acid (and/or glutamine) and glycine. The protein did not show immunological similarity to thiamine-binding proteins in buckwheat and sesame seeds. However proteins similar to the thiamine-binding protein from rice germ existed in gramineous seeds. They were suggested to have thiamine-binding activity and to be of the same molecular mass as the thiamine-binding protein. PMID:27299548

  2. Protein folding, protein homeostasis, and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Van Drie, John H.

    2011-01-01

    Proteins fold into their functional 3-dimensional structures from a linear amino acid sequence. In vitro this process is spontaneous; while in vivo it is orchestrated by a specialized set of proteins, called chaperones. Protein folding is an ongoing cellular process, as cellular proteins constantly undergo synthesis and degradation. Here emerging links between this process and cancer are reviewed. This perspective both yields insights into the current struggle to develop novel cancer chemotherapeutics and has implications for future chemotherapy discovery. PMID:21272445

  3. Split-Protein Systems: Beyond Binary Protein-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Shekhawat, Sujan S.; Ghosh, Indraneel

    2011-01-01

    It has been estimated that 650,000 protein-protein interactions exist in the human interactome [1], a subset of all possible macromolecular partnerships that dictate life. Thus there is a continued need for the development of sensitive and user-friendly methods for cataloguing biomacromolecules in complex environments and for detecting their interactions, modifications, and cellular location. Such methods also allow for establishing differences in the interactome between a normal and diseased cellular state and for quantifying the outcome of therapeutic intervention. A promising approach for deconvoluting the role of macromolecular partnerships is split-protein reassembly, also called protein fragment complementation. This approach relies on the appropriate fragmentation of protein reporters, such as the green fluorescent protein or firefly luciferase, which when attached to possible interacting partners can reassemble and regain function, thereby confirming the partnership. Split-protein methods have been effectively utilized for detecting protein-protein interactions in cell-free systems, E. coli, yeast, mammalian cells, plants, and live animals. Herein, we present recent advances in engineering split-protein systems that allow for the rapid detection of ternary protein complexes, small molecule inhibitors, as well as a variety of macromolecules including nucleic acids, poly(ADP) ribose, and iron sulfur clusters. We also present advances that combine split-protein systems with chemical inducers of dimerization strategies that allow for regulating the activity of orthogonal split-proteases as well as aid in identifying enzyme inhibitors. Finally, we discuss autoinhibition strategies leading to turn-on sensors as well as future directions in split-protein methodology including possible therapeutic approaches. PMID:22070901

  4. Split-protein systems: beyond binary protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Shekhawat, Sujan S; Ghosh, Indraneel

    2011-12-01

    It has been estimated that 650,000 protein-protein interactions exist in the human interactome (Stumpf et al., 2008), a subset of all possible macromolecular partnerships that dictate life. Thus there is a continued need for the development of sensitive and user-friendly methods for cataloguing biomacromolecules in complex environments and for detecting their interactions, modifications, and cellular location. Such methods also allow for establishing differences in the interactome between a normal and diseased cellular state and for quantifying the outcome of therapeutic intervention. A promising approach for deconvoluting the role of macromolecular partnerships is split-protein reassembly, also called protein fragment complementation. This approach relies on the appropriate fragmentation of protein reporters, such as the green fluorescent protein or firefly luciferase, which when attached to possible interacting partners can reassemble and regain function, thereby confirming the partnership. Split-protein methods have been effectively utilized for detecting protein-protein interactions in cell-free systems, Escherichia coli, yeast, mammalian cells, plants, and live animals. Herein, we present recent advances in engineering split-protein systems that allow for the rapid detection of ternary protein complexes, small molecule inhibitors, as well as a variety of macromolecules including nucleic acids, poly(ADP) ribose, and iron sulfur clusters. We also present advances that combine split-protein systems with chemical inducers of dimerization strategies that allow for regulating the activity of orthogonal split-proteases as well as aid in identifying enzyme inhibitors. Finally, we discuss autoinhibition strategies leading to turn-on sensors as well as future directions in split-protein methodology including possible therapeutic approaches. PMID:22070901

  5. Evolutionary optimization of protein folding.

    PubMed

    Debès, Cédric; Wang, Minglei; Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo; Gräter, Frauke

    2013-01-01

    Nature has shaped the make up of proteins since their appearance, [Formula: see text]3.8 billion years ago. However, the fundamental drivers of structural change responsible for the extraordinary diversity of proteins have yet to be elucidated. Here we explore if protein evolution affects folding speed. We estimated folding times for the present-day catalog of protein domains directly from their size-modified contact order. These values were mapped onto an evolutionary timeline of domain appearance derived from a phylogenomic analysis of protein domains in 989 fully-sequenced genomes. Our results show a clear overall increase of folding speed during evolution, with known ultra-fast downhill folders appearing rather late in the timeline. Remarkably, folding optimization depends on secondary structure. While alpha-folds showed a tendency to fold faster throughout evolution, beta-folds exhibited a trend of folding time increase during the last [Formula: see text]1.5 billion years that began during the "big bang" of domain combinations. As a consequence, these domain structures are on average slow folders today. Our results suggest that fast and efficient folding of domains shaped the universe of protein structure. This finding supports the hypothesis that optimization of the kinetic and thermodynamic accessibility of the native fold reduces protein aggregation propensities that hamper cellular functions. PMID:23341762

  6. Altering the antigenicity of proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, H; Alexander, S; Getzoff, E D; Tainer, J A; Geysen, H M; Lerner, R A

    1992-01-01

    To better understand the binding interaction between antigen and antibody we need to distinguish protein residues critical to the binding energy and mechanism from residues merely localized in the interface. By analyzing the binding of monoclonal antibodies to recombinant wild-type and mutant myohemerythrin (MHr) proteins, we were able to test the role of individual critical residues at the highly antigenic site MHr-(79-84), within the context of the folded protein. The results directly show the existence of antigenically critical residues, whose mutations significantly reduce antibody binding to the folded protein, thus verifying peptide-based assignments of these critical residues and demonstrating the ability of buried side chains to influence antigenicity. Taken together, these results (i) distinguish the antigenic surface from the solvent-exposed protein surface before binding, (ii) support a two-stage interaction mechanism allowing inducible changes in protein antigens by antibody binding, and (iii) show that protein antigenicity can be significantly reduced by alteration of single critical residues without destroying biological activity. Images PMID:1373498

  7. Protein in diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... basic structure of protein is a chain of amino acids. You need protein in your diet to help ... Protein foods are broken down into parts called amino acids during digestion. The human body needs a number ...

  8. Protein-losing enteropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007338.htm Protein-losing enteropathy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Protein-losing enteropathy is an abnormal loss of protein ...

  9. Protein electrophoresis - serum

    MedlinePlus

    ... digestive tract to absorb proteins ( protein-losing enteropathy ) Malnutrition Kidney disorder called nephrotic syndrome Scarring of the ... may indicate: Abnormally low level of LDL cholesterol Malnutrition Increased gamma globulin proteins may indicate: Bone marrow ...

  10. Activities of the Sex-lethal protein in RNA binding and protein:protein interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Samuels, M; Deshpande, G; Schedl, P

    1998-01-01

    The Drosophila sex determination gene Sex-lethal (Sxl) controls its own expression, and the expression of downstream target genes such as transformer , by regulating pre-mRNA splicing and mRNA translation. Sxl codes an RNA-binding protein that consists of an N-terminus of approximately 100 amino acids, two 90 amino acid RRM domains, R1 and R2, and an 80 amino acid C-terminus. In the studies reported here we have examined the functional properties of the different Sxl protein domains in RNA binding and in protein:protein interactions. The two RRM domains are responsible for RNA binding. Specificity in the recognition of target RNAs requires both RRM domains, and proteins which consist of the single domains or duplicated domains have anomalous RNA recognition properties. Moreover, the length of the linker between domains can affect RNA recognition properties. Our results indicate that the two RRM domains mediate Sxl:Sxl protein interactions, and that these interactions probably occur both in cis and trans. We speculate that cis interactions between R1 and R2 play a role in RNA recognition by the Sxl protein, while trans interactions stabilize complex formation on target RNAs that contain two or more closely spaced binding sites. Finally, we show that the interaction of Sxl with the snRNP protein Snf is mediated by the R1 RRM domain. PMID:9592147

  11. Prediction of lipid-binding regions in cytoplasmic and extracellular loops of membrane proteins as exemplified by protein translocation membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Keller, Rob C A

    2013-01-01

    The presence of possible lipid-binding regions in the cytoplasmic or extracellular loops of membrane proteins with an emphasis on protein translocation membrane proteins was investigated in this study using bioinformatics. Recent developments in approaches recognizing lipid-binding regions in proteins were found to be promising. In this study a total bioinformatics approach specialized in identifying lipid-binding helical regions in proteins was explored. Two features of the protein translocation membrane proteins, the position of the transmembrane regions and the identification of additional lipid-binding regions, were analyzed. A number of well-studied protein translocation membrane protein structures were checked in order to demonstrate the predictive value of the bioinformatics approach. Furthermore, the results demonstrated that lipid-binding regions in the cytoplasmic and extracellular loops in protein translocation membrane proteins can be predicted, and it is proposed that the interaction of these regions with phospholipids is important for proper functioning during protein translocation. PMID:22961045

  12. Mining protein sequences for motifs.

    PubMed

    Narasimhan, Giri; Bu, Changsong; Gao, Yuan; Wang, Xuning; Xu, Ning; Mathee, Kalai

    2002-01-01

    We use methods from Data Mining and Knowledge Discovery to design an algorithm for detecting motifs in protein sequences. The algorithm assumes that a motif is constituted by the presence of a "good" combination of residues in appropriate locations of the motif. The algorithm attempts to compile such good combinations into a "pattern dictionary" by processing an aligned training set of protein sequences. The dictionary is subsequently used to detect motifs in new protein sequences. Statistical significance of the detection results are ensured by statistically determining the various parameters of the algorithm. Based on this approach, we have implemented a program called GYM. The Helix-Turn-Helix motif was used as a model system on which to test our program. The program was also extended to detect Homeodomain motifs. The detection results for the two motifs compare favorably with existing programs. In addition, the GYM program provides a lot of useful information about a given protein sequence. PMID:12487759

  13. The Geobiochemistry of Methanogen Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, A.; Shock, E.

    2013-12-01

    A principle of geobiochemistry is that adaptation over evolutionary time includes a thermodynamic drive to minimize costs of making biomolecules like proteins and lipids. If so, then biomolecule abundances will reflect, at least in part, their relative stabilities at the conditions imposed by external environments. We tested this hypothesis by comparing relative stabilities of 138 orthologous proteins between a representative lake-sediment methanogen (Methanoculleus marisnigri) and a representative rumen methanogen (Methanospirillum hungatei) at the compositional constraints of their respective environments. Chemical affinities of the proteins were calculated based on pH, temperature, and concentrations of dissolved hydrogen, bicarbonate, ammonia, and hydrogen sulfide, together with standard Gibbs energies of formation of proteins from the elements predicted with a group additivity algorithm for unfolded proteins [1]. Methanogens were chosen as they are chemoautotrophs and their metabolism proceeds at relatively small affinities. Also, they are found in a variety of compositionally varying habitats like rumen, sediments, hydrothermal systems and sewage. The methanogens selected belong to the same order of taxonomy and are closely related. Preliminary results show that a majority of the proteins belonging to the rumen methanogen (66%) are more stable in the rumen environment, while a majority of the proteins belonging to the lake-sediment methanogen (58%) are more stable at sediment conditions. In a separate observation, it was noted that while the complete protein ';proteasome subunit alpha' of another rumen methanogen (Methanobrevibacter smithii) was less stable in its more reducing habitat as compared to a sewage methanogen (Methanothermobacter thermoautotophicus), its first 26 amino acid residues (N terminal) were in fact more stable in its own environment. These 26 residues are reported to be unique as compared to other proteasome proteins and are suggested to

  14. Domains mediate protein-protein interactions and nucleate protein assemblies.

    PubMed

    Costa, S; Cesareni, G

    2008-01-01

    Cell physiology is governed by an intricate mesh of physical and functional links among proteins, nucleic acids and other metabolites. The recent information flood coming from large-scale genomic and proteomic approaches allows us to foresee the possibility of compiling an exhaustive list of the molecules present within a cell, enriched with quantitative information on concentration and cellular localization. Moreover, several high-throughput experimental and computational techniques have been devised to map all the protein interactions occurring in a living cell. So far, such maps have been drawn as graphs where nodes represent proteins and edges represent interactions. However, this representation does not take into account the intrinsically modular nature of proteins and thus fails in providing an effective description of the determinants of binding. Since proteins are composed of domains that often confer on proteins their binding capabilities, a more informative description of the interaction network would detail, for each pair of interacting proteins in the network, which domains mediate the binding. Understanding how protein domains combine to mediate protein interactions would allow one to add important features to the protein interaction network, making it possible to discriminate between simultaneously occurring and mutually exclusive interactions. This objective can be achieved by experimentally characterizing domain recognition specificity or by analyzing the frequency of co-occurring domains in proteins that do interact. Such approaches allow gaining insights on the topology of complexes with unknown three-dimensional structure, thus opening the prospect of adopting a more rational strategy in developing drugs designed to selectively target specific protein interactions. PMID:18491061

  15. Drugging Membrane Protein Interactions.

    PubMed

    Yin, Hang; Flynn, Aaron D

    2016-07-11

    The majority of therapeutics target membrane proteins, accessible on the surface of cells, to alter cellular signaling. Cells use membrane proteins to transduce signals into cells, transport ions and molecules, bind cells to a surface or substrate, and catalyze reactions. Newly devised technologies allow us to drug conventionally "undruggable" regions of membrane proteins, enabling modulation of protein-protein, protein-lipid, and protein-nucleic acid interactions. In this review, we survey the state of the art of high-throughput screening and rational design in drug discovery, and we evaluate the advances in biological understanding and technological capacity that will drive pharmacotherapy forward against unorthodox membrane protein targets. PMID:26863923

  16. Protein sensing with engineered protein nanopores*

    PubMed Central

    Mohammad, Mohammad M.; Movileanu, Liviu

    2013-01-01

    The use of nanopores is a powerful new frontier in single-molecule sciences. Nanopores have been used effectively in exploring various biophysical features of small polypeptides and proteins, such as their folding state and structure, ligand interactions, and enzymatic activity. In particular, the α-hemolysin protein pore (αHL) has been used extensively for the detection, characterization and analysis of polypeptides, because this protein nanopore is highly robust, versatile and tractable under various experimental conditions. Inspired by the mechanisms of protein translocation across the outer membrane translocases of mitochondria, we have shown the ability to use nanopore-probe techniques in controlling a single protein using engineered αHL pores. Here, we provide a detailed protocol for the preparation of αHL protein nanopores. Moreover, we demonstrate that placing attractive electrostatic traps is instrumental in tackling single-molecule stochastic sensing of folded proteins. PMID:22528256

  17. Protein imprinting in polyacrylamide-based gels

    PubMed Central

    Zayats, Maya; Brenner, Andrew J.; Searson, Peter C.

    2015-01-01

    Protein imprinting in hydrogels is a method to produce materials capable of selective recognition and capture of a target protein. Here we report on the imprinting of fluorescently-labeled maltose binding protein (MBP) in acrylamide (AAm)/N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAm) hydrogels. The targeting efficiency and selectivity of protein recognition is usually characterized by the imprinting factor, which in the simplest case is the ratio of protein uptake in an imprinted film divided by the uptake by the corresponding non-imprinted film. Our objective in this work is to study the dynamics of protein binding and elution in imprinted and non-imprinted films to elucidate the processes that control protein recognition. Protein elution from imprinted and non-imprinted films suggests that imprinting results in sites with a distribution of binding energies, and that only a relatively small fraction of these sites exhibit strong binding. PMID:25034963

  18. Protein imprinting in polyacrylamide-based gels.

    PubMed

    Zayats, Maya; Brenner, Andrew J; Searson, Peter C

    2014-10-01

    Protein imprinting in hydrogels is a method to produce materials capable of selective recognition and capture of a target protein. Here we report on the imprinting of fluorescently-labeled maltose binding protein (MBP) in acrylamide (AAm)/N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAm) hydrogels. The targeting efficiency and selectivity of protein recognition is usually characterized by the imprinting factor, which in the simplest case is the ratio of protein uptake in an imprinted film divided by the uptake by the corresponding non-imprinted film. Our objective in this work is to study the dynamics of protein binding and elution in imprinted and non-imprinted films to elucidate the processes that control protein recognition. Protein elution from imprinted and non-imprinted films suggests that imprinting results in sites with a distribution of binding energies, and that only a relatively small fraction of these sites exhibit strong binding. PMID:25034963

  19. Detection and identification of protein interactions of S100 proteins by ProteinChip technology.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Roland; Melle, Christian; Escher, Niko; von Eggeling, Ferdinand

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this work was to establish an approach for identification of protein interactions. This assay used an anti-S100A8 antibody coupled on beads and incubated with cell extract. The bead eluates were analyzed using ProteinChip technology and subsequently subjected to an appropriate digestion. Molecular masses of digestion fragments were determined by SELDI-MS, and database analysis revealed S100A10 as interacting protein. This result was confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation and immunocapturing. Using S100A10 as new bait, a specific interaction with S100A7 was detectable. PMID:16212425

  20. Distinguishing Proteins From Arbitrary Amino Acid Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Yau, Stephen S.-T.; Mao, Wei-Guang; Benson, Max; He, Rong Lucy

    2015-01-01

    What kinds of amino acid sequences could possibly be protein sequences? From all existing databases that we can find, known proteins are only a small fraction of all possible combinations of amino acids. Beginning with Sanger's first detailed determination of a protein sequence in 1952, previous studies have focused on describing the structure of existing protein sequences in order to construct the protein universe. No one, however, has developed a criteria for determining whether an arbitrary amino acid sequence can be a protein. Here we show that when the collection of arbitrary amino acid sequences is viewed in an appropriate geometric context, the protein sequences cluster together. This leads to a new computational test, described here, that has proved to be remarkably accurate at determining whether an arbitrary amino acid sequence can be a protein. Even more, if the results of this test indicate that the sequence can be a protein, and it is indeed a protein sequence, then its identity as a protein sequence is uniquely defined. We anticipate our computational test will be useful for those who are attempting to complete the job of discovering all proteins, or constructing the protein universe. PMID:25609314

  1. A Protein Complex Map of Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Vaibhav; Najafabadi, Hamed S.; Moshiri, Houtan; Jardim, Armando; Salavati, Reza

    2016-01-01

    The functions of the majority of trypanosomatid-specific proteins are unknown, hindering our understanding of the biology and pathogenesis of Trypanosomatida. While protein-protein interactions are highly informative about protein function, a global map of protein interactions and complexes is still lacking for these important human parasites. Here, benefiting from in-depth biochemical fractionation, we systematically interrogated the co-complex interactions of more than 3354 protein groups in procyclic life stage of Trypanosoma brucei, the protozoan parasite responsible for human African trypanosomiasis. Using a rigorous methodology, our analysis led to identification of 128 high-confidence complexes encompassing 716 protein groups, including 635 protein groups that lacked experimental annotation. These complexes correlate well with known pathways as well as for proteins co-expressed across the T. brucei life cycle, and provide potential functions for a large number of previously uncharacterized proteins. We validated the functions of several novel proteins associated with the RNA-editing machinery, identifying a candidate potentially involved in the mitochondrial post-transcriptional regulation of T. brucei. Our data provide an unprecedented view of the protein complex map of T. brucei, and serve as a reliable resource for further characterization of trypanosomatid proteins. The presented results in this study are available at: www.TrypsNetDB.org. PMID:26991453

  2. Graph pyramids for protein function prediction

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Uncovering the hidden organizational characteristics and regularities among biological sequences is the key issue for detailed understanding of an underlying biological phenomenon. Thus pattern recognition from nucleic acid sequences is an important affair for protein function prediction. As proteins from the same family exhibit similar characteristics, homology based approaches predict protein functions via protein classification. But conventional classification approaches mostly rely on the global features by considering only strong protein similarity matches. This leads to significant loss of prediction accuracy. Methods Here we construct the Protein-Protein Similarity (PPS) network, which captures the subtle properties of protein families. The proposed method considers the local as well as the global features, by examining the interactions among 'weakly interacting proteins' in the PPS network and by using hierarchical graph analysis via the graph pyramid. Different underlying properties of the protein families are uncovered by operating the proposed graph based features at various pyramid levels. Results Experimental results on benchmark data sets show that the proposed hierarchical voting algorithm using graph pyramid helps to improve computational efficiency as well the protein classification accuracy. Quantitatively, among 14,086 test sequences, on an average the proposed method misclassified only 21.1 sequences whereas baseline BLAST score based global feature matching method misclassified 362.9 sequences. With each correctly classified test sequence, the fast incremental learning ability of the proposed method further enhances the training model. Thus it has achieved more than 96% protein classification accuracy using only 20% per class training data. PMID:26044522

  3. Non-classical protein secretion in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Bendtsen, Jannick D; Kiemer, Lars; Fausbøll, Anders; Brunak, Søren

    2005-01-01

    Background We present an overview of bacterial non-classical secretion and a prediction method for identification of proteins following signal peptide independent secretion pathways. We have compiled a list of proteins found extracellularly despite the absence of a signal peptide. Some of these proteins also have known roles in the cytoplasm, which means they could be so-called "moon-lightning" proteins having more than one function. Results A thorough literature search was conducted to compile a list of currently known bacterial non-classically secreted proteins. Pattern finding methods were applied to the sequences in order to identify putative signal sequences or motifs responsible for their secretion. We have found no signal or motif characteristic to any majority of the proteins in the compiled list of non-classically secreted proteins, and conclude that these proteins, indeed, seem to be secreted in a novel fashion. However, we also show that the apparently non-classically secreted proteins are still distinguished from cellular proteins by properties such as amino acid composition, secondary structure and disordered regions. Specifically, prediction of disorder reveals that bacterial secretory proteins are more structurally disordered than their cytoplasmic counterparts. Finally, artificial neural networks were used to construct protein feature based methods for identification of non-classically secreted proteins in both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Conclusion We present a publicly available prediction method capable of discriminating between this group of proteins and other proteins, thus allowing for the identification of novel non-classically secreted proteins. We suggest candidates for non-classically secreted proteins in Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. The prediction method is available online. PMID:16212653

  4. Infrared Protein Crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    J Sage; Y Zhang; J McGeehan; R Ravelli; M Weik; J van Thor

    2011-12-31

    We consider the application of infrared spectroscopy to protein crystals, with particular emphasis on exploiting molecular orientation through polarization measurements on oriented single crystals. Infrared microscopes enable transmission measurements on individual crystals using either thermal or nonthermal sources, and can accommodate flow cells, used to measure spectral changes induced by exposure to soluble ligands, and cryostreams, used for measurements of flash-cooled crystals. Comparison of unpolarized infrared measurements on crystals and solutions probes the effects of crystallization and can enhance the value of the structural models refined from X-ray diffraction data by establishing solution conditions under which they are most relevant. Results on several proteins are consistent with similar equilibrium conformational distributions in crystal and solutions. However, the rates of conformational change are often perturbed. Infrared measurements also detect products generated by X-ray exposure, including CO{sub 2}. Crystals with favorable symmetry exhibit infrared dichroism that enhances the synergy with X-ray crystallography. Polarized infrared measurements on crystals can distinguish spectral contributions from chemically similar sites, identify hydrogen bonding partners, and, in opportune situations, determine three-dimensional orientations of molecular groups. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Protein Structure and Function in the Crystalline State.

  5. Protein designs in HP models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Arvind; Khodabakhshi, Alireza Hadj; Maňuch, Ján; Rafiey, Arash; Stacho, Ladislav

    2009-07-01

    The inverse protein folding problem is that of designing an amino acid sequence which folds into a prescribed shape. This problem arises in drug design where a particular structure is necessary to ensure proper protein-protein interactions and could have applications in nanotechnology. A major challenge in designing proteins with native folds that attain a specific shape is to avoid proteins that have multiple native folds (unstable proteins). In this technical note we present our results on protein designs in the variant of Hydrophobic-Polar (HP) model introduced by Dill [6] on 2D square lattice. The HP model distinguishes only polar and hydrophobic monomers and only counts the number of hydrophobic contacts in the energy function. To achieve better stability of our designs we use the Hydrophobic-Polar-Cysteine (HPC) model which distinguishes the third type of monomers called "cysteines" and incorporates also the disulfid bridges (SS-bridges) into the energy function. We present stable designs in 2D square lattice and 3D hexagonal prism lattice in the HPC model.

  6. Datamining protein structure databanks for crystallization patterns of proteins.

    PubMed

    Valafar, Homayoun; Prestegard, James H; Valafar, Faramarz

    2002-12-01

    A study of 345 protein structures selected among 1,500 structures determined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods, revealed useful correlations between crystallization properties and several parameters for the studied proteins. NMR methods of structure determination do not require the growth of protein crystals, and hence allow comparison of properties of proteins that have or have not been the subject of crystallographic approaches. One- and two-dimensional statistical analyses of the data confirmed a hypothesized relation between the size of the molecule and its crystallization potential. Furthermore, two-dimensional Bayesian analysis revealed a significant relationship between relative ratio of different secondary structures and the likelihood of success for crystallization trials. The most immediate result is an apparent correlation of crystallization potential with protein size. Further analysis of the data revealed a relationship between the unstructured fraction of proteins and the success of its crystallization. Utilization of Bayesian analysis on the latter correlation resulted in a prediction performance of about 64%, whereas a two-dimensional Bayesian analysis succeeded with a performance of about 75%. PMID:12594078

  7. Systematic Characterization of Human Protein Complexes Identifies Chromosome Segregation Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hutchins, James R.A.; Toyoda, Yusuke; Hegemann, Björn; Poser, Ina; Hériché, Jean-Karim; Sykora, Martina M.; Augsburg, Martina; Hudecz, Otto; Buschhorn, Bettina A.; Bulkescher, Jutta; Conrad, Christian; Comartin, David; Schleiffer, Alexander; Sarov, Mihail; Pozniakovsky, Andrei; Slabicki, Mikolaj Michal; Schloissnig, Siegfried; Steinmacher, Ines; Leuschner, Marit; Ssykor, Andrea; Lawo, Steffen; Pelletier, Laurence; Stark, Holger; Nasmyth, Kim; Ellenberg, Jan; Durbin, Richard; Buchholz, Frank; Mechtler, Karl; Hyman, Anthony A.; Peters, Jan-Michael

    2010-01-01

    Chromosome segregation and cell division are essential, highly ordered processes that depend on numerous protein complexes. Results from recent RNA interference (RNAi) screens indicate that the identity and composition of these protein complexes is incompletely understood. Using gene tagging on bacterial artificial chromosomes, protein localization and tandem affinity purification-mass spectrometry, the MitoCheck consortium has analyzed about 100 human protein complexes, many of which had not or only incompletely been characterized. This work has led to the discovery of previously unknown, evolutionarily conserved subunits of the anaphase-promoting complex (APC/C) and the γ-tubulin ring complex (γ-TuRC), large complexes which are essential for spindle assembly and chromosome segregation. The approaches we describe here are generally applicable to high throughput follow-up analyses of phenotypic screens in mammalian cells. PMID:20360068

  8. Systematic analysis of human protein complexes identifies chromosome segregation proteins.

    PubMed

    Hutchins, James R A; Toyoda, Yusuke; Hegemann, Björn; Poser, Ina; Hériché, Jean-Karim; Sykora, Martina M; Augsburg, Martina; Hudecz, Otto; Buschhorn, Bettina A; Bulkescher, Jutta; Conrad, Christian; Comartin, David; Schleiffer, Alexander; Sarov, Mihail; Pozniakovsky, Andrei; Slabicki, Mikolaj Michal; Schloissnig, Siegfried; Steinmacher, Ines; Leuschner, Marit; Ssykor, Andrea; Lawo, Steffen; Pelletier, Laurence; Stark, Holger; Nasmyth, Kim; Ellenberg, Jan; Durbin, Richard; Buchholz, Frank; Mechtler, Karl; Hyman, Anthony A; Peters, Jan-Michael

    2010-04-30

    Chromosome segregation and cell division are essential, highly ordered processes that depend on numerous protein complexes. Results from recent RNA interference screens indicate that the identity and composition of these protein complexes is incompletely understood. Using gene tagging on bacterial artificial chromosomes, protein localization, and tandem-affinity purification-mass spectrometry, the MitoCheck consortium has analyzed about 100 human protein complexes, many of which had not or had only incompletely been characterized. This work has led to the discovery of previously unknown, evolutionarily conserved subunits of the anaphase-promoting complex and the gamma-tubulin ring complex--large complexes that are essential for spindle assembly and chromosome segregation. The approaches we describe here are generally applicable to high-throughput follow-up analyses of phenotypic screens in mammalian cells. PMID:20360068

  9. Nutritional quality of rice bran protein in comparison to animal and vegetable protein.

    PubMed

    Han, Sung-Wook; Chee, Kyu-Man; Cho, Seong-Jun

    2015-04-01

    Rice bran protein (RBP) was prepared by alkali extraction and isoelectric precipitation from defatted rice bran. The protein quality of RPB was evaluated and compared to two vegetable proteins [soy protein (ISP) and rice endosperm protein (REP)] and two animal proteins [whey protein (WPI) and casein]. RPB contained 74.93% of protein and its pepsin digestibility and KOH solubility were 89.8% and 91.5%, respectively. In Sprague-Dawley rats, RBP showed protein efficiency ratio, net protein ratio, net protein utilisation, and biological value of 2.39, 3.77, 70.7, and 72.6, which were comparable to the qualities of animal proteins. The true digestibility of RBP (94.8%) was significantly higher than that of REP (90.8%), ISP (91.7%) and WPI (92.8%) and the same as that of casein. Protein digestibility corrected amino acid score (PDCAAS) of RBP was 0.90. These results suggest that rice bran protein appears to be a promising protein source with good biological values and digestibility. PMID:25442618

  10. PREFACE: Protein protein interactions: principles and predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nussinov, Ruth; Tsai, Chung-Jung

    2005-06-01

    Proteins are the `workhorses' of the cell. Their roles span functions as diverse as being molecular machines and signalling. They carry out catalytic reactions, transport, form viral capsids, traverse membranes and form regulated channels, transmit information from DNA to RNA, making possible the synthesis of new proteins, and they are responsible for the degradation of unnecessary proteins and nucleic acids. They are the vehicles of the immune response and are responsible for viral entry into the cell. Given their importance, considerable effort has been centered on the prediction of protein function. A prime way to do this is through identification of binding partners. If the function of at least one of the components with which the protein interacts is known, that should let us assign its function(s) and the pathway(s) in which it plays a role. This holds since the vast majority of their chores in the living cell involve protein-protein interactions. Hence, through the intricate network of these interactions we can map cellular pathways, their interconnectivities and their dynamic regulation. Their identification is at the heart of functional genomics; their prediction is crucial for drug discovery. Knowledge of the pathway, its topology, length, and dynamics may provide useful information for forecasting side effects. The goal of predicting protein-protein interactions is daunting. Some associations are obligatory, others are continuously forming and dissociating. In principle, from the physical standpoint, any two proteins can interact, but under what conditions and at which strength? The principles of protein-protein interactions are general: the non-covalent interactions of two proteins are largely the outcome of the hydrophobic effect, which drives the interactions. In addition, hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interactions play important roles. Thus, many of the interactions observed in vitro are the outcome of experimental overexpression. Protein disorder

  11. Protein structure alignment beyond spatial proximity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Sheng; Ma, Jianzhu; Peng, Jian; Xu, Jinbo

    2013-01-01

    Protein structure alignment is a fundamental problem in computational structure biology. Many programs have been developed for automatic protein structure alignment, but most of them align two protein structures purely based upon geometric similarity without considering evolutionary and functional relationship. As such, these programs may generate structure alignments which are not very biologically meaningful from the evolutionary perspective. This paper presents a novel method DeepAlign for automatic pairwise protein structure alignment. DeepAlign aligns two protein structures using not only spatial proximity of equivalent residues (after rigid-body superposition), but also evolutionary relationship and hydrogen-bonding similarity. Experimental results show that DeepAlign can generate structure alignments much more consistent with manually-curated alignments than other automatic tools especially when proteins under consideration are remote homologs. These results imply that in addition to geometric similarity, evolutionary information and hydrogen-bonding similarity are essential to aligning two protein structures. PMID:23486213

  12. Protein sequence comparison and protein evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, W.R.

    1995-12-31

    This tutorial was one of eight tutorials selected to be presented at the Third International Conference on Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology which was held in the United Kingdom from July 16 to 19, 1995. This tutorial examines how the information conserved during the evolution of a protein molecule can be used to infer reliably homology, and thus a shared proteinfold and possibly a shared active site or function. The authors start by reviewing a geological/evolutionary time scale. Next they look at the evolution of several protein families. During the tutorial, these families will be used to demonstrate that homologous protein ancestry can be inferred with confidence. They also examine different modes of protein evolution and consider some hypotheses that have been presented to explain the very earliest events in protein evolution. The next part of the tutorial will examine the technical aspects of protein sequence comparison. Both optimal and heuristic algorithms and their associated parameters that are used to characterize protein sequence similarities are discussed. Perhaps more importantly, they survey the statistics of local similarity scores, and how these statistics can both be used to improve the selectivity of a search and to evaluate the significance of a match. They them examine distantly related members of three protein families, the serine proteases, the glutathione transferases, and the G-protein-coupled receptors (GCRs). Finally, the discuss how sequence similarity can be used to examine internal repeated or mosaic structures in proteins.

  13. Computational Prediction of Protein–Protein Interaction Networks: Algo-rithms and Resources

    PubMed Central

    Zahiri, Javad; Bozorgmehr, Joseph Hannon; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Protein interactions play an important role in the discovery of protein functions and pathways in biological processes. This is especially true in case of the diseases caused by the loss of specific protein-protein interactions in the organism. The accuracy of experimental results in finding protein-protein interactions, however, is rather dubious and high throughput experimental results have shown both high false positive beside false negative information for protein interaction. Computational methods have attracted tremendous attention among biologists because of the ability to predict protein-protein interactions and validate the obtained experimental results. In this study, we have reviewed several computational methods for protein-protein interaction prediction as well as describing major databases, which store both predicted and detected protein-protein interactions, and the tools used for analyzing protein interaction networks and improving protein-protein interaction reliability. PMID:24396273

  14. An ontology-based search engine for protein-protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Keyword matching or ID matching is the most common searching method in a large database of protein-protein interactions. They are purely syntactic methods, and retrieve the records in the database that contain a keyword or ID specified in a query. Such syntactic search methods often retrieve too few search results or no results despite many potential matches present in the database. Results We have developed a new method for representing protein-protein interactions and the Gene Ontology (GO) using modified Gödel numbers. This representation is hidden from users but enables a search engine using the representation to efficiently search protein-protein interactions in a biologically meaningful way. Given a query protein with optional search conditions expressed in one or more GO terms, the search engine finds all the interaction partners of the query protein by unique prime factorization of the modified Gödel numbers representing the query protein and the search conditions. Conclusion Representing the biological relations of proteins and their GO annotations by modified Gödel numbers makes a search engine efficiently find all protein-protein interactions by prime factorization of the numbers. Keyword matching or ID matching search methods often miss the interactions involving a protein that has no explicit annotations matching the search condition, but our search engine retrieves such interactions as well if they satisfy the search condition with a more specific term in the ontology. PMID:20122195

  15. Genome-wide Protein-protein Interaction Screening by Protein-fragment Complementation Assay (PCA) in Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    Filteau, Marie; Leducq, Jean-Baptiste; Dubé, Alexandre K.; Landry, Christian R.

    2015-01-01

    Proteins are the building blocks, effectors and signal mediators of cellular processes. A protein’s function, regulation and localization often depend on its interactions with other proteins. Here, we describe a protocol for the yeast protein-fragment complementation assay (PCA), a powerful method to detect direct and proximal associations between proteins in living cells. The interaction between two proteins, each fused to a dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) protein fragment, translates into growth of yeast strains in presence of the drug methotrexate (MTX). Differential fitness, resulting from different amounts of reconstituted DHFR enzyme, can be quantified on high-density colony arrays, allowing to differentiate interacting from non-interacting bait-prey pairs. The high-throughput protocol presented here is performed using a robotic platform that parallelizes mating of bait and prey strains carrying complementary DHFR-fragment fusion proteins and the survival assay on MTX. This protocol allows to systematically test for thousands of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) involving bait proteins of interest and offers several advantages over other PPI detection assays, including the study of proteins expressed from their endogenous promoters without the need for modifying protein localization and for the assembly of complex reporter constructs. PMID:25867901

  16. Multiple protein-protein interactions converging on the Prp38 protein during activation of the human spliceosome.

    PubMed

    Schütze, Tonio; Ulrich, Alexander K C; Apelt, Luise; Will, Cindy L; Bartlick, Natascha; Seeger, Martin; Weber, Gert; Lührmann, Reinhard; Stelzl, Ulrich; Wahl, Markus C

    2016-02-01

    Spliceosomal Prp38 proteins contain a conserved amino-terminal domain, but only higher eukaryotic orthologs also harbor a carboxy-terminal RS domain, a hallmark of splicing regulatory SR proteins. We show by crystal structure analysis that the amino-terminal domain of human Prp38 is organized around three pairs of antiparallel α-helices and lacks similarities to RNA-binding domains found in canonical SR proteins. Instead, yeast two-hybrid analyses suggest that the amino-terminal domain is a versatile protein-protein interaction hub that possibly binds 12 other spliceosomal proteins, most of which are recruited at the same stage as Prp38. By quantitative, alanine surface-scanning two-hybrid screens and biochemical analyses we delineated four distinct interfaces on the Prp38 amino-terminal domain. In vitro interaction assays using recombinant proteins showed that Prp38 can bind at least two proteins simultaneously via two different interfaces. Addition of excess Prp38 amino-terminal domain to in vitro splicing assays, but not of an interaction-deficient mutant, stalled splicing at a precatalytic stage. Our results show that human Prp38 is an unusual SR protein, whose amino-terminal domain is a multi-interface protein-protein interaction platform that might organize the relative positioning of other proteins during splicing. PMID:26673105

  17. Sorghum and millet proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sorghum and millet proteins are an important source of dietary protein for significant numbers of people living throughout Africa and parts of Asia. Compared to other food proteins, such as those found in milk, eggs and wheat, little is known about the functionality of sorghum and millet proteins. ...

  18. Whey protein fractionation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Concentrated whey protein products from cheese whey, such as whey protein concentrate (WPC) and whey protein isolate (WPI), contain more than seven different types of proteins: alpha-lactalbumin (alpha-LA), beta-lactoglobulin (beta-LG), bovine serum albumin (BSA), immunoglobulins (Igs), lactoferrin ...

  19. Protein in diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... protein. The basic structure of protein is a chain of amino acids. You need protein in your diet to help your body repair cells and make new ones. Protein is also important for growth and development in children, teens, and pregnant women.

  20. Protein engineering strategies with potential applications for altering clinically relevant cellular pathways at the protein level.

    PubMed

    Regan, Lynne; Hinrichsen, Michael R; Oi, Curran

    2016-05-01

    All diseases can be fundamentally viewed as the result of malfunctioning cellular pathways. Protein engineering offers the potential to develop new tools that will allow these dysfunctional pathways to be better understood, in addition to potentially providing new routes to restore proper function. Here we discuss different approaches that can be used to change the intracellular activity of a protein by intervening at the protein level: targeted protein sequestration, protein recruitment, protein degradation, and selective inhibition of binding interfaces. The potential of each of these tools to be developed into effective therapeutic treatments will also be discussed, along with any major barriers that currently block their translation into the clinic. PMID:27031866

  1. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus envelope (E) protein interacts with mitochondrial proteins and induces apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Pujhari, Sujit; Zakhartchouk, Alexander N

    2016-07-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) causes significant economic losses for the swine industry worldwide. The PRRSV E protein, encoded by ORF 2b, is one of the non-glycosylated minor structural proteins. In this study, we present evidence for the interaction of the E protein with mitochondrial proteins ATP5A (part of ATP synthase complex), prohibitin, and ADP/ATP translocase. We additionally demonstrate partial mitochondrial localization of the E protein in transfected cells. To functionally investigate these interactions, we infected MARC-145 cells with PRRSV or alphavirus replicon particles (VRPs) expressing PRRSV E protein. In infected cells, production of ATP was significantly reduced. The E protein also induced apoptosis by activating caspase-3, which results in PARP cleavage. Taken together, these data suggest that the PRRSV E protein interacts with mitochondrial proteins and induces apoptosis by inhibiting ATP production. PMID:27068165

  2. Comparative analysis of rigidity across protein families.

    PubMed

    Wells, S A; Jimenez-Roldan, J E; Römer, R A

    2009-01-01

    We present a comparative study in which 'pebble game' rigidity analysis is applied to multiple protein crystal structures, for each of six different protein families. We find that the main-chain rigidity of a protein structure at a given hydrogen bond energy cutoff is quite sensitive to small structural variations, and conclude that the hydrogen bond constraints in rigidity analysis should be chosen so as to form and test specific hypotheses about the rigidity of a particular protein. Our comparative approach highlights two different characteristic patterns ('sudden' or 'gradual') for protein rigidity loss as constraints are removed, in line with recent results on the rigidity transitions of glassy networks. PMID:19773604

  3. Techniques in protein methylation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaeho; Cheng, Donghang; Bedford, Mark T

    2004-01-01

    Proteins can be methylated on the side-chain nitrogens of arginine and lysine residues or on carboxy-termini. Protein methylation is a way of subtly changing the primary sequence of a peptide so that it can encode more information. This common posttranslational modification is implicated in the regulation of a variety of processes including protein trafficking, transcription and protein-protein interactions. In this chapter, we will use the arginine methyltransferases to illustrate different approaches that have been developed to assess protein methylation. Both in vivo and in vitro methylation techniques are described, and the use of small molecule inhibitors of protein methylation will be demonstrated. PMID:15173617

  4. Protein interfacial structure and nanotoxicology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, John W.; Perriman, Adam W.; McGillivray, Duncan J.; Lin, Jhih-Min

    2009-02-01

    Here we briefly recapitulate the use of X-ray and neutron reflectometry at the air-water interface to find protein structures and thermodynamics at interfaces and test a possibility for understanding those interactions between nanoparticles and proteins which lead to nanoparticle toxicology through entry into living cells. Stable monomolecular protein films have been made at the air-water interface and, with a specially designed vessel, the substrate changed from that which the air-water interfacial film was deposited. This procedure allows interactions, both chemical and physical, between introduced species and the monomolecular film to be studied by reflectometry. The method is briefly illustrated here with some new results on protein-protein interaction between β-casein and κ-casein at the air-water interface using X-rays. These two proteins are an essential component of the structure of milk. In the experiments reported, specific and directional interactions appear to cause different interfacial structures if first, a β-casein monolayer is attacked by a κ-casein solution compared to the reverse. The additional contrast associated with neutrons will be an advantage here. We then show the first results of experiments on the interaction of a β-casein monolayer with a nanoparticle titanium oxide sol, foreshadowing the study of the nanoparticle "corona" thought to be important for nanoparticle-cell wall penetration.

  5. The Intrinsic Geometric Structure of Protein-Protein Interaction Networks for Protein Interaction Prediction.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yi; Sun, Mengtian; Dai, Guoxian; Ramain, Karthik

    2016-01-01

    Recent developments in high-throughput technologies for measuring protein-protein interaction (PPI) have profoundly advanced our ability to systematically infer protein function and regulation. However, inherently high false positive and false negative rates in measurement have posed great challenges in computational approaches for the prediction of PPI. A good PPI predictor should be 1) resistant to high rate of missing and spurious PPIs, and 2) robust against incompleteness of observed PPI networks. To predict PPI in a network, we developed an intrinsic geometry structure (IGS) for network, which exploits the intrinsic and hidden relationship among proteins in network through a heat diffusion process. In this process, all explicit PPIs participate simultaneously to glue local infinitesimal and noisy experimental interaction data to generate a global macroscopic descriptions about relationships among proteins. The revealed implicit relationship can be interpreted as the probability of two proteins interacting with each other. The revealed relationship is intrinsic and robust against individual, local and explicit protein interactions in the original network. We apply our approach to publicly available PPI network data for the evaluation of the performance of PPI prediction. Experimental results indicate that, under different levels of the missing and spurious PPIs, IGS is able to robustly exploit the intrinsic and hidden relationship for PPI prediction with a higher sensitivity and specificity compared to that of recently proposed methods. PMID:26886733

  6. A Least Square Method Based Model for Identifying Protein Complexes in Protein-Protein Interaction Network

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Qiguo; Guo, Maozu; Guo, Yingjie; Liu, Xiaoyan; Liu, Yang; Teng, Zhixia

    2014-01-01

    Protein complex formed by a group of physical interacting proteins plays a crucial role in cell activities. Great effort has been made to computationally identify protein complexes from protein-protein interaction (PPI) network. However, the accuracy of the prediction is still far from being satisfactory, because the topological structures of protein complexes in the PPI network are too complicated. This paper proposes a novel optimization framework to detect complexes from PPI network, named PLSMC. The method is on the basis of the fact that if two proteins are in a common complex, they are likely to be interacting. PLSMC employs this relation to determine complexes by a penalized least squares method. PLSMC is applied to several public yeast PPI networks, and compared with several state-of-the-art methods. The results indicate that PLSMC outperforms other methods. In particular, complexes predicted by PLSMC can match known complexes with a higher accuracy than other methods. Furthermore, the predicted complexes have high functional homogeneity. PMID:25405206

  7. Protein breakdown in cancer cachexia.

    PubMed

    Sandri, Marco

    2016-06-01

    Skeletal muscle is a highly adaptive tissue, capable of altering muscle fiber size, functional capacity and metabolism in response to physiological stimuli. However, pathological conditions such as cancer growth compromise the mechanisms that regulate muscle homeostasis, resulting in loss of muscle mass, functional impairment and compromised metabolism. This tumor-induced condition is characterized by enhanced muscle protein breakdown and amino acids release that sustain liver gluconeogenesis and tissue protein synthesis. Proteolysis is controlled by the two most important cellular degradation systems, the ubiquitin proteasome and autophagy lysosome. These systems are carefully regulated by different signalling pathways that determine protein and organelle turnover. In this review we will describe the involvement of the ubiquitin proteasome and autophagy lysosome systems in cancer cachexia and the principal signalling pathways that regulate tumor-induced protein breakdown in muscle. PMID:26564688

  8. When is protein binding important?

    PubMed

    Heuberger, Jules; Schmidt, Stephan; Derendorf, Hartmut

    2013-09-01

    The present paper is an ode to a classic citation by Benet and Hoener (2002. Clin Pharm Ther 71(3):115-121). The now classic paper had a huge impact on drug development and the way the issue of protein binding is perceived and interpreted. Although the authors very clearly pointed out the limitations and underlying assumptions for their delineations, these are too often overlooked and the classic paper's message is misinterpreted by broadening to cases that were not intended. Some members of the scientific community concluded from the paper that protein binding is not important. This was clearly not intended by the authors, as they finished their paper with a paragraph entitled: "When is protein binding important?" Misinterpretation of the underlying assumptions in the classic work can result in major pitfalls in drug development. Therefore, we revisit the topic of protein binding with the intention of clarifying when clinically relevant changes should be considered during drug development. PMID:23650013

  9. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SEED YIELD AND SEED PROTEIN IN HIGH PROTEIN SOYBEAN POPULATIONS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean seed yield and protein concentration often show a strong negative correlation. Initial results of our study indicate that development of soybean lines with high yield and high protein concentration is possible by selecting for protein concentration first. We evaluated the relationship of yie...

  10. Contribution of hydrogen bonds to protein stability.

    PubMed

    Pace, C Nick; Fu, Hailong; Lee Fryar, Katrina; Landua, John; Trevino, Saul R; Schell, David; Thurlkill, Richard L; Imura, Satoshi; Scholtz, J Martin; Gajiwala, Ketan; Sevcik, Jozef; Urbanikova, Lubica; Myers, Jeffery K; Takano, Kazufumi; Hebert, Eric J; Shirley, Bret A; Grimsley, Gerald R

    2014-05-01

    Our goal was to gain a better understanding of the contribution of the burial of polar groups and their hydrogen bonds to the conformational stability of proteins. We measured the change in stability, Δ(ΔG), for a series of hydrogen bonding mutants in four proteins: villin headpiece subdomain (VHP) containing 36 residues, a surface protein from Borrelia burgdorferi (VlsE) containing 341 residues, and two proteins previously studied in our laboratory, ribonucleases Sa (RNase Sa) and T1 (RNase T1). Crystal structures were determined for three of the hydrogen bonding mutants of RNase Sa: S24A, Y51F, and T95A. The structures are very similar to wild type RNase Sa and the hydrogen bonding partners form intermolecular hydrogen bonds to water in all three mutants. We compare our results with previous studies of similar mutants in other proteins and reach the following conclusions. (1) Hydrogen bonds contribute favorably to protein stability. (2) The contribution of hydrogen bonds to protein stability is strongly context dependent. (3) Hydrogen bonds by side chains and peptide groups make similar contributions to protein stability. (4) Polar group burial can make a favorable contribution to protein stability even if the polar groups are not hydrogen bonded. (5) The contribution of hydrogen bonds to protein stability is similar for VHP, a small protein, and VlsE, a large protein. PMID:24591301

  11. Contribution of hydrogen bonds to protein stability

    PubMed Central

    Pace, C Nick; Fu, Hailong; Fryar, Katrina Lee; Landua, John; Trevino, Saul R; Schell, David; Thurlkill, Richard L; Imura, Satoshi; Scholtz, J Martin; Gajiwala, Ketan; Sevcik, Jozef; Urbanikova, Lubica; Myers, Jeffery K; Takano, Kazufumi; Hebert, Eric J; Shirley, Bret A; Grimsley, Gerald R

    2014-01-01

    Our goal was to gain a better understanding of the contribution of the burial of polar groups and their hydrogen bonds to the conformational stability of proteins. We measured the change in stability, Δ(ΔG), for a series of hydrogen bonding mutants in four proteins: villin headpiece subdomain (VHP) containing 36 residues, a surface protein from Borrelia burgdorferi (VlsE) containing 341 residues, and two proteins previously studied in our laboratory, ribonucleases Sa (RNase Sa) and T1 (RNase T1). Crystal structures were determined for three of the hydrogen bonding mutants of RNase Sa: S24A, Y51F, and T95A. The structures are very similar to wild type RNase Sa and the hydrogen bonding partners form intermolecular hydrogen bonds to water in all three mutants. We compare our results with previous studies of similar mutants in other proteins and reach the following conclusions. (1) Hydrogen bonds contribute favorably to protein stability. (2) The contribution of hydrogen bonds to protein stability is strongly context dependent. (3) Hydrogen bonds by side chains and peptide groups make similar contributions to protein stability. (4) Polar group burial can make a favorable contribution to protein stability even if the polar groups are not hydrogen bonded. (5) The contribution of hydrogen bonds to protein stability is similar for VHP, a small protein, and VlsE, a large protein. PMID:24591301

  12. Cross-talk unfolded: MARCKS proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Arbuzova, Anna; Schmitz, Arndt A P; Vergères, Guy

    2002-01-01

    The proteins of the MARCKS (myristoylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate) family were first identified as prominent substrates of protein kinase C (PKC). Since then, these proteins have been implicated in the regulation of brain development and postnatal survival, cellular migration and adhesion, as well as endo-, exo- and phago-cytosis, and neurosecretion. The effector domain of MARCKS proteins is phosphorylated by PKC, binds to calmodulin and contributes to membrane binding. This multitude of mutually exclusive interactions allows cross-talk between the signal transduction pathways involving PKC and calmodulin. This review focuses on recent, mostly biophysical and biochemical results renewing interest in this protein family. MARCKS membrane binding is now understood at the molecular level. From a structural point of view, there is a consensus emerging that MARCKS proteins are "natively unfolded". Interestingly, domains similar to the effector domain have been discovered in other proteins. Furthermore, since the effector domain enhances the polymerization of actin in vitro, MARCKS proteins have been proposed to mediate regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. However, the recent observations that MARCKS might serve to sequester phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate in the plasma membrane of unstimulated cells suggest an alternative model for the control of the actin cytoskeleton. While myristoylation is classically considered to be a co-translational, irreversible event, new reports on MARCKS proteins suggest a more dynamic picture of this protein modification. Finally, studies with mice lacking MARCKS proteins have investigated the functions of these proteins during embryonic development in the intact organism. PMID:11829734

  13. Contribution of Hydrogen Bonds to Protein Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pace, Nick

    2014-03-01

    I will discuss the contribution of the burial of polar groups and their hydrogen bonds to the conformational stability of proteins. We measured the change in stability, Δ(Δ G), for a series of hydrogen bonding mutants in four proteins: villin head piece subdomain (VHP) containing 36 residues, a surface protein from Borrelia burgdorferi (VlsE) containing 341 residues, and two proteins previously studied in our laboratory, ribonucleases Sa (RNase Sa) and T1 (RNase T1). Crystal structures were determined for three of the hydrogen bonding mutants of RNase Sa: S24A (1.1Å), Y51F(1.5Å), and T95A(1.3Å). The structures are very similar to wild type RNase Sa and the hydrogen bonding partners always form intermolecular hydrogen bonds to water in the mutants. We compare our results with previous studies of similar mutants in other proteins and reach the following conclusions: 1) Hydrogen bonds contribute favorably to protein stability. 2) The contribution of hydrogen bonds to protein stability is strongly context dependent. 3) Hydrogen bonds by side chains and peptide groups make similar contributions to protein stability. 4) Polar group burial can make a favorable contribution to protein stability even if the polar groups are not hydrogen bonded. 5) The contribution of hydrogen bonds to protein stability is similar for VHP, a small protein, and VlsE, a large protein.

  14. Biochemical Approaches for Discovering Protein-Protein Interactions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protein-protein interactions or protein complexes are indigenous to nearly all cellular processes, ranging from metabolism to structure. Elucidating both individual protein associations and complex protein interaction networks, while challenging, is an essential goal of functional genomics. For ex...

  15. Urine Protein and Urine Protein to Creatinine Ratio

    MedlinePlus

    ... limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Urine Protein and Urine Protein to Creatinine Ratio Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: 24-Hour Urine Protein; Urine Total Protein; Urine Protein to Creatinine Ratio; ...

  16. Origins of Myc Proteins – Using Intrinsic Protein Disorder to Trace Distant Relatives

    PubMed Central

    Mahani, Amir; Henriksson, Johan; Wright, Anthony P. H.

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian Myc proteins are important determinants of cell proliferation as well as the undifferentiated state of stem cells and their activity is frequently deregulated in cancer. Based mainly on conservation in the C-terminal DNA-binding and dimerization domain, Myc-like proteins have been reported in many simpler organisms within and outside the Metazoa but they have not been found in fungi or plants. Several important signature motifs defining mammalian Myc proteins are found in the N-terminal domain but the extent to which these are found in the Myc-like proteins from simpler organisms is not well established. The extent of N-terminal signature sequence conservation would give important insights about the evolution of Myc proteins and their current function in mammalian physiology and disease. In a systematic study of Myc-like proteins we show that N-terminal signature motifs are not readily detectable in individual Myc-like proteins from invertebrates but that weak similarities to Myc boxes 1 and 2 can be found in the N-termini of the simplest Metazoa as well as the unicellular choanoflagellate, Monosiga brevicollis, using multiple protein alignments. Phylogenetic support for the connections of these proteins to established Myc proteins is however poor. We show that the pattern of predicted protein disorder along the length of Myc proteins can be used as a complementary approach to making dendrograms of Myc proteins that aids the classification of Myc proteins. This suggests that the pattern of disorder within Myc proteins is more conserved through evolution than their amino acid sequence. In the disorder-based dendrograms the Myc-like proteins from simpler organisms, including M. brevicollis, are connected to established Myc proteins with a higher degree of certainty. Our results suggest that protein disorder based dendrograms may be of general significance for studying distant relationships between proteins, such as transcription factors, that have high

  17. [Protein expression and purification].

    PubMed

    Růčková, E; Müller, P; Vojtěšek, B

    2014-01-01

    Production of recombinant proteins is essential for many applications in both basic research and also in medicine, where recombinant proteins are used as pharmaceuticals. This review summarizes procedures involved in recombinant protein expression and purification, including molecular cloning of target genes into expression vectors, selection of the appropriate expression system, and protein purification techniques. Recombinant DNA technology allows protein engineering to modify protein stability, activity and function or to facilitate protein purification by affinity tag fusions. A wide range of cloning systems enabling fast and effective design of expression vectors is currently available. A first choice of protein expression system is usually the bacteria Escherichia coli. The main advantages of this prokaryotic expression system are low cost and simplicity; on the other hand this system is often unsuitable for production of complex mammalian proteins. Protein expression mediated by eukaryotic cells (yeast, insect and mammalian cells) usually produces properly folded and posttranslationally modified proteins. How-ever, cultivation of insect and, especially, mammalian cells is time consuming and expensive. Affinity tagged recombinant proteins are purified efficiently using affinity chromatography. An affinity tag is a protein or peptide that mediates specific binding to a chromatography column, unbound proteins are removed during a washing step and pure protein is subsequently eluted. PMID:24945544

  18. PCDq: human protein complex database with quality index which summarizes different levels of evidences of protein complexes predicted from H-Invitational protein-protein interactions integrative dataset

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Proteins interact with other proteins or biomolecules in complexes to perform cellular functions. Existing protein-protein interaction (PPI) databases and protein complex databases for human proteins are not organized to provide protein complex information or facilitate the discovery of novel subunits. Data integration of PPIs focused specifically on protein complexes, subunits, and their functions. Predicted candidate complexes or subunits are also important for experimental biologists. Description Based on integrated PPI data and literature, we have developed a human protein complex database with a complex quality index (PCDq), which includes both known and predicted complexes and subunits. We integrated six PPI data (BIND, DIP, MINT, HPRD, IntAct, and GNP_Y2H), and predicted human protein complexes by finding densely connected regions in the PPI networks. They were curated with the literature so that missing proteins were complemented and some complexes were merged, resulting in 1,264 complexes comprising 9,268 proteins with 32,198 PPIs. The evidence level of each subunit was assigned as a categorical variable. This indicated whether it was a known subunit, and a specific function was inferable from sequence or network analysis. To summarize the categories of all the subunits in a complex, we devised a complex quality index (CQI) and assigned it to each complex. We examined the proportion of consistency of Gene Ontology (GO) terms among protein subunits of a complex. Next, we compared the expression profiles of the corresponding genes and found that many proteins in larger complexes tend to be expressed cooperatively at the transcript level. The proportion of duplicated genes in a complex was evaluated. Finally, we identified 78 hypothetical proteins that were annotated as subunits of 82 complexes, which included known complexes. Of these hypothetical proteins, after our prediction had been made, four were reported to be actual subunits of the

  19. Origins of Protein Functions in Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seelig, Burchard; Pohorille, Andrzej

    2011-01-01

    . Recently it was found that, as in the previous case, the proteins have a structure unknown among modern enzymes. In this case, in vitro evolution started from a small, non-enzymatic protein. A similar selection process initiated from a library of random polypeptides is in progress. These results not only allow for estimating the occurrence of function in random protein assemblies but also provide evidence for the possibility of alternative protein worlds. Extant proteins might simply represent a frozen accident in the world of possible proteins. Alternative collections of proteins, even with similar functions, could originate alternative evolutionary paths.

  20. Protein-protein binding affinities by pulse proteolysis: application to TEM-1/BLIP protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Hanes, Melinda S; Ratcliff, Kathleen; Marqusee, Susan; Handel, Tracy M

    2010-10-01

    Efficient methods for quantifying dissociation constants have become increasingly important for high-throughput mutagenesis studies in the postgenomic era. However, experimentally determining binding affinity is often laborious, requires large amounts of purified protein, and utilizes specialized equipment. Recently, pulse proteolysis has been shown to be a robust and simple method to determine the dissociation constants for a protein-ligand pair based on the increase in thermodynamic stability upon ligand binding. Here, we extend this technique to determine binding affinities for a protein-protein complex involving the β-lactamase TEM-1 and various β-lactamase inhibitor protein (BLIP) mutants. Interaction with BLIP results in an increase in the denaturation curve midpoint, C(m), of TEM-1, which correlates with the rank order of binding affinities for several BLIP mutants. Hence, pulse proteolysis is a simple, effective method to assay for mutations that modulate binding affinity in protein-protein complexes. From a small set (n = 4) of TEM-1/BLIP mutant complexes, a linear relationship between energy of stabilization (dissociation constant) and ΔC(m) was observed. From this "calibration curve," accurate dissociation constants for two additional BLIP mutants were calculated directly from proteolysis-derived ΔC(m) values. Therefore, in addition to qualitative information, armed with knowledge of the dissociation constants from the WT protein and a limited number of mutants, accurate quantitation of binding affinities can be determined for additional mutants from pulse proteolysis. Minimal sample requirements and the suitability of impure protein preparations are important advantages that make pulse proteolysis a powerful tool for high-throughput mutagenesis binding studies. PMID:20669180

  1. Multifunctional proteins revealed by overlapping clustering in protein interaction network

    PubMed Central

    Chapple, Charles E.; Guénoche, Alain; Brun, Christine

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: Multifunctional proteins perform several functions. They are expected to interact specifically with distinct sets of partners, simultaneously or not, depending on the function performed. Current graph clustering methods usually allow a protein to belong to only one cluster, therefore impeding a realistic assignment of multifunctional proteins to clusters. Results: Here, we present Overlapping Cluster Generator (OCG), a novel clustering method which decomposes a network into overlapping clusters and which is, therefore, capable of correct assignment of multifunctional proteins. The principle of OCG is to cover the graph with initial overlapping classes that are iteratively fused into a hierarchy according to an extension of Newman's modularity function. By applying OCG to a human protein–protein interaction network, we show that multifunctional proteins are revealed at the intersection of clusters and demonstrate that the method outperforms other existing methods on simulated graphs and PPI networks. Availability: This software can be downloaded from http://tagc.univ-mrs.fr/welcome/spip.php?rubrique197 Contact: brun@tagc.univ-mrs.fr Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:22080466

  2. Multilevel regulation of protein protein interactions in biological circuitry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckett, Dorothy

    2005-06-01

    Protein-protein interactions are central to biology and, in this 'post-genomic era', prediction of these interactions has become the goal of many computational efforts. Close inspection of even relatively simple biological regulatory circuitry reveals multiple levels of control of the contributing protein interactions. The fundamental probability that an interaction will occur under a given set of conditions is difficult to predict because the relationship between structure and energy is not known. Layered on this basic difficulty are allosteric control mechanisms involving post-translational modification or small ligand binding. In addition, many biological processes involve multiple protein-protein interactions, some of which may be cooperative or even competitive. Finally, although the emphasis in predicting protein interactions is based on equilibrium thermodynamic principles, kinetics can be a major controlling feature in these systems. This complexity reinforces the necessity of performing detailed quantitative studies of the component interactions of complex biological regulatory systems. Results of such studies will help us to bridge the gap between our knowledge of structure and our understanding of functional biology.

  3. Measuring protein-protein and protein-nucleic Acid interactions by biolayer interferometry.

    PubMed

    Sultana, Azmiri; Lee, Jeffrey E

    2015-01-01

    Biolayer interferometry (BLI) is a simple, optical dip-and-read system useful for measuring interactions between proteins, peptides, nucleic acids, small molecules, and/or lipids in real time. In BLI, a biomolecular bait is immobilized on a matrix at the tip of a fiber-optic sensor. The binding between the immobilized ligand and another molecule in an analyte solution produces a change in optical thickness at the tip and results in a wavelength shift proportional to binding. BLI provides direct binding affinities and rates of association and dissociation. This unit describes an efficient approach using streptavidin-based BLI to analyze DNA-protein and protein-protein interactions. A quantitative set of equilibrium binding affinities (K(d)) and rates of association and dissociation (k(a)/k(d)) can be measured in minutes using nanomole quantities of sample. PMID:25640894

  4. Microstructural Changes in High-Protein Nutrition Bars Formulated with Extruded or Toasted Milk Protein Concentrate.

    PubMed

    Banach, J C; Clark, S; Lamsal, B P

    2016-02-01

    Milk protein concentrates with more than 80% protein (that is, MPC80) are underutilized as the primary protein source in high-protein nutrition bars as they impart crumbliness and cause hardening during storage. High-protein nutrition bar texture changes are often associated with internal protein aggregations and macronutrient phase separation. These changes were investigated in model high-protein nutrition bars formulated with MPC80 and physically modified MPC80s. High-protein nutrition bars formulated with extruded MPC80s hardened slower than those formulated with toasted or unmodified MPC80. Extruded MPC80 had reduced free sulfhydryl group exposure, whereas measurable increases were seen in the toasted MPC80. High-protein nutrition bar textural performance may be related to the number of exposed free sulfhydryl groups in MPC80. Protein aggregations resulting from ingredient modification and high-protein nutrition bar storage were studied with sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Disulfide-based protein aggregations and changes in free sulfhydryl concentration were not consistently relatable to high-protein nutrition bar texture change. However, the high-protein nutrition bars formulated with extruded MPC80 were less prone to phase separations, as depicted by confocal laser scanning microscopy, and underwent less texture change during storage than those formulated with toasted or unmodified MPC80. PMID:26748454

  5. A method for investigating protein-protein interactions related to Salmonella typhimurium pathogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhury, Saiful M.; Shi, Liang; Yoon, Hyunjin; Ansong, Charles; Rommereim, Leah M.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Auberry, Kenneth J.; Moore, R. J.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Heffron, Fred; Smith, Richard D.

    2009-02-10

    We successfully modified an existing method to investigate protein-protein interactions in the pathogenic bacterium Salmonella typhimurium (STM). This method includes i) addition of a histidine-biotin-histidine tag to the bait proteins via recombinant DNA techniques; ii) in vivo cross-linking with formaldehyde; iii) tandem affinity purification of bait proteins under fully denaturing conditions; and iv) identification of the proteins cross-linked to the bait proteins by liquid-chromatography in conjunction with tandem mass-spectrometry. In vivo cross-linking stabilized protein interactions permitted the subsequent two-step purification step conducted under denaturing conditions. The two-step purification greatly reduced nonspecific binding of non-cross-linked proteins to bait proteins. Two different negative controls were employed to reduce false-positive identification. In an initial demonstration of this approach, we tagged three selected STM proteins- HimD, PduB and PhoP- with known binding partners that ranged from stable (e.g., HimD) to transient (i.e., PhoP). Distinct sets of interacting proteins were identified with each bait protein, including the known binding partners such as HimA for HimD, as well as anticipated and unexpected binding partners. Our results suggest that novel protein-protein interactions may be critical to pathogenesis by Salmonella typhimurium. .

  6. Towards the development of Bacillus subtilis as a cell factory for membrane proteins and protein complexes

    PubMed Central

    Zweers, Jessica C; Barák, Imrich; Becher, Dörte; Driessen, Arnold JM; Hecker, Michael; Kontinen, Vesa P; Saller, Manfred J; Vavrová, L'udmila; van Dijl, Jan Maarten

    2008-01-01

    Background The Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis is an important producer of high quality industrial enzymes and a few eukaryotic proteins. Most of these proteins are secreted into the growth medium, but successful examples of cytoplasmic protein production are also known. Therefore, one may anticipate that the high protein production potential of B. subtilis can be exploited for protein complexes and membrane proteins to facilitate their functional and structural analysis. The high quality of proteins produced with B. subtilis results from the action of cellular quality control systems that efficiently remove misfolded or incompletely synthesized proteins. Paradoxically, cellular quality control systems also represent bottlenecks for the production of various heterologous proteins at significant concentrations. Conclusion While inactivation of quality control systems has the potential to improve protein production yields, this could be achieved at the expense of product quality. Mechanisms underlying degradation of secretory proteins are nowadays well understood and often controllable. It will therefore be a major challenge for future research to identify and modulate quality control systems of B. subtilis that limit the production of high quality protein complexes and membrane proteins, and to enhance those systems that facilitate assembly of these proteins. PMID:18394159

  7. Post-translational control of protein function with light using a LOV-intein fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Jones, D C; Mistry, I N; Tavassoli, A

    2016-04-01

    Methods for the post-translational control of protein function with light hold much value as tools in cell biology. To this end, we report a fusion protein that consists of DnaE split-inteins, flanking the light sensitive LOV2 domain of Avena sativa. The resulting chimera combines the activities of these two unrelated proteins to enable controlled formation of a functional protein via upregulation of intein splicing with blue light in bacterial and human cells. PMID:26940144

  8. PPLook: an automated data mining tool for protein-protein interaction

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Extracting and visualizing of protein-protein interaction (PPI) from text literatures are a meaningful topic in protein science. It assists the identification of interactions among proteins. There is a lack of tools to extract PPI, visualize and classify the results. Results We developed a PPI search system, termed PPLook, which automatically extracts and visualizes protein-protein interaction (PPI) from text. Given a query protein name, PPLook can search a dataset for other proteins interacting with it by using a keywords dictionary pattern-matching algorithm, and display the topological parameters, such as the number of nodes, edges, and connected components. The visualization component of PPLook enables us to view the interaction relationship among the proteins in a three-dimensional space based on the OpenGL graphics interface technology. PPLook can also provide the functions of selecting protein semantic class, counting the number of semantic class proteins which interact with query protein, counting the literature number of articles appearing the interaction relationship about the query protein. Moreover, PPLook provides heterogeneous search and a user-friendly graphical interface. Conclusions PPLook is an effective tool for biologists and biosystem developers who need to access PPI information from the literature. PPLook is freely available for non-commercial users at http://meta.usc.edu/softs/PPLook. PMID:20550717

  9. Leveraging Genomics Software to Improve Proteomics Results

    SciTech Connect

    Fodor, I K; Nelson, D O

    2005-09-06

    Rigorous data analysis techniques are essential in quantifying the differential expression of proteins in biological samples of interest. Statistical methods from the microarray literature were applied to the analysis of two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) proteomics experiments, in the context of technical variability studies involving human plasma. Protein expression measurements were corrected to account for observed intensity-dependent biases within gels, and normalized to mitigate observed gel to gel variations. The methods improved upon the results achieved using the best currently available 2-D DIGE proteomics software. The spot-wise protein variance was reduced by 10% and the number of apparently differentially expressed proteins was reduced by over 50%.

  10. Identification of Cellular Proteins that Interact with Human Cytomegalovirus Immediate-Early Protein 1 by Protein Array Assay

    PubMed Central

    Puerta Martínez, Francisco; Tang, Qiyi

    2013-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) gene expression during infection is characterized as a sequential process including immediate-early (IE), early (E), and late (L)-stage gene expression. The most abundantly expressed gene at the IE stage of infection is the major IE (MIE) gene that produces IE1 and IE2. IE1 has been the focus of study because it is an important protein, not only for viral gene expression but also for viral replication. It is believed that IE1 plays important roles in viral gene regulation by interacting with cellular proteins. In the current study, we performed protein array assays and identified 83 cellular proteins that interact with IE1. Among them, seven are RNA-binding proteins that are important in RNA processing; more than half are nuclear proteins that are involved in gene regulations. Tumorigenesis-related proteins are also found to interact with IE1, implying that the role of IE1 in tumorigenesis might need to be reevaluated. Unexpectedly, cytoplasmic proteins, such as Golgi autoantigen and GGA1 (both related to the Golgi trafficking protein), are also found to be associated with IE1. We also employed a coimmunoprecipitation assay to test the interactions of IE1 and some of the proteins identified in the protein array assays and confirmed that the results from the protein array assays are reliable. Many of the proteins identified by the protein array assay have not been previously reported. Therefore, the functions of the IE1-protein interactions need to be further explored in the future. PMID:24385082

  11. Quantitative study of protein-protein interactions by quartz nanopipettes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Purushottam Babu; Astudillo, Luisana; Miksovska, Jaroslava; Wang, Xuewen; Li, Wenzhi; Darici, Yesim; He, Jin

    2014-08-01

    In this report, protein-modified quartz nanopipettes were used to quantitatively study protein-protein interactions in attoliter sensing volumes. As shown by numerical simulations, the ionic current through the conical-shaped nanopipette is very sensitive to the surface charge variation near the pore mouth. With the appropriate modification of negatively charged human neuroglobin (hNgb) onto the inner surface of a nanopipette, we were able to detect concentration-dependent current change when the hNgb-modified nanopipette tip was exposed to positively charged cytochrome c (Cyt c) with a series of concentrations in the bath solution. Such current change is due to the adsorption of Cyt c to the inner surface of the nanopipette through specific interactions with hNgb. In contrast, a smaller current change with weak concentration dependence was observed when Cyt c was replaced with lysozyme, which does not specifically bind to hNgb. The equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) for the Cyt c-hNgb complex formation was derived and the value matched very well with the result from surface plasmon resonance measurement. This is the first quantitative study of protein-protein interactions by a conical-shaped nanopore based on charge sensing. Our results demonstrate that nanopipettes can potentially be used as a label-free analytical tool to quantitatively characterize protein-protein interactions.In this report, protein-modified quartz nanopipettes were used to quantitatively study protein-protein interactions in attoliter sensing volumes. As shown by numerical simulations, the ionic current through the conical-shaped nanopipette is very sensitive to the surface charge variation near the pore mouth. With the appropriate modification of negatively charged human neuroglobin (hNgb) onto the inner surface of a nanopipette, we were able to detect concentration-dependent current change when the hNgb-modified nanopipette tip was exposed to positively charged cytochrome c (Cyt c) with

  12. Flow behavior of mixed-protein incipient gels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Strong protein gel networks may result from synergistic interactions with other proteins or food materials above that achievable with a single protein alone. We determined varying flow and viscoelastic behavior of calcium caseinate (CC) or whey protein isolate (WPI) mixed with egg albumin (EA), fish...

  13. Designing Fluorinated Proteins.

    PubMed

    Marsh, E N G

    2016-01-01

    As methods to incorporate noncanonical amino acid residues into proteins have become more powerful, interest in their use to modify the physical and biological properties of proteins and enzymes has increased. This chapter discusses the use of highly fluorinated analogs of hydrophobic amino acids, for example, hexafluoroleucine, in protein design. In particular, fluorinated residues have proven to be generally effective in increasing the thermodynamic stability of proteins. The chapter provides an overview of the different fluorinated amino acids that have been used in protein design and the various methods available for producing fluorinated proteins. It discusses model proteins systems into which highly fluorinated amino acids have been introduced and the reasons why fluorinated residues are generally stabilizing, with particular reference to thermodynamic and structural studies from our laboratory. Lastly, details of the methodology we have developed to measure the thermodynamic stability of oligomeric fluorinated proteins are presented, as this may be generally applicable to many proteins. PMID:27586337

  14. A Preliminary Immunologic Study of Urinary Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Barcelo, Raymond; Pollak, Victor E.

    1966-01-01

    The clearances of seven different proteins were measured by a quantitative immunodiffusion technique in 15 patients with proteinuria. All urines were also studied by immunoelectrophoresis. The renal histology was evaluated in each case, and no correlation was found between histologic changes and the urinary protein excretion. This observation was confirmed by both immunodiffusion and immunoelectrophoretic techniques. No specific urinary protein excretion pattern was found in six patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. High-molecular-weight proteins were rarely found in urine, even when the glomerular basement membrane was definitely thickened. Low-molecular-weight proteins were often observed, but their clearances were variable. The results do not support the suggestion that protein clearances are valuable diagnostic and prognostic tools in renal diseases. They also do not support the view that glomerular filtration is the sole factor responsible for the final patterns of urinary proteins; tubular reabsorption is probably another important factor. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 4Fig. 5 PMID:20328484

  15. Global Analysis of Posttranslational Protein Arginylation

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Reena; Bailey, Aaron O; Yates, John R; Wolf, Yuri I; Zebroski, Henry; Kashina, Anna

    2007-01-01

    Posttranslational arginylation is critical for embryogenesis, cardiovascular development, and angiogenesis, but its molecular effects and the identity of proteins arginylated in vivo are largely unknown. Here we report a global analysis of this modification on the protein level and identification of 43 proteins arginylated in vivo on highly specific sites. Our data demonstrate that unlike previously believed, arginylation can occur on any N-terminally exposed residue likely defined by a structural recognition motif on the protein surface, and that it preferentially affects a number of physiological systems, including cytoskeleton and primary metabolic pathways. The results of our study suggest that protein arginylation is a general mechanism for regulation of protein structure and function and outline the potential role of protein arginylation in cell metabolism and embryonic development. PMID:17896865

  16. Computational approaches for predicting mutant protein stability.

    PubMed

    Kulshreshtha, Shweta; Chaudhary, Vigi; Goswami, Girish K; Mathur, Nidhi

    2016-05-01

    Mutations in the protein affect not only the structure of protein, but also its function and stability. Prediction of mutant protein stability with accuracy is desired for uncovering the molecular aspects of diseases and design of novel proteins. Many advanced computational approaches have been developed over the years, to predict the stability and function of a mutated protein. These approaches based on structure, sequence features and combined features (both structure and sequence features) provide reasonably accurate estimation of the impact of amino acid substitution on stability and function of protein. Recently, consensus tools have been developed by incorporating many tools together, which provide single window results for comparison purpose. In this review, a useful guide for the selection of tools that can be employed in predicting mutated proteins' stability and disease causing capability is provided. PMID:27160393

  17. Hyperquenching for protein cryocrystallography

    PubMed Central

    Warkentin, Matthew; Berejnov, Viatcheslav; Husseini, Naji S.; Thorne, Robert E.

    2010-01-01

    When samples having volumes characteristic of