Science.gov

Sample records for sequence including maps

  1. Physical mapping 220 kb centromeric of the human MHC and DNA sequence analysis of the 43-kb segment including the RING1, HKE6, and HKE4 genes.

    PubMed

    Kikuti, Y Y; Tamiya, G; Ando, A; Chen, L; Kimura, M; Ferreira, E; Tsuji, K; Trowsdale, J; Inoko, H

    1997-06-15

    A cosmid contig was constructed from a YAC clone with a 220-kb insert that spans the centromeric side of the human MHC class II region, corresponding to the mouse t complex. The gene order was identified to be HSET-HKE1.5-HKE2-HKE3-RING1-HKE6- HKE4 (RING5). The genomic sequence of a 42,801-bp long region encoded by one cosmid clone in the RING1, HKE6, and HKE4 subregions was determined by the shotgun method. The exon-intron organization of these three genes, RING1 (Ring finger protein), HKE6 (steroid dehydrogenase-like protein), and HKE4 (transmembrane protein with histidine-rich charge clusters), was determined. The previously reported RING2 gene was revealed to be identical to HKE6. Transcripts from HKE4 were detected in the placenta, lung, kidney, and pancreas. Those of HKE6 were found in the liver and pancreas. The 25-kb region proximal to the RING1 gene includes an extensive dense cluster of Alu repeats (about 1.2 Alu per kb), and no gene has been identified in this so far. The region is equivalent to part of the mouse t complex and could be of relevance to human development. PMID:9205114

  2. Genetic mapping and DNA sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Speed, T.; Waterman, M.S.

    1996-12-31

    The Human Genome Initiative has as its primary objective the characterization of the human genome. High-resolution linkage maps of genetic markers will play an important role in completing the human genome project. This is one of two volumes based on the proceedings of the 1994 IMA Summer Program on Molecular Biology and comprises Weeks 1 and 2 of the four-week program. This volume focuses on genetic mapping and DNA sequencing. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  3. Benchmarking short sequence mapping tools

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The development of next-generation sequencing instruments has led to the generation of millions of short sequences in a single run. The process of aligning these reads to a reference genome is time consuming and demands the development of fast and accurate alignment tools. However, the current proposed tools make different compromises between the accuracy and the speed of mapping. Moreover, many important aspects are overlooked while comparing the performance of a newly developed tool to the state of the art. Therefore, there is a need for an objective evaluation method that covers all the aspects. In this work, we introduce a benchmarking suite to extensively analyze sequencing tools with respect to various aspects and provide an objective comparison. Results We applied our benchmarking tests on 9 well known mapping tools, namely, Bowtie, Bowtie2, BWA, SOAP2, MAQ, RMAP, GSNAP, Novoalign, and mrsFAST (mrFAST) using synthetic data and real RNA-Seq data. MAQ and RMAP are based on building hash tables for the reads, whereas the remaining tools are based on indexing the reference genome. The benchmarking tests reveal the strengths and weaknesses of each tool. The results show that no single tool outperforms all others in all metrics. However, Bowtie maintained the best throughput for most of the tests while BWA performed better for longer read lengths. The benchmarking tests are not restricted to the mentioned tools and can be further applied to others. Conclusion The mapping process is still a hard problem that is affected by many factors. In this work, we provided a benchmarking suite that reveals and evaluates the different factors affecting the mapping process. Still, there is no tool that outperforms all of the others in all the tests. Therefore, the end user should clearly specify his needs in order to choose the tool that provides the best results. PMID:23758764

  4. Sequence finishing and mapping of Drosophila melanogasterheterochromatin

    SciTech Connect

    Hoskins, Roger A.; Carlson, Joseph W.; Kennedy, Cameron; Acevedo,David; Evans-Holm, Martha; Frise, Erwin; Wan, Kenneth H.; Park, Soo; Mendez-Lago, Maria; Rossi, Fabrizio; Villasante, Alfredo; Dimitri,Patrizio; Karpen, Gary H.; Celniker, Susan E.

    2007-06-15

    Genome sequences for most metazoans are incomplete due tothe presence of repeated DNA in the pericentromeric heterochromatin. Theheterochromatic regions of D. melanogaster contain 20 Mb of sequenceamenable to mapping, sequence assembly and finishing. Here we describethe generation of 15 Mb of finished or improved heterochromatic sequenceusing available clone resources and assembly and mapping methods. We alsoconstructed a BAC-based physical map that spans approximately 13 Mb ofthe pericentromeric heterochromatin, and a cytogenetic map that positionsapproximately 11 Mb of BAC contigs and sequence scaffolds in specificchromosomal locations. The integrated sequence assembly and maps greatlyimprove our understanding of the structure and composition of this poorlyunderstood fraction of a metazoan genome and provide a framework forfunctional analyses.

  5. A Statistical Approach for Ambiguous Sequence Mappings

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    When attempting to map RNA sequences to a reference genome, high percentages of short sequence reads are often assigned to multiple genomic locations. One approach to handling these “ambiguous mappings” has been to discard them. This results in a loss of data, which can sometimes be as much as 45% o...

  6. Quantitative texton sequences for legible bivariate maps.

    PubMed

    Ware, Colin

    2009-01-01

    Representing bivariate scalar maps is a common but difficult visualization problem. One solution has been to use two dimensional color schemes, but the results are often hard to interpret and inaccurately read. An alternative is to use a color sequence for one variable and a texture sequence for another. This has been used, for example, in geology, but much less studied than the two dimensional color scheme, although theory suggests that it should lead to easier perceptual separation of information relating to the two variables. To make a texture sequence more clearly readable the concept of the quantitative texton sequence (QTonS) is introduced. A QTonS is defined a sequence of small graphical elements, called textons, where each texton represents a different numerical value and sets of textons can be densely displayed to produce visually differentiable textures. An experiment was carried out to compare two bivariate color coding schemes with two schemes using QTonS for one bivariate map component and a color sequence for the other. Two different key designs were investigated (a key being a sequence of colors or textures used in obtaining quantitative values from a map). The first design used two separate keys, one for each dimension, in order to measure how accurately subjects could independently estimate the underlying scalar variables. The second key design was two dimensional and intended to measure the overall integral accuracy that could be obtained. The results show that the accuracy is substantially higher for the QTonS/color sequence schemes. A hypothesis that texture/color sequence combinations are better for independent judgments of mapped quantities was supported. A second experiment probed the limits of spatial resolution for QTonSs. PMID:19834229

  7. Sequence analysis by iterated maps, a review.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Jonas S

    2014-05-01

    Among alignment-free methods, Iterated Maps (IMs) are on a particular extreme: they are also scale free (order free). The use of IMs for sequence analysis is also distinct from other alignment-free methodologies in being rooted in statistical mechanics instead of computational linguistics. Both of these roots go back over two decades to the use of fractal geometry in the characterization of phase-space representations. The time series analysis origin of the field is betrayed by the title of the manuscript that started this alignment-free subdomain in 1990, 'Chaos Game Representation'. The clash between the analysis of sequences as continuous series and the better established use of Markovian approaches to discrete series was almost immediate, with a defining critique published in same journal 2 years later. The rest of that decade would go by before the scale-free nature of the IM space was uncovered. The ensuing decade saw this scalability generalized for non-genomic alphabets as well as an interest in its use for graphic representation of biological sequences. Finally, in the past couple of years, in step with the emergence of BigData and MapReduce as a new computational paradigm, there is a surprising third act in the IM story. Multiple reports have described gains in computational efficiency of multiple orders of magnitude over more conventional sequence analysis methodologies. The stage appears to be now set for a recasting of IMs with a central role in processing nextgen sequencing results. PMID:24162172

  8. Interior view looking SW includes map hanging from ceiling and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view looking SW includes map hanging from ceiling and edge of fire finder stand on right. - Badger Mountain Lookout, .125 mile northwest of Badger Mountain summit, East Wenatchee, Douglas County, WA

  9. Strong nucleosomes of mouse genome including recovered centromeric sequences.

    PubMed

    Salih, Bilal F; Teif, Vladimir B; Tripathi, Vijay; Trifonov, Edward N

    2015-01-01

    Recently discovered strong nucleosomes (SNs) characterized by visibly periodical DNA sequences have been found to concentrate in centromeres of Arabidopsis thaliana and in transient meiotic centromeres of Caenorhabditis elegans. To find out whether such affiliation of SNs to centromeres is a more general phenomenon, we studied SNs of the Mus musculus. The publicly available genome sequences of mouse, as well as of practically all other eukaryotes do not include the centromere regions which are difficult to assemble because of a large amount of repeat sequences in the centromeres and pericentromeric regions. We recovered those missing sequences using the data from MNase-seq experiments in mouse embryonic stem cells, where the sequence of DNA inside nucleosomes, including missing regions, was determined by 100-bp paired-end sequencing. Those nucleosome sequences, which are not matching to the published genome sequence, would largely belong to the centromeres. By evaluating SN densities in centromeres and in non-centromeric regions, we conclude that mouse SNs concentrate in the centromeres of telocentric mouse chromosomes, with ~3.9 times excess compared to their density in the rest of the genome. The remaining non-centromeric SNs are harbored mainly by introns and intergenic regions, by retro-transposons, in particular. The centromeric involvement of the SNs opens new horizons for the chromosome and centromere structure studies. PMID:24998943

  10. Mapping and sequencing the human genome

    SciTech Connect

    1988-01-01

    Numerous meetings have been held and a debate has developed in the biological community over the merits of mapping and sequencing the human genome. In response a committee to examine the desirability and feasibility of mapping and sequencing the human genome was formed to suggest options for implementing the project. The committee asked many questions. Should the analysis of the human genome be left entirely to the traditionally uncoordinated, but highly successful, support systems that fund the vast majority of biomedical research. Or should a more focused and coordinated additional support system be developed that is limited to encouraging and facilitating the mapping and eventual sequencing of the human genome. If so, how can this be done without distorting the broader goals of biological research that are crucial for any understanding of the data generated in such a human genome project. As the committee became better informed on the many relevant issues, the opinions of its members coalesced, producing a shared consensus of what should be done. This report reflects that consensus.

  11. Mapping and Sequencing the Human Genome

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    1988-01-01

    Numerous meetings have been held and a debate has developed in the biological community over the merits of mapping and sequencing the human genome. In response a committee to examine the desirability and feasibility of mapping and sequencing the human genome was formed to suggest options for implementing the project. The committee asked many questions. Should the analysis of the human genome be left entirely to the traditionally uncoordinated, but highly successful, support systems that fund the vast majority of biomedical research. Or should a more focused and coordinated additional support system be developed that is limited to encouraging and facilitating the mapping and eventual sequencing of the human genome. If so, how can this be done without distorting the broader goals of biological research that are crucial for any understanding of the data generated in such a human genome project. As the committee became better informed on the many relevant issues, the opinions of its members coalesced, producing a shared consensus of what should be done. This report reflects that consensus.

  12. Sequence analysis by iterated maps, a review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Among alignment-free methods, Iterated Maps (IMs) are on a particular extreme: they are also scale free (order free). The use of IMs for sequence analysis is also distinct from other alignment-free methodologies in being rooted in statistical mechanics instead of computational linguistics. Both of these roots go back over two decades to the use of fractal geometry in the characterization of phase-space representations. The time series analysis origin of the field is betrayed by the title of the manuscript that started this alignment-free subdomain in 1990, ‘Chaos Game Representation’. The clash between the analysis of sequences as continuous series and the better established use of Markovian approaches to discrete series was almost immediate, with a defining critique published in same journal 2 years later. The rest of that decade would go by before the scale-free nature of the IM space was uncovered. The ensuing decade saw this scalability generalized for non-genomic alphabets as well as an interest in its use for graphic representation of biological sequences. Finally, in the past couple of years, in step with the emergence of BigData and MapReduce as a new computational paradigm, there is a surprising third act in the IM story. Multiple reports have described gains in computational efficiency of multiple orders of magnitude over more conventional sequence analysis methodologies. The stage appears to be now set for a recasting of IMs with a central role in processing nextgen sequencing results. PMID:24162172

  13. Whole Genome Mapping with Feature Sets from High-Throughput Sequencing Data.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yonglong; Wang, Xiaoming; Liu, Lin; Wang, Hao; Luo, Meizhong

    2016-01-01

    A good physical map is essential to guide sequence assembly in de novo whole genome sequencing, especially when sequences are produced by high-throughput sequencing such as next-generation-sequencing (NGS) technology. We here present a novel method, Feature sets-based Genome Mapping (FGM). With FGM, physical map and draft whole genome sequences can be generated, anchored and integrated using the same data set of NGS sequences, independent of restriction digestion. Method model was created and parameters were inspected by simulations using the Arabidopsis genome sequence. In the simulations, when ~4.8X genome BAC library including 4,096 clones was used to sequence the whole genome, ~90% of clones were successfully connected to physical contigs, and 91.58% of genome sequences were mapped and connected to chromosomes. This method was experimentally verified using the existing physical map and genome sequence of rice. Of 4,064 clones covering 115 Mb sequence selected from ~3 tiles of 3 chromosomes of a rice draft physical map, 3,364 clones were reconstructed into physical contigs and 98 Mb sequences were integrated into the 3 chromosomes. The physical map-integrated draft genome sequences can provide permanent frameworks for eventually obtaining high-quality reference sequences by targeted sequencing, gap filling and combining other sequences. PMID:27611682

  14. Sequence mapping of the Californian MSW strain of Myxoma virus.

    PubMed

    Labudovic, A; Perkins, H; van Leeuwen, B; Kerr, P

    2004-03-01

    Partial sequence mapping of the MSW Californian strain of Myxoma virus was performed by cloning EcoRI and SalI restriction fragments of viral DNA and sequencing the ends of these. In this way, regions of 74 MSW open reading frames were sequenced and mapped onto the complete genome sequences of the related leporipoxviruses South American Myxoma virus and Rabbit fibroma virus to form a partial map of the MSW strain. In general, gene locations and sequences were conserved between the three viruses. However the Californian Myxoma virus was more closely related to South American myxoma virus than to Rabbit fibroma virus based on sequence comparisons and the presence of three genes that have been lost from the Rabbit fibroma virus genome. Compared to the other two viruses, the main difference found in the MSW genome was that the terminal inverted repeats were extended with the duplication of 5 complete open reading frames (M151R, M152R, M153R, M154L, M156R) and partial duplication of one open reading frame (M150R). This rearrangement was associated with the loss of the majority of the M009L open reading frame. Three known virulence genes, including the serine proteinase inhibitor (SERPIN) genes M151R and M152R and leukemia associated protein (LAP) gene M153R, and the potential virulence gene M156R are now present in two copies. PMID:14991443

  15. Analecta of structures formed during the 28 June 1992 Landers-Big Bear, California earthquake sequence (including maps of shear zones, belts of shear zones, tectonic ridge, duplex en echelon fault, fault elements, and thrusts in restraining steps)

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A.M.; Johnson, N.A.; Johnson, K.M.; Wei, W.; Fleming, R.W.; Cruikshank, K.M.; Martosudarmo, S.Y.

    1997-12-31

    The June 28, 1992, M{sub s} 7.5 earthquake at Landers, California, which occurred about 10 km north of the community of Yucca Valley, California, produced spectacular ground rupturing more than 80 km in length (Hough and others, 1993). The ground rupturing, which was dominated by right-lateral shearing, extended along at least four distinct faults arranged broadly en echelon. The faults were connected through wide transfer zones by stepovers, consisting of right-lateral fault zones and tension cracks. The Landers earthquakes occurred in the desert of southeastern California, where details of ruptures were well preserved, and patterns of rupturing were generally unaffected by urbanization. The structures were varied and well-displayed and, because the differential displacements were so large, spectacular. The scarcity of vegetation, the aridity of the area, the compactness of the alluvium and bedrock, and the relative isotropy and brittleness of surficial materials collaborated to provide a marvelous visual record of the character of the deformation zones. The authors present a series of analecta -- that is, verbal clips or snippets -- dealing with a variety of structures, including belts of shear zones, segmentation of ruptures, rotating fault block, en echelon fault zones, releasing duplex structures, spines, and ramps. All of these structures are documented with detailed maps in text figures or in plates (in pocket). The purpose is to describe the structures and to present an understanding of the mechanics of their formation. Hence, most descriptions focus on structures where the authors have information on differential displacements as well as spatial data on the position and orientation of fractures.

  16. Target Enrichment Improves Mapping of Complex Traits by Deep Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jianjun; Fan, Jue; Hauser, Bernard A.; Rhee, Seung Y.

    2015-01-01

    Complex traits such as crop performance and human diseases are controlled by multiple genetic loci, many of which have small effects and often go undetected by traditional quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping. Recently, bulked segregant analysis with large F2 pools and genome-level markers (named extreme-QTL or X-QTL mapping) has been used to identify many QTL. To estimate parameters impacting QTL detection for X-QTL mapping, we simulated the effects of population size, marker density, and sequencing depth of markers on QTL detectability for traits with differing heritabilities. These simulations indicate that a high (>90%) chance of detecting QTL with at least 5% effect requires 5000× sequencing depth for a trait with heritability of 0.4−0.7. For most eukaryotic organisms, whole-genome sequencing at this depth is not economically feasible. Therefore, we tested and confirmed the feasibility of applying deep sequencing of target-enriched markers for X-QTL mapping. We used two traits in Arabidopsis thaliana with different heritabilities: seed size (H2 = 0.61) and seedling greening in response to salt (H2 = 0.94). We used a modified G test to identify QTL regions and developed a model-based statistical framework to resolve individual peaks by incorporating recombination rates. Multiple QTL were identified for both traits, including previously undiscovered QTL. We call our method target-enriched X-QTL (TEX-QTL) mapping; this mapping approach is not limited by the genome size or the availability of recombinant inbred populations and should be applicable to many organisms and traits. PMID:26530422

  17. User guide for mapping-by-sequencing in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Mapping-by-sequencing combines genetic mapping with whole-genome sequencing in order to accelerate mutant identification. However, application of mapping-by-sequencing requires decisions on various practical settings on the experimental design that are not intuitively answered. Following an experimentally determined recombination landscape of Arabidopsis and next generation sequencing-specific biases, we simulated more than 400,000 mapping-by-sequencing experiments. This allowed us to evaluate a broad range of different types of experiments and to develop general rules for mapping-by-sequencing in Arabidopsis. Most importantly, this informs about the properties of different crossing scenarios, the number of recombinants and sequencing depth needed for successful mapping experiments. PMID:23773572

  18. From synaptic plasticity to spatial maps and sequence learning.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Mayank R

    2015-06-01

    The entorhinal-hippocampal circuit is crucial for several forms of learning and memory, especially sequence learning, including spatial navigation. The challenge is to understand the underlying mechanisms. Pioneering discoveries of spatial selectivity in this circuit, i.e. place cells and grid cells, provided a major step forward in tackling this challenge. Considerable research has also shown that sequence learning relies on synaptic plasticity, especially the Hebbian or the NMDAR-dependent synaptic plasticity. This raises several questions: Are spatial maps plastic? If so, what is the contribution of Hebbian plasticity to spatial map plasticity? How does the spatial map plasticity contribute to sequence learning? A combination of computational and experimental studies has shown that NMDAR-mediated plasticity and theta rhythm can have specific effects on the formation and experiential modification of spatial maps to facilitate predictive coding. Advances in transgenic techniques have provided further support for these mechanisms. Although many exciting challenges remain, these findings have brought us closer to solving the puzzle of how the hippocampal system contributes to spatial memory, and point to a way forward. PMID:25929239

  19. Simulation of Accident Sequences Including Emergency Operating Procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Queral, Cesar; Exposito, Antonio; Hortal, Javier

    2004-07-01

    Operator actions play an important role in accident sequences. However, design analysis (Safety Analysis Report, SAR) seldom includes consideration of operator actions, although they are required by compulsory Emergency Operating Procedures (EOP) to perform some checks and actions from the very beginning of the accident. The basic aim of the project is to develop a procedure validation system which consists of the combination of three elements: a plant transient simulation code TRETA (a C based modular program) developed by the CSN, a computerized procedure system COPMA-III (Java technology based program) developed by the OECD-Halden Reactor Project and adapted for simulation with the contribution of our group and a software interface that provides the communication between COPMA-III and TRETA. The new combined system is going to be applied in a pilot study in order to analyze sequences initiated by secondary side breaks in a Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) plant. (authors)

  20. Mapping Challenging Mutations by Whole-Genome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Harold E.; Fabritius, Amy S.; Jaramillo-Lambert, Aimee; Golden, Andy

    2016-01-01

    Whole-genome sequencing provides a rapid and powerful method for identifying mutations on a global scale, and has spurred a renewed enthusiasm for classical genetic screens in model organisms. The most commonly characterized category of mutation consists of monogenic, recessive traits, due to their genetic tractability. Therefore, most of the mapping methods for mutation identification by whole-genome sequencing are directed toward alleles that fulfill those criteria (i.e., single-gene, homozygous variants). However, such approaches are not entirely suitable for the characterization of a variety of more challenging mutations, such as dominant and semidominant alleles or multigenic traits. Therefore, we have developed strategies for the identification of those classes of mutations, using polymorphism mapping in Caenorhabditis elegans as our model for validation. We also report an alternative approach for mutation identification from traditional recombinant crosses, and a solution to the technical challenge of sequencing sterile or terminally arrested strains where population size is limiting. The methods described herein extend the applicability of whole-genome sequencing to a broader spectrum of mutations, including classes that are difficult to map by traditional means. PMID:26945029

  1. Mapping Challenging Mutations by Whole-Genome Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Smith, Harold E; Fabritius, Amy S; Jaramillo-Lambert, Aimee; Golden, Andy

    2016-01-01

    Whole-genome sequencing provides a rapid and powerful method for identifying mutations on a global scale, and has spurred a renewed enthusiasm for classical genetic screens in model organisms. The most commonly characterized category of mutation consists of monogenic, recessive traits, due to their genetic tractability. Therefore, most of the mapping methods for mutation identification by whole-genome sequencing are directed toward alleles that fulfill those criteria (i.e., single-gene, homozygous variants). However, such approaches are not entirely suitable for the characterization of a variety of more challenging mutations, such as dominant and semidominant alleles or multigenic traits. Therefore, we have developed strategies for the identification of those classes of mutations, using polymorphism mapping in Caenorhabditis elegans as our model for validation. We also report an alternative approach for mutation identification from traditional recombinant crosses, and a solution to the technical challenge of sequencing sterile or terminally arrested strains where population size is limiting. The methods described herein extend the applicability of whole-genome sequencing to a broader spectrum of mutations, including classes that are difficult to map by traditional means. PMID:26945029

  2. Mapping copy number variation by population-scale genome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Mills, Ryan E; Walter, Klaudia; Stewart, Chip; Handsaker, Robert E; Chen, Ken; Alkan, Can; Abyzov, Alexej; Yoon, Seungtai Chris; Ye, Kai; Cheetham, R Keira; Chinwalla, Asif; Conrad, Donald F; Fu, Yutao; Grubert, Fabian; Hajirasouliha, Iman; Hormozdiari, Fereydoun; Iakoucheva, Lilia M; Iqbal, Zamin; Kang, Shuli; Kidd, Jeffrey M; Konkel, Miriam K; Korn, Joshua; Khurana, Ekta; Kural, Deniz; Lam, Hugo Y K; Leng, Jing; Li, Ruiqiang; Li, Yingrui; Lin, Chang-Yun; Luo, Ruibang; Mu, Xinmeng Jasmine; Nemesh, James; Peckham, Heather E; Rausch, Tobias; Scally, Aylwyn; Shi, Xinghua; Stromberg, Michael P; Stütz, Adrian M; Urban, Alexander Eckehart; Walker, Jerilyn A; Wu, Jiantao; Zhang, Yujun; Zhang, Zhengdong D; Batzer, Mark A; Ding, Li; Marth, Gabor T; McVean, Gil; Sebat, Jonathan; Snyder, Michael; Wang, Jun; Ye, Kenny; Eichler, Evan E; Gerstein, Mark B; Hurles, Matthew E; Lee, Charles; McCarroll, Steven A; Korbel, Jan O

    2011-02-01

    Genomic structural variants (SVs) are abundant in humans, differing from other forms of variation in extent, origin and functional impact. Despite progress in SV characterization, the nucleotide resolution architecture of most SVs remains unknown. We constructed a map of unbalanced SVs (that is, copy number variants) based on whole genome DNA sequencing data from 185 human genomes, integrating evidence from complementary SV discovery approaches with extensive experimental validations. Our map encompassed 22,025 deletions and 6,000 additional SVs, including insertions and tandem duplications. Most SVs (53%) were mapped to nucleotide resolution, which facilitated analysing their origin and functional impact. We examined numerous whole and partial gene deletions with a genotyping approach and observed a depletion of gene disruptions amongst high frequency deletions. Furthermore, we observed differences in the size spectra of SVs originating from distinct formation mechanisms, and constructed a map of SV hotspots formed by common mechanisms. Our analytical framework and SV map serves as a resource for sequencing-based association studies. PMID:21293372

  3. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, Natasha V.; Broekaert, Willem F.; Chua, Nam-Hai; Kush, Anil

    1993-02-16

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a pu GOVERNMENT RIGHTS This application was funded under Department of Energy Contract DE-AC02-76ER01338. The U.S. Government has certain rights under this application and any patent issuing thereon.

  4. Halvade: scalable sequence analysis with MapReduce

    PubMed Central

    Decap, Dries; Reumers, Joke; Herzeel, Charlotte; Costanza, Pascal; Fostier, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: Post-sequencing DNA analysis typically consists of read mapping followed by variant calling. Especially for whole genome sequencing, this computational step is very time-consuming, even when using multithreading on a multi-core machine. Results: We present Halvade, a framework that enables sequencing pipelines to be executed in parallel on a multi-node and/or multi-core compute infrastructure in a highly efficient manner. As an example, a DNA sequencing analysis pipeline for variant calling has been implemented according to the GATK Best Practices recommendations, supporting both whole genome and whole exome sequencing. Using a 15-node computer cluster with 360 CPU cores in total, Halvade processes the NA12878 dataset (human, 100 bp paired-end reads, 50× coverage) in <3 h with very high parallel efficiency. Even on a single, multi-core machine, Halvade attains a significant speedup compared with running the individual tools with multithreading. Availability and implementation: Halvade is written in Java and uses the Hadoop MapReduce 2.0 API. It supports a wide range of distributions of Hadoop, including Cloudera and Amazon EMR. Its source is available at http://bioinformatics.intec.ugent.be/halvade under GPL license. Contact: jan.fostier@intec.ugent.be Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25819078

  5. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, N.V.; Broekaert, W.F.; Chua, N.H.; Kush, A.

    1995-03-21

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1,018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74--79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli. 11 figures.

  6. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Raikhel, N.V.; Broekaert, W.F.; Chua, N.H.; Kush, A.

    2000-07-04

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74--79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli.

  7. CDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, Natasha V.; Broekaert, Willem F.; Chua, Nam-Hai; Kush, Anil

    1995-03-21

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74-79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli.

  8. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, Natasha V.; Broekaert, Willem F.; Chua, Nam-Hai; Kush, Anil

    1999-05-04

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74-79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli.

  9. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, N.V.; Broekaert, W.F.; Chua, N.H.; Kush, A.

    1999-05-04

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74--79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli. 12 figs.

  10. A Probabilistic Approach for Improved Sequence Mapping in Metatranscriptomic Studies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mapping millions of short DNA sequences a reference genome is a necessary step in many experiments designed to investigate the expression of genes involved in disease resistance. This is a difficult task in which several challenges often arise resulting in a suboptimal mapping. This mapping process ...

  11. Regulated expression of repetitive sequences including the identifier sequence during myotube formation in culture.

    PubMed Central

    Herget, T; Reich, M; Stüber, K; Starzinski-Powitz, A

    1986-01-01

    We have isolated and characterized a cDNA of 1183 bp, pL6-411, from rat L6 muscle cells. This cDNA contains repetitive sequences - including two inverted copies of the previously described identifier sequence - as shown by sequence analysis. Repetitive sequences from pL6-411 characterize a family of RNAs which is specifically induced during L6 myotube formation. Another part of the pL6-411 sequence, existing at low-copy number per haploid rat genome, hybridized to two RNAs of 5 kb and 2 kb from L6 myoblasts as well as from L6 myotubes. A third pL6-411-related RNA of 150 bases was detected which hybridized with the repetitive sequence but did not hybridize with the low-copy number part of pL6-411. It appears that the 'identifier' sequence in this population of small RNAs is complementary to one of the 'identifier' copies in the pL6-411-related RNA. Finally, we identified on cDNA pL6-411 the recognition site for the TGGCA-binding protein and in both orientations a total of four putative promoters for RNA polymerase III. Images Fig.1. Fig.2. Fig.3. PMID:2423328

  12. Microbial genome sequencing using optical mapping and Illumina sequencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction Optical mapping is a technique in which strands of genomic DNA are digested with one or more restriction enzymes, and a physical map of the genome constructed from the resulting image. In outline, genomic DNA is extracted from a pure culture, linearly arrayed on a specialized glass sli...

  13. JVM: Java Visual Mapping tool for next generation sequencing read.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ye; Liu, Juan

    2015-01-01

    We developed a program JVM (Java Visual Mapping) for mapping next generation sequencing read to reference sequence. The program is implemented in Java and is designed to deal with millions of short read generated by sequence alignment using the Illumina sequencing technology. It employs seed index strategy and octal encoding operations for sequence alignments. JVM is useful for DNA-Seq, RNA-Seq when dealing with single-end resequencing. JVM is a desktop application, which supports reads capacity from 1 MB to 10 GB. PMID:25387956

  14. Sequencing and mapping of the onion genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cost of DNA sequencing continues to decline and, in the near future, it will become reasonable to undertake sequencing of the enormous nuclear genome of onion. We undertook sequencing of expressed and genomic regions of the onion genome to learn about the structure of the onion genome, as well a...

  15. QTL mapping using high-throughput sequencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping in plants dates to the 1980’s, but earlier studies were often hindered by the expense and time required to identify large numbers of polymorphic genetic markers that differentiated the parental genotypes and then to genotype them on large segregating mapping po...

  16. Restoration of distorted depth maps calculated from stereo sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Damour, Kevin; Kaufman, Howard

    1991-01-01

    A model-based Kalman estimator is developed for spatial-temporal filtering of noise and other degradations in velocity and depth maps derived from image sequences or cinema. As an illustration of the proposed procedures, edge information from image sequences of rigid objects is used in the processing of the velocity maps by selecting from a series of models for directional adaptive filtering. Adaptive filtering then allows for noise reduction while preserving sharpness in the velocity maps. Results from several synthetic and real image sequences are given.

  17. Quality Assessment of Mapping Building Textures from Infrared Image Sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoegner, L.; Iwaszczuk, D.; Stilla, U.

    2012-07-01

    Generation and texturing of building models is a fast developing field of research. Several techniques have been developed to extract building geometry and textures from multiple images and image sequences. In this paper, these techniques are discussed and extended to automatically add new textures from infrared (IR) image sequences to existing building models. In contrast to existing work, geometry and textures are not generated together from the same dataset but the textures are extracted from the image sequence and matched to an existing geo-referenced 3D building model. The texture generation is divided in two main parts. The first part deals with the estimation and refinement of the exterior camera orientation. Feature points are extracted in the images and used as tie points in the sequence. A recorded exterior orientation of the camera s added to these homologous points and a bundle adjustment is performed starting on image pairs and combining the hole sequence. A given 3d model of the observed building is additionally added to introduce further constraint as ground control points in the bundle adjustment. The second part includes the extraction of textures from the images and the combination of textures from different images of the sequence. Using the reconstructed exterior camera orientation for every image of the sequence, the visible facades are projected into the image and texture is extracted. These textures normally contain only parts of the facade. The partial textures extracted from all images are combined to one facade texture. This texture is stored with a 3D reference to the corresponding facade. This allows searching for features in textures and localising those features in 3D space. It will be shown, that the proposed strategy allows texture extraction and mapping even for big building complexes with restricted viewing possibilities and for images with low optical resolution.

  18. Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Mapping Using Genome-Wide Unique Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Leslie Y.Y.; Lu, Szu-Hsien; Shih, Edward S.C.; Hwang, Ming-Jing

    2002-01-01

    As more and more genomic DNAs are sequenced to characterize human genetic variations, the demand for a very fast and accurate method to genomically position these DNA sequences is high. We have developed a new mapping method that does not require sequence alignment. In this method, we first identified DNA fragments of 15 bp in length that are unique in the human genome and then used them to position single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) sequences. By use of four desktop personal computers with AMD K7 (1 GHz) processors, our new method mapped more than 1.6 million SNP sequences in 20 hr and achieved a very good agreement with mapping results from alignment-based methods. PMID:12097348

  19. Appliation of rad-sequencing to linkage mapping in citrus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High density linkage maps can be developed for modest cost using high-throughput DNA sequencing to genotype a defined fraction (representation) of the genome. We developed linkage maps in two citrus populations using the RAD (Restriction site Associated DNA) genotyping method which involves restrict...

  20. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, N.V.; Broekaert, W.F.; Namhai Chua; Kush, A.

    1993-02-16

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1,018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids.

  1. A physical map of the papaya genome with integrated genetic map and genome sequence

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Papaya is a major fruit crop in tropical and subtropical regions worldwide and has primitive sex chromosomes controlling sex determination in this trioecious species. The papaya genome was recently sequenced because of its agricultural importance, unique biological features, and successful application of transgenic papaya for resistance to papaya ringspot virus. As a part of the genome sequencing project, we constructed a BAC-based physical map using a high information-content fingerprinting approach to assist whole genome shotgun sequence assembly. Results The physical map consists of 963 contigs, representing 9.4× genome equivalents, and was integrated with the genetic map and genome sequence using BAC end sequences and a sequence-tagged high-density genetic map. The estimated genome coverage of the physical map is about 95.8%, while 72.4% of the genome was aligned to the genetic map. A total of 1,181 high quality overgo (overlapping oligonucleotide) probes representing conserved sequences in Arabidopsis and genetically mapped loci in Brassica were anchored on the physical map, which provides a foundation for comparative genomics in the Brassicales. The integrated genetic and physical map aligned with the genome sequence revealed recombination hotspots as well as regions suppressed for recombination across the genome, particularly on the recently evolved sex chromosomes. Suppression of recombination spread to the adjacent region of the male specific region of the Y chromosome (MSY), and recombination rates were recovered gradually and then exceeded the genome average. Recombination hotspots were observed at about 10 Mb away on both sides of the MSY, showing 7-fold increase compared with the genome wide average, demonstrating the dynamics of recombination of the sex chromosomes. Conclusion A BAC-based physical map of papaya was constructed and integrated with the genetic map and genome sequence. The integrated map facilitated the draft genome assembly

  2. Time-dependent accident sequences including human actions

    SciTech Connect

    Apostolakis, G.; Chu, T.L.

    1984-02-01

    During an accident, transitions between plant states can occur due to operator intervention and the failure of systems while running. The latter cause of transition is much less likely than the first, which includes errors of commission and omission as well as recovery of lost functions. A methodology has been developed to model these transitions in the time domain. As an example, it is applied to the analysis of Three-Mile-Island-type accidents. Statistical evidence is collected and used in assessing the frequency of stuck-open power-operated relief valves at Babcock and Wilcox plants as well as the frequency of misdiagnosis. Statistical data are also used in modeling the timing of operator actions during the accident, i.e., turning off and on the high-pressure injection system and closing the block valves.

  3. Complete MHC haplotype sequencing for common disease gene mapping.

    PubMed

    Stewart, C Andrew; Horton, Roger; Allcock, Richard J N; Ashurst, Jennifer L; Atrazhev, Alexey M; Coggill, Penny; Dunham, Ian; Forbes, Simon; Halls, Karen; Howson, Joanna M M; Humphray, Sean J; Hunt, Sarah; Mungall, Andrew J; Osoegawa, Kazutoyo; Palmer, Sophie; Roberts, Anne N; Rogers, Jane; Sims, Sarah; Wang, Yu; Wilming, Laurens G; Elliott, John F; de Jong, Pieter J; Sawcer, Stephen; Todd, John A; Trowsdale, John; Beck, Stephan

    2004-06-01

    The future systematic mapping of variants that confer susceptibility to common diseases requires the construction of a fully informative polymorphism map. Ideally, every base pair of the genome would be sequenced in many individuals. Here, we report 4.75 Mb of contiguous sequence for each of two common haplotypes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), to which susceptibility to >100 diseases has been mapped. The autoimmune disease-associated-haplotypes HLA-A3-B7-Cw7-DR15 and HLA-A1-B8-Cw7-DR3 were sequenced in their entirety through a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) cloning strategy using the consanguineous cell lines PGF and COX, respectively. The two sequences were annotated to encompass all described splice variants of expressed genes. We defined the complete variation content of the two haplotypes, revealing >18,000 variations between them. Average SNP densities ranged from less than one SNP per kilobase to >60. Acquisition of complete and accurate sequence data over polymorphic regions such as the MHC from large-insert cloned DNA provides a definitive resource for the construction of informative genetic maps, and avoids the limitation of chromosome regions that are refractory to PCR amplification. PMID:15140828

  4. Temperature sequences for categorizing all ternary distillation boundary maps

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, E.J.; Partin, L.R.

    1997-05-01

    Temperature sequences are formulated as a complete method of categorizing the feasible distillation boundary maps (DBMs) for ternary systems which commonly have unique binary and ternary azeotropes. DBMs are simplified versions of residue curve maps. The method requires the boiling temperatures at system pressure of pure components and azeotropes, if they exist. Seven position numbers are assigned to the pure components (three) and azeotropes (three binary, one ternary). The boiling temperatures are sorted to rank the position numbers. The temperature sequence is defined as the ranking of position numbers. The position numbers of missing azeotropes are excluded from the sequence. An algorithm searches all possible temperature sequences for feasible DBMs. The result is a complete listing of 125 DBMs, 307 temperature sequences, and 382 [temperature sequence, DBM] pairs. Lookup tables simplify the procedure for finding the DBM(s) for a temperature sequence or finding the temperature sequences for a DBM. Example applications are presented for applying the technique in the initial screening for distillation system synthesis.

  5. A high density physical map of chromosome 1BL supports evolutionary studies, map-based cloning and sequencing in wheat

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background As for other major crops, achieving a complete wheat genome sequence is essential for the application of genomics to breeding new and improved varieties. To overcome the complexities of the large, highly repetitive and hexaploid wheat genome, the International Wheat Genome Sequencing Consortium established a chromosome-based strategy that was validated by the construction of the physical map of chromosome 3B. Here, we present improved strategies for the construction of highly integrated and ordered wheat physical maps, using chromosome 1BL as a template, and illustrate their potential for evolutionary studies and map-based cloning. Results Using a combination of novel high throughput marker assays and an assembly program, we developed a high quality physical map representing 93% of wheat chromosome 1BL, anchored and ordered with 5,489 markers including 1,161 genes. Analysis of the gene space organization and evolution revealed that gene distribution and conservation along the chromosome results from the superimposition of the ancestral grass and recent wheat evolutionary patterns, leading to a peak of synteny in the central part of the chromosome arm and an increased density of non-collinear genes towards the telomere. With a density of about 11 markers per Mb, the 1BL physical map provides 916 markers, including 193 genes, for fine mapping the 40 QTLs mapped on this chromosome. Conclusions Here, we demonstrate that high marker density physical maps can be developed in complex genomes such as wheat to accelerate map-based cloning, gain new insights into genome evolution, and provide a foundation for reference sequencing. PMID:23800011

  6. Mapping and Initial Analysis of Human Subtelomeric Sequence Assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Riethman, Harold; Ambrosini, Anthony; Castaneda, Carlos; Finklestein, Jeffrey; Hu, Xue-Lan; Mudunuri, Uma; Paul, Sheila; Wei, Jun

    2004-01-01

    Physical mapping data were combined with public draft and finished sequences to derive subtelomeric sequence assemblies for each of the 41 genetically distinct human telomere regions. Sequence gaps that remain on the reference telomeres are generally small,well-defined,and for the most part,restricted to regions directly adjacent to the terminal (TTAGGG)n tract. Of the 20.66 Mb of subtelomeric DNA analyzed, 3.01 Mb are subtelomeric repeat sequences (Srpt),and an additional 2.11 Mb are segmental duplications. The subtelomeric sequence assemblies are enriched >25-fold in short,internal (TTAGGG)n-like sequences relative to the rest of the genome; a total of 114 (TTAGGG)n-like islands were found,55 within Srpt regions,35 within one-copy regions,11 at one-copy/Srpt or Srpt/segmental duplication boundaries,and 13 at the telomeric ends of assemblies. Transcripts were annotated in each assembly,noting their mapping coordinates relative to their respective telomere and whether they originate in duplicated DNA or single-copy DNA. A total of 697 transcripts were found in 15.53 Mb of one-copy DNA,76 transcripts in 2.11 Mb of segmentally duplicated DNA,and 168 transcripts in 3.01 Mb of Srpt sequence. This overall transcript density is similar (within ∼10%) to that found genome-wide. Zinc finger-containing genes and olfactory receptor genes are duplicated within and between multiple telomere regions. PMID:14707167

  7. Evolutionary optimization of biopolymers and sequence structure maps

    SciTech Connect

    Reidys, C.M.; Kopp, S.; Schuster, P.

    1996-06-01

    Searching for biopolymers having a predefined function is a core problem of biotechnology, biochemistry and pharmacy. On the level of RNA sequences and their corresponding secondary structures we show that this problem can be analyzed mathematically. The strategy will be to study the properties of the RNA sequence to secondary structure mapping that is essential for the understanding of the search process. We show that to each secondary structure s there exists a neutral network consisting of all sequences folding into s. This network can be modeled as a random graph and has the following generic properties: it is dense and has a giant component within the graph of compatible sequences. The neutral network percolates sequence space and any two neutral nets come close in terms of Hamming distance. We investigate the distribution of the orders of neutral nets and show that above a certain threshold the topology of neutral nets allows to find practically all frequent secondary structures.

  8. A High Resolution Genetic Map Anchoring Scaffolds of the Sequenced Watermelon Genome

    PubMed Central

    Kou, Qinghe; Jiang, Jiao; Guo, Shaogui; Zhang, Haiying; Hou, Wenju; Zou, Xiaohua; Sun, Honghe; Gong, Guoyi; Levi, Amnon; Xu, Yong

    2012-01-01

    As part of our ongoing efforts to sequence and map the watermelon (Citrullus spp.) genome, we have constructed a high density genetic linkage map. The map positioned 234 watermelon genome sequence scaffolds (an average size of 1.41 Mb) that cover about 330 Mb and account for 93.5% of the 353 Mb of the assembled genomic sequences of the elite Chinese watermelon line 97103 (Citrullus lanatus var. lanatus). The genetic map was constructed using an F8 population of 103 recombinant inbred lines (RILs). The RILs are derived from a cross between the line 97103 and the United States Plant Introduction (PI) 296341-FR (C. lanatus var. citroides) that contains resistance to fusarium wilt (races 0, 1, and 2). The genetic map consists of eleven linkage groups that include 698 simple sequence repeat (SSR), 219 insertion-deletion (InDel) and 36 structure variation (SV) markers and spans ∼800 cM with a mean marker interval of 0.8 cM. Using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with 11 BACs that produced chromosome-specifc signals, we have depicted watermelon chromosomes that correspond to the eleven linkage groups constructed in this study. The high resolution genetic map developed here should be a useful platform for the assembly of the watermelon genome, for the development of sequence-based markers used in breeding programs, and for the identification of genes associated with important agricultural traits. PMID:22247776

  9. Fractal MapReduce decomposition of sequence alignment

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The dramatic fall in the cost of genomic sequencing, and the increasing convenience of distributed cloud computing resources, positions the MapReduce coding pattern as a cornerstone of scalable bioinformatics algorithm development. In some cases an algorithm will find a natural distribution via use of map functions to process vectorized components, followed by a reduce of aggregate intermediate results. However, for some data analysis procedures such as sequence analysis, a more fundamental reformulation may be required. Results In this report we describe a solution to sequence comparison that can be thoroughly decomposed into multiple rounds of map and reduce operations. The route taken makes use of iterated maps, a fractal analysis technique, that has been found to provide a "alignment-free" solution to sequence analysis and comparison. That is, a solution that does not require dynamic programming, relying on a numeric Chaos Game Representation (CGR) data structure. This claim is demonstrated in this report by calculating the length of the longest similar segment by inspecting only the USM coordinates of two analogous units: with no resort to dynamic programming. Conclusions The procedure described is an attempt at extreme decomposition and parallelization of sequence alignment in anticipation of a volume of genomic sequence data that cannot be met by current algorithmic frameworks. The solution found is delivered with a browser-based application (webApp), highlighting the browser's emergence as an environment for high performance distributed computing. Availability Public distribution of accompanying software library with open source and version control at http://usm.github.com. Also available as a webApp through Google Chrome's WebStore http://chrome.google.com/webstore: search with "usm". PMID:22551205

  10. A sequence-tagged site map of human chromosome 11.

    PubMed

    Smith, M W; Clark, S P; Hutchinson, J S; Wei, Y H; Churukian, A C; Daniels, L B; Diggle, K L; Gen, M W; Romo, A J; Lin, Y

    1993-09-01

    We report the construction of 370 sequence-tagged sites (STSs) that are detectable by PCR amplification under sets of standardized conditions and that have been regionally mapped to human chromosome 11. DNA sequences were determined by sequencing directly from cosmid templates using primers complementary to T3 and T7 promoters present in the cloning vector. Oligonucleotide PCR primers were predicted by computer and tested using a battery of genomic DNAs. Cosmids were regionally localized on chromosome 11 by using fluorescence in situ hybridization or by analyzing a somatic cell hybrid panel. Additional STSs corresponding to known genes and markers on chromosome 11 were also produced under the same series of standardized conditions. The resulting STSs provide uniform coverage of chromosome 11 with an average spacing of 340 kb. The DNA sequence determined for use in STS production corresponds to about 0.1% (116 kb) of chromosome 11 and has been analyzed for the presence of repetitive sequences, similarities to known genes and motifs, and possible exons. Computer analysis of this sequence has identified and therefore mapped at least eight new genes on chromosome 11. PMID:8244387

  11. Fast and sensitive mapping of nanopore sequencing reads with GraphMap

    PubMed Central

    Sović, Ivan; Šikić, Mile; Wilm, Andreas; Fenlon, Shannon Nicole; Chen, Swaine; Nagarajan, Niranjan

    2016-01-01

    Realizing the democratic promise of nanopore sequencing requires the development of new bioinformatics approaches to deal with its specific error characteristics. Here we present GraphMap, a mapping algorithm designed to analyse nanopore sequencing reads, which progressively refines candidate alignments to robustly handle potentially high-error rates and a fast graph traversal to align long reads with speed and high precision (>95%). Evaluation on MinION sequencing data sets against short- and long-read mappers indicates that GraphMap increases mapping sensitivity by 10–80% and maps >95% of bases. GraphMap alignments enabled single-nucleotide variant calling on the human genome with increased sensitivity (15%) over the next best mapper, precise detection of structural variants from length 100 bp to 4 kbp, and species and strain-specific identification of pathogens using MinION reads. GraphMap is available open source under the MIT license at https://github.com/isovic/graphmap. PMID:27079541

  12. Fast and sensitive mapping of nanopore sequencing reads with GraphMap.

    PubMed

    Sović, Ivan; Šikić, Mile; Wilm, Andreas; Fenlon, Shannon Nicole; Chen, Swaine; Nagarajan, Niranjan

    2016-01-01

    Realizing the democratic promise of nanopore sequencing requires the development of new bioinformatics approaches to deal with its specific error characteristics. Here we present GraphMap, a mapping algorithm designed to analyse nanopore sequencing reads, which progressively refines candidate alignments to robustly handle potentially high-error rates and a fast graph traversal to align long reads with speed and high precision (>95%). Evaluation on MinION sequencing data sets against short- and long-read mappers indicates that GraphMap increases mapping sensitivity by 10-80% and maps >95% of bases. GraphMap alignments enabled single-nucleotide variant calling on the human genome with increased sensitivity (15%) over the next best mapper, precise detection of structural variants from length 100 bp to 4 kbp, and species and strain-specific identification of pathogens using MinION reads. GraphMap is available open source under the MIT license at https://github.com/isovic/graphmap. PMID:27079541

  13. Physical mapping of human chromosomes by repetitive sequence fingerprinting.

    PubMed Central

    Stallings, R L; Torney, D C; Hildebrand, C E; Longmire, J L; Deaven, L L; Jett, J H; Doggett, N A; Moyzis, R K

    1990-01-01

    We have developed an approach for identifying overlapping cosmid clones by exploiting the high density of repetitive sequences in complex genomes. Individual clones are fingerprinted, using a combination of restriction enzyme digestions followed by hybridization with selected classes of repetitive sequences. This "repeat fingerprinting" technique allows small regions of clone overlap (10-20%) to be unambiguously assigned. We demonstrate the utility of this approach, using the fingerprinting of 3145 cosmid clones (1.25 x coverage), containing one or more (GT)n repeats, from human chromosome 16. A statistical analysis was used to link these clones into 460 contiguous sequences (contigs), averaging 106 kilobases (kb) in length and representing approximately 54% (48.7 Mb) of the euchromatic arms of this chromosome. These values are consistent with theoretical calculations and indicate that 150- to 200-kb contigs can be generated with 1.5 x coverage. This strategy requires the fingerprinting of approximately one-fourth as many cosmids as random strategies requiring 50% minimum overlap for overlap detection. By "nucleating" at specific regions in the human genome, and exploiting the high density of interspersed sequences, this approach allows (i) the rapid generation of large (greater than 100-kb) contigs in the early stages of contig mapping and (ii) the production of a contig map with useful landmarks for rapid integration of the genetic and physical maps. Images PMID:2385591

  14. Computationally mapping sequence space to understand evolutionary protein engineering.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Kathryn A; Tidor, Bruce

    2008-01-01

    Evolutionary protein engineering has been dramatically successful, producing a wide variety of new proteins with altered stability, binding affinity, and enzymatic activity. However, the success of such procedures is often unreliable, and the impact of the choice of protein, engineering goal, and evolutionary procedure is not well understood. We have created a framework for understanding aspects of the protein engineering process by computationally mapping regions of feasible sequence space for three small proteins using structure-based design protocols. We then tested the ability of different evolutionary search strategies to explore these sequence spaces. The results point to a non-intuitive relationship between the error-prone PCR mutation rate and the number of rounds of replication. The evolutionary relationships among feasible sequences reveal hub-like sequences that serve as particularly fruitful starting sequences for evolutionary search. Moreover, genetic recombination procedures were examined, and tradeoffs relating sequence diversity and search efficiency were identified. This framework allows us to consider the impact of protein structure on the allowed sequence space and therefore on the challenges that each protein presents to error-prone PCR and genetic recombination procedures. PMID:18020358

  15. MOSAIK: a hash-based algorithm for accurate next-generation sequencing short-read mapping.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wan-Ping; Stromberg, Michael P; Ward, Alistair; Stewart, Chip; Garrison, Erik P; Marth, Gabor T

    2014-01-01

    MOSAIK is a stable, sensitive and open-source program for mapping second and third-generation sequencing reads to a reference genome. Uniquely among current mapping tools, MOSAIK can align reads generated by all the major sequencing technologies, including Illumina, Applied Biosystems SOLiD, Roche 454, Ion Torrent and Pacific BioSciences SMRT. Indeed, MOSAIK was the only aligner to provide consistent mappings for all the generated data (sequencing technologies, low-coverage and exome) in the 1000 Genomes Project. To provide highly accurate alignments, MOSAIK employs a hash clustering strategy coupled with the Smith-Waterman algorithm. This method is well-suited to capture mismatches as well as short insertions and deletions. To support the growing interest in larger structural variant (SV) discovery, MOSAIK provides explicit support for handling known-sequence SVs, e.g. mobile element insertions (MEIs) as well as generating outputs tailored to aid in SV discovery. All variant discovery benefits from an accurate description of the read placement confidence. To this end, MOSAIK uses a neural-network based training scheme to provide well-calibrated mapping quality scores, demonstrated by a correlation coefficient between MOSAIK assigned and actual mapping qualities greater than 0.98. In order to ensure that studies of any genome are supported, a training pipeline is provided to ensure optimal mapping quality scores for the genome under investigation. MOSAIK is multi-threaded, open source, and incorporated into our command and pipeline launcher system GKNO (http://gkno.me). PMID:24599324

  16. DOE project on genome mapping and sequencing. Progress report, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, G.A.

    1992-12-31

    These efforts on the human genome project were initiated in September, 1990, to contribute towards completion of the human genome project physical mapping effort. In the original application, the authors proposed a novel strategy for constructing a physical map of human chromosome 11, based upon techniques derived in this group and by others. The original goals were to (1) produce a set of cosmid reference clones mapped to specific sites by high resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization, (2) produce a set of associated STS sequences and PCR primers for each site, (3) isolate YAC clones corresponding to each STS and, (4) construct YAC contigs such that > 90% of the chromosome would be covered by contigs of 2 mb or greater. Since that time, and with the advent of new technology and reagents, the strategy has been modified slightly but still retains the same goals as originally proposed. The authors have added a project to produce chromosome 11-specific cDNAs and determine the map location and DNA sequence of a selected portion of them.

  17. Mapping DNA polymerase errors by single-molecule sequencing.

    PubMed

    Lee, David F; Lu, Jenny; Chang, Seungwoo; Loparo, Joseph J; Xie, Xiaoliang S

    2016-07-27

    Genomic integrity is compromised by DNA polymerase replication errors, which occur in a sequence-dependent manner across the genome. Accurate and complete quantification of a DNA polymerase's error spectrum is challenging because errors are rare and difficult to detect. We report a high-throughput sequencing assay to map in vitro DNA replication errors at the single-molecule level. Unlike previous methods, our assay is able to rapidly detect a large number of polymerase errors at base resolution over any template substrate without quantification bias. To overcome the high error rate of high-throughput sequencing, our assay uses a barcoding strategy in which each replication product is tagged with a unique nucleotide sequence before amplification. This allows multiple sequencing reads of the same product to be compared so that sequencing errors can be found and removed. We demonstrate the ability of our assay to characterize the average error rate, error hotspots and lesion bypass fidelity of several DNA polymerases. PMID:27185891

  18. Mapping of aldose reductase gene sequences to human chromosomes 1, 3, 7, 9, 11, and 13

    SciTech Connect

    Bateman, J.B.; Kojis, T. UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA ); Heinzmann, C.; Sparkes, R.S.; Klisak, I.; Diep, A. ); Carper, D. ); Nishimura, Chihiro ); Mohandas, T. )

    1993-09-01

    Aldose reductase (alditol:NAD(P)+ 1-oxidoreductase; EC 1.1.1.21) (AR) catalyzes the reduction of several aldehydes, including that of glucose, to the corresponding sugar alcohol. Using a complementary DNA clone encoding human AR, the authors mapped the gene sequences to human chromosomes 1, 3, 7, 9, 11, 13, 14, and 18 by somatic cell hybridization. By in situ hybridization analysis, sequences were localized to human chromosomes 1q32-q43, 3p12, 7q31-q35, 9q22, 11p14-p15, and 13q14-q21. As a putative functional AR gene has been mapped to chromosome 7 and a putative pseudogene to chromosome 3, the sequences on the other seven chromosomes may represent other active genes, non-aldose reductase homologous sequences, or pseudogenes. 24 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Sequence, molecular properties, and chromosomal mapping of mouse lumican

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funderburgh, J. L.; Funderburgh, M. L.; Hevelone, N. D.; Stech, M. E.; Justice, M. J.; Liu, C. Y.; Kao, W. W.; Conrad, G. W.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    PURPOSE. Lumican is a major proteoglycan of vertebrate cornea. This study characterizes mouse lumican, its molecular form, cDNA sequence, and chromosomal localization. METHODS. Lumican sequence was determined from cDNA clones selected from a mouse corneal cDNA expression library using a bovine lumican cDNA probe. Tissue expression and size of lumican mRNA were determined using Northern hybridization. Glycosidase digestion followed by Western blot analysis provided characterization of molecular properties of purified mouse corneal lumican. Chromosomal mapping of the lumican gene (Lcn) used Southern hybridization of a panel of genomic DNAs from an interspecific murine backcross. RESULTS. Mouse lumican is a 338-amino acid protein with high-sequence identity to bovine and chicken lumican proteins. The N-terminus of the lumican protein contains consensus sequences for tyrosine sulfation. A 1.9-kb lumican mRNA is present in cornea and several other tissues. Antibody against bovine lumican reacted with recombinant mouse lumican expressed in Escherichia coli and also detected high molecular weight proteoglycans in extracts of mouse cornea. Keratanase digestion of corneal proteoglycans released lumican protein, demonstrating the presence of sulfated keratan sulfate chains on mouse corneal lumican in vivo. The lumican gene (Lcn) was mapped to the distal region of mouse chromosome 10. The Lcn map site is in the region of a previously identified developmental mutant, eye blebs, affecting corneal morphology. CONCLUSIONS. This study demonstrates sulfated keratan sulfate proteoglycan in mouse cornea and describes the tools (antibodies and cDNA) necessary to investigate the functional role of this important corneal molecule using naturally occurring and induced mutants of the murine lumican gene.

  20. Mapping by sequencing the Pneumocystis genome using the ordering DNA sequences V3 tool.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zheng; Lance, Britton; Vargas, Claudia; Arpinar, Budak; Bhandarkar, Suchendra; Kraemer, Eileen; Kochut, Krys J; Miller, John A; Wagner, Jeff R; Weise, Michael J; Wunderlich, John K; Stringer, James; Smulian, George; Cushion, Melanie T; Arnold, Jonathan

    2003-04-01

    A bioinformatics tool called ODS3 has been created for mapping by sequencing. The tool allows the creation of integrated genomic maps from genetic, physical mapping, and sequencing data and permits an integrated genome map to be stored, retrieved, viewed, and queried in a stand-alone capacity, in a client/server relationship with the Fungal Genome Database (FGDB), and as a web-browsing tool for the FGDB. In that ODS3 is programmed in Java, the tool promotes platform independence and supports export of integrated genome-mapping data in the extensible markup language (XML) for data interchange with other genome information systems. The tool ODS3 is used to create an initial integrated genome map of the AIDS-related fungal pathogen, Pneumocystis carinii. Contig dynamics would indicate that this physical map is approximately 50% complete with approximately 200 contigs. A total of 10 putative multigene families were found. Two of these putative families were previously characterized in P. carinii, namely the major surface glycoproteins (MSGs) and HSP70 proteins; three of these putative families (not previously characterized in P. carinii) were found to be similar to families encoding the HSP60 in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the heat-shock psi protein in S. pombe, and the RNA synthetase family (i.e., MES1) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Physical mapping data are consistent with the 16S, 5.8S, and 26S rDNA genes being single copy in P. carinii. No other fungus outside this genus is known to have the rDNA genes in single copy. PMID:12702676

  1. Random-breakage mapping method applied to human DNA sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lobrich, M.; Rydberg, B.; Cooper, P. K.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    The random-breakage mapping method [Game et al. (1990) Nucleic Acids Res., 18, 4453-4461] was applied to DNA sequences in human fibroblasts. The methodology involves NotI restriction endonuclease digestion of DNA from irradiated calls, followed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, Southern blotting and hybridization with DNA probes recognizing the single copy sequences of interest. The Southern blots show a band for the unbroken restriction fragments and a smear below this band due to radiation induced random breaks. This smear pattern contains two discontinuities in intensity at positions that correspond to the distance of the hybridization site to each end of the restriction fragment. By analyzing the positions of those discontinuities we confirmed the previously mapped position of the probe DXS1327 within a NotI fragment on the X chromosome, thus demonstrating the validity of the technique. We were also able to position the probes D21S1 and D21S15 with respect to the ends of their corresponding NotI fragments on chromosome 21. A third chromosome 21 probe, D21S11, has previously been reported to be close to D21S1, although an uncertainty about a second possible location existed. Since both probes D21S1 and D21S11 hybridized to a single NotI fragment and yielded a similar smear pattern, this uncertainty is removed by the random-breakage mapping method.

  2. Functional mapping of sequence learning in normal humans.

    PubMed

    Grafton, S T; Hazeltine, E; Ivry, R

    1995-01-01

    The brain localization of motor sequence learning was studied in normal subjects with positron emission tomography. Subjects performed a serial reaction time (SRT) task by responding to a series of stimuli that occurred at four different spatial positions. The stimulus locations were either determined randomly or according to a 6-element sequence that cycled continuously. The SRT task was performed under two conditions. With attentional interference from a secondary counting task there was no development of awareness of the sequence. Learning-related increases of cerebral blood flow were located in contralateral motor effector areas including motor cortex, supplementary motor area, and putamen, consistent with the hypothesis that nondeclarative motor learning occurs in cerebral areas that control limb movements. Additional cortical sites included the rostral prefrontal cortex and parietal cortex. The SRT learning task was then repeated with a new sequence and no attentional interference. In this condition, 7 of 12 subjects developed awareness of the sequence. Learning-related blood flow increases were present in right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, right premotor cortex, right ventral putamen, and biparieto-occipital cortex. The right dorsolateral prefrontal and parietal areas have been previously implicated in spatial working memory and right prefrontal cortex is also implicated in retrieval tasks of verbal episodic memory. Awareness of the sequence at the end of learning was associated with greater activity in bilateral parietal, superior temporal, and right premotor cortex. Motor learning can take place in different cerebral areas, contingent on the attentional demands of the task. PMID:23961907

  3. An autotetraploid linkage map of rose (Rosa hybrida) validated using the strawberry (Fragaria vesca) genome sequence.

    PubMed

    Gar, Oron; Sargent, Daniel J; Tsai, Ching-Jung; Pleban, Tzili; Shalev, Gil; Byrne, David H; Zamir, Dani

    2011-01-01

    Polyploidy is a pivotal process in plant evolution as it increase gene redundancy and morphological intricacy but due to the complexity of polysomic inheritance we have only few genetic maps of autopolyploid organisms. A robust mapping framework is particularly important in polyploid crop species, rose included (2n = 4x = 28), where the objective is to study multiallelic interactions that control traits of value for plant breeding. From a cross between the garden, peach red and fragrant cultivar Fragrant Cloud (FC) and a cut-rose yellow cultivar Golden Gate (GG), we generated an autotetraploid GGFC mapping population consisting of 132 individuals. For the map we used 128 sequence-based markers, 141 AFLP, 86 SSR and three morphological markers. Seven linkage groups were resolved for FC (Total 632 cM) and GG (616 cM) which were validated by markers that segregated in both parents as well as the diploid integrated consensus map.The release of the Fragaria vesca genome, which also belongs to the Rosoideae, allowed us to place 70 rose sequenced markers on the seven strawberry pseudo-chromosomes. Synteny between Rosa and Fragaria was high with an estimated four major translocations and six inversions required to place the 17 non-collinear markers in the same order. Based on a verified linear order of the rose markers, we could further partition each of the parents into its four homologous groups, thus providing an essential framework to aid the sequencing of an autotetraploid genome. PMID:21647382

  4. BioNano genome mapping of individual chromosomes supports physical mapping and sequence assembly in complex plant genomes.

    PubMed

    Staňková, Helena; Hastie, Alex R; Chan, Saki; Vrána, Jan; Tulpová, Zuzana; Kubaláková, Marie; Visendi, Paul; Hayashi, Satomi; Luo, Mingcheng; Batley, Jacqueline; Edwards, David; Doležel, Jaroslav; Šimková, Hana

    2016-07-01

    The assembly of a reference genome sequence of bread wheat is challenging due to its specific features such as the genome size of 17 Gbp, polyploid nature and prevalence of repetitive sequences. BAC-by-BAC sequencing based on chromosomal physical maps, adopted by the International Wheat Genome Sequencing Consortium as the key strategy, reduces problems caused by the genome complexity and polyploidy, but the repeat content still hampers the sequence assembly. Availability of a high-resolution genomic map to guide sequence scaffolding and validate physical map and sequence assemblies would be highly beneficial to obtaining an accurate and complete genome sequence. Here, we chose the short arm of chromosome 7D (7DS) as a model to demonstrate for the first time that it is possible to couple chromosome flow sorting with genome mapping in nanochannel arrays and create a de novo genome map of a wheat chromosome. We constructed a high-resolution chromosome map composed of 371 contigs with an N50 of 1.3 Mb. Long DNA molecules achieved by our approach facilitated chromosome-scale analysis of repetitive sequences and revealed a ~800-kb array of tandem repeats intractable to current DNA sequencing technologies. Anchoring 7DS sequence assemblies obtained by clone-by-clone sequencing to the 7DS genome map provided a valuable tool to improve the BAC-contig physical map and validate sequence assembly on a chromosome-arm scale. Our results indicate that creating genome maps for the whole wheat genome in a chromosome-by-chromosome manner is feasible and that they will be an affordable tool to support the production of improved pseudomolecules. PMID:26801360

  5. Single-Molecule Real-Time Sequencing Combined with Optical Mapping Yields Completely Finished Fungal Genome

    PubMed Central

    Faino, Luigi; Seidl, Michael F.; Datema, Erwin; van den Berg, Grardy C. M.; Janssen, Antoine; Wittenberg, Alexander H. J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have increased the scalability, speed, and resolution of genomic sequencing and, thus, have revolutionized genomic studies. However, eukaryotic genome sequencing initiatives typically yield considerably fragmented genome assemblies. Here, we assessed various state-of-the-art sequencing and assembly strategies in order to produce a contiguous and complete eukaryotic genome assembly, focusing on the filamentous fungus Verticillium dahliae. Compared with Illumina-based assemblies of the V. dahliae genome, hybrid assemblies that also include PacBio-generated long reads establish superior contiguity. Intriguingly, provided that sufficient sequence depth is reached, assemblies solely based on PacBio reads outperform hybrid assemblies and even result in fully assembled chromosomes. Furthermore, the addition of optical map data allowed us to produce a gapless and complete V. dahliae genome assembly of the expected eight chromosomes from telomere to telomere. Consequently, we can now study genomic regions that were previously not assembled or poorly assembled, including regions that are populated by repetitive sequences, such as transposons, allowing us to fully appreciate an organism’s biological complexity. Our data show that a combination of PacBio-generated long reads and optical mapping can be used to generate complete and gapless assemblies of fungal genomes. PMID:26286689

  6. A physical map of the highly heterozygous Populus genome: integration with the genome sequence and genetic map

    SciTech Connect

    Kelleher, Colin; CHIU, Dr. R.; Shin, Dr. H.; Krywinski, Martin; Fjell, Chris; Wilkin, Jennifer; Yin, Tongming; Difazio, Stephen P.

    2007-01-01

    As part of a larger project to sequence the Populus genome and generate genomic resources for this emerging model tree, we constructed a physical map of the Populus genome, representing one of the few such maps of an undomesticated, highly heterozygous plant species. The physical map, consisting of 2802 contigs, was constructed from fingerprinted bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones. The map represents approximately 9.4-fold coverage of the Populus genome, which has been estimated from the genome sequence assembly to be 485 {+-} 10 Mb in size. BAC ends were sequenced to assist long-range assembly of whole-genome shotgun sequence scaffolds and to anchor the physical map to the genome sequence. Simple sequence repeat-based markers were derived from the end sequences and used to initiate integration of the BAC and genetic maps. A total of 2411 physical map contigs, representing 97% of all clones assigned to contigs, were aligned to the sequence assembly (JGI Populus trichocarpa, version 1.0). These alignments represent a total coverage of 384 Mb (79%) of the entire poplar sequence assembly and 295 Mb (96%) of linkage group sequence assemblies. A striking result of the physical map contig alignments to the sequence assembly was the co-localization of multiple contigs across numerous regions of the 19 linkage groups. Targeted sequencing of BAC clones and genetic analysis in a small number of representative regions showed that these co-aligning contigs represent distinct haplotypes in the heterozygous individual sequenced, and revealed the nature of these haplotype sequence differences.

  7. A high resolution genetic map anchoring scaffolds of the sequenced watermelon genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As part of our ongoing efforts to sequence and map the watermelon (Citrullus spp.) genome, we have constructed a high-density genetic linkage map. The map positioned 234 watermelon genome sequence scaffolds (an average size of 1.41 Mb) that cover about 330 Mb and account for 93.5% of the 353 Mb of ...

  8. Rapid multipoint linkage analysis of recessive traits in nuclear families, including homozygosity mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Kruglyak, L.; Daly, M.J.; Lander, E.S. |

    1995-02-01

    Homozygosity mapping is a powerful strategy for mapping rare recessive traits in children of consanguineous marriages. Practical applications of this strategy are currently limited by the inability of conventional linkage analysis software to compute, in reasonable time, multipoint LOD scores for pedigrees with inbreeding loops. We have developed a new algorithm for rapid multipoint likelihood calculations in small pedigrees, including those with inbreeding loops. The running time of the algorithm grows, at most, linearly with the number of loci considered simultaneously. The running time is not sensitive to the presence of inbreeding loops, missing genotype information, and highly polymorphic loci. We have incorporated this algorithm into a software package, MAPMAKER/HOMOZ, that allows very rapid multipoint mapping of disease genes in nuclear families, including homozygosity mapping. Multipoint analysis with dozens of markers can be carried out in minutes on a personal workstation. 23 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Linkage maps of the Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) genome derived from RAD sequencing

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Genetic linkage maps are useful tools for mapping quantitative trait loci (QTL) influencing variation in traits of interest in a population. Genotyping-by-sequencing approaches such as Restriction-site Associated DNA sequencing (RAD-Seq) now enable the rapid discovery and genotyping of genome-wide SNP markers suitable for the development of dense SNP linkage maps, including in non-model organisms such as Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar). This paper describes the development and characterisation of a high density SNP linkage map based on SbfI RAD-Seq SNP markers from two Atlantic salmon reference families. Results Approximately 6,000 SNPs were assigned to 29 linkage groups, utilising markers from known genomic locations as anchors. Linkage maps were then constructed for the four mapping parents separately. Overall map lengths were comparable between male and female parents, but the distribution of the SNPs showed sex-specific patterns with a greater degree of clustering of sire-segregating SNPs to single chromosome regions. The maps were integrated with the Atlantic salmon draft reference genome contigs, allowing the unique assignment of ~4,000 contigs to a linkage group. 112 genome contigs mapped to two or more linkage groups, highlighting regions of putative homeology within the salmon genome. A comparative genomics analysis with the stickleback reference genome identified putative genes closely linked to approximately half of the ordered SNPs and demonstrated blocks of orthology between the Atlantic salmon and stickleback genomes. A subset of 47 RAD-Seq SNPs were successfully validated using a high-throughput genotyping assay, with a correspondence of 97% between the two assays. Conclusions This Atlantic salmon RAD-Seq linkage map is a resource for salmonid genomics research as genotyping-by-sequencing becomes increasingly common. This is aided by the integration of the SbfI RAD-Seq SNPs with existing reference maps and the draft reference genome, as well

  10. A high-resolution radiation hybrid map of the human genome draft sequence.

    PubMed

    Olivier, M; Aggarwal, A; Allen, J; Almendras, A A; Bajorek, E S; Beasley, E M; Brady, S D; Bushard, J M; Bustos, V I; Chu, A; Chung, T R; De Witte, A; Denys, M E; Dominguez, R; Fang, N Y; Foster, B D; Freudenberg, R W; Hadley, D; Hamilton, L R; Jeffrey, T J; Kelly, L; Lazzeroni, L; Levy, M R; Lewis, S C; Liu, X; Lopez, F J; Louie, B; Marquis, J P; Martinez, R A; Matsuura, M K; Misherghi, N S; Norton, J A; Olshen, A; Perkins, S M; Perou, A J; Piercy, C; Piercy, M; Qin, F; Reif, T; Sheppard, K; Shokoohi, V; Smick, G A; Sun, W L; Stewart, E A; Fernando, J; Tejeda; Tran, N M; Trejo, T; Vo, N T; Yan, S C; Zierten, D L; Zhao, S; Sachidanandam, R; Trask, B J; Myers, R M; Cox, D R

    2001-02-16

    We have constructed a physical map of the human genome by using a panel of 90 whole-genome radiation hybrids (the TNG panel) in conjunction with 40,322 sequence-tagged sites (STSs) derived from random genomic sequences as well as expressed sequences. Of 36,678 STSs on the TNG radiation hybrid map, only 3604 (9.8%) were absent from the unassembled draft sequence of the human genome. Of 20,030 STSs ordered on the TNG map as well as the assembled human genome draft sequence and the Celera assembled human genome sequence, 36% of the STSs had a discrepant order between the working draft sequence and the Celera sequence. The TNG map order was identical to one of the two sequence orders in 60% of these discrepant cases. PMID:11181994

  11. Mapping the mosaic sequence of primate visual cortical development

    PubMed Central

    Mundinano, Inaki-Carril; Kwan, William Chin; Bourne, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Traditional “textbook” theory suggests that the development and maturation of visual cortical areas occur as a wave from V1. However, more recent evidence would suggest that this is not the case, and the emergence of extrastriate areas occurs in a non-hierarchical fashion. This proposition comes from both physiological and anatomical studies but the actual developmental sequence of extrastriate areas remains unknown. In the current study, we examined the development and maturation of the visual cortex of the marmoset monkey, a New World simian, from embryonic day 130 (15 days prior to birth) through to adulthood. Utilizing the well-described expression characteristics of the calcium-binding proteins calbindin and parvalbumin, and nonphosphorylated neurofilament for the pyramidal neurons, we were able to accurately map the sequence of development and maturation of the visual cortex. To this end, we demonstrated that both V1 and middle temporal area (MT) emerge first and that MT likely supports dorsal stream development while V1 supports ventral stream development. Furthermore, the emergence of the dorsal stream-associated areas was significantly earlier than ventral stream areas. The difference in the temporal development of the visual streams is likely driven by a teleological requirement for specific visual behavior in early life. PMID:26539084

  12. Comparative mapping of expressed sequence tags containing microsatellites in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    PubMed Central

    Rexroad, Caird E; Rodriguez, Maria F; Coulibaly, Issa; Gharbi, Karim; Danzmann, Roy G; DeKoning, Jenefer; Phillips, Ruth; Palti, Yniv

    2005-01-01

    Background Comparative genomics, through the integration of genetic maps from species of interest with whole genome sequences of other species, will facilitate the identification of genes affecting phenotypes of interest. The development of microsatellite markers from expressed sequence tags will serve to increase marker densities on current salmonid genetic maps and initiate in silico comparative maps with species whose genomes have been fully sequenced. Results Eighty-nine polymorphic microsatellite markers were generated for rainbow trout of which at least 74 amplify in other salmonids. Fifty-five have been associated with functional annotation and 30 were mapped on existing genetic maps. Homologous sequences were identified for 20 of the EST containing microsatellites to identify comparative assignments within the tetraodon, mouse, and/or human genomes. Conclusion The addition of microsatellite markers constructed from expressed sequence tag data will facilitate the development of high-density genetic maps for rainbow trout and comparative maps with other salmonids and better studied species. PMID:15836796

  13. A sequence-based genetic map of Medicago truncatula and comparison of marker colinearity with M. sativa.

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hong-Kyu; Kim, Dongjin; Uhm, Taesik; Limpens, Eric; Lim, Hyunju; Mun, Jeong-Hwan; Kalo, Peter; Penmetsa, R Varma; Seres, Andrea; Kulikova, Olga; Roe, Bruce A; Bisseling, Ton; Kiss, Gyorgy B; Cook, Douglas R

    2004-01-01

    A core genetic map of the legume Medicago truncatula has been established by analyzing the segregation of 288 sequence-characterized genetic markers in an F(2) population composed of 93 individuals. These molecular markers correspond to 141 ESTs, 80 BAC end sequence tags, and 67 resistance gene analogs, covering 513 cM. In the case of EST-based markers we used an intron-targeted marker strategy with primers designed to anneal in conserved exon regions and to amplify across intron regions. Polymorphisms were significantly more frequent in intron vs. exon regions, thus providing an efficient mechanism to map transcribed genes. Genetic and cytogenetic analysis produced eight well-resolved linkage groups, which have been previously correlated with eight chromosomes by means of FISH with mapped BAC clones. We anticipated that mapping of conserved coding regions would have utility for comparative mapping among legumes; thus 60 of the EST-based primer pairs were designed to amplify orthologous sequences across a range of legume species. As an initial test of this strategy, we used primers designed against M. truncatula exon sequences to rapidly map genes in M. sativa. The resulting comparative map, which includes 68 bridging markers, indicates that the two Medicago genomes are highly similar and establishes the basis for a Medicago composite map. PMID:15082563

  14. Investigating bisulfite short-read mapping failure with hairpin bisulfite sequencing data

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background DNA methylation is an important epigenetic mark relevant to normal development and disease genesis. A common approach to characterizing genome-wide DNA methylation is using Next Generation Sequencing technology to sequence bisulfite treated DNA. The short sequence reads are mapped to the reference genome to determine the methylation statuses of Cs. However, despite intense effort, a much smaller proportion of the reads derived from bisulfite treated DNA (usually about 40-80%) can be mapped than regular short reads mapping (> 90%), and it is unclear what factors lead to this low mapping efficiency. Results To address this issue, we used the hairpin bisulfite sequencing technology to determine sequences of both DNA double strands simultaneously. This enabled the recovery of the original non-bisulfite-converted sequences. We used Bismark for bisulfite read mapping and Bowtie2 for recovered read mapping. We found that recovering the reads improved unique mapping efficiency by 9-10% compared to the bisulfite reads. Such improvement in mapping efficiency is related to sequence entropy. Conclusions The hairpin recovery technique improves mapping efficiency, and sequence entropy relates to mapping efficiency. PMID:26576456

  15. Integrated genome sequence and linkage map of physic nut (Jatropha curcas L.), a biodiesel plant.

    PubMed

    Wu, Pingzhi; Zhou, Changpin; Cheng, Shifeng; Wu, Zhenying; Lu, Wenjia; Han, Jinli; Chen, Yanbo; Chen, Yan; Ni, Peixiang; Wang, Ying; Xu, Xun; Huang, Ying; Song, Chi; Wang, Zhiwen; Shi, Nan; Zhang, Xudong; Fang, Xiaohua; Yang, Qing; Jiang, Huawu; Chen, Yaping; Li, Meiru; Wang, Ying; Chen, Fan; Wang, Jun; Wu, Guojiang

    2015-03-01

    The family Euphorbiaceae includes some of the most efficient biomass accumulators. Whole genome sequencing and the development of genetic maps of these species are important components in molecular breeding and genetic improvement. Here we report the draft genome of physic nut (Jatropha curcas L.), a biodiesel plant. The assembled genome has a total length of 320.5 Mbp and contains 27,172 putative protein-coding genes. We established a linkage map containing 1208 markers and anchored the genome assembly (81.7%) to this map to produce 11 pseudochromosomes. After gene family clustering, 15,268 families were identified, of which 13,887 existed in the castor bean genome. Analysis of the genome highlighted specific expansion and contraction of a number of gene families during the evolution of this species, including the ribosome-inactivating proteins and oil biosynthesis pathway enzymes. The genomic sequence and linkage map provide a valuable resource not only for fundamental and applied research on physic nut but also for evolutionary and comparative genomics analysis, particularly in the Euphorbiaceae. PMID:25603894

  16. The Cancer Experience Map: An Approach to Including the Patient Voice in Supportive Care Solutions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The perspective of the patient, also called the “patient voice”, is an essential element in materials created for cancer supportive care. Identifying that voice, however, can be a challenge for researchers and developers. A multidisciplinary team at a health information company tasked with addressing this issue created a representational model they call the “cancer experience map”. This map, designed as a tool for content developers, offers a window into the complex perspectives inside the cancer experience. Informed by actual patient quotes, the map shows common overall themes for cancer patients, concerns at key treatment points, strategies for patient engagement, and targeted behavioral goals. In this article, the team members share the process by which they created the map as well as its first use as a resource for cancer support videos. The article also addresses the broader policy implications of including the patient voice in supportive cancer content, particularly with regard to mHealth apps. PMID:26022846

  17. Chromosome mapping of repetitive sequences in four Serrasalmidae species (Characiformes)

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Leila Braga; Matoso, Daniele Aparecida; Feldberg, Eliana

    2014-01-01

    The Serrasalmidae family is composed of a number of commercially interesting species, mainly in the Amazon region where most of these fishes occur. In the present study, we investigated the genomic organization of the 18S and 5S rDNA and telomeric sequences in mitotic chromosomes of four species from the basal clade of the Serrasalmidae family: Colossoma macropomum, Mylossoma aureum, M. duriventre, and Piaractus mesopotamicus, in order to understand the chromosomal evolution in the family. All the species studied had diploid numbers 2n = 54 and exclusively biarmed chromosomes, but variations of the karyotypic formulas were observed. C-banding resulted in similar patterns among the analyzed species, with heterochromatic blocks mainly present in centromeric regions. The 18S rDNA mapping of C. macropomum and P. mesopotamicus revealed multiple sites of this gene; 5S rDNA sites were detected in two chromosome pairs in all species, although not all of them were homeologs. Hybridization with a telomeric probe revealed signals in the terminal portions of chromosomes in all the species and an interstitial signal was observed in one pair of C. macropomum. PMID:24688290

  18. HetMappsS: Heterozygous mapping strategy for high resolution Genotyping-by-Sequencing Markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reduced representation genotyping approaches, such as genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS), provide opportunities to generate high-resolution genetic maps at a low per-sample cost. However, missing data and non-uniform sequence coverage can complicate map creation in highly heterozygous species. To facili...

  19. Sequencing the Pig Genome Using a Mapped BAC by BAC Approach

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have generated a highly contiguous physical map covering >98% of the pig genome in just 176 contigs. The map is localised to the genome through integration with the UIUC RH map as well BAC end sequence alignments to the human genome. Over 265k HindIII restriction digest fingerprints totalling 1...

  20. Mapping the hallmarks of lung adenocarcinoma with massively parallel sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Imielinski, Marcin; Berger, Alice H.; Hammerman, Peter S.; Hernandez, Bryan; Pugh, Trevor J.; Hodis, Eran; Cho, Jeonghee; Suh, James; Capelletti, Marzia; Sivachenko, Andrey; Sougnez, Carrie; Auclair, Daniel; Lawrence, Michael; Stojanov, Petar; Cibulskis, Kristian; Choi, Kyusam; de Waal, Luc; Sharifnia, Tanaz; Brooks, Angela; Greulich, Heidi; Banerji, Shantanu; Zander, Thomas; Seidel, Danila; Leenders, Frauke; Ansén, Sascha; Ludwig, Corinna; Engel-Riedel, Walburga; Stoelben, Erich; Wolf, Jürgen; Goparju, Chandra; Thompson, Kristin; Winckler, Wendy; Kwiatkowski, David; Johnson, Bruce E.; Jänne, Pasi A.; Miller, Vincent A.; Pao, William; Travis, William D.; Pass, Harvey; Gabriel, Stacey; Lander, Eric; Thomas, Roman K.; Garraway, Levi A.; Getz, Gad; Meyerson, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Lung adenocarcinoma, the most common subtype of non-small cell lung cancer, is responsible for over 500,000 deaths per year worldwide. Here, we report exome and genome sequences of 183 lung adenocarcinoma tumor/normal DNA pairs. These analyses revealed a mean exonic somatic mutation rate of 12.0 events/megabase and identified the majority of genes previously reported as significantly mutated in lung adenocarcinoma. In addition, we identified statistically recurrent somatic mutations in the splicing factor gene U2AF1 and truncating mutations affecting RBM10 and ARID1A. Analysis of nucleotide context-specific mutation signatures grouped the sample set into distinct clusters that correlated with smoking history and alterations of reported lung adenocarcinoma genes. Whole genome sequence analysis revealed frequent structural re-arrangements, including in-frame exonic alterations within EGFR and SIK2 kinases. The candidate genes identified in this study are attractive targets for biological characterization and therapeutic targeting of lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:22980975

  1. Mapping Nucleotide Sequences that Encode Complex Binary Disease Traits with HapMap

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yuehua; Fu, Wenjiang; Sun, Kelian; Romero, Roberto; Wu, Rongling

    2007-01-01

    Detecting the patterns of DNA sequence variants across the human genome is a crucial step for unraveling the genetic basis of complex human diseases. The human HapMap constructed by single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) provides efficient sequence variation information that can speed up the discovery of genes related to common diseases. In this article, we present a generalized linear model for identifying specific nucleotide variants that encode complex human diseases. A novel approach is derived to group haplotypes to form composite diplotypes, which largely reduces the model degrees of freedom for an association test and hence increases the power when multiple SNP markers are involved. An efficient two-stage estimation procedure based on the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm is derived to estimate parameters. Non-genetic environmental or clinical risk factors can also be fitted into the model. Computer simulations show that our model has reasonable power and type I error rate with appropriate sample size. It is also suggested through simulations that a balanced design with approximately equal number of cases and controls should be preferred to maintain small estimation bias and reasonable testing power. To illustrate the utility, we apply the method to a genetic association study of large for gestational age (LGA) neonates. The model provides a powerful tool for elucidating the genetic basis of complex binary diseases. PMID:19384427

  2. Transcriptome sequencing to produce a SNP-based genetic map of onion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sequencing the onion genome is challenging because of its enormous size (16 giga base pairs DNA per haploid genome). Pilot sequencing of onion transcripts showed sufficient numbers of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to develop a detailed genetic map. We sequenced 2.5 Roche-454 plates of norma...

  3. A mapping of an ensemble of mitochondrial sequences for various organisms into 3D space based on the word composition.

    PubMed

    Aita, Takuyo; Nishigaki, Koichi

    2012-11-01

    To visualize a bird's-eye view of an ensemble of mitochondrial genome sequences for various species, we recently developed a novel method of mapping a biological sequence ensemble into Three-Dimensional (3D) vector space. First, we represented a biological sequence of a species s by a word-composition vector x(s), where its length [absolute value]x(s)[absolute value] represents the sequence length, and its unit vector x(s)/[absolute value]x(s)[absolute value] represents the relative composition of the K-tuple words through the sequence and the size of the dimension, N=4(K), is the number of all possible words with the length of K. Second, we mapped the vector x(s) to the 3D position vector y(s), based on the two following simple principles: (1) [absolute value]y(s)[absolute value]=[absolute value]x(s)[absolute value] and (2) the angle between y(s) and y(t) maximally correlates with the angle between x(s) and x(t). The mitochondrial genome sequences for 311 species, including 177 Animalia, 85 Fungi and 49 Green plants, were mapped into 3D space by using K=7. The mapping was successful because the angles between vectors before and after the mapping highly correlated with each other (correlation coefficients were 0.92-0.97). Interestingly, the Animalia kingdom is distributed along a single arc belt (just like the Milky Way on a Celestial Globe), and the Fungi and Green plant kingdoms are distributed in a similar arc belt. These two arc belts intersect at their respective middle regions and form a cross structure just like a jet aircraft fuselage and its wings. This new mapping method will allow researchers to intuitively interpret the visual information presented in the maps in a highly effective manner. PMID:22776549

  4. Genomics and introgression: discovery and mapping of thousands of species-diagnostic SNPs using RAD sequencing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hand, Brian K; Hether, Tyler D; Kovach, Ryan P.; Muhlfeld, Clint C.; Amish, Stephen J.; Boyer, Matthew C.; O’Rourke, Sean M.; Miller, Michael R.; Lowe, Winsor H.; Hohenlohe, Paul A.; Luikart, Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Invasive hybridization and introgression pose a serious threat to the persistence of many native species. Understanding the effects of hybridization on native populations (e.g., fitness consequences) requires numerous species-diagnostic loci distributed genome-wide. Here we used RAD sequencing to discover thousands of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are diagnostic between rainbow trout (RBT, Oncorhynchus mykiss), the world’s most widely introduced fish, and native westslope cutthroat trout (WCT, O. clarkii lewisi) in the northern Rocky Mountains, USA. We advanced previous work that identified 4,914 species-diagnostic loci by using longer sequence reads (100 bp vs. 60 bp) and a larger set of individuals (n = 84). We sequenced RAD libraries for individuals from diverse sampling sources, including native populations of WCT and hatchery broodstocks of WCT and RBT. We also took advantage of a newly released reference genome assembly for RBT to align our RAD loci. In total, we discovered 16,788 putatively diagnostic SNPs, 10,267 of which we mapped to anchored chromosome locations on the RBT genome. A small portion of previously discovered putative diagnostic loci (325 of 4,914) were no longer diagnostic (i.e., fixed between species) based on our wider survey of non-hybridized RBT and WCT individuals. Our study suggests that RAD loci mapped to a draft genome assembly could provide the marker density required to identify genes and chromosomal regions influencing selection in admixed populations of conservation concern and evolutionary interest.

  5. Combined sequence-based and genetic mapping analysis of complex traits in outbred rats

    PubMed Central

    Baud, Amelie; Hermsen, Roel; Guryev, Victor; Stridh, Pernilla; Graham, Delyth; McBride, Martin W.; Foroud, Tatiana; Calderari, Sophie; Diez, Margarita; Ockinger, Johan; Beyeen, Amennai D.; Gillett, Alan; Abdelmagid, Nada; Guerreiro-Cacais, Andre Ortlieb; Jagodic, Maja; Tuncel, Jonatan; Norin, Ulrika; Beattie, Elisabeth; Huynh, Ngan; Miller, William H.; Koller, Daniel L.; Alam, Imranul; Falak, Samreen; Osborne-Pellegrin, Mary; Martinez-Membrives, Esther; Canete, Toni; Blazquez, Gloria; Vicens-Costa, Elia; Mont-Cardona, Carme; Diaz-Moran, Sira; Tobena, Adolf; Hummel, Oliver; Zelenika, Diana; Saar, Kathrin; Patone, Giannino; Bauerfeind, Anja; Bihoreau, Marie-Therese; Heinig, Matthias; Lee, Young-Ae; Rintisch, Carola; Schulz, Herbert; Wheeler, David A.; Worley, Kim C.; Muzny, Donna M.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Lathrop, Mark; Lansu, Nico; Toonen, Pim; Ruzius, Frans Paul; de Bruijn, Ewart; Hauser, Heidi; Adams, David J.; Keane, Thomas; Atanur, Santosh S.; Aitman, Tim J.; Flicek, Paul; Malinauskas, Tomas; Jones, E. Yvonne; Ekman, Diana; Lopez-Aumatell, Regina; Dominiczak, Anna F; Johannesson, Martina; Holmdahl, Rikard; Olsson, Tomas; Gauguier, Dominique; Hubner, Norbert; Fernandez-Teruel, Alberto; Cuppen, Edwin; Mott, Richard; Flint, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Genetic mapping on fully sequenced individuals is transforming our understanding of the relationship between molecular variation and variation in complex traits. Here we report a combined sequence and genetic mapping analysis in outbred rats that maps 355 quantitative trait loci for 122 phenotypes. We identify 35 causal genes involved in 31 phenotypes, implicating novel genes in models of anxiety, heart disease and multiple sclerosis. The relation between sequence and genetic variation is unexpectedly complex: at approximately 40% of quantitative trait loci a single sequence variant cannot account for the phenotypic effect. Using comparable sequence and mapping data from mice, we show the extent and spatial pattern of variation in inbred rats differ significantly from those of inbred mice, and that the genetic variants in orthologous genes rarely contribute to the same phenotype in both species. PMID:23708188

  6. Combined sequence-based and genetic mapping analysis of complex traits in outbred rats.

    PubMed

    Baud, Amelie; Hermsen, Roel; Guryev, Victor; Stridh, Pernilla; Graham, Delyth; McBride, Martin W; Foroud, Tatiana; Calderari, Sophie; Diez, Margarita; Ockinger, Johan; Beyeen, Amennai D; Gillett, Alan; Abdelmagid, Nada; Guerreiro-Cacais, Andre Ortlieb; Jagodic, Maja; Tuncel, Jonatan; Norin, Ulrika; Beattie, Elisabeth; Huynh, Ngan; Miller, William H; Koller, Daniel L; Alam, Imranul; Falak, Samreen; Osborne-Pellegrin, Mary; Martinez-Membrives, Esther; Canete, Toni; Blazquez, Gloria; Vicens-Costa, Elia; Mont-Cardona, Carme; Diaz-Moran, Sira; Tobena, Adolf; Hummel, Oliver; Zelenika, Diana; Saar, Kathrin; Patone, Giannino; Bauerfeind, Anja; Bihoreau, Marie-Therese; Heinig, Matthias; Lee, Young-Ae; Rintisch, Carola; Schulz, Herbert; Wheeler, David A; Worley, Kim C; Muzny, Donna M; Gibbs, Richard A; Lathrop, Mark; Lansu, Nico; Toonen, Pim; Ruzius, Frans Paul; de Bruijn, Ewart; Hauser, Heidi; Adams, David J; Keane, Thomas; Atanur, Santosh S; Aitman, Tim J; Flicek, Paul; Malinauskas, Tomas; Jones, E Yvonne; Ekman, Diana; Lopez-Aumatell, Regina; Dominiczak, Anna F; Johannesson, Martina; Holmdahl, Rikard; Olsson, Tomas; Gauguier, Dominique; Hubner, Norbert; Fernandez-Teruel, Alberto; Cuppen, Edwin; Mott, Richard; Flint, Jonathan

    2013-07-01

    Genetic mapping on fully sequenced individuals is transforming understanding of the relationship between molecular variation and variation in complex traits. Here we report a combined sequence and genetic mapping analysis in outbred rats that maps 355 quantitative trait loci for 122 phenotypes. We identify 35 causal genes involved in 31 phenotypes, implicating new genes in models of anxiety, heart disease and multiple sclerosis. The relationship between sequence and genetic variation is unexpectedly complex: at approximately 40% of quantitative trait loci, a single sequence variant cannot account for the phenotypic effect. Using comparable sequence and mapping data from mice, we show that the extent and spatial pattern of variation in inbred rats differ substantially from those of inbred mice and that the genetic variants in orthologous genes rarely contribute to the same phenotype in both species. PMID:23708188

  7. The organization of biological sequences into constrained and unconstrained parts determines fundamental properties of genotype-phenotype maps.

    PubMed

    Greenbury, S F; Ahnert, S E

    2015-12-01

    Biological information is stored in DNA, RNA and protein sequences, which can be understood as genotypes that are translated into phenotypes. The properties of genotype-phenotype (GP) maps have been studied in great detail for RNA secondary structure. These include a highly biased distribution of genotypes per phenotype, negative correlation of genotypic robustness and evolvability, positive correlation of phenotypic robustness and evolvability, shape-space covering, and a roughly logarithmic scaling of phenotypic robustness with phenotypic frequency. More recently similar properties have been discovered in other GP maps, suggesting that they may be fundamental to biological GP maps, in general, rather than specific to the RNA secondary structure map. Here we propose that the above properties arise from the fundamental organization of biological information into 'constrained' and 'unconstrained' sequences, in the broadest possible sense. As 'constrained' we describe sequences that affect the phenotype more immediately, and are therefore more sensitive to mutations, such as, e.g. protein-coding DNA or the stems in RNA secondary structure. 'Unconstrained' sequences, on the other hand, can mutate more freely without affecting the phenotype, such as, e.g. intronic or intergenic DNA or the loops in RNA secondary structure. To test our hypothesis we consider a highly simplified GP map that has genotypes with 'coding' and 'non-coding' parts. We term this the Fibonacci GP map, as it is equivalent to the Fibonacci code in information theory. Despite its simplicity the Fibonacci GP map exhibits all the above properties of much more complex and biologically realistic GP maps. These properties are therefore likely to be fundamental to many biological GP maps. PMID:26609063

  8. The organization of biological sequences into constrained and unconstrained parts determines fundamental properties of genotype–phenotype maps

    PubMed Central

    Greenbury, S. F.; Ahnert, S. E.

    2015-01-01

    Biological information is stored in DNA, RNA and protein sequences, which can be understood as genotypes that are translated into phenotypes. The properties of genotype–phenotype (GP) maps have been studied in great detail for RNA secondary structure. These include a highly biased distribution of genotypes per phenotype, negative correlation of genotypic robustness and evolvability, positive correlation of phenotypic robustness and evolvability, shape-space covering, and a roughly logarithmic scaling of phenotypic robustness with phenotypic frequency. More recently similar properties have been discovered in other GP maps, suggesting that they may be fundamental to biological GP maps, in general, rather than specific to the RNA secondary structure map. Here we propose that the above properties arise from the fundamental organization of biological information into ‘constrained' and ‘unconstrained' sequences, in the broadest possible sense. As ‘constrained' we describe sequences that affect the phenotype more immediately, and are therefore more sensitive to mutations, such as, e.g. protein-coding DNA or the stems in RNA secondary structure. ‘Unconstrained' sequences, on the other hand, can mutate more freely without affecting the phenotype, such as, e.g. intronic or intergenic DNA or the loops in RNA secondary structure. To test our hypothesis we consider a highly simplified GP map that has genotypes with ‘coding' and ‘non-coding' parts. We term this the Fibonacci GP map, as it is equivalent to the Fibonacci code in information theory. Despite its simplicity the Fibonacci GP map exhibits all the above properties of much more complex and biologically realistic GP maps. These properties are therefore likely to be fundamental to many biological GP maps. PMID:26609063

  9. A sequencing-based linkage map of cucumber

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic maps are important tools for molecular breeding, gene cloning, and study of meiotic recombination. In cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.), the marker density, resolution and genome coverage of previously developed genetic maps using PCR-based molecular markers are relatively low. In this study we ...

  10. A 1,681-locus consensus genetic map of cultivated cucumber including 67 NB-LRR resistance gene homolog and ten gene loci

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cucumber is an important vegetable crop that is susceptible to many pathogens, but no disease resistance (R) genes have been cloned. The availability of whole genome sequences provides an excellent opportunity for systematic identification and characterization of the nucleotide binding and leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR) type R gene homolog (RGH) sequences in the genome. Cucumber has a very narrow genetic base making it difficult to construct high-density genetic maps. Development of a consensus map by synthesizing information from multiple segregating populations is a method of choice to increase marker density. As such, the objectives of the present study were to identify and characterize NB-LRR type RGHs, and to develop a high-density, integrated cucumber genetic-physical map anchored with RGH loci. Results From the Gy14 draft genome, 70 NB-containing RGHs were identified and characterized. Most RGHs were in clusters with uneven distribution across seven chromosomes. In silico analysis indicated that all 70 RGHs had EST support for gene expression. Phylogenetic analysis classified 58 RGHs into two clades: CNL and TNL. Comparative analysis revealed high-degree sequence homology and synteny in chromosomal locations of these RGH members between the cucumber and melon genomes. Fifty-four molecular markers were developed to delimit 67 of the 70 RGHs, which were integrated into a genetic map through linkage analysis. A 1,681-locus cucumber consensus map including 10 gene loci and spanning 730.0 cM in seven linkage groups was developed by integrating three component maps with a bin-mapping strategy. Physically, 308 scaffolds with 193.2 Mbp total DNA sequences were anchored onto this consensus map that covered 52.6% of the 367 Mbp cucumber genome. Conclusions Cucumber contains relatively few NB-LRR RGHs that are clustered and unevenly distributed in the genome. All RGHs seem to be transcribed and shared significant sequence homology and synteny with the melon

  11. DNA sequence analyses of blended herbal products including synthetic cannabinoids as designer drugs.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Jun; Uchiyama, Nahoko; Kikura-Hanajiri, Ruri; Goda, Yukihiro

    2013-04-10

    In recent years, various herbal products adulterated with synthetic cannabinoids have been distributed worldwide via the Internet. These herbal products are mostly sold as incense, and advertised as not for human consumption. Although their labels indicate that they contain mixtures of several potentially psychoactive plants, and numerous studies have reported that they contain a variety of synthetic cannabinoids, their exact botanical contents are not always clear. In this study, we investigated the origins of botanical materials in 62 Spice-like herbal products distributed on the illegal drug market in Japan, by DNA sequence analyses and BLAST searches. The nucleotide sequences of four regions were analyzed to identify the origins of each plant species in the herbal mixtures. The sequences of "Damiana" (Turnera diffusa) and Lamiaceae herbs (Mellissa, Mentha and Thymus) were frequently detected in a number of products. However, the sequences of other plant species indicated on the packaging labels were not detected. In a few products, DNA fragments of potent psychotropic plants were found, including marijuana (Cannabis sativa), "Diviner's Sage" (Salvia divinorum) and "Kratom" (Mitragyna speciosa). Their active constituents were also confirmed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), although these plant names were never indicated on the labels. Most plant species identified in the products were different from the plants indicated on the labels. The plant materials would be used mainly as diluents for the psychoactive synthetic compounds, because no reliable psychoactive effects have been reported for most of the identified plants, with the exception of the psychotropic plants named above. PMID:23092848

  12. Cloning, mapping, and sequencing of plasmid R100 traM and finP genes.

    PubMed Central

    Fee, B E; Dempsey, W B

    1986-01-01

    The fertility control gene finP, the transfer gene traM, and the transfer origin, oriT, of plasmid R100 were isolated on a single 1.2-kilobase EcoRV fragment and were then subcloned as HaeIII fragments. The sequence of the 754-base-pair finP-containing fragment is reported here. In addition to the finP gene, the sequence includes all but two bases of the R100 traM open reading frame and apparently all of the leader mRNA sequence and amino end of the traJ gene of R100. The sequence contains two open reading frames which encode small proteins on the opposite strand from the traM and traJ genes. It also shows two sets of inverted repeats that have the characteristics of transcription terminators. One set is positioned as if it was the traM terminator, and the other set, which is downstream from the first, sits in the middle of the leader mRNA sequence for traJ. On the bottom strand, this inverted repeat has the structure of a rho-independent terminator. Other less-stable inverted repeats overlap this second terminator in the same way as is seen in attenuation sequences, and the two separate small open reading frames on the bottom strand also totally overlap the stem of the rho-independent terminator, suggesting that their translation would cause shifting of termination to the bottom strand homolog of the putative traM terminator. The finP gene product was not identified, but the gene was mapped to the sequence which contains the traJ gene. It either overlaps traJ or is antisense to it. PMID:3522549

  13. Enhancement of accuracy and efficiency for RNA secondary structure prediction by sequence segmentation and MapReduce

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ribonucleic acid (RNA) molecules play important roles in many biological processes including gene expression and regulation. Their secondary structures are crucial for the RNA functionality, and the prediction of the secondary structures is widely studied. Our previous research shows that cutting long sequences into shorter chunks, predicting secondary structures of the chunks independently using thermodynamic methods, and reconstructing the entire secondary structure from the predicted chunk structures can yield better accuracy than predicting the secondary structure using the RNA sequence as a whole. The chunking, prediction, and reconstruction processes can use different methods and parameters, some of which produce more accurate predictions than others. In this paper, we study the prediction accuracy and efficiency of three different chunking methods using seven popular secondary structure prediction programs that apply to two datasets of RNA with known secondary structures, which include both pseudoknotted and non-pseudoknotted sequences, as well as a family of viral genome RNAs whose structures have not been predicted before. Our modularized MapReduce framework based on Hadoop allows us to study the problem in a parallel and robust environment. Results On average, the maximum accuracy retention values are larger than one for our chunking methods and the seven prediction programs over 50 non-pseudoknotted sequences, meaning that the secondary structure predicted using chunking is more similar to the real structure than the secondary structure predicted by using the whole sequence. We observe similar results for the 23 pseudoknotted sequences, except for the NUPACK program using the centered chunking method. The performance analysis for 14 long RNA sequences from the Nodaviridae virus family outlines how the coarse-grained mapping of chunking and predictions in the MapReduce framework exhibits shorter turnaround times for short RNA sequences. However

  14. Construction and Analysis of High-Density Linkage Map Using High-Throughput Sequencing Data

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Min; Liu, Hui; Zeng, Huaping; Deng, Dejing; Xin, Huaigen; Song, Jun; Xu, Chunhua; Sun, Xiaowen; Hou, Xilin; Wang, Xiaowu; Zheng, Hongkun

    2014-01-01

    Linkage maps enable the study of important biological questions. The construction of high-density linkage maps appears more feasible since the advent of next-generation sequencing (NGS), which eases SNP discovery and high-throughput genotyping of large population. However, the marker number explosion and genotyping errors from NGS data challenge the computational efficiency and linkage map quality of linkage study methods. Here we report the HighMap method for constructing high-density linkage maps from NGS data. HighMap employs an iterative ordering and error correction strategy based on a k-nearest neighbor algorithm and a Monte Carlo multipoint maximum likelihood algorithm. Simulation study shows HighMap can create a linkage map with three times as many markers as ordering-only methods while offering more accurate marker orders and stable genetic distances. Using HighMap, we constructed a common carp linkage map with 10,004 markers. The singleton rate was less than one-ninth of that generated by JoinMap4.1. Its total map distance was 5,908 cM, consistent with reports on low-density maps. HighMap is an efficient method for constructing high-density, high-quality linkage maps from high-throughput population NGS data. It will facilitate genome assembling, comparative genomic analysis, and QTL studies. HighMap is available at http://highmap.biomarker.com.cn/. PMID:24905985

  15. Physical mapping of complex genomes by sampled sequencing: A theoretical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kupfer, K.; Smith, M.; Quackenbush, J.

    1995-05-01

    A method for high-throughput, high-resolution physical mapping of complex genomes and human chromosomes called Genomic Sequence Sampling (GSS) has recently been proposed. This mapping strategy employs high-density cosmid contig assembly over 200-kb to 1-Mb regions of the target genome coupled with DNA sequencing of the cosmid ends. The relative order and spacing of the sequence fragments is determined from the template contig, resulting in a physical map of 1-to 5-kb resolution that contains a substantial portion of the entire sequence at one-pass accuracy. The purpose of this paper is to determine the theoretical parameters for GSS mapping, to evaluate the effectiveness of the contig-building strategy, and to calculate the expected fraction of the target genome that can be recovered as mapped sequence. A novel aspect of the cosmid fingerprinting and contig-building strategy involves determining the orientation of the genomic inserts relative to the cloning vectors, so that the sampled sequence fragments can be mapped with high resolution. The algorithm is based upon complete restriction enzyme digestion, contig assembly by matching fragments, and end-orientation of individual cosmids by determining the best consistent fit of the labeled cosmid end fragments in the consensus restriction map. 32 refs., 7 figs.

  16. A Sequence Based Synteny Map Between Soybean and Arabidopis Thaliana.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In an effort to identify conserved sequences between soybean (Glycine max, L. Merr.) and the model organism Arabidopsis thaliana (thale cress), a series of JAVA-based programs were created that processed and compared 341,619 soybean DNA sequences against A. thaliana chromosomal DNA. A. thaliana DNA ...

  17. Integration of Two Diploid Potato Linkage Maps with the Potato Genome Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Felcher, Kimberly J.; Coombs, Joseph J.; Massa, Alicia N.; Hansey, Candice N.; Hamilton, John P.; Veilleux, Richard E.; Buell, C. Robin; Douches, David S.

    2012-01-01

    To facilitate genome-guided breeding in potato, we developed an 8303 Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) marker array using potato genome and transcriptome resources. To validate the Infinium 8303 Potato Array, we developed linkage maps from two diploid populations (DRH and D84) and compared these maps with the assembled potato genome sequence. Both populations used the doubled monoploid reference genotype DM1-3 516 R44 as the female parent but had different heterozygous diploid male parents (RH89-039-16 and 84SD22). Over 4,400 markers were mapped (1,960 in DRH and 2,454 in D84, 787 in common) resulting in map sizes of 965 (DRH) and 792 (D84) cM, covering 87% (DRH) and 88% (D84) of genome sequence length. Of the mapped markers, 33.5% were in candidate genes selected for the array, 4.5% were markers from existing genetic maps, and 61% were selected based on distribution across the genome. Markers with distorted segregation ratios occurred in blocks in both linkage maps, accounting for 4% (DRH) and 9% (D84) of mapped markers. Markers with distorted segregation ratios were unique to each population with blocks on chromosomes 9 and 12 in DRH and 3, 4, 6 and 8 in D84. Chromosome assignment of markers based on linkage mapping differed from sequence alignment with the Potato Genome Sequencing Consortium (PGSC) pseudomolecules for 1% of the mapped markers with some disconcordant markers attributable to paralogs. In total, 126 (DRH) and 226 (D84) mapped markers were not anchored to the pseudomolecules and provide new scaffold anchoring data to improve the potato genome assembly. The high degree of concordance between the linkage maps and the pseudomolecules demonstrates both the quality of the potato genome sequence and the functionality of the Infinium 8303 Potato Array. The broad genome coverage of the Infinium 8303 Potato Array compared to other marker sets will enable numerous downstream applications. PMID:22558443

  18. Integration of two diploid potato linkage maps with the potato genome sequence.

    PubMed

    Felcher, Kimberly J; Coombs, Joseph J; Massa, Alicia N; Hansey, Candice N; Hamilton, John P; Veilleux, Richard E; Buell, C Robin; Douches, David S

    2012-01-01

    To facilitate genome-guided breeding in potato, we developed an 8303 Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) marker array using potato genome and transcriptome resources. To validate the Infinium 8303 Potato Array, we developed linkage maps from two diploid populations (DRH and D84) and compared these maps with the assembled potato genome sequence. Both populations used the doubled monoploid reference genotype DM1-3 516 R44 as the female parent but had different heterozygous diploid male parents (RH89-039-16 and 84SD22). Over 4,400 markers were mapped (1,960 in DRH and 2,454 in D84, 787 in common) resulting in map sizes of 965 (DRH) and 792 (D84) cM, covering 87% (DRH) and 88% (D84) of genome sequence length. Of the mapped markers, 33.5% were in candidate genes selected for the array, 4.5% were markers from existing genetic maps, and 61% were selected based on distribution across the genome. Markers with distorted segregation ratios occurred in blocks in both linkage maps, accounting for 4% (DRH) and 9% (D84) of mapped markers. Markers with distorted segregation ratios were unique to each population with blocks on chromosomes 9 and 12 in DRH and 3, 4, 6 and 8 in D84. Chromosome assignment of markers based on linkage mapping differed from sequence alignment with the Potato Genome Sequencing Consortium (PGSC) pseudomolecules for 1% of the mapped markers with some disconcordant markers attributable to paralogs. In total, 126 (DRH) and 226 (D84) mapped markers were not anchored to the pseudomolecules and provide new scaffold anchoring data to improve the potato genome assembly. The high degree of concordance between the linkage maps and the pseudomolecules demonstrates both the quality of the potato genome sequence and the functionality of the Infinium 8303 Potato Array. The broad genome coverage of the Infinium 8303 Potato Array compared to other marker sets will enable numerous downstream applications. PMID:22558443

  19. Construction of an Integrated High Density Simple Sequence Repeat Linkage Map in Cultivated Strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) and its Applicability

    PubMed Central

    Isobe, Sachiko N.; Hirakawa, Hideki; Sato, Shusei; Maeda, Fumi; Ishikawa, Masami; Mori, Toshiki; Yamamoto, Yuko; Shirasawa, Kenta; Kimura, Mitsuhiro; Fukami, Masanobu; Hashizume, Fujio; Tsuji, Tomoko; Sasamoto, Shigemi; Kato, Midori; Nanri, Keiko; Tsuruoka, Hisano; Minami, Chiharu; Takahashi, Chika; Wada, Tsuyuko; Ono, Akiko; Kawashima, Kumiko; Nakazaki, Naomi; Kishida, Yoshie; Kohara, Mitsuyo; Nakayama, Shinobu; Yamada, Manabu; Fujishiro, Tsunakazu; Watanabe, Akiko; Tabata, Satoshi

    2013-01-01

    The cultivated strawberry (Fragaria× ananassa) is an octoploid (2n = 8x = 56) of the Rosaceae family whose genomic architecture is still controversial. Several recent studies support the AAA′A′BBB′B′ model, but its complexity has hindered genetic and genomic analysis of this important crop. To overcome this difficulty and to assist genome-wide analysis of F. × ananassa, we constructed an integrated linkage map by organizing a total of 4474 of simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers collected from published Fragaria sequences, including 3746 SSR markers [Fragaria vesca expressed sequence tag (EST)-derived SSR markers] derived from F. vesca ESTs, 603 markers (F. × ananassa EST-derived SSR markers) from F. × ananassa ESTs, and 125 markers (F. × ananassa transcriptome-derived SSR markers) from F. × ananassa transcripts. Along with the previously published SSR markers, these markers were mapped onto five parent-specific linkage maps derived from three mapping populations, which were then assembled into an integrated linkage map. The constructed map consists of 1856 loci in 28 linkage groups (LGs) that total 2364.1 cM in length. Macrosynteny at the chromosome level was observed between the LGs of F. × ananassa and the genome of F. vesca. Variety distinction on 129 F. × ananassa lines was demonstrated using 45 selected SSR markers. PMID:23248204

  20. CloudMap: a cloud-based pipeline for analysis of mutant genome sequences.

    PubMed

    Minevich, Gregory; Park, Danny S; Blankenberg, Daniel; Poole, Richard J; Hobert, Oliver

    2012-12-01

    Whole genome sequencing (WGS) allows researchers to pinpoint genetic differences between individuals and significantly shortcuts the costly and time-consuming part of forward genetic analysis in model organism systems. Currently, the most effort-intensive part of WGS is the bioinformatic analysis of the relatively short reads generated by second generation sequencing platforms. We describe here a novel, easily accessible and cloud-based pipeline, called CloudMap, which greatly simplifies the analysis of mutant genome sequences. Available on the Galaxy web platform, CloudMap requires no software installation when run on the cloud, but it can also be run locally or via Amazon's Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2) service. CloudMap uses a series of predefined workflows to pinpoint sequence variations in animal genomes, such as those of premutagenized and mutagenized Caenorhabditis elegans strains. In combination with a variant-based mapping procedure, CloudMap allows users to sharply define genetic map intervals graphically and to retrieve very short lists of candidate variants with a few simple clicks. Automated workflows and extensive video user guides are available to detail the individual analysis steps performed (http://usegalaxy.org/cloudmap). We demonstrate the utility of CloudMap for WGS analysis of C. elegans and Arabidopsis genomes and describe how other organisms (e.g., Zebrafish and Drosophila) can easily be accommodated by this software platform. To accommodate rapid analysis of many mutants from large-scale genetic screens, CloudMap contains an in silico complementation testing tool that allows users to rapidly identify instances where multiple alleles of the same gene are present in the mutant collection. Lastly, we describe the application of a novel mapping/WGS method ("Variant Discovery Mapping") that does not rely on a defined polymorphic mapping strain, and we integrate the application of this method into CloudMap. CloudMap tools and documentation are

  1. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hev ein sequence

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, Natasha V.; Broekaert, Willem F.; Chua, Nam-Hai; Kush, Anil

    2000-07-04

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74-79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli.

  2. Infrared Mapping of the Dust Around Main Sequence Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinrichsen, I.; Walker, H.; Klaas, U.; Sylvester, R.

    1998-01-01

    The photopolarimeter on ISO (ISOPHOT) has been used to investigate the dust discs around the four prototype Vega-like stars and several main sequence stars with excess infrared emission from IRAS data.

  3. REPEATED SEQUENCES INCLUDING RS1100 FROM PSEUDOMONAS CEPACIA AC100 FUNCTION AS IS ELEMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several lines of evidence were obtained that the previously identified, repeated sequence RS1100 of Pseudomonas cepacia strain AC1100 undergoes transposition events. NA sequences flanking the chlorohydroxy hydroquinone (CHQ) degradative genes of this organism were examined from s...

  4. A Physical Map, Including a BAC/PAC Clone Contig, of the Williams-Beuren Syndrome–Deletion Region at 7q11.23

    PubMed Central

    Peoples, Risa; Franke, Yvonne; Wang, Yu-Ker; Pérez-Jurado, Luis; Paperna, Tamar; Cisco, Michael; Francke, Uta

    2000-01-01

    Summary Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS) is a developmental disorder caused by haploinsufficiency for genes in a 2-cM region of chromosome band 7q11.23. With the exception of vascular stenoses due to deletion of the elastin gene, the various features of WBS have not yet been attributed to specific genes. Although ⩾16 genes have been identified within the WBS deletion, completion of a physical map of the region has been difficult because of the large duplicated regions flanking the deletion. We present a physical map of the WBS deletion and flanking regions, based on assembly of a bacterial artificial chromosome/P1-derived artificial chromosome contig, analysis of high-throughput genome-sequence data, and long-range restriction mapping of genomic and cloned DNA by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Our map encompasses 3 Mb, including 1.6 Mb within the deletion. Two large duplicons, flanking the deletion, of ⩾320 kb contain unique sequence elements from the internal border regions of the deletion, such as sequences from GTF2I (telomeric) and FKBP6 (centromeric). A third copy of this duplicon exists in inverted orientation distal to the telomeric flanking one. These duplicons show stronger sequence conservation with regard to each other than to the presumptive ancestral loci within the common deletion region. Sequence elements originating from beyond 7q11.23 are also present in these duplicons. Although the duplicons are not present in mice, the order of the single-copy genes in the conserved syntenic region of mouse chromosome 5 is inverted relative to the human map. A model is presented for a mechanism of WBS-deletion formation, based on the orientation of duplicons' components relative to each other and to the ancestral elements within the deletion region. PMID:10631136

  5. Sex Differences in Infants' Mapping of Complex Occlusion Sequences: Further Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilcox, Teresa

    2007-01-01

    Recently, infant researchers have reported sex differences in infants' capacity to map their representation of an occlusion sequence onto a subsequent no-occlusion display. The research reported here sought to identify the extent to which these sex differences are observed in event-mapping tasks and to identify the underlying basis for these…

  6. A Time Sequence-Oriented Concept Map Approach to Developing Educational Computer Games for History Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chu, Hui-Chun; Yang, Kai-Hsiang; Chen, Jing-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Concept maps have been recognized as an effective tool for students to organize their knowledge; however, in history courses, it is important for students to learn and organize historical events according to the time of their occurrence. Therefore, in this study, a time sequence-oriented concept map approach is proposed for developing a game-based…

  7. A high-resolution cattle CNV map by population-scale genome sequencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Copy Number Variations (CNVs) are common genomic structural variations that have been linked to human diseases and phenotypic traits. Prior studies in cattle have produced low-resolution CNV maps. We constructed a draft, high-resolution map of cattle CNVs based on whole genome sequencing data from 7...

  8. Comparison and quantitative verification of mapping algorithms for whole genome bisulfite sequencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Coupling bisulfite conversion with next-generation sequencing (Bisulfite-seq) enables genome-wide measurement of DNA methylation, but poses unique challenges for mapping. However, despite a proliferation of Bisulfite-seq mapping tools, no systematic comparison of their genomic coverage and quantitat...

  9. Construction of a SNP and SSR linkage map in autotetraploid blueberry using genotyping by sequencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A mapping population developed from a cross between two key highbush blueberry cultivars, Draper × Jewel (Vaccinium corymbosum), segregating for a number of important phenotypic traits, has been utilized to produce a genetic linkage map. Data on 233 single sequence repeat (SSR) markers and 1794 sing...

  10. Dynamical Maps of a Class of Sl+1=Sl-1 Sln Fibonacci Sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Baohua; Liu, Tianshi

    1991-12-01

    The dynamical properties of a class of Sl+1=Sl-1Sln Fibonacci sequences are discussed following K. K. T. method. The recursion relations for the dynamical maps are derived. Linearisation about their fixed points yields the Jacobian matrix of the mapping and the eigenvalues for the fixed points.

  11. Optimization of Brain T2 Mapping Using Standard CPMG Sequence In A Clinical Scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hnilicová, P.; Bittšanský, M.; Dobrota, D.

    2014-04-01

    In magnetic resonance imaging, transverse relaxation time (T2) mapping is a useful quantitative tool enabling enhanced diagnostics of many brain pathologies. The aim of our study was to test the influence of different sequence parameters on calculated T2 values, including multi-slice measurements, slice position, interslice gap, echo spacing, and pulse duration. Measurements were performed using standard multi-slice multi-echo CPMG imaging sequence on a 1.5 Tesla routine whole body MR scanner. We used multiple phantoms with different agarose concentrations (0 % to 4 %) and verified the results on a healthy volunteer. It appeared that neither the pulse duration, the size of interslice gap nor the slice shift had any impact on the T2. The measurement accuracy was increased with shorter echo spacing. Standard multi-slice multi-echo CPMG protocol with the shortest echo spacing, also the smallest available interslice gap (100 % of slice thickness) and shorter pulse duration was found to be optimal and reliable for calculating T2 maps in the human brain.

  12. Ioncopy: a novel method for calling copy number alterations in amplicon sequencing data including significance assessment

    PubMed Central

    Budczies, Jan; Pfarr, Nicole; Stenzinger, Albrecht; Treue, Denise; Endris, Volker; Ismaeel, Fakher; Bangemann, Nikola; Blohmer, Jens-Uwe; Dietel, Manfred; Loibl, Sibylle; Klauschen, Frederick; Weichert, Wilko; Denkert, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    Recently, it has been demonstrated that calling of copy number alterations (CNAs) from amplicon sequencing (AS) data is feasible. Most approaches, however, require non-tumor (germline) DNA for data normalization. Here, we present the method Ioncopy for CNA detection which requires no normal controls and includes a significance assessment for each detected alteration. Ioncopy was evaluated in a cohort of 184 clinically annotated breast carcinomas. A total number of 252 amplifications were detected, of which 183 (72.6%) could be validated by a call of an additional amplicon interrogating the same gene. Moreover, a total number of 33 deletions were found, whereof 27 (81.8%) could be validated. Analyzing the 16 most frequently amplified genes, validation rates of over 89% could be achieved for 11 of these genes. 11 of the top 16 genes showed significant overexpression in the amplified tumors. 89.5% of the HER2-amplified tumors were GRB7 and STARD3 co-amplified, whereas 68.4% of the HER2-amplified tumors had additional MED1 amplifications. Correlations between CNAs measured by amplicons in HER2 exons 19, 20 and 21 were strong (all R > 0.93). AS based detection of HER2 amplifications had a sensitivity of 90.0% and a specificity of 98.8% compared to the gold standard of HER2 immunohistochemistry combined with in situ hybridization. In summary, we developed and validated a novel method for detection and significance assessment of CNAs in amplicon sequencing data. Using Ioncopy, AS offers a straightforward and efficient approach to simultaneously analyze gene amplifications and gene deletions together with simple somatic mutations in a single assay. PMID:26910888

  13. Sequence of mammalian fossils, including hominoid teeth, from the Bubing Basin caves, South China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Potts, Richard; Baoyin, Yuan; Huang, Weiwen; Cheng, Hai; Edwards, R Lawrence; Ditchfield, Peter

    2007-04-01

    A Plio-Pleistocene to Holocene faunal sequence has been recovered from four carefully excavated caves in the Bubing Basin, adjacent to the larger Bose Basin of South China. The caves vary in elevation; we suggest that the higher caves were formed and filled with sediments prior to the lower caves. The highest deposits, which are from Mohui Cave, contain hominoid teeth and other fossilized remains of mammalian taxa most similar to late Pliocene and early Pleistocene faunas. Wuyun Cave ( approximately 50m lower in elevation than Mohui) contains a late middle Pleistocene fauna, which is supported by U-series age constraints from 350 to 200ka. Lower Pubu Cave ( approximately 23m below Wuyun) is assigned to the late Pleistocene, while the Cunkong Cave (the lowest, approximately 2m lower elevation than Lower Pubu) preserves a Holocene fauna. The four faunal assemblages indicate species-level changes in Ailuropoda, Stegodon, and Sus, the appearance of Elephas, the local disappearance of Stegodon, and the migration of Equus hemionus to South China. These initial results of our work call into question the continued value of the Stegodon/Ailuropoda Fauna, a category long used to characterize the Pleistocene faunas of South China. Excavation of karstic caves of varying elevation within the basins of South China holds promise for defining local sequences of mammalian fossils that can be used to investigate faunal variations related to climate change, biogeographic events, and evolutionary change over the past two million years. Stable isotopic analysis of a small sample of mammalian teeth from Bubing Basin caves is consistent with 100% C(3) vegetation in the Bubing/Bose region, with certain delta(13)C values consistent with a canopied woodland or forest. A preliminary assessment of the hominoid teeth indicates the presence of diverse molar and premolar morphologies including dental remains of Gigantopithecus blacki and a sample with similarities to the teeth reported from

  14. A quantitative trait locus for variation in dopamine metabolism mapped in a primate model using reference sequences from related species

    PubMed Central

    Freimer, Nelson B.; Service, Susan K.; Ophoff, Roel A.; Jasinska, Anna J.; McKee, Kevin; Villeneuve, Amelie; Belisle, Alexandre; Bailey, Julia N.; Breidenthal, Sherry E.; Jorgensen, Matthew J.; Mann, J. John; Cantor, Rita M.; Dewar, Ken; Fairbanks, Lynn A.

    2007-01-01

    Non-human primates (NHP) provide crucial research models. Their strong similarities to humans make them particularly valuable for understanding complex behavioral traits and brain structure and function. We report here the genetic mapping of an NHP nervous system biologic trait, the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentration of the dopamine metabolite homovanillic acid (HVA), in an extended inbred vervet monkey (Chlorocebus aethiops sabaeus) pedigree. CSF HVA is an index of CNS dopamine activity, which is hypothesized to contribute substantially to behavioral variations in NHP and humans. For quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping, we carried out a two-stage procedure. We first scanned the genome using a first-generation genetic map of short tandem repeat markers. Subsequently, using >100 SNPs within the most promising region identified by the genome scan, we mapped a QTL for CSF HVA at a genome-wide level of significance (peak logarithm of odds score >4) to a narrow well delineated interval (<10 Mb). The SNP discovery exploited conserved segments between human and rhesus macaque reference genome sequences. Our findings demonstrate the potential of using existing primate reference genome sequences for designing high-resolution genetic analyses applicable across a wide range of NHP species, including the many for which full genome sequences are not yet available. Leveraging genomic information from sequenced to nonsequenced species should enable the utilization of the full range of NHP diversity in behavior and disease susceptibility to determine the genetic basis of specific biological and behavioral traits. PMID:17884980

  15. Toward a physical map of Drosophila buzzatii. Use of randomly amplified polymorphic dna polymorphisms and sequence-tagged site landmarks.

    PubMed Central

    Laayouni, H; Santos, M; Fontdevila, A

    2000-01-01

    We present a physical map based on RAPD polymorphic fragments and sequence-tagged sites (STSs) for the repleta group species Drosophila buzzatii. One hundred forty-four RAPD markers have been used as probes for in situ hybridization to the polytene chromosomes, and positive results allowing the precise localization of 108 RAPDs were obtained. Of these, 73 behave as effectively unique markers for physical map construction, and in 9 additional cases the probes gave two hybridization signals, each on a different chromosome. Most markers (68%) are located on chromosomes 2 and 4, which partially agree with previous estimates on the distribution of genetic variation over chromosomes. One RAPD maps close to the proximal breakpoint of inversion 2z(3) but is not included within the inverted fragment. However, it was possible to conclude from this RAPD that the distal breakpoint of 2z(3) had previously been wrongly assigned. A total of 39 cytologically mapped RAPDs were converted to STSs and yielded an aggregate sequence of 28,431 bp. Thirty-six RAPDs (25%) did not produce any detectable hybridization signal, and we obtained the DNA sequence from three of them. Further prospects toward obtaining a more developed genetic map than the one currently available for D. buzzatii are discussed. PMID:11102375

  16. Human insulin genome sequence map, biochemical structure of insulin for recombinant DNA insulin.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Chiranjib; Mungantiwar, Ashish A

    2003-08-01

    Insulin is a essential molecule for type I diabetes that is marketed by very few companies. It is the first molecule, which was made by recombinant technology; but the commercialization process is very difficult. Knowledge about biochemical structure of insulin and human insulin genome sequence map is pivotal to large scale manufacturing of recombinant DNA Insulin. This paper reviews human insulin genome sequence map, the amino acid sequence of porcine insulin, crystal structure of porcine insulin, insulin monomer, aggregation surfaces of insulin, conformational variation in the insulin monomer, insulin X-ray structures for recombinant DNA technology in the synthesis of human insulin in Escherichia coli. PMID:12769691

  17. Towards a transcription map of human chromosome 21: Identification of expressed sequences by exon trapping

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.M.; Chrast, R.; Rossier, C.

    1994-09-01

    Chromosome 21q contains about 1% of the human genome, and when triplicated is responsible for Down syndrome. The genetic and physical maps of this chromosome are amongst the most developed of all human chromosomes. A considerable international effort is now under way with the aims of cloning and mapping all chromosome 21 genes, assigning functions, and determining their involvement in disease phenotypes. We have used exon trapping/amplification methods to identify exons of genes that map on chromosome 21. EcoR1 or Bam HI-digested DNA from pools of 96 cosmids from the chromosome 21 library LL21NC02{open_quotes}Q{close_quotes} were used for cloning in vector pSLP3 (after elimination of cosmids positive for ribosomal RNR genes and mouse DNA); recombinant plasmids were transfected into cos7 cells and trapped sequences were subcloned. False positive clones, i.e. those containing vector self-spliced sequences (which represented between 8-30% of clones in different experiments), have been eliminated by hybridization of oligonucleotides corresponding to sequences of the vector self-spliced events. More than 100 different trapped {open_quotes}exons{close_quotes} have been identified to date after single or double pass sequencing. Two sequences matched exons of known genes on chromosome 21 (COL6A 1 and MX1). About 45% of the sequences were entirely new, i.e. there was no homology with entries in the nucleotide or protein databases (blastin and blastx searches). An additional 48% of the sequences were homologous but not identical to sequences in the databases. Only 4% were repetitive elements. Specific homologies will be presented. All of the trapped sequences that have been mapped by filter hybridization, PCR, or FISH, map back to cosmids or YACs of chromosome 21. This approach permits rapid identification of expressed sequences of this chromosome, the cloning of its genes, and the understanding of its disorders.

  18. High-density linkage map construction and mapping of seed trait QTLs in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) using Genotyping-by-Sequencing (GBS)

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Subodh; Gupta, Shefali; Bandhiwal, Nitesh; Kumar, Tapan; Bharadwaj, Chellapilla; Bhatia, Sabhyata

    2015-01-01

    This study reports the use of Genotyping-by-Sequencing (GBS) for large-scale SNP discovery and simultaneous genotyping of recombinant inbred lines (RILs) of an intra-specific mapping population of chickpea contrasting for seed traits. A total of 119,672 raw SNPs were discovered, which after stringent filtering revealed 3,977 high quality SNPs of which 39.5% were present in genic regions. Comparative analysis using physically mapped marker loci revealed a higher degree of synteny with Medicago in comparison to soybean. The SNP genotyping data was utilized to construct one of the most saturated intra-specific genetic linkage maps of chickpea having 3,363 mapped positions including 3,228 SNPs on 8 linkage groups spanning 1006.98 cM at an average inter marker distance of 0.33 cM. The map was utilized to identify 20 quantitative trait loci (QTLs) associated with seed traits accounting for phenotypic variations ranging from 9.97% to 29.71%. Analysis of the genomic sequence corresponding to five robust QTLs led to the identification of 684 putative candidate genes whose expression profiling revealed that 101 genes exhibited seed specific expression. The integrated approach utilizing the identified QTLs along with the available genome and transcriptome could serve as a platform for candidate gene identification for molecular breeding of chickpea. PMID:26631981

  19. High-density linkage map construction and mapping of seed trait QTLs in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) using Genotyping-by-Sequencing (GBS).

    PubMed

    Verma, Subodh; Gupta, Shefali; Bandhiwal, Nitesh; Kumar, Tapan; Bharadwaj, Chellapilla; Bhatia, Sabhyata

    2015-01-01

    This study reports the use of Genotyping-by-Sequencing (GBS) for large-scale SNP discovery and simultaneous genotyping of recombinant inbred lines (RILs) of an intra-specific mapping population of chickpea contrasting for seed traits. A total of 119,672 raw SNPs were discovered, which after stringent filtering revealed 3,977 high quality SNPs of which 39.5% were present in genic regions. Comparative analysis using physically mapped marker loci revealed a higher degree of synteny with Medicago in comparison to soybean. The SNP genotyping data was utilized to construct one of the most saturated intra-specific genetic linkage maps of chickpea having 3,363 mapped positions including 3,228 SNPs on 8 linkage groups spanning 1006.98 cM at an average inter marker distance of 0.33 cM. The map was utilized to identify 20 quantitative trait loci (QTLs) associated with seed traits accounting for phenotypic variations ranging from 9.97% to 29.71%. Analysis of the genomic sequence corresponding to five robust QTLs led to the identification of 684 putative candidate genes whose expression profiling revealed that 101 genes exhibited seed specific expression. The integrated approach utilizing the identified QTLs along with the available genome and transcriptome could serve as a platform for candidate gene identification for molecular breeding of chickpea. PMID:26631981

  20. Alignment of Escherichia coli K12 DNA sequences to a genomic restriction map.

    PubMed Central

    Rudd, K E; Miller, W; Ostell, J; Benson, D A

    1990-01-01

    We use the extensive published information describing the genome of Escherichia coli and new restriction map alignment software to align DNA sequence, genetic, and physical maps. Restriction map alignment software is used which considers restriction maps as strings analogous to DNA or protein sequences except that two values, enzyme name and DNA base address, are associated with each position on the string. The resulting alignments reveal a nearly linear relationship between the physical and genetic maps of the E. coli chromosome. Physical map comparisons with the 1976, 1980, and 1983 genetic maps demonstrate a better fit with the more recent maps. The results of these alignments are genomic kilobase coordinates, orientation and rank of the alignment that best fits the genetic data. A statistical measure based on extreme value distribution is applied to the alignments. Additional computer analyses allow us to estimate the accuracy of the published E. coli genomic restriction map, simulate rearrangements of the bacterial chromosome, and search for repetitive DNA. The procedures we used are general enough to be applicable to other genome mapping projects. PMID:2183179

  1. ZOOM Lite: next-generation sequencing data mapping and visualization software

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zefeng; Lin, Hao; Ma, Bin

    2010-01-01

    High-throughput next-generation sequencing technologies pose increasing demands on the efficiency, accuracy and usability of data analysis software. In this article, we present ZOOM Lite, a software for efficient reads mapping and result visualization. With a kernel capable of mapping tens of millions of Illumina or AB SOLiD sequencing reads efficiently and accurately, and an intuitive graphical user interface, ZOOM Lite integrates reads mapping and result visualization into a easy to use pipeline on desktop PC. The software handles both single-end and paired-end reads, and can output both the unique mapping result or the top N mapping results for each read. Additionally, the software takes a variety of input file formats and outputs to several commonly used result formats. The software is freely available at http://bioinfor.com/zoom/lite/. PMID:20530531

  2. Tablet: Visualizing Next-Generation Sequence Assemblies and Mappings.

    PubMed

    Milne, Iain; Bayer, Micha; Stephen, Gordon; Cardle, Linda; Marshall, David

    2016-01-01

    This chapter is designed to be a practical guide to using Tablet for the visualization of next/second-generation (NGS) sequencing data. NGS data is being produced more frequently and in greater data volumes every year. As such, it is increasingly important to have tools which enable biologists and bioinformaticians to understand and gain key insights into their data. Visualization can play a key role in the exploration of such data as well as aid in the visual validation of sequence assemblies and features such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We aim to show several use cases which demonstrate Tablet's ability to visually highlight various situations of interest which can arise in NGS data. PMID:26519411

  3. Human phosphoribosylformylglycineamide amidotransferase (FGARAT): regional mapping, complete coding sequence, isolation of a functional genomic clone, and DNA sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Patterson, D; Bleskan, J; Gardiner, K; Bowersox, J

    1999-11-01

    Purines play essential roles in many cellular functions, including DNA replication, transcription, intra- and extra-cellular signaling, energy metabolism, and as coenzymes for many biochemical reactions. The de-novo synthesis of purines requires 10 enzymatic steps for the production of inosine monophosphate (IMP). Defects in purine metabolism are associated with human diseases. Further, many anticancer agents function as inhibitors of the de-novo biosynthetic pathway. Genes or cDNAs for most of the enzymes comprising this pathway have been isolated from humans or other mammals. One notable exception is the phosphoribosylformylglycineamide amidotransferase (FGARAT) gene, which encodes the fourth step of this pathway. This gene has been cloned from numerous microorganisms and from Drosophila melanogaster and C. elegans. We report here the identification of a human cDNA containing the coding region of the FGARAT mRNA and the isolation of a P1 clone that contains an intact human FGARAT gene. The P1 clone corrects the purine auxotrophy and protein deficiency of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell mutants (AdeB) deficient in both the activity and the protein for FGARAT. The P1 clone was used to regionally map the FGARAT gene to chromosome region 17p13, a location consistent with our prior assignment of this gene to chromosome 17. A comparison of the DNA sequence of the human FGARAT and FGARAT DNA sequence from 17 other organisms is reported. The isolation of this gene means that DNA clones for all the 10 steps of IMP synthesis have been isolated from humans or other mammals. PMID:10548741

  4. High-Throughput Mapping of Single-Neuron Projections by Sequencing of Barcoded RNA.

    PubMed

    Kebschull, Justus M; Garcia da Silva, Pedro; Reid, Ashlan P; Peikon, Ian D; Albeanu, Dinu F; Zador, Anthony M

    2016-09-01

    Neurons transmit information to distant brain regions via long-range axonal projections. In the mouse, area-to-area connections have only been systematically mapped using bulk labeling techniques, which obscure the diverse projections of intermingled single neurons. Here we describe MAPseq (Multiplexed Analysis of Projections by Sequencing), a technique that can map the projections of thousands or even millions of single neurons by labeling large sets of neurons with random RNA sequences ("barcodes"). Axons are filled with barcode mRNA, each putative projection area is dissected, and the barcode mRNA is extracted and sequenced. Applying MAPseq to the locus coeruleus (LC), we find that individual LC neurons have preferred cortical targets. By recasting neuroanatomy, which is traditionally viewed as a problem of microscopy, as a problem of sequencing, MAPseq harnesses advances in sequencing technology to permit high-throughput interrogation of brain circuits. PMID:27545715

  5. Saturated linkage map construction in Rubus idaeus using genotyping by sequencing and genome-independent imputation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Rapid development of highly saturated genetic maps aids molecular breeding, which can accelerate gain per breeding cycle in woody perennial plants such as Rubus idaeus (red raspberry). Recently, robust genotyping methods based on high-throughput sequencing were developed, which provide high marker density, but result in some genotype errors and a large number of missing genotype values. Imputation can reduce the number of missing values and can correct genotyping errors, but current methods of imputation require a reference genome and thus are not an option for most species. Results Genotyping by Sequencing (GBS) was used to produce highly saturated maps for a R. idaeus pseudo-testcross progeny. While low coverage and high variance in sequencing resulted in a large number of missing values for some individuals, a novel method of imputation based on maximum likelihood marker ordering from initial marker segregation overcame the challenge of missing values, and made map construction computationally tractable. The two resulting parental maps contained 4521 and 2391 molecular markers spanning 462.7 and 376.6 cM respectively over seven linkage groups. Detection of precise genomic regions with segregation distortion was possible because of map saturation. Microsatellites (SSRs) linked these results to published maps for cross-validation and map comparison. Conclusions GBS together with genome-independent imputation provides a rapid method for genetic map construction in any pseudo-testcross progeny. Our method of imputation estimates the correct genotype call of missing values and corrects genotyping errors that lead to inflated map size and reduced precision in marker placement. Comparison of SSRs to published R. idaeus maps showed that the linkage maps constructed with GBS and our method of imputation were robust, and marker positioning reliable. The high marker density allowed identification of genomic regions with segregation distortion in R. idaeus, which

  6. A Topographic Image Map of the Sabrina Valles Region Including Information on Large Martian Impact Craters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehrke, S.; Köhring, R.; Barlow, N. G.; Gwinner, K.; Scholten, F.; Lehmann, H.; Albertz, J.

    2007-03-01

    The Catalog of Large Martian Impact Craters provides detailed information on 42,283 craters >5 km; it is planned to be integrated in the Topographic Image Map Mars 1:200,000 series. Such an update is shown in a special target map, based on HRSC data.

  7. PerM: efficient mapping of short sequencing reads with periodic full sensitive spaced seeds

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yangho; Souaiaia, Tade; Chen, Ting

    2009-01-01

    Motivation: The explosion of next-generation sequencing data has spawned the design of new algorithms and software tools to provide efficient mapping for different read lengths and sequencing technologies. In particular, ABI's sequencer (SOLiD system) poses a big computational challenge with its capacity to produce very large amounts of data, and its unique strategy of encoding sequence data into color signals. Results: We present the mapping software, named PerM (Periodic Seed Mapping) that uses periodic spaced seeds to significantly improve mapping efficiency for large reference genomes when compared with state-of-the-art programs. The data structure in PerM requires only 4.5 bytes per base to index the human genome, allowing entire genomes to be loaded to memory, while multiple processors simultaneously map reads to the reference. Weight maximized periodic seeds offer full sensitivity for up to three mismatches and high sensitivity for four and five mismatches while minimizing the number random hits per query, significantly speeding up the running time. Such sensitivity makes PerM a valuable mapping tool for SOLiD and Solexa reads. Availability: http://code.google.com/p/perm/ Contact: tingchen@usc.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:19675096

  8. Ion Torrent sequencing for conducting genome-wide scans for mutation mapping analysis.

    PubMed

    Damerla, Rama Rao; Chatterjee, Bishwanath; Li, You; Francis, Richard J B; Fatakia, Sarosh N; Lo, Cecilia W

    2014-04-01

    Mutation mapping in mice can be readily accomplished by genome wide segregation analysis of polymorphic DNA markers. In this study, we showed the efficacy of Ion Torrent next generation sequencing for conducting genome-wide scans to map and identify a mutation causing congenital heart disease in a mouse mutant, Bishu, recovered from a mouse mutagenesis screen. The Bishu mutant line generated in a C57BL/6J (B6) background was intercrossed with another inbred strain, C57BL/10J (B10), and the resulting B6/B10 hybrid offspring were intercrossed to generate mutants used for the mapping analysis. For each mutant sample, a panel of 123 B6/B10 polymorphic SNPs distributed throughout the mouse genome was PCR amplified, bar coded, and then pooled to generate a single library used for Ion Torrent sequencing. Sequencing carried out using the 314 chip yielded >600,000 usable reads. These were aligned and mapped using a custom bioinformatics pipeline. Each SNP was sequenced to a depth >500×, allowing accurate automated calling of the B6/B10 genotypes. This analysis mapped the mutation in Bishu to an interval on the proximal region of mouse chromosome 4. This was confirmed by parallel capillary sequencing of the 123 polymorphic SNPs. Further analysis of genes in the map interval identified a splicing mutation in Dnaic1(c.204+1G>A), an intermediate chain dynein, as the disease causing mutation in Bishu. Overall, our experience shows Ion Torrent amplicon sequencing is high throughput and cost effective for conducting genome-wide mapping analysis and is easily scalable for other high volume genotyping analyses. PMID:24306492

  9. Molecular phylogeny of horsetails (Equisetum) including chloroplast atpB sequences.

    PubMed

    Guillon, Jean-Michel

    2007-07-01

    Equisetum is a genus of 15 extant species that are the sole surviving representatives of the class Sphenopsida. The generally accepted taxonomy of Equisetum recognizes two subgenera: Equisetum and Hippochaete. Two recent phylogenetical studies have independently questioned the monophyly of subgenus Equisetum. Here, I use original (atpB) and published (rbcL, trnL-trnF, rps4) sequence data to investigate the phylogeny of the genus. Analyses of atpB sequences give an unusual topology, with E. bogotense branching within Hippochaete. A Bayesian analysis based on all available sequences yields a tree with increased resolution, favoring the sister relationships of E. bogotense with subgenus Hippochaete. PMID:17476459

  10. M2SG: mapping human disease-related genetic variants to protein sequences and genomic loci

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Renkai; Cong, Qian; Li, Wenlin; Grishin, Nick V.

    2013-01-01

    Summary: Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) is a manually curated compendium of human genetic variants and the corresponding phenotypes, mostly human diseases. Instead of directly documenting the native sequences for gene entries, OMIM links its entries to protein and DNA sequences in other databases. However, because of the existence of gene isoforms and errors in OMIM records, mapping a specific OMIM mutation to its corresponding protein sequence is not trivial. Combining computer programs and extensive manual curation of OMIM full-text descriptions and original literature, we mapped 98% of OMIM amino acid substitutions (AASs) and all SwissProt Variant (SwissVar) disease-related AASs to reference sequences and confidently mapped 99.96% of all AASs to the genomic loci. Based on the results, we developed an online database and interactive web server (M2SG) to (i) retrieve the mapped OMIM and SwissVar variants for a given protein sequence; and (ii) obtain related proteins and mutations for an input disease phenotype. This database will be useful for analyzing sequences, understanding the effect of mutations, identifying important genetic variations and designing experiments on a protein of interest. Availability and implementation: The database and web server are freely available at http://prodata.swmed.edu/M2S/mut2seq.cgi. Contact: grishin@chop.swmed.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:24002112

  11. Synchronous imitation of continuous action sequences: The role of spatial and topological mapping.

    PubMed

    Ramenzoni, Verónica C; Sebanz, Natalie; Knoblich, Günther

    2015-10-01

    What are the mapping mechanisms that enable people to synchronously imitate continuous action sequences observed in others? We investigated this question in 4 experiments that used a tapping task where participants synchronously performed alternating bimanual hand movements with a model presented in an egocentric or allocentric orientation. Their task was to tap in synchrony, with each hand matching the movements of the ipsilateral model hand as closely as possible. The results show that automatic establishment of topological mappings, where the performer's hand is mapped onto the model's anatomically matching hand even if the 2 are spatially misaligned, can interfere with maintaining spatial mappings (Experiments 1 and 2). The interference was particularly strong in musicians who have expertise in establishing topological mappings in continuous performance (Experiment 4). Adopting an unusual body posture greatly interfered with establishing spatial as well as topological mappings (Experiment 3). Together, the results suggest that synchronous imitation of continuous action sequences depends on flexible predictive models that simultaneously apply spatial and topological mapping constraints to enable an actor to act in synchrony with observed action sequences. PMID:26052697

  12. Comparative chromosome mapping of repetitive sequences. Implications for genomic evolution in the fish, Hoplias malabaricus

    PubMed Central

    Cioffi, Marcelo B; Martins, Cesar; Bertollo, Luiz AC

    2009-01-01

    Background Seven karyomorphs of the fish, Hoplias malabaricus (A-G) were previously included in two major groups, Group I (A, B, C, D) and Group II (E, F, G), based on their similar karyotype structure. In this paper, karyomorphs from Group I were analyzed by means of distinct chromosomal markers, including silver-stained nucleolar organizer regions (Ag-NORs) and chromosomal location of repetitive sequences (18S and 5S rDNA, and satellite 5SHindIII-DNA), through fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), in order to evaluate the evolutionary relationships among them. Results The results showed that several chromosomal markers had conserved location in the four karyomorphs. In addition, some other markers were only conserved in corresponding chromosomes of karyomorphs A-B and C-D. These data therefore reinforced and confirmed the proposed grouping of karyomorphs A-D in Group I and highlight a closer relationship between karyomorphs A-B and C-D. Moreover, the mapping pattern of some markers on some autosomes and on the chromosomes of the XY and X1X2Y systems provided new evidence concerning the possible origin of the sex chromosomes. Conclusion The in situ investigation of repetitive DNA sequences adds new informative characters useful in comparative genomics at chromosomal level and provides insights into the evolutionary relationships among Hoplias malabaricus karyomorphs. PMID:19583858

  13. Integrating mapping and sequencing around the human iduronate-2-sulfate sulfatase locus

    SciTech Connect

    Timms, K.; Lu, F.; Shen, Y.

    1994-09-01

    The logical progression of the human genome project is from mapping to sequencing. However, the criteria for accurate sequencing and mapping are different and consequently, sequencing can reveal unexpected or erroneous relationships between cosmid clones that appear overlapping by hybridization. We are sequencing a 1 Mb region of human Xq28 spanning the genes for fragile X (fraxA) and iduronate-2-sulfate sulfatase (IDS). To date, seven cosmids from this region have been completed and another five are currently being sequenced. One of the completed cosmids contains the complete IDS gene, while another cosmid contains 4 of the 9 IDS exons. The exon sequences in both cosmids are identical, but corresponding introns have proved to be highly variant. This raises the possibility of either a second IDS gene or unusual pseudogene. In addition, one of the cosmids contains a microsatellite marker which has been mapped 150 kb distant from the gene for IDS. This indicates that either two cosmids containing IDS exons are separated by at least 100 kb, or a rearrangement in one of the cosmids prior to library construction. To simplify the development of sequence-ready cosmids, we have developed a rapid method of cosmid walking to select additional clones that are minimally overlapping.

  14. A High-Density Genetic Linkage Map for Cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.): Based on Specific Length Amplified Fragment (SLAF) Sequencing and QTL Analysis of Fruit Traits in Cucumber

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wen-Ying; Huang, Long; Chen, Long; Yang, Jian-Tao; Wu, Jia-Ni; Qu, Mei-Ling; Yao, Dan-Qing; Guo, Chun-Li; Lian, Hong-Li; He, Huan-Le; Pan, Jun-Song; Cai, Run

    2016-01-01

    High-density genetic linkage map plays an important role in genome assembly and quantitative trait loci (QTL) fine mapping. Since the coming of next-generation sequencing, makes the structure of high-density linkage maps much more convenient and practical, which simplifies SNP discovery and high-throughput genotyping. In this research, a high-density linkage map of cucumber was structured using specific length amplified fragment sequencing, using 153 F2 populations of S1000 × S1002. The high-density genetic map composed 3,057 SLAFs, including 4,475 SNP markers on seven chromosomes, and spanned 1061.19 cM. The average genetic distance is 0.35 cM. Based on this high-density genome map, QTL analysis was performed on two cucumber fruit traits, fruit length and fruit diameter. There are 15 QTLs for the two fruit traits were detected. PMID:27148281

  15. A High-Density Genetic Linkage Map for Cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.): Based on Specific Length Amplified Fragment (SLAF) Sequencing and QTL Analysis of Fruit Traits in Cucumber.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wen-Ying; Huang, Long; Chen, Long; Yang, Jian-Tao; Wu, Jia-Ni; Qu, Mei-Ling; Yao, Dan-Qing; Guo, Chun-Li; Lian, Hong-Li; He, Huan-Le; Pan, Jun-Song; Cai, Run

    2016-01-01

    High-density genetic linkage map plays an important role in genome assembly and quantitative trait loci (QTL) fine mapping. Since the coming of next-generation sequencing, makes the structure of high-density linkage maps much more convenient and practical, which simplifies SNP discovery and high-throughput genotyping. In this research, a high-density linkage map of cucumber was structured using specific length amplified fragment sequencing, using 153 F2 populations of S1000 × S1002. The high-density genetic map composed 3,057 SLAFs, including 4,475 SNP markers on seven chromosomes, and spanned 1061.19 cM. The average genetic distance is 0.35 cM. Based on this high-density genome map, QTL analysis was performed on two cucumber fruit traits, fruit length and fruit diameter. There are 15 QTLs for the two fruit traits were detected. PMID:27148281

  16. Mapping Ds insertions in barley using a sequence-based approach.

    PubMed

    Cooper, L D; Marquez-Cedillo, L; Singh, J; Sturbaum, A K; Zhang, S; Edwards, V; Johnson, K; Kleinhofs, A; Rangel, S; Carollo, V; Bregitzer, P; Lemaux, P G; Hayes, P M

    2004-09-01

    A transposon tagging system, based upon maize Ac/Ds elements, was developed in barley (Hordeum vulgaresubsp. vulgare). The long-term objective of this project is to identify a set of lines with Ds insertions dispersed throughout the genome as a comprehensive tool for gene discovery and reverse genetics. AcTPase and Ds-bar elements were introduced into immature embryos of Golden Promise by biolistic transformation. Subsequent transposition and segregation of Ds away from AcTPase and the original site of integration resulted in new lines, each containing a stabilized Ds element in a new location. The sequence of the genomic DNA flanking the Ds elements was obtained by inverse PCR and TAIL-PCR. Using a sequence-based mapping strategy, we determined the genome locations of the Ds insertions in 19 independent lines using primarily restriction digest-based assays of PCR-amplified single nucleotide polymorphisms and PCR-based assays of insertions or deletions. The principal strategy was to identify and map sequence polymorphisms in the regions corresponding to the flanking DNA using the Oregon Wolfe Barley mapping population. The mapping results obtained by the sequence-based approach were confirmed by RFLP analyses in four of the lines. In addition, cloned DNA sequences corresponding to the flanking DNA were used to assign map locations to Morex-derived genomic BAC library inserts, thus integrating genetic and physical maps of barley. BLAST search results indicate that the majority of the transposed Ds elements are found within predicted or known coding sequences. Transposon tagging in barley using Ac/Ds thus promises to provide a useful tool for studies on the functional genomics of the Triticeae. PMID:15449176

  17. Physical map of the chromosome of Neisseria gonorrhoeae FA1090 with locations of genetic markers, including opa and pil genes.

    PubMed Central

    Dempsey, J A; Litaker, W; Madhure, A; Snodgrass, T L; Cannon, J G

    1991-01-01

    A physical map of the chromosome of Neisseria gonorrhoeae FA1090 has been constructed. Digestion of strain FA1090 DNA with NheI, SpeI, BglII, or PacI resulted in a limited number of fragments that were resolved by contour-clamped homogeneous electric field electrophoresis. The estimated genome size was 2,219 kb. To construct the map, probes corresponding to single-copy chromosomal sequences were used in Southern blots of digested DNA separated on pulsed-field gels, to determine how the fragments from different digests overlapped. Some of the probes represented identified gonococcal genes, whereas others were anonymous cloned fragments of strain FA1090 DNA. By using this approach, a macrorestriction map of the strain FA1090 chromosome was assembled, and the locations of various genetic markers on the map were determined. Once the map was completed, the repeated gene families encoding Opa and pilin proteins were mapped. The 11 opa loci of strain FA1090 were distributed over approximately 60% of the chromosome. The pil loci were more clustered and were located in two regions separated by approximately one-fourth of the chromosome. Images PMID:1679431

  18. Mapping and analysis of Caenorhabditis elegans transcription factor sequence specificities

    PubMed Central

    Narasimhan, Kamesh; Lambert, Samuel A; Yang, Ally WH; Riddell, Jeremy; Mnaimneh, Sanie; Zheng, Hong; Albu, Mihai; Najafabadi, Hamed S; Reece-Hoyes, John S; Fuxman Bass, Juan I; Walhout, Albertha JM; Weirauch, Matthew T; Hughes, Timothy R

    2015-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans is a powerful model for studying gene regulation, as it has a compact genome and a wealth of genomic tools. However, identification of regulatory elements has been limited, as DNA-binding motifs are known for only 71 of the estimated 763 sequence-specific transcription factors (TFs). To address this problem, we performed protein binding microarray experiments on representatives of canonical TF families in C. elegans, obtaining motifs for 129 TFs. Additionally, we predict motifs for many TFs that have DNA-binding domains similar to those already characterized, increasing coverage of binding specificities to 292 C. elegans TFs (∼40%). These data highlight the diversification of binding motifs for the nuclear hormone receptor and C2H2 zinc finger families and reveal unexpected diversity of motifs for T-box and DM families. Motif enrichment in promoters of functionally related genes is consistent with known biology and also identifies putative regulatory roles for unstudied TFs. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06967.001 PMID:25905672

  19. Comparative mapping of human alphoid centromeric sequences in great apes

    SciTech Connect

    Archidiacono, N.; Antonacci, R.; Marzella, R.

    1994-09-01

    Metaphase spreads from chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes and Pan paniscus) and gorilla (Gorilla gorilla) have been hybridized in situ with 27 alphoid DNA probes specific for the centromere of human chromosomes, to investigate the evolutionary relationship between centromeric regions of human and great apes. The results showed that most human probes do not recognize their corresponding homologs in great apes. Chromosome X is the only chromosome showing localization consistency in all the four species. Each suprachromosomal family (SCF) exhibits a distinct and peculiar evolutionary history. SCF1 (chromosomes 1, 3, 6, 7, 19, 12, 16) is very heterogeneous: some probes gave intense signals, but always on non-homologous chromosomes; others did not produce any hybridization signal. All probes localized on SCF2 (chromosomes 2, 4, 8, 9, 13, 14, 15, 18, 20, 21, and 22) recognize a single chromosome: chromosome 11 (phylogenetic IX) in PTR and PPA; chromosome 4 (phylogenetic V) in GGO. SCF3 subsets (chromosomes 1, 11, 17, X) are substantially conserved in PTR and PPA, but not in GGO, with the exception restricted to chromosome X. No signals have been detected on PPA chromosomes I, III, IV, V, VI and in PTR chromosomes V, suggesting that the centromeric region of some chromsomes have probably lost homology with human alphoid sequences.

  20. Use of the Caulobacter crescentus Genome Sequence To Develop a Method for Systematic Genetic Mapping

    PubMed Central

    West, Lisandra; Yang, Desiree; Stephens, Craig

    2002-01-01

    The functional analysis of sequenced genomes will be facilitated by the development of tools for the rapid mapping of mutations. We have developed a systematic approach to genetic mapping in Caulobacter crescentus that is based on bacteriophage-mediated transduction of strategically placed antibiotic resistance markers. The genomic DNA sequence was used to identify sites distributed evenly around the chromosome at which plasmids could be nondisruptively integrated. DNA fragments from these sites were amplified by PCR and cloned into a kanamycin-resistant (Kanr) suicide vector. Delivery of these plasmids into C. crescentus resulted in integration via homologous recombination. A set of 41 strains containing Kanr markers at 100-kb intervals was thereby generated. These strains serve as donors for generalized transduction using bacteriophage φCr30, which can transduce at least 120 kb of DNA. Transductants are selected with kanamycin and screened for loss of the mutant phenotype to assess linkage between the marker and the site of the mutation. The dependence of cotransduction frequency on sequence distance was evaluated using several markers and mutant strains. With these data as a standard, previously unmapped mutations were readily localized to DNA sequence intervals equivalent to less than 1% of the genome. Candidate genes within the interval were then examined further by subcloning and complementation analysis. Mutations resulting in sensitivity to ampicillin, in nutritional auxotrophies, or temperature-sensitive growth were mapped. This approach to genetic mapping should be applicable to other bacteria with sequenced genomes for which generalized transducing phage are available. PMID:11914347

  1. OmniMapFree: A unified tool to visualise and explore sequenced genomes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    • Background Acquiring and exploring whole genome sequence information for a species under investigation is now a routine experimental approach. On most genome browsers, typically, only the DNA sequence, EST support, motif search results, and GO annotations are displayed. However, for many species, a growing volume of additional experimental information is available but this is rarely searchable within the landscape of the entire genome. • Results We have developed a generic software which permits users to view a single genome in entirety either within its chromosome or supercontig context within a single window. This software permits the genome to be displayed at any scales and with any features. Different data types and data sets are displayed onto the genome, which have been acquired from other types of studies including classical genetics, forward and reverse genetics, transcriptomics, proteomics and improved annotation from alternative sources. In each display, different types of information can be overlapped, then retrieved in the desired combinations and scales and used in follow up analyses. The displays generated are of publication quality. • Conclusions OmniMapFree provides a unified, versatile and easy-to-use software tool for studying a single genome in association with all the other datasets and data types available for the organism. PMID:22085540

  2. High Resolution Genetic Mapping by Genome Sequencing Reveals Genome Duplication and Tetraploid Genetic Structure of the Diploid Miscanthus sinensis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xue-Feng; Jensen, Elaine; Alexandrov, Nickolai; Troukhan, Maxim; Zhang, Liping; Thomas-Jones, Sian; Farrar, Kerrie; Clifton-Brown, John; Donnison, Iain; Swaller, Timothy; Flavell, Richard

    2012-01-01

    We have created a high-resolution linkage map of Miscanthus sinensis, using genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS), identifying all 19 linkage groups for the first time. The result is technically significant since Miscanthus has a very large and highly heterozygous genome, but has no or limited genomics information to date. The composite linkage map containing markers from both parental linkage maps is composed of 3,745 SNP markers spanning 2,396 cM on 19 linkage groups with a 0.64 cM average resolution. Comparative genomics analyses of the M. sinensis composite linkage map to the genomes of sorghum, maize, rice, and Brachypodium distachyon indicate that sorghum has the closest syntenic relationship to Miscanthus compared to other species. The comparative results revealed that each pair of the 19 M. sinensis linkages aligned to one sorghum chromosome, except for LG8, which mapped to two sorghum chromosomes (4 and 7), presumably due to a chromosome fusion event after genome duplication. The data also revealed several other chromosome rearrangements relative to sorghum, including two telomere-centromere inversions of the sorghum syntenic chromosome 7 in LG8 of M. sinensis and two paracentric inversions of sorghum syntenic chromosome 4 in LG7 and LG8 of M. sinensis. The results clearly demonstrate, for the first time, that the diploid M. sinensis is tetraploid origin consisting of two sub-genomes. This complete and high resolution composite linkage map will not only serve as a useful resource for novel QTL discoveries, but also enable informed deployment of the wealth of existing genomics resources of other species to the improvement of Miscanthus as a high biomass energy crop. In addition, it has utility as a reference for genome sequence assembly for the forthcoming whole genome sequencing of the Miscanthus genus. PMID:22439001

  3. High resolution genetic mapping by genome sequencing reveals genome duplication and tetraploid genetic structure of the diploid Miscanthus sinensis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xue-Feng; Jensen, Elaine; Alexandrov, Nickolai; Troukhan, Maxim; Zhang, Liping; Thomas-Jones, Sian; Farrar, Kerrie; Clifton-Brown, John; Donnison, Iain; Swaller, Timothy; Flavell, Richard

    2012-01-01

    We have created a high-resolution linkage map of Miscanthus sinensis, using genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS), identifying all 19 linkage groups for the first time. The result is technically significant since Miscanthus has a very large and highly heterozygous genome, but has no or limited genomics information to date. The composite linkage map containing markers from both parental linkage maps is composed of 3,745 SNP markers spanning 2,396 cM on 19 linkage groups with a 0.64 cM average resolution. Comparative genomics analyses of the M. sinensis composite linkage map to the genomes of sorghum, maize, rice, and Brachypodium distachyon indicate that sorghum has the closest syntenic relationship to Miscanthus compared to other species. The comparative results revealed that each pair of the 19 M. sinensis linkages aligned to one sorghum chromosome, except for LG8, which mapped to two sorghum chromosomes (4 and 7), presumably due to a chromosome fusion event after genome duplication. The data also revealed several other chromosome rearrangements relative to sorghum, including two telomere-centromere inversions of the sorghum syntenic chromosome 7 in LG8 of M. sinensis and two paracentric inversions of sorghum syntenic chromosome 4 in LG7 and LG8 of M. sinensis. The results clearly demonstrate, for the first time, that the diploid M. sinensis is tetraploid origin consisting of two sub-genomes. This complete and high resolution composite linkage map will not only serve as a useful resource for novel QTL discoveries, but also enable informed deployment of the wealth of existing genomics resources of other species to the improvement of Miscanthus as a high biomass energy crop. In addition, it has utility as a reference for genome sequence assembly for the forthcoming whole genome sequencing of the Miscanthus genus. PMID:22439001

  4. 1989 Walker Branch Watershed Surveying and Mapping Including a Guide to Coordinate Transformation Procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Timmins, S.

    1991-01-01

    Walker Branch Watershed is a forested, research watershed marked throughout by a 264 ft grid that was surveyed in 1967 using the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (X-10) coordinate system. The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) prepared a contour map of the watershed in 1987, and an ARC/INFO{trademark} version of the TVA topographic map with the X-10 grid superimposed has since been used as the primary geographic information system (GIS) data base for the watershed. However, because of inaccuracies observed in mapped locations of some grid markers and permanent research plots, portions of the watershed were resurveyed in 1989 and an extensive investigation of the coordinates used in creating both the TVA map and ARC/INFO data base and of coordinate transformation procedures currently in use on the Oak Ridge Reservation was conducted. They determined that the positional errors resulted from the field orientation of the blazed grid rather than problems in mapmaking. In resurveying the watershed, previously surveyed control points were located or noted as missing, and 25 new control points along the perimeter roads were surveyed. In addition, 67 of 156 grid line intersections (pegs) were physically located and their positions relative to mapped landmarks were recorded. As a result, coordinates for the Walker Branch Watershed grid lines and permanent research plots were revised, and a revised map of the watershed was produced. In conjunction with this work, existing procedures for converting between the local grid systems, Tennessee state plane, and the 1927 and 1983 North American Datums were updated and compiled along with illustrative examples and relevant historical information. Alternative algorithms were developed for several coordinate conversions commonly used on the Oak Ridge Reservation.

  5. Mapping Sensorimotor Sequences to Word Sequences: A Connectionist Model of Language Acquisition and Sentence Generation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takac, Martin; Benuskova, Lubica; Knott, Alistair

    2012-01-01

    In this article we present a neural network model of sentence generation. The network has both technical and conceptual innovations. Its main technical novelty is in its semantic representations: the messages which form the input to the network are structured as sequences, so that message elements are delivered to the network one at a time. Rather…

  6. A physical map of the highly heterozygous Populus genome: integration with the genome sequence and genetic map and analysis of haplotype variation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As part of a larger project to sequence the Populus genome and generate genomic resources for this emerging model tree, we constructed a physical map of the Populus genome, representing one of the first maps of an undomesticated, highly heterozygous plant species. The physical map, consisting of 2,...

  7. Substrate-Driven Mapping of the Degradome by Comparison of Sequence Logos

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Julian E.; von Grafenstein, Susanne; Huber, Roland G.; Kramer, Christian; Liedl, Klaus R.

    2013-01-01

    Sequence logos are frequently used to illustrate substrate preferences and specificity of proteases. Here, we employed the compiled substrates of the MEROPS database to introduce a novel metric for comparison of protease substrate preferences. The constructed similarity matrix of 62 proteases can be used to intuitively visualize similarities in protease substrate readout via principal component analysis and construction of protease specificity trees. Since our new metric is solely based on substrate data, we can engraft the protease tree including proteolytic enzymes of different evolutionary origin. Thereby, our analyses confirm pronounced overlaps in substrate recognition not only between proteases closely related on sequence basis but also between proteolytic enzymes of different evolutionary origin and catalytic type. To illustrate the applicability of our approach we analyze the distribution of targets of small molecules from the ChEMBL database in our substrate-based protease specificity trees. We observe a striking clustering of annotated targets in tree branches even though these grouped targets do not necessarily share similarity on protein sequence level. This highlights the value and applicability of knowledge acquired from peptide substrates in drug design of small molecules, e.g., for the prediction of off-target effects or drug repurposing. Consequently, our similarity metric allows to map the degradome and its associated drug target network via comparison of known substrate peptides. The substrate-driven view of protein-protein interfaces is not limited to the field of proteases but can be applied to any target class where a sufficient amount of known substrate data is available. PMID:24244149

  8. Saturated linkage map construction in Rubus idaeus using genotyping by sequencing and genome-independent imputation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rapid development of highly saturated genetic maps aids molecular breeding, which can accelerate gain per breeding cycle in woody perennial plants such as Rubus idaeus (red raspberry). Recently, robust genotyping methods based on high-throughput sequencing were developed, which provide high marker d...

  9. Mapping sequenced E.coli genes by computer: software, strategies and examples.

    PubMed Central

    Rudd, K E; Miller, W; Werner, C; Ostell, J; Tolstoshev, C; Satterfield, S G

    1991-01-01

    Methods are presented for organizing and integrating DNA sequence data, restriction maps, and genetic maps for the same organism but from a variety of sources (databases, publications, personal communications). Proper software tools are essential for successful organization of such diverse data into an ordered, cohesive body of information, and a suite of novel software to support this endeavor is described. Though these tools automate much of the task, a variety of strategies is needed to cope with recalcitrant cases. We describe such strategies and illustrate their application with numerous examples. These strategies have allowed us to order, analyze, and display over one megabase of E. coli DNA sequence information. The integration task often exposes inconsistencies in the available data, perhaps caused by strain polymorphisms or human oversight, necessitating the application of sound biological judgment. The examples illustrate both the level of expertise required of the database curator and the knowledge gained as apparent inconsistencies are resolved. The software and mapping methods are applicable to the study of any genome for which a high resolution restriction map is available. They were developed to support a weakly coordinated sequencing effort involving many laboratories, but would also be useful for highly orchestrated sequencing projects. PMID:2011534

  10. A physical map of the X chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster: Cosmid contigs and sequence tagged sites

    SciTech Connect

    Madueno, E.; Modolell, J.; Papagiannakis, G.

    1995-04-01

    A physical map of the euchromatic X chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster has been constructed by assembling contiguous arrays of cosmids that were selected by screening a library with DNA isolated from microamplified chromosomal divisions. This map, consisting of 893 cosmids, covers {approximately}64% of the euchromatic part of the chromosome. In addition, 568 sequence tagged sites (STS), in aggregate representing 120 kb of sequenced DNA, were derived from selected cosmids. Most of these STSs, spaced at an average distance of {approximately} 35 kb along the euchromatic region of the chromosome, represent DNA tags that can be used as entry points to the fruitfly genome. Furthermore, 42 genes have been placed on the physical map, either through the hybridization of specific probes to the cosmids or through the fact that they were represented among the STSs. These provide a link between the physical and the genetic maps of D. melanogaster. Nine novel genes have been tentatively identified in Drosophila on the basis of matches between STS sequences and sequences from other species. 32 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. Raman-based system for DNA sequencing-mapping and other separations

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    1994-01-01

    DNA sequencing and mapping are performed by using a Raman spectrometer with a surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate to enhance the Raman signal. A SERS label is attached to a DNA fragment and then analyzed with the Raman spectrometer to identify the DNA fragment according to characteristics of the Raman spectrum generated.

  12. Raman-based system for DNA sequencing-mapping and other separations

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, T.

    1994-04-26

    DNA sequencing and mapping are performed by using a Raman spectrometer with a surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate to enhance the Raman signal. A SERS label is attached to a DNA fragment and then analyzed with the Raman spectrometer to identify the DNA fragment according to characteristics of the Raman spectrum generated. 11 figures.

  13. Rapid restriction mapping of cosmids by sequence-specific triple-helix-mediated affinity capture

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Huamin; Francisco, T.; Smith, L.M.; Guilfoyle, R.A.

    1996-01-15

    A simple and rapid strategy for restriction mapping based on sequence-specific triple-helix affinity capture (TAC) was developed. The strategy was applied to the analysis of cosmid clones by the construction of a new cosmid vector, ScosTriplex-II, containing two different triple-helix-forming sequences flanking the cloning site of the original SuperCos-1 cosmid vector. For restriction mapping, the recombinant cosmid DNA is digested with NotI restriction enzyme or with one of four intron-encoded endonucleases for excision of intact inserts followed by controlled partial digestion with a mapping enzyme used in conjunction with the corresponding methyltransferase. The partial digestion products are combined with biotinylated triple-helix-forming oligonucleotides to form a triple-helical complex. The triple-helix complexes are immobilized on streptavidin-coated magnetic beads, washed, and eluted with pH 9 buffer solution. The fragments are separated and directly sized by agarose gel electrophoresis. Bidirectional maps are obtained simultaneously by binding to the two different triple-helix-forming oligonucleotides. No probe labeling, gel drying, blotting to membranes, hybridization, or autoradiography is necessary. Also, TAC conditions that permit gel-free isolation of the terminal restriction fragments from cosmid inserts were found. These advantages afforded by ScosTriplex-II should facilitate the automation of cosmid restriction site fingerprinting needed for large-scale mapping and sequencing projects. 24 refs., 5 figs.

  14. Computational approach towards promoter sequence comparison via TF mapping using a new distance measure.

    PubMed

    Meera, A; Rangarajan, Lalitha; Bhat, Savithri

    2011-03-01

    We propose a method for identifying transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) in the given promoter sequence and mapping the transcription factors (TFs). The proposed algorithm searches the +1 transcription start site (TSS) for eukaryotic and prokaryotic sequences individually. The algorithm was tested with sequences from both eukaryotes and prokaryotes for at least 9 experimentally verified and validated functional TFs in promoter sequences. The order and type of TF binding to the promoter of genes encoding central metabolic pathway (CMP) enzyme was tabulated. A new similarity measure was devised for scoring the similarity between a pair of promoter sequences based on the number and order of motifs. Further, these were grouped in clusters considering the scores between them. The distance between each of the clusters in individual pathway was calculated and a phylogenetic tree was developed. This method is further applied to other pathways such as lipid and amino acid biosynthesis to retrieve and compare experimentally verified and conserved TFBS. PMID:21369887

  15. Utilizing mapping targets of sequences underrepresented in the reference assembly to reduce false positive alignments

    PubMed Central

    Miga, Karen H.; Eisenhart, Christopher; Kent, W. James

    2015-01-01

    The human reference assembly remains incomplete due to the underrepresentation of repeat-rich sequences that are found within centromeric regions and acrocentric short arms. Although these sequences are marginally represented in the assembly, they are often fully represented in whole-genome short-read datasets and contribute to inappropriate alignments and high read-depth signals that localize to a small number of assembled homologous regions. As a consequence, these regions often provide artifactual peak calls that confound hypothesis testing and large-scale genomic studies. To address this problem, we have constructed mapping targets that represent roughly 8% of the human genome generally omitted from the human reference assembly. By integrating these data into standard mapping and peak-calling pipelines we demonstrate a 10-fold reduction in signals in regions common to the blacklisted region and identify a comprehensive set of regions that exhibit mapping sensitivity with the presence of the repeat-rich targets. PMID:26163063

  16. Rapid fine conformational epitope mapping using comprehensive mutagenesis and deep sequencing.

    PubMed

    Kowalsky, Caitlin A; Faber, Matthew S; Nath, Aritro; Dann, Hailey E; Kelly, Vince W; Liu, Li; Shanker, Purva; Wagner, Ellen K; Maynard, Jennifer A; Chan, Christina; Whitehead, Timothy A

    2015-10-30

    Knowledge of the fine location of neutralizing and non-neutralizing epitopes on human pathogens affords a better understanding of the structural basis of antibody efficacy, which will expedite rational design of vaccines, prophylactics, and therapeutics. However, full utilization of the wealth of information from single cell techniques and antibody repertoire sequencing awaits the development of a high throughput, inexpensive method to map the conformational epitopes for antibody-antigen interactions. Here we show such an approach that combines comprehensive mutagenesis, cell surface display, and DNA deep sequencing. We develop analytical equations to identify epitope positions and show the method effectiveness by mapping the fine epitope for different antibodies targeting TNF, pertussis toxin, and the cancer target TROP2. In all three cases, the experimentally determined conformational epitope was consistent with previous experimental datasets, confirming the reliability of the experimental pipeline. Once the comprehensive library is generated, fine conformational epitope maps can be prepared at a rate of four per day. PMID:26296891

  17. Fine-mapping diabetes-related traits, including insulin resistance, in heterogeneous stock rats.

    PubMed

    Solberg Woods, Leah C; Holl, Katie L; Oreper, Daniel; Xie, Yuying; Tsaih, Shirng-Wern; Valdar, William

    2012-11-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a disease of relative insulin deficiency resulting from both insulin resistance and beta cell failure. We have previously used heterogeneous stock (HS) rats to fine-map a locus for glucose tolerance. We show here that glucose intolerance in the founder strains of the HS colony is mediated by different mechanisms: insulin resistance in WKY and an insulin secretion defect in ACI, and we demonstrate a high degree of variability for measures of insulin resistance and insulin secretion in HS rats. As such, our goal was to use HS rats to fine-map several diabetes-related traits within a region on rat chromosome 1. We measured blood glucose and plasma insulin levels after a glucose tolerance test in 782 male HS rats. Using 97 SSLP markers, we genotyped a 68 Mb region on rat chromosome 1 previously implicated in glucose and insulin regulation. We used linkage disequilibrium mapping by mixed model regression with inferred descent to identify a region from 198.85 to 205.9 that contains one or more quantitative trait loci (QTL) for fasting insulin and a measure of insulin resistance, the quantitative insulin sensitivity check index. This region also encompasses loci identified for fasting glucose and Insulin_AUC (area under the curve). A separate <3 Mb QTL was identified for body weight. Using a novel penalized regression method we then estimated effects of alternative haplotype pairings under each locus. These studies highlight the utility of HS rats for fine-mapping genetic loci involved in the underlying causes of T2D. PMID:22947656

  18. Improving the Mapping of Smith-Waterman Sequence Database Searches onto CUDA-Enabled GPUs

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Liang-Tsung; Wu, Chao-Chin; Lai, Lien-Fu; Li, Yun-Ju

    2015-01-01

    Sequence alignment lies at heart of the bioinformatics. The Smith-Waterman algorithm is one of the key sequence search algorithms and has gained popularity due to improved implementations and rapidly increasing compute power. Recently, the Smith-Waterman algorithm has been successfully mapped onto the emerging general-purpose graphics processing units (GPUs). In this paper, we focused on how to improve the mapping, especially for short query sequences, by better usage of shared memory. We performed and evaluated the proposed method on two different platforms (Tesla C1060 and Tesla K20) and compared it with two classic methods in CUDASW++. Further, the performance on different numbers of threads and blocks has been analyzed. The results showed that the proposed method significantly improves Smith-Waterman algorithm on CUDA-enabled GPUs in proper allocation of block and thread numbers. PMID:26339591

  19. Identification and mapping of paralogous genes on a known genomic DNA sequence.

    PubMed

    Bina, Minou

    2006-01-01

    The completion of whole genome sequencing projects offers the opportunity to examine the organization of genes and the discovery of evolutionarily related genes in a given species. For the beginners in the field, through a specific example, this chapter provides a step-by-step procedure for identifying paralogous genes, using the genome browser at UCSC (http://genome.ucsc.edu/). The example describes identification and mapping in the human genome, the paralogs of TCF12/HTF4. The example identifies TCF3 and TCF4 as paralogs of the TCF12/HTF4 gene. The example also identifies a related sequence, corresponding to a pseudogene, in one of the introns of the JAK2 gene. The procedure described should be applicable to the discovery and creation of maps of paralogous genes in the genomic DNA sequences that are available at the genome browser at UCSC. PMID:16888348

  20. Improving the Mapping of Smith-Waterman Sequence Database Searches onto CUDA-Enabled GPUs.

    PubMed

    Huang, Liang-Tsung; Wu, Chao-Chin; Lai, Lien-Fu; Li, Yun-Ju

    2015-01-01

    Sequence alignment lies at heart of the bioinformatics. The Smith-Waterman algorithm is one of the key sequence search algorithms and has gained popularity due to improved implementations and rapidly increasing compute power. Recently, the Smith-Waterman algorithm has been successfully mapped onto the emerging general-purpose graphics processing units (GPUs). In this paper, we focused on how to improve the mapping, especially for short query sequences, by better usage of shared memory. We performed and evaluated the proposed method on two different platforms (Tesla C1060 and Tesla K20) and compared it with two classic methods in CUDASW++. Further, the performance on different numbers of threads and blocks has been analyzed. The results showed that the proposed method significantly improves Smith-Waterman algorithm on CUDA-enabled GPUs in proper allocation of block and thread numbers. PMID:26339591

  1. SNP identification from RNA sequencing and linkage map construction of rubber tree for anchoring the draft genome.

    PubMed

    Shearman, Jeremy R; Sangsrakru, Duangjai; Jomchai, Nukoon; Ruang-Areerate, Panthita; Sonthirod, Chutima; Naktang, Chaiwat; Theerawattanasuk, Kanikar; Tragoonrung, Somvong; Tangphatsornruang, Sithichoke

    2015-01-01

    Hevea brasiliensis, or rubber tree, is an important crop species that accounts for the majority of natural latex production. The rubber tree nuclear genome consists of 18 chromosomes and is roughly 2.15 Gb. The current rubber tree reference genome assembly consists of 1,150,326 scaffolds ranging from 200 to 531,465 bp and totalling 1.1 Gb. Only 143 scaffolds, totalling 7.6 Mb, have been placed into linkage groups. We have performed RNA-seq on 6 varieties of rubber tree to identify SNPs and InDels and used this information to perform target sequence enrichment and high throughput sequencing to genotype a set of SNPs in 149 rubber tree offspring from a cross between RRIM 600 and RRII 105 rubber tree varieties. We used this information to generate a linkage map allowing for the anchoring of 24,424 contigs from 3,009 scaffolds, totalling 115 Mb or 10.4% of the published sequence, into 18 linkage groups. Each linkage group contains between 319 and 1367 SNPs, or 60 to 194 non-redundant marker positions, and ranges from 156 to 336 cM in length. This linkage map includes 20,143 of the 69,300 predicted genes from rubber tree and will be useful for mapping studies and improving the reference genome assembly. PMID:25831195

  2. Dual-pathway multi-echo sequence for simultaneous frequency and T2 mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Cheng-Chieh; Mei, Chang-Sheng; Duryea, Jeffrey; Chung, Hsiao-Wen; Chao, Tzu-Cheng; Panych, Lawrence P.; Madore, Bruno

    2016-04-01

    Purpose: To present a dual-pathway multi-echo steady state sequence and reconstruction algorithm to capture T2, T2∗ and field map information. Methods: Typically, pulse sequences based on spin echoes are needed for T2 mapping while gradient echoes are needed for field mapping, making it difficult to jointly acquire both types of information. A dual-pathway multi-echo pulse sequence is employed here to generate T2 and field maps from the same acquired data. The approach might be used, for example, to obtain both thermometry and tissue damage information during thermal therapies, or susceptibility and T2 information from a same head scan, or to generate bonus T2 maps during a knee scan. Results: Quantitative T2, T2∗ and field maps were generated in gel phantoms, ex vivo bovine muscle, and twelve volunteers. T2 results were validated against a spin-echo reference standard: A linear regression based on ROI analysis in phantoms provided close agreement (slope/R2 = 0.99/0.998). A pixel-wise in vivo Bland-Altman analysis of R2 = 1/T2 showed a bias of 0.034 Hz (about 0.3%), as averaged over four volunteers. Ex vivo results, with and without motion, suggested that tissue damage detection based on T2 rather than temperature-dose measurements might prove more robust to motion. Conclusion: T2, T2∗ and field maps were obtained simultaneously, from the same datasets, in thermometry, susceptibility-weighted imaging and knee-imaging contexts.

  3. Identification and Mapping of the Edwards Stratigraphic Sequence in the State of Chihuahua Assisted by ten ArcMap Based Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Pina, C.; Granados, A.; Goodell, P.

    2007-05-01

    Edwards Formation is a reef limestone that hosts one of the largest aquifers of the State of Texas. In 2004 the United States and Mexico signed an agreement intended to characterize and identify the shared binational underground resources. Texas Water Development Board Report 360 established for the Edwards Aquifer an area of more than 31,000 km2, half of which is in the State of Coahuila, Mexico (the agreement did not include the State of Chihuahua). This led to the idea that Chihuahua may also have hydrologic potential in the Edwards equivalent, where numerous large cavern systems are already recognized (Naica's Sword Cavern, and the Coyame, Nombre de Dios and Bocagrande Caverns). The objective of this study is to establish the existence, in the State of Chihuahua, of the stratigraphic sequence and geohydrologic properties such as faulting, sinkholes, and springs, within the Edwards equivalent. The Consejo de Recursos Minerales geologic map, INEGI's hydrologic study, petroleum, mining and hydrogeology studies of Chihuahua, and many others, constitute the database used. ArcMap is used to define the geologic framework and construct different thematic layers (structural, lithological, hydrological) that would aid in the identification of the stratigraphic sequence. The results show that all the Edwards Stratigraphic Sequence (ESS) exists in Chihuahua; that there are isolated areas of groundwater production in eastern Chihuahua possibly from ESS but this is not well established. Overall the ESS presents an unusual opportunity as a potentially productive aquifer in the State of Chihuahua.

  4. Phase-corrected Bipolar Gradients in Multiecho Gradient-echo Sequences for Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jianqi; Chang, Shixin; Liu, Tian; Jiang, Hongwei; Dong, Fang; Pei, Mengchao; Wang, Qianfeng; Wang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Object The large echo spacing of unipolar readout gradients in current multiecho gradient-echo sequences for mapping fields in quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) can be reduced using bipolar readout gradients to improve acquisition efficiency. Materials and Methods Phase discrepancies between odd and even echoes in the bipolar readout gradients caused by non-ideal gradient behaviors were measured, modeled as polynomials in space and corrected for accordingly in field mapping. The bipolar approach for multiecho gradient-echo field mapping was compared with the unipolar approach for QSM. Results The odd-even-echo phase discrepancies were approximately constant along the phase encoding direction and linear along the readout and slice-selection directions. A simple linear phase correction in all three spatial directions was shown to enable accurate QSM in the human brain using a bipolar multiecho GRE sequence. Bipolar multiecho acquisition provides QSM in good quantitative agreement with unipolar acquisition while also reducing noise. Conclusion With a linear phase correction between odd-even echoes, bipolar readout gradients can be used in multiecho gradient-echo sequences for QSM. PMID:25408108

  5. Mapping wide row crops with video sequences acquired from a tractor moving at treatment speed.

    PubMed

    Sainz-Costa, Nadir; Ribeiro, Angela; Burgos-Artizzu, Xavier P; Guijarro, María; Pajares, Gonzalo

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a mapping method for wide row crop fields. The resulting map shows the crop rows and weeds present in the inter-row spacing. Because field videos are acquired with a camera mounted on top of an agricultural vehicle, a method for image sequence stabilization was needed and consequently designed and developed. The proposed stabilization method uses the centers of some crop rows in the image sequence as features to be tracked, which compensates for the lateral movement (sway) of the camera and leaves the pitch unchanged. A region of interest is selected using the tracked features, and an inverse perspective technique transforms the selected region into a bird's-eye view that is centered on the image and that enables map generation. The algorithm developed has been tested on several video sequences of different fields recorded at different times and under different lighting conditions, with good initial results. Indeed, lateral displacements of up to 66% of the inter-row spacing were suppressed through the stabilization process, and crop rows in the resulting maps appear straight. PMID:22164003

  6. Mapping Wide Row Crops with Video Sequences Acquired from a Tractor Moving at Treatment Speed

    PubMed Central

    Sainz-Costa, Nadir; Ribeiro, Angela; Burgos-Artizzu, Xavier P.; Guijarro, María; Pajares, Gonzalo

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a mapping method for wide row crop fields. The resulting map shows the crop rows and weeds present in the inter-row spacing. Because field videos are acquired with a camera mounted on top of an agricultural vehicle, a method for image sequence stabilization was needed and consequently designed and developed. The proposed stabilization method uses the centers of some crop rows in the image sequence as features to be tracked, which compensates for the lateral movement (sway) of the camera and leaves the pitch unchanged. A region of interest is selected using the tracked features, and an inverse perspective technique transforms the selected region into a bird’s-eye view that is centered on the image and that enables map generation. The algorithm developed has been tested on several video sequences of different fields recorded at different times and under different lighting conditions, with good initial results. Indeed, lateral displacements of up to 66% of the inter-row spacing were suppressed through the stabilization process, and crop rows in the resulting maps appear straight. PMID:22164003

  7. Genome Assembly Improvement and Mapping Convergently Evolved Skeletal Traits in Sticklebacks with Genotyping-by-Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Glazer, Andrew M.; Killingbeck, Emily E.; Mitros, Therese; Rokhsar, Daniel S.; Miller, Craig T.

    2015-01-01

    Marine populations of the threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) have repeatedly colonized and rapidly adapted to freshwater habitats, providing a powerful system to map the genetic architecture of evolved traits. Here, we developed and applied a binned genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) method to build dense genome-wide linkage maps of sticklebacks using two large marine by freshwater F2 crosses of more than 350 fish each. The resulting linkage maps significantly improve the genome assembly by anchoring 78 new scaffolds to chromosomes, reorienting 40 scaffolds, and rearranging scaffolds in 4 locations. In the revised genome assembly, 94.6% of the assembly was anchored to a chromosome. To assess linkage map quality, we mapped quantitative trait loci (QTL) controlling lateral plate number, which mapped as expected to a 200-kb genomic region containing Ectodysplasin, as well as a chromosome 7 QTL overlapping a previously identified modifier QTL. Finally, we mapped eight QTL controlling convergently evolved reductions in gill raker length in the two crosses, which revealed that this classic adaptive trait has a surprisingly modular and nonparallel genetic basis. PMID:26044731

  8. Nested Association Mapping of Stem Rust Resistance in Wheat Using Genotyping by Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Rouse, Matthew N.; Tsilo, Toi J.; Macharia, Godwin K.; Bhavani, Sridhar; Jin, Yue; Anderson, James A.

    2016-01-01

    We combined the recently developed genotyping by sequencing (GBS) method with joint mapping (also known as nested association mapping) to dissect and understand the genetic architecture controlling stem rust resistance in wheat (Triticum aestivum). Ten stem rust resistant wheat varieties were crossed to the susceptible line LMPG-6 to generate F6 recombinant inbred lines. The recombinant inbred line populations were phenotyped in Kenya, South Africa, and St. Paul, Minnesota, USA. By joint mapping of the 10 populations, we identified 59 minor and medium-effect QTL (explained phenotypic variance range of 1% – 20%) on 20 chromosomes that contributed towards adult plant resistance to North American Pgt races as well as the highly virulent Ug99 race group. Fifteen of the 59 QTL were detected in multiple environments. No epistatic relationship was detected among the QTL. While these numerous small- to medium-effect QTL are shared among the families, the founder parents were found to have different allelic effects for the QTL. Fourteen QTL identified by joint mapping were also detected in single-population mapping. As these QTL were mapped using SNP markers with known locations on the physical chromosomes, the genomic regions identified with QTL could be explored more in depth to discover candidate genes for stem rust resistance. The use of GBS-derived de novo SNPs in mapping resistance to stem rust shown in this study could be used as a model to conduct similar marker-trait association studies in other plant species. PMID:27186883

  9. High-resolution genetic mapping of maize pan-genome sequence anchors.

    PubMed

    Lu, Fei; Romay, Maria C; Glaubitz, Jeffrey C; Bradbury, Peter J; Elshire, Robert J; Wang, Tianyu; Li, Yu; Li, Yongxiang; Semagn, Kassa; Zhang, Xuecai; Hernandez, Alvaro G; Mikel, Mark A; Soifer, Ilya; Barad, Omer; Buckler, Edward S

    2015-01-01

    In addition to single-nucleotide polymorphisms, structural variation is abundant in many plant genomes. The structural variation across a species can be represented by a 'pan-genome', which is essential to fully understand the genetic control of phenotypes. However, the pan-genome's complexity hinders its accurate assembly via sequence alignment. Here we demonstrate an approach to facilitate pan-genome construction in maize. By performing 18 trillion association tests we map 26 million tags generated by reduced representation sequencing of 14,129 maize inbred lines. Using machine-learning models we select 4.4 million accurately mapped tags as sequence anchors, 1.1 million of which are presence/absence variations. Structural variations exhibit enriched association with phenotypic traits, indicating that it is a significant source of adaptive variation in maize. The ability to efficiently map ultrahigh-density pan-genome sequence anchors enables fine characterization of structural variation and will advance both genetic research and breeding in many crops. PMID:25881062

  10. Recombination mapping using Boolean logic and high-density SNP genotyping for exome sequence filtering

    PubMed Central

    Markello, Thomas C.; Han, Ted; Carlson-Donohoe, Hannah; Ahaghotu, Chidi; Harper, Ursula; Jones, MaryPat; Chandrasekharappa, Settara; Anikster, Yair; Adams, David R.; Gahl, William A.; Boerkoel, Cornelius F.

    2012-01-01

    Whole genome sequence data for small pedigrees has been shown to provide sufficient information to resolve detailed haplotypes in small pedigrees. Using such information, recombinations can be mapped onto chromosomes, compared with the segregation of a disease of interest and used to filter genome sequence variants. We now show that relatively inexpensive SNP array data from small pedigrees can be used in a similar manner to provide a means of identifying regions of interest in exome sequencing projects. We demonstrate that in those situations where one can assume complete penetrance and parental DNA is available, SNP recombination mapping using Boolean logic identifies chromosomal regions identical to those detected by multipoint linkage using microsatellites but with much less computation. We further show that this approach is successful because the probability of a double crossover between informative SNP loci is negligible. Our observations provide a rationale for using SNP arrays and recombination mapping as a rapid and cost-effective means of incorporating chromosome segregation information into exome sequencing projects intended for disease-gene identification. PMID:22264778

  11. TCGA's Pan-Cancer Efforts and Expansion to Include Whole Genome Sequence - TCGA

    Cancer.gov

    Carolyn Hutter, Ph.D., Program Director of NHGRI's Division of Genomic Medicine, discusses the expansion of TCGA's Pan-Cancer efforts to include the Pan-Cancer Analysis of Whole Genomes (PAWG) project.

  12. A framework radiation hybrid map of buffalo chromosome 1 ordering scaffolds from buffalo genome sequence assembly.

    PubMed

    Stafuzza, N B; Naressi, B C M; Yang, E; Cai, J J; Amaral-Trusty, M E J

    2015-01-01

    River buffalo chromosome 1 (BBU1) is a sub-metacentric chromosome homologous to bovine chromosomes 1 and 27. In this study, we constructed a new framework radiation hybrid (RH) map from BBU1 using BBURH5000 panel adding nine new genes (ADRB3, ATP2C1, COPB2, CRYGS, P2RY1, SLC5A3, SLC20A2, SST, and ZDHHC2) and one microsatellite (CSSM043) to the set of markers previously mapped on BBU1. The new framework RH map of BBU1 contained 141 markers (55 genes, 2 ESTs, 10 microsatellites, and 74 SNPs) distributed within one linkage group spanning 2832.62 centirays. Comparison of the RH map to sequences from bovine chromosomes 1 and 27 revealed an inversion close to the telomeric region. In addition, we ordered a set of 34 scaffolds from the buffalo genome assembly UMD_CASPUR_WB_2.0. The RH map could provide a valuable tool to order scaffolds from the buffalo genome sequence, contributing to its annotation. PMID:26535622

  13. Comparison and quantitative verification of mapping algorithms for whole-genome bisulfite sequencing.

    PubMed

    Kunde-Ramamoorthy, Govindarajan; Coarfa, Cristian; Laritsky, Eleonora; Kessler, Noah J; Harris, R Alan; Xu, Mingchu; Chen, Rui; Shen, Lanlan; Milosavljevic, Aleksandar; Waterland, Robert A

    2014-04-01

    Coupling bisulfite conversion with next-generation sequencing (Bisulfite-seq) enables genome-wide measurement of DNA methylation, but poses unique challenges for mapping. However, despite a proliferation of Bisulfite-seq mapping tools, no systematic comparison of their genomic coverage and quantitative accuracy has been reported. We sequenced bisulfite-converted DNA from two tissues from each of two healthy human adults and systematically compared five widely used Bisulfite-seq mapping algorithms: Bismark, BSMAP, Pash, BatMeth and BS Seeker. We evaluated their computational speed and genomic coverage and verified their percentage methylation estimates. With the exception of BatMeth, all mappers covered >70% of CpG sites genome-wide and yielded highly concordant estimates of percentage methylation (r(2) ≥ 0.95). Fourfold variation in mapping time was found between BSMAP (fastest) and Pash (slowest). In each library, 8-12% of genomic regions covered by Bismark and Pash were not covered by BSMAP. An experiment using simulated reads confirmed that Pash has an exceptional ability to uniquely map reads in genomic regions of structural variation. Independent verification by bisulfite pyrosequencing generally confirmed the percentage methylation estimates by the mappers. Of these algorithms, Bismark provides an attractive combination of processing speed, genomic coverage and quantitative accuracy, whereas Pash offers considerably higher genomic coverage. PMID:24391148

  14. Comparison and quantitative verification of mapping algorithms for whole-genome bisulfite sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Kunde-Ramamoorthy, Govindarajan; Coarfa, Cristian; Laritsky, Eleonora; Kessler, Noah J.; Harris, R. Alan; Xu, Mingchu; Chen, Rui; Shen, Lanlan; Milosavljevic, Aleksandar; Waterland, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Coupling bisulfite conversion with next-generation sequencing (Bisulfite-seq) enables genome-wide measurement of DNA methylation, but poses unique challenges for mapping. However, despite a proliferation of Bisulfite-seq mapping tools, no systematic comparison of their genomic coverage and quantitative accuracy has been reported. We sequenced bisulfite-converted DNA from two tissues from each of two healthy human adults and systematically compared five widely used Bisulfite-seq mapping algorithms: Bismark, BSMAP, Pash, BatMeth and BS Seeker. We evaluated their computational speed and genomic coverage and verified their percentage methylation estimates. With the exception of BatMeth, all mappers covered >70% of CpG sites genome-wide and yielded highly concordant estimates of percentage methylation (r2 ≥ 0.95). Fourfold variation in mapping time was found between BSMAP (fastest) and Pash (slowest). In each library, 8–12% of genomic regions covered by Bismark and Pash were not covered by BSMAP. An experiment using simulated reads confirmed that Pash has an exceptional ability to uniquely map reads in genomic regions of structural variation. Independent verification by bisulfite pyrosequencing generally confirmed the percentage methylation estimates by the mappers. Of these algorithms, Bismark provides an attractive combination of processing speed, genomic coverage and quantitative accuracy, whereas Pash offers considerably higher genomic coverage. PMID:24391148

  15. A high-density linkage map for Astyanax mexicanus using genotyping-by-sequencing technology.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Brian M; Onusko, Samuel W; Gross, Joshua B

    2015-02-01

    The Mexican tetra, Astyanax mexicanus, is a unique model system consisting of cave-adapted and surface-dwelling morphotypes that diverged >1 million years (My) ago. This remarkable natural experiment has enabled powerful genetic analyses of cave adaptation. Here, we describe the application of next-generation sequencing technology to the creation of a high-density linkage map. Our map comprises more than 2200 markers populating 25 linkage groups constructed from genotypic data generated from a single genotyping-by-sequencing project. We leveraged emergent genomic and transcriptomic resources to anchor hundreds of anonymous Astyanax markers to the genome of the zebrafish (Danio rerio), the most closely related model organism to our study species. This facilitated the identification of 784 distinct connections between our linkage map and the Danio rerio genome, highlighting several regions of conserved genomic architecture between the two species despite ~150 My of divergence. Using a Mendelian cave-associated trait as a proof-of-principle, we successfully recovered the genomic position of the albinism locus near the gene Oca2. Further, our map successfully informed the positions of unplaced Astyanax genomic scaffolds within particular linkage groups. This ability to identify the relative location, orientation, and linear order of unaligned genomic scaffolds will facilitate ongoing efforts to improve on the current early draft and assemble future versions of the Astyanax physical genome. Moreover, this improved linkage map will enable higher-resolution genetic analyses and catalyze the discovery of the genetic basis for cave-associated phenotypes. PMID:25520037

  16. Geologic map of the southern Funeral Mountains including nearby groundwater discharge sites in Death Valley National Park, California and Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fridrich, C.J.; Thompson, R.A.; Slate, J.L.; Berry, M.E.; Machette, M.N.

    2012-01-01

    This 1:50,000-scale geologic map covers the southern part of the Funeral Mountains, and adjoining parts of four structural basins—Furnace Creek, Amargosa Valley, Opera House, and central Death Valley—in California and Nevada. It extends over three full 7.5-minute quadrangles, and parts of eleven others—an area of about 1,000 square kilometers (km2). The boundaries of this map were drawn to include all of the known proximal hydrogeologic features that may affect the flow of groundwater that discharges from springs of the Furnace Creek basin, in the west-central part of the map. These springs provide the main potable water supply for Death Valley National Park. Major hydrogeologic features shown on this map include: (1) springs of the Furnace Creek basin, (2) a large Pleistocene groundwater discharge mound in the northeastern part of the map, (3) the exposed extent of limestones and dolomites that constitute the Paleozoic carbonate aquifer, and (4) the exposed extent of the alluvial conglomerates that constitute the Funeral Formation aquifer.

  17. A Guide to Films, Filmstrips, Maps and Globes, Records on Asia. [and] Supplement, Including a New Section on Slides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Violet M., Comp.; And Others

    This third edition bibliography identifies and annotates selected films, filmstrips, maps and globes, and records which will contribute to increased knowledge and understanding of Asian peoples and cultures. (Asia is defined as including all countries from Afghanistan to Japan). A separate supplement, designed to be used with the third edition,…

  18. The reduced mycorrhizal colonisation (rmc) mutation of tomato disrupts five gene sequences including the CYCLOPS/IPD3 homologue.

    PubMed

    Larkan, Nicholas J; Ruzicka, Dan R; Edmonds-Tibbett, Tamara; Durkin, Jonathan M H; Jackson, Louise E; Smith, F Andrew; Schachtman, Daniel P; Smith, Sally E; Barker, Susan J

    2013-10-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis in vascular plant roots is an ancient mutualistic interaction that evolved with land plants. More recently evolved root mutualisms have recruited components of the AM signalling pathway as identified with molecular approaches in model legume research. Earlier we reported that the reduced mycorrhizal colonisation (rmc) mutation of tomato mapped to chromosome 8. Here we report additional functional characterisation of the rmc mutation using genotype grafts and proteomic and transcriptomic analyses. Our results led to identification of the precise genome location of the Rmc locus from which we identified the mutation by sequencing. The rmc phenotype results from a deletion that disrupts five predicted gene sequences, one of which has close sequence match to the CYCLOPS/IPD3 gene identified in legumes as an essential intracellular regulator of both AM and rhizobial symbioses. Identification of two other genes not located at the rmc locus but with altered expression in the rmc genotype is also described. Possible roles of the other four disrupted genes in the deleted region are discussed. Our results support the identification of CYCLOPS/IPD3 in legumes and rice as a key gene required for AM symbiosis. The extensive characterisation of rmc in comparison with its 'parent' 76R, which has a normal mycorrhizal phenotype, has validated these lines as an important comparative model for glasshouse and field studies of AM and non-mycorrhizal plants with respect to plant competition and microbial interactions with vascular plant roots. PMID:23572326

  19. Genome Sequencing of Four Strains of Rickettsia prowazekii, the Causative Agent of Epidemic Typhus, Including One Flying Squirrel Isolate.

    PubMed

    Bishop-Lilly, Kimberly A; Ge, Hong; Butani, Amy; Osborne, Brian; Verratti, Kathleen; Mokashi, Vishwesh; Nagarajan, Niranjan; Pop, Mihai; Read, Timothy D; Richards, Allen L

    2013-01-01

    Rickettsia prowazekii is a notable intracellular pathogen, the agent of epidemic typhus, and a potential biothreat agent. We present here whole-genome sequence data for four strains of R. prowazekii, including one from a flying squirrel. PMID:23814035

  20. A new technique for selective identification and mapping of enhancers within long genomic sequences.

    PubMed

    Chernov, Igor; Stukacheva, Elena; Akopov, Sergey; Didych, Dmitry; Nikolaev, Lev; Sverdlov, Eugene

    2008-05-01

    We report a new experimental method of direct selection, identification, and mapping of potential enhancer sequences within extended stretches of genomic DNA. The method allows simultaneous cloning of a quantity of sequences instead of tedious screening of the separate ones, thus providing a robust and high-throughput approach to the mapping of enhancers. The selection procedure is based on the ability of such sequences to activate a minimal promoter that drives expression of a selective gene. To this end a mixture of short DNA fragments derived from the segment of interest was cloned in a retroviral vector containing the neomycin phosphotransferase II gene under control of a cytomegalovirus (CMV) minimal promoter. The pool of retroviruses obtained was used to infect HeLa cells and then to select neomycin-resistant colonies containing constructs with enhancer-like sequences. The pool of the genomic fragments was rescued by PCR and cloned, forming a library of the potential enhancers. Fifteen enhancer-like fragments were selected from 1-Mb human genome locus, and enhancer activity of 13 of them was verified in a transient transfection reporter gene assay. The sequences selected were found to be predominantly located near 5' regions of genes or within gene introns. PMID:18476831

  1. A genetic map of melon highly enriched with fruit quality QTLs and EST markers, including sugar and carotenoid metabolism genes.

    PubMed

    Harel-Beja, R; Tzuri, G; Portnoy, V; Lotan-Pompan, M; Lev, S; Cohen, S; Dai, N; Yeselson, L; Meir, A; Libhaber, S E; Avisar, E; Melame, T; van Koert, P; Verbakel, H; Hofstede, R; Volpin, H; Oliver, M; Fougedoire, A; Stalh, C; Fauve, J; Copes, B; Fei, Z; Giovannoni, J; Ori, N; Lewinsohn, E; Sherman, A; Burger, J; Tadmor, Y; Schaffer, A A; Katzir, N

    2010-08-01

    A genetic map of melon enriched for fruit traits was constructed, using a recombinant inbred (RI) population developed from a cross between representatives of the two subspecies of Cucumis melo L.: PI 414723 (subspecies agrestis) and 'Dulce' (subspecies melo). Phenotyping of 99 RI lines was conducted over three seasons in two locations in Israel and the US. The map includes 668 DNA markers (386 SSRs, 76 SNPs, six INDELs and 200 AFLPs), of which 160 were newly developed from fruit ESTs. These ESTs include candidate genes encoding for enzymes of sugar and carotenoid metabolic pathways that were cloned from melon cDNA or identified through mining of the International Cucurbit Genomics Initiative database (http://www.icugi.org/). The map covers 1,222 cM with an average of 2.672 cM between markers. In addition, a skeleton physical map was initiated and 29 melon BACs harboring fruit ESTs were localized to the 12 linkage groups of the map. Altogether, 44 fruit QTLs were identified: 25 confirming QTLs described using other populations and 19 newly described QTLs. The map includes QTLs for fruit sugar content, particularly sucrose, the major sugar affecting sweetness in melon fruit. Six QTLs interacting in an additive manner account for nearly all the difference in sugar content between the two genotypes. Three QTLs for fruit flesh color and carotenoid content were identified. Interestingly, no clear colocalization of QTLs for either sugar or carotenoid content was observed with over 40 genes encoding for enzymes involved in their metabolism. The RI population described here provides a useful resource for further genomics and metabolomics studies in melon, as well as useful markers for breeding for fruit quality. PMID:20401460

  2. Heterozygous Mapping Strategy (HetMappS) for High Resolution Genotyping-By-Sequencing Markers: A Case Study in Grapevine

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Minghui; Londo, Jason P.; Acharya, Charlotte B.; Mitchell, Sharon E.; Sun, Qi; Reisch, Bruce; Cadle-Davidson, Lance

    2015-01-01

    Genotyping by sequencing (GBS) provides opportunities to generate high-resolution genetic maps at a low genotyping cost, but for highly heterozygous species, missing data and heterozygote undercalling complicate the creation of GBS genetic maps. To overcome these issues, we developed a publicly available, modular approach called HetMappS, which functions independently of parental genotypes and corrects for genotyping errors associated with heterozygosity. For linkage group formation, HetMappS includes both a reference-guided synteny pipeline and a reference-independent de novo pipeline. The de novo pipeline can be utilized for under-characterized or high diversity families that lack an appropriate reference. We applied both HetMappS pipelines in five half-sib F1 families involving genetically diverse Vitis spp. Starting with at least 116,466 putative SNPs per family, the HetMappS pipelines identified 10,440 to 17,267 phased pseudo-testcross (Pt) markers and generated high-confidence maps. Pt marker density exceeded crossover resolution in all cases; up to 5,560 non-redundant markers were used to generate parental maps ranging from 1,047 cM to 1,696 cM. The number of markers used was strongly correlated with family size in both de novo and synteny maps (r = 0.92 and 0.91, respectively). Comparisons between allele and tag frequencies suggested that many markers were in tandem repeats and mapped as single loci, while markers in regions of more than two repeats were removed during map curation. Both pipelines generated similar genetic maps, and genetic order was strongly correlated with the reference genome physical order in all cases. Independently created genetic maps from shared parents exhibited nearly identical results. Flower sex was mapped in three families and correctly localized to the known sex locus in all cases. The HetMappS pipeline could have wide application for genetic mapping in highly heterozygous species, and its modularity provides opportunities to

  3. Using genic sequence capture in combination with a syntenic pseudo genome to map a deletion mutant in a wheat species.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, Laura-Jayne; Gawroński, Piotr; Olohan, Lisa; Schnurbusch, Thorsten; Hall, Neil; Hall, Anthony

    2014-12-01

    Mapping-by-sequencing analyses have largely required a complete reference sequence and employed whole genome re-sequencing. In species such as wheat, no finished genome reference sequence is available. Additionally, because of its large genome size (17 Gb), re-sequencing at sufficient depth of coverage is not practical. Here, we extend the utility of mapping by sequencing, developing a bespoke pipeline and algorithm to map an early-flowering locus in einkorn wheat (Triticum monococcum L.) that is closely related to the bread wheat genome A progenitor. We have developed a genomic enrichment approach using the gene-rich regions of hexaploid bread wheat to design a 110-Mbp NimbleGen SeqCap EZ in solution capture probe set, representing the majority of genes in wheat. Here, we use the capture probe set to enrich and sequence an F2 mapping population of the mutant. The mutant locus was identified in T. monococcum, which lacks a complete genome reference sequence, by mapping the enriched data set onto pseudo-chromosomes derived from the capture probe target sequence, with a long-range order of genes based on synteny of wheat with Brachypodium distachyon. Using this approach we are able to map the region and identify a set of deleted genes within the interval. PMID:25205592

  4. High-throughput sequencing for 1-methyladenosine (m(1)A) mapping in RNA.

    PubMed

    Tserovski, Lyudmil; Marchand, Virginie; Hauenschild, Ralf; Blanloeil-Oillo, Florence; Helm, Mark; Motorin, Yuri

    2016-09-01

    Detection and mapping of modified nucleotides in RNAs is a difficult and laborious task. Several physico-chemical approaches based on differential properties of modified nucleotides can be used, however, most of these methods do not allow high-throughput analysis. Here we describe in details a method for mapping of rather common 1-methyladenosine (m(1)A) residues using high-throughput next generation sequencing (NGS). Since m(1)A residues block primer extension during reverse transcription (RT), the accumulation of abortive products as well as the nucleotide misincorporation can be detected in the sequencing data. The described library preparation protocol allows to capture both types of cDNA products essential for further bioinformatic analysis. We demonstrate that m(1)A residues produce characteristic arrest and mismatch rates and combination of both can be used for their detection as well as for discrimination of m(1)A from other modified A residues present in RNAs. PMID:26922842

  5. [Identification and mapping of cis-regulatory elements within long genomic sequences].

    PubMed

    Akopov, S B; Chernov, I P; Vetchinova, A S; Bulanenkova, S S; Nikolaev, L G

    2007-01-01

    The publication of the human and other metazoan genome sequences opened up the possibility for mapping and analysis of genomic regulatory elements. Unfortunately, experimental data on genomic positions of such sequences as enhancers, silencers, insulators, transcription terminators, and replication origins are very limited, especially at the whole genome level. As most genomic regulatory elements (e.g., enhancers) are generally gene-, tissue-, or cell-specific, the prediction of these elements in silico is often ambiguous. Therefore, the development of high-throughput experimental approaches for identification and mapping of genomic functional elements is highly desirable. In this review we discuss novel approaches to high-throughput experimental identification of mammalian genomes cis-regulatory elements which is a necessary step toward the complete genome annotation. PMID:18240562

  6. How children aged seven to twelve organize the opening sequence in a map task.

    PubMed

    Filipi, Anna

    2016-07-01

    Using the methods of conversation analysis, the opening sequences of a map task in the interactions of sixteen children aged seven to twelve were analyzed. The analytical concerns driving the study were who started, how they started, and how children dealt with differential access to information and the identification of phases within the opening. It was found that all participants oriented to the instruction-giver as the one to start, even when the information-follower commenced the task. With respect to how to start, the older children produced a question and answer sequence or a try-mark to establish a common starting point. Five of the eight younger children inferred a common starting point on the map. Three recurring phases were identified: readiness to begin established through a discourse marker, location of the starting point, and actual instruction. The findings are discussed with reference to the importance of interaction in referential spatial tasks. PMID:26144557

  7. Bacterial interspersed mosaic elements (BIMEs) are a major source of sequence polymorphism in Escherichia coli intergenic regions including specific associations with a new insertion sequence.

    PubMed

    Bachellier, S; Clément, J M; Hofnung, M; Gilson, E

    1997-03-01

    A significant fraction of Escherichia coli intergenic DNA sequences is composed of two families of repeated bacterial interspersed mosaic elements (BIME-1 and BIME-2). In this study, we determined the sequence organization of six intergenic regions in 51 E. coli and Shigella natural isolates. Each region contains a BIME in E. coli K-12. We found that multiple sequence variations are located within or near these BIMEs in the different bacteria. Events included excisions of a whole BIME-1, expansion/deletion within a BIME-2 and insertions of non-BIME sequences like the boxC repeat or a new IS element, named IS 1397. Remarkably, 14 out of IS 1397 integration sites correspond to a BIME sequence, strongly suggesting that this IS element is specifically associated with BIMEs, and thus inserts only in extragenic regions. Unlike BIMEs, IS 1397 is not detected in all E. coli isolates. Possible relationships between the presence of this IS element and the evolution of BIMEs are discussed. PMID:9055066

  8. Quantitative Trait Locus Mapping and Candidate Gene Analysis for Plant Architecture Traits Using Whole Genome Re-Sequencing in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Jung-Hyun; Yang, Hyun-Jung; Jung, Ki-Hong; Yoo, Soo-Cheul; Paek, Nam-Chon

    2014-01-01

    Plant breeders have focused on improving plant architecture as an effective means to increase crop yield. Here, we identify the main-effect quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for plant shape-related traits in rice (Oryza sativa) and find candidate genes by applying whole genome re-sequencing of two parental cultivars using next-generation sequencing. To identify QTLs influencing plant shape, we analyzed six traits: plant height, tiller number, panicle diameter, panicle length, flag leaf length, and flag leaf width. We performed QTL analysis with 178 F7 recombinant in-bred lines (RILs) from a cross of japonica rice line ‘SNUSG1’ and indica rice line ‘Milyang23’. Using 131 molecular markers, including 28 insertion/deletion markers, we identified 11 main- and 16 minor-effect QTLs for the six traits with a threshold LOD value > 2.8. Our sequence analysis identified fifty-four candidate genes for the main-effect QTLs. By further comparison of coding sequences and meta-expression profiles between japonica and indica rice varieties, we finally chose 15 strong candidate genes for the 11 main-effect QTLs. Our study shows that the whole-genome sequence data substantially enhanced the efficiency of polymorphic marker development for QTL fine-mapping and the identification of possible candidate genes. This yields useful genetic resources for breeding high-yielding rice cultivars with improved plant architecture. PMID:24599000

  9. Genetic Mapping and Exome Sequencing Identify Variants Associated with Five Novel Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Puffenberger, Erik G.; Jinks, Robert N.; Sougnez, Carrie; Cibulskis, Kristian; Willert, Rebecca A.; Achilly, Nathan P.; Cassidy, Ryan P.; Fiorentini, Christopher J.; Heiken, Kory F.; Lawrence, Johnny J.; Mahoney, Molly H.; Miller, Christopher J.; Nair, Devika T.; Politi, Kristin A.; Worcester, Kimberly N.; Setton, Roni A.; DiPiazza, Rosa; Sherman, Eric A.; Eastman, James T.; Francklyn, Christopher; Robey-Bond, Susan; Rider, Nicholas L.; Gabriel, Stacey; Morton, D. Holmes; Strauss, Kevin A.

    2012-01-01

    The Clinic for Special Children (CSC) has integrated biochemical and molecular methods into a rural pediatric practice serving Old Order Amish and Mennonite (Plain) children. Among the Plain people, we have used single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) microarrays to genetically map recessive disorders to large autozygous haplotype blocks (mean = 4.4 Mb) that contain many genes (mean = 79). For some, uninformative mapping or large gene lists preclude disease-gene identification by Sanger sequencing. Seven such conditions were selected for exome sequencing at the Broad Institute; all had been previously mapped at the CSC using low density SNP microarrays coupled with autozygosity and linkage analyses. Using between 1 and 5 patient samples per disorder, we identified sequence variants in the known disease-causing genes SLC6A3 and FLVCR1, and present evidence to strongly support the pathogenicity of variants identified in TUBGCP6, BRAT1, SNIP1, CRADD, and HARS. Our results reveal the power of coupling new genotyping technologies to population-specific genetic knowledge and robust clinical data. PMID:22279524

  10. HomozygosityMapper2012--bridging the gap between homozygosity mapping and deep sequencing.

    PubMed

    Seelow, Dominik; Schuelke, Markus

    2012-07-01

    Homozygosity mapping is a common method to map recessive traits in consanguineous families. To facilitate these analyses, we have developed HomozygosityMapper, a web-based approach to homozygosity mapping. HomozygosityMapper allows researchers to directly upload the genotype files produced by the major genotyping platforms as well as deep sequencing data. It detects stretches of homozygosity shared by the affected individuals and displays them graphically. Users can interactively inspect the underlying genotypes, manually refine these regions and eventually submit them to our candidate gene search engine GeneDistiller to identify the most promising candidate genes. Here, we present the new version of HomozygosityMapper. The most striking new feature is the support of Next Generation Sequencing *.vcf files as input. Upon users' requests, we have implemented the analysis of common experimental rodents as well as of important farm animals. Furthermore, we have extended the options for single families and loss of heterozygosity studies. Another new feature is the export of *.bed files for targeted enrichment of the potential disease regions for deep sequencing strategies. HomozygosityMapper also generates files for conventional linkage analyses which are already restricted to the possible disease regions, hence superseding CPU-intensive genome-wide analyses. HomozygosityMapper is freely available at http://www.homozygositymapper.org/. PMID:22669902

  11. Constructing a Genome-Wide LD Map of Wild A. gambiae Using Next-Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaohong; Afrane, Yaw A.; Yan, Guiyun; Li, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Anopheles gambiae is the major malaria vector in Africa. Examining the molecular basis of A. gambiae traits requires knowledge of both genetic variation and genome-wide linkage disequilibrium (LD) map of wild A. gambiae populations from malaria-endemic areas. We sequenced the genomes of nine wild A. gambiae mosquitoes individually using next-generation sequencing technologies and detected 2,219,815 common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), 88% of which are novel. SNPs are not evenly distributed across A. gambiae chromosomes. The low SNP-frequency regions overlay heterochromatin and chromosome inversion domains, consistent with the lower recombinant rates at these regions. Nearly one million SNPs that were genotyped correctly in all individual mosquitoes with 99.6% confidence were extracted from these high-throughput sequencing data. Based on these SNP genotypes, we constructed a genome-wide LD map for wild A. gambiae from malaria-endemic areas in Kenya and made it available through a public Website. The average size of LD blocks is less than 40 bp, and several large LD blocks were also discovered clustered around the para gene, which is consistent with the effect of insecticide selective sweeps. The SNPs and the LD map will be valuable resources for scientific communities to dissect the A. gambiae genome. PMID:26421280

  12. Detection and mapping of amplified DNA sequences in breast cancer by comparative genomic hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Kallioniemi, A.; Tanner, M.; Kallioniemi, O.P.; Piper, J.; Stokke, T.; Pinkel, D.; Gray, J.W.; Waldman, F.M.; Chen, L.; Smith, H.S.

    1994-03-15

    Comparative genomic hybridization was applied to 5 breast cancer cell lines and 33 primary tumors to discover and map regions of the genome with increased DNA-sequence copy-number. Two-thirds of primary tumors and almost all cell lines showed increased DNA-sequence copy-number affecting a total of 26 chromosomal subregions. Most of these loci were distinct from those of currently known amplified genes in breast cancer, with sequences originating from 17q22-q24 and 20q13 showing the highest frequency of amplification. The results indicate that these chromosomal regions may contain previously unknown genes whose increased expression contributes to breast cancer progression. Chromosomal regions with increased copy-number often spanned tens of Mb, suggesting involvement of more than one gene in each region.

  13. Amplification, Next-generation Sequencing, and Genomic DNA Mapping of Retroviral Integration Sites.

    PubMed

    Serrao, Erik; Cherepanov, Peter; Engelman, Alan N

    2016-01-01

    Retroviruses exhibit signature integration preferences on both the local and global scales. Here, we present a detailed protocol for (1) generation of diverse libraries of retroviral integration sites using ligation-mediated PCR (LM-PCR) amplification and next-generation sequencing (NGS), (2) mapping the genomic location of each virus-host junction using BEDTools, and (3) analyzing the data for statistical relevance. Genomic DNA extracted from infected cells is fragmented by digestion with restriction enzymes or by sonication. After suitable DNA end-repair, double-stranded linkers are ligated onto the DNA ends, and semi-nested PCR is conducted using primers complementary to both the long terminal repeat (LTR) end of the virus and the ligated linker DNA. The PCR primers carry sequences required for DNA clustering during NGS, negating the requirement for separate adapter ligation. Quality control (QC) is conducted to assess DNA fragment size distribution and adapter DNA incorporation prior to NGS. Sequence output files are filtered for LTR-containing reads, and the sequences defining the LTR and the linker are cropped away. Trimmed host cell sequences are mapped to a reference genome using BLAT and are filtered for minimally 97% identity to a unique point in the reference genome. Unique integration sites are scrutinized for adjacent nucleotide (nt) sequence and distribution relative to various genomic features. Using this protocol, integration site libraries of high complexity can be constructed from genomic DNA in three days. The entire protocol that encompasses exogenous viral infection of susceptible tissue culture cells to integration site analysis can therefore be conducted in approximately one to two weeks. Recent applications of this technology pertain to longitudinal analysis of integration sites from HIV-infected patients. PMID:27023428

  14. L-asparaginase II of Escherichia coli K-12: cloning, mapping and sequencing of the ansB gene.

    PubMed

    Bonthron, D T

    1990-07-01

    The Escherichia coli gene ansB, encoding the chemotherapeutic enzyme L-asparaginase II, has been cloned, using a strategy based on the polymerase chain reaction, and sequenced. The amino acid (aa) sequence differs in eleven positions from the data previously derived by direct aa sequencing. A cleavable secretory signal peptide precedes the N terminus of the mature protein. The ansB gene maps to position 3114 kb on the physical map of E. coli [Kohara et al., Cell 50 (1987) 495-508], corresponding to approx. 63.8 min on the genetic map. PMID:2144836

  15. Misassembly detection using paired-end sequence reads and optical mapping data

    PubMed Central

    Muggli, Martin D.; Puglisi, Simon J.; Ronen, Roy; Boucher, Christina

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: A crucial problem in genome assembly is the discovery and correction of misassembly errors in draft genomes. We develop a method called misSEQuel that enhances the quality of draft genomes by identifying misassembly errors and their breakpoints using paired-end sequence reads and optical mapping data. Our method also fulfills the critical need for open source computational methods for analyzing optical mapping data. We apply our method to various assemblies of the loblolly pine, Francisella tularensis, rice and budgerigar genomes. We generated and used stimulated optical mapping data for loblolly pine and F.tularensis and used real optical mapping data for rice and budgerigar. Results: Our results demonstrate that we detect more than 54% of extensively misassembled contigs and more than 60% of locally misassembled contigs in assemblies of F.tularensis and between 31% and 100% of extensively misassembled contigs and between 57% and 73% of locally misassembled contigs in assemblies of loblolly pine. Using the real optical mapping data, we correctly identified 75% of extensively misassembled contigs and 100% of locally misassembled contigs in rice, and 77% of extensively misassembled contigs and 80% of locally misassembled contigs in budgerigar. Availability and implementation: misSEQuel can be used as a post-processing step in combination with any genome assembler and is freely available at http://www.cs.colostate.edu/seq/. Contact: muggli@cs.colostate.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:26072512

  16. Computational Prediction and Experimental Verification of New MAP Kinase Docking Sites and Substrates Including Gli Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Whisenant, Thomas C.; Ho, David T.; Benz, Ryan W.; Rogers, Jeffrey S.; Kaake, Robyn M.; Gordon, Elizabeth A.; Huang, Lan; Baldi, Pierre; Bardwell, Lee

    2010-01-01

    In order to fully understand protein kinase networks, new methods are needed to identify regulators and substrates of kinases, especially for weakly expressed proteins. Here we have developed a hybrid computational search algorithm that combines machine learning and expert knowledge to identify kinase docking sites, and used this algorithm to search the human genome for novel MAP kinase substrates and regulators focused on the JNK family of MAP kinases. Predictions were tested by peptide array followed by rigorous biochemical verification with in vitro binding and kinase assays on wild-type and mutant proteins. Using this procedure, we found new ‘D-site’ class docking sites in previously known JNK substrates (hnRNP-K, PPM1J/PP2Czeta), as well as new JNK-interacting proteins (MLL4, NEIL1). Finally, we identified new D-site-dependent MAPK substrates, including the hedgehog-regulated transcription factors Gli1 and Gli3, suggesting that a direct connection between MAP kinase and hedgehog signaling may occur at the level of these key regulators. These results demonstrate that a genome-wide search for MAP kinase docking sites can be used to find new docking sites and substrates. PMID:20865152

  17. A third-generation microsatellite-based linkage map of the honey bee, Apis mellifera, and its comparison with the sequence-based physical map

    PubMed Central

    Solignac, Michel; Mougel, Florence; Vautrin, Dominique; Monnerot, Monique; Cornuet, Jean-Marie

    2007-01-01

    Background: The honey bee is a key model for social behavior and this feature led to the selection of the species for genome sequencing. A genetic map is a necessary companion to the sequence. In addition, because there was originally no physical map for the honey bee genome project, a meiotic map was the only resource for organizing the sequence assembly on the chromosomes. Results: We present the genetic (meiotic) map here and describe the main features that emerged from comparison with the sequence-based physical map. The genetic map of the honey bee is saturated and the chromosomes are oriented from the centromeric to the telomeric regions. The map is based on 2,008 markers and is about 40 Morgans (M) long, resulting in a marker density of one every 2.05 centiMorgans (cM). For the 186 megabases (Mb) of the genome mapped and assembled, this corresponds to a very high average recombination rate of 22.04 cM/Mb. Honey bee meiosis shows a relatively homogeneous recombination rate along and across chromosomes, as well as within and between individuals. Interference is higher than inferred from the Kosambi function of distance. In addition, numerous recombination hotspots are dispersed over the genome. Conclusion: The very large genetic length of the honey bee genome, its small physical size and an almost complete genome sequence with a relatively low number of genes suggest a very promising future for association mapping in the honey bee, particularly as the existence of haploid males allows easy bulk segregant analysis. PMID:17459148

  18. Sequencing and mapping hemoglobin gene clusters in the australian model dasyurid marsupial sminthopsis macroura

    SciTech Connect

    De Leo, A.A.; Wheeler, D.; Lefevre, C.; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Hope, R.; Kuliwaba, J.; Nicholas, K.R.; Westermanc, M.; Graves, J.A.M.

    2004-07-26

    Comparing globin genes and their flanking sequences across many species has allowed globin gene evolution to be reconstructed in great detail. Marsupial globin sequences have proved to be of exceptional significance. A previous finding of a beta-like omega gene in the alpha cluster in the tammar wallaby suggested that the alpha and beta cluster evolved via genome duplication and loss rather than tandem duplication. To confirm and extend this important finding we isolated and sequenced BACs containing the alpha and beta loci from the distantly related Australian marsupial Sminthopsis macroura. We report that the alpha gene lies in the same BAC as the beta-like omega gene, implying that the alpha-omega juxtaposition is likely to be conserved in all marsupials. The LUC7L gene was found 3' of the S. macroura alpha locus, a gene order shared with humans but not mouse, chicken or fugu. Sequencing a BAC contig that contained the S. macroura beta globin and epsilon globin loci showed that the globin cluster is flanked by olfactory genes, demonstrating a gene arrangement conserved for over 180 MY. Analysis of the region 5' to the S. macroura epsilon globin gene revealed a region similar to the eutherian LCR, containing sequences and potential transcription factor binding sites with homology to eutherian hypersensitive sites 1 to 5. FISH mapping of BACs containing S. macroura alpha and beta globin genes located the beta globin cluster on chromosome 3q and the alpha locus close to the centromere on 1q, resolving contradictory map locations obtained by previous radioactive in situ hybridization.

  19. Reconstructing mitochondrial genomes directly from genomic next-generation sequencing reads—a baiting and iterative mapping approach

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Christoph; Bachmann, Lutz; Chevreux, Bastien

    2013-01-01

    We present an in silico approach for the reconstruction of complete mitochondrial genomes of non-model organisms directly from next-generation sequencing (NGS) data—mitochondrial baiting and iterative mapping (MITObim). The method is straightforward even if only (i) distantly related mitochondrial genomes or (ii) mitochondrial barcode sequences are available as starting-reference sequences or seeds, respectively. We demonstrate the efficiency of the approach in case studies using real NGS data sets of the two monogenean ectoparasites species Gyrodactylus thymalli and Gyrodactylus derjavinoides including their respective teleost hosts European grayling (Thymallus thymallus) and Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). MITObim appeared superior to existing tools in terms of accuracy, runtime and memory requirements and fully automatically recovered mitochondrial genomes exceeding 99.5% accuracy from total genomic DNA derived NGS data sets in <24 h using a standard desktop computer. The approach overcomes the limitations of traditional strategies for obtaining mitochondrial genomes for species with little or no mitochondrial sequence information at hand and represents a fast and highly efficient in silico alternative to laborious conventional strategies relying on initial long-range PCR. We furthermore demonstrate the applicability of MITObim for metagenomic/pooled data sets using simulated data. MITObim is an easy to use tool even for biologists with modest bioinformatics experience. The software is made available as open source pipeline under the MIT license at https://github.com/chrishah/MITObim. PMID:23661685

  20. The amino acid alphabet and the architecture of the protein sequence-structure map. I. Binary alphabets.

    PubMed

    Ferrada, Evandro

    2014-12-01

    The correspondence between protein sequences and structures, or sequence-structure map, relates to fundamental aspects of structural, evolutionary and synthetic biology. The specifics of the mapping, such as the fraction of accessible sequences and structures, or the sequences' ability to fold fast, are dictated by the type of interactions between the monomers that compose the sequences. The set of possible interactions between monomers is encapsulated by the potential energy function. In this study, I explore the impact of the relative forces of the potential on the architecture of the sequence-structure map. My observations rely on simple exact models of proteins and random samples of the space of potential energy functions of binary alphabets. I adopt a graph perspective and study the distribution of viable sequences and the structures they produce, as networks of sequences connected by point mutations. I observe that the relative proportion of attractive, neutral and repulsive forces defines types of potentials, that induce sequence-structure maps of vastly different architectures. I characterize the properties underlying these differences and relate them to the structure of the potential. Among these properties are the expected number and relative distribution of sequences associated to specific structures and the diversity of structures as a function of sequence divergence. I study the types of binary potentials observed in natural amino acids and show that there is a strong bias towards only some types of potentials, a bias that seems to characterize the folding code of natural proteins. I discuss implications of these observations for the architecture of the sequence-structure map of natural proteins, the construction of random libraries of peptides, and the early evolution of the natural amino acid alphabet. PMID:25473967

  1. The Amino Acid Alphabet and the Architecture of the Protein Sequence-Structure Map. I. Binary Alphabets

    PubMed Central

    Ferrada, Evandro

    2014-01-01

    The correspondence between protein sequences and structures, or sequence-structure map, relates to fundamental aspects of structural, evolutionary and synthetic biology. The specifics of the mapping, such as the fraction of accessible sequences and structures, or the sequences' ability to fold fast, are dictated by the type of interactions between the monomers that compose the sequences. The set of possible interactions between monomers is encapsulated by the potential energy function. In this study, I explore the impact of the relative forces of the potential on the architecture of the sequence-structure map. My observations rely on simple exact models of proteins and random samples of the space of potential energy functions of binary alphabets. I adopt a graph perspective and study the distribution of viable sequences and the structures they produce, as networks of sequences connected by point mutations. I observe that the relative proportion of attractive, neutral and repulsive forces defines types of potentials, that induce sequence-structure maps of vastly different architectures. I characterize the properties underlying these differences and relate them to the structure of the potential. Among these properties are the expected number and relative distribution of sequences associated to specific structures and the diversity of structures as a function of sequence divergence. I study the types of binary potentials observed in natural amino acids and show that there is a strong bias towards only some types of potentials, a bias that seems to characterize the folding code of natural proteins. I discuss implications of these observations for the architecture of the sequence-structure map of natural proteins, the construction of random libraries of peptides, and the early evolution of the natural amino acid alphabet. PMID:25473967

  2. YAC contig and cell hybrid mapping of six expressed sequences encoded by human chromosome 21

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, J.; Cox, M.; Patterson, D.

    1994-09-01

    The candidate gene approach for positional cloning requires a sufficient number of expressed gene sequences from the chromosomal region of interest. Trisomy for human chromosome 21 results in Down syndrome (DS). However, only a limited number of genes on chromosome 21 have been identified and cloned. We used 1,000 single-copy microclones from a microdissection library of chromosome 21 to screen various cDNA libraries and isolated 9 cDNA clones, of which 6 contain unique sequences: 21E-C1, C3, C4, C5, C7, C10. Using a refined regional mapping panel of chromosome 21 which comprised 24 cell hybrids and divided the chromosome into 33 subregions, we assigned 21E-C1 and C7 to subregion No. 22 (distal q22.1), 21E-C3 to No. 25 (proximal q22.2), 21E-C4 to No. 23 (very distal q22.1), 21E-C5 to No. 31 (proximal q22.3), and 21E-C10 to No. 28 (middle q22.2). In addition, we identified YAC clones corresponding to these cDNA clones using the complete YAC contig spanning the entire chromosome 21q. On the average, 10 positive YAC clones were identified for each cDNA. The mapping positions for the 6 cDNAs determined by the STSs in the YAC contig agree well with the cytogenetic map constructed by the hybrid panel. These cDNA clones with refined mapping positions on chromosome 21 should be useful as candidate genes for the specific component phenotypes of DS assigned to the region.

  3. Mapping and sequencing the human genome: Science, ethics, and public policy. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    McInerney, J.D.

    1993-03-31

    Development of Mapping and Sequencing the Human Genome: Science, Ethics, and Public Policy followed the standard process of curriculum development at the Biological Sciences Curriculum Study (BSCS), the process is described. The production of this module was a collaborative effort between BSCS and the American Medical Association (AMA). Appendix A contains a copy of the module. Copies of reports sent to the Department of Energy (DOE) during the development process are contained in Appendix B; all reports should be on file at DOE. Appendix B also contains copies of status reports submitted to the BSCS Board of Directors.

  4. Small genomes: New initiatives in mapping and sequencing. Workshop summary report

    SciTech Connect

    McKenney, K.; Robb, F.

    1993-12-31

    The workshop was held 5--7 July 1993 at the Center for Advanced Research in Biotechnology (CARB) and hosted by the University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute (UMBI) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The objective of this workshop was to bring together individuals interested in DNA technologies and to determine the impact of these current and potential improvements of the speed and cost-effectiveness of mapping and sequencing on the planning of future small genome projects. A major goal of the workshop was to spur the collaboration of more diverse groups of scientists working on this topic, and to minimize competitiveness as an inhibitory factor to progress.

  5. Integrable maps from Galois differential algebras, Borel transforms and number sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tempesta, Piergiulio

    A new class of integrable maps, obtained as lattice versions of polynomial dynamical systems is introduced. These systems are obtained by means of a discretization procedure that preserves several analytic and algebraic properties of a given differential equation, in particular symmetries and integrability (see Tempesta, 2010 [40]). Our approach is based on the properties of a suitable Galois differential algebra, that we shall call a Rota algebra. A formulation of the procedure in terms of category theory is proposed. In order to render the lattice dynamics confined, a Borel regularization is also adopted. As a byproduct of the theory, a connection between number sequences and integrability is discussed.

  6. Genetic linkage map of Chinese native variety faba bean (Vicia faba L.) based on simple sequence repeat markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Simple sequence repeat (SSR) marker is a powerful tool for construction of genetic linkage map which can be applied for locating quantitative trait loci (QTL) and marker-assisted selection (MAS). In this study, a genetic map of faba bean was constructed with SSR markers using a population of 129 F2 ...

  7. Heterozygous mapping strategy (HetMapps)for high resolution genotyping-by-sequencing markers: a case study in grapevine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genotyping by sequencing (GBS) provides opportunities to generate high-resolution genetic maps at a low per-sample genotyping cost, but missing data and under-calling of heterozygotes complicate the creation of GBS linkage maps for highly heterozygous species. To overcome these issues, we developed ...

  8. Large-scale metagenomic sequence clustering on map-reduce clusters.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao; Zola, Jaroslaw; Aluru, Srinivas

    2013-02-01

    Taxonomic clustering of species from millions of DNA fragments sequenced from their genomes is an important and frequently arising problem in metagenomics. In this paper, we present a parallel algorithm for taxonomic clustering of large metagenomic samples with support for overlapping clusters. We develop sketching techniques, akin to those created for web document clustering, to deduce significant similarities between pairs of sequences without resorting to expensive all vs. all comparison. We formulate the metagenomic classification problem as that of maximal quasi-clique enumeration in the resulting similarity graph, at multiple levels of the hierarchy as prescribed by different similarity thresholds. We cast execution of the underlying algorithmic steps as applications of the map-reduce framework to achieve a cloud ready implementation. We show that the resulting framework can produce high quality clustering of metagenomic samples consisting of millions of reads, in reasonable time limits, when executed on a modest size cluster. PMID:23427983

  9. SBH and the integration of complementary approaches in the mapping, sequencing, and understanding of complex genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Drmanac, R.; Drmanac, S.; Labat, I.; Vicentic, A.; Gemmell, A.; Stavropoulos, N.; Jarvis, J.

    1992-12-01

    A variant of sequencing by hybridization (SBH) is being developed with a potential to inexpensively determine up to 100 million base pairs per year. The method comprises (1) arraying short clones in 864-well plates; (2) growth of the M13 clones or PCR of the inserts; (3) automated spotting of DNAs by corresponding pin-arrays; (4) hybridization of dotted samples with 200-3000 {sup 32}P- or {sup 33}P-labeled 6- to 8-mer probes; and (5) scoring hybridization signals using storage phosphor plates. Some 200 7- to 8-mers can provide an inventory of the genes if CDNA clones are hybridized, or can define the order of 2-kb genomic clones, creating physical and structural maps with 100-bp resolution; the distribution of G+C, LINEs, SINEs, and gene families would be revealed. cDNAs that represent new genes and genomic clones in regions of interest selected by SBH can be sequenced by a gel method. Uniformly distributed clones from the previous step will be hybridized with 2000--3000 6- to 8-mers. As a result, approximately 50--60% of the genomic regions containing members of large repetitive and gene families and those families represented in GenBank would be completely sequenced. In the less redundant regions, every base pair is expected to be read with 3-4 probes, but the complete sequence can not be reconstructed. Such partial sequences allow the inference of similarity and the recognition of coding, regulatory, and repetitive sequences, as well as study of the evolutionary processes all the way up to the species delineation.

  10. SBH and the integration of complementary approaches in the mapping, sequencing, and understanding of complex genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Drmanac, R.; Drmanac, S.; Labat, I.; Vicentic, A.; Gemmell, A.; Stavropoulos, N.; Jarvis, J.

    1992-01-01

    A variant of sequencing by hybridization (SBH) is being developed with a potential to inexpensively determine up to 100 million base pairs per year. The method comprises (1) arraying short clones in 864-well plates; (2) growth of the M13 clones or PCR of the inserts; (3) automated spotting of DNAs by corresponding pin-arrays; (4) hybridization of dotted samples with 200-3000 [sup 32]P- or [sup 33]P-labeled 6- to 8-mer probes; and (5) scoring hybridization signals using storage phosphor plates. Some 200 7- to 8-mers can provide an inventory of the genes if CDNA clones are hybridized, or can define the order of 2-kb genomic clones, creating physical and structural maps with 100-bp resolution; the distribution of G+C, LINEs, SINEs, and gene families would be revealed. cDNAs that represent new genes and genomic clones in regions of interest selected by SBH can be sequenced by a gel method. Uniformly distributed clones from the previous step will be hybridized with 2000--3000 6- to 8-mers. As a result, approximately 50--60% of the genomic regions containing members of large repetitive and gene families and those families represented in GenBank would be completely sequenced. In the less redundant regions, every base pair is expected to be read with 3-4 probes, but the complete sequence can not be reconstructed. Such partial sequences allow the inference of similarity and the recognition of coding, regulatory, and repetitive sequences, as well as study of the evolutionary processes all the way up to the species delineation.

  11. dcp gene of Escherichia coli: cloning, sequencing, transcript mapping, and characterization of the gene product.

    PubMed Central

    Henrich, B; Becker, S; Schroeder, U; Plapp, R

    1993-01-01

    Dipeptidyl carboxypeptidase is a C-terminal exopeptidase of Escherichia coli. We have isolated the respective gene, dcp, from a low-copy-number plasmid library by its ability to complement a dcp mutation preventing the utilization of the unique substrate N-benzoyl-L-glycyl-L-histidyl-L-leucine. Sequence analysis of a 2.9-kb DNA fragment revealed an open reading frame of 2,043 nucleotides which was assigned to the dcp gene by N-terminal amino acid sequencing and electrophoretic molecular mass determination of the purified dcp product. Transcript mapping by primer extension and S1 protection experiments verified the physiological significance of potential initiation and termination signals for dcp transcription and allowed the identification of a single species of monocistronic dcp mRNA. The codon usage pattern and the effects of elevated gene copy number indicated a relatively low level of dcp expression. The predicted amino acid sequence of dipeptidyl carboxypeptidase, containing a potential zinc-binding site, is highly homologous (78.8%) to the corresponding enzyme from Salmonella typhimurium. It also displays significant homology to the products of the S. typhimurium opdA and the E. coli prlC genes and to some metalloproteases from rats and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. No potential export signals could be inferred from the amino acid sequence. Dipeptidyl carboxypeptidase was enriched 80-fold from crude extracts of E. coli and used to investigate some of its biochemical and biophysical properties. Images PMID:8226676

  12. Linking the human cytogenetic map with nucleotide sequence: the CCAP clone set.

    PubMed

    Jang, Wonhee; Yonescu, Raluca; Knutsen, Turid; Brown, Theresa; Reppert, Tricia; Sirotkin, Karl; Schuler, Gregory D; Ried, Thomas; Kirsch, Ilan R

    2006-07-15

    We present the completed dataset and clone repository of the Cancer Chromosome Aberration Project (CCAP), an initiative developed and funded through the intramural program of the U.S. National Cancer Institute, to provide seamless linkage of human cytogenetic markers with the primary nucleotide sequence of the human genome. Spaced at 1-2 Mb intervals across the human genome, 1,339 bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones have been localized to chromosomal bands through high-resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) mapping. Of these clones, 99.8% can be positioned on the primary human genome sequence and 95% are placed at or close to their precise nucleotide starts and stops. This dataset can be studied and manipulated within generally available public Web sites. The clones are available from a commercial repository. The CCAP BAC clone set provides anchors for the interrogation of gene and sequence involvement in oncogenic and developmental disorders when the starting point is the recognition of a structural, numerical, or interstitial chromosomal aberration. This dataset also provides a current view of the quality and coherence of the available genome sequence and insight into the nucleotide and three-dimensional structures that manifest as Giemsa light and dark chromosomal banding patterns. PMID:16843097

  13. Geologic map of southwestern Sequoia National Park and vicinity, Tulare County, California, including the Mineral King metamorphic pendant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sisson, T. W.; Moore, J. G.

    2012-12-01

    From the late 1940s to the early 1990s, scientists of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) mapped the geology of most of Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks, California, and published the results as a series of 15-minute (1:62,500 scale) Geologic Quadrangles. The southwest corner of Sequoia National Park, encompassing the Mineral King and eastern edge of the Kaweah 15-minute topographic quadrangles, however, remained unfinished. At the request of the National Park Service's Geologic Resources Division (NPS-GRD), the USGS has mapped the geology of that area using 7.5-minute (1:24,000 scale) topographic bases and high-resolution ortho-imagery. With partial support from NPS-GRD, the major plutons in the map area were dated by the U-Pb zircon method with the Stanford-USGS SHRIMP-RG ion microprobe. Highlights include: (1) Identification of the Early Cretaceous volcano-plutonic suite of Mineral King (informally named), consisting of three deformed granodiorite plutons and the major metarhyolite tuffs of the Mineral King metamorphic pendant. Members of the suite erupted or intruded at 130-140 Ma (pluton ages: this study; rhyolite ages: lower-intercept concordia from zircon results of Busby-Spera, 1983, Princeton Ph.D. thesis, and from Klemetti et al., 2011, AGU abstract) during the pause of igneous activity between emplacement of the Jurassic and Cretaceous Sierran batholiths. (2) Some of the deformation of the Mineral King metamorphic pendant is demonstrably Cretaceous, with evidence including map-scale folding of Early Cretaceous metarhyolite tuff, and an isoclinally folded aplite dike dated at 98 Ma, concurrent with the large 98-Ma granodiorite of Castle Creek that intruded the Mineral King pendant on the west. (3) A 21-km-long magmatic synform within the 99-100 Ma granite of Coyote Pass that is defined both by inward-dipping mafic inclusions (enclaves) and by sporadic, cm-thick, sharply defined mineral layering. The west margin of the granite of Coyote Pass overlies

  14. Construction of a high-density genetic map for grape using next generation restriction-site associated DNA sequencing

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Genetic mapping and QTL detection are powerful methodologies in plant improvement and breeding. Construction of a high-density and high-quality genetic map would be of great benefit in the production of superior grapes to meet human demand. High throughput and low cost of the recently developed next generation sequencing (NGS) technology have resulted in its wide application in genome research. Sequencing restriction-site associated DNA (RAD) might be an efficient strategy to simplify genotyping. Combining NGS with RAD has proven to be powerful for single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) marker development. Results An F1 population of 100 individual plants was developed. In-silico digestion-site prediction was used to select an appropriate restriction enzyme for construction of a RAD sequencing library. Next generation RAD sequencing was applied to genotype the F1 population and its parents. Applying a cluster strategy for SNP modulation, a total of 1,814 high-quality SNP markers were developed: 1,121 of these were mapped to the female genetic map, 759 to the male map, and 1,646 to the integrated map. A comparison of the genetic maps to the published Vitis vinifera genome revealed both conservation and variations. Conclusions The applicability of next generation RAD sequencing for genotyping a grape F1 population was demonstrated, leading to the successful development of a genetic map with high density and quality using our designed SNP markers. Detailed analysis revealed that this newly developed genetic map can be used for a variety of genome investigations, such as QTL detection, sequence assembly and genome comparison. PMID:22908993

  15. Progress towards the construction of a sequence-ready physical map of the 3AS chromosome arm of hexaploid wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The large genome size (~17 Gb), polyploid nature, and repetitive sequence content (>90%) of hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum) present a challenge for constructing physical maps, which are fundamental resources to aid genomic sequencing and annotation, and gene cloning. One approach to reduce the c...

  16. WebGMAP: a web service for mapping and aligning cDNA sequences to genomes

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Chun; Liu, Lin; Ji, Guoli

    2009-01-01

    The genomes of thousands of organisms are being sequenced, often with accompanying sequences of cDNAs or ESTs. One of the great challenges in bioinformatics is to make these genomic sequences and genome annotations accessible in a user-friendly manner to general biologists to address interesting biological questions. We have created an open-access web service called WebGMAP (http://www.bioinfolab.org/software/webgmap) that seamlessly integrates cDNA-genome alignment tools, such as GMAP, with easy-to-use data visualization and mining tools. This web service is intended to facilitate community efforts in improving genome annotation, determining accurate gene structures and their variations, and exploring important biological processes such as alternative splicing and alternative polyadenylation. For routine sequence analysis, WebGMAP provides a web-based sequence viewer with many useful functions, including nucleotide positioning, six-frame translations, sequence reverse complementation, and imperfect motif detection and alignment. WebGMAP also provides users with the ability to sort, filter and search for individual cDNA sequences and cDNA-genome alignments. Our EST-Genome-Browser can display annotated gene structures and cDNA-genome alignments at scales from 100 to 50 000 nt. With its ability to highlight base differences between query cDNAs and the genome, our EST-Genome-Browser allows biologists to discover potential point or insertion-deletion variations from cDNA-genome alignments. PMID:19465381

  17. Mapping the Pheno-Structure of Didactic Sequences. Didakometry No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bjerstedt, Ake

    A framework is provided for the evaluation of self instructional materials before the materials are ready for field testing. Several aids are offered to assist the development of an evaluation model, including: checklists, maps of relations between terminal objectives and single didactic units, and unit charting protocols. Checklist questions…

  18. High resolution radiation hybrid maps of bovine chromosomes 19 and 29: comparison with the bovine genome sequence assembly

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Aparna; Schiex, Thomas; McKay, Stephanie; Murdoch, Brenda; Wang, Zhiquan; Womack, James E; Stothard, Paul; Moore, Stephen S

    2007-01-01

    Background High resolution radiation hybrid (RH) maps can facilitate genome sequence assembly by correctly ordering genes and genetic markers along chromosomes. The objective of the present study was to generate high resolution RH maps of bovine chromosomes 19 (BTA19) and 29 (BTA29), and compare them with the current 7.1X bovine genome sequence assembly (bovine build 3.1). We have chosen BTA19 and 29 as candidate chromosomes for mapping, since many Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) for the traits of carcass merit and residual feed intake have been identified on these chromosomes. Results We have constructed high resolution maps of BTA19 and BTA29 consisting of 555 and 253 Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) markers respectively using a 12,000 rad whole genome RH panel. With these markers, the RH map of BTA19 and BTA29 extended to 4591.4 cR and 2884.1 cR in length respectively. When aligned with the current bovine build 3.1, the order of markers on the RH map for BTA19 and 29 showed inconsistencies with respect to the genome assembly. Maps of both the chromosomes show that there is a significant internal rearrangement of the markers involving displacement, inversion and flips within the scaffolds with some scaffolds being misplaced in the genome assembly. We also constructed cattle-human comparative maps of these chromosomes which showed an overall agreement with the comparative maps published previously. However, minor discrepancies in the orientation of few homologous synteny blocks were observed. Conclusion The high resolution maps of BTA19 (average 1 locus/139 kb) and BTA29 (average 1 locus/208 kb) presented in this study suggest that by the incorporation of RH mapping information, the current bovine genome sequence assembly can be significantly improved. Furthermore, these maps can serve as a potential resource for fine mapping QTL and identification of causative mutations underlying QTL for economically important traits. PMID:17784962

  19. Ordered shotgun sequencing of a 135 kb Xq25 YAC containing ANT2 and four possible genes, including three confirmed by EST matches.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, C N; Su, Y; Baybayan, P; Siruno, A; Nagaraja, R; Mazzarella, R; Schlessinger, D; Chen, E

    1996-01-01

    Ordered shotgun sequencing (OSS) has been successfully carried out with an Xq25 YAC substrate. yWXD703 DNA was subcloned into lambda phage and sequences of insert ends of the lambda subclones were used to generate a map to select a minimum tiling path of clones to be completely sequenced. The sequence of 135 038 nt contains the entire ANT2 cDNA as well as four other candidates suggested by computer-assisted analyses. One of the putative genes is homologous to a gene implicated in Graves' disease and it, ANT2 and two others are confirmed by EST matches. The results suggest that OSS can be applied to YACs in accord with earlier simulations and further indicate that the sequence of the YAC accurately reflects the sequence of uncloned human DNA. PMID:8918809

  20. Whole Genome Profiling provides a robust framework for physical mapping and sequencing in the highly complex and repetitive wheat genome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Sequencing projects using a clone-by-clone approach require the availability of a robust physical map. The SNaPshot technology, based on pair-wise comparisons of restriction fragments sizes, has been used recently to build the first physical map of a wheat chromosome and to complete the maize physical map. However, restriction fragments sizes shared randomly between two non-overlapping BACs often lead to chimerical contigs and mis-assembled BACs in such large and repetitive genomes. Whole Genome Profiling (WGP™) was developed recently as a new sequence-based physical mapping technology and has the potential to limit this problem. Results A subset of the wheat 3B chromosome BAC library covering 230 Mb was used to establish a WGP physical map and to compare it to a map obtained with the SNaPshot technology. We first adapted the WGP-based assembly methodology to cope with the complexity of the wheat genome. Then, the results showed that the WGP map covers the same length than the SNaPshot map but with 30% less contigs and, more importantly with 3.5 times less mis-assembled BACs. Finally, we evaluated the benefit of integrating WGP tags in different sequence assemblies obtained after Roche/454 sequencing of BAC pools. We showed that while WGP tag integration improves assemblies performed with unpaired reads and with paired-end reads at low coverage, it does not significantly improve sequence assemblies performed at high coverage (25x) with paired-end reads. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that, with a suitable assembly methodology, WGP builds more robust physical maps than the SNaPshot technology in wheat and that WGP can be adapted to any genome. Moreover, WGP tag integration in sequence assemblies improves low quality assembly. However, to achieve a high quality draft sequence assembly, a sequencing depth of 25x paired-end reads is required, at which point WGP tag integration does not provide additional scaffolding value. Finally, we suggest that WGP

  1. Information on a Major New Initiative: Mapping and Sequencing the Human Genome (1986 DOE Memorandum)

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    DeLisi, Charles (Associate Director, Health and Environmental Research, DOE Office of Energy Research)

    1986-05-06

    In the history of the Human Genome Program, Dr. Charles DeLisi and Dr. Alvin Trivelpiece of the Department of Energy (DOE) were instrumental in moving the seeds of the program forward. This May 1986 memo from DeLisi to Trivelpiece, Director of DOE's Office of Energy Research, documents this fact. Following the March 1986 Santa Fe workshop on the subject of mapping and sequencing the human genome, DeLisi's memo outlines workshop conclusions, explains the relevance of this project to DOE and the importance of the Department's laboratories and capabilities, notes the critical experience of DOE in managing projects of this scale and potential magnitude, and recognizes the fact that the project will impact biomedical science in ways which could not be fully anticipated at the time. Subsequently, program guidance was further sought from the DOE Health Effects Research Advisory Committee (HERAC) and the April 1987 HERAC report recommended that DOE and the nation commit to a large, multidisciplinary, scientific and technological undertaking to map and sequence the human genome.

  2. MapMyFlu: visualizing spatio-temporal relationships between related influenza sequences.

    PubMed

    Nolte, Nicholas; Kurzawa, Nils; Eils, Roland; Herrmann, Carl

    2015-07-01

    Understanding the molecular dynamics of viral spreading is crucial for anticipating the epidemiological implications of disease outbreaks. In the case of influenza, reassortments or point mutations affect the adaption to new hosts or resistance to anti-viral drugs and can determine whether a new strain will result in a pandemic infection or a less severe progression. To this end, tools integrating molecular information with epidemiological parameters are important to understand how molecular characteristics reflect in the infection dynamics. We present a new web tool, MapMyFlu, which allows to spatially and temporally display influenza viruses related to a query sequence on a Google Map based on BLAST results against the NCBI Influenza Database. Temporal and geographical trends appear clearly and may help in reconstructing the evolutionary history of a particular sequence. The tool is accessible through a web server, hence without the need for local installation. The website has an intuitive design and provides an easy-to-use service, and is available at http://mapmyflu.ipmb.uni-heidelberg.de. PMID:25940623

  3. MapMyFlu: visualizing spatio-temporal relationships between related influenza sequences

    PubMed Central

    Nolte, Nicholas; Kurzawa, Nils; Eils, Roland; Herrmann, Carl

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the molecular dynamics of viral spreading is crucial for anticipating the epidemiological implications of disease outbreaks. In the case of influenza, reassortments or point mutations affect the adaption to new hosts or resistance to anti-viral drugs and can determine whether a new strain will result in a pandemic infection or a less severe progression. To this end, tools integrating molecular information with epidemiological parameters are important to understand how molecular characteristics reflect in the infection dynamics. We present a new web tool, MapMyFlu, which allows to spatially and temporally display influenza viruses related to a query sequence on a Google Map based on BLAST results against the NCBI Influenza Database. Temporal and geographical trends appear clearly and may help in reconstructing the evolutionary history of a particular sequence. The tool is accessible through a web server, hence without the need for local installation. The website has an intuitive design and provides an easy-to-use service, and is available at http://mapmyflu.ipmb.uni-heidelberg.de PMID:25940623

  4. Including Faults Detected By Near-Surface Seismic Methods in the USGS National Seismic Hazard Maps - Some Restrictions Apply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, R. A.; Haller, K. M.

    2014-12-01

    Every 6 years, the USGS updates the National Seismic Hazard Maps (new version released July 2014) that are intended to help society reduce risk from earthquakes. These maps affect hundreds of billions of dollars in construction costs each year as they are used to develop seismic-design criteria of buildings, bridges, highways, railroads, and provide data for risk assessment that help determine insurance rates. Seismic source characterization, an essential component of hazard model development, ranges from detailed trench excavations across faults at the ground surface to less detailed analysis of broad regions defined mainly on the basis of historical seismicity. Though it is a priority for the USGS to discover new Quaternary fault sources, the discovered faults only become a part of the hazard model if there are corresponding constraints on their geometry (length and depth extent) and slip-rate (or recurrence interval). When combined with fault geometry and slip-rate constraints, near-surface seismic studies that detect young (Quaternary) faults have become important parts of the hazard source model. Examples of seismic imaging studies with significant hazard impact include the Southern Whidbey Island fault, Washington; Santa Monica fault, San Andreas fault, and Palos Verdes fault zone, California; and Commerce fault, Missouri. There are many more faults in the hazard model in the western U.S. than in the expansive region east of the Rocky Mountains due to the higher rate of tectonic deformation, frequent surface-rupturing earthquakes and, in some cases, lower erosion rates. However, the recent increase in earthquakes in the central U.S. has revealed previously unknown faults for which we need additional constraints before we can include them in the seismic hazard maps. Some of these new faults may be opportunities for seismic imaging studies to provide basic data on location, dip, style of faulting, and recurrence.

  5. High density linkage mapping of genomic and transcriptomic SNPs for synteny analysis and anchoring the genome sequence of chickpea

    PubMed Central

    Gaur, Rashmi; Jeena, Ganga; Shah, Niraj; Gupta, Shefali; Pradhan, Seema; Tyagi, Akhilesh K; Jain, Mukesh; Chattopadhyay, Debasis; Bhatia, Sabhyata

    2015-01-01

    This study presents genome-wide discovery of SNPs through next generation sequencing of the genome of Cicer reticulatum. Mapping of the C. reticulatum sequenced reads onto the draft genome assembly of C. arietinum (desi chickpea) resulted in identification of 842,104 genomic SNPs which were utilized along with an additional 36,446 genic SNPs identified from transcriptome sequences of the aforementioned varieties. Two new chickpea Oligo Pool All (OPAs) each having 3,072 SNPs were designed and utilized for SNP genotyping of 129 Recombinant Inbred Lines (RILs). Using Illumina GoldenGate Technology genotyping data of 5,041 SNPs were generated and combined with the 1,673 marker data from previously published studies, to generate a high resolution linkage map. The map comprised of 6698 markers distributed on eight linkage groups spanning 1083.93 cM with an average inter-marker distance of 0.16 cM. Utility of the present map was demonstrated for improving the anchoring of the earlier reported draft genome sequence of desi chickpea by ~30% and that of kabuli chickpea by 18%. The genetic map reported in this study represents the most dense linkage map of chickpea , with the potential to facilitate efficient anchoring of the draft genome sequences of desi as well as kabuli chickpea varieties. PMID:26303721

  6. A High-Density SNP Map of Sunflower Derived from RAD-Sequencing Facilitating Fine-Mapping of the Rust Resistance Gene R12

    PubMed Central

    Talukder, Zahirul I.; Gong, Li; Hulke, Brent S.; Pegadaraju, Venkatramana; Song, Qijian; Schultz, Quentin; Qi, Lili

    2014-01-01

    A high-resolution genetic map of sunflower was constructed by integrating SNP data from three F2 mapping populations (HA 89/RHA 464, B-line/RHA 464, and CR 29/RHA 468). The consensus map spanned a total length of 1443.84 cM, and consisted of 5,019 SNP markers derived from RAD tag sequencing and 118 publicly available SSR markers distributed in 17 linkage groups, corresponding to the haploid chromosome number of sunflower. The maximum interval between markers in the consensus map is 12.37 cM and the average distance is 0.28 cM between adjacent markers. Despite a few short-distance inversions in marker order, the consensus map showed high levels of collinearity among individual maps with an average Spearman's rank correlation coefficient of 0.972 across the genome. The order of the SSR markers on the consensus map was also in agreement with the order of the individual map and with previously published sunflower maps. Three individual and one consensus maps revealed the uneven distribution of markers across the genome. Additionally, we performed fine mapping and marker validation of the rust resistance gene R12, providing closely linked SNP markers for marker-assisted selection of this gene in sunflower breeding programs. This high resolution consensus map will serve as a valuable tool to the sunflower community for studying marker-trait association of important agronomic traits, marker assisted breeding, map-based gene cloning, and comparative mapping. PMID:25014030

  7. Mapping whole genome shotgun sequence and variant calling in mammalian species without their reference genomes.

    PubMed

    Kalbfleisch, Ted; Heaton, Michael P

    2013-01-01

    Genomics research in mammals has produced reference genome sequences that are essential for identifying variation associated with disease.  High quality reference genome sequences are now available for humans, model species, and economically important agricultural animals.  Comparisons between these species have provided unique insights into mammalian gene function.  However, the number of species with reference genomes is small compared to those needed for studying molecular evolutionary relationships in the tree of life.  For example, among the even-toed ungulates there are approximately 300 species whose phylogenetic relationships have been calculated in the 10k trees project.  Only six of these have reference genomes:  cattle, swine, sheep, goat, water buffalo, and bison.  Although reference sequences will eventually be developed for additional hoof stock, the resources in terms of time, money, infrastructure and expertise required to develop a quality reference genome may be unattainable for most species for at least another decade.  In this work we mapped 35 Gb of next generation sequence data of a Katahdin sheep to its own species' reference genome ( Ovis aries Oar3.1) and to that of a species that diverged 15 to 30 million years ago ( Bos taurus UMD3.1).  In total, 56% of reads covered 76% of UMD3.1 to an average depth of 6.8 reads per site, 83 million variants were identified, of which 78 million were homozygous and likely represent interspecies nucleotide differences. Excluding repeat regions and sex chromosomes, nearly 3.7 million heterozygous sites were identified in this animal vs. bovine UMD3.1, representing polymorphisms occurring in sheep.  Of these, 41% could be readily mapped to orthologous positions in ovine Oar3.1 with 80% corroborated as heterozygous.  These variant sites, identified via interspecies mapping could be used for comparative genomics, disease association studies, and ultimately to understand mammalian gene

  8. Crop Type Mapping from a Sequence of Terrasar-X Images with Dynamic Conditional Random Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenduiywo, B. K.; Bargiel, D.; Soergel, U.

    2016-06-01

    Crop phenology is dynamic as it changes with times of the year. Such biophysical processes also look spectrally different to remote sensing satellites. Some crops may depict similar spectral properties if their phenology coincide, but differ later when their phenology diverge. Thus, conventional approaches that select only images from phenological stages where crops are distinguishable for classification, have low discrimination. In contrast, stacking images within a cropping season limits discrimination to a single feature space that can suffer from overlapping classes. Since crop backscatter varies with time, it can aid discrimination. Therefore, our main objective is to develop a crop sequence classification method using multitemporal TerraSAR-X images. We adopt first order markov assumption in undirected temporal graph sequence. This property is exploited to implement Dynamic Conditional Random Fields (DCRFs). Our DCRFs model has a repeated structure of temporally connected Conditional Random Fields (CRFs). Each node in the sequence is connected to its predecessor via conditional probability matrix. The matrix is computed using posterior class probabilities from association potential. This way, there is a mutual temporal exchange of phenological information observed in TerraSAR-X images. When compared to independent epoch classification, the designed DCRF model improved crop discrimination at each epoch in the sequence. However, government, insurers, agricultural market traders and other stakeholders are interested in the quantity of a certain crop in a season. Therefore, we further develop a DCRF ensemble classifier. The ensemble produces an optimal crop map by maximizing over posterior class probabilities selected from the sequence based on maximum F1-score and weighted by correctness. Our ensemble technique is compared to standard approach of stacking all images as bands for classification using Maximum Likelihood Classifier (MLC) and standard CRFs. It

  9. A Comprehensive Genome-Wide Map of Autonomously Replicating Sequences in a Naive Genome

    PubMed Central

    Liachko, Ivan; Bhaskar, Anand; Lee, Chanmi; Chung, Shau Chee Claire

    2010-01-01

    Eukaryotic chromosomes initiate DNA synthesis from multiple replication origins. The machinery that initiates DNA synthesis is highly conserved, but the sites where the replication initiation proteins bind have diverged significantly. Functional comparative genomics is an obvious approach to study the evolution of replication origins. However, to date, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae replication origin map is the only genome map available. Using an iterative approach that combines computational prediction and functional validation, we have generated a high-resolution genome-wide map of DNA replication origins in Kluyveromyces lactis. Unlike other yeasts or metazoans, K. lactis autonomously replicating sequences (KlARSs) contain a 50 bp consensus motif suggestive of a dimeric structure. This motif is necessary and largely sufficient for initiation and was used to dependably identify 145 of the up to 156 non-repetitive intergenic ARSs projected for the K. lactis genome. Though similar in genome sizes, K. lactis has half as many ARSs as its distant relative S. cerevisiae. Comparative genomic analysis shows that ARSs in K. lactis and S. cerevisiae preferentially localize to non-syntenic intergenic regions, linking ARSs with loci of accelerated evolutionary change. PMID:20485513

  10. B1 Mapping of Short T2* Spins Using a 3D Radial Gradient Echo Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Naoharu; Garwood, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To develop a method to acquire a radiofrequency (B1) field map when the signal has a short T2*. Theory and Methods The method is based on the actual flip angle imaging (AFI) technique and a radial 3D gradient-echo sequence known as COncurrent Dephasing and Excitation (CODE) which preserves short T2* signals. CODE was implemented with Gradient-modulated Offset-Independent Adiabaticity (GOIA) pulses to obtain high estimation sensitivity with AFI. The correlation method, that removes the quadratic phase from the frequency-modulated pulse excitation, was modified to handle gradient-modulated pulses. Validity of the modified correlation procedure was tested by Bloch simulations. CODE experiments with sinc, hyperbolic secant, and GOIA pulses were performed in order to see effects from the frequency- and gradient-modulation. Finally, GOIA-CODE AFI was conducted and compared with conventional AFI with 3D GRE. Results The modified correlation method developed to accommodate frequency- and gradient-modulations of GOIA performed well as judged by the minimal impact on reconstructed image quality. GOIA-CODE AFI provided flip angle maps consistent with those measured by GRE AFI when the T2* was long (> 2 ms) and continued to perform well for short T2* signals. Conclusion The proposed technique provides a means to obtain a 3D B1 field map when imaging spins with short T2*. PMID:23754634

  11. Isolation and refined regional mapping of expressed sequences from human chromosome 21

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, F.T.; Yu, J.; Patterson, D.

    1994-10-01

    To increase candidate genes from human chromosome 21 for the analysis of Down syndrome and other genetic diseases localized on this chromosome, we have isolated and studied 9 cDNA clones encoded by chromosome 21. For isolating cDNAs, single-copy microclones from a chromosome 21 microdissection library were used in direct screening of various cDNA libraries. Seven of the cDNA clones have been regionally mapped on chromosome 21 using a comprehensive hybrid mapping panel comprising 24 cell hybrids that divide the chromosome into 33 subregions. These cDNA clones with refined mapping positions should be useful for identification and cloning of genes responsible for the specific component phenotypes of Down syndrome and other diseases on chromosome 21, including progressive myoclonus epilepsy in 21q22.3. 12 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  12. The Genome Analysis Toolkit: a MapReduce framework for analyzing next-generation DNA sequencing data.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Aaron; Hanna, Matthew; Banks, Eric; Sivachenko, Andrey; Cibulskis, Kristian; Kernytsky, Andrew; Garimella, Kiran; Altshuler, David; Gabriel, Stacey; Daly, Mark; DePristo, Mark A

    2010-09-01

    Next-generation DNA sequencing (NGS) projects, such as the 1000 Genomes Project, are already revolutionizing our understanding of genetic variation among individuals. However, the massive data sets generated by NGS--the 1000 Genome pilot alone includes nearly five terabases--make writing feature-rich, efficient, and robust analysis tools difficult for even computationally sophisticated individuals. Indeed, many professionals are limited in the scope and the ease with which they can answer scientific questions by the complexity of accessing and manipulating the data produced by these machines. Here, we discuss our Genome Analysis Toolkit (GATK), a structured programming framework designed to ease the development of efficient and robust analysis tools for next-generation DNA sequencers using the functional programming philosophy of MapReduce. The GATK provides a small but rich set of data access patterns that encompass the majority of analysis tool needs. Separating specific analysis calculations from common data management infrastructure enables us to optimize the GATK framework for correctness, stability, and CPU and memory efficiency and to enable distributed and shared memory parallelization. We highlight the capabilities of the GATK by describing the implementation and application of robust, scale-tolerant tools like coverage calculators and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) calling. We conclude that the GATK programming framework enables developers and analysts to quickly and easily write efficient and robust NGS tools, many of which have already been incorporated into large-scale sequencing projects like the 1000 Genomes Project and The Cancer Genome Atlas. PMID:20644199

  13. Genetic linkage maps for Asian and American lotus constructed using novel SSR markers derived from the genome of sequenced cultivar

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The genus Nelumbo Adans. comprises two living species, N. nucifera Gaertan. (Asian lotus) and N. lutea Pers. (American lotus). A genetic linkage map is an essential resource for plant genetic studies and crop improvement but has not been generated for Nelumbo. We aimed to develop genomic simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers from the genome sequence and construct two genetic maps for Nelumbo to assist genome assembly and integration of a genetic map with the genome sequence. Results A total of 86,089 SSR motifs were identified from the genome sequences. Di- and tri-nucleotide repeat motifs were the most abundant, and accounted for 60.73% and 31.66% of all SSRs, respectively. AG/GA repeats constituted 51.17% of dinucleotide repeat motifs, followed by AT/TA (44.29%). Of 500 SSR primers tested, 386 (77.20%) produced scorable alleles with an average of 2.59 per primer, and 185 (37.00%) showed polymorphism among two parental genotypes, N. nucifera ‘Chinese Antique’ and N. lutea ‘AL1’, and six progenies of their F1 population. The normally segregating markers, which comprised 268 newly developed SSRs, 37 previously published SSRs and 53 sequence-related amplified polymorphism markers, were used for genetic map construction. The map for Asian lotus was 365.67 cM with 47 markers distributed in seven linkage groups. The map for American lotus was 524.51 cM, and contained 177 markers distributed in 11 genetic linkage groups. The number of markers per linkage group ranged from three to 34 with an average genetic distance of 3.97 cM between adjacent markers. Moreover, 171 SSR markers contained in linkage groups were anchored to 97 genomic DNA sequence contigs of ‘Chinese Antique’. The 97 contigs were merged into 60 scaffolds. Conclusion Genetic mapping of SSR markers derived from sequenced contigs in Nelumbo enabled the associated contigs to be anchored in the linkage map and facilitated assembly of the genome sequences of ‘Chinese Antique’. The

  14. A high-density genetic map of cucumber derived from Specific Length Amplified Fragment sequencing (SLAF-seq)

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xuewen; Xu, Ruixue; Zhu, Biyun; Yu, Ting; Qu, Wenqin; Lu, Lu; Xu, Qiang; Qi, Xiaohua; Chen, Xuehao

    2015-01-01

    High-density genetic map provides an essential framework for accurate and efficient genome assembly and QTL fine mapping. Construction of high-density genetic maps appears more feasible since the advent of next-generation sequencing (NGS), which eases SNP discovery and high-throughput genotyping of large population. In this research, a high-density genetic map of cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) was successfully constructed across an F2 population by a recently developed Specific Length Amplified Fragment sequencing (SLAF-seq) method. In total, 18.69 GB of data containing 93,460,000 paired-end reads were obtained after preprocessing. The average sequencing depth was 44.92 in the D8 (female parent), 42.16 in the Jin5-508 (male parent), and 5.01 in each progeny. 79,092 high-quality SLAFs were detected, of which 6784 SLAFs were polymorphic, and 1892 of the polymorphic markers met the requirements for constructing genetic map. The genetic map spanned 845.87 cm with an average genetic distance of 0.45 cm. It is a reliable linkage map for fine mapping and molecular breeding of cucumber for its high marker density and well-ordered markers. PMID:25610449

  15. A consensus linkage map for sugi (Cryptomeria japonica) from two pedigrees, based on microsatellites and expressed sequence tags.

    PubMed Central

    Tani, Naoki; Takahashi, Tomokazu; Iwata, Hiroyoshi; Mukai, Yuzuru; Ujino-Ihara, Tokuko; Matsumoto, Asako; Yoshimura, Kensuke; Yoshimaru, Hiroshi; Murai, Masafumi; Nagasaka, Kazutoshi; Tsumura, Yoshihiko

    2003-01-01

    A consensus map for sugi (Cryptomeria japonica) was constructed by integrating linkage data from two unrelated third-generation pedigrees, one derived from a full-sib cross and the other by self-pollination of F1 individuals. The progeny segregation data of the first pedigree were derived from cleaved amplified polymorphic sequences, microsatellites, restriction fragment length polymorphisms, and single nucleotide polymorphisms. The data of the second pedigree were derived from cleaved amplified polymorphic sequences, isozyme markers, morphological traits, random amplified polymorphic DNA markers, and restriction fragment length polymorphisms. Linkage analyses were done for the first pedigree with JoinMap 3.0, using its parameter set for progeny derived by cross-pollination, and for the second pedigree with the parameter set for progeny derived from selfing of F1 individuals. The 11 chromosomes of C. japonica are represented in the consensus map. A total of 438 markers were assigned to 11 large linkage groups, 1 small linkage group, and 1 nonintegrated linkage group from the second pedigree; their total length was 1372.2 cM. On average, the consensus map showed 1 marker every 3.0 cM. PCR-based codominant DNA markers such as cleaved amplified polymorphic sequences and microsatellite markers were distributed in all linkage groups and occupied about half of mapped loci. These markers are very useful for integration of different linkage maps, QTL mapping, and comparative mapping for evolutional study, especially for species with a large genome size such as conifers. PMID:14668402

  16. A high-density gene map of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) based on exome sequence capture genotyping.

    PubMed

    Neves, Leandro Gomide; Davis, John M; Barbazuk, William B; Kirst, Matias

    2014-01-01

    Loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) is an economically and ecologically important conifer for which a suite of genomic resources is being generated. Despite recent attempts to sequence the large genome of conifers, their assembly and the positioning of genes remains largely incomplete. The interspecific synteny in pines suggests that a gene-based map would be useful to support genome assemblies and analysis of conifers. To establish a reference gene-based genetic map, we performed exome sequencing of 14729 genes on a mapping population of 72 haploid samples, generating a resource of 7434 sequence variants segregating for 3787 genes. Most markers are single-nucleotide polymorphisms, although short insertions/deletions and multiple nucleotide polymorphisms also were used. Marker segregation in the population was used to generate a high-density, gene-based genetic map. A total of 2841 genes were mapped to pine's 12 linkage groups with an average of one marker every 0.58 cM. Capture data were used to detect gene presence/absence variations and position 65 genes on the map. We compared the marker order of genes previously mapped in loblolly pine and found high agreement. We estimated that 4123 genes had enough sequencing depth for reliable detection of markers, suggesting a high marker conversation rate of 92% (3787/4123). This is possible because a significant portion of the gene is captured and sequenced, increasing the chances of identifying a polymorphic site for characterization and mapping. This sub-centiMorgan genetic map provides a valuable resource for gene positioning on chromosomes and guide for the assembly of a reference pine genome. PMID:24192835

  17. Genome-Wide Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms Discovery and High-Density Genetic Map Construction in Cauliflower Using Specific-Locus Amplified Fragment Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhenqing; Gu, Honghui; Sheng, Xiaoguang; Yu, Huifang; Wang, Jiansheng; Huang, Long; Wang, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Molecular markers and genetic maps play an important role in plant genomics and breeding studies. Cauliflower is an important and distinctive vegetable; however, very few molecular resources have been reported for this species. In this study, a novel, specific-locus amplified fragment (SLAF) sequencing strategy was employed for large-scale single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) discovery and high-density genetic map construction in a double-haploid, segregating population of cauliflower. A total of 12.47 Gb raw data containing 77.92 M pair-end reads were obtained after processing and 6815 polymorphic SLAFs between the two parents were detected. The average sequencing depths reached 52.66-fold for the female parent and 49.35-fold for the male parent. Subsequently, these polymorphic SLAFs were used to genotype the population and further filtered based on several criteria to construct a genetic linkage map of cauliflower. Finally, 1776 high-quality SLAF markers, including 2741 SNPs, constituted the linkage map with average data integrity of 95.68%. The final map spanned a total genetic length of 890.01 cM with an average marker interval of 0.50 cM, and covered 364.9 Mb of the reference genome. The markers and genetic map developed in this study could provide an important foundation not only for comparative genomics studies within Brassica oleracea species but also for quantitative trait loci identification and molecular breeding of cauliflower. PMID:27047515

  18. elPrep: High-Performance Preparation of Sequence Alignment/Map Files for Variant Calling

    PubMed Central

    Decap, Dries; Fostier, Jan; Reumers, Joke

    2015-01-01

    elPrep is a high-performance tool for preparing sequence alignment/map files for variant calling in sequencing pipelines. It can be used as a replacement for SAMtools and Picard for preparation steps such as filtering, sorting, marking duplicates, reordering contigs, and so on, while producing identical results. What sets elPrep apart is its software architecture that allows executing preparation pipelines by making only a single pass through the data, no matter how many preparation steps are used in the pipeline. elPrep is designed as a multithreaded application that runs entirely in memory, avoids repeated file I/O, and merges the computation of several preparation steps to significantly speed up the execution time. For example, for a preparation pipeline of five steps on a whole-exome BAM file (NA12878), we reduce the execution time from about 1:40 hours, when using a combination of SAMtools and Picard, to about 15 minutes when using elPrep, while utilising the same server resources, here 48 threads and 23GB of RAM. For the same pipeline on whole-genome data (NA12878), elPrep reduces the runtime from 24 hours to less than 5 hours. As a typical clinical study may contain sequencing data for hundreds of patients, elPrep can remove several hundreds of hours of computing time, and thus substantially reduce analysis time and cost. PMID:26182406

  19. HBLAST: Parallelised sequence similarity--A Hadoop MapReducable basic local alignment search tool.

    PubMed

    O'Driscoll, Aisling; Belogrudov, Vladislav; Carroll, John; Kropp, Kai; Walsh, Paul; Ghazal, Peter; Sleator, Roy D

    2015-04-01

    The recent exponential growth of genomic databases has resulted in the common task of sequence alignment becoming one of the major bottlenecks in the field of computational biology. It is typical for these large datasets and complex computations to require cost prohibitive High Performance Computing (HPC) to function. As such, parallelised solutions have been proposed but many exhibit scalability limitations and are incapable of effectively processing "Big Data" - the name attributed to datasets that are extremely large, complex and require rapid processing. The Hadoop framework, comprised of distributed storage and a parallelised programming framework known as MapReduce, is specifically designed to work with such datasets but it is not trivial to efficiently redesign and implement bioinformatics algorithms according to this paradigm. The parallelisation strategy of "divide and conquer" for alignment algorithms can be applied to both data sets and input query sequences. However, scalability is still an issue due to memory constraints or large databases, with very large database segmentation leading to additional performance decline. Herein, we present Hadoop Blast (HBlast), a parallelised BLAST algorithm that proposes a flexible method to partition both databases and input query sequences using "virtual partitioning". HBlast presents improved scalability over existing solutions and well balanced computational work load while keeping database segmentation and recompilation to a minimum. Enhanced BLAST search performance on cheap memory constrained hardware has significant implications for in field clinical diagnostic testing; enabling faster and more accurate identification of pathogenic DNA in human blood or tissue samples. PMID:25625550

  20. Connectivity mapping using a combined gene signature from multiple colorectal cancer datasets identified candidate drugs including existing chemotherapies

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background While the discovery of new drugs is a complex, lengthy and costly process, identifying new uses for existing drugs is a cost-effective approach to therapeutic discovery. Connectivity mapping integrates gene expression profiling with advanced algorithms to connect genes, diseases and small molecule compounds and has been applied in a large number of studies to identify potential drugs, particularly to facilitate drug repurposing. Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a commonly diagnosed cancer with high mortality rates, presenting a worldwide health problem. With the advancement of high throughput omics technologies, a number of large scale gene expression profiling studies have been conducted on CRCs, providing multiple datasets in gene expression data repositories. In this work, we systematically apply gene expression connectivity mapping to multiple CRC datasets to identify candidate therapeutics to this disease. Results We developed a robust method to compile a combined gene signature for colorectal cancer across multiple datasets. Connectivity mapping analysis with this signature of 148 genes identified 10 candidate compounds, including irinotecan and etoposide, which are chemotherapy drugs currently used to treat CRCs. These results indicate that we have discovered high quality connections between the CRC disease state and the candidate compounds, and that the gene signature we created may be used as a potential therapeutic target in treating the disease. The method we proposed is highly effective in generating quality gene signature through multiple datasets; the publication of the combined CRC gene signature and the list of candidate compounds from this work will benefit both cancer and systems biology research communities for further development and investigations. PMID:26356760

  1. Bloch Equations-Based Reconstruction of Myocardium T1 Maps from Modified Look-Locker Inversion Recovery Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Marty, Benjamin; Vignaud, Alexandre; Greiser, Andreas; Robert, Benjamin; de Sousa, Paulo Loureiro; Carlier, Pierre G.

    2015-01-01

    Modified Look-Locker Inversion recovery (MOLLI) sequence is increasingly performed for myocardial T1 mapping but is known to underestimate T1 values. The aim of the study was to quantitatively analyze several sources of errors when T1 maps are derived using standard post-processing of the sequence and to propose a reconstruction approach that takes into account inversion efficacy (η), T2 relaxation during balanced steady-state free-precession readouts and B1+ inhomogeneities. Contributions of the different sources of error were analyzed using Bloch equations simulations of MOLLI sequence. Bloch simulations were then combined with the acquisition of fast B1+ and T2 maps to derive more accurate T1 maps. This novel approach was evaluated on phantoms and on five healthy volunteers. Simulations show that T2 variations, B1+ heterogeneities and inversion efficiency represent major confounders for T1 mapping when MOLLI is processed with standard 3-parameters fitting. In vitro data indicate that T1 values are accurately derived with the simulation approach and in vivo data suggest that myocardium T1 are 15% underestimated when processed with the standard 3-parameters fitting. At the cost of additional acquisitions, this method might be suitable in clinical research protocols for precise tissue characterization as it decorrelates T1 and T2 effects on parametric maps provided by MOLLI sequence and avoids inaccuracies when B1+ is not homogenous throughout the myocardium. PMID:25962182

  2. Microbial genome program report: Optical approaches for physical mapping and sequence assembly of the Deinococcus radiodurans chromosome

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, David C.

    1999-11-23

    Maps of genomic or cloned DNA are frequently constructed by analyzing the cleavage patterns produced by restriction enzymes. Restriction enzymes are remarkable reagents that faithfully cleave only at specific sequences of between 4 and 8 nucleotides, which vary according to the specific enzymes. Restriction enzymes are reliable, numerous, and easily obtainable and presently, there are approximately 250 different sequences represented among thousands of enzymes. Restriction maps characterize gene structure and even entire genomes. Furthermore, such maps provide a useful scaffold for the alignment and verification of sequence data. Restriction maps generated by computer and predicted from the sequence are aligned with the actual restriction map. Restriction enzyme action has traditionally been assayed by gel electrophoresis. This technique separates cleaved molecules on the basis of their nobilities under the influence of an applied electrical field, within a gel separation matrix (small fragments have a greater mobility than large ones). Although gel electrophoresis distinguishes different sized DNA fragments (known as a fingerprint), the original order of these fragments remains unknown. The subsequent task of determining the order of such fragments is a labor intensive task, especially when making restriction maps of whole genomes, and therefore despite its obvious utility to genome analysis, it is not widely used.

  3. A High-Density SNP-Based Linkage Map of the Chicken Genome Reveals Sequence Features Correlated With Recombination Rate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The resolution of the widely used chicken consensus linkage map was highly enlarged by genotyping a total of 12,945 SNPs on the three existing mapping populations in chicken; the Wageningen (WU), East Lansing (EL) and Uppsala (UPP) mapping populations. A total of 8608 SNPs could be included on the m...

  4. MapNext: a software tool for spliced and unspliced alignments and SNP detection of short sequence reads

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Next-generation sequencing technologies provide exciting avenues for studies of transcriptomics and population genomics. There is an increasing need to conduct spliced and unspliced alignments of short transcript reads onto a reference genome and estimate minor allele frequency from sequences of population samples. Results We have designed and implemented MapNext, a software tool for both spliced and unspliced alignments of short sequence reads onto reference sequences, and automated SNP detection using neighbourhood quality standards. MapNext provides four main analyses: (i) unspliced alignment and clustering of reads, (ii) spliced alignment of transcript reads over intron boundaries, (iii) SNP detection and estimation of minor allele frequency from population sequences, and (iv) storage of result data in a database to make it available for more flexible queries and for further analyses. The software tool has been tested using both simulated and real data. Conclusion MapNext is a comprehensive and powerful tool for both spliced and unspliced alignments of short reads and automated SNP detection from population sequences. The simplicity, flexibility and efficiency of MapNext makes it a valuable tool for transcriptomic and population genomic research. PMID:19958476

  5. Efficient high-resolution genetic mapping of mouse interspersed repetitive sequence PCR products, toward integrated genetic and physical mapping of the mouse genome.

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, L; Hunter, K; Schalkwyk, L; Riba, L; Anson, S; Mott, R; Newell, W; Bruley, C; Bar, I; Ramu, E

    1995-01-01

    The ability to carry out high-resolution genetic mapping at high throughput in the mouse is a critical rate-limiting step in the generation of genetically anchored contigs in physical mapping projects and the mapping of genetic loci for complex traits. To address this need, we have developed an efficient, high-resolution, large-scale genome mapping system. This system is based on the identification of polymorphic DNA sites between mouse strains by using interspersed repetitive sequence (IRS) PCR. Individual cloned IRS PCR products are hybridized to a DNA array of IRS PCR products derived from the DNA of individual mice segregating DNA sequences from the two parent strains. Since gel electrophoresis is not required, large numbers of samples can be genotyped in parallel. By using this approach, we have mapped > 450 polymorphic probes with filters containing the DNA of up to 517 backcross mice, potentially allowing resolution of 0.14 centimorgan. This approach also carries the potential for a high degree of efficiency in the integration of physical and genetic maps, since pooled DNAs representing libraries of yeast artificial chromosomes or other physical representations of the mouse genome can be addressed by hybridization of filter representations of the IRS PCR products of such libraries. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7777502

  6. Mapping Reads on a Genomic Sequence: An Algorithmic Overview and a Practical Comparative Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Véronique; Zytnicki, Matthias; Fayolle, Julien; Loux, Valentin; Gibrat, Jean-François

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Mapping short reads against a reference genome is classically the first step of many next-generation sequencing data analyses, and it should be as accurate as possible. Because of the large number of reads to handle, numerous sophisticated algorithms have been developped in the last 3 years to tackle this problem. In this article, we first review the underlying algorithms used in most of the existing mapping tools, and then we compare the performance of nine of these tools on a well controled benchmark built for this purpose. We built a set of reads that exist in single or multiple copies in a reference genome and for which there is no mismatch, and a set of reads with three mismatches. We considered as reference genome both the human genome and a concatenation of all complete bacterial genomes. On each dataset, we quantified the capacity of the different tools to retrieve all the occurrences of the reads in the reference genome. Special attention was paid to reads uniquely reported and to reads with multiple hits. PMID:22506536

  7. A Simple Sequence Repeat- and Single-Nucleotide Polymorphism-Based Genetic Linkage Map of the Brown Planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens

    PubMed Central

    Jairin, Jirapong; Kobayashi, Tetsuya; Yamagata, Yoshiyuki; Sanada-Morimura, Sachiyo; Mori, Kazuki; Tashiro, Kosuke; Kuhara, Satoru; Kuwazaki, Seigo; Urio, Masahiro; Suetsugu, Yoshitaka; Yamamoto, Kimiko; Matsumura, Masaya; Yasui, Hideshi

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we developed the first genetic linkage map for the major rice insect pest, the brown planthopper (BPH, Nilaparvata lugens). The linkage map was constructed by integrating linkage data from two backcross populations derived from three inbred BPH strains. The consensus map consists of 474 simple sequence repeats, 43 single-nucleotide polymorphisms, and 1 sequence-tagged site, for a total of 518 markers at 472 unique positions in 17 linkage groups. The linkage groups cover 1093.9 cM, with an average distance of 2.3 cM between loci. The average number of marker loci per linkage group was 27.8. The sex-linkage group was identified by exploiting X-linked and Y-specific markers. Our linkage map and the newly developed markers used to create it constitute an essential resource and a useful framework for future genetic analyses in BPH. PMID:23204257

  8. Mapping DNA methylation by transverse current sequencing: Reduction of noise from neighboring nucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, Jose; Massey, Steven; Kalitsov, Alan; Velev, Julian

    Nanopore sequencing via transverse current has emerged as a competitive candidate for mapping DNA methylation without needed bisulfite-treatment, fluorescent tag, or PCR amplification. By eliminating the error producing amplification step, long read lengths become feasible, which greatly simplifies the assembly process and reduces the time and the cost inherent in current technologies. However, due to the large error rates of nanopore sequencing, single base resolution has not been reached. A very important source of noise is the intrinsic structural noise in the electric signature of the nucleotide arising from the influence of neighboring nucleotides. In this work we perform calculations of the tunneling current through DNA molecules in nanopores using the non-equilibrium electron transport method within an effective multi-orbital tight-binding model derived from first-principles calculations. We develop a base-calling algorithm accounting for the correlations of the current through neighboring bases, which in principle can reduce the error rate below any desired precision. Using this method we show that we can clearly distinguish DNA methylation and other base modifications based on the reading of the tunneling current.

  9. Genomic mapping of phosphorothioates reveals partial modification of short consensus sequences

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Bo; Chen, Chao; DeMott, Michael S.; Cheng, Qiuxiang; Clark, Tyson A.; Xiong, Xiaolin; Zheng, Xiaoqing; Butty, Vincent; Levine, Stuart S.; Yuan, George; Boitano, Matthew; Luong, Khai; Song, Yi; Zhou, Xiufen; Deng, Zixin; Turner, Stephen W.; Korlach, Jonas; You, Delin; Wang, Lianrong; Chen, Shi; Dedon, Peter C.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial phosphorothioate (PT) DNA modifications are incorporated by Dnd proteins A-E and often function with DndF-H as a restriction-modification (R-M) system, as in Escherichia coli B7A. However, bacteria such as Vibrio cyclitrophicus FF75 lack dndF-H, which points to other PT functions. To better understand PT biology, we report two novel, orthogonal technologies to map PTs across the genomes of B7A and FF75 with >90% agreement: real-time (SMRT) sequencing and deep sequencing of iodine-induced cleavage at PT (ICDS). In B7A, we detect PT on both strands of GpsAAC/GpsTTC motifs, but with only 18% of 40,701 possible sites modified. In contrast, PT in FF75 occurs as a single-strand modification at CpsCA, again with only 14% of 160,541 sites modified. Single-molecule analysis indicates that modification could be partial at any particular genomic site even with active restriction by DndF-H, with direct interaction of modification proteins with GAAC/GTTC sites demonstrated with oligonucleotides. These results point to highly unusual target selection by PT modification proteins and rule out known R-M mechanisms. PMID:24899568

  10. Whole-genome shotgun optical mapping of Rhodobacter sphaeroides strain 2.4. 1 and its use for whole-genome shotgun sequence assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Shou, S.; Kvikstad, E.; Kile, A.; Severin, J.; Forrest, D.; Runnheim, R.; Churas, C.; Hickman, J. W.; Mackenzie, C.; Choudhary, M.; Donohue, T.; Kaplan, S.; Schwartz, D. C.

    2003-09-01

    Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1 is a facultative photoheterotrophic bacterium with tremendous metabolic diversity, which has significantly contributed to our understanding of the molecular genetics of photosynthesis, photoheterotrophy, nitrogen fixation, hydrogen metabolism, carbon dioxide fixation, taxis, and tetrapyrrole biosynthesis. To further understand this remarkable bacterium, and to accelerate an ongoing sequencing project, two whole-genome restriction maps (EcoRI and HindIII) of R. sphaeroides strain 2.4.1 were constructed using shotgun optical mapping. The approach directly mapped genomic DNA by the random mapping of single molecules. The two maps were used to facilitate sequence assembly by providing an optical scaffold for high-resolution alignment and verification of sequence contigs. Our results show that such maps facilitated the closure of sequence gaps by the early detection of nascent sequence contigs during the course of the whole-genome shotgun sequencing process.

  11. The Genomic Scrapheap Challenge; Extracting Relevant Data from Unmapped Whole Genome Sequencing Reads, Including Strain Specific Genomic Segments, in Rats

    PubMed Central

    van der Weide, Robin H.; Simonis, Marieke; Hermsen, Roel; Toonen, Pim; Cuppen, Edwin; de Ligt, Joep

    2016-01-01

    Unmapped next-generation sequencing reads are typically ignored while they contain biologically relevant information. We systematically analyzed unmapped reads from whole genome sequencing of 33 inbred rat strains. High quality reads were selected and enriched for biologically relevant sequences; similarity-based analysis revealed clustering similar to previously reported phylogenetic trees. Our results demonstrate that on average 20% of all unmapped reads harbor sequences that can be used to improve reference genomes and generate hypotheses on potential genotype-phenotype relationships. Analysis pipelines would benefit from incorporating the described methods and reference genomes would benefit from inclusion of the genomic segments obtained through these efforts. PMID:27501045

  12. Sequence analysis and mapping of a novel human mitochondrial ATP synthase subunit 9 cDNA (ATP5G3)

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, W.L.; Gusella, J.F. |; Haines, J.L. |

    1994-11-15

    The authors describe the cloning, sequence analysis, and chromosomal mapping of a novel mitochondrial ATP synthase subunit 9 cDNA, P3. Subunit 9 transports protons across the inner mitochondrial membrane to the F{sub 1}-ATPase protruding on the matrix side, resulting in the generation of ATP. Sequence analysis of the P3 cDNA reveals only 80% identity with the human subunit 9 genes P1 and P2 in the DNA sequence encoding the mature protein identical to P1 and P2. The predicted sequence of the P3 leader peptide differs from the P1 and P2 leaders, but retains the {open_quotes}RFS{close_quotes} motif critical for mitochondrial import and maturation. The P3 gene (ATP5G3) maps to chromosome 2. 8 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  13. Genotyping by Sequencing Using Specific Allelic Capture to Build a High-Density Genetic Map of Durum Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Holtz, Yan; Ardisson, Morgane; Ranwez, Vincent; Besnard, Alban; Leroy, Philippe; Poux, Gérard; Roumet, Pierre; Viader, Véronique; Santoni, Sylvain; David, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Targeted sequence capture is a promising technology which helps reduce costs for sequencing and genotyping numerous genomic regions in large sets of individuals. Bait sequences are designed to capture specific alleles previously discovered in parents or reference populations. We studied a set of 135 RILs originating from a cross between an emmer cultivar (Dic2) and a recent durum elite cultivar (Silur). Six thousand sequence baits were designed to target Dic2 vs. Silur polymorphisms discovered in a previous RNAseq study. These baits were exposed to genomic DNA of the RIL population. Eighty percent of the targeted SNPs were recovered, 65% of which were of high quality and coverage. The final high density genetic map consisted of more than 3,000 markers, whose genetic and physical mapping were consistent with those obtained with large arrays. PMID:27171472

  14. SHARAKU: an algorithm for aligning and clustering read mapping profiles of deep sequencing in non-coding RNA processing

    PubMed Central

    Tsuchiya, Mariko; Amano, Kojiro; Abe, Masaya; Seki, Misato; Hase, Sumitaka; Sato, Kengo; Sakakibara, Yasubumi

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Deep sequencing of the transcripts of regulatory non-coding RNA generates footprints of post-transcriptional processes. After obtaining sequence reads, the short reads are mapped to a reference genome, and specific mapping patterns can be detected called read mapping profiles, which are distinct from random non-functional degradation patterns. These patterns reflect the maturation processes that lead to the production of shorter RNA sequences. Recent next-generation sequencing studies have revealed not only the typical maturation process of miRNAs but also the various processing mechanisms of small RNAs derived from tRNAs and snoRNAs. Results: We developed an algorithm termed SHARAKU to align two read mapping profiles of next-generation sequencing outputs for non-coding RNAs. In contrast with previous work, SHARAKU incorporates the primary and secondary sequence structures into an alignment of read mapping profiles to allow for the detection of common processing patterns. Using a benchmark simulated dataset, SHARAKU exhibited superior performance to previous methods for correctly clustering the read mapping profiles with respect to 5′-end processing and 3′-end processing from degradation patterns and in detecting similar processing patterns in deriving the shorter RNAs. Further, using experimental data of small RNA sequencing for the common marmoset brain, SHARAKU succeeded in identifying the significant clusters of read mapping profiles for similar processing patterns of small derived RNA families expressed in the brain. Availability and Implementation: The source code of our program SHARAKU is available at http://www.dna.bio.keio.ac.jp/sharaku/, and the simulated dataset used in this work is available at the same link. Accession code: The sequence data from the whole RNA transcripts in the hippocampus of the left brain used in this work is available from the DNA DataBank of Japan (DDBJ) Sequence Read Archive (DRA) under the accession number DRA

  15. Integrated Georeferencing of Stereo Image Sequences Captured with a Stereovision Mobile Mapping System - Approaches and Practical Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eugster, H.; Huber, F.; Nebiker, S.; Gisi, A.

    2012-07-01

    Stereovision based mobile mapping systems enable the efficient capturing of directly georeferenced stereo pairs. With today's camera and onboard storage technologies imagery can be captured at high data rates resulting in dense stereo sequences. These georeferenced stereo sequences provide a highly detailed and accurate digital representation of the roadside environment which builds the foundation for a wide range of 3d mapping applications and image-based geo web-services. Georeferenced stereo images are ideally suited for the 3d mapping of street furniture and visible infrastructure objects, pavement inspection, asset management tasks or image based change detection. As in most mobile mapping systems, the georeferencing of the mapping sensors and observations - in our case of the imaging sensors - normally relies on direct georeferencing based on INS/GNSS navigation sensors. However, in urban canyons the achievable direct georeferencing accuracy of the dynamically captured stereo image sequences is often insufficient or at least degraded. Furthermore, many of the mentioned application scenarios require homogeneous georeferencing accuracy within a local reference frame over the entire mapping perimeter. To achieve these demands georeferencing approaches are presented and cost efficient workflows are discussed which allows validating and updating the INS/GNSS based trajectory with independently estimated positions in cases of prolonged GNSS signal outages in order to increase the georeferencing accuracy up to the project requirements.

  16. Sequence characterization, in silico mapping and cytosine methylation analysis of markers linked to apospory in Paspalum notatum.

    PubMed

    Podio, Maricel; Rodríguez, María P; Felitti, Silvina; Stein, Juliana; Martínez, Eric J; Siena, Lorena A; Quarin, Camilo L; Pessino, Silvina C; Ortiz, Juan Pablo A

    2012-12-01

    In previous studies we reported the identification of several AFLP, RAPD and RFLP molecular markers linked to apospory in Paspalum notatum. The objective of this work was to sequence these markers, obtain their flanking regions by chromosome walking and perform an in silico mapping analysis in rice and maize. The methylation status of two apospory-related sequences was also assessed using methylation-sensitive RFLP experiments. Fourteen molecular markers were analyzed and several protein-coding sequences were identified. Copy number estimates and RFLP linkage analysis showed that the sequence PnMAI3 displayed 2-4 copies per genome and linkage to apospory. Extension of this marker by chromosome walking revealed an additional protein-coding sequence mapping in silico in the apospory-syntenic regions of rice and maize. Approximately 5 kb corresponding to different markers were characterized through the global sequencing procedure. A more refined analysis based on sequence information indicated synteny with segments of chromosomes 2 and 12 of rice and chromosomes 3 and 5 of maize. Two loci associated with apomixis locus were tested in methylation-sensitive RFLP experiments using genomic DNA extracted from leaves. Although both target sequences were methylated no methylation polymorphisms associated with the mode of reproduction were detected. PMID:23271945

  17. Mapping of human chromosome Xq28 by two-color fluorescence in situ hybridization of DNA sequences to interphase cell nuclei.

    PubMed Central

    Trask, B J; Massa, H; Kenwrick, S; Gitschier, J

    1991-01-01

    We have used the proximity of probe hybridization sites in interphase chromatin to derive the order of DNA sequences in a 2-3-Mbp region of human chromosome Xq28. The map generated bridges the results of genetic and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis mapping to produce a more complete map of Xq28 than possible with either of these other techniques alone. Two-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was used to detect the positions of two or more probes in G1 male interphase nuclei. We show that cosmids that are 50 kbp to 2-3 Mbp apart can be ordered rapidly with two alternative approaches: (1) by comparing the average measured distance between two probes and (2) simply by scoring the order of red and green fluorescent dots after detection of three or more probes with two fluorochromes. The validity of these approaches is demonstrated using five cosmids from a region spanning approximately 800 kbp that includes the factor VIII (F8), glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), and color-vision pigment (CV) genes. The cosmid map derived from interphase mapping is consistent with the map determined by restriction-fragment analysis. The two interphase mapping approaches were then used (1) to orient the F8/CV cluster relative to two markers, c1A1 and st14c, which we show by metaphase mapping to be proximal to the F8/CV cluster, (2) to position st14c (DXS52) between c1A1 and F8, and (3) to orient the CV gene cluster relative to G6PD by using two CV-flanking cosmids, 18b41 and fr7. The probe order in Xq28 derived from interphase proximity is cen-c1A1-st14c-5'F8 (p624-p542-p625)-G6PD-18b41-3' green-green-red-fr7-tel. We also show that, to determine their order by using metaphase chromosomes, sequences must be at least 1 Mbp apart, an order of magnitude greater than required in interphase chromatin. The data show that FISH mapping is a simple way to order sequences separated by greater than or equal to 50 kbp for the construction of long-range maps of mammalian genomes

  18. Tracking the evolution of sex chromosome systems in Melanoplinae grasshoppers through chromosomal mapping of repetitive DNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The accumulation of repetitive DNA during sex chromosome differentiation is a common feature of many eukaryotes and becomes more evident after recombination has been restricted or abolished. The accumulated repetitive sequences include multigene families, microsatellites, satellite DNAs and mobile elements, all of which are important for the structural remodeling of heterochromatin. In grasshoppers, derived sex chromosome systems, such as neo-XY♂/XX♀ and neo-X1X2Y♂/X1X1X2X2♀, are frequently observed in the Melanoplinae subfamily. However, no studies concerning the evolution of sex chromosomes in Melanoplinae have addressed the role of the repetitive DNA sequences. To further investigate the evolution of sex chromosomes in grasshoppers, we used classical cytogenetic and FISH analyses to examine the repetitive DNA sequences in six phylogenetically related Melanoplinae species with X0♂/XX♀, neo-XY♂/XX♀ and neo-X1X2Y♂/X1X1X2X2♀ sex chromosome systems. Results Our data indicate a non-spreading of heterochromatic blocks and pool of repetitive DNAs (C0t-1 DNA) in the sex chromosomes; however, the spreading of multigene families among the neo-sex chromosomes of Eurotettix and Dichromatos was remarkable, particularly for 5S rDNA. In autosomes, FISH mapping of multigene families revealed distinct patterns of chromosomal organization at the intra- and intergenomic levels. Conclusions These results suggest a common origin and subsequent differential accumulation of repetitive DNAs in the sex chromosomes of Dichromatos and an independent origin of the sex chromosomes of the neo-XY and neo-X1X2Y systems. Our data indicate a possible role for repetitive DNAs in the diversification of sex chromosome systems in grasshoppers. PMID:23937327

  19. Walking, cloning, and mapping with YACs in 3q27: Localization of five ESTs including three members of the cystatin gene family and identification of CpG islands

    SciTech Connect

    James, L.A.; Ogilvie, D.J.; Anand, R.

    1996-03-05

    Using yeast artificial chromosomes, we have generated a high-resolution physical map for 2.7 Mb of human chromosomal region 3q27. The YAC clones group into three contigs, one of which has also been linked to the CEPH YAC contig map of human chromosome 3. Fluorescence in situ hybridization has been used to order the contigs on the chromosome and to estimate the distance between them. Expressed sequence tags for five genes, including three members of the cystatin gene family and a gene thought to be involved in B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma, have been placed within the YAC contigs, and 12 putative CpG islands have been identified. These YACs provide a useful resource to complete the physical mapping of 3q27 and to begin identification and characterization of further genes that are located there. 27 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  20. Measurement of Myocardial T1ρ with a Motion Corrected, Parametric Mapping Sequence in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Shahid, Mohammed; Han, Yuchi; Witschey, Walter R. T.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To develop a robust T1ρ magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequence for assessment of myocardial disease in humans. Materials and Methods We developed a breath-held T1ρ mapping method using a single-shot, T1ρ-prepared balanced steady-state free-precession (bSSFP) sequence. The magnetization trajectory was simulated to identify sources of T1ρ error. To limit motion artifacts, an optical flow-based image registration method was used to align T1ρ images. The reproducibility and accuracy of these methods was assessed in phantoms and 10 healthy subjects. Results are shown in 1 patient with pre-ventricular contractions (PVCs), 1 patient with chronic myocardial infarction (MI) and 2 patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Results In phantoms, the mean bias was 1.0 ± 2.7 msec (100 msec phantom) and 0.9 ± 0.9 msec (60 msec phantom) at 60 bpm and 2.2 ± 3.2 msec (100 msec) and 1.4 ± 0.9 msec (60 msec) at 80 bpm. The coefficient of variation (COV) was 2.2 (100 msec) and 1.3 (60 msec) at 60 bpm and 2.6 (100 msec) and 1.4 (60 msec) at 80 bpm. Motion correction improved the alignment of T1ρ images in subjects, as determined by the increase in Dice Score Coefficient (DSC) from 0.76 to 0.88. T1ρ reproducibility was high (COV < 0.05, intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) = 0.85–0.97). Mean myocardial T1ρ value in healthy subjects was 63.5 ± 4.6 msec. There was good correspondence between late-gadolinium enhanced (LGE) MRI and increased T1ρ relaxation times in patients. Conclusion Single-shot, motion corrected, spin echo, spin lock MRI permits 2D T1ρ mapping in a breath-hold with good accuracy and precision. PMID:27003184

  1. Mapping the sex determination locus in the Atlantic halibut (Hippoglossus hippoglossus) using RAD sequencing

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Atlantic halibut (Hippoglossus hippoglossus) is a high-value, niche market species for cold-water marine aquaculture. Production of monosex female stocks is desirable in commercial production since females grow faster and mature later than males. Understanding the sex determination mechanism and developing sex-associated markers will shorten the time for the development of monosex female production, thus decreasing the costs of farming. Results Halibut juveniles were masculinised with 17 α-methyldihydrotestosterone (MDHT) and grown to maturity. Progeny groups from four treated males were reared and sexed. Two of these groups (n = 26 and 70) consisted of only females, while the other two (n = 30 and 71) contained balanced sex ratios (50% and 48% females respectively). DNA from parents and offspring from the two mixed-sex families were used as a template for Restriction-site Associated DNA (RAD) sequencing. The 648 million raw reads produced 90,105 unique RAD-tags. A linkage map was constructed based on 5703 Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) markers and 7 microsatellites consisting of 24 linkage groups, which corresponds to the number of chromosome pairs in this species. A major sex determining locus was mapped to linkage group 13 in both families. Assays for 10 SNPs with significant association with phenotypic sex were tested in both population data and in 3 additional families. Using a variety of machine-learning algorithms 97% correct classification could be obtained with the 3% of errors being phenotypic males predicted to be females. Conclusion Altogether our findings support the hypothesis that the Atlantic halibut has an XX/XY sex determination system. Assays are described for sex-associated DNA markers developed from the RAD sequencing analysis to fast track progeny testing and implement monosex female halibut production for an immediate improvement in productivity. These should also help to speed up the inclusion of neomales derived

  2. Construction of high resolution genetic linkage maps to improve the soybean genome sequence assembly Glyma1.01

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A landmark in soybean research, Glyma1.01, the first whole genome sequence of variety Williams 82 (Glycine max L. Merr.) was completed in 2010 and is widely used. However, because the assembly was primarily built based on the linkage maps constructed with a limited number of markers and recombinant...

  3. An evaluation of genotyping by sequencing (GBS) to map the Breviaristatum-e (ari-e) locus in cultivated barley

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We explored the use of genotyping by sequencing (GBS) on a recombinant inbred line population (GPMx) derived from a cross between the two-rowed barley cultivar ‘Golden Promise’ (ari-e.GP/Vrs1) and the six-rowed cultivar ‘Morex’ (Ari-e/vrs1) to map plant height. We identified three Quantitative Trait...

  4. A high-density simple sequence repeat and single nucleotide polymorphism genetic map of the tetraploid cotton genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton genome complexity was investigated with a saturated molecular genetic map that combined several sets of microsatellites or simple sequence repeats (SSR) and the first major public set of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers in cotton genomes (Gossypium spp.), and that was constructed ...

  5. Germline mutations of STR-alleles include multi-step mutations as defined by sequencing of repeat and flanking regions.

    PubMed

    Dauber, Eva-Maria; Kratzer, Adelgunde; Neuhuber, Franz; Parson, Walther; Klintschar, Michael; Bär, Walter; Mayr, Wolfgang R

    2012-05-01

    Well defined estimates of mutation rates are a prerequisite for the use of short tandem repeat (STR-) loci in relationship testing. We investigated 65 isolated genetic inconsistencies, which were observed within 50,796 allelic transfers at 23 STR-loci (ACTBP2 (SE33), CD4, CSF1PO, F13A1, F13B, FES, FGA, vWA, TH01, TPOX, D2S1338, D3S1358, D5S818, D7S820, D8S1132, D8S1179, D12S391, D13S317, D16S539, D17S976, D18S51, D19S433, D21S11) in Caucasoid families residing in Austria and Switzerland. Sequencing data of repeat and flanking regions and the median of all theoretically possible mutational steps showed valuable information to characterise the mutational events with regard to parental origin, change of repeat number (mutational step size) and direction of mutation (losses and gains of repeats). Apart from predominant single-step mutations including one case with a double genetic inconsistency, two double-step and two apparent four-step mutations could be identified. More losses than gains of repeats and more mutations originating from the paternal than the maternal lineage were observed (31 losses, 22 gains, 12 losses or gains and 47 paternal, 11 maternal mutations and 7 unclear of parental origin). The mutation in the paternal germline was 3.3 times higher than in the maternal germline. The results of our study show, that apart from the vast majority of single-step mutations rare multi-step mutations can be observed. Therefore, the interpretation of mutational events should not rigidly be restricted to the shortest possible mutational step, because rare but true multi-step mutations can easily be overlooked, if haplotype analysis is not possible. PMID:21873136

  6. Using genotyping by sequencing to map two novel anthracnose resistance loci in Sorghum bicolor

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Felderhoff, Tery J.; McIntyre, Lauren M.; Saballos, Ana; Vermerris, Wilfred

    2016-05-18

    Colletotrichum sublineola is an aggressive fungal pathogen that causes anthracnose in sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench]. The obvious symptoms of anthracnose are leaf blight and stem rot. Sorghum, the fifth most widely grown cereal crop in the world, can be highly susceptible to the disease, most notably in hot and humid environments. In the southeastern United States the acreage of sorghum has been increasing steadily in recent years, spurred by growing interest in producing biofuels, bio-based products, and animal feed. Resistance to anthracnose is, therefore, of paramount importance for successful sorghum production in this region. To identify anthracnose resistance locimore » present in the highly resistant cultivar ‘Bk7’, a biparental mapping population of F3:4 and F4:5 sorghum lines was generated by crossing ‘Bk7’ with the susceptible inbred ‘Early Hegari-Sart’. Lines were phenotyped in three environments and in two different years following natural infection. The population was genotyped by sequencing. Following a stringent custom filtering protocol, totals of 5186 and 2759 informative SNP markers were identified in the two populations. Segregation data and association analysis identified resistance loci on chromosomes 7 and 9, with the resistance alleles derived from ‘Bk7’. Both loci contain multiple classes of defense-related genes based on sequence similarity and gene ontologies. Genetic analysis following an independent selection experiment of lines derived from a cross between ‘Bk7’ and sweet sorghum ‘Mer81-4’ narrowed the resistance locus on chromosome 9 substantially, validating this QTL. As observed in other species, sorghum appears to have regions of clustered resistance genes. Lastly, further characterization of these regions will facilitate the development of novel germplasm with resistance to anthracnose and other diseases.« less

  7. Using genotyping by sequencing to map two novel anthracnose resistance Loci in Sorghum bicolor

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Felderhoff, Terry J.; McIntyre, Lauren M.; Saballos, Ana; Vermerris, Wilfred

    2016-05-18

    Colletotrichum sublineola is an aggressive fungal pathogen that causes anthracnose in sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench]. The obvious symptoms of anthracnose are leaf blight and stem rot. Sorghum, the fifth most widely grown cereal crop in the world, can be highly susceptible to the disease, most notably in hot and humid environments. In the southeastern United States the acreage of sorghum has been increasing steadily in recent years, spurred by growing interest in producing biofuels, bio-based products, and animal feed. Resistance to anthracnose is, therefore, of paramount importance for successful sorghum production in this region. To identify anthracnose resistance locimore » present in the highly resistant cultivar ‘Bk7’, a biparental mapping population of F3:4 and F4:5 sorghum lines was generated by crossing ‘Bk7’ with the susceptible inbred ‘Early Hegari-Sart’. Lines were phenotyped in three environments and in two different years following natural infection. The population was genotyped by sequencing. Following a stringent custom filtering protocol, totals of 5186 and 2759 informative SNP markers were identified in the two populations. Segregation data and association analysis identified resistance loci on chromosomes 7 and 9, with the resistance alleles derived from ‘Bk7’. Both loci contain multiple classes of defense-related genes based on sequence similarity and gene ontologies. In addition, genetic analysis following an independent selection experiment of lines derived from a cross between ‘Bk7’ and sweet sorghum ‘Mer81-4’ narrowed the resistance locus on chromosome 9 substantially, validating this QTL. As observed in other species, sorghum appears to have regions of clustered resistance genes. Further characterization of these regions will facilitate the development of novel germplasm with resistance to anthracnose and other diseases.« less

  8. Using Genotyping by Sequencing to Map Two Novel Anthracnose Resistance Loci in Sorghum bicolor

    PubMed Central

    J. Felderhoff, Terry; M. McIntyre, Lauren; Saballos, Ana; Vermerris, Wilfred

    2016-01-01

    Colletotrichum sublineola is an aggressive fungal pathogen that causes anthracnose in sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench]. The obvious symptoms of anthracnose are leaf blight and stem rot. Sorghum, the fifth most widely grown cereal crop in the world, can be highly susceptible to the disease, most notably in hot and humid environments. In the southeastern United States the acreage of sorghum has been increasing steadily in recent years, spurred by growing interest in producing biofuels, bio-based products, and animal feed. Resistance to anthracnose is, therefore, of paramount importance for successful sorghum production in this region. To identify anthracnose resistance loci present in the highly resistant cultivar ‘Bk7’, a biparental mapping population of F3:4 and F4:5 sorghum lines was generated by crossing ‘Bk7’ with the susceptible inbred ‘Early Hegari-Sart’. Lines were phenotyped in three environments and in two different years following natural infection. The population was genotyped by sequencing. Following a stringent custom filtering protocol, totals of 5186 and 2759 informative SNP markers were identified in the two populations. Segregation data and association analysis identified resistance loci on chromosomes 7 and 9, with the resistance alleles derived from ‘Bk7’. Both loci contain multiple classes of defense-related genes based on sequence similarity and gene ontologies. Genetic analysis following an independent selection experiment of lines derived from a cross between ‘Bk7’ and sweet sorghum ‘Mer81-4’ narrowed the resistance locus on chromosome 9 substantially, validating this QTL. As observed in other species, sorghum appears to have regions of clustered resistance genes. Further characterization of these regions will facilitate the development of novel germplasm with resistance to anthracnose and other diseases. PMID:27194807

  9. Using Genotyping by Sequencing to Map Two Novel Anthracnose Resistance Loci in Sorghum bicolor.

    PubMed

    J Felderhoff, Terry; M McIntyre, Lauren; Saballos, Ana; Vermerris, Wilfred

    2016-01-01

    Colletotrichum sublineola is an aggressive fungal pathogen that causes anthracnose in sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench]. The obvious symptoms of anthracnose are leaf blight and stem rot. Sorghum, the fifth most widely grown cereal crop in the world, can be highly susceptible to the disease, most notably in hot and humid environments. In the southeastern United States the acreage of sorghum has been increasing steadily in recent years, spurred by growing interest in producing biofuels, bio-based products, and animal feed. Resistance to anthracnose is, therefore, of paramount importance for successful sorghum production in this region. To identify anthracnose resistance loci present in the highly resistant cultivar 'Bk7', a biparental mapping population of F3:4 and F4:5 sorghum lines was generated by crossing 'Bk7' with the susceptible inbred 'Early Hegari-Sart'. Lines were phenotyped in three environments and in two different years following natural infection. The population was genotyped by sequencing. Following a stringent custom filtering protocol, totals of 5186 and 2759 informative SNP markers were identified in the two populations. Segregation data and association analysis identified resistance loci on chromosomes 7 and 9, with the resistance alleles derived from 'Bk7'. Both loci contain multiple classes of defense-related genes based on sequence similarity and gene ontologies. Genetic analysis following an independent selection experiment of lines derived from a cross between 'Bk7' and sweet sorghum 'Mer81-4' narrowed the resistance locus on chromosome 9 substantially, validating this QTL. As observed in other species, sorghum appears to have regions of clustered resistance genes. Further characterization of these regions will facilitate the development of novel germplasm with resistance to anthracnose and other diseases. PMID:27194807

  10. Object of interest extraction in low-frame-rate image sequences and application to mobile mapping systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Peng; Wang, Cheng

    2012-06-01

    Here, we present a novel object of interest (OOI) extraction framework designed for low-frame-rate (LFR) image sequences, typically from mobile mapping systems (MMS). The proposed method integrates tracking and segmentation in a unified framework. We propose a novel object-shaped kernel-based scale-invariant mean shift algorithm to track the OOI through the LFR sequences and keep the temporal consistency. Then the well-known GrabCut approach for static image segmentation is generalized to the LFR sequences. We analyze the imaging geometry of the OOI in LFR sequences collected by the MMS and design a Kalman filter module to assist the proposed tracker. Extensive experimental results on real LFR sequences collected by VISAT™ MMS demonstrate that the proposed approach is robust to the challenges such as low frame rate, fast scaling, and large inter-frame displacement of the OOI.

  11. Kohonen map as a visualization tool for the analysis of protein sequences: multiple alignments, domains and segments of secondary structures.

    PubMed

    Hanke, J; Reich, J G

    1996-12-01

    The method of Kohonen maps, a special form of neural networks, was applied as a visualization tool for the analysis of protein sequence similarity. The procedure converts sequence (domains, aligned sequences, segments of secondary structure) into a characteristic signal matrix. This conversion depends on the property or replacement score vector selected by the user. Similar sequences have small distance in the signal space. The trained Kohonen network is functionally equivalent to an unsupervised non-linear cluster analyzer. Protein families, or aligned sequences, or segments of similar secondary structure, aggregate as clusters, and their proximity may be inspected on a color screen or on paper. Pull-down menus permit access to background information in the established text-oriented way. PMID:9021261

  12. Construction of a linkage map based on retrotransposon insertion polymorphisms in sweetpotato via high-throughput sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Monden, Yuki; Hara, Takuya; Okada, Yoshihiro; Jahana, Osamu; Kobayashi, Akira; Tabuchi, Hiroaki; Onaga, Shoko; Tahara, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas L.) is an outcrossing hexaploid species with a large number of chromosomes (2n = 6x = 90). Although sweetpotato is one of the world’s most important crops, genetic analysis of the species has been hindered by its genetic complexity combined with the lack of a whole genome sequence. In the present study, we constructed a genetic linkage map based on retrotransposon insertion polymorphisms using a mapping population derived from a cross between ‘Purple Sweet Lord’ (PSL) and ‘90IDN-47’ cultivars. High-throughput sequencing and subsequent data analyses identified many Rtsp-1 retrotransposon insertion sites, and their allele dosages (simplex, duplex, triplex, or double-simplex) were determined based on segregation ratios in the mapping population. Using a pseudo-testcross strategy, 43 and 47 linkage groups were generated for PSL and 90IDN-47, respectively. Interestingly, most of these insertions (~90%) were present in a simplex manner, indicating their utility for linkage map construction in polyploid species. Additionally, our approach led to savings of time and labor for genotyping. Although the number of markers herein was insufficient for map-based cloning, our trial analysis exhibited the utility of retrotransposon-based markers for linkage map construction in sweetpotato. PMID:26069444

  13. A 3D-1D substitution matrix for protein fold recognition that includes predicted secondary structure of the sequence.

    PubMed

    Rice, D W; Eisenberg, D

    1997-04-11

    In protein fold recognition, a probe amino acid sequence is compared to a library of representative folds of known structure to identify a structural homolog. In cases where the probe and its homolog have clear sequence similarity, traditional residue substitution matrices have been used to predict the structural similarity. In cases where the probe is sequentially distant from its homolog, we have developed a (7 x 3 x 2 x 7 x 3) 3D-1D substitution matrix (called H3P2), calculated from a database of 119 structural pairs. Members of each pair share a similar fold, but have sequence identity less than 30%. Each probe sequence position is defined by one of seven residue classes and three secondary structure classes. Each homologous fold position is defined by one of seven residue classes, three secondary structure classes, and two burial classes. Thus the matrix is five-dimensional and contains 7 x 3 x 2 x 7 x 3 = 882 elements or 3D-1D scores. The first step in assigning a probe sequence to its homologous fold is the prediction of the three-state (helix, strand, coil) secondary structure of the probe; here we use the profile based neural network prediction of secondary structure (PHD) program. Then a dynamic programming algorithm uses the H3P2 matrix to align the probe sequence with structures in a representative fold library. To test the effectiveness of the H3P2 matrix a challenging, fold class diverse, and cross-validated benchmark assessment is used to compare the H3P2 matrix to the GONNET, PAM250, BLOSUM62 and a secondary structure only substitution matrix. For distantly related sequences the H3P2 matrix detects more homologous structures at higher reliabilities than do these other substitution matrices, based on sensitivity versus specificity plots (or SENS-SPEC plots). The added efficacy of the H3P2 matrix arises from its information on the statistical preferences for various sequence-structure environment combinations from very distantly related proteins. It

  14. Interactive segmentation of tongue contours in ultrasound video sequences using quality maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghrenassia, Sarah; Ménard, Lucie; Laporte, Catherine

    2014-03-01

    Ultrasound (US) imaging is an effective and non invasive way of studying the tongue motions involved in normal and pathological speech, and the results of US studies are of interest for the development of new strategies in speech therapy. State-of-the-art tongue shape analysis techniques based on US images depend on semi-automated tongue segmentation and tracking techniques. Recent work has mostly focused on improving the accuracy of the tracking techniques themselves. However, occasional errors remain inevitable, regardless of the technique used, and the tongue tracking process must thus be supervised by a speech scientist who will correct these errors manually or semi-automatically. This paper proposes an interactive framework to facilitate this process. In this framework, the user is guided towards potentially problematic portions of the US image sequence by a segmentation quality map that is based on the normalized energy of an active contour model and automatically produced during tracking. When a problematic segmentation is identified, corrections to the segmented contour can be made on one image and propagated both forward and backward in the problematic subsequence, thereby improving the user experience. The interactive tools were tested in combination with two different tracking algorithms. Preliminary results illustrate the potential of the proposed framework, suggesting that the proposed framework generally improves user interaction time, with little change in segmentation repeatability.

  15. Nucleotide sequence analysis with polynucleotide kinase and nucleotide `mapping' methods. 5′-Terminal sequence of deoxyribonucleic acid from bacteriophages λ and 424

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Kenneth

    1973-01-01

    The polynucleotide kinase reaction was used in analyses of complex mixtures of oligodeoxynucleotides which were fractionated by various two-dimensional nucleotide `mapping' procedures. Parallel ionophoretic analyses on DEAE-cellulose paper, pH2, and AE-cellulose paper, pH3.5, of venom phosphodiesterase partial digests of 5′-terminally labelled oligonucleotides enabled the sequence of the nucleotides to be deduced uniquely. A `diagonal ionophoresis' method has been used with mixtures of nucleotides. Application of these methods to 5′-terminally labelled DNA from bacteriophage λ gave the terminal sequences pA-G-G-T-C-G and pG-G-G-C-G. Identical 5′-terminal sequences were found with DNA from bacteriophage 424. ImagesPLATE 5PLATE 1PLATE 2PLATE 3PLATE 4 PMID:4352720

  16. Toward allotetraploid cotton genome assembly: integration of a high-density molecular genetic linkage map with DNA sequence information

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cotton is the world’s most important natural textile fiber and a significant oilseed crop. Decoding cotton genomes will provide the ultimate reference and resource for research and utilization of the species. Integration of high-density genetic maps with genomic sequence information will largely accelerate the process of whole-genome assembly in cotton. Results In this paper, we update a high-density interspecific genetic linkage map of allotetraploid cultivated cotton. An additional 1,167 marker loci have been added to our previously published map of 2,247 loci. Three new marker types, InDel (insertion-deletion) and SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) developed from gene information, and REMAP (retrotransposon-microsatellite amplified polymorphism), were used to increase map density. The updated map consists of 3,414 loci in 26 linkage groups covering 3,667.62 cM with an average inter-locus distance of 1.08 cM. Furthermore, genome-wide sequence analysis was finished using 3,324 informative sequence-based markers and publicly-available Gossypium DNA sequence information. A total of 413,113 EST and 195 BAC sequences were physically anchored and clustered by 3,324 sequence-based markers. Of these, 14,243 ESTs and 188 BACs from different species of Gossypium were clustered and specifically anchored to the high-density genetic map. A total of 2,748 candidate unigenes from 2,111 ESTs clusters and 63 BACs were mined for functional annotation and classification. The 337 ESTs/genes related to fiber quality traits were integrated with 132 previously reported cotton fiber quality quantitative trait loci, which demonstrated the important roles in fiber quality of these genes. Higher-level sequence conservation between different cotton species and between the A- and D-subgenomes in tetraploid cotton was found, indicating a common evolutionary origin for orthologous and paralogous loci in Gossypium. Conclusion This study will serve as a valuable genomic resource

  17. Multishot versus Single-Shot Pulse Sequences in Very High Field fMRI: A Comparison Using Retinotopic Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Gatenby, J. Christopher; Gore, John C.; Tong, Frank

    2012-01-01

    High-resolution functional MRI is a leading application for very high field (7 Tesla) human MR imaging. Though higher field strengths promise improvements in signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) and BOLD contrast relative to fMRI at 3 Tesla, these benefits may be partially offset by accompanying increases in geometric distortion and other off-resonance effects. Such effects may be especially pronounced with the single-shot EPI pulse sequences typically used for fMRI at standard field strengths. As an alternative, one might consider multishot pulse sequences, which may lead to somewhat lower temporal SNR than standard EPI, but which are also often substantially less susceptible to off-resonance effects. Here we consider retinotopic mapping of human visual cortex as a practical test case by which to compare examples of these sequence types for high-resolution fMRI at 7 Tesla. We performed polar angle retinotopic mapping at each of 3 isotropic resolutions (2.0, 1.7, and 1.1 mm) using both accelerated single-shot 2D EPI and accelerated multishot 3D gradient-echo pulse sequences. We found that single-shot EPI indeed led to greater temporal SNR and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) than the multishot sequences. However, additional distortion correction in postprocessing was required in order to fully realize these advantages, particularly at higher resolutions. The retinotopic maps produced by both sequence types were qualitatively comparable, and showed equivalent test/retest reliability. Thus, when surface-based analyses are planned, or in other circumstances where geometric distortion is of particular concern, multishot pulse sequences could provide a viable alternative to single-shot EPI. PMID:22514646

  18. Radiation hybrid maps of D-genome of Aegilops tauschii and their application in sequence assembly of large and complex plant genomes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The large and complex genome of bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L., ~17 Gb) requires high-resolution genome maps saturated with ordered markers to assist in anchoring and orienting BAC contigs/ sequence scaffolds for whole genome sequence assembly. Radiation hybrid (RH) mapping has proven to be an e...

  19. The Locus Lookup Tool at MaizeGDB: Identification of Genomic Regions in Maize by Integrating Sequence Information with Physical and Genetic Maps

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methods to automatically integrate sequence information with physical and genetic maps are scarce. The Locus Lookup Tool enables researchers to define windows of genomic sequence likely to contain loci of interest where only genetic or physical mapping associations are reported. Using the Locus Look...

  20. Construction of High-Density Linkage Maps of Populus deltoides × P. simonii Using Restriction-Site Associated DNA Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Chunfa; Li, Huogen; Wang, Ying; Li, Xuran; Ou, Jiajia; Wang, Deyuan; Xu, Houxi; Ma, Chao; Lang, Xianye; Liu, Guangxin; Zhang, Bo; Shi, Jisen

    2016-01-01

    Although numerous linkage maps have been constructed in the genus Populus, they are typically sparse and thus have limited applications due to low throughput of traditional molecular markers. Restriction-site associated DNA sequencing (RADSeq) technology allows us to identify a large number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) across genomes of many individuals in a fast and cost-effective way, and makes it possible to construct high-density genetic linkage maps. We performed RADSeq for 299 progeny and their two parents in an F1 hybrid population generated by crossing the female Populus deltoides ‘I-69’ and male Populus simonii ‘L3’. A total of 2,545 high quality SNP markers were obtained and two parent-specific linkage maps were constructed. The female genetic map contained 1601 SNPs and 20 linkage groups, spanning 4,249.12 cM of the genome with an average distance of 2.69 cM between adjacent markers, while the male map consisted of 940 SNPs and also 20 linkage groups with a total length of 3,816.24 cM and an average marker interval distance of 4.15 cM. Finally, our analysis revealed that synteny and collinearity are highly conserved between the parental linkage maps and the reference genome of P. trichocarpa. We demonstrated that RAD sequencing is a powerful technique capable of rapidly generating a large number of SNPs for constructing genetic maps in outbred forest trees. The high-quality linkage maps constructed here provided reliable genetic resources to facilitate locating quantitative trait loci (QTLs) that control growth and wood quality traits in the hybrid population. PMID:26964097

  1. easyPAC: A Tool for Fast Prediction, Testing and Reference Mapping of Degenerate PCR Primers from Alignments or Consensus Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Rosenkranz, David

    2012-01-01

    The PCR-amplification of unknown homologous or paralogous genes generally relies on PCR primers predicted from multi sequence alignments. But increasing sequence divergence can induce the need to use degenerate primers which entails the problem of testing the characteristics, unwanted interactions and potential mispriming of degenerate primers. Here I introduce easyPAC, a new software for the prediction of degenerate primers from multi sequence alignments or single consensus sequences. As a major innovation, easyPAC allows to apply all customary primer test procedures to degenerate primer sequences including fast mapping to reference files. Thus, easyPAC simplifies and expedites the designing of specific degenerate primers enormously. Degenerate primers suggested by easyPAC were used in PCR amplification with subsequent de novo sequencing of TDRD1 exon 11 homologs from several representatives of the haplorrhine primate phylogeny. The results demonstrate the efficient performance of the suggested primers and therefore show that easyPAC can advance upcoming comparative genetic studies.

  2. UV cross-link mapping of the substrate-binding site of an RNase P ribozyme to a target mRNA sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Kilani, A F; Liu, F

    1999-01-01

    RNase P ribozyme cleaves an RNA helix that resembles the acceptor stem and T-stem structure of its natural ptRNA substrate. When covalently linked with a guide sequence, the ribozyme can function as a sequence-specific endonuclease and cleave any target RNA sequences that base pair with the guide sequence. Using a site-directed ultraviolet (UV) cross-linking approach, we have mapped the regions of the ribozyme that are in close proximity to a substrate that contains the mRNA sequence encoding thymidine kinase of human herpes simplex virus 1. Our data suggest that the cleavage site of the mRNA substrate is positioned at the same regions of the ribozyme that bind to the cleavage site of a ptRNA. The mRNA-binding domains include regions that interact with the acceptor stem and T-stem and in addition, regions that are unique and not in close contact with a ptRNA. Identification of the mRNA-binding site provides a foundation to study how RNase P ribozymes achieve their sequence specificity and facilitates the development of gene-targeting ribozymes. PMID:10496224

  3. YAC contig mapping of six expressed sequences encoded by human chromosome 21

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, J.; Cox, M.; Patterson, D. |

    1995-03-01

    Six cDNA clones from human chromosome 21 have been mapped in a set of complete YAC contig spanning the entire chromosome 21q. The mapping positions between two STSs on the YAC contig and the NotI coordinates starting from the telomere of 21q were determined for the cDNA clones. The YAC contig mapping positions agree well with those using a comprehensive somatic cell hybrid mapping panel. 6 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  4. PRIMAL: Page Rank-Based Indoor Mapping and Localization Using Gene-Sequenced Unlabeled WLAN Received Signal Strength.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mu; Zhang, Qiao; Xu, Kunjie; Tian, Zengshan; Wang, Yanmeng; He, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Due to the wide deployment of wireless local area networks (WLAN), received signal strength (RSS)-based indoor WLAN localization has attracted considerable attention in both academia and industry. In this paper, we propose a novel page rank-based indoor mapping and localization (PRIMAL) by using the gene-sequenced unlabeled WLAN RSS for simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM). Specifically, first of all, based on the observation of the motion patterns of the people in the target environment, we use the Allen logic to construct the mobility graph to characterize the connectivity among different areas of interest. Second, the concept of gene sequencing is utilized to assemble the sporadically-collected RSS sequences into a signal graph based on the transition relations among different RSS sequences. Third, we apply the graph drawing approach to exhibit both the mobility graph and signal graph in a more readable manner. Finally, the page rank (PR) algorithm is proposed to construct the mapping from the signal graph into the mobility graph. The experimental results show that the proposed approach achieves satisfactory localization accuracy and meanwhile avoids the intensive time and labor cost involved in the conventional location fingerprinting-based indoor WLAN localization. PMID:26404274

  5. PRIMAL: Page Rank-Based Indoor Mapping and Localization Using Gene-Sequenced Unlabeled WLAN Received Signal Strength

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Mu; Zhang, Qiao; Xu, Kunjie; Tian, Zengshan; Wang, Yanmeng; He, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Due to the wide deployment of wireless local area networks (WLAN), received signal strength (RSS)-based indoor WLAN localization has attracted considerable attention in both academia and industry. In this paper, we propose a novel page rank-based indoor mapping and localization (PRIMAL) by using the gene-sequenced unlabeled WLAN RSS for simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM). Specifically, first of all, based on the observation of the motion patterns of the people in the target environment, we use the Allen logic to construct the mobility graph to characterize the connectivity among different areas of interest. Second, the concept of gene sequencing is utilized to assemble the sporadically-collected RSS sequences into a signal graph based on the transition relations among different RSS sequences. Third, we apply the graph drawing approach to exhibit both the mobility graph and signal graph in a more readable manner. Finally, the page rank (PR) algorithm is proposed to construct the mapping from the signal graph into the mobility graph. The experimental results show that the proposed approach achieves satisfactory localization accuracy and meanwhile avoids the intensive time and labor cost involved in the conventional location fingerprinting-based indoor WLAN localization. PMID:26404274

  6. Nested association mapping of stem rust resistance in wheat using genotyping by sequencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nested association mapping is an approach to map trait loci in which families within populations are interconnected by a common parent. By implementing joint-linkage association analysis, this approach is able to map causative loci with higher power and resolution compared to biparental linkage mapp...

  7. High-Throughput Sequencing of Campylobacter jejuni Insertion Mutant Libraries Reveals mapA as a Fitness Factor for Chicken Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Jeremiah G.; Livny, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a leading cause of gastrointestinal infections worldwide, due primarily to its ability to asymptomatically colonize the gastrointestinal tracts of agriculturally relevant animals, including chickens. Infection often occurs following consumption of meat that was contaminated by C. jejuni during harvest. Because of this, much interest lies in understanding the mechanisms that allow C. jejuni to colonize the chicken gastrointestinal tract. To address this, we generated a C. jejuni transposon mutant library that is amenable to insertion sequencing and introduced this mutant pool into day-of-hatch chicks. Following deep sequencing of C. jejuni mutants in the cecal outputs, several novel factors required for efficient colonization of the chicken gastrointestinal tract were identified, including the predicted outer membrane protein MapA. A mutant strain lacking mapA was constructed and found to be significantly reduced for chicken colonization in both competitive infections and monoinfections. Further, we found that mapA is required for in vitro competition with wild-type C. jejuni but is dispensable for growth in monoculture. PMID:24633877

  8. Biosynthesis of riboflavin: cloning, sequencing, mapping, and expression of the gene coding for GTP cyclohydrolase II in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Richter, G; Ritz, H; Katzenmeier, G; Volk, R; Kohnle, A; Lottspeich, F; Allendorf, D; Bacher, A

    1993-01-01

    GTP cyclohydrolase II catalyzes the first committed step in the biosynthesis of riboflavin. The gene coding for this enzyme in Escherichia coli has been cloned by marker rescue. Sequencing indicated an open reading frame of 588 bp coding for a 21.8-kDa peptide of 196 amino acids. The gene was mapped to a position at 28.2 min on the E. coli chromosome and is identical with ribA. GTP cyclohydrolase II was overexpressed in a recombinant strain carrying a plasmid with the cloned gene. The enzyme was purified to homogeneity from the recombinant strain. The N-terminal sequence determined by Edman degradation was identical to the predicted sequence. The sequence is homologous to the 3' part of the central open reading frame in the riboflavin operon of Bacillus subtilis. PMID:8320220

  9. Toward a high-resolution Plasmodium falciparum linkage map: Polymorphic markers from hundreds of simple sequence repeats

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Xin-Zhuan; Wellems, T.E.

    1996-05-01

    A total of 5.7 simple sequence repeats (SSRs or {open_quotes}microsatellites{close_quotes}) were identified from Plasmodium falciparum sequences in GenBank and from inserts in a genomic DNA library. Oligonucleotide primers from sequences that flank 224 of these SSRs were synthesized and used in PCR assays to test for simple sequence length polymorphisms (SSLPs). Of the 224 SSRs, 188 showed SSLPs were assigned to chromosome linkage groups by physical mapping and by comparing their inheritance patterns against those of restriction fragment length polymorphism markers in a genetic cross (HB3XDd2). The predominant SSLPs in P. falciparum were found to contain [TA]{sub n}, and [TAA]{sub n}, a feature that is reminiscent of plant genomes and is consistent with the proposed algal-like origin of malaria parasites. Since such SSLPs are abundant and readily isolated, they are a powerful resource for genetic analysis of P. falciparum. 38 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. A genetic map of melon highly enriched with fruit quality QTLs and EST markers, including sugar and carotenoid metabolism genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A genetic map of melon enriched for fruit traits was constructed, using a recombinant inbred (RI) population developed from a cross between representatives of the two subspecies of Cucumis melo L.: PI 414723 (subspecies agrestis) and 'Dulce' (subspecies melo). Phenotyping of 99 RI lines was conducte...

  11. A bioinformatics insight to rhizobial globins: gene identification and mapping, polypeptide sequence and phenetic analysis, and protein modeling.

    PubMed Central

    Gesto-Borroto, Reinier; Sánchez-Sánchez, Miriam; Arredondo-Peter, Raúl

    2015-01-01

    Globins (Glbs) are proteins widely distributed in organisms. Three evolutionary families have been identified in Glbs: the M, S and T Glb families. The M Glbs include flavohemoglobins (fHbs) and single-domain Glbs (SDgbs); the S Glbs include globin-coupled sensors (GCSs), protoglobins and sensor single domain globins, and the T Glbs include truncated Glbs (tHbs). Structurally, the M and S Glbs exhibit 3/3-folding whereas the T Glbs exhibit 2/2-folding. Glbs are widespread in bacteria, including several rhizobial genomes. However, only few rhizobial Glbs have been characterized. Hence, we characterized Glbs from 62 rhizobial genomes using bioinformatics methods such as data mining in databases, sequence alignment, phenogram construction and protein modeling. Also, we analyzed soluble extracts from Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA38 and USDA58 by (reduced + carbon monoxide (CO) minus reduced) differential spectroscopy. Database searching showed that only fhb, sdgb, gcs and thb genes exist in the rhizobia analyzed in this work. Promoter analysis revealed that apparently several rhizobial glb genes are not regulated by a -10 promoter but might be regulated by -35 and Fnr (fumarate-nitrate reduction regulator)-like promoters. Mapping analysis revealed that rhizobial fhbs and thbs are flanked by a variety of genes whereas several rhizobial sdgbs and gcss are flanked by genes coding for proteins involved in the metabolism of nitrates and nitrites and chemotaxis, respectively. Phenetic analysis showed that rhizobial Glbs segregate into the M, S and T Glb families, while structural analysis showed that predicted rhizobial SDgbs and fHbs and GCSs globin domain and tHbs fold into the 3/3- and 2/2-folding, respectively. Spectra from B. japonicum USDA38 and USDA58 soluble extracts exhibited peaks and troughs characteristic of bacterial and vertebrate Glbs thus indicating that putative Glbs are synthesized in B. japonicum USDA38 and USDA58. PMID:26594329

  12. Whole genome sequence analysis of circulating Bluetongue virus serotype 11 strains from the United States including two domestic canine isolates.

    PubMed

    Gaudreault, Natasha N; Jasperson, Dane C; Dubovi, Edward J; Johnson, Donna J; Ostlund, Eileen N; Wilson, William C

    2015-07-01

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) is a vector-transmitted pathogen that typically infects and causes disease in domestic and wild ruminants. BTV is also known to infect domestic canines as discovered when dogs were vaccinated with a BTV-contaminated vaccine. Canine BTV infections have been documented through serological surveys, and natural infection by the Culicoides vector has been suggested. The report of isolation of BTV serotype 11 (BTV-11) from 2 separate domestic canine abortion cases in the states of Texas in 2011 and Kansas in 2012, were apparently unrelated to BTV-contaminated vaccination or consumption of BTV-contaminated raw meat as had been previously speculated. To elucidate the origin and relationship of these 2 domestic canine BTV-11 isolates, whole genome sequencing was performed. Six additional BTV-11 field isolates from Texas, Florida, and Washington, submitted for diagnostic investigation during 2011 and 2013, were also fully sequenced and analyzed. The phylogenetic analysis indicates that the BTV-11 domestic canine isolates are virtually identical, and both share high identity with 2 BTV-11 isolates identified from white-tailed deer in Texas in 2011. The results of the current study further support the hypothesis that a BTV-11 strain circulating in the Midwestern states could have been transmitted to the dogs by the infected Culicoides vector. Our study also expands the short list of available BTV-11 sequences, which may aid BTV surveillance and epidemiology. PMID:26069226

  13. The Azorhizobium caulinodans nifA gene: identification of upstream-activating sequences including a new element, the 'anaerobox'.

    PubMed Central

    Nees, D W; Stein, P A; Ludwig, R A

    1988-01-01

    From nucleotide sequencing analyses, the A. caulinodans nifA gene seems to be under dual control by the Ntr (in response to available N) and Fnr (in response to available O2) transcriptional activation/repression systems. Because it fixes N2 in two contexts, the Ntr system might regulate A. caulinodans nif gene expression ex planta, while the Fnr system might similarly regulate in planta. As nifA upstream-activating elements, we have identified: (i) a gpNifA binding site allowing autogenous nifA regulation, (ii) an Ntr-dependent transcription start, presumably the target of gpNifA activation, and (iii) an "anaerobox" tetradecameric nucleotide sequence that is precisely conserved among O2 regulated enteric bacterial genes controlled by the gpFnr transcriptional activator. Because it is precisely positioned upstream of enteric bacterial transcriptional starts, the "anaerobox" sequence may constitute the gpFnr DNA binding site. If so, then a second, Ntr-independent nifA transcription start may exist. We have also deduced the A. caulinodans nifA open reading frame and have compared the gene product (gpNifA) with those of other N2-fixing organisms. These proteins exhibit strongly conserved motifs: (i) sites conserved among ATP-binding proteins, (ii) an interdomain linker region, and (iii) a C-terminal alpha-helix-turn-alpha-helix DNA binding site. PMID:3186446

  14. SNP Assay Development for Linkage Map Construction, Anchoring Whole-Genome Sequence, and Other Genetic and Genomic Applications in Common Bean

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Song, Qijian; Jia, Gaofeng; Hyten, David L.; Jenkins, Jerry; Hwang, Eun-Young; Schroeder, Steven G.; Osorno, Juan M.; Schmutz, Jeremy; Jackson, Scott A.; McClean, Phillip E.; et al

    2015-08-28

    A total of 992,682 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was identified as ideal for Illumina Infinium II BeadChip design after sequencing a diverse set of 17 common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L) varieties with the aid of next-generation sequencing technology. From these, two BeadChips each with >5000 SNPs were designed. The BARCBean6K_1 BeadChip was selected for the purpose of optimizing polymorphism among market classes and, when possible, SNPs were targeted to sequence scaffolds in the Phaseolus vulgaris 14× genome assembly with sequence lengths >10 kb. The BARCBean6K_2 BeadChip was designed with the objective of anchoring additional scaffolds and to facilitate orientation of largemore » scaffolds. Analysis of 267 F2 plants from a cross of varieties Stampede × Red Hawk with the two BeadChips resulted in linkage maps with a total of 7040 markers including 7015 SNPs. With the linkage map, a total of 432.3 Mb of sequence from 2766 scaffolds was anchored to create the Phaseolus vulgaris v1.0 assembly, which accounted for approximately 89% of the 487 Mb of available sequence scaffolds of the Phaseolus vulgaris v0.9 assembly. A core set of 6000 SNPs (BARCBean6K_3 BeadChip) with high genotyping quality and polymorphism was selected based on the genotyping of 365 dry bean and 134 snap bean accessions with the BARCBean6K_1 and BARCBean6K_2 BeadChips. The BARCBean6K_3 BeadChip is a useful tool for genetics and genomics research and it is widely used by breeders and geneticists in the United States and abroad.« less

  15. SNP Assay Development for Linkage Map Construction, Anchoring Whole-Genome Sequence, and Other Genetic and Genomic Applications in Common Bean

    PubMed Central

    Song, Qijian; Jia, Gaofeng; Hyten, David L.; Jenkins, Jerry; Hwang, Eun-Young; Schroeder, Steven G.; Osorno, Juan M.; Schmutz, Jeremy; Jackson, Scott A.; McClean, Phillip E.; Cregan, Perry B.

    2015-01-01

    A total of 992,682 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was identified as ideal for Illumina Infinium II BeadChip design after sequencing a diverse set of 17 common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L) varieties with the aid of next-generation sequencing technology. From these, two BeadChips each with >5000 SNPs were designed. The BARCBean6K_1 BeadChip was selected for the purpose of optimizing polymorphism among market classes and, when possible, SNPs were targeted to sequence scaffolds in the Phaseolus vulgaris 14× genome assembly with sequence lengths >10 kb. The BARCBean6K_2 BeadChip was designed with the objective of anchoring additional scaffolds and to facilitate orientation of large scaffolds. Analysis of 267 F2 plants from a cross of varieties Stampede × Red Hawk with the two BeadChips resulted in linkage maps with a total of 7040 markers including 7015 SNPs. With the linkage map, a total of 432.3 Mb of sequence from 2766 scaffolds was anchored to create the Phaseolus vulgaris v1.0 assembly, which accounted for approximately 89% of the 487 Mb of available sequence scaffolds of the Phaseolus vulgaris v0.9 assembly. A core set of 6000 SNPs (BARCBean6K_3 BeadChip) with high genotyping quality and polymorphism was selected based on the genotyping of 365 dry bean and 134 snap bean accessions with the BARCBean6K_1 and BARCBean6K_2 BeadChips. The BARCBean6K_3 BeadChip is a useful tool for genetics and genomics research and it is widely used by breeders and geneticists in the United States and abroad. PMID:26318155

  16. SNP Assay Development for Linkage Map Construction, Anchoring Whole-Genome Sequence, and Other Genetic and Genomic Applications in Common Bean

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Qijian; Jia, Gaofeng; Hyten, David L.; Jenkins, Jerry; Hwang, Eun-Young; Schroeder, Steven G.; Osorno, Juan M.; Schmutz, Jeremy; Jackson, Scott A.; McClean, Phillip E.; Cregan, Perry B.

    2015-08-28

    A total of 992,682 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was identified as ideal for Illumina Infinium II BeadChip design after sequencing a diverse set of 17 common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L) varieties with the aid of next-generation sequencing technology. From these, two BeadChips each with >5000 SNPs were designed. The BARCBean6K_1 BeadChip was selected for the purpose of optimizing polymorphism among market classes and, when possible, SNPs were targeted to sequence scaffolds in the Phaseolus vulgaris 14× genome assembly with sequence lengths >10 kb. The BARCBean6K_2 BeadChip was designed with the objective of anchoring additional scaffolds and to facilitate orientation of large scaffolds. Analysis of 267 F2 plants from a cross of varieties Stampede × Red Hawk with the two BeadChips resulted in linkage maps with a total of 7040 markers including 7015 SNPs. With the linkage map, a total of 432.3 Mb of sequence from 2766 scaffolds was anchored to create the Phaseolus vulgaris v1.0 assembly, which accounted for approximately 89% of the 487 Mb of available sequence scaffolds of the Phaseolus vulgaris v0.9 assembly. A core set of 6000 SNPs (BARCBean6K_3 BeadChip) with high genotyping quality and polymorphism was selected based on the genotyping of 365 dry bean and 134 snap bean accessions with the BARCBean6K_1 and BARCBean6K_2 BeadChips. The BARCBean6K_3 BeadChip is a useful tool for genetics and genomics research and it is widely used by breeders and geneticists in the United States and abroad.

  17. SNP Assay Development for Linkage Map Construction, Anchoring Whole-Genome Sequence, and Other Genetic and Genomic Applications in Common Bean.

    PubMed

    Song, Qijian; Jia, Gaofeng; Hyten, David L; Jenkins, Jerry; Hwang, Eun-Young; Schroeder, Steven G; Osorno, Juan M; Schmutz, Jeremy; Jackson, Scott A; McClean, Phillip E; Cregan, Perry B

    2015-11-01

    A total of 992,682 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was identified as ideal for Illumina Infinium II BeadChip design after sequencing a diverse set of 17 common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L) varieties with the aid of next-generation sequencing technology. From these, two BeadChips each with >5000 SNPs were designed. The BARCBean6K_1 BeadChip was selected for the purpose of optimizing polymorphism among market classes and, when possible, SNPs were targeted to sequence scaffolds in the Phaseolus vulgaris 14× genome assembly with sequence lengths >10 kb. The BARCBean6K_2 BeadChip was designed with the objective of anchoring additional scaffolds and to facilitate orientation of large scaffolds. Analysis of 267 F2 plants from a cross of varieties Stampede × Red Hawk with the two BeadChips resulted in linkage maps with a total of 7040 markers including 7015 SNPs. With the linkage map, a total of 432.3 Mb of sequence from 2766 scaffolds was anchored to create the Phaseolus vulgaris v1.0 assembly, which accounted for approximately 89% of the 487 Mb of available sequence scaffolds of the Phaseolus vulgaris v0.9 assembly. A core set of 6000 SNPs (BARCBean6K_3 BeadChip) with high genotyping quality and polymorphism was selected based on the genotyping of 365 dry bean and 134 snap bean accessions with the BARCBean6K_1 and BARCBean6K_2 BeadChips. The BARCBean6K_3 BeadChip is a useful tool for genetics and genomics research and it is widely used by breeders and geneticists in the United States and abroad. PMID:26318155

  18. KROSS: mapping the Hα emission across the star formation sequence at z ≈ 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magdis, Georgios E.; Bureau, Martin; Stott, J. P.; Tiley, A.; Swinbank, A. M.; Bower, R.; Bunker, A. J.; Jarvis, Matt; Johnson, Helen; Sharples, Ray

    2016-03-01

    We present first results from the KMOS (K-band Multi-Object Spectrograph) Redshift One Spectroscopic Survey, an ongoing large kinematical survey of a thousand, z ˜ 1 star-forming galaxies, with VLT KMOS. Out of the targeted galaxies (˜500 so far), we detect and spatially resolve Hα emission in ˜90 and 77 per cent of the sample, respectively. Based on the integrated Hα flux measurements and the spatially resolved maps, we derive a median star formation rate (SFR) of ˜7.0 M⊙ yr-1 and a median physical size of = 5.1 kpc. We combine the inferred SFRs and effective radii measurements to derive the star formation surface densities (ΣSFR) and present a `resolved' version of the star formation main sequence (MS) that appears to hold at subgalactic scales, with similar slope and scatter as the one inferred from galaxy-integrated properties. Our data also yield a trend between ΣSFR and Δ(sSFR) (distance from the MS) suggesting that galaxies with higher sSFR are characterized by denser star formation activity. Similarly, we find evidence for an anticorrelation between the gas phase metallicity (Z) and the Δ(sSFR), suggesting a 0.2 dex variation in the metal content of galaxies within the MS and significantly lower metallicities for galaxies above it. The origin of the observed trends between ΣSFR-Δ(sSFR) and Z-Δ(sSFR) could be driven by an interplay between variations of the gas fraction or the star formation efficiency of the galaxies along and off the MS. To address this, follow-up observations of our sample that will allow gas mass estimates are necessary.

  19. Association mapping of disease resistance traits in rainbow trout using restriction site associated DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Nathan R; LaPatra, Scott E; Overturf, Ken; Towner, Richard; Narum, Shawn R

    2014-12-01

    Recent advances in genotyping-by-sequencing have enabled genome-wide association studies in nonmodel species including those in aquaculture programs. As with other aquaculture species, rainbow trout and steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) are susceptible to disease and outbreaks can lead to significant losses. Fish culturists have therefore been pursuing strategies to prevent losses to common pathogens such as Flavobacterium psychrophilum (the etiological agent for bacterial cold water disease [CWD]) and infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) by adjusting feed formulations, vaccine development, and selective breeding. However, discovery of genetic markers linked to disease resistance offers the potential to use marker-assisted selection to increase resistance and reduce outbreaks. For this study we sampled juvenile fish from 40 families from 2-yr classes that either survived or died after controlled exposure to either CWD or IHNV. Restriction site-associated DNA sequencing produced 4661 polymorphic single-nucleotide polymorphism loci after strict filtering. Genotypes from individual survivors and mortalities were then used to test for association between disease resistance and genotype at each locus using the program TASSEL. After we accounted for kinship and stratification of the samples, tests revealed 12 single-nucleotide polymorphism markers that were highly associated with resistance to CWD and 19 markers associated with resistance to IHNV. These markers are candidates for further investigation and are expected to be useful for marker assisted selection in future broodstock selection for various aquaculture programs. PMID:25354781

  20. Association Mapping of Disease Resistance Traits in Rainbow Trout Using Restriction Site Associated DNA Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Nathan R.; LaPatra, Scott E.; Overturf, Ken; Towner, Richard; Narum, Shawn R.

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in genotyping-by-sequencing have enabled genome-wide association studies in nonmodel species including those in aquaculture programs. As with other aquaculture species, rainbow trout and steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) are susceptible to disease and outbreaks can lead to significant losses. Fish culturists have therefore been pursuing strategies to prevent losses to common pathogens such as Flavobacterium psychrophilum (the etiological agent for bacterial cold water disease [CWD]) and infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) by adjusting feed formulations, vaccine development, and selective breeding. However, discovery of genetic markers linked to disease resistance offers the potential to use marker-assisted selection to increase resistance and reduce outbreaks. For this study we sampled juvenile fish from 40 families from 2-yr classes that either survived or died after controlled exposure to either CWD or IHNV. Restriction site−associated DNA sequencing produced 4661 polymorphic single-nucleotide polymorphism loci after strict filtering. Genotypes from individual survivors and mortalities were then used to test for association between disease resistance and genotype at each locus using the program TASSEL. After we accounted for kinship and stratification of the samples, tests revealed 12 single-nucleotide polymorphism markers that were highly associated with resistance to CWD and 19 markers associated with resistance to IHNV. These markers are candidates for further investigation and are expected to be useful for marker assisted selection in future broodstock selection for various aquaculture programs. PMID:25354781

  1. Drawing a high-resolution functional map of adeno-associated virus capsid by massively parallel sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Adachi, Kei; Enoki, Tatsuji; Kawano, Yasuhiro; Veraz, Michael; Nakai, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) capsid engineering is an emerging approach to advance gene therapy. However, a systematic analysis on how each capsid amino acid contributes to multiple functions remains challenging. Here we show proof-of-principle and successful application of a novel approach, termed AAV Barcode-Seq, that allows us to characterize phenotypes of hundreds of different AAV strains in a high-throughput manner and therefore overcomes technical difficulties in the systematic analysis. In this approach, we generate DNA barcode-tagged AAV libraries and determine a spectrum of phenotypes of each AAV strain by Illumina barcode sequencing. By applying this method to AAV capsid mutant libraries tagged with DNA barcodes, we can draw a high-resolution map of AAV capsid amino acids important for the structural integrity and functions including receptor binding, tropism, neutralization and blood clearance. Thus, Barcode-Seq provides a new tool to generate a valuable resource for virus and gene therapy research. PMID:24435020

  2. Mapping and Exome Sequencing Identifies a Mutation in the IARS Gene as the Cause of Hereditary Perinatal Weak Calf Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hirano, Takashi; Kobayashi, Naohiko; Matsuhashi, Tamako; Watanabe, Daisaku; Watanabe, Toshio; Takasuga, Akiko; Sugimoto, Mayumi; Sugimoto, Yoshikazu

    2013-01-01

    We identified an IARS (isoleucyl-tRNA synthetase) c.235G>C (p.Val79Leu) substitution as the causative mutation for neonatal weakness with intrauterine growth retardation (perinatal weak calf syndrome). In Japanese Black cattle, the syndrome was frequently found in calves sired by Bull A. Hence, we employed homozygosity mapping and linkage analysis. In order to identify the perinatal weak calf syndrome locus in a 4.04-Mb region of BTA 8, we analysed a paternal half-sibling family with a BovineSNP50 BeadChip and microsatellites. In this critical region, we performed exome sequencing to identify a causative mutation. Three variants were detected as possible candidates for causative mutations that were predicted to disrupt the protein function, including a G>C (p.Val79Leu) mutation in IARS c.235. The IARS c.235G>C mutation was not a homozygous risk allele in the 36 healthy offspring of Bull A. Moreover, the IARS Val79 residue and its flanking regions were evolutionarily and highly conserved. The IARS mutant (Leu79) had decreased aminoacylation activity. Additionally, the homozygous mutation was not found in any of 1526 healthy cattle. Therefore, we concluded that the IARS c.235G>C mutation was the cause of hereditary perinatal weak calf syndrome. PMID:23700453

  3. Rapid and Efficient Identification of Caenorhabditis elegans Legacy Mutations Using Hawaiian SNP-Based Mapping and Whole-Genome Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo-Lambert, Aimee; Fuchsman, Abigail S; Fabritius, Amy S; Smith, Harold E; Golden, Andy

    2015-05-01

    The production of viable embryos requires the coordination of many cellular processes, including protein synthesis, cytoskeletal reorganization, establishment of polarity, cell migration, cell division, and in Caenorhabditis elegans, eggshell formation. Defects in any of these processes can lead to embryonic lethality. We examined six temperature-sensitive mutants as well as one nonconditional mutant that were previously identified in genetic screens as either embryonic lethal (maternal-effect or zygotic lethal) or eggshell defective. The responsible molecular lesion for each had never been determined. After confirmation of temperature sensitivity and lethality, we performed whole-genome sequencing using a single-nucleotide polymorphism mapping strategy to pinpoint the molecular lesions. Gene candidates were confirmed by RNA interference phenocopy and/or complementation tests and one mutant was further validated by CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palidromic Repeats)/Cas9 gene editing. This approach identified new alleles of several genes that had only been previously studied by RNA interference depletion. Our identification of temperature-sensitive alleles for all of these essential genes provides an extremely useful tool for further investigation for the C. elegans community, such as the ability to address mutant phenotypes at various developmental stages and the ability to carry out suppressor/enhancer screens to identify other genes that function in a specific cellular process. PMID:25740937

  4. Rapid and Efficient Identification of Caenorhabditis elegans Legacy Mutations Using Hawaiian SNP-Based Mapping and Whole-Genome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Jaramillo-Lambert, Aimee; Fuchsman, Abigail S.; Fabritius, Amy S.; Smith, Harold E.; Golden, Andy

    2015-01-01

    The production of viable embryos requires the coordination of many cellular processes, including protein synthesis, cytoskeletal reorganization, establishment of polarity, cell migration, cell division, and in Caenorhabditis elegans, eggshell formation. Defects in any of these processes can lead to embryonic lethality. We examined six temperature-sensitive mutants as well as one nonconditional mutant that were previously identified in genetic screens as either embryonic lethal (maternal-effect or zygotic lethal) or eggshell defective. The responsible molecular lesion for each had never been determined. After confirmation of temperature sensitivity and lethality, we performed whole-genome sequencing using a single-nucleotide polymorphism mapping strategy to pinpoint the molecular lesions. Gene candidates were confirmed by RNA interference phenocopy and/or complementation tests and one mutant was further validated by CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palidromic Repeats)/Cas9 gene editing. This approach identified new alleles of several genes that had only been previously studied by RNA interference depletion. Our identification of temperature-sensitive alleles for all of these essential genes provides an extremely useful tool for further investigation for the C. elegans community, such as the ability to address mutant phenotypes at various developmental stages and the ability to carry out suppressor/enhancer screens to identify other genes that function in a specific cellular process. PMID:25740937

  5. Mapping whole genome shotgun sequence and variant calling in mammalian species without their reference genomes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genomics research in mammals has produced reference genome sequences that are essential for identifying variation associated with disease. High quality reference genome sequences are now available for humans, model species, and economically important agricultural animals. Comparisons between these s...

  6. Identification and mapping of DNA binding proteins target sequences in long genomic regions by two-dimensional EMSA.

    PubMed

    Chernov, Igor P; Akopov, Sergey B; Nikolaev, Lev G; Sverdlov, Eugene D

    2006-07-01

    Specific binding of nuclear proteins, in particular transcription factors, to target DNA sequences is a major mechanism of genome functioning and gene expression regulation in eukaryotes. Therefore, identification and mapping specific protein target sites (PTS) is necessary for understanding genomic regulation. Here we used a novel two-dimensional electrophoretic mobility shift assay (2D-EMSA) procedure for identification and mapping of 52 PTS within a 563-kb human genome region located between the FXYD5 and TZFP genes. The PTS occurred with approximately equal frequency within unique and repetitive genomic regions. PTS belonging to unique sequences tended to group together within gene introns and close to their 5' and 3' ends, whereas PTS located within repeats were evenly distributed between transcribed and intragenic regions. PMID:16869519

  7. Mapping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinney, Douglas M.; McIntosh, Willard L.

    1979-01-01

    The area of geological mapping in the United States in 1978 increased greatly over that reported in 1977; state geological maps were added for California, Idaho, Nevada, and Alaska last year. (Author/BB)

  8. Construction of the first high-density genetic linkage map of Salvia miltiorrhiza using specific length amplified fragment (SLAF) sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tian; Guo, Linlin; Pan, Yuling; Zhao, Qi; Wang , Jianhua; Song, Zhenqiao

    2016-01-01

    Salvia miltiorrhiza is an important medicinal crop in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). Knowledge of its genetic foundation is limited because sufficient molecular markers have not been developed, and therefore a high-density genetic linkage map is incomplete. Specific length amplified fragment sequencing (SLAF-seq) is a recently developed high-throughput strategy for large-scale SNP (Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms) discovery and genotyping based on next generation sequencing (NGS). In this study, genomic DNA extracted from two parents and their 96 F1 individuals was subjected to high-throughput sequencing and SLAF library construction. A total of 155.96 Mb of data containing 155,958,181 pair-end reads were obtained after preprocessing. The average coverage of each SLAF marker was 83.43-fold for the parents compared with 10.36-fold for the F1 offspring. The final linkage map consists of 5,164 SLAFs in 8 linkage groups (LGs) and spans 1,516.43 cM, with an average distance of 0.29 cM between adjacent markers. The results will not only provide a platform for mapping quantitative trait loci but also offer a critical new tool for S. miltiorrhiza biotechnology and comparative genomics as well as a valuable reference for TCM studies. PMID:27040179

  9. Construction of the first high-density genetic linkage map of Salvia miltiorrhiza using specific length amplified fragment (SLAF) sequencing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tian; Guo, Linlin; Pan, Yuling; Zhao, Qi; Wang, Jianhua; Song, Zhenqiao

    2016-01-01

    Salvia miltiorrhiza is an important medicinal crop in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). Knowledge of its genetic foundation is limited because sufficient molecular markers have not been developed, and therefore a high-density genetic linkage map is incomplete. Specific length amplified fragment sequencing (SLAF-seq) is a recently developed high-throughput strategy for large-scale SNP (Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms) discovery and genotyping based on next generation sequencing (NGS). In this study, genomic DNA extracted from two parents and their 96 F1 individuals was subjected to high-throughput sequencing and SLAF library construction. A total of 155.96 Mb of data containing 155,958,181 pair-end reads were obtained after preprocessing. The average coverage of each SLAF marker was 83.43-fold for the parents compared with 10.36-fold for the F1 offspring. The final linkage map consists of 5,164 SLAFs in 8 linkage groups (LGs) and spans 1,516.43 cM, with an average distance of 0.29 cM between adjacent markers. The results will not only provide a platform for mapping quantitative trait loci but also offer a critical new tool for S. miltiorrhiza biotechnology and comparative genomics as well as a valuable reference for TCM studies. PMID:27040179

  10. Homozygosity Mapping and Targeted Sanger Sequencing Reveal Genetic Defects Underlying Inherited Retinal Disease in Families from Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Waheed, Nadia Khalida; Siddiqui, Sorath Noorani; Mustafa, Bilal; Ayub, Humaira; Ali, Liaqat; Ahmad, Shakeel; Micheal, Shazia; Hussain, Alamdar; Shah, Syed Tahir Abbas; Ali, Syeda Hafiza Benish; Ahmed, Waqas; Khan, Yar Muhammad; den Hollander, Anneke I.; Haer-Wigman, Lonneke; Collin, Rob W. J.; Khan, Muhammad Imran; Qamar, Raheel; Cremers, Frans P. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Homozygosity mapping has facilitated the identification of the genetic causes underlying inherited diseases, particularly in consanguineous families with multiple affected individuals. This knowledge has also resulted in a mutation dataset that can be used in a cost and time effective manner to screen frequent population-specific genetic variations associated with diseases such as inherited retinal disease (IRD). Methods We genetically screened 13 families from a cohort of 81 Pakistani IRD families diagnosed with Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), retinitis pigmentosa (RP), congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB), or cone dystrophy (CD). We employed genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array analysis to identify homozygous regions shared by affected individuals and performed Sanger sequencing of IRD-associated genes located in the sizeable homozygous regions. In addition, based on population specific mutation data we performed targeted Sanger sequencing (TSS) of frequent variants in AIPL1, CEP290, CRB1, GUCY2D, LCA5, RPGRIP1 and TULP1, in probands from 28 LCA families. Results Homozygosity mapping and Sanger sequencing of IRD-associated genes revealed the underlying mutations in 10 families. TSS revealed causative variants in three families. In these 13 families four novel mutations were identified in CNGA1, CNGB1, GUCY2D, and RPGRIP1. Conclusions Homozygosity mapping and TSS revealed the underlying genetic cause in 13 IRD families, which is useful for genetic counseling as well as therapeutic interventions that are likely to become available in the near future. PMID:25775262

  11. Floral Transcriptome Sequencing for SSR Marker Development and Linkage Map Construction in the Tea Plant (Camellia sinensis)

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Kang; Zhang, Cheng-Cai; Wu, Li-Yun; Qi, Gui-Nian; Cheng, Hao; Zhang, Qiang; Cui, Qing-Mei; Liang, Jin-Bo

    2013-01-01

    Despite the worldwide consumption and high economic importance of tea, the plant (Camellia sinensis) is not well studied in molecular biology. Under the few circumstances in which the plant is studied, C. sinensis flowers, which are important for reproduction and cross-breeding, receive less emphasis than investigation of its leaves or roots. Using high-throughput Illumina RNA sequencing, we analyzed a C. sinensis floral transcriptome, and 26.9 million clean reads were assembled into 75,531 unigenes averaging 402 bp. Among them, 50,792 (67.2%) unigenes were annotated with a BLAST search against the NCBI Non-Redundant (NR) database and 10,290 (16.67%) were detected that contained one or more simple sequence repeats (SSRs). From these SSR-containing sequences, 2,439 candidate SSR markers were developed and 720 were experimentally tested, validating 431 (59.9%) novel polymorphic SSR markers for C. sinensis. Then, a consensus SSR-based linkage map was constructed that covered 1,156.9 cM with 237 SSR markers distributed in 15 linkage groups. Both transcriptome information and the genetic map of C. sinensis presented here offer a valuable foundation for molecular biology investigations such as functional gene isolation, quantitative trait loci mapping, and marker-assisted selection breeding in this important species. PMID:24303059

  12. Genetic mapping of legume orthologs reveals high conservation of synteny between lentil species and the sequenced genomes of Medicago and chickpea

    PubMed Central

    Gujaria-Verma, Neha; Vail, Sally L.; Carrasquilla-Garcia, Noelia; Penmetsa, R. Varma; Cook, Douglas R.; Farmer, Andrew D.; Vandenberg, Albert; Bett, Kirstin E.

    2014-01-01

    Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) is a global food crop with increasing importance for food security in south Asia and other regions. Lens ervoides, a wild relative of cultivated lentil, is an important source of agronomic trait variation. Lens is a member of the galegoid clade of the Papilionoideae family, which includes other important dietary legumes such as chickpea (Cicer arietinum) and pea (Pisum sativum), and the sequenced model legume Medicago truncatula. Understanding the genetic structure of Lens spp. in relation to more fully sequenced legumes would allow leveraging of genomic resources. A set of 1107 TOG-based amplicons were identified in L. ervoides and a subset thereof used to design SNP markers for mapping. A map of L. ervoides consisting of 377 SNP markers spread across seven linkage groups was developed using a GoldenGate genotyping array and single SNP marker assays. Comparison with maps of M. truncatula and L. culinaris documented considerable shared synteny and led to the identification of a few major translocations and a major inversion that distinguish Lens from M. truncatula, as well as a translocation that distinguishes L. culinaris from L. ervoides. The identification of chromosome-level differences among Lens spp. will aid in the understanding of introgression of genes from L. ervoides into cultivated L. culinaris, furthering genetic research and breeding applications in lentil. PMID:25538716

  13. Reliable In Silico Identification of Sequence Polymorphisms and Their Application for Extending the Genetic Map of Sugar Beet (Beta vulgaris)

    PubMed Central

    Holtgräwe, Daniela; Sörensen, Thomas Rosleff; Viehöver, Prisca; Schneider, Jessica; Schulz, Britta; Borchardt, Dietrich; Kraft, Thomas; Himmelbauer, Heinz; Weisshaar, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Molecular markers are a highly valuable tool for creating genetic maps. Like in many other crops, sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) breeding is increasingly supported by the application of such genetic markers. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) based markers have a high potential for automated analysis and high-throughput genotyping. We developed a bioinformatics workflow that uses Sanger and 2nd-generation sequence data for detection, evaluation and verification of new transcript-associated SNPs from sugar beet. RNAseq data from one parent of an established mapping population were produced by 454-FLX sequencing and compared to Sanger ESTs derived from the other parent. The workflow established for SNP detection considers the quality values of both types of reads, provides polymorphic alignments as well as selection criteria for reliable SNP detection and allows painless generation of new genetic markers within genes. We obtained a total of 14,323 genic SNPs and InDels. According to empirically optimised settings for the quality parameters, we classified these SNPs into four usability categories. Validation of a subset of the in silico detected SNPs by genotyping the mapping population indicated a high success rate of the SNP detection. Finally, a total of 307 new markers were integrated with existing data into a new genetic map of sugar beet which offers improved resolution and the integration of terminal markers. PMID:25302600

  14. A High-Density Genetic Map of Tetraploid Salix matsudana Using Specific Length Amplified Fragment Sequencing (SLAF-seq).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Yuan, Huwei; Li, Min; Li, Yujuan; Wang, Ying; Ma, Xiangjian; Zhang, Yuan; Tan, Feng; Wu, Rongling

    2016-01-01

    As a salt-tolerant arbor tree species, Salix matsudana plays an important role in afforestation and greening in the coastal areas of China. To select superior Salix varieties that adapt to wide saline areas, it is of paramount importance to understand and identify the mechanisms of salt-tolerance at the level of the whole genome. Here, we describe a high-density genetic linkage map of S. matsudana that represents a good coverage of the Salix genome. An intraspecific F1 hybrid population was established by crossing the salt-sensitive "Yanjiang" variety as the female parent with the salt-tolerant "9901" variety as the male parent. This population, along with its parents, was genotyped by specific length amplified fragment sequencing (SLAF-seq), leading to 277,333 high-quality SLAF markers. By marker analysis, we found that both the parents and offspring were tetraploid. The mean sequencing depth was 53.20-fold for "Yanjiang", 47.41-fold for "9901", and 11.02-fold for the offspring. Of the SLAF markers detected, 42,321 are polymorphic with sufficient quality for map construction. The final genetic map was constructed using 6,737 SLAF markers, covering 38 linkage groups (LGs). The genetic map spanned 5,497.45 cM in length, with an average distance of 0.82 cM. As a first high-density genetic map of S. matsudana constructed from salt tolerance-varying varieties, this study will provide a foundation for mapping quantitative trait loci that modulate salt tolerance and resistance in Salix and provide important references for molecular breeding of this important forest tree. PMID:27327501

  15. A High-Density Genetic Map of Tetraploid Salix matsudana Using Specific Length Amplified Fragment Sequencing (SLAF-seq)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Min; Li, Yujuan; Wang, Ying; Ma, Xiangjian; Zhang, Yuan; Tan, Feng; Wu, Rongling

    2016-01-01

    As a salt-tolerant arbor tree species, Salix matsudana plays an important role in afforestation and greening in the coastal areas of China. To select superior Salix varieties that adapt to wide saline areas, it is of paramount importance to understand and identify the mechanisms of salt-tolerance at the level of the whole genome. Here, we describe a high-density genetic linkage map of S. matsudana that represents a good coverage of the Salix genome. An intraspecific F1 hybrid population was established by crossing the salt-sensitive “Yanjiang” variety as the female parent with the salt-tolerant “9901” variety as the male parent. This population, along with its parents, was genotyped by specific length amplified fragment sequencing (SLAF-seq), leading to 277,333 high-quality SLAF markers. By marker analysis, we found that both the parents and offspring were tetraploid. The mean sequencing depth was 53.20-fold for “Yanjiang”, 47.41-fold for “9901”, and 11.02-fold for the offspring. Of the SLAF markers detected, 42,321 are polymorphic with sufficient quality for map construction. The final genetic map was constructed using 6,737 SLAF markers, covering 38 linkage groups (LGs). The genetic map spanned 5,497.45 cM in length, with an average distance of 0.82 cM. As a first high-density genetic map of S. matsudana constructed from salt tolerance-varying varieties, this study will provide a foundation for mapping quantitative trait loci that modulate salt tolerance and resistance in Salix and provide important references for molecular breeding of this important forest tree. PMID:27327501

  16. Using Intervention Mapping to develop a programme to prevent sexually transmittable infections, including HIV, among heterosexual migrant men

    PubMed Central

    Wolfers, Mireille EG; van den Hoek, Caty; Brug, Johannes; de Zwart, Onno

    2007-01-01

    Background There is little experience with carefully developed interventions in the HIV/STI prevention field aimed at adult heterosexual target groups in the Netherlands. The ability to apply intervention development protocols, like Intervention Mapping, in daily practice outside of academia, is a matter of concern. An urgent need also exists for interventions aimed at the prevention of STI in migrant populations in the Netherlands. This article describes the theory and evidence based development of HIV/STI prevention interventions by the Municipal Public Health Service Rotterdam Area (MPHS), the Netherlands, for heterosexual migrant men with Surinamese, Dutch-Caribbean, Cape Verdean, Turkish and Moroccan backgrounds. Methods First a needs assessment was carried out. Then, a literature review was done, key figures were interviewed and seven group discussions were held. Subsequently, the results were translated into specific objectives ("change objectives") and used in intervention development for two subgroups: men with an Afro-Caribbean background and unmarried men with a Turkish and Moroccan background. A matrix of change objectives was made for each subgroup and suitable theoretical methods and practical strategies were selected. Culturally-tailored interventions were designed and were pre-tested among the target groups. Results This development process resulted in two interventions for specific subgroups that were appreciated by both the target groups and the migrant prevention workers. The project took place in collaboration with a university center, which provided an opportunity to get expert advice at every step of the Intervention Mapping process. At relevant points of the development process, migrant health educators and target group members provided advice and feedback on the draft intervention materials. Conclusion This intervention development project indicates that careful well-informed intervention development using Intervention Mapping is feasible in

  17. Glacial and periglacial geomorphology and its paleoclimatological significance in three North Ethiopian Mountains, including a detailed geomorphological map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrickx, Hanne; Jacob, Miro; Frankl, Amaury; Nyssen, Jan

    2015-10-01

    Geomorphological investigations and detailed mapping of past and present (peri)glacial landforms are required in order to understand the impact of climatic anomalies. The Ethiopian Highlands show a great variety in past and contemporary climate, and therefore, in the occurrence of glacial and periglacial landforms. However, only a few mountain areas have been studied, and detailed geomorphological understanding is lacking. In order to allow a fine reconstruction of the impact of the past glacial cycle on the geomorphology, vegetation complexes, and temperature anomalies, a detailed geomorphological map of three mountain areas (Mt. Ferrah Amba, 12°51‧N 39°29‧E; Mt. Lib Amba, 12°04‧N 39°22‧; and Mt. Abuna Yosef, 12°08‧N 39°11‧E) was produced. In all three study areas, inactive solifluction lobes, presumably from the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), were found. In the highest study area of Abuna Yosef, three sites were discovered bearing morainic material from small late Pleistocene glaciers. These marginal glaciers occurred below the modeled snowline and existed because of local topo-climatic conditions. Evidence of such Pleistocene avalanche-fed glaciers in Ethiopia (and Africa) has not been produced earlier. Current frost action is limited to frost cracks and small-scale patterned ground phenomena. The depression of the altitudinal belts of periglacial and glacial processes during the last cold period was assessed through periglacial and glacial landform mapping and comparisons with data from other mountain areas taking latitude into account. The depression of glacial and periglacial belts of approximately 600 m implies a temperature drop around 6 °C in the last cold period. This cooling is in line with temperature depressions elsewhere in East Africa during the LGM. This study serves as a case study for all the intermediate mountains (3500-4200 m) of the North Ethiopian highlands.

  18. A Sequence-Ready Physical Map of Barley Anchored Genetically by Two Million Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Ariyadasa, Ruvini; Mascher, Martin; Nussbaumer, Thomas; Schulte, Daniela; Frenkel, Zeev; Poursarebani, Naser; Zhou, Ruonan; Steuernagel, Burkhard; Gundlach, Heidrun; Taudien, Stefan; Felder, Marius; Platzer, Matthias; Himmelbach, Axel; Schmutzer, Thomas; Hedley, Pete E.; Muehlbauer, Gary J.; Scholz, Uwe; Korol, Abraham; Mayer, Klaus F.X.; Waugh, Robbie; Langridge, Peter; Graner, Andreas; Stein, Nils

    2014-01-01

    Barley (Hordeum vulgare) is an important cereal crop and a model species for Triticeae genomics. To lay the foundation for hierarchical map-based sequencing, a genome-wide physical map of its large and complex 5.1 billion-bp genome was constructed by high-information content fingerprinting of almost 600,000 bacterial artificial chromosomes representing 14-fold haploid genome coverage. The resultant physical map comprises 9,265 contigs with a cumulative size of 4.9 Gb representing 96% of the physical length of the barley genome. The reliability of the map was verified through extensive genetic marker information and the analysis of topological networks of clone overlaps. A minimum tiling path of 66,772 minimally overlapping clones was defined that will serve as a template for hierarchical clone-by-clone map-based shotgun sequencing. We integrated whole-genome shotgun sequence data from the individuals of two mapping populations with published bacterial artificial chromosome survey sequence information to genetically anchor the physical map. This novel approach in combination with the comprehensive whole-genome shotgun sequence data sets allowed us to independently validate and improve a previously reported physical and genetic framework. The resources developed in this study will underpin fine-mapping and cloning of agronomically important genes and the assembly of a draft genome sequence. PMID:24243933

  19. Chromosome mapping of repetitive sequences in Anostomidae species: implications for genomic and sex chromosome evolution

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Members of the Anostomidae family provide an interesting model system for the study of the influence of repetitive elements on genome composition, mainly because they possess numerous heterochromatic segments and a peculiar system of female heterogamety that is restricted to a few species of the Leporinus genus. The aim of this study was to isolate and identify important new repetitive DNA elements in Anostomidae through restriction enzyme digestion, followed by cloning, characterisation and chromosome mapping of this fragment. To identify repetitive elements in other Leporinus species and expand on studies of repetitive elements in Anostomidae, hybridisation experiments were also performed using previously described probes of LeSpeI repetitive elements. Results The 628-base pair (bp) LeSpeII fragment was hybridised to metaphase cells of L. elongatus individuals as well as those of L. macrocephalus, L. obtusidens, L. striatus, L. lacustris, L. friderici, Schizodon borellii and S. isognathus. In L. elongatus, both male and female cells contained small clusters of LeSpeII repetitive elements dispersed on all of the chromosomes, with enrichment near most of the terminal portions of the chromosomes. In the female sex chromosomes of L. elongatus (Z2,Z2/W1W2), however, this repeated element was absent. In the remaining species, a dispersed pattern of hybridisation was observed on all chromosomes irrespective of whether or not they were sex chromosomes. The repetitive element LeSpeI produced positive hybridisations signals only in L. elongatus, L. macrocephalus and L. obtusidens, i.e., species with differentiated sex chromosomes. In the remaining species, the LeSpeI element did not produce hybridisation signals. Conclusions Results are discussed in terms of the effects of repetitive sequences on the differentiation of the Anostomidae genome, especially with respect to sex chromosome evolution. LeSpeII showed hybridisation patterns typical of Long Interspersed

  20. A second generation radiation hybrid map to aid the assembly of the bovine genome sequence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Several approaches can be used to determine the order of loci on chromosomes and hence develop maps of the genome. However, all mapping approaches are prone to errors either arising from technical deficiencies or lack of statistical support to distinguish between alternative orders of l...

  1. Interrelationships of the subgenera of Coryphaenoides (Teleostei: Gadiformes: Macrouridae): synthesis of allozyme, peptide mapping, and DNA sequence data.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Raymond R; Attia, Phoebe

    2003-05-01

    DNA sequences of the 12s rRNA mitochondrial gene from 12 species key to the question of the monophyly of the deep-sea fish genus Coryphaenoides (Macrouridae) were analyzed phylogenetically using maximum parsimony and maximum likelihood. The results were compared with those of three previous studies in which allozyme, peptide mapping, and DNA sequence data were similarly analyzed. The allozyme and DNA sequence data suggested that the largest subgenus (Coryphaenoides), which contained most of the species inhabiting continental slopes between approximately 600 and 2000m depth, is monophyletic. Two of the three subgenera containing the species inhabiting abyssal ocean basins below approximately 2000m together formed a sister group to subgenus Coryphaenoides. The macrourids of the abyssal basins and those of the continental slopes thus appear to have experienced separate radiations from a common ancestor. PMID:12695096

  2. The P450 superfamily: update on new sequences, gene mapping, and recommended nomenclature.

    PubMed

    Nebert, D W; Nelson, D R; Coon, M J; Estabrook, R W; Feyereisen, R; Fujii-Kuriyama, Y; Gonzalez, F J; Guengerich, F P; Gunsalus, I C; Johnson, E F

    1991-01-01

    We provide here a list of 154 P450 genes and seven putative pseudogenes that have been characterized as of October 20, 1990. These genes have been described in a total of 23 eukaryotes (including nine mammalian and one plant species) and six prokaryotes. Of 27 gene families so far described, 10 exist in all mammals. These 10 families comprise 18 subfamilies, of which 16 and 14 have been mapped in the human and mouse genomes, respectively; to date, each subfamily appears to represent a cluster of tightly linked genes. We propose here a modest revision of the initially proposed (Nebert et al., DNA 6, 1-11, 1987) and updated (Nebert et al., DNA 8, 1-13, 1989) nomenclature system based on evolution of the superfamily. For the gene we recommend that the italicized root symbol CYP for human (Cyp for mouse), representing cytochrome P450, be followed by an Arabic number denoting the family, a letter designating the subfamily (when two or more exist), and an Arabic numeral representing the individual gene within the subfamily. A hyphen should precede the final number in mouse genes. We suggest that the human nomenclature system be used for other species. This system is consistent with our earlier proposed nomenclature for P450 of all eukaryotes and prokaryotes, except that we are discouraging the future use of cumbersome Roman numerals. PMID:1991046

  3. Combining SNP discovery from next-generation sequencing data with bulked segregant analysis (BSA) to fine-map genes in polyploid wheat

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies are providing new ways to accelerate fine-mapping and gene isolation in many species. To date, the majority of these efforts have focused on diploid organisms with readily available whole genome sequence information. In this study, as a proof of concept, we tested the use of NGS for SNP discovery in tetraploid wheat lines differing for the previously cloned grain protein content (GPC) gene GPC-B1. Bulked segregant analysis (BSA) was used to define a subset of putative SNPs within the candidate gene region, which were then used to fine-map GPC-B1. Results We used Illumina paired end technology to sequence mRNA (RNAseq) from near isogenic lines differing across a ~30-cM interval including the GPC-B1 locus. After discriminating for SNPs between the two homoeologous wheat genomes and additional quality filtering, we identified inter-varietal SNPs in wheat unigenes between the parental lines. The relative frequency of these SNPs was examined by RNAseq in two bulked samples made up of homozygous recombinant lines differing for their GPC phenotype. SNPs that were enriched at least 3-fold in the corresponding pool (6.5% of all SNPs) were further evaluated. Marker assays were designed for a subset of the enriched SNPs and mapped using DNA from individuals of each bulk. Thirty nine new SNP markers, corresponding to 67% of the validated SNPs, mapped across a 12.2-cM interval including GPC-B1. This translated to 1 SNP marker per 0.31 cM defining the GPC-B1 gene to within 13-18 genes in syntenic cereal genomes and to a 0.4 cM interval in wheat. Conclusions This study exemplifies the use of RNAseq for SNP discovery in polyploid species and supports the use of BSA as an effective way to target SNPs to specific genetic intervals to fine-map genes in unsequenced genomes. PMID:22280551

  4. MCTP system model based on linear programming optimization of apertures obtained from sequencing patient image data maps

    SciTech Connect

    Ureba, A.; Salguero, F. J.; Barbeiro, A. R.; Jimenez-Ortega, E.; Baeza, J. A.; Leal, A.; Miras, H.; Linares, R.; Perucha, M.

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: The authors present a hybrid direct multileaf collimator (MLC) aperture optimization model exclusively based on sequencing of patient imaging data to be implemented on a Monte Carlo treatment planning system (MC-TPS) to allow the explicit radiation transport simulation of advanced radiotherapy treatments with optimal results in efficient times for clinical practice. Methods: The planning system (called CARMEN) is a full MC-TPS, controlled through aMATLAB interface, which is based on the sequencing of a novel map, called “biophysical” map, which is generated from enhanced image data of patients to achieve a set of segments actually deliverable. In order to reduce the required computation time, the conventional fluence map has been replaced by the biophysical map which is sequenced to provide direct apertures that will later be weighted by means of an optimization algorithm based on linear programming. A ray-casting algorithm throughout the patient CT assembles information about the found structures, the mass thickness crossed, as well as PET values. Data are recorded to generate a biophysical map for each gantry angle. These maps are the input files for a home-made sequencer developed to take into account the interactions of photons and electrons with the MLC. For each linac (Axesse of Elekta and Primus of Siemens) and energy beam studied (6, 9, 12, 15 MeV and 6 MV), phase space files were simulated with the EGSnrc/BEAMnrc code. The dose calculation in patient was carried out with the BEAMDOSE code. This code is a modified version of EGSnrc/DOSXYZnrc able to calculate the beamlet dose in order to combine them with different weights during the optimization process. Results: Three complex radiotherapy treatments were selected to check the reliability of CARMEN in situations where the MC calculation can offer an added value: A head-and-neck case (Case I) with three targets delineated on PET/CT images and a demanding dose-escalation; a partial breast

  5. Complete mitochondrial genome DNA sequence for two ophiuroids and a holothuroid: the utility of protein gene sequence and gene maps in the analyses of deep deuterostome phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Scouras, Andrea; Beckenbach, Karen; Arndt, Allan; Smith, Michael J

    2004-04-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome sequences have been determined for the holothuroid Cucumaria miniata and two ophiuroid species Ophiopholis aculeata and Ophiura lütkeni. In addition, the nucleotide sequence of the mitochondrial protein-coding genes for the asteroid Pisaster ochraceus has been completed. Maximum-likelihood and LogDet distance analyses of concatenated protein-coding sequences produced a series of trees that did not conclusively support generally accepted models of echinoderm phylogeny. The ophiuroid data consistently demonstrated accelerated nucleotide divergence rates and lack of stationarity. This confounds the phylogenetic analyses. Molecular investigations using individual protein-coding gene alignments demonstrated that the cytochrome b gene exhibits the least deviation in rate and stationarity and generated some trees consistent with proposed echinoderm phylogenies. Phylogenies based on echinoderm mitochondrial gene rearrangements also proved problematic because of extensive variation in gene order between and within classes. A comparison of the two distinctive ophiuroid mitochondrial gene orders supports the hypothesis that O. lütkeni has a more derived mitochondrial gene order versus O. aculeata. The variation in the echinoderm mitochondrial gene maps reinforces the limitations of the application of mitochondrial gene rearrangements as a global phylogenetic tool. PMID:15019608

  6. Mapping Layer Sequence and Folds of Pre-Holocene Ice at the Pakitsoq "Horizontal Ice Coring"-Site, West Greenland.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeh, N.; Severinghaus, J.; Ahlstrom, A.; Brook, E.; Petrenko, V.

    2005-12-01

    Since 1985, the δ18O content of the surface ice has been studied at several ice-margin locations in Greenland. A provisional chronology for the ice margin records was established by correlating characteristic δ18O-features in the ice margin records with similar features in dated Greenland deep ice core records. This demonstrated that, at many ice-margin locations, a several hundred metre wide band of ice pre-dating the present warm interglacial occurs adjacent to the ice edge. A main concern with utilizing this aincient ice for studies of the past has been the fear of likely disturbances of the layer sequence by folds and faults. Recent trace element analyses of ice samples from the ice-sheet margin at Pakitsoq, 50 km northeast of Ilulissat/Jakobshavn, West Greenland have unambiguously demonstrated the occurrence of ice from the transition from the Last Glacial Maximum to the Holocene including ice from the Bølling-Allerød and Younger Dryas intervals. Thus large amounts of well-dated old ice with intact content of trace constituents are available at the Pakitsoq ice-margin. However, analysis of the trace constituents as well as visual inspection also demonstrated the occurrence of a large-scale fold in ice representing the Allerød/Younger Dryas/Pre-Boreal climate oscillation. Moreover, observations of ice ablation and dynamics clearly showed that the Pakitsoq ice-margin sector is presently far from a balanced state, stressing the need for developing a model for the evolution of the ice margin in order to support future ice-mining activities. Here, we report on the development of such a model based on mapping of the large-scale structures on the ice margin by using GPS, ground-penetrating radar (GPR), and trace element geo-chemical analysis (mainly δ18O-analysis of ice samples). Samples for δ18O-analysis were collected each year in the period 2001 - 2005 in several profiles across the large scale fold in order to document the time evolution. Altogether more

  7. Microsatellite primers resource developed from the mapped sequence scaffolds of Nisqually-1 genome. Submitted to New Phytologist

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Tongming; ZHANG, Dr. XINYE; Gunter, Lee E; Li, Shuxian; Wullschleger, Stan D; Huang, Prof. Minren; Tuskan, Gerald A

    2009-01-01

    In this study, 148 428 simple sequence repeat (SSR) primer pairs were designed from the unambiguously mapped sequence scaffolds of the Nisqually-1 genome. The physical position of the priming sites were identified along each of the 19 Populus chromosomes, and it was specified whether the priming sequences belong to intronic, intergenic, exonic or UTR regions. A subset of 150 SSR loci were amplified and a high amplification success rate (72%) was obtained in P. tremuloides, which belongs to a divergent subgenus of Populus relative to Nisqually-1. PCR reactions showed that the amplification success rate of exonic primer pairs was much higher than that of the intronic/intergenic primer pairs. Applying ANOVA and regression analyses to the flanking sequences of microsatellites, the repeat lengths, the GC contents of the repeats, the repeat motif numbers, the repeat motif length and the base composition of the repeat motif, it was determined that only the base composition of the repeat motif and the repeat motif length significantly affect the microsatellite variability in P. tremuloides samples. The SSR primer resource developed in this study provides a database for selecting highly transferable SSR markers with known physical position in the Populus genome and provides a comprehensive genetic tool to extend the genome sequence of Nisqually-1 to genetic studies in different Populus species.

  8. The map-based genome sequence of Spirodela polyrhiza aligned with its chromosomes, a reference for karyotype evolution.

    PubMed

    Cao, Hieu Xuan; Vu, Giang Thi Ha; Wang, Wenqin; Appenroth, Klaus J; Messing, Joachim; Schubert, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    Duckweeds are aquatic monocotyledonous plants of potential economic interest with fast vegetative propagation, comprising 37 species with variable genome sizes (0.158-1.88 Gbp). The genomic sequence of Spirodela polyrhiza, the smallest and the most ancient duckweed genome, needs to be aligned to its chromosomes as a reference and prerequisite to study the genome and karyotype evolution of other duckweed species. We selected physically mapped bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) containing Spirodela DNA inserts with little or no repetitive elements as probes for multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization (mcFISH), using an optimized BAC pooling strategy, to validate its physical map and correlate it with its chromosome complement. By consecutive mcFISH analyses, we assigned the originally assembled 32 pseudomolecules (supercontigs) of the genomic sequences to the 20 chromosomes of S. polyrhiza. A Spirodela cytogenetic map containing 96 BAC markers with an average distance of 0.89 Mbp was constructed. Using a cocktail of 41 BACs in three colors, all chromosome pairs could be individualized simultaneously. Seven ancestral blocks emerged from duplicated chromosome segments of 19 Spirodela chromosomes. The chromosomally integrated genome of S. polyrhiza and the established prerequisites for comparative chromosome painting enable future studies on the chromosome homoeology and karyotype evolution of duckweed species. PMID:26305472

  9. Mapping Quantitative Trait Loci From a Single-Tail Sample of the Phenotype Distribution Including Survival Data

    PubMed Central

    Sillanpää, Mikko J.; Hoti, Fabian

    2007-01-01

    A new effective Bayesian quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping approach for the analysis of single-tail selected samples of the phenotype distribution is presented. The approach extends the affected-only tests to single-tail sampling with quantitative traits such as the log-normal survival time or censored/selected traits. A great benefit of the approach is that it enables the utilization of multiple-QTL models, is easy to incorporate into different data designs (experimental and outbred populations), and can potentially be extended to epistatic models. In inbred lines, the method exploits the fact that the parental mating type and the linkage phases (haplotypes) are known by definition. In outbred populations, two-generation data are needed, for example, selected offspring and one of the parents (the sires) in breeding material. The idea is to statistically (computationally) generate a fully complementary, maximally dissimilar, observation for each offspring in the sample. Bayesian data augmentation is then used to sample the space of possible trait values for the pseudoobservations. The benefits of the approach are illustrated using simulated data sets and a real data set on the survival of F2 mice following infection with Listeria monocytogenes. PMID:18073434

  10. Rapid sequencing and disulfide mapping of peptides containing disulfide bonds by using 1,5-diaminonaphthalene as a reductive matrix.

    PubMed

    Fukuyama, Yuko; Iwamoto, Shinichi; Tanaka, Koichi

    2006-02-01

    MS/MS is indispensable for the amino acid sequencing of peptides. However, its use is limited for peptides containing disulfide bonds. We have applied the reducing properties of 1,5-diaminonaphthalene (1,5-DAN) as a MALDI matrix to amino acid sequencing and disulfide bond mapping of human urotensin II possessing one disulfide bond, and human guanylin possessing two disulfide bonds. 1,5-DAN was used in the same manner as the usual MALDI matrices without any pre-treatment of the peptide, and MS/MS was performed using a matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization quadrupole ion trap time-of-flight mass spectrometer (MALDI QIT TOFMS). The results demonstrated that MS/MS of the molecular ions reduced by 1,5-DAN provided a series of significant b-/y-product ions. All 11 amino acid residues of urotensin II were identified using 1,5-DAN, while only 5 out of 11 residues were identified using 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB); similarly 11 out of 15 amino acid residues of guanylin were identified using 1,5-DAN, while only three were identified using DHB. In addition, comparison of the theoretical and measured values of the mass differences between corresponding MS/MS product ions using 1,5-DAN and DHB narrowed down the possible disulfide bond arrangement candidates. Consequently, 1,5-DAN as a reductive matrix facilitates rapid amino acid sequencing and disulfide mapping for peptides containing disulfide bonds. PMID:16382486

  11. Aeromagnetic maps of the Colorado River region including the Kingman, Needles, Salton Sea, and El Centro 1 degree by 2 degrees quadrangles, California, Arizona, and Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mariano, John; Grauch, V.J.

    1988-01-01

    Aeromagnetic anomalies are produced by variations in the strength and direction of the magnetic field of rocks that include magnetic minerals, commonly magnetite. Patterns of anomalies on aeromagnetic maps can reveal structures - for example, faults which have juxtaposed magnetic rocks against non-magnetic rocks, or areas of alteration where magnetic minerals have been destroyed by hydrothermal activity. Tectonic features of regional extent may not become apparent until a number of aeromagnetic surveys have been compiled and plotted at the same scale. Commonly the compilation involves piecing together data from surveys that were flown at different times with widely disparate flight specifications and data reduction procedures. The data may be compiled into a composite map, where all the pieces are plotted onto one map without regard to the difference in flight elevation and datum, or they may be compiled into a merged map, where all survey data are analytically reduced to a common flight elevation and datum, and then digitally merged at the survey boundaries. The composite map retains the original resolution of all the survey data, but computer methods to enhance regional features crossing the survey boundaries may not be applied. On the other hand, computer methods can be applied to the merged data, but the accuracy of the data may be slightly diminished.

  12. DNA sequencing conference, 2

    SciTech Connect

    Cook-Deegan, R.M.; Venter, J.C.; Gilbert, W.; Mulligan, J.; Mansfield, B.K.

    1991-06-19

    This conference focused on DNA sequencing, genetic linkage mapping, physical mapping, informatics and bioethics. Several were used to study this sequencing and mapping. This article also discusses computer hardware and software aiding in the mapping of genes.

  13. Microtubule-associated protein MAP2 preferentially binds to a dA/dT sequence present in mouse satellite DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Avila, J; Montejo de Garcini, E; Wandosell, F; Villasante, A; Sogo, J M; Villanueva, N

    1983-01-01

    Microtubule-associated protein MAP2 binds to the Sau96.1 restriction monomer fragment of mouse satellite DNA. This fragment is also present in a lower proportion in bulk DNA. The digestion of MAP2-Sau96.1 fragment complex by DNase results in the protection of certain nucleotide sequences. The sequence poly(dA)4/poly(dT)4 is mainly protected against DNase digestion. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 5. PMID:10872313

  14. High-Resolution N6-Methyladenosine (m6A) Map Using Photo-Crosslinking-Assisted m6A Sequencing**

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kai; Lu, Zhike; Wang, Xiao; Fu, Ye; Luo, Guan-Zheng; Liu, Nian; Han, Dali; Dominissini, Dan; Dai, Qing; Pan, Tao; He, Chuan

    2015-01-01

    N6-methyladenosine (m6A) is an abundant internal modification in eukaryotic mRNA and plays regulatory roles in mRNA metabolism. However, methods to precisely locate the m6A modification remain limited. We present here a photo-crosslinking-assisted m6A sequencing strategy (PA-m6A-seq) to more accurately define sites with m6A modification. Using this strategy, we obtained a high-resolution map of m6A in a human transcriptome. The map resembles the general distribution pattern observed previously, and reveals new m6A sites at base resolution. Our results provide insight into the relationship between the methylation regions and the binding sites of RNA-binding proteins. PMID:25491922

  15. AFSM sequencing approach: a simple and rapid method for genome-wide SNP and methylation site discovery and genetic mapping

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Zhiqiang; Zou, Meiling; Zhang, Shengkui; Feng, Binxiao; Wang, Wenquan

    2014-01-01

    We describe methods for the assessment of amplified-fragment single nucleotide polymorphism and methylation (AFSM) sites using a quick and simple molecular marker-assisted breeding strategy based on the use of two restriction enzyme pairs (EcoRI-MspI and EcoRI-HpaII) and a next-generation sequencing platform. Two sets of 85 adapter pairs were developed to concurrently identify SNPs, indels and methylation sites for 85 lines of cassava population in this study. In addition to SNPs and indels, the simplicity of the AFSM protocol makes it particularly suitable for high-throughput full methylation and hemi-methylation analyses. To further demonstrate the ease of this approach, a cassava genetic linkage map was constructed. This approach should be widely applicable for genetic mapping in a variety of organisms and will improve the application of crop genomics in assisted breeding. PMID:25466435

  16. Genotyping-by-Sequencing SNP Identification for Crops without a Reference Genome: Using Transcriptome Based Mapping as an Alternative Strategy.

    PubMed

    Berthouly-Salazar, Cécile; Mariac, Cédric; Couderc, Marie; Pouzadoux, Juliette; Floc'h, Jean-Baptiste; Vigouroux, Yves

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing opens the way for genomic studies of diversity even for non-model crops and animals. Genome reduction techniques are becoming progressively more popular as they allow a fraction of the genome to be sequenced for multiple individuals and/or populations. These techniques are an efficient way to explore genome diversity in non-model crops and animals for which no reference genome is available. Genome reduction techniques emerged with the development of specific pipelines such as UNEAK (Universal Network Enabled Analysis Kit) and Stacks. However, even for non-model crops and animals, transcriptomes are easier to obtain, thereby making it possible to directly map reads. We investigate the direct use of transcriptome as an alternative strategy. Our specific objective was to compare SNPs obtained from the UNEAK pipeline as well as SNPs obtained by directly mapping genotyping-by-sequencing reads on a transcriptome. We assessed the feasibility of both SNP datasets, UNEAK and transcriptome mapping, to investigate the diversity of 91 samples of wild pearl millet sampled across its distribution area. Both approaches produced several tens of thousands of single nucleotide variants, but differed in the way the variants were identified, leading to differences in the frequency spectrum associated with marked differences in the assessment of diversity. Difference in the frequency spectrum significantly biased a large set of diversity analyses as well as detection of selection approaches. However, whatever the approach, we found very similar inference of genetic structure, with three major genetic groups from West, Central, and East Africa. For non-model crops, using transcriptome data as a reference is thus a particularly promising way to obtain a more thorough analysis of datasets generated using genome reduction techniques. PMID:27379109

  17. Genotyping-by-Sequencing SNP Identification for Crops without a Reference Genome: Using Transcriptome Based Mapping as an Alternative Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Berthouly-Salazar, Cécile; Mariac, Cédric; Couderc, Marie; Pouzadoux, Juliette; Floc’h, Jean-Baptiste; Vigouroux, Yves

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing opens the way for genomic studies of diversity even for non-model crops and animals. Genome reduction techniques are becoming progressively more popular as they allow a fraction of the genome to be sequenced for multiple individuals and/or populations. These techniques are an efficient way to explore genome diversity in non-model crops and animals for which no reference genome is available. Genome reduction techniques emerged with the development of specific pipelines such as UNEAK (Universal Network Enabled Analysis Kit) and Stacks. However, even for non-model crops and animals, transcriptomes are easier to obtain, thereby making it possible to directly map reads. We investigate the direct use of transcriptome as an alternative strategy. Our specific objective was to compare SNPs obtained from the UNEAK pipeline as well as SNPs obtained by directly mapping genotyping-by-sequencing reads on a transcriptome. We assessed the feasibility of both SNP datasets, UNEAK and transcriptome mapping, to investigate the diversity of 91 samples of wild pearl millet sampled across its distribution area. Both approaches produced several tens of thousands of single nucleotide variants, but differed in the way the variants were identified, leading to differences in the frequency spectrum associated with marked differences in the assessment of diversity. Difference in the frequency spectrum significantly biased a large set of diversity analyses as well as detection of selection approaches. However, whatever the approach, we found very similar inference of genetic structure, with three major genetic groups from West, Central, and East Africa. For non-model crops, using transcriptome data as a reference is thus a particularly promising way to obtain a more thorough analysis of datasets generated using genome reduction techniques. PMID:27379109

  18. Prostate Cancer Discrimination in the Peripheral Zone With a Reduced Field-of-View T2-mapping MRI Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Yamauchi, Fernando I.; Penzkofer, Tobias; Fedorov, Andriy; Fennessy, Fiona M.; Chu, Renxin; Maier, Stephan E.; Tempany, Clare M.C.; Mulkern, Robert V.; Panych, Lawrence P.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the performance of T2 mapping in discriminating prostate cancer from normal prostate tissue in the peripheral zone using a practical reduced field-of-view MRI sequence requiring less than 3 minutes of scan time. Materials and Methods Thirty-six patients with biopsy-proven peripheral zone prostate cancer without prior treatment underwent routine multiparametric MRI at 3.0T with an endorectal coil. An Inner-Volume Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill imaging sequence that required 2.8 minutes to obtain data for quantitative T2 mapping covering the entire prostate gland was added to the routine multiparametric protocol. Suspected cancer (SC) and suspected healthy (SH) tissue in the peripheral zone were identified in consensus by three radiologists and were correlated with available biopsy results. Differences in mean T2 values in SC and SH ROIs were tested for significance using unpaired Student’s two-tailed t test. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was used to assess the optimal threshold T2 value for cancer discrimination. Results ROI analyses revealed significantly (p<0.0001) shorter T2 values in SC (85.4 ± 12.3 ms) compared to SH (169.6 ± 38.7 ms). An estimated T2 threshold of 99 ms yielded a sensitivity of 92% and a specificity of 97% for prostate cancer discrimination. Conclusions Quantitative values derived from this clinically practical T2-mapping sequence allow high precision discrimination between healthy and cancerous peripheral zone in the prostate. PMID:25687187

  19. Development of high-density linkage map and tagging leaf spot resistance in pearl millet using genotyping-by-sequencing markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pearl millet is an important forage and grain crop in many parts of the world. Genome mapping studies are a prerequisite for tagging agronomically important traits. Genotyping-by-Sequencing (GBS) markers can be used to build high density linkage maps even in species lacking a reference genome. A re...

  20. Application of Genotyping-By-Sequencing for selection of locus-specific BAC clones to construct physical maps and identify candidate genes in Vitis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    While genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) is widely used for linkage and association mapping, its potential for physical mapping and candidate gene identification in under-characterized species has not been fully realized. Eight half-sib Vitis families (480 progeny) were genotyped using GBS and phenotyp...

  1. Tripartite mitochondrial genome of spinach: physical structure, mitochondrial gene mapping, and locations of transposed chloroplast DNA sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Stern, D B; Palmer, J D

    1986-01-01

    A complete physical map of the spinach mitochondrial genome has been established. The entire sequence content of 327 kilobase pairs (kb) is postulated to occur as a single circular molecule. Two directly repeated elements of approximately 6 kb, located on this "master chromosome", are proposed to participate in an intragenomic recombination event that reversibly generates two "subgenomic" circles of 93 kb and 234 kb. The positions of protein and ribosomal RNA-encoding genes, determined by heterologous filter hybridizations, are scattered throughout the genome, with duplicate 26S rRNA genes located partially or entirely within the 6 kb repeat elements. Filter hybridizations between spinach mitochondrial DNA and cloned segments of spinach chloroplast DNA reveal at least twelve dispersed regions of inter-organellar sequence homology. Images PMID:3016660

  2. Whole-genome profiling and shotgun sequencing delivers an anchored, gene-decorated, physical map assembly of bread wheat chromosome 6A.

    PubMed

    Poursarebani, Naser; Nussbaumer, Thomas; Simková, Hana; Safář, Jan; Witsenboer, Hanneke; van Oeveren, Jan; Doležel, Jaroslav; Mayer, Klaus F X; Stein, Nils; Schnurbusch, Thorsten

    2014-07-01

    Bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is the most important staple food crop for 35% of the world's population. International efforts are underway to facilitate an increase in wheat production, of which the International Wheat Genome Sequencing Consortium (IWGSC) plays an important role. As part of this effort, we have developed a sequence-based physical map of wheat chromosome 6A using whole-genome profiling (WGP™). The bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) contig assembly tools fingerprinted contig (fpc) and linear topological contig (ltc) were used and their contig assemblies were compared. A detailed investigation of the contigs structure revealed that ltc created a highly robust assembly compared with those formed by fpc. The ltc assemblies contained 1217 contigs for the short arm and 1113 contigs for the long arm, with an L50 of 1 Mb. To facilitate in silico anchoring, WGP™ tags underlying BAC contigs were extended by wheat and wheat progenitor genome sequence information. Sequence data were used for in silico anchoring against genetic markers with known sequences, of which almost 79% of the physical map could be anchored. Moreover, the assigned sequence information led to the 'decoration' of the respective physical map with 3359 anchored genes. Thus, this robust and genetically anchored physical map will serve as a framework for the sequencing of wheat chromosome 6A, and is of immediate use for map-based isolation of agronomically important genes/quantitative trait loci located on this chromosome. PMID:24813060

  3. CloudDOE: A User-Friendly Tool for Deploying Hadoop Clouds and Analyzing High-Throughput Sequencing Data with MapReduce

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Wei-Chun; Chen, Chien-Chih; Ho, Jan-Ming; Lin, Chung-Yen; Hsu, Wen-Lian; Wang, Yu-Chun; Lee, D. T.; Lai, Feipei; Huang, Chih-Wei; Chang, Yu-Jung

    2014-01-01

    Background Explosive growth of next-generation sequencing data has resulted in ultra-large-scale data sets and ensuing computational problems. Cloud computing provides an on-demand and scalable environment for large-scale data analysis. Using a MapReduce framework, data and workload can be distributed via a network to computers in the cloud to substantially reduce computational latency. Hadoop/MapReduce has been successfully adopted in bioinformatics for genome assembly, mapping reads to genomes, and finding single nucleotide polymorphisms. Major cloud providers offer Hadoop cloud services to their users. However, it remains technically challenging to deploy a Hadoop cloud for those who prefer to run MapReduce programs in a cluster without built-in Hadoop/MapReduce. Results We present CloudDOE, a platform-independent software package implemented in Java. CloudDOE encapsulates technical details behind a user-friendly graphical interface, thus liberating scientists from having to perform complicated operational procedures. Users are guided through the user interface to deploy a Hadoop cloud within in-house computing environments and to run applications specifically targeted for bioinformatics, including CloudBurst, CloudBrush, and CloudRS. One may also use CloudDOE on top of a public cloud. CloudDOE consists of three wizards, i.e., Deploy, Operate, and Extend wizards. Deploy wizard is designed to aid the system administrator to deploy a Hadoop cloud. It installs Java runtime environment version 1.6 and Hadoop version 0.20.203, and initiates the service automatically. Operate wizard allows the user to run a MapReduce application on the dashboard list. To extend the dashboard list, the administrator may install a new MapReduce application using Extend wizard. Conclusions CloudDOE is a user-friendly tool for deploying a Hadoop cloud. Its smart wizards substantially reduce the complexity and costs of deployment, execution, enhancement, and management. Interested users

  4. Large-Scale SNP Discovery and Genotyping for Constructing a High-Density Genetic Map of Tea Plant Using Specific-Locus Amplified Fragment Sequencing (SLAF-seq).

    PubMed

    Ma, Jian-Qiang; Huang, Long; Ma, Chun-Lei; Jin, Ji-Qiang; Li, Chun-Fang; Wang, Rong-Kai; Zheng, Hong-Kun; Yao, Ming-Zhe; Chen, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Genetic maps are important tools in plant genomics and breeding. The present study reports the large-scale discovery of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for genetic map construction in tea plant. We developed a total of 6,042 valid SNP markers using specific-locus amplified fragment sequencing (SLAF-seq), and subsequently mapped them into the previous framework map. The final map contained 6,448 molecular markers, distributing on fifteen linkage groups corresponding to the number of tea plant chromosomes. The total map length was 3,965 cM, with an average inter-locus distance of 1.0 cM. This map is the first SNP-based reference map of tea plant, as well as the most saturated one developed to date. The SNP markers and map resources generated in this study provide a wealth of genetic information that can serve as a foundation for downstream genetic analyses, such as the fine mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTL), map-based cloning, marker-assisted selection, and anchoring of scaffolds to facilitate the process of whole genome sequencing projects for tea plant. PMID:26035838

  5. Physical mapping and BAC-end sequence analysis provide initial insights into the flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) genome

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) is an important source of oil rich in omega-3 fatty acids, which have proven health benefits and utility as an industrial raw material. Flax seeds also contain lignans which are associated with reducing the risk of certain types of cancer. Its bast fibres have broad industrial applications. However, genomic tools needed for molecular breeding were non existent. Hence a project, Total Utilization Flax GENomics (TUFGEN) was initiated. We report here the first genome-wide physical map of flax and the generation and analysis of BAC-end sequences (BES) from 43,776 clones, providing initial insights into the genome. Results The physical map consists of 416 contigs spanning ~368 Mb, assembled from 32,025 fingerprints, representing roughly 54.5% to 99.4% of the estimated haploid genome (370-675 Mb). The N50 size of the contigs was estimated to be ~1,494 kb. The longest contig was ~5,562 kb comprising 437 clones. There were 96 contigs containing more than 100 clones. Approximately 54.6 Mb representing 8-14.8% of the genome was obtained from 80,337 BES. Annotation revealed that a large part of the genome consists of ribosomal DNA (~13.8%), followed by known transposable elements at 6.1%. Furthermore, ~7.4% of sequence was identified to harbour novel repeat elements. Homology searches against flax-ESTs and NCBI-ESTs suggested that ~5.6% of the transcriptome is unique to flax. A total of 4064 putative genomic SSRs were identified and are being developed as novel markers for their use in molecular breeding. Conclusion The first genome-wide physical map of flax constructed with BAC clones provides a framework for accessing target loci with economic importance for marker development and positional cloning. Analysis of the BES has provided insights into the uniqueness of the flax genome. Compared to other plant genomes, the proportion of rDNA was found to be very high whereas the proportion of known transposable elements was low. The SSRs

  6. A high-resolution cattle CNV map by population-scale genome sequencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Copy Number Variations (CNVs) are common genomic structural variations that have been linked to human diseases and phenotypic traits. CNVs represent an important type of genetic variation among cattle breeds and even individual animals; however, only low-resolution maps of cattle CNVs currently exis...

  7. Comprehensive Sequence-Flux Mapping of a Levoglucosan Utilization Pathway in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Klesmith, Justin R; Bacik, John-Paul; Michalczyk, Ryszard; Whitehead, Timothy A

    2015-11-20

    Synthetic metabolic pathways often suffer from low specific productivity, and new methods that quickly assess pathway functionality for many thousands of variants are urgently needed. Here we present an approach that enables the rapid and parallel determination of sequence effects on flux for complete gene-encoding sequences. We show that this method can be used to determine the effects of over 8000 single point mutants of a pyrolysis oil catabolic pathway implanted in Escherichia coli. Experimental sequence-function data sets predicted whether fitness-enhancing mutations to the enzyme levoglucosan kinase resulted from enhanced catalytic efficiency or enzyme stability. A structure of one design incorporating 38 mutations elucidated the structural basis of high fitness mutations. One design incorporating 15 beneficial mutations supported a 15-fold improvement in growth rate and greater than 24-fold improvement in enzyme activity relative to the starting pathway. This technique can be extended to improve a wide variety of designed pathways. PMID:26369947

  8. Efficient mapping of genomic sequences to optimize multiple pairwise alignment in hybrid cluster platforms.

    PubMed

    Montañola, Alberto; Roig, Concepció; Hernández, Porfidio

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sequence alignment (MSA), used in biocomputing to study similarities between different genomic sequences, is known to require important memory and computation resources. Nowadays, researchers are aligning thousands of these sequences, creating new challenges in order to solve the problem using the available resources efficiently. Determining the efficient amount of resources to allocate is important to avoid waste of them, thus reducing the economical costs required in running for example a specific cloud instance. The pairwise alignment is the initial key step of the MSA problem, which will compute all pair alignments needed. We present a method to determine the optimal amount of memory and computation resources to allocate by the pairwise alignment, and we will validate it through a set of experimental results for different possible inputs. These allow us to determine the best parameters to configure the applications in order to use effectively the available resources of a given system. PMID:25339085

  9. Integration of the draft sequence and physical map as a framework for genomic research in soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) and wild soybean (Glycine soja Sieb. and Zucc.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean is a model for the legume research community due to its importance as a crop, a well populated genetic map, and the availability of a genome sequence. Even though a whole genome shotgun sequence and Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC) libraries are available, a high-resolution chromosome-b...

  10. Synchronization and cluster sequences in modular and evolving map-based neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslennikov, Oleg V.; Nekorkin, Vladimir I.

    2016-06-01

    The impact of modularity and time delay for spiking neural networks is considered in the first part of this report. We show for different complex topologies that time delay controls regimes of inter-module synchronization as well as the oscillatory rate of modules. In the second part of the work we study a paradigmatic model of the evolving neural network whose topology is influenced by nodal dynamics which results in generating different cluster sequences. We show the conditions under which the sequences are robust to small perturbations of initial conditions, parameter detuning, and noise, while at the same are selective to information stimuli.

  11. Anopheles darlingi polytene chromosomes: revised maps including newly described inversions and evidence for population structure in Manaus

    PubMed Central

    Cornel, Anthony J; Brisco, Katherine K; Tadei, Wanderli P; Secundino, Nágila FC; Rafael, Miriam S; Galardo, Allan KR; Medeiros, Jansen F; Pessoa, Felipe AC; Ríos-Velásquez, Claudia M; Lee, Yoosook; Pimenta, Paulo FP; Lanzaro, Gregory C

    2016-01-01

    Salivary gland polytene chromosomes of 4th instar Anopheles darlingi Root were examined from multiple locations in the Brazilian Amazon. Minor modifications were made to existing polytene photomaps. These included changes to the breakpoint positions of several previously described paracentric inversions and descriptions of four new paracentric inversions, two on the right arm of chromosome 3 and two on the left arm of chromosome 3 that were found in multiple locations. A total of 18 inversions on the X (n = 1) chromosome, chromosome 2 (n = 7) and 3 (n = 11) were scored for 83 individuals from Manaus, Macapá and Porto Velho municipalities. The frequency of 2Ra inversion karyotypes in Manaus shows significant deficiency of heterozygotes (p < 0.0009). No significant linkage disequilibrium was found between inversions on chromosome 2 and 3. We hypothesize that at least two sympatric subpopulations exist within the An. darlingi population at Manaus based on inversion frequencies. PMID:27223867

  12. Anopheles darlingi polytene chromosomes: revised maps including newly described inversions and evidence for population structure in Manaus.

    PubMed

    Cornel, Anthony J; Brisco, Katherine K; Tadei, Wanderli P; Secundino, Nágila Fc; Rafael, Miriam S; Galardo, Allan Kr; Medeiros, Jansen F; Pessoa, Felipe Ac; Ríos-Velásquez, Claudia M; Lee, Yoosook; Pimenta, Paulo Fp; Lanzaro, Gregory C

    2016-05-01

    Salivary gland polytene chromosomes of 4th instar Anopheles darlingi Root were examined from multiple locations in the Brazilian Amazon. Minor modifications were made to existing polytene photomaps. These included changes to the breakpoint positions of several previously described paracentric inversions and descriptions of four new paracentric inversions, two on the right arm of chromosome 3 and two on the left arm of chromosome 3 that were found in multiple locations. A total of 18 inversions on the X (n = 1) chromosome, chromosome 2 (n = 7) and 3 (n = 11) were scored for 83 individuals from Manaus, Macapá and Porto Velho municipalities. The frequency of 2Ra inversion karyotypes in Manaus shows significant deficiency of heterozygotes (p < 0.0009). No significant linkage disequilibrium was found between inversions on chromosome 2 and 3. We hypothesize that at least two sympatric subpopulations exist within the An. darlingi population at Manaus based on inversion frequencies. PMID:27223867

  13. Construction of High Density Sweet Cherry (Prunus avium L.) Linkage Maps Using Microsatellite Markers and SNPs Detected by Genotyping-by-Sequencing (GBS).

    PubMed

    Guajardo, Verónica; Solís, Simón; Sagredo, Boris; Gainza, Felipe; Muñoz, Carlos; Gasic, Ksenija; Hinrichsen, Patricio

    2015-01-01

    Linkage maps are valuable tools in genetic and genomic studies. For sweet cherry, linkage maps have been constructed using mainly microsatellite markers (SSRs) and, recently, using single nucleotide polymorphism markers (SNPs) from a cherry 6K SNP array. Genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS), a new methodology based on high-throughput sequencing, holds great promise for identification of high number of SNPs and construction of high density linkage maps. In this study, GBS was used to identify SNPs from an intra-specific sweet cherry cross. A total of 8,476 high quality SNPs were selected for mapping. The physical position for each SNP was determined using the peach genome, Peach v1.0, as reference, and a homogeneous distribution of markers along the eight peach scaffolds was obtained. On average, 65.6% of the SNPs were present in genic regions and 49.8% were located in exonic regions. In addition to the SNPs, a group of SSRs was also used for construction of linkage maps. Parental and consensus high density maps were constructed by genotyping 166 siblings from a 'Rainier' x 'Rivedel' (Ra x Ri) cross. Using Ra x Ri population, 462, 489 and 985 markers were mapped into eight linkage groups in 'Rainier', 'Rivedel' and the Ra x Ri map, respectively, with 80% of mapped SNPs located in genic regions. Obtained maps spanned 549.5, 582.6 and 731.3 cM for 'Rainier', 'Rivedel' and consensus maps, respectively, with an average distance of 1.2 cM between adjacent markers for both 'Rainier' and 'Rivedel' maps and of 0.7 cM for Ra x Ri map. High synteny and co-linearity was observed between obtained maps and with Peach v1.0. These new high density linkage maps provide valuable information on the sweet cherry genome, and serve as the basis for identification of QTLs and genes relevant for the breeding of the species. PMID:26011256

  14. Novel Sequence-Based Mapping of Recently Emerging H5NX Influenza Viruses Reveals Pandemic Vaccine Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Christopher S.; DeDiego, Marta L.; Thakar, Juilee; Topham, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, an avian influenza virus, H5NX subclade 2.3.4.4, emerged and spread to North America. This subclade has frequently reassorted, leading to multiple novel viruses capable of human infection. Four cases of human infections, three leading to death, have already occurred. Existing vaccine strains do not protect against these new viruses, raising a need to identify new vaccine candidate strains. We have developed a novel sequence-based mapping (SBM) tool capable of visualizing complex protein sequence data sets using a single intuitive map. We applied SBM on the complete set of avian H5 viruses in order to better understand hemagglutinin protein variance amongst H5 viruses and identify any patterns associated with this variation. The analysis successfully identified the original reassortments that lead to the emergence of this new subclade of H5 viruses, as well as their known unusual ability to re-assort among neuraminidase subtypes. In addition, our analysis revealed distinct clusters of 2.3.4.4 variants that would not be covered by existing strains in the H5 vaccine stockpile. The results suggest that our method may be useful for pandemic candidate vaccine virus selection. PMID:27494186

  15. Novel Sequence-Based Mapping of Recently Emerging H5NX Influenza Viruses Reveals Pandemic Vaccine Candidates.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Christopher S; DeDiego, Marta L; Thakar, Juilee; Topham, David J

    2016-01-01

    Recently, an avian influenza virus, H5NX subclade 2.3.4.4, emerged and spread to North America. This subclade has frequently reassorted, leading to multiple novel viruses capable of human infection. Four cases of human infections, three leading to death, have already occurred. Existing vaccine strains do not protect against these new viruses, raising a need to identify new vaccine candidate strains. We have developed a novel sequence-based mapping (SBM) tool capable of visualizing complex protein sequence data sets using a single intuitive map. We applied SBM on the complete set of avian H5 viruses in order to better understand hemagglutinin protein variance amongst H5 viruses and identify any patterns associated with this variation. The analysis successfully identified the original reassortments that lead to the emergence of this new subclade of H5 viruses, as well as their known unusual ability to re-assort among neuraminidase subtypes. In addition, our analysis revealed distinct clusters of 2.3.4.4 variants that would not be covered by existing strains in the H5 vaccine stockpile. The results suggest that our method may be useful for pandemic candidate vaccine virus selection. PMID:27494186

  16. Transcriptome sequencing to produce SNP-based genetic maps of onion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We used the 454 platform to sequence from normalized cDNA libraries from each of two parental inbred lines of onion: 5225 is a red, doubled-haploid onion and OH1 is a yellow inbred that shows high frequency of gynogenic haploid production. From approximately 1.6 million reads from each inbred, 27,06...

  17. Transcriptome sequencing to produce SNP-based genetic maps of onion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We used the 454 platform to sequence from normalized cDNA libraries from each of two inbred lines of onion (OH1 and 5225). From approximately 1.6 million reads from each inbred, 27,065 and 33,254 cDNA contigs were assembled from OH1 and 5225, respectively. In total, 3,364 single nucleotide polymorph...

  18. Application of genotyping-by-sequencing for mapping disease resistance in grapevine breeding families

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genotyping-by-Sequencing (GBS) is a low-cost, high-throughput, method for genome-wide polymorphism discovery and genotyping adjacent to restriction sites. Since 2010, GBS has been applied for the genotyping of over 12,000 grape breeding lines, with a primary focus on identifying markers predictive ...

  19. Rapid and accurate sequencing of the rainbow trout physical map using Illumina technology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) are the most widely cultivated cold freshwater fish in the world and serve as an important model species for many areas of research. Despite their importance, a reference genome sequence has not yet been generated for rainbow trout due in large part to the complex...

  20. Rapid and accurate sequencing of the rainbow trout physical map using Illumina technology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) are the most widely cultivated cold freshwater fish in the world and an important model species for many areas of research. Despite their importance, a reference genome sequence has not been generated for rainbow trout due in large part to the complex nature of th...

  1. Mapping cattle copy number variation by population-scale genome sequencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Copy number variation (CNV) is abundant in livestock, differing from SNPs in extent, origin and functional impact. Despite progress in CNV discovery, the nucleotide resolution architecture of most CNVs remains elusive. As a pilot population study of cattle CNV, we sequenced 100 representative cattle...

  2. Individualized cattle copy number and segmental duplication maps using next generation sequencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Copy Number Variations (CNVs) affect a wide range of phenotypic traits; however, CNVs in or near segmental duplication regions are often intractable. Using a read depth approach based on next generation sequencing, we examined genome-wide copy number differences among five taurine (three Angus, one ...

  3. Photogeologic map of the Hellas basin floor, Mars: Nature, origin, and sequence of major infill units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhardt, H.; Hiesinger, H.; Ivanov, M.; Erkeling, G.; Ruesch, O.; Reiss, D.

    2015-10-01

    Based on all state- of -the-art datasets and USGS -mapping guidelines [1,2], we produced a comprehensive photogeological map of the Hellas basin floor and its immediate surroundings (scale 1:2,000,000; Fig. 1). We compiled a self-consistent geologic history of the area, incorporating absolute and relative dating of identified units, as well as insights gained by previous investigations in and around the Hellas basin [e.g.,3-5]. Based on their ages, derived approximate volumes, as well as other characteristics, we suggest potential circum-Hellas source regions for specific basin floor units. Large deposits and erosional units in the basin show ages very similar to those of volcanic units in and around Hellas (~3.7 Ga), which is in agreement with certain volcanic outgassing models enabling liquid water runoff during that time.

  4. A map of human genome variation from population-scale sequencing.

    PubMed

    Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Altshuler, David; Auton, Adam; Brooks, Lisa D; Durbin, Richard M; Gibbs, Richard A; Hurles, Matt E; McVean, Gil A

    2010-10-28

    The 1000 Genomes Project aims to provide a deep characterization of human genome sequence variation as a foundation for investigating the relationship between genotype and phenotype. Here we present results of the pilot phase of the project, designed to develop and compare different strategies for genome-wide sequencing with high-throughput platforms. We undertook three projects: low-coverage whole-genome sequencing of 179 individuals from four populations; high-coverage sequencing of two mother-father-child trios; and exon-targeted sequencing of 697 individuals from seven populations. We describe the location, allele frequency and local haplotype structure of approximately 15 million single nucleotide polymorphisms, 1 million short insertions and deletions, and 20,000 structural variants, most of which were previously undescribed. We show that, because we have catalogued the vast majority of common variation, over 95% of the currently accessible variants found in any individual are present in this data set. On average, each person is found to carry approximately 250 to 300 loss-of-function variants in annotated genes and 50 to 100 variants previously implicated in inherited disorders. We demonstrate how these results can be used to inform association and functional studies. From the two trios, we directly estimate the rate of de novo germline base substitution mutations to be approximately 10(-8) per base pair per generation. We explore the data with regard to signatures of natural selection, and identify a marked reduction of genetic variation in the neighbourhood of genes, due to selection at linked sites. These methods and public data will support the next phase of human genetic research. PMID:20981092

  5. Integrating mapping-, assembly- and haplotype-based approaches for calling variants in clinical sequencing applications

    PubMed Central

    Mathieson, Iain; Iqbal, Zamin; Twigg, Stephen R F; Wilkie, Andrew O M; McVean, Gil; Lunter, Gerton

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput DNA sequencing technology has transformed genetic research and is starting to make an impact on clinical practice. However, analyzing high-throughput sequencing data remains challenging, particularly in clinical settings where accuracy and turnaround times are critical. We present a new approach to this problem, implemented in a software package called Platypus. Platypus achieves high sensitivity and specificity for SNPs, indels and complex polymorphisms by using local de novo assembly to generate candidate variants, followed by local realignment and probabilistic haplotype estimation. It is an order of magnitude faster than existing tools and generates calls from raw aligned read data without preprocessing. We demonstrate the performance of Platypus in clinically relevant experimental designs by comparing with SAMtools and GATK on whole-genome and exome-capture data, by identifying de novo variation in 15 parent-offspring trios with high sensitivity and specificity, and by estimating human leukocyte antigen genotypes directly from variant calls. PMID:25017105

  6. Integrating mapping-, assembly- and haplotype-based approaches for calling variants in clinical sequencing applications.

    PubMed

    Rimmer, Andy; Phan, Hang; Mathieson, Iain; Iqbal, Zamin; Twigg, Stephen R F; Wilkie, Andrew O M; McVean, Gil; Lunter, Gerton

    2014-08-01

    High-throughput DNA sequencing technology has transformed genetic research and is starting to make an impact on clinical practice. However, analyzing high-throughput sequencing data remains challenging, particularly in clinical settings where accuracy and turnaround times are critical. We present a new approach to this problem, implemented in a software package called Platypus. Platypus achieves high sensitivity and specificity for SNPs, indels and complex polymorphisms by using local de novo assembly to generate candidate variants, followed by local realignment and probabilistic haplotype estimation. It is an order of magnitude faster than existing tools and generates calls from raw aligned read data without preprocessing. We demonstrate the performance of Platypus in clinically relevant experimental designs by comparing with SAMtools and GATK on whole-genome and exome-capture data, by identifying de novo variation in 15 parent-offspring trios with high sensitivity and specificity, and by estimating human leukocyte antigen genotypes directly from variant calls. PMID:25017105

  7. Comprehensive sequence-flux mapping of a levoglucosan utilization pathway in E. coli

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Klesmith, Justin R.; Bacik, John -Paul; Michalczyk, Ryszard; Whitehead, Timothy A.

    2015-09-14

    Synthetic metabolic pathways often suffer from low specific productivity, and new methods that quickly assess pathway functionality for many thousands of variants are urgently needed. Here we present an approach that enables the rapid and parallel determination of sequence effects on flux for complete gene-encoding sequences. We show that this method can be used to determine the effects of over 8000 single point mutants of a pyrolysis oil catabolic pathway implanted in Escherichia coli. Experimental sequence-function data sets predicted whether fitness-enhancing mutations to the enzyme levoglucosan kinase resulted from enhanced catalytic efficiency or enzyme stability. A structure of one designmore » incorporating 38 mutations elucidated the structural basis of high fitness mutations. One design incorporating 15 beneficial mutations supported a 15-fold improvement in growth rate and greater than 24-fold improvement in enzyme activity relative to the starting pathway. Lastly, this technique can be extended to improve a wide variety of designed pathways.« less

  8. Congenic mapping and candidate sequencing of susceptibility genes for Type 1 diabetes in the NOD mouse.

    PubMed

    Ikegami, Hiroshi; Fujisawa, Tomomi; Makino, Susumu; Ogihara, Toshio

    2003-11-01

    Inheritance of type 1 diabetes is polygenic with a major susceptibility gene located in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). In addition to MHC-linked susceptibility, a number of susceptibility genes have been mapped outside the MHC in both humans and animal models. In order to localize and identify susceptibility genes for type 1 diabetes, we have developed a series of congenic strains in which either susceptibility intervals from the NOD mouse, a mouse model of type 1 diabetes, were introgressed onto control background genes or protective intervals from control strains were introgressed onto NOD background genes. NOD. CTS-H-2 congenic mice, which possess recombinant MHC with NOD alleles at class II A and E genes, which are candidates for Idd1, revealed that Idd1 consists of multiple components, one in class II (Idd1) and the other adjacent to, but distinct from, Idd1 (Idd16). Phenotypes of NOD. IIS-Idd3 congenic mice, which share the same alleles at both Il2 and Il21 as the NOD mouse, were indistinguishable from the NOD parental strain, indicating that both Il2 and Il21 are candidates for Idd3. In contrast, NOD. IIS-Idd10 congenic mice, which share the same alleles at Fcgr1, a previous candidate for Idd10, as the NOD mouse, were protected from type 1 diabetes, suggesting that Fcgr1 may not be responsible for the Idd10 effect. These data suggest that the use of strain colony closely related to a disease model to find the same candidate mutation on different haplotypes and make congenic strains with this recombinant chromosome, termed ancestral haplotype congenic mapping, is an effective strategy for fine mapping and identification of genes responsible for complex traits. PMID:14679059

  9. Cloning and comparative mapping of a human chromosome 4-specific alpha satellite DNA sequence

    SciTech Connect

    D'Aiuto, L.; Marzella, R.; Archidiacono, N.; Rocchi, M. ); Antonacci, R. )

    1993-11-01

    The authors have isolated and characterized two human alphoid DNA clones: p4n1/4 and pZ4.1. Clone p4n1/4 identifies specifically the centromeric region of chromosome 4; pZ4.1 recognizes a subset of alphoid DNA shared by chromosomes 4 and 9. The specificity was determined using fluorescence in situ hybridization experiments on metaphase spreads and Southern blotting analysis of human-hamster somatic cell hybrids. The genomic organization of both subsets was also investigated. Comparative mapping on chimpanzee and gorilla chromosomes was performed. p4n1/4 hybridizes to chimpanzee chromosomes 11 and 13, homologs of human chromosomes 9 and 2q, respectively. On gorilla metaphase spreads, p4n1/4 hybridizes exclusively to the centromeric region of chromosome 19, partially homologous to human chromosome 17. No hybridization signal was detected on chromosome 3 of both chimpanzee and gorilla, in both species homolog of human chromosome 4. Identical comparative mapping results were obtained using pZ4.1 probe, although the latter recognizes an alphoid subset distinct from the one recognized by p4n1/4. The implications of these results in the evolution of centromeric regions of primate chromosomes are discussed. 33 refs., 4 figs.

  10. A Novel Viable Allele of Arabidopsis CULLIN1 Identified in a Screen for Superroot2 Suppressors by Next Generation Sequencing-Assisted Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Pacurar, Daniel I.; Pacurar, Monica L.; Pacurar, Andrea M.; Gutierrez, Laurent; Bellini, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Map-based cloning (MBC) is the conventional approach for linking phenotypes to genotypes, and has been successfully used to identify causal mutations in diverse organisms. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies offer unprecedented possibilities to sequence the entire genomes of organisms, thereby in principle enabling direct identification of causal mutations without mapping. However, although mapping-by-sequencing has proven to be a cost effective alternative to classical MBC in particular situations, methods based solely on NGS still have limitations and need to be refined. Aiming to identify the causal mutations in suppressors of Arabidopsis thaliana superroot2 phenotype, generated by ethyl methane sulfonate (EMS) treatment, we combined NGS and classical mapping, to rapidly identify the point mutations and restrict the number of testable candidates by defining the chromosomal intervals containing the causal mutations, respectively. The NGS-assisted mapping approach we describe here facilitates unbiased identification of virtually any causal EMS-generated mutation by overlapping the identification (deep sequencing) and validation (mapping) steps. To exemplify the useful marriage of the two approaches we discuss the strategy used to identify a new viable recessive allele of the Arabidopsis CULLIN1 gene in the non-reference Wassilewskija (Ws-4) accession. PMID:24955772

  11. Mapping the magnetospheric structure at outburst of the pre-main sequence close binary AK Sco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez De Castro, Ana

    2013-10-01

    Pre-main sequence {PMS} binaries are surrounded by circumbinary disks from which matter falls onto both components. The material dragged from the circumbinary disk flows onto each star through independent streams channelled by the variable gravitational field. The action of the bar-like potential is most prominent in high eccentricity systems made of two equal mass stars. AK Sco is a unique PMS system composed of two F5 stars that get as close as 11.3 stellar radii at periastron {e=0.47}. AK Sco is an ideal laboratory to study matter infall in binaries and its role in orbit circularization. Our team has reported recently, the discovery of an unexpected 1.3mHz ultra low frequency {ULF} oscillation in the ultraviolet light curve at periastron passage. The oscillation lasted 0.6% of the orbital period. According to our numerical simulations, the cirscumstellar structures get in contact at periastron producing an accretion outburst that triggered of the oscillation. If confirmed, this would unveil a new mechanism for angular momentum loss during pre-main sequence evolution and a new type of interacting binary. The objective of this project is to identify the source of the oscillation and the physical structure of the accretion flow before, during and after the oscillation is triggered. Since the accretion flow radiates in the ultraviolet range, this study requires an ultraviolet {UV} spectroscopic monitoring.

  12. Interim Report on Multiple Sequence Alignments and TaqMan Signature Mapping to Phylogenetic Trees

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, S; Jaing, C

    2012-03-27

    The goal of this project is to develop forensic genotyping assays for select agent viruses, addressing a significant capability gap for the viral bioforensics and law enforcement community. We used a multipronged approach combining bioinformatics analysis, PCR-enriched samples, microarrays and TaqMan assays to develop high resolution and cost effective genotyping methods for strain level forensic discrimination of viruses. We have leveraged substantial experience and efficiency gained through year 1 on software development, SNP discovery, TaqMan signature design and phylogenetic signature mapping to scale up the development of forensics signatures in year 2. In this report, we have summarized the Taqman signature development for South American hemorrhagic fever viruses, tick-borne encephalitis viruses and henipaviruses, Old World Arenaviruses, filoviruses, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus, Rift Valley fever virus and Japanese encephalitis virus.

  13. Subset selection of high-depth next generation sequencing reads for de novo genome assembly using MapReduce framework

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Recent progress in next-generation sequencing technology has afforded several improvements such as ultra-high throughput at low cost, very high read quality, and substantially increased sequencing depth. State-of-the-art high-throughput sequencers, such as the Illumina MiSeq system, can generate ~15 Gbp sequencing data per run, with >80% bases above Q30 and a sequencing depth of up to several 1000x for small genomes. Illumina HiSeq 2500 is capable of generating up to 1 Tbp per run, with >80% bases above Q30 and often >100x sequencing depth for large genomes. To speed up otherwise time-consuming genome assembly and/or to obtain a skeleton of the assembly quickly for scaffolding or progressive assembly, methods for noise removal and reduction of redundancy in the original data, with almost equal or better assembly results, are worth studying. Results We developed two subset selection methods for single-end reads and a method for paired-end reads based on base quality scores and other read analytic tools using the MapReduce framework. We proposed two strategies to select reads: MinimalQ and ProductQ. MinimalQ selects reads with minimal base-quality above a threshold. ProductQ selects reads with probability of no incorrect base above a threshold. In the single-end experiments, we used Escherichia coli and Bacillus cereus datasets of MiSeq, Velvet assembler for genome assembly, and GAGE benchmark tools for result evaluation. In the paired-end experiments, we used the giant grouper (Epinephelus lanceolatus) dataset of HiSeq, ALLPATHS-LG genome assembler, and QUAST quality assessment tool for comparing genome assemblies of the original set and the subset. The results show that subset selection not only can speed up the genome assembly but also can produce substantially longer scaffolds. Availability: The software is freely available at https://github.com/moneycat/QReadSelector. PMID:26678408

  14. BMPER Mutation in Diaphanospondylodysostosis Identified by Ancestral Autozygosity Mapping and Targeted High-Throughput Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Funari, Vincent A.; Krakow, Deborah; Nevarez, Lisette; Chen, Zugen; Funari, Tara L.; Vatanavicharn, Nithiwat; Wilcox, William R.; Rimoin, David L.; Nelson, Stanley F.; Cohn, Daniel H.

    2010-01-01

    Diaphanospondylodysostosis (DSD) is a rare, recessively inherited, perinatal lethal skeletal disorder. The low frequency and perinatal lethality of DSD makes assembling a large set of families for traditional linkage-based genetic approaches challenging. By searching for evidence of unknown ancestral consanguinity, we identified two autozygous intervals, comprising 34 Mbps, unique to a single case of DSD. Empirically testing for ancestral consanguinity was effective in localizing the causative variant, thereby reducing the genomic space within which the mutation resides. High-throughput sequence analysis of exons captured from these intervals demonstrated that the affected individual was homozygous for a null mutation in BMPER, which encodes the bone morphogenetic protein-binding endothelial cell precursor-derived regulator. Mutations in BMPER were subsequently found in three additional DSD cases, confirming that defects in BMPER produce DSD. Phenotypic similarities between DSD and Bmper null mice indicate that BMPER-mediated signaling plays an essential role in vertebral segmentation early in human development. PMID:20869035

  15. Fine mapping of genome activation in bovine embryos by RNA sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Graf, Alexander; Krebs, Stefan; Zakhartchenko, Valeri; Schwalb, Björn; Blum, Helmut; Wolf, Eckhard

    2014-01-01

    During maternal-to-embryonic transition control of embryonic development gradually switches from maternal RNAs and proteins stored in the oocyte to gene products generated after embryonic genome activation (EGA). Detailed insight into the onset of embryonic transcription is obscured by the presence of maternal transcripts. Using the bovine model system, we established by RNA sequencing a comprehensive catalogue of transcripts in germinal vesicle and metaphase II oocytes, and in embryos at the four-cell, eight-cell, 16-cell, and blastocyst stages. These were produced by in vitro fertilization of Bos taurus taurus oocytes with sperm from a Bos taurus indicus bull to facilitate parent-specific transcriptome analysis. Transcripts from 12.4 to 13.7 × 103 different genes were detected in the various developmental stages. EGA was analyzed by (i) detection of embryonic transcripts, which are not present in oocytes; (ii) detection of transcripts from the paternal allele; and (iii) detection of primary transcripts with intronic sequences. These strategies revealed (i) 220, (ii) 937, and (iii) 6,848 genes to be activated from the four-cell to the blastocyst stage. The largest proportion of gene activation [i.e., (i) 59%, (ii) 42%, and (iii) 58%] was found in eight-cell embryos, indicating major EGA at this stage. Gene ontology analysis of genes activated at the four-cell stage identified categories related to RNA processing, translation, and transport, consistent with preparation for major EGA. Our study provides the largest transcriptome data set of bovine oocyte maturation and early embryonic development and detailed insight into the timing of embryonic activation of specific genes. PMID:24591639

  16. High-Resolution Linkage and Quantitative Trait Locus Mapping Aided by Genome Survey Sequencing: Building Up An Integrative Genomic Framework for a Bivalve Mollusc

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Wenqian; Fu, Xiaoteng; Dou, Jinzhuang; Li, Hengde; Su, Hailin; Mao, Junxia; Yu, Qian; Zhang, Lingling; Hu, Xiaoli; Huang, Xiaoting; Wang, Yangfan; Wang, Shi; Bao, Zhenmin

    2014-01-01

    Genetic linkage maps are indispensable tools in genetic and genomic studies. Recent development of genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) methods holds great promise for constructing high-resolution linkage maps in organisms lacking extensive genomic resources. In the present study, linkage mapping was conducted for a bivalve mollusc (Chlamys farreri) using a newly developed GBS method—2b-restriction site-associated DNA (2b-RAD). Genome survey sequencing was performed to generate a preliminary reference genome that was utilized to facilitate linkage and quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping in C. farreri. A high-resolution linkage map was constructed with a marker density (3806) that has, to our knowledge, never been achieved in any other molluscs. The linkage map covered nearly the whole genome (99.5%) with a resolution of 0.41 cM. QTL mapping and association analysis congruously revealed two growth-related QTLs and one potential sex-determination region. An important candidate QTL gene named PROP1, which functions in the regulation of growth hormone production in vertebrates, was identified from the growth-related QTL region detected on the linkage group LG3. We demonstrate that this linkage map can serve as an important platform for improving genome assembly and unifying multiple genomic resources. Our study, therefore, exemplifies how to build up an integrative genomic framework in a non-model organism. PMID:24107803

  17. Carriage and acquisition rates of Clostridium difficile in hospitalized horses, including molecular characterization, multilocus sequence typing and antimicrobial susceptibility of bacterial isolates.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, C; Taminiau, B; Brévers, B; Avesani, V; Van Broeck, J; Leroux, A A; Amory, H; Delmée, M; Daube, G

    2014-08-01

    Clostridium difficile has been identified as a significant agent of diarrhoea and enterocolitis in both foals and adult horses. Hospitalization, antibiotic therapy or changes in diet may contribute to the development of C. difficile infection. Horses admitted to a care unit are therefore at greater risk of being colonized. The aim of this study was to investigate the carriage of C. difficile in hospitalized horses and the possible influence of some risk factors in colonization. During a seven-month period, faecal samples and data relating the clinical history of horses admitted to a veterinary teaching hospital were collected. C. difficile isolates were characterized through toxin profiles, cytotoxicity activity, PCR-ribotyping, antimicrobial resistance and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Ten isolates were obtained with a total of seven different PCR-ribotypes, including PCR-ribotype 014. Five of them were identified as toxinogenic. A high resistance to gentamicin, clindamycin and ceftiofur was found. MLST revealed four different sequencing types (ST), which included ST11, ST26, ST2 and ST15, and phylogenetic analysis showed that most of the isolates clustered in the same lineage. Clinical history suggests that horses frequently harbour toxigenic and non-toxigenic C. difficile and that in most cases they are colonized regardless of the reason for hospitalization; the development of diarrhoea is more unusual. PMID:24894133

  18. Mapping and Validation of the Major Sex-Determining Region in Nile Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus L.) Using RAD Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Mohd G. Q.; Taggart, John B.; Gharbi, Karim; McAndrew, Brendan J.; Penman, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Sex in Oreochromis niloticus (Nile tilapia) is principally determined by an XX/XY locus but other genetic and environmental factors also influence sex ratio. Restriction Associated DNA (RAD) sequencing was used in two families derived from crossing XY males with females from an isogenic clonal line, in order to identify Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) and map the sex-determining region(s). We constructed a linkage map with 3,802 SNPs, which corresponded to 3,280 informative markers, and identified a major sex-determining region on linkage group 1, explaining nearly 96% of the phenotypic variance. This sex-determining region was mapped in a 2 cM interval, corresponding to approximately 1.2 Mb in the O. niloticus draft genome. In order to validate this, a diverse family (4 families; 96 individuals in total) and population (40 broodstock individuals) test panel were genotyped for five of the SNPs showing the highest association with phenotypic sex. From the expanded data set, SNPs Oni23063 and Oni28137 showed the highest association, which persisted both in the case of family and population data. Across the entire dataset all females were found to be homozygous for these two SNPs. Males were heterozygous, with the exception of five individuals in the population and two in the family dataset. These fish possessed the homozygous genotype expected of females. Progeny sex ratios (over 95% females) from two of the males with the “female” genotype indicated that they were neomales (XX males). Sex reversal induced by elevated temperature during sexual differentiation also resulted in phenotypic males with the “female” genotype. This study narrows down the region containing the main sex-determining locus, and provides genetic markers tightly linked to this locus, with an association that persisted across the population. These markers will be of use in refining the production of genetically male O. niloticus for aquaculture. PMID:23874606

  19. Genome-wide Bisulfite Sequencing in Zygotes Identifies Demethylation Targets and Maps the Contribution of TET3 Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Peat, Julian R.; Dean, Wendy; Clark, Stephen J.; Krueger, Felix; Smallwood, Sébastien A.; Ficz, Gabriella; Kim, Jong Kyoung; Marioni, John C.; Hore, Timothy A.; Reik, Wolf

    2014-01-01

    Summary Fertilization triggers global erasure of paternal 5-methylcytosine as part of epigenetic reprogramming during the transition from gametic specialization to totipotency. This involves oxidation by TET3, but our understanding of its targets and the wider context of demethylation is limited to a small fraction of the genome. We employed an optimized bisulfite strategy to generate genome-wide methylation profiles of control and TET3-deficient zygotes, using SNPs to access paternal alleles. This revealed that in addition to pervasive removal from intergenic sequences and most retrotransposons, gene bodies constitute a major target of zygotic demethylation. Methylation loss is associated with zygotic genome activation and at gene bodies is also linked to increased transcriptional noise in early development. Our data map the primary contribution of oxidative demethylation to a subset of gene bodies and intergenic sequences and implicate redundant pathways at many loci. Unexpectedly, we demonstrate that TET3 activity also protects certain CpG islands against methylation buildup. PMID:25497087

  20. Mapping the DNA-binding domain and target sequences of the Streptomyces peucetius daunorubicin biosynthesis regulatory protein, DnrI.

    PubMed

    Sheldon, Paul J; Busarow, Sara B; Hutchinson, C Richard

    2002-04-01

    Streptomyces antibiotic regulatory proteins (SARPs) constitute a novel family of transcriptional activators that control the expression of several diverse anti-biotic biosynthetic gene clusters. The Streptomyces peucetius DnrI protein, one of only a handful of these proteins yet discovered, controls the biosynthesis of the polyketide antitumour antibiotics daunorubicin and doxorubicin. Recently, comparative analyses have revealed significant similarities among the predicted DNA-binding domains of the SARPs and the C-terminal DNA-binding domain of the OmpR family of regulatory proteins. Using the crystal structure of the OmpR-binding domain as a template, DnrI was mapped by truncation and site-directed mutagenesis. Several highly conserved residues within the N-terminus are crucial for DNA binding and protein function. Tandemly arranged heptameric imperfect repeat sequences are found within the -35 promoter regions of target genes. Substitutions for each nucleotide within the repeats of the dnrG-dpsABCD promoter were performed by site-directed mutagenesis. The mutant promoter fragments were found to have modified binding characteristics in gel mobility shift assays. The spacing between the repeat target sequences is also critical for successful occupation by DnrI and, therefore, competent transcriptional activation of the dnrG-dpsABCD operon. PMID:11972782

  1. Sequence composition of BAC clones and SSR markers mapped to Upland cotton chromosomes 11 and 21 targeting resistance to soil-borne pathogens.

    PubMed

    Wang, Congli; Ulloa, Mauricio; Shi, Xinyi; Yuan, Xiaohui; Saski, Christopher; Yu, John Z; Roberts, Philip A

    2015-01-01

    Genetic and physical framework mapping in cotton (Gossypium spp.) were used to discover putative gene sequences involved in resistance to common soil-borne pathogens. Chromosome (Chr) 11 and its homoeologous Chr 21 of Upland cotton (G. hirsutum) are foci for discovery of resistance (R) or pathogen-induced R (PR) genes underlying QTLs involved in response to root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita), reniform nematode (Rotylenchulus reniformis), Fusarium wilt (Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. vasinfectum), Verticillium wilt (Verticillium dahliae), and black root rot (Thielaviopsis basicola). Simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers and bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones from a BAC library developed from the Upland cotton Acala Maxxa were mapped on Chr 11 and Chr 21. DNA sequence through Gene Ontology (GO) of 99 of 256 Chr 11 and 109 of 239 Chr 21 previously mapped SSRs revealed response elements to internal and external stimulus, stress, signaling process, and cell death. The reconciliation between genetic and physical mapping of gene annotations from new DNA sequences of 20 BAC clones revealed 467 (Chr 11) and 285 (Chr 21) G. hirsutum putative coding sequences, plus 146 (Chr 11) and 98 (Chr 21) predicted genes. GO functional profiling of Unigenes uncovered genes involved in different metabolic functions and stress response elements (SRE). Our results revealed that Chrs 11 and 21 harbor resistance gene rich genomic regions. Sequence comparisons with the ancestral diploid D5 (G. raimondii), A2 (G. arboreum) and domesticated tetraploid TM-1 AD1 (G. hirsutum) genomes revealed abundance of transposable elements and confirmed the richness of resistance gene motifs in these chromosomes. The sequence information of SSR markers and BAC clones and the genetic mapping of BAC clones provide enhanced genetic and physical frameworks of resistance gene-rich regions of the cotton genome, thereby aiding discovery of R and PR genes and breeding for resistance to cotton diseases. PMID

  2. Sequence composition of BAC clones and SSR markers mapped to Upland cotton chromosomes 11 and 21 targeting resistance to soil-borne pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Congli; Ulloa, Mauricio; Shi, Xinyi; Yuan, Xiaohui; Saski, Christopher; Yu, John Z.; Roberts, Philip A.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic and physical framework mapping in cotton (Gossypium spp.) were used to discover putative gene sequences involved in resistance to common soil-borne pathogens. Chromosome (Chr) 11 and its homoeologous Chr 21 of Upland cotton (G. hirsutum) are foci for discovery of resistance (R) or pathogen-induced R (PR) genes underlying QTLs involved in response to root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita), reniform nematode (Rotylenchulus reniformis), Fusarium wilt (Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. vasinfectum), Verticillium wilt (Verticillium dahliae), and black root rot (Thielaviopsis basicola). Simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers and bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones from a BAC library developed from the Upland cotton Acala Maxxa were mapped on Chr 11 and Chr 21. DNA sequence through Gene Ontology (GO) of 99 of 256 Chr 11 and 109 of 239 Chr 21 previously mapped SSRs revealed response elements to internal and external stimulus, stress, signaling process, and cell death. The reconciliation between genetic and physical mapping of gene annotations from new DNA sequences of 20 BAC clones revealed 467 (Chr 11) and 285 (Chr 21) G. hirsutum putative coding sequences, plus 146 (Chr 11) and 98 (Chr 21) predicted genes. GO functional profiling of Unigenes uncovered genes involved in different metabolic functions and stress response elements (SRE). Our results revealed that Chrs 11 and 21 harbor resistance gene rich genomic regions. Sequence comparisons with the ancestral diploid D5 (G. raimondii), A2 (G. arboreum) and domesticated tetraploid TM-1 AD1 (G. hirsutum) genomes revealed abundance of transposable elements and confirmed the richness of resistance gene motifs in these chromosomes. The sequence information of SSR markers and BAC clones and the genetic mapping of BAC clones provide enhanced genetic and physical frameworks of resistance gene-rich regions of the cotton genome, thereby aiding discovery of R and PR genes and breeding for resistance to cotton diseases. PMID

  3. A high-density genetic recombination map of sequence-tagged sites for sorghum, as a framework for comparative structural and evolutionary genomics of tropical grains and grasses.

    PubMed Central

    Bowers, John E; Abbey, Colette; Anderson, Sharon; Chang, Charlene; Draye, Xavier; Hoppe, Alison H; Jessup, Russell; Lemke, Cornelia; Lennington, Jennifer; Li, Zhikang; Lin, Yann-Rong; Liu, Sin-Chieh; Luo, Lijun; Marler, Barry S; Ming, Reiguang; Mitchell, Sharon E; Qiang, Dou; Reischmann, Kim; Schulze, Stefan R; Skinner, D Neil; Wang, Yue-Wen; Kresovich, Stephen; Schertz, Keith F; Paterson, Andrew H

    2003-01-01

    We report a genetic recombination map for Sorghum of 2512 loci spaced at average 0.4 cM ( approximately 300 kb) intervals based on 2050 RFLP probes, including 865 heterologous probes that foster comparative genomics of Saccharum (sugarcane), Zea (maize), Oryza (rice), Pennisetum (millet, buffelgrass), the Triticeae (wheat, barley, oat, rye), and Arabidopsis. Mapped loci identify 61.5% of the recombination events in this progeny set and reveal strong positive crossover interference acting across intervals of sequence-tagged sites will foster many structural, functional and evolutionary genomic studies in major food, feed, and biomass crops. PMID:14504243

  4. SPITZER IRS SPECTRAL MAPPING OF THE TOOMRE SEQUENCE: SPATIAL VARIATIONS OF PAH, GAS, AND DUST PROPERTIES IN NEARBY MAJOR MERGERS

    SciTech Connect

    Haan, S.; Armus, L.; Laine, S.; Surace, J. A.; Diaz-Santos, T.; Beirao, P.; Stierwalt, S.; Charmandaris, V.; Smith, J. D.; Schweizer, F.; Murphy, E. J.; Brandl, B.; Evans, A. S.; Hibbard, J. E.; Yun, M.; Jarrett, T. H.

    2011-12-01

    We have mapped the key mid-IR diagnostics in eight major merger systems of the Toomre sequence (NGC 4676, NGC 7592, NGC 6621, NGC 2623, NGC 6240, NGC 520, NGC 3921, and NGC 7252) using the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph. With these maps, we explore the variation of the ionized-gas, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH), and warm gas (H{sub 2}) properties across the sequence and within the galaxies. While the global PAH interband strength and ionized gas flux ratios ([Ne III]/[Ne II]) are similar to those of normal star-forming galaxies, the distribution of the spatially resolved PAH and fine structure line flux ratios is significantly different from one system to the other. Rather than a constant H{sub 2}/PAH flux ratio, we find that the relation between the H{sub 2} and PAH fluxes is characterized by a power law with a roughly constant exponent (0.61 {+-} 0.05) over all merger components and spatial scales. While following the same power law on local scales, three galaxies have a factor of 10 larger integrated (i.e., global) H{sub 2}/PAH flux ratio than the rest of the sample, even larger than what it is in most nearby active galactic nuclei. These findings suggest a common dominant excitation mechanism for H{sub 2} emission over a large range of global H{sub 2}/PAH flux ratios in major mergers. Early-merger systems show a different distribution between the cold (CO J = 1-0) and warm (H{sub 2}) molecular gas components, which is likely due to the merger interaction. Strong evidence for buried star formation in the overlap region of the merging galaxies is found in two merger systems (NGC 6621 and NGC 7592) as seen in the PAH, [Ne II], [Ne III], and warm gas line emission, but with no apparent corresponding CO (J = 1-0) emission. The minimum of the 11.3/7.7 {mu}m PAH interband strength ratio is typically located in the nuclei of galaxies, while the [Ne III/[Ne II] ratio increases with distance from the nucleus. Our findings also demonstrate that the variations of

  5. Construction of a high-density integrated genetic linkage map of rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis) using genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS)

    PubMed Central

    Pootakham, Wirulda; Ruang-Areerate, Panthita; Jomchai, Nukoon; Sonthirod, Chutima; Sangsrakru, Duangjai; Yoocha, Thippawan; Theerawattanasuk, Kanikar; Nirapathpongporn, Kanlaya; Romruensukharom, Phayao; Tragoonrung, Somvong; Tangphatsornruang, Sithichoke

    2015-01-01

    Construction of linkage maps is crucial for genetic studies and marker-assisted breeding programs. Recent advances in next generation sequencing technologies allow for the generation of high-density linkage maps, especially in non-model species lacking extensive genomic resources. Here, we constructed a high-density integrated genetic linkage map of rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis), the sole commercial producer of high-quality natural rubber. We applied a genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) technique to simultaneously discover and genotype single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers in two rubber tree populations. A total of 21,353 single nucleotide substitutions were identified, 55% of which represented transition events. GBS-based genetic maps of populations P and C comprised 1704 and 1719 markers and encompassed 2041 cM and 1874 cM, respectively. The average marker densities of these two maps were one SNP in 1.23–1.25 cM. A total of 1114 shared SNP markers were used to merge the two component maps. An integrated linkage map consisted of 2321 markers and spanned the cumulative length of 2052 cM. The composite map showed a substantial improvement in marker density, with one SNP marker in every 0.89 cM. To our knowledge, this is the most saturated genetic map in rubber tree to date. This integrated map allowed us to anchor 28,965 contigs, covering 135 Mb or 12% of the published rubber tree genome. We demonstrated that GBS is a robust and cost-effective approach for generating a common set of genome-wide SNP data suitable for constructing integrated linkage maps from multiple populations in a highly heterozygous agricultural species. PMID:26074933

  6. Construction of a high-density integrated genetic linkage map of rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis) using genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS).

    PubMed

    Pootakham, Wirulda; Ruang-Areerate, Panthita; Jomchai, Nukoon; Sonthirod, Chutima; Sangsrakru, Duangjai; Yoocha, Thippawan; Theerawattanasuk, Kanikar; Nirapathpongporn, Kanlaya; Romruensukharom, Phayao; Tragoonrung, Somvong; Tangphatsornruang, Sithichoke

    2015-01-01

    Construction of linkage maps is crucial for genetic studies and marker-assisted breeding programs. Recent advances in next generation sequencing technologies allow for the generation of high-density linkage maps, especially in non-model species lacking extensive genomic resources. Here, we constructed a high-density integrated genetic linkage map of rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis), the sole commercial producer of high-quality natural rubber. We applied a genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) technique to simultaneously discover and genotype single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers in two rubber tree populations. A total of 21,353 single nucleotide substitutions were identified, 55% of which represented transition events. GBS-based genetic maps of populations P and C comprised 1704 and 1719 markers and encompassed 2041 cM and 1874 cM, respectively. The average marker densities of these two maps were one SNP in 1.23-1.25 cM. A total of 1114 shared SNP markers were used to merge the two component maps. An integrated linkage map consisted of 2321 markers and spanned the cumulative length of 2052 cM. The composite map showed a substantial improvement in marker density, with one SNP marker in every 0.89 cM. To our knowledge, this is the most saturated genetic map in rubber tree to date. This integrated map allowed us to anchor 28,965 contigs, covering 135 Mb or 12% of the published rubber tree genome. We demonstrated that GBS is a robust and cost-effective approach for generating a common set of genome-wide SNP data suitable for constructing integrated linkage maps from multiple populations in a highly heterozygous agricultural species. PMID:26074933

  7. Using specific length amplified fragment sequencing to construct the high-density genetic map for Vitis (Vitis vinifera L. × Vitis amurensis Rupr.)

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yinshan; Shi, Guangli; Liu, Zhendong; Zhao, Yuhui; Yang, Xiaoxu; Zhu, Junchi; Li, Kun; Guo, Xiuwu

    2015-01-01

    In this study, 149 F1 plants from the interspecific cross between ‘Red Globe’ (Vitis vinifera L.) and ‘Shuangyou’ (Vitis amurensis Rupr.) and the parent were used to construct a molecular genetic linkage map by using the specific length amplified fragment sequencing technique. DNA sequencing generated 41.282 Gb data consisting of 206,411,693 paired-end reads. The average sequencing depths were 68.35 for ‘Red Globe,’ 63.65 for ‘Shuangyou,’ and 8.01 for each progeny. In all, 115,629 high-quality specific length amplified fragments were detected, of which 42,279 were polymorphic. The genetic map was constructed using 7,199 of these polymorphic markers. These polymorphic markers were assigned to 19 linkage groups; the total length of the map was 1929.13 cm, with an average distance of 0.28 cm between each maker. To our knowledge, the genetic maps constructed in this study contain the largest number of molecular markers. These high-density genetic maps might form the basis for the fine quantitative trait loci mapping and molecular-assisted breeding of grape. PMID:26089826

  8. Mapping of the Sequences Directing Localization of the Drosophila Germ Cell-Expressed Protein (GCE)

    PubMed Central

    Greb-Markiewicz, Beata; Sadowska, Daria; Surgut, Natalia; Godlewski, Jakub; Zarębski, Mirosław; Ożyhar, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster germ cell-expressed protein (GCE) belongs to the family of bHLH-PAS transcription factors that are the regulators of gene expression networks that determine many physiological and developmental processes. GCE is a homolog of D. melanogaster methoprene tolerant protein (MET), a key mediator of anti-metamorphic signaling in insects and the putative juvenile hormone receptor. Recently, it has been shown that the functions of MET and GCE are only partially redundant and tissue specific. The ability of bHLH-PAS proteins to fulfill their function depends on proper intracellular trafficking, determined by specific sequences, i.e. the nuclear localization signal (NLS) and the nuclear export signal (NES). Nevertheless, until now no data has been published on the GCE intracellular shuttling and localization signals. We performed confocal microscopy analysis of the subcellular distribution of GCE fused with yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) and YFP-GCE derivatives which allowed us to characterize the details of the subcellular traffic of this protein. We demonstrate that GCE possess specific pattern of localization signals, only partially consistent with presented previously for MET. The presence of a strong NLS in the C-terminal part of GCE, seems to be unique and important feature of this protein. The intracellular localization of GCE appears to be determined by the NLSs localized in PAS-B domain and C-terminal fragment of GCE, and NESs localized in PAS-A, PAS-B domains and C-terminal fragment of GCE. NLSs activity can be modified by juvenile hormone (JH) and other partners, likely 14-3-3 proteins. PMID:26186223

  9. Mapping and Sequencing the Human Genome: Science, Ethics, and Public Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutter, Mary Ann G.; Drexler, Edward; McCullough, Laurence B.; McInerney, Joseph D.; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Rossiter, Belinda; Zola, John

    The human genome project started in 1989 with the collaboration of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). This document aims to develop an understanding among students of the human genome project and relevant issues. Topics include the science and technology of the human genome project, and the ethical and…

  10. The utility of multiple molecular methods including whole genome sequencing as tools to differentiate Escherichia coli O157:H7 outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Berenger, Byron M; Berry, Chrystal; Peterson, Trevor; Fach, Patrick; Delannoy, Sabine; Li, Vincent; Tschetter, Lorelee; Nadon, Celine; Honish, Lance; Louie, Marie; Chui, Linda

    2015-01-01

    A standardised method for determining Escherichia coli O157:H7 strain relatedness using whole genome sequencing or virulence gene profiling is not yet established. We sought to assess the capacity of either high-throughput polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of 49 virulence genes, core-genome single nt variants (SNVs) or k-mer clustering to discriminate between outbreak-associated and sporadic E. coli O157:H7 isolates. Three outbreaks and multiple sporadic isolates from the province of Alberta, Canada were included in the study. Two of the outbreaks occurred concurrently in 2014 and one occurred in 2012. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) were employed as comparator typing methods. The virulence gene profiles of isolates from the 2012 and 2014 Alberta outbreak events and contemporary sporadic isolates were mostly identical; therefore the set of virulence genes chosen in this study were not discriminatory enough to distinguish between outbreak clusters. Concordant with PFGE and MLVA results, core genome SNV and k-mer phylogenies clustered isolates from the 2012 and 2014 outbreaks as distinct events. k-mer phylogenies demonstrated increased discriminatory power compared with core SNV phylogenies. Prior to the widespread implementation of whole genome sequencing for routine public health use, issues surrounding cost, technical expertise, software standardisation, and data sharing/comparisons must be addressed. PMID:26625187

  11. Morphology and SSU rDNA sequence analysis of two hypotrichous ciliates (Protozoa, Ciliophora, Hypotrichia) including the new species Metaurostylopsis parastruederkypkeae n. sp.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Borong; Wang, Chundi; Huang, Jie; Shi, Yuhong; Chen, Xiangrui

    2016-05-01

    The morphology and phylogeny of two hypotrichous ciliates, Metaurostylopsis parastruederkypkeae n. sp. and Neourostylopsis flavicana (Wang et al., 2011) Chen et al., 2013 were investigated based on morphology, infraciliature and the small subunit (SSU) ribosomal RNA gene (rRNA) sequence. The new species, M. parastruederkypkeae n. sp. was identified according to its characteristics: body shape ellipsoidal, size about (165-200) × (45-60) μm in vivo, cell color reddish; two types of cortical granules including wheat grain-like and yellow-greenish larger ones along the marginal cirri rows and dorsal kineties and dot-like and reddish smaller ones, grouped around marginal cirri on ventral side and arranged in short lines on dorsal side; 26-41 adoral membranelles; three frontal and one parabuccal, five to seven frontoterminal, one buccal, and three to six transverse cirri; seven to thirteen midventral pairs; five to nine unpaired ventral cirri, five to seven left and three to five right marginal rows; and three complete dorsal kineties. Phylogenetic analysis based on SSU rDNA sequences showed that both Metaurostylopsis and Neourostylopsis are monophyletic. As the internal relationship between and within both genera are not clear, further studies on the species in these two genera are necessary. The key characteristics of all known twelve Metaurostylopsis-Apourostylopsis-Neourostylopsis species complex were updated.

  12. Large-scale East-Asian eQTL mapping reveals novel candidate genes for LD mapping and the genomic landscape of transcriptional effects of sequence variants.

    PubMed

    Narahara, Maiko; Higasa, Koichiro; Nakamura, Seiji; Tabara, Yasuharu; Kawaguchi, Takahisa; Ishii, Miho; Matsubara, Kenichi; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Yamada, Ryo

    2014-01-01

    Profiles of sequence variants that influence gene transcription are very important for understanding mechanisms that affect phenotypic variation and disease susceptibility. Using genotypes at 1.4 million SNPs and a comprehensive transcriptional profile of 15,454 coding genes and 6,113 lincRNA genes obtained from peripheral blood cells of 298 Japanese individuals, we mapped expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs). We identified 3,804 cis-eQTLs (within 500 kb from target genes) and 165 trans-eQTLs (>500 kb away or on different chromosomes). Cis-eQTLs were often located in transcribed or adjacent regions of genes; among these regions, 5' untranslated regions and 5' flanking regions had the largest effects. Epigenetic evidence for regulatory potential accumulated in public databases explained the magnitude of the effects of our eQTLs. Cis-eQTLs were often located near the respective target genes, if not within genes. Large effect sizes were observed with eQTLs near target genes, and effect sizes were obviously attenuated as the eQTL distance from the gene increased. Using a very stringent significance threshold, we identified 165 large-effect trans-eQTLs. We used our eQTL map to assess 8,069 disease-associated SNPs identified in 1,436 genome-wide association studies (GWAS). We identified genes that might be truly causative, but GWAS might have failed to identify for 148 out of the GWAS-identified SNPs; for example, TUFM (P = 3.3E-48) was identified for inflammatory bowel disease (early onset); ZFP90 (P = 4.4E-34) for ulcerative colitis; and IDUA (P = 2.2E-11) for Parkinson's disease. We identified four genes (P<2.0E-14) that might be related to three diseases and two hematological traits; each expression is regulated by trans-eQTLs on a different chromosome than the gene. PMID:24956270

  13. Large-Scale East-Asian eQTL Mapping Reveals Novel Candidate Genes for LD Mapping and the Genomic Landscape of Transcriptional Effects of Sequence Variants

    PubMed Central

    Narahara, Maiko; Higasa, Koichiro; Nakamura, Seiji; Tabara, Yasuharu; Kawaguchi, Takahisa; Ishii, Miho; Matsubara, Kenichi; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Yamada, Ryo

    2014-01-01

    Profiles of sequence variants that influence gene transcription are very important for understanding mechanisms that affect phenotypic variation and disease susceptibility. Using genotypes at 1.4 million SNPs and a comprehensive transcriptional profile of 15,454 coding genes and 6,113 lincRNA genes obtained from peripheral blood cells of 298 Japanese individuals, we mapped expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs). We identified 3,804 cis-eQTLs (within 500 kb from target genes) and 165 trans-eQTLs (>500 kb away or on different chromosomes). Cis-eQTLs were often located in transcribed or adjacent regions of genes; among these regions, 5′ untranslated regions and 5′ flanking regions had the largest effects. Epigenetic evidence for regulatory potential accumulated in public databases explained the magnitude of the effects of our eQTLs. Cis-eQTLs were often located near the respective target genes, if not within genes. Large effect sizes were observed with eQTLs near target genes, and effect sizes were obviously attenuated as the eQTL distance from the gene increased. Using a very stringent significance threshold, we identified 165 large-effect trans-eQTLs. We used our eQTL map to assess 8,069 disease-associated SNPs identified in 1,436 genome-wide association studies (GWAS). We identified genes that might be truly causative, but GWAS might have failed to identify for 148 out of the GWAS-identified SNPs; for example, TUFM (P = 3.3E-48) was identified for inflammatory bowel disease (early onset); ZFP90 (P = 4.4E-34) for ulcerative colitis; and IDUA (P = 2.2E-11) for Parkinson's disease. We identified four genes (P<2.0E-14) that might be related to three diseases and two hematological traits; each expression is regulated by trans-eQTLs on a different chromosome than the gene. PMID:24956270

  14. Development and characterization of BAC-end sequence derived SSRs, and their incorporation into a new higher density genetic map for cultivated peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cultivated peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) is an important crop worldwide, valued for its edible oil and digestible protein. It has a very narrow genetic base that may well derive from a relatively recent single polyploidization event. Accordingly molecular markers have low levels of polymorphism and the number of polymorphic molecular markers available for cultivated peanut is still limiting. Results Here, we report a large set of BAC-end sequences (BES), use them for developing SSR (BES-SSR) markers, and apply them in genetic linkage mapping. The majority of BESs had no detectable homology to known genes (49.5%) followed by sequences with similarity to known genes (44.3%), and miscellaneous sequences (6.2%) such as transposable element, retroelement, and organelle sequences. A total of 1,424 SSRs were identified from 36,435 BESs. Among these identified SSRs, dinucleotide (47.4%) and trinucleotide (37.1%) SSRs were predominant. The new set of 1,152 SSRs as well as about 4,000 published or unpublished SSRs were screened against two parents of a mapping population, generating 385 polymorphic loci. A genetic linkage map was constructed, consisting of 318 loci onto 21 linkage groups and covering a total of 1,674.4 cM, with an average distance of 5.3 cM between adjacent loci. Two markers related to resistance gene homologs (RGH) were mapped to two different groups, thus anchoring 1 RGH-BAC contig and 1 singleton. Conclusions The SSRs mined from BESs will be of use in further molecular analysis of the peanut genome, providing a novel set of markers, genetically anchoring BAC clones, and incorporating gene sequences into a linkage map. This will aid in the identification of markers linked to genes of interest and map-based cloning. PMID:22260238

  15. Constructing physical and genomic maps for Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici,the wheat stripe rust pathogen, by comparing its EST sequences to the genomic sequence of P. graminis f. sp. tritici,the wheat stem rust pathogen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The wheat stripe rust fungus, Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst), does not have a known alternate host for sexual reproduction, which makes it impossible to study gene linkages through classic genetic and molecular mapping approaches. In this study, we compared 4,219 Pst expression sequence t...

  16. Assessment of the evaluation of liver T1 mapping imaging applying virtual ECG gating on a modified look-locker inversion recovery (MOLLI) pulse sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Seung-Man; Goo, Eun-Hoe; Lee, Suk-Jun; Choe, Bo-Young

    2014-10-01

    A T1 mapping calculation error may occur in a physicochemical environment with large relaxivity. We evaluated through a simulated electrocardiogram (ECG) the administration of a contrast with high relaxivity and its effect on the heart rate by using a modified Look-Locker inversion recovery (MOLLI) pulse sequence. The agarose 2% phantom of high relaxivity environment was developed by diluting gadoxetic acid magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) T1 contrast media. The gold standard T1 determination was based on coronal single section imaging with a 2D inversion-recovery turbo spin echo sequence (2D-IRTSE) in a 3T MR unit. Using the identical 3T MR scanner, we acquired T1 mapping for the MOLLI pulse sequence with various virtual heart rates. T1 mapping data of the two different pulse sequences ( i.e., 2D-IRTSE and MOLLI) were measured to investigate the accuracy and the specificity. An in vivo study was conducted in the same manner as the phantom experiments for liver T1 mapping imaging in three healthy volunteers. The MOLLI pulse sequence showed an error rate of less than 10% at a contrast agent concentration of 0.4 mmol/L, and significant error, compared with the reference value, was observed at 0.6 mmol/L or higher. The percentage error of the T1 value did not correlated with the RR ( i.e., the time between heart beats) change that was observed (P =.270). Based on the in-vivo liver test, T1 mapping imaging of an abdominal organ as the liver can be successfully achieved using the applied virtual ECG gating on the MOLLI sequence.

  17. Discovery of candidate disease genes in ENU-induced mouse mutants by large-scale sequencing, including a splice-site mutation in nucleoredoxin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An accurate and precisely annotated genome assembly is a fundamental requirement for functional genomic analysis. Here, the complete DNA sequence and gene annotation of mouse Chromosome 11 was used to test the efficacy of large-scale sequencing for mutation identification. We re-sequenced the 14,000...

  18. Cloning and sequencing of the gene for alpha antigen from Mycobacterium avium and mapping of B-cell epitopes.

    PubMed Central

    Ohara, N; Matsuo, K; Yamaguchi, R; Yamazaki, A; Tasaka, H; Yamada, T

    1993-01-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of alpha antigen secreted from Mycobacterium avium (A-alpha) was determined. The gene encodes 330 amino acids, including 40 amino acids for the signal peptide, followed by 290 amino acids for the mature protein with a molecular mass of 30,811 Da. This is the first sequence of A-alpha. Comparisons between A-alpha and alpha antigens of Mycobacterium leprae, Mycobacterium bovis BCG, and Mycobacterium kansasii showed highly homologous regions which suggested a conserved functional domain and two less-homologous regions. Serological analysis of recombinant A-alpha, expressed by a series of deletion constructs, indicated the possibility that A-alpha carries at least six B-cell epitopes. The three antigenic determinants were common to Mycobacterium tuberculosis, M. kansasii, and M. avium. The results also suggested the possibility that there are three species-specific epitopes. Images PMID:7681039

  19. BAC-end sequence-based SNP mining in Allotetraploid Cotton (Gossypium) utilizing re-sequencing data, phylogenetic inferences and perspectives for genetic mapping

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library and BAC-end sequences for Gossypium hirsutum L. have recently been developed. Here we report on genomic-based genome-wide SNP mining utilizing re-sequencing data with a BAC-end sequence reference for twelve G. hirsutum L. lines, one G. barbadense L. li...

  20. Sequence composition of BAC clones and SSR markers mapped to Upland cotton chromosomes 11 and 21 targeting resistance to soil-borne pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic and physical framework mapping in cotton (Gossypium spp.) were used to discover putative gene sequences involved in resistance to common soil-borne pathogens. Chromosome (Chr) 11 and its homoeologous Chr 21 of Upland cotton (G. hirsutum) is a focus for discovery of resistance (R) or pathoge...

  1. Molecular Cytogenetic Mapping of Satellite DNA Sequences in Aegilops geniculata and Wheat.

    PubMed

    Koo, Dal-Hoe; Tiwari, Vijay K; Hřibová, Eva; Doležel, Jaroslav; Friebe, Bernd; Gill, Bikram S

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) provides an efficient system for cytogenetic analysis of wild relatives of wheat for individual chromosome identification, elucidation of homoeologous relationships, and for monitoring alien gene transfers into wheat. This study is aimed at developing cytogenetic markers for chromosome identification of wheat and Aegilops geniculata (2n = 4x = 28, UgUgMgMg) using satellite DNAs obtained from flow-sorted chromosome 5Mg. FISH was performed to localize the satellite DNAs on chromosomes of wheat and selected Aegilops species. The FISH signals for satellite DNAs on chromosome 5Mg were generally associated with constitutive heterochromatin regions corresponding to C-band-positive chromatin including telomeric, pericentromeric, centromeric, and interstitial regions of all the 14 chromosome pairs of Ae. geniculata. Most satellite DNAs also generated FISH signals on wheat chromosomes and provided diagnostic chromosome arm-specific cytogenetic markers that significantly improved chromosome identification in wheat. The newly identified satellite DNA CL36 produced localized Mg genome chromosome-specific FISH signals in Ae. geniculata and in the M genome of the putative diploid donor species Ae. comosa subsp. subventricosa but not in Ae. comosa subsp. comosa, suggesting that the Mg genome of Ae. geniculata was probably derived from subsp. subventricosa. PMID:27403741

  2. SlopMap: a software application tool for quick and flexible identification of similar sequences using exact k-mer matching.

    PubMed

    Zhbannikov, Ilya Y; Hunter, Samuel S; Settles, Matthew L; Foster, James A

    2013-08-01

    With the advent of Next-Generation (NG) sequencing, it has become possible to sequence a entire genomes quickly and inexpensively. However, in some experiments one only needs to extract and assembly a portion of the sequence reads, for example when performing transcriptome studies, sequencing mitochondrial genomes, or characterizing exomes. With the raw DNA-library of a complete genome it would appear to be a trivial problem to identify reads of interest. But it is not always easy to incorporate well-known tools such as BLAST, BLAT, Bowtie, and SOAP directly into a bioinformatics pipelines before the assembly stage, either due to incompatibility with the assembler's file inputs, or because it is desirable to incorporate information that must be extracted separately. For example, in order to incorporate flowgrams from a Roche 454 sequencer into the Newbler assembler it is necessary to first extract them from the original SFF files. We present SlopMap, a bioinformatics software utility that allows quickly identification similar to the provided reference reads from either Roche 454 or Illumnia DNA library. With simple and intuitive command-line interface along with file output formats compatible to assembly programs, SlopMap can be directly embedded to biological data processing pipeline without any additional programming work. In addition, SlopMap preserves flowgram information needed for Roche 454 assembler. PMID:24404406

  3. SlopMap: a software application tool for quick and flexible identification of similar sequences using exact k-mer matching

    PubMed Central

    Zhbannikov, Ilya Y.; Hunter, Samuel S.; Settles, Matthew L.; Foster, James A.

    2013-01-01

    With the advent of Next-Generation (NG) sequencing, it has become possible to sequence a entire genomes quickly and inexpensively. However, in some experiments one only needs to extract and assembly a portion of the sequence reads, for example when performing transcriptome studies, sequencing mitochondrial genomes, or characterizing exomes. With the raw DNA-library of a complete genome it would appear to be a trivial problem to identify reads of interest. But it is not always easy to incorporate well-known tools such as BLAST, BLAT, Bowtie, and SOAP directly into a bioinformatics pipelines before the assembly stage, either due to incompatibility with the assembler’s file inputs, or because it is desirable to incorporate information that must be extracted separately. For example, in order to incorporate flowgrams from a Roche 454 sequencer into the Newbler assembler it is necessary to first extract them from the original SFF files. We present SlopMap, a bioinformatics software utility that allows quickly identification similar to the provided reference reads from either Roche 454 or Illumnia DNA library. With simple and intuitive command-line interface along with file output formats compatible to assembly programs, SlopMap can be directly embedded to biological data processing pipeline without any additional programming work. In addition, SlopMap preserves flowgram information needed for Roche 454 assembler. PMID:24404406

  4. Physical chromosome mapping of repetitive DNA sequences in Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus: evidences for a differential distribution of repetitive elements in the sex chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Irani A; Martins, Cesar

    2008-06-01

    Repetitive DNAs have been extensively applied as physical chromosome markers on comparative studies, identification of chromosome rearrangements and sex chromosomes, chromosome evolution analysis, and applied genetics. Here we report the characterization of repetitive DNA sequences from the Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) genome by construction and screening of plasmid library enriched with repetitive DNAs, analysis of a BAC-based physical map, and hybridization to chromosomes. The physical mapping of BACs enriched with repetitive sequences and C(o)t-1 DNA (DNA enriched for highly and moderately repetitive DNA sequences) to chromosomes using FISH showed a predominant distribution of repetitive elements in the centromeric and telomeric regions and along the entire length of the largest chromosome pair (X and Y sex chromosomes) of the species. The distribution of repetitive DNAs differed significantly between the p arm of X and Y chromosomes. These findings suggest that repetitive DNAs have had an important role in the differentiation of sex chromosomes. PMID:17395473

  5. Construction of a Genetic Linkage Map Based on Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism Markers and Development of Sequence-Tagged Site Markers for Marker-Assisted Selection of the Sporeless Trait in the Oyster Mushroom (Pleurotus eryngii)

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Jun; Obatake, Yasushi; Murakami, Shigeyuki; Fukumasa, Yukitaka; Matsumoto, Teruyuki

    2012-01-01

    A large number of spores from fruiting bodies can lead to allergic reactions and other problems during the cultivation of edible mushrooms, including Pleurotus eryngii (DC.) Quél. A cultivar harboring a sporulation-deficient (sporeless) mutation would be useful for preventing these problems, but traditional breeding requires extensive time and labor. In this study, using a sporeless P. eryngii strain, we constructed a genetic linkage map to introduce a molecular breeding program like marker-assisted selection. Based on the segregation of 294 amplified fragment length polymorphism markers, two mating type factors, and the sporeless trait, the linkage map consisted of 11 linkage groups with a total length of 837.2 centimorgans (cM). The gene region responsible for the sporeless trait was located in linkage group IX with 32 amplified fragment length polymorphism markers and the B mating type factor. We also identified eight markers closely linked (within 1.2 cM) to the sporeless locus using bulked-segregant analysis-based amplified fragment length polymorphism. One such amplified fragment length polymorphism marker was converted into two sequence-tagged site markers, SD488-I and SD488-II. Using 14 wild isolates, sequence-tagged site analysis indicated the potential usefulness of the combination of two sequence-tagged site markers in cross-breeding of the sporeless strain. It also suggested that a map constructed for P. eryngii has adequate accuracy for marker-assisted selection. PMID:22210222

  6. Genome Sequencing and Mapping Reveal Loss of Heterozygosity as a Mechanism for Rapid Adaptation in the Vegetable Pathogen Phytophthora capsici

    SciTech Connect

    Lamour, Kurt H.; Mudge, Joann; Gobena, Daniel; Hurtado-Gonzales, Oscar P.; Schmutz, Jeremy; Kuo, Alan; Miller, Neil A.; Rice, Brandon J.; Raffaele, Sylvain; Cano, Liliana M.; Bharti, Arvind K.; Donahoo, Ryan S.; Finely, Sabra; Huitema, Edgar; Hulvey, Jon; Platt, Darren; Salamov, Asaf; Savidor, Alon; Sharma, Rahul; Stam, Remco; Sotrey, Dylan; Thines, Marco; Win, Joe; Haas, Brian J.; Dinwiddie, Darrell L.; Jenkins, Jerry; Knight, James R.; Affourtit, Jason P.; Han, Cliff S.; Chertkov, Olga; Lindquist, Erika A.; Detter, Chris; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Kamoun, Sophien; Kingsmore, Stephen F.

    2012-02-07

    The oomycete vegetable pathogen Phytophthora capsici has shown remarkable adaptation to fungicides and new hosts. Like other members of this destructive genus, P. capsici has an explosive epidemiology, rapidly producing massive numbers of asexual spores on infected hosts. In addition, P. capsici can remain dormant for years as sexually recombined oospores, making it difficult to produce crops at infested sites, and allowing outcrossing populations to maintain significant genetic variation. Genome sequencing, development of a high-density genetic map, and integrative genomic or genetic characterization of P. capsici field isolates and intercross progeny revealed significant mitotic loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in diverse isolates. LOH was detected in clonally propagated field isolates and sexual progeny, cumulatively affecting >30percent of the genome. LOH altered genotypes for more than 11,000 single-nucleotide variant sites and showed a strong association with changes in mating type and pathogenicity. Overall, it appears that LOH may provide a rapid mechanism for fixing alleles and may be an important component of adaptability for P. capsici.

  7. Genome sequencing and mapping reveal loss of heterozygosity as a mechanism for rapid adaptation in the vegetable pathogen Phytophthora capsici.

    PubMed

    Lamour, Kurt H; Mudge, Joann; Gobena, Daniel; Hurtado-Gonzales, Oscar P; Schmutz, Jeremy; Kuo, Alan; Miller, Neil A; Rice, Brandon J; Raffaele, Sylvain; Cano, Liliana M; Bharti, Arvind K; Donahoo, Ryan S; Finley, Sabra; Huitema, Edgar; Hulvey, Jon; Platt, Darren; Salamov, Asaf; Savidor, Alon; Sharma, Rahul; Stam, Remco; Storey, Dylan; Thines, Marco; Win, Joe; Haas, Brian J; Dinwiddie, Darrell L; Jenkins, Jerry; Knight, James R; Affourtit, Jason P; Han, Cliff S; Chertkov, Olga; Lindquist, Erika A; Detter, Chris; Grigoriev, Igor V; Kamoun, Sophien; Kingsmore, Stephen F

    2012-10-01

    The oomycete vegetable pathogen Phytophthora capsici has shown remarkable adaptation to fungicides and new hosts. Like other members of this destructive genus, P. capsici has an explosive epidemiology, rapidly producing massive numbers of asexual spores on infected hosts. In addition, P. capsici can remain dormant for years as sexually recombined oospores, making it difficult to produce crops at infested sites, and allowing outcrossing populations to maintain significant genetic variation. Genome sequencing, development of a high-density genetic map, and integrative genomic or genetic characterization of P. capsici field isolates and intercross progeny revealed significant mitotic loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in diverse isolates. LOH was detected in clonally propagated field isolates and sexual progeny, cumulatively affecting >30% of the genome. LOH altered genotypes for more than 11,000 single-nucleotide variant sites and showed a strong association with changes in mating type and pathogenicity. Overall, it appears that LOH may provide a rapid mechanism for fixing alleles and may be an important component of adaptability for P. capsici. PMID:22712506

  8. Genome sequencing and mapping reveal loss of heterozygosity as a mechanism for rapid adaptation in the vegetable pathogen Phytophthora capsici

    PubMed Central

    Lamour, Kurt H.; Mudge, Joann; Gobena, Daniel; Hurtado-Gonzales, Oscar P.; Schmutz, Jeremy; Kuo, Alan; Miller, Neil A.; Rice, Brandon J.; Raffaele, Sylvain; Cano, Liliana M.; Bharti, Arvind K.; Donahoo, Ryan S.; Finley, Sabra; Huitema, Edgar; Hulvey, Jon; Platt, Darren; Salamov, Asaf; Savidor, Alon; Sharma, Rahul; Stam, Remco; Storey, Dylan; Thines, Marco; Win, Joe; Haas, Brian J.; Dinwiddie, Darrell L.; Jenkins, Jerry; Knight, James R.; Affourtit, Jason P.; Han, Cliff S.; Chertkov, Olga; Lindquist, Erika A.; Detter, Chris; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Kamoun, Sophien; Kingsmore, Stephen F.

    2013-01-01

    The oomycete vegetable pathogen Phytophthora capsici has shown remarkable adaptation to fungicides and new hosts. Like other members of this destructive genus, P. capsici has an explosive epidemiology, rapidly producing massive numbers of asexual spores on infected hosts. In addition, P. capsici can remain dormant for years as sexually-recombined oospores, making it difficult to produce crops at infested sites, and allowing outcrossing populations to maintain significant genetic variation. Genome sequencing, development of a high-density genetic map, and integrative genomic/genetic characterization of P. capsici field isolates and intercross progeny revealed significant mitotic loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and higher levels of SNVs than those reported for humans, plants, and P. infestans. LOH was detected in clonally propagated field isolates and sexual progeny, cumulatively affecting >30% of the genome. LOH altered genotypes for more than 11,000 single nucleotide variant (SNV) sites and showed a strong association with changes in mating type and pathogenicity. Overall, it appears that LOH may provide a rapid mechanism for fixing alleles and may be an important component of adaptability for P. capsici. PMID:22712506

  9. Allele frequency-based analyses robustly map sequence sites under balancing selection in a malaria vaccine candidate antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Polley, Spencer D; Chokejindachai, Watcharee; Conway, David J

    2003-01-01

    The Plasmodium falciparum apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1) is a leading candidate for a malaria vaccine. Here, within-population analyses of alleles from 50 Thai P. falciparum isolates yield significant evidence for balancing selection on polymorphisms within the disulfide-bonded domains I and III of the surface accessible ectodomain of AMA1, a result very similar to that seen previously in a Nigerian population. Studying the frequency of nucleotide polymorphisms in both populations shows that the between-population component of variance (F(ST)) is significantly lower in domains I and III compared to the intervening domain II and compared to 11 unlinked microsatellite loci. A nucleotide site-by-site analysis shows that sites with exceptionally high or low F(ST) values cluster significantly into serial runs, with four runs of low values in domain I and one in domain III. These runs may map the sequences that are consistently under the strongest balancing selection from naturally acquired immune responses. PMID:14573469

  10. Deep RNA sequencing of L. monocytogenes reveals overlapping and extensive stationary phase and sigma B-dependent transcriptomes, including multiple highly transcribed noncoding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Identification of specific genes and gene expression patterns important for bacterial survival, transmission and pathogenesis is critically needed to enable development of more effective pathogen control strategies. The stationary phase stress response transcriptome, including many σB-dependent genes, was defined for the human bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes using RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) with the Illumina Genome Analyzer. Specifically, bacterial transcriptomes were compared between stationary phase cells of L. monocytogenes 10403S and an otherwise isogenic ΔsigB mutant, which does not express the alternative σ factor σB, a major regulator of genes contributing to stress response, including stresses encountered upon entry into stationary phase. Results Overall, 83% of all L. monocytogenes genes were transcribed in stationary phase cells; 42% of currently annotated L. monocytogenes genes showed medium to high transcript levels under these conditions. A total of 96 genes had significantly higher transcript levels in 10403S than in ΔsigB, indicating σB-dependent transcription of these genes. RNA-Seq analyses indicate that a total of 67 noncoding RNA molecules (ncRNAs) are transcribed in stationary phase L. monocytogenes, including 7 previously unrecognized putative ncRNAs. Application of a dynamically trained Hidden Markov Model, in combination with RNA-Seq data, identified 65 putative σB promoters upstream of 82 of the 96 σB-dependent genes and upstream of the one σB-dependent ncRNA. The RNA-Seq data also enabled annotation of putative operons as well as visualization of 5'- and 3'-UTR regions. Conclusions The results from these studies provide powerful evidence that RNA-Seq data combined with appropriate bioinformatics tools allow quantitative characterization of prokaryotic transcriptomes, thus providing exciting new strategies for exploring transcriptional regulatory networks in bacteria. See minireivew http://jbiol.com/content/8

  11. The First High-Density Genetic Map Construction in Tree Peony (Paeonia Sect. Moutan) using Genotyping by Specific-Locus Amplified Fragment Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Cai, Changfu; Cheng, Fang-Yun; Wu, Jing; Zhong, Yuan; Liu, Gaixiu

    2015-01-01

    Genetic linkage maps, permitting the elucidation of genome structure, are one of most powerful genomic tools to accelerate marker-assisted breeding. However, due to a lack of sufficient user-friendly molecular markers, no genetic linkage map has been developed for tree peonies (Paeonia Sect. Moutan), a group of important horticultural plants worldwide. Specific-locus amplified fragment sequencing (SLAF-seq) is a recent molecular marker development technology that enable the large-scale discovery and genotyping of sequence-based marker in genome-wide. In this study, we performed SLAF sequencing of an F1 population, derived from the cross P. ostti 'FenDanBai' × P. × suffruticosa 'HongQiao', to identify sufficient high-quality markers for the construction of high-density genetic linkage map in tree peonies. After SLAF sequencing, a total of 78 Gb sequencing data and 285,403,225 pair-end reads were generated. We detected 309,198 high-quality SLAFs from these data, of which 85,124 (27.5%) were polymorphic. Subsequently, 3518 of the polymorphic markers, which were successfully encoded in to Mendelian segregation types, and were in conformity with the criteria of high-quality markers, were defined as effective markers and used for genetic linkage mapping. Finally, we constructed an integrated genetic map, which comprised 1189 markers on the five linkage groups, and spanned 920.699 centiMorgans (cM) with an average inter-marker distance of 0.774 cM. There were 1115 'SNP-only' markers, 18 'InDel-only' markers, and 56 'SNP&InDel' markers on the map. Among these markers, 450 (37.85%) showed significant segregation distortion (P < 0.05). In conclusion, this investigation reported the first large-scale marker development and high-density linkage map construction for tree peony. The results of this study will serve as a solid foundation not only for marker-assisted breeding, but also for genome sequence assembly for tree peony. PMID:26010095

  12. The First High-Density Genetic Map Construction in Tree Peony (Paeonia Sect. Moutan) using Genotyping by Specific-Locus Amplified Fragment Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Changfu; Cheng, Fang-Yun; Wu, Jing; Zhong, Yuan; Liu, Gaixiu

    2015-01-01

    Genetic linkage maps, permitting the elucidation of genome structure, are one of most powerful genomic tools to accelerate marker-assisted breeding. However, due to a lack of sufficient user-friendly molecular markers, no genetic linkage map has been developed for tree peonies (Paeonia Sect. Moutan), a group of important horticultural plants worldwide. Specific-locus amplified fragment sequencing (SLAF-seq) is a recent molecular marker development technology that enable the large-scale discovery and genotyping of sequence-based marker in genome-wide. In this study, we performed SLAF sequencing of an F1 population, derived from the cross P. ostti ‘FenDanBai’ × P. × suffruticosa ‘HongQiao’, to identify sufficient high-quality markers for the construction of high-density genetic linkage map in tree peonies. After SLAF sequencing, a total of 78 Gb sequencing data and 285,403,225 pair-end reads were generated. We detected 309,198 high-quality SLAFs from these data, of which 85,124 (27.5%) were polymorphic. Subsequently, 3518 of the polymorphic markers, which were successfully encoded in to Mendelian segregation types, and were in conformity with the criteria of high-quality markers, were defined as effective markers and used for genetic linkage mapping. Finally, we constructed an integrated genetic map, which comprised 1189 markers on the five linkage groups, and spanned 920.699 centiMorgans (cM) with an average inter-marker distance of 0.774 cM. There were 1115 ‘SNP-only’ markers, 18 ‘InDel-only’ markers, and 56 ‘SNP&InDel’ markers on the map. Among these markers, 450 (37.85%) showed significant segregation distortion (P < 0.05). In conclusion, this investigation reported the first large-scale marker development and high-density linkage map construction for tree peony. The results of this study will serve as a solid foundation not only for marker-assisted breeding, but also for genome sequence assembly for tree peony. PMID:26010095

  13. Transcriptome sequencing of two parental lines of cabbage (Brassica oleracea L. var. capitata L.) and construction of an EST-based genetic map

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Expressed sequence tag (EST)-based markers are preferred because they reflect transcribed portions of the genome. We report the development of simple sequence repeat (SSR) and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers derived from transcriptome sequences in cabbage, and their utility for map construction. Results Transcriptome sequences were obtained from two cabbage parental lines, C1184 and C1234, which are susceptible and resistant to black rot disease, respectively, using the 454 platform. A total of 92,255 and 127,522 reads were generated and clustered into 34,688 and 40,947 unigenes, respectively. We identified 2,405 SSR motifs from the unigenes of the black rot-resistant parent C1234. Trinucleotide motifs were the most abundant (66.15%) among the repeat motifs. In addition, 1,167 SNPs were detected between the two parental lines. A total of 937 EST-based SSR and 97 SNP-based dCAPS markers were designed and used for detection of polymorphism between parents. Using an F2 population, we built a genetic map comprising 265 loci, and consisting of 98 EST-based SSRs, 21 SNP-based dCAPS, 55 IBP markers derived from B. rapa genome sequence and 91 public SSRs, distributed on nine linkage groups spanning a total of 1,331.88 cM with an average distance of 5.03 cM between adjacent loci. The parental lines used in this study are elite breeding lines with little genetic diversity; therefore, the markers that mapped in our genetic map will have broad spectrum utility. Conclusions This genetic map provides additional genetic information to the existing B. oleracea map. Moreover, the new set of EST-based SSR and dCAPS markers developed herein is a valuable resource for genetic studies and will facilitate cabbage breeding. Additionally, this study demonstrates the usefulness of NGS transcriptomes for the development of genetic maps even with little genetic diversity in the mapping population. PMID:24559437

  14. Development of cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence markers and a CAPS-based genetic linkage map in watermelon (Citrullus lanatus [Thunb.] Matsum. and Nakai) constructed using whole-genome re-sequencing data

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shi; Gao, Peng; Zhu, Qianglong; Luan, Feishi; Davis, Angela R.; Wang, Xiaolu

    2016-01-01

    Cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (CAPS) markers are useful tools for detecting single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). This study detected and converted SNP sites into CAPS markers based on high-throughput re-sequencing data in watermelon, for linkage map construction and quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis. Two inbred lines, Cream of Saskatchewan (COS) and LSW-177 had been re-sequenced and analyzed by Perl self-compiled script for CAPS marker development. 88.7% and 78.5% of the assembled sequences of the two parental materials could map to the reference watermelon genome, respectively. Comparative assembled genome data analysis provided 225,693 and 19,268 SNPs and indels between the two materials. 532 pairs of CAPS markers were designed with 16 restriction enzymes, among which 271 pairs of primers gave distinct bands of the expected length and polymorphic bands, via PCR and enzyme digestion, with a polymorphic rate of 50.94%. Using the new CAPS markers, an initial CAPS-based genetic linkage map was constructed with the F2 population, spanning 1836.51 cM with 11 linkage groups and 301 markers. 12 QTLs were detected related to fruit flesh color, length, width, shape index, and brix content. These newly CAPS markers will be a valuable resource for breeding programs and genetic studies of watermelon. PMID:27162496

  15. Development of cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence markers and a CAPS-based genetic linkage map in watermelon (Citrullus lanatus [Thunb.] Matsum. and Nakai) constructed using whole-genome re-sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shi; Gao, Peng; Zhu, Qianglong; Luan, Feishi; Davis, Angela R; Wang, Xiaolu

    2016-03-01

    Cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (CAPS) markers are useful tools for detecting single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). This study detected and converted SNP sites into CAPS markers based on high-throughput re-sequencing data in watermelon, for linkage map construction and quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis. Two inbred lines, Cream of Saskatchewan (COS) and LSW-177 had been re-sequenced and analyzed by Perl self-compiled script for CAPS marker development. 88.7% and 78.5% of the assembled sequences of the two parental materials could map to the reference watermelon genome, respectively. Comparative assembled genome data analysis provided 225,693 and 19,268 SNPs and indels between the two materials. 532 pairs of CAPS markers were designed with 16 restriction enzymes, among which 271 pairs of primers gave distinct bands of the expected length and polymorphic bands, via PCR and enzyme digestion, with a polymorphic rate of 50.94%. Using the new CAPS markers, an initial CAPS-based genetic linkage map was constructed with the F2 population, spanning 1836.51 cM with 11 linkage groups and 301 markers. 12 QTLs were detected related to fruit flesh color, length, width, shape index, and brix content. These newly CAPS markers will be a valuable resource for breeding programs and genetic studies of watermelon. PMID:27162496

  16. High-resolution physical mapping of a 250-kb region of human chromosome 11q24 by genomic sequence sampling (GSS)

    SciTech Connect

    Selleri, L.; Smith, M.W.; Holmsen, A.L.

    1995-04-10

    A physical map of the region of human chromosome 11q24 containing the FLI1 gene, disrupted by the t(11;22) translocation in Ewing sarcoma and primitive neuroectodermal tumors, was analyzed by genomic sequence sampling. Using a 4- to 5-fold coverage chromosome 11-specific library, 22 region-specific cosmid clones were identified by phenol emulsion reassociation hybridization, with a 245-kb yeast artificial chromosome clone containing the FLI1 gene, and by directed {open_quotes}walking{close_quotes} techniques. Cosmid contigs were constructed by individual clone fingerprinting using restriction enzyme digestion and assembly with the Genome Reconstruction and AsseMbly (GRAM) computer algorithm. The relative orientation and spacing of cosmid contigs with respect to the chromosome were determined by the structural analysis of cosmid clones and by direct visual in situ hybridization mapping. Each cosmid clone in the contig was subjected to {open_quotes}one-pass{close_quotes} end sequencing, and the resulting ordered sequence fragments represent {approximately}5% of the complete DNA sequence, making the entire region accessible by PCR amplification. The sequence samples were analyzed for putative exons, repetitive DNAs, and simple sequence repeats using a variety of computer algorithms. Based upon the computer predictions, Southern and Northern blot experiments led to the independent identification and localization of the FLI1 gene as well as a previously unknown gene located in this region of chromosome 11q24. This approach to high-resolution physical analysis of human chromosomes allows the assembly of detailed sequence-based maps. 62 refs., 7 figs.

  17. A Contiguous 3-Mb Sequence-Ready Map in the S3–MX Region on 21q22.2 Based on High- Throughput Nonisotopic Library Screenings

    PubMed Central

    Hildmann, Thomas; Kong, Xianging; O’Brien, John; Riesselman, Lisa; Christensen, Hoang-My; Dagand, Emilie; Lehrach, Hans; Yaspo, Marie-Laure

    1999-01-01

    Progress in complete genomic sequencing of human chromosome 21 relies on the construction of high-quality bacterial clone maps spanning large chromosomal regions. To achieve this goal, we have applied a strategy based on nonradioactive hybridizations to contig building. A contiguous sequence-ready map was constructed in the Down syndrome congenital heart disease (DS-CHD) region in 21q22.2, as a framework for large-scale genomic sequencing and positional candidate gene approach. Contig assembly was performed essentially by high throughput nonisotopic screenings of genomic libraries, prior to clone validation by (1) restriction digest fingerprinting, (2) STS analysis, (3) Southern hybridizations, and (4) FISH analysis. The contig contains a total of 50 STSs, of which 13 were newly isolated. A minimum tiling path (MTP) was subsequently defined that consists of 20 PACs, 2 BACs, and 5 cosmids covering 3 Mb between D21S3 and MX1. Gene distribution in the region includes 9 known genes (c21–LRP, WRB, SH3BGR, HMG14, PCP4, DSCAM, MX2, MX1, and TMPRSS2) and 14 new additional gene signatures consisting of cDNA selection products and ESTs. Forthcoming genomic sequence information will unravel the structural organization of potential candidate genes involved in specific features of Down syndrome pathogenesis. PMID:10207158

  18. An Expressed Sequence Tag (EST)-enriched genetic map of turbot (Scophthalmus maximus): a useful framework for comparative genomics across model and farmed teleosts

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The turbot (Scophthalmus maximus) is a relevant species in European aquaculture. The small turbot genome provides a source for genomics strategies to use in order to understand the genetic basis of productive traits, particularly those related to sex, growth and pathogen resistance. Genetic maps represent essential genomic screening tools allowing to localize quantitative trait loci (QTL) and to identify candidate genes through comparative mapping. This information is the backbone to develop marker-assisted selection (MAS) programs in aquaculture. Expressed sequenced tag (EST) resources have largely increased in turbot, thus supplying numerous type I markers suitable for extending the previous linkage map, which was mostly based on anonymous loci. The aim of this study was to construct a higher-resolution turbot genetic map using EST-linked markers, which will turn out to be useful for comparative mapping studies. Results A consensus gene-enriched genetic map of the turbot was constructed using 463 SNP and microsatellite markers in nine reference families. This map contains 438 markers, 180 EST-linked, clustered at 24 linkage groups. Linkage and comparative genomics evidences suggested additional linkage group fusions toward the consolidation of turbot map according to karyotype information. The linkage map showed a total length of 1402.7 cM with low average intermarker distance (3.7 cM; ~2 Mb). A global 1.6:1 female-to-male recombination frequency (RF) ratio was observed, although largely variable among linkage groups and chromosome regions. Comparative sequence analysis revealed large macrosyntenic patterns against model teleost genomes, significant hits decreasing from stickleback (54%) to zebrafish (20%). Comparative mapping supported particular chromosome rearrangements within Acanthopterygii and aided to assign unallocated markers to specific turbot linkage groups. Conclusions The new gene-enriched high-resolution turbot map represents a

  19. Construction of a High-Density Genetic Map Based on Large-Scale Marker Development in Mango Using Specific-Locus Amplified Fragment Sequencing (SLAF-seq)

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Chun; Shu, Bo; Yao, Quangsheng; Wu, Hongxia; Xu, Wentian; Wang, Songbiao

    2016-01-01

    Genetic maps are particularly important and valuable tools for quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping and marker assisted selection (MAS) of plant with desirable traits. In this study, 173 F1 plants from a cross between Mangifera indica L. “Jin-Hwang” and M. indica L. “Irwin” and their parent plants were subjected to high-throughput sequencing and specific-locus amplified fragment (SLAF) library construction. After preprocessing, 66.02 Gb of raw data containing 330.64 M reads were obtained. A total of 318,414 SLAFs were detected, of which 156,368 were polymorphic. Finally, 6594 SLAFs were organized into a linkage map consisting of 20 linkage groups (LGs). The total length of the map was 3148.28 cM and the average distance between adjacent markers was 0.48 cM. This map could be considered, to our knowledge, the first high-density genetic map of mango, and might form the basis for fine QTL mapping and MAS of mango. PMID:27625670

  20. Construction of a High-Density Genetic Map Based on Large-Scale Marker Development in Mango Using Specific-Locus Amplified Fragment Sequencing (SLAF-seq).

    PubMed

    Luo, Chun; Shu, Bo; Yao, Quangsheng; Wu, Hongxia; Xu, Wentian; Wang, Songbiao

    2016-01-01

    Genetic maps are particularly important and valuable tools for quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping and marker assisted selection (MAS) of plant with desirable traits. In this study, 173 F1 plants from a cross between Mangifera indica L. "Jin-Hwang" and M. indica L. "Irwin" and their parent plants were subjected to high-throughput sequencing and specific-locus amplified fragment (SLAF) library construction. After preprocessing, 66.02 Gb of raw data containing 330.64 M reads were obtained. A total of 318,414 SLAFs were detected, of which 156,368 were polymorphic. Finally, 6594 SLAFs were organized into a linkage map consisting of 20 linkage groups (LGs). The total length of the map was 3148.28 cM and the average distance between adjacent markers was 0.48 cM. This map could be considered, to our knowledge, the first high-density genetic map of mango, and might form the basis for fine QTL mapping and MAS of mango. PMID:27625670

  1. BAC-End Sequence-Based SNP Mining in Allotetraploid Cotton (Gossypium) Utilizing Resequencing Data, Phylogenetic Inferences, and Perspectives for Genetic Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Hulse-Kemp, Amanda M.; Ashrafi, Hamid; Stoffel, Kevin; Zheng, Xiuting; Saski, Christopher A.; Scheffler, Brian E.; Fang, David D.; Chen, Z. Jeffrey; Van Deynze, Allen; Stelly, David M.

    2015-01-01

    A bacterial artificial chromosome library and BAC-end sequences for cultivated cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) have recently been developed. This report presents genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) mining utilizing resequencing data with BAC-end sequences as a reference by alignment of 12 G. hirsutum L. lines, one G. barbadense L. line, and one G. longicalyx Hutch and Lee line. A total of 132,262 intraspecific SNPs have been developed for G. hirsutum, whereas 223,138 and 470,631 interspecific SNPs have been developed for G. barbadense and G. longicalyx, respectively. Using a set of interspecific SNPs, 11 randomly selected and 77 SNPs that are putatively associated with the homeologous chromosome pair 12 and 26, we mapped 77 SNPs into two linkage groups representing these chromosomes, spanning a total of 236.2 cM in an interspecific F2 population (G. barbadense 3-79 × G. hirsutum TM-1). The mapping results validated the approach for reliably producing large numbers of both intraspecific and interspecific SNPs aligned to BAC-ends. This will allow for future construction of high-density integrated physical and genetic maps for cotton and other complex polyploid genomes. The methods developed will allow for future Gossypium resequencing data to be automatically genotyped for identified SNPs along the BAC-end sequence reference for anchoring sequence assemblies and comparative studies. PMID:25858960

  2. BAC-End Sequence-Based SNP Mining in Allotetraploid Cotton (Gossypium) Utilizing Resequencing Data, Phylogenetic Inferences, and Perspectives for Genetic Mapping.

    PubMed

    Hulse-Kemp, Amanda M; Ashrafi, Hamid; Stoffel, Kevin; Zheng, Xiuting; Saski, Christopher A; Scheffler, Brian E; Fang, David D; Chen, Z Jeffrey; Van Deynze, Allen; Stelly, David M

    2015-06-01

    A bacterial artificial chromosome library and BAC-end sequences for cultivated cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) have recently been developed. This report presents genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) mining utilizing resequencing data with BAC-end sequences as a reference by alignment of 12 G. hirsutum L. lines, one G. barbadense L. line, and one G. longicalyx Hutch and Lee line. A total of 132,262 intraspecific SNPs have been developed for G. hirsutum, whereas 223,138 and 470,631 interspecific SNPs have been developed for G. barbadense and G. longicalyx, respectively. Using a set of interspecific SNPs, 11 randomly selected and 77 SNPs that are putatively associated with the homeologous chromosome pair 12 and 26, we mapped 77 SNPs into two linkage groups representing these chromosomes, spanning a total of 236.2 cM in an interspecific F2 population (G. barbadense 3-79 × G. hirsutum TM-1). The mapping results validated the approach for reliably producing large numbers of both intraspecific and interspecific SNPs aligned to BAC-ends. This will allow for future construction of high-density integrated physical and genetic maps for cotton and other complex polyploid genomes. The methods developed will allow for future Gossypium resequencing data to be automatically genotyped for identified SNPs along the BAC-end sequence reference for anchoring sequence assemblies and comparative studies. PMID:25858960

  3. Knock-in/Knock-out (KIKO) vectors for rapid integration of large DNA sequences, including whole metabolic pathways, onto the Escherichia coli chromosome at well-characterised loci

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Metabolic engineering projects often require integration of multiple genes in order to control the desired phenotype. However, this often requires iterative rounds of engineering because many current insertion approaches are limited by the size of the DNA that can be transferred onto the chromosome. Consequently, construction of highly engineered strains is very time-consuming. A lack of well-characterised insertion loci is also problematic. Results A series of knock-in/knock-out (KIKO) vectors was constructed for integration of large DNA sequences onto the E. coli chromosome at well-defined loci. The KIKO plasmids target three nonessential genes/operons as insertion sites: arsB (an arsenite transporter); lacZ (β-galactosidase); and rbsA-rbsR (a ribose metabolism operon). Two homologous ‘arms’ target each insertion locus; insertion is mediated by λ Red recombinase through these arms. Between the arms is a multiple cloning site for the introduction of exogenous sequences and an antibiotic resistance marker (either chloramphenicol or kanamycin) for selection of positive recombinants. The resistance marker can subsequently be removed by flippase-mediated recombination. The insertion cassette is flanked by hairpin loops to isolate it from the effects of external transcription at the integration locus. To characterize each target locus, a xylanase reporter gene (xynA) was integrated onto the chromosomes of E. coli strains W and K-12 using the KIKO vectors. Expression levels varied between loci, with the arsB locus consistently showing the highest level of expression. To demonstrate the simultaneous use of all three loci in one strain, xynA, green fluorescent protein (gfp) and a sucrose catabolic operon (cscAKB) were introduced into lacZ, arsB and rbsAR respectively, and shown to be functional. Conclusions The KIKO plasmids are a useful tool for efficient integration of large DNA fragments (including multiple genes and pathways) into E. coli. Chromosomal

  4. Geologic map and map database of northeastern San Francisco Bay region, California, [including] most of Solano County and parts of Napa, Marin, Contra Costa, San Joaquin, Sacramento, Yolo, and Sonoma Counties

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graymer, Russell Walter; Jones, David Lawrence; Brabb, Earl E.

    2002-01-01

    This digital map database, compiled from previously published and unpublished data, and new mapping by the authors, represents the general distribution of bedrock and surficial deposits in the mapped area. Together with the accompanying text file (nesfmf.ps, nesfmf.pdf, nesfmf.txt), it provides current information on the geologic structure and stratigraphy of the area covered. The database delineates map units that are identified by general age and lithology following the stratigraphic nomenclature of the U.S. Geological Survey. The scale of the source maps limits the spatial resolution (scale) of the database to 1:62,500 or smaller.

  5. Genome-Wide Mapping of Growth-Related Quantitative Trait Loci in Orange-Spotted Grouper (Epinephelus coioides) Using Double Digest Restriction-Site Associated DNA Sequencing (ddRADseq).

    PubMed

    Yu, Hui; You, Xinxin; Li, Jia; Liu, Hankui; Meng, Zining; Xiao, Ling; Zhang, Haifa; Lin, Hao-Ran; Zhang, Yong; Shi, Qiong

    2016-01-01

    Mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTL) is essential for the discovery of genetic structures that related to complex quantitative traits. In this study, we identified 264,072 raw SNPs (single-nucleotide polymorphisms) by double digest restriction site associated DNA sequencing (ddRADseq), and utilized 3029 of these SNPs to construct a genetic linkage map in orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides) using a regression mapping algorithm. The genetic map contained 24 linkage groups (LGs) spanning a total genetic distance of 1231.98 cM. Twenty-seven significant growth-related QTLs were identified. Furthermore, we identified 17 genes (fez2, alg3, ece2, arvcf, sla27a4, sgk223, camk2, prrc2b, mchr1, sardh, pappa, syk, tert, wdrcp91, ftz-f1, mate1 and notch1) including three (tert, ftz-f1 and notch1) that have been reported to be involved in fish growth. To summarize, we mapped growth-related QTLs in the orange-spotted grouper. These QTLs will be useful in marker-assisted selection (MAS) efforts to improve growth-related traits in this economically important fish. PMID:27058532

  6. Genome-Wide Mapping of Growth-Related Quantitative Trait Loci in Orange-Spotted Grouper (Epinephelus coioides) Using Double Digest Restriction-Site Associated DNA Sequencing (ddRADseq)

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hui; You, Xinxin; Li, Jia; Liu, Hankui; Meng, Zining; Xiao, Ling; Zhang, Haifa; Lin, Hao-Ran; Zhang, Yong; Shi, Qiong

    2016-01-01

    Mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTL) is essential for the discovery of genetic structures that related to complex quantitative traits. In this study, we identified 264,072 raw SNPs (single-nucleotide polymorphisms) by double digest restriction site associated DNA sequencing (ddRADseq), and utilized 3029 of these SNPs to construct a genetic linkage map in orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides) using a regression mapping algorithm. The genetic map contained 24 linkage groups (LGs) spanning a total genetic distance of 1231.98 cM. Twenty-seven significant growth-related QTLs were identified. Furthermore, we identified 17 genes (fez2, alg3, ece2, arvcf, sla27a4, sgk223, camk2, prrc2b, mchr1, sardh, pappa, syk, tert, wdrcp91, ftz-f1, mate1 and notch1) including three (tert, ftz-f1 and notch1) that have been reported to be involved in fish growth. To summarize, we mapped growth-related QTLs in the orange-spotted grouper. These QTLs will be useful in marker-assisted selection (MAS) efforts to improve growth-related traits in this economically important fish. PMID:27058532

  7. Harnessing the sorghum genome sequence:development of a genome-wide microsattelite (SSR) resource for swift genetic mapping and map based cloning in sorghum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sorghum is the second cereal crop to have a full genome completely sequenced (Nature (2009), 457:551). This achievement is widely recognized as a scientific milestone for grass genetics and genomics in general. However, the true worth of genetic information lies in translating the sequence informa...

  8. {open_quotes}Feature{close_quotes} mapping of the HLA-C linked DNA region: Construction by sequencing from nested deletions

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, B.R.; Chaplin, D.D. |

    1994-09-01

    The HLA complex located on chromosome 6p spans {approximately}4 Mb and is gene dense. To enable systematic analysis of less well-characterized portions of HLA, we are defining significant {open_quotes}features{close_quotes} of these DNA regions: locations of putative genes (prediction of exons by GRAIL analysis) and Alu elements, regions with homology to the database, and regions of evolutionarily conserved DNA sequence. Initially, we cloned a 35 kb DNA segment adjacent to HLA-C into a transposon {gamma}{delta}-based cosmid vector designed for generating nested deletions in vivo. Over 70 informative nested deletions were obtained and sequenced by fluorescent-automated technology. Islands of DNA sequences were obtained and used to construct a feature map of the 35 kb HLA segment. Our data (i) defined the organization of the previously identified keratinocyte-specific S gene, (ii) generated the DNA sequence of two evolutionarily conserved DNA segments, and (iii) located otherwise undefined putative exons and Alu elements. The construction of such feature maps of large DNA segments using the nested deletion-sequencing approach provides an efficient means to identify DNA segments meriting systematic and detailed analysis.

  9. A gene-derived SNP-based high resolution linkage map of carrot including the location of QTL conditioning root and leaf anthocyanin pigmentation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Purple carrots accumulate large quantities of anthocyanins in their roots and leaves. These flavonoid pigments possess antioxidant activity and are implicated in providing health benefits. The lack of informative and saturated linkage maps associated with well characterized populations s...

  10. Feasibility of T2* mapping for the evaluation of hip joint cartilage at 1.5T using a three-dimensional (3D), gradient-echo (GRE) sequence: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Bittersohl, Bernd; Hosalkar, Harish S; Hughes, Tim; Kim, Young-Jo; Werlen, Stefan; Siebenrock, Klaus A; Mamisch, Tallal C

    2009-10-01

    This study defines the feasibility of utilizing three-dimensional (3D) gradient-echo (GRE) MRI at 1.5T for T(2)* mapping to assess hip joint cartilage degenerative changes using standard morphological MR grading while comparing it to delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC). MRI was obtained from 10 asymptomatic young adult volunteers and 33 patients with symptomatic femoroacetabular impingement (FAI). The protocol included T(2)* mapping without gadolinium-enhancement utilizing a 3D-GRE sequence with six echoes, and after gadolinium injection, routine hip sequences, and a dual-flip-angle 3D-GRE sequence for dGEMRIC T(1) mapping. Cartilage was classified as normal, with mild changes, or with severe degenerative changes based on morphological MRI. T(1) and T(2)* findings were subsequently correlated. There were significant differences between volunteers and patients in normally-rated cartilage only for T(1) values. Both T(1) and T(2)* values decreased significantly with the various grades of cartilage damage. There was a statistically significant correlation between standard MRI and T(2)* (T(1)) (P < 0.05). High intraclass correlation was noted for both T(1) and T(2)*. Correlation factor was 0.860 to 0.954 (T(2)*-T(1) intraobserver) and 0.826 to 0.867 (T(2)*-T(1) interobserver). It is feasible to gather further information about cartilage status within the hip joint using GRE T(2)* mapping at 1.5T. PMID:19645008

  11. Discovery and mapping of a new expressed sequence tag-single nucleotide polymorphism and simple sequence repeat panel for large-scale genetic studies and breeding of Theobroma cacao L.

    PubMed Central

    Allegre, Mathilde; Argout, Xavier; Boccara, Michel; Fouet, Olivier; Roguet, Yolande; Bérard, Aurélie; Thévenin, Jean Marc; Chauveau, Aurélie; Rivallan, Ronan; Clement, Didier; Courtois, Brigitte; Gramacho, Karina; Boland-Augé, Anne; Tahi, Mathias; Umaharan, Pathmanathan; Brunel, Dominique; Lanaud, Claire

    2012-01-01

    Theobroma cacao is an economically important tree of several tropical countries. Its genetic improvement is essential to provide protection against major diseases and improve chocolate quality. We discovered and mapped new expressed sequence tag-single nucleotide polymorphism (EST-SNP) and simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers and constructed a high-density genetic map. By screening 149 650 ESTs, 5246 SNPs were detected in silico, of which 1536 corresponded to genes with a putative function, while 851 had a clear polymorphic pattern across a collection of genetic resources. In addition, 409 new SSR markers were detected on the Criollo genome. Lastly, 681 new EST-SNPs and 163 new SSRs were added to the pre-existing 418 co-dominant markers to construct a large consensus genetic map. This high-density map and the set of new genetic markers identified in this study are a milestone in cocoa genomics and for marker-assisted breeding. The data are available at http://tropgenedb.cirad.fr. PMID:22210604

  12. Fine mapping of complex traits in non-model species: using next generation sequencing and advanced intercross lines in Japanese quail

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background As for other non-model species, genetic analyses in quail will benefit greatly from a higher marker density, now attainable thanks to the evolution of sequencing and genotyping technologies. Our objective was to obtain the first genome wide panel of Japanese quail SNP (Single Nucleotide Polymorphism) and to use it for the fine mapping of a QTL for a fear-related behaviour, namely tonic immobility, previously localized on Coturnix japonica chromosome 1. To this aim, two reduced representations of the genome were analysed through high-throughput 454 sequencing: AFLP (Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism) fragments as representatives of genomic DNA, and EST (Expressed Sequence Tag) as representatives of the transcriptome. Results The sequencing runs produced 399,189 and 1,106,762 sequence reads from cDNA and genomic fragments, respectively. They covered over 434 Mb of sequence in total and allowed us to detect 17,433 putative SNP. Among them, 384 were used to genotype two Advanced Intercross Lines (AIL) obtained from three quail lines differing for duration of tonic immobility. Despite the absence of genotyping for founder individuals in the analysis, the previously identified candidate region on chromosome 1 was refined and led to the identification of a candidate gene. Conclusions These data confirm the efficiency of transcript and AFLP-sequencing for SNP discovery in a non-model species, and its application to the fine mapping of a complex trait. Our results reveal a significant association of duration of tonic immobility with a genomic region comprising the DMD (dystrophin) gene. Further characterization of this candidate gene is needed to decipher its putative role in tonic immobility in Coturnix. PMID:23066875

  13. Use of 3' untranslated sequences of human cDNAs for rapid chromosome assignment and conversion to STSs: implications for an expression map of the genome.

    PubMed Central

    Wilcox, A S; Khan, A S; Hopkins, J A; Sikela, J M

    1991-01-01

    A general mapping strategy is described in which the 3'untranslated regions of human cDNAs are used to design PCR primers which will selectively amplify human genomic sequences in a rodent background. When applied to panels of human x hamster somatic cell hybrid DNAs, this approach provides a PCR-based method for rapidly assigning genes to specific chromosomes and chromosomal regions. In addition, it follows from the virtual absence of introns in the 3'untranslated region of vertebrate genes that within this region the cDNA sequences almost always will be identical to those of the genomic DNA and can therefore be used to automatically generate gene-specific sequence-tagged sites (STSs). We have applied this strategy to six human cDNAs and demonstrate that 1) the primers selectively amplify human genomic DNA and 2) the PCR product is of the size predicted from the cDNA. To test this approach further we have utilized it to confirm the known chromosomal location of the retinoblastoma gene. Lastly, we describe how this strategy can readily be applied to unknown human cDNAs, and thereby be integrated into efforts to generate a human STS expression map of the genome. A strategy for production of such a map, using human brain cDNAs as a model, is described. Images PMID:2030965

  14. Nuclear gene for mitochondrial leucyl-tRNA synthetase of Neurospora crassa: isolation, sequence, chromosomal mapping, and evidence that the leu-5 locus specifies structural information.

    PubMed Central

    Chow, C M; Metzenberg, R L; Rajbhandary, U L

    1989-01-01

    We have isolated and characterized the nuclear gene for the mitochondrial leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS) of Neurospora crassa and have established that a defect in this structural gene is responsible for the leu-5 phenotype. We have purified mitochondrial LeuRS protein, determined its N-terminal sequence, and used this sequence information to identify and isolate a full-length genomic DNA clone. The 3.7-kilobase-pair region representing the structural gene and flanking regions has been sequenced. The 5' ends of the mRNA were mapped by S1 nuclease protection, and the 3' ends were determined from the sequence of cDNA clones. The gene contains a single short intron, 60 base pairs long. The methionine-initiated open reading frame specifies a 52-amino-acid mitochondrial targeting sequence followed by a 942-amino-acid protein. Restriction fragment length polymorphism analyses mapped the mitochondrial LeuRS structural gene to linkage group V, exactly where the leu-5 mutation had been mapped before. We show that the leu-5 strain has a defect in the structural gene for mitochondrial LeuRS by restoring growth under restrictive conditions for this strain after transformation with a wild-type copy of the mitochondrial LeuRS gene. We have cloned the mutant allele present in the leu-5 strain and identified the defect as being due to a Thr-to-Pro change in mitochondrial LeuRS. Finally, we have used immunoblotting to show that despite the apparent lack of mitochondrial LeuRS activity in leu-5 extracts, the leu-5 strain contains levels of mitochondrial LeuRS protein to similar to those of the wild-type strain. Images PMID:2574823

  15. Identification of sRNA interacting with a transcript of interest using MS2-affinity purification coupled with RNA sequencing (MAPS) technology

    PubMed Central

    Lalaouna, David; Massé, Eric

    2015-01-01

    RNA sequencing (RNAseq) technology recently allowed the identification of thousands of small RNAs (sRNAs) within the prokaryotic kingdom. However, drawing the comprehensive interaction map of a sRNA remains a challenging task. To address this problem, we recently developed a method called MAPS (MS2 affinity purification coupled with RNA sequencing) to characterize the full targetome of specific sRNAs. This method enabled the identification of target RNAs interacting with sRNAs, regardless of the type of regulation (positive or negative), type of targets (mRNA, tRNA, sRNA) or their abundance. We also demonstrated that we can use this technology to perform a reverse MAPS experiment, where an RNA fragment of interest is used as bait to identify interacting sRNAs. Here, we demonstrated that RybB and MicF sRNAs co-purified with internal transcribed spacers (ITS) of metZ–metW–metV tRNA transcript, confirming results obtained with MS2-RybB MAPS. Both raw and analyzed RNAseq data are available in GEO database (GSE66517). PMID:26484242

  16. Full-sized HERV-K (HML-2) human endogenous retroviral LTR sequences on human chromosome 21: map locations and evolutionary history.

    PubMed

    Kurdyukov, S G; Lebedev, Y B; Artamonova, I I; Gorodentseva, T N; Batrak, A V; Mamedov, I Z; Azhikina, T L; Legchilina, S P; Efimenko, I G; Gardiner, K; Sverdlov, E D

    2001-07-25

    One of the evolutionary mechanisms for acquisition of novel functional sequences can be domestication of exogenous retroviruses that have been integrated into the germ line. The whole genome mapping of such elements in various species could reveal differences in positions of the retroviral integration and suggest possible roles of these differences in speciation. Here, we describe the number, locations and sequence features of the human endogenous retrovirus HERV-K (HML-2) long terminal repeat (LTR) sequences on human chromosome 21. We show that their distribution along the chromosome is not only non-random but also roughly correlated with the gene density. Amplification of orthologous LTR sites from a number of primate genomes produced patterns of presence and absence for each LTR sequence and allowed determination of the phylogenetic ages and evolutionary order of appearance of individual LTRs. The identity level and phylogenetic age of the LTRs did not correlate with their map locations. Thus, despite the non-random distribution of LTRs, they have apparently been inserted randomly into the chromosome relative to each other. As evidenced in previous studies of chromosomes 19 and 22, this is a characteristic of HERV-K integration. PMID:11483360

  17. Physical and genetic maps of the Leptospira interrogans serovar icterohaemorrhagiae strain Ictero no.1 chromosome and sequencing of a 19-kb region of the genome containing the 5S rRNA gene.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Y; Akase, K; Hirano, H; Fukunaga, M

    1998-07-17

    We report the construction of physical and genetic maps of the chromosome of Leptospira interrogans serovar icterohaemorrhagiae strain Ictero No.1 using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of DNA fragments generated by digestion with enzymes SrfI, AscI, FseI, and NotI and using reciprocal hybridization. We also sequenced the 19-kilobase (kb) DNA segment including the one gene for 5S rRNA (rrf) of pathogenic Leptospira. The size of the chromosome of the strain Ictero No.1 was estimated to be 4673kb and was found to be similar to those of the chromosomes of the leptospira strains Verdun (serovar icterohaemorrhagiae) and RZ11 (serovar pomona). The strains Verdun and RZ11 carry a small 350-kb replicon (minichromosome), and the strain Ictero No.1 also contained the same kind of molecule together with the chromosome. The physical maps of the strains Ictero No.1 and Verdun were almost identical, as were the locations of the selected genes, except for the location of one of the 16S rRNA genes. Overall, the genetic organization appeared to be conserved within the serovar icterohaemorrhagiae strains. In the sequenced region, we identified 10 putative ORFs and one rrf sequence, and the transcription orientations were all the same. A homology search for the products deduced from the sequenced data revealed that the orf H exhibited high similarity to malic acid enzyme of Haemophilus influenzae and fumarate hydratase of Escherichia coli (orf J). The rest of the putative products encoded by ORFs in the sequenced region showed little similarity with the proteins contained in the databases and were considered to be unknown proteins. PMID:9666070

  18. High-Density Genetic Mapping with Interspecific Hybrids of Two Sea Urchins, Strongylocentrotus nudus and S. intermedius, by RAD Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zunchun; Liu, Shikai; Dong, Ying; Gao, Shan; Chen, Zhong; Jiang, Jingwei; Yang, Aifu; Sun, Hongjuan; Guan, Xiaoyan; Jiang, Bei; Wang, Bai

    2015-01-01

    Sea urchins have long been used as research model organisms for developmental biology and evolutionary studies. Some of them are also important aquaculture species in East Asia. In this work, we report the construction of RAD-tag based high-density genetic maps by genotyping F1 interspecific hybrids derived from a crossing between a female sea urchin Strongylocentrotus nudus and a male Strongylocentrotus intermedius. With polymorphisms present in these two wild individuals, we constructed a female meiotic map containing 3,080 markers for S. nudus, and a male meiotic map for S. intermedius which contains 1,577 markers. Using the linkage maps, we were able to anchor a total of 1,591 scaffolds (495.9 Mb) accounting for 60.8% of the genome assembly of Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. A genome-wide scan resulted in the identification of one putative QTL for body size which spanned from 25.3 cM to 30.3 cM. This study showed the efficiency of RAD-Seq based high-density genetic map construction using F1 progenies for species with no prior genomic information. The genetic maps are essential for QTL mapping and are useful as framework to order and orientate contiguous scaffolds from sea urchin genome assembly. The integration of the genetic map with genome assembly would provide an unprecedented opportunity to conduct QTL analysis, comparative genomics, and population genetics studies. PMID:26398139

  19. High-Density Genetic Mapping with Interspecific Hybrids of Two Sea Urchins, Strongylocentrotus nudus and S. intermedius, by RAD Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Ying; Gao, Shan; Chen, Zhong; Jiang, Jingwei; Yang, Aifu; Sun, Hongjuan; Guan, Xiaoyan; Jiang, Bei; Wang, Bai

    2015-01-01

    Sea urchins have long been used as research model organisms for developmental biology and evolutionary studies. Some of them are also important aquaculture species in East Asia. In this work, we report the construction of RAD-tag based high-density genetic maps by genotyping F1 interspecific hybrids derived from a crossing between a female sea urchin Strongylocentrotus nudus and a male Strongylocentrotus intermedius. With polymorphisms present in these two wild individuals, we constructed a female meiotic map containing 3,080 markers for S. nudus, and a male meiotic map for S. intermedius which contains 1,577 markers. Using the linkage maps, we were able to anchor a total of 1,591 scaffolds (495.9 Mb) accounting for 60.8% of the genome assembly of Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. A genome-wide scan resulted in the identification of one putative QTL for body size which spanned from 25.3 cM to 30.3 cM. This study showed the efficiency of RAD-Seq based high-density genetic map construction using F1 progenies for species with no prior genomic information. The genetic maps are essential for QTL mapping and are useful as framework to order and orientate contiguous scaffolds from sea urchin genome assembly. The integration of the genetic map with genome assembly would provide an unprecedented opportunity to conduct QTL analysis, comparative genomics, and population genetics studies. PMID:26398139

  20. Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus strain Deutsch, 5 BAC clone sequencing, including two encoding Cytochrome P450s and one encoding CzEst9 carboxylesterase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, has a genome over 2.4 times the size of the human genome, and with over 70% of repetitive DNA, this genome would prove very costly to sequence at today's prices and difficult to assemble and analyze. BAC clones give insight into the genome struct...

  1. Extension of the Legionella pneumophila sequence-based typing scheme to include strains carrying a variant of the N-acylneuraminate cytidylyltransferase gene.

    PubMed

    Mentasti, M; Underwood, A; Lück, C; Kozak-Muiznieks, N A; Harrison, T G; Fry, N K

    2014-07-01

    Sequence-based typing (SBT) combined with monoclonal antibody subgrouping of Legionella pneumophila isolates is at present considered to be the reference standard during epidemiological investigation of Legionnaires' disease outbreaks. In some isolates of L. pneumophila, the seventh allele of the standard SBT scheme, neuA, is not amplified, because a homologue that is refractory to amplification with the standard neuA primers is present. Consequently, a complete seven-allele profile, and hence a sequence type, cannot be obtained. Subsequently, primers were designed to amplify both neuA and the homologue, but these yielded suboptimal sequencing results. In this study, novel primers specific for the neuA homologue were designed and internationally validated by members of the ESCMID Study Group for Legionella Infections at national and regional Legionella reference laboratories with a modified version of the online L. pneumophila sequence quality tool. To date, the addition of the neuAh target to the SBT protocol has allowed full typing data to be obtained for 108 isolates of 11 different serogroups, namely 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 13, and 14, which could not previously be typed with the standard SBT neuA primers. Further studies are necessary to determine why it is still not possible to obtain either a neuA or a neuAh allele from three serogroup 11 isolates. PMID:24245827

  2. The Oryza map alignment project: Construction, alignment and analysis of 12 BAC fingerprint/end sequence framework physical maps that represent the 10 genome types of genus Oryza

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Oryza Map Alignment Project (OMAP) provides the first comprehensive experimental system for understanding the evolution, physiology and biochemistry of a full genus in plants or animals. We have constructed twelve deep-coverage BAC libraries that are representative of both diploid and tetraploid...

  3. A meta-analysis of somatic mutations from next generation sequencing of 241 melanomas: a road map for the study of genes with potential clinical relevance

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Junfeng; Jia, Peilin; Hutchinson, Katherine E.; Dahlman, Kimberly B.; Johnson, Douglas; Sosman, Jeffrey; Pao, William; Zhao, Zhongming

    2014-01-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) has been used to characterize the overall genomic landscape of melanomas. Here, we systematically examined mutations from recently published melanoma NGS data involving 241 paired tumor-normal samples to identify potentially clinically relevant mutations. Melanomas were characterized according to an in-house clinical assay that identifies well-known specific recurrent mutations in five driver genes: BRAF (affecting V600), NRAS (G12, G13, and Q61), KIT (W557, V559, L576, K642, and D816), GNAQ (Q209), and GNA11 (Q209). Tumors with none of these mutations are termed “pan-negative”. We then mined the driver mutation-positive and pan-negative melanoma NGS data for mutations in 632 cancer genes that could influence existing or emerging targeted therapies. First, we uncovered several genes whose mutations were more likely associated with BRAF- or NRAS-driven melanomas, including TP53 and COL1A1 with BRAF, and PPP6C, KALRN, PIK3R4, TRPM6, GUCY2C, and PRKAA2 with NRAS. Second, we found that the 69 “pan-negative” melanoma genomes harbored alternate infrequent mutations in the 5 known driver genes along with many mutations in genes encoding guanine nucleotide binding protein α-subunits. Third, we identified 12 significantly mutated genes in “pan-negative” samples (ALK, STK31, DGKI, RAC1, EPHA4, ADAMTS18, EPHA7, ERBB4, TAF1L, NF1, SYK, and KDR), including 5 genes (RAC1, ADAMTS18, EPHA7, TAF1L, and NF1) with a recurrent mutation in at least 2 “pan-negative” tumor samples. This meta-analysis provides a road map for the study of additional potentially actionable genes in both driver mutation-positive and pan-negative melanomas. PMID:24755198

  4. Concept Mapping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callison, Daniel

    2001-01-01

    Explains concept mapping as a heuristic device that is helpful in visualizing the relationships between and among ideas. Highlights include how to begin a map; brainstorming; map applications, including document or information summaries and writing composition; and mind mapping to strengthen note-taking. (LRW)

  5. Mapping of Schistosomiasis and Soil-Transmitted Helminths in Namibia: The First Large-Scale Protocol to Formally Include Rapid Diagnostic Tests

    PubMed Central

    Sousa-Figueiredo, José Carlos; Stanton, Michelle C.; Katokele, Stark; Arinaitwe, Moses; Adriko, Moses; Balfour, Lexi; Reiff, Mark; Lancaster, Warren; Noden, Bruce H.; Bock, Ronnie; Stothard, J. Russell

    2015-01-01

    Background Namibia is now ready to begin mass drug administration of praziquantel and albendazole against schistosomiasis and soil-transmitted helminths, respectively. Although historical data identifies areas of transmission of these neglected tropical diseases (NTDs), there is a need to update epidemiological data. For this reason, Namibia adopted a new protocol for mapping of schistosomiasis and geohelminths, formally integrating rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) for infections and morbidity. In this article, we explain the protocol in detail, and introduce the concept of ‘mapping resolution’, as well as present results and treatment recommendations for northern Namibia. Methods/Findings/Interpretation This new protocol allowed a large sample to be surveyed (N = 17 896 children from 299 schools) at relatively low cost (7 USD per person mapped) and very quickly (28 working days). All children were analysed by RDTs, but only a sub-sample was also diagnosed by light microscopy. Overall prevalence of schistosomiasis in the surveyed areas was 9.0%, highly associated with poorer access to potable water (OR = 1.5, P<0.001) and defective (OR = 1.2, P<0.001) or absent sanitation infrastructure (OR = 2.0, P<0.001). Overall prevalence of geohelminths, more particularly hookworm infection, was 12.2%, highly associated with presence of faecal occult blood (OR = 1.9, P<0.001). Prevalence maps were produced and hot spots identified to better guide the national programme in drug administration, as well as targeted improvements in water, sanitation and hygiene. The RDTs employed (circulating cathodic antigen and microhaematuria for Schistosoma mansoni and S. haematobium, respectively) performed well, with sensitivities above 80% and specificities above 95%. Conclusion/Significance This protocol is cost-effective and sensitive to budget limitations and the potential economic and logistical strains placed on the national Ministries of Health. Here we present a high resolution map

  6. Phosphorylation of Simian Cytomegalovirus Assembly Protein Precursor (pAPNG.5) and Proteinase Precursor (pAPNG1): Multiple Attachment Sites Identified, Including Two Adjacent Serines in a Casein Kinase II Consensus Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Plafker, Scott M.; Woods, Amina S.; Gibson, Wade

    1999-01-01

    The assembly protein precursor (pAP) of cytomegalovirus (CMV), and its homologs in other herpesviruses, functions at several key steps during the process of capsid formation. This protein, and the genetically related maturational proteinase, is distinguished from the other capsid proteins by posttranslational modifications, including phosphorylation. The objective of this study was to identify sites at which pAP is phosphorylated so that the functional significance of this modification and the enzyme(s) responsible for it can be determined. In the work reported here, we used peptide mapping, mass spectrometry, and site-directed mutagenesis to identify two sets of pAP phosphorylation sites. One is a casein kinase II (CKII) consensus sequence that contains two adjacent serines, both of which are phosphorylated. The other site(s) is in a different domain of the protein, is phosphorylated less frequently than the CKII site, does not require preceding CKII-site phosphorylation, and causes an electrophoretic mobility shift when phosphorylated. Transfection/expression assays for proteolytic activity showed no gross effect of CKII-site phosphorylation on the enzymatic activity of the proteinase or on the substrate behavior of pAP. Evidence is presented that both the CKII sites and the secondary sites are phosphorylated in virus-infected cells and plasmid-transfected cells, indicating that these modifications can be made by a cellular enzyme(s). Apparent compartmental differences in phosphorylation of the CKII-site (cytoplasmic) and secondary-site (nuclear) serines suggest the involvement of more that one enzyme in these modifications. PMID:10516011

  7. Draft Genome Sequences of Three European Laboratory Derivatives from Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 Strain EDL933, Including Two Plasmids

    PubMed Central

    Fellner, Lea; Huptas, Christopher; Simon, Svenja; Mühlig, Anna; Neuhaus, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli O157:H7 EDL933, isolated in 1982 in the United States, was the first enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) strain sequenced. Unfortunately, European labs can no longer receive the original strain. We checked three European EDL933 derivatives and found major genetic deviations (deletions, inversions) in two strains. All EDL933 strains contain the cryptic EHEC-plasmid, not reported before. PMID:27056239

  8. Isolation and characterization of transcribed sequences from a chromosome 16 hn-cDNA library and the physical mapping of genes and transcribed sequences using a high-resolution somatic cell panel of human chromosome 16

    SciTech Connect

    Whitmore, S.A.; Apostolou, S.; Lane, S.; Nancarrow, J.K.; Phillips, H.A.; Richards, R.I.; Sutherland, G.R.; Callen, D.F. )

    1994-03-15

    A hn-cDNA (heteronuclear complementary DNA) library was constructed from a mouse/human somatic cell hybrid, CY18, which contains chromosome 16 as the only human chromosome. Hexamer primers constructed from consensus 5[prime]intron splice sequences were used to generate cDNA from the immature unspliced mRNA. The resulting cDNA library was screened with a total human DNA probe to identify potential human clones. Rescreening was necessary, and use of a mouse-derived clone with homology to 7SL RNA proved successful in eliminating the majority of mouse clones. Thirteen clones had open reading frames, and of those, five showed homology to human sequences in Gen-Bank. Two clones had homology to random partially sequenced cDNAs, one clone was likely to be a GRP78 pseudogene, one clone mapped the PHKG2 gene to 16p11.2-16p12.1, and one clone had homology to human S-13 ribosomal protein. All clones except the latter were mapped to a high-resolution somatic cell panel. Although isolation of human chromosome 16 genes from this library was successful, it was apparent that cDNA synthesis was initiated at sites other than intron splice sites, presumably by mispairing of the hexamers. 31 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Development of a high-density intra-specific linkage map of lettuce using genotyping by sequencing (GBS)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genotyping by sequencing (GBS) has been developed as an affordable application of next-generation sequencing for the purposes of discovering and genotyping SNPs in a variety of crop species and populations. In this study we employed a double restriction enzyme digestion protocol (HindIII and NlaIII)...

  10. Homozygosity mapping and targeted genomic sequencing reveal the gene responsible for cerebellar hypoplasia and quadrupedal locomotion in a consanguineous kindred

    PubMed Central

    Gulsuner, Suleyman; Tekinay, Ayse Begum; Doerschner, Katja; Boyaci, Huseyin; Bilguvar, Kaya; Unal, Hilal; Ors, Aslihan; Onat, O. Emre; Atalar, Ergin; Basak, A. Nazli; Topaloglu, Haluk; Kansu, Tulay; Tan, Meliha; Tan, Uner; Gunel, Murat; Ozcelik, Tayfun

    2011-01-01

    The biological basis for the development of the cerebro-cerebellar structures required for posture and gait in humans is poorly understood. We investigated a large consanguineous family from Turkey exhibiting an extremely rare phenotype associated with quadrupedal locomotion, mental retardation, and cerebro-cerebellar hypoplasia, linked to a 7.1-Mb region of homozygosity on chromosome 17p13.1–13.3. Diffusion weighted imaging and fiber tractography of the patients' brains revealed morphological abnormalities in the cerebellum and corpus callosum, in particular atrophy of superior, middle, and inferior peduncles of the cerebellum. Structural magnetic resonance imaging showed additional morphometric abnormalities in several cortical areas, including the corpus callosum, precentral gyrus, and Brodmann areas BA6, BA44, and BA45. Targeted sequencing of the entire homozygous region in three affected individuals and two obligate carriers uncovered a private missense mutation, WDR81 p.P856L, which cosegregated with the condition in the extended family. The mutation lies in a highly conserved region of WDR81, flanked by an N-terminal BEACH domain and C-terminal WD40 beta-propeller domains. WDR81 is predicted to be a transmembrane protein. It is highly expressed in the cerebellum and corpus callosum, in particular in the Purkinje cell layer of the cerebellum. WDR81 represents the third gene, after VLDLR and CA8, implicated in quadrupedal locomotion in humans. PMID:21885617

  11. Chromosome Mapping of Repetitive Sequences in Rachycentron canadum (Perciformes: Rachycentridae): Implications for Karyotypic Evolution and Perspectives for Biotechnological Uses

    PubMed Central

    Jacobina, Uedson Pereira; Cioffi, Marcelo de Bello; Souza, Luiz Gustavo Rodrigues; Calado, Leonardo Luiz; Tavares, Manoel; Manzella, João; Bertollo, Luiz Antonio Carlos; Molina, Wagner Franco

    2011-01-01

    The cobia, Rachycentron canadum, a species of marine fish, has been increasingly used in aquaculture worldwide. It is the only member of the family Rachycentridae (Perciformes) showing wide geographic distribution and phylogenetic patterns still not fully understood. In this study, the species was cytogenetically analyzed by different methodologies, including Ag-NOR and chromomycin A3 (CMA3)/DAPI staining, C-banding, early replication banding (RGB), and in situ fluorescent hybridization with probes for 18S and 5S ribosomal genes and for telomeric sequences (TTAGGG)n. The results obtained allow a detailed chromosomal characterization of the Atlantic population. The chromosome diversification found in the karyotype of the cobia is apparently related to pericentric inversions, the main mechanism associated to the karyotypic evolution of Perciformes. The differential heterochromatin replication patterns found were in part associated to functional genes. Despite maintaining conservative chromosomal characteristics in relation to the basal pattern established for Perciformes, some chromosome pairs in the analyzed population exhibit markers that may be important for cytotaxonomic, population, and biodiversity studies as well as for monitoring the species in question. PMID:21541243

  12. BAC sequencing using pooled methods.

    PubMed

    Saski, Christopher A; Feltus, F Alex; Parida, Laxmi; Haiminen, Niina

    2015-01-01

    Shotgun sequencing and assembly of a large, complex genome can be both expensive and challenging to accurately reconstruct the true genome sequence. Repetitive DNA arrays, paralogous sequences, polyploidy, and heterozygosity are main factors that plague de novo genome sequencing projects that typically result in highly fragmented assemblies and are difficult to extract biological meaning. Targeted, sub-genomic sequencing offers complexity reduction by removing distal segments of the genome and a systematic mechanism for exploring prioritized genomic content through BAC sequencing. If one isolates and sequences the genome fraction that encodes the relevant biological information, then it is possible to reduce overall sequencing costs and efforts that target a genomic segment. This chapter describes the sub-genome assembly protocol for an organism based upon a BAC tiling path derived from a genome-scale physical map or from fine mapping using BACs to target sub-genomic regions. Methods that are described include BAC isolation and mapping, DNA sequencing, and sequence assembly. PMID:25239741

  13. Identification and characterisation of functional expressed sequence tags-derived simple sequence repeat (eSSR) markers for genetic linkage mapping of Schistosoma mansoni juvenile resistance and susceptibility loci in Biomphalaria glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Ittiprasert, Wannaporn; Miller, André; Su, Xin-zhuan; Mu, Jianbing; Bhusudsawang, Ganlayarat; Ukoskit, Kitipat; Knight, Matty

    2013-01-01

    Biomphalaria glabrata susceptibility to Schistosoma mansoni has a strong genetic component, offering the possibility for investigating host–parasite interactions at the molecular level, perhaps leading to novel control approaches. The identification, mapping and molecular characterisation of genes that influence the outcome of parasitic infection in the intermediate snail host is, therefore, seen as fundamental to the control of schistosomiasis. To better understand the evolutionary processes driving disease resistance/susceptibility phenotypes, we previously identified polymorphic random amplification of polymorphic DNA and genomic simple sequence repeats from B. glabrata. In the present study we identified and characterised polymorphic expressed simple sequence repeats markers (Bg-eSSR) from existing B. glabrata expressed sequence tags. Using these markers, and with previously identified genomic simple sequence repeats, genetic linkage mapping for parasite refractory and susceptibility phenotypes, the first known for B. glabrata, was initiated. Data mining of 54,309 expressed sequence tag, produced 660 expressed simple sequence repeats of which dinucleotide motifs (TA)n were the most common (37.88%), followed by trinucleotide (29.55%), mononucleotide (18.64%) and tetranucleotide (10.15%). Penta- and hexanucleotide motifs represented <3% of the Bg-eSSRs identified. While the majority (71%) of Bg-eSSRs were monomorphic between resistant and susceptible snails, several were, however, useful for the construction of a genetic linkage map based on their inheritance in segregating F2 progeny snails derived from crossing juvenile BS-90 and NMRI snails. Polymorphic Bg-eSSRs assorted into six linkage groups at a logarithm of odds score of 3. Interestingly, the heritability of four markers (Prim1_910, Prim1_771, Prim6_1024 and Prim7_823) with juvenile snail resistance were, by t-test, significant (P < 0.05) while an allelic marker, Prim24_524, showed linkage with the

  14. High-Quality Draft Genome Sequences for Five Non-O157 Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli Strains Generated with PacBio Sequencing and Optical Maps.

    PubMed

    Lindsey, Rebecca L; Rowe, Lori; Garcia-Toledo, Lisley; Loparev, Vladimir; Knipe, Kristen; Stripling, Devon; Martin, Haley; Trees, Eija; Juieng, Phalasy; Batra, Dhwani; Strockbine, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) is a foodborne pathogen. We report here the high-quality draft whole-genome sequences of five STEC strains isolated from clinical cases in the United States. This report is for STEC of serotypes O55:H7, O79:H7, O91:H14, O153:H2, and O156:H25. PMID:27365352

  15. High-Quality Draft Genome Sequences for Five Non-O157 Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli Strains Generated with PacBio Sequencing and Optical Maps

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Lori; Garcia-Toledo, Lisley; Loparev, Vladimir; Knipe, Kristen; Stripling, Devon; Martin, Haley; Trees, Eija; Juieng, Phalasy; Batra, Dhwani; Strockbine, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) is a foodborne pathogen. We report here the high-quality draft whole-genome sequences of five STEC strains isolated from clinical cases in the United States. This report is for STEC of serotypes O55:H7, O79:H7, O91:H14, O153:H2, and O156:H25. PMID:27365352

  16. Peptide mapping and amino acid sequencing of two catechol 1,2-dioxygenases (CD I1 and CD I2) from Acinetobacter lwoffii K24.

    PubMed

    Kim, S I; Ha, K S

    1997-10-31

    The partial amino acid sequences of two catechol 1,2-dioxygenases (CD I1 and CD I2) from Acinetobacter lwoffii K24 have been determined by analysis of peptides after cleavages with endopeptidase Lys-C, endopeptidase Glu-C, trypsin, and chemicals (cyanogen bromide and BNPS-skatole). They include 248 amino acid sequences (4 fragments) of CD I1 and 211 amino acid sequences (5 fragments) of CD I2. Two enzymes have more than 50% sequence homology with type I catechol 1,2-dioxygenases and less than 30% sequence homology with type II catechol 1,2-dioxygenases. Two enzymes have similar hydropathy profiles in the N-terminal region, suggesting that they have similar secondary structures. PMID:9387151

  17. Accelerated Cardiac T2 Mapping using Breath-hold Multi-Echo Fast Spin-Echo Pulse Sequence with Compressed sensing and Parallel Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Li; Otazo, Ricardo; Jung, Hong; Jensen, Jens H.; Ye, Jong C.; Sodickson, Daniel K.; Kim, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac T2 mapping is a promising method for quantitative assessment of myocardial edema and iron overload. We have developed a new multi-echo fast spin echo (ME-FSE) pulse sequence for breath-hold T2 mapping with acceptable spatial resolution. We propose to further accelerate this new ME-FSE pulse sequence using k-t FOCal Underdetermined System Solver (FOCUSS) adapted with a framework that utilizes both compressed sensing and parallel imaging (.e.g, GRAPPA) to achieve higher spatial resolution. We imaged twelve control subjects in mid-ventricular short-axis planes and compared the accuracy of T2 measurements obtained using ME-FSE with GRAPPA and ME-FSE with k-t FOCUSS. For image reconstruction, we used a bootstrapping two-step approach, where in the first step fast Fourier transform was used as the sparsifying transform and in the final step principal component analysis was used as the sparsifying transform. Compared with T2 measurements obtained using GRAPPA, T2 measurements obtained using k-t FOCUSS were in excellent agreement (mean difference = 0.04 ms; upper/lower 95% limits of agreement were 2.26/−2.19 ms). The proposed accelerated ME-FSE pulse sequence with k-t FOCUSS is a promising investigational method for rapid T2 measurement of the heart with relatively high spatial resolution (1.7 mm × 1.7 mm). PMID:21360737

  18. An evaluation of temperature scales for silica diagenesis in diatomaceous sequences including a new approach based on the Miocene Monterey Formation, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keller, M.A.; Isaacs, C.M.

    1985-01-01

    Geologic relations indicate that silica phases transformed in the Monterey Formation in two zones that persist over a narrow depth/temperature range and do not stratigraphically overlap. The wide and overlapping range of reported temperatures of these transformations is mainly a result of the many uncertainties inherent in the different methods used to estimate temperature and does not indicate that phases transform throughout these ranges. Our approach to a reliable temperature scale for silica diagenesis combines as empirical zonation of silica phases with temperature calibration from a sequence at maximum temperature and depth of burial. ?? 1985 Springer-Verlag New York Inc.

  19. Whole Genome Sequencing

    MedlinePlus

    ... you want to learn. Search form Search Whole Genome Sequencing You are here Home Testing & Services Testing ... the full story, click here . What is whole genome sequencing? Whole genome sequencing is the mapping out ...

  20. Refined mapping and YAC contig construction of the X-linked cleft palate and ankyloglossia locus (CPX) including the proximal X-Y homology breakpoint within Xq21.3

    SciTech Connect

    Forbes, S.A.; Brennan, L.; Richardson, M.

    1996-01-01

    The gene for X-linked cleft palate (CPX) has previously been mapped in an Icelandic kindred between the unordered proximal markers DXS1002/DXS349/DXS95 and the distal marker DXYS1X, which maps to the proximal end of the X-Y homology region in Xq21.3. Using six sequence-tagged sites (STSs) within the region, a total of 91 yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) clones were isolated and overlapped in a single contig that spans approximately 3.1 Mb between DXS1002 and DXYS1X. The order of microsatellite and STS markers in this was established as DXS1002-DXS1168-DXS349-DXS95-DXS364-DXS1196-DXS472-DXS1217-DXYS1X. A long-range restriction map of this region was created using eight nonchimeric, overlapping YAC clones. Analysis of newly positioned polymorphic markers in recombinant individuals from the Icelandic family has enabled us to identify DXS1196 and DXS1217 as the flanking markers for CPX. The maximum physical distance containing the CPX gene has been estimated to be 2.0 Mb, which is spanned by a minimum set of five nonchimeric YAC clones. In addition, YAC end clone and STS analyses have pinpointed the location of the proximal boundary of the X-Y homology region within the map. 40 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Epitope Mapping of a Monoclonal Antibody Directed against Neisserial Heparin Binding Antigen Using Next Generation Sequencing of Antigen-Specific Libraries.

    PubMed

    Domina, Maria; Lanza Cariccio, Veronica; Benfatto, Salvatore; Venza, Mario; Venza, Isabella; Donnarumma, Danilo; Bartolini, Erika; Borgogni, Erica; Bruttini, Marco; Santini, Laura; Midiri, Angelina; Galbo, Roberta; Romeo, Letizia; Patanè, Francesco; Biondo, Carmelo; Norais, Nathalie; Masignani, Vega; Teti, Giuseppe; Felici, Franco; Beninati, Concetta

    2016-01-01

    We explore here the potential of a newly described technology, which is named PROFILER and is based on next generation sequencing of gene-specific lambda phage-displayed libraries, to rapidly and accurately map monoclonal antibody (mAb) epitopes. For this purpose, we used a novel mAb (designated 31E10/E7) directed against Neisserial Heparin-Binding Antigen (NHBA), a component of the anti-group B meningococcus Bexsero® vaccine. An NHBA phage-displayed library was affinity-selected with mAb 31E10/E7, followed by massive sequencing of the inserts present in antibody-selected phage pools. Insert analysis identified an amino acid stretch (D91-A128) in the N-terminal domain, which was shared by all of the mAb-enriched fragments. Moreover, a recombinant fragment encompassing this sequence could recapitulate the immunoreactivity of the entire NHBA molecule against mAb 31E10/E7. These results were confirmed using a panel of overlapping recombinant fragments derived from the NHBA vaccine variant and a set of chemically synthetized peptides covering the 10 most frequent antigenic variants. Furthermore, hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass-spectrometry analysis of the NHBA-mAb 31E10/E7 complex was also compatible with mapping of the epitope to the D91-A128 region. Collectively, these results indicate that the PROFILER technology can reliably identify epitope-containing antigenic fragments and requires considerably less work, time and reagents than other epitope mapping methods. PMID:27508302

  2. Epitope Mapping of a Monoclonal Antibody Directed against Neisserial Heparin Binding Antigen Using Next Generation Sequencing of Antigen-Specific Libraries

    PubMed Central

    Domina, Maria; Lanza Cariccio, Veronica; Benfatto, Salvatore; Venza, Mario; Venza, Isabella; Donnarumma, Danilo; Bartolini, Erika; Borgogni, Erica; Bruttini, Marco; Santini, Laura; Midiri, Angelina; Galbo, Roberta; Romeo, Letizia; Patanè, Francesco; Biondo, Carmelo; Norais, Nathalie; Masignani, Vega; Teti, Giuseppe; Felici, Franco; Beninati, Concetta

    2016-01-01

    We explore here the potential of a newly described technology, which is named PROFILER and is based on next generation sequencing of gene-specific lambda phage-displayed libraries, to rapidly and accurately map monoclonal antibody (mAb) epitopes. For this purpose, we used a novel mAb (designated 31E10/E7) directed against Neisserial Heparin-Binding Antigen (NHBA), a component of the anti-group B meningococcus Bexsero® vaccine. An NHBA phage-displayed library was affinity-selected with mAb 31E10/E7, followed by massive sequencing of the inserts present in antibody-selected phage pools. Insert analysis identified an amino acid stretch (D91-A128) in the N-terminal domain, which was shared by all of the mAb-enriched fragments. Moreover, a recombinant fragment encompassing this sequence could recapitulate the immunoreactivity of the entire NHBA molecule against mAb 31E10/E7. These results were confirmed using a panel of overlapping recombinant fragments derived from the NHBA vaccine variant and a set of chemically synthetized peptides covering the 10 most frequent antigenic variants. Furthermore, hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass-spectrometry analysis of the NHBA-mAb 31E10/E7 complex was also compatible with mapping of the epitope to the D91-A128 region. Collectively, these results indicate that the PROFILER technology can reliably identify epitope-containing antigenic fragments and requires considerably less work, time and reagents than other epitope mapping methods. PMID:27508302

  3. Identification of novel mutations including a double mutation in patients with inherited cardiomyopathy by a targeted sequencing approach using the Ion Torrent PGM system

    PubMed Central

    ZHAO, YUE; CAO, HONG; SONG, YINDI; FENG, YUE; DING, XIAOXUE; PANG, MINGJIE; ZHANG, YUNMEI; ZHANG, HONG; DING, JIAHUAN; XIA, XUESHAN

    2016-01-01

    Inherited cardiomyopathy is the major cause of sudden cardiac death (SCD) and heart failure (HF). The disease is associated with extensive genetic heterogeneity; pathogenic mutations in cardiac sarcomere protein genes, cytoskeletal protein genes and nuclear envelope protein genes have been linked to its etiology. Early diagnosis is conducive to clinical monitoring and allows for presymptomatic interventions as needed. In the present study, the entire coding sequences and flanking regions of 12 major disease (cardiomyopathy)-related genes [namely myosin, heavy chain 7, cardiac muscle, β (MYH7); myosin binding protein C, cardiac (MYBPC3); lamin A/C (LMNA); troponin I type 3 (cardiac) (TNNI3); troponin T type 2 (cardiac) (TNNT2); actin, α, cardiac muscle 1 (ACTC1); tropomyosin 1 (α) (TPM1); sodium channel, voltage gated, type V alpha subunit (SCN5A); myosin, light chain 2, regulatory, cardiac, slow (MYL2); myosin, heavy chain 6, cardiac muscle, α (MYH6); myosin, light chain 3, alkali, ventricular, skeletal, slow (MYL3); and protein kinase, AMP-activated, gamma 2 non-catalytic subunit (PRKAG2)] in 8 patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and in 8 patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) were amplified and then sequenced using the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine (PGM) system. As a result, a novel heterozygous mutation (MYH7, p.Asn885Thr) and a variant of uncertain significance (TNNT2, p.Arg296His) were identified in 2 patients with HCM. These 2 missense mutations, which were absent in the samples obtained from the 200 healthy control subjects, altered the amino acid that was evolutionarily conserved among a number of vertebrate species; this illustrates that these 2 non-synonymous mutations play a role in the pathogenesis of HCM. Moreover, a double heterozygous mutation (PRKAG2, p.Gly100Ser plus MYH7, p.Arg719Trp) was identified in a patient with severe familial HCM, for the first time to the best of our knowledge. This patient provided us with more

  4. Estimation of two-dimensional intraventricular velocity and pressure maps by digital processing conventional color-Doppler sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Damien; Del Alamo, Juan C.; Tanne, David; Cortina, Cristina; Yotti, Raquel; Fernandez-Aviles, Francisco; Bermejo, Javier

    2008-11-01

    Clinical echocardiographic quantification of blood flow in the left ventricle is limited because Doppler methods only provide one velocity component. We developed a new technique to obtain two-dimensional flow maps from conventional transthoracic echocardiographic acquisitions. Velocity and pressure maps were calculated from color-Doppler velocity (apical long-axis view) by solving the continuity and Euler equations under the assumptions of zero transverse fluxes of mass and momentum. This technique is fast, clinically-compliant and does not require any specific training. Particle image velocimetry experiments performed in an atrioventricular duplicator showed that the circulation and size of the diastolic vortex was quantified accurately. Micromanometer measurements in pigs showed that apex-base pressure differences extracted from two-dimensional maps qualitatively agreed with micromanometer data. Initial clinical measurements in healthy volunteers showed a large prograde vortex. Additional retrograde vortices appeared in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy and left ventricular hypertrophy.

  5. DksA regulates RNA polymerase in Escherichia coli through a network of interactions in the secondary channel that includes Sequence Insertion 1.

    PubMed

    Parshin, Andrey; Shiver, Anthony L; Lee, Jookyung; Ozerova, Maria; Schneidman-Duhovny, Dina; Gross, Carol A; Borukhov, Sergei

    2015-12-15

    Sensing and responding to nutritional status is a major challenge for microbial life. In Escherichia coli, the global response to amino acid starvation is orchestrated by guanosine-3',5'-bisdiphosphate and the transcription factor DksA. DksA alters transcription by binding to RNA polymerase and allosterically modulating its activity. Using genetic analysis, photo-cross-linking, and structural modeling, we show that DksA binds and acts upon RNA polymerase through prominent features of both the nucleotide-access secondary channel and the active-site region. This work is, to our knowledge, the first demonstration of a molecular function for Sequence Insertion 1 in the β subunit of RNA polymerase and significantly advances our understanding of how DksA binds to RNA polymerase and alters transcription. PMID:26604313

  6. DksA regulates RNA polymerase in Escherichia coli through a network of interactions in the secondary channel that includes Sequence Insertion 1

    PubMed Central

    Parshin, Andrey; Shiver, Anthony L.; Lee, Jookyung; Ozerova, Maria; Schneidman-Duhovny, Dina; Gross, Carol A.; Borukhov, Sergei

    2015-01-01

    Sensing and responding to nutritional status is a major challenge for microbial life. In Escherichia coli, the global response to amino acid starvation is orchestrated by guanosine-3′,5′-bisdiphosphate and the transcription factor DksA. DksA alters transcription by binding to RNA polymerase and allosterically modulating its activity. Using genetic analysis, photo–cross-linking, and structural modeling, we show that DksA binds and acts upon RNA polymerase through prominent features of both the nucleotide-access secondary channel and the active-site region. This work is, to our knowledge, the first demonstration of a molecular function for Sequence Insertion 1 in the β subunit of RNA polymerase and significantly advances our understanding of how DksA binds to RNA polymerase and alters transcription. PMID:26604313

  7. Nucleotide sequence and genetic analysis of the Azotobacter chroococcum nifUSVWZM gene cluster, including a new gene (nifP) which encodes a serine acetyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Evans, D J; Jones, R; Woodley, P R; Wilborn, J R; Robson, R L

    1991-09-01

    Nucleotide sequence was obtained for a region of 7,099 bp spanning the nifU, nifS, nifV, nifW, nifZ, and nifM genes from Azotobacter chroococcum. Chromosomal mutations constructed at several sites within the locus confirmed a requirement for this region for expression of the molybdenum nitrogenase in this organism. The genes are tightly clustered and ordered as in Klebsiella pneumoniae except for two additional open reading frames (ORFs) between nifV and nifW. The arrangement of genes in A. chroococcum closely matches that described for Azotobacter vinelandii. The polypeptide encoded by ORF4 immediately downstream from nifV is 41% identical over 186 amino acids to the product of the cysE gene from Escherichia coli, which encodes serine acetyltransferase (SAT), a key enzyme in cysteine biosynthesis. Plasmids which potentially express ORF4 complemented E. coli JM39, a cysteine auxotroph which lacks SAT. SAT activity was detected in crude extracts of one such complemented strain. A strain of A. chroococcum carrying a chromosomal disruption of ORF4 grew normally with ammonium as the N source but more slowly than the parental strain when N2 was the sole N source. These data suggest that ORF4 encodes a nif-specific SAT required for optimizing expression of nitrogenase activity. ORF4 was assigned the name nifP. nifP may be required to boost rates of synthesis or intracellular concentrations of cysteine or methionine. Sequence identity between nifV and leuA gene products suggests that nifV may catalyze a condensation reaction analogous to that carried out by isopropylmalate synthase (LEUA) but in which acetyl coenzyme and alpha-ketoglutarate are substrates for the formation of homocitrate, the proposed product of NIFV activity. PMID:1885524

  8. Nucleotide sequence and genetic analysis of the Azotobacter chroococcum nifUSVWZM gene cluster, including a new gene (nifP) which encodes a serine acetyltransferase.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, D J; Jones, R; Woodley, P R; Wilborn, J R; Robson, R L

    1991-01-01

    Nucleotide sequence was obtained for a region of 7,099 bp spanning the nifU, nifS, nifV, nifW, nifZ, and nifM genes from Azotobacter chroococcum. Chromosomal mutations constructed at several sites within the locus confirmed a requirement for this region for expression of the molybdenum nitrogenase in this organism. The genes are tightly clustered and ordered as in Klebsiella pneumoniae except for two additional open reading frames (ORFs) between nifV and nifW. The arrangement of genes in A. chroococcum closely matches that described for Azotobacter vinelandii. The polypeptide encoded by ORF4 immediately downstream from nifV is 41% identical over 186 amino acids to the product of the cysE gene from Escherichia coli, which encodes serine acetyltransferase (SAT), a key enzyme in cysteine biosynthesis. Plasmids which potentially express ORF4 complemented E. coli JM39, a cysteine auxotroph which lacks SAT. SAT activity was detected in crude extracts of one such complemented strain. A strain of A. chroococcum carrying a chromosomal disruption of ORF4 grew normally with ammonium as the N source but more slowly than the parental strain when N2 was the sole N source. These data suggest that ORF4 encodes a nif-specific SAT required for optimizing expression of nitrogenase activity. ORF4 was assigned the name nifP. nifP may be required to boost rates of synthesis or intracellular concentrations of cysteine or methionine. Sequence identity between nifV and leuA gene products suggests that nifV may catalyze a condensation reaction analogous to that carried out by isopropylmalate synthase (LEUA) but in which acetyl coenzyme and alpha-ketoglutarate are substrates for the formation of homocitrate, the proposed product of NIFV activity. PMID:1885524

  9. CISN Display - Reliable Delivery of Real-time Earthquake Information, Including Rapid Notification and ShakeMap to Critical End Users

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rico, H.; Hauksson, E.; Thomas, E.; Friberg, P.; Given, D.

    2002-12-01

    The California Integrated Seismic Network (CISN) Display is part of a Web-enabled earthquake notification system alerting users in near real-time of seismicity, and also valuable geophysical information following a large earthquake. It will replace the Caltech/USGS Broadcast of Earthquakes (CUBE) and Rapid Earthquake Data Integration (REDI) Display as the principal means of delivering graphical earthquake information to users at emergency operations centers, and other organizations. Features distinguishing the CISN Display from other GUI tools are a state-full client/server relationship, a scalable message format supporting automated hyperlink creation, and a configurable platform-independent client with a GIS mapping tool; supporting the decision-making activities of critical users. The CISN Display is the front-end of a client/server architecture known as the QuakeWatch system. It is comprised of the CISN Display (and other potential clients), message queues, server, server "feeder" modules, and messaging middleware, schema and generators. It is written in Java, making it platform-independent, and offering the latest in Internet technologies. QuakeWatch's object-oriented design allows components to be easily upgraded through a well-defined set of application programming interfaces (APIs). Central to the CISN Display's role as a gateway to other earthquake products is its comprehensive XML-schema. The message model starts with the CUBE message format, but extends it by provisioning additional attributes for currently available products, and those yet to be considered. The supporting metadata in the XML-message provides the data necessary for the client to create a hyperlink and associate it with a unique event ID. Earthquake products deliverable to the CISN Display are ShakeMap, Ground Displacement, Focal Mechanisms, Rapid Notifications, OES Reports, and Earthquake Commentaries. Leveraging the power of the XML-format, the CISN Display provides prompt access to

  10. Active Mapping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, Dennis

    1994-01-01

    Explains a social studies lesson for third graders that uses KidPix, a computer software graphics program to help students make maps and map keys. Advantages to using the computer versus hand drawing maps are discussed, and an example of map requirements for the lesson is included. (LRW)

  11. Complementary DNA sequencing: Expressed sequence tags and human genome project

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, M.D.; Kelley, J.M.; Gocayne, J.D.; Dubnick, M.; Wu, A.; Olde, B.; Moreno, R.F.; Kerlavage, A.R.; McCombie, W.R.; Venter, J.C. ); Polymeropoulos, M.H.; Hong Xiao; Merril, C.R. )

    1991-06-21

    Automated partial DNA sequencing was conducted on more than 600 randomly selected human brain complementary DNA (cDNA) clones to generate expressed sequence tags (ESTs). ESTs have applications in the discovery of new human genes, mapping of the human genome, and identification of coding regions in genomic sequences. Of the sequences generated, 337 represent new genes, including 48 with significant similarity to genes from other organisms, such as a yeast RNA polymerase II subunit; Drosophila kinesin, Notch, and Enhancer of split; and a murine tyrosine kinase receptor. Forty-six ESTs were mapped to chromosomes after amplification by the polymerase chain reaction. This fast approach to cDNA characterization will facilitate the tagging of most human genes in a few years at a fraction of the cost of complete genomic sequencing, provide new genetic markers, and serve as a resource in diverse biological research fields.

  12. Genotyping-by-sequencing map permits identification of clubroot resistance QTLs and revision of the reference genome assembly in cabbage (Brassica oleracea L.).

    PubMed

    Lee, Jonghoon; Izzah, Nur Kholilatul; Choi, Beom-Soon; Joh, Ho Jun; Lee, Sang-Choon; Perumal, Sampath; Seo, Joodeok; Ahn, Kyounggu; Jo, Eun Ju; Choi, Gyung Ja; Nou, Ill-Sup; Yu, Yeisoo; Yang, Tae-Jin

    2016-02-01

    Clubroot is a devastating disease caused by Plasmodiophora brassicae and results in severe losses of yield and quality in Brassica crops. Many clubroot resistance genes and markers are available in Brassica rapa but less is known in Brassica oleracea. Here, we applied the genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) technique to construct a high-resolution genetic map and identify clubroot resistance (CR) genes. A total of 43,821 SNPs were identified using GBS data for two parental lines, one resistant and one susceptible lines to clubroot, and 18,187 of them showed >5× coverage in the GBS data. Among those, 4,103 were credibly genotyped for all 78 F2 individual plants. These markers were clustered into nine linkage groups spanning 879.9 cM with an average interval of 1.15 cM. Quantitative trait loci (QTLs) survey based on three rounds of clubroot resistance tests using F2 : 3 progenies revealed two and single major QTLs for Race 2 and Race 9 of P. brassicae, respectively. The QTLs show similar locations to the previously reported CR loci for Race 4 in B. oleracea but are in different positions from any of the CR loci found in B. rapa. We utilized two reference genome sequences in this study. The high-resolution genetic map developed herein allowed us to reposition 37 and 2 misanchored scaffolds in the 02-12 and TO1000DH genome sequences, respectively. Our data also support additional positioning of two unanchored 3.3 Mb scaffolds into the 02-12 genome sequence. PMID:26622061

  13. Delimiting the Origin of a B Chromosome by FISH Mapping, Chromosome Painting and DNA Sequence Analysis in Astyanax paranae (Teleostei, Characiformes)

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Duílio M. Z. de A.; Pansonato-Alves, José Carlos; Utsunomia, Ricardo; Araya-Jaime, Cristian; Ruiz-Ruano, Francisco J.; Daniel, Sandro Natal; Hashimoto, Diogo Teruo; Oliveira, Cláudio; Camacho, Juan Pedro M.; Porto-Foresti, Fábio; Foresti, Fausto

    2014-01-01

    Supernumerary (B) chromosomes have been shown to contain a wide variety of repetitive sequences. For this reason, fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH) is a useful tool for ascertaining the origin of these genomic elements, especially when combined with painting from microdissected B chromosomes. In order to investigate the origin of B chromosomes in the fish species Astyanax paranae, these two approaches were used along with PCR amplification of specific DNA sequences obtained from the B chromosomes and its comparison with those residing in the A chromosomes. Remarkably, chromosome painting with the one-arm metacentric B chromosome probe showed hybridization signals on entire B chromosome, while FISH mapping revealed the presence of H1 histone and 18S rDNA genes symmetrically placed in both arms of the B chromosome. These results support the hypothesis that the B chromosome of A. paranae is an isochromosome. Additionally, the chromosome pairs Nos. 2 or 23 are considered the possible B chromosome ancestors since both contain syntenic H1 and 18S rRNA sequences. The analysis of DNA sequence fragments of the histone and rRNA genes obtained from the microdissected B chromosomes showed high similarity with those obtained from 0B individuals, which supports the intraspecific origin of B chromosomes in A. paranae. Finally, the population hereby analysed showed a female-biased B chromosome presence suggesting that B chromosomes in this species could influence sex determinism. PMID:24736529

  14. Complete genome sequence and integrated protein localization and interaction map for alfalfa dwarf virus, which combines properties of both cytoplasmic and nuclear plant rhabdoviruses

    SciTech Connect

    Bejerman, Nicolás; Giolitti, Fabián; Breuil, Soledad de; Trucco, Verónica; Nome, Claudia; Lenardon, Sergio; Dietzgen, Ralf G.

    2015-09-15

    Summary: We have determined the full-length 14,491-nucleotide genome sequence of a new plant rhabdovirus, alfalfa dwarf virus (ADV). Seven open reading frames (ORFs) were identified in the antigenomic orientation of the negative-sense, single-stranded viral RNA, in the order 3′-N-P-P3-M-G-P6-L-5′. The ORFs are separated by conserved intergenic regions and the genome coding region is flanked by complementary 3′ leader and 5′ trailer sequences. Phylogenetic analysis of the nucleoprotein amino acid sequence indicated that this alfalfa-infecting rhabdovirus is related to viruses in the genus Cytorhabdovirus. When transiently expressed as GFP fusions in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves, most ADV proteins accumulated in the cell periphery, but unexpectedly P protein was localized exclusively in the nucleus. ADV P protein was shown to have a homotypic, and heterotypic nuclear interactions with N, P3 and M proteins by bimolecular fluorescence complementation. ADV appears unique in that it combines properties of both cytoplasmic and nuclear plant rhabdoviruses. - Highlights: • The complete genome of alfalfa dwarf virus is obtained. • An integrated localization and interaction map for ADV is determined. • ADV has a genome sequence similarity and evolutionary links with cytorhabdoviruses. • ADV protein localization and interaction data show an association with the nucleus. • ADV combines properties of both cytoplasmic and nuclear plant rhabdoviruses.

  15. Mapping of Genotype–Phenotype Diversity among Clinical Isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by Sequence-Based Transcriptional Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Graham; Cortes, Teresa; Comas, Iñaki; Coscolla, Mireia; Gagneux, Sebastien; Young, Douglas B.

    2013-01-01

    Genome sequencing has identified an extensive repertoire of single nucleotide polymorphisms among clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, but the extent to which these differences influence phenotypic properties of the bacteria remains to be elucidated. To determine whether these polymorphisms give rise to phenotypic diversity, we have integrated genome data sets with RNA sequencing to assess their impact on the comparative transcriptome profiles of strains belonging to M. tuberculosis Lineages 1 and 2. We observed clear correlations between genotype and transcriptional phenotype. These arose by three mechanisms. First, lineage-specific changes in amino acid sequence of transcriptional regulators were associated with alterations in their ability to control gene expression. Second, changes in nucleotide sequence were associated with alteration of promoter activity and generation of novel transcriptional start sites in intergenic regions and within coding sequences. We show that in some cases this mechanism is expected to generate functionally active truncated proteins involved in innate immune recognition. Finally, genes showing lineage-specific patterns of differential expression not linked directly to primary mutations were characterized by a striking overrepresentation of toxin–antitoxin pairs. Taken together, these findings advance our understanding of mycobacterial evolution, contribute to a systems level understanding of this important human pathogen, and more broadly demonstrate the application of state-of-the-art techniques to provide novel insight into mechanisms by which intergenic and silent mutations contribute to diversity. PMID:24115728

  16. QTL Mapping for Grain Yield, Flowering Time, and Stay-Green Traits in Sorghum with Genotyping-by-Sequencing Markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Molecular breeding can complement traditional breeding approaches to achieve genetic gains in a more efficient way. In the present study, genetic mapping was conducted in a sorghum recombinant inbred line (RIL) population developed from Tx436 (a non-stay-green high food quality inbred) × 00MN7645 (a...

  17. Identification of novel mutations including a double mutation in patients with inherited cardiomyopathy by a targeted sequencing approach using the Ion Torrent PGM system.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yue; Cao, Hong; Song, Yindi; Feng, Yue; Ding, Xiaoxue; Pang, Mingjie; Zhang, Yunmei; Zhang, Hong; Ding, Jiahuan; Xia, Xueshan

    2016-06-01

    Inherited cardiomyopathy is the major cause of sudden cardiac death (SCD) and heart failure (HF). The disease is associated with extensive genetic heterogeneity; pathogenic mutations in cardiac sarcomere protein genes, cytoskeletal protein genes and nuclear envelope protein genes have been linked to its etiology. Early diagnosis is conducive to clinical monitoring and allows for presymptomatic interventions as needed. In the present study, the entire coding sequences and flanking regions of 12 major disease (cardiomyopathy)-related genes [namely myosin, heavy chain 7, cardiac muscle, β (MYH7); myosin binding protein C, cardiac (MYBPC3); lamin A/C (LMNA); troponin I type 3 (cardiac) (TNNI3); troponin T type 2 (cardiac) (TNNT2); actin, α, cardiac muscle 1 (ACTC1); tropomyosin 1 (α) (TPM1); sodium channel, voltage gated, type V alpha subunit (SCN5A); myosin, light chain 2, regulatory, cardiac, slow (MYL2); myosin, heavy chain 6, cardiac muscle, α (MYH6); myosin, light chain 3, alkali, ventricular, skeletal, slow (MYL3); and protein kinase, AMP-activated, gamma 2 non-catalytic subunit  (PRKAG2)] in 8 patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and in 8 patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) were amplified and then sequenced using the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine (PGM) system. As a result, a novel heterozygous mutation (MYH7, p.Asn885Thr) and a variant of uncertain significance (TNNT2, p.Arg296His) were identified in 2 patients with HCM. These 2 missense mutations, which were absent in the samples obtained from the 200 healthy control subjects, altered the amino acid that was evolutionarily conserved among a number of vertebrate species; this illustrates that these 2 non-synonymous mutations play a role in the pathogenesis of HCM. Moreover, a double heterozygous mutation (PRKAG2, p.Gly100Ser plus MYH7, p.Arg719Trp) was identified in a patient with severe familial HCM, for the first time to the best of our

  18. Speech processing using maximum likelihood continuity mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Hogden, John E.

    2000-01-01

    Speech processing is obtained that, given a probabilistic mapping between static speech sounds and pseudo-articulator positions, allows sequences of speech sounds to be mapped to smooth sequences of pseudo-articulator positions. In addition, a method for learning a probabilistic mapping between static speech sounds and pseudo-articulator position is described. The method for learning the mapping between static speech sounds and pseudo-articulator position uses a set of training data composed only of speech sounds. The said speech processing can be applied to various speech analysis tasks, including speech recognition, speaker recognition, speech coding, speech synthesis, and voice mimicry.

  19. Speech processing using maximum likelihood continuity mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Hogden, J.E.

    2000-04-18

    Speech processing is obtained that, given a probabilistic mapping between static speech sounds and pseudo-articulator positions, allows sequences of speech sounds to be mapped to smooth sequences of pseudo-articulator positions. In addition, a method for learning a probabilistic mapping between static speech sounds and pseudo-articulator position is described. The method for learning the mapping between static speech sounds and pseudo-articulator position uses a set of training data composed only of speech sounds. The said speech processing can be applied to various speech analysis tasks, including speech recognition, speaker recognition, speech coding, speech synthesis, and voice mimicry.

  20. Comprehensive sequence-flux mapping of a levoglucosan utilization pathway in E. coli

    SciTech Connect

    Klesmith, Justin R.; Bacik, John -Paul; Michalczyk, Ryszard; Whitehead, Timothy A.

    2015-09-14

    Synthetic metabolic pathways often suffer from low specific productivity, and new methods that quickly assess pathway functionality for many thousands of variants are urgently needed. Here we present an approach that enables the rapid and parallel determination of sequence effects on flux for complete gene-encoding sequences. We show that this method can be used to determine the effects of over 8000 single point mutants of a pyrolysis oil catabolic pathway implanted in Escherichia coli. Experimental sequence-function data sets predicted whether fitness-enhancing mutations to the enzyme levoglucosan kinase resulted from enhanced catalytic efficiency or enzyme stability. A structure of one design incorporating 38 mutations elucidated the structural basis of high fitness mutations. One design incorporating 15 beneficial mutations supported a 15-fold improvement in growth rate and greater than 24-fold improvement in enzyme activity relative to the starting pathway. Lastly, this technique can be extended to improve a wide variety of designed pathways.

  1. Comprehensive sequence-flux mapping of a levoglucosan utilization pathway in E. coli

    SciTech Connect

    Klesmith, Justin R.; Bacik, John -Paul; Michalczyk, Ryszard; Whitehead, Timothy A.

    2015-11-20

    Synthetic metabolic pathways often suffer from low specific productivity, and new methods that quickly assess pathway functionality for many thousands of variants are urgently needed. Here we present an approach that enables the rapid and parallel determination of sequence effects on flux for complete gene-encoding sequences. We show that this method can be used to determine the effects of over 8000 single point mutants of a pyrolysis oil catabolic pathway implanted in Escherichia coli. Experimental sequence-function data sets predicted whether fitness-enhancing mutations to the enzyme levoglucosan kinase resulted from enhanced catalytic efficiency or enzyme stability. A structure of one design incorporating 38 mutations elucidated the structural basis of high fitness mutations. One design incorporating 15 beneficial mutations supported a 15-fold improvement in growth rate and greater than 24-fold improvement in enzyme activity relative to the starting pathway. Lastly, this technique can be extended to improve a wide variety of designed pathways.

  2. A hybrid genetic linkage map of two ecologically and morphologically divergent Midas cichlid fishes (Amphilophus spp.) obtained by massively parallel DNA sequencing (ddRADSeq).

    PubMed

    Recknagel, Hans; Elmer, Kathryn R; Meyer, Axel

    2013-01-01

    Cichlid fishes are an excellent model system for studying speciation and the formation of adaptive radiations because of their tremendous species richness and astonishing phenotypic diversity. Most research has focused on African rift lake fishes, although Neotropical cichlid species display much variability as well. Almost one dozen species of the Midas cichlid species complex (Amphilophus spp.) have been described so far and have formed repeated adaptive radiations in several Nicaraguan crater lakes. Here we apply double-digest restriction-site associated DNA sequencing to obtain a high-density linkage map of an interspecific cross between the benthic Amphilophus astorquii and the limnetic Amphilophus zaliosus, which are sympatric species endemic to Crater Lake Apoyo, Nicaragua. A total of 755 RAD markers were genotyped in 343 F(2) hybrids. The map resolved 25 linkage groups and spans a total distance of 1427 cM with an average marker spacing distance of 1.95 cM, almost matching the total number of chromosomes (n = 24) in these species. Regions of segregation distortion were identified in five linkage groups. Based on the pedigree of parents to F(2) offspring, we calculated a genome-wide mutation rate of 6.6 × 10(-8) mutations per nucleotide per generation. This genetic map will facilitate the mapping of ecomorphologically relevant adaptive traits in the repeated phenotypes that evolved within the Midas cichlid lineage and, as the first linkage map of a Neotropical cichlid, facilitate comparative genomic analyses between African cichlids, Neotropical cichlids and other teleost fishes. PMID:23316439

  3. Detection of Growth-Related Quantitative Trait Loci and High-Resolution Genetic Linkage Maps Using Simple Sequence Repeat Markers in the Kelp Grouper (Epinephelus bruneus).

    PubMed

    Kessuwan, Kanonkporn; Kubota, Satoshi; Liu, Qi; Sano, Motohiko; Okamoto, Nobuaki; Sakamoto, Takashi; Yamashita, Hirofumi; Nakamura, Yoji; Ozaki, Akiyuki

    2016-02-01

    To initiate breeding programs for kelp grouper (Epinephelus bruneus), the establishment of genetic linkage maps becomes essential accompanied by the search for quantitative trait loci that may be utilized in selection programs. We constructed a high-resolution genetic linkage map using 1055 simple sequence