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Sample records for server biological network

  1. File servers, networking, and supercomputers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Reagan W.

    1992-01-01

    One of the major tasks of a supercomputer center is managing the massive amount of data generated by application codes. A data flow analysis of the San Diego Supercomputer Center is presented that illustrates the hierarchical data buffering/caching capacity requirements and the associated I/O throughput requirements needed to sustain file service and archival storage. Usage paradigms are examined for both tightly-coupled and loosely-coupled file servers linked to the supercomputer by high-speed networks.

  2. File servers, networking, and supercomputers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Reagan W.

    1991-01-01

    One of the major tasks of a supercomputer center is managing the massive amount of data generated by application codes. A data flow analysis of the San Diego Supercomputer Center is presented that illustrates the hierarchical data buffering/caching capacity requirements and the associated I/O throughput requirements needed to sustain file service and archival storage. Usage paradigms are examined for both tightly-coupled and loosely-coupled file servers linked to the supercomputer by high-speed networks.

  3. The network-enabled optimization system server

    SciTech Connect

    Mesnier, M.P.

    1995-08-01

    Mathematical optimization is a technology under constant change and advancement, drawing upon the most efficient and accurate numerical methods to date. Further, these methods can be tailored for a specific application or generalized to accommodate a wider range of problems. This perpetual change creates an ever growing field, one that is often difficult to stay abreast of. Hence, the impetus behind the Network-Enabled Optimization System (NEOS) server, which aims to provide users, both novice and expert, with a guided tour through the expanding world of optimization. The NEOS server is responsible for bridging the gap between users and the optimization software they seek. More specifically, the NEOS server will accept optimization problems over the Internet and return a solution to the user either interactively or by e-mail. This paper discusses the current implementation of the server.

  4. Genonets server-a web server for the construction, analysis and visualization of genotype networks.

    PubMed

    Khalid, Fahad; Aguilar-Rodríguez, José; Wagner, Andreas; Payne, Joshua L

    2016-07-01

    A genotype network is a graph in which vertices represent genotypes that have the same phenotype. Edges connect vertices if their corresponding genotypes differ in a single small mutation. Genotype networks are used to study the organization of genotype spaces. They have shed light on the relationship between robustness and evolvability in biological systems as different as RNA macromolecules and transcriptional regulatory circuits. Despite the importance of genotype networks, no tool exists for their automatic construction, analysis and visualization. Here we fill this gap by presenting the Genonets Server, a tool that provides the following features: (i) the construction of genotype networks for categorical and univariate phenotypes from DNA, RNA, amino acid or binary sequences; (ii) analyses of genotype network topology and how it relates to robustness and evolvability, as well as analyses of genotype network topography and how it relates to the navigability of a genotype network via mutation and natural selection; (iii) multiple interactive visualizations that facilitate exploratory research and education. The Genonets Server is freely available at http://ieu-genonets.uzh.ch. PMID:27106055

  5. Optimal allocation of file servers in a local network environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodside, C. M.; Tripathi, S. K.

    1986-01-01

    Files associated with workstations in a local area network are to be allocated among two or more file servers. Assuming statistically identical workstations and file servers and a performance model which is a closed multiclass separable queueing network, an optimal allocation is found. It is shown that all the files of each workstation should be placed on one file server, with the workstations divided as equally as possible among the file servers.

  6. Enhanced networked server management with random remote backups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Song-Kyoo

    2003-08-01

    In this paper, the model is focused on available server management in network environments. The (remote) backup servers are hooked up by VPN (Virtual Private Network) and replace broken main severs immediately. A virtual private network (VPN) is a way to use a public network infrastructure and hooks up long-distance servers within a single network infrastructure. The servers can be represent as "machines" and then the system deals with main unreliable and random auxiliary spare (remote backup) machines. When the system performs a mandatory routine maintenance, auxiliary machines are being used for backups during idle periods. Unlike other existing models, the availability of auxiliary machines is changed for each activation in this enhanced model. Analytically tractable results are obtained by using several mathematical techniques and the results are demonstrated in the framework of optimized networked server allocation problems.

  7. Efficient server selection system for widely distributed multiserver networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyun-pyo; Park, Sung-sik; Lee, Kyoon-Ha

    2001-07-01

    In order to providing more improved quality of Internet service, the access speed to a subscriber's network and a server which is the Internet access device was rapidly enhanced by traffic distribution and installation of high-performance server. But the Internet access quality and the content for a speed were remained out of satisfaction. With such a hazard, an extended node at Internet access device has a limitation for coping with growing network traffic, and the root cause is located in the Middle-mile node between a CP (Content Provider) server and a user node. For such a problem, this paper proposes a new method to select a effective server to a client as minimizing the number of node between the server and the client while keeping the load balance among servers which is clustered by the client's location on the physically distributed multi-site environments. The proposed method use a NSP (Network Status Prober) and a contents server manager so as to get a status of each servers and distributed network, a new architecture will be shown for the server selecting algorithm and the implementation for the algorithm. And also, this paper shows the parameters selecting a best service providing server for client and that the grantor will be confirmed by the experiment over the proposed architectures.

  8. Multiple-server Flexible Blind Quantum Computation in Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Xiaoqin; Li, Qin; Wu, Chunhui; Yu, Fang; He, Jinjun; Sun, Zhiyuan

    2016-06-01

    Blind quantum computation (BQC) can allow a client with limited quantum power to delegate his quantum computation to a powerful server and still keep his own data private. In this paper, we present a multiple-server flexible BQC protocol, where a client who only needs the ability of accessing qua ntum channels can delegate the computational task to a number of servers. Especially, the client's quantum computation also can be achieved even when one or more delegated quantum servers break down in networks. In other words, when connections to certain quantum servers are lost, clients can adjust flexibly and delegate their quantum computation to other servers. Obviously it is trivial that the computation will be unsuccessful if all servers are interrupted.

  9. Multiple-server Flexible Blind Quantum Computation in Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Xiaoqin; Li, Qin; Wu, Chunhui; Yu, Fang; He, Jinjun; Sun, Zhiyuan

    2016-02-01

    Blind quantum computation (BQC) can allow a client with limited quantum power to delegate his quantum computation to a powerful server and still keep his own data private. In this paper, we present a multiple-server flexible BQC protocol, where a client who only needs the ability of accessing qua ntum channels can delegate the computational task to a number of servers. Especially, the client's quantum computation also can be achieved even when one or more delegated quantum servers break down in networks. In other words, when connections to certain quantum servers are lost, clients can adjust flexibly and delegate their quantum computation to other servers. Obviously it is trivial that the computation will be unsuccessful if all servers are interrupted.

  10. Improvements to the NIST network time protocol servers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, Judah

    2008-12-01

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) operates 22 network time servers at various locations. These servers respond to requests for time in a number of different formats and provide time stamps that are directly traceable to the NIST atomic clock ensemble in Boulder. The link between the servers at locations outside of the NIST Boulder Laboratories and the atomic clock ensemble is provided by the Automated Computer Time Service (ACTS) system, which has a direct connection to the clock ensemble and which transmits time information over dial-up telephone lines with a two-way protocol to measure the transmission delay. I will discuss improvements to the ACTS servers and to the time servers themselves. These improvements have resulted in an improvement of almost an order of magnitude in the performance of the system.

  11. Mathematical defense method of networked servers with controlled remote backups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Song-Kyoo

    2006-05-01

    The networked server defense model is focused on reliability and availability in security respects. The (remote) backup servers are hooked up by VPN (Virtual Private Network) with high-speed optical network and replace broken main severs immediately. The networked server can be represent as "machines" and then the system deals with main unreliable, spare, and auxiliary spare machine. During vacation periods, when the system performs a mandatory routine maintenance, auxiliary machines are being used for back-ups; the information on the system is naturally delayed. Analog of the N-policy to restrict the usage of auxiliary machines to some reasonable quantity. The results are demonstrated in the network architecture by using the stochastic optimization techniques.

  12. Economics of Computing: The Case of Centralized Network File Servers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, Martin B.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses computer networking and the cost effectiveness of decentralization, including local area networks. A planned experiment with a centralized approach to the operation and management of file servers at the University of South Carolina is described that hopes to realize cost savings and the avoidance of staffing problems. (Contains four…

  13. NatalieQ: A web server for protein-protein interaction network querying

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Molecular interactions need to be taken into account to adequately model the complex behavior of biological systems. These interactions are captured by various types of biological networks, such as metabolic, gene-regulatory, signal transduction and protein-protein interaction networks. We recently developed Natalie, which computes high-quality network alignments via advanced methods from combinatorial optimization. Results Here, we present NatalieQ, a web server for topology-based alignment of a specified query protein-protein interaction network to a selected target network using the Natalie algorithm. By incorporating similarity at both the sequence and the network level, we compute alignments that allow for the transfer of functional annotation as well as for the prediction of missing interactions. We illustrate the capabilities of NatalieQ with a biological case study involving the Wnt signaling pathway. Conclusions We show that topology-based network alignment can produce results complementary to those obtained by using sequence similarity alone. We also demonstrate that NatalieQ is able to predict putative interactions. The server is available at: http://www.ibi.vu.nl/programs/natalieq/. PMID:24690407

  14. Network time synchronization servers at the US Naval Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Richard E.

    1995-05-01

    Responding to an increased demand for reliable, accurate time on the Internet and Milnet, the U.S. Naval Observatory Time Service has established the network time servers, tick.usno.navy.mil and tock.usno.navy.mil. The system clocks of these HP9000/747i industrial work stations are synchronized to within a few tens of microseconds of USNO Master Clock 2 using VMEbus IRIG-B interfaces. Redundant time code is available from a VMEbus GPS receiver. UTC(USNO) is provided over the network via a number of protocols, including the Network Time Protocol (NTP) (DARPA Network Working Group Report RFC-1305), the Daytime Protocol (RFC-867), and the Time protocol (RFC-868). Access to USNO network time services is presently open and unrestricted. An overview of USNO time services and results of LAN and WAN time synchronization tests will be presented.

  15. Network time synchronization servers at the US Naval Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, Richard E.

    1995-01-01

    Responding to an increased demand for reliable, accurate time on the Internet and Milnet, the U.S. Naval Observatory Time Service has established the network time servers, tick.usno.navy.mil and tock.usno.navy.mil. The system clocks of these HP9000/747i industrial work stations are synchronized to within a few tens of microseconds of USNO Master Clock 2 using VMEbus IRIG-B interfaces. Redundant time code is available from a VMEbus GPS receiver. UTC(USNO) is provided over the network via a number of protocols, including the Network Time Protocol (NTP) (DARPA Network Working Group Report RFC-1305), the Daytime Protocol (RFC-867), and the Time protocol (RFC-868). Access to USNO network time services is presently open and unrestricted. An overview of USNO time services and results of LAN and WAN time synchronization tests will be presented.

  16. Adventures in the evolution of a high-bandwidth network for central servers

    SciTech Connect

    Swartz, K.L.; Cottrell, L.; Dart, M.

    1994-08-01

    In a small network, clients and servers may all be connected to a single Ethernet without significant performance concerns. As the number of clients on a network grows, the necessity of splitting the network into multiple sub-networks, each with a manageable number of clients, becomes clear. Less obvious is what to do with the servers. Group file servers on subnets and multihomed servers offer only partial solutions -- many other types of servers do not lend themselves to a decentralized model, and tend to collect on another, well-connected but overloaded Ethernet. The higher speed of FDDI seems to offer an easy solution, but in practice both expense and interoperability problems render FDDI a poor choice. Ethernet switches appear to permit cheaper and more reliable networking to the servers while providing an aggregate network bandwidth greater than a simple Ethernet. This paper studies the evolution of the server networks at SLAC. Difficulties encountered in the deployment of FDDI are described, as are the tools and techniques used to characterize the traffic patterns on the server network. Performance of Ethernet, FDDI, and switched Ethernet networks is analyzed, as are reliability and maintainability issues for these alternatives. The motivations for re-designing the SLAC general server network to use a switched Ethernet instead of FDDI are described, as are the reasons for choosing FDDI for the farm and firewall networks at SLAC. Guidelines are developed which may help in making this choice for other networks.

  17. Applications of Server Clustering Technology in Sensor Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, G.; Foley, S.; Battistuz, B.; Eakins, J.; Vernon, F. L.; Astiz, L.

    2007-12-01

    The Array Network Facility is charged with the acquisition and processing of seismic data from the Earthscope USArray experiment. High resolution data from 400 seismic sensors is streamed in near real-time to the ANF at UCSD in La Jolla, CA where it is automatically processed by machine and reviewed by analysts before being externally distributed to other data centers, including the IRIS Data Management Center. Data streams include six channels of 24- bit seismic data at 40 samples per second and over twenty channels of state-of-heath data at 1 sample per second per station. The sheer volume of data acquired and processed overwhelms the capabilities of any one affordable server system. Due to the relatively small buffers on-site (typically four hours) at the seismic stations, it is vital that the real-time systems remain online and acquiring data around the clock in order to meet data distribution requirements in a timely manner. Although the ANF does not have a 24x7x365 operations staff, the logistical difficulty in retrieving data from often remote locations after it expires from the on-site buffers requires the real- time systems to automatically recover from server failures without immediate operator intervention. To accomplish these goals, the ANF has implemented a five node Sun Solaris Cluster with acquisition and processing tasks shared by a mixture of integer and floating point processing units (Sun T2000 and V240/V245 systems). This configuration is an improvement over the typical regional network data center for a number of reasons: - By implementing a shared storage architecture, acquisition, processing, and distribution can be split between multiple systems working on the same data set, thus limiting the impact of a particularly resource-intensive task on the acquisition system. - The Solaris Cluster software monitors the health of the cluster nodes and provides the ability automatically fail over processes from a failed node to a healthy node

  18. Networks in Cell Biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchanan, Mark; Caldarelli, Guido; De Los Rios, Paolo; Rao, Francesco; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2010-05-01

    Introduction; 1. Network views of the cell Paolo De Los Rios and Michele Vendruscolo; 2. Transcriptional regulatory networks Sarath Chandra Janga and M. Madan Babu; 3. Transcription factors and gene regulatory networks Matteo Brilli, Elissa Calistri and Pietro Lió; 4. Experimental methods for protein interaction identification Peter Uetz, Björn Titz, Seesandra V. Rajagopala and Gerard Cagney; 5. Modeling protein interaction networks Francesco Rao; 6. Dynamics and evolution of metabolic networks Daniel Segré; 7. Hierarchical modularity in biological networks: the case of metabolic networks Erzsébet Ravasz Regan; 8. Signalling networks Gian Paolo Rossini; Appendix 1. Complex networks: from local to global properties D. Garlaschelli and G. Caldarelli; Appendix 2. Modelling the local structure of networks D. Garlaschelli and G. Caldarelli; Appendix 3. Higher-order topological properties S. Ahnert, T. Fink and G. Caldarelli; Appendix 4. Elementary mathematical concepts A. Gabrielli and G. Caldarelli; References.

  19. MetExplore: a web server to link metabolomic experiments and genome-scale metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Cottret, Ludovic; Wildridge, David; Vinson, Florence; Barrett, Michael P; Charles, Hubert; Sagot, Marie-France; Jourdan, Fabien

    2010-07-01

    High-throughput metabolomic experiments aim at identifying and ultimately quantifying all metabolites present in biological systems. The metabolites are interconnected through metabolic reactions, generally grouped into metabolic pathways. Classical metabolic maps provide a relational context to help interpret metabolomics experiments and a wide range of tools have been developed to help place metabolites within metabolic pathways. However, the representation of metabolites within separate disconnected pathways overlooks most of the connectivity of the metabolome. By definition, reference pathways cannot integrate novel pathways nor show relationships between metabolites that may be linked by common neighbours without being considered as joint members of a classical biochemical pathway. MetExplore is a web server that offers the possibility to link metabolites identified in untargeted metabolomics experiments within the context of genome-scale reconstructed metabolic networks. The analysis pipeline comprises mapping metabolomics data onto the specific metabolic network of an organism, then applying graph-based methods and advanced visualization tools to enhance data analysis. The MetExplore web server is freely accessible at http://metexplore.toulouse.inra.fr. PMID:20444866

  20. SurvNet: a web server for identifying network-based biomarkers that most correlate with patient survival data.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Roebuck, Paul; Grünewald, Stefan; Liang, Han

    2012-07-01

    An important task in biomedical research is identifying biomarkers that correlate with patient clinical data, and these biomarkers then provide a critical foundation for the diagnosis and treatment of disease. Conventionally, such an analysis is based on individual genes, but the results are often noisy and difficult to interpret. Using a biological network as the searching platform, network-based biomarkers are expected to be more robust and provide deep insights into the molecular mechanisms of disease. We have developed a novel bioinformatics web server for identifying network-based biomarkers that most correlate with patient survival data, SurvNet. The web server takes three input files: one biological network file, representing a gene regulatory or protein interaction network; one molecular profiling file, containing any type of gene- or protein-centred high-throughput biological data (e.g. microarray expression data or DNA methylation data); and one patient survival data file (e.g. patients' progression-free survival data). Given user-defined parameters, SurvNet will automatically search for subnetworks that most correlate with the observed patient survival data. As the output, SurvNet will generate a list of network biomarkers and display them through a user-friendly interface. SurvNet can be accessed at http://bioinformatics.mdanderson.org/main/SurvNet. PMID:22570412

  1. Design and development of a secure DICOM-Network Attached Server.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Hidenobu; Omatsu, Masahiko; Higuchi, Ko; Umeda, Tokuo

    2006-03-01

    It is not easy to connect a web-based server with an existing DICOM server, and using a web-based server on the INTERNET has risks. In this study, we designed and developed the secure DICOM-Network Attached Server (DICOM-NAS) through which the DICOM server in a hospital-Local Area Network (LAN) was connected to the INTERNET. After receiving a Client's image export request, the DICOM-NAS sent it to the DICOM server with DICOM protocol. The server then provided DICOM images to the DICOM-NAS, which transferred them to the Client using HTTP. The DICOM-NAS plays an important role between DICOM protocol and HTTP, and only temporarily stores the requested images. The DICOM server keeps all of the original DICOM images. When unwanted outsiders attempt to get into the DICOM-NAS, they cannot access any medical images because these images are not stored in the DICOM-NAS. Therefore, the DICOM-NAS does not require large storage, but can greatly improve information security. PMID:16503366

  2. Study and implementation of the network management agent of telecommunication application server in NGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kun; He, Hui; Ni, Yuhua

    2013-03-01

    The telecommunication application server (AS) is an important part of the value-added service network in the next generation network(NGN) as the support platform. Remote, unified and secure management to a variety of services is implemented after the remote network management of the telecommunications application server. The network management system based on Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) is decided to utilized to analyse and study the network managed objects in AS because of the integration of telecommunications networks and computer networks on the network management and convenient, economical and flexible features of SNMP protocol. The network management agent module of AS is designed and an example is illustrated the details of the model. Results indicate the good performance of the network management agent.

  3. Implementation and performance evaluation of a network-attached CD image file server

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jinglian; Dong, Yonggui; Sun, Zhaoyan; Jia, Huibo

    2002-09-01

    A network-attached CD Image file server, working on the Linux operating system, is implemented. By taking advantage of virtual file system (VFS) infrastructure and loopback device, the data of CD are mirrored in harddisks and can be shared by clients synchronously through network. The primary benefits of such a server are cost effectiveness, high capacity and excellent compatibility with Chinese characters. The performance of the server is evaluated by testing its throughput during I/O request. The experimental results show that, compared with conventional methods such as sharing the CD-ROM hard devices via network as, the rate of reading data from the CD Image is much higher. This is especially true when the server is dealing with multi-client access.

  4. [Design and development of a secure DICOM-Network Attached Server].

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Hidenobu; Omatsu, Masahiko; Higuchi, Ko; Umeda, Tokuo

    2006-04-20

    It is not easy to connect a Web-based server with an existing DICOM server, and using a Web-based server on the Internet has risks. In this study, we designed and developed a secure DICOM-Network Attached Server (DICOM-NAS) through which the DICOM server in a hospital LAN was connected to the Internet. After receiving a client's image export request, the DICOM-NAS sent it to the DICOM server using the DICOM protocol. The server then provided DICOM images to the DICOM-NAS, which transferred them to the client, using HTTP. The DICOM-NAS plays an important role between the DICOM protocol and HTTP, and stores the requested images only temporarily. The DICOM server keeps all of the original DICOM images. If an unauthorized user attempts to access the DICOM-NAS, medical images cannot be accessed because images are not stored in the DICOM-NAS. Furthermore, the DICOM-NAS has features related to reporting and MPR. Therefore, the DICOM-NAS does not require a large storage capacity, but can greatly improve information security. PMID:16639395

  5. Impact of malicious servers over trust and reputation models in wireless sensor networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Vinod Kumar; Singh, Surinder; Pathak, N. P.

    2016-03-01

    This article deals with the impact of malicious servers over different trust and reputation models in wireless sensor networks. First, we analysed the five trust and reputation models, namely BTRM-WSN, Eigen trust, peer trust, power trust, linguistic fuzzy trust model. Further, we proposed wireless sensor network design for optimisation of these models. Finally, influence of malicious servers on the behaviour of above mentioned trust and reputation models is discussed. Statistical analysis has been carried out to prove the validity of our proposal.

  6. A unified biological modeling and simulation system for analyzing biological reaction networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Seok Jong; Tung, Thai Quang; Park, Junho; Lim, Jongtae; Yoo, Jaesoo

    2013-12-01

    In order to understand the biological response in a cell, a researcher has to create a biological network and design an experiment to prove it. Although biological knowledge has been accumulated, we still don't have enough biological models to explain complex biological phenomena. If a new biological network is to be created, integrated modeling software supporting various biological models is required. In this research, we design and implement a unified biological modeling and simulation system, called ezBioNet, for analyzing biological reaction networks. ezBioNet designs kinetic and Boolean network models and simulates the biological networks using a server-side simulation system with Object Oriented Parallel Accelerator Library framework. The main advantage of ezBioNet is that a user can create a biological network by using unified modeling canvas of kinetic and Boolean models and perform massive simulations, including Ordinary Differential Equation analyses, sensitivity analyses, parameter estimates and Boolean network analysis. ezBioNet integrates useful biological databases, including the BioModels database, by connecting European Bioinformatics Institute servers through Web services Application Programming Interfaces. In addition, we employ Eclipse Rich Client Platform, which is a powerful modularity framework to allow various functional expansions. ezBioNet is intended to be an easy-to-use modeling tool and a simulation system for understanding the control mechanism by monitoring the change of each component in a biological network. The simulation result can be managed and visualized on ezBioNet, which is available free of charge at http://ezbionet.sourceforge.net or http://ezbionet.cbnu.ac.kr.

  7. 78 FR 48472 - Hewlett Packard Company; Enterprise Storage Servers and Networking (Tape) Group; Formerly D/B/A...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-08

    ... Employment and Training Administration Hewlett Packard Company; Enterprise Storage Servers and Networking (Tape) Group; Formerly D/B/A Enterprise Group, HP Storage, Tape Group; Fort Collins, Colorado; Notice of..., Enterprise Storage Servers and Networking (Tape) Group (formerly d/b/a Enterprise Group, HP Storage,...

  8. Querying Large Biological Network Datasets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gulsoy, Gunhan

    2013-01-01

    New experimental methods has resulted in increasing amount of genetic interaction data to be generated every day. Biological networks are used to store genetic interaction data gathered. Increasing amount of data available requires fast large scale analysis methods. Therefore, we address the problem of querying large biological network datasets.…

  9. [The therapeutic drug monitoring network server of tacrolimus for Chinese renal transplant patients].

    PubMed

    Deng, Chen-Hui; Zhang, Guan-Min; Bi, Shan-Shan; Zhou, Tian-Yan; Lu, Wei

    2011-07-01

    This study is to develop a therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) network server of tacrolimus for Chinese renal transplant patients, which can facilitate doctor to manage patients' information and provide three levels of predictions. Database management system MySQL was employed to build and manage the database of patients and doctors' information, and hypertext mark-up language (HTML) and Java server pages (JSP) technology were employed to construct network server for database management. Based on the population pharmacokinetic model of tacrolimus for Chinese renal transplant patients, above program languages were used to construct the population prediction and subpopulation prediction modules. Based on Bayesian principle and maximization of the posterior probability function, an objective function was established, and minimized by an optimization algorithm to estimate patient's individual pharmacokinetic parameters. It is proved that the network server has the basic functions for database management and three levels of prediction to aid doctor to optimize the regimen of tacrolimus for Chinese renal transplant patients. PMID:22010353

  10. RiceNet v2: an improved network prioritization server for rice genes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tak; Oh, Taeyun; Yang, Sunmo; Shin, Junha; Hwang, Sohyun; Kim, Chan Yeong; Kim, Hyojin; Shim, Hongseok; Shim, Jung Eun; Ronald, Pamela C.; Lee, Insuk

    2015-01-01

    Rice is the most important staple food crop and a model grass for studies of bioenergy crops. We previously published a genome-scale functional network server called RiceNet, constructed by integrating diverse genomics data and demonstrated the use of the network in genetic dissection of rice biotic stress responses and its usefulness for other grass species. Since the initial construction of the network, there has been a significant increase in the amount of publicly available rice genomics data. Here, we present an updated network prioritization server for Oryza sativa ssp. japonica, RiceNet v2 (http://www.inetbio.org/ricenet), which provides a network of 25 765 genes (70.1% of the coding genome) and 1 775 000 co-functional links. Ricenet v2 also provides two complementary methods for network prioritization based on: (i) network direct neighborhood and (ii) context-associated hubs. RiceNet v2 can use genes of the related subspecies O. sativa ssp. indica and the reference plant Arabidopsis for versatility in generating hypotheses. We demonstrate that RiceNet v2 effectively identifies candidate genes involved in rice root/shoot development and defense responses, demonstrating its usefulness for the grass research community. PMID:25813048

  11. Volume serving and media management in a networked, distributed client/server environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, Ralph H.; Tefend, Linda L.

    1993-01-01

    The E-Systems Modular Automated Storage System (EMASS) is a family of hierarchical mass storage systems providing complete storage/'file space' management. The EMASS volume server provides the flexibility to work with different clients (file servers), different platforms, and different archives with a 'mix and match' capability. The EMASS design considers all file management programs as clients of the volume server system. System storage capacities are tailored to customer needs ranging from small data centers to large central libraries serving multiple users simultaneously. All EMASS hardware is commercial off the shelf (COTS), selected to provide the performance and reliability needed in current and future mass storage solutions. All interfaces use standard commercial protocols and networks suitable to service multiple hosts. EMASS is designed to efficiently store and retrieve in excess of 10,000 terabytes of data. Current clients include CRAY's YMP Model E based Data Migration Facility (DMF), IBM's RS/6000 based Unitree, and CONVEX based EMASS File Server software. The VolSer software provides the capability to accept client or graphical user interface (GUI) commands from the operator's console and translate them to the commands needed to control any configured archive. The VolSer system offers advanced features to enhance media handling and particularly media mounting such as: automated media migration, preferred media placement, drive load leveling, registered MediaClass groupings, and drive pooling.

  12. On Demand Content Anycasting to Enhance Content Server Using P2P Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Othman, Othman M. M.; Okamura, Koji

    In this paper, we suggest a new technology called Content Anycasting, and we show our design and evaluation of it. Content Anycasting shows how to utilize the capabilities of one of the candidate future Internet technologies that is the Flow-based network as in OpenFlow to giving new opportunities to the future internet that are currently not available. Content Anycasting aims to provide more flexible and dynamic redirection of contents. This would be very useful in extending the content server's capacity by enabling it to serve more clients, and in improving the response of the P2P networks by reducing the time of joining P2P networks. This method relies on three important ideas which are; the content based networking, decision making by the network in a similar manner to anycast, and the participation of user clients in providing the service. This is done through the use of the flow-based actions in flow-based network and having some modifications to the content server and client.

  13. Virtualization in network and servers infrastructure to support dynamic system reconfiguration in ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Tzu-Chiang; Ovando, Nicolás.; Bartsch, Marcelo; Simmond, Max; Vélez, Gastón; Robles, Manuel; Soto, Rubén.; Ibsen, Jorge; Saldias, Christian

    2012-09-01

    ALMA is the first astronomical project being constructed and operated under industrial approach due to the huge amount of elements involved. In order to achieve the maximum through put during the engineering and scientific commissioning phase, several production lines have been established to work in parallel. This decision required modification in the original system architecture in which all the elements are controlled and operated within a unique Standard Test Environment (STE). The advance in the network industry and together with the maturity of virtualization paradigm allows us to provide a solution which can replicate the STE infrastructure without changing their network address definition. This is only possible with Virtual Routing and Forwarding (VRF) and Virtual LAN (VLAN) concepts. The solution allows dynamic reconfiguration of antennas and other hardware across the production lines with minimum time and zero human intervention in the cabling. We also push the virtualization even further, classical rack mount servers are being replaced and consolidated by blade servers. On top of them virtualized server are centrally administrated with VMWare ESX. Hardware costs and system administration effort will be reduced considerably. This mechanism has been established and operated successfully during the last two years. This experience gave us confident to propose a solution to divide the main operation array into subarrays using the same concept which will introduce huge flexibility and efficiency for ALMA operation and eventually may simplify the complexity of ALMA core observing software since there will be no need to deal with subarrays complexity at software level.

  14. Verifying the secure setup of Unix client/servers and detection of network intrusion

    SciTech Connect

    Feingold, R.; Bruestle, H.R.; Bartoletti, T.; Saroyan, A.; Fisher, J.

    1995-07-01

    This paper describes our technical approach to developing and delivering Unix host- and network-based security products to meet the increasing challenges in information security. Today`s global ``Infosphere`` presents us with a networked environment that knows no geographical, national, or temporal boundaries, and no ownership, laws, or identity cards. This seamless aggregation of computers, networks, databases, applications, and the like store, transmit, and process information. This information is now recognized as an asset to governments, corporations, and individuals alike. This information must be protected from misuse. The Security Profile Inspector (SPI) performs static analyses of Unix-based clients and servers to check on their security configuration. SPI`s broad range of security tests and flexible usage options support the needs of novice and expert system administrators alike. SPI`s use within the Department of Energy and Department of Defense has resulted in more secure systems, less vulnerable to hostile intentions. Host-based information protection techniques and tools must also be supported by network-based capabilities. Our experience shows that a weak link in a network of clients and servers presents itself sooner or later, and can be more readily identified by dynamic intrusion detection techniques and tools. The Network Intrusion Detector (NID) is one such tool. NID is designed to monitor and analyze activity on an Ethernet broadcast Local Area Network segment and produce transcripts of suspicious user connections. NID`s retrospective and real-time modes have proven invaluable to security officers faced with ongoing attacks to their systems and networks.

  15. Functional Aspects of Biological Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sneppen, Kim

    2007-03-01

    We discuss biological networks with respect to 1) relative positioning and importance of high degree nodes, 2) function and signaling, 3) logic and dynamics of regulation. Visually the soft modularity of many real world networks can be characterized in terms of number of high and low degrees nodes positioned relative to each other in a landscape analogue with mountains (high-degree nodes) and valleys (low-degree nodes). In these terms biological networks looks like rugged landscapes with separated peaks, hub proteins, which each are roughly as essential as any of the individual proteins on the periphery of the hub. Within each sup-domain of a molecular network one can often identify dynamical feedback mechanisms that falls into combinations of positive and negative feedback circuits. We will illustrate this with examples taken from phage regulation and bacterial uptake and regulation of small molecules. In particular we find that a double negative regulation often are replaced by a single positive link in unrelated organisms with same functional requirements. Overall we argue that network topology primarily reflects functional constraints. References: S. Maslov and K. Sneppen. ``Computational architecture of the yeast regulatory network." Phys. Biol. 2:94 (2005) A. Trusina et al. ``Functional alignment of regulatory networks: A study of temerate phages". Plos Computational Biology 1:7 (2005). J.B. Axelsen et al. ``Degree Landscapes in Scale-Free Networks" physics/0512075 (2005). A. Trusina et al. ``Hierarchy and Anti-Hierarchy in Real and Scale Free networks." PRL 92:178702 (2004) S. Semsey et al. ``Genetic Regulation of Fluxes: Iron Homeostasis of Escherichia coli". (2006) q-bio.MN/0609042

  16. A FPGA Embedded Web Server for Remote Monitoring and Control of Smart Sensors Networks

    PubMed Central

    Magdaleno, Eduardo; Rodríguez, Manuel; Pérez, Fernando; Hernández, David; García, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the implementation of a web server using an embedded Altera NIOS II IP core, a general purpose and configurable RISC processor which is embedded in a Cyclone FPGA. The processor uses the μCLinux operating system to support a Boa web server of dynamic pages using Common Gateway Interface (CGI). The FPGA is configured to act like the master node of a network, and also to control and monitor a network of smart sensors or instruments. In order to develop a totally functional system, the FPGA also includes an implementation of the time-triggered protocol (TTP/A). Thus, the implemented master node has two interfaces, the webserver that acts as an Internet interface and the other to control the network. This protocol is widely used to connecting smart sensors and actuators and microsystems in embedded real-time systems in different application domains, e.g., industrial, automotive, domotic, etc., although this protocol can be easily replaced by any other because of the inherent characteristics of the FPGA-based technology. PMID:24379047

  17. A FPGA embedded web server for remote monitoring and control of smart sensors networks.

    PubMed

    Magdaleno, Eduardo; Rodríguez, Manuel; Pérez, Fernando; Hernández, David; García, Enrique

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the implementation of a web server using an embedded Altera NIOS II IP core, a general purpose and configurable RISC processor which is embedded in a Cyclone FPGA. The processor uses the μCLinux operating system to support a Boa web server of dynamic pages using Common Gateway Interface (CGI). The FPGA is configured to act like the master node of a network, and also to control and monitor a network of smart sensors or instruments. In order to develop a totally functional system, the FPGA also includes an implementation of the time-triggered protocol (TTP/A). Thus, the implemented master node has two interfaces, the webserver that acts as an Internet interface and the other to control the network. This protocol is widely used to connecting smart sensors and actuators and microsystems in embedded real-time systems in different application domains, e.g., industrial, automotive, domotic, etc., although this protocol can be easily replaced by any other because of the inherent characteristics of the FPGA-based technology. PMID:24379047

  18. The RING 2.0 web server for high quality residue interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Piovesan, Damiano; Minervini, Giovanni; Tosatto, Silvio C E

    2016-07-01

    Residue interaction networks (RINs) are an alternative way of representing protein structures where nodes are residues and arcs physico-chemical interactions. RINs have been extensively and successfully used for analysing mutation effects, protein folding, domain-domain communication and catalytic activity. Here we present RING 2.0, a new version of the RING software for the identification of covalent and non-covalent bonds in protein structures, including π-π stacking and π-cation interactions. RING 2.0 is extremely fast and generates both intra and inter-chain interactions including solvent and ligand atoms. The generated networks are very accurate and reliable thanks to a complex empirical re-parameterization of distance thresholds performed on the entire Protein Data Bank. By default, RING output is generated with optimal parameters but the web server provides an exhaustive interface to customize the calculation. The network can be visualized directly in the browser or in Cytoscape. Alternatively, the RING-Viz script for Pymol allows visualizing the interactions at atomic level in the structure. The web server and RING-Viz, together with an extensive help and tutorial, are available from URL: http://protein.bio.unipd.it/ring. PMID:27198219

  19. The RING 2.0 web server for high quality residue interaction networks

    PubMed Central

    Piovesan, Damiano; Minervini, Giovanni; Tosatto, Silvio C.E.

    2016-01-01

    Residue interaction networks (RINs) are an alternative way of representing protein structures where nodes are residues and arcs physico–chemical interactions. RINs have been extensively and successfully used for analysing mutation effects, protein folding, domain–domain communication and catalytic activity. Here we present RING 2.0, a new version of the RING software for the identification of covalent and non-covalent bonds in protein structures, including π–π stacking and π–cation interactions. RING 2.0 is extremely fast and generates both intra and inter-chain interactions including solvent and ligand atoms. The generated networks are very accurate and reliable thanks to a complex empirical re-parameterization of distance thresholds performed on the entire Protein Data Bank. By default, RING output is generated with optimal parameters but the web server provides an exhaustive interface to customize the calculation. The network can be visualized directly in the browser or in Cytoscape. Alternatively, the RING-Viz script for Pymol allows visualizing the interactions at atomic level in the structure. The web server and RING-Viz, together with an extensive help and tutorial, are available from URL: http://protein.bio.unipd.it/ring. PMID:27198219

  20. systemsDock: a web server for network pharmacology-based prediction and analysis.

    PubMed

    Hsin, Kun-Yi; Matsuoka, Yukiko; Asai, Yoshiyuki; Kamiyoshi, Kyota; Watanabe, Tokiko; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Kitano, Hiroaki

    2016-07-01

    We present systemsDock, a web server for network pharmacology-based prediction and analysis, which permits docking simulation and molecular pathway map for comprehensive characterization of ligand selectivity and interpretation of ligand action on a complex molecular network. It incorporates an elaborately designed scoring function for molecular docking to assess protein-ligand binding potential. For large-scale screening and ease of investigation, systemsDock has a user-friendly GUI interface for molecule preparation, parameter specification and result inspection. Ligand binding potentials against individual proteins can be directly displayed on an uploaded molecular interaction map, allowing users to systemically investigate network-dependent effects of a drug or drug candidate. A case study is given to demonstrate how systemsDock can be used to discover a test compound's multi-target activity. systemsDock is freely accessible at http://systemsdock.unit.oist.jp/. PMID:27131384

  1. Design principles in biological networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyal, Sidhartha

    Much of biology emerges from networks of interactions. Even in a single bacterium such as Escherichia coli, there are hundreds of coexisting gene and protein networks. Although biological networks are the outcome of evolution, various physical and biological constraints limit their functional capacity. The focus of this thesis is to understand how functional constraints such as optimal growth in mircoorganisms and information flow in signaling pathways shape the metabolic network of bacterium E. coli and the quorum sensing network of marine bacterium Vibrio harveyi, respectively. Metabolic networks convert basic elemental sources into complex building-blocks eventually leading to cell's growth. Therefore, typically, metabolic pathways are often coupled both by the use of a common substrate and by stoichiometric utilization of their products for cell growth. We showed that such a coupled network with product-feedback inhibition may exhibit limit-cycle oscillations which arise via a Hopf bifurcation. Furthermore, we analyzed several representative metabolic modules and find that, in all cases, simple product-feedback inhibition allows nearly optimal growth, in agreement with the predicted growth-rate by the flux-balance analysis (FBA). Bacteria have fascinating and diverse social lives. They display coordinated group behaviors regulated by quorum sensing (QS) systems. The QS circuit of V. harveyi integrates and funnels different ecological information through a common phosphorelay cascade to a set of small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) that enables collective behavior. We analyzed the signaling properties and information flow in the QS circuit, which provides a model for information flow in signaling networks more generally. A comparative study of post-transcriptional and conventional transcriptional regulation suggest a niche for sRNAs in allowing cells to transition quickly yet reliably between distinct states. Furthermore, we develop a new framework for analyzing signal

  2. QuIN: A Web Server for Querying and Visualizing Chromatin Interaction Networks

    PubMed Central

    Thibodeau, Asa; Márquez, Eladio J.; Luo, Oscar; Ruan, Yijun; Shin, Dong-Guk; Stitzel, Michael L.; Ucar, Duygu

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies of the human genome have indicated that regulatory elements (e.g. promoters and enhancers) at distal genomic locations can interact with each other via chromatin folding and affect gene expression levels. Genomic technologies for mapping interactions between DNA regions, e.g., ChIA-PET and HiC, can generate genome-wide maps of interactions between regulatory elements. These interaction datasets are important resources to infer distal gene targets of non-coding regulatory elements and to facilitate prioritization of critical loci for important cellular functions. With the increasing diversity and complexity of genomic information and public ontologies, making sense of these datasets demands integrative and easy-to-use software tools. Moreover, network representation of chromatin interaction maps enables effective data visualization, integration, and mining. Currently, there is no software that can take full advantage of network theory approaches for the analysis of chromatin interaction datasets. To fill this gap, we developed a web-based application, QuIN, which enables: 1) building and visualizing chromatin interaction networks, 2) annotating networks with user-provided private and publicly available functional genomics and interaction datasets, 3) querying network components based on gene name or chromosome location, and 4) utilizing network based measures to identify and prioritize critical regulatory targets and their direct and indirect interactions. AVAILABILITY: QuIN’s web server is available at http://quin.jax.org QuIN is developed in Java and JavaScript, utilizing an Apache Tomcat web server and MySQL database and the source code is available under the GPLV3 license available on GitHub: https://github.com/UcarLab/QuIN/. PMID:27336171

  3. TFmiR: a web server for constructing and analyzing disease-specific transcription factor and miRNA co-regulatory networks

    PubMed Central

    Hamed, Mohamed; Spaniol, Christian; Nazarieh, Maryam; Helms, Volkhard

    2015-01-01

    TFmiR is a freely available web server for deep and integrative analysis of combinatorial regulatory interactions between transcription factors, microRNAs and target genes that are involved in disease pathogenesis. Since the inner workings of cells rely on the correct functioning of an enormously complex system of activating and repressing interactions that can be perturbed in many ways, TFmiR helps to better elucidate cellular mechanisms at the molecular level from a network perspective. The provided topological and functional analyses promote TFmiR as a reliable systems biology tool for researchers across the life science communities. TFmiR web server is accessible through the following URL: http://service.bioinformatik.uni-saarland.de/tfmir. PMID:25943543

  4. TFmiR: a web server for constructing and analyzing disease-specific transcription factor and miRNA co-regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Hamed, Mohamed; Spaniol, Christian; Nazarieh, Maryam; Helms, Volkhard

    2015-07-01

    TFmiR is a freely available web server for deep and integrative analysis of combinatorial regulatory interactions between transcription factors, microRNAs and target genes that are involved in disease pathogenesis. Since the inner workings of cells rely on the correct functioning of an enormously complex system of activating and repressing interactions that can be perturbed in many ways, TFmiR helps to better elucidate cellular mechanisms at the molecular level from a network perspective. The provided topological and functional analyses promote TFmiR as a reliable systems biology tool for researchers across the life science communities. TFmiR web server is accessible through the following URL: http://service.bioinformatik.uni-saarland.de/tfmir. PMID:25943543

  5. Reputation-based collaborative network biology.

    PubMed

    Binder, Jean; Boue, Stephanie; Di Fabio, Anselmo; Fields, R Brett; Hayes, William; Hoeng, Julia; Park, Jennifer S; Peitsch, Manuel C

    2015-01-01

    A pilot reputation-based collaborative network biology platform, Bionet, was developed for use in the sbv IMPROVER Network Verification Challenge to verify and enhance previously developed networks describing key aspects of lung biology. Bionet was successful in capturing a more comprehensive view of the biology associated with each network using the collective intelligence and knowledge of the crowd. One key learning point from the pilot was that using a standardized biological knowledge representation language such as BEL is critical to the success of a collaborative network biology platform. Overall, Bionet demonstrated that this approach to collaborative network biology is highly viable. Improving this platform for de novo creation of biological networks and network curation with the suggested enhancements for scalability will serve both academic and industry systems biology communities. PMID:25592588

  6. A Comparison Between Publish-and-Subscribe and Client-Server Models in Distributed Control System Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boulanger, Richard P., Jr.; Kwauk, Xian-Min; Stagnaro, Mike; Kliss, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The BIO-Plex control system requires real-time, flexible, and reliable data delivery. There is no simple "off-the-shelf 'solution. However, several commercial packages will be evaluated using a testbed at ARC for publish- and-subscribe and client-server communication architectures. Point-to-point communication architecture is not suitable for real-time BIO-Plex control system. Client-server architecture provides more flexible data delivery. However, it does not provide direct communication among nodes on the network. Publish-and-subscribe implementation allows direct information exchange among nodes on the net, providing the best time-critical communication. In this work Network Data Delivery Service (NDDS) from Real-Time Innovations, Inc. ARTIE will be used to implement publish-and subscribe architecture. It offers update guarantees and deadlines for real-time data delivery. Bridgestone, a data acquisition and control software package from National Instruments, will be tested for client-server arrangement. A microwave incinerator located at ARC will be instrumented with a fieldbus network of control devices. BridgeVIEW will be used to implement an enterprise server. An enterprise network consisting of several nodes at ARC and a WAN connecting ARC and RISC will then be setup to evaluate proposed control system architectures. Several network configurations will be evaluated for fault tolerance, quality of service, reliability and efficiency. Data acquired from these network evaluation tests will then be used to determine preliminary design criteria for the BIO-Plex distributed control system.

  7. Delay decomposition at a single server queue with constant service time and multiple inputs. [Waiting time on computer network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziegler, C.; Schilling, D. L.

    1977-01-01

    Two networks consisting of single server queues, each with a constant service time, are considered. The external inputs to each network are assumed to follow some general probability distribution. Several interesting equivalencies that exist between the two networks considered are derived. This leads to the introduction of an important concept in delay decomposition. It is shown that the waiting time experienced by a customer can be decomposed into two basic components called self delay and interference delay.

  8. An open system network for the biological sciences.

    PubMed Central

    Springer, G. K.; Loch, J. L.; Patrick, T. B.

    1991-01-01

    A description of an open system, distributed computing environment for the Biological Sciences is presented. This system utilizes a transparent interface in a computer network using NCS to implement an application system for molecular biologists to perform various processing activities from their local workstation. This system accepts requests for the services of a remote database server, located across the network, to perform all of the database searches needed to support the activities of the user. This database access is totally transparent to the user of the system and it appears, to the user, that all activities are being carried out on the local workstation. This system is a prototype for a much more extensive system being built to support the research efforts in the Biological Sciences at UMC. PMID:1807659

  9. Dali server update.

    PubMed

    Holm, Liisa; Laakso, Laura M

    2016-07-01

    The Dali server (http://ekhidna2.biocenter.helsinki.fi/dali) is a network service for comparing protein structures in 3D. In favourable cases, comparing 3D structures may reveal biologically interesting similarities that are not detectable by comparing sequences. The Dali server has been running in various places for over 20 years and is used routinely by crystallographers on newly solved structures. The latest update of the server provides enhanced analytics for the study of sequence and structure conservation. The server performs three types of structure comparisons: (i) Protein Data Bank (PDB) search compares one query structure against those in the PDB and returns a list of similar structures; (ii) pairwise comparison compares one query structure against a list of structures specified by the user; and (iii) all against all structure comparison returns a structural similarity matrix, a dendrogram and a multidimensional scaling projection of a set of structures specified by the user. Structural superimpositions are visualized using the Java-free WebGL viewer PV. The structural alignment view is enhanced by sequence similarity searches against Uniprot. The combined structure-sequence alignment information is compressed to a stack of aligned sequence logos. In the stack, each structure is structurally aligned to the query protein and represented by a sequence logo. PMID:27131377

  10. Studying Pensions Funds Through an Infinite Servers Nodes Network: A Theoretical Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, M. A. M.; Andrade, M.; Filipe, J. A.

    2012-11-01

    This study intends to present a representation of a pensions fund through a stochastic network with two infinite servers nodes. With this representation it is allowed to deduce an equilibrium condition of the system with basis on the identity of the random rates expected values, for which the contributions arrive to the fund and the pensions are paid by the fund. In our study a stochastic network is constructed where traffic is represented. This network allows to study the equilibrium in the system and it is admissible to get a balance to a pensions fund. A specific case is studied. When the arrivals from outside at nodes A and B are according to a Poisson process, with rates λA and λB, respectively, the system may be seen as a two nodes network where the first node is a M/G/∞ queue and second a Mt/G/∞ queue. For this case in the long term the conditions of equilibrium are as follows: mAλAαA = mB(ρλA + λB)αB. In this formula it is established a relationship among the two nodes. Several examples are given in the study.

  11. PathwAX: a web server for network crosstalk based pathway annotation.

    PubMed

    Ogris, Christoph; Helleday, Thomas; Sonnhammer, Erik L L

    2016-07-01

    Pathway annotation of gene lists is often used to functionally analyse biomolecular data such as gene expression in order to establish which processes are activated in a given experiment. Databases such as KEGG or GO represent collections of how genes are known to be organized in pathways, and the challenge is to compare a given gene list with the known pathways such that all true relations are identified. Most tools apply statistical measures to the gene overlap between the gene list and pathway. It is however problematic to avoid false negatives and false positives when only using the gene overlap. The pathwAX web server (http://pathwAX.sbc.su.se/) applies a different approach which is based on network crosstalk. It uses the comprehensive network FunCoup to analyse network crosstalk between a query gene list and KEGG pathways. PathwAX runs the BinoX algorithm, which employs Monte-Carlo sampling of randomized networks and estimates a binomial distribution, for estimating the statistical significance of the crosstalk. This results in substantially higher accuracy than gene overlap methods. The system was optimized for speed and allows interactive web usage. We illustrate the usage and output of pathwAX. PMID:27151197

  12. Server Cache Synchronization Protocol (SCSP): component for directory-enabled networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa Requena, Jose; Kantola, Raimo

    1999-11-01

    This paper describes and analyses a solution to the problem of data synchronization and replication for distributed entities such as directories in IP communication networks. We discuss the role of directories in the developing IP communications service infrastructure. The data replication solution we have implemented is based on the protocol specifications for the Internet, titled `Server Cache Synchronization Protocol' (SCSP). We review the requirements of using and maintaining data that is shared among many applications while the data resides in different physical locations. We give a brief description of the SCSP and discuss its implementation. We point out some possible applications for the protocol in a mixed IP/ISDN network. We also review some alternative approaches to directory services. In conclusion we propose the SCSP as a component for directory enabled networks--a concept emphasizing the key role of directories in the merging communications infrastructure. New emerging services manage large amounts of data. To facilitate the data management it is distributed over different locations following directory structures where the information is close to the customer location. The main goal is to achieve a global service accessible from everywhere, independently of the location where the user is accessing the service.

  13. Introduction to Network Analysis in Systems Biology

    PubMed Central

    Ma’ayan, Avi

    2011-01-01

    This Teaching Resource provides lecture notes, slides, and a problem set for a set of three lectures from a course entitled “Systems Biology: Biomedical Modeling.” The materials are from three separate lectures introducing applications of graph theory and network analysis in systems biology. The first lecture describes different types of intracellular networks, methods for constructing biological networks, and different types of graphs used to represent regulatory intracellular networks. The second lecture surveys milestones and key concepts in network analysis by introducing topological measures, random networks, growing network models, and topological observations from molecular biological systems abstracted to networks. The third lecture discusses methods for analyzing lists of genes and experimental data in the context of prior knowledge networks to make predictions. PMID:21917719

  14. NetExplore: a web server for modeling small network motifs

    PubMed Central

    Papatsenko, Dmitri; Lemischka, Ihor R.

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: Quantitative and qualitative assessment of biological data often produces small essential recurrent networks, containing 3–5 components called network motifs. In this context, model solutions for small network motifs represent very high interest. Results: Software package NetExplore has been created in order to generate, classify and analyze solutions for network motifs including up to six network components. NetExplore allows plotting and visualization of the solution's phase spaces and bifurcation diagrams. Availability and implementation: The current version of NetExplore has been implemented in Perl-CGI and is accessible at the following locations: http://line.bioinfolab.net/nex/NetExplore.htm and http://nex.autosome.ru/nex/NetExplore.htm. Contact: dmitri.papatsenko@gmail.com Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25637559

  15. Measuring the evolutionary rewiring of biological networks.

    PubMed

    Shou, Chong; Bhardwaj, Nitin; Lam, Hugo Y K; Yan, Koon-Kiu; Kim, Philip M; Snyder, Michael; Gerstein, Mark B

    2011-01-01

    We have accumulated a large amount of biological network data and expect even more to come. Soon, we anticipate being able to compare many different biological networks as we commonly do for molecular sequences. It has long been believed that many of these networks change, or "rewire", at different rates. It is therefore important to develop a framework to quantify the differences between networks in a unified fashion. We developed such a formalism based on analogy to simple models of sequence evolution, and used it to conduct a systematic study of network rewiring on all the currently available biological networks. We found that, similar to sequences, biological networks show a decreased rate of change at large time divergences, because of saturation in potential substitutions. However, different types of biological networks consistently rewire at different rates. Using comparative genomics and proteomics data, we found a consistent ordering of the rewiring rates: transcription regulatory, phosphorylation regulatory, genetic interaction, miRNA regulatory, protein interaction, and metabolic pathway network, from fast to slow. This ordering was found in all comparisons we did of matched networks between organisms. To gain further intuition on network rewiring, we compared our observed rewirings with those obtained from simulation. We also investigated how readily our formalism could be mapped to other network contexts; in particular, we showed how it could be applied to analyze changes in a range of "commonplace" networks such as family trees, co-authorships and linux-kernel function dependencies. PMID:21253555

  16. Optimizing Nutrient Uptake in Biological Transport Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronellenfitsch, Henrik; Katifori, Eleni

    2013-03-01

    Many biological systems employ complex networks of vascular tubes to facilitate transport of solute nutrients, examples include the vascular system of plants (phloem), some fungi, and the slime-mold Physarum. It is believed that such networks are optimized through evolution for carrying out their designated task. We propose a set of hydrodynamic governing equations for solute transport in a complex network, and obtain the optimal network architecture for various classes of optimizing functionals. We finally discuss the topological properties and statistical mechanics of the resulting complex networks, and examine correspondence of the obtained networks to those found in actual biological systems.

  17. The NEOS server.

    SciTech Connect

    Czyzyk, J.; Mesnier, M. P.; More, J. J.; Mathematics and Computer Science

    1998-07-01

    The Network-Enabled Optimization System (NEOS) is an Internet based optimization service. The NEOS Server introduces a novel approach for solving optimization problems. Users of the NEOS Server submit a problem and their choice of optimization solver over the Internet. The NEOS Server computes all information (for example, derivatives and sparsity patterns) required by the solver, links the optimization problem with the solver, and returns a solution.

  18. Collecting and distributing wearable sensor data: an embedded personal area network to local area network gateway server.

    PubMed

    Neuhaeuser, Jakob; D'Angelo, Lorenzo T

    2013-01-01

    The goal of the concept and of the device presented in this contribution is to be able to collect sensor data from wearable sensors directly, automatically and wirelessly and to make them available over a wired local area network. Several concepts in e-health and telemedicine make use of portable and wearable sensors to collect movement or activity data. Usually these data are either collected via a wireless personal area network or using a connection to the user's smartphone. However, users might not carry smartphones on them while inside a residential building such as a nursing home or a hospital, but also within their home. Also, in such areas the use of other wireless communication technologies might be limited. The presented system is an embedded server which can be deployed in several rooms in order to ensure live data collection in bigger buildings. Also, the collection of data batches recorded out of range, as soon as a connection is established, is also possible. Both, the system concept and the realization are presented. PMID:24110771

  19. On Crowd-verification of Biological Networks.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Sam; Binder, Jean; Boue, Stephanie; Di Fabio, Anselmo; Hayes, William; Hoeng, Julia; Iskandar, Anita; Kleiman, Robin; Norel, Raquel; O'Neel, Bruce; Peitsch, Manuel C; Poussin, Carine; Pratt, Dexter; Rhrissorrakrai, Kahn; Schlage, Walter K; Stolovitzky, Gustavo; Talikka, Marja

    2013-01-01

    Biological networks with a structured syntax are a powerful way of representing biological information generated from high density data; however, they can become unwieldy to manage as their size and complexity increase. This article presents a crowd-verification approach for the visualization and expansion of biological networks. Web-based graphical interfaces allow visualization of causal and correlative biological relationships represented using Biological Expression Language (BEL). Crowdsourcing principles enable participants to communally annotate these relationships based on literature evidences. Gamification principles are incorporated to further engage domain experts throughout biology to gather robust peer-reviewed information from which relationships can be identified and verified. The resulting network models will represent the current status of biological knowledge within the defined boundaries, here processes related to human lung disease. These models are amenable to computational analysis. For some period following conclusion of the challenge, the published models will remain available for continuous use and expansion by the scientific community. PMID:24151423

  20. On Crowd-verification of Biological Networks

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Sam; Binder, Jean; Boue, Stephanie; Di Fabio, Anselmo; Hayes, William; Hoeng, Julia; Iskandar, Anita; Kleiman, Robin; Norel, Raquel; O’Neel, Bruce; Peitsch, Manuel C.; Poussin, Carine; Pratt, Dexter; Rhrissorrakrai, Kahn; Schlage, Walter K.; Stolovitzky, Gustavo; Talikka, Marja

    2013-01-01

    Biological networks with a structured syntax are a powerful way of representing biological information generated from high density data; however, they can become unwieldy to manage as their size and complexity increase. This article presents a crowd-verification approach for the visualization and expansion of biological networks. Web-based graphical interfaces allow visualization of causal and correlative biological relationships represented using Biological Expression Language (BEL). Crowdsourcing principles enable participants to communally annotate these relationships based on literature evidences. Gamification principles are incorporated to further engage domain experts throughout biology to gather robust peer-reviewed information from which relationships can be identified and verified. The resulting network models will represent the current status of biological knowledge within the defined boundaries, here processes related to human lung disease. These models are amenable to computational analysis. For some period following conclusion of the challenge, the published models will remain available for continuous use and expansion by the scientific community. PMID:24151423

  1. Managing biological networks by using text mining and computer-aided curation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Seok Jong; Cho, Yongseong; Lee, Min-Ho; Lim, Jongtae; Yoo, Jaesoo

    2015-11-01

    In order to understand a biological mechanism in a cell, a researcher should collect a huge number of protein interactions with experimental data from experiments and the literature. Text mining systems that extract biological interactions from papers have been used to construct biological networks for a few decades. Even though the text mining of literature is necessary to construct a biological network, few systems with a text mining tool are available for biologists who want to construct their own biological networks. We have developed a biological network construction system called BioKnowledge Viewer that can generate a biological interaction network by using a text mining tool and biological taggers. It also Boolean simulation software to provide a biological modeling system to simulate the model that is made with the text mining tool. A user can download PubMed articles and construct a biological network by using the Multi-level Knowledge Emergence Model (KMEM), MetaMap, and A Biomedical Named Entity Recognizer (ABNER) as a text mining tool. To evaluate the system, we constructed an aging-related biological network that consist 9,415 nodes (genes) by using manual curation. With network analysis, we found that several genes, including JNK, AP-1, and BCL-2, were highly related in aging biological network. We provide a semi-automatic curation environment so that users can obtain a graph database for managing text mining results that are generated in the server system and can navigate the network with BioKnowledge Viewer, which is freely available at http://bioknowledgeviewer.kisti.re.kr.

  2. Biological Networks for Cancer Candidate Biomarkers Discovery.

    PubMed

    Yan, Wenying; Xue, Wenjin; Chen, Jiajia; Hu, Guang

    2016-01-01

    Due to its extraordinary heterogeneity and complexity, cancer is often proposed as a model case of a systems biology disease or network disease. There is a critical need of effective biomarkers for cancer diagnosis and/or outcome prediction from system level analyses. Methods based on integrating omics data into networks have the potential to revolutionize the identification of cancer biomarkers. Deciphering the biological networks underlying cancer is undoubtedly important for understanding the molecular mechanisms of the disease and identifying effective biomarkers. In this review, the networks constructed for cancer biomarker discovery based on different omics level data are described and illustrated from recent advances in the field. PMID:27625573

  3. Biological Networks for Cancer Candidate Biomarkers Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Wenying; Xue, Wenjin; Chen, Jiajia; Hu, Guang

    2016-01-01

    Due to its extraordinary heterogeneity and complexity, cancer is often proposed as a model case of a systems biology disease or network disease. There is a critical need of effective biomarkers for cancer diagnosis and/or outcome prediction from system level analyses. Methods based on integrating omics data into networks have the potential to revolutionize the identification of cancer biomarkers. Deciphering the biological networks underlying cancer is undoubtedly important for understanding the molecular mechanisms of the disease and identifying effective biomarkers. In this review, the networks constructed for cancer biomarker discovery based on different omics level data are described and illustrated from recent advances in the field. PMID:27625573

  4. Secure data aggregation in heterogeneous and disparate networks using stand off server architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vimalathithan, S.; Sudarsan, S. D.; Seker, R.; Lenin, R. B.; Ramaswamy, S.

    2009-04-01

    The emerging global reach of technology presents myriad challenges and intricacies as Information Technology teams aim to provide anywhere, anytime and anyone access, for service providers and customers alike. The world is fraught with stifling inequalities, both from an economic as well as socio-political perspective. The net result has been large capability gaps between various organizational locations that need to work together, which has raised new challenges for information security teams. Similar issues arise, when mergers and acquisitions among and between organizations take place. While integrating remote business locations with mainstream operations, one or more of the issues including the lack of application level support, computational capabilities, communication limitations, and legal requirements cause a serious impediment thereby complicating integration while not violating the organizations' security requirements. Often resorted techniques like IPSec, tunneling, secure socket layer, etc. may not be always techno-economically feasible. This paper addresses such security issues by introducing an intermediate server between corporate central server and remote sites, called stand-off-server. We present techniques such as break-before-make connection, break connection after transfer, multiple virtual machine instances with different operating systems using the concept of a stand-off-server. Our experiments show that the proposed solution provides sufficient isolation for the central server/site from attacks arising out of weak communication and/or computing links and is simple to implement.

  5. ezBioNet: A modeling and simulation system for analyzing biological reaction networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Seok Jong; Tung, Thai Quang; Park, Junho; Lim, Jongtae; Yoo, Jaesoo

    2012-10-01

    To achieve robustness against living environments, a living organism is composed of complicated regulatory mechanisms ranging from gene regulations to signal transduction. If such life phenomena are to be understand, an integrated analysis tool that should have modeling and simulation functions for biological reactions, as well as new experimental methods for measuring biological phenomena, is fundamentally required. We have designed and implemented modeling and simulation software (ezBioNet) for analyzing biological reaction networks. The software can simultaneously perform an integrated modeling of various responses occurring in cells, ranging from gene expressions to signaling processes. To support massive analysis of biological networks, we have constructed a server-side simulation system (VCellSim) that can perform ordinary differential equations (ODE) analysis, sensitivity analysis, and parameter estimates. ezBioNet integrates the BioModel database by connecting the european bioinformatics institute (EBI) servers through Web services APIs and supports the handling of systems biology markup language (SBML) files. In addition, we employed eclipse RCP (rich client platform) which is a powerful modularity framework allowing various functional expansions. ezBioNet is intended to be an easy-to-use modeling tool, as well as a simulation system, to understand the control mechanism by monitoring the change of each component in a biological network. A researcher may perform the kinetic modeling and execute the simulation. The simulation result can be managed and visualized on ezBioNet, which is freely available at http://ezbionet.cbnu.ac.kr.

  6. Simplified models of biological networks.

    PubMed

    Sneppen, Kim; Krishna, Sandeep; Semsey, Szabolcs

    2010-01-01

    The function of living cells is controlled by complex regulatory networks that are built of a wide diversity of interacting molecular components. The sheer size and intricacy of molecular networks of even the simplest organisms are obstacles toward understanding network functionality. This review discusses the achievements and promise of a bottom-up approach that uses well-characterized subnetworks as model systems for understanding larger networks. It highlights the interplay between the structure, logic, and function of various types of small regulatory circuits. The bottom-up approach advocates understanding regulatory networks as a collection of entangled motifs. We therefore emphasize the potential of negative and positive feedback, as well as their combinations, to generate robust homeostasis, epigenetics, and oscillations. PMID:20192769

  7. Asian Network for Biological Sciences (ANBS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asian Network for Biological Sciences.

    The Asian Network for Biological Sciences (ANBS) is a group of institutions, laboratories, research centers, and scholars who are willing to cooperate in programs and activities aimed at improving teaching and research in the biological sciences. This publication: (1) outlines ANBS aims and objectives; (2) describes major activities in the past;…

  8. Network-Based Models in Molecular Biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyer, Andreas

    Biological systems are characterized by a large number of diverse interactions. Interaction maps have been used to abstract those interactions at all biological scales ranging from food webs at the ecosystem level down to protein interaction networks at the molecular scale.

  9. Quantifying evolvability in small biological networks

    SciTech Connect

    Nemenman, Ilya; Mugler, Andrew; Ziv, Etay; Wiggins, Chris H

    2008-01-01

    The authors introduce a quantitative measure of the capacity of a small biological network to evolve. The measure is applied to a stochastic description of the experimental setup of Guet et al. (Science 2002, 296, pp. 1466), treating chemical inducers as functional inputs to biochemical networks and the expression of a reporter gene as the functional output. The authors take an information-theoretic approach, allowing the system to set parameters that optimise signal processing ability, thus enumerating each network's highest-fidelity functions. All networks studied are highly evolvable by the measure, meaning that change in function has little dependence on change in parameters. Moreover, each network's functions are connected by paths in the parameter space along which information is not significantly lowered, meaning a network may continuously change its functionality without completely losing it along the way. This property further underscores the evolvability of the networks.

  10. Remote diagnosis server

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deb, Somnath (Inventor); Ghoshal, Sudipto (Inventor); Malepati, Venkata N. (Inventor); Kleinman, David L. (Inventor); Cavanaugh, Kevin F. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A network-based diagnosis server for monitoring and diagnosing a system, the server being remote from the system it is observing, comprises a sensor for generating signals indicative of a characteristic of a component of the system, a network-interfaced sensor agent coupled to the sensor for receiving signals therefrom, a broker module coupled to the network for sending signals to and receiving signals from the sensor agent, a handler application connected to the broker module for transmitting signals to and receiving signals therefrom, a reasoner application in communication with the handler application for processing, and responding to signals received from the handler application, wherein the sensor agent, broker module, handler application, and reasoner applications operate simultaneously relative to each other, such that the present invention diagnosis server performs continuous monitoring and diagnosing of said components of the system in real time. The diagnosis server is readily adaptable to various different systems.

  11. Reconstructing Causal Biological Networks through Active Learning.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyunghoon; Berger, Bonnie; Peng, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Reverse-engineering of biological networks is a central problem in systems biology. The use of intervention data, such as gene knockouts or knockdowns, is typically used for teasing apart causal relationships among genes. Under time or resource constraints, one needs to carefully choose which intervention experiments to carry out. Previous approaches for selecting most informative interventions have largely been focused on discrete Bayesian networks. However, continuous Bayesian networks are of great practical interest, especially in the study of complex biological systems and their quantitative properties. In this work, we present an efficient, information-theoretic active learning algorithm for Gaussian Bayesian networks (GBNs), which serve as important models for gene regulatory networks. In addition to providing linear-algebraic insights unique to GBNs, leading to significant runtime improvements, we demonstrate the effectiveness of our method on data simulated with GBNs and the DREAM4 network inference challenge data sets. Our method generally leads to faster recovery of underlying network structure and faster convergence to final distribution of confidence scores over candidate graph structures using the full data, in comparison to random selection of intervention experiments. PMID:26930205

  12. Reconstructing Causal Biological Networks through Active Learning

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyunghoon; Berger, Bonnie; Peng, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Reverse-engineering of biological networks is a central problem in systems biology. The use of intervention data, such as gene knockouts or knockdowns, is typically used for teasing apart causal relationships among genes. Under time or resource constraints, one needs to carefully choose which intervention experiments to carry out. Previous approaches for selecting most informative interventions have largely been focused on discrete Bayesian networks. However, continuous Bayesian networks are of great practical interest, especially in the study of complex biological systems and their quantitative properties. In this work, we present an efficient, information-theoretic active learning algorithm for Gaussian Bayesian networks (GBNs), which serve as important models for gene regulatory networks. In addition to providing linear-algebraic insights unique to GBNs, leading to significant runtime improvements, we demonstrate the effectiveness of our method on data simulated with GBNs and the DREAM4 network inference challenge data sets. Our method generally leads to faster recovery of underlying network structure and faster convergence to final distribution of confidence scores over candidate graph structures using the full data, in comparison to random selection of intervention experiments. PMID:26930205

  13. Network Reverse Engineering Approach in Synthetic Biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haoqian; Liu, Ao; Lu, Yuheng; Sheng, Ying; Wu, Qianzhu; Yin, Zhenzhen; Chen, Yiwei; Liu, Zairan; Pan, Heng; Ouyang, Qi

    2013-12-01

    Synthetic biology is a new branch of interdisciplinary science that has been developed in recent years. The main purpose of synthetic biology is to apply successful principles that have been developed in electronic and chemical engineering to develop basic biological functional modules, and through rational design, develop man-made biological systems that have predicted useful functions. Here, we discuss an important principle in rational design of functional biological circuits: the reverse engineering design. We will use a research project that was conducted at Peking University for the International Genetic Engineering Machine Competition (iGEM) to illustrate the principle: synthesis a cell which has a semi-log dose-response to the environment. Through this work we try to demonstrate the potential application of network engineering in synthetic biology.

  14. Biological and Environmental Research Network Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Balaji, V.; Boden, Tom; Cowley, Dave; Dart, Eli; Dattoria, Vince; Desai, Narayan; Egan, Rob; Foster, Ian; Goldstone, Robin; Gregurick, Susan; Houghton, John; Izaurralde, Cesar; Johnston, Bill; Joseph, Renu; Kleese-van Dam, Kerstin; Lipton, Mary; Monga, Inder; Pritchard, Matt; Rotman, Lauren; Strand, Gary; Stuart, Cory; Tatusova, Tatiana; Tierney, Brian; Thomas, Brian; Williams, Dean N.; Zurawski, Jason

    2013-09-01

    The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is the primary provider of network connectivity for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science (SC), the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States. In support of SC programs, ESnet regularly updates and refreshes its understanding of the networking requirements of the instruments, facilities, scientists, and science programs that it serves. This focus has helped ESnet be a highly successful enabler of scientific discovery for over 25 years. In November 2012, ESnet and the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) of the DOE SC organized a review to characterize the networking requirements of the programs funded by the BER program office. Several key findings resulted from the review. Among them: 1) The scale of data sets available to science collaborations continues to increase exponentially. This has broad impact, both on the network and on the computational and storage systems connected to the network. 2) Many science collaborations require assistance to cope with the systems and network engineering challenges inherent in managing the rapid growth in data scale. 3) Several science domains operate distributed facilities that rely on high-performance networking for success. Key examples illustrated in this report include the Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF) and the Systems Biology Knowledgebase (KBase). This report expands on these points, and addresses others as well. The report contains a findings section as well as the text of the case studies discussed at the review.

  15. SiBIC: a web server for generating gene set networks based on biclusters obtained by maximal frequent itemset mining.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kei-ichiro; Takigawa, Ichigaku; Mamitsuka, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Detecting biclusters from expression data is useful, since biclusters are coexpressed genes under only part of all given experimental conditions. We present a software called SiBIC, which from a given expression dataset, first exhaustively enumerates biclusters, which are then merged into rather independent biclusters, which finally are used to generate gene set networks, in which a gene set assigned to one node has coexpressed genes. We evaluated each step of this procedure: 1) significance of the generated biclusters biologically and statistically, 2) biological quality of merged biclusters, and 3) biological significance of gene set networks. We emphasize that gene set networks, in which nodes are not genes but gene sets, can be more compact than usual gene networks, meaning that gene set networks are more comprehensible. SiBIC is available at http://utrecht.kuicr.kyoto-u.ac.jp:8080/miami/faces/index.jsp. PMID:24386124

  16. SiBIC: A Web Server for Generating Gene Set Networks Based on Biclusters Obtained by Maximal Frequent Itemset Mining

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Kei-ichiro; Takigawa, Ichigaku; Mamitsuka, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Detecting biclusters from expression data is useful, since biclusters are coexpressed genes under only part of all given experimental conditions. We present a software called SiBIC, which from a given expression dataset, first exhaustively enumerates biclusters, which are then merged into rather independent biclusters, which finally are used to generate gene set networks, in which a gene set assigned to one node has coexpressed genes. We evaluated each step of this procedure: 1) significance of the generated biclusters biologically and statistically, 2) biological quality of merged biclusters, and 3) biological significance of gene set networks. We emphasize that gene set networks, in which nodes are not genes but gene sets, can be more compact than usual gene networks, meaning that gene set networks are more comprehensible. SiBIC is available at http://utrecht.kuicr.kyoto-u.ac.jp:8080/miami/faces/index.jsp. PMID:24386124

  17. Structural determinants of criticality in biological networks

    PubMed Central

    Valverde, Sergi; Ohse, Sebastian; Turalska, Malgorzata; West, Bruce J.; Garcia-Ojalvo, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Many adaptive evolutionary systems display spatial and temporal features, such as long-range correlations, typically associated with the critical point of a phase transition in statistical physics. Empirical and theoretical studies suggest that operating near criticality enhances the functionality of biological networks, such as brain and gene networks, in terms for instance of information processing, robustness, and evolvability. While previous studies have explained criticality with specific system features, we still lack a general theory of critical behavior in biological systems. Here we look at this problem from the complex systems perspective, since in principle all critical biological circuits have in common the fact that their internal organization can be described as a complex network. An important question is how self-similar structure influences self-similar dynamics. Modularity and heterogeneity, for instance, affect the location of critical points and can be used to tune the system toward criticality. We review and discuss recent studies on the criticality of neuronal and genetic networks, and discuss the implications of network theory when assessing the evolutionary features of criticality. PMID:26005422

  18. Theoretical knock-outs on biological networks.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Pedro J; de S Pinto, Sandro E; Baptista, Murilo S; La Guardia, Giuliano G

    2016-08-21

    In this work we redefine the concept of biological importance and how to compute it, based on a model of complex networks and random walk. We call this new procedure, theoretical knock-out (KO). The proposed method generalizes the procedure presented in a recent study about Oral Tolerance. To devise this method, we make two approaches: algebraically and algorithmically. In both cases we compute a vector on an asymptotic state, called flux vector. The flux is given by a random walk on a directed graph that represents a biological phenomenon. This vector gives us the information about the relative flux of walkers on a vertex which represents a biological agent. With two vector of this kind, we can calculate the relative mean error between them by averaging over its coefficients. This quantity allows us to assess the degree of importance of each vertex of a complex network that evolves in time and has experimental background. We find out that this procedure can be applied in any sort of biological phenomena in which we can know the role and interrelationships of its agents. These results also provide experimental biologists to predict the order of importance of biological agents on a mounted complex network. PMID:27188251

  19. Discovery of Chemical Toxicity via Biological Networks and Systems Biology

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, Edward; Habib, Tanwir; Guan, Xin; Escalon, Barbara; Falciani, Francesco; Chipman, J.K.; Antczak, Philipp; Edwards, Stephen; Taylor, Ronald C.; Vulpe, Chris; Loguinov, Alexandre; Van Aggelen, Graham; Villeneuve, Daniel L.; Garcia-Reyero, Natalia

    2010-09-30

    Both soldiers and animals are exposed to many chemicals as the result of military activities. Tools are needed to understand the hazards and risks that chemicals and new materials pose to soldiers and the environment. We have investigated the potential of global gene regulatory networks in understanding the impact of chemicals on reproduction. We characterized effects of chemicals on ovaries of the model animal system, the Fathead minnow (Pimopheles promelas) connecting chemical impacts on gene expression to circulating blood levels of the hormones testosterone and estradiol in addition to the egg yolk protein vitellogenin. We describe the application of reverse engineering complex interaction networks from high dimensional gene expression data to characterize chemicals that disrupt the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal endocrine axis that governs reproduction in fathead minnows. The construction of global gene regulatory networks provides deep insights into how drugs and chemicals effect key organs and biological pathways.

  20. Review of Biological Network Data and Its Applications

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Donghyeon; Kim, MinSoo; Xiao, Guanghua

    2013-01-01

    Studying biological networks, such as protein-protein interactions, is key to understanding complex biological activities. Various types of large-scale biological datasets have been collected and analyzed with high-throughput technologies, including DNA microarray, next-generation sequencing, and the two-hybrid screening system, for this purpose. In this review, we focus on network-based approaches that help in understanding biological systems and identifying biological functions. Accordingly, this paper covers two major topics in network biology: reconstruction of gene regulatory networks and network-based applications, including protein function prediction, disease gene prioritization, and network-based genome-wide association study. PMID:24465231

  1. Application of graph colouring to biological networks.

    PubMed

    Khor, S

    2010-05-01

    The author explores the application of graph colouring to biological networks, specifically protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks. First, the author finds that given similar conditions (i.e. graph size, degree distribution and clustering), fewer colours are needed to colour disassortative than assortative networks. Fewer colours create fewer independent sets which in turn imply higher concurrency potential for a network. Since PPI networks tend to be disassortative, the author suggests that in addition to functional specificity and stability proposed previously by Maslov and Sneppen (Science, 296, 2002), the disassortative nature of PPI networks may promote the ability of cells to perform multiple, crucial and functionally diverse tasks concurrently. Second, because graph colouring is closely related to the presence of cliques in a graph, the significance of node colouring information to the problem of identifying protein complexes (dense subgraphs in PPI networks), is investigated. The author finds that for PPI networks where 1-11% of nodes participate in at least one identified protein complex, such as H. sapien, DSATUR (a well-known complete graph colouring algorithm) node colouring information can improve the quality (homogeneity and separation) of initial candidate complexes. This finding may help improve existing protein complex detection methods, and/or suggest new methods. [Includes supplementary material]. PMID:20499999

  2. BIOLOGICAL NETWORK EXPLORATION WITH CYTOSCAPE 3

    PubMed Central

    Su, Gang; Morris, John H.; Demchak, Barry; Bader, Gary D.

    2014-01-01

    Cytoscape is one of the most popular open-source software tools for the visual exploration of biomedical networks composed of protein, gene and other types of interactions. It offers researchers a versatile and interactive visualization interface for exploring complex biological interconnections supported by diverse annotation and experimental data, thereby facilitating research tasks such as predicting gene function and pathway construction. Cytoscape provides core functionality to load, visualize, search, filter and save networks, and hundreds of Apps extend this functionality to address specific research needs. The latest generation of Cytoscape (version 3.0 and later) has substantial improvements in function, user interface and performance relative to previous versions. This protocol aims to jump-start new users with specific protocols for basic Cytoscape functions, such as installing Cytoscape and Cytoscape Apps, loading data, visualizing and navigating the network, visualizing network associated data (attributes) and identifying clusters. It also highlights new features that benefit experienced users. PMID:25199793

  3. Some physics problems in biological networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialek, William

    2007-03-01

    Most of the interesting things that happen in living organisms require interactions among many components, and it is convenient to think of these as a ``network'' of interactions. We use this language at the level of single molecules (the network of interactions among amino acids that determine protein structure), single cells (the network of protein-DNA interactions responsible for the regulation of gene expression) and complex multicellular organisms (the networks of neurons in our brain). In this talk I'll try to look at two very different kinds of theoretical physics problems that arise in thinking about such networks. The first problems are phenomenological: Given what our experimentalists friends can measure, can we generate a global view of network function and dynamics? I'll argue that maximum entropy methods can be useful here, and show how such methods have been used in very recent work on networks of neurons, enzymes, genes and (in disguise) amino acids. In this line of reasoning there are of course interesting connections to statistical mechanics, and we'll see that natural statistical mechanics questions about the underlying models actually teach us something about how the real biological system works, in ways that will be tested through new experiments. In the second half of the talk I'll ask if there are principles from which we might actually be able to predict the structure and dynamics of biological networks. I'll focus on optimization principles, in particular the optimization of information flow in transcriptional regulation. Even setting up these arguments forces us to think critically about our understanding of the signals, specificity and noise in these systems, all current topics of research. Although we don't know if we have the right principles, trying to work out the consequences of such optimization again suggests new experiments.

  4. Random networks created by biological evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slanina, František; Kotrla, Miroslav

    2000-11-01

    We investigate a model of an evolving random network, introduced by us previously [Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 5587 (1999)]. The model is a generalization of the Bak-Sneppen model of biological evolution, with the modification that the underlying network can evolve by adding and removing sites. The behavior and the averaged properties of the network depend on the parameter p, the probability to establish a link to the newly introduced site. For p=1 the system is self-organized critical, with two distinct power-law regimes with forward-avalanche exponents τ=1.98+/-0.04 and τ'=1.65+/-0.05. The average size of the network diverges as a powerlaw when p-->1. We study various geometrical properties of the network: the probability distribution of sizes and connectivities, size and number of disconnected clusters, and the dependence of the mean distance between two sites on the cluster size. The connection with models of growing networks with a preferential attachment is discussed.

  5. Adaptation and optimization of biological transport networks.

    PubMed

    Hu, Dan; Cai, David

    2013-09-27

    It has been hypothesized that topological structures of biological transport networks are consequences of energy optimization. Motivated by experimental observation, we propose that adaptation dynamics may underlie this optimization. In contrast to the global nature of optimization, our adaptation dynamics responds only to local information and can naturally incorporate fluctuations in flow distributions. The adaptation dynamics minimizes the global energy consumption to produce optimal networks, which may possess hierarchical loop structures in the presence of strong fluctuations in flow distribution. We further show that there may exist a new phase transition as there is a critical open probability of sinks, above which there are only trees for network structures whereas below which loops begin to emerge. PMID:24116821

  6. Comparing artificial and biological dynamical neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAulay, Alastair D.

    2006-05-01

    Modern computers can be made more friendly and otherwise improved by making them behave more like humans. Perhaps we can learn how to do this from biology in which human brains evolved over a long period of time. Therefore, we first explain a commonly used biological neural network (BNN) model, the Wilson-Cowan neural oscillator, that has cross-coupled excitatory (positive) and inhibitory (negative) neurons. The two types of neurons are used for frequency modulation communication between neurons which provides immunity to electromagnetic interference. We then evolve, for the first time, an artificial neural network (ANN) to perform the same task. Two dynamical feed-forward artificial neural networks use cross-coupling feedback (like that in a flip-flop) to form an ANN nonlinear dynamic neural oscillator with the same equations as the Wilson-Cowan neural oscillator. Finally we show, through simulation, that the equations perform the basic neural threshold function, switching between stable zero output and a stable oscillation, that is a stable limit cycle. Optical implementation with an injected laser diode and future research are discussed.

  7. New scaling relation for information transfer in biological networks.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunju; Davies, Paul; Walker, Sara Imari

    2015-12-01

    We quantify characteristics of the informational architecture of two representative biological networks: the Boolean network model for the cell-cycle regulatory network of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe (Davidich et al. 2008 PLoS ONE 3, e1672 (doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0001672)) and that of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Li et al. 2004 Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 101, 4781-4786 (doi:10.1073/pnas.0305937101)). We compare our results for these biological networks with the same analysis performed on ensembles of two different types of random networks: Erdös-Rényi and scale-free. We show that both biological networks share features in common that are not shared by either random network ensemble. In particular, the biological networks in our study process more information than the random networks on average. Both biological networks also exhibit a scaling relation in information transferred between nodes that distinguishes them from random, where the biological networks stand out as distinct even when compared with random networks that share important topological properties, such as degree distribution, with the biological network. We show that the most biologically distinct regime of this scaling relation is associated with a subset of control nodes that regulate the dynamics and function of each respective biological network. Information processing in biological networks is therefore interpreted as an emergent property of topology (causal structure) and dynamics (function). Our results demonstrate quantitatively how the informational architecture of biologically evolved networks can distinguish them from other classes of network architecture that do not share the same informational properties. PMID:26701883

  8. DelPhi Web Server: A comprehensive online suite for electrostatic calculations of biological macromolecules and their complexes

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Subhra; Witham, Shawn; Zhang, Jie; Zhenirovskyy, Maxim; Rocchia, Walter; Alexov, Emil

    2011-01-01

    Here we report a web server, the DelPhi web server, which utilizes DelPhi program to calculate electrostatic energies and the corresponding electrostatic potential and ionic distributions, and dielectric map. The server provides extra services to fix structural defects, as missing atoms in the structural file and allows for generation of missing hydrogen atoms. The hydrogen placement and the corresponding DelPhi calculations can be done with user selected force field parameters being either Charmm22, Amber98 or OPLS. Upon completion of the calculations, the user is given option to download fixed and protonated structural file, together with the parameter and Delphi output files for further analysis. Utilizing Jmol viewer, the user can see the corresponding structural file, to manipulate it and to change the presentation. In addition, if the potential map is requested to be calculated, the potential can be mapped onto the molecule surface. The DelPhi web server is available from http://compbio.clemson.edu/delphi_webserver. PMID:24683424

  9. Noncommutative Biology: Sequential Regulation of Complex Networks

    PubMed Central

    Letsou, William; Cai, Long

    2016-01-01

    Single-cell variability in gene expression is important for generating distinct cell types, but it is unclear how cells use the same set of regulatory molecules to specifically control similarly regulated genes. While combinatorial binding of transcription factors at promoters has been proposed as a solution for cell-type specific gene expression, we found that such models resulted in substantial information bottlenecks. We sought to understand the consequences of adopting sequential logic wherein the time-ordering of factors informs the final outcome. We showed that with noncommutative control, it is possible to independently control targets that would otherwise be activated simultaneously using combinatorial logic. Consequently, sequential logic overcomes the information bottleneck inherent in complex networks. We derived scaling laws for two noncommutative models of regulation, motivated by phosphorylation/neural networks and chromosome folding, respectively, and showed that they scale super-exponentially in the number of regulators. We also showed that specificity in control is robust to the loss of a regulator. Lastly, we connected these theoretical results to real biological networks that demonstrate specificity in the context of promiscuity. These results show that achieving a desired outcome often necessitates roundabout steps. PMID:27560383

  10. Noncommutative Biology: Sequential Regulation of Complex Networks.

    PubMed

    Letsou, William; Cai, Long

    2016-08-01

    Single-cell variability in gene expression is important for generating distinct cell types, but it is unclear how cells use the same set of regulatory molecules to specifically control similarly regulated genes. While combinatorial binding of transcription factors at promoters has been proposed as a solution for cell-type specific gene expression, we found that such models resulted in substantial information bottlenecks. We sought to understand the consequences of adopting sequential logic wherein the time-ordering of factors informs the final outcome. We showed that with noncommutative control, it is possible to independently control targets that would otherwise be activated simultaneously using combinatorial logic. Consequently, sequential logic overcomes the information bottleneck inherent in complex networks. We derived scaling laws for two noncommutative models of regulation, motivated by phosphorylation/neural networks and chromosome folding, respectively, and showed that they scale super-exponentially in the number of regulators. We also showed that specificity in control is robust to the loss of a regulator. Lastly, we connected these theoretical results to real biological networks that demonstrate specificity in the context of promiscuity. These results show that achieving a desired outcome often necessitates roundabout steps. PMID:27560383

  11. FNTM: a server for predicting functional networks of tissues in mouse.

    PubMed

    Goya, Jonathan; Wong, Aaron K; Yao, Victoria; Krishnan, Arjun; Homilius, Max; Troyanskaya, Olga G

    2015-07-01

    Functional Networks of Tissues in Mouse (FNTM) provides biomedical researchers with tissue-specific predictions of functional relationships between proteins in the most widely used model organism for human disease, the laboratory mouse. Users can explore FNTM-predicted functional relationships for their tissues and genes of interest or examine gene function and interaction predictions across multiple tissues, all through an interactive, multi-tissue network browser. FNTM makes predictions based on integration of a variety of functional genomic data, including over 13 000 gene expression experiments, and prior knowledge of gene function. FNTM is an ideal starting point for clinical and translational researchers considering a mouse model for their disease of interest, researchers already working with mouse models who are interested in discovering new genes related to their pathways or phenotypes of interest, and biologists working with other organisms to explore the functional relationships of their genes of interest in specific mouse tissue contexts. FNTM predicts tissue-specific functional relationships in 200 tissues, does not require any registration or installation and is freely available for use at http://fntm.princeton.edu. PMID:25940632

  12. Irregularity and asynchrony in biologic network signals.

    PubMed

    Pincus, S M

    2000-01-01

    ; "r" is chosen as a fixed percentage (often 20%) of the subject's SD. This version of ApEn has the property that it is decorrelated from process SD--it remains unchanged under uniform process magnification, reduction, and translation (shift by a constant). Cross-ApEn is generally applied to compare sequences from two distinct yet interwined variables in a network. Thus we can directly assess network, and not just nodal, evolution, under different settings--e.g., to directly evaluate uncoupling and/or changes in feedback and control. Hence, cross-ApEn facilitates analyses of output from myriad complicated networks, avoiding the requirement to fully model the underlying system. This is especially important, since accurate modeling of (biological) networks is often nearly impossible. Algorithmically and insofar as implementation and reproducibility properties are concerned, cross-ApEn is thematically similar to ApEn. Furthermore, cross-ApEn is shown to be complementary to the two most prominent statistical means of assessing multivariate series, correlation and power spectral methodologies. In particular, we highlight, both theoretically and by case study examples, the many physiological feedback and/or control systems and models for which cross-ApEn can detect significant changes in bivariate asynchrony, yet for which cross-correlation and cross-spectral methods fail to clearly highlight markedly changing features of the data sets under consideration. Finally, we introduce spatial ApEn, which appears to have considerable potential, both theoretically and empirically, in evaluating multidimensional lattice structures, to discern and quantify the extent of changing patterns, and for the emergence and dissolution of traveling waves, throughout multiple contexts within biology and chemistry. PMID:10909056

  13. Centrality Analysis Methods for Biological Networks and Their Application to Gene Regulatory Networks

    PubMed Central

    Koschützki, Dirk; Schreiber, Falk

    2008-01-01

    The structural analysis of biological networks includes the ranking of the vertices based on the connection structure of a network. To support this analysis we discuss centrality measures which indicate the importance of vertices, and demonstrate their applicability on a gene regulatory network. We show that common centrality measures result in different valuations of the vertices and that novel measures tailored to specific biological investigations are useful for the analysis of biological networks, in particular gene regulatory networks. PMID:19787083

  14. Secure IRC Server

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, Marcia

    2003-08-25

    The IRCD is an IRC server that was originally distributed by the IRCD Hybrid developer team for use as a server in IRC message over the public Internet. By supporting the IRC protocol defined in the IRC RFC, IRCD allows the users to create and join channels for group or one-to-one text-based instant messaging. It stores information about channels (e.g., whether it is public, secret, or invite-only, the topic set, membership) and users (who is online and what channels they are members of). It receives messages for a specific user or channel and forwards these messages to the targeted destination. Since server-to-server communication is also supported, these targeted destinations may be connected to different IRC servers. Messages are exchanged over TCP connections that remain open between the client and the server. The IRCD is being used within the Pervasive Computing Collaboration Environment (PCCE) as the 'chat server' for message exchange over public and private channels. After an LBNLSecureMessaging(PCCE chat) client has been authenticated, the client connects to IRCD with its assigned nickname or 'nick.' The client can then create or join channels for group discussions or one-to-one conversations. These channels can have an initial mode of public or invite-only and the mode may be changed after creation. If a channel is public, any one online can join the discussion; if a channel is invite-only, users can only join if existing members of the channel explicity invite them. Users can be invited to any type of channel and users may be members of multiple channels simultaneously. For use with the PCCE environment, the IRCD application (which was written in C) was ported to Linux and has been tested and installed under Linux Redhat 7.2. The source code was also modified with SSL so that all messages exchanged over the network are encrypted. This modified IRC server also verifies with an authentication server that the client is who he or she claims to be and that

  15. Secure IRC Server

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2003-08-25

    The IRCD is an IRC server that was originally distributed by the IRCD Hybrid developer team for use as a server in IRC message over the public Internet. By supporting the IRC protocol defined in the IRC RFC, IRCD allows the users to create and join channels for group or one-to-one text-based instant messaging. It stores information about channels (e.g., whether it is public, secret, or invite-only, the topic set, membership) and users (who ismore » online and what channels they are members of). It receives messages for a specific user or channel and forwards these messages to the targeted destination. Since server-to-server communication is also supported, these targeted destinations may be connected to different IRC servers. Messages are exchanged over TCP connections that remain open between the client and the server. The IRCD is being used within the Pervasive Computing Collaboration Environment (PCCE) as the 'chat server' for message exchange over public and private channels. After an LBNLSecureMessaging(PCCE chat) client has been authenticated, the client connects to IRCD with its assigned nickname or 'nick.' The client can then create or join channels for group discussions or one-to-one conversations. These channels can have an initial mode of public or invite-only and the mode may be changed after creation. If a channel is public, any one online can join the discussion; if a channel is invite-only, users can only join if existing members of the channel explicity invite them. Users can be invited to any type of channel and users may be members of multiple channels simultaneously. For use with the PCCE environment, the IRCD application (which was written in C) was ported to Linux and has been tested and installed under Linux Redhat 7.2. The source code was also modified with SSL so that all messages exchanged over the network are encrypted. This modified IRC server also verifies with an authentication server that the client is who he or she claims to be and

  16. Topological implications of negative curvature for biological and social networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Réka; DasGupta, Bhaskar; Mobasheri, Nasim

    2014-03-01

    Network measures that reflect the most salient properties of complex large-scale networks are in high demand in the network research community. In this paper we adapt a combinatorial measure of negative curvature (also called hyperbolicity) to parametrized finite networks, and show that a variety of biological and social networks are hyperbolic. This hyperbolicity property has strong implications on the higher-order connectivity and other topological properties of these networks. Specifically, we derive and prove bounds on the distance among shortest or approximately shortest paths in hyperbolic networks. We describe two implications of these bounds to crosstalk in biological networks, and to the existence of central, influential neighborhoods in both biological and social networks.

  17. SU-E-I-75: Development of New Biological Fingerprints for Patient Recognition to Identify Misfiled Images in a PACS Server

    SciTech Connect

    Shimizu, Y; Yoon, Y; Iwase, K; Yasumatsu, S; Matsunobu, Y; Morishita, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: We are trying to develop an image-searching technique to identify misfiled images in a picture archiving and communication system (PACS) server by using five biological fingerprints: the whole lung field, cardiac shadow, superior mediastinum, lung apex, and right lower lung. Each biological fingerprint in a chest radiograph includes distinctive anatomical structures to identify misfiled images. The whole lung field was less effective for evaluating the similarity between two images than the other biological fingerprints. This was mainly due to the variation in the positioning for chest radiographs. The purpose of this study is to develop new biological fingerprints that could reduce influence of differences in the positioning for chest radiography. Methods: Two hundred patients were selected randomly from our database (36,212 patients). These patients had two images each (current and previous images). Current images were used as the misfiled images in this study. A circumscribed rectangular area of the lung and the upper half of the rectangle were selected automatically as new biological fingerprints. These biological fingerprints were matched to all previous images in the database. The degrees of similarity between the two images were calculated for the same and different patients. The usefulness of new the biological fingerprints for automated patient recognition was examined in terms of receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Results: Area under the ROC curves (AUCs) for the circumscribed rectangle of the lung, upper half of the rectangle, and whole lung field were 0.980, 0.994, and 0.950, respectively. The new biological fingerprints showed better performance in identifying the patients correctly than the whole lung field. Conclusion: We have developed new biological fingerprints: circumscribed rectangle of the lung and upper half of the rectangle. These new biological fingerprints would be useful for automated patient identification system

  18. Computer-Based Semantic Network in Molecular Biology: A Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callman, Joshua L.; And Others

    This paper analyzes the hardware and software features that would be desirable in a computer-based semantic network system for representing biology knowledge. It then describes in detail a prototype network of molecular biology knowledge that has been developed using Filevision software and a Macintosh computer. The prototype contains about 100…

  19. Analyzing large biological datasets with association networks

    SciTech Connect

    Karpinets, T. V.; Park, B. H.; Uberbacher, E. C.

    2012-05-25

    Due to advances in high throughput biotechnologies biological information is being collected in databases at an amazing rate, requiring novel computational approaches for timely processing of the collected data into new knowledge. In this study we address this problem by developing a new approach for discovering modular structure, relationships and regularities in complex data. These goals are achieved by converting records of biological annotations of an object, like organism, gene, chemical, sequence, into networks (Anets) and rules (Arules) of the associated annotations. Anets are based on similarity of annotation profiles of objects and can be further analyzed and visualized providing a compact birds-eye view of most significant relationships in the collected data and a way of their clustering and classification. Arules are generated by Apriori considering each record of annotations as a transaction and augmenting each annotation item by its type. Arules provide a way to validate relationships discovered by Anets producing comprehensive statistics on frequently associated annotations and specific confident relationships among them. A combination of Anets and Arules represents condensed information on associations among the collected data, helping to discover new knowledge and generate hypothesis. As an example we have applied the approach to analyze bacterial metadata from the Genomes OnLine Database. The analysis allowed us to produce a map of sequenced bacterial and archaeal organisms based on their genomic, metabolic and physiological characteristics with three major clusters of metadata representing bacterial pathogens, environmental isolates, and plant symbionts. A signature profile of clustered annotations of environmental bacteria if compared with pathogens linked the aerobic respiration, the high GC content and the large genome size to diversity of metabolic activities and physiological features of the organisms.

  20. Biology Question Generation from a Semantic Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lishan

    Science instructors need questions for use in exams, homework assignments, class discussions, reviews, and other instructional activities. Textbooks never have enough questions, so instructors must find them from other sources or generate their own questions. In order to supply instructors with biology questions, a semantic network approach was developed for generating open response biology questions. The generated questions were compared to professional authorized questions. To boost students' learning experience, adaptive selection was built on the generated questions. Bayesian Knowledge Tracing was used as embedded assessment of the student's current competence so that a suitable question could be selected based on the student's previous performance. A between-subjects experiment with 42 participants was performed, where half of the participants studied with adaptive selected questions and the rest studied with mal-adaptive order of questions. Both groups significantly improved their test scores, and the participants in adaptive group registered larger learning gains than participants in the control group. To explore the possibility of generating rich instructional feedback for machine-generated questions, a question-paragraph mapping task was identified. Given a set of questions and a list of paragraphs for a textbook, the goal of the task was to map the related paragraphs to each question. An algorithm was developed whose performance was comparable to human annotators. A multiple-choice question with high quality distractors (incorrect answers) can be pedagogically valuable as well as being much easier to grade than open-response questions. Thus, an algorithm was developed to generate good distractors for multiple-choice questions. The machine-generated multiple-choice questions were compared to human-generated questions in terms of three measures: question difficulty, question discrimination and distractor usefulness. By recruiting 200 participants from

  1. Systems Biology in the Context of Big Data and Networks

    PubMed Central

    Altaf-Ul-Amin, Md.; Afendi, Farit Mochamad; Kiboi, Samuel Kuria; Kanaya, Shigehiko

    2014-01-01

    Science is going through two rapidly changing phenomena: one is the increasing capabilities of the computers and software tools from terabytes to petabytes and beyond, and the other is the advancement in high-throughput molecular biology producing piles of data related to genomes, transcriptomes, proteomes, metabolomes, interactomes, and so on. Biology has become a data intensive science and as a consequence biology and computer science have become complementary to each other bridged by other branches of science such as statistics, mathematics, physics, and chemistry. The combination of versatile knowledge has caused the advent of big-data biology, network biology, and other new branches of biology. Network biology for instance facilitates the system-level understanding of the cell or cellular components and subprocesses. It is often also referred to as systems biology. The purpose of this field is to understand organisms or cells as a whole at various levels of functions and mechanisms. Systems biology is now facing the challenges of analyzing big molecular biological data and huge biological networks. This review gives an overview of the progress in big-data biology, and data handling and also introduces some applications of networks and multivariate analysis in systems biology. PMID:24982882

  2. BioNSi: A Discrete Biological Network Simulator Tool.

    PubMed

    Rubinstein, Amir; Bracha, Noga; Rudner, Liat; Zucker, Noga; Sloin, Hadas E; Chor, Benny

    2016-08-01

    Modeling and simulation of biological networks is an effective and widely used research methodology. The Biological Network Simulator (BioNSi) is a tool for modeling biological networks and simulating their discrete-time dynamics, implemented as a Cytoscape App. BioNSi includes a visual representation of the network that enables researchers to construct, set the parameters, and observe network behavior under various conditions. To construct a network instance in BioNSi, only partial, qualitative biological data suffices. The tool is aimed for use by experimental biologists and requires no prior computational or mathematical expertise. BioNSi is freely available at http://bionsi.wix.com/bionsi , where a complete user guide and a step-by-step manual can also be found. PMID:27354160

  3. Discovery of biological networks from diverse functional genomic data

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Chad L; Robson, Drew; Wible, Adam; Hibbs, Matthew A; Chiriac, Camelia; Theesfeld, Chandra L; Dolinski, Kara; Troyanskaya, Olga G

    2005-01-01

    We have developed a general probabilistic system for query-based discovery of pathway-specific networks through integration of diverse genome-wide data. This framework was validated by accurately recovering known networks for 31 biological processes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and experimentally verifying predictions for the process of chromosomal segregation. Our system, bioPIXIE, a public, comprehensive system for integration, analysis, and visualization of biological network predictions for S. cerevisiae, is freely accessible over the worldwide web. PMID:16420673

  4. The GeneMANIA prediction server: biological network integration for gene prioritization and predicting gene function.

    PubMed

    Warde-Farley, David; Donaldson, Sylva L; Comes, Ovi; Zuberi, Khalid; Badrawi, Rashad; Chao, Pauline; Franz, Max; Grouios, Chris; Kazi, Farzana; Lopes, Christian Tannus; Maitland, Anson; Mostafavi, Sara; Montojo, Jason; Shao, Quentin; Wright, George; Bader, Gary D; Morris, Quaid

    2010-07-01

    GeneMANIA (http://www.genemania.org) is a flexible, user-friendly web interface for generating hypotheses about gene function, analyzing gene lists and prioritizing genes for functional assays. Given a query list, GeneMANIA extends the list with functionally similar genes that it identifies using available genomics and proteomics data. GeneMANIA also reports weights that indicate the predictive value of each selected data set for the query. Six organisms are currently supported (Arabidopsis thaliana, Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster, Mus musculus, Homo sapiens and Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and hundreds of data sets have been collected from GEO, BioGRID, Pathway Commons and I2D, as well as organism-specific functional genomics data sets. Users can select arbitrary subsets of the data sets associated with an organism to perform their analyses and can upload their own data sets to analyze. The GeneMANIA algorithm performs as well or better than other gene function prediction methods on yeast and mouse benchmarks. The high accuracy of the GeneMANIA prediction algorithm, an intuitive user interface and large database make GeneMANIA a useful tool for any biologist. PMID:20576703

  5. Causal biological network database: a comprehensive platform of causal biological network models focused on the pulmonary and vascular systems

    PubMed Central

    Boué, Stéphanie; Talikka, Marja; Westra, Jurjen Willem; Hayes, William; Di Fabio, Anselmo; Park, Jennifer; Schlage, Walter K.; Sewer, Alain; Fields, Brett; Ansari, Sam; Martin, Florian; Veljkovic, Emilija; Kenney, Renee; Peitsch, Manuel C.; Hoeng, Julia

    2015-01-01

    With the wealth of publications and data available, powerful and transparent computational approaches are required to represent measured data and scientific knowledge in a computable and searchable format. We developed a set of biological network models, scripted in the Biological Expression Language, that reflect causal signaling pathways across a wide range of biological processes, including cell fate, cell stress, cell proliferation, inflammation, tissue repair and angiogenesis in the pulmonary and cardiovascular context. This comprehensive collection of networks is now freely available to the scientific community in a centralized web-based repository, the Causal Biological Network database, which is composed of over 120 manually curated and well annotated biological network models and can be accessed at http://causalbionet.com. The website accesses a MongoDB, which stores all versions of the networks as JSON objects and allows users to search for genes, proteins, biological processes, small molecules and keywords in the network descriptions to retrieve biological networks of interest. The content of the networks can be visualized and browsed. Nodes and edges can be filtered and all supporting evidence for the edges can be browsed and is linked to the original articles in PubMed. Moreover, networks may be downloaded for further visualization and evaluation. Database URL: http://causalbionet.com PMID:25887162

  6. BioFNet: biological functional network database for analysis and synthesis of biological systems.

    PubMed

    Kurata, Hiroyuki; Maeda, Kazuhiro; Onaka, Toshikazu; Takata, Takenori

    2014-09-01

    In synthetic biology and systems biology, a bottom-up approach can be used to construct a complex, modular, hierarchical structure of biological networks. To analyze or design such networks, it is critical to understand the relationship between network structure and function, the mechanism through which biological parts or biomolecules are assembled into building blocks or functional networks. A functional network is defined as a subnetwork of biomolecules that performs a particular function. Understanding the mechanism of building functional networks would help develop a methodology for analyzing the structure of large-scale networks and design a robust biological circuit to perform a target function. We propose a biological functional network database, named BioFNet, which can cover the whole cell at the level of molecular interactions. The BioFNet takes an advantage in implementing the simulation program for the mathematical models of the functional networks, visualizing the simulated results. It presents a sound basis for rational design of biochemical networks and for understanding how functional networks are assembled to create complex high-level functions, which would reveal design principles underlying molecular architectures. PMID:23894104

  7. On the Interplay between the Evolvability and Network Robustness in an Evolutionary Biological Network: A Systems Biology Approach

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bor-Sen; Lin, Ying-Po

    2011-01-01

    In the evolutionary process, the random transmission and mutation of genes provide biological diversities for natural selection. In order to preserve functional phenotypes between generations, gene networks need to evolve robustly under the influence of random perturbations. Therefore, the robustness of the phenotype, in the evolutionary process, exerts a selection force on gene networks to keep network functions. However, gene networks need to adjust, by variations in genetic content, to generate phenotypes for new challenges in the network’s evolution, ie, the evolvability. Hence, there should be some interplay between the evolvability and network robustness in evolutionary gene networks. In this study, the interplay between the evolvability and network robustness of a gene network and a biochemical network is discussed from a nonlinear stochastic system point of view. It was found that if the genetic robustness plus environmental robustness is less than the network robustness, the phenotype of the biological network is robust in evolution. The tradeoff between the genetic robustness and environmental robustness in evolution is discussed from the stochastic stability robustness and sensitivity of the nonlinear stochastic biological network, which may be relevant to the statistical tradeoff between bias and variance, the so-called bias/variance dilemma. Further, the tradeoff could be considered as an antagonistic pleiotropic action of a gene network and discussed from the systems biology perspective. PMID:22084563

  8. Organization principles of biological networks: An explorative study.

    PubMed

    Kohestani, Havva; Giuliani, Alessandro

    2016-03-01

    The definition of general topological principles allowing for graph characterization is an important pre-requisite for investigating structure-function relationships in biological networks. Here we approached the problem by means of an explorative, data-driven strategy, building upon a size-balanced data set made of around 200 distinct biological networks from seven functional classes and simulated networks coming from three mathematical graph models. A clear link between topological structure and biological function did emerge in terms of class membership prediction (average 67% of correct predictions, p<0.0001) with a varying degree of 'peculiarity' across classes going from a very low (25%) recognition efficiency for neural and brain networks to the extremely high (80%) peculiarity of amino acid-amino acid interaction (AAI) networks. We recognized four main dimensions (principal components) as main organization principles of biological networks. These components allowed for an efficient description of network architectures and for the identification of 'not-physiological' (in this case cancer metabolic networks acting as test set) wiring patterns. We highlighted as well the need of developing new theoretical generative models for biological networks overcoming the limitations of present mathematical graph idealizations. PMID:26845173

  9. A Biologically Inspired Network Design Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoge; Adamatzky, Andrew; Chan, Felix T.S.; Deng, Yong; Yang, Hai; Yang, Xin-She; Tsompanas, Michail-Antisthenis I.; Sirakoulis, Georgios Ch.; Mahadevan, Sankaran

    2015-01-01

    A network design problem is to select a subset of links in a transport network that satisfy passengers or cargo transportation demands while minimizing the overall costs of the transportation. We propose a mathematical model of the foraging behaviour of slime mould P. polycephalum to solve the network design problem and construct optimal transport networks. In our algorithm, a traffic flow between any two cities is estimated using a gravity model. The flow is imitated by the model of the slime mould. The algorithm model converges to a steady state, which represents a solution of the problem. We validate our approach on examples of major transport networks in Mexico and China. By comparing networks developed in our approach with the man-made highways, networks developed by the slime mould, and a cellular automata model inspired by slime mould, we demonstrate the flexibility and efficiency of our approach. PMID:26041508

  10. Biological solutions to transport network design.

    PubMed

    Bebber, Daniel P; Hynes, Juliet; Darrah, Peter R; Boddy, Lynne; Fricker, Mark D

    2007-09-22

    Transport networks are vital components of multicellular organisms, distributing nutrients and removing waste products. Animal and plant transport systems are branching trees whose architecture is linked to universal scaling laws in these organisms. In contrast, many fungi form reticulated mycelia via the branching and fusion of thread-like hyphae that continuously adapt to the environment. Fungal networks have evolved to explore and exploit a patchy environment, rather than ramify through a three-dimensional organism. However, there has been no explicit analysis of the network structures formed, their dynamic behaviour nor how either impact on their ecological function. Using the woodland saprotroph Phanerochaete velutina, we show that fungal networks can display both high transport capacity and robustness to damage. These properties are enhanced as the network grows, while the relative cost of building the network decreases. Thus, mycelia achieve the seemingly competing goals of efficient transport and robustness, with decreasing relative investment, by selective reinforcement and recycling of transport pathways. Fungal networks demonstrate that indeterminate, decentralized systems can yield highly adaptive networks. Understanding how these relatively simple organisms have found effective transport networks through a process of natural selection may inform the design of man-made networks. PMID:17623638

  11. Controllability and observability of Boolean networks arising from biology.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui; Yang, Meng; Chu, Tianguang

    2015-02-01

    Boolean networks are currently receiving considerable attention as a computational scheme for system level analysis and modeling of biological systems. Studying control-related problems in Boolean networks may reveal new insights into the intrinsic control in complex biological systems and enable us to develop strategies for manipulating biological systems using exogenous inputs. This paper considers controllability and observability of Boolean biological networks. We propose a new approach, which draws from the rich theory of symbolic computation, to solve the problems. Consequently, simple necessary and sufficient conditions for reachability, controllability, and observability are obtained, and algorithmic tests for controllability and observability which are based on the Gröbner basis method are presented. As practical applications, we apply the proposed approach to several different biological systems, namely, the mammalian cell-cycle network, the T-cell activation network, the large granular lymphocyte survival signaling network, and the Drosophila segment polarity network, gaining novel insights into the control and/or monitoring of the specific biological systems. PMID:25725640

  12. Controllability and observability of Boolean networks arising from biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Rui; Yang, Meng; Chu, Tianguang

    2015-02-01

    Boolean networks are currently receiving considerable attention as a computational scheme for system level analysis and modeling of biological systems. Studying control-related problems in Boolean networks may reveal new insights into the intrinsic control in complex biological systems and enable us to develop strategies for manipulating biological systems using exogenous inputs. This paper considers controllability and observability of Boolean biological networks. We propose a new approach, which draws from the rich theory of symbolic computation, to solve the problems. Consequently, simple necessary and sufficient conditions for reachability, controllability, and observability are obtained, and algorithmic tests for controllability and observability which are based on the Gröbner basis method are presented. As practical applications, we apply the proposed approach to several different biological systems, namely, the mammalian cell-cycle network, the T-cell activation network, the large granular lymphocyte survival signaling network, and the Drosophila segment polarity network, gaining novel insights into the control and/or monitoring of the specific biological systems.

  13. Modeling information flow in biological networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yoo-Ah; Przytycki, Jozef H.; Wuchty, Stefan; Przytycka, Teresa M.

    2011-06-01

    Large-scale molecular interaction networks are being increasingly used to provide a system level view of cellular processes. Modeling communications between nodes in such huge networks as information flows is useful for dissecting dynamical dependences between individual network components. In the information flow model, individual nodes are assumed to communicate with each other by propagating the signals through intermediate nodes in the network. In this paper, we first provide an overview of the state of the art of research in the network analysis based on information flow models. In the second part, we describe our computational method underlying our recent work on discovering dysregulated pathways in glioma. Motivated by applications to inferring information flow from genotype to phenotype in a very large human interaction network, we generalized previous approaches to compute information flows for a large number of instances and also provided a formal proof for the method.

  14. Rigidity and flexibility of biological networks.

    PubMed

    Gáspár, Merse E; Csermely, Peter

    2012-11-01

    The network approach became a widely used tool to understand the behaviour of complex systems in the last decade. We start from a short description of structural rigidity theory. A detailed account on the combinatorial rigidity analysis of protein structures, as well as local flexibility measures of proteins and their applications in explaining allostery and thermostability is given. We also briefly discuss the network aspects of cytoskeletal tensegrity. Finally, we show the importance of the balance between functional flexibility and rigidity in protein-protein interaction, metabolic, gene regulatory and neuronal networks. Our summary raises the possibility that the concepts of flexibility and rigidity can be generalized to all networks. PMID:23165349

  15. The Structure and Function of Biological Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Daniel Duanqing

    2010-01-01

    Biology has been revolutionized in recent years by an explosion in the availability of data. Transforming this new wealth of data into meaningful biological insights and clinical breakthroughs requires a complete overhaul both in the questions being asked and the methodologies used to answer them. A major challenge in organizing and understanding…

  16. Identification of the connections in biologically inspired neural networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demuth, H.; Leung, K.; Beale, M.; Hicklin, J.

    1990-01-01

    We developed an identification method to find the strength of the connections between neurons from their behavior in small biologically-inspired artificial neural networks. That is, given the network external inputs and the temporal firing pattern of the neurons, we can calculate a solution for the strengths of the connections between neurons and the initial neuron activations if a solution exists. The method determines directly if there is a solution to a particular neural network problem. No training of the network is required. It should be noted that this is a first pass at the solution of a difficult problem. The neuron and network models chosen are related to biology but do not contain all of its complexities, some of which we hope to add to the model in future work. A variety of new results have been obtained. First, the method has been tailored to produce connection weight matrix solutions for networks with important features of biological neural (bioneural) networks. Second, a computationally efficient method of finding a robust central solution has been developed. This later method also enables us to find the most consistent solution in the presence of noisy data. Prospects of applying our method to identify bioneural network connections are exciting because such connections are almost impossible to measure in the laboratory. Knowledge of such connections would facilitate an understanding of bioneural networks and would allow the construction of the electronic counterparts of bioneural networks on very large scale integrated (VLSI) circuits.

  17. Epigenetics and Why Biological Networks are More Controllable than Expected

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motter, Adilson

    2013-03-01

    A fundamental property of networks is that perturbations to one node can affect other nodes, potentially causing the entire system to change behavior or fail. In this talk, I will show that it is possible to exploit this same principle to control network behavior. This approach takes advantage of the nonlinear dynamics inherent to real networks, and allows bringing the system to a desired target state even when this state is not directly accessible or the linear counterpart is not controllable. Applications show that this framework permits both reprogramming a network to a desired task as well as rescuing networks from the brink of failure, which I will illustrate through various biological problems. I will also briefly review the progress our group has made over the past 5 years on related control of complex networks in non-biological domains.

  18. Systematic Functional Annotation and Visualization of Biological Networks.

    PubMed

    Baryshnikova, Anastasia

    2016-06-22

    Large-scale biological networks represent relationships between genes, but our understanding of how networks are functionally organized is limited. Here, I describe spatial analysis of functional enrichment (SAFE), a systematic method for annotating biological networks and examining their functional organization. SAFE visualizes the network in 2D space and measures the continuous distribution of functional enrichment across local neighborhoods, producing a list of the associated functions and a map of their relative positioning. I applied SAFE to annotate the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genetic interaction similarity network and protein-protein interaction network with gene ontology terms. SAFE annotations of the genetic network matched manually derived annotations, while taking less than 1% of the time, and proved robust to noise and sensitive to biological signal. Integration of genetic interaction and chemical genomics data using SAFE revealed a link between vesicle-mediate transport and resistance to the anti-cancer drug bortezomib. These results demonstrate the utility of SAFE for examining biological networks and understanding their functional organization. PMID:27237738

  19. NETWORKS, BIOLOGY AND SYSTEMS ENGINEERING: A CASE STUDY IN INFLAMMATION

    PubMed Central

    Foteinou, P.T.; Yang, E.; Androulakis, I. P.

    2009-01-01

    Biological systems can be modeled as networks of interacting components across multiple scales. A central problem in computational systems biology is to identify those critical components and the rules that define their interactions and give rise to the emergent behavior of a host response. In this paper we will discuss two fundamental problems related to the construction of transcription factor networks and the identification of networks of functional modules describing disease progression. We focus on inflammation as a key physiological response of clinical and translational importance. PMID:20161495

  20. Using biological networks to improve our understanding of infectious diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mulder, Nicola J.; Akinola, Richard O.; Mazandu, Gaston K.; Rapanoel, Holifidy

    2014-01-01

    Infectious diseases are the leading cause of death, particularly in developing countries. Although many drugs are available for treating the most common infectious diseases, in many cases the mechanism of action of these drugs or even their targets in the pathogen remain unknown. In addition, the key factors or processes in pathogens that facilitate infection and disease progression are often not well understood. Since proteins do not work in isolation, understanding biological systems requires a better understanding of the interconnectivity between proteins in different pathways and processes, which includes both physical and other functional interactions. Such biological networks can be generated within organisms or between organisms sharing a common environment using experimental data and computational predictions. Though different data sources provide different levels of accuracy, confidence in interactions can be measured using interaction scores. Connections between interacting proteins in biological networks can be represented as graphs and edges, and thus studied using existing algorithms and tools from graph theory. There are many different applications of biological networks, and here we discuss three such applications, specifically applied to the infectious disease tuberculosis, with its causative agent Mycobacterium tuberculosis and host, Homo sapiens. The applications include the use of the networks for function prediction, comparison of networks for evolutionary studies, and the generation and use of host–pathogen interaction networks. PMID:25379138

  1. Biological Network Inference and Analysis using SEBINI and CABIN

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Ronald C.; Singhal, Mudita

    2008-01-01

    Attaining a detailed understanding of the various biological networks in an organism lies at the core of the emerging discipline of systems biology. A precise description of the relationships formed between genes, mRNA molecules, and proteins is a necessary step toward a complete description of the dynamic behavior of an organism at the cellular level; and towards intelligent, efficient and directed modification of an organism. The importance of understanding such regulatory, signaling, and interaction networks has fueled the development of numerous in silico inference algorithms, as well as new experimental techniques and a growing collection of public databases. The Software Environment for BIological Network Inference (SEBINI) has been created to provide an interactive environment for the deployment, evaluation, and improvement of algorithms used to reconstruct the structure of biological regulatory and interaction networks. SEBINI can be used to analyze high-throughput gene expression, protein expression, or protein activation data via a suite of state-of-the-art network inference algorithms. It also allows algorithm developers to compare and train network inference methods on artificial networks and simulated gene expression perturbation data. SEBINI can therefore be used by software developers wishing to evaluate, refine, or combine inference techniques, as well as by bioinformaticians analyzing experimental data. Networks inferred from the SEBINI software platform can be further analyzed using the Collective Analysis of Biological Interaction Networks (CABIN) tool, which is exploratory data analysis software that enables integration and analysis of protein-protein interaction and gene-to-gene regulatory evidence obtained from multiple sources. The collection of edges in public databases, along with the confidence held in each edge (if available), can be fed into CABIN as one “evidence network”, using the Cytoscape SIF file format. Using CABIN, one may

  2. Analysis and logical modeling of biological signaling transduction networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhongyao

    The study of network theory and its application span across a multitude of seemingly disparate fields of science and technology: computer science, biology, social science, linguistics, etc. It is the intrinsic similarities embedded in the entities and the way they interact with one another in these systems that link them together. In this dissertation, I present from both the aspect of theoretical analysis and the aspect of application three projects, which primarily focus on signal transduction networks in biology. In these projects, I assembled a network model through extensively perusing literature, performed model-based simulations and validation, analyzed network topology, and proposed a novel network measure. The application of network modeling to the system of stomatal opening in plants revealed a fundamental question about the process that has been left unanswered in decades. The novel measure of the redundancy of signal transduction networks with Boolean dynamics by calculating its maximum node-independent elementary signaling mode set accurately predicts the effect of single node knockout in such signaling processes. The three projects as an organic whole advance the understanding of a real system as well as the behavior of such network models, giving me an opportunity to take a glimpse at the dazzling facets of the immense world of network science.

  3. Toward modeling a dynamic biological neural network.

    PubMed

    Ross, M D; Dayhoff, J E; Mugler, D H

    1990-01-01

    Mammalian macular endorgans are linear bioaccelerometers located in the vestibular membranous labyrinth of the inner ear. In this paper, the organization of the endorgan is interpreted on physical and engineering principles. This is a necessary prerequisite to mathematical and symbolic modeling of information processing by the macular neural network. Mathematical notations that describe the functioning system were used to produce a novel, symbolic model. The model is six-tiered and is constructed to mimic the neural system. Initial simulations show that the network functions best when some of the detecting elements (type I hair cells) are excitatory and others (type II hair cells) are weakly inhibitory. The simulations also illustrate the importance of disinhibition of receptors located in the third tier in shaping nerve discharge patterns at the sixth tier in the model system. PMID:11538873

  4. Biological impacts and context of network theory

    SciTech Connect

    Almaas, E

    2007-01-05

    Many complex systems can be represented and analyzed as networks, and examples that have benefited from this approach span the natural sciences. For instance, we now know that systems as disparate as the World-Wide Web, the Internet, scientific collaborations, food webs, protein interactions and metabolism all have common features in their organization, the most salient of which are their scale-free connectivity distributions and their small-world behavior. The recent availability of large scale datasets that span the proteome or metabolome of an organism have made it possible to elucidate some of the organizational principles and rules that govern their function, robustness and evolution. We expect that combining the currently separate layers of information from gene regulatory-, signal transduction-, protein interaction- and metabolic networks will dramatically enhance our understanding of cellular function and dynamics.

  5. Classifying pairs with trees for supervised biological network inference.

    PubMed

    Schrynemackers, Marie; Wehenkel, Louis; Babu, M Madan; Geurts, Pierre

    2015-08-01

    Networks are ubiquitous in biology, and computational approaches have been largely investigated for their inference. In particular, supervised machine learning methods can be used to complete a partially known network by integrating various measurements. Two main supervised frameworks have been proposed: the local approach, which trains a separate model for each network node, and the global approach, which trains a single model over pairs of nodes. Here, we systematically investigate, theoretically and empirically, the exploitation of tree-based ensemble methods in the context of these two approaches for biological network inference. We first formalize the problem of network inference as a classification of pairs, unifying in the process homogeneous and bipartite graphs and discussing two main sampling schemes. We then present the global and the local approaches, extending the latter for the prediction of interactions between two unseen network nodes, and discuss their specializations to tree-based ensemble methods, highlighting their interpretability and drawing links with clustering techniques. Extensive computational experiments are carried out with these methods on various biological networks that clearly highlight that these methods are competitive with existing methods. PMID:26008881

  6. Course 10: Three Lectures on Biological Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnasco, M. O.

    1 Enzymatic networks. Proofreading knots: How DNA topoisomerases disentangle DNA 1.1 Length scales and energy scales 1.2 DNA topology 1.3 Topoisomerases 1.4 Knots and supercoils 1.5 Topological equilibrium 1.6 Can topoisomerases recognize topology? 1.7 Proposal: Kinetic proofreading 1.8 How to do it twice 1.9 The care and proofreading of knots 1.10 Suppression of supercoils 1.11 Problems and outlook 1.12 Disquisition 2 Gene expression networks. Methods for analysis of DNA chip experiments 2.1 The regulation of gene expression 2.2 Gene expression arrays 2.3 Analysis of array data 2.4 Some simplifying assumptions 2.5 Probeset analysis 2.6 Discussion 3 Neural and gene expression networks: Song-induced gene expression in the canary brain 3.1 The study of songbirds 3.2 Canary song 3.3 ZENK 3.4 The blush 3.5 Histological analysis 3.6 Natural vs. artificial 3.7 The Blush II: gAP 3.8 Meditation

  7. Topology and static response of interaction networks in molecular biology.

    PubMed

    Radulescu, Ovidiu; Lagarrigue, Sandrine; Siegel, Anne; Veber, Philippe; Le Borgne, Michel

    2006-02-22

    We introduce a mathematical framework describing static response of networks occurring in molecular biology. This formalism has many similarities with the Laplace-Kirchhoff equations for electrical networks. We introduce the concept of graph boundary and we show how the response of the biological networks to external perturbations can be related to the Dirichlet or Neumann problems for the corresponding equations on the interaction graph. Solutions to these two problems are given in terms of path moduli (measuring path rigidity with respect to the propagation of interaction along the graph). Path moduli are related to loop products in the interaction graph via generalized Mason-Coates formulae. We apply our results to two specific biological examples: the lactose operon and the genetic regulation of lipogenesis. Our applications show consistency with experimental results and in the case of lipogenesis check some hypothesis on the behaviour of hepatic fatty acids on fasting. PMID:16849230

  8. Topology and static response of interaction networks in molecular biology

    PubMed Central

    Radulescu, Ovidiu; Lagarrigue, Sandrine; Siegel, Anne; Veber, Philippe; Le Borgne, Michel

    2005-01-01

    We introduce a mathematical framework describing static response of networks occurring in molecular biology. This formalism has many similarities with the Laplace–Kirchhoff equations for electrical networks. We introduce the concept of graph boundary and we show how the response of the biological networks to external perturbations can be related to the Dirichlet or Neumann problems for the corresponding equations on the interaction graph. Solutions to these two problems are given in terms of path moduli (measuring path rigidity with respect to the propagation of interaction along the graph). Path moduli are related to loop products in the interaction graph via generalized Mason–Coates formulae. We apply our results to two specific biological examples: the lactose operon and the genetic regulation of lipogenesis. Our applications show consistency with experimental results and in the case of lipogenesis check some hypothesis on the behaviour of hepatic fatty acids on fasting. PMID:16849230

  9. BiologicalNetworks 2.0 - an integrative view of genome biology data

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background A significant problem in the study of mechanisms of an organism's development is the elucidation of interrelated factors which are making an impact on the different levels of the organism, such as genes, biological molecules, cells, and cell systems. Numerous sources of heterogeneous data which exist for these subsystems are still not integrated sufficiently enough to give researchers a straightforward opportunity to analyze them together in the same frame of study. Systematic application of data integration methods is also hampered by a multitude of such factors as the orthogonal nature of the integrated data and naming problems. Results Here we report on a new version of BiologicalNetworks, a research environment for the integral visualization and analysis of heterogeneous biological data. BiologicalNetworks can be queried for properties of thousands of different types of biological entities (genes/proteins, promoters, COGs, pathways, binding sites, and other) and their relations (interactions, co-expression, co-citations, and other). The system includes the build-pathways infrastructure for molecular interactions/relations and module discovery in high-throughput experiments. Also implemented in BiologicalNetworks are the Integrated Genome Viewer and Comparative Genomics Browser applications, which allow for the search and analysis of gene regulatory regions and their conservation in multiple species in conjunction with molecular pathways/networks, experimental data and functional annotations. Conclusions The new release of BiologicalNetworks together with its back-end database introduces extensive functionality for a more efficient integrated multi-level analysis of microarray, sequence, regulatory, and other data. BiologicalNetworks is freely available at http://www.biologicalnetworks.org. PMID:21190573

  10. Discriminating direct and indirect connectivities in biological networks

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Taek; Moore, Richard; Li, Yi; Sontag, Eduardo; Bleris, Leonidas

    2015-01-01

    Reverse engineering of biological pathways involves an iterative process between experiments, data processing, and theoretical analysis. Despite concurrent advances in quality and quantity of data as well as computing resources and algorithms, difficulties in deciphering direct and indirect network connections are prevalent. Here, we adopt the notions of abstraction, emulation, benchmarking, and validation in the context of discovering features specific to this family of connectivities. After subjecting benchmark synthetic circuits to perturbations, we inferred the network connections using a combination of nonparametric single-cell data resampling and modular response analysis. Intriguingly, we discovered that recovered weights of specific network edges undergo divergent shifts under differential perturbations, and that the particular behavior is markedly different between topologies. Our results point to a conceptual advance for reverse engineering beyond weight inference. Investigating topological changes under differential perturbations may address the longstanding problem of discriminating direct and indirect connectivities in biological networks. PMID:26420864

  11. Non-Hermitian localization in biological networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amir, Ariel; Hatano, Naomichi; Nelson, David R.

    2016-04-01

    We explore the spectra and localization properties of the N -site banded one-dimensional non-Hermitian random matrices that arise naturally in sparse neural networks. Approximately equal numbers of random excitatory and inhibitory connections lead to spatially localized eigenfunctions and an intricate eigenvalue spectrum in the complex plane that controls the spontaneous activity and induced response. A finite fraction of the eigenvalues condense onto the real or imaginary axes. For large N , the spectrum has remarkable symmetries not only with respect to reflections across the real and imaginary axes but also with respect to 90∘ rotations, with an unusual anisotropic divergence in the localization length near the origin. When chains with periodic boundary conditions become directed, with a systematic directional bias superimposed on the randomness, a hole centered on the origin opens up in the density-of-states in the complex plane. All states are extended on the rim of this hole, while the localized eigenvalues outside the hole are unchanged. The bias-dependent shape of this hole tracks the bias-independent contours of constant localization length. We treat the large-N limit by a combination of direct numerical diagonalization and using transfer matrices, an approach that allows us to exploit an electrostatic analogy connecting the "charges" embodied in the eigenvalue distribution with the contours of constant localization length. We show that similar results are obtained for more realistic neural networks that obey "Dale's law" (each site is purely excitatory or inhibitory) and conclude with perturbation theory results that describe the limit of large directional bias, when all states are extended. Related problems arise in random ecological networks and in chains of artificial cells with randomly coupled gene expression patterns.

  12. Non-Hermitian localization in biological networks.

    PubMed

    Amir, Ariel; Hatano, Naomichi; Nelson, David R

    2016-04-01

    We explore the spectra and localization properties of the N-site banded one-dimensional non-Hermitian random matrices that arise naturally in sparse neural networks. Approximately equal numbers of random excitatory and inhibitory connections lead to spatially localized eigenfunctions and an intricate eigenvalue spectrum in the complex plane that controls the spontaneous activity and induced response. A finite fraction of the eigenvalues condense onto the real or imaginary axes. For large N, the spectrum has remarkable symmetries not only with respect to reflections across the real and imaginary axes but also with respect to 90^{∘} rotations, with an unusual anisotropic divergence in the localization length near the origin. When chains with periodic boundary conditions become directed, with a systematic directional bias superimposed on the randomness, a hole centered on the origin opens up in the density-of-states in the complex plane. All states are extended on the rim of this hole, while the localized eigenvalues outside the hole are unchanged. The bias-dependent shape of this hole tracks the bias-independent contours of constant localization length. We treat the large-N limit by a combination of direct numerical diagonalization and using transfer matrices, an approach that allows us to exploit an electrostatic analogy connecting the "charges" embodied in the eigenvalue distribution with the contours of constant localization length. We show that similar results are obtained for more realistic neural networks that obey "Dale's law" (each site is purely excitatory or inhibitory) and conclude with perturbation theory results that describe the limit of large directional bias, when all states are extended. Related problems arise in random ecological networks and in chains of artificial cells with randomly coupled gene expression patterns. PMID:27176315

  13. Spectral algorithms for heterogeneous biological networks.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Martin; Higham, Desmond J; Vass, J Keith

    2012-11-01

    Spectral methods, which use information relating to eigenvectors, singular vectors and generalized singular vectors, help us to visualize and summarize sets of pairwise interactions. In this work, we motivate and discuss the use of spectral methods by taking a matrix computation view and applying concepts from applied linear algebra. We show that this unified approach is sufficiently flexible to allow multiple sources of network information to be combined. We illustrate the methods on microarray data arising from a large population-based study in human adipose tissue, combined with related information concerning metabolic pathways. PMID:23117863

  14. Servers for sequence–structure relationship analysis and prediction

    PubMed Central

    Dosztányi, Zsuzsanna; Magyar, Csaba; Tusnády, Gábor E.; Cserző, Miklós; Fiser, András; Simon, István

    2003-01-01

    We describe several algorithms and public servers that were developed to analyze and predict various features of protein structures. These servers provide information about the covalent state of cysteine (CYSREDOX), as well as about residues involved in non-covalent cross links that play an important role in the structural stability of proteins (SCIDE and SCPRED). We also discuss methods and servers developed to identify helical transmembrane proteins from large databases and rough genomic data, including two of the most popular transmembrane prediction methods, DAS and HMMTOP. Several biologically interesting applications of these servers are also presented. The servers are available through http://www.enzim.hu/servers.html. PMID:12824327

  15. Servers for sequence-structure relationship analysis and prediction.

    PubMed

    Dosztányi, Zsuzsanna; Magyar, Csaba; Tusnády, Gábor E; Cserzo, Miklós; Fiser, András; Simon, István

    2003-07-01

    We describe several algorithms and public servers that were developed to analyze and predict various features of protein structures. These servers provide information about the covalent state of cysteine (CYSREDOX), as well as about residues involved in non-covalent cross links that play an important role in the structural stability of proteins (SCIDE and SCPRED). We also discuss methods and servers developed to identify helical transmembrane proteins from large databases and rough genomic data, including two of the most popular transmembrane prediction methods, DAS and HMMTOP. Several biologically interesting applications of these servers are also presented. The servers are available through http://www.enzim.hu/servers.html. PMID:12824327

  16. Using biological networks to integrate, visualize and analyze genomics data.

    PubMed

    Charitou, Theodosia; Bryan, Kenneth; Lynn, David J

    2016-01-01

    Network biology is a rapidly developing area of biomedical research and reflects the current view that complex phenotypes, such as disease susceptibility, are not the result of single gene mutations that act in isolation but are rather due to the perturbation of a gene's network context. Understanding the topology of these molecular interaction networks and identifying the molecules that play central roles in their structure and regulation is a key to understanding complex systems. The falling cost of next-generation sequencing is now enabling researchers to routinely catalogue the molecular components of these networks at a genome-wide scale and over a large number of different conditions. In this review, we describe how to use publicly available bioinformatics tools to integrate genome-wide 'omics' data into a network of experimentally-supported molecular interactions. In addition, we describe how to visualize and analyze these networks to identify topological features of likely functional relevance, including network hubs, bottlenecks and modules. We show that network biology provides a powerful conceptual approach to integrate and find patterns in genome-wide genomic data but we also discuss the limitations and caveats of these methods, of which researchers adopting these methods must remain aware. PMID:27036106

  17. Systems biology and gene networks in neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorders

    PubMed Central

    Parikshak, Neelroop N.; Gandal, Michael J.; Geschwind, Daniel H.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic and genomic approaches have implicated hundreds of genetic loci in neurodevelopmental disorders and neurodegeneration, but mechanistic understanding continues to lag behind the pace of gene discovery. Understanding the role of specific genetic variants in the brain involves dissecting a functional hierarchy that encompasses molecular pathways, diverse cell types, neural circuits and, ultimately, cognition and behaviour. With a focus on transcriptomics, this Review discusses how high-throughput molecular, integrative and network approaches inform disease biology by placing human genetics in a molecular systems and neurobiological context. We provide a framework for interpreting network biology studies and leveraging big genomics data sets in neurobiology. PMID:26149713

  18. A Newtonian framework for community detection in undirected biological networks.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Tejaswini; Subramaniam, Shankar

    2014-02-01

    Community detection is a key problem of interest in network analysis, with applications in a variety of domains such as biological networks, social network modeling, and communication pattern analysis. In this paper, we present a novel framework for community detection that is motivated by a physical system analogy. We model a network as a system of point masses, and drive the process of community detection, by leveraging the Newtonian interactions between the point masses. Our framework is designed to be generic and extensible relative to the model parameters that are most suited for the problem domain. We illustrate the applicability of our approach by applying the Newtonian Community Detection algorithm on protein-protein interaction networks of E. coli , C. elegans, and S. cerevisiae. We obtain results that are comparable in quality to those obtained from the Newman-Girvan algorithm, a widely employed divisive algorithm for community detection. We also present a detailed analysis of the structural properties of the communities produced by our proposed algorithm, together with a biological interpretation using E. coli protein network as a case study. A functional enrichment heat map is constructed with the Gene Ontology functional mapping, in addition to a pathway analysis for each community. The analysis illustrates that the proposed algorithm elicits communities that are not only meaningful from a topological standpoint, but also possess biological relevance. We believe that our algorithm has the potential to serve as a key computational tool for driving therapeutic applications involving targeted drug development for personalized care delivery. PMID:24681920

  19. Theory of interface: category theory, directed networks and evolution of biological networks.

    PubMed

    Haruna, Taichi

    2013-11-01

    Biological networks have two modes. The first mode is static: a network is a passage on which something flows. The second mode is dynamic: a network is a pattern constructed by gluing functions of entities constituting the network. In this paper, first we discuss that these two modes can be associated with the category theoretic duality (adjunction) and derive a natural network structure (a path notion) for each mode by appealing to the category theoretic universality. The path notion corresponding to the static mode is just the usual directed path. The path notion for the dynamic mode is called lateral path which is the alternating path considered on the set of arcs. Their general functionalities in a network are transport and coherence, respectively. Second, we introduce a betweenness centrality of arcs for each mode and see how the two modes are embedded in various real biological network data. We find that there is a trade-off relationship between the two centralities: if the value of one is large then the value of the other is small. This can be seen as a kind of division of labor in a network into transport on the network and coherence of the network. Finally, we propose an optimization model of networks based on a quality function involving intensities of the two modes in order to see how networks with the above trade-off relationship can emerge through evolution. We show that the trade-off relationship can be observed in the evolved networks only when the dynamic mode is dominant in the quality function by numerical simulations. We also show that the evolved networks have features qualitatively similar to real biological networks by standard complex network analysis. PMID:24012823

  20. From biological and social network metaphors to coupled bio-social wireless networks.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Christopher L; Channakeshava, Karthik; Eubank, Stephen; Anil Kumar, V S; Marathe, Madhav V

    2011-01-01

    Biological and social analogies have been long applied to complex systems. Inspiration has been drawn from biological solutions to solve problems in engineering products and systems, ranging from Velcro to camouflage to robotics to adaptive and learning computing methods. In this paper, we present an overview of recent advances in understanding biological systems as networks and use this understanding to design and analyse wireless communication networks. We expand on two applications, namely cognitive sensing and control and wireless epidemiology. We discuss how our work in these two applications is motivated by biological metaphors. We believe that recent advances in computing and communications coupled with advances in health and social sciences raise the possibility of studying coupled bio-social communication networks. We argue that we can better utilise the advances in our understanding of one class of networks to better our understanding of the other. PMID:21643462

  1. From biological and social network metaphors to coupled bio-social wireless networks

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Christopher L.; Eubank, Stephen; Anil Kumar, V.S.; Marathe, Madhav V.

    2010-01-01

    Biological and social analogies have been long applied to complex systems. Inspiration has been drawn from biological solutions to solve problems in engineering products and systems, ranging from Velcro to camouflage to robotics to adaptive and learning computing methods. In this paper, we present an overview of recent advances in understanding biological systems as networks and use this understanding to design and analyse wireless communication networks. We expand on two applications, namely cognitive sensing and control and wireless epidemiology. We discuss how our work in these two applications is motivated by biological metaphors. We believe that recent advances in computing and communications coupled with advances in health and social sciences raise the possibility of studying coupled bio-social communication networks. We argue that we can better utilise the advances in our understanding of one class of networks to better our understanding of the other. PMID:21643462

  2. Towards the understanding of network information processing in biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Vijay

    Living organisms perform incredibly well in detecting a signal present in the environment. This information processing is achieved near optimally and quite reliably, even though the sources of signals are highly variable and complex. The work in the last few decades has given us a fair understanding of how individual signal processing units like neurons and cell receptors process signals, but the principles of collective information processing on biological networks are far from clear. Information processing in biological networks, like the brain, metabolic circuits, cellular-signaling circuits, etc., involves complex interactions among a large number of units (neurons, receptors). The combinatorially large number of states such a system can exist in makes it impossible to study these systems from the first principles, starting from the interactions between the basic units. The principles of collective information processing on such complex networks can be identified using coarse graining approaches. This could provide insights into the organization and function of complex biological networks. Here I study models of biological networks using continuum dynamics, renormalization, maximum likelihood estimation and information theory. Such coarse graining approaches identify features that are essential for certain processes performed by underlying biological networks. We find that long-range connections in the brain allow for global scale feature detection in a signal. These also suppress the noise and remove any gaps present in the signal. Hierarchical organization with long-range connections leads to large-scale connectivity at low synapse numbers. Time delays can be utilized to separate a mixture of signals with temporal scales. Our observations indicate that the rules in multivariate signal processing are quite different from traditional single unit signal processing.

  3. Client/server study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dezhgosha, Kamyar; Marcus, Robert; Brewster, Stephen

    1995-01-01

    The goal of this project is to find cost-effective and efficient strategies/solutions to integrate existing databases, manage network, and improve productivity of users in a move towards client/server and Integrated Desktop Environment (IDE) at NASA LeRC. The project consisted of two tasks as follows: (1) Data collection, and (2) Database Development/Integration. Under task 1, survey questionnaires and a database were developed. Also, an investigation on commercially available tools for automated data-collection and net-management was performed. As requirements evolved, the main focus has been task 2 which involved the following subtasks: (1) Data gathering/analysis of database user requirements, (2) Database analysis and design, making recommendations for modification of existing data structures into relational database or proposing a common interface to access heterogeneous databases(INFOMAN system, CCNS equipment list, CCNS software list, USERMAN, and other databases), (3) Establishment of a client/server test bed at Central State University (CSU), (4) Investigation of multi-database integration technologies/ products for IDE at NASA LeRC, and (5) Development of prototypes using CASE tools (Object/View) for representative scenarios accessing multi-databases and tables in a client/server environment. Both CSU and NASA LeRC have benefited from this project. CSU team investigated and prototyped cost-effective/practical solutions to facilitate NASA LeRC move to a more productive environment. CSU students utilized new products and gained skills that could be a great resource for future needs of NASA.

  4. Fault-tolerant PACS server

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Fei; Liu, Brent J.; Huang, H. K.; Zhou, Michael Z.; Zhang, Jianguo; Zhang, X. C.; Mogel, Greg T.

    2002-05-01

    Failure of a PACS archive server could cripple an entire PACS operation. Last year we demonstrated that it was possible to design a fault-tolerant (FT) server with 99.999% uptime. The FT design was based on a triple modular redundancy with a simple majority vote to automatically detect and mask a faulty module. The purpose of this presentation is to report on its continuous developments in integrating with external mass storage devices, and to delineate laboratory failover experiments. An FT PACS Simulator with generic PACS software has been used in the experiment. To simulate a PACS clinical operation, image examinations are transmitted continuously from the modality simulator to the DICOM gateway and then to the FT PACS server and workstations. The hardware failures in network, FT server module, disk, RAID, and DLT are manually induced to observe the failover recovery of the FT PACS to resume its normal data flow. We then test and evaluate the FT PACS server in its reliability, functionality, and performance.

  5. CentiServer: A Comprehensive Resource, Web-Based Application and R Package for Centrality Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jalili, Mahdi; Salehzadeh-Yazdi, Ali; Asgari, Yazdan; Arab, Seyed Shahriar; Yaghmaie, Marjan; Ghavamzadeh, Ardeshir; Alimoghaddam, Kamran

    2015-01-01

    Various disciplines are trying to solve one of the most noteworthy queries and broadly used concepts in biology, essentiality. Centrality is a primary index and a promising method for identifying essential nodes, particularly in biological networks. The newly created CentiServer is a comprehensive online resource that provides over 110 definitions of different centrality indices, their computational methods, and algorithms in the form of an encyclopedia. In addition, CentiServer allows users to calculate 55 centralities with the help of an interactive web-based application tool and provides a numerical result as a comma separated value (csv) file format or a mapped graphical format as a graph modeling language (GML) file. The standalone version of this application has been developed in the form of an R package. The web-based application (CentiServer) and R package (centiserve) are freely available at http://www.centiserver.org/ PMID:26571275

  6. Flux-concentration duality in dynamic nonequilibrium biological networks.

    PubMed

    Jamshidi, Neema; Palsson, Bernhard Ø

    2009-09-01

    The structure of dynamic states in biological networks is of fundamental importance in understanding their function. Considering the elementary reaction structure of reconstructed metabolic networks, we show how appreciation of a gradient matrix, G =dv/dx (where v is the vector of fluxes and x is the vector of concentrations), enables the formulation of dual Jacobian matrices. One is for concentrations, J(x) =S x G, and the other is for fluxes, J(v) =G x S. The fundamental properties of these two Jacobians and the underlying duality that relates them are delineated. We describe a generalized approach to decomposing reaction networks in terms of the thermodynamic and kinetic components in the context of the network structure. The thermodynamic and kinetic influences can be viewed in terms of direction-driver relationships in the network. PMID:19720010

  7. Convergence behaviour and Control in Non-Linear Biological Networks

    PubMed Central

    Karl, Stefan; Dandekar, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Control of genetic regulatory networks is challenging to define and quantify. Previous control centrality metrics, which aim to capture the ability of individual nodes to control the system, have been found to suffer from plausibility and applicability problems. Here we present a new approach to control centrality based on network convergence behaviour, implemented as an extension of our genetic regulatory network simulation framework Jimena ( http://stefan-karl.de/jimena). We distinguish three types of network control, and show how these mathematical concepts correspond to experimentally verified node functions and signalling pathways in immunity and cell differentiation: Total control centrality quantifies the impact of node mutations and identifies potential pharmacological targets such as genes involved in oncogenesis (e.g. zinc finger protein GLI2 or bone morphogenetic proteins in chondrocytes). Dynamic control centrality describes relaying functions as observed in signalling cascades (e.g. src kinase or Jak/Stat pathways). Value control centrality measures the direct influence of the value of the node on the network (e.g. Indian hedgehog as an essential regulator of proliferation in chondrocytes). Surveying random scale-free networks and biological networks, we find that control of the network resides in few high degree driver nodes and networks can be controlled best if they are sparsely connected. PMID:26068060

  8. Performance of a distributed superscalar storage server

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finestead, Arlan; Yeager, Nancy

    1993-01-01

    The RS/6000 performed well in our test environment. The potential exists for the RS/6000 to act as a departmental server for a small number of users, rather than as a high speed archival server. Multiple UniTree Disk Server's utilizing one UniTree Disk Server's utilizing one UniTree Name Server could be developed that would allow for a cost effective archival system. Our performance tests were clearly limited by the network bandwidth. The performance gathered by the LibUnix testing shows that UniTree is capable of exceeding ethernet speeds on an RS/6000 Model 550. The performance of FTP might be significantly faster if asked to perform across a higher bandwidth network. The UniTree Name Server also showed signs of being a potential bottleneck. UniTree sites that would require a high ratio of file creations and deletions to reads and writes would run into this bottleneck. It is possible to improve the UniTree Name Server performance by bypassing the UniTree LibUnix Library altogether and communicating directly with the UniTree Name Server and optimizing creations. Although testing was performed in a less than ideal environment, hopefully the performance statistics stated in this paper will give end-users a realistic idea as to what performance they can expect in this type of setup.

  9. PACS image security server

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Fei; Huang, H. K.

    2004-04-01

    Medical image security in a PACS environment has become a pressing issue as communications of images increasingly extends over open networks, and hospitals are currently hard-pushed by Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) to be HIPPA complaint for ensuring health data security. Other security-related guidelines and technical standards continue bringing to the public attention in healthcare. However, there is not an infrastructure or systematic method to implement and deploy these standards in a PACS. In this paper, we first review DICOM Part15 standard for secure communications of medical images and the HIPAA impacts on PACS security, as well as our previous works on image security. Then we outline a security infrastructure in a HIPAA mandated PACS environment using a dedicated PACS image security server. The server manages its own database of all image security information. It acts as an image Authority for checking and certificating the image origin and integrity upon request by a user, as a secure DICOM gateway to the outside connections and meanwhile also as a PACS operation monitor for HIPAA supporting information.

  10. Composite nanowire networks for biological sensor platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabal, Jamie Marie Francisco

    The main goal of this research is to design, fabricate, and test a nanomaterial-based platform adequate for the measurement of physiological changes in living cells. The two primary objectives toward this end are (1) the synthesis and selection of a suitable nanomaterial and (2) the demonstration of cellular response to a direct stimulus. Determining a useful nanomaterial morphology and behavior within a sensor configuration presented challenges based on cellular integration and access to electrochemical characterization. The prospect for feasible optimization and eventual scale-up in technology were also significant. Constraining criteria are that the nanomaterial detector must (a) be cheap and relatively easy to fabricate controllably, (b) encourage cell attachment, (c) exhibit consistent wettability over time, and (d) facilitate electrochemical processes. The ultimate goal would be to transfer a proof-of-principle and proof-of-design for a whole-cell sensor technology that is cost effective and has a potential for hand-held packaging. Initial tasks were to determine an effective and highly-functional nanomaterial for biosensors by assessing wettability, morphology and conductivity behavior of several candidate materials: gallium nitride nanowires, silicon dioxide nanosprings and nanowires, and titania nanofibers. Electrospinning poly(vinyl pyrrolidone)-coated titania nano- and microfibers (O20 nm--2 microm) into a pseudo-random network is controllable to a uniformity of 1--2° in contact angle. The final electrode can be prepared with a precise wettability ranging from partial wetting to ultrahydrophobic (170°) on a variety of substrates: glass, indium tin oxide, silicon, and aluminum. Fiber mats exhibit excellent mechanical stability against rinsing, and support the incubation of epithelial (skin) and pancreatic cells. Impedance spectroscopy on the whole-cell sensor shows resistive changes attributed to cell growth as well as complex frequency

  11. Purge Lock Server

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, Kevin

    2012-08-21

    The software provides a simple web api to allow users to request a time window where a file will not be removed from cache. HPSS provides the concept of a "purge lock". When a purge lock is set on a file, the file will not be removed from disk, entering tape only state. A lot of network file protocols assume a file is on disk so it is good to purge lock a file before transferring using one of those protocols. HPSS's purge lock system is very coarse grained though. A file is either purge locked or not. Nothing enforces quotas, timely unlocking of purge locks, or managing the races inherent with multiple users wanting to lock/unlock the same file. The Purge Lock Server lets you, through a simple REST API, specify a list of files to purge lock and an expire time, and the system will ensure things happen properly.

  12. Purge Lock Server

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2012-08-21

    The software provides a simple web api to allow users to request a time window where a file will not be removed from cache. HPSS provides the concept of a "purge lock". When a purge lock is set on a file, the file will not be removed from disk, entering tape only state. A lot of network file protocols assume a file is on disk so it is good to purge lock a file beforemore » transferring using one of those protocols. HPSS's purge lock system is very coarse grained though. A file is either purge locked or not. Nothing enforces quotas, timely unlocking of purge locks, or managing the races inherent with multiple users wanting to lock/unlock the same file. The Purge Lock Server lets you, through a simple REST API, specify a list of files to purge lock and an expire time, and the system will ensure things happen properly.« less

  13. A Scalability Model for ECS's Data Server

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menasce, Daniel A.; Singhal, Mukesh

    1998-01-01

    This report presents in four chapters a model for the scalability analysis of the Data Server subsystem of the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Core System (ECS). The model analyzes if the planned architecture of the Data Server will support an increase in the workload with the possible upgrade and/or addition of processors, storage subsystems, and networks. The approaches in the report include a summary of the architecture of ECS's Data server as well as a high level description of the Ingest and Retrieval operations as they relate to ECS's Data Server. This description forms the basis for the development of the scalability model of the data server and the methodology used to solve it.

  14. Reduction of dynamical biochemical reactions networks in computational biology

    PubMed Central

    Radulescu, O.; Gorban, A. N.; Zinovyev, A.; Noel, V.

    2012-01-01

    Biochemical networks are used in computational biology, to model mechanistic details of systems involved in cell signaling, metabolism, and regulation of gene expression. Parametric and structural uncertainty, as well as combinatorial explosion are strong obstacles against analyzing the dynamics of large models of this type. Multiscaleness, an important property of these networks, can be used to get past some of these obstacles. Networks with many well separated time scales, can be reduced to simpler models, in a way that depends only on the orders of magnitude and not on the exact values of the kinetic parameters. The main idea used for such robust simplifications of networks is the concept of dominance among model elements, allowing hierarchical organization of these elements according to their effects on the network dynamics. This concept finds a natural formulation in tropical geometry. We revisit, in the light of these new ideas, the main approaches to model reduction of reaction networks, such as quasi-steady state (QSS) and quasi-equilibrium approximations (QE), and provide practical recipes for model reduction of linear and non-linear networks. We also discuss the application of model reduction to the problem of parameter identification, via backward pruning machine learning techniques. PMID:22833754

  15. High-resolution network biology: connecting sequence with function

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Colm J.; Cimermančič, Peter; Szpiech, Zachary A.; Sali, Andrej; Hernandez, Ryan D.; Krogan, Nevan J.

    2014-01-01

    Proteins are not monolithic entities; rather, they can contain multiple domains that mediate distinct interactions, and their functionality can be regulated through post-translational modifications at multiple distinct sites. Traditionally, network biology has ignored such properties of proteins and has instead examined either the physical interactions of whole proteins or the consequences of removing entire genes. In this Review, we discuss experimental and computational methods to increase the resolution of protein– protein, genetic and drug–gene interaction studies to the domain and residue levels. Such work will be crucial for using interaction networks to connect sequence and structural information, and to understand the biological consequences of disease-associated mutations, which will hopefully lead to more effective therapeutic strategies. PMID:24197012

  16. NetDecoder: a network biology platform that decodes context-specific biological networks and gene activities

    PubMed Central

    da Rocha, Edroaldo Lummertz; Ung, Choong Yong; McGehee, Cordelia D.; Correia, Cristina; Li, Hu

    2016-01-01

    The sequential chain of interactions altering the binary state of a biomolecule represents the ‘information flow’ within a cellular network that determines phenotypic properties. Given the lack of computational tools to dissect context-dependent networks and gene activities, we developed NetDecoder, a network biology platform that models context-dependent information flows using pairwise phenotypic comparative analyses of protein–protein interactions. Using breast cancer, dyslipidemia and Alzheimer's disease as case studies, we demonstrate NetDecoder dissects subnetworks to identify key players significantly impacting cell behaviour specific to a given disease context. We further show genes residing in disease-specific subnetworks are enriched in disease-related signalling pathways and information flow profiles, which drive the resulting disease phenotypes. We also devise a novel scoring scheme to quantify key genes—network routers, which influence many genes, key targets, which are influenced by many genes, and high impact genes, which experience a significant change in regulation. We show the robustness of our results against parameter changes. Our network biology platform includes freely available source code (http://www.NetDecoder.org) for researchers to explore genome-wide context-dependent information flow profiles and key genes, given a set of genes of particular interest and transcriptome data. More importantly, NetDecoder will enable researchers to uncover context-dependent drug targets. PMID:26975659

  17. NetDecoder: a network biology platform that decodes context-specific biological networks and gene activities.

    PubMed

    da Rocha, Edroaldo Lummertz; Ung, Choong Yong; McGehee, Cordelia D; Correia, Cristina; Li, Hu

    2016-06-01

    The sequential chain of interactions altering the binary state of a biomolecule represents the 'information flow' within a cellular network that determines phenotypic properties. Given the lack of computational tools to dissect context-dependent networks and gene activities, we developed NetDecoder, a network biology platform that models context-dependent information flows using pairwise phenotypic comparative analyses of protein-protein interactions. Using breast cancer, dyslipidemia and Alzheimer's disease as case studies, we demonstrate NetDecoder dissects subnetworks to identify key players significantly impacting cell behaviour specific to a given disease context. We further show genes residing in disease-specific subnetworks are enriched in disease-related signalling pathways and information flow profiles, which drive the resulting disease phenotypes. We also devise a novel scoring scheme to quantify key genes-network routers, which influence many genes, key targets, which are influenced by many genes, and high impact genes, which experience a significant change in regulation. We show the robustness of our results against parameter changes. Our network biology platform includes freely available source code (http://www.NetDecoder.org) for researchers to explore genome-wide context-dependent information flow profiles and key genes, given a set of genes of particular interest and transcriptome data. More importantly, NetDecoder will enable researchers to uncover context-dependent drug targets. PMID:26975659

  18. Web server with ATMEGA 2560 microcontroller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Răduca, E.; Ungureanu-Anghel, D.; Nistor, L.; Haţiegan, C.; Drăghici, S.; Chioncel, C.; Spunei, E.; Lolea, R.

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents the design and building of a Web Server to command, control and monitor at a distance lots of industrial or personal equipments and/or sensors. The server works based on a personal software. The software can be written by users and can work with many types of operating system. The authors were realized the Web server based on two platforms, an UC board and a network board. The source code was written in "open source" language Arduino 1.0.5.

  19. A biologically inspired immunization strategy for network epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Deng, Yong; Jusup, Marko; Wang, Zhen

    2016-07-01

    Well-known immunization strategies, based on degree centrality, betweenness centrality, or closeness centrality, either neglect the structural significance of a node or require global information about the network. We propose a biologically inspired immunization strategy that circumvents both of these problems by considering the number of links of a focal node and the way the neighbors are connected among themselves. The strategy thus measures the dependence of the neighbors on the focal node, identifying the ability of this node to spread the disease. Nodes with the highest ability in the network are the first to be immunized. To test the performance of our method, we conduct numerical simulations on several computer-generated and empirical networks, using the susceptible-infected-recovered (SIR) model. The results show that the proposed strategy largely outperforms the existing well-known strategies. PMID:27113785

  20. Systems analysis of biological networks in skeletal muscle function.

    PubMed

    Smith, Lucas R; Meyer, Gretchen; Lieber, Richard L

    2013-01-01

    Skeletal muscle function depends on the efficient coordination among subcellular systems. These systems are composed of proteins encoded by a subset of genes, all of which are tightly regulated. In the cases where regulation is altered because of disease or injury, dysfunction occurs. To enable objective analysis of muscle gene expression profiles, we have defined nine biological networks whose coordination is critical to muscle function. We begin by describing the expression of proteins necessary for optimal neuromuscular junction function that results in the muscle cell action potential. That action potential is transmitted to proteins involved in excitation-contraction coupling enabling Ca(2+) release. Ca(2+) then activates contractile proteins supporting actin and myosin cross-bridge cycling. Force generated by cross-bridges is transmitted via cytoskeletal proteins through the sarcolemma and out to critical proteins that support the muscle extracellular matrix. Muscle contraction is fueled through many proteins that regulate energy metabolism. Inflammation is a common response to injury that can result in alteration of many pathways within muscle. Muscle also has multiple pathways that regulate size through atrophy or hypertrophy. Finally, the isoforms associated with fast muscle fibers and their corresponding isoforms in slow muscle fibers are delineated. These nine networks represent important biological systems that affect skeletal muscle function. Combining high-throughput systems analysis with advanced networking software will allow researchers to use these networks to objectively study skeletal muscle systems. PMID:23188744

  1. Protozoan HSP90-heterocomplex: molecular interaction network and biological significance.

    PubMed

    Figueras, Maria J; Echeverria, Pablo C; Angel, Sergio O

    2014-05-01

    The HSP90 chaperone is a highly conserved protein from bacteria to higher eukaryotes. In eukaryotes, this chaperone participates in different large complexes, such as the HSP90 heterocomplex, which has important biological roles in cell homeostasis and differentiation. The HSP90-heterocomplex is also named the HSP90/HSP70 cycle because different co-chaperones (HIP, HSP40, HOP, p23, AHA1, immunophilins, PP5) participate in this complex by assembling sequentially, from the early to the mature complex. In this review, we analyze the conservation and relevance of HSP90 and the HSP90-heterocomplex in several protozoan parasites, with emphasis in Plasmodium spp., Toxoplasma spp., Leishmania spp. and Trypanosoma spp. In the last years, there has been an outburst of studies based on yeast two-hybrid methodology, co-immunoprecipitation-mass spectrometry and bioinformatics, which have generated a most comprehensive protein-protein interaction (PPI) network of HSP90 and its co-chaperones. This review analyzes the existing PPI networks of HSP90 and its co-chaperones of some protozoan parasites and discusses the usefulness of these powerful tools to analyze the biological role of the HSP90-heterocomplex in these parasites. The generation of a T. gondii HSP90 heterocomplex PPI network based on experimental data and a recent Plasmodium HSP90 heterocomplex PPI network are also included and discussed. As an example, the putative implication of nuclear transport and chromatin (histones and Sir2) as HSP90-heterocomplex interactors is here discussed. PMID:24694366

  2. Systems analysis of biological networks in skeletal muscle function

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Lucas R.; Meyer, Gretchen; Lieber, Richard L.

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle function depends on the efficient coordination among subcellular systems. These systems are composed of proteins encoded by a subset of genes, all of which are tightly regulated. In the cases where regulation is altered because of disease or injury, dysfunction occurs. To enable objective analysis of muscle gene expression profiles, we have defined nine biological networks whose coordination is critical to muscle function. We begin by describing the expression of proteins necessary for optimal neuromuscular junction function that results in the muscle cell action potential. That action potential is transmitted to proteins involved in excitation–contraction coupling enabling Ca2+ release. Ca2+ then activates contractile proteins supporting actin and myosin cross-bridge cycling. Force generated by cross-bridges is transmitted via cytoskeletal proteins through the sarcolemma and out to critical proteins that support the muscle extracellular matrix. Muscle contraction is fueled through many proteins that regulate energy metabolism. Inflammation is a common response to injury that can result in alteration of many pathways within muscle. Muscle also has multiple pathways that regulate size through atrophy or hypertrophy. Finally, the isoforms associated with fast muscle fibers and their corresponding isoforms in slow muscle fibers are delineated. These nine networks represent important biological systems that affect skeletal muscle function. Combining high-throughput systems analysis with advanced networking software will allow researchers to use these networks to objectively study skeletal muscle systems. PMID:23188744

  3. Minimum dominating set-based methods for analyzing biological networks.

    PubMed

    Nacher, Jose C; Akutsu, Tatsuya

    2016-06-01

    The fast increase of 'multi-omics' data does not only pose a computational challenge for its analysis but also requires novel algorithmic methodologies to identify complex biological patterns and decipher the ultimate roots of human disorders. To that end, the massive integration of omics data with disease phenotypes is offering a new window into the cell functionality. The minimum dominating set (MDS) approach has rapidly emerged as a promising algorithmic method to analyze complex biological networks integrated with human disorders, which can be composed of a variety of omics data, from proteomics and transcriptomics to metabolomics. Here we review the main theoretical foundations of the methodology and the key algorithms, and examine the recent applications in which biological systems are analyzed by using the MDS approach. PMID:26773457

  4. Conversation Threads Hidden within Email Server Logs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palus, Sebastian; Kazienko, Przemysław

    Email server logs contain records of all email Exchange through this server. Often we would like to analyze those emails not separately but in conversation thread, especially when we need to analyze social network extracted from those email logs. Unfortunately each mail is in different record and those record are not tided to each other in any obvious way. In this paper method for discussion threads extraction was proposed together with experiments on two different data sets - Enron and WrUT..

  5. From biological neural networks to thinking machines: Transitioning biological organizational principles to computer technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Muriel D.

    1991-01-01

    The three-dimensional organization of the vestibular macula is under study by computer assisted reconstruction and simulation methods as a model for more complex neural systems. One goal of this research is to transition knowledge of biological neural network architecture and functioning to computer technology, to contribute to the development of thinking computers. Maculas are organized as weighted neural networks for parallel distributed processing of information. The network is characterized by non-linearity of its terminal/receptive fields. Wiring appears to develop through constrained randomness. A further property is the presence of two main circuits, highly channeled and distributed modifying, that are connected through feedforward-feedback collaterals and biasing subcircuit. Computer simulations demonstrate that differences in geometry of the feedback (afferent) collaterals affects the timing and the magnitude of voltage changes delivered to the spike initiation zone. Feedforward (efferent) collaterals act as voltage followers and likely inhibit neurons of the distributed modifying circuit. These results illustrate the importance of feedforward-feedback loops, of timing, and of inhibition in refining neural network output. They also suggest that it is the distributed modifying network that is most involved in adaptation, memory, and learning. Tests of macular adaptation, through hyper- and microgravitational studies, support this hypothesis since synapses in the distributed modifying circuit, but not the channeled circuit, are altered. Transitioning knowledge of biological systems to computer technology, however, remains problematical.

  6. Biological Instability in a Chlorinated Drinking Water Distribution Network

    PubMed Central

    Nescerecka, Alina; Rubulis, Janis; Vital, Marius; Juhna, Talis; Hammes, Frederik

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of a drinking water distribution system is to deliver drinking water to the consumer, preferably with the same quality as when it left the treatment plant. In this context, the maintenance of good microbiological quality is often referred to as biological stability, and the addition of sufficient chlorine residuals is regarded as one way to achieve this. The full-scale drinking water distribution system of Riga (Latvia) was investigated with respect to biological stability in chlorinated drinking water. Flow cytometric (FCM) intact cell concentrations, intracellular adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP), heterotrophic plate counts and residual chlorine measurements were performed to evaluate the drinking water quality and stability at 49 sampling points throughout the distribution network. Cell viability methods were compared and the importance of extracellular ATP measurements was examined as well. FCM intact cell concentrations varied from 5×103 cells mL−1 to 4.66×105 cells mL−1 in the network. While this parameter did not exceed 2.1×104 cells mL−1 in the effluent from any water treatment plant, 50% of all the network samples contained more than 1.06×105 cells mL−1. This indisputably demonstrates biological instability in this particular drinking water distribution system, which was ascribed to a loss of disinfectant residuals and concomitant bacterial growth. The study highlights the potential of using cultivation-independent methods for the assessment of chlorinated water samples. In addition, it underlines the complexity of full-scale drinking water distribution systems, and the resulting challenges to establish the causes of biological instability. PMID:24796923

  7. PREFACE: Complex Networks: from Biology to Information Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrat, A.; Boccaletti, S.; Caldarelli, G.; Chessa, A.; Latora, V.; Motter, A. E.

    2008-06-01

    The field of complex networks is one of the most active areas in contemporary statistical physics. Ten years after seminal work initiated the modern study of networks, interest in the field is in fact still growing, as indicated by the ever increasing number of publications in network science. The reason for such a resounding success is most likely the simplicity and broad significance of the approach that, through graph theory, allows researchers to address a variety of different complex systems within a common framework. This special issue comprises a selection of contributions presented at the workshop 'Complex Networks: from Biology to Information Technology' held in July 2007 in Pula (Cagliari), Italy as a satellite of the general conference STATPHYS23. The contributions cover a wide range of problems that are currently among the most important questions in the area of complex networks and that are likely to stimulate future research. The issue is organised into four sections. The first two sections describe 'methods' to study the structure and the dynamics of complex networks, respectively. After this methodological part, the issue proceeds with a section on applications to biological systems. The issue closes with a section concentrating on applications to the study of social and technological networks. The first section, entitled Methods: The Structure, consists of six contributions focused on the characterisation and analysis of structural properties of complex networks: The paper Motif-based communities in complex networks by Arenas et al is a study of the occurrence of characteristic small subgraphs in complex networks. These subgraphs, known as motifs, are used to define general classes of nodes and their communities by extending the mathematical expression of the Newman-Girvan modularity. The same line of research, aimed at characterising network structure through the analysis of particular subgraphs, is explored by Bianconi and Gulbahce in Algorithm

  8. Predicting genetic interactions from Boolean models of biological networks.

    PubMed

    Calzone, Laurence; Barillot, Emmanuel; Zinovyev, Andrei

    2015-08-01

    Genetic interaction can be defined as a deviation of the phenotypic quantitative effect of a double gene mutation from the effect predicted from single mutations using a simple (e.g., multiplicative or linear additive) statistical model. Experimentally characterized genetic interaction networks in model organisms provide important insights into relationships between different biological functions. We describe a computational methodology allowing us to systematically and quantitatively characterize a Boolean mathematical model of a biological network in terms of genetic interactions between all loss of function and gain of function mutations with respect to all model phenotypes or outputs. We use the probabilistic framework defined in MaBoSS software, based on continuous time Markov chains and stochastic simulations. In addition, we suggest several computational tools for studying the distribution of double mutants in the space of model phenotype probabilities. We demonstrate this methodology on three published models for each of which we derive the genetic interaction networks and analyze their properties. We classify the obtained interactions according to their class of epistasis, dependence on the chosen initial conditions and the phenotype. The use of this methodology for validating mathematical models from experimental data and designing new experiments is discussed. PMID:25958956

  9. Competition for Catalytic Resources Alters Biological Network Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rondelez, Yannick

    2012-01-01

    Genetic regulation networks orchestrate many complex cellular behaviors. Dynamic operations that take place within cells are thus dependent on the gene expression machinery, enabled by powerful enzymes such as polymerases, ribosomes, or nucleases. These generalist enzymes typically process many different substrates, potentially leading to competitive situations: by saturating the common enzyme, one substrate may down-regulate its competitors. However, most theoretical or experimental models simply omit these effects, focusing on the pattern of genetic regulatory interactions as the main determinant of network function. We show here that competition effects have important outcomes, which can be spotted within the global dynamics of experimental systems. Further we demonstrate that enzyme saturation creates a layer of cross couplings that may foster, but also hamper, the expected behavior of synthetic biology constructs.

  10. CellNet: Network Biology Applied to Stem Cell Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Cahan, Patrick; Li, Hu; Morris, Samantha A.; da Rocha, Edroaldo Lummertz; Daley, George Q.; Collins, James J.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Somatic cell reprogramming, directed differentiation of pluripotent stem cells, and direct conversions between differentiated cell lineages represent powerful approaches to engineer cells for research and regenerative medicine. We have developed CellNet, a network biology platform that more accurately assesses the fidelity of cellular engineering than existing methodologies and generates hypotheses for improving cell derivations. Analyzing expression data from 56 published reports, we found that cells derived via directed differentiation more closely resemble their in vivo counterparts than products of direct conversion, as reflected by the establishment of target cell-type gene regulatory networks (GRNs). Furthermore, we discovered that directly converted cells fail to adequately silence expression programs of the starting population, and that the establishment of unintended GRNs is common to virtually every cellular engineering paradigm. CellNet provides a platform for quantifying how closely engineered cell populations resemble their target cell type and a rational strategy to guide enhanced cellular engineering. PMID:25126793

  11. Characterizing Loopy Biological Distribution Networks in Three Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modes, Carl; Katifori, Eleni; Magnasco, Marcelo

    2014-03-01

    In order to develop useful predictive models for vascular or other biological distribution networks that include the effects of network architecture, development, and topology some set of tools must be chosen to characterize vasculature in a physically relevant, mathematically compact way. Few such tools are extant. To address this issue we have generalized the existing two dimensional leaf venation characterization to a fully three dimensional setting, from whence it may be brought to bear on many problems in human and mammalian vasculature, particularly where that vasculature is extremely complex, as in the organs. The new algorithm rests on the abstraction of the physical `tiling' from the two dimensional case to an effective, statistical tiling of an abstract surface that the network may be thought to sit in. Generically these abstract surfaces are richer than the flat plane and as a result there are now two families of fundamental units that may aggregate upon cutting weakest links - the plaquettes of the tiling and the longer `topological' cycles associated with the abstract surface. Upon sequential removal of these weakest links, two characterizing trees emerge that condense most of the relevant information from the full network.

  12. Algorithmic Perspectives of Network Transitive Reduction Problems and their Applications to Synthesis and Analysis of Biological Networks

    PubMed Central

    Aditya, Satabdi; DasGupta, Bhaskar; Karpinski, Marek

    2013-01-01

    In this survey paper, we will present a number of core algorithmic questions concerning several transitive reduction problems on network that have applications in network synthesis and analysis involving cellular processes. Our starting point will be the so-called minimum equivalent digraph problem, a classic computational problem in combinatorial algorithms. We will subsequently consider a few non-trivial extensions or generalizations of this problem motivated by applications in systems biology. We will then discuss the applications of these algorithmic methodologies in the context of three major biological research questions: synthesizing and simplifying signal transduction networks, analyzing disease networks, and measuring redundancy of biological networks. PMID:24833332

  13. Servers Made to Order

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Daryl L.

    2007-11-01

    Virtualization is a hot buzzword right now, and it’s no wonder federal agencies are coming around to the idea of consolidating their servers and storage. Traditional servers do nothing for about 80% of their lifecycle, yet use nearly half their peak energy consumption which wastes capacity and power. Server virtualization creates logical "machines" on a single physical server. At the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland, Washington, using virtualization technology is proving to be a cost-effective way to make better use of current server hardware resources while reducing hardware lifecycle costs and cooling demands, and saving precious data center space. And as an added bonus, virtualization also ties in with the Laboratory’s mission to be responsible stewards of the environment as well as the Department of Energy’s assets. This article explains why even the smallest IT shops can benefit from the Laboratory’s best practices.

  14. Arena3D: visualization of biological networks in 3D

    PubMed Central

    Pavlopoulos, Georgios A; O'Donoghue, Seán I; Satagopam, Venkata P; Soldatos, Theodoros G; Pafilis, Evangelos; Schneider, Reinhard

    2008-01-01

    Background Complexity is a key problem when visualizing biological networks; as the number of entities increases, most graphical views become incomprehensible. Our goal is to enable many thousands of entities to be visualized meaningfully and with high performance. Results We present a new visualization tool, Arena3D, which introduces a new concept of staggered layers in 3D space. Related data – such as proteins, chemicals, or pathways – can be grouped onto separate layers and arranged via layout algorithms, such as Fruchterman-Reingold, distance geometry, and a novel hierarchical layout. Data on a layer can be clustered via k-means, affinity propagation, Markov clustering, neighbor joining, tree clustering, or UPGMA ('unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic mean'). A simple input format defines the name and URL for each node, and defines connections or similarity scores between pairs of nodes. The use of Arena3D is illustrated with datasets related to Huntington's disease. Conclusion Arena3D is a user friendly visualization tool that is able to visualize biological or any other network in 3D space. It is free for academic use and runs on any platform. It can be downloaded or lunched directly from . Java3D library and Java 1.5 need to be pre-installed for the software to run. PMID:19040715

  15. Design and Implementation of Streaming Media Server Cluster Based on FFMpeg

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hong; Zhou, Chun-long; Jin, Bao-zhao

    2015-01-01

    Poor performance and network congestion are commonly observed in the streaming media single server system. This paper proposes a scheme to construct a streaming media server cluster system based on FFMpeg. In this scheme, different users are distributed to different servers according to their locations and the balance among servers is maintained by the dynamic load-balancing algorithm based on active feedback. Furthermore, a service redirection algorithm is proposed to improve the transmission efficiency of streaming media data. The experiment results show that the server cluster system has significantly alleviated the network congestion and improved the performance in comparison with the single server system. PMID:25734187

  16. Network portal: a database for storage, analysis and visualization of biological networks

    PubMed Central

    Turkarslan, Serdar; Wurtmann, Elisabeth J.; Wu, Wei-Ju; Jiang, Ning; Bare, J. Christopher; Foley, Karen; Reiss, David J.; Novichkov, Pavel; Baliga, Nitin S.

    2014-01-01

    The ease of generating high-throughput data has enabled investigations into organismal complexity at the systems level through the inference of networks of interactions among the various cellular components (genes, RNAs, proteins and metabolites). The wider scientific community, however, currently has limited access to tools for network inference, visualization and analysis because these tasks often require advanced computational knowledge and expensive computing resources. We have designed the network portal (http://networks.systemsbiology.net) to serve as a modular database for the integration of user uploaded and public data, with inference algorithms and tools for the storage, visualization and analysis of biological networks. The portal is fully integrated into the Gaggle framework to seamlessly exchange data with desktop and web applications and to allow the user to create, save and modify workspaces, and it includes social networking capabilities for collaborative projects. While the current release of the database contains networks for 13 prokaryotic organisms from diverse phylogenetic clades (4678 co-regulated gene modules, 3466 regulators and 9291 cis-regulatory motifs), it will be rapidly populated with prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms as relevant data become available in public repositories and through user input. The modular architecture, simple data formats and open API support community development of the portal. PMID:24271392

  17. Integrative Biology Identifies Shared Transcriptional Networks in CKD

    PubMed Central

    Martini, Sebastian; Nair, Viji; Keller, Benjamin J.; Eichinger, Felix; Hawkins, Jennifer J.; Randolph, Ann; Böger, Carsten A.; Gadegbeku, Crystal A.; Fox, Caroline S.; Cohen, Clemens D.

    2014-01-01

    A previous meta-analysis of genome-wide association data by the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology and CKDGen consortia identified 16 loci associated with eGFR. To define how each of these single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) could affect renal function, we integrated GFR-associated loci with regulatory pathways, producing a molecular map of CKD. In kidney biopsy specimens from 157 European subjects representing nine different CKDs, renal transcript levels for 18 genes in proximity to the SNPs significantly correlated with GFR. These 18 genes were mapped into their biologic context by testing coregulated transcripts for enriched pathways. A network of 97 pathways linked by shared genes was constructed and characterized. Of these pathways, 56 pathways were reported previously to be associated with CKD; 41 pathways without prior association with CKD were ranked on the basis of the number of candidate genes connected to the respective pathways. All pathways aggregated into a network of two main clusters comprising inflammation- and metabolism-related pathways, with the NRF2-mediated oxidative stress response pathway serving as the hub between the two clusters. In all, 78 pathways and 95% of the connections among those pathways were verified in an independent North American biopsy cohort. Disease-specific analyses showed that most pathways are shared between sets of three diseases, with closest interconnection between lupus nephritis, IgA nephritis, and diabetic nephropathy. Taken together, the network integrates candidate genes from genome-wide association studies into their functional context, revealing interactions and defining established and novel biologic mechanisms of renal impairment in renal diseases. PMID:24925724

  18. Community-Reviewed Biological Network Models for Toxicology and Drug Discovery Applications

    PubMed Central

    Namasivayam, Aishwarya Alex; Morales, Alejandro Ferreiro; Lacave, Ángela María Fajardo; Tallam, Aravind; Simovic, Borislav; Alfaro, David Garrido; Bobbili, Dheeraj Reddy; Martin, Florian; Androsova, Ganna; Shvydchenko, Irina; Park, Jennifer; Calvo, Jorge Val; Hoeng, Julia; Peitsch, Manuel C.; Racero, Manuel González Vélez; Biryukov, Maria; Talikka, Marja; Pérez, Modesto Berraquero; Rohatgi, Neha; Díaz-Díaz, Noberto; Mandarapu, Rajesh; Ruiz, Rubén Amián; Davidyan, Sergey; Narayanasamy, Shaman; Boué, Stéphanie; Guryanova, Svetlana; Arbas, Susana Martínez; Menon, Swapna; Xiang, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Biological network models offer a framework for understanding disease by describing the relationships between the mechanisms involved in the regulation of biological processes. Crowdsourcing can efficiently gather feedback from a wide audience with varying expertise. In the Network Verification Challenge, scientists verified and enhanced a set of 46 biological networks relevant to lung and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The networks were built using Biological Expression Language and contain detailed information for each node and edge, including supporting evidence from the literature. Network scoring of public transcriptomics data inferred perturbation of a subset of mechanisms and networks that matched the measured outcomes. These results, based on a computable network approach, can be used to identify novel mechanisms activated in disease, quantitatively compare different treatments and time points, and allow for assessment of data with low signal. These networks are periodically verified by the crowd to maintain an up-to-date suite of networks for toxicology and drug discovery applications. PMID:27429547

  19. Community-Reviewed Biological Network Models for Toxicology and Drug Discovery Applications.

    PubMed

    Namasivayam, Aishwarya Alex; Morales, Alejandro Ferreiro; Lacave, Ángela María Fajardo; Tallam, Aravind; Simovic, Borislav; Alfaro, David Garrido; Bobbili, Dheeraj Reddy; Martin, Florian; Androsova, Ganna; Shvydchenko, Irina; Park, Jennifer; Calvo, Jorge Val; Hoeng, Julia; Peitsch, Manuel C; Racero, Manuel González Vélez; Biryukov, Maria; Talikka, Marja; Pérez, Modesto Berraquero; Rohatgi, Neha; Díaz-Díaz, Noberto; Mandarapu, Rajesh; Ruiz, Rubén Amián; Davidyan, Sergey; Narayanasamy, Shaman; Boué, Stéphanie; Guryanova, Svetlana; Arbas, Susana Martínez; Menon, Swapna; Xiang, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Biological network models offer a framework for understanding disease by describing the relationships between the mechanisms involved in the regulation of biological processes. Crowdsourcing can efficiently gather feedback from a wide audience with varying expertise. In the Network Verification Challenge, scientists verified and enhanced a set of 46 biological networks relevant to lung and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The networks were built using Biological Expression Language and contain detailed information for each node and edge, including supporting evidence from the literature. Network scoring of public transcriptomics data inferred perturbation of a subset of mechanisms and networks that matched the measured outcomes. These results, based on a computable network approach, can be used to identify novel mechanisms activated in disease, quantitatively compare different treatments and time points, and allow for assessment of data with low signal. These networks are periodically verified by the crowd to maintain an up-to-date suite of networks for toxicology and drug discovery applications. PMID:27429547

  20. A network biology approach to denitrification in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Arat, Seda; Bullerjahn, George S.; Laubenbacher, Reinhard

    2015-02-23

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a metabolically flexible member of the Gammaproteobacteria. Under anaerobic conditions and the presence of nitrate, P. aeruginosa can perform (complete) denitrification, a respiratory process of dissimilatory nitrate reduction to nitrogen gas via nitrite (NO₂), nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous oxide (N₂O). This study focuses on understanding the influence of environmental conditions on bacterial denitrification performance, using a mathematical model of a metabolic network in P. aeruginosa. To our knowledge, this is the first mathematical model of denitrification for this bacterium. Analysis of the long-term behavior of the network under changing concentration levels of oxygen (O₂), nitrate (NO₃),more » and phosphate (PO₄) suggests that PO₄ concentration strongly affects denitrification performance. The model provides three predictions on denitrification activity of P. aeruginosa under various environmental conditions, and these predictions are either experimentally validated or supported by pertinent biological literature. One motivation for this study is to capture the effect of PO₄ on a denitrification metabolic network of P. aeruginosa in order to shed light on mechanisms for greenhouse gas N₂O accumulation during seasonal oxygen depletion in aquatic environments such as Lake Erie (Laurentian Great Lakes, USA). Simulating the microbial production of greenhouse gases in anaerobic aquatic systems such as Lake Erie allows a deeper understanding of the contributing environmental effects that will inform studies on, and remediation strategies for, other hypoxic sites worldwide.« less

  1. A Network Biology Approach to Denitrification in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Arat, Seda; Bullerjahn, George S.; Laubenbacher, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a metabolically flexible member of the Gammaproteobacteria. Under anaerobic conditions and the presence of nitrate, P. aeruginosa can perform (complete) denitrification, a respiratory process of dissimilatory nitrate reduction to nitrogen gas via nitrite (NO2), nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous oxide (N2O). This study focuses on understanding the influence of environmental conditions on bacterial denitrification performance, using a mathematical model of a metabolic network in P. aeruginosa. To our knowledge, this is the first mathematical model of denitrification for this bacterium. Analysis of the long-term behavior of the network under changing concentration levels of oxygen (O2), nitrate (NO3), and phosphate (PO4) suggests that PO4 concentration strongly affects denitrification performance. The model provides three predictions on denitrification activity of P. aeruginosa under various environmental conditions, and these predictions are either experimentally validated or supported by pertinent biological literature. One motivation for this study is to capture the effect of PO4 on a denitrification metabolic network of P. aeruginosa in order to shed light on mechanisms for greenhouse gas N2O accumulation during seasonal oxygen depletion in aquatic environments such as Lake Erie (Laurentian Great Lakes, USA). Simulating the microbial production of greenhouse gases in anaerobic aquatic systems such as Lake Erie allows a deeper understanding of the contributing environmental effects that will inform studies on, and remediation strategies for, other hypoxic sites worldwide. PMID:25706405

  2. A network biology approach to denitrification in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Arat, Seda; Bullerjahn, George S; Laubenbacher, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a metabolically flexible member of the Gammaproteobacteria. Under anaerobic conditions and the presence of nitrate, P. aeruginosa can perform (complete) denitrification, a respiratory process of dissimilatory nitrate reduction to nitrogen gas via nitrite (NO2), nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous oxide (N2O). This study focuses on understanding the influence of environmental conditions on bacterial denitrification performance, using a mathematical model of a metabolic network in P. aeruginosa. To our knowledge, this is the first mathematical model of denitrification for this bacterium. Analysis of the long-term behavior of the network under changing concentration levels of oxygen (O2), nitrate (NO3), and phosphate (PO4) suggests that PO4 concentration strongly affects denitrification performance. The model provides three predictions on denitrification activity of P. aeruginosa under various environmental conditions, and these predictions are either experimentally validated or supported by pertinent biological literature. One motivation for this study is to capture the effect of PO4 on a denitrification metabolic network of P. aeruginosa in order to shed light on mechanisms for greenhouse gas N2O accumulation during seasonal oxygen depletion in aquatic environments such as Lake Erie (Laurentian Great Lakes, USA). Simulating the microbial production of greenhouse gases in anaerobic aquatic systems such as Lake Erie allows a deeper understanding of the contributing environmental effects that will inform studies on, and remediation strategies for, other hypoxic sites worldwide. PMID:25706405

  3. Mining Functional Modules in Heterogeneous Biological Networks Using Multiplex PageRank Approach.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Zhao, Patrick X

    2016-01-01

    Identification of functional modules/sub-networks in large-scale biological networks is one of the important research challenges in current bioinformatics and systems biology. Approaches have been developed to identify functional modules in single-class biological networks; however, methods for systematically and interactively mining multiple classes of heterogeneous biological networks are lacking. In this paper, we present a novel algorithm (called mPageRank) that utilizes the Multiplex PageRank approach to mine functional modules from two classes of biological networks. We demonstrate the capabilities of our approach by successfully mining functional biological modules through integrating expression-based gene-gene association networks and protein-protein interaction networks. We first compared the performance of our method with that of other methods using simulated data. We then applied our method to identify the cell division cycle related functional module and plant signaling defense-related functional module in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Our results demonstrated that the mPageRank method is effective for mining sub-networks in both expression-based gene-gene association networks and protein-protein interaction networks, and has the potential to be adapted for the discovery of functional modules/sub-networks in other heterogeneous biological networks. The mPageRank executable program, source code, the datasets and results of the presented two case studies are publicly and freely available at http://plantgrn.noble.org/MPageRank/. PMID:27446133

  4. Mining Functional Modules in Heterogeneous Biological Networks Using Multiplex PageRank Approach

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; Zhao, Patrick X.

    2016-01-01

    Identification of functional modules/sub-networks in large-scale biological networks is one of the important research challenges in current bioinformatics and systems biology. Approaches have been developed to identify functional modules in single-class biological networks; however, methods for systematically and interactively mining multiple classes of heterogeneous biological networks are lacking. In this paper, we present a novel algorithm (called mPageRank) that utilizes the Multiplex PageRank approach to mine functional modules from two classes of biological networks. We demonstrate the capabilities of our approach by successfully mining functional biological modules through integrating expression-based gene-gene association networks and protein-protein interaction networks. We first compared the performance of our method with that of other methods using simulated data. We then applied our method to identify the cell division cycle related functional module and plant signaling defense-related functional module in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Our results demonstrated that the mPageRank method is effective for mining sub-networks in both expression-based gene-gene association networks and protein-protein interaction networks, and has the potential to be adapted for the discovery of functional modules/sub-networks in other heterogeneous biological networks. The mPageRank executable program, source code, the datasets and results of the presented two case studies are publicly and freely available at http://plantgrn.noble.org/MPageRank/. PMID:27446133

  5. Alzheimer disease: modeling an Aβ-centered biological network.

    PubMed

    Campion, D; Pottier, C; Nicolas, G; Le Guennec, K; Rovelet-Lecrux, A

    2016-07-01

    In genetically complex diseases, the search for missing heritability is focusing on rare variants with large effect. Thanks to next generation sequencing technologies, genome-wide characterization of these variants is now feasible in every individual. However, a lesson from current studies is that collapsing rare variants at the gene level is often insufficient to obtain a statistically significant signal in case-control studies, and that network-based analyses are an attractive complement to classical approaches. In Alzheimer disease (AD), according to the prevalent amyloid cascade hypothesis, the pathology is driven by the amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide. In past years, based on experimental studies, several hundreds of proteins have been shown to interfere with Aβ production, clearance, aggregation or toxicity. Thanks to a manual curation of the literature, we identified 335 genes/proteins involved in this biological network and classified them according to their cellular function. The complete list of genes, or its subcomponents, will be of interest in ongoing AD genetic studies. PMID:27021818

  6. Biologically relevant neural network architectures for support vector machines.

    PubMed

    Jändel, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    Neural network architectures that implement support vector machines (SVM) are investigated for the purpose of modeling perceptual one-shot learning in biological organisms. A family of SVM algorithms including variants of maximum margin, 1-norm, 2-norm and ν-SVM is considered. SVM training rules adapted for neural computation are derived. It is found that competitive queuing memory (CQM) is ideal for storing and retrieving support vectors. Several different CQM-based neural architectures are examined for each SVM algorithm. Although most of the sixty-four scanned architectures are unconvincing for biological modeling four feasible candidates are found. The seemingly complex learning rule of a full ν-SVM implementation finds a particularly simple and natural implementation in bisymmetric architectures. Since CQM-like neural structures are thought to encode skilled action sequences and bisymmetry is ubiquitous in motor systems it is speculated that trainable pattern recognition in low-level perception has evolved as an internalized motor programme. PMID:24126252

  7. Enhancement of COPD biological networks using a web-based collaboration interface.

    PubMed

    Boue, Stephanie; Fields, Brett; Hoeng, Julia; Park, Jennifer; Peitsch, Manuel C; Schlage, Walter K; Talikka, Marja; Binenbaum, Ilona; Bondarenko, Vladimir; Bulgakov, Oleg V; Cherkasova, Vera; Diaz-Diaz, Norberto; Fedorova, Larisa; Guryanova, Svetlana; Guzova, Julia; Igorevna Koroleva, Galina; Kozhemyakina, Elena; Kumar, Rahul; Lavid, Noa; Lu, Qingxian; Menon, Swapna; Ouliel, Yael; Peterson, Samantha C; Prokhorov, Alexander; Sanders, Edward; Schrier, Sarah; Schwaitzer Neta, Golan; Shvydchenko, Irina; Tallam, Aravind; Villa-Fombuena, Gema; Wu, John; Yudkevich, Ilya; Zelikman, Mariya

    2015-01-01

    The construction and application of biological network models is an approach that offers a holistic way to understand biological processes involved in disease. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a progressive inflammatory disease of the airways for which therapeutic options currently are limited after diagnosis, even in its earliest stage. COPD network models are important tools to better understand the biological components and processes underlying initial disease development. With the increasing amounts of literature that are now available, crowdsourcing approaches offer new forms of collaboration for researchers to review biological findings, which can be applied to the construction and verification of complex biological networks. We report the construction of 50 biological network models relevant to lung biology and early COPD using an integrative systems biology and collaborative crowd-verification approach. By combining traditional literature curation with a data-driven approach that predicts molecular activities from transcriptomics data, we constructed an initial COPD network model set based on a previously published non-diseased lung-relevant model set. The crowd was given the opportunity to enhance and refine the networks on a website ( https://bionet.sbvimprover.com/) and to add mechanistic detail, as well as critically review existing evidence and evidence added by other users, so as to enhance the accuracy of the biological representation of the processes captured in the networks. Finally, scientists and experts in the field discussed and refined the networks during an in-person jamboree meeting. Here, we describe examples of the changes made to three of these networks: Neutrophil Signaling, Macrophage Signaling, and Th1-Th2 Signaling. We describe an innovative approach to biological network construction that combines literature and data mining and a crowdsourcing approach to generate a comprehensive set of COPD-relevant models that can be

  8. Enhancement of COPD biological networks using a web-based collaboration interface

    PubMed Central

    Boue, Stephanie; Fields, Brett; Hoeng, Julia; Park, Jennifer; Peitsch, Manuel C.; Schlage, Walter K.; Talikka, Marja; Binenbaum, Ilona; Bondarenko, Vladimir; Bulgakov, Oleg V.; Cherkasova, Vera; Diaz-Diaz, Norberto; Fedorova, Larisa; Guryanova, Svetlana; Guzova, Julia; Igorevna Koroleva, Galina; Kozhemyakina, Elena; Kumar, Rahul; Lavid, Noa; Lu, Qingxian; Menon, Swapna; Ouliel, Yael; Peterson, Samantha C.; Prokhorov, Alexander; Sanders, Edward; Schrier, Sarah; Schwaitzer Neta, Golan; Shvydchenko, Irina; Tallam, Aravind; Villa-Fombuena, Gema; Wu, John; Yudkevich, Ilya; Zelikman, Mariya

    2015-01-01

    The construction and application of biological network models is an approach that offers a holistic way to understand biological processes involved in disease. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a progressive inflammatory disease of the airways for which therapeutic options currently are limited after diagnosis, even in its earliest stage. COPD network models are important tools to better understand the biological components and processes underlying initial disease development. With the increasing amounts of literature that are now available, crowdsourcing approaches offer new forms of collaboration for researchers to review biological findings, which can be applied to the construction and verification of complex biological networks. We report the construction of 50 biological network models relevant to lung biology and early COPD using an integrative systems biology and collaborative crowd-verification approach. By combining traditional literature curation with a data-driven approach that predicts molecular activities from transcriptomics data, we constructed an initial COPD network model set based on a previously published non-diseased lung-relevant model set. The crowd was given the opportunity to enhance and refine the networks on a website ( https://bionet.sbvimprover.com/) and to add mechanistic detail, as well as critically review existing evidence and evidence added by other users, so as to enhance the accuracy of the biological representation of the processes captured in the networks. Finally, scientists and experts in the field discussed and refined the networks during an in-person jamboree meeting. Here, we describe examples of the changes made to three of these networks: Neutrophil Signaling, Macrophage Signaling, and Th1-Th2 Signaling. We describe an innovative approach to biological network construction that combines literature and data mining and a crowdsourcing approach to generate a comprehensive set of COPD-relevant models that can be

  9. Complex network problems in physics, computer science and biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cojocaru, Radu Ionut

    There is a close relation between physics and mathematics and the exchange of ideas between these two sciences are well established. However until few years ago there was no such a close relation between physics and computer science. Even more, only recently biologists started to use methods and tools from statistical physics in order to study the behavior of complex system. In this thesis we concentrate on applying and analyzing several methods borrowed from computer science to biology and also we use methods from statistical physics in solving hard problems from computer science. In recent years physicists have been interested in studying the behavior of complex networks. Physics is an experimental science in which theoretical predictions are compared to experiments. In this definition, the term prediction plays a very important role: although the system is complex, it is still possible to get predictions for its behavior, but these predictions are of a probabilistic nature. Spin glasses, lattice gases or the Potts model are a few examples of complex systems in physics. Spin glasses and many frustrated antiferromagnets map exactly to computer science problems in the NP-hard class defined in Chapter 1. In Chapter 1 we discuss a common result from artificial intelligence (AI) which shows that there are some problems which are NP-complete, with the implication that these problems are difficult to solve. We introduce a few well known hard problems from computer science (Satisfiability, Coloring, Vertex Cover together with Maximum Independent Set and Number Partitioning) and then discuss their mapping to problems from physics. In Chapter 2 we provide a short review of combinatorial optimization algorithms and their applications to ground state problems in disordered systems. We discuss the cavity method initially developed for studying the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model of spin glasses. We extend this model to the study of a specific case of spin glass on the Bethe

  10. The redox biology network in cancer pathophysiology and therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Manda, Gina; Isvoranu, Gheorghita; Comanescu, Maria Victoria; Manea, Adrian; Debelec Butuner, Bilge; Korkmaz, Kemal Sami

    2015-01-01

    The review pinpoints operational concepts related to the redox biology network applied to the pathophysiology and therapeutics of solid tumors. A sophisticated network of intrinsic and extrinsic cues, integrated in the tumor niche, drives tumorigenesis and tumor progression. Critical mutations and distorted redox signaling pathways orchestrate pathologic events inside cancer cells, resulting in resistance to stress and death signals, aberrant proliferation and efficient repair mechanisms. Additionally, the complex inter-cellular crosstalk within the tumor niche, mediated by cytokines, redox-sensitive danger signals (HMGB1) and exosomes, under the pressure of multiple stresses (oxidative, inflammatory, metabolic), greatly contributes to the malignant phenotype. The tumor-associated inflammatory stress and its suppressive action on the anti-tumor immune response are highlighted. We further emphasize that ROS may act either as supporter or enemy of cancer cells, depending on the context. Oxidative stress-based therapies, such as radiotherapy and photodynamic therapy, take advantage of the cytotoxic face of ROS for killing tumor cells by a non-physiologically sudden, localized and intense oxidative burst. The type of tumor cell death elicited by these therapies is discussed. Therapy outcome depends on the differential sensitivity to oxidative stress of particular tumor cells, such as cancer stem cells, and therefore co-therapies that transiently down-regulate their intrinsic antioxidant system hold great promise. We draw attention on the consequences of the damage signals delivered by oxidative stress-injured cells to neighboring and distant cells, and emphasize the benefits of therapeutically triggered immunologic cell death in metastatic cancer. An integrative approach should be applied when designing therapeutic strategies in cancer, taking into consideration the mutational, metabolic, inflammatory and oxidative status of tumor cells, cellular heterogeneity and the

  11. Wireless address event representation system for biological sensor networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folowosele, Fopefolu; Tapson, Jonathan; Etienne-Cummings, Ralph

    2007-05-01

    We describe wireless networking systems for close proximity biological sensors, as would be encountered in artificial skin. The sensors communicate to a "base station" that interprets the data and decodes its origin. Using a large bundle of ultra thin metal wires from the sensors to the "base station" introduces significant technological hurdles for both the construction and maintenance of the system. Fortunately, the Address Event Representation (AER) protocol provides an elegant and biomorphic method for transmitting many impulses (i.e. neural spikes) down a single wire/channel. However, AER does not communicate any sensory information within each spike, other that the address of the origination of the spike. Therefore, each sensor must provide a number of spikes to communicate its data, typically in the form of the inter-spike intervals or spike rate. Furthermore, complex circuitry is required to arbitrate access to the channel when multiple sensors communicate simultaneously, which results in spike delay. This error is exacerbated as the number of sensors per channel increases, mandating more channels and more wires. We contend that despite the effectiveness of the wire-based AER protocol, its natural evolution will be the wireless AER protocol. A wireless AER system: (1) does not require arbitration to handle multiple simultaneous access of the channel, (2) uses cross-correlation delay to encode sensor data in every spike (eliminating the error due to arbitration delay), and (3) can be reorganized and expanded with little consequence to the network. The system uses spread spectrum communications principles, implemented with a low-power integrate-and-fire neurons. This paper discusses the design, operation and capabilities of such a system. We show that integrate-and-fire neurons can be used to both decode the origination of each spike and extract the data contained within in. We also show that there are many technical obstacles to overcome before this version

  12. Optimization-based Inference for Temporally Evolving Networks with Applications in Biology

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Young Hwan; Gray, Joe

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The problem of identifying dynamics of biological networks is of critical importance in order to understand biological systems. In this article, we propose a data-driven inference scheme to identify temporally evolving network representations of genetic networks. In the formulation of the optimization problem, we use an adjacency map as a priori information and define a cost function that both drives the connectivity of the graph to match biological data as well as generates a sparse and robust network at corresponding time intervals. Through simulation studies of simple examples, it is shown that this optimization scheme can help capture the topological change of a biological signaling pathway, and furthermore, might help to understand the structure and dynamics of biological genetic networks. PMID:23210478

  13. Understanding Customer Dissatisfaction with Underutilized Distributed File Servers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riedel, Erik; Gibson, Garth

    1996-01-01

    An important trend in the design of storage subsystems is a move toward direct network attachment. Network-attached storage offers the opportunity to off-load distributed file system functionality from dedicated file server machines and execute many requests directly at the storage devices. For this strategy to lead to better performance, as perceived by users, the response time of distributed operations must improve. In this paper we analyze measurements of an Andrew file system (AFS) server that we recently upgraded in an effort to improve client performance in our laboratory. While the original server's overall utilization was only about 3%, we show how burst loads were sufficiently intense to lead to period of poor response time significant enough to trigger customer dissatisfaction. In particular, we show how, after adjusting for network load and traffic to non-project servers, 50% of the variation in client response time was explained by variation in server central processing unit (CPU) use. That is, clients saw long response times in large part because the server was often over-utilized when it was used at all. Using these measures, we see that off-loading file server work in a network-attached storage architecture has to potential to benefit user response time. Computational power in such a system scales directly with storage capacity, so the slowdown during burst period should be reduced.

  14. Final Report for ''Client Server Software for the National Transport Code Collaboration''

    SciTech Connect

    John R Cary; David Alexander; Johan Carlsson; Kelly Luetkemeyer; Nathaniel Sizemore

    2004-04-30

    OAK-B135 Tech-X Corporation designed and developed all the networking code tying together the NTCC data server with the data client and the physics server with the data server and physics client. We were also solely responsible for the data and physics clients and the vast majority of the work on the data server. We also performed a number of other tasks.

  15. A Unifying Mathematical Framework for Genetic Robustness, Environmental Robustness, Network Robustness and their Trade-offs on Phenotype Robustness in Biological Networks. Part III: Synthetic Gene Networks in Synthetic Biology.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bor-Sen; Lin, Ying-Po

    2013-01-01

    Robust stabilization and environmental disturbance attenuation are ubiquitous systematic properties that are observed in biological systems at many different levels. The underlying principles for robust stabilization and environmental disturbance attenuation are universal to both complex biological systems and sophisticated engineering systems. In many biological networks, network robustness should be large enough to confer: intrinsic robustness for tolerating intrinsic parameter fluctuations; genetic robustness for buffering genetic variations; and environmental robustness for resisting environmental disturbances. Network robustness is needed so phenotype stability of biological network can be maintained, guaranteeing phenotype robustness. Synthetic biology is foreseen to have important applications in biotechnology and medicine; it is expected to contribute significantly to a better understanding of functioning of complex biological systems. This paper presents a unifying mathematical framework for investigating the principles of both robust stabilization and environmental disturbance attenuation for synthetic gene networks in synthetic biology. Further, from the unifying mathematical framework, we found that the phenotype robustness criterion for synthetic gene networks is the following: if intrinsic robustness + genetic robustness + environmental robustness ≦ network robustness, then the phenotype robustness can be maintained in spite of intrinsic parameter fluctuations, genetic variations, and environmental disturbances. Therefore, the trade-offs between intrinsic robustness, genetic robustness, environmental robustness, and network robustness in synthetic biology can also be investigated through corresponding phenotype robustness criteria from the systematic point of view. Finally, a robust synthetic design that involves network evolution algorithms with desired behavior under intrinsic parameter fluctuations, genetic variations, and environmental

  16. A Unifying Mathematical Framework for Genetic Robustness, Environmental Robustness, Network Robustness and their Trade-offs on Phenotype Robustness in Biological Networks. Part III: Synthetic Gene Networks in Synthetic Biology

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bor-Sen; Lin, Ying-Po

    2013-01-01

    Robust stabilization and environmental disturbance attenuation are ubiquitous systematic properties that are observed in biological systems at many different levels. The underlying principles for robust stabilization and environmental disturbance attenuation are universal to both complex biological systems and sophisticated engineering systems. In many biological networks, network robustness should be large enough to confer: intrinsic robustness for tolerating intrinsic parameter fluctuations; genetic robustness for buffering genetic variations; and environmental robustness for resisting environmental disturbances. Network robustness is needed so phenotype stability of biological network can be maintained, guaranteeing phenotype robustness. Synthetic biology is foreseen to have important applications in biotechnology and medicine; it is expected to contribute significantly to a better understanding of functioning of complex biological systems. This paper presents a unifying mathematical framework for investigating the principles of both robust stabilization and environmental disturbance attenuation for synthetic gene networks in synthetic biology. Further, from the unifying mathematical framework, we found that the phenotype robustness criterion for synthetic gene networks is the following: if intrinsic robustness + genetic robustness + environmental robustness ≦ network robustness, then the phenotype robustness can be maintained in spite of intrinsic parameter fluctuations, genetic variations, and environmental disturbances. Therefore, the trade-offs between intrinsic robustness, genetic robustness, environmental robustness, and network robustness in synthetic biology can also be investigated through corresponding phenotype robustness criteria from the systematic point of view. Finally, a robust synthetic design that involves network evolution algorithms with desired behavior under intrinsic parameter fluctuations, genetic variations, and environmental

  17. HDF-EOS Web Server

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ullman, Richard; Bane, Bob; Yang, Jingli

    2008-01-01

    A shell script has been written as a means of automatically making HDF-EOS-formatted data sets available via the World Wide Web. ("HDF-EOS" and variants thereof are defined in the first of the two immediately preceding articles.) The shell script chains together some software tools developed by the Data Usability Group at Goddard Space Flight Center to perform the following actions: Extract metadata in Object Definition Language (ODL) from an HDF-EOS file, Convert the metadata from ODL to Extensible Markup Language (XML), Reformat the XML metadata into human-readable Hypertext Markup Language (HTML), Publish the HTML metadata and the original HDF-EOS file to a Web server and an Open-source Project for a Network Data Access Protocol (OPeN-DAP) server computer, and Reformat the XML metadata and submit the resulting file to the EOS Clearinghouse, which is a Web-based metadata clearinghouse that facilitates searching for, and exchange of, Earth-Science data.

  18. Home media server content management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokmakoff, Andrew A.; van Vliet, Harry

    2001-07-01

    With the advent of set-top boxes, the convergence of TV (broadcasting) and PC (Internet) is set to enter the home environment. Currently, a great deal of activity is occurring in developing standards (TV-Anytime Forum) and devices (TiVo) for local storage on Home Media Servers (HMS). These devices lie at the heart of convergence of the triad: communications/networks - content/media - computing/software. Besides massive storage capacity and being a communications 'gateway', the home media server is characterised by the ability to handle metadata and software that provides an easy to use on-screen interface and intelligent search/content handling facilities. In this paper, we describe a research prototype HMS that is being developed within the GigaCE project at the Telematica Instituut . Our prototype demonstrates advanced search and retrieval (video browsing), adaptive user profiling and an innovative 3D component of the Electronic Program Guide (EPG) which represents online presence. We discuss the use of MPEG-7 for representing metadata, the use of MPEG-21 working draft standards for content identification, description and rights expression, and the use of HMS peer-to-peer content distribution approaches. Finally, we outline explorative user behaviour experiments that aim to investigate the effectiveness of the prototype HMS during development.

  19. Exploratory Analysis of Biological Networks through Visualization, Clustering, and Functional Annotation in Cytoscape.

    PubMed

    Baryshnikova, Anastasia

    2016-01-01

    Biological networks define how genes, proteins, and other cellular components interact with one another to carry out specific functions, providing a scaffold for understanding cellular organization. Although in-depth network analysis requires advanced mathematical and computational knowledge, a preliminary visual exploration of biological networks is accessible to anyone with basic computer skills. Visualization of biological networks is used primarily to examine network topology, identify functional modules, and predict gene functions based on gene connectivity within the network. Networks are excellent at providing a bird's-eye view of data sets and have the power of illustrating complex ideas in simple and intuitive terms. In addition, they enable exploratory analysis and generation of new hypotheses, which can then be tested using rigorous statistical and experimental tools. This protocol describes a simple procedure for visualizing a biological network using the genetic interaction similarity network for Saccharomyces cerevisiae as an example. The visualization procedure described here relies on the open-source network visualization software Cytoscape and includes detailed instructions on formatting and loading the data, clustering networks, and overlaying functional annotations. PMID:26988373

  20. A Glimpse to Background and Characteristics of Major Molecular Biological Networks

    PubMed Central

    Altaf-Ul-Amin, Md.; Katsuragi, Tetsuo; Sato, Tetsuo; Kanaya, Shigehiko

    2015-01-01

    Recently, biology has become a data intensive science because of huge data sets produced by high throughput molecular biological experiments in diverse areas including the fields of genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics. These huge datasets have paved the way for system-level analysis of the processes and subprocesses of the cell. For system-level understanding, initially the elements of a system are connected based on their mutual relations and a network is formed. Among omics researchers, construction and analysis of biological networks have become highly popular. In this review, we briefly discuss both the biological background and topological properties of major types of omics networks to facilitate a comprehensive understanding and to conceptualize the foundation of network biology. PMID:26491677

  1. CommServer: A Communications Manager For Remote Data Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irving, K.; Kane, D. L.

    2012-12-01

    CommServer is a software system that manages making connections to remote data-gathering stations, providing a simple network interface to client applications. The client requests a connection to a site by name, and the server establishes the connection, providing a bidirectional channel between the client and the target site if successful. CommServer was developed to manage networks of FreeWave serial data radios with multiple data sites, repeaters, and network-accessed base stations, and has been in continuous operational use for several years. Support for Iridium modems using RUDICS will be added soon, and no changes to the application interface are anticipated. CommServer is implemented on Linux using programs written in bash shell, Python, Perl, AWK, under a set of conventions we refer to as ThinObject.

  2. Gene regulatory networks and the underlying biology of developmental toxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    Embryonic cells are specified by large-scale networks of functionally linked regulatory genes. Knowledge of the relevant gene regulatory networks is essential for understanding phenotypic heterogeneity that emerges from disruption of molecular functions, cellular processes or sig...

  3. Network integration and graph analysis in mammalian molecular systems biology

    PubMed Central

    Ma'ayan, A.

    2009-01-01

    Abstraction of intracellular biomolecular interactions into networks is useful for data integration and graph analysis. Network analysis tools facilitate predictions of novel functions for proteins, prediction of functional interactions and identification of intracellular modules. These efforts are linked with drug and phenotype data to accelerate drug-target and biomarker discovery. This review highlights the currently available varieties of mammalian biomolecular networks, and surveys methods and tools to construct, compare, integrate, visualise and analyse such networks. PMID:19045817

  4. Community Structure Reveals Biologically Functional Modules in MEF2C Transcriptional Regulatory Network

    PubMed Central

    Alcalá-Corona, Sergio A.; Velázquez-Caldelas, Tadeo E.; Espinal-Enríquez, Jesús; Hernández-Lemus, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Gene regulatory networks are useful to understand the activity behind the complex mechanisms in transcriptional regulation. A main goal in contemporary biology is using such networks to understand the systemic regulation of gene expression. In this work, we carried out a systematic study of a transcriptional regulatory network derived from a comprehensive selection of all potential transcription factor interactions downstream from MEF2C, a human transcription factor master regulator. By analyzing the connectivity structure of such network, we were able to find different biologically functional processes and specific biochemical pathways statistically enriched in communities of genes into the network, such processes are related to cell signaling, cell cycle and metabolism. In this way we further support the hypothesis that structural properties of biological networks encode an important part of their functional behavior in eukaryotic cells. PMID:27252657

  5. Engineering Proteins for Thermostability with iRDP Web Server

    PubMed Central

    Ghanate, Avinash; Ramasamy, Sureshkumar; Suresh, C. G.

    2015-01-01

    Engineering protein molecules with desired structure and biological functions has been an elusive goal. Development of industrially viable proteins with improved properties such as stability, catalytic activity and altered specificity by modifying the structure of an existing protein has widely been targeted through rational protein engineering. Although a range of factors contributing to thermal stability have been identified and widely researched, the in silico implementation of these as strategies directed towards enhancement of protein stability has not yet been explored extensively. A wide range of structural analysis tools is currently available for in silico protein engineering. However these tools concentrate on only a limited number of factors or individual protein structures, resulting in cumbersome and time-consuming analysis. The iRDP web server presented here provides a unified platform comprising of iCAPS, iStability and iMutants modules. Each module addresses different facets of effective rational engineering of proteins aiming towards enhanced stability. While iCAPS aids in selection of target protein based on factors contributing to structural stability, iStability uniquely offers in silico implementation of known thermostabilization strategies in proteins for identification and stability prediction of potential stabilizing mutation sites. iMutants aims to assess mutants based on changes in local interaction network and degree of residue conservation at the mutation sites. Each module was validated using an extensively diverse dataset. The server is freely accessible at http://irdp.ncl.res.in and has no login requirements. PMID:26436543

  6. iMODS: internal coordinates normal mode analysis server

    PubMed Central

    López-Blanco, José Ramón; Aliaga, José I.; Quintana-Ortí, Enrique S.; Chacón, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Normal mode analysis (NMA) in internal (dihedral) coordinates naturally reproduces the collective functional motions of biological macromolecules. iMODS facilitates the exploration of such modes and generates feasible transition pathways between two homologous structures, even with large macromolecules. The distinctive internal coordinate formulation improves the efficiency of NMA and extends its applicability while implicitly maintaining stereochemistry. Vibrational analysis, motion animations and morphing trajectories can be easily carried out at different resolution scales almost interactively. The server is versatile; non-specialists can rapidly characterize potential conformational changes, whereas advanced users can customize the model resolution with multiple coarse-grained atomic representations and elastic network potentials. iMODS supports advanced visualization capabilities for illustrating collective motions, including an improved affine-model-based arrow representation of domain dynamics. The generated all-heavy-atoms conformations can be used to introduce flexibility for more advanced modeling or sampling strategies. The server is free and open to all users with no login requirement at http://imods.chaconlab.org. PMID:24771341

  7. Pandora, a PAthway and Network DiscOveRy Approach based on common biological evidence

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kelvin Xi; Ouellette, B. F. Francis

    2010-01-01

    Motivation: Many biological phenomena involve extensive interactions between many of the biological pathways present in cells. However, extraction of all the inherent biological pathways remains a major challenge in systems biology. With the advent of high-throughput functional genomic techniques, it is now possible to infer biological pathways and pathway organization in a systematic way by integrating disparate biological information. Results: Here, we propose a novel integrated approach that uses network topology to predict biological pathways. We integrated four types of biological evidence (protein–protein interaction, genetic interaction, domain–domain interaction and semantic similarity of Gene Ontology terms) to generate a functionally associated network. This network was then used to develop a new pathway finding algorithm to predict biological pathways in yeast. Our approach discovered 195 biological pathways and 31 functionally redundant pathway pairs in yeast. By comparing our identified pathways to three public pathway databases (KEGG, BioCyc and Reactome), we observed that our approach achieves a maximum positive predictive value of 12.8% and improves on other predictive approaches. This study allows us to reconstruct biological pathways and delineates cellular machinery in a systematic view. Availability: The method has been implemented in Perl and is available for downloading from http://www.oicr.on.ca/research/ouellette/pandora. It is distributed under the terms of GPL (http://opensource.org/licenses/gpl-2.0.php) Contact: francis@oicr.on.ca Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:20031970

  8. Robustness of the p53 network and biological hackers.

    PubMed

    Dartnell, Lewis; Simeonidis, Evangelos; Hubank, Michael; Tsoka, Sophia; Bogle, I David L; Papageorgiou, Lazaros G

    2005-06-01

    The p53 protein interaction network is crucial in regulating the metazoan cell cycle and apoptosis. Here, the robustness of the p53 network is studied by analyzing its degeneration under two modes of attack. Linear Programming is used to calculate average path lengths among proteins and the network diameter as measures of functionality. The p53 network is found to be robust to random loss of nodes, but vulnerable to a targeted attack against its hubs, as a result of its architecture. The significance of the results is considered with respect to mutational knockouts of proteins and the directed attacks mounted by tumour inducing viruses. PMID:15896791

  9. Modeling Reactivity to Biological Macromolecules with a Deep Multitask Network.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Tyler B; Dang, Na Le; Miller, Grover P; Swamidass, S Joshua

    2016-08-24

    Most small-molecule drug candidates fail before entering the market, frequently because of unexpected toxicity. Often, toxicity is detected only late in drug development, because many types of toxicities, especially idiosyncratic adverse drug reactions (IADRs), are particularly hard to predict and detect. Moreover, drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is the most frequent reason drugs are withdrawn from the market and causes 50% of acute liver failure cases in the United States. A common mechanism often underlies many types of drug toxicities, including both DILI and IADRs. Drugs are bioactivated by drug-metabolizing enzymes into reactive metabolites, which then conjugate to sites in proteins or DNA to form adducts. DNA adducts are often mutagenic and may alter the reading and copying of genes and their regulatory elements, causing gene dysregulation and even triggering cancer. Similarly, protein adducts can disrupt their normal biological functions and induce harmful immune responses. Unfortunately, reactive metabolites are not reliably detected by experiments, and it is also expensive to test drug candidates for potential to form DNA or protein adducts during the early stages of drug development. In contrast, computational methods have the potential to quickly screen for covalent binding potential, thereby flagging problematic molecules and reducing the total number of necessary experiments. Here, we train a deep convolution neural network-the XenoSite reactivity model-using literature data to accurately predict both sites and probability of reactivity for molecules with glutathione, cyanide, protein, and DNA. On the site level, cross-validated predictions had area under the curve (AUC) performances of 89.8% for DNA and 94.4% for protein. Furthermore, the model separated molecules electrophilically reactive with DNA and protein from nonreactive molecules with cross-validated AUC performances of 78.7% and 79.8%, respectively. On both the site- and molecule-level, the

  10. Why network approach can promote a new way of thinking in biology

    PubMed Central

    Giuliani, Alessandro; Filippi, Simonetta; Bertolaso, Marta

    2014-01-01

    This work deals with the particular nature of network-based approach in biology. We will comment about the shift from the consideration of the molecular layer as the definitive place where causative process start to the elucidation of the among elements (at any level of biological organization they are located) interaction network as the main goal of scientific explanation. This shift comes from the intrinsic nature of networks where the properties of a specific node are determined by its position in the entire network (top-down explanation) while the global network characteristics emerge from the nodes wiring pattern (bottom-up explanation). This promotes a “middle-out” paradigm formally identical to the time honored chemical thought holding big promises in the study of biological regulation. PMID:24782892

  11. Implementing a secure client/server application

    SciTech Connect

    Kissinger, B.A.

    1994-08-01

    There is an increasing rise in attacks and security breaches on computer systems. Particularly vulnerable are systems that exchange user names and passwords directly across a network without encryption. These kinds of systems include many commercial-off-the-shelf client/server applications. A secure technique for authenticating computer users and transmitting passwords through the use of a trusted {open_quotes}broker{close_quotes} and public/private keys is described in this paper.

  12. Commentary: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Educators Launch National Network

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Cheryl; Bell, Ellis; Johnson, Margaret; Mattos, Carla; Sears, Duane; White, Harold B.

    2010-01-01

    The American Society of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB) has launched an National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded 5 year project to support biochemistry and molecular biology educators learning what and how students learn. As a part of this initiative, hundreds of life scientists will plan and develop a rich central resource for…

  13. A Unifying Mathematical Framework for Genetic Robustness, Environmental Robustness, Network Robustness and their Trade-off on Phenotype Robustness in Biological Networks Part I: Gene Regulatory Networks in Systems and Evolutionary Biology.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bor-Sen; Lin, Ying-Po

    2013-01-01

    Robust stabilization and environmental disturbance attenuation are ubiquitous systematic properties observed in biological systems at different levels. The underlying principles for robust stabilization and environmental disturbance attenuation are universal to both complex biological systems and sophisticated engineering systems. In many biological networks, network robustness should be enough to confer intrinsic robustness in order to tolerate intrinsic parameter fluctuations, genetic robustness for buffering genetic variations, and environmental robustness for resisting environmental disturbances. With this, the phenotypic stability of biological network can be maintained, thus guaranteeing phenotype robustness. This paper presents a survey on biological systems and then develops a unifying mathematical framework for investigating the principles of both robust stabilization and environmental disturbance attenuation in systems and evolutionary biology. Further, from the unifying mathematical framework, it was discovered that the phenotype robustness criterion for biological networks at different levels relies upon intrinsic robustness + genetic robustness + environmental robustness ≦ network robustness. When this is true, the phenotype robustness can be maintained in spite of intrinsic parameter fluctuations, genetic variations, and environmental disturbances. Therefore, the trade-offs between intrinsic robustness, genetic robustness, environmental robustness, and network robustness in systems and evolutionary biology can also be investigated through their corresponding phenotype robustness criterion from the systematic point of view. PMID:23515240

  14. A Unifying Mathematical Framework for Genetic Robustness, Environmental Robustness, Network Robustness and their Trade-off on Phenotype Robustness in Biological Networks Part I: Gene Regulatory Networks in Systems and Evolutionary Biology

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bor-Sen; Lin, Ying-Po

    2013-01-01

    Robust stabilization and environmental disturbance attenuation are ubiquitous systematic properties observed in biological systems at different levels. The underlying principles for robust stabilization and environmental disturbance attenuation are universal to both complex biological systems and sophisticated engineering systems. In many biological networks, network robustness should be enough to confer intrinsic robustness in order to tolerate intrinsic parameter fluctuations, genetic robustness for buffering genetic variations, and environmental robustness for resisting environmental disturbances. With this, the phenotypic stability of biological network can be maintained, thus guaranteeing phenotype robustness. This paper presents a survey on biological systems and then develops a unifying mathematical framework for investigating the principles of both robust stabilization and environmental disturbance attenuation in systems and evolutionary biology. Further, from the unifying mathematical framework, it was discovered that the phenotype robustness criterion for biological networks at different levels relies upon intrinsic robustness + genetic robustness + environmental robustness ≦ network robustness. When this is true, the phenotype robustness can be maintained in spite of intrinsic parameter fluctuations, genetic variations, and environmental disturbances. Therefore, the trade-offs between intrinsic robustness, genetic robustness, environmental robustness, and network robustness in systems and evolutionary biology can also be investigated through their corresponding phenotype robustness criterion from the systematic point of view. PMID:23515240

  15. Inference, simulation, modeling, and analysis of complex networks, with special emphasis on complex networks in systems biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Claire Petra

    Across diverse fields ranging from physics to biology, sociology, and economics, the technological advances of the past decade have engendered an unprecedented explosion of data on highly complex systems with thousands, if not millions of interacting components. These systems exist at many scales of size and complexity, and it is becoming ever-more apparent that they are, in fact, universal, arising in every field of study. Moreover, they share fundamental properties---chief among these, that the individual interactions of their constituent parts may be well-understood, but the characteristic behaviour produced by the confluence of these interactions---by these complex networks---is unpredictable; in a nutshell, the whole is more than the sum of its parts. There is, perhaps, no better illustration of this concept than the discoveries being made regarding complex networks in the biological sciences. In particular, though the sequencing of the human genome in 2003 was a remarkable feat, scientists understand that the "cellular-level blueprints" for the human being are cellular-level parts lists, but they say nothing (explicitly) about cellular-level processes. The challenge of modern molecular biology is to understand these processes in terms of the networks of parts---in terms of the interactions among proteins, enzymes, genes, and metabolites---as it is these processes that ultimately differentiate animate from inanimate, giving rise to life! It is the goal of systems biology---an umbrella field encapsulating everything from molecular biology to epidemiology in social systems---to understand processes in terms of fundamental networks of core biological parts, be they proteins or people. By virtue of the fact that there are literally countless complex systems, not to mention tools and techniques used to infer, simulate, analyze, and model these systems, it is impossible to give a truly comprehensive account of the history and study of complex systems. The author

  16. Laser diagnostics of anisotropy in birefringent networks of biological tissues in different physiological conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Ushenko, Yu A; Tomka, Yu Ya; Dubolazov, A V

    2011-02-28

    We study the possibility of differentiation of optical anisotropy properties of biological tissues in different physiological conditions by means of statistical analysis of coordinate distributions of a new analytic parameter, namely, the complex degree of mutual anisotropy of extracellular matrix, formed by a network of birefringent filament-like protein crystals. (laser biology)

  17. A biologically inspired neural network for dynamic programming.

    PubMed

    Francelin Romero, R A; Kacpryzk, J; Gomide, F

    2001-12-01

    An artificial neural network with a two-layer feedback topology and generalized recurrent neurons, for solving nonlinear discrete dynamic optimization problems, is developed. A direct method to assign the weights of neural networks is presented. The method is based on Bellmann's Optimality Principle and on the interchange of information which occurs during the synaptic chemical processing among neurons. The neural network based algorithm is an advantageous approach for dynamic programming due to the inherent parallelism of the neural networks; further it reduces the severity of computational problems that can occur in methods like conventional methods. Some illustrative application examples are presented to show how this approach works out including the shortest path and fuzzy decision making problems. PMID:11852439

  18. Parenclitic networks: uncovering new functions in biological data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanin, Massimiliano; Alcazar, Joaquín Medina; Carbajosa, Jesus Vicente; Paez, Marcela Gomez; Papo, David; Sousa, Pedro; Menasalvas, Ernestina; Boccaletti, Stefano

    2014-05-01

    We introduce a novel method to represent time independent, scalar data sets as complex networks. We apply our method to investigate gene expression in the response to osmotic stress of Arabidopsis thaliana. In the proposed network representation, the most important genes for the plant response turn out to be the nodes with highest centrality in appropriately reconstructed networks. We also performed a target experiment, in which the predicted genes were artificially induced one by one, and the growth of the corresponding phenotypes compared to that of the wild-type. The joint application of the network reconstruction method and of the in vivo experiments allowed identifying 15 previously unknown key genes, and provided models of their mutual relationships. This novel representation extends the use of graph theory to data sets hitherto considered outside of the realm of its application, vastly simplifying the characterization of their underlying structure.

  19. Blood flow in microvascular networks: A study in nonlinear biology

    PubMed Central

    Geddes, John B.; Carr, Russell T.; Wu, Fan; Lao, Yingyi; Maher, Meaghan

    2010-01-01

    Plasma skimming and the Fahraeus–Lindqvist effect are well-known phenomena in blood rheology. By combining these peculiarities of blood flow in the microcirculation with simple topological models of microvascular networks, we have uncovered interesting nonlinear behavior regarding blood flow in networks. Nonlinearity manifests itself in the existence of multiple steady states. This is due to the nonlinear dependence of viscosity on blood cell concentration. Nonlinearity also appears in the form of spontaneous oscillations in limit cycles. These limit cycles arise from the fact that the physics of blood flow can be modeled in terms of state dependent delay equations with multiple interacting delay times. In this paper we extend our previous work on blood flow in a simple two node network and begin to explore how topological complexity influences the dynamics of network blood flow. In addition we present initial evidence that the nonlinear phenomena predicted by our model are observed experimentally. PMID:21198135

  20. Usage of Thin-Client/Server Architecture in Computer Aided Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cimen, Caghan; Kavurucu, Yusuf; Aydin, Halit

    2014-01-01

    With the advances of technology, thin-client/server architecture has become popular in multi-user/single network environments. Thin-client is a user terminal in which the user can login to a domain and run programs by connecting to a remote server. Recent developments in network and hardware technologies (cloud computing, virtualization, etc.)…

  1. Using Network Biology to Bridge Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics in Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Kirouac, D C; Onsum, M D

    2013-01-01

    If mathematical modeling is to be used effectively in cancer drug development, future models must take into account both the mechanistic details of cellular signal transduction networks and the pharmacokinetics (PK) of drugs used to inhibit their oncogenic activity. In this perspective, we present an approach to building multiscale models that capture systems-level architectural features of oncogenic signaling networks, and describe how these models can be used to design combination therapies and identify predictive biomarkers in silico. PMID:24005988

  2. Potential unsatisfiability of cyclic constraints on stochastic biological networks biases selection towards hierarchical architectures

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Cameron; Pechuan, Ximo; Puzio, Raymond S.; Biro, Daniel; Bergman, Aviv

    2015-01-01

    Constraints placed upon the phenotypes of organisms result from their interactions with the environment. Over evolutionary time scales, these constraints feed back onto smaller molecular subnetworks comprising the organism. The evolution of biological networks is studied by considering a network of a few nodes embedded in a larger context. Taking into account this fact that any network under study is actually embedded in a larger context, we define network architecture, not on the basis of physical interactions alone, but rather as a specification of the manner in which constraints are placed upon the states of its nodes. We show that such network architectures possessing cycles in their topology, in contrast to those that do not, may be subjected to unsatisfiable constraints. This may be a significant factor leading to selection biased against those network architectures where such inconsistent constraints are more likely to arise. We proceed to quantify the likelihood of inconsistency arising as a function of network architecture finding that, in the absence of sampling bias over the space of possible constraints and for a given network size, networks with a larger number of cycles are more likely to have unsatisfiable constraints placed upon them. Our results identify a constraint that, at least in isolation, would contribute to a bias in the evolutionary process towards more hierarchical -modular versus completely connected network architectures. Together, these results highlight the context dependence of the functionality of biological networks. PMID:26040595

  3. Characterization of Adaptation by Morphology in a Planar Biological Network of Plasmodial Slime Mold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Masateru; Okamoto, Riki; Takamatsu, Atsuko

    2011-07-01

    Growth processes of a planar biological network of plasmodium of a true slime mold, Physarum polycephalum, were analyzed quantitatively. The plasmodium forms a transportation network through which protoplasm conveys nutrients, oxygen, and cellular organelles similarly to blood in a mammalian vascular network. To analyze the network structure, vertices were defined at tube bifurcation points. Then edges were defined for the tubes connecting both end vertices. Morphological analysis was attempted along with conventional topological analysis, revealing that the growth process of the plasmodial network structure depends on environmental conditions. In an attractive condition, the network is a polygonal lattice with more than six edges per vertex at the early stage and the hexagonal lattice at a later stage. Through all growing stages, the tube structure was not highly developed but an unstructured protoplasmic thin sheet was dominantly formed. The network size is small. In contrast, in the repulsive condition, the network is a mixture of polygonal lattice and tree-graph. More specifically, the polygonal lattice has more than six edges per vertex in the early stage, then a tree-graph structure is added to the lattice network at a later stage. The thick tube structure was highly developed. The network size, in the meaning of Euclidean distance but not topological one, grows considerably. Finally, the biological meaning of the environment-dependent network structure in the plasmodium is discussed.

  4. Pattern Learning, Damage and Repair within Biological Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siu, Theodore; Fitzgerald O'Neill, Kate; Shinbrot, Troy

    2015-03-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) causes damage to neural networks, potentially leading to disability or even death. Nearly one in ten of these patients die, and most of the remainder suffer from symptoms ranging from headaches and nausea to convulsions and paralysis. In vitro studies to develop treatments for TBI have limited in vivo applicability, and in vitro therapies have even proven to worsen the outcome of TBI patients. We propose that this disconnect between in vitro and in vivo outcomes may be associated with the fact that in vitro tests assess indirect measures of neuronal health, but do not investigate the actual function of neuronal networks. Therefore in this talk, we examine both in vitro and in silico neuronal networks that actually perform a function: pattern identification. We allow the networks to execute genetic, Hebbian, learning, and additionally, we examine the effects of damage and subsequent repair within our networks. We show that the length of repaired connections affects the overall pattern learning performance of the network and we propose therapies that may improve function following TBI in clinical settings.

  5. System Review about Function Role of ESCC Driver Gene KDM6A by Network Biology Approach.

    PubMed

    Ran, Jihua; Li, Hui; Li, Huiwu

    2016-01-01

    Background. KDM6A (Lysine (K)-Specific Demethylase 6A) is the driver gene related to esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). In order to provide more biological insights into KDM6A, in this paper, we treat PPI (protein-protein interaction) network derived from KDM6A as a conceptual framework and follow it to review its biological function. Method. We constructed a PPI network with Cytoscape software and performed clustering of network with Clust&See. Then, we evaluate the pathways, which are statistically involved in the network derived from KDM6A. Lastly, gene ontology analysis of clusters of genes in the network was conducted. Result. The network includes three clusters that consist of 74 nodes connected via 453 edges. Fifty-five pathways are statistically involved in the network and most of them are functionally related to the processes of cell cycle, gene expression, and carcinogenesis. The biology themes of clusters 1, 2, and 3 are chromatin modification, regulation of gene expression by transcription factor complex, and control of cell cycle, respectively. Conclusion. The PPI network presents a panoramic view which can facilitate for us to understand the function role of KDM6A. It is a helpful way by network approach to perform system review on a certain gene. PMID:27294188

  6. System Review about Function Role of ESCC Driver Gene KDM6A by Network Biology Approach

    PubMed Central

    Ran, Jihua; Li, Hui; Li, Huiwu

    2016-01-01

    Background. KDM6A (Lysine (K)-Specific Demethylase 6A) is the driver gene related to esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). In order to provide more biological insights into KDM6A, in this paper, we treat PPI (protein-protein interaction) network derived from KDM6A as a conceptual framework and follow it to review its biological function. Method. We constructed a PPI network with Cytoscape software and performed clustering of network with Clust&See. Then, we evaluate the pathways, which are statistically involved in the network derived from KDM6A. Lastly, gene ontology analysis of clusters of genes in the network was conducted. Result. The network includes three clusters that consist of 74 nodes connected via 453 edges. Fifty-five pathways are statistically involved in the network and most of them are functionally related to the processes of cell cycle, gene expression, and carcinogenesis. The biology themes of clusters 1, 2, and 3 are chromatin modification, regulation of gene expression by transcription factor complex, and control of cell cycle, respectively. Conclusion. The PPI network presents a panoramic view which can facilitate for us to understand the function role of KDM6A. It is a helpful way by network approach to perform system review on a certain gene. PMID:27294188

  7. Information theory in systems biology. Part I: Gene regulatory and metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Mousavian, Zaynab; Kavousi, Kaveh; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali

    2016-03-01

    "A Mathematical Theory of Communication", was published in 1948 by Claude Shannon to establish a framework that is now known as information theory. In recent decades, information theory has gained much attention in the area of systems biology. The aim of this paper is to provide a systematic review of those contributions that have applied information theory in inferring or understanding of biological systems. Based on the type of system components and the interactions between them, we classify the biological systems into 4 main classes: gene regulatory, metabolic, protein-protein interaction and signaling networks. In the first part of this review, we attempt to introduce most of the existing studies on two types of biological networks, including gene regulatory and metabolic networks, which are founded on the concepts of information theory. PMID:26701126

  8. Computation of the effective mechanical response of biological networks accounting for large configuration changes.

    PubMed

    El Nady, K; Ganghoffer, J F

    2016-05-01

    The asymptotic homogenization technique is involved to derive the effective elastic response of biological membranes viewed as repetitive beam networks. Thereby, a systematic methodology is established, allowing the prediction of the overall mechanical properties of biological membranes in the nonlinear regime, reflecting the influence of the geometrical and mechanical micro-parameters of the network structure on the overall response of the equivalent continuum. Biomembranes networks are classified based on nodal connectivity, so that we analyze in this work 3, 4 and 6-connectivity networks, which are representative of most biological networks. The individual filaments of the network are described as undulated beams prone to entropic elasticity, with tensile moduli determined from their persistence length. The effective micropolar continuum evaluated as a continuum substitute of the biological network has a kinematics reflecting the discrete network deformation modes, involving a nodal displacement and a microrotation. The statics involves the classical Cauchy stress and internal moments encapsulated into couple stresses, which develop internal work in duality to microcurvatures reflecting local network undulations. The relative ratio of the characteristic bending length of the effective micropolar continuum to the unit cell size determines the relevant choice of the equivalent medium. In most cases, the Cauchy continuum is sufficient to model biomembranes. The peptidoglycan network may exhibit a re-entrant hexagonal configuration due to thermal or pressure fluctuations, for which micropolar effects become important. The homogenized responses are in good agreement with FE simulations performed over the whole network. The predictive nature of the employed homogenization technique allows the identification of a strain energy density of a hyperelastic model, for the purpose of performing structural calculations of the shape evolutions of biomembranes. PMID:26541071

  9. The Stochastic Evolutionary Game for a Population of Biological Networks Under Natural Selection

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bor-Sen; Ho, Shih-Ju

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a population of evolutionary biological networks is described by a stochastic dynamic system with intrinsic random parameter fluctuations due to genetic variations and external disturbances caused by environmental changes in the evolutionary process. Since information on environmental changes is unavailable and their occurrence is unpredictable, they can be considered as a game player with the potential to destroy phenotypic stability. The biological network needs to develop an evolutionary strategy to improve phenotypic stability as much as possible, so it can be considered as another game player in the evolutionary process, ie, a stochastic Nash game of minimizing the maximum network evolution level caused by the worst environmental disturbances. Based on the nonlinear stochastic evolutionary game strategy, we find that some genetic variations can be used in natural selection to construct negative feedback loops, efficiently improving network robustness. This provides larger genetic robustness as a buffer against neutral genetic variations, as well as larger environmental robustness to resist environmental disturbances and maintain a network phenotypic traits in the evolutionary process. In this situation, the robust phenotypic traits of stochastic biological networks can be more frequently selected by natural selection in evolution. However, if the harbored neutral genetic variations are accumulated to a sufficiently large degree, and environmental disturbances are strong enough that the network robustness can no longer confer enough genetic robustness and environmental robustness, then the phenotype robustness might break down. In this case, a network phenotypic trait may be pushed from one equilibrium point to another, changing the phenotypic trait and starting a new phase of network evolution through the hidden neutral genetic variations harbored in network robustness by adaptive evolution. Further, the proposed evolutionary game is extended to

  10. Logical Reduction of Biological Networks to Their Most Determinative Components.

    PubMed

    Matache, Mihaela T; Matache, Valentin

    2016-07-01

    Boolean networks have been widely used as models for gene regulatory networks, signal transduction networks, or neural networks, among many others. One of the main difficulties in analyzing the dynamics of a Boolean network and its sensitivity to perturbations or mutations is the fact that it grows exponentially with the number of nodes. Therefore, various approaches for simplifying the computations and reducing the network to a subset of relevant nodes have been proposed in the past few years. We consider a recently introduced method for reducing a Boolean network to its most determinative nodes that yield the highest information gain. The determinative power of a node is obtained by a summation of all mutual information quantities over all nodes having the chosen node as a common input, thus representing a measure of information gain obtained by the knowledge of the node under consideration. The determinative power of nodes has been considered in the literature under the assumption that the inputs are independent in which case one can use the Bahadur orthonormal basis. In this article, we relax that assumption and use a standard orthonormal basis instead. We use techniques of Hilbert space operators and harmonic analysis to generate formulas for the sensitivity to perturbations of nodes, quantified by the notions of influence, average sensitivity, and strength. Since we work on finite-dimensional spaces, our formulas and estimates can be and are formulated in plain matrix algebra terminology. We analyze the determinative power of nodes for a Boolean model of a signal transduction network of a generic fibroblast cell. We also show the similarities and differences induced by the alternative complete orthonormal basis used. Among the similarities, we mention the fact that the knowledge of the states of the most determinative nodes reduces the entropy or uncertainty of the overall network significantly. In a special case, we obtain a stronger result than in previous

  11. Frame architecture for video servers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatramani, Chitra; Kienzle, Martin G.

    1999-11-01

    Video is inherently frame-oriented and most applications such as commercial video processing require to manipulate video in terms of frames. However, typical video servers treat videos as byte streams and perform random access based on approximate byte offsets to be supplied by the client. They do not provide frame or timecode oriented API which is essential for many applications. This paper describes a frame-oriented architecture for video servers. It also describes the implementation in the context of IBM's VideoCharger server. The later part of the paper describes an application that uses the frame architecture and provides fast and slow-motion scanning capabilities to the server.

  12. BinAligner: a heuristic method to align biological networks.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jialiang; Li, Jun; Grünewald, Stefan; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2013-01-01

    The advances in high throughput omics technologies have made it possible to characterize molecular interactions within and across various species. Alignments and comparison of molecular networks across species will help detect orthologs and conserved functional modules and provide insights on the evolutionary relationships of the compared species. However, such analyses are not trivial due to the complexity of network and high computational cost. Here we develop a mixture of global and local algorithm, BinAligner, for network alignments. Based on the hypotheses that the similarity between two vertices across networks would be context dependent and that the information from the edges and the structures of subnetworks can be more informative than vertices alone, two scoring schema, 1-neighborhood subnetwork and graphlet, were introduced to derive the scoring matrices between networks, besides the commonly used scoring scheme from vertices. Then the alignment problem is formulated as an assignment problem, which is solved by the combinatorial optimization algorithm, such as the Hungarian method. The proposed algorithm was applied and validated in aligning the protein-protein interaction network of Kaposi's sarcoma associated herpesvirus (KSHV) and that of varicella zoster virus (VZV). Interestingly, we identified several putative functional orthologous proteins with similar functions but very low sequence similarity between the two viruses. For example, KSHV open reading frame 56 (ORF56) and VZV ORF55 are helicase-primase subunits with sequence identity 14.6%, and KSHV ORF75 and VZV ORF44 are tegument proteins with sequence identity 15.3%. These functional pairs can not be identified if one restricts the alignment into orthologous protein pairs. In addition, BinAligner identified a conserved pathway between two viruses, which consists of 7 orthologous protein pairs and these proteins are connected by conserved links. This pathway might be crucial for virus packing and

  13. Biology Inspired Approach for Communal Behavior in Sensor Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Kennie H.; Lodding, Kenneth N.; Olariu, Stephan; Wilson, Larry; Xin, Chunsheng

    2006-01-01

    Research in wireless sensor network technology has exploded in the last decade. Promises of complex and ubiquitous control of the physical environment by these networks open avenues for new kinds of science and business. Due to the small size and low cost of sensor devices, visionaries promise systems enabled by deployment of massive numbers of sensors working in concert. Although the reduction in size has been phenomenal it results in severe limitations on the computing, communicating, and power capabilities of these devices. Under these constraints, research efforts have concentrated on developing techniques for performing relatively simple tasks with minimal energy expense assuming some form of centralized control. Unfortunately, centralized control does not scale to massive size networks and execution of simple tasks in sparsely populated networks will not lead to the sophisticated applications predicted. These must be enabled by new techniques dependent on local and autonomous cooperation between sensors to effect global functions. As a step in that direction, in this work we detail a technique whereby a large population of sensors can attain a global goal using only local information and by making only local decisions without any form of centralized control.

  14. Revealing gene regulation and association through biological networks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This review had first summarized traditional methods used by plant breeders for genetic improvement, such as QTL analysis and transcriptomic analysis. With accumulating data, we can draw a network that comprises all possible links between members of a community, including protein–protein interaction...

  15. Biological Networks Underlying Soybean Seed Oil Composition and Content

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean is the most important oil crop in the United States. Production of soybean seed oil requires coordinated expression of many biological components and pathways, which is further regulated by seed development and phyto-hormones. A new research project is initiated in my laboratory to delineat...

  16. PSSweb: protein structural statistics web server.

    PubMed

    Gaillard, Thomas; Stote, Roland H; Dejaegere, Annick

    2016-07-01

    With the increasing number of protein structures available, there is a need for tools capable of automating the comparison of ensembles of structures, a common requirement in structural biology and bioinformatics. PSSweb is a web server for protein structural statistics. It takes as input an ensemble of PDB files of protein structures, performs a multiple sequence alignment and computes structural statistics for each position of the alignment. Different optional functionalities are proposed: structure superposition, Cartesian coordinate statistics, dihedral angle calculation and statistics, and a cluster analysis based on dihedral angles. An interactive report is generated, containing a summary of the results, tables, figures and 3D visualization of superposed structures. The server is available at http://pssweb.org. PMID:27174930

  17. PSSweb: protein structural statistics web server

    PubMed Central

    Gaillard, Thomas; Stote, Roland H.; Dejaegere, Annick

    2016-01-01

    With the increasing number of protein structures available, there is a need for tools capable of automating the comparison of ensembles of structures, a common requirement in structural biology and bioinformatics. PSSweb is a web server for protein structural statistics. It takes as input an ensemble of PDB files of protein structures, performs a multiple sequence alignment and computes structural statistics for each position of the alignment. Different optional functionalities are proposed: structure superposition, Cartesian coordinate statistics, dihedral angle calculation and statistics, and a cluster analysis based on dihedral angles. An interactive report is generated, containing a summary of the results, tables, figures and 3D visualization of superposed structures. The server is available at http://pssweb.org. PMID:27174930

  18. BiNA: A Visual Analytics Tool for Biological Network Data

    PubMed Central

    Gerasch, Andreas; Faber, Daniel; Küntzer, Jan; Niermann, Peter; Kohlbacher, Oliver; Lenhof, Hans-Peter; Kaufmann, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Interactive visual analysis of biological high-throughput data in the context of the underlying networks is an essential task in modern biomedicine with applications ranging from metabolic engineering to personalized medicine. The complexity and heterogeneity of data sets require flexible software architectures for data analysis. Concise and easily readable graphical representation of data and interactive navigation of large data sets are essential in this context. We present BiNA - the Biological Network Analyzer - a flexible open-source software for analyzing and visualizing biological networks. Highly configurable visualization styles for regulatory and metabolic network data offer sophisticated drawings and intuitive navigation and exploration techniques using hierarchical graph concepts. The generic projection and analysis framework provides powerful functionalities for visual analyses of high-throughput omics data in the context of networks, in particular for the differential analysis and the analysis of time series data. A direct interface to an underlying data warehouse provides fast access to a wide range of semantically integrated biological network databases. A plugin system allows simple customization and integration of new analysis algorithms or visual representations. BiNA is available under the 3-clause BSD license at http://bina.unipax.info/. PMID:24551056

  19. AN INTEGRATED NETWORK APPROACH TO IDENTIFYING BIOLOGICAL PATHWAYS AND ENVIRONMENTAL EXPOSURE INTERACTIONS IN COMPLEX DISEASES

    PubMed Central

    DARABOS, CHRISTIAN; QIU, JINGYA; MOORE, JASON H.

    2015-01-01

    Complex diseases are the result of intricate interactions between genetic, epigenetic and environmental factors. In previous studies, we used epidemiological and genetic data linking environmental exposure or genetic variants to phenotypic disease to construct Human Phenotype Networks and separately analyze the effects of both environment and genetic factors on disease interactions. To better capture the intricacies of the interactions between environmental exposure and the biological pathways in complex disorders, we integrate both aspects into a single “tripartite” network. Despite extensive research, the mechanisms by which chemical agents disrupt biological pathways are still poorly understood. In this study, we use our integrated network model to identify specific biological pathway candidates possibly disrupted by environmental agents. We conjecture that a higher number of co-occurrences between an environmental substance and biological pathway pair can be associated with a higher likelihood that the substance is involved in disrupting that pathway. We validate our model by demonstrating its ability to detect known arsenic and signal transduction pathway interactions and speculate on candidate cell-cell junction organization pathways disrupted by cadmium. The validation was supported by distinct publications of cell biology and genetic studies that associated environmental exposure to pathway disruption. The integrated network approach is a novel method for detecting the biological effects of environmental exposures. A better understanding of the molecular processes associated with specific environmental exposures will help in developing targeted molecular therapies for patients who have been exposed to the toxicity of environmental chemicals. PMID:26776169

  20. Identifying common components across biological network graphs using a bipartite data model

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The GeneWeaver bipartite data model provides an efficient means to evaluate shared molecular components from sets derived across diverse species, disease states and biological processes. In order to adapt this model for examining related molecular components and biological networks, such as pathway or gene network data, we have developed a means to leverage the bipartite data structure to extract and analyze shared edges. Using the Pathway Commons database we demonstrate the ability to rapidly identify shared connected components among a diverse set of pathways. In addition, we illustrate how results from maximal bipartite discovery can be decomposed into hierarchical relationships, allowing shared pathway components to be mapped through various parent-child relationships to help visualization and discovery of emergent kernel driven relationships. Interrogating common relationships among biological networks and conventional GeneWeaver gene lists will increase functional specificity and reliability of the shared biological components. This approach enables self-organization of biological processes through shared biological networks. PMID:25374613

  1. Ordered cyclic motifs contribute to dynamic stability in biological and engineered networks

    PubMed Central

    Ma'ayan, Avi; Cecchi, Guillermo A.; Wagner, John; Rao, A. Ravi; Iyengar, Ravi; Stolovitzky, Gustavo

    2008-01-01

    Representation and analysis of complex biological and engineered systems as directed networks is useful for understanding their global structure/function organization. Enrichment of network motifs, which are over-represented subgraphs in real networks, can be used for topological analysis. Because counting network motifs is computationally expensive, only characterization of 3- to 5-node motifs has been previously reported. In this study we used a supercomputer to analyze cyclic motifs made of 3–20 nodes for 6 biological and 3 technological networks. Using tools from statistical physics, we developed a theoretical framework for characterizing the ensemble of cyclic motifs in real networks. We have identified a generic property of real complex networks, antiferromagnetic organization, which is characterized by minimal directional coherence of edges along cyclic subgraphs, such that consecutive links tend to have opposing direction. As a consequence, we find that the lack of directional coherence in cyclic motifs leads to depletion in feedback loops, where the number of nodes affected by feedback loops appears to be at a local minimum compared with surrogate shuffled networks. This topology provides more dynamic stability in large networks. PMID:19033453

  2. A swarm intelligence framework for reconstructing gene networks: searching for biologically plausible architectures.

    PubMed

    Kentzoglanakis, Kyriakos; Poole, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the problem of reverse engineering the topology of gene regulatory networks from temporal gene expression data. We adopt a computational intelligence approach comprising swarm intelligence techniques, namely particle swarm optimization (PSO) and ant colony optimization (ACO). In addition, the recurrent neural network (RNN) formalism is employed for modeling the dynamical behavior of gene regulatory systems. More specifically, ACO is used for searching the discrete space of network architectures and PSO for searching the corresponding continuous space of RNN model parameters. We propose a novel solution construction process in the context of ACO for generating biologically plausible candidate architectures. The objective is to concentrate the search effort into areas of the structure space that contain architectures which are feasible in terms of their topological resemblance to real-world networks. The proposed framework is initially applied to the reconstruction of a small artificial network that has previously been studied in the context of gene network reverse engineering. Subsequently, we consider an artificial data set with added noise for reconstructing a subnetwork of the genetic interaction network of S. cerevisiae (yeast). Finally, the framework is applied to a real-world data set for reverse engineering the SOS response system of the bacterium Escherichia coli. Results demonstrate the relative advantage of utilizing problem-specific knowledge regarding biologically plausible structural properties of gene networks over conducting a problem-agnostic search in the vast space of network architectures. PMID:21576756

  3. Biological Implications of Dynamical Phases in Non-equilibrium Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murugan, Arvind; Vaikuntanathan, Suriyanarayanan

    2016-03-01

    Biology achieves novel functions like error correction, ultra-sensitivity and accurate concentration measurement at the expense of free energy through Maxwell Demon-like mechanisms. The design principles and free energy trade-offs have been studied for a variety of such mechanisms. In this review, we emphasize a perspective based on dynamical phases that can explain commonalities shared by these mechanisms. Dynamical phases are defined by typical trajectories executed by non-equilibrium systems in the space of internal states. We find that coexistence of dynamical phases can have dramatic consequences for function vs free energy cost trade-offs. Dynamical phases can also provide an intuitive picture of the design principles behind such biological Maxwell Demons.

  4. Detecting modules in biological networks by edge weight clustering and entropy significance.

    PubMed

    Lecca, Paola; Re, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Detection of the modular structure of biological networks is of interest to researchers adopting a systems perspective for the analysis of omics data. Computational systems biology has provided a rich array of methods for network clustering. To date, the majority of approaches address this task through a network node classification based on topological or external quantifiable properties of network nodes. Conversely, numerical properties of network edges are underused, even though the information content which can be associated with network edges has augmented due to steady advances in molecular biology technology over the last decade. Properly accounting for network edges in the development of clustering approaches can become crucial to improve quantitative interpretation of omics data, finally resulting in more biologically plausible models. In this study, we present a novel technique for network module detection, named WG-Cluster (Weighted Graph CLUSTERing). WG-Cluster's notable features, compared to current approaches, lie in: (1) the simultaneous exploitation of network node and edge weights to improve the biological interpretability of the connected components detected, (2) the assessment of their statistical significance, and (3) the identification of emerging topological properties in the detected connected components. WG-Cluster utilizes three major steps: (i) an unsupervised version of k-means edge-based algorithm detects sub-graphs with similar edge weights, (ii) a fast-greedy algorithm detects connected components which are then scored and selected according to the statistical significance of their scores, and (iii) an analysis of the convolution between sub-graph mean edge weight and connected component score provides a summarizing view of the connected components. WG-Cluster can be applied to directed and undirected networks of different types of interacting entities and scales up to large omics data sets. Here, we show that WG-Cluster can be

  5. Detecting modules in biological networks by edge weight clustering and entropy significance

    PubMed Central

    Lecca, Paola; Re, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Detection of the modular structure of biological networks is of interest to researchers adopting a systems perspective for the analysis of omics data. Computational systems biology has provided a rich array of methods for network clustering. To date, the majority of approaches address this task through a network node classification based on topological or external quantifiable properties of network nodes. Conversely, numerical properties of network edges are underused, even though the information content which can be associated with network edges has augmented due to steady advances in molecular biology technology over the last decade. Properly accounting for network edges in the development of clustering approaches can become crucial to improve quantitative interpretation of omics data, finally resulting in more biologically plausible models. In this study, we present a novel technique for network module detection, named WG-Cluster (Weighted Graph CLUSTERing). WG-Cluster's notable features, compared to current approaches, lie in: (1) the simultaneous exploitation of network node and edge weights to improve the biological interpretability of the connected components detected, (2) the assessment of their statistical significance, and (3) the identification of emerging topological properties in the detected connected components. WG-Cluster utilizes three major steps: (i) an unsupervised version of k-means edge-based algorithm detects sub-graphs with similar edge weights, (ii) a fast-greedy algorithm detects connected components which are then scored and selected according to the statistical significance of their scores, and (iii) an analysis of the convolution between sub-graph mean edge weight and connected component score provides a summarizing view of the connected components. WG-Cluster can be applied to directed and undirected networks of different types of interacting entities and scales up to large omics data sets. Here, we show that WG-Cluster can be

  6. Quantitative assessment of biological impact using transcriptomic data and mechanistic network models

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, Ty M.; Sewer, Alain; Martin, Florian; Belcastro, Vincenzo; Frushour, Brian P.; Gebel, Stephan; Park, Jennifer; Schlage, Walter K.; Talikka, Marja; Vasilyev, Dmitry M.; Westra, Jurjen W.; Hoeng, Julia; Peitsch, Manuel C.

    2013-11-01

    Exposure to biologically active substances such as therapeutic drugs or environmental toxicants can impact biological systems at various levels, affecting individual molecules, signaling pathways, and overall cellular processes. The ability to derive mechanistic insights from the resulting system responses requires the integration of experimental measures with a priori knowledge about the system and the interacting molecules therein. We developed a novel systems biology-based methodology that leverages mechanistic network models and transcriptomic data to quantitatively assess the biological impact of exposures to active substances. Hierarchically organized network models were first constructed to provide a coherent framework for investigating the impact of exposures at the molecular, pathway and process levels. We then validated our methodology using novel and previously published experiments. For both in vitro systems with simple exposure and in vivo systems with complex exposures, our methodology was able to recapitulate known biological responses matching expected or measured phenotypes. In addition, the quantitative results were in agreement with experimental endpoint data for many of the mechanistic effects that were assessed, providing further objective confirmation of the approach. We conclude that our methodology evaluates the biological impact of exposures in an objective, systematic, and quantifiable manner, enabling the computation of a systems-wide and pan-mechanistic biological impact measure for a given active substance or mixture. Our results suggest that various fields of human disease research, from drug development to consumer product testing and environmental impact analysis, could benefit from using this methodology. - Highlights: • The impact of biologically active substances is quantified at multiple levels. • The systems-level impact integrates the perturbations of individual networks. • The networks capture the relationships between

  7. Identifying and Analyzing Web Server Attacks

    SciTech Connect

    Seifert, Christian; Endicott-Popovsky, Barbara E.; Frincke, Deborah A.; Komisarczuk, Peter; Muschevici, Radu; Welch, Ian D.

    2008-08-29

    Abstract: Client honeypots can be used to identify malicious web servers that attack web browsers and push malware to client machines. Merely recording network traffic is insufficient to perform comprehensive forensic analyses of such attacks. Custom tools are required to access and analyze network protocol data. Moreover, specialized methods are required to perform a behavioral analysis of an attack, which helps determine exactly what transpired on the attacked system. This paper proposes a record/replay mechanism that enables forensic investigators to extract application data from recorded network streams and allows applications to interact with this data in order to conduct behavioral analyses. Implementations for the HTTP and DNS protocols are presented and their utility in network forensic investigations is demonstrated.

  8. Beyond clients and servers.

    PubMed Central

    van Mulligen, E.; Timmers, T.

    1994-01-01

    Computer scientists working in medical informatics have to face the problem that software offered by industry is more and more adopted for clinical use by medical professionals. A new challenge arises of how to combine commercial solutions with typical medical software that already exists for some years and proved to be reliable with these off-the-shelf solutions [1]. With the HERMES project, this new challenge was accepted and possible solutions to integrate existing legacy systems with state-of-the-art commercial solutions have been investigated. After a period of prototyping to assess possible alternative solutions, a system based on an indirect client-server model was implemented with help of the industry. In this paper, its architecture is described together with the most important features currently covered. Based on the HERMES architecture, both systems for clinical data analysis and patient care (cardiology) are currently developed. PMID:7949988

  9. Information theory in systems biology. Part II: protein-protein interaction and signaling networks.

    PubMed

    Mousavian, Zaynab; Díaz, José; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali

    2016-03-01

    By the development of information theory in 1948 by Claude Shannon to address the problems in the field of data storage and data communication over (noisy) communication channel, it has been successfully applied in many other research areas such as bioinformatics and systems biology. In this manuscript, we attempt to review some of the existing literatures in systems biology, which are using the information theory measures in their calculations. As we have reviewed most of the existing information-theoretic methods in gene regulatory and metabolic networks in the first part of the review, so in the second part of our study, the application of information theory in other types of biological networks including protein-protein interaction and signaling networks will be surveyed. PMID:26691180

  10. Reverse engineering biological networks :applications in immune responses to bio-toxins.

    SciTech Connect

    Martino, Anthony A.; Sinclair, Michael B.; Davidson, George S.; Haaland, David Michael; Timlin, Jerilyn Ann; Thomas, Edward Victor; Slepoy, Alexander; Zhang, Zhaoduo; May, Elebeoba Eni; Martin, Shawn Bryan; Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel

    2005-12-01

    Our aim is to determine the network of events, or the regulatory network, that defines an immune response to a bio-toxin. As a model system, we are studying T cell regulatory network triggered through tyrosine kinase receptor activation using a combination of pathway stimulation and time-series microarray experiments. Our approach is composed of five steps (1) microarray experiments and data error analysis, (2) data clustering, (3) data smoothing and discretization, (4) network reverse engineering, and (5) network dynamics analysis and fingerprint identification. The technological outcome of this study is a suite of experimental protocols and computational tools that reverse engineer regulatory networks provided gene expression data. The practical biological outcome of this work is an immune response fingerprint in terms of gene expression levels. Inferring regulatory networks from microarray data is a new field of investigation that is no more than five years old. To the best of our knowledge, this work is the first attempt that integrates experiments, error analyses, data clustering, inference, and network analysis to solve a practical problem. Our systematic approach of counting, enumeration, and sampling networks matching experimental data is new to the field of network reverse engineering. The resulting mathematical analyses and computational tools lead to new results on their own and should be useful to others who analyze and infer networks.