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Sample records for severe acute pancreatitis

  1. Management of severe acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Doctor, Nilesh; Agarwal, Pravin; Gandhi, Vidhyachandra

    2012-02-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) develops in about 25% of patients with acute pancreatitis. Severity of acute pancreatitis is linked to the presence of systemic organ dysfunctions and/or necrotizing pancreatitis. Risk factors independently determining the outcome of SAP are early multiorgan failure (MOF), infection of necrosis, and extended necrosis (>50%). Morbidity of SAP is biphasic, in the first week it is strongly related to systemic inflammatory response syndrome while, sepsis due to infected pancreatic necrosis leading to MOF syndrome occurs in the later course after the first week. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography provides the highest diagnostic accuracy for necrotizing pancreatitis when performed after the first week of disease. Patients who suffer early organ dysfunctions or are at risk for developing a severe disease require early intensive care treatment. Antibiotic prophylaxis has not been shown as an effective preventive treatment. Early enteral feeding is based on a high level of evidence, resulting in a reduction of local and systemic infection. Patients suffering infected necrosis causing clinical sepsis are candidates for intervention. Hospital mortality of SAP after interventional or surgical debridement has decreased to below 20% in high-volume centers. PMID:23372306

  2. Severe Acute Pancreatitis in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Abdullah, Bahiyah; Kathiresan Pillai, Thanikasalam; Cheen, Lim Huay; Ryan, Ray Joshua

    2015-01-01

    This is a case of a pregnant lady at 8 weeks of gestation, who presented with acute abdomen. She was initially diagnosed with ruptured ectopic pregnancy and ruptured corpus luteal cyst as the differential diagnosis. However she then, was finally diagnosed as acute hemorrhagic pancreatitis with spontaneous complete miscarriage. This is followed by review of literature on this topic. Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy is not uncommon. The emphasis on high index of suspicion of acute pancreatitis in women who presented with acute abdomen in pregnancy is highlighted. Early diagnosis and good supportive care by multidisciplinary team are crucial to ensure good maternal and fetal outcomes. PMID:25628906

  3. Pazopanib-Induced Severe Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Kawakubo, Kazumichi; Hata, Hiroo; Kawakami, Hiroshi; Kuwatani, Masaki; Kawahata, Shuhei; Kubo, Kimitoshi; Imafuku, Keisuke; Kitamura, Shinya; Sakamoto, Naoya

    2015-01-01

    Pazopanib is an oral angiogenesis inhibitor targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptors, platelet-derived growth factor receptors, and c-Kit approved for the treatment of renal cell carcinoma and soft tissue sarcoma. Nonselective kinase inhibitors, such as sunitinib and sorafenib, are known to be associated with acute pancreatitis. There are few case reports of severe acute pancreatitis induced by pazopanib treatment. We present a case of severe acute pancreatitis caused by pazopanib treatment for cutaneous angiosarcoma. The patient was an 82-year-old female diagnosed with cutaneous angiosarcoma. She had been refractory to docetaxel treatment and began pazopanib therapy. Three months after pazopanib treatment, CT imaging of the abdomen showed the swelling of the pancreas and surrounding soft tissue inflammation without abdominal pain. After she continued pazopanib treatment for 2 months, she presented with nausea and appetite loss. Abdominal CT showed the worsening of the surrounding soft tissue inflammation of the pancreas. Serum amylase and lipase levels were 296 and 177 IU/l, respectively. She was diagnosed with acute pancreatitis induced by pazopanib treatment and was managed conservatively with discontinuation of pazopanib, but the symptoms did not improve. Subsequently, an abdominal CT scan demonstrated the appearance of a pancreatic pseudocyst. She underwent endoscopic ultrasound-guided pseudocyst drainage using a flared-end fully covered self-expandable metallic stent. Then, the symptoms resolved without recurrence. Due to the remarkable progress of molecular targeted therapy, the oncologist should know that acute pancreatitis was recognized as a potential adverse event of pazopanib treatment and could proceed to severe acute pancreatitis. PMID:26464570

  4. Severe acute pancreatitis: Clinical course and management

    PubMed Central

    Beger, Hans G; Rau, Bettina M

    2007-01-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) develops in about 25% of patients with acute pancreatitis (AP). Severity of AP is linked to the presence of systemic organ dysfunctions and/or necrotizing pancreatitis pathomorphologically. Risk factors determining independently the outcome of SAP are early multi-organ failure, infection of necrosis and extended necrosis (> 50%). Up to one third of patients with necrotizing pancreatitis develop in the late course infection of necroses. Morbidity of SAP is biphasic, in the first week strongly related to early and persistence of organ or multi-organ dysfunction. Clinical sepsis caused by infected necrosis leading to multi-organ failure syndrome (MOFS) occurs in the later course after the first week. To predict sepsis, MOFS or deaths in the first 48-72 h, the highest predictive accuracy has been objectified for procalcitonin and IL-8; the Sepsis-Related Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA)-score predicts the outcome in the first 48 h, and provides a daily assessment of treatment response with a high positive predictive value. Contrast-enhanced CT provides the highest diagnostic accuracy for necrotizing pancreatitis when performed after the first week of disease. Patients who suffer early organ dysfunctions or at risk of developing a severe disease require early intensive care treatment. Early vigorous intravenous fluid replacement is of foremost importance. The goal is to decrease the hematocrit or restore normal cardiocirculatory functions. Antibiotic prophylaxis has not been shown as an effective preventive treatment. Early enteral feeding is based on a high level of evidence, resulting in a reduction of local and systemic infection. Patients suffering infected necrosis causing clinical sepsis, pancreatic abscess or surgical acute abdomen are candidates for early intervention. Hospital mortality of SAP after interventional or surgical debridement has decreased in high volume centers to below 20%. PMID:17876868

  5. [Concept of SIRS and severe acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Hirota, Masahiko; Sugita, Hiroki; Maeda, Keisuke; Ichibara, Atsushi; Ogawa, Michio

    2004-11-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a potentially fatal disease, the severity of which ranges from a mild edematous form to a severe necrotizing form. Most patients develop systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), which is induced by proinflammatory cytokines. The cytokine production can be induced by activation of Toll-like receptor. The breakdown products of the pancreatic and peripancreatic tissues by proteases might be the agonists. Cytokines are supposed to be produced as a biological defense system. However, cytokines may often evoke organ failure and/or immunosuppressive state, if they would be produced excessively. To express this complicated pathologic condition, Ogawa proposed a concept of LISIS(local inflammation-induced systemic immunosuppression syndrome). We have to pay attention to such aspects in the management of this disease. PMID:15552899

  6. THE PANC 3 SCORE PREDICTING SEVERITY OF ACUTE PANCREATITIS

    PubMed Central

    BEDUSCHI, Murilo Gamba; MELLO, André Luiz Parizi; VON-MÜHLEN, Bruno; FRANZON, Orli

    2016-01-01

    Background : About 20% of cases of acute pancreatitis progress to a severe form, leading to high mortality rates. Several studies suggested methods to identify patients that will progress more severely. However, most studies present problems when used on daily practice. Objective : To assess the efficacy of the PANC 3 score to predict acute pancreatitis severity and its relation to clinical outcome. Methods : Acute pancreatitis patients were assessed as to sex, age, body mass index (BMI), etiology of pancreatitis, intensive care need, length of stay, length of stay in intensive care unit and mortality. The PANC 3 score was determined within the first 24 hours after diagnosis and compared to acute pancreatitis grade of the Revised Atlanta classification. Results : Out of 64 patients diagnosed with acute pancreatitis, 58 met the inclusion criteria. The PANC 3 score was positive in five cases (8.6%), pancreatitis progressed to a severe form in 10 cases (17.2%) and five patients (8.6%) died. Patients with a positive score and severe pancreatitis required intensive care more often, and stayed for a longer period in intensive care units. The PANC 3 score showed sensitivity of 50%, specificity of 100%, accuracy of 91.4%, positive predictive value of 100% and negative predictive value of 90.6% in prediction of severe acute pancreatitis. Conclusion : The PANC 3 score is useful to assess acute pancreatitis because it is easy and quick to use, has high specificity, high accuracy and high predictive value in prediction of severe acute pancreatitis. PMID:27120730

  7. Pterostilbene as treatment for severe acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Y J; Ding, Y; Wu, J; Ning, B T

    2016-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) has a fast onset and progression, which lead to an unfavorable prognosis. Therefore, the development of novel drugs for its treatment is critical. As a homologous derivative of resveratrol, pterostilbene exerts a variety of effects including anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antitumor effects. This study investigated the potential of pterostilbene for treatment of severe AP (SAP) and related mechanisms. Effects of pterostilbene were evaluated in a Wistar rat model of AP. Serum levels of amylase (AMY), creatinine (Cr), and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) were quantified. Furthermore, serum levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-a and interleukin (IL)-1b were quantified using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Nuclear factor (NF)-kB expression in pancreatic tissues was quantified by real-time PCR and western blotting. The production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was determined using a spectrometer, while superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity was assayed. In the AP rat model, the expression of inflammatory markers TNF-a and IL-1b, expression of NF-kB, and serum indices (AMY, Cr, and ALT) increased compared to the corresponding levels in the control group (P < 0.05). Pterostilbene reduced serum levels of TNF-a and IL-1b; decreased NF-kB gene expression, serum indices, and ROS generation; and increased SOD activity in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, pterostilbene can alleviate SAP-induced tissue damage by decreasing the inflammatory response and by promoting antioxidation leading to the protection of pancreatic tissues. PMID:27525946

  8. Severe acute pancreatitis: nutritional management in the ICU.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Neeraj; O'Keefe, Stephen J D

    2004-02-01

    Patients with acute pancreatitis have elevated nutritional needs due to increased energy expenditure and catabolism. It is a clinical challenge to provide adequate nutrition to these patients while maintaining gut function, preventing pancreatic stimulation, and minimizing the risk of septic and metabolic complications associated with nutritional support. We present the case of a patient who had severe acute pancreatitis and was initially given total parenteral nutrition. After a period of initial improvement, he developed hyperglycemia, bacteremia, and sepsis. Parenteral nutrition was discontinued and infection was treated with antibiotics. Subsequent nutritional support consisted of enteral feeding with an elemental diet infused via a nasojejunal feeding tube. His condition improved gradually and he made a full recovery. This case illustrates the difficulties encountered while managing a case of severe acute pancreatitis and provides an evidence based approach to the nutritional management of severe acute pancreatitis in the intensive care unit setting. PMID:16215093

  9. Early severe acute pancreatitis: characteristics of a new subgroup.

    PubMed

    Isenmann, R; Rau, B; Beger, H G

    2001-04-01

    This study focuses on patients with severe acute pancreatitis complicated by organ failure within the initial phase of the disease. Data of 158 patients with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) admitted to hospital within 72 hours after onset of symptoms were prospectively documented and analyzed for the occurrence of early severe acute pancreatitis (ESAP). ESAP was defined as presence of organ failure (OF) at admission. Forty-seven (30%) patients had ESAP, compared with 111 patients without OF (SAP group). In a multivariate analysis, the main factor predisposing to ESAP was the presence of extended pancreatic necrosis (odds ratio, 3.8), whereas biliary pancreatitis was associated with a slightly lower risk compared with alcoholic pancreatitis (odds ratio, 0.34). Compared with SAP, patients with ESAP more frequently developed intractable organ failure, which posed the indication for surgical treatment. Surgical necrosectomy due to progressive OF had to be performed in 89% of the ESAP patients and in 60% of the SAP patients. The incidence of infected pancreatic necrosis did not differ between both groups (23 vs. 21%). Mortality was significantly higher in ESAP (42 vs. 14%; p = 0.0003). ESAP is characterized by the presence of extended pancreatic necrosis and a complicated clinical course. Intractable organ failure is a frequent finding. Given the poor prognosis of ESAP, these patients should be treated in specialized intensive care units. PMID:11291929

  10. Liver transplantation for acute liver failure accompanied by severe acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Kirino, Izumi; Fujimoto, Yasuhiro; Hata, Koichiro; Uemoto, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    The role of liver transplantation (LT) in acute liver failure (ALF) complicated by severe acute pancreatitis is still unclear. We here report a case of deceased-donor LT for idiopathic ALF accompanied by severe acute pancreatitis. A 58-year-old man with no history of liver disease presented with idiopathic ALF and acute pancreatitis. After careful consideration, he received a liver from a deceased donor. Following surgery, the patient's liver function rapidly reverted to normal level and the acute pancreatitis simultaneously subsided. The patient later developed a pancreatic pseudocyst, which was treated successfully with combination interventional radiology. LT can be considered for ALF associated with severe acute pancreatitis if there is no clinical evidence of an absolute contraindication for organ transplantation, such as systemic or local infection. Moreover, we recommend a close follow-up by ultrasonography to allow early detection and treatment of pancreatic pseudocysts following surgery. PMID:27600056

  11. [PREVENTION AND CORRECTION OF PULMONARY COMPLICATIONS FOR SEVERE ACUTE PANCREATITIS].

    PubMed

    Fedorkiv, M B

    2015-06-01

    Increased of proinflammatory cytokines levels, including interleukin-8 (IL-8) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) on severe acute pancreatitis causes vasodilatation, increased permeability of the wall, accumulation of fluid in lung tissue and pleural sinuses. Transudate from acute parapancreatyc clusters of hot liquid and abdomen falls into the chest cavity through microscopic defects in the diaphragm due to the formation of pathological pleural-peritoneal connections or the relevant pressure gradient between the abdominal and pleural cavities. Remediation and removal of acute parapancreatyc clusters combined with the use of a multicomponent drug infusion therapy Cytoflavin provide a reduction in the frequency of pulmonary complications of acute pancreatitis from 48.3 to 31.0%. Use of the drug Cytoflavin reduces the severity of endogenous intoxication and mortality from acute lung injury from 12.9 to 6.1%. PMID:26521460

  12. Ascites fluid in severe acute pancreatitis: from pathophysiology to therapy.

    PubMed

    Dugernier, T; Laterre, P F; Reynaert, M S

    2000-01-01

    Several pathophysiological mechanisms are involved in the development of the inflammatory necrotizing process that takes place in the retroperitoneal area during the early phase of acute pancreatitis. They include premature intraglandular activation of pancreatic proenzymes (zymogens) and in particular trypsin, early microcirculatory impairment with subsequent ischaemia/reperfusion and overstimulation of immune effector cells. Although intra-acinar or interstitial activation of trypsinogen is most probably the trigger of acute pancreatitis, in recent years much emphasis has been put on the role of leukocytes. Based on numerous experimental and human data several pro-inflammatory mediators including cytokines, arachidonic acid derivatives, activated oxygen species and proteases are released locally by overactivated neutrophils and monocytes/macrophages among other cells. They are now believed to play a central role in the development of pancreatic necrosis and, once they gain access to the systemic circulation, in the emergence of early multisystem organ failure. However the sequential and relative contribution of each of these 3 pathophysiological mechanisms remain controversial and the precise identification of the mediators incriminated in local and remote tissue injury is still awaited. Severe acute pancreatitis still carries a mortality of 20% to 30%. With advances in intensive care management 80% of the deaths occur somewhat late in the attack due to infected pancreatic necrosis. Nevertheless early remote organ failures still remain a lifethreatening condition for most of these patients. A peritoneal exudate rich in activated lipolytic and proteolytic enzymes, vasoactive substances and several other pro-inflammatory mediators collect in over 60% of the patients with severe acute pancreatitis. On the basis of favourable animal experiments early percutaneous or surgical peritoneal lavage with or without the addition of antiproteases has been carried out in human

  13. Alcohol abuse-related severe acute pancreatitis with rhabdomyolysis complications

    PubMed Central

    SU, MAO-SHENG; JIANG, YING; YAN, XIAO-YUAN HU; ZHAO, QING-HUA; LIU, ZHI-WEI; ZHANG, WEN-ZHI; HE, LEI

    2013-01-01

    Non-traumatic rhabdomyolysis is a rare complication of acute pancreatitis. One of the major risk factors of both acute pancreatitis and rhabdomyolysis is alcohol abuse. However, only a few studies have reported the prognosis and association of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) and rhabdomyolysis in alcohol abuse patients. In the present study, we report two cases presenting with SAP complicated by rhabdomyolysis following high-dose alcohol intake. The disease onset, clinical manifestations, laboratory data, diagnosis and treatment procedure of each patient were recorded, and the association with rhabdomyolysis was analyzed. Alcohol consumption was the most predominant cause of SAP and rhabdomyolysis in these patients. SAP-related rhabdomyolysis was primarily induced by the toxicity associated with pancreatic necrosis. The laboratory tests revealed that the concentration of serum creatine kinase (CK) and myoglobin increased and acute renal failure symptoms were present, which provided an exact diagnosis for SAP-induced rhabdomyolysis. Rhabdomyolysis and subsequent hypermyoglobinuria severely impaired kidney function and aggravated hypocalcemia. The therapy of early stage SAP complicated by rhabdomyolysis involved liquid resuscitation support. When first stage treatment fails, blood purification should be performed immediately. Both patients developed multiple organ failure (MOF) and succumbed to the disease. Considering the two cases presented, we conclude that alcohol-related SAP complicated by rhabdomyolysis may have a poor clinical prognosis. PMID:23251265

  14. Lipolysis of Visceral Adipocyte Triglyceride by Pancreatic Lipases Converts Mild Acute Pancreatitis to Severe Pancreatitis Independent of Necrosis and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Krutika; Trivedi, Ram N.; Durgampudi, Chandra; Noel, Pawan; Cline, Rachel A.; DeLany, James P.; Navina, Sarah; Singh, Vijay P.

    2016-01-01

    Visceral fat necrosis has been associated with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) for over 100 years; however, its pathogenesis and role in SAP outcomes are poorly understood. Based on recent work suggesting that pancreatic fat lipolysis plays an important role in SAP, we evaluated the role of pancreatic lipases in SAP-associated visceral fat necrosis, the inflammatory response, local injury, and outcomes of acute pancreatitis (AP). For this, cerulein pancreatitis was induced in lean and obese mice, alone or with the lipase inhibitor orlistat and parameters of AP induction (serum amylase and lipase), fat necrosis, pancreatic necrosis, and multisystem organ failure, and inflammatory response were assessed. Pancreatic lipases were measured in fat necrosis and were overexpressed in 3T3-L1 cells. We noted obesity to convert mild cerulein AP to SAP with greater cytokines, unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs), and multisystem organ failure, and 100% mortality without affecting AP induction or pancreatic necrosis. Increased pancreatic lipase amounts and activity were noted in the extensive visceral fat necrosis of dying obese mice. Lipase inhibition reduced fat necrosis, UFAs, organ failure, and mortality but not the parameters of AP induction. Pancreatic lipase expression increased lipolysis in 3T3-L1 cells. We conclude that UFAs generated via lipolysis of visceral fat by pancreatic lipases convert mild AP to SAP independent of pancreatic necrosis and the inflammatory response. PMID:25579844

  15. Severe acute pancreatitis: Pathogenetic aspects and prognostic factors

    PubMed Central

    Mofleh, Ibrahim A Al

    2008-01-01

    Approximately 20% of patients with acute pancreatitis develop a severe disease associated with complications and high risk of mortality. The purpose of this study is to review pathogenesis and prognostic factors of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). An extensive medline search was undertaken with focusing on pathogenesis, complications and prognostic evaluation of SAP. Cytokines and other inflammatory markers play a major role in the pathogenesis and course of SAP and can be used as prognostic markers in its early phase. Other markers such as simple prognostic scores have been found to be as effective as multifactorial scoring systems (MFSS) at 48 h with the advantage of simplicity, efficacy, low cost, accuracy and early prediction of SAP. Recently, several laboratory markers including hematocrit, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine, matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and serum amyloid A (SAA) have been used as early predictors of severity within the first 24 h. The last few years have witnessed a tremendous progress in understanding the pathogenesis and predicting the outcome of SAP. In this review we classified the prognostic markers into predictors of severity, pancreatic necrosis (PN), infected PN (IPN) and mortality. PMID:18205255

  16. Contemporary management of infected necrosis complicating severe acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Jamdar, Saurabh; Siriwardena, Ajith K

    2006-01-01

    Pancreatic necrosis complicating severe acute pancreatitis is a challenging scenario in contemporary critical care practice; it requires multidisciplinary care in a setting where there is a relatively limited evidence base to support decision making. This commentary provides a concise overview of current management of patients with infected necrosis, focusing on detection, the role of pharmacologic intervention, and the timing and nature of surgical interventions. Fine-needle aspiration of necrosis remains the mainstay for establishment of infection. Pharmacological intervention includes antibiotic therapy as an adjunct to surgical debridement/drainage and, more recently, drotrecogin alfa. Specific concerns remain regarding the suitability of drotrecogin alfa in this setting. Early surgical intervention is unhelpful; surgery is indicated when there is strong evidence for infection of necrotic tissue, with the current trend being toward 'less drastic' surgical interventions. PMID:16356213

  17. Relaxin prevents the development of severe acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Cosen-Binker, Laura Iris; Binker, Marcelo Gustavo; Cosen, Rodica; Negri, Gustavo; Tiscornia, Osvaldo

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the severity of acute pancreatitis (AP) is associated to the intensity of leukocyte activation, inflammatory up-regulation and microcirculatory disruption associated to ischemia-reperfusion injury. Microvascular integrity and inhibition of pro-inflammatory mediators are key-factors in the evolution of AP. Relaxin is an insulin-like hormone that has been attributed vasorelaxant properties via the nitric oxide pathway while behaving as a glucocorticoid receptor agonist. METHODS: AP was induced by the bilio-pancreatic duct-outlet-exclusion closed-duodenal-loops model. Treatment with relaxin was done at different time-points. Nitric oxide synthase inhibition by L-NAME and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) blockage by mifepristone was considered. AP severity was assessed by biochemical and histopathological analyses. RESULTS: Treatment with relaxin reduced serum amylase, lipase, C-reactive protein, IL-6, IL-10, hsp72, LDH and 8-isoprostane as well as pancreatic and lung myeloperoxidase. Acinar and fat necrosis, hemorrhage and neutrophil infiltrate were also decreased. ATP depletion and ADP/ATP ratio were reduced while caspases 2-3-8 and 9 activities were increased. L-NAME and mifepristone decreased the efficiency of relaxin. CONCLUSION: Relaxin resulted beneficial in the treatment of AP combining the properties of a GR agonist while preserving the microcirculation and favoring apoptosis over necrosis. PMID:16570348

  18. Acute fatty liver of pregnancy associated with severe acute pancreatitis: A case report

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Cássio Vieira; Moreira, Alecsandro; Baima, Julio P; Franzoni, Leticia de C; Lima, Talles B; Yamashiro, Fabio da S; Coelho, Kunie Yabuki Rabelo; Sassaki, Ligia Y; Caramori, Carlos Antonio; Romeiro, Fernando G; Silva, Giovanni F

    2014-01-01

    Acute fatty liver of pregnancy is a rare disease that affects women in the third trimester of pregnancy. Although infrequent, the disease can cause maternal mortality. The diagnosis is not always clear until the pregnancy is terminated, and significant complications, such as acute pancreatitis, can occur. Pancreatic involvement typically only occurs in severe cases after the development of hepatic and renal impairment. To date, little knowledge is available regarding how the disease causes pancreatitis. Treatment involves supportive measures and pregnancy interruption. In this report, we describe a case of a previously healthy 26-year-old woman at a gestational age of 27 wk and 6 d who was admitted with severe abdominal pain and vomiting. This case illustrates the clinical and laboratory overlap between acute fatty liver of pregnancy and pancreatitis, highlighting the difficulties in differentiating each disease. Furthermore, the hypothesis for this overlapping is presented, and the therapeutic options are discussed. PMID:25068005

  19. Early enteral feeding in severe acute pancreatitis: can it prevent secondary pancreatic (super) infection?

    PubMed

    Lehocky, P; Sarr, M G

    2000-01-01

    Sepsis continues to account for a second peak in mortality in patients with severe acute pancreatitis. The prevention of these septic complications and subsequent development of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome remains a major focus for investigators, yet despite considerable clinical and experimental work addressing its etiology, septic complications remain high. Several studies have been designed to demonstrate the mechanism of origin of these septic complications with an attempt to define strategies for their prevention to improve patient outcomes. There is clear evidence that the origin of this secondary bacterial infection arises from enteric bacterial translocation secondary to disruption of the gut mucosal barrier during acute pancreatitis. Strategies designed to prevent secondary pancreatic infection include aggressive fluid resuscitation to maximize organ perfusion, early systemic antibiotic treatment or selective gut decontamination, and recently attempts to block mediators of the systemic inflammatory response. This discussion will summarize our present understanding of the etiopathogenesis of secondary bacterial 'superinfection' of necrotizing pancreatitis and how the initiation of enteral feeding early in the course of acute pancreatitis may prove to be an effective means of preventing and/or reversing the breakdown of the gut mucosal defense barrier. PMID:11155001

  20. Treatment of severe acute pancreatitis and its complications.

    PubMed

    Zerem, Enver

    2014-10-14

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP), which is the most serious type of this disorder, is associated with high morbidity and mortality. SAP runs a biphasic course. During the first 1-2 wk, a pro-inflammatory response results in systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). If the SIRS is severe, it can lead to early multisystem organ failure (MOF). After the first 1-2 wk, a transition from a pro-inflammatory response to an anti-inflammatory response occurs; during this transition, the patient is at risk for intestinal flora translocation and the development of secondary infection of the necrotic tissue, which can result in sepsis and late MOF. Many recommendations have been made regarding SAP management and its complications. However, despite the reduction in overall mortality in the last decade, SAP is still associated with high mortality. In the majority of cases, sterile necrosis should be managed conservatively, whereas in infected necrotizing pancreatitis, the infected non-vital solid tissue should be removed to control the sepsis. Intervention should be delayed for as long as possible to allow better demarcation and liquefaction of the necrosis. Currently, the step-up approach (delay, drain, and debride) may be considered as the reference standard intervention for this disorder. PMID:25320523

  1. Imaging of Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Thoeni, Ruedi F

    2015-11-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an acute inflammation of the pancreas. Several classification systems have been used in the past but were considered unsatisfactory. A revised Atlanta classification of acute pancreatitis was published that assessed the clinical course and severity of disease; divided acute pancreatitis into interstitial edematous pancreatitis and necrotizing pancreatitis; discerned an early phase (first week) from a late phase (after the first week); and focused on systemic inflammatory response syndrome and organ failure. This article focuses on the revised classification of acute pancreatitis, with emphasis on imaging features, particularly on newly-termed fluid collections and implications for the radiologist. PMID:26526433

  2. Early Assessment of Pancreatic Infections and Overall Prognosis in Severe Acute Pancreatitis by Procalcitonin (PCT)

    PubMed Central

    Rau, Bettina M.; Kemppainen, Esko A.; Gumbs, Andrew A.; Büchler, Markus W.; Wegscheider, Karl; Bassi, Claudio; Puolakkainen, Pauli A.; Beger, Hans G.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Pancreatic infections and sepsis are major complications in severe acute pancreatitis (AP) with significant impact on management and outcome. We investigated the value of Procalcitonin (PCT) for identifying patients at risk to develop pancreatic infections in severe AP. Methods: A total of 104 patients with predicted severe AP were enrolled in five European academic surgical centers within 96 hours of symptom onset. PCT was measured prospectively by a semi-automated immunoassay in each center, C-reactive protein (CRP) was routinely assessed. Both parameters were monitored over a maximum of 21 consecutive days and in weekly intervals thereafter. Results: In contrast to CRP, PCT concentrations were significantly elevated in patients with pancreatic infections and associated multiorgan dysfunction syndrome (MODS) who all required surgery (n = 10) and in nonsurvivors (n = 8) early after onset of symptoms. PCT levels revealed only a moderate increase in patients with pancreatic infections in the absence of MODS (n = 7), all of whom were managed nonoperatively without mortality. A PCT value of ≥3.5 ng/mL on 2 consecutive days was superior to CRP ≥430 mg/L for the assessment of infected necrosis with MODS or nonsurvival as determined by ROC analysis with a sensitivity and specificity of 93% and 88% for PCT and 40% and 100% for CRP, respectively (P < 0.01). The single or combined prediction of the two major complications was already possible on the third and fourth day after onset of symptoms with a sensitivity and specificity of 79% and 93% for PCT ≥3.8 ng/mL compared with 36% and 97% for CRP ≥430 mg/L, respectively (P = 0.002). Conclusion: Monitoring of PCT allows early and reliable assessment of clinically relevant pancreatic infections and overall prognosis in AP. This single test parameter significantly contributes to an improved stratification of patients at risk to develop major complications. PMID:17457167

  3. Intravenous glutamine for severe acute pancreatitis: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Xin; Liang, Cui-Ping; Gong, Shu

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the efficacy of intravenous glutamine on the patients with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). METHODS: The Cochrane Library, PubMed, EMBASE, and EBM review databases were searched up to June 2012. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared non-glutamine nutrition with intravenous glutamine supplemented nutrition in patients with SAP were included. A method recommended by the Cochrane Collaboration was used to perform a meta-analysis of those RCTs. RESULTS: Four RCTs involving a total of 190 participants were included. Analysis of these RCTs revealed the presence of statistical homogeneity among them. Results showed that glutamine dipeptide has a positive effect in reducing the mortality rate (OR = 0.26, 95%CI: 0.09-0.73, P = 0.01), length of hospital stay (weighted mean difference = -4.85, 95%CI: 6.67--3.03, P < 0.001), and the rate of complications (OR = 0.41, 95%CI: 0.22-0.78, P = 0.006). No serious adverse effects were found. CONCLUSION: Current best evidence demonstrates that glutamine is effective for SAP. Further high quality trials are required and parameters of nutritional condition and hospital cost should be considered in future RCTs with sufficient size and rigorous design. PMID:24701410

  4. Early Nasogastric Feeding in Predicted Severe Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Eckerwall, Gunilla E.; Axelsson, Jakob B.; Andersson, Roland G.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To compare the efficacy and safety of early, nasogastric enteral nutrition (EN) with total parenteral nutrition (TPN) in patients with predicted severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). Summary Background Data: In SAP, the magnitude of the inflammatory response as well as increased intestinal permeability correlates with outcome. Enteral feeding has been suggested superior to parenteral feeding due to a proposed beneficial effect on the gut barrier. Methods: Fifty patients who met the inclusion criteria were randomized to TPN or EN groups. The nutritional regimen was started within 24 hours from admission and EN was provided through a nasogastric tube. The observation period was 10 days. Intestinal permeability was measured by excretion of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and concentrations of antiendotoxin core antibodies (Endocab). Interleukins (IL)-6 IL-8, and C-reactive protein (CRP) were used as markers of the systemic inflammatory response. Morbidity and feasibility of the nutritional route were evaluated by the frequency of complications, gastrointestinal symptoms, and abdominal pain. Results: PEG, Endocab, CRP, IL-6, APACHE II score, severity according to the Atlanta classification (22 patients), and gastrointestinal symptoms or abdominal pain did not significantly differ between the groups. The incidence of hyperglycemia was significantly higher in TPN patients (21 of 26 vs. 7 of 23; P < 0.001). Total complications (25 vs. 52; P = 0.04) and pulmonary complications (10 vs. 21; P = 0.04) were significantly more frequent in EN patients, although complications were diagnosed dominantly within the first 3 days. Conclusion: In predicted SAP, nasogastric early EN was feasible and resulted in better control of blood glucose levels, although the overall early complication rate was higher in the EN group. No beneficial effects on intestinal permeability or the inflammatory response were seen by EN treatment. PMID:17122621

  5. Acute Lipotoxicity Regulates Severity of Biliary Acute Pancreatitis without Affecting Its Initiation

    PubMed Central

    Durgampudi, Chandra; Noel, Pawan; Patel, Krutika; Cline, Rachel; Trivedi, Ram N.; DeLany, James P.; Yadav, Dhiraj; Papachristou, Georgios I.; Lee, Kenneth; Acharya, Chathur; Jaligama, Deepthi; Navina, Sarah; Murad, Faris; Singh, Vijay P.

    2015-01-01

    Obese patients have worse outcomes during acute pancreatitis (AP). Previous animal models of AP have found worse outcomes in obese rodents who may have a baseline proinflammatory state. Our aim was to study the role of acute lipolytic generation of fatty acids on local severity and systemic complications of AP. Human postpancreatitis necrotic collections were analyzed for unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs) and saturated fatty acids. A model of biliary AP was designed to replicate the human variables by intraductal injection of the triglyceride glyceryl trilinoleate alone or with the chemically distinct lipase inhibitors orlistat or cetilistat. Parameters of AP etiology and outcomes of local and systemic severity were measured. Patients with postpancreatitis necrotic collections were obese, and 13 of 15 had biliary AP. Postpancreatitis necrotic collections were enriched in UFAs. Intraductal glyceryl trilinoleate with or without the lipase inhibitors resulted in oil red O–positive areas, resembling intrapancreatic fat. Both lipase inhibitors reduced the glyceryl trilinoleate–induced increase in serum lipase, UFAs, pancreatic necrosis, serum inflammatory markers, systemic injury, and mortality but not serum alanine aminotransferase, bilirubin, or amylase. We conclude that UFAs are enriched in human necrotic collections and acute UFA generation via lipolysis worsens pancreatic necrosis, systemic inflammation, and injury associated with severe AP. Inhibition of lipolysis reduces UFA generation and improves these outcomes of AP without interfering with its induction. PMID:24854864

  6. [Artificial nutrition in severe acute pancreatitis: an evolving concept].

    PubMed

    Mangiante, Gerardo; Zugni, Chiara; Chimetto, Andrea; Rossi, Michele; Campagnaro, Tommaso; Biasiutti, Carlo

    2007-01-01

    We reviewed our series of consecutive cases of severe pancreatitis observed from 2002 to 2004, in order to verify how our actual therapeutic strategy improved prognosis. Seventeen patients with diagnosis of severe pancreatitis (SP) were admitted. On presumption of SP we inserted a naso-jejunal self-propelling feeding tube (SPT) in all but one patients, and an early enteral nutrition ( EEN ) was started. Severity of pancreatitis has been scored by APACHE II (> 8), IMRIE (> or = 3), and Balthazar Computed Tomography findings (> 30% necrosis). We always used a polymeric diet added with glutamine and fibres at initial rate of 20-30 ml/h until achievement of a full regimen of EEN, based on Harris-Benedict formula but no more than 30 kcal/kg/day. Only one patient has been submitted to surgical removal of infected necrosis. A patient died (5.8%) by dis-metabolic and septic state. From our experience we can state EEN is safe and useful to determine a favourable outcome on this dismal pathology, preserving the patient from infection, without significative alterations of nutritional index. PMID:17361934

  7. A study of the clinical profile of acute pancreatitis and its correlation with severity indices

    PubMed Central

    Vengadakrishnan, K.; Koushik, A. K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute pancreatitis is a common disease with wide clinical variation and its incidence is increasing. Acute pancreatitis may vary in severity, from mild self-limiting pancreatic inflammation to pancreatic necrosis with life-threatening sequelae. Severity of acute pancreatitis is linked to the presence of systemic organ dysfunctions and/or necrotizing pancreatitis. Aim and objectives The present study was aimed to assess the clinical profile of acute pancreatitis and to assess the efficacy of various severity indices in predicting the outcome of patients. Methodology This was a prospective study done in Sri Ramachandra Medical College and Hospital from April 2012–September 2014. All patients with a diagnosis of acute pancreatitis were included in this study. Along with routine lab parameters, serum amylase, lipase, lipid profile, calcium, CRP, LDH, CT abdomen, CXR and 2D Echo was done for all patients. Results A total of 110 patients were analysed. 50 patients required Intensive care, among them 9 patients (18%) died. 20 patients (18.2%) had MODS, 15 patients (13.6%) had pleural effusion, 9 patients (8.2%) had pseudocyst, 2 patients(1.8%) had hypotension, 2 patients(1.8%) had ARDS and 2 patients(1.8%) had DKA. In relation to various severity indices, high score of CRP, LDH and CT severity index was associated with increased morbidity and mortality. 15 patients (13.6%) underwent open necrosectomy surgery, 3 patients (2.7%) underwent laparoscopic necrosectomy and 7 patients (6.4%) were tried step up approach but could not avoid surgery. Step up approach and surgery did not have a significant reduction in the mortality. Conclusion Initial assessment of severity by CRP, LDH and lipase could be reliable indicators of outcome in acute pancreatitis PMID:26715920

  8. Effects of Local Pancreatic Renin-Angiotensin System on the Microcirculation of Rat with Severe Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Pan, Zhijian; Feng, Ling; Long, Haocheng; Wang, Hui; Feng, Jiarui; Chen, Feixiang

    2015-07-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) is normally related to multiorgan dysfunction and local complications. Studies have found that local pancreatic renin-angiotensin system (RAS) was significantly upregulated in drug-induced SAP. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of angiotensin II receptors inhibitor valsartan on dual role of RAS in SAP in a rat model and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. 3.8% sodium taurocholate (1 ml/kg) was injected to the pancreatic capsule in order for pancreatitis induction. Rats in the sham group were injected with normal saline in identical locations. We also investigated the regulation of experimentally induced SAP on local RAS expression in the pancreas through determination of the activities of serum amylase, lipase and myeloperoxidase, histological and biochemical analysis, radioimmunoassay, fluorescence quantitative PCR and Western blot analysis. The results indicated that valsartan could effectively suppress the local RAS to protect against experimental acute pancreatitis through inhibition of microcirculation disturbances and inflammation. The results suggest that pancreatic RAS plays a critical role in the regulation of pancreatic functions and demonstrates application potential as AT1 receptor antagonists. Moreover, other RAS inhibitors could be a new therapeutic target in acute pancreatitis. PMID:26170733

  9. Effects of Local Pancreatic Renin-Angiotensin System on the Microcirculation of Rat with Severe Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Ling; Long, Haocheng; Wang, Hui; Feng, Jiarui; Chen, Feixiang

    2015-01-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) is normally related to multiorgan dysfunction and local complications. Studies have found that local pancreatic renin-angiotensin system (RAS) was significantly upregulated in drug-induced SAP. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of angiotensin II receptors inhibitor valsartan on dual role of RAS in SAP in a rat model and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. 3.8% sodium taurocholate (1 ml/kg) was injected to the pancreatic capsule in order for pancreatitis induction. Rats in the sham group were injected with normal saline in identical locations. We also investigated the regulation of experimentally induced SAP on local RAS expression in the pancreas through determination of the activities of serum amylase, lipase and myeloperoxidase, histological and biochemical analysis, radioimmunoassay, fluorescence quantitative PCR and Western blot analysis. The results indicated that valsartan could effectively suppress the local RAS to protect against experimental acute pancreatitis through inhibition of microcirculation disturbances and inflammation. The results suggest that pancreatic RAS plays a critical role in the regulation of pancreatic functions and demonstrates application potential as AT1 receptor antagonists. Moreover, other RAS inhibitors could be a new therapeutic target in acute pancreatitis. PMID:26170733

  10. A randomised, double blind, multicentre trial of octreotide in moderate to severe acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Uhl, W; Buchler, M; Malfertheiner, P; Beger, H; Adler, G; Gaus, W; the, G

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The pharmacological inhibition of exocrine pancreatic secretion with the somatostatin analogue octreotide has been advocated as a specific treatment of acute pancreatitis.
AIM—To investigate the efficacy of octreotide in acute pancreatitis in a randomised, placebo controlled trial.
METHODS—302 patients from 32 hospitals, fulfilling the criteria for moderate to severe acute pancreatitis within 96 hours of the onset of symptoms, were randomly assigned to one of three treatment groups: group P (n=103) received placebo, while groups O1 (n=98) and O2 (n=101) received 100 and 200 µg of octreotide, respectively, by subcutaneous injection three times daily for seven days. The primary outcome variable was a score composed of mortality and 15 typical complications of acute pancreatitis.
RESULTS—The three groups were well matched with respect to pretreatment characteristics. An intent to treat analysis of all 302 patients revealed no significant differences among treatment groups with respect to mortality (P: 16%; O1: 15%; O2: 12%), the rate of newly developed complications, the duration of pain, surgical interventions, or the length of the hospital stay. A valid for efficacy analysis (251 patients) also revealed no significant differences.
CONCLUSIONS—This trial shows no benefit of octreotide in the treatment of acute pancreatitis.


Keywords: acute pancreatitis; somatostatin; octreotide; randomised controlled multicentre trial PMID:10369711

  11. Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Geokas, Michael C.

    1972-01-01

    For many decades two types of acute pancreatitis have been recognized: the edematous or interstitial and the hemorrhagic or necrotic. In most cases acute pancreatitis is associated with alcoholism or biliary tract disease. Elevated serum or urinary α-amylase is the most important finding in diagnosis. The presence of methemalbumin in serum and in peritoneal or pleural fluid supports the diagnosis of the hemorrhagic form of the disease in patients with a history and enzyme studies suggestive of pancreatitis. There is no characteristic clinical picture in acute pancreatitis, and its complications are legion. Pancreatic pseudocyst is probably the most common and pancreatic abscess is the most serious complication. The pathogenetic principle is autodigestion, but the precise sequence of biochemical events is unclear, especially the mode of trypsinogen activation and the role of lysosomal hydrolases. A host of metabolic derangements have been identified in acute pancreatitis, involving lipid, glucose, calcium and magnesium metabolism and changes of the blood clotting mechanism, to name but a few. Medical treatment includes intestinal decompression, analgesics, correction of hypovolemia and other supportive and protective measures. Surgical exploration is advisable in selected cases, when the diagnosis is in doubt, and is considered imperative in the presence of certain complications, especially pancreatic abscess. PMID:4559467

  12. Epidural anesthesia improves pancreatic perfusion and decreases the severity of acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Sadowski, Samira M; Andres, Axel; Morel, Philippe; Schiffer, Eduardo; Frossard, Jean-Louis; Platon, Alexandra; Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre; Bühler, Leo

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To study the safety of epidural anesthesia (EA), its effect on pancreatic perfusion and the outcome of patients with acute pancreatitis (AP). METHODS: From 2005 to August 2010, patients with predicted severe AP [Ranson score ≥ 2, C-reactive protein > 100 or necrosis on computed tomography (CT)] were prospectively randomized to either a group receiving EA or a control group treated by patient controlled intravenous analgesia. Pain management was evaluated in the two groups every eight hours using the visual analog pain scale (VAS). Parameters for clinical severity such as length of hospital stay, use of antibiotics, admission to the intensive care unit, radiological/clinical complications and the need for surgical necrosectomy including biochemical data were recorded. A CT scan using a perfusion protocol was performed on admission and at 72 h to evaluate pancreatic blood flow. A significant variation in blood flow was defined as a 20% difference in pancreatic perfusion between admission and 72 h and was measured in the head, body and tail of the pancreas. RESULTS: We enrolled 35 patients. Thirteen were randomized to the EA group and 22 to the control group. There were no differences in demographic characteristics between the two groups. The Balthazar radiological severity score on admission was higher in the EA group than in the control group (mean score 4.15 ± 2.54 vs 3.38 ± 1.75, respectively, P = 0.347) and the median Ranson scores were 3.4 and 2.7 respectively (P = NS). The median duration of EA was 5.7 d, and no complications of the epidural procedure were reported. An improvement in perfusion of the pancreas was observed in 13/30 (43%) of measurements in the EA group vs 2/27 (7%) in the control group (P = 0.0025). Necrosectomy was performed in 1/13 patients in the EA group vs 4/22 patients in the control group (P = 0.63). The VAS improved during the first ten days in the EA group compared to the control group (0.2 vs 2.33, P = 0.034 at 10 d). Length

  13. Valproic Acid-Induced Severe Acute Pancreatitis with Pseudocyst Formation: Report of a Case.

    PubMed

    Ray, Sukanta; Khamrui, Sujan; Kataria, Mohnish; Biswas, Jayanta; Saha, Suman

    2015-08-01

    Valproic acid is the most widely used anti-epilep-tic drug in children, and it is probably the most frequent cause of drug-induced acute pancreatitis. Outcomes for patients with valproic acid-associated pancreatitis vary from full recovery after discontinuation of the drug to severe acute pancreatitis and death. Here, we present a case of valproic acid-induced severe acute pancreatitis with pseudocyst formation in a 10-year-old girl with cerebral palsy and generalized tonic-clonic seizure. There was no resolution of the pseudocyst after discontinuation of valproic acid. The patient became symptomatic with a progressive increase in the size of the pseudocyst. She was successfully treated with cystogastrostomy and was well at 12-month follow-up. PMID:26366333

  14. Valproic Acid-Induced Severe Acute Pancreatitis with Pseudocyst Formation: Report of a Case

    PubMed Central

    Khamrui, Sujan; Kataria, Mohnish; Biswas, Jayanta; Saha, Suman

    2015-01-01

    Valproic acid is the most widely used anti-epilep­tic drug in children, and it is probably the most frequent cause of drug-induced acute pancreatitis. Outcomes for patients with valproic acid-associated pancreatitis vary from full recovery after discontinuation of the drug to severe acute pancreatitis and death. Here, we present a case of valproic acid-induced severe acute pancreatitis with pseudocyst formation in a 10-year-old girl with cerebral palsy and generalized tonic-clonic seizure. There was no resolution of the pseudocyst after discontinuation of valproic acid. The patient became symptomatic with a progressive increase in the size of the pseudocyst. She was successfully treated with cystogastrostomy and was well at 12-month follow-up. PMID:26366333

  15. CT Evaluation of Acute Pancreatitis and its Prognostic Correlation with CT Severity Index

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Rajesh; Vyas, Mahendra Mohan; Sharma, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Pancreatitis is one of most complex and clinically challenging of all abdominal disorders. USG and abdominal CT are the most commonly used diagnostic imaging modalities for the evaluation of pancreas. Computed Tomography (CT) is highly accurate and sensitive than USG in both diagnosing as well as demonstrating the extent. Early assessment of the cause and severity of acute pancreatitis is of utmost importance for prompt treatment and close monitoring of patient with severe disease. CT is the imaging method of choice for assessing the extent of acute pancreatitis and for evaluating complications. Aim To assess prognostic correlation and clinical outcome of acute pancreatitis on the basis of CT severity index. Materials and Methods A prospective study of 50 cases was carried out in the Department of Radio Diagnosis, with complaint suggestive of acute pancreatitis on the basis of clinical/laboratory/ultrasonography findings were evaluated in Siemens somatom 40 slice CT. The severity of pancreatitis was scored using CT severity index, modified severity index and revised Atlanta classification and classified into mild, moderate, severe categories. Clinical follow-up of the patients was done in terms of the following parameters: Length of hospital stay, Need for surgery or percutaneous intervention, Evidence of infection in any organ system, Occurrence of organ failure- respiratory, cardiovascular, renal, hepatic and haematological system, death. The clinical outcome was compared with the currently accepted Balthazar’s CTSI and Modified Mortele’s CTSI and revised Atlanta classification in all the cases. Results Gall stone disease was most common aetiological factor seen in 40% cases, it was more common in females than males. Alcohol was second most common aetiological factor seen in 38% cases and was noted only in males. Pleural effusion was the most common extra-pancreatic complication seen in 46% cases. Balthazar grade C was the most common (40

  16. Soluble CD163 is increased in patients with acute pancreatitis independent of disease severity.

    PubMed

    Karrasch, Thomas; Brünnler, Tanja; Hamer, Okka W; Schmid, Karin; Voelk, Markus; Herfarth, Hans; Buechler, Christa

    2015-10-01

    Macrophages are crucially involved in the pathophysiology of acute pancreatitis. Soluble CD163 (sCD163) is specifically released from macrophages and systemic levels are increased in inflammatory diseases. Here, sCD163 was measured in serum of 50 patients with acute pancreatitis to find out possible associations with disease activity. Admission levels of systemic sCD163 were nearly three-fold higher in patients with acute pancreatitis compared to controls. In patients sCD163 did not correlate with C-reactive protein and leukocyte count as established markers of inflammation. Levels were not associated with disease severity assessed by the Schroeder score, Balthazar score, Acute Physiology, Age, and Chronic Health Evaluation (Apache) II score and peripancreatic necrosis score. Soluble CD163 was not related to complications of acute pancreatitis. These data show that serum sCD163 is increased in acute pancreatitis indicating activation of macrophages but is not associated with disease severity and outcome. PMID:26209500

  17. Rosiglitazone attenuates the severity of hyperlipidemic severe acute pancreatitis in rats

    PubMed Central

    NIYAZ, BATUR; ZHAO, KAI-LIANG; LIU, LI-MIN; CHEN, CHEN; DENG, WEN-HONG; ZUO, TENG; SHI, QIAO; WANG, WEI-XING

    2013-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) ligand regulates adipocyte differentiation and insulin sensitivity, and exerts antihyperlipidemic and anti-inflammatory effects. However, the mechanisms by which PPAR-γ ligands affect hyperlipidemia with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) have not been fully elucidated. The present study investigated the effects of rosiglitazone, a PPAR-γ ligand, on hyperlipidemia with SAP in a rat model. The hyperlipidemia was induced with a high-fat diet and SAP was induced by the administration of sodium taurocholate (TCA). The hyperlipidemia was shown to aggravate the severity of the sodium taurocholate-induced SAP. However, rosiglitazone demonstrated significant antihyperlipidemic and anti-inflammatory effects in the rats with high-lipid diet-induced hyperlipidemia and SAP. PMID:24137303

  18. Controlled clinical trial of selective decontamination for the treatment of severe acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Luiten, E J; Hop, W C; Lange, J F; Bruining, H A

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: A randomized, controlled, multicenter trial was undertaken in 102 patients with objective evidence of severe acute pancreatitis to evaluate whether selective decontamination reduces mortality. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Secondary pancreatic infection is the major cause of death in patients with acute necrotizing pancreatitis. Controlled clinical trials to study the effect of selective decontamination in such patients are not available. METHODS: Between April 22, 1990 and April 19, 1993, 102 patients with severe acute pancreatitis were admitted to 16 participating hospitals. Patients were entered into the study if severe acute pancreatitis was indicated, on admission, by multiple laboratory criteria (Imrie score > or = 3) and/or computed tomography criteria (Balthazar grade D or E). Patients were randomly assigned to receive standard treatment (control group) or standard treatment plus selective decontamination (norfloxacin, colistin, amphotericin; selective decontamination group). All patients received full supportive treatment, and surveillance cultures were taken in both groups. RESULTS: Fifty patients were assigned to the selective decontamination group and 52 were assigned to the control group. There were 18 deaths in the control group (35%), compared with 11 deaths (22%) in the selective decontamination group (adjusted for Imrie score and Balthazar grade: p = 0.048). This difference was mainly caused by a reduction of late mortality (> 2 weeks) due to significant reduction of gram-negative pancreatic infection (p = 0.003). The average number of laparotomies per patient was reduced in patients treated with selective decontamination (p < 0.05). Failure of selective decontamination to prevent secondary gram-negative pancreatic infection with subsequent death was seen in only three patients (6%) and transient gram-negative pancreatic infection was seen in one (2%). In both groups of patients, all gram-negative aerobic pancreatic infection was preceded by

  19. A Case of Severe Acute Necrotizing Pancreatitis after Administration of Sitagliptin

    PubMed Central

    Sue, Mariko; Yoshihara, Aya; Kuboki, Koji; Hiroi, Naoki; Yoshino, Gen

    2013-01-01

    A 55-year-old Japanese man with a 3-year history of type 2 diabetes mellitus was admitted to our hospital for upper abdominal pain. Control of diabetes mellitus was good with voglibose and metformin, with sitagliptin added to this regimen 8 months prior. His pancreatic enzyme levels were elevated, and abdominal computed tomography (CT) showed diffuse pancreatic swelling with fluid accumulation and ascites of CT grade 3. The patient was diagnosed with severe acute pancreatitis. There were no obvious causes for pancreatitis except the recently administered sitagliptin. Since incretin-related drugs entered the market, the number of incretin-related drugs prescriptions rapidly increased and so did the incidence of pancreatitis. There are several reports suggesting the correlation between incretin-related drugs and pancreatitis, such as a report based on data obtained from the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) which revealed a significant correlation between the administration of exenatide or sitagliptin and pancreatitis. However, there also is a report that denied the evidence for such in a large cohort study. The relation between incretin based drugs and pancreatitis is still controversial. PMID:23467428

  20. Central role of neutrophil in the pathogenesis of severe acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhi-wen; Meng, Xiao-xiao; Xu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) is an acute abdominal disease with the strong systemic inflammatory response, and rapidly progresses from a local pancreatic damage into multiple organ dysfunction. For many decades, the contributions of neutrophils to the pathology of SAP were traditionally thought to be the chemokine and cytokine cascades that accompany inflammation. In this review, we focus mainly on those recently recognized aspects of neutrophils in SAP processes. First, emerging evidence suggests that therapeutic interventions targeting neutrophils significantly lower tissue damage and protect against the occurrence of pancreatitis. Second, trypsin activation promotes the initial neutrophils recruitment into local pancreas, and subsequently neutrophils infiltration in turn triggers trypsin production. Finally, neutrophils have the unique ability to release neutrophil extracellular traps even in the absence of pathogens. PMID:26249268

  1. Central role of neutrophil in the pathogenesis of severe acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhi-Wen; Meng, Xiao-Xiao; Xu, Ping

    2015-11-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) is an acute abdominal disease with the strong systemic inflammatory response, and rapidly progresses from a local pancreatic damage into multiple organ dysfunction. For many decades, the contributions of neutrophils to the pathology of SAP were traditionally thought to be the chemokine and cytokine cascades that accompany inflammation. In this review, we focus mainly on those recently recognized aspects of neutrophils in SAP processes. First, emerging evidence suggests that therapeutic interventions targeting neutrophils significantly lower tissue damage and protect against the occurrence of pancreatitis. Second, trypsin activation promotes the initial neutrophils recruitment into local pancreas, and subsequently neutrophils infiltration in turn triggers trypsin production. Finally, neutrophils have the unique ability to release neutrophil extracellular traps even in the absence of pathogens. PMID:26249268

  2. Association between glucose-regulated protein and neutrophil apoptosis in severe acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lan-Tao; Xu, He-Ling; Fu, Ming-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to investigate the role of glucose regulated protein 78 (GRP-78) in the apoptosis of neutrophils in rats with severe acute pancreatitis. Methods: A total of 54 SD male rats were randomly assigned into 2 groups: sham group (n=24) and pancreatitis group (n=30). Severe acute pancreatitis was induced by retrograde cholangiopancreatography injection of sodium taurocholate. Rats were sacrified at 3 h, 6 h and 12 h after injection. In control group, rats received laparotomy, but the pancreates remained intact. The serum amylase was detected at different time points, and flow cytometry was done to detect the apoptosis of neutrophils. Proteins were extracted from neutrophils and subjected to detection of GRP78 and Mcl-1 expression by Western blot assay. HE staining was performed for pathological scoring of the pancreas. Results: The serum amylase in pancreatitis group increased markedly when compared with control group (P<0.01). In SAP group, the serum amylase increased gradually over time (P<0.01). HE staining showed a lot of inflammatory cells and infiltration of red blood cells and the apoptosis rate of neutrophils reduced gradually (P<0.01). Western blot assay showed the protein expression of GRP-78 and Mcl-1 increased in neutrophils over time. Conclusion: In rats with SAP, the apoptosis rate of neutrophils reduced over time, which may be associated to the stress induced expression of GRP78 and subsequent activation of Mcl-1 resulting in suppression of neutrphil apoptosis over time. PMID:26464680

  3. A murine model of obesity implicates the adipokine milieu in the pathogenesis of severe acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Zyromski, Nicholas J; Mathur, Abhishek; Pitt, Henry A; Lu, Debao; Gripe, John T; Walker, Julia J; Yancey, Kyle; Wade, Terence E; Swartz-Basile, Deborah A

    2008-09-01

    Obesity is clearly an independent risk factor for increased severity of acute pancreatitis (AP), although the mechanisms underlying this association are unknown. Adipokines (including leptin and adiponectin) are pleiotropic molecules produced by adipocytes that are important regulators of the inflammatory response. We hypothesized that the altered adipokine milieu observed in obesity contributes to the increased severity of pancreatitis. Lean (C57BL/6J), obese leptin-deficient (LepOb), and obese hyperleptinemic (LepDb) mice were subjected to AP by six hourly intraperitoneal injections of cerulein (50 microg/kg). Severity of AP was assessed by histology and by measuring pancreatic concentration of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1beta and IL-6, the chemokine MCP-1, and the marker of neutrophil activation MPO. Both congenitally obese strains of mice developed significantly more severe AP than wild-type lean animals. Severity of AP was not solely related to adipose tissue volume: LepOb mice were heaviest; however, LepDb mice developed the most severe AP both histologically and biochemically. Circulating adiponectin concentrations inversely mirrored the severity of pancreatitis. These data demonstrate that congenitally obese mice develop more severe AP than lean animals when challenged by cerulein hyperstimulation and suggest that alteration of the adipokine milieu exacerbates the severity of AP in obesity. PMID:18583460

  4. Cathelicidin-related antimicrobial peptide modulates the severity of acute pancreatitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yuan-Yuan; Shamoon, Muhammad; He, Yue; Bhatia, Madhav; Sun, Jia

    2016-05-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the immunomodulatory effects of mouse cathelicidin-related antimicrobial peptide (CRAMP) on experimental acute pancreatitis (AP). AP is a common clinical condition characterized by acute abdominal inflammation. Innate immune cells and mediators are intrinsically linked to the pathogenesis of AP. Cathelicidins are innate immunity-derived antimicrobial peptides that exert immunomodulatory effects on various host cells. However, how cathelicidins are involved and modulate the severity and inflammatory responses of AP remains unclear. In the present study, the mouse CRAMP gene‑deficient cnlp‑/‑ mice and their wild‑type C57BL/6J littermates were induced with AP by multiple hourly injections of supramaximal doses of caerulein. Serum amylase levels, pancreatic myeloperoxidase activity and histological examination were performed in order to determine the disease severity and the levels of inflammatory cytokines. Disease severity and inflammatory markers were subsequently evaluated in the control mice, cnlp‑/‑ C57BL/6J mice with AP, and wild‑type C57BL/6J mice with AP. The results demonstrated that cnlp‑/‑ mice exhibited a more severe phenotype and inflammatory response following AP induction compared with the wild‑type mice, as evidenced by increased serum amylase levels, pancreatic myeloperoxidase release, and early inflammatory mediator tumor necrosis factor‑α production. Histological examination confirmed that CRAMP deficiency worsened the pancreatic inflammatory condition. These results indicate that CRAMP may be considered a novel modulatory mediator in mouse experimental AP. PMID:27035328

  5. Cathelicidin-related antimicrobial peptide modulates the severity of acute pancreatitis in mice

    PubMed Central

    DENG, YUAN-YUAN; SHAMOON, MUHAMMAD; HE, YUE; BHATIA, MADHAV; SUN, JIA

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the immunomodulatory effects of mouse cathelicidin-related antimicrobial peptide (CRAMP) on experimental acute pancreatitis (AP). AP is a common clinical condition characterized by acute abdominal inflammation. Innate immune cells and mediators are intrinsically linked to the pathogenesis of AP. Cathelicidins are innate immunity-derived antimicrobial peptides that exert immunomodulatory effects on various host cells. However, how cathelicidins are involved and modulate the severity and inflammatory responses of AP remains unclear. In the present study, the mouse CRAMP gene-deficient cnlp−/− mice and their wild-type C57BL/6J littermates were induced with AP by multiple hourly injections of supramaximal doses of caerulein. Serum amylase levels, pancreatic myeloperoxidase activity and histological examination were performed in order to determine the disease severity and the levels of inflammatory cytokines. Disease severity and inflammatory markers were subsequently evaluated in the control mice, cnlp−/− C57BL/6J mice with AP, and wild-type C57BL/6J mice with AP. The results demonstrated that cnlp−/− mice exhibited a more severe phenotype and inflammatory response following AP induction compared with the wild-type mice, as evidenced by increased serum amylase levels, pancreatic myeloperoxidase release, and early inflammatory mediator tumor necrosis factor-α production. Histological examination confirmed that CRAMP deficiency worsened the pancreatic inflammatory condition. These results indicate that CRAMP may be considered a novel modulatory mediator in mouse experimental AP. PMID:27035328

  6. A case of severe acute pancreatitis treated with CTR-001 direct hemoperfusion for cytokine apheresis.

    PubMed

    Saotome, Takao; Endo, Yoshihiro; Sasaki, Teiji; Tabata, Takahisa; Hamamoto, Tetsu; Fujino, Kazunori; Andoh, Akira; Eguchi, Yutaka; Tani, Tohru; Fujiyama, Yoshihide

    2005-08-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis is a clinical entity that can develop into multiple organ failure (MOF), and still has a poor prognosis. It is generally agreed that excessive humoral mediators such as pro-inflammatory cytokines play important roles in the pathogenesis of organ failure in patients with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). Furthermore, it has been reported that continuous hemodiafiltration (CHDF) can remove the excess humoral mediators during the hypercytokinemic state of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). We experienced a case of severe acute pancreatitis induced by alcohol abuse, on whom we performed cytokine apheresis. The patient was a 46 year-old male. He received 14 cytokine apheresis procedures, for about 4 hours in each session, using a CTR-001 direct hemoperfusion (DHP) cartridge. His serum levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-6 (IL-6; 1649.1+/-667.1-1257.1+/-489.4 pg/mL, P=0.013) decreased significantly after the CTR-001 procedures. However tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) (26.2+/-1.7-24.3+/-1.9 pg/mL, P=0.087), IL-1beta (6.1+/-2.9-3.49+/-1.1 pg/mL, P=0.477), IL-8 (192.5+/-33.4-229.5+/-51.8 pg/mL, P=0.754) and IL-10 (14.4+/-2.7-14.0+/-1.9 pg/mL, P=0.726) did not decrease statistically. Therefore, we conclude that in this case, cytokine apheresis using a CTR-001 cartridge was effective for reducing the pro-inflammatory cytokines during severe acute pancreatitis. PMID:16076384

  7. Radial EUS Examination Can be Helpful in Predicting the Severity of Acute Biliary Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Alper, Emrah; Arabul, Mahmut; Aslan, Fatih; Cekic, Cem; Celik, Mustafa; Ipek, Serkan; Unsal, Belkis

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the utility of noncontrast enhanced endosonography (EUS) in predicting the severity of acute pancreatitis (AP) during the first 72 to 96 h of admission.In total, 187 patients with acute biliary pancreatitis were included. The patients were classified into 2 groups as having severe and mild AP according to the Modified Glasgow scoring and computerized tomography severity index (SI). The 158 cases with mild and 29 cases with severe AP had a similar age and sex distribution.Although none of the cases with mild AP developed morbidity and death, of the cases with severe AP, 16 developed serious morbidities and 5 died. On EUS examination, we looked for parenchymal findings, peripancreatic inflammatory signs, free or loculated fluid collections, and abnormalities of the common bile duct and the pancreatic channel. Statistical analysis indicated a significant relationship between the severity of AP with diffuse parenchymal edema, periparenchymal plastering, and/or diffuse retroperitoneal free fluid accumulation, and peri-pancreatic edema. We also defined an EUSSI and found that the EUSSI had sensitivity of 89.7%, specificity of 84.2%, positive predictivity value (PPV) of 88.9%, negative predictivity value (NPV) of 91.2%, and an accuracy of 87.9% in the differentiation of mild and severe AP. We found that the EUSSI had an accuracy of 72.4%, sensitivity of 75.4%, specificity of 65.1%, PPV of 69.3%, and NPV of 73.1% for determining mortality.Our data suggest that EUS allowed us to accurately predict the severity and mortality in nearly 90% of cases with AP. PMID:26817865

  8. Biopsy-proven drug-induced tubulointerstitial nephritis in a patient with acute kidney injury and alcoholic severe acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, Wakako; Mori, Takayasu; Nagahama, Kiyotaka; Tamura, Teiichi

    2013-01-01

    We report a 49-year-old man with alcoholic severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) complicated by drug-induced acute tubulointerstitial nephritis (DI-AIN). Oliguria persisted and became anuric again on day 17 despite improvement of pancreatitis. He presented rash, fever and eosinophilia from day 20. Renal biopsy was performed for dialysis-dependent acute kidney injury (AKI), DI-AIN was revealed, and prompt use of corticosteroids fully restored his renal function. This diagnosis might be missed because it is difficult to perform renal biopsy in such a clinical situation. If the patient's general condition allows, renal biopsy should be performed and reversible AKI must be distinguished from many cases of irreversible AKI complicated by SAP. This is the first report of biopsy-proven DI-AIN associated with SAP, suggesting the importance of biopsy for distinguishing DI-AIN in persisting AKI of SAP. PMID:23645698

  9. Src kinases play a novel dual role in acute pancreatitis affecting severity but no role in stimulated enzyme secretion.

    PubMed

    Nuche-Berenguer, Bernardo; Ramos-Álvarez, Irene; Jensen, R T

    2016-06-01

    In pancreatic acinar cells, the Src family of kinases (SFK) is involved in the activation of several signaling cascades that are implicated in mediating cellular processes (growth, cytoskeletal changes, apoptosis). However, the role of SFKs in various physiological responses such as enzyme secretion or in pathophysiological processes such as acute pancreatitis is either controversial, unknown, or incompletely understood. To address this, in this study, we investigated the role/mechanisms of SFKs in acute pancreatitis and enzyme release. Enzyme secretion was studied in rat dispersed pancreatic acini, in vitro acute-pancreatitis-like changes induced by supramaximal COOH-terminal octapeptide of cholecystokinin (CCK). SFK involvement assessed using the chemical SFK inhibitor (PP2) with its inactive control, 4-amino-7-phenylpyrazol[3,4-d]pyrimidine (PP3), under experimental conditions, markedly inhibiting SFK activation. In CCK-stimulated pancreatic acinar cells, activation occurred of trypsinogen, various MAP kinases (p42/44, JNK), transcription factors (signal transducer and activator of transcription-3, nuclear factor-κB, activator protein-1), caspases (3, 8, and 9) inducing apoptosis, LDH release reflective of necrosis, and various chemokines secreted (monocyte chemotactic protein-1, macrophage inflammatory protein-1α, regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted). All were inhibited by PP2, not by PP3, except caspase activation leading to apoptosis, which was increased, and trypsin activation, which was unaffected, as was CCK-induced amylase release. These results demonstrate SFK activation is playing a dual role in acute pancreatitis, inhibiting apoptosis and promoting necrosis as well as chemokine/cytokine release inducing inflammation, leading to more severe disease, as well as not affecting secretion. Thus, our studies indicate that SFK is a key mediator of inflammation and pancreatic acinar cell death in acute pancreatitis, suggesting it

  10. Study progress on mechanism of severe acute pancreatitis complicated with hepatic injury*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xi-ping; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Jie

    2007-01-01

    Study on the action mechanism of inflammatory mediators generated by the severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) in multiple organ injury is a hotspot in the surgical field. In clinical practice, the main complicated organ dysfunctions are shock, respiratory failure, renal failure, encephalopathy, with the rate of hepatic diseases being closely next to them. The hepatic injury caused by SAP cannot only aggravate the state of pancreatitis, but also develop into hepatic failure and cause patient death. Its complicated pathogenic mechanism is an obstacle in clinical treatment. Among many pathogenic factors, the changes of vasoactive substances, participation of inflammatory mediators as well as OFR (oxygen free radical), endotoxin, etc. may play important roles in its progression. PMID:17444596

  11. [Acute pancreatitis in children].

    PubMed

    Rottier, B L; Holl, R A; Draaisma, J M

    1998-02-21

    Acute pancreatitis is probably commoner in children than was previously thought. In children it is most commonly associated with trauma or viral infection. The presentation may be subtler than in adults, requiring a high index of suspicion in the clinician. In three children, two boys aged 4 and 10 and a girl of 15 years, acute pancreatitis was suspected because of the findings at ultrasonography and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography performed when the disease recurred (the boy aged 4), apathy and immobility without dehydration or other obvious causes (the boy aged 10), and severe abdominal pain in combination with vomiting (the girl). All three patients had severely increased (urinary) amylase levels. Most often, acute pancreatitis in children tends to be a self-limiting disease which responds well to conservative treatment. PMID:9562770

  12. Characterization and Predictive Value of Near Infrared 2-Deoxyglucose Optical Imaging in Severe Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Cristiane; Patel, Krutika; Mishra, Vivek; Trivedi, Ram N.; Noel, Pawan; Singh, Abhilasha; Yaron, Jordan R.; Singh, Vijay P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Studying the uptake of 2-deoxy glucose (2-DG) analogs such as 2-Deoxy-2-[18F] fluoroglucose (FDG) is a common approach to identify and monitor malignancies and more recently chronic inflammation. While pancreatitis is a common cause for false positive results in human studies on pancreatic cancer using FDG, the relevance of these findings to acute pancreatitis (AP) is unknown. FDG has a short half-life. Thus, with an aim to accurately characterize the metabolic demand of the pancreas during AP in real-time, we studied the uptake of the non-radioactive, near infrared fluorescence labelled 2-deoxyglucose analog, IRDye® 800CW 2-DG probe (NIR 2-DG; Li-Cor) during mild and severe biliary AP. Methods Wistar rats (300 g; 8–12/group) were administered NIR 2-DG (10 nM; I.V.). Mild and severe biliary AP were respectively induced by biliopancreatic duct ligation (DL) alone or along with infusing glyceryl trilinoleate (GTL; 50 μL/100 g) within 10 minutes of giving NIR 2-DG. Controls (CON) only received NIR 2-DG. Imaging was done every 5–10 minutes over 3 hrs. Average Radiant Efficiency [p/s/cm²/sr]/[μW/cm²] was measured over the pancreas using the IVIS 200 in-vivo imaging system (PerkinElmer) using the Living Image® software and verified in ex vivo pancreata. Blood amylase, lipase and pancreatic edema, necrosis were measured over the course of AP. Results NIR 2-DG uptake over the first hour was not influenced by AP induction. However, while the signal declined in controls and rats with mild AP, there was significantly higher retention of NIR 2-DG in the pancreas after 1 hour in those with GTL pancreatitis. The increase was > 3 fold over controls in the GTL group and was verified to be in the pancreas ex vivo. In vitro, pancreatic acini exposed to GTL had a similar increase in NIR 2-DG uptake which was followed by progressively worse acinar necrosis. Greater retention of NIR 2-DG in vivo was associated with worse pancreatic necrosis, reduced ATP

  13. Intestinal hypoperfusion contributes to gut barrier failure in severe acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Sakhawat H; Ammori, Basil J; Holmfield, John; Larvin, Michael; McMahon, Michael J

    2003-01-01

    Intestinal barrier failure and subsequent bacterial translocation have been implicated in the development of organ dysfunction and septic complications associated with severe acute pancreatitis. Splanchnic hypoperfusion and ischemia/reperfusion injury have been postulated as a cause of increased intestinal permeability. The urinary concentration of intestinal fatty acid binding protein (IFABP) has been shown to be a sensitive marker of intestinal ischemia, with increased levels being associated with ischemia/reperfusion. The aim of the current study was to assess the relationship between excretion of IFABP in urine, gut mucosal barrier failure (intestinal hyperpermeability and systemic exposure to endotoxemia), and clinical severity. Patients with a clinical and biochemical diagnosis of acute pancreatitis were studied within 72 hours of onset of pain. Polyethylene glycol probes of 3350 kDa and 400 kDa were administered enterally, and the ratio of the percentage of retrieval of each probe after renal excretion was used as a measure of intestinal macromolecular permeability. Collected urine was also used to determine the IFABP concentration (IFABP-c) and total IFABP (IFABP-t) excreted over the 24-hour period, using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay technique. The systemic inflammatory response was estimated from peak 0 to 72-hour plasma C-reactive protein levels, and systemic exposure to endotoxins was measured using serum IgM endotoxin cytoplasmic antibody (EndoCAb) levels. The severity of the attack was assessed on the basis of the Atlanta criteria. Sixty-one patients with acute pancreatitis (severe in 19) and 12 healthy control subjects were studied. Compared to mild attacks, severe attacks were associated with significantly higher urinary IFABP-c (median 1092 pg/ml vs. 84 pg/ml; P < 0.001) and IFABP-t (median 1.14 microg vs. 0.21 microg; P = 0.003). Furthermore, the control group had significantly lower IFABP-c (median 37 pg/ml; P = 0.029) and IFABP-t (median

  14. Hypocalcemia in acute pancreatitis revisited

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Armin; Azim, Afzal; Gurjar, Mohan; Baronia, Arvind Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Hypocalcemia is a frequent finding in acute pancreatitis. Severe hypocalcemia can present with neurological as well as cardiovascular manifestations. Correction of hypocalcemia by parenteral calcium infusion remains a controversial topic as intracellular calcium overload is the central mechanism of acinar cell injury in pancreatitis. The current article deals with the art and science of calcium correction in pancreatitis patients. PMID:27076730

  15. Early increase in intestinal permeability in patients with severe acute pancreatitis: correlation with endotoxemia, organ failure, and mortality.

    PubMed

    Ammori, B J; Leeder, P C; King, R F; Barclay, G R; Martin, I G; Larvin, M; McMahon, M J

    1999-01-01

    Sepsis accounts for 80% of deaths from acute pancreatitis. This study aimed to investigate early changes in intestinal permeability in patients with acute pancreatitis, and to correlate these changes with subsequent disease severity and endotoxemia. The renal excretion of enterally administered polyethylene glycol (PEG) 3350 and PEG 400 was measured within 72 hours of onset of acute pancreatitis to determine intestinal permeability. Severity was assessed on the basis of APACHE II scores and C-reactive protein measurements. Serum endotoxin and antiendotoxin antibodies were measured on admission. Eight-five patients with acute pancreatitis (mild in 56, severe in 29) and 25 healthy control subjects were studied. Urinary excretion of PEG 3350 (median) was significantly greater in patients who had severe attacks (0.61%) compared to those with mild disease (0.09%) and health control subjects (0.12%) (P <0. 0001), as was the permeability index (PEG 3350/400 excretion) (P <0. 00001). The permeability index was significantly greater in patients who subsequently developed multiple organ system failure and/or died compared with other severe cases (0.16 vs. 0.04) (P = 0.0005). The excretion of PEG 3350 correlated strongly with endotoxemia (r = 0.8; P = 0.002). Early increased intestinal permeability may play an important role in the pathophysiology of severe acute pancreatitis. Therapies that aim to restore intestinal barrier function may improve outcome. PMID:10481118

  16. Hydrogen-rich saline ameliorates the severity of L-arginine-induced acute pancreatitis in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Han; Sun, Yan Ping; Li, Yang; Liu, Wen Wu; Xiang, Hong Gang; Fan, Lie Ying; Sun, Qiang; Xu, Xin Yun; Cai, Jian Mei; Ruan, Can Ping; Su, Ning; Yan, Rong Lin; Sun, Xue Jun; Wang, Qiang

    2010-03-05

    Molecular hydrogen, which reacts with the hydroxyl radical, has been considered as a novel antioxidant. Here, we evaluated the protective effects of hydrogen-rich saline on the L-arginine (L-Arg)-induced acute pancreatitis (AP). AP was induced in Sprague-Dawley rats by giving two intraperitoneal injections of L-Arg, each at concentrations of 250 mg/100 g body weight, with an interval of 1 h. Hydrogen-rich saline (>0.6 mM, 6 ml/kg) or saline (6 ml/kg) was administered, respectively, via tail vein 15 min after each L-Arg administration. Severity of AP was assessed by analysis of serum amylase activity, pancreatic water content and histology. Samples of pancreas were taken for measuring malondialdehyde and myeloperoxidase. Apoptosis in pancreatic acinar cell was determined with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick-end labeling technique (TUNEL). Expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) were detected with immunohistochemistry. Hydrogen-rich saline treatment significantly attenuated the severity of L-Arg-induced AP by ameliorating the increased serum amylase activity, inhibiting neutrophil infiltration, lipid oxidation and pancreatic tissue edema. Moreover, hydrogen-rich saline treatment could promote acinar cell proliferation, inhibit apoptosis and NF-{kappa}B activation. These results indicate that hydrogen treatment has a protective effect against AP, and the effect is possibly due to its ability to inhibit oxidative stress, apoptosis, NF-{kappa}B activation and to promote acinar cell proliferation.

  17. [Etiological factors of acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Spicák, J

    2002-09-01

    Acute pancreatitis develops immediately after the causative impulse, while chronic pancreatitis develops after the long-term action of the noxious agent. A typical representative of acute pancreatitis is biliary pancreatitis, chronic pancreatitis develops in alcoholism and has a long latency. As alcoholic pancreatitis is manifested at first as a rule by a potent attack, it is classified in this stage as acute pancreatitis. The most frequent etiological factors in our civilization are thus cholelithiasis and alcoholism (both account for 20-50% in different studies). The assumed pathogenetic principles in acute biliary pancreatitis are the common canal of both efferent ducts above the obturated papilla, duodenopancreatic reflux and intrapancreatic hypertension. A detailed interpretation is however lacking. The pathogenesis of alcoholic pancreatitis is more complicated. Among others some part is played by changes in the calcium concentration and fusion of cellular membranes. Idiopathic pancreatitis occurs in up to 10%, part of the are due to undiagnosed alcoholism and cholelithiasis. Other etiologies are exceptional. Similarly as in cholelithiasis pancreatitis develops also during other pathological processes in the area of the papilla of Vater such as dysfunction of the sphincter of Oddi, ampulloma and juxtapapillary diverticulum, it is however usually mild. The incidence of postoperative pancreatitis is declining. Its lethality is 30% and the diagnosis is difficult. In the pathogenesis changes of the ion concentration are involved, hypoxia and mechanical disorders of the integrity of the gland. Pancreatitis develops in association with other infections--frequently in mumps, rarely in hepatitis, tuberculosis, typhoid and mycoses. Viral pancreatitis is usually mild. In parasitoses pancreatitis develops due to a block of the papilla Vateri. In hyperparathyroidism chronic pancreatitis is more likely to develop, recent data are lacking. As to dyslipoproteinaemias

  18. Acute pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... sure children receive vaccines to protect them against mumps and other childhood illnesses. Treat medical problems that ... Heart failure - overview Hemolytic-uremic syndrome Kawasaki disease Mumps Mycoplasma pneumonia Reye syndrome Patient Instructions Pancreatitis - discharge ...

  19. Acute pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... rate Lab tests that show the release of pancreatic enzymes will be done. These include: Increased blood amylase level Increased serum blood lipase level Increased urine amylase ... include: Abdominal CT scan Abdominal MRI Abdominal ultrasound

  20. [Latest advances in acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    de-Madaria, Enrique

    2015-09-01

    The present article analyses the main presentations on acute pancreatitis at Digestive Disease Week 2015. Arterial pseudoaneurysm is an uncommon complication of acute pancreatitis (incidence 0.7%) and mortality from this cause is currently anecdotal. Diabetes mellitus has little impact on the clinical course of acute pancreatitis, unlike cirrhosis, which doubles the risk of mortality. Intake of unsaturated fat could be associated with an increased severity of acute pancreatitis and is a confounding factor in studies evaluating the relationship between obesity and morbidity and mortality. PET-CT (positron emission tomography-computed tomography) could be a non-invasive tool to detect infection of collections in acute pancreatitis. Peripancreatic fat necrosis is less frequent than pancreatic fat necrosis and is associated with a better clinical course. If the clinical course is poor, increasing the calibre of the percutaneous drains used in the treatment of infected necrosis can avoid surgery in 20% of patients. The use of low molecular-weight heparin in moderate or severe pancreatitis could be associated with a better clinical course, specifically with a lower incidence of necrosis. In acute recurrent pancreatitis, simvastatin is a promising drug for prophylaxis of new episodes of acute pancreatitis. Nutritional support through a nasogastric tube does not improve clinical course compared with oral nutrition. PMID:26520203

  1. Protective Effect of Tetrandrine on Sodium Taurocholate-Induced Severe Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xian-lin; Li, Jie-xing; Li, Zhen-dong; Liu, Da-sheng; Lu, Su-hong; Liu, Kang-li; Duan, Hong-yan; Luo, Yu-hong

    2015-01-01

    Tet is a type of alkaloid extracted from Stephania tetrandra, and it has recently been demonstrated that Tet can protect against inflammation and free radical injury and inhibit the release of inflammatory mediators. The present study was designed to observe the protective effect of Tet on sodium taurocholate-induced severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). The rat model of SAP was induced by retrograde bile duct injection of sodium taurocholate and then treated with Verapamil and Tet. The results showed that Tet can reduce NF-κB activation in pancreas issue, inhibit the SAP cascade, and improve SAP through inducing pancreas acinar cell apoptosis and stabilizing intracellular calcium in the pancreas, thus mitigating the damage to the pancreas. Our study revealed that Tet may reduce systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and multiple organ dysfunction syndromes (MODS) to protect against damage, and these roles may be mediated through the NF-κB pathway to improve the proinflammatory/anti-inflammatory imbalance. PMID:26557854

  2. Protective Effect of Tetrandrine on Sodium Taurocholate-Induced Severe Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xian-Lin; Li, Jie-Xing; Li, Zhen-Dong; Liu, Da-Sheng; Lu, Su-Hong; Liu, Kang-Li; Duan, Hong-Yan; Luo, Yu-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Tet is a type of alkaloid extracted from Stephania tetrandra, and it has recently been demonstrated that Tet can protect against inflammation and free radical injury and inhibit the release of inflammatory mediators. The present study was designed to observe the protective effect of Tet on sodium taurocholate-induced severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). The rat model of SAP was induced by retrograde bile duct injection of sodium taurocholate and then treated with Verapamil and Tet. The results showed that Tet can reduce NF-κB activation in pancreas issue, inhibit the SAP cascade, and improve SAP through inducing pancreas acinar cell apoptosis and stabilizing intracellular calcium in the pancreas, thus mitigating the damage to the pancreas. Our study revealed that Tet may reduce systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and multiple organ dysfunction syndromes (MODS) to protect against damage, and these roles may be mediated through the NF-κB pathway to improve the proinflammatory/anti-inflammatory imbalance. PMID:26557854

  3. Interventional Treatment of Abdominal Compartment Syndrome during Severe Acute Pancreatitis: Current Status and Historical Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Radenkovic, Dejan V.; Johnson, Colin D.; Milic, Natasa; Gregoric, Pavle; Ivancevic, Nenad; Bezmarevic, Mihailo; Bilanovic, Dragoljub; Cijan, Vladimir; Antic, Andrija; Bajec, Djordje

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) in patients with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) is a marker of severe disease. It occurs as combination of inflammation of retroperitoneum, visceral edema, ascites, acute peripancreatic fluid collections, paralytic ileus, and aggressive fluid resuscitation. The frequency of ACS in SAP may be rising due to more aggressive fluid resuscitation, a trend towards conservative treatment, and attempts to use a minimally invasive approach. There remains uncertainty about the most appropriate surgical technique for the treatment of ACS in SAP. Some unresolved questions remain including medical treatment, indications, timing, and interventional techniques. This review will focus on interventional treatment of this serious condition. First line therapy is conservative treatment aiming to decrease IAP and to restore organ dysfunction. If nonoperative measures are not effective, early abdominal decompression is mandatory. Midline laparostomy seems to be method of choice. Since it carries significant morbidity we need randomized studies to establish firm advantages over other described techniques. After ACS resolves efforts should be made to achieve early primary fascia closure. Additional data are necessary to resolve uncertainties regarding ideal timing and indication for operative treatment. PMID:26839539

  4. Interventional Treatment of Abdominal Compartment Syndrome during Severe Acute Pancreatitis: Current Status and Historical Perspective.

    PubMed

    Radenkovic, Dejan V; Johnson, Colin D; Milic, Natasa; Gregoric, Pavle; Ivancevic, Nenad; Bezmarevic, Mihailo; Bilanovic, Dragoljub; Cijan, Vladimir; Antic, Andrija; Bajec, Djordje

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) in patients with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) is a marker of severe disease. It occurs as combination of inflammation of retroperitoneum, visceral edema, ascites, acute peripancreatic fluid collections, paralytic ileus, and aggressive fluid resuscitation. The frequency of ACS in SAP may be rising due to more aggressive fluid resuscitation, a trend towards conservative treatment, and attempts to use a minimally invasive approach. There remains uncertainty about the most appropriate surgical technique for the treatment of ACS in SAP. Some unresolved questions remain including medical treatment, indications, timing, and interventional techniques. This review will focus on interventional treatment of this serious condition. First line therapy is conservative treatment aiming to decrease IAP and to restore organ dysfunction. If nonoperative measures are not effective, early abdominal decompression is mandatory. Midline laparostomy seems to be method of choice. Since it carries significant morbidity we need randomized studies to establish firm advantages over other described techniques. After ACS resolves efforts should be made to achieve early primary fascia closure. Additional data are necessary to resolve uncertainties regarding ideal timing and indication for operative treatment. PMID:26839539

  5. Azathioprine-induced Acute Pancreatitis in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Diseases—A Prospective Study on Incidence and Severity

    PubMed Central

    Mohl, Wolfgang; Bokemeyer, Bernd; Bündgens, Burkhard; Büning, Jürgen; Miehlke, Stephan; Hüppe, Dietrich; Maaser, Christian; Klugmann, Tobias; Kruis, Wolfgang; Siegmund, Britta; Helwig, Ulf; Weismüller, Joseph; Drabik, Attyla; Stallmach, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Azathioprine [AZA] is recommended for maintenance of steroid-free remission in inflammatory bowel disease IBD. The aim of this study has been to establish the incidence and severity of AZA-induced pancreatitis, an idiosyncratic and major side effect, and to identify specific risk factors. Methods: We studied 510 IBD patients [338 Crohn’s disease, 157 ulcerative colitis, 15 indeterminate colitis] with initiation of AZA treatment in a prospective multicentre registry study. Acute pancreatitis was diagnosed in accordance with international guidelines. Results: AZA was continued by 324 [63.5%] and stopped by 186 [36.5%] patients. The most common cause of discontinuation was nausea [12.2%]. AZA-induced pancreatitis occurred in 37 patients [7.3%]. Of these: 43% were hospitalised with a median inpatient time period of 5 days; 10% had peripancreatic fluid collections; 24% had vomiting; and 14% had fever. No patient had to undergo nonsurgical or surgical interventions. Smoking was the strongest risk factor for AZA-induced acute pancreatitis [p < 0.0002] in univariate and multivariate analyses. Conclusions: AZA-induced acute pancreatitis is a common adverse event in IBD patients, but in this study had a mild course in all patients. Smoking is the most important risk factor. PMID:26468141

  6. Effects of early enteral nutrition on immune function of severe acute pancreatitis patients

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jia-Kui; Mu, Xin-Wei; Li, Wei-Qin; Tong, Zhi-Hui; Li, Jing; Zheng, Shu-Yun

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of early enteral nutrition (EEN) on the immune function and clinical outcome of patients with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). METHODS: Patients were randomly allocated to receive EEN or delayed enteral nutrition (DEN). Enteral nutrition was started within 48 h after admission in EEN group, whereas from the 8th day in DEN group. All the immunologic parameters and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were collected on days 1, 3, 7 and 14 after admission. The clinical outcome variables were also recorded. RESULTS: Sixty SAP patients were enrolled to this study. The CD4+ T-lymphocyte percentage, CD4+/CD8+ ratio, and the CRP levels in EEN group became significantly lower than in DEN group from the 7th day after admission. In contrast, the immunoglobulin G (IgG) levels and human leukocyte antigen-DR expression in EEN group became significantly higher than in DEN group from the 7th day after admission. No difference of CD8+ T-lymphocyte percentage, IgM and IgA levels was found between the two groups. The incidences of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, systemic inflammatory response syndrome, and pancreatic infection as well as the duration of intensive care unit stay were significantly lower in EEN group than in DEN group. However, there was no difference of hospital mortality between the two groups. CONCLUSION: EEN moderates the excessive immune response during the early stage of SAP without leading to subsequent immunosuppression. EEN can improve the clinical outcome, but not decrease the hospital mortality of SAP patients. PMID:23431120

  7. Interleukin-22 ameliorates acute severe pancreatitis-associated lung injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Ying-Ying; Liu, Xiao-Qin; Xu, Chang-Qin; Zhang, Zheng; Xu, Hong-Wei

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the potential protective effect of exogenous recombinant interleukin-22 (rIL-22) on L-arginine-induced acute severe pancreatitis (SAP)-associated lung injury and the possible signaling pathway involved. METHODS: Balb/c mice were injected intraperitoneally with L-arginine to induce SAP. Recombinant mouse IL-22 was then administered subcutaneously to mice. Serum amylase levels and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in the lung tissue were measured after the L-arginine administration. Histopathology of the pancreas and lung was evaluated by hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining. Expression of B cell lymphoma/leukemia-2 (Bcl-2), Bcl-xL and IL-22RA1 mRNAs in the lung tissue was detected by real-time PCR. Expression and phosphorylation of STAT3 were analyzed by Western blot. RESULTS: Serum amylase levels and MPO activity in the lung tissue in the SAP group were significantly higher than those in the normal control group (P < 0.05). In addition, the animals in the SAP group showed significant pancreatic and lung injuries. The expression of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL mRNAs in the SAP group was decreased markedly, while the IL-22RA1 mRNA expression was increased significantly relative to the normal control group (P < 0.05). Pretreatment with PBS did not significantly affect the serum amylase levels, MPO activity or expression of Bcl-2, Bcl-xL or IL-22RA1 mRNA (P > 0.05). Moreover, no significant differences in the degrees of pancreatic and lung injuries were observed between the PBS and SAP groups. However, the serum amylase levels and lung tissue MPO activity in the rIL-22 group were significantly lower than those in the SAP group (P < 0.05), and the injuries in the pancreas and lung were also improved. Compared with the PBS group, rIL-22 stimulated the expression of Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and IL-22RA1 mRNAs in the lung (P < 0.05). In addition, the ratio of p-STAT3 to STAT3 protein in the rIL-22 group was significantly higher than that in the PBS group (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION

  8. Effects of thoracic epidural anesthesia on survival and microcirculation in severe acute pancreatitis: a randomized experimental trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Severe acute pancreatitis is still a potentially life threatening disease with high mortality. The aim of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic effect of thoracic epidural anaesthesia (TEA) on survival, microcirculation, tissue oxygenation and histopathologic damage in an experimental animal model of severe acute pancreatitis in a prospective animal study. Methods In this study, 34 pigs were randomly assigned into 2 treatment groups. After severe acute pancreatitis was induced by intraductal injection of glycodesoxycholic acid in Group 1 (n = 17) bupivacaine (0.5%; bolus injection 2 ml, continuous infusion 4 ml/h) was applied via TEA. In Group 2 (n = 17) no TEA was applied. During a period of 6 hours after induction, tissue oxygen tension (tpO2) in the pancreas and pancreatic microcirculation was assessed. Thereafter animals were observed for 7 days followed by sacrification and histopathologic examination. Results Survival rate after 7 days was 82% in Group 1 (TEA) versus 29% in Group 2: (Control) (P <0.05). Group 1 (TEA) also showed a significantly superior microcirculation (1,608 ± 374 AU versus 1,121 ± 510 AU; P <0.05) and tissue oxygenation (215 ± 64 mmHg versus 138 ± 90 mmHG; P <0.05) as compared to Group 2 (Control). Consecutively, tissue damage in Group 1 was reduced in the histopathologic scoring (5.5 (3 to 8) versus 8 (5.5 to 10); P <0.05). Conclusions TEA led to improved survival, enhanced microcirculatory perfusion and tissue oxygenation and resulted in less histopathologic tissue-damage in an experimental animal model of severe acute pancreatitis. PMID:24314012

  9. Canagliflozin-Associated Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Verma, Rajanshu

    2016-01-01

    Canagliflozin is a new drug in class of sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors used for treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. We describe a patient who developed moderately severe acute pancreatitis as an untoward consequence after being initiated on this drug. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of canagliflozin-associated acute pancreatitis in clinical literature. PMID:25187092

  10. Corticosteroid therapy for severe acute pancreatitis: a meta-analysis of randomized, controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Li-Hua; Liu, Zhong-Min; Wang, Shi-Ji; Zhao, Shu-Jie; Zhang, Dong; Chen, Ying; Wang, Yu-Shan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recent reports about the benefits of corticosteroid therapy in patients with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) have shown conflicting results. We aimed to explore the effects of corticosteroid therapy in SAP patients on patient outcomes by performing a meta-analysis. Methods: Databases (Medline, EMBASE, Web of Science, PubMed, Cochrane Library, Chinese Biomedicine Database, and China Academic Journal Full-Text Database) were queried for all relevant, randomized, controlled trials investigating corticosteroid therapy in patients with SAP. Results: Six randomized, controlled trials including 430 SAP patients were identified. Corticosteroid therapy for SAP was associated with reductions in the length of hospital stay, the need for surgical intervention, and the mortality rate (weighted mean difference [WMD]: -9.47, 95% confidence interval [CI]: -16.91 to -2.04, P = 0.01; odds ratio [OR]: 0.35, 95% CI: 0.18-0.67, P = 0.002; OR: 0.45, 95% CI: 0.22-0.94, P = 0.03). There were no significant differences in the complication rates or Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) scores in patients with or without corticosteroid therapy. Conclusion: Corticosteroid therapy may improve outcomes in patients with SAP. PMID:26339332

  11. [New model of acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Cherkezova-Kinova, E; Lateva, E

    1981-01-01

    The authors propose a new model of acute pancreatitis by infusing duodenal content, obtained both from animals with experimental pancreatitis and from patients with pancreatitis, hepatitis and cholecystitis, into the duodenum of experimental animals without pressure for a period of several days. Pancreatitis was established functionally and histomorphologically. The control group of animals did not reveal deviations from the norm after infusion of duodenal content. The authors suggested the presence of pathogenic substances in the duodenal content of animals and sick persons, and these components damaged the pancreas, liver and kidneys by means of blood and lymph ways. PMID:7227280

  12. TLR4-mediated NF-κB signaling pathway mediates HMGB1-induced pancreatic injury in mice with severe acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    LI, GANG; WU, XUEJUN; YANG, LE; HE, YUXIANG; LIU, YANG; JIN, XING; YUAN, HAI

    2016-01-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) is an extremely dangerous acute abdominal disorder which causes multiple complications and has a high mortality rate. Previous research has suggested that high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of SAP; however, the mechanisms underlying this strong correlation remain unclear. In this study, to further investigate whether HMGB1 acts as a stimulating factor, and whether Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) acts as its major mediator in the development of pancreatic injury during SAP, recombinant human HMGB1 (rhHMGB1) and TLR4-deficient mice were used. We found that HMGB1 and TLR4 were highly expressed, and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) was activated in our mouse model of SAP. We noted that the rhHMGB1 pancreas-targeted injection activated the TLR4-mediated NF-κB signaling pathway and induced pancreatic injury in wild-type mice. In TLR4-deficient mice, the rhHMGB1-induced activation of NF-κB and pathological changes in the pancreas were less evident than in wild-type mice. Therefore, this study provides evidence that HMGB1 promotes the pathogenesis of pancreatitis, and its downstream TLR4-mediated NF-κB signaling pathway is a potential important mediator in the development of this form of pancreatic injury. PMID:26719855

  13. Clinical characteristics and management of patients with early acute severe pancreatitis: Experience from a medical center in China

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Hou-Quan; Zhang, Jing-Xia; Zou, Shou-Chun

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To study clinical characteristics and management of patients with early severe acute pancreatitis (ESAP). METHODS: Data of 297 patients with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) admitted to our hospital within 72 h after onset of symptoms from January 1991 to June 2003 were reviewed for the occurrence and development of early severe acute pancreatitis (ESAP). ESAP was defined as presence of organ dysfunction within 72 h after onset of symptoms. Sixty-nine patients had ESAP, 228 patients without organ dysfunction within 72 h after onset of symptoms had SAP. The clinical characteristics, incidence of organ dysfunction during hospitalization and prognosis between ESAP and SAP were compared. RESULTS: Impairment degree of pancreas (Balthazar CT class) in ESAP was more serious than that in SAP (5.31 ± 0.68 vs 3.68 ± 0.29, P < 0.01). ESAP had a higher mortality than SAP (43.4% vs 2.6%, P < 0.01), and a higher incidence of hypoxemia (85.5% vs 25%, P < 0.01), pancreas infection (15.9% vs 7.5%, P < 0.05), abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) (78.3% vs 23.2%, P < 0.01) and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS)(78.3% vs 10.1%, P < 0.01). In multiple logistic regression analysis, the main predisposing factors to ESAP were higher APACHE II score, Balthazar CT class, MODS and hypoxemia. CONCLUSION: ESAP is characterised by MODS, severe pathological changes of pancreas, early hypoxemia and abdominal compartment syndrome. Given the poor prognosis of ESAP, these patients should be treated in specialized intensive care units with special measures such as close supervision, fluid resuscitation, improvement of hypoxemia, reduction of pancreatic secretion, elimination of inflammatory mediators, prevention and treatment of pancreatic infections. PMID:15040047

  14. Redox signaling in acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Salvador; Pereda, Javier; Sabater, Luis; Sastre, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory process of the pancreatic gland that eventually may lead to a severe systemic inflammatory response. A key event in pancreatic damage is the intracellular activation of NF-κB and zymogens, involving also calcium, cathepsins, pH disorders, autophagy, and cell death, particularly necrosis. This review focuses on the new role of redox signaling in acute pancreatitis. Oxidative stress and redox status are involved in the onset of acute pancreatitis and also in the development of the systemic inflammatory response, being glutathione depletion, xanthine oxidase activation, and thiol oxidation in proteins critical features of the disease in the pancreas. On the other hand, the release of extracellular hemoglobin into the circulation from the ascitic fluid in severe necrotizing pancreatitis enhances lipid peroxidation in plasma and the inflammatory infiltrate into the lung and up-regulates the HIF–VEGF pathway, contributing to the systemic inflammatory response. Therefore, redox signaling and oxidative stress contribute to the local and systemic inflammatory response during acute pancreatitis. PMID:25778551

  15. Comparison of laparoscopy and open surgery in treating severe acute pancreatitis and its relative aftercare.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Jiang, M X; Zheng, Y; Shu, M; Sun, S B

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the effects and compare laparoscopic intervention and open surgery in treating severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) and its relative aftercare, to improve the overall treatment of SAP. Ninety patients with SAP were enrolled from the 2nd Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University from 2008 to 2014 and divided into a laparoscopic intervention group (25 cases) and an open surgery group (65 cases). Patients were asked for clinical symptoms, general hospital information, laboratory inspection, imageological examination, local and systemic complications, treatment and outcome. SAP patients’ relevant clinical indicators were compared between the two groups before and after the operation. Results revealed that there was no statistical significance in lesion range and main scoring indexes for reflecting the severity of the disease. For both groups statistical significance was found in blood loss (285.3±79.8 mL vs 362±91.6 mL), intensive care unit (ICU) monitoring time (9.04±6.35 d vs 12.48±8.34 d) and service time of breathing machine (9.47±6.24 d vs 12.98±8.25 d), and the laparoscopic operation group was superior to the open surgery group (p < 0.05). Besides, the laparoscopic operation group was also superior to the open surgery group in demand for main analgesics one week after the operation, as well as for recovery rate and incidence of complications (p < 0.05). Thus, it can be concluded that patients undergoing laparoscopic intervention are less likely to develop pulmonary infection and more likely to be cured in comparison with patients who receive open surgery. In addition, laparoscopic intervention results in less damage, lighter pain and fewer complications compared with open surgery. PMID:27049091

  16. Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... sudden inflammation of the pancreas manifested clinically by abdominal pain, nausea and dehydration that is usually self-limiting ... room for evaluation should they develop any abnormal abdominal pain symptoms. Conclusions While a rare event, acute pancreatitis ...

  17. Acute pancreatitis in children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Mitsuyoshi; Sai, Jin Kan; Shimizu, Toshiaki

    2014-01-01

    In this Topic Highlight, the causes, diagnosis, and treatment of acute pancreatitis in children are discussed. Acute pancreatitis should be considered during the differential diagnosis of abdominal pain in children and requires prompt treatment because it may become life-threatening. The etiology, clinical manifestations, and course of acute pancreatitis in children are often different than in adults. Therefore, the specific features of acute pancreatitis in children must be considered. The etiology of acute pancreatitis in children is often drugs, infections, trauma, or anatomic abnormalities. Diagnosis is based on clinical symptoms (such as abdominal pain and vomiting), serum pancreatic enzyme levels, and imaging studies. Several scoring systems have been proposed for the assessment of severity, which is useful for selecting treatments and predicting prognosis. The basic pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis does not greatly differ between adults and children, and the treatments for adults and children are similar. In large part, our understanding of the pathology, optimal treatment, assessment of severity, and outcome of acute pancreatitis in children is taken from the adult literature. However, we often find that the common management of adult pancreatitis is difficult to apply to children. With advances in diagnostic techniques and treatment methods, severe acute pancreatitis in children is becoming better understood and more controllable. PMID:25400985

  18. [PROGNOSTIC SIGNIFICANCE OF ELEMENTS OF THE MULTIORGAN INSUFFICIENCY SYNDROME AND ESTIMATION OF THE PATIENTS STATE SEVERITY IN ACCORDANCE TO INTEGRAL SCALES IN AN ACUTE NECROTIC PANCREATITIS].

    PubMed

    Khomyak, I V; Rotar, O V; Rotar, V I; Petrovskiy, G G

    2015-09-01

    There were examined 113 patients, in whom an acute necrotic pancreatitis was diagnosed. While admittance to hospital a constant organ insufficiency was revealed in 50 (44%), a transient one--in 63 (56%) patients. In total 31 (27.4%) patients died. Respiratory insufficiency have occurred in 67% patients, and almost with similar rate--cardio-vascular (in 59%), renal (in 56%) and enteral (in 54%), dominating in the lethality structure. The BISAP (Bedcide Index for Severity in Acute Pancreatitis) scales applied permit with high probability to prognosticate the organ insufficiency and lethality in patients, suffering an acute necrotic pancreatitis. PMID:26817077

  19. Association of Matrix Metalloproteinases -7, -8 and -9 and TIMP -1 with Disease Severity in Acute Pancreatitis. A Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Nukarinen, Eija; Lindström, Outi; Kuuliala, Krista; Kylänpää, Leena; Pettilä, Ville; Puolakkainen, Pauli; Kuuliala, Antti; Hämäläinen, Mari; Moilanen, Eeva; Repo, Heikki; Hästbacka, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Several biomarkers for early detection of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) have been presented. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) and their tissue inhibitors (TIMP) are released early in inflammation. We aimed to assess levels of MMP-7, -8, -9 and TIMP-1 in acute pancreatitis (AP) and explore their ability to detect disease severity. Our second aim was to find an association between MMPs, TIMP and creatinine. Methods We collected plasma samples for MMP-7, -8, -9 and TIMP-1 analyses from 176 patients presenting within 96 h from onset of acute pancreatitis (AP) symptoms. We used samples from 32 control subjects as comparison. The revised Atlanta Classification was utilised to assess severity of disease. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis and Spearman´s Rho-test were utilised for statistical calculations. Results Compared with controls, patients showed higher levels of all studied markers. MMP-8 was higher in moderately severe AP than in mild AP (p = 0.005) and MMP-8, -9 and TIMP-1 were higher in severe than in mild AP (p<0.001, p = 0.005 and p = 0.019). MMP-8 detected SAP with an AUC of 0.939 [95% CI 0.894–0.984], LR+ 9.03 [5.30–15.39]. MMP-8, -9 and TIMP-1 failed to discern moderately severe AP from SAP. MMP-7 was not different between patient groups. MMP-7 and TIMP-1 correlated weakly with creatinine (Rho = 0.221 and 0.243). MMP-8 might be a useful biomarker in early detection of SAP. PMID:27561093

  20. Nutrition support in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Ioannidis, Orestis; Lavrentieva, Athina; Botsios, Dimitrios

    2008-01-01

    In the majority (80%) of patients with acute pancreatitis, the disease is self limiting and, after a few days of withholding feeding and intravenous administration of fluids, patients can again be normally fed orally. In a small percentage of patients, the disease progresses to severe necrotic pancreatitis, with an intense systemic inflammatory response and often with multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. As mortality is high in patients with severe disease and as mortality and morbidity rates are directly related to the failure of establishing a positive nitrogen balance, it is assumed that feeding will improve survival in patients with severe disease. The aim of nutritional support is to cover the elevated metabolic demands as much as possible, without stimulating pancreatic secretion and maximizing self-digestion. The administration of either total parenteral nutrition or jejunal nutrition does not stimulate pancreatic secretion. Recently, a series of controlled clinical studies has been conducted in order to evaluate the effectiveness of enteral nutrition with jejunal administration of the nutritional solution. The results have shown that enteral nutrition, as compared to total parenteral nutrition, was cheaper, safer and more effective as regards the suppression of the immunoinflammatory response, the decrease of septic complications, the need for surgery for the management of the complications of acute pancreatitis and the reduction of the total hospitalization period. It did not seem to affect mortality or the rate of non-septic complications. In conclusion, enteral nutrition should be the preferred route of nutritional support in patients with acute pancreatitis. PMID:18648127

  1. Traditional Chinese medicine, Qing Ying Tang, ameliorates the severity of acute lung injury induced by severe acute pancreatitis in rats via the upregulation of aquaporin-1.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhenming; Xu, Junfeng; Sun, Deguang; Zhang, Rixin; Liang, Rui; Wang, Liming; Fan, Rong

    2014-12-01

    Aquaporin-1 (AQP-1) is expressed in lung endothelial cells and regulates water transport; thus, AQP-1 plays an important role in a number of edema-associated lung diseases. Qing Yin Tang (QYT), a traditional Chinese medicine, has been shown to effectively reduce the mortality rate of acute lung injury (ALI) induced by severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). The current study aimed to investigate the detailed mechanisms underlying the effects of QYT on ALI induced by SAP, particularly the effects on the expression levels of AQP-1 in the lung tissue. ALI was established in Wister rats who were subsequently divided into four groups: SHAM, ALI, dexamethasone (DEX) and QYT groups (n=8 per group). In the QYT group, 20 ml/kg QYT was administered by gavage immediately following the induction of SAP. Blood and lung tissues were collected 8 h following the induction of pancreatitis. The lung wet/dry ratio, as well as the levels of blood gases, serum amylase and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), were measured at 4, 8 and 12 h following SAP-associated ALI induction surgery. The expression levels of AQP-1 in the lung tissue were detected by quantitative polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis. No statistically significant differences were observed with regard to the levels of serum amylase, wet/dry ratio, partial pressure of oxygen, serum TNF-α and pathological changes in the pulmonary tissue between the QYT and DEX groups; however, a statistically significant difference was observed when compared with the ALI group. The expression levels of AQP-1 significantly increased (P<0.05) and lung edema was alleviated in the QYT and DEX groups, when compared with ALI group. Therefore, the expression level of AQP-1 is associated with pulmonary edema. QYT protects the lungs from injury induced by SAP via the upregulation of AQP-1, which suppresses TNF-α expression. PMID:25371738

  2. Traditional Chinese medicine, Qing Ying Tang, ameliorates the severity of acute lung injury induced by severe acute pancreatitis in rats via the upregulation of aquaporin-1

    PubMed Central

    GAO, ZHENMING; XU, JUNFENG; SUN, DEGUANG; ZHANG, RIXIN; LIANG, RUI; WANG, LIMING; FAN, RONG

    2014-01-01

    Aquaporin-1 (AQP-1) is expressed in lung endothelial cells and regulates water transport; thus, AQP-1 plays an important role in a number of edema-associated lung diseases. Qing Yin Tang (QYT), a traditional Chinese medicine, has been shown to effectively reduce the mortality rate of acute lung injury (ALI) induced by severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). The current study aimed to investigate the detailed mechanisms underlying the effects of QYT on ALI induced by SAP, particularly the effects on the expression levels of AQP-1 in the lung tissue. ALI was established in Wister rats who were subsequently divided into four groups: SHAM, ALI, dexamethasone (DEX) and QYT groups (n=8 per group). In the QYT group, 20 ml/kg QYT was administered by gavage immediately following the induction of SAP. Blood and lung tissues were collected 8 h following the induction of pancreatitis. The lung wet/dry ratio, as well as the levels of blood gases, serum amylase and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), were measured at 4, 8 and 12 h following SAP-associated ALI induction surgery. The expression levels of AQP-1 in the lung tissue were detected by quantitative polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis. No statistically significant differences were observed with regard to the levels of serum amylase, wet/dry ratio, partial pressure of oxygen, serum TNF-α and pathological changes in the pulmonary tissue between the QYT and DEX groups; however, a statistically significant difference was observed when compared with the ALI group. The expression levels of AQP-1 significantly increased (P<0.05) and lung edema was alleviated in the QYT and DEX groups, when compared with ALI group. Therefore, the expression level of AQP-1 is associated with pulmonary edema. QYT protects the lungs from injury induced by SAP via the upregulation of AQP-1, which suppresses TNF-α expression. PMID:25371738

  3. Liraglutide-induced acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Jeyaraj, Santhosh; Shetty, Ananth Samith; Kumar, Champat Raj Roopesh; Nanditha, Arun; Krishnamoorthy, Satheesh; Raghavan, Arun; Raghavan, K; Ramachandran, Ambady

    2014-01-01

    An obese lady of 51 year with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus for 13 years was prescribed Liraglutide, a glucagon like peptide (GLP-1) analogue (Victoza) for glycaemic control and reduction of weight. She was on gliclazide and Insulin prior to initiation of Liraglutide. Eight weeks after initiation of GLP -1 analogue, she developed severe abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. She was admitted to a private hospital and evaluated. Biochemical tests and CT scan revealed presence of pancreatitis and she was treated for acute pancreatitis. Liraglutide was withdrawn and symptoms subsided. Subsequent follow-up showed that pancreatic enzyme levels were normal. PMID:25327099

  4. Blood tests for acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Basnayake, Chamara; Ratnam, Dilip

    2015-01-01

    Summary The diagnosis of acute pancreatitis requires the presence of at least two of the three diagnostic criteria – characteristic abdominal pain, elevated serum amylase or lipase, and radiological evidence of pancreatitis. Serum concentrations of amylase and lipase rise within hours of the pancreatic injury. A threshold concentration 2–4 times the upper limit of normal is recommended for diagnosis. Serum lipase is now the preferred test due to its improved sensitivity, particularly in alcohol-induced pancreatitis. Its prolonged elevation creates a wider diagnostic window than amylase. Neither enzyme is useful in monitoring or predicting the severity of an episode of pancreatitis in adults. New biomarkers including trypsinogen and elastase have no significant advantage over amylase or lipase. PMID:26648641

  5. Imaging of acute pancreatitis and its complications. Part 2: complications of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Türkvatan, A; Erden, A; Türkoğlu, M A; Seçil, M; Yüce, G

    2015-02-01

    The Atlanta classification of acute pancreatitis was introduced in 1992 and divides patients into mild and severe groups based on clinical and biochemical criteria. Recently, the terminology and classification scheme proposed at the initial Atlanta Symposium have been reviewed and a new consensus statement has been proposed by the Acute Pancreatitis Classification Working Group. Major changes include subdividing acute fluid collections into "acute peripancreatic fluid collection" and "acute post-necrotic pancreatic/peripancreatic fluid collection (acute necrotic collection)" based on the presence of necrotic debris. Delayed fluid collections have been similarly subdivided into "pseudocyst" and "walled of pancreatic necrosis". Appropriate use of the new terms describing the fluid collections is important for management decision-making in patients with acute pancreatitis. The purpose of this review article is to present an overview of complications of the acute pancreatitis with emphasis on their prognostic significance and impact on clinical management and to clarify confusing terminology for pancreatic fluid collections. PMID:24703377

  6. [Severe acute pancreatitis and infection by influenza A (H1N1) virus in a child: case report].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Schulz, Diego; Martínez, Agustina; Guzmán, María Belén; Robledo, Hugo; Capocasa, Patricia; Martínez, Luz; Garnero, Analía

    2015-08-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas, characterized by abdominal pain and high level of pancreatic enzymes. Pancreatitis is the most common disease of pancreas in children and adults. For the diagnosis we need 2 of 3 characteristics: abdominal pain characteristic of acute pancreatitis, amylase and/or lipase 3 times higher than the normal upper limit and characteristic findings in images. The etiologies are multiple: trauma, metabolic disease and infections: mixovirus, HIV, measles, coxsackie, hepatitis B, C, cytomegalovirus, varicella, herpes simplex. Three cases of PA associated with H1N1 Influenza virus were reported, only one in a child with uncomplicated features. PMID:26172021

  7. Inhibition of SOCs Attenuates Acute Lung Injury Induced by Severe Acute Pancreatitis in Rats and PMVECs Injury Induced by Lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guanyu; Zhang, Jingwen; Xu, Caiming; Han, Xiao; Gao, Yanyan; Chen, Hailong

    2016-06-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a critical complication of the severe acute pancreatitis (SAP), characterized by increased pulmonary permeability with high mortality. Pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMVECs) injury and apoptosis play a key role in ALI. Previous studies indicated that store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) could regulate a variety of cellular processes. The present study was to investigate the effects of SOCE inhibition on ALI induced by SAP in Sprague-Dawley rats, and PMVECs injury induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Rat model of SAP-associated ALI were established by the retrograde infusion of sodium deoxycholate. Serum levels of amylase, TNF-α, and IL-6, histological changes, water content of the lung, oxygenation index, and ultrastructural changes of PMVECs were examined in ALI rats with or without store-operated Ca(2+) channels (SOCs) pharmacological inhibitor (2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate, 2-APB) pretreatment. For in vitro studies, PMVECs were transiently transfected with or without small interfering RNA (siRNA) against calcium release-activated calcium channel protein1 (Orai1) and stromal interaction molecule1 (STIM1), the two main molecular constituents of SOCs, then exposed to LPS. The viability of PMVECs was determined. The expression of STIM1, Orai1, Bax, and caspase3, both in lung tissue and in PMVECs, were assessed by quantitative real-time PCR and western blot. Administration of sodium deoxycholate upregulated the expression of SOCs proteins in lung tissue. Similarly, the SOCs proteins were increased in PMVECs induced by LPS. 2-APB reduced the serum levels of amylase, TNF-α, and IL-6, and attenuated lung water content and histological findings. In addition, the decreased oxygenation index and ultrastructural damage in PMVECs associated with SAP were ameliorated after administration of 2-APB. Knockdown of STIM1 and Orai1 inhibited LPS-induced PMVECs death. Furthermore, blockade of SOCE significantly suppressed Orai1, STIM1, Bax

  8. The Value of BISAP Score for Predicting Mortality and Severity in Acute Pancreatitis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Cheng-En

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The Bedside Index for Severity in Acute Pancreatitis (BISAP) score has been developed to identify patients at high risk for mortality or severe disease early during the course of acute pancreatitis. We aimed to undertake a meta-analysis to quantify the accuracy of BISAP score for predicting mortality and severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). Materials and Methods We searched the databases of Pubmed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library to identify studies using the BISAP score to predict mortality or SAP. The pooled sensitivity, specificity, likelihood ratios, and diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) were calculated from each study and were compared with the traditional scoring systems. Results Twelve cohorts from 10 studies were included. The overall sensitivity of a BISAP score of ≥3 for mortality was 56% (95% CI, 53%-60%), with a specificity of 91% (95% CI, 90%-91%). The positive and negative likelihood ratios were 5.65 (95% CI, 4.23-7.55) and 0.48 (95% CI, 0.41-0.56), respectively. Regarding the outcome of SAP, the pooled sensitivity was 51% (43%-60%), and the specificity was 91% (89%-92%). The pooled positive and negative likelihood ratios were 7.23 (4.21-12.42) and 0.56 (0.44-0.71), respectively. Compared with BISAP score, the Ranson criteria and APACHEⅡscore showed higher sensitivity and lower specificity for both outcomes. Conclusions The BISAP score was a reliable tool to identify AP patients at high risk for unfavorable outcomes. Compared with the Ranson criteria and APACHEⅡscore, BISAP score outperformed in specificity, but having a suboptimal sensitivity for mortality as well as SAP. PMID:26091293

  9. Severe Hypertriglyceridemia Induced Pancreatitis in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Seema; Shaffer, Lemuel; Cavens, Paula; Blankstein, Josef

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis caused by severe gestational hypertriglyceridemia is a rare complication of pregnancy. Acute pancreatitis has been well associated with gallstone disease, alcoholism, or drug abuse but rarely seen in association with severe hypertriglyceridemia. Hypertriglyceridemia may occur in pregnancy due to normal physiological changes leading to abnormalities in lipid metabolism. We report a case of severe gestational hypertriglyceridemia that caused acute pancreatitis at full term and was successfully treated with postpartum therapeutic plasma exchange. Patient also developed several other complications related to her substantial hypertriglyceridemia including preeclampsia, chylous ascites, retinal detachment, pleural effusion, and chronic pericarditis. This patient had no previous family or personal history of lipid abnormality and had four successful prior pregnancies without developing gestational hypertriglyceridemia. Such a severe hypertriglyceridemia is usually seen in patients with familial chylomicronemia syndromes where hypertriglyceridemia is exacerbated by the pregnancy, leading to fatal complications such as acute pancreatitis. PMID:24995138

  10. Nutrition, Inflammation, and Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, Max

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is acute inflammatory disease of the pancreas. Nutrition has a number of anti-inflammatory effects that could affect outcomes of patients with pancreatitis. Further, it is the most promising nonspecific treatment modality in acute pancreatitis to date. This paper summarizes the best available evidence regarding the use of nutrition with a view of optimising clinical management of patients with acute pancreatitis. PMID:24490104

  11. Gadolinium induced recurrent acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Blasco-Perrin, H; Glaser, B; Pienkowski, M; Peron, J M; Payen, J L

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a sudden swelling and inflammation of the pancreas. The two most common causes are alcohol use and biliary stones. Drug-induced acute pancreatitis are rare (1.4-2%). In this present study, we present a case of recurrent acute pancreatitis induced by a specific magnetic-resonance-imaging (MRI) contrast agent called gadobenate dimeglumine. PMID:23395575

  12. Pharmacologic therapy for acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kambhampati, Swetha; Park, Walter; Habtezion, Aida

    2014-01-01

    While conservative management such as fluid, bowel rest, and antibiotics is the mainstay of current acute pancreatitis management, there is a lot of promise in pharmacologic therapies that target various aspects of the pathogenesis of pancreatitis. Extensive review of preclinical studies, which include assessment of therapies such as anti-secretory agents, protease inhibitors, anti-inflammatory agents, and anti-oxidants are discussed. Many of these studies have shown therapeutic benefit and improved survival in experimental models. Based on available preclinical studies, we discuss potential novel targeted pharmacologic approaches that may offer promise in the treatment of acute pancreatitis. To date a variety of clinical studies have assessed the translational potential of animal model effective experimental therapies and have shown either failure or mixed results in human studies. Despite these discouraging clinical studies, there is a great clinical need and there exist several preclinical effective therapies that await investigation in patients. Better understanding of acute pancreatitis pathophysiology and lessons learned from past clinical studies are likely to offer a great foundation upon which to expand future therapies in acute pancreatitis. PMID:25493000

  13. Compatibility of carbapenem antibiotics with nafamostat mesilate in arterial infusion therapy for severe acute pancreatitis: stabilities of carbapenem antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Yukihiro; Imaizumi, Hiroshi; Miyazawa, Shirou; Kida, Mitsuhiro; Souma, Kazui; Koizumi, Wasaburou; Sunakawa, Keisuke; Kuroyama, Masakazu

    2012-08-01

    The effectiveness of continuous regional arterial infusion therapy using protease inhibitors and antibiotics for severe acute pancreatitis has been previously reported. Carbapenem antibiotics, which have a broad antibacterial spectrum, and nafamostat mesilate are often used for this therapeutic approach. We investigated the compatibility of various carbapenem antibiotics with nafamostat mesilate. Carbapenem antibiotics were dissolved in 30 mL of saline or 5% glucose and the appearance, pH, and stability of the solutions were determined. The changes in each carbapenem antibiotic solution after mixing with nafamostat mesilate were then investigated. Biapenem and doripenem showed a residual rate of > or = 90% at 8 hours after dissolution in saline or 5% glucose and exhibited an appropriate appearance and residual rate (> or = 90%). After mixing with nafamostat mesilate, biapenem maintained a residual rate of > or = 90% for the longest time period (8 hours) and exhibited a slight coloration, followed by doripenem (6 hours) and meropenem dissolved in saline. The other carbapenem antibiotics that were tested exhibited changes in appearance or their residual rate. Biapenem and doripenem, which exert their effects in a time-dependent manner, can be infused for prolonged periods for the treatment of not only severe acute pancreatitis, but also other severe infections. PMID:23259254

  14. Key Molecular Mechanisms of Chaiqinchengqi Decoction in Alleviating the Pulmonary Albumin Leakage Caused by Endotoxemia in Severe Acute Pancreatitis Rats.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei; Luo, Ruijie; Lin, Ziqi; Xia, Qing; Xue, Ping

    2016-01-01

    To reveal the key molecular mechanisms of Chaiqinchengqi decoction (CQCQD) in alleviating the pulmonary albumin leakage caused by endotoxemia in severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) rats. Rats models of SAP endotoxemia-induced acute lung injury were established, the studies in vivo provided the important evidences that the therapy of CQCQD significantly ameliorated the increases in plasma levels of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), sCd14, and Lbp, the elevation of serum amylase level, the enhancements of systemic and pulmonary albumin leakage, and the depravation of airways indicators, thus improving respiratory dysfunction and also pancreatic and pulmonary histopathological changes. According to the analyses of rats pulmonary tissue microarray and protein-protein interaction network, c-Fos, c-Src, and p85α were predicted as the target proteins for CQCQD in alleviating pulmonary albumin leakage. To confirm these predictions, human umbilical vein endothelial cells were employed in in vitro studies, which provide the evidences that (1) LPS-induced paracellular leakage and proinflammatory cytokines release were suppressed by pretreatment with inhibitors of c-Src (PP1) or PI3K (LY294002) or by transfection with siRNAs of c-Fos; (2) fortunately, CQCQD imitated the actions of these selective inhibitions agents to inhibit LPS-induced high expressions of p-Src, p-p85α, and c-Fos, therefore attenuating paracellular leakage and proinflammatory cytokines release. PMID:27413385

  15. Key Molecular Mechanisms of Chaiqinchengqi Decoction in Alleviating the Pulmonary Albumin Leakage Caused by Endotoxemia in Severe Acute Pancreatitis Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wei; Luo, Ruijie; Lin, Ziqi; Xia, Qing

    2016-01-01

    To reveal the key molecular mechanisms of Chaiqinchengqi decoction (CQCQD) in alleviating the pulmonary albumin leakage caused by endotoxemia in severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) rats. Rats models of SAP endotoxemia-induced acute lung injury were established, the studies in vivo provided the important evidences that the therapy of CQCQD significantly ameliorated the increases in plasma levels of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), sCd14, and Lbp, the elevation of serum amylase level, the enhancements of systemic and pulmonary albumin leakage, and the depravation of airways indicators, thus improving respiratory dysfunction and also pancreatic and pulmonary histopathological changes. According to the analyses of rats pulmonary tissue microarray and protein-protein interaction network, c-Fos, c-Src, and p85α were predicted as the target proteins for CQCQD in alleviating pulmonary albumin leakage. To confirm these predictions, human umbilical vein endothelial cells were employed in in vitro studies, which provide the evidences that (1) LPS-induced paracellular leakage and proinflammatory cytokines release were suppressed by pretreatment with inhibitors of c-Src (PP1) or PI3K (LY294002) or by transfection with siRNAs of c-Fos; (2) fortunately, CQCQD imitated the actions of these selective inhibitions agents to inhibit LPS-induced high expressions of p-Src, p-p85α, and c-Fos, therefore attenuating paracellular leakage and proinflammatory cytokines release. PMID:27413385

  16. Acute Pancreatitis in Children.

    PubMed

    Werlin, Steven L.

    2001-10-01

    There are no drugs that cure or abate pancreatitis. The treatment of patients with mild and moderate episodes of pancreatitis (85%) is supportive and expectant. Central issues include the removal of the initiating process (if possible), relief of pain, and maintenance of fluid and electrolyte balance. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography may be required for stone extraction in patients with biliary pancreatitis. Surgery is rarely required. The aims of treatment for patients with severe disease includes treatment of local, systemic, and septic complications in addition to those for mild and moderate disease. Homeostasis is maintained by the correction of hypocalcemia, anemia, hypoalbuminemia, electrolyte imbalances, and hypoxemia. A large number of medications have been used unsuccessfully in an attempt to halt the progression of the autodigestive process within the pancreas and to reduce pancreatic secretions. Nutritional support with either enteral or parenteral feeding is given. Intravenous antibiotics or selective bowel decontamination decrease mortality in patients with severe episodes of pancreatitis. The treatment for these individuals is often prolonged. Surgical treatment of traumatic pancreatitis with ductal rupture includes repair or resection. At times, simple drainage is performed and definitive surgery is deferred until later. Surgical treatment of severe pancreatitis includes debridement of necrotic and infected tissue. The emerging consensus appears to be that necrosectomy and local lavage or open management with planned re-exploration offers better survival than the conventional therapy of resection plus drainage alone. PMID:11560787

  17. Minimal contribution of severe hypertriglyceridemia in L-asparaginase-associated pancreatitis developed in a child with acute lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Goto, Yoshinori; Nishimura, Ryosei; Nohara, Atsushi; Mase, Shintaro; Fujiki, Toshihiro; Irabu, Hitoshi; Kuroda, Rie; Araki, Raita; Ikawa, Yasuhiro; Maeba, Hideaki; Yachie, Akihiro

    2016-08-01

    A 10-year-old girl developed L-asparaginase (ASP)-associated pancreatitis during chemotherapy for acute lymphocytic leukemia. Her symptoms showed alleviation with continuous regional arterial infusion of protease inhibitor and systemic somatostatin analog therapy. She had intermittent and marked hypertriglyceridemia, an initial trigger for pancreatitis, probably as a side effect of ASP and steroids. However, we considered the pancreatitis to have developed mainly because of factors other than hypertriglyceridemia as lipoprotein analysis confirmed chylomicron levels to be nearly undetectable. Extremely large chylomicrons contribute directly to the onset of pancreatitis by causing blockage of small vessels. Although it is necessary to examine patients for dyslipidemia developing as a side effect of ASP, therapeutic intervention for hypertriglyceridemia is not considered to prevent the onset of ASP-associated pancreatitis. PMID:27599414

  18. [Acute pancreatitis and pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Scollo, P; Licitra, G

    1993-12-01

    Aetiologic factors (gallstones, hyperlipidemia I-IV, hypertriglyceridaemia) make their occurrence, mainly, in the third trimester of gestation. Two cases of acute pancreatitis in pregnancy are described; in both cases patients referred healthy diet, no habit to smoke and no previous episode of pancreatitis. An obstructive pathology of biliary tract was the aetiologic factor. Vomiting, upper abdominal pain are aspecific symptoms that impose a differential diagnosis with acute appendicitis, cholecystitis and obstructive intestinal pathology. Laboratory data (elevated serum amylase and lipase levels) and ultrasonography carry out an accurate diagnosis. The management of acute pancreatitis is based on the use of symptomatic drugs, a low fat diet alternated to the parenteral nutrition when triglycerides levels are more than 28 mmol/L. Surgical therapy, used only in case of obstructive pathology of biliary tract, is optimally collected in the third trimester or immediately after postpartum. Our patients, treated only medically, delivered respectively at 38th and 40th week of gestation. Tempestivity of diagnosis and appropriate therapy permit to improve prognosis of a pathology that, although really associated with pregnancy, presents high maternal mortality (37%) cause of complications (shock, coagulopathy, acute respiratory insufficiency) and fetal (37.9%) by occurrence of preterm delivery. PMID:8139793

  19. Severe acute necrotizing pancreatitis associated with lipoprotein lipase deficiency in childhood.

    PubMed

    van Walraven, L A; de Klerk, J B C; Postema, R R

    2003-09-01

    An 11-year-old girl with lipoprotein lipase deficiency experienced recurring episodes of abdominal pain. She initially underwent appendectomy for suspected appendicitis; however, the appendix was normal. Pancreatitis was subsequently identified as the cause of her pain. PMID:14523833

  20. Established enteral nutrition pathway in a severe acute pancreatitis patient with duodenum fistula: a case report.

    PubMed

    Li, G; Shen, X; Ke, L; Tong, Z; Li, W

    2015-10-01

    Enteral feeding is the preferred way to provide nutritional support in patients with high nutritional risk but relatively normal gastrointestinal function; thus, establishing a safe and a reliable pathway of enteral nutrition (EN) is of great importance. There are many techniques for placing the feeding tube, such as blind placement at bedside, assisting by fluoroscopy and endoscopy, surgical and so on. Despite these variable techniques, it is still difficult to obtain the pathway for EN in some specific patients. Here, we present a recent case of infected pancreatic/peripancreatic necrosis complicated by a duodenal enteric fistula in whom we establish the feeding pathway extraordinarily. Briefly, after several failed attempts of placing the nasojejunal feeding tube, a jejunal feeding tube was placed percutaneously guided by computed tomography, and EN was successfully applied thereafter. With the implementation of EN, duodenal fistula healed without surgical intervention. As EN is pivotal for the recovery of duodenal fistula, this novel approach could be beneficial in selected patients. PMID:26306567

  1. Advances in Management of Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Janisch, Nigeen H; Gardner, Timothy B

    2016-03-01

    This article reviews advances in the management of acute pancreatitis. Medical treatment has been primarily supportive for this diagnosis, and despite extensive research efforts, there are no pharmacologic therapies that improve prognosis. The current mainstay of management, notwithstanding the ongoing debate regarding the volume, fluid type, and rate of administration, is aggressive intravenous fluid resuscitation. Although antibiotics were used consistently for prophylaxis in severe acute pancreatitis to prevent infection, they are no longer used unless infection is documented. Enteral nutrition, especially in patients with severe acute pancreatitis, is considered a cornerstone in management of this disease. PMID:26895677

  2. A Chinese Herbal Decoction, Huoxue Qingyi Decoction, Promotes Rehabilitation of Patients with Severe Acute Pancreatitis: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Chao Hui; Tang, Cheng Wu; Feng, Wen Ming; Bao, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) still remains an important surgical problem with high morbidity and mortality. The utilization of Traditional Chinese Medicine shows good prospects in therapy of SAP since it has advantages of more extensive pharmacological effects and fewer adverse effects. In this retrospective study, 38 patients received standardized treatment (control group) and 37 patients received Chinese herbal decoction, Huoxue Qingyi Decoction (HQD group), in addition to standard treatment for SAP. We found that the HQD group had a shorter hospital stay and lower initial expense than the control group (P < 0.05). The duration of hyperamylasemia and systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) were significantly shorter in HQD group (P < 0.05). The percentage of patients having any complication was much lower in HQD group than control group (27/38 versus 17/37, P < 0.05), especially pancreatic pseudocyst (10/38 versus 2/37, P < 0.05). No adverse effect induced by HQD was found. We concluded that the HQD was effective, safe, and economic for reduction of complication, for early recovery from systemic inflammation, and for promoting earlier rehabilitation from SAP. PMID:27110265

  3. Pancreatic blood flow in experimental acute pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, A.R.; Millar, A.M.; Taylor, T.V.

    1982-05-01

    The etiology and pathogenesis of acute necrotizing hemorrhagic pancreatitis remain controversial. Recent work has suggested that an early fall in pancreatic blood flow, causing ischemia, may be the initiating factor. Using an established rat model of hemorrhagic pancreatitis and the fractional indicator distribution technique with /sup 86/RbCl, pancreatic blood flow and tissue perfusion have been measured at various times in the condition. Six groups of ten rats were studied: control sham operation and pancreatitis groups were sacrificed at 1, 6, and 24 hr. Pancreatic blood flow (% of cardiac output) and perfusion (blood flow/g tissue) were measured. Blood flow was increased by a maximum of 53% at 1 hr (P less than 0.001) and remained elevated for 24 hr, and perfusion was increased by a maximum of 70% (P less than 0.001) at 1 hr and remained elevated at 6 hr. Pancreatic perfusion declines after 6 hr due to increasing gland edema. The results demonstrate a significant increase in pancreatic blood flow and perfusion in experimentally induced acute pancreatitis, suggesting a primary inflammatory response, and refute the ischemic etiological theory.

  4. Effect of tiron on remote organ injury in rats with severe acute pancreatitis induced by L-arginine.

    PubMed

    Ateyya, Hayam; Wagih, Heba M; El-Sherbeeny, Nagla A

    2016-08-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is an acute inflammatory disorder of the pancreas that can be complicated by involvement of other remote organs. Oxidative stress is known to have a crucial role in the development of pancreatic acinar damage and one of the main causes in multisystem organ failure in experimental AP. The aim of the study was to determine the effect of tiron on pancreas and remote organ damage in L-arginine (L-Arg) induced AP rat model. Thirty-two male rats were divided in random into four groups: control, tiron, L-Arg, and tiron with L-Arg. At the end of the experiment, blood samples were withdrawn for biochemical analysis. The pancreas, lung, kidney, and liver were collected for histopathological examination. Estimation of pancreatic water content was done. Analysis of pulmonary, hepatic, renal, and pancreatic lipid peroxide levels (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and reduced glutathione (GSH) were carried out. Finally, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) expression in pancreatic tissue was determined. Results indicated that treatment with tiron significantly decreased lipid peroxide levels and markedly increased both SOD activity and GSH level. Moreover, histopathological analysis further confirmed that administration of tiron relatively ameliorates pancreatic acinar cells and remote organ damage. Increased immunoreactivity of NF-κB and TGF-β1 were reduced also by tiron treatment. These findings pointed out the protective role of the mitochondrial antioxidant, tiron against AP induced by L-Arg. PMID:27118662

  5. Nutritional support for acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Pisters, P W; Ranson, J H

    1992-09-01

    The current review has summarized current data relevant to the nutritional support of patients with acute pancreatitis. Selection of the most appropriate form of nutritional support for patients with acute pancreatitis is intimately linked to a thorough understanding of the effects of various forms of enteral and parenteral nutrition on physiologic exocrine secretory mechanisms. Two basic concepts have emerged from the multiple studies that have addressed these issues to date: 1, enteral feeds should have low fat composition and be delivered distal to the ligament of Treitz to minimize exocrine pancreatic secretion and 2, parenteral substrate infusions, alone or in combinations similar to those administered during TPN, do not stimulate exocrine pancreatic secretion. From a practical standpoint, most patients with acute pancreatitis are diagnosed by nonoperative means and will manifest some degree of paralytic ileus during the early phase of the disease. Therefore, jejunal feeds are usually not a therapeutic option early in the course of this disease. On the basis of the clinical studies reviewed herein we propose general guidelines for the nutritional support of patients with acute pancreatitis: 1, most patients with mild uncomplicated pancreatitis (one to two prognostic signs) do not benefit from nutritional support; 2, nutritional support should begin early in the course of patients with moderate to severe disease (as soon as hemodynamic and cardiorespiratory stability permit); 3, initial nutritional support should be through the parenteral route and include fat emulsion in amounts sufficient to prevent essential fatty acid deficiency (no objective data exist to recommend specific amino acid formulations); 4, patients requiring operation for diagnosis or complications of the disease should have a feeding jejunostomy placed at the time of operation for subsequent enteral nutrition using a low fat formula, such as Precision HN (Sandoz, 1.3 percent calories as fat

  6. Comparison of Ranson, Glasgow, MOSS, SIRS, BISAP, APACHE-II, CTSI Scores, IL-6, CRP, and Procalcitonin in Predicting Severity, Organ Failure, Pancreatic Necrosis, and Mortality in Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, Ajay K.; Meher, Susanta; Prakash, Shashi; Tiwary, Satyendra Kumar; Singh, Usha; Srivastava, Arvind; Dixit, V. K.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Multifactorial scorings, radiological scores, and biochemical markers may help in early prediction of severity, pancreatic necrosis, and mortality in patients with acute pancreatitis (AP). Methods. BISAP, APACHE-II, MOSS, and SIRS scores were calculated using data within 24 hrs of admission, whereas Ranson and Glasgow scores after 48 hrs of admission; CTSI was calculated on day 4 whereas IL-6 and CRP values at end of study. Predictive accuracy of scoring systems, sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of various markers in prediction of severe acute pancreatitis, organ failure, pancreatic necrosis, admission to intensive care units and mortality were calculated. Results. Of 72 patients, 31 patients had organ failure and local complication classified as severe acute pancreatitis, 17 had pancreatic necrosis, and 9 died (12.5%). Area under curves for Ranson, Glasgow, MOSS, SIRS, APACHE-II, BISAP, CTSI, IL-6, and CRP in predicting SAP were 0.85, 0.75, 0.73, 0.73, 0.88, 0.80, 0.90, and 0.91, respectively, for pancreatic necrosis 0.70, 0.64, 0.61, 0.61, 0.68, 0.61, 0.75, 0.86, and 0.90, respectively, and for mortality 0.84, 0.83, 0.77, 0.76, 0.86, 0.83, 0.57, 0.80, and 0.75, respectively. Conclusion. CRP and IL-6 have shown a promising result in early detection of severity and pancreatic necrosis whereas APACHE-II and Ranson score in predicting AP related mortality in this study. PMID:24204087

  7. Retrocrural Space Involvement on Computed Tomography as a Predictor of Mortality and Disease Severity in Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Haotong; Ebner, Lukas; Jiang, Shiming; Wu, Yi; Christe, Andreas; Zhang, Shaoxiang; Zhang, Xiaoming; Luo, Zhulin; Tian, Fuzhou

    2014-01-01

    Background Because computed tomography (CT) has advantages for visualizing the manifestation of necrosis and local complications, a series of scoring systems based on CT manifestations have been developed for assessing the clinical outcomes of acute pancreatitis (AP), including the CT severity index (CTSI), modified CTSI, etc. Despite the internationally accepted CTSI having been successfully used to predict the overall mortality and disease severity of AP, recent literature has revealed the limitations of the CTSI. Using the Delphi method, we establish a new scoring system based on retrocrural space involvement (RCSI), and compared its effectiveness at evaluating the mortality and severity of AP with that of the CTSI. Methods We reviewed CT images of 257 patients with AP taken within 3–5 days of admission in 2012. The RCSI scoring system, which includes assessment of infectious conditions involving the retrocrural space and the adjacent pleural cavity, was established using the Delphi method. Two radiologists independently assessed the RCSI and CTSI scores. The predictive points of the RCSI and CTSI scoring systems in evaluating the mortality and severity of AP were estimated using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Principal Findings The RCSI score can accurately predict the mortality and disease severity. The area under the ROC curve for the RCSI versus CTSI score was 0.962±0.011 versus 0.900±0.021 for predicting the mortality, and 0.888±0.025 versus 0.904±0.020 for predicting the severity of AP. Applying ROC analysis to our data showed that a RCSI score of 4 was the best cutoff value, above which mortality could be identified. Conclusion The Delphi method was innovatively adopted to establish a scoring system to predict the clinical outcome of AP. The RCSI scoring system can predict the mortality of AP better than the CTSI system, and the severity of AP equally as well. PMID:25222846

  8. Artesunate ameliorates severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) in rats by inhibiting expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and Toll-like receptor 4.

    PubMed

    Cen, Yanyan; Liu, Chao; Li, Xiaoli; Yan, Zifei; Kuang, Mei; Su, Yujie; Pan, Xichun; Qin, Rongxin; Liu, Xin; Zheng, Jiang; Zhou, Hong

    2016-09-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) is a severe clinical condition with significant morbidity and mortality. Multiple organs dysfunction (MOD) is the leading cause of SAP-related death. The over-release of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α is the underlying mechanism of MOD; however, there is no effective agent against the inflammation. Herein, artesunate (AS) was found to increase the survival of SAP rats significantly when injected with 3.5% sodium taurocholate into the biliopancreatic duct in a retrograde direction, improving their pancreatic pathology and decreasing serum amylase and pancreatic lipase activities along with substantially reduced pancreatic IL-1β and IL-6 release. In vitro, AS-pretreatment strongly inhibited IL-1β and IL-6 release and their mRNA expressions in the pancreatic acinar cells treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) but exerted little effect on TNF-α release. Additionally, AS reduced the mRNA expressions of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) p65 as well as their protein expressions in the pancreatic acinar cells. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that AS could significantly protect SAP rats, and this protection was related to the reduction of digestive enzyme activities and pro-inflammatory cytokine expressions via inhibition of TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway. Therefore, AS may be considered as a potential therapeutic agent against SAP. PMID:27318790

  9. Efficacy of thymosin α1 and interferon α for the treatment of severe acute pancreatitis in a rat model

    PubMed Central

    WANG, XIAOQIN; ZENG, XIAOYAN; YANG, BO; ZHAO, SHAN; CHEN, WEI; GUO, XUAN

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of treatment with thymosin α1 (TA1) or interferon α (IFNα) following the establishment of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) in rats. A total of 144 Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups. The rats in all four groups were celiotomized, and the rats in the control group were administered with an intravenous injection of saline. The three other groups were administered with 5% 1 ml/kg sodium taurocholate via the cholangiopancreatic duct. SAP group rats were administered with an intravenous injection of saline; TA1 group rats received 26.7 µg/kg TA1; and interferon α (INFα) group rats received 4.0×105 U/kg IFNα. The rats were anesthetized and blood samples were collected from the animals 3, 12 and 24 h after surgery. The levels of T cell subsets, serum enzyme indicators, cytokines and procalcitonin (PCT) were measured. The general conditions of the rats were observed until sacrifice, and pancreatic and lung tissue samples were sampled for hematoxylin and eosin staining and histological scoring. The expression levels of aspartate transaminase, lactate dehydrogenase, α-amylase (AMY), P-type-amylase, lipase, PCT, tumor-necrosis factor α, interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, and IL-18 in the TA1 and IFNα-treated rats were significantly lower, compared with those of the SAP rats within the first 24 h of model establishment (P<0.05). The TA1 and IFNα-treated rats exhibited significantly increased levels of CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, and an increased ratio of CD4+/CD8+ cells, compared with SAP rats. Histological analysis revealed that the TA1 and IFNα-treated rats exhibited significantly ameliorated pancreas and lung damage, and mortality rates were reduced from 50.0% (6/12) to 25.0% (3/12) and 33.3% (4/12), respectively. The immunomodulatory agents TA1 and IFNα reduced acute inflammation, decreasing cell damage and enhancing immune function and survival rates in the SAP rats. PMID:26330363

  10. Nasogastric Nutrition versus Nasojejunal Nutrition in Patients with Severe Acute Pancreatitis: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Youfeng; Yin, Haiyan; Zhang, Rui; Ye, Xiaoling

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Previous studies have shown that the nasogastric (NG) route seems equivalent to the nasojejunal (NJ) route in patients with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). However, these studies used a small sample size and old criteria for diagnosing SAP, which may include some patients with moderate SAP, according to the newly established SAP criteria (Atlanta 2012 classification). Based on the changes in the criteria for classifying SAP, we performed an up-to-date meta-analysis. Method. We reviewed the PubMed, EMbase, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, Wanfang Database, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials electronic databases. We included randomized controlled trials comparing NG and NJ nutrition in patients with SAP. We performed the meta-analysis using the Cochrane Collaborations' RevMan 5.3 software. Results. We included four randomized controlled trials involving 237 patients with SAP. There were no significant differences in the incidence of mortality, infectious complications, digestive complications, achievement of energy balance, or length of hospital stay between the NG and NJ nutrition groups. Conclusions. NG nutrition was as safe and effective as NJ nutrition in patients with SAP. Further studies are needed to confirm our results. PMID:27340401

  11. Nutrition in acute pancreatitis: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Lodewijkx, Piet J; Besselink, Marc G; Witteman, Ben J; Schepers, Nicolien J; Gooszen, Hein G; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C; Bakker, Olaf J; On Behalf Of The Dutch Pancreatitis Study Group

    2016-05-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis poses unique nutritional challenges. The optimal nutritional support in patients with severe acute pancreatitis has been a subject of debate for decades. This review provides a critical review of the available literature. According to current literature, enteral nutrition is superior to parenteral nutrition, although several limitations should be taken into account. The optimal route of enteral nutrition remains unclear, but normal or nasogastric tube feeding seems safe when tolerated. In patients with predicted severe acute pancreatitis an on-demand feeding strategy is advised and when patients do not tolerate an oral diet after 72 hours, enteral nutrition can be started. The use of supplements, both parenteral as enteral, are not recommended. Optimal nutritional support in severe cases often requires a tailor-made approach with day-to-day evaluation of its effectiveness. PMID:26823272

  12. [MPO-ANCA related vasculitis complicating mucinous cystadenoma of the pancreas and severe acute pancreatitis after steroid pulse therapy: a case report].

    PubMed

    Tsuruoka, Kayori; Sekiya, Syuusuke; Yokoyama, Takeshi; Koitabashi, Kenichirou; Shimazaki, Minako; Sakurada, Tsutomu; Shirai, Sayuri; Yasuda, Takashi; Kimura, Kenjirou

    2008-01-01

    A 72-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital because of massive proteinuria of 2.2 g/day. She had seen a general practitioner for management of Basedow disease, diabetes mellitus and hypertension for 24 years. On admission, she complained of anorexia and nausea. Laboratory data showed serum creatinine of 3.62 mg/dL and MPO-ANCA of 68 EU. Renal biopsy revealed crescentic glomerulonephritis complicated with membranous nephropathy. Thiamazole (MMI), which was being given for Basedow disease for years, was withdrawn on the suspicion as a cause of MPO-ANCA. Three years after the withdrawal of MMI, renal failure slowly progressed to the end-stage, while MPO-ANCA was negative. She was introduced onto hemodialysis. At that time, MPO-ANCA became positive again, the titer being 12.9 EU. Therefore, we suspected a relapse of ANCA-related vasculitis and performed steroid pulse therapy on the patient with methylprednisolone at 0.5 g/day for 3 days. On hospital day 14, MPO-ANCA became negative. On day 25, however, severe acute pancreatitis developed and a pancreatic tumor lesion was found on CT. In spite of amelioration of the pancreatitis by medical treatment, the pancreatic tumor lesion did not show any significant change. On day 48, she died of multiple organ failure. Autopsy showed a mucinous cyst adenoma of pancreas and necrotizing pancreatitis. We suspected steroid therapy as the cause of the pancreatic lesions. PMID:19069154

  13. Acute pancreatitis: clinical vs. CT findings

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, M.C.; Barkin, J.; Isikoff, M.B.; Silver stein, W.; Kalser, M.

    1982-08-01

    In a prospective study of 91 patients with acute pancreatitis, computed tomographic (CT) findings were correlated with the clinical type of acute pancreatitis. In acute edematous pancreatitis (63 patients; 16 with repeat CT), CT was normal (28%) or showed inflammation limited to the pancreas (61%). Phlegmonous changes were present in 11%, including one patient with focal pancreatic hemorrhage, indicating that clinically unsuspected hemorrhagic pancreatitis can occur. In acute necrotizing (hemorrhagic, suppurative) pancreatitis (nine patients; eight with repeat CT), no patient had a normal CT scan and 89% had phlegmonous changes. One patient had hemorrhagic pancreatitis and three had abscesses. In acute exacerbation of chronic pancreatitis (10 patients; three with repeat CT), there were pancreatic calcifications (70%), a focal mass (40%), and pancreatic ductal dilation (30%). On follow-up CT, the findings of acute pancreatitis did not always disappear with resolution of the clinical symptons. This was especialy true of phlegmonous pancreatitis, where the CT findings could persist for months.

  14. Cannabis-induced recurrent acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Howaizi, Mehran; Chahine, Mouhamad; Haydar, Fadi; Jemaa, Yassine; Lapoile, Emmanuel

    2012-12-01

    Acute pancreatitis has a large number of causes. Major causes are alcohol and gallstones. Toxic causes, mainly represented by medication-induced pancreatitis account for less than 2% of the cases. Cannabis is an anecdotally reported cause of acute pancreatitis. Six cases have previously been reported. Herein we report a new case of cannabis-induced recurrent acute pancreatitis. PMID:23402090

  15. Drug-Induced Acute Pancreatitis: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Mark R.; Hall, Oliver Morgan; Kaye, Adam M.; Kaye, Alan David

    2015-01-01

    Background The majority of drug-induced pancreatitis cases are mild to moderate in severity, but severe and even fatal cases can occur. Management of drug-induced pancreatitis requires withdrawal of the offending agent and supportive care. Methods This review focuses on differential diagnosis, clinical presentation, drug-mediated effects, treatments, and mechanisms of pancreatitis, with an emphasis on drug-induced pancreatitis. Results Although only a minority of cases associated with acute pancreatitis are linked to drugs, clinical presentation and mechanisms of injury to the pancreas are not well understood by clinicians in terms of individual drug effects in the mediation or modulation of injury to the pancreas. In recent years, a large number of commonly prescribed medications has been linked to drug-induced pancreatitis pathogenesis. Although mechanisms are proposed, the exact cause of injury is either not well understood or controversial. Conclusion Future investigation into the mechanisms of pancreatitis and an appreciation by clinicians of the drugs commonly linked to the condition will help establish earlier diagnosis and quicker cessation of offending drugs in the treatment of drug-induced acute pancreatitis. PMID:25829880

  16. Acute chylous peritonitis due to acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Georgiou, Georgios K; Harissis, Haralampos; Mitsis, Michalis; Batsis, Haralampos; Fatouros, Michalis

    2012-04-28

    We report a case of acute chylous ascites formation presenting as peritonitis (acute chylous peritonitis) in a patient suffering from acute pancreatitis due to hypertriglyceridemia and alcohol abuse. The development of chylous ascites is usually a chronic process mostly involving malignancy, trauma or surgery, and symptoms arise as a result of progressive abdominal distention. However, when accumulation of "chyle" occurs rapidly, the patient may present with signs of peritonitis. Preoperative diagnosis is difficult since the clinical picture usually suggests hollow organ perforation, appendicitis or visceral ischemia. Less than 100 cases of acute chylous peritonitis have been reported. Pancreatitis is a rare cause of chyloperitoneum and in almost all of the cases chylous ascites is discovered some days (or even weeks) after the onset of symptoms of pancreatitis. This is the second case in the literature where the patient presented with acute chylous peritonitis due to acute pancreatitis, and the presence of chyle within the abdominal cavity was discovered simultaneously with the establishment of the diagnosis of pancreatitis. The patient underwent an exploratory laparotomy for suspected perforated duodenal ulcer, since, due to hypertriglyceridemia, serum amylase values appeared within the normal range. Moreover, abdominal computed tomography imaging was not diagnostic for pancreatitis. Following abdominal lavage and drainage, the patient was successfully treated with total parenteral nutrition and octreotide. PMID:22563182

  17. Acute Scorpion Pancreatitis in Trinidad

    PubMed Central

    Bartholomew, Courtenay

    1970-01-01

    Over a two-month period 30 patients were admitted to hospital following stings of the scorpion of Trinidad, the Tityus trinitatis. In 24 cases acute pancreatitis developed soon after the sting, but in nine of these no abdominal pain occurred. All the patients made an uneventful recovery. Although such complications have been reported no pseudocyst formations or acute haemorrhagic pancreatitis occurred in this series. PMID:5443968

  18. Role of high mobility group box-1 and protection of growth hormone and somatostatin in severe acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Y.F.; Wu, M.; Ma, B.J.; Cai, D.A.; Yin, B.B.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the potential role of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) in severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) and the effects of growth hormone (G) and somatostatin (S) in SAP rats. The rats were randomly divided into 6 groups of 20 each: sham-operated, SAP, SAP+saline, SAP+G, SAP+S and SAP+G+S. Ileum and pancreas tissues of rats in each group were evaluated histologically. HMGB1 mRNA expression was measured by reverse transcription-PCR. Levels of circulating TNF-α, IL-1, IL-6, and endotoxin were also measured. In the SAP group, interstitial congestion and edema, inflammatory cell infiltration, and interstitial hemorrhage occurred in ileum and pancreas tissues. The levels of HMGB1, TNF-α, IL-1, IL-6 and endotoxin were significantly up-regulated in the SAP group compared with those in the sham-operated group, and the 7-day survival rate was 0%. In the SAP+G and SAP+S groups, the inflammatory response of the morphological structures was alleviated, the levels of HMGB1, TNF-α, IL-1, IL-6, and endotoxin were significantly decreased compared with those in the SAP group, and the survival rate was increased. Moreover, in the SAP+G+S group, all histological scores were significantly improved and the survival rate was significantly higher compared with the SAP group. In conclusion, HMGB1 might participate in pancreas and ileum injury in SAP. Growth hormone and somatostatin might play a therapeutic role in the inflammatory response of SAP. PMID:25387675

  19. Minimally Invasive Necrosectomy Techniques in Severe Acute Pancreatitis: Role of Percutaneous Necrosectomy and Video-Assisted Retroperitoneal Debridement

    PubMed Central

    Logue, Jennifer A.; Carter, C. Ross

    2015-01-01

    Consensus advocating a principle of early organ support, nutritional optimisation, followed ideally by delayed minimally invasive intervention within a “step-up” framework where possible has radically changed the surgical approach to complications of acute pancreatitis in the last 20 years. The 2012 revision of the Atlanta Classification incorporates these changes, and provides a background which underpins the complexities of individual patient management decisions. This paper discusses the place for delayed minimally invasive surgical intervention (percutaneous necrosectomy, video-assisted retroperitoneal debridement (VARD)), and the rationale for opting to adopt a percutaneous approach over endoscopic or laparoscopic approaches in different clinical situations. PMID:26587018

  20. Imaging lexicon for acute pancreatitis: 2012 Atlanta Classification revisited.

    PubMed

    Sureka, Binit; Bansal, Kalpana; Patidar, Yashwant; Arora, Ankur

    2016-02-01

    The original 1992 Atlanta Classification System for acute pancreatitis was revised in 2012 by the Atlanta Working Group, assisted by various national and international societies, through web-based consensus. This revised classification identifies two phases of acute pancreatitis: early and late. Acute pancreatitis can be either oedematous interstitial pancreatitis or necrotizing pancreatitis. Severity of the disease is categorized into three levels: mild, moderately severe and severe, depending upon organ failure and local/systemic complications. According to the type of pancreatitis, collections are further divided into acute peripancreatic fluid collection, pseudocyst, acute necrotic collection, and walled-off necrosis. Insight into the revised terminology is essential for accurate communication of imaging findings. In this review article, we will summarize the updated nomenclature and illustrate corresponding imaging findings using examples. PMID:26224684

  1. Acute pancreatitis caused by bortezomib.

    PubMed

    Solakoglu, Tevfik; Akyol, Pinar; Guney, Tekin; Dilek, Imdat; Atalay, Roni; Koseoglu, Huseyin; Akin, Ebru; Demirezer Bolat, Aylin; Buyukasik, Naciye Semnur; Ersoy, Osman

    2013-01-01

    Drug-induced pancreatitis has been reported rarely. Bortezomib is a selective and reversible proteasome inhibitor used for the treatment of patients with multiple myeloma (MM). Recently, one case report about acute pancreatitis (AP) caused by bortezomib was published in the international literature. Herein we report a case of AP in a 67-year-old male on bortezomib therapy. On the fourth day after the first administration of bortezomib, the patient admitted to the hospital with symptoms of AP. The common etiological factors for AP were all excluded. Than the patient was diagnosed as bortezomib-induced pancreatitis. PMID:23561979

  2. [The clinical practice and related reflections of staged step-up approach in the treatment of patients with severe acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Sun, Bei; Ji, Liang

    2015-09-01

    Both new insights in the pathophysiology of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) and upspringing related evidence-based supports prompt the staged step-up approach, which stress emphasis on minimal invasiveness and damage control, to be accepted and advocated by the majority of guidelines. For documented or suspected patients with infected pancreatic necrosis, an imaging-guided percutaneous catheter drainage or an endoscopic transluminal drainage should be initially performed followed by, if necessary, a minimal access retroperitoneal necrosectomy, or a video-assisted retroperitoneal debridement, or an endoscopic transluminal necrosectomy, or an even an open access necrosectomy. The outstanding performance of staged step-up approach in patients with SAP has been justified from both a clinical and a health economic point of view, meanwhile, there are some issues remained to be further elucidated and optimized. PMID:26654144

  3. Acute hepatitis E complicated by acute pancreatitis and multiorgan dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Karanth, Suman S; Khan, Zohaib; Rau, Nileshwar Radhakrishna; Rao, Karthik

    2014-01-01

    We report this rare case of a 27-year-old man who presented with acute hepatitis E and went on to develop acute epigastric pain. He was diagnosed to have acute severe pancreatitis with shock and acute renal failure due to hepatitis E. Such a phenomenon has rarely been reported in the literature, with patients following a benign course and complete recovery after conservative management and analgesia. Awareness of this potentially life-threatening complication, especially in young men from endemic areas with acute hepatitis E presenting with abdomen pain has been highlighted. PMID:24899005

  4. Management of infection in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Hartwig, Werner; Werner, Jens; Uhl, Waldemar; Büchler, Markus W

    2002-01-01

    The clinical course of acute pancreatitis varies from a mild, transitory illness to a severe, rapidly fatal disease. In about 80% to 90% of cases pancreatitis presents as a mild, self-limiting disease with low morbidity and mortality. Unlike mild pancreatitis, necrotizing pancreatitis develops in about 15% of patients, with infection of pancreatic and peripancreatic necrosis representing the single most important risk factor for a fatal outcome. Infection of pancreatic necrosis in the natural course develops in the second and third week after onset of the disease and is reported in 40% to 70% of patients with necrotizing pancreatitis. Just recently, prevention of infection by prophylactic antibiotic treatment and assessment of the infection status of pancreatic necrosis by fine-needle aspiration have been established in the management of severe pancreatitis. Because medical treatment alone will result in a mortality rate of almost 100% in patients with signs of local and systemic septic complications, patients with infected necrosis must undergo surgical intervention, which consists of an organ-preserving necrosectomy combined with a postoperative closed lavage concept that maximizes further evacuation of infected debris and exudate. However, intensive care treatment, including prophylactic antibiotics, reduces the infection rate and delays the need for surgery in most patients until the third or fourth week after the onset of symptoms. At that time, debridement of necrosis is technically easier to perform, due to better demarcation between viable and necrotic tissue compared with necrosectomy earlier in the disease. In contrast, surgery is rarely needed in the presence of sterile pancreatic necrosis. In those patients the conservative approach is supported by the present data. PMID:12483263

  5. Acute Pancreatitis in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... are the symptoms of pancreatitis? Common symptoms include abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting. However, not every patient with ... help the pancreas to recover. Patients who have abdominal pain can be treated with pain medications. Some patients ...

  6. Development of acute pancreatitis after Nissen fundoplication.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Mikihiro; Uchida, Keiichi; Otake, Kohei; Okigami, Masato; Maji, Tomoaki; Kusunoki, Masato

    2015-04-01

    Acute pancreatitis subsequent to Nissen fundoplication for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is an extremely rare adverse event. We describe a pediatric case of acute pancreatitis resulting from superior mesenteric artery syndrome (SMAS) and gas bloat after fundoplication. Gas bloat is one of the known postoperative complications after Nissen fundoplication. Poor nutrition status, which is often associated with severe pediatric GERD, is a risk factor for SMAS. In this case, development of gas bloat and SMAS led to the formation of a closed loop and increased intraluminal pressure of the duodenum and pancreatic duct. Many pediatric patients who need anti-reflux surgery face the risk of developing this entity. Preventive measures, such as treatment with prokinetics and frequent small-volume meals, should be considered until improvement of nutritional status after fundoplication. PMID:25868962

  7. Acute Pancreatitis Classifications: Basis and Key Goals.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiao Dong; Wang, Zhe Yuan; Zhang, Ling Yi; Ni, Rui; Wei, Feng Xian; Han, Wei; Zhang, Hui Han; Zhang, Ya Wu; Wei, Zhen Gang; Guo, Xiao Hu; Guo, Liu Qiang; Ma, Jian Zhong; Zhang, You Cheng

    2015-12-01

    To explore the efficacy of the revised Atlanta classification (RACAP) and the determinant-based classification of acute pancreatitis severity (DBCAPS) on the basis of clinical data and feedback from patients with acute pancreatitis (AP). The authors retrospectively investigated a total of 573 patients with AP admitted to our hospital between December 2011 and December 2014. The definitions of severity and local complications in AP using RACAP and DBCAPS are presented and common points and mutual differences between the 2 groups are analyzed and discussed. Classification according to RACAP and DBCAPS found 86 (15%) and 178 (31.1%) mild cases (P < 0.01), 269 (46.9%) and 176 (30.7%) moderate cases (P < 0.01), and 218 (38.0%) and 219 (38.2%) severe cases (P = 0.95), respectively. A major contribution of DBCAPS is the introduction of a new type of severe AP, critical AP, identified in 4 patients (0.7%). Complications were observed in 313 RACAP-defined cases and 153 DBCAPS-defined cases (P < 0.01). Among the 313 RACAP-defined cases, acute peripancreatic fluid collection (236 patients, 75.40%), pancreatic pseudocysts (20 patients, 6.4%), acute necrotic collection (42 patients, 13.4%), and walled-off necrosis (15 patients, 4.8%) were observed. Among the 153 DBCAPS-defined cases, sterile peripancreatic necrosis (105 patients, 68.6%), sterile pancreatic necrosis (44 patients, 28.8%), infected peripancreatic necrosis (2 patients, 1.3%), and infected pancreatic necrosis (2/153 patients, 1.3%) were observed. Both classifications adopted organ failure and complications as determinants of severity. Revised Atlanta classification refined local complications and DBCAPS modified severity to include critical AP. In accordance with the demands of precision medicine, a combination of the 2 could be important for further clinical practice and scientific research. PMID:26632905

  8. Acute pancreatitis induced by anticancer chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ben Kridis, W; Khanfir, A; Frikha, M

    2013-01-01

    Drug-induced pancreatitis is rare (1.4-2%). This report describes a 20-year-old female patient who developed acute pancreatitis while being treated for neurosarcoma of abdominal wall with the ifosfamide and doxorubicin regimen. Although it is unusual, it is important to consider chemotherapeutic agents as a possible etiology for acute pancreatitis in patients presenting with gastrointestinal symptoms. PMID:24455804

  9. Acute Pancreatitis Due to a Duodenal Ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Pyeon, Sung Ik; Kim, Yong Tae; Lee, Ban Seok; Lee, Sang Ho; Lee, Jae Nam; Cheong, Jae Hoon; Oh, Kong Jin

    2014-01-01

    Duodenal ulcers and acute pancreatitis are two of the most commonly encountered gastrointestinal diseases among the general population. However, duodenal ulcer-induced pancreatitis is very rarely reported worldwide. This report elaborates on a distinct medical treatment that contributes to partial or complete treatment of acute pancreatitis induced by a duodenal ulcer scar. PMID:25505728

  10. Acute Pancreatitis in a Patient with Complicated Falciparum Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Prasanta Kumar; Lynrah, Kryshan G; Ete, Tony; Issar, Neel Kanth

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is one of the most common protozoan diseases, especially in tropical countries. The clinical manifestation of malaria, especially falciparum malaria varies from mild acute febrile illness to life threatening severe systemic complications involving one or more organ systems. We would like to report a case of complicated falciparum malaria involving cerebral, renal, hepatic system along with acute pancreatitis. The patient was successfully treated with anti malarial and other supportive treatment. To the best of our knowledge there are very few reports of acute pancreatitis due to malaria. Falciparum malaria therefore should be added to the list of infectious agents causing acute pancreatitis especially in areas where malaria is endemic. PMID:26894117

  11. Intra-abdominal hypertension and acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Mifkovic, A; Skultety, J; Sykora, P; Prochotsky, A; Okolicany, R

    2013-01-01

    Intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) contributes to organ dysfunction and leads to the development of the abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS). IAH and ACS are relatively frequent findings in patiens with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) and are associated with deterioration in organ functions. The most affected are cardiovascular, respiratory and renal functions. The incidence of IAH in patients with SAP is approximately 60-80%. There is an accumulating evidence in human and animal studies that changes of perfusion, particularly to the microvasculature, are crucial events in the progression of acute pancreatitis (AP). The perfusion of the small and large intestine is impaired due to reduced arterial pressure, increased vascular resistence and diminished portal blood flow. Bacterial translocation has been described in patients with ACS, and this may apply to patients with SAP. Approximately 30-40% of SAP patients develop ACS because of pancreatic (retroperitoneal) inflammation, peripancreatic tissue edema, formation of fluid collections or abdominal distension. Surgical debridement was the preferred treatment to control necrotizing pancreatitis in the past. However, the management of necrotizing pancreatitis has changed over the last decade. The main objective of this article is to describe the association between IAH and AP and to emphasize this situation in clinical praxis as well (Fig. 1, Ref. 38). PMID:23406186

  12. Diosmetin ameliorates the severity of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in mice by inhibiting the activation of the nuclear factor-κB

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ge; Wan, Rong; Yin, Guojian; Xiong, Jie; Hu, Yanling; Xing, Miao; Cang, Xiaofeng; Fan, Yuting; Xiao, Wenqin; Qiu, Lei; Wang, Xingpeng; Hu, Guoyong

    2014-01-01

    Diosmetin (3’, 5, 7-trihydroxy-4’-methoxyflavone), the aglycone part of the flavonoid glycosides diosmin occurs naturally in citrus fruit, was considered to exhibit anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. Our study aimed to investigate the effect of diosmetin in a murine model of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis (AP). Experimental AP was induced in mice by seven intraperitoneal injection of cerulein (50 ug/kg) at hourly intervals. Diosmetin (100 mg/kg) or vehicle was pretreated 2 h before the first cerulein injection. After 6 h, 9 h, 12 h of the first cerulein injection, the severity of acute pancreatitis was evaluated biochemically and morphologically. Pretreatment with diosmetin significantly reduced serum levels of amylase and lipase; the histological injury; the secretion of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-6; myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, trypsinogen activation peptide (TAP) level, the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS); and the nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation in cerulein-induced AP. This study showed that administration of diosmetin demonstrated a beneficial effect on the course of cerulein-induced AP in mice. Therefore, diosmetin may become a new therapeutic agent in future clinical trials for treatment of AP. PMID:24966921

  13. Diosmetin ameliorates the severity of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in mice by inhibiting the activation of the nuclear factor-κB.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ge; Wan, Rong; Yin, Guojian; Xiong, Jie; Hu, Yanling; Xing, Miao; Cang, Xiaofeng; Fan, Yuting; Xiao, Wenqin; Qiu, Lei; Wang, Xingpeng; Hu, Guoyong

    2014-01-01

    Diosmetin (3', 5, 7-trihydroxy-4'-methoxyflavone), the aglycone part of the flavonoid glycosides diosmin occurs naturally in citrus fruit, was considered to exhibit anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. Our study aimed to investigate the effect of diosmetin in a murine model of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis (AP). Experimental AP was induced in mice by seven intraperitoneal injection of cerulein (50 ug/kg) at hourly intervals. Diosmetin (100 mg/kg) or vehicle was pretreated 2 h before the first cerulein injection. After 6 h, 9 h, 12 h of the first cerulein injection, the severity of acute pancreatitis was evaluated biochemically and morphologically. Pretreatment with diosmetin significantly reduced serum levels of amylase and lipase; the histological injury; the secretion of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-6; myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, trypsinogen activation peptide (TAP) level, the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS); and the nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation in cerulein-induced AP. This study showed that administration of diosmetin demonstrated a beneficial effect on the course of cerulein-induced AP in mice. Therefore, diosmetin may become a new therapeutic agent in future clinical trials for treatment of AP. PMID:24966921

  14. Energetic etiologies of acute pancreatitis: A report of five cases.

    PubMed

    Shmelev, Artem; Abdo, Alain; Sachdev, Sarina; Shah, Urvi; Kowdley, Gopal C; Cunningham, Steven C

    2015-11-15

    There are several common causes of acute pancreatitis, principally excessive alcohol intake and gallstones, and there are many rare causes. However, cases of pancreatitis still occur in the absence of any recognizable factors, and these cases of idiopathic pancreatitis suggest the presence of unrecognized etiologies. Five cases of acute pancreatitis in four patients came to attention due to a strong temporal association with exposure to nerve stimulators and energy drinks. Given that these cases of pancreatitis were otherwise unexplained, and given that these exposures were not clearly known to be associated with pancreatitis, we performed a search for precedent cases and for mechanistic bases. No clear precedent cases were found in PubMed and only scant, weak precedent cases were found in public-health databases. However, there was a coherent body of intriguing literature in support of a mechanistic basis for these exposures playing a role in the etiology of pancreatitis. PMID:26600983

  15. Energetic etiologies of acute pancreatitis: A report of five cases

    PubMed Central

    Shmelev, Artem; Abdo, Alain; Sachdev, Sarina; Shah, Urvi; Kowdley, Gopal C; Cunningham, Steven C

    2015-01-01

    There are several common causes of acute pancreatitis, principally excessive alcohol intake and gallstones, and there are many rare causes. However, cases of pancreatitis still occur in the absence of any recognizable factors, and these cases of idiopathic pancreatitis suggest the presence of unrecognized etiologies. Five cases of acute pancreatitis in four patients came to attention due to a strong temporal association with exposure to nerve stimulators and energy drinks. Given that these cases of pancreatitis were otherwise unexplained, and given that these exposures were not clearly known to be associated with pancreatitis, we performed a search for precedent cases and for mechanistic bases. No clear precedent cases were found in PubMed and only scant, weak precedent cases were found in public-health databases. However, there was a coherent body of intriguing literature in support of a mechanistic basis for these exposures playing a role in the etiology of pancreatitis. PMID:26600983

  16. Improving the Outcome of Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Marco J

    2016-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is the most common indication for hospital admission and its incidence is rising. It has a variable prognosis, which is mainly dependent upon the development of persistent organ failure and infected necrotizing pancreatitis. In the past few years, based on large-scale multicenter randomized trials, some novel insights regarding clinical management have emerged. In patients with infected pancreatic necrosis, a step-up approach of percutaneous catheter drainage followed by necrosectomy only when the patient does not improve, reduces new-onset organ failure and prevents the need for necrosectomy in about a third of patients. A randomized pilot study comparing surgical to endoscopic necrosectomy in patients with infected necrotizing pancreatitis showed a striking reduction of the pro-inflammatory response following endoscopic necrosectomy. These promising results have recently been tested in a large multicenter randomized trial whose results are eagerly awaited. Contrary to earlier data from uncontrolled studies, a large multicenter randomized trial comparing early (within 24 h) nasoenteric tube feeding compared with an oral diet after 72 h, did not show that early nasoenteric tube feeding was superior in reducing the rate of infection or death in patients with AP at high risk for complications. Although early ERCP does not have a role in the treatment of predicted mild pancreatitis, except in the case of concomitant cholangitis, it may ameliorate the disease course in patients with predicted severe pancreatitis. Currently, a large-scale randomized study is underway and results are expected in 2017. PMID:27336312

  17. Acute Pancreatitis: Landmark Studies, Management Decisions, and the Future.

    PubMed

    Banks, Peter A

    2016-01-01

    A great deal of progress has been made in the last 50 years in the diagnosis and treatment of acute pancreatitis. Many landmark studies have been published and have focused on the classification of acute pancreatitis, markers of severity, important roles of imaging and endoscopy, and improvements in our treatment. This report will review several landmark studies, describe ongoing controversies in management decisions including standards of early fluid resuscitation and appropriate use of enteral feeding, and outline what will be required in the future to improve the care of patients with acute pancreatitis. PMID:27077712

  18. Tamoxifen-induced hypertriglyceridemia causing acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Hemant Kumar; Prasad, Mahendranath S.; Kandasamy, Arun K.; Dharanipragada, Kadambari

    2016-01-01

    Tamoxifen has both antagonistic and agonistic tissue-specific actions. It can have a paradoxical estrogenic effect on lipid metabolism resulting in elevated triglyceride and chylomicron levels. This can cause life-threatening complications like acute pancreatitis. To our knowledge, very few cases of tamoxifen-induced pancreatitis have been reported in the literature. We report a case of severe hypertriglyceridemia and acute pancreatitis following tamoxifen use. A 50-year-old diabetic lady was on tamoxifen (20mg/day) hormonal therapy for breast cancer. Within 3 months of starting therapy, she developed hypertriglyceridemia and acute pancreatitis. Laboratory values include: Serum amylase 778 IU/L, total cholesterol 785 mg/dL, triglycerides 4568 mg/dL and high-density lipoproteins (HDL) 12 mg/dL. Tamoxifen was substituted with letrozole and atorvastatin started. There was a prompt reversal of the adverse effects. Effects on lipid profile must be considered while initiating tamoxifen in predisposed individuals as the consequences are life threatening. PMID:27127396

  19. Tamoxifen-induced hypertriglyceridemia causing acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Hemant Kumar; Prasad, Mahendranath S; Kandasamy, Arun K; Dharanipragada, Kadambari

    2016-01-01

    Tamoxifen has both antagonistic and agonistic tissue-specific actions. It can have a paradoxical estrogenic effect on lipid metabolism resulting in elevated triglyceride and chylomicron levels. This can cause life-threatening complications like acute pancreatitis. To our knowledge, very few cases of tamoxifen-induced pancreatitis have been reported in the literature. We report a case of severe hypertriglyceridemia and acute pancreatitis following tamoxifen use. A 50-year-old diabetic lady was on tamoxifen (20mg/day) hormonal therapy for breast cancer. Within 3 months of starting therapy, she developed hypertriglyceridemia and acute pancreatitis. Laboratory values include: Serum amylase 778 IU/L, total cholesterol 785 mg/dL, triglycerides 4568 mg/dL and high-density lipoproteins (HDL) 12 mg/dL. Tamoxifen was substituted with letrozole and atorvastatin started. There was a prompt reversal of the adverse effects. Effects on lipid profile must be considered while initiating tamoxifen in predisposed individuals as the consequences are life threatening. PMID:27127396

  20. Clinical practice guideline: management of acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Joshua A.; Hsu, Jonathan; Bawazeer, Mohammad; Marshall, John; Friedrich, Jan O.; Nathens, Avery; Coburn, Natalie; May, Gary R.; Pearsall, Emily; McLeod, Robin S.

    2016-01-01

    There has been an increase in the incidence of acute pancreatitis reported worldwide. Despite improvements in access to care, imaging and interventional techniques, acute pancreatitis continues to be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Despite the availability of clinical practice guidelines for the management of acute pancreatitis, recent studies auditing the clinical management of the condition have shown important areas of noncompliance with evidence-based recommendations. This underscores the importance of creating understandable and implementable recommendations for the diagnosis and management of acute pancreatitis. The purpose of the present guideline is to provide evidence-based recommendations for the management of both mild and severe acute pancreatitis as well as the management of complications of acute pancreatitis and of gall stone–induced pancreatitis. Une hausse de l’incidence de pancréatite aiguë a été constatée à l’échelle mondiale. Malgré l’amélioration de l’accès aux soins et aux techniques d’imagerie et d’intervention, la pancréatite aiguë est toujours associée à une morbidité et une mortalité importantes. Bien qu’il existe des guides de pratique clinique pour la prise en charge de la pancréatite aiguë, des études récentes sur la vérification de la prise en charge clinique de cette affection révèlent des lacunes importantes dans la conformité aux recommandations fondées sur des données probantes. Ces résultats mettent en relief l’importance de formuler des recommandations compréhensibles et applicables pour le diagnostic et la prise en charge de la pancréatite aiguë. La présente ligne directrice vise à fournir des recommandations fondées sur des données probantes pour la prise en charge de la pancréatite aiguë, qu’elle soit bénigne ou grave, ainsi que de ses complications et de celles de la pancréatite causée par un calcul biliaire. PMID:27007094

  1. [Biochemical diagnostics in acute pancreatitis recognition and outcome predicition].

    PubMed

    Olczyk, Paweł; Kozma, Ewa M; Olczyk, Krystyna; Komosińska-Vassev, Katarzyna

    2004-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a common disease associated with an improper activation of pancreatic zymogens leading to autodigestion of the gland and if excessive--to multiple organ dysfunction. Acute necrotizing pancreatitis manifested by 20% of patients with acute pancreatitis is a life threatening disorder requiring subsequent management in intensive care unit. Unfortunately, none of biochemical tests presently used for laboratory assessment of acute pancreatitis at the early stage of the disease is able to estimate accurately: diagnosis, etiology and severity. At present, diagnosis of acute pancreatitis is based on evaluation of serum amylase and lipase activity due to easy availability and simplicity of these enzymatic tests. Low specificity of the mentioned enzymes resulted in studies concerning pancreatic isoamylase, elastase-1, chymotrypsine, procarboxy-peptidase B, trypsinogen-2 and immunoreactive trypsinogen usefulness in the laboratory diagnosis of AP. The prediction of severity in acute pancreatitis using multifactorial scoring systems is cumbersome especially due to their complexity. On the other hand the biochemical method of choice, estimation of serum C reactive protein, is useless in the early phase of disease. Unfortunately, the computed tomography--the most accurate method in severity assessing--is not always available. Recent studies have brought some progress in severity predicting, such as phospholipase A2, cellular immunity markers, cytokines, activation peptides of trypsinogen and carboxypeptidase B, procalcitonine, pancreatitis associated protein and serum amyloid A. All these newly introduced biochemical methods allow to look optimistically into the future of laboratory diagnostics of the acute pancreatitis believing that the problem of diagnosing and predicting the AP severity will be solved. PMID:15850341

  2. Acute pancreatitis: prognostic value of CT

    SciTech Connect

    Balthazar, E.J.; Ranson, J.H.C.; Naidich, D.P.; Megibow, A.J.; Caccavale, R.; Cooper, M.M.

    1985-09-01

    In 83 patients with acute pancreatitis, the initial computed tomographic (CT) examinations were classified by degree of disease severity (grades A-E) and were correlated with the clinical follow-up, objective prognostic signs, and complications and death. The length of hospitalization correlated well with the severity of the initial CT findings. Abscesses occurred in 21.6% of the entire group, compared with 60.0% of grade E patients. Pleural effusions were also more common in grade E patients. Abscesses were seen in 80.0% of patients with six to eight prognostic signs, compared with 12.5% of those with zero to two. The use of prognostic signs with initial CT findings results in improved prognostic accuracy. Early CT examination of patients with acute pancreatitis is a useful prognostic indicator of morbidity and mortality.

  3. Questions about the use of antibiotics in acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    De Campos, Tercio; Assef, Jose Cesar; Rasslan, Samir

    2006-01-01

    Background and objective The use of antibiotics in acute pancreatitis despite recent clinical trials remains controversial. The aim of this study is to review the latest clinical trials and guidelines about antibiotics in acute pancreatitis and determine its proper use. Methods Through a Medline search, we selected and analyzed pertinent randomized clinical trials and guidelines that evaluated the use of antibiotics in acute pancreatitis. We answered the most frequent questions about this topic. Results and conclusion Based on these clinical trials and guidelines, we conclude that the best treatment currently is the use of antibiotics in patients with severe acute pancreatitis with more than 30% of pancreatic necrosis. The best option for the treatment is Imipenem 3 × 500 mg/day i.v. for 14 days. Alternatively, Ciprofloxacin 2 × 400 mg/day i.v. associated with Metronidazole 3 × 500 mg for 14 days can also be considered as an option. PMID:16820058

  4. Hereditary Angioedema Presenting as Recurrent Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Berger, Tal D; Garty, Ben-Zion

    2016-02-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) may manifest with swelling of the face, extremities, and upper airways. Gastrointestinal symptoms are also common and may include abdominal pain, vomiting, and diarrhea. However, pancreatic involvement is rare and has been reported only in a few adults with previously diagnosed HAE. We describe a 6-year-old boy who presented with recurrent severe abdominal pain accompanied by an elevation in pancreatic enzyme levels, without subcutaneous or cutaneous angioedema. His symptoms had begun 18 months earlier, and he was hospitalized several times before the present admission with a diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. More comprehensive analysis yielded low levels of C2, C4, CH50, and C1 esterase inhibitor, establishing the diagnosis of HAE. One year after diagnosis, swelling of the extremities appeared for the first time. This is the first report of a child in whom pancreatic disease was the presenting symptom of HAE. HAE should be included in the differential diagnosis of recurrent pancreatitis in children. PMID:26812927

  5. Drug induced acute pancreatitis: Does it exist?

    PubMed Central

    Tenner, Scott

    2014-01-01

    As the incidence of acute pancreatitis continues to rise, establishing the etiology in order to prevent recurrence is important. Although the etiology of acute pancreatitis is not difficult in the majority of patients, almost a quarter of patients are initially labeled as having idiopathic acute pancreatitis. When confronted with a patient with acute pancreatitis and no clear etiology defined as an absence alcoholism, gallstones (ultrasound and/or MRI), a normal triglyceride level, and absence of tumor, it often appears reasonable to consider a drug as the cause of acute pancreatitis. Over 100 drugs have been implicated by case reports as causing acute pancreatitis. While some of these case reports are well written, many case reports represent poorly written experiences of the clinician simply implicating a drug without a careful evaluation. Over-reliance on case reports while ignoring randomized clinical trials and large pharmacoepidemiologic surveys has led to confusion about drug induced acute pancreatitis. This review will explain that drug induced acute pancreatitis does occur, but it is rare, and over diagnosis leads to misconceptions about the disease resulting in inappropriate patient care, increased litigation and a failure to address the true entity: idiopathic acute pancreatitis. PMID:25469020

  6. Drug induced acute pancreatitis: does it exist?

    PubMed

    Tenner, Scott

    2014-11-28

    As the incidence of acute pancreatitis continues to rise, establishing the etiology in order to prevent recurrence is important. Although the etiology of acute pancreatitis is not difficult in the majority of patients, almost a quarter of patients are initially labeled as having idiopathic acute pancreatitis. When confronted with a patient with acute pancreatitis and no clear etiology defined as an absence alcoholism, gallstones (ultrasound and/or MRI), a normal triglyceride level, and absence of tumor, it often appears reasonable to consider a drug as the cause of acute pancreatitis. Over 100 drugs have been implicated by case reports as causing acute pancreatitis. While some of these case reports are well written, many case reports represent poorly written experiences of the clinician simply implicating a drug without a careful evaluation. Over-reliance on case reports while ignoring randomized clinical trials and large pharmacoepidemiologic surveys has led to confusion about drug induced acute pancreatitis. This review will explain that drug induced acute pancreatitis does occur, but it is rare, and over diagnosis leads to misconceptions about the disease resulting in inappropriate patient care, increased litigation and a failure to address the true entity: idiopathic acute pancreatitis. PMID:25469020

  7. Plasmablastic Lymphoma Mimicking Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Virk, Hafeez Ul Hassan; Cheema, Ahmad R.; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2016-01-01

    Background. Plasmablastic lymphoma (PBL) is a rare B-cell neoplasm. It predominantly occurs in the oral cavity of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients and exhibits a highly aggressive clinical behavior. Case Presentation. We describe an unusual case of a 37-year-old HIV-positive male who presented with acute pancreatitis secondary to multiple peripancreatic masses compressing the pancreas. Histopathological examination of the lesions showed diffuse and cohesive pattern of large B-cells resembling immunoblasts or plasmablasts. The neoplastic cells were positive for BOB1 and MUM1, partially positive for CD79a, and negative for CD20, CD56, CD138, CD3, CD5, AE1/AE3, and HHV8. Epstein-Barr virus-encoded RNA in situ hybridization was positive. These features were consistent with PBL. The patient was initiated on cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (CHOP) chemotherapy, demonstrating a striking response. Conclusion. To our research, this is the first report of PBL with the initial presentation of acute pancreatitis. The findings in this case suggest that PBL should be included in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic and peripancreatic tumors. PMID:27034868

  8. Plasmablastic Lymphoma Mimicking Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Inayat, Faisal; Virk, Hafeez Ul Hassan; Cheema, Ahmad R; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2016-01-01

    Background. Plasmablastic lymphoma (PBL) is a rare B-cell neoplasm. It predominantly occurs in the oral cavity of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients and exhibits a highly aggressive clinical behavior. Case Presentation. We describe an unusual case of a 37-year-old HIV-positive male who presented with acute pancreatitis secondary to multiple peripancreatic masses compressing the pancreas. Histopathological examination of the lesions showed diffuse and cohesive pattern of large B-cells resembling immunoblasts or plasmablasts. The neoplastic cells were positive for BOB1 and MUM1, partially positive for CD79a, and negative for CD20, CD56, CD138, CD3, CD5, AE1/AE3, and HHV8. Epstein-Barr virus-encoded RNA in situ hybridization was positive. These features were consistent with PBL. The patient was initiated on cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (CHOP) chemotherapy, demonstrating a striking response. Conclusion. To our research, this is the first report of PBL with the initial presentation of acute pancreatitis. The findings in this case suggest that PBL should be included in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic and peripancreatic tumors. PMID:27034868

  9. Atorvastatin Use Associated With Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Shih-Wei; Lin, Cheng-Li; Liao, Kuan-Fu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Few data are present in the literature on the relationship between atorvastatin use and acute pancreatitis. The aim of this study was to explore this issue in Taiwan. Using representative claims data established from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Program, this case–control study consisted of 5810 cases aged 20 to 84 years with a first-time diagnosis of acute pancreatitis during the period 1998 to 2011and 5733 randomly selected controls without acute pancreatitis. Both cases and controls were matched by sex, age, comorbidities, and index year of diagnosing acute pancreatitis. Subjects who at least received 1 prescription for other statins or nonstatin lipid-lowering drugs were excluded from the study. If subjects never had 1 prescription for atorvastatin, they were defined as never use of atorvastatin. Current use of atorvastatin was defined as subjects whose last remaining 1 tablet of atorvastatin was noted ≤7 days before the date of diagnosing acute pancreatitis. Late use of atorvastatin was defined as subjects whose last remaining 1 tablet of atorvastatin was noted >7 days before the date of diagnosing acute pancreatitis. The odds ratio with 95% confidence interval of acute pancreatitis associated with atorvastatin use was calculated by using the logistic regression analysis. The logistic regression analysis revealed that the odds ratio of acute pancreatitis was 1.67 for subjects with current use of atorvastatin (95% confidence interval 1.18, 2.38), when compared with subjects with never use of atorvastatin. The odds ratio decreased to 1.15 for those with late use of atorvastatin (95% confidence interval 0.87, 1.52), but without statistical significance. Current use of atorvastatin is associated with the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. Clinically, clinicians should consider the possibility of atorvastatin-associated acute pancreatitis when patients present with a diagnosis of acute pancreatitis without a definite etiology but are taking

  10. Computerized tomography in acute and chronic pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Kalmar, J.A.; Matthews, C.C.; Bishop, L.A.

    1984-11-01

    Modern imaging techniques have revolutionized the diagnostic evaluation of pancreatitis, primarily demonstrating its complications. Computerized tomography (CT) is a more sensitive method than ultrasonography and pancreatic ductography. A chart review revealed 214 patients at our hospital with a discharge diagnosis of pancreatitis. Sixty patients had CT for evaluation of possible complications. Only five scans were normal. Of 37 cases of acute pancreatitis, 92% demonstrated localized or diffuse enlargement, and 65% showed loss of pancreatic outline. Other frequent findings included thickening of perirenal fascia (49%), ileus (43%), edema of mesentery (35%), and inflammatory exudate (32%). Abscess and pseudocyst were each detected in 8% of cases. In chronic pancreatitis 65% of patients showed localized or diffuse pancreatic enlargement. Atrophy of the gland (30%), calcification (30%), pseudocyst (26%), and dilated pancreatic ducts (17%) were also seen. CT is effective in evaluating pancreatitis and its complications. 14 references, 5 figures, 2 tables.

  11. Experimental Models in Syrian Golden Hamster Replicate Human Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yunan; Kayoumu, Abudurexiti; Lu, Guotao; Xu, Pengfei; Qiu, Xu; Chen, Liye; Qi, Rong; Huang, Shouxiong; Li, Weiqin; Wang, Yuhui; Liu, George

    2016-01-01

    The hamster has been shown to share a variety of metabolic similarities with humans. To replicate human acute pancreatitis with hamsters, we comparatively studied the efficacy of common methods, such as the peritoneal injections of caerulein, L-arginine, the retrograde infusion of sodium taurocholate, and another novel model with concomitant administration of ethanol and fatty acid. The severity of pancreatitis was evaluated by serum amylase activity, pathological scores, myeloperoxidase activity, and the expression of inflammation factors in pancreas. The results support that the severity of pathological injury is consistent with the pancreatitis induced in mice and rat using the same methods. Specifically, caerulein induced mild edematous pancreatitis accompanied by minimal lung injury, while L-arginine induced extremely severe pancreatic injury including necrosis and neutrophil infiltration. Infusion of Na-taurocholate into the pancreatic duct induced necrotizing pancreatitis in the head of pancreas and lighter inflammation in the distal region. The severity of acute pancreatitis induced by combination of ethanol and fatty acids was between the extent of caerulein and L-arginine induction, with obvious inflammatory cells infiltration. In view of the advantages in lipid metabolism features, hamster models are ideally suited for the studies of pancreatitis associated with altered metabolism in humans. PMID:27302647

  12. Experimental Models in Syrian Golden Hamster Replicate Human Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yunan; Kayoumu, Abudurexiti; Lu, Guotao; Xu, Pengfei; Qiu, Xu; Chen, Liye; Qi, Rong; Huang, Shouxiong; Li, Weiqin; Wang, Yuhui; Liu, George

    2016-01-01

    The hamster has been shown to share a variety of metabolic similarities with humans. To replicate human acute pancreatitis with hamsters, we comparatively studied the efficacy of common methods, such as the peritoneal injections of caerulein, L-arginine, the retrograde infusion of sodium taurocholate, and another novel model with concomitant administration of ethanol and fatty acid. The severity of pancreatitis was evaluated by serum amylase activity, pathological scores, myeloperoxidase activity, and the expression of inflammation factors in pancreas. The results support that the severity of pathological injury is consistent with the pancreatitis induced in mice and rat using the same methods. Specifically, caerulein induced mild edematous pancreatitis accompanied by minimal lung injury, while L-arginine induced extremely severe pancreatic injury including necrosis and neutrophil infiltration. Infusion of Na-taurocholate into the pancreatic duct induced necrotizing pancreatitis in the head of pancreas and lighter inflammation in the distal region. The severity of acute pancreatitis induced by combination of ethanol and fatty acids was between the extent of caerulein and L-arginine induction, with obvious inflammatory cells infiltration. In view of the advantages in lipid metabolism features, hamster models are ideally suited for the studies of pancreatitis associated with altered metabolism in humans. PMID:27302647

  13. ‘Step-port’ laparoscopic cystgastrostomy for the management of organized solid predominant post-acute fluid collections after severe acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Simon C; Robertson, Bernard F; Dickson, Euan J; McKay, Colin J; Carter, C Ross

    2014-01-01

    Background: Post-acute pancreatic collections (PAPCs) may require intervention when persistent, large or symptomatic. An open cystgastrostomy is an effective treatment option particularly for larger, solid predominant collections. A laparoscopic cystgastrostomy (LCG) as initially described, could be technically challenging. This report describes the evolution of the operative technique and the results from LCG in a tertiary referral centre. Methods: Retrospective analysis of the unit’s prospectively populated database was conducted. All patients who underwent a surgical cystgastrostomy (SCG) were identified. Patient demographics, outcome and complications were collected and analysed. Results: Forty-four patients underwent SCG: 8 open and 36 laparoscopic. Of the 36 LCG, 6 required open conversion, although with evolution of the technique all of the last 17 cases were completed laparoscopically. The median interquartile range (IQR) length of stay in patients completed laparoscopically was 6 (2–10) compared with 15.5 days (8–19) in those patients who were converted (P = 0.0351). The only peri-operative complication after a LCG was a self-limiting upper gastrointestinal bleed. With a median (IQR) follow-up of 891 days (527–1495) one patient required re-intervention for a residual collection with no recurrent collections identified. Conclusion: LCG is a safe and effective procedure in patients with large, solid predominant PAPCs. With increased experience and technical expertise conversion rates can be lowered and outcome optimized. PMID:23551864

  14. Procalcitonin Strip Test as an Independent Predictor in Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Dias, Brendan Hermenigildo; Rozario, Anthony Prakash; Olakkengil, Santosh Antony; V, Anirudh

    2015-12-01

    Plasma procalcitonin (PCT) is a highly specific marker for the diagnosis of bacterial infection and sepsis. Studies have demonstrated its role in the setting of sepsis and acute pancreatitis. This study aims to analyze and compare the prognostic efficacy of plasma procalcitonin strip test in acute pancreatitis. A prospective study was conducted in the department of general surgery from June 2012 to June 2013. Plasma procalcitonin was estimated by the semiquantitative strip test. The study included a total of 50 patients diagnosed to have acute pancreatitis. Data was collected and statistically analyzed using SPSS version 17. Thirty-nine out of the 50 patients (78 %) were males with a mean age of 46.8 years (range, 25-78 years) and 25 patients (50 %) had ethanol-induced pancreatitis, while 13 patients (26 %) had gall stone pancreatitis. Plasma PCT values were found to correlate better than CRP levels and total leukocyte count with the total duration of hospitalization, ITU, and ICU stay, as well as with the progression to severe acute pancreatitis. A cut off for plasma PCT of >2 ng/mL was found to be 100 % sensitive and 100 % specific and a cut off for CRP of >19 mg/dL was 70 % sensitive and 65 % specific for predicting the progression to severe acute pancreatitis. Plasma PCT also correlated well with antibiotic requirement. A cut off value of >0.5 ng/mL for plasma PCT was 100 % sensitive and 80 % specific and a cut off value of >18 mg/dL for CRP was 86 % sensitive and 63 % specific for predicting antibiotic requirement. Plasma procalcitonin is an early and reliable prognostic indicator in acute pancreatitis. The procalcitonin strip test is a rapid test which is useful in analyzing prognosis in patients with acute pancreatitis. PMID:27011501

  15. Acute pancreatitis in a multi-ethnic population.

    PubMed

    Kandasami, P; Harunarashid, Hanafiah; Kaur, Harjit

    2002-06-01

    There is very little information in literature describing ethnic variations in etiologic and clinical outcome of acute pancreatitis in the Asian population. This study describes the demographic, etiologic and clinical course of acute pancreatitis among the three main races in Malaysia namely, the Malays, Chinese and Indians. One hundred and thirty-three consecutive patients were admitted for acute pancreatitis for the period January 1994 to July 1999 and they consisted of 77 males and 56 females with a mean age of 43.5 years (SD+/- 14.7). The racial breakdown of acute pancreatitis was: Malays 38 (28.6%), Chinese 19 (14.3%), Indians 75 (56.4%) and 1 (0.8%) patient was an orang asli. The incidence of alcohol association with acute pancreatitis was significantly increased in the males, while gallstone pancreatitis was principally a disease of the female. Alcohol was identified as the predominant factor associated with acute pancreatitis among the Indians (73.3%) and in contrast, gallstone was the commonest associated etiologic factor for the Malays and Chinese. No etiologic factor could be identified in a substantial proportion of the Malay patients (60.5%) when compared to the Chinese (36.8%) and Indians (35%). Severe disease developed in 25% of the cases reviewed but there was no difference in of the rate of severe pancreatitis in terms of ethnic groupings or etiologic factors. The overall mortality rate was 7.5% and the commonest cause of death was multi-organ failure. The study recognises that there are differences in the characteristics of acute pancreatitis among the three major races in the country and this divergence is primarily due to sociocultural habits. PMID:12380724

  16. Acute pancreatitis: international classification and nomenclature.

    PubMed

    Bollen, T L

    2016-02-01

    The incidence of acute pancreatitis (AP) is increasing and it is associated with a major healthcare concern. New insights in the pathophysiology, better imaging techniques, and novel treatment options for complicated AP prompted the update of the 1992 Atlanta Classification. Updated nomenclature for pancreatic collections based on imaging criteria is proposed. Adoption of the newly Revised Classification of Acute Pancreatitis 2012 by radiologists should help standardise reports and facilitate accurate conveyance of relevant findings to referring physicians involved in the care of patients with AP. This review will clarify the nomenclature of pancreatic collections in the setting of AP. PMID:26602933

  17. Acute mediastinitis arising from pancreatic mediastinal fistula in recurrent pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Choe, In Soo; Kim, Yong Seok; Lee, Tae Hee; Kim, Sun Moon; Song, Kyung Ho; Koo, Hoon Sup; Park, Jung Ho; Pyo, Jin Sil; Kim, Ji Yeong; Choi, In Seok

    2014-01-01

    Acute mediastinitis is a fatal disease that usually originates from esophageal perforation and surgical infection. Rare cases of descending necrotizing mediastinitis can occur following oral cavity and pharynx infection or can be a complication of pancreatitis. The most common thoracic complications of pancreatic disease are reactive pleural effusion and pneumonia, while rare complications include thoracic conditions, such as pancreaticopleural fistula with massive pleural effusion or hemothorax and extension of pseudocyst into the mediastinum. There have been no reports of acute mediastinitis originating from pancreatitis in South Korea. In this report, we present the case of a 50-year-old female suffering from acute mediastinitis with pleural effusion arising from recurrent pancreatitis that improved after surgical intervention. PMID:25356062

  18. Comparison of early enteral nutrition in severe acute pancreatitis with prebiotic fiber supplementation versus standard enteral solution: A prospective randomized double-blind study

    PubMed Central

    Karakan, Tarkan; Ergun, Meltem; Dogan, Ibrahim; Cindoruk, Mehmet; Unal, Selahattin

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To compare the beneficial effects of early enteral nutrition (EN) with prebiotic fiber supplementation in patients with severe acute pancreatitis (AP). METHODS: Thirty consecutive patients with severe AP, who required stoppage of oral feeding for 48 h, were randomly assigned to nasojejunal EN with or without prebiotics. APACHE II score, Balthazar’s CT score and CRP were assessed daily during the study period. RESULTS: The median duration of hospital stay was shorter in the study group [10 ± 4 (8-14) d vs 15 ± 6 (7-26) d] (P < 0.05). The median value of days in intensive care unit was also similar in both groups [6 ± 2 (5-8) d vs 6 ± 2 (5-7) d]. The median duration of EN was 8 ± 4 (6-12) d vs 10 ± 4 (6-13) d in the study and control groups, respectively (P > 0.05). Deaths occurred in 6 patients (20%), 2 in the study group and 4 in the control group. The mean duration of APACHE II normalization (APACHE II score < 8) was shorter in the study group than in the control group (4 ± 2 d vs 6.5 ± 3 d, P < 0.05). The mean duration of CRP normalization was also shorter in the study group than in the control group (7 ± 2 d vs 10 ± 3 d, P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Nasojejunal EN with prebiotic fiber supplementation in severe AP improves hospital stay, duration nutrition therapy, acute phase response and overall complications compared to standard EN therapy. PMID:17569144

  19. Saxagliptin-induced recurrent acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chien-Feng; Sun, Meng-Shun; Tai, Yen-Kuang

    2014-01-01

    Although dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors have been implicated in the development of acute pancreatitis, the causality of this phenomenon is not well established. We herein report the case of an 85-year-old woman who presented with epigastric pain after taking saxagliptin for five months. A high serum lipase level with characteristic computed tomography findings confirmed the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. The patient's symptoms rapidly resolved after admission, although they recurred when she resumed treatment with saxagliptin for 18 days after discharge. In the absence of any identifiable causes of pancreatitis and considering the temporal sequence of events, the saxagliptin therapy was highly suspected to be the triggering factor. Although drug-induced pancreatitis is rare, treatment with DPP-4 inhibitors should be included as a potential etiology of acute pancreatitis. PMID:24930656

  20. Tyropanoate cholecystography early in the course of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Longstreth, G F; Slivka, J

    1981-01-01

    Oral cholecystography (OCG) has traditionally been delayed until several weeks after hospitalization for pancreatitis because of the putative frequent poor visualization during the acute episode. Recently, OCG with iopanoic acid was reported successful in most patients with acute pancreatitis soon after resumption of a solid diet. We evaluated OCG with sodium tyropanoate, a pharmacokinetically different contrast material, in 30 hospitalized patients with pancreatitis before resumption of solid food. It accurately evaluated the gallbladder in 24 cases (80%). Abnormal liver function tests, including mild hyperbilirubinemia, did not interfere with the examination. Consequently, 1) tyropanoate OCG adequately opacifies the gallbladder in most patients with acute pancreatitis who are fasting or taking liquids only; 2) allows gallbladder evaluation earlier than with iopanoic acid OCG; 3) is less affected by hepatic dysfunction; and 4) provides an alternative to ultrasonography. PMID:7328298

  1. Acute pancreatitis in a young girl with the Netherton syndrome.

    PubMed

    Söreide, Kjetil; Söiland, Håvard; Körner, Hartwig; Haga, Harald; Söreide, Jon Arne

    2005-11-01

    Acute pancreatitis is uncommon in children younger than 15 years. We present the first report on the association of acute pancreatitis with the Netherton syndrome. The Netherton syndrome is an inherited skin disease characterized by ichthyosiform erythroderma, a pathognomonic hair shaft defect ("bamboo hair"), and atopic features. A 14-year-old girl with symptoms and signs of severe acute pancreatitis was admitted to our department. A diagnostic workup could not reveal any common known cause of pancreatitis, and the cause of pancreatitis would most likely be considered idiopathic. However, based on recent reports regarding various pathophysiological mechanisms for both acute pancreatitis and the Netherton syndrome (eg, shearing the 5q locus for the respective gene-associated defects in SPINK1 and SPINK5), we speculate if a possible association may exist. Investigations on pancreatitis and the Netherton syndrome may disclose factors closely involved in the pathomechanisms of both. This notion may be of clinical importance as it adds to the number of potential life-threatening events to patients with the Netherton syndrome. PMID:16291148

  2. Lupeol Protects Against Cerulein-Induced Acute Pancreatitis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Jun; Bae, Gi-Sang; Choi, Sun Bok; Jo, Il-Joo; Kim, Dong-Goo; Shin, Joon-Yeon; Lee, Sung-Kon; Kim, Myoung-Jin; Song, Ho-Joon; Park, Sung-Joo

    2015-10-01

    Lupeol is a triterpenoid commonly found in fruits and vegetables and is known to exhibit a wide range of biological activities, including antiinflammatory and anti-cancer effects. However, the effects of lupeol on acute pancreatitis specifically have not been well characterized. Here, we investigated the effects of lupeol on cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in mice. Acute pancreatitis was induced via an intraperitoneal injection of cerulein (50 µg/kg). In the lupeol treatment group, lupeol was administered intraperitoneally (10, 25, or 50 mg/kg) 1 h before the first cerulein injection. Blood samples were taken to determine serum cytokine and amylase levels. The pancreas was rapidly removed for morphological examination and used in the myeloperoxidase assay, trypsin activity assay, and real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. In addition, we isolated pancreatic acinar cells using a collagenase method to examine the acinar cell viability. Lupeol administration significantly attenuated the severity of pancreatitis, as was shown by reduced pancreatic edema, and neutrophil infiltration. In addition, lupeol inhibited elevation of digestive enzymes and cytokine levels, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1, and interleukin (IL)-6. Furthermore, lupeol inhibited the cerulein-induced acinar cell death. In conclusion, these results suggest that lupeol exhibits protective effects on cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis. PMID:26179197

  3. [Urinalysis in patients at the early stage of acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Rybak, Katarzyna; Sporek, Mateusz; Gala-Błądzińska, Agnieszka; Mazur-Laskowska, Małgorzata; Dumnicka, Paulina; Walocha, Jerzy; Drożdż, Ryszard; Kuźniewski, Marek; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Kuśnierz-Cabala, Beata

    2016-01-01

    Urinalysis is a routine and cheap laboratory test that provides clinically useful information in patients with acute abdominal conditions, including acute pancreatitis. The aim of the study was to assess the relationships between the results of urinalysis and the course of the disease among 65 patients with acute pancreatitis (34 men and 31 women, mean age 61 ± 19 years) at the early phase of the disease, i.e. during the first 72 hours from the onset of symptoms. Mild acute pancreatitis was diagnosed in 47 patients, moderately severe in 13 and severe in 5. The most prevalent abnormalities were proteinuria (43% of patients), high urinary bilirubin (20%), erythrocytes (18%), glucose (18%) and leukocytes (17%). High urinary protein and low specific gravity were associated with more severe acute disease and with acute kidney injury. The severity of bilirubinuria and proteinuria were positively correlated with urine concentrations of neutrophil gelatinase associated lipocalin (NGAL). Urinalysis should be routinely performed in patients with acute pancreatitis. PMID:27197429

  4. A case of montelukast induced hypercholesterolemia, severe hypertriglyceridemia and pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Das, Saibal; Mondal, Somnath; Dey, Jayanta Kumar; Bandyopadhyay, Sanjib; Saha, Indranil; Tripathi, Santanu Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Montelukast sodium is a leukotriene inhibitor, and competitively antagonizes cys-LT1 receptor and used widely and effectively in treating allergic rhinitis, bronchial asthma and allied respiratory conditions. This case report outlines a rare case of montelukast induced hypercholesterolemia, severe hypertriglyceridemia and acute pancreatitis in a 22 years old male patient. The patient was taking 10 mg oral montelukast daily for allergic rhinitis. Although his symptoms improved considerably, after 2 months of therapy, he experienced unusual weight gain and got admitted with severe pain abdomen. Clinical and other relevant investigation findings revealed the presence of acute pancreatitis with associated hypercholesterolemia and severe hypertriglyceridemia. There were no evidences of any other possible hereditary, surgical, metabolic, infective, organic or other pathologic causes giving rise to these conditions. De-challenge was done and the patient was treated conservatively resulting in reversal of the diseased state. Naranjo adverse drug reaction probability scale suggested that it was 'probable' that oral administration of montelukast was responsible for the acute pancreatitis associated with hypercholesterolemia and severe hypertriglyceridemia. There is only a singular and confirmed reported case of montelukast induced hypertriglyceridemia from India. For patients taking montelukast for a long duration, routine lipid profile monitoring should be done, and if these patients present with symptoms of epigastric and periumbilical pain with vomiting, provisions for screening acute pancreatitis might be warranted. PMID:24023457

  5. Misdiagnosis of Abdominal Pain in Pregnancy: Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Samal, Sunita; Gupta, Shweta; Begum, Jasmina; Ghose, Seetesh

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of acute pancreatitis in a pregnant woman who presented to our emergency department with complaints of severe abdominal pain, was misdiagnosed as scar dehiscence and underwent emergency repeat caesarean section at 33 wks for fetal distress. The preterm baby developed severe respiratory distress and succumbed on the second postnatal day. Persistent severe pain in the postoperative period in the mother prompted further evaluation which led to a diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. Conservative and supportive management was instituted leading to an eventual favourable maternal outcome. PMID:25738042

  6. Activation of cellular immune response in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Mora, A; Pérez-Mateo, M; Viedma, J A; Carballo, F; Sánchez-Payá, J; Liras, G

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Inflammatory mediators have recently been implicated as potential markers of severity in acute pancreatitis. AIMS: To determine the value of neopterin and polymorphonuclear (PMN) elastase as markers of activation of cellular immunity and as early predictors of disease severity. PATIENTS: Fifty two non-consecutive patients classified according to their clinical outcome into mild (n = 26) and severe pancreatitis (n = 26). METHODS: Neopterin in serum and the PMN elastase/A1PI complex in plasma were measured during the first three days of hospital stay. RESULTS: Within three days after the onset of acute pancreatitis, PMN elastase was significantly higher in the severe pancreatitis group. Patients with severe disease also showed significantly higher values of neopterin on days 1 and 2 but not on day 3 compared with patients with mild disease. There was a significant correlation between PMN elastase and neopterin values on days 1 and 2. PMN elastase on day 1 predicted disease severity with a sensitivity of 76.7% and a specificity of 91.6%. Neopterin did not surpass PMN elastase in the probability of predicting disease severity. CONCLUSIONS: These data show that activation of cellular immunity is implicated in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis and may be a main contributory factor to disease severity. Neopterin was not superior to PMN elastase in the prediction of severity. PMID:9245935

  7. Hormonal protection in acute pancreatitis by ghrelin, leptin and melatonin

    PubMed Central

    Jaworek, Jolanta; Konturek, Stanisław Jan

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a nonbacterial disease of the pancreas. The severe form of this ailment is characterized by high mortality. Whether acute pancreatitis develops as the severe type or resolves depends on the intensity of the inflammatory process which is counteracted by the recruitment of innate defense mechanisms. It has been shown that the hormones ghrelin, leptin and melatonin are able to modulate the immune function of the organism and to protect the pancreas against inflammatory damage. Experimental studies have demonstrated that the application of these substances prior to the induction of acute pancreatitis significantly attenuated the intensity of the inflammation and reduced pancreatic tissue damage. The pancreatic protective mechanisms of the above hormones have been related to the mobilization of non-specific immune defense, to the inhibition of nuclear factor kappa B and modulation of cytokine production, to the stimulation of heat shock proteins and changes of apoptotic processes in the acinar cells, as well as to the activation of antioxidant system of the pancreatic tissue. The protective effect of ghrelin seems to be indirect and perhaps dependent on the release of growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor 1. Leptin and ghrelin, but not melatonin, employ sensory nerves in their beneficial action on acute pancreatitis. It is very likely that ghrelin, leptin and melatonin could be implicated in the natural protection of the pancreatic gland against inflammatory damage because the blood levels of these substances increase in the initial phase of pancreatic inflammation. The above hormones could be a part of the innate resistance system which might remove noxious factors and could suppress or attenuate the inflammatory process in the pancreas. PMID:25493003

  8. Is nasogastric suction necessary in acute pancreatitis?

    PubMed Central

    Naeije, R; Salingret, E; Clumeck, N; De Troyer, A; Devis, G

    1978-01-01

    Fifty-eight patients with mild to moderately severe acute pancreatitis were randomly allocated to treatment with or without nasogastric suction (27 and 31 patients respectively). Intravenous fluids and pethidine hydrochloride were also given. The two groups were comparable clinically at the start of the study. There were no differences between the two groups in the mean duration of the following features: abdominal pain or tenderness; absence of bowel movements; raised serum amylase concentration; time to resumption of oral feeding; and days in hospital. Prolonged hyperamylasaemia (serum amylase greater than 0.33 mU/l) occurred in one patient in the suction group and in three patients in the non-suction group. A mild recurrence of abdominal pain after resumption of oral feeding occurred in three patients in the suction group and in two patients in the non-suction group. Two patients in the suction group developed overt consumption coagulopathy and two others pulmonary complications. No patient in the non-suction group had complications. The findings suggest that most patients with mild to moderately severe acute pancreatitis do not benefit from nasogastric suction. The procedure should be elective rather than mandatory in treating this condition. PMID:698650

  9. Peripancreatic fat necrosis worsens acute pancreatitis independent of pancreatic necrosis via unsaturated fatty acids increased in human pancreatic necrosis collections

    PubMed Central

    Noel, Pawan; Patel, Krutika; Durgampudi, Chandra; Trivedi, Ram N; de Oliveira, Cristiane; Crowell, Michael D; Pannala, Rahul; Lee, Kenneth; Brand, Randall; Chennat, Jennifer; Slivka, Adam; Papachristou, Georgios I; Khalid, Asif; Whitcomb, David C; DeLany, James P; Cline, Rachel A; Acharya, Chathur; Jaligama, Deepthi; Murad, Faris M; Yadav, Dhiraj; Navina, Sarah; Singh, Vijay P

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims Peripancreatic fat necrosis occurs frequently in necrotising pancreatitis. Distinguishing markers from mediators of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) is important since targeting mediators may improve outcomes. We evaluated potential agents in human pancreatic necrotic collections (NCs), pseudocysts (PCs) and pancreatic cystic neoplasms and used pancreatic acini, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and an acute pancreatitis (AP) model to determine SAP mediators. Methods We measured acinar and PBMC injury induced by agents increased in NCs and PCs. Outcomes of caerulein pancreatitis were studied in lean rats coadministered interleukin (IL)-1β and keratinocyte chemoattractant/growth-regulated oncogene, triolein alone or with the lipase inhibitor orlistat. Results NCs had higher fatty acids, IL-8 and IL-1β versus other fluids. Lipolysis of unsaturated triglyceride and resulting unsaturated fatty acids (UFA) oleic and linoleic acids induced necro-apoptosis at less than half the concentration in NCs but other agents did not do so at more than two times these concentrations. Cytokine coadministration resulted in higher pancreatic and lung inflammation than caerulein alone, but only triolein coadministration caused peripancreatic fat stranding, higher cytokines, UFAs, multisystem organ failure (MSOF) and mortality in 97% animals, which were prevented by orlistat. Conclusions UFAs, IL-1β and IL-8 are elevated in NCs. However, UFAs generated via peripancreatic fat lipolysis causes worse inflammation and MSOF, converting mild AP to SAP. PMID:25500204

  10. Quetiapine-induced hypertriglyceridaemia causing acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Franco, John Mark; Vallabhajosyula, Saraschandra; Griffin, Timothy John

    2015-01-01

    Second-generation antipsychotics have well-known metabolic side effects such as hyperlipidaemia and hyperglycaemia. A middle-aged man presented with epigastric and flank pain associated with nausea, and was noted to have elevated triglycerides (3590 mg/dL or 40.53 mmol/L), lipase and glucose. Haematological parameters revealed neutropenia with pancytopaenia. The patient was started on conservative management for acute pancreatitis, and on intravenous insulin and oral gemfibrozil for lowering of his triglycerides. He gradually improved and was transitioned to oral atorvastatin and fenofibrate. His triglycerides, glucose and leucocyte counts normalised at discharge and he was transitioned to ziprasidone. The combination of hypertriglyceridaemia, worsening hyperglycaemia and neutropenia made us suspect quetiapine as the causative agent. Medications cause only 0.1-7% of acute pancreatitis cases, with quetiapine implicated in only five-reported cases. Hypertriglyceridaemia (>600 mg/dL or 6.77 mmol/L) is frequently reported with quetiapine use, but severe hypertriglyceridaemia (>1000 mg/dL or 11.29 mmol/L) has been reported in <10 patients. PMID:25976202

  11. Acute Pancreatitis Caused By Mushroom Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Karahan, Samet; Erden, Abdulsamet; Cetinkaya, Ali; Avci, Deniz; Ortakoyluoglu, Adile Irfan; Karagoz, Hatice; Bulut, Kadir; Basak, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Of the more than 5000 species of mushrooms known, 100 types are toxic and approximately 10% of these toxic types can cause fatal toxicity. A type of mushroom called Amanita phalloides is responsible for 95% of toxic mushroom poisonings. In this article, we report 2 cases of mushroom poisonings caused by Lactarius volemus, known as Tirmit by the local people. The patient and his wife were admitted to the emergency room with abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting 20 hours after consuming Lactarius volemus, an edible type of mushroom. The patients reported that they had been collecting this mushroom from the mountains and eating them for several years but had never developed any clinicopathology to date. Further examination of the patients revealed a very rare case of acute pancreatitis due to mushroom intoxication. The male patient was admitted to the intensive care unit while his wife was followed in the internal medicine service, because of her relative mild clinical symptoms. Both patients recovered without sequelae and were discharged. In this article, we aimed to emphasize that gastrointestinal symptoms are often observed in mushroom intoxications and can be confused with acute pancreatitis, thus leading to misdiagnosis of patients. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment can improve patients’ prognosis and prevent the development of complications. PMID:26835473

  12. Surgical and interventional management of complications caused by acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Karakayali, Feza Y

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is one of the most common gastrointestinal disorders worldwide. It requires acute hospitalization, with a reported annual incidence of 13 to 45 cases per 100000 persons. In severe cases there is persistent organ failure and a mortality rate of 15% to 30%, whereas mortality of mild pancreatitis is only 0% to 1%. Treatment principles of necrotizing pancreatitis and the role of surgery are still controversial. Despite surgery being effective for infected pancreatic necrosis, it carries the risk of long-term endocrine and exocrine deficiency and a morbidity and mortality rate of between 10% to 40%. Considering high morbidity and mortality rates of operative necrosectomy, minimally invasive strategies are being explored by gastrointestinal surgeons, radiologists, and gastroenterologists. Since 1999, several other minimally invasive surgical, endoscopic, and radiologic approaches to drain and debride pancreatic necrosis have been described. In patients who do not improve after technically adequate drainage, necrosectomy should be performed. When minimal invasive management is unsuccessful or necrosis has spread to locations not accessible by endoscopy, open abdominal surgery is recommended. Additionally, surgery is recognized as a major determinant of outcomes for acute pancreatitis, and there is general agreement that patients should undergo surgery in the late phase of the disease. It is important to consider multidisciplinary management, considering the clinical situation and the comorbidity of the patient, as well as the surgeons experience. PMID:25309073

  13. Management of acute pancreatitis (AP) – Polish Pancreatic Club recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Rosołowski, Mariusz; Lipiński, Michał; Dobosz, Marek; Durlik, Marek; Głuszek, Stanisław; Kuśnierz, Katarzyna; Lampe, Paweł; Małecka-Panas, Ewa; Nowakowska-Duława, Ewa; Nowak-Niezgoda, Magdalena; Radomańska, Barbara; Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata; Wereszczyńska-Siemiątkowska, Urszula

    2016-01-01

    The presented recommendations concern the current management of acute pancreatitis. The recommendations relate to the diagnostics and treatment of early and late phases of acute pancreatitis and complications of the disease taking into consideration surgical and endoscopic methods. All the recommendations were subjected to voting by the members of the Working Group of the Polish Pancreatic Club, who evaluated them every single time on a five-point scale, where A means full acceptance, B means acceptance with a certain reservation, C means acceptance with a serious reservation, D means rejection with a certain reservation and E means full rejection. The results of the vote, together with commentary, are provided for each recommendation. PMID:27350832

  14. Preventive strategies for septic complications of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Oláh, A; Pardavi, G; Belágyi, T; Romics, L

    2007-01-01

    The diagram of the mortality of acute pancreatitis is characterized by two distinct peaks, in a similar manner to other generalized acute inflammatory responses. In the first phase, which is characterized by "hyper-inflammatory" mechanisms, death occurs due to overwhelming SIRS and subsequent multi-organ failure. The second peak of death is usually detected much later, at least two weeks after the onset of acute pancreatitis. Infection in necrotising pancreatitis is frequently observed in this so-called "compensatory antiinflammatory" phase. Since there has been no effective therapy evolved to prevent the activation of inflammatory and proteolytic cascades, the treatment of acute pancreatitis is merely symptomatic. Adequate fluid resuscitation and analgesia are the mainstays of treatment. In case of development of multi-organ failure, extensive medical and ventilatory supportive therapy is usually necessary. However, recent studies suggested certain methods might decrease the incidence of infection in pancreatic necrosis, which is usually due to bacterial translocation from the gut. Numerous attempts have been published in the literature to decrease the frequency of septic complications. Furthermore, the outcome of studies favouring antibiotic prophylaxis in acute pancreatitis were debatable. The development of multi-resistant strains of Gram-positive bacteria and Candida, due to long-term antibiotic use, is a strong argument against the indication of prophylactic antibiotic use. Recently, various clinical studies aimed to decrease bacterial translocation, including probiotic use and enteral feeding as part of the treatment. This paper provides a systematic review on data available in the evidence based literature on the use of antibiotics and the role of alternative and supportive therapy in the treatment of severe acute pancreatitis. PMID:17966933

  15. Biliary scintigraphy in acute pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Serafini, A.N.; Al-Sheikh, W.; Barkin, J.S.; Hourani, M.; Sfakiankis, G.; Clarke, L.P.; Ashkar, F.S.

    1982-08-01

    A prospective study was carried out in 60 patients to determine the efficacy of /sup 99m/Tc-PIPIDA scintigraphy in differentiating biliary pancreatitis from nonbiliary pancreatitis. Forty patients were classified as having biliary pancreatitis and 20 patients as having the nonbiliary type. Scintigraphic scans were divided into five main types according to the time to visualization of the gallbladder and the time to excretion of /sup 99m/Tc-PIPIDA into the intestinal tract. Normal scans were obtained on 95% of patients (19/20) with nonbiliary pancreatitis; 22.5% of patients (9/40) with biliary pancreatitis had normal scans. It is concluded that elevated amylase levels together with an abnormal biliary scan, as defined by the criteria presented here, indicate biliary pancreatitis, while a normal scan largely excludes such diagnosis.

  16. Biliary scintigraphy in acute pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Serafini, A.N.; Al-Sheikh, W.; Barkin, J.S.; Hourani, M.; Sfakiankis, G.; Clarke, L.P.; Ashkar, F.S.

    1982-08-01

    A prospective study was carried out in 60 patients to determine the efficacy of /sup 99//sup m/Tc-PIPIDA scintigraphy in differentiating biliary pancreatitis from nonbiliary pancreatitis. Forty patients were classified as having biliary pancreatitis and 20 patients as having the nonbiliary type. Scintigraphic scans were divided into five main types according to the time to visualization of the gallbladder and the time to excretion of /sup 99//sup m/Tc-PIPIDA into the intestinal tract. Normal scans were obtained in 95% of patients (19/20) with nonbiliary pancreatitis; 22.5% of patients (9/40) with biliary pancreatitis had normal scans. It is concluded that elevated amylase levels together with an abnormal biliary scan, as defined by the criteria presented here, indicate biliary pancreatitis, while a normal scan largely excludes such diagnosis.

  17. Colonic Necrosis in a 4-Year-Old with Hyperlipidemic Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Patton, Tiffany J.; Sentongo, Timothy A.; Mak, Grace Z.; Kahn, Stacy A.

    2016-01-01

    Here we report the case of a 4-year-old male with severe acute pancreatitis due to hyperlipidemia, who presented with abdominal pain, metabolic abnormalities, and colonic necrosis. This colonic complication was secondary to the extension of a large peripancreatic fluid collection causing direct serosal autodigestion by pancreatic enzymes. Two weeks following the initial presentation, the peripancreatic fluid collection developed into a mature pancreatic pseudocyst, which was percutaneously drained. To our knowledge, this is the youngest documented pediatric case of colonic necrosis due to severe pancreatitis and the first descriptive pediatric case of a colonic complication due to hyperlipidemia-induced acute pancreatitis. PMID:26925282

  18. Colonic Necrosis in a 4-Year-Old with Hyperlipidemic Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Patton, Tiffany J; Sentongo, Timothy A; Mak, Grace Z; Kahn, Stacy A

    2016-01-01

    Here we report the case of a 4-year-old male with severe acute pancreatitis due to hyperlipidemia, who presented with abdominal pain, metabolic abnormalities, and colonic necrosis. This colonic complication was secondary to the extension of a large peripancreatic fluid collection causing direct serosal autodigestion by pancreatic enzymes. Two weeks following the initial presentation, the peripancreatic fluid collection developed into a mature pancreatic pseudocyst, which was percutaneously drained. To our knowledge, this is the youngest documented pediatric case of colonic necrosis due to severe pancreatitis and the first descriptive pediatric case of a colonic complication due to hyperlipidemia-induced acute pancreatitis. PMID:26925282

  19. Relationship between pancreatic hormones and glucose metabolism: A cross-sectional study in patients after acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Pendharkar, Sayali A; Asrani, Varsha M; Xiao, Amy Y; Yoon, Harry D; Murphy, Rinki; Windsor, John A; Petrov, Maxim S

    2016-07-01

    Abnormal glucose metabolism is present in almost 40% of patients after acute pancreatitis, but its pathophysiology has been poorly investigated. Pancreatic hormone derangements have been sparingly studied to date, and their relationship with abnormal glucose metabolism is largely unknown. The aim was to investigate the associations between pancreatic hormones and glucose metabolism after acute pancreatitis, including the effect of potential confounders. This was a cross-sectional study of 83 adult patients after acute pancreatitis. Fasting venous blood was collected from all patients and used for analysis of insulin, glucagon, pancreatic polypeptide, amylin, somatostatin, C-peptide, glucose, and hemoglobin A1c. Statistical analyses were conducted using the modified Poisson regression, multivariable linear regression, and Spearman's correlation. Age, sex, body mass index, recurrence of acute pancreatitis, duration from first attack, severity, and etiology were adjusted for. Increased insulin was significantly associated with abnormal glucose metabolism after acute pancreatitis, in both unadjusted (P = 0.038) and adjusted (P = 0.001) analyses. Patients with abnormal glucose metabolism also had significantly decreased pancreatic polypeptide (P = 0.001) and increased amylin (P = 0.047) in adjusted analyses. Somatostatin, C-peptide, and glucagon were not changed significantly in both unadjusted and adjusted analyses. Increased insulin resistance and reduced insulin clearance may be important components of hyperinsulinemic compensation in patients after acute pancreatitis. Increased amylin and reduced pancreatic polypeptide fasting levels characterize impaired glucose homeostasis. Clinical studies investigating islet-cell hormonal responses to mixed-nutrient meal testing and euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamps are now warranted for further insights into the role of pancreatic hormones in glucose metabolism derangements secondary to pancreatic diseases. PMID:27173509

  20. The clinical analysis of acute pancreatitis in colorectal cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy after operation

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Yanlei; Han, Zhen; Shao, Limei; Li, Yunling; Zhao, Long; Zhao, Yuehuan

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a rare complication in postoperative colorectal cancer patients after FOLFOX6 (oxaliplatin + calcium folinate +5-FU [5-fluorouracil]) chemotherapy. In this paper, a total of 62 patients with gastrointestinal cancer were observed after the burst of acute pancreatitis. Surgery of the 62 cases of colorectal cancer patients was completed successfully. But when they underwent FOLFOX6 chemotherapy, five patients got acute pancreatitis (8.06%), four (6.45%) had mild acute pancreatitis, and one (1.61%) had severe acute pancreatitis, of which two were males (3.23%) and three females (4.84%). No patients (0.00%) had acute pancreatitis on the 1st day after chemotherapy; one patient (1.61%) got it in the first 2 and 3 days after chemotherapy; and three others (4.83%) got it in the first 4 days after chemotherapy. In the 62 patients with malignant tumors, the body mass index (BMI) was less than 18 (underweight) in six of them, with two cases of acute pancreatitis (33.33%); the BMI was 18–25 (normal weight) in 34 cases, with one case (2.94%) of acute pancreatitis; the BMI was 25–30 (overweight) in 13 cases, with 0 cases (0.00%) of acute pancreatitis; and the BMI was ≥30 (obese) in nine patients, with two cases of acute pancreatitis (22.22%). After symptomatic treatment, four patients were cured and one died; the mortality rate was 1.61%. Most of them appeared in the first 4 days after chemotherapy; the probability of this complication is significantly higher in slim and obese patients than in normal weight patients. Postoperative colorectal cancer patients after FOLFOX6 chemotherapy have a sudden onset of acute pancreatitis occult, especially in patients with severe acute pancreatitis; the symptoms are difficult to control, there is high mortality and it is worthy of clinician’s attention. PMID:26392780

  1. The clinical analysis of acute pancreatitis in colorectal cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy after operation.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yanlei; Han, Zhen; Shao, Limei; Li, Yunling; Zhao, Long; Zhao, Yuehuan

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a rare complication in postoperative colorectal cancer patients after FOLFOX6 (oxaliplatin + calcium folinate +5-FU [5-fluorouracil]) chemotherapy. In this paper, a total of 62 patients with gastrointestinal cancer were observed after the burst of acute pancreatitis. Surgery of the 62 cases of colorectal cancer patients was completed successfully. But when they underwent FOLFOX6 chemotherapy, five patients got acute pancreatitis (8.06%), four (6.45%) had mild acute pancreatitis, and one (1.61%) had severe acute pancreatitis, of which two were males (3.23%) and three females (4.84%). No patients (0.00%) had acute pancreatitis on the 1st day after chemotherapy; one patient (1.61%) got it in the first 2 and 3 days after chemotherapy; and three others (4.83%) got it in the first 4 days after chemotherapy. In the 62 patients with malignant tumors, the body mass index (BMI) was less than 18 (underweight) in six of them, with two cases of acute pancreatitis (33.33%); the BMI was 18-25 (normal weight) in 34 cases, with one case (2.94%) of acute pancreatitis; the BMI was 25-30 (overweight) in 13 cases, with 0 cases (0.00%) of acute pancreatitis; and the BMI was ≥30 (obese) in nine patients, with two cases of acute pancreatitis (22.22%). After symptomatic treatment, four patients were cured and one died; the mortality rate was 1.61%. Most of them appeared in the first 4 days after chemotherapy; the probability of this complication is significantly higher in slim and obese patients than in normal weight patients. Postoperative colorectal cancer patients after FOLFOX6 chemotherapy have a sudden onset of acute pancreatitis occult, especially in patients with severe acute pancreatitis; the symptoms are difficult to control, there is high mortality and it is worthy of clinician's attention. PMID:26392780

  2. Association between severity and the determinant-based classification, Atlanta 2012 and Atlanta 1992, in acute pancreatitis: a clinical retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuhui; Ke, Lu; Tong, Zhihui; Li, Weiqin; Li, Jieshou

    2015-04-01

    Recently, the determinant-based classification (DBC) and the Atlanta 2012 have been proposed to provide a basis for study and treatment of acute pancreatitis (AP). The present study aimed to evaluate the association between severity and the DBC, the Atlanta 2012 and the Atlanta 1992, in AP. Patients admitted to our center with AP from January 2007 to July 2013 were reviewed retrospectively. Patients were assigned to severity categories for all the 3 classification systems. The primary outcomes include long-term clinical prognosis (mortality and length-of-hospital stay), major complications (intraabdominal hemorrhage, multiple-organ dysfunction, single organ failure [OF], and sepsis) and clinical interventions (surgical drainage, continuous renal replace therapy [CRRT] lasting time, and mechanical ventilation [MV] lasting time). The classification systems were validated and compared in terms of these abovementioned primary outcomes. A total of 395 patients were enrolled in this retrospective study with an overall 8.86% in-hospital mortality. Intraabdominal hemorrhage was present in 27 (6.84%) of the patients, multiple-organ dysfunction in 73(18.48%), single OF in 67 (16.96%), and sepsis in 73(18.48%). For each classification system, different categories regarding severity were associated with statistically different clinical mortality, major complications, and clinical interventions (P < 0.05). However, the Atlanta 2012 and the DBC performed better than the Atlanta 1992, and they were comparable in predicting mortality (area under curve [AUC] 0.899 and 0.955 vs 0.585, P < 0.05); intraabdominal hemorrhage (AUC 0.930 and 0.961 vs 0.583, P < 0.05), multiple-organ dysfunction (AUC 0.858 and 0.881 vs 0.595, P < 0.05), sepsis (AUC 0.826 and 0.879 vs 0.590, P < 0.05), and surgical drainage (AUC 0.900 and 0.847 vs 0.606, P < 0.05). For continuous variables, the Atlanta 2012 and the DBC were also better than the Atlanta 1992, and they were similar in

  3. Enhancement of ICAM-1 via the JAK2/STAT3 signaling pathway in a rat model of severe acute pancreatitis-associated lung injury

    PubMed Central

    HAN, XIAO; WANG, YUXI; CHEN, HAILONG; ZHANG, JINGWEN; XU, CAIMING; LI, JIAN; LI, MINGYUE

    2016-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI), which is associated with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP), results from damage to the pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMVECs), which in turn leads to high levels of inflammatory cytokines that destroy PMVECs. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying SAP-associated ALI (SAP-ALI) are currently not well understood. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) has been implicated in the persistent migration and accumulation of neutrophils and macrophages, which in turn has been associated with the increased permeability of microvascular endothelial cells. Signal transduction via the Janus kinase-2 (JAK2)/signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3) transcription factors has been shown to be involved in inflammation. The present study aimed to investigate the expression levels of ICAM-1 and JAK2/STAT3 signaling components in a rat model of SAP-ALI. SAP was induced in the rat model, and dexamethasone (DEX) was administered to the treatment group. Subsequently, ICAM-1, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, JAK2, STAT3 and nuclear factor (NF)-κB mRNA expression levels were determined using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction; ICAM-1 protein expression levels were determined using western blotting; and IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α levels were measured via an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In addition, an immunohistochemical analysis of ICAM-1, NF-κB, JAK2 and STAT3 was conducted, and the protein expression and cell morphology of the lungs in all rats was analyzed. ICAM-1 mRNA and protein expression levels were significantly increased following induction of SAP, and were significantly decreased in the DEX-treated group. Furthermore, treatment with DEX significantly reduced serum expression levels of IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α and decreased expression levels of NF-κB, JAK2 and STAT3 in the lung tissue, as compared with the untreated SAP group. The present study demonstrated that DEX treatment was

  4. Eruptive xanthomas and acute pancreatitis in a patient with hypertriglyceridemia.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Desirée Pérez; Díaz, Juan Oscar Fernández; Bobes, Carmen Maciá

    2008-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis and eruptive xanthomas are the only recognised direct complications of severe hypertriglyceridaemia. We present the case of a 33-years old male patient in whom the onset of a type 2 diabetes, added to an unknown familial hyperlipidemia, precipitated a dramatic raise of serum triglyceride levels, that cause in turn an acute pancreatitis and the appearance of dermic eruptive xanthomas. TRANSLATION: This article is translated from Spanish, originally published in Archivos de Medicina. The original work is at doi:10.3823/001. PMID:18474088

  5. Eruptive xanthomas and acute pancreatitis in a patient with hypertriglyceridemia

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Desirée Pérez; Díaz, Juan Óscar Fernández; Bobes, Carmen Maciá

    2008-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis and eruptive xanthomas are the only recognised direct complications of severe hypertriglyceridaemia. We present the case of a 33-years old male patient in whom the onset of a type 2 diabetes, added to an unknown familial hyperlipidemia, precipitated a dramatic raise of serum triglyceride levels, that cause in turn an acute pancreatitis and the appearance of dermic eruptive xanthomas. Translation This article is translated from Spanish, originally published in Archivos de Medicina. The original work is at doi:10.3823/001 PMID:18474088

  6. Acute recurrent pancreatitis: Etiopathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Testoni, Pier Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Acute recurrent pancreatitis (ARP) refers to a clinical entity characterized by episodes of acute pancreatitis which occurs on more than one occasion. Recurrence of pancreatitis generally occurs in a setting of normal morpho-functional gland, however, an established chronic disease may be found either on the occasion of the first episode of pancreatitis or during the follow-up. The aetiology of ARP can be identified in the majority of patients. Most common causes include common bile duct stones or sludge and bile crystals; sphincter of oddi dysfunction; anatomical ductal variants interfering with pancreatic juice outflow; obstruction of the main pancreatic duct or pancreatico-biliary junction; genetic mutations; alcohol consumption. However, despite diagnostic technologies, the aetiology of ARP still remains unknown in up to 30% of cases: in these cases the term “idiopathic” is used. Because occult bile stone disease and sphincter of oddi dysfunction account for the majority of cases, cholecystectomy, and eventually the endoscopic biliary and/or pancreatic sphincterotomy are curative in most of cases. Endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy appeared to be a curative procedure per se in about 80% of patients. Ursodeoxycholic acid oral treatment alone has also been reported effective for treatment of biliary sludge. In uncertain cases toxin botulin injection may help in identifying some sphincter of oddi dysfunction, but this treatment is not widely used. In the last twenty years, pancreatic endotherapy has been proven effective in cases of recurrent pancreatitis depending on pancreatic ductal obstruction, independently from the cause of obstruction, and has been widely used instead of more aggressive approaches. PMID:25493002

  7. Acute pancreatitis induced by methimazole therapy.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Albin; Raghavan, Pooja; Patel, Rajshree; Rajan, Dhyan; Singh, Jaspreet; Mustacchia, Paul

    2012-05-01

    Among the causative factors for acute pancreatitis, adverse drug reactions are considered to be rare. The diagnosis of drug-induced pancreatitis (DIP) is challenging to establish, and is often underestimated because of the difficulties in determining the causative agent and the need for a retrospective re-evaluation of the suspected agent. We present the case of an 80-year-old woman who presented with complaints of abdominal pain. Her medications included methimazole (MMI) which she had been on for the past 3 months. Computed tomography of her abdomen showed peripancreatic fat stranding with trace amount of surrounding fluid, along with amylase and lipase levels suggestive of acute pancreatitis. In the absence of classical risk factors for acute pancreatitis, a diagnosis of DIP secondary to MMI use was made. Withdrawal of the drug from her medication regimen was accompanied by relief of symptoms and resolution of clinical evidence of pancreatitis. The aim of this paper is to report only the fourth case of MMI-induced pancreatitis in the published literature, and to illustrate the significance of an appropriate and timely diagnosis of DIP. PMID:22679409

  8. Acute pancreatitis at the beginning of the 21st century: The state of the art

    PubMed Central

    Tonsi, Alfredo F; Bacchion, Matilde; Crippa, Stefano; Malleo, Giuseppe; Bassi, Claudio

    2009-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an acute inflammatory disease of the pancreas which can lead to a systemic inflammatory response syndrome with significant morbidity and mortality in 20% of patients. Gallstones and alcohol consumption are the most frequent causes of pancreatitis in adults. The treatment of mild acute pancreatitis is conservative and supportive; however severe episodes characterized by necrosis of the pancreatic tissue may require surgical intervention. Advanced understanding of the pathology, and increased interest in assessment of disease severity are the cornerstones of future management strategies of this complex and heterogeneous disease in the 21st century. PMID:19554647

  9. Obestatin Accelerates the Recovery in the Course of Ischemia/Reperfusion-Induced Acute Pancreatitis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Bukowczan, Jakub; Warzecha, Zygmunt; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Kuśnierz-Cabala, Beata; Tomaszewska, Romana

    2015-01-01

    Objective Several previous studies have shown that obestatin exhibits protective and regenerative effects in some organs including the stomach, kidney, and the brain. In the pancreas, pretreatment with obestatin inhibits the development of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis, and promotes survival of pancreatic beta cells and human islets. However, no studies investigated the effect of obestatin administration following the onset of experimental acute pancreatitis. Aim The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of obestatin therapy in the course of ischemia/reperfusion-induced pancreatitis. Moreover, we tested the influence of ischemia/reperfusion-induced acute pancreatitis and administration of obestatin on daily food intake and pancreatic exocrine secretion. Methods Acute pancreatitis was induced by pancreatic ischemia followed by reperfusion of the pancreas. Obestatin (8nmol/kg/dose) was administered intraperitoneally twice a day, starting 24 hours after the beginning of reperfusion. The effect of obestatin in the course of necrotizing pancreatitis was assessed between 2 and 14 days, and included histological, functional, and biochemical analyses. Secretory studies were performed on the third day after sham-operation or induction of acute pancreatitis in conscious rats equipped with chronic pancreatic fistula. Results Treatment with obestatin ameliorated morphological signs of pancreatic damage including edema, vacuolization of acinar cells, hemorrhages, acinar necrosis, and leukocyte infiltration of the gland, and led to earlier pancreatic regeneration. Structural changes were accompanied by biochemical and functional improvements manifested by accelerated normalization of interleukin-1β level and activity of myeloperoxidase and lipase, attenuation of the decrease in pancreatic DNA synthesis, and by an improvement of pancreatic blood flow. Induction of acute pancreatitis by pancreatic ischemia followed by reperfusion significantly decreased daily food

  10. Pancreatic ascites hemoglobin contributes to the systemic response in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Salvador; Pereda, Javier; Sabater, Luis; Sastre, Juan

    2015-04-01

    Upon hemolysis extracellular hemoglobin causes oxidative stress and cytotoxicity due to its peroxidase activity. Extracellular hemoglobin may release free hemin, which increases vascular permeability, leukocyte recruitment, and adhesion molecule expression. Pancreatitis-associated ascitic fluid is reddish and may contain extracellular hemoglobin. Our aim has been to determine the role of extracellular hemoglobin in the local and systemic inflammatory response during severe acute pancreatitis in rats. To this end we studied taurocholate-induced necrotizing pancreatitis in rats. First, extracellular hemoglobin in ascites and plasma was quantified and the hemolytic action of ascitic fluid was tested. Second, we assessed whether peritoneal lavage prevented the increase in extracellular hemoglobin in plasma during pancreatitis. Third, hemoglobin was purified from rat erythrocytes and administered intraperitoneally to assess the local and systemic effects of ascitic-associated extracellular hemoglobin during acute pancreatitis. Extracellular hemoglobin and hemin levels markedly increased in ascitic fluid and plasma during necrotizing pancreatitis. Peroxidase activity was very high in ascites. The peritoneal lavage abrogated the increase in extracellular hemoglobin in plasma. The administration of extracellular hemoglobin enhanced ascites; dramatically increased abdominal fat necrosis; upregulated tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, and interleukin-6 gene expression; and decreased expression of interleukin-10 in abdominal adipose tissue during pancreatitis. Extracellular hemoglobin enhanced the gene expression and protein levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and other hypoxia-inducible factor-related genes in the lung. Extracellular hemoglobin also increased myeloperoxidase activity in the lung. In conclusion, extracellular hemoglobin contributes to the inflammatory response in severe acute pancreatitis through abdominal fat necrosis and inflammation

  11. Recent Advances in Managing Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Janisch, Nigeen; Gardner, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    This article will review the recent advances in managing acute pancreatitis. Supportive care has long been the standard of treatment for this disease despite extensive, but ultimately unsuccessful, efforts to develop disease-specific pharmacologic therapies. The primary interventions center on aggressive fluid resuscitation, initiation of early enteral nutrition, targeted antibiotic therapy, and the management of complications. In this article, we will detail treatment of acute pancreatitis with a focus on intravenous fluid resuscitation, enteral feeding, and the current evidence behind the use of antibiotics and other pharmacologic therapies. PMID:26918139

  12. Acute pancreatitis due to ascariasis: a sonographic pictorial essay on four cases.

    PubMed

    Lynser, Donboklang; Thangkhiew, R S; Laloo, Demitrost; Hek, M D; Marbaniang, Evarisalin; Tariang, Satisfy

    2016-06-01

    Ascariasis is the commonest helminthic disease to infect humans. Due to their wandering nature, the roundworms from the second part of the duodenum migrate through the biliary opening into the hepatobiliary and pancreatic ducts. Ascariasis is the most common parasitic cause of pancreatitis in endemic region. Pancreatitis can result due to pancreatic ascariasis, biliary ascariasis or both. Pancreatitis due to ascariasis can be severe and life-threatening. We present a pictorial essay of acute pancreatitis due to ascariasis on four cases. PMID:27059341

  13. Citrobacter freundii infection after acute necrotizing pancreatitis in a patient with a pancreatic pseudocyst: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Infections are the most frequent and severe complications of acute necrotizing pancreatitis with a mortality rate of up to 80 percent. Although experimental and clinical studies suggest that the microbiologic source of pancreatic infection could be enteric, information in this regard is controversial. Case presentation We describe a Citrobacter freundii isolation by endoscopy ultrasound fine needle aspiration in a 80-year-old Caucasian man with pancreatic pseudocyst after acute necrotizing pancreatitis. Conclusion Our case report confirms that this organism can be recovered in patients with a pancreatic pseudocyst. On-site cytology feedback was crucial to the successful outcome of this case as immediate interpretation of the fine needle aspiration sample directed the appropriate cultures and, ultimately, the curative therapy. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of isolated pancreatic C. freundii diagnosed by endoscopy ultrasound fine needle aspiration. PMID:21299889

  14. Pancreatitis and cholecystitis in primary acute symptomatic Epstein-Barr virus infection - Systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kottanattu, Lisa; Lava, Sebastiano A G; Helbling, Rossana; Simonetti, Giacomo D; Bianchetti, Mario G; Milani, Gregorio P

    2016-09-01

    Acute pancreatitis and acalculous cholecystitis have been occasionally reported in primary acute symptomatic Epstein-Barr virus infection. We completed a review of the literature and retained 48 scientific reports published between 1966 and 2016 for the final analysis. Acute pancreatitis was recognized in 14 and acalculous cholecystitis in 37 patients with primary acute symptomatic Epstein-Barr virus infection. In all patients, the features of acute pancreatitis or acalculous cholecystitis concurrently developed with those of primary acute symptomatic Epstein-Barr virus infection. Acute pancreatitis and acalculous cholecystitis resolved following a hospital stay of 25days or less. Acalculous cholecystitis was associated with Gilbert-Meulengracht syndrome in two cases. In conclusion, this thorough analysis indicates that acute pancreatitis and acalculous cholecystitis are unusual but plausible complications of primary acute symptomatic Epstein-Barr virus infection. Pancreatitis and cholecystitis deserve consideration in cases with severe abdominal pain. These complications are usually rather mild and resolve spontaneously without sequelae. PMID:27434148

  15. [A case of acute pancreatitis and acute hepatitis caused by ingestion of Ceramium kondoi].

    PubMed

    Kim, Da-bin; Cho, Yoo-Kyung; Song, Hyun Joo; Song, Byung-Cheol

    2013-11-01

    In Korea, the use of herbal remedies is a common cause of drug-induced liver injury. However, the occurrence of both acute pancreatitis and acute hepatitis after taking herbal remedies has rarely been reported. Herein, we report a case of concurrent acute pancreatitis and acute hepatitis associated with Ceramium kondoi ingestion. A 58-year-old woman was diagnosed with advanced gastric cancer 7 months ago. Total gastrectomy and adjuvant chemotherapy was performed without complications. The patient had been well until recently, when she presented with severe abdominal pain after ingestion of Ceramium kondoifor 4 weeks. The laboratory findings demonstrated elevated liver enzymes and lipase, and abdominal computed tomography revealed pancreas swelling with fat infiltration. The diagnosis was made based on the diagnostic criteria for drug induced pancreatitis and the Russel Uclaf Causality Assessment Method scale for drug-induced liver injury. After cessation of Ceramium kondoi, she showed clinical and biochemical improvement. PMID:24262598

  16. Acute chylous ascites mimicking acute appendicitis in a patient with pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Emily K; Ek, Edmund; Croagh, Daniel; Spain, Lavinia A; Farrell, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of acute chylous peritonitis mimicking acute appendicitis in a man with acute on chronic pancreatitis. Pancreatitis, both acute and chronic, causing the development of acute chylous ascites and peritonitis has rarely been reported in the English literature. This is the fourth published case of acute chylous ascites mimicking acute appendicitis in the literature. PMID:19824123

  17. Acute pancreatitis in slender-tailed meerkats (Suricata suricatta).

    PubMed

    Naples, Lisa M; Lacasse, Claude; Landolfi, Jennifer A; Langan, Jennifer N; Steiner, Jörg M; Suchodolski, Jan S; Gamble, Kathryn C

    2010-06-01

    Four adult, full-sibling slender-tailed meerkats (Suricata suricatta) were diagnosed with acute pancreatitis. The incident case presented with lethargy, anorexia, abdominal guarding, and a cranial abdominal mass. Serum was grossly lipemic, with elevated cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations and increased amylase and lipase activity. An exploratory laparotomy confirmed chylous peritonitis and included excision of a saponified spleno-duodenal mass, a partial pancreatectomy, and a splenectomy. Histopathology revealed severe, multifocal, subacute necrotizing and granulomatous pancreatitis. Within 13 days of the incident case, the second meerkat was identified with essentially identical clinical, surgical, and histologic findings. During subsequent physical examinations of apparently unaffected cohorts (n=12), physical and hematologic findings suggestive of pancreatitis were identified in the two remaining siblings of the first two cases. The definitive cause for these four cases is undetermined; however, common risk factors identified were obesity and hyperlipidemia, a change to a higher-fat diet, and genetic predisposition. To assess its usefulness in the diagnosis of meerkat pancreatitis, serum canine and feline pancreatic lipase immunoreactivity (cPLI and fPLI) concentrations were measured in serum samples (n=61) from two unrelated meerkat populations. Although these assays are highly sensitive and specific for the diagnosis of pancreatitis in domestic carnivores, similar correlation was not apparent for meerkats. In addition, hyperlipidemia was inconsistently present in many meerkats, with no apparent correlation to the development of clinical illness. Based on these observations, sensitive and specific diagnostic tests for pancreatitis in meerkats are currently unavailable. PMID:20597219

  18. Enteral nutrition and immune modulation of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Hegazi, Refaat A; DeWitt, Tiffany

    2014-11-21

    Enteral nutrition has been strongly recommended by major scientific societies for the nutritional management of patients with acute pancreatitis. Providing severe acute pancreatitis patients with enteral nutrition within the first 24-48 h of hospital admission can help improve outcomes compared to parenteral nutrition and no feeding. New research is focusing in on when and what to feed to best improve outcomes for acute pancreatitis patients. Early enteral nutrition have the potential to modulate the immune responses. Despite this consistent evidence of early enteral nutrition in patients with acute pancreatitis, clinical practice continues to vary due to individual clinician preference. Achieving the immune modulating effects of enteral nutrition heavily depend on proper placement of the feeding tube and managing any tube feeding associated complications. The current article reviews the immune modulating effects of enteral nutrition and pro- and prebiotics and suggests some practical tools that help improve the patient adherence and tolerance to the tube feeding. Proper selection of the type of the tube, close monitoring of the tube for its placement, patency and securing its proper placement and routine checking the gastric residual volume could all help improve the outcome. Using peptide-based and high medium chain triglycerides feeding formulas help improving feeding tolerance. PMID:25473161

  19. [Imaging of acute pancreatitis--the role of US, CT and MRI].

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Takeshi; Yamaguchi, Taketo; Saisho, Hiromitsu

    2004-11-01

    Imaging of the pancreas with US and CT plays a major role in the diagnosis and evaluations of patients with acute pancreatitis. In severe acute pancreatitis, dynamic CT is essential to assess the severity of the disease and evaluate the complications. MRI is comparable to CT in its capacity to provide precise information about the severity of acute pancreatitis. MRI has some advantages over CT in being free from ionizing radiation and lower toxity of gadolinium which is used for contrast medium intravenously. The disadvantages of MRI, however, include cost, longer exam duration, limited availability and the practical difficulties of scanning a patient with ICU equipment. PMID:15552887

  20. Validation of a novel, physiologic model of experimental acute pancreatitis in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, Kathryn M; Wade, Terence E; Wang, Sue; Swartz-Basile, Deborah A; Pitt, Henry A; Zyromski, Nicholas J

    2011-01-01

    Background: Many experimental models of acute pancreatitis suffer from lack of clinical relevance. We sought to validate a recently reported murine model of acute pancreatitis that more closely represents the physiology of human biliary pancreatitis. Methods: Mice (C57BL/6J n=6 and CF-1 n=8) underwent infusion of 50μl of 5% sodium taurocholate (NaT) or 50μl of normal saline (NaCl) directly into the pancreatic duct. Twenty-four hours later, pancreatitis severity was graded histologically by three independent observers, and pancreatic tissue concentration of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) were determined by ELISA. Results: Twenty four hours after retrograde injection, the total pancreatitis score was significantly greater in mice infused with NaT than in those infused with NaCl (6.3 ± 1.2 vs. 1.2 ± 0.4, p<0.05). In addition, the inflammatory mediators IL-6 and MCP-1 were increased in the NaT group relative to the NaCl group. Discussion: Retrograde pancreatic duct infusion of sodium taurocholate induces acute pancreatitis in the mouse. This model is likely representative of human biliary pancreatitis pathophysiology, and therefore provides a powerful tool with which to elucidate basic mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis. PMID:21416058

  1. Acute pancreatitis possibly due to arginine use: a case report.

    PubMed

    Saka, Mendane; Tüzün, Ahmet; Ateş, Yüksel; Bağci, Sait; Karaeren, Necmettin; Dağalp, Kemal

    2004-03-01

    Arginine has been used by millions of athletes over the past 20 years to enhance production of human growth hormone. The effects of arginine supplementation include increased fat burning and muscle building, enhanced immunity, and improvement in erectile function in men. Excessive doses of basic amino acids such as ethionine, methionine and lysine are known to damage the rat pancreas. Recent studies have demonstrated that excessive doses of arginine induce necrotizing pancreatitis in rats. In this article, we report a 16-year-old male patient hospitalized in our clinic because of severe pain in upper abdomen, nausea and vomiting who was suspected to have arginine-induced acute pancreatitis. PMID:15264124

  2. Acute pancreatitis associated with pegylated interferon-alpha-2a therapy in chronic hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jong Wook; Lee, June Sung; Paik, Woo Hyun; Song, Tae Jun; Kim, Jung Wook; Bae, Won Ki; Kim, Kyung-Ah; Kim, Jung Gon

    2016-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major cause of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Combination therapy of pegylated interferon-alpha (PEG-IFN-α) and ribavirin (RBV) is a current standard treatment for chronic HCV infection in Korea, which has considerable adverse effects. Acute pancreatitis is a rare complication of PEG-IFN-α administration. We report a case of a 62-year-old female who experienced acute pancreatitis after 4 weeks of PEG-IFN-α-2a and RBV combination therapy for chronic HCV infection. The main cause of the acute pancreatitis in this case was probably PEG-IFN-α rather than RBV for several reasons. A few cases have been reported in which acute pancreatitis occurred during treatment with PEG-IFN-α-2b. This is the first report of acute pancreatitis associated with PEG-IFN-α-2a in Korea. PMID:27044768

  3. CXCR2 inhibition suppresses acute and chronic pancreatic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Steele, Colin W; Karim, Saadia A; Foth, Mona; Rishi, Loveena; Leach, Joshua D G; Porter, Ross J; Nixon, Colin; Jeffry Evans, T R; Carter, C Ross; Nibbs, Robert J B; Sansom, Owen J; Morton, Jennifer P

    2015-09-01

    Pancreatitis is a significant clinical problem and the lack of effective therapeutic options means that treatment is often palliative rather than curative. A deeper understanding of the pathogenesis of both acute and chronic pancreatitis is necessary to develop new therapies. Pathological changes in pancreatitis are dependent on innate immune cell recruitment to the site of initial tissue damage, and on the coordination of downstream inflammatory pathways. The chemokine receptor CXCR2 drives neutrophil recruitment during inflammation, and to investigate its role in pancreatic inflammation, we induced acute and chronic pancreatitis in wild-type and Cxcr2(-/-) mice. Strikingly, Cxcr2(-/-) mice were strongly protected from tissue damage in models of acute pancreatitis, and this could be recapitulated by neutrophil depletion or by the specific deletion of Cxcr2 from myeloid cells. The pancreata of Cxcr2(-/-) mice were also substantially protected from damage during chronic pancreatitis. Neutrophil depletion was less effective in this model, suggesting that CXCR2 on non-neutrophils contributes to the development of chronic pancreatitis. Importantly, pharmacological inhibition of CXCR2 in wild-type mice replicated the protection seen in Cxcr2(-/-) mice in acute and chronic models of pancreatitis. Moreover, acute pancreatic inflammation was reversible by inhibition of CXCR2. Thus, CXCR2 is critically involved in the development of acute and chronic pancreatitis in mice, and its inhibition or loss protects against pancreatic damage. CXCR2 may therefore be a viable therapeutic target in the treatment of pancreatitis. PMID:25950520

  4. Hiatus Hernia: A Rare Cause of Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Shruti; Jawairia, Mahreema; Subramani, Krishnaiyer; Mustacchia, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Hiatal hernia (HH) is the herniation of elements of the abdominal cavity through the esophageal hiatus of the diaphragm. A giant HH with pancreatic prolapse is very rare and its causing pancreatitis is an even more extraordinary condition. We describe a case of a 65-year-old man diagnosed with acute pancreatitis secondary to pancreatic herniation. In these cases, acute pancreatitis may be caused by the diaphragmatic crura impinging upon the pancreas and leading to repetitive trauma as it crosses the hernia; intermittent folding of the main pancreatic duct; ischemia associated with stretching at its vascular pedicle; or total pancreatic incarceration. Asymptomatic hernia may not require any treatment, while multiple studies have supported the recommendation of early elective repair as a safer route in symptomatic patients. In summary, though rare, pancreatic herniation should be considered as a cause of acute pancreatitis. A high index of suspicion for complications is warranted in cases like these. PMID:27066077

  5. Acute pancreatitis : complication of chicken pox in an immunocompetent host.

    PubMed

    Roy, Pinaki; Maity, Pranab; Basu, Arindam; Dey, Somitra; Das, Biman; Ghosh, U S

    2012-12-01

    Chicken pox is a benign self limited disease. But it may rarely be complicated with acute pancreatitis in otherwise healthy patient. We present a case of varicella pancreatitis and its marked recovery with acyclovir. PMID:23781673

  6. Enterococcus hirae Bacteremia Associated with Acute Pancreatitis and Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Dicpinigaitis, Peter V.; De Aguirre, Manuel; Divito, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Infection with Enterococcus hirae has rarely been reported in humans but is not uncommon in mammals and birds. We describe a case of Enterococcus hirae bacteremia associated with acute pancreatitis, acute cholecystitis, and septic shock responsive to antibiotic therapy and supportive critical care management. Unique aspects of this case of Enterococcus hirae bacteremia are its association with acute pancreatitis and its geographical origin. To our knowledge, this is the first report of Enterococcus hirae bacteremia occurring in a patient in the United States. Although human infection with this organism appears to be rare, all cases reported to date describe bacteremia associated with severe and life-threatening illness. Thus, physicians need to be cognizant of the clinical significance of this heretofore little recognized pathogen. PMID:26417465

  7. Increased expression of transforming growth factor beta s after acute oedematous pancreatitis in rats suggests a role in pancreatic repair.

    PubMed Central

    Riesle, E; Friess, H; Zhao, L; Wagner, M; Uhl, W; Baczako, K; Gold, L I; Korc, M; Büchler, M W

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Transforming growth factor beta isoforms (TGF beta s) belong to a family of multifunctional regulators of cellular growth and differentiation. They are mitogenic and chemotactic for fibroblasts and are potent stimulators of extracellular matrix production (collagen) and deposition. Upregulation of TGF beta transcription has been reported for several in vivo systems during repair after injury. AIMS: To study the expression of the three mammalian isoforms of TGF beta (TGF beta 1-3) and their relation to collagen expression as a marker for fibroblast response in acute oedematous pancreatitis in rats. METHODS: Using northern blot analysis and immunohistochemistry, the expression and localisation of TGF beta isoforms, collagen, and amylase were analysed during the course of acute oedematous pancreatitis in rats, experimentally induced by intravenous caerulein infusion. RESULTS: Induction of acute pancreatitis resulted in a biphasic peak pattern of expression of TGF beta 1, beta 2, and beta 3 mRNA, with a pronounced increase from day 1 to day 3 (sixfold, 2.5-fold, fivefold, respectively) and again from day 5 to day 7 (three-fold, 2.3-fold, 3.5-fold, respectively). The temporal changes in TGF beta mRNA identically paralleled the expression in collagen mRNA. In contrast, amylase mRNA expression, used as a general indicator of acinar cell integrity, was slightly decreased after induction of acute pancreatitis. Immunohistochemical analysis of pancreatitis tissue showed that increased expression of TGF beta s was mainly present in the pancreatic acinar and ductal cells; this was evident within one day after pancreatitis induction. CONCLUSION: Overexpression of TGF beta s after induction of acute pancreatitis suggests a role for these proteins in pancreatic repair and remodelling. The increased levels of TGF beta s may help suppress immune activation, and may contribute to the increase in the extracellular matrix including collagen and to the repair of the

  8. Resolvin D1 protects against inflammation in experimental acute pancreatitis and associated lung injury.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong; Zhou, Dan; Long, Fei-Wu; Chen, Ke-Ling; Yang, Hong-Wei; Lv, Zhao-Yin; Zhou, Bin; Peng, Zhi-Hai; Sun, Xiao-Feng; Li, Yuan; Zhou, Zong-Guang

    2016-03-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory condition that may lead to multisystemic organ failure with considerable mortality. Recently, resolvin D1 (RvD1) as an endogenous anti-inflammatory lipid mediator has been confirmed to protect against many inflammatory diseases. This study was designed to investigate the effects of RvD1 in acute pancreatitis and associated lung injury. Acute pancreatitis varying from mild to severe was induced by cerulein or cerulein combined with LPS, respectively. Mice were pretreated with RvD1 at a dose of 300 ng/mouse 30 min before the first injection of cerulein. Severity of AP was assessed by biochemical markers and histology. Serum cytokines and myeloperoxidase (MPO) levels in pancreas and lung were determined for assessing the extent of inflammatory response. NF-κB activation was determined by Western blotting. The injection of cerulein or cerulein combined with LPS resulted in local injury in the pancreas and corresponding systemic inflammatory changes with pronounced severity in the cerulein and LPS group. Pretreated RvD1 significantly reduced the degree of amylase, lipase, TNF-α, and IL-6 serum levels; the MPO activities in the pancreas and the lungs; the pancreatic NF-κB activation; and the severity of pancreatic injury and associated lung injury, especially in the severe acute pancreatitis model. These results suggest that RvD1 is capable of improving injury of pancreas and lung and exerting anti-inflammatory effects through the inhibition of NF-κB activation in experimental acute pancreatitis, with more notable protective effect in severe acute pancreatitis. These findings indicate that RvD1 may constitute a novel therapeutic strategy in the management of severe acute pancreatitis. PMID:26702138

  9. Acute pancreatitis and acute renal failure complicating doxylamine succinate intoxication.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yang Deok; Lee, Soo Teik

    2002-06-01

    Doxylamine succinate is an antihistaminic drugwith additional hypnotic, anticholinergic and local anesthetic effects first described in 1948. In Korea and many other countries, it is a common-over-the counter medication frequently involved in overdoses. Clinical symtomatology of doxylamine succinate overdose includes somnolence, coma, seizures, mydriasis, tachycardia, psychosis, and rhabdomyolysis. A serious complication may be rhabdomyolysis with subsequent impairment of renal function and acute renal failure. We report a case of acute renal failure and acute pancreatitis complicating a doxylamine succinate intoxication. PMID:12046971

  10. Tc-99m IDA cholescintigraphy in acute pancreatitis: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, A.; Turner, D.A.; Fordham, E.W.

    1982-10-01

    Recently it has been suggested that cholescintigraphy is unreliable in the detection of acute cholecystitis when acute pancreatitis is present. During a recent 17 month interval, twenty-one patients with a firmly established diagnosis of acute pancreatitis underwent cholescintigraphy in our laboratory. The gallbladder failed to visualize in only five cases, all of whom had acute cholecystitis. These data, and those available in the literature, lead us to conclude that cholescintigraphy is useful in the diagnosis of acute cholecystitis whether or not acute pancreatitis is present.

  11. Acute Pancreatitis: The Role of Imaging and Interventional Radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Maher, Michael M.; Lucey, Brian C.; Gervais, Debra A.; Mueller, Peter R.

    2004-09-15

    Acute pancreatitis can manifest as a benign condition with minimal abdominal pain and hyperamylasemia or can have a fulminant course, which can be life-threatening usually due to the development of infected pancreatic necrosis, and multisystem organ failure. Fortunately, 70-80% of patients with acute pancreatitis have a benign self-limiting course. The initial 24-48 hours after the initial diagnosis is usually the period that determines the subsequent course, and for many of the 20-30% of patients who subsequently have a fulminant course, this becomes apparent within this time frame. With reference to long-term outcome following acute pancreatitis, most cases recover without long-term sequelae with only a minority of cases progressing to chronic pancreatitis. In the initial management of acute pancreatitis, assessment of metabolic disturbances and systemic organ dysfunction is critical. However, the advent and continued refinement of cross-sectional imaging modalities over the past two decades has led to a prominent role for diagnostic imaging in assessing acute pancreatitis. Furthermore, these cross-sectional imaging modalities have enabled the development of diagnostic and therapeutic interventional techniques in the hands of radiologists. In this article we review the diagnostic features of acute pancreatitis, the clinical staging systems, complications and the role of imaging. The role of interventional radiology techniques in the management of acute pancreatitis will be discussed as well as potential complications associated with these treatments.

  12. Poorly controlled type 2 diabetes complicated by an episode of severe hypertriglyceridaemia-induced pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Denecker, Nathalie; Decochez, Katelijn

    2013-01-01

    A 23-year-old woman with a history of type 2 diabetes and non-compliance presented to the emergency department with abdominal epigastric pain and nausea. Laboratory examination revealed a mild ketoacidosis while an abdominal CT scan performed the following day demonstrated a severe acute pancreatitis of the body and tail (Balthazar grade E) despite normal amylase serum levels on admission. The presence of a lactescent serum was the clue to an extremely high triglyceride level (>10 000 mg/dl) causing the pancreatitis. The hypertriglyceridaemia itself was attributed mainly to the diabetic ketoacidosis. There was no family history of hypertriglyceridaemia. The triad consisting of diabetic ketoacidosis, hypertriglyceridaemia and acute pancreatitis is an unusual presentation of poorly controlled diabetes which can occur in type 1 as well as type 2 diabetic adults and children. Treatment with intravenous insulin and hydration successfully resolved the ketoacidosis and hypertriglyceridaemia and reversed the episode of acute pancreatitis. PMID:23632173

  13. [Galvanic current in the conservative treatment of acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Alekseenko, A V; Iftodiĭ, A G; Stoliar, V F

    1990-10-01

    Experiments were conducted on 42 adult dogs with a model of acute pancreatitis to study the degree of antibiotic storage in the pancreatic tissue in different variants of intralesional+ electrophoresis. Optimum concentration of the antibiotic was produced in transverse galvanization of the zone of the pancreas. Clinical observations over 63 patients with various forms of acute pancreatitis bear evidence that the method raises the efficacy of nonoperative treatment in the oedematous stage of the process and reduces the duration of treatment. PMID:2283730

  14. Acute pancreatitis following granulosa cell tumor removal in a mare

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Diego E.; Radtke, Catherine L.; Russell, Lauren A.; Lopez, Alfonso; Wichtel, Maureen W.

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a rare disease in horses and is often associated with gastrointestinal disorders. Accurate diagnosis is challenging due to the presence of nonspecific clinical signs. This case represents the first documentation of acute pancreatitis in a horse following surgery of the reproductive tract. PMID:26483579

  15. Differences in Severity and Outcomes Between Hypertriglyceridemia and Alcohol-Induced Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Hemant; Smith, Betsy; Bayer, Chelsey; Rutherford, Carla; Shelnut, Danielle

    2016-01-01

    Background: Alcohol and hypertriglyceridemia (HTG) are among the most common causes of acute pancreatitis (AP) after gallstones. However, differences in severity at the time of presentation and outcomes have not been well-studied. Objective: The aim of this study is to assess the differences between severity at presentation and outcomes of AP of hypertriglyceridemic and alcoholic origins. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of 177 patients who were discharged with diagnosis of AP was performed. Severity at presentation was identified by the presence of systemic inflammatory response syndrome, bedside index for severity in AP (BISAP) score, and Balthazar index. Outcomes were measured by the length of stay, intensive care unit care, surgical intervention, and mortality. Results: We found 147 patients with alcoholic pancreatitis and 30 patients with hypertriglyceridemic pancreatitis. A larger percentage of hypertriglyceridemic pancreatitis patients (23.33%) had a BISAP score of ≥2 compared to the alcoholic group (12.24%). Only 32.65% of the patients with alcoholic pancreatitis but 60% of the patients with hypertriglyceridemic pancreatitis had the presence of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) at admission (P = 0.0067). There were 73.34% hypertriglyceridemic pancreatits patients and only 40.28% alcoholic pancreatitis patients with Balthazar index C or greater, suggesting a higher disease burden at admission for hypertriglyceridemic pancreatitis patients (P = 0.0047). There was a statistically significant difference in the relative number of hypertriglyceridemic and alcoholic pancreatitis patients receiving intensive care (P = 0.00030) and in receiving surgical interventions related to pancreatitis (P = 0.016). Conclusion: Our study found that patients with hypertriglyceridemic pancreatitis have a greater severity of disease and they experience less favorable outcomes than patients with alcoholic pancreatitis. PMID:27042605

  16. Scrub typhus masquerading as acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Amit; Gupta, Monica; Bhardwaj, Shweta; Handa, Dipti

    2016-01-01

    The clinical spectrum of scrub typhus ranges from mild to fatal depending on the virulence of bacterial strain, susceptibility of the host and promptness with which treatment is started. We report a case of a 14-year-old child with scrub typhus who developed acute pancreatitis. On serological confirmation, doxycycline therapy was started. The patient responded well and had no complications on follow-up. This case report highlights the importance of recognising an uncommon presentation of this common tropical disease, and its prompt diagnosis and early treatment for prevention of serious complications of the condition. PMID:27161204

  17. Loss of Bace1 in Mice Does Not Alter the Severity of Caerulein Induced Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Heindl, Mario; Tuennemann, Jan; Sommerer, Ines; Mössner, Joachim; Hoffmeister, Albrecht

    2015-01-01

    Context Beta-site alpha-amyloid protein cleaving enzyme1 (BACE1) plays a key role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease. Additional to its moderate expression in the brain, high levels of BACE1 mRNA were found in the pancreas. Murine Bace1 has been immunohistochemicaly detected at the apical pole of acinar cells within the exocrine pancreas of mice and Bace1 activity was observed in pancreatic juice. In vitro experiments revealed enteropeptidase as a putative substrate for Bace1 suggesting a role in acute pancreatitis. Objective The aim of this study was to address a protective mechanism of Bace1 in acute experimental pancreatitis in mice. Methods Acute experimental pancreatitis was induced by intraperitoneal injection of caerulein in homozygote Bace1-/- mice and wild type mice. Serum and tissue analyses were carried out after 4 h, 8 h and 24 h. Measurement of plasma amylase and lipase was performed to confirm pancreatitis induction. In order to assess the severity of pancreatitis H&E stained pancreatic sections were examined regarding edema, inflammation and apoptosis. Immunohistochemical detection of myeloperoxidase (MPO) positive cells was carried out to further quantify the extent of inflammation. Expression of Bace2 within the pancreas was analyzed by immunohistochemistry and RT-qPCR. Results We demonstrate that total loss of Bace1 in mice leads to no alterations in the course of acute experimental caerulein-pancreatitis. Bace1-/- mice develop a moderate pancreatitis that is comparable in histomorphological and serological features with those seen in wild type mice. Discussion We discuss the results in the context of the applied caerulein induced edematous pancreatitis model and possible compensatory mechanisms via Bace2 that might be responsible for the observed results. PMID:25961820

  18. Continuous Regional Arterial Infusion Therapy for Acute Necrotizing Pancreatitis Due to Mycoplasma pneumoniae Infection in a Child

    SciTech Connect

    Nakagawa, Motoo Ogino, Hiroyuki; Shimohira, Masashi; Hara, Masaki; Shibamoto, Yuta

    2009-05-15

    A case of acute necrotizing pancreatitis due to Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection was treated in an 8-year-old girl. She experienced acute pancreatitis during treatment for M. pneumoniae. Contrast-enhanced computed tomographic scan revealed necrotizing pancreatitis. The computed tomographic severity index was 8 points (grade E). A protease inhibitor, ulinastatin, was provided via intravenous infusion but was ineffective. Continuous regional arterial infusion therapy was provided with gabexate mesilate (FOY-007, a protease inhibitor) and meropenem trihydrate, and the pancreatitis improved. This case suggests that infusion therapy is safe and useful in treating necrotizing pancreatitis in children.

  19. Pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the hormones insulin and glucagon into the bloodstream. Pancreatitis is inflammation of the pancreas. It happens when digestive enzymes start digesting the pancreas itself. Pancreatitis can be acute or chronic. Either form is ...

  20. Effects of urtica dioica extract on experimental acute pancreatitis model in rats

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Baris; Basar, Ömer; Aktas, Bora; Altinbas, Akif; Ekiz, Fuat; Büyükcam, Fatih; Albayrak, Aynur; Ginis, Zeynep; Öztürk, Gülfer; Coban, Sahin; Ucar, Engin; Kaya, Oskay; Yüksel, Osman; Caner, Sedat; Delibasi, Tuncay

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is the acute inflammation of pancreas and peripancreatic tissues, and distant organs are also affected. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of Urtica dioica extract (UDE) treatment on cerulein induced acute pancreatitis in rats. Twenty-one Wistar Albino rats were divided into three groups: Control, Pancreatitis, and UDE treatment group. In the control group no procedures were performed. In the pancreatitis and treatment groups, pancreatitis was induced with intraperitoneal injection of cerulein, followed by intraperitoneal injection of 1 ml saline (pancreatitis group) and 1 ml 5.2% UDE (treatment group). Pancreatic tissues were examined histopathologically. Pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α), amylase and markers of apoptosis (M30, M65) were also measured in blood samples. Immunohistochemical staining was performed with Caspase-3 antibody. Histopathological findings in the UDE treatment group were less severe than in the pancreatitis group (5.7 vs 11.7, p = 0.010). TNF-α levels were not statistically different between treated and control groups (63.3 vs. 57.2, p = 0.141). UDE treatment was associated with less apoptosis [determined by M30, caspase-3 index (%)], (1.769 vs. 0.288, p = 0.056; 3% vs. 2.2%, p = 0.224; respectively). UDE treatment of pancreatitis merits further study. PMID:24995088

  1. [Acute pancreatitis with hypertriglyceridemia--an underestimated disease?].

    PubMed

    Wild, Wolfgang; Tajjiou, Morad; Ferschke, Melanie; Bormann, Fabian; Dörr, Pius; Schwarzbach, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia is a rare, but since a long time well known etiology for acute pancreatitis. It could occure alone or coactive with other triggers like alcohlic excess. Nevertheless it found no approach to the current classifications and parameters of prognosis of the acute pancreatitis. We refer about two patients with hypertriglyceridemia and acute pancreatitis, whose initial disease was limited on the tail of the pancreas with just a circumscripted or--in the other case--no necrosis. However, in both cases and although a consequent treatment started immediately, a serious process developed including a life-threatening acute respiratory distress syndrome in one case, which necessitated an extracorporal membrane oxygenation. PMID:26710203

  2. Role of Biomarkers in Diagnosis and Prognostic Evaluation of Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Meher, Susanta; Mishra, Tushar Subhadarshan; Sasmal, Prakash Kumar; Rath, Satyajit; Sharma, Rakesh; Rout, Bikram; Sahu, Manoj Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a potentially life threatening disease. The spectrum of severity of the illness ranges from mild self-limiting disease to a highly fatal severe necrotizing pancreatitis. Despite intensive research and improved patient care, overall mortality still remains high, reaching up to 30–40% in cases with infected pancreatic necrosis. Although little is known about the exact pathogenesis, it has been widely accepted that premature activation of digestive enzymes within the pancreatic acinar cell is the trigger that leads to autodigestion of pancreatic tissue which is followed by infiltration and activation of leukocytes. Extensive research has been done over the past few decades regarding their role in diagnosis and prognostic evaluation of severe acute pancreatitis. Although many standalone biochemical markers have been studied for early assessment of severity, C-reactive protein still remains the most frequently used along with Interleukin-6. In this review we have discussed briefly the pathogenesis and the role of different biochemical markers in the diagnosis and severity evaluation in acute pancreatitis. PMID:26345247

  3. Pancreatitis-induced acute lung injury. An ARDS model.

    PubMed Central

    Guice, K S; Oldham, K T; Johnson, K J; Kunkel, R G; Morganroth, M L; Ward, P A

    1988-01-01

    Cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in rats is associated with acute lung injury characterized by increased pulmonary microvascular permeability, increased wet lung weights, and histologic features of alveolar capillary endothelial cell and pulmonary parenchymal injury. The alveolar capillary permeability index is increased 1.8-fold after a 3-hour injury (0.30 to 0.54, p less than 0.05). Gravimetric analysis shows a similar 1.5-fold increase in wet lung weights at 3 hours (0.35% vs. 0.51% of total body weight, p less than 0.05). Histologic features assessed by quantitative morphometric analysis include significant intra-alveolar hemorrhage (0.57 +/- 0.08 vs. 0.12 +/- 0.02 RBC/alveolus at 6 hours, p less than 0.001); endothelial cell disruption (28.11% vs. 4.3%, p less than 0.001); and marked, early neutrophil infiltration (7.45 +/- 0.53 vs. 0.83 +/- 0.18 PMN/hpf at 3 hours, p less than 0.001). The cerulein peptide itself, a cholecystokinin (CCK) analog, is naturally occurring and is not toxic and in several in vitro settings including exposure to pulmonary artery endothelial cells, Type II epithelial cells, and an ex vivo perfused lung preparation. The occurrence of this ARDS-like acute lung injury with acute pancreatitis provides an excellent experimental model to investigate mechanisms and mediators involved in the pathogenesis of ARDS. Images Fig. 1. PMID:3389946

  4. Pancreatitis-induced acute lung injury. An ARDS model.

    PubMed

    Guice, K S; Oldham, K T; Johnson, K J; Kunkel, R G; Morganroth, M L; Ward, P A

    1988-07-01

    Cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in rats is associated with acute lung injury characterized by increased pulmonary microvascular permeability, increased wet lung weights, and histologic features of alveolar capillary endothelial cell and pulmonary parenchymal injury. The alveolar capillary permeability index is increased 1.8-fold after a 3-hour injury (0.30 to 0.54, p less than 0.05). Gravimetric analysis shows a similar 1.5-fold increase in wet lung weights at 3 hours (0.35% vs. 0.51% of total body weight, p less than 0.05). Histologic features assessed by quantitative morphometric analysis include significant intra-alveolar hemorrhage (0.57 +/- 0.08 vs. 0.12 +/- 0.02 RBC/alveolus at 6 hours, p less than 0.001); endothelial cell disruption (28.11% vs. 4.3%, p less than 0.001); and marked, early neutrophil infiltration (7.45 +/- 0.53 vs. 0.83 +/- 0.18 PMN/hpf at 3 hours, p less than 0.001). The cerulein peptide itself, a cholecystokinin (CCK) analog, is naturally occurring and is not toxic and in several in vitro settings including exposure to pulmonary artery endothelial cells, Type II epithelial cells, and an ex vivo perfused lung preparation. The occurrence of this ARDS-like acute lung injury with acute pancreatitis provides an excellent experimental model to investigate mechanisms and mediators involved in the pathogenesis of ARDS. PMID:3389946

  5. A Case of Idiopathic Acute Pancreatitis in the First Trimester of Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Tomomi; Kanasaki, Haruhiko; Oride, Aki; Ishihara, Tomoko; Kyo, Satoru

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is rare in pregnancy, with an estimated incidence of approximately 1 in 1000 to 1 in 10,000 pregnancies. Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy usually occurs in the third trimester. Here, we report a case of acute pancreatitis in the first trimester. A 36-year-old primigravida at 11 weeks of gestation complained of severe lower abdominal pain. The pain gradually worsened and migrated toward the epigastric region. She had no history of chronic alcoholism. Blood investigations showed elevated level of C-reactive protein (9.58 mg/dL), pancreatic amylase (170 IU/L), and lipase (332 IU/L). There was no gallstone and no abnormality in the pancreatic and biliary ducts on ultrasonography. Antinuclear antibody and IgG4 were negative and no evidence of hyperlipidemia or diabetes was found. There was also no evidence of viral infection. On the third day of hospitalization, she was diagnosed with severe acute pancreatitis on magnetic resonance imaging. Medical interventions were initiated with nafamostat mesilate and ulinastatin, and parenteral nutrition was administered through a central venous catheter. On the eighth day of hospitalization, her condition gradually improved with a decreased level of pancreatic amylase and the pain subsided. After conservative management, she did not have any recurrence during her pregnancy. PMID:26843995

  6. The Role of Eugenol in the Prevention of Acute Pancreatitis-Induced Acute Kidney Injury: Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Markakis, Charalampos; Tsaroucha, Alexandra; Papalois, Apostolos E.; Lambropoulou, Maria; Spartalis, Eleftherios; Tsigalou, Christina; Romanidis, Konstantinos; Simopoulos, Constantinos

    2016-01-01

    Aim. Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory intra-abdominal disease, which takes a severe form in 15–20% of patients and can result in high mortality especially when complicated by acute renal failure. The aim of this study is to assess the possible reduction in the extent of acute kidney injury after administration of eugenol in an experimental model of acute pancreatitis. Materials and Methods. 106 male Wistar rats weighing 220–350 g were divided into 3 groups: (1) Sham, with sham surgery; (2) Control, with induction of acute pancreatitis, through ligation of the biliopancreatic duct; and (3) Eugenol, with induction of acute pancreatitis and eugenol administration at a dose of 15 mg/kg. Serum urea and creatinine, histopathological changes, TNF-α, IL-6, and MPO activity in the kidneys were evaluated at predetermined time intervals. Results. The group that was administered eugenol showed milder histopathological changes than the Control group, TNF-α activity was milder in the Eugenol group, and there was no difference in activity for MPO and IL-6. Serum urea and creatinine levels were lower in the Eugenol group than in the Control group. Conclusions. Eugenol administration was protective for the kidneys in an experimental model of acute pancreatitis in rats. PMID:26884642

  7. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, diabetes mellitus and serum nutritional markers after acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Vujasinovic, Miroslav; Tepes, Bojan; Makuc, Jana; Rudolf, Sasa; Zaletel, Jelka; Vidmar, Tjasa; Seruga, Maja; Birsa, Bostjan

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate impairment and clinical significance of exocrine and endocrine pancreatic function in patients after acute pancreatitis (AP). METHODS: Patients with AP were invited to participate in the study. Severity of AP was determined by the Atlanta classification and definitions revised in 2012. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI) was diagnosed by the concentration of fecal elastase-1. An additional work-up, including laboratory testing of serum nutritional markers for determination of malnutrition, was offered to all patients with low levels of fecal elastase-1 FE. Hemoglobin A1c or oral glucose tolerance tests were also performed in patients without prior diabetes mellitus, and type 3c diabetes mellitus (T3cDM) was diagnosed according to American Diabetes Association criteria. RESULTS: One hundred patients were included in the study: 75% (75/100) of patients had one attack of AP and 25% (25/100) had two or more attacks. The most common etiology was alcohol. Mild, moderately severe and severe AP were present in 67, 15 and 18% of patients, respectively. The mean time from attack of AP to inclusion in the study was 2.7 years. PEI was diagnosed in 21% (21/100) of patients and T3cDM in 14% (14/100) of patients. In all patients with PEI, at least one serologic nutritional marker was below the lower limit of normal. T3cDM was more frequently present in patients with severe AP (P = 0.031), but was also present in some patients with mild and moderately severe AP. PEI was present in all degrees of severity of AP. There were no statistically significantly differences according to gender, etiology and number of AP attacks. CONCLUSION: As exocrine and endocrine pancreatic insufficiency can develop after AP, routine follow-up of patients is necessary, for which serum nutritional panel measurements can be useful. PMID:25561813

  8. Hypertriglyceridemia-induced acute pancreatitis in pregnancy causing maternal death

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Hae Rin; Cho, Yoon Jin; Chon, Seung Joo

    2016-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy is rare and occurs in approximately 3 in 10,000 pregnancies. It rarely complicates pregnancy, and can occur during any trimester, however over half (52%) of cases occur during the third trimester and during the post-partum period. Gallstones are the most common cause of acute pancreatitis. On the other hand, acute pancreatitis caused by hypertriglyceridemia due to increase of estrogen during the gestational period is very unusual, but complication carries a higher risk of morbidity and mortality for both the mother and the fetus. We experienced a case of pregnant woman who died of acute exacerbation of hypertriglyceridemia-induced acute pancreatitis at 23 weeks of gestation. We report on progress and management of this case along with literature reviews. PMID:27004207

  9. Imaging and Percutaneous Management of Acute Complicated Pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Shankar, Sridhar; Sonnenberg, Eric van; Silverman, Stuart G.; Tuncali, Kemal; Banks, Peter A.

    2004-11-15

    Acute pancreatitis varies from a mild, self-limited disease to one with significant morbidity and mortality in its most severe forms. While clinical criteria abound, imaging has become indispensable to diagnose the extent of the disease and its complications, as well as to guide and monitor therapy. Percutaneous interventional techniques offer options that can be life-saving, surgery-sparing or important adjuncts to operation. Close cooperation and communication between the surgeon, gastroenterologist and interventional radiologist enhance the likelihood of successful patient care.

  10. [Immune and enzyme disorders in patients with acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Briskin, B S; Iarovaia, G A; Savchenko, Z I; Rybakov, G S; Khalidov, O Kh; Mkhitarova, L A; Suplotova, A A

    2001-01-01

    Analysis of immune and enzyme disorders in 85 patients with acute pancreatitis shows that persistent imbalance of immunoregulatory T-lymphocytes with suppression predominance; reduction of all immunoglobulines number, imbalance in phagocytic immunity with height of absorbing activity of neutropils and stimultaneous decrease of their digestive capacity are prognostically unfavourable for high risk of pyonecrotic complications and lethal outcome. It is necessary to include immunocorrectors in combined therapy. Direct assessment of leukocytic elastase activity and alpha-IP level in blood plasma permits to evaluate spreading of inflammatory process and it severity, efficacy and prognosis of treatment. PMID:11521303

  11. A case of severe necrotising pancreatitis following ampullary biopsy.

    PubMed

    Skelton, D; Barnes, J; French, J

    2015-05-01

    We present a case of necrotising pancreatitis following ampullary biopsy in a patient with Barrett's oesophagus. The patient needed multiple necrosectomies and several admissions to the intensive care unit. This report is only the third and most severe case of pancreatitis following ampullary biopsy, highlighting its importance as a complication. PMID:26263955

  12. The crosstalk between gut inflammation and gastrointestinal disorders during acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhen-Zhen; Wang, Pu; Yi, Zhi-Hui; Huang, Zhi-Yin; Tang, Cheng-Wei

    2014-01-01

    The intestinal inflammation caused by intestinal ischemia reperfusion during acute pancreatitis (AP) often leads to multiple organ dysfunction and aggravation of acute pancreatitis. This review concerns up-date progress of the pathophysiology and molecular mechanism of the excessive production of gut-derived cytokines. The regulation effects of immuno-neuro-endocrine network for pancreatic necrosis are the basis for pharmacological therapeutic in AP. The translation from basic research to clinical trials for the prevention or treatment of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) is of great value. Early enteral nutrition is necessary for the restitution, proliferation, and differentiation of the intestinal epithelial cells adjacent to the wounded area. Clearance of the excess intestinal bacteria and supplement of probiotics may be helpful to prevent bacterial translocation and infection of pancreas. PMID:23782148

  13. Revised Atlanta Classification for Acute Pancreatitis: A Pictorial Essay.

    PubMed

    Foster, Bryan R; Jensen, Kyle K; Bakis, Gene; Shaaban, Akram M; Coakley, Fergus V

    2016-01-01

    The 2012 revised Atlanta classification is an update of the original 1992 Atlanta classification, a standardized clinical and radiologic nomenclature for acute pancreatitis and associated complications based on research advances made over the past 2 decades. Acute pancreatitis is now divided into two distinct subtypes, necrotizing pancreatitis and interstitial edematous pancreatitis (IEP), based on the presence or absence of necrosis, respectively. The revised classification system also updates confusing and sometimes inaccurate terminology that was previously used to describe pancreatic and peripancreatic collections. As such, use of the terms acute pseudocyst and pancreatic abscess is now discouraged. Instead, four distinct collection subtypes are identified on the basis of the presence of pancreatic necrosis and time elapsed since the onset of pancreatitis. Acute peripancreatic fluid collections (APFCs) and pseudocysts occur in IEP and contain fluid only. Acute necrotic collections (ANCs) and walled-off necrosis (WON) occur only in patients with necrotizing pancreatitis and contain variable amounts of fluid and necrotic debris. APFCs and ANCs occur within 4 weeks of disease onset. After this time, APFCs or ANCs may either resolve or persist, developing a mature wall to become a pseudocyst or a WON, respectively. Any collection subtype may become infected and manifest as internal gas, though this occurs most commonly in necrotic collections. In this review, the authors present a practical image-rich guide to the revised Atlanta classification system, with the goal of fostering implementation of the revised system into radiology practice, thereby facilitating accurate communication among clinicians and reinforcing the radiologist's role as a key member of a multidisciplinary team in treating patients with acute pancreatitis. (©)RSNA, 2016. PMID:27163588

  14. Transcatheter embolization of pancreatic arteriovenous malformation associated with recurrent acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Rajesh, S; Mukund, Amar; Bhatia, Vikram; Arora, Ankur

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic arteriovenous malformation (PAVM) is extremely rare; even rarer is its association with pancreatitis. The authors report a case of PAVM causing recurrent episodes of acute pancreatitis in a 46-year-old male. Patient refused surgery and was treated with transcatheter arterial embolization using liquid embolic agent (mixture of n-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate glue and lipiodol), which resulted in a significant decrease in the size of the PAVM. PMID:27081231

  15. Chronic pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic pancreatitis - chronic; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - chronic; Acute pancreatitis - chronic ... abuse over many years. Repeated episodes of acute pancreatitis can lead to chronic pancreatitis. Genetics may be ...

  16. Immune-modulating therapy in acute pancreatitis: Fact or fiction

    PubMed Central

    Akinosoglou, Karolina; Gogos, Charalambos

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is one of the most common diseases of the gastrointestinal tract, bearing significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Current treatment of AP remains unspecific and supportive and is mainly targeted to aggressively prevent systemic complications and organ failure by intensive care. As acute pancreatitis shares an indistinguishable profile of inflammation with sepsis, therapeutic approaches have turned towards modulating the systemic inflammatory response. Targets, among others, have included pro- and anti-inflammatory modulators, cytokines, chemokines, immune cells, adhesive molecules and platelets. Even though, initial results in experimental models have been encouraging, clinical implementation of immune-regulating therapies in acute pancreatitis has had a slow progress. Main reasons include difficulty in clinical translation of experimental data, poor understanding of inflammatory response time-course, flaws in experimental designs, need for multimodal approaches and commercial drawbacks. Whether immune-modulation in acute pancreatitis remains a fact or just fiction remains to be seen in the future. PMID:25386069

  17. A prospective study of radionuclide biliary scanning in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Neoptolemos, J. P.; Fossard, D. P.; Berry, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    Early surgery for biliary pancreatitis has resulted in a need for an accurate method of gallstone detection in acute pancreatitis. Fifty patients with acute pancreatitis were studied prospectively to assess the diagnostic value of Radionuclide Biliary Scanning (RBS) performed within 72 hours of an attack. To assess the general accuracy of RBS a further 154 patients with suspected acute cholecystitis or biliary colic were similarly studied. There were 34 patients with biliary pancreatitis and 18 (53%) had a positive scan (no gallbladder seen). There were 16 patients with non-biliary pancreatitis and 5 (31%) had a positive scan. All 51 patients with acute cholecystitis had a positive scan, as did 82% of the 51 patients with biliary colic. There were 52 patients with no biliary or pancreatic disease and none of these had a positive scan. RBS is highly accurate in confirming a diagnosis of acute cholecystitis or biliary colic. However, it cannot be relied on to differentiate between biliary and non-biliary pancreatitis and should certainly not be used as the basis for biliary surgery in these patients. PMID:6859781

  18. Enteral nutrition in acute pancreatitis: a review of the current evidence.

    PubMed

    Oláh, Attila; Romics, Laszlo

    2014-11-21

    The use of enteral feeding as part of the management of acute pancreatitis dates back almost two decades. This review describes the indications for and limitations of enteral feeding for the treatment of acute pancreatitis using up-to-date evidence-based data. A systematic review was carried out to analyse current data on the use of enteral nutrition in the management of acute pancreatitis. Relevant literature was analysed from the viewpoints of enteral vs parenteral feeding, early vs delayed enteral nutrition, nasogastric vs nasojejunal feeding, and early oral diet and immunonutrition, particularly glutamine and probiotic supplementation. Finally, current applicable guidelines and the effects of these guidelines on clinical practice are discussed. The latest meta-analyses suggest that enteral nutrition significantly reduces the mortality rate of severe acute pancreatitis compared to parenteral feeding. To maintain gut barrier function and prevent early bacterial translocation, enteral feeding should be commenced within the first 24 h of hospital admission. Also, the safety of nasogastric feeding, which eases the administration of enteral nutrients in the clinical setting, is likely equal to nasojejunal feeding. Furthermore, an early low-fat oral diet is potentially beneficial in patients with mild pancreatitis. Despite the initial encouraging results, the current evidence does not support the use of immunoenhanced nutrients or probiotics in patients with acute pancreatitis. PMID:25473164

  19. BPC 157 therapy to detriment sphincters failure-esophagitis-pancreatitis in rat and acute pancreatitis patients low sphincters pressure.

    PubMed

    Petrovic, I; Dobric, I; Drmic, D; Sever, M; Klicek, R; Radic, B; Brcic, L; Kolenc, D; Zlatar, M; Kunjko, K; Jurcic, D; Martinac, M; Rasic, Z; Boban Blagaic, A; Romic, Z; Seiwerth, S; Sikiric, P

    2011-10-01

    Possibly, acute esophagitis and pancreatitis cause each other, and we focused on sphincteric failure as the common causative key able to induce either esophagitis and acute pancreatitis or both of them, and thereby investigate the presence of a common therapy nominator. This may be an anti-ulcer pentadecapeptide BPC 157 (tested for inflammatory bowel disease, wound treatment) affecting esophagitis, lower esophageal and pyloric sphincters failure and acute pancreatitis (10 μg/kg, 10 ng/kg intraperitoneally or in drinking water). The esophagitis-sphincter failure procedure (i.e., insertion of the tubes into the sphincters, lower esophageal and pyloric) and acute pancreatitis procedure (i.e., bile duct ligation) were combined in rats. Esophageal manometry was done in acute pancreatitis patients. In rats acute pancreatitis procedure produced also esophagitis and both sphincter failure, decreased pressure 24 h post-surgery. Furthermore, bile duct ligation alone immediately declines the pressure in both sphincters. Vice versa, the esophagitis-sphincter failure procedure alone produced acute pancreatitis. What's more, these lesions (esophagitis, sphincter failure, acute pancreatitis when combined) aggravate each other (tubes into sphincters and ligated bile duct). Counteraction occurred by BPC 157 therapies. In acute pancreatitis patients lower pressure at rest was in both esophageal sphincters in acute pancreatitis patients. We conclude that BPC 157 could cure esophagitis/sphincter/acute pancreatitis healing failure. PMID:22204800

  20. Vasoactive mediators and the progression from oedematous to necrotising experimental acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Weidenbach, H; Lerch, M M; Gress, T M; Pfaff, D; Turi, S; Adler, G

    1995-01-01

    Little is known about the pathophysiological factors that determine the clinical severity of acute pancreatitis. Because impairment of pancreatic circulation and oxygenation is associated with greater disease severity and morphological damage in experimental pancreatitis it has been suggested that various vasoactive mediators might participate in the progression from the oedematous to the necrotising variety of the disease. This study used an animal model of acute pancreatitis induced by intravenous caeruleint (10 micrograms/kg/h for up to six hours), which does not entail either haemorrhage or significant necrosis of the pancreas. This study considered whether the administration or the inhibition of either nitric oxide, bradykinin, or adrenergic mediators can convert this mild variety into haemorrhagic and necrotising pancreatitis. Neither nitric oxide nor catecholamines were involved in the progression from oedematous to haemorrhagic pancreatitis. Their substitution, activation, and inhibition all failed to change the severity of the disease process. Bradykinin alone seemed to be critically involved in the pathogenesis of pancreatic haemorrhage and necrosis. However, the inhibition of bradykinin and not its activation or substitution increased the severity of the disease. Images Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7590444

  1. Acute Pancreatitis after Percutaneous Mechanical Thrombectomy: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    SciTech Connect

    Hershberger, Richard C. Bornak, Arash; Aulivola, Bernadette; Mannava, Krishna

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: We describe a case of severe acute pancreatitis after percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy (PMT) and review the literature for the occurrence of this complication. Materials and Methods: A 53-year-old man with a history of bilateral external iliac artery stent placement sought care for acute onset of lifestyle-limiting left claudication. Angiography confirmed left external iliac stent occlusion, and PMT with the AngioJet Xpeedior catheter (Possis Medical, Minneapolis MN) was performed. Results: After PMT of the occluded external iliac artery, a residual in-stent stenosis required the placement of a second iliac stent. The procedure was complicated by severe acute pancreatitis. Other causes of pancreatitis were eliminated during the patient's hospital stay. A literature review revealed nine cases of acute pancreatitis after PMT. Conclusion: Although rare, pancreatitis can be a devastating complication of PMT. The development of pancreatitis seems to be related to the products of extensive hemolysis triggering an inflammatory process. To prevent this complication, we recommend that close attention be paid to the duration and extent of PMT, thereby avoiding extensive hemolysis and subsequent complications.

  2. Kaempferol, a dietary flavonoid, ameliorates acute inflammatory and nociceptive symptoms in gastritis, pancreatitis, and abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Kim, Shi Hyoung; Park, Jae Gwang; Sung, Gi-Ho; Yang, Sungjae; Yang, Woo Seok; Kim, Eunji; Kim, Jun Ho; Ha, Van Thai; Kim, Han Gyung; Yi, Young-Su; Kim, Ji Hye; Baek, Kwang-Soo; Sung, Nak Yoon; Lee, Mi-nam; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Cho, Jae Youl

    2015-07-01

    Kaempferol (KF) is the most abundant polyphenol in tea, fruits, vegetables, and beans. However, little is known about its in vivo anti-inflammatory efficacy and mechanisms of action. To study these, several acute mouse inflammatory and nociceptive models, including gastritis, pancreatitis, and abdominal pain were employed. Kaempferol was shown to attenuate the expansion of inflammatory lesions seen in ethanol (EtOH)/HCl- and aspirin-induced gastritis, LPS/caerulein (CA) triggered pancreatitis, and acetic acid-induced writhing. PMID:25917334

  3. Update on pathogenesis and clinical management of acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Santamaría, Dulce M; Taxonera, Carlos; Giner, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP), defined as the acute nonbacterial inflammatory condition of the pancreas, is derived from the early activation of digestive enzymes found inside the acinar cells, with variable compromise of the gland itself, nearby tissues and other organs. So, it is an event that begins with pancreatic injury, elicits an acute inflammatory response, encompasses a variety of complications and generally resolves over time. Different conditions are known to induce this disorder, although the innermost mechanisms and how they act to develop the disease are still unknown. We summarize some well established aspects. A phase sequence has been proposed: etiology factors generate other conditions inside acinar cells that favor the AP development with some systemic events; genetic factors could be involved as susceptibility and modifying elements. AP is a disease with extremely different clinical expressions. Most patients suffer a mild and limited disease, but about one fifth of cases develop multi organ failure, accompanied by high mortality. This great variability in presentation, clinical course and complications has given rise to the confusion related to AP related terminology. However, consensus meetings have provided uniform definitions, including the severity of the illness. The clinical management is mainly based on the disease´s severity and must be directed to correct the underlying predisposing factors and control the inflammatory process itself. The first step is to determine if it is mild or severe. We review the principal aspects to be considered in this treatment, as reflected in several clinical practice guidelines. For the last 25 years, there has been a global increase in incidence of AP, along with many advances in diagnosis and treatment. However, progress in knowledge of its pathogenesis is scarce. PMID:22737590

  4. Management of severe pancreatitis in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed Central

    Slakey, D P; Johnson, C P; Cziperle, D J; Roza, A M; Wittmann, D H; Gray, D W; Roake, J A; Britton, J; Morris, P J; Adams, M B

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors determine if any aspects of the treatment of renal transplant patients with pancreatitis were of particular benefit with regard to graft and patient survival. BACKGROUND: The incidence of pancreatitis in renal transplant patients is low (1%-2%), but the mortality of the disease approaches 100%. Although several descriptive reports have been published, there is no consensus-regarding management. METHODS: The authors conduct a retrospective chart review. RESULTS: Twenty-one patients were identified with posttransplant pancreatitis (1.3% incidence). The cause of pancreatitis was presumed to be maintenance immunosuppression in all cases. Patients were classified by dynamic computed tomography (CT) scans having 1) mild/edematous disease (4 patients), 2) localized abscess or pseudocyst (6 patients), or 3) severe disease (11 patients). Patients with mild/edematous pancreatitis did well with medical management. The six patients with localized abscess or pseudocyst were successfully treated with standard operative intervention. Of the 11 patients with severe disease, 6 had several days of intensive medical management before operation, and all died. The other five patients underwent early operative intervention based principally on CT scan findings, and all survived. The latter group had multiple operations and four of five had functioning renal allografts at discharge. CONCLUSION: The severity of pancreatitis in the posttranplant patients may be difficult to assess by clinical criteria. Dynamic CT scanning is, therefore, essential in defining the extent of disease. Early, and perhaps repeated, operations may be lifesaving in those patients having CT scan findings of severe pancreatitis. PMID:9065299

  5. Activity of "nonspecific pancreatic carboxylesterase" in rat serum in experimentally induced acute pancreatitis (preliminary results).

    PubMed

    Kálmán, A; Kálmán, Z; Velösy, G; Vargha, G; Vargha, G; Papp, M

    1989-01-01

    The aim of this study was to obtain more information on the serum level of "nonspecific pancreatic carboxylesterase" (PCE) in experimentally induced acute pancreatitis in rats. The effects of caerulein stimulation, hepatic duct ligation, bile-pancreatic duct ligation or the effect of retrograde injection of saline, 5% taurocholate and sunflower oil were investigated. The activity of PCE and amylase was measured in the serum, pancreatic tissue, pancreatic juice and ascitic fluid. The changes in PCE activity were greater (both in directions to increase or decrease) than that of amylase, produced by different experimental procedures. The results confirm the thesis that the serum activity of PCE is a more sensitive diagnostic method than that of amylase to detect the inflammatory process in the pancreas or the effect of obstruction of the pancreatic duct. PMID:2480696

  6. The role of fat and alcohol in acute pancreatitis: A dangerous liaison.

    PubMed

    Criddle, David N

    2015-07-01

    Excessive alcohol consumption is a major trigger for severe acute pancreatitis which may lead to multi-organ dysfunction and premature death of the individual. Hyperlipidaemia is a risk factor for both acute and chronic pancreatitis and the role of fatty acids in mediating damage has received increasing attention in recent years. In the pancreas ethanol is metabolised by both oxidative and non-oxidative pathways. The latter, predominant route generates fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) from fatty acid substrates via the action of diverse enzymes called FAEE synthases, including carboxylester lipase an enzyme synthesized and secreted by the acinar cells. Inhibition of the oxidative pathway promotes formation of FAEEs which induce sustained elevations of cytosolic calcium leading to inhibition of mitochondrial function, loss of ATP and necrosis of isolated pancreatic acinar cells. Furthermore, FAEEs undergo hydrolysis in the mitochondria releasing free fatty acids that exert toxic effects. Our recent work has shown that pharmacological inhibition of carboxylester lipase ameliorated detrimental effects of non-oxidative ethanol metabolism in isolated pancreatic acinar cells in vitro and in a new in vivo experimental model of alcoholic acute pancreatitis, revealing a specific enzyme target for ethanol-induced injury. Strategies that prevent FAEE synthesis, protect mitochondria, reduce calcium overload or sustain calcium homeostasis by ATP provision may provide promising therapeutic avenues for the treatment of alcoholic acute pancreatitis. PMID:25845855

  7. Surgical management of acute pancreatitis in Italy: lessons from a prospective multicentre study

    PubMed Central

    De Rai, Paolo; Zerbi, Alessandro; Castoldi, Laura; Bassi, Claudio; Frulloni, Luca; Uomo, Generoso; Gabbrielli, Armando; Pezzilli, Raffaele; Cavallini, Giorgio; Di Carlo, Valerio

    2010-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to evaluate the surgical treatment of acute pancreatitis in Italy and to assess compliance with international guidelines. Methods A series of 1173 patients in 56 hospitals were prospectively enrolled and their data analysed. Results Twenty-nine patients with severe pancreatitis underwent surgical intervention. Necrosectomy was performed in 26 patients, associated with postoperative lavage in 70% of cases. A feeding jejunostomy was added in 37% of cases. Mortality was 21%. Of the patients with mild pancreatitis, 714 patients with a biliary aetiology were evaluated. Prophylactic treatment of relapses was carried out in 212 patients (36%) by cholecystectomy and in 161 using a laparoscopic approach. Preoperative endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography was associated with cholecystectomy in 83 patients (39%). Forty-seven patients (22%) were treated at a second admission, with a median delay of 31 days from the onset of pancreatitis. Eighteen patients with severe pancreatitis underwent cholecystectomy 37.9 days after the first admission. There were no deaths. Discussion The results indicate poor compliance with published guidelines. In severe pancreatitis, early surgical intervention is frequently performed and enteral feeding is seldom used. Only a small number of patients with mild biliary pancreatitis undergo definitive treatment (i.e. cholecystectomy) within 4 weeks of the onset of pancreatitis. PMID:20961367

  8. Cathepsin L inactivates human trypsinogen whereas cathepsin L deletion reduces the severity of pancreatitis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wartmann, Thomas; Mayerle, Julia; Kähne, Thilo; Sahin-Tóth, Miklós; Ruthenbürger, Manuel; Matthias, Rainer; Kruse, Anne; Reinheckel, Thomas; Peters, Christoph; Weiss, F. Ulrich; Sendler, Matthias; Hans-Lippert; Schulz, Hans-Ulrich; Aghdassi, Ali; Dummer, Annegret; Teller, Steffen; Halangk, Walter; Lerch, Markus M.

    2010-01-01

    Background & Aims Acute pancreatitis is characterized by an activation cascade of digestive enzymes in the pancreas. The first of these, trypsinogen, can be converted to active trypsin by the peptidase cathepsin B (CTSB). We investigated whether cathepsin L (CTSL), the second most abundant lysosomal cysteine proteinase, can also process trypsinogen to active trypsin and has a role in pancreatitis. Methods In CTSL-deficient (Ctsl−/−) mice, pancreatitis was induced by injection of cerulein or infusion of taurocholate into the pancreatic duct. Human tissue, pancreatic juice, mouse pancreatitis specimens, and recombinant enzymes were studied by enzyme assay, immunoblot, N-terminal sequencing, immunocytochemistry, and electron microscopy analyses. Isolated acini from Ctsl−/− and Ctsb−/− mice were studied. Results CTSL was expressed in human and mouse pancreas, where it colocalized with trypsinogen in secretory vesicles and lysosomes and was secreted into pancreatic juice. Severity of pancreatitis was reduced in Ctsl−/− mice, compared with wild-type controls, whereas apoptosis and intrapancreatic trypsin activity were increased in Ctsl−/− mice. CTSL induced cleavage of trypsinogen occurred 3 amino acids toward the C terminus from the CTSB activation site and resulted in a truncated, inactive form of trypsin and an elongated propeptide (TAP). This elongated TAP was not detected by ELISA but was effectively converted to an immunoreactive form by CTSB. Levels of TAP thus generated by CTSB were not associated with disease severity, although this is what the TAP-ELISA is used to determine in the clinic. Conclusions CTSL inactivates trypsinogen and counteracts the ability of CTSB to form active trypsin. In mouse models of pancreatitis, absence of CTSL induces apoptosis and reduces disease severity. PMID:19900452

  9. Inhibition of pancreatic oxidative damage by stilbene derivative dihydro-resveratrol: implication for treatment of acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, Siu Wai; Guan, Yi-Fu; Wang, Juan; Bian, Zhao-Xiang; Zhang, Hong-Jie

    2016-01-01

    Trans-resveratrol is a natural stilbenoid possessing multifarious pharmacological benefits; however, when orally consumed, it is rapidly metabolised by colonic microflora and converted to dihydro-resveratrol. Thus, this microbial metabolite is of great therapeutic relevance. In the present study, upon the oral administration of dihydro-resveratrol (10–50 mg/kg), the severity of acute pancreatitis in the cerulein-treated rats was significantly ameliorated as evidenced by decreased α-amylase activities in the plasma and lessened oedema formation in the pancreatic parenchyma. In addition, the generation of intracellular reactive oxidative products, including malondialdehyde and protein carbonyls, was accordingly reduced, so as the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. While inhibiting the activities of NADPH oxidase and myeloperoxidase, the depletion of glutathione was considerably restored. Importantly, the attenuation of pancreatic oxidative damage by dihydro-resveratrol was associated with a down-regulation of the nuclear factor-kappaB and phosphatidylinositol 3′-kinase-serine/threonine kinase signalling pathways. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the solubility of dihydro-resveratrol was at least 5 times higher than trans-resveratrol whilst exhibiting a much lower cytotoxicity. Collectively, the current findings accentuate new mechanistic insight of dihydro-resveratrol in pancreatic oxidative damage, and advocate its therapeutic potential for the management of acute pancreatitis, particularly for patients unresponsive to trans-resveratrol due to the lack of proper microbial strains. PMID:26971398

  10. Inhibition of pancreatic oxidative damage by stilbene derivative dihydro-resveratrol: implication for treatment of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Siu Wai; Guan, Yi-Fu; Wang, Juan; Bian, Zhao-Xiang; Zhang, Hong-Jie

    2016-01-01

    Trans-resveratrol is a natural stilbenoid possessing multifarious pharmacological benefits; however, when orally consumed, it is rapidly metabolised by colonic microflora and converted to dihydro-resveratrol. Thus, this microbial metabolite is of great therapeutic relevance. In the present study, upon the oral administration of dihydro-resveratrol (10-50 mg/kg), the severity of acute pancreatitis in the cerulein-treated rats was significantly ameliorated as evidenced by decreased α-amylase activities in the plasma and lessened oedema formation in the pancreatic parenchyma. In addition, the generation of intracellular reactive oxidative products, including malondialdehyde and protein carbonyls, was accordingly reduced, so as the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. While inhibiting the activities of NADPH oxidase and myeloperoxidase, the depletion of glutathione was considerably restored. Importantly, the attenuation of pancreatic oxidative damage by dihydro-resveratrol was associated with a down-regulation of the nuclear factor-kappaB and phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase-serine/threonine kinase signalling pathways. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the solubility of dihydro-resveratrol was at least 5 times higher than trans-resveratrol whilst exhibiting a much lower cytotoxicity. Collectively, the current findings accentuate new mechanistic insight of dihydro-resveratrol in pancreatic oxidative damage, and advocate its therapeutic potential for the management of acute pancreatitis, particularly for patients unresponsive to trans-resveratrol due to the lack of proper microbial strains. PMID:26971398