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Sample records for severe acute pancreatitis

  1. Severe Acute Pancreatitis and Necrotizing Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Maheshwari, Rahul; Subramanian, Ram M

    2016-04-01

    Acute pancreatitis results in nearly 250,000 admissions annually. Acute pancreatitis varies widely in its clinical presentation. Pancreatic necrosis accounts for substantial additional morbidity, with mortality rates remaining as high as 10% to 20% despite advances in critical care. The extent of necrosis correlates well with the incidence of infected necrosis, multiorgan failure, need for pancreatic debridement, and morbidity and mortality. Having established the diagnosis of pancreatic necrosis, goals of appropriately aggressive resuscitation should be established and adhered to in a multidisciplinary approach involving both medical and surgical critical care. PMID:27016168

  2. Severe Acute Pancreatitis in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Abdullah, Bahiyah; Kathiresan Pillai, Thanikasalam; Cheen, Lim Huay; Ryan, Ray Joshua

    2015-01-01

    This is a case of a pregnant lady at 8 weeks of gestation, who presented with acute abdomen. She was initially diagnosed with ruptured ectopic pregnancy and ruptured corpus luteal cyst as the differential diagnosis. However she then, was finally diagnosed as acute hemorrhagic pancreatitis with spontaneous complete miscarriage. This is followed by review of literature on this topic. Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy is not uncommon. The emphasis on high index of suspicion of acute pancreatitis in women who presented with acute abdomen in pregnancy is highlighted. Early diagnosis and good supportive care by multidisciplinary team are crucial to ensure good maternal and fetal outcomes. PMID:25628906

  3. [Severe acute pancreatitis associated with gallbladder gangrene].

    PubMed

    Arroyo-Snchez, Abel S; Aguirre-Meja, Rosa Y; Echenique-Martnez, Sergio E

    2014-01-01

    We present a diabetic patient who developed severe acute pancreatitis associated to gallbladder gangrene, in this case we assessed the applicability of classification criteria and management of the pathways for acute pancreatitis and also we suggest some topics that could be investigated in the future. PMID:24721961

  4. Consensus guidelines on severe acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Pezzilli, Raffaele; Zerbi, Alessandro; Campra, Donata; Capurso, Gabriele; Golfieri, Rita; Arcidiacono, Paolo G; Billi, Paola; Butturini, Giovanni; Calculli, Lucia; Cannizzaro, Renato; Carrara, Silvia; Crippa, Stefano; De Gaudio, Raffaele; De Rai, Paolo; Frulloni, Luca; Mazza, Ernesto; Mutignani, Massimiliano; Pagano, Nico; Rabitti, Piergiorgio; Balzano, Gianpaolo

    2015-07-01

    This Position Paper contains clinically oriented guidelines by the Italian Association for the Study of the Pancreas (AISP) for the diagnosis and treatment of severe acute pancreatitis. The statements were formulated by three working groups of experts who searched and analysed the most recent literature; a consensus process was then performed using a modified Delphi procedure. The statements provide recommendations on the most appropriate definition of the complications of severe acute pancreatitis, the diagnostic approach and the timing of conservative as well as interventional endoscopic, radiological and surgical treatments. PMID:25921277

  5. Metabolic management of severe acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Windsor, J A; Hammodat, H

    2000-06-01

    The metabolic management of severe acute pancreatitis involves early identification of patients with severe pancreatitis, aggressive fluid resuscitation, organ support, and careful monitoring in an intensive care environment. Recent evidence has helped to define the roles of enteral feeding, prophylactic antibiotics, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, computed tomography, and fine-needle aspiration for bacteriology. The most difficult decision in the management of these patients is whether surgery is required and which of the complementary approaches to necrosectomy and drainage is appropriate. Key metabolic events in the acinar cell, pancreas, and intestines are now being unraveled, as is the basis for the systemic manifestations and organ dysfunction associated with pancreatitis. This gives hope for the development of more specific metabolic interventions, which will likely target the maintenance of intestinal integrity and function, preservation of pancreatic microcirculation, and balanced modulation of the inflammatory response. PMID:10773118

  6. Inflammation and immunosuppression in severe acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Kylnp, Marja-Leena; Repo, Heikki; Puolakkainen, Pauli Antero

    2010-06-21

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a common disease, which usually exists in its mild form. However, in a fifth of cases, the disease is severe, with local pancreatic complications or systemic organ dysfunction or both. Because the development of organ failure is the major cause of death in AP, early identification of patients likely to develop organ failure is important. AP is initiated by intracellular activation of pancreatic proenzymes and autodigestion of the pancreas. Destruction of the pancreatic parenchyma first induces an inflammatory reaction locally, but may lead to overwhelming systemic production of inflammatory mediators and early organ failure. Concomitantly, anti-inflammatory cytokines and specific cytokine inhibitors are produced. This anti-inflammatory reaction may overcompensate and inhibit the immune response, rendering the host at risk of systemic infection. At present, there is no specific treatment for AP. Increased understanding of the pathogenesis of systemic inflammation and development of organ dysfunction may provide us with drugs to ameliorate physiological disturbances. PMID:20556831

  7. Timing of cholecystectomy after acute severe pancreatitis in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    TALEBI-BAKHSHAYESH, Mousa; MOHAMMADZADEH, Alireza; ZARGAR, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is one of the most common diseases of the gastrointestinal tract and is usually caused by gallstones; its occurrence in pregnancy is rare. Cholecystectomy for biliary pancreatitis during pregnancy is unavoidable, but its timing is controversial. We herein present the case of a patient who underwent termination of pregnancy due to deteriorated acute severe pancreatitis during the 27th week of gestation. Cholecystectomy was performed because of the relapse of acute biliary pancreatitis 10 days after being discharged. The interval from pancreatitis to cholecystectomy varies with its severity; in mild pancreatitis the interval may be one week, but in severe cases it maybe up to three weeks. Because pancreatitis may relapse during this interval, as occurred in the present case, a better solution for the timing of cholecystectomy must be sought. PMID:26715899

  8. [Malignant pancreatic non-hodgkin's lymphoma manifesting as severe acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Mofredj, A; Cadranel, J F; Cazier, A; Traor, I; Coutarel, P; Levy, P

    1999-04-01

    Primary non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of the pancreas is a rare disease. Its diagnosis is difficult without histological examination. In fact, clinical and imaging findings are not pathognomonic. Acute pancreatitis associated with pancreatic lymphoma is extremely rare. We have found only 7 case reports in literature. We report herein a new case of pancreatic lymphoma which was revealed by a severe pancreatitis. PMID:10416118

  9. Protective effects of rhubarb on experimental severe acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yu-Qing; Liu, Xiao-Hong; Ito, Tetsuhide; Qian, Jia-Ming

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of rhubarb on severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) in rats. METHODS: Severe acute pancreatitis was induced by two intraperitoneal injections of cerulein (40 ?g/kg body weight) plus 5-h restraint water-immersion stress. Rhubarb (75-150 mg/kg) was orally fed before the first cerulein injection. The degree of pancreatic edema, serum amylase level, local pancreatic blood flow (PBF), and histological alterations were investigated. The effects of rhubarb on pancreatic exocrine secretion in this model were evaluated by comparing with those of somatostatin. RESULTS: In the Cerulein + Stress group, severe edema and diffuse hemorrhage in the pancreas were observed, the pancreatic wet weight (11.60 0.61 g/Kg) and serum amylase (458 490 43 100 U/L) were markedly increased (P < 0.01 vs control). In the rhubarb (150 mg/kg) treated rats, necrosis and polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) infiltration in the pancreas were significantly reduced (P < 0.01), and a marked decrease (50%) in serum amylase levels was also observed (P < 0.01). PBF dropped to 38% (93 5 mL/min per 100 g) of the control in the Cerulein + Stress group and partly recovered in the Cerulein + Stress + Rhubarb 150 mg group (135 12 mL/min per 100 g) (P < 0.01). The pancreatic exocrine function was impaired in the SAP rats. The amylase levels of pancreatic juice were reduced in the rats treated with rhubarb or somatostatin, comparing with that of untreated SAP group. The bicarbonate concentration of pancreatic juice was markedly elevated only in the rhubarb-treated group (P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: Rhubarb can exert protective effects on SAP, probably by inhibiting the inflammation of pancreas, improving pancreatic microcirculation, and altering exocrine secretion. PMID:15052683

  10. [Principles of intensive care in severe acute pancreatitis in 2008].

    PubMed

    Darvas, Katalin; Fut, Judit; Okrs, Ilona; Gondos, Tibor; Csoms, Akos; Kupcsulik, Pter

    2008-11-23

    Acute pancreatitis is a dynamic, often progressive disease; 14-20% require intensive care in its severe form due to multiorgan dysfunction and/or failure. This review was created using systematic literature review of articles published on this subject in the last 5 years. The outcome of severe acute pancreatitis is determined by the inflammatory response and multiorgan dysfunction - the prognostic scores (Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation, Glasgow Prognostic Index, Sepsis-related Organ Failure Assessment, Multi Organ Dysfunction Syndrome Scale, Ranson Scale) can be used to determine outcome. Clinical signs (age, coexisting diseases, confusion, obesity) and biochemistry values (serum amylase, lipase, C-reactive protein, procalcitonin, creatinine, urea, calcium) have important prognostic roles as well. Early organ failure increases the risk of late abdominal complications and mortality. Intensive care can provide appropriate multi-function patient monitoring which helps in early recognition of complications and appropriate target-controlled treatment. Treatment of severe acute pancreatitis aims at reducing systemic inflammatory response and multiorgan dysfunction and, on the other side, at increasing the anti-inflammatory response. Oral starvation for 24-48 hours is effective in reducing the exocrine activity of the pancreas; the efficacy of protease inhibitors is questionable. Early intravascular volume resuscitation and stable haemodynamics improve microcirculation. Early oxygen therapy and mechanical ventilation provide adequate oxygenation. Electrolyte and acid-base control can be as important as tight glucose control. Adequate pain relief can be achieved by thoracic epidural catheterization. Early enteral nutrition with immunonutrition should be used. There is evidence that affecting the coagulation cascade by activated protein C can play a role in reducing the inflammatory response. The complex therapy of acute pancreatitis includes appropriate antibiotics, thrombo-embolic prophylaxis and in certain cases plasmapheresis and/or haemofiltration. Reducing intraabdominal pressure may be necessary in the acute phase. Intensive care multidisciplinary teamwork can reduce the mortality of severe acute pancreatitis from 30% to 10%. PMID:19004743

  11. Decreased mortality of severe acute pancreatitis after proximal cytokine blockade.

    PubMed Central

    Norman, J G; Franz, M G; Fink, G S; Messina, J; Fabri, P J; Gower, W R; Carey, L C

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study determined the ability of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) to decrease the mortality of experimental acute pancreatitis. The response of the inflammatory cytokine cascade and its subsequent effects on pancreatic morphology were measured to determine the role of these peptides in mediating pancreatic injury. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Previous studies have shown that proinflammatory cytokines are produced in large amounts during acute pancreatitis and that blockade at the level of the IL-1 receptor significantly decreases intrinsic pancreatic damage. The subsequent effect on survival is not known. METHODS: A lethal form of acute hemorrhagic necrotizing pancreatitis was induced in young female mice by feeding a choline-deficient, ethionine supplemented (CDE) diet for 72 hours. For determination of mortality, the animals were divided into 3 groups of 45 animals each: control subjects received 100/microL normal saline intraperitoneally every 6 hours for 5 days; IL-1ra early mice received recombinant interleukin-1 receptor antagonist 15 mg/kg intraperitoneally every 6 hours for 5 days beginning at time 0; IL-1ra late mice received IL-1ra 15 mg/kg intraperitoneally every 6 hours for 3.5 days beginning 1.5 days after introduction of the CDE diet. A parallel experiment was conducted simultaneously with a minimum of 29 animals per group, which were sacrificed daily for comparisons of serum amylase, lipase, IL-1, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, IL-1ra, pancreatic wet weight, and blind histopathologic grading. RESULTS: The 10-day mortality in the untreated control group was 73%. Early and late IL-1ra administration resulted in decreases of mortality to 44% and 51%, respectively (both p < 0.001). Interleukin-1 antagonism also was associated with a significant attenuation in the rise in pancreatic wet weight and serum amylase and lipase in both early and late IL-1ra groups (all p < 0.05). All control animals developed a rapid elevation of the inflammatory cytokines, with maximal levels reached on day 3. The IL-1ra-treated animals, however, demonstrated a blunted rise of these mediators (all p < 0.05). Blind histologic grading revealed an overall decrease in the severity of pancreatitis in those animals receiving the antagonist. CONCLUSIONS: Early or late blockade of the cytokine cascade at the level of the IL-1 receptor significantly decreases the mortality of severe acute pancreatitis. The mechanism by which this is accomplished appears to include attenuation of systemic inflammatory cytokines and decreased pancreatic destruction. PMID:7794067

  12. Early plasmapheresis in patients with severe hypertriglyceridemia induced acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Nasa, Prashant; Alexander, George; Kulkarni, Amitabh; Juneja, Deven; Sehra, Sudhish; Agarwal, Rajesh; Koul, Kandy

    2015-01-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia can cause severe diseases such as acute pancreatitis (AP) and coronary artery disease. The routine management of hypertriglyceridemia is dietary restriction of fat and lipid-lowering medications to manage the secondary or precipitating causes of hypertriglyceridemia. However, in cases of AP with severe hypertriglyceridemia (SHTG) (triglycerides [TG] >1000 mg/dl) rapid reduction of TG levels to well below 1000 mg/dl can improve outcome and prevent further episodes of pancreatitis. Plasmapheresis is a therapeutic option in such medical emergencies. We discussed 2 cases of severe AP with SHTG where we used early plsmapheresis along with other supportive management. PMID:26321811

  13. Alcohol abuse-related severe acute pancreatitis with rhabdomyolysis complications

    PubMed Central

    SU, MAO-SHENG; JIANG, YING; YAN, XIAO-YUAN HU; ZHAO, QING-HUA; LIU, ZHI-WEI; ZHANG, WEN-ZHI; HE, LEI

    2013-01-01

    Non-traumatic rhabdomyolysis is a rare complication of acute pancreatitis. One of the major risk factors of both acute pancreatitis and rhabdomyolysis is alcohol abuse. However, only a few studies have reported the prognosis and association of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) and rhabdomyolysis in alcohol abuse patients. In the present study, we report two cases presenting with SAP complicated by rhabdomyolysis following high-dose alcohol intake. The disease onset, clinical manifestations, laboratory data, diagnosis and treatment procedure of each patient were recorded, and the association with rhabdomyolysis was analyzed. Alcohol consumption was the most predominant cause of SAP and rhabdomyolysis in these patients. SAP-related rhabdomyolysis was primarily induced by the toxicity associated with pancreatic necrosis. The laboratory tests revealed that the concentration of serum creatine kinase (CK) and myoglobin increased and acute renal failure symptoms were present, which provided an exact diagnosis for SAP-induced rhabdomyolysis. Rhabdomyolysis and subsequent hypermyoglobinuria severely impaired kidney function and aggravated hypocalcemia. The therapy of early stage SAP complicated by rhabdomyolysis involved liquid resuscitation support. When first stage treatment fails, blood purification should be performed immediately. Both patients developed multiple organ failure (MOF) and succumbed to the disease. Considering the two cases presented, we conclude that alcohol-related SAP complicated by rhabdomyolysis may have a poor clinical prognosis. PMID:23251265

  14. Hemoconcentration is a poor predictor of severity in acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Remes-Troche, Jos M.; Duarte-Rojo, Andrs; Morales, Gustavo; Robles-Daz, Guillermo

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether the hematocrit (Hct) at admission or at 24 h after admission was associated with severe acute pancreatitis (AP), organ failure (OF), and pancreatic necrosis. METHODS: A total of 336 consecutive patients with a first AP episode were studied. Etiology, Hct values at admission and at 24 h, development of severe AP according to Atlantas criteria, pancreatic necrosis, OF and mortality were recorded. Hemoconcentration was defined as Hct level >44% for males and >40% for females. The t-test and ?2 test were used to assess the association of hemoconcentration to the severity, necrosis and OF. Diagnostic accuracy was also determined. RESULTS: Biliary disease was the most frequent etiology (n = 148). Mean Hct levels at admission were 416% for females and 467% for males (P<0.01). Seventy-eight (23%) patients had severe AP, and OF developed in 45 (13%) patients. According to contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan, 36% (54/150) patients showed pancreatic necrosis. Hct levels were elevated in 58% (55/96) and 61% (33/54) patients with interstitial and necrotizing pancreatitis, respectively. Neither Hct levels at admission nor hemoconcentration at 24 h were associated with the severity, necrosis or OF. Sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive values for both determinations were very low; and negative predictive values were between 61% and 86%, being the highest value for OF. CONCLUSION: Hct is not a useful marker to predict a worse outcome in acute pancreatitis. In spite of the high negative predictive value of hemoconcentration, the prognosis gain is limited due to an already high incidence of mild disease. PMID:16437609

  15. Lipolysis of visceral adipocyte triglyceride by pancreatic lipases converts mild acute pancreatitis to severe pancreatitis independent of necrosis and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Patel, Krutika; Trivedi, Ram N; Durgampudi, Chandra; Noel, Pawan; Cline, Rachel A; DeLany, James P; Navina, Sarah; Singh, Vijay P

    2015-03-01

    Visceral fat necrosis has been associated with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) for over 100 years; however, its pathogenesis and role in SAP outcomes are poorly understood. Based on recent work suggesting that pancreatic fat lipolysis plays an important role in SAP, we evaluated the role of pancreatic lipases in SAP-associated visceral fat necrosis, the inflammatory response, local injury, and outcomes of acute pancreatitis (AP). For this, cerulein pancreatitis was induced in lean and obese mice, alone or with the lipase inhibitor orlistat and parameters of AP induction (serum amylase and lipase), fat necrosis, pancreatic necrosis, and multisystem organ failure, and inflammatory response were assessed. Pancreatic lipases were measured in fat necrosis and were overexpressed in 3T3-L1 cells. We noted obesity to convert mild cerulein AP to SAP with greater cytokines, unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs), and multisystem organ failure, and 100% mortality without affecting AP induction or pancreatic necrosis. Increased pancreatic lipase amounts and activity were noted in the extensive visceral fat necrosis of dying obese mice. Lipase inhibition reduced fat necrosis, UFAs, organ failure, and mortality but not the parameters of AP induction. Pancreatic lipase expression increased lipolysis in 3T3-L1 cells. We conclude that UFAs generated via lipolysis of visceral fat by pancreatic lipases convert mild AP to SAP independent of pancreatic necrosis and the inflammatory response. PMID:25579844

  16. Severe acute pancreatitis: Pathogenetic aspects and prognostic factors

    PubMed Central

    Mofleh, Ibrahim A Al

    2008-01-01

    Approximately 20% of patients with acute pancreatitis develop a severe disease associated with complications and high risk of mortality. The purpose of this study is to review pathogenesis and prognostic factors of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). An extensive medline search was undertaken with focusing on pathogenesis, complications and prognostic evaluation of SAP. Cytokines and other inflammatory markers play a major role in the pathogenesis and course of SAP and can be used as prognostic markers in its early phase. Other markers such as simple prognostic scores have been found to be as effective as multifactorial scoring systems (MFSS) at 48 h with the advantage of simplicity, efficacy, low cost, accuracy and early prediction of SAP. Recently, several laboratory markers including hematocrit, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine, matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and serum amyloid A (SAA) have been used as early predictors of severity within the first 24 h. The last few years have witnessed a tremendous progress in understanding the pathogenesis and predicting the outcome of SAP. In this review we classified the prognostic markers into predictors of severity, pancreatic necrosis (PN), infected PN (IPN) and mortality. PMID:18205255

  17. Prediction of Severe Acute Pancreatitis Using a Decision Tree Model Based on the Revised Atlanta Classification of Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yushun; Yang, Chong; Gou, Shanmiao; Li, Yongfeng; Xiong, Jiongxin; Wu, Heshui; Wang, Chunyou

    2015-01-01

    Objective To develop a model for the early prediction of severe acute pancreatitis based on the revised Atlanta classification of acute pancreatitis. Methods Clinical data of 1308 patients with acute pancreatitis (AP) were included in the retrospective study. A total of 603 patients who were admitted to the hospital within 36 hours of the onset of the disease were included at last according to the inclusion criteria. The clinical data were collected within 12 hours after admission. All the patients were classified as having mild acute pancreatitis (MAP), moderately severe acute pancreatitis (MSAP) and severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) based on the revised Atlanta classification of acute pancreatitis. All the 603 patients were randomly divided into training group (402 cases) and test group (201 cases). Univariate and multiple regression analyses were used to identify the independent risk factors for the development of SAP in the training group. Then the prediction model was constructed using the decision tree method, and this model was applied to the test group to evaluate its validity. Results The decision tree model was developed using creatinine, lactate dehydrogenase, and oxygenation index to predict SAP. The diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of SAP in the training group were 80.9% and 90.0%, respectively, and the sensitivity and specificity in the test group were 88.6% and 90.4%, respectively. Conclusions The decision tree model based on creatinine, lactate dehydrogenase, and oxygenation index is more likely to predict the occurrence of SAP. PMID:26580397

  18. Left scrotal swelling caused by severe acute pancreatitis in a 38-year-old Chinese male

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Weidong; Wang, Xingyu; Zhang, Jianlin

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis can be associated with a variety of complications caused by the interaction of the pancreatic fluids with the local structures, and may eventually form pseudocysts, ascites, etc. Nevertheless, scrotal swelling caused by severe acute pancreatitis was rarely reported due to low incidence or lack of recognition. We reported a rare phenomenon that left scrotal swelling caused by severe acute pancreatitis in a 38-year-old man. PMID:26221392

  19. Zerumbone Attenuates the Severity of Acute Necrotizing Pancreatitis and Pancreatitis-Induced Hepatic Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wenhong, Deng; Jia, Yu; Weixing, Wang; Xiaoyan, Chen; Chen, Chen; Sheng, Xu; Hao, Jin

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigated the potential effects of zerumbone pretreatment on an acute necrotizing pancreatitis rat model induced by sodium taurocholate. The pancreatitis injury was evaluated by serum AMY, sPLA2, and pancreatic pathological score. Pancreatitis-induced hepatic injury was measured by ALT, AST, and hepatic histopathology. The expression of I-?B? and NF-?B protein was evaluated by western blot and immunohistochemistry assay while ICAM-1 and IL-1? mRNA were examined by RT-PCR. The results showed that AMY, sPLA2, ALT, and AST levels and histopathological assay of pancreatic and hepatic tissues were significantly reduced following administration of zerumbone. Applying zerumbone also has been shown to inhibit NF-?B protein and downregulation of ICAM-1 and IL-1? mRNA. The present paper suggests that treatment of zerumbone on rat attenuates the severity of acute necrotizing pancreatitis and pancreatitis-induced hepatic injury, via inhibiting NF-?B activation and downregulating the expression of ICAM-1 and IL-1?. PMID:22529518

  20. Relaxin prevents the development of severe acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Cosen-Binker, Laura Iris; Binker, Marcelo Gustavo; Cosen, Rodica; Negri, Gustavo; Tiscornia, Osvaldo

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the severity of acute pancreatitis (AP) is associated to the intensity of leukocyte activation, inflammatory up-regulation and microcirculatory disruption associated to ischemia-reperfusion injury. Microvascular integrity and inhibition of pro-inflammatory mediators are key-factors in the evolution of AP. Relaxin is an insulin-like hormone that has been attributed vasorelaxant properties via the nitric oxide pathway while behaving as a glucocorticoid receptor agonist. METHODS: AP was induced by the bilio-pancreatic duct-outlet-exclusion closed-duodenal-loops model. Treatment with relaxin was done at different time-points. Nitric oxide synthase inhibition by L-NAME and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) blockage by mifepristone was considered. AP severity was assessed by biochemical and histopathological analyses. RESULTS: Treatment with relaxin reduced serum amylase, lipase, C-reactive protein, IL-6, IL-10, hsp72, LDH and 8-isoprostane as well as pancreatic and lung myeloperoxidase. Acinar and fat necrosis, hemorrhage and neutrophil infiltrate were also decreased. ATP depletion and ADP/ATP ratio were reduced while caspases 2-3-8 and 9 activities were increased. L-NAME and mifepristone decreased the efficiency of relaxin. CONCLUSION: Relaxin resulted beneficial in the treatment of AP combining the properties of a GR agonist while preserving the microcirculation and favoring apoptosis over necrosis. PMID:16570348

  1. Acute fatty liver of pregnancy associated with severe acute pancreatitis: A case report

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Cássio Vieira; Moreira, Alecsandro; Baima, Julio P; Franzoni, Leticia de C; Lima, Talles B; Yamashiro, Fabio da S; Coelho, Kunie Yabuki Rabelo; Sassaki, Ligia Y; Caramori, Carlos Antonio; Romeiro, Fernando G; Silva, Giovanni F

    2014-01-01

    Acute fatty liver of pregnancy is a rare disease that affects women in the third trimester of pregnancy. Although infrequent, the disease can cause maternal mortality. The diagnosis is not always clear until the pregnancy is terminated, and significant complications, such as acute pancreatitis, can occur. Pancreatic involvement typically only occurs in severe cases after the development of hepatic and renal impairment. To date, little knowledge is available regarding how the disease causes pancreatitis. Treatment involves supportive measures and pregnancy interruption. In this report, we describe a case of a previously healthy 26-year-old woman at a gestational age of 27 wk and 6 d who was admitted with severe abdominal pain and vomiting. This case illustrates the clinical and laboratory overlap between acute fatty liver of pregnancy and pancreatitis, highlighting the difficulties in differentiating each disease. Furthermore, the hypothesis for this overlapping is presented, and the therapeutic options are discussed. PMID:25068005

  2. Formalized therapeutic guideline for hyperlipidemic severe acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Mao, En-Qiang; Tang, Yao-Qing; Zhang, Sheng-Dao

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To investigate a formalized therapeutic guideline for hyperlipidemic severe acute pancreatitis (HL-SAP). METHODS: Thirty-two consecutive patients with severe acute pancreatitis were included in the clinical trial. All of them met the following five criteria for admission to the study, namely the Atlanta classification and stratification system for the clinical diagnosis of SAP, APACHEII score more than 8, time interval for therapeutic intervention less than 72 h after onset of the disease, serum triglyceride (TG) level 6.8 mmol/L or over, and exclusion of other etiologies. They were divided into severe acute pancreatitis group (SAP, 22 patients) and fulminant severe acute pancreatitis group (FSAP, 10 patients). Besides the conventional therapeutic measures, Penta-association therapy was also applied in the two groups, which consisted of blood purification (adsorption of triglyceride and hemofiltration), antihyperlipidemic agents (fluvastatin or lipanthyl), low molecular weight heparin (fragmin), insulin, topical application of Pixiao (a traditional Chinese medicine) over the whole abdomen. Serum triglyceride, pro-inflammatory cytokines and anti-inflammatory cytokines were determined before blood purification (PF), at the end of blood purification (AFE) and on the 7th day after onset of the disease (AF7) respectively. Simultaneously, severity of the diseases was assessed by the APACHE II system. Prognosis was evaluated by non-operation cure rate, absorption rate of pseudocyst, time interval pseudocyst absorption, hospital stay and survival rate. RESULTS: Serum triglyceride level (mmol/L), TNF? (U/mL) concentration and APACHE II score were significantly decreased (P < 0.05) at AFE and AF7, as compared with PF. However, serum IL-10 concentration (pg/mL) was increased significantly (P < 0.001) at AFE, and decreased significantly (P < 0.05) at AF7 when compared with PF. Operations: The First surgical intervention time was 55.8 42.6 d in SAP group (5 patients) and 12.2 6.6 d in FSAP group (7 patients), there was a significant difference between the two groups (P = 0.02). The number of operations in the two groups was 1.33 0.5 vs 3.5 1.2 (P = 0.0037), respectively. Prognosis: Non-operation cure rate, absorption rate of pseudocyst, hospital stay and survival rate in SAP group and FSAP group were 100% (22/22) vs 11.1% (1/9), 77.3% (17/22) vs 11.1% (1/9), 54.2 35.9 vs 99.1 49.5 d (P = 0.008) and 100% (22/22) vs 66.7% (6/9) (P = 0.0044). The time for absorption of pseudocyst was 135.1 137.5 d in SAP group. CONCLUSION: Penta-association therapy is an effective guideline in the treatment of hyperlipidemic severe acute pancreatitis at its early stage (within 72 h). PMID:14606112

  3. Treatment of severe acute pancreatitis and its complications

    PubMed Central

    Zerem, Enver

    2014-01-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP), which is the most serious type of this disorder, is associated with high morbidity and mortality. SAP runs a biphasic course. During the first 1-2 wk, a pro-inflammatory response results in systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). If the SIRS is severe, it can lead to early multisystem organ failure (MOF). After the first 1-2 wk, a transition from a pro-inflammatory response to an anti-inflammatory response occurs; during this transition, the patient is at risk for intestinal flora translocation and the development of secondary infection of the necrotic tissue, which can result in sepsis and late MOF. Many recommendations have been made regarding SAP management and its complications. However, despite the reduction in overall mortality in the last decade, SAP is still associated with high mortality. In the majority of cases, sterile necrosis should be managed conservatively, whereas in infected necrotizing pancreatitis, the infected non-vital solid tissue should be removed to control the sepsis. Intervention should be delayed for as long as possible to allow better demarcation and liquefaction of the necrosis. Currently, the step-up approach (delay, drain, and debride) may be considered as the reference standard intervention for this disorder. PMID:25320523

  4. Mesenchymal stem cells improve intestinal integrity during severe acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Tu, Xiao-Huang; Huang, Shao-Xiong; Li, Wen-Sheng; Song, Jing-Xiang; Yang, Xiao-Li

    2014-10-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) is an acute inflammatory disease of the pancreas that involves various distant tissues and organs. This study aimed to investigate post-tissue injury repair by mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in a rat model of SAP. A total of 54 pathogen-free adult male SD rats were randomly assigned to the groups SAP, SAP + MSCs and sham-operated (SO). SAP was induced by 4% sodium taurocholate, and MSCs were injected via the dorsal penile vein 1 h later. The amylase activity, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-? and diamine oxidase (DAO) levels were measured with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), while the expression of aquaporin (AQP)-1 was evaluated by immunohistochemical staining. The pathological score of intestinal tissues was also compared among groups. Marked improvement in intestinal necrosis, villi shedding and infiltration of inflammatory cells was observed in the SAP + MSCs group compared to the SAP and SO groups. Amylase, TNF-?, and DAO levels were significantly increased in the SAP + MSCs group. The intestinal expression of AQP-1 was increased at 12 and 24 h post-MSC transplantation compared to the SO group. Rats of the SAP + MSCs group displayed higher pathological scores compared to the SAP group at all time points. Overall, these data showed that MSCs can inhibit systemic inflammation and reduce TNF-? release in a rat model of SAP-induced intestinal injury, suggesting that MSCs exert protective effects on the intestinal barrier during SAP. PMID:25109509

  5. Acute pancreatitis and severe hypertriglyceridaemia masking unsuspected underlying diabetic ketoacidosis

    PubMed Central

    Aboulhosn, Kewan; Arnason, Terra

    2013-01-01

    A healthy 18-year-old girl presented to a local emergency room with 48 h of abdominal pain and vomiting. A radiological and biochemical diagnosis of moderate acute pancreatitis was made. Bloodwork demonstrated prominent hypertriglyceridaemia (HTG) of 19.5 mmol/L (severe HTG: 11.2–22.4), detectable urine ketones and a random blood glucose of 13 mmol/L dropping to 10.5 mmol/L on repeat (normal random <11). Ketone levels were deemed consistent with fasting ketosis after 48 h of vomiting. There was no known history of diabetes in the patient. Management included aggressive rehydration and pain control, yet the patient rapidly decompensated into shock requiring intensive care unit support. Blood gases revealed severe metabolic acidosis (pH 6.99) and unsuspected underlying diabetic ketoacidosis was diagnosed. The HTG gradually resolved following intravenous fluids and insulin infusion with slower correction of the metabolic acidosis. Importantly, her glycated haemoglobin was 12%, indicating the silent presence of chronic glucose elevations. PMID:24005972

  6. Circulating cytokines in predicting development of severe acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Severe acute pancreatitis (AP) is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Early prediction of severe AP is needed to improve patient outcomes. The aim of the present study was to find novel cytokines or combinations of cytokines that can be used for the early identification of patients with AP at risk for severe disease. Methods We performed a prospective study of 163 nonconsecutive patients with AP, of whom 25 had severe AP according to the revised Atlanta criteria. Admission serum levels of 48 cytokines and growth factors were determined using Bio-Plex Pro Human Cytokine Assay 21-plex and 27-plex magnetic bead suspension panels. Admission plasma levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), creatinine and calcium were measured for comparison. In subgroup analyses, we assessed the cytokine profiles of patients with severe AP (n = 14) who did not have organ dysfunction (OD) upon admission (modified Marshall score <2). Results Of 14 cytokines elevated in the severe AP group, interleukin 6 (IL-6) and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) levels were independent prognostic markers of severe AP. IL-6, HGF and a combination of them predicted severe AP with sensitivities of 56.0%, 60.0% and 72.0%, respectively, and specificities of 90.6%, 92.8% and 89.9%, respectively. The corresponding positive likelihood ratio (LR+) values were 5.9, 8.3 and 7.1, respectively. The predictive values of CRP, creatinine and calcium were comparable to those of the cytokines. In subgroup analyses of patients with severe AP and without OD upon admission, we found that IL-8, HGF and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) levels predicted the development of severe AP, with G-CSF being the most accurate cytokine at a sensitivity of 35.7%, a specificity of 96.1% and a LR+ of 9.1. Conclusions IL-6 and HGF levels upon admission have prognostic value for severe AP which is similar to levels of CRP, creatinine and calcium. Although IL-6 and HGF, as either single or combined markers, were not perfect in identifying patients at risk for severe AP, the possibility that combining them with novel prognostic markers other than cytokines might improve prognostic accuracy needs to be studied. The accuracy of IL-8, HGF and G-CSF levels in predicting severe AP in patients without clinical signs of OD upon admission warrants larger studies. PMID:24886762

  7. Early Nasogastric Feeding in Predicted Severe Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Eckerwall, Gunilla E.; Axelsson, Jakob B.; Andersson, Roland G.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To compare the efficacy and safety of early, nasogastric enteral nutrition (EN) with total parenteral nutrition (TPN) in patients with predicted severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). Summary Background Data: In SAP, the magnitude of the inflammatory response as well as increased intestinal permeability correlates with outcome. Enteral feeding has been suggested superior to parenteral feeding due to a proposed beneficial effect on the gut barrier. Methods: Fifty patients who met the inclusion criteria were randomized to TPN or EN groups. The nutritional regimen was started within 24 hours from admission and EN was provided through a nasogastric tube. The observation period was 10 days. Intestinal permeability was measured by excretion of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and concentrations of antiendotoxin core antibodies (Endocab). Interleukins (IL)-6 IL-8, and C-reactive protein (CRP) were used as markers of the systemic inflammatory response. Morbidity and feasibility of the nutritional route were evaluated by the frequency of complications, gastrointestinal symptoms, and abdominal pain. Results: PEG, Endocab, CRP, IL-6, APACHE II score, severity according to the Atlanta classification (22 patients), and gastrointestinal symptoms or abdominal pain did not significantly differ between the groups. The incidence of hyperglycemia was significantly higher in TPN patients (21 of 26 vs. 7 of 23; P < 0.001). Total complications (25 vs. 52; P = 0.04) and pulmonary complications (10 vs. 21; P = 0.04) were significantly more frequent in EN patients, although complications were diagnosed dominantly within the first 3 days. Conclusion: In predicted SAP, nasogastric early EN was feasible and resulted in better control of blood glucose levels, although the overall early complication rate was higher in the EN group. No beneficial effects on intestinal permeability or the inflammatory response were seen by EN treatment. PMID:17122621

  8. Severe Transient Hyperglycemia in a Prediabetic Patient during Mild Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Reghina, Aura Diana; Craciun, Silvia; Fica, Simona

    2015-01-01

    A 30-year-old obese male patient had been diagnosed with diabetes mellitus due to acute hyperglycemia and ketonuria. He also presented with severe hypertriglyceridemia and high levels of serum lipase. He was initially misdiagnosed with type 1 diabetes and treated with insulin for one month. At two months from first presentation, pancreatic antibodies were negative, and the C-peptide level was normal. A1c level was 5.9% without insulin treatment. The association between diabetes mellitus and acute pancreatitis is well established. We reported a case of severe transient hyperglycemia during mild acute pancreatitis in a metabolically ill patient. PMID:25918533

  9. Acute Lipotoxicity Regulates Severity of Biliary Acute Pancreatitis without Affecting Its Initiation

    PubMed Central

    Durgampudi, Chandra; Noel, Pawan; Patel, Krutika; Cline, Rachel; Trivedi, Ram N.; DeLany, James P.; Yadav, Dhiraj; Papachristou, Georgios I.; Lee, Kenneth; Acharya, Chathur; Jaligama, Deepthi; Navina, Sarah; Murad, Faris; Singh, Vijay P.

    2015-01-01

    Obese patients have worse outcomes during acute pancreatitis (AP). Previous animal models of AP have found worse outcomes in obese rodents who may have a baseline proinflammatory state. Our aim was to study the role of acute lipolytic generation of fatty acids on local severity and systemic complications of AP. Human postpancreatitis necrotic collections were analyzed for unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs) and saturated fatty acids. A model of biliary AP was designed to replicate the human variables by intraductal injection of the triglyceride glyceryl trilinoleate alone or with the chemically distinct lipase inhibitors orlistat or cetilistat. Parameters of AP etiology and outcomes of local and systemic severity were measured. Patients with postpancreatitis necrotic collections were obese, and 13 of 15 had biliary AP. Postpancreatitis necrotic collections were enriched in UFAs. Intraductal glyceryl trilinoleate with or without the lipase inhibitors resulted in oil red Opositive areas, resembling intrapancreatic fat. Both lipase inhibitors reduced the glyceryl trilinoleateinduced increase in serum lipase, UFAs, pancreatic necrosis, serum inflammatory markers, systemic injury, and mortality but not serum alanine aminotransferase, bilirubin, or amylase. We conclude that UFAs are enriched in human necrotic collections and acute UFA generation via lipolysis worsens pancreatic necrosis, systemic inflammation, and injury associated with severe AP. Inhibition of lipolysis reduces UFA generation and improves these outcomes of AP without interfering with its induction. PMID:24854864

  10. Dexamethasone and dextran 40 treatment of 32 patients with severe acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zi-Fa; Liu, Chang; Lu, Yi; Dong, Rui; Xu, Jun; Yu, Liang; Yao, Ying-Min; Liu, Qing-Guang; Pan, Cheng-En

    2004-01-01

    AIM: Based on the pathogenesis of severe acute pancreatitis and our experimental studies, to investigate the effect of dexamethasone and dextran in treatment of patients with severe acute pancreatitis. METHODS: Thirty-two patients with severe acute pancreatitis were treated with 0.5-1 mg/kg per day dexamethasone for 3-5 d, and 500-1 000 mL/d of dextran 40 for 7 d, besides the routine therapy. RESULTS: After 4-8 h of treatment, abdominal pain began to be relieved; range of tenderness began to be localized in 27 patients. They were cured with nonsurgical treatment. Five of them were deteriorated, and treated with surgery. Four patients in this group died. CONCLUSION: Dexamethasone and dextran 40 block the pathologic process of severe acute pancreatitis through inhibition of inflammatory mediators and improvement of microcirculation disorders respectively. PMID:15112353

  11. Use of endoscopic naso-pancreatic drainage in the treatment of severe acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Zhu-Fu; Wang, Zhi-Ming; Li, Wei-Qin; Li, Jie-Shou

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To review the experience on the use of endoscopic nasopancreatic drainage (ENPD) in the treatment of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). METHODS: Since March 1998, under the regular management of SAP with non-operative method, ENPD has been randomly used in 14 patients. The average age of the patients was 41.3 15.9 (years), with 8 males and 6 females. The time from onset to admission was 32.9 22.8 (hours). 8 cases were found to have gallbladder stone. The daily output of pancreatic fluid was measured. The body temperature, heart rate, WBC count, blood glucose, blood calcium, PaO2, blood and urine levels of amylase were detected on the fifth day and compared with their respective data on the first day. Therapeutic results and hospitalization times were recorded. RESULTS: The time of drainage was 7.3 4.0 days. The daily drainage outputs of the first five days were 236.4 176.6, 287.1 164.7, 284.6 216.4, 435.0 357.8 and 377.8 223.8 ml, respectively. The decreases in body temperature, heart rate, WBC counts, blood and urine levels of amylase and the increase in PaO2 were significant on the fifth day when compared with those on the first day. Infection of pancreatic necrosis was found in one patient and controlled by anti-infectives. 6 out of 8 patients with gallbladder stone were operated during hospital stay. All patients were cured and diischarged and the average hospital stay was 28.1 11.6 days. CONCLUSION: ENPD is an effective method for the drainage of pancreatic fluid and might have an important role in the treatment of SAP. Further observation, comparison and summary by this method are worthy to be considered. PMID:12679951

  12. Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Geokas, Michael C.

    1972-01-01

    For many decades two types of acute pancreatitis have been recognized: the edematous or interstitial and the hemorrhagic or necrotic. In most cases acute pancreatitis is associated with alcoholism or biliary tract disease. Elevated serum or urinary ?-amylase is the most important finding in diagnosis. The presence of methemalbumin in serum and in peritoneal or pleural fluid supports the diagnosis of the hemorrhagic form of the disease in patients with a history and enzyme studies suggestive of pancreatitis. There is no characteristic clinical picture in acute pancreatitis, and its complications are legion. Pancreatic pseudocyst is probably the most common and pancreatic abscess is the most serious complication. The pathogenetic principle is autodigestion, but the precise sequence of biochemical events is unclear, especially the mode of trypsinogen activation and the role of lysosomal hydrolases. A host of metabolic derangements have been identified in acute pancreatitis, involving lipid, glucose, calcium and magnesium metabolism and changes of the blood clotting mechanism, to name but a few. Medical treatment includes intestinal decompression, analgesics, correction of hypovolemia and other supportive and protective measures. Surgical exploration is advisable in selected cases, when the diagnosis is in doubt, and is considered imperative in the presence of certain complications, especially pancreatic abscess. PMID:4559467

  13. A study of the clinical profile of acute pancreatitis and its correlation with severity indices

    PubMed Central

    Vengadakrishnan, K.; Koushik, A. K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute pancreatitis is a common disease with wide clinical variation and its incidence is increasing. Acute pancreatitis may vary in severity, from mild self-limiting pancreatic inflammation to pancreatic necrosis with life-threatening sequelae. Severity of acute pancreatitis is linked to the presence of systemic organ dysfunctions and/or necrotizing pancreatitis. Aim and objectives The present study was aimed to assess the clinical profile of acute pancreatitis and to assess the efficacy of various severity indices in predicting the outcome of patients. Methodology This was a prospective study done in Sri Ramachandra Medical College and Hospital from April 2012–September 2014. All patients with a diagnosis of acute pancreatitis were included in this study. Along with routine lab parameters, serum amylase, lipase, lipid profile, calcium, CRP, LDH, CT abdomen, CXR and 2D Echo was done for all patients. Results A total of 110 patients were analysed. 50 patients required Intensive care, among them 9 patients (18%) died. 20 patients (18.2%) had MODS, 15 patients (13.6%) had pleural effusion, 9 patients (8.2%) had pseudocyst, 2 patients(1.8%) had hypotension, 2 patients(1.8%) had ARDS and 2 patients(1.8%) had DKA. In relation to various severity indices, high score of CRP, LDH and CT severity index was associated with increased morbidity and mortality. 15 patients (13.6%) underwent open necrosectomy surgery, 3 patients (2.7%) underwent laparoscopic necrosectomy and 7 patients (6.4%) were tried step up approach but could not avoid surgery. Step up approach and surgery did not have a significant reduction in the mortality. Conclusion Initial assessment of severity by CRP, LDH and lipase could be reliable indicators of outcome in acute pancreatitis PMID:26715920

  14. Effects of Local Pancreatic Renin-Angiotensin System on the Microcirculation of Rat with Severe Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Ling; Long, Haocheng; Wang, Hui; Feng, Jiarui; Chen, Feixiang

    2015-01-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) is normally related to multiorgan dysfunction and local complications. Studies have found that local pancreatic renin-angiotensin system (RAS) was significantly upregulated in drug-induced SAP. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of angiotensin II receptors inhibitor valsartan on dual role of RAS in SAP in a rat model and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. 3.8% sodium taurocholate (1 ml/kg) was injected to the pancreatic capsule in order for pancreatitis induction. Rats in the sham group were injected with normal saline in identical locations. We also investigated the regulation of experimentally induced SAP on local RAS expression in the pancreas through determination of the activities of serum amylase, lipase and myeloperoxidase, histological and biochemical analysis, radioimmunoassay, fluorescence quantitative PCR and Western blot analysis. The results indicated that valsartan could effectively suppress the local RAS to protect against experimental acute pancreatitis through inhibition of microcirculation disturbances and inflammation. The results suggest that pancreatic RAS plays a critical role in the regulation of pancreatic functions and demonstrates application potential as AT1 receptor antagonists. Moreover, other RAS inhibitors could be a new therapeutic target in acute pancreatitis. PMID:26170733

  15. A nuclear import inhibitory peptide ameliorates the severity of cholecystokinin-induced acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Letoha, Tams; Somlai, Csaba; Takcs, Tams; Szabolcs, Annamria; Jrmay, Katalin; Jr, Zoltn Rakonczay; Hegyi, Pter; Varga, Ilona; Kaszaki, Jzsef; Krizbai, Istvn; Boros, Imre; Duda, Ern; Kusz, Erzsbet; Penke, Botond

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To assess the effect of our novel cell-permeable nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-?B) inhibitor peptide PN50 in an experimental model of acute pancreatitis. PN50 was produced by conjugating the cell-penetrating penetratin peptide with the nuclear localization signal of the NF-?B p50 subunit. METHODS: Pancreatitis was induced in male Wistar rats by administering 2100 ?g/kg body weight of cholecystokinin-octapeptide (CCK) intraperitoneally (IP) at an interval of 1 h. PN50-treated animals received 1 mg/kg of PN50 IP 30 min before or after the CCK injections. The animals were sacrificed 4 h after the first injection of CCK. RESULTS: All the examined laboratory (the pancreatic weight/body weight ratio, serum amylase activity, pancreatic levels of TNF-? and IL-6, degree of lipid peroxidation, reduced glutathione levels, NF-?B binding activity, pancreatic and lung myeloperoxidase activity) and morphological parameters of the disease were improved before and after treatment with the PN50 peptide. According to the histological findings, PN50 protected the animals against acute pancreatitis by favoring the induction of apoptotic, as opposed to necrotic acinar cell death associated with severe acute pancreatitis. CONCLUSION: Our study implies that reversible inhibitors of stress-responsive transcription factors like NF-?B might be clinically useful for the suppression of the severity of acute pancreatitis. PMID:15742402

  16. Epidural anesthesia improves pancreatic perfusion and decreases the severity of acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Sadowski, Samira M; Andres, Axel; Morel, Philippe; Schiffer, Eduardo; Frossard, Jean-Louis; Platon, Alexandra; Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre; Bhler, Leo

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To study the safety of epidural anesthesia (EA), its effect on pancreatic perfusion and the outcome of patients with acute pancreatitis (AP). METHODS: From 2005 to August 2010, patients with predicted severe AP [Ranson score ? 2, C-reactive protein > 100 or necrosis on computed tomography (CT)] were prospectively randomized to either a group receiving EA or a control group treated by patient controlled intravenous analgesia. Pain management was evaluated in the two groups every eight hours using the visual analog pain scale (VAS). Parameters for clinical severity such as length of hospital stay, use of antibiotics, admission to the intensive care unit, radiological/clinical complications and the need for surgical necrosectomy including biochemical data were recorded. A CT scan using a perfusion protocol was performed on admission and at 72 h to evaluate pancreatic blood flow. A significant variation in blood flow was defined as a 20% difference in pancreatic perfusion between admission and 72 h and was measured in the head, body and tail of the pancreas. RESULTS: We enrolled 35 patients. Thirteen were randomized to the EA group and 22 to the control group. There were no differences in demographic characteristics between the two groups. The Balthazar radiological severity score on admission was higher in the EA group than in the control group (mean score 4.15 2.54 vs 3.38 1.75, respectively, P = 0.347) and the median Ranson scores were 3.4 and 2.7 respectively (P = NS). The median duration of EA was 5.7 d, and no complications of the epidural procedure were reported. An improvement in perfusion of the pancreas was observed in 13/30 (43%) of measurements in the EA group vs 2/27 (7%) in the control group (P = 0.0025). Necrosectomy was performed in 1/13 patients in the EA group vs 4/22 patients in the control group (P = 0.63). The VAS improved during the first ten days in the EA group compared to the control group (0.2 vs 2.33, P = 0.034 at 10 d). Length of stay and mortality were not statistically different between the 2 groups (26 d vs 30 d, P = 0.65, and 0% for both respectively). CONCLUSION: Our study demonstrates that EA increases arterial perfusion of the pancreas and improves the clinical outcome of patients with AP. PMID:26604652

  17. Valproic Acid-Induced Severe Acute Pancreatitis with Pseudocyst Formation: Report of a Case.

    PubMed

    Ray, Sukanta; Khamrui, Sujan; Kataria, Mohnish; Biswas, Jayanta; Saha, Suman

    2015-08-01

    Valproic acid is the most widely used anti-epilep-tic drug in children, and it is probably the most frequent cause of drug-induced acute pancreatitis. Outcomes for patients with valproic acid-associated pancreatitis vary from full recovery after discontinuation of the drug to severe acute pancreatitis and death. Here, we present a case of valproic acid-induced severe acute pancreatitis with pseudocyst formation in a 10-year-old girl with cerebral palsy and generalized tonic-clonic seizure. There was no resolution of the pseudocyst after discontinuation of valproic acid. The patient became symptomatic with a progressive increase in the size of the pseudocyst. She was successfully treated with cystogastrostomy and was well at 12-month follow-up. PMID:26366333

  18. [C-reactive protein and lactate dehydrogenase as single prognostic factors of severity in acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Zrni?, Irena Krznari?; Mili?, Sandra; Fisi?, Elizabeta; Radi?, Mladen; Stimac, Davor

    2007-01-01

    Ranson and Glasgow scores are routinely used for prediction of severity in acute pancreatitis. We undertook a prospective study to investigate the role of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and C-reactive protein (CRP) as potential single predictors of severity in acute pancreatitis. In our study we included 100 patients with diagnosis of acute pancreatitis admitted to our hospital during last two years. The inclusion criteria consisted of a combination of clinical features, a typical case history, elevation of serum pancreatic enzymes and diagnosis confirmed by imaging studies (ultrasound or computerised tomography). We used Ranson score for assesment of severity and compared it with single parameters as LDH and CRP on the first and the third day after admission. Cut off values for predicting local and systemic complications were > or =3 for Ranson score, 320 IU for LDH and 5 mg/L for CRP. Ranson score showed highest sensitivity in the prediction of local and systemic complication of acute pancreatitis. Specificity and diagnostic accuracy were highest for LDH on the first day (67.74; 57%). Diagnostic accuracy for Ranson score and CRP on the third day after admission was around 50%. We can conclude that LDH and CRP are available, simple and economical biochemical parameters that can help us predict complications of acute pancreatitis in the early phase of the disease. They showed similar diagnostic accuracy as the far more clinically used Ranson score. PMID:17489509

  19. Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... NPF Centers Animated Pancreas Patient About the Pancreas Pancreatic Cancer Chronic Pancreatitis Acute Pancreatitis Children/Pediatric Other Pancreas ... Common Disorders of the Pancreas Genetics & The Pancreas Pancreatic Cancer Pancreatic Cancer Risks and Symptoms Diagnosis of Pancreatic ...

  20. Association between serum interleukin-35 levels and severity of acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi-Li; Zhou, Xiu-Yun; Guo, Xian-Yang; Tu, Jun-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory cytokines have been reported to be associated with pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis. The aim of this study was to measure the serum IL-35 levels in patients with acute pancreatitis and analyze the relationship between IL-35 levels and the disease severity. Thirty-two patients with acute pancreatitis and 32 healthy control subjects were included into the study. The serum levels of IL-35 were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay upon admission and the following seven days. The relationships with severity and etiology during the clinical course were analyzed. Serum IL-35 levels in patients with acute pancreatitis at the time of admission (5.250.37 ng/mL) were significantly higher than those in healthy controls (1.930.16 ng/mL, P<0.001). Moreover, serum IL-35 levels in patients with severe attacks (7.150.48 ng/mL) were significantly higher than those with moderately severe attacks (5.140.49 ng/mL, P=0.01) and mild attacks (3.690.53 ng/mL, P<0.001). However, there was no significant difference of serum IL-35 levels among patients with acute pancreatitis due of alcohol, gallstone and idiopathy. In addition, the peak serum concentrations of IL-35 were on day 1 after admission. Our results demonstrate that increased serum IL-35 levels may be related to the inflammatory response in patients with acute pancreatitis, suggesting that IL-35 may be used for a potential biomarker of acute pancreatitis. PMID:26221286

  1. [Experimental models of acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Ceranowicz, Piotr; Cieszkowski, Jakub; Warzecha, Zygmunt; Dembi?ski, Artur

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a severe disease with high mortality. Clinical studies can bring some data about etiology, pathogenesis and the course of acute pancreatitis. However, studies concerning early events of this disease and the new concepts of treatment cannot be performed on humans, due to ethical reasons. Animal models of acute pancreatitis have been developed to solve this problem. This review presents currently used experimental models of acute pancreatitis, their properties and clinical relevance. Experimental models of acute pancreatitis can be divided into in vivo (non-invasive and invasive) and ex vivo models. The onset, development, severity and extent of acute pancreatitis, as well as the mortality, vary considerably between these different models. Animal models reproducibly produce mild, moderate or severe acute pancreatitis. One of the most commonly used models of acute pancreatitis is created by administration of supramaximal doses of cerulein, an analog of cholecystokinin. This model produces acute mild edematous pancreatitis in rats, whereas administration of cerulein in mice leads to the development of acute necrotizing pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis evoked by retrograde administration of sodium taurocholate into the pancreatic duct is the most often used model of acute severe necrotizing pancreatitis in rats. Ex vivo models allow to eliminate the influence of hormonal and nervous factors on the development of acute pancreatitis. PMID:25720613

  2. High-mobility group box 1 protein and its role in severe acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xiao; Li, Wei-Qin

    2015-01-01

    The high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), which belongs to the subfamily of HMG-1/-2, is a highly conserved single peptide chain consisting of 215 amino acid residues with a molecular weight of approximately 24894 Da. HMGB1 is a ubiquitous nuclear protein in mammals and plays a vital role in inflammatory diseases. Acute pancreatitis is one of the most common causes of acute abdominal pain with a poor prognosis. Acute pancreatitis is an acute inflammatory process of the pancreas (duration of less than six months), for which the severe form is called severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). More and more studies have shown that HMGB1 has a bidirectional effect in the pathogenesis of SAP. Extracellular HMGB1 can aggravate the pancreatic inflammatory process, whereas intracellular HMGB1 has a protective effect against pancreatitis. The mechanism of HMGB1 is multiple, mainly through the nuclear factor-?B pathway. Receptors for advanced glycation end-products and toll-like receptors (TLR), especially TLR-2 and TLR-4, are two major types of receptors mediating the inflammatory process triggered by HMGB1 and may be also the main mediators in the pathogenesis of SAP. HMGB1 inhibitors, such as ethyl pyruvate, pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate and Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans, can decrease the level of extracellular HMGB1 and are the promising targets in the treatment of SAP. PMID:25663762

  3. Nardostachys jatamansi inhibits severe acute pancreatitis via mitogen-activated protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Bae, Gi-Sang; Park, Kyoung-Chel; Koo, Bon Soon; Jo, Il-Joo; Choi, Sun Bok; Song, Ho-Joon; Park, Sung-Joo

    2012-09-01

    Previously, we reported that Nardostachys jatamansi (NJ) attenuated cerulein-induced mild acute pancreatitis (AP). In the present study, we investigated the ability of NJ to ameliorate severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) induced by a choline-deficient diet supplemented with ethionine (CDE). An NJ extract was orally administered ad libitum via the water during administration of the CDE. After three days, the CDE was replaced with a normal diet. After four days of normal feeding the mice were sacrificed and the blood and pancreas were obtained for further investigation. NJ treatment reduced SAP-induced pancreatic damage, as shown by histology. NJ treatment also inhibited neutrophil infiltration into the pancreas. NJ also inhibited the secretion of digestive enzymes and cytokine production, and inhibited the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in the SAP-challenged pancreas. These data suggest that NJ protects against pancreatic injury in CDE-induced SAP by deactivating MAPKs. PMID:23181131

  4. Nardostachys jatamansi inhibits severe acute pancreatitis via mitogen-activated protein kinases

    PubMed Central

    BAE, GI-SANG; PARK, KYOUNG-CHEL; KOO, BON SOON; JO, IL-JOO; CHOI, SUN BOK; SONG, HO-JOON; PARK, SUNG-JOO

    2012-01-01

    Previously, we reported that Nardostachys jatamansi (NJ) attenuated cerulein-induced mild acute pancreatitis (AP). In the present study, we investigated the ability of NJ to ameliorate severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) induced by a choline-deficient diet supplemented with ethionine (CDE). An NJ extract was orally administered ad libitum via the water during administration of the CDE. After three days, the CDE was replaced with a normal diet. After four days of normal feeding the mice were sacrificed and the blood and pancreas were obtained for further investigation. NJ treatment reduced SAP-induced pancreatic damage, as shown by histology. NJ treatment also inhibited neutrophil infiltration into the pancreas. NJ also inhibited the secretion of digestive enzymes and cytokine production, and inhibited the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in the SAP-challenged pancreas. These data suggest that NJ protects against pancreatic injury in CDE-induced SAP by deactivating MAPKs. PMID:23181131

  5. Protective effects of daphnetin on sodium taurocholate?induced severe acute pancreatitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhi-Yong; Liu, Jiao; Zhao, Kai-Liang; Wang, Li-Kun; Shi, Qiao; Zuo, Teng; Liu, Tian-Yi; Zhao, Liang; Wang, Wei-Xing

    2014-05-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) is the sudden onset of pancreatic inflammation, which is characterized by edema, acinar cell necrosis, hemorrhage and severe inflammation of the pancreas and is associated with a high mortality rate. Daphnetin has been shown to alleviate organ injury in a variety of preclinical animal models of coagulation disorders. The aim of the present study was to investigate the protective effects of daphnetin on severe acute pancreatitis in a rat model. Severe acute pancreatitis in the rat model was induced by retrograde infusion of 5% sodium taurocholate (1 ml/kg) into the bile-pancreatic duct. Daphnetin (4 mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally at 30 min prior to the infusion of sodium taurocholate. The severity of pancreatitis was evaluated by various analyses of serum amylase and lipase, tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?) and interleukin-1? (IL-1?) levels, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and malondialdehyde (MDA) content, as well as by histological grading. The levels of TNF-? and IL-1? in the serum were measured by ELISA. The results revealed that the daphnetin-treated SAP rat group (SAP-D) exhibited a lower pathological score of the pancreas compared with the SAP group (SAP). Further analyses demonstrated that the SAP-D group had lower levels of serum amylase, lipase and pro-inflammatory cytokines, including TNF-? and IL-1?, and a decreased MPO activity and MDA content 3, 6 and 12 h subsequent to the infusion of sodium taurocholate compared with the SAP group (SAP). These findings indicated that daphnetin exerted a protective function in the SAP rat model. Therefore, daphnetin may be considered as a potential compound for the therapy and prevention of acute pancreatitis. PMID:24584301

  6. [Biochemical markers in assessment of severity and prognosis of acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Petricusi?, Lidija; Bani?, Marko; Cabrijan, Zeljko; Urek-Crncevi?, Marija; Hulak-Karlak, Vanja; Grgurevi?, Ivica

    2009-01-01

    The authors reveal and discuss the role of novel biochemical parameters in early diagnosis of acute pancreatitis and assessment of the severity of the disease. These biochemical parameters, beside routinely used amilase and lipase, might enable us to early identify those patients who are at risk of developing severe form of pancreatitis or complications. These parameters include trypsinogen activation peptide (TAP), C-reactive protein (CRP, tripsinogen-2, procalcitonin, phospholipase-A2 (PLA2), carboxypeptidase activation peptide (CAPAP) and interleukin-6 and 8 (IL-6, IL-8). Although these markers are still not incorporated in routine clinical practice, IL-6, IL-10, procalcitonin and trypsinogen activation peptide seem to have a good chance to be used as a new biochemical markers in assessment of severity and prognosis of acute pancreatitis. PMID:23120847

  7. TLR4-mediated NF-?B signaling pathway mediates HMGB1-induced pancreatic injury in mice with severe acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Wu, Xuejun; Yang, Le; He, Yuxiang; Liu, Yang; Jin, Xing; Yuan, Hai

    2016-01-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) is an extremely dangerous acute abdominal disorder which causes multiple complications and has a high mortality rate. Previous research has suggested that high-mobility group box1(HMGB1) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of SAP; however, the mechanisms underlying this strong correlation remain unclear. In this study, to further investigate whether HMGB1 acts as a stimulating factor, and whether Toll-like receptor4(TLR4) acts as its major mediator in the development of pancreatic injury during SAP, recombinant human HMGB1(rhHMGB1) and TLR4-deficient mice were used. We found that HMGB1 and TLR4 were highly expressed, and nuclear factor-?B(NF-?B) was activated in our mouse model of SAP. We noted that the rhHMGB1 pancreas-targeted injection activated the TLR4-mediated NF-?B signaling pathway and induced pancreatic injury in wild-type mice. In TLR4-deficient mice, the rhHMGB1-induced activation of NF-?B and pathological changes in the pancreas were less evident than in wild-type mice. Therefore, this study provides evidence that HMGB1 promotes the pathogenesis of pancreatitis, and its downstream TLR4-mediated NF-?B signaling pathway is a potential important mediator in the development of this form of pancreatic injury. PMID:26719855

  8. TLR4-mediated NF-?B signaling pathway mediates HMGB1-induced pancreatic injury in mice with severe acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    LI, GANG; WU, XUEJUN; YANG, LE; HE, YUXIANG; LIU, YANG; JIN, XING; YUAN, HAI

    2016-01-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) is an extremely dangerous acute abdominal disorder which causes multiple complications and has a high mortality rate. Previous research has suggested that high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of SAP; however, the mechanisms underlying this strong correlation remain unclear. In this study, to further investigate whether HMGB1 acts as a stimulating factor, and whether Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) acts as its major mediator in the development of pancreatic injury during SAP, recombinant human HMGB1 (rhHMGB1) and TLR4-deficient mice were used. We found that HMGB1 and TLR4 were highly expressed, and nuclear factor-?B (NF-?B) was activated in our mouse model of SAP. We noted that the rhHMGB1 pancreas-targeted injection activated the TLR4-mediated NF-?B signaling pathway and induced pancreatic injury in wild-type mice. In TLR4-deficient mice, the rhHMGB1-induced activation of NF-?B and pathological changes in the pancreas were less evident than in wild-type mice. Therefore, this study provides evidence that HMGB1 promotes the pathogenesis of pancreatitis, and its downstream TLR4-mediated NF-?B signaling pathway is a potential important mediator in the development of this form of pancreatic injury. PMID:26719855

  9. Central role of neutrophil in the pathogenesis of severe acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhi-wen; Meng, Xiao-xiao; Xu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) is an acute abdominal disease with the strong systemic inflammatory response, and rapidly progressesfrom a local pancreatic damage into multiple organ dysfunction. For many decades, the contributions of neutrophils to the pathology of SAP were traditionally thought to be the chemokine and cytokine cascades that accompany inflammation. In this review, we focus mainly on those recently recognized aspects of neutrophils in SAP processes. First, emerging evidence suggests that therapeutic interventions targeting neutrophils significantly lower tissue damage and protect against the occurrence of pancreatitis. Second, trypsin activation promotes the initial neutrophils recruitment into local pancreas, and subsequently neutrophils infiltration in turn triggers trypsin production. Finally, neutrophils have the unique ability to release neutrophil extracellular traps even in the absence of pathogens. PMID:26249268

  10. Caspase-1 inhibition alleviates acute renal injury in rats with severe acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Hua; Li, Min-Li; Wang, Bin; Guo, Mei-Xia; Zhu, Ren-Min

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To assess the effect of inhibition of caspase-1 on acute renal injury in rats with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). METHODS: Forty-two Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups: healthy controls (HC, n = 6), SAP rats treated with saline (SAP-S, n = 18), or SAP rats treated with a caspase-1/interleukin (IL)-1?-converting-enzyme (ICE) inhibitor (SAP-I-ICE, n = 18). SAP was induced by retrograde infusion of 5% sodium taurocholate into the bile-pancreatic duct. HC rats were subjected to identical treatment and surgical procedures without sodium taurocholate. Rats received an intraperitoneal injection of isotonic saline (SAP-S) or the inhibitor (SAP-ICE-I) at 2 and 12 h after induction of acute pancreatitis. Surviving rats were sacrificed at different time points after SAP induction; all samples were obtained and stored for subsequent analyses. The levels of blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine (Cr) were measured using automatic methods, and serum IL-1? concentrations were measured by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Intrarenal expression of IL-1?, IL-18 and caspase-1 mRNAs was detected by RT-PCR. IL-1? protein expression and the pathologic changes in kidney tissues were observed by microscopy after immunohistochemical or hematoxylin and eosin staining, respectively. RESULTS: The serum levels of BUN and Cr in the SAP-S group were 12.48 2.30 mmol/L and 82.83 13.89 ?mol/L at 6 h, 23.53 2.58 mmol/L and 123.67 17.67 ?mol/L at 12 h, and 23.60 3.33 mmol/L and 125.33 21.09 ?mol/L at 18 h, respectively. All were significantly increased compared to HC rats (P < 0.01 for all). Levels in SAP-ICE-I rats were significantly decreased compared to SAP-S rats both at 12 and 18 h (P < 0.01 for all). Serum IL-1? levels in the SAP-S group were 276.77 44.92 pg/mL at 6 h, 308.99 34.95 pg/mL at 12 h, and 311.60 46.51 pg/mL at 18 h; all significantly higher than those in the HC and SAP-ICE-I groups (P < 0.01 for all). Intrarenal expression of IL-1? mRNA was weak in HC rats, but increased significantly in SAP-S rats (P < 0.01). ICE inhibition significantly decreased the expression of IL-1? and IL-18 mRNAs (P < 0.05 for all vs SAP-S), whereas caspase-1 mRNA expression was not significantly different. Weak IL-1? immunostaining was observed in HC animals, and marked staining was found in the SAP-S group mainly in renal tubular epithelial cells. IL-1? immunostaining was significantly descended in SAP-ICE-I rats compared to SAP-S rats (P < 0.05). Caspase-1 inhibition had no effect on the severity of kidney tissue destruction. CONCLUSION: The expression of caspase-1-activated cytokines IL-1? and IL-18 plays a pivotal role in acute renal injury in rats with experimental SAP. Caspase-1 inhibition improves renal function effectively. PMID:25132762

  11. CD64 Expression Is Increased in Patients with Severe Acute Pancreatitis: Clinical Significance

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hao; Ling, Xian-Long; Wu, Yu-Yun; L, Mu-Han; Guo, Hong; Zhang, Peng-Bin; Zhao, Xiao-Yan; Yang, Shi-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims Upregulated CD64 expression on neutrophils is the most useful marker for acute bacterial infections and systemic inflammation. However, it is unknown whether CD64 is involved in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis (AP). This study was designed to determine whether CD64 is implicated in severe acute pancreatitis (SAP), and thus, is a suitable marker for SAP. Methods SAP was induced in rats with an intraperitoneal injection of L-arginine. CD64 expression in the rat pancreas was determined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry. Additionally, the CD64 mRNA expression in peripheral blood leukocytes from 21 patients with mild acute pancreatitis (MAP) and 10 patients with SAP was investigated at the time of admission and during remission by qRT-PCR. Results CD64 mRNA and protein expression in the pancreas was significantly higher in rats with SAP, compared to the controls. The CD64 expression was higher in the patients with SAP than in the patients with MAP. During remission, CD64 mRNA decreased in both the MAP and SAP patients. The area under the curve of CD64 expression for the detection of SAP was superior to both the Ranson and the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II scores. Conclusions The CD64 level was significantly increased in correlation with the disease severity in SAP and may act as a useful marker for predicting the development of SAP. PMID:25071912

  12. Angiotensin-converting enzyme gene DD genotype neither increases susceptibility to acute pancreatitis nor influences disease severity

    PubMed Central

    Oruc, Nevin; Papachristou, Georgios I; Avula, Haritha; Slivka, Adam; Lamb, Janette; Whitcomb, David C

    2009-01-01

    Background The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) has been implied in the pathogenesis of various diseases including acute and chronic pancreatitis. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) is the key enzyme in activating the RAS. Deletion (D)-type polymorphism in the 16th intron of the ACE gene has been associated with higher serum levels of the enzyme. Inhibition of ACE was found to ameliorate acute pancreatitis in animal models suggesting that ACE plays a role in pathogenesis and progression of acute pancreatitis. Objectives were to investigate the occurrence of the ACE insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism in acute pancreatitis patients and its association with the severity of the disease. Material and Methods Seventy-nine acute pancreatitis patients and 95 healthy controls were evaluated. Acute pancreatitis cases were grouped as mild or severe according to the Atlanta criteria. Main outcome measure: The presence of the ACE I/D polymorphism. Results ACE gene I and D allele frequency of patients (44% and 56%) were similar to controls (45% and 55%, respectively). There were no significant differences in severity of pancreatitis between patients with the ACE-insertion or ACE-insertion/deletion versus ACE-deletion genotypes. Conclusions The ACE gene deletion polymorphism is neither a risk factor for development of acute pancreatitis nor contributes to the severity of disease or development of complications. PMID:19590623

  13. A murine model of obesity implicates the adipokine milieu in the pathogenesis of severe acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Zyromski, Nicholas J; Mathur, Abhishek; Pitt, Henry A; Lu, Debao; Gripe, John T; Walker, Julia J; Yancey, Kyle; Wade, Terence E; Swartz-Basile, Deborah A

    2008-09-01

    Obesity is clearly an independent risk factor for increased severity of acute pancreatitis (AP), although the mechanisms underlying this association are unknown. Adipokines (including leptin and adiponectin) are pleiotropic molecules produced by adipocytes that are important regulators of the inflammatory response. We hypothesized that the altered adipokine milieu observed in obesity contributes to the increased severity of pancreatitis. Lean (C57BL/6J), obese leptin-deficient (LepOb), and obese hyperleptinemic (LepDb) mice were subjected to AP by six hourly intraperitoneal injections of cerulein (50 microg/kg). Severity of AP was assessed by histology and by measuring pancreatic concentration of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1beta and IL-6, the chemokine MCP-1, and the marker of neutrophil activation MPO. Both congenitally obese strains of mice developed significantly more severe AP than wild-type lean animals. Severity of AP was not solely related to adipose tissue volume: LepOb mice were heaviest; however, LepDb mice developed the most severe AP both histologically and biochemically. Circulating adiponectin concentrations inversely mirrored the severity of pancreatitis. These data demonstrate that congenitally obese mice develop more severe AP than lean animals when challenged by cerulein hyperstimulation and suggest that alteration of the adipokine milieu exacerbates the severity of AP in obesity. PMID:18583460

  14. A simple taurocholate-induced model of severe acute pancreatitis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhong-Hui; Peng, Jun-Sheng; Li, Chu-Jun; Yang, Zu-Li; Xiang, Jun; Song, Hu; Wu, Xiao-Bing; Chen, Jun-Rong; Diao, De-Chang

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To investigate gut barrier damage and intestinal bacteria translocation in severe acute pancreatitis (SAP), a simple rat model of SAP was induced and studied. METHODS: Pancreatitis was induced by uniformly distributed injection of 3.8% Na taurocholate (1 mL/kg) beneath the pancreatic capsule. Rats in the control group were injected with normal saline in the identical location. RESULTS: Serum amylase, plasma endotoxin, intestinal permeability, and pancreatitis pathology scores were all markedly higher in the pancreatitis group than in the control group (P < 0.01). The bacterial infection rate was significantly higher in the SAP group than in the control group (P < 0.01), observed in parallel by both bacterial culture and real-time polymerase chain reaction. Acute damage of the pancreas was observed histologically in SAP rats, showing interstitial edema, leukocyte infiltration, acinar cell necrosis and hemorrhage. The microstructure of the intestinal mucosa of SAP rats appeared to be destroyed with loose, shortened microvilli and rupture of the intercellular junction, as shown by electron microscopy. CONCLUSION: Significant gut barrier damage and intestinal bacterial translocation were definitely observed with few potential study confounders in this SAP rat model, suggesting that it may be an appropriate animal model for study of gut barrier damage and bacterial translocation in SAP. PMID:19960573

  15. Endotoxaemia and serum tumour necrosis factor as prognostic markers in severe acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Exley, A R; Leese, T; Holliday, M P; Swann, R A; Cohen, J

    1992-01-01

    Endotoxaemia and circulating tumour necrosis factor are important prognostic factors in severe sepsis and are implicated in the pathogenesis of septic shock. Because clinical and pathological features in acute pancreatitis are similar to septic shock this study sought to determine whether endotoxin and tumour necrosis factor were prognostic factors in 38 patients with prognostically severe acute pancreatitis. Endotoxaemia, present in 19/37 (51%) patients on day 1, was more common in nonsurvivors than survivors (10/11, 91% v 9/26, 35%, p = 0.003). Day 1 serum endotoxin concentrations were higher in patients with a severe outcome (median (interquartile range) 314 (173-563) pg/ml v 0 (0-185) pg/ml, p<0.01) and in non-survivors (266 (173-586) pg/ml v 0 (0-165) pg/ml, p<0.01). Serum tumour necrosis factor was detectable in 47 of 109 samples (43%) from 38 patients (median 35 pg/ml, range 5-943 pg/ml). Day 1 serum tumour necrosis factor correlated with a worse prognostic score and a severe outcome in all patients (n = 38, r = 0.36, p = 0.027; r = 0.33, p<0.05) and with mortality in patients with gall stones (n = 23, r = 0.50, p = 0.02). Our data suggest that endotoxin and tumour necrosis factor could be prognostic factors in severe acute pancreatitis. PMID:1398241

  16. Effect of IL-4 on altered expression of complement activation regulators in rat pancreatic cells during severe acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cheng; Ge, Chun-Lin; Guo, Ren-Xuan; He, San-Guang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of IL-4 on the altered expression of complement activation regulators in pancreas and pancreatic necrosis during experimental severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). METHODS: SAP model of rats was established by retrograde injection of 5% sodium taurocholate (1 mL/kg) into the pancreatic duct. We immunohistochemically assayed the expression of three complement activation regulators: decay accelerating factor (DAF; CD55), 20 ku homologous restriction factor (HRF20; CD59) and membrane cofactor protein (MCP; CD46), in the pancreatic acinar cells of rats at 0, 3, 6, 12, and 24 h after the induction of SAP model. Meanwhile the levels of amylase and lipase were determined, and morphological examination was performed. Then, 61 rats were randomly divided into three groups. Group A (n = 21) received no treatment after the SAP model was established; group B (n = 20) was given IL-4 (8 g/animal) intraperitoneally 0.5 h before the SAP model was established; group C (n = 20) was given IL-4 (8 g/animal) intraperitoneally 0.5 h after the SAP model was established. Plasma amylase and lipase, extent of pancreatic necrosis and expression of complement activation regulators were investigated 6 h after the induction of SAP model. RESULTS: Three complement activation regulators were all expressed in pancreatic acinar cells. MCP was not found on the basolateral surface as reported. Contrary to the gradually increasing plasma level of amylase and lipase, expression of complement activation regulators decreased after SAP model was set up. At the same time, the severity of pancreatic necrosis was enhanced. A strong negative correlation was found between the expression of MCP, DAF, CD59 in pancreatic acinar cells and the severity of pancreatic necrosis (r = 0.748, 0.827, 0.723; P<0.01). In the second series of experiments, no matter when the treatment of IL-4 was given (before or after the induction of SAP model), the serum level of amylase or lipase was decreased and the extent of pancreatic necrosis was ameliorated significantly. Compared to SAP control group, the expression of DAF and CD59 in pancreas was reinforced when IL-4 was given before the induction of SAP model (P<0.01, P<0.05), but the expression of MCP was not influenced (P>0.05). The expression of DAF was enhanced, when IL-4 was given after the induction of SAP model (P<0.05), but the expression of CD59 and MCP did not change (P>0.05). CONCLUSION: Complement activation regulators may participate in the pathogenesis of pancreatic inflammation. Downregulation of complement activation regulators expression may be one of the causes of pancreatic necrosis. IL-4 treatment may control SAP aggravation by enhancing expression of DAF and CD59 in pancreas and decreasing pancreatic necrosis. Moreover, DAF and CD59 may play an important role in the regulation of complement activation regulators during SAP. PMID:16425382

  17. Acute pancreatitis. A more common and severe complication of gallstones in males

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Arshad M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe an increased incidence and severity of gallstone pancreatitis in males compared to females. Design: Methods This is a retrospective observational comparative study conducted at Liaquat University of Medical and Health Sciences, Jamshoro, Pakistan, over 3 years from June 2008 to June 2011. The study includes two hundred and thirty seven (237) patients with a mean age of 52.38, Std 13.311,65 (2287) with 157 (66.24%) females and 80 (33.75%) males who were admitted as acute abdominal pain secondary to gallstones. The patients were mostly diagnosed on ultrasonography and enzyme studies. Demographics and other variables are studied and statistical analysis done on SPSS version 20. Results More frequent cases of severe acute pancreatitis were observed in males with gallstones (70%) compared to females (P<0.001). The aged people had a high prevalence while males were more likely to develop local and systemic complications. Severity stratification was done based on different criterias like Ransons criteria, and APACHEII. Overall mortality was 7.59%. Mortality among males was significantly high (70%, n=16) in our study due to an increased incidence of fulminant course of the disease. Conclusion Contrary to the belief, gallstone associated acute pancreatitis is getting more common in our society and especially so in male population. PMID:26309432

  18. Radial EUS Examination Can be Helpful in Predicting the Severity of Acute Biliary Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Alper, Emrah; Arabul, Mahmut; Aslan, Fatih; Cekic, Cem; Celik, Mustafa; Ipek, Serkan; Unsal, Belkis

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the utility of noncontrast enhanced endosonography (EUS) in predicting the severity of acute pancreatitis (AP) during the first 72 to 96?h of admission.In total, 187 patients with acute biliary pancreatitis were included. The patients were classified into 2 groups as having severe and mild AP according to the Modified Glasgow scoring and computerized tomography severity index (SI). The 158 cases with mild and 29 cases with severe AP had a similar age and sex distribution.Although none of the cases with mild AP developed morbidity and death, of the cases with severe AP, 16 developed serious morbidities and 5 died. On EUS examination, we looked for parenchymal findings, peripancreatic inflammatory signs, free or loculated fluid collections, and abnormalities of the common bile duct and the pancreatic channel. Statistical analysis indicated a significant relationship between the severity of AP with diffuse parenchymal edema, periparenchymal plastering, and/or diffuse retroperitoneal free fluid accumulation, and peri-pancreatic edema. We also defined an EUSSI and found that the EUSSI had sensitivity of 89.7%, specificity of 84.2%, positive predictivity value (PPV) of 88.9%, negative predictivity value (NPV) of 91.2%, and an accuracy of 87.9% in the differentiation of mild and severe AP. We found that the EUSSI had an accuracy of 72.4%, sensitivity of 75.4%, specificity of 65.1%, PPV of 69.3%, and NPV of 73.1% for determining mortality.Our data suggest that EUS allowed us to accurately predict the severity and mortality in nearly 90% of cases with AP. PMID:26817865

  19. [Acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Ruiz Chvez, R

    1991-01-01

    This article review newer concepts of diagnosis and therapy for patients with acute pancreatitis. Although the pathogenesis are incompletely understood, much progress has recently been made in treatment of symptoms and medical support of the critically ill patients. The most common associate factors include: biliary tract disease (lithiasis), alcohol abuse, trauma and hyperlipoproteinemia. Most patients have abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting, fever, abdominal tenderness and hypovolemia of varying degrees. Renal clearance of amilase is increased, the ratio of renal clearance to that of creatinine is very important in patients with hypovolemia or an underlying renal disease. The definition of risk factors, with regard to morbility or mortality. Those patients at great risk require critical care treatment in an ICU and meticulous pulmonary, cardiac, hematological and metabolic monitoring and treatment of any the abdominal complications. PMID:1820183

  20. Effect of emodin on endoplasmic reticulum stress in rats with severe acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Li; Cai, Baochang; Zheng, Shizhong; Liu, Xiao; Cai, Hao; Li, Huan

    2013-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate the protective effect of emodin on endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in rats with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) and the underlying molecular mechanism. Sprague-Dawley male rats were randomly divided into sham operation group, SAP model group, and emodin treatment group. SAP was constructed through injecting sodium taurocholate into pancreatic and biliary duct in rats. Half an hour before establishing the animal model, emodin or sodium carboxymethylcellulose was intragastrically administrated to the rats in respective group. Rats were killed at 3, 6, and 12 h postdisease induction. The amylase, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-?) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels in serum, pancreatic histopathology, acinar ER ultrastructure, protein expression of Bip, IRE1?,TRAF2, ASK1, p-JNK, and p-p38 MAPK in pancreas were examined. Sodium taurocholate induced pancreatic injury and ER lumen dilated in exocrine pancreas in rats at 3-, 6-, and 12-h time points. ER stress transducers Bip, IRE1?, and their downstream molecules TRAF2, ASK1 in pancreatitis were upregulated. Furthermore, phosphorylation of JNK and p38MAPK in pancreas was increased, which induced high expression level of inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-? and IL-6. Treatment with emodin obviously ameliorated pancreatic injury and decreased the release of amylase and inflammatory cytokines. Further studies showed that emodin significantly decreased the expression of Bip, IRE1?, TRAF2, and ASK1, inhibited phosphorylation of JNK and p38 MAPK in pancreas in rats at all time points. Emodin could reduce pancreatic injury and restrain inflammatory reaction in SAP rats partly via inhibiting ER stress transducers IRE1? and its downstream molecules. PMID:23605470

  1. Biopsy-proven drug-induced tubulointerstitial nephritis in a patient with acute kidney injury and alcoholic severe acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Yoshioka, Wakako; Mori, Takayasu; Nagahama, Kiyotaka; Tamura, Teiichi

    2013-01-01

    We report a 49-year-old man with alcoholic severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) complicated by drug-induced acute tubulointerstitial nephritis (DI-AIN). Oliguria persisted and became anuric again on day 17 despite improvement of pancreatitis. He presented rash, fever and eosinophilia from day 20. Renal biopsy was performed for dialysis-dependent acute kidney injury (AKI), DI-AIN was revealed, and prompt use of corticosteroids fully restored his renal function. This diagnosis might be missed because it is difficult to perform renal biopsy in such a clinical situation. If the patient's general condition allows, renal biopsy should be performed and reversible AKI must be distinguished from many cases of irreversible AKI complicated by SAP. This is the first report of biopsy-proven DI-AIN associated with SAP, suggesting the importance of biopsy for distinguishing DI-AIN in persisting AKI of SAP. PMID:23645698

  2. [The role of jejunal feeding in the treatment of acute necrotizing pancreatitis and in recurrence of chronic pancreatitis with severe necrosis].

    PubMed

    Hamvas, J; Pap, A

    1998-04-19

    Acute necrotising is the most serious form of pancreatic inflammatory diseases leading to multiorgan failure and high (15-20%) mortality. The poor nutritional and metabolic condition of the patient and secondary bacterial translocation further rise the mortality. A recently introduced method of continuous nasojejunal feeding putting the pancreas into rest with basal pattern of secretion resulted in lower mortality rate by using adequate nutrition into the second loop of jejunum bypassing duodenopancreatic stimulations via an endoscopically placed feeding tube. The better nutritional and immunological states of the patients, the restored absorption and intestinal motility promote the recovery of pancreatitis, prevent bacterial translocation, resulting in time and in financial spares. Although surgery is occasionally inevitable because of progression of pancreatitis, nasojejunal feeding improves the general condition of patients more efficiently than parenteral nutrition and makes the scheduling of the operation optimal. The authors retrospectively analyse the results of treatment in 56 patients suffering from acute necrotising pancreatitis, as well as in 30 patients with chronic pancreatitis accompanied with more than 20% of necrosis in the pancreas and admitted to their gastroenterological medical department during 5 years. The effect of parenteral nutrition were less beneficial than that of jejunal feeding regarding the mortality and the necessity of operative interventions. Chronic pancreatitis with severe necrosis behaved similarly to the acute necrotising pancreatitis. The continuous nasojejunal feeding seems to be a promising new method for acute necrotising pancreatitis preventing complications and severe catabolic state of the disease by a cost--effective manner. PMID:9595928

  3. [Acute pancreatitis in children].

    PubMed

    Rottier, B L; Holl, R A; Draaisma, J M

    1998-02-21

    Acute pancreatitis is probably commoner in children than was previously thought. In children it is most commonly associated with trauma or viral infection. The presentation may be subtler than in adults, requiring a high index of suspicion in the clinician. In three children, two boys aged 4 and 10 and a girl of 15 years, acute pancreatitis was suspected because of the findings at ultrasonography and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography performed when the disease recurred (the boy aged 4), apathy and immobility without dehydration or other obvious causes (the boy aged 10), and severe abdominal pain in combination with vomiting (the girl). All three patients had severely increased (urinary) amylase levels. Most often, acute pancreatitis in children tends to be a self-limiting disease which responds well to conservative treatment. PMID:9562770

  4. Therapeutic effect of human clonal bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells in severe acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kyung Hee; Yi, TacGhee; Son, Mi Kwon; Song, Sun U; Hong, Soon-Sun

    2015-01-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP), a common necroinflammatory disease initiated by the premature activation of digestive enzymes within the pancreatic acinar cells, is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. In this study, we investigated whether human bone marrow-derived clonal mesenchymal stem cells (hcMSCs), isolated from human bone marrow aspirate according to our newly established isolation protocol, have potential therapeutic effects in SAP. SAP was induced by three intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of cerulein (100?g/kg) and sequential LPS (10mg/kg) in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. hcMSCs (1נ10(6)/head) were infused on 24h after LPS injection via the tail vein. The rats were sacrificed 3days after infusion of hcMSCs. We observed that infused hcMSCs reduced the levels of serum amylase and lipase. Infused hcMSCs ameliorated acinar cell necrosis, pancreatic edema, and inflammatory infiltration. Also, infused hcMSCs decreased the level of malondialdehyde, and increased the levels of glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase. The number of TUNEL positive acinar cells was reduced after hcMSCs infusion. In addition, hcMSCs reduced the expression levels of pro-inflammation mediators and cytokines, and increased the expression of SOX9 in SAP. Taken together, hcMSCs could effectively relieve injury of pancreatitis as a promising therapeutics for SAP. PMID:25142942

  5. Fibrosis Reduces Severity of Acute-on-Chronic Pancreatitis in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Chathur; Cline, Rachel A.; Jaligama, Deepthi; Noel, Pawan; Delany, James P.; Bae, Kyongtae; Furlan, Alessandro; Baty, Catherine J.; Karlsson, Jenny M.; Rosario, Bedda L; Patel, Krutika; Mishra, Vivek; Durgampudi, Chandra; Yadav, Dhiraj; Navina, Sarah; Singh, Vijay P.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Acute pancreatitis (AP) and chronic pancreatitis (CP) share etiologies, but AP can be more severe and has higher mortality. We investigated features of CP that protect against severity. The amount of intra-pancreatic fat (IPF) is increased in obesity and fibrosis is increased in CP; so we studied whether fibrosis or fat regulate severity of AP attacks in patients with CP. METHODS We reviewed records from the University of Pittsburg Medical Center Autopsy database (19982008) for patients with diagnosed AP (n=23), CP (n=35), or both (AP-on-CP; n=15). Pancreatic histology samples from these patients and 50 randomly selected Controls (no pancreatic disease) were analyzed, and IPF data were correlated with computed tomography data. An adipocyte and acinar cell transwell co-culture system, with or without collagen Type-I (collagen-I), was used to study the effects of fibrosis on acinar-adipocyte interactions. We studied the effects of non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) and adipokines on acinar cells in culture. RESULTS Levels of IPF were significantly higher among non-obese patients with CP than non-obese Controls. In CP or AP-on-CP, areas of IPF were surrounded by significantly more fibrosis than in Controls or patients with AP. Fat necrosis (FN)-associated peri-fat acinar necrosis (PFAN, indicated by NEFA spillage) contributed to most of the necrosis observed in AP samples; however, PFAN and total necrosis were significantly lower in samples from patients with CP and AP-on-CP. Fibrosis appeared to wall off the FN and limit PFAN, reducing acinar necrosis. In vitro, collagen-I limited the lipolytic flux between acinar cells and adipocytes and prevented increases in adipokines in the acinar compartment. This was associated with reduced acinar cell necrosis. However, NEFA, but not adipokines, caused acinar-cell necrosis. CONCLUSIONS Based on analysis of pancreatic samples from patients with CP, AP and AP-on-CP, and in vitro studies, fibrosis reduces the severity of acute exacerbations of CP by reducing lipolytic flux between adipocytes and acinar cells. PMID:23684709

  6. A mouse model of severe acute pancreatitis induced with caerulein and lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Shi-Ping; Li, Ji-Cheng; Jin, Chang

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To establish a non-traumatic, easy to induce and reproducible mouse model of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) induced with caerulein and lipopolyasccharide (LPS). METHODS: Thirty-two healthy mature NIH female mice were selected and divided at random into four groups (each of 8 mice), i.e., the control group (NS group), the caerulein group (Cn group), the lipopolysaccharide group (LPS group), and the caerulein+LPS group (Cn + LPS group). Mice were injected intraperitoneally with caerulein only, or LPS only, and caerulein and LPS in combination. All the animals were then killed by neck dislocation three hours after the last intraperitoneal injection. The pancreas and exo-pancreatic organs were then carefully removed for microscopic examination. And the pancreatic acinus was further observed under transmission electron microscope (TEM). Pancreatic weight, serum amylase, serum nitric oxide (NO) concentration, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration of the pancreas were assayed respectively. RESULTS: (1) NS animals displayed normal pancreatic structure both in the exocrine and endocrine. In the LPS group, the pancreas was slightly edematous, with the infiltration of a few inflammatory cells and the necrosis of the adjacent fat tissues. All the animals of the Cn group showed distinct signs of a mild edematous pancreatitis characterized by interstitial edema, infiltration of neutrophil and mononuclear cells, but without obvious parenchyma necrosis and hemorrhage. In contrast, the Cn + LPS group showed more diffuse focal areas of nonviable pancreatic and hemorrhage as well as systemic organ dysfunction. According to Schmidts criteria, the pancreatic histologic score showed that there existed significant difference in the Cn + LPS group in the interstitial edema, inflammatory infiltration, parenchyma necrosis and parenchyma homorrhage in comparison with those of the Cn group, LPS group and NS group (P < 0.01 or P < 0.05). (2) The ultrasturcture of acinar cells was seriously damaged in the Cn + LPS group. Chromatin margination of nuclei was present, the number and volume of vacuoles greatly increased. Zymogen granules (ZGs) were greatly decreased in number and endoplasmic reticulum exhibited whorls. The swollen mitochondria appeared, the crista of which was decreased in number or disappeared. (3) Pancreatic weight and serum amylase levels in the Cn +LPS was significantly higher than those of the NS group and the LPS group respectively (P < 0.01 or P < 0.05). However, the pancreatic wet weight and serum amylase concentration showed no significant difference between the Cn + LPS group and the Cn group. (4) NO concentration in the Cn + LPS group was significantly higher than that of NS group, LPS group and Cn group(P < 0.05 or P < 0.01). 5) The SOD and MDA concentration of the pancreas in the Cn + LPS group were significantly higher than those of NS, LPS and Cn groups (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: The mouse model of severe acute pancreatitis could be induced with caerulein and LPS, which could be non-traumatic and easy to induce, reproducible with the same pathological characteristics as those of SAP in human, and could be used in the research on the mechanism of human SAP. PMID:12632523

  7. Characterization and Predictive Value of Near Infrared 2-Deoxyglucose Optical Imaging in Severe Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Cristiane; Patel, Krutika; Mishra, Vivek; Trivedi, Ram N.; Noel, Pawan; Singh, Abhilasha; Yaron, Jordan R.; Singh, Vijay P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Studying the uptake of 2-deoxy glucose (2-DG) analogs such as 2-Deoxy-2-[18F] fluoroglucose (FDG) is a common approach to identify and monitor malignancies and more recently chronic inflammation. While pancreatitis is a common cause for false positive results in human studies on pancreatic cancer using FDG, the relevance of these findings to acute pancreatitis (AP) is unknown. FDG has a short half-life. Thus, with an aim to accurately characterize the metabolic demand of the pancreas during AP in real-time, we studied the uptake of the non-radioactive, near infrared fluorescence labelled 2-deoxyglucose analog, IRDye® 800CW 2-DG probe (NIR 2-DG; Li-Cor) during mild and severe biliary AP. Methods Wistar rats (300 g; 8–12/group) were administered NIR 2-DG (10 nM; I.V.). Mild and severe biliary AP were respectively induced by biliopancreatic duct ligation (DL) alone or along with infusing glyceryl trilinoleate (GTL; 50 μL/100 g) within 10 minutes of giving NIR 2-DG. Controls (CON) only received NIR 2-DG. Imaging was done every 5–10 minutes over 3 hrs. Average Radiant Efficiency [p/s/cm²/sr]/[μW/cm²] was measured over the pancreas using the IVIS 200 in-vivo imaging system (PerkinElmer) using the Living Image® software and verified in ex vivo pancreata. Blood amylase, lipase and pancreatic edema, necrosis were measured over the course of AP. Results NIR 2-DG uptake over the first hour was not influenced by AP induction. However, while the signal declined in controls and rats with mild AP, there was significantly higher retention of NIR 2-DG in the pancreas after 1 hour in those with GTL pancreatitis. The increase was > 3 fold over controls in the GTL group and was verified to be in the pancreas ex vivo. In vitro, pancreatic acini exposed to GTL had a similar increase in NIR 2-DG uptake which was followed by progressively worse acinar necrosis. Greater retention of NIR 2-DG in vivo was associated with worse pancreatic necrosis, reduced ATP concentrations and mortality, which were not predicted by the blood parameters. Conclusion In-vivo fluorescent imaging of a non-radioactive near infrared 2-DG optical probe can predict the AP severity early during the disease. PMID:26901564

  8. Effect of BN52021 on NF?-Bp65 expression in pancreatic tissues of rats with severe acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Shi-Hai; Fang, Dian-Chun; Hu, Chun-Xiu; Bi, Hui-Ying; Yang, Yin-Zhi; Di, Yao

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate dynamic changes and significance of expression of NF-?Bp65 in pancreatic tissues of rats with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP), as well as BN52021 effects. METHODS: Wistar male rats were randomly divided into negative control group (NC group, n = 60), SAP-model group (SAP group, n = 60), and BN52021-treated group (BN group, n = 60), and each of the above groups was respectively divided into 6 subgroups at different time points after operation (1 h, 2 h, 3 h, 6 h, 12 h, and 24 h) (n = 10). By RT-PCR and Western blot, NF-?Bp65 mRNA and its protein expression in pancreatic tissues of rats were detected respectively. RESULTS: The expression of NF-?Bp65 mRNA dynamically changed in both SAP groups and BN groups. The mRNA level was higher in SAP groups than NC groups at 2 h, 3 h, 12 h, and 24 h after operation (P < 0.05), higher in BN groups than NC groups at all time points (P < 0.05), and higher in BN groups than SAP group at 1 h (P < 0.05). The NF-?Bp65 protein level was higher in SAP groups than NC groups at 1 h, 3 h, and 6 h (P < 0.01), and 2 h, 12 h, and 24 h (P < 0.05), higher in BN groups than NC groups at all time points (P < 0.05), and lower in BN groups than SAP groups at 1 h, 3 h, and 6 h (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: The expression of NF-?Bp65 in pancreatic tissues is dynamically changed and the changes play an important role in pathogenesis of SAP. BN52021 exerts therapeutic effects through reducing the expression level of NF-?Bp65 protein in the early stage of SAP. PMID:17352017

  9. Hydrogen-rich saline ameliorates the severity of L-arginine-induced acute pancreatitis in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Han; Sun, Yan Ping; Li, Yang; Liu, Wen Wu; Xiang, Hong Gang; Fan, Lie Ying; Sun, Qiang; Xu, Xin Yun; Cai, Jian Mei; Ruan, Can Ping; Su, Ning; Yan, Rong Lin; Sun, Xue Jun; Wang, Qiang

    2010-03-05

    Molecular hydrogen, which reacts with the hydroxyl radical, has been considered as a novel antioxidant. Here, we evaluated the protective effects of hydrogen-rich saline on the L-arginine (L-Arg)-induced acute pancreatitis (AP). AP was induced in Sprague-Dawley rats by giving two intraperitoneal injections of L-Arg, each at concentrations of 250 mg/100 g body weight, with an interval of 1 h. Hydrogen-rich saline (>0.6 mM, 6 ml/kg) or saline (6 ml/kg) was administered, respectively, via tail vein 15 min after each L-Arg administration. Severity of AP was assessed by analysis of serum amylase activity, pancreatic water content and histology. Samples of pancreas were taken for measuring malondialdehyde and myeloperoxidase. Apoptosis in pancreatic acinar cell was determined with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick-end labeling technique (TUNEL). Expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) were detected with immunohistochemistry. Hydrogen-rich saline treatment significantly attenuated the severity of L-Arg-induced AP by ameliorating the increased serum amylase activity, inhibiting neutrophil infiltration, lipid oxidation and pancreatic tissue edema. Moreover, hydrogen-rich saline treatment could promote acinar cell proliferation, inhibit apoptosis and NF-{kappa}B activation. These results indicate that hydrogen treatment has a protective effect against AP, and the effect is possibly due to its ability to inhibit oxidative stress, apoptosis, NF-{kappa}B activation and to promote acinar cell proliferation.

  10. Inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3? attenuates acute kidney injury in sodium taurocholate?induced severe acute pancreatitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Kailiang; Chen, Chen; Shi, Qiao; Deng, Wenhong; Zuo, Teng; He, Xiaobo; Liu, Tianyi; Zhao, Liang; Wang, Weixing

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the efficacy of 4?benzyl?2?methyl?1,2,4?thiadiazolidine?3,5?dione (TDZD?8), the selective inhibitor of glycogen synthase kinase?3? (GSK?3?), on the development of acute kidney injury in an experimental model of sodium taurocholate?induced severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) in rats. The serum amylase, lipase, interleukin?1? and interleukin?6 levels, and the pancreatic pathological score were examined to determine the magnitude of pancreatitis injury. The serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen levels, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and renal histological grading were measured to assess the magnitude of SAP?induced acute kidney injury. The activation of nuclear factor??B (NF??B) was examined using an immunohistochemistry assay. The expression of GSK?3?, phospho?GSK?3? (Ser9), tumour necrosis factor?? (TNF??), intercellular adhesion molecule?1 (ICAM?1) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) protein in the kidney was characterised using western blot analysis. TDZD?8 attenuated (i) serum amylase, lipase and renal dysfunction; (ii) the serum concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines; (iii) pancreatic and renal pathological injury; (iv) renal MPO activity and (v) NF??B activation and TNF??, ICAM?1 and iNOS protein expression in the kidney. The results obtained in the present study suggest that the inhibition of GSK?3? attenuates renal disorders associated with SAP through the inhibition of NF??B activation and the downregulation of the expression of proinflammatory cytokines, TNF??, ICAM?1 and iNOS in rats. Blocking GSK?3? protein kinase activity may be a novel approach to the treatment of this in?ammatory condition. PMID:25323773

  11. Lycopene protects pancreatic acinar cells against severe acute pancreatitis by abating the oxidative stress through JNK pathway.

    PubMed

    Lv, J C; Wang, G; Pan, S H; Bai, X W; Sun, B

    2015-02-01

    This study investigated the anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory effects of lycopene on severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) in both in vivo and in vitro models. Utilizing a rat model, we found that lycopene administration protected against SAP, as indicated by the decreased levels of serum amylase and C-reactive protein. Pathological changes were alleviated by pretreatment with lycopene. The serum levels of tumor necrosis factor-?, interleukin-6, macrophage inflammatory protein-1?, and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 were decreased by lycopene. The decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS) content in the pancreatic tissues of the lycopene-treated group were indirectly evaluated by measuring the levels of myeloperoxidase, lipid peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase. Lycopene protected acinar cells against necrosis and apoptosis by relieving the mitochondrial and endoplasmic stress caused by ROS which was shown in electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry staining of active nuclear factor-?B p65. The protective effect was also observed in a simulated SAP model in a rat acinar cell line. ROS and apoptotic staining were compared between groups. Lycopene exerts protective effects against SAP in rats that may be related to its anti-inflammatory property through inhibiting the expression of damage-associated molecular patterns, and anti-oxidative property which can thus maintain cellular homeostasis and prevent the phosphorylation of JNK pathway. PMID:25410533

  12. [Latest advances in acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    de-Madaria, Enrique

    2015-09-01

    The present article analyses the main presentations on acute pancreatitis at Digestive Disease Week 2015. Arterial pseudoaneurysm is an uncommon complication of acute pancreatitis (incidence 0.7%) and mortality from this cause is currently anecdotal. Diabetes mellitus has little impact on the clinical course of acute pancreatitis, unlike cirrhosis, which doubles the risk of mortality. Intake of unsaturated fat could be associated with an increased severity of acute pancreatitis and is a confounding factor in studies evaluating the relationship between obesity and morbidity and mortality. PET-CT (positron emission tomography-computed tomography) could be a non-invasive tool to detect infection of collections in acute pancreatitis. Peripancreatic fat necrosis is less frequent than pancreatic fat necrosis and is associated with a better clinical course. If the clinical course is poor, increasing the calibre of the percutaneous drains used in the treatment of infected necrosis can avoid surgery in 20% of patients. The use of low molecular-weight heparin in moderate or severe pancreatitis could be associated with a better clinical course, specifically with a lower incidence of necrosis. In acute recurrent pancreatitis, simvastatin is a promising drug for prophylaxis of new episodes of acute pancreatitis. Nutritional support through a nasogastric tube does not improve clinical course compared with oral nutrition. PMID:26520203

  13. Upregulation of PIAS1 protects against sodium taurocholate-induced severe acute pancreatitis associated with acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ping; Huang, Liya; Sun, Yunwei; Yuan, Yaozong

    2011-06-01

    The regulator of cytokine signaling known as protein inhibitor of activated STAT-1 (PIAS1) is increasingly understood to have diverse regulatory functions for inflammation, but its effect in inflammatory conditions such as severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) has not previously been reported. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of upregulation of PIAS1 on SAP associated with acute lung injury (ALI), and its subsequent effect on disease severity. Sprague-Dawley rats were given an IV injection of adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5)/F35-PIAS1, Ad5/F35-vector or saline before induction of SAP. The control group received only a sham operation. Lung and pancreas samples were harvested 16h after induction. The protein levels of PIAS1 in tissue were investigated. The severity of pancreatic injury was determined by a histological score of pancreatic injury, serum amylase, and pancreatic water content. The lung injury was evaluated by measurement of pulmonary microvascular permeability, lung myeloperoxidase activity and malondialdehyde levels. The survival rates of rats were also analyzed. The results found that in Ad5/F35-PIAS1 treated rats, serum tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-?, interleukin (IL)-1? and IL-6 levels were decreased but showed no influence on the levels of IL-10, and the severity of pancreatic tissue injury was less compared with either untreated SAP or Ad5/F35-vector treated rats (P<0.01). The administration of Ad5/F35-PIAS1 in SAP-induced rats downregulated the activity of the signal transducer and activator of transcription-1 (STAT1) pathway and the expressions of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 protein in lung. Thus, compared with the untreated SAP rats, the inflammatory response and the severity of ALI decreased, and the survival rates increased (P<0.01). These findings suggest that PIAS1 could augment anti-inflammatory activity by inhibiting STAT1, thus attenuating the severity of SAP associated with ALI. PMID:21419645

  14. Concurrent acute pancreatitis and pericardial effusion

    PubMed Central

    Kayar, Yusuf; Turkdogan, Kenan Ahmet; Baysal, Birol; Gultekin, Nigar; Danalioglu, Ahmet; Ince, Ali Tuzun; Senturk, Hakan

    2015-01-01

    While pleural effusion and ascites secondary to acute pancreatitis are common, clinically relevant pericardial effusion and cardiac tamponade are observed rarely. In a study by Pezzilli et al., pleural effusion was noted in 7 of the 21 patients with acute pancreatitis whereas the authors detected pericardial effusion development in only three. The authors asserted that pleural effusion was associated with severe acute pancreatitis, while pericardial effusion and the severity of acute pancreatitis were not significantly related. PMID:26327959

  15. Sequential blood purification therapy for critical patients with hyperlipidemic severe acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong-Liang; Yu, Kai-Jiang

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the efficacy of sequential blood purification therapy in the treatment of critical patients with hyperlipidemic severe acute pancreatitis. METHODS: Thirty-one intensive care unit (ICU) patients with hyperlipidemic severe acute pancreatitis treated at the Second Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University were divided into either a study group (n = 15; July 1, 2012 to June 30, 2014) or a control group (n = 16; July 1, 2010 to June 30, 2012) based on the implementation of sequential blood purification therapy. The control group received continuous venous-venous hemofiltration (CVVH) on the basis of conventional treatments, and the therapeutic dose of CVVH was 30 mL/kg per hour. The study group received sequential plasma exchange and CVVH on the basis of conventional treatments. The anticoagulation regimen of CVVH is the regional citrate anticoagulation. Mortality rate on day 28, rates of systemic and local complications, duration of ICU, and time to target serum lipid level, as well as physiologic and laboratory indices were compared between the two groups. RESULTS: The mortality rate on day 28 was significantly lower in the study group than in the control group (13.33% vs 37.50%; P < 0.05). The duration of ICU stay was significantly shorter in the study group than in the control group (7.4 1.35 d vs 9.19 2.99 d, P < 0.05). The time to target serum lipid level was significantly shorter in the study group than in the control group (3.47 0.52 d vs 7.90 1.14 d, P < 0.01). There were no significant differences in the rates of systemic complications and local complications between the two groups (60% vs 50% and 80% vs 81%, respectively). In the comparisons of physiologic and laboratory indices, serum albumin and C-reactive protein were significantly better in the study group than in the control group after treatment (37.8 4.6 g/L vs 38.9 5.7 g/L, and 20.5 6.4 mg/L vs 28.5 7.1 mg/L, respectively, both P < 0.05). With the exception of plateletcrit, no other indices showed significant differences between the two groups. CONCLUSION: Sequential blood purification therapy is effective in the treatment of ICU patients with hyperlipidemic severe acute pancreatitis and can improve patient prognosis. PMID:26034366

  16. Resistin is not an appropriate biochemical marker to predict severity of acute pancreatitis: A case-controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Al-Maramhy, Hamdi; Abdelrahman, Abdelrahman I; Sawalhi, Samer

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To assess levels of serum resistin upon hospital admission as a predictor of acute pancreatitis (AP) severity. METHODS: AP is both a common and serious disease, with severe cases resulting in a high mortality rate. Several predictive inflammatory markers have been used clinically to assess severity. This prospective study collected data from 102 patients who were diagnosed with an initial acute biliary pancreatitis between March 2010 and February 2013. Measurements of body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) were obtained and serum resistin levels were analyzed at the time of hospital admission using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Additionally, resistin levels were measured from a control group after matching gender, BMI and age. RESULTS: A total of 102 patients (60 females and 42 males) were diagnosed with acute gallstone-induced pancreatitis. The mean age was 45 years, and mean BMI value was 30.5 kg/m2 (Obese, class?I). Twenty-two patients (21.6%) had severe AP, while eighty-eight patients had mild pancreatitis (78.4%). Our results showed that BMI significantly correlated with pancreatitis severity (P = 0.007). Serum resistin did not correlate with BMI, weight or WC. Furthermore, serum resistin was significantly higher in patients with AP compared to control subjects (P < 0.0001). The mean resistin values upon admission were 17.5 ng/mL in the severe acute biliary pancreatitis group and 16.82 ng/mL in the mild AP group (P = 0.188), indicating that resistin is not an appropriate predictive marker of clinical severity. CONCLUSION: We demonstrate that obesity is a risk factor for developing severe AP. Further, although there is a correlation between serum resistin levels and AP at the time of hospital admission, resistin does not adequately serve as a predictive marker of clinical severity. PMID:25386084

  17. Endoscopic Treatment of Recurrent Acute Pancreatitis and Smoldering Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Das, Rohit; Yadav, Dhiraj; Papachristou, Georgios I

    2015-10-01

    Recurrent acute pancreatitis (RAP) is a challenging condition that can lead to chronic pancreatitis and long-term morbidity. Etiology-based treatment can potentially have an impact on the natural history of RAP and its progression to chronic pancreatitis. In cases of divisum-associated RAP and idiopathic RAP, several studies have been performed to evaluate the efficacy of endoscopic therapy in alleviation of symptoms and frequency of AP events. This review discusses the literature available on these topic as well as touching on the role of endoscopic therapy in smoldering acute pancreatitis. PMID:26431601

  18. Protective Effect of Tetrandrine on Sodium Taurocholate-Induced Severe Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xian-lin; Li, Jie-xing; Li, Zhen-dong; Liu, Da-sheng; Lu, Su-hong; Liu, Kang-li; Duan, Hong-yan; Luo, Yu-hong

    2015-01-01

    Tet is a type of alkaloid extracted from Stephania tetrandra, and it has recently been demonstrated that Tet can protect against inflammation and free radical injury and inhibit the release of inflammatory mediators. The present study was designed to observe the protective effect of Tet on sodium taurocholate-induced severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). The rat model of SAP was induced by retrograde bile duct injection of sodium taurocholate and then treated with Verapamil and Tet. The results showed that Tet can reduce NF-?B activation in pancreas issue, inhibit the SAP cascade, and improve SAP through inducing pancreas acinar cell apoptosis and stabilizing intracellular calcium in the pancreas, thus mitigating the damage to the pancreas. Our study revealed that Tet may reduce systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and multiple organ dysfunction syndromes (MODS) to protect against damage, and these roles may be mediated through the NF-?B pathway to improve the proinflammatory/anti-inflammatory imbalance. PMID:26557854

  19. Acute pancreatitis secondary to ifosfamide.

    PubMed

    Gerson, R; Serrano, A; Villalobos, A; Sternbach, G L; Varon, J

    1997-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis in cancer patients can be secondary to the malignant process itself. It is also a rare complication of antineoplastic agent administration. Ifosfamide is an effective drug in the treatment of several tumors and has known neurologic, renal, and hematologic toxicities. There is only one recent report in the literature of pancreatitis associated with ifosfamide. We report a case of a 65-year-old woman with small cell bronchogenic carcinoma without pancreatic metastases who developed acute pancreatitis after ifosfamide administration. PMID:9348053

  20. Interventional Treatment of Abdominal Compartment Syndrome during Severe Acute Pancreatitis: Current Status and Historical Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Radenkovic, Dejan V.; Johnson, Colin D.; Milic, Natasa; Gregoric, Pavle; Ivancevic, Nenad; Bezmarevic, Mihailo; Bilanovic, Dragoljub; Cijan, Vladimir; Antic, Andrija; Bajec, Djordje

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) in patients with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) is a marker of severe disease. It occurs as combination of inflammation of retroperitoneum, visceral edema, ascites, acute peripancreatic fluid collections, paralytic ileus, and aggressive fluid resuscitation. The frequency of ACS in SAP may be rising due to more aggressive fluid resuscitation, a trend towards conservative treatment, and attempts to use a minimally invasive approach. There remains uncertainty about the most appropriate surgical technique for the treatment of ACS in SAP. Some unresolved questions remain including medical treatment, indications, timing, and interventional techniques. This review will focus on interventional treatment of this serious condition. First line therapy is conservative treatment aiming to decrease IAP and to restore organ dysfunction. If nonoperative measures are not effective, early abdominal decompression is mandatory. Midline laparostomy seems to be method of choice. Since it carries significant morbidity we need randomized studies to establish firm advantages over other described techniques. After ACS resolves efforts should be made to achieve early primary fascia closure. Additional data are necessary to resolve uncertainties regarding ideal timing and indication for operative treatment. PMID:26839539

  1. Interventional Treatment of Abdominal Compartment Syndrome during Severe Acute Pancreatitis: Current Status and Historical Perspective.

    PubMed

    Radenkovic, Dejan V; Johnson, Colin D; Milic, Natasa; Gregoric, Pavle; Ivancevic, Nenad; Bezmarevic, Mihailo; Bilanovic, Dragoljub; Cijan, Vladimir; Antic, Andrija; Bajec, Djordje

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) in patients with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) is a marker of severe disease. It occurs as combination of inflammation of retroperitoneum, visceral edema, ascites, acute peripancreatic fluid collections, paralytic ileus, and aggressive fluid resuscitation. The frequency of ACS in SAP may be rising due to more aggressive fluid resuscitation, a trend towards conservative treatment, and attempts to use a minimally invasive approach. There remains uncertainty about the most appropriate surgical technique for the treatment of ACS in SAP. Some unresolved questions remain including medical treatment, indications, timing, and interventional techniques. This review will focus on interventional treatment of this serious condition. First line therapy is conservative treatment aiming to decrease IAP and to restore organ dysfunction. If nonoperative measures are not effective, early abdominal decompression is mandatory. Midline laparostomy seems to be method of choice. Since it carries significant morbidity we need randomized studies to establish firm advantages over other described techniques. After ACS resolves efforts should be made to achieve early primary fascia closure. Additional data are necessary to resolve uncertainties regarding ideal timing and indication for operative treatment. PMID:26839539

  2. Influence of Fatty Liver on the Severity and Clinical Outcome in Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yongda; Zhang, Deqing; Jia, Zhenyu; Zhuang, Xiaohui; Shi, Yuqi; Xu, Ting; Xing, Lihua; Shen, Jiaqing

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a common disease in the department of gastroenterology with variable severity, from being mild and self-limited to severe and fatal. The early diagnosis and accurate prediction of AP severity are of great importance. Our primary observation showed that fatty liver (FL) was frequently detected in patients with AP. In this retrospective study, we aimed to evaluate the relation between FL and the severity and outcomes of AP. The medical records of 2671 patients with AP were reviewed retrospectively, and characteristics of AP patients were recorded. FL was assessed by abdominal CT scan, and AP patients were categorized by the occurrence of FL for the analysis. The variation of mortality, clinical severity and the appearance of CT were analyzed between the non-FL group and FL groups. Compared with patients without FL, an obviously higher rate of death and higher frequency of severe AP (SAP) and necrotizing AP (ANP) were observed in patients with FL, as well as the incidence of local complications and systemic complications. Taking obesity into consideration, a higher rate of death and more severe AP were found in patients with FL, no matter whether they were obese or not. Alcoholic fatty liver (AFL) and non-alcoholic fatty liver (NAFL) were also separated for comparison in this study; the incidence of ANP and the clinical severity had no significant difference between the AFL and NAFL groups. In conclusion, FL could influence the severity and clinical outcome and may play a prognostic role in AP. This study is of clinical significance, because few reports have been previously issued on FL and AP. PMID:26571385

  3. Azathioprine-induced Acute Pancreatitis in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel DiseasesA Prospective Study on Incidence and Severity

    PubMed Central

    Mohl, Wolfgang; Bokemeyer, Bernd; Bndgens, Burkhard; Bning, Jrgen; Miehlke, Stephan; Hppe, Dietrich; Maaser, Christian; Klugmann, Tobias; Kruis, Wolfgang; Siegmund, Britta; Helwig, Ulf; Weismller, Joseph; Drabik, Attyla; Stallmach, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Azathioprine [AZA] is recommended for maintenance of steroid-free remission in inflammatory bowel disease IBD. The aim of this study has been to establish the incidence and severity of AZA-induced pancreatitis, an idiosyncratic and major side effect, and to identify specific risk factors. Methods: We studied 510 IBD patients [338 Crohns disease, 157 ulcerative colitis, 15 indeterminate colitis] with initiation of AZA treatment in a prospective multicentre registry study. Acute pancreatitis was diagnosed in accordance with international guidelines. Results: AZA was continued by 324 [63.5%] and stopped by 186 [36.5%] patients. The most common cause of discontinuation was nausea [12.2%]. AZA-induced pancreatitis occurred in 37 patients [7.3%]. Of these: 43% were hospitalised with a median inpatient time period of 5 days; 10% had peripancreatic fluid collections; 24% had vomiting; and 14% had fever. No patient had to undergo nonsurgical or surgical interventions. Smoking was the strongest risk factor for AZA-induced acute pancreatitis [p < 0.0002] in univariate and multivariate analyses. Conclusions: AZA-induced acute pancreatitis is a common adverse event in IBD patients, but in this study had a mild course in all patients. Smoking is the most important risk factor. PMID:26468141

  4. Efficacy of glucocorticoids in rodents of severe acute pancreatitis: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Min; Yang, Zhen; Zhu, Yin; Lu, Nonghua

    2014-01-01

    Background: The use of corticosteroid in the management of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) remains contentious and is still being debated despite many pre-clinical studies demonstrating benefits. The limitations of clinical research on corticosteroid in SAP are disparities with regard to benefit, a lack of adequate safety data and insufficient understanding of its mechanisms of action. Thus, we performed a meta-analysis to assess the effectiveness of corticosteroid in experimental SAP and take a closer look at the relation between the animal studies and prospective trials. Methods: Studies investigating corticosteroid use in rodent animal models of SAP were identified by searching multiple three electronic databases through October 2013, and by reviewing references lists of obtained articles. Data on mortality, changes of ascitic fluid and histopathology of pancreas were extracted. A random-effects model was used to compute the pooled efficacy. Publication bias and sensitivity analysis were also performed. Results: We identified 15 published papers which met our inclusion criteria. Corticosteroid prolonged survival by a factor of 0.35 (95% CI 0.21-0.59). Prophylactic use of corticosteroid showed efficacy with regards to ascitic fluid and histopathology of pancreas, whereas therapeutic use did not. Efficacy was higher in large dose and dexamethasone groups. Study characteristics, namely type of steroids, rout of delivery, genders and strains of animal, accounted for a significant proportion of between-study heterogeneity. No significant publication bias was observed. Conclusions: On the whole, corticosteroids have showed beneficial effects in rodent animal models of SAP. Prophylactic use of corticosteroid has failed to validate usefulness in prophylaxis of postendoscopic retrogradcholangiopancreatography pancreatitis. Further appropriate and informative animal experiments should be performed before conducting clinical trials investigating therapeutic use in SAP. PMID:25120741

  5. Effects of early enteral nutrition on immune function of severe acute pancreatitis patients

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jia-Kui; Mu, Xin-Wei; Li, Wei-Qin; Tong, Zhi-Hui; Li, Jing; Zheng, Shu-Yun

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of early enteral nutrition (EEN) on the immune function and clinical outcome of patients with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). METHODS: Patients were randomly allocated to receive EEN or delayed enteral nutrition (DEN). Enteral nutrition was started within 48 h after admission in EEN group, whereas from the 8th day in DEN group. All the immunologic parameters and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were collected on days 1, 3, 7 and 14 after admission. The clinical outcome variables were also recorded. RESULTS: Sixty SAP patients were enrolled to this study. The CD4+ T-lymphocyte percentage, CD4+/CD8+ ratio, and the CRP levels in EEN group became significantly lower than in DEN group from the 7th day after admission. In contrast, the immunoglobulin G (IgG) levels and human leukocyte antigen-DR expression in EEN group became significantly higher than in DEN group from the 7th day after admission. No difference of CD8+ T-lymphocyte percentage, IgM and IgA levels was found between the two groups. The incidences of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, systemic inflammatory response syndrome, and pancreatic infection as well as the duration of intensive care unit stay were significantly lower in EEN group than in DEN group. However, there was no difference of hospital mortality between the two groups. CONCLUSION: EEN moderates the excessive immune response during the early stage of SAP without leading to subsequent immunosuppression. EEN can improve the clinical outcome, but not decrease the hospital mortality of SAP patients. PMID:23431120

  6. Canagliflozin-Associated Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Verma, Rajanshu

    2014-09-01

    Canagliflozin is a new drug in class of sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors used for treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. We describe a patient who developed moderately severe acute pancreatitis as an untoward consequence after being initiated on this drug. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of canagliflozin-associated acute pancreatitis in clinical literature. PMID:25187092

  7. Effects of time interval for hemofiltration on the prognosis of severe acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Mao, En-Qiang; Tang, Yao-Qing; Zhang, Sheng-Dao

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the impact of time interval for hemofiltration (HF) on the prognosis of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). METHODS: Thirty-six consecutive patients with severe acute pancreatitis were included in the study. Atlanta classification system was applied for stratification. They were randomly divided into short veno-venous HF group, (SVVH, Group 1, 20 patients); and long veno-venous HF group (LVVH, Group 2, 16 patients). In group 1, SVVH was stopped when the abdominal signs disappeared, and heart rate and breath rate were less than 90 beats/min and 20 times/min, respectively. HF was stopped if SVVH was continued, and when heart rate and breath rate were more than 90 beats/min and 20 times/min again (Group 2). Except that the time interval for HF was different, other parameters for HF were the same. And conservative curing rate, survival rate, cost for hospital stay and length of hospital stay were observed. RESULTS: Time interval for HF in Group 1 (3.81 1.3 h) was shorter than that of in Group 2 (9.38 2.9 hr), P < 0.01. Conservative curing rate (90%) in Group 1 was much higher than that in Group 2 (56.3%) (P < 0.05); but cost in Group 1 (RMB 56600 56400 Yuan) was lower than that in Group 2 (RMB 137000 105000 Yuan) (P < 0.05). And the survival rate (95%) in Group 1 was higher than that in Group 2 (81.3%) (P < 0.25); however, hospital stay in Group 1 (44.3 41 d) was shorter than that in Group 2 (55.2 39.5 d) (P < 0.2). So, the prognosis was not improved through the prolongation of time interval for HF, but side-effects were seen. CONCLUSION: The prognosis was not further improved by LVVH in the treatment of SAP, with side-effects. Time interval for HF plays an important role in treatment of SAP in early stage. SVVH is thought to be superior to LVVH; and LVVH is superior to CVVH in early (72 h) treatment of SAP. PMID:12532470

  8. Continuous regional arterial infusion and laparotomic decompression for severe acute pancreatitis with abdominal compartment syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Zhi-Gang; Zhou, Jian-Yin; Yin, Zhen-Yu; Peng, You-Yuan; Wang, Fu-Qiang; Wang, Xiao-Min

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the therapeutic effects of abdominal decompression plus continuous regional arterial infusion (CRAI) via a drug delivery system (DDS) in severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) patients with abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS). METHODS: We presented our recent experience in 8 patients with SAP. The patients developed clinical ACS, which required abdominal decompression. During the operation, a DDS was inserted into the peripancreatic artery (the catheter was inserted from the right gastroepiploic artery until it reached the junction between the pancreaticoduodenal and gastroduodenal artery). Through this DDS, a protease inhibitor, antibiotics and octreotide were infused continuously. The duration of the regional artery infusion ranged from 8 to 41 d. The outcomes and the changes in the APACHE II score, computed tomography (CT) severity index and intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) of the patients were retrospectively evaluated. RESULTS: Eight patients with an initial APACHE IIscore of 18.9 (range, 13-27) and a Balthazar CT severity index of 9.1 (range, 7-10) developed severe local and systemic complications. These patients underwent subsequent surgical decompression and CRAI therapy because of intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH). After a mean interval of 131.9 72.3 d hospitalization, 7 patients recovered with decreased APACHE II scores, CT severity indexes and IAP. The mean APACHE II score was 5.4 (range, 4-8), the CT severity index was 2.3 (range, 1-3), and IAP decreased to 7.7 mmHg (range, 6-11 mmHg) 60 d after operation. One patient died of multiple organ failure 1 wk after surgery. CONCLUSION: CRAI and laparotomic decompression might be a therapeutic option for SAP patients with ACS. PMID:22171133

  9. Effects of thoracic epidural anesthesia on survival and microcirculation in severe acute pancreatitis: a randomized experimental trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Severe acute pancreatitis is still a potentially life threatening disease with high mortality. The aim of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic effect of thoracic epidural anaesthesia (TEA) on survival, microcirculation, tissue oxygenation and histopathologic damage in an experimental animal model of severe acute pancreatitis in a prospective animal study. Methods In this study, 34 pigs were randomly assigned into 2 treatment groups. After severe acute pancreatitis was induced by intraductal injection of glycodesoxycholic acid in Group 1 (n?=?17) bupivacaine (0.5%; bolus injection 2ml, continuous infusion 4ml/h) was applied via TEA. In Group 2 (n?=?17) no TEA was applied. During a period of 6hours after induction, tissue oxygen tension (tpO2) in the pancreas and pancreatic microcirculation was assessed. Thereafter animals were observed for 7days followed by sacrification and histopathologic examination. Results Survival rate after 7days was 82% in Group 1 (TEA) versus 29% in Group 2: (Control) (P <0.05). Group 1 (TEA) also showed a significantly superior microcirculation (1,608??374AU versus 1,121??510AU; P <0.05) and tissue oxygenation (215??64mmHg versus 138??90 mmHG; P <0.05) as compared to Group 2 (Control). Consecutively, tissue damage in Group 1 was reduced in the histopathologic scoring (5.5 (3 to 8) versus 8 (5.5 to 10); P <0.05). Conclusions TEA led to improved survival, enhanced microcirculatory perfusion and tissue oxygenation and resulted in less histopathologic tissue-damage in an experimental animal model of severe acute pancreatitis. PMID:24314012

  10. An impaired phagocytic function is associated with leucocyte activation in the early stages of severe acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Liras, G; Carballo, F

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An excessive leucocyte activation takes place early in severe acute pancreatitis. Furthermore, some indirect evidences suggest a disturbance of the mononuclear phagocytic system in the severe cases. AIMS: To compare the early functionalism of leucocytes obtained from patients with mild disease and severe disease, under the hypothesis that an impaired phagocytic function could be associated with the leucocyte activation. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Flow cytometric parameters of leucocyte function, such as phagocytosis, and fluorescence of leucocytes with acridine orange (FLAO) were prospectively measured together with granulocyte elastase plasma concentrations in 21 patients with severe (n = 7) and mild (n = 14) acute pancreatitis. Samples were drawn at 24 hours from admission, 48 hours, 72 hours, and on day 5. RESULTS: There was a greater leucocyte activation together with a deficient phagocytosis before 72 hours in severe patients. The results (mean (SEM)) severe v mild were: 440 (115) microgram/l v 77 (14) micrograms/l for granulocyte elastase, 2.218 (377) v 1.308 (155) for FLAO, 64 (7) v 90 (2), and 55 (9) v 81 (3) for percentages of phagocytising neutrophils and monocytes, respectively. Phagocytic capacity returned to normal later on day 5. CONCLUSIONS: The excessive leucocyte activation together with the impaired phagocytosis could be related to the onset of complications in severe acute pancreatitis. PMID:8881806

  11. Nasogastric nutrition is efficacious in severe acute pancreatitis: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Nally, Deirdre M; Kelly, Enda G; Clarke, Mary; Ridgway, Paul

    2014-12-14

    In patients with severe acute pancreatitis (AP), enteral nutrition is delivered by nasojejunal (NJ) tube to minimise pancreatic stimulation. Nasogastric (NG) feeding represents an alternative route. The primary objective of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to evaluate the efficacy of NG feeding. Secondary objectives were to compare the NG and NJ routes and assess the side effects of the former. The primary endpoint was exclusive NG feeding with delivery of 75% of nutritional targets. Additional outcomes included change to total parenteral nutrition (TPN), increased pain or disease severity, vomiting, diarrhoea, delivery rate reduction and tube displacement. Among the retrieved studies, six were found to be eligible for the qualitative review and four for the meta-analysis. NG nutrition was received by 147 patients; exclusive NG feeding was achieved in 90% (133/147). Of the 147 patients, 129 (87%) received 75% of the target energy. In studies where all subjects received exclusive NG nutrition, 82% (seventy-four of the ninety patients) received >75% of the intended energy. Compared with NJ nutrition, there was no significant difference in the delivery of 75% of nutritional targets (pooled risk ratio (RR) 1.02; 95% CI 0.75, 1.38.) or no increased risk of change to TPN (pooled RR 1.05; 95% CI 0.45, 2.48), diarrhoea (pooled RR 1.28; 95% CI 0.62, 2.66), exacerbation of pain (pooled RR 1.10; 95% CI 0.47, 2.61) or tube displacement (pooled RR 0.44; 95% CI 0.11, 1.73). Vomiting and diarrhoea were the most common side effects of NG feeding (13.3 and 12.9%, respectively). With respect to the delivery of nutrition, 11.2% of the patients required delivery rate reduction and 3.4% dislodged the tube. Other side effects included elevated levels of aspirates (9.1%), abdominal distension (1.5%), pain exacerbation (7.5%) and increased disease severity (1.6%). In conclusion, NG feeding is efficacious in 90% of patients. Further research is required to optimise the delivery of NG nutrition and examine 'gut-rousing' approaches to nutrition in patients with severe AP. PMID:25333639

  12. [Prolonged acute pancreatitis after bone marrow transplantation].

    PubMed

    De Singly, B; Simon, M; Bennani, J; Wittnebel, S; Zagadanski, A-M; Pacault, V; Gornet, J-M; Allez, M; Lmann, M

    2008-04-01

    Acute pancreatitis is not infrequent after allogenic marrow transplantation. Several causes can predispose to pancreatitis, including Graft-Versus-Host Disease (GVHD), a condition which is probably underestimated. In the literature, few description of pancreatic GVHD can be found. Pancreatic GVHD diagnosis can be difficult if pancreatic involvement occurs without other typical manifestations of GVHD. We report the case of a woman, 54 years old, suffering from prolonged, painful pancreatitis two months after allogenic bone marrow transplantation for acute myeloid leucemia. Pancreatic GVHD diagnosis was performed after five weeks on duodenal biopsies despite the absence of diarrheoa. The patient dramatically improved within few days on corticosteroids. PMID:18378104

  13. Corticosteroid therapy for severe acute pancreatitis: a meta-analysis of randomized, controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Li-Hua; Liu, Zhong-Min; Wang, Shi-Ji; Zhao, Shu-Jie; Zhang, Dong; Chen, Ying; Wang, Yu-Shan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recent reports about the benefits of corticosteroid therapy in patients with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) have shown conflicting results. We aimed to explore the effects of corticosteroid therapy in SAP patients on patient outcomes by performing a meta-analysis. Methods: Databases (Medline, EMBASE, Web of Science, PubMed, Cochrane Library, Chinese Biomedicine Database, and China Academic Journal Full-Text Database) were queried for all relevant, randomized, controlled trials investigating corticosteroid therapy in patients with SAP. Results: Six randomized, controlled trials including 430 SAP patients were identified. Corticosteroid therapy for SAP was associated with reductions in the length of hospital stay, the need for surgical intervention, and the mortality rate (weighted mean difference [WMD]: -9.47, 95% confidence interval [CI]: -16.91 to -2.04, P = 0.01; odds ratio [OR]: 0.35, 95% CI: 0.18-0.67, P = 0.002; OR: 0.45, 95% CI: 0.22-0.94, P = 0.03). There were no significant differences in the complication rates or Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) scores in patients with or without corticosteroid therapy. Conclusion: Corticosteroid therapy may improve outcomes in patients with SAP. PMID:26339332

  14. Vascular Endothelial Injury and Apoptosis in Rats with Severe Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Ning; Xia, Qing; Yang, Zhong-Hua; Ding, Qun-Fang; Zeng, Zhi

    2015-01-01

    We explored mechanisms of vascular endothelial injury that lead to systemic multiple organ failure by detecting the soluble endothelial protein C receptor (sEPCR), von Willebrand factor (vWF), serum nitric oxide (NO), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-?) and Bcl-2 mRNA and Bax mRNA expression in a severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) rat model. Compared to controls, the levels of TNF-?, vWF, and sEPCR were significantly increased in the experimental group at 12 hours and 24 hours and the NO level was significantly decreased. After 12 hours, the aortic endothelial apoptosis index and Bax mRNA expression in aortic endothelial cells had increased in the experimental group, but Bcl-2 mRNA levels had decreased. All these changes appeared at both 12?h and 24 hours. The results indicated that vascular endothelial injury and apoptosis markers were elevated in SAP. Endothelial injury and increased apoptosis in the experimental group were related to the increased expression of TNF-?. PMID:25688263

  15. Redox signaling in acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Salvador; Pereda, Javier; Sabater, Luis; Sastre, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory process of the pancreatic gland that eventually may lead to a severe systemic inflammatory response. A key event in pancreatic damage is the intracellular activation of NF-κB and zymogens, involving also calcium, cathepsins, pH disorders, autophagy, and cell death, particularly necrosis. This review focuses on the new role of redox signaling in acute pancreatitis. Oxidative stress and redox status are involved in the onset of acute pancreatitis and also in the development of the systemic inflammatory response, being glutathione depletion, xanthine oxidase activation, and thiol oxidation in proteins critical features of the disease in the pancreas. On the other hand, the release of extracellular hemoglobin into the circulation from the ascitic fluid in severe necrotizing pancreatitis enhances lipid peroxidation in plasma and the inflammatory infiltrate into the lung and up-regulates the HIF–VEGF pathway, contributing to the systemic inflammatory response. Therefore, redox signaling and oxidative stress contribute to the local and systemic inflammatory response during acute pancreatitis. PMID:25778551

  16. Redox signaling in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Salvador; Pereda, Javier; Sabater, Luis; Sastre, Juan

    2015-08-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory process of the pancreatic gland that eventually may lead to a severe systemic inflammatory response. A key event in pancreatic damage is the intracellular activation of NF-κB and zymogens, involving also calcium, cathepsins, pH disorders, autophagy, and cell death, particularly necrosis. This review focuses on the new role of redox signaling in acute pancreatitis. Oxidative stress and redox status are involved in the onset of acute pancreatitis and also in the development of the systemic inflammatory response, being glutathione depletion, xanthine oxidase activation, and thiol oxidation in proteins critical features of the disease in the pancreas. On the other hand, the release of extracellular hemoglobin into the circulation from the ascitic fluid in severe necrotizing pancreatitis enhances lipid peroxidation in plasma and the inflammatory infiltrate into the lung and up-regulates the HIF-VEGF pathway, contributing to the systemic inflammatory response. Therefore, redox signaling and oxidative stress contribute to the local and systemic inflammatory response during acute pancreatitis. PMID:25778551

  17. Clinical characteristics and management of patients with early acute severe pancreatitis: Experience from a medical center in China

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Hou-Quan; Zhang, Jing-Xia; Zou, Shou-Chun

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To study clinical characteristics and management of patients with early severe acute pancreatitis (ESAP). METHODS: Data of 297 patients with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) admitted to our hospital within 72 h after onset of symptoms from January 1991 to June 2003 were reviewed for the occurrence and development of early severe acute pancreatitis (ESAP). ESAP was defined as presence of organ dysfunction within 72 h after onset of symptoms. Sixty-nine patients had ESAP, 228 patients without organ dysfunction within 72 h after onset of symptoms had SAP. The clinical characteristics, incidence of organ dysfunction during hospitalization and prognosis between ESAP and SAP were compared. RESULTS: Impairment degree of pancreas (Balthazar CT class) in ESAP was more serious than that in SAP (5.31 0.68 vs 3.68 0.29, P < 0.01). ESAP had a higher mortality than SAP (43.4% vs 2.6%, P < 0.01), and a higher incidence of hypoxemia (85.5% vs 25%, P < 0.01), pancreas infection (15.9% vs 7.5%, P < 0.05), abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) (78.3% vs 23.2%, P < 0.01) and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS)(78.3% vs 10.1%, P < 0.01). In multiple logistic regression analysis, the main predisposing factors to ESAP were higher APACHE II score, Balthazar CT class, MODS and hypoxemia. CONCLUSION: ESAP is characterised by MODS, severe pathological changes of pancreas, early hypoxemia and abdominal compartment syndrome. Given the poor prognosis of ESAP, these patients should be treated in specialized intensive care units with special measures such as close supervision, fluid resuscitation, improvement of hypoxemia, reduction of pancreatic secretion, elimination of inflammatory mediators, prevention and treatment of pancreatic infections. PMID:15040047

  18. Wortmannin, PI3K/Akt signaling pathway inhibitor, attenuates thyroid injury associated with severe acute pancreatitis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Abliz, Ablikim; Deng, Wenhong; Sun, Rongze; Guo, Wenyi; Zhao, Liang; Wang, Weixing

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidences suggest that PI3K/AKT pathway plays an important role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases such as acute pancreatitis. However, the exact effect of PI3K/AKT on thyroid injury associated with acute pancreatitis has not been investigated. This study aimed to investigate the protective effects of wortmannin, PI3K/AKT inhibitor, on thyroid injury in a rat model of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). Sixty male SD rats were randomly divided into four groups: sham operating group (SO), SAP group, wortmannin treatment (WOR) group and drug control (WOR-CON) group. Serum amylase (AMY), lipase (LIP) and thyroid hormone levels were evaluated. The morphological change of thyroid tissue was analyzed under the light and transmission electron microscopy. AKT, P38MAPK and NF-?B expression in the thyroid tissue was evaluated by immunohistochemical staining. Oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokines were detected. Results showed that wortmannin attenuated the following: (1) serum AMY, LIP and thyroid hormone (2) pancreatic and thyroid pathological injuries (3) thyroid MDA, (4) thyroid ultrastructural change, (5) serum TNF-?, IL-6 and IL-1? (6) AKT, MAPKP38 and NF-?B expression in thyroid tissues. These results suggested that wortmannin attenuates thyroid injury in SAP rats, presumably because of its role on prevent ROS generation and inhibits the activation of P38MAPK, NF-?B pathway. Our findings provide new therapeutic targets for thyroid injury associated with SAP. PMID:26823696

  19. A New Combination Therapy in Severe Acute PancreatitisHyperbaric Oxygen Plus 3-Aminobenzamide

    PubMed Central

    Inal, Volkan; Mas, Mehmet Refik; Isik, Ahmet Turan; Comert, Bilgin; Ayd?n, Sezai; Mas, Nukhet; Deveci, Mehmet Salih; Tasci, Ilker; Yamanel, Levent; Cinar, Esref; Unal, Mehmet Tahir

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study was designed to evaluate effects of hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) plus 3-aminobenzamide (3-AB) cotreatment on tissue oxidative stress parameters (TOSp), tissue histopathology scores (THSc), and bacterial translocations (Bact-Trans) in an experimental model of severe acute pancreatitis (AP). Methods Seventy-five Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into 5 groups. Group 1 received sham. Severe AP was induced by intraductal taurocholate infusion and then group 2 received saline, group 3 received 3-AB, group 4 received 3-AB plus HBO, and group 5 received HBO. 3-Aminobenzamide (10 mg/kg per day, once daily, intraperitoneal) and saline (1 mL/kg) were started right after the induction, whereas HBO (2,8 atm pressure, BID, 90 minutes each) was started at the sixth hour. The rats were euthanized at the 54th hour, and TOSp, THSc, and Bact-Trans were studied. Results In treatment groups 3 and 5, Bact-Trans (P < 0.05, P < 0.05), TOSp (P < 0.05, P < 0.05), and THSc (P < 0.001, P < 0.001) were significantly lower than controls. In addition to these findings, group 4 (cotreatment) showed the most significant effect on Bact-Trans and THSc (P < 0.001, P < 0.001) and also better in TOSp (P < 0.02). Conclusions Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibition by 3-AB and HBO treatment alone was effective in the course of severe AP, and favorable with cotreatment because of the improved cascades of inflammatory process by different aspects. PMID:25347462

  20. Hydrogen-Rich Saline Attenuates Acute Renal Injury in Sodium Taurocholate-Induced Severe Acute Pancreatitis by Inhibiting ROS and NF-?B Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Qiao; Liao, Kang-Shu; Zhao, Kai-Liang; Zuo, Teng; Deng, Wen-Hong; Chen, Chen; Yu, Jia; Guo, Wen-Yi; He, Xiao-Bo; Abliz, Ablikim; Wang, Peng; Zhao, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen (H2), a new antioxidant, was reported to reduce OH and ONOO? selectively and inhibit certain proinflammatory mediators to product, without disturbing metabolic redox reactions or ROS involved in cell signaling. We herein aim to explore its protective effects on acute renal injury in sodium taurocholate-induced acute pancreatitis and its possible mechanisms. Rats were injected with hydrogen-rich saline (HRS group) or normal saline (SO and SAP group) through tail intravenously (6?mL/kg) and compensated subcutaneously (20?mL/kg) after successful modeling. Results showed that hydrogen-rich saline attenuated the following: (1) serum Cr and BUN, (2) pancreatic and renal pathological injuries, (3) renal MDA, (4) renal MPO, (5) serum IL-1?, IL-6, and renal TNF-?, HMGB1, and (6) tyrosine nitration, I?B degradation, and NF-?B activation in renal tissues. In addition, it increased the level of IL-10 and SOD activity in renal tissues. These results proved that hydrogen-rich saline attenuates acute renal injury in sodium taurocholate-induced acute pancreatitis, presumably because of its detoxification activity against excessive ROS, and inhibits the activation of NF-?B by affecting I?B nitration and degradation. Our findings highlight the potential value of hydrogen-rich saline as a new therapeutic method on acute renal injury in severe acute pancreatitis clinically. PMID:25878401

  1. Effects of emodin and baicalein on rats with severe acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xi-Ping; Li, Zhong-Fang; Liu, Xiao-Gong; Wu, Yong-Tao; Wang, Jun-Xian; Wang, Kang-Min; Zhou, Yi-Feng

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the therapeutic effects of emodin in combination with baicalein on severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) rats and to explore the mechanism of SAP. METHODS: A total of 112 SAP rats induced by retrograde injection of 5% sodium taurocholate into the biliary-pancreatic duct, randomly assigned to a untreated group and three treated groups emodin group, combined emodin and baicalein group, and sandostatin group. Meanwhile, another 28 other rats were selected as sham operation (SO) group. There were 28 rats in each group, 8 rats were in 3 and 6 h groups respectively, and 12 rats in 12 h group. At each time-points, survival rates, ascites volumes, pathological lesion scores of pancreas tissues, serum amylase, tumor necrosis factor-? and IL-6 levels were determined as the indexes of therapeutic effects. RESULTS: The survival rate at 12 h was significantly higher in three treated groups than in untreated group. The ascites volume at 12 h was remarkably less in combined and sandostatin groups than in emodin group, but there was no difference between combined group and sandostatin group (P>0.05). Serum amylase levels at all time-points were significantly lower in three treated groups than in untreated group. However, they had no difference among treated groups (P>0.05). Serum TNF-? were lower in three treated groups than in untreated group at all time points. Among the three treated groups, at 6 h, the TNF-? levels of combination and sandostatin groups were lower than those of emodin group. These was no difference between combined and sandostantin. Serum IL-6 concentration at 3 h were lower in combined and sandostatin groups than in untreated group, but at 6 and 12 h they were lower in all treated groups than in untreated group and the combined and sandostatin groups and in emodin group, no difference was found between combined and sandostatin groups at all time-points (P>0.05). The pathological scores of pancreas at all time points were significantly lower in three treated groups than in the untreated group, and at 6, 12 h, the scores of combined and sandostatin groups were lower than in emodin group. There was no difference between combined and sandostatin groups (P>0.05). CONCLUSION: Combination of emodin with baicalein has significant therapeutic effects on SAP rats. PMID:15810074

  2. Acute and Chronic Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Berenson; Wyllie

    1995-10-01

    Pancreatitis, once thought to be almost exclusively a disease of adults, is increasingly being found as the cause of abdominal pain in adolescents. The authors review the pathophysiology, diagnosis, managment, and complications of acute and chronic pancreatitis, noting that a high index of suspicion is needed to properly diagnose and provide optimal care to these patients. PMID:10358323

  3. Ulinastatin enhances the therapeutic effect of intraperitoneal lavage on severe acute pancreatitis in rats

    PubMed Central

    FENG, CONG; SU, XUAN; CHEN, LI; ZHOU, XUAN; LI, BEI; WANG, LI-LI; LV, FA-QIN; LI, TAN-SHI

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated the therapeutic effect of peritoneal lavage with ulinastatin on the outcome of rats with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). A total of 110 male Wistar rats were randomly divided into the following groups: Control (C), SAP model (SAP), saline lavage (SL), intravenous ulinastatin (IU) and low-dose (LUL), medium-dose (MUL), high-dose (HUL) and ultrahigh-dose (UHUL) ulinastatin lavage. The treatments were performed immediately subsequent to the establishment of the SAP model. Intraperitoneal lavage with or without ulinastatin was performed for 3 h. Survival time was recorded for 12 h and the median survival time was calculated. Histopathological analyses, and measurements of plasma amylase and lipase levels were performed. Blood pH, lactic acid and base excess were also detected. The LUL, MUL, HUL, UHUL and IU groups showed an increase in the median survival time compared with the SAP group, with the maximal effect observed in the MUL group (P<0.01). The SL, MUL and IU groups showed a reduced activity of amylase and lipase compared with the SAP group. The SL (P<0.01) and the MUL groups (P<0.01) additionally showed a reduction in the lactic acid in arterial blood relative to the SAP group but the IU group did not. The MUL group showed greater improvements in pH (P<0.01) and base excess (P<0.01) versus the SAP group than the SL and IU groups. Furthermore the MUL group demonstrated a more marked reduction in the histological changes in necrosis, edema and inflammation compared with the SL and IU groups. Intraperitoneal lavage with ulinastatin significantly improves the prognosis of SAP in rats. PMID:26136873

  4. Continuous veno-venous haemofiltration in the treatment of severe acute pancreatitis: 6-year experience

    PubMed Central

    Plaudis, H.; Grigane, A.; Zeiza, K.; Purmalis, G.

    2007-01-01

    Background. Continuous veno-venous haemofiltration (CVVH) could be reasonable for attenuation of systemic complications in severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). The aim of the study was implementation and feasibility assessment of the CVVH in the treatment protocol of SAP. Patients and methods. CVVH was applied to 111 SAP patients during 20002005. APACHE II, systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS), serum lipase, C-reactive protein (CRP), complication rate and main outcomes were analysed comparing two periods. Results. Overall, 39 patients corresponded to Balthazar grade E SAP and 72 patients to necrotizing SAP (NSAP), with an average APACHE II score of 7 and 8.5, respectively, on admission. CVVH was started within 48 h in 82% of patients. Duration of CVVH was significantly augmented in NSAP patients during the routine period, comprising 92 h (p=0.006). The clinical presentation of SIRS and MODS was similar in both periods, with more initial pulmonary dysfunctions in NSAP (p=0.048). Peripancreatic infection decreased in the routine period; surgical interventions were performed in 34.8% vs 72.4% of patients. Hospital stay comprised on average 15.9 days for grade E SAP and 29.4 days for NSAP in the routine period, with overall mortality of 10.26% and 30.5%, respectively. Discussion. Application of CVVH in the treatment protocol of SAP is obscure due to relative invasiveness, a poorly understood mechanism of action and scarce clinical experience. We conclude that early pre-emptive application of CVVH is safe and feasible in the treatment of SAP. Duration of the procedure seems to be essential. Randomized clinical trials are justified. Our results are in favour of clinical application of CVVH in the treatment of SAP. PMID:18345308

  5. Early nasogastric enteral nutrition for severe acute pancreatitis: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Kun; Chen, Xin-Zu; Xia, Qing; Tang, Wen-Fu; Wang, Lei

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of early nasogastric enteral nutrition (NGEN) for patients with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). METHODS: We searched Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (Issue 2, 2006), Pub-Medline (1966-2006), and references from relevant articles. We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) only, which reported the mortality of SAP patients at least. Two reviewers assessed the quality of each trial and collected data independently. The Cochrane Collaborations RevMan 4.2.9 software was used for statistical analysis. RESULTS: Three RCTs were included, involving 131 patients. The baselines of each trial were comparable. Meta-analysis showed no significant differences in mortality rate of SAP patients between nasogastric and conventional routes (RR = 0.76, 95% CI = 0.37 and 1.55, P = 0.45), and in other outcomes, including time of hospital stay (weighted mean difference = -5.87, 95% CI = -20.58 and 8.84, P = 0.43), complication rate of infection (RR = 1.41, 95% CI = 0.62 and 3.23, P = 0.41) or multiple organ deficiency syndrome (RR = 0.97, 95% CI = 0.27 and 3.47, P = 0.97), rate of admission to ICU (RR = 1.00, 95% CI = 0.48 and 2.09, P = 0.99) or conversion to surgery (RR = 0.66, 95% CI = 0.12 and 3.69, P = 0.64), as well as recurrence of re-feeding pain and adverse events associated with nutrition. CONCLUSION: Early NGEN is a breakthrough in the management of SAP. Based on current studies, early NGEN appears effective and safe. Since the available evidence is poor in quantity, it is hard to make an accurate evaluation of the role of early NGEN in SAP. Before recommendation to clinical practice, further high qualified, large scale, randomized controlled trials are needed. PMID:17876897

  6. Nutrition in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Abou-Assi, S; O'Keefe, S J

    2001-03-01

    The majority of patients (80%) admitted with acute pancreatitis recovers after a few days of bowel rest and intravenous fluids. However, some cases progress to a fulminant disease complicated by a severe systemic inflammatory response and multiple organ failure, a condition in which mortality is related to the degree of negative nitrogen balance. The goal of nutrition support in this situation is to cover the increased metabolic demands without stimulating pancreatic secretion and exacerbating the "autodigestion" that characterizes the condition. Although human and animal studies have shown conflicting results regarding the effect of composition and location of feeding on pancreatic enzyme secretion, there is consensus that total parenteral nutrition (TPN), given at moderate infusion rates, does not significantly stimulate secretion in humans and that enteral diets stimulate enzyme secretion unless delivered below the jejunum. Consequently, until recently TPN has been the standard of therapy. The fact that the cost and complications of TPN can often outweigh its benefits (catheter sepsis, hyperglycemia) has led to a series of recent controlled clinical trials of modified enteral diets in which the diet is delivered by nasojejunal tube. Results have demonstrated that enteral nutrition, with either elemental or polymeric formulas, was cheaper, safer, and at the same time more effective in reducing the systemic inflammatory response. The pathophysiologic explanation for these observations needs further investigation. PMID:11246344

  7. Therapeutic effect of Qingyi decoction in severe acute pancreatitis-induced intestinal barrier injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing-Wen; Zhang, Gui-Xin; Chen, Hai-Long; Liu, Ge-Liang; Owusu, Lawrence; Wang, Yu-Xi; Wang, Guan-Yu; Xu, Cai-Ming

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of Qingyi decoction on the expression of secreted phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) in intestinal barrier injury. METHODS: Fifty healthy Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into control, severe acute pancreatitis (SAP), Qingyi decoction-treated (QYT), dexamethasone-treated (DEX), and verapamil-treated (VER) groups. The SAP model was induced by retrograde infusion of 1.5% sodium deoxycholate into the biliopancreatic duct of the rats. All rats were sacrificed 24 h post-SAP induction. Arterial blood, intestine, and pancreas from each rat were harvested for investigations. The levels of serum amylase (AMY) and diamine oxidase (DAO) were determined using biochemical methods, and serum tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α level was measured by an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Pathologic changes in the harvested tissues were investigated by microscopic examination of hematoxylin and eosin-stained tissue sections. The expressions of sPLA2 at mRNA and protein levels were detected by reverse transcriptase PCR and Western blot, respectively. A terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling assay was used to investigate apoptosis of epithelial cells in the intestinal tissues. RESULTS: Compared to the control group, the expression of sPLA2 at both the mRNA and protein levels increased significantly in the SAP group (0.36 ± 0.13 vs 0.90 ± 0.38, and 0.16 ± 0.05 vs 0.64 ± 0.05, respectively; Ps < 0.01). The levels of AMY, TNF-α and DAO in serum were also significantly increased (917 ± 62 U/L vs 6870 ± 810 U/L, 59.7 ± 14.3 ng/L vs 180.5 ± 20.1 ng/L, and 10.37 ± 2.44 U/L vs 37.89 ± 5.86 U/L, respectively; Ps < 0.01). The apoptosis index of intestinal epithelial cells also differed significantly between the SAP and control rats (0.05 ± 0.02 vs 0.26 ± 0.06; P < 0.01). The serum levels of DAO and TNF-α, and the intestinal apoptosis index significantly correlated with sPLA2 expression in the intestine (r = 0.895, 0.893 and 0.926, respectively; Ps < 0.05). The levels of sPLA2, AMY, TNF-α, and DAO in the QYT, VER, and DEX groups were all decreased compared with the SAP group, but not the control group. Qingyi decoction intervention, however, gave the most therapeutic effect against intestinal barrier damage, although the onset of its therapeutic effect was slower. CONCLUSION: Qingyi decoction ameliorates acute pancreatitis-induced intestinal barrier injury by inhibiting the overexpression of intestinal sPLA2. This mechanism may be similar to that of verapamil. PMID:25834318

  8. Overexpressed miRNA-155 dysregulates intestinal epithelial apical junctional complex in severe acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Rui; Wang, Rui-Lan; Xie, Hui; Jin, Wei; Yu, Kang-Long

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether miRNA-155 (miR-155) dysregulates apical junctional complex (AJC) protein expression in experimental severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). METHODS: Twenty-four male BALB/c mice were randomly assigned to two groups: the SAP group (n = 12) receiving sequential intraperitoneal injection of 50 g/kg caerulein and 10 mg/kg lipopolysaccharide over 6 h, and the control group (n = 12) receiving intraperitoneal injection of normal saline. Animals were sacrificed 3 h following the last injection for collection of blood samples and pancreas and distal ileal segment specimens. Routine pancreas and intestine histology was used to assess SAP pathology and intestinal epithelial barrier damage. Levels of serum amylase, diamine oxidase (DAO), and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-? were determined using commercial kits. Total RNA samples were isolated from intestinal epithelial specimens and reversely transcribed into cDNA. miR-155 and RhoA mRNA expression profiles were determined using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Target genes for miR-155 were predicted using the miRTarBase database, RNA22 and PicTar computational methods. Western blotting was performed to quantitate the protein expression levels of the target gene RhoA, as well as zonula occludens (ZO)-1 and E-cadherin, two AJC component proteins. RESULTS: Intraperitoneal injection of caerulein and lipopolysaccharide successfully induced experimental acute pancreatic damage (SAP vs control, 10.0 2.0 vs 3.2 1.2, P < 0.01) and intestinal epithelial barrier damage (3.2 0.7 vs 1.4 0.7, P < 0.01). Levels of serum amylase (21.6 5.1 U/mL vs 14.3 4.2 U/mL, P < 0.01), DAO (21.4 4.1 mg/mL vs 2.6 0.8 mg/mL, P < 0.01), and TNF-? (61.0 15.1 ng/mL vs 42.9 13.9 ng/mL, P < 0.01) increased significantly in SAP mice compared to those in control mice. miR-155 was significantly overexpressed in SAP intestinal epithelia (1.94 0.50 fold vs 1.03 0.23 fold, P < 0.01), and RhoA gene containing three miR-155-specific binding sites in the three prime untranslated regions was one of the target genes for miR-155. RhoA (22.7 5.8 folds vs 59.6 11.6 folds, P < 0.01), ZO-1 (46 18 folds vs 68 19 folds, P < 0.01), and E-cadherin proteins (48 15 folds vs 77 18 folds, P < 0.01) were underexpressed in SAP intestinal epithelia although RhoA mRNA expression was not significantly changed in SAP (0.97 0.18 folds vs 1.01 0.17 folds, P > 0.05). CONCLUSION: TNF-?-regulated miR-155 overexpression inhibits AJC component protein syntheses of ZO-1, and E-cadherin by downregulating post-transcriptional RhoA expression, and disrupts intestinal epithelial barrier in experimental SAP. PMID:24363519

  9. Acute pancreatitis in children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Mitsuyoshi; Sai, Jin Kan; Shimizu, Toshiaki

    2014-01-01

    In this Topic Highlight, the causes, diagnosis, and treatment of acute pancreatitis in children are discussed. Acute pancreatitis should be considered during the differential diagnosis of abdominal pain in children and requires prompt treatment because it may become life-threatening. The etiology, clinical manifestations, and course of acute pancreatitis in children are often different than in adults. Therefore, the specific features of acute pancreatitis in children must be considered. The etiology of acute pancreatitis in children is often drugs, infections, trauma, or anatomic abnormalities. Diagnosis is based on clinical symptoms (such as abdominal pain and vomiting), serum pancreatic enzyme levels, and imaging studies. Several scoring systems have been proposed for the assessment of severity, which is useful for selecting treatments and predicting prognosis. The basic pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis does not greatly differ between adults and children, and the treatments for adults and children are similar. In large part, our understanding of the pathology, optimal treatment, assessment of severity, and outcome of acute pancreatitis in children is taken from the adult literature. However, we often find that the common management of adult pancreatitis is difficult to apply to children. With advances in diagnostic techniques and treatment methods, severe acute pancreatitis in children is becoming better understood and more controllable. PMID:25400985

  10. Predictors of Percutaneous Catheter Drainage (PCD) after Abdominal Paracentesis Drainage (APD) in Patients with Moderately Severe or Severe Acute Pancreatitis along with Fluid Collections

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei-hui; Wang, Tao; Yan, Hong-tao; Chen, Tao; Xu, Chuan; Ye, Ping; Zhang, Ning; Liu, Zheng-cai; Tang, Li-jun

    2015-01-01

    Aims Although we previously demonstrated abdominal paracentesis drainage (APD) preceding percutaneous catheter drainage (PCD) as the central step for treating patients with moderately severe (MSAP) or severe acute pancreatitis (SAP), the predictors leading to PCD after APD have not been studied. Methods Consecutive patients with MSAP or SAP were recruited between June 2011 and June 2013. As a step-up approach, all patients initially received medical management, later underwent ultrasound-guided APD before PCD, if necessary, followed by endoscopic necrosectomy through the path formed by PCD. APD primarily targeted fluid in the abdominal or pelvic cavities, whereas PCD aimed at (peri)pancreatic fluid. Results Of the 92 enrolled patients, 40 were managed with APD alone and 52 received PCD after APD (14 required necrosectomy after initial PCD). The overall mortality was 6.5%. Univariate analysis showed that among the 20 selected parameters, 13 factors significantly affected PCD intervention after APD. Multivariate analysis revealed that infected (peri)pancreatic collections (P = -0.001), maximum extent of necrosis of more than 30% of the pancreas (P = -0.024), size of the largest necrotic peri(pancreatic) collection (P = -0.007), and reduction of (peri)pancreatic fluid collections by <50% after APD (P = -0.008) were all independent predictors of PCD. Conclusions Infected (peri)pancreatic collections, a largest necrotic peri(pancreatic) collection of more than 100 ml, and reduction of (peri)pancreatic fluid collections by <50% after APD could effectively predict the need for PCD in the early course of the disease. PMID:25659143

  11. Blood tests for acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Basnayake, Chamara; Ratnam, Dilip

    2015-01-01

    Summary The diagnosis of acute pancreatitis requires the presence of at least two of the three diagnostic criteria – characteristic abdominal pain, elevated serum amylase or lipase, and radiological evidence of pancreatitis. Serum concentrations of amylase and lipase rise within hours of the pancreatic injury. A threshold concentration 2–4 times the upper limit of normal is recommended for diagnosis. Serum lipase is now the preferred test due to its improved sensitivity, particularly in alcohol-induced pancreatitis. Its prolonged elevation creates a wider diagnostic window than amylase. Neither enzyme is useful in monitoring or predicting the severity of an episode of pancreatitis in adults. New biomarkers including trypsinogen and elastase have no significant advantage over amylase or lipase. PMID:26648641

  12. Melatonin reduces bacterial translocation by preventing damage to the intestinal mucosa in an experimental severe acute pancreatitis rat model.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xuecheng; Shao, Yingying; Jin, Yin; Huai, Jiaping; Zhou, Qiong; Huang, Zhiming; Wu, Jiansheng

    2013-12-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that melatonin significantly decreased all studied acute pancreatitis-associated inflammatory parameters, in addition to reducing apoptosis and necrosis associated with pancreatic injury. However, the effect of melatonin on gut barrier dysfunction and bacterial translocation has not been fully elucidated. This study aimed to investigate the protective effects of melatonin on intestinal integrity in a rat model of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) to evaluate whether melatonin prevented intestine barrier dysfunction and reduced bacterial translocation. Forty male Sprague Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into three groups, with 8 rats in the sham operation (SO) group, 18 rats in the SAP group and 14 SAP rats in the melatonin treatment (MT) group. SAP was induced by retrograde injection of 4% taurocholate into the biliopancreatic duct. Melatonin was administered 30 min prior to taurocholate injection in the melatonin-treated rats. All rats were sacrificed 24 h subsequent to pancreatitis induction. Real-time fluorescence quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to detect and quantify Escherichia coli (E. coli) O157 in postcava blood. The microvilli structure was also analyzed with transmission electron microscopy. The level of E. coli DNA in the MT group was significantly lower than in rats in the SAP group. No E. coli DNA was detected in the control group. Villus height and crypt depth in the ileum were significantly higher in the MT and control groups compared to the SAP group, and were significantly higher in the MT group than in the SAP group. These results suggested that melatonin prevented gut barrier dysfunction and reduced bacterial translocation, resulting in reduced pancreatic-associated infections and decreased early mortality rates. PMID:24255660

  13. [Severe acute pancreatitis and infection by influenza A (H1N1) virus in a child: case report].

    PubMed

    Rodrguez Schulz, Diego; Martnez, Agustina; Guzmn, Mara Beln; Robledo, Hugo; Capocasa, Patricia; Martnez, Luz; Garnero, Anala

    2015-08-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas, characterized by abdominal pain and high level of pancreatic enzymes. Pancreatitis is the most common disease of pancreas in children and adults. For the diagnosis we need 2 of 3 characteristics: abdominal pain characteristic of acute pancreatitis, amylase and/or lipase 3 times higher than the normal upper limit and characteristic findings in images. The etiologies are multiple: trauma, metabolic disease and infections: mixovirus, HIV, measles, coxsackie, hepatitis B, C, cytomegalovirus, varicella, herpes simplex. Three cases of PA associated with H1N1 Influenza virus were reported, only one in a child with uncomplicated features. PMID:26172021

  14. Nutrition, Inflammation, and Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, Max

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is acute inflammatory disease of the pancreas. Nutrition has a number of anti-inflammatory effects that could affect outcomes of patients with pancreatitis. Further, it is the most promising nonspecific treatment modality in acute pancreatitis to date. This paper summarizes the best available evidence regarding the use of nutrition with a view of optimising clinical management of patients with acute pancreatitis. PMID:24490104

  15. Pancreatic herniation: a rare cause of acute pancreatitis?

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Prashant; Turp, Matthew; Fellows, Sarah; Ellis, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a common and potentially fatal condition, with several well-known causes including gallstones, excessive alcohol consumption and specific medications. We report a case of an 89-year-old man presenting with acute pancreatitis, which we believe to be secondary to a diaphragmatic herniation of the pancreas. This extremely rare anatomical abnormality can be found incidentally in the asymptomatic patient or may present with a variety of acute symptoms. However, there have been only isolated reports of these cases presenting as acute pancreatitis. While the majority of acute pancreatitis cases can be explained by common causes, it is important that clinicians be aware of and should consider investigating for other more unusual possibilities, such as pancreatic herniation, before labelling an episode as idiopathic. PMID:24343805

  16. Pharmacologic therapy for acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kambhampati, Swetha; Park, Walter; Habtezion, Aida

    2014-01-01

    While conservative management such as fluid, bowel rest, and antibiotics is the mainstay of current acute pancreatitis management, there is a lot of promise in pharmacologic therapies that target various aspects of the pathogenesis of pancreatitis. Extensive review of preclinical studies, which include assessment of therapies such as anti-secretory agents, protease inhibitors, anti-inflammatory agents, and anti-oxidants are discussed. Many of these studies have shown therapeutic benefit and improved survival in experimental models. Based on available preclinical studies, we discuss potential novel targeted pharmacologic approaches that may offer promise in the treatment of acute pancreatitis. To date a variety of clinical studies have assessed the translational potential of animal model effective experimental therapies and have shown either failure or mixed results in human studies. Despite these discouraging clinical studies, there is a great clinical need and there exist several preclinical effective therapies that await investigation in patients. Better understanding of acute pancreatitis pathophysiology and lessons learned from past clinical studies are likely to offer a great foundation upon which to expand future therapies in acute pancreatitis. PMID:25493000

  17. Severe Hypertriglyceridemia Induced Pancreatitis in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Seema; Shaffer, Lemuel; Cavens, Paula; Blankstein, Josef

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis caused by severe gestational hypertriglyceridemia is a rare complication of pregnancy. Acute pancreatitis has been well associated with gallstone disease, alcoholism, or drug abuse but rarely seen in association with severe hypertriglyceridemia. Hypertriglyceridemia may occur in pregnancy due to normal physiological changes leading to abnormalities in lipid metabolism. We report a case of severe gestational hypertriglyceridemia that caused acute pancreatitis at full term and was successfully treated with postpartum therapeutic plasma exchange. Patient also developed several other complications related to her substantial hypertriglyceridemia including preeclampsia, chylous ascites, retinal detachment, pleural effusion, and chronic pericarditis. This patient had no previous family or personal history of lipid abnormality and had four successful prior pregnancies without developing gestational hypertriglyceridemia. Such a severe hypertriglyceridemia is usually seen in patients with familial chylomicronemia syndromes where hypertriglyceridemia is exacerbated by the pregnancy, leading to fatal complications such as acute pancreatitis. PMID:24995138

  18. An unreported complication of acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Muthukumarasamy, G; Shanmugam, V; Yule, SR; Ravindran, R

    2007-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis constitutes 3% of all admissions with abdominal pain. There are reports of osteal fat necrosis leading to periosteal reactions and osteolytic lesions following severe pancreatitis, particularly in long bones. A 54-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with acute pancretitis, who later developed spinal discitis secondary to necrotizing pancreatitis. He was treated conservatively with antibiotics and after a month he recovered completely without any neurological deficit. This case is reported for its unusual and unreported spinal complications after acute pancreatitis. PMID:17659740

  19. H2S mitigates severe acute pancreatitis through the PI3K/AKT-NF-?B pathway in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Chun-Yan; Fu, Lan-Ying; Hu, Chang-Lun; Chen, Dai-Xing; Gan, Tian; Wang, Yi-Cheng; Zhao, Xiao-Yan

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To study the effect of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) on severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) in a rat model. METHODS: Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were administered an intraperitoneal injection of saline containing 20% L-Arg (250 mg/100 g) hourly for over 2 h to induce SAP. The rats were treated with DL-propargylglycine (PAG, 50 mg/kg) or different dosages of NaHS (5 mg/kg, 10 mg/kg, 20 mg/kg or 100 mg/kg). PAG or NaHS was administered 1 h before induction of pancreatitis. Rats were sacrificed 24 h after the last L-Arg injection. Blood and pancreas tissues were collected. RESULTS: The H2S and cystathionine-?-lyase mRNA levels in SAP rats were signi?cantly lower than those in the control group, and treatment with PAG further reduced the H2S level. Nevertheless, H2S was significantly increased after NaHS administration compared with the SAP group, and the degree of upregulation was associated with the NaHS dosage. NaHS reduced the levels of plasma amylase, interleukin-6 and myeloperoxidase in pancreatic tissue. NaHS suppressed the degradation of I?B? and the activity of nuclear factor-?B, as well as the phosphorylation of PI3K/AKT. CONCLUSION: H2S plays an anti-inflammatory role in SAP in vivo. PMID:25914464

  20. NSAIDs and Acute Pancreatitis: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Pezzilli, Raffaele; Morselli-Labate, Antonio Maria; Corinaldesi, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    The resulting pain is the main symptom of acute pancreatitis and it should be alleviated as soon as possible. NSAIDs are the first line therapy for pain and they are generally administered to acute pancreatitis patients upon admission to the hospital. In addition, these drugs have also been used to prevent post-endoscopic cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) acute pancreatitis. On the other hand, there are several reports indicating that NSAIDs may be the actual cause of acute pancreatitis. We carried out a literature search on PubMed/MEDLINE; all full text papers published in from January 1966 to November 2009 on the use of NSAIDs in acute pancreatitis were collected; the literature search was also supplemented by a review of the bibliographies of the papers evaluated. Thus, in this article, we will systematically review the current literature in order to better illustrate the role of NSAIDs in acute pancreatitis, in particular: i) NSAIDs as a cause of acute pancreatitis; ii) their use to prevent post-retrograde ERCP pancreatitis and iii) their efficacy for pain relief in the acute illness of the pancreas.

  1. [Acute pancreatitis and pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Scollo, P; Licitra, G

    1993-12-01

    Aetiologic factors (gallstones, hyperlipidemia I-IV, hypertriglyceridaemia) make their occurrence, mainly, in the third trimester of gestation. Two cases of acute pancreatitis in pregnancy are described; in both cases patients referred healthy diet, no habit to smoke and no previous episode of pancreatitis. An obstructive pathology of biliary tract was the aetiologic factor. Vomiting, upper abdominal pain are aspecific symptoms that impose a differential diagnosis with acute appendicitis, cholecystitis and obstructive intestinal pathology. Laboratory data (elevated serum amylase and lipase levels) and ultrasonography carry out an accurate diagnosis. The management of acute pancreatitis is based on the use of symptomatic drugs, a low fat diet alternated to the parenteral nutrition when triglycerides levels are more than 28 mmol/L. Surgical therapy, used only in case of obstructive pathology of biliary tract, is optimally collected in the third trimester or immediately after postpartum. Our patients, treated only medically, delivered respectively at 38th and 40th week of gestation. Tempestivity of diagnosis and appropriate therapy permit to improve prognosis of a pathology that, although really associated with pregnancy, presents high maternal mortality (37%) cause of complications (shock, coagulopathy, acute respiratory insufficiency) and fetal (37.9%) by occurrence of preterm delivery. PMID:8139793

  2. Severe acute necrotizing pancreatitis associated with lipoprotein lipase deficiency in childhood.

    PubMed

    van Walraven, L A; de Klerk, J B C; Postema, R R

    2003-09-01

    An 11-year-old girl with lipoprotein lipase deficiency experienced recurring episodes of abdominal pain. She initially underwent appendectomy for suspected appendicitis; however, the appendix was normal. Pancreatitis was subsequently identified as the cause of her pain. PMID:14523833

  3. Acute pancreatitis and subdural haematoma in a patient with severe falciparum malaria: case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Seshadri, Pratibha; Dev, Anand Vimal; Viggeswarpu, Surekha; Sathyendra, Sowmya; Peter, John Victor

    2008-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum infection is known to be associated with a spectrum of systemic complications ranging from mild and self-limiting to life-threatening. This case report illustrates a patient who had a protracted course in hospital due to several rare complications of falciparum malaria. A 21-year old man presented with a five-day history of high-grade fever, jaundice and abdominal pain and a two-day history of altered conscious state. A diagnosis of severe falciparum malaria was made based on the clinical presentation and a positive blood smear with parasitaemia of 45%. Despite adequate anti-malarial therapy with artesunate, the patient had persistent and worsening abdominal pain. Investigations suggested a diagnosis of acute pancreatitis, a rare association with falciparum malaria. However, in spite of supportive therapy for acute pancreatitis and a 10-day course of intravenous artesunate and oral doxycycline at recommended doses, he continued to be febrile with peripheral blood smear showing persistence of ring forms. Antimalarial therapy was, therefore, changed to quinine on the suspicion of possible artesunate resistance. On the 17th day of stay in hospital, the patient developed generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Computerized tomography of the brain showed bilateral fronto-parietal subdural haematomas that were surgically drained. His fever persisted beyond 30-days despite broad-spectrum antibiotics, quinine therapy and negative malarial smears. A possibility of drug fever was considered and all drugs were ceased. He subsequently became afebrile and was discharged on the 38th hospital admission day. Recognition of complications and appropriate management at each stage facilitated successful outcome. This report has been presented to highlight the occurrence of several rare complications of falciparum malaria in the same patient. PMID:18510778

  4. Acute pancreatitis and subdural haematoma in a patient with severe falciparum malaria: Case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Seshadri, Pratibha; Dev, Anand Vimal; Viggeswarpu, Surekha; Sathyendra, Sowmya; Peter, John Victor

    2008-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum infection is known to be associated with a spectrum of systemic complications ranging from mild and self-limiting to life-threatening. This case report illustrates a patient who had a protracted course in hospital due to several rare complications of falciparum malaria. A 21-year old man presented with a five-day history of high-grade fever, jaundice and abdominal pain and a two-day history of altered conscious state. A diagnosis of severe falciparum malaria was made based on the clinical presentation and a positive blood smear with parasitaemia of 45%. Despite adequate anti-malarial therapy with artesunate, the patient had persistent and worsening abdominal pain. Investigations suggested a diagnosis of acute pancreatitis, a rare association with falciparum malaria. However, in spite of supportive therapy for acute pancreatitis and a 10-day course of intravenous artesunate and oral doxycycline at recommended doses, he continued to be febrile with peripheral blood smear showing persistence of ring forms. Antimalarial therapy was, therefore, changed to quinine on the suspicion of possible artesunate resistance. On the 17th day of stay in hospital, the patient developed generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Computerized tomography of the brain showed bilateral fronto-parietal subdural haematomas that were surgically drained. His fever persisted beyond 30-days despite broad-spectrum antibiotics, quinine therapy and negative malarial smears. A possibility of drug fever was considered and all drugs were ceased. He subsequently became afebrile and was discharged on the 38th hospital admission day. Recognition of complications and appropriate management at each stage facilitated successful outcome. This report has been presented to highlight the occurrence of several rare complications of falciparum malaria in the same patient. PMID:18510778

  5. Expression of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase and effects of inhibitor Wortmannin on expression of tumor necrosis factor-? in severe acute pancreatitis associated with acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Ming; Gong, Yan-jie; Tu, Ling; Li, Jia; Liang, Ying-hong; Zhang, Yi-hua

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute lung injury (ALI) is a common and serious complication of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). The study aimed to investigate the protective effect and mechanism of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) inhibitor Wortmannin in SAP associated with ALI. METHODS: Ninety rats were randomly divided into three groups: sham operation (SO) group (n=30), SAP group (n=30), and SAP+Wortmannin (SAP+W) group (n=30). SAP model was induced by retrograde injection of 4% sodium taurocholate into the biliopancreatic duct of rats. The rate of lung water content, myeloperoxidase (MPO), matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9), protein kinase B (PKB), abdphosphorylation of protein kinase B (P-PKB) activity in the lung tissue were evaluated. RESULTS: In the SAP group, the p-PKB expression in the lung tissue began to rise at 3 hours after modeling, and peaked at 12 hours (P<0.05); the rate of lung water content, MPO and TNF-? activity were also gradually increased, and the degree of lung lesion gradually increased (P<0.05). In the SAP+Wortmannin group, the p-PKB expression in the lung tissue began to rise at 3 hours after modeling, and peaked at 12 hours; it was higher than that in the SO group (P<0.05), but significantly lower than that in the SAP group (P<0.05). The rest indicators in the SAP+Wortmannin group were also significantly decreased as compared with the SAP group (P<0.05). CONCLUSIONS: The expression of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase/protein kinase B was elevated in severe pancreatitis rats with lung injury. This suggested that PI3K signal transduction pathway is involved in the control and release of proinflammatory cytokines TNF-?, which may play an important role in the pathogenesis of severe acute pancreatitis associated with lung injury. This finding indicated that Wortmannin can block the PI3K signal transduction pathway, and inhibit the release of inflammatory factor TNF-?.

  6. Changes of amount and ultrastructure of interstitial cells of Cajal in rats with severe acute pancreatitis and their importance

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yujie; Li, Guoxia; Sun, Xiaomin; Xu, Ping; Lou, Xiaoli; Tang, Maochun

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the changes in the amount and ultrastructure of interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) in rats with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) and their importance. Methods: A modified Aho method was employed to establish a SAP rat model. Laser scanning confocal immunofluorescence microscopy was employed to detect the amount of ICC, and transmission electron microscopy was employed for observation of ultrastructure of ICC and nerve-ICC-smooth muscle network. Results: The amount of ICC reduced, the intercellular space of ICC was enlarged, cell processes reduced or were absent, cell morphology was irregular, and ICC had unclear borderline, reduced organelles, impaired organelles, nuclear shrinkage and deformation. The junctions between ICC and between ICC and smooth muscle cell/nerve reduced, and the network-like structure was disrupted. Conclusion: In SAP, ICC reduces, with disrupted ultrastructure, and the integrity of network among intestinal nerve, ICC and smooth muscle is impaired, both of which may affect the intestinal functions. PMID:26131128

  7. Comparison of Ranson, Glasgow, MOSS, SIRS, BISAP, APACHE-II, CTSI Scores, IL-6, CRP, and Procalcitonin in Predicting Severity, Organ Failure, Pancreatic Necrosis, and Mortality in Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, Ajay K.; Meher, Susanta; Prakash, Shashi; Tiwary, Satyendra Kumar; Singh, Usha; Srivastava, Arvind; Dixit, V. K.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Multifactorial scorings, radiological scores, and biochemical markers may help in early prediction of severity, pancreatic necrosis, and mortality in patients with acute pancreatitis (AP). Methods. BISAP, APACHE-II, MOSS, and SIRS scores were calculated using data within 24?hrs of admission, whereas Ranson and Glasgow scores after 48?hrs of admission; CTSI was calculated on day 4 whereas IL-6 and CRP values at end of study. Predictive accuracy of scoring systems, sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of various markers in prediction of severe acute pancreatitis, organ failure, pancreatic necrosis, admission to intensive care units and mortality were calculated. Results. Of 72 patients, 31 patients had organ failure and local complication classified as severe acute pancreatitis, 17 had pancreatic necrosis, and 9 died (12.5%). Area under curves for Ranson, Glasgow, MOSS, SIRS, APACHE-II, BISAP, CTSI, IL-6, and CRP in predicting SAP were 0.85, 0.75, 0.73, 0.73, 0.88, 0.80, 0.90, and 0.91, respectively, for pancreatic necrosis 0.70, 0.64, 0.61, 0.61, 0.68, 0.61, 0.75, 0.86, and 0.90, respectively, and for mortality 0.84, 0.83, 0.77, 0.76, 0.86, 0.83, 0.57, 0.80, and 0.75, respectively. Conclusion. CRP and IL-6 have shown a promising result in early detection of severity and pancreatic necrosis whereas APACHE-II and Ranson score in predicting AP related mortality in this study. PMID:24204087

  8. Patterns of severe pancreatic injury following cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed Central

    Rose, D M; Ranson, J H; Cunningham, J N; Spencer, F C

    1984-01-01

    Severe pancreatic complications following cardiac surgery are rare, but 14 patients with severe pancreatitis have been encountered since 1971. Six of these developed acute fulminating pancreatitis following cardiac surgery and each of these died within 21 days following operation. Seven patients had less severe pancreatitis, resulting in pancreatic abscess formation and five in this group expired. One patient developed a pancreatic pseudocyst following mild acute pancreatitis and expired 4 months later. Although the etiologic mechanisms are unclear, possible factors include: prolonged cardiopulmonary bypass, "the low cardiac output syndrome," and inadequately treated or unrecognized postoperative pancreatitis. The diagnosis is based on physical examination, upper gastrointestinal series, and the abdominal CT scan. Despite aggressive surgical therapy, pancreatitis following cardiopulmonary bypass is an extremely serious condition. PMID:6696532

  9. Protective effect of Lai Fu Cheng Qi decoction on severe acute pancreatitis-induced myocardial injury in a rat model

    PubMed Central

    LI, NAN; TIAN, YING; WANG, CHUNLI; ZHANG, PENG; YOU, SHENGYI

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of Lai Fu Cheng Qi decoction on myocardial injury in rats with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). In total, 30 rats were randomly divided into sham, SAP and decoction treatment groups. SAP was induced by a retrograde pancreatic duct injection of 5% sodium taurocholate in the SAP and decoction treatment groups. Rats in decoction treatment group also received intragastric administration of Lai Fu Cheng Qi decoction. The serum levels of creatine kinase isoenzyme (CK-MB) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were detected using an automatic biochemical analyzer. In addition, myocardial Na+-K+-ATPase activity was analyzed using a spectrophotometric method and the mitochondrial membrane potential was measured by flow cytometry. Myocardial apoptosis was assessed using a TUNEL assay and pathological changes to the heart and pancreas were detected by hematoxylin and eosin staining. Compared with the rats in the sham group, rats in the SAP and decoction treatment groups exhibited significantly higher levels of serum CK-MB and LDH, apoptosis index and pathological scores, and had significantly lower levels of Na+-K+-ATPase activity and mitochondrial membrane potential. However, when compared with the SAP group, the serum levels of CK-MB and LDH, the pathological scores of the pancreas and heart, and the myocardial cell apoptosis index in the decoction treatment group were significantly lower. Furthermore, the Na+-K+-ATPase activity and mitochondrial membrane potential were significantly increased in the decoction treatment group when compared with the SAP group. Therefore, Lai Fu Cheng Qi decoction was shown to exert a protective effect on myocardial injury induced by SAP in rats. PMID:25780399

  10. Acute pancreatitis: Etiology and common pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guo-Jun; Gao, Chun-Fang; Wei, Dong; Wang, Cun; Ding, Si-Qin

    2009-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas. The etiology and pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis have been intensively investigated for centuries worldwide. Many causes of acute pancreatitis have been discovered, but the pathogenetic theories are controversial. The most common cause of acute pancreatitis is gallstone impacting the distal common bile-pancreatic duct. The majority of investigators accept that the main factors for acute billiary pancreatitis are pancreatic hyperstimulation and bile-pancreatic duct obstruction which increase pancreatic duct pressure and active trypsin reflux. Acute pancreatitis occurs when intracellular protective mechanisms to prevent trypsinogen activation or reduce trypsin activity are overwhelmed. However, little is known about the other acute pancreatitis. We hypothesize that acute biliary pancreatitis and other causes of acute pancreatitis possess a common pathogenesis. Pancreatic hyperstimulation and pancreatic duct obstruction increase pancreatic duct pressure, active trypsin reflux, and subsequent unregulated activation of trypsin within pancreatic acinar cells. Enzyme activation within the pancreas leads to auto-digestion of the gland and local inflammation. Once the hypothesis is confirmed, traditional therapeutic strategies against acute pancreatitis may be improved. Decompression of pancreatic duct pressure should be advocated in the treatment of acute pancreatitits which may greatly improve its outcome. PMID:19322914

  11. Contraceptive pills and acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Mehrotra, T N; Mital, H S; Gupta, S K

    1981-06-01

    This article reports a case of acute pancreatitis in a patient taking the oral contraceptive pill. A 32 year old mother had been on combined contraceptive pills since 1975. In 1978 she started having upper abdominal and retrosternal pain. She became critically ill with peripheral circulatory collapse, dyspnoea and cyanosis. A superficial thrombophlebitis was noted on the medial aspect of the right thigh. The diagnosis of pancreatitis was considered with history of recurrent abdominal pain. After several tests and supportive therapy (intravenous fluids, antibiotics, steriods), the woman started showing improvements in 48 hours and recovered in 10 days. This case differs from previously described cases in that the cholesterol and triglyceride levels were normal. The hypoglycemia has not been described previously. PMID:7320005

  12. Efficacy of thymosin α1 and interferon α for the treatment of severe acute pancreatitis in a rat model

    PubMed Central

    WANG, XIAOQIN; ZENG, XIAOYAN; YANG, BO; ZHAO, SHAN; CHEN, WEI; GUO, XUAN

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of treatment with thymosin α1 (TA1) or interferon α (IFNα) following the establishment of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) in rats. A total of 144 Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups. The rats in all four groups were celiotomized, and the rats in the control group were administered with an intravenous injection of saline. The three other groups were administered with 5% 1 ml/kg sodium taurocholate via the cholangiopancreatic duct. SAP group rats were administered with an intravenous injection of saline; TA1 group rats received 26.7 µg/kg TA1; and interferon α (INFα) group rats received 4.0×105 U/kg IFNα. The rats were anesthetized and blood samples were collected from the animals 3, 12 and 24 h after surgery. The levels of T cell subsets, serum enzyme indicators, cytokines and procalcitonin (PCT) were measured. The general conditions of the rats were observed until sacrifice, and pancreatic and lung tissue samples were sampled for hematoxylin and eosin staining and histological scoring. The expression levels of aspartate transaminase, lactate dehydrogenase, α-amylase (AMY), P-type-amylase, lipase, PCT, tumor-necrosis factor α, interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, and IL-18 in the TA1 and IFNα-treated rats were significantly lower, compared with those of the SAP rats within the first 24 h of model establishment (P<0.05). The TA1 and IFNα-treated rats exhibited significantly increased levels of CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, and an increased ratio of CD4+/CD8+ cells, compared with SAP rats. Histological analysis revealed that the TA1 and IFNα-treated rats exhibited significantly ameliorated pancreas and lung damage, and mortality rates were reduced from 50.0% (6/12) to 25.0% (3/12) and 33.3% (4/12), respectively. The immunomodulatory agents TA1 and IFNα reduced acute inflammation, decreasing cell damage and enhancing immune function and survival rates in the SAP rats. PMID:26330363

  13. Efficacy of thymosin α1 and interferon α for the treatment of severe acute pancreatitis in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoqin; Zeng, Xiaoyan; Yang, Bo; Zhao, Shan; Chen, Wei; Guo, Xuan

    2015-11-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of treatment with thymosin α1 (TA1) or interferon α (IFNα) following the establishment of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) in rats. A total of 144 Sprague‑Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups. The rats in all four groups were celiotomized, and the rats in the control group were administered with an intravenous injection of saline. The three other groups were administered with 5% 1 ml/kg sodium taurocholate via the cholangiopancreatic duct. SAP group rats were administered with an intravenous injection of saline; TA1 group rats received 26.7 µg/kg TA1; and interferon α (INFα) group rats received 4.0x105 U/kg IFNα. The rats were anesthetized and blood samples were collected from the animals 3, 12 and 24 h after surgery. The levels of T cell subsets, serum enzyme indicators, cytokines and procalcitonin (PCT) were measured. The general conditions of the rats were observed until sacrifice, and pancreatic and lung tissue samples were sampled for hematoxylin and eosin staining and histological scoring. The expression levels of aspartate transaminase, lactate dehydrogenase, α‑amylase (AMY), P‑type‑amylase, lipase, PCT, tumor‑necrosis factor α, interleukin (IL)‑4, IL‑5, and IL‑18 in the TA1 and IFNα‑treated rats were significantly lower, compared with those of the SAP rats within the first 24 h of model establishment (P<0.05). The TA1 and IFNα‑treated rats exhibited significantly increased levels of CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, and an increased ratio of CD4+/CD8+ cells, compared with SAP rats. Histological analysis revealed that the TA1 and IFNα‑treated rats exhibited significantly ameliorated pancreas and lung damage, and mortality rates were reduced from 50.0% (6/12) to 25.0% (3/12) and 33.3% (4/12), respectively. The immunomodulatory agents TA1 and IFNα reduced acute inflammation, decreasing cell damage and enhancing immune function and survival rates in the SAP rats. PMID:26330363

  14. Myocardial function in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Ito, K; Ramirez-Schon, G; Shah, P M; Agarwal, N; Delguercio, L R; Reynolds, B M

    1981-01-01

    Fifteen patients with acute pancreatitis had 68 physiologic cardiopulmonary assessments performed, and they were compared with 61 performed on normal postoperative patients, and 113 on 41 cirrhotics. It was found that the patients with pancreatitis have an elevated cardiac index (CI), which is not due to the hyperdynamic hemodynamic state found in cirrhotics. In spite of this, the Sarnoff curves demonstrated that pancreatitis was accompanied by a myocardial depression p less than 0.03, not found in hyperdynamic cirrhotics. Cirrhotics are unable to increase their oxygen consumption in response to an increase in CI, as do normal patients or those with acute pancreatitis. In cirrhotics the hemodynamic lesion occurs at the capillary level with the opening of arteriovenous shunts which rob the tissues of their nutritive blood supply, while the patient with acute pancreatitis has a primary myocardial depression and his peripheral vasculature reacts like that of a normal person. PMID:7247538

  15. [MPO-ANCA related vasculitis complicating mucinous cystadenoma of the pancreas and severe acute pancreatitis after steroid pulse therapy: a case report].

    PubMed

    Tsuruoka, Kayori; Sekiya, Syuusuke; Yokoyama, Takeshi; Koitabashi, Kenichirou; Shimazaki, Minako; Sakurada, Tsutomu; Shirai, Sayuri; Yasuda, Takashi; Kimura, Kenjirou

    2008-01-01

    A 72-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital because of massive proteinuria of 2.2 g/day. She had seen a general practitioner for management of Basedow disease, diabetes mellitus and hypertension for 24 years. On admission, she complained of anorexia and nausea. Laboratory data showed serum creatinine of 3.62 mg/dL and MPO-ANCA of 68 EU. Renal biopsy revealed crescentic glomerulonephritis complicated with membranous nephropathy. Thiamazole (MMI), which was being given for Basedow disease for years, was withdrawn on the suspicion as a cause of MPO-ANCA. Three years after the withdrawal of MMI, renal failure slowly progressed to the end-stage, while MPO-ANCA was negative. She was introduced onto hemodialysis. At that time, MPO-ANCA became positive again, the titer being 12.9 EU. Therefore, we suspected a relapse of ANCA-related vasculitis and performed steroid pulse therapy on the patient with methylprednisolone at 0.5 g/day for 3 days. On hospital day 14, MPO-ANCA became negative. On day 25, however, severe acute pancreatitis developed and a pancreatic tumor lesion was found on CT. In spite of amelioration of the pancreatitis by medical treatment, the pancreatic tumor lesion did not show any significant change. On day 48, she died of multiple organ failure. Autopsy showed a mucinous cyst adenoma of pancreas and necrotizing pancreatitis. We suspected steroid therapy as the cause of the pancreatic lesions. PMID:19069154

  16. Drug-Induced Acute Pancreatitis: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Mark R.; Hall, Oliver Morgan; Kaye, Adam M.; Kaye, Alan David

    2015-01-01

    Background The majority of drug-induced pancreatitis cases are mild to moderate in severity, but severe and even fatal cases can occur. Management of drug-induced pancreatitis requires withdrawal of the offending agent and supportive care. Methods This review focuses on differential diagnosis, clinical presentation, drug-mediated effects, treatments, and mechanisms of pancreatitis, with an emphasis on drug-induced pancreatitis. Results Although only a minority of cases associated with acute pancreatitis are linked to drugs, clinical presentation and mechanisms of injury to the pancreas are not well understood by clinicians in terms of individual drug effects in the mediation or modulation of injury to the pancreas. In recent years, a large number of commonly prescribed medications has been linked to drug-induced pancreatitis pathogenesis. Although mechanisms are proposed, the exact cause of injury is either not well understood or controversial. Conclusion Future investigation into the mechanisms of pancreatitis and an appreciation by clinicians of the drugs commonly linked to the condition will help establish earlier diagnosis and quicker cessation of offending drugs in the treatment of drug-induced acute pancreatitis. PMID:25829880

  17. Acute chylous peritonitis due to acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Georgiou, Georgios K; Harissis, Haralampos; Mitsis, Michalis; Batsis, Haralampos; Fatouros, Michalis

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of acute chylous ascites formation presenting as peritonitis (acute chylous peritonitis) in a patient suffering from acute pancreatitis due to hypertriglyceridemia and alcohol abuse. The development of chylous ascites is usually a chronic process mostly involving malignancy, trauma or surgery, and symptoms arise as a result of progressive abdominal distention. However, when accumulation of chyle occurs rapidly, the patient may present with signs of peritonitis. Preoperative diagnosis is difficult since the clinical picture usually suggests hollow organ perforation, appendicitis or visceral ischemia. Less than 100 cases of acute chylous peritonitis have been reported. Pancreatitis is a rare cause of chyloperitoneum and in almost all of the cases chylous ascites is discovered some days (or even weeks) after the onset of symptoms of pancreatitis. This is the second case in the literature where the patient presented with acute chylous peritonitis due to acute pancreatitis, and the presence of chyle within the abdominal cavity was discovered simultaneously with the establishment of the diagnosis of pancreatitis. The patient underwent an exploratory laparotomy for suspected perforated duodenal ulcer, since, due to hypertriglyceridemia, serum amylase values appeared within the normal range. Moreover, abdominal computed tomography imaging was not diagnostic for pancreatitis. Following abdominal lavage and drainage, the patient was successfully treated with total parenteral nutrition and octreotide. PMID:22563182

  18. Acute chylous peritonitis due to acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Georgiou, Georgios K; Harissis, Haralampos; Mitsis, Michalis; Batsis, Haralampos; Fatouros, Michalis

    2012-04-28

    We report a case of acute chylous ascites formation presenting as peritonitis (acute chylous peritonitis) in a patient suffering from acute pancreatitis due to hypertriglyceridemia and alcohol abuse. The development of chylous ascites is usually a chronic process mostly involving malignancy, trauma or surgery, and symptoms arise as a result of progressive abdominal distention. However, when accumulation of "chyle" occurs rapidly, the patient may present with signs of peritonitis. Preoperative diagnosis is difficult since the clinical picture usually suggests hollow organ perforation, appendicitis or visceral ischemia. Less than 100 cases of acute chylous peritonitis have been reported. Pancreatitis is a rare cause of chyloperitoneum and in almost all of the cases chylous ascites is discovered some days (or even weeks) after the onset of symptoms of pancreatitis. This is the second case in the literature where the patient presented with acute chylous peritonitis due to acute pancreatitis, and the presence of chyle within the abdominal cavity was discovered simultaneously with the establishment of the diagnosis of pancreatitis. The patient underwent an exploratory laparotomy for suspected perforated duodenal ulcer, since, due to hypertriglyceridemia, serum amylase values appeared within the normal range. Moreover, abdominal computed tomography imaging was not diagnostic for pancreatitis. Following abdominal lavage and drainage, the patient was successfully treated with total parenteral nutrition and octreotide. PMID:22563182

  19. Pathophysiology of pulmonary complications of acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Browne, George W; Pitchumoni, CS

    2006-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis in its severe form is complicated by multiple organ system dysfunction, most importantly by pulmonary complications which include hypoxia, acute respiratory distress syndrome, atelectasis, and pleural effusion. The pathogenesis of some of the above complications is attributed to the production of noxious cytokines. Clinically significant is the early onset of pleural effusion, which heralds a poor outcome of acute pancreatitis. The role of circulating trypsin, phospholipase A2, platelet activating factor, release of free fatty acids, chemoattractants such as tumor necrsosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6, IL-8, fMet-leu-phe (a bacterial wall product), nitric oxide, substance P, and macrophage inhibitor factor is currently studied. The hope is that future management of acute pancreatitis with a better understanding of the pathogenesis of lung injury will be directed against the production of noxious cytokines. PMID:17131469

  20. An audit of fatal acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, A. K.; Kaul, A.; Bache, E.; Parberry, A. C.; Doran, J.; Nicholson, M. L.

    1995-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis has a mortality of about 10%: this figure has not changed over the last 20 years. A retrospective audit of fatal acute pancreatitis was performed in a teaching hospital with a catchment population of about 750,000 patients to examine patient characteristics. Using Hospital Activity Analysis code 577.0, all fatal cases of acute pancreatitis were studied in a six-year period 1987-93. Additionally, all post mortem diagnoses of acute pancreatitis were traced. The overall post mortem rate in Nottingham at the time of the study was about 35%. All available records, X-ray and biochemical data were studied and appropriate information recorded and analysed for 65 fatal cases. Only 15% were post mortem diagnoses, lower than in previous series; 72% had respiratory and 67% had renal complications. Only 34% had been admitted to the intensive care unit. A third of patients had had surgery; 67% of these was some form of external drainage. Of the 14 patients with proven gallstone pancreatitis only three had endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography; 42% of patients had idiopathic disease. Not all the patients diagnosed ante mortem had the full biochemical predicted severity criteria analysed: pO2 and calcium analysis was performed in about 80%. Pre-mortem diagnoses of pancreatitis was achieved more frequently than in other comparable series. PMID:7567753

  1. Conservative approach in the management of severe acute pancreatitis: eight-year experience in a single institution

    PubMed Central

    Zeiza, K.; Plaudis, H.; Suhova, A.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction. Recognition of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP), intensive care, shifting away from early surgical treatment, and monitoring of the intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) is important in the management of SAP. The aim of our study was retrospective evaluation and critical assessment of the experience with SAP management protocol involving new strategy in the university hospital. Methods. Protocols of 274 SAP patients treated in our institution during the last eight years were reassessed. APACHE II, CRP and SOFA score, IAP, pulmonary complications, ventilatory support and infection rate were evaluated. The success of the conservative treatment, surgical interventions and mortality was analysed comparing period 1 from 1999 to 2002 and period 2 from 2003 to 2006. Results. More patients with necrotising SAP were treated in period 2. The average CRP and SOFA score was higher in period 2, p=0.018; p=0.011. A total of 139 patients underwent continuous veno-venouse haemofiltration (CVVH) as a component of fluid resuscitation and IAP control. Application of CVVH increased in period 2, p<0.005. Only 58% of patients were managed with ventilatory support. The overall infection rate decreased in period 2 comprising 21%, p<0.005. Success rate of the conservative therapy reached 69% in period 2, p<0.01. Surgical treatment was performed in 41% of patients in period 1 vs. 19% in period 2, p<0.001. Overall mortality was 19%, with a reduction to 12% in year 2006. Conclusion. The conservative protocol-based approach is a rational treatment strategy for the management of SAP and can be successfully implemented in the setting of the university hospital. PMID:18982151

  2. Reversible severe bilateral visual loss in an unusual case of bilateral lateral geniculate myelinolysis during acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Viloria, Alejandro; Jimenez, Beatriz; Palacn, Marta

    2015-01-01

    A 40-year-old man was diagnosed with pancreatitis following cholecystectomy. During hospitalisation, he reported bilateral acute vision loss. His best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was counting fingers in the right eye and 20/200 in the left eye. Ocular fundus examination and optical coherence tomography revealed a slight alteration in the retinal nerve fibres in the nasal macular region. Automated perimetry revealed bilateral visual field defects affecting both temporal and nasal hemifields in a predominantly nasal distribution, and brain MRI confirmed symmetrical lesions within both lateral geniculate nuclei. BCVA was gradually recovered, reaching 20/20 within 6?weeks. PMID:26718705

  3. Minimally Invasive Necrosectomy Techniques in Severe Acute Pancreatitis: Role of Percutaneous Necrosectomy and Video-Assisted Retroperitoneal Debridement

    PubMed Central

    Logue, Jennifer A.; Carter, C. Ross

    2015-01-01

    Consensus advocating a principle of early organ support, nutritional optimisation, followed ideally by delayed minimally invasive intervention within a “step-up” framework where possible has radically changed the surgical approach to complications of acute pancreatitis in the last 20 years. The 2012 revision of the Atlanta Classification incorporates these changes, and provides a background which underpins the complexities of individual patient management decisions. This paper discusses the place for delayed minimally invasive surgical intervention (percutaneous necrosectomy, video-assisted retroperitoneal debridement (VARD)), and the rationale for opting to adopt a percutaneous approach over endoscopic or laparoscopic approaches in different clinical situations. PMID:26587018

  4. Acute pancreatitis and its association with diabetes mellitus in children.

    PubMed

    Shenoy, S D; Cody, D; Rickett, A B; Swift, P G F

    2004-12-01

    Acute pancreatitis is more common in childhood than has been appreciated previously. During acute attacks of pancreatitis, hyperglycaemia and glycosuria are not uncommon but permanent diabetes mellitus is rare. Acute pancreatitis can also be associated with diabetic ketoacidosis and the association between these two is of a two-way cause and effect relationship. Early imaging of the pancreas is recommended in children with severe prolonged abdominal pain. PMID:15645701

  5. Imaging lexicon for acute pancreatitis: 2012 Atlanta Classification revisited

    PubMed Central

    Sureka, Binit; Bansal, Kalpana; Patidar, Yashwant; Arora, Ankur

    2016-01-01

    The original 1992 Atlanta Classification System for acute pancreatitis was revised in 2012 by the Atlanta Working Group, assisted by various national and international societies, through web-based consensus. This revised classification identifies two phases of acute pancreatitis: early and late. Acute pancreatitis can be either oedematous interstitial pancreatitis or necrotizing pancreatitis. Severity of the disease is categorized into three levels: mild, moderately severe and severe, depending upon organ failure and local/systemic complications. According to the type of pancreatitis, collections are further divided into acute peripancreatic fluid collection, pseudocyst, acute necrotic collection, and walled-off necrosis. Insight into the revised terminology is essential for accurate communication of imaging findings. In this review article, we will summarize the updated nomenclature and illustrate corresponding imaging findings using examples. PMID:26224684

  6. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE and ACE2) imbalance correlates with the severity of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ruixia; Qi, Haiyu; Wang, Jing; Wang, Yan; Cui, Lijian; Wen, Yan; Yin, Chenghong

    2014-04-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and its effector peptide angiotensin II (Ang II) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of pancreatitis. Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) degrades Ang II to angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)] and has recently been described to have an antagonistic effect on ACE signalling. However, the specific underlying role of ACE2 in the pathogenesis of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) is unclear. In the present study, the local imbalance of ACE and ACE2, as well as Ang II and Ang-(1-7) expression, was compared in wild-type (WT) and ACE2 knock-out (KO) or ACE2 transgenic (TG) mice subjected to cerulein-induced SAP. Serum amylase, tumour necrosis factor-?, interleukin (IL)-1?, IL-6 and IL-10 levels and histological morphometry were used to determine the severity of pancreatitis. In WT mice, pancreatic ACE and Ang II and serum Ang II expression increased (P < 0.05), while pancreatic ACE2 and Ang-(1-7) and serum Ang-(1-7) levels were also significantly elevated (P < 0.05) from 2 to 72 h after the onset of SAP. However, the ratio of pancreatic ACE2 to ACE expression was significantly reduced (from 1.46 0.09 to 0.27 0.05, P < 0.001) and paralleled the severity of pancreatitis. The Ace2 KO mice exhibited increased levels of tumour necrosis factor-?, IL-1?, IL-6, multifocal coagulative necrosis and inflammatory infiltrate, and lower levels of serum IL-10 and pancreatic Ang-(1-7) (4.70 2.13 versus 10.87 2.51, P < 0.001) compared with cerulein-treated WT mice at the same time point. Conversely, Ace2 TG mice with normal ACE expression were more resistant to SAP challenge as evidenced by a decreased inflammatory response, attenuated pathological changes and increased survival rates. These data suggest that the ACE2-ACE imbalance plays an important role in the pathogenesis of SAP and that pancreatic ACE2 is an important factor in determining the severity of SAP. PMID:24414175

  7. Acute pancreatitis and fibromyalgia: Cytokine link

    PubMed Central

    Muzammil, Sadat; Cooper, Helen Catherine

    2011-01-01

    Context: Fibromyalgia is a widespread musculoskeletal pain disorder found in 2% of the general population and with a preponderance of 85% in females, and has both genetic and environmental contribution. Acute pancreatitis is a severe condition and in most cases gallstones disease represents approximately half of the cases of acute pancreatitis, and 20-25% are related to alcohol abuse. Small numbers of cases are caused by a variety of other reasons but a few cases have no obvious cause, referred to as ‘idiopathic’. Here we present a case where fibromyalgia might be linked to acute pancreatitis. We believe this has not been reported in this context in literature. Case Report: Fibromyalgia is a widespread musculoskeletal pain disorder found in 2% of the general population and with a preponderance of 85% in females, and has both genetic and environmental contribution. Patient had a cholecystectomy eight years previously. Patient feels tired almost all the time due to her fibromyalgia and requires family support for daily routine. Patient's blood results showed alanine transaminase 527 IU/L, alkaline phosphatase 604 IU/L, bilirubin 34 μmol/L, amylase 2257 IU/L, C-reactive protein 19 mg/L, Gamma-Glutamyl transpeptidase 851 IU/L, renal function and electrolytes were within normal limits. The patient was admitted to the high dependency unit with a diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. Conclusion: There is a known increase in levels of cytokines in patients with fibromyalgia. Part of the pathophysiology of acute pancreatitis is related to raised cytokines and immune deregulations. We hypothesize that elevated levels of cytokines in fibromyalgia has led to acute pancreatitis in our patient. Further epidemiological research on the incidence of pancreatitis in cytokine mediated conditions such as fibromyalgia is required. PMID:22540093

  8. Role of Daphnetin in Rat Severe Acute Pancreatitis Through the Regulation of TLR4/NF-[Formula: see text]B Signaling Pathway Activation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhiyong; Liu, Jiao; Zhao, Kailiang; Shi, Qiao; Zuo, Teng; Wang, Guirong; Wang, Weixing

    2016-02-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) often results in multiple-organ dysfunction syndrome with high mortality. There is no effective clinical therapy for SAP, yet daphnetin, a coumarin extracted from Dracaena marginata, has analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects, and has been used clinically in several diseases. The objective of this study was to investigate the role and underlying mechanisms of daphnetin in a rat SAP model. Male Wistar rats were pretreated with daphnetin via intraperitoneal injection, 30[Formula: see text]min before retrograde infusion of 5% sodium taurocholate into the biliopancreatic duct. Twelve hours after sodium taurocholate administration, rats were sacrificed and tissues and blood were harvested. Then, histological, chemical, and molecular analyses were performed. Daphnetin treatment reduced the levels of serum alanine transaminase and creatinine (CR), increased superoxide dismutase(SOD) activity, and decreased neutrophil infiltration and cell apoptosis of the pancreatic tissues in rat SAP. Daphnetin treatment significantly decreased expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and increased expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines in rat SAP. Molecular analyses revealed that daphnetin reduced TLR4 expression and inhibited NF-[Formula: see text]B signaling pathway activation. These findings demonstrate that daphnetin attenuates acute pancreatic injury by regulating the TLR4/NF-[Formula: see text]B signaling pathway and inflammation in rat SAP model. Daphnetin may be a potential therapeutic agent for SAP. PMID:26916920

  9. Ethyl pyruvate significantly inhibits tumour necrosis factor-?, interleukin-1? and high mobility group box 1 releasing and attenuates sodium taurocholate-induced severe acute pancreatitis associated with acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Luan, Z-G; Zhang, J; Yin, X-H; Ma, X-C; Guo, R-X

    2013-06-01

    In this study, we examined the effect of ethyl pyruvate (EP) on pulmonary inflammation in rats with severe pancreatitis-associated acute lung injury (ALI). Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) was induced in rats by the retrograde injection of 5% sodium taurocholate into the pancreatic duct. Rats were randomly divided into the following experimental groups: control group, SAP group and EP-treated group. The tissue specimens were harvested for morphological studies, Streptavidin-peroxidase immunohistochemistry examination. Pancreatic or lung tissue oedema was evaluated by tissue water content. Serum amylase and lung tissue malondialdehyde (MDA) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) were measured. Meanwhile, the nuclear factor-?B (NF-?B) activation, tumour necrosis factor-? (TNF-?), interleukin-1? (IL-1?) levels and HMGB1 protein expression levels in the lung were studied. In the present study, we demonstrated that treatment with EP after SAP was associated with a reduction in the severity of SAP and lung injury. Treatment with EP significantly decreased the expression of TNF-?, IL-1?, HMGB1 and ameliorated MDA concentration, MPO activity in the lung in SAP rats. Compared to SAP group, administration of EP prevented pancreatitis-induced increases in nuclear translocation of NF-?B in the lung. Similarly, treatment with EP significantly decreased the accumulation of neutrophils and markedly reduced the enhanced lung permeability. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that EP might play a therapeutic role in pulmonary inflammation in this SAP model. PMID:23600830

  10. Somatostatin prevents acute pancreatitis after pancreatic duct sphincter hydrostatic balloon dilation in patients with idiopathic recurrent pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Guelrud, M; Mendoza, S; Viera, L; Gelrud, D

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether prophylactic somatostatin infusion can prevent pancreatitis after hydrostatic balloon dilation of the pancreatic duct sphincter segment in 16 patients with idiopathic recurrent pancreatitis. This study demonstrated that prophylactic administration of somatostatin before, during, and after the procedure diminished the incidence and severity of acute pancreatitis. We recommend consideration of such prophylaxis in patients undergoing this procedure. PMID:1672278

  11. Action of antiproteases on the inflammatory response in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Chia; Wang, Sun Sang; Lee, Fa-Yauh

    2007-01-01

    The spectrum of acute pancreatitis ranges from mild edematous disease to a severe necrotizing process which is usually accompanied by local or systemic complications and even mortality. Early deaths (within the first week) due to severe acute pancreatitis are generally caused by massive inflammatory responses which result in multiple organ failure. Although the exact mechanisms which trigger the inflammatory and necrotizing processes are not completely understood, it is generally accepted that autodigestion and activated leukocytes play important roles in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis. Proinflammatory cytokines are associated with systemic inflammatory response syndrome and multiple organ failure syndrome in acute pancreatitis. A compensatory anti-inflammatory response occurs in parallel with systemic inflammatory response syndrome. Trypsin secreted by the pancreatic acinar cells activates protease-activated receptor-2 which can result in the production of cytokines. Protease inhibitors such as aprotinin, gabexate mesilate, nafamostat mesilate, ulinastatin, etc. can inhibit the various enzymes and inflammatory response in experimental and clinical studies. Thus, protease inhibitors have been considered as a potential treatment to inhibit the pancreatic inflammation in acute pancreatitis. The beneficial effects of antiproteases on experimental severe acute pancreatitis may be, in part, due to the modulation of inflammatory cytokine responses. The effect of protease inhibitors on the inflammatory response in human acute pancreatitis deserves further study. PMID:17625305

  12. The role of pancreatic ducts in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Hegyi, Peter; Rakonczay, Zoltan

    2015-07-01

    Pancreatic ducts secrete 2.5l of alkaline, HCO3(-)-rich fluid daily which greatly contributes to the homeostasis of the pancreas. Ducts are also important in the pathophysiology of the pancreas; alteration of ductal function can lead to severe diseases such as cystic fibrosis and chronic pancreatitis. The role of pancreatic ducts in the development of acute pancreatitis has only been uncovered recently. Pancreatitis inducing agents like bile acids and ethanol dose-dependently affect pancreatic ductal secretion; low concentrations stimulate, whereas high concentrations inhibit secretion. The majority of the review will focus on the central role of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a critical protein in the regulation of ductal secretion, in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis which is highlighted by numerous investigations. Downregulation of CFTR expression results in increased severity of acute pancreatitis in mice. Furthermore, human genetic studies have demonstrated statistically significant association of CFTR mutations with acute recurrent pancreatitis. Overall, the data support the involvement of pancreatic ducts in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis. PMID:25921231

  13. Acute Pancreatitis Classifications: Basis and Key Goals

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiao Dong; Wang, Zhe Yuan; Zhang, Ling Yi; Ni, Rui; Wei, Feng Xian; Han, Wei; Zhang, Hui Han; Zhang, Ya Wu; Wei, Zhen Gang; Guo, Xiao Hu; Guo, Liu Qiang; Ma, Jian Zhong; Zhang, You Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To explore the efficacy of the revised Atlanta classification (RACAP) and the determinant-based classification of acute pancreatitis severity (DBCAPS) on the basis of clinical data and feedback from patients with acute pancreatitis (AP). The authors retrospectively investigated a total of 573 patients with AP admitted to our hospital between December 2011 and December 2014. The definitions of severity and local complications in AP using RACAP and DBCAPS are presented and common points and mutual differences between the 2 groups are analyzed and discussed. Classification according to RACAP and DBCAPS found 86 (15%) and 178 (31.1%) mild cases (P?severe cases (P?=?0.95), respectively. A major contribution of DBCAPS is the introduction of a new type of severe AP, critical AP, identified in 4 patients (0.7%). Complications were observed in 313 RACAP-defined cases and 153 DBCAPS-defined cases (P?acute peripancreatic fluid collection (236 patients, 75.40%), pancreatic pseudocysts (20 patients, 6.4%), acute necrotic collection (42 patients, 13.4%), and walled-off necrosis (15 patients, 4.8%) were observed. Among the 153 DBCAPS-defined cases, sterile peripancreatic necrosis (105 patients, 68.6%), sterile pancreatic necrosis (44 patients, 28.8%), infected peripancreatic necrosis (2 patients, 1.3%), and infected pancreatic necrosis (2/153 patients, 1.3%) were observed. Both classifications adopted organ failure and complications as determinants of severity. Revised Atlanta classification refined local complications and DBCAPS modified severity to include critical AP. In accordance with the demands of precision medicine, a combination of the 2 could be important for further clinical practice and scientific research. PMID:26632905

  14. Respiratory failure in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, A. K.; Haggie, S. J.; Jones, R. B.; Basran, G. S.

    1995-01-01

    There are a number of important pulmonary complications of acute pancreatitis which make a significant contribution to the morbidity and mortality of the condition. The pathophysiology and management guidelines are given for each and approaches towards better treatment in the future are discussed. PMID:7644392

  15. Acute idiopathic pancreatitis in pregnancy: A case study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Yeon; Jung, Sung Hoon; Choi, Hyung Wook; Song, Dong Jin; Jeong, Cheol Yoon; Lee, Dong Hyun; Whang, Il Soon

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis during pregnancy is a rare event, and can be associated with high maternal mortality and fetal loss. Gallstone disease is thought to be the most common causative factor of acute pancreatitis, but, in many cases, the cause remains unclear. We report a case of a 36-year-old woman at 35 wk of gestation, who presented with severe pain confined to the upper abdomen and radiating to the back. The patient was diagnosed with acute idiopathic pancreatitis, which was managed conservatively; she recovered within several days and then delivered a healthy baby. Therefore it is important to consider acute pancreatitis when a pregnant woman presents with upper abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting in order to improve fetal and maternal outcomes for patients with acute pancreatitis. PMID:25473197

  16. The Timing of Biliary Surgery in Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Ranson, John H. C.

    1979-01-01

    The timing of biliary surgery remains controversial in patients with acute pancreatitis associated with cholelithiasis. Eighty hospital admissions for acute pancreatitis, occurring in 74 patients with cholelithiasis, have therefore been reviewed. Among 22 patients who underwent abdominal surgery during the first week of treatment, there were five deaths (23%) and four patients (18%) who required more than seven days of intensive care. Fifty-eight episodes of pancreatitis were managed nonoperatively during the first week of treatment, with no deaths, although six (10%) required more than seven days of intensive care. Biliary surgery was undertaken later during the same admission in 37 patients, with no deaths. Twenty-one patients were discharged without biliary operation, but seven (33%) developed further pancreatitis. Previously reported prognostic signs were used to divide pancreatitis into 57 mild episodes (1.8% mortality) and 23 severe episodes (17% mortality). Early (day 0-7) definitive biliary surgery was undertaken in 11 patients with mild pancreatitis, with one death (9%), and in six patients with severe pancreatitis, with four deaths (67%). In three recent patients with severe pancreatitis, early biliary surgery was limited to cholecystostomy, with no deaths. These findings suggest that although early correction of associated biliary disease may be undertaken safely in many patients with mild acute pancreatitis, early definitive surgery is hazardous in severe pancreatitis and should, if possible, be deferred until pancreatitis has subsided. In most patients biliary surgery should precede hospital discharge. PMID:443917

  17. [The clinical relevance of experimental acute pancreatitis models].

    PubMed

    Takács, Tamás; Szabolcs, Anna; Biczó, György; Hegyi, Péter; Rakonczay, Zoltán

    2008-10-19

    The clinical diagnostics and therapeutic standards applied in the routine management of human acute pancreatitis are based on the results of animal experiments and human studies performed in the past several decades. During this time period, a number of experimental acute pancreatitis models have been developed, which allowed us to study the etiopathogenesis of acute pancreatitis, analyzing the local and remote complications of the inflammatory processes and also the preclinical testing of potentially effective drugs and agents. Only animal models are suitable to examine the very early phase of the pathogenetic processes in acute pancreatitis. In recent years, the progress in molecular genetic methods allowed us to create genetically engineered animal models to clarify the role of different mediators in the pathogenetic process. There is no doubt that the results gained from experimental animal studies are of limited value concerning human pancreatitis. Nevertheless, experimental studies seem to be indispensable in the progress of management of human pancreatic disorders. PMID:18842550

  18. INCIDENCE OF ACUTE PANCREATITIS IN ALBANIAN POPULATION

    PubMed Central

    Kurti, Floreta; Shpata, Vjollca; Kuqo, Altin; Duni, Albana; Roshi, Enver; Basho, Jovan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acute Pancreatitis (AP) is an inflammatory pathology with large regional variations in incidence and etiology Aim: The aim of the study was to provide a description of the epidemiologic situation of AP in Albanian population, regarding incidence, etiology and severity of the disease Methods: We have studied all the files of all patients with acute pancreatitis admitted at the UHC ‘Mother Theresa” during an eight year period (2005-2012). The results: We had 964 admissions with the diagnosis acute pancreatitis, making an incidence of 5.64 per 100 000 inhabitants per year. Mean age of patients was 54.5 ± 16.93 years old. Among risk factors, alcohol consumption was found in 382 patients (39.6%), gallstone in 362 patients (37.6%), and others in 220 patients (22.8%). Conclusion: The incidence of acute pancreatitis in Albania ranges from 3.6 – 5.64 new cases per 100 000 inhabitants per year, with an increasing trend during the last years. The incidence of AP among females almost doubles during 2005-2012. Alcohol consumption is the predominating etiologic factor among young males. PMID:26889094

  19. [Diagnosis and therapy of acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Bergamini, C; Luchetti, P; Tieghi, C

    1984-06-23

    A retrospective analysis of 83 cases of acute pancreatitis treated in the General Surgery Division of the G. Fornaroli Hospital in Magenta (Milan) is presented. It is emphasised that acute pancreatitis should be suspected in all hospitalised acute abdominal cases and the need for prompt medical and surgical treatment is also underlined, during acute pancreatitis are analysed and discussed with a review of the most appropriate therapeutic measures. PMID:6738906

  20. Acute Pancreatitis in a Patient with Complicated Falciparum Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Prasanta Kumar; Lynrah, Kryshan G; Ete, Tony; Issar, Neel Kanth

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is one of the most common protozoan diseases, especially in tropical countries. The clinical manifestation of malaria, especially falciparum malaria varies from mild acute febrile illness to life threatening severe systemic complications involving one or more organ systems. We would like to report a case of complicated falciparum malaria involving cerebral, renal, hepatic system along with acute pancreatitis. The patient was successfully treated with anti malarial and other supportive treatment. To the best of our knowledge there are very few reports of acute pancreatitis due to malaria. Falciparum malaria therefore should be added to the list of infectious agents causing acute pancreatitis especially in areas where malaria is endemic. PMID:26894117

  1. [Diagnostic and management algorithm of acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Rybakov, G S; Dibirov, M D; Briskin, B S; Khalidov, O Kh; Barsukov, M G; Prosperov, M A; Kuznetsova, M A; Mikhaĭlin, A A; Ramazanova, Iu I; Larichev, D V; Kuz'mina, I D

    2008-01-01

    The analysis of diagnostics and treatment of 602 patients with destructive pancreatitis has shown that definition of etiological and pathogenetic forms of pancreatitis defines strategy of treatment. In this way, patients with biliary pancreatitis require emergency operative treatment with use of endoscopic interventions without dependence from a stage of disease. To patients with alcoholic or alimentary pancreatitis in the stage of enzymatic toxemia conservative treatment should be spent only, until shock and/or delirium won't be reduced. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography + endoscopic papillosphincterotomy with concrement removal from common bile duct--is the operation of choice in case of acute biliary pancreatitis at the first stage. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is the operation of choice at the second stage of disease. At destructive pancreatitis of other origin in a stage of the infection or necrotic suppurative inflammation use of open and closed small invasive methods of intervention is most proved. Given tactics of treatment has allowed to lower severity of clinical course, frequency of complications and lethality. PMID:18454103

  2. Energetic etiologies of acute pancreatitis: A report of five cases

    PubMed Central

    Shmelev, Artem; Abdo, Alain; Sachdev, Sarina; Shah, Urvi; Kowdley, Gopal C; Cunningham, Steven C

    2015-01-01

    There are several common causes of acute pancreatitis, principally excessive alcohol intake and gallstones, and there are many rare causes. However, cases of pancreatitis still occur in the absence of any recognizable factors, and these cases of idiopathic pancreatitis suggest the presence of unrecognized etiologies. Five cases of acute pancreatitis in four patients came to attention due to a strong temporal association with exposure to nerve stimulators and energy drinks. Given that these cases of pancreatitis were otherwise unexplained, and given that these exposures were not clearly known to be associated with pancreatitis, we performed a search for precedent cases and for mechanistic bases. No clear precedent cases were found in PubMed and only scant, weak precedent cases were found in public-health databases. However, there was a coherent body of intriguing literature in support of a mechanistic basis for these exposures playing a role in the etiology of pancreatitis. PMID:26600983

  3. Energetic etiologies of acute pancreatitis: A report of five cases.

    PubMed

    Shmelev, Artem; Abdo, Alain; Sachdev, Sarina; Shah, Urvi; Kowdley, Gopal C; Cunningham, Steven C

    2015-11-15

    There are several common causes of acute pancreatitis, principally excessive alcohol intake and gallstones, and there are many rare causes. However, cases of pancreatitis still occur in the absence of any recognizable factors, and these cases of idiopathic pancreatitis suggest the presence of unrecognized etiologies. Five cases of acute pancreatitis in four patients came to attention due to a strong temporal association with exposure to nerve stimulators and energy drinks. Given that these cases of pancreatitis were otherwise unexplained, and given that these exposures were not clearly known to be associated with pancreatitis, we performed a search for precedent cases and for mechanistic bases. No clear precedent cases were found in PubMed and only scant, weak precedent cases were found in public-health databases. However, there was a coherent body of intriguing literature in support of a mechanistic basis for these exposures playing a role in the etiology of pancreatitis. PMID:26600983

  4. Diosmetin ameliorates the severity of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in mice by inhibiting the activation of the nuclear factor-?B

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ge; Wan, Rong; Yin, Guojian; Xiong, Jie; Hu, Yanling; Xing, Miao; Cang, Xiaofeng; Fan, Yuting; Xiao, Wenqin; Qiu, Lei; Wang, Xingpeng; Hu, Guoyong

    2014-01-01

    Diosmetin (3, 5, 7-trihydroxy-4-methoxyflavone), the aglycone part of the flavonoid glycosides diosmin occurs naturally in citrus fruit, was considered to exhibit anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. Our study aimed to investigate the effect of diosmetin in a murine model of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis (AP). Experimental AP was induced in mice by seven intraperitoneal injection of cerulein (50 ug/kg) at hourly intervals. Diosmetin (100 mg/kg) or vehicle was pretreated 2 h before the first cerulein injection. After 6 h, 9 h, 12 h of the first cerulein injection, the severity of acute pancreatitis was evaluated biochemically and morphologically. Pretreatment with diosmetin significantly reduced serum levels of amylase and lipase; the histological injury; the secretion of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-?, interleukin (IL)-1?, and IL-6; myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, trypsinogen activation peptide (TAP) level, the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS); and the nuclear factor (NF)-?B activation in cerulein-induced AP. This study showed that administration of diosmetin demonstrated a beneficial effect on the course of cerulein-induced AP in mice. Therefore, diosmetin may become a new therapeutic agent in future clinical trials for treatment of AP. PMID:24966921

  5. [Biochemical diagnostics in acute pancreatitis recognition and outcome predicition].

    PubMed

    Olczyk, Pawe?; Kozma, Ewa M; Olczyk, Krystyna; Komosi?ska-Vassev, Katarzyna

    2004-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a common disease associated with an improper activation of pancreatic zymogens leading to autodigestion of the gland and if excessive--to multiple organ dysfunction. Acute necrotizing pancreatitis manifested by 20% of patients with acute pancreatitis is a life threatening disorder requiring subsequent management in intensive care unit. Unfortunately, none of biochemical tests presently used for laboratory assessment of acute pancreatitis at the early stage of the disease is able to estimate accurately: diagnosis, etiology and severity. At present, diagnosis of acute pancreatitis is based on evaluation of serum amylase and lipase activity due to easy availability and simplicity of these enzymatic tests. Low specificity of the mentioned enzymes resulted in studies concerning pancreatic isoamylase, elastase-1, chymotrypsine, procarboxy-peptidase B, trypsinogen-2 and immunoreactive trypsinogen usefulness in the laboratory diagnosis of AP. The prediction of severity in acute pancreatitis using multifactorial scoring systems is cumbersome especially due to their complexity. On the other hand the biochemical method of choice, estimation of serum C reactive protein, is useless in the early phase of disease. Unfortunately, the computed tomography--the most accurate method in severity assessing--is not always available. Recent studies have brought some progress in severity predicting, such as phospholipase A2, cellular immunity markers, cytokines, activation peptides of trypsinogen and carboxypeptidase B, procalcitonine, pancreatitis associated protein and serum amyloid A. All these newly introduced biochemical methods allow to look optimistically into the future of laboratory diagnostics of the acute pancreatitis believing that the problem of diagnosing and predicting the AP severity will be solved. PMID:15850341

  6. Acute necrotizing pancreatitis as first manifestation of primary hyperparathyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Lenz, Jeroen I; Jacobs, Jimmy M; Op de Beeck, Bart; Huyghe, Ivan A; Pelckmans, Paul A; Moreels, Tom G

    2010-01-01

    We report the case of a female patient with severe acute necrotizing pancreatitis associated with hypercalcemia as first manifestation of primary hyperparathyroidism caused by a benign parathyroid adenoma. Initially the acute pancreatitis was treated conservatively. The patient subsequently underwent surgical resection of the parathyroid adenoma and surgical clearance of a large infected pancreatic pseudocyst. Although the association of parathyroid adenoma-induced hypercalcemia and acute pancreatitis is a known medical entity, it is very uncommon. The pathophysiology of hypercalcemia-induced acute pancreatitis is therefore not well known, although some mechanisms have been proposed. It is important to treat the provoking factor. Therefore, the cause of hypercalcemia should be identified early. Surgical resection of the parathyroid adenoma is the ultimate therapy. PMID:20556845

  7. Hereditary Angioedema Presenting as Recurrent Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Berger, Tal D; Garty, Ben-Zion

    2016-02-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) may manifest with swelling of the face, extremities, and upper airways. Gastrointestinal symptoms are also common and may include abdominal pain, vomiting, and diarrhea. However, pancreatic involvement is rare and has been reported only in a few adults with previously diagnosed HAE. We describe a 6-year-old boy who presented with recurrent severe abdominal pain accompanied by an elevation in pancreatic enzyme levels, without subcutaneous or cutaneous angioedema. His symptoms had begun 18 months earlier, and he was hospitalized several times before the present admission with a diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. More comprehensive analysis yielded low levels of C2, C4, CH50, and C1 esterase inhibitor, establishing the diagnosis of HAE. One year after diagnosis, swelling of the extremities appeared for the first time. This is the first report of a child in whom pancreatic disease was the presenting symptom of HAE. HAE should be included in the differential diagnosis of recurrent pancreatitis in children. PMID:26812927

  8. Drug induced acute pancreatitis: Does it exist?

    PubMed Central

    Tenner, Scott

    2014-01-01

    As the incidence of acute pancreatitis continues to rise, establishing the etiology in order to prevent recurrence is important. Although the etiology of acute pancreatitis is not difficult in the majority of patients, almost a quarter of patients are initially labeled as having idiopathic acute pancreatitis. When confronted with a patient with acute pancreatitis and no clear etiology defined as an absence alcoholism, gallstones (ultrasound and/or MRI), a normal triglyceride level, and absence of tumor, it often appears reasonable to consider a drug as the cause of acute pancreatitis. Over 100 drugs have been implicated by case reports as causing acute pancreatitis. While some of these case reports are well written, many case reports represent poorly written experiences of the clinician simply implicating a drug without a careful evaluation. Over-reliance on case reports while ignoring randomized clinical trials and large pharmacoepidemiologic surveys has led to confusion about drug induced acute pancreatitis. This review will explain that drug induced acute pancreatitis does occur, but it is rare, and over diagnosis leads to misconceptions about the disease resulting in inappropriate patient care, increased litigation and a failure to address the true entity: idiopathic acute pancreatitis. PMID:25469020

  9. Plasmablastic Lymphoma Mimicking Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Virk, Hafeez Ul Hassan; Cheema, Ahmad R.; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2016-01-01

    Background. Plasmablastic lymphoma (PBL) is a rare B-cell neoplasm. It predominantly occurs in the oral cavity of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients and exhibits a highly aggressive clinical behavior. Case Presentation. We describe an unusual case of a 37-year-old HIV-positive male who presented with acute pancreatitis secondary to multiple peripancreatic masses compressing the pancreas. Histopathological examination of the lesions showed diffuse and cohesive pattern of large B-cells resembling immunoblasts or plasmablasts. The neoplastic cells were positive for BOB1 and MUM1, partially positive for CD79a, and negative for CD20, CD56, CD138, CD3, CD5, AE1/AE3, and HHV8. Epstein-Barr virus-encoded RNA in situ hybridization was positive. These features were consistent with PBL. The patient was initiated on cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (CHOP) chemotherapy, demonstrating a striking response. Conclusion. To our research, this is the first report of PBL with the initial presentation of acute pancreatitis. The findings in this case suggest that PBL should be included in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic and peripancreatic tumors.

  10. Nutritional support in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Neeraj; O'Keefe, Stephen J D

    2004-08-01

    Acute pancreatitis is one of the most catabolic of critical illnesses, and its clinical course is often prolonged. Consequently, the need for interventional nutritional support is great. Because of fears that feeding might exacerbate the tryptic autodigestion and disease process, total parenteral nutrition was used exclusively until recent years, when it was recognized that the complications of hyperglycemia and sepsis outweighed nutritional benefits. In clinical practice, enteral feeding has proven superior because it avoids these complications and maintains gut function, but enteral feeding needs to be given in a form that minimizes pancreatic stimulation. This review discusses the advances in our understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease, the results of recent clinical trials of nutritional support, and the challenges that remain in optimizing nutritional management. PMID:15245702

  11. [Unusual presentation of hypertriglyceridemic acute pancreatitis in a child].

    PubMed

    Boutbaoucht, M; Mouaffak, Y; Dilai, M-O; Najib, M; Jalal, H; El Adib, A-G; Younous, S

    2012-03-01

    Acute pancreatitis in children is rare and is characterized by clinical, biological, and etiological polymorphism. We report the case of a 6-year-old child who underwent surgery for intestinal obstruction. The diagnosis of acute pancreatitis was made after the surgical exploration. Initial laboratory tests showed hyperlipasemia and mild hypertriglyceridemia. After 2 weeks of hospitalization, we found severe hypertriglyceridemia, which was considered the cause of acute pancreatitis. Based on a review of the literature, we emphasize the importance of considering acute pancreatitis in the diagnosis of abdominal pain in children. Hypertriglyceridemia is one of its rare causes and must be detected because specific treatments are needed. Blood triglyceride concentration in the initial phase can be misleading and the assay should be repeated after the acute episode. PMID:22269915

  12. The Conspiracy of Autophagy, Stress and Inflammation in Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Jason C.; Crawford, Howard C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Acute pancreatitis (AP) is associated with alcohol abuse, gallstones and bacterial infection. Its basic etiology is tissue destruction accompanied by an innate inflammatory response, which induces epithelial stress pathways. Recent studies have focused on some of the integral cellular pathways shared between multiple pancreatitis models that also suggest new approaches to detection and treatment. Recent findings Several models of pancreatitis have been associated with stress responses, such as endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and oxidative stress together with the induction of a defective autophagic pathway. Recent evidence reinforces the critical role of these cellular processes in pancreatitis. A member of the the Toll-Like Receptor family, TLR4, which is known to contribute to disease pathology in many models of experimental pancreatitis, has been found to be a promising target for treatment of pancreatitis. Interestingly, a direct activator of TLR4,, the bacterial cell wall component in Gram negative bacteria lipopolysaccharide (LPS), contributes to the onset and severity of disease when combined with additional stressors, such as chronic alcohol feeding, however recent studies have shown that acute infection of mice with live bacteria is alone sufficient to induce acute pancreatitis. Summary In the last several months, the convergent roles of acinar cell stress, autophagy and proinflammatory signaling initiated by the toll-like receptors have been emphatically reinforced in the onset of acute pancreatitis. PMID:25003605

  13. Peritoneal lavage efficiently eliminates protease-alpha-2-macroglobulin complexes and components of the contact system from the peritoneal cavity in patients with severe acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Aasen, A O; Ruud, T E; Roeise, O; Bouma, B N; Stadaas, J O

    1989-01-01

    Trypsin (Try), plasma kallikrein (KK) and plasmin activities together with coagulation factor XII (F XII, Hageman factor), high-molecular-weight kininogen (HMWK), plasma prekallikrein (PKK), alpha 2-macroglobulin (alpha 2-M), C1 inhibitor (C1Inh), and functional plasma kallikrein inhibition (KKI) values were studied in peritoneal fluid and lavage taps of 9 patients with severe acute pancreatitis treated with peritoneal lavage. Both immunochemical methods and functional techniques based on chromogenic peptide substrate assays were used. In the exudate obtained before peritoneal lavage was performed, F XII was 52%, HMWK was 30%, PKK was 40%, alpha 2-M was 29% and C1Inh was 57% of standard plasma pool values, determined by immunochemical technique. Functional plasma KKI values were zero, whereas Try activities determined by chromogenic peptide substrate technique were markedly elevated in the exudate. Using a prepacked HR 10/30 Superose Tm 12 column (Pharmacia, Uppsala, Sweden) and chromogenic peptide substrate assays, Try and KK activities were detected in the alpha 2-M containing fractions of the peritoneal exudate demonstrating KK-alpha 2-M and Try-alpha 2-M complex formation. The peritoneal lavage procedure efficiently eliminated components of the contact system and protease activities. In the first lavage tap, Try activities were markedly reduced compared to values found in the exudate and concentrations of F XII, HMWK, PKK, alpha 2-M and C1Inh were all zero. In consecutive lavage taps Try values were also zero. The study shows that the lavage procedures efficiently clears the peritoneal cavity for protease-alpha 2-M complexes generated during acute pancreatitis. Also, components of the contact system found in peritoneal exudate, and which might serve as substrates for the protease-alpha 2-M complexes, are rapidly eliminated by the procedure. PMID:2469582

  14. Acute pancreatitis in a multi-ethnic population.

    PubMed

    Kandasami, P; Harunarashid, Hanafiah; Kaur, Harjit

    2002-06-01

    There is very little information in literature describing ethnic variations in etiologic and clinical outcome of acute pancreatitis in the Asian population. This study describes the demographic, etiologic and clinical course of acute pancreatitis among the three main races in Malaysia namely, the Malays, Chinese and Indians. One hundred and thirty-three consecutive patients were admitted for acute pancreatitis for the period January 1994 to July 1999 and they consisted of 77 males and 56 females with a mean age of 43.5 years (SD+/- 14.7). The racial breakdown of acute pancreatitis was: Malays 38 (28.6%), Chinese 19 (14.3%), Indians 75 (56.4%) and 1 (0.8%) patient was an orang asli. The incidence of alcohol association with acute pancreatitis was significantly increased in the males, while gallstone pancreatitis was principally a disease of the female. Alcohol was identified as the predominant factor associated with acute pancreatitis among the Indians (73.3%) and in contrast, gallstone was the commonest associated etiologic factor for the Malays and Chinese. No etiologic factor could be identified in a substantial proportion of the Malay patients (60.5%) when compared to the Chinese (36.8%) and Indians (35%). Severe disease developed in 25% of the cases reviewed but there was no difference in of the rate of severe pancreatitis in terms of ethnic groupings or etiologic factors. The overall mortality rate was 7.5% and the commonest cause of death was multi-organ failure. The study recognises that there are differences in the characteristics of acute pancreatitis among the three major races in the country and this divergence is primarily due to sociocultural habits. PMID:12380724

  15. Acute Pancreatitis and Splenic Vein Thrombosis due to Hypertriglyceridemia

    PubMed Central

    Gndz, Ercan; Dursun, Recep; ?er, Mustafa; Zengin, Y?lmaz; Glo?lu, Cahfer

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a condition characterised by the activation of the normally inactive digestive enzymes due to an etiological factor and digestion of the pancreatic tissues, resulting in extensive inflammation and leading to local, regional, and systemic complications in the organism. It may vary from the mild edematous to the hemorrhagic and severely necrotising form. The most common causes are biliary stones and alcohol abuse. In this case study, we would like to present a patient with AP due to hypertriglyceridemia (HPTG), which is a rare cause of pancreatitis, and splenic vein thrombosis, which is a rare complication of pancreatitis. PMID:25802772

  16. Involvement of interleukin-17A in pancreatic damage in rat experimental acute necrotizing pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Ni, Jianbo; Hu, Guoyong; Xiong, Jie; Shen, Jie; Shen, Jiaqing; Yang, Lijuan; Tang, Maochun; Zhao, Yan; Ying, Guojian; Yu, Ge; Hu, Yanling; Xing, Miao; Wan, Rong; Wang, Xingpeng

    2013-02-01

    Interleukin (IL)-17A is a proinflammatory cytokine, which has recently attracted much interest due to its pathogenic role in various inflammatory conditions such as ischemia/reperfusion injury, chronic inflammation, and autoimmune diseases, but the role of IL-17A in acute pancreatitis remains unclear. This study aimed to investigate the role of IL-17A in experimental acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP). We analyzed the expression of IL-17A during the pathogenesis of ANP in vivo induced by 3 % sodium taurocholate (NaTc), by microarray test, quantitative real-time PCR, Western blotting, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and immunohistochemistry. The effects of IL-17A on pancreatic acinar cells and pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) were further investigated in vitro using recombinant rat IL-17A (rIL-17A). Expression of IL-17A was significantly increased following experimental acute pancreatitis. In addition, rIL-17A induced rat pancreatic acinar cell necrosis and promoted expression of several target genes, including IL-6, IL-1?, CXCL1, CXCL2, and CXCL5, in acinar cells and PSCs. These findings suggest that IL-17A may be involved in pancreatic damage by regulating the expression of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines during experimental acute pancreatitis. PMID:22990529

  17. Acute pancreatitis: international classification and nomenclature.

    PubMed

    Bollen, T L

    2016-02-01

    The incidence of acute pancreatitis (AP) is increasing and it is associated with a major healthcare concern. New insights in the pathophysiology, better imaging techniques, and novel treatment options for complicated AP prompted the update of the 1992 Atlanta Classification. Updated nomenclature for pancreatic collections based on imaging criteria is proposed. Adoption of the newly Revised Classification of Acute Pancreatitis 2012 by radiologists should help standardise reports and facilitate accurate conveyance of relevant findings to referring physicians involved in the care of patients with AP. This review will clarify the nomenclature of pancreatic collections in the setting of AP. PMID:26602933

  18. Acute mediastinitis arising from pancreatic mediastinal fistula in recurrent pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Choe, In Soo; Kim, Yong Seok; Lee, Tae Hee; Kim, Sun Moon; Song, Kyung Ho; Koo, Hoon Sup; Park, Jung Ho; Pyo, Jin Sil; Kim, Ji Yeong; Choi, In Seok

    2014-10-28

    Acute mediastinitis is a fatal disease that usually originates from esophageal perforation and surgical infection. Rare cases of descending necrotizing mediastinitis can occur following oral cavity and pharynx infection or can be a complication of pancreatitis. The most common thoracic complications of pancreatic disease are reactive pleural effusion and pneumonia, while rare complications include thoracic conditions, such as pancreaticopleural fistula with massive pleural effusion or hemothorax and extension of pseudocyst into the mediastinum. There have been no reports of acute mediastinitis originating from pancreatitis in South Korea. In this report, we present the case of a 50-year-old female suffering from acute mediastinitis with pleural effusion arising from recurrent pancreatitis that improved after surgical intervention. PMID:25356062

  19. Acute mediastinitis arising from pancreatic mediastinal fistula in recurrent pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Choe, In Soo; Kim, Yong Seok; Lee, Tae Hee; Kim, Sun Moon; Song, Kyung Ho; Koo, Hoon Sup; Park, Jung Ho; Pyo, Jin Sil; Kim, Ji Yeong; Choi, In Seok

    2014-01-01

    Acute mediastinitis is a fatal disease that usually originates from esophageal perforation and surgical infection. Rare cases of descending necrotizing mediastinitis can occur following oral cavity and pharynx infection or can be a complication of pancreatitis. The most common thoracic complications of pancreatic disease are reactive pleural effusion and pneumonia, while rare complications include thoracic conditions, such as pancreaticopleural fistula with massive pleural effusion or hemothorax and extension of pseudocyst into the mediastinum. There have been no reports of acute mediastinitis originating from pancreatitis in South Korea. In this report, we present the case of a 50-year-old female suffering from acute mediastinitis with pleural effusion arising from recurrent pancreatitis that improved after surgical intervention. PMID:25356062

  20. Can early endoscopic ultrasound predict pancreatic necrosis in acute pancreatitis?

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Surinder S.; Bhasin, Deepak K.; Sharma, Vishal; Sharma, Ravi; Chaudhary, Vinita; Chhabra, Puneet

    2014-01-01

    Background Presence of pancreatic/extrapancreatic necroses (PN/EPN) is an important prognostic indicator in acute pancreatitis (AP) and their early detection is a challenge. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) provides high resolution images of pancreas but there is paucity of data on its role in AP. Methods Consecutive patients with AP seen at our center from December 2012-November 2013 and presenting within 5 days of onset of symptoms were prospectively enrolled. EUS was done on the day of admission with a radial echoendoscope and pancreatic/peripancreatic findings were compared with the abdominal computed tomography (CT) findings performed on day 7. Results Of the 46 patients evaluated, 14 were excluded, and 32 patients (22 male; age 40.6812.46 years) underwent EUS at admission. The etiology of AP was alcohol in 16, gallstones in 13, and idiopathic in 3 patients. Necrotizing pancreatitis was present in 20 (62%) patients, and mean CT severity index was 6.452.96. In patients without PN (n=12), EUS revealed normal echo pattern in 6 patients and diffusely hyperechoic and enlarged pancreas in 6 patients. In patients with PN/EPN, EUS revealed multiple hypoechoic areas (>5 mm) in 5 patients, multiple hyperechoic areas (>5 mm) in 7 patients and mixed hypo and hyperechoic areas in 8 patients. Also, 13 of these patients had peripancreatic hypoechoic areas that correlated with EPN. Moreover, EUS detected common bile duct (CBD) stones in two patients, pleural effusion in 17 patients, and ascites in 15 patients. Conclusion EUS done at admission can reliably detect PN and co-existent disorders like CBD stones. PMID:25331790

  1. Acute pancreatitis complicated by acute myocardial infarction A rare association

    PubMed Central

    Vasantha Kumar, Allam; Mohan Reddy, G.; Anirudh Kumar, A.

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis complicated by acute myocardial infarction has been reported very rarely. The exact mechanism of the cause of myocardial injury is not known. We report a case of 36 year old male presenting with acute pancreatitis complicated by ST elevation acute myocardial infarction (AMI). The administration of thrombolytic therapy in such patients can have deleterious effects. We report successful performance of primary angioplasty in this complicated patient. PMID:23993014

  2. Acute pancreatitis complicated by acute myocardial infarction - a rare association.

    PubMed

    Vasantha Kumar, Allam; Mohan Reddy, G; Anirudh Kumar, A

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis complicated by acute myocardial infarction has been reported very rarely. The exact mechanism of the cause of myocardial injury is not known. We report a case of 36 year old male presenting with acute pancreatitis complicated by ST elevation acute myocardial infarction (AMI). The administration of thrombolytic therapy in such patients can have deleterious effects. We report successful performance of primary angioplasty in this complicated patient. PMID:23993014

  3. Acute pancreatitis in two five-day-old Appaloosa foals.

    PubMed

    Ollivett, T L; Divers, T J; Cushing, T; Priest, H; Dawson, D R; Peters, R; Stokol, T

    2012-02-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) in foals is rare and treatment has not been documented. This paper describes the clinical, haematological and ultrasonographic findings as well as attempted treatment of SAP in two 5-day-old Appaloosa fillies. Clinical signs, including colic, diarrhoea and coma, may be mistaken for sepsis or neonatal encephalopathy. Hyperlipaemic serum and peritoneal fluid, and elevated serum and peritoneal fluid amylase and lipase activities aided the diagnosis. Severe acute pancreatitis should be included as a differential in an acutely ill foal with diarrhoea, colic, cerebral cortica dysfunction and hyperlipaemia. PMID:22594035

  4. [On PACAP-aggravated experimental acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Chen, Youdai; Zhou, Zongguang; Chen, Youqin; Wang, Zhao; Gao, Hongkai; Zheng, Xuelian

    2004-12-01

    The role of PACAP (pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide), a peptidergic transmitter, in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis is not yet clear. This experiment was conducted to examine the action of exogenous PACAP on rat pancreas and on the course of experimental acute pancreatitis. The results showed that 5-30 microg/kg of PACAP slightly raised the serum amylase level, induced pancreatic edema (23.88% +/- 2.532%-25.86% +/- 1.974% of experiment groups versus 29.21% +/- 5.657% of control group), inflammatory cell infiltration, vacuolization of acinar cells, and occasionally fatty and parenchymal necroses. 15-30 microg/kg of PACAP aggravated cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis; the pancreatic edema became more marked (13.45% +/- 2.045%-17.66% +/- 4.652% of expreiment groups versus 21.83% +/- 3.013% of cerulein group, P<0.05), the serum amylase level became higher; and ascites, pancreatic bleeding, fatty and parenchymal necroses, and extensive vacuolization of acinar cells appeared. For sodium taurocholate-induced pancreatitis, 5-10 microg/kg of PACAP mildly attenuated the pancreatic edema, reduced the serum amylase level (1986.91 +/- 710.97-2944.33 +/- 1182.47 IU/L vs 3690.87 +/- 2277.99 IU/L, P<0.05), whereas it caused multifocal hemorrhage and prominent necrosis in pancreas. Except the cerulein-induced pancreatitis groups, other groups were found to have reduced pancreatic functional capillary density (FCD); when pancreatic edema was taken into consideration and calibrated FCD was introduced (FCD weighted against pancreatic wet/dry ratio), all groups revealed increases in pancreatic functional capillaries when compared with normal control. In conclusion, PACAP is proinflammatory in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis, PACAP plus cerulein can induce acute hemorrhagic/necrotizing pancreatitis, and the action of PACAP on cerulein-induced panceatitis may differ from that on sodium taurocholate-induced one. In this experiment, pancreatic FCD was underestimated due to pancreatic edema. PMID:15646343

  5. Stress kinase inhibition modulates acute experimental pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Fleischer, F.; Dabew, R.; ke, B. G; Wagner, ACC

    2001-01-01

    AIM: To examine the role of p38 during acute experimental cerulein pancreatitis. METHODS: Rats were treated with cerulein with or without a specific JNK inhibitor (CEP1347) and/or a specific p38 inhbitor (SB203580) and pancreatic stress kinase activity was determined. Parameters to assess pancreatitis included trypsin, amylase, lipase, pancreatic weight and histology. RESULTS: JNK inhibition with CEP1347 ameliorated pancreatitis, reducing pancreatic edema. In contrast, p38 inhibition with SB203580 aggravated pancreatitis with higher trypsin levels and, with induction of acinar necrosis not normally found after cerulein hyperstimulation. Simultaneous treatment with both CEP1347 and SB203580 mutually abolished the effects of either compound on cerulein pancreatitis. CONCLUSION: Stress kinases modulate pancreatitis differentially. JNK seems to promote pancreatitis development, possibly by supporting inflammatory reactions such as edema formation while its inhibition ameliorates pancreatitis. In contrast, p38 may help reduce organ destruction while inhibition of p38 during induction of cerulein pancreatitis leads to the occurrence of acinar necrosis. PMID:11819771

  6. Comparison of early enteral nutrition in severe acute pancreatitis with prebiotic fiber supplementation versus standard enteral solution: A prospective randomized double-blind study

    PubMed Central

    Karakan, Tarkan; Ergun, Meltem; Dogan, Ibrahim; Cindoruk, Mehmet; Unal, Selahattin

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To compare the beneficial effects of early enteral nutrition (EN) with prebiotic fiber supplementation in patients with severe acute pancreatitis (AP). METHODS: Thirty consecutive patients with severe AP, who required stoppage of oral feeding for 48 h, were randomly assigned to nasojejunal EN with or without prebiotics. APACHE II score, Balthazar’s CT score and CRP were assessed daily during the study period. RESULTS: The median duration of hospital stay was shorter in the study group [10 ± 4 (8-14) d vs 15 ± 6 (7-26) d] (P < 0.05). The median value of days in intensive care unit was also similar in both groups [6 ± 2 (5-8) d vs 6 ± 2 (5-7) d]. The median duration of EN was 8 ± 4 (6-12) d vs 10 ± 4 (6-13) d in the study and control groups, respectively (P > 0.05). Deaths occurred in 6 patients (20%), 2 in the study group and 4 in the control group. The mean duration of APACHE II normalization (APACHE II score < 8) was shorter in the study group than in the control group (4 ± 2 d vs 6.5 ± 3 d, P < 0.05). The mean duration of CRP normalization was also shorter in the study group than in the control group (7 ± 2 d vs 10 ± 3 d, P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Nasojejunal EN with prebiotic fiber supplementation in severe AP improves hospital stay, duration nutrition therapy, acute phase response and overall complications compared to standard EN therapy. PMID:17569144

  7. Lupeol Protects Against Cerulein-Induced Acute Pancreatitis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Jun; Bae, Gi-Sang; Choi, Sun Bok; Jo, Il-Joo; Kim, Dong-Goo; Shin, Joon-Yeon; Lee, Sung-Kon; Kim, Myoung-Jin; Song, Ho-Joon; Park, Sung-Joo

    2015-10-01

    Lupeol is a triterpenoid commonly found in fruits and vegetables and is known to exhibit a wide range of biological activities, including antiinflammatory and anti-cancer effects. However, the effects of lupeol on acute pancreatitis specifically have not been well characterized. Here, we investigated the effects of lupeol on cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in mice. Acute pancreatitis was induced via an intraperitoneal injection of cerulein (50?g/kg). In the lupeol treatment group, lupeol was administered intraperitoneally (10, 25, or 50?mg/kg) 1?h before the first cerulein injection. Blood samples were taken to determine serum cytokine and amylase levels. The pancreas was rapidly removed for morphological examination and used in the myeloperoxidase assay, trypsin activity assay, and real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. In addition, we isolated pancreatic acinar cells using a collagenase method to examine the acinar cell viability. Lupeol administration significantly attenuated the severity of pancreatitis, as was shown by reduced pancreatic edema, and neutrophil infiltration. In addition, lupeol inhibited elevation of digestive enzymes and cytokine levels, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-?, interleukin (IL)-1, and interleukin (IL)-6. Furthermore, lupeol inhibited the cerulein-induced acinar cell death. In conclusion, these results suggest that lupeol exhibits protective effects on cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis. PMID:26179197

  8. Effects of PDTC on NF-κB expression and apoptosis in rats with severe acute pancreatitis-associated lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Kan, Shihai; Zhou, Hongying; Jin, Changzhu; Yang, Huijun

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effects of pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) on intrapulmonary expression of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), and apoptosis in rats with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). We induced SAP, then used immunohistochemistry, TUNEL staining, quantitative PCR assays and western blotting to examine PDTC effects. Treatment with PDTC resulted in interstitial edema and widening of the basement membrane, with swollen mitochondria and aggregation of nuclear chromatin. Expression of NF-κB, Fas, Bcl-2 and TNF-α in lung tissues of SAP rats was increased, with NF-κB, Fas and TNF-α levels maximal after 6 h. PDTC appeared to ameliorate pathological changes, with low levels of NF-κB, Fas, TNF-α, and Caspase-3 mRNA observed and a lower apoptosis index compared with that seen in SAP rats. Expression of NF-κB could be involved in lung tissue apoptosis during SAP. We postulate that PDTC inhibits the activation of NF-κB and apoptosis, effectively alleviating the severity of lung injury. PMID:26064215

  9. Using the polymerase chain reaction coupled with denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis to investigate the association between bacterial translocation and systemic inflammatory response syndrome in predicted acute severe pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Callum B; Zinkevich, Vitaly; Beech, Iwona; Funjika, Viera; Ruiz, Ana Garcia; Aladawi, Afraa; Duncan, Hamish D

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the use of PCR and DGGE to investigate the association between bacterial translocation and systemic inflammatory response syndrome in predicted severe AP. METHODS: Patients with biochemical and clinical evidence of acute pancreatitis and an APACHE II score ?8 were enrolled. PCR and DGGE were employed to detect bacterial translocation in blood samples collected on d 1, 3, and 8 after the admission. Standard microbial blood cultures were taken when there was clinical evidence of sepsis or when felt to be clinically indicated by the supervising team. RESULTS: Six patients were included. Of all the patients investigated, only one developed septic complications; the others had uneventful illness. Bacteria were detected using PCR in 4 of the 17 collected blood samples. The patient with sepsis was PCR-positive in two samples (taken on d 1 and 3), despite three negative blood cultures. Using DGGE and specific primers, the bacteria in all blood specimens which tested positive for the presence of bacterial DNA were identified as E coli. CONCLUSION: Our study confirmed that unlike traditional microbiological techniques, PCR can detect the presence of bacteria in the blood of patients with severe AP. Therefore, this latter method in conjunction with DGGE is potentially an extremely useful tool in predicting septic morbidity and evaluating patients with the disease. Further research using increased numbers of patients, in particular those patients with necrosis and sepsis, is required to assess the reliability of PCR and DGGE in the rapid diagnosis of infection in AP. PMID:16437661

  10. Misdiagnosis of Abdominal Pain in Pregnancy: Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Samal, Sunita; Gupta, Shweta; Begum, Jasmina; Ghose, Seetesh

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of acute pancreatitis in a pregnant woman who presented to our emergency department with complaints of severe abdominal pain, was misdiagnosed as scar dehiscence and underwent emergency repeat caesarean section at 33 wks for fetal distress. The preterm baby developed severe respiratory distress and succumbed on the second postnatal day. Persistent severe pain in the postoperative period in the mother prompted further evaluation which led to a diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. Conservative and supportive management was instituted leading to an eventual favourable maternal outcome. PMID:25738042

  11. Activation of cellular immune response in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Mora, A; Prez-Mateo, M; Viedma, J A; Carballo, F; Snchez-Pay, J; Liras, G

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Inflammatory mediators have recently been implicated as potential markers of severity in acute pancreatitis. AIMS: To determine the value of neopterin and polymorphonuclear (PMN) elastase as markers of activation of cellular immunity and as early predictors of disease severity. PATIENTS: Fifty two non-consecutive patients classified according to their clinical outcome into mild (n = 26) and severe pancreatitis (n = 26). METHODS: Neopterin in serum and the PMN elastase/A1PI complex in plasma were measured during the first three days of hospital stay. RESULTS: Within three days after the onset of acute pancreatitis, PMN elastase was significantly higher in the severe pancreatitis group. Patients with severe disease also showed significantly higher values of neopterin on days 1 and 2 but not on day 3 compared with patients with mild disease. There was a significant correlation between PMN elastase and neopterin values on days 1 and 2. PMN elastase on day 1 predicted disease severity with a sensitivity of 76.7% and a specificity of 91.6%. Neopterin did not surpass PMN elastase in the probability of predicting disease severity. CONCLUSIONS: These data show that activation of cellular immunity is implicated in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis and may be a main contributory factor to disease severity. Neopterin was not superior to PMN elastase in the prediction of severity. PMID:9245935

  12. Acetaminophen Poisoning and Risk of Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sy-Jou; Lin, Chin-Sheng; Hsu, Chin-Wang; Lin, Cheng-Li; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to assess whether acetaminophen poisoning is associated with a higher risk of acute pancreatitis. We conducted a retrospective cohort study by using the longitudinal population-based database of Taiwan's National Health Insurance (NHI) program between 2000 and 2011. The acetaminophen cohort comprised patients aged ?20 years with newly identified acetaminophen poisoning (N?=?2958). The comparison cohort comprised randomly selected patients with no history of acetaminophen poisoning. The acetaminophen and comparison cohorts were frequency matched by age, sex, and index year (N?=?11,832) at a 1:4 ratio. Each patient was followed up from the index date until the date an acute pancreatitis diagnosis was made, withdrawal from the NHI program, or December 31, 2011. Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to determine the effects of acetaminophen on the risk of acute pancreatitis. The risk of acute pancreatitis was 3.11-fold higher in the acetaminophen cohort than in the comparison cohort (11.2 vs 3.61 per 10,000 person-years), with an adjusted hazard ratio of 2.40 (95% confidence interval, 1.294.47). The incidence rate was considerably high in patients who were aged 35 to 49 years, men, those who had comorbidities, and within the first year of follow-up. Acetaminophen poisoning is associated with an increased risk of acute pancreatitis. Additional prospective studies are necessary to verify how acetaminophen poisoning affects the risk of acute pancreatitis. PMID:26200631

  13. Hormonal protection in acute pancreatitis by ghrelin, leptin and melatonin

    PubMed Central

    Jaworek, Jolanta; Konturek, Stanis?aw Jan

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a nonbacterial disease of the pancreas. The severe form of this ailment is characterized by high mortality. Whether acute pancreatitis develops as the severe type or resolves depends on the intensity of the inflammatory process which is counteracted by the recruitment of innate defense mechanisms. It has been shown that the hormones ghrelin, leptin and melatonin are able to modulate the immune function of the organism and to protect the pancreas against inflammatory damage. Experimental studies have demonstrated that the application of these substances prior to the induction of acute pancreatitis significantly attenuated the intensity of the inflammation and reduced pancreatic tissue damage. The pancreatic protective mechanisms of the above hormones have been related to the mobilization of non-specific immune defense, to the inhibition of nuclear factor kappa B and modulation of cytokine production, to the stimulation of heat shock proteins and changes of apoptotic processes in the acinar cells, as well as to the activation of antioxidant system of the pancreatic tissue. The protective effect of ghrelin seems to be indirect and perhaps dependent on the release of growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor 1. Leptin and ghrelin, but not melatonin, employ sensory nerves in their beneficial action on acute pancreatitis. It is very likely that ghrelin, leptin and melatonin could be implicated in the natural protection of the pancreatic gland against inflammatory damage because the blood levels of these substances increase in the initial phase of pancreatic inflammation. The above hormones could be a part of the innate resistance system which might remove noxious factors and could suppress or attenuate the inflammatory process in the pancreas. PMID:25493003

  14. Minimally invasive percutaneous catheter drainage versus open laparotomy with temporary closure for treatment of abdominal compartment syndrome in patients with early-stage severe acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Peng, Tao; Dong, Li-Ming; Zhao, Xing; Xiong, Jiong-Xin; Zhou, Feng; Tao, Jing; Cui, Jing; Yang, Zhi-Yong

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed to examine the clinical efficacy of minimally invasive percutaneous catheter drainage (PCD) versus open laparotomy with temporary closure in the treatment of abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) in patients with early-stage severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). Clinical data of 212 patients who underwent PCD and 61 patients who were given open laparotomy with temporary closure in our hospital over the last 10-year period were retrospectively analyzed, and outcomes were compared, including total and post-decompression intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital stays, physiological data, organ dysfunction, complications, and mortality. The results showed that the organ dysfunction scores were similar between the PCD and open laparotomy groups 72 h after decompression. In the PCD group, 134 of 212 (63.2%) patients required postoperative ICU support versus 60 of 61 (98.4%) in the open laparotomy group (P<0.001). Additionally, 87 (41.0%) PCD patients experienced complications as compared to 49 of 61 (80.3%) in the open laparotomy group (P<0.001). There were 40 (18.9%) and 32 (52.5%) deaths, respectively, in the PCD and open laparotomy groups (P<0.001). In conclusion, minimally invasive PCD is superior to open laparotomy with temporary closure, with fewer complications and deaths occurring in PCD group. PMID:26838748

  15. Acute Pancreatitis Caused By Mushroom Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Karahan, Samet; Erden, Abdulsamet; Cetinkaya, Ali; Avci, Deniz; Ortakoyluoglu, Adile Irfan; Karagoz, Hatice; Bulut, Kadir; Basak, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Of the more than 5000 species of mushrooms known, 100 types are toxic and approximately 10% of these toxic types can cause fatal toxicity. A type of mushroom called Amanita phalloides is responsible for 95% of toxic mushroom poisonings. In this article, we report 2 cases of mushroom poisonings caused by Lactarius volemus, known as Tirmit by the local people. The patient and his wife were admitted to the emergency room with abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting 20 hours after consuming Lactarius volemus, an edible type of mushroom. The patients reported that they had been collecting this mushroom from the mountains and eating them for several years but had never developed any clinicopathology to date. Further examination of the patients revealed a very rare case of acute pancreatitis due to mushroom intoxication. The male patient was admitted to the intensive care unit while his wife was followed in the internal medicine service, because of her relative mild clinical symptoms. Both patients recovered without sequelae and were discharged. In this article, we aimed to emphasize that gastrointestinal symptoms are often observed in mushroom intoxications and can be confused with acute pancreatitis, thus leading to misdiagnosis of patients. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment can improve patients’ prognosis and prevent the development of complications. PMID:26835473

  16. Endotoxaemia and complement activation in acute pancreatitis in man.

    PubMed Central

    Foulis, A K; Murray, W R; Galloway, D; McCartney, A C; Lang, E; Veitch, J; Whaley, K

    1982-01-01

    Twenty-four patients who experienced 26 attacks of acute pancreatitis were studied. Endotoxaemia, as measured by the limulus lysate assay, was present in 13 of the attacks. Six out of seven patients with systemic complications of the disease had endotoxaemia. C3 catabolism was increased in all 26 attacks of pancreatitis, and a falling level of C3 during attacks of severe pancreatitis was associated with a fatal outcome. There was statistical evidence of more complement activation in serum samples taken when patients had positive limulus lysate tests than when endotoxin was not detected in their blood. PMID:7095560

  17. Pegaspargase Induced Hypertriglyceridemia Resulting in Severe Fatal Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Vyas, Neil; Ching Companioni, Rafael; Tiba, Melik; Alkhawam, Hassan; Walfish, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    Pegaspargase is used to treat acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL). Pegaspargase definitely has its benefits in treating ALL; however we cannot lose sight of one of its very rare but potentially deadly complications, acute pancreatitis. Clinicians should monitor triglycerides while the patient is on treatment with Pegaspargase and suspect acute pancreatitis if the patient develops abdominal pain. If pancreatitis occurs, therapy should be stopped immediately and not reinstituted. For patients with hypertriglyceridemia without pancreatitis, discontinuation of therapy should be considered. PMID:26693361

  18. Use of probiotics in the treatment of severe acute pancreatitis: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Necrotic tissue infection can worsen the prognosis of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP), and probiotics have been shown to be beneficial in reducing the infection rate in animal experiments and primary clinical trials. However, the results of multicenter randomized clinical trials have been contradictory. Our aim in this study was to systematically review and quantitatively analyze all randomized controlled trials with regard to important outcomes in patients with predicted SAP who received probiotics. Methods A systematic literature search of the PubMed, Embase and Cochrane Library databases was conducted using specific search terms. Eligible studies were randomized controlled trials that compared the effects of probiotic with placebo treatment in patients with predicted SAP. Mean difference (MD), risk ratio (RR) and 95% confidence interval (95% CI) were calculated using the Mantel-Haenszel fixed- and random-effects models. A meta-analysis on the use of probiotics in the treatment of critically ill patients was also performed to serve as a reference. Results In this study, 6 trials comprising an aggregate total of 536 patients were analyzed. Significant heterogeneities were observed in the type, dose, treatment duration and clinical effects of probiotics in these trials. Systematic analysis showed that probiotics did not significantly affect the pancreatic infection rate (RR = 1.19, 95% CI = 0.74 to 1.93; P = 0.47), total infections (RR = 1.09, 95% CI = 0.80 to 1.48; P = 0.57), operation rate (RR = 1.42, 95% CI = 0.43 to 3.47; P = 0.71), length of hospital stay (MD = 2.45, 95% CI = −2.71 to 7.60; P = 0.35) or mortality (RR = 0.72, 95% CI = 0.42 to 1.45; P = 0.25). Conclusions Probiotics showed neither beneficial nor adverse effects on the clinical outcomes of patients with predicted SAP. However, significant heterogeneity was noted between the trials reviewed with regard to the type, dose and treatment duration of probiotics, which may have contributed to the heterogeneity of the clinical outcomes. The current data are not sufficient to draw a conclusion regarding the effects of probiotics on patients with predicted SAP. Carefully designed clinical trials are needed to validate the effects of particular probiotics given at specific dosages and for specific treatment durations. PMID:24684832

  19. Inverted U-Shaped Relationship between Central Venous Pressure and Intra-Abdominal Pressure in the Early Phase of Severe Acute Pancreatitis: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xinglin; Liu, Tao; Gou, Shanmiao; Chen, Changzhong; Xiao, Jun; Jin, Xin; He, Zhiqiang; Dong, Liming; Zhang, Yushun; Luo, Na; Wu, Heshui; Wang, Chunyou

    2015-01-01

    Objective Many studies have indicated that intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) is positively correlated with central venous pressure (CVP) in severe cases. However, although elevated IAP is common in patients with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP), its relationship with CVP remains unclear. Our study aimed to investigate the association of IAP with CVP in early-phase SAP patients. Methods In total, 116 SAP patients were included in this retrospective study. On the first day of hospitalization, blood samples were collected for biochemical examination and cytokine concentration monitoring. Additionally, a urinary catheter and right subclavian vein catheter were inserted for IAP and CVP measurement, respectively. Other routine clinical data were also recorded. Results Within 24 hours after hospitalization, CVP fluctuated and increased with increasing IAP up to 15.7 mmHg (P = 0.054) but decreased with increasing IAP when the IAP was > 15.7 mmHg (P < 0.001). After adjusting for abdominal perfusion pressure (APP) and mean arterial pressure (MAP), a similar distribution was observed. An inverted U-shaped trend between IAP and CVP was also present in the groups classified according to the patients sex, local complications, ascites, and serum amylase levels. Conclusions CVP and IAP have an inverted U-shaped relationship, with a peak at an IAP of 15.7 mmHg in the early phase of SAP. After this peak, CVP decreases as IAP increases. These results have crucial implications for clinical fluid resuscitation in SAP patients. In particular, because one CVP value might be correlated with different IAP values in patients with the same CVP, the volume of fluid needed might be different. PMID:26053865

  20. Surgical and interventional management of complications caused by acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Karakayali, Feza Y

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is one of the most common gastrointestinal disorders worldwide. It requires acute hospitalization, with a reported annual incidence of 13 to 45 cases per 100000 persons. In severe cases there is persistent organ failure and a mortality rate of 15% to 30%, whereas mortality of mild pancreatitis is only 0% to 1%. Treatment principles of necrotizing pancreatitis and the role of surgery are still controversial. Despite surgery being effective for infected pancreatic necrosis, it carries the risk of long-term endocrine and exocrine deficiency and a morbidity and mortality rate of between 10% to 40%. Considering high morbidity and mortality rates of operative necrosectomy, minimally invasive strategies are being explored by gastrointestinal surgeons, radiologists, and gastroenterologists. Since 1999, several other minimally invasive surgical, endoscopic, and radiologic approaches to drain and debride pancreatic necrosis have been described. In patients who do not improve after technically adequate drainage, necrosectomy should be performed. When minimal invasive management is unsuccessful or necrosis has spread to locations not accessible by endoscopy, open abdominal surgery is recommended. Additionally, surgery is recognized as a major determinant of outcomes for acute pancreatitis, and there is general agreement that patients should undergo surgery in the late phase of the disease. It is important to consider multidisciplinary management, considering the clinical situation and the comorbidity of the patient, as well as the surgeons experience. PMID:25309073

  1. Colonic Necrosis in a 4-Year-Old with Hyperlipidemic Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Patton, Tiffany J.; Sentongo, Timothy A.; Mak, Grace Z.; Kahn, Stacy A.

    2016-01-01

    Here we report the case of a 4-year-old male with severe acute pancreatitis due to hyperlipidemia, who presented with abdominal pain, metabolic abnormalities, and colonic necrosis. This colonic complication was secondary to the extension of a large peripancreatic fluid collection causing direct serosal autodigestion by pancreatic enzymes. Two weeks following the initial presentation, the peripancreatic fluid collection developed into a mature pancreatic pseudocyst, which was percutaneously drained. To our knowledge, this is the youngest documented pediatric case of colonic necrosis due to severe pancreatitis and the first descriptive pediatric case of a colonic complication due to hyperlipidemia-induced acute pancreatitis. PMID:26925282

  2. Effect of peritoneal lavage with ulinastatin on the expression of NF-?B and TNF-? in multiple organs of rats with severe acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    FENG, CONG; LI, BEI; WANG, LI-LI; CHEN, LI; ZHOU, XUAN; LV, FA-QIN; LI, TAN-SHI

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of peritoneal lavage with ulinastatin on the expression levels of nuclear factor ?B (NF-?B) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-? in multiple organs of rats with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into the following groups: Sham-operated (C), SAP model (SAP), saline lavage (SL), intravenous ulinastatin (IU) and peritoneal lavage with ulinastatin (UL). The SAP model was induced by the retrograde infusion of 5% sodium taurocholate into the biliopancreatic ducts of the rats. Intraperitoneal lavage or injection was performed immediately following the establishment of the SAP model in groups SL, IU and UL. Intraperitoneal lavage with or without ulinastatin was performed for 3 h. The survival time of half of the rats in each group was recorded over a 12-h period. At 3 h after the induction of SAP, inflammatory mediators and the expression levels of NF-?B and TNF-? in multiple organs of the rats in each group were also detected. The survival rates of the rats in group UL at 6 h and 9 h were increased compared with those in group SAP, and were also higher than that in groups SL and IU. The levels of serum inflammatory mediators were effectively reduced in groups SL, IU and UL, the greatest effects were observed in group UL. The expression levels of NF-?B and TNF-? in multiple organs were significantly lower in group UL compared with other groups. Intraperitoneal lavage with ulinastatin significantly ameliorated the inflammatory reaction and inhibited NF-?B and TNF-? expression in multiple organs of SAP model rats. PMID:26668591

  3. Acute recurrent pancreatitis: Etiopathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Testoni, Pier Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Acute recurrent pancreatitis (ARP) refers to a clinical entity characterized by episodes of acute pancreatitis which occurs on more than one occasion. Recurrence of pancreatitis generally occurs in a setting of normal morpho-functional gland, however, an established chronic disease may be found either on the occasion of the first episode of pancreatitis or during the follow-up. The aetiology of ARP can be identified in the majority of patients. Most common causes include common bile duct stones or sludge and bile crystals; sphincter of oddi dysfunction; anatomical ductal variants interfering with pancreatic juice outflow; obstruction of the main pancreatic duct or pancreatico-biliary junction; genetic mutations; alcohol consumption. However, despite diagnostic technologies, the aetiology of ARP still remains unknown in up to 30% of cases: in these cases the term idiopathic is used. Because occult bile stone disease and sphincter of oddi dysfunction account for the majority of cases, cholecystectomy, and eventually the endoscopic biliary and/or pancreatic sphincterotomy are curative in most of cases. Endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy appeared to be a curative procedure per se in about 80% of patients. Ursodeoxycholic acid oral treatment alone has also been reported effective for treatment of biliary sludge. In uncertain cases toxin botulin injection may help in identifying some sphincter of oddi dysfunction, but this treatment is not widely used. In the last twenty years, pancreatic endotherapy has been proven effective in cases of recurrent pancreatitis depending on pancreatic ductal obstruction, independently from the cause of obstruction, and has been widely used instead of more aggressive approaches. PMID:25493002

  4. Acute pancreatitis in infants and children.

    PubMed Central

    Hillemeier, C.; Gryboski, J. D.

    1984-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is being encountered more often in children due to antimetabolite therapy, accidental injury, and traumatic battering. Pancreatitis may occur in the absence of traditionally elevated serum amylase and lipase, and initial diagnosis may depend upon ultrasonography. Traditional therapy of enteric rest with nasogastric suction has been supported by the use of parenteral nutrition. Newer pharmaceutical agents have been ineffective in altering the course of the illness or in preventing complications of pseudocyst or abscess. PMID:6382834

  5. The clinical analysis of acute pancreatitis in colorectal cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy after operation

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Yanlei; Han, Zhen; Shao, Limei; Li, Yunling; Zhao, Long; Zhao, Yuehuan

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a rare complication in postoperative colorectal cancer patients after FOLFOX6 (oxaliplatin + calcium folinate +5-FU [5-fluorouracil]) chemotherapy. In this paper, a total of 62 patients with gastrointestinal cancer were observed after the burst of acute pancreatitis. Surgery of the 62 cases of colorectal cancer patients was completed successfully. But when they underwent FOLFOX6 chemotherapy, five patients got acute pancreatitis (8.06%), four (6.45%) had mild acute pancreatitis, and one (1.61%) had severe acute pancreatitis, of which two were males (3.23%) and three females (4.84%). No patients (0.00%) had acute pancreatitis on the 1st day after chemotherapy; one patient (1.61%) got it in the first 2 and 3 days after chemotherapy; and three others (4.83%) got it in the first 4 days after chemotherapy. In the 62 patients with malignant tumors, the body mass index (BMI) was less than 18 (underweight) in six of them, with two cases of acute pancreatitis (33.33%); the BMI was 18–25 (normal weight) in 34 cases, with one case (2.94%) of acute pancreatitis; the BMI was 25–30 (overweight) in 13 cases, with 0 cases (0.00%) of acute pancreatitis; and the BMI was ≥30 (obese) in nine patients, with two cases of acute pancreatitis (22.22%). After symptomatic treatment, four patients were cured and one died; the mortality rate was 1.61%. Most of them appeared in the first 4 days after chemotherapy; the probability of this complication is significantly higher in slim and obese patients than in normal weight patients. Postoperative colorectal cancer patients after FOLFOX6 chemotherapy have a sudden onset of acute pancreatitis occult, especially in patients with severe acute pancreatitis; the symptoms are difficult to control, there is high mortality and it is worthy of clinician’s attention. PMID:26392780

  6. Enhancement of ICAM-1 via the JAK2/STAT3 signaling pathway in a rat model of severe acute pancreatitis-associated lung injury

    PubMed Central

    HAN, XIAO; WANG, YUXI; CHEN, HAILONG; ZHANG, JINGWEN; XU, CAIMING; LI, JIAN; LI, MINGYUE

    2016-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI), which is associated with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP), results from damage to the pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMVECs), which in turn leads to high levels of inflammatory cytokines that destroy PMVECs. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying SAP-associated ALI (SAP-ALI) are currently not well understood. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) has been implicated in the persistent migration and accumulation of neutrophils and macrophages, which in turn has been associated with the increased permeability of microvascular endothelial cells. Signal transduction via the Janus kinase-2 (JAK2)/signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3) transcription factors has been shown to be involved in inflammation. The present study aimed to investigate the expression levels of ICAM-1 and JAK2/STAT3 signaling components in a rat model of SAP-ALI. SAP was induced in the rat model, and dexamethasone (DEX) was administered to the treatment group. Subsequently, ICAM-1, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, JAK2, STAT3 and nuclear factor (NF)-κB mRNA expression levels were determined using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction; ICAM-1 protein expression levels were determined using western blotting; and IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α levels were measured via an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In addition, an immunohistochemical analysis of ICAM-1, NF-κB, JAK2 and STAT3 was conducted, and the protein expression and cell morphology of the lungs in all rats was analyzed. ICAM-1 mRNA and protein expression levels were significantly increased following induction of SAP, and were significantly decreased in the DEX-treated group. Furthermore, treatment with DEX significantly reduced serum expression levels of IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α and decreased expression levels of NF-κB, JAK2 and STAT3 in the lung tissue, as compared with the untreated SAP group. The present study demonstrated that DEX treatment was able to suppress ICAM-1 mRNA and protein expression in a rat model of SAP-ALI via the inhibition of IL-6 and TNF-α-induced JAK2/STAT3 activation; thus suggesting that DEX treatment may be considered a potential strategy in the treatment of patients with SAP-ALI. PMID:26997994

  7. Obestatin Accelerates the Recovery in the Course of Ischemia/Reperfusion-Induced Acute Pancreatitis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Bukowczan, Jakub; Warzecha, Zygmunt; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Kuśnierz-Cabala, Beata; Tomaszewska, Romana

    2015-01-01

    Objective Several previous studies have shown that obestatin exhibits protective and regenerative effects in some organs including the stomach, kidney, and the brain. In the pancreas, pretreatment with obestatin inhibits the development of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis, and promotes survival of pancreatic beta cells and human islets. However, no studies investigated the effect of obestatin administration following the onset of experimental acute pancreatitis. Aim The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of obestatin therapy in the course of ischemia/reperfusion-induced pancreatitis. Moreover, we tested the influence of ischemia/reperfusion-induced acute pancreatitis and administration of obestatin on daily food intake and pancreatic exocrine secretion. Methods Acute pancreatitis was induced by pancreatic ischemia followed by reperfusion of the pancreas. Obestatin (8nmol/kg/dose) was administered intraperitoneally twice a day, starting 24 hours after the beginning of reperfusion. The effect of obestatin in the course of necrotizing pancreatitis was assessed between 2 and 14 days, and included histological, functional, and biochemical analyses. Secretory studies were performed on the third day after sham-operation or induction of acute pancreatitis in conscious rats equipped with chronic pancreatic fistula. Results Treatment with obestatin ameliorated morphological signs of pancreatic damage including edema, vacuolization of acinar cells, hemorrhages, acinar necrosis, and leukocyte infiltration of the gland, and led to earlier pancreatic regeneration. Structural changes were accompanied by biochemical and functional improvements manifested by accelerated normalization of interleukin-1β level and activity of myeloperoxidase and lipase, attenuation of the decrease in pancreatic DNA synthesis, and by an improvement of pancreatic blood flow. Induction of acute pancreatitis by pancreatic ischemia followed by reperfusion significantly decreased daily food intake and pancreatic exocrine secretion. Administration of obestatin at doses used was without significant effect with regard to daily food intake or pancreatic exocrine secretion in sham-operated rats, as well as in rats with acute pancreatitis. On the other hand, obestatin abolished a statistical significance of difference in food intake between animals with AP and control animals without pancreatic fistula and induction of AP. Conclusion Treatment with the exogenous obestatin reduces severity of ischemia/reperfusion-induced acute pancreatitis and accelerates recovery in this disease. The involved mechanisms are likely to be multifactorial, and are mediated, at least in part, by anti-inflammatory properties of obestatin. PMID:26226277

  8. Cell Death and DAMPs in Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Rui; Lotze, Michael T; Zeh, Herbert J; Billiar, Timothy R; Tang, Daolin

    2014-01-01

    Cell death and inflammation are key pathologic responses of acute pancreatitis (AP), the leading cause of hospital admissions for gastrointestinal disorders. It is becoming increasingly clear that damage-associated molecular pattern molecules (DAMPs) play an important role in the pathogenesis of AP by linking local tissue damage to systemic inflammation syndrome. Endogenous DAMPs released from dead, dying or injured cells initiate and extend sterile inflammation via specific pattern recognition receptors. Inhibition of the release and activity of DAMPs (for example, high mobility group box 1, DNA, histones and adenosine triphosphate) provides significant protection against experimental AP. Moreover, increased serum levels of DAMPs in patients with AP correlate with disease severity. These findings provide novel insight into the mechanism, diagnosis and management of AP. DAMPs might be an attractive therapeutic target in AP. PMID:25105302

  9. Acute pancreatitis at the beginning of the 21st century: The state of the art

    PubMed Central

    Tonsi, Alfredo F; Bacchion, Matilde; Crippa, Stefano; Malleo, Giuseppe; Bassi, Claudio

    2009-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an acute inflammatory disease of the pancreas which can lead to a systemic inflammatory response syndrome with significant morbidity and mortality in 20% of patients. Gallstones and alcohol consumption are the most frequent causes of pancreatitis in adults. The treatment of mild acute pancreatitis is conservative and supportive; however severe episodes characterized by necrosis of the pancreatic tissue may require surgical intervention. Advanced understanding of the pathology, and increased interest in assessment of disease severity are the cornerstones of future management strategies of this complex and heterogeneous disease in the 21st century. PMID:19554647

  10. Pancreatic ascites hemoglobin contributes to the systemic response in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Salvador; Pereda, Javier; Sabater, Luis; Sastre, Juan

    2015-04-01

    Upon hemolysis extracellular hemoglobin causes oxidative stress and cytotoxicity due to its peroxidase activity. Extracellular hemoglobin may release free hemin, which increases vascular permeability, leukocyte recruitment, and adhesion molecule expression. Pancreatitis-associated ascitic fluid is reddish and may contain extracellular hemoglobin. Our aim has been to determine the role of extracellular hemoglobin in the local and systemic inflammatory response during severe acute pancreatitis in rats. To this end we studied taurocholate-induced necrotizing pancreatitis in rats. First, extracellular hemoglobin in ascites and plasma was quantified and the hemolytic action of ascitic fluid was tested. Second, we assessed whether peritoneal lavage prevented the increase in extracellular hemoglobin in plasma during pancreatitis. Third, hemoglobin was purified from rat erythrocytes and administered intraperitoneally to assess the local and systemic effects of ascitic-associated extracellular hemoglobin during acute pancreatitis. Extracellular hemoglobin and hemin levels markedly increased in ascitic fluid and plasma during necrotizing pancreatitis. Peroxidase activity was very high in ascites. The peritoneal lavage abrogated the increase in extracellular hemoglobin in plasma. The administration of extracellular hemoglobin enhanced ascites; dramatically increased abdominal fat necrosis; upregulated tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, and interleukin-6 gene expression; and decreased expression of interleukin-10 in abdominal adipose tissue during pancreatitis. Extracellular hemoglobin enhanced the gene expression and protein levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and other hypoxia-inducible factor-related genes in the lung. Extracellular hemoglobin also increased myeloperoxidase activity in the lung. In conclusion, extracellular hemoglobin contributes to the inflammatory response in severe acute pancreatitis through abdominal fat necrosis and inflammation and by increasing VEGF and leukocyte infiltration into the lung. PMID:25157787

  11. Beneficial Effects of Trypsin Inhibitors Derived from a Spider Venom Peptide in L-Arginine-Induced Severe Acute Pancreatitis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fan; Wang, Hengyun; Wang, Fan; Wang, Xiaojuan; Tang, Huaxin; Liang, Songping; Shi, Xiaoliu; Liu, Zhonghua

    2013-01-01

    HWTI is a 55-residue protein isolated from the venom of the spider Ornithoctonus huwena. It is a potent trypsin inhibitor and a moderate voltage-gated potassium channel blocker. Here, we designed and expressed two HWTI mutants, HWTI-mut1 and HWTI-mut2, in which the potassium channel inhibitory activity was reduced while the trypsin inhibitory activity of the wild type form (approximately 5 EPU/mg) was retained. Animal studies showed that these mutants were less toxic than HWTI. The effects of HWTI and HWTI-mut1 were examined in a mouse model of acute pancreatitis induced by intraperitoneal injection of a large dose of L-arginine (4 mg/kg, twice). Serum amylase and serum lipase activities were assessed, and pathological sections of the pancreas were examined. Treatment with HWTI and HWTI-mut1 significantly reduced serum amylase and lipase levels in a dose dependent manner. Compared with the control group, at 4 mg/kg, HWTI significantly reduced serum amylase level by 47% and serum lipase level by 73%, while HWTI-mut1 significantly reduced serum amylase level by 59% and serum lipase level by 72%. Moreover, HWTI and HWTI-mut1 effectively protected the pancreas from acinar cell damage and inflammatory cell infiltration. The trypsin inhibitory potency and lower neurotoxicity of HWTI-mut1 suggest that it could potentially be developed as a drug for the treatment of acute pancreatitis with few side effects. PMID:23613780

  12. Recent Advances in Managing Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Janisch, Nigeen; Gardner, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    This article will review the recent advances in managing acute pancreatitis. Supportive care has long been the standard of treatment for this disease despite extensive, but ultimately unsuccessful, efforts to develop disease-specific pharmacologic therapies. The primary interventions center on aggressive fluid resuscitation, initiation of early enteral nutrition, targeted antibiotic therapy, and the management of complications. In this article, we will detail treatment of acute pancreatitis with a focus on intravenous fluid resuscitation, enteral feeding, and the current evidence behind the use of antibiotics and other pharmacologic therapies. PMID:26918139

  13. Early continuous veno-venous haemofiltration in the management of severe acute pancreatitis complicated with intra-abdominal hypertension: retrospective review of 10 years' experience

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Conservative treatment of patients with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) may be associated with development of intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH), deterioration of visceral perfusion and increased risk of multiple organ dysfunction. Fluid balance is essential for maintenance of adequate organ perfusion and control of the third space. Timely application of continuous veno-venous haemofiltration (CVVH) may help in balancing fluid replacement and removal of cytokines from the blood and tissue compartments. The aim of the present study was to determine whether CVVH can be recommended as a constituent of conservative treatment in patients with SAP who suffer IAH. Methods A retrospective analysis of 10 years' experience with low-flow CVVH application in patients with SAP who develop IAH was. In all patients, measurement of the intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) was done indirectly through the urinary bladder. Sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score was calculated for severity assessment, and necrotizing forms were verified by contrast-enhanced computed tomography. Dynamics of IAP were analysed in parallel with signs of systemic inflammation, dynamics of C-reactive protein and cumulative fluid balance. All variables, complication rate and outcomes were analysed in the whole group and in patients with IAH (CVVH and no-CVVH groups). Results From the total of 130 patients, 75 were treated with application of CVVH and 55 without CVVH. Late hospitalization was associated with application of CVVH. Infection was observed in 28.5% of cases regardless of the type of treatment received, with a similar necessity for surgical intervention. IAH was observed in 68.5% of patients, and they had significantly higher SOFA scores compared to patients with normal IAP. CVVH treatment resulted in negative cumulative fluid balance starting from day 5 in patients with IAH, whereas without this treatment, fluid balance remained increasingly positive after a week. Finally, application of CVVH resulted in a lower infection rate and shorter hospital stay, 26.7% vs. 37.9%, and a median of 32 (interquartile range (IQR) = 60 to 12) days vs. 24 (IQR = 34 to 4) days, p = 0.05, comparing CVVH vs. no-CVVH group. Mortality rate reached 11.7% in the CVVH group and 13.8% in the no-CVVH group. Conclusions Early application of CVVH facilitates negative fluid balance and reduction of IAH in patients with SAP; it is not associated with increased infection or mortality rate and may reduce hospital stay. PMID:23281603

  14. Morphological study of the relation between accidental hypothermia and acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Foulis, A K

    1982-01-01

    There is a recognised but poorly understood association between hypothermia and acute pancreatitis. A histological study of the pancreas was made in eight patients with accidental hypothermia who had evidence of pancreatitis at necropsy. From an analysis of the patterns of parenchymal necrosis in the pancreas it was thought that there were at least three possible mechanisms for the relation between hypothermia and pancreatitis. Firstly, that ischaemic pancreatitis may result from the "microcirculatory shock" of hypothermia. Secondly, that both hypothermia and pancreatitis may be secondary to alcohol abuse: and finally, that severe pancreatitis may be the primary disease and that hypothermia results from the patients' social circumstances. Images PMID:7142433

  15. [Can the L/A ratio identify acute alcoholic pancreatitis?].

    PubMed

    Deltenre, P; Ghilain, J M; Maisin, J M; Schapira, M; Henrion, J; Heller, F R

    1995-01-01

    Early distinction between acute alcoholic pancreatitis is important, because of possible emergency endoscopic sphincterotomy in case of biliary pancreatitis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the value of L/A ratio in the diagnosis of acute alcoholic pancreatitis. From 1990 to end 1993, 133 patients with acute pancreatitis were reviewed. Inclusion criteria were: 1) abdominal pain, 2) pathological serum amylase or serum lipase on admission or within 24 hours after beginning or abdominal pain, 3) acute pancreatitis at the echography or CT scan within 48 hours after admission. 60 patients met the inclusion criteria (31 alcoholic pancreatitis, 19 biliary pancreatitis and 10 pancreatitis of other causes). L/A ratio was studied in terms of delay from beginning of abdominal pain. There was no statistical difference between alcoholic and biliary pancreatitis at any time of the study, with the exception of admission. AST, ALT and alkaline phosphatase were higher in biliary pancreatitis than in alcoholic pancreatitis. AST and ALT were the best biochemical tests to diagnose biliary pancreatitis. Blamey's criteria can also contribute to diagnose biliary pancreatitis. These biochemical tests are the most helpful if they are collected very soon in the evolution of acute pancreatitis. It is concluded that L/A ratio is not helpful in the diagnosis of alcoholic acute pancreatitis. PMID:7571983

  16. Endoscopic therapy in acute recurrent pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Baillie, John

    2008-01-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) has evolved from a largely diagnostic to a largely therapeutic modality. Cross-sectional imaging, such as computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and less invasive endoscopy, especially endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), have largely taken over from ERCP for diagnosis. However, ERCP remains the first line therapeutic tool in the management of mechanical causes of acute recurrent pancreatitis, including bile duct stones (choledocholithiasis), ampullary masses (benign and malignant), congenital variants of biliary and pancreatic anatomy (e.g. pancreas divisum, choledochoceles), sphincter of Oddi dysfunction (SOD), pancreatic stones and strictures, and parasitic disorders involving the biliary tree and/or pancreatic duct (e.g Ascariasis, Clonorchiasis). PMID:18286684

  17. Acute pancreatitis in slender-tailed meerkats (Suricata suricatta).

    PubMed

    Naples, Lisa M; Lacasse, Claude; Landolfi, Jennifer A; Langan, Jennifer N; Steiner, Jrg M; Suchodolski, Jan S; Gamble, Kathryn C

    2010-06-01

    Four adult, full-sibling slender-tailed meerkats (Suricata suricatta) were diagnosed with acute pancreatitis. The incident case presented with lethargy, anorexia, abdominal guarding, and a cranial abdominal mass. Serum was grossly lipemic, with elevated cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations and increased amylase and lipase activity. An exploratory laparotomy confirmed chylous peritonitis and included excision of a saponified spleno-duodenal mass, a partial pancreatectomy, and a splenectomy. Histopathology revealed severe, multifocal, subacute necrotizing and granulomatous pancreatitis. Within 13 days of the incident case, the second meerkat was identified with essentially identical clinical, surgical, and histologic findings. During subsequent physical examinations of apparently unaffected cohorts (n=12), physical and hematologic findings suggestive of pancreatitis were identified in the two remaining siblings of the first two cases. The definitive cause for these four cases is undetermined; however, common risk factors identified were obesity and hyperlipidemia, a change to a higher-fat diet, and genetic predisposition. To assess its usefulness in the diagnosis of meerkat pancreatitis, serum canine and feline pancreatic lipase immunoreactivity (cPLI and fPLI) concentrations were measured in serum samples (n=61) from two unrelated meerkat populations. Although these assays are highly sensitive and specific for the diagnosis of pancreatitis in domestic carnivores, similar correlation was not apparent for meerkats. In addition, hyperlipidemia was inconsistently present in many meerkats, with no apparent correlation to the development of clinical illness. Based on these observations, sensitive and specific diagnostic tests for pancreatitis in meerkats are currently unavailable. PMID:20597219

  18. Bleeding due to acquired hemophilia A in acute pancreatitis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Tomoki; Tsunoda, Yuya; Ito, Tsuyoshi; Imamura, Satoshi; Nagakubo, Shuichi; Morohoshi, Yuichi; Koike, Yuji; Fujita, Yuriko; Komatsu, Hirokazu

    2016-01-01

    Acquired hemophilia A leads to severe bleeding and is known to be related to many underlying diseases; however, it has not been reported to occur as a complication of pancreatitis. We present a case of acquired hemophilia A secondary to severe acute pancreatitis. A 76-year-old female developed a hematoma in the lower leg muscle while being treated for severe acute pancreatitis. Blood tests revealed prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) and the presence of an autoantibody to factor VIII. The bleeding diathesis was successfully controlled by immunosuppressive therapy. This case highlights the need for careful differential diagnosis for successful management of bleeding disorders as complications of pancreatitis. PMID:26743559

  19. Lipotoxicity Causes Multisystem Organ Failure and Exacerbates Acute Pancreatitis in Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Navina, Sarah; Acharya, Chathur; DeLany, James P.; Orlichenko, Lidiya S.; Baty, Catherine J.; Shiva, Sruti S.; Durgampudi, Chandra; Karlsson, Jenny M.; Lee, Kenneth; Bae, Kyongtae T.; Furlan, Alessandro; Behari, Jaideep; Liu, Shiguang; McHale, Teresa; Nichols, Larry; Papachristou, Georgios Ioannis; Yadav, Dhiraj; Singh, Vijay P.

    2012-01-01

    Obesity increases the risk of adverse outcomes during acute critical illnesses such as burns, severe trauma, and acute pancreatitis. Although individuals with more body fat and higher serum cytokines and lipase are more likely to experience problems, the roles that these characteristics play are not clear. We used severe acute pancreatitis as a representative disease to investigate the effects of obesity on local organ function and systemic processes. In obese humans, we found that an increase in the volume of intrapancreatic adipocytes was associated with more extensive pancreatic necrosis during acute pancreatitis and that acute pancreatitis was associated with multisystem organ failure in obese individuals. In vitro studies of pancreatic acinar cells showed that unsaturated fatty acids were proinflammatory, releasing intracellular calcium, inhibiting mitochondrial complexes I and V, and causing necrosis. Saturated fatty acids had no such effects. Inhibition of lipolysis in obese (ob/ob) mice with induced pancreatitis prevented a rise in serum unsaturated fatty acids and prevented renal injury, lung injury, systemic inflammation, hypocalcemia, reduced pancreatic necrosis, and mortality. Thus, therapeutic approaches that target unsaturated fatty acidmediated lipotoxicity may reduce adverse outcomes in obese patients with critical illnesses such as severe acute pancreatitis. PMID:22049070

  20. Acute chylous ascites mimicking acute appendicitis in a patient with pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Emily K; Ek, Edmund; Croagh, Daniel; Spain, Lavinia A; Farrell, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of acute chylous peritonitis mimicking acute appendicitis in a man with acute on chronic pancreatitis. Pancreatitis, both acute and chronic, causing the development of acute chylous ascites and peritonitis has rarely been reported in the English literature. This is the fourth published case of acute chylous ascites mimicking acute appendicitis in the literature. PMID:19824123

  1. [Treatment of acute pancreatitis with protease inhibitor, H2 receptor antagonist and somatostatin analogue].

    PubMed

    Kohsaki, Takuhiro; Nishimori, Isao; Onishi, Saburo

    2004-11-01

    Acute pancreatitis sometimes develops to severe condition with a variety of clinical manifestations and high mortality. Autodigestion of the pancreas, secondary to the activation of digestive enzymes, plays a major role in the pathogenetic mechanism of acute pancreatitis. To improve the mortality and complication rates, appropriate treatments based on the precise prediction of disease severity are required. To this end, the early administration of protease inhibitors has commonly been employed for the therapy of acute pancreatitis in Japan. However, a number of clinical trials have failed to show the clinical effects of protease inhibitors, H2 receptor antagonist and somatostatin analogue on the treatment of acute pancreatitis. To evidence the therapeutic value of these agents for acute pancreatitis, well-organized clinical studies will be required. PMID:15552889

  2. A Case of Recurrent Acute Pancreatitis due to Pancreatic Arteriovenous Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jong Kyoung; Kwak, Min Sun; Kim, Jai Hwan; Jang, Eun Sun; Hwang, Sung Wook; Hwang, Jin Hyeok; Joo, Li Jin; Yoon, Yoo Seok; Kim, Hae Ryoung

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is an extremely rare condition with various clinical manifestations. We report herein a case of recurrent acute pancreatitis due to pancreatic AVM in a 49-year-old man. This patient presented with epigastric pain that had developed after consuming alcohol 2 days prior to admission. Serum amylase and lipase levels were elevated and computed tomography revealed focal low-attenuation lesions with peripancreatic infiltrations in the pancreatic tail and multiple collateral vessels around the low-attenuation lesions. He was diagnosed with acute pancreatitis and pancreatic AVM. Although he had stopped drinking after the first attack of acute pancreatitis, his pancreatitis recurred twice within 3 months. He underwent a distal pancreatectomy after the third attack of acute pancreatitis. He was free of symptoms for 2 years after the pancreatectomy. PMID:20479928

  3. Parenteral nutrition in the treatment of acute pancreatitis: effect on complications and mortality.

    PubMed Central

    Goodgame, J T; Fischer, J E

    1977-01-01

    Clinical characteristics of 46 cases of acute pancreatitis treated with total parenteral nutrition were examined. Hyperalimentation may be used in these severely ill patients with minimal technical or metabolic morbidity. This method of nutritional support can maintain patients with nonfunctional gastrointestinal tracts for several months. Catheter-related sepsis was more common than expected early in the course of acute pancreatitis but caused minimal morbidity. The incidence of catheter-related sepsis late in disease was minor. Hyperalimentation had little if any effect on the pathophysiology of acute pancreatitis as judged by the overall mortality and the incidence and severity of the complications of acute respiratory failure and acute renal failure. It is not clear that parenteral hyperalimentation alters the course of acute pancreatitis but it is a useful adjunct for nutritional support in this illness. PMID:411429

  4. Inhibition of the nucleotide-binding domain, leucine-rich containing family, pyrin-domain containing 3 inflammasome reduces the severity of experimentally induced acute pancreatitis in obese mice.

    PubMed

    York, Jason M; Castellanos, Karla J; Cabay, Robert J; Fantuzzi, Giamila

    2014-10-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP), although most often a mild and self-limiting inflammatory disease, worsens to a characteristically necrotic severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) in about 20% of cases. Obesity, affecting more than one-third of American adults, is a risk factor for the development of SAP, but the exact mechanism of this association has not been identified. Coincidental with chronic low-grade inflammation, activation of the nucleotide-binding domain, leucine-rich containing family, pyrin-domain containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome increases with obesity. Lean mice genetically deficient in specific components of the NLRP3 inflammasome are protected from experimentally induced AP, indicating a direct involvement of this pathway in AP pathophysiology. We hypothesized that inhibition of the NLRP3 inflammasome with the sulfonylurea drug glyburide would reduce disease severity in obese mice with cerulein-induced SAP. Treatment with glyburide led to significantly reduced relative pancreatic mass and water content and less pancreatic damage and cell death in genetically obese ob/ob mice with SAP compared with vehicle-treated obese SAP mice. Glyburide administration in ob/ob mice with cerulein-induced SAP also resulted in significantly reduced serum levels of interleukin 6, lipase, and amylase and led to lower production of lipopolysaccharide-stimulated interleukin 1? release in cultured peritoneal cells, compared with vehicle-treated ob/ob mice with SAP. Together, these data indicate involvement of the NLRP3 inflammasome in obesity-associated SAP and expose the possible utility of its inhibition in prevention or treatment of SAP in obese individuals. PMID:25152324

  5. Enteral nutrition and immune modulation of acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Hegazi, Refaat A; DeWitt, Tiffany

    2014-01-01

    Enteral nutrition has been strongly recommended by major scientific societies for the nutritional management of patients with acute pancreatitis. Providing severe acute pancreatitis patients with enteral nutrition within the first 24-48 h of hospital admission can help improve outcomes compared to parenteral nutrition and no feeding. New research is focusing in on when and what to feed to best improve outcomes for acute pancreatitis patients. Early enteral nutrition have the potential to modulate the immune responses. Despite this consistent evidence of early enteral nutrition in patients with acute pancreatitis, clinical practice continues to vary due to individual clinician preference. Achieving the immune modulating effects of enteral nutrition heavily depend on proper placement of the feeding tube and managing any tube feeding associated complications. The current article reviews the immune modulating effects of enteral nutrition and pro- and prebiotics and suggests some practical tools that help improve the patient adherence and tolerance to the tube feeding. Proper selection of the type of the tube, close monitoring of the tube for its placement, patency and securing its proper placement and routine checking the gastric residual volume could all help improve the outcome. Using peptide-based and high medium chain triglycerides feeding formulas help improving feeding tolerance. PMID:25473161

  6. Acute pancreatitis with an intramural duodenal hematoma.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Ming; Huang, Hsien-Hao; How, Chorng-Kuang

    2015-01-01

    The patient was a 43-year-old man admitted to the hospital with intermittent epigastric pain and vomiting, without any evidence of trauma. Blood tests showed elevated lipase/amylase levels. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) revealed pancreatitis complicated by an intramural duodenal hematoma (IDH). He was conservatively treated, and one month after admission, follow-up panendoscopy showed normal duodenal mucosa without luminal narrowing. Non-traumatic IDH is typically associated with coagulation abnormalities. Abdominal CT is an excellent tool for diagnosis in cases of acute abdomen. However, the pathogenesis of and relationship between IDH and pancreatitis remain unknown. PMID:25832937

  7. CXCR2 inhibition suppresses acute and chronic pancreatic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Steele, Colin W; Karim, Saadia A; Foth, Mona; Rishi, Loveena; Leach, Joshua D G; Porter, Ross J; Nixon, Colin; Jeffry Evans, T R; Carter, C Ross; Nibbs, Robert J B; Sansom, Owen J; Morton, Jennifer P

    2015-09-01

    Pancreatitis is a significant clinical problem and the lack of effective therapeutic options means that treatment is often palliative rather than curative. A deeper understanding of the pathogenesis of both acute and chronic pancreatitis is necessary to develop new therapies. Pathological changes in pancreatitis are dependent on innate immune cell recruitment to the site of initial tissue damage, and on the coordination of downstream inflammatory pathways. The chemokine receptor CXCR2 drives neutrophil recruitment during inflammation, and to investigate its role in pancreatic inflammation, we induced acute and chronic pancreatitis in wild-type and Cxcr2(-/-) mice. Strikingly, Cxcr2(-/-) mice were strongly protected from tissue damage in models of acute pancreatitis, and this could be recapitulated by neutrophil depletion or by the specific deletion of Cxcr2 from myeloid cells. The pancreata of Cxcr2(-/-) mice were also substantially protected from damage during chronic pancreatitis. Neutrophil depletion was less effective in this model, suggesting that CXCR2 on non-neutrophils contributes to the development of chronic pancreatitis. Importantly, pharmacological inhibition of CXCR2 in wild-type mice replicated the protection seen in Cxcr2(-/-) mice in acute and chronic models of pancreatitis. Moreover, acute pancreatic inflammation was reversible by inhibition of CXCR2. Thus, CXCR2 is critically involved in the development of acute and chronic pancreatitis in mice, and its inhibition or loss protects against pancreatic damage. CXCR2 may therefore be a viable therapeutic target in the treatment of pancreatitis. PMID:25950520

  8. The Crucial Role of Early Mitochondrial Injury in L-Lysine-Induced Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Bicz, Gyrgy; Hegyi, Pter; Dsa, Sndor; Shalbuyeva, Natalia; Berczi, Sndor; Sinervirta, Riitta; Hracsk, Zsuzsanna; Siska, Andrea; Kukor, Zoltn; Jrmay, Katalin; Venglovecz, Viktria; Varga, Ilona S.; Ivnyi, Bla; Alhonen, Leena; Wittmann, Tibor; Gukovskaya, Anna; Takcs, Tams

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Aims Large doses of intraperitoneally injected basic amino acids, L-arginine, or L-ornithine, induce acute pancreatitis in rodents, although the mechanisms mediating pancreatic toxicity remain unknown. Another basic amino acid, L-lysine, was also shown to cause pancreatic acinar cell injury. The aim of the study was to get insight into the mechanisms through which L-lysine damages the rat exocrine pancreas, in particular to characterize the kinetics of L-lysine-induced mitochondrial injury, as well as the pathologic responses (including alteration of antioxidant systems) characteristic of acute pancreatitis. Results We showed that intraperitoneal administration of 2?g/kg L-lysine induced severe acute necrotizing pancreatitis. L-lysine administration caused early pancreatic mitochondrial damage that preceded the activation of trypsinogen and the proinflammatory transcription factor nuclear factor-?B (NF-?B), which are commonly thought to play an important role in the development of acute pancreatitis. Our data demonstrate that L-lysine impairs adenosine triphosphate synthase activity of isolated pancreatic, but not liver, mitochondria. Innovation and Conclusion Taken together, early mitochondrial injury caused by large doses of L-lysine may lead to the development of acute pancreatitis independently of pancreatic trypsinogen and NF-?B activation. PMID:21644850

  9. Acute pancreatitis : complication of chicken pox in an immunocompetent host.

    PubMed

    Roy, Pinaki; Maity, Pranab; Basu, Arindam; Dey, Somitra; Das, Biman; Ghosh, U S

    2012-12-01

    Chicken pox is a benign self limited disease. But it may rarely be complicated with acute pancreatitis in otherwise healthy patient. We present a case of varicella pancreatitis and its marked recovery with acyclovir. PMID:23781673

  10. Enterococcus hirae Bacteremia Associated with Acute Pancreatitis and Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Dicpinigaitis, Peter V.; De Aguirre, Manuel; Divito, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Infection with Enterococcus hirae has rarely been reported in humans but is not uncommon in mammals and birds. We describe a case of Enterococcus hirae bacteremia associated with acute pancreatitis, acute cholecystitis, and septic shock responsive to antibiotic therapy and supportive critical care management. Unique aspects of this case of Enterococcus hirae bacteremia are its association with acute pancreatitis and its geographical origin. To our knowledge, this is the first report of Enterococcus hirae bacteremia occurring in a patient in the United States. Although human infection with this organism appears to be rare, all cases reported to date describe bacteremia associated with severe and life-threatening illness. Thus, physicians need to be cognizant of the clinical significance of this heretofore little recognized pathogen. PMID:26417465

  11. Acute pancreatitis: animal models and recent advances in basic research.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yuk Cheung; Leung, Po Sing

    2007-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is characterized by edema, acinar cell necrosis, hemorrhage, and severe inflammation of the pancreas. Patients with AP present with elevated blood and urine levels of pancreatic digestive enzymes, such as amylase and lipase. Severe AP may lead to systemic inflammatory response syndrome and multiorgan dysfunction syndrome, which account for the high mortality rate of AP. Although most (>80%) cases of AP are associated with gallstones and alcoholism, some are idiopathic. Although the pathogenesis of AP has not yet been elucidated, a common feature is the premature activation of trypsinogen within pancreatic tissues, which triggers autodigestion of the gland. Recent advances in basic research suggest that etiologic factors including cyclooxygenase-2, substance P, and angiotensin II may have novel roles in this disease. Basic research data obtained thus far have been based on animal models of AP ranging from mild edematous pancreatitis to severe necrotizing pancreatitis. In view of this, an adequate selection of experimental animal models is of paramount importance. Notwithstanding these animal models, it should be emphasized that none of these models mimic the clinical situation where varying degrees of severity usually occur. In this review, commonly used animal models of AP will be critically evaluated. A discussion of recent advances in our knowledge about AP risk factors is also included. PMID:17198179

  12. Trypsin-based laboratory methods and carboxypeptidase activation peptide in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Kylnp-Bck, Marja Leena; Kemppainen, Esko; Puolakkainen, Pauli

    2002-03-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a common disease varying widely in severity. At present, there is no "gold standard" for the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. Currently, the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis is based on measurements of serum amylase and/or lipase activity, which are considered unsatisfactory due to their low level of accuracy. Early identification of acute pancreatitis and especially detection of patients with a severe form of the disease is of utmost importance. Premature intrapancreatic activation of trypsinogen is a crucial early event in the pathophysiology of acute pancreatitis. The conversion of trypsinogen to active trypsin is mediated by the release of its activation peptide (TAP). The active trypsin is then able to activate other pancreatic zymogens (i.e. procarboxypeptidase) leading to tissue damage and eventually to autodigestion of the pancreas. To improve the laboratory diagnostics of AP, new methods have been developed to measure this primary pancreatic proteolytic insult. Here we review the current knowledge and clinical implications of trypsin based laboratory methods and carboxypeptidase activation peptide (CAPAP) in the diagnosis and severity assessment of acute pancreatitis. PMID:11884765

  13. The pathogenesis of pulmonary edema in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Warshaw, A L; Lesser, P B; Rie, M; Cullen, D J

    1975-01-01

    Acute pulmonary edema appeared 3 or more days after the onset of acute pancreatitis in 7 patients, an approximate incidence of 8%. The severity of pancreatitis in these patients was characterized by massive requirements for intravenous colloid and by marked hypocalcemia. In addition, at least 5 of the 7 patients had very high serum levels of triglycerides at the time of hospital admission. Hemodynamic studies during pulmonary edema showed normal central venous pressure, pulmonary artery pressure, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, and pulmonary vascular resistance. Cardiac index was appropriately elevated. Respiratory treatment, consisting of endotracheal intubation and controlled ventilation with PEEP, was successful in allowing reversal of the pulmonary injury and recovery of respiratory function within 1-2 weeks in all cases. Two patients died later from pancreatic abscesses. The findings indicate that a distinct form of pulmonary injury may occur in acute pancreatitis, characterized by loss of integrity of the alveolar-capilllary membrane, leading to pulmonary edema. The mechanism of injury is not known but may be caused by circulating free fatty acids, phospholipase A, or vasoactive substances. The pulmonary membrane lesion appears to heal during the period of intensive respiratory support. Images Fig. 1. PMID:1101836

  14. Alteration and role of heat shock proteins in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jia Yan; Li, Yong Yu

    2010-10-01

    Many etiological factors are involved in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis. The pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis has been attributed to such causes as trypsin autodigestion, pancreatic microcirculation malfunction, the calcium overload in pancreatic acinar cells, oxygen free radical injury, cytokine injury, and has been treated in detail in numerous reviews. More recently, heat shock proteins (HSP), particularly heat shock protein 60 (HSP60), have receive increasing attention as another possible factor in the pathogenesis and development of acute pancreatitis. This brief review aims to: (i) outline our current understanding of HSP and their role in pancreatitis; (ii) discuss the available evidences that suggest HSP's interplay between pancreas tissues and etiological agents; (iii) delineate the functional mechanisms of HSP proposed by different research groups, and offer new thinking in preventing and treating acute pancreatitis in general. PMID:20883423

  15. Acute pancreatitis and acute renal failure complicating doxylamine succinate intoxication.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yang Deok; Lee, Soo Teik

    2002-06-01

    Doxylamine succinate is an antihistaminic drugwith additional hypnotic, anticholinergic and local anesthetic effects first described in 1948. In Korea and many other countries, it is a common-over-the counter medication frequently involved in overdoses. Clinical symtomatology of doxylamine succinate overdose includes somnolence, coma, seizures, mydriasis, tachycardia, psychosis, and rhabdomyolysis. A serious complication may be rhabdomyolysis with subsequent impairment of renal function and acute renal failure. We report a case of acute renal failure and acute pancreatitis complicating a doxylamine succinate intoxication. PMID:12046971

  16. Resolvin D1 protects against inflammation in experimental acute pancreatitis and associated lung injury.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong; Zhou, Dan; Long, Fei-Wu; Chen, Ke-Ling; Yang, Hong-Wei; Lv, Zhao-Yin; Zhou, Bin; Peng, Zhi-Hai; Sun, Xiao-Feng; Li, Yuan; Zhou, Zong-Guang

    2016-03-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory condition that may lead to multisystemic organ failure with considerable mortality. Recently, resolvin D1 (RvD1) as an endogenous anti-inflammatory lipid mediator has been confirmed to protect against many inflammatory diseases. This study was designed to investigate the effects of RvD1 in acute pancreatitis and associated lung injury. Acute pancreatitis varying from mild to severe was induced by cerulein or cerulein combined with LPS, respectively. Mice were pretreated with RvD1 at a dose of 300 ng/mouse 30 min before the first injection of cerulein. Severity of AP was assessed by biochemical markers and histology. Serum cytokines and myeloperoxidase (MPO) levels in pancreas and lung were determined for assessing the extent of inflammatory response. NF-κB activation was determined by Western blotting. The injection of cerulein or cerulein combined with LPS resulted in local injury in the pancreas and corresponding systemic inflammatory changes with pronounced severity in the cerulein and LPS group. Pretreated RvD1 significantly reduced the degree of amylase, lipase, TNF-α, and IL-6 serum levels; the MPO activities in the pancreas and the lungs; the pancreatic NF-κB activation; and the severity of pancreatic injury and associated lung injury, especially in the severe acute pancreatitis model. These results suggest that RvD1 is capable of improving injury of pancreas and lung and exerting anti-inflammatory effects through the inhibition of NF-κB activation in experimental acute pancreatitis, with more notable protective effect in severe acute pancreatitis. These findings indicate that RvD1 may constitute a novel therapeutic strategy in the management of severe acute pancreatitis. PMID:26702138

  17. Factors influencing mortality in acute pancreatitis: can we alter them?

    PubMed

    Pitchumoni, C S; Patel, Nayan M; Shah, Prasanna

    2005-10-01

    Severe acture pancreatitis (SAP), a multisystem disease, is characterized by multiple organ system failure and additionally by local pancreatic complications such as necrosis, abscess, or pseudocyst. The rate of mortality in SAP, which is about 20% of all cases of acute pancreatitis (AP), may be as high as 25%, as in infected pancreatic necrosis. The factors that influence mortality in different degrees are various. Etiology for the episode, age, sex, race, ethnicity, genetic makeup, severity on admission, and the extent and nature of pancreatic necrosis (sterile vs. infected) influence the mortality. Other factors include treatment modalities such as administration of prophylactic antibiotics, the mode of feeding (TPN vs. enteral), ERCP with sphincterotomy, and surgery in selected cases. Epidemiological studies indicate that the incidence of AP is increasing along with an increase in obesity, a bad prognostic factor. Many studies have indicated a worse prognosis in idiopathic AP compared to pancreatitis induced by alcoholism or biliary stone. The risk for SAP after ERCP is the subject of extensive study. AP after trauma, organ transplant, or coronary artery bypass surgery is rare but may be serious. Since Ranson reported early prognostic criteria, a number of attempts have been made to simplify or add new clinical or laboratory studies in the early assessment of severity. Obesity, hemoconcentration on admission, presence of pleural effusion, increased fasting blood sugar, as well as creatinine, elevated CRP in serum, and urinary trypsinogen levels are some of the well-documented factors in the literature. The role of appropriate prophylactic antibiotic therapy although still is highly controversial, in properly chosen cases appears to be beneficial and well accepted in clinical practice. Early enteral nutrition has gained much support and jejunal feeding bypassing the pancreatic stimulatory effect of it in the duodenum is desirable in selected cases. The limited role for endoscopic sphincterotomy in patients with demonstrated dilated CBD with impacted stone and evidence of impending cholangitis is well documented. Surgery in AP other than for removal of the gallbladder is often limited to infected pancreatic necrosis, pseudocysts, and pancreatic abscess and in some cases of traumatic pancreatitis with a ruptured duct system. The progress in the understanding of the role of cytokines will over us opportunities to use immunomodulatory therapies to improve the outcome in SAP. PMID:16145344

  18. Effects of hypoxia-inducible factor-1? and matrix metalloproteinase-9 on alveolar-capillary barrier disruption and lung edema in rat models of severe acute pancreatitis-associated lung injury.

    PubMed

    Qi, Bing; Chen, Hai-Long; Shang, Dong; Dong, Ying; Zhang, Gui-Xin; Yu, Lei

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of hypoxia-inducible factor-1? (HIF-1?) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) on alveolar-capillary barrier disruption and lung edema in rat models of severe acute pancreatitis-associated lung injury (PALI). A total of 40 male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into a sham surgery group (n=10) and three PALI groups, in which acute pancreatitis was induced by the retrograde infusion of 5% sodium taurocholate (1 ml/kg). The PALI groups were as follows: i) Untreated PALI group (n=10); ii) 2-methoxyestradiol (2ME2) group (5 mg/kg body mass; n=10); and iii) 2ME2 group (15 mg/kg body mass; n=10). In the two 2ME2 groups, the HIF-1? inhibitor 2ME2 was administered intraperitoneally 1 h after the induction of AP. The severity of the pancreatitis was evaluated by the serum amylase levels and pathology. The severity of the lung injury was evaluated by the wet/dry ratio, blood gas analysis and pathology. The alveolar-capillary barrier disruption was assessed by Evans blue dye extravasation. The protein and mRNA expression levels of HIF-1? and MMP-9 were studied using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs), western blot analysis and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The active tumor necrosis factor-? levels were measured using an ELISA. The HIF-1? inhibitor 2ME2 attenuated the severity of the pancreatitis and PALI, while the lung edema and alveolar-capillary barrier disruption were significantly ameliorated compared with those in the untreated PALI group. Administration of the higher dose of 2ME2 significantly suppressed the protein expression of MMP-9 in the lung tissues. The results indicate that HIF-1? has a major function in alveolar-capillary barrier disruption and lung edema in PALI via a molecular pathway cascade involving MMP-9. Inhibition of HIF-1? by 2ME2 attenuates alveolar-capillary barrier disruption and lung edema. Pharmacological blockade of this pathway in patients with PALI may provide a novel therapeutic strategy. PMID:25120621

  19. Effects of hypoxia-inducible factor-1? and matrix metalloproteinase-9 on alveolar-capillary barrier disruption and lung edema in rat models of severe acute pancreatitis-associated lung injury

    PubMed Central

    QI, BING; CHEN, HAI-LONG; SHANG, DONG; DONG, YING; ZHANG, GUI-XIN; YU, LEI

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of hypoxia-inducible factor-1? (HIF-1?) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) on alveolar-capillary barrier disruption and lung edema in rat models of severe acute pancreatitis-associated lung injury (PALI). A total of 40 male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into a sham surgery group (n=10) and three PALI groups, in which acute pancreatitis was induced by the retrograde infusion of 5% sodium taurocholate (1 ml/kg). The PALI groups were as follows: i) Untreated PALI group (n=10); ii) 2-methoxyestradiol (2ME2) group (5 mg/kg body mass; n=10); and iii) 2ME2 group (15 mg/kg body mass; n=10). In the two 2ME2 groups, the HIF-1? inhibitor 2ME2 was administered intraperitoneally 1 h after the induction of AP. The severity of the pancreatitis was evaluated by the serum amylase levels and pathology. The severity of the lung injury was evaluated by the wet/dry ratio, blood gas analysis and pathology. The alveolar-capillary barrier disruption was assessed by Evans blue dye extravasation. The protein and mRNA expression levels of HIF-1? and MMP-9 were studied using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs), western blot analysis and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The active tumor necrosis factor-? levels were measured using an ELISA. The HIF-1? inhibitor 2ME2 attenuated the severity of the pancreatitis and PALI, while the lung edema and alveolar-capillary barrier disruption were significantly ameliorated compared with those in the untreated PALI group. Administration of the higher dose of 2ME2 significantly suppressed the protein expression of MMP-9 in the lung tissues. The results indicate that HIF-1? has a major function in alveolar-capillary barrier disruption and lung edema in PALI via a molecular pathway cascade involving MMP-9. Inhibition of HIF-1? by 2ME2 attenuates alveolar-capillary barrier disruption and lung edema. Pharmacological blockade of this pathway in patients with PALI may provide a novel therapeutic strategy. PMID:25120621

  20. Pathophysiologic factors in recurrent acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Carey, L C

    1985-09-01

    No single pathophysiologic factor has been identified as the cause of recurrent acute pancreatitis. A systematic search should be undertaken in every patient to identify one of a myriad of factors that have been shown to play a part in causing this distressing illness. The abuse of alcohol remains the likeliest cause, and further research may reveal an inborn error of metabolism that jeopardizes some people. Biliary tract disease, gallstones, choledochal cyst, papillary stenosis, and duodenal diverticula show a clear relationship. Metabolic disorders such as hypercalcemia, hyperlipidemia, and hyperparathyroidism remain suspect. Systemic illnesses such as systemic lupus erythematosus and cystic fibrosis must be considered. Development anomalies such as pancreas divisum may precipitate acute pancreatitis through aberrant anatomic structures. Cancer must always be disproved. Not yet firmly established but worthy of thorough investigation are uncommon causes, such as the ingestion of certain drugs or combinations of drugs and trauma, either recent or past. Pancreatitis remains frightening for those with the disease and puzzling and frustrating for the medical people who treat it. A careful history and investigation in accordance with a systematic diagnostic plan that includes many disparate factors will lead to identification of the cause in the majority of patients. PMID:3935840

  1. Influencing factors of pancreatic microcirculatory impairment in acute panceatitis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zong-Guang; Chen, You-Dai

    2002-06-01

    Pancreatic microcirculatory disturbance plays an important role in th e pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis, and it involves a series of changes including vasoconstriction, ischaemia, increased vascular permeability, impairment of nutritive tissue perfusion, ischaemia/reperfusion, leukocyte adherence, hemorrheological changes and impaired lymphatic drainage. Ischaemia possibly acts as an initiating factor of pancreatic microcirculatory injury in acute pancreatitis, or as an aggravating/continuing mechanism. The end-artery feature of the intralobular arterioles suggests that the pancreatic microcirculation is highly susceptible to ischaemia. Various vasoactive mediators, as bradykinin, platelet activating factor, endothelin and nitric oxide participate in the development of microcirculatory failure. PMID:12046059

  2. Influencing factors of pancreatic microcirculatory impairment in acute panceatitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zong-Guang; Chen, You-Dai

    2002-01-01

    Pancreatic microcirculatory disturbance plays an important role in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis, and it involves a series of changes including vasoconstriction, ischaemia, increased vascular permeability, impairment of nutritive tissue perfusion, ischaemia/reperfusion, leukocyte adherence, hemorrheological changes and impaired lymphatic drainage. Ischaemia possibly acts as an initiating factor of pancreatic microcirculatory injury in acute pancreatitis, or as an aggravating/continuing mechanism. The end-artery feature of the intralobular arterioles suggests that the pancreatic microcirculation is highly susceptible to ischaemia. Various vasoactive mediators, as bradykinin, platelet activating factor, endothelin and nitric oxide participate in the development of microcirculatory failure. PMID:12046059

  3. Bidirectional Relationship Between Diabetes and Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yi-Kung; Huang, Ming-Yuan; Hsu, Chen-Yang; Su, Yung-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The proposed bidirectional relationship between acute pancreatitis (AP) and diabetes has never been examined with the same source of data. Furthermore, the effects of disease severity on this relationship have not been fully evaluated. The present study employed the findings from a single database to measure the strength of the association between AP and diabetes. Findings from 1 million National Health Insurance beneficiaries were utilized. Two cohort studies with this database were selected to evaluate the linkage between diabetes and AP. The first cohort analysis addressed the risk of AP among diabetic patients and was comprised of 42,080 diabetic patients and 672,146 unexposed subjects. The second cohort analysis considered the risk of diabetes among patients with AP and enrolled 3187 patients with AP and 709259 unexposed subjects. All adult beneficiaries were followed from January 1, 2005 to December 31, 2012 to identify outcomes of interest. Cox regression models were applied to compare hazards adjusted for potential confounders. For the first cohort, the adjusted hazard ratio (HR) of AP was significantly increased by the presence of diabetes (1.72; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.521.96). In diabetic patients with a history of hyperglycemic crisis episodes (HCEs), the HR was even higher (6.32; 95% CI, 4.548.81). For the second cohort, the adjusted HR of diabetes in patients with AP was increased compared to the general population (2.15; 95% CI, 1.922.41). For patients with severe AP, the HR was also higher (2.22; 95% CI, 1.503.29) but did not differ significantly from that for patients with nonsevere AP. The 2 cohort studies provided evidence for the bidirectional relationship between diabetes and AP. Moreover, diabetic patients with history of HCEs may be associated with higher risk of AP. PMID:26765434

  4. Acute Pancreatitis: The Role of Imaging and Interventional Radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Maher, Michael M.; Lucey, Brian C.; Gervais, Debra A.; Mueller, Peter R.

    2004-09-15

    Acute pancreatitis can manifest as a benign condition with minimal abdominal pain and hyperamylasemia or can have a fulminant course, which can be life-threatening usually due to the development of infected pancreatic necrosis, and multisystem organ failure. Fortunately, 70-80% of patients with acute pancreatitis have a benign self-limiting course. The initial 24-48 hours after the initial diagnosis is usually the period that determines the subsequent course, and for many of the 20-30% of patients who subsequently have a fulminant course, this becomes apparent within this time frame. With reference to long-term outcome following acute pancreatitis, most cases recover without long-term sequelae with only a minority of cases progressing to chronic pancreatitis. In the initial management of acute pancreatitis, assessment of metabolic disturbances and systemic organ dysfunction is critical. However, the advent and continued refinement of cross-sectional imaging modalities over the past two decades has led to a prominent role for diagnostic imaging in assessing acute pancreatitis. Furthermore, these cross-sectional imaging modalities have enabled the development of diagnostic and therapeutic interventional techniques in the hands of radiologists. In this article we review the diagnostic features of acute pancreatitis, the clinical staging systems, complications and the role of imaging. The role of interventional radiology techniques in the management of acute pancreatitis will be discussed as well as potential complications associated with these treatments.

  5. Aprotinin revisited: formulation, characterization, biodistribution and therapeutic potential of new aprotinin microemulsion in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Karasulu, H Yeşim; Oruç, Nevin; Üstündağ-Okur, Neslihan; İlem Özdemir, Derya; Ay Şenyiğit, Zeynep; Barbet Yılmaz, Funda; Aşıkoğlu, Makbule; Özkılıç, Hayal; Akçiçek, Eren; Güneri, Tamer; Özütemiz, Ömer

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop aprotinin-loaded microemulsion (MA) for intravenous administration and evaluate the biodistribution and therapeutic potential of developed formulation in acute pancreatitis models in rats. Phase diagrams were constructed to identify microemulsion region and the optimal microemulsion was evaluated for physicochemical properties and treatment effect in rats, and comparisons made with the solution of aprotinin (SA). To evaluate the biodistribution of the drug by gamma scintigraphy aprotinin was radiolabeled with (99m)Tc radionuclide. Mild and severe acute pancreatitis was induced in rats by subcutaneous injections of cerulein and introductal infusion of 3% sodium taurocholate into the bile-pancreatic duct, respectively. In addition, serum amylase and pancreatic tissue myeloperoxidase activities were measured to evaluate the pancreatic damage. According to gamma scintigraphy and biodistribution studies, accumulation times and distribution of (99m)Tc-MA and SA were different. While MA was highly uptake by reticuloendothelial system, SA was mostly excreted by kidneys and bladder. Compared with the mild acute pancreatitis group, treatment with MA significantly decreased the serum amylase activity and pancreas myeloperoxidase activity. Furthermore, the protease inhibitor molecule aprotinin has therapeutic potential in acute pancreatitis. Finally, MA may be suggested as a promising alternative for treatment of acute pancreatitis. PMID:25738992

  6. Successful Plasma Exchange for Acute Pancreatitis Complicated With Hypertriglyceridemia

    PubMed Central

    Takahira, Shuji; Suzuki, Hiromichi; Watanabe, Yusuke; Kin, Hunsook; Ooya, Yoshitaka; Sekine, Yasumasa; Sonoda, Kenichiro; Ogawa, Hiroshi; Nomura, Yushi; Takane, Hiroshi; Tsuchiya, Youhei; Tsukamoto, Isao; Nemoto, Manabu

    2015-01-01

    A 33-year-old male with acute pancreatitis induced by hypertriglyceridemia had problems during treatment with plasma exchange. The hypercoagulable state was prevented by introducing innovative methods for cleaning and warming of the circuit and dialyzer. This enabled successful therapy, and the patient fully recovered from life-threatening acute pancreatitis. PMID:26904702

  7. Role of the gut barrier in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Capurso, Gabriele; Zerboni, Giulia; Signoretti, Marianna; Valente, Roberto; Stigliano, Serena; Piciucchi, Matteo; Delle Fave, Gianfranco

    2012-10-01

    The small intestine is one of the distant organs that become damaged during severe acute pancreatitis, due to microcirculation disturbance associated with loss of fluids in the "third space," hypovolemia, splanchnic vasoconstriction, and finally an ischemia-reperfusion injury. In this scenario, the gut acts as the starter for severe systemic complications, as the failure of the intestinal barrier is associated with translocation of bacteria and inflammatory and toxic products produced in the intestinal wall, which can be responsible for sepsis and infection of the necrotic pancreas and for systemic inflammatory response. Therefore, one of the main goals of treatment in the early phases of severe acute pancreatitis should be to maintain the integrity of the gut barrier in the small intestine. These strategies include appropriate fluid resuscitation to limit the damage due to the relative hypovolemia and early enteral feeding. The role of intravenous antibiotics to prevent infection of the pancreatic necrosis is controversial and the role of probiotics, which seemed a promising tool in vitro and in early clinical trials, needs to be further investigated to better understand the effects of the single specific strains at various doses and timing before designing new clinical trials. PMID:22955357

  8. The theory of 'persisting' common bile duct stones in severe gallstone pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Neoptolemos, J. P.

    1989-01-01

    There have been uncertainties as to the role of common bile duct (CBD) stones in severe gallstone pancreatitis. In order to resolve this, ERCP findings in 131 patients with acute pancreatitis were compared with predicted severity, clinical course and final outcome. Significant associations were found between 'persisting' CBD stones, coincidental acute cholangitis, predicted severity and actual outcome. There was evidence for acute obstruction of both the CBD and the pancreatic duct by CBD stones. The theory was therefore proposed that small migrating stones tend to initiate the attack, whereas larger 'persisting' stones tend to convert a mild attack into a severe attack. This hypothesis resolves previously irreconcilable theories and lends support to the use of urgent endoscopic sphincterotomy for treatment, but only in cases predicted to be severe. Images fig. 4 PMID:2802482

  9. Study on acute recent stage pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Ye-Chen; Wang, Min; Zhu, Feng; Qin, Ren-Yi

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas which involves the pancreas and surrounding tissue, and systemic inflammation with a characteristic systemic increase of vascular permeability and increased risk of multiple organ dysfunction. Currently, the pathogenesis of AP is fuzzy, and the diagnosis and treatment need to be standardized. Nevertheless, increased knowledge of AP may achieve more thorough understanding of the pathogenesis. The use of further advanced diagnostic tools and superior treatment, potentially will help clinicians to manage AP at an appropriate stage. However, in view of the multi factorial disease and the complex clinical manifestations, the management of patients with AP is also remaining areas for improvement. PMID:25473166

  10. Poorly controlled type 2 diabetes complicated by an episode of severe hypertriglyceridaemia-induced pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Denecker, Nathalie; Decochez, Katelijn

    2013-01-01

    A 23-year-old woman with a history of type 2 diabetes and non-compliance presented to the emergency department with abdominal epigastric pain and nausea. Laboratory examination revealed a mild ketoacidosis while an abdominal CT scan performed the following day demonstrated a severe acute pancreatitis of the body and tail (Balthazar grade E) despite normal amylase serum levels on admission. The presence of a lactescent serum was the clue to an extremely high triglyceride level (>10 000 mg/dl) causing the pancreatitis. The hypertriglyceridaemia itself was attributed mainly to the diabetic ketoacidosis. There was no family history of hypertriglyceridaemia. The triad consisting of diabetic ketoacidosis, hypertriglyceridaemia and acute pancreatitis is an unusual presentation of poorly controlled diabetes which can occur in type 1 as well as type 2 diabetic adults and children. Treatment with intravenous insulin and hydration successfully resolved the ketoacidosis and hypertriglyceridaemia and reversed the episode of acute pancreatitis. PMID:23632173

  11. A better model of acute pancreatitis for evaluating therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, J; Rattner, D W; Lewandrowski, K; Compton, C C; Mandavilli, U; Knoefel, W T; Warshaw, A L

    1992-01-01

    Existing models of acute pancreatitis have limitations to studying novel therapy. Whereas some produce mild self-limited pancreatitis, others result in sudden necrotizing injury. The authors developed an improved model providing homogeneous moderately severe injury by superimposing secretory hyperstimulation on minimal intraductal bile acid exposure. Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 231) received low-pressure intraductal glycodeoxycholic acid (GDOC) at very low (5 or 10 mmol/L) concentrations followed by intravenous cerulein. Cerulein or GDOC alone caused only very mild inflammation. However, GDOC combined with cerulein was uniformly associated with more edema (p less than 0.0005), acinar necrosis (p less than 0.01), inflammation (p less than 0.006), and hemorrhage (p less than 0.01). Pancreatic injury was further increased and death was potentiated by increasing volume and duration of intraductal low-dose GDOC infusion. There was significant morphologic progression between 6 and 24 hours. The authors conclude that (1) combining minimal intraductal bile acid exposure with intravenous hyperstimulation produces homogeneous pancreatitis of intermediate severity that can be modulated at will; (2) the injury is progressive over at least 24 hours with finite mortality rate; (3) the model provides superior opportunity to study innovative therapy. Images FIG. 3. FIG. 4. FIG. 5. FIG. 6. FIG. 7. PMID:1731649

  12. Anti-cytokine strategies in acute pancreatitis: pathophysiological insights and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Rau, B M; Krger, C M; Schilling, M K

    2005-01-01

    The clinical presentation of acute pancreatitis varies significantly from mild self-limiting discomfort to a severe life-threatening condition. Once the disease process is initiated, the severity of the disease is largely determined by a complex network of activated inflammatory mediators such as cytokines, proteolytic enzymes, reactive oxygen species, and many more which render the local injury to a systemic disease with multiple organ dysfunction, sepsis, and considerable mortality. Remarkable progress in diagnostic modalities, intensive care technologies, and organ preserving surgical techniques have decreased mortality of severe acute pancreatitis during the past decades. However, the treatment of acute pancreatitis still remains largely supportive and no specific approach exists to prevent evolving complications. A large body of clinical and experimental evidence suggests that cytokines are key factors in the pathomechanism of local and systemic complications of acute pancreatitis. Targeting cytokine activity as therapeutic approach to acute pancreatitis is a challenging concept and the results of modulating activation of TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, IL-2, IL-10, PAF and various chemokines has indeed been promising in the experimental setting even if tested under therapeutic conditions. However, experience from a limited number of clinical trials on anti cytokine strategies in acute pancreatitis has remarkably emphasized that translating successful experimental observations into reproducible clinical associations seems to be difficult. PMID:16358948

  13. Continuous Regional Arterial Infusion Therapy for Acute Necrotizing Pancreatitis Due to Mycoplasma pneumoniae Infection in a Child

    SciTech Connect

    Nakagawa, Motoo Ogino, Hiroyuki; Shimohira, Masashi; Hara, Masaki; Shibamoto, Yuta

    2009-05-15

    A case of acute necrotizing pancreatitis due to Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection was treated in an 8-year-old girl. She experienced acute pancreatitis during treatment for M. pneumoniae. Contrast-enhanced computed tomographic scan revealed necrotizing pancreatitis. The computed tomographic severity index was 8 points (grade E). A protease inhibitor, ulinastatin, was provided via intravenous infusion but was ineffective. Continuous regional arterial infusion therapy was provided with gabexate mesilate (FOY-007, a protease inhibitor) and meropenem trihydrate, and the pancreatitis improved. This case suggests that infusion therapy is safe and useful in treating necrotizing pancreatitis in children.

  14. Effects of urtica dioica extract on experimental acute pancreatitis model in rats.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Baris; Basar, Omer; Aktas, Bora; Altinbas, Akif; Ekiz, Fuat; Bykcam, Fatih; Albayrak, Aynur; Ginis, Zeynep; Oztrk, Glfer; Coban, Sahin; Ucar, Engin; Kaya, Oskay; Yksel, Osman; Caner, Sedat; Delibasi, Tuncay

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is the acute inflammation of pancreas and peripancreatic tissues, and distant organs are also affected. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of Urtica dioica extract (UDE) treatment on cerulein induced acute pancreatitis in rats. Twenty-one Wistar Albino rats were divided into three groups: Control, Pancreatitis, and UDE treatment group. In the control group no procedures were performed. In the pancreatitis and treatment groups, pancreatitis was induced with intraperitoneal injection of cerulein, followed by intraperitoneal injection of 1 ml saline (pancreatitis group) and 1 ml 5.2% UDE (treatment group). Pancreatic tissues were examined histopathologically. Pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-?), amylase and markers of apoptosis (M30, M65) were also measured in blood samples. Immunohistochemical staining was performed with Caspase-3 antibody. Histopathological findings in the UDE treatment group were less severe than in the pancreatitis group (5.7 vs 11.7, p = 0.010). TNF-? levels were not statistically different between treated and control groups (63.3 vs. 57.2, p = 0.141). UDE treatment was associated with less apoptosis [determined by M30, caspase-3 index (%)], (1.769 vs. 0.288, p = 0.056; 3% vs. 2.2%, p = 0.224; respectively). UDE treatment of pancreatitis merits further study. PMID:24995088

  15. Loss of Bace1 in Mice Does Not Alter the Severity of Caerulein Induced Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Heindl, Mario; Tuennemann, Jan; Sommerer, Ines; Mössner, Joachim; Hoffmeister, Albrecht

    2015-01-01

    Context Beta-site alpha-amyloid protein cleaving enzyme1 (BACE1) plays a key role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease. Additional to its moderate expression in the brain, high levels of BACE1 mRNA were found in the pancreas. Murine Bace1 has been immunohistochemicaly detected at the apical pole of acinar cells within the exocrine pancreas of mice and Bace1 activity was observed in pancreatic juice. In vitro experiments revealed enteropeptidase as a putative substrate for Bace1 suggesting a role in acute pancreatitis. Objective The aim of this study was to address a protective mechanism of Bace1 in acute experimental pancreatitis in mice. Methods Acute experimental pancreatitis was induced by intraperitoneal injection of caerulein in homozygote Bace1-/- mice and wild type mice. Serum and tissue analyses were carried out after 4 h, 8 h and 24 h. Measurement of plasma amylase and lipase was performed to confirm pancreatitis induction. In order to assess the severity of pancreatitis H&E stained pancreatic sections were examined regarding edema, inflammation and apoptosis. Immunohistochemical detection of myeloperoxidase (MPO) positive cells was carried out to further quantify the extent of inflammation. Expression of Bace2 within the pancreas was analyzed by immunohistochemistry and RT-qPCR. Results We demonstrate that total loss of Bace1 in mice leads to no alterations in the course of acute experimental caerulein-pancreatitis. Bace1-/- mice develop a moderate pancreatitis that is comparable in histomorphological and serological features with those seen in wild type mice. Discussion We discuss the results in the context of the applied caerulein induced edematous pancreatitis model and possible compensatory mechanisms via Bace2 that might be responsible for the observed results. PMID:25961820

  16. Relationship between the exocrine and endocrine pancreas after acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Das, Stephanie L M; Kennedy, James I C; Murphy, Rinki; Phillips, Anthony R J; Windsor, John A; Petrov, Maxim S

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To determine the prevalence and time course of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency in individuals with newly diagnosed prediabetes or diabetes mellitus after acute pancreatitis. METHODS: Relevant literature cited in three major biomedical journal databases (EMBASE, MEDLINE, and Scopus) was reviewed independently by two authors. There were no language constraints but the search was limited to human studies. Studies included were cohort studies of adult patients who were discharged after an attack of acute pancreatitis. Patients were excluded if they were under 18 years of age or had a previous diagnosis of prediabetes or diabetes mellitus, pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, or chronic pancreatitis. The main outcome measure was the prevalence of concomitant pancreatic exocrine insufficiency in patients who were diagnosed with prediabetes and diabetes mellitus after an attack of acute pancreatitis. Subgroup analysis was conducted for patients who were diagnosed with prediabetes only and those who were diagnosed with diabetes mellitus only. Subgroup analysis looking at the time course of concomitant pancreatic exocrine and endocrine insufficiency was also conducted. Pooled prevalence and corresponding 95% confidence intervals were calculated for all outcome measures and P-values < 0.05 were deemed statistically significant. RESULTS: Eight clinical studies comprising of 234 patients met all eligibility criteria. The pooled prevalence of newly diagnosed prediabetes or diabetes in individuals after acute pancreatitis was 43% (95%CI: 30%-56%). The pooled prevalence of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency in individuals after acute pancreatitis was 29% (95%CI: 19%-39%). The prevalence of concomitant pancreatic exocrine insufficiency in individuals with newly diagnosed prediabetes or diabetes was 40% (95%CI: 25%-55%). The prevalence of concomitant pancreatic exocrine insufficiency among individuals with prediabetes alone and diabetes mellitus alone was 41% (95%CI: 12%-75%) and 39% (95%CI: 28%-51%), respectively. Further analysis showed that the prevalence of concomitant pancreatic exocrine insufficiency in individuals with prediabetes or diabetes decreases over time after an attack of acute pancreatitis. CONCLUSION: Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency occurs in 40% of individuals with newly diagnosed prediabetes or diabetes mellitus after acute pancreatitis. Further studies are needed to investigate the pathogenesis of diabetes in this setting. PMID:25493036

  17. Fluid collections in and around the pancreas in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Brun, Alexander; Agarwal, Nanakram; Pitchumoni, C S

    2011-08-01

    The advent of computed tomographic scan with its wide use in the evaluation of acute pancreatitis has opened up a new topic in pancreatology i.e. fluid collections. Fluid collections in and around the pancreas occur often in acute pancreatitis and were defined by the Atlanta Symposium on Acute Pancreatitis in 1992. Two decades since the Atlanta Conference additional experience has brought to light the inadequacy and poor understanding of the terms used by different specialists involved in the care of patients with acute pancreatitis when interpreting imaging modalities and the need for a uniformly used classification system. The deficiencies of the Atlanta definitions and advances in medicine have led to a proposed revision of the Atlanta classification promulgated by the Acute Pancreatitis Classification Working Group. The newly used terms "acute peripancreatic fluid collections," "pancreatic pseudocyst," "postnecrotic pancreatic/peripancreatic fluid collections," and "walled-off pancreatic necrosis" are to be clearly understood in the interpretation of imaging studies. The current treatment methods for fluid collections are diverse and depend on accurate interpretations of radiologic tests. Management options include conservative treatment, percutaneous catheter drainage, open and laparoscopic surgery, and endoscopic drainage. The choice of treatment depends on a correct diagnosis of the type of fluid collection. In this study we have attempted to clarify the management and clinical features of different types of fluid collections as they have been initially defined under the 1992 Atlanta Classification and revised by the Working Group's proposed categorization. PMID:21750432

  18. Role of Biomarkers in Diagnosis and Prognostic Evaluation of Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Meher, Susanta; Mishra, Tushar Subhadarshan; Sasmal, Prakash Kumar; Rath, Satyajit; Sharma, Rakesh; Rout, Bikram; Sahu, Manoj Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a potentially life threatening disease. The spectrum of severity of the illness ranges from mild self-limiting disease to a highly fatal severe necrotizing pancreatitis. Despite intensive research and improved patient care, overall mortality still remains high, reaching up to 30-40% in cases with infected pancreatic necrosis. Although little is known about the exact pathogenesis, it has been widely accepted that premature activation of digestive enzymes within the pancreatic acinar cell is the trigger that leads to autodigestion of pancreatic tissue which is followed by infiltration and activation of leukocytes. Extensive research has been done over the past few decades regarding their role in diagnosis and prognostic evaluation of severe acute pancreatitis. Although many standalone biochemical markers have been studied for early assessment of severity, C-reactive protein still remains the most frequently used along with Interleukin-6. In this review we have discussed briefly the pathogenesis and the role of different biochemical markers in the diagnosis and severity evaluation in acute pancreatitis. PMID:26345247

  19. Role of Biomarkers in Diagnosis and Prognostic Evaluation of Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Meher, Susanta; Mishra, Tushar Subhadarshan; Sasmal, Prakash Kumar; Rath, Satyajit; Sharma, Rakesh; Rout, Bikram; Sahu, Manoj Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a potentially life threatening disease. The spectrum of severity of the illness ranges from mild self-limiting disease to a highly fatal severe necrotizing pancreatitis. Despite intensive research and improved patient care, overall mortality still remains high, reaching up to 3040% in cases with infected pancreatic necrosis. Although little is known about the exact pathogenesis, it has been widely accepted that premature activation of digestive enzymes within the pancreatic acinar cell is the trigger that leads to autodigestion of pancreatic tissue which is followed by infiltration and activation of leukocytes. Extensive research has been done over the past few decades regarding their role in diagnosis and prognostic evaluation of severe acute pancreatitis. Although many standalone biochemical markers have been studied for early assessment of severity, C-reactive protein still remains the most frequently used along with Interleukin-6. In this review we have discussed briefly the pathogenesis and the role of different biochemical markers in the diagnosis and severity evaluation in acute pancreatitis. PMID:26345247

  20. Acute pancreatitis in a pregnant woman with acute fatty liver dystrophy. A case report.

    PubMed

    Cruciat, Gheorghe; Stamatian, Florin; Puscas, Mariana; Cruciat, Carmen; Ispasoiu, Florin; Mure?an, Daniel

    2007-06-01

    Acute fatty liver and acute pancreatitis rarely complicate pregnancy. Acute pancreatitis may appear isolated but when it is subsequent to acute fatty liver of pregnancy the evolution is in many cases fatal. We report the case of a 26-year-old primigravida, at 25 weeks' gestation, who developed acute fatty liver of pregnancy and acute pancreatitis after an acute viral upper respiratory tract infection, with an unfavorable evolution to death. Establishing the diagnosis was very difficult and it was confirmed only at laparotomy. PMID:17592570

  1. ACR Appropriateness Criteria® acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Baker, Mark E; Nelson, Rendon C; Rosen, Max P; Blake, Michael A; Cash, Brooks D; Hindman, Nicole M; Kamel, Ihab R; Kaur, Harmeet; Piorkowski, Robert J; Qayyum, Aliya; Yarmish, Gail M

    2014-12-01

    The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every two years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances where evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment. The Atlanta Classification by the Acute Pancreatitis Classification Working Group recently modified the terminology for the clinical course and the morphologic changes identified on imaging, primarily contrast- enhanced multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). The two distinct clinical courses of the disease are classified as (1) early phase, which lasts approximately 1 week, and (2) late phase, which starts after the first week and can last for months after the initial episode. The two, primary, morphologic changes are acute, interstitial edematous and necrotizing pancreatitis. Timing of imaging, primarily MDCT, is based on the clinical phases and is, therefore, important for these imaging guidelines. Ultrasound's role is to detect gallstones after the first episode. MDCT plays a primary role in the management of acutely ill patients, only after a minimum of 48-72 hours and generally after one week. MR plays a supplementary role to MDCT. Follow-up MDCT guides management and therapy: percutaneous aspiration of fluid collections and/or placement of large caliber catheters in infected necrosis. PMID:25364960

  2. A Case of Idiopathic Acute Pancreatitis in the First Trimester of Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Tomomi; Kanasaki, Haruhiko; Oride, Aki; Ishihara, Tomoko; Kyo, Satoru

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is rare in pregnancy, with an estimated incidence of approximately 1 in 1000 to 1 in 10,000 pregnancies. Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy usually occurs in the third trimester. Here, we report a case of acute pancreatitis in the first trimester. A 36-year-old primigravida at 11 weeks of gestation complained of severe lower abdominal pain. The pain gradually worsened and migrated toward the epigastric region. She had no history of chronic alcoholism. Blood investigations showed elevated level of C-reactive protein (9.58 mg/dL), pancreatic amylase (170 IU/L), and lipase (332 IU/L). There was no gallstone and no abnormality in the pancreatic and biliary ducts on ultrasonography. Antinuclear antibody and IgG4 were negative and no evidence of hyperlipidemia or diabetes was found. There was also no evidence of viral infection. On the third day of hospitalization, she was diagnosed with severe acute pancreatitis on magnetic resonance imaging. Medical interventions were initiated with nafamostat mesilate and ulinastatin, and parenteral nutrition was administered through a central venous catheter. On the eighth day of hospitalization, her condition gradually improved with a decreased level of pancreatic amylase and the pain subsided. After conservative management, she did not have any recurrence during her pregnancy. PMID:26843995

  3. The Role of Eugenol in the Prevention of Acute Pancreatitis-Induced Acute Kidney Injury: Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Markakis, Charalampos; Tsaroucha, Alexandra; Papalois, Apostolos E.; Lambropoulou, Maria; Spartalis, Eleftherios; Tsigalou, Christina; Romanidis, Konstantinos; Simopoulos, Constantinos

    2016-01-01

    Aim. Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory intra-abdominal disease, which takes a severe form in 15–20% of patients and can result in high mortality especially when complicated by acute renal failure. The aim of this study is to assess the possible reduction in the extent of acute kidney injury after administration of eugenol in an experimental model of acute pancreatitis. Materials and Methods. 106 male Wistar rats weighing 220–350 g were divided into 3 groups: (1) Sham, with sham surgery; (2) Control, with induction of acute pancreatitis, through ligation of the biliopancreatic duct; and (3) Eugenol, with induction of acute pancreatitis and eugenol administration at a dose of 15 mg/kg. Serum urea and creatinine, histopathological changes, TNF-α, IL-6, and MPO activity in the kidneys were evaluated at predetermined time intervals. Results. The group that was administered eugenol showed milder histopathological changes than the Control group, TNF-α activity was milder in the Eugenol group, and there was no difference in activity for MPO and IL-6. Serum urea and creatinine levels were lower in the Eugenol group than in the Control group. Conclusions. Eugenol administration was protective for the kidneys in an experimental model of acute pancreatitis in rats. PMID:26884642

  4. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, diabetes mellitus and serum nutritional markers after acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Vujasinovic, Miroslav; Tepes, Bojan; Makuc, Jana; Rudolf, Sasa; Zaletel, Jelka; Vidmar, Tjasa; Seruga, Maja; Birsa, Bostjan

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate impairment and clinical significance of exocrine and endocrine pancreatic function in patients after acute pancreatitis (AP). METHODS: Patients with AP were invited to participate in the study. Severity of AP was determined by the Atlanta classification and definitions revised in 2012. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI) was diagnosed by the concentration of fecal elastase-1. An additional work-up, including laboratory testing of serum nutritional markers for determination of malnutrition, was offered to all patients with low levels of fecal elastase-1 FE. Hemoglobin A1c or oral glucose tolerance tests were also performed in patients without prior diabetes mellitus, and type 3c diabetes mellitus (T3cDM) was diagnosed according to American Diabetes Association criteria. RESULTS: One hundred patients were included in the study: 75% (75/100) of patients had one attack of AP and 25% (25/100) had two or more attacks. The most common etiology was alcohol. Mild, moderately severe and severe AP were present in 67, 15 and 18% of patients, respectively. The mean time from attack of AP to inclusion in the study was 2.7 years. PEI was diagnosed in 21% (21/100) of patients and T3cDM in 14% (14/100) of patients. In all patients with PEI, at least one serologic nutritional marker was below the lower limit of normal. T3cDM was more frequently present in patients with severe AP (P = 0.031), but was also present in some patients with mild and moderately severe AP. PEI was present in all degrees of severity of AP. There were no statistically significantly differences according to gender, etiology and number of AP attacks. CONCLUSION: As exocrine and endocrine pancreatic insufficiency can develop after AP, routine follow-up of patients is necessary, for which serum nutritional panel measurements can be useful. PMID:25561813

  5. Hypertriglyceridemia-induced acute pancreatitis in pregnancy causing maternal death

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Hae Rin; Cho, Yoon Jin; Chon, Seung Joo

    2016-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy is rare and occurs in approximately 3 in 10,000 pregnancies. It rarely complicates pregnancy, and can occur during any trimester, however over half (52%) of cases occur during the third trimester and during the post-partum period. Gallstones are the most common cause of acute pancreatitis. On the other hand, acute pancreatitis caused by hypertriglyceridemia due to increase of estrogen during the gestational period is very unusual, but complication carries a higher risk of morbidity and mortality for both the mother and the fetus. We experienced a case of pregnant woman who died of acute exacerbation of hypertriglyceridemia-induced acute pancreatitis at 23 weeks of gestation. We report on progress and management of this case along with literature reviews. PMID:27004207

  6. Acute pancreatitis after spine surgery: a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Tauchi, Ryoji; Imagama, Shiro; Ito, Zenya; Ando, Kei; Hirano, Kenichi; Ukai, Junichi; Kobayashi, Kazuyoshi; Shinjo, Ryuichi; Muramoto, Akio; Nakashima, Hiroaki; Matsumoto, Tomohiro; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2014-07-01

    Although acute postoperative pancreatitis is a relatively frequent complication after open biliary tract surgery and gastric surgery, acute pancreatitis after spine surgery is a rare complication. We report the first case of acute pancreatitis after posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) for spondylolisthesis that resolved with conservative treatment. A 53-year-old female patient received a PLIF from L3 to L5. The patient presented with persistent mild abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting several hours after the surgery. An abdominal CT revealed swelling of the head of the pancreas and free fluid around the pancreas. A gastroenterologist diagnosed acute pancreatitis and prescribed nafamostat mesilate, antibiotics and intravenous fluid therapy. The patient recovered gradually, and clinical symptoms disappeared. At 6 months after the operation, she had experienced no recurrence of abdominal symptoms, and solid spinal fusion was achieved. In previous studies, acute pancreatitis was reported as a complication after spine surgery for various spine diseases such as scoliosis and lumbar disorders. The procedures performed included anterior/posterior scoliosis surgery and anterior/posterior lumbar fusion surgery. We must consider the possibility of acute pancreatitis when unusual abdominal symptoms with elevated serum amylase levels occur after spine surgery. Prompt diagnosis and supportive therapy are essential to minimize morbidity and mortality. PMID:24318308

  7. Imaging and Percutaneous Management of Acute Complicated Pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Shankar, Sridhar; Sonnenberg, Eric van; Silverman, Stuart G.; Tuncali, Kemal; Banks, Peter A.

    2004-11-15

    Acute pancreatitis varies from a mild, self-limited disease to one with significant morbidity and mortality in its most severe forms. While clinical criteria abound, imaging has become indispensable to diagnose the extent of the disease and its complications, as well as to guide and monitor therapy. Percutaneous interventional techniques offer options that can be life-saving, surgery-sparing or important adjuncts to operation. Close cooperation and communication between the surgeon, gastroenterologist and interventional radiologist enhance the likelihood of successful patient care.

  8. [Early prognosis of acute pancreatitis (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Borda, F; Garca Carasusan, M; Burusco, M J; Arin, A; Ayensa, C; Rivero Puente, A

    1979-03-25

    One hundred patients with acute pancreatitis are studied. The results in 90 cases were "favorable or very favorable", in ten cases "unfavorable or death". Various different characterisitics were analyzed statistically in relationship to the two types of outcome: sex, clinical histories, and results of physical examination. Furthermore, the individual relationships between age, main initial analytic parameters, and later development were determined. In our experience neither age nor sex, considered individually, showed a significant relationship to the seriousness of the disease. Having had pancreatitis previously proved to be a favorable factor (p less than 0.005). None of the other factors in the case histories showed any bearing of the later course of the condition. Findings in physical examination which were signs of unfavorable prognosis included jaundice (p less than 0.001), low blood pressure (p less than 0.001), tachycardia (p less than 0.005), intestinal paresia (p less than 0.001), pain following decompression (p less than 0.025), and abdominal tenderness (p less than 0.05). Abnormalities in ECG (p less than 0.005), marked leukocytosis (p less than 0.0005), hyperglycemia (p less than 0.02), hypocalcemia (p less than 0.05), and high values for the coefficient of amilase/creatinine clearance (p less than 0.01) also suggested an unfavorable course. PMID:459591

  9. Acute pancreatitis as an adverse event in patients with the duodenal-jejunal bypass liner.

    PubMed

    Betzel, Bark; Homan, Jens; Aarts, Edo; Janssen, Ignace; Spanier, Marcel; Wahab, Peter; Groenen, Marcel; Berends, Frits

    2015-11-01

    Placement of the duodenal-jejunal bypass liner (DJBL) is a minimally invasive technique for the management of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity. Acute pancreatitis was seen in 5 of 167 patients (3?%) in our series. It is suggested that acute pancreatitis in patients with the DJBL results from either direct blockage or edema of the major duodenal papilla, which may be caused by the following: migration of the anchor of the DJBL, accumulation of food debris between the liner and the duodenal wall, or reflux of duodenal contents into the pancreatic duct due to intraluminal hypertension caused by the liner. Early removal of the DJBL resulted in fast and complete recovery, whereas delayed diagnosis and removal led to severe, necrotizing acute pancreatitis. PMID:26021308

  10. Acute necrotizing pancreatitis: can tigecycline be included in a therapeutic strategy?

    PubMed Central

    OCCHIONORELLI, S.; MORGANTI, L.; CULTRERA, R.; ANDREOTTI, D.; MACCATROZZO, S.; CAPPELLARI, L.; STANO, R.; VASQUEZ, G.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Acute necrotizing pancreatitis is a severe and life-threatening disease. Infection, which occurs in about 30% of cases, is the most feared complication. Antibiotic therapy is still discussed and there are no clear recommendation in literature. These clinical series underline the importance of having a clear antibiotic protocol, including tigecycline, in the management of acute necrotizing pancreatitis. Clinical series Six patients with clinical and radiological diagnosis of necrotizing acute pancreatitis are treated in Emergency Surgery Department, following a conservative management, which includes fluid resuscitation, intensive care unit and radiological monitoring, ultrasound-guided percutaneous drainage and an antibiotic treatment protocol, that includes tigecycline. No one of the six patient undergo surgery (mean hospital stay: 44 days). In a six months follow-up all patients are alive and in good clinical conditions. Discussion Infection is the most important factor which determinate prognosis and outcome of acute necrotizing pancreatitis. Antibiotic prophylaxis is still discussed and there are no clear antibiotic treatment guidelines in literature. Despite its side effects on pancreatic gland, tigecycline is successful in resolution of sepsis, caused by infected pancreatic necrosis. Conclusions Collaboration with infectivologist and a clear antibiotic protocol is fundamental to solve infected necrosis. Antibiotic treatment, set up as soon as possible, is successful in our six patients, as they recover without undergoing surgical procedures. Tigecycline offers broad coverage and efficacy against resistant pathogens for the treatment of documented pancreatic necrosis infection. However, further studies are necessary to fully understand the safety profile and efficacy of tigecycline. PMID:25827664

  11. A serial histologic study of the development and progression of acute pancreatitis in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Rao, S. S.; Watt, I. A.; Donaldson, L. A.; Crocket, A.; Joffe, S. N.

    1981-01-01

    This study was undertaken for the purpose of a serial investigation of the development and progression of the light-microscopic changes of acute pancreatitis and histologic criteria for evaluating pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis, similar to that found in man, was induced in rats with the use of a closed duodenal loop technique (n = 36). Control rats underwent a laparotomy with mobilization of the duodenum (n = 12). Animals were killed every 2 hours for 24 hours, and a detailed and independent histologic evaluation was made of each. Focal acinar necrosis proceeding to a vasculitis appeared within 2--4 hours before the infiltration of inflammatory cells. Thereafter, the extent of acinar necrosis closely reflected the vasculitis with the later development of the acute inflammation. By the sixteenth hour, these changes were graded as moderate pancreatitis, and by 24 hours the process represented severe hemorrhagic pancreatitis. Vascular changes and acinar necrosis preceded the inflammatory cell infiltrate. The pancreatitis has been quantitated into minimal, moderate, or severe by assessing the severity of edema, acute inflammatory infiltrate, and changes in the vessels, ducts, and acini. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:7223862

  12. Active interleukin-1 receptor required for maximal progression of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Norman, J G; Fink, G; Franz, M; Guffey, J; Carter, G; Davison, B; Sexton, C; Glaccum, M

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors' aim was to determine the requirement for an active interleukin (IL)-1 receptor during the development and progression of acute pancreatitis. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Interleukin-1 is a pro- inflammatory cytokine that has been shown to be produced during acute pancreatitis. Earlier animal studies of moderate and severe pancreatitis have shown that blockade of this powerful mediator is associated with attenuated pancreatic destruction and dramatic increases in survival. The exact role played by IL-1 and the requirement for activation of its receptor in the initiation and progression of pancreatitis is unknown. METHODS: Conventional and IL-1 receptor knockout animals were used in parallel experiments of acute pancreatitis induced by intraperitoneal injection of cerulean (50 microg/kg every 1 hour X 4). The conventional mouse strain had the IL-1 receptor blocked prophylactically by means of a recombinant IL-1 receptor antagonist (10 mg/kg injected intraperitoneally every 2 hours). The second mouse strain was genetically engineered by means of gene targeting in murine embryonic stem cells to be devoid of type 1 IL-1 receptor (IL-1 receptor knockout). Animals were killed at 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, and 8 hours, with the severity of pancreatitis determined by serum amylase, lipase, and IL-6 levels and blind histologic grading. Strain-specific controls were used for comparison. RESULTS: The genetic absence of the IL-1 receptor or its pharmacologic blockade resulted in significantly attenuated pancreatic vacuolization, edema, necrosis, inflammation, and enzyme release. Serum IL-6, a marker of inflammation severity, was dramatically decreased in both groups. CONCLUSIONS: Activation of the IL-1 receptor is not required for the development of pancreatitis but apparently is necessary for the maximal propagation of pancreatic injury and its associated inflammation. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. PMID:8597510

  13. Mechanisms of polyamine catabolism-induced acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Hyvnen, M T; Merentie, M; Uimari, A; Keinnen, T A; Jnne, J; Alhonen, L

    2007-04-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an autodigestive disease, in which the pancreatic tissue is damaged by the digestive enzymes produced by the acinar cells. Among the tissues in the mammalian body, pancreas has the highest concentration of the natural polyamine, spermidine. We have found that pancreas is very sensitive to acute decreases in the concentrations of the higher polyamines, spermidine and spermine. Activation of polyamine catabolism in transgenic rats overexpressing SSAT (spermidine/spermine-N(1)-acetyltransferase) in the pancreas leads to rapid depletion of these polyamines and to acute necrotizing pancreatitis. Replacement of the natural polyamines with methylated polyamine analogues before the induction of acute pancreatitis prevents the development of the disease. As premature trypsinogen activation is a common, early event leading to tissue injury in acute pancreatitis in human and in experimental animal models, we studied its role in polyamine catabolism-induced pancreatitis. Cathepsin B, a lysosomal hydrolase mediating trypsinogen activation, was activated just 2 h after induction of SSAT. Pre-treatment of the rats with bismethylspermine prevented pancreatic cathepsin B activation. Analysis of tissue ultrastructure by transmission electron microscopy revealed early dilatation of rough endoplasmic reticulum, probable disturbance of zymogen packaging, appearance of autophagosomes and later disruption of intracellular membranes and organelles. Based on these results, we suggest that rapid eradication of polyamines from cellular structures leads to premature zymogen activation and autodigestion of acinar cells. PMID:17371271

  14. A prospective study of radionuclide biliary scanning in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Neoptolemos, J. P.; Fossard, D. P.; Berry, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    Early surgery for biliary pancreatitis has resulted in a need for an accurate method of gallstone detection in acute pancreatitis. Fifty patients with acute pancreatitis were studied prospectively to assess the diagnostic value of Radionuclide Biliary Scanning (RBS) performed within 72 hours of an attack. To assess the general accuracy of RBS a further 154 patients with suspected acute cholecystitis or biliary colic were similarly studied. There were 34 patients with biliary pancreatitis and 18 (53%) had a positive scan (no gallbladder seen). There were 16 patients with non-biliary pancreatitis and 5 (31%) had a positive scan. All 51 patients with acute cholecystitis had a positive scan, as did 82% of the 51 patients with biliary colic. There were 52 patients with no biliary or pancreatic disease and none of these had a positive scan. RBS is highly accurate in confirming a diagnosis of acute cholecystitis or biliary colic. However, it cannot be relied on to differentiate between biliary and non-biliary pancreatitis and should certainly not be used as the basis for biliary surgery in these patients. PMID:6859781

  15. BPC 157 therapy to detriment sphincters failure-esophagitis-pancreatitis in rat and acute pancreatitis patients low sphincters pressure.

    PubMed

    Petrovic, I; Dobric, I; Drmic, D; Sever, M; Klicek, R; Radic, B; Brcic, L; Kolenc, D; Zlatar, M; Kunjko, K; Jurcic, D; Martinac, M; Rasic, Z; Boban Blagaic, A; Romic, Z; Seiwerth, S; Sikiric, P

    2011-10-01

    Possibly, acute esophagitis and pancreatitis cause each other, and we focused on sphincteric failure as the common causative key able to induce either esophagitis and acute pancreatitis or both of them, and thereby investigate the presence of a common therapy nominator. This may be an anti-ulcer pentadecapeptide BPC 157 (tested for inflammatory bowel disease, wound treatment) affecting esophagitis, lower esophageal and pyloric sphincters failure and acute pancreatitis (10 ?g/kg, 10 ng/kg intraperitoneally or in drinking water). The esophagitis-sphincter failure procedure (i.e., insertion of the tubes into the sphincters, lower esophageal and pyloric) and acute pancreatitis procedure (i.e., bile duct ligation) were combined in rats. Esophageal manometry was done in acute pancreatitis patients. In rats acute pancreatitis procedure produced also esophagitis and both sphincter failure, decreased pressure 24 h post-surgery. Furthermore, bile duct ligation alone immediately declines the pressure in both sphincters. Vice versa, the esophagitis-sphincter failure procedure alone produced acute pancreatitis. What's more, these lesions (esophagitis, sphincter failure, acute pancreatitis when combined) aggravate each other (tubes into sphincters and ligated bile duct). Counteraction occurred by BPC 157 therapies. In acute pancreatitis patients lower pressure at rest was in both esophageal sphincters in acute pancreatitis patients. We conclude that BPC 157 could cure esophagitis/sphincter/acute pancreatitis healing failure. PMID:22204800

  16. Acute pancreatitis at its centenary. The contribution of Reginald Fitz.

    PubMed

    Leach, S D; Gorelick, F S; Modlin, I M

    1990-07-01

    1989 represents the 100th anniversary of Reginald Fitz's initial characterization of acute pancreatitis. Our current understanding of this disease has advanced little beyond Fitz's early description. While survival from pancreatitis has improved largely through advancements in critical care techniques, no medical or surgical therapy exists that can limit pancreatic autodigestion and inflammation. Recent investigations have suggested that pancreatitis may result from a disruption of normal stimulus-secretion coupling within the acinar cell. Future research based on these observations may ultimately result in successful therapy for this disease. PMID:2194439

  17. Acute pancreatitis at its centenary. The contribution of Reginald Fitz.

    PubMed Central

    Leach, S D; Gorelick, F S; Modlin, I M

    1990-01-01

    1989 represents the 100th anniversary of Reginald Fitz's initial characterization of acute pancreatitis. Our current understanding of this disease has advanced little beyond Fitz's early description. While survival from pancreatitis has improved largely through advancements in critical care techniques, no medical or surgical therapy exists that can limit pancreatic autodigestion and inflammation. Recent investigations have suggested that pancreatitis may result from a disruption of normal stimulus-secretion coupling within the acinar cell. Future research based on these observations may ultimately result in successful therapy for this disease. Images Fig. 1. PMID:2194439

  18. Acute Pancreatitis after Percutaneous Mechanical Thrombectomy: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    SciTech Connect

    Hershberger, Richard C. Bornak, Arash; Aulivola, Bernadette; Mannava, Krishna

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: We describe a case of severe acute pancreatitis after percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy (PMT) and review the literature for the occurrence of this complication. Materials and Methods: A 53-year-old man with a history of bilateral external iliac artery stent placement sought care for acute onset of lifestyle-limiting left claudication. Angiography confirmed left external iliac stent occlusion, and PMT with the AngioJet Xpeedior catheter (Possis Medical, Minneapolis MN) was performed. Results: After PMT of the occluded external iliac artery, a residual in-stent stenosis required the placement of a second iliac stent. The procedure was complicated by severe acute pancreatitis. Other causes of pancreatitis were eliminated during the patient's hospital stay. A literature review revealed nine cases of acute pancreatitis after PMT. Conclusion: Although rare, pancreatitis can be a devastating complication of PMT. The development of pancreatitis seems to be related to the products of extensive hemolysis triggering an inflammatory process. To prevent this complication, we recommend that close attention be paid to the duration and extent of PMT, thereby avoiding extensive hemolysis and subsequent complications.

  19. Apoptotic Mechanisms of Peroxisome ProliferatorActivated Receptor-? Activation in Acinar Cells During Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ping; Lou, Xiao-Li; Chen, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to determine the mechanism by which activation of peroxisome proliferatoractivated receptor-? promotes apoptosis of acinar cells in pancreatitis. Methods AR42j cells pretreated with the peroxisome proliferatoractivated receptor-? agonist pioglitazone were activated by cerulein as an in vitro model of acute pancreatitis. Inflammatory cytokines and amylase were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Cell viability was determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Cell apoptosis was measured by flow cytometry and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferasemediated dUTP nick end labeling staining. Activity of caspases was determined. Bax and Bcl-2 levels were assayed by Western blot. Results Cytokines, amylase, and cellular proliferation decreased in pioglitazone-pretreated cells. Pioglitazone increased the activity of caspases 3, 8, and 9 in cerulein-activated AR42j cells as well as in the pancreas of rats 3 hours after induction of severe acute pancreatitis. Acinar cell apoptosis was induced by reducing the mitochondrial membrane potential in the pioglitazone group. Pioglitazone increased expression of proapoptotic Bax proteins and decreased antiapoptotic Bcl-2 in cerulein-induced AR42j cells and decreased Bcl-2 levels in pancreatic tissue of severe acute pancreatitis rats 1 and 3 hours after induction. Conclusion Pioglitazone may promote apoptosis of acinar cells through both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways in acute pancreatitis. PMID:26495791

  20. Early phase of acute pancreatitis: Assessment and management

    PubMed Central

    Phillip, Veit; Steiner, Jrg M; Algl, Hana

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a potentially life-threatening disease with a wide spectrum of severity. The overall mortality of AP is approximately 5%. According to the revised Atlanta classification system, AP can be classified as mild, moderate, or severe. Severe AP often takes a clinical course with two phases, an early and a late phase, which should both be considered separately. In this review article, we first discuss general aspects of AP, including incidence, pathophysiology, etiology, and grading of severity, then focus on the assessment of patients with suspected AP, including diagnosis and risk stratification, followed by the management of AP during the early phase, with special emphasis on fluid therapy, pain management, nutrition, and antibiotic prophylaxis. PMID:25133018

  1. [TOTAL PARENTERAL NUTRITION IN A PREGNANT PATIENT WITH ACUTE PANCREATITIS AND LIPOPROTEIN LIPASE DEFICIENCY].

    PubMed

    Contreras-Bolvar, Victoria; Gonzlez-Molero, Inmaculada; Valdivieso, Pedro; Olveira, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of severe acute pancreatitis induced by hypertriglyceridemia secondary to lipoprotein lipase (LPL) deficiency in a pregnant patient with gestational diabetes, initially maneged with diet but it was later necessary to carry out artificial nutricional support measures: total parenteral nutrition. LPL deficiency might cause severe hypertriglyceridemia, repetition acute pancreatitis which is an unwieldy and severe situation during pregnancy. Acute familial hypertriglyceridemia pancreatitis accounts for 5% of cases, including LPL deficiency. The goal of treatment is to reach triglycerides levels below 500 mg/dl, being very low fat diet the treatment of choice, drugs or plasmapheresis techniques can also be associated. TPN enriched in ?3 fatty acids and glutamine was safe and effective in our patient with significant decrease in triglyceride levels. PMID:26545559

  2. A Rare Cause of Acute Pancreatitis: Intramural Duodenal Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Hemant; Singla, Umesh; Agrawal, Roli R.

    2012-01-01

    We describe an interesting case of intramural duodenal hematoma in an otherwise healthy male who presented to emergency room with gradually progressive abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting. This condition was missed on initial evaluation and patient was discharged from emergency room with diagnosis of acute gastritis. After 3 days, patient came back to emergency room and abdominal imaging studies were conducted which showed that patient had intramural duodenal hematoma associated with gastric outlet obstruction and pancreatitis. Hematoma was the cause of acute pancreatitis as pancreatic enzymes levels were normal at the time of first presentation, but later as the hematoma grew in size, it caused compression of pancreas and subsequent elevation of pancreatic enzymes. We experienced a case of pancreatitis which was caused by intramural duodenal hematoma. This case was missed on initial evaluation. We suggest that physicians should be more vigilant about this condition. PMID:23091743

  3. Kaempferol, a dietary flavonoid, ameliorates acute inflammatory and nociceptive symptoms in gastritis, pancreatitis, and abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Kim, Shi Hyoung; Park, Jae Gwang; Sung, Gi-Ho; Yang, Sungjae; Yang, Woo Seok; Kim, Eunji; Kim, Jun Ho; Ha, Van Thai; Kim, Han Gyung; Yi, Young-Su; Kim, Ji Hye; Baek, Kwang-Soo; Sung, Nak Yoon; Lee, Mi-nam; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Cho, Jae Youl

    2015-07-01

    Kaempferol (KF) is the most abundant polyphenol in tea, fruits, vegetables, and beans. However, little is known about its in vivo anti-inflammatory efficacy and mechanisms of action. To study these, several acute mouse inflammatory and nociceptive models, including gastritis, pancreatitis, and abdominal pain were employed. Kaempferol was shown to attenuate the expansion of inflammatory lesions seen in ethanol (EtOH)/HCl- and aspirin-induced gastritis, LPS/caerulein (CA) triggered pancreatitis, and acetic acid-induced writhing. PMID:25917334

  4. Fatty Acid Ethyl Esters Are Less Toxic Than Their Parent Fatty Acids Generated during Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Patel, Krutika; Durgampudi, Chandra; Noel, Pawan; Trivedi, Ram N; de Oliveira, Cristiane; Singh, Vijay P

    2016-04-01

    Although ethanol causes acute pancreatitis (AP) and lipolytic fatty acid (FA) generation worsens AP, the contribution of ethanol metabolites of FAs, ie, FA ethyl esters (FAEEs), to AP outcomes is unclear. Previously, pancreata of dying alcoholics and pancreatic necrosis in severe AP, respectively, showed high FAEEs and FAs, with oleic acid (OA) and its ethyl esters being the most abundant. We thus compared the toxicities of FAEEs and their parent FAs in severe AP. Pancreatic acini and peripheral blood mononuclear cells were exposed to FAs or FAEEs in vitro. The triglyceride of OA (i.e., glyceryl tri-oleate) or OAEE was injected into the pancreatic ducts of rats, and local and systemic severities were studied. Unsaturated FAs at equimolar concentrations to FAEEs induced a larger increase in cytosolic calcium, mitochondrial depolarization, and necro-apoptotic cell death. Glyceryl tri-oleate but not OAEE resulted in 70% mortality with increased serum OA, a severe inflammatory response, worse pancreatic necrosis, and multisystem organ failure. Our data show that FAs are more likely to worsen AP than FAEEs. Our observations correlate well with the high pancreatic FAEE concentrations in alcoholics without pancreatitis and high FA concentrations in pancreatic necrosis. Thus, conversion of FAs to FAEE may ameliorate AP in alcoholics. PMID:26878214

  5. Acute abdomen due to acute pancreatitis--a rare presentation of leptospirosis.

    PubMed

    Baburaj, P; Antony, T; Louis, Francy; Harikrishnan, B L

    2008-11-01

    Even though, Leptospiral infection is not uncommon, it can have different rare presentations. Acute pancreatitis is one such rare gastrointestinal manifestation of acute pancreatitis. Apart from the typical clinical features; elevated serum lipase or elastase-1, along with radiological evidence and positive leptospiral serology confirms this rare association. PMID:19263694

  6. [Acute pancreatitis and pancreatic reactions due to Salmonella. A study of 6 cases].

    PubMed

    Mofredj, Ali; Laribi, Karim; Delcenserie, Richard; Danon, Olivier; Eb, Franois; Bachmeyer, Claude; Coutarel, Pierre; Bouraya, Dalila; Lemaitre, Patrice; Cadranel, Jean-Franois

    2002-01-01

    Numerous infectious agents may induce acute pancreatitis. We report 6 cases of Salmonella-associated acute pancreatitis. Pathogenesis of this type of pancreatitis is related to multiple factors that may coexist in the same patient. The typical clinical picture consists in epigastric pain, nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea and fever. Imaging techniques often disclose minimal changes such as moderate swelling of a part or of the totality of pancreas. As outcome is usually good, conservative treatment and antibiotics may be sufficient to ensure recovery. PMID:11938049

  7. Autophagy and acute pancreatitis: a novel autophagy theory for trypsinogen activation.

    PubMed

    Ohmuraya, Masaki; Yamamura, Ken-ichi

    2008-11-01

    Autodigestion of the pancreas by its own prematurely activated digestive proteases is thought to be an important event in the onset of acute pancreatitis. Although lysosomal hydrolases, such as cathepsin B, play a key role in intrapancreatic trypsinogen activation, it remains unclear where and how trypsinogen meets these lysosomal enzymes. Autophagy is an intracellular bulk degradation system in which cytoplasmic components are directed to the lysosome/vacuole by a membrane-mediated process. To analyze the role of autophagy in acute pancreatitis, we produced a conditional knockout mouse that lacks the autophagy-related (Atg) gene Atg5 in the pancreatic acinar cells. The severity of acute pancreatitis induced by cerulein is greatly reduced in these mice. In addition, Atg5-deficient acinar cells show a significantly decreased level of trypsinogen activation. These data suggest that autophagy exerts a detrimental effect in pancreatic acinar cells by activation of trypsinogen to trypsin. We propose a theory in which autophagy accelerates trypsinogen activation by lysosomal hydrolases under acidic conditions, thus triggering acute pancreatitis in its early stage. PMID:18776738

  8. The role of fat and alcohol in acute pancreatitis: A dangerous liaison.

    PubMed

    Criddle, David N

    2015-07-01

    Excessive alcohol consumption is a major trigger for severe acute pancreatitis which may lead to multi-organ dysfunction and premature death of the individual. Hyperlipidaemia is a risk factor for both acute and chronic pancreatitis and the role of fatty acids in mediating damage has received increasing attention in recent years. In the pancreas ethanol is metabolised by both oxidative and non-oxidative pathways. The latter, predominant route generates fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) from fatty acid substrates via the action of diverse enzymes called FAEE synthases, including carboxylester lipase an enzyme synthesized and secreted by the acinar cells. Inhibition of the oxidative pathway promotes formation of FAEEs which induce sustained elevations of cytosolic calcium leading to inhibition of mitochondrial function, loss of ATP and necrosis of isolated pancreatic acinar cells. Furthermore, FAEEs undergo hydrolysis in the mitochondria releasing free fatty acids that exert toxic effects. Our recent work has shown that pharmacological inhibition of carboxylester lipase ameliorated detrimental effects of non-oxidative ethanol metabolism in isolated pancreatic acinar cells invitro and in a new invivo experimental model of alcoholic acute pancreatitis, revealing a specific enzyme target for ethanol-induced injury. Strategies that prevent FAEE synthesis, protect mitochondria, reduce calcium overload or sustain calcium homeostasis by ATP provision may provide promising therapeutic avenues for the treatment of alcoholic acute pancreatitis. PMID:25845855

  9. Surgical management of acute pancreatitis in Italy: lessons from a prospective multicentre study

    PubMed Central

    De Rai, Paolo; Zerbi, Alessandro; Castoldi, Laura; Bassi, Claudio; Frulloni, Luca; Uomo, Generoso; Gabbrielli, Armando; Pezzilli, Raffaele; Cavallini, Giorgio; Di Carlo, Valerio

    2010-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to evaluate the surgical treatment of acute pancreatitis in Italy and to assess compliance with international guidelines. Methods A series of 1173 patients in 56 hospitals were prospectively enrolled and their data analysed. Results Twenty-nine patients with severe pancreatitis underwent surgical intervention. Necrosectomy was performed in 26 patients, associated with postoperative lavage in 70% of cases. A feeding jejunostomy was added in 37% of cases. Mortality was 21%. Of the patients with mild pancreatitis, 714 patients with a biliary aetiology were evaluated. Prophylactic treatment of relapses was carried out in 212 patients (36%) by cholecystectomy and in 161 using a laparoscopic approach. Preoperative endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography was associated with cholecystectomy in 83 patients (39%). Forty-seven patients (22%) were treated at a second admission, with a median delay of 31 days from the onset of pancreatitis. Eighteen patients with severe pancreatitis underwent cholecystectomy 37.9 days after the first admission. There were no deaths. Discussion The results indicate poor compliance with published guidelines. In severe pancreatitis, early surgical intervention is frequently performed and enteral feeding is seldom used. Only a small number of patients with mild biliary pancreatitis undergo definitive treatment (i.e. cholecystectomy) within 4 weeks of the onset of pancreatitis. PMID:20961367

  10. Controversial role of toll-like receptors in acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Vaz, Juan; Akbarshahi, Hamid; Andersson, Roland

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a common clinical condition with an incidence of about 300 or more patients per million annually. About 10%-15% of patients will develop severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) and of those, 10%-30% may die due to SAP-associated complications. Despite the improvements done in the diagnosis and management of AP, the mortality rate has not significantly declined during the last decades. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are pattern-recognition receptors that seem to play a major role in the development of numerous diseases, which make these molecules attractive as potential therapeutic targets. TLRs are involved in the development of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome, a potentially lethal complication in SAP. In the present review, we explore the current knowledge about the role of different TLRs that have been described associated with AP. The main candidate for targeting seems to be TLR4, which recognizes numerous damage-associated molecular patterns related to AP. TLR2 has also been linked with AP, but there are only limited studies that exclusively studied its role in AP. There is also data suggesting that TLR9 may play a role in AP. PMID:23431068

  11. Cerebral infarction leading to hemiplegia: A rare complication of acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Vinod, Kolar Vishwanath; Verma, Shailendra Prasad; Karthikeyan, Balasubramanian; Kishore, Ariga; Dutta, Tarun Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Peripancreatic vascular thrombosis is a known complication of acute pancreatitis (AP) and chronic pancreatitis. However, hemiplegia resulting from cerebral infarction due to cerebral arterial thrombosis is a rare complication of AP. Here, we report a case of alcohol related severe AP with multi-organ dysfunction, which was complicated by large left sided middle cerebral artery territory infarct - leading to right sided hemiplegia in a 48-year-old male patient. The neurological and vascular thrombotic complications of pancreatitis, their pathogenesis and management are discussed in brief. PMID:24339644

  12. Intense adrenal enhancement in patients with acute pancreatitis and early organ failure.

    PubMed

    Bollen, T L; van Santvoort, H C; Besselink, M G H; van Ramshorst, B; van Es, H W; Gooszen, H G

    2007-10-01

    Intense adrenal enhancement has previously been reported in patients with hypovolemic and septic shock. The purpose of this study was to assess whether this computed tomography (CT) finding is also observed in patients presenting with severe acute pancreatitis and early organ failure. A retrospective analysis of a prospectively collected database was performed. Out of 38 consecutive patients with predicted severe acute pancreatitis, 3 patients showed intense bilateral adrenal enhancement on early CT. All patients had early multiple organ failure and subsequently died. In two cases, pathologic correlation was obtained. Intense adrenal enhancement may be a new prognostic indicator in patients with acute pancreatitis, particularly when organ failure is present at the time of CT examination. Further studies are necessary to confirm this observation. PMID:17594117

  13. Increased intestinal production of α-defensins in aged rats with acute pancreatic injury.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Débora Maria Gomes; Koike, Marcia Kiyomi; Barbeiro, Denise Frediani; Barbeiro, Hermes Vieira; Hamasaki, Mike Yoshio; Coelho Neto, Guilherme Tude; Machado, Marcel Cerqueira César; da Silva, Fabiano Pinheiro

    2014-12-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a life-threatening situation, frequently associated with uncontrolled local and systemic inflammation, and aging is associated with a worst prognosis. Antimicrobial peptides are ancient molecules that belong to innate immunity, produced by epithelial and immune cells, and are able to trigger a myriad of effector responses. We have hypothesized that antimicrobial peptides could play an important role during serious pancreatic injury. To investigate our hypothesis, α-defensin-5, α-defensin-7 and CRAMP gene expression levels were measured in the intestinal tissue of old and young rats submitted to chemical pancreatic damage. We found significantly higher levels of α-defensin-5 and α-defensin-7, but not CRAMP, in the samples from old mice. This increase was not associated with a worse systemic inflammatory response. We conclude that α-defensins may have a pivotal role during acute pancreatitis and that the elderly develops a more severe local, but not systemic inflammatory process. PMID:25449854

  14. Chronic alcohol intake and carbachol-induced acute pancreatitis in the rat.

    PubMed

    Grnroos, J M; Laine, J; Kaila, T; Nevalainen, T J

    1994-07-01

    Alcohol-induced changes in cholinergic and pancreozymin pathways regulating exocrine pancreatic secretion have been proposed to play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of acute alcoholic pancreatitis. In the present study we investigated the role of chronic alcohol intake in an experimental acute pancreatitis induced in rats by cholinergic hyperstimulation. Chronic alcohol intake interfered with the function of rat pancreatic muscarinic receptors in carbachol-induced acute pancreatitis. However, chronic alcohol intake did not sensitize the experimental animals to cholinergic hyperstimulation. Whether this increased resistance at the level of pancreatic muscarinic receptors contributes to acute alcoholic pancreatitis is discussed in the present article. PMID:7987075

  15. Inhibition of pancreatic oxidative damage by stilbene derivative dihydro-resveratrol: implication for treatment of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Siu Wai; Guan, Yi-Fu; Wang, Juan; Bian, Zhao-Xiang; Zhang, Hong-Jie

    2016-01-01

    Trans-resveratrol is a natural stilbenoid possessing multifarious pharmacological benefits; however, when orally consumed, it is rapidly metabolised by colonic microflora and converted to dihydro-resveratrol. Thus, this microbial metabolite is of great therapeutic relevance. In the present study, upon the oral administration of dihydro-resveratrol (10-50 mg/kg), the severity of acute pancreatitis in the cerulein-treated rats was significantly ameliorated as evidenced by decreased α-amylase activities in the plasma and lessened oedema formation in the pancreatic parenchyma. In addition, the generation of intracellular reactive oxidative products, including malondialdehyde and protein carbonyls, was accordingly reduced, so as the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. While inhibiting the activities of NADPH oxidase and myeloperoxidase, the depletion of glutathione was considerably restored. Importantly, the attenuation of pancreatic oxidative damage by dihydro-resveratrol was associated with a down-regulation of the nuclear factor-kappaB and phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase-serine/threonine kinase signalling pathways. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the solubility of dihydro-resveratrol was at least 5 times higher than trans-resveratrol whilst exhibiting a much lower cytotoxicity. Collectively, the current findings accentuate new mechanistic insight of dihydro-resveratrol in pancreatic oxidative damage, and advocate its therapeutic potential for the management of acute pancreatitis, particularly for patients unresponsive to trans-resveratrol due to the lack of proper microbial strains. PMID:26971398

  16. Inhibition of pancreatic oxidative damage by stilbene derivative dihydro-resveratrol: implication for treatment of acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, Siu Wai; Guan, Yi-Fu; Wang, Juan; Bian, Zhao-Xiang; Zhang, Hong-Jie

    2016-01-01

    Trans-resveratrol is a natural stilbenoid possessing multifarious pharmacological benefits; however, when orally consumed, it is rapidly metabolised by colonic microflora and converted to dihydro-resveratrol. Thus, this microbial metabolite is of great therapeutic relevance. In the present study, upon the oral administration of dihydro-resveratrol (10–50 mg/kg), the severity of acute pancreatitis in the cerulein-treated rats was significantly ameliorated as evidenced by decreased α-amylase activities in the plasma and lessened oedema formation in the pancreatic parenchyma. In addition, the generation of intracellular reactive oxidative products, including malondialdehyde and protein carbonyls, was accordingly reduced, so as the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. While inhibiting the activities of NADPH oxidase and myeloperoxidase, the depletion of glutathione was considerably restored. Importantly, the attenuation of pancreatic oxidative damage by dihydro-resveratrol was associated with a down-regulation of the nuclear factor-kappaB and phosphatidylinositol 3′-kinase-serine/threonine kinase signalling pathways. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the solubility of dihydro-resveratrol was at least 5 times higher than trans-resveratrol whilst exhibiting a much lower cytotoxicity. Collectively, the current findings accentuate new mechanistic insight of dihydro-resveratrol in pancreatic oxidative damage, and advocate its therapeutic potential for the management of acute pancreatitis, particularly for patients unresponsive to trans-resveratrol due to the lack of proper microbial strains. PMID:26971398

  17. E-cadherin expression in a rat model of acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    YUAN, WEIHONG; PAN, QI; CHEN, GUOCHANG; YAN, JUN; XIA, JIAZENG; CHEN, YIGANG

    2015-01-01

    A clinical requirement exists for early biomarkers that can predict the severity of acute pancreatitis (AP). In order to determine whether E-cadherin is associated with the severity of AP, a pancreatitic rat model was established and the expression levels of E-cadherin were detected. A study population of 24 Sprague Dawley rats was administered intraperitoneal injections of various concentrations of L-arginine in order to induce pancreatitis. Rats were assigned to the severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) or mild acute pancreatitis (MAP) group based on the results of histological evaluations and the serum levels of amylase. An additional 8 rats received intraperitoneal injections of NaCl solution, as a control group. For each group, the serum concentrations of soluble E-cadherin and the expression levels of E-cadherin protein in the pancreatic tissue were detected. The results indicated that the rat model of pancreatitis was successfully established. Rats in the high concentration L-arginine treatment group, which exhibited a higher pancreatitis pathology score and level of serum amylase, were assigned to the SAP group. Low concentration L-arginine group rats were assigned to the MAP group. The pathology scores and levels of serum amylase in the SAP and MAP group rats were higher compared with the control group rats. The levels of serum E-cadherin were the most elevated in the SAP group. Statistically significant differences were detected in the SAP and MAP groups compared with the control group, and in the SAP group compared with the MAP group (P<0.05). Furthermore, the levels of E-cadherin protein in the pancreatic tissue were elevated in the SAP group compared with the MAP and control groups. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that E-cadherin was overexpressed in SAP rats, and the overexpression of E-cadherin may be associated with the severity of AP. PMID:26668600

  18. Angiopoietin-2 Is an Early Indicator of Acute Pancreatic-Renal Syndrome in Patients with Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Sporek, Mateusz; Dumnicka, Paulina; Gala-Bladzinska, Agnieszka; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Warzecha, Zygmunt; Dembinski, Artur; Stepien, Ewa; Walocha, Jerzy; Drozdz, Ryszard; Kuzniewski, Marek; Kusnierz-Cabala, Beata

    2016-01-01

    Within the first week of the disease, acute kidney injury (AKI) is among the most common causes of mortality in acute pancreatitis (AP). Recently, serum angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2) has been associated with hyperdynamic state of the systemic circulation. The aim of this study was to examine the associations between Ang-2 and the clinical AP severity during the first 72 hours of the disease, and organ disfunction, including AKI. Methods. Study included patients admitted to the surgery ward, diagnosed with AP. AKI was diagnosed according to KDIGO guidelines and renal failure according to modified Marshall scoring system. Ang-2 was determined in serum with ELISA. Results. AP was classified as mild (MAP) in 71% of patients, moderately severe (MSAP) in 22%, and severe (SAP) in 8%. During the first 72 hours of AP, 11 patients developed AKI and 6 developed renal failure. Ang-2 at 24, 48, and 72 hours following the onset of AP symptoms significantly predicted SAP and MSAP, as well as AKI and renal failure. Also, Ang-2 significantly correlated with acute phase proteins as well as with the indicators of renal disfunction. Conclusions. Serum Ang-2 may be a relevant predictor of AP severity, in particular of the development of AP-renal syndrome.

  19. ERCP in acute pancreatitis: What takes place in routine clinical practice?

    PubMed Central

    Gabbrielli, Armando; Pezzilli, Raffaele; Uomo, Generoso; Zerbi, Alessandro; Frulloni, Luca; Rai, Paolo De; Castoldi, Laura; Costamagna, Guido; Bassi, Claudio; Carlo, Valerio Di

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the data from a survey carried out in Italy regarding the endoscopic approach to acute pancreatitis in order to obtain a picture of what takes place after the release of an educational project on acute pancreatitis sponsored by the Italian Association for the Study of the Pancreas. METHODS: Of the 1 173 patients enrolled in our survey, the most frequent etiological category was biliary forms (69.3%) and most patients had mild pancreatitis (85.8%). RESULTS: 344/1 173 (29.3%) underwent endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). The mean interval between the onset of symptoms and ERCP was 6.7 5.0 d; only 89 examinations (25.9%) were performed within 72 h from the onset of symptoms. The main indications for ERCP were suspicion of common bile duct stones (90.3%), jaundice (44.5%), clinical worsening of acute pancreatitis (14.2%) and cholangitis (6.1%). Biliary and pancreatic ducts were visualized in 305 patients (88.7%) and in 93 patients (27.0%) respectively. The success rate in obtaining a cholangiogram was statistically higher (P = 0.003) in patients with mild acute pancreatitis (90.6%) than in patients with severe disease (72.2%). Biliary endoscopic sphincterotomy was performed in 295 of the 305 patients (96.7%) with no difference between mild and severe disease (P = 0.985). ERCP morbidity was 6.1% and mortality was 1.7%; the mortality was due to the complications of acute pancreatitis and not the endoscopic procedure. CONCLUSION: The results of this survey, as with those carried out in other countries, indicate a lack of compliance with the guidelines for the indications for interventional endoscopy. PMID:21160762

  20. Bacteremia in the Patients With Acute Pancreatitis as Revealed by 16S Ribosomal RNA Gene-Based Techniques.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiurong; Wang, Chenyang; Tang, Chun; He, Qin; Li, Ning; Li, Jieshou

    2013-06-12

    OBJECTIVES:: To define the characteristic of bacteremia in the patients with acute pancreatitis and determine its possible association with the disease severity. DESIGN:: A prospective controlled study. SETTING:: ICU of Jinling Hospital, China. PATIENTS:: A total of 48 patients with mild or severe acute pancreatitis were enrolled in this study. INTERVENTIONS:: None. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS:: Samples of peripheral blood were collected from the patients at 4 or 5 and 9 or 10 days after acute pancreatitis was definitely diagnosed. Resulting DNA from the blood was analyzed using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, and separated fragments were sequenced for identification of bacterial species. Bacterial DNA was detected in peripheral blood from 68.8% of patients with acute pancreatitis, and more than half (60.4%) of the patients encountered polymicrobial flora. Translocated bacteria in patients with acute pancreatitis were primarily constituted of opportunistic pathogens derived from the gut, including Escherichia coli, Shigella flexneri, Enterobacteriaceae bacterium, Acinetobacter lwoffii, Bacillus coagulans, and Enterococcus faecium. And the species of circulating bacteria shifted remarkably among the patients with different severity. The presence of the bacteremia correlated positively with the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation-II scores of patients with acute pancreatitis (r = 0.7918, p < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS:: This study provides a detailed description on the prevalence of bacteremia and characteristic of bacterial species in patients with acute pancreatitis. We demonstrate an association between the bacteremia and the disease severity, which enables us to better understand a potential role of bacterial translocation in the pathogenesis of septic complication in acute pancreatitis. PMID:23764972

  1. Relationship Between Acute Benzodiazepine Poisoning and Acute Pancreatitis Risk: A Population-Based Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Liaw, Geng-Wang; Hung, Dong-Zong; Chen, Wei-Kung; Lin, Cheng-Li; Lin, I-Ching; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-12-01

    We designed a population-based retrospective cohort study to investigate the association between the event of benzodiazepine (BZD) poisoning and the risk of acute pancreatitis.In the present study, 12,893 patients with BZD poisoning during 2000 to 2011 were enrolled and matched with 4 comparison patients according to mean age and sex. We determined the cumulative incidences and adjusted hazard ratios of acute pancreatitis.A significant association was observed between BZD poisoning and acute pancreatitis. After adjustment for potential risk factors, the patients with BZD poisoning had a 5.33-fold increased risk of acute pancreatitis compared with the controls without BZD poisoning (HR?=?5.33, 95% CI?=?2.26-12.60). The results revealed that acute pancreatitis in patients with BZD poisoning occurred in a follow-up time of ?1 month (HR?=?50.0, P?acute pancreatitis was no different between the patients with and without BZD poisoning when the follow-up time was?>1 month (HR?=?1.07, P?>?.05).This population-based study revealed the positive correlation between the event of BZD poisoning and an increased risk of acute pancreatitis. The findings warrant further large-scale and in-depth investigation. PMID:26717383

  2. Fatal hypertriglyceridaemia, acute pancreatitis and diabetic ketoacidosis possibly induced by quetiapine.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Kristian Roerbaek

    2014-01-01

    A 27-year-old man treated with quetiapine for anxiety disorder developed hypertriglyceridaemia-induced acute pancreatitis and diabetic ketoacidosis. He was otherwise physically healthy with no family history of hyperlipidaemia. Despite aggressive intensive therapy he died of multiorgan failure within 36 h from initial presentation. While second-generation antipsychotics are well known to be causally linked to diabetes and hyperlipidaemia, this is to my knowledge the first-described case of a fatal triad of extreme hypertriglyceridaemia, acute pancreatitis and diabetic ketoacidosis possibly induced by quetiapine. Clinicians should be aware of this rare clinical presentation since rapid progression to multiorgan failure can occur. Early supportive therapy should be initiated. Lactescent serum and ketoacidosis in severe acute pancreatitis should not be overlooked-initiate insulin therapy and possibly plasmapheresis in case of extreme hypertriglyceridaemia. PMID:24403385

  3. Hypertriglyceridemia, acute pancreatitis, and diabetic ketoacidosis possibly associated with mirtazapine therapy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Chen, Julie L; Spinowitz, Noam; Karwa, Manoj

    2003-07-01

    A 44-year-old woman with a history of major depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder was prescribed mirtazapine. She came to the emergency department approximately 2 months after starting therapy; severe hypertriglyceridemia, acute pancreatitis, and diabetic ketoacidosis were diagnosed. Although these adverse effects have been reported in early clinical trials, we found only three published cases of subclinical pancreatitis possibly associated with mirtazapine therapy. We suspect that mirtazapine-associated hypertriglyceridemia had contributed to the development of acute pancreatitis and diabetic ketoacidosis in our patient. All these problems resolved with supportive care and discontinuation of mirtazapine. Her serum amylase, lipase, and lipid levels were normal 2 months after the acute event occurred. Health care providers should be aware of these possible adverse effects. Serum glucose and triglyceride levels should be measured at baseline and monitored regularly thereafter in all patients receiving mirtazapine therapy. PMID:12885107

  4. Fatal hypertriglyceridaemia, acute pancreatitis and diabetic ketoacidosis possibly induced by quetiapine

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, Kristian Roerbaek

    2014-01-01

    A 27-year-old man treated with quetiapine for anxiety disorder developed hypertriglyceridaemia-induced acute pancreatitis and diabetic ketoacidosis. He was otherwise physically healthy with no family history of hyperlipidaemia. Despite aggressive intensive therapy he died of multiorgan failure within 36 h from initial presentation. While second-generation antipsychotics are well known to be causally linked to diabetes and hyperlipidaemia, this is to my knowledge the first-described case of a fatal triad of extreme hypertriglyceridaemia, acute pancreatitis and diabetic ketoacidosis possibly induced by quetiapine. Clinicians should be aware of this rare clinical presentation since rapid progression to multiorgan failure can occur. Early supportive therapy should be initiated. Lactescent serum and ketoacidosis in severe acute pancreatitis should not be overlooked—initiate insulin therapy and possibly plasmapheresis in case of extreme hypertriglyceridaemia. PMID:24403385

  5. [The effect of p-bromophenacylbromide, a phospholipase A inhibitor, in experimental acute pancreatitis in rats].

    PubMed

    Zch, G; Roth, E; Hlbling, N; Karner, J; Funovics, J; Czerwenka, K

    1984-01-01

    In this study the effect of p-bromophenacylbromide (p-BPAB), an inhibitor of phospholipase A, was studied in acute pancreatitis in an experimental rat model. Acute pancreatitis was produced by instillation of 0.4 ml bile into the pancreatic duct. p-BPAB was injected i.p. in a dosage of 0.25 micrograms/g b.wt. 30 min before, 30 min after, or 4h after the onset of pancreatitis. Prophylactic and early administration of p-BPAB inhibited severe morphological changes, such as necrosis and hemorrhages. Moreover, during administration of the inhibitor, decreased plasma concentrations of serum lipase and amylase (P less than 0.001) were monitored and compared with untreated animals. These therapeutic effects of p-BPAB were not seen in rats in which the inhibitor was injected 4 h after the onset of pancreatitis. As a result the phospholipase inhibitor, p-BPAB, reduces the clinical and morphological manifestations of acute pancreatitis. The effect of p-BPAB is dependent on the time of administration. PMID:6206532

  6. Inferior phrenic artery pseudoaneurysm complicating drug-induced acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Salem, Jean F; Haydar, Ali; Hallal, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Inferior phrenic artery (IPA) pseudoaneurysm is an extremely rare complication of chronic pancreatitis with only three cases reported in the literature so far. It is a serious condition that can be life-threatening if not diagnosed promptly. Recent advances in endovascular interventions made angiography with embolisation the modality of choice for diagnosis and treatment. We presented the first report of a case of ruptured IPA pseudoaneurysm complicating a drug-induced acute pancreatitis that was successfully treated by transcatheter arterial embolisation. Despite its rarity, rupture of pseudoaneurysm due to drug-induced pancreatitis should be suspected and included in the differential diagnosis when associated with haemodynamic instability. PMID:24385392

  7. Burkitt lymphoma with unusual presentation: Acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Koca, Tugba; Aslan, Nagehan; Dereci, Selim; Akcam, Mustafa

    2015-08-01

    Pancreatitis due to malignant infiltration is an uncommon condition in childhood. Pancreatic lymphomas constitute <2% of all non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Only six reported cases with various clinical presentation have been documented in the literature. Described herein is the case of a nine-year-old boy with abdominal pain, jaundice, emesis, weight loss, diarrhea, who developed hyperlipidemia and cholestasis. Pancreatitis was suspected due to high amylase and lipase. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography showed diffuse enlargement of the pancreas. This sausage pancreas imaging was suggestive of autoimmune pancreatitis, but the patient was diagnosed with Burkitt lymphoma on bone marrow aspiration, and rapidly improved with chemotherapy. Burkitt lymphoma should be kept in mind when patients present with pancreatitis, especially with diffuse enlarged pancreas. PMID:26031558

  8. Predictors of critical acute pancreatitis: a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Ke, Lu; Tong, Zhi-hui; Li, Wei-qin; Wu, Congye; Li, Ning; Windsor, John A; Li, Jie-shou; Petrov, Maxim S

    2014-11-01

    Critical acute pancreatitis (CAP) has recently emerged as the most ominous severity category of acute pancreatitis (AP). As such there have been no studies specifically designed to evaluate predictors of CAP. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the accuracy of 4 parameters (Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation [APACHE] II score, C-reactive protein [CRP], D-dimer, and intra-abdominal pressure [IAP]) for predicting CAP early after hospital admission. During the study period, data on patients with AP were prospectively collected and D-dimer, CRP, and IAP levels were measured using standard methods at admission whereas the APACHE II score was calculated within 24 hours of hospital admission. The receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was applied and the likelihood ratios were calculated to evaluate the predictive accuracy. A total of 173 consecutive patients were included in the analysis and 47 (27%) of them developed CAP. The overall hospital mortality was 11% (19 of 173). APACHE II score ≥11 and IAP ≥13 mm Hg showed significantly better overall predictive accuracy than D-dimer and CRP (area under the ROC curve-0.94 and 0.92 vs. 0.815 and 0.667, correspondingly). The positive likelihood ratio of APACHE II score is excellent (9.9) but of IAP is moderate (4.2). The latter can be improved by adding CRP (5.8). In conclusion, of the parameters studied, APACHE II score and IAP are the best available predictors of CAP within 24 hours of hospital admission. Given that APACHE II score is rather cumbersome, the combination of IAP and CRP appears to be the most practical way to predict critical course of AP early after hospital admission. PMID:25380082

  9. Loss of Ifnar1 in Pancreatic Acinar Cells Ameliorates the Disease Course of Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Katharina J.; Raulefs, Susanne; Kong, Bo; Steiger, Katja; Regel, Ivonne; Gewies, Andreas; Kleeff, Jrg; Michalski, Christoph W.

    2015-01-01

    Type I interferon constitutes an essential component of the combinational therapy against viral disease. Acute pancreatitis is one side effect of type I interferon-based therapy, implying that activation of type I interferon signaling affects the homeostasis and integrity of pancreatic acinar cells. Here, we investigated the role of type I interferon signaling in pancreatic acinar cells using a caerulein-induced murine model of acute pancreatitis. Pancreas-specific ablation of interferon (alpha and beta) receptor 1 (Ifnar1) partially protected animals from caerulein-induced pancreatitis, as demonstrated by reduced tissue damage. Profiling of infiltrating immune cells revealed that this dampened tissue damage response correlated with the number of macrophages in the pancreas. Pharmacologic depletion of macrophages reversed the protective effect of Ifnar1 deficiency. Furthermore, expression of chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (Ccl2), a potent factor for macrophage recruitment, was significantly increased in the Ifnar1-deficient pancreas. Thus, type I interferon signaling in pancreatic acinar cells controls pancreatic homeostasis by affecting the macrophage-mediated inflammatory response in the pancreas. PMID:26618925

  10. Serine proteases mediate inflammatory pain in acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Ceppa, Eugene P.; Lyo, Victoria; Grady, Eileen F.; Knecht, Wolfgang; Grahn, Sarah; Peterson, Anders; Bunnett, Nigel W.; Cattaruzza, Fiore

    2011-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a life-threatening inflammatory disease characterized by abdominal pain of unknown etiology. Trypsin, a key mediator of pancreatitis, causes inflammation and pain by activating protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2), but the isoforms of trypsin that cause pancreatitis and pancreatic pain are unknown. We hypothesized that human trypsin IV and rat P23, which activate PAR2 and are resistant to pancreatic trypsin inhibitors, contribute to pancreatic inflammation and pain. Injections of a subinflammatory dose of exogenous trypsin increased c-Fos immunoreactivity, indicative of spinal nociceptive activation, but did not cause inflammation, as assessed by measuring serum amylase and myeloperoxidase activity and by histology. The same dose of trypsin IV and P23 increased some inflammatory end points and caused a more robust effect on nociception, which was blocked by melagatran, a trypsin inhibitor that also inhibits polypeptide-resistant trypsin isoforms. To determine the contribution of endogenous activation of trypsin and its minor isoforms, recombinant enterokinase (ENK), which activates trypsins in the duodenum, was administered into the pancreas. Intraductal ENK caused nociception and inflammation that were diminished by polypeptide inhibitors, including soybean trypsin inhibitor and a specific trypsin inhibitor (type I-P), and by melagatran. Finally, the secretagogue cerulein induced pancreatic nociceptive activation and nocifensive behavior that were reversed by melagatran. Thus trypsin and its minor isoforms mediate pancreatic pain and inflammation. In particular, the inhibitor-resistant isoforms trypsin IV and P23 may be important in mediating prolonged pancreatic inflammatory pain in pancreatitis. Our results suggest that inhibitors of these isoforms could be novel therapies for pancreatitis pain. PMID:21436316

  11. Significantly Elevated Serum Lipase in Pregnancy with Nausea and Vomiting: Acute Pancreatitis or Hyperemesis Gravidarum?

    PubMed Central

    Hooshvar, Nina; Tice, Daphne; Kao, Elaine; Nawabi, Suhalia; Jones, Steven; Zhang, Lihua

    2015-01-01

    Hyperemesis gravidarum is a severe manifestation of nausea and vomiting of pregnancy and it is associated with weight loss and metabolic abnormalities. It is known that abnormal laboratory values, including mildly elevated serum lipase level, could be associated with hyperemesis gravidarum. However, in this case report details of two women with hyperemesis gravidarum but with significantly elevated serum lipase levels were discussed. These patients presented with severe nausea and vomiting but without abdominal pain. They were found to have severely elevated lipase levels over 1,000 units/liter. In the absence of other findings of pancreatitis, they were treated with conservative measures for hyperemesis gravidarum, with eventual resolution to normal lipase levels. Although significantly elevated lipase level in pregnant patients with nausea and vomiting is a concern for acute pancreatitis, these two cases of significantly elevated serum lipase without other clinical findings of pancreatitis led to this report that serum lipase could be quite elevated in hyperemesis gravidarum and that it might not be an accurate biochemical marker for acute pancreatitis. Imaging studies are thus necessary to establish the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. PMID:25709846

  12. Ectopic mediastinal parathyroid carcinoma presenting as acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Chih-Wei; Lin, Shan-Zu; Sun, Chih-Hao; Chen, Chun-Chia; Yang, An-Hang; Chang, Full-Young; Lin, Han-Chieh; Lee, Shou-Dong

    2013-02-01

    Parathyroid carcinoma is a rare cause of hyperparathyroidism, accounting for fewer than 1% of cases. The incidence of acute pancreatitis in patients with hyperparathyroidism was reported to be only 1.5%. We report a very rare case of ectopic mediastinal parathyroid carcinoma presenting as acute pancreatitis. A 72-year-old man presented with acute pancreatitis and hypercalcemia. During the work-up for hypercalcemia, a mediastinal parathyroid tumor was identified by (99m)Tc-sestamibi scintigraphy and magnetic resonance imaging. The tumor was completely removed via a lower cervical collar incision. The histopathology revealed parathyroid carcinoma. There was no tumor recurrence or abdominal symptoms at 3-year follow-up. PMID:23351422

  13. [Invasive and non-invasive diagnostic methods for evaluation of hypovolemia in acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Gundling, F; Teich, N; Pehl, C; Schepp, W

    2006-12-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis leads to a dramatic fluid loss in the intraperitoneal space which may result in circulatory decompensation. Sequestration of fluid can amount up to 40 percent of the circulating blood volume. The amount of fluid and electrolyte replacement is often misjudged leading to a higher rate of complications and a higher mortality rate of the disease. Furthermore, subsequent and adequate fluid resuscitation seems to influence the prognostic course of the disease by improving the perfusion and oxygenation of the pancreas. Otherwise volume overload may cause cardiopulmonary decompensation in the case of synchronous cardiopulmonary comorbidities. Therefore, an important part of treatment relies on careful haemodynamic monitoring, if necessary managed in an intensive care unit. Usually most patients with acute pancreatitis will be treated on a non-intensive medical ward which allows a differentiated and continuous haemodynamic monitoring only to a limited extent. Apart from monitoring circulatory parameters and measuring central venous pressure, there are other clinical methods, laboratory tests and radiological diagnostic procedures to determine the amount of intravascular fluid deficit and the individual volume demand of patients with acute pancreatitis. Prospective clinical trials for evaluation of pancreatitis-specific volume management do not exist so far. The aim of this review is to provide background information on invasive and non-invasive diagnostic methods for detection of circulatory hypovolemia in acute pancreatitis. PMID:17163376

  14. Waterlow score as a surrogate marker for predicting adverse outcome in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Gillick, K; Elbeltagi, H; Bhattacharya, S

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Introduced originally to stratify risk for developing decubitus ulcers, the Waterlow scoring system is recorded routinely for surgical admissions. It is a composite score, reflecting patients' general condition and co-morbidities. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the Waterlow score can be used as an independent surrogate marker to predict severity and adverse outcome in acute pancreatitis. Methods In this retrospective analysis, a consecutive cohort was studied of 250 patients presenting with acute pancreatitis, all of whom had their Waterlow score calculated on admission. Primary outcome measures were length of hospital stay and mortality. Secondary outcome measures included rate of intensive care unit (ICU) admission and development of complications such as peripancreatic free fluid, pancreatic necrosis and pseudocyst formation. Correlation of the Waterlow score with some known markers of disease severity and outcomes was also analysed. Results The Waterlow score correlated strongly with the most commonly used marker of disease severity, the Glasgow score (analysis of variance, p=0.0012). Inpatient mortality, rate of ICU admission and length of hospital stay increased with a higher Waterlow score (Mann-Whitney U test, p=0.0007, p=0.049 and p=0.0002 respectively). There was, however, no significant association between the Waterlow score and the incidence of three known complications of pancreatitis: presence of peripancreatic fluid, pancreatic pseudocyst formation and pancreatic necrosis. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis demonstrated good predictive power of the Waterlow score for mortality (area under the curve [AUC]: 0.73), ICU admission (AUC: 0.65) and length of stay >7 days (AUC: 0.64). This is comparable with the predictive power of the Glasgow score and C-reactive protein. Conclusions The Waterlow score for patients admitted with acute pancreatitis could provide a useful tool in prospective assessment of disease severity, help clinicians with appropriate resource management and inform patients. PMID:26688403

  15. Perfusion-CT - Can We Predict Acute Pancreatitis Outcome within the First 24 Hours from the Onset of Symptoms?

    PubMed Central

    Pieńkowska, Joanna; Gwoździewicz, Katarzyna; Skrobisz-Balandowska, Katarzyna; Marek, Iwona; Kostro, Justyna; Szurowska, Edyta; Studniarek, Michał

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Severe acute pancreatitis (AP) is still a significant clinical problem which is associated with a highly mortality. The aim of this study was the evaluation of prognostic value of CT regional perfusion measurement performed on the first day of onset of symptoms of AP, in assessing the risk of developing severe form of acute pancreatitis. Material and Methods 79 patients with clinical symptoms and biochemical criteria indicative of acute pancreatitis (acute upper abdominal pain, elevated levels of serum amylase and lipase) underwent perfusion CT within 24 hours after onset of symptoms. The follow-up examinations were performed after 4–6 days to detect progression of the disease. Perfusion parameters were compared in 41 people who developed severe form of AP (pancreatic and/or peripancreatic tissue necrosis) with parameters in 38 consecutive patients in whom course of AP was mild. Blood flow, blood volume, mean transit time and permeability surface area product were calculated in the three anatomic pancreatic subdivisions (head, body and tail). At the same time the patient's clinical status was assessed by APACHE II score and laboratory parameters such as CRP, serum lipase and amylase, AST, ALT, GGT, ALP and bilirubin were compared. Results Statistical differences in the perfusion parameters between the group of patients with mild and severe AP were shown. Blood flow, blood volume and mean transit time were significantly lower and permeability surface area product was significantly higher in patients who develop severe acute pancreatitis and presence of pancreatic and/or peripancreatic necrosis due to pancreatic ischemia. There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups in terms of evaluated on admission severity of pancreatitis assessed using APACHE II score and laboratory tests. Conclusions CT perfusion is a very useful indicator for prediction and selection patients in early stages of acute pancreatitis who are at risk of developing pancreatic and/or peripancreatic necrosis already on the first day of the onset of symptoms and can be used for treatment planning and monitoring of therapy of acute pancreatitis. Early suspicion of possible pancreatic necrosis both on the basis of scores based on clinical status and laboratory tests have low predictive value. PMID:26784348

  16. Chylous ascites caused by acute pancreatitis with portal vein thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Dong Eun

    2011-01-01

    Chylous ascites is defined as the accumulation of chyle in the peritoneum due to obstruction or rupture of the peritoneal or retroperitoneal lymphatic glands. Chylous ascites that arises from acute pancreatitis with portal vein thrombosis is very rare. We report here on a case of chylous ascite that was caused by acute pancreatitis with portal vein thrombosis, in which the patient showed an impressive response to conservative therapy with total parenteral nutrition and octerotide. We also review the relevant literature about chylous ascites with particular reference to the management of this rare disease. PMID:22319743

  17. Haematological abnormalities in acute pancreatitis. A prospective study.

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, D.; Imrie, C. W.; Davidson, J. F.

    1977-01-01

    Twenty-five patients with acute pancreatitis were studied prospectively in the first week of their admission using haematological and coagulation tests. Platelet counts initially fell and later returned to admission levels. Rising levels of plasma fibrinogen were recorded. The kaolin cephalin clotting time was shorter than its control in twenty-one patients. Eighteen patients had elevated fibrinogen degradation products and fourteen had a positive ethanol gelation test. It is suggested that by taking into account the results in series of individual patients a degree of intravascular coagulation may be a common feature of acute pancreatitis. In one patient (presented in detail) strong evidence for disseminated intravascular coagulation was found PMID:887529

  18. Post-ERCP acute pancreatitis and its risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Iorgulescu, A; Sandu, I; Turcu, F; Iordache, N

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is a complex endoscopic technique that evolved from a diagnostic to a mainly therapeutic procedure. This was due to the identification of post-procedural complications that can follow both simple ERCP and that associated with the instrumentation of the biliary and pancreatic ductals. The identification of post ERCP complications in a proportion of 5 to 10% of cases, with a mortality rate of 0.33%, imposed their analysis and study of risk factors involved in their occurrence. The significance of post ERCP complications reveals the necessity of their avoidance by adopting additional measures if risk factors are identified. Materials and methods. We have retrospectively analyzed 900 cases that underwent ERCP in the Surgery Department of "Sf. Ioan" Clinical Hospital in a period of 17 years. The complications of the procedure were studied. Among them, a special attention was given to post-ERCP acute pancreatitis (pERCP-AP), the most common complication that occurred in the study group. We also tried to find out and highlight the risk factors for this complication. Results. ERCP is a relatively safe invasive procedure, yet it has complications (8% of cases), some of them potentially fatal (mortality 0.43%). The most common complications after ERCP are acute pancreatitis (3.7%), papillary bleeding (1.04%), retroperitoneal duodenal perforation (0.69%) and biliary septic complications like acute cholecystitis and cholangitis (1.21%). Acute pancreatitis is by far the most common complication. Risk factors for its occurrence are difficult sphincterotomy with precut use, failure of CBD desobstruction, pancreatic sphincterotomy, repeated injection of contrast in the pancreatic ductal system, dysfunction of the sphincter of Oddi and the absence of changes of chronic pancreatitis. When risk factors are identified, the patients selection must be very strict and diagnostic ERCP should be avoided in favor of non-invasive diagnostic methods (MRI-cholangiography, echo-endoscopy). PMID:23599832

  19. Severe acute malnutrition and infection

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Kelsey D J; Berkley, James A

    2014-01-01

    Severe acute malnutrition (SAM) is associated with increased severity of common infectious diseases, and death amongst children with SAM is almost always as a result of infection. The diagnosis and management of infection are often different in malnourished versus well-nourished children. The objectives of this brief are to outline the evidence underpinning important practical questions relating to the management of infectious diseases in children with SAM and to highlight research gaps. Overall, the evidence base for many aspects covered in this brief is very poor. The brief addresses antimicrobials; antipyretics; tuberculosis; HIV; malaria; pneumonia; diarrhoea; sepsis; measles; urinary tract infection; nosocomial Infections; soil transmitted helminths; skin infections and pharmacology in the context of SAM. The brief is structured into sets of clinical questions, which we hope will maximise the relevance to contemporary practice. PMID:25475887

  20. The revised Atlanta classification of acute pancreatitis: its importance for the radiologist and its effect on treatment.

    PubMed

    Thoeni, Ruedi F

    2012-03-01

    An international working group has modified the Atlanta classification for acute pancreatitis to update the terminology and provide simple functional clinical and morphologic classifications. The modifications (a) address the clinical course and severity of disease, (b) divide acute pancreatitis into interstitial edematous pancreatitis and necrotizing pancreatitis, (c) distinguish an early phase (1st week) and a late phase (after the 1st week), and (d) emphasize systemic inflammatory response syndrome and multisystem organ failure. In the 1st week, only clinical parameters are important for treatment planning. After the 1st week, morphologic criteria defined on the basis of computed tomographic findings are combined with clinical parameters to help determine care. This revised classification introduces new terminology for pancreatic fluid collections. Depending on presence or absence of necrosis, acute collections in the first 4 weeks are called acute necrotic collections or acute peripancreatic fluid collections. Once an enhancing capsule develops, persistent acute peripancreatic fluid collections are referred to as pseudocysts; and acute necrotic collections, as walled-off necroses. All can be sterile or infected. Terms such as pancreatic abscess and intrapancreatic pseudocyst have been abandoned. The goal is for radiologists, gastroenterologists, surgeons, and pathologists to use the revised classifications to standardize imaging terminology to facilitate treatment planning and enable precise comparison of results among different departments and institutions. PMID:22357880

  1. [Clinical manifestation of acute pancreatitis in children with caustic ingestion injury - the role of oxidative stress].

    PubMed

    Brankov, O; Shivachev, Kh; Drebov, R; Dumanov, K

    2007-01-01

    For a 10 years period (1996-2005) 66 children with severe caustic injuries of the esophagus and stomach were admitted at the Department of Pediatric Surgery. Subject of this article are 17 children with clinical, laboratory and intraoperative proven acute pancreatitis. The patients were admitted at the clinic 12 hours to 12 days after the ingestion of the corrosive agent. Fifteen of them underwent surgery and different surgical procedures were performed - gastric resection, transhiatal esophagectomy, gastrectomy, gastrostomy. In all patients were found elevated levels of alpha-amilase in blood serum and urine as well as elevated CRP in blood serum. Clinically manifested acute pancreatitis was diagnosed on ultrasound studies and laparotomy. The newest theories about the genesis of acute pancreatitis emphasize on the role of oxidative stress. Experimental models suggest that burn trauma (thermal or chemical) cause critical increase of free oxygen radicals and lipid peroxydation products in the tissue of the damaged organ and the bloodstream. The local tissue damage leads to release of inflammatory mediators which enter the bloodstream and cause distant organs damage of - lung, liver, kidneys and pancreas. In this preliminary report the authors discuss the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis in children with acute corrosive ingestion injury of the esophagus and stomach. We call this phenomenon " caustic " oxidative stress. This is the first scientific report on this topic in the reviewed literature. PMID:18437101

  2. Cardiac tamponade, an unusual complication of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Veron Esquivel, Daniel; Aello, Gerardo; Batiz, Fernando; Fernandez Barrera, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    A 41-year-old Hispanic man was admitted to our hospital with the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis due to hypertriglyceridemia. During his stay, he developed sudden haemodynamic instability and clinical presentation suggestive of cardiac tamponade. A transthoracic echocardiogram confirmed the diagnosis. Echocardiography-guided pericardiocentesis was performed with immediate haemodynamic improvement. The patient's condition underwent favourable evolution. The pancreatitis was resolved and a control transthoracic echocardiography was performed showing no pericardial effusion. The pathophysiology of this rare entity is unknown. Early diagnosis and treatment are crucial. Although pericardiocentesis is the treatment of choice, there have been a few reports of medical treatment with encouraging results. Although the association of acute pancreatitis and tamponade are anecdotal in literature, medics should be aware of this association in order to perform prompt diagnosis. PMID:26969361

  3. Mucinous cystic tumour of the pancreas presenting with acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Pope, I; Garden, OJ

    2001-01-01

    Background The optimal therapy for mucinous neoplasms of the pancreas is surgical resection because these tumours are either premalignant (cystadenoma) or malignant. Case outline A 44-year-old previously fit woman presented with sudden onset of epigastric pain. Clinical and laboratory findings were consistent with acute pancreatitis. Abdominal ultrasound scan demonstrated a mature 6-cm cyst in the tail of pancreas and no findings suggestive of cholelithiasis. These findings were confirmed by a CT scan, which also demonstrated splenic infarction and evidence of recent haemorrhage into the cyst. The patient's abdominal pain persisted after amylase levels returned to normal. Results Splenic infarction, a mature cyst in the tail of the pancreas, and peripancreatic inflammation consistent with recent pancreatitis were found at laparotomy. Enbloc distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy were performed. Histological examination of the cyst wall demonstrated a focus of mucinous cystadenoma. Discussion This case demonstrates that acute pancreatitis may be the first presentation of a cystic neoplasm. PMID:18333030

  4. Protective effect of YHI and HHI-I against experimental acute pancreatitis in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lian-Gen; Wu, Xiao-Xian; Han, En-Kun; Chen, Yu-Ling; Chen, Chi; Xu, Dong-Qin

    1998-01-01

    AIM: To observe the protective effect of combined i.v. administraction of Yuanhu injection (YHI) and Huoxuehuayu injection-I (HHI-I) against acute pancreatitis (AP) in rabbits. METHODS: Sever acute pancreatitis (SAP) was induced by retrograde infusion of artificial bile juice into biliary-pancreatic duct, and treated with YHI and HHI-I intravenously. The protective effect was judged by the survival time and rate, serum amylase, serum interleukin-6, pancreatic microcirculation and pathological alteration. RESULTS: Combined use of YHI and HHI-I could markedly increase the rabbits 5-d survival rate after AP (83.3% in the treatment group and 33.3% in control). The serum amylase value (x- s) decreased to 1596.6 U/L 760.50 U/L in the 5th day from the high level (6320.83 U/L 2614.12 U/L) in the 1st day after AP in the treatment group, while in the control group the amylase activity in the 5th day was 2095.0 U/L 1081.87 U/L, being significantly different from that before AP (837.17 U/L 189.12 U/L). YHI and HHI-I also obviously improved the pancreatic microcirculation and lowered the serum interleukin-6 level, one of the indices of severe pancreatitis. Pathological examination indicated all the changes typical for AP in YHI and HHI-I treatment group were milder than those in the control. CONCLUSION: YHI and HHI-I used in combination might have protective effect against acute pancreatitis in rabbits. PMID:11819290

  5. Acute pancreatitis, ascites, and acute renal failure in Plasmodium vivax malaria infection, a rare complication.

    PubMed

    Lakhotia, Manoj; Pahadiya, Hans Raj; Kumar, Harish; Singh, Jagdish; Sangappa, Jainapur Ravi; Choudhary, Prakash Kumar

    2015-01-01

    A 22-year-old male presented with 6 days history of intermittent fever with chills, 2 days history of upper abdomen pain, distension of abdomen, and decreased urine output. He was diagnosed to have Plasmodium vivax malaria, acute pancreatitis, ascites, and acute renal failure. These constellations of complications in P. vivax infection have never been reported in the past. The patient responded to intravenous chloroquine and supportive treatment. For renal failure, he required hemodialysis. Acute pancreatitis, ascites, and acute renal failure form an unusual combination in P. vivax infection. PMID:26629455

  6. Review of acute severe asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, P K

    1989-01-01

    Status asthmaticus in the 1980s is still occasionally a fatal disorder. Preventable causes appear to be common: failing to appreciate the severity of the illness and undertreatment, particularly with steroids. Thus, an objective data base, early treatment, and frequent reassessment are of paramount importance. Despite intensive therapeutic intervention, mechanical ventilation may be required. In managing the ventilator in these patients, efforts should be directed at minimizing peak airway pressures while vigorous conventional modalities are continued. The need to use mechanical ventilation does not imply that the course of the disease will worsen, and the long-term outlook generally is good. Thus, even a low mortality rate is troubling. Once the acute process has resolved, educating the patient and close follow-up are essential. PMID:2662613

  7. CLINICAL AND THERAPEUTIC CORRELATIONS IN PATIENTS WITH SLIGHT ACUTE PANCREATITIS

    PubMed Central

    MUNHOZ-FILHO, Clewis Henri; BATIGLIA, Fernando; FUNES, Hamilton Luiz Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas due to enzymatic autodigestion which can cause necrosis or multiple organ failure; its pathophysiology is not fully known yet. Aim To evaluate the correlation between clinical and therapeutic data in patients with mild acute pancreatitis. Methods A retrospective study in 55 medical records of patients admitted with acute mild pancreatitis was realized to analyze the association between age, leukocytosis, serum glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase and lactate dehydrogenase, glucose, antibiotics, time admission and Ransons scores. Results There was a positive association between less intensive care (strict hydration, analgesia and monitoring of vital signs), early antibiotic therapy (monotherapy), early return to diet after 48 hours and laboratory control of the serum amylase and lipase (high in the first week and decreasing after 10 days, without any prognostic value). Conclusions Changes in the management of patients with mild acute pancreatitis, such as enteral nutrition, rational use of lower spectrum antibiotics and intensive care, have contributed significantly to the reduction of hospitalization time and mortality. PMID:25861064

  8. [Suspected azodicarbonamide poisoning in a patient with acute hemorrhaging pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Zawadzki, Marcin; Maksymowicz, Krzysztof

    2007-01-01

    The report describes the case of death of a 22-year old man due to acute hemorrhaging pancreatitis. Azodicarbonamide poisoning was suspected in this patient. Autopsy results, data from the literature and the knowledge about mechanisms of azodicarbonamide toxicity allowed for excluding poisoning with this substance as the cause of death. PMID:18432145

  9. Percutaneous Drainage of Suppurative Pylephlebitis Complicating Acute Pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Nouira, Kais Bedioui, Haykel; Azaiez, Olfa; Belhiba, Hend; Messaoud, Monia Ben; Ksantini, Rachid; Jouini, Mohamed; Menif, Emna

    2007-11-15

    Suppurative pylephlebitis is a rare condition with a significant mortality rate, ranging from 50% to 80%. We report a case of suppurative pylephlebitis complicating acute pancreatitis treated by percutaneous drainage in a 40-year-old woman. The patient had an uneventful recovery.

  10. Multiple roles for TGFβ receptor type II in regulating the pancreatic response in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Gittes, George K

    2016-04-01

    In their recent publication in Journal of Pathology, Grabliauskaite and Sapanora and their colleagues in Zurich use a conditional ablation of the TGFβ type II receptor (TBRII) to analyse its specific role in pancreatic epithelial cells in response to a caerulein-induced model of acute pancreatitis. These experiments help to clarify some confusion that has existed in the literature stemming from the use of a dominant-negative transgenic TBRII mouse. The results point to a central role for TBRII in acinar cells in mitigating the overall response of the pancreas to the damage and inflammation of acute pancreatitis. Copyright © 2015 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26608971

  11. Acute oxalate nephropathy due to pancreatic atrophy in newly diagnosed pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Moinuddin, Irfan; Bala, Asif; Ali, Butool; Khan, Husna; Bracamonte, Erika; Sussman, Amy

    2016-02-01

    Acute oxalate nephropathy can occur due to primary hyperoxaluria and secondary hyperoxaluria. The primary hyperoxalurias are a group of autosomal recessive disorders of endogenous oxalate overproduction. Secondary hyperoxaluria may occur as a result of excess dietary intake, poisoning with oxalate precursors (ethylene glycol), or enteric hyperoxaluria. The differential diagnosis of enteric hyperoxaluria includes inflammatory bowel disease, short bowel syndrome, bariatric surgery (with jejunoileal bypass or Roux-en-Y gastric bypass), celiac disease, partial colectomy, and chronic pancreatitis. The common etiology in all these processes is fat malabsorption, steatorrhea, saponification of calcium, and absorption of free oxalate. Hyperoxaluria causes increased urinary oxalate excretion, urolithiasis (promoted by hypovolemia, decreased urinary pH caused by metabolic acidosis, and decreased citrate and magnesium concentrations in urine), tubulointerstitial oxalate deposits, and tubulointerstitial nephritis. We report a rare case of acute oxalate nephropathy due to pancreatic atrophy and exocrine insufficiency caused by newly diagnosed pancreatic cancer. PMID:26614399

  12. Leptin Is Associated With Persistence of Hyperglycemia in Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, James I.C.; Askelund, Kathryn J.; Premkumar, Rakesh; Phillips, Anthony R.J.; Murphy, Rinki; Windsor, John A.; Petrov, Maxim S.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Adipokines have many homeostatic roles, including modulation of glucose metabolism, but their role in the pathophysiology of hyperglycemia associated with acute and critical illnesses in general, and acute pancreatitis (AP) in particular, is largely unknown. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between a panel of adipokines and hyperglycemia in the early course of AP, as well as the role of adipokines as predictors of AP severity. Adiponectin, leptin, omentin, resistin, and visfatin were measured on a daily basis in the first 72 hours after hospital admission. A first set of analyses was undertaken with admission glycemia stratified by severity, and a second set of analyses was undertaken based on persistence of early hyperglycemia. All of the analyses were adjusted for confounders. A total of 32 patients with AP were included in this study. None of the studied adipokines was significantly associated with glucose level on admission. Leptin was significantly (P = 0.003) increased in patients with persistent hyperglycemia. Adiponectin was significantly associated with the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) score in patients with persistent hyperglycemia (P = 0.015), visfatin with APACHE II score in patients with persistent hyperglycemia (P = 0.014), and omentin with APACHE II score in all of the patients regardless of the presence or absence of hyperglycemia (P = 0.021). Leptin is significantly associated with persistent hyperglycemia in the early course of AP. Omentin has a potential to become an accurate predictor of AP severity. PMID:26871770

  13. Ligustrazine alleviates acute renal injury in a rat model of acute necrotizing pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian-Xin; Dang, Sheng-Chun; Qu, Jian-Guo; Wang, Xue-Qing

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of ligustrazine, a traditional Chinese medicine, on renal injury in a rat model of acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP). METHODS: A total of 192 rats were randomly divided into three groups: control (C group), ANP without treatment (P group), and ANP treated with ligustrazine (T group). Each group was further divided into 0.5, 2, 6, 12 h subgroups. All rats were anesthetized with an intraperitoneal injection of sodium pentobarbital. Sodium taurocholate was infused through the pancreatic membrane to induce ANP. T group was infused sodium taurocholate as above, and 0.6% ligustrazine was then administered via the femoral vein. Serum urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine (Cr) concentrations were measured for the evaluation of renal function. The effects of ligustrazine on the severity of renal injury were assessed by renal function, TXA2/PGI2 and histopathological changes. Renal blood flow was determined by the radioactive microsphere technique (RMT). RESULTS: Compared with control group, the renal blood flow in P group was decreased significantly. Serious renal and pancreatic damages were found in P group, the BUN and Cr levels were elevated significantly, and the ratio of TXA2 to PGI2 was increased at 2, 6 and 12 h. Compared with P group, the blood flow of kidney was elevated significantly at 6 and 12 h after induction of ANP, the renal and pancreatic damages were attenuated, and the BUN and Cr levels were decreased significantly, and the ratio of TXA2 to PGI2 was decreased at 6 and 12 h in T group. CONCLUSION: Microcirculatory disorder (MCD) is an important factor for renal injury in ANP. Ligustrazine can ameliorate the condition of MCD and the damage of pancreas and kidney. PMID:17171804

  14. Hepatic steatosis depresses alpha-1-antitrypsin levels in human and rat acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qian; Du, Jianjun; Yu, Pengfei; Bai, Bin; Zhao, Zhanwei; Wang, Shiqi; Zhu, Junjie; Feng, Quanxin; Gao, Yun; Zhao, Qingchuan; Liu, Chaoxu

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic steatosis (HS) can exacerbate acute pancreatitis (AP). This study aimed to investigate the relation between α1-antitrypsin (AAT) and acute pancreatitis when patients have HS. Using proteomic profiling, we identified 18 differently expressed proteins pots in the serum of rats with or without HS after surgical establishment of AP. AAT was found to be one of the significantly down-regulated proteins. AAT levels were significantly lower in hepatic steatosis acute pancreatitis (HSAP) than in non-HSAP (NHSAP) (P < 0.001). To explore the clinical significance of these observations, we measured the levels of AAT in the serum of 240 patients with HSAP, NHSAP, fatty liver disease (FLD), or no disease. Compared with healthy controls, serum AAT levels in patients with NHSAP were significantly higher (P < 0.01), while in patients with HSAP serum AAT levels were significantly lower (P < 0.01). Further studies showed that acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (APACHE-II) scores were negatively correlated with serum AAT levels (r = −0.85, P < 0.01). In conclusion, low serum levels of AAT in patients with HSAP are correlated with disease severity and AAT may represent a potential target for therapies aiming to improve pancreatitis. PMID:26634430

  15. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome (PRES) After Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Tara; Al-Sharief, Khalid; Sethi, Vineeta; Ranger, Gurpreet S.

    2015-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is an unusual condition typified by acute visual impairment caused by sudden, marked parieto-occipital vasogenic edema. Thought to be inflammatory in origin, it has been described in patients undergoing chemotherapy, with autoimmune disease, and in some infections. We report a case of PRES that occurred one week after an episode of acute pancreatitis in an otherwise healthy 40-year-old female. There was progressive visual impairment over a 24-hour period with almost complete visual loss, with characteristic findings on magnetic resonance imaging. After treatment with steroids, the visual loss recovered. Clinicians should retain an index of suspicion of this rare condition in patients with visual impairment after acute pancreatitis. PMID:26759673

  16. Reduced Pancreatic Exocrine Function and Organellar Disarray in a Canine Model of Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiang; Bhugul, Pravin Avinash; Huang, Xince; Liu, Lewei; Pan, Liangliang; Ni, Haizhen; Chen, Bicheng; Sun, Hongwei; Zhang, Qiyu; Hehir, Michael; Zhou, Mengtao

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the pancreatic exocrine function in a canine model and to analyze the changes in organelles of pancreatic acinar cells during the early stage of acute pancreatitis (AP). AP was induced by retrograde injection of 5% sodium taurocholate (0.5 ml/kg) into the main pancreatic duct of dogs. The induction of AP resulted in serum hyperamylasemia and a marked reduction of amylase activity in the pancreatic fluid (PF). The pancreatic exocrine function was markedly decreased in subjects with AP compared with the control group. After the induction of AP, histological examination showed acinar cell edema, cytoplasmic vacuolization, fibroblasts infiltration, and inflammatory cell infiltration in the interstitium. Electron micrographs after the induction of AP revealed that most of the rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) were dilated and that some of the ribosomes were no longer located on the RER. The mitochondria were swollen, with shortened and broken cristae. The present study demonstrated, in a canine model, a reduced volume of PF secretion with decreased enzyme secretion during the early stage of AP. Injury of mitochondria and dilatation and degranulation of RER may be responsible for the reduced exocrine function in AP. Furthermore, the present model and results may be useful for researching novel therapeutic measures in AP. PMID:26895040

  17. Reduced Pancreatic Exocrine Function and Organellar Disarray in a Canine Model of Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yuepeng; Bai, Yongyu; Li, Qiang; Bhugul, Pravin Avinash; Huang, Xince; Liu, Lewei; Pan, Liangliang; Ni, Haizhen; Chen, Bicheng; Sun, Hongwei; Zhang, Qiyu; Hehir, Michael; Zhou, Mengtao

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the pancreatic exocrine function in a canine model and to analyze the changes in organelles of pancreatic acinar cells during the early stage of acute pancreatitis (AP). AP was induced by retrograde injection of 5% sodium taurocholate (0.5 ml/kg) into the main pancreatic duct of dogs. The induction of AP resulted in serum hyperamylasemia and a marked reduction of amylase activity in the pancreatic fluid (PF). The pancreatic exocrine function was markedly decreased in subjects with AP compared with the control group. After the induction of AP, histological examination showed acinar cell edema, cytoplasmic vacuolization, fibroblasts infiltration, and inflammatory cell infiltration in the interstitium. Electron micrographs after the induction of AP revealed that most of the rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) were dilated and that some of the ribosomes were no longer located on the RER. The mitochondria were swollen, with shortened and broken cristae. The present study demonstrated, in a canine model, a reduced volume of PF secretion with decreased enzyme secretion during the early stage of AP. Injury of mitochondria and dilatation and degranulation of RER may be responsible for the reduced exocrine function in AP. Furthermore, the present model and results may be useful for researching novel therapeutic measures in AP. PMID:26895040

  18. Scrotal Swelling as a Complication of Hydrochlorothiazide Induced Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Nikiforov, Ivan; Mansoora, Qurat; Al-Khalisy, Hassan; Joseph, Sarah; Cheriyath, Pramil

    2015-01-01

    Background. Scrotal swelling is a rare complication of acute pancreatitis with few reported cases in the literature. In this case report, we present a 59-year-old male with hydrochlorothiazide induced pancreatitis who developed scrotal swelling. Case Presentation. A 59-year-old male presented to the emergency department with sharp epigastric abdominal pain that radiated to the back and chest. On physical examination, he had abdominal tenderness and distention with hypoactive bowel sounds. Computed tomography (CT) scan of the abdomen showed acute pancreatitis. The patient's condition deteriorated and he was admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). After he improved and was transferred out of the ICU, the patient developed swelling of the scrotum and penis. Ultrasound (US) of the scrotum showed large hydrocele bilaterally with no varicoceles or testicular masses. Good blood flow was observed for both testicles. The swelling diminished over the next eight days with the addition of Lasix and the patient was discharged home in stable condition. Conclusion. Scrotal swelling is a rare complication of acute pancreatitis. It usually resolves spontaneously with conservative medical management such as diuretics and elevation of the legs. PMID:26199765

  19. Effects of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-? activation on apoptosis in rats with acute pancreatitis.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Xu P; Lou XL; Chen C; Yang ZW

    2013-12-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the effects and mechanisms of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-? (PPAR-?) activation on the induction of apoptosis in rats with acute pancreatitis.METHODS: Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) and mild acute pancreatitis (MAP) were induced and pre-treated with pioglitazone, which is a ligand of PPAR-?. The expression of inflammatory factors (TNF-? and IL6) of the pancreas was detected by ELISA. The apoptosis in pancreas were detected by TUNEL assay and the activity of caspase 3 was determined. Phosphorylation of p65 in pancreas of SAP or MAP was determined by western-blot.RESULTS: Expression levels of PPAR-? proteins were elevated in the pancreases of SAP or MAP rats pre-injected with pioglitazone intraperitoneally. Downregulation of the expression TNF-? and IL6 and relief of pathological changes in the pancreas suggested that pioglitazone had protective effects on acute panceatitis. In pioglitazone pre-treated groups, a TUNEL assay indicated a high level of apoptosis in SAP but little apoptosis in MAP, showing pioglitazone could promote taurocholate-induced apoptosis but inhibit ceruleininduced apoptosis in pancraeatic aniniar cells. Furthermore, caspase 3 activity was high in SAP but low in MAP, implying that the apoptotic mechanism in pancreatic acinar cells of AP rats was correlated with caspase 3 activity. Phosphorylation of p65 was reduced in SAP or MAP group pretreated with pioglitazone, indicating that pioglitazone reduced the inflammation reaction by inhibiting the activation of the NF-?B.CONCLUSIONS: These results indicated that activation of PPAR-? induced apoptosis in pancreatic acinar cells of SAP rats but inhibited apoptosis in pancraeatic acinar cells of MAP rats, which demonstrated that PPAR-? may be an efficiently therapeutic target in pancreatic inflammation.

  20. [Vital prognosis in acute pancreatitis. Study of 5 clinicobiological indices].

    PubMed

    Bouillot, J L; Mariette, D; Canel, M A; Gaudez, F; Baccot, S; Boucherie, J C; Salah, S; Alexandre, J H

    1993-01-01

    The values of the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Enquiry (Apache II) and the Simplified Acute Physiology Scores (SAPS) were compared with Ranson and Imrie scores to predict death after acute pancreatitis. Fifty-five (ten deaths) patients were evaluated. Patients who died had a mean score greater than those who survived. The accuracy of all scores was similar after 48 hours. The ICU (Intensive Care Unit) available at the time of admission may facilitate the early selection of patients for appropriate management. PMID:8253309

  1. Varicella zoster virus: a rare cause of acute pancreatitis in an immunocompetent child.

    PubMed

    Kulasegaran, Suheelan; Wilson, Elizabeth Jane; Vasquez, Leon; Hulme-Moir, Mike

    2016-01-01

    A 15-year-old girl with a diagnosis of varicella zoster virus (VZV) presented to hospital with severe abdominal pain. This patient was immunocompetent and found to have acute pancreatitis in association with VZV. She responded well to intravenous acyclovir and supportive treatment. A review of the literature for the management of pancreatitis associated with VZV suggests treatment with acyclovir, as it appears to reduce hospital stay and symptoms. The exact benefit is yet to be quantified. Importantly, this diagnosis should be considered in children who have VZV associated with abdominal pain. PMID:26762351

  2. Severe acute malnutrition in Asia.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Tahmeed; Hossain, Muttaquina; Mahfuz, Mustafa; Choudhury, Nuzhat; Hossain, Mir Mobarak; Bhandari, Nita; Lin, Maung Maung; Joshi, Prakash Chandra; Angdembe, Mirak Raj; Wickramasinghe, V Pujitha; Hossain, S M Moazzem; Shahjahan, Mohammad; Irianto, Sugeng Eko; Soofi, Sajid; Bhutta, Zulfiqar

    2014-06-01

    Severe acute malnutrition (SAM) is a common condition that kills children and intellectually maims those who survive. Close to 20 million children under the age of 5 years suffer from SAM globally, and about 1 million of them die each year. Much of this burden takes place in Asia. Six countries in Asia together have more than 12 million children suffering from SAM: 0.6 million in Afghanistan, 0.6 million in Bangladesh, 8.0 million in India, 1.2 million in Indonesia, 1.4 million in Pakistan, and 0.6 million in Yemen. This article is based on a review of SAM burden and intervention programs in Asian countries where, despite the huge numbers of children suffering from the condition, the coverage of interventions is either absent on a national scale or poor. Countries in Asia have to recognize SAM as a major problem and mobilize internal resources for its management. Screening of children in the community for SAM and appropriate referral and back referral require good health systems. Improving grassroots services will not only contribute to improving management of SAM, it will also improve infant and young child feeding and nutrition in general. Ready-to-use therapeutic food (RUTF), the key to home management of SAM without complications, is still not endorsed by many countries because of its unavailability in the countries and its cost. It should preferably be produced locally from locally available food ingredients. Countries in Asia that do not have the capacity to produce RUTF from locally available food ingredients can benefit from other countries in the region that can produce it. Health facilities in all high-burden countries should be staffed and equipped to treat children with SAM. A continuous cascade of training of health staff on management of SAM can offset the damage that results from staff attrition or transfers. The basic nutrition interventions, which include breastfeeding, appropriate complementary feeding, micronutrient supplementation, and management of acute malnutrition, should be scaled up in Asian countries that are plagued with the burden of malnutrition. PMID:25069289

  3. Duration of injury correlates with necrosis in caerulein-induced experimental acute pancreatitis: implications for pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Tony G; Raghav, Rahul; Kumar, Ajay; Garg, Pramod K; Roy, Tara S

    2014-06-01

    Pancreatic acinar cell necrosis is indicative of severe pancreatitis and the degree of necrosis is an index of its outcome. We studied whether the dose and duration of injury correlates with severity, particularly in terms of necrosis, in caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis (AP) in Swiss albino mice. In addition to control group 1 (G1), groups 2 and 3 received four injections of caerulein every hour but were sacrificed at five hours (G2) and nine hours (G3) respectively, and group 4 received eight injections and was sacrificed at nine hours (G4). The severity of pancreatitis was assessed histopathologically and biochemically. The histopathological scores of pancreatitis in groups 3 and 4 were significantly higher than in groups 1 and 2 (4 vs. 1, 4 vs. 2, 3 vs. 1, 3 vs. 2; P<0.05). TUNEL-positive apoptotic cells were significantly higher in groups 2 and 3 compared with groups 1 and 4 (P<0.05). Necrosis was significantly more in group 4 than other groups (37.49% (4.68) vs. 19.97% (1.60) in G2; 20.36% (1.56) in G3; P=0.006 for G 2 vs. 4 and P=0.019 for G 3 vs. 4). Electron microscopy revealed numerous autophagosomes in groups 2 and 3 and mitochondrial damage and necrosis in group 4. The pancreatic and pulmonary myeloperoxidase activity in group 4 was significantly higher than that in the other groups (P<0.01). Hence, severity of pancreatitis is a function of the dose of injurious agent, while inflammation is both dose and duration dependent, which may also explain the wide spectrum of severity of AP seen in clinical practice. PMID:24761825

  4. Role of phosphoinositide 3-kinase in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Lupia, Enrico; Pigozzi, Luca; Goffi, Alberto; Hirsch, Emilio; Montrucchio, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    A large body of experimental and clinical data supports the notion that inflammation in acute pancreatitis has a crucial role in the pathogenesis of local and systemic damage and is a major determinant of clinical severity. Thus, research has recently focused on molecules that can regulate the inflammatory processes, such as phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks), a family of lipid and protein kinases involved in intracellular signal transduction. Studies using genetic ablation or pharmacologic inhibitors of different PI3K isoforms, in particular the class I PI3K? and PI3K?, have contributed to a greater understanding of the roles of these kinases in the modulation of inflammatory and immune responses. Recent data suggest that PI3Ks are also involved in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis. Activation of the PI3K signaling pathway, and in particular of the class IB PI3K? isoform, has a significant role in those events which are necessary for the initiation of acute pancreatic injury, namely calcium signaling alteration, trypsinogen activation, and nuclear factor-?B transcription. Moreover, PI3K? is instrumental in modulating acinar cell apoptosis, and regulating local neutrophil infiltration and systemic inflammatory responses during the course of experimental acute pancreatitis. The availability of PI3K inhibitors selective for specific isoforms may provide new valuable therapeutic strategies to improve the clinical course of this disease. This article presents a brief summary of PI3K structure and function, and highlights recent advances that implicate PI3Ks in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis. PMID:25386068

  5. Mechanisms of interleukin-22's beneficial effects in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Huan, Chongmin; Kim, Daniel; Ou, Peiqi; Alfonso, Antonio; Stanek, Albert

    2016-02-15

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a disorder characterized by parenchymal injury of the pancreas controlled by immune cell-mediated inflammation. AP remains a significant challenge in the clinic due to a lack of specific and effective treatment. Knowledge of the complex mechanisms that regulate the inflammatory response in AP is needed for the development of new approaches to treatment, since immune cell-derived inflammatory cytokines have been recognized to play critical roles in the pathogenesis of the disease. Recent studies have shown that interleukin (IL)-22, a cytokine secreted by leukocytes, when applied in the severe animal models of AP, protects against the inflammation-mediated acinar injury. In contrast, in a mild AP model, endogenous IL-22 has been found to be a predominantly anti-inflammatory mediator that inhibits inflammatory cell infiltration via the induction of Reg3 proteins in acinar cells, but does not protect against acinar injury in the early stage of AP. However, constitutively over-expressed IL-22 can prevent the initial acinar injury caused by excessive autophagy through the induction of the anti-autophagic proteins Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL. Thus IL-22 plays different roles in AP depending on the severity of the AP model. This review focuses on these recently reported findings for the purpose of better understanding IL-22's regulatory roles in AP which could help to develop a novel therapeutic strategy. PMID:26909233

  6. Influence of adenosine receptors on the development of caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Szczerbi?ski, Mariusz; Celi?ski, Krzysztof; S?omka, Maria; Kasztelan-Szczerbi?ska, Beata; Cichoz-Lach, Halina

    2002-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis leads to hypoxia caused by vasoconstriction and to activation of lysosomal and digestive enzymes resulting in pancreas autodigestion and damage. This causes activation of leucocytes and increased expression of adhesive molecules enabling margination and adhesion of activated leucocytes to the endothelium. Activated leucocytes are the source of proinflammatory cytokins and oxygen-free radicals which intensify the inflammatory response. The reports indicating that adenosine may prevent activation of the above-mentioned processes in ischaemia prompted us to undertake this study. The study was performed in two stages. The first stage was to evaluate the effects of agonists and antagonists of adenosine receptors on normal pancreas while the second one was to determine the influence of these substances on the development of caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis. During the first stage, the animals were injected intraperitoneally with the substances examined: the A1 receptor antagonist--DPCPX, the A2 receptor agonist--CGS 21680, the A2 receptor antagonist--ZM 241385 and the A3 receptor agonist--IB-MECA and then received intravenous saline. The control animals were subjected only to the 12 h intravenous infusion of 0.15 M NaCl. During the second stage, after the intraperitoneal administration of adenosine receptor agonists and antagonists (as in the first stage), acute pancreatitis was induced with the 12 h intravenous infusion of 5 micrograms/kg/h caerulein. Identical acute pancreatitis was induced in the control animals, however no other substances were administered. The pancreatic tissue samples were collected directly after intravenous infusion. The severity of inflammatory processes in the pancreas was evaluated on the basis of the plasma amylase activity, pancreatic weight and enhancement of histopathological changes observed in this organ. In the animals infused with saline alone, no effects of the substances examined on the pancreatic weight, plasma amylase activity and histopathological features were observed. The intravenous caerulein infusion induced acute pancreatitis expressed as bigger pancreatic weight, increased plasma amylase activity and tissue damage (oedema, cell vacuolization, leucocyte infiltration). The A2 receptor agonist administration preceding the induction of acute pancreatitis decreased the pancreas damage caused by caerulein. Lower weight of the pancreas and decreased plasma amylase activities were observed; on histopathological examination--oedema, leucocyte infiltration and intensity of alveolar cell vacuolization were lower. On the other hand, intraperitoneal pretreatment with the A2 receptor antagonist intensified the pancreas injury. The A1 receptor blockade and A3 receptor stimulation in the animals injected with caerulein did not affect the pancreatic weight, plasma amylase activity or histopathological picture of the organ. The administration of A2 receptor agonists decreases the organ injury in caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in rats. This action may result from modulating effects of these substances on different stages of the cascade of inflammatory reactions. However, the present study did not reveal any effect of the A1 receptor agonist or A3 receptor antagonist on inflammatory processes in the experimental model described. PMID:12898930

  7. Comparison of sialylated N-glycopeptide levels in serum of pancreatic cancer patients, acute pancreatitis patients, and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Kontro, Hilkka; Joenvr, Sakari; Haglund, Caj; Renkonen, Risto

    2014-08-01

    Serum protein glycosylation is known to be affected by pathological conditions, including cancer and inflammatory diseases. Pancreatic cancer patients would benefit from early diagnosis, as the disease is often detected in an advanced stage and has poor prognosis. Searching for changes in serum protein site-specific glycosylation could reveal novel glycoprotein biomarkers. We used Sambucus nigra lectin affinity chromatography to enrich ?-2,6 sialylated tryptic N-glycopeptides from albumin-depleted sera of pancreatic cancer patients, acute pancreatitis patients, and healthy individuals, and compared their relative abundance using ultra performance LC-MS. Relative quantitation was done using the spectrum processing software MZmine. Identification was performed on the web-based tool GlycopeptideID, developed for in silico analysis of intact N-glycopeptides. Seventeen high-abundance serum proteins, mainly acute-phase proteins, and immunoglobulins, with total 27 N-glycosylation sites, and 62 glycoforms, were identified. Pancreatitis patient sera contained 38, and pancreatic cancer patients sera contained 13 glycoform changes with statistical significance (p < 0.05). In pancreatitis, up to tenfold changes were found in some glycoforms, and in pancreatic cancer, threefold. Analysis showed that the changes often concerned one or two, but not all, N-glycosylation sites in a specific glycoprotein. In conclusion, the analysis shows that pancreatic cancer, and acute pancreatitis are associated with changes in concentrations of intact sialylated N-glycopeptides derived from acute-phase proteins, and immunoglobulins, and that changes are site specific. PMID:24841998

  8. Pancreatic resection with islet cell autotransplant for the treatment of severe chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Argo, Joshua L; Contreras, Juan L; Wesley, Mary M; Christein, John D

    2008-06-01

    Pancreatic resection can alleviate pain in properly selected patients with severe chronic pancreatitis (CP), although the apancreatic state causes "brittle" diabetes. Islet auto-transplantation (IAT) after resection can decrease diabetes-related morbidity. Twenty-six consecutive patients with CP who underwent 27 pancreatic resections with IAT from April 2005 to December 2007 were evaluated in this retrospective case control study. Data were collected by chart and operative note reviews and query of hospital databases. Subgroup analysis was performed on 21 cases of total pancreatectomy and six cases of pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD). Mean age was 43.8 years and 46.2 per cent of patients were female. The most common etiology of CP was alcoholism (34.6%), followed by idiopathic causes (30.8%) and pancreatic divisum (23.1%). There was no mortality and the complication rate was 56 per cent. Islet equivalents infused and islet equivalents/gram of pancreas were 82,094 and 2,739 respectively. Mean discharge insulin dose was 10.7 units/day. Mean follow-up was 6.5 months. At 6 months, 80 per cent of patients reporting had decreased or eliminated their use of narcotic medication and all total pancreatectomy patients required insulin (mean 23 units/day). In appropriately selected patients, pancreatic resection with IAT is safe and effective for the treatment of intractable pain associated with CP. PMID:18556996

  9. Acute pancreatitis after liver transplantation: incidence and contributing factors

    PubMed Central

    Krokos, N. V.; Karavias, D.; Tzakis, A.; Tepetes, K.; Ramos, E.; Todo, S.; Fung, J. J.; Starzl, T. E.

    2010-01-01

    In order to assess the incidence and possible predisposing and contributing factors in the development of acute pancreatitis after liver transplantation, we reviewed the medical records of all 1832 adult patients who underwent 2161 orthotopic liver transplantation (OLTx) procedures in our center between January 1987 and September 1992. Of these patients, 55 (3 % incidence) developed clinical pancreatitis and 247 (13.4 % incidence) developed hyperamylasemia (biochemical pancreatitis). Overall mortality in cases of clinical pancreatitis was 63.6 %. The mortality in cases of hyperamylasemia was similar to that found in the general liver transplant population (i. e., 23 %). A strong correlation was found between pancreatitis after liver transplantation and end-stage liver disease due to hepatitis B (30 % of the cases, P = 0.00001). Extensive surgical dissection around the pancreas (P < 0.05), the type of biliary reconstruction following liver transplantation (P < 0.05), and the number of liver grafts received by the same patient (P = 0.00001) appeared to be possible contributing factors as did the duration of venovenous bypass and the quantity of IV calcium chloride administered intraoperatively. PMID:7534081

  10. Parathyroid Cyst Presenting as Acute Pancreatitis: Report of a Case

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi-Young; Chung, Cho-Yun; Kim, Jong-Sun; Myung, Dae-Seong; Cho, Sung-Bum; Park, Chang-Hwan; Kim, Young

    2013-01-01

    We report the first case of hypercalcemia-induced acute pancreatitis caused by a functioning parathyroid cyst in a 67-year-old man. Laboratory investigation revealed increased serum amylase and lipase, increased serum ionized calcium and parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels, and decreased serum phosphate, indicating pancreatitis and primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT). Abdominal computed tomography (CT) revealed mild swelling of the pancreatic head with peri-pancreatic fat infiltration and fluid collection around the pancreatic tail. Ultrasonography and CT of the neck showed a cystic lesion at the inferior portion of the left thyroid gland, suggesting a parathyroid cyst. There was no evidence of parathyroid adenoma by 99mTc sestamibi scintigraphy. PHPT caused by a functioning parathyroid cyst was suspected. The patient underwent surgical resection of the functioning parathyroid cyst owing to his prolonged hypercalcemia. At 3 weeks after the operation, his serum levels of PTH, total calcium, ionized calcium, inorganic phosphate, amylase, and lipase were normalized. At the follow-up examinations, he has remained asymptomatic. PMID:24400215

  11. Necro-inflammatory response of pancreatic acinar cells in the pathogenesis of acute alcoholic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Gu, H; Werner, J; Bergmann, F; Whitcomb, D C; Büchler, M W; Fortunato, F

    2013-01-01

    The role of pancreatic acinar cells in initiating necro-inflammatory responses during the early onset of alcoholic acute pancreatitis (AP) has not been fully evaluated. We investigated the ability of acinar cells to generate pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators, including inflammasome-associated IL-18/caspase-1, and evaluated acinar cell necrosis in an animal model of AP and human samples. Rats were fed either an ethanol-containing or control diet for 14 weeks and killed 3 or 24 h after a single lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injection. Inflammasome components and necro-inflammation were evaluated in acinar cells by immunofluorescence (IF), histology, and biochemical approaches. Alcohol exposure enhanced acinar cell-specific production of TNFα, IL-6, MCP-1 and IL-10, as early as 3 h after LPS, whereas IL-18 and caspase-1 were evident 24 h later. Alcohol enhanced LPS-induced TNFα expression, whereas blockade of LPS signaling diminished TNFα production in vitro, indicating that the response of pancreatic acinar cells to LPS is similar to that of immune cells. Similar results were observed from acinar cells in samples from patients with acute/recurrent pancreatitis. Although morphologic examination of sub-clinical AP showed no visible signs of necrosis, early loss of pancreatic HMGB1 and increased systemic levels of HMGB1 and LDH were observed, indicating that this strong systemic inflammatory response is associated with little pancreatic necrosis. These results suggest that TLR-4-positive acinar cells respond to LPS by activating the inflammasome and producing pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators during the development of mild, sub-clinical AP, and that these effects are exacerbated by alcohol injury. PMID:24091659

  12. A systematic review of acute pancreatitis as an adverse event of type 2 diabetes drugs: from hard facts to a balanced position.

    PubMed

    Giorda, C B; Nada, E; Tartaglino, B; Marafetti, L; Gnavi, R

    2014-11-01

    The question whether antidiabetes drugs can cause acute pancreatitis dates back to the 1970s. Recently, old concerns have re-emerged following claims that use of incretins, a new class of drugs for type 2 diabetes, might increase the relative risk of acute pancreatitis up to 30-fold. Given that diabetes is per se a potent risk factor for acute pancreatitis and that drug-related acute pancreatitis is rare and difficult to diagnose, we searched the medical databases for information linking acute pancreatitis and type 2 diabetes drugs. Among the biguanides, both phenformin and metformin (the latter in patients with renal insufficiency) have been cited in case reports as a potential cause of acute pancreatitis. Sulphonylureas, as both entire class and single compound (glibenclamide), have also been found in cohort studies to increase its risk. No direct link was found between pancreatic damage and therapy with metaglinide, acarbose, pramlintide or SGLT-2 inhibitors. In animal models, thiazolinediones have demonstrated proprieties to attenuate pancreatic damage, opening perspectives for their use in treating acute pancreatitis in humans. Several case reports and the US Food and Drug Administration pharmacovigilance database indicate an association between acute pancreatitis and incretins, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors, and GLP-1 receptor agonists. To date, however, a clear-cut odds ratio for this association has been reported in only one of eight pharmacoepidemiological studies. Finally, none of the intervention trials investigating these compounds, including two large randomized controlled trials with cardiovascular endpoints, confirmed the purportedly increased risk of acute pancreatitis with incretin use. PMID:24702687

  13. Marked elevation of transaminases and pancreatic enzymes in severe malnourished male with eating disorder.

    PubMed

    Urso, C; Brucculeri, S; Caimi, G

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of a 45 year old Caucasian malnourished male with an history of eating disorder who developed severe liver and pancreatic damage and multiorgan disfunction. At admission to our department, his body mass index (BMI) was 11.1. Biochemical evaluation showed elevated serum levels of transaminases (AST= 2291 U/L, ALT= 1792 U/L), amylase (3620 U/L), lipase (4102 U/L), CPK= 1370 U/L, LDH= 2082 U/L. No other cause of acute liver and pancreatic damage was evidenced. Haematological disorders (anemia, thrombocytopenia, leukopenia) found on admission seem related to bone marrow hypoplasia and to gelatinous marrow transformation described in severe state of malnutrition. Although a moderate increase in liver and pancreatic enzymes are a common finding in malnourished patients, only a small number of reports describes severe liver injury and multiorgan dysfunction. After a few days of treatment (hydration and nutritional support) a marked decrease of serum transaminases, lipase, amylase, CPK, LDH occurred, despite a transient increase in these levels secondary to refeeding syndrome. The association of chronic malnutrition and a decrease in systemic perfusion may be responsible for multiorgan dysfunction. In our patient the high levels of transaminases and pancreatic enzymes were the most important biochemical abnormalities normalized after refeeding. PMID:24217841

  14. Effects of clotrimazol on the acute necrotizing pancreatitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Cekic, Arif Burak; Alhan, Etem; Usta, Arif; Trky?lmaz, Serdar; Kural, Birgl Vanizor; Erin, Cengiz

    2013-12-01

    This study aims to investigate the influence of clotrimazol (CLTZ) on acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP) induced by glycodeoxycholic acid in rats. Rats were divided into five groups as sham + saline, sham + CLTZ, sham + polyethylene glycol, ANP + saline, and ANP + CLTZ. ANP in rats was induced by glycodeoxycholic acid. The extent of acinar cell injury, mortality, systemic cardiorespiratory variables, functional capillary density (FCD), renal/hepatic functions, and changes in some enzyme markers for pancreatic and lung tissue were investigated during ANP in rats. The use of CLTZ after the induction of ANP resulted in a significant decrease in the mortality rate, pancreatic necrosis, and serum activity of amylase, alanine aminotransferase, interleukin-6, lactate dehydrogenase in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, serum concentration of urea, and tissue activity of myeloperoxidase, and malondialdehyde in the pancreas and lung and a significant increase in concentrations of calcium, blood pressure, urine output, pO2, and FCD. This study showed that CLTZ demonstrated beneficial effect on the course of ANP in rats. Therefore, it may be used in the treatment of acute pancreatitis. PMID:23892997

  15. Gene expression profiling and endothelin in acute experimental pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Oz, Helieh S; Lu, Ying; Vera-Portocarrero, Louis P; Ge, Pei; Silos-Santiago, Ada; Westlund, Karin N

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To analyze gene expression profiles in an experimental pancreatitis and provide functional reversal of hypersensitivity with candidate gene endothelin-1 antagonists. METHODS: Dibutyltin dichloride (DBTC) is a chemical used as a polyvinyl carbonate stabilizer/catalyzer, biocide in agriculture, antifouling agent in paint and fabric. DBTC induces an acute pancreatitis flare through generation of reactive oxygen species. Lewis-inbred rats received a single i.v. injection with either DBTC or vehicle. Spinal cord and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) were taken at the peak of inflammation and processed for transcriptional profiling with a cDNA microarray biased for rat brain-specific genes. In a second study, groups of animals with DBTC-induced pancreatitis were treated with endothelin (ET) receptor antagonists [ET-A (BQ123) and ET-B BQ788)]. Spontaneous pain related mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity were measured. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed using anti-ET-A and ET-B antibodies on sections from pancreatic tissues and DRG of the T10-12 spinal segments. RESULTS: Animals developed acute pancreatic inflammation persisting 7-10 d as confirmed by pathological studies (edema in parenchyma, loss of pancreatic architecture and islets, infiltration of inflammatory cells, neutrophil and mononuclear cells, degeneration, vacuolization and necrosis of acinar cells) and the pain-related behaviors (cutaneous secondary mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity). Gene expression profile was different in the spinal cord from animals with pancreatitis compared to the vehicle control group. Over 260 up-regulated and 60 down-regulated unique genes could be classified into 8 functional gene families: circulatory/acute phase/immunomodulatory; extracellular matrix; structural; channel/receptor/transporter; signaling transduction; transcription/translation-related; antioxidants/chaperones/heat shock; pancreatic and other enzymes. ET-1 was among the 52 candidate genes up-regulated greater than 2-fold in animals with pancreatic inflammation and visceral pain-related behavior. Treatments with the ET-A (BQ123) and ET-B (BQ-788) antagonists revealed significant protection against inflammatory pain related mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity behaviors in animals with pancreatitis (P < 0.05). Open field spontaneous behavioral activity (at baseline, day 6 and 30 min after drug treatments (BQ123, BQ788) showed overall stable activity levels indicating that the drugs produced no undesirable effects on normal exploratory behaviors, except for a trend toward reduction of the active time and increase in resting time at the highest dose (300 ?mol/L). Immunocytochemical localization revealed that expression of ET-A and ET-B receptors increased in DRG from animals with pancreatitis. Endothelin receptor localization was combined in dual staining with neuronal marker NeuN, and glia marker, glial fibrillary acidic protein. ET-A was expressed in the cell bodies and occasional nuclei of DRG neurons in nave animals. However, phenotypic expression of ET-A receptor was greatly increased in neurons of all sizes in animals with pancreatitis. Similarly, ET-B receptor was localized in neurons and in the satellite glia, as well as in the Schwann cell glial myelin sheaths surrounding the axons passing through the DRG. CONCLUSION: Endothelin-receptor antagonists protect against inflammatory pain responses without interfering with normal exploratory behaviors. Candidate genes can serve as future biomarkers for diagnosis and/or targeted gene therapy. PMID:22969188

  16. Tissue Pharmacology of Da-Cheng-Qi Decoction in Experimental Acute Pancreatitis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xianlin; Zhang, Yumei; Li, Juan; Wan, Meihua; Zhu, Shifeng; Guo, Hui; Xiang, Jin; Thrower, Edwin C.; Tang, Wenfu

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. The Chinese herbal medicine Da-Cheng-Qi Decoction (DCQD) can ameliorate the severity of acute pancreatitis (AP). However, the potential pharmacological mechanism remains unclear. This study explored the potential effective components and the pharmacokinetic characteristics of DCQD in target tissue in experimental acute pancreatitis in rats. Methods. Acute pancreatitis-like symptoms were first induced in rats and then they were given different doses of DCQD (6?g/kg, 12?g/kg, and 24?g/kg body weight) orally. Tissue drug concentration, tissue pathological score, and inflammatory mediators in pancreas, intestine, and lung tissues of rats were examined after 24 hours, respectively. Results. Major components of DCQD could be found in target tissues and their concentrations increased in conjunction with the intake dose of DCQD. The high-dose compounds showed maximal effect on altering levels of anti-inflammatory (interleukin-4 and interleukin-10) and proinflammatory markers (tumor necrosis factor ? and interleukin-6) and ameliorating the pathological damage in target tissues (P < 0.05). Conclusions. DCQD could alleviate pancreatic, intestinal, and lung injury by altering levels of inflammatory cytokines in AP rats with tissue distribution of its components. PMID:26199633

  17. Pancreatic T cell protein-tyrosine phosphatase deficiency ameliorates cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a common clinical problem whose incidence has been progressively increasing in recent years. Onset of the disease is trigged by intra-acinar cell activation of digestive enzyme zymogens that induce autodigestion, release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and acinar cell injury. T-cell protein tyrosine phosphatase (TCPTP) is implicated in inflammatory signaling but its significance in AP remains unclear. Results In this study we assessed the role of pancreatic TCPTP in cerulein-induced AP. TCPTP expression was increased at the protein and messenger RNA levels in the early phase of AP in mice and rats. To directly determine whether TCPTP may have a causal role in AP we generated mice with pancreatic TCPTP deletion (panc-TCPTP KO) by crossing TCPTP floxed mice with Pdx1-Cre transgenic mice. Amylase and lipase levels were lower in cerulein-treated panc-TCPTP KO mice compared with controls. In addition, pancreatic mRNA and serum concentrations of the inflammatory cytokines TNF? and IL-6 were lower in panc-TCPTP KO mice. At the molecular level, panc-TCPTP KO mice exhibited enhanced cerulein-induced STAT3 Tyr705 phosphorylation accompanied by a decreased cerulein-induced NF-?B inflammatory response, and decreased ER stress and cell death. Conclusion These findings revealed a novel role for pancreatic TCPTP in the progression of cerulein-induced AP. PMID:24606867

  18. Is antibiotic prophylaxis beneficial in acute pancreatitis?--First update.

    PubMed

    Rada, Gabriel; Pea, Jos

    2015-01-01

    This Living FRISBEE (Living FRIendly Summary of the Body of Evidence using Epistemonikos) is an update of the summary published in August 2014, based on two systematic reviews appeared in January and February 2015. There is controversy about the effects of prophylactic antibiotics in acute pancreatitis. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified 18 systematic reviews including 19 randomised studies overall. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings following the GRADE approach. We concluded that prophylactic antibiotics may reduce mortality and length of hospitalization in patients with acute pancreatitis, but the certainty of the evidence is low. The probability that future evidence change what we know is high. PMID:25938428

  19. Concentration of tissue angiotensin II increases with severity of experimental pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Hiroyuki; Shinmura, Atsushi; Tajima, Hidehiro; Tsukada, Tomoya; Nakanuma, Shin-Ichi; Okamoto, Koichi; Sakai, Seisho; Makino, Isamu; Nakamura, Keishi; Hayashi, Hironori; Oyama, Katsunobu; Inokuchi, Masafumi; Nakagawara, Hisatoshi; Miyashita, Tomoharu; Fujita, Hideto; Takamura, Hiroyuki; Ninomiya, Itasu; Kitagawa, Hirohisa; Fushida, Sachio; Fujimura, Takashi; Ohta, Tetsuo; Wakayama, Tomohiko; Iseki, Shoichi

    2013-08-01

    Necrotizing pancreatitis is a serious condition that is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Although vasospasm is reportedly involved in necrotizing pancreatitis, the underlying mechanism is not completely clear. In addition, the local renin?angiotensin system has been hypothesized to be involved in the progression of pancreatitis and trypsin has been shown to generate angiotensin II under weakly acidic conditions. However, to the best of our knowledge, no studies have reported elevated angiotensin II levels in tissue with pancreatitis. In the present study, the concentration of pancreatic angiotensin II in rats with experimentally induced acute pancreatitis was measured. Acute pancreatitis was induced by retrograde injection of 6% sodium taurocholate into the biliopancreatic duct. Control rats were sacrificed without injection into the biliopancreatic duct. The concentration of tissue angiotensin II was measured using the florisil method. Angiotensin II concentration in tissues with acute pancreatitis measured at 3, 6, 12 and 24 h following taurocholate injection were significantly higher than that of normal pancreatic tissue. In addition, the concentration of angiotensin II increased in a time?dependent manner. The results demonstrated that the angiotensin II generating system is involved in the transition from edematous to necrotizing pancreatitis in experimental animals. We hypothesize that locally formed angiotensin II affects the microenvironment in pancreatitis. PMID:23754456

  20. Postburn pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, C M; Sheridan, R L; Schoenfeld, D A; Warshaw, A L; Tompkins, R G

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors examined the prevalence and complications of pancreatitis in severely burned patients. Factors predictive for the development of pancreatitis after burns are considered. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Pancreatitis has been documented at necropsy after burns; however, it is not clinically recognized as a common complication of burn injury. Recent improvements in survival rates could yield previously unrecognized complications, such as pancreatitis, particularly in those patients who previously would have not survived. The hypothesis is that pancreatitis is a frequent complication after major burn injury and causes significant morbidity for patients with large burns. METHODS: This retrospective review of adult patients with large burns examines postburn pancreatitis using stepwise logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: Forty-nine of 121 (40%) patients developed hyperamylasemia or hyperlipasemia well after the admission period (23 +/- 3 days), and all enzyme abnormalities were temporally associated with emerging infections. Most of these patients (40/49, 82%) had symptoms of pancreatitis. Three patients (6%) had pancreatic pseudocysts or abscesses. Inhalation injury (p = 0.0001), associated trauma (p = 0.0311), and escharotomy (p = 0.0415) were risk factors for pancreatitis. Using Fischer's exact test, patients with pancreatitis had increased mortality and length of stay. Patients with high enzyme elevations and > or = 50% body surface area burned were at severe risk of pancreatic pseudocyst or abscess development (43%; 90% confidence interval of 23-77%). CONCLUSIONS: Pancreatitis is a frequent complication after large burn injuries. Patients at high risk for pancreatitis complications should receive surveillance examinations during their acute hospitalization. PMID:7543741

  1. The ST2 Pathway Is Involved in Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Ouziel, Romy; Gustot, Thierry; Moreno, Christophe; Arvanitakis, Marianna; Degr, Delphine; Trpo, Eric; Quertinmont, Eric; Vercruysse, Vincent; Demetter, Pieter; Le Moine, Olivier; McKenzie, Andrew N.J.; Delhaye, Myriam; Devire, Jacques; Lemmers, Arnaud

    2012-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is an inflammatory disease in which the regulatory pathways are not clearly elucidated. Activation of interleukin 1? (IL-1?) and immunomodulation via MyD88, the first signaling molecule in the ST2 pathway, seem to be involved. Because IL-33, the ST2 ligand, is an IL-1 family member and acts as an alarmin, we explored the ST2 pathway in human and mouse AP. Soluble ST2 was assayed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in plasma of 44 patients admitted for AP. The levels of soluble ST2 increased early during AP and correlated with parameters of severity. Under two different experimental models of AP (ie, choline-deficient-ethionine-supplemented diet and cerulein injections), ST2-deficient mice (Il1rl1?/?) presented with more severe disease than wild-type mice, with increased activation of mast cells. In vitro, Il1rl1?/? bone-marrow-derived mast cells exhibited exacerbated degranulation, compared with the wild type. Flow cytometry identified mast cells as the main peritoneal population expressing ST2. Using immunohistochemistry and ELISA, we showed constitutive expression of IL-33 in murine pancreas and its release during experimental AP. Correlated with AP severity, increased soluble ST2 levels evoke involvement of the ST2 pathway in human AP. Furthermore, our experimental data suggest a protective role for ST2 during AP, highlighting the potential regulatory role of mast cells and the possibility of the ST2 pathway as a new therapeutic target in AP. PMID:22542450

  2. The Effects of Total Colectomy on Bacterial Translocation in a Model of Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Şenocak, Rahman; Yigit, Taner; Kılbaş, Zafer; Coşkun, Ali Kağan; Harlak, Ali; Menteş, Mustafa Öner; Kılıç, Abdullah; Günal, Armağan; Kozak, Orhan

    2015-12-01

    Prevention of secondary infection is currently the main goal of treatment for acute necrotizing pancreatitis. Colon was considered as the main origin of secondary infection. Our aim was to investigate whether prophylactic total colectomy would reduce the rate of bacterial translocation and infection of pancreatic necrosis. Forty-two Sprague-Dawley rats were used. Pancreatitis was created by ductal infusion of sodium taurocholate. Rats were divided into four groups: group-1, laparotomy + pancreatic ductal infusion of saline; group-2, laparotomy + pancreatic ductal infusion of sodium taurocholate; group-3, total colectomy + pancreatic ductal infusion of saline; and group-4, total colectomy + pancreatic ductal infusion of sodium taurocholate. Forty-eight hours later, tissue and blood samples were collected for microbiological and histopathological analysis. Total colectomy caused small bowel bacterial overgrowth with gram-negative and gram-positive microorganisms. Bacterial count of gram-negative rods in the small intestine and pancreatic tissue in rats with colectomy and acute pancreatitis were significantly higher than in rats with acute pancreatitis only (group-2 versus group-4; small bowel, p = <0.001; pancreas, p = 0.002). Significant correlation was found between proximal small bowel bacterial overgrowth and pancreatic infection (r = 0,836, p = 0.001). In acute pancreatitis, prophylactic total colectomy (which can mimic colonic cleansing and reduction of colonic flora) induces small bowel bacterial overgrowth, which is associated with increased bacterial translocation to the pancreas. PMID:26730036

  3. ACUTE PANCREATITIS GRAVITY PREDICTIVE FACTORS: WHICH AND WHEN TO USE THEM?

    PubMed Central

    FERREIRA, Alexandre de Figueiredo; BARTELEGA, Janaina Alves; URBANO, Hugo Corrêa de Andrade; de SOUZA, Iure Kalinine Ferraz

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Acute pancreatitis has as its main causes lithiasic biliary disease and alcohol abuse. Most of the time, the disease shows a self-limiting course, with a rapid recovery, only with supportive treatment. However, in a significant percentage of cases, it runs with important local and systemic complications associated with high mortality rates. Aim: To present the current state of the use of these prognostic factors (predictive scores) of gravity, as the time of application, complexity and specificity. Method: A non-systematic literature review through 28 papers, with emphasis on 13 articles published in indexed journals between 2008 and 2013 using Lilacs, Medline, Pubmed. Results: Several clinical, laboratory analysis, molecular and image variables can predict the development of severe acute pancreatitis. Some of them by themselves can be determinant to the progression of the disease to a more severe form, such as obesity, hematocrit, age and smoking. Hematocrit with a value lower than 44% and serum urea lower than 20 mg/dl, both at admission, appear as risk factors for pancreatic necrosis. But the PCR differentiates mild cases of serious ones in the first 24 h. Multifactorial scores measured on admission and during the first 48 h of hospitalization have been used in intensive care units, being the most ones used: Ranson, Apache II, Glasgow, Iget and Saps II. Conclusion: Acute pancreatitis is a disease in which several prognostic factors are employed being useful in predicting mortality and on the development of the severe form. It is suggested that the association of a multifactorial score, especially the Saps II associated with Iget, may increase the prognosis accuracy. However, the professional's preferences, the experience on the service as well as the available tools, are factors that have determined the choice of the most suitable predictive score. PMID:26537149

  4. Extracorporeal Treatment in Severe Hypertriglyceridemia-Induced Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Zeitler, Heike; Balta, Zeynep; Klein, Burkhard; Strassburg, Christian P

    2015-08-01

    Plasmapheresis is a well-accepted treatment option in severe hypertriglyceridemia-induced pancreatitis (HTGP). The rationale behind this approach is the depletion of triglycerides and the reduction of inflammatory cytokines. The time span between onset of clinical symptoms and start of plasmapheresis might have an important impact on mortality. Hyperviscosity of patients' plasma represents another special challenge for the applied separation technology. The procedures can be performed either by centrifugal device (CFD) or membrane based (MBS) units. The present study reports the outcome of 10 patients suffering from HTG. The expected mortality of the collective was 25%. Plasmapheresis was started after an average 16.3?h (SD 6.7?h) after onset of symptoms. No mortality occurred. Apheresis was statistically equally effective with both devices. A median of 3 sessions reduced the TG level to normal and correlated with patients' improvement. During follow up, three patients developed a pancreatic pseudocyst requiring surgical intervention without further complication. PMID:25851561

  5. Tamoxifen-induced acute pancreatitis - a case report.

    PubMed

    Czy?ykowski, Rafa?; Po?owinczak-Przyby?ek, Joanna; Janiak, Anna; Herman, Jerzy; Potemski, Piotr

    2014-03-01

    Tamoxifen is a selective estrogen receptor modulator used for the treatment of oestrogen/progesterone receptor positive breast cancer. It has antagonistic or agonistic activity depending on the tissue location. Generally it causes mild and reversible side effects, however more serious ones including cardiovascular and thromboembolic adverse events, uterine cancer or acute pancreatitis can also occur. Tamoxifen, like oestrogens, increases the plasma level of TG and liver secretion of VLDL. Moreover, it inhibits the key enzymes of triglyceride metabolism. In this report we present a case of a 55-year-old woman with a history of a poorly controlled hypertriglyceridaemia diagnosed with breast cancer. She was treated with surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy, radiotherapy and hormonotherapy with tamoxifen. About three months after hormonal treatment, her triglyceride level increased. Five months later she developed an acute necrotic pancreatitis that required hospitalization. Her serum samples on admission were highly lipemic. An abdominal ultrasound showed no evidence of gallstones or dilation of the bile ducts. There was no history of alcohol abuse or abdominal trauma. Tamoxifen was suspected as a trigger factor for pancreatitis. After the drug withdrawal and administration of the conservative management the patient's medical condition improved. Due to a postmenopausal status of the patient and no harmful effect on serum lipids, an adjuvant hormonotherapy with aromatase inhibitor was started. PMID:26327832

  6. Review of experimental animal models of biliary acute pancreatitis and recent advances in basic research

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Mei H; Huang, Wei; Latawiec, Diane; Jiang, Kun; Booth, David M; Elliott, Victoria; Mukherjee, Rajarshi; Xia, Qing

    2012-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a formidable disease, which, in severe forms, causes significant mortality. Biliary AP, or gallstone obstruction-associated AP, accounts for 3050% of all clinical cases of AP. In biliary AP, pancreatic acinar cell (PAC) death (the initiating event in the disease) is believed to occur as acinar cells make contact with bile salts when bile refluxes into the pancreatic duct. Recent advances have unveiled an important receptor responsible for the major function of bile acids on acinar cells, namely, the cell surface G-protein-coupled bile acid receptor-1 (Gpbar1), located in the apical pole of the PAC. High concentrations of bile acids induce cytosolic Ca2+ overload and inhibit mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production, resulting in cell injury to both PACs and pancreatic ductal epithelial cells. Various bile salts are employed to induce experimental AP, most commonly sodium taurocholate. Recent characterization of taurolithocholic acid 3-sulphate on PACs has led researchers to focus on this bile salt because of its potency in causing acinar cell injury at relatively low, sub-detergent concentrations, which strongly implicates action via the receptor Gpbar1. Improved surgical techniques have enabled the infusion of bile salts into the pancreatic duct to induce experimental biliary AP in mice, which allows the use of these transgenic animals as powerful tools. This review summarizes recent findings using transgenic mice in experimental biliary AP. PMID:22221567

  7. Phospholipase-A1 and -A2 in experimental acute pancreatitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Hlbling, N; el-Kalak, H; Georgopoulos, A; Stilianu, L; Hacker, G

    1985-01-01

    Using a standardized model of bile-induced acute pancreatitis, the reaction of phospholipase-A1 activity was investigated in parallel to that of phospholipase-A2, as well as their relationship to the pathomorphological spread of pancreatitis. While the measurement of the total free fatty acids (FFA) in serum as metabolites of phospholipase-A activity indicated variable reactions with the average remaining the same (0.186 +/- 0.15 to 0.192 +/- 0.153 mEq/l), phospholipase-A2 exhibited a highly significant increase from 9.6 +/- 2.2 to 18.2 +/- 5.4 nmol/ml/min (P less than 0.01). It was demonstrated that in parallel phospholipase-A1 also showed a highly significant increase from 2.5 +/- 1.2 to 6.7 +/- 3.1 nmol/ml/min (P less than 0.01). In relation to the pathomorphological score, both phospholipases showed a small increase at a low score (edema to focal necrosis), whereas in groups with a larger spread of the pancreatitis, score 5 or 6 (extended necrosis to retroperitoneal necrosis), the increase was substantially clearer. As a result of these findings, we conclude that phospholipase-A1 could possibly be used as phospholipase-A2 as an indicator of the severity of acute pancreatitis and that it should be taken into consideration in the very promising therapy with phospholipase-A-antagonists. PMID:3992056

  8. Protective Effects of Lithospermum erythrorhizon Against Cerulein-Induced Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sun Bok; Bae, Gi-Sang; Jo, Il-Joo; Seo, Seung-Hee; Kim, Dong-Goo; Shin, Joon-Yeon; Hong, Seung-Heon; Choi, Byung-Min; Park, Sang-Hyun; Song, Ho-Joon; Park, Sung-Joo

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We aimed to evaluate the anti-inflammatory and inhibitory effects of Lithospermum erythrorhizon (LE) on cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis (AP) in a mouse model. Methods Acute pancreatitis was induced via intraperitoneal injection of cerulein (50 μg/kg) every hour for 6 times. In the LE, water extract (100, 250, or 500 mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally 1 hour before the first injection of cerulein. Six hours after AP, blood, the pancreas, and the lung were harvested for further examination. In addition, pancreatic acinar cells were isolated using a collagenase method, and then, we investigated the acinar cell viability and cytokine productions. Results Treatment with LE reduced pancreatic damage and AP-associated lung injury and attenuated the severity of AP, as evidenced by the reduction in neutrophil infiltration, serum amylase and lipase levels, trypsin activity, and proinflammatory cytokine expression. In addition, treatment with LE inhibited high mobility group box 1 expression in the pancreas during AP. In accordance with in vivo data, LE inhibited the cerulein-induced acinar cell death, cytokine productions, and high-mobility group box 1 expression. Furthermore, LE also inhibited the activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases. Conclusions These results suggest that LE plays a protective role during the development of AP by inhibiting the activation of p38. PMID:25102438

  9. [Choice of surgical treatment in patients with acute destructive pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Belik, B M; Chernov, V N; Alibekov, A Z

    2015-01-01

    Medical and diagnostic algorithm in patients with pancreatic necrosis is developed. It takes into consideration features and expansion of necrotic process in retroperitoneal space, objective severity of patients' condition according to SAPS scale and inflammatory process according to serum procalcitonin concentration. Comparative analysis revealed that the use of developed algorithm improves results of treatment. PMID:26271419

  10. Pathobiology of acute pancreatitis: focus on intracellular calcium and calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Ole H; Gerasimenko, Oleg V; Gerasimenko, Julia V

    2011-01-01

    The exocrine pancreas synthesizes all the enzymes needed for intestinal breakdown of proteins, fats, and carbohydrates in our diet. Unfortunately, the proteases needed for the digestion of the meat we eat can, if inappropriately activated inside the acinar cells, also digest the pancreas itself as well as the surrounding tissues, which is what happens in the sometimes fatal human disease acute pancreatitis. The disease is currently untreatable, but significant progress has recently been made in understanding the fundamental processes initiating the pathological changes underlying pancreatic autodigestion. It is now clear that intracellular trypsin activation-a crucial step in pathogenesis-is due to excessive release of Ca(2+) from intracellular stores, principally via two types of inositol trisphosphate receptor. The unexpected recent discovery of an intrinsic protective mechanism caused by intracellular calmodulin and, specifically, the finding that this protective effect can be boosted by a membrane-permeable Ca(2+)-like peptide are promising. PMID:21876721

  11. Impaired lipid clearance in patients with previous acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Guzmn, S; Nervi, F; Llanos, O; Len, P; Valdivieso, V

    1985-01-01

    Fasting serum triglycerides were measured in 52 patients who had sustained an attack of pancreatitis (gall stone related 33, alcoholism six) at least six months earlier. Several patients (23%) had raised fasting serum triglycerides, with a type IV phenotype in all but one patient. The 40 patients with normal fasting serum triglycerides received an oral load of 100 g sunflower oil to compare their clearance of dietary triglycerides with that of a control group of 54 subjects. The clearance of ingested triglycerides was significantly impaired in the patients - irrespective of the presumed aetiological factor, or clinical condition associated with pancreatitis - compared with the clearance in controls. A triglyceride tolerance test is the only way to detect those patients in whom a future attack of pancreatitis may be precipitated by a diet rich in fat, or endogenous over production of triglycerides as after an alcoholic debauch. PMID:4029716

  12. Treatment of Rare Gastric Variceal Bleeding in Acute Pancreatitis Using Embolization of the Splenic Artery Combined with Short Gastric Vein

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lixin; Zhao, Xin

    2012-01-01

    In the acute stage of pancreatitis, sinistral portal hypertension is a rare reason for gastric variceal bleeding. Here we report a 20-year-old female patient with massive upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage 7 days after an episode of severe acute pancreatitis. Computed tomography showed gastric varices caused by splenic venous thrombosis. Emergency endoscopic examination was performed, however tissue adhesive utilized to restrain the bleeding was not successful. Although interventional therapy was controversial to treat the gastric variceal hemorrhage resulting from sinistral portal hypertension, the bleeding was successfully treated by embolization of the splenic artery combined with short gastric vein. Two weeks after the interventional the patient was discharged from our hospital without recurrence of bleeding. Embolization of the splenic artery combined with short gastric vein proved to be an effective emergency therapeutic method for gastric variceal bleeding caused by sinistral portal hypertension in the acute stage of pancreatitis. PMID:23275766

  13. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome following acute pancreatitis during chemotherapy for acute monocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Nishimoto, Mitsutaka; Koh, Hideo; Bingo, Masato; Yoshida, Masahiro; Nanno, Satoru; Hayashi, Yoshiki; Nakane, Takahiko; Nakamae, Hirohisa; Shimono, Taro; Hino, Masayuki

    2014-05-01

    We describe an 18-year-old man with acute leukemia who presented with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) shortly after developing acute pancreatitis. On day 15 after the third consolidation course with high-dose cytarabine, treatment with broad-spectrum antibiotics was initiated for febrile neutropenia. On day 16, he developed septic shock, and subsequently, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). After adding vancomycin, micafungin and high-dose methylprednisolone (mPSL) to his treatment regimen, these manifestations subsided. On day 22, he received hemodialysis for drug-induced acute renal failure. On day 24, he developed acute pancreatitis possibly due to mPSL; the following day he had generalized seizures, and was intubated. Cerebrospinal fluid findings were normal. Brain MRI revealed hyperintense signals on FLAIR images and increased apparent diffusion coefficient values in the sub-cortical and deep white matter areas of the bilateral temporal and occipital lobes, indicative of vasogenic edema. Thus, we diagnosed PRES. Blood pressure, seizures and volume status were controlled, with MRI findings showing improvement by day 42. He was extubated on day 32 and discharged on day 49 without complications. Although little is known about PRES following acute pancreatitis, clinicians should be aware that this condition may develop. PMID:24881921

  14. Effects of diclofenac sodium and octreotide on treatment of caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ozer Cakir, Ozlem; Esen, Hasan; Toker, Aysun; Ataseven, Huseyin; Demir, Ali; Polat, Hakki

    2015-01-01

    Background: Research continues to develop novel therapeutic modalities that particularly focus on the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis. This study aimed to assess the effects of diclofenac sodium and octreotide, alone or in combination, on pancreatic enzymes, pancreatic myeloperoxidase activity, histopathology and apoptosis of pancreas cells, using a model of experimentally induced acute pancreatitis. Objectives: We aimed to demonstrate effects of diclofenac sodium, octreotide and their combined use on pancreatic enzymes, activity of pancreatic myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, histopathology and apoptosis of pancreas on treatment of caerulin-induced experimental acute pancreatitis. Materials and methods: Caerulin-induced acute pancreatitis model was created using a total of 58 male BALB-C mice of 25 gr in seven groups. Serum amylase, lipase levels and pancreatic myeloperoxidase activity were examined as well as apoptotic values in pancreatic acinar cells through TUNNEL method. Histopathology of pancreas was evaluated for presence of edema, hemorrhage, parenchymal necrosis, fat necrosis, leukocyte infiltration, and fibrosis. Results: In the diclofenac sodium group, apoptotic values in the pancreatic acinar cells were found to be statistically lower than in the acute pancreatitis group in terms of parenchymal necrosis and hemorrhage scores (P = 0.007, P = 0.002, and P = 0.052, respectively). No statistically significant differences were found in serum level of amylase, lipase, pancreatic myeloperoxidase activity and the other histopathological scores (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Diclofenac sodium, a cost-effective agent with a favorable side-effect profile, may represent a novel therapeutic agent for the treatment of acute pancreatitis. Findings of this study suggest a better efficacy for diclofenac sodium monotherapy as compared to octreotide alone or octreotide/diclofenac combination. PMID:26770346

  15. Primary Pancreatic Lymphoma Simulating Acute Cholestatic Hepatitis in a 7-Year-Old Child

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Nitesh; Alam, Seema; Rawat, Dinesh; Khanna, Rajeev; Bansal, Kalpana; Bihari, Chhagan

    2015-01-01

    Primary pancreatic lymphoma in children has been described infrequently in literature, and its acute presentation as cholestatic hepatitis is similarly rare. We report a case of a 7-year-old child with primary pancreatic lymphoma presenting as acute infective hepatitis, leading to delay in correct diagnosis and management. PMID:26157960

  16. A Rare and Unexpected Side-Effect of Cannabis Use: Abdominal Pain due to Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Akkucuk, Mehmet Husamettin; Erbayrak, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a frequently encountered disorder in patients presenting to emergency units. Biliary system disorders, alcohol consumption, infections, and drugs are among the causes of acute pancreatitis. However, it is sometimes difficult to determine the etiology of this disorder, particularly if the patient does not wish to disclose his consumption of cannabis, the use of which is illegal. PMID:25759763

  17. Successful Plasma Exchange for Acute Pancreatitis Complicated With Hypertriglyceridemia: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Takahira, Shuji; Suzuki, Hiromichi; Watanabe, Yusuke; Kin, Hunsook; Ooya, Yoshitaka; Sekine, Yasumasa; Sonoda, Kenichiro; Ogawa, Hiroshi; Nomura, Yushi; Takane, Hiroshi; Tsuchiya, Youhei; Tsukamoto, Isao; Nemoto, Manabu

    2015-01-01

    A 33-year-old male with acute pancreatitis induced by hypertriglyceridemia had problems during treatment with plasma exchange. The hypercoagulable state was prevented by introducing innovative methods for cleaning and warming of the circuit and dialyzer. This enabled successful therapy, and the patient fully recovered from life-threatening acute pancreatitis. PMID:26904702

  18. Endoscopic transgastric debridement and drainage for splenic necrosis following an acute episode in chronic alcoholic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Binek, J; Fretz, C; Meyenberger, C

    2006-06-01

    Management of the complications and sequelae of acute and chronic pancreatitis is a clinical challenge. We report a case of successful transgastric drainage of splenic necrosis after occlusion of the splenic vessels during an acute episode in chronic pancreatitis. PMID:16802272

  19. Fisetin attenuates cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis through down regulation of JNK and NF-?B signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Jo, Il-Joo; Bae, Gi-Sang; Choi, Sun Bok; Kim, Dong-Goo; Shin, Joon-Yeon; Seo, Seung-Hee; Choi, Mee-Ok; Kim, Tae-Hyeon; Song, Ho-Joon; Park, Sung-Joo

    2014-08-15

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a complicated disease which is largely undiscovered. Fisetin, a natural flavonoid from fruits and vegetables, has been shown to have anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and anti-cancer activities in various disease models. However, the effects of fisetin on AP have not been determined. Pre- and post- treatment of mice with fisetin reduced the severity of AP and pancreatitis-associated lung injury and inhibited several biochemical parameters (pancreatic weight to body weight ratio, amylase, lipase, and myeloperoxidase activity) and production of inflammatory cytokines. In pancreatic acinar cells, fisetin also inhibited cell death and production of inflammatory cytokines. In addition, fisetin inhibited activation of c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) and nuclear factor (NF)-?B in vivo and in vitro. In conclusion, these results suggest that fisetin exhibits anti-inflammatory effect on AP and could be a beneficial agent in the treatment of AP and its pulmonary complications. PMID:24861022

  20. Improving the management of acute pancreatitis in a district general hospital.

    PubMed

    Crowther, Nicola; Kahvo, Mia; Chana, Prem

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a common problem seen in the United Kingdom, with an incidence of 56.6 per 100,000 population.[1,2,3] Optimising management has been shown to reduce mortality and morbidity, and the British Society of Gastroenterology (BSG) published revised guidelines in 2005 to standardise treatment for this potentially life threatening condition.[4] The aim of this quality improvement project was to investigate and improve the initial management of acute pancreatitis in patients presenting to the Great Western Hospital (GWH) in Swindon between November 2012 and July 2013. Patients presenting to the surgical team during this time with a diagnosis of acute pancreatitis were identified for the initial data collection. Notes were prospectively reviewed and data collected allowing a comparison between management in GWH against BSG guidelines. Following this stage, a pro forma based on the 2005 guidelines was created and implemented, with the aim of raising awareness and standardising care among surgical staff. Following implementation of the pro forma, data collection was repeated between May and June 2013 to assess the impact of the intervention. Results revealed an improvement from 93% to 100% of patients receiving the correct diagnosis within 24 hours of presentation. Severity stratification within 48 hours of diagnosis improved from 75% to 88% and identification of aetiology also improved from 64% to 74%. The implementation of an acute pancreatitis management protocol and education of junior surgical staff has been shown to improve compliance with BSG guidelines at the GWH, and ultimately aims to improves patient care and outcomes. PMID:26734376

  1. Evidence for a role of mitogen-activated protein kinases in the treatment of experimental acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Irrera, Natasha; Bitto, Alessandra; Interdonato, Monica; Squadrito, Francesco; Altavilla, Domenica

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is an inflammatory disease characterized by acute inflammation and necrosis of the pancreatic parenchyma. AP is often associated with organ failure, sepsis, and high mortality. The pathogenesis of AP is still not well understood. In recent years several papers have highlighted the cellular and molecular events of acute pancreatitis. Pancreatitis is initiated by activation of digestive enzymes within the acinar cells that are involved in autodigestion of the gland, followed by a massive infiltration of neutrophils and macrophages and release of inflammatory mediators, responsible for the local and systemic inflammatory response. The hallmark of AP is parenchymal cell necrosis that represents the cause of the high morbidity and mortality, so that new potential therapeutic approaches are indispensable for the treatment of patients at high risk of complications. However, not all factors that determine the onset and course of the disease have been explained. Aim of this article is to review the role of mitogen-activated protein kinases in pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis. PMID:25469021

  2. Evidence for a role of mitogen-activated protein kinases in the treatment of experimental acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Irrera, Natasha; Bitto, Alessandra; Interdonato, Monica; Squadrito, Francesco; Altavilla, Domenica

    2014-11-28

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is an inflammatory disease characterized by acute inflammation and necrosis of the pancreatic parenchyma. AP is often associated with organ failure, sepsis, and high mortality. The pathogenesis of AP is still not well understood. In recent years several papers have highlighted the cellular and molecular events of acute pancreatitis. Pancreatitis is initiated by activation of digestive enzymes within the acinar cells that are involved in autodigestion of the gland, followed by a massive infiltration of neutrophils and macrophages and release of inflammatory mediators, responsible for the local and systemic inflammatory response. The hallmark of AP is parenchymal cell necrosis that represents the cause of the high morbidity and mortality, so that new potential therapeutic approaches are indispensable for the treatment of patients at high risk of complications. However, not all factors that determine the onset and course of the disease have been explained. Aim of this article is to review the role of mitogen-activated protein kinases in pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis. PMID:25469021

  3. [Pancreatic enzyme activity in early phases of acute experimental pancreatitis in rats].

    PubMed

    Sa?dalikhodzhaeva, O Z; Iuldashev, N M; Daniiarov, A N; Muratova, U Z

    2002-04-01

    Experiments were performed on laboratory rats with acute pancreatitis caused by local freezing the pancreas with chlorethyl. An active action of enzymes alpha-amilase, lipase, phospholipase A2, was revealed. During the first hours, an increase in action of all three enzymes, particularly that of phospholipase A2, was found. It was established that the lipid spectrum of pancreas had changed. It shows that cell membranes were destroyed. Experiments revealed an activating role of Ca2+ ions for all the enzymes and a correcting action of chlorpromasine. PMID:12058542

  4. Genetics and Treatments Options for Recurrent Acute and Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Shelton, Celeste A.; Whitcomb, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Opinion Statement Worldwide research efforts demonstrate a major role of gene-environment interactions for the risk, development, and progression of most pancreatic diseases, including recurrent acute and chronic pancreatitis. New findings of pancreas disease-associated risk variants have been reported in the CPA1, GGT1, CLDN2, MMP1, MTHFR, and other genes. These risk genes and their regulatory regions must be added to the known pathogenic variants in the PRSS1, SPINK1, CFTR, CTRC, CASR, UBR1, SBDS, CEL, and CTSB genes. This new knowledge promises to improve disease management and prevention through personalized medicine. At the same time, however, knowledge of an increasing number of pathogenic variants, and their complicated effects when present in combination, results in increasing difficulty in interpretation and development of recommendations. Direct-to-consumer marketing of genetic testing results also adds complexity to disease management paradigms, especially without interpretation and, in many cases, proven accuracy. While improvements in the ability to rapidly and accurately interpret complex genetic tests are clearly needed, some results, such as pathogenic CFTR variants – including a new class of bicarbonate-defective mutations – and PRSS1 variants have immediate implications that direct management. In addition, discovery of pancreatitis-associated genetic variants in patients with glucose intolerance may suggest underlying type 3c diabetes, which also has implications for treatment and disease management. PMID:24954874

  5. Correlation of fibrinogen-like protein 2 with progression of acute pancreatitis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Xiao-Hua; Chen, Tan-Zhou; Huai, Jia-Ping; Lu, Guang-Rong; Zhuge, Xiao-Ju; Chen, Ren-Pin; Chen, Wu-Jie; Wang, Chen; Huang, Zhi-Ming

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To examine fibrinogen-like protein 2 (fgl2) expression during taurocholate-induced acute pancreatitis progression in rats and its correlation with pancreatic injury severity. METHODS: Forty-eight male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into the severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) group (n = 24) and the sham operation (SO) group (n = 24). Sodium taurocholate (4% at doses of 1 mL/kg body weight) was retrogradely injected into the biliopancreatic ducts of the rats to induce SAP. Pancreatic tissues were prepared immediately after sacrifice. At the time of sacrifice, blood was obtained for determination of serum amylase activity and isolation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Pancreatic tissue specimens were obtained for routine light microscopy including hematoxylin and eosin staining, and the severity of pancreatic injury was evaluated 1, 4 and 8 h after induction. Expression of fgl2 mRNA was measured in the pancreas and PBMCs using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Expression of fgl2 protein was evaluated in pancreatic tissues using Western blotting and immunohistochemical staining. Masson staining was also performed to observe microthrombosis. RESULTS: At each time point, levels of fgl2 mRNAs in pancreatic tissues and PBMCs were higher (P < 0.05) in the SAP group than in the SO group. For pancreatic tissue in SAP vs SO, the levels were: after 1 h, 3.911 1.277 vs 1.000 0.673; after 4 h, 9.850 3.095 vs 1.136 0.609; and after 8 h, 12.870 3.046 vs 1.177 0.458. For PBMCs in SAP vs SO, the levels were: after 1 h, 2.678 1.509 vs 1.000 0.965; after 4 h, 6.922 1.984 vs 1.051 0.781; and after 8 h, 13.533 6.575 vs 1.306 1.179. Levels of fgl2 protein expression as determined by Western blotting and immunohistochemical staining were markedly up-regulated (P < 0.001) in the SAP group compared with those in the SO group. For Western blotting in SAP vs SO, the results were: after 1 h, 2.183 0.115 vs 1.110 0.158; after 4 h, 2.697 0.090 vs 0.947 0.361; and after 8 h, 3.258 0.094 vs 1.208 0.082. For immunohistochemical staining in SAP vs SO, the results were: after 1 h, 1.793 0.463 vs 0.808 0.252; after 4 h, 4.535 0.550 vs 0.871 0.318; and after 8 h, 6.071 0.941 vs 1.020 0.406. Moreover, we observed a positive correlation in the pancreas (r = 0.852, P < 0.001) and PBMCs (r = 0.735, P < 0.001) between fgl2 expression and the severity of pancreatic injury. Masson staining showed that microthrombosis (%) in rats with SAP was increased (P < 0.001) compared with that in the SO group and it was closely correlated with fgl2 expression in the pancreas (r = 0.842, P < 0.001). For Masson staining in SAP vs SO, the results were: after 1 h, 26.880 9.031 vs 8.630 3.739; after 4 h, 53.750 19.039 vs 8.500 4.472; and after 8 h, 80.250 12.915 vs 10.630 7.003. CONCLUSION: Microthrombosis due to fgl2 overexpression contributes to pancreatic impairment in rats with SAP, and fgl2 level may serve as a biomarker during early stages of disease. PMID:23674850

  6. FTY720 Attenuates Acute Pancreatitis in Hypertriglyceridemic Apolipoprotein CIII Transgenic Mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinjiao; Xu, Pengfei; Zhang, Ling; Kayoumu, Abudurexiti; Wang, Yunan; Wang, Mengyu; Gao, Mingming; Zhang, Xiaohong; Wang, Yuhui; Liu, George

    2015-09-01

    Hypertriglyceridemic pancreatitis (HTGP) is often encountered clinically as a common form of recurrent acute pancreatitis (AP). It is important to evaluate the management of severe hypertriglyceridemia (HTG) or anti-inflammation in the prophylaxis of HTGP in the clinic. FTY720 (2-amino-2[2-(4-octylphenyl) ethyl]-1, 3-propanediol) is a new anti-inflammatory agent with low toxicity and reported to ameliorate lung injury with pancreatitis in rat. We evaluated its protective affection on AP induced by seven hourly intraperitoneal injection of cerulein in apolipoprotein CIII transgenic mice with severe HTG. FTY720 at 1.5 mg/kg was administered by gastric lavage daily for 3 days before induction of AP. The effects of FTY720 to protect against HTGP were assessed by serum amylase, pancreatic pathological scores, immunostaining, and the expression of inflammatory cytokine genes. As a result, injection of cerulein resulted in more severe pathological changes of AP and higher monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 expression in the pancreas in transgenic than in nontransgenic mice. FTY720 pretreatment improved the pathological severity of AP and decreased the expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 in the pancreas significantly, especially near fourfold reduction in transgenic mice. However, FTY720 did not affect plasma triglyceride levels, and other inflammatory factors and plasma amylase were not correlated with the extent of pancreatic damage in AP with or without FTY720 administration. In summary, our study in a new model, apolipoprotein CIII transgenic mice, demonstrated that HTG mice are susceptible to induction of AP. Prophylactic treatment of FTY720 can significantly attenuate cerulein-induced AP and hence warrant further investigation of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptors agonist for potential clinical application in recurrent attacks of HTGP. PMID:25944794

  7. A Nonpancreatic Source of the Proteolytic-enzyme Amidase and Bacteriology in Experimental Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Keynes, W. Milo

    1980-01-01

    In previous studies of human and experimental acute pancreatitis, three main assumptions have been made. First, that the disease is due to activation of pancreatic proteolytic enzymes in the pancreas with resulting autodigestion of the gland. Second, that interstitial pancreatitis is a mild form of hemorrhagic pancreatitis into which it may progress, and third, that bacteria play little part, if any, in the initiation of the disease. These assumptions are now questioned. In the present study in dogs, levels of proteolytic enzymes in blood, thoracicduct lymph and peritoneal fluid were measured using benzoylarginine amide. Raised levels of amidase were found in hemorrhagic, but not with interstitial, pancreatitis, and biochemical examination of amidase suggested it was not a pancreatic protease, but with its broad specificity and stability derived from bacteria. Addition of antibiotic to the blind duodenal loop in hemorrhagic pancreatitis reduced the level of blood amidase, but Trasylol given intravenously did not, nor did it inhibit amidase in vitro. In all animals, histological examination was made of the pancreas at time of death. On bacteriology, it is concluded that experimental interstitial pancreatitis results from damage to the pancreatic duct system without infection, and haemorrhagic pancreatitis mainly from reflux of bacteria into the pancreatic ducts from the duodenum. Only bacteria such as Escherichia coli and Clostridium welchii that produce proteolytic enzymes and cytotoxins appear to be able to cause haemorrhagic pancreatitis, and these bacteria may explain the release of vasoactive polypeptides and the vascular effects. In hemorrhagic pancreatitis such bacteria were found in the pancreas, but none in interstitial pancreatitis. Evidence is given to suggest that pancreatic proteolytic enzymes are unlikely to cause the cell necrosis which is a pathological feature of hemorrhagic pancreatitis, and that autodigestion is likewise unlikely to be a cause of this condition. An extrapancreatic source of proteolytic enzymes from bacteria is now suggested in haemorrhagic pancreatitis, and more attention to bacteriology in human acute pancreatitis is urgently needed. Amidase levels were highest in peritoneal fluid, suggesting a rationale for peritoneal lavage in the treatment of acute pancreatitis, and it is unlikely that Trasylol can give any benefit. The assessment of treatment of acute pancreatitis will be unsatisfactory as long as the proportion of haemorrhagic to interstitial pancreatitis in any series is not known accurately. PMID:6987958

  8. Acute Pancreatitis-Induced Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy in an African American Male

    PubMed Central

    Bruenjes, Joseph D.; Vacek, Christopher J.; Fixley, Joleen E.

    2015-01-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TCM) is triggered by multiple physical and psychological stressors and frequently mimics acute coronary syndrome. Acute pancreatitis as a trigger for TCM has rarely been reported. We report a 55-year-old African American man with hypertension and alcohol abuse history, who presented with epigastric and sub-sternal pain and electrocardiogram demonstrating ischemic changes. Laboratory parameters revealed elevated troponin-I, amylase, lipase, and metabolic acidosis. He was diagnosed with acute pancreatitis and ACS. Coronary angiogram was unrevealing for coronary atherosclerosis and he was managed conservatively for acute pancreatitis and heart failure from TCM. PMID:26504880

  9. Imaging tests for accurate diagnosis of acute biliary pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    ?urlin, Valeriu; S?ftoiu, Adrian; Dumitrescu, Daniela

    2014-11-28

    Gallstones represent the most frequent aetiology of acute pancreatitis in many statistics all over the world, estimated between 40%-60%. Accurate diagnosis of acute biliary pancreatitis (ABP) is of outmost importance because clearance of lithiasis [gallbladder and common bile duct (CBD)] rules out recurrences. Confirmation of biliary lithiasis is done by imaging. The sensitivity of the ultrasonography (US) in the detection of gallstones is over 95% in uncomplicated cases, but in ABP, sensitivity for gallstone detection is lower, being less than 80% due to the ileus and bowel distension. Sensitivity of transabdominal ultrasonography (TUS) for choledocolithiasis varies between 50%-80%, but the specificity is high, reaching 95%. Diameter of the bile duct may be orientative for diagnosis. Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) seems to be a more effective tool to diagnose ABP rather than endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), which should be performed only for therapeutic purposes. As the sensitivity and specificity of computerized tomography are lower as compared to state-of-the-art magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) or EUS, especially for small stones and small diameter of CBD, the later techniques are nowadays preferred for the evaluation of ABP patients. ERCP has the highest accuracy for the diagnosis of choledocholithiasis and is used as a reference standard in many studies, especially after sphincterotomy and balloon extraction of CBD stones. Laparoscopic ultrasonography is a useful tool for the intraoperative diagnosis of choledocholithiasis. Routine exploration of the CBD in cases of patients scheduled for cholecystectomy after an attack of ABP was not proven useful. A significant rate of the so-called idiopathic pancreatitis is actually caused by microlithiasis and/or biliary sludge. In conclusion, the general algorithm for CBD stone detection starts with anamnesis, serum biochemistry and then TUS, followed by EUS or MRCP. In the end, bile duct microscopic analysis may be performed by bile harvested during ERCP in case of recurrent attacks of ABP and these should be followed by laparoscopic cholecystectomy. PMID:25469022

  10. Strongyloidiasis: a case with acute pancreatitis and a literature review.

    PubMed

    Makker, Jasbir; Balar, Bhavna; Niazi, Masooma; Daniel, Myrta

    2015-03-21

    Strongyloides stercoralis, a soil transmitted helminth infection, affects millions with varying prevalence worldwide. A large number of affected hosts are asymptomatic. Symptoms pertaining to pulmonary and gastrointestinal involvement may be present. Manifestations of involvement beyond lung and intestine can be seen with dissemination of infection and lethal hyperinfection. Immunosuppression secondary to use of steroids or other immunosuppressants and coexistence of human T-lymphotropic virus type-1 are the known risk factors for dissemination and hyperinfection. Diagnostic modalities comprise stool examination, serology and molecular testing. Stool tests are inexpensive but are limited by low sensitivity, whereas serologic and molecular tests are more precise but at the expense of higher cost. Treatment with Ivermectin or Albendazole as an alternative is safe and efficacious. We present a rare case of acute pancreatitis secondary to Strongyloides. High index of suspicion in patients specifically from endemic countries of origin and lack of other common etiologies of acute pancreatitis may help in early diagnosis and prompt treatment of this potentially fatal infection. PMID:25805946

  11. Role and timing of endoscopy in acute biliary pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Anderloni, Andrea; Repici, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    The role and timing of endoscopy in the setting of acute biliary pancreatitis (ABP) is still being debated. Despite numerous randomized trials have been published, there is an obvious lack of consensus on the indications and timing of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in ABP in meta-analyses and nationwide guidelines. The present editorial has been written to clarify the role of endoscopy in ABP. In clinical practice the decision to perform an ERCP is often based on biochemical and radiological criteria despite they already have been shown to be unreliable predictors of common bile duct stone presence. Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) is not currently a worldwide standard diagnostic procedure early in the course of acute biliary pancreatitis, but it has been shown to be accurate, safe and cost effective in diagnosing biliary obstructions compared with magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography and ERCP and therefore in preventing unnecessary ERCP and its related complications. Early EUS in ABP allows, if appropriate, immediate endoscopic treatment and significant spare of unnecessary operative procedures thus reducing possible related complications. PMID:26527465

  12. Role and timing of endoscopy in acute biliary pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Anderloni, Andrea; Repici, Alessandro

    2015-10-28

    The role and timing of endoscopy in the setting of acute biliary pancreatitis (ABP) is still being debated. Despite numerous randomized trials have been published, there is an obvious lack of consensus on the indications and timing of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in ABP in meta-analyses and nationwide guidelines. The present editorial has been written to clarify the role of endoscopy in ABP. In clinical practice the decision to perform an ERCP is often based on biochemical and radiological criteria despite they already have been shown to be unreliable predictors of common bile duct stone presence. Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) is not currently a worldwide standard diagnostic procedure early in the course of acute biliary pancreatitis, but it has been shown to be accurate, safe and cost effective in diagnosing biliary obstructions compared with magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography and ERCP and therefore in preventing unnecessary ERCP and its related complications. Early EUS in ABP allows, if appropriate, immediate endoscopic treatment and significant spare of unnecessary operative procedures thus reducing possible related complications. PMID:26527465

  13. Strongyloidiasis: A case with acute pancreatitis and a literature review

    PubMed Central

    Makker, Jasbir; Balar, Bhavna; Niazi, Masooma; Daniel, Myrta

    2015-01-01

    Strongyloides stercoralis, a soil transmitted helminth infection, affects millions with varying prevalence worldwide. A large number of affected hosts are asymptomatic. Symptoms pertaining to pulmonary and gastrointestinal involvement may be present. Manifestations of involvement beyond lung and intestine can be seen with dissemination of infection and lethal hyperinfection. Immunosuppression secondary to use of steroids or other immunosuppressants and coexistence of human T-lymphotropic virus type-1 are the known risk factors for dissemination and hyperinfection. Diagnostic modalities comprise stool examination, serology and molecular testing. Stool tests are inexpensive but are limited by low sensitivity, whereas serologic and molecular tests are more precise but at the expense of higher cost. Treatment with Ivermectin or Albendazole as an alternative is safe and efficacious. We present a rare case of acute pancreatitis secondary to Strongyloides. High index of suspicion in patients specifically from endemic countries of origin and lack of other common etiologies of acute pancreatitis may help in early diagnosis and prompt treatment of this potentially fatal infection. PMID:25805946

  14. Early complications after interventions in patients with acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Ai-Lin; Guo, Qiang; Wang, Ming-Jun; Hu, Wei-Ming; Zhang, Zhao-Da

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To identify the possible predictors of early complications after the initial intervention in acute necrotizing pancreatitis. METHODS: We collected the medical records of 334 patients with acute necrotizing pancreatitis who received initial intervention in our center. Complications associated with predictors were analyzed. RESULTS: The postoperative mortality rate was 16% (53/334). Up to 31% of patients were successfully treated with percutaneous catheter drainage alone. The rates of intra-abdominal bleeding, colonic fistula, and progressive infection were 15% (50/334), 20% (68/334), and 26% (87/334), respectively. Multivariate analysis indicated that Marshall score upon admission, multiple organ failure, preoperative respiratory infection, and sepsis were the predictors of postoperative progressive infection (P < 0.05). Single organ failure, systemic inflammatory response syndrome upon admission, and C-reactive protein level upon admission were the risk factors of postoperative colonic fistula (P < 0.05). Moreover, preoperative Marshall score, organ failure, sepsis, and preoperative systemic inflammatory response syndrome were the risk factors of postoperative intra-abdominal bleeding (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Marshall score, organ failures, preoperative respiratory infection, sepsis, preoperative systemic inflammatory response syndrome, and C-reactive protein level upon admission are associated with postoperative complications. PMID:26973421

  15. Time course and cellular source of pancreatic regeneration following acute pancreatitis in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Elsaesser, H.P.A.; Adler, G.; Kern, H.F.

    1986-01-01

    The regenerative capacity of the different cell types in the rat exocrine pancreas has been studied in a model of hormone-induced acute pancreatitis in which pancreatic edema, inflammation, and acinar cell destruction were induced within 12 h of infusion of supramaximal concentrations of cerulein (5 micrograms/kg/h). A sequential biochemical and structural analysis of the pancreas in daily intervals was combined with the autoradiographic quantitation of labeling indices of five cell populations following /sup 3/H-thymidine injection at days 1-7 after induction of pancreatitis. Desquamation of acinar cell apical cytoplasm and release of cytoplasmic segments into the acinar lumen on the first day following induction of pancreatitis led to formation of duct-like tubular complexes. Enzyme content in the pancreas decreased progressively following the formation of the edema to levels 15-20% of controls and remained reduced during the initial 5 days. Thymidine incorporation into total DNA showed a biphasic pattern with a distinct peak at day 1 and a second broader peak between days 4 and 7. Autoradiographic quantitation of labeling indices demonstrated the exclusive incorporation into intercalated duct cells and interstitial cells during the initial 24 h, while the second peak was predominantly due to labeling of acinar cells. Larger interlobular ducts and islets did not show changes in labeling index. In vivo labeling with /sup 3/H-thymidine during the first day and analysis of labeling indices 14 days later showed the persistence of label in intercalated duct cells and interstitial cells and argued against the stem cell hypothesis and against transformation of duct cells into acinar cells.

  16. Acute Pancreatitis Accelerates Initiation and Progression to Pancreatic Cancer in Mice Expressing Oncogenic Kras in the Nestin Cell Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Carrire, Catherine; Young, Alison L.; Gunn, Jason R.; Longnecker, Daniel S.; Korc, Murray

    2011-01-01

    Targeting of oncogenic Kras to the pancreatic Nestin-expressing embryonic progenitor cells and subsequently to the adult acinar compartment and Nestin-expressing cells is sufficient for the development of low grade pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) between 2 and 4 months. The mice die around 6 month-old of unrelated causes, and it is therefore not possible to assess whether the lesions will progress to carcinoma. We now report that two brief episodes of caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in 2 month-old mice causes rapid PanIN progression and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) development by 4 months of age. These events occur with similar frequency as observed in animals where the oncogene is targeted during embryogenesis to all pancreatic cell types. Thus, these data show that oncogenic Kras-driven PanIN originating in a non-ductal compartment can rapidly progress to PDAC when subjected to a brief inflammatory insult. PMID:22140463

  17. The Clinical Course of Acute Pancreatitis and the Inflammatory Mediators That Drive It

    PubMed Central

    Kylnp, Leena; Rakonczay, Zoltn; O'Reilly, Derek A.

    2012-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a common emergency condition. In the majority of cases, it presents in a mild and self-limited form. However, about 20% of patients develop severe disease with local pancreatic complications (including necrosis, abscess, or pseudocysts), systemic organ dysfunction, or both. A modern classification of AP severity has recently been proposed based on the factors that are causally associated with severity of AP. These factors are both local (peripancreatic necrosis) and systemic (organ failure). In AP, inflammation is initiated by intracellular activation of pancreatic proenzymes and/or nuclear factor-?B. Activated leukocytes infiltrate into and around the pancreas and play a central role in determining AP severity. Inflammatory reaction is first local, but may amplify leading to systemic overwhelming production of inflammatory mediators and early organ failure. Concomitantly, anti-inflammatory cytokines and specific cytokine inhibitors are produced. This anti-inflammatory reaction may overcompensate and inhibit the immune response, rendering the host at risk for systemic infection. Currently, there is no specific treatment for AP. However, there are several early supportive treatments and interventions which are beneficial. Also, increasing the understanding of the pathogenesis of systemic inflammation and the development of organ dysfunction may provide us with future treatment modalities. PMID:23304633

  18. Extracorporeal support for severe acute respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Fanelli, V; Costamagna, A; Ranieri, V Marco

    2014-08-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) and extracorporeal CO(2) removal (ECCO(2)R) techniques have increasingly been applied in patients with severe acute lung injury refractory to conventional mechanical ventilatory support. The objectives of this article are to review current concepts of extracorporeal life support techniques (ECMO and ECCO(2)R systems) and provide the rationale for their application in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome, chronic obstruction pulmonary disease, and as adjunctive therapy for bridging patients to lung transplantation. PMID:25111648

  19. Acute Pancreatitis with Rapid Clinical Improvement in a Child with Isovaleric Acidemia

    PubMed Central

    Mantadakis, Elpis; Chrysafis, Ioannis; Tsouvala, Emmanouela; Evangeliou, Athanassios; Chatzimichael, Athanassios

    2013-01-01

    Isovaleric acidemia is a rare branched-chain organic acidemia. The authors describe a 3.5-year-old girl with isovaleric acidemia and acute abdominal pain associated with bilious emesis. Elevated serum amylase and abdominal ultrasonography demonstrating an enlarged and edematous pancreas, along with the presence of peripancreatic exudates, confirmed the presence of acute pancreatitis. The patient recovered quickly with intravenous hydration, pancreatic rest, and administration of intravenous L-carnitine. Pancreatitis should be ruled out in the context of vomiting in any patient with isovaleric acidemia. Conversely, branched-chain organic acidemias should be included in the differential diagnosis of any child with pancreatitis of unknown origin. PMID:23431490

  20. Acute pancreatitis with rapid clinical improvement in a child with isovaleric acidemia.

    PubMed

    Mantadakis, Elpis; Chrysafis, Ioannis; Tsouvala, Emmanouela; Evangeliou, Athanassios; Chatzimichael, Athanassios

    2013-01-01

    Isovaleric acidemia is a rare branched-chain organic acidemia. The authors describe a 3.5-year-old girl with isovaleric acidemia and acute abdominal pain associated with bilious emesis. Elevated serum amylase and abdominal ultrasonography demonstrating an enlarged and edematous pancreas, along with the presence of peripancreatic exudates, confirmed the presence of acute pancreatitis. The patient recovered quickly with intravenous hydration, pancreatic rest, and administration of intravenous L-carnitine. Pancreatitis should be ruled out in the context of vomiting in any patient with isovaleric acidemia. Conversely, branched-chain organic acidemias should be included in the differential diagnosis of any child with pancreatitis of unknown origin. PMID:23431490

  1. Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 Inhibitor Use Is Not Associated With Acute Pancreatitis in High-Risk Type 2 Diabetic Patients: A Nationwide Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Hsuin; Lin, Jou-Wei; Chen, Shu-Ting; Lai, Mei-Shu; Chuang, Lee-Ming; Chang, Yi-Cheng

    2016-02-01

    To analyze the association between use of DPP-4 inhibitors and acute pancreatitis in high-risk type 2 diabetic patients.A retrospective nationwide cohort study was conducted using the Taiwan National Health Insurance claim database. The risk associated with sitagliptin was compared to that with acarbose, a second-line antidiabetic drug prescribed for patients with similar diabetes severity and with a known neutral effect on pancreatitis. Between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2010, a total of 8526 sitagliptin initiators and 8055 acarbose initiators who had hypertriglyceridemia or prior hospitalization history for acute pancreatitis were analyzed for the risk of hospitalization due to acute pancreatitis stratified for baseline propensity score.In the crude analysis, sitagliptin was associated with a decreased risk of acute pancreatitis (hazard ratio [HR] 0.74; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.62-0.88) compared to acarbose in diabetic patients with prior history of hospitalization for pancreatitis or hypertriglyceridemia. The association was abolished after stratification for propensity score quintiles (adjusted HR 0.95; 95% CI: 0.79-1.16). Similar results were found separately in both patients' histories of prior hospitalization of acute pancreatitis (adjusted HR 0.97; 95% CI: 0.76-1.24) and those with hypertriglyceridemia (adjusted HR 0.86; 95% CI: 0.65-1.13). No significant association was found for different durations or accumulative doses of sitagliptin. In the stratified analysis, no significant effect modification was found in relation to patients' characteristics.Use of sitagliptin was not associated with an increased risk of acute pancreatitis in high-risk diabetic patients with hypertriglyceridemia or with history of acute pancreatitis. PMID:26886601

  2. Acute Pancreatitis Induced by Azathioprine and 6-mercaptopurine Proven by Single and Low Dose Challenge Testing in a Child with Crohn Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Geum-Chae-Won; Yoon, Ka-Hyun

    2012-01-01

    We report here a case of drug-induced acute pancreatitis proved by elimination and single, low dose challenge test in a child with Crohn disease. A 14-year-old boy with moderate/severe Crohn disease was admitted due to high fever and severe epigastric pain during administration of mesalazine and azathioprine. Blood test and abdominal ultrasonography revealed acute pancreatitis. After discontinuance of the medication and supportive care, the symptoms and laboratory findings improved. A single, low dose challenge test was done to confirm the relationship of the adverse drug reaction and acute pancreatitis, and to discriminate the responsible drug. Azathioprine and 6-mercaptopurine showed positive responses, and mesalazine showed a negative response. We introduce the method of single, low dose challenge test and its interpretation for drug-induced pancreatitis. PMID:24010098

  3. Biliopancreatic duct injection of ethanol as an experimental model of acute and chronic pancreatitis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Unal, Ethem; Atalay, Suleyman; Tolan, Huseyin Kerem; Yuksekdag, Sema; Yucel, Metin; Acar, Aylin; Basak, Fatih; Gunes, Pembegul; Bas, Gurhan

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we described an easily reproducable experimental pancreatits model induced by biliopancreatic duct injection of ethyl alcohol. Seventy Wistar albino rats were divided equally into seven groups randomly: the control group (group 1), acute pancreatitis groups; induced by 20% ethanol (group 2), 48% ethanol (group 3), 80% ethanol (group 4), chronic pancreatitis groups; induced by 20% ethanol (group 5), 48% ethanol (group 6) and by 80% ethanol (group 7). Acute pancreatitis groups were sacrified on postoperative day 3, while the control group and chronic pancreatitis groups were killed on postoperative day 7. Histopathologic evaluation was done, and P < 0.05 was accepted as statistically significant. All rats in group 3 developed acute pancreatitis (100%). Inflammatory infiltration of neutrophils and mononuclear cells, interstitial edema, and focal necrotic areas were seen in the pancreatic tissues. Similarly, all rats in group 6 developed chronic pancreatitis (100%). Interstitial fibrosis, lymphotic infiltration, ductal dilatation, acinar cell atrophy, periductal hyperplasia were seen in the pancreatic tissues. Mortality was seen only in group 7. The biliopancreatic ductal injection of 48% ethanol induced acute and chronic pancreatitis has 100% success rate. PMID:25785001

  4. Loss of Periostin Results in Impaired Regeneration and Pancreatic Atrophy after Cerulein-Induced Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Hausmann, Simone; Regel, Ivonne; Steiger, Katja; Wagner, Nadine; Thorwirth, Manja; Schlitter, Anna M; Esposito, Irene; Michalski, Christoph W; Friess, Helmut; Kleeff, Jrg; Erkan, Mert

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular matrix molecule periostin (POSTN, encoded by POSTN), which is secreted by activated pancreatic stellate cells, has important functions in chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. However, the role of POSTN in acute pancreatitis and subsequent regeneration processes has not been addressed so far. We analyzed the function of POSTN in pancreatic exocrine regeneration after the induction of a severe acute pancreatitis. Postn-deficient mice and wild-type control animals received repetitive cerulein injections, and a detailed histologic analysis of pancreatic tissues was performed. Although there was no difference in pancreatitis severity in the acute inflammatory phase, the recovery of the exocrine pancreas was massively impaired in Postn-deficient mice. Loss of Postn expression was accompanied by strong pancreatic atrophy and acinar-to-adipocyte differentiation, which was also reflected in gene expression patterns. Our data suggest that POSTN is a crucial factor for proper exocrine lineage-specific regeneration after severe acute pancreatitis. PMID:26632158

  5. Effect of biologically active fraction of Nardostachys jatamansi on cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Gi-Sang; Kim, Min-Sun; Park, Kyoung-Chel; Koo, Bon Soon; Jo, Il-Joo; Choi, Sun Bok; Lee, Dong-Sung; Kim, Youn-Chul; Kim, Tae-Hyeon; Seo, Sang-Wan; Shin, Yong Kook; Song, Ho-Joon; Park, Sung-Joo

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To determine if the fraction of Nardostachys jatamansi (NJ) has the potential to ameliorate the severity of acute pancreatitis (AP). METHODS: Mice were administered the biologically active fraction of NJ, i.e., the 4th fraction (NJ4), intraperitoneally, and then injected with the stable cholecystokinin analogue cerulein hourly for 6 h. Six hours after the last cerulein injection, the pancreas, lung, and blood were harvested for morphological examination, measurement of cytokine expression, and examination of neutrophil infiltration. RESULTS: NJ4 administration attenuated the severity of AP and lung injury associated with AP. It also reduced cytokine production and neutrophil infiltration and resulted in the in vivo up-regulation of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). Furthermore, NJ4 and its biologically active fraction, NJ4-2 inhibited the cerulein-induced death of acinar cells by inducing HO-1 in isolated pancreatic acinar cells. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that NJ4 may be a candidate fraction offering protection in AP and NJ4 might ameliorate the severity of pancreatitis by inducing HO-1 expression. PMID:22783046

  6. Functional Effect of Polymorphisms in the Promoter of TNFAIP3 (A20) in Acute Pancreatitis in the Han Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lijuan; Chen, Guangyu; Wu, Ailin; Zeng, Ping; Xu, Wanqing

    2014-01-01

    Background The zinc finger protein A20 is an important negative regulator of inflammation; polymorphisms in the corresponding gene, TNFAIP3, have been reported to be associated with several inflammation diseases. However, only a few studies have focused on the relationship between TNFAIP3 polymorphisms and acute pancreatitis (AP). Methods We enrolled 201 healthy controls and 190 acute pancreatitis patients (including 47 systemic inflammatory response syndrome patients) for this study and used DNA sequencing to investigate polymorphisms in the TNFAIP3 promoter. The functional effects of these variants on transcriptional activity, A20 expression, NF-?B activity, and TNF-? and IL-1? levels, after in vitro lipopolysaccharide stimulation, were assessed. Results Two SNPs (rs59693083 and rs5029924) in the TNFAIP3 promoter were selected based on bioinformatic analysis. Neither of these SNPs was associated with susceptibility to AP; however, acute pancreatitis patients who possessed the T allele of rs5029924 were more likely to experience systemic inflammatory response syndrome. Moreover, rs5029924 was found to affect TNFAIP3 promoter activity. After lipopolysaccharide stimulation, the expression of A20 protein significantly decreased, while the activity of NF-?B and the production of TNF-? and IL-1? significantly increased in whole blood leukocytes from subjects with the T allele. Conclusion The rs5029924 polymorphism in the TNFAIP3 promoter may alter the risk of systemic inflammatory response syndrome in acute pancreatitis patients by influencing the expression of A20 protein. PMID:25050625

  7. Soluble epoxide hydrolase deficiency ameliorates acute pancreatitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Bettaieb, Ahmed; Morisseau, Christophe; Hammock, Bruce; Haj, Fawaz

    2014-10-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a frequent gastrointestinal disorder that causes significant morbidity and its incidence has been progressively increasing. AP starts as a local inflammation in the pancreas that often leads to systemic inflammatory response and complications. Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) is a cytosolic enzyme whose inhibition in murine models has beneficial effects in inflammatory diseases, but its significance in AP remains unexplored. To investigate whether sEH may have a causal role in AP we utilized sEH knockout (KO) mice to determine the effects of sEH deficiency on ceruelin- and arginine-induced AP. sEH expression increased at the protein and messenger RNA levels, as well as sEH activity in the early phase of cerulein- and arginine-induced AP in mice. In addition, amylase and lipase levels were lower in cerulein-treated sEH KO mice compared with non-treated controls. Moreover, pancreatic mRNA and serum concentrations of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1 and IL-6 were lower in sEH KO mice compared with controls. Further, sEH KO mice exhibited decreased cerulein- and arginine-induced NF-?B inflammatory response, MAPKs activation and decreased cell death. These findings demonstrate a novel role for sEH in the progression of cerulein- and arginine-induced AP. PMID:26461340

  8. Necroptosis: a potential, promising target and switch in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gang; Qu, Feng-Zhi; Li, Le; Lv, Jia-Chen; Sun, Bei

    2016-02-01

    Pancreatic acinar cell death is the major pathophysiological change in early acute pancreatitis (AP), and the death modalities are important factors determining its progression and prognosis. During AP, acinar cells undergo two major modes of death, including necrosis and apoptosis. Acinar necrosis can lead to intensely local and systemic inflammatory responses, which both induce and aggravate the lesion. Necrosis has long been considered an unregulated, and passive cell death process. Since the effective interventions of necrosis are difficult to perform, its relevant studies have not received adequate attention. Necroptosis is a newly discovered cell death modality characterized by both necrosis and apoptosis, i.e., it is actively regulated by special genes, while has the typical morphological features of necrosis. Currently, necroptosis is gradually becoming an important topic in the fields of inflammatory diseases. The preliminary results from necroptosis in AP have confirmed the existence of acinar cell necroptosis, which may be a potential target for effectively regulating inflammatory injuries and improving its outcomes; however, the functional changes and mechanisms of necroptosis still require further investigation. This article reviewed the progress of necroptosis in AP to provide a reference for deeply understanding the pathogenic mechanisms of AP and identifying new therapeutic targets. PMID:26514558

  9. Hypertrygliceridemia-induced Acute Pancreatitis Following Hyperlipidemic Abdominal Crisis

    PubMed Central

    Akay, Serhat; Ardic, Murat Enis; Erkan, Nazif

    2011-01-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia is a well established cause of acute pancreatitis (AP). Multiple mechanism are proposed to explain this phenomenon, but the exact mechanism is unknown. Clinical manifestations are similar to other forms of AP. Although amylase and lipase levels exclude the diagnosis of AP in normolipidemic patients, they may be normal in hypertriglyceridemia-induced AP. Further evaluation with imaging studies are needed for diagnosis. A less known entity hyperlipidemic abdominal crisis is a prior clinical state before development to AP. We describe a young male patient without any previously diagnosed metabolic disorder presenting to emergency department with abdominal pain and vomiting where normal amylase in lactescent serum was detected. His abdomen computed tomography (CT) was reported as normal. His symptoms were relieved with antiemetic and histamine-2 blocker and he was diagnosed with hypertriglyceridemia and dyspepsia. Readmission with recurrence of symptoms after 3 hours resulted in hospitalization where the second CT showed edematous AP. PMID:25610177

  10. To Study the Clinical, Biochemical and Radiological Features of Acute Pancreatitis in HIV and AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Raza, Shahzad; Chaudhry, Naueen A.; Brown, Jordan D.; Aghaie, Sina; Rezai, Damoun; Khan, Areej; Tan, Paul De Leon; Berger, Barbara J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Pancreatitis complicating HIV infection, even in the Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) era, remains a management challenge. We felt there is a need to discern patterns in the biochemical markers, radiological studies, co-infections, length of stay (LOS) in patients with HIV or AIDS AND pancreatitis. Methods This is a retrospective study conducted from June, 2008 to August, 2010 on patients admitted with acute pancreatitis to our hospital. We extracted and compared the following parameters: biochemical markers, HBV markers (surface antigen, core antibody and surface antibody), HCV antibody, radiological studies, and length of stay (LOS). The Balthazar Grade score was used to assess radiological severity of disease. We stratified the cohort into comparison subsets according to CD4 count. Results Ninety-four admissions met the criteria for HIV or AIDS AND pancreatitis; 67 unique patients comprised the cohort. Median age was 48 years (range, 23 to 60 years). Thirty seven (55%) were male, 30 (45%), female. Two third (n = 51) (76%) were African American. Known risk factors included a history of pancreatitis, 17 (25%); cholecystitis, 13 (19%); alcohol abuse, 25 (37%); Intravenous drug abuse, 18 (27%). Only 36 (38%) admissions were on HAART regimen. Biochemical features on admission were: WBC, 6,100/mm3 (900 - 25,700); amylase, 152 U/L (30 - 1,344); lipase, 702.5 U/L (30 - 5,766), triglyceride, 65 mg/dL (57 - 400); glucose, 94 mg/dL (60 - 1,670); lactate, 2.3 mmol/L (1.09 - 5.49); AST, 61.5 U/L (9 - 1,950); LDH, 762 U/L (394 - 5,500); bicarbonate 19.5 mEq/L (3.3 - 82.7). Interestingly, 62% patients had normal pancreas on CT scan on admission. Of 67 individuals, hepatitis profile was available in 43, 21 (49%) were positive for HCV, 11 (26%) had markers for HBV. Four of 11 patients (36) with CD4 < 50 had evidence of persistent HBV (+core, -surface ab). Patients with CD4 < 200 have a median time for hospital course of 8 days (range 4 - 61 days) compare to 3 days in patients with CD4 > 200. P = 0.03 via t-test comparison. One patient with CD4 < 50 died due to acute pancreatitis. Conclusion Pancreatitis remains a major cause of morbidity in HIV-infected individuals. This study has provided detailed features in the HAART therapy era about the clinical, biochemical and radiological features of pancreatitis. Half of our patients were positive for HCV; additionally, 36% with CD4 < 50 had persistent HBV. As opposed to earlier studies, we did not find a female predominance. Patients with CD4 < 200 had a 2.67-fold increase length of stay. Future studies are needed for a closer look on viral cofactors which might precipitate episodes of acute pancreatitis. PMID:23390470

  11. The Efficacy of Endoscopic Papillary Balloon Dilation for Patients with Acute Biliary Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wei-Chih; Chan, Hoi-Hung; Lai, Kwok-Hung; Tsai, Tzung-Jiun; Lin, Huey-Shyan; Lin, Kung-Hung; Wang, Kai-Ming; Kao, Sung-Shuo; Chiang, Po-Hung; Cheng, Jin-Shiung; Hsu, Ping-I; Tsai, Wei-Lun; Chen, Wen-Chi; Li, Yun-Da; Wang, E-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Background. No study investigated the efficacy and safety of endoscopic papillary balloon dilation (EPBD) for the treatment of acute biliary pancreatitis (ABP). Method. We retrospectively reviewed the effects of EPBD on patients with ABP from February 2003 to December 2012. The general data, findings of image studies, details of the procedure, and outcomes after EPBD were analyzed. Result. Total 183 patients (male/female: 110/73) were enrolled. The mean age was 65.9 years. Among them, 155 patients had mild pancreatitis. The meantime from admission to EPBD was 3.3 days. Cholangiogram revealed filling defects inside the common bile duct (CBD) in 149 patients. The mean dilating balloon size was 10.5?mm and mean duration of the dilating procedure was 4.3 minutes. Overall, 124 patients had gross stones retrieved from CBD. Four (2.2%) adverse events and 2 (1.1%) intraprocedure bleeding incidents but no procedure-related mortality were noted. Bilirubin and amylase levels significantly decreased after EPBD. On average, patients resumed oral intake within 1.4 days. The clinical parameters and outcomes were similar in patients with different severity of pancreatitis. Conclusion. EPBD can be effective and safe for the treatment of ABP, even in patients presenting with severe disease. PMID:25949236

  12. Socs1 and Socs3 degrades Traf6 via polyubiquitination in LPS-induced acute necrotizing pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, X; Liu, Z; Cheng, X; Zheng, Y; Zeng, F; He, Y

    2015-01-01

    Mechanisms involved in inflammatory development during acute pancreatitis (AP) are largely vague, especially in the transformation of acute edematous pancreatitis (AEP) into acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP). This current study aims to investigate the functions of Traf6 in different AP models in vitro and in vivo, and to identify the possible regulatory mechanism in the progression of inflammation from mild to severe. Our data revealed that the level of Traf6 expression was significantly increased in the mild AP induced by caerulein, and the upregulation of Traf6 played a protective role in acinar cells against caerulein-induced apoptosis. In contrast, only Traf6 protein but not mRNA was downregulated in the severe ANP induced by combination treatment of caerulein and LPS. Mechanistic studies showed that LPS upregulated the levels of Socs1 and Socs3 expressions in acinar cells, Socs1 and Socs3 interacted Traf6 directly and degraded Traf6 protein via polyubiquitination, thereby counteracted the protective function of Traf6. In vivo study further showed that combination treatment of caerulein and LPS failed to induce an ANP model in the TLR4 knockout mice, and the level of Traf6 expression in the pancreatic tissues remained the same as that from the acute edematous pancreatitis (AEP) mouse. Taken together, our study reveals that Traf6 functioned as a protective factor in the progression of AP, and LPS-induced Socs1 and Socs3 exacerbate mild AP to severe AP, which provides evidence for developing a new therapeutic target to combat AP. PMID:26633718

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging in pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Balci, Numan Cem; Bieneman, B Kirke; Bilgin, Mehmet; Akduman, Isin E; Fattahi, Rana; Burton, Frank R

    2009-02-01

    Pancreatitis can occur in acute and chronic forms. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) plays an important role in the early diagnosis of both conditions and complications that may arise from acute or chronic inflammation of the gland. Standard MRI techniques including T1-weighted and T2-weighted fat-suppressed imaging sequences together with contrast-enhanced imaging can both aid in the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis and demonstrate complications as pseudocysts, hemorrhage, and necrosis. Combined use of MRI and MR cholangiopancreatography can show both parenchymal findings that are associated with chronic pancreatitis including pancreatic size and signal and arterial enhancements, all of which are diminished in chronic pancreatitis. The degree of main pancreatic duct dilatation and/or the number of side branch ectasia determines the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis and its severity. In this paper, we report the spectrum of imaging findings of acute and chronic pancreatitis on MRI and MR cholangiopancreatography. PMID:19687723

  14. Pancreatitis-imaging approach

    PubMed Central

    Busireddy, Kiran K; AlObaidy, Mamdoh; Ramalho, Miguel; Kalubowila, Janaka; Baodong, Liu; Santagostino, Ilaria; Semelka, Richard C

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatitis is defined as the inflammation of the pancreas and considered the most common pancreatic disease in children and adults. Imaging plays a signi?cant role in the diagnosis, severity assessment, recognition of complications and guiding therapeutic interventions. In the setting of pancreatitis, wider availability and good image quality make multi-detector contrast-enhanced computed tomography (MD-CECT) the most used imaging technique. However, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers diagnostic capabilities similar to those of CT, with additional intrinsic advantages including lack of ionizing radiation and exquisite soft tissue characterization. This article reviews the proposed definitions of revised Atlanta classification for acute pancreatitis, illustrates a wide range of morphologic pancreatic parenchymal and associated peripancreatic changes for different types of acute pancreatitis. It also describes the spectrum of early and late chronic pancreatitis imaging findings and illustrates some of the less common types of chronic pancreatitis, with special emphasis on the role of CT and MRI. PMID:25133027

  15. Determination of iNOS-2087A>G Polymorphism in Acute Pancreatitis Patients

    PubMed Central

    P?DUREANU, V.; STREA??, IOANA; IOANA, M.; ?URLIN, V.; GEORGESCU, E.F.; M?RGINEAN, CRISTINA; S?FTOIU, A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) is involved in susceptibility for acute pancreatitis. Material and Methods: Genomic DNA was extracted from blood samples collected from cases of acute pancreatitis (n=110) and normal population controls frequency matched for age and sex (n=232). iNOS 2087A>G polymorphism was genotyped using TaqMan allelic discrimination assays. The association of the genetic polymorphism with clinical and pathological data of the patients was evaluated. Results: We have found no significant statistical association between this polymorphism and an increased risk of developing acute pancreatitis. Conclusion: In Romanian population, the risk of developing acute pancreatitis is not increased by the presence of iNOS-2087A>G polymorphism.

  16. Bortezomib-induced acute pancreatitis: Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Talamo, Giampaolo; Sivik, Jeffrey; Pandey, Manoj K; Mir, Muhammad A

    2016-04-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a rare complication of chemotherapy agents. We describe the case of a patient with multiple myeloma who developed acute pancreatitis after treatment with bortezomib, a proteasome inhibitor commonly used in the treatment of this disease. We reviewed the available medical literature on this topic, and found other seven similar cases, all after intravenous bortezomib. Our case is the first one occurring with the subcutaneous route of administration. PMID:25516544

  17. Continuous regional arterial infusion for acute pancreatitis: a propensity score analysis using a nationwide administrative database

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Although continuous regional arterial infusion (CRAI) of a protease inhibitor and an antibiotic may be effective in patients with severe acute pancreatitis, CRAI has not yet been validated in large patient populations. We therefore evaluated the effectiveness of CRAI based on data from a national administrative database covering 1,032 Japanese hospitals. Methods In-hospital mortality, length of stay and costs were compared in the CRAI and non-CRAI groups, using propensity score analysis to adjust for treatment selection bias. Results A total of 17,415 eligible patients with acute pancreatitis were identified between 1 July and 30 September 2011, including 287 (1.6%) patients who underwent CRAI. One-to-one propensity-score matching generated 207 pairs with well-balanced baseline characteristics. In-hospital mortality rates were similar in the CRAI and non-CRAI groups (7.7% vs. 8.7%; odds ratio, 0.88; 95% confidence interval, 0.441.78, P?=?0.720). CRAI was associated with significantly longer median hospital stay (29 vs. 18days, P?acute pancreatitis, but was associated with longer hospital stay and higher costs. Randomized controlled trials in large numbers of patients are required to further evaluate CRAI for this indication. PMID:24088324

  18. Acetaminophen Poisoning and Risk of Acute Pancreatitis: A Population-Based Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sy-Jou; Lin, Chin-Sheng; Hsu, Chin-Wang; Lin, Cheng-Li; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether acetaminophen poisoning is associated with a higher risk of acute pancreatitis. We conducted a retrospective cohort study by using the longitudinal population-based database of Taiwan's National Health Insurance (NHI) program between 2000 and 2011. The acetaminophen cohort comprised patients aged ? 20 years with newly identified acetaminophen poisoning (N = 2958). The comparison cohort comprised randomly selected patients with no history of acetaminophen poisoning. The acetaminophen and comparison cohorts were frequency matched by age, sex, and index year (N = 11,832) at a 1:4 ratio. Each patient was followed up from the index date until the date an acute pancreatitis diagnosis was made, withdrawal from the NHI program, or December 31, 2011. Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to determine the effects of acetaminophen on the risk of acute pancreatitis.The risk of acute pancreatitis was 3.11-fold higher in the acetaminophen cohort than in the comparison cohort (11.2 vs 3.61 per 10,000 person-years), with an adjusted hazard ratio of 2.40 (95% confidence interval, 1.29-4.47). The incidence rate was considerably high in patients who were aged 35 to 49 years, men, those who had comorbidities, and within the first year of follow-up.Acetaminophen poisoning is associated with an increased risk of acute pancreatitis. Additional prospective studies are necessary to verify how acetaminophen poisoning affects the risk of acute pancreatitis. PMID:26200631

  19. Vascular Access System for Continuous Arterial Infusion of a Protease Inhibitor in Acute Necrotizing Pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Ganaha, Fumikiyo; Yamada, Tetsuhisa; Yorozu, Naoya; Ujita, Masuo; Irie, Takeo; Fukuda, Yasushi; Fukuda, Kunihiko; Tada, Shimpei

    1999-09-15

    We used a vascular access system (VAS) for continuous arterial infusion (CAI) of a protease inhibitor in two patients with acute necrotizing pancreatitis. The infusion catheter was placed into the dorsal pancreatic artery in the first patient and into the gastroduodenal artery in the second, via a femoral artery approach. An implantable port was then connected to the catheter and was secured in a subcutaneous pocket prepared in the right lower abdomen. No complications related to the VAS were encountered. This system provided safe and uncontaminated vascular access for successful CAI for acute pancreatitis.

  20. Retrospective study of patients with acute pancreatitis: is serum amylase still required?

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Dhanwant; Addison, Alfred; De Rosa, Antonella; Brooks, Adam; Cameron, Iain C

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To assess the role of serum amylase and lipase in the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. Secondary aims were to perform a cost analysis of these enzyme assays in patients admitted to the surgical admissions unit. Design Cohort study. Setting Secondary care. Participants Patients admitted with pancreatitis to the acute surgical admissions unit from January to December 2010 were included in the study. Methods Data collated included demographics, laboratory results and aetiology. The cost of measuring a single enzyme assay was £0.69 and both assays were £0.99. Results Of the 151 patients included, 117 patients had acute pancreatitis with gallstones (n=51) as the most common cause. The majority of patients with acute pancreatitis had raised levels of both amylase and lipase. Raised lipase levels only were observed in additional 12% and 23% of patients with gallstone-induced and alcohol-induced pancreatitis, respectively. Overall, raised lipase levels were seen in between 95% and 100% of patients depending on aetiology. Sensitivity and specificity of lipase in the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis was 96.6% and 99.4%, respectively. In contrast, the sensitivity and specificity of amylase in diagnosing acute pancreatitis were 78.6% and 99.1%, respectively. Single lipase assay in all patients presenting with abdominal pain to the surgical admission unit would result in a potential saving of £893.70/year. Conclusions Determining serum lipase level alone is sufficient to diagnose acute pancreatitis and substantial savings can be made if measured alone. PMID:23002153

  1. Changing Referral Trends of Acute Pancreatitis in Children: A 12-year Single-center Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Alexander; Latif, Sahibzada Usman; Shah, Ahsan U.; Tian, Jianmin; Werlin, Steven; Hsiao, Allen; Pashankar, Dinesh; Bhandari, Vineet; Nagar, Anil; Husain, Sohail Zakiuddin

    2011-01-01

    Background Acute pancreatitis is a painful inflammatory disorder known to occur in children. Recent reports, primarily on the basis of adult data, have suggested an increasing incidence. However, pediatric studies are limited. Objective The study was performed to examine the frequency of acute pancreatitis in a pediatric population from 1994 to 2007 and to characterize etiologies by age subsets. Patients and Methods In this retrospective study, cases of pancreatitis were identified by ICD-9 codes and subjected to inclusion criteria. Results Two hundred and seventy-one cases of pancreatitis met inclusion criteria. Mean age of the subjects was 13.1 5.6 years. The recurrence rate was 15.3%. Biliary disease was the most common etiology (32.6%). Acute pancreatitis cases evaluated at a single tertiary care center increased 53% between 1995 to 2000 and 2001 to 2006 (P <0.02). However, when cases were normalized by all annual pediatric emergency department visits for all medical reasons, the increase was reduced to 22% and lost statistical significance (P = 0.16). The rise was not associated with a change in etiologies or body mass index (BMI). Conclusions This is the first report demonstrating that an increase in pediatric pancreatitis may in part be due to growing referrals to tertiary care centers. The data on etiologies, particularly with regard to differing ages, may be helpful in managing children who present with acute pancreatitis. PMID:19503003

  2. Effective peritoneal therapy of acute pancreatitis in the rat with glutaryl-trialanin-ethylamide: a novel inhibitor of pancreatic elastase.

    PubMed Central

    Fric, P; Slab, J; Kasafrek, E; Kocna, P; Marek, J

    1992-01-01

    The six hour peritoneal lavage with glutaryl-trialanin-ethylamide, a low molecular competitive inhibitor of pancreatic elastase (IC50-8 mumol/l), effectively suppresses the evolution of taurocholate induced acute pancreatitis in the rat. The lavage alone is followed by a marked decrease of fat necrosis and amylase and lipase activity in serum. The area of pancreatic haemorrhage was significantly reduced only after the lavage solution was supplemented with Glt-Ala3-NHEt. The effect was not enhanced by a bolus injection of the inhibitor before starting the lavage. The combination of Glt-Ala3-NHEt with aprotinin or nafamstate mesilate produced only marginal greater benefit. The effect of Glt-Ala3-NHEt on pancreatic haemorrhage is time and dose related even with delayed onset of the lavage. Animals treated with peritoneal lavage without Get-Ala3-NHEt lived longer than controls (p less than 0.05), but by 60 hours the survival rate of both groups was almost the same (76 v 74%). All animals lavaged with Glt-Ala3-NHEt survived 120 hours and the difference in the survival rate between this and both remaining groups was significant (100% v 76% v 74% - p less than 0.05). The results were considered favourable and preliminary clinical trials of Glt-Ala3-NHEt in subjects with acute pancreatitis justified. PMID:1377154

  3. Chapter 14: Acute severe asthma (status asthmaticus).

    PubMed

    Shah, Rachna; Saltoun, Carol A

    2012-01-01

    Acute severe asthma, formerly known as status asthmaticus, is defined as severe asthma unresponsive to repeated courses of beta-agonist therapy such as inhaled albuterol, levalbuterol, or subcutaneous epinephrine. It is a medical emergency that requires immediate recognition and treatment. Oral or parenteral corticosteroids should be administered to all patients with acute severe asthma as early as possible because clinical benefits may not occur for a minimum of 6-12 hours. Approximately 50% of episodes are attributable to upper respiratory infections, and other causes include medical nonadherence, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory exposure in aspirin-allergic patients, allergen exposure (especially pets) in severely atopic individuals, irritant inhalation (smoke, paint, etc.), exercise, and insufficient use of inhaled or oral corticosteroids. The patient history should be focused on acute severe asthma including current use of oral or inhaled corticosteroids, number of hospitalizations, emergency room visits, intensive-care unit admissions and intubations, the frequency of albuterol use, the presence of nighttime symptoms, exercise intolerance, current medications or illicit drug use, exposure to allergens, and other significant medical conditions. Severe airflow obstruction may be predicted by accessory muscle use, pulsus paradoxus, refusal to recline below 30, a pulse >120 beats/min, and decreased breath sounds. Physicians' subjective assessments of airway obstruction are often inaccurate. More objective measures of airway obstruction via peak flow (or forced expiratory volume in 1 second) and pulse oximetry before oxygen administration usually are helpful. Pulse oximetry values >90% are less commonly associated with problems although CO(2) retention and a low Pao(2) may be missed. PMID:22794687

  4. Acute pancreatitis and normoamylasemia. Not an uncommon combination.

    PubMed Central

    Clavien, P A; Robert, J; Meyer, P; Borst, F; Hauser, H; Herrmann, F; Dunand, V; Rohner, A

    1989-01-01

    A consecutive series of 352 attacks of acute pancreatitis (AP) was studied prospectively in 318 patients. AP was ascertained by contrast-enhanced CT scan in all but four cases in which diagnosis was made at operation or autopsy. Sixty-seven of these cases (19%) had normal serum amylase levels on admission (i.e., less than 160 IU/L, a limit that includes 99% of control values), a figure considerably higher than generally admitted. When compared to AP with elevated serum amylase, normoamylasemic pancreatitis was characterized by the following: (1) the prevalence of alcoholic etiology (58% vs. 33%, respectively, p less than 0.01), (2) a greater number of previous attacks in alcoholic pancreatitis (0.7 vs. 0.4, p less than 0.01); and (3) a longer duration of symptoms before admission (2.4 vs. 1.5 days, p less than 0.005). In contrast AP did not appear to differ significantly in terms of CT findings, Ranson's score, and clinical course, when comparing normo- and hyperamylasemic patients, although there was a tendency for normoamylasemic patients to follow milder courses. Serum lipase was measured in 65 of these normoamylasemic cases and was found to be elevated in 44 (68%), thus increasing diagnostic sensitivity from 81% when amylase alone is used to 94% for both enzymes. A peritoneal tab was obtained in 44 cases: amylase concentration in the first liter of dialysate was greater than 160 IU/L in 24 cases (55%), and lipase was greater than 250 U/L in 31 cases (70%). Twelve of these 44 cases had low peritoneal fluid and plasma concentrations for both enzymes. Thus little gain in diagnostic sensitivity was obtained when adding peritoneal values (96%) to serum determinations. AP is not invariably associated with elevated serum amylase. Multiple factors may contribute to the absence of hyperamylasemia on admission, including a return to normal enzyme levels before hospitalization or the inability of inflamed pancreases to produce amylase. Approximately two thirds of cases with normal amylasemia were properly identified by serum lipase determinations. AP does not appear to behave differently when serum amylase is normal or elevated, and should therefore be submitted to similar therapeutic regimens in both conditions. PMID:2479346

  5. Severe necrotic and septic pancreatitis. Indications to endoscopic, surgical, and nutritional therapy

    PubMed Central

    MANGIANTE, G.; RODELLA, L.; CEROFOLINI, A.; GIACOPUZZI, S.; PASSERI, V.; STERZI, E.; CATALANO, F.; SCHENAL, G.; de MANZONI, G.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) management has changed over the last fifteen years, and from too aggressive behaviour, we moved to a cautious one. In every case, we can appreciate defect of extremist conceptual position. We reviewed our strategy on disease treatment, and we analyzed treatment of single cases. We collected 4 SAP cases from January 2009 to January 2010. All patients were septic, and we adopted the same approach for all of them, avoiding surgery without peritoneal infection. In all patients we placed jejumostomy and, after cleaning of septic site, we started immediate enteral nutrition (EN). Antibiotic therapy against Gram+, Gram− and antifugal drug had been started. No one died and all patients were back to an active life even if social costs are considerably high especially due to very long hospital stay. PMID:24629818

  6. Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 Inhibitors and the Risk of Acute Pancreatitis in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes in Taiwan: A Population-Based Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yun-Ju; Hu, Hsiao-Yun; Chen, Hsin-Hua; Chou, Pesus

    2015-10-01

    To investigate the effects of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors on the risk of acute pancreatitis in patients with type 2 diabetes.This nationwide population-based cohort study used the diabetes patients dataset of Taiwan's National Health Research Insurance Research Database. Patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes between January 1, 2008 and December 31, 2009 and no history of acute pancreatitis were selected. This cohort was followed from the index date to the onset of acute pancreatitis or December 31, 2011. The main outcome measure was the hazard ratio (HR) for acute pancreatitis associated with DPP-4 inhibitor use. Cox proportional-hazards regression analyses were adjusted for alcohol use, hypertriglyceridemia, cholelithiasis, neoplasm, and Diabetes Complications Severity Index (DCSI) score. Subgroup analyses stratified by age and sex were conducted.The study cohort comprised 114,141 patients. Significant interaction effects were observed between sex and age (HR 0.80, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.64-0.99) and age and DCSI score (HR 0.83, 95% CI: 0.71-0.97). In subgroup analyses, significant risks of acute pancreatitis were noted in female and elderly DPP-4 inhibitor users. Among women, the risk of acute pancreatitis was significantly higher among DPP-4 inhibitor users than among nonusers (HR 2.27, 95% CI: 1.30-3.97). This risk was also significantly higher in users than in nonusers among patients aged >65 years (HR 2.39, 95% CI: 1.11-5.15).Female and elderly DPP-4 inhibitor users had significantly elevated risks of acute pancreatitis development. Further well-conducted studies are needed to confirm our findings. PMID:26512613

  7. Angiopoietin-1 gene-modified human mesenchymal stem cells promote angiogenesis and reduce acute pancreatitis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Jie; He, Zhi-Gang; Qian, Dao-Hai; Lin, Sheng-Ping; Gong, Jian; Meng, Hong-Bo; Yang, Ting-Song; Sun, Wei; Xu, Bin; Zhou, Bo; Song, Zhen-Shun

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can serve as a vehicle for gene therapy. Angiopoietin-1 (ANGPT1) plays an important role in the regulation of endothelial cell survival, vascular stabilization, and angiogenesis. We hypothesized that ANGPT1 gene-modified MSCs might be a potential therapeutic approach for severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) in rats. Human umbilical cord-derived MSCs with or without transfection with lentiviral vectors containing the ANGPT1 gene were delivered through the tail vein of rats 12 h after induction of SAP. Administration of MSCs alone significantly reduced pancreatic injury and inflammation, as reflected by reductions in pancreatitis severity scores and serum amylase and lipase levels as well as reducing the serum levels of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-?, IFN-?, IL-1?, and IL-6). Furthermore, administration of ANGPT1-transfected MSCs resulted in not only further reductions in pancreatic injury and serum levels of proinflammatory cytokines, but also promotion of pancreatic angiogenesis. These results suggest that MSCs and ANGPT1 have a synergistic role in the treatment of SAP. ANGPT1 gene-modified MSCs may be developed as a potential novel therapy strategy for the treatment of SAP. PMID:25120736

  8. Maintenance Treatment With Low-Dose Mercaptopurine in Combination With Allopurinol in Children With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and Mercaptopurine-Induced Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Zerra, Patricia; Bergsagel, John; Keller, Frank G; Lew, Glen; Pauly, Melinda

    2016-04-01

    Mercaptopurine (6-mercaptopurine, 6MP) is a mainstay of curative therapy in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), and contributes to its 90% overall survival rate. We present two patients with ALL who suffered with severe pancreatitis secondary to 6MP. Through the use of allopurinol in conjunction with reduced dose 6MP, we were able to continue 6MP without further pancreatitis. This report contributes to the small body of literature on 6MP associated pancreatitis in childhood ALL and describes a novel approach to continued use of 6MP during therapy. PMID:26878433

  9. Differential effects of saralasin and ramiprilat, the inhibitors of renin-angiotensin system, on cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Siu Wai; Ip, Siu Po; Wong, Tung Po; Che, Chun Tao; Leung, Po Sing

    2003-03-28

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease characterized by pancreatic tissue edema, acinar cell necrosis, hemorrhage and inflammation of the damaged gland. It is believed that acinar cell injury is initiated by the activation of digestive zymogens inside the acinar cells, leading finally to the autodigestion of the pancreas. Previous study in our laboratory demonstrated that cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis was associated with an up-regulation of local renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in rat pancreas. Therefore, the utilization of RAS inhibitors may provide a novel and alternative treatment for acute pancreatitis. By means of a rat model of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis, results from the present study showed that an intravenous injection of saralasin, an antagonist for angiotensin II receptors, at a dose of 40 microg/kg 30 min before the induction of acute pancreatitis significantly attenuated pancreatic edema. Results from the biochemical measurements showed that pretreatment with saralasin at a dose of 20 microg/kg markedly reduced pancreatic injury, as evidenced by the decreased activities of alpha-amylase and lipase in plasma. However, the same recipe of ramiprilat, a specific inhibitor for angiotensin-converting enzyme, at a dose of 20 microg/kg did not provide any protective effect against acute pancreatitis. On the contrary, pretreatment with ramiprilat at a dose 40 microg/kg enhanced cerulein-induced pancreatic injury. Results from histopathological analysis of these RAS inhibitors further confirmed with those results as obtained from biochemical analysis. These data indicate that administration of saralasin but not ramiprilat could be protective against acute pancreatitis and that activation of pancreatic RAS in acute pancreatitis may play a role in pancreatic tissue injury. PMID:12609748

  10. The effect of prophylactic peripapillary administration of methylprednisolone in reducing the risk and severity of postendoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis: A double blind clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Shavakhi, Ahmad; Khodadustan, Mahsa; Tamizifar, Babak

    2015-01-01

    Background: The most common complication of diagnostic and therapeutic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is acute pancreatitis. A number of therapeutic trials have been studied due to reduce the occurrence of postendoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis (PEP) but many of them were unsuccessful. Periampullary corticosteroid injection was proposed to use as prophylactic agents for PEP because of its anti-inflammatory property with relative low systemic side effects. Materials and Methods: By conducting a double blinded clinical trial study in a single center university hospital, all patients undergoing therapeutic or diagnostic ERCP in our gastrointestinal endoscopy ward, enrolled the study. During ERCP, we randomly assigned the patients in blocks of 40 to undergo a locally injection of methylprednisolone acetate (corticosteroid group) or saline (control group) on the major papilla and prospectively evaluated the occurrence of PEP pancreatitis in each groups. Clinical and laboratory findings of acute pancreatitis were collected by means of a validated questionnaire during the procedure and before discharge. At baseline and end of the study, were compared pancreatitis prevalence and also its severity by using Chi-square and t-test statistics. Results: The frequency of moderate to severe PEP pain was not significantly between the placebo and corticosteroid receiving group (13.7% 3.2% vs. 9.3% 2.1%, respectively; P = 0.8). There is no significant difference in the mean concentration of lipase and amylase between corticosteroid receiving group and placebo receiving group at the first, second, and third time. In the corticosteroid receiving group, 3 patients (10.3%) while in the control group, 11 patients (11.3%) developed pancreatitis. Conclusion: We found no significant difference in PEP rates and also severity between the corticosteroid and placebo groups. The mean increase in serum amylase and amylase level in pancreatitis patients and the frequency of abdominal pain were not significantly higher in the placebo group. Besides, there were no cases of severe PEP pancreatitis in either group.

  11. Acute renal failure in severe exertional rhabdomyolysis.

    PubMed

    Uberoi, H S; Dugal, J S; Kasthuri, A S; Kolhe, V S; Kumar, A K; Cruz, S A

    1991-09-01

    During the last 6 years, 7 healthy individuals who were reasonably well acclimatised to physical exertion came under observation with acute renal failure due to exercise induced myoglobinuria. Their mean age was 20 years, and renal failure resulted after cross country run of 10-15 km in 6 cases and long route march of 90 km in 3 days in one case. There was no evidence of effects of heat, dehydration or hypotension. Apart from myoglobinuria and significant urinary sediments, serum aldolase (mean 69.0 SL u/ml) and serum creatinine phosphokinase (mean 120.0 Sigma u/ml) were also elevated. Maximum blood urea and creatinine were 224 mg/dl and 13.9 mg/dl respectively. Hypocalcaemia was noticed in 3 cases, hyperkalaemia in 4 cases and hyperuricaemia in one case during the oliguric phase. One case had features of non-oliguric acute renal failure. All cases recovered though 4 cases required dialysis support. Kidney biopsy in 3 cases showed recovering acute tubular necrosis with eosinophilic material in tubules. Lactate studies in the convalescent period revealed normal response and repeat physical exertion of same severity after 6 months did not reproduce the syndrome. It is concluded that exertional rhabdomyolysis unassociated with heat stress is a rare entity, and with prompt diagnosis and energic management results are rewarding. PMID:1814900

  12. The Role of IL-6, 8, and 10, sTNFr, CRP, and Pancreatic Elastase in the Prediction of Systemic Complications in Patients with Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Fisic, E; Poropat, G; Bilic-Zulle, L; Licul, V; Milic, S; Stimac, D

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aim. Early assessment of severity in acute pancreatitis (AP) is a key measure to provide rational and effective management. The aim of our study is to determine the prognostic value of interleukins (IL) 6, 8, and 10, soluble receptor for tumor necrosis factor (sTNFr), pancreatic elastase (E1), and C-reactive protein (CRP) as predictors of systemic complications in AP. Patients and Methods. A hundred and fifty patients with confirmed AP were enrolled in the study. The severity of AP was defined according to Atlanta criteria. Measurements of interleukins and sTNFr were performed on the first day of admission. CRP and E1 levels were assessed on admission and after 48 hours. ROC analysis was performed for all parameters. Results. Interleukins and sTNFr significantly differentiated patients with systemic complications from those without. Elevation of IL-6 showed the highest significance as a predictor (P = 0.001). CRP and elastase levels did not differ between mild and severe cases on admission, but reached statistical significance when measured on the third day (P = 0.002 and P = 0.001, resp.). Conclusion. Our study confirmed that IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and sTNFr measured on admission, and CRP and pancreatic elastase measured on third day of admission represent valuable prognostic factors of severity and systemic complications of AP. PMID:23476635

  13. The Role of IL-6, 8, and 10, sTNFr, CRP, and Pancreatic Elastase in the Prediction of Systemic Complications in Patients with Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Fisic, E.; Poropat, G.; Bilic-Zulle, L.; Licul, V.; Milic, S.; Stimac, D.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aim. Early assessment of severity in acute pancreatitis (AP) is a key measure to provide rational and effective management. The aim of our study is to determine the prognostic value of interleukins (IL) 6, 8, and 10, soluble receptor for tumor necrosis factor (sTNFr), pancreatic elastase (E1), and C-reactive protein (CRP) as predictors of systemic complications in AP. Patients and Methods. A hundred and fifty patients with confirmed AP were enrolled in the study. The severity of AP was defined according to Atlanta criteria. Measurements of interleukins and sTNFr were performed on the first day of admission. CRP and E1 levels were assessed on admission and after 48 hours. ROC analysis was performed for all parameters. Results. Interleukins and sTNFr significantly differentiated patients with systemic complications from those without. Elevation of IL-6 showed the highest significance as a predictor (P = 0.001). CRP and elastase levels did not differ between mild and severe cases on admission, but reached statistical significance when measured on the third day (P = 0.002 and P = 0.001, resp.). Conclusion. Our study confirmed that IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and sTNFr measured on admission, and CRP and pancreatic elastase measured on third day of admission represent valuable prognostic factors of severity and systemic complications of AP. PMID:23476635

  14. Primary hyperparathyroidism presenting with acute pancreatitis and asymptomatic bone involvement.

    PubMed

    Saif, Aasem

    2015-01-01

    A 15-year-old female patient presented to the emergency room with vomiting and abdominal pain. She had two similar attacks in the previous three months both of them were diagnosed as pancreatitis in two different hospitals. On admission, her serum calcium and parathyroid hormone levels were very high. CT scan revealed left inferior parathyroid adenoma. Investigations to rule out possible multiple endocrine neoplasia were all negative. The patient was managed by intravenous fluids and furosemide to lower her serum calcium level. Then, left inferior parathyroidectomy was done. Postoperatively, the patient had hungry bone syndrome with severe hypocalcaemia and was managed by intravenous calcium infusion for five days in the intensive care unit. Later, she was kept on oral calcium and vitamin D supplementation. She became symptom-free and her serum calcium improved gradually. PMID:26604950

  15. Primary hyperparathyroidism presenting with acute pancreatitis and asymptomatic bone involvement

    PubMed Central

    Saif, Aasem

    2015-01-01

    Summary A 15-year-old female patient presented to the emergency room with vomiting and abdominal pain. She had two similar attacks in the previous three months both of them were diagnosed as pancreatitis in two different hospitals. On admission, her serum calcium and parathyroid hormone levels were very high. CT scan revealed left inferior parathyroid adenoma. Investigations to rule out possible multiple endocrine neoplasia were all negative. The patient was managed by intravenous fluids and furosemide to lower her serum calcium level. Then, left inferior parathyroidectomy was done. Postoperatively, the patient had hungry bone syndrome with severe hypocalcaemia and was managed by intravenous calcium infusion for five days in the intensive care unit. Later, she was kept on oral calcium and vitamin D supplementation. She became symptom-free and her serum calcium improved gradually. PMID:26604950

  16. Clinical impact of preoperative acute pancreatitis in patients who undergo pancreaticoduodenectomy for periampullary tumors

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yong-Hua; Xie, Si-Ming; Zhang, Hao; Tan, Chun-Lu; Ke, Neng-Wen; Mai, Gang; Liu, Xu-Bao

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the impact of preoperative acute pancreatitis (PAP) on the surgical management of periampullary tumors. METHODS: Fifty-eight patients with periampullary tumors and PAP were retrospectively analyzed. Thirty-four patients who underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) and 4 patients who underwent total pancreatectomy were compared with a control group of 145 patients without PAP during the same period. RESULTS: The preoperative waiting time was significantly shorter for the concomitant PAP patients who underwent a resection (22.4 d vs 54.6 d, P < 0.001) compared to those who did not. The presence of PAP significantly increased the rate of severe complications (Clavien grade 3 or higher) (17.6% vs 4.8%, P = 0.019) and lengthened the hospital stay (19.5 d vs 14.5 d, P = 0.006). A multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that PAP was an independent risk factor for postoperative pancreatic fistula (OR = 2.91; 95%CI: 1.10-7.68; P = 0.032) and severe complications (OR = 4.70; 95%CI: 1.48-14.96; P = 0.009) after PD. There was no perioperative mortality. CONCLUSION: PAP significantly increases the incidence of severe complications and lengthens the hospital stay following PD. PD could be safely performed in highly selective patients with PAP. PMID:26078571

  17. [Antioxidative effect of N2-mercaptopropionylglycine (N2 MPG) in experimental acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Abdo, E E; Machado, M C; Coelho, A M; Sampietre, S N; Leite, K R; Molan, N A; Pinotti, H W

    1998-01-01

    The N2-Mercaptopropionylglycine (N2-MPG) is a potent antioxidant by inhibiting the abnormal production of xantina-oxidase. The aim of this research is to analyze the antioxidant capacity of this tiol compound by offering some protection to pancreatic tissue in the acute pancreatitis (AP). The induction of AP was obtained through two methods: a) supramaximal dose of cerulein; b) infusion of 2.5% sodium taurocholate into the biliopancreatic duct of the rat. Thirty-six male Wistar rats (220-270 g) were divided into four groups. AP with cerulein (Two parenteral doses of 20 micrograms/kg; one hour interval): in two groups: GI: nineteen rats previously treated with N2-MPG (100 mg/kg) ten minutes before AP. GII (control): seventeen animals which received saline 0.9%. AP with taurocholate (0.5 ml into the main biliopancreatic duct): in other two groups: GIII: eleven rats previously treated with N2-MPG (100 mg/kg) ten minutes before AP. GIV (control): fifteen animals which received saline 0.9%. The albumin leakage into the cell interstice as an inflammatory parameter was measured through Evans-Blue (EB) colorimetry, that links totally with serum albumin after injection into the pancreatic tissue, immediately before induction of AP. The rats were sacrificed one hour after. Water tissue content was also measured. There was a relevant reduction of EB leakage in GI (344 +/- 27 micrograms/gtissue) when compared to GII (729 +/- 84 micrograms/gtissue), p < 0.01, and in GIII (386 +/- 52 micrograms/gtissue) when compared to GIV (543 +/- 53 micrograms/gtissue), p < 0.05. There was no difference in tissue water content between GI (88.2 +/- 0.6%) and GII (87.4 +/- 0.9%), but certainly between GIII (77.7 +/- 2.1%) and GIV (82.8 +/- 1.2%), p < 0.05. The amilase levels didn't show any difference among the four groups. These results suggest that the use of the antioxidant N2-MPG offers a protective action, at least in rats, reducing the severity of AP induced by supramaximal dose of cerulein, and even in a more severe AP such as produced by sodium taurocholate at 2.5%, although apparently not interfering with its pathogenesis. It also strengthens the actual participation of free radicals of oxygen in the physiopathology of acute pancreatitis. PMID:9922494

  18. Role of cathepsin B in intracellular trypsinogen activation and the onset of acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Halangk, Walter; Lerch, Markus M.; Brandt-Nedelev, Barbara; Roth, Wera; Ruthenbuerger, Manuel; Reinheckel, Thomas; Domschke, Wolfram; Lippert, Hans; Peters, Christoph; Deussing, Jan

    2000-01-01

    Autodigestion of the pancreas by its own prematurely activated digestive proteases is thought to be an important event in the onset of acute pancreatitis. The mechanism responsible for the intrapancreatic activation of digestive zymogens is unknown, but a recent hypothesis predicts that a redistribution of lysosomal cathepsin B (CTSB) into a zymogen-containing subcellular compartment triggers this event. To test this hypothesis, we used CTSB-deficient mice in which the ctsb gene had been deleted by targeted disruption. After induction of experimental secretagogueinduced pancreatitis, the trypsin activity in the pancreas of ctsb/ animals was more than 80% lower than in ctsb+/+ animals. Pancreatic damage as indicated by serum activities of amylase and lipase, or by the extent of acinar tissue necrosis, was 50% lower in ctsb/ animals. These experiments provide the first conclusive evidence to our knowledge that cathepsin B plays a role in intrapancreatic trypsinogen activation and the onset of acute pancreatitis. PMID:10995788

  19. Heparin improves organ microcirculatory disturbances in caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Dobosz, Marek; Mionskowska, Lucjanna; Ha?, Stanislaw; Dobrowolski, Sebastian; Dymecki, Dariusz; Wajda, Zdzislaw

    2004-01-01

    AIM: Microcirculatory disturbances are important early pathophysiological events in various organs during acute pancreatitis. The aim of the study was to evaluate changes in microperfusion of the pancreas, liver, kidney, stomach, colon, skeletal muscle, and to investigate the influence of heparin on the organ microcirculation in caerulein-induced experimental acute pancreatitis. METHODS: Acute pancreatitis was induced by 4 intraperitoneal injections of caerulein (Cn) (15 ?g/kg). The organ microcirculation was measured by laser Doppler flowmetry. Serum interleukin 6 and hematocrit levels were analysed. RESULTS: Acute pancreatitis resulted in a significant drop of microperfusion in all examined organs. Heparin administration (2 2.5 mg/kg) improved the microcirculation in pancreas (36.9% 4% vs 75.9% 10%), liver (56.6% 6% vs 75.2% 16%), kidney (45.1% 6% vs 79.3% 5%), stomach (65.2% 8% vs 78.1% 19%), colon (69.8% 6% vs 102.5% 19%), and skeletal muscle (59.2% 6% vs 77.9% 13%). Heparin treatment lowered IL-6 (359.0 66 U/mL vs 288.558 U/mL) and hematocrit level (53% 4% vs 46% 3%). CONCLUSION: Heparin administration has a positive influence on organ microcirculatory disturbances accompanying experimental Cn-induced acute pancreatitis. PMID:15300904

  20. [Electrocardiographic changes in patients with acute pancreatitis. Case report and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Bulava, A; Skvarilov, M; Marek, O; Lukl, J

    2001-06-01

    Transient electrocardiographic changes in patients with acute pancreatitis are well known in the literature. Mostly these changes are in the form of T-wave inversion, ST-segment depression, and rarely ST-segment elevation without the presence of coronary artery disease. We report a patient, in whom electrocardiographic changes mimicked acute inferior myocardial infarction with subsequent evolution of Q-waves in the inferior leads and ischaemia in the anterior wall. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report documenting the evolution of Q-waves on surface ECG in the absence of myocardial necrosis verified by postmortem examination in the patient, who died of cardiorespiratory failure and massive haemoperitoneum as a complication of ongoing acute necrotizing haemorrhagic pancreatitis. The authors also discuss diagnostic and therapeutic options in patients with acute pancreatitis and ECG pattern of acute myocardial infarction. Acute pancreatitis may mimic acute myocardial ischaemia (or infarction) or these two diseases may be present at the same time. In differential diagnosis, selective coronarography might be helpful and it allows also immediate revascularisation. Administration of thrombolytic therapy in such patients is not safe and might end up with fatal consequences. PMID:11494889

  1. Acute pancreatitis and development of pancreatic pseudo cyst after extra corporeal shock wave lithotripsy to a left renal calculus: A rare case with review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Mylarappa, Prasad; Javali, Tarun; Prathvi; Ramesh, D.

    2014-01-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) is considered the standard of care for the treatment of small upper ureteric and renal calculi. A few centers have extended its use to the treatment of bile duct calculi and pancreatic calculi. The complication rates with SWL are low, resulting in its wide spread acceptance and usage. However, some of the serious complications reported in 1% of patients include acute pancreatitis, perirenal hematoma, urosepsis, venous thrombosis, biliary obstruction, bowel perforation, lung injury, rupture of aortic aneurysm and intracranial hemorrhage. To our knowledge, only six cases of acute pancreatitis or necrotizing pancreatitis following SWL have been documented in the literature. Herein, we report a rare case of acute pancreatitis and formation of a pseudo cyst following SWL for left renal pelvic calculus. PMID:24497695

  2. Prospective evaluation of the cause of acute pancreatitis, with special attention to medicines

    PubMed Central

    Rashidi, Mitra; Røkke, Ola

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the cause of acute pancreatitis (AP) by conducting a thorough investigation of drugs and their possible etiological role. METHODS: We investigated the cause of AP in a large retrospective cohort of 613 adult patients admitted with AP at the Akershus University Hospital, Norway, from 2000 until 2009, who were evaluated with standard ward investigations. This group was compared with a prospectively evaluated group (n = 57) admitted from January 2010 until September 2010 who investigated more extensively using medical history and radiological assessment. RESULTS: The groups were comparable with regards to gender, age, comorbidity and severity. The most common etiology was bile stones and alcohol, occurring in 60% in both groups. The prospective group was examined more thoroughly with regards to the use of alcohol and medicines. An increased number of radiological investigations during hospital stay and at follow-up were also performed. A more extensive use of radiological evaluation did not increase the detection frequency of bile stones. In the prospective group, more than half of the patients had two or more possible causes of pancreatitis, being mostly a combination of bile stones and drugs. No possible cause was found in only 3.5% of these patients, compared with 29.7% in the retrospective group. CONCLUSION: A detailed medical history and extensive radiological evaluation may determine a possible etiology in almost all cases of AP. Many patients have several possible risk factors, and uncertainty remains in establishing the definitive etiology. PMID:26877614

  3. Intra-abdominal pressure: Time ripe to revise management guidelines of acute pancreatitis?

    PubMed Central

    Jaipuria, Jiten; Bhandari, Vimal; Chawla, Avneet Singh; Singh, Mohit

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To systematically review evidence on pathophysiology of intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) in acute pancreatitis (AP) with its clinical correlates. METHODS: Systematic review of available evidence in English literature with relevant medical subject heading terms on PubMed, Medline and Scopus with further search from open access sources on internet as suggested by articles retrieved. RESULTS: Intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) is increasingly gaining recognition as a point of specific intervention with potential to alter disease outcome and improve mortality in AP. IAH can be expected in at least 17% of patients presenting with diagnosis of AP to a typical tertiary care hospital (prevalence increasing to 50% in those with severe disease). Abdominal compartment syndrome can be expected in at least 15% patients with severe disease. Recent guidelines on management of AP do not acknowledge utility of surveillance for IAP other than those by Japanese Society of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery. We further outline pathophysiologic mechanisms of IAH; understanding of which advances our knowledge and helps to coherently align common observed variations in management related conundrums (such as fluid therapy, nutrition and antibiotic prophylaxis) with potential to further individualize treatment in AP. CONCLUSION: We suggest that IAP be given its due place in future practice guidelines and that recommendations be formed with help of a broader panel with inclusion of clinicians experienced in management of IAH. PMID:26909242

  4. Acute Pancreatitis Induced by Methimazole in a Patient With Subclinical Hyperthyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Agito, Katrina

    2015-01-01

    We report here a unique case of methimazole (MMI)-induced pancreatitis. To our knowledge, this is the sixth case reported in the literature and the first diagnosed in a patient with toxic multinodular goiter. A 51-year-old Caucasian female with a history of benign multinodular goiter and subclinical hyperthyroidism was started on MMI 10 mg orally daily. Three weeks later, she developed sharp epigastric pain, diarrhea, lack of appetite, and fever. Her lipase was elevated 5 times the upper limit of normal, consistent with acute pancreatitis. There was no history of hypertriglyceridemia, or alcohol abuse. Abdominal computed tomography was consistent with acute uncomplicated pancreatitis, without evidence of gallstones or tumors. MMI was discontinued, and her hyperthyroid symptoms were managed with propranolol. Her acute episode of pancreatitis quickly resolved clinically and biochemically. One year later, she redeveloped mild clinical symptoms of hyperthyroidism with biochemical evidence of subclinical hyperthyroidism. MMI 10 mg orally daily was restarted. Five days later, she experienced progressive abdominal discomfort. Her lipase was elevated 12 times the upper limit of normal, and the abdominal computed tomography was again compatible with acute uncomplicated pancreatitis. MMI was again discontinued, which was followed by rapid resolution of her pancreatitis. The patient is currently considering undergoing definitive therapy with radioactive iodine ablation. Our case as well as previous case reports in the literature should raise awareness about the possibility of pancreatitis in subjects treated with MMI in the presence of suggestive symptoms. If the diagnosis is confirmed by elevated pancreatic enzymes, the drug should be discontinued. PMID:26425645

  5. Severe Hypertriglyceridemia During Therapy For Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Bhojwani, Deepa; Darbandi, Rashid; Pei, Deqing; Ramsey, Laura B.; Chemaitilly, Wassim; Sandlund, John T.; Cheng, Cheng; Pui, Ching-Hon; Relling, Mary V.; Jeha, Sima; Metzger, Monika L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Asparaginase and steroids can cause hypertriglyceridemia in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). There are no guidelines for screening or management of patients with severe hypertriglyceridemia (>1000 mg/dL) during ALL therapy. Patients and Methods Fasting lipid profiles were obtained prospectively at 4 time-points for 257 children consecutively enrolled on a frontline ALL study. Risk factors were evaluated by the exact chi-square test. Details of adverse events and management of hypertriglyceridemia were extracted retrospectively. Results Eighteen of 257 (7%) patients developed severe hypertriglyceridemia. Older age and treatment with higher doses of asparaginase and steroids on the standard/high-risk arm were significant risk factors. Severe hypertriglyceridemia was not associated with pancreatitis after adjustment for age and treatment arm or with osteonecrosis after adjustment for age. However, patients with severe hypertriglyceridemia had a 2.5 to 3 times higher risk of thrombosis compared to patients without, albeit the difference was not statistical significant. Of the 30 episodes of severe hypertriglyceridemia in 18 patients, 7 were managed conservatively while the others with pharmacotherapy. Seventeen of 18 patients continued to receive asparaginase and steroids. Triglyceride levels normalized after completion of ALL therapy in all 12 patients with available measurements. Conclusion Asparaginase- and steroid-induced transient hypertriglyceridemia can be adequately managed with dietary modifications and close monitoring without altering chemotherapy. Patients with severe hypertriglyceridemia were not at increased risk of adverse events, with a possible exception of thrombosis. The benefit of pharmacotherapy in decreasing symptoms and potential complications requires further investigation. PMID:25087182

  6. ?,?-amyrin, a natural triterpenoid ameliorates L-arginine-induced acute pancreatitis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Melo, Caroline Mouro; Carvalho, Karine Maria Martins Bezerra; Neves, Julliana Catharina de Sousa; Morais, Talita Cavalcante; Rao, Vietla Satyanarayana; Santos, Flvia Almeida; Brito, Gerly Anne de Castro; Chaves, Mariana Helena

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To study the beneficial effects of triterpene ?,?-amyrin and the underlying mechanisms in an experimental pancreatitis model. METHODS: Acute pancreatitis was induced in five groups of rats (n = 8) by L-arginine (2 2.5 g/kg, intraperitoneal, 1 h apart) and 1 h later, they received a single oral dose of ?,?-amyrin (10, 30 and 100 mg/kg), methylprednisolone (30 mg/kg) and vehicle (3% Tween 80). A saline (0.9% NaCl) treated group served as a normal control. Efficacy was assessed at 24 h by determination of serum levels of amylase, lipase and pro-inflammatory cytokines [tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-? and interleukin (IL)-6], pancreatic myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, lipid peroxidation [thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS)], nitrate/nitrite levels, and the wet weight/body weight ratio. Tissue histology and the immunoreactivity for TNF-? and inducible nitric oxide synthetase (iNOS) were performed. RESULTS: ?,?-amyrin and methylprednisolone treatments significantly (P < 0.05) attenuated the L-arginine-induced increases in pancreatic wet weight/body weight ratio, and decreased the serum levels of amylase and lipase, and TNF-? and IL-6, as compared to the vehicle control. Also, pancreatic levels of MPO activity, TBARS, and nitrate/nitrite were significantly lower. Histological findings and TNF-? and iNOS immunostaining further confirmed the amelioration of pancreatic injury by ?,?-amyrin. CONCLUSION: ?,?-amyrin has the potential to combat acute pancreatitis by acting as an anti-inflammatory and antioxidant agent. PMID:20818810

  7. Management of severe acute malnutrition in children.

    PubMed

    Collins, Steve; Dent, Nicky; Binns, Paul; Bahwere, Paluku; Sadler, Kate; Hallam, Alistair

    2006-12-01

    Severe acute malnutrition (SAM) is defined as a weight-for-height measurement of 70% or less below the median, or three SD or more below the mean National Centre for Health Statistics reference values, the presence of bilateral pitting oedema of nutritional origin, or a mid-upper-arm circumference of less than 110 mm in children age 1-5 years. 13 million children under age 5 years have SAM, and the disorder is associated with 1 million to 2 million preventable child deaths each year. Despite this global importance, child-survival programmes have ignored SAM, and WHO does not recognise the term "acute malnutrition". Inpatient treatment is resource intensive and requires many skilled and motivated staff. Where SAM is common, the number of cases exceeds available inpatient capacity, which limits the effect of treatment; case-fatality rates are 20-30% and coverage is commonly under 10%. Programmes of community-based therapeutic care substantially reduce case-fatality rates and increase coverage rates. These programmes use new, ready-to-use, therapeutic foods and are designed to increase access to services, reduce opportunity costs, encourage early presentation and compliance, and thereby increase coverage and recovery rates. In community-based therapeutic care, all patients with SAM without complications are treated as outpatients. This approach promises to be a successful and cost-effective treatment strategy. PMID:17141707

  8. Duodenal obstruction following acute pancreatitis caused by a large duodenal diverticular bezoar.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Hun; Chang, Jae Hyuck; Nam, Sung Min; Lee, Mi Jeong; Maeng, Il Ho; Park, Jin Young; Im, Yun Sun; Kim, Tae Ho; Park, Il Young; Han, Sok Won

    2012-10-14

    Bezoars are concretions of indigestible materials in the gastrointestinal tract. It generally develops in patients with previous gastric surgery or patients with delayed gastric emptying. Cases of periampullary duodenal divericular bezoar are rare. Clinical manifestations by a bezoar vary from no symptom to acute abdominal syndrome depending on the location of the bezoar. Biliary obstruction or acute pancreatitis caused by a bezoar has been rarely reported. Small bowel obstruction by a bezoar is also rare, but it is a complication that requires surgery. This is a case of acute pancreatitis and subsequent duodenal obstruction caused by a large duodenal bezoar migrating from a periampullary diverticulum to the duodenal lumen, which mimicked pancreatic abscess or microperforation on abdominal computerized tomography. The patient underwent surgical removal of the bezoar and recovered completely. PMID:23082068

  9. Fatal acute necrohaemorrhagic pancreatitis with massive intraperitoneal and retroperitoneal bleeding: a rare cause of exsanguination.

    PubMed

    Querido, Sara; Carvalho, Ins; Moleiro, Filipa; Pvoa, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    An otherwise healthy 37-year-old man was admitted to hospital with uncontrollable vomiting and abdominal pain. Lithiasic acute pancreatitis was diagnosed on the basis of clinical symptoms along with raised serum amylase levels and compatible findings in ultrasonography and CT scan. Two Ranson criteria (lactate dehydrogenase over 350?U/L and aspartate aminotransferase over 250?U/L) were present at admission. The patient was transferred to an intensive care unit (ICU); intravenous crystalloids were prescribed and analgaesics were administered for pain relief. Unexpectedly, 10?h after ICU admission, he presented a cardiac arrest with a non-defibrillate rhythm and died after 40?min of advanced life support. An autopsy was performed and revealed acute necrohaemorrhagic pancreatitis with massive intraperitoneal and retroperitoneal haemorrhage. This case report summarises the epidemiology, pathophysiology and risk factors for fatal bleeding acute pancreatitis. PMID:26791128