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  1. Monitoring SEU parameters at reduced bias

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, D.R.; McNulty, P.J.; Abdel-Kader, W.G.; Strauss, L. . Dept. of Physics and Astronomy); Stassinopoulos, E.G. )

    1993-12-01

    SEU sensitivity of a CMOS SRAM increases with decreasing bias in such a manner that the critical charge exhibits a linear dependence on bias. This should allow proton and neutron monitoring of SEU parameters even for radiation hardened devices. The sensitivity of SEU rates to the thickness of the sensitive volume is demonstrated and procedures for determining the SEU parameters using protons are outlined.

  2. Guidelines for SEU-Resistant Integrated Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, D. K.

    1986-01-01

    Paper presents recent results of continuing program for increasing resistance of integrated circuits to single-event upset (SEU). Results based on study of test data for heavy-ion SEU in more than 180 different types of devices. (Some devices perform identical functions but made by different processes.) Program also examines developments in mathematical models for SEU.

  3. SEU In An Advanced Bipolar Integrated Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoutendyk, John A.; Secrest, Elaine C.; Berndt, Dale F.

    1989-01-01

    Report summarizes investigation of single-event upsets (SEU) in bipolar integrated-circuit set of flip-flops (memory cells). Device tested made by advanced digital bipolar silicon process of Honeywell, Inc. Circuit chip contained 4 cells. Construction enabled study of effect of size on SEU behavior. Each cell externally biased so effect of bias current on SEU behavior. Results of study provides important information for optimal design of devices fabricated using buried-layer bipolar process operating in heavy-ion SEU environments. Designers use information to provide required levels of suppression of SEU in specific applications via combinations of size and/or cell-current scaling.

  4. SEU measurements on HFETS and HFET SRAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Remke, R.L.; Witmer, S.B.; Jones, S.D.F. ); Barber, F.E. ); Flesner, L.D.; O'Brien, M.E. )

    1989-12-01

    The single event upset (SEU) response of n{sup +}-AlGaAs/GaAs heterostructure field effect transistors(HFETs--also known as SDHTs, HEMTs, MODFETs, and TEGFETs) and HFET static random access memories (SRAMs) was evaluated by measuring their response to focused electron pulses. Initially, focused electron beam pulses were used to measure and model HFET drain and gate SEU responses. Circuit simulations using these SEU models predicted that an HFET memory is most vulnerable to a single particle event in the area between the drain and the source (drain hit) of the OFF pull down HFET. Subsequent testing of an HFET SRAM cell confirmed this prediction. The authors discuss how these first SEU evaluations of HFETs and HFET memories show that measurements on individual HFETs and circuit simulations of SEU hits may be used to predict the SEU response of HFET memories.

  5. SEU induced errors observed in microprocessor systems

    SciTech Connect

    Asenek, V.; Underwood, C.; Oldfield, M.; Velazco, R.; Rezgui, S.; Cheynet, P.; Ecoffet, R.

    1998-12-01

    In this paper, the authors present software tools for predicting the rate and nature of observable SEU induced errors in microprocessor systems. These tools are built around a commercial microprocessor simulator and are used to analyze real satellite application systems. Results obtained from simulating the nature of SEU induced errors are shown to correlate with ground-based radiation test data.

  6. Single event upset (SEU) testing at JPL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coss, James R.

    1987-01-01

    It is believed that the increase in SEUs with more modern devices may have serious consequences for future space missions. The physics behind an SEU is discussed as well as SEU test philosophy and equipment, and testing results. It is concluded that the problem may be ameliorated by careful device selection and the use of redundancy or error correction.

  7. SEU Performance of TAG Based Flip Flops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuler, Robert L.; Kouba, Coy; O'Neill, Patrick M.

    2005-01-01

    We describe heavy ion test results for two new SEU tolerant latches based on transition nand gates, one for single rail asynchronous and the other for dual rail synchronous designs, implemented in AMI 0.5microprocess.

  8. Critical issues regarding SEU in avionics

    SciTech Connect

    Normand, E. ); McNulty, P.J. )

    1993-01-01

    The energetic neutrons in the atmosphere cause microelectronics in avionic system to malfunction through a mechanism called single-event upsets (SEUs), and single-event latchup is a potential threat. Data from military and experimental flights as well as laboratory testing indicate that typical non-radiation-hardened 64K and 256K static random access memories (SRAMs) can experience a significant SEU rate at aircraft altitudes. Microelectronics in avionics systems have been demonstrated to be susceptible to SEU. Of all device types, RAMs are the most sensitive because they have the largest number of bits on a chip (e.g., an SRAM may have from 64K to 1M bits, a microprocessor 3K to 10K bits, and a logic device like an analog-to-digital converter, 12 bits). Avionics designers will need to take this susceptibility into account in current and future designs. A number of techniques are available for dealing with SEU: EDAC, redundancy, use of SEU-hard parts, reset and/or watchdog timer capability, etc. Specifications should be developed to guide avionics vendors in the analysis, prevention, and verification of neutron-induced SEU. Areas for additional research include better definition of the atmospheric neutrons and protons, development of better calculational models (e.g., those used for protons[sup 11]), and better characterization of neutron-induced latchup.

  9. A simple approach to SEU cross section evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Miroshkin, V.V.; Tverskoy, M.G.

    1998-12-01

    The simplified method for determination of proton induced SEU cross section is presented. The method is based on results of the analysis of experimental SEU cross sections initiated by fast nucleons. The possibility of SEU cross section measurement at single proton energy for SEU rate prediction is shown.

  10. Serendipitous SEU hardening of resistive load SRAMs

    SciTech Connect

    Koga, R.; Kirshman, J.F.; Pinkerton, S.D.; Hansel, S.J.; Crawford, K.B.; Crain, W.R.

    1996-06-01

    High and low resistive load versions of Micron Technology`s MT5C1008C (128K {times} 8) and MT5C2561C (256K {times} 1) SRAMs were tested for SEU vulnerability. Contrary to computer simulation results, SEU susceptibility decreased with increasing resistive load. A substantially larger number of multiple-bit errors were observed for the low resistive load SRAMs, which also exhibited a 1 {r_arrow} 0 to 0 {r_arrow} 1 bit error ratio close to unity; in contrast, the high resistive load devices displayed a pronounced error bit polarity effect. Two distinct upset mechanisms are proposed to account for these observations.

  11. Low power SEU immune CMOS memory circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, M. N.; Whitaker, Sterling

    1992-01-01

    The authors report a design improvement for CMOS static memory circuits hardened against single event upset (SEU) using a recently proposed logic/circuit design technique. This improvement drastically reduces static power consumption, reduces the number of transistors required in a D flip-flop design, and eliminates the possibility of capturing an upset state in the slave section during a clock transition.

  12. Comparative SEU sensitivities to relativistic heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Koga, R.; Crain, S.H.; Crain, W.R.; Crawford, K.B.; Hansel, S.J.

    1998-12-01

    SEU sensitivity of microcircuits to relativistic heavy ions is compared to that measured with low-energy ions of comparable LET values. Multiple junction charge collection in a complex circuit seems to mask the effect of varying charge generations due to different iron track structures. Heavy ions at sub-relativistic speeds may generate nuclear fragments, sometimes resulting in SEUs.

  13. SEU/SRAM as a Process Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blaes, B. R.; Buehler, M. G.

    1993-01-01

    The SEU/SRAM is a 4-kbit Static Random Access Memory (SRAM) designed to detect Single-Event Upsets (SEUs) produced by high energy particles. This device was used to determine the distribution in the memory cell spontaneous flip potential.

  14. SEU hardening of CMOS memory circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, S.; Canaris, J.; Liu, K.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports a design technique to harden CMOS memory circuits against Single Event Upset (SEU) in the space environment. A RAM cell and Flip Flop design are presented to demonstrate the method. The Flip Flop was used in the control circuitry for a Reed Solomon encoder designed for the Space Station.

  15. An SEU tolerant memory cell derived from fundamental studies of SEU mechanisms in SRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, H.T.; Axness, C.L.; McBrayer, J.D.; Browning, J.S.; Fu, J.S.; Ochoa, A. Jr.; Koga, R.

    1987-12-01

    A new single event upset (SEU) hardening concept, an LRAM cell, is demonstrated theoretically and experimentally. Decoupling resistors in the LRAM are used only to protect against the short n-channel transient; longer persisting pulses are reduced in magnitude by a voltage divider, a basically new concept for SEU protection. In such a design, smaller resistors provide SEU tolerance, allowing higher performance, hardened memories. As basis for the LRAM idea, techniques were developed to measure time constants for ion induced voltage transients in conventional static random access memories, SRAM. Time constants of 0.8 and 6.3 nsec were measured for transients following strikes at the n- and p-channel drains, respectively - primary areas of SEU sensitivity. These data are the first transient time measurements on full memory chips and the large difference is fundamental to the LRAM concept. Test structures of the new design exhibit equivalent SEU tolerance with resistors 5-to-10 times smaller than currently used in SRAM. Our advanced transport-plus-circuit numerical simulations of the SEU process predicted this result and account for the LRAM experiments, as well as a variety of experiments on conventional SRAM.

  16. Refined Transistor Model For Simulation Of SEU

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoutendyk, John A.; Benumof, Reuben

    1988-01-01

    Equivalent base resistance added. Theoretical study develops equations for parameters of Gummel-Poon model of bipolar junction transistor: includes saturation current, amplification factors, charging times, knee currents, capacitances, and resistances. Portion of study concerned with base region goes beyond Gummel-Poon analysis to provide more complete understanding of transistor behavior. Extended theory useful in simulation of single-event upset (SEU) caused in logic circuits by cosmic rays or other ionizing radiation.

  17. Recent trends in parts SEU susceptibility from heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, D.K.; Smith, L.S.; Price, W.E.; Koga, R.; Kolasinski, W.A.

    1987-12-01

    JPL and Aerospace have collected an extensive set of heavy ion single event upset (SEU) test data since their last joint publication in December, 1985. Trends in SEU susceptibility for state-of-the-art parts are presented.

  18. Upper-Bound Estimates Of SEU in CMOS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmonds, Larry D.

    1990-01-01

    Theory of single-event upsets (SEU) (changes in logic state caused by energetic charged subatomic particles) in complementary metal oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) logic devices extended to provide upper-bound estimates of rates of SEU when limited experimental information available and configuration and dimensions of SEU-sensitive regions of devices unknown. Based partly on chord-length-distribution method.

  19. Simulation of SEU transients in CMOS ICs

    SciTech Connect

    Kaul, N.; Bhuva, B.L.; Kerns, S.E. )

    1991-12-01

    This paper reports that available analytical models of the number of single-event-induced errors (SEU) in combinational logic systems are not easily applicable to real integrated circuits (ICs). An efficient computer simulation algorithm set, SITA, predicts the vulnerability of data stored in and processed by complex combinational logic circuits to SEU. SITA is described in detail to allow researchers to incorporate it into their error analysis packages. Required simulation algorithms are based on approximate closed-form equations modeling individual device behavior in CMOS logic units. Device-level simulation is used to estimate the probability that ion-device interactions produce erroneous signals capable of propagating to a latch (or n output node), and logic-level simulation to predict the spread of such erroneous, latched information through the IC. Simulation results are compared to those from SPICE for several circuit and logic configurations. SITA results are comparable to this established circuit-level code, and SITA can analyze circuits with state-of-the-art device densities (which SPICE cannot). At all IC complexity levels, SITAS offers several factors of 10 savings in simulation time over SPICE.

  20. Laser SEU sensitivity mapping of deep submicron CMOS SRAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yongtao, Yu; Guoqiang, Feng; Rui, Chen; Jianwei, Han

    2014-06-01

    The pulsed laser facility for SEU sensitivity mapping is utilized to study the SEU sensitive regions of a 0.18 μm CMOS SRAM cell. Combined with the device layout micrograph, SEU sensitivity maps of the SRAM cell are obtained. TCAD simulation work is performed to examine the SEU sensitivity characteristics of the SRAM cell. The laser mapping experiment results are discussed and compared with the electron micrograph information of the SRAM cell and the TCAD simulation results. The results present that the test technique is reliable and of high mapping precision for the deep submicron technology device.

  1. Scaling of SEU mapping and cross section, and proton induced SEU at reduced supply voltage

    SciTech Connect

    Barak, J.; Levinson, J.; Akkerman, A.

    1999-12-01

    New experimental study of heavy ion and proton induced SEU at reduced voltage (i.e., reduced critical charge) reveals interesting results. It is shown that the heavy ion cross section and microprobe mapping scale like the threshold LET and the parameter, which is almost invariant under bias changes, is the effective charge collection depth. For studying proton induced SEU and surface-barrier-detector spectra the authors use protons with energies from 5.6 to 300 MeV. The results are analyzed in view of the processes involved in low energy deposition by protons. Detailed calculations show the importance of straggling in proton direct ionization which might be the leading process in very sensitive devices like photodiodes.

  2. Exact Chord-Length Distribution For SEU Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, Martin G.; Luke, Keung L.

    1990-01-01

    Computed rates of SEU's more accurate. Exact integral chord-length distribution derived for use in calculations of rates of single-event upsets (SEU's) (changes in logic states) caused by impingement of cosmic rays or other ionizing radiation on electronic logic circuits.

  3. Simulation of SRAM SEU Sensitivity at Reduced Operating Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanathanamurthy, S.; Ramachandran, V.; Alles, M. L.; Reed, R. A.; Massengill, L. W.; Raman, A.; Turowski, M.; Mantooth, A.; Woods, B.; Barlow, M.; Moen, K.; Bellini, M.; Sutton, A.; Cressler, J. D.

    2009-01-01

    A new NanoTCAD-to-Spectre interface is applied to perform mixed-mode SEU simulations of an SRAM cell. Results using newly calibrated TCAD cold temperature substrate mobility models, and BSIM3 compact models extracted explicitly for the cold temperature designs, indicate a 33% reduction in SEU threshold for the range of temperatures simulated.

  4. Impact of technology trends on SEU in CMOS SRAMs

    SciTech Connect

    Dodd, P.E.; Sexton, F.W.; Hash, G.L.; Shaneyfelt, M.R.; Draper, B.L.; Farino, A.J.; Flores, R.S.

    1996-12-01

    The impact of technology trends on the SEU hardness of epitaxial CMOS SRAMs is investigated using three-dimensional simulation. The authors study trends in SEU susceptibility with parameter variations across and within technology generations. Upset mechanisms for various strike locations and their dependence on gate-length scaling are explored. Such studies are useful for technology development and providing input for process and design decisions. An application of SEU simulation to the development of a 0.5-{micro}m radiation-hardened CMOS SRAM is presented.

  5. Single-event upset (SEU) in a dram with on-chip error correction

    SciTech Connect

    Zoutendyk, J.A.; Schwartz, H.R.; Watson, R.K.; Hasnain, Z.; Nevill, L.R.

    1987-12-01

    The results are given of the first SEU measurements ever reported on IC devices with on-chip error correction. This method of SEU abatement could revolutionize the design of SEU-immune electronic systems.

  6. SEU System Analysis: Not Just the Sum of All Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berg, Melanie D.; Label, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Single event upset (SEU) analysis of complex systems is challenging. Currently, system SEU analysis is performed by component level partitioning and then either: the most dominant SEU cross-sections (SEUs) are used in system error rate calculations; or the partition SEUs are summed to eventually obtain a system error rate. In many cases, system error rates are overestimated because these methods generally overlook system level derating factors. The problem with overestimating is that it can cause overdesign and consequently negatively affect the following: cost, schedule, functionality, and validation/verification. The scope of this presentation is to discuss the risks involved with our current scheme of SEU analysis for complex systems; and to provide alternative methods for improvement.

  7. A SEU-Hard Flip-Flop for Antifuse FPGAs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, R.; Wang, J. J.; McCollum, J.; Cronquist, B.; Chan, R.; Yu, D.; Kleyner, I.; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A single event upset (SEU)-hardened flip-flop has been designed and developed for antifuse Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) application. Design and application issues, testability, test methods, simulation, and results are discussed.

  8. On the figure of merit model for SEU rate calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Barak, J.; Reed, R.A.; LaBel, K.A.

    1999-12-01

    Petersen has introduced a one parameter characterization of a device by the Figure of Merit (FOM). It was claimed that this parameter was sufficient to estimate the SEU rate in almost all orbits. The present paper presents an analytic study of the FOM concept and compares the FOM model with other empirical models. It is found that indeed the FOM parameter gives, in most cases, a good agreement with the rates found using the full SEU cross section plots of the devices. The agreement is poorer in cases where a high portion of the proton flux comes from low energy protons and for very SEU-hard devices. This is demonstrated for certain devices (FPGAs) where the FOM predicted by proton may be smaller by an order of magnitude than the FOM from heavy ions.

  9. Temporal analysis of SEU in SOI/GAA SRAMs

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, P.; Colinge, J.P.; Berger, G.

    1995-12-01

    This paper analyzes the very strong SEU hardness of a 1k static random-access memory fabricated using the SOI/GAA technology, irradiated with a xenon ion beam at various angles of incidence. The memory has been shown to operate with a supply voltage as low as 2V while still presenting excellent SEU hardness. Since the different physical charge collection mechanisms are particularly slow in SOI devices, it is shown that collected and critical charges must be dynamically compared in order to determine the SEU threshold. A new approach is then proposed to evaluate the time-variable critical charge independently of the pulse shape generated by the incident ion, and a general analytical model is derived. Finally, predictions in good agreement with experimental data are obtained.

  10. Estimating the dimensions of the SEU-sensitive volume

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Kader, W.G.; McNulty, P.J.; El-Teleaty, S.; Lynch, J.E.; Khondker, A.N.

    1987-12-01

    Simulations of the diffusion contribution to charge collection in SEU events are carried out under the simple assumption of random walk. The results of the simulation are combined with calculations of the funneling length for the field-assisted drift components to determine the effective thickness of the sensitive volume element to be used in calculations of soft-error rates for heavy-ion-induced and proton-induced upsets in microelectronic circuits. Comparison is made between predicted and measured SEU cross-sections for devices for which the critical charges are known from electrical measurements and the dimensions of the sensitive volume used are determined by the techniques described. The agreement is sufficient to encourage confidence that SEU rates can be calculated from first principles and a knowledge of the material, structural, and electrical characteristics of the device.

  11. SEU43 fuel bundle shielding analysis during spent fuel transport

    SciTech Connect

    Margeanu, C. A.; Ilie, P.; Olteanu, G.

    2006-07-01

    The basic task accomplished by the shielding calculations in a nuclear safety analysis consist in radiation doses calculation, in order to prevent any risks both for personnel protection and impact on the environment during the spent fuel manipulation, transport and storage. The paper investigates the effects induced by fuel bundle geometry modifications on the CANDU SEU spent fuel shielding analysis during transport. For this study, different CANDU-SEU43 fuel bundle projects, developed in INR Pitesti, have been considered. The spent fuel characteristics will be obtained by means of ORIGEN-S code. In order to estimate the corresponding radiation doses for different measuring points the Monte Carlo MORSE-SGC code will be used. Both codes are included in ORNL's SCALE 5 programs package. A comparison between the considered SEU43 fuel bundle projects will be also provided, with CANDU standard fuel bundle taken as reference. (authors)

  12. A new method for using Cf-252 in SEU testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costantine, A.; Howard, J. W.; Becker, M.; Block, R. C.; Smith, L. S.; Soli, G. A.; Stauber, M. C.

    1990-01-01

    A system using Cf-252 and associated nuclear instrumentation has determined the single-event upset (SEU) cross section versus linear energy transfer (LET) curve for several 2K x 8 static random access memories (SRAMs). The Cf-252 fission fragments pass through a thin-film organic scintillator detector (TFD) on the way to the device under test (DUT). The TFD provides energy information for each transiting fragment. Data analysis provides the energy of the individual ion responsible for each SEU; thus, separate upset cross sections can be developed for different energy and mass regions of the californium spectrum. This californium-based device is quite small and fits onto a bench top. It provides a convenient and inexpensive supplement or alternative to accelerator and high-altitude/space SEU testing.

  13. An SEU-hardened CMOS data latch design

    SciTech Connect

    Rockett, L.R. Jr.

    1988-12-01

    A Single Event Upset (SEU)-hardened Complementary Metal-Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) data latch design is described. The hardness is achieved by virtue of the latch design, thus no fabrication process or design groundrule development is required. Hardness is gained with comparatively little adverse impact on performance. Cyclotron tests provided hardness verification.

  14. SEU-hardened storage cell validation using a pulsed laser

    SciTech Connect

    Velazco, R.

    1996-12-01

    Laser tests performed on a prototype chip to validate new SEU-hardened storage cell designs revealed unexpected latch-up and single-event upset phenomena. The investigations that identified their location show the existence of a topology-dependent dual node upset mechanism. Design solutions are suggested to avoid its occurrence.

  15. Importance of ion energy on SEU in CMOS SRAMs

    SciTech Connect

    Dodd, P.E.; Shaneyfelt, M.R.; Sexton, F.W.; Hash, G.L.; Winokur, P.S.; Musseau, O.; Leray, J.L.

    1998-03-01

    The single-event upset (SEU) responses of 16 Kbit to 1 Mbit SRAMs irradiated with low and high-energy heavy ions are reported. Standard low-energy heavy ion tests appear to be sufficiently conservative for technologies down to 0.5 {micro}m.

  16. Relationship between IBICC imaging and SEU in CMOS ICs

    SciTech Connect

    Sexton, F.W.; Horn, K.M.; Doyle, B.L.; Laird, J.S.; Cholewa, M.; Saint, A.; Legge, G.J.F.

    1993-03-01

    Ion-beam-induced charge-collection (IBICC) images of the TA670 16K-bit CMOS SRAM are analyzed and compared to previous SEU images. Enhanced charge collection was observed in the n-source/drains regions consistent with bipolar amplification or shunting.

  17. SEU sensitive depth in a submicron SRAM technology

    SciTech Connect

    Detcheverry, C.; Bruguier, G.; Palau, J.M.; Gasiot, J.; Ecoffet, R.; Duzellier, S.; Barak, J.; Lifshitz, Y.

    1998-06-01

    This work determines experimentally and by simulation the SEU sensitive depth in a 0.6 {micro}m SRAM technology. A good correlation is obtained between the two studies in the case of heavy ions deposing energy close to the critical energy. Other simulation results complete the first investigation by studying the minimum sensitive depth for ions deposing higher energies (at greater LET).

  18. Upper-Bound SEU Rates In Anisotropic Fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmonds, Larry D.

    1993-01-01

    Upper bounds on rates of single-event upsets (SEU's) in digital integrated circuits and other electronic devices exposed to anisotropic fluxes of energetic ionizing particles computed by use of improved method. Derived from simplified, worst-case mathematical models of charge-collecting volumes and physical phenomena in electronic devices.

  19. Relationship between IBICC imaging and SEU in CMOS ICs

    SciTech Connect

    Sexton, F.W.; Horn, K.M.; Doyle, B.L. ); Laird, J.S.; Cholewa, M.; Saint, A.; Legge, G.J.F. )

    1993-01-01

    Ion-beam-induced charge-collection (IBICC) images of the TA670 16K-bit CMOS SRAM are analyzed and compared to previous SEU images. Enhanced charge collection was observed in the n-source/drains regions consistent with bipolar amplification or shunting.

  20. Some aspects of application of the two parameter SEU model

    SciTech Connect

    Miroshkin, V.V.; Tverskoy, M.G.

    1995-12-01

    Influence of the projectile type, pion production in nucleon-nucleon interaction inside nucleus and direction of the beam incidence on SEU cross section for INTEL 2164A microcircuit in framework of the two parameter model is investigated. Model parameters for devices, investigated recently are reported. Optimum proton energies for determination of model parameters are proposed.

  1. SEU evaluation of FeRAM memories for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheick, L.; Guertin, S.; Nguyen, d.

    2002-01-01

    SEU cross-sections were obtained for two different FeRAM memories: The 64 kbit and 256 kbit Ramtron FeRAM and the Hynix 64 kbit device. The devices were seen to have latch-up characteristics typical of commercial CMOS. Also, errors in the memory were also seen from heavy ion irradiation.

  2. SEU characterization and design dependence of the SA3300 microprocessor

    SciTech Connect

    Sexton, F.W.; Treece, R.K.; Axness, C.L.; Hughes, K.H.; Hash, G.L.; Hass, K.J.

    1990-01-01

    The SA3300 16-bit microprocessor is a key component for interplanetary space probes to be launched in the 1990's. A full SEU characterization of the D-latches of the SA3300 is given, including pattern sensitivity and temperature. 9 refs., 5 figs.

  3. Test results for SEU and SEL immune memory circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiseman, D.; Canaris, J.; Whitaker, S.; Gambles, J.; Arave, K.; Arave, L.

    1993-01-01

    Test results for three SEU logic/circuit hardened CMOS memory circuits verify upset and latch-up immunity for two configurations to be in excess of 120 MeV cm(exp 2)/mg using a commercial, non-radiation hardened CMOS process. Test chips from three separate fabrication runs in two different process were evaluated.

  4. SEU mitigation strategies for SRAM-based FPGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Pei; Zhang, Jian

    2011-08-01

    The type of Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) technology and device family used in a design is a key factor for system reliability. Though antifuse-based FPGAs are widely used in aerospace because of their high reliability, current antifuse-based FPGA devices are expensive and leave no room for mistakes or changes since they are not reprogrammable. The substitute for antifuse-based FPGAs are needed in aerospace design, they should be both reprogrammable and highly reliable to Single Event Upset effects (SEUs). SRAM-based FPGAs are widely and systematically used in complex embedding digital systems both in a single chip industry and commercial applications. They are reprogrammable and high in density because of the smaller SRAM cells and logic structures. But the SRAM-based FPGAs are especially sensitive to cosmic radiation because the configuration information is stored in SRAM memory. The ideal FPGA for aerospace use should be high-density SRAM-based which is also insensitive to cosmic radiation induced SEUs. Therefore, in order to enable the use of SRAM-based FPGAs in safety critical applications, new techniques and strategies are essential to mitigate the SEU errors in such devices. In order to improve the reliability of SRAM-based FPGAs which are very sensitive to SEU errors, techniques such as reconfiguration and Triple Module Redundancy (TMR) are widely used in the aerospace electronic systems to mitigate the SEU and Single Event Functional Interrupt (SEFI) errors. Compared to reconfiguration and triplication, scrubbing and partial reconfiguration will utilize fewer or even no internal resources of FPGA. What's more, the detection and repair process can detect and correct SEU errors in configuration memories of the FPGA without affecting or interrupting the proper working of the system while reconfiguration would terminate the operation of the FPGA. This paper presents a payload system realized on Xilinx Virtex-4 FPGA which mitigates SEU effects in the

  5. Variation in SEU sensitivity of dose-imprinted CMOS SRAMs

    SciTech Connect

    Stassinopoulos, E.G. ); Brucker, G.S. ); Van Gunten, O. ); Kim, H.S. )

    1989-12-01

    This paper reports on an experimental study of dose-induced changes in SEU sensitivity of CMOS static RAMs. Two time-regimes were investigated following exposure of memories to Cobalt-60 gamma rays: the near term within a few hours after exposure, and the long term, after many days. Samples were irradiated both at room and at liquid nitrogen temperatures. The latter procedure was used in order to freeze-in the damage state until SEU measurements could be made before annealing would take place. Results show that memories damaged by dose are more sensitive to upsets by heavy ions. The induced changes are substantial: threshold linear energy transfer (LET) values decreased by as much as 46% and asymptotic cross sections increased by factors of 2 to 4 (unannealed samples).

  6. Variation in SEU sensitivity of dose-imprinted CMOS SRAMs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stassinopoulos, E. G.; Brucker, G. J.; Van Gunten, O.; Kim, H. S.

    1989-01-01

    The authors report on an experimental study of dose-induced changes in SEU (single-event-upset) sensitivity of CMOS static RAMs. Two time regimes were investigated following exposure of memories to cobalt-60 gamma rays: the near term, within a few hours after exposure, and the long term, after many days. Samples were irradiated both at room and at liquid nitrogen temperatures. The latter procedure was used in order to freeze in the damage state until SEU measurements could be made prior to annealing. Results show that memories damaged by dose are more sensitive to upsets by heavy ions. The induced changes are substantial: threshold linear energy transfer (LET) values decreased by as much as 46 percent and asymptotic cross sections increased by factors of two to four (unannealed samples).

  7. SEU tolerant computer based on the R3000

    SciTech Connect

    Kaschmitter, J.L.; Butner, D.B.; Shaeffer, D.L.; Colella, N.J.; McKnett, C.L.; Coakley, P.G.

    1993-01-30

    We have built and tested a Single Event Upset (SEU) tolerant computer (STC) based on the MIPS Inc. R3000 processor. Testing in a proton environment is ongoing. The design of this computer was postulated in previous work and based upon extensive radiation effects testing performed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). This computer is based entirely on commercially available parts. The purpose of these tests is to demonstrate the capability of using non-radiation hardened parts in an SEU environment, in this case Low Earth Orbit (LEO), with upset mitigation through fault tolerant hardware and software design methodologies. The hardware and software designs are described in detail, the test setup and test parameters are given and test results are presented.

  8. Methods for calculating SEU rates for bipolar and NMOS circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNulty, P. J.; Abdel-Kader, W. G.; Bisgrove, J. M.

    1985-12-01

    Computer codes developed at Clarkson for simulating charge generation by proton-induced nuclear reactions in well-defined silicon microstructures can be used to calculate SEU rates for specific devices when the critical charge and the dimensions of all SEU sensitive junctions on the device are known, provided one can estimate the contribution from externally-generated charge which enters the sensitive junction by drift and diffusion. Calculations for two important bipolar devices, the AMD 2901B bit slice and the Fairchild 93L422 RAM, for which the dimensions of the sensitive volumes were estimated from available heavy-ion test data, have been found to be in agreement with experimental data. Circuit data for the Intel 2164A, an alpha sensitive dRAM, was provided by the manufacturer. Calculations based on crude assumptions regarding which nuclear recoils and which alphas trigger upsets in the 2164A were found to agree with experimental data.

  9. SEU design consideration for MESFETs on LT GaAs

    SciTech Connect

    Weatherford, T.R.; Radice, R.; Eskins, D.

    1997-12-01

    Computer simulation results are reported on transistor design and single-event charge collection modeling of metal-semiconductor field effect transistors (MESFETs) fabricated in the Vitesse H-GaAsIII{reg_sign} process on Low Temperature grown (LT) GaAs epitaxial layers. Tradeoffs in Single Event Upset (SEU) immunity and transistor design are discussed. Effects due to active loads and diffusion barriers are examined.

  10. Effects of ion damage on IBICC and SEU imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Sexton, F.W.; Horn, K.M.; Doyle, B.L.; Shaneyfelt, M.R.; Meisenheimer, T.L.

    1995-12-01

    The effect of displacement and ionizing dose damage on ion-beam-induced-charge-collection (IBICC) and single-event-upset (SEU) imaging are explored. IBICC imaging is not affected by ionizing dose damage, and its dependence on displacement damage is a complex function of the structure of the samples used in this study. Degradation of the IBICC signal is controlled by displacement damage that occurs at different rates in the heavily doped substrate and lightly doped epitaxial silicon layer, leading to a non-linear dependence of inverse degradation versus ion fluence. The effect of ion exposure on the electrical performance of complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) static random access memories (SRAMs) is solely related to ionizing dose effects in the transistor oxides. With SEU imaging, the authors found that an additional region became sensitive to upset with ion fluence probably as a result of ionizing dose effects on the restoring transistors. Finally, SEU during IBICC imaging resulted in charge collection from both p-drains of a memory cell. Implications of damage on the use of these microbeam techniques are discussed.

  11. Relationship between IBICC imaging and SEU in CMOS ICs

    SciTech Connect

    Sexton, F.W.; Horn, K.M.; Doyle, B.L. ); Laird, J.S.; Cholewa, M.; Saint, A.; Legge, G.J.F. . Micro Analytical Research Centre)

    1993-12-01

    Ion-beam-induced charge-collection imaging (IBICC) has been used to study the SEU mechanisms of the Sandia TA670 16K-bit SRAM. Quantitative charge-collection spectra from known regions of the memory cell have been derived with this technique. For 2.4-MeV He ions at normal incidence, charge collection depth for a reverse-biased p+ drain strike is estimated to be 4.8[+-]0.4 [mu]m. Heavy-ion strikes to the reverse-biased p-well result in nearly complete collection of deposited charge to a depth of 5.5[+-]0.5 [mu]m. A charge amplification effect in the n-on drain is identified and is due to either bipolar amplification or a shunt effect in the parasitic vertical npn bipolar transistor associated with the n+/n substrate, p-well, and n+ drain. This effect is present only when the n+ drain is at 0V bias. When coupled with previous SEU-imaging, these results strongly suggest that the dominant SEU mechanism in this SRAM is a heavy-ion strike to the n-on transistor drain.

  12. Single event upset (SEU) sensitivity dependence of linear integrated circuits (ICs) on bias conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Koga, R.; Penzin, S.H.; Crawford, K.B.; Crain, W.R.; Moss, S.C.; Pinkerton, S.D.; LaLumondiere, S.D.; Maher, M.C.

    1997-12-01

    The single event upset (SEU) sensitivity of certain types of linear microcircuits is strongly affected by bias conditions. For these devices, a model of upset mechanism and a method for SEU control have been suggested.

  13. S.E.U. experiments on an artificial neural network implemented by means of digital processors

    SciTech Connect

    Velazco, R.; Assoum, A.; Cheynet, P.; Olmos, M.

    1996-12-01

    The SEU sensitivity of an Artificial Neural Network intended to be used in space to detect protonic whistlers is investigated. The authors evaluate its behavior in the presence of SEU-like faults for a hardware implementation, associating a general purpose microprocessor to a dedicated neural processor. Experimental results (SEU simulations and heavy ion ground tests) show the robustness of this implementation.

  14. SEU cross sections derived from a diffusion analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Edmonds, L.D.

    1996-12-01

    A simple theoretical prediction of single-event upset (SEU) cross section versus linear energy transfer (LET) is derived from a diffusion analysis, and the result is compared to some real device curves. It was found that at least some real device curves show two regimes. One regime (high-LET) is characterized by a very good fit to the theoretical prediction, and the other (low-LET) is characterized by a very bad fit. The existence of a high-LET regime provides additional credibility for the increasingly popular postulate that diffusion has an important effect on the shape of the cross-sectional curve.

  15. Threshold LET for SEU induced by low energy ions

    SciTech Connect

    McNulty, P.J.; Roche, P.; Palau, J.M.; Gasiot, J.

    1999-12-01

    Simulations to determine the threshold LET as a function of the length of the ion track are consistent with there being two regions of charge collection. In the top layer which contains the depletion region all the charge generated is collected in time to upset the device. In the next layer, 10% to 20% of the charge generated is collected and contributes to upsetting the device. This second layer of partial charge collection may significantly impact the accuracy of SEU predictions involving low-energy neutrons and protons. A simple method of including this contribution in calculations is proposed.

  16. The SEU Figure of Merit and proton upset rate calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, E.L.

    1998-12-01

    This paper re-examines the use of the SEU Figure of Merit for heavy ion upset rate predictions. Slightly different orbit dependent rate coefficients are used for unhardened and hardened parts. The two different coefficients allow for the slight changes of LET spectra that occur due to the earth`s magnetic shielding. Accurate heavy ion predictions can be made for any orbit and any part. The authors show that the Figure of Merit can also be used to predict upset rate due to protons in the proton radiation belt. A proton rate coefficient is introduced to describe the upset likelihood in orbits with proton exposures. These results mean that a part susceptibility can be described by a single parameter, rather than the four Weibull parameters and two Bendel parameters used previously. The Figure of Merit completely describes a part`s SEU susceptibility and can be obtained from either proton or heavy ion measurements, eliminating the expense of making both types of experiment. The total upset rate for a part in a particular orbit can be calculated using its characteristic Figure of Merit and a single orbit specific rate coefficient, the sum of the heavy ion and proton rate coefficients.

  17. Charge collection and SEU from angled ion strikes

    SciTech Connect

    Dodd, P.E.; Shaneyfelt, M.R.; Sexton, F.W.

    1997-03-01

    Single event upsets (SEUs) are caused in semiconductor microcircuits when charge is deposited in a sensitive volume of the circuit by an incident energetic particle. Collection of this charge causes a loss of information stored at the struck circuit node. Sensitive regions of a microcircuit typically consist of reverse-biased junctions which efficiently collect deposited charge through the influence of drift fields. During laboratory SEU testing, angled ion strikes are often used to conveniently mimic normally incident particles of higher linear energy transfer (LET). This practice is based on ion pathlengths through a thin rectangular parallelepiped (RPP) sensitive volume. Specifically, the authors assume that an angled strike deposits 1/cos{theta} more charge in the sensitive volume, which in turn is assumed to lead to 1/cos{theta} more charge collection at the sensitive node, and an increase in the particle`s effective LET to 1/cos{theta} higher than at normal incidence.

  18. SEU characterization and design dependence of the SA3300 microprocessor

    SciTech Connect

    Sexton, F.W.; Treece, R.K.; Hass, K.J.; Hash, G.L.; Axness, C.L. ); Hughes, K.L. ); Buchner, S.P.; Kang, K. )

    1990-12-01

    The SEU vulnerability of the SA3300 16-bit microprocessor has been characterized, and the effects of two different design revisions on error rate have been explored. The authors have found that the threshold for upset depends on the data pattern written into the general purpose registers. With all bits in the general purpose registers set to logic one, a design with 2-{mu}m n- and p-channel transistor lengths had a threshold LET of 35 MeV-cm{sup 2}/mg at 25{degrees} C and 4.5 volt operation. With all zero's stored in the registers the upset threshold increased by more than a factor of two to 83 MeV- cm{sup 2}/mg. A second design revision, with 1.25-{mu}m and 1.75-{mu}m n- and p-channel transistor lengths, respectively, was more vulnerable to upset, but exhibited a smaller dependence on logic state.

  19. SEU mitigation for half-latches in xilinx virtex FPGAs.

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, P. S.; Caffrey, M. P.; Wirthlin, M. J.; Johnson, D. E.; Rollins, N.

    2003-01-01

    The performance, in-system reprogrammability, flexibility, and reduced costs of SRAM-based field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) make them very interesting for high-speed, on-orbit data processing, but, because the current generation of radiation-tolerant SRAM-based FPGAs are derived directly from COTS versions of the chips, their memory structures are still susceptible to single-event upsets (SEUs) . While previous papers have described the SEU characteristics and mitigation techniques for the configuration and user memory structures on the Xilinx Virtex family of FPGAs, we will concentrate on the effects of SEUs on 'half-latch' structures within the Virtex architecture, describe techniques for mitigating these effects, and provide new experimental data which illustrate the effectiveness of one of these mitigation techniques under proton radiation.

  20. Implications of angle of incidence in SEU testing of modern circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, R.A.; McNulty, P.J.; Abdel-Kadar, W.G. . Dept. of Physics and Astronomy)

    1994-12-01

    Simulations show that ignoring the angular dependence of proton SEU cross sections produces errors in predictions of SEU rates in space. Moreover, they suggest that devices with thin sensitive volumes may upset to protons at grazing incidence despite high threshold LET values (> 80 MeV cm[sup 2]) at normal incidence. Incorporating angular effects in space predictions requires accurate knowledge of the dimensions of the sensitive volume associated with the SEU-sensitive junction, especially the thickness. A method is proposed for using proton SEU measurements at different angles and energies combined with simulations to determine the thickness of the sensitive volume and to test the reliability of the predictions.

  1. An SEU (single event upset) tolerant memory cell derived from fundamental studies of SEU mechanisms in SRAM (static random access memories)

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, H.T.; Axness, C.L.; McBrayer, J.D.; Browning, J.S.; Fu, J.S.; Ochoa, A. Jr.; Koga, R.

    1987-01-01

    A new single event upset (SEU) hardening concept, an LRAM cell, is demonstrated theoretically and experimentally. As basis for the LRAM idea, techniques were developed to measure time constants for ion induced voltage transients in conventional static random access memories, SRAM. Time constants of 0.8 and 6.0 nsec were measured for transients following strikes at the n- and p-channel drains, respectively - primary areas of SEU sensitivity. These data are the first transient time measurements on full memory chips and the large difference is fundamental to the LRAM concept. Decoupling resistors in the LRAM are used only to protect against the short transient; longer persisting pulses are blocked by a voltage divider, a basically new concept for SEU protection. In such a design, smaller resistors provide SEU tolerance, allowing higher performance, hardened memories. Test structures of the new design exhibit SEU tolerance with resistors 5-to-10 times smaller than currently used in SRAM. Our advanced transport-plus-circuit numerical simulations of the SEU process predicted this result and account for the LRAM experiments, as well as a variety of experiments on conventional SRAM. 16 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Investigation of single-event upset (SEU) in an advanced bipolar process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoutendyk, John A.; Secrest, Elaine C.; Berndt, Dale F.

    1988-01-01

    An extensive analytical and experimental study SEU in an advanced silicon bipolar process was made. The modeling used process and device parameters to model the SEU charge, collection, and circuit response derived from a special version of PISCES in cylindrical coordinates and SPICE, respectively. Data are reported for test cells of various sizes.

  3. Two CMOS memory cells suitable for the design of SEU-tolerant VLSI circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Velazco, R.; Bessot, D. ); Duzellier, S. ); Ecoffet, R. ); Koga, R. )

    1994-12-01

    Two new CMOS memory cells, called HIT cells, designed to be SEU-immune are presented. Compared to previously reported design hardened solutions, the HIT cells feature better electrical performances and consume less silicon area. SEU tests performed on a prototype chip prove the efficiency of the approach.

  4. SEU immunity: The effects of scaling on the peripheral circuits of SRAMs

    SciTech Connect

    Jacunski, L.; Doyle, S.; Jallice, D.; Haddad, N.; Scott, T. )

    1994-12-01

    Heavy ion testing on a scaled 256K SRAM has shown that SEU analysis of the peripheral circuits as well as the memory cell must be performed as circuits are scaled to smaller and smaller dimensions. This paper describes the SEU induce phenomena experienced by the scaled version of a previous 256K radiation hardened SRAM design, affected by circuits in the periphery.

  5. P-well or N-well CMOS technology for advanced SEU-hard SRAMs

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    The decoupling resistances required for SEU hardening CMOS SRAMs of the 2..mu..m p-well and n-well technologies are compared. An advanced device-plus-circuit simulator has been used to illuminate the underpinings of why one technology is intrinsically more SEU tolerant than the other. 3 refs., 5 figs.

  6. SEU response of design- and resistor-hardened D-latches in the SA3300 microprocessor

    SciTech Connect

    Sexton, F.W.; Corbett, W.T.; Axness, C.L.; Wunsch, T.F.; Hughes, K.L.; Treece, R.K.; Hass, K.J.; Hash, G.L.; Shaneyfelt, M.R.

    1991-01-01

    The effectiveness of hardening the SA3300 against SEU using design and design-plus-resistor approaches is presented. The full performance and SEU tolerance requirements are met using R{sub fb} {le} 160 k{Omega}. Lumped-parameter circuit simulations are used to analyze results. 10 refs., 5 figs.

  7. Recent Results on SEU Hardening of SiGe HBT Logic Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krithivasan, Ramkumar; Marshall, Paul W.; Nayeem, Mustayeen; Sutton, Akil K.; Kuo, Wei-Min Lance; Haugerud, Becca M.; Najafizadeh, Laieh; Cressler, John D.; Carts, martin A.; Marshall, Cheryl J.

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on SEU tolerant SiGe HBT technology is shown. The topics include: 1) Introduction; 2) TID and SEU in SiGe Technology; 3) RHBD Techniques; 4) Experiment; 5) Heavy-Ion Data and Analysis; and 6) Summary.

  8. Measurements of SEU and total dose in geostationary orbit under normal and solar flare conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, L.; Daly, E.J.; Harboe-Sorensen, R. ); Holmes-Siedle, A.G. ); Ward, A.K.; Bull, R.A. )

    1991-12-01

    The Meteosat-3 Radiation Effects Experiment includes two 256 Kbit SRAMs configured for SEU detection and a RADFET array for dose measurement. SEU rates and doses are enhanced during solar flares. In this paper two years of orbital data are compared with ground tests and prediction.

  9. Predictions and observations of SEU rates in space

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, E.L.

    1997-12-01

    This paper summarizes the available data on the observation and prediction of SEU rates in space. It considers three questions: (1) How good can a prediction be? (2) How bad can a prediction be? (3) How does the quality of the prediction depend on the type of orbit? The paper considers one hundred and twenty-six reports of predicted and observed rates. These include updated predictions for the CRRES devices. The analysis then excludes solar particle events, single event burnout, cases with poor statistics, and cases that are essentially duplicates; leaving 77 comparisons. The heavy ion predictions based on the CREME environments and the proton predictions based on the AP8 environments are both very successful for their basic environments, but are less accurate for low earth orbits (LEO). The quality of the results depends on the use of the proper shielding around the part. The results appear consistent with suggested modifications in these environments based on recent space measurements. The methods that are used for upset rate predictions appear to be adequate for the current generation of devices.

  10. SEU-tolerant IQ detection algorithm for LLRF accelerator system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grecki, M.

    2007-08-01

    High-energy accelerators use RF field to accelerate charged particles. Measurements of effective field parameters (amplitude and phase) are tasks of great importance in these facilities. The RF signal is downconverted in frequency but keeping the information about amplitude and phase and then sampled in ADC. One of the several tasks for LLRF control system is to estimate the amplitude and phase (or I and Q components) of the RF signal. These parameters are further used in the control algorithm. The XFEL accelerator will be built using a single-tunnel concept. Therefore electronic devices (including LLRF control system) will be exposed to ionizing radiation, particularly to a neutron flux generating SEUs in digital circuits. The algorithms implemented in FPGA/DSP should therefore be SEU-tolerant. This paper presents the application of the WCC method to obtain immunity of IQ detection algorithm to SEUs. The VHDL implementation of this algorithm in Xilinx Virtex II Pro FPGA is presented, together with results of simulation proving the algorithm suitability for systems operating in the presence of SEUs.

  11. Energy-resolved neutron SEU measurements from 22 to 160 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Johansson, K.; Dyreklev, P.; Granbom, B.; Olsson, N.; Blomgren, J.; Renberg, P.U.

    1998-12-01

    The energy dependence of the neutron- induced single-event upset (NSEU) cross section for Static RAMs have been measured, using quasi-monoenergetic neutrons of five different energies from 22 to 160 MeV. The measured SEU cross sections were corrected for the low-energy neutron tail by an iterative folding procedure. A clear energy dependence has been found. The SEU rate has been compared both with results from testing with a neutron spallation spectrum up to 800 MeV and the measured SEU rate from In-Flight experiments at 10 km.

  12. Ion induced charge collection and SEU sensitivity of emitter coupled logic (ECL) devices

    SciTech Connect

    Koga, R.; Crain, W.R.; Hansel, S.J.; Crawford, K.B.; Kirshman, J.F.; Pinkerton, S.D.; Penzin, S.H.; Moss, S.C.; Maher, M.

    1995-12-01

    This paper presents single event upset (SEU) and latchup test results for selected Emitter Coupled Logic (ECL) microcircuits, including several types of low capacity SRAMs and other memory devices. The high speed of ECL memory devices makes them attractive for use in space applications. However, the emitter coupled transistor design increases susceptibility to radiation induced functional errors, especially SEU, because the transistors are not saturated, unlike the transistors in a CMOS device. Charge collection at the sensitive nodes in ECL memory elements differs accordingly. These differences are responsible, in part, for the heightened SEU vulnerability of ECL memory devices relative to their CMOS counterparts.

  13. Verification of a SEU model for advanced 1-micron CMOS structures using heavy ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cable, J. S.; Carter, J. R.; Witteles, A. A.

    1986-01-01

    Modeling and test results are reported for 1 micron CMOS circuits. Analytical predictions are correlated with experimental data, and sensitivities to process and design variations are discussed. Unique features involved in predicting the SEU performance of these devices are described. The results show that the critical charge for upset exhibits a strong dependence on pulse width for very fast devices, and upset predictions must factor in the pulse shape. Acceptable SEU error rates can be achieved for a 1 micron bulk CMOS process. A thin retrograde well provides complete SEU immunity for N channel hits at normal incidence angle. Source interconnect resistance can be important parameter in determining upset rates, and Cf-252 testing can be a valuable tool for cost-effective SEU testing.

  14. SEU response of an entire SRAM cell simulated as one contiguous three dimensional device domain

    SciTech Connect

    Roche, P.; Palau, J.M.; Bruguier, G.; Gasiot, J.; Belhaddad, K.; Ecoffet, R.

    1998-12-01

    The first SEU response of a complete 3-D SRAM cell is presented. This simulation method allows to verify the accuracy of the commonly used mixed-mode technique and to study coupling effects between different junctions of the cell.

  15. Upper-bound SEU rate for devices in an isotropic or nonisotropic flux

    SciTech Connect

    Edmonds, L.D.

    1991-08-01

    A method for constructing upper bound estimates for device single event upset (SEU) rates is presented. A directional Heinrich flux, as a function of direction, must be known. A computer code, included, converts the directional Heinrich flux into an 'effective flux'. The effective flux provides a simple way to estimate upper bound SEU rates for devices with a known normal incident cross section versus LET curve.

  16. Observation and prediction of SEU in Hitachi SRAMs in low altitude polar orbits

    SciTech Connect

    Harboe-Sorensen, R.; Daly, E.J.; Adams, L. ); Underwood, C.I. . Surrey Satellite Technology); Mueller, R. . Institut fuer Datenverarbeitungsanlagen)

    1993-12-01

    In-orbit SEU data from three microsatellites are separated into Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR), South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) and solar flare upsets. Heavy ion and proton testing of the same devices are reported and predictions using LET-dependent ion cross sections and a 2-parameter fit to proton cross section data are compared with in-flight data. SEU trends in memory devices from a single manufacturer, from 16 K-bit to 4 M-bit, are identified.

  17. SEU testing of a novel hardened register implemented using standard CMOS technology

    SciTech Connect

    Monnier, T.; Roche, F.M.; Cosculluela, J.; Velazco, R.

    1999-12-01

    A novel memory structure, designed to tolerate SEU perturbations, has been implemented in registers and tested. The design was completed using a standard submicron nonradiation hardened CMOS technology. This paper presents the results of heavy ions tests which evidence the noticeable improvement of the SEU-robustness with an increased LET threshold and reduced cross-section, without significant impact to die real estate, write time, or power consumption.

  18. Upper bound SEU rate for devices in an isotropic or nonisotropic flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmonds, Larry D.

    1991-01-01

    A method for constructing upper bound estimates for device single event upset (SEU) rates is presented. A directional Heinrich flux, as a function of direction, must be known. A computer code, included, converts the directional Heinrich flux into an 'effective flux'. The effective flux provides a simple way to estimate upper bound SEU rates for devices with a known normal incident cross section versus LET curve.

  19. The Single Event Upset (SEU) response to 590 MeV protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, D. K.; Price, W. E.; Smith, L. S.; Soli, G. A.

    1984-01-01

    The presence of high-energy protons in cosmic rays, solar flares, and trapped radiation belts around Jupiter poses a threat to the Galileo project. Results of a test of 10 device types (including 1K RAM, 4-bit microP sequencer, 4-bit slice, 9-bit data register, 4-bit shift register, octal flip-flop, and 4-bit counter) exposed to 590 MeV protons at the Swiss Institute of Nuclear Research are presented to clarify the picture of SEU response to the high-energy proton environment of Jupiter. It is concluded that the data obtained should remove the concern that nuclear reaction products generated by protons external to the device can cause significant alteration in the device SEU response. The data also show only modest increases in SEU cross section as proton energies are increased up to the upper limits of energy for both the terrestrial and Jovian trapped proton belts.

  20. Study on FPGA SEU Mitigation for the Readout Electronics of DAMPE BGO Calorimeter in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Zhongtao; Feng, Changqing; Gao, Shanshan; Zhang, Deliang; Jiang, Di; Liu, Shubin; An, Qi

    2015-06-01

    The BGO calorimeter, which provides a wide measurement range of the primary cosmic ray spectrum, is a key sub-detector of Dark Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE). The readout electronics of calorimeter consists of 16 pieces of Actel ProASIC Plus FLASH-based FPGA, of which the design-level flip-flops and embedded block RAMs are single event upset (SEU) sensitive in the harsh space environment. Therefore to comply with radiation hardness assurance (RHA), SEU mitigation methods, including partial triple modular redundancy (TMR), CRC checksum, and multi-domain reset are analyzed and tested by the heavy-ion beam test. Composed of multi-level redundancy, a FPGA design with the characteristics of SEU tolerance and low resource consumption is implemented for the readout electronics.

  1. SEU rate prediction and measurement of GaAs SRAMs onboard the CRRES satellite

    SciTech Connect

    Weatherford, T.R.; McDonald, P.T. Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC ); Campbell, A.B.; Langworthy, J.B. )

    1993-12-01

    The Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) launched in July of 1990 included experiments to study effects of Single Event Upset (SEU) on various microelectronic ICs. The MicroElectronics Package (MEP) subsection of the satellite experiments monitored upset rates on 65 devices over a 15 month period. One of the purposes of the SEU experiments was to determine if the soft error modeling techniques were of sufficient accuracy to predict error rates, and if not, to determine where the deficiencies existed. An analysis is presented on SPICE predicted, SEU ground tested, and CRRES observed heavy ion and proton soft error rates of GaAs SRAMs. Upset rates overestimated the susceptibility of the GaAs SRAMs. Differences are accounted to several factors.

  2. Design and qualification of the SEU/TD Radiation Monitor chip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, Martin G.; Blaes, Brent R.; Soli, George A.; Zamani, Nasser; Hicks, Kenneth A.

    1992-01-01

    This report describes the design, fabrication, and testing of the Single-Event Upset/Total Dose (SEU/TD) Radiation Monitor chip. The Radiation Monitor is scheduled to fly on the Mid-Course Space Experiment Satellite (MSX). The Radiation Monitor chip consists of a custom-designed 4-bit SRAM for heavy ion detection and three MOSFET's for monitoring total dose. In addition the Radiation Monitor chip was tested along with three diagnostic chips: the processor monitor and the reliability and fault chips. These chips revealed the quality of the CMOS fabrication process. The SEU/TD Radiation Monitor chip had an initial functional yield of 94.6 percent. Forty-three (43) SEU SRAM's and 14 Total Dose MOSFET's passed the hermeticity and final electrical tests and were delivered to LL.

  3. Simulation and research on a 4T-cell based duplication redundancy SRAM for SEU radiation hardening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xinhong, Hong; Liyang, Pan; Wendi, Zhang; Dongmei, Ji; Dong, Wu; Chen, Shen; Jun, Xu

    2015-11-01

    A novel 4T-cell based duplication redundancy SRAM is proposed for SEU radiation hardening applications. The memory cell is designed with a 65-nm low leakage process; the operation principle and the SEU radiation hardening mechanism are discussed in detail. The SEE characteristics and failure mechanism are also studied with a 3-D device simulator. The results show that the proposed SRAM structure exhibits high SEU hardening performance with a small cell size.

  4. Empirical modeling of Single-Event Upset (SEU) in NMOS depletion-mode-load static RAM (SRAM) chips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoutendyk, J. A.; Smith, L. S.; Soli, G. A.; Smith, S. L.; Atwood, G. E.

    1986-01-01

    A detailed experimental investigation of single-event upset (SEU) in static RAM (SRAM) chips fabricated using a family of high-performance NMOS (HMOS) depletion-mode-load process technologies, has been done. Empirical SEU models have been developed with the aid of heavy-ion data obtained with a three-stage tandem van de Graaff accelerator. The results of this work demonstrate a method by which SEU may be empirically modeled in NMOS integrated circuits.

  5. SPICE analysis of the SEU sensitivity of a fully depleted SOI CMOS SRAM cell

    SciTech Connect

    Alles, M.L. )

    1994-12-01

    Fully depleted silicon-on-insulator (SOI) technologies are of interest for commercial applications as well as for use in harsh (radiation-intensive) environments. In both types of application, effects of charged particles (single-event effects) are of concern. Here, SPICE analysis of SEU sensitivity of a 6-T SRAM cell using commercially-representative fully depleted SOI CMOS technology parameters indicates that reduction of the minority carrier lifetime (parasitic bipolar gain) and use of thinner silicon can significantly reduce SEU sensitivity.

  6. Simulation of SEU Cross-sections using MRED under Conditions of Limited Device Information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauenstein, J. M.; Reed, R. A.; Weller, R. A.; Mendenhall, M. H.; Warren, K. M.; Pellish, J. A.; Schrimpf, R. D.; Sierawski, B. D.; Massengill, L. W.; Dodd, P. E.; Shaneyfelt, M. R.; Felix, J. A.; Schwank, J. R.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the simulation of Single Event Upset (SEU) cross sections using the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) resistance and electrode diffusion (MRED) tool using "Best guess" assumptions about the process and geometry, and direct ionization, low-energy beam test results. This work will also simulate SEU cross-sections including angular and high energy responses and compare the simulated results with beam test data for the validation of the model. Using MRED, we produced a reasonably accurate upset response model of a low-critical charge SRAM without detailed information about the circuit, device geometry, or fabrication process

  7. Single-Event Upset (SEU) model verification and threshold determination using heavy ions in a bipolar static RAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoutendyk, J. A.; Smith, L. S.; Soli, G. A.; Thieberger, P.; Wegner, H. E.

    1985-01-01

    Single-Event Upset (SEU) response of a bipolar low-power Schottky-diode-clamped TTL static RAM has been observed using Br ions in the 100-240 MeV energy range and O ions in the 20-100 MeV range. These data complete the experimental verification of circuit-simulation SEU modeling for this device. The threshold for onset of SEU has been observed by the variation of energy, ion species and angle of incidence. The results obtained from the computer circuit-simulation modeling and experimental model verification demonstrate a viable methodology for modeling SEU in bipolar integrated circuits.

  8. SEU of complementary GaAs static RAMs due to heavy ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuleeg, R.; Notthoff, J. K.; Nichols, D. K.

    1984-01-01

    The first measurement of single event upset (SEU) for complementary GaAs static RAMs caused by heavy ions is reported. Upset cross-sections of the circuits for 28 MeV oxygen ions are reported as well as the linear energy transfer (LET) threshold established by using 170 MeV oxygen ions at various angles of beam incidence.

  9. SEU critical charge and sensitive area in a submicron CMOS technology

    SciTech Connect

    Detcheverry, C.; Dachs, C.; Lorfevre, E.; Sudre, C.; Bruguier, G.; Palau, J.M.; Gasiot, J.; Ecoffet, R.

    1997-12-01

    This work presents SEU phenomena in advanced SRAM memory cells. Using mixed-mode simulation, the effects of scaling on the notions of sensitive area and critical charge is shown. Specifically, the authors quantify the influence of parasitic bipolar action in cells fabricated in a submicron technology.

  10. A method to compute SEU fault probabilities in memory arrays with error correction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gercek, Gokhan

    1994-01-01

    With the increasing packing densities in VLSI technology, Single Event Upsets (SEU) due to cosmic radiations are becoming more of a critical issue in the design of space avionics systems. In this paper, a method is introduced to compute the fault (mishap) probability for a computer memory of size M words. It is assumed that a Hamming code is used for each word to provide single error correction. It is also assumed that every time a memory location is read, single errors are corrected. Memory is read randomly whose distribution is assumed to be known. In such a scenario, a mishap is defined as two SEU's corrupting the same memory location prior to a read. The paper introduces a method to compute the overall mishap probability for the entire memory for a mission duration of T hours.

  11. SEU hardened memory cells for a CCSDS Reed-Solomon encoder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, Sterling; Canaris, John; Liu, Kathy

    1991-01-01

    A design technique to harden CMOS memory circuits against single event upset (SEU) in the space environment is reported. The design technique provides a recovery mechanism which is independent of the shape of the upsetting event. A RAM cell and flip-flop design are presented to demonstrate the method. The flip-flop was used in the control circuitry for a Reed-Solomon encoder designed for the Space Station and Explorer platforms.

  12. Altitude and latitude variations in avionics SEU and atmospheric neutron flux

    SciTech Connect

    Normand, E.; Baker, T.J. )

    1993-12-01

    The direct cause of single event upsets in SRAMs at aircraft altitudes by the atmospheric neutrons has previously been documented. The variation of the in-flight SEU rate with latitude is demonstrated by new data over a wide range of geographical locations. New measurements and models of the atmospheric neutron flux are also evaluated to characterize its variation with altitude, latitude and solar activity.

  13. Single-event upset (SEU) in a DRAM with on-chip error correction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoutendyk, J. A.; Schwartz, H. R.; Watson, R. K.; Hasnain, Z.; Nevile, L. R.

    1987-01-01

    Results are given of SEU measurements on 256K dynamic RAMs with on-chip error correction. They are claimed to be the first ever reported. A (12/8) Hamming error-correcting code was incorporated in the layout. Physical separation of the bits in each code word was used to guard against multiple bits being disrupted in any given word. Significant reduction in observed errors is reported.

  14. A new approach for the prediction of the neutron-induced SEU rate

    SciTech Connect

    Vial, C.; Palau, J.M.; Gasiot, J.; Calvet, M.C.; Fourtine, S.

    1998-12-01

    A new approach for SEU rate prediction in components submitted to neutron environment is presented. The method aims to take into account the characteristics of the secondary particles in terms of electrical effect. So, in addition to the critical energy/charge criterion generally used until now, two criteria are tentatively proposed: a critical LET and a limited distance in which energy must be deposited. The starting point of each computation is a common neutron-silicon interaction database.

  15. Ion Beam Induced Charge Collection (IBICC) microscopy of ICs: Relation to Single Event Upsets (SEU)

    SciTech Connect

    Horn, K.M.; Doyle, B.L.; Sexton, F.W. ); Laird, J.S.; Saint, A.; Cholewa, M.; Legge, G.J.F. . Micro Analytical Research Center )

    1992-01-01

    Single Event Upset (SEU) Imaging is a new diagnostic technique recently developed using Sandia's nuclear microprobe. This technique directly images, with micron resolution, those regions within an integrated circuit which are susceptible to ion-induced malfunctions. Such malfunctions are an increasing threat to space-based systems which make use of current generation IC designs. A complimentary technique to SEU-Imaging involves measurement of the charge collection volumes within integrated circuits; charge collection is the underlying physical process responsible for single event phenomena. This technique, which we term. Ion Beam Induced Charge Collection (IBICC) has been used here and elsewhere to generate micron resolution maps of the charge collection response of integrated circuits. In this paper, we demonstrate the utility of combining the SEU-Imaging and IBICC techniques in order to gain a better understanding of single event upset phenomena. High resolution IBICC images are used to extract more detailed information from charge collection spectra than that obtained from conventional broad-area ion exposures, such as from radioactive sources. Lastly, we will comment on the applications for IBICC as a replacement of Electron Beam Induced Conduction/Current (EBIC) measurements. As reductions in circuit feature size continue in the sub-micron regime, IBICC could certainly prove to be a technologically valuable replacement for EBlC and an important business opportunity for all nuclear microprobe facilities. 12 ref.

  16. Ion Beam Induced Charge Collection (IBICC) microscopy of ICs: Relation to Single Event Upsets (SEU)

    SciTech Connect

    Horn, K.M.; Doyle, B.L.; Sexton, F.W.; Laird, J.S.; Saint, A.; Cholewa, M.; Legge, G.J.F.

    1992-07-01

    Single Event Upset (SEU) Imaging is a new diagnostic technique recently developed using Sandia`s nuclear microprobe. This technique directly images, with micron resolution, those regions within an integrated circuit which are susceptible to ion-induced malfunctions. Such malfunctions are an increasing threat to space-based systems which make use of current generation IC designs. A complimentary technique to SEU-Imaging involves measurement of the charge collection volumes within integrated circuits; charge collection is the underlying physical process responsible for single event phenomena. This technique, which we term. Ion Beam Induced Charge Collection (IBICC) has been used here and elsewhere to generate micron resolution maps of the charge collection response of integrated circuits. In this paper, we demonstrate the utility of combining the SEU-Imaging and IBICC techniques in order to gain a better understanding of single event upset phenomena. High resolution IBICC images are used to extract more detailed information from charge collection spectra than that obtained from conventional broad-area ion exposures, such as from radioactive sources. Lastly, we will comment on the applications for IBICC as a replacement of Electron Beam Induced Conduction/Current (EBIC) measurements. As reductions in circuit feature size continue in the sub-micron regime, IBICC could certainly prove to be a technologically valuable replacement for EBlC and an important business opportunity for all nuclear microprobe facilities. 12 ref.

  17. SEU-hardened silicon bipolar and GaAs MESFET SRAM cells using local redundancy techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Hauser, J.R. )

    1992-02-01

    Silicon bipolar and GaAs FET SRAM's have proven to be more difficult to harden with respect to single-event upset mechanisms than have silicon CMOS SRAM's. This is a fundamental property of bipolar and JFET or MESFET device technologies which do not have a high-impedance, nonactive isolation between the control electrode and the current or voltage being controlled. All SEU circuit level hardening techniques applied at the local level must use some type of information storage redundancy so that information loss on one node due to an SEU event can be recovered from information stored elsewhere in the cell. In CMOS technologies, this can be achieved by the use of simple cross-coupling resistors, whereas in bipolar and FET technologies, no such simple approach is possible. Several approaches to the use of local redundancy in bipolar and FET technologies are discussed in this paper. At the expense of increased cell complexity and increased power consumption and write time, several approaches are capable of providing complete SEU hardness at the local cell level.

  18. Assessing the SEU resistance of CMOS latches using alpha-particle sensitive test circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, M.; Blaes, B.; Nixon, R.

    1990-01-01

    The importance of Cosmic Rays on the performance of integrated circuits (IC's) in a space environment is evident in the upset rate of the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS) launched in Apr. 1983. This satellite experiences a single-event-upset (SEU) per day which must be corrected from the ground. Such experience caused a redesign of the Galileo spacecraft with SEU resistant IC's. The solution to the SEU problem continues to be important as the complexity of spacecraft grows, the feature size of IC's decreases, and as space systems are designed with circuits fabricated at non-radiation hardened foundries. This paper describes an approach for verifying the susceptibility of CMOS latches to heavy-ion induced state changes. The approach utilizes alpha particles to induce the upsets in test circuits. These test circuits are standard cells that have offset voltages which sensitize the circuits to upsets. These results are then used to calculate the upsetability at operating voltages. In this study results are presented for the alpha particle upset of a six-transistor static random access memory (SRAM) cell. Then a methodology is described for the analysis of a standard-cell inverter latch.

  19. Experimental evidence for a new single-event upset (SEU) mode in a CMOS SRAM obtained from model verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoutendyk, J. A.; Smith, L. S.; Soli, G. A.; Lo, R. Y.

    1987-01-01

    Modeling of SEU has been done in a CMOS static RAM containing 1-micron-channel-length transistors fabricated from a p-well epilayer process using both circuit-simulation and numerical-simulation techniques. The modeling results have been experimentally verified with the aid of heavy-ion beams obtained from a three-stage tandem van de Graaff accelerator. Experimental evidence for a novel SEU mode in an ON n-channel device is presented.

  20. The contribution of low-energy protons to the total on-orbit SEU rate

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dodds, Nathaniel Anson; Martinez, Marino J.; Dodd, Paul E.; Shaneyfelt, Marty R.; Sexton, Frederick W.; Black, Jeffrey D.; Lee, David S.; Swanson, Scot E.; Bhuva, B. L.; Warren, K. M.; et al

    2015-11-10

    Low- and high-energy proton experimental data and error rate predictions are presented for many bulk Si and SOI circuits from the 20-90 nm technology nodes to quantify how much low-energy protons (LEPs) can contribute to the total on-orbit single-event upset (SEU) rate. Every effort was made to predict LEP error rates that are conservatively high; even secondary protons generated in the spacecraft shielding have been included in the analysis. Across all the environments and circuits investigated, and when operating within 10% of the nominal operating voltage, LEPs were found to increase the total SEU rate to up to 4.3 timesmore » as high as it would have been in the absence of LEPs. Therefore, the best approach to account for LEP effects may be to calculate the total error rate from high-energy protons and heavy ions, and then multiply it by a safety margin of 5. If that error rate can be tolerated then our findings suggest that it is justified to waive LEP tests in certain situations. Trends were observed in the LEP angular responses of the circuits tested. As a result, grazing angles were the worst case for the SOI circuits, whereas the worst-case angle was at or near normal incidence for the bulk circuits.« less

  1. The contribution of low-energy protons to the total on-orbit SEU rate

    SciTech Connect

    Dodds, Nathaniel Anson; Martinez, Marino J.; Dodd, Paul E.; Shaneyfelt, Marty R.; Sexton, Frederick W.; Black, Jeffrey D.; Lee, David S.; Swanson, Scot E.; Bhuva, B. L.; Warren, K. M.; Reed, R. A.; Trippe, J.; Sierawski, B. D.; Weller, R. A.; Mahatme, N.; Gaspard, N.; Assis, T.; Austin, R.; Massengill, L. M.; Swift, G.; Wirthlin, M.; Cannon, M.; Liu, R.; Chen, L.; Kelly, A. T.; Marshall, P.; Trinczek, M.; Blackmore, E. W.; Wen, S. -J.; Wong, R.; Narasimham, B.; Pellish, J. A.; Puchner, H.; Weeden-Wright, S. L.

    2015-11-10

    Low- and high-energy proton experimental data and error rate predictions are presented for many bulk Si and SOI circuits from the 20-90 nm technology nodes to quantify how much low-energy protons (LEPs) can contribute to the total on-orbit single-event upset (SEU) rate. Every effort was made to predict LEP error rates that are conservatively high; even secondary protons generated in the spacecraft shielding have been included in the analysis. Across all the environments and circuits investigated, and when operating within 10% of the nominal operating voltage, LEPs were found to increase the total SEU rate to up to 4.3 times as high as it would have been in the absence of LEPs. Therefore, the best approach to account for LEP effects may be to calculate the total error rate from high-energy protons and heavy ions, and then multiply it by a safety margin of 5. If that error rate can be tolerated then our findings suggest that it is justified to waive LEP tests in certain situations. Trends were observed in the LEP angular responses of the circuits tested. As a result, grazing angles were the worst case for the SOI circuits, whereas the worst-case angle was at or near normal incidence for the bulk circuits.

  2. Area overhead analysis of SEF: A design methodology for tolerating SEU

    SciTech Connect

    Blaquiere, Y.; Savaria, Y.

    1987-12-01

    Soft-Error filtering (SEF) is a design methodology proposed recently for implementing machines tolerant to SEU. This paper deals mainly with the evaluation and the reduction of the area overhead brought by SEF. A new shift register filtering latch configuration is proposed. The use of this latch, optimized for minimum area, reduces the area overhead by a factor of 2.6, when compared with latches optimized for time performance. A detailed analysis of the area overhead with SEF implemented on two relatively complex machines produced the following results: a SEF version of the 6800 microprocessor would require an area overhead varying between 12% and 69% depending on the SEF latch used and, a SEF version of the RISCII microprocessor would result in a 38.8% area overhead. An analysis of the cost of implementing the Hamming error correcting code on a register array is presented and this cost is compared with that of implementing SEU tolerance directly with SEF. Finally, a hybrid approach is proposed where a large register array is protected by an error correcting code whereas the isolated latches are replaced by filtering latches. This hybrid approach reduces the area overhead to 18.8% for the RISCII architecture.

  3. The impact of software and CAE tools on SEU in field programmable gate arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, R.; Wang, J.; McCollum, J.; Cronquist, B.

    1999-12-01

    Field programmable gate array (FPGA) devices, heavily used in spacecraft electronics, have grown substantially in size over the past few years, causing designers to work at a higher conceptual level, with computer aided engineering (CAE) tools synthesizing and optimizing the logic from a description. It is shown that the use of commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) CAE tools can produce unreliable circuit designs when the device is used in a radiation environment and a flip-flop is upset. At a lower level, software can be used to improve the SEU performance of a flip-flop, exploiting the configurable nature of FPGA technology and on-chip delay, parasitic resistive, and capacitive circuit elements.

  4. Measurement of SEU thresholds and cross sections at fixed incidence angles

    SciTech Connect

    Criswell, T.L.; Oberg, D.L.; Wert, J.L.; Measel, P.R.; Wilson, W.E.

    1987-12-01

    Current SEU testing and analysis techniques have as basic assumptions that the charge deposited at a junction depends linearly on the linear energy transfer (LET) of the ion and the pathlength of the ion through an imagined parallelepiped that represents the depletion region. This study tests these assumptions for two bipolar parts, AMD 27LS00 and Fairchild 93L422, by irradiating at fixed angles while varying the LET of two ion species. It was found that the 27LS00 shows a pronounced ion species dependence, and may show a deviation of deposited charge from the usual inverse-cosine times a fixed depletion depth, while the 93L422 exhibited the expected inverse-cosine dependence and no ion species dependence.

  5. Using Pipelined XNOR Logic to Reduce SEU Risks in State Machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le, Martin; Zheng, Xin; Katanyoutant, Sunant

    2008-01-01

    Single-event upsets (SEUs) pose great threats to avionic systems state machine control logic, which are frequently used to control sequence of events and to qualify protocols. The risks of SEUs manifest in two ways: (a) the state machine s state information is changed, causing the state machine to unexpectedly transition to another state; (b) due to the asynchronous nature of SEU, the state machine's state registers become metastable, consequently causing any combinational logic associated with the metastable registers to malfunction temporarily. Effect (a) can be mitigated with methods such as triplemodular redundancy (TMR). However, effect (b) cannot be eliminated and can degrade the effectiveness of any mitigation method of effect (a). Although there is no way to completely eliminate the risk of SEU-induced errors, the risk can be made very small by use of a combination of very fast state-machine logic and error-detection logic. Therefore, one goal of two main elements of the present method is to design the fastest state-machine logic circuitry by basing it on the fastest generic state-machine design, which is that of a one-hot state machine. The other of the two main design elements is to design fast error-detection logic circuitry and to optimize it for implementation in a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) architecture: In the resulting design, the one-hot state machine is fitted with a multiple-input XNOR gate for detection of illegal states. The XNOR gate is implemented with lookup tables and with pipelines for high speed. In this method, the task of designing all the logic must be performed manually because no currently available logic synthesis software tool can produce optimal solutions of design problems of this type. However, some assistance is provided by a script, written for this purpose in the Python language (an object-oriented interpretive computer language) to automatically generate hardware description language (HDL) code from state

  6. Experimental determination of single-event upset (SEU) as a function of collected charge in bipolar integrated circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoutendyk, J. A.; Malone, C. J.; Smith, L. S.

    1984-01-01

    Single-Event Upset (SEU) in bipolar integrated circuits (ICs) is caused by charge collection from ion tracks in various regions of a bipolar transistor. This paper presents experimental data which have been obtained wherein the range-energy characteristics of heavy ions (Br) have been utilized to determine the cross section for soft-error generation as a function of charge collected from single-particle tracks which penetrate a bipolar static RAM. The results of this work provide a basis for the experimental verification of circuit-simulation SEU modeling in bipolar ICs.

  7. Validity of Using a Fixed Analog Input for Evaluating the SEU Sensitivity of a Flash Analog-to-Digital Converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchner, Stephen; Campbell, Arthur B.; Sternberg, Andrew; Massengill, Lloyd; McMorrow, Dale; Dyer, Clive

    2003-01-01

    The SEU rate in a flash ADC (AD9058) on board a space experiment varied by more than an order of magnitude, depending on the input. A pulsed laser aided in elucidating the reasons, which were found to be the result of the unique design of the AD9058.

  8. Comparison between observed and theoretically determined SEU rates in the Texas TMS4416 DRAMs on-board the UoSAT-2 micro-satellite

    SciTech Connect

    Oldfield, M.K.; Underwood, C.I.

    1998-06-01

    A single event upset (SEU) prediction tool, PRISM (Protons in Semi-conductor Materials) has been used to model the proton induced upset rate in Texas TMS4416 DRAMs on-board the UoSAT-2 micro-satellite. Good agreement is found between the observed and theoretically determined SEU and MBU (multiple-bit upset) rates for this device.

  9. Hardening techniques to counter cumulated dose on SEU and SEL in space environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessot, D.

    1991-04-01

    The total dose effect of space particles acting on semiconductor devices by creating charges in the silicon and the silicon dioxide and by creating displacement damage, from the beginning of charge creation to the parameter shifts, is reviewed. Detailed investigations on three phenomena are described: the Single Event Upset (SEU) caused by the heavy ions and the protons which come from the galactic rays and resulting in a transient upset of a critical node voltage; the Single Event Latchup (SEL) caused by the galactic and solar flares cosmic heavy ions and which may be destructive; the displacement damage induced by high energy trapped protons lying in the radiation belts (Van Allen), which involves the creation of permanent defaults over time which act on the mean carrier life, the carrier mobility and the resistivity, thus increasing either generation or recombination rate. These studies allow definition of techniques for the design and fabrication of circuits that are the least vulnerable to radiation. Simulation and test give guarantee that these new techniques assure the margins of the desired specification in space applications.

  10. Pressure/temperature sensitive inorganic phosphors. [La/sub 2/O/sub 2/S:Eu

    SciTech Connect

    Seals, W.O.; Offen, H.W.; Turley, W.D.

    1987-01-01

    Kistler gauges are presently used to monitor pressures generated in various types of experimental tests. When a one-gallon container of stores liquid propellant was impacted by a shaped charge, hydraulic pressures in excess of 100,000 psi were produced. This destroyed the gauges. A class of inorganic phosphors, including rare earth-doped lanthanum oxysulfide (La/sub 2/O/sub 2/S:Eu) and yittrium oxysulfide (Y/sub 2/O/sub 2/S:Eu), show spectral emission characteristics that are strongly pressure dependent. The intensity of the emission lines and fluorescence decay time if individual emission lines show pressure dependence in the range of several kbar to greater than 100 kbar. These properties suggest that these phosphors could be applied as remotely operated pressure transducers. In addition phosphors show temperature dependence. This paper discusses the potential of inorganic phosphors to measure high pressure and also examines temperature effects. 5 refs., 7 figs

  11. IBM powerPC 405 SEU mitigation using processor voting techniques in Xilinx Virtex-I1 pro FPGA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Mandy W.; Bolotin, Gary S.

    2004-01-01

    Not until recently, Xilinx has developed a new field programmable gate array (FPGA) device family, Virtex-I1 Pro. In this single device, not only dies it have density logic cells (3K to125K), gigabit connectivity, on chip memory, digital clock management, but also it can have up to four IBM PowerPC 405 Processor hard cores, running up to 400MHz and 633 Mbps. To utilize this cutting edge device in space applications, a few Single Event Upset (SEU) mitigation techniques need to be implemented to a design for the device. At Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), we have successfully demonstrated the feasibility of running multiple processors running in a lock step fashion to accomplish SEU mitigation and fault tolerance.

  12. Synthesis of Y2O2S:Eu3+, Mg2+, Ti4+ hollow microspheres via homogeneous precipitation route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Peng-Fei; Liu, Ying-Liang; Xiao, Li-Yuan; Wang, Hou-Jin; Meng, Jian-Xin

    2010-06-01

    A phosphorescent material in the form of Y2O2S:Eu3+, Mg2+, Ti4+ hollow microspheres was prepared by homogeneous precipitation using monodispersed carbon spheres as hard templates. Y2O3:Eu3+ hollow microspheres were first synthesized to serve as the precursor. Y2O2S:Eu3+, Mg2+, Ti4+ powders were obtained by calcinating the precursor in a CS2 atmosphere. The crystal structure, morphology and optical properties of the composites were characterized. X-ray diffraction measurements confirmed the purity of the Y2O2S phase. Electron microscopy observations revealed that the Y2O2S:Eu3+, Mg2+, Ti4+ particles inherited the hollow spherical shape from the precursor after being calcined in a CS2 atmosphere and that they had a diameter of 350-450 nm and a wall thickness of about 50-80 nm. After ultraviolet radiation at 265 or 325 nm for 5 min, the particles emitted strong red long-lifetime phosphorescence originating from Eu3+ ions. This phosphorescence is associated with the trapping of charge carriers by Ti4+ and Mg2+ ions.

  13. A new approach to the analysis of SEU and SEL data to obtain the sensitive volume thickness

    SciTech Connect

    Barak, J.; Levinson, J.; Akkerman, A.; Zentner, A.; David, D.; Even, O.; Lifshitz, Y.; Hass, M.; Victoria, M.

    1996-06-01

    It is proposed to use short-range ions (along with long-range ions) to obtain the thickness of the sensitive volume, d, and the SEU and SEL cross sections vs the energy deposited in this volume, {sigma}{sub ion}({var_epsilon}). These {sigma}{sub ion}({var_epsilon}) and d can be used for calculating the proton induced cross sections {sigma}{sub p}. A study of HM65162 demonstrates this method. The calculated {sigma}{sub p} is in good agreement with the experimental {sigma}{sub p}.

  14. Tree Diversity and Dynamics of the Forest of Seu Nico, Viçosa, Minas Gerais, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Leyh, Werner; Meira-Neto, João A.A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background To understand future changes in community composition due to global changes, the knowledge about forest community dynamics is of crucial importance. To improve our understanding about processes and patterns involved in maintaining species rich Neotropical ecosystems, we provide here a dataset from the one hectare Forest of Seu Nico (FSN) Dynamics Plot from Southeastern Brazil. New information We report diameter at breast height, basal area and height measurements of 2868 trees and treelets identified from two census spanning over a nine-year period. Furthermore, soil properties and understory light availability of all 100 10 x 10m subplots from the one hectare FSN Dynamics Plot during the second census are given. PMID:26312053

  15. A simple algorithm for predicting proton SEU rates in space compared to the rates measured on the CRRES satellite

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, R.A.; McNulty, P.J.; Beauvais, W.J.; Abdel-Kader, W.G. . Dept. of Physics and Astronomy); Stassinopoulos, E.G.; Barth, J.C.L. )

    1994-12-01

    A new simulation code, the Clemson Omnidirectional Spallation Model for Interaction in Circuits (COSMIC), is described and its predictions agree with SEU data from four devices flown as part of the microelectronics package experiment on the CRRES satellite. The code uses CUPID for determining the energy depositions in the sensitive volumes; it allows proton exposures with arbitrary angles of incidence including random omnidirectional exposure; and the user specifies the thickness of shielding on six sides of the sensitive volume. COSMIC is used as part of an algorithm developed to predict the rate proton induced single event upsets occur in the space radiation environment given by AP-8. In testing the algorithm, the position coordinates are taken from the satellite's ephemeris data, but calculations based on position coordinates from orbital codes were also in agreement with the measured values.

  16. SEU measurements using /sup 252/CF fission particles, on CMOS static RAMS, subjected to a continuous period of low dose rate /sup 60/CO irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sanderson, T.K.; Mapper, D.; Stephen, J.H.; Farren, J.; Adams, L.; Harboe-Sorensen, R.

    1987-12-01

    SEU measurements have been made on a number of CMOS static RAMs over a period of eight months while they were being continuously irradiated with /sup 60/Co gamma rays. The results are discussed and compared with those of other workers using different methods.

  17. Validity of Using a Fixed Analog Input for Evaluating the SEU Sensitivity of a Flash Analog-to-Digita1 Converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchner, Stephen; Campbell, Arthur; Sternberg, Andrew; Massengill, Lloyd; McMorrow, Dale; Dyer, Clive

    2003-01-01

    The SEU rate in a flash ADC (AD9058) on board a space experiment varied by more than an order of magnitude, depending on the input. A pulsed laser aided in elucidating the reasons, which were found to be the result of the unique design of the AD9058.

  18. Evaluation of transuranium isotopes inventory for Candu/ACR standard and SEU spent fuel and the possibility to transmute them

    SciTech Connect

    Ghizdeanu, Elena Nineta; Pavelescu, Alexandru; Balaceanu, Victoria

    2007-07-01

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: The main disadvantage of nuclear energy is the quantity of long lived radioactive waste produced in a NPP. Transmutation could be one of the solutions to reduce it. Waste transmutation will require a suitable deployment of techniques for spent fuel reprocessing. At present, reprocessing is done by aqueous methods that are very efficient for Pu separation (up to 99.9%). For transmutation applications, new partitioning processes must be developed for minor actinides separation from the high level waste. Although these processes are still very much at the research stage, industrial scale-up will result in the deployment of new, more specific separation techniques for transmutation applications. Partitioning and Transmutation (P and T) techniques could contribute to reduce the radioactive inventory and its associated radio-toxicity. Scientists are looking for ways to drastically reduce both the mass and the radio-toxicity of the nuclear waste to be stored in a deep geological repository, and to reduce the time needed to reach the radioactivity level of the raw material originally used to produce energy. The first stage in the transmutation process is the isotopes inventory formed in the spent fuel. In this paper is made an intercomparison evaluation using WIMS 5B.12 and ORIGEN computer codes. Using these two codes, there is evaluated the isotopes released by a fuel standard from a Candu reactor. Moreover, there is simulated an inventory released by a Candu-SEU reactor and an ACR reactor. (authors)

  19. Intrinsically Zirconium-89 Labeled Gd2 O2 S:Eu Nanoprobes for In Vivo Positron Emission Tomography and Gamma-Ray-Induced Radioluminescence Imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Yonghua; Ai, Fanrong; Chen, Feng; Valdovinos, Hector F; Orbay, Hakan; Sun, Haiyan; Liang, Jimin; Barnhart, Todd E; Tian, Jie; Cai, Weibo

    2016-06-01

    The engineering of a novel dual-modality imaging probe is reported here by intrinsically labeling zirconium-89 ((89) Zr, a positron emission radioisotope with a half-life of 78.4 h) to PEGylated Gd2 O2 S:Eu nanophorphors, forming [(89) Zr]Gd2 O2 S:Eu@PEG for in vivo positron emission tomography/radioluminescence lymph node mapping. PMID:27106630

  20. Effects of target fragmentation on evaluation of LET spectra from space radiation in low-earth orbit (LEO) environment: impact on SEU predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shinn, J. L.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W.; Badhwar, G. D.; O'Neill, P. M.; Badavi, F. F.

    1995-01-01

    Recent improvements in the radiation transport code HZETRN/BRYNTRN and galactic cosmic ray environmental model have provided an opportunity to investigate the effects of target fragmentation on estimates of single event upset (SEU) rates for spacecraft memory devices. Since target fragments are mostly of very low energy, an SEU prediction model has been derived in terms of particle energy rather than linear energy transfer (LET) to account for nonlinear relationship between range and energy. Predictions are made for SEU rates observed on two Shuttle flights, each at low and high inclination orbit. Corrections due to track structure effects are made for both high energy ions with track structure larger than device sensitive volume and for low energy ions with dense track where charge recombination is important. Results indicate contributions from target fragments are relatively important at large shield depths (or any thick structure material) and at low inclination orbit. Consequently, a more consistent set of predictions for upset rates observed in these two flights is reached when compared to an earlier analysis with CREME model. It is also observed that the errors produced by assuming linear relationship in range and energy in the earlier analysis have fortuitously canceled out the errors for not considering target fragmentation and track structure effects.

  1. Effects of target fragmentation on evaluation of LET spectra from space radiation in low-earth orbit (LEO) environment: impact on SEU predictions.

    PubMed

    Shinn, J L; Cucinotta, F A; Wilson, J W; Badhwar, G D; O'Neill, P M; Badavi, F F

    1995-12-01

    Recent improvements in the radiation transport code HZETRN/BRYNTRN and galactic cosmic ray environmental model have provided an opportunity to investigate the effects of target fragmentation on estimates of single event upset (SEU) rates for spacecraft memory devices. Since target fragments are mostly of very low energy, an SEU prediction model has been derived in terms of particle energy rather than linear energy transfer (LET) to account for nonlinear relationship between range and energy. Predictions are made for SEU rates observed on two Shuttle flights, each at low and high inclination orbit. Corrections due to track structure effects are made for both high energy ions with track structure larger than device sensitive volume and for low energy ions with dense track where charge recombination is important. Results indicate contributions from target fragments are relatively important at large shield depths (or any thick structure material) and at low inclination orbit. Consequently, a more consistent set of predictions for upset rates observed in these two flights is reached when compared to an earlier analysis with CREME model. It is also observed that the errors produced by assuming linear relationship in range and energy in the earlier analysis have fortuitously canceled out the errors for not considering target fragmentation and track structure effects. PMID:11541192

  2. Effects of Target Fragmentation on Evaluation of LET Spectra From Space Radiation in Low-Earth Orbit (LEO) Environment: Impact on SEU Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shinn, J. L.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Badhwar, G. D.; ONeill, P. M.; Badavi, F. F.

    1995-01-01

    Recent improvements in the radiation transport code HZETRN/BRYNTRN and galactic cosmic ray environmental model have provided an opportunity to investigate the effects of target fragmentation on estimates of single event upset (SEU) rates for spacecraft memory devices. Since target fragments are mostly of very low energy, an SEU prediction model has been derived in terms of particle energy rather than linear energy transfer (LET) to account for nonlinear relationship between range and energy. Predictions are made for SEU rates observed on two Shuttle flights, each at low and high inclination orbit. Corrections due to track structure effects are made for both high energy ions with track structure larger than device sensitive volume and for low energy ions with dense track where charge recombination is important. Results indicate contributions from target fragments are relatively important at large shield depths (or any thick structure material) and at low inclination orbit. Consequently, a more consistent set of predictions for upset rates observed in these two flights is reached when compared to an earlier analysis with CREME model. It is also observed that the errors produced by assuming linear relationship in range and energy in the earlier analysis have fortuitously canceled out the errors for not considering target fragmentation and track structure effects.

  3. Using Classical Reliability Models and Single Event Upset (SEU) Data to Determine Optimum Implementation Schemes for Triple Modular Redundancy (TMR) in SRAM-Based Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berg, M.; Kim, H.; Phan, A.; Seidleck, C.; LaBel, K.; Pellish, J.; Campola, M.

    2015-01-01

    Space applications are complex systems that require intricate trade analyses for optimum implementations. We focus on a subset of the trade process, using classical reliability theory and SEU data, to illustrate appropriate TMR scheme selection.

  4. The influence of different species of gases on the luminescent and structural properties of pulsed laser-ablated Y2O2S:Eu3+ thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, A. G.; Dejene, B. F.; Swart, H. C.

    2016-05-01

    Y2O2S:Eu3+ films have been grown on Si (100) substrates by using a pulsed laser deposition technique. The thin films grown under vacuum, argon and oxygen ambient have been characterized using structural and luminescent measurements. The X-ray diffraction patterns showed mixed phases of cubic and hexagonal crystal structures. The crystallinity of the film deposited in vacuum is poor, but improved significantly in argon and oxygen atmosphere. Similarly, both scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy confirmed that different species of gases affected the morphology of the films. The average band gap of the films calculated from diffuse reflectance spectra using the Kubelka-Munk function was about 4.69 eV. The photoluminescence measurements indicated red emission of Y2O2S:Eu3+ thin films with the most intense peak appearing at 612 nm, which is assigned to the 5 D 0-7 F 2 transition of Eu3+. The intensities of this most intense peak greatly depend on the species of gas with argon having the highest peak. This phosphor has applications in the flat panel displays.

  5. A comparative investigation of Lu2SiO5:Ce and Gd2O2S:Eu powder scintillators for use in x-ray mammography detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michail, C. M.; Fountos, G. P.; David, S. L.; Valais, I. G.; Toutountzis, A. E.; Kalyvas, N. E.; Kandarakis, I. S.; Panayiotakis, G. S.

    2009-10-01

    The dominant powder scintillator in most medical imaging modalities for decades has been Gd2O2S:Tb due to the very good intrinsic properties and overall efficiency. Apart from Gd2O2S:Tb, there are alternative powder phosphor scintillators such as Lu2SiO5:Ce and Gd2O2S:Eu that have been suggested for use in various medical imaging modalities. Gd2O2S:Eu emits red light and can be combined mainly with digital mammography detectors such as CCDs. Lu2SiO5:Ce emits blue light and can be combined with blue sensitivity films, photocathodes and some photodiodes. For the purposes of the present study, two scintillating screens, one from Lu2SiO5:Ce and the other from Gd2O2S:Eu powders, were prepared using the method of sedimentation. The screen coating thicknesses were 25.0 and 33.1 mg cm-2 respectively. The screens were investigated by evaluating the following parameters: the output signal, the modulation transfer function, the noise equivalent passband, the informational efficiency, the quantum detection efficiency and the zero-frequency detective quantum efficiency. Furthermore, the spectral compatibility of those materials with various optical detectors was determined. Results were compared to published data for the commercially employed 'Kodak Min-R film-screen system', based on a 31.7 mg cm-2 thick Gd2O2S:Tb phosphor. For Gd2O2S:Eu, MTF data were found comparable to those of Gd2O2S:Tb, while the MTF of Lu2SiO5:Ce was even higher resulting in better spatial resolution and image sharpness properties. On the other hand, Gd2O2S:Eu was found to exhibit higher output signal and zero-frequency detective quantum efficiency than Lu2SiO5:Ce.

  6. An SEU immune logic family

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canaris, J.

    1991-01-01

    A new logic family, which is immune to single event upsets, is described. Members of the logic family are capable of recovery, regardless of the shape of the upsetting event. Glitch propagation from an upset node is also blocked. Logic diagrams for an Inverter, Nor, Nand, and Complex Gates are provided. The logic family can be implemented in a standard, commercial CMOS process with no additional masks. DC, transient, static power, upset recovery and layout characteristics of the new family, based on a commercial 1 micron CMOS N-Well process, are described.

  7. SEU and SEL response of the Westinghouse 64K E{sup 2}PROM, analog devices AD7876 12-bit ADC, and the Intel 82527 Serial Communications Controller

    SciTech Connect

    Sexton, F.W.; Hash, G.L.; Connors, M.P.; Murray, J.R.; Schwank, J.R.; Winokur, P.S.; Bradley, E.G.

    1994-12-01

    The Westinghouse SA3823 64K E{sup 2}PROM radiation-hardened SONOS non-volatile memory exhibited a single-event-upset (SEU) threshold in the read mode of 60 MeV-cm{sup 2}/mg and 40 MeV-cm{sup 2}/mg for data latch errors. The minimum threshold for address latch errors was 35 MeV-cm{sup 2}/mg. Hard errors were observed with Kr at V{sub p} = 8.5 V and with Xe at Programming voltages (V{sub p}) as low as 7.5 V. NO hard errors were observed with Cu at any angle up to V{sub p} = II V. The system specification of no hard errors for Ar ions or lighter was exceeded. No single-event latchup (SEL) was observed in these devices for the conditions examined. The Analog Devices AD7876 12bit analog-to-digital converter (ADC) had an upset threshold of 2 MeV-cm{sup 2}/mg for all values of input voltage (V{sub in}), while the worst-case saturation cross section of {approximately}2 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} cm{sup 2} as measured with V{sub in} = 4.49 V. No latchup was observed. The Intel 82C527 serial communications controller exhibited a minimum threshold for upset of 2 MeV-cm{sup 4}/mLi, and a saturation cross section of about 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}4}cm{sup 2}. For latchup the minimum threshold was measured at 17 MeV-cm{sup 2}/mg, and cross section saturated at about 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} cm{sup 2}. Error rates for the expected applications are presented.

  8. Bioactivity-guided fractionation of the triglyceride-lowering component and in vivo and in vitro evaluation of hypolipidemic effects of Calyx seu Fructus Physalis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In folklore, some people take the decoction of Calyx seu Fructus Physalis (CSFP) for lowering blood lipids. The present study is designed to evaluate the lipid-lowering activities of CSFP, and search for its pharmacodynamical material. Methods CSFP was extracted by water and 75% ethanol, respectively. The extracts of CSFP for reducing serum lipid levels were evaluated on mouse model of hyperlipidemia. The optimized extract was subjected to the bioactivity-guided fractionation in which the liquid-liquid extraction, collumn chromatography, the in vivo and in vitro models of hyperlipidemia were utilized. The structure of active component was determined by 13 C-NMR and 1H-NMR. Results The 75% ethanol extract of CSFP decreased the serum total cholesterol (TC) and triglyceride (TG) levels in mouse model of hyperlipidemia. Followed a separation process for the 75% ethanol extract of CSFP, the fraction B was proved to be an active fraction for lowering lipid in vivo and in vitro experiments, which could significantly decrease the serum TC and TG levels in mouse model of hyperlipidemia, and remarkably decrease the increase of TG in primary mouse hepatocytes induced by high glucose and the increase of TG in HepG2 cells induced by oleic acid. The fraction B2, isolated from B on bioactivity-guided fractionation, could significantly decrease TG level in HepG2 cells. One compound with the highest content in B2 was isolated and determined as luteolin-7-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside by NMR spectra. It could significantly reduce the TG level in HepG2 cells, and inhibited the accumulation of lipids by oil red O stain. Conclusion Our results demonstrated that the 75% ethanol extract of CSFP could improve in vitro and in vivo lipid accumulation. Luteolin-7-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside might be a leading pharmacodynamical material of CSFP for lowering lipids. PMID:22413998

  9. Imaging performance of a thin Lu2O3:Eu nanophosphor scintillating screen coupled to a high resolution CMOS sensor under X-ray radiographic conditions: comparison with Gd2O2S:Eu conventional phosphor screen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seferis, I.; Michail, C.; Valais, I.; Zeler, J.; Liaparinos, P.; Kalyvas, N.; Fountos, G.; Zych, E.; Kandarakis, I.; Panayiotakis, G.

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to experimentally evaluate the imaging characteristics of the Lu2O3:Eu nanophosphor thin screen coupled to a high resolution CMOS sensor under radiographic conditions. Parameters such as the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF), the Normalized Noise Power Spectrum (NNPS) and the Detective Quantum Efficiency (DQE) were investigated at 70 kVp under three exposure levels (20 mAs, 63 mAs and 90 mAs). Since Lu2O3:Eu emits light in the red wavelength range, the imaging characteristics of a 33.3 mg/cm2 Gd2O2S:Eu conventional phosphor screen were also evaluated for comparison purposes. The Lu2O3:Eu nanophosphor powder was produced by the combustion synthesis, using urea as fuel. A scintillating screen of 30.2 mg/cm2 was prepared by sedimentation of the nanophosphor powder on a fused silica substrate. The CMOS/Lu2O3:Eu detector`s imaging characteristics were evaluated using an experimental method proposed by the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) guidelines. It was found that the CMOS/Lu2O3:Eu nanophosphor system has higher MTF values compared to the CMOS/Gd2O2S:Eu sensor/screen combination in the whole frequency range examined. For low frequencies (0 to 2 cycles/mm) NNPS values of the CMOS/Gd2O2S:Eu system were found 90% higher compared to the NNPS values of the CMOS/Lu2O3:Eu nanophosphor system, whereas from medium to high frequencies (2 to 13 cycles/mm) were found 40% higher. In contrast with the CMOS/ Gd2O2S:Eu system, CMOS/Lu2O3:Eu nanophosphor system appears to retain high DQE values in the whole frequency range examined. Our results indicate that Lu2O3:Eu nanophosphor is a promising scintillator for further research in digital X-ray radiography.

  10. Decay time characteristics of La2O2S:Eu and La2O2S:Tb for use within an optical sensor for human skin temperature measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Yap, Sook Voon; Ranson, Robert M.; Cranton, Wayne M.; Koutsogeorgis, Demosthenes

    2008-09-20

    We focus on the development of a remote temperature sensing technology, i.e., an optical laser-based sensor, using thermographic phosphors for medical applications, particularly within an electromagnetically hostile magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) environment. A MRI scanner uses a strong magnetic field and radio waves to generate images of the inside of the body. The quality of the image improves with increasing magnetic resonance; however, the drawback of applying a greater magnetic strength is the inducement of heat into the body tissue. Therefore, monitoring the patient's temperature inside MRI is vital, but until now, a practical solution for temperature measurement did not exist. We show europium doped lanthanum oxysulphide (La2O2S:Eu) and terbium doped lanthanum oxysulphide (La2O2S:Tb) are both temperature sensitive to a low temperature range of 10-50 deg. C when under ultraviolet (UV) excitation. The emission spectra and decay time characteristics of these phosphors were demonstrated. The results indicate that La2O2S:Eu has a quenching rate of 13.7 m deg. C{sup -1} and 4 m deg. C{sup -1} at 512 nm and 538 nm, respectively. In addition, La2O2S:Tb has a lower quenching rate of 4.19 m deg. C{sup -1} at 548 nm due to its faster decay time.

  11. SEU and Test Considerations for FPGA Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berg, Malanie

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides an overview of Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs), what they are, implementations in space missions, and current available technologies. Single Event Upsets (SEUs) and Single Event Transients (SETs) are discussed in relation to their effects on FPGAs. Testing goals, considerations, and data analysis are reviewed.

  12. VIRTEX-4 VQ static SEU Characterization Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Gregory; Swift, Gary; Carmichael, Carl

    2008-01-01

    This report is the result of the combined efforts of members within the Xilinx Radiation Test Consortium (XRTC), sometimes known as the Xilinx SEE Test Consortium. The XRTC is a voluntary association of aerospace entities, including leading aerospace companies, universities and national laboratories, combining resources to characterize reconfigurable FPGAs for aerospace applications. Previous publications of Virtex-4 radiation results are for commercial (non-epitaxial) devices; see, for example, Refs. 1-4. A notable exception is Ref. 5, which presents XRTC upset measurements of storage elements in the PowerPC405s in the XQR4VFX60. This report of upset susceptibility to heavy ions and protons of the static memory elements in the Virtex-4QV family is a direct parallel to the XRTC report on the thin epitaxial devices in the Virtex-2 family released four years ago.

  13. SEU/SET Tolerant Phase-Locked Loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuler, Robert L., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    The phase-locked loop (PLL) is an old and widely used circuit for frequency and phase demodulation, carrier and clock recovery, and frequency synthesis [1]. Its implementations range from discrete components to fully integrated circuits and even to firmware or software. Often the PLL is a highly critical component of a system, as for example when it is used to derive the on-chip clock, but as of this writing no definitive single-event upset (SET)/single-event transient (SET) tolerant PLL circuit has been described. This chapter hopes to rectify that situation, at least in regard to PLLs that are used to generate clocks. Older literature on fault-tolerant PLLs deals with detection of a hard failure, which is recovered by replacement, repair, or manual restart of discrete component systems. Several patents exist along these lines (6349391, 6272647, and 7089442). A newer approach is to harden the parts of a PLL system, to one degree or another, such as by using a voltage-based charge pump or a triple modular redundant (TMR) voted voltage-controlled oscillator (VCO). A more comprehensive approach is to harden by triplication and voting (TMR) all the digital pieces (primarily the divider) of a frequency synthesis PLL, but this still leaves room for errors in the VCO and the loop filter. Instead of hardening or voting pieces of a system, such as a frequency synthesis system (i.e., clock multiplier), we will show how the entire system can be voted. There are two main ways of doing this, each with advantages and drawbacks. We will show how each has advantages in certain areas, depending on the lock acquisition and tracking characteristics of the PLL. Because of this dependency on PLL characteristics, we will briefly revisit the theory of PLLs. But first we will describe the characteristics of voters and their correct application, as some literature does not follow the voting procedure that guarantees elimination of errors. Additionally, we will find that voting clocks is a bit trickier than voting data where an infallible clock is assumed. It is our job here to produce (or recover) that assumed infallible clock!

  14. Methods and circuitry for reconfigurable SEU/SET tolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuler, Jr., Robert L. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A device is disclosed in one embodiment that has multiple identical sets of programmable functional elements, programmable routing resources, and majority voters that correct errors. The voters accept a mode input for a redundancy mode and a split mode. In the redundancy mode, the programmable functional elements are identical and are programmed identically so the voters produce an output corresponding to the majority of inputs that agree. In a split mode, each voter selects a particular programmable functional element output as the output of the voter. Therefore, in the split mode, the programmable functional elements can perform different functions, operate independently, and/or be connected together to process different parts of the same problem.

  15. SEU sensitivity of power converters with MOSFETS in space

    SciTech Connect

    Brucker, G.J.; Measel, P.; Oberg, D.; Wert, J.; Criswell, T.

    1987-12-01

    This paper presents the results of an investigation into the survivability of power MOSFETs in space. Seventy-two of these devices are presently in geosynchronous orbit on board six communications spacecraft, and operating at 70V which is 70% of the nominal breakdown voltage. No failures have occurred after 94536 device-days in space. The irradiation of discrete parts as well as the prototype flight power converter, containing the same part types, by iron particles with a LET of 10 MeV-cm/sup 2/.mg, and an iron spectrum with a maximum LET of 26 showed these Hi-Rel (''S'') flight parts to be relatively harder than the same type of devices previously ground tested. This appears to be the explanation for the lack of failures in space.

  16. Xilinx Virtex-5QV (V5QV) Independent SEU Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berg, Melanie D.; Label, Kenneth A.; Pellish, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    This is an independent study to determine the single event destructive and transient susceptibility of the Xilinx Virtex-5QV (SIRF) device. A framework for evaluating complex digital systems targeted for harsh radiation environments such as space is presented.

  17. The Sustainable Energy Utility (SEU) Model for Energy Service Delivery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houck, Jason; Rickerson, Wilson

    2009-01-01

    Climate change, energy price spikes, and concerns about energy security have reignited interest in state and local efforts to promote end-use energy efficiency, customer-sited renewable energy, and energy conservation. Government agencies and utilities have historically designed and administered such demand-side measures, but innovative…

  18. Two-dimensional thermography using La sub 2 O sub 2 S:Eu and Y sub 2 O sub 2 S:Eu thermal phosphors

    SciTech Connect

    Taliaferro, J.M.; Allison, S.W.; Tobin, K.W.

    1991-11-01

    This report describes efforts to obtain two-dimensional temperature profiles of aerodynamic surfaces by using imaging techniques in conjunction with fluorescence thermometry. The fluorescence of several temperature sensitive phosphors were observed by using an image-intensified, charge coupled device (CCD) camera. The intensity profile of the image for two emission wavelengths was stored and processed to yield temperature profiles of a coated specimen. The best results were obtained with oxysulfide phosphors, which showed temperature dependence from ambient to 200{degree}C. The temperature resolution was about 0.5%C at ambient. 3 refs.

  19. Single event upset (SEU) of semiconductor devices - A summary of JPL test data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, D. K.; Price, W. E.; Malone, C. J.

    1983-01-01

    The data summarized describe single event upset (bit-flips) for 60 device types having data storage elements. The data are from 15 acceleration tests with both protons and heavier ions. Tables are included summarizing the upset threshold data and listing the devices tested for heavy ion induced bit-flip and the devices tested with protons. With regard to the proton data, it is noted that the data are often limited to one proton energy, since the tests were usually motivated by the engineering requirement of comparing similar candidate devices for a system. It is noted that many of the devices exhibited no upset for the given test conditions (the maximum fluence and the maximum proton energy Ep are given for these cases). It is believed, however, that some possibility of upset usually exists because there is a slight chance that the recoil atom may receive up to 10 to 20 MeV of recoil energy (with more energy at higher Ep).

  20. Defect-sensitivity analysis of an SEU immune CMOS logic family

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingermann, Erik H.; Frenzel, James F.

    1992-01-01

    Fault testing of resistive manufacturing defects is done on a recently developed single event upset immune logic family. Resistive ranges and delay times are compared with those of traditional CMOS logic. Reaction of the logic to these defects is observed for a NOR gate, and an evaluation of its ability to cope with them is determined.

  1. Analysis of the influence of MOS device geometry on predicted SEU cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, K.; Massengill, L.; Schrimpf, R.; Barnaby, H.

    1999-12-01

    An investigation into the single-event sensitive area geometry of a body-tied-to-source (BTS) SOI nMOS transistor has been performed through a novel simulation technique. Results are presented which demonstrate the influence of spatial variations in charge collection efficiency on the shape of the predicted upset cross section curve. Observations are made on a technique for inferring sensitive area or intra-cell collection efficiencies from cross section data.

  2. Determination of key parameters of SEU occurrence using 3-D full cell SRAM simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Roche, P.; Palau, J.M.; Bruguier, G.; Tavernier, C.; Ecoffet, R.; Gasiot, J.

    1999-12-01

    A 3-D entire SRAM cell, based on a 0.35-{micro}m current CMOS technology, is simulated in this work with a DEVICE simulator. The transient current, resulting from a heavy ion strike in the most sensitive region of the cell, is studied as a function of the LET value, the cell layout and the ion penetration depth. A definition of the critical charge is proposed and two new methods are presented to compute this basic amount of charge only using SPICE simulations. Numerical applications are performed with two different generations of submicron CMOS technologies, including the determination of the sensitive thicknesses.

  3. A guideline for heavy ion radiation testing for Single Event Upset (SEU)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, D. K.; Price, W. E.; Malone, C.

    1984-01-01

    A guideline for heavy ion radiation testing for single event upset was prepared to assist new experimenters in preparing and directing tests. How to estimate parts vulnerability and select an irradiation facility is described. A broad brush description of JPL equipment is given, certain necessary pre-test procedures are outlined and the roles and testing guidelines for on-site test personnel are indicated. Detailed descriptions of equipment needed to interface with JPL test crew and equipment are not provided, nor does it meet the more generalized and broader requirements of a MIL-STD document. A detailed equipment description is available upon request, and a MIL-STD document is in the early stages of preparation.

  4. Two-dimensional thermography using La{sub 2}O{sub 2}S:Eu and Y{sub 2}O{sub 2}S:Eu thermal phosphors

    SciTech Connect

    Taliaferro, J.M.; Allison, S.W.; Tobin, K.W.

    1991-11-01

    This report describes efforts to obtain two-dimensional temperature profiles of aerodynamic surfaces by using imaging techniques in conjunction with fluorescence thermometry. The fluorescence of several temperature sensitive phosphors were observed by using an image-intensified, charge coupled device (CCD) camera. The intensity profile of the image for two emission wavelengths was stored and processed to yield temperature profiles of a coated specimen. The best results were obtained with oxysulfide phosphors, which showed temperature dependence from ambient to 200{degree}C. The temperature resolution was about 0.5%C at ambient. 3 refs.

  5. A software solution to estimate the SEU-induced soft error rate for systems implemented on SRAM-based FPGAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhongming, Wang; Zhibin, Yao; Hongxia, Guo; Min, Lu

    2011-05-01

    SRAM-based FPGAs are very susceptible to radiation-induced Single-Event Upsets (SEUs) in space applications. The failure mechanism in FPGA's configuration memory differs from those in traditional memory device. As a result, there is a growing demand for methodologies which could quantitatively evaluate the impact of this effect. Fault injection appears to meet such requirement. In this paper, we propose a new methodology to analyze the soft errors in SRAM-based FPGAs. This method is based on in depth understanding of the device architecture and failure mechanisms induced by configuration upsets. The developed programs read in the placed and routed netlist, search for critical logic nodes and paths that may destroy the circuit topological structure, and then query a database storing the decoded relationship of the configurable resources and corresponding control bit to get the sensitive bits. Accelerator irradiation test and fault injection experiments were carried out to validate this approach.

  6. Experience, lessons learned and methodology in the design of space systems to accommodate total dose and SEU effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trainor, James H.

    1993-01-01

    We now have considerable experience with successfully designing science systems to function properly, even during and after exposure to ionizing radiation approaching one Megarad, and during large solar particle events with substantial high Z fluxes such as the events that happened in August, 1972 and in the fall of 1989. Nevertheless, with changing device dimensions and properties, newer technologies and new applications, new problems arise. Some recent basic research has shed light on these problems and pointed the way to better diagnostic tests. In the case of single event upsets, clearly one cannot always accurately predict upset probabilities simply by knowing the quiescent Linear Energy Transfer (LET) threshold and the asymptotic cross-section of the device.

  7. Determining the Best-Fit FPGA for a Space Mission: An Analysis of Cost, SEU Sensitivity,and Reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berg, Melanie; LaBel, Ken

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the selection of the optimum Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA) for space missions. Included in this review is a discussion on differentiating amongst various FPGAs, cost analysis of the various options, the investigation of radiation effects, an expansion of the evaluation criteria, and the application of the evaluation criteria to the selection process.

  8. Effectiveness of Internal vs. External SEU Scrubbing Mitigation Strategies in a Xilinx FPGA: Design, Test, and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berg, Melanie; Poivey C.; Petrick, D.; Espinosa, D.; Lesea, Austin; LaBel, K. A.; Friendlich, M; Kim, H; Phan, A.

    2008-01-01

    We compare two scrubbing mitigation schemes for Xilinx FPGA devices. The design of the scrubbers is briefly discussed along with an examination of mitigation limitations. Proton and Heavy Ion data are then presented and analyzed.

  9. SEDS MIL-STD-1773 fiber optic data bus: Proton irradiation test results and spaceflight SEU data

    SciTech Connect

    LaBel, K.A.; Stassinopoulos, E.G.; Miller, J.T. ); Marshall, P. ); Dale, C. ); Crabtree, C.M. ); Gates, M.M. )

    1993-12-01

    The Small Explorer Data System (SEDS) was launched in July of 1992 as part of the Solar Anomalous Magnetospheric Particle Explorer (SAMPEX) mission. The SEDS utilizes NASA's first MIL-STD-1773 Fiber Optic Multiplexed Data Bus (or 1773 bus) to communicate with other spacecraft subsystems in the space environment. The 1773 bus is the fiber optic version of the MIL-STD-1553 Data Bus, a electronic wire bus used in many avionics applications. The authors present proton test and space flight single event effect data for NASA's first fiber optic data bus. Bit error rate predictions based on a new proton direct ionization model agree well with flight data for proton belt and solar flare effects.

  10. Auxin can act independently of CRC, LUG, SEU, SPT and STY1 in style development but not apical-basal patterning of the Arabidopsis gynoecium.

    PubMed

    Ståldal, Veronika; Sohlberg, Joel J; Eklund, D Magnus; Ljung, Karin; Sundberg, Eva

    2008-01-01

    Patterning of the Arabidopsis thaliana gynoecium is dependent on the localization and concentration of the plant hormone auxin and it has been previously reported that STYLISH1 (STY1) activates transcription of the auxin biosynthesis gene YUCCA4 (YUC4) and affects gynoecium development. Here, the relationship between auxin, STY1 and other regulators of gynoecium development was examined. Exogenous auxin in droplets of lanolin paste were applied to young gynoecia; auxin biosynthesis rate was measured and STY1 overexpression or chemically mediated polar auxin transport (PAT) inhibition were induced in various mutants. The style phenotype of sty1-1sty2-1 mutants was restored by exogenous application of auxin, and STY1 over-activation resulted in an elevated auxin biosynthesis rate. Both over-activation of STY1 and inhibition of PAT restored the stylar defects of several unrelated mutants, but with regard to gynoecium apical-basal patterning the mutants responded differently to inhibition of PAT. These results suggest that reduced auxin concentrations cause the sty1-1 sty2-1 phenotype, that STY1 induces auxin biosynthesis, that elevated apical auxin concentrations can compensate for the loss of several style-promoting factors, and that auxin may act downstream of, or in parallel with these during style development but is dependent on their action in apical-basal patterning. PMID:18811619

  11. Co-precipitation synthesis of Y2O2SO4:Eu3+ nanophosphor and comparison of photoluminescence properties with Y2O3:Eu3+ and Y2O2S:Eu3+ nanophosphors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Jingbao; Qin, Hua; Liang, Ping; Liu, Feng

    2015-10-01

    Eu3+ ions activated yttrium oxysulfate (Y2O2SO4:Eu3+) nanophosphor has been successfully synthesized by a co-precipitation method from commercially available Y(NO3)3·6H2O, Eu(NO3)3·6H2O, (NH4)2SO4 and NH3·H2O as the starting materials. Detailed characterizations of the synthetic products were obtained by differential thermal analysis, thermogravimetry and derivative thermogravimetry (DTA-TG-DTG), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray diffractometry (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. The results revealed that the precursor was composed of amorphous yttrium hydroxide sulfate when (NH4)2SO4 was introduced in the reaction system. Moreover, the precursor could be converted into pure Y2O2SO4 phase by calcining at 800 °C for 2 h in air and pure Y2O2S phase could be obtained by calcining Y2O2SO4 at 800 °C for 1 h in hydrogen atmosphere. The as-synthesized Y2O2SO4 phosphor particles are quasi-spherical in shape, slight aggregation and about 20-30 nm in size. PL spectra of the Y2O2SO4:Eu3+ nanophosphor under 270 nm ultraviolet (UV) light excitation show a red emission at 620 nm as the most prominent peak, which attributes to the 5D0→7F2 transition of Eu3+ ions. The quenching concentration of Eu3+ ions was 5 mol%, and its corresponding fluorescence lifetime was 1.49 ms according to the linear fitting result. Furthermore, the Y2O3 nanophosphor was synthesized by similar reaction and comparison of PL properties among three kinds of Eu3+ activated nanophosphors was also systematically discussed.

  12. AVALIAÇÃO DA PRESENÇA DE ENDOSSIMBIONTES Cardinium em DIFERENTES ESPÉCIES DE ARTRÓPODES.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A presença de endossimbiontes do gênero Cardinium em alguns grupos de artrópodes foi recentemente relatada e relacionada com diversas alterações reprodutivas em seus hospedeiros, tais como feminilização de ácaros, partenogênese em parasitóides, incompatibilidade citoplasmática e aumento da fecundida...

  13. Single event upsets calculated from new ENDF/B-VI proton and neutron data up to 150 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Chadwick, M.B.; Normand, E.

    1999-06-01

    Single-event upsets (SEU) in microelectronics are calculated from newly-developed silicon nuclear reaction recoil data that extend up to 150 MeV, for incident protons and neutrons. Calculated SEU cross sections are compared with measured data.

  14. Single event upset test structures for digital CMOS application specific integrated circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Baze, M.P.; Bartholet, W.G.; Braatz, J.C.; Dao, T.A. )

    1993-12-01

    An approach has been developed for the design and utilization of SEU test structures for digital CMOS ASICs. This approach minimizes the number of test structures required by categorizing ASIC library cells according to their SEU response and designing a structure to characterize each response for each category. Critical SEU response parameters extracted from these structures are used to evaluate the SEU hardness of ASIC libraries and predict the hardness of ASIC chips.

  15. Single event upset cross sections at various data rates

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, R.A.; Marshall, C.J.; McMorrow, D.; Carts, M.A.; Marshall, P.W.; Buchner, S.; La Macchia, M.; Mathes, B.

    1996-12-01

    The authors present data which show that Single Event Upset (SEU) cross section varies linearly with frequency for most devices tested. They show that the SEU cross section can increase dramatically away from a linear relationship when the test setup is not optimized, or when testing near the maximum operating frequency. They also observe non-linear behavior in some complex circuit topologies. Knowledge of the relationship between SEU cross section and frequency is important for estimates of on-orbit SEU rates.

  16. The Self in Decision Making and Decision Implementation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beach, Lee Roy; Mitchell, Terence R.

    Since the early 1950's the principal prescriptive model in the psychological study of decision making has been maximization of Subjective Expected Utility (SEU). This SEU maximization has come to be regarded as a description of how people go about making decisions. However, while observed decision processes sometimes resemble the SEU model,…

  17. Subjective Expected Utility: A Model of Decision-Making.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischoff, Baruch; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Outlines a model of decision making known to researchers in the field of behavioral decision theory (BDT) as subjective expected utility (SEU). The descriptive and predictive validity of the SEU model, probability and values assessment using SEU, and decision contexts are examined, and a 54-item reference list is provided. (JL)

  18. Device simulation of charge collection and single-event upset

    SciTech Connect

    Dodd, P.E.

    1996-04-01

    In this paper the author reviews the current status of device simulation of ionizing-radiation-induced charge collection and single-event upset (SEU), with an emphasis on significant results of recent years. The author presents an overview of device-modeling techniques applicable to the SEU problem and the unique challenges this task presents to the device modeler. He examines unloaded simulations of radiation-induced charge collection in simple p/n diodes, SEU in dynamic random access memories (DRAM`s), and SEU in static random access memories (SRAM`s). The author concludes with a few thoughts on future issues likely to confront the SEU device modeler.

  19. SEUSS Integrates Gibberellin Signaling with Transcriptional Inputs from the SHR-SCR-SCL3 Module to Regulate Middle Cortex Formation in the Arabidopsis Root.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xue; Flores-Vergara, Miguel A; Hong, Jing Han; Chu, Huangwei; Lim, Jun; Franks, Robert G; Liu, Zhongchi; Xu, Jian

    2016-03-01

    A decade of studies on middle cortex (MC) formation in the root endodermis of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) have revealed a complex regulatory network that is orchestrated by several GRAS family transcription factors, including SHORT-ROOT (SHR), SCARECROW (SCR), and SCARECROW-LIKE3 (SCL3). However, how their functions are regulated remains obscure. Here we show that mutations in the SEUSS (SEU) gene led to a higher frequency of MC formation. seu mutants had strongly reduced expression of SHR, SCR, and SCL3, suggesting that SEU positively regulates these genes. Our results further indicate that SEU physically associates with upstream regulatory sequences of SHR, SCR, and SCL3; and that SEU has distinct genetic interactions with these genes in the control of MC formation, with SCL3 being epistatic to SEU. Similar to SCL3, SEU was repressed by the phytohormone GA and induced by the GA biosynthesis inhibitor paclobutrazol, suggesting that SEU acts downstream of GA signaling to regulate MC formation. Consistently, we found that SEU mediates the regulation of SCL3 by GA signaling. Together, our study identifies SEU as a new critical player that integrates GA signaling with transcriptional inputs from the SHR-SCR-SCL3 module to regulate MC formation in the Arabidopsis root. PMID:26818732

  20. Impact of temperature on single event upset measurement by heavy ions in SRAM devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tianqi, Liu; Chao, Geng; Zhangang, Zhang; Fazhan, Zhao; Song, Gu; Teng, Tong; Kai, Xi; Gang, Liu; Zhengsheng, Han; Mingdong, Hou; Jie, Liu

    2014-08-01

    The temperature dependence of single event upset (SEU) measurement both in commercial bulk and silicon on insulator (SOI) static random access memories (SRAMs) has been investigated by experiment in the Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL). For commercial bulk SRAM, the SEU cross section measured by 12C ions is very sensitive to the temperature. The temperature test of SEU in SOI SRAM was conducted by 209Bi and 12C ions, respectively, and the SEU cross sections display a remarkable growth with the elevated temperature for 12C ions but keep constant for 209Bi ions. The impact of temperature on SEU measurement was analyzed by Monte Carlo simulation. It is revealed that the SEU cross section is significantly affected by the temperature around the threshold linear energy transfer of SEU occurrence. As the SEU occurrence approaches saturation, the SEU cross section gradually exhibits less temperature dependency. Based on this result, the experimental data measured in HIRFL was analyzed, and then a reasonable method of predicting the on-orbit SEU rate was proposed.

  1. SEUSS Integrates Gibberellin Signaling with Transcriptional Inputs from the SHR-SCR-SCL3 Module to Regulate Middle Cortex Formation in the Arabidopsis Root1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Xue; Hong, Jing Han; Chu, Huangwei; Lim, Jun

    2016-01-01

    A decade of studies on middle cortex (MC) formation in the root endodermis of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) have revealed a complex regulatory network that is orchestrated by several GRAS family transcription factors, including SHORT-ROOT (SHR), SCARECROW (SCR), and SCARECROW-LIKE3 (SCL3). However, how their functions are regulated remains obscure. Here we show that mutations in the SEUSS (SEU) gene led to a higher frequency of MC formation. seu mutants had strongly reduced expression of SHR, SCR, and SCL3, suggesting that SEU positively regulates these genes. Our results further indicate that SEU physically associates with upstream regulatory sequences of SHR, SCR, and SCL3; and that SEU has distinct genetic interactions with these genes in the control of MC formation, with SCL3 being epistatic to SEU. Similar to SCL3, SEU was repressed by the phytohormone GA and induced by the GA biosynthesis inhibitor paclobutrazol, suggesting that SEU acts downstream of GA signaling to regulate MC formation. Consistently, we found that SEU mediates the regulation of SCL3 by GA signaling. Together, our study identifies SEU as a new critical player that integrates GA signaling with transcriptional inputs from the SHR-SCR-SCL3 module to regulate MC formation in the Arabidopsis root. PMID:26818732

  2. Single event upset in irradiated 16k CMOS SRAMs

    SciTech Connect

    Axness, C.L.; Schwank, J.R.; Winokur, P.S.; Browning, J.S.; Fleetwood, D.M.; Koga, R.

    1988-12-01

    The Single Event Upset (SEU) characteristics of a CMOS SRAM cell irradiated under conditions that simulate the total-dose degradation anticipated in space applications are experimentally and theoretically investigated. Simulations of SEU sensitivity utilizing a 2D circuit/device simulator, with measured transistor threshold-voltage shifts and mobility degradations as inputs, are shown to be in good agreement with experimental data at high total dose. Both simulation and experiment show a strong SRAM cell SEU imbalance, resulting in a more SEU tolerant preferred state and a less tolerant non-preferred state. The resulting cell imbalance causes an overall degradation in SEU immunity which increases with increasing total dose and which should be taken into account in SEU testing and part characterization.

  3. Studies Of Single-Event-Upset Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoutendyk, J. A.; Smith, L. S.; Soli, G. A.

    1988-01-01

    Report presents latest in series of investigations of "soft" bit errors known as single-event upsets (SEU). In this investigation, SEU response of low-power, Schottky-diode-clamped, transistor/transistor-logic (TTL) static random-access memory (RAM) observed during irradiation by Br and O ions in ranges of 100 to 240 and 20 to 100 MeV, respectively. Experimental data complete verification of computer model used to simulate SEU in this circuit.

  4. The NASA Education Forum at SAO on the Structure and Evolution of the Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, Roy; Rosendhal, Jeffrey (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    During the past year the SEU Forum has made significant progress on a number of fronts: (1) the Forum has brought several large education projects close to completion; (2) we have greatly expanded our relationship with the SEU missions and programs; and (3) we have started a significant program to better involve space scientists in education and outreach activities. Among our accomplishments for the past year: (1) completed planning and design for Cosmic Questions, a national traveling exhibition on SEU themes; (2) launched the informal Science Education Resource Directory; (3) Coordinating with the SEU and Origins missions; and (4) promoted scientist-educator partnerships.

  5. A New Approach to Neighbourhood Renewal in England.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Moira

    2001-01-01

    Summarizes the comprehensive approach to tackling problems of poor neighborhoods developed by the British government's Social Exclusion Unit (SEU), analyzing neighborhood decline and describing the SEU's National Strategy for Neighborhood Renewal, which emphasizes improving public services in England, building inclusive partnerships locally that…

  6. Charge collection spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, R.A.; McNulty, P.J.; Beauvais, W.J.; Roth, D.R. . Dept. of Physics and Astronomy)

    1993-12-01

    Monitoring pulses measured between the power pins of a microelectronic device exposed to high LET ions yields important information on the SEU response of the circuit. Analysis is complicated for p-well CMOS devices by the possibility of competition between unctions, but the results suggest that charge collection measurements are still sufficient to determine SEU parameters accurately.

  7. Application of RADSAFE to Model Single Event Upset Response of a 0.25 micron CMOS SRAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, Kevin M.; Weller, Robert A.; Sierawski, Brian; Reed, Robert A.; Mendenhall, Marcus H.; Schrimpf, Ronald D.; Massengill, Lloyd; Porter, Mark; Wilkerson, Jeff; LaBel, Kenneth A.; Adams, James

    2006-01-01

    The RADSAFE simulation framework is described and applied to model Single Event Upsets (SEU) in a 0.25 micron CMOS 4Mbit Static Random Access Memory (SRAM). For this circuit, the RADSAFE approach produces trends similar to those expected from classical models, but more closely represents the physical mechanisms responsible for SEU in the SRAM circuit.

  8. The single event upset environment for avionics at high latitude

    SciTech Connect

    Sims, A.J.; Dyer, C.S.; Peerless, C.L. . Space and Communications Dept.); Johansson, K.; Pettersson, H. ); Farren, J. . Harwell Lab.)

    1994-12-01

    Modern avionic systems for civil and military applications are becoming increasingly reliant upon embedded microprocessors and associated memory devices. The phenomenon of single event upset (SEU) is well known in space systems and designers have generally been careful to use SEU tolerant devices or to implement error detection and correction (EDAC) techniques where appropriate. In the past, avionics designers have had no reason to consider SEU effects but is clear that the more prevalent use of memory devices combined with increasing levels of IC integration will make SEU mitigation an important design consideration for future avionic systems. To this end, it is necessary to work towards producing models of the avionics SEU environment which will permit system designers to choose components and EDAC techniques which are based on predictions of SEU rates correct to much better than an order of magnitude. Measurements of the high latitude SEU environment at avionics altitude have been made on board a commercial airliner. Results are compared with models of primary and secondary cosmic rays and atmospheric neutrons. Ground based SEU tests of static RAMs are used to predict rates in flight.

  9. The Big Picture: The National Achievement Agenda and Minority Ethnic Pupils.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barber, Michael

    1999-01-01

    Describes issues of minority student achievement in the context of United Kingdom government policies and the government's Standards and Effectiveness Unit (SEU). Discusses: (1) the big picture; (2) data on ethnic student achievement; (3) SEU policies; (4) government approaches to the Ethnic Minority Achievement Grant; and (5) issues for the…

  10. Spread Of Charge From Ion Tracks In Integrated Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoutendyk, John A.; Schwartz, Harvey R.; Watson, R. Kevin; Nevill, Leland R.

    1989-01-01

    Single-event upsets (SEU's) propagate to adjacent cells in integrated memory circuits. Findings of experiments in lateral transport of electrical-charge carriers from ion tracks in 256K dynamic randon-access memories (DRAM's). As dimensions of integrated circuits decrease, vulnerability to SEU's increases. Understanding gained enables design of less vulnerable circuits.

  11. Factors Involved in Juveniles' Decisions about Crime.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cimler, Edward; Beach, Lee Roy

    1981-01-01

    Investigated whether delinquency is the result of a rational decision. The Subjective Expected Utility (SEU) model from decision theory was used with male juvenile offenders (N=45) as the model of the decision process. Results showed that the SEU model predicted 62.7 percent of the subjects' decisions. (Author/RC)

  12. A radiation-hardened 16/32-bit microprocessor

    SciTech Connect

    Hass, K.J.; Treece, R.K.; Giddings, A.E. )

    1989-12-01

    This paper reports on the development of single chip radiation-hardened 16/32-bit microprocessor. This device, the SA3300, is an emulation of National Semiconductor's NS32C016. The SA3300 is designed to withstand high levels of ionizing radiation and is resistant to single event upset (SEU) caused by heavy ions. New techniques were used to improve immunity to SEU effects in combinational logic. The authors' testing has demonstrated that the SA3300 is functional after a total gamma dose of 5 Mrad(Si). The device does not latch up from SEU, and parts without SEU resistors have an SEU linear energy transfer (LET) upset threshold greater than 28 MeV/mg/cm{sup 2}.

  13. Effects of total dose irradiation on single-event upset hardness.

    SciTech Connect

    Paillet, Philippe; Ferlet-Cavrois, V.; Flores, Richard S.; Schwank, James Ralph; Felix, James Andrew; Shaneyfelt, Marty Ray; Hash, Gerald Leon; Cole, Edward Isaac, Jr.; Blackmore, E. W.; Dodd, Paul Emerson; Baggio, J.

    2005-04-01

    The effect of total dose on SEU hardness is investigated as a function of temperature and power supply voltage to determine worst case hardness assurance test conditions for space environments. SRAMs from six different vendors were characterized for single-event upset (SEU) hardness at proton energies from 20 to 500 MeV and at temperatures of 25 and 80 C after total dose irradiating the SRAMs with either protons, Co-60 gamma rays, or low-energy x-rays. It is shown that total dose irradiation and the bias configuration during total dose irradiation and SEU characterization can substantially affect SEU hardness for some SRAMs. For one SRAM, the bias configuration made more than two orders of magnitude difference in SEU cross section at the highest total dose level examined. In addition, it is shown that increasing the temperature during SEU characterization can also increase the effect of total dose on SEU hardness. As a result, worst-case SEU hardness assurance test conditions are the maximum total dose and temperature of the system environment, and the minimum operating voltage of the SRAM. In contrast to previous works, our results using selective area x-ray irradiations show that the source of the effect of total dose on SEU hardness is radiation-induced leakage currents in the memory cells. The increase in SEU cross section with total dose appears to be consistent with radiation-induced currents originating in the memory cells affecting the output bias levels of bias level shift circuitry used to control the voltage levels to the memory cells and/or due to the lowering of the noise margin of individual memory cells caused by radiation-induced leakage currents.

  14. NASA Education Forum at SAO on the Structure and Evolution of the Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosendhal, Jeffrey (Technical Monitor); Gould, Roy R.

    2003-01-01

    NASA's Structure and Evolution of the Universe (SEU) science theme offers an unparalleled opportunity to capture the public's imagination and inspire the next generation of scientific explorers-the generation that will determine America's lead in science and technology in the 21st century. The missions and research programs of SEU science are transporting the public to some of the universe's most exotic destinations: the beginning of time, the edge of space at the entrance to a black hole, and the great cycles of matter and energy that have slowly brought life to the universe. NASA's Office of Space Science (OSS) has put in place an Education and Public Outreach (EPO) initiative designed to do just that. Spanning all of NASA's OSS science themes, the initiative is a far-reaching partnership with the education community. As a result, NASA space science now reaches every avenue of education-from the nation's schools, science museums and planetariums, to libraries, community groups and after-school programs. As a partner in this enterprise, the,SEU Forum has successfully brought SEU science to a large and diverse audience. But this is an ongoing process, and much still needs to be done. Working with our colleagues in the OSS Support Network, and with our partners in the space science and education communities, we look forward to ensuring that the public supports and participates in the great explorations of the SEU theme. Working with the SEU missions and members of the OSS Support Network, the Forum will harness the assets of the SEU science community to: Inform, inspire, and involve the public in the explorations of the SEU science theme. Use the unique resources of the SEU science theme to enhance K-14 science, technology, and mathematics education. Identify and develop high-leverage opportunities for the SEU science community to contribute to education and outreach.

  15. Establishing the Empirical Relationship Between Non-Science Majoring Undergraduate Learners' Spatial Thinking Skills and Their Conceptual Astronomy Knowledge. (Spanish Title: Estableciendo Una Relación Empírica Entre el Razonamiento Espacial de los Estudiantes de Graduación de Carreras no Científicas y su Conocimento Conceptual de la Astronomía.) Estabelecendo Uma Relação Empírica Entre o RacioCínio Espacial dos Estudantes de Graduação EM Carreiras Não Científicas e Seu Conhecimento Conceitual da Astronomia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyer, Inge; Slater, Stephanie J.; Slater, Timothy F.

    2013-12-01

    The astronomy education community has tacitly assumed that learning astronomy is a conceptual domain resting upon spatial thinking skills. As a first step to formally identify an empirical relationship, undergraduate students in a non-major introductory astronomy survey class at a mediumsized, Ph.D. granting, mid-western US university were given pre- and post-astronomy conceptual diagnostics and spatial reasoning diagnostics, Instruments used were the "Test Of Astronomy Standards" and "What Do You Know?" Using only fully matched data for analysis, our sample consisted of 86 undergraduate non-science majors. Students' normalized gains for astronomy surveys were low at .26 and .13 respectively. Students' spatial thinking was measured using an instrument designed specifically for this study. Correlations between the astronomy instruments' pre- to post-course gain scores and the spatial assessment instrument show moderate to strong relationships suggesting the relationship between spatial reasoning and astronomy ability can explain about 25% of the variation in student achievement. La comunidad de educación en astronomía ha supuesto de forma tácita que el aprendizaje de la astronomía consiste en un dominio conceptual fundamentado en el razonamiento espacial. Como un primer paso para identificar formalmente una relación empírica entre estas dos cosas, utilizamos como muestra los estudantes de graduación de carreras no científicas de un curso experimental en una universidad norteamericana del medioeste de porte mediano con programa de Doctorado em curso, en el cual estos estudiantes se sometieron a un diagnóstico de razonamiento espacial y conceptos astronómicos antes e después del mismo. Las herramientas utilizadas fueron el Test Of Astronomy Standards (TOAST) y el cuestionario What do you know? Utilizando solo los datos completamente consistentes para este análisis, nuestra muestra consistió en 86 estudantes de graduación. Las mejoras, depués de normalizadas, en el desempeño de los estudiantes en estos dos asuntos foram pequenas, 0.26 e 0.13 respectivamente. El razonamiento espacial de los estudiantes fue medido utilizando un instrumento específico desarrollado para este trabaljo. Las correlaciones entre los resultados de los tests astronómicos y este instrumento específico, antes y después del curso mostraron una relación entre moderada y fuerte, sugiriendo que la relación entre el razonamiento espacial y el conocimiento astronómico puede explicar hasta un 25% de la variación em el desempeño de los estudiantes. A comunidade da educação em astronomia tem suposto de forma implícita que o aprendizado da astronomia consiste em um domínio conceitual fundamentado no raciocínio espacial. Como um primeiro passo para identificar formalmente uma relação empírica entre estas duas coisas, utilizamos como amostra os estudantes de graduação de carreiras não científicas de um curso exploratório em uma universidade norte-americana do meio-oeste de médio porte com programa de Doutorado em andamento, onde estes estudantes foram submetidos a um diagnóstico de raciocino espacial e conceitos astronômicos antes e depois do mesmo. As ferramentas utilizadas foram o Test Of Astronomy Standards (TOAST) e o questionário What do you know? Utilizando somente dados completamente consistentes para esta análise, nossa amostra consistiu de 86 estudantes de graduação. As melhoras, depois de normalizadas, do desempenho dos estudantes nos dois quesitos foram pequenas, 0.26 e 0.13 respectivamente. O raciocínio espacial dos estudantes foi medido utilizando um instrumento específico desenhado para este trabalho. As correlações entre os resultados dos testes astronômicos e este instrumento específico antes e depois do curso mostraram uma relação entre moderada e forte, sugerindo que a relação entre o raciocínio espacial e o conhecimento astronômico pode explicar até um 25% na variação no desempenho dos estudantes.

  16. Single event upsets correlated with environment

    SciTech Connect

    Vampola, A.L.; Albin, F. ); Lauriente, M. ); Wilkinson, D.C.; Allen, J. )

    1994-12-01

    Single Event Upset rates on satellites in different Earth orbits are correlated with solar protons and geomagnetic activity and also with the NASA AP8 proton model to extract information about satellite anomalies caused by the space environment. An extensive discussion of the SEU data base from the TOMS solid state recorder and an algorithm for correcting spontaneous upsets in it are included as an Appendix. SAMPEX and TOMS, which have the same memory chips, have similar normalized responses in the South Atlantic Anomaly. SEU rates due to solar protons over the polar caps are within expectations. No geomagnetic activity effects can be discerned in the SEU rates.

  17. Heavy-ion broad-beam and microprobe studies of single-event upsets in 0.20 um SiGe heterojunction bipolar transistors and circuits.

    SciTech Connect

    Fritz, Karl; Irwin, Timothy J.; Niu, Guofu; Fodness, Bryan; Carts, Martin A.; Marshall, Paul W.; Reed, Robert A.; Gilbert, Barry; Randall, Barbara; Prairie, Jason; Riggs, Pam; Pickel, James C.; LaBel, Kenneth; Cressler, John D.; Krithivasan, Ramkumar; Dodd, Paul Emerson; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy

    2003-09-01

    Combining broad-beam circuit level single-event upset (SEU) response with heavy ion microprobe charge collection measurements on single silicon-germanium heterojunction bipolar transistors improves understanding of the charge collection mechanisms responsible for SEU response of digital SiGe HBT technology. This new understanding of the SEU mechanisms shows that the right rectangular parallele-piped model for the sensitive volume is not applicable to this technology. A new first-order physical model is proposed and calibrated with moderate success.

  18. Heavy Ion Irradiation Fluence Dependence for Single-Event Upsets of NAND Flash Memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Dakai; Wilcox, Edward; Ladbury, Raymond; Kim, Hak; Phan, Anthony; Seidleck, Christina; LaBel, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the single-event effect (SEE) susceptibility of the Micron 16 nm NAND flash, and found the single-event upset (SEU) cross section varied inversely with fluence. The SEU cross section decreased with increasing fluence. We attribute the effect to the variable upset sensitivities of the memory cells. The current test standards and procedures assume that SEU follow a Poisson process and do not take into account the variability in the error rate with fluence. Therefore, heavy ion irradiation of devices with variable upset sensitivity distribution using typical fluence levels may underestimate the cross section and on-orbit event rate.

  19. Soft-error generation due to heavy-ion tracks in bipolar integrated circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoutendyk, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    Both bipolar and MOS integrated circuits have been empirically demonstrated to be susceptible to single-particle soft-error generation, commonly referred to as single-event upset (SEU), which is manifested in a bit-flip in a latch-circuit construction. Here, the intrinsic characteristics of SEU in bipolar (static) RAM's are demonstrated through results obtained from the modeling of this effect using computer circuit-simulation techniques. It is shown that as the dimensions of the devices decrease, the critical charge required to cause SEU decreases in proportion to the device cross-section. The overall results of the simulations are applicable to most integrated circuit designs.

  20. Determination Of LETs Of SRAMs By Use Of A Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Quiesup; Mccarty, Kenneth P.; Barnes, Charles E.; Schwartz, Harvey R.; Coss, James R.

    1995-01-01

    Report describes experimental study of use of microelectronic advanced laser scanner (MEALS) to cause single-event upsets (SEUs) in integrated logic circuits. Basic concepts of SEU testing by use of MEALS described in "Laser Scanner Tests for Single-Event Upsets" (NPO-18216), "Single-Event-Upset Laser Scanner With Optical Bias" (NPO-18217), and "More About Laser Scanner Tests for Single-Event Upsets" (NPO-18494). Study part of continuing effort to study SEU effects of ionizing radiation on such circuits and to use MEALS as relatively inexpensive SEU-prescreening laboratory apparatus serving as alternative to heavy-ion acclerator.

  1. Single event upsets in gallium arsenide dynamic logic

    SciTech Connect

    Fouts, D.J. . ECE Dept.); Weatherford, T. ); McMorrow, C.; Melinger, J.S.; Campbell, A.B. )

    1994-12-01

    The advantages and disadvantages of using gallium arsenide (GaAs) dynamic logic in computers and digital systems are briefly discussed, especially with respect to space applications. A short introduction to the topology and operation of GaAs Two-Phase Dynamic FET Logic (TDFL) circuits is presented. Experiments for testing the SEU sensitivity of GaAs TDFL, using a laser to create charge collection events, are described. Results are used to estimate the heavy-ion, soft error rate for TDFL in a spacecraft in geosynchronous orbit, and the dependence of the SEU sensitivity on clock frequency, clock voltage, and clock phase. Analysis of the data includes a comparison between the SEU sensitivities of TDFL and the more common static form of GaAs logic, Directly Coupled FET Logic (DCFL). This is the first reported SEU testing of GaAs dynamic logic.

  2. Extensions of the burst generation rate method for wider application to proton/neutron-induced single event effects

    SciTech Connect

    Normand, E.

    1998-12-01

    The Burst Generation Rate (BGR) method, originally developed to calculate single event upset (SEU) rates in microelectronics due to neutrons and protons, has been extended for wider application, allowing cross sections for both SEU and single event latchup (SEL) to be calculated, and comparisons to be made with measured data. The method uses the Weibull fit to accurately represent the behavior of the heavy ion SEU cross section. Proton SEU cross sections in RAMs, microprocessors and FPGAs are calculated, with agreement generally to within a factor of 2--3, and similar results are obtained for neutron cross sections for both cosmic ray and fission spectra. The BGR method is also modified to calculate cross sections for proton/neutron induced SEL. Agreement is generally good for SEL for most devices, but there are also limitations, since some very modern devices are shown to have unusually high susceptibility to SEL by protons/neutrons.

  3. Influence of edge effects on single event upset susceptibility of SOI SRAMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Song; Liu, Jie; Zhao, Fazhan; Zhang, Zhangang; Bi, Jinshun; Geng, Chao; Hou, Mingdong; Liu, Gang; Liu, Tianqi; Xi, Kai

    2015-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the single event upset (SEU) susceptibility for heavy ions at tilted incidence was performed. The differences of SEU cross-sections between tilted incidence and normal incidence at equivalent effective linear energy transfer were 21% and 57% for the silicon-on-insulator (SOI) static random access memories (SRAMs) of 0.5 μm and 0.18 μm feature size, respectively. The difference of SEU cross-section raised dramatically with increasing tilt angle for SOI SRAM of deep-submicron technology. The result of CRÈME-MC simulation for tilted irradiation of the sensitive volume indicates that the energy deposition spectrum has a substantial tail extending into the low energy region. The experimental results show that the influence of edge effects on SEU susceptibility cannot be ignored in particular with device scaling down.

  4. Single event upset studies using the ATLAS SCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dafinca, A.; Henderson, J.; Weidberg, A. R.

    2014-01-01

    Single Event Upsets (SEU) are expected to occur during high luminosity running of the ATLAS SemiConductor Tracker (SCT). The SEU cross sections were measured in pion beams with momenta in the range 200 to 465 MeV/c and proton test beams at 24 GeV/c but the extrapolation to LHC conditions is non-trivial because of the range of particle types and momenta. The SEUs studied occur in the p-i-n photodiode and the registers in the ABCD chip. Other possible locations for SEU were not investigated in this study. Comparisons between predicted SEU rates and those measured from ATLAS data are presented. The implications for ATLAS operation are discussed.

  5. A Decision Making Analysis of Persuasive Argumentation and the Choice Shift Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vinokur, Amiram; And Others

    1975-01-01

    A subjective expected utility (SEU) decision-making analysis was performed on the content of arguments generated by subjects privately or during group discussion in response to choice-dilemmas shown to shift toward risk and caution. (Editor)

  6. Single-event upset and snapback in silicon-on-insulator devices

    SciTech Connect

    DODD,PAUL E.; SHANEYFELT,MARTY R.; SCHWANK,JAMES R.; HASH,GERALD L.; DRAPER,BRUCE L.; WINOKUR,PETER S.

    2000-02-23

    SEU is studied in SOI transistors and circuits with various body tie structures. The importance of impact ionization effects, including single-event snapback, is explored. Implications for hardness assurance testing of SOI integrated circuits are discussed.

  7. An Examination of Environment Perturbation Effects on Single Event Upset Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, Michele M.; Leidecker, Henning W.; Lewis, Mark J.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the sensitivity of single event upset (SEU) rate predictions to changes in the direct ionization-inducing environment. An examination based on the nature of the SEU rate equation is presented for the case in which the perturbation is constant across varying particle linear energy transfer (LET). It is shown that the relative variation in SEU rate is equal to the relative perturbation in flux. Results are also presented for the case in which the environment perturbations exist in small LET bins. Through this analysis it is shown that the relative variation in expected SEU rate is equal to that in flux only for the LET regime in which the product of the cross section and differential flux is maximum.

  8. Possible role for secondary particles in proton-induced single event upsets of modern devices

    SciTech Connect

    Savage, M.W.; McNulty, P.J.; Roth, D.R.; Foster, C.C.

    1998-12-01

    Increases in the SEU sensitivity of some modern COTS devices suggest that other reactions besides the direct spallation reaction may begin to play a role in proton SEU events, but only in devices with upset thresholds significantly lower than devices currently flown in space or sold commercially for terrestrial applications. Triple coincidence tagged proton exposures and neutron exposures are combined to demonstrate these reactions in the same device.

  9. Synergistic effects of total ionizing dose on single event upset sensitivity in static random access memory under proton irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Yao; Guo, Hong-Xia; Zhang, Feng-Qi; Zhao, Wen; Wang, Yan-Ping; Zhang, Ke-Ying; Ding, Li-Li; Fan, Xue; Luo, Yin-Hong; Wang, Yuan-Ming

    2014-11-01

    Synergistic effects of the total ionizing dose (TID) on the single event upset (SEU) sensitivity in static random access memories (SRAMs) were studied by using protons. The total dose was cumulated with high flux protons during the TID exposure, and the SEU cross section was tested with low flux protons at several cumulated dose steps. Because of the radiation-induced off-state leakage current increase of the CMOS transistors, the noise margin became asymmetric and the memory imprint effect was observed.

  10. Low-Energy Proton Testing Methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellish, Jonathan A.; Marshall, Paul W.; Heidel, David F.; Schwank, James R.; Shaneyfelt, Marty R.; Xapsos, M.A.; Ladbury, Raymond L.; LaBel, Kenneth A.; Berg, Melanie; Kim, Hak S.; Phan, Anthony; Friendlich, M.R.; Rodbell, Kenneth P.; Hakey, Mark C.; Dodd, Paul E.; Reed, Robert A.; Weller, Robert A.; Mendenhall, Marcus H.; Sierawski, B.D.

    2009-01-01

    Use of low-energy protons and high-energy light ions is becoming necessary to investigate current-generation SEU thresholds. Systematic errors can dominate measurements made with low-energy protons. Range and energy straggling contribute to systematic error. Low-energy proton testing is not a step-and-repeat process. Low-energy protons and high-energy light ions can be used to measure SEU cross section of single sensitive features; important for simulation.

  11. Measuring Critical Charges For Single-Event Upsets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, Martin G.; Blaes, Brent R.

    1988-01-01

    Concept for determining susceptibility of integrated circuits to single-event upsets (SEU's) based on direct measurement of critical charge causing upset. Test circuit is modified version of standard complementary metal-oxide/semiconductor static cell. Contains six transistors, connected to form latch that retains state of cell set by input pulses. Makes possible to evaluate vulnerability to SEU during design and development of digital equipment.

  12. Solar Particle Induced Upsets in the TDRS-1 Attitude Control System RAM During the October 1989 Solar Particle Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croley, D. R.; Garrett, H. B.; Murphy, G. B.; Garrard,T. L.

    1995-01-01

    The three large solar particle events, beginning on October 19, 1989 and lasting approximately six days, were characterized by high fluences of solar protons and heavy ions at 1 AU. During these events, an abnormally large number of upsets (243) were observed in the random access memory of the attitude control system (ACS) control processing electronics (CPE) on-board the geosynchronous TDRS-1 (Telemetry and Data Relay Satellite). The RAM unit affected was composed of eight Fairchild 93L422 memory chips. The Galileo spacecraft, launched on October 18, 1989 (one day prior to the solar particle events) observed the fluxes of heavy ions experienced by TDRS-1. Two solid-state detector telescopes on-board Galileo, designed to measure heavy ion species and energy, were turned on during time periods within each of the three separate events. The heavy ion data have been modeled and the time history of the events reconstructed to estimate heavy ion fluences. These fluences were converted to effective LET spectra after transport through the estimated shielding distribution around the TDRS-1 ACS system. The number of single event upsets (SEU) expected was calculated by integrating the measured cross section for the Fairchild 93L422 memory chip with average effective LET spectrum. The expected number of heavy ion induced SEU's calculated was 176. GOES-7 proton data, observed during the solar particle events, were used to estimate the number of proton-induced SEU's by integrating the proton fluence spectrum incident on the memory chips, with the two-parameter Bendel cross section for proton SEU'S. The proton fluence spectrum at the device level was gotten by transporting the protons through the estimated shielding distribution. The number of calculated proton-induced SEU's was 72, yielding a total of 248 predicted SEU'S, very dose to the 243 observed SEU'S. These calculations uniquely demonstrate the roles that solar heavy ions and protons played in the production of SEU

  13. Transcriptomic Characterization of a Synergistic Genetic Interaction during Carpel Margin Meristem Development in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Wynn, April N.; Rueschhoff, Elizabeth E.; Franks, Robert G.

    2011-01-01

    In flowering plants the gynoecium is the female reproductive structure. In Arabidopsis thaliana ovules initiate within the developing gynoecium from meristematic tissue located along the margins of the floral carpels. When fertilized the ovules will develop into seeds. SEUSS (SEU) and AINTEGUMENTA (ANT) encode transcriptional regulators that are critical for the proper formation of ovules from the carpel margin meristem (CMM). The synergistic loss of ovule initiation observed in the seu ant double mutant suggests that SEU and ANT share overlapping functions during CMM development. However the molecular mechanism underlying this synergistic interaction is unknown. Using the ATH1 transcriptomics platform we identified transcripts that were differentially expressed in seu ant double mutant relative to wild type and single mutant gynoecia. In particular we sought to identify transcripts whose expression was dependent on the coordinated activities of the SEU and ANT gene products. Our analysis identifies a diverse set of transcripts that display altered expression in the seu ant double mutant tissues. The analysis of overrepresented Gene Ontology classifications suggests a preponderance of transcriptional regulators including multiple members of the REPRODUCTIVE MERISTEMS (REM) and GROWTH-REGULATING FACTOR (GRF) families are mis-regulated in the seu ant gynoecia. Our in situ hybridization analyses indicate that many of these genes are preferentially expressed within the developing CMM. This study is the first step toward a detailed description of the transcriptional regulatory hierarchies that control the development of the CMM and ovule initiation. Understanding the regulatory hierarchy controlled by SEU and ANT will clarify the molecular mechanism of the functional redundancy of these two genes and illuminate the developmental and molecular events required for CMM development and ovule initiation. PMID:22031826

  14. Single event upsets caused by solar energetic heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Tylka, A.J.; Adams, J.H. Jr.; Boberg, P.R.; Dietrich, W.F.; Smith, E.C.

    1996-12-01

    The authors calculate single event upset (SEU) rates due to protons, alphas, and heavier ions in two satellite systems for the major solar particle events of 1989--92, using a new and complete analysis of GOES proton data and high-energy heavy-ion fluences from the University of Chicago Cosmic Ray Telescope on IMP-8. These measurements cover the entire range of energies relevant to SEU studies and therefore overcome shortcomings of previous studies, which relied upon theoretical or semi-empirical estimates of high-energy heavy-ion spectra. They compare the results to the observed SEU rates in these events. The SEU rates in one device were overwhelmingly dominated by protons. However, even after taking into account uncertainties in the ground-test cross-section data, the authors find that at least {approximately}45% of the SEUs in the other device must have been caused by heavy ions. The results demonstrate that both protons and heavy ions must be considered in order to make a reliable assessment of SEU vulnerabilities. Furthermore, the GOES/Chicago database of solar particle events provides a basis for making accurate solar particle SEU calculations and credible worst-case estimates. In particular, measurements of the historic solar particle events of October 1989 are used in worst week and worst day environment models in CREME96, a revision of NRL`s Cosmic Ray Effects on MicroElectronics code.

  15. Single-event phenomena in GaAs devices and circuits

    SciTech Connect

    McMorrow, D.; Melinger, J.S.; Campbell, A.B. III; Weatherford, T.R.; Buchner, S.; Knudson, A.R.; Tran, L.H.

    1996-04-01

    The single-event upset (SEU) characteristics of GaAs devices and circuits are reviewed. GaAs FET-based integrated circuits (IC`s) are susceptible to upsets from both cosmic-ray heavy ions and protons trapped in the Earth`s radiation belts. The origin of the SEU sensitivity of GaAs IC`s is discussed in terms of both device-level and circuit-level considerations. At the device level, efficient charge-enhancement mechanisms through which more charge can be collected than is deposited by the ion have a significant negative impact on the SEU characteristics of GaAs IC`s. At the circuit level, different GaAs digital logic topologies exhibit different levels of sensitivity to SEU because of variations in parameters, including logic levels, capacitances, and the degree of gate or peripheral isolation. The operational and SEU characteristics of several different GaAs logic families are discussed. Recent advances in materials and processing that provide possible solutions to the SEU problem are addressed.

  16. Solar particle induced upsets in the TDRS-1 attitude control system RAM during the October 1989 solar particle events

    SciTech Connect

    Croley, D.R.; Garrett, H.B.; Murphy, G.B.; Garrard, T.L.

    1995-10-01

    The three large solar particle events, beginning on October 19, 1989 and lasting approximately six days, were characterized by high fluences of solar protons and heavy ions at 1 AU. During these events, an abnormally large number of upsets (243) were observed in the random access memory of the attitude control system (ACS) control processing electronics (CPE) on-board the geosynchronous TDRS-1 (Telemetry and Data Relay Satellite). The RAM unit affected was composed of eight Fairchild 93L422 memory chips. The Galileo spacecraft, launched on October 18, 1989 (one day prior to the solar particle events) observed the fluxes of heavy ions experienced by TDRS-1. Two solid-state detector telescopes on-board Galileo, designed to measure heavy ion species and energy, were turned on during time periods within each of the three separate events. The heavy ion data have been modeled and the time history of the events reconstructed to estimate heavy ion fluences. These fluences were converted to effective LET spectra after transport through the estimated shielding distribution around the TDRS-1 ACS system. The number of single event upsets (SEU) expected was calculated by integrating the measured cross section for the Fairchild 93L422 memory chip with average effective LET spectrum. The expected number of heavy ion induced SEU`s calculated was 176. GOES-7 proton data, observed during the solar particle events, were used to estimate the number of proton-induced SEU`s by integrating the proton fluence spectrum incident on the memory chips, with the two-parameter Bendel cross section for proton SEU`s. The proton fluence spectrum at the device level was gotten by transporting the protons through the estimated shielding distribution. The number of calculated proton-induced SEU`s was 72, yielding a total of 248 predicted SEU`s, very close to the 243 observed SEU`s.

  17. Accelerators for critical experiments involving single-particle upset in solid-state microcircuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoutendyk, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    Charged-particle interactions in microelectronic circuit chips (integrated circuits) present a particularly insidious problem for solid-state electronic systems due to the generation of soft errors or single-particle event upset (SEU) by either cosmic rays or other radiation sources. Particle accelerators are used to provide both light and heavy ions in order to assess the propensity of integrated circuit chips for SEU. Critical aspects of this assessment involve the ability to analytically model SEU for the prediction of error rates in known radiation environments. In order to accurately model SEU, the measurement and prediction of energy deposition in the form of an electron-hole plasma generated along an ion track is of paramount importance. This requires the use of accelerators which allow for ease in both energy control (change of energy) and change of ion species. This and other aspects of ion-beam control and diagnostics (e.g., uniformity and flux) are of critical concern for the experimental verification of theoretical SEU models.

  18. Single-event upset tests on the readout electronics for the pixel detectors of the PANDA experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazza, G.; Balossino, I.; Calvo, D.; De Mori, F.; De Remigis, P.; Filippi, A.; Marcello, S.; Mignone, M.; Wheadon, R.; Zotti, L.; Candelori, A.; Mattiazzo, S.; Silvestrin, L.

    2014-01-01

    The Silicon Pixel Detector (SPD) of the future PANDA experiment is the closest one to the interaction point and therefore the sensor and its electronics are the most exposed to radiation. The Total Ionizing Dose (TID) issue has been addressed by the use of a deep-submicron technology (CMOS 0.13 μm) for the readout ASICs. While this technology is very effective in reducing radiation induced oxide damage, it is also more sensitive to Single Event Upset (SEU) effects due to their extremely reduced dimensions. This problem has to be addressed at the circuit level and generally leads to an area penalty. Several techniques have been proposed in literature with different trade-off between level of protection and cell size. A subset of these techniques has been implemented in the PANDA SPD ToPiX readout ASIC prototypes, ranging from DICE cells to triple redundancy. Two prototypes have been tested with different ion beams at the INFN-LNL facility in order to measure the SEU cross section. Comparative results of the SEU test will be shown, together with an analysis of the SEU tolerance of the various protection schemes and future plans for the SEU protection strategy which will be implemented in the next ToPiX prototype.

  19. Single-event-upset sensitivity analysis on low-swing drivers.

    PubMed

    Mahyuddin, Nor Muzlifah; Russell, Gordon

    2014-01-01

    Technology scaling relies on reduced nodal capacitances and lower voltages in order to improve performance and power consumption, resulting in significant increase in layout density, thus making these submicron technologies more susceptible to soft errors. Previous analysis indicates a significant improvement in SEU tolerance of the driver when the bias current is injected into the circuit but results in increase of power dissipation. Subsequently, other alternatives are considered. The impact of transistor sizes and temperature on SEU tolerance is tested. Results indicate no significant changes in Q(crit) when the effective transistor length is increased by 10%, but there is an improvement when high temperature and high bias currents are applied. However, this is due to other process parameters that are temperature dependent, which contribute to the sharp increase in Q(crit). It is found that, with temperature, there is no clear factor that can justify the direct impact of temperature on the SEU tolerance. Thus, in order to improve the SEU tolerance, high bias currents are still considered to be the most effective method in improving the SEU sensitivity. However, good trade-off is required for the low-swing driver in order to meet the reliability target with minimal power overhead. PMID:24782671

  20. Comparative study of MC-50 and ANITA neutron beams by using 55 nm SRAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baeg, Sanghyeon; Lee, Soonyoung; Bak, Geun Yong; Jeong, Hyunsoo; Jeon, Sang Hoon

    2012-09-01

    Single event upset (SEU) is mainly caused by neutrons in the terrestrial environment. In addition, SEU effects become more and more problematic as technology scales. It is, therefore, important to understand the SEU behaviors of semiconductor devices under neutron reactions. ANITA (atmospheric-like neutrons from thick target) in TSL (The Svedberg Laboratory), Sweden, resembles the neutron energy and flux spectrum to neutrons at the terrestrial level and are typically used to estimate the soft error rate (SER). On the other hand, the neutron energy and flux spectrum from the MC-50 cyclotron at KIRAMS (Korea Institute of Radiological & Medical Sciences) differs greatly from the atmospheric environment. The main objective of this work is finding the efficacy of the neutron beam at KIRAMS for a SEU analysis by using a comparative analysis; 55 nm SRAM is used to determine SEU difference under the beams at two different locations. Since MCU (multi-cell upset) is the dominant effect in emerging technologies with smaller critical charges, the MCU cross sections from the two different beam tests are compared.

  1. Single-event effects in avionics

    SciTech Connect

    Normand, E.

    1996-04-01

    The occurrence of single-event upset (SEU) in aircraft electronics has evolved from a series of interesting anecdotal incidents to accepted fact. A study completed in 1992 demonstrated that SEU`s are real, that the measured in-flight rates correlate with the atmospheric neutron flux, and that the rates can be calculated using laboratory SEU data. Once avionics DEU was shown to be an actual effect, it had to be dealt with in avionics designs. The major concern is in random access memories (RAM`s), both static (SRAM`s) and dynamic (DRAM`s), because these microelectronic devices contain the largest number of bits, but other parts, such as microprocessors, are also potentially susceptible to upset. In addition, other single-event effects (SEE`s), specifically latch-up and burnout, can also be induced by atmospheric neutrons.

  2. Energy spectra and LET spectra of protons behind shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Sari; Barak, Joseph

    2014-08-01

    With the advent of devices sensitive to SEU due to direct ionization by protons, it became important to know the flux and energies of protons behind aluminum shielding or within satellites. We present new analytically derived expressions for the energy distribution of incident protons, after passing the shielding, and of secondary protons emitted within the shielding. The results are compared with those of the MULASSIS code. In some cases, like a satellite in a GCR orbit, the contribution of the secondary protons to SEU might be the dominant one. Proton energy-distributions behind shielding are proportional, at low energy values, to inverse proton-LET in aluminum. Their calculated LET-spectra in silicon can be used for evaluating SEU-rate in space. The analytic expressions presented here can be useful in calculating the influence of shielding on other incident ions and secondary ions.

  3. Development of a Nuclear Reaction Database on Silicon for Simulation of Neutron-Induced Single-Event Upsets in Microelectronics and its Application

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Yukinobu; Kodama, Akihiro; Tukamoto, Yasuyuki; Nakashima, Hideki

    2005-05-24

    We have developed a cross-section database for neutron-induced reactions on 28Si in the energy range between 2 MeV and 3 GeV in order to analyze single-event upsets (SEUs) phenomena induced by cosmic-ray neutrons in microelectronic devices. A simplified spherical device model is proposed for simulation of the initial processes of SEUs. The model is applied to SEU cross-section calculations for semiconductor memory devices. The calculated results are compared with measured SEU cross sections and the other simulation result. The dependence of SEU cross sections on incident neutron energy and secondary ions having the most important effects on SEUs are discussed.

  4. The single event upset response of the analog devices, ADSP2100A, digital signal processor

    SciTech Connect

    Harboe-Sorensen, R.; Seran, H.; Armbruster, P.; Adams, L. )

    1992-06-01

    This paper presents the results of a radiation evaluation program carried out by ESTEC on the Analog Devices, ADSP2100A, which is a single chip microprocessor optimized for 12.5 Mips Digital Signal Processing (DSP). Single Event Upset/Latch-up (SEU/SEL) testing using Californium-252 was the primary aim of this program, however, accelerator heavy ion and proton SEU/SEL data as well as total ionizing dose data are also presented. The hardware design and software used will be described and details of the various tests and test facilities will be given. Finally, the authors report on the use of the SEU data for the calculation of expected in-orbit upset rates using the CREME suite of programs.

  5. Measuring improved patient choice.

    PubMed

    Holmes-Rovner, M; Rovner, D R

    2000-08-01

    Patient decision support (PDS) tools or decision aids have been developed as adjuncts to the clinical encounter. Their aim is to support evidence-based patient choice. Clinical trials of PDS tools have used an array of outcome measures to determine efficacy, including knowledge, satisfaction, health status and consistency between patient choice and values. This paper proposes that the correlation between 'subjective expected utility' (SEU) and decision may be the best primary endpoint for trials. SEU is a measure usually used in behavioural decision theory. The paper first describes how decision support tools may use decision analysis to structure the presentation of evidence and guide patient decision-making. Uses of expected utility (EU) are suggested for evaluating PDS tools when improving population health status is the objective. SEU is the theoretically better measure when internal consistency of patient choices is the objective. PMID:11083037

  6. Single-event effects in resolver-to-digital converters

    SciTech Connect

    Buchner, S.; Tran, L.; Mann, J.; Turflinger, T.; McMorrow, D.; Campbell, A.; Dozier, C.

    1999-12-01

    Single-event effects (SEE's) in two resolver-to-digital converters (RDC's) have been studied using heavy ions and pulsed laser light. The important role of the pulsed laser in establishing single-event upset (SEU) and single-event latchup (SEL) levels prior to accelerator testing is described, as is its role in evaluating the test software and hardware and in gaining a better understanding of the origins of the SEE's. Results from pulsed-laser testing are in quantitative agreement with those from heavy-ion testing: the RDC-19220 is sensitive to both SEU's and SEL's whereas the AD2S80 is less sensitive to SEU's and immune to SEL.

  7. New insights gained on mechanisms of low-energy proton-induced SEUs by minimizing energy straggle

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dodds, Nathaniel Anson; Dodd, Paul E.; Shaneyfelt, Marty R.; Sexton, Frederick W.; Martinez, Marino J.; Black, Jeffrey D.; Marshall, P. W.; Reed, R. A.; McCurdy, M. W.; Weller, R. A.; et al

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we present low-energy proton single-event upset (SEU) data on a 65 nm SOI SRAM whose substrate has been completely removed. Since the protons only had to penetrate a very thin buried oxide layer, these measurements were affected by far less energy loss, energy straggle, flux attrition, and angular scattering than previous datasets. The minimization of these common sources of experimental interference allows more direct interpretation of the data and deeper insight into SEU mechanisms. The results show a strong angular dependence, demonstrate that energy straggle, flux attrition, and angular scattering affect the measured SEU cross sections, andmore » prove that proton direct ionization is the dominant mechanism for low-energy proton-induced SEUs in these circuits.« less

  8. Analysis of radiation induced effects in high-density commercial memories on-board Alsat-1: The impact of extreme solar particle events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentoutou, Youcef; Bensikaddour, El-Habib

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents a long-term study on radiation effects in non-hardened high density memory devices operating within the main on-board computer system of the Algerian microsatellite Alsat-1 in Low Earth Orbit (LEO). A statistical analysis of single-event upset (SEU) activity is presented for commercial SRAM devices, and their response to extreme solar events shows SEU rate significant increases correlated with high-energy protons (E > 100 MeV). Ground based neutron monitor data are used to illustrate the long-term correlation between galactic cosmic rays and Alsat-1 upsets. The short-term effects of energetic solar particles are illustrated with space environment data from GOES-11. The Alsat-1 observed SEU rates are compared to the predicted rates based on ground test data and environment models. The prediction results are in good agreement with in-flight data.

  9. Radiation-Hardened Electronics for Advanced Communications Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, Sterling

    2015-01-01

    Novel approach enables high-speed special-purpose processors Advanced reconfigurable and reprogrammable communication systems will require sub-130-nanometer electronics. Legacy single event upset (SEU) radiation-tolerant circuits are ineffective at speeds greater than 125 megahertz. In Phase I of this project, ICs, LLC, demonstrated new base-level logic circuits that provide SEU immunity for sub-130-nanometer high-speed circuits. In Phase II, the company developed an innovative self-restoring logic (SRL) circuit and a system approach that provides high-speed, SEU-tolerant solutions that are effective for sub-130-nanometer electronics scalable to at least 22-nanometer processes. The SRL system can be used in the design of NASA's next-generation special-purpose processors, especially reconfigurable communication processors.

  10. Heavy-ion induced single-event upset in integrated circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoutendyk, J. A.

    1991-01-01

    The cosmic ray environment in space can affect the operation of Integrated Circuit (IC) devices via the phenomenon of Single Event Upset (SEU). In particular, heavy ions passing through an IC can induce sufficient integrated current (charge) to alter the state of a bistable circuit, for example a memory cell. The SEU effect is studied in great detail in both static and dynamic memory devices, as well as microprocessors fabricated from bipolar, Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) and N channel Metal Oxide Semiconductor (NMOS) technologies. Each device/process reflects its individual characteristics (minimum scale geometry/process parameters) via a unique response to the direct ionization of electron hole pairs by heavy ion tracks. A summary of these analytical and experimental SEU investigations is presented.

  11. New insights gained on mechanisms of low-energy proton-induced SEUs by minimizing energy straggle

    SciTech Connect

    Dodds, Nathaniel Anson; Dodd, Paul E.; Shaneyfelt, Marty R.; Sexton, Frederick W.; Martinez, Marino J.; Black, Jeffrey D.; Marshall, P. W.; Reed, R. A.; McCurdy, M. W.; Weller, R. A.; Pellish, J. A.; Rodbell, K. P.; Gordon, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we present low-energy proton single-event upset (SEU) data on a 65 nm SOI SRAM whose substrate has been completely removed. Since the protons only had to penetrate a very thin buried oxide layer, these measurements were affected by far less energy loss, energy straggle, flux attrition, and angular scattering than previous datasets. The minimization of these common sources of experimental interference allows more direct interpretation of the data and deeper insight into SEU mechanisms. The results show a strong angular dependence, demonstrate that energy straggle, flux attrition, and angular scattering affect the measured SEU cross sections, and prove that proton direct ionization is the dominant mechanism for low-energy proton-induced SEUs in these circuits.

  12. Radiation hardness evaluations of 65 nm fully depleted silicon on insulator and bulk processes by measuring single event transient pulse widths and single event upset rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuta, Jun; Sonezaki, Eiji; Kobayashi, Kazutoshi

    2015-04-01

    We measure single event transient (SET) pulse widths on inverter chains and single event upset (SEU) rates on flip-flops (FFs) fabricated in 65 nm fully depleted silicon on insulator (FD-SOI) and bulk processes. The layout designs of test chips are strictly identical between their processes besides buried oxide (BOX) layers. Experimental results show that neutron-induced SEU and SET rates in the FD-SOI process are 230× and 450× lower than those in the bulk process, respectively.

  13. Reprogrammable field programmable gate array with integrated system for mitigating effects of single event upsets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Tak-kwong (Inventor); Herath, Jeffrey A. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An integrated system mitigates the effects of a single event upset (SEU) on a reprogrammable field programmable gate array (RFPGA). The system includes (i) a RFPGA having an internal configuration memory, and (ii) a memory for storing a configuration associated with the RFPGA. Logic circuitry programmed into the RFPGA and coupled to the memory reloads a portion of the configuration from the memory into the RFPGA's internal configuration memory at predetermined times. Additional SEU mitigation can be provided by logic circuitry on the RFPGA that monitors and maintains synchronized operation of the RFPGA's digital clock managers.

  14. The Reliability of FPGA circuit designs in the presence of radiation induced configuration upsets

    SciTech Connect

    Wirthlin, M. J.; Johnson, E.; Rollins, N.; Caffrey, M. P.; Graham, P. S.

    2003-01-01

    FPGAs are an appealing solution for space-based remote sensing applications. However, an a low-earth orbit, FPGAs are susceptible t o Single-Event Upsets (SEUs). In an effort to understand the effects of SEUs, an SEU simulator based on the SLAAC-1V computing board has been developed. This simulator artifically upsets the conjiguration memory of an FPGA and measures its impact on FPGA designs. The accuracy of this simulation environment has been verified using ground-based radiation testing. This sim{approx}ulataon tool is being used to characterize the reliabilitg of SEU mitigation techniques for PI'GAs.

  15. Use of new ENDF/B-VI proton and neutron cross sections for single event upset calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Chadwick, M.B.; Normand, E.

    1999-12-01

    Single-event upsets (SEU) in microelectronics are calculated from newly-developed silicon nuclear reaction recoil data for incident protons and neutrons with energies up to 150 MeV. This paper focuses on the nuclear reaction physics that is important for calculating recoil spectra, and burst generation rate spectra. Comparisons are made with previous results, obtained from intranuclear cascade calculations as well as from previous ENDF data below 20 MeV, to demonstrate new features in the present calculations. Calculated SEU cross sections are compared with measured data.

  16. Method for characterizing the upset response of CMOS circuits using alpha-particle sensitive test circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, Martin G. (Inventor); Blaes, Brent R. (Inventor); Nixon, Robert H. (Inventor); Soli, George A. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A method for predicting the SEU susceptibility of a standard-cell D-latch using an alpha-particle sensitive SRAM, SPICE critical charge simulation results, and alpha-particle interaction physics. A technique utilizing test structures to quickly and inexpensively characterize the SEU sensitivity of standard cell latches intended for use in a space environment. This bench-level approach utilizes alpha particles to induce upsets in a low LET sensitive 4-k bit test SRAM. This SRAM consists of cells that employ an offset voltage to adjust their upset sensitivity and an enlarged sensitive drain junction to enhance the cell's upset rate.

  17. Predictions for proton and heavy ions induced SEUs in 65 nm SRAMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shougang, Du; Suge, Yue; Hongxia, Liu; Long, Fan; Hongchao, Zheng

    2015-11-01

    We report on irradiation induced single event upset (SEU) by high-energy protons and heavy ions. The experiments were performed at the Paul Scherer Institute, and heavy ions at the SEE irradiating Facility on the HI-13 Tandem Accelerator in China's Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing and the Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou in the Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences. The results of proton and heavy ions induced (SEU) in 65 nm bulk silicon CMOS SRAMS are discussed and the prediction on several typical orbits are presented.

  18. Observations of single-event upsets in non-hardened high-density SRAMs in sun-synchronous orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Underwood, C. I.; Ward, J. W.; Dyer, C. S.; Sims, A. J.

    1992-12-01

    Observations of single-event upset (SEU) activity in nonhardened static and dynamic RAMs of both low (16-kb) and high (256-kb, 1-Mb), density are presented for a family of small spacecraft in low-earth, near-polar, sun-synchronous orbits. The observation of single-event multiple-bit upset (MBU) in these devices is discussed, and the implications of such events for error-protection coding schemes are examined. Contrary to expectations, the 1-Mb static RAMs (SRAMs) are more resilient to SEU than the 246-kb SRAMs, and one type of commercial 1-Mb SRAM shows a particularly low error rate.

  19. Dual-doped thermographic phosphor particles as surrogates for GFP-labelled cells in tests of cytometric neurocatheters

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, Stephen W; Gillies, George

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the laser-induced fluorescence of particles of a compound thermographic phosphor La2O2S:Eu (1%) and Gd2O2S:Eu (1%), to see if they can serve as a surrogate for cells transfected with the green fluorescent protein, in tests of neurocatheters used for intraparenchymal cell delivery. At an excitation wavelength of 337 nm and a concentration of 2x106 particles ml-1, the resulting slurries produced fluorescence intensities at 625 nm that were within a factor of two of those produced by similar number densities of relevant cells, thus suggesting the utility of this approach.

  20. Cosmic ray simulation and testing program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolasinski, W. A.; Koga, R.; King, C. G.; Imamoto, S. I.

    1985-01-01

    Single event upset (SEU) and latchup vulnerabilities were determined for a number of parts of interest to NASA space programs. In cases where a threshold linear energy transfer (LET) for SEU could be measured, an upset rate in a low inclination Space Shuttle orbit was computed. The predicted upset rates are extremely low, except for the devices with LET thresholds below the geomagnetic cutoff for altitude and inclination of the Space Shuttle orbit. While some of the devices do exhibit latchup, the cross sections and threshold LETs are such that the risk associated with flying these devices in low, near equatorial orbits is small if not negligible.

  1. Modeling of single-event upset in bipolar integrated circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoutendyk, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    The results of work done on the quantitative characterization of single-event upset (SEU) in bipolar random-access memories (RAMs) have been obtained through computer simulation of SEU in RAM cells that contain circuit models for bipolar transistors. The models include current generators that emulate the charge collected from ion tracks. The computer simulation results are compared with test data obtained from a RAM in a bipolar microprocessor chip. This methodology is applicable to other bipolar integrated circuit constructions in addition to RAM cells.

  2. Single Event Testing on Complex Devices: Test Like You Fly Versus Test-Specific Design Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berg, Melanie D.; Label, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    We present a mechanism for evaluating complex digital systems targeted for harsh radiation environments such as space. Focus is limited to analyzing the single event upset (SEU) susceptibility of designs implemented inside Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) devices. Tradeoffs are provided between application-specific versus test-specific test structures.

  3. SEE induced in SRAM operating in a superconducting electron linear accelerator environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makowski, D.; Mukherjee, Bhaskar; Grecki, M.; Simrock, Stefan

    2005-02-01

    Strong fields of bremsstrahlung photons and photoneutrons are produced during the operation of high-energy electron linacs. Therefore, a mixed gamma and neutron radiation field dominates the accelerators environment. The gamma radiation induced Total Ionizing Dose (TID) effect manifests the long-term deterioration of the electronic devices operating in accelerator environment. On the other hand, the neutron radiation is responsible for Single Event Effects (SEE) and may cause a temporal loss of functionality of electronic systems. This phenomenon is known as Single Event Upset (SEU). The neutron dose (KERMA) was used to scale the neutron induced SEU in the SRAM chips. Hence, in order to estimate the neutron KERMA conversion factor for Silicon (Si), dedicated calibration experiments using an Americium-Beryllium (241Am/Be) neutron standard source was carried out. Single Event Upset (SEU) influences the short-term operation of SRAM compared to the gamma induced TID effect. We are at present investigating the feasibility of an SRAM based real-time beam-loss monitor for high-energy accelerators utilizing the SEU caused by fast neutrons. This paper highlights the effects of gamma and neutron radiations on Static Random Access Memory (SRAM), placed at selected locations near the Superconducting Linear Accelerator driving the Vacuum UV Free Electron Laser (VUVFEL) of DESY.

  4. The Education of Refugees in Africa: The Role of Distance and Open Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodds, Tony

    1988-01-01

    Description of education services to refugees in Africa focuses on three case studies: Institute of In-Service Teacher Training (IITT) in Somalia; Sudan Extension Unit (SEU); and Namibian Extension Unit (NEU) in Angola and Zambia. Highlights include refugee problems, the relevance of distance and open learning approaches, and international…

  5. Effects of Computer-Assisted Instruction in Using Formal Decision-Making Strategies to Choose a College Major.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mau, Wei-Cheng; Jepsen, David A.

    1992-01-01

    Compared decision-making strategies and college major choice among 113 first-year students assigned to Elimination by Aspects Strategy (EBA), Subjective Expected Utility Strategy (SEU), and control groups. "Rational" EBA students scored significantly higher on choice certainty; lower on choice anxiety and career indecision than "rational"…

  6. Overcoming scaling concerns in a radiation-hardening CMOS technology

    SciTech Connect

    Maimon, J.; Haddad, N.

    1999-12-01

    Scaling efforts to develop an advanced radiation-hardened CMOS process to support a 4M SRAM are described. Issues encountered during scaling of transistor, isolation, and resistor elements are discussed, as well as the solutions used to overcome these issues. Transistor data, total dose radiation results, and the performance of novel resistors for prevention of single event upsets (SEU) are presented.

  7. Reliability design of CMOS image sensor for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Ning; Chen, Shijun; Chen, Yongping

    2013-08-01

    In space applications, sensors work in very harsh space environment. Thus the reliability design must be carefully considered. This paper addresses the techniques which effectively increase the reliability of CMOS image sensors. A radiation tolerant pixel design which is implemented in a sun tracker sensor is presented. Measurement results of total dose radiation, SEL, SEU, etc prove the radiation immunity of the sensor.

  8. Alpha-particle emissivity screening of materials used for semiconductor manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Michael; Rodbell, Kenneth

    2015-03-01

    Single-Event Upsets (SEU's) in semiconductor memory and logic devices continue to be a reliability issue in modern CMOS devices. SEU's result from deposited charge in the Si devices caused by the passage of ionizing radiation. With technology scaling, the device area decreases, but the critical charge required to flip bits decreases as well. The interplay between both determines how the SEU rate scales with shrinking device geometries and dimensions. In order to minimize the alpha-particle component of SEU, the radiation in the device environment has to be at the Ultra-Low Alpha (ULA) activity levels, e.g. less than 2 α/khr-cm2. Most detectors have background levels that are significantly larger than that level which makes making these measurements difficult and time consuming. A new class of alpha particle detector, utilizing pulse shape discrimination, is now available which allows one to make measurements quickly with ultra-low detector background. This talk will discuss what is involved in making alpha particle measurements of materials in the ULA activity levels, in terms of calibration, radon adsorption mitigation, the time required for obtaining reasonable statistics and comparisons to other detectors.

  9. Teenage Pregnancy and Sex and Relationship Education: Myths and (Mis)conceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vincent, Kerry

    2007-01-01

    This paper explores the role of sex and relationship education (SRE) in reducing teenage pregnancy rates. It critically examines some of the assumptions underlying the emphasis placed on SRE within the teenage pregnancy strategy ( SEU, 1999)--in particular, the view that ignorance of sexual matters plays a key part in teenage conception. An…

  10. A radiation-hardened 16/32-bit microprocessor

    SciTech Connect

    Hass, K.J.; Treece, R.K.; Giddings, A.E.

    1989-01-01

    A radiation-hardened 16/32-bit microprocessor has been fabricated and tested. Our initial evaluation has demonstrated that it is functional after a total gamma dose of 5Mrad(Si) and is immune to SEU from Krypton ions. 3 refs., 2 figs.

  11. Single event soft error in advanced integrated circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuanfu, Zhao; Suge, Yue; Xinyuan, Zhao; Shijin, Lu; Qiang, Bian; Liang, Wang; Yongshu, Sun

    2015-11-01

    As technology feature size decreases, single event upset (SEU), and single event transient (SET) dominate the radiation response of microcircuits. Multiple bit upset (MBU) (or multi cell upset) effects, digital single event transient (DSET) and analogue single event transient (ASET) cause serious problems for advanced integrated circuits (ICs) applied in a radiation environment and have become a pressing issue. To face this challenge, a lot of work has been put into the single event soft error mechanism and mitigation schemes. This paper presents a review of SEU and SET, including: a brief historical overview, which summarizes the historical development of the SEU and SET since their first observation in the 1970's; effects prominent in advanced technology, which reviews the effects such as MBU, MSET as well as SET broadening and quenching with the influence of temperature, device structure etc.; the present understanding of single event soft error mechanisms, which review the basic mechanism of single event generation including various component of charge collection; and a discussion of various SEU and SET mitigation schemes divided as circuit hardening and layout hardening that could help the designer meet his goals.

  12. Novel functional roles for PERIANTHIA and SEUSS during floral organ identity specification, floral meristem termination, and gynoecial development

    PubMed Central

    Wynn, April N.; Seaman, Andrew A.; Jones, Ashley L.; Franks, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    The gynoecium is the female reproductive structure of angiosperm flowers. In Arabidopsis thaliana the gynoecium is composed of two carpels that are fused into a tube-like structure. As the gynoecial primordium arises from the floral meristem, a specialized meristematic structure, the carpel margin meristem (CMM), develops from portions of the medial gynoecial domain. The CMM is critical for reproductive competence because it gives rise to the ovules, the precursors of the seeds. Here we report a functional role for the transcription factor PERIANTHIA (PAN) in the development of the gynoecial medial domain and the formation of ovule primordia. This function of PAN is revealed in pan aintegumenta (ant) as well as seuss (seu) pan double mutants that form reduced numbers of ovules. Previously, PAN was identified as a regulator of perianth organ number and as a direct activator of AGAMOUS (AG) expression in floral whorl four. However, the seu pan double mutants display enhanced ectopic AG expression in developing sepals and the partial transformation of sepals to petals indicating a novel role for PAN in the repression of AG in floral whorl one. These results indicate that PAN functions as an activator or repressor of AG expression in a whorl-specific fashion. The seu pan double mutants also display enhanced floral indeterminacy, resulting in the formation of “fifth whorl” structures and disruption of WUSCHEL (WUS) expression patterns revealing a novel role for SEU in floral meristem termination. PMID:24778638

  13. Radiation Hardening of Computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, D. K.; Smith, L. S.; Zoutendyk, J. A.; Giddings, A. E.; Hewlett, F. W.; Treece, R. K.

    1986-01-01

    Single-event upsets reduced by use of oversize transistors. Computers made less susceptible to ionizing radiation by replacing bipolar integrated circuits with properly designed, complementary metaloxide-semiconductor (CMOS) circuits. CMOS circuit chips made highly resistant to single-event upset (SEU), especially when certain feedback resistors are incorporated. Redesigned chips also consume less power than original chips.

  14. Decisions Under Uncertainty III: Rationality Issues, Sex Stereotypes, and Sex Role Appropriateness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonoma, Thomas V.

    The explanatory cornerstone of most currently viable social theories is a strict cost-gain assumption. The clearest formal explication of this view is contained in subjective expected utility models (SEU), in which individuals are assumed to scale their subjective likelihood estimates of decisional consequences and the personalistic worth or…

  15. Adolescent Contraceptive Use: Models, Research, and Directions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitley, Bernard E., Jr.; Schofield, Janet Ward

    Both the career model and the decision model have been proposed to explain patterns of contraceptive use in teenagers. The career model views contraceptive use as a symbol of a woman's sexuality and implies a clear decision to be sexually active. The decision model is based on the subjective expected utility (SEU) theory which holds that people…

  16. Neutron induced soft errors in CMOS memories under reduced bias

    SciTech Connect

    Hazucha, P.; Svensson, C.; Johansson, K.

    1998-12-01

    A custom designed 16 kbit CMOS memory was irradiated by 14 MeV neutrons and 100 MeV neutrons. SEU cross sections were evaluated under different supply voltages. The cross section values are compared to those predicted by the BGR model.

  17. Evaluation of an Ultra-Low Power Reed Solomon Encoder for NASA's Space Technology 5 Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, K. E.; Xapsos, M. A.; Poivey, C.; LaBel, K. A.; Stone, R. F.; Yeh, P-S.; Gambles, J.; Hass, J.; Maki, G.; Marguia, J.

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on radiation tests on encoders intended for a constellation of microsatellites. The encoders use CMOS Ultra-Low Power Radiation Tolerant (CULPRiT) technology. The presentation addresses power consumption, radiation dosage, and Single Event Upset (SEU).

  18. SRAM Based Re-programmable FPGA for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. J.; Sun, J. S.; Cronquist, B. E.; McCollum, J. L.; Speers, T. M.; Plants, W. C.; Katz, R. B.

    1999-01-01

    An SRAM (static random access memory)-based reprogrammable FPGA (field programmable gate array) is investigated for space applications. A new commercial prototype, named the RS family, was used as an example for the investigation. The device is fabricated in a 0.25 micrometers CMOS technology. Its architecture is reviewed to provide a better understanding of the impact of single event upset (SEU) on the device during operation. The SEU effect of different memories available on the device is evaluated. Heavy ion test data and SPICE simulations are used integrally to extract the threshold LET (linear energy transfer). Together with the saturation cross-section measurement from the layout, a rate prediction is done on each memory type. The SEU in the configuration SRAM is identified as the dominant failure mode and is discussed in detail. The single event transient error in combinational logic is also investigated and simulated by SPICE. SEU mitigation by hardening the memories and employing EDAC (error detection and correction) at the device level are presented. For the configuration SRAM (CSRAM) cell, the trade-off between resistor de-coupling and redundancy hardening techniques are investigated with interesting results. Preliminary heavy ion test data show no sign of SEL (single event latch-up). With regard to ionizing radiation effects, the increase in static leakage current (static I(sub CC)) measured indicates a device tolerance of approximately 50krad(Si).

  19. Single event effects and laser simulation studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Q.; Schwartz, H.; Mccarty, K.; Coss, J.; Barnes, C.

    1993-01-01

    The single event upset (SEU) linear energy transfer threshold (LETTH) of radiation hardened 64K Static Random Access Memories (SRAM's) was measured with a picosecond pulsed dye laser system. These results were compared with standard heavy ion accelerator (Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL)) measurements of the same SRAM's. With heavy ions, the LETTH of the Honeywell HC6364 was 27 MeV-sq cm/mg at 125 C compared with a value of 24 MeV-sq cm/mg obtained with the laser. In the case of the second type of 64K SRAM, the IBM640lCRH no upsets were observed at 125 C with the highest LET ions used at BNL. In contrast, the pulsed dye laser tests indicated a value of 90 MeV-sq cm/mg at room temperature for the SEU-hardened IBM SRAM. No latchups or multiple SEU's were observed on any of the SRAM's even under worst case conditions. The results of this study suggest that the laser can be used as an inexpensive laboratory SEU prescreen tool in certain cases.

  20. Single event effect characterization of the mixed-signal ASIC developed for CCD camera in space use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Hiroshi; Fujikawa, Mari; Mori, Hideki; Kan, Hiroaki; Ueda, Shutaro; Kosugi, Hiroko; Anabuki, Naohisa; Hayashida, Kiyoshi; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Doty, John P.; Ikeda, Hirokazu; Kitamura, Hisashi; Uchihori, Yukio

    2013-12-01

    We present the single event effect (SEE) tolerance of a mixed-signal application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) developed for a charge-coupled device camera onboard a future X-ray astronomical mission. We adopted proton and heavy ion beams at HIMAC/NIRS in Japan. The particles with high linear energy transfer (LET) of 57.9 MeV cm2/mg is used to measure the single event latch-up (SEL) tolerance, which results in a sufficiently low cross-section of σSEL<4.2×10-11 cm2/(Ion×ASIC). The single event upset (SEU) tolerance is estimated with various kinds of species with wide range of energy. Taking into account that a part of the protons creates recoiled heavy ions that have higher LET than that of the incident protons, we derived the probability of SEU event as a function of LET. Then the SEE event rate in a low-earth orbit is estimated considering a simulation result of LET spectrum. SEL rate is below once per 49 years, which satisfies the required latch-up tolerance. The upper limit of the SEU rate is derived to be 1.3×10-3 events/s. Although the SEU events cannot be distinguished from the signals of X-ray photons from astronomical objects, the derived SEU rate is below 1.3% of expected non-X-ray background rate of the detector and hence these events should not be a major component of the instrumental background.

  1. The transcriptional regulator SsuR activates expression of the Corynebacterium glutamicum sulphonate utilization genes in the absence of sulphate.

    PubMed

    Koch, Daniel J; Rückert, Christian; Albersmeier, Andreas; Hüser, Andrea T; Tauch, Andreas; Pühler, Alfred; Kalinowski, Jörn

    2005-10-01

    In a recent study, the putative regulatory gene cg0012 was shown to belong to the regulon of McbR, a global transcriptional regulator of sulphur metabolism in Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032. A deletion of cg0012, now designated ssuR (sulphonate sulphur utilization regulator), led to the mutant strain C. glutamicum DK100, which was shown to be blocked in the utilization of sulphonates as sulphur sources. According to DNA microarray hybridizations, transcription of the ssu and seu genes, encoding the sulphonate utilization system of C. glutamicum, was considerably decreased in C. glutamicum DK100 when compared with the wild-type strain. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays with purified SsuR protein demonstrated that the upstream regions of ssuI, seuABC, ssuD2 and ssuD1CBA contain SsuR binding sites. A nucleotide sequence alignment of the four DNA fragments containing the SsuR binding sites revealed a common 21 bp motif consisting of T-, GC- and A-rich domains. Mapping of the transcriptional start sites in front of ssuI, seuABC, ssuD2 and ssuD1CBA indicated that the SsuR binding sites are located directly upstream of identified promoter sequences and that the ssu genes are expressed by leaderless transcripts. Binding of the SsuR protein to its operator was shown to be diminished in vitro by the effector substance sulphate and its direct assimilation products adenosine 5'-phosphosulphate, sulphite and sulphide. Real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction experiments verified that the expression of the ssu and seu genes was also repressed in vivo by the presence of sulphate or sulphite. Therefore, the regulatory protein SsuR activates the expression of the ssu and seu genes in C. glutamicum in the absence of the preferred sulphur source sulphate. PMID:16194234

  2. Reconfigurable computing in space: from current technology to reconfigurable systems-on-a-chip.

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, R. C.; Caffrey, M. P.; Johnson, D. E.; Wirthlin, M. J.

    2002-01-01

    The performance, in-system reprogrammability, flexibility, and reduced costs of SRAM-based FPGAs make them very interesting for high-speed, on-orbit data processing, but, because the current generation of radiation-tolerant SRAM-based FPGAs are derived directly from COTS versions of the chips, several issues must be dealt with for space, including SEU sensitivities, power consumption, thermal problems, and support logic. This paper will discuss Los Alamos National Laboratory's approach to using the Xilinx XQVR1000 FPGAs for on-orbit processing in the Cibola Flight Experiment (CFE) as well as the possibilities and challenges of using newer, system-on-a-reprogrammable-chip FPGAs, such as Virtex I1 Pro, in space-based reconfigurable computing. The reconfigurable computing payload for CFE includes three processing boards, each having three radiation-tolerant Xilinx XQVRl 000 FPGAs. The reconfigurable computing architecture for this project is intended for in-flight, real-time processing of two radio fi-equency channels, each producing 12-bit samples at 100 million samples/second. In this system, SEU disruptions in data path operations can be tolerated while disruptions in the control path are much less tolerable. With this system in mind, LANL has developed an SEU management scheme with strategies for handling upsets in all of the FPGA resources known to be sensitive to radiation-induced SEUs. While mitigation schemes for many resources will be discussed, the paper will concentrate on SEU management strategies and tools developed at LANL for the configuration bitstream and 'half latches'. To understand the behavior of specific designs under SEUs in the configuration bitstream, LANL and Brigham Young University have developed an SEU simulator using ISI's SLAACl-V reconfigurable computing board. The simulator can inject single-bit upsets into a design's configuration bitstream to simulate SEUs and observe how these simulated SEUs affect the design's operation. Using fast

  3. Analysis of single-event upset of magnetic tunnel junction used in spintronic circuits caused by radiation-induced current

    SciTech Connect

    Sakimura, N.; Nebashi, R.; Sugibayashi, T.; Natsui, M.; Hanyu, T.; Ohno, H.

    2014-05-07

    This paper describes the possibility of a switching upset of a magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) caused by a terrestrial radiation-induced single-event-upset (SEU) current in spintronic integrated circuits. The current waveforms were simulated by using a 3-D device simulator in a basic circuit including MTJs designed using 90-nm CMOS parameters and design rules. The waveforms have a 400 -μA peak and a 200-ps elapsed time when neutron particles with a linear energy transfer value of 14 MeV cm{sup 2}/mg enter the silicon surface. The authors also found that the SEU current may cause soft errors with a probability of more than 10{sup −12} per event, which was obtained by approximate solution of the ordinary differential equation of switching probability when the intrinsic critical current (I{sub C0}) became less than 30 μA.

  4. 1986 Annual Conference on Nuclear and Space Radiation Effects, 23rd, Providence, RI, July 21-23, 1986, Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, Thomas D. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    The present conference on the effects of nuclear and space radiation on electronic hardware gives attention to topics in the basic mechanisms of radiation effects, dosimetry and energy-dependent effects, electronic device radiation hardness assurance, SOI/SOS radiation effects, spacecraft charging and space radiation, IC radiation effects and hardening, single-event upset (SEU) phenomena and hardening, and EMP/SGEMP/IEMP phenomena. Specific treatments encompass the generation of interface states by ionizing radiation in very thin MOS oxides, the microdosimetry of meson energy deposited on 1-micron sites in Si, total dose radiation and engineering studies, plasma interactions with biased concentrator solar cells, the transient imprint memory effect in MOS memories, mechanisms leading to SEU, and the vaporization and breakdown of thin columns of water.

  5. Laser-induced fluorescence of phosphors for remote cryogenic thermometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beshears, D. L.; Capps, G. J.; Cates, M. R.; Simmons, C. M.; Schwenterly, S. W.

    1990-01-01

    Remote cryogenic temperature measurements can be made by inducing fluorescence in phosphors with temperature-dependent emissions and measuring the emission lifetimes. The thermographic phosphor technique can be used for making precision, noncontact, cryogenic-temperature measurements in electrically hostile environments, such as high dc electric or magnetic fields. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration is interested in using these thermographic phosphors for mapping hot spots on cryogenic tank walls. Europium-doped lanthanum oxysulfide (La2O2S:Eu) and magnesium fluorogermanate doped with manganese (Mg4FGeO6:Mn) are suitable for low-temperature surface thermometry. Several emission lines, excited by a 337-nm ultraviolet laser, provide fluorescence lifetimes having logarithmic dependence with temperature from 4 to above 125 K. A calibration curve for both La2O2S:Eu and Mg4FGeO6:Mn is presented, as well as emission spectra taken at room temperature and 11 K.

  6. Analysis of single-event upset of magnetic tunnel junction used in spintronic circuits caused by radiation-induced current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakimura, N.; Nebashi, R.; Natsui, M.; Ohno, H.; Sugibayashi, T.; Hanyu, T.

    2014-05-01

    This paper describes the possibility of a switching upset of a magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) caused by a terrestrial radiation-induced single-event-upset (SEU) current in spintronic integrated circuits. The current waveforms were simulated by using a 3-D device simulator in a basic circuit including MTJs designed using 90-nm CMOS parameters and design rules. The waveforms have a 400 -μA peak and a 200-ps elapsed time when neutron particles with a linear energy transfer value of 14 MeV cm2/mg enter the silicon surface. The authors also found that the SEU current may cause soft errors with a probability of more than 10-12 per event, which was obtained by approximate solution of the ordinary differential equation of switching probability when the intrinsic critical current (IC0) became less than 30 μA.

  7. Simulation of the characteristics of low-energy proton induced single event upset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Chao; Xi, Kai; Liu, TianQi; Liu, Jie

    2014-10-01

    Monte Carlo simulation results are reported on the single event upset (SEU) triggered by the direct ionization effect of low-energy proton. The SEU cross-sections on the 45 nm static random access memory (SRAM) were compared with previous research work, which not only validated the simulation approach used herein, but also exposed the existence of saturated cross-section and the multiple bit upsets (MBUs) when the incident energy was less than 1 MeV. Additionally, it was observed that the saturated cross-section and MBUs are involved with energy loss and critical charge. The amount of deposited charge and the distribution with respect to the critical charge as the supplemental evidence are discussed.

  8. Comparison of single event phenomena for front/back irradiations

    SciTech Connect

    Musseau, O.; Ferlet-Cavrois, V.; Campbell, A.B.; Stapor, W.J.; McDonald, P.T.

    1997-12-01

    For devices irradiated from the front and the back, where ions have the same LET in the sensitive volumes, the SEU sensitivities and charge collection spectra are different. A specific test setup has been developed to make precise measurements of both collected charge and SEU in CMOS SRAMs. The authors present a set of new data and discuss the possible experimental artifacts that could affect these measurements. In all the cases, the device is more sensitive when irradiated from the back than from the front. This phenomenon seems related to energy transfer mechanisms from the ion to the material target, with secondary particles from both electronic and nuclear reactions being forward emitted. This effect may influence to net sensitivity of scaled down devices, with shallow sensitive layers, and heavy metal interconnects.

  9. Simulation of temporal characteristics of ion-velocity susceptibility to single event upset effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Chao; Xi, Kai; Liu, Tian-Qi; Gu, Song; Liu, Jie

    2014-08-01

    Using a Monte Carlo simulation tool of the multi-functional package for SEEs Analysis (MUFPSA), we study the temporal characteristics of ion-velocity susceptibility to the single event upset (SEU) effect, including the deposited energy, traversed time within the device, and profile of the current pulse. The results show that the averaged dposited energy decreases with the increase of the ion-velocity, and incident ions of 209Bi have a wider distribution of energy deposition than 132Xe at the same ion-velocity. Additionally, the traversed time presents an obvious decreasing trend with the increase of ion-velocity. Concurrently, ion-velocity certainly has an influence on the current pulse and then it presents a particular regularity. The detailed discussion is conducted to estimate the relevant linear energy transfer (LET) of incident ions and the SEU cross section of the testing device from experiment and simulation and to critically consider the metric of LET.

  10. A dual redundancy radiation-hardened flip—flop based on a C-element in a 65 nm process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gang, Chen; Bo, Gao; Min, Gong

    2013-09-01

    A radiation-hardened flip—flop is proposed to mitigate the single event upset (SEU) effect. Immunity was achieved through the use of C-elements and redundant storage elements. It takes advantage of the property of a C-element in which it enters a high impedance mode when its inputs are of different logic values. Redundant storage nodes are then used to drive the C-elements so that a single upset pulse in any storage will be prevented from altering the state of the output of the flip—flop. The flip—flop was implemented using 48 transistors and occupied an area of 30.78 μm2, using 65 nm CMOS process. It consumed 22.6% fewer transistors as compared to the traditional SEU resilient TMR flip—flop.