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Sample records for sequence backbone composition

  1. Interplay among side chain sequence, backbone composition, and residue rigidification in polypeptide folding and assembly

    PubMed Central

    Horne, W. Seth; Price, Joshua L.; Gellman, Samuel H.

    2008-01-01

    The extent to which polypeptide conformation depends on side-chain composition and sequence has been widely studied, but less is known about the importance of maintaining an α-amino acid backbone. Here, we examine a series of peptides with backbones that feature different repeating patterns of α- and β-amino acid residues but an invariant side-chain sequence. In the pure α-backbone, this sequence corresponds to the previously studied peptide GCN4-pLI, which forms a very stable four-helix bundle quaternary structure. Physical characterization in solution and crystallographic structure determination show that a variety of α/β-peptide backbones can adopt sequence-encoded quaternary structures similar to that of the α prototype. There is a loss in helix bundle stability upon β-residue incorporation; however, stability of the quaternary structure is not a simple function of β-residue content. We find that cyclically constrained β-amino acid residues can stabilize the folds of α/β-peptide GCN4-pLI analogues and restore quaternary structure formation to backbones that are predominantly unfolded in the absence of cyclic residues. Our results show a surprising degree of plasticity in terms of the backbone compositions that can manifest the structural information encoded in a sequence of amino acid side chains. These findings offer a framework for the design of nonnatural oligomers that mimic the structural and functional properties of proteins. PMID:18587049

  2. Increasing Sequence Diversity with Flexible Backbone Protein Design: The Complete Redesign of a Protein Hydrophobic Core

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Grant S.; Mills, Jeffrey L.; Miley, Michael J.; Machius, Mischa; Szyperski, Thomas; Kuhlman, Brian

    2015-10-15

    Protein design tests our understanding of protein stability and structure. Successful design methods should allow the exploration of sequence space not found in nature. However, when redesigning naturally occurring protein structures, most fixed backbone design algorithms return amino acid sequences that share strong sequence identity with wild-type sequences, especially in the protein core. This behavior places a restriction on functional space that can be explored and is not consistent with observations from nature, where sequences of low identity have similar structures. Here, we allow backbone flexibility during design to mutate every position in the core (38 residues) of a four-helix bundle protein. Only small perturbations to the backbone, 12 {angstrom}, were needed to entirely mutate the core. The redesigned protein, DRNN, is exceptionally stable (melting point >140C). An NMR and X-ray crystal structure show that the side chains and backbone were accurately modeled (all-atom RMSD = 1.3 {angstrom}).

  3. AbDesign: an algorithm for combinatorial backbone design guided by natural conformations and sequences

    PubMed Central

    Lapidoth, Gideon D.; Baran, Dror; Pszolla, Gabriele M.; Norn, Christoffer; Alon, Assaf; Tyka, Michael D.; Fleishman, Sarel J.

    2016-01-01

    Computational design of protein function has made substantial progress, generating new enzymes, binders, inhibitors, and nanomaterials not previously seen in nature. However, the ability to design new protein backbones for function – essential to exert control over all polypeptide degrees of freedom – remains a critical challenge. Most previous attempts to design new backbones computed the mainchain from scratch. Here, instead, we describe a combinatorial backbone and sequence optimization algorithm called AbDesign, which leverages the large number of sequences and experimentally determined molecular structures of antibodies to construct new antibody models, dock them against target surfaces and optimize their sequence and backbone conformation for high stability and binding affinity. We used the algorithm to produce antibody designs that target the same molecular surfaces as nine natural, high-affinity antibodies; in six the backbone conformation at the core of the antibody binding surface is similar to the natural antibody targets, and in several cases sequence and sidechain conformations recapitulate those seen in the natural antibodies. In the case of an anti-lysozyme antibody, designed antibody CDRs at the periphery of the interface, such as L1 and H2, show a greater backbone conformation diversity than the CDRs at the core of the interface, and increase the binding surface area compared to the natural antibody, which could enhance affinity and specificity. PMID:25670500

  4. Base sequence dependence and backbone-induced effects on charge transport through DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joe, Yong; Lee, Sun; Hedin, Eric

    2009-03-01

    We investigate quantum mechanical electron transmission along the long axis of the DNA molecule using a tight-binding model. Specifically, we use two different DNA models to study the charge transfer efficiency of synthetic ds-DNA. First, the generic form of a simple one-conduction channel model, called the fishbone model, is used. The sugar-phosphate backbone and the coupling amplitude between each site of the base and the backbone are incorporated into an energy-dependent on-site potential in the main DNA site. Here, individual sites represent a base-pair formed by either AT (TA) or GC (CG) pairs coupled via hydrogen bonds. Second, we employ a two-dimensional three-chain model where the backbone on-site energy, the coupling amplitude between the bases and the backbone, and a possible hopping of charge carriers between the successive backbone sites are used as key parameters. The overall transmission and the current-voltage characteristics are calculated to determine the influence of mismatch (impurity) effects in the DNA sequence. Finally, we discuss the transmission gap as a function of coupling between the bases and between the bases and the backbone. *One of the authors (E.R.H) is partially supported by a grant from the Center for Energy Research, Education, and Service (CERES) at Ball State University.

  5. A backbone amide protecting group for overcoming difficult sequences and suppressing aspartimide formation.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Aal, Abu-Baker M; Papageorgiou, George; Raz, Richard; Quibell, Martin; Burlina, Fabienne; Offer, John

    2016-05-01

    A backbone amide bond protecting group, 2-hydroxy-4-methoxy-5-nitrobenzyl (Hmnb), improved the synthesis of aggregation and aspartimide-prone peptides. Introduction of Hmnb is automated and carried out during peptide assembly by addition of 4-methoxy-5-nitrosalicylaldehyde to the peptidyl-resin and on-resin reduction to the secondary amine. Acylation of the hindered secondary amine is aided by the formation of an internal nitrophenol ester that undergoes a favourable O,N intramolecular acyl transfer. This activated ester participates in the coupling and generally gives complete reaction with standard coupling conditions. Hmnb is easily available in a single preparative step from commercially available material. Different methods for removing the amide protecting group were explored. The protecting group is labile to acidolysis, following reduction of the nitro group to the aniline. The two main uses of backbone protection of preventing aspartimide formation and of overcoming difficult sequences are demonstrated, first with the synthesis of a challenging aspartimide-prone test sequence and then with the classic difficult sequence ACP (65-74) and a 23-mer homopolymer of polyalanine. PMID:27086749

  6. Comparative experimental investigation on the actuation mechanisms of ionic polymer–metal composites with different backbones and water contents

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Zicai; Chang, Longfei; Wang, Yanjie; Chen, Hualing; Asaka, Kinji; Zhao, Hongxia; Li, Dichen

    2014-03-28

    Water-based ionic polymer–metal composites (IPMCs) exhibit complex deformation properties, especially when the water content changes. To explore the general actuation mechanisms, both Nafion and Flemion membranes are used as the polymer backbones. IPMC deformation includes three stages: fast anode deformation, relaxation deformation, and slow anode deformation, which is mainly dependent on the water content and the backbone. When the water content decreases from 21 to 14 wt. %, Nafion–IPMC exhibits a large negative relaxation deformation, zero deformation, a positive relaxation deformation, and a positive steady deformation without relaxation in sequence. Despite the slow anode deformation, Flemion–IPMC also shows a slight relaxation deformation, which disappears when the water content is less than 13 wt. %. The different water states are investigated at different water contents using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The free water, which decreases rapidly at the beginning through evaporation, is proven to be critical for relaxation deformation. For the backbone, indirect evidence from the steady current response is correlated with the slow anode deformation of Flemion-IPMC. The latter is explained by the secondary dissociation of the weak acid group –COOH. Finally, we thoroughly explain not only the three deformations by swelling but also their evolvement with decreasing water content. A fitting model is also presented based on a multi-diffusion equation to reveal the deformation processes more clearly, the results from which are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  7. Effect of Liquid-Crystalline Epoxy Backbone Structure on Thermal Conductivity of Epoxy-Alumina Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giang, Thanhkieu; Kim, Jinhwan

    2016-06-01

    In a series of papers published recently, we clearly demonstrated that the most important factor governing the thermal conductivity of epoxy-Al2O3 composites is the backbone structure of the epoxy. In this study, three more epoxies based on diglycidyl ester-terminated liquid-crystalline epoxy (LCE) have been synthesized to draw conclusions regarding the effect of the epoxy backbone structure on the thermal conductivity of epoxy-alumina composites. The synthesized structures were characterized by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) and Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, and optical microscopy were also employed to examine the thermal and optical properties of the synthesized LCEs and the cured composites. All three LCE resins exhibited typical liquid-crystalline behaviors: clear solid crystalline state below the melting temperature (T m), sharp crystalline melting at T m, and transition to nematic phase above T m with consequent isotropic phase above the isotropic temperature (T i). The LCE resins displayed distinct nematic liquid-crystalline phase over a wide temperature range and retained liquid-crystalline phase after curing, with high thermal conductivity of the resulting composite. The thermal conductivity values ranged from 3.09 W/m-K to 3.89 W/m-K for LCE-Al2O3 composites with 50 vol.% filler loading. The steric effect played a governing role in the difference. The neat epoxy resin thermal conductivity was obtained as 0.35 W/m-K to 0.49 W/m-K based on analysis using the Agari-Uno model. The results clearly support the objective of this study in that the thermal conductivity of the LCE-containing networks strongly depended on the epoxy backbone structure and the degree of ordering in the cured network.

  8. Role of monomer sequence and backbone structure in polypeptoid and polypeptide polymers for anti-fouling applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, Anastasia; Rizis, Georgios; Wenning, Brandon; Finlay, John; Ober, Christopher; Segalman, Rachel

    Polymeric coatings rely on a fine balance of surface properties to achieve biofouling resistance. Bioinsipired polymers and oligomers provide a modular strategy for the inclusion of multiple functionalities with controlled architecture, sequence and surface properties. In this work, polypeptoid and polypeptide functionalized coatings based on PEO and PDMS block copolymers were compared with respect to surface presentation and fouling by Ulva linza. While polypeptoids and polypeptides are simple isomers of each other, the lack of backbone chirality and hydrogen bonding in polypeptoids leads to surprisingly different surface behavior. Specifically, the polypeptoids surface segregate much more strongly than analogous polypeptide functionalized polymers, which in turn affects the performance of the coating. Indeed, polypeptoid functionalized surfaces were significantly better both in terms of anti-fouling and fouling release than the corresponding polypeptide-bearing polymers. The role of specific monomer sequence and backbone chemistry will be further discussed in this poster.

  9. Loss of Internal Backbone Carbonyls: Additional Evidence for Sequence-Scrambling in Collision-Induced Dissociation of y-Type Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harper, Brett; Miladi, Mahsan; Solouki, Touradj

    2014-10-01

    It is shown that y-type ions, after losing C-terminal H2O or NH3, can lose an internal backbone carbonyl (CO) from different peptide positions and yield structurally different product fragment ions upon collision-induced dissociation (CID). Such CO losses from internal peptide backbones of y-fragment ions are not unique to a single peptide and were observed in four of five model peptides studied herein. Experimental details on examples of CO losses from y-type fragment ions for an isotopically labeled AAAAH AA-NH2 heptapeptide and des-acetylated-α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (dα-MSH) (SYSMEHFRWGKPV-NH2) are reported. Results from isotope labeling, tandem mass spectrometry (MSn), and ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) confirm that CO losses from different amino acids of m/ z-isolated y-type ions yield structurally different ions. It is shown that losses of internal backbone carbonyls (as CID products of m/ z-isolated y-type ions) are among intermediate steps towards formation of rearranged or permutated product fragment ions. Possible mechanisms for generation of the observed sequence-scrambled a-"like" ions, as intermediates in sequence-scrambling pathways of y-type ions, are proposed and discussed.

  10. Transgene sequences free of CG dinucleotides lead to high level, long-term expression in the lung independent of plasmid backbone design.

    PubMed

    Bazzani, Reto P; Pringle, Ian A; Connolly, Mary M; Davies, Lee A; Sumner-Jones, Stephanie G; Schleef, Martin; Hyde, Stephen C; Gill, Deborah R

    2016-07-01

    Non-viral aerosol gene therapy offers great potential for treating chronic lung diseases of the airways such as cystic fibrosis (CF). Early clinical trials showed that transgene expression in the airways was transient whereas maximal duration of transgene expression is essential in order to minimise the frequency of aerosol treatments. Improved vector design, such as careful selection of the promoter/enhancer, can lead to more persistent levels of transgene expression, but multiple factors affect expression in vivo. Following aerosol delivery to the lungs of mice, we measured reporter gene expression from a CpG-free luciferase transgene cassette in the context of both a plasmid and minicircle vector configuration and showed that the vector backbone had no effect on expression. Transgene activity was affected by the vector backbone however, when a similar, but sub-optimal CpG-containing transgene was used, suggesting that aspects of the plasmid backbone had a negative impact on transgene expression. Similar studies were performed in Toll-like receptor-9 (TLR9) knockout mice to investigate a potential role for the TLR9 signalling pathway in detecting CpGs in the vector sequence. Even in the absence of TLR9, persistent expression could only be achieved with a CpG-free transgene. Together, these data indicate that in order to achieve high levels of persistent expression in vivo, a CpG-free transgene cassette is required. PMID:27061267

  11. Composition for nucleic acid sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2008-08-26

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid, i.e. the activity of a nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme on the template nucleic acid molecule to be sequenced is followed in real time. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing complementary strand of the target nucleic acid by the catalytic activity of the nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme at each step in the sequence of base additions. A polymerase on the target nucleic acid molecule complex is provided in a position suitable to move along the target nucleic acid molecule and extend the oligonucleotide primer at an active site. A plurality of labelled types of nucleotide analogs are provided proximate to the active site, with each distinguishable type of nucleotide analog being complementary to a different nucleotide in the target nucleic acid sequence. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand at the active site, where the nucleotide analog being added is complementary to the nucleotide of the target nucleic acid at the active site. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The steps of providing labelled nucleotide analogs, polymerizing the growing nucleic acid strand, and identifying the added nucleotide analog are repeated so that the nucleic acid strand is further extended and the sequence of the target nucleic acid is determined.

  12. N-terminal peptide sequence repetition influences the kinetics of backbone fragmentation: a manifestation of the Jahn-Teller effect?

    PubMed

    Good, David M; Yang, Hongqian; Zubarev, Roman A

    2013-11-01

    Analysis of large (>10,000 entries) databases consisting of high-resolution tandem mass spectra of peptide dications revealed with high statistical significance (P < 1[Symbol: see text]10(-3)) that peptides with non-identical first two N-terminal amino acids undergo cleavages of the second peptide bond at higher rates than repetitive sequences composed of the same amino acids (i.e., in general AB- and BA- bonds cleave more often than AA- and BB- bonds). This effect seems to depend upon the collisional energy, being stronger at lower energies. The phenomenon is likely to indicate the presence of the diketopiperazine structure for at least some b2 (+) ions. When consisting of two identical amino acids, these species should form through intermediates that have a symmetric geometry and, thus, must be subject to the Jahn-Teller effect that reduces the stability of such systems. PMID:23633015

  13. "Pinning strategy": a novel approach for predicting the backbone structure in terms of protein blocks from sequence.

    PubMed

    De Brevern, A G; Etchebest, C; Benros, C; Hazout, S

    2007-01-01

    The description of protein 3D structures can be performed through a library of 3D fragments, named a structural alphabet. Our structural alphabet is composed of 16 small protein fragments of 5 C alpha in length, called protein blocks (PBs). It allows an efficient approximation of the 3D protein structures and a correct prediction of the local structure. The 72 most frequent series of 5 consecutive PBs, called structural words (SWs)are able to cover more than 90% of the 3D structures. PBs are highly conditioned by the presence of a limited number of transitions between them. In this study, we propose a new method called "pinning strategy" that used this specific feature to predict long protein fragments. Its goal is to define highly probable successions of PBs. It starts from the most probable SW and is then extended with overlapping SWs. Starting from an initial prediction rate of 34.4%, the use of the SWs instead of the PBs allows a gain of 4.5%. The pinning strategy simply applied to the SWs increases the prediction accuracy to 39.9%. In a second step, the sequence-structure relationship is optimized, the prediction accuracy reaches 43.6%. PMID:17426380

  14. Fold homology detection using sequence fragment composition profiles of proteins.

    PubMed

    Solis, Armando D; Rackovsky, Shalom R

    2010-10-01

    The effectiveness of sequence alignment in detecting structural homology among protein sequences decreases markedly when pairwise sequence identity is low (the so-called "twilight zone" problem of sequence alignment). Alternative sequence comparison strategies able to detect structural kinship among highly divergent sequences are necessary to address this need. Among them are alignment-free methods, which use global sequence properties (such as amino acid composition) to identify structural homology in a rapid and straightforward way. We explore the viability of using tetramer sequence fragment composition profiles in finding structural relationships that lie undetected by traditional alignment. We establish a strategy to recast any given protein sequence into a tetramer sequence fragment composition profile, using a series of amino acid clustering steps that have been optimized for mutual information. Our method has the effect of compressing the set of 160,000 unique tetramers (if using the 20-letter amino acid alphabet) into a more tractable number of reduced tetramers (approximately 15-30), so that a meaningful tetramer composition profile can be constructed. We test remote homology detection at the topology and fold superfamily levels using a comprehensive set of fold homologs, culled from the CATH database that share low pairwise sequence similarity. Using the receiver-operating characteristic measure, we demonstrate potentially significant improvement in using information-optimized reduced tetramer composition, over methods relying only on the raw amino acid composition or on traditional sequence alignment, in homology detection at or below the "twilight zone". PMID:20635424

  15. Sequence-specific (1)H, (13)C and (15)N backbone resonance assignments of the plakin repeat domain of human envoplakin.

    PubMed

    Jeeves, Mark; Fogl, Claudia; Al-Jassar, Caezar; Chidgey, Martyn; Overduin, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The plakin repeat domain is a distinctive hallmark of the plakin superfamily of proteins, which are found within all epithelial tissues. Plakin repeat domains mediate the interactions of these proteins with the cell cytoskeleton and are critical for the maintenance of tissue integrity. Despite their biological importance, no solution state resonance assignments are available for any homologue. Here we report the essentially complete (1)H, (13)C and (15)N backbone chemical shift assignments of the singular 22 kDa plakin repeat domain of human envoplakin, providing the means to investigate its interactions with ligands including intermediate filaments. PMID:26590577

  16. Prebiotically plausible mechanisms increase compositional diversity of nucleic acid sequences

    PubMed Central

    Derr, Julien; Manapat, Michael L.; Rajamani, Sudha; Leu, Kevin; Xulvi-Brunet, Ramon; Joseph, Isaac; Nowak, Martin A.; Chen, Irene A.

    2012-01-01

    During the origin of life, the biological information of nucleic acid polymers must have increased to encode functional molecules (the RNA world). Ribozymes tend to be compositionally unbiased, as is the vast majority of possible sequence space. However, ribonucleotides vary greatly in synthetic yield, reactivity and degradation rate, and their non-enzymatic polymerization results in compositionally biased sequences. While natural selection could lead to complex sequences, molecules with some activity are required to begin this process. Was the emergence of compositionally diverse sequences a matter of chance, or could prebiotically plausible reactions counter chemical biases to increase the probability of finding a ribozyme? Our in silico simulations using a two-letter alphabet show that template-directed ligation and high concatenation rates counter compositional bias and shift the pool toward longer sequences, permitting greater exploration of sequence space and stable folding. We verified experimentally that unbiased DNA sequences are more efficient templates for ligation, thus increasing the compositional diversity of the pool. Our work suggests that prebiotically plausible chemical mechanisms of nucleic acid polymerization and ligation could predispose toward a diverse pool of longer, potentially structured molecules. Such mechanisms could have set the stage for the appearance of functional activity very early in the emergence of life. PMID:22319215

  17. Two modes of protein sequence evolution and their compositional dependencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannige, Ranjan V.

    2013-06-01

    Protein sequence evolution has resulted in a vast repertoire of molecular functionality crucial to life. Despite the central importance of sequence evolution to biology, our fundamental understanding of how sequence composition affects evolution is incomplete. This report describes the utilization of lattice model simulations of directed evolution, which indicate that, on average, peptide and protein evolvability is strongly dependent on initial sequence composition. The report also discusses two distinct regimes of sequence evolution by point mutation: (a) the “classical” mode where sequences “crawl” over free energy barriers towards acquiring a target fold, and (b) the “quantum” mode where sequences appear to “tunnel” through large energy barriers generally insurmountable by means of a crawl. Finally, the simulations indicate that oily and charged peptides are the most efficient substrates for evolution at the “classical” and “quantum” regimes, respectively, and that their respective response to temperature is commensurate with analogies made to barrier crossing in classical and quantum systems. On the whole, these results show that sequence composition can tune both the evolvability and the optimal mode of evolution of peptides and proteins.

  18. Methods and compositions for efficient nucleic acid sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Drmanac, Radoje

    2002-01-01

    Disclosed are novel methods and compositions for rapid and highly efficient nucleic acid sequencing based upon hybridization with two sets of small oligonucleotide probes of known sequences. Extremely large nucleic acid molecules, including chromosomes and non-amplified RNA, may be sequenced without prior cloning or subcloning steps. The methods of the invention also solve various current problems associated with sequencing technology such as, for example, high noise to signal ratios and difficult discrimination, attaching many nucleic acid fragments to a surface, preparing many, longer or more complex probes and labelling more species.

  19. Methods and compositions for efficient nucleic acid sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Drmanac, Radoje

    2006-07-04

    Disclosed are novel methods and compositions for rapid and highly efficient nucleic acid sequencing based upon hybridization with two sets of small oligonucleotide probes of known sequences. Extremely large nucleic acid molecules, including chromosomes and non-amplified RNA, may be sequenced without prior cloning or subcloning steps. The methods of the invention also solve various current problems associated with sequencing technology such as, for example, high noise to signal ratios and difficult discrimination, attaching many nucleic acid fragments to a surface, preparing many, longer or more complex probes and labelling more species.

  20. Integrating Information Literacy with a Sequenced English Composition Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holliday, Wendy; Fagerheim, Britt

    2006-01-01

    This article details the process of implementing a sequenced information literacy program for two core English composition courses at Utah State University. An extensive needs assessment guided the project, leading to a curriculum design process with the goal of building a foundation for deeper critical thinking skills. The curriculum development…

  1. Motif-directed flexible backbone design of functional interactions

    PubMed Central

    Havranek, James J; Baker, David

    2009-01-01

    Computational protein design relies on a number of approximations to efficiently search the huge sequence space available to proteins. The fixed backbone and rotamer approximations in particular are important for formulating protein design as a discrete combinatorial optimization problem. However, the resulting coarse-grained sampling of possible side-chain terminal positions is problematic for the design of protein function, which depends on precise positioning of side-chain atoms. Although backbone flexibility can greatly increase the conformation freedom of side-chain functional groups, it is not obvious which backbone movements will generate the critical constellation of atoms responsible for protein function. Here, we report an automated method for identifying protein backbone movements that can give rise to any specified set of desired side-chain atomic placements and interactions, using protein–DNA interfaces as a model system. We use a library of previously observed protein–DNA interactions (motifs) and a rotamer-based description of side-chain conformation freedom to identify placements for the protein backbone that can give rise to a favorable side-chain interaction with DNA. We describe a tree-search algorithm for identifying those combinations of interactions from the library that can be realized with minimal perturbation of the protein backbone. We compare the efficiency of this method with the alternative approach of building and screening alternate backbone conformations. PMID:19472357

  2. Load sequence effects on the fatigue of unnotched composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, J. N.; Jones, D. L.

    1981-01-01

    A more comprehensive version of an earlier fatigue and residual strength degradation model is proposed to predict the effect of load sequence on the statistical fatigue behavior of composite laminates. The model, which reduces to various fatigue models proposed in the literature by means of approximations, is verified by a survey of experiments on glass/epoxy laminates. It is shown that the correlation between the model and the test results under dual stress levels is reasonable, and that a simplified version of the model is verified by experiments on graphite/epoxy laminates in which the correlation between theoretical predictions and results under dual stress levels is satisfactory. The model is also shown capable of predicting the effect of proof loads on the fatigue behavior of composite materials.

  3. A sampling approach for protein backbone fragment conformations.

    PubMed

    Yu, J Y; Zhang, W

    2013-01-01

    In protein structure prediction, backbone fragment bias information can narrow down the conformational space of the whole polypeptide chain significantly. Unlike existing methods that use fragments as building blocks, the paper presents a probabilistic sampling approach for protein backbone torsion angles by modelling angular correlation of (phi, psi) with a directional statistics distribution. Given a protein sequence and secondary structure information, this method samples backbone fragments conformations by using a backtrack sampling algorithm for the hidden Markov model with multiple inputs and a single output. The proposed approach is applied to a fragment library, and some well-known structural motifs are sampled very well on the optimal path. Computational results show that the method can help to obtain native-like backbone fragments conformations. PMID:23777175

  4. Simulation of Ames Backbone Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shahnasser, Hamid

    1998-01-01

    The networking demands of Ames Research Center are dramatically increasing. More and more workstations are requested to run video and audio applications on the network. These applications require a much greater bandwidth than data applications. The existing ARCLAN 2000 network bandwidth is insufficient, due to the use of FDDI as its backbone, for accommodating video applications. Operating at a maximum of 100 Mbps, FDDI can handle only a few workstations running multimedia applications. The ideal solution is to replace the current ARCLAN 2000 FDDI backbone with an ATM backbone. ATM has the capability to handle the increasing traffic loads on the ARCLAN 2000 that results from these new applications. As it can be seen from Figure 1, ARCLAN 2000 have a total of 32 routers (5 being core routers) each connected to the FDDI backbone via a 100 Mbps link. This network serves 34 different locations by using 34 hubs that are connected to secondary routers. End users are connected to the secondary routers with 10 Mbps links.

  5. Constructing optimal backbone segments for joining fixed DNA base pairs.

    PubMed Central

    Mazur, J; Jernigan, R L; Sarai, A

    1996-01-01

    A method is presented to link a sequence of space-fixed base pairs by the sugar-phosphate segments of single nucleotides and to evaluate the effects in the backbone caused by this positioning of the bases. The entire computational unit comprises several nucleotides that are energy-minimized, subject to constraints imposed by the sugar-phosphate backbone segments being anchored to space-fixed base pairs. The minimization schemes are based on two stages, a conjugate gradient method followed by a Newton-Raphson algorithm. Because our purpose is to examine the response, or relaxation, of an artificially stressed backbone, it is essential to be able to obtain, as closely as possible, a lowest minimum energy conformation of the backbone segment in conformational space. For this purpose, an algorithm is developed that leads to the generation of an assembly of many local energy minima. From these sets of local minima, one conformation corresponding to the one with the lowest minimum is then selected and designated to represent the backbone segment at its minimum. The effective electrostatic potential of mean force is expressed in terms of adjustable parameters that incorporate solvent screening action in the Coulombic interactions between charged backbone atoms; these parameters are adjusted to obtain the best fit of the nearest-neighbor phosphorous atoms in an x-ray structure. PMID:8874023

  6. ANSS Backbone Station Quality Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leeds, A.; McNamara, D.; Benz, H.; Gee, L.

    2006-12-01

    In this study we assess the ambient noise levels of the broadband seismic stations within the United States Geological Survey's (USGS) Advanced National Seismic System (ANSS) backbone network. The backbone consists of stations operated by the USGS as well as several regional network stations operated by universities. We also assess the improved detection capability of the network due to the installation of 13 additional backbone stations and the upgrade of 26 existing stations funded by the Earthscope initiative. This assessment makes use of probability density functions (PDF) of power spectral densities (PSD) (after McNamara and Buland, 2004) computed by a continuous noise monitoring system developed by the USGS- ANSS and the Incorporated Research Institutions in Seismology (IRIS) Data Management Center (DMC). We compute the median and mode of the PDF distribution and rank the stations relative to the Peterson Low noise model (LNM) (Peterson, 1993) for 11 different period bands. The power of the method lies in the fact that there is no need to screen the data for system transients, earthquakes or general data artifacts since they map into a background probability level. Previous studies have shown that most regional stations, instrumented with short period or extended short period instruments, have a higher noise level in all period bands while stations in the US network have lower noise levels at short periods (0.0625-8.0 seconds), high frequencies (8.0- 0.125Hz). The overall network is evaluated with respect to accomplishing the design goals set for the USArray/ANSS backbone project which were intended to increase broadband performance for the national monitoring network.

  7. Backbone upgrades and DEC equipment replacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vancamp, Warren

    1991-01-01

    The NASA Science Internet (NSI) dual protocol backbone is outlined. It includes DECnet link upgrades to match TCP/IP link performance. It also includes the integration of backbone resources and central management. The phase 1 transition process is outlined.

  8. The backbone of a city

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scellato, S.; Cardillo, A.; Latora, V.; Porta, S.

    2006-03-01

    Recent studies have revealed the importance of centrality measures to analyze various spatial factors affecting human life in cities. Here we show how it is possible to extract the backbone of a city by deriving spanning trees based on edge betweenness and edge information. By using as sample cases the cities of Bologna and San Francisco, we show how the obtained trees are radically different from those based on edge lengths, and allow an extended comprehension of the “skeleton” of most important routes that so much affects pedestrian/vehicular flows, retail commerce vitality, land-use separation, urban crime and collective dynamical behaviours.

  9. Adding Diverse Noncanonical Backbones to Rosetta: Enabling Peptidomimetic Design

    PubMed Central

    Craven, Timothy W.; Butterfoss, Glenn L.; Chou, Fang-Chieh; Lyskov, Sergey; Bullock, Brooke N.; Watkins, Andrew; Labonte, Jason W.; Pacella, Michael; Kilambi, Krishna Praneeth; Leaver-Fay, Andrew; Kuhlman, Brian; Gray, Jeffrey J.; Bradley, Philip; Kirshenbaum, Kent; Arora, Paramjit S.; Das, Rhiju; Bonneau, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Peptidomimetics are classes of molecules that mimic structural and functional attributes of polypeptides. Peptidomimetic oligomers can frequently be synthesized using efficient solid phase synthesis procedures similar to peptide synthesis. Conformationally ordered peptidomimetic oligomers are finding broad applications for molecular recognition and for inhibiting protein-protein interactions. One critical limitation is the limited set of design tools for identifying oligomer sequences that can adopt desired conformations. Here, we present expansions to the ROSETTA platform that enable structure prediction and design of five non-peptidic oligomer scaffolds (noncanonical backbones), oligooxopiperazines, oligo-peptoids, -peptides, hydrogen bond surrogate helices and oligosaccharides. This work is complementary to prior additions to model noncanonical protein side chains in ROSETTA. The main purpose of our manuscript is to give a detailed description to current and future developers of how each of these noncanonical backbones was implemented. Furthermore, we provide a general outline for implementation of new backbone types not discussed here. To illustrate the utility of this approach, we describe the first tests of the ROSETTA molecular mechanics energy function in the context of oligooxopiperazines, using quantum mechanical calculations as comparison points, scanning through backbone and side chain torsion angles for a model peptidomimetic. Finally, as an example of a novel design application, we describe the automated design of an oligooxopiperazine that inhibits the p53-MDM2 protein-protein interaction. For the general biological and bioengineering community, several noncanonical backbones have been incorporated into web applications that allow users to freely and rapidly test the presented protocols (http://rosie.rosettacommons.org). This work helps address the peptidomimetic community's need for an automated and expandable modeling tool for noncanonical

  10. A silent composite hemoglobinopathy characterized by gene sequencing.

    PubMed

    Zorai, A; Moumni, I; Benmansour, I; Chaouachi, D; Ghanem, A; Abbes, S

    2011-01-01

    We report the case of a 35-year-old Tunisian women with a chronic anemia non investigated for a long time. Laboratory analysis using advanced technology of DNA sequencing revealed a compound heterozygote for Hb O Arab and cd 39 beta degrees-thalassemia. It's the first time that such a genotype has been characterized by gene sequencing. PMID:23461145

  11. The "universal polymer backbone" concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollino, Joel Matthew

    This thesis begins with a brief analysis of the synthetic methodologies utilized in polymer science. A conclusion is drawn inferring that upper limits in molecular design are inevitable, arising as a direct consequence of the predominance of covalent strategies in the field. To address these concerns, the 'universal polymer backbone' (UPB) concept has been hypothesized. A UPB has been defined as any copolymer, side-chain functionalized with multiple recognition elements that are individually capable of forming strong, directional, and reversible non-covalent bonds. Non-covalent functionalization of these scaffolds can lead to the formation of a multitude of new polymer structures, each stemming from a single parent or 'universal polymer backbone'. To prepare such a UPB, isomerically pure exo-norbornene esters containing either a PdII SCS pincer complex or a diaminopyridine residue were synthesized, polymerized, and copolymerized via ROMP. All polymerizations were living under mild reaction conditions. Kinetic studies showed that the kp values are highly dependent upon the isomeric purity but completely independent of the terminal recognition units. Non-covalent functionalization of these copolymers was accomplished via (1) directed self-assembly, (2) multi-step self-assembly , and (3) one-step orthogonal self-assembly. This system shows complete specificity of each recognition motif for its complementary unit with no observable changes in the association constant upon functionalization. To explore potential applications of this UPB concept, random terpolymers possessing high concentrations of pendant alkyl chains and small amounts of recognition units were synthesized. Non-covalent crosslinking using a directed functionalization strategy resulted in dramatic increases in solution viscosities for metal crosslinked polymers with only minor changes in viscosity for hydrogen bonding motifs. The crosslinked materials were further functionalized via self-assembly by

  12. Diverse nucleotide compositions and sequence fluctuation in Rubisco protein genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holden, Todd; Dehipawala, S.; Cheung, E.; Bienaime, R.; Ye, J.; Tremberger, G., Jr.; Schneider, P.; Lieberman, D.; Cheung, T.

    2011-10-01

    The Rubisco protein-enzyme is arguably the most abundance protein on Earth. The biology dogma of transcription and translation necessitates the study of the Rubisco genes and Rubisco-like genes in various species. Stronger correlation of fractal dimension of the atomic number fluctuation along a DNA sequence with Shannon entropy has been observed in the studied Rubisco-like gene sequences, suggesting a more diverse evolutionary pressure and constraints in the Rubisco sequences. The strategy of using metal for structural stabilization appears to be an ancient mechanism, with data from the porphobilinogen deaminase gene in Capsaspora owczarzaki and Monosiga brevicollis. Using the chi-square distance probability, our analysis supports the conjecture that the more ancient Rubisco-like sequence in Microcystis aeruginosa would have experienced very different evolutionary pressure and bio-chemical constraint as compared to Bordetella bronchiseptica, the two microbes occupying either end of the correlation graph. Our exploratory study would indicate that high fractal dimension Rubisco sequence would support high carbon dioxide rate via the Michaelis- Menten coefficient; with implication for the control of the whooping cough pathogen Bordetella bronchiseptica, a microbe containing a high fractal dimension Rubisco-like sequence (2.07). Using the internal comparison of chi-square distance probability for 16S rRNA (~ E-22) versus radiation repair Rec-A gene (~ E-05) in high GC content Deinococcus radiodurans, our analysis supports the conjecture that high GC content microbes containing Rubisco-like sequence are likely to include an extra-terrestrial origin, relative to Deinococcus radiodurans. Similar photosynthesis process that could utilize host star radiation would not compete with radiation resistant process from the biology dogma perspective in environments such as Mars and exoplanets.

  13. Flexible backbone aromatic polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Progar, Donald J.; St.clair, Terry L.

    1988-01-01

    Continuing research at Langley Research Center on the synthesis and development of new inexpensive flexible aromatic polyimides as adhesives has resulted in a material identified as LARC-F-SO2 with similarities to polyimidesulfone, PISO2, and other flexible backbone polyimides recently reported by Progar and St. Clair. Also prepared and evaluated was an endcapped version of PISO2. These two polymers were compared with LARC-TPI and LARC-STPI, polyimides research in our laboratory and reported in the literature. The adhesive evaluation, primarily based on lap shear strength (LSS) tests at RT, 177 C and 204 C, involved preparing adhesive tapes, conducting bonding studies and exposing lap shear specimens to 204 C air for up to 1000 hrs and to a 72-hour water boil. The type of adhesive failure as well as the Tg was determined for the fractured specimens. The results indicate that LARC-TPI provides the highest LSSs. LARC-F-SO2, LARC-TPI and LARC-STPI all retain their strengths after thermal exposure for 1000 hrs and PISO2 retains greater than 80 percent of its control strengths. After a 72-hr water boil exposure, most of the four adhesive systems showed reduced strengths for all test temperatures although still retaining a high percentage of their original strength (greater than 60 percent) except for one case. The predominant failure type was cohesive with no significant change in the Tgs.

  14. Flexible backbone aromatic polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Progar, Donald J.; St. Clair, Terry L.

    1989-01-01

    Continuing research at Langley Research Center on the synthesis and development of new inexpensive flexible aromatic polyimides as adhesives has resulted in a material identified as LARC-F-SO2 with similarities to polyimidesulfone, PISO2, and other flexible backbone polyimides recently reported by Progar and St. Clair. Also prepared and evaluated was an endcapped version of PISO2. These two polymers were compared with LARC-TPI and LARC-STPI, polyimides research in our laboratory and reported in the literature. The adhesive evaluation, primarily based on lap shear strength (LSS) tests at RT, 177 C and 204 C, involved preparing adhesive tapes, conducting bonding studies and exposing lap shear specimens to 204 C air for up to 1000 hrs and to a 72-hour water boil. The type of adhesive failure as well as the Tg was determined for the fractured specimens. The results indicate that LARC-TPI provides the highest LSSs. LARC-F-SO2, LARC-TPI and LARC-STPI all retain their strengths after thermal exposure for 1000 hrs and PISO2 retains greater than 80 percent of its control strengths. After a 72-hr water boil exposure, most of the four adhesive systems showed reduced strengths for all test temperatures although still retaining a high percentage of their original strength (greater than 60 percent) except for one case. The predominant failure type was cohesive with no significant change in the Tgs.

  15. The structure of the carbohydrate backbone of the lipopolysaccharide of Pectinatus frisingensis strain VTT E-79104.

    PubMed

    Vinogradov, Evgeny; Li, Jianjun; Sadovskaya, Irina; Jabbouri, Said; Helander, Ilkka M

    2004-06-22

    The structure of the carbohydrate backbone of the lipopolysaccharide from Pectinatus frisingensis strain VTT E-79104 was analyzed using chemical degradations, NMR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and chemical methods. The LPS contains two major structural variants, differing in the presence or absence of an octasaccharide fragment. The largest structure of the carbohydrate backbone of the LPS, that could be deduced from experimental results, consists of 20 monosaccharides arranged in a nonrepetitive sequence: [carbohydrate structure: see text] where R is H or 4-O-Me-alpha-L-Fuc-(1-2)-4-O-Me-beta-Hep-(1-3)-alpha-GlcNAc-(1-2)-beta-Man-(1-3)-beta-ManNAc-(1-4)-alpha-Gal-(1-4)-beta-Hep-(1-3)-beta-GalNAc-(1- where Hep is a residue of D-glycero-D-galacto-heptose; all monosaccharides have the D-configuration except for 4-O-Me-L-Fuc and L-Ara4N. This structure is architecturally similar to the oligosaccharide system reported previously in P. frisingensis VTT E-82164 LPS, but differs from the latter in composition and also in the size of the outer region. PMID:15183738

  16. Changing the topology of protein backbone: the effect of backbone cyclization on the structure and dynamics of a SH3 domain

    PubMed Central

    Schumann, Frank H.; Varadan, Ranjani; Tayakuniyil, Praveen P.; Grossman, Jennifer H.; Camarero, Julio A.; Fushman, David

    2015-01-01

    Understanding of the effects of the backbone cyclization on the structure and dynamics of a protein is essential for using protein topology engineering to alter protein stability and function. Here we have determined, for the first time, the structure and dynamics of the linear and various circular constructs of the N-SH3 domain from protein c-Crk. These constructs differ in the length and amino acid composition of the cyclization region. The backbone cyclization was carried out using intein-mediated intramolecular chemical ligation between the juxtaposed N- and the C-termini. The structure and backbone dynamics studies were performed using solution NMR. Our data suggest that the backbone cyclization has little effect on the overall three-dimensional structure of the SH3 domain: besides the termini, only minor structural changes were found in the proximity of the cyclization region. In contrast to the structure, backbone dynamics are significantly affected by the cyclization. On the subnanosecond time scale, the backbone of all circular constructs on average appears more rigid than that of the linear SH3 domain; this effect is observed over the entire backbone and is not limited to the cyclization site. The backbone mobility of the circular constructs becomes less restricted with increasing length of the circularization loop. In addition, significant conformational exchange motions (on the sub-millisecond time scale) were found in the N-Src loop and in the adjacent β-strands in all circular constructs studied in this work. These effects of backbone cyclization on protein dynamics have potential implications for the stability of the protein fold and for ligand binding. PMID:25905098

  17. External Tank - The Structure Backbone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welzyn, Kenneth; Pilet, Jeffrey C.; Diecidue-Conners, Dawn; Worden, Michelle; Guillot, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    The External Tank forms the structural backbone of the Space Shuttle in the launch configuration. Because the tank flies to orbital velocity with the Space Shuttle Orbiter, minimization of weight is mandatory, to maximize payload performance. Choice of lightweight materials both for structure and thermal conditioning was necessary. The tank is large, and unique manufacturing facilities, tooling, handling, and transportation operations were required. Weld processes and tooling evolved with the design as it matured through several block changes, to reduce weight. Non Destructive Evaluation methods were used to assure integrity of welds and thermal protection system materials. The aluminum-lithium alloy was used near the end of the program and weld processes and weld repair techniques had to be refined. Development and implementation of friction stir welding was a substantial technology development incorporated during the Program. Automated thermal protection system application processes were developed for the majority of the tank surface. Material obsolescence was an issue throughout the 40 year program. The final configuration and tank weight enabled international space station assembly in a high inclination orbit allowing international cooperation with the Russian Federal Space Agency. Numerous process controls were implemented to assure product quality, and innovative proof testing was accomplished prior to delivery. Process controls were implemented to assure cleanliness in the production environment, to control contaminants, and to preclude corrosion. Each tank was accepted via rigorous inspections, including non-destructive evaluation techniques, proof testing, and all systems testing. In the post STS-107 era, the project focused on ascent debris risk reduction. This was accomplished via stringent process controls, post flight assessment using substantially improved imagery, and selective redesigns. These efforts were supported with a number of test programs to

  18. Mitochondrial COI sequences in mites: evidence for variations in base composition.

    PubMed

    Navajas, M; Fournier, D; Lagnel, J; Gutierrez, J; Boursot, P

    1996-11-01

    Studies of mitochondrial DNA sequences in a variety of animals have shown important differences between phyla, including differences in the genetic codes used, and varying constraints on base composition. In that respect, little is known of mites, an important and diversified group. We sequenced a portion (340 nt) of the cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) encoding gene in twenty species of phytophagous mites belonging to nine genera of the two families Tetranychidae and Tenuipalpidae. The mitochondrial genetic code used in mites appeared to be the same as in insects. As is generally also the case in insects, the mite sequences were very rich in A + T (75% on average), especially at the third codon position (94%). However, important variations of base composition were observed among mite species, one of them showing as little as 69% A + T. Variations of base composition occur mostly through synonymous transitions, and do not have detectable effects on polypeptide evolution in this group. PMID:8933179

  19. Sequence analysis and compositional properties of untranslated regions of human mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Pesole, G; Fiormarino, G; Saccone, C

    1994-03-25

    A detailed computer analysis of the untranslated regions, 5'-UTR and 3'-UTR, of human mRNA sequences is reported. The compositional properties of these regions, compared with those of the corresponding coding regions, indicate that 5'-UTR and 3'-UTR are less affected by the isochore compartmentalization than the corresponding third codon positions of mRNAs. The presence of higher functional constraints in 5'-UTR is also reported. Dinucleotide analysis shows a depletion of CpG and TpA in both sequences. A search for significant sequence motifs using the WORDUP algorithm reveals the patterns already known to have a functional role in the mRNA UTR, and several other motifs whose functional roles remain to be demonstrated. This type of analysis may be particularly useful for guiding site-directed mutagenesis experiments. In addition, it can be used for assessing the nature of anonymous sequences now produced in large amounts in megabase sequencing projects. PMID:8144029

  20. Protein location prediction using atomic composition and global features of the amino acid sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Cherian, Betsy Sheena; Nair, Achuthsankar S.

    2010-01-22

    Subcellular location of protein is constructive information in determining its function, screening for drug candidates, vaccine design, annotation of gene products and in selecting relevant proteins for further studies. Computational prediction of subcellular localization deals with predicting the location of a protein from its amino acid sequence. For a computational localization prediction method to be more accurate, it should exploit all possible relevant biological features that contribute to the subcellular localization. In this work, we extracted the biological features from the full length protein sequence to incorporate more biological information. A new biological feature, distribution of atomic composition is effectively used with, multiple physiochemical properties, amino acid composition, three part amino acid composition, and sequence similarity for predicting the subcellular location of the protein. Support Vector Machines are designed for four modules and prediction is made by a weighted voting system. Our system makes prediction with an accuracy of 100, 82.47, 88.81 for self-consistency test, jackknife test and independent data test respectively. Our results provide evidence that the prediction based on the biological features derived from the full length amino acid sequence gives better accuracy than those derived from N-terminal alone. Considering the features as a distribution within the entire sequence will bring out underlying property distribution to a greater detail to enhance the prediction accuracy.

  1. Conformation Dependence of Backbone Geometry in Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Berkholz, Donald S.; Shapovalov, Maxim V.; Dunbrack, Roland L.; Karplus, P. Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Summary Protein structure determination and predictive modeling have long been guided by the paradigm that the peptide backbone has a single, context-independent ideal geometry. Both quantum-mechanics calculations and empirical analyses have shown this is an incorrect simplification in that backbone covalent geometry actually varies systematically as a function of the Φ and Ψ backbone dihedral angles. Here, we use a nonredundant set of ultrahigh-resolution protein structures to define these conformation-dependent variations. The trends have a rational, structural basis that can be explained by avoidance of atomic clashes or optimization of favorable electrostatic interactions. To facilitate adoption of this new paradigm, we have created a conformation-dependent library of covalent bond lengths and bond angles and shown that it has improved accuracy over existing methods without any additional variables to optimize. Protein structures derived both from crystallographic refinement and predictive modeling both stand to benefit from incorporation of the new paradigm. PMID:19836332

  2. Isolation of the protein backbone of an arabinogalactan-protein from the styles of Nicotiana alata and characterization of a corresponding cDNA.

    PubMed Central

    Du, H; Simpson, R J; Moritz, R L; Clarke, A E; Bacic, A

    1994-01-01

    Arabinogalactan-proteins (AGPs) from the styles of Nicotiana alata were isolated by ion exchange and gel filtration chromatography. After deglycosylation by anhydrous hydrogen fluoride, the protein backbones were fractionated by reversed-phase HPLC. One of the protein backbones, containing mainly hydroxyproline, alanine, and serine residues (53% of total residues), was digested with proteases, and the peptides were isolated and sequenced. This sequence information allowed the cloning of a 712-bp cDNA, AGPNa1. AGPNa1 encodes a 132-amino acid protein with three domains: an N-terminal secretion signal sequence, which is cleaved from the mature protein; a central sequence, which contains most of the hydroxyproline/proline residues; and a C-terminal hydrophobic region. AGPNa1 is expressed in many tissues of N. alata and related species. The arrangement of domains and amino acid composition of the AGP encoded by AGPNa1 are similar to that of an AGP from pear cell suspension culture filtrate, although the only sequence identity is at the N termini of the mature proteins. PMID:7827496

  3. Compositional and monomer sequence distribution analysis of monodisperse brominated-polystyrenes using interaction chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Junwon; Semler, James J.

    2005-03-01

    High performance liquid chromatography techniques have been developed for characterizing complex polymers that are often heterogeneous in molecular weight, molecular architecture, and chemical composition. Recently, interaction chromatography (IC) techniques have been developed, which facilitate separation of polymers based on enthalpic ``attraction'' difference among the chemical constituents of the molecule. Here, we use IC for characterizing the composition and monomer sequence distribution in statistical copolymers of poly(styrene-co-4-bromostyrene) (PBrxS). The PBrxS copolymers were synthesized by brominating monodisperse polystyrenes; the degree of bromination (x) and the sequence distribution have been adjusted by varying the bromination time and the solvent quality, respectively. Both normal-phase (bare silica) and reversed-phase (C18-bonded silica) columns are used at different combinations of solvents and non-solvents to monitor the content of the 4-bromostyrene units in the copolymer and their average monomer sequence distribution.

  4. Influence of processing sequence on the tribological properties of VGCF-X/PA6/SEBS composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osada, Yu; Nishitani, Yosuke; Kitano, Takeshi

    2016-03-01

    In order to develop the new tribomaterials for mechanical sliding parts with sufficient balance of mechanical and tribological properties, we investigated the influence of processing sequence on the tribological properties of the ternary nanocomposites: the polymer blends of polyamide 6 (PA6) and styrene-ethylene/butylene-styrene copolymer (SEBS) filled with vapor grown carbon fiber (VGCF-X), which is one of carbon nanofiber (CNF) and has 15nm diameter and 3μm length. Five different processing sequences: (1) VGCF-X, PA6 and SEBS were mixed simultaneously (Process A), (2) Re-mixing (Second compounding) of the materials prepared by Process A (Process AR),(3) SEBS was blended with PA6 (PA6/SEBS blends) and then these blends were mixed with VGCF-X (Process B), (4) VGCF-X was mixed with PA6 (VGCF-X/PA6 composites) and then these composites were blended with SEBS (Process C), and (5) VGCF-X were mixed with SEBS (VGCF-X/SEBS composites) and then these composites were blended with PA6 (Process D) were attempted for preparing of the ternary nanocomposites (VGCF-X/PA6/SEBS composites). These ternary polymer nanocomposites were extruded by a twin screw extruder and injection-molded. Their tribological properties were evaluated by using a ring-on-plate type sliding wear tester under dry condition. The tribological properties such as the frictional coefficient and the specific wear rate were influenced by the processing sequence. These results may be attributed to the change of internal structure formation, which is a dispersibility of SEBS particle and VGCF-X in ternary nanocomposites (VGCF-X/PA6/SEBS) by different processing sequences. In particular, the processing sequences of AR, B and D, which are those of re-mixing of VGCF-X, have a good dispersibility of VGCF-X for the improvement of tribological properties.

  5. Optimum stacking sequence design of composite sandwich panel using genetic algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bir, Amarpreet Singh

    Composite sandwich structures recently gained preference for various structural components over conventional metals and simple composite laminates in the aerospace industries. For most widely used composite sandwich structures, the optimization problems only requires the determination of the best stacking sequence and the number of laminae with different fiber orientations. Genetic algorithm optimization technique based on Darwin's theory of survival of the fittest and evolution is most suitable for solving such optimization problems. The present research work focuses on the stacking sequence optimization of composite sandwich panels with laminated face-sheets for both critical buckling load maximization and thickness minimization problems, subjected to bi-axial compressive loading. In the previous studies, only balanced and even-numbered simple composite laminate panels have been investigated ignoring the effects of bending-twisting coupling terms. The current work broadens the application of genetic algorithms to more complex composite sandwich panels with balanced, unbalanced, even and odd-numbered face-sheet laminates including the effects of bending-twisting coupling terms.

  6. Protein-protein docking with backbone flexibility.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chu; Bradley, Philip; Baker, David

    2007-10-19

    Computational protein-protein docking methods currently can create models with atomic accuracy for protein complexes provided that the conformational changes upon association are restricted to the side chains. However, it remains very challenging to account for backbone conformational changes during docking, and most current methods inherently keep monomer backbones rigid for algorithmic simplicity and computational efficiency. Here we present a reformulation of the Rosetta docking method that incorporates explicit backbone flexibility in protein-protein docking. The new method is based on a "fold-tree" representation of the molecular system, which seamlessly integrates internal torsional degrees of freedom and rigid-body degrees of freedom. Problems with internal flexible regions ranging from one or more loops or hinge regions to all of one or both partners can be readily treated using appropriately constructed fold trees. The explicit treatment of backbone flexibility improves both sampling in the vicinity of the native docked conformation and the energetic discrimination between near-native and incorrect models. PMID:17825317

  7. WDM backbone network with guaranteed performance planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Peng; Sheng, Wang; Zhong, Xusi; Li, Lemin

    2005-11-01

    Wavelength-Division multiplexing (WDM), which allows a single fibre to carry multiple signals simultaneously, has been widely used to increase link capacity and is a promising technology in backbone transport network. But designing such WDM backbone network is hard for two reasons, one is the uncertainty of future traffic demand, the other is difficulty of planning of the backup resource for failure conditions. As a result, enormous amount of link capacity for the network has to be provided for the network. Recently, a new approach called Valiant Load-Balanced Scheme (VLBS) has been proposed to design the WDM backbone network. The network planned by Valiant Load-Balanced Scheme is insensitive to the traffic and continues to guarantee performance under a user defined number of link or node failures. In this paper, the Valiant Load-Balanced Scheme (VLBS) for backbone network planning has been studied and a new Valiant Load-Balanced Scheme has been proposed. Compared with the early work, the new Valiant Load-Balanced Scheme is much more general and can be used for the computation of the link capacity of both homogeneous and heterogeneous networks. The abbreviation for the general Valiant Load-Balanced Scheme is GVLBS. After a brief description of the VLBS, we will give the detail derivation of the GVLBS. The central concept of the derivation of GVLBS is transforming the heterogeneous network into a homogeneous network, and taking advantage of VLBS to get GVLBS. Such transformation process is described and the derivation and analysis of GVLBS for link capacity under normal and failure conditions is also given. The numerical results show that GVLBS can compute the minimum link capacity required for the heterogeneous backbone network under different conditions (normal or failure).

  8. Determination of load sequence effects on the degradation and failure of composite materials. [Graphite-epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, J. N.; Jones, D. L.

    1981-01-01

    A theoretical model was established to predict the fatigue behavior of composite materials, with emphasis placed on predictions of the degradation of residual strength and residual stiffness during fatigue cycling. The model parameters were evaluated from three test series including static strength fatigue life and residual strength tests. The tests were applied to two graphite/epoxy laminates. Load sequence effects were emphasized for both laminates and the predicted results agreed quite well with subsequent verification tests. Dynamic as well as static stiffness reduction data were collected by use of a PDP11-03 computer, which performed quite satisfactorily and permitted the recording of a substantial amount of dynamic stiffness reduction data.

  9. Nucleotide composition of CO1 sequences in Chelicerata (Arthropoda): detecting new mitogenomic rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Arabi, Juliette; Judson, Mark L I; Deharveng, Louis; Lourenço, Wilson R; Cruaud, Corinne; Hassanin, Alexandre

    2012-02-01

    Here we study the evolution of nucleotide composition in third codon-positions of CO1 sequences of Chelicerata, using a phylogenetic framework, based on 180 taxa and three markers (CO1, 18S, and 28S rRNA; 5,218 nt). The analyses of nucleotide composition were also extended to all CO1 sequences of Chelicerata found in GenBank (1,701 taxa). The results show that most species of Chelicerata have a positive strand bias in CO1, i.e., in favor of C nucleotides, including all Amblypygi, Palpigradi, Ricinulei, Solifugae, Uropygi, and Xiphosura. However, several taxa show a negative strand bias, i.e., in favor of G nucleotides: all Scorpiones, Opisthothelae spiders and several taxa within Acari, Opiliones, Pseudoscorpiones, and Pycnogonida. Several reversals of strand-specific bias can be attributed to either a rearrangement of the control region or an inversion of a fragment containing the CO1 gene. Key taxa for which sequencing of complete mitochondrial genomes will be necessary to determine the origin and nature of mtDNA rearrangements involved in the reversals are identified. Acari, Opiliones, Pseudoscorpiones, and Pycnogonida were found to show a strong variability in nucleotide composition. In addition, both mitochondrial and nuclear genomes have been affected by higher substitution rates in Acari and Pseudoscorpiones. The results therefore indicate that these two orders are more liable to fix mutations of all types, including base substitutions, indels, and genomic rearrangements. PMID:22362465

  10. Composite Sequences for Triple-dot Qubits that Compensate for Miscalibration and Hyperfine Gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladd, Thaddeus

    2014-03-01

    Exchange-only qubits defined in triple quantum dots form a promising means for all-electrical semiconductor quantum control, but they suffer from both charge noise and random magnetic field gradients. Low-frequency noise sources can be compensated using composite sequences, but the development of such sequences is constrained by the fact that exchange energies are always positive and the control axes are non-orthogonal. Here, we present the results of both analytical approaches and computational searches for composite pulse sequences, which compensate for simultaneous low-frequency miscalibration (due to fixed random electric fields) and hyperfine effects (due to nuclear magnetic fields) in a single triple-dot qubit. We also present compensation sequences for multi-qubit gates. These results can substantially improve the working fidelity of quantum operations in semiconductor quantum dot devices. Sponsored by United States Department of Defense. The views and conclusions contained in this document are those of the authors and should not be interpreted as representing the official policies, either expressly or implied, of the United States Department of Defense or the U.S. Government.

  11. Sequence Composition and Gene Content of the Short Arm of Rye (Secale cereale) Chromosome 1

    PubMed Central

    Fluch, Silvia; Kopecky, Dieter; Burg, Kornel; Šimková, Hana; Taudien, Stefan; Petzold, Andreas; Kubaláková, Marie; Platzer, Matthias; Berenyi, Maria; Krainer, Siegfried; Doležel, Jaroslav; Lelley, Tamas

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of the study is to elucidate the sequence composition of the short arm of rye chromosome 1 (Secale cereale) with special focus on its gene content, because this portion of the rye genome is an integrated part of several hundreds of bread wheat varieties worldwide. Methodology/Principal Findings Multiple Displacement Amplification of 1RS DNA, obtained from flow sorted 1RS chromosomes, using 1RS ditelosomic wheat-rye addition line, and subsequent Roche 454FLX sequencing of this DNA yielded 195,313,589 bp sequence information. This quantity of sequence information resulted in 0.43× sequence coverage of the 1RS chromosome arm, permitting the identification of genes with estimated probability of 95%. A detailed analysis revealed that more than 5% of the 1RS sequence consisted of gene space, identifying at least 3,121 gene loci representing 1,882 different gene functions. Repetitive elements comprised about 72% of the 1RS sequence, Gypsy/Sabrina (13.3%) being the most abundant. More than four thousand simple sequence repeat (SSR) sites mostly located in gene related sequence reads were identified for possible marker development. The existence of chloroplast insertions in 1RS has been verified by identifying chimeric chloroplast-genomic sequence reads. Synteny analysis of 1RS to the full genomes of Oryza sativa and Brachypodium distachyon revealed that about half of the genes of 1RS correspond to the distal end of the short arm of rice chromosome 5 and the proximal region of the long arm of Brachypodium distachyon chromosome 2. Comparison of the gene content of 1RS to 1HS barley chromosome arm revealed high conservation of genes related to chromosome 5 of rice. Conclusions The present study revealed the gene content and potential gene functions on this chromosome arm and demonstrated numerous sequence elements like SSRs and gene-related sequences, which can be utilised for future research as well as in breeding of wheat and rye. PMID:22328922

  12. Compositional analysis: a valid approach to analyze microbiome high-throughput sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Gloor, Gregory B; Reid, Gregor

    2016-08-01

    A workshop held at the 2015 annual meeting of the Canadian Society of Microbiologists highlighted compositional data analysis methods and the importance of exploratory data analysis for the analysis of microbiome data sets generated by high-throughput DNA sequencing. A summary of the content of that workshop, a review of new methods of analysis, and information on the importance of careful analyses are presented herein. The workshop focussed on explaining the rationale behind the use of compositional data analysis, and a demonstration of these methods for the examination of 2 microbiome data sets. A clear understanding of bioinformatics methodologies and the type of data being analyzed is essential, given the growing number of studies uncovering the critical role of the microbiome in health and disease and the need to understand alterations to its composition and function following intervention with fecal transplant, probiotics, diet, and pharmaceutical agents. PMID:27314511

  13. ANSS Backbone Station Installation and Site Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meremonte, M.; Leeds, A.; Overturf, D.; McMillian, J.; Allen, J.; McNamara, D.

    2004-12-01

    During 2004 several new broadband seismic stations have been deployed as a part of the USGS's Advanced National Seismic System (ANSS) backbone and regional networks. New stations include: ERPA, MNTX, OGLA, AMTX, NATX, KCCO, BMO, MARC, TZTN, LAO, DGMT, REDW, KSU1, MOOW, TPAW, LOHW, RAMW. Permanent station locations were chosen to minimize the local noise conditions by recording continuous data and using a quantitative analysis of the statistical distribution of noise power estimates. For each one-hour segment of continuous data, a power spectral density (PSD) is estimated and smoothed in full octave averages at 1/8 octave intervals. Powers for each 1/8 period interval were then accumulated in one dB power bins. A statistical analysis of power bins yields probability density functions (PDFs) as a function of noise power for each of the octave bands at each station and component. Examination of earthquake signal, artifacts related to station operation and episodic cultural noise in the PDFs allow us to estimate both the overall station quality and the level of earth noise at each potential backbone site. The main function of a seismic network, such as the ANSS, is to provide high quality data for earthquake monitoring, source studies, and Earth structure research. The utility of seismic data is greatly increased when noise levels are reduced. A good quantification and understanding of seismic noise is a first step at reducing noise levels in seismic data and improving overall data quality from the ANSS backbone network.

  14. Automated Real-Space Refinement of Protein Structures Using a Realistic Backbone Move Set

    PubMed Central

    Haddadian, Esmael J.; Gong, Haipeng; Jha, Abhishek K.; Yang, Xiaojing; DeBartolo, Joe; Hinshaw, James R.; Rice, Phoebe A.; Sosnick, Tobin R.; Freed, Karl F.

    2011-01-01

    Crystals of many important biological macromolecules diffract to limited resolution, rendering accurate model building and refinement difficult and time-consuming. We present a torsional optimization protocol that is applicable to many such situations and combines Protein Data Bank-based torsional optimization with real-space refinement against the electron density derived from crystallography or cryo-electron microscopy. Our method converts moderate- to low-resolution structures at initial (e.g., backbone trace only) or late stages of refinement to structures with increased numbers of hydrogen bonds, improved crystallographic R-factors, and superior backbone geometry. This automated method is applicable to DNA-binding and membrane proteins of any size and will aid studies of structural biology by improving model quality and saving considerable effort. The method can be extended to improve NMR and other structures. Our backbone score and its sequence profile provide an additional standard tool for evaluating structural quality. PMID:21843481

  15. Geometry and Stacking Sequence Effect on Composite Spinnaker Pole's Stiffness: Experimental and Numerical Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valenza, Antonino; Borsellino, Chiara; Calabrese, Luigi; di Bella, Guido

    2006-07-01

    Composite materials are widely employed in sailing sports, a possible application is for the mast pole or other sail poles. In the paper the attention is focused on the spinnaker poles mechanical performances; in particular the focus is on axial and ring compressive properties of three different carbon fibre/epoxy resin spinnaker poles, to investigate both the diameter and stacking sequence effect on the mechanical performance of the structure. Starting from the stacking sequence used in the production of a particular spinnaker pole, the effect of a lamina at 0° in the middle of wall thickness is investigated with the purpose to obtain a more stiff structure. Moreover to test the proposed stacking sequence on different size products, a prototype with lower diameter is realized. To properly evaluate axial and ring stiffness, axial compression test and ring stiffness one are performed. Then a numerical model is developed to support the design of the finished product: A simple and versatile numerical analysis (FEA with software ANSYS), by simulating ring stiffness and pull-direction compression tests, is carried out in elastic regime. Such model should be suitable for designing and/or verifying the mechanical performance of pole structures, even though differing from those above described, for materials, geometry and stacking sequence.

  16. Backbone Dynamics Of Intracellular Lipid Binding Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez-González, Luis H.

    2005-04-01

    The family of intracellular lipid binding proteins (iLBPs) comprises a group of homologous 14-15 kDa proteins that specifically bind and facilitate the transport of fatty acids, bile acids, retinoids or eicosanoids. Members of this family include several types of fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs), ileal lipid binding protein, cellular retinoic acid binding proteins and cellular retinoid binding proteins. As a contribution to understanding the structure-function relationship in this protein family, the solution structure and backbone dynamics of human epidermal-type FABP (E-FABP) determined by NMR spectroscopy are reported. Moreover, hydrogen/deuterium exchange experiments indicated a direct correlation between the stability of the hydrogen-bonding network in the β-sheet structure and the conformational exchange in the millisecond-to-microsecond time range. The features of E-FABP backbone dynamics discussed in the present study are compared with those obtained for other phylogenetically related proteins. A strong interdependence with the overall protein stability and possibly also with the ligand-binding affinity for members of the lipid-binding protein family is shown.

  17. Backbone Solution Structures of Proteins Using Residual Dipolar Couplings: Application to a Novel Structural Genomics Target

    PubMed Central

    Valafar, H.; Mayer, K. L.; Bougault, C. M.; LeBlond, P. D.; Jenney, F. E.; Brereton, P. S.; Adams, M.W.W.; Prestegard, J.H.

    2006-01-01

    Structural genomics (or proteomics) activities are critically dependent on the availability of high-throughput structure determination methodology. Development of such methodology has been a particular challenge for NMR based structure determination because of the demands for isotopic labeling of proteins and the requirements for very long data acquisition times. We present here a methodology that gains efficiency from a focus on determination of backbone structures of proteins as opposed to full structures with all side chains in place. This focus is appropriate given the presumption that many protein structures in the future will be built using computational methods that start from representative fold family structures and replace as many as 70% of the side chains in the course of structure determination. The methodology we present is based primarily on residual dipolar couplings (RDCs), readily accessible NMR observables that constrain the orientation of backbone fragments irrespective of separation in space. A new software tool is described for the assembly of backbone fragments under RDC constraints and an application to a structural genomics target is presented. The target is an 8.7 kDa protein from Pyrococcus furiosus, PF1061, that was previously not well annotated, and had a nearest structurally characterized neighbor with only 33% sequence identity. The structure produced shows structural similarity to this sequence homologue, but also shows similarity to other proteins that suggests a functional role in sulfur transfer. Given the backbone structure and a possible functional link this should be an ideal target for development of modeling methods. PMID:15704012

  18. Targeted Sequencing Reveals Large-Scale Sequence Polymorphism in Maize Candidate Genes for Biomass Production and Composition

    PubMed Central

    Ulpinnis, Chris; Scholz, Uwe; Altmann, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    A major goal of maize genomic research is to identify sequence polymorphisms responsible for phenotypic variation in traits of economic importance. Large-scale detection of sequence variation is critical for linking genes, or genomic regions, to phenotypes. However, due to its size and complexity, it remains expensive to generate whole genome sequences of sufficient coverage for divergent maize lines, even with access to next generation sequencing (NGS) technology. Because methods involving reduction of genome complexity, such as genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS), assess only a limited fraction of sequence variation, targeted sequencing of selected genomic loci offers an attractive alternative. We therefore designed a sequence capture assay to target 29 Mb genomic regions and surveyed a total of 4,648 genes possibly affecting biomass production in 21 diverse inbred maize lines (7 flints, 14 dents). Captured and enriched genomic DNA was sequenced using the 454 NGS platform to 19.6-fold average depth coverage, and a broad evaluation of read alignment and variant calling methods was performed to select optimal procedures for variant discovery. Sequence alignment with the B73 reference and de novo assembly identified 383,145 putative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), of which 42,685 were non-synonymous alterations and 7,139 caused frameshifts. Presence/absence variation (PAV) of genes was also detected. We found that substantial sequence variation exists among genomic regions targeted in this study, which was particularly evident within coding regions. This diversification has the potential to broaden functional diversity and generate phenotypic variation that may lead to new adaptations and the modification of important agronomic traits. Further, annotated SNPs identified here will serve as useful genetic tools and as candidates in searches for phenotype-altering DNA variation. In summary, we demonstrated that sequencing of captured DNA is a powerful approach for

  19. Broadband echo sequence using a pi composite pulse for the pure NQR of a spin I = 32 powder sample

    PubMed

    Odin

    2000-04-01

    This work presents a numerical approach to optimizing sequences with composite pulses for the pure NQR of a spin I = 32 powder sample. The calculations are based on a formalism developed in a previous paper, which allows a fast powder-averaging procedure to be implemented. The framework of the Cayley-Klein matrices to describe space rotations by 2 x 2 unitary and unimodular complex matrices is used to calculate the pulse propagators. The object of such a study is to design a high-performance echo sequence composed of a single preparation pulse and a three-pulse composite transfer pulse. We mean a sequence leading to a large excitation bandwidth with a good signal-to-noise ratio, a flat excitation profile near the irradiation frequency, and a good linearity of the phase as a function of frequency offset. Such a composite echo sequence is intended to give a better excitation profile than the classical Hahn (θ)-tau-(2θ) echo sequence. It is argued that in pure NQR of a powder sample, the sequence must be optimized as a whole since both the excitation and the reception of the signal depend on the relative orientation of the crystallites with respect to the coil axis. To our knowledge, this is the first time such a global approach is presented. An extensive numerical study of the composite echo sequence described above is performed in this article. The key of the discrimination between the sequences lies in using the first five reduced moments of the excitation profile as well as an estimator of the phase linearity. Based on such information, we suggest that the echo sequence that best fulfills our criterion is (1)(0)-tau-(0.35)(0)(2.1)(pi)(0.35)(0), the pulse angles omega(RF)t(p) being in radians. The subscripts are the relative pulse phases. We outlined the way to implement the spin echo mapping method to reconstruct large spectra with this sequence, and it is shown that it reduces the acquisition time by a factor of 1.7 if compared to the classical Hahn echo. Some

  20. TMAO influence on the backbone of proteins: an oligoglycine model

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Char Y.; Lynch, Gillian C.; Kokubo, Hironori; Pettitt, B. Montgomery

    2009-01-01

    The study of organic osmolytes has been pivotal in demonstrating the role of solvent effects on the protein backbone in the folding process. Whereas a thermodynamic description of the interactions between the protein backbone and osmolyte has been well defined, the structural analysis of the effect of osmolyte on the protein backbone has been incomplete. Therefore, we have carried out simulations of a peptide backbone model, glycine15 in protecting osmolyte TMAO solution in order to determine the effect of the solution structure on the conformation of the peptide backbone. We demonstrate that the models chosen show that the ensemble of backbone structures shifts towards a more collapsed state in TMAO solution as compared to pure water solution. The collapse is consistent with preferential exclusion of the osmolyte caused by unfavorable interactions between osmolyte and peptide backbone. The exclusion is due to strong triplet correlations of osmolyte, water, and peptide backbone. This provides a clear mechanism demonstrating that even a modest concentration of TMAO forces the protein backbone to adopt a more collapsed structure in the absence of sidechain effects. PMID:19790265

  1. The non-coding RNA composition of the mitotic chromosome by 5'-tag sequencing.

    PubMed

    Meng, Yicong; Yi, Xianfu; Li, Xinhui; Hu, Chuansheng; Wang, Ju; Bai, Ling; Czajkowsky, Daniel M; Shao, Zhifeng

    2016-06-01

    Mitotic chromosomes are one of the most commonly recognized sub-cellular structures in eukaryotic cells. Yet basic information necessary to understand their structure and assembly, such as their composition, is still lacking. Recent proteomic studies have begun to fill this void, identifying hundreds of RNA-binding proteins bound to mitotic chromosomes. However, by contrast, there are only two RNA species (U3 snRNA and rRNA) that are known to be associated with the mitotic chromosome, suggesting that there are many mitotic chromosome-associated RNAs (mCARs) not yet identified. Here, using a targeted protocol based on 5'-tag sequencing to profile the mammalian mCAR population, we report the identification of 1279 mCARs, the majority of which are ncRNAs, including lncRNAs that exhibit greater conservation across 60 vertebrate species than the entire population of lncRNAs. There is also a significant enrichment of snoRNAs and specific SINE RNAs. Finally, ∼40% of the mCARs are presently unannotated, many of which are as abundant as the annotated mCARs, suggesting that there are also many novel ncRNAs in the mCARs. Overall, the mCARs identified here, together with the previous proteomic and genomic data, constitute the first comprehensive catalogue of the molecular composition of the eukaryotic mitotic chromosomes. PMID:27016738

  2. Metagenomic sequencing reveals the relationship between microbiota composition and quality of Chinese Rice Wine

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Xutao; Chen, Jing; Liu, Lin; Wu, Huan; Tan, Haiqin; Xie, Guangfa; Xu, Qian; Zou, Huijun; Yu, Wenjing; Wang, Lan; Qin, Nan

    2016-01-01

    Chinese Rice Wine (CRW) is a common alcoholic beverage in China. To investigate the influence of microbial composition on the quality of CRW, high throughput sequencing was performed for 110 wine samples on bacterial 16S rRNA gene and fungal Internal Transcribed Spacer II (ITS2). Bioinformatic analyses demonstrated that the quality of yeast starter and final wine correlated with microbial taxonomic composition, which was exemplified by our finding that wine spoilage resulted from a high proportion of genus Lactobacillus. Subsequently, based on Lactobacillus abundance of an early stage, a model was constructed to predict final wine quality. In addition, three batches of 20 representative wine samples selected from a pool of 110 samples were further analyzed in metagenomics. The results revealed that wine spoilage was due to rapid growth of Lactobacillus brevis at the early stage of fermentation. Gene functional analysis indicated the importance of some pathways such as synthesis of biotin, malolactic fermentation and production of short-chain fatty acid. These results led to a conclusion that metabolisms of microbes influence the wine quality. Thus, nurturing of beneficial microbes and inhibition of undesired ones are both important for the mechanized brewery. PMID:27241862

  3. The non-coding RNA composition of the mitotic chromosome by 5′-tag sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Yicong; Yi, Xianfu; Li, Xinhui; Hu, Chuansheng; Wang, Ju; Bai, Ling; Czajkowsky, Daniel M.; Shao, Zhifeng

    2016-01-01

    Mitotic chromosomes are one of the most commonly recognized sub-cellular structures in eukaryotic cells. Yet basic information necessary to understand their structure and assembly, such as their composition, is still lacking. Recent proteomic studies have begun to fill this void, identifying hundreds of RNA-binding proteins bound to mitotic chromosomes. However, by contrast, there are only two RNA species (U3 snRNA and rRNA) that are known to be associated with the mitotic chromosome, suggesting that there are many mitotic chromosome-associated RNAs (mCARs) not yet identified. Here, using a targeted protocol based on 5′-tag sequencing to profile the mammalian mCAR population, we report the identification of 1279 mCARs, the majority of which are ncRNAs, including lncRNAs that exhibit greater conservation across 60 vertebrate species than the entire population of lncRNAs. There is also a significant enrichment of snoRNAs and specific SINE RNAs. Finally, ∼40% of the mCARs are presently unannotated, many of which are as abundant as the annotated mCARs, suggesting that there are also many novel ncRNAs in the mCARs. Overall, the mCARs identified here, together with the previous proteomic and genomic data, constitute the first comprehensive catalogue of the molecular composition of the eukaryotic mitotic chromosomes. PMID:27016738

  4. Metagenomic sequencing reveals the relationship between microbiota composition and quality of Chinese Rice Wine.

    PubMed

    Hong, Xutao; Chen, Jing; Liu, Lin; Wu, Huan; Tan, Haiqin; Xie, Guangfa; Xu, Qian; Zou, Huijun; Yu, Wenjing; Wang, Lan; Qin, Nan

    2016-01-01

    Chinese Rice Wine (CRW) is a common alcoholic beverage in China. To investigate the influence of microbial composition on the quality of CRW, high throughput sequencing was performed for 110 wine samples on bacterial 16S rRNA gene and fungal Internal Transcribed Spacer II (ITS2). Bioinformatic analyses demonstrated that the quality of yeast starter and final wine correlated with microbial taxonomic composition, which was exemplified by our finding that wine spoilage resulted from a high proportion of genus Lactobacillus. Subsequently, based on Lactobacillus abundance of an early stage, a model was constructed to predict final wine quality. In addition, three batches of 20 representative wine samples selected from a pool of 110 samples were further analyzed in metagenomics. The results revealed that wine spoilage was due to rapid growth of Lactobacillus brevis at the early stage of fermentation. Gene functional analysis indicated the importance of some pathways such as synthesis of biotin, malolactic fermentation and production of short-chain fatty acid. These results led to a conclusion that metabolisms of microbes influence the wine quality. Thus, nurturing of beneficial microbes and inhibition of undesired ones are both important for the mechanized brewery. PMID:27241862

  5. Reconstruction of protein backbones from the BriX collection of canonical protein fragments.

    PubMed

    Baeten, Lies; Reumers, Joke; Tur, Vicente; Stricher, François; Lenaerts, Tom; Serrano, Luis; Rousseau, Frederic; Schymkowitz, Joost

    2008-05-01

    As modeling of changes in backbone conformation still lacks a computationally efficient solution, we developed a discretisation of the conformational states accessible to the protein backbone similar to the successful rotamer approach in side chains. The BriX fragment database, consisting of fragments from 4 to 14 residues long, was realized through identification of recurrent backbone fragments from a non-redundant set of high-resolution protein structures. BriX contains an alphabet of more than 1,000 frequently observed conformations per peptide length for 6 different variation levels. Analysis of the performance of BriX revealed an average structural coverage of protein structures of more than 99% within a root mean square distance (RMSD) of 1 Angstrom. Globally, we are able to reconstruct protein structures with an average accuracy of 0.48 Angstrom RMSD. As expected, regular structures are well covered, but, interestingly, many loop regions that appear irregular at first glance are also found to form a recurrent structural motif, albeit with lower frequency of occurrence than regular secondary structures. Larger loop regions could be completely reconstructed from smaller recurrent elements, between 4 and 8 residues long. Finally, we observed that a significant amount of short sequences tend to display strong structural ambiguity between alpha helix and extended conformations. When the sequence length increases, this so-called sequence plasticity is no longer observed, illustrating the context dependency of polypeptide structures. PMID:18483555

  6. Extracting the Information Backbone in Online System

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qian-Ming; Zeng, An; Shang, Ming-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Information overload is a serious problem in modern society and many solutions such as recommender system have been proposed to filter out irrelevant information. In the literature, researchers have been mainly dedicated to improving the recommendation performance (accuracy and diversity) of the algorithms while they have overlooked the influence of topology of the online user-object bipartite networks. In this paper, we find that some information provided by the bipartite networks is not only redundant but also misleading. With such “less can be more” feature, we design some algorithms to improve the recommendation performance by eliminating some links from the original networks. Moreover, we propose a hybrid method combining the time-aware and topology-aware link removal algorithms to extract the backbone which contains the essential information for the recommender systems. From the practical point of view, our method can improve the performance and reduce the computational time of the recommendation system, thus improving both of their effectiveness and efficiency. PMID:23690946

  7. Toward future IP optical backbone networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urushidani, Shigeo

    2005-11-01

    The rapid and aggressive penetration of broadband access services such as fiber to the home (FTTH) has been accelerating the increase in IP traffic volume and new networking technologies are required in order to accommodate future traffic in a cost-effective manner. This paper overviews the advanced IP optical network architecture and technologies for very-large-scale IP backbone networks. These technologies are the key to accommodate the huge volumes of IP traffic expected and control network resources in an effective and dynamic manner. We describe advanced IP optical networking technologies which accommodate multiple service networks using multi-instance technologies, and enable multi-layer traffic engineering using virtual network topology technologies. The migration scenario is described from the existing networks to GMPLS networks; reference is made to the advanced Path Computation Element (PCE) which enables multi-layer traffic engineering and MPLS/GMPLS migration. New network concepts such as Layer 1 Virtual Private Network (L1VPN) and GMPLS interoperability issues, which are being discussed in IETF, are also described.

  8. NET amyloidogenic backbone in human activated neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Pulze, L; Bassani, B; Gini, E; D'Antona, P; Grimaldi, A; Luini, A; Marino, F; Noonan, D M; Tettamanti, G; Valvassori, R; de Eguileor, M

    2016-03-01

    Activated human neutrophils produce a fibrillar DNA network [neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs)] for entrapping and killing bacteria, fungi, protozoa and viruses. Our results suggest that the neutrophil extracellular traps show a resistant amyloidogenic backbone utilized for addressing reputed proteins and DNA against the non-self. The formation of amyloid fibrils in neutrophils is regulated by the imbalance of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the cytoplasm. The intensity and source of the ROS signal is determinant for promoting stress-associated responses such as amyloidogenesis and closely related events: autophagy, exosome release, activation of the adrenocorticotrophin hormone/α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (ACTH/α-MSH) loop and synthesis of specific cytokines. These interconnected responses in human activated neutrophils, that have been evaluated from a morphofunctional and quantitative viewpoint, represent primitive, but potent, innate defence mechanisms. In invertebrates, circulating phagocytic immune cells, when activated, show responses similar to those described previously for activated human neutrophils. Invertebrate cells within endoplasmic reticulum cisternae produce a fibrillar material which is then assembled into an amyloidogenic scaffold utilized to convey melanin close to the invader. These findings, in consideration to the critical role played by NET in the development of several pathologies, could explain the structural resistance of these scaffolds and could provide the basis for developing new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches in immunomediated diseases in which the innate branch of the immune system has a pivotal role. PMID:26462606

  9. Free backbone carbonyls mediate rhodopsin activation.

    PubMed

    Kimata, Naoki; Pope, Andreyah; Sanchez-Reyes, Omar B; Eilers, Markus; Opefi, Chikwado A; Ziliox, Martine; Reeves, Philip J; Smith, Steven O

    2016-08-01

    Conserved prolines in the transmembrane helices of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are often considered to function as hinges that divide the helix into two segments capable of independent motion. Depending on their potential to hydrogen-bond, the free C=O groups associated with these prolines can facilitate conformational flexibility, conformational switching or stabilization of the receptor structure. To address the role of conserved prolines in family A GPCRs through solid-state NMR spectroscopy, we focus on bovine rhodopsin, a GPCR in the visual receptor subfamily. The free backbone C=O groups on helices H5 and H7 stabilize the inactive rhodopsin structure through hydrogen-bonds to residues on adjacent helices. In response to light-induced isomerization of the retinal chromophore, hydrogen-bonding interactions involving these C=O groups are released, thus facilitating repacking of H5 and H7 onto the transmembrane core of the receptor. These results provide insights into the multiple structural and functional roles of prolines in membrane proteins. PMID:27376589

  10. Extracting the information backbone in online system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian-Ming; Zeng, An; Shang, Ming-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Information overload is a serious problem in modern society and many solutions such as recommender system have been proposed to filter out irrelevant information. In the literature, researchers have been mainly dedicated to improving the recommendation performance (accuracy and diversity) of the algorithms while they have overlooked the influence of topology of the online user-object bipartite networks. In this paper, we find that some information provided by the bipartite networks is not only redundant but also misleading. With such "less can be more" feature, we design some algorithms to improve the recommendation performance by eliminating some links from the original networks. Moreover, we propose a hybrid method combining the time-aware and topology-aware link removal algorithms to extract the backbone which contains the essential information for the recommender systems. From the practical point of view, our method can improve the performance and reduce the computational time of the recommendation system, thus improving both of their effectiveness and efficiency. PMID:23690946

  11. RNA-Redesign: a web server for fixed-backbone 3D design of RNA

    PubMed Central

    Yesselman, Joseph D.; Das, Rhiju

    2015-01-01

    RNA is rising in importance as a design medium for interrogating fundamental biology and for developing therapeutic and bioengineering applications. While there are several online servers for design of RNA secondary structure, there are no tools available for the rational design of 3D RNA structure. Here we present RNA-Redesign (http://rnaredesign.stanford.edu), an online 3D design tool for RNA. This resource utilizes fixed-backbone design to optimize the sequence identity and nucleobase conformations of an RNA to match a desired backbone, analogous to fundamental tools that underlie rational protein engineering. The resulting sequences suggest thermostabilizing mutations that can be experimentally verified. Further, sequence preferences that differ between natural and computationally designed sequences can suggest whether natural sequences possess functional constraints besides folding stability, such as cofactor binding or conformational switching. Finally, for biochemical studies, the designed sequences can suggest experimental tests of 3D models, including concomitant mutation of base triples. In addition to the designs generated, detailed graphical analysis is presented through an integrated and user-friendly environment. PMID:25964298

  12. RNA-Redesign: a web server for fixed-backbone 3D design of RNA.

    PubMed

    Yesselman, Joseph D; Das, Rhiju

    2015-07-01

    RNA is rising in importance as a design medium for interrogating fundamental biology and for developing therapeutic and bioengineering applications. While there are several online servers for design of RNA secondary structure, there are no tools available for the rational design of 3D RNA structure. Here we present RNA-Redesign (http://rnaredesign.stanford.edu), an online 3D design tool for RNA. This resource utilizes fixed-backbone design to optimize the sequence identity and nucleobase conformations of an RNA to match a desired backbone, analogous to fundamental tools that underlie rational protein engineering. The resulting sequences suggest thermostabilizing mutations that can be experimentally verified. Further, sequence preferences that differ between natural and computationally designed sequences can suggest whether natural sequences possess functional constraints besides folding stability, such as cofactor binding or conformational switching. Finally, for biochemical studies, the designed sequences can suggest experimental tests of 3D models, including concomitant mutation of base triples. In addition to the designs generated, detailed graphical analysis is presented through an integrated and user-friendly environment. PMID:25964298

  13. Local backbone structure prediction of proteins.

    PubMed

    de Brevern, Alexandre G; Benros, Cristina; Gautier, Romain; Valadié, Héléne; Hazout, Serge; Etchebest, Catherine

    2004-01-01

    A statistical analysis of the PDB structures has led us to define a new set of small 3D structural prototypes called Protein Blocks (PBs). This structural alphabet includes 16 PBs, each one is defined by the (phi, psi) dihedral angles of 5 consecutive residues. The amino acid distributions observed in sequence windows encompassing these PBs are used to predict by a Bayesian approach the local 3D structure of proteins from the sole knowledge of their sequences. LocPred is a software which allows the users to submit a protein sequence and performs a prediction in terms of PBs. The prediction results are given both textually and graphically. PMID:15724288

  14. Backbones of evolutionary history test biodiversity theory for microbes

    PubMed Central

    O’Dwyer, James P.; Kembel, Steven W.; Sharpton, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Identifying the ecological and evolutionary mechanisms that determine biological diversity is a central question in ecology. In microbial ecology, phylogenetic diversity is an increasingly common and relevant means of quantifying community diversity, particularly given the challenges in defining unambiguous species units from environmental sequence data. We explore patterns of phylogenetic diversity across multiple bacterial communities drawn from different habitats and compare these data to evolutionary trees generated using theoretical models of biodiversity. We have two central findings. First, although on finer scales the empirical trees are highly idiosyncratic, on coarse scales the backbone of these trees is simple and robust, consistent across habitats, and displays bursts of diversification dotted throughout. Second, we find that these data demonstrate a clear departure from the predictions of standard neutral theories of biodiversity and that an alternative family of generalized models provides a qualitatively better description. Together, these results lay the groundwork for a theoretical framework to connect ecological mechanisms to observed phylogenetic patterns in microbial communities. PMID:26106159

  15. Solution Structure and Backbone Dynamics of Streptopain

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chih-Chieh; Houng, Hsiang-Chee; Chen, Chun-Liang; Wang, Pei-Ju; Kuo, Chih-Feng; Lin, Yee-Shin; Wu, Jiunn-Jong; Lin, Ming T.; Liu, Ching-Chuan; Huang, Wenya; Chuang, Woei-Jer

    2009-01-01

    Streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin B (SPE B) is a cysteine protease expressed by Streptococcus pyogenes. The D9N, G163S, G163S/A172S, and G239D mutant proteins were expressed to study the effect of the allelic variants on their protease activity. In contrast to other mutants, the G239D mutant was ∼12-fold less active. The Gly-239 residue is located within the C-terminal S230-G239 region, which cannot be observed in the x-ray structure. The three-dimensional structure and backbone dynamics of the 28-kDa mature SPE B (mSPE B) were determined. Unlike the x-ray structure of the 40-kDa zymogen SPE B (proSPE B), we observed the interactions between the C-terminal loop and the active site residues in mSPE B. The structural differences between mSPE B and proSPE B were the conformation of the C-terminal loop and the orientation of the catalytic His-195 residue, suggesting that activation and inactivation of SPE B is involved in the His-195 side-chain rotation. Dynamics analysis of mSPE B and the mSPE B/inhibitor complexes showed that the catalytic and C-terminal loops were the most flexible regions with low order parameter values of 0.5 to 0.8 and exhibited the motion on the ps/ns timescale. These findings suggest that the flexible C-terminal loop of SPE B may play an important role in controlling the substrate binding, resulting in its broad substrate specificity. PMID:19237546

  16. Parallel data acquisition of in-source fragmented glycopeptides to sequence the glycosylation sites of proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jingfu; Song, Ehwang; Zhu, Rui; Mechref, Yehia

    2016-06-01

    Glycosylation plays important roles in maintaining protein stability and controlling biological processes. In recent years, the correlation between aberrant glycoproteins and many diseases has been reported. Hence, qualitative and quantitative analyses of glycoproteins are necessary to understand physiological processes. LC-MS/MS analysis of glycopeptides is faced with the low glycopeptide signal intensities and low peptide sequence identification. In our study, in-source fragmentation (ISF) was used in conjunction with LC-MS/MS to facilitate the parallel acquisition of peptide backbone sequence and glycan composition information. In ISF method, the identification of glycosylation sites depended on the detection of Y1 ion (ion of peptide backbone with an N-acetylglucosamine attached). To attain dominant Y1 ions, a range of source fragmentation voltages was studied using fetuin. A 45 V ISF voltage was found to be the most efficient voltage for the analysis of glycoproteins. ISF was employed to study the glycosylation sites of three model glycoproteins, including fetuin, α1-acid glycoprotein and porcine thyroglobulin. The approach was then used to analyze blood serum samples. Y1 ions of glycopeptides in tryptic digests of samples were detected. Y1 ions of glycopeptides with different sialic acid groups are observed at different retention times, representing the various numbers of sialic acid moieties associated with the same peptide backbone sequence. With ISF facilitating the peptide backbone sequencing of glycopeptides, identified peptide sequence coverage was increased. For example, identified fetuin sequence percentage was improved from 39 to 80% in MASCOT database searching compared to conventional CID method. The formation of Y1 ions and oxonium ions in ISF facilitates glycopeptide sequencing and glycan composition identification. PMID:26957414

  17. Influence of laminate sequence and fabric type on the inherent acoustic nonlinearity in carbon fiber reinforced composites.

    PubMed

    Chakrapani, Sunil Kishore; Barnard, Daniel J; Dayal, Vinay

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents the study of influence of laminate sequence and fabric type on the baseline acoustic nonlinearity of fiber-reinforced composites. Nonlinear elastic wave techniques are increasingly becoming popular in detecting damage in composite materials. It was earlier observed by the authors that the non-classical nonlinear response of fiber-reinforced composite is influenced by the fiber orientation [Chakrapani, Barnard, and Dayal, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 137(2), 617-624 (2015)]. The current study expands this effort to investigate the effect of laminate sequence and fabric type on the non-classical nonlinear response. Two hypotheses were developed using the previous results, and the theory of interlaminar stresses to investigate the influence of laminate sequence and fabric type. Each hypothesis was tested by capturing the nonlinear response by performing nonlinear resonance spectroscopy and measuring frequency shifts, loss factors, and higher harmonics. It was observed that the laminate sequence can either increase or decrease the nonlinear response based on the stacking sequence. Similarly, tests were performed to compare unidirectional fabric and woven fabric and it was observed that woven fabric exhibited a lower nonlinear response compared to the unidirectional fabric. Conjectures based on the matrix properties and interlaminar stresses were used in an attempt to explain the observed nonlinear responses for different configurations. PMID:27250126

  18. Radiation safety system (RSS) backbones: Design, engineering, fabrication and installation

    SciTech Connect

    Wilmarth, J.E.; Sturrock, J.C.; Gallegos, F.R.

    1998-12-01

    The Radiation Safety System (RSS) Backbones are part of an electrical/electronic/mechanical system insuring safe access and exclusion of personnel to areas at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) accelerator. The RSS Backbones control the safety fusible beam plugs which terminate transmission of accelerated ion beams in response to predefined conditions. Any beam or access fault of the backbone inputs will cause insertion of the beam plugs in the low energy beam transport. The Backbones serve the function of tying the beam plugs to the access control systems, beam spill monitoring systems and current-level limiting systems. In some ways the Backbones may be thought of as a spinal column with beam plugs at the head and nerve centers along the spinal column. The two Linac Backbone segments and experimental area segments form a continuous cable plant over 3,500 feet from beam plugs to the tip on the longest tail. The Backbones were installed in compliance with current safety standards, such as installation of the two segments in separate conduits or tray. Monitoring for ground-faults and input wiring verification was an added enhancement to the system. The system has the capability to be tested remotely.

  19. Radiation Safety System (RSS) backbones: Design, engineering, fabrication, and installation

    SciTech Connect

    Wilmarth, J. E.; Sturrock, J. C.; Gallegos, F. R.

    1998-12-10

    The Radiation Safety System (RSS) backbones are part of an electrical/electronic/mechanical system ensuring safe access and exclusion of personnel to areas at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) accelerator. The RSS backbones control the safety-fusible beam plugs which terminate transmission of accelerated ion beams in response to predefined conditions. Any beam or access fault of the backbone inputs will cause insertion of the beam plugs in the low-energy beam transport. The backbones serve the function of tying the beam plugs to the access control systems, beam spill monitoring systems and current-level limiting systems. In some ways the backbones may be thought of as a spinal column with beam plugs at the head and nerve centers along the spinal column. The two linac backbone segments and the experimental area segments form a continuous cable plant over 3500 feet from the beam plugs to the tip on the longest tail. The backbones were installed in compliance with current safety standards, such as installation of the two segments in separate conduits or tray. Monitoring for ground-faults and input wiring verification was an added enhancement to the system. The system has the capability to be tested remotely.

  20. Radiation Safety System (RSS) backbones: Design, engineering, fabrication, and installation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilmarth, J. E.; Sturrock, J. C.; Gallegos, F. R.

    1998-12-01

    The Radiation Safety System (RSS) backbones are part of an electrical/electronic/mechanical system ensuring safe access and exclusion of personnel to areas at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) accelerator. The RSS backbones control the safety-fusible beam plugs which terminate transmission of accelerated ion beams in response to predefined conditions. Any beam or access fault of the backbone inputs will cause insertion of the beam plugs in the low-energy beam transport. The backbones serve the function of tying the beam plugs to the access control systems, beam spill monitoring systems and current-level limiting systems. In some ways the backbones may be thought of as a spinal column with beam plugs at the head and nerve centers along the spinal column. The two linac backbone segments and the experimental area segments form a continuous cable plant over 3500 feet from the beam plugs to the tip on the longest tail. The backbones were installed in compliance with current safety standards, such as installation of the two segments in separate conduits or tray. Monitoring for ground-faults and input wiring verification was an added enhancement to the system. The system has the capability to be tested remotely.

  1. Radiation Safety System (RSS) backbones: Design, engineering, fabrication, and installation

    SciTech Connect

    Wilmarth, J.E.; Sturrock, J.C.; Gallegos, F.R.

    1998-12-01

    The Radiation Safety System (RSS) backbones are part of an electrical/electronic/mechanical system ensuring safe access and exclusion of personnel to areas at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) accelerator. The RSS backbones control the safety-fusible beam plugs which terminate transmission of accelerated ion beams in response to predefined conditions. Any beam or access fault of the backbone inputs will cause insertion of the beam plugs in the low-energy beam transport. The backbones serve the function of tying the beam plugs to the access control systems, beam spill monitoring systems and current-level limiting systems. In some ways the backbones may be thought of as a spinal column with beam plugs at the head and nerve centers along the spinal column. The two linac backbone segments and the experimental area segments form a continuous cable plant over 3500 feet from the beam plugs to the tip on the longest tail. The backbones were installed in compliance with current safety standards, such as installation of the two segments in separate conduits or tray. Monitoring for ground-faults and input wiring verification was an added enhancement to the system. The system has the capability to be tested remotely. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. Bacterial community compositions in sediment polluted by perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) using Illumina high-throughput sequencing.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yajun; Wang, Tieyu; Peng, Xiawei; Wang, Pei; Lu, Yonglong

    2016-06-01

    The characterization of bacterial community compositions and the change in perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) along a natural river distribution system were explored in the present study. Illumina high-throughput sequencing was used to explore bacterial community diversity and structure in sediment polluted by PFAAs from the Xiaoqing River, the area with concentrated fluorochemical facilities in China. The concentration of PFAAs was in the range of 8.44-465.60 ng/g dry weight (dw) in sediment. Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) was the dominant PFAA in all samples, which accounted for 94.2 % of total PFAAs. High-level PFOA could lead to an obvious increase in relative abundance of Proteobacteria, ε-Proteobacteria, Thiobacillus, and Sulfurimonas and the decrease in relative abundance of other bacteria. Redundancy analysis revealed that PFOA played an important role in the formation of bacterial community, and PFOA at higher concentration could reduce the diversity of bacterial community. When the concentration of PFOA was below 100 ng/g dw in sediment, no significant effect on microbial community structure was observed. Thiobacillus and Sulfurimonas were positively correlated with the concentration of PFOA, suggesting that both genera were resistant to PFOA contamination. PMID:26780047

  3. Comparison of SXT and R391, two conjugative integrating elements: definition of a genetic backbone for the mobilization of resistance determinants.

    PubMed

    Beaber, J W; Burrus, V; Hochhut, B; Waldor, M K

    2002-12-01

    The SXT element (SXT) is becoming an increasingly prevalent vector for the dissemination of antibiotic resistances in Vibrio cholerae. SXT is a member of a larger family of elements, formerly defined as IncJ plasmids, that are self-transmissible by conjugation and integrate site-specifically into the host chromosome. Comparison of the DNA sequences of SXT and R391, an IncJ element from Providencia rettgeri, indicate that these elements consist of a conserved backbone that mediates the regulation, excision/integration and conjugative transfer of the elements. Both elements have insertions into this backbone that either confer the element-specific properties or are of unknown function. Interestingly, the conserved SXT and R391 backbone apparently contains hotspots for insertion of additional DNA sequences. This backbone represents a scaffold for the mobilization of genetic material between a wide range of gram-negative bacteria, allowing for rapid adaptation to changing environments. PMID:12568332

  4. Nano-Scale Alignment of Proteins on a Flexible DNA Backbone

    PubMed Central

    Nojima, Tatsuya; Konno, Hiroki; Kodera, Noriyuki; Seio, Kohji; Taguchi, Hideki; Yoshida, Masasuke

    2012-01-01

    Nano-scale alignment of several proteins with freedom of motion is equivalent to an enormous increase in effective local concentration of proteins and will enable otherwise impossible weak and/or cooperative associations between them or with their ligands. For this purpose, a DNA backbone made of six oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) chains is designed in which five double-stranded segments are connected by four single-stranded flexible linkers. A desired protein with an introduced cysteine is connected covalently to the 5′-end of azido-ODN by catalyst-free click chemistry. Then, six protein-ODN conjugates are assembled with their complementary nucleotide sequences into a single multi-protein-DNA complex, and six proteins are aligned along the DNA backbone. Flexible alignment of proteins is directly observed by high-speed AFM imaging, and association of proteins with weak interaction is demonstrated by fluorescence resonance energy transfer between aligned proteins. PMID:23300700

  5. On the satisfaction of backbone-carbonyl lone pairs of electrons in protein structures.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Gail J; Woolfson, Derek N

    2016-04-01

    Protein structures are stabilized by a variety of noncovalent interactions (NCIs), including the hydrophobic effect, hydrogen bonds, electrostatic forces and van der Waals' interactions. Our knowledge of the contributions of NCIs, and the interplay between them remains incomplete. This has implications for computational modeling of NCIs, and our ability to understand and predict protein structure, stability, and function. One consideration is the satisfaction of the full potential for NCIs made by backbone atoms. Most commonly, backbone-carbonyl oxygen atoms located within α-helices and β-sheets are depicted as making a single hydrogen bond. However, there are two lone pairs of electrons to be satisfied for each of these atoms. To explore this, we used operational geometric definitions to generate an inventory of NCIs for backbone-carbonyl oxygen atoms from a set of high-resolution protein structures and associated molecular-dynamics simulations in water. We included more-recently appreciated, but weaker NCIs in our analysis, such as n→π* interactions, Cα-H bonds and methyl-H bonds. The data demonstrate balanced, dynamic systems for all proteins, with most backbone-carbonyl oxygen atoms being satisfied by two NCIs most of the time. Combinations of NCIs made may correlate with secondary structure type, though in subtly different ways from traditional models of α- and β-structure. In addition, we find examples of under- and over-satisfied carbonyl-oxygen atoms, and we identify both sequence-dependent and sequence-independent secondary-structural motifs in which these reside. Our analysis provides a more-detailed understanding of these contributors to protein structure and stability, which will be of use in protein modeling, engineering and design. PMID:26833776

  6. Histidine-Directed Arylation/Alkenylation of Backbone N-H Bonds Mediated by Copper(II).

    PubMed

    Ohata, Jun; Minus, Matthew B; Abernathy, Morgan E; Ball, Zachary T

    2016-06-22

    Chemical modification of proteins and peptides represents a challenge of reaction design as well as an important biological tool. In contrast to side-chain modification, synthetic methods to alter backbone structure are extremely limited. In this communication, copper-mediated backbone N-alkenylation or N-arylation of peptides and proteins by direct modification of natural sequences is described. Histidine residues direct oxidative coupling of boronic acids at the backbone NH of a neighboring amino acid. The mild reaction conditions in common physiological buffers, at ambient temperature, are compatible with proteins and biological systems. This simple reaction demonstrates the potential for directed reactions in complex systems to allow modification of N-H bonds that directly affect polypeptide structure, stability, and function. PMID:27249339

  7. Impact of HIV-1 Backbone on Neutralization Sensitivity: Neutralization Profiles of Heterologous Envelope Glycoproteins Expressed in Native Subtype C and CRF01_AE Backbone

    PubMed Central

    Sanders-Buell, Eric; Wesberry, Maggie; Towle, Teresa; Pillis, Devin M.; Molnar, Sebastian; McLinden, Robert; Edmonds, Tara; Hirsch, Ivan; O’Connell, Robert; McCutchan, Francine E.; Montefiori, David C.; Ochsenbauer, Christina; Kappes, John C.; Kim, Jerome H.; Polonis, Victoria R.; Tovanabutra, Sodsai

    2013-01-01

    Standardized assays to assess vaccine and antiviral drug efficacy are critical for the development of protective HIV-1 vaccines and drugs. These immune assays will be advanced by the development of standardized viral stocks, such as HIV-1 infectious molecular clones (IMC), that i) express a reporter gene, ii) are representative of globally diverse subtypes and iii) are engineered to easily exchange envelope (env) genes for expression of sequences of interest. Thus far, a subtype B IMC backbone expressing Renilla luciferase (LucR), and into which the ectodomain of heterologous env coding sequences can be expressed has been successfully developed but as execution of HIV-1 vaccine efficacy trials shifts increasingly to non-subtype B epidemics (Southern African and Southeast Asia), non-subtype B HIV-1 reagents are needed to support vaccine development. Here we describe two IMCs derived from subtypes C and CRF01_AE HIV-1 primary isolates expressing LucR (IMC.LucR) that were engineered to express heterologous gp160 Envs. 18 constructs expressing various subtypes C and CRF01_AE Envs, mostly acute, in subtype-matched and –unmatched HIV backbones were tested for functionality and neutralization sensitivity. Our results suggest a possible effect of non-env HIV-1 genes on the interaction of Env and neutralizing antibodies and highlight the need to generate a library of IMCs representative of the HIV-1 subtype spectrum to be used as standardized neutralization assay reagents for assessing HIV-1 vaccine efficacy. PMID:24312165

  8. Large-scale measurement and modeling of backbone Internet traffic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roughan, Matthew; Gottlieb, Joel

    2002-07-01

    There is a brewing controversy in the traffic modeling community concerning how to model backbone traffic. The fundamental work on self-similarity in data traffic appears to be contradicted by recent findings that suggest that backbone traffic is smooth. The traffic analysis work to date has focused on high-quality but limited-scope packet trace measurements; this limits its applicability to high-speed backbone traffic. This paper uses more than one year's worth of SNMP traffic data covering an entire Tier 1 ISP backbone to address the question of how backbone network traffic should be modeled. Although the limitations of SNMP measurements do not permit us to comment on the fine timescale behavior of the traffic, careful analysis of the data suggests that irrespective of the variation at fine timescales, we can construct a simple traffic model that captures key features of the observed traffic. Furthermore, the model's parameters are measurable using existing network infrastructure, making this model practical in a present-day operational network. In addition to its practicality, the model verifies basic statistical multiplexing results, and thus sheds deep insight into how smooth backbone traffic really is.

  9. Resistance issues with new nucleoside/nucleotide backbone options.

    PubMed

    Wainberg, Mark A; Turner, Dan

    2004-09-01

    The nucleoside and nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs/NtRTIs) remain an enduring feature of combination therapy. As NRTI/NtRTI options continue to expand, questions arise about how best to combine these agents to create effective dual NRTI/NtRTI backbones in antiretroviral regimens while avoiding treatment-emergent drug resistance. Clinicians must consider how NRTIs/NtRTIs such as tenofovir DF (TDF), abacavir (ABC), and emtricitabine (FTC), as well as new once-daily and coformulated NRTIs/NtRTIs, interact with older agents when combined in novel regimens and how sequencing the new NRTIs can preserve future treatment options. Resistance data from clinical trials have revealed important information on the patterns, prevalence, and effects of resistance seen among patients experiencing virologic failure. In recent years, the prevalence of some mutations such as M184V and Q151M has remained relatively constant, while the L74V mutation, the 69 insertions, and thymidine analogue mutations have decreased in prevalence. Other mutations such as K65R and Y115F, while still relatively uncommon, are increasing in prevalence. This increase may be due to the use of new treatment combinations that select for these mutations at a higher rate. Clinical trials suggest that new regimens containing TDF or ABC select for K65R and that this mutation is observed more frequently with TDF; in contrast, L74V is observed more frequently in ABC-containing regimens but is not commonly selected by TDF-containing regimens. Several lines of evidence are converging to suggest that the presence of zidovudine may decrease the risk of L74V and K65R in ABC- or TDF-containing regimens. This review summarizes the clinical implications of resistance profiles associated with new NRTI/NtRTI regimens in current use and in advanced clinical studies. PMID:15319668

  10. The nucleotide composition of the spacer sequence influences the expression yield of heterologously expressed genes in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Liebeton, Klaus; Lengefeld, Jette; Eck, Jürgen

    2014-12-10

    Bacillus subtilis is a commonly used host for the heterologous expression of genes in academia and industry. Many factors are known to influence the expression yield in this organism e.g. the complementarity between the Shine-Dalgarno sequence (SD) and the 16S-rRNA or secondary structures in the translation initiation region of the transcript. In this study, we analysed the impact of the nucleotide composition between the SD sequence and the start codon (the spacer sequence) on the expression yield. We demonstrated that a polyadenylate-moiety spacer sequence moderately increases the expression level of laccase CotA from B. subtilis. By screening a library of artificially generated spacer variants, we identified clones with greatly increased expression levels of two model enzymes, the laccase CotA from B. subtilis (11 fold) and the metagenome derived protease H149 (30 fold). Furthermore, we demonstrated that the effect of the spacer sequence is specific to the gene of interest. These results prove the high impact of the spacer sequence on the expression yield in B. subtilis. PMID:24997355

  11. East vergent structure of Backbone Range: Insights from A-Lan-Yi area and sandbox modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C. A.; Lu, C. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Southern Taiwan, including Pingtung peninsula and Taitung, is the incipient oblique collision zone of Eurasian plate and Philippine Sea plate. The Luzon volcanic arc converged toward Taiwan Island and formed Hengchun Ridge south offshore Taiwan. Thus, Taiwan mountain belt developed from north to south as the Backbone Range, so that we can infer the incipient feature structure from the topography and outcrop study of southern Taiwan. Our field survey of this study concentrated at the southeast coastline of Taiwan, also known as A-Lan-Yi Trail. According to previous study, the deformational structures such as faults and folds are consistent with regional kinematic processes, and the preserved transpression structure is the most important evidence of incipient collision. In this study, we use the sedimentary sequences of study area to trace the regional tectonics from north to south. Discovered structures in this area show the similar kinematic history as the eastern flank of Backbone Range, so that we suggest they are at the same series of a tectonic event. To complete the regional structure mapping in this accessible area, besides the field geological data, we also applied the LiDAR-derived DTM which is a 3D visualization technology to improve our topography information. In addition, we use the sandbox modeling to demonstrate the development of structures in the eastern flank of Backbone Range. After combining the results of field observation and regional structure mapping, this study provides a strong evidence of backthrusting and backfolding deformation during the incipient oblique collision stage.

  12. Peptide Amphiphile Nanofibers with Conjugated Polydiacetylene Backbones in Their Core

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Lorraine; Cvetanovich, Gregory L.; Stupp, Samuel I.

    2008-01-01

    The coupling of electronic and biological functionality through self-assembly is an interesting target in supramolecular chemistry. We report here on a set of diacetylene-derivatized peptide amphiphiles (PAs) that react to form conjugated polydiacetylene backbones following self-assembly into cylindrical nanofibers. The polymerization reaction yields highly conjugated backbones when the peptidic segment of the PAs has a linear, as opposed to a branched, architecture. Given the topotactic nature of the polymerization, these results suggest that a high degree of internal order exists in the supramolecular nanofibers formed by the linear PA. On the basis of microscopy, the formation of a polydiacetylene backbone to covalently connect the β-sheets that help form the fibers does not disrupt the fiber shape. Interestingly, we observe the appearance of a polydiacetylene (PDA) circular dichroism band at 547 nm in linear PA nanofibers suggesting the conjugated backbone in the core of the nanostructures is twisted. We believe this CD signal is due to chiral induction by the β-sheets, which are normally twisted in helical fashion. Heating and cooling shows simultaneous changes in β-sheet and conjugated backbone structure, indicating they are both correlated. At the same time, poor polymerization in nanofibers formed by branched PAs indicates that less internal order exists in these nanostructures and, as expected, then a circular dichroism signal is not observed for the conjugated backbone. The general variety of materials investigated here has the obvious potential to couple electronic properties and in vitro bioactivity. Furthermore, the polymerization of monomers in peptide amphiphile assemblies by a rigid conjugated backbone also leads to mechanical robustness and insolubility, two properties that may be important for the patterning of these materials at the cellular scale. PMID:18314978

  13. Characterizing the composition and evolution of homoeologous genomes in hexaploid wheat through BAC-end sequencing on chromosome 3B.

    PubMed

    Paux, Etienne; Roger, Delphine; Badaeva, Ekatherina; Gay, Georges; Bernard, Michel; Sourdille, Pierre; Feuillet, Catherine

    2006-11-01

    Bread wheat (Triticum aestivum) is one of the most important crops worldwide. However, because of its large, hexaploid, highly repetitive genome it is a challenge to develop efficient means for molecular analysis and genetic improvement in wheat. To better understand the composition and molecular evolution of the hexaploid wheat homoeologous genomes and to evaluate the potential of BAC-end sequences (BES) for marker development, we have followed a chromosome-specific strategy and generated 11 Mb of random BES from chromosome 3B, the largest chromosome of bread wheat. The sequence consisted of about 86% of repetitive elements, 1.2% of coding regions, and 13% remained unknown. With 1.2% of the sequence length corresponding to coding sequences, 6000 genes were estimated for chromosome 3B. New repetitive sequences were identified, including a Triticineae-specific tandem repeat (Fat) that represents 0.6% of the B-genome and has been differentially amplified in the homoeologous genomes before polyploidization. About 10% of the BES contained junctions between nested transposable elements that were used to develop chromosome-specific markers for physical and genetic mapping. Finally, sequence comparison with 2.9 Mb of random sequences from the D-genome of Aegilops tauschii suggested that the larger size of the B-genome is due to a higher content in repetitive elements. It also indicated which families of transposable elements are mostly responsible for differential expansion of the homoeologous wheat genomes during evolution. Our data demonstrate that BAC-end sequencing from flow-sorted chromosomes is a powerful tool for analysing the structure and evolution of polyploid and highly repetitive genomes. PMID:17010109

  14. A mapping of an ensemble of mitochondrial sequences for various organisms into 3D space based on the word composition.

    PubMed

    Aita, Takuyo; Nishigaki, Koichi

    2012-11-01

    To visualize a bird's-eye view of an ensemble of mitochondrial genome sequences for various species, we recently developed a novel method of mapping a biological sequence ensemble into Three-Dimensional (3D) vector space. First, we represented a biological sequence of a species s by a word-composition vector x(s), where its length [absolute value]x(s)[absolute value] represents the sequence length, and its unit vector x(s)/[absolute value]x(s)[absolute value] represents the relative composition of the K-tuple words through the sequence and the size of the dimension, N=4(K), is the number of all possible words with the length of K. Second, we mapped the vector x(s) to the 3D position vector y(s), based on the two following simple principles: (1) [absolute value]y(s)[absolute value]=[absolute value]x(s)[absolute value] and (2) the angle between y(s) and y(t) maximally correlates with the angle between x(s) and x(t). The mitochondrial genome sequences for 311 species, including 177 Animalia, 85 Fungi and 49 Green plants, were mapped into 3D space by using K=7. The mapping was successful because the angles between vectors before and after the mapping highly correlated with each other (correlation coefficients were 0.92-0.97). Interestingly, the Animalia kingdom is distributed along a single arc belt (just like the Milky Way on a Celestial Globe), and the Fungi and Green plant kingdoms are distributed in a similar arc belt. These two arc belts intersect at their respective middle regions and form a cross structure just like a jet aircraft fuselage and its wings. This new mapping method will allow researchers to intuitively interpret the visual information presented in the maps in a highly effective manner. PMID:22776549

  15. HIV-1 Phenotypic Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor Drug Resistance Test Interpretation Is Not Dependent on the Subtype of the Virus Backbone

    PubMed Central

    Bronze, Michelle; Steegen, Kim; Wallis, Carole L.; De Wolf, Hans; Papathanasopoulos, Maria A.; Van Houtte, Margriet; Stevens, Wendy S.; de Wit, Tobias Rinke; Stuyver, Lieven J.

    2012-01-01

    To date, the majority of HIV-1 phenotypic resistance testing has been performed with subtype B virus backbones (e.g. HXB2). However, the relevance of using this backbone to determine resistance in non-subtype B HIV-1 viruses still needs to be assessed. From 114 HIV-1 subtype C clinical samples (36 ARV-naïve, 78 ARV-exposed), pol amplicons were produced and analyzed for phenotypic resistance using both a subtype B- and C-backbone in which the pol fragment was deleted. Phenotypic resistance was assessed in resulting recombinant virus stocks (RVS) for a series of antiretroviral drugs (ARV's) and expressed as fold change (FC), yielding 1660 FC comparisons. These Antivirogram® derived FC values were categorized as having resistant or sensitive susceptibility based on biological cut-off values (BCOs). The concordance between resistance calls obtained for the same clinical sample but derived from two different backbones (i.e. B and C) accounted for 86.1% (1429/1660) of the FC comparisons. However, when taking the assay variability into account, 95.8% (1590/1660) of the phenotypic data could be considered as being concordant with respect to their resistance call. No difference in the capacity to detect resistance associated with M184V, K103N and V106M mutations was noted between the two backbones. The following was concluded: (i) A high level of concordance was shown between the two backbone phenotypic resistance profiles; (ii) Assay variability is largely responsible for discordant results (i.e. for FC values close to BCO); (iii) Confidence intervals should be given around the BCO's, when assessing resistance in HIV-1 subtype C; (iv) No systematic resistance under- or overcalling of subtype C amplicons in the B-backbone was observed; (v) Virus backbone subtype sequence variability outside the pol region does not contribute to phenotypic FC values. In conclusion the HXB2 virus backbone remains an acceptable vector for phenotyping HIV-1 subtype C pol amplicons. PMID

  16. Grid-Assembly: An oligonucleotide composition-based partitioning strategy to aid metagenomic sequence assembly.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Tarini Shankar; Mehra, Varun; Mande, Sharmila S

    2015-06-01

    Metagenomics approach involves extraction, sequencing and characterization of the genomic content of entire community of microbes present in a given environment. In contrast to genomic data, accurate assembly of metagenomic sequences is a challenging task. Given the huge volume and the diverse taxonomic origin of metagenomic sequences, direct application of single genome assembly methods on metagenomes are likely to not only lead to an immense increase in requirements of computational infrastructure, but also result in the formation of chimeric contigs. A strategy to address the above challenge would be to partition metagenomic sequence datasets into clusters and assemble separately the sequences in individual clusters using any single-genome assembly method. The current study presents such an approach that uses tetranucleotide usage patterns to first represent sequences as points in a three dimensional (3D) space. The 3D space is subsequently partitioned into "Grids". Sequences within overlapping grids are then progressively assembled using any available assembler. We demonstrate the applicability of the current Grid-Assembly method using various categories of assemblers as well as different simulated metagenomic datasets. Validation results indicate that the Grid-Assembly approach helps in improving the overall quality of assembly, in terms of the purity and volume of the assembled contigs. PMID:25790784

  17. A Consistent Phylogenetic Backbone for the Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Ebersberger, Ingo; de Matos Simoes, Ricardo; Kupczok, Anne; Gube, Matthias; Kothe, Erika; Voigt, Kerstin; von Haeseler, Arndt

    2012-01-01

    The kingdom of fungi provides model organisms for biotechnology, cell biology, genetics, and life sciences in general. Only when their phylogenetic relationships are stably resolved, can individual results from fungal research be integrated into a holistic picture of biology. However, and despite recent progress, many deep relationships within the fungi remain unclear. Here, we present the first phylogenomic study of an entire eukaryotic kingdom that uses a consistency criterion to strengthen phylogenetic conclusions. We reason that branches (splits) recovered with independent data and different tree reconstruction methods are likely to reflect true evolutionary relationships. Two complementary phylogenomic data sets based on 99 fungal genomes and 109 fungal expressed sequence tag (EST) sets analyzed with four different tree reconstruction methods shed light from different angles on the fungal tree of life. Eleven additional data sets address specifically the phylogenetic position of Blastocladiomycota, Ustilaginomycotina, and Dothideomycetes, respectively. The combined evidence from the resulting trees supports the deep-level stability of the fungal groups toward a comprehensive natural system of the fungi. In addition, our analysis reveals methodologically interesting aspects. Enrichment for EST encoded data—a common practice in phylogenomic analyses—introduces a strong bias toward slowly evolving and functionally correlated genes. Consequently, the generalization of phylogenomic data sets as collections of randomly selected genes cannot be taken for granted. A thorough characterization of the data to assess possible influences on the tree reconstruction should therefore become a standard in phylogenomic analyses. PMID:22114356

  18. A consistent phylogenetic backbone for the fungi.

    PubMed

    Ebersberger, Ingo; de Matos Simoes, Ricardo; Kupczok, Anne; Gube, Matthias; Kothe, Erika; Voigt, Kerstin; von Haeseler, Arndt

    2012-05-01

    The kingdom of fungi provides model organisms for biotechnology, cell biology, genetics, and life sciences in general. Only when their phylogenetic relationships are stably resolved, can individual results from fungal research be integrated into a holistic picture of biology. However, and despite recent progress, many deep relationships within the fungi remain unclear. Here, we present the first phylogenomic study of an entire eukaryotic kingdom that uses a consistency criterion to strengthen phylogenetic conclusions. We reason that branches (splits) recovered with independent data and different tree reconstruction methods are likely to reflect true evolutionary relationships. Two complementary phylogenomic data sets based on 99 fungal genomes and 109 fungal expressed sequence tag (EST) sets analyzed with four different tree reconstruction methods shed light from different angles on the fungal tree of life. Eleven additional data sets address specifically the phylogenetic position of Blastocladiomycota, Ustilaginomycotina, and Dothideomycetes, respectively. The combined evidence from the resulting trees supports the deep-level stability of the fungal groups toward a comprehensive natural system of the fungi. In addition, our analysis reveals methodologically interesting aspects. Enrichment for EST encoded data-a common practice in phylogenomic analyses-introduces a strong bias toward slowly evolving and functionally correlated genes. Consequently, the generalization of phylogenomic data sets as collections of randomly selected genes cannot be taken for granted. A thorough characterization of the data to assess possible influences on the tree reconstruction should therefore become a standard in phylogenomic analyses. PMID:22114356

  19. LARC-IA: A flexible backbone polyimide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Progar, Donald J.; Stclair, Terry L.

    1990-01-01

    A new linear, aromatic, thermoplastic polyimide, prepared from oxydiphthalic anhydride (ODPA) and 3,4'-oxydianiline (ODA) in diglyme and identified as LARC-IA, was synthesized and evaluated. The monomers are relatively inexpensive and physiologically safe. Molecular weight was controlled by use of a monofunctional anhydride, phthalic anhydride (PA), in order to promote controlled flow and wetting properties. The polymer is considered a safe alternative to commercially available LARC-TPI which is prepared with an expensive diamine of uncertain carcinogenicity. The evaluation was based primarily on the polymer's adhesive properties as determined by thermal and water boil exposure of lap shear specimens. Strengths were determined at room temperature, 177, 204 and 232 C before and after exposure to determine the adhesive system's durability to adverse environments over a period of time. Other properties (FWT, G(1c), film and composite properties) were examined which were determined to be typical of a high temperature polyimide. Results of the study show a favorable comparison to LARC-TPI, a commercially available polyimide.

  20. Sequence-based Association Analysis Reveals an MGST1 eQTL with Pleiotropic Effects on Bovine Milk Composition.

    PubMed

    Littlejohn, Mathew D; Tiplady, Kathryn; Fink, Tania A; Lehnert, Klaus; Lopdell, Thomas; Johnson, Thomas; Couldrey, Christine; Keehan, Mike; Sherlock, Richard G; Harland, Chad; Scott, Andrew; Snell, Russell G; Davis, Stephen R; Spelman, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    The mammary gland is a prolific lipogenic organ, synthesising copious amounts of triglycerides for secretion into milk. The fat content of milk varies widely both between and within species, and recent independent genome-wide association studies have highlighted a milk fat percentage quantitative trait locus (QTL) of large effect on bovine chromosome 5. Although both EPS8 and MGST1 have been proposed to underlie these signals, the causative status of these genes has not been functionally confirmed. To investigate this QTL in detail, we report genome sequence-based imputation and association mapping in a population of 64,244 taurine cattle. This analysis reveals a cluster of 17 non-coding variants spanning MGST1 that are highly associated with milk fat percentage, and a range of other milk composition traits. Further, we exploit a high-depth mammary RNA sequence dataset to conduct expression QTL (eQTL) mapping in 375 lactating cows, revealing a strong MGST1 eQTL underpinning these effects. These data demonstrate the utility of DNA and RNA sequence-based association mapping, and implicate MGST1, a gene with no obvious mechanistic relationship to milk composition regulation, as causally involved in these processes. PMID:27146958

  1. Sequence-based Association Analysis Reveals an MGST1 eQTL with Pleiotropic Effects on Bovine Milk Composition

    PubMed Central

    Littlejohn, Mathew D.; Tiplady, Kathryn; Fink, Tania A.; Lehnert, Klaus; Lopdell, Thomas; Johnson, Thomas; Couldrey, Christine; Keehan, Mike; Sherlock, Richard G.; Harland, Chad; Scott, Andrew; Snell, Russell G.; Davis, Stephen R.; Spelman, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    The mammary gland is a prolific lipogenic organ, synthesising copious amounts of triglycerides for secretion into milk. The fat content of milk varies widely both between and within species, and recent independent genome-wide association studies have highlighted a milk fat percentage quantitative trait locus (QTL) of large effect on bovine chromosome 5. Although both EPS8 and MGST1 have been proposed to underlie these signals, the causative status of these genes has not been functionally confirmed. To investigate this QTL in detail, we report genome sequence-based imputation and association mapping in a population of 64,244 taurine cattle. This analysis reveals a cluster of 17 non-coding variants spanning MGST1 that are highly associated with milk fat percentage, and a range of other milk composition traits. Further, we exploit a high-depth mammary RNA sequence dataset to conduct expression QTL (eQTL) mapping in 375 lactating cows, revealing a strong MGST1 eQTL underpinning these effects. These data demonstrate the utility of DNA and RNA sequence-based association mapping, and implicate MGST1, a gene with no obvious mechanistic relationship to milk composition regulation, as causally involved in these processes. PMID:27146958

  2. Effect of lipid composition and amino acid sequence upon transmembrane peptide-accelerated lipid transleaflet diffusion (flip-flop).

    PubMed

    LeBarron, Jamie; London, Erwin

    2016-08-01

    We examined how hydrophobic peptide-accelerated transleaflet lipid movement (flip-flop) was affected by peptide sequence and vesicle composition and properties. A peptide with a completely hydrophobic sequence had little if any effect upon flip-flop. While peptides with a somewhat less hydrophobic sequence accelerated flip-flop, the half-time remained slow (hours) with substantial (0.5mol%) peptide in the membranes. It appears that peptide-accelerated lipid flip-flop involves a rare event that may reflect a rare state of the peptide or lipid bilayer. There was no simple relationship between peptide overall hydrophobicity and flip-flop. In addition, flip-flop was not closely linked to whether the peptides were in a transmembrane or non-transmembrane (interfacial) inserted state. Flip-flop was also not associated with peptide-induced pore formation. We found that peptide-accelerated flip-flop is initially faster in small (highly curved) unilamellar vesicles relative to that in large unilamellar vesicles. Peptide-accelerated flip-flop was also affected by lipid composition, being slowed in vesicles with thick bilayers or those containing 30% cholesterol. Interestingly, these factors also slow spontaneous lipid flip-flop in the absence of peptide. Combined with previous studies, the results are most consistent with acceleration of lipid flip-flop by peptide-induced thinning of bilayer width. PMID:27131444

  3. Static magnetoelectric and magnetoelastic response of composite cantilevers: Theory of short vs. open circuit operation and layer sequence effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krantz, Matthias C.; Gugat, Jascha L.; Gerken, Martina

    2015-11-01

    The static bending-mode transverse magnetoelectric effect and the magnetic field-induced bending response of composite cantilevers with thin magnetostrictive (MS), piezoelectric (PE), and substrate (Sub) layers is investigated for the PE layer subjected to open and short circuit conditions. Analytic theories are presented for strain-coupled three layer composites of PE, MS, and Sub layers in all layer sequences. We use constitutive equations with linear coupling of stress, strain, H, E, and D fields and present results for the open and short circuit magnetoelectric and bending responses for arbitrary layer thickness ratios for the FeCoBSi-AlN-Si materials system. Besides a rich sequence dependent behavior the theory predicts great and systematic differences between the open and short circuit magnetoelectric response yielding maxima at similar MS and PE layer thicknesses in the open circuit and near vanishing PE layer thicknesses in the short circuit cases. In contrast, the open vs. short circuit bending response differences are pronounced but much smaller. Layer sequence systematics and implications for static H-field sensors will be discussed.

  4. Development of a Backbone Cyclic Peptide Library as Potential Antiparasitic Therapeutics Using Microwave Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Qvit, Nir; Kornfeld, Opher S

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are intimately involved in almost all biological processes and are linked to many human diseases. Therefore, there is a major effort to target PPIs in basic research and in the pharmaceutical industry. Protein-protein interfaces are usually large, flat, and often lack pockets, complicating the discovery of small molecules that target such sites. Alternative targeting approaches using antibodies have limitations due to poor oral bioavailability, low cell-permeability, and production inefficiency. Using peptides to target PPI interfaces has several advantages. Peptides have higher conformational flexibility, increased selectivity, and are generally inexpensive. However, peptides have their own limitations including poor stability and inefficiency crossing cell membranes. To overcome such limitations, peptide cyclization can be performed. Cyclization has been demonstrated to improve peptide selectivity, metabolic stability, and bioavailability. However, predicting the bioactive conformation of a cyclic peptide is not trivial. To overcome this challenge, one attractive approach it to screen a focused library to screen in which all backbone cyclic peptides have the same primary sequence, but differ in parameters that influence their conformation, such as ring size and position. We describe a detailed protocol for synthesizing a library of backbone cyclic peptides targeting specific parasite PPIs. Using a rational design approach, we developed peptides derived from the scaffold protein Leishmania receptor for activated C-kinase (LACK). We hypothesized that sequences in LACK that are conserved in parasites, but not in the mammalian host homolog, may represent interaction sites for proteins that are critical for the parasites' viability. The cyclic peptides were synthesized using microwave irradiation to reduce reaction times and increase efficiency. Developing a library of backbone cyclic peptides with different ring sizes facilitates a

  5. Polyarylether composition and membrane

    DOEpatents

    Hung, Joyce; Brunelle, Daniel Joseph; Harmon, Marianne Elisabeth; Moore, David Roger; Stone, Joshua James; Zhou, Hongyi; Suriano, Joseph Anthony

    2010-11-09

    A composition including a polyarylether copolymer is provided. The copolymer includes a polyarylether backbone; and a sulfonated oligomeric group bonded to the polyarylether suitable for use as a cation conducting membrane. Method of bonding a sulfonated oligomeric group to the polyarylether backbone to form a polyarylether copolymer. The membrane may be formed from the polyarylether copolymer composition. The chain length of the sulfonated oligomeric group may be controlled to affect or control the ion conductivity of the membrane.

  6. Apollo 17 petrology and experimental determination of differentiation sequences in model moon compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, F. N.; Kushiro, I.

    1974-01-01

    Experimental studies of model moon compositions are discussed, taking into account questions related to the differentiation of the outer layer of the moon. Phase relations for a series of proposed lunar compositions have been determined and a petrographic and electron microprobe study was conducted on four Apollo 17 samples. Two of the samples consist of high-titanium mare basalts, one includes crushed anorthosite and gabbro, and another contains blue-gray breccia.

  7. BAC-end sequences analysis provides first insights into coffee (Coffea canephora P.) genome composition and evolution.

    PubMed

    Dereeper, Alexis; Guyot, Romain; Tranchant-Dubreuil, Christine; Anthony, François; Argout, Xavier; de Bellis, Fabien; Combes, Marie-Christine; Gavory, Frederick; de Kochko, Alexandre; Kudrna, Dave; Leroy, Thierry; Poulain, Julie; Rondeau, Myriam; Song, Xiang; Wing, Rod; Lashermes, Philippe

    2013-10-01

    Coffee is one of the world's most important agricultural commodities. Coffee belongs to the Rubiaceae family in the euasterid I clade of dicotyledonous plants, to which the Solanaceae family also belongs. Two bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) libraries of a homozygous doubled haploid plant of Coffea canephora were constructed using two enzymes, HindIII and BstYI. A total of 134,827 high quality BAC-end sequences (BESs) were generated from the 73,728 clones of the two libraries, and 131,412 BESs were conserved for further analysis after elimination of chloroplast and mitochondrial sequences. This corresponded to almost 13 % of the estimated size of the C. canephora genome. 6.7 % of BESs contained simple sequence repeats, the most abundant (47.8 %) being mononucleotide motifs. These sequences allow the development of numerous useful marker sites. Potential transposable elements (TEs) represented 11.9 % of the full length BESs. A difference was observed between the BstYI and HindIII libraries (14.9 vs. 8.8 %). Analysis of BESs against known coding sequences of TEs indicated that 11.9 % of the genome corresponded to known repeat sequences, like for other flowering plants. The number of genes in the coffee genome was estimated at 41,973 which is probably overestimated. Comparative genome mapping revealed that microsynteny was higher between coffee and grapevine than between coffee and tomato or Arabidopsis. BESs constitute valuable resources for the first genome wide survey of coffee and provide new insights into the composition and evolution of the coffee genome. PMID:23708951

  8. Sequence stratigraphy and composition of late quaternary shelf-margin deltas, Northern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Morton, R.A.; Suter, J.R.

    1996-04-01

    High-resolution seismic profiles and foundation borings from the northwestern Gulf of Mexico record the physical attributes and depositional histories of several late Quaternary sequences that were deposited by wave-modified, river-dominated shelf-margin deltas during successive periods of lowered sea level. Each progressively younger deltaic sequence is thinner and exhibits a systematic decrease in the abundance and concentration of sand, which is attributed to a shift in the axes of trunk streams and greater structural influence through time. Our study shows that (1) contemporaneous structural deformation controlled the thickness of each sequence, the oblique directions of delta progradation, the axes of major fluvial channels, and the geometries of delta lobes at the shelf margin; (2) sedimentation was rapid in response to rapid eustatic fluctuations and structural influence; (3) boundaries of these high-frequency sequences are the correlative conformities of updip fluvial incision and coincide with downlap surfaces at the shelf margin; (4) the downlap surfaces are not true surfaces, but zones of parallel reflections that become progressively higher and younger in the direction of progradation; (5) the downlap zones are composed of marine muds that do not contain the high concentrations of shell debris expected in condensed sections; (6) possible paleosols capping the two oldest sequences are regressive surfaces of subaerial exposure that were preserved during transgressions; and (7) no incised valleys or submarine canyons breach the paleoshelf margin, even though incised drainages were present updip and sea level curves indicate several periods of rapid fall.

  9. Using Chou's pseudo amino acid composition to predict protein quaternary structure: a sequence-segmented PseAAC approach.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shao-Wu; Chen, Wei; Yang, Feng; Pan, Quan

    2008-10-01

    In the protein universe, many proteins are composed of two or more polypeptide chains, generally referred to as subunits, which associate through noncovalent interactions and, occasionally, disulfide bonds to form protein quaternary structures. It has long been known that the functions of proteins are closely related to their quaternary structures; some examples include enzymes, hemoglobin, DNA polymerase, and ion channels. However, it is extremely labor-expensive and even impossible to quickly determine the structures of hundreds of thousands of protein sequences solely from experiments. Since the number of protein sequences entering databanks is increasing rapidly, it is highly desirable to develop computational methods for classifying the quaternary structures of proteins from their primary sequences. Since the concept of Chou's pseudo amino acid composition (PseAAC) was introduced, a variety of approaches, such as residue conservation scores, von Neumann entropy, multiscale energy, autocorrelation function, moment descriptors, and cellular automata, have been utilized to formulate the PseAAC for predicting different attributes of proteins. Here, in a different approach, a sequence-segmented PseAAC is introduced to represent protein samples. Meanwhile, multiclass SVM classifier modules were adopted to classify protein quaternary structures. As a demonstration, the dataset constructed by Chou and Cai [(2003) Proteins 53:282-289] was adopted as a benchmark dataset. The overall jackknife success rates thus obtained were 88.2-89.1%, indicating that the new approach is quite promising for predicting protein quaternary structure. PMID:18427713

  10. Palynological composition of a Lower Cretaceous South American tropical sequence: Climatic implications and diversity comparisons with other latitudes.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mejia-Velasquez, Paula J.; Dilcher, David L.; Jaramillo, Carlos A.; Fortini, Lucas B.; Manchester, Steven R.

    2012-01-01

    Premise of the study: Reconstruction of floristic patterns during the early diversification of angiosperms is impeded by the scarce fossil record, especially in tropical latitudes. Here we collected quantitative palynological data from a stratigraphic sequence in tropical South America to provide floristic and climatic insights into such tropical environments during the Early Cretaceous. Methods: We reconstructed the floristic composition of an Aptian-Albian tropical sequence from central Colombia using quantitative palynology (rarefied species richness and abundance) and used it to infer its predominant climatic conditions. Additionally, we compared our results with available quantitative data from three other sequences encompassing 70 floristic assemblages to determine latitudinal diversity patterns. Key results: Abundance of humidity indicators was higher than that of aridity indicators (61% vs. 10%). Additionally, we found an angiosperm latitudinal diversity gradient (LDG) for the Aptian, but not for the Albian, and an inverted LDG of the overall diversity for the Albian. Angiosperm species turnover during the Albian, however, was higher in humid tropics. Conclusions: There were humid climates in northwestern South America during the Aptian-Albian interval contrary to the widespread aridity expected for the tropical belt. The Albian inverted overall LDG is produced by a faster increase in per-sample angiosperm and pteridophyte diversity in temperate latitudes. However, humid tropical sequences had higher rates of floristic turnover suggesting a higher degree of morphological variation than in temperate regions.

  11. Microbial Community Composition in the Marine Sediments of Jeju Island: Next-Generation Sequencing Surveys.

    PubMed

    Choi, Heebok; Koh, Hyeon-Woo; Kim, Hongik; Chae, Jong-Chan; Park, Soo-Je

    2016-05-28

    Marine sediments are a microbial biosphere with an unknown physiology, and the sediments harbor numerous distinct phylogenetic lineages of Bacteria and Archaea that are at present uncultured. In this study, the structure of the archaeal and bacterial communities was investigated in the surface and subsurface sediments of Jeju Island using a next-generation sequencing method. The microbial communities in the surface sediments were distinct from those in the subsurface sediments; the relative abundance of sequences for Thaumarchaeota, Actinobacteria, Bacteroides, Alphaproteobacteria, and Gammaproteobacteria were higher in the surface than subsurface sediments, whereas the sequences for Euryarchaeota, Acidobacteria, Firmicutes, and Deltaproteobacteria were relatively more abundant in the subsurface than surface sediments. This study presents detailed characterization of the spatial distribution of benthic microbial communities of Jeju Island and provides fundamental information on the potential interactions mediated by microorganisms with the different biogeochemical cycles in coastal sediments. PMID:26869600

  12. Utilizing sequence intrinsic composition to classify protein-coding and long non-coding transcripts.

    PubMed

    Sun, Liang; Luo, Haitao; Bu, Dechao; Zhao, Guoguang; Yu, Kuntao; Zhang, Changhai; Liu, Yuanning; Chen, Runsheng; Zhao, Yi

    2013-09-01

    It is a challenge to classify protein-coding or non-coding transcripts, especially those re-constructed from high-throughput sequencing data of poorly annotated species. This study developed and evaluated a powerful signature tool, Coding-Non-Coding Index (CNCI), by profiling adjoining nucleotide triplets to effectively distinguish protein-coding and non-coding sequences independent of known annotations. CNCI is effective for classifying incomplete transcripts and sense-antisense pairs. The implementation of CNCI offered highly accurate classification of transcripts assembled from whole-transcriptome sequencing data in a cross-species manner, that demonstrated gene evolutionary divergence between vertebrates, and invertebrates, or between plants, and provided a long non-coding RNA catalog of orangutan. CNCI software is available at http://www.bioinfo.org/software/cnci. PMID:23892401

  13. A fractographic investigation of the influence of stacking sequence on the strength of notched laminated composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Charles E.; Morris, Don H.

    1987-01-01

    The fracture behavior of T300/5208 CFRP laminate panels with 12 different combinations of ply orientation and stacking sequence is investigated experimentally, using optical microscopy, SEM, and X-ray radiography to characterize the notch-tip damage zones and fracture surfaces of center-cracked tension specimens subjected to tensile loading at constant crosshead displacement rate 20 micron/s. The results are presented graphically and analyzed in detail. Significant differences in notched strength are found for different ply fiber orientations and stacking sequences; the laminates with few major delaminations had a greater percentage of fracture due to broken fibers and also higher notched strength.

  14. Reduced dimensionality (4,3)D-hnCOCANH experiment: an efficient backbone assignment tool for NMR studies of proteins.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Dinesh

    2013-09-01

    Sequence specific resonance assignment of proteins forms the basis for variety of structural and functional proteomics studies by NMR. In this context, an efficient standalone method for rapid assignment of backbone ((1)H, (15)N, (13)C(α) and (13)C') resonances of proteins has been presented here. Compared to currently available strategies used for the purpose, the method employs only a single reduced dimensionality experiment--(4,3)D-hnCOCANH and exploits the linear combinations of backbone ((13)C(α) and (13)C') chemical shifts to achieve a dispersion relatively better compared to those of individual chemical shifts (see the text). The resulted increased dispersion of peaks--which is different in sum (CA + CO) and difference (CA - CO) frequency regions--greatly facilitates the analysis of the spectrum by resolving the problems (associated with routine assignment strategies) arising because of degenerate amide (15)N and backbone (13)C chemical shifts. Further, the spectrum provides direct distinction between intra- and inter-residue correlations because of their opposite peak signs. The other beneficial feature of the spectrum is that it provides: (a) multiple unidirectional sequential (i→i + 1) (15)N and (13)C correlations and (b) facile identification of certain specific triplet sequences which serve as check points for mapping the stretches of sequentially connected HSQC cross peaks on to the primary sequence for assigning the resonances sequence specifically. On top of all this, the F₂-F₃ planes of the spectrum corresponding to sum (CA + CO) and difference (CA - CO) chemical shifts enable rapid and unambiguous identification of sequential HSQC peaks through matching their coordinates in these two planes (see the text). Overall, the experiment presented here will serve as an important backbone assignment tool for variety of structural and functional proteomics and drug discovery research programs by NMR involving well behaved small folded proteins (MW

  15. The effect of chirality and steric hindrance on intrinsic backbone conformational propensities: tools for protein design.

    PubMed

    Childers, Matthew Carter; Towse, Clare-Louise; Daggett, Valerie

    2016-07-01

    The conformational propensities of amino acids are an amalgamation of sequence effects, environmental effects and underlying intrinsic behavior. Many have attempted to investigate neighboring residue effects to aid in our understanding of protein folding and improve structure prediction efforts, especially with respect to difficult to characterize states, such as disordered or unfolded states. Host-guest peptide series are a useful tool in examining the propensities of the amino acids free from the surrounding protein structure. Here, we compare the distributions of the backbone dihedral angles (φ/ψ) of the 20 proteogenic amino acids in two different sequence contexts using the AAXAA and GGXGG host-guest pentapeptide series. We further examine their intrinsic behaviors across three environmental contexts: water at 298 K, water at 498 K, and 8 M urea at 298 K. The GGXGG systems provide the intrinsic amino acid propensities devoid of any conformational context. The alanine residues in the AAXAA series enforce backbone chirality, thereby providing a model of the intrinsic behavior of amino acids in a protein chain. Our results show modest differences in φ/ψ distributions due to the steric constraints of the Ala side chains, the magnitudes of which are dependent on the denaturing conditions. One of the strongest factors modulating φ/ψ distributions was the protonation of titratable side chains, and the largest differences observed were in the amino acid propensities for the rarely sampled αL region. PMID:27284086

  16. Increasing protein production by directed vector backbone evolution

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant protein production in prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms was a key enabling technology for the rapid development of industrial and molecular biotechnology. However, despite all progress the improvement of protein production is an ongoing challenge and of high importance for cost-effective enzyme production. With the epMEGAWHOP mutagenesis protocol for vector backbone optimization we report a novel directed evolution based approach to increase protein production levels by randomly introducing mutations in the vector backbone. In the current study we validate the epMEGAWHOP mutagenesis protocol for three different expression systems. The latter demonstrated the general applicability of the epMEGAWHOP method. Cellulase and lipase production was doubled in one round of directed evolution by random mutagenesis of pET28a(+) and pET22b(+) vector backbones. Protease production using the vector pHY300PLK was increased ~4-times with an average of ~1.25 mutations per kb vector backbone. The epMEGAWHOP does not require any rational understanding of the expression machinery and can generally be applied to enzymes, expression vectors and related hosts. epMEGAWHOP is therefore from our point of view a robust, rapid and straight forward alternative for increasing protein production in general and for biotechnological applications. PMID:23890095

  17. The Graphical Representation of the Digital Astronaut Physiology Backbone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briers, Demarcus

    2010-01-01

    This report summarizes my internship project with the NASA Digital Astronaut Project to analyze the Digital Astronaut (DA) physiology backbone model. The Digital Astronaut Project (DAP) applies integrated physiology models to support space biomedical operations, and to assist NASA researchers in closing knowledge gaps related to human physiologic responses to space flight. The DA physiology backbone is a set of integrated physiological equations and functions that model the interacting systems of the human body. The current release of the model is HumMod (Human Model) version 1.5 and was developed over forty years at the University of Mississippi Medical Center (UMMC). The physiology equations and functions are scripted in an XML schema specifically designed for physiology modeling by Dr. Thomas G. Coleman at UMMC. Currently it is difficult to examine the physiology backbone without being knowledgeable of the XML schema. While investigating and documenting the tags and algorithms used in the XML schema, I proposed a standard methodology for a graphical representation. This standard methodology may be used to transcribe graphical representations from the DA physiology backbone. In turn, the graphical representations can allow examination of the physiological functions and equations without the need to be familiar with the computer programming languages or markup languages used by DA modeling software.

  18. Determination of backbone chain direction of PDA using FFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Sadaharu; Okamoto, Kentaro; Takenaga, Mitsuru

    2010-01-01

    The effect of backbone chains on friction force was investigated on both Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films of 10,12-heptacosadiynoic acid and the (0 1 0) surfaces of single crystals of 2,4-hexadiene-1,6-diol using friction force microscopy (FFM). It was observed that friction force decreased when the scanning direction was parallel to the [0 0 1] direction in both samples. Moreover, friction force decreased when the scanning direction was parallel to the crystallographic [1 0 2], [1 0 1], [1 0 0] and [1 0 1¯] directions in only the single crystals. For the LB films, the [0 0 1] direction corresponds to the backbone chain direction of 10,12-heptacosadiynoic acid. For the single crystals, both the [0 0 1] and [1 0 1] directions correspond to the backbone chain direction, and the [1 0 2], [1 0 0] and [1 0 1¯] directions correspond to the low-index crystallographic direction. In both the LB films and single crystals, the friction force was minimized when the directions of scanning and the backbone chain were parallel.

  19. Cooperative UAV-Based Communications Backbone for Sensor Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, R S

    2001-10-07

    The objective of this project is to investigate the use of unmanned air vehicles (UAVs) as mobile, adaptive communications backbones for ground-based sensor networks. In this type of network, the UAVs provide communication connectivity to sensors that cannot communicate with each other because of terrain, distance, or other geographical constraints. In these situations, UAVs provide a vertical communication path for the sensors, thereby mitigating geographic obstacles often imposed on networks. With the proper use of UAVs, connectivity to a widely disbursed sensor network in rugged terrain is readily achieved. Our investigation has focused on networks where multiple cooperating UAVs are used to form a network backbone. The advantage of using multiple UAVs to form the network backbone is parallelization of sensor connectivity. Many widely spaced or isolated sensors can be connected to the network at once using this approach. In these networks, the UAVs logically partition the sensor network into sub-networks (subnets), with one UAV assigned per subnet. Partitioning the network into subnets allows the UAVs to service sensors in parallel thereby decreasing the sensor-to-network connectivity. A UAV services sensors in its subnet by flying a route (path) through the subnet, uplinking data collected by the sensors, and forwarding the data to a ground station. An additional advantage of using multiple UAVs in the network is that they provide redundancy in the communications backbone, so that the failure of a single UAV does not necessarily imply the loss of the network.

  20. Backbone Additivity in the Transfer Model of Protein Solvation

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Char Y.; Kokubo, Hironori; Lynch, Gillian C.; Bolen, D Wayne; Pettitt, Bernard M.

    2010-05-01

    The transfer model implying additivity of the peptide backbone free energy of transfer is computationally tested. Molecular dynamics simulations are used to determine the extent of change in transfer free energy (ΔGtr) with increase in chain length of oligoglycine with capped end groups. Solvation free energies of oligoglycine models of varying lengths in pure water and in the osmolyte solutions, 2M urea and 2M trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), were calculated from simulations of all atom models, and ΔGtr values for peptide backbone transfer from water to the osmolyte solutions were determined. The results show that the transfer free energies change linearly with increasing chain length, demonstrating the principle of additivity, and provide values in reasonable agreement with experiment. The peptide backbone transfer free energy contributions arise from van der Waals interactions in the case of transfer to urea, but from electrostatics on transfer to TMAO solution. The simulations used here allow for the calculation of the solvation and transfer free energy of longer oligoglycine models to be evaluated than is currently possible through experiment. The peptide backbone unit computed transfer free energy of –54 cal/mol/Mcompares quite favorably with –43 cal/mol/M determined experimentally.

  1. Impact of template backbone heterogeneity on RNA polymerase II transcription

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Liang; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Lu; Chong, Jenny; Huang, Xuhui; Wang, Dong

    2015-01-01

    Variations in the sugar component (ribose or deoxyribose) and the nature of the phosphodiester linkage (3′-5′ or 2′-5′ orientation) have been a challenge for genetic information transfer from the very beginning of evolution. RNA polymerase II (pol II) governs the transcription of DNA into precursor mRNA in all eukaryotic cells. How pol II recognizes DNA template backbone (phosphodiester linkage and sugar) and whether it tolerates the backbone heterogeneity remain elusive. Such knowledge is not only important for elucidating the chemical basis of transcriptional fidelity but also provides new insights into molecular evolution. In this study, we systematically and quantitatively investigated pol II transcriptional behaviors through different template backbone variants. We revealed that pol II can well tolerate and bypass sugar heterogeneity sites at the template but stalls at phosphodiester linkage heterogeneity sites. The distinct impacts of these two backbone components on pol II transcription reveal the molecular basis of template recognition during pol II transcription and provide the evolutionary insight from the RNA world to the contemporary ‘imperfect’ DNA world. In addition, our results also reveal the transcriptional consequences from ribose-containing genomic DNA. PMID:25662224

  2. Protein-Backbone Thermodynamics across the Membrane Interface.

    PubMed

    Bereau, Tristan; Kremer, Kurt

    2016-07-01

    The thermodynamics of insertion of a protein in a membrane depends on the fine interplay between backbone and side-chain contributions interacting with the lipid environment. Using computer simulations, we probe how different descriptions of the backbone glycyl unit affect the thermodynamics of insertion of individual residues, dipeptides, and entire transmembrane helices. Due to the lack of reference data, we first introduce an efficient methodology to estimate atomistic potential of mean force (PMF) curves from a series of representative and uncorrelated coarse-grained (CG) snapshots. We find strong discrepancies between two CG models, Martini and PLUM, against reference atomistic PMFs and experiments. Atomistic simulations suggest a weak free energy of insertion between water and a POPC membrane for the glycyl unit, in overall agreement with experimental results despite severe assumptions in our calculations. We show that refining the backbone contribution in PLUM significantly improves the PMF of insertion of the WALP16 transmembrane peptide. An improper balance between the glycyl backbone and the attached side chain will lead to energetic artifacts, rationalizing Martini's overstabilization of WALP's adsorbed interfacial state. It illustrates difficulties associated with free-energy-based parametrizations of single-residue models, as the relevant free energy of partitioning used for force-field parametrization does not arise from the entire residue but rather the solvent-accessible chemical groups. PMID:27138459

  3. Backbone additivity in the transfer model of protein solvation

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Char Y; Kokubo, Hironori; Lynch, Gillian C; Bolen, D Wayne; Pettitt, B Montgomery

    2010-01-01

    The transfer model implying additivity of the peptide backbone free energy of transfer is computationally tested. Molecular dynamics simulations are used to determine the extent of change in transfer free energy (ΔGtr) with increase in chain length of oligoglycine with capped end groups. Solvation free energies of oligoglycine models of varying lengths in pure water and in the osmolyte solutions, 2M urea and 2M trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), were calculated from simulations of all atom models, and ΔGtr values for peptide backbone transfer from water to the osmolyte solutions were determined. The results show that the transfer free energies change linearly with increasing chain length, demonstrating the principle of additivity, and provide values in reasonable agreement with experiment. The peptide backbone transfer free energy contributions arise from van der Waals interactions in the case of transfer to urea, but from electrostatics on transfer to TMAO solution. The simulations used here allow for the calculation of the solvation and transfer free energy of longer oligoglycine models to be evaluated than is currently possible through experiment. The peptide backbone unit computed transfer free energy of −54 cal/mol/M compares quite favorably with −43 cal/mol/M determined experimentally. PMID:20306490

  4. A Multi-Objective Approach for Protein Structure Prediction Based on an Energy Model and Backbone Angle Preferences

    PubMed Central

    Tsay, Jyh-Jong; Su, Shih-Chieh; Yu, Chin-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Protein structure prediction (PSP) is concerned with the prediction of protein tertiary structure from primary structure and is a challenging calculation problem. After decades of research effort, numerous solutions have been proposed for optimisation methods based on energy models. However, further investigation and improvement is still needed to increase the accuracy and similarity of structures. This study presents a novel backbone angle preference factor, which is one of the factors inducing protein folding. The proposed multiobjective optimisation approach simultaneously considers energy models and backbone angle preferences to solve the ab initio PSP. To prove the effectiveness of the multiobjective optimisation approach based on the energy models and backbone angle preferences, 75 amino acid sequences with lengths ranging from 22 to 88 amino acids were selected from the CB513 data set to be the benchmarks. The data sets were highly dissimilar, therefore indicating that they are meaningful. The experimental results showed that the root-mean-square deviation (RMSD) of the multiobjective optimization approach based on energy model and backbone angle preferences was superior to those of typical energy models, indicating that the proposed approach can facilitate the ab initio PSP. PMID:26151847

  5. Elevated nutrients change bacterial community composition and connectivity: high throughput sequencing of young marine biofilms.

    PubMed

    Lawes, Jasmin C; Neilan, Brett A; Brown, Mark V; Clark, Graeme F; Johnston, Emma L

    2016-01-01

    Biofilms are integral to many marine processes but their formation and function may be affected by anthropogenic inputs that alter environmental conditions, including fertilisers that increase nutrients. Density composition and connectivity of biofilms developed in situ (under ambient and elevated nutrients) were compared using 454-pyrosequencing of the 16S gene. Elevated nutrients shifted community composition from bacteria involved in higher processes (eg Pseudoalteromonas spp. invertebrate recruitment) towards more nutrient-tolerant bacterial species (eg Terendinibacter sp.). This may enable the persistence of biofilm communities by increasing resistance to nutrient inputs. A core biofilm microbiome was identified (predominantly Alteromonadales and Oceanospirillales) and revealed shifts in abundances of core microbes that could indicate enrichment by fertilisers. Fertiliser decreased density and connectivity within biofilms indicating that associations were disrupted perhaps via changes to energetic allocations within the core microbiome. Density composition and connectivity changes suggest nutrients can affect the stability and function of these important marine communities. PMID:26751559

  6. Assignment of protein backbone resonances using connectivity, torsion angles and 13Calpha chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Morris, Laura C; Valafar, Homayoun; Prestegard, James H

    2004-05-01

    A program is presented which will return the most probable sequence location for a short connected set of residues in a protein given just (13)C(alpha) chemical shifts (delta((13)C(alpha))) and data restricting the phi and psi backbone angles. Data taken from both the BioMagResBank and the Protein Data Bank were used to create a probability density function (PDF) using a multivariate normal distribution in delta((13)C(alpha)), phi, and psi space for each amino acid residue. Extracting and combining probabilities for particular amino acid residues in a short proposed sequence yields a score indicative of the correctness of the proposed assignment. The program is illustrated using several proteins for which structure and (13)C(alpha) chemical shift data are available. PMID:15017135

  7. Triazole linkages and backbone branches in nucleic acids for biological and extra-biological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paredes, Eduardo

    well-defined architectures based solely on DNA. While backbone branched DNAs are useful for nanotechnological applications, backbone branches in RNA occur in nature and are involved in the distinct but related processes of splicing, debranching and RNAi. Therefore we have developed protocols for the synthesis of backbone branched nucleic acids in the solid-phase using photoprotecting groups. Using the synthesized backbone branched RNAs we have uncovered a specific substrate requirement of debranching enzyme which distinguishes it from other homologous proteins with alternative functions. Finally, through the marriage of click chemistry and backbone branches, we have produced useful progeny in the synthesis of lariat RNAs. We investigated the potential of these lariats as therapeutic agents by synthesizing siRNA sequences as lariats. We showed that these lariats are efficiently debranched by debranching enzyme and are able to induce an RNAi response in vivo. Altogether, the development of click chemistry and backbone branched nucleic acids represents a significant advantage in the ability to modify nucleic acid structure and affect its function. I envision that these methods can become generally useful to probe nucleic acid systems, useful nanomaterials and functional effectors in nucleic acid based therapies.

  8. RNA backbone: consensus all-angle conformers and modular string nomenclature (an RNA Ontology Consortium contribution).

    PubMed

    Richardson, Jane S; Schneider, Bohdan; Murray, Laura W; Kapral, Gary J; Immormino, Robert M; Headd, Jeffrey J; Richardson, David C; Ham, Daniela; Hershkovits, Eli; Williams, Loren Dean; Keating, Kevin S; Pyle, Anna Marie; Micallef, David; Westbrook, John; Berman, Helen M

    2008-03-01

    A consensus classification and nomenclature are defined for RNA backbone structure using all of the backbone torsion angles. By a consensus of several independent analysis methods, 46 discrete conformers are identified as suitably clustered in a quality-filtered, multidimensional dihedral angle distribution. Most of these conformers represent identifiable features or roles within RNA structures. The conformers are given two-character names that reflect the seven-angle delta epsilon zeta alpha beta gamma delta combinations empirically found favorable for the sugar-to-sugar "suite" unit within which the angle correlations are strongest (e.g., 1a for A-form, 5z for the start of S-motifs). Since the half-nucleotides are specified by a number for delta epsilon zeta and a lowercase letter for alpha beta gamma delta, this modular system can also be parsed to describe traditional nucleotide units (e.g., a1) or the dinucleotides (e.g., a1a1) that are especially useful at the level of crystallographic map fitting. This nomenclature can also be written as a string with two-character suite names between the uppercase letters of the base sequence (N1aG1gN1aR1aA1cN1a for a GNRA tetraloop), facilitating bioinformatic comparisons. Cluster means, standard deviations, coordinates, and examples are made available, as well as the Suitename software that assigns suite conformer names and conformer match quality (suiteness) from atomic coordinates. The RNA Ontology Consortium will combine this new backbone system with others that define base pairs, base-stacking, and hydrogen-bond relationships to provide a full description of RNA structural motifs. PMID:18192612

  9. Reconstruction of clonal trees and tumor composition from multi-sample sequencing data

    PubMed Central

    El-Kebir, Mohammed; Oesper, Layla; Acheson-Field, Hannah; Raphael, Benjamin J.

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: DNA sequencing of multiple samples from the same tumor provides data to analyze the process of clonal evolution in the population of cells that give rise to a tumor. Results: We formalize the problem of reconstructing the clonal evolution of a tumor using single-nucleotide mutations as the variant allele frequency (VAF) factorization problem. We derive a combinatorial characterization of the solutions to this problem and show that the problem is NP-complete. We derive an integer linear programming solution to the VAF factorization problem in the case of error-free data and extend this solution to real data with a probabilistic model for errors. The resulting AncesTree algorithm is better able to identify ancestral relationships between individual mutations than existing approaches, particularly in ultra-deep sequencing data when high read counts for mutations yield high confidence VAFs. Availability and implementation: An implementation of AncesTree is available at: http://compbio.cs.brown.edu/software. Contact: braphael@brown.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:26072510

  10. Antigenic characterization of influenza viruses produced using synthetic DNA and novel backbones.

    PubMed

    Suphaphiphat, Pirada; Whittaker, Lynne; De Souza, Ivna; Daniels, Rodney S; Dormitzer, Philip R; McCauley, John W; Settembre, Ethan C

    2016-07-12

    The global system for manufacturing seasonal influenza vaccines has been developed to respond to the natural evolution of influenza viruses, but the problem of antigenic mismatch continues to be a challenge in certain years. In some years, mismatches arise naturally due to the antigenic drift of circulating viruses after vaccine strain selection has already been made. In other years, antigenic differences between the vaccine virus and circulating viruses are introduced as part of the current system, which relies on the use of egg-adapted isolates as a starting material for candidate vaccine viruses (CVVs). Improving the current process for making vaccine viruses can provide great value. We have previously established a synthetic approach for rapidly generating influenza viruses in a vaccine-approved Madin Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cell line using novel, high-growth backbones that increase virus rescue efficiency and antigen yield. This technology also has the potential to produce viruses that maintain antigenic similarity to the intended reference viruses, depending on the hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) sequences used for gene synthesis. To demonstrate this utility, we generated a panel of synthetic viruses using HA and NA sequences from recent isolates and showed by hemagglutination inhibition (HI) tests that all synthetic viruses were antigenically-like their conventional egg- or cell-propagated reference strains and there was no impact of the novel backbones on antigenicity. This synthetic approach can be used for the efficient production of CVVs that may be more representative of circulating viruses and may be used for both egg- and cell-based vaccine manufacturing platforms. When combined with mammalian cell culture technology for antigen production, synthetic viruses generated using HA and NA sequences from a non-egg-adapted prototype can help to reduce the potential impact of antigenic differences between vaccine virus and circulating viruses on

  11. Determination of backbone nitrogen-nitrogen J correlations in proteins.

    PubMed

    Theis, K; Dingley, A J; Hoffmann, A; Omichinski, J G; Grzesiek, S

    1997-12-01

    Recently, a quantitative J correlation technique has been presented which makes use of homonuclear Hartmann-Hahn cross-polarization (TOCSY) to measure (3)J(C)'(C)' in proteins isotopically enriched with (13)C [Grzesiek, S. and Bax, A. (1997) J. Biomol. NMR, 9, 207-211]. Since homonuclear Hartmann-Hahn is twice as fast as conventional COSY transfer, this method is much less sensitive to transverse relaxation, which is the principal limiting factor in achieving long-range J-coupling correlations in macromolecules. Here we describe a similar experiment which is used to measure(3) J(NN) coupling constants between sequential amide(15) N nuclei in the backbone of ubiquitin. As expected from the low magnetic moment of (15)N, the (3)J(NN) coupling constants are exceedingly small, with values between 0.14 and 0.36 Hz for residues in β-conformations and values below 0.15 Hz for residues in α-conformations. In contrast to what is expected from a Karplus-type dependence on the backbone angle ψ, large differences in the values of(3) J(NN) are observed for a number of residues with very similar backbone ψ angles. A quantitative description of statistical and systematic errors, in particular of relaxation effects during the TOCSY transfer, shows that these differences are highly significant. PMID:20859784

  12. Exploring the Gastrointestinal “Nemabiome”: Deep Amplicon Sequencing to Quantify the Species Composition of Parasitic Nematode Communities

    PubMed Central

    Avramenko, Russell W.; Redman, Elizabeth M.; Lewis, Roy; Yazwinski, Thomas A.; Wasmuth, James D.; Gilleard, John S.

    2015-01-01

    Parasitic helminth infections have a considerable impact on global human health as well as animal welfare and production. Although co-infection with multiple parasite species within a host is common, there is a dearth of tools with which to study the composition of these complex parasite communities. Helminth species vary in their pathogenicity, epidemiology and drug sensitivity and the interactions that occur between co-infecting species and their hosts are poorly understood. We describe the first application of deep amplicon sequencing to study parasitic nematode communities as well as introduce the concept of the gastro-intestinal “nemabiome”. The approach is analogous to 16S rDNA deep sequencing used to explore microbial communities, but utilizes the nematode ITS-2 rDNA locus instead. Gastro-intestinal parasites of cattle were used to develop the concept, as this host has many well-defined gastro-intestinal nematode species that commonly occur as complex co-infections. Further, the availability of pure mono-parasite populations from experimentally infected cattle allowed us to prepare mock parasite communities to determine, and correct for, species representation biases in the sequence data. We demonstrate that, once these biases have been corrected, accurate relative quantitation of gastro-intestinal parasitic nematode communities in cattle fecal samples can be achieved. We have validated the accuracy of the method applied to field-samples by comparing the results of detailed morphological examination of L3 larvae populations with those of the sequencing assay. The results illustrate the insights that can be gained into the species composition of parasite communities, using grazing cattle in the mid-west USA as an example. However, both the technical approach and the concept of the ‘nemabiome’ have a wide range of potential applications in human and veterinary medicine. These include investigations of host-parasite and parasite-parasite interactions

  13. Kerogen and biomarker compositions of uranium-rich coaly shales from Miocene sequence at Kanamaru, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, M.; Watanabe, Y.

    2005-12-01

    We obtained a continuous 40 m-long core from the Miocene sedimentary sequence and basement Cretaceous granite at Kanamaru, northeast Japan. The Miocene sequence intercalates with a uranium-rich coaly shale seam (U = 25-100 ppm; Th = 23-42 ppm). We have analyzed the kerogen macerals and biomarkers in the core to characterize the organic matter in the uranium-rich seam. Visual kerogen analysis indicated that the relative abundance of coaly and woody kerogens in total kerogen is generally high in the samples that contain high amount of uranium. The coaly and woody kerogens consist about 80 percent of total kerogen, and the rest 20 percent are herbaceous and amorphous kerogens in uranium-rich coaly shales. TMAH-pyrolysis-GC/MS analysis showed that the organic matter in pyrolysates comprises mainly alkyl-aromatic hydrocarbons (alkyl-benzenes, alkyl-indenes, alkyl-naphthalenes, etc.) and n-alkanes. Acyclic isoprenoid alkanes (mainly pristane), n-alkenes, n-fatty acids and acyclic isoprenoid acids were detected as minor components. Most of these compounds are characteristic of the type-III kerogen that derived from terrestrial higher plants. Thermal alteration index (TAI) of Pinus pollen was about 2.6, which indicates that the thermal maturation of the coaly shale reached the stage of early catagenesis. This maturity was also suggested by high abundance of diagenetically generated isomers of hopanes in TMAH pyrolysates. A good correspondence that uranium-rich samples are always rich in type-III organic matter suggests that the type-III organic matter was able to concentrate uranium by the absorption and/or reduction of uranium during deposition and/or early diagenesis.

  14. Novel Variants of AbaR Resistance Islands with a Common Backbone in Acinetobacter baumannii Isolates of European Clone II

    PubMed Central

    Povilonis, Justas; Sužiedėlienė, Edita

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the genetic organization of three novel genomic antibiotic resistance islands (AbaRs) in Acinetobacter baumannii isolates belonging to group of European clone II (EC II) comM integrated sequences of 18-, 21-, and 23-kb resistance islands were determined. These resistance islands carry the backbone of AbaR-type transposon structures, which are composed of the transposition module coding for potential transposition proteins and other genes coding for the intact universal stress protein (uspA), sulfate permease (sul), and proteins of unknown function. The antibiotic resistance genes strA, strB, tetB, and tetR and insertion sequence CR2 element were found to be inserted into the AbaR transposons. GenBank homology searches indicated that they are closely related to the AbaR sequences found integrated in comM in strains of EC II (A. baumannii strains 1656-2 and TCDC-AB0715) and AbaR4 integrated in another location of A. baumannii AB0057 (EC I). All of the AbaRs showed structural similarity to the previously described AbaR4 island and share a 12,008-bp backbone. AbaRs contain Tn1213, Tn2006, and the multiple fragments which could be derived from transposons Tn3, Tn10, Tn21, Tn1000, Tn5393, and Tn6020, the insertion sequences IS26, ISAba1, ISAba14, and ISCR2, and the class 1 integron. Moreover, chromosomal DNA was inserted into distinct regions of the AbaR backbone. Sequence analysis suggested that the AbaR-type transposons have evolved through insertions, deletions, and homologous recombination. AbaR islands, sharing the core structure similar to AbaR4, appeared to be distributed in isolates of EC I and EC II via integration into distinct genomic sites, i.e., pho and comM, respectively. PMID:22290980

  15. Triazine‐Based Sequence‐Defined Polymers with Side‐Chain Diversity and Backbone–Backbone Interaction Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Kai‐For; Daily, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Sequence control in polymers, well‐known in nature, encodes structure and functionality. Here we introduce a new architecture, based on the nucleophilic aromatic substitution chemistry of cyanuric chloride, that creates a new class of sequence‐defined polymers dubbed TZPs. Proof of concept is demonstrated with two synthesized hexamers, having neutral and ionizable side chains. Molecular dynamics simulations show backbone–backbone interactions, including H‐bonding motifs and pi–pi interactions. This architecture is arguably biomimetic while differing from sequence‐defined polymers having peptide bonds. The synthetic methodology supports the structural diversity of side chains known in peptides, as well as backbone–backbone hydrogen‐bonding motifs, and will thus enable new macromolecules and materials with useful functions. PMID:26865312

  16. Characterization of the structure and melting of DNAs containing backbone nicks and gaps

    SciTech Connect

    Snowden-Ifft, E.A.; Wemmer, D.E. )

    1990-06-26

    A DNA molecule containing a gap (a missing phosphate) has been examined and compared to two other molecules of the same sequence, one containing a nick (a phosphorylated gap) and the other a normal duplex containing no break in the backbone. A second gapped sequence was also compared to a normal duplex of the same sequence. The molecules containing nicks or gaps were generated as dumbbell molecules, short helices closed by a loop at each end. The dumbbells were formed by the association of two hairpins with self-complementary dangling 5'-ends. Nuclear magnetic resonance was used to monitor the melting transition and to probe structural differences between molecules. Under the conditions used here no change in stability was observed upon phosphorylation of the gap. Structural changes upon phosphorylation of a gap or closure of a nick were minimal and were localized to the region immediately around the gap or nick. Two transitions can be observed as a gapped or nicked molecule melts, although the resolution of the two transitions varies with the salt concentration. At moderate to high salt (greater than or equal to 30 mM) the molecule melts essentially all at once. At low salt the two transitions occur at temperatures that differ by as much as 15 degrees C. In addition, comparison with other NMR melting studies indicates that the duplex formed by the overlap of the dangling ends of the hairpins is stabilized relative to a free duplex of the same sequence, probably by stacking onto the hairpin stem.

  17. Identification of protein N-termini in Cyanophora paradoxa cyanelles: transit peptide composition and sequence determinants for precursor maturation

    PubMed Central

    Köhler, Daniel; Dobritzsch, Dirk; Hoehenwarter, Wolfgang; Helm, Stefan; Steiner, Jürgen M.; Baginsky, Sacha

    2015-01-01

    Glaucophyta, rhodophyta, and chloroplastida represent the three main evolutionary lineages that diverged from a common ancestor after primary endosymbiosis. Comparative analyses between members of these three lineages are a rich source of information on ancestral plastid features. We analyzed the composition and the cleavage site of cyanelle transit peptides from the glaucophyte Cyanophora paradoxa by terminal amine labeling of substrates (TAILS), and compared their characteristics to those of representatives of the chloroplastida. Our data show that transit peptide architecture is similar between members of these two lineages. This entails a comparable modular structure, an overrepresentation of serine or alanine and similarities in the amino acid composition around the processing peptidase cleavage site. The most distinctive difference is the overrepresentation of phenylalanine in the N-terminal 1–10 amino acids of cyanelle transit peptides. A quantitative proteome analysis with periplasm-free cyanelles identified 42 out of 262 proteins without the N-terminal phenylalanine, suggesting that the requirement for phenylalanine in the N-terminal region is not absolute. Proteins in this set are on average of low abundance, suggesting that either alternative import pathways are operating specifically for low abundance proteins or that the gene model annotation is incorrect for proteins with fewer EST sequences. We discuss these two possibilities and provide examples for both interpretations. PMID:26257763

  18. Bacterial community compositions of coking wastewater treatment plants in steel industry revealed by Illumina high-throughput sequencing.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qiao; Qu, Yuanyuan; Shen, Wenli; Zhang, Zhaojing; Wang, Jingwei; Liu, Ziyan; Li, Duanxing; Li, Huijie; Zhou, Jiti

    2015-03-01

    In this study, Illumina high-throughput sequencing was used to reveal the community structures of nine coking wastewater treatment plants (CWWTPs) in China for the first time. The sludge systems exhibited a similar community composition at each taxonomic level. Compared to previous studies, some of the core genera in municipal wastewater treatment plants such as Zoogloea, Prosthecobacter and Gp6 were detected as minor species. Thiobacillus (20.83%), Comamonas (6.58%), Thauera (4.02%), Azoarcus (7.78%) and Rhodoplanes (1.42%) were the dominant genera shared by at least six CWWTPs. The percentages of autotrophic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria were unexpectedly low, which were verified by both real-time PCR and fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses. Hierarchical clustering and canonical correspondence analysis indicated that operation mode, flow rate and temperature might be the key factors in community formation. This study provides new insights into our understanding of microbial community compositions and structures of CWWTPs. PMID:25569032

  19. Alpha-helical stabilization by side chain shielding of backbone hydrogen bonds.

    PubMed

    García, Angel E; Sanbonmatsu, Kevin Y

    2002-03-01

    We study atomic models of the thermodynamics of the structural transition of peptides that form alpha-helices. The effect of sequence variation on alpha-helix formation for alanine-rich peptides, Ac-Ala21-methyl amide (A21) and Ac-A5 (AAARA)3A-methyl amide (Fs peptide), is investigated by atomic simulation studies of the thermodynamics of the helix-coil transition in explicit water. The simulations show that the guanidinium group in the Arg side chains in the Fs peptide interacts with the carbonyl group four amino acids upstream in the chain and desolvates backbone hydrogen bonds. This desolvation can be directly correlated with a higher probability of hydrogen bond formation. We find that Fs has higher helical content than A21 at all temperatures. A small modification in the amber force field reproduces the experimental helical content and helix-coil transition temperatures for the Fs peptide. PMID:11867710

  20. Full-Length Venom Protein cDNA Sequences from Venom-Derived mRNA: Exploring Compositional Variation and Adaptive Multigene Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Modahl, Cassandra M.; Mackessy, Stephen P.

    2016-01-01

    Envenomation of humans by snakes is a complex and continuously evolving medical emergency, and treatment is made that much more difficult by the diverse biochemical composition of many venoms. Venomous snakes and their venoms also provide models for the study of molecular evolutionary processes leading to adaptation and genotype-phenotype relationships. To compare venom complexity and protein sequences, venom gland transcriptomes are assembled, which usually requires the sacrifice of snakes for tissue. However, toxin transcripts are also present in venoms, offering the possibility of obtaining cDNA sequences directly from venom. This study provides evidence that unknown full-length venom protein transcripts can be obtained from the venoms of multiple species from all major venomous snake families. These unknown venom protein cDNAs are obtained by the use of primers designed from conserved signal peptide sequences within each venom protein superfamily. This technique was used to assemble a partial venom gland transcriptome for the Middle American Rattlesnake (Crotalus simus tzabcan) by amplifying sequences for phospholipases A2, serine proteases, C-lectins, and metalloproteinases from within venom. Phospholipase A2 sequences were also recovered from the venoms of several rattlesnakes and an elapid snake (Pseudechis porphyriacus), and three-finger toxin sequences were recovered from multiple rear-fanged snake species, demonstrating that the three major clades of advanced snakes (Elapidae, Viperidae, Colubridae) have stable mRNA present in their venoms. These cDNA sequences from venom were then used to explore potential activities derived from protein sequence similarities and evolutionary histories within these large multigene superfamilies. Venom-derived sequences can also be used to aid in characterizing venoms that lack proteomic profiles and identify sequence characteristics indicating specific envenomation profiles. This approach, requiring only venom, provides

  1. Full-Length Venom Protein cDNA Sequences from Venom-Derived mRNA: Exploring Compositional Variation and Adaptive Multigene Evolution.

    PubMed

    Modahl, Cassandra M; Mackessy, Stephen P

    2016-06-01

    Envenomation of humans by snakes is a complex and continuously evolving medical emergency, and treatment is made that much more difficult by the diverse biochemical composition of many venoms. Venomous snakes and their venoms also provide models for the study of molecular evolutionary processes leading to adaptation and genotype-phenotype relationships. To compare venom complexity and protein sequences, venom gland transcriptomes are assembled, which usually requires the sacrifice of snakes for tissue. However, toxin transcripts are also present in venoms, offering the possibility of obtaining cDNA sequences directly from venom. This study provides evidence that unknown full-length venom protein transcripts can be obtained from the venoms of multiple species from all major venomous snake families. These unknown venom protein cDNAs are obtained by the use of primers designed from conserved signal peptide sequences within each venom protein superfamily. This technique was used to assemble a partial venom gland transcriptome for the Middle American Rattlesnake (Crotalus simus tzabcan) by amplifying sequences for phospholipases A2, serine proteases, C-lectins, and metalloproteinases from within venom. Phospholipase A2 sequences were also recovered from the venoms of several rattlesnakes and an elapid snake (Pseudechis porphyriacus), and three-finger toxin sequences were recovered from multiple rear-fanged snake species, demonstrating that the three major clades of advanced snakes (Elapidae, Viperidae, Colubridae) have stable mRNA present in their venoms. These cDNA sequences from venom were then used to explore potential activities derived from protein sequence similarities and evolutionary histories within these large multigene superfamilies. Venom-derived sequences can also be used to aid in characterizing venoms that lack proteomic profiles and identify sequence characteristics indicating specific envenomation profiles. This approach, requiring only venom, provides

  2. Robust identification of backbone curves using control-based continuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renson, L.; Gonzalez-Buelga, A.; Barton, D. A. W.; Neild, S. A.

    2016-04-01

    Control-based continuation is a recently developed approach for testing nonlinear dynamic systems in a controlled manner and exploring their dynamic features as system parameters are varied. In this paper, control-based continuation is adapted to follow the locus where system response and excitation are in quadrature, extracting the backbone curve of the underlying conservative system. The method is applied to a single-degree-of-freedom oscillator under base excitation, and the results are compared with the standard resonant-decay method.

  3. Scientific Laser Market Still The Backbone Of The Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomkins, Jon

    1988-06-01

    Good morning. I would like to thank Gary Forrest and Laser Focus for giving me the opportunity to participate in this seminar. After listening to Moe Levitt's overview of the industry outlook for 1988, it is a pleasure for me to represent one of the 'hot' sectors in the market - the old research market. My mission today is to provide a perspective of this market to you as one of the healthier parts of the industry, as one of the backbones of our industry.

  4. Improving prediction of secondary structure, local backbone angles, and solvent accessible surface area of proteins by iterative deep learning

    PubMed Central

    Heffernan, Rhys; Paliwal, Kuldip; Lyons, James; Dehzangi, Abdollah; Sharma, Alok; Wang, Jihua; Sattar, Abdul; Yang, Yuedong; Zhou, Yaoqi

    2015-01-01

    Direct prediction of protein structure from sequence is a challenging problem. An effective approach is to break it up into independent sub-problems. These sub-problems such as prediction of protein secondary structure can then be solved independently. In a previous study, we found that an iterative use of predicted secondary structure and backbone torsion angles can further improve secondary structure and torsion angle prediction. In this study, we expand the iterative features to include solvent accessible surface area and backbone angles and dihedrals based on Cα atoms. By using a deep learning neural network in three iterations, we achieved 82% accuracy for secondary structure prediction, 0.76 for the correlation coefficient between predicted and actual solvent accessible surface area, 19° and 30° for mean absolute errors of backbone φ and ψ angles, respectively, and 8° and 32° for mean absolute errors of Cα-based θ and τ angles, respectively, for an independent test dataset of 1199 proteins. The accuracy of the method is slightly lower for 72 CASP 11 targets but much higher than those of model structures from current state-of-the-art techniques. This suggests the potentially beneficial use of these predicted properties for model assessment and ranking. PMID:26098304

  5. Effect of Backbone Design on Hybridization Thermodynamics of Oligo-nucleic Acids: A Coarse-Grained Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghobadi, Ahmadreza F.; Jayaraman, Arthi

    DNA hybridization is the basis of various bio-nano technologies, such as DNA origami and assembly of DNA-functionalized nanoparticles. A hybridized double stranded (ds) DNA is formed when complementary nucleobases on hybridizing strands exhibit specific and directional hydrogen bonds through canonical Watson-Crick base-pairing interactions. In recent years, the need for cheaper alternatives and significant synthetic advances have driven design of DNA mimics with new backbone chemistries. However, a fundamental understanding of how these backbone modifications in the oligo-nucleic acids impact the hybridization and melting behavior of the duplex is still lacking. In this talk, we present our recent findings on impact of varying backbone chemistry on hybridization of oligo-nucleic acid duplexes. We use coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations to isolate the effect of strand flexibility, electrostatic interactions and nucleobase spacing on the melting curves for duplexes with various strand sequences and concentrations. Since conjugation of oligo-nucleic acids with polymers serve as building blocks for thermo-responsive polymer networks and gels, we also present the effect of such conjugation on hybridization thermodynamics and polymer conformation.

  6. Predicting Secretory Proteins of Malaria Parasite by Incorporating Sequence Evolution Information into Pseudo Amino Acid Composition via Grey System Model

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wei-Zhong; Fang, Jian-An; Xiao, Xuan; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2012-01-01

    The malaria disease has become a cause of poverty and a major hindrance to economic development. The culprit of the disease is the parasite, which secretes an array of proteins within the host erythrocyte to facilitate its own survival. Accordingly, the secretory proteins of malaria parasite have become a logical target for drug design against malaria. Unfortunately, with the increasing resistance to the drugs thus developed, the situation has become more complicated. To cope with the drug resistance problem, one strategy is to timely identify the secreted proteins by malaria parasite, which can serve as potential drug targets. However, it is both expensive and time-consuming to identify the secretory proteins of malaria parasite by experiments alone. To expedite the process for developing effective drugs against malaria, a computational predictor called “iSMP-Grey” was developed that can be used to identify the secretory proteins of malaria parasite based on the protein sequence information alone. During the prediction process a protein sample was formulated with a 60D (dimensional) feature vector formed by incorporating the sequence evolution information into the general form of PseAAC (pseudo amino acid composition) via a grey system model, which is particularly useful for solving complicated problems that are lack of sufficient information or need to process uncertain information. It was observed by the jackknife test that iSMP-Grey achieved an overall success rate of 94.8%, remarkably higher than those by the existing predictors in this area. As a user-friendly web-server, iSMP-Grey is freely accessible to the public at http://www.jci-bioinfo.cn/iSMP-Grey. Moreover, for the convenience of most experimental scientists, a step-by-step guide is provided on how to use the web-server to get the desired results without the need to follow the complicated mathematical equations involved in this paper. PMID:23189138

  7. Characterizing Aciniform Silk Repetitive Domain Backbone Dynamics and Hydrodynamic Modularity.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Marie-Laurence; Xu, Lingling; Sarker, Muzaddid; Liu, Xiang-Qin; Rainey, Jan K

    2016-01-01

    Spider aciniform (wrapping) silk is a remarkable fibrillar biomaterial with outstanding mechanical properties. It is a modular protein consisting, in Argiope trifasciata, of a core repetitive domain of 200 amino acid units (W units). In solution, the W units comprise a globular folded core, with five α-helices, and disordered tails that are linked to form a ~63-residue intrinsically disordered linker in concatemers. Herein, we present nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy-based (15)N spin relaxation analysis, allowing characterization of backbone dynamics as a function of residue on the ps-ns timescale in the context of the single W unit (W₁) and the two unit concatemer (W₂). Unambiguous mapping of backbone dynamics throughout W₂ was made possible by segmental NMR active isotope-enrichment through split intein-mediated trans-splicing. Spectral density mapping for W₁ and W₂ reveals a striking disparity in dynamics between the folded core and the disordered linker and tail regions. These data are also consistent with rotational diffusion behaviour where each globular domain tumbles almost independently of its neighbour. At a localized level, helix 5 exhibits elevated high frequency dynamics relative to the proximal helix 4, supporting a model of fibrillogenesis where this helix unfolds as part of the transition to a mixed α-helix/β-sheet fibre. PMID:27517921

  8. A phylogenetic backbone for Bivalvia: an RNA-seq approach

    PubMed Central

    González, Vanessa L.; Andrade, Sónia C. S.; Bieler, Rüdiger; Collins, Timothy M.; Dunn, Casey W.; Mikkelsen, Paula M.; Taylor, John D.; Giribet, Gonzalo

    2015-01-01

    Bivalves are an ancient and ubiquitous group of aquatic invertebrates with an estimated 10 000–20 000 living species. They are economically significant as a human food source, and ecologically important given their biomass and effects on communities. Their phylogenetic relationships have been studied for decades, and their unparalleled fossil record extends from the Cambrian to the Recent. Nevertheless, a robustly supported phylogeny of the deepest nodes, needed to fully exploit the bivalves as a model for testing macroevolutionary theories, is lacking. Here, we present the first phylogenomic approach for this important group of molluscs, including novel transcriptomic data for 31 bivalves obtained through an RNA-seq approach, and analyse these data with published genomes and transcriptomes of other bivalves plus outgroups. Our results provide a well-resolved, robust phylogenetic backbone for Bivalvia with all major lineages delineated, addressing long-standing questions about the monophyly of Protobranchia and Heterodonta, and resolving the position of particular groups such as Palaeoheterodonta, Archiheterodonta and Anomalodesmata. This now fully resolved backbone demonstrates that genomic approaches using hundreds of genes are feasible for resolving phylogenetic questions in bivalves and other animals. PMID:25589608

  9. Characterizing Aciniform Silk Repetitive Domain Backbone Dynamics and Hydrodynamic Modularity

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay, Marie-Laurence; Xu, Lingling; Sarker, Muzaddid; Liu, Xiang-Qin; Rainey, Jan K.

    2016-01-01

    Spider aciniform (wrapping) silk is a remarkable fibrillar biomaterial with outstanding mechanical properties. It is a modular protein consisting, in Argiope trifasciata, of a core repetitive domain of 200 amino acid units (W units). In solution, the W units comprise a globular folded core, with five α-helices, and disordered tails that are linked to form a ~63-residue intrinsically disordered linker in concatemers. Herein, we present nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy-based 15N spin relaxation analysis, allowing characterization of backbone dynamics as a function of residue on the ps–ns timescale in the context of the single W unit (W1) and the two unit concatemer (W2). Unambiguous mapping of backbone dynamics throughout W2 was made possible by segmental NMR active isotope-enrichment through split intein-mediated trans-splicing. Spectral density mapping for W1 and W2 reveals a striking disparity in dynamics between the folded core and the disordered linker and tail regions. These data are also consistent with rotational diffusion behaviour where each globular domain tumbles almost independently of its neighbour. At a localized level, helix 5 exhibits elevated high frequency dynamics relative to the proximal helix 4, supporting a model of fibrillogenesis where this helix unfolds as part of the transition to a mixed α-helix/β-sheet fibre. PMID:27517921

  10. A phylogenetic backbone for Bivalvia: an RNA-seq approach.

    PubMed

    González, Vanessa L; Andrade, Sónia C S; Bieler, Rüdiger; Collins, Timothy M; Dunn, Casey W; Mikkelsen, Paula M; Taylor, John D; Giribet, Gonzalo

    2015-02-22

    Bivalves are an ancient and ubiquitous group of aquatic invertebrates with an estimated 10 000-20 000 living species. They are economically significant as a human food source, and ecologically important given their biomass and effects on communities. Their phylogenetic relationships have been studied for decades, and their unparalleled fossil record extends from the Cambrian to the Recent. Nevertheless, a robustly supported phylogeny of the deepest nodes, needed to fully exploit the bivalves as a model for testing macroevolutionary theories, is lacking. Here, we present the first phylogenomic approach for this important group of molluscs, including novel transcriptomic data for 31 bivalves obtained through an RNA-seq approach, and analyse these data with published genomes and transcriptomes of other bivalves plus outgroups. Our results provide a well-resolved, robust phylogenetic backbone for Bivalvia with all major lineages delineated, addressing long-standing questions about the monophyly of Protobranchia and Heterodonta, and resolving the position of particular groups such as Palaeoheterodonta, Archiheterodonta and Anomalodesmata. This now fully resolved backbone demonstrates that genomic approaches using hundreds of genes are feasible for resolving phylogenetic questions in bivalves and other animals. PMID:25589608

  11. Long-term forecasting of internet backbone traffic.

    PubMed

    Papagiannaki, Konstantina; Taft, Nina; Zhang, Zhi-Li; Diot, Christophe

    2005-09-01

    We introduce a methodology to predict when and where link additions/upgrades have to take place in an Internet protocol (IP) backbone network. Using simple network management protocol (SNMP) statistics, collected continuously since 1999, we compute aggregate demand between any two adjacent points of presence (PoPs) and look at its evolution at time scales larger than 1 h. We show that IP backbone traffic exhibits visible long term trends, strong periodicities, and variability at multiple time scales. Our methodology relies on the wavelet multiresolution analysis (MRA) and linear time series models. Using wavelet MRA, we smooth the collected measurements until we identify the overall long-term trend. The fluctuations around the obtained trend are further analyzed at multiple time scales. We show that the largest amount of variability in the original signal is due to its fluctuations at the 12-h time scale. We model inter-PoP aggregate demand as a multiple linear regression model, consisting of the two identified components. We show that this model accounts for 98% of the total energy in the original signal, while explaining 90% of its variance. Weekly approximations of those components can be accurately modeled with low-order autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) models. We show that forecasting the long term trend and the fluctuations of the traffic at the 12-h time scale yields accurate estimates for at least 6 months in the future. PMID:16252820

  12. Backbone dynamics of barstar: a (15)N NMR relaxation study.

    PubMed

    Sahu, S C; Bhuyan, A K; Majumdar, A; Udgaonkar, J B

    2000-12-01

    Backbone dynamics of uniformly (15)N-labeled barstar have been studied at 32 degrees C, pH 6.7, by using (15)N relaxation data obtained from proton-detected 2D (1)H-(15)N NMR spectroscopy. (15)N spin-lattice relaxation rate constants (R(1)), spin-spin relaxation rate constants (R(2)), and steady-state heteronuclear (1)H-(15)N NOEs have been determined for 69 of the 86 (excluding two prolines and the N-terminal residue) backbone amide (15)N at a magnetic field strength of 14.1 Tesla. The primary relaxation data have been analyzed by using the model-free formalism of molecular dynamics, using both isotropic and axially symmetric diffusion of the molecule, to determine the overall rotational correlation time (tau(m)), the generalized order parameter (S(2)), the effective correlation time for internal motions (tau(e)), and NH exchange broadening contributions (R(ex)) for each residue. As per the axially symmetric diffusion, the ratio of diffusion rates about the unique and perpendicular axes (D( parallel)/D( perpendicular)) is 0.82 +/- 0.03. The two results have only marginal differences. The relaxation data have also been used to map reduced spectral densities for the NH vectors of these residues at three frequencies: 0, omega(H), and omega(N), where omega(H),(N) are proton and nitrogen Larmor frequencies. The value of tau(m) obtained from model-free analysis of the relaxation data is 5.2 ns. The reduced spectral density analysis, however, yields a value of 5.7 ns. The tau(m) determined here is different from that calculated previously from time-resolved fluorescence data (4.1 ns). The order parameter ranges from 0.68 to 0.98, with an average value of 0.85 +/- 0.02. A comparison of the order parameters with the X-ray B-factors for the backbone nitrogens of wild-type barstar does not show any considerable correlation. Model-free analysis of the relaxation data for seven residues required the inclusion of an exchange broadening term, the magnitude of which ranges from 2

  13. Efficient synthesis of longer Aβ peptides via removable backbone modification.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Chao; Tang, Shan; Si, Yan-Yan; Wang, Zhipeng A; Tian, Chang-Lin; Zheng, Ji-Shen

    2016-06-14

    Longer amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptides (43 to 49 amino acids) play essential roles in the pathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The difficulty in the preparation of longer Aβ peptides is still an obstacle to elucidate their roles in AD. Herein we report a robust and efficient strategy for the chemical synthesis of longer Aβ peptides (Aβ48 and Aβ49). A key feature of this method is the installation of removable Arg4-tagged backbone modification groups into the hydrophobic region of Aβ. This modification can improve the handling properties of the purification, ligation and mass characterization of longer Aβ peptides. The practicability of the new method has been demonstrated by the successful synthesis of Aβ48 and Aβ49 peptides. PMID:27188564

  14. Carbon backbone topology of the metabolome of a cell.

    PubMed

    Bingol, Kerem; Zhang, Fengli; Bruschweiler-Li, Lei; Brüschweiler, Rafael

    2012-05-30

    The complex metabolic makeup of a biological system, such as a cell, is a key determinant of its biological state providing unique insights into its function. Here we characterize the metabolome of a cell by a novel homonuclear (13)C 2D NMR approach applied to a nonfractionated uniformly (13)C-enriched lysate of E. coli cells and determine de novo their carbon backbone topologies that constitute the "topolome". A protocol was developed, which first identifies traces in a constant-time (13)C-(13)C TOCSY NMR spectrum that are unique for individual mixture components and then assembles for each trace the corresponding carbon-bond topology network by consensus clustering. This led to the determination of 112 topologies of unique metabolites from a single sample. The topolome is dominated by carbon topologies of carbohydrates (34.8%) and amino acids (45.5%) that can constitute building blocks of more complex structures. PMID:22540339

  15. A Native to Amyloidogenic Transition Regulated by a Backbone Trigger

    SciTech Connect

    Eakin,C.; Berman, A.; Miranker, A.

    2006-01-01

    Many polypeptides can self-associate into linear, aggregated assemblies termed amyloid fibers. High-resolution structural insights into the mechanism of fibrillogenesis are elusive owing to the transient and mixed oligomeric nature of assembly intermediates. Here, we report the conformational changes that initiate fiber formation by beta-2-microglobulin (beta2m) in dialysis-related amyloidosis. Access of beta2m to amyloidogenic conformations is catalyzed by selective binding of divalent cations. The chemical basis of this process was determined to be backbone isomerization of a conserved proline. On the basis of this finding, we designed a beta2m variant that closely adopts this intermediate state. The variant has kinetic, thermodynamic and catalytic properties consistent with its being a fibrillogenic intermediate of wild-type beta2m. Furthermore, it is stable and folded, enabling us to unambiguously determine the initiating conformational changes for amyloid assembly at atomic resolution.

  16. Transforming plastic surfaces with electrophilic backbones from hydrophobic to hydrophilic.

    PubMed

    Kim, Samuel; Bowen, Raffick A R; Zare, Richard N

    2015-01-28

    We demonstrate a simple nonaqueous reaction scheme for transforming the surface of plastics from hydrophobic to hydrophilic. The chemical modification is achieved by base-catalyzed trans-esterification with polyols. It is permanent, does not release contaminants, and causes no optical or mechanical distortion of the plastic. We present contact angle measurements to show successful modification of several types of plastics including poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) and polycarbonate (PC). Its applicability to blood analysis is explored using chemically modified PET blood collection tubes and found to be quite satisfactory. We expect this approach will reduce the cost of manufacturing plastic devices with optimized wettability and can be generalized to other types of plastic materials having an electrophilic linkage as its backbone. PMID:25565370

  17. Effects of phosphorylation on the intrinsic propensity of backbone conformations of serine/threonine.

    PubMed

    He, Erbin; Yan, Guanghui; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Jun; Li, Wenfei

    2016-03-01

    Each amino acid has its intrinsic propensity for certain local backbone conformations, which can be further modulated by the physicochemical environment and post-translational modifications. In this work, we study the effects of phosphorylation on the intrinsic propensity for different local backbone conformations of serine/threonine by molecular dynamics simulations. We showed that phosphorylation has very different effects on the intrinsic propensity for certain local backbone conformations for the serine and threonine. The phosphorylation of serine increases the propensity of forming polyproline II, whereas that of threonine has the opposite effect. Detailed analysis showed that such different responses to phosphorylation mainly arise from their different perturbations to the backbone hydration and the geometrical constraints by forming side-chain-backbone hydrogen bonds due to phosphorylation. Such an effect of phosphorylation on backbone conformations can be crucial for understanding the molecular mechanism of phosphorylation-regulated protein structures/dynamics and functions. PMID:26759163

  18. A unique signal distorts the perception of species richness and composition in high-throughput sequencing surveys of microbial communities: a case study of fungi in indoor dust.

    PubMed

    Adams, Rachel I; Amend, Anthony S; Taylor, John W; Bruns, Thomas D

    2013-11-01

    Sequence-based surveys of microorganisms in varied environments have found extremely diverse assemblages. A standard practice in current high-throughput sequence (HTS) approaches in microbial ecology is to sequence the composition of many environmental samples at once by pooling amplicon libraries at a common concentration before processing on one run of a sequencing platform. Biomass of the target taxa, however, is not typically determined prior to HTS, and here, we show that when abundances of the samples differ to a large degree, this standard practice can lead to a perceived bias in community richness and composition. Fungal signal in settled dust of five university teaching laboratory classrooms, one of which was used for a mycology course, was surveyed. The fungal richness and composition in the dust of the nonmycology classrooms were remarkably similar to each other, while the mycology classroom was dominated by abundantly sporulating specimen fungi, particularly puffballs, and appeared to have a lower overall richness based on rarefaction curves and richness estimators. The fungal biomass was three to five times higher in the mycology classroom than the other classrooms, indicating that fungi added to the mycology classroom swamped the background fungi present in indoor air. Thus, the high abundance of a few taxa can skew the perception of richness and composition when samples are sequenced to an even depth. Next, we used in silico manipulations of the observed data to confirm that a unique signature can be identified with HTS approaches when the source is abundant, whether or not the taxon identity is distinct. Lastly, aerobiology of indoor fungi is discussed. PMID:23880792

  19. Sequences of Regressions Distinguish Nonmechanical from Mechanical Associations between Metabolic Factors, Body Composition, and Bone in Healthy Postmenopausal Women123

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Gail R; Prentice, Ann

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is increasing recognition of complex interrelations between the endocrine functions of bone and fat tissues or organs. Objective: The objective was to describe nonmechanical and mechanical links between metabolic factors, body composition, and bone with the use of graphical Markov models. Methods: Seventy postmenopausal women with a mean ± SD age of 62.3 ± 3.7 y and body mass index (in kg/m2) of 24.9 ± 3.8 were recruited. Bone outcomes were peripheral quantitative computed tomography measures of the distal and diaphyseal tibia, cross-sectional area (CSA), volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD), and cortical CSA. Biomarkers of osteoblast and adipocyte function were plasma concentrations of leptin, adiponectin, osteocalcin, undercarboxylated osteocalcin (UCOC), and phylloquinone. Body composition measurements were lean and percent fat mass, which were derived with the use of a 4-compartment model. Sequences of Regressions, a subclass of graphical Markov models, were used to describe the direct (nonmechanical) and indirect (mechanical) interrelations between metabolic factors and bone by simultaneously modeling multiple bone outcomes and their relation with biomarker outcomes with lean mass, percent fat mass, and height as intermediate explanatory variables. Results: The graphical Markov models showed both direct and indirect associations linking plasma leptin and adiponectin concentrations with CSA and vBMD. At the distal tibia, lean mass, height, and adiponectin-UCOC interaction were directly explanatory of CSA (R2 = 0.45); at the diaphysis, lean mass, percent fat mass, leptin, osteocalcin, and age-adiponectin interaction were directly explanatory of CSA (R2 = 0.49). The regression models exploring direct associations for vBMD were much weaker, with R2 = 0.15 and 0.18 at the distal and diaphyseal sites, respectively. Lean mass and UCOC were associated, and the global Markov property of the graph indicated that this association was explained by

  20. Backbone tree for Chaetothyriales with four new species of Minimelanolocus from aquatic habitats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Ying; Udayanga, Dhanushka; Luo, Zong-Long; Chen, Li-Jiao; Zhou, De-Qun; Su, Hong Yan; Hyde, Kevin D

    2015-11-01

    We are studying the freshwater lignicolous fungi along a north-south latitudinal gradient in Asia. In this paper, fresh collections of Minimelanolocus from submerged wood in streams in Yunnan Province, China are characterised based on morphology and molecular phylogeny based on three rDNA regions: 18S (SSU), ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 (ITS) and 28S nuclear rDNA (LSU). The phylogenetic analysis of combined LSU and SSU sequence data and a separate analysis of ITS placed the isolates within the family Herpotrichiellaceae, order Chaetothyriales. An updated phylogenetic backbone tree for Chaetothyriales is provided with available ex-type and additional isolates. One of the isolates collected was identified as Minimelanolocus obscurus based on morphology and molecular data. Minimelanolocus aquaticus, M. asiaticus, M. curvatus and M. melanicus are described as new species considering the interspecific ITS variability and morphology. The phylogenetic placement of Minimelanolocus in Chaetothyriales is novel and provides new sequence data for the genus as a distinct lineage in Chaetothyriales. The conidial characters of all the known species in the genus are summarized. Descriptions and illustrations are provided for the five species of Minimelanolocus with notes on their taxonomy and phylogeny. PMID:26466879

  1. Water proton spin saturation affects measured protein backbone 15 N spin relaxation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kang; Tjandra, Nico

    2011-12-01

    Protein backbone 15N NMR spin relaxation rates are useful in characterizing the protein dynamics and structures. To observe the protein nuclear-spin resonances a pulse sequence has to include a water suppression scheme. There are two commonly employed methods, saturating or dephasing the water spins with pulse field gradients and keeping them unperturbed with flip-back pulses. Here different water suppression methods were incorporated into pulse sequences to measure 15N longitudinal T1 and transversal rotating-frame T1ρ spin relaxation. Unexpectedly the 15N T1 relaxation time constants varied significantly with the choice of water suppression method. For a 25-kDa Escherichiacoli. glutamine binding protein (GlnBP) the T1 values acquired with the pulse sequence containing a water dephasing gradient are on average 20% longer than the ones obtained using a pulse sequence containing the water flip-back pulse. In contrast the two T1ρ data sets are correlated without an apparent offset. The average T1 difference was reduced to 12% when the experimental recycle delay was doubled, while the average T1 values from the flip-back measurements were nearly unchanged. Analysis of spectral signal to noise ratios ( s/ n) showed the apparent slower 15N relaxation obtained with the water dephasing experiment originated from the differences in 1H N recovery for each relaxation time point. This in turn offset signal reduction from 15N relaxation decay. The artifact becomes noticeable when the measured 15N relaxation time constant is comparable to recycle delay, e.g., the 15N T1 of medium to large proteins. The 15N relaxation rates measured with either water suppression schemes yield reasonable fits to the structure. However, data from the saturated scheme results in significantly lower Model-Free order parameters (< S2> = 0.81) than the non-saturated ones (< S2> = 0.88), indicating such order parameters may be previously underestimated.

  2. Thin Films Formed from Conjugated Polymers with Ionic, Water-Soluble Backbones.

    PubMed

    Voortman, Thomas P; Chiechi, Ryan C

    2015-12-30

    This paper compares the morphologies of films of conjugated polymers in which the backbone (main chain) and pendant groups are varied between ionic/hydrophilic and aliphatic/hydrophobic. We observe that conjugated polymers in which the pendant groups and backbone are matched, either ionic-ionic or hydrophobic-hydrophobic, form smooth, structured, homogeneous films from water (ionic) or tetrahydrofuran (hydrophobic). Mismatched conjugated polymers, by contrast, form inhomogeneous films with rough topologies. The polymers with ionic backbone chains are conjugated polyions (conjugated polymers with closed-shell charges in the backbone), which are semiconducting materials with tunable bad-gaps, not unlike uncharged conjugated polymers. PMID:25723354

  3. Trimethylamine Ν-oxide Influence on the Backbone of Proteins: An Oligoglycine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Char Y.; Lynch, Gillian C.; Kokubo, Hironori; Pettitt, Bernard M.

    2010-02-15

    The study of organic osmolytes has been pivotal in demonstrating the role of solvent effects on the protein backbone in the folding process. Although a thermodynamic description of the interactions between the protein backbone and osmolyte has been well defined, the structural analysis of the effect of osmolyte on the protein backbone has been incomplete. Therefore, we have performed simulations of a peptide backbone model, glycine₁₅, in protecting osmolyte trimethylamine Ν-oxide (TMAO) solution, in order to determine the effect of the solution structure on the conformation of the peptide backbone. We show that the models chosen show that the ensemble of backbone structures shifts toward a more collapsed state in TMAO solution as compared with pure water solution. The collapse is consistent with preferential exclusion of the osmolyte caused by unfavorable interactions between osmolyte and peptide backbone. The exclusion is caused by strong triplet correlations of osmolyte, water, and peptide backbone. This provides a clear mechanism showing that even a modest concentration of TMAO forces the protein backbone to adopt a more collapsed structure in the absence of side chain effects.

  4. Sequencing-Based Analysis of the Bacterial and Fungal Composition of Kefir Grains and Milks from Multiple Sources

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, Alan J.; O’Sullivan, Orla; Hill, Colin; Ross, R. Paul; Cotter, Paul D.

    2013-01-01

    Kefir is a fermented milk-based beverage to which a number of health-promoting properties have been attributed. The microbes responsible for the fermentation of milk to produce kefir consist of a complex association of bacteria and yeasts, bound within a polysaccharide matrix, known as the kefir grain. The consistency of this microbial population, and that present in the resultant beverage, has been the subject of a number of previous, almost exclusively culture-based, studies which have indicated differences depending on geographical location and culture conditions. However, culture-based identification studies are limited by virtue of only detecting species with the ability to grow on the specific medium used and thus culture-independent, molecular-based techniques offer the potential for a more comprehensive analysis of such communities. Here we describe a detailed investigation of the microbial population, both bacterial and fungal, of kefir, using high-throughput sequencing to analyse 25 kefir milks and associated grains sourced from 8 geographically distinct regions. This is the first occasion that this technology has been employed to investigate the fungal component of these populations or to reveal the microbial composition of such an extensive number of kefir grains or milks. As a result several genera and species not previously identified in kefir were revealed. Our analysis shows that the bacterial populations in kefir are dominated by 2 phyla, the Firmicutes and the Proteobacteria. It was also established that the fungal populations of kefir were dominated by the genera Kazachstania, Kluyveromyces and Naumovozyma, but that a variable sub-dominant population also exists. PMID:23894461

  5. Photopolymerization of aromatic acrylate containing phosphine oxide backbone and its application to holographic recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yu Mi; Yoon, Sung Cheol; Han, Mijeong

    2007-12-01

    Photopolymer compositions for holographic recording were prepared from aromatic diacrylate having phosphine oxide backbone, a hybrid sol-gel, and photoinitiator. The physical and holographic properties of photopolymer were controlled by the ratio of precursor triethoxysilylpropyl polyethyleneglycol carbamate (TSPEG) in a hybrid sol-gel binder and the content of monomer. The photopolymerization rate and conversion of monomer were monitored by photo-differential scanning calorimetry (photo-DSC). Holographic recording was attempted by photopolymerization of the monomers in the photopolymer film using a 532 nm laser. Holographic gratings were written into the photopolymer samples by interfering two collimated plane wave beams. The temporal growth of the diffracted power was monitored in real-time at 785 nm laser. Contents of monomer and TESPEG were changed in the range of 0-60 wt% and the composition were optimized in terms of diffraction efficiency. Photopolymer film exhibited very high diffraction efficiency of 93.5% and low shrinkage (<0.5%) after the contents of monomer, binder, and TSPEG were optimized.

  6. Composition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nemanich, Donald, Ed.

    1974-01-01

    The articles in this special issue of the "Illinois English Bulletin" concern the state of composition instruction at the secondary and college levels. The titles and authors are "Monologues or Dialogues? A Plea for Literacy" by Dr. Alfred J. Lindsey, "Teaching Composition: Curiouser and Curiouser" by Denny Brandon, and "Teaching Writing to High…

  7. Protein sequence analysis by incorporating modified chaos game and physicochemical properties into Chou's general pseudo amino acid composition.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chunrui; Sun, Dandan; Liu, Shenghui; Zhang, Yusen

    2016-10-01

    In this contribution we introduced a novel graphical method to compare protein sequences. By mapping a protein sequence into 3D space based on codons and physicochemical properties of 20 amino acids, we are able to get a unique P-vector from the 3D curve. This approach is consistent with wobble theory of amino acids. We compute the distance between sequences by their P-vectors to measure similarities/dissimilarities among protein sequences. Finally, we use our method to analyze four datasets and get better results compared with previous approaches. PMID:27375218

  8. Strong liquid-crystalline polymeric compositions

    DOEpatents

    Dowell, F.

    1993-12-07

    Strong liquid-crystalline polymeric (LCP) compositions of matter are described. LCP backbones are combined with liquid crystalline (LC) side chains in a manner which maximizes molecular ordering through interdigitation of the side chains, thereby yielding materials which are predicted to have superior mechanical properties over existing LCPs. The theoretical design of LCPs having such characteristics includes consideration of the spacing distance between side chains along the backbone, the need for rigid sections in the backbone and in the side chains, the degree of polymerization, the length of the side chains, the regularity of the spacing of the side chains along the backbone, the interdigitation of side chains in sub-molecular strips, the packing of the side chains on one or two sides of the backbone to which they are attached, the symmetry of the side chains, the points of attachment of the side chains to the backbone, the flexibility and size of the chemical group connecting each side chain to the backbone, the effect of semiflexible sections in the backbone and the side chains, and the choice of types of dipolar and/or hydrogen bonding forces in the backbones and the side chains for easy alignment. 27 figures.

  9. Strong liquid-crystalline polymeric compositions

    DOEpatents

    Dowell, Flonnie

    1993-01-01

    Strong liquid-crystalline polymeric (LCP) compositions of matter. LCP backbones are combined with liquid crystalline (LC) side chains in a manner which maximizes molecular ordering through interdigitation of the side chains, thereby yielding materials which are predicted to have superior mechanical properties over existing LCPs. The theoretical design of LCPs having such characteristics includes consideration of the spacing distance between side chains along the backbone, the need for rigid sections in the backbone and in the side chains, the degree of polymerization, the length of the side chains, the regularity of the spacing of the side chains along the backbone, the interdigitation of side chains in sub-molecular strips, the packing of the side chains on one or two sides of the backbone to which they are attached, the symmetry of the side chains, the points of attachment of the side chains to the backbone, the flexibility and size of the chemical group connecting each side chain to the backbone, the effect of semiflexible sections in the backbone and the side chains, and the choice of types of dipolar and/or hydrogen bonding forces in the backbones and the side chains for easy alignment.

  10. Pendant Dynamics of Ethylene-Oxide Containing Polymers with Diverse Backbones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartels, Joshua; Wang, Jing-Han Helen; Chen, Quan; Runt, James; Colby, Ralph

    In the last twenty years, a wide variety of ion conducting polymers have used ether oxygens to facilitate ion conduction, and it is therefore important to understand the dynamics of ether oxygens (EOs) when attached to different polymer backbones. Four different EO-containing polymer architectures are studied by dielectric spectroscopy to understand the backbone effect on the EO dipoles. Polysiloxanes, polyphosphazenes, polymethylmethacrylates, and a polyester ether are compared, with different EO pendant lengths for the siloxane and methylmethacrylate backbones. The flexible polysiloxanes and polyphosphazene backbones impart superior segmental mobility with a glass transition temperature 15 K lower than that of the organic backbone polymers. Short EO pendants are found to impart a lower static dielectric constant at comparable EO content as compared to longer EO pendants of either inorganic or organic backbones. The long-pendant polymethylmethacrylate polymers show two relaxations corresponding to fast EOs near the pendant tail end and slow EOs close to the slower backbone, whereas the long-pendant polysiloxane shows a single relaxation due to the siloxane backbone relaxing faster than the EO pendant. Supported by the NSF Division of Materials Research Polymers Program through Grants DMR-1404586 (RHC) and DMR-1505953 (JR).

  11. Live-attenuated influenza A virus vaccines using a B virus backbone

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The currently FDA-licensed live attenuated influenza virus vaccine contains a trivalent mixture of types A (H1N1 and H3N2) and B vaccine viruses. The two A virus vaccines have the backbone of a cold-adapted influenza A virus and the B virus vaccine has the six backbone segments derived from a cold-...

  12. Abundances of Triacylglycerol Positional Isomers and Enantiomers Comprised of a Dipalmitoylglycerol Backbone and Short- or Medium-chain Fatty Acids in Bovine Milk Fat.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Toshiharu; Watanabe, Natsuko; Yoshinaga, Kazuaki; Mizobe, Hoyo; Kojima, Koichi; Kuroda, Ikuma; Odanaka, Yuki; Saito, Tadao; Beppu, Fumiaki; Gotoh, Naohiro

    2015-01-01

    Bovine milk fat (BMF) is composed of triacylglycerols (TAG) rich in palmitic acid (P), oleic acid (O), and short-chain or medium-chain fatty acids (SCFAs or MCFAs). The composition and binding positions of the fatty acids on the glycerol backbone determine their physical and nutritional properties. SCFAs and MCFAs are known to characteristically bind to the sn-3 position of the TAGs in BMF; however, there are very few non-destructive analyses of TAG enantiomers binding the fatty acids at this position. We previously reported a method to resolve the enantiomers of TAGs, binding both long-chain saturated fatty acid and unsaturated fatty acid at the sn-1 and 3 positions, in palm oil, fish oil, and marine mammal oil using chiral HPLC. Here, we further developed a method to resolve several TAG enantiomers containing a dipalmitoyl (PP) glycerol backbone and one SCFA (or MCFA) in BMF. We revealed that the predominant TAG structure in BMF was homochiral, such as 1,2-dipalmitoyl-3-butyroyl-sn-glycerol. This is the first quantitative determination of many TAG enantiomers, which bind to a SCFA or MCFA, in BMF was evaluated simultaneously. Furthermore, the results indicated that the amount ratios of the positional isomers and enantiomers of TAGs consisting of a dipalmitoyl (PP) glycerol backbone and SCFA (or MCFA), resembled the whole TAG structures containing the other diacylglycerol backbones consisting of P, O, myristic acid, and/or stearic acid in BMF. PMID:26329769

  13. Solid state radiation chemistry of the DNA backbone

    SciTech Connect

    Bernhard, W.A.

    1989-09-01

    The long term goal of this program is to determine the fundamental rules needed to predict the type and yield of damage produced in DNA due to direct effects of ionizing radiation. The focus is on damage to the sugar-phosphate backbone, damage that would lead to strand breaks. Model systems have been chosen that permit various aspects of this problem to be investigated. The emphasis will be on single crystals of monosaccharides, nucleosides, and nucleotides but will also include some powder work on polynucleotides. In these model systems, free radical products and reactions are observed by electron spin resonance (ESR) and electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) techniques. The information thus gained is used in constructing rules that predict what primary free radicals are formed in single crystals of model compounds and the reactions stemming from the primary radicals. The formulation of a set of rules that work in model systems will represent a major advance toward formulating a set of rules that predict the direct damage in DNA itself. In a broader context this program is part of the effort to understand and predict the effects of exposure to ionizing radiation received at low dose rates over long periods of time. Assessment of low dose effects requires a basic understanding of the action of radiation at the molecular level. By contributing to that basic understanding, this program will help solve the problems of risk assessment under low dose conditions. 5 refs., 3 figs.

  14. Backbone Assignment of the MALT1 Paracaspase by Solution NMR

    PubMed Central

    Unnerståle, Sofia; Nowakowski, Michal; Baraznenok, Vera; Stenberg, Gun; Lindberg, Jimmy; Mayzel, Maxim; Orekhov, Vladislav; Agback, Tatiana

    2016-01-01

    Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma translocation protein 1 (MALT1) is a unique paracaspase protein whose protease activity mediates oncogenic NF-κB signalling in activated B cell-like diffuse large B cell lymphomas (ABC-DLBCLs). ABC-DLBCLs are aggressive lymphomas with high resistance to current chemotherapies. Low survival rate among patients emphasizes the urgent need for alternative treatment options. The characterization of the MALT1 will be an essential tool for developing new target-directed drugs against MALT1 dependent disorders. As the first step in the atomic-level NMR studies of the system, here we report, the 15N/13C/1H backbone assignment of the apo form of the MALT1 paracaspase region together with the third immunoglobulin-like (Ig3) domain, 44 kDa, by high resolution NMR. In addition, the non-uniform sampling (NUS) based targeted acquisition procedure is evaluated as a mean of decreasing acquisition and analysis time for larger proteins. PMID:26788853

  15. A New Secondary Structure Assignment Algorithm Using Cα Backbone Fragments

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Chen; Wang, Guishen; Liu, An; Xu, Shutan; Wang, Lincong; Zou, Shuxue

    2016-01-01

    The assignment of secondary structure elements in proteins is a key step in the analysis of their structures and functions. We have developed an algorithm, SACF (secondary structure assignment based on Cα fragments), for secondary structure element (SSE) assignment based on the alignment of Cα backbone fragments with central poses derived by clustering known SSE fragments. The assignment algorithm consists of three steps: First, the outlier fragments on known SSEs are detected. Next, the remaining fragments are clustered to obtain the central fragments for each cluster. Finally, the central fragments are used as a template to make assignments. Following a large-scale comparison of 11 secondary structure assignment methods, SACF, KAKSI and PROSS are found to have similar agreement with DSSP, while PCASSO agrees with DSSP best. SACF and PCASSO show preference to reducing residues in N and C cap regions, whereas KAKSI, P-SEA and SEGNO tend to add residues to the terminals when DSSP assignment is taken as standard. Moreover, our algorithm is able to assign subtle helices (310-helix, π-helix and left-handed helix) and make uniform assignments, as well as to detect rare SSEs in β-sheets or long helices as outlier fragments from other programs. The structural uniformity should be useful for protein structure classification and prediction, while outlier fragments underlie the structure–function relationship. PMID:26978354

  16. A New Secondary Structure Assignment Algorithm Using Cα Backbone Fragments.

    PubMed

    Cao, Chen; Wang, Guishen; Liu, An; Xu, Shutan; Wang, Lincong; Zou, Shuxue

    2016-01-01

    The assignment of secondary structure elements in proteins is a key step in the analysis of their structures and functions. We have developed an algorithm, SACF (secondary structure assignment based on Cα fragments), for secondary structure element (SSE) assignment based on the alignment of Cα backbone fragments with central poses derived by clustering known SSE fragments. The assignment algorithm consists of three steps: First, the outlier fragments on known SSEs are detected. Next, the remaining fragments are clustered to obtain the central fragments for each cluster. Finally, the central fragments are used as a template to make assignments. Following a large-scale comparison of 11 secondary structure assignment methods, SACF, KAKSI and PROSS are found to have similar agreement with DSSP, while PCASSO agrees with DSSP best. SACF and PCASSO show preference to reducing residues in N and C cap regions, whereas KAKSI, P-SEA and SEGNO tend to add residues to the terminals when DSSP assignment is taken as standard. Moreover, our algorithm is able to assign subtle helices (310-helix, π-helix and left-handed helix) and make uniform assignments, as well as to detect rare SSEs in β-sheets or long helices as outlier fragments from other programs. The structural uniformity should be useful for protein structure classification and prediction, while outlier fragments underlie the structure-function relationship. PMID:26978354

  17. Bond distances in polypeptide backbones depend on the local conformation.

    PubMed

    Improta, Roberto; Vitagliano, Luigi; Esposito, Luciana

    2015-06-01

    By combining quantum-mechanical analysis of small model peptides and statistical surveys of high-resolution protein structures, a systematic conformational dependence of bond lengths in polypeptide backbones has been unveiled which involves both the peptide bond (C-O and C-N) and those bonds centred on the C(α) atom. All of these bond lengths indeed display a systematic variability in the ψ angle according to both calculations and surveys of protein structures. The overall agreement between the computed and the statistical data suggests that these trends are essentially driven by local effects. The dependence of C(α) distances on ψ is governed by interactions between the σ system of the C(α) moiety and the C-O π system of the peptide bond. Maximum and minimum values for each bond distance are found for conformations with the specific bond perpendicular and parallel to the adjacent CONH peptide plane, respectively. On the other hand, the variability of the C-O and C-N distances is related to the strength of the interactions between the lone pair of the N atom and the C-O π* system, which is modulated by the ψ angle. The C-O and C-N distances are related but their trends are not strictly connected to peptide-bond planarity, although a correlation amongst all of these parameters is expected on the basis of the classical resonance model. PMID:26057667

  18. Quantitative Analysis of PMLA Nanoconjugate Components after Backbone Cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Hui; Patil, Rameshwar; Portilla-Arias, Jose; Black, Keith L.; Ljubimova, Julia Y.; Holler, Eggehard

    2015-01-01

    Multifunctional polymer nanoconjugates containing multiple components show great promise in cancer therapy, but in most cases complete analysis of each component is difficult. Polymalic acid (PMLA) based nanoconjugates have demonstrated successful brain and breast cancer treatment. They consist of multiple components including targeting antibodies, Morpholino antisense oligonucleotides (AONs), and endosome escape moieties. The component analysis of PMLA nanoconjugates is extremely difficult using conventional spectrometry and HPLC method. Taking advantage of the nature of polyester of PMLA, which can be cleaved by ammonium hydroxide, we describe a method to analyze the content of antibody and AON within nanoconjugates simultaneously using SEC-HPLC by selectively cleaving the PMLA backbone. The selected cleavage conditions only degrade PMLA without affecting the integrity and biological activity of the antibody. Although the amount of antibody could also be determined using the bicinchoninic acid (BCA) method, our selective cleavage method gives more reliable results and is more powerful. Our approach provides a new direction for the component analysis of polymer nanoconjugates and nanoparticles. PMID:25894227

  19. Thermogelling Biodegradable Polymers with Hydrophilic Backbones: PEG-g-PLGA

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Byeongmoon; Kibbey, Merinda R.; Birnbaum, Jerome C.; Won, You-Yeong; Gutowska, Anna

    2000-10-31

    The aqueous solutions of poly(ethylene glycol)grafted with poly(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid) flow freely at room temperature but form gels at higher temperature. The existence of micelles in water at low polymer concentration was confirmed by Cro-transmission electron microscopy and dye solubilization studies. The micellar diameter and critical micelle concentration are about 9 nm and 0.47 wt.% respectively. The critical gel concentration, above which a gel phase appears was 16 wt.% and sol-to-gel transition temperature was slightly affected by the concentration in the range of 16 {approx} 25 wt.%. At sol-to-gel transition, viscosity increased abruptly and C-NMR showed molecular motion of hydrophilic poly(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid) side-chains increased. The hydrogel of PEG-g-PLGA with hydrophilic backbones was transparent during degradation and remained a gel for one week, suggesting a promising material for short-term drug delivery.

  20. Backbone of complex networks of corporations: The flow of control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glattfelder, J. B.; Battiston, S.

    2009-09-01

    We present a methodology to extract the backbone of complex networks based on the weight and direction of links, as well as on nontopological properties of nodes. We show how the methodology can be applied in general to networks in which mass or energy is flowing along the links. In particular, the procedure enables us to address important questions in economics, namely, how control and wealth are structured and concentrated across national markets. We report on the first cross-country investigation of ownership networks, focusing on the stock markets of 48 countries around the world. On the one hand, our analysis confirms results expected on the basis of the literature on corporate control, namely, that in Anglo-Saxon countries control tends to be dispersed among numerous shareholders. On the other hand, it also reveals that in the same countries, control is found to be highly concentrated at the global level, namely, lying in the hands of very few important shareholders. Interestingly, the exact opposite is observed for European countries. These results have previously not been reported as they are not observable without the kind of network analysis developed here.

  1. Backbone of complex networks of corporations: the flow of control.

    PubMed

    Glattfelder, J B; Battiston, S

    2009-09-01

    We present a methodology to extract the backbone of complex networks based on the weight and direction of links, as well as on nontopological properties of nodes. We show how the methodology can be applied in general to networks in which mass or energy is flowing along the links. In particular, the procedure enables us to address important questions in economics, namely, how control and wealth are structured and concentrated across national markets. We report on the first cross-country investigation of ownership networks, focusing on the stock markets of 48 countries around the world. On the one hand, our analysis confirms results expected on the basis of the literature on corporate control, namely, that in Anglo-Saxon countries control tends to be dispersed among numerous shareholders. On the other hand, it also reveals that in the same countries, control is found to be highly concentrated at the global level, namely, lying in the hands of very few important shareholders. Interestingly, the exact opposite is observed for European countries. These results have previously not been reported as they are not observable without the kind of network analysis developed here. PMID:19905177

  2. Aggregation tendencies in the p53 family are modulated by backbone hydrogen bonds.

    PubMed

    Cino, Elio A; Soares, Iaci N; Pedrote, Murilo M; de Oliveira, Guilherme A P; Silva, Jerson L

    2016-01-01

    The p53 family of proteins is comprised of p53, p63 and p73. Because the p53 DNA binding domain (DBD) is naturally unstable and possesses an amyloidogenic sequence, it is prone to form amyloid fibrils, causing loss of functions. To develop p53 therapies, it is necessary to understand the molecular basis of p53 instability and aggregation. Light scattering, thioflavin T (ThT) and high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) assays showed that p53 DBD aggregates faster and to a greater extent than p63 and p73 DBDs, and was more susceptible to denaturation. The aggregation tendencies of p53, p63, and p73 DBDs were strongly correlated with their thermal stabilities. Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations indicated specific regions of structural heterogeneity unique to p53, which may be promoted by elevated incidence of exposed backbone hydrogen bonds (BHBs). The results indicate regions of structural vulnerability in the p53 DBD, suggesting new targetable sites for modulating p53 stability and aggregation, a potential approach to cancer therapy. PMID:27600721

  3. Aggregation tendencies in the p53 family are modulated by backbone hydrogen bonds

    PubMed Central

    Cino, Elio A.; Soares, Iaci N.; Pedrote, Murilo M.; de Oliveira, Guilherme A. P.; Silva, Jerson L.

    2016-01-01

    The p53 family of proteins is comprised of p53, p63 and p73. Because the p53 DNA binding domain (DBD) is naturally unstable and possesses an amyloidogenic sequence, it is prone to form amyloid fibrils, causing loss of functions. To develop p53 therapies, it is necessary to understand the molecular basis of p53 instability and aggregation. Light scattering, thioflavin T (ThT) and high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) assays showed that p53 DBD aggregates faster and to a greater extent than p63 and p73 DBDs, and was more susceptible to denaturation. The aggregation tendencies of p53, p63, and p73 DBDs were strongly correlated with their thermal stabilities. Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations indicated specific regions of structural heterogeneity unique to p53, which may be promoted by elevated incidence of exposed backbone hydrogen bonds (BHBs). The results indicate regions of structural vulnerability in the p53 DBD, suggesting new targetable sites for modulating p53 stability and aggregation, a potential approach to cancer therapy. PMID:27600721

  4. Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, T.; McCullough, R.L.; Pipes, R.B.

    1986-10-01

    The degree of control over material properties that is typified by hybrid composites is transforming engineering design. In part because homogeneous materials such as metals and alloys do not offer comparable control, specifying a material and designing a component have traditionally taken place separately. As composites begin to replace traditional materials in fields and such as aerospace, component design and the specification of a material are merging and becoming aspects of a single process. The controllable microstructure of a composite allows it to be tailored to match the distribution of stresses to which it will be subject. At the same time components must come to reflect the distinctive nature of composites: their directional properties and the intricate forms they can be given through processes such as injection molding, filament winding and three-dimensional weaving. The complexity inherent in conceiving components and their materials at the same time suggests engineering design will grow increasingly dependent on computers and multidisciplinary teams. Such an approach will harness the full potential of composites for the technologies of the future. 10 figures.

  5. Solution structure and backbone dynamics of Mason-Pfizer monkey virus (MPMV) nucleocapsid protein.

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Y.; Kaluarachchi, K.; Giedroc, D. P.

    1998-01-01

    Retroviral nucleocapsid proteins (NCPs) are CCHC-type zinc finger proteins that mediate virion RNA binding activities associated with retrovirus assembly and genomic RNA encapsidation. Mason-Pfizer monkey virus (MPMV), a type D retrovirus, encodes a 96-amino acid nucleocapsid protein, which contains two Cys-X2-Cys-X4-His-X4-Cys (CCHC) zinc fingers connected by an unusually long 15-amino acid linker. Homonuclear, two-dimensional sensitivity-enhanced 15N-1H, three-dimensional 15N-1H, and triple resonance NMR spectroscopy have been used to determine the solution structure and residue-specific backbone dynamics of the structured core domain of MPMV NCP containing residues 21-80. Structure calculations and spectral density mapping of N-H bond vector mobility reveal that MPMV NCP 21-80 is best described as two independently folded, rotationally uncorrelated globular domains connected by a seven-residue flexible linker consisting of residues 42-48. The N-terminal CCHC zinc finger domain (residues 24-37) appears to adopt a fold like that described previously for HIV-1 NCP; however, residues within this domain and the immediately adjacent linker region (residues 38-41) are characterized by extensive conformational averaging on the micros-ms time scale at 25 degrees C. In contrast to other NCPs, residues 49-77, which includes the C-terminal CCHC zinc-finger (residues 53-66), comprise a well-folded globular domain with the Val49-Pro-Gly-Leu52 sequence and C-terminal tail residues 67-77 characterized by amide proton exchange properties and 15N R1, R2, and (1H-15N) NOE values indistinguishable to residues in the core C-terminal finger. Twelve refined structural models of MPMV NCP residues 49-80 (pairwise backbone RMSD of 0.77 A) reveal that the side chains of the conserved Pro50 and Trp62 are in van der Waals contact with one another. Residues 70-73 in the C-terminal tail adopt a reverse turn-like structure. Ile77 is involved in extensive van der Waals contact with the core

  6. Single cell genotyping of exome sequencing-identified mutations to characterize the clonal composition and evolution of inv(16) AML in a CBL mutated clonal hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Niemöller, Christoph; Renz, Nathalie; Bleul, Sabine; Blagitko-Dorfs, Nadja; Greil, Christine; Yoshida, Kenichi; Pfeifer, Dietmar; Follo, Marie; Duyster, Justus; Claus, Rainer; Ogawa, Seishi; Lübbert, Michael; Becker, Heiko

    2016-08-01

    We recently described the development of an inv(16) acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in a CBL mutated clonal hematopoiesis. Here, we further characterized the clonal composition and evolution of the AML based on the genetic information from the bulk specimen and analyses of individual bone marrow cells for mutations in CAND1, PTPRT, and DOCK6. To control for allele dropout, heterozygous polymorphisms located close to the respective mutation loci were assessed in parallel. The clonal composition concluded from exome sequencing suggested a proliferation advantage associated with the acquisition of mutations in CAND1, PTPRT, and DOCK6. Out of 102 single cell sequencing reactions on these mutations and the respective polymorphisms, analyses yielded conclusive results for at least 2 mutation sites in 12 cells. The single cell genotyping not only confirmed the co-occurrence of the PTPRT, CAND1 and DOCK6 mutations in the same AML clone but also revealed a clonal hierarchy, as the PTPRT mutation was likely acquired after the CAND1 and DOCK6 mutations. This insight had not been possible based solely on the exome sequencing data and suggests that the mutation in PTPRT, which encodes a STAT3-inhibiting protein tyrosine phosphatase, contributed to the AML development at a later stage by enhancing proliferation. PMID:27244256

  7. MCBT: Multi-Hop Cluster Based Stable Backbone Trees for Data Collection and Dissemination in WSNs.

    PubMed

    Shin, Inyoung; Kim, Moonseong; Mutka, Matt W; Choo, Hyunseung; Lee, Tae-Jin

    2009-01-01

    We propose a stable backbone tree construction algorithm using multi-hop clusters for wireless sensor networks (WSNs). The hierarchical cluster structure has advantages in data fusion and aggregation. Energy consumption can be decreased by managing nodes with cluster heads. Backbone nodes, which are responsible for performing and managing multi-hop communication, can reduce the communication overhead such as control traffic and minimize the number of active nodes. Previous backbone construction algorithms, such as Hierarchical Cluster-based Data Dissemination (HCDD) and Multicluster, Mobile, Multimedia radio network (MMM), consume energy quickly. They are designed without regard to appropriate factors such as residual energy and degree (the number of connections or edges to other nodes) of a node for WSNs. Thus, the network is quickly disconnected or has to reconstruct a backbone. We propose a distributed algorithm to create a stable backbone by selecting the nodes with higher energy or degree as the cluster heads. This increases the overall network lifetime. Moreover, the proposed method balances energy consumption by distributing the traffic load among nodes around the cluster head. In the simulation, the proposed scheme outperforms previous clustering schemes in terms of the average and the standard deviation of residual energy or degree of backbone nodes, the average residual energy of backbone nodes after disseminating the sensed data, and the network lifetime. PMID:22454570

  8. Generation of Backbone-Free, Low Transgene Copy Plants by Launching T-DNA from the Agrobacterium Chromosome1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Oltmanns, Heiko; Frame, Bronwyn; Lee, Lan-Ying; Johnson, Susan; Li, Bo; Wang, Kan; Gelvin, Stanton B.

    2010-01-01

    In both applied and basic research, Agrobacterium-mediated transformation is commonly used to introduce genes into plants. We investigated the effect of three Agrobacterium tumefaciens strains and five transferred (T)-DNA origins of replication on transformation frequency, transgene copy number, and the frequency of integration of non-T-DNA portions of the T-DNA-containing vector (backbone) into the genome of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and maize (Zea mays). Launching T-DNA from the picA locus of the Agrobacterium chromosome increases the frequency of single transgene integration events and almost eliminates the presence of vector backbone sequences in transgenic plants. Along with novel Agrobacterium strains we have developed, our findings are useful for improving the quality of T-DNA integration events. PMID:20023148

  9. Backbone and side-chain resonance assignment of the A147T polymorph of mouse TSPO in complex with a high-affinity radioligand.

    PubMed

    Jaremko, Mariusz; Jaremko, Łukasz; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Zweckstetter, Markus

    2016-04-01

    The integral polytopic membrane protein TSPO is the target for numerous endogenous and synthetic ligands. However, the affinity of many ligands is influenced by a common polymorphism in TSPO, in which an alanine at position 147 is replaced by threonine, thereby complicating the use of several radioligands for clinical diagnosis. In contrast, the best-characterized TSPO ligand (R)-PK11195 binds with similar affinity to both variants of mitochondrial TSPO (wild-type and A147T variant). Here we report the (1)H, (13)C, (15)N backbone and side-chain resonance assignment of the A147T polymorph of TSPO from Mus Musculus in complex with (R)-PK11195 in DPC detergent micelles. More than 90 % of all resonances were sequence-specifically assigned, demonstrating the ability to obtain high-quality spectral data for both the backbone and the side-chains of medically relevant integral membrane proteins. PMID:26364056

  10. Computation-Guided Backbone Grafting of a Discontinuous Motif onto a Protein Scaffold

    SciTech Connect

    Azoitei, Mihai L.; Correia, Bruno E.; Ban, Yih-En Andrew; Carrico, Chris; Kalyuzhniy, Oleksandr; Chen, Lei; Schroeter, Alexandria; Huang, Po-Ssu; McLellan, Jason S.; Kwong, Peter D.; Baker, David; Strong, Roland K.; Schief, William R.

    2012-02-07

    The manipulation of protein backbone structure to control interaction and function is a challenge for protein engineering. We integrated computational design with experimental selection for grafting the backbone and side chains of a two-segment HIV gp120 epitope, targeted by the cross-neutralizing antibody b12, onto an unrelated scaffold protein. The final scaffolds bound b12 with high specificity and with affinity similar to that of gp120, and crystallographic analysis of a scaffold bound to b12 revealed high structural mimicry of the gp120-b12 complex structure. The method can be generalized to design other functional proteins through backbone grafting.

  11. Uganda's National Transmission Backbone Infrastructure Project: Technical Challenges and the Way Forward

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulega, T.; Kyeyune, A.; Onek, P.; Sseguya, R.; Mbabazi, D.; Katwiremu, E.

    2011-10-01

    Several publications have identified technical challenges facing Uganda's National Transmission Backbone Infrastructure project. This research addresses the technical limitations of the National Transmission Backbone Infrastructure project, evaluates the goals of the project, and compares the results against the technical capability of the backbone. The findings of the study indicate a bandwidth deficit, which will be addressed by using dense wave division multiplexing repeaters, leasing bandwidth from private companies. Microwave links for redundancy, a Network Operation Center for operation and maintenance, and deployment of wireless interoperability for microwave access as a last-mile solution are also suggested.

  12. Composite-180° pulse-based symmetry sequences to recouple proton chemical shift anisotropy tensors under ultrafast MAS solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Malon, Michal; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Nishiyama, Yusuke

    2015-01-01

    There is considerable interest in the measurement of proton ((1)H) chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensors to obtain deeper insights into H-bonding interactions which find numerous applications in chemical and biological systems. However, the presence of strong (1)H/(1)H dipolar interaction makes it difficult to determine small size (1)H CSAs from the homogeneously broadened NMR spectra. Previously reported pulse sequences for (1)H CSA recoupling are prone to the effects of radio frequency field (B1) inhomogeneity. In the present work we have carried out a systematic study using both numerical and experimental approaches to evaluate γ-encoded radio frequency (RF) pulse sequences based on R-symmetries that recouple (1)H CSA in the indirect dimension of a 2D (1)H/(1)H anisotropic/isotropic chemical shift correlation experiment under ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) frequencies. The spectral resolution and sensitivity can be significantly improved in both frequency dimensions of the 2D (1)H/(1)H correlation spectrum without decoupling (1)H/(1)H dipolar couplings but by using ultrafast MAS rates up to 70 kHz. We successfully demonstrate that with a reasonable RF field requirement (<200 kHz) a set of symmetry-based recoupling sequences, with a series of phase-alternating 270°0-90°180 composite-180° pulses, are more robust in combating B1 inhomogeneity effects. In addition, our results show that the new pulse sequences render remarkable (1)H CSA recoupling efficiency and undistorted CSA lineshapes. Experimental results on citric acid and malonic acid comparing the efficiencies of these newly developed pulse sequences with that of previously reported CSA recoupling pulse sequences are also reported under ultrafast MAS conditions. PMID:25497846

  13. Animal Protection and Structural Studies of a Consensus Sequence Vaccine Targeting the Receptor Binding Domain of the Type IV Pilus of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, Daniel J.; Churchill, Mair E.A.; Irvin, Randall T.; Hodges, Robert S.

    2008-09-23

    One of the main obstacles in the development of a vaccine against Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the requirement that it is protective against a wide range of virulent strains. We have developed a synthetic-peptide consensus-sequence vaccine (Cs1) that targets the host receptor-binding domain (RBD) of the type IV pilus of P. aeruginosa. Here, we show that this vaccine provides increased protection against challenge by the four piliated strains that we have examined (PAK, PAO, KB7 and P1) in the A.BY/SnJ mouse model of acute P. aeruginosa infection. To further characterize the consensus sequence, we engineered Cs1 into the PAK monomeric pilin protein and determined the crystal structure of the chimeric Cs1 pilin to 1.35 {angstrom} resolution. The substitutions (T130K and E135P) used to create Cs1 do not disrupt the conserved backbone conformation of the pilin RBD. In fact, based on the Cs1 pilin structure, we hypothesize that the E135P substitution bolsters the conserved backbone conformation and may partially explain the immunological activity of Cs1. Structural analysis of Cs1, PAK and K122-4 pilins reveal substitutions of non-conserved residues in the RBD are compensated for by complementary changes in the rest of the pilin monomer. Thus, the interactions between the RBD and the rest of the pilin can either be mediated by polar interactions of a hydrogen bond network in some strains or by hydrophobic interactions in others. Both configurations maintain a conserved backbone conformation of the RBD. Thus, the backbone conformation is critical in our consensus-sequence vaccine design and that cross-reactivity of the antibody response may be modulated by the composition of exposed side-chains on the surface of the RBD. This structure will guide our future vaccine design by focusing our investigation on the four variable residue positions that are exposed on the RBD surface.

  14. Animal Protection and Structural Studies of a Consensus Sequence VaccineTargeting the Receptor Binding Domain of the Type IV Pilus of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Daniel J.; Churchill, Mair E. A.; Irvin, Randall T.; Hodges, Robert S.

    2010-01-01

    One of the main obstacles in the development of a vaccine against Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the requirement that it is protective against a wide range of virulent strains. We have developed a synthetic-peptide consensus-sequence vaccine (Cs1) that targets the host receptor-binding domain (RBD) of the type IV pilus of P. aeruginosa. Here, we show that this vaccine provides increased protection against challenge by the four piliated strains that we have examined (PAK, PAO, KB7 and P1) in the A.BY/SnJ mouse model of acute P. aeruginosa infection. To further characterize the consensus sequence, we engineered Cs1 into the PAK monomeric pilin protein and determined the crystal structure of the chimeric Cs1 pilin to 1.35 Å resolution. The substitutions (T130K and E135P) used to create Cs1 do not disrupt the conserved backbone conformation of the pilin RBD. In fact, based on the Cs1 pilin structure, we hypothesize that the E135P substitution bolsters the conserved backbone conformation and may partially explain the immunological activity of Cs1. Structural analysis of Cs1, PAK and K122-4 pilins reveal substitutions of non-conserved residues in the RBD are compensated for by complementary changes in the rest of the pilin monomer. Thus, the interactions between the RBD and the rest of the pilin can either be mediated by polar interactions of a hydrogen bond network in some strains or by hydrophobic interactions in others. Both configurations maintain a conserved backbone conformation of the RBD. Thus, the backbone conformation is critical in our consensus-sequence vaccine design and that cross-reactivity of the antibody response may be modulated by the composition of exposed side-chains on the surface of the RBD. This structure will guide our future vaccine design by focusing our investigation on the four variable residue positions that are exposed on the RBD surface. PMID:17936788

  15. DNA extraction protocols cause differences in 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing efficiency but not in community profile composition or structure

    SciTech Connect

    2014-12-01

    The recent development of methods applying next-generation sequencing to microbial community characterization has led to the proliferation of these studies in a wide variety of sample types. Yet, variation in the physical properties of environmental samples demands that optimal DNA extraction techniques be explored for each new environment. The microbiota associated with many species of insects offer an extraction challenge as they are frequently surrounded by an armored exoskeleton, inhibiting disruption of the tissues within. In this study, we examine the efficacy of several commonly used protocols for extracting bacterial DNA from ants. While bacterial community composition recovered using Illumina 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing was not detectably biased by any method, the quantity of bacterial DNA varied drastically, reducing the number of samples that could be amplified and sequenced. These results indicate that the concentration necessary for dependable sequencing is around 10,000 copies of target DNA per microliter. Exoskeletal pulverization and tissue digestion increased the reliability of extractions, suggesting that these steps should be included in any study of insect-associated microorganisms that relies on obtaining microbial DNA from intact body segments. Although laboratory and analysis techniques should be standardized across diverse sample types as much as possible, minimal modifications such as these will increase the number of environments in which bacterial communities can be successfully studied.

  16. DNA extraction protocols cause differences in 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing efficiency but not in community profile composition or structure

    DOE PAGESBeta

    None

    2014-12-01

    The recent development of methods applying next-generation sequencing to microbial community characterization has led to the proliferation of these studies in a wide variety of sample types. Yet, variation in the physical properties of environmental samples demands that optimal DNA extraction techniques be explored for each new environment. The microbiota associated with many species of insects offer an extraction challenge as they are frequently surrounded by an armored exoskeleton, inhibiting disruption of the tissues within. In this study, we examine the efficacy of several commonly used protocols for extracting bacterial DNA from ants. While bacterial community composition recovered using Illuminamore » 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing was not detectably biased by any method, the quantity of bacterial DNA varied drastically, reducing the number of samples that could be amplified and sequenced. These results indicate that the concentration necessary for dependable sequencing is around 10,000 copies of target DNA per microliter. Exoskeletal pulverization and tissue digestion increased the reliability of extractions, suggesting that these steps should be included in any study of insect-associated microorganisms that relies on obtaining microbial DNA from intact body segments. Although laboratory and analysis techniques should be standardized across diverse sample types as much as possible, minimal modifications such as these will increase the number of environments in which bacterial communities can be successfully studied.« less

  17. DNA extraction protocols cause differences in 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing efficiency but not in community profile composition or structure

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, Benjamin E R; Sanders, Jon G; Hampton-Marcell, Jarrad; Owens, Sarah M; Gilbert, Jack A; Moreau, Corrie S

    2014-01-01

    The recent development of methods applying next-generation sequencing to microbial community characterization has led to the proliferation of these studies in a wide variety of sample types. Yet, variation in the physical properties of environmental samples demands that optimal DNA extraction techniques be explored for each new environment. The microbiota associated with many species of insects offer an extraction challenge as they are frequently surrounded by an armored exoskeleton, inhibiting disruption of the tissues within. In this study, we examine the efficacy of several commonly used protocols for extracting bacterial DNA from ants. While bacterial community composition recovered using Illumina 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing was not detectably biased by any method, the quantity of bacterial DNA varied drastically, reducing the number of samples that could be amplified and sequenced. These results indicate that the concentration necessary for dependable sequencing is around 10,000 copies of target DNA per microliter. Exoskeletal pulverization and tissue digestion increased the reliability of extractions, suggesting that these steps should be included in any study of insect-associated microorganisms that relies on obtaining microbial DNA from intact body segments. Although laboratory and analysis techniques should be standardized across diverse sample types as much as possible, minimal modifications such as these will increase the number of environments in which bacterial communities can be successfully studied. PMID:25257543

  18. Toward quantification of protein backbone–backbone hydrogen bonding energies: An energetic analysis of an amide-to-ester mutation in an α-helix within a protein

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jianmin; Kelly, Jeffery W.

    2008-01-01

    Amide-to-ester backbone mutagenesis enables a specific backbone–backbone hydrogen bond (H-bond) in a protein to be eliminated in order to quantify its energetic contribution to protein folding. To extract a H-bonding free energy from an amide-to-ester perturbation free energy (ΔG folding,wt − ΔG folding,mut), it is necessary to correct for the putative introduction of a lone pair–lone pair electrostatic repulsion, as well as for the transfer free energy differences that may arise between the all amide sequence and the predominantly amide sequence harboring an ester bond. Mutation of the 9–10 amide bond within the V9F variant of the predominantly helical villin headpiece subdomain (HP35) to an ester or an E-olefin backbone bond results in a less stable but defined wild-type fold, an attribute required for this study. Comparing the folding free energies of the ester and E-olefin mutants, with correction for the desolvation free energy differences (ester and E-olefin) and the loss of an n-to-π* interaction (E-olefin), yields an experimentally based estimate of +0.4 kcal/mol for the O–O repulsion energy in an α-helical context, analogous to our previous experimentally based estimate of the O–O repulsion free energy in the context of a β-sheet. The small O–O repulsion energy indicates that amide-to-ester perturbation free energies can largely be attributed to the deletion of the backbone H-bonds after correction for desolvation differences. Quantitative evaluation of H-bonding in an α-helix should now be possible, an important step toward deciphering the balance of forces that enable spontaneous protein folding. PMID:18434500

  19. Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, John G.

    The Composites market is arguably the most challenging and profitable market for phenolic resins aside from electronics. The variety of products and processes encountered creates the challenges, and the demand for high performance in critical operations brings value. Phenolic composite materials are rendered into a wide range of components to supply a diverse and fragmented commercial base that includes customers in aerospace (Space Shuttle), aircraft (interiors and brakes), mass transit (interiors), defense (blast protection), marine, mine ducting, off-shore (ducts and grating) and infrastructure (architectural) to name a few. For example, phenolic resin is a critical adhesive in the manufacture of honeycomb sandwich panels. Various solvent and water based resins are described along with resin characteristics and the role of metal ions for enhanced thermal stability of the resin used to coat the honeycomb. Featured new developments include pultrusion of phenolic grating, success in RTM/VARTM fabricated parts, new ballistic developments for military vehicles and high char yield carbon-carbon composites along with many others. Additionally, global regional market resin volumes and sales are presented and compared with other thermosetting resin systems.

  20. Bacterial Pathogens and Community Composition in Advanced Sewage Treatment Systems Revealed by Metagenomics Analysis Based on High-Throughput Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xin; Zhang, Xu-Xiang; Wang, Zhu; Huang, Kailong; Wang, Yuan; Liang, Weigang; Tan, Yunfei; Liu, Bo; Tang, Junying

    2015-01-01

    This study used 454 pyrosequencing, Illumina high-throughput sequencing and metagenomic analysis to investigate bacterial pathogens and their potential virulence in a sewage treatment plant (STP) applying both conventional and advanced treatment processes. Pyrosequencing and Illumina sequencing consistently demonstrated that Arcobacter genus occupied over 43.42% of total abundance of potential pathogens in the STP. At species level, potential pathogens Arcobacter butzleri, Aeromonas hydrophila and Klebsiella pneumonia dominated in raw sewage, which was also confirmed by quantitative real time PCR. Illumina sequencing also revealed prevalence of various types of pathogenicity islands and virulence proteins in the STP. Most of the potential pathogens and virulence factors were eliminated in the STP, and the removal efficiency mainly depended on oxidation ditch. Compared with sand filtration, magnetic resin seemed to have higher removals in most of the potential pathogens and virulence factors. However, presence of the residual A. butzleri in the final effluent still deserves more concerns. The findings indicate that sewage acts as an important source of environmental pathogens, but STPs can effectively control their spread in the environment. Joint use of the high-throughput sequencing technologies is considered a reliable method for deep and comprehensive overview of environmental bacterial virulence. PMID:25938416

  1. A highly selective and sensitive electrochemical CS-MWCNTs/Au-NPs composite DNA biosensor for Staphylococcus aureus gene sequence detection.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yange; He, Xingxing; Ji, Jian; Jia, Min; Wang, Zhouping; Sun, Xiulan

    2015-08-15

    This paper presents a new electrochemical DNA biosensor constructed using a substrate electrode composed of a novel nanocomposite material prepared using gold nanoparticles (Au-NPs) and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and further modified with an Au electrode (AuE), which was used as the substrate electrode. A single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) probe was immobilized on the Au-NPs/CS-MWCNTs/AuE electrode by means of facile gold-thiol affinity, which resulted in hybridization with the target ssDNA sequence. Hybridization reactions were assessed by using the reduction peak current of methylene blue (MB) as an electrochemical indicator. The advantages of the nanomaterials were found to include high surface area, favorable electronic properties, and strong electrocatalytic activity. The amount of ssDNA adsorbed on the electrode surface was increased and the electrochemical response of MB accelerated. The differential pulse voltammetric responses of MB were in line with the specific target ssDNA sequence within the concentration range 1.0×10(-15)-1.0×10(-8)M with the detection limit 3.3×10(-16)M (3σ). In the colony forming unit (CFU) we were able to detect 10CFU mL(-1)of Staphylococcus aureus in the tap water, achieving good discrimination ability between one- and three-base mismatched ssDNA sequences. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification products of S. aureus nuc gene sequence were also detected with satisfactory results. PMID:25966418

  2. Chemorheology of phenylboronate-salicylhydroxamate crosslinked hydrogel networks with a sulfonated polymer backbone

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Meredith C.; Mahalingam, Alamelu; Hanson, Melissa C.; Kiser, Patrick F.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogel networks crosslinked with polymer-bound phenylboronic acid (PBA) and salicylhydroxamic acid (SHA) demonstrate pH-reversible gel behavior due to the pH-dependent equilibrium of the crosslinking moieties that form the gel network. Furthermore, the pH at which gels behave dynamically can be controlled by use of a polyelectrolyte backbone. Here we report on the frequency-dependent chemorheological characterization of PBA-SHA crosslinked hydrogel networks with a sulfonated polymer backbone. Our results suggest that the anionic nature of the polymers allows reversible crosslinking at neutral pH that an otherwise neutral-backboned PBA-SHA crosslinked network cannot, and that these charge-induced dynamics can be effectively screened by ions in solution. Moreover, moduli-frequency data can effectively be reduced into a single master curve with a neutral-backboned PBA-SHA gel data set as the reference condition. PMID:23132956

  3. Modeling (15)N NMR chemical shift changes in protein backbone with pressure.

    PubMed

    La Penna, Giovanni; Mori, Yoshiharu; Kitahara, Ryo; Akasaka, Kazuyuki; Okamoto, Yuko

    2016-08-28

    Nitrogen chemical shift is a useful parameter for determining the backbone three-dimensional structure of proteins. Empirical models for fast calculation of N chemical shift are improving their reliability, but there are subtle effects that cannot be easily interpreted. Among these, the effects of slight changes in hydrogen bonds, both intramolecular and with water molecules in the solvent, are particularly difficult to predict. On the other hand, these hydrogen bonds are sensitive to changes in protein environment. In this work, the change of N chemical shift with pressure for backbone segments in the protein ubiquitin is correlated with the change in the population of hydrogen bonds involving the backbone amide group. The different extent of interaction of protein backbone with the water molecules in the solvent is put in evidence. PMID:27586953

  4. Paleoproterozoic sequences and magmatic complexes of the Losevo suture zone of the Voronezh crystalline massif: Geological position, material composition, geochemistry, and paleogeodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terentiev, R. A.

    2014-03-01

    In order to resolve the contradictions associated with uncertainty in the identification of the material composition, subdivision, and conditions of formation of the Paleoproterozoic intrusive, metavolcanogenic, and metasedimentary sequences of the Losevo suture zone of the Voronezh crystalline massif, this work presents geological, petrographic, petrochemical, and geochemical features of these sequences. The stratigraphic and magmatic scheme of the central part of the Losevo suture zone is clarified. In particular, the Paleoproterozoic Losevo Series is divided into two sequences: Strelitsa (marginal sea) and Podgornoe (island arc). A new hypabyssal Novo-Voronezh metagabbro-diabase complex, comagmatic to metatholeiites of the Podgornoe sequence, is distinguished. The isotope age of the Strelitsa sequence is assumed to be 2172 ± 17 Ma on the basis of the results of age dating of zircon cores from the Usman plagiogranites, intruding this sequence. The upper age boundary of the Strelitsa sequence corresponds to the age of premetamorphic gabbro of the Rozhdestvenskoe complex, comagmatic to metavolcanites (2120 ± 11-2158 ± 43 Ma). The age of the Usman plagiogranite complex is clarified. On the basis of geological-structural and petrographic-mineralogical analyses of metavolcanogenic rocks, lithological analysis of metasedimentary formations, and new geochemical data obtained from metavolcanites and metamorphosed deposits, the pattern of paleogeodynamic evolution of the Losevo suture zone in the first half of the Paleoproterozoic is proposed. The next stages are distinguished: (1) intrusion of tholeiites of transition T-MORB type in spreading zones and deposition of terrigenous strata in the marginal sea basins; (2) intrusion of Nb-depleted tholeiites and plagiorhyolites, the geochemical characteristics indicating their formation in the subduction setting; (3) intrusion of gabbroids of the Rozhdestvenskoe complex; (4) formation of an island arc synchronously with

  5. Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmielewski, M.; Nosewicz, S.; Pietrzak, K.; Rojek, J.; Strojny-Nędza, A.; Mackiewicz, S.; Dutkiewicz, J.

    2014-11-01

    It is commonly known that the properties of sintered materials are strongly related to technological conditions of the densification process. This paper shows the sintering behavior of a NiAl-Al2O3 composite, and its individual components sintered separately. Each kind of material was processed via the powder metallurgy route (hot pressing). The progress of sintering at different stages of the process was tested. Changes in the microstructure were examined using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Metal-ceramics interface was clean and no additional phases were detected. Correlation between the microstructure, density, and mechanical properties of the sintered materials was analyzed. The values of elastic constants of NiAl/Al2O3 were close to intermetallic ones due to the volume content of the NiAl phase particularly at low densities, where small alumina particles had no impact on the composite's stiffness. The influence of the external pressure of 30 MPa seemed crucial for obtaining satisfactory stiffness for three kinds of the studied materials which were characterized by a high dense microstructure with a low number of isolated spherical pores.

  6. Using self-consistent fields to bias Monte Carlo methods with applications to designing and sampling protein sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Jinming; Saven, Jeffery G.

    2003-02-01

    For complex multidimensional systems, Monte Carlo methods are useful for sampling probable regions of a configuration space and, in the context of annealing, for determining "low energy" or "high scoring" configurations. Such methods have been used in protein design as means to identify amino acid sequences that are energetically compatible with a particular backbone structure. As with many other applications of Monte Carlo methods, such searches can be inefficient if trial configurations (protein sequences) in the Markov chain are chosen randomly. Here a mean-field biased Monte Carlo method (MFBMC) is presented and applied to designing and sampling protein sequences. The MFBMC method uses predetermined sequence identity probabilities wi(α) to bias the sequence selection. The wi(α) are calculated using a self-consistent, mean-field theory that can estimate the number and composition of sequences having predetermined values of energetically related foldability criteria. The MFBMC method is applied to both a simple protein model, the 27-mer lattice model, and an all-atom protein model. Compared to conventional Monte Carlo (MC) and configurational bias Monte Carlo (BMC), the MFBMC method converges faster to low energy sequences and samples such sequences more efficiently. The MFBMC method also tolerates faster cooling rates than the MC and BMC methods. The MFBMC method can be applied not only to protein sequence search, but also to a wide variety of polymeric and condensed phase systems.

  7. Backbone structures in human milk oligosaccharides: trans-glycosylation by metagenomic β-N-acetylhexosaminidases.

    PubMed

    Nyffenegger, Christian; Nordvang, Rune Thorbjørn; Zeuner, Birgitte; Łężyk, Mateusz; Difilippo, Elisabetta; Logtenberg, Madelon J; Schols, Henk A; Meyer, Anne S; Mikkelsen, Jørn Dalgaard

    2015-10-01

    This paper describes the discovery and characterization of two novel β-N-acetylhexosaminidases HEX1 and HEX2, capable of catalyzing the synthesis of human milk oligosaccharides (HMO) backbone structures with fair yields using chitin oligomers as β-N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) donor. The enzyme-encoding genes were identified by functional screening of a soil-derived metagenomic library. The β-N-acetylhexosaminidases were expressed in Escherichia coli with an N-terminal His6-tag and were purified by nickel affinity chromatography. The sequence similarities of the enzymes with their respective closest homologues are 59 % for HEX1 and 51 % for HEX2 on the protein level. Both β-N-acetylhexosaminidases are classified into glycosyl hydrolase family 20 (GH 20) are able to hydrolyze para-nitrophenyl-β-N-acetylglucosamine (pNP-GlcNAc) as well as para-nitrophenyl-β-N-acetylgalactosamine (pNP-GalNAc) and exhibit pH optima of 8 and 6 for HEX1 and HEX2, respectively. The enzymes are able to hydrolyze N-acetylchitooligosaccharides with a degree of polymerization of two, three, and four. The major findings were, that HEX1 and HEX2 catalyze trans-glycosylation reactions with lactose as acceptor, giving rise to the human milk oligosaccharide precursor lacto-N-triose II (LNT2) with yields of 2 and 8 % based on the donor substrate. In total, trans-glycosylation reactions were tested with the disaccharide acceptors β-lactose, sucrose, and maltose, as well as with the monosaccharides galactose and glucose resulting in the successful attachment of GlcNAc to the acceptor in all cases. PMID:25843303

  8. Backbone NMR reveals allosteric signal transduction networks in the β1-adrenergic receptor.

    PubMed

    Isogai, Shin; Deupi, Xavier; Opitz, Christian; Heydenreich, Franziska M; Tsai, Ching-Ju; Brueckner, Florian; Schertler, Gebhard F X; Veprintsev, Dmitry B; Grzesiek, Stephan

    2016-02-11

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are physiologically important transmembrane signalling proteins that trigger intracellular responses upon binding of extracellular ligands. Despite recent breakthroughs in GPCR crystallography, the details of ligand-induced signal transduction are not well understood owing to missing dynamical information. In principle, such information can be provided by NMR, but so far only limited data of functional relevance on few side-chain sites of eukaryotic GPCRs have been obtained. Here we show that receptor motions can be followed at virtually any backbone site in a thermostabilized mutant of the turkey β1-adrenergic receptor (β1AR). Labelling with [(15)N]valine in a eukaryotic expression system provides over twenty resolved resonances that report on structure and dynamics in six ligand complexes and the apo form. The response to the various ligands is heterogeneous in the vicinity of the binding pocket, but gets transformed into a homogeneous readout at the intracellular side of helix 5 (TM5), which correlates linearly with ligand efficacy for the G protein pathway. The effect of several pertinent, thermostabilizing point mutations was assessed by reverting them to the native sequence. Whereas the response to ligands remains largely unchanged, binding of the G protein mimetic nanobody NB80 and G protein activation are only observed when two conserved tyrosines (Y227 and Y343) are restored. Binding of NB80 leads to very strong spectral changes throughout the receptor, including the extracellular ligand entrance pocket. This indicates that even the fully thermostabilized receptor undergoes activating motions in TM5, but that the fully active state is only reached in presence of Y227 and Y343 by stabilization with a G protein-like partner. The combined analysis of chemical shift changes from the point mutations and ligand responses identifies crucial connections in the allosteric activation pathway, and presents a general experimental

  9. Improving the prediction accuracy of residue solvent accessibility and real-value backbone torsion angles of proteins by guided-learning through a two-layer neural network

    PubMed Central

    Faraggi, Eshel; Xue, Bin; Zhou, Yaoqi

    2008-01-01

    This paper attempts to increase the prediction accuracy of residue solvent accessibility and real-value backbone torsion angles of proteins through improved learning. Most methods developed for improving the backpropagation algorithm of artificial neural networks are limited to small neural networks. Here, we introduce a guided-learning method suitable for networks of any size. The method employs a part of the weights for guiding and the other part for training and optimization. We demonstrate this technique by predicting residue solvent accessibility and real-value backbone torsion angles of proteins. In this application, the guiding factor is designed to satisfy the intuitive condition that for most residues, the contribution of a residue to the structural properties of another residue is smaller for greater separation in the protein-sequence distance between the two residues. We show that the guided-learning method makes a 2-4% reduction in ten-fold cross-validated mean absolute errors (MAE) for predicting residue solvent accessibility and backbone torsion angles, regardless of the size of database, the number of hidden layers and the size of input windows. This together with introduction of two-layer neural network with a bipolar activation function leads to a new method that has a MAE of 0.11 for residue solvent accessibility, 36° for ψ, and 22° for ϕ. The method is available as a Real-SPINE 3.0 server in http://sparks.informatics.iupui.edu. PMID:18704931

  10. Bacterial community composition in the water column of the deepest freshwater Lake Baikal as determined by next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Kurilkina, Maria I; Zakharova, Yulia R; Galachyants, Yuri P; Petrova, Darya P; Bukin, Yuri S; Domysheva, Valentina M; Blinov, Vadim V; Likhoshway, Yelena V

    2016-07-01

    The composition of bacterial communities in Lake Baikal in different hydrological periods and at different depths (down to 1515 m) has been analyzed using pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene V3 variable region. Most of the resulting 34 562 reads of the Bacteria domain have clustered into 1693 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) classified with the phyla Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Chloroflexi, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Acidobacteria and Cyanobacteria. It has been found that their composition at the family level and relative contributions to bacterial communities distributed over the water column vary depending on hydrological period. The number of OTUs and the parameters of taxonomic richness (ACE, Chao1 indices) and diversity (Shannon and inverse Simpson index) reach the highest values in water layers. The composition of bacterial communities in these layers remains relatively constant, whereas that in surface layers differs between hydrological seasons. The dynamics of physicochemical conditions over the water column and their relative constancy in deep layers are decisive factors in shaping the pattern of bacterial communities in Lake Baikal. PMID:27162182

  11. Incorporating substrate sequence motifs and spatial amino acid composition to identify kinase-specific phosphorylation sites on protein three-dimensional structures

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Protein phosphorylation catalyzed by kinases plays crucial regulatory roles in cellular processes. Given the high-throughput mass spectrometry-based experiments, the desire to annotate the catalytic kinases for in vivo phosphorylation sites has motivated. Thus, a variety of computational methods have been developed for performing a large-scale prediction of kinase-specific phosphorylation sites. However, most of the proposed methods solely rely on the local amino acid sequences surrounding the phosphorylation sites. An increasing number of three-dimensional structures make it possible to physically investigate the structural environment of phosphorylation sites. Results In this work, all of the experimental phosphorylation sites are mapped to the protein entries of Protein Data Bank by sequence identity. It resulted in a total of 4508 phosphorylation sites containing the protein three-dimensional (3D) structures. To identify phosphorylation sites on protein 3D structures, this work incorporates support vector machines (SVMs) with the information of linear motifs and spatial amino acid composition, which is determined for each kinase group by calculating the relative frequencies of 20 amino acid types within a specific radial distance from central phosphorylated amino acid residue. After the cross-validation evaluation, most of the kinase-specific models trained with the consideration of structural information outperform the models considering only the sequence information. Furthermore, the independent testing set which is not included in training set has demonstrated that the proposed method could provide a comparable performance to other popular tools. Conclusion The proposed method is shown to be capable of predicting kinase-specific phosphorylation sites on 3D structures and has been implemented as a web server which is freely accessible at http://csb.cse.yzu.edu.tw/PhosK3D/. Due to the difficulty of identifying the kinase-specific phosphorylation

  12. Purifying selection, sequence composition, and context-specific indel mutations shape intraspecific variation in a bacterial endosymbiont.

    PubMed

    Williams, Laura E; Wernegreen, Jennifer J

    2012-01-01

    Comparative genomics of closely related bacterial strains can clarify mutational processes and selective forces that impact genetic variation. Among primary bacterial endosymbionts of insects, such analyses have revealed ongoing genome reduction, raising questions about the ultimate evolutionary fate of these partnerships. Here, we explored genomic variation within Blochmannia vafer, an obligate mutualist of the ant Camponotus vafer. Polymorphism analysis of the Illumina data set used previously for de novo assembly revealed a second Bl. vafer genotype. To determine why a single ant colony contained two symbiont genotypes, we examined polymorphisms in 12 C. vafer mitochondrial sequences assembled from the Illumina data; the spectrum of variants suggests that the colony contained two maternal lineages, each harboring a distinct Bl. vafer genotype. Comparing the two Bl. vafer genotypes revealed that purifying selection purged most indels and nonsynonymous differences from protein-coding genes. We also discovered that indels occur frequently in multimeric simple sequence repeats, which are relatively abundant in Bl. vafer and may play a more substantial role in generating variation in this ant mutualist than in the aphid endosymbiont Buchnera. Finally, we explored how an apparent relocation of the origin of replication in Bl. vafer and the resulting shift in strand-associated mutational pressures may have caused accelerated gene loss and an elevated rate of indel polymorphisms in the region spanning the origin relocation. Combined, these results point to significant impacts of purifying selection on genomic polymorphisms as well as distinct patterns of indels associated with unusual genomic features of Blochmannia. PMID:22117087

  13. Partial sequencing reveals the transposable element composition of Coffea genomes and provides evidence for distinct evolutionary stories.

    PubMed

    Guyot, Romain; Darré, Thibaud; Dupeyron, Mathilde; de Kochko, Alexandre; Hamon, Serge; Couturon, Emmanuel; Crouzillat, Dominique; Rigoreau, Michel; Rakotomalala, Jean-Jacques; Raharimalala, Nathalie E; Akaffou, Sélastique Doffou; Hamon, Perla

    2016-10-01

    The Coffea genus, 124 described species, has a natural distribution spreading from inter-tropical Africa, to Western Indian Ocean Islands, India, Asia and up to Australasia. Two cultivated species, C. arabica and C. canephora, are intensively studied while, the breeding potential and the genome composition of all the wild species remained poorly uncharacterized. Here, we report the characterization and comparison of the highly repeated transposable elements content of 11 Coffea species representatives of the natural biogeographic distribution. A total of 994 Mb from 454 reads were produced with a genome coverage ranging between 3.2 and 15.7 %. The analyses showed that highly repeated transposable elements, mainly LTR retrotransposons (LTR-RT), represent between 32 and 53 % of Coffea genomes depending on their biogeographic location and genome size. Species from West and Central Africa (Eucoffea) contained the highest LTR-RT content but with no strong variation relative to their genome size. At the opposite, for the insular species (Mascarocoffea), a strong variation of LTR-RT was observed suggesting differential dynamics of these elements in this group. Two LTR-RT lineages, SIRE and Del were clearly differentially accumulated between African and insular species, suggesting these lineages were associated to the genome divergence of Coffea species in Africa. Altogether, the information obtained in this study improves our knowledge and brings new data on the composition, the evolution and the divergence of wild Coffea genomes. PMID:27469896

  14. The backbone structure of the thermophilic Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis ribose binding protein is essentially identical to its mesophilic E. coli homolog

    PubMed Central

    Cuneo, Matthew J; Tian, Yaji; Allert, Malin; Hellinga, Homme W

    2008-01-01

    Background Comparison of experimentally determined mesophilic and thermophilic homologous protein structures is an important tool for understanding the mechanisms that contribute to thermal stability. Of particular interest are pairs of homologous structures that are structurally very similar, but differ significantly in thermal stability. Results We report the X-ray crystal structure of a Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis ribose binding protein (tteRBP) determined to 1.9 Å resolution. We find that tteRBP is significantly more stable (appTm value ~102°C) than the mesophilic Escherichia coli ribose binding protein (ecRBP) (appTm value ~56°C). The tteRBP has essentially the identical backbone conformation (0.41 Å RMSD of 235/271 Cα positions and 0.65 Å RMSD of 270/271 Cα positions) as ecRBP. Classification of the amino acid substitutions as a function of structure therefore allows the identification of amino acids which potentially contribute to the observed thermal stability of tteRBP in the absence of large structural heterogeneities. Conclusion The near identity of backbone structures of this pair of proteins entails that the significant differences in their thermal stabilities are encoded exclusively by the identity of the amino acid side-chains. Furthermore, the degree of sequence divergence is strongly correlated with structure; with a high degree of conservation in the core progressing to increased diversity in the boundary and surface regions. Different factors that may possibly contribute to thermal stability appear to be differentially encoded in each of these regions of the protein. The tteRBP/ecRBP pair therefore offers an opportunity to dissect contributions to thermal stability by side-chains alone in the absence of large structural differences. PMID:18373848

  15. Evaluation of composition and individual variability of rumen microbiota in yaks by 16S rRNA high-throughput sequencing technology.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wei; Li, Ying; Wang, Lizhi; Wang, Jiwen; Xu, Qin; Yan, Tianhai; Xue, Bai

    2015-08-01

    The Yak (Bos grunniens) is a unique species of ruminant animals that is important to agriculture of the Tibetan plateau, and has a complex intestinal microbial community. The objective of the present study was to characterize the composition and individual variability of microbiota in the rumen of yaks using 16S rRNA gene high-throughput sequencing technique. Rumen samples used in the present study were obtained from grazing adult male yaks (n = 6) in a commercial farm in Ganzi Autonomous Prefecture of Sichuan Province, China. Universal prokaryote primers were used to target the V4-V5 hypervariable region of 16S rRNA gene. A total of 7200 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were obtained after sequence filtering and chimera removal. Within these OTUs, 0.56% belonged to Archaea (40 OTUs), 7.19% to unassigned species (518 OTUs), and the remaining OTUs (6642) in all samples were of bacterial origin. When examining the community structure of bacteria, we identified 23 phyla within 159 families after taxonomic summarization. Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes were the predominant phyla accounting for 39.68% (SD = 0.05) and 45.90% (SD = 0.06), respectively. Moreover, 3764 OTUs were identified as shared OTUs (i.e. represented in all yaks) and belonged to 35 genera, exhibiting highly variable abundance across individual samples. Phylogenetic placement of these genera across individual samples was examined. In addition, we evaluated the distance among the 6 rumen samples by adding taxon phylogeny using UniFrac, representing 24.1% of average distance. In summary, the current study reveals a shared rumen microbiome and phylogenetic lineage and presents novel information on composition and individual variability of the bacterial community in the rumen of yaks. PMID:25911445

  16. Diffraction in resonant electron scattering from helical macromolecules: Effects of the DNA backbone

    SciTech Connect

    Caron, Laurent; Sanche, Leon

    2005-09-15

    We recently developed a theoretical framework to treat low-energy electron scattering from helical macromolecules. In this article, we use this framework to extend our previous model of simple base-pair scatterers, organized into the DNA structure, to include the backbone. The internal diffraction pattern due to base pairs is still present, but addition of the backbone screens the base pairs by a factor of 2. More interestingly, the effect of constructive interference on the phosphate groups within the backbone itself is seen to be strong at lower energies. We perform a calculation for electrons incident perpendicular and parallel to the axis of a fragment and find comparable electron patterns on the phosphate groups at the surface of films consisting of vertically or horizontally arranged segments relative to the substrate.

  17. Concordance of HIV Type 1 Tropism Phenotype to Predictions Using Web-Based Analysis of V3 Sequences: Composite Algorithms May Be Needed to Properly Assess Viral Tropism

    PubMed Central

    Cabral, Gabriela Bastos; Ferreira, João Leandro de Paula; Coelho, Luana Portes Osório; Fonsi, Mylva; Estevam, Denise Lotufo; Cavalcanti, Jaqueline Souza

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Genotypic prediction of HIV-1 tropism has been considered a practical surrogate for phenotypic tests and recently an European Consensus has set up recommendations for its use in clinical practice. Twenty-five antiretroviral-experienced patients, all heavily treated cases with a median of 16 years of antiretroviral therapy, had viral tropism determined by the Trofile assay and predicted by HIV-1 sequencing of partial env, followed by interpretation using web-based tools. Trofile determined 17/24 (71%) as X4 tropic or dual/mixed viruses, with one nonreportable result. The use of European consensus recommendations for single sequences (geno2pheno false-positive rates 20% cutoff) would lead to 4/24 (16.7%) misclassifications, whereas a composite algorithm misclassified 1/24 (4%). The use of the geno2pheno clinical option using CD4 T cell counts at collection was useful in resolving some discrepancies. Applying the European recommendations followed by additional web-based tools for cases around the recommended cutoff would resolve most misclassifications. PMID:21919801

  18. Concordance of HIV type 1 tropism phenotype to predictions using web-based analysis of V3 sequences: composite algorithms may be needed to properly assess viral tropism.

    PubMed

    Cabral, Gabriela Bastos; Ferreira, João Leandro de Paula; Coelho, Luana Portes Osório; Fonsi, Mylva; Estevam, Denise Lotufo; Cavalcanti, Jaqueline Souza; Brígido, Luis Fernando de Macedo

    2012-07-01

    Genotypic prediction of HIV-1 tropism has been considered a practical surrogate for phenotypic tests and recently an European Consensus has set up recommendations for its use in clinical practice. Twenty-five antiretroviral-experienced patients, all heavily treated cases with a median of 16 years of antiretroviral therapy, had viral tropism determined by the Trofile assay and predicted by HIV-1 sequencing of partial env, followed by interpretation using web-based tools. Trofile determined 17/24 (71%) as X4 tropic or dual/mixed viruses, with one nonreportable result. The use of European consensus recommendations for single sequences (geno2pheno false-positive rates 20% cutoff) would lead to 4/24 (16.7%) misclassifications, whereas a composite algorithm misclassified 1/24 (4%). The use of the geno2pheno clinical option using CD4 T cell counts at collection was useful in resolving some discrepancies. Applying the European recommendations followed by additional web-based tools for cases around the recommended cutoff would resolve most misclassifications. PMID:21919801

  19. Assessing quality of Medicago sativa silage by monitoring bacterial composition with single molecule, real-time sequencing technology and various physiological parameters.

    PubMed

    Bao, Weichen; Mi, Zhihui; Xu, Haiyan; Zheng, Yi; Kwok, Lai Yu; Zhang, Heping; Zhang, Wenyi

    2016-01-01

    The present study applied the PacBio single molecule, real-time sequencing technology (SMRT) in evaluating the quality of silage production. Specifically, we produced four types of Medicago sativa silages by using four different lactic acid bacteria-based additives (AD-I, AD-II, AD-III and AD-IV). We monitored the changes in pH, organic acids (including butyric acid, the ratio of acetic acid/lactic acid, γ-aminobutyric acid, 4-hyroxy benzoic acid and phenyl lactic acid), mycotoxins, and bacterial microbiota during silage fermentation. Our results showed that the use of the additives was beneficial to the silage fermentation by enhancing a general pH and mycotoxin reduction, while increasing the organic acids content. By SMRT analysis of the microbial composition in eight silage samples, we found that the bacterial species number and relative abundances shifted apparently after fermentation. Such changes were specific to the LAB species in the additives. Particularly, Bacillus megaterium was the initial dominant species in the raw materials; and after the fermentation process, Pediococcus acidilactici and Lactobacillus plantarum became the most prevalent species, both of which were intrinsically present in the LAB additives. Our data have demonstrated that the SMRT sequencing platform is applicable in assessing the quality of silage. PMID:27340760

  20. Assessing quality of Medicago sativa silage by monitoring bacterial composition with single molecule, real-time sequencing technology and various physiological parameters

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Weichen; Mi, Zhihui; Xu, Haiyan; Zheng, Yi; Kwok, Lai Yu; Zhang, Heping; Zhang, Wenyi

    2016-01-01

    The present study applied the PacBio single molecule, real-time sequencing technology (SMRT) in evaluating the quality of silage production. Specifically, we produced four types of Medicago sativa silages by using four different lactic acid bacteria-based additives (AD-I, AD-II, AD-III and AD-IV). We monitored the changes in pH, organic acids (including butyric acid, the ratio of acetic acid/lactic acid, γ-aminobutyric acid, 4-hyroxy benzoic acid and phenyl lactic acid), mycotoxins, and bacterial microbiota during silage fermentation. Our results showed that the use of the additives was beneficial to the silage fermentation by enhancing a general pH and mycotoxin reduction, while increasing the organic acids content. By SMRT analysis of the microbial composition in eight silage samples, we found that the bacterial species number and relative abundances shifted apparently after fermentation. Such changes were specific to the LAB species in the additives. Particularly, Bacillus megaterium was the initial dominant species in the raw materials; and after the fermentation process, Pediococcus acidilactici and Lactobacillus plantarum became the most prevalent species, both of which were intrinsically present in the LAB additives. Our data have demonstrated that the SMRT sequencing platform is applicable in assessing the quality of silage. PMID:27340760

  1. Cross-backbone templating; ribodinucleotides made on poly(C)

    PubMed Central

    Majerfeld, Irene; Puthenvedu, Deepa; Yarus, Michael

    2016-01-01

    G5′pp5′G synthesis from pG and chemically activated 2MeImpG is accelerated by the addition of complementary poly(C), but affected only slightly by poly(G) and not at all by poly(U) and poly(A). This suggests that 3′–5′ poly(C) is a template for uncatalyzed synthesis of 5′–5′ GppG, as was poly(U) for AppA synthesis, previously. The reaction occurs at 50 mM mono- and divalent ion concentrations, at moderate temperatures, and near pH 7. The reactive complex at the site of enhanced synthesis of 5′–5′ GppG seems to contain a single pG, a single phosphate-activated nucleotide 2MeImpG, and a single strand of poly(C). Most likely this structure is base-paired, as the poly(C)-enhanced reaction is completely disrupted between 30 and 37°C, whereas slower, untemplated synthesis of GppG accelerates. More specifically, the reactive center acts as would be expected for short, isolated G nucleotide stacks expanded and ordered by added poly(C). For example, poly(C)-mediated GppG production is very nonlinear in overall nucleotide concentration. Uncatalyzed NppN synthesis is now known for two polymers and their complementary free nucleotides. These data suggest that varied, simple, primordial 3′–5′ RNA sequences could express a specific chemical phenotype by encoding synthesis of complementary, reactive, coenzyme-like 5′–5′ ribodinucleotides. PMID:26759450

  2. Remote Enantioselection Transmitted by an Achiral Peptide Nucleic Acid Backbone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozlov, Igor A.; Orgel, Leslie E.; Nielsen, Peter E.

    2000-01-01

    short homochiral segment of DNA into a PNA helix could have guaranteed that the next short segment of DNA to be incorporated would have the same handedness as the first. Once two segments of the same handedness were present, the probability that a third segment would have the same handedness would increase, and so on. Evolution could then slowly dilute out the PNA part. This scenario would ultimately allow the formation of a chiral oligonucleotide by processes that are largely resistant to enantiomeric crossinhibition. It is important to note that the ligation of homochiral dinucleotides on a nucleic acid template would probably be at least as enantiospecific as the reaction that we have studied. The disadvantage of using chiral monomers as components of a replicating system arises from the difficulty of generating a first long homochiral template from a racemic mixture of monomers, although results of experiments designed to overcome this difficulty by employing homochiral tetramers have been reported.l l The probability of obtaining a homochiral n-mer from achiral substrates is approximately 1P-I if the nontemplate-directed extension of the primer is not enantioselective. Hence, it would be very hard to get started with a homochiral 40-mer, for example. No such difficulty exists in a scenario that originates with an achiral genetic material and in which the incorporation of very few chiral monomers in this achiral background gradually progresses towards homochirality. It seems possible that some PNA sequences could act as catalysts, analogous to ribozymes, even though PNA lacks clear metal binding sites. Although such catalysts could not be enantioselective, the incorporation of as few as two chiral nucleotides could then impose chiral specificity on the system. Furthermore, such patch chimeras could help to bridge the gap in catalytic potential between PNA and RNA, while guaranteeing enantioselectivity.

  3. The backbone of the post-synaptic density originated in a unicellular ancestor of choanoflagellates and metazoans

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Comparative genomics of the early diverging metazoan lineages and of their unicellular sister-groups opens new window to reconstructing the genetic changes which preceded or accompanied the evolution of multicellular body plans. A recent analysis found that the genome of the nerve-less sponges encodes the homologues of most vertebrate post-synaptic proteins. In vertebrate excitatory synapses, these proteins assemble to form the post-synaptic density, a complex molecular platform linking membrane receptors, components of their signalling pathways, and the cytoskeleton. Newly available genomes from Monosiga brevicollis (a member of Choanoflagellata, the closest unicellular relatives of animals) and Trichoplax adhaerens (a member of Placozoa: besides sponges, the only nerve-less metazoans) offer an opportunity to refine our understanding of post-synaptic protein evolution. Results Searches for orthologous proteins and reconstruction of gene gains/losses based on the taxon phylogeny indicate that post-synaptic proteins originated in two main steps. The backbone scaffold proteins (Shank, Homer, DLG) and some of their partners were acquired in a unicellular ancestor of choanoflagellates and metazoans. A substantial additional set appeared in an exclusive ancestor of the Metazoa. The placozoan genome contains most post-synaptic genes but lacks some of them. Notably, the master-scaffold protein Shank might have been lost secondarily in the placozoan lineage. Conclusions The time of origination of most post-synaptic proteins was not concomitant with the acquisition of synapses or neural-like cells. The backbone of the scaffold emerged in a unicellular context and was probably not involved in cell-cell communication. Based on the reconstructed protein composition and potential interactions, its ancestral function could have been to link calcium signalling and cytoskeleton regulation. The complex later became integrated into the evolving synapse through the

  4. Sequence analysis of styrenic copolymers by tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yol, Aleer M; Janoski, Jonathan; Quirk, Roderic P; Wesdemiotis, Chrys

    2014-10-01

    Styrene and smaller molar amounts of either m-dimethylsilylstyrene (m-DMSS) or p-dimethylsilylstyrene (p-DMSS) were copolymerized under living anionic polymerization conditions, and the compositions, architectures, and sequences of the resulting copolymers were characterized by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS(2)). MS analysis revealed that linear copolymer chains containing phenyl-Si(CH3)2H pendants were the major product for both DMSS comonomers. In addition, two-armed architectures with phenyl-Si(CH3)2-benzyl branches were detected as minor products. The comonomer sequence in the linear chains was established by MS(2) experiments on lithiated oligomers, based on the DMSS content of fragments generated by backbone C-C bond scissions and with the help of reference MS(2) spectra obtained from a polystyrene homopolymer and polystyrene end-capped with a p-DMSS block. The MS(2) data provided conclusive evidence that copolymerization of styrene/DMSS mixtures leads to chains with a rather random distribution of the silylated comonomer when m-DMSS is used, but to chains with tapered block structures, with the silylated units near the initiator, when p-DMSS is used. Hence, MS(2) fragmentation patterns permit not only differentiation of the sequences generated in the synthesis, but also the determination of specific comonomer locations along the polymer chain. PMID:25181590

  5. Using Excel To Study The Relation Between Protein Dihedral Angle Omega And Backbone Length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shew, Christopher; Evans, Samari; Tao, Xiuping

    How to involve the uninitiated undergraduate students in computational biophysics research? We made use of Microsoft Excel to carry out calculations of bond lengths, bond angles and dihedral angles of proteins. Specifically, we studied protein backbone dihedral angle omega by examining how its distribution varies with the length of the backbone length. It turns out Excel is a respectable tool for this task. An ordinary current-day desktop or laptop can handle the calculations for midsized proteins in just seconds. Care has to be taken to enter the formulas for the spreadsheet column after column to minimize the computing load. Supported in part by NSF Grant #1238795.

  6. Polyboramines for Hydrogen Release: Polymers Containing Lewis Pairs in their Backbone.

    PubMed

    Ledoux, Audrey; Larini, Paolo; Boisson, Christophe; Monteil, Vincent; Raynaud, Jean; Lacôte, Emmanuel

    2015-12-21

    The one-step polycondensation of diamines and diboranes triggered by the in situ deprotonation of the diammonium salts and concomitant reduction of bisboronic acids leads to the assembly of polymer chains through multiple Lewis pairing in their backbone. These new polyboramines are dihydrogen reservoirs that can be used for the hydrogenation of imines and carbonyl compounds. They also display a unique dihydrogen thermal release profile that is a direct consequence of the insertion of the amine-borane linkages in the polymeric backbone. PMID:26563914

  7. Electric field induced localization phenomena in a ladder network with superlattice configuration: Effect of backbone environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Paramita; Maiti, Santanu K.; Karmakar, S. N.

    2014-09-01

    Electric field induced localization properties of a tight-binding ladder network in presence of backbone sites are investigated. Based on Green's function formalism we numerically calculate two-terminal transport together with density of states for different arrangements of atomic sites in the ladder and its backbone. Our results lead to a possibility of getting multiple mobility edges which essentially plays a switching action between a completely opaque to fully or partly conducting region upon the variation of system Fermi energy, and thus, support in fabricating mesoscopic or DNA-based switching devices.

  8. Solvation thermodynamics of amino acid side chains on a short peptide backbone

    SciTech Connect

    Hajari, Timir; Vegt, Nico F. A. van der

    2015-04-14

    The hydration process of side chain analogue molecules differs from that of the actual amino acid side chains in peptides and proteins owing to the effects of the peptide backbone on the aqueous solvent environment. A recent molecular simulation study has provided evidence that all nonpolar side chains, attached to a short peptide backbone, are considerably less hydrophobic than the free side chain analogue molecules. In contrast to this, the hydrophilicity of the polar side chains is hardly affected by the backbone. To analyze the origin of these observations, we here present a molecular simulation study on temperature dependent solvation free energies of nonpolar and polar side chains attached to a short peptide backbone. The estimated solvation entropies and enthalpies of the various amino acid side chains are compared with existing side chain analogue data. The solvation entropies and enthalpies of the polar side chains are negative, but in absolute magnitude smaller compared with the corresponding analogue data. The observed differences are large; however, owing to a nearly perfect enthalpy-entropy compensation, the solvation free energies of polar side chains remain largely unaffected by the peptide backbone. We find that a similar compensation does not apply to the nonpolar side chains; while the backbone greatly reduces the unfavorable solvation entropies, the solvation enthalpies are either more favorable or only marginally affected. This results in a very small unfavorable free energy cost, or even free energy gain, of solvating the nonpolar side chains in strong contrast to solvation of small hydrophobic or nonpolar molecules in bulk water. The solvation free energies of nonpolar side chains have been furthermore decomposed into a repulsive cavity formation contribution and an attractive dispersion free energy contribution. We find that cavity formation next to the peptide backbone is entropically favored over formation of similar sized nonpolar side

  9. Convenient and Scalable Synthesis of Fmoc-Protected Peptide Nucleic Acid Backbone

    PubMed Central

    Feagin, Trevor A.; Shah, Nirmal I.; Heemstra, Jennifer M.

    2012-01-01

    The peptide nucleic acid backbone Fmoc-AEG-OBn has been synthesized via a scalable and cost-effective route. Ethylenediamine is mono-Boc protected, then alkylated with benzyl bromoacetate. The Boc group is removed and replaced with an Fmoc group. The synthesis was performed starting with 50 g of Boc anhydride to give 31 g of product in 32% overall yield. The Fmoc-protected PNA backbone is a key intermediate in the synthesis of nucleobase-modified PNA monomers. Thus, improved access to this molecule is anticipated to facilitate future investigations into the chemical properties and applications of nucleobase-modified PNA. PMID:22848796

  10. Convenient and scalable synthesis of fmoc-protected Peptide nucleic Acid backbone.

    PubMed

    Feagin, Trevor A; Shah, Nirmal I; Heemstra, Jennifer M

    2012-01-01

    The peptide nucleic acid backbone Fmoc-AEG-OBn has been synthesized via a scalable and cost-effective route. Ethylenediamine is mono-Boc protected, then alkylated with benzyl bromoacetate. The Boc group is removed and replaced with an Fmoc group. The synthesis was performed starting with 50 g of Boc anhydride to give 31 g of product in 32% overall yield. The Fmoc-protected PNA backbone is a key intermediate in the synthesis of nucleobase-modified PNA monomers. Thus, improved access to this molecule is anticipated to facilitate future investigations into the chemical properties and applications of nucleobase-modified PNA. PMID:22848796

  11. Gene expression classification using epigenetic features and DNA sequence composition in the human embryonic stem cell line H1.

    PubMed

    Su, Wen-Xia; Li, Qian-Zhong; Zhang, Lu-Qiang; Fan, Guo-Liang; Wu, Cheng-Yan; Yan, Zhen-He; Zuo, Yong-Chun

    2016-10-30

    Epigenetic factors are known to correlate with gene expression in the existing studies. However, quantitative models that accurately classify the highly and lowly expressed genes based on epigenetic factors are currently lacking. In this study, a new machine learning method combines histone modifications, DNA methylation, DNA accessibility, transcription factors, and trinucleotide composition with support vector machines (SVM) is developed in the context of human embryonic stem cell line (H1). The results indicate that the predictive accuracy will be markedly improved when the epigenetic features are considered. The predictive accuracy and Matthews correlation coefficient of the best model are as high as 95.96% and 0.92 for 10-fold cross-validation test, and 95.58% and 0.92 for independent dataset test, respectively. Our model provides a good way to judge a gene is either highly or lowly expressed gene by using genetic and epigenetic data, when the expression data of the gene is lacking. And a web-server GECES for our analysis method is established at http://202.207.14.87:8032/fuwu/GECES/index.asp, so that other scientists can easily get their desired results by our web-server, without going through the mathematical details. PMID:27468948

  12. The sequence of intermetallic formation and solidification pathway of an Al–13Mg–7Si–2Cu in-situ composite

    SciTech Connect

    Farahany, Saeed; Nordin, Nur Azmah; Ourdjini, Ali; Abu Bakar, TutyAsma; Hamzah, Esah; Idris, Mohd Hasbullah; Hekmat-Ardakan, Alireza

    2014-12-15

    The phase transformation sequence and solidification behaviour of an Al–13Mg–7Si–2Cu in-situ composite was examined using a combination of computer-aided cooling curve thermal analysis and interrupted quenching techniques. Five different phases were identified by analysing the derivative cooling curves, the X-ray diffraction profile, optical and scanning electron microscopy images and the corresponding energy dispersive spectroscopy. It has been found that the solidification of this alloy begins with primary Mg{sub 2}Si precipitation and continues with the formation of eutectic Al–Mg{sub 2}Si, followed by Al{sub 5}FeSi and simultaneous precipitation of Al{sub 5}Cu{sub 2}Mg{sub 8}Si{sub 6} and Al{sub 2}Cu complex intermetallic phases. The formation of the last three intermetallic compounds changes the solidification behaviour of these composites remarkably due to their complex eutectic formation reactions. The solidification of the alloy, calculated using the Factsage thermochemical analysis software, has demonstrated a good agreement with the experiments in terms of compound prediction, their weight fractions and reaction temperatures. - Highlights: • Solidification path of a commercial Al-13Mg-7Si-2Cu composite was characterized. • Five different phases were identified and then confirmed with EDS and XRD results. • Mg{sub 2}Si, Al-Mg{sub 2}Si,Al{sub 5}FeSi (β),Al{sub 5}Cu{sub 2}Mg{sub 8}Si{sub 6} (Q) and Al{sub 2}Cu(θ) precipitated respectively. • Solidification was predicted using the Factsage thermochemical analysis software.

  13. Folding a protein by discretizing its backbone torsional dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Ariel

    1999-05-01

    The aim of this work is to provide a coarse codification of local conformational constraints associated with each folding motif of a peptide chain in order to obtain a rough solution to the protein folding problem. This is accomplished by implementing a discretized version of the soft-mode dynamics on a personal computer (PC). Our algorithm mimics a parallel process as it evaluates concurrent folding possibilities by pattern recognition. It may be implemented in a PC as a sequence of perturbation-translation-renormalization (p-t-r) cycles performed on a matrix of local topological constraints (LTM). This requires suitable representational tools and a periodic quenching of the dynamics required for renormalization. We introduce a description of the peptide chain based on a local discrete variable the values of which label the basins of attraction of the Ramachandran map for each residue. Thus, the local variable indicates the basin in which the torsional coordinates of each residue lie at a given time. In addition, a coding of local topological constraints associated with each secondary and tertiary structural motif is introduced. Our treatment enables us to adopt a computation time step of 81 ps, a value far larger than hydrodynamic drag time scales. Folding pathways are resolved as transitions between patterns of locally encoded structural signals that change within the 10 μs-100 ms time scale range. These coarse folding pathways are generated by the periodic search for structural patterns in the time-evolving LTM. Each pattern is recorded as a contact matrix, an operation subject to a renormalization feedback loop. The validity of our approach is tested vis-a-vis experimentally-probed folding pathways eventually generating tertiary interactions in proteins which recover their active structure under in vitro renaturation conditions. As an illustration, we focus on determining significant folding intermediates and late kinetic bottlenecks that occur within the

  14. Graduate Education in Kinesiology: Are We Part of "America's Backbone for Competitiveness and Innovation"?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DePauw, Karen P.

    2008-01-01

    Graduate education in the United States has been identified as being the backbone of American competitiveness and innovation in a recent report by the Council of Graduate Schools. The report provides a framework for examining the role of graduate education in partnership with business and government to advance an action agenda for achieving…

  15. On the relationship between NMR-derived amide order parameters and protein backbone entropy changes

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, Kim A.; O’Brien, Evan; Kasinath, Vignesh; Wand, A. Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to analyze the relationship between NMR-derived squared generalized order parameters of amide NH groups and backbone entropy. Amide order parameters (O2NH) are largely determined by the secondary structure and average values appear unrelated to the overall flexibility of the protein. However, analysis of the more flexible subset (O2NH < 0.8) shows that these report both on the local flexibility of the protein and on a different component of the conformational entropy than that reported by the side chain methyl axis order parameters, O2axis. A calibration curve for backbone entropy vs. O2NH is developed which accounts for both correlations between amide group motions of different residues, and correlations between backbone and side chain motions. This calibration curve can be used with experimental values of O2NH changes obtained by NMR relaxation measurements to extract backbone entropy changes, e.g. upon ligand binding. In conjunction with our previous calibration for side chain entropy derived from measured O2axis values this provides a prescription for determination of the total protein conformational entropy changes from NMR relaxation measurements. PMID:25739366

  16. Synthesis and evaluation of backbone/amide-modified analogs of leualacin.

    PubMed

    Hu, M K; Yang, F C; Chou, C C; Yen, M H

    1999-02-22

    Leualacin (1), a cyclic depsi-pentapeptide, and its backbone/amide-modified analogs 2-4 were synthesized. Amide analogue 3 exhibited stronger vasodilatory effects. It also strongly inhibited collagen- and arachidonic acid (AA)-induced platelet aggregations with IC50s of 0.6 microM and 2.0 microM, respectively. PMID:10098664

  17. Animals without Backbones: The Invertebrate Story. Grade Level 5-9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jerome, Brian; Fuqua, Paul

    This guide, when used in tandem with the videotape "Animals Without Backbones," helps students learn about invertebrates. These materials promote hands-on discovery and learning. The guide is composed of six curriculum-based teaching units: (1) "Getting Started"; (2) "Porifera"; (3) "Cnidarians"; (4) "Worms"; (5) "Mollusks"; (6) "Arthropods"; and…

  18. A structural role for arginine in proteins: multiple hydrogen bonds to backbone carbonyl oxygens.

    PubMed

    Borders, C L; Broadwater, J A; Bekeny, P A; Salmon, J E; Lee, A S; Eldridge, A M; Pett, V B

    1994-04-01

    We propose that arginine side chains often play a previously unappreciated general structural role in the maintenance of tertiary structure in proteins, wherein the positively charged guanidinium group forms multiple hydrogen bonds to backbone carbonyl oxygens. Using as a criterion for a "structural" arginine one that forms 4 or more hydrogen bonds to 3 or more backbone carbonyl oxygens, we have used molecular graphics to locate arginines of interest in 4 proteins: Arg 180 in Thermus thermophilus manganese superoxide dismutase, Arg 254 in human carbonic anhydrase II, Arg 31 in Streptomyces rubiginosus xylose isomerase, and Arg 313 in Rhodospirillum rubrum ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase. Arg 180 helps to mold the active site channel of superoxide dismutase, whereas in each of the other enzymes the structural arginine is buried in the "mantle" (i.e., inside, but near the surface) of the protein interior well removed from the active site, where it makes 5 hydrogen bonds to 4 backbone carbonyl oxygens. Using a more relaxed criterion of 3 or more hydrogen bonds to 2 or more backbone carbonyl oxygens, arginines that play a potentially important structural role were found in yeast enolase, Bacillus stearothermophilus glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, bacteriophage T4 and human lysozymes, Enteromorpha prolifera plastocyanin, HIV-1 protease, Trypanosoma brucei brucei and yeast triosephosphate isomerases, and Escherichia coli trp aporepressor (but not trp repressor or the trp repressor/operator complex).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8003972

  19. Analysis of Polygala tenuifolia Transcriptome and Description of Secondary Metabolite Biosynthetic Pathways by Illumina Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Tian, Hongling; Xu, Xiaoshuang; Zhang, Fusheng; Wang, Yaoqin; Guo, Shuhong; Qin, Xuemei; Du, Guanhua

    2015-01-01

    Radix polygalae, the dried roots of Polygala tenuifolia and P. sibirica, is one of the most well-known traditional Chinese medicinal plants. Radix polygalae contains various saponins, xanthones, and oligosaccharide esters and these compounds are responsible for several pharmacological properties. To provide basic breeding information, enhance molecular biological analysis, and determine secondary metabolite biosynthetic pathways of P. tenuifolia, we applied Illumina sequencing technology and de novo assembly. We also applied this technique to gain an overview of P. tenuifolia transcriptome from samples with different years. Using Illumina sequencing, approximately 67.2% of unique sequences were annotated by basic local alignment search tool similarity searches against public sequence databases. We classified the annotated unigenes by using Nr, Nt, GO, COG, and KEGG databases compared with NCBI. We also obtained many candidates CYP450s and UGTs by the analysis of genes in the secondary metabolite biosynthetic pathways, including putative terpenoid backbone and phenylpropanoid biosynthesis pathway. With this transcriptome sequencing, future genetic and genomics studies related to the molecular mechanisms associated with the chemical composition of P. tenuifolia may be improved. Genes involved in the enrichment of secondary metabolite biosynthesis-related pathways could enhance the potential applications of P. tenuifolia in pharmaceutical industries. PMID:26543847

  20. Analysis of Polygala tenuifolia Transcriptome and Description of Secondary Metabolite Biosynthetic Pathways by Illumina Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Hongling; Xu, Xiaoshuang; Zhang, Fusheng; Wang, Yaoqin; Guo, Shuhong; Qin, Xuemei; Du, Guanhua

    2015-01-01

    Radix polygalae, the dried roots of Polygala tenuifolia and P. sibirica, is one of the most well-known traditional Chinese medicinal plants. Radix polygalae contains various saponins, xanthones, and oligosaccharide esters and these compounds are responsible for several pharmacological properties. To provide basic breeding information, enhance molecular biological analysis, and determine secondary metabolite biosynthetic pathways of P. tenuifolia, we applied Illumina sequencing technology and de novo assembly. We also applied this technique to gain an overview of P. tenuifolia transcriptome from samples with different years. Using Illumina sequencing, approximately 67.2% of unique sequences were annotated by basic local alignment search tool similarity searches against public sequence databases. We classified the annotated unigenes by using Nr, Nt, GO, COG, and KEGG databases compared with NCBI. We also obtained many candidates CYP450s and UGTs by the analysis of genes in the secondary metabolite biosynthetic pathways, including putative terpenoid backbone and phenylpropanoid biosynthesis pathway. With this transcriptome sequencing, future genetic and genomics studies related to the molecular mechanisms associated with the chemical composition of P. tenuifolia may be improved. Genes involved in the enrichment of secondary metabolite biosynthesis-related pathways could enhance the potential applications of P. tenuifolia in pharmaceutical industries. PMID:26543847

  1. Acute Effects of TiO2 Nanomaterials on the Viability and Taxonomic Composition of Aquatic Bacterial Communities Assessed via High-Throughput Screening and Next Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Binh, Chu Thi Thanh; Tong, Tiezheng; Gaillard, Jean-François; Gray, Kimberly A.; Kelly, John J.

    2014-01-01

    The nanotechnology industry is growing rapidly, leading to concerns about the potential ecological consequences of the release of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) to the environment. One challenge of assessing the ecological risks of ENMs is the incredible diversity of ENMs currently available and the rapid pace at which new ENMs are being developed. High-throughput screening (HTS) is a popular approach to assessing ENM cytotoxicity that offers the opportunity to rapidly test in parallel a wide range of ENMs at multiple concentrations. However, current HTS approaches generally test one cell type at a time, which limits their ability to predict responses of complex microbial communities. In this study toxicity screening via a HTS platform was used in combination with next generation sequencing (NGS) to assess responses of bacterial communities from two aquatic habitats, Lake Michigan (LM) and the Chicago River (CR), to short-term exposure in their native waters to several commercial TiO2 nanomaterials under simulated solar irradiation. Results demonstrate that bacterial communities from LM and CR differed in their sensitivity to nano-TiO2, with the community from CR being more resistant. NGS analysis revealed that the composition of the bacterial communities from LM and CR were significantly altered by exposure to nano-TiO2, including decreases in overall bacterial diversity, decreases in the relative abundance of Actinomycetales, Sphingobacteriales, Limnohabitans, and Flavobacterium, and a significant increase in Limnobacter. These results suggest that the release of nano-TiO2 to the environment has the potential to alter the composition of aquatic bacterial communities, which could have implications for the stability and function of aquatic ecosystems. The novel combination of HTS and NGS described in this study represents a major advance over current methods for assessing ENM ecotoxicity because the relative toxicities of multiple ENMs to thousands of naturally

  2. Acute effects of TiO2 nanomaterials on the viability and taxonomic composition of aquatic bacterial communities assessed via high-throughput screening and next generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Binh, Chu Thi Thanh; Tong, Tiezheng; Gaillard, Jean-François; Gray, Kimberly A; Kelly, John J

    2014-01-01

    The nanotechnology industry is growing rapidly, leading to concerns about the potential ecological consequences of the release of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) to the environment. One challenge of assessing the ecological risks of ENMs is the incredible diversity of ENMs currently available and the rapid pace at which new ENMs are being developed. High-throughput screening (HTS) is a popular approach to assessing ENM cytotoxicity that offers the opportunity to rapidly test in parallel a wide range of ENMs at multiple concentrations. However, current HTS approaches generally test one cell type at a time, which limits their ability to predict responses of complex microbial communities. In this study toxicity screening via a HTS platform was used in combination with next generation sequencing (NGS) to assess responses of bacterial communities from two aquatic habitats, Lake Michigan (LM) and the Chicago River (CR), to short-term exposure in their native waters to several commercial TiO2 nanomaterials under simulated solar irradiation. Results demonstrate that bacterial communities from LM and CR differed in their sensitivity to nano-TiO2, with the community from CR being more resistant. NGS analysis revealed that the composition of the bacterial communities from LM and CR were significantly altered by exposure to nano-TiO2, including decreases in overall bacterial diversity, decreases in the relative abundance of Actinomycetales, Sphingobacteriales, Limnohabitans, and Flavobacterium, and a significant increase in Limnobacter. These results suggest that the release of nano-TiO2 to the environment has the potential to alter the composition of aquatic bacterial communities, which could have implications for the stability and function of aquatic ecosystems. The novel combination of HTS and NGS described in this study represents a major advance over current methods for assessing ENM ecotoxicity because the relative toxicities of multiple ENMs to thousands of naturally

  3. Backrub-like backbone simulation recapitulates natural protein conformational variability and improves mutant side-chain prediction

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Colin A.; Kortemme, Tanja

    2008-01-01

    Summary Incorporation of effective backbone sampling into protein simulation and design is an important step in increasing the accuracy of computational protein modeling. Recent analysis of high-resolution crystal structures has suggested a new model, termed backrub, to describe localized, hinge-like alternative backbone and side chain conformations observed in the crystal lattice. The model involves internal backbone rotations about axes between Cα atoms. Based on this observation, we have implemented a backrub-inspired sampling method in the Rosetta structure prediction and design program. We evaluate this model of backbone flexibility using three different tests. First, we show that Rosetta backrub simulations recapitulate the correlation between backbone and side-chain conformations in the high-resolution crystal structures upon which the model was based. As a second test of backrub sampling, we show that backbone flexibility improves the accuracy of predicting point-mutant side chain conformations over fixed backbone rotameric sampling alone. Finally, we show that backrub sampling of triosephosphate isomerase loop 6 can capture the ms/µs oscillation between the open and closed states observed in solution. Our results suggest that backrub sampling captures a sizable fraction of localized conformational changes that occur in natural proteins. Application of this simple model of backbone motions may significantly improve both protein design and atomistic simulations of localized protein flexibility. PMID:18547585

  4. The Impact of Different DNA Extraction Kits and Laboratories upon the Assessment of Human Gut Microbiota Composition by 16S rRNA Gene Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Nicholas A.; Walker, Alan W.; Berry, Susan H.; Duncan, Sylvia H.; Farquarson, Freda M.; Louis, Petra; Thomson, John M.; Ahmad, T; Anderson, CA; Barrett, JC; Drummond, H; Edwards, C; Hart, A; Hawkey, C; Henderson, P; Khan, M; Lamb, CA; Lee, JC; Mansfield, JC; Mathew, CG; Mowat, C; Newman, WG; Prescott, NJ; Simmons, A; Simpson, P; Taylor, K; Taylor, K; Wilson, DC; Satsangi, Jack; Flint, Harry J.; Parkhill, Julian

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Determining bacterial community structure in fecal samples through DNA sequencing is an important facet of intestinal health research. The impact of different commercially available DNA extraction kits upon bacterial community structures has received relatively little attention. The aim of this study was to analyze bacterial communities in volunteer and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patient fecal samples extracted using widely used DNA extraction kits in established gastrointestinal research laboratories. Methods Fecal samples from two healthy volunteers (H3 and H4) and two relapsing IBD patients (I1 and I2) were investigated. DNA extraction was undertaken using MoBio Powersoil and MP Biomedicals FastDNA SPIN Kit for Soil DNA extraction kits. PCR amplification for pyrosequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes was performed in both laboratories on all samples. Hierarchical clustering of sequencing data was done using the Yue and Clayton similarity coefficient. Results DNA extracted using the FastDNA kit and the MoBio kit gave median DNA concentrations of 475 (interquartile range 228-561) and 22 (IQR 9-36) ng/µL respectively (p<0.0001). Hierarchical clustering of sequence data by Yue and Clayton coefficient revealed four clusters. Samples from individuals H3 and I2 clustered by patient; however, samples from patient I1 extracted with the MoBio kit clustered with samples from patient H4 rather than the other I1 samples. Linear modelling on relative abundance of common bacterial families revealed significant differences between kits; samples extracted with MoBio Powersoil showed significantly increased Bacteroidaceae, Ruminococcaceae and Porphyromonadaceae, and lower Enterobacteriaceae, Lachnospiraceae, Clostridiaceae, and Erysipelotrichaceae (p<0.05). Conclusion This study demonstrates significant differences in DNA yield and bacterial DNA composition when comparing DNA extracted from the same fecal sample with different extraction kits. This highlights

  5. Mapping membrane protein backbone dynamics: a comparison of site-directed spin labeling with NMR 15N-relaxation measurements.

    PubMed

    Lo, Ryan H; Kroncke, Brett M; Solomon, Tsega L; Columbus, Linda

    2014-10-01

    The ability to detect nanosecond backbone dynamics with site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) in soluble proteins has been well established. However, for membrane proteins, the nitroxide appears to have more interactions with the protein surface, potentially hindering the sensitivity to backbone motions. To determine whether membrane protein backbone dynamics could be mapped with SDSL, a nitroxide was introduced at 55 independent sites in a model polytopic membrane protein, TM0026. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectral parameters were compared with NMR (15)N-relaxation data. Sequential scans revealed backbone dynamics with the same trends observed for the R1 relaxation rate, suggesting that nitroxide dynamics remain coupled to the backbone on membrane proteins. PMID:25296323

  6. A Plasmid Bearing the bla(CTX-M-15) Gene and Phage P1-Like Sequences from a Sequence Type 11 Klebsiella pneumoniae Isolate.

    PubMed

    Shin, Juyoun; Ko, Kwan Soo

    2015-10-01

    Plasmid pKP12226 was extracted and analyzed from a CTX-M-15-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae sequence type 11 (ST11) isolate collected in South Korea. The plasmid represents chimeric characteristics consisting of a pIP1206-like backbone and lysogenized phage P1-like sequences. It bears a resistance region that includes resistance genes to several antibiotics and is different from previously characterized plasmids from South Korea bearing blaCTX-M-15. It may have resulted from recombination between an Escherichia coli plasmid backbone, a blaCTX-M-15-bearing resistance region, and lysogenized phage P1-like sequences. PMID:26195513

  7. Self-assembly of diphenylalanine backbone homologues and their combination with functionalized carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinesh, Bhimareddy; Squillaci, Marco A.; Ménard-Moyon, Cécilia; Samorì, Paolo; Bianco, Alberto

    2015-09-01

    The integration of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) into organized nanostructures is of great interest for applications in materials science and biomedicine. In this work we studied the self-assembly of β and γ homologues of diphenylalanine peptides under different solvent and pH conditions. We aimed to investigate the role of peptide backbone in tuning the formation of different types of nanostructures alone or in combination with carbon nanotubes. In spite of having the same side chain, β and γ peptides formed distinctively different nanofibers, a clear indication of the role played by the backbone homologation on the self-assembly. The variation of the pH allowed to transform the nanofibers into spherical structures. Moreover, the co-assembly of β and γ peptides with carbon nanotubes covalently functionalized with the same peptide generated unique dendritic assemblies. This comparative study on self-assembly using diphenylalanine backbone homologues and of the co-assembly with CNT covalent conjugates is the first example exploring the capacity of β and γ peptides to adopt precise nanostructures, particularly in combination with carbon nanotubes. The dendritic organization obtained by mixing carbon nanotubes and peptides might find interesting applications in tissue engineering and neuronal interfacing.The integration of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) into organized nanostructures is of great interest for applications in materials science and biomedicine. In this work we studied the self-assembly of β and γ homologues of diphenylalanine peptides under different solvent and pH conditions. We aimed to investigate the role of peptide backbone in tuning the formation of different types of nanostructures alone or in combination with carbon nanotubes. In spite of having the same side chain, β and γ peptides formed distinctively different nanofibers, a clear indication of the role played by the backbone homologation on the self-assembly. The variation of the pH allowed to

  8. The magnitude of the backbone conformational entropy change in protein folding.

    PubMed

    D'Aquino, J A; Gómez, J; Hilser, V J; Lee, K H; Amzel, L M; Freire, E

    1996-06-01

    The magnitude of the conformational entropy change experienced by the peptide backbone upon protein folding was investigated experimentally and by computational analysis. Experimentally, two different pairs of mutants of a 33 amino acid peptide corresponding to the leucine zipper region of GCN4 were used for high-sensitivity microcalorimetric analysis. Each pair of mutants differed only by having alanine or glycine at a specific solvent-exposed position under conditions in which the differences in stability could be attributed to differences in the conformational entropy of the unfolded state. The mutants studied were characterized by different stabilities but had identical heat capacity changes of unfolding (delta Cp), identical solvent-related entropies of unfolding (delta Ssolv), and identical enthalpies of unfolding (delta H) at equivalent temperatures. Accordingly, the differences in stability between the different mutants could be attributed to differences in conformational entropy. The computational studies were aimed at generating the energy profile of backbone conformations as a function of the main chain dihedral angles phi and phi. The energy profiles permit a direct calculation of the probability distribution of different conformers and therefore of the conformational entropy of the backbone. The experimental results presented in this paper indicate that the presence of the methyl group in alanine reduces the conformational entropy of the peptide backbone by 2.46 +/- 0.2 cal/K. mol with respect to that of glycine, consistent with a 3.4-fold reduction in the number of allowed conformations in the alanine-containing peptides. Similar results were obtained from the energy profiles. The computational analysis also indicates that the addition of further carbon atoms to the side chain had only a small effect as long as the side chains were unbranched at position beta. A further reduction with respect to Ala of only 0.61 and 0.81 cal/K. mol in the backbone

  9. Tailored Living Block Copolymerization: Multiblock Poly(cyclohexene carbonate)s with Sequence Control

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jeung Gon; Cowman, Christina D.; LaPointe, Anne M.; Wiesner, Ulrich; Coates, Geoffrey W.

    2011-03-08

    In this Communication, the living block copolymerization of functionalized cyclohexene oxides and CO{sub 2} is described, yielding multiblock poly(cyclohexene carbonate)s [p(CHC)s] with a diverse range of functionality on the side chains and good control of block sequence and length. Unlike prior systems that contain stable vinyl backbones, the carbonate backbones of polymers reported herein are degradable, allowing possible applications where removable templates are required.

  10. Modifications to the Peptidoglycan Backbone Help Bacteria To Establish Infection ▿

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Kimberly M.; Weiser, Jeffrey N.

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens that colonize mucosal surfaces have acquired resistance to antimicrobials that are abundant at these sites. One of the main antimicrobials present on mucosal surfaces is lysozyme, a muramidase that hydrolyzes the peptidoglycan backbone of bacteria. Cleavage of the peptidoglycan backbone leads to bacterial cell death and lysis, which releases bacterial fragments, including peptidoglycan, at the site of infection. Peptidoglycan fragments can be recognized by host receptors and initiate an immune response that will aid in clearing infection. Many mucosal pathogens modify the peptidoglycan residues surrounding the cleavage site for lysozyme to avoid peptidoglycan degradation and the release of these proinflammatory fragments. This review will focus specifically on peptidoglycan modifications, their role in lysozyme resistance, and downstream effects on the host immune response to infection. PMID:21041496