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Sample records for severe metabolic acidosis

  1. Severe metabolic acidosis following assault chemical burn

    PubMed Central

    Roock, Sophie D; Deleuze, Jean-Paul; Rose, Thomas; Jennes, Serge; Hantson, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Assault chemical burns are uncommon in northern Europe. Besides local toxicity, systemic manifestations are possible after strong acid exposure. A 40-year-old woman was admitted 1 h after a criminal assault with sulfuric acid. The total burned surface area was 35%, third degree. Injury was due to sulfuric acid (measured pH 0.9) obtained from a car battery. Immediate complications were obstructive dyspnea and metabolic acidosis. The admission arterial pH was 6.92, with total bicarbonate 8.6 mEq/l and base deficit 23.4 mEq/l. The correction of metabolic acidosis was achieved after several hours by the administration of bicarbonate and lactate buffers. The patient developed several burns-related complications (sepsis and acute renal failure). Cutaneous projections of strong acids may cause severe metabolic acidosis, particularly when copious irrigation and clothes removal cannot be immediately performed at the scene. PMID:22787349

  2. Metabolic acidosis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... diabetes Hyperchloremic acidosis: Results from excessive loss of sodium bicarbonate from the body. This can occur with severe ... aimed at the underlying condition. In some cases, sodium bicarbonate (the chemical in baking soda) may be given ...

  3. Severe hypernatremic dehydration and metabolic acidosis due to neonatal intestinal microvillus inclusion disease.

    PubMed

    Shahid, Shaneela; Fraser, Douglas D; Driman, David K; Bax, Kevin C

    2012-01-01

    Neonatal microvillus inclusion disease (MID) is a congenital secretory diarrhea diagnosed by morphological enterocyte abnormalities on histology. The secretory diarrhea associated with MID occurs within the first few hours of birth and is exacerbated by enteral feeding. Affected newborns will die of dehydration and acid-base disturbances if MID is not rapidly recognized and treated with massive intravenous fluid replacement and gut rest. We report a case of a 4-day-old neonate presenting with 18% weight loss, hypernatremic dehydration and metabolic acidosis. Despite aggressive fluid resuscitation (206 ml/kg for the first 24 h), the dehydration and metabolic acidosis were only minimally improved. The diapers were found soaked with clear, non-odorous fluid on repeated examinations. Persistent secretory diarrhea was suspected. Stool electrolytes analyses showed a high NaCl content typical of secretory diarrhea and intestinal biopsy with electron microscopy was diagnostic of MID. PMID:21968248

  4. Diagnostic Challenge in a Patient with Severe Anion Gap Metabolic Acidosis

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Eugene M.; Kalimullah, Ejaaz; Sohail, M. Rizwan; Ramar, Kannan

    2015-01-01

    The approach to the patient with acute renal failure and elevated anion and osmolal gap is difficult. Differential diagnoses include toxic alcohol ingestion, diabetic or starvation ketoacidosis, or 5-oxoproline acidosis. We present a 76-year-old female with type 2 diabetes mellitus, who was found at home in a confused state. Laboratory analysis revealed serum pH 6.84, bicarbonate 5.8?mmol/L, pCO2 29?mmHg, anion gap 22.2?mmol/L, osmolal gap 17.4?mOsm/kg, elevated beta-hydroxybutyrate (4.2?mmol/L), random blood sugar 213?mg/dL, creatinine 2.1?mg/dL, and potassium 7.5?mmol/L with no electrocardiogram (EKG) changes. Fomepizole and hemodialysis were initiated for presumed ethylene glycol or methanol ingestion. Drug screens returned negative for ethylene glycol, alcohols, and acetaminophen, but there were elevated urine levels of acetone (11?mg/dL). The acetaminophen level was negative, and 5-oxoproline was not analyzed. After 5 days in the intensive care unit (ICU), her mental status improved with supportive care. She was discharged to a nursing facility. Though a diagnosis was not established, our patient's presentation was likely due to starvation ketosis combined with chronic acetaminophen ingestion. Acetone ingestion is less likely. Overall, our case illustrates the importance of systematically approaching an elevated osmolal and anion gap metabolic acidosis. PMID:26113997

  5. Metabolic acidosis: neo-considerations for general surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Martin, LCE; Abah, U; Bean, E; Gupta, S

    2012-01-01

    Hyperchloraemic metabolic acidosis is a documented complication of neobladder formation. However, it usually improves with time and is mild. Severe and persistent metabolic acidosis may manifest when patients undergo further surgery for other reasons. Neobladder formation following radical cystectomy or cystoprostatectomy is becoming increasingly more common, and surgeons treating patients with neobladders should recognise and treat metabolic acidosis with intravenous fluids and bicarbonate. PMID:23131216

  6. Acidosis induces reprogramming of cellular metabolism to mitigate oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A variety of oncogenic and environmental factors alter tumor metabolism to serve the distinct cellular biosynthetic and bioenergetic needs present during oncogenesis. Extracellular acidosis is a common microenvironmental stress in solid tumors, but little is known about its metabolic influence, particularly when present in the absence of hypoxia. In order to characterize the extent of tumor cell metabolic adaptations to acidosis, we employed stable isotope tracers to examine how acidosis impacts glucose, glutamine, and palmitate metabolism in breast cancer cells exposed to extracellular acidosis. Results Acidosis increased both glutaminolysis and fatty acid ?-oxidation, which contribute metabolic intermediates to drive the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA cycle) and ATP generation. Acidosis also led to a decoupling of glutaminolysis and novel glutathione (GSH) synthesis by repressing GCLC/GCLM expression. We further found that acidosis redirects glucose away from lactate production and towards the oxidative branch of the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP). These changes all serve to increase nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) production and counter the increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) present under acidosis. The reduced novel GSH synthesis under acidosis may explain the increased demand for NADPH to recycle existing pools of GSH. Interestingly, acidosis also disconnected novel ribose synthesis from the oxidative PPP, seemingly to reroute PPP metabolites to the TCA cycle. Finally, we found that acidosis activates p53, which contributes to both the enhanced PPP and increased glutaminolysis, at least in part, through the induction of G6PD and GLS2 genes. Conclusions Acidosis alters the cellular metabolism of several major metabolites, which induces a significant degree of metabolic inflexibility. Cells exposed to acidosis largely rely upon mitochondrial metabolism for energy generation to the extent that metabolic intermediates are redirected away from several other critical metabolic processes, including ribose and glutathione synthesis. These alterations lead to both a decrease in cellular proliferation and increased sensitivity to ROS. Collectively, these data reveal a role for p53 in cellular metabolic reprogramming under acidosis, in order to permit increased bioenergetic capacity and ROS neutralization. Understanding the metabolic adaptations that cancer cells make under acidosis may present opportunities to generate anti-tumor therapeutic agents that are more tumor-specific. PMID:24359630

  7. Sodium Bicarbonate Therapy in Patients with Metabolic Acidosis

    PubMed Central

    Adeva-Andany, María M.; Fernández-Fernández, Carlos; Mouriño-Bayolo, David; Castro-Quintela, Elvira; Domínguez-Montero, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic acidosis occurs when a relative accumulation of plasma anions in excess of cations reduces plasma pH. Replacement of sodium bicarbonate to patients with sodium bicarbonate loss due to diarrhea or renal proximal tubular acidosis is useful, but there is no definite evidence that sodium bicarbonate administration to patients with acute metabolic acidosis, including diabetic ketoacidosis, lactic acidosis, septic shock, intraoperative metabolic acidosis, or cardiac arrest, is beneficial regarding clinical outcomes or mortality rate. Patients with advanced chronic kidney disease usually show metabolic acidosis due to increased unmeasured anions and hyperchloremia. It has been suggested that metabolic acidosis might have a negative impact on progression of kidney dysfunction and that sodium bicarbonate administration might attenuate this effect, but further evaluation is required to validate such a renoprotective strategy. Sodium bicarbonate is the predominant buffer used in dialysis fluids and patients on maintenance dialysis are subjected to a load of sodium bicarbonate during the sessions, suffering a transient metabolic alkalosis of variable severity. Side effects associated with sodium bicarbonate therapy include hypercapnia, hypokalemia, ionized hypocalcemia, and QTc interval prolongation. The potential impact of regular sodium bicarbonate therapy on worsening vascular calcifications in patients with chronic kidney disease has been insufficiently investigated. PMID:25405229

  8. [Water-electrolyte and acid-base imbalance. VI. Metabolic acidosis].

    PubMed

    Velásquez-Jones, L

    1990-03-01

    Metabolic acidosis results from a disequilibrium between production and excretion of acid. Loss of base from the body through the gastrointestinal tract or in the urine or an increase in metabolic acid production are the three major mechanisms from which metabolic acidosis is generated. Uncomplicated metabolic acidosis is manifested by an increase in blood acidity, hypobicarbonatemia, and hypocapnea. The magnitude of these changes defines the severity wf the acidosis. It is convenient to divide metabolic acidosis into two general categories (hyperchloremic and normochloremic), based on the observed anion gap, as this serves to narrow the differential diagnosis. The normal anion gap is that amount of plasma anion not measure by routine laboratory screening that accounts for the difference between the measured sodium cation (Na+) and anions (Cl +/- HCO3-). Metabolic acidosis; causes; diagnosis; clinical manifestations. PMID:2193653

  9. Metabolic acidosis during parenteral nutrition: Pathophysiological mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Dounousi, Evangelia; Zikou, Xanthi; Koulouras, Vasilis; Katopodis, Kostas

    2015-01-01

    Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is associated with metabolic complications including metabolic acidosis (MA), one of the main disorders of acid-base balance. The main causes involved in the appearance of MA during TPN administration are the metabolism of cationic amino acids and amino acids containing sulfuric acid (exogenous addition), the titratable acidity of the infused parenteral solution, the addition of acidificant agents (hydrochloric acid, acetic acid), thiamine deficiency, disruption of carbohydrate and lipid metabolic pathways and D-fructose administration. Moreover, hypophosphatemia that appears during TPN therapy contributes significantly to the maintenance of MA. This review describes in a comprehensive way the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in the appearance of MA induced by intravenous administration of TPN products most commonly used in critically ill-patients. PMID:25983433

  10. Metabolic acidosis during parenteral nutrition: Pathophysiological mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Dounousi, Evangelia; Zikou, Xanthi; Koulouras, Vasilis; Katopodis, Kostas

    2015-05-01

    Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is associated with metabolic complications including metabolic acidosis (MA), one of the main disorders of acid-base balance. The main causes involved in the appearance of MA during TPN administration are the metabolism of cationic amino acids and amino acids containing sulfuric acid (exogenous addition), the titratable acidity of the infused parenteral solution, the addition of acidificant agents (hydrochloric acid, acetic acid), thiamine deficiency, disruption of carbohydrate and lipid metabolic pathways and D-fructose administration. Moreover, hypophosphatemia that appears during TPN therapy contributes significantly to the maintenance of MA. This review describes in a comprehensive way the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in the appearance of MA induced by intravenous administration of TPN products most commonly used in critically ill-patients. PMID:25983433

  11. Acidosis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Respiratory acidosis develops when there is too much carbon dioxide (an acid) in the body. This type of ... when the body is unable to remove enough carbon dioxide through breathing. Other names for respiratory acidosis are ...

  12. Biochemical aspects of renal ammonia formation in metabolic acidosis.

    PubMed

    Hems, D A

    1975-01-01

    In omnivorous creatures, the diet is acidogenic, especially as a result of the meat content, which gives rise to phosphoric and sulphuric acids, i.e., to metabolic acidosis. In the short term, metabolic acids are buffered by tissue proteins and bicarbonate (the 'alkali reserve'). In the longer term, acid must be excreted, or neutralized with base which is also generated from the diet, by conversion of dietary amino-nitrogen to ammonia. The final steps of this process occur in the kidney, which converts circulating glutamine to ammonia, and to carbon products such as glucose and carbon dioxide, by metabolic reactions which adapt during acidosis to generate more ammonia and maintain an increased renal ammonia content. The complex mechanisms which govern the formation of ammonia, glucose and carbon dioxide from glutamine, involving the reactions of amino acids, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and gluconeogenesis, are reviewed. PMID:231

  13. Efficacy of hemodiafiltration in a child with severe lactic acidosis due to thiamine deficiency.

    PubMed

    Pela, I; Seracini, D; Lavoratti, G C; Sarti, A

    2000-05-01

    We report the case of a child in whom severe lactic acidosis (LA) and hyperammonemia developed after twenty days of total parenteral nutrition (TPN) for diffuse esophageal damage due to caustic ingestion. The revision of TPN preparation revealed that thiamine was never included and the hypothesis of thiamine deficiency was later confirmed measuring the serum thiamine level. Because severe metabolic acidosis the dialytic treatment with hemodiafiltration (HDF) and bicarbonate infusion were performed: the patient very quickly recovered with dramatic reestablishment of the acid-basic balance. Thiamine administration restored lactate metabolism. We emphasize that HDF is a useful and prompt treatment for LA to get over the critical phase of neurological and cardiological damage. PMID:11305815

  14. Treatment of Metabolic Acidosis in Patients With CKD

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei; Abramowitz, Matthew K.

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic acidosis is a common complication of chronic kidney disease and believed to contribute to a number of sequelae, including bone disease, altered protein metabolism, skeletal muscle wasting, and progressive GFR loss. Small trials in animal models and humans suggest a role for alkali therapy to lessen these complications. Recent studies support this notion, although more definitive evidence is needed on the long-term benefits of alkali therapy and the optimal serum bicarbonate level. The role of dietary modification should also be given greater consideration. In addition, potential adverse effects of alkali treatment must be taken into consideration, including sodium retention and the theoretical concern of promoting vascular calcification. This teaching case summarizes the rationale for and the benefits and complications of base therapy in patients with chronic kidney disease. PMID:23932089

  15. Abnormalities of acid-base balance and predisposition to metabolic acidosis in Metachromatic Leukodystrophy patients.

    PubMed

    Lorioli, L; Cicalese, M P; Silvani, P; Assanelli, A; Salvo, I; Mandelli, A; Fumagalli, F; Fiori, R; Ciceri, F; Aiuti, A; Sessa, M; Roncarolo, M G; Lanzani, C; Biffi, A

    2015-05-01

    Metachromatic Leukodystrophy (MLD; MIM# 250100) is a rare inherited lysosomal storage disorder caused by the deficiency of Arylsulfatase A (ARSA). The enzymatic defect results in the accumulation of the ARSA substrate that is particularly relevant in myelin forming cells and leads to progressive dysmyelination and dysfunction of the central and peripheral nervous system. Sulfatide accumulation has also been reported in various visceral organs, although little is known about the potential clinical consequences of such accumulation. Different forms of MLD-associated gallbladder disease have been described, and there is one reported case of an MLD patient presenting with functional consequences of sulfatide accumulation in the kidney. Here we describe a wide cohort of MLD patients in whom a tendency to sub-clinical metabolic acidosis was observed. Furthermore in some of them we report episodes of metabolic acidosis of different grades of severity developed in acute clinical conditions of various origin. Importantly, we finally show how a careful acid-base balance monitoring and prompt correction of imbalances might prevent severe consequences of acidosis. PMID:25796965

  16. Treatment options for lactic acidosis and metabolic crisis in children with mitochondrial disease.

    PubMed

    Danhauser, Katharina; Smeitink, Jan A M; Freisinger, Peter; Sperl, Wolfgang; Sabir, Hemmen; Hadzik, Berit; Mayatepek, Ertan; Morava, Eva; Distelmaier, Felix

    2015-05-01

    The mitochondrial pyruvate oxidation route is a tightly regulated process, which is essential for aerobic cellular energy production. Disruption of this pathway may lead to severe neurometabolic disorders with onset in early childhood. A frequent finding in these patients is acute and chronic lactic acidemia, which is caused by increased conversion of pyruvate via the enzyme lactate dehydrogenase. Under stable clinical conditions, this process may remain well compensated and does not require specific therapy. However, especially in situations with altered energy demands, such as febrile infections or longer periods of fasting, children with mitochondrial disorders have a high risk of metabolic decompensation with exacerbation of hyperlactatemia and severe metabolic acidosis. Unfortunately, no controlled studies regarding therapy of this critical condition are available and clinical outcome is often unfavorable. Therefore, the aim of this review was to formulate expert-based suggestions for treatment of these patients, including dietary recommendations, buffering strategies and specific drug therapy. However, it is important to keep in mind that a specific therapy for the underlying metabolic cause in children with mitochondrial diseases is usually not available and symptomatic therapy especially of severe lactic acidosis has its ethical limitations. PMID:25687154

  17. Citrate metabolism in blood transfusions and its relationship due to metabolic alkalosis and respiratory acidosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kai; Xu, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic alkalosis commonly results from excessive hydrochloric acid (HCl), potassium (K+) and water (H2O) loss from the stomach or through the urine. The plasma anion gap increases in non-hypoproteinemic metabolic alkalosis due to an increased negative charge equivalent on albumin and the free ionized calcium (Ca++) content of plasma decreases. The mean citrate load in all patients was 8740±7027 mg from 6937±6603 mL of transfused blood products. The citrate load was significantly higher in patients with alkalosis (9164±4870 vs. 7809±3967, P < 0.05). The estimated mean total citrate administered via blood and blood products was calculated as 43.2±34.19 mg/kilogram/day. In non-massive and frequent blood transfusions, the elevated carbon dioxide output has been shown to occur. Due to citrate metabolism causes intracellular acidosis. As a result of intracellular acidosis compensation, decompensated metabolic alkalosis + respiratory acidosis and electrolyte imbalance may develop, blood transfusions may result in certain complications. PMID:26131288

  18. Prevalence of Metformin Use and the Associated Risk of Metabolic Acidosis in US Diabetic Adults With CKD

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Chin-Chi; Yeh, Hung-Chieh; Chen, Bradley; Tsai, Ching-Wei; Lin, Yu-Sheng; Huang, Chiu-Ching

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The use of metformin in chronic kidney disease (CKD) population has been intensely debated with conflicting evidence. Large population studies are needed to inform risk assessment and therapeutic decision-making. We evaluated the associations among metformin, metabolic acidosis, and CKD in a 10-year nationally representative noninstitutionalized civilian population in the United States. In this cross-sectional study, a total of 2279 diabetic adults aged 20 years or older in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) from 2003 to 2012 were included and had measurements of serum bicarbonate, sodium, potassium, and chloride. The exposure was metformin use. The outcome was subclinical and severe metabolic acidosis defined by serum bicarbonate <23?mEq/L and anion gap > 16mEq/L and by serum bicarbonate < 20?mEq/L, respectively. The prevalence of metformin use decreased from 67.2% among CKD-1 and -2, 40.6% among CKD-3, to 1.3% among advanced CKD-4 and -5. Across CKD stages up to CKD-3b, we observed a tendency of lower levels of serum bicarbonate that was significant in metformin users with CKD-2 and CKD-3a and marginally significant with CKD-3b compared to nonmetformin users. The corresponding tendency of higher anion gap in metformin users with the estimated glomerular filtration rate >60?mL/min/1.73?m2 was also observed. In multiple linear regression analysis, metformin was significantly associated with decreased serum bicarbonate levels (??=??0.45, 95% CI: ?0.73, ?0.17) and increased serum anion gap levels (??=?0.40, 95% CI: 0.19, 0.61). The adjusted odds ratio of subclinical high anion gap and severe metabolic acidosis for metformin users was 1.68 (95% CI: 1.11, 2.55) and 1.31 (0.49, 3.47), respectively. The association between metformin and serum bicarbonate was significantly modified by CKD status. No interaction was found between metformin and CKD stages for serum anion gap and acidosis. Metformin is associated with subclinical metabolic acidosis but not with severe metabolic acidosis. The propensity of serum bicarbonate-lowering effect was intensified in advanced CKD; however, such tendency was not associated with the risk of clinically defined acidosis. Our findings highlight a potential of cautious expansion of metformin use among CKD-3b patients with diabetes meriting further investigations. PMID:26705203

  19. Infusion of sodium bicarbonate in experimentally induced metabolic acidosis does not provoke cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) acidosis in calves

    PubMed Central

    Abeysekara, Saman; Zello, Gordon A.; Lohmann, Katharina L.; Alcorn, Jane; Hamilton, Don L.; Naylor, Jonathan M.

    2012-01-01

    In a crossover study, 5 calves were made acidotic by intermittent intravenous infusion of isotonic hydrochloric acid (HCl) over approximately 24 h. This was followed by rapid (4 h) or slow (24 h) correction of blood pH with isotonic sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) to determine if rapid correction of acidemia produced paradoxical cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) acidosis. Infusion of HCl produced a marked metabolic acidosis with respiratory compensation. Venous blood pH (mean ± Sx) was 7.362 ± 0.021 and 7.116 ± 0.032, partial pressure of carbon dioxide (Pco2, torr) 48.8 ± 1.3 and 34.8 ± 1.4, and bicarbonate (mmol/L), 27.2 ± 1.27 and 11 ± 0.96; CSF pH was 7.344 ± 0.031 and 7.240 ± 0.039, Pco2 42.8 ± 2.9 and 34.5 ± 1.4, and bicarbonate 23.5 ± 0.91 and 14.2 ± 1.09 for the period before the infusion of hydrochloric acid and immediately before the start of sodium bicarbonate correction, respectively. In calves treated with rapid infusion of sodium bicarbonate, correction of venous acidemia was significantly more rapid and increases in Pco2 and bicarbonate in CSF were also more rapid. However, there was no significant difference in CSF pH. After 4 h of correction, CSF pH was 7.238 ± 0.040 and 7.256 ± 0.050, Pco2 44.4 ± 2.2 and 34.2 ± 2.1, and bicarbonate 17.8 ± 1.02 and 14.6 ± 1.4 for rapid and slow correction, respectively. Under the conditions of this experiment, rapid correction of acidemia did not provoke paradoxical CSF acidosis. PMID:22754090

  20. Ionized alkaline water: new strategy for management of metabolic acidosis in experimental animals.

    PubMed

    Abol-Enein, Hassan; Gheith, Osama A; Barakat, Nashwa; Nour, Eman; Sharaf, Abd-Elhameed

    2009-06-01

    Metabolic acidosis can occur as a result of either the accumulation of endogenous acids or loss of bicarbonate from the gastrointestinal tract or the kidney, which represent common causes of metabolic acidosis. The appropriate treatment of acute metabolic acidosis has been very controversial. Ionized alkaline water was not evaluated in such groups of patients in spite of its safety and reported benefits. So, we aimed to assess its efficacy in the management of metabolic acidosis in animal models. Two models of metabolic acidosis were created in dogs and rats. The first model of renal failure was induced by ligation of both ureters; and the second model was induced by urinary diversion to gut (gastrointestinal bicarbonate loss model). Both models were subjected to ionized alkaline water (orally and by hemodialysis). Dogs with renal failure were assigned to two groups according to the type of dialysate utilized during hemodialysis sessions, the first was utilizing alkaline water and the second was utilizing conventional water. Another two groups of animals with urinary diversion were arranged to receive oral alkaline water and tap water. In renal failure animal models, acid-base parameters improved significantly after hemodialysis with ionized alkaline water compared with the conventional water treated with reverse osmosis (RO). Similar results were observed in urinary diversion models as there was significant improvement of both the partial pressure of carbon dioxide and serum bicarbonate (P = 0.007 and 0.001 respectively) after utilizing alkaline water orally. Alkaline ionized water can be considered as a major safe strategy in the management of metabolic acidosis secondary to renal failure or dialysis or urinary diversion. Human studies are indicated in the near future to confirm this issue in humans. PMID:19527469

  1. Mild metabolic acidosis impairs the ?-adrenergic response in isolated human failing myocardium

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Pronounced extracellular acidosis reduces both cardiac contractility and the ?-adrenergic response. In the past, this was shown in some studies using animal models. However, few data exist regarding how the human end-stage failing myocardium, in which compensatory mechanisms are exhausted, reacts to acute mild metabolic acidosis. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of mild metabolic acidosis on contractility and the ?-adrenergic response of isolated trabeculae from human end-stage failing hearts. Methods Intact isometrically twitching trabeculae isolated from patients with end-stage heart failure were exposed to mild metabolic acidosis (pH 7.20). Trabeculae were stimulated at increasing frequencies and finally exposed to increasing concentrations of isoproterenol (0 to 1 × 10-6 M). Results A mild metabolic acidosis caused a depression in twitch-force amplitude of 26% (12.1 ± 1.9 to 9.0 ± 1.5 mN/mm2; n = 12; P < 0.01) as compared with pH 7.40. Force-frequency relation measurements yielded no further significant differences of twitch force. At the maximal isoproterenol concentration, the force amplitude was comparable in each of the two groups (pH 7.40 versus pH 7.20). However, the half-maximal effective concentration (EC50) was significantly increased in the acidosis group, with an EC50 of 5.834 × 10-8 M (confidence interval (CI), 3.48 × 10-8 to 9.779 × 10-8; n = 9), compared with the control group, which had an EC50 of 1.056 × 10-8 M (CI, 2.626 × 10-9 to 4.243 × 10-8; n = 10; P < 0.05), indicating an impaired ?-adrenergic force response. Conclusions Our data show that mild metabolic acidosis reduces cardiac contractility and significantly impairs the ?-adrenergic force response in human failing myocardium. Thus, our results could contribute to the still-controversial discussion about the therapy regimen of acidosis in patients with critical heart failure. PMID:22889236

  2. Response of the mitochondrial proteome of rat renal proximal convoluted tubules to chronic metabolic acidosis.

    PubMed

    Freund, Dana M; Prenni, Jessica E; Curthoys, Norman P

    2013-01-15

    Metabolic acidosis is a common clinical condition that is caused by a decrease in blood pH and bicarbonate concentration. Increased extraction and mitochondrial catabolism of plasma glutamine within the renal proximal convoluted tubule generates ammonium and bicarbonate ions that facilitate the excretion of acid and partially restore acid-base balance. Previous studies identified only a few mitochondrial proteins, including two key enzymes of glutamine metabolism, which are increased during chronic acidosis. A workflow was developed to characterize the mitochondrial proteome of the proximal convoluted tubule. Based upon the increase in specific activity of cytochrome c oxidase, the isolated mitochondria were enriched eightfold. Two-dimensional liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry was utilized to compare mitochondrial-enriched samples from control and chronic acidotic rats. Proteomic analysis identified 901 proteins in the control and acidotic samples. Further analysis identified 37 peptides that contain an N-?-acetyl-lysine; of these, 22 are novel sites. Spectral counting analysis revealed 33 proteins that are significantly altered in abundance in response to chronic metabolic acidosis. Western blot analysis was performed to validate the calculated changes in abundance. Thus the current study represents the first comprehensive analysis of the mitochondrial proteome of the rat renal proximal convoluted tubule and its response to metabolic acidosis. PMID:23136003

  3. Chronic metabolic acidosis reduces urinary oxalate excretion and promotes intestinal oxalate secretion in the rat.

    PubMed

    Whittamore, Jonathan M; Hatch, Marguerite

    2015-11-01

    Urinary oxalate excretion is reduced in rats during a chronic metabolic acidosis, but how this is achieved is not clear. In this report, we re-examine our prior work on the effects of a metabolic acidosis on urinary oxalate handling [Green et al., Am J Physiol Ren Physiol 289(3):F536-F543, 2005], offering a more detailed analysis and interpretation of the data, together with new, previously unpublished observations revealing a marked impact on intestinal oxalate transport. Sprague-Dawley rats were provided with 0.28 M ammonium chloride in their drinking water for either 4 or 14 days followed by 24 h urine collections, blood-gas and serum ion analysis, and measurements of (14)C-oxalate fluxes across isolated segments of the distal colon. Urinary oxalate excretion was significantly reduced by 75 % after just 4 days compared to control rats, and this was similarly sustained at 14 days. Oxalate:creatinine clearance ratios indicated enhanced net re-absorption of oxalate by the kidney during a metabolic acidosis, but this was not associated with any substantive changes to serum oxalate levels. In the distal colon, oxalate transport was dramatically altered from net absorption in controls (6.20 ± 0.63 pmol cm(-2) h(-1)), to net secretion in rats with a metabolic acidosis (-5.19 ± 1.18 and -2.07 ± 1.05 pmol cm(-2) h(-1) at 4 and 14 days, respectively). Although we cannot rule out modifications to bi-directional oxalate movements along the proximal tubule, these findings support a gut-kidney axis in the management of oxalate homeostasis, where this shift in renal handling during a metabolic acidosis is associated with compensatory adaptations by the intestine. PMID:26162424

  4. An autopsy case of death due to metabolic acidosis after citric acid ingestion.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Tomoya; Usui, Akihito; Matsumura, Takashi; Aramaki, Tomomi; Hosoya, Tadashi; Igari, Yui; Ohuchi, Tsukasa; Hayashizaki, Yoshie; Usui, Kiyotaka; Funayama, Masato

    2015-11-01

    A man in his 40s was found unconscious on a sofa in a communal residence for people with various disabilities. He appeared to have drunk 800ml of undiluted citric acid from a commercial plastic bottle. The instructions on the label of the beverage specified that the beverage be diluted 20- to 30-fold before consumption. The patient was admitted to an emergency hospital with severe metabolic acidosis (pH, 6.70; HCO3(-), 3.6mEq/L) and a low ionized calcium level (0.73mmol/L). Although ionized calcium and catecholamines were continuously administered intravenously to correct the acidosis, the state of acidemia and low blood pressure did not improve, and he died 20h later. Citric acid concentrations in the patient's serum drawn shortly after treatment in the hospital and from the heart at autopsy were 80.6mg/ml and 39.8mg/dl, respectively (normal range: 1.3-2.6mg/dl). Autopsy revealed black discoloration of the mucosal surface of the esophagus. Microscopically, degenerated epithelium and neutrophilic infiltration in the muscle layer were observed. In daily life, drinking a large amount of concentrated citric acid beverage is rare as a cause of lethal poisoning. However, persons with mental disorders such as dementia may mistakenly drink detergent or concentrated fluids, as in our case. Family members or facility staff in the home or nursing facility must bear in mind that they should not leave such bottles in places where they are easily accessible to mentally handicapped persons. PMID:26594004

  5. Tumour hypoxia induces a metabolic shift causing acidosis: a common feature in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chiche, Johanna; Brahimi-Horn, M Christiane; Pouysségur, Jacques

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Maintenance of cellular pH homeostasis is fundamental to life. A number of key intracellular pH (pHi) regulating systems including the Na+/H+ exchangers, the proton pump, the monocarboxylate transporters, the HCO3? transporters and exchangers and the membrane-associated and cytosolic carbonic anhydrases cooperate in maintaining a pHi that is permissive for cell survival. A common feature of tumours is acidosis caused by hypoxia (low oxygen tension). In addition to oncogene activation and transformation, hypoxia is responsible for inducing acidosis through a shift in cellular metabolism that generates a high acid load in the tumour microenvironment. However, hypoxia and oncogene activation also allow cells to adapt to the potentially toxic effects of an excess in acidosis. Hypoxia does so by inducing the activity of a transcription factor the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF), and particularly HIF-1, that in turn enhances the expression of a number of pHi-regulating systems that cope with acidosis. In this review, we will focus on the characterization and function of some of the hypoxia-inducible pH-regulating systems and their induction by hypoxic stress. It is essential to understand the fundamentals of pH regulation to meet the challenge consisting in targeting tumour metabolism and acidosis as an anti-tumour approach. We will summarize strategies that take advantage of intracellular and extracellular pH regulation to target the primary tumour and metastatic growth, and to turn around resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. PMID:20015196

  6. Hyperchloremic Metabolic Acidosis due to Cholestyramine: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Kamar, Fareed B.; McQuillan, Rory F.

    2015-01-01

    Cholestyramine is a bile acid sequestrant that has been used in the treatment of hypercholesterolemia, pruritus due to elevated bile acid levels, and diarrhea due to bile acid malabsorption. This medication can rarely cause hyperchloremic nonanion gap metabolic acidosis, a complication featured in this report of an adult male with concomitant acute kidney injury. This case emphasizes the caution that must be taken in prescribing cholestyramine to patients who may also be volume depleted, in renal failure, or taking spironolactone. PMID:26425378

  7. THE CORRELATION OF SERUM BICARBONATE AND METABOLIC ACIDOSIS TO ALBUMIN IN HEMODIALYSIS PATIENTS

    E-print Network

    Vyduna, Jennifer Lynn

    2012-12-31

    of bicarbonate from the lower intestine, breakdown of proteins from diet, and oxidation of carbohydrates and fats in muscle cells (13, 15). The kidney assists in regenerating bicarbonate used for buffering acids and is vital in acid-base balance. Hydrogen ion... including renal osteodystrophy, protein catabolism, decreased normalized protein catabolic rate (nPCR), decreased serum albumin synthesis, and protein energy wasting are observed with metabolic acidosis during maintenance hemodialysis (3, 4). Maintenance...

  8. Prevalence of Metformin Use and the Associated Risk of Metabolic Acidosis in US Diabetic Adults With CKD: A National Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Chin-Chi; Yeh, Hung-Chieh; Chen, Bradley; Tsai, Ching-Wei; Lin, Yu-Sheng; Huang, Chiu-Ching

    2015-12-01

    The use of metformin in chronic kidney disease (CKD) population has been intensely debated with conflicting evidence. Large population studies are needed to inform risk assessment and therapeutic decision-making. We evaluated the associations among metformin, metabolic acidosis, and CKD in a 10-year nationally representative noninstitutionalized civilian population in the United States.In this cross-sectional study, a total of 2279 diabetic adults aged 20 years or older in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) from 2003 to 2012 were included and had measurements of serum bicarbonate, sodium, potassium, and chloride. The exposure was metformin use. The outcome was subclinical and severe metabolic acidosis defined by serum bicarbonate <23?mEq/L and anion gap > 16mEq/L and by serum bicarbonate < 20?mEq/L, respectively.The prevalence of metformin use decreased from 67.2% among CKD-1 and -2, 40.6% among CKD-3, to 1.3% among advanced CKD-4 and -5. Across CKD stages up to CKD-3b, we observed a tendency of lower levels of serum bicarbonate that was significant in metformin users with CKD-2 and CKD-3a and marginally significant with CKD-3b compared to nonmetformin users. The corresponding tendency of higher anion gap in metformin users with the estimated glomerular filtration rate >60?mL/min/1.73?m was also observed. In multiple linear regression analysis, metformin was significantly associated with decreased serum bicarbonate levels (??=?-0.45, 95% CI: -0.73, -0.17) and increased serum anion gap levels (??=?0.40, 95% CI: 0.19, 0.61). The adjusted odds ratio of subclinical high anion gap and severe metabolic acidosis for metformin users was 1.68 (95% CI: 1.11, 2.55) and 1.31 (0.49, 3.47), respectively. The association between metformin and serum bicarbonate was significantly modified by CKD status. No interaction was found between metformin and CKD stages for serum anion gap and acidosis.Metformin is associated with subclinical metabolic acidosis but not with severe metabolic acidosis. The propensity of serum bicarbonate-lowering effect was intensified in advanced CKD; however, such tendency was not associated with the risk of clinically defined acidosis. Our findings highlight a potential of cautious expansion of metformin use among CKD-3b patients with diabetes meriting further investigations. PMID:26705203

  9. Rh versus pH: the role of Rhesus glycoproteins in renal ammonia excretion during metabolic acidosis in a freshwater teleost fish.

    PubMed

    Wright, Patricia A; Wood, Chris M; Wilson, Jonathan M

    2014-08-15

    Increased renal ammonia excretion in response to metabolic acidosis is thought to be a conserved response in vertebrates. We tested the hypothesis that Rhesus (Rh) glycoproteins in the kidney of the freshwater common carp, Cyprinus carpio, play a crucial role in regulating renal ammonia excretion during chronic metabolic acidosis. Exposure to water pH 4.0 (72 h) resulted in a classic metabolic acidosis with reduced plasma arterial pH and [HCO3(-)], no change in PCO2 and large changes in renal function. Urine [NH4(+)] as well as [titratable acidity-HCO3(-)] rose significantly over the acid exposure, but the profound reduction (fivefold) in urine flow rates eliminated the expected elevations in renal ammonia excretion. Low urine flow rates may be a primary strategy to conserve ions, as urinary excretion rates of Na(+), Cl(-) and Ca(2+) were significantly lower during the acid exposure relative to the control period. Interestingly, renal Rhcg1 mRNA and protein levels were elevated in acid-exposed relative to control groups, along with mRNA levels of several ion transporters, including the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger, H(+)-ATPase and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase. Immunofluorescence microscopy showed a strong apical Rhcg1 signal in distal tubules. Taken together, these data show that renal Rh glycoproteins and associated ion transporters are responsive to metabolic acidosis, but conservation of ions through reduced urine flow rates takes primacy over renal acid-base regulation in the freshwater C. carpio. We propose that an 'acid/base-ion balance' compromise explains the variable renal responses to metabolic acidosis in freshwater teleosts. PMID:24855681

  10. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery reduces bone mineral density and induces metabolic acidosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Abegg, Kathrin; Gehring, Nicole; Wagner, Carsten A; Liesegang, Annette; Schiesser, Marc; Bueter, Marco; Lutz, Thomas A

    2013-11-01

    Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery leads to bone loss in humans, which may be caused by vitamin D and calcium malabsorption and subsequent secondary hyperparathyroidism. However, because these conditions occur frequently in obese people, it is unclear whether they are the primary causes of bone loss after RYGB. To determine the contribution of calcium and vitamin D malabsorption to bone loss in a rat RYGB model, adult male Wistar rats were randomized for RYGB surgery, sham-operation-ad libitum fed, or sham-operation-body weight-matched. Bone mineral density, calcium and phosphorus balance, acid-base status, and markers of bone turnover were assessed at different time points for 14 wk after surgery. Bone mineral density decreased for several weeks after RYGB. Intestinal calcium absorption was reduced early after surgery, but plasma calcium and parathyroid hormone levels were normal. 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels decreased, while levels of active 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D increased after surgery. RYGB rats displayed metabolic acidosis due to increased plasma lactate levels and increased urinary calcium loss throughout the study. These results suggest that initial calcium malabsorption may play a key role in bone loss early after RYGB in rats, but other factors, including chronic metabolic acidosis, contribute to insufficient bone restoration after normalization of intestinal calcium absorption. Secondary hyperparathyroidism is not involved in postoperative bone loss. Upregulated vitamin D activation may compensate for any vitamin D malabsorption. PMID:24026074

  11. Mechanism of potassium depletion during chronic metabolic acidosis in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Scandling, J.D.; Ornt, D.B.

    1987-01-01

    Pair-fed rats on a normal K diet were given either 1.5% NH/sub 4/Cl or water for 4 days. The acid-fed animals developed metabolic acidosis, negative K balance, and K depletion. Urinary Na excretion and urinary flow were not different between the groups beyond the first day. After the 4 days, isolated kidneys from animals in each of these groups were perfused at normal pH and bicarbonate concentrations. Urinary K excretion was similar between the groups despite the potassium depletion in the acid-fed animals. In contrast, isolated kidneys from animals with comparable K depletion induced by dietary K restriction readily conserved K. Sodium excretion and urinary flow were similar among the three groups of isolated kidneys. Plasma aldosterone concentrations were greater in the acid-fed rats after the 4 days of NH/sub 4/Cl ingestion than in the control animals. Adrenalectomized rats were treated with either normal (4 ..mu..g/day) or high (22 ..mu..g/day) aldosterone replacement while ingesting NH/sub 4/Cl for 4 days. Only in the presence of high aldosterone replacement did the acid-fed adrenalectomized animals develop K depletion. The authors conclude that chronic metabolic acidosis stimulates aldosterone secretion, and that aldosterone maintains the inappropriately high urinary potassium excretion and K depletion seen in this acid-base disorder.

  12. Insulin sensitivity of muscle protein metabolism is altered in patients with chronic kidney disease and metabolic acidosis

    PubMed Central

    Garibotto, Giacomo; Sofia, Antonella; Russo, Rodolfo; Paoletti, Ernesto; Bonanni, Alice; Parodi, Emanuele L; Viazzi, Francesca; Verzola, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    An emergent hypothesis is that a resistance to the anabolic drive by insulin may contribute to loss of strength and muscle mass in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). We tested whether insulin resistance extends to protein metabolism using the forearm perfusion method with arterial insulin infusion in 7 patients with CKD and metabolic acidosis (bicarbonate 19?mmol/l) and 7 control individuals. Forearm glucose balance and protein turnover (2H-phenylalanine kinetics) were measured basally and in response to insulin infused at different rates for 2?h to increase local forearm plasma insulin concentration by approximately 20 and 50??U/ml. In response to insulin, forearm glucose uptake was significantly increased to a lesser extent (?40%) in patients with CKD than controls. In addition, whereas in the controls net muscle protein balance and protein degradation were decreased by both insulin infusion rates, in patients with CKD net protein balance and protein degradation were sensitive to the high (0.035?mU/kg per min) but not the low (0.01?mU/kg per min) insulin infusion. Besides blunting muscle glucose uptake, CKD and acidosis interfere with the normal suppression of protein degradation in response to a moderate rise in plasma insulin. Thus, alteration of protein metabolism by insulin may lead to changes in body tissue composition which may become clinically evident in conditions characterized by low insulinemia. PMID:26308671

  13. Neuronal expression of sodium/bicarbonate cotransporter NBCn1 (SLC4A7) and its response to chronic metabolic acidosis.

    PubMed

    Park, Hae Jeong; Rajbhandari, Ira; Yang, Han Soo; Lee, Soojung; Cucoranu, Delia; Cooper, Deborah S; Klein, Janet D; Sands, Jeff M; Choi, Inyeong

    2010-05-01

    The sodium-bicarbonate cotransporter NBCn1 (SLC4A7) is an acid-base transporter that normally moves Na(+) and HCO(3)(-) into the cell. This membrane protein is sensitive to cellular and systemic pH changes. We examined NBCn1 expression and localization in the brain and its response to chronic metabolic acidosis. Two new NBCn1 antibodies were generated by immunizing a rabbit and a guinea pig. The antibodies stained neurons in a variety of rat brain regions, including hippocampal pyramidal neurons, dentate gyrus granular neurons, posterior cortical neurons, and cerebellar Purkinje neurons. Choroid plexus epithelia were also stained. Double immunofluorescence labeling showed that NBCn1 and the postsynaptic density protein PSD-95 were found in the same hippocampal CA3 neurons and partially colocalized in dendrites. PSD-95 was pulled down from rat brain lysates with the GST/NBCn1 fusion protein and was also coimmunoprecipitated with NBCn1. Chronic metabolic acidosis was induced by feeding rats with normal chow or 0.4 M HCl-containing chow for 7 days. Real-time PCR and immunoblot showed upregulation of NBCn1 mRNA and protein in the hippocampus of acidotic rats. NBCn1 immunostaining was enhanced in CA3 neurons, posterior cortical neurons, and cerebellar granular cells. Intraperitoneal administration of N-methyl-d-aspartate caused neuronal death determined by caspase-3 activity, and this effect was more severe in acidotic rats. Administering N-methyl-d-aspartate also inhibited NBCn1 upregulation in acidotic rats. We conclude that NBCn1 in neurons is upregulated by chronic acid loads, and this upregulation is associated with glutamate excitotoxicity. PMID:20147654

  14. Neuronal expression of sodium/bicarbonate cotransporter NBCn1 (SLC4A7) and its response to chronic metabolic acidosis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hae Jeong; Rajbhandari, Ira; Yang, Han Soo; Lee, Soojung; Cucoranu, Delia; Cooper, Deborah S.; Klein, Janet D.; Sands, Jeff M.

    2010-01-01

    The sodium-bicarbonate cotransporter NBCn1 (SLC4A7) is an acid-base transporter that normally moves Na+ and HCO3? into the cell. This membrane protein is sensitive to cellular and systemic pH changes. We examined NBCn1 expression and localization in the brain and its response to chronic metabolic acidosis. Two new NBCn1 antibodies were generated by immunizing a rabbit and a guinea pig. The antibodies stained neurons in a variety of rat brain regions, including hippocampal pyramidal neurons, dentate gyrus granular neurons, posterior cortical neurons, and cerebellar Purkinje neurons. Choroid plexus epithelia were also stained. Double immunofluorescence labeling showed that NBCn1 and the postsynaptic density protein PSD-95 were found in the same hippocampal CA3 neurons and partially colocalized in dendrites. PSD-95 was pulled down from rat brain lysates with the GST/NBCn1 fusion protein and was also coimmunoprecipitated with NBCn1. Chronic metabolic acidosis was induced by feeding rats with normal chow or 0.4 M HCl-containing chow for 7 days. Real-time PCR and immunoblot showed upregulation of NBCn1 mRNA and protein in the hippocampus of acidotic rats. NBCn1 immunostaining was enhanced in CA3 neurons, posterior cortical neurons, and cerebellar granular cells. Intraperitoneal administration of N-methyl-d-aspartate caused neuronal death determined by caspase-3 activity, and this effect was more severe in acidotic rats. Administering N-methyl-d-aspartate also inhibited NBCn1 upregulation in acidotic rats. We conclude that NBCn1 in neurons is upregulated by chronic acid loads, and this upregulation is associated with glutamate excitotoxicity. PMID:20147654

  15. Phosphate binders and metabolic acidosis in patients undergoing maintenance hemodialysis—sevelamer hydrochloride, calcium carbonate, and bixalomer.

    PubMed

    Sanai, Toru; Tada, Hideo; Ono, Takashi; Fukumitsu, Toma

    2015-01-01

    The serum bicarbonate (HCO3(-)) levels are decreased in chronic hemodialysis (HD) patients treated with sevelamer hydrochloride (SH). We assessed the effects of bixalomer on the chronic metabolic acidosis in these patients. We examined 12 of the 122 consecutive Japanese patients with end-stage renal disease on HD, who orally ingested a dose of SH (?2250?mg), and an arterial blood gas analysis and biochemical analysis were performed before HD. Patients whose serum HCO3(-) levels were under 18?mmol/L were changed from SH to the same dose of bixalomer. A total of 12 patients were treated with a large amount of SH. Metabolic acidosis (a serum HCO3(-) level under 18?mmol/L) was found in eight patients. These patients were also treated with or without small dose of calcium carbonate (1.2?±?1.1?g). The dose of SH was changed to that of bixalomer. After 1 month, the serum HCO3(-) levels increased from 16.3?±?1.4 to 19.6?±?1.7?mmol/L (P?Metabolic acidosis was not observed in four patients (serum HCO3(-) level: 20.3?±?0.7?mmol/L) likely because they were taking 3?g of calcium carbonate with SH. In the present study, the development of chronic metabolic acidosis was induced by HCl containing phosphate binders, such as SH, and partially ameliorated by calcium carbonate, then subsequently improved after changing the treatment to bixalomer. PMID:24980286

  16. In vivo unaltered muscle protein synthesis in experimental chronic metabolic acidosis.

    PubMed

    Maniar, S; Laouari, D; Dechaux, M; Motel, V; Yvert, J P; Mathian, B; Kleinknecht, C

    1994-12-01

    Chronic metabolic acidosis (CMA) is a major cause of growth defect, implying disturbances of protein metabolism. Previously, in vivo studies performed in the fasting state showed enhanced whole body protein turnover, whereas in vitro studies showed unchanged muscle protein synthesis. The present study is the first to determine the effects of CMA on muscle protein synthesis and degradation in vivo. Two studies were performed in 60 g male rats fed a 30% casein diet. In study I, one group was sham-operated (C rats), and two groups underwent subtotal nephrectomy. One of them developed acidosis (UA rats) which was corrected in the other by NaHCO3 in the diet (UNA rats). Study II compared sham-operated rats rendered acidotic by NH4Cl in the drinking water (CA rats) and normal pair-fed (CNA) rats. Fractional protein synthesis rate (FSR) was determined in gastrocnemius muscle after injection of 3H-phenylalanine. Fractional protein degradation rate (FDR) was calculated as FSR minus fractional rate of muscle growth (FGR). In study I, UA rats had lower growth and N balance (163 +/- 12 vs. 216 +/- 11 mg N/day; P < 0.001) than UNA rats, despite identical food intake (11 g/day). This was associated with identical FSR (10.4 +/- 0.5 vs. 10.9 +/- 0.5%/day), but enhanced protein degradation (6.30 +/- 0.99 vs. 5.10 +/- 0.71%/day; P < 0.05). Plasma insulin, C peptide, PTH and corticosterone did not differ in UA and UNA rats, whereas plasma IGF-I was markedly reduced (147 +/- 21 vs. 283 +/- 27 ng/ml; P < 0.01) in UA rats.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7700030

  17. [Bicarbonate reabsorption in proximal renal tubule: molecular mechanisms and metabolic acidosis].

    PubMed

    Guo, Yi-Min; Liu, Ying; Chen, Li-Ming

    2014-08-25

    HCO3(-) reabsorption in the renal tubules plays a critically important role in maintaining the global acid-base balance. Loss of HCO3(-) causes metabolic acidosis. Proximal renal tubule is the major site for HCO3(-) reabsorption, accounting for more than 80% of total HCO3(-) reabsorption along the nephron. Over the past more than half centuries, tremendous progresses have been made on understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the HCO3(-) reabsorption in proximal tubules. The transepithelial movement of HCO3(-) involves the coordinated operation of machineries on both the apical and the basolateral membranes of the epithelial cells. On the apical domain, Na(+)-H(+) exchanger NHE3 and the vacuolar H(+)-ATPase are two major pathways mediating the apical uptake of HCO3(-)-related species. Taken together, NHE3 and H(+)-ATPase are responsible for about 80% of HCO3(-) reabsorption in the proximal tubule. The remaining 20% is likely mediated by pathways yet to be characterized. On the basolateral membrane, NBCe1 represents the only major known pathway mediating the extrusion of HCO3(-) coupled with Na(+) into the interstitial space. In the present article, we provide a historical view about the studies on the mechanisms of HCO3(-) reabsorption since 1940s. Moreover, we summarize the latest progresses emerging over the past decade in the physiological as well as pathological roles of acid-base transporters underlying the HCO3(-) reabsorption in proximal tubules. PMID:25131781

  18. The effect of sodium bicarbonate on cytokine secretion in CKD patients with metabolic acidosis.

    PubMed

    Ori, Yaacov; Zingerman, Boris; Bergman, Michael; Bessler, Hanna; Salman, Hertzel

    2015-04-01

    The incidence of acidosis increases with the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Correction of acidosis by sodium bicarbonate may slow CKD deterioration. Inflammation, which is common in CKD, may be related to acidosis. Whether the slower rate of GFR decline following the correction of acidosis is related to changes in inflammatory markers is unknown. The current study examined whether correcting CKD-acidosis affected inflammatory cytokines secretion. Thirteen patients with CKD 4-5 and acidosis were tested for cytokines secretion from peripheral-blood mononuclear cells at baseline and after one month of oral sodium bicarbonate. Following treatment with sodium bicarbonate there was no change in weight, blood pressure, serum creatinine, albumin, sodium, calcium, phosphate, PTH, hemoglobin and CRP. Serum urea decreased (134±10-116±8 mg/dl, P=0.002), potassium decreased (5.1±0.4-4.8±0.1 mequiv./l, P=0.064), pH increased (7.29±0.01-7.33±0.01, P=0.008), and serum bicarbonate increased (18.6±0.4 mequiv./l to 21.3±0.3 mequiv./l, P=0.001). The secretion of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 decreased (2.75±0.25 ng/ml to 2.29±0.21 ng/ml, P=0.041). There was no significant change in the secretion of the other pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines, including IL-1?, IL-2, IL-6, TNF?, IFN?, IL-1ra. Thus, correcting acidosis in CKD with bicarbonate decreases IL-10 secretion. Its significance needs to be further investigated. PMID:25960222

  19. Sympathetic activation in exercise is not dependent on muscle acidosis. Direct evidence from studies in metabolic myopathies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vissing, J.; Vissing, S. F.; MacLean, D. A.; Saltin, B.; Quistorff, B.; Haller, R. G.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Muscle acidosis has been implicated as a major determinant of reflex sympathetic activation during exercise. To test this hypothesis we studied sympathetic exercise responses in metabolic myopathies in which muscle acidosis is impaired or augmented during exercise. As an index of reflex sympathetic activation to muscle, microneurographic measurements of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) were obtained from the peroneal nerve. MSNA was measured during static handgrip exercise at 30% of maximal voluntary contraction force to exhaustion in patients in whom exercise-induced muscle acidosis is absent (seven myophosphorylase deficient patients; MD [McArdle's disease], and one patient with muscle phosphofructokinase deficiency [PFKD]), augmented (one patient with mitochondrial myopathy [MM]), or normal (five healthy controls). Muscle pH was monitored by 31P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy during handgrip exercise in the five control subjects, four MD patients, and the MM and PFKD patients. With handgrip to exhaustion, the increase in MSNA over baseline (bursts per minute [bpm] and total activity [%]) was not impaired in patients with MD (17+/-2 bpm, 124+/-42%) or PFKD (65 bpm, 307%), and was not enhanced in the MM patient (24 bpm, 131%) compared with controls (17+/-4 bpm, 115+/-17%). Post-handgrip ischemia studied in one McArdle patient, caused sustained elevation of MSNA above basal suggesting a chemoreflex activation of MSNA. Handgrip exercise elicited an enhanced drop in muscle pH of 0.51 U in the MM patient compared with the decrease in controls of 0.13+/-0.02 U. In contrast, muscle pH increased with exercise in MD by 0.12+/-0.05 U and in PFKD by 0.01 U. In conclusion, patients with glycogenolytic, glycolytic, and oxidative phosphorylation defects show normal muscle sympathetic nerve responses to static exercise. These findings indicate that muscle acidosis is not a prerequisite for sympathetic activation in exercise.

  20. Mitochondrial aquaporin-8 in renal proximal tubule cells: evidence for a role in the response to metabolic acidosis.

    PubMed

    Molinas, Sara M; Trumper, Laura; Marinelli, Raúl A

    2012-08-01

    Mitochondrial ammonia synthesis in proximal tubules and its urinary excretion are key components of the renal response to maintain acid-base balance during metabolic acidosis. Since aquaporin-8 (AQP8) facilitates transport of ammonia and is localized in inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM) of renal proximal cells, we hypothesized that AQP8-facilitated mitochondrial ammonia transport in these cells plays a role in the response to acidosis. We evaluated whether mitochondrial AQP8 (mtAQP8) knockdown by RNA interference is able to impair ammonia excretion in the human renal proximal tubule cell line, HK-2. By RT-PCR and immunoblotting, we found that AQP8 is expressed in these cells and is localized in IMM. HK-2 cells were transfected with short-interfering RNA targeting human AQP8. After 48 h, the levels of mtAQP8 protein decreased by 53% (P < 0.05). mtAQP8 knockdown decreased the rate of ammonia released into culture medium in cells grown at pH 7.4 (-31%, P < 0.05) as well as in cells exposed to acid (-90%, P < 0.05). We also evaluated mtAQP8 protein expression in HK-2 cells exposed to acidic medium. After 48 h, upregulation of mtAQP8 (+74%, P < 0.05) was observed, together with higher ammonia excretion rate (+73%, P < 0.05). In vivo studies in NH(4)Cl-loaded rats showed that mtAQP8 protein expression was also upregulated after 7 days of acidosis in renal cortex (+51%, P < 0.05). These data suggest that mtAQP8 plays an important role in the adaptive response of proximal tubule to acidosis possibly facilitating mitochondrial ammonia transport. PMID:22622463

  1. [Metformin- related lactic acidosis].

    PubMed

    Manes, Massimo; Pellu, Valentina; Caputo, Donatella; Molino, Andrea; Paternoster, Giuseppe; Gabrielli, Danila; Nebiolo, Pier Eugenio

    2014-01-01

    Lactic acidosis metformin-related is a potentially fatal complication. Reviews show a stable prevalence of this phenomenon, but nephrological experience is required since it is frequently involved in therapeutic management. Here we report the cases of two old patients with severe lactic acidosis and acute renal failure treated with hemodiafiltration. PMID:25504165

  2. Acute but not chronic metabolic acidosis potentiates the acetylcholine-induced reduction in blood pressure: an endothelium-dependent effect.

    PubMed

    Celotto, A C; Ferreira, L G; Capellini, V K; Albuquerque, A A S; Rodrigues, A J; Evora, P R B

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic acidosis has profound effects on vascular tone. This study investigated the in vivo effects of acute metabolic acidosis (AMA) and chronic metabolic acidosis (CMA) on hemodynamic parameters and endothelial function. CMA was induced by ad libitum intake of 1% NH4Cl for 7 days, and AMA was induced by a 3-h infusion of 6 M NH4Cl (1 mL/kg, diluted 1:10). Phenylephrine (Phe) and acetylcholine (Ach) dose-response curves were performed by venous infusion with simultaneous venous and arterial blood pressure monitoring. Plasma nitrite/nitrate (NOx) was measured by chemiluminescence. The CMA group had a blood pH of 7.15±0.03, which was associated with reduced bicarbonate (13.8±0.98 mmol/L) and no change in the partial pressure of arterial carbon dioxide (PaCO2). The AMA group had a pH of 7.20±0.01, which was associated with decreases in bicarbonate (10.8±0.54 mmol/L) and PaCO2 (47.8±2.54 to 23.2±0.74 mmHg) and accompanied by hyperventilation. Phe or ACh infusion did not affect arterial or venous blood pressure in the CMA group. However, the ACh infusion decreased the arterial blood pressure (?BP: -28.0±2.35 mm Hg [AMA] to -4.5±2.89 mmHg [control]) in the AMA group. Plasma NOx was normal after CMA but increased after AMA (25.3±0.88 to 31.3±0.54 ?M). These results indicate that AMA, but not CMA, potentiated the Ach-induced decrease in blood pressure and led to an increase in plasma NOx, reinforcing the effect of pH imbalance on vascular tone and blood pressure control. PMID:26648089

  3. A Comparison of Treating Metabolic Acidosis in CKD Stage 4 Hypertensive Kidney Disease with Fruits and Vegetables or Sodium Bicarbonate

    PubMed Central

    Goraya, Nimrit; Simoni, Jan; Jo, Chan-Hee

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Current guidelines recommend Na+-based alkali for CKD with metabolic acidosis and plasma total CO2 (PTCO2) < 22 mM. Because diets in industrialized societies are typically acid-producing, we compared base-producing fruits and vegetables with oral NaHCO3 (HCO3) regarding the primary outcome of follow-up estimated GFR (eGFR) and secondary outcomes of improved metabolic acidosis and reduced urine indices of kidney injury. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Individuals with stage 4 (eGFR, 15–29 ml/min per 1.73 m2) CKD due to hypertensive nephropathy, had a PTCO2 level < 22 mM, and were receiving angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition were randomly assigned to 1 year of daily oral NaHCO3 at 1.0 mEq/kg per day (n=35) or fruits and vegetables dosed to reduce dietary acid by half (n=36). Results Plasma cystatin C–calculated eGFR did not differ at baseline and 1 year between groups. One-year PTCO2 was higher than baseline in the HCO3 group (21.2±1.3 versus 19.5±1.5 mM; P<0.01) and the fruits and vegetables group (19.9±1.7 versus 19.3±1.9 mM; P<0.01), consistent with improved metabolic acidosis, and was higher in the HCO3 than the fruits and vegetable group (P<0.001). One-year urine indices of kidney injury were lower than baseline in both groups. Plasma [K+] did not increase in either group. Conclusions One year of fruits and vegetables or NaHCO3 in individuals with stage 4 CKD yielded eGFR that was not different, was associated with higher-than-baseline PTCO2, and was associated with lower-than-baseline urine indices of kidney injury. The data indicate that fruits and vegetables improve metabolic acidosis and reduce kidney injury in stage 4 CKD without producing hyperkalemia. PMID:23393104

  4. Atypical distal renal tubular acidosis confirmed by mutation analysis.

    PubMed

    Weber, S; Soergel, M; Jeck, N; Konrad, M

    2000-12-01

    In autosomal dominant distal renal tubular acidosis type I (dRTA) impaired hydrogen ion secretion is associated with metabolic acidosis, hyperchloremic hypokalemia, hypercalciuria, nephrocalcinosis, and/or nephrolithiasis. A retardation of growth is commonly observed. In this report we present a family with autosomal dominant dRTA with an atypical and discordant clinical picture. The father presented with severe nephrocalcinosis, nephrolithiasis, and isosthenuria but metabolic acidosis was absent. His 6-year-old daughter, however, suffered from metabolic acidosis, hypokalemia, and hypercalciuria. In addition, sonography revealed multiple bilateral renal cysts but no nephrocalcinosis. Mutation analysis of the AE1 gene coding for the renal Cl-/HCO3(-)-exchanger AE1 displayed a heterozygous Arg589Cys exchange in both patients but not in the healthy family members. This point mutation is frequently associated with autosomal dominant dRTA. Diagnosis of autosomal dominant dRTA is supported in this family by results of AE1 mutation analysis. PMID:11149111

  5. Effects of clinically relevant acute hypercapnic and metabolic acidosis on the cardiovascular system: an experimental porcine study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Hypercapnic acidosis (HCA) that accompanies lung-protective ventilation may be considered permissive (a tolerable side effect), or it may be therapeutic by itself. Cardiovascular effects may contribute to, or limit, the potential therapeutic impact of HCA; therefore, a complex physiological study was performed in healthy pigs to evaluate the systemic and organ-specific circulatory effects of HCA, and to compare them with those of metabolic (eucapnic) acidosis (MAC). Methods In anesthetized, mechanically ventilated and instrumented pigs, HCA was induced by increasing the inspired fraction of CO2 (n?=?8) and MAC (n?=?8) by the infusion of HCl, to reach an arterial plasma pH of 7.1. In the control group (n?=?8), the normal plasma pH was maintained throughout the experiment. Hemodynamic parameters, including regional organ hemodynamics, blood gases, and electrocardiograms, were measured in vivo. Subsequently, isometric contractions and membrane potentials were recorded in vitro in the right ventricular trabeculae. Results HCA affected both the pulmonary (increase in mean pulmonary arterial pressure (MPAP) and pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR)) and systemic (increase in mean arterial pressure (MAP), decrease in systemic vascular resistance (SVR)) circulations. Although the renal perfusion remained unaffected by any type of acidosis, HCA increased carotid, portal, and, hence, total liver blood flow. MAC influenced the pulmonary circulation only (increase in MPAP and PVR). Both MAC and HCA reduced the stroke volume, which was compensated for by an increase in heart rate to maintain (MAC), or even increase (HCA), the cardiac output. The right ventricular stroke work per minute was increased by both MAC and HCA; however, the left ventricular stroke work was increased by HCA only. In vitro, the trabeculae from the control pigs and pigs with acidosis showed similar contraction force and action-potential duration (APD). Perfusion with an acidic solution decreased the contraction force, whereas APD was not influenced. Conclusions MAC preferentially affects the pulmonary circulation, whereas HCA affects the pulmonary, systemic, and regional circulations. The cardiac contractile function was reduced, but the cardiac output was maintained (MAC), or even increased (HCA). The increased ventricular stroke work per minute revealed an increased work demand placed by acidosis on the heart. PMID:24377654

  6. Characterization of the increased synthesis of rat renal glutaminase during metabolic acidosis

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, J.Y.

    1986-01-01

    The relative rates of glutaminase synthesis were determined by comparing the amount of (/sup 35/S)methionine incorporated into specific immunoprecipitates with that incorporated into total protein. In a normal animal, the rate of glutaminase synthesis constitutes 0.04% of the total protein synthesis. During onset of acidosis, the relative rate of synthesis increases more rapidly than the appearance of increased glutaminase activity. Recovery from chronic acidosis results in a rapid decrease in the relative rate of glutaminase synthesis, but a gradual decrease in glutaminase activity. From the decrease in activity that occurs upon recovery from acidosis, the tube half-life for the glutaminase was estimated to be 3 days. The reticulocyte lysate was used to compare the level of translatable glutaminase mRNA that is present in rat kidney following translatable glutaminase mRNA that is present in rat kidney following onset of acidosis. The initial translate of glutaminase was previously identified as a 72,000 dalton protein that is 4000 daltons larger than the mitochondrial glutaminase. The amount of (/sup 35/S)methionine incorporated into the glutaminase was determined by densitometric tracing of specific immunoprecipitates. The relative rate of glutaminase synthesis was determined by comparing this value with the amount of (/sup 35/S) methionine incorporated into total protein. In order to obtain a more specific immunoprecipitate of the in vitro translate, poly(A)/sup +/RNA was fractionated. The fractionated poly(A)/sup +/RNA was about 25-fold enriched in glutaminase mRNA. The size of glutaminase mRNA was estimated to be between 6.4 Kb and 6.8 Kb. The effect of alteration in acid-base balance on the level of mRNA coding for glutaminase was also determined by using fractionated poly(A)/sup +/RNA from the kidneys of normal, chronic acidotic and recovered rats for in vitro translation.

  7. Physiological and molecular responses of the goldfish (Carassius auratus) kidney to metabolic acidosis, and potential mechanisms of renal ammonia transport.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Michael J; Wright, Patricia A; Wood, Chris M

    2015-07-01

    Relative to the gills, the mechanisms by which the kidney contributes to ammonia and acid-base homeostasis in fish are poorly understood. Goldfish were exposed to a low pH environment (pH 4.0, 48?h), which induced a characteristic metabolic acidosis and an increase in total plasma [ammonia] but reduced plasma ammonia partial pressure (PNH3). In the kidney tissue, total ammonia, lactate and intracellular pH remained unchanged. The urinary excretion rate of net base under control conditions changed to net acid excretion under low pH, with contributions from both the NH4 (+) (?30%) and titratable acidity minus bicarbonate (?70%; TA-HCO3 (-)) components. Inorganic phosphate (Pi), urea and Na(+) excretion rates were also elevated while Cl(-) excretion rates were unchanged. Renal alanine aminotransferase activity increased under acidosis. The increase in renal ammonia excretion was due to significant increases in both the glomerular filtration and the tubular secretion rates of ammonia, with the latter accounting for ?75% of the increase. There was also a 3.5-fold increase in the mRNA expression of renal Rhcg-b (Rhcg1) mRNA. There was no relationship between ammonia secretion and Na(+) reabsorption. These data indicate that increased renal ammonia secretion during acidosis is probably mediated through Rhesus (Rh) glycoproteins and occurs independently of Na(+) transport, in contrast to branchial and epidermal models of Na(+)-dependent ammonia transport in freshwater fish. Rather, we propose a model of parallel H(+)/NH3 transport as the primary mechanism of renal tubular ammonia secretion that is dependent on renal amino acid catabolism. PMID:25987732

  8. Lactic Acidosis in a Patient with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Weisberg, Lawrence S

    2015-08-01

    Lactic acidosis occurs when lactate production exceeds its metabolism. There are many possible causes of lactic acidosis, and in any given patient, several causes may coexist. This Attending Rounds presents a case in point. Metformin's role in the pathogenesis of lactic acidosis in patients with diabetes mellitus is complex, as the present case illustrates. The treatment of lactic acidosis is controversial, except for the imperative to remedy its underlying cause. The use of sodium bicarbonate to treat the often alarming metabolic derangements may be quite efficacious in that regard but is of questionable benefit to patients. Renal replacement therapies (RRTs) have particular appeal in this setting for a variety of reasons, but their effect on clinical outcomes is untested. PMID:25762524

  9. Veno-venous extracorporeal CO2 removal for the treatment of severe respiratory acidosis: pathophysiological and technical considerations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction While non-invasive ventilation aimed at avoiding intubation has become the modality of choice to treat mild to moderate acute respiratory acidosis, many severely acidotic patients (pH <7.20) still need intubation. Extracorporeal veno-venous CO2 removal (ECCO2R) could prove to be an alternative. The present animal study tested in a systematic fashion technical requirements for successful ECCO2R in terms of cannula size, blood and sweep gas flow. Methods ECCO2R with a 0.98 m2 surface oxygenator was performed in six acidotic (pH <7.20) pigs using either a 14.5 French (Fr) or a 19Fr catheter, with sweep gas flow rates of 8 and 16 L/minute, respectively. During each experiment the blood flow was incrementally increased to a maximum of 400 mL/minute (14.5Fr catheter) and 1000 mL/minute (19Fr catheter). Results Amelioration of severe respiratory acidosis was only feasible when blood flow rates of 750 to 1000 mL/minute (19Fr catheter) were used. Maximal CO2-elimination was 146.1?±?22.6 mL/minute, while pH increased from 7.13?±?0.08 to 7.41?±?0.07 (blood flow of 1000 mL/minute; sweep gas flow 16 L/minute). Accordingly, a sweep gas flow of 8 L/minute resulted in a maximal CO2-elimination rate of 138.0?±?16.9 mL/minute. The 14.5Fr catheter allowed a maximum CO2 elimination rate of 77.9 mL/minute, which did not result in the normalization of pH. Conclusions Veno-venous ECCO2R may serve as a treatment option for severe respiratory acidosis. In this porcine model, ECCO2R was most effective when using blood flow rates ranging between 750 and 1000 mL/minute, while an increase in sweep gas flow from 8 to 16 L/minute had less impact on ECCO2R in this setting. PMID:24942014

  10. Acidosis-Induced Dysfunction of Cortical GABAergic Neurons through Astrocyte-Related Excitotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Sudong; Zhu, Yan; Wang, Jin-Hui

    2015-01-01

    Background Acidosis impairs cognitions and behaviors presumably by acidification-induced changes in neuronal metabolism. Cortical GABAergic neurons are vulnerable to pathological factors and their injury leads to brain dysfunction. How acidosis induces GABAergic neuron injury remains elusive. As the glia cells and neurons interact each other, we intend to examine the role of the astrocytes in acidosis-induced GABAergic neuron injury. Results Experiments were done at GABAergic cells and astrocytes in mouse cortical slices. To identify astrocytic involvement in acidosis-induced impairment, we induced the acidification in single GABAergic neuron by infusing proton intracellularly or in both neurons and astrocytes by using proton extracellularly. Compared the effects of intracellular acidification and extracellular acidification on GABAergic neurons, we found that their active intrinsic properties and synaptic outputs appeared more severely impaired in extracellular acidosis than intracellular acidosis. Meanwhile, extracellular acidosis deteriorated glutamate transporter currents on the astrocytes and upregulated excitatory synaptic transmission on the GABAergic neurons. Moreover, the antagonists of glutamate NMDA-/AMPA-receptors partially reverse extracellular acidosis-induced injury in the GABAergic neurons. Conclusion Our studies suggest that acidosis leads to the dysfunction of cortical GABAergic neurons by astrocyte-mediated excitotoxicity, in addition to their metabolic changes as indicated previously. PMID:26474076

  11. Renal tubular acidosis: developments in our understanding of the molecular basis.

    PubMed

    Laing, Christopher M; Toye, Ashley M; Capasso, Giovambattista; Unwin, Robert J

    2005-06-01

    Renal tubular acidosis is a metabolic acidosis due to impaired acid excretion by the kidney. Hyperchloraemic acidosis with a normal anion gap and normal (or near normal) glomerular filtration rate, and in the absence of diarrhoea, defines this disorder. However, systemic acidosis is not always evident and renal tubular acidosis can present with hypokalaemia, medullary nephrocalcinosis and recurrent calcium phosphate stone disease, as well as growth retardation and rickets in children, or short stature and osteomalacia in adults. Renal dysfunction in renal tubular acidosis is not always confined to acid excretion and can be part of a more generalised renal tubule defect, as in the renal Fanconi syndrome. Isolated renal tubular acidosis is more usually acquired, due to drugs, autoimmune disease, post-obstructive uropathy or any cause of medullary nephrocalcinosis. Less commonly, it is inherited and may be associated with deafness, osteopetrosis or ocular abnormalities. The clinical classification of renal tubular acidosis has been correlated with our current physiological model of how the nephron excretes acid, and this has facilitated genetic studies that have identified mutations in several genes encoding acid and base ion transporters. In vitro functional studies of these mutant proteins in cell expression systems have helped to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying renal tubular acidosis, which ultimately may lead to new therapeutic options in what is still treatment only by giving an oral alkali. PMID:15778079

  12. Chronic Metabolic Acidosis Activates Renal Tubular Sodium Chloride Cotransporter through Angiotension II-dependent WNK4-SPAK Phosphorylation Pathway.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yu-Wei; Yang, Sung-Sen; Cheng, Chih-Jen; Tseng, Min-Hua; Hsu, Hui-Min; Lin, Shih-Hua

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism by which chronic metabolic acidosis (CMA) regulates sodium (Na(+))-chloride (Cl(-)) cotransporter (NCC) in the renal distal convoluted tubules remains unexplored. We examined the role of STE20/SPS1-related proline/alanine-rich kinase (SPAK) and with-no-lysine kinase 4 (WNK4) on expression of NCC in mouse models of CMA. CMA was induced by NH4Cl in wild type mice (WTA mice), SPAK, and WNK4 knockout mice. The quantities of Ncc mRNA, expression of total NCC, phosphorylated (p)-NCC, SPAK and WNK4 in the kidneys as well as NCC inhibition with hydrochlorothiazide and Na(+) balance were evaluated. Relative to WT mice, WTA mice had similar levels of Ncc mRNA, but increased expression of total and p-NCC, SPAK, and WNK4 and an exaggerated response to hydrochlorothiazide which could not be observed in SPAK or WNK4 knockout mice with CMA. In WTA mice, increased plasma renin activity, aldosterone and angiotensin II concentrations accompanied by a significantly negative Na(+) balance. High Na(+) diet abolished the enhanced NCC expression in WTA mice. Furthermore, an angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker rather than a mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist exerted a marked inhibition on Na(+) reabsorption and NCC phosphorylation in WTA mice. CMA increases WNK4-SPAK-dependent NCC phosphorylation and appears to be secondary to previous natriuresis with volume-dependent angiotensin II activation. PMID:26728390

  13. Respiratory acidosis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... such as bicarbonate, that help restore the body's acid-base balance. Acute respiratory acidosis is a condition in ... Effros RM, Swenson ER. Acid-base balance. In: Mason RJ, Broaddus CV, ... Textbook of Respiratory Medicine . 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  14. Lactate Clearance and Vasopressor Seem to Be Predictors for Mortality in Severe Sepsis Patients with Lactic Acidosis Supplementing Sodium Bicarbonate: A Retrospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Bin; Jeong, Hyo Jin; Son, Young Ki; An, Won Suk

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Initial lactate level, lactate clearance, C-reactive protein, and procalcitonin in critically ill patients with sepsis are associated with hospital mortality. However, no study has yet discovered which factor is most important for mortality in severe sepsis patients with lactic acidosis. We sought to clarify this issue in patients with lactic acidosis who were supplementing with sodium bicarbonate. Materials and Methods Data were collected from a single center between May 2011 and April 2014. One hundred nine patients with severe sepsis and lactic acidosis who were supplementing with sodium bicarbonate were included. Results The 7-day mortality rate was 71.6%. The survivors had higher albumin levels and lower SOFA, APACHE II scores, vasopressor use, and follow-up lactate levels at an elapsed time after their initial lactate levels were checked. In particular, a decrement in lactate clearance of at least 10% for the first 6 hours, 24 hours, and 48 hours of treatment was more dominant among survivors than non-survivors. Although the patients who were treated with broad-spectrum antibiotics showed higher illness severity than those who received conventional antibiotics, there was no significant mortality difference. 6-hour, 24-hour, and 48-hour lactate clearance (HR: 4.000, 95% CI: 1.309–12.219, P = 0.015) and vasopressor use (HR: 4.156, 95% CI: 1.461–11.824, P = 0.008) were significantly associated with mortality after adjusting for confounding variables. Conclusions Lactate clearance at a discrete time point seems to be a more reliable prognostic index than initial lactate value in severe sepsis patients with lactic acidosis who were supplementing with sodium bicarbonate. Careful consideration of vasopressor use and the initial application of broad-spectrum antibiotics within the first 48 hours may be helpful for improving survival, and further study is warranted. PMID:26692209

  15. Effect of Sodium Bicarbonate Administration on Mortality in Patients with Lactic Acidosis: A Retrospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun Jeong; Son, Young Ki; An, Won Suk

    2013-01-01

    Background Lactic acidosis is a common cause of high anion gap metabolic acidosis. Sodium bicarbonate may be considered for an arterial pH <7.15 but paradoxically depresses cardiac performance and exacerbates acidosis by enhancing lactate production. This study aimed to evaluate the cause and mortality rate of lactic acidosis and to investigate the effect of factors, including sodium bicarbonate use, on death. Methods We conducted a single center analysis from May 2011 through April 2012. We retrospectively analyzed 103 patients with lactic acidosis among 207 patients with metabolic acidosis. We used SOFA and APACHE II as severity scores to estimate illness severity. Multivariate logistic regression analysis and Cox regression analysis models were used to identify factors that affect mortality. Results Of the 103 patients with a mean age of 66.1±11.4 years, eighty-three patients (80.6%) died from sepsis (61.4%), hepatic failure, cardiogenic shock and other causes. The percentage of sodium bicarbonate administration (p?=?0.006), catecholamine use, ventilator care and male gender were higher in the non-survival group than the survival group. The non-survival group had significantly higher initial and follow-up lactic acid levels, lower initial albumin, higher SOFA scores and APACHE II scores than the survival group. The mortality rate was significantly higher in patients who received sodium bicarbonate. Sodium bicarbonate administration (p?=?0.016) was associated with higher mortality. Independent factors that affected mortality were SOFA score (Exp (B)?=?1.72, 95% CI?=?1.12–2.63, p?=?0.013) and sodium bicarbonate administration (Exp (B)?=?6.27, 95% CI?=?1.10–35.78, p?=?0.039). Conclusions Lactic acidosis, which has a high mortality rate, should be evaluated in patients with metabolic acidosis. In addition, sodium bicarbonate should be prescribed with caution in the case of lactic acidosis because sodium bicarbonate administration may affect mortality. PMID:23755210

  16. Severe Hyperosmolar Metabolic Acidosis Due to a Large Dose of Intravenous Lorazepam

    E-print Network

    Barnes, Brian Joseph

    2002-04-18

    Anabolic Steroids To the Editor: The popliteal-artery entrapment syndrome is a potentially serious but rare cause of ischemia of the legs.1 It occurs predominantly in young persons and is due to an abnormal anatomical relation between the popliteal artery... syndrome who abused anabolic steroids. A 31-year-old male bodybuilder was referred to our emer- gency department with a three-day history of claudication and paresthesias of the left foot. Clinical examination re- vealed symmetric muscular hypertrophy...

  17. Further studies on the clinical features and clinicopathological findings of a syndrome of metabolic acidosis with minimal dehydration in neonatal calves.

    PubMed Central

    Kasari, T R; Naylor, J M

    1986-01-01

    A syndrome of metabolic acidosis of unknown etiology was diagnosed in twelve beef calves 7 to 31 days old. Principal clinical signs were unconsciousness or depression concomitant with weakness and ataxia. Other signs included weak or absent suckle and menace reflexes, succussable nontympanic fluid sounds in the anterior abdomen, and a slow, deep thoracic and abdominal pattern of respiration. The variation in clinical signs between calves was highly correlated (r = 0.87, P less than 0.001) with their acid-base (base deficit) status. Abnormal laboratory findings included reduced venous blood pH, pCO2 and bicarbonate ion concentration as well as hyperchloremia, elevated blood urea nitrogen, increased anion gap and neutrophilic leukocytosis with a left shift. Sodium bicarbonate solution administered intravenously effectively raised blood pH and improved demeanor, ambulation and appetite. All calves did well following a return to a normal acid-base status. PMID:3024795

  18. L-Arginine Affects Aerobic Capacity and Muscle Metabolism in MELAS (Mitochondrial Encephalomyopathy, Lactic Acidosis and Stroke-Like Episodes) Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rodan, Lance H.; Wells, Greg D.; Banks, Laura; Thompson, Sara; Schneiderman, Jane E.; Tein, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Objective To study the effects of L-arginine (L-Arg) on total body aerobic capacity and muscle metabolism as assessed by 31Phosphorus Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (31P-MRS) in patients with MELAS (Mitochondrial Encephalomyopathy with Lactic Acidosis and Stroke-like episodes) syndrome. Methods We performed a case control study in 3 MELAS siblings (m.3243A>G tRNAleu(UUR) in MTTL1 gene) with different % blood mutant mtDNA to evaluate total body maximal aerobic capacity (VO2peak) using graded cycle ergometry and muscle metabolism using 31P-MRS. We then ran a clinical trial pilot study in MELAS sibs to assess response of these parameters to single dose and a 6-week steady-state trial of oral L-Arginine. Results At baseline (no L-Arg), MELAS had lower serum Arg (p = 0.001). On 31P-MRS muscle at rest, MELAS subjects had increased phosphocreatine (PCr) (p = 0.05), decreased ATP (p = 0.018), and decreased intracellular Mg2+ (p = 0.0002) when compared to matched controls. With L-arginine therapy, the following trends were noted in MELAS siblings on cycle ergometry: (1) increase in mean % maximum work at anaerobic threshold (AT) (2) increase in % maximum heart rate at AT (3) small increase in VO2peak. On 31P-MRS the following mean trends were noted: (1) A blunted decrease in pH after exercise (less acidosis) (2) increase in Pi/PCr ratio (ADP) suggesting increased work capacity (3) a faster half time of PCr recovery (marker of mitochondrial activity) following 5 minutes of moderate intensity exercise (4) increase in torque. Significance These results suggest an improvement in aerobic capacity and muscle metabolism in MELAS subjects in response to supplementation with L-Arg. Intramyocellular hypomagnesemia is a novel finding that warrants further study. Classification of Evidence Class III evidence that L-arginine improves aerobic capacity and muscle metabolism in MELAS subjects. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01603446. PMID:25993630

  19. The Genomic Analysis of Lactic Acidosis and Acidosis Response in Human Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Julia Ling-Yu; Lucas, Joseph E.; Schroeder, Thies; Mori, Seiichi; Wu, Jianli; Nevins, Joseph; Dewhirst, Mark; West, Mike; Chi, Jen-Tsan

    2008-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment has a significant impact on tumor development. Two important determinants in this environment are hypoxia and lactic acidosis. Although lactic acidosis has long been recognized as an important factor in cancer, relatively little is known about how cells respond to lactic acidosis and how that response relates to cancer phenotypes. We develop genome-scale gene expression studies to dissect transcriptional responses of primary human mammary epithelial cells to lactic acidosis and hypoxia in vitro and to explore how they are linked to clinical tumor phenotypes in vivo. The resulting experimental signatures of responses to lactic acidosis and hypoxia are evaluated in a heterogeneous set of breast cancer datasets. A strong lactic acidosis response signature identifies a subgroup of low-risk breast cancer patients having distinct metabolic profiles suggestive of a preference for aerobic respiration. The association of lactic acidosis response with good survival outcomes may relate to the role of lactic acidosis in directing energy generation toward aerobic respiration and utilization of other energy sources via inhibition of glycolysis. This “inhibition of glycolysis” phenotype in tumors is likely caused by the repression of glycolysis gene expression and Akt inhibition. Our study presents a genomic evaluation of the prognostic information of a lactic acidosis response independent of the hypoxic response. Our results identify causal roles of lactic acidosis in metabolic reprogramming, and the direct functional consequence of lactic acidosis pathway activity on cellular responses and tumor development. The study also demonstrates the utility of genomic analysis that maps expression-based findings from in vitro experiments to human samples to assess links to in vivo clinical phenotypes. PMID:19057672

  20. The Use of Sodium Bicarbonate in the Treatment of Acidosis in Sepsis: A Literature Update on a Long Term Debate.

    PubMed

    Velissaris, Dimitrios; Karamouzos, Vasilios; Ktenopoulos, Nikolaos; Pierrakos, Charalampos; Karanikolas, Menelaos

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Sepsis and its consequences such as metabolic acidosis are resulting in increased mortality. Although correction of metabolic acidosis with sodium bicarbonate seems a reasonable approach, there is ongoing debate regarding the role of bicarbonates as a therapeutic option. Methods. We conducted a PubMed literature search in order to identify published literature related to the effects of sodium bicarbonate treatment on metabolic acidosis due to sepsis. The search included all articles published in English in the last 35 years. Results. There is ongoing debate regarding the use of bicarbonates for the treatment of acidosis in sepsis, but there is a trend towards not using bicarbonate in sepsis patients with arterial blood gas pH > 7.15. Conclusions. Routine use of bicarbonate for treatment of severe acidemia and lactic acidosis due to sepsis is subject of controversy, and current opinion does not favor routine use of bicarbonates. However, available evidence is inconclusive, and more studies are required to determine the potential benefit, if any, of bicarbonate therapy in the sepsis patient with acidosis. PMID:26294968

  1. The Use of Sodium Bicarbonate in the Treatment of Acidosis in Sepsis: A Literature Update on a Long Term Debate

    PubMed Central

    Velissaris, Dimitrios; Karamouzos, Vasilios; Ktenopoulos, Nikolaos; Pierrakos, Charalampos; Karanikolas, Menelaos

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Sepsis and its consequences such as metabolic acidosis are resulting in increased mortality. Although correction of metabolic acidosis with sodium bicarbonate seems a reasonable approach, there is ongoing debate regarding the role of bicarbonates as a therapeutic option. Methods. We conducted a PubMed literature search in order to identify published literature related to the effects of sodium bicarbonate treatment on metabolic acidosis due to sepsis. The search included all articles published in English in the last 35 years. Results. There is ongoing debate regarding the use of bicarbonates for the treatment of acidosis in sepsis, but there is a trend towards not using bicarbonate in sepsis patients with arterial blood gas pH > 7.15. Conclusions. Routine use of bicarbonate for treatment of severe acidemia and lactic acidosis due to sepsis is subject of controversy, and current opinion does not favor routine use of bicarbonates. However, available evidence is inconclusive, and more studies are required to determine the potential benefit, if any, of bicarbonate therapy in the sepsis patient with acidosis. PMID:26294968

  2. Fuel metabolism during severe rowing exercise

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyt, R.W.; Lubowitz, J.; Asakura, T.; Stein, T.P.

    1986-03-01

    Eight elite oarsmen were studied during and after six min of severe ergometer exercise. Power output averaged 380 +/- 28 watts. Serial venous blood samples and gas exchange measurements were obtained during exercise. In 4 of the 8 subjects, a primed periodic oral dose of the tracer (6,6-/sup 2/H/sub 2/)glucose was used to determine the effects of severe exercise on glucose metabolism. During exercise, the levels of lactate progressively increased to 12.2 +/- 1.3 mM (SE). There was little change in isotopic glucose enrichment during exercise (from 2.95 +/- 0.30 to 2.55 +/- 0.23 atom percent excess, APE). During recovery, isotopic glucose enrichment decreased significantly to 1.40 +/- 0.14 APE, indicating a substantial post-exercise plasma glucose flux. There were significant post-exercise increases in plasma glucose accumulation (from 84 +/- 5 to 131 +/- 3 mg/dl) and insulin concentration (0.57 +/- 0.08 to 1.34 +/- 0.15 ng/ml). These results suggest that muscle glycogen is the primary source of fuel during six minutes of maximal rowing exercise.

  3. Lactate clearance and metabolic aspects of continuous high-volume hemofiltration

    PubMed Central

    Cheungpasitporn, Wisit; Zand, Ladan; Dillon, John J.; Qian, Qi; Leung, Nelson

    2015-01-01

    Lactic acidosis is associated with high morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients. Treatment of lactic acidosis is targeted on correcting the underlying causes and optimizing adequate oxygen delivery to the tissues. Even though evidence is lacking, continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) and dialysis have been advocated as treatments for lactic acidosis. We report a 28-year-old Caucasian male with a history of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis who presented with septic shock, severe lactic acidosis and multiple organ failure. Metabolic acidosis was corrected after bicarbonate therapy and CRRT with a hemofiltration rate of 7 L/h (58 mL/kg/h). Lactate clearance was calculated to be 79 mL/min. Compared with reported rates of lactate overproduction in septic shock, the rate of lactate clearance is quite small. Our case suggests that CRRT with high-volume hemofiltration is not effective for severe lactic acidosis. Lactic acidosis alone should not be considered as a nonrenal indication for CRRT. PMID:26251702

  4. Effect of oral sodium bicarbonate supplementation on progression of chronic kidney disease in patients with chronic metabolic acidosis: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial (SoBic-Study)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Overt chronic metabolic acidosis in patients with chronic kidney disease develops after a drop of glomerular filtration rate to less than approximately 25 mL/min/1.73 m2. The pathogenic mechanism seems to be a lack of tubular bicarbonate production, which in healthy individuals neutralizes the acid net production. As shown in several animal and human studies the acidotic milieu alters bone and vitamin D metabolism, induces muscle wasting, and impairs albumin synthesis, aside from a direct alteration of renal tissue by increasing angiotensin II, aldosteron and endothelin kidney levels. Subsequent studies testing various therapeutic approaches in very selected study populations showed that oral supplementation of the lacking bicarbonate halts progression of decline of renal function. However, due to methodological limitations of these studies further investigations are of urgent need to ensure the validity of this therapeutic concept. Methods/Design The SoBic-study is a single-center, randomized, controlled, open-label clinical phase IV study performed at the nephrological outpatient service of the Medical University of Vienna. Two-hundred patients classified to CKD stage 3 or 4 with two separate measurements of HCO3- of <21 mmol/L will be 1:1 randomized to either receive a high dose of oral sodium bicarbonate with a serum target HCO3- level of 24?±?1 mmol/L or receive a rescue therapy of sodium bicarbonate with a serum target level of 20?±?1 mmol/L. The follow up will be for two years. The primary outcome is the effect of sodium bicarbonate supplementation on renal function measured by means of estimated glomerular filtration rates (4-variable-MDRD-equation) after two years. Secondary outcomes are change in markers of bone metabolism between groups, death rates between groups, and the number of subjects proceeding to renal replacement therapy across groups. Adverse events, such as worsening of arterial hypertension due to the additional sodium consumption, will be accurately monitored. Discussion We hypothesize that sufficiently balanced acid–base homeostasis leads to a reduction of decline of renal function in patients with chronic kidney disease. The concept of an exogenous bicarbonate supplementation to substitute the lacking endogenous bicarbonate has existed for a long time, but has never been investigated sufficiently to state clear treatment guidelines. Trial registration EUDRACT Number: 2012-001824-36 PMID:23826760

  5. Protein metabolism in severe childhood malnutrition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The major clinical syndromes of severe childhood malnutrition (SCM) are marasmus (non-oedematous SCM), kwashiorkor and marasmic-kwashiorkor (oedematous SCM). Whereas treatment of marasmus is straightforward and the associated mortality is low, kwashiorkor and marasmic-kwashiorkor are difficult to tr...

  6. SDF1 induction by acidosis from principal cells regulates intercalated cell subtype distribution.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, George J; Gao, XiaoBo; Tsuruoka, Shuichi; Purkerson, Jeffrey M; Peng, Hu; D'Agati, Vivette; Picard, Nicolas; Eladari, Dominique; Al-Awqati, Qais

    2015-01-01

    The nephron cortical collecting duct (CCD) is composed of principal cells, which mediate Na, K, and water transport, and intercalated cells (ICs), which are specialized for acid-base transport. There are two canonical IC forms: acid-secreting ?-ICs and HCO3-secreting ?-ICs. Chronic acidosis increases ?-ICs at the expense of ?-ICs, thereby increasing net acid secretion by the CCD. We found by growth factor quantitative PCR array that acidosis increases expression of mRNA encoding SDF1 (or CXCL12) in kidney cortex and isolated CCDs from mouse and rabbit kidney cortex. Exogenous SDF1 or pH 6.8 media increased H+ secretion and decreased HCO3 secretion in isolated perfused rabbit CCDs. Acid-dependent changes in H+ and HCO3 secretion were largely blunted by AMD3100, which selectively blocks the SDF1 receptor CXCR4. In mice, diet-induced chronic acidosis increased ?-ICs and decreased ?-ICs. Additionally, IC-specific Cxcr4 deletion prevented IC subtype alterations and magnified metabolic acidosis. SDF1 was transcriptionally regulated and a target of the hypoxia-sensing transcription factor HIF1?. IC-specific deletion of Hif1a produced no effect on mice fed an acid diet, as ?-ICs increased and ?-ICs decreased similarly to that observed in WT littermates. However, Hif1a deletion in all CCD cells prevented acidosis-induced IC subtype distribution, resulting in more severe acidosis. Cultured principal cells exhibited an HIF1?-dependent increase of Sdf1 transcription in response to media acidification. Thus, our results indicate that principal cells respond to acid by producing SDF1, which then acts on adjacent ICs. PMID:26517693

  7. Trauma triggering thyrotoxic crisis with lactic acidosis

    PubMed Central

    Prosser, Jennifer S.; Quan, Dan K.

    2015-01-01

    Thyrotoxic crisis (TC) is defined as a life-threatening exacerbation of the hyperthyroid state that causes multiple autonomic and metabolic disturbances. It is considered to be an endocrine emergency that must be urgently diagnosed and treated. We describe a case of TC precipitated by trauma with a resultant lactic acidosis. The patient is a 24-year-old male with a history of hyperthyroidism who presented to the emergency department following a motor vehicle accident. The patient was initially tachycardic and hypertensive, however, was afebrile. Initial laboratory analysis showed an anion gap of 26, lactic acid 7.6, free T4 5.61 and thyroid stimulating hormone < 0.015. A diagnosis of TC was made, and he was treated with intravenous fluids, propranolol, and methimazole with improvement of tachycardia and lactic acidosis. We discuss the features of this case, which reviews the presentations of TC as well as its metabolic sequelae.

  8. Reversible lactic acidosis associated with repeated intravenous infusions of sorbitol and ethanol.

    PubMed Central

    Batstone, G. F.; Alberti, K. G.; Dewar, A. K.

    1977-01-01

    Infusions of fructose or sorbitol are used commonly in parenteral nutrition and may cause lactic acidosis. A case is reported in whom blood lactate concentration was monitored frequently over a 5-day period during intravenous feeding with a sorbitol-ethanol-amino acid mixture. During the first five infusions blood lactate rose only moderately, but with the final infusion lactate rose to 11-1 mmol/l and the patient had a severe metabolic acidosis. In retrospect the patient had shown deterioration in renal and hepatic function tests during the preceding 24 hr. On terminating the infusions the blood lactate concentration fell rapidly. It is suggested that great care should be exercised when using such infusions in ill patients and acid base status and renal and hepatic function should be monitored frequently. PMID:22069

  9. Maternal inheritance of severe hypertriglyceridemia impairs glucose metabolism in offspring

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ya-Hong; Yu, Caiguo; Kayoumu, Abudurexiti; Guo, Xin; Ji, Zhili; Liu, George

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Maternally inherited familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) impairs glucose metabolism and increases cardiovascular risks in the offspring to a greater degree than paternal inherited FH. However, it remains unknown whether hypertriglyceridemia affects glucose metabolism via inheritance. In this study, we sought to compare the impact of maternally and paternally inherited hypertriglyceridemia on glucose and lipid metabolism in mice. ApoCIII transgenic mice with severe hypertriglyceridemia were mated with non-transgenic control mice to obtain 4 types of offspring: maternal non-transgenic control and maternal transgenic offspring, and paternal control and paternal transgenic offspring. Plasma triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol (TC), fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and fasting insulin (FINS) were measured. ApoCIII overexpression caused severe hypertriglyceridemia, but the transgenic female mice had unaltered fertility with normal pregnancy and birth of pups. The 4 groups of offspring had similar birth weight and growth rate. The plasma TG of maternal and paternal transgenic offspring were nearly 40-fold higher than maternal and paternal control mice, but there was no difference in plasma TG between maternal and paternal transgenic offspring. Although the FPG of the 4 groups of animals had no difference, the maternal transgenic mice showed impaired glucose tolerance, increased FINS levels and higher homeostasis model assessment insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR) than the other 3 groups. In conclusion, maternally inherited hypertriglyceridemia in ApoCIII transgenic mice displayed impaired glucose tolerance, hyperinsulinemia and increased HOMA-R, while paternally inherited hypertriglyceridemia did not have such impacts. PMID:25859267

  10. [Severe nortriptyline poisoning in poor metabolizers of the sparteine type].

    PubMed

    Petersen, P; Brøsen, K

    1991-02-01

    Approximately 7% of the Danish population are so called poor metabolizers (PM) as regards the model compound sparteine. These individuals lack the P450 isozyme which is mainly responsible for elimination of at least 20 different medicaments including nortriptyline. A woman aged 42 years suffering from depression was treated with 100 mg nortriptyline daily and, during the course of treatment, she developed a toxic serum nortriptyline level (approximately 2,100 nM). Treatment was withdrawn temporarily on account of severe side-effects. The depression recurred. During the medicine-free period, a sparteine test was performed and this demonstrated that the patient was a poor metabolizer. Scarcely two months after hospitalization, treatment was recommenced with 25 mg nortriptyline daily after which the patient's depression disappeared completely without any side-effects of note. PMID:2000655

  11. Influence of pre-exercise acidosis and alkalosis on the kinetics of acid-base recovery following intense exercise.

    PubMed

    Robergs, Robert; Hutchinson, Keith; Hendee, Shonn; Madden, Sean; Siegler, Jason

    2005-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the recovery kinetics of pH and lactate for the conditions of pre-exercise acidosis, alkalosis, and placebo states. Twelve trained male cyclists completed 3 exercise trials (110% workload at VO2max), ingesting either 0.3 g/kg of NH4Cl (ACD), 0.2 g/kg of Na+HCO3- and 0.2 g/kg of sodium citrate (ALK), or a placebo (calcium carbonate) (PLAC). Blood samples (heated dorsal hand vein) were drawn before, during, and after exercise. Exercise-induced acidosis was more severe in the ACD and PLAC trials (7.15 +/- 0.06, 7.21 +/- 0.07, 7.16 +/- 0.06, P < 0.05, for ACD, ALK, PLAC, respectively). Recovery kinetics for blood pH and lactate, as assessed by the monoexponential slope constant, were not different between trials (0.057 +/- 0.01, 0.050 +/- 0.01, 0.080 +/- 0.02, for ACD, ALK, PLAC, respectively). Complete recovery of blood pH from metabolic acidosis can take longer than 45 min. Such a recovery profile is nonlinear, with 50% recovery occurring in approximately 12 min. Complete recovery of blood lactate can take longer than 60 min, with 50% recovery occurring in approximately 30 min. Induced alkalosis decreases metabolic acidosis and improves pH recovery compared to acidodic and placebo conditions. Although blood pH and lactate are highly correlated during recovery from acidosis, they recover at significantly different rates. PMID:15902990

  12. Examining the relationship between diet-induced acidosis and cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Increased cancer risk is associated with select dietary factors. Dietary lifestyles can alter systemic acid-base balance over time. Acidogenic diets, which are typically high in animal protein and salt and low in fruits and vegetables, can lead to a sub-clinical or low-grade state of metabolic acidosis. The relationship between diet and cancer risk prompts questions about the role of acidosis in the initiation and progression of cancer. Cancer is triggered by genetic and epigenetic perturbations in the normal cell, but it has become clear that microenvironmental and systemic factors exert modifying effects on cancer cell development. While there are no studies showing a direct link between diet-induced acidosis and cancer, acid-base disequilibrium has been shown to modulate molecular activity including adrenal glucocorticoid, insulin growth factor (IGF-1), and adipocyte cytokine signaling, dysregulated cellular metabolism, and osteoclast activation, which may serve as intermediary or downstream effectors of carcinogenesis or tumor promotion. In short, diet-induced acidosis may influence molecular activities at the cellular level that promote carcinogenesis or tumor progression. This review defines the relationship between dietary lifestyle and acid-base balance and discusses the potential consequences of diet-induced acidosis and cancer occurrence or progression. PMID:22853725

  13. Hemodynamic and Metabolic Correlates of Perinatal White Matter Injury Severity

    PubMed Central

    Riddle, Art; Maire, Jennifer; Cai, Victor; Nguyen, Thuan; Gong, Xi; Hansen, Kelly; Grafe, Marjorie R.; Hohimer, A. Roger; Back, Stephen A.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Although the spectrum of perinatal white matter injury (WMI) in preterm infants is shifting from cystic encephalomalacia to milder forms of WMI, the factors that contribute to this changing spectrum are unclear. We hypothesized that the variability in WMI quantified by immunohistochemical markers of inflammation could be correlated with the severity of impaired blood oxygen, glucose and lactate. Methods We employed a preterm fetal sheep model of in utero moderate hypoxemia and global severe but not complete cerebral ischemia that reproduces the spectrum of human WMI. Since there is small but measurable residual brain blood flow during occlusion, we sought to determine if the metabolic state of the residual arterial blood was associated with severity of WMI. Near the conclusion of hypoxia-ischemia, we recorded cephalic arterial blood pressure, blood oxygen, glucose and lactate levels. To define the spectrum of WMI, an ordinal WMI rating scale was compared against an unbiased quantitative image analysis protocol that provided continuous histo-pathological outcome measures for astrogliosis and microgliosis derived from the entire white matter. Results A spectrum of WMI was observed that ranged from diffuse non-necrotic lesions to more severe injury that comprised discrete foci of microscopic or macroscopic necrosis. Residual arterial pressure, oxygen content and blood glucose displayed a significant inverse association with WMI and lactate concentrations were directly related. Elevated glucose levels were the most significantly associated with less severe WMI. Conclusions Our results suggest that under conditions of hypoxemia and severe cephalic hypotension, WMI severity measured using unbiased immunohistochemical measurements correlated with several physiologic parameters, including glucose, which may be a useful marker of fetal response to hypoxia or provide protection against energy failure and more severe WMI. PMID:24416093

  14. Diabetes Severity, Metabolic syndrome, and the risk of Erectile Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, Aviva E.; Eisenberg, Michael; Patel, Chirag J.; Chertow, Glenn M.; Leppert, John T.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Erectile dysfunction (ED) is more common in men with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), obesity, and/or the metabolic syndrome (MetS). Aim To investigate the associations among proxy measures of diabetic severity and the presence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) with erectile dysfunction (ED) in a nationally representative U.S. data sample. Methods We performed a cross-sectional analysis of adult participants in the 2001–2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Main outcome measures ED was ascertained by self-report. T2DM severity was defined by calculated measures of glycemic control and insulin resistance (IR). Insulin resistance was estimated using fasting plasma insulin (FPI) levels and the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) definition. We classified glycemic control using HbA1c and fasting plasma glucose levels (FPG). Metabolic syndrome was defined by the American Heart Association and National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute criteria. Logistic regression models, adjusted for sociodemographics, risk factors and comorbidities, were fitted for each measure of T2DM severity, MetS, and the presence of ED. Results Proxy measures of glycemic control and insulin resistance were associated with ED. Participants with FPG between 100–126mg/dL (5.6–7 mmol/L) and ?126mg/dL (>7mmol/L) had higher odds of ED, OR 1.22 [CI, 0.83–1.80] and OR 2.68 [CI, 1.48–4.86], respectively. Participants with HbA1c 5.7–6.4% (38.8–46.4 mmol/mol) and ?6.5% (47.5 mmol/mol) had higher odds of ED, (OR 1.73 [CI, 1.08–2.76] and 3.70 [CI, 2.19–6.27], respectively). When FPI and HOMA-IR were evaluated by tertiles, there was a graded relation among participants in the top tertile. In multivariable models, a strong association remained between HbA1c and ED (OR 3.19 [CI,1.13–9.01]). MetS was associated with >2.5-fold increased odds of self reported ED (OR 2.55 [CI, 1.85–3.52]). Conclusions Poor glycemic control, impaired insulin sensitivity and the MetS are associated with a heightened risk of ED. PMID:24010555

  15. Proximal tubule function and response to acidosis.

    PubMed

    Curthoys, Norman P; Moe, Orson W

    2014-09-01

    The human kidneys produce approximately 160-170 L of ultrafiltrate per day. The proximal tubule contributes to fluid, electrolyte, and nutrient homeostasis by reabsorbing approximately 60%-70% of the water and NaCl, a greater proportion of the NaHCO3, and nearly all of the nutrients in the ultrafiltrate. The proximal tubule is also the site of active solute secretion, hormone production, and many of the metabolic functions of the kidney. This review discusses the transport of NaCl, NaHCO3, glucose, amino acids, and two clinically important anions, citrate and phosphate. NaCl and the accompanying water are reabsorbed in an isotonic fashion. The energy that drives this process is generated largely by the basolateral Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, which creates an inward negative membrane potential and Na(+)-gradient. Various Na(+)-dependent countertransporters and cotransporters use the energy of this gradient to promote the uptake of HCO3 (-) and various solutes, respectively. A Na(+)-dependent cotransporter mediates the movement of HCO3 (-) across the basolateral membrane, whereas various Na(+)-independent passive transporters accomplish the export of various other solutes. To illustrate its homeostatic feat, the proximal tubule alters its metabolism and transport properties in response to metabolic acidosis. The uptake and catabolism of glutamine and citrate are increased during acidosis, whereas the recovery of phosphate from the ultrafiltrate is decreased. The increased catabolism of glutamine results in increased ammoniagenesis and gluconeogenesis. Excretion of the resulting ammonium ions facilitates the excretion of acid, whereas the combined pathways accomplish the net production of HCO3 (-) ions that are added to the plasma to partially restore acid-base balance. PMID:23908456

  16. Severe Obesity: Evidence for a Deranged Metabolic Program in Skeletal Muscle?

    PubMed Central

    Houmard, Joseph A; Pories, Walter J; Dohm, G Lynis

    2012-01-01

    Severe obesity is increasing at a disproportionate rate compared to milder grade obesity. Our research group has obtained evidence indicative of an “obesity metabolic program” in the skeletal muscle of severely obese individuals which may be genetically or epigenetically determined. We believe this represents a paradigm shift in thinking about metabolic regulation in obesity. PMID:22710702

  17. Acidosis-induced downregulation of hepatocyte mitochondrial aquaporin-8 and ureagenesis from ammonia.

    PubMed

    Molinas, Sara M; Soria, Leandro R; Marrone, Julieta; Danielli, Mauro; Trumper, Laura; Marinelli, Raúl A

    2015-08-01

    It has been proposed that, during metabolic acidosis, the liver downregulates mitochondrial ammonia detoxification via ureagenesis, a bicarbonate-consuming process. Since we previously demonstrated that hepatocyte mitochondrial aquaporin-8 channels (mtAQP8) facilitate the uptake of ammonia and its metabolism into urea, we studied whether mtAQP8 is involved in the liver adaptive response to acidosis. Primary cultured rat hepatocytes were adapted to acidosis by exposing them to culture medium at pH 7.0 for 40 h. Control cells were exposed to pH 7.4. Hepatocytes exposed to acid medium showed a decrease in mtAQP8 protein expression (-30%, p < 0.05). Ureagenesis from ammonia was assessed by incubating the cells with (15)N-labeled ammonia and measuring (15)N-labeled urea synthesis by nuclear magnetic resonance. Reduced ureagenesis was found in acidified hepatocytes (-31%, p < 0.05). In vivo studies in rats subjected to 7 days acidosis also showed decreased protein expression of hepatic mtAQP8 (-50%, p < 0.05) and reduced liver urea content (-35%; p < 0.05). In conclusion, our in vitro and in vivo data suggest that hepatic mtAQP8 expression is downregulated in acidosis, a mechanism that may contribute to decreased ureagenesis from ammonia in response to acidosis. PMID:26194146

  18. Fatal Tenofovir-Associateacd Lactic Acidosis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Hashim, Hasriza; Sahari, Narisa Sulaiman; Sazlly Lim, Sazlyna Mohd; Hoo, Fan Kee

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), in 1996, has resulted in marked reductions in the rate of illness and death, due to HIV infection. The HAART has transformed HIV infection into a manageable chronic disease. However, although many regimens lower plasma viral load, to below the limit of detection, in most patients, maintaining viral load suppression remains challenging, because of adverse effects and toxicity in the long term, which can lead to non-adherence, virologic failure and drug resistance. Although rare, lactic acidosis often develops fatal complications, as reported in several human immunodeficiency virus infected patients treated with nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs). The purpose of this paper is to report a case of tenofovir induced lactic acidosis and review the literature. Case Presentation: A 52-year-old Malay gentleman, with hepatitis C virus and HIV infection was admitted to the intensive care unit for severe lactic acidosis, with concurrent Escherichia coli bacteremia with multiorgan dysfunction. The patient was started on highly active antiretroviral therapy, which included tenofovir, 5 weeks before presentation. Antimicrobial therapy, continuous veno-venous hemofiltration, and other supportive treatments were instituted. However, the patient eventually succumbed to his illness. Conclusions: It is essential for clinicians to be able to recognize the signs and symptoms of lactic acidosis in NRTIs treated HIV patients, as an early diagnosis is important to institute treatment. PMID:26568856

  19. Osteomalacia complicating renal tubular acidosis in association with Sjogren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    El Ati, Zohra; Fatma, Lilia Ben; Boulahya, Ghada; Rais, Lamia; Krid, Madiha; Smaoui, Wided; Maiz, Hedi Ben; Beji, Soumaya; Zouaghi, Karim; Moussa, Fatma Ben

    2014-09-01

    Renal involvement in Sjogren's syndrome (SS) is not uncommon and may precede other complaints. Tubulointerstitial nephritis is the most common renal disease in SS and may lead to renal tubular acidosis (RTA), which in turn may cause osteomalacia. Nevertheless, osteomalacia rarely occurs as the first manifestation of a renal tubule disorder due to SS. We herewith describe a 43-year-old woman who was admitted to our hospital for weakness, lumbago and inability to walk. X-ray of the long bones showed extensive demineralization of the bones. Laboratory investigations revealed chronic kidney disease with serum creatinine of 2.3 mg/dL and creatinine clearance of 40 mL/min, hypokalemia (3.2 mmol/L), hypophosphatemia (0.4 mmol/L), hypocalcemia (2.14 mmol/L) and hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis (chlorine: 114 mmol/L; alkaline reserve: 14 mmol/L). The serum alkaline phosphatase levels were elevated. The serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D and 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D were low and borderline low, respectively, and the parathyroid hormone level was 70 pg/L. Urinalysis showed inappropriate alkaline urine (urinary PH: 7), glycosuria with normal blood glucose, phosphaturia and uricosuria. These values indicated the presence of both distal and proximal RTA. Our patient reported dryness of the mouth and eyes and Schirmer's test showed xerophthalmia. An accessory salivary gland biopsy showed changes corresponding to stage IV of Chisholm and Masson score. Kidney biopsy showed diffuse and severe tubulo-interstitial nephritis with dense lymphoplasmocyte infiltrates. Sicca syndrome and renal interstitial infiltrates indicated SS as the underlying cause of the RTA and osteomalacia. The patient received alkalinization, vitamin D (Sterogyl ®), calcium supplements and steroids in an initial dose of 1 mg/kg/day, tapered to 10 mg daily. The prognosis was favorable and the serum creatinine level was 1.7 mg/dL, calcium was 2.2 mmol/L and serum phosphate was 0.9 mmol/L. PMID:25193912

  20. Sulfur amino acid metabolism in children with severe childhood undernutrition: methionine kinetics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Children with edematous but not nonedematous severe childhood undernutrition (SCU) have lower plasma and erythrocyte-free concentrations of cysteine and methionine, which suggests a decreased availability of methionine for cysteine synthesis. We propose that methionine production and metabolism will...

  1. Distal renal tubular acidosis associated with concurrent leptospirosis in a dog.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Stephen A; Hostutler, Roger A

    2014-01-01

    A 9 yr old spayed female boxer was presented for evaluation of vomiting, lethargy, anorexia, and weight loss. Initial laboratory evaluation revealed a hyperchloremic normal anion gap metabolic acidosis with alkaline urine that was consistent with a diagnosis of distal renal tubular acidosis (RTA). Targeted therapy was initiated with Na bicarbonate (HCO3) and potassium (K) gluconate. Leptospirosis was subsequently diagnosed with paired microagglutination testing (MAT), and doxycycline was added to the other treatments. Clinical signs resolved, and 6 mo after diagnosis, although the dog remained on alkali therapy (i.e., NaHCO3 and K gluconate) and a mild metabolic acidosis persisted, the dog remained otherwise healthy with a good quality of life. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report to describe the concomitant association of those two disorders. Leptospirosis should be considered for any case of RTA in dogs. PMID:24659721

  2. Evaluation of in vitro models for predicting acidosis risk of barley grain in finishing beef cattle.

    PubMed

    Anele, U Y; Swift, M-L; McAllister, T A; Galyean, M L; Yang, W Z

    2015-10-01

    Our objective was to develop a model to predict the acidosis potential of barley based on the in vitro batch culture incubation of 50 samples varying in bulk density, starch content, processing method, growing location, and agronomic practices. The model was an adaptation of the acidosis index (calculated from a combination of in situ and in vitro analyses and from several components of grain chemical composition) developed in Australia for use in the feed industry to estimate the potential for grains to increase the risk of ruminal acidosis. Of the independent variables considered, DM disappearance at 6 h of incubation (DMD6) using reduced-strength (20%) buffer in the batch culture accounted for 90.5% of the variation in the acidosis index with a root mean square error (RMSE) of 4.46%. To evaluate our model using independent datasets (derived from previous batch culture studies using full-strength [100%] buffer), we performed another batch culture study using full-strength buffer. The full-strength buffer model using in vitro DMD6 (DMD6-FS) accounted for 66.5% of the variation in the acidosis index with an RMSE of 8.30%. When the new full-strength buffer model was applied to 3 independent datasets to predict acidosis, it accounted for 20.1, 28.5, and 30.2% of the variation in the calculated acidosis index. Significant ( < 0.001) mean bias was evident in 2 of the datasets, for which the DMD6 model underpredicted the acidosis index by 46.9 and 5.73%. Ranking of samples from the most diverse independent dataset using the DMD6-FS model and the Black (2008) model (calculated using in situ starch degradation) indicated the relationship between the rankings using Spearman's rank correlation was negative (? = -0.30; = 0.059). When the reduced-strength buffer model was used, however, there were similarities in the acidosis index ranking of barley samples by the models as shown by the result of a correlation analysis between calculated (using the Australian model) and predicted (using the reduced-strength buffer DMD6 model) acidosis index (? = 0.67; < 0.001). Results suggest that our model, which is based on a reduced-strength buffer in vitro DMD6, has the potential to predict acidosis risk and can rank barley samples based on their acidotic risk. Nonetheless, the model would benefit from further refinement by expanding the database. PMID:26523578

  3. Astrocytic Acidosis in Hyperglycemic and Complete Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Kraig, Richard P.; Chesler, Mitchell

    2011-01-01

    Summary Nearly complete brain ischemia under normoglycemic conditions results in death of only selectively vulnerable neurons. With prior elevation of brain glucose, such injury is enhanced to include pancel1ular necrosis (i.e., infarction), perhaps because an associated, severe lactic acidosis preferentially injures astrocytes. However, no direct physiologic measurements exist to support this hypothesis. Therefore, we used microelectrodes to measure intracellular pH and passive electrical properties of cortical astrocytes as a first approach to characterizing the physiologic behavior of these cel1s during hyperglycemic and complete ischemia, conditions that produce infarction in reperfused brain. Anesthesized rats (n = 26) were made extremely hyperglycemic (blood glucose, 51.4 ± 2.8 mM) so as to create potentially the most extreme acidic conditions possible; then ischemia was induced by cardiac arrest. Two loci more acidic than the interstitial space (6.17–6.20 pH) were found. The more acidic locus [4.30 ± 0.19 (n = 5); range: 3.82–4.89] was occasional1y seen at the onset of anoxic depolarization, 3–7 min after cardiac arrest. The less acidic locus [5.30 ± 0.07 (n = 53); range 4.46–5.93)] was seen 5–46 min after cardiac arrest. A smal1 negative change in DC potential [8 ± 1 mV (n = 5); range ?3 to ?12 mV and 7 ± 2 mV (n = 53); range +3 to ?31 mV, respectively] was always seen upon impalement of acidic loci, suggesting cellular penetration. In a separate group of five animals, electrical characteristics of these cells were specifically measured (n = 17): membrane potential was ?12 ± 0.2 mV (range ?3 to ?24 mY), input resistance was 114 ± 16 M? (range 25–250 M?), and time constant was 4.4 ± 0.4 ms (range 3.0–7.9 ms). Injection of horseradish peroxidase into cells from either animal group uniformly stained degenerating astrocytes. These findings establish previously unrecognized properties of ischemic astrocytes that may be prerequisites for infarction from nearly complete ischemia: the capacity to develop profound cellular acidosis and a concomitant reduction in cel1 membrane ion permeability. PMID:2298827

  4. Genetic signatures in choline and 1-carbon metabolism are associated with the severity of hepatic steatosis

    PubMed Central

    Corbin, Karen D.; Abdelmalek, Manal F.; Spencer, Melanie D.; da Costa, Kerry-Ann; Galanko, Joseph A.; Sha, Wei; Suzuki, Ayako; Guy, Cynthia D.; Cardona, Diana M.; Torquati, Alfonso; Diehl, Anna Mae; Zeisel, Steven H.

    2013-01-01

    Choline metabolism is important for very low-density lipoprotein secretion, making this nutritional pathway an important contributor to hepatic lipid balance. The purpose of this study was to assess whether the cumulative effects of multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across genes of choline/1-carbon metabolism and functionally related pathways increase susceptibility to developing hepatic steatosis. In biopsy-characterized cases of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and controls, we assessed 260 SNPs across 21 genes in choline/1-carbon metabolism. When SNPs were examined individually, using logistic regression, we only identified a single SNP (PNPLA3 rs738409) that was significantly associated with severity of hepatic steatosis after adjusting for confounders and multiple comparisons (P=0.02). However, when groupings of SNPs in similar metabolic pathways were defined using unsupervised hierarchical clustering, we identified groups of subjects with shared SNP signatures that were significantly correlated with steatosis burden (P=0.0002). The lowest and highest steatosis clusters could also be differentiated by ethnicity. However, unique SNP patterns defined steatosis burden irrespective of ethnicity. Our results suggest that analysis of SNP patterns in genes of choline/1-carbon metabolism may be useful for prediction of severity of steatosis in specific subsets of people, and the metabolic inefficiencies caused by these SNPs should be examined further.—Corbin, K. D., Abdelmalek, M. F., Spencer, M. D., da Costa, K.-A., Galanko, J. A., Sha, W., Suzuki, A., Guy, C. D., Cardona, D. M., Torquati, A., Diehl, A. M., Zeisel, S. H. Genetic signatures in choline and 1-carbon metabolism are associated with the severity of hepatic steatosis. PMID:23292069

  5. [Correction of metabolic hypoxia in patients with severe burn injury and septic toxemia].

    PubMed

    Kozinets, G P; Osadchaia, O I; Tsygankov, V P; Isaenko, N P; Zhernov, A A; Boiarskaia, A M

    2012-12-01

    The clinical efficacy of the preparation reamberin in correction of metabolic hypoxia in patients with severe thermal burn injury under septicotoxemia was studied. It was established high efficacy of the preparation in the correction of the antioxidant defense system, its considerable antitoxic activity. Established role of reamberin in maintaining the functioning of the humoral detoxication systems, and antimicrobial resistance in patients with severe thermal injury. PMID:23610818

  6. Fulminant lactic acidosis in two patients with Type 2 diabetes treated with metformin.

    PubMed

    Brassøe, R; Elkmann, T; Hempel, M; Gravholt, C H

    2005-10-01

    Lactic acidosis is a known adverse risk of metformin treatment. We report two cases in whom fulminant lactic acidosis developed during treatment. There were no contraindications to metformin treatment and both were admitted with abdominal discomfort for some days, causing dehydration. Both patients had renal failure on admission, developed multiple organ failure and both suffered a massive stroke. One patient died and the other survived but is severely disabled. We suggest, in both cases, that acute renal failure developed as a result of dehydration, causing metformin accumulation and lactic acidosis. We recommend that all patients on metformin should consider discontinuation of metformin treatment in the event of a severe medical condition causing dehydration. PMID:16176212

  7. Effect of acarbose on acute acidosis.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, C L; Thompson, A; Greenwood, K; Sherington, J; Bruce, C

    2009-06-01

    A challenge model was used to evaluate a new approach to controlling acute acidosis. Acute acidosis reduces performance in both dairy and beef cattle and most often occurs as a consequence of ingestion of large amounts of readily fermentable starch, resulting in increased production of volatile fatty acids (VFA) and lactic acid and a reduction in ruminal pH. Acarbose is an alpha-amylase and glucosidase inhibitor that slows the rate of degradation of starch to glucose, thereby reducing the rate of VFA production and maintaining rumen pH at a more stable level. It is commercially available (Glucobay, Bayer, Wuppertal, Germany) and indicated for the control of blood glucose in diabetic patients. The ability of acarbose to reduce the incidence of acidosis and the comparative efficacies of acarbose, sodium bicarbonate, and monensin were tested in 3 acute acidosis challenge experiments in cattle. Rumen-cannulated Holstein steers were challenged with a mixture of 48.4% cornstarch, 48.4% ground corn, 2.1% sodium caseinate, and 1.1% urea with or without test substance. The challenge was administered at a rate of 12.5 g/kg of body weight (BW) as a slurry through the cannula directly into the rumen. Ruminal pH was monitored at 10-min intervals throughout the study. Animals were removed from study and rumen contents replaced if they exhibited acute acidosis as defined as pH <4.5. If acidosis was not observed within 24 h, animals were subjected to a second challenge. Ruminal fluid samples were taken for measurement of VFA and lactate concentrations at various intervals after the challenge. In experiment 1, the carbohydrate challenge induced acidosis in 4 of 4 control animals and 0 of 4 animals treated with 2.14 or 21.4 mg of acarbose/kg of BW in the challenge based on the criterion of pH <4.5. In experiment 2, the carbohydrate challenge induced acidosis in 4 of 7 control animals and 1 of 7 animals when 1.07 mg of acarbose/kg of BW was included in the challenge. In experiment 3, acidosis was induced in 7 of 7 animals in the control, 1% sodium bicarbonate, and 12 mg of monensin/kg of dry matter intake groups and in 3 of 8 steers administered 1.07 mg of acarbose/kg of BW in the challenge. Increases in lactate concentrations and decreases in total VFA associated with acute acidosis were mitigated by acarbose. Thus, acarbose, an amylase and glucosidase inhibitor, prevented or reduced the incidence of acidosis in an acute challenge model in steers and was more effective than monensin or sodium bicarbonate. PMID:19448010

  8. The Relationship of Omental and Subcutaneous Adipocyte Size to Metabolic Disease in Severe Obesity

    PubMed Central

    O'Connell, Jean; Lynch, Lydia; Cawood, Tom J.; Kwasnik, Anna; Nolan, Niamh; Geoghegan, Justin; McCormick, Aiden; O'Farrelly, Cliona; O'Shea, Donal

    2010-01-01

    Objective Several studies have reported the existence of a subgroup of obese individuals with normal metabolic profiles. It remains unclear what factors are responsible for this phenomenon. We proposed that adipocyte size might be a key factor in the protection of metabolically healthy obese (MHO) individuals from the adverse effects of obesity. Subjects Thirty-five patients undergoing bariatric surgery were classified as MHO (n?=?15) or metabolically unhealthy obese (MUO, n?=?20) according to cut-off points adapted from the International Diabetes Federation definition of the metabolic syndrome. Median body mass index (BMI) was 48 (range 40–71). Results There was a moderate correlation between omental adipocyte size and subcutaneous adipocyte size (r?=?0.59, p<0.05). The MHO group had significantly lower mean omental adipocyte size (80.9±10.9 µm) when compared with metabolically unhealthy patients (100.0±7.6 µm, p<0.0001). Mean subcutaneous adipocyte size was similar between the two groups (104.1±8.5 µm versus 107.9±7.1 µm). Omental, but not subcutaneous adipocyte size, correlated with the degree of insulin resistance as measured by HOMA-IR (r?=?0.73, p<0.0005), as well as other metabolic parameters including triglyceride/HDL-cholesterol ratio and HbA1c. Twenty-eight patients consented to liver biopsy. Of these, 46% had steatohepatitis and fibrosis. Fifty percent (including all the MHO patients) had steatosis only. Both omental and subcutaneous adipocyte size were significantly associated with the degree of steatosis (r?=?0.66, p<0.0001 and r?=?0.63, p<0.005 respectively). However, only omental adipocyte size was an independent predictor of the presence or absence of fibrosis. Conclusion Metabolically healthy individuals are a distinct subgroup of the severely obese. Both subcutaneous and omental adipocyte size correlated positively with the degree of fatty liver, but only omental adipocyte size was related to metabolic health, and possibly progression from hepatic steatosis to fibrosis. PMID:20376319

  9. Chronic administration of Eucommia leaf stimulates metabolic function of rats across several organs.

    PubMed

    Fujikawa, Takahiko; Hirata, Tetsuya; Wada, Atsunori; Kawamura, Naomi; Yamaguchi, Yasuyo; Fujimura, Katsuyuki; Ueda, Taro; Yurugi, Yutaka; Soya, Hideaki; Nishibe, Sansei

    2010-12-01

    Eucommia bark (Eucommia ulmoides Oliver) has been used as an herbal medicine, and more recently, the plant's leaves have been widely used to prepare tea which may have anti-obesity properties. We used a metabolic syndrome-like rat model, produced by feeding a 35% high-fat diet (HFD), to examine potential anti-obesity and anti-metabolic syndrome effects and mechanisms of chronic administration of Eucommia leaf as an extract or green leaf powder. Eighty rats were studied for 3 months in ten groups. Both forms of Eucommia leaves minimised increases in body weight and visceral fat in a dose-dependent fashion. Increases in plasma levels of TAG and NEFA, and insulin resistance secondary to HFD were lessened by both forms of Eucommia leaf. Concomitantly, an increase in plasma adiponectin levels and suppression of plasma resistin and TNF-? levels were confirmed. Real-time PCR studies showed that both forms of Eucommia leaf enhanced metabolic function across several organs, including diminishing ATP production (white adipose tissue), accelerating ?-oxidation (liver) and increasing the use of ketone bodies/glucose (skeletal muscle), all of which may exert anti-obesity effects under HFD conditions. These findings suggest that chronic administration of either form of Eucommia leaves stimulates the metabolic function in rats across several organs. The anti-obesity and anti-metabolic syndrome activity in this rat model may be maintained through secretion and regulation of adipocytokines that depend on the accumulation of visceral fat to improve insulin resistance or hyperlipaemia. PMID:20691136

  10. Changes in energy metabolism after induction therapy in patients with severe or moderate ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Mai; Sasaki, Masaya; Takaoka, Azusa; Kurihara, Mika; Iwakawa, Hiromi; Bamba, Shigeki; Ban, Hiromitsu; Andoh, Akira

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the changes in energy expenditure during induction therapy in patients with severe or moderate ulcerative colitis. Thirteen patients (10 men, 3 women; mean age, 36.5 years) with ulcerative colitis admitted to the Shiga University Hospital were enrolled in this study. We measured the resting energy expenditure and respiratory quotients of these patients before and after induction therapy with indirect calorimetry. We analyzed the changes of nutritional status and serum inflammatory cytokine levels and also evaluated the relationship between energy metabolism and disease activity by using the Seo index and Lichtiger index. The resting energy expenditure was 26.3 ± 3.8 kcal/kg/day in the active stage and significantly decreased to 23.5 ± 2.4 kcal/kg/day after induction therapy (p<0.01). The resting energy expenditure changed in parallel with the disease activity index and C-reactive protein and inflammatory cytokine levels. The respiratory quotient significantly increased after induction therapy. Thus, moderate to severe ulcerative colitis patients had a hyper-metabolic status, and the energy metabolism of these patients significantly changed after induction therapy. Therefore, we recommend that nutritional management with 30–34 kcal/kg/day (calculated as measured resting energy expenditure × activity factor, 1.3) may be optimal for hospitalized ulcerative colitis patients. PMID:26060352

  11. Comparison of metabolic substrates in alligators and several birds of prey.

    PubMed

    Sweazea, Karen L; McMurtry, John P; Elsey, Ruth M; Redig, Patrick; Braun, Eldon J

    2014-08-01

    On average, avian blood glucose concentrations are 1.5-2 times those of mammals of similar mass and high concentrations of insulin are required to lower blood glucose. Whereas considerable data exist for granivorous species, few data are available for plasma metabolic substrate and glucoregulatory hormone concentrations for carnivorous birds and alligators. Birds and mammals with carnivorous diets have higher metabolic rates than animals consuming diets with less protein whereas alligators have low metabolic rates. Therefore, the present study was designed to compare substrate and glucoregulatory hormone concentrations in several birds of prey and a phylogenetically close relative of birds, the alligator. The hypothesis was that the combination of carnivorous diets and high metabolic rates favored the evolution of greater protein and fatty acid utilization leading to insulin resistance and high plasma glucose concentrations in carnivorous birds. In contrast, it was hypothesized that alligators would have low substrate utilization attributable to a low metabolic rate. Fasting plasma substrate and glucoregulatory hormone concentrations were compared for bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus), great horned owls (Bubo virginianus), red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis), and American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis). Avian species had high circulating ?-hydroxybutyrate (10-21 mg/dl) compared to alligators (2.81 ± 0.16 mg/dl). In mammals high concentrations of this byproduct of fatty acid utilization are correlated with insulin resistance. Fasting glucose and insulin concentrations were positively correlated in eagles whereas no relationship was found between these variables for owls, hawks or alligators. Additionally, ?-hydroxybutyrate concentrations were low in alligators. Similar to carnivorous mammals, ingestion of a high protein diet may have favored the utilization of fatty acids and protein for energy thereby promoting the development of insulin resistance and gluconeogenesis-induced high plasma glucose concentrations during periods of fasting in birds of prey. PMID:25043840

  12. Mineral metabolism disturbances are associated with the presence and severity of calcific aortic valve disease*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhen-kun; Ying, Chen; Zhao, Hong-yan; Fang, Yue-hua; Chen, Ying; Shen, Wei-feng

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We investigated whether disturbance of calcium and phosphate metabolism is associated with the presence and severity of calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) in patients with normal or mildly impaired renal function. Methods: We measured serum levels of calcium, phosphate, alkaline phosphatase (AKP), intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH), 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OHD), and biomarkers of bone turnover in 260 consecutive patients with normal or mildly impaired renal function and aortic valve sclerosis (AVSc) (n=164) or stenosis (AVS) (n=96) and in 164 age- and gender-matched controls. Logistic regression models were used to determine the association of mineral metabolism parameters with the presence and severity of CAVD. Results: Stepwise increases were observed in serum levels of calcium, phosphate, AKP, and iPTH from the control group to patients with AVS, and with reverse changes for 25-OHD levels (all P<0.001). Similarly, osteocalcin, procollagen I N-terminal peptide, and ?-isomerized type I collagen C-telopeptide breakdown products were significantly increased stepwise from the control group to patients with AVS (all P<0.001). In patients with AVS, serum levels of iPTH were positively, in contrast 25-OHD levels were negatively, related to trans-aortic peak flow velocity and mean pressure gradient. After adjusting for relevant confounding variables, increased serum levels of calcium, phosphate, AKP, and iPTH and reduced serum levels of 25-OHD were independently associated with the presence and severity of CAVD. Conclusions: This study suggests an association between mineral metabolism disturbance and the presence and severity of CAVD in patients with normal or mildly impaired renal function. Abnormal bone turnover may be a potential mechanism. PMID:25990053

  13. The metabolic effects of moderately severe upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage in man.

    PubMed Central

    Foster, K. J.; Alberti, K. G.; Binder, C.; Holdstock, G.; Karran, S. J.; Smith, C. L.; Talbot, S.; Turnell, D. C.

    1982-01-01

    The metabolic effects of moderately severe gastrointestinal haemorrhage were investigated in man. Before resuscitation, patients had raised circulating concentrations of glucose, lactate, alanine, glycerol and cortisol. After urgent operation for haemorrhage, metabolite concentrations were similar to those of control patients having elective abdominal surgery, but insulin concentrations were higher and cortisol lower in haemorrhage patients. There were no significant differences in nitrogen excretion between haemorrhage patients and their controls, but urinary 3-methyl-histidine excretion by haemorrhage patients was lower indicating decreased muscle protein breakdown. Decreased amino acid release from muscle might account for previously reported imparied wound healing after haemorrhage. PMID:7045838

  14. Gitelman's syndrome with vomiting manifested by severe metabolic alkalosis and progressive renal insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong-Ho; Lee, Jeonghwan; Han, Jin Suk

    2013-01-01

    Gitelman's syndrome is an autosomal recessive salt-losing tubulopathy showing hypokalemic hypomagnesemic hypocalciuria with metabolic alkalosis and hyperreninemic hyperaldosteronism. This syndrome is caused by mutations in the SLC12A3 gene that encodes sodium-chloride cotransporter expressed at the apical membrane of renal distal convoluted tubule. Symptoms and renal outcomes of Gitelman's syndrome are, in general, mild and benign, and renal insufficiency from Gitelman's syndrome associated with long-standing hypokalemia and volume depletion is extremely rare. Herein, we report a 27-year-old male patient with Gitelman's syndrome who manifested renal failure, hypokalemia, severe metabolic alkalosis and altered mentality. About one year ago, the patient had been transferred to Seoul National University Hospital, because of unsolved hypokalemia, and was diagnosed as Gitelman's syndrome by clinical features and genetic analysis of the SLC12A3 gene. The patient carries a missense mutation at one allele of SLC12A3 gene (c.781C>T, p.Arg261Cys). His mother is also heterozygous for the same mutation and she had a history of hypokalemia. On this admission, the patient had recurrent bouts of vomiting induced by psychiatric eating disorder and showed severe volume depletion with hypotension, azotemia and metabolic alkalosis. Intense hydration therapy and emergency hemodialysis transiently improved his fluid-electrolyte imbalance and renal function. However, renal dysfunction progressively deteriorated despite the medical treatment. Our findings suggest that even in Gitelman's syndrome, constant monitoring for volume status and other comorbid conditions should be employed to prevent progressive renal injury. PMID:24162365

  15. Muscle inactivation of mTOR causes metabolic and dystrophin defects leading to severe myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Risson, Valérie; Mazelin, Laetitia; Roceri, Mila; Sanchez, Hervé; Moncollin, Vincent; Corneloup, Claudine; Richard-Bulteau, Hélène; Vignaud, Alban; Baas, Dominique; Defour, Aurélia; Freyssenet, Damien; Tanti, Jean-François; Le-Marchand-Brustel, Yannick; Ferrier, Bernard; Conjard-Duplany, Agnès; Romanino, Klaas; Bauché, Stéphanie; Hantaï, Daniel; Mueller, Matthias; Kozma, Sara C.; Thomas, George; Rüegg, Markus A.; Ferry, Arnaud; Pende, Mario; Bigard, Xavier; Koulmann, Nathalie

    2009-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a key regulator of cell growth that associates with raptor and rictor to form the mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) and mTORC2, respectively. Raptor is required for oxidative muscle integrity, whereas rictor is dispensable. In this study, we show that muscle-specific inactivation of mTOR leads to severe myopathy, resulting in premature death. mTOR-deficient muscles display metabolic changes similar to those observed in muscles lacking raptor, including impaired oxidative metabolism, altered mitochondrial regulation, and glycogen accumulation associated with protein kinase B/Akt hyperactivation. In addition, mTOR-deficient muscles exhibit increased basal glucose uptake, whereas whole body glucose homeostasis is essentially maintained. Importantly, loss of mTOR exacerbates the myopathic features in both slow oxidative and fast glycolytic muscles. Moreover, mTOR but not raptor and rictor deficiency leads to reduced muscle dystrophin content. We provide evidence that mTOR controls dystrophin transcription in a cell-autonomous, rapamycin-resistant, and kinase-independent manner. Collectively, our results demonstrate that mTOR acts mainly via mTORC1, whereas regulation of dystrophin is raptor and rictor independent. PMID:20008564

  16. Distal Renal Tubular Acidosis and Calcium Nephrolithiasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moe, Orson W.; Fuster, Daniel G.; Xie, Xiao-Song

    2008-09-01

    Calcium stones are commonly encountered in patients with congenital distal renal tubular acidosis, a disease of renal acidification caused by mutations in either the vacuolar H+-ATPase (B1 or a4 subunit), anion exchanger-1, or carbonic anhydrase II. Based on the existing database, we present two hypotheses. First, heterozygotes with mutations in B1 subunit of H+-ATPase are not normal but may harbor biochemical abnormalities such as renal acidification defects, hypercalciuria, and hypocitraturia which can predispose them to kidney stone formation. Second, we propose at least two mechanisms by which mutant B1 subunit can impair H+-ATPase: defective pump assembly and defective pump activity.

  17. Renal tubular acidosis complicated with hyponatremia due to cortisol insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Izumi, Yuichiro; Nakayama, Yushi; Onoue, Tomoaki; Inoue, Hideki; Mukoyama, Masashi

    2015-01-01

    Adrenocortical insufficiency such as occurs in Addison's disease causes hyponatremia and renal tubular acidosis (RTA). Hyponatremia results from both aldosterone and cortisol insufficiency. RTA is due to aldosterone insufficiency. The involvement of cortisol in RTA is unclear. Here, we report a woman in her 70s who was admitted to our hospital with severe hyponatremia (106 mEq/l) and RTA. The patient exhibited low plasma cortisol levels with little response to rapid adrenocorticotropic hormone loading. In contrast, the plasma aldosterone concentration was maintained at or above the normal range. Hydrocortisone replacement greatly improved both the hyponatremia and RTA. This case suggests that both aldosterone and cortisol are involved in acid secretion from the kidney. PMID:26609420

  18. Side Effects of HIV Medicines: HIV and Lactic Acidosis

    MedlinePLUS

    Side Effects of HIV Medicines HIV and Lactic Acidosis (Last updated 1/7/2016; last reviewed 1/7/2016) Key Points Lactic acidosis is a ... rare but serious side effect of some HIV medicines. All HIV medicines in the nucleoside reverse transcriptase ...

  19. Metabolic studies in a patient with severe carnitine palmitoyltransferase type II deficiency.

    PubMed

    Fontaine, M; Briand, G; Largillière, C; Degand, P; Divry, P; Vianey-Saban, C; Mousson, B; Vamecq, J

    1998-05-25

    Here we report on a patient with severe ("non-classic") carnitine palmitoyltransferase type II (CPT II) deficiency. Hypoglycemia prompted by an infectious episode and associated with non-ketotic dicarboxylic aciduria orientated diagnosis towards beta-oxidation deficiency disorders. Blood carnitine levels revealed a secondary carnitine deficiency that was responsive to oral L-carnitine supplementation. Blood acylcarnitine profiles were abnormal and included acetyl (C2:0), butyryl/isobutyryl (C4:0), isovaleryl/2-methylbutyryl (C5:0), hexanoyl (C6:0), myristoyl (C14:0), palmitoyl (C16:0), hexadecenoyl (C16:1), oleyl (C18:1) and stearoyl (C18:0) carnitine. In urine, excess excretion of dicarboxylylcarnitines, mainly dodecanedioylcarnitine, was noticed. Upon carnitine supplementation, C8 to C12 fatty acylcarnitines, with decanoylcarnitine as well as C10 to C14 dicarboxylylcarnitines being prominent, were observed in urine. Biochemical measurements disclosed a severe reduction of mitochondrial CPT II activity (7% of normal values). Correlations of metabolic findings in the patient and physiological roles of CPT II are briefly discussed. PMID:9657346

  20. Cytoplasmic acidosis as a determinant of flooding intolerance in plants.

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, J K; Callis, J; Jardetzky, O; Walbot, V; Freeling, M

    1984-01-01

    We present evidence that cytoplasmic acidosis is a cause of meristematic death in hypoxic root tips of maize and pea seedlings. Usually, leakage of acid from the vacuole is responsible for cytoplasmic acidosis. Leakage of acid, which occurs earlier during hypoxia in pea root tips than in maize root tips, appears to account for the lower tolerance of peas for hypoxia. Cytoplasmic acidosis is accelerated in maize root tips that are either (i) deficient in alcohol dehydrogenase, so that lactic acid production continues throughout hypoxia, or (ii) exposed to external CO2 during hypoxia, or (iii) perfused slowly so that escape of CO2 produced during ethanolic fermentation is retarded. All three conditions decrease the length of time maize root tips can tolerate hypoxia; more rapid cytoplasmic acidosis is associated with more rapid death under hypoxia. Possible mechanisms by which cytoplasmic acidosis leads to death are suggested; the mechanism does not involve inhibition of glycolysis by low pH. PMID:6592598

  1. Evidence for a Detrimental Effect of Bicarbonate Therapy in Hypoxic Lactic Acidosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, Helmut; Leach, William; Arieff, Allen I.

    1985-02-01

    Lactic acidosis, a clinical syndrome caused by the accumulation of lactic acid, is characterized by lactate concentration in blood greater than 5 mM. Therapy usually consists of intravenous sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3), but resultant mortality is greater than 60 percent. The metabolic and systemic effects of NaHCO3 therapy of hypoxic lactic acidosis in dogs were studied and compared to the effects of sodium chloride or no therapy. Sodium bicarbonate elevated blood lactate concentrations to a greater extent than did either sodium chloride or no treatment. Despite the infusion of NaHCO3, both arterial pH and bicarbonate concentration decreased by a similar amount in all three groups of dogs. Additional detrimental effects of NaHCO3 were observed on the cardiovascular system, including decreases in cardiac output and blood pressure that were not observed with either sodium chloride or no treatment. Thus there is evidence for a harmful effect of NaHCO3 in the treatment of hypoxic lactic acidosis.

  2. Metabolism

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Metabolic Disorders Metabolism Basics Our bodies get the energy they need from food through metabolism, the chemical ... that convert the fuel from food into the energy needed to do everything from moving to thinking ...

  3. Hyperhomocysteinemia as a metabolic disorder parameter is independently associated with the severity of coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chenggui; Yang, Yinzhong; Peng, Duanliang; Chen, Linong; Luo, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To study the associations between hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) and the severity of coronary heart disease (CHD). Methods: We retrospectively analyzed metabolic parameters, anthropometric variables, and life style habits in 292 CHD patients of different categories, and 100 controlled non-CHD patients with chest pain symptoms who were hospitalized in the Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Sichuan Academy of Medical Sciences and Sichuan Provincial People’s Hospital, Chengdu, China between October 2013 and September 2014. Results: The prevalence of HHcy in CHD patients was 79.1%, while only 5% of non-CHD patients had elevated serum homocysteine (Hcy) concentrations. The prevalence of HHcy significantly increased from 5% in non-CHD controls to 66% in the stable angina pectoris (SAP) group, to 81.9% in the unstable angina pectoris group, and to 93.15% in the acute myocardial infarction (AMI) group (p<0.001). After adjusting for confounding factors, multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that HHcy was independently associated with CHD category (AMI versus SAP, odds ratio [6.38], 95% confidence interval; 1.18-34.46). The Hcy was negatively correlated with folic acid (r=-0.67, p<0.001) and vitamin B12 (r=-0.56, p<0.001). Of the CHD patients with HHcy, 51.1% had low folic acid and 42% had low vitamin B12, 7 or 5 times higher than that of CHD patients with normal-low Hcy concentrations (p<0.001). Conclusion: Hyperhomocysteinemia is independently associated with the severity of CHD, and significantly correlated with low status of folic acid and vitamin B12 in CHD patients. PMID:26108589

  4. Determinants of Severe Metabolic Bone Disease in Very Low-Birth-Weight Infants with Severe Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia Admitted to a Tertiary Referral Center.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Erik A; White, Ammie M; Liu, Peihui; Yee, Keolamau; Waber, Brenda; Monk, Heather M; Zhang, Huayan

    2016-01-01

    Objective?Nonrespiratory comorbidities are common among preterm infants with severe bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) referred to tertiary perinatal centers. We evaluated the incidence, severity, and risk factors for metabolic bone disease (MBD) in this population. Study Design?We conducted a retrospective cohort study of all infants born???1,500?g who were diagnosed with severe BPD in our single, tertiary referral center between September 2010 and October 2012. MBD severity was classified by serial radiography. Results?Among the 83 infants diagnosed with severe BPD, 26 (31%) developed severe MBD (rickets). Male gender and lower gestational age and birth weight were associated with increased odds of severe MBD. After adjustment for these potential confounders, cytomegalovirus infection, postnatal growth restriction, surgical necrotizing enterocolitis, and blood culture confirmed sepsis were associated with increased odds of severe MBD. The cumulative duration of therapy with furosemide, hydrocortisone, and prednisolone each correlated with significantly greater probability of severe MBD. Conclusions?Severe MBD was common in this referral-based cohort with severe BPD. The high incidence in this population is likely explained by the coexistence of multiple exposures and comorbidities associated with bone demineralization. PMID:26295968

  5. Prevention of lactic acidosis in cattle by lasalocid or monensin.

    PubMed

    Nagaraja, T G; Avery, T B; Bartley, E E; Galitzer, S J; Dayton, A D

    1981-07-01

    Intraruminal administration of lasalocid or monensin (1.3 mg/kg body weight) effectively prevented in glucose- or corn-induced lactic acidosis in cattle. Administering the antibiotics for 7 days before experimentally inducing acidosis with corn (27.5 g/kg body weight), effectively prevented acidosis, while 2 days' were sufficient to prevent glucose-induced acidosis (12.5 g/kg body weight). The different responses observed in the two trials probably stemmed from the difference in amounts of carbohydrate used to induce acidosis. Antibiotic-treated cattle had higher rumen pH values and lower L(+) and D(-) lactate concentrations that control cattle that received no antibiotics. Ruminal VFA in control cattle decreased, while total VFA and the molar proportion of propionate increased in antibiotic-treated cattle after grain engorgement. Control cattle exhibited classic signs of acidosis, such as lowered blood pH; increased blood lactate, particularly D(-) isomer; hemoconcentration, and depleted alkali reserve with a pronounced based deficit. Antibiotic-treated cattle exhibited no signs of systemic acidosis. PMID:7319937

  6. Near-fatal persistent anion- and osmolal-gap acidosis due to massive gamma-butyrolactone/ethanol intoxication.

    PubMed

    Heytens, Luc; Neels, Hugo; Van Regenmortel, Niels; van den Brink, Wim; Henckes, Manu; Schouwers, Sofie; Dockx, Greet; Crunelle, Cleo L

    2015-03-01

    We report a case of an ethanol and massive gamma-butyrolactone (GBL) intoxication, the precursor of the recreational drug gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB), resulting in life-threatening metabolic acidosis (pH 6.5) with a highly increased anion- and osmolal gap. Rapid analysis using gas chromatography revealed a GHB plasma concentration of 4400?mg/L, far above the upper limit concentration of 1000?mg/L found in adult fatalities attributed to GBL. Full recovery was established following supportive treatment including haemodialysis. This is the first report of a combined ethanol/GBL intoxication as a cause of high serum anion- and osmolal-gap metabolic acidosis. PMID:25205856

  7. Metabolic Crisis in Severely Head-Injured Patients: Is Ischemia Just the Tip of the Iceberg?

    PubMed Central

    Carre, Emilie; Ogier, Michael; Boret, Henry; Montcriol, Ambroise; Bourdon, Lionel; Jean-Jacques, Risso

    2013-01-01

    Ischemia and metabolic crisis are frequent post-traumatic secondary brain insults that negatively influence outcome. Clinicians commonly mix up these two types of insults, mainly because high lactate/pyruvate ratio (LPR) is the common marker for both ischemia and metabolic crisis. However, LPR elevations during ischemia and metabolic crisis reflect two different energetic imbalances: ischemia (Type 1 LPR elevations with low oxygenation) is characterized by a drastic deprivation of energetic substrates, whereas metabolic crisis (Type 2 LPR elevations with normal or high oxygenation) is associated with profound mitochondrial dysfunction but normal supply of energetic substrates. The discrimination between ischemia and metabolic crisis is crucial because conventional recommendations against ischemia may be detrimental for patients with metabolic crisis. Multimodal monitoring, including microdialysis and brain tissue oxygen monitoring, allows such discrimination, but these techniques are not easily accessible to all head-injured patients. Thus, a new “gold standard” and adapted medical education are required to optimize the management of patients with metabolic crisis. PMID:24130548

  8. Gingival overgrowth caused by vitamin C deficiency associated with metabolic syndrome and severe periodontal infection: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Omori, Kazuhiro; Hanayama, Yoshihisa; Naruishi, Koji; Akiyama, Kentaro; Maeda, Hiroshi; Otsuka, Fumio; Takashiba, Shogo

    2014-01-01

    It has been suggested that vitamin C deficiency/scurvy is associated with gingival inflammatory changes; however, the disorder is very infrequently encountered in the modern era. Here, we report a case of extensive gingival overgrowth caused by vitamin C deficiency associated with metabolic syndrome and severe periodontal infection. PMID:25548632

  9. Gingival overgrowth caused by vitamin C deficiency associated with metabolic syndrome and severe periodontal infection: a case report.

    PubMed

    Omori, Kazuhiro; Hanayama, Yoshihisa; Naruishi, Koji; Akiyama, Kentaro; Maeda, Hiroshi; Otsuka, Fumio; Takashiba, Shogo

    2014-12-01

    It has been suggested that vitamin C deficiency/scurvy is associated with gingival inflammatory changes; however, the disorder is very infrequently encountered in the modern era. Here, we report a case of extensive gingival overgrowth caused by vitamin C deficiency associated with metabolic syndrome and severe periodontal infection. PMID:25548632

  10. Anesthetic Management of a Patient with Sustained Severe Metabolic Alkalosis and Electrolyte Abnormalities Caused by Ingestion of Baking Soda

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    The use of alternative medicine is prevalent worldwide. However, its effect on intraoperative anesthetic care is underreported. We report the anesthetic management of a patient who underwent an extensive head and neck cancer surgery and presented with a severe intraoperative metabolic alkalosis from the long term ingestion of baking soda and other herbal remedies. PMID:25180100

  11. Drug-induced haemolysis, renal failure, thrombocytopenia and lactic acidosis in patients with HIV and cryptococcal meningitis: a diagnostic challenge.

    PubMed

    Camara-Lemarroy, Carlos R; Flores-Cantu, Hazael; Calderon-Hernandez, Hector J; Diaz-Torres, Marco A; Villareal-Velazquez, Hector J

    2015-12-01

    Patients with HIV are at risk of both primary and secondary haematological disorders. We report two cases of patients with HIV and cryptococcal meningitis who developed severe haemolytic anaemia, thrombocytopenia, renal failure and lactic acidosis while on treatment with amphotericin B and co-trimoxazole. PMID:25614519

  12. Distal Renal Tubular Acidosis in Infancy: A Bicarbonate Wasting State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez-Soriano, J.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Studied were three unrelated infants with distal renal tubular acidosis (a condition characterized by an inability to acidify the urine to minimal pH levels resulting in the loss of bicarbonates). (DB)

  13. Acidosis differently modulates the inflammatory program in monocytes and macrophages.

    PubMed

    Riemann, Anne; Wußling, Hanna; Loppnow, Harald; Fu, Hang; Reime, Sarah; Thews, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation, ischemia or the microenvironment of solid tumors is often accompanied by a reduction of extracellular pH (acidosis) that stresses the cells and acts on cellular signaling and transcription. The effect of acidosis on the expression of various inflammatory markers, on functional parameters (migration, phagocytic activity) and on signaling pathways involved was studied in monocytic cells and macrophages. In monocytic cell lines acidosis led to a reduction in expression of most of the inflammatory mediators, namely IL-1ß, IL-6, TNF-?, MCP-1, COX-2 and osteopontin. In primary human monocytes MCP-1 and TNF-? were reduced but COX-2 and IL-6 were increased. In RAW264.7 macrophage cell line IL-1ß, COX-2 and iNOS expression was increased, whereas MCP-1 was reduced similar to the effect in monocytic cells. For primary human monocyte-derived macrophages the regulation of inflammatory markers by acidosis depended on activation state, except for the acidosis-induced downregulation of MCP-1 and TNF-?. Acidosis affected functional immune cell behavior when looking at phagocytic activity which was increased in a time-dependent manner, but cellular motility was not changed. Neither ERK1/2 nor CREB signaling was stimulated by the reduction of extracellular pH. However, p38 was activated by acidosis in RAW264.7 cells and this activation was critical for the induction of IL-1ß, COX-2 and iNOS expression. In conclusion, acidosis may impede the recruitment of immune cells, but fosters inflammation when macrophages are present by increasing the level of COX-2 and iNOS and by functionally forcing up the phagocytic activity. PMID:26499398

  14. Normal liver enzymes are correlated with severity of metabolic syndrome in a large population based cohort

    PubMed Central

    Kälsch, Julia; Bechmann, Lars P.; Heider, Dominik; Best, Jan; Manka, Paul; Kälsch, Hagen; Sowa, Jan-Peter; Moebus, Susanne; Slomiany, Uta; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Erbel, Raimund; Gerken, Guido; Canbay, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Key features of the metabolic syndrome are insulin resistance and diabetes. The liver as central metabolic organ is not only affected by the metabolic syndrome as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), but may contribute to insulin resistance and metabolic alterations. We aimed to identify potential associations between liver injury markers and diabetes in the population-based Heinz Nixdorf RECALL Study. Demographic and laboratory data were analyzed in participants (n?=?4814, age 45 to 75y). ALT and AST values were significantly higher in males than in females. Mean BMI was 27.9?kg/m2 and type-2-diabetes (known and unkown) was present in 656 participants (13.7%). Adiponectin and vitamin D both correlated inversely with BMI. ALT, AST, and GGT correlated with BMI, CRP and HbA1c and inversely correlated with adiponectin levels. Logistic regression models using HbA1c and adiponectin or HbA1c and BMI were able to predict diabetes with high accuracy. Transaminase levels within normal ranges were closely associated with the BMI and diabetes risk. Transaminase levels and adiponectin were inversely associated. Re-assessment of current normal range limits should be considered, to provide a more exact indicator for chronic metabolic liver injury, in particular to reflect the situation in diabetic or obese individuals. PMID:26269425

  15. Molecular basis of proximal renal tubular acidosis.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Takashi; Sekine, Takashi; Watanabe, Hiroshi

    2002-01-01

    Proximal renal tubular acidosis (pRTA) results from an impairment of bicarbonate (HCO3-) reabsorption in the renal proximal tubules, characterized by a decreased HCO3- threshold. pRTA commonly occurs as a manifestation of a generalized functional defect in proximal tubules. In contrast, pRTA can occur without other functional defects in proximal tubules (isolated pRTA). Most of the isolated pRTA in children are hereditary. Recent progress in molecular biological analyses is unraveling the molecular basis of hereditary pRTA. Mutations in the kidney type Na+/HCO3- cotransporter gene (SLC4A4) cause permanent isolated proximal RTA with ocular abnormalities. Mutations in carbonic anhydrase II gene lead to osteopetrosis, RTA (pRTA, distal RTA or combined proximal and distal RTA), cerebral calcification, and mental retardation. SLC9A3, encoding the Na+/H+ exchanger, is a candidate gene for pRTA without other manifestations. These results help further understand the molecular basis of hereditary pRTA and characterize the clinical and genetic manifestations of the disorder. PMID:12027212

  16. MT2013-31: Allo HCT for Metabolic Disorders and Severe Osteopetrosis

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-19

    Mucopolysaccharidosis I; Mucopolysaccharidosis II; Mucopolysaccharidosis VI; Mucopolysaccharidosis VII; Hurler Syndrome; Hunter Syndrome; Maroteaux Lamy Syndrome; Sly Syndrome; Glycoprotein Metabolic Disorders; Alpha Mannosidosis; Fucosidosis; Aspartylglucosaminuria; Adrenoleukodystrophy; Peroxisomal Disorders; Osteopetrosis; Sphingolipidosis; Gangliosidosis; Globoid Cell Leukodystrophy; Metachromatic Leukodystrophy; Niemann Pick B; Niemann Pick C Subtype 2; I-cell Disease

  17. Bone and metabolic complications of urinary diversions.

    PubMed

    Cano Megías, Marta; Muñoz Delgado, Eva Golmayo

    2015-02-01

    Hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis is a complication of urinary diversion using ileum or colon. Its prevalence ranges from 25% and 46% depending on the procedure used and renal function of the patient. It is a consequence of intestinal fluid and electrolyte exchange between intestinal mucosa and urine. The main mechanism is absorption of ammonium and chloride from urine. Long-term chronic metabolic acidosis in these patients may lead to impaired bone metabolism and osteomalacia. Regular monitoring of pH, chlorine, bicarbonate, and calcium-phosphorus metabolism is therefore essential for early diagnosis and treatment. PMID:25481805

  18. CYP3A Mediated Ketamine Metabolism is Severely Impaired in Liver S9 Fractions from Aging Sprague Dawley Rats

    E-print Network

    Raphael Santamaria; Marie-Chantal Giroux; Pascal Vachon; Francis Beaudry

    2015-09-25

    Ketamine is widely used in veterinary medicine and in medicine. Ketamine is metabolized to its active metabolite norketamine principally by liver CYP3A. Drug metabolism alterations during aging have severe consequences particularly in anesthesiology and very few studies on older animals were conducted for ketamine. The objective of the present study is to assess the influence of aging on CYP3A metabolism of ketamine. Liver S9 fractions from 3, 6, 12 and 18 month old male Sprague Dawley rats were prepared and Michaelis-Menten parameters were determined for primary metabolic pathways. The derived maximum enzyme velocity (i.e. Vmax) suggests a rapid saturation of the CYP3A enzyme active sites in liver S9 fractions of 18-month old rats. Observed Vmax for Liver S9 fractions from 3, 6 and 12 month old male Sprague Dawley rats were 2.39 (+-0.23), 2.61 (+-0.18), and 2.07 (+-0.07) respectively compared to 0.68 (+-0.02) for Liver S9 fractions from 18 month old male Sprague Dawley rats. Interestingly, we observed a 6 to 7 fold change in the derived Km when comparing Liver S9 fractions from 18 month old male Sprague Dawley rats with Liver S9 fractions from younger rats. Our results suggest that rat CYP3A enzyme undergoes conformational changes with age particularly in our geriatric group (e.g. 18 month rats) leading significant decrease in the rate of formation of norketamine. Moreover, our results strongly suggest a severe impairment of CYP3A ketamine mediated metabolism.

  19. Distal renal tubular acidosis with multiorgan autoimmunity: a case report.

    PubMed

    van den Wildenberg, Maria J; Hoorn, Ewout J; Mohebbi, Nilufar; Wagner, Carsten A; Woittiez, Arend-Jan; de Vries, Peter A M; Laverman, Gozewijn D

    2015-04-01

    A 61-year-old woman with a history of pernicious anemia presented with progressive muscle weakness and dysarthria. Hypokalemic paralysis (serum potassium, 1.4 mEq/L) due to distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA) was diagnosed. After excluding several possible causes, dRTA was considered autoimmune. However, the patient did not meet criteria for any of the autoimmune disorders classically associated with dRTA. She had very high antibody titers against parietal cells, intrinsic factor, and thyroid peroxidase (despite normal thyroid function). The patient consented to a kidney biopsy, and acid-base transporters, anion exchanger type 1 (AE1), and pendrin were undetectable by immunofluorescence. Indirect immunofluorescence detected diminished abundance of AE1- and pendrin-expressing intercalated cells in the kidney, as well as staining by the patient's serum of normal human intercalated cells and parietal cells expressing the adenosine triphosphatase hydrogen/potassium pump (H(+)/K(+)-ATPase) in normal human gastric mucosa. The dRTA likely is caused by circulating autoantibodies against intercalated cells, with possible cross-reactivity against structures containing gastric H(+)/K(+)-ATPase. This case demonstrates that in patients with dRTA without a classic autoimmune disorder, autoimmunity may still be the underlying cause. The mechanisms involved in autoantibody development and how dRTA can be caused by highly specific autoantibodies against intercalated cells have yet to be determined. PMID:25533600

  20. Differential impacts of elevated CO2 and acidosis on the energy budget of gill and liver cells from Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua.

    PubMed

    Stapp, L S; Kreiss, C M; Pörtner, H O; Lannig, G

    2015-09-01

    Ocean acidification impacts fish and other marine species through increased seawater PCO2 levels (hypercapnia). Knowledge of the physiological mechanisms mediating effects in various tissues of fish is incomplete. Here we tested the effects of extracellular hypercapnia and acidosis on energy metabolism of gill and liver cells of Atlantic cod. Exposure media mimicked blood conditions in vivo, either during normo- or hypercapnia and at control or acidic extracellular pH (pHe). We determined metabolic rate and energy expenditure for protein biosynthesis, Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase and H(+)-ATPase and considered nutrition status by measurements of metabolic rate and protein biosynthesis in media with and without free amino acids (FAA). Addition of FAA stimulated hepatic but not branchial oxygen consumption. Normo- and hypercapnic acidosis as well as hypercapnia at control pHe depressed metabolic stimulation of hepatocytes. In gill cells, acidosis depressed respiration independent of PCO2 and FAA levels. For both cell types, depressed respiration was not correlated with the same reduction in energy allocated to protein biosynthesis or Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase. Hepatic energy expenditure for protein synthesis and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase was even elevated at acidic compared to control pHe suggesting increased costs for ion regulation and cellular reorganization. Hypercapnia at control pHe strongly reduced oxygen demand of branchial Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase with a similar trend for H(+)-ATPase. We conclude that extracellular acidosis triggers metabolic depression in gill and metabolically stimulated liver cells. Additionally, hypercapnia itself seems to limit capacities for metabolic usage of amino acids in liver cells while it decreases the use and costs of ion regulatory ATPases in gill cells. PMID:26005104

  1. Low Cerebral Glucose Metabolism: A Potential Predictor for the Severity of Vascular Parkinsonism and Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yunqi; Wei, Xiaobo; Liu, Xu; Liao, Jinchi; Lin, Jiaping; Zhu, Cansheng; Meng, Xiaochun; Xie, Dongsi; Chao, Dongman; Fenoy, Albert J; Cheng, Muhua; Tang, Beisha; Zhang, Zhuohua; Xia, Ying; Wang, Qing

    2015-01-01

    This study explored the association between cerebral metabolic rates of glucose (CMRGlc) and the severity of Vascular Parkinsonism (VP) and Parkinson’s disease (PD). A cross-sectional study was performed to compare CMRGlc in normal subjects vs. VP and PD patients. Twelve normal subjects, 22 VP, and 11 PD patients were evaluated with the H&Y and MMSE, and underwent 18F-FDG measurements. Pearson’s correlations were used to identify potential associations between the severity of VP/PD and CMRGlc. A pronounced reduction of CMRGlc in the frontal lobe and caudate putamen was detected in patients with VP and PD when compared with normal subjects. The VP patients displayed a slight CMRGlc decrease in the caudate putamen and frontal lobe in comparison with PD patients. These decreases in CMRGlc in the frontal lobe and caudate putamen were significantly correlated with the VP patients’ H&Y, UPDRS II, UPDRS III, MMSE, cardiovascular, and attention/memory scores. Similarly, significant correlations were observed in patients with PD. This is the first clinical study finding strong evidence for an association between low cerebral glucose metabolism and the severity of VP and PD. Our findings suggest that these changes in glucose metabolism in the frontal lobe and caudate putamen may underlie the pathophysiological mechanisms of VP and PD. As the scramble to find imaging biomarkers or predictors of the disease intensifies, a better understanding of the roles of cerebral glucose metabolism may give us insight into the pathogenesis of VP and PD. PMID:26618044

  2. Characterization of the interaction between local cerebral metabolic rate for glucose and acid-base index in ischemic rat brain employing a double-isotope methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Peek, K.E.H.

    1988-01-01

    The association between increases in cerebral glucose metabolism and the development of acidosis is largely inferential, based on reports linking hyperglycemia with poor neurological outcome, lactate accumulation, and the severity of acidosis. We measured local cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (lCMRglc) and an index of brain pH-the acid-base index (ABI)-concurrently and characterized their interaction in a model of focal cerebral ischemia in rats in a double-label autoradiographic study, using ({sup 14}C)2-deoxyglucose and ({sup 14}C)dimethyloxazolidinedione. Computer-assisted digitization and analysis permitted the simultaneous quantification of the two variables on a pixel-by-pixel basis in the same brain slices.

  3. Nutritional and metabolic status of children with autism vs. neurotypical children, and the association with autism severity

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The relationship between relative metabolic disturbances and developmental disorders is an emerging research focus. This study compares the nutritional and metabolic status of children with autism with that of neurotypical children and investigates the possible association of autism severity with biomarkers. Method Participants were children ages 5-16 years in Arizona with Autistic Spectrum Disorder (n = 55) compared with non-sibling, neurotypical controls (n = 44) of similar age, gender and geographical distribution. Neither group had taken any vitamin/mineral supplements in the two months prior to sample collection. Autism severity was assessed using the Pervasive Development Disorder Behavior Inventory (PDD-BI), Autism Treatment Evaluation Checklist (ATEC), and Severity of Autism Scale (SAS). Study measurements included: vitamins, biomarkers of vitamin status, minerals, plasma amino acids, plasma glutathione, and biomarkers of oxidative stress, methylation, sulfation and energy production. Results Biomarkers of children with autism compared to those of controls using a t-test or Wilcoxon test found the following statistically significant differences (p < 0.001): Low levels of biotin, plasma glutathione, RBC SAM, plasma uridine, plasma ATP, RBC NADH, RBC NADPH, plasma sulfate (free and total), and plasma tryptophan; also high levels of oxidative stress markers and plasma glutamate. Levels of biomarkers for the neurotypical controls were in good agreement with accessed published reference ranges. In the Autism group, mean levels of vitamins, minerals, and most amino acids commonly measured in clinical care were within published reference ranges. A stepwise, multiple linear regression analysis demonstrated significant associations between several groups of biomarkers with all three autism severity scales, including vitamins (adjusted R2 of 0.25-0.57), minerals (adj. R2 of 0.22-0.38), and plasma amino acids (adj. R2 of 0.22-0.39). Conclusion The autism group had many statistically significant differences in their nutritional and metabolic status, including biomarkers indicative of vitamin insufficiency, increased oxidative stress, reduced capacity for energy transport, sulfation and detoxification. Several of the biomarker groups were significantly associated with variations in the severity of autism. These nutritional and metabolic differences are generally in agreement with other published results and are likely amenable to nutritional supplementation. Research investigating treatment and its relationship to the co-morbidities and etiology of autism is warranted. PMID:21651783

  4. Metabolism

    MedlinePLUS

    Metabolism refers to all the physical and chemical processes in the body that convert or use energy, ... Tortora GJ, Derrickson BH. Metabolism. In: Tortora GJ, Derrickson BH. Principles of Anatomy and Physiology . 14th ed. Hoboken, NJ: John H Wiley and Sons; 2013: ...

  5. Lipoatrophy and severe metabolic disturbance in mice with fat-specific deletion of PPAR?

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fenfen; Mullican, Shannon E.; DiSpirito, Joanna R.; Peed, Lindsey C.; Lazar, Mitchell A.

    2013-01-01

    Adipose tissue is an important metabolic organ, the dysfunction of which is associated with the development of obesity, diabetes mellitus, and cardiovascular disease. The nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR?) is considered the master regulator of adipocyte differentiation and function. Although its cell-autonomous role in adipogenesis has been clearly demonstrated in cell culture, previous fat-specific knockouts of the murine PPAR? gene did not demonstrate a dramatic phenotype in vivo. Here, using Adipoq–Cre mice to drive adipose-specific recombination, we report a unique fat-specific PPAR? knockout (PPAR? FKO) mouse model with almost no visible brown and white adipose tissue at age 3 mo. As a consequence, PPAR? FKO mice had hugely enlarged pancreatic islets, massive fatty livers, and dramatically elevated levels of blood glucose and serum insulin accompanied by extreme insulin resistance. PPAR? FKO mice also exhibited delayed hair coat formation associated with absence of dermal fat, disrupted mammary gland development with loss of mammary fat pads, and high bone mass with loss of bone marrow fat, indicating the critical roles of adipose PPAR? in these tissues. Together, our data reveal the necessity of fat PPAR? in adipose formation, whole-body metabolic homeostasis, and normal development of fat-containing tissues. PMID:24167256

  6. Clinical and laboratory approaches in the diagnosis of renal tubular acidosis.

    PubMed

    Santos, Fernando; Ordóñez, Flor A; Claramunt-Taberner, Débora; Gil-Peña, Helena

    2015-12-01

    In the absence of a gastrointestinal origin, a maintained hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis must raise the diagnostic suspicion of renal tubular acidosis (RTA). Unlike adults, in whom RTA is usually secondary to acquired causes, children most often have primary forms of RTA resulting from an inherited genetic defect in the tubular proteins involved in the renal regulation of acid-base homeostasis. According to their pathophysiological basis, four types of RTA are distinguished. Distal type 1 RTA, proximal type 2 RTA, mixed-type 3 RTA, and type 4 RTA can be differentiated based on the family history, the presenting manifestations, the biochemical profile, and the radiological findings. Functional tests to explore the proximal wasting of bicarbonate and the urinary acidification capacity are also useful diagnostic tools. Although currently the molecular basis of the disease can frequently be discovered by gene analysis, patients with RTA must undergo a detailed clinical study and laboratory work-up in order to understand the pathophysiology of the disease and to warrant a correct and accurate diagnosis. PMID:25823989

  7. Metabolism

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Some metabolic diseases and conditions include: Hyperthyroidism (pronounced: hi-per-THIGH-roy-dih-zum). Hyperthyroidism is caused ... or through surgery or radiation treatments. Hypothyroidism (pronounced: hi-po-THIGH-roy-dih-zum) . Hypothyroidism is caused ...

  8. Deletion of the Chloride Transporter Slc26a7 Causes Distal Renal Tubular Acidosis and Impairs Gastric Acid Secretion*

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jie; Song, Penghong; Nakamura, Suguru; Miller, Marian; Barone, Sharon; Alper, Seth L.; Riederer, Brigitte; Bonhagen, Janina; Arend, Lois J.; Amlal, Hassane; Seidler, Ursula; Soleimani, Manoocher

    2009-01-01

    SLC26A7 (human)/Slc26a7 (mouse) is a recently identified chloride-base exchanger and/or chloride transporter that is expressed on the basolateral membrane of acid-secreting cells in the renal outer medullary collecting duct (OMCD) and in gastric parietal cells. Here, we show that mice with genetic deletion of Slc26a7 expression develop distal renal tubular acidosis, as manifested by metabolic acidosis and alkaline urine pH. In the kidney, basolateral Cl?/HCO3? exchange activity in acid-secreting intercalated cells in the OMCD was significantly decreased in hypertonic medium (a normal milieu for the medulla) but was reduced only mildly in isotonic medium. Changing from a hypertonic to isotonic medium (relative hypotonicity) decreased the membrane abundance of Slc26a7 in kidney cells in vivo and in vitro. In the stomach, stimulated acid secretion was significantly impaired in isolated gastric mucosa and in the intact organ. We propose that SLC26A7 dysfunction should be investigated as a potential cause of unexplained distal renal tubular acidosis or decreased gastric acid secretion in humans. PMID:19723628

  9. Effect of ginkgolide B on brain metabolism and tissue oxygenation in severe haemorrhagic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Chun-Ling; Shen, Dong-Fang; Wang, Peng-Jun; Li, Hu-Lun; Zhang, Li

    2015-01-01

    Ginkgolide B, a diterpene, is an herbal constituent isolated from the leaves of Ginkgo biloba tree. The present study demonstrates the effect of ginkgolide B in osmotherapy on brain metabolism and tissue oxygenation. Multimodality monitoring including intracranial pressure (ICP), cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP), partial pressure of brain tissue oxygen (PbtO2), lactate/pyruvate ratio (LPR) and microdialysis were employed to study the effect of ginkgolide B osmotherapy. The results demonstrated that administration of 15% solution of ginkgolide B to the comatose patients with raised ICP (> 20 mm Hg) and resistant to standard therapy led to a significant decrease in ICP. The cerebral microdialysis was used to compare mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), ICP, CPP, PbtO2, brain lactate, pyruvate and glucose level after hourly intervals starting 3 h before and up to 4 h after hyperosmolar therapy. There was a decrease in ICP in 45 min from 23 ± 14 mm Hg (P < 0.001) to 18 ± 24 mm Hg and increase in CPP after 1 h of gingkolide B infusion from 74 ± 18 to 85 ± 22 mm Hg (P < 0.002). However there was no significant effect on MAP but PbtO2 was maintained in the range of 22-26. The peak lactate/pyruvate ratio was recorded at the time of initiation of osmotherapy (44 ± 20) with an 18% decrease over 2 h following gingkolide B therapy. Also the brain glucose remained unaffected. PMID:26064244

  10. Severe hyperkalemia as a complication of timolol, a topically applied beta-adrenergic antagonist

    SciTech Connect

    Swenson, E.R.

    1986-06-01

    Severe hyperkalemia occurred in a patient with radiation pneumonitis and glaucoma shortly after beginning prednisone therapy. There was no evidence of renal failure, diabetes, acidosis, increased potassium intake, or significant tissue trauma. Medications having adverse effects on potassium metabolism were considered, and the patient's use of timolol maleate eyedrops was discontinued. His serum potassium level normalized despite continuation of the prednisone therapy. He became hyperkalemic on rechallenge with timolol and normokalemic following its withdrawal. This case indicates that the potential for beta-blocker-induced hyperkalemia exists even with topical appreciation.

  11. Unique metabolic characteristics of the major syndromes of severe childhood malnutrition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The major clinical syndromes of severe childhood malnutrition (SCM) are marasmus, kwashiorkor and marasmic-kwashiorkor. Whereas treatment of marasmus is straightforward and the associated mortality is low, kwashiorkor and marasmic-kwashiorkor are difficult to treat and have high morbidity and mortal...

  12. Sulfur amino acid metabolism in children with severe childhood undernutrition: cysteine kinetics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Children with edematous but not nonedematous severe childhood undernutrition (SCU) have lower plasma and erythrocyte-free concentrations of cysteine, the rate-limiting precursor of glutathione synthesis. We propose that these lower cysteine concentrations are due to reduced production secondary to s...

  13. Genetic causes and mechanisms of distal renal tubular acidosis.

    PubMed

    Batlle, Daniel; Haque, Syed K

    2012-10-01

    The primary or hereditary forms of distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA) have received increased attention because of advances in the understanding of the molecular mechanism, whereby mutations in the main proteins involved in acid-base transport result in impaired acid excretion. Dysfunction of intercalated cells in the collecting tubules accounts for all the known genetic causes of dRTA. These cells secrete protons into the tubular lumen through H(+)-ATPases functionally coupled to the basolateral anion exchanger 1 (AE1). The substrate for both transporters is provided by the catalytic activity of the cytosolic carbonic anhydrase II (CA II), an enzyme which is also present in the proximal tubular cells and osteoclasts. Mutations in ATP6V1B1, encoding the B-subtype unit of the apical H(+) ATPase, and ATP6V0A4, encoding the a-subtype unit, lead to the loss of function of the apical H(+) ATPase and are usually responsible for patients with autosomal recessive dRTA often associated with early or late sensorineural deafness. Mutations in the gene encoding the cytosolic CA II are associated with the autosomal recessive syndrome of osteopetrosis, mixed distal and proximal RTA and cerebral calcification. Mutations in the AE1, the gene that encodes the Cl(-)/HCO(3)(-) exchanger, usually present as dominant dRTA, but a recessive pattern has been recently described. Several studies have shown trafficking defects in the mutant protein rather than the lack of function as the major mechanism underlying the pathogenesis of dRTA from AE1 mutations. PMID:23114896

  14. Acidosis, magnesium and acetylsalicylic acid: Effects on thrombin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisevich, Nikolaj; Loznikova, Svetlana; Sukhodola, Aleksandr; Halets, Inessa; Bryszewska, Maria; Shcharbin, Dzmitry

    2013-03-01

    Thrombin, an enzyme from the hydrolase family, is the main component of the blood coagulation system. In ischemic stroke it acts as a serine protease that converts soluble fibrinogen into insoluble strands of fibrin forming blood clots in the brain. It has been found to phosphoresce at room temperature in the millisecond and microsecond ranges. The phosphorescence of thrombin was studied under physiological conditions, in acidosis (decrease of pH from 8.0 to 5.0) and on the addition of salts (magnesium sulfate and sodium chloride) and of acetylsalicylic acid, and its connection with thrombin function is discussed. Acidosis significantly increased the internal dynamics of thrombin. We propose that lactate-acidosis plays a protective role in stroke, preventing the formation of clots. The addition of NaCl and MgSO4 in different concentrations increased the internal dynamics of thrombin. Also, the addition of MgSO4 decreased thrombin-induced platelet aggregation. However, magnesium sulfate and acetylsalicylic acid in the therapeutic concentrations used for treatment of ischemic stroke had no effect on thrombin internal dynamics. The data obtained will help to elucidate the conformational stability of thrombin under conditions modulating lactate-acidosis and in the presence of magnesium sulfate.

  15. Oxidative stress parameters and their correlation with clinical, metabolic and polysomnographic parameters in severe obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Asker, Selvi; Asker, Muntecep; Sarikaya, Eren; Sunnetcioglu, Aysel; Aslan, Mehmet; Demir, Halit

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the levels of oxidative stress markers, catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and malondialdehyde (MDA) in severe OSAS and to investigate any correlation between oxidative stress markers and clinical, metabolic and polysomnographic parameters. A total of 30 patients with severe OSAS and 30 healthy controls were included in this cross-sectional, clinical study. Demographic data, polysomnographic, biochemical and clinical indices as well as serum levels of CAT, MDA and GPX were measured and compared in OSAS and control groups. Furthermore, OSAS patients with and without pulmonary hypertension (PHT) were evaluated in terms of levels of CAT, MDA and GPX. Patients with severe OSAS exhibited significantly lower serum levels of CAT (P<0.001) and GPX (P<0.001). Serum MDA levels were remarkably higher in OSAS group (P<0.001). Correlation analysis revealed that levels of CAT and GPX were correlated with apnea-hypopnea index and there was a correlation between serum levels of MDA and CRP. Severe OSAS patients with and without PHT did not reveal any differences for CAT (P=0.789), MDA (P=0.805) and GPX levels (P=0.281). Our results have shown that oxidative stress markers significantly changed in patients with severe OSAS. This information is noteworthy because documentation of the role of oxidative stress in OSAS may have important implications regarding diagnosis, monitoring, treatment and prognosis. PMID:26379962

  16. Metabolic and electrolyte disturbance after cardiac arrest: How to deal with it.

    PubMed

    Bellomo, Rinaldo; Märtensson, Johan; Eastwood, Glenn Matthew

    2015-12-01

    Cardiac arrest (CA) is a sudden, severe event that causes a cascade of metabolic and electrolyte disturbances throughout the body triggered by a loss of cardiac output. Metabolic disturbances are primarily in the form of mixed metabolic and respiratory acidosis; dysglycaemia; and states of deficiency or excess in potassium, calcium, magnesium and lactate. It is known that persistent metabolic disturbances are associated with poor patient outcome following resuscitation from CA, but this might simply be a reflection of the severity of illness. Moreover, contemporary evidence for the management of metabolic disturbances to improve outcomes in these patients is scarce. Moreover, metabolic disturbances during the early post-resuscitation period remain poorly understood in terms of severity, duration and the influence of their post-resuscitation care and treatment on outcome. Although sufficient data suggest that extreme metabolic disturbances such as hypoglycaemia, severe hyperglycaemia, severe hypokalaemia and hyperkalaemia and hypomagnesaemia likely have a devastating effect and should be avoided, randomised controlled trial evidence is clearly need for the management of metabolic and electrolyte derangements in resuscitated CA patients. PMID:26670818

  17. Successful management of drug-induced hypercapnic acidosis with naloxone and noninvasive positive pressure ventilation.

    PubMed

    Agrafiotis, Michalis; Tryfon, Stavros; Siopi, Demetra; Chassapidou, Georgia; Galanou, Artemis; Tsara, Venetia

    2015-02-01

    A 74-year-old man was referred to our hospital due to deteriorating level of consciousness and desaturation. His Glasgow Coma Scale was 6, and his pupils were constricted but responded to light. Chest radiograph was negative for significant findings. Arterial blood gas evaluation on supplemental oxygen revealed severe acute on chronic respiratory acidosis: pH 7.15; PCO2, 133 mm Hg; PO2,64 mm Hg; and HCO3, 31 mmol/L. He regained full consciousness (Glasgow Coma Scale, 15) after receiving a 0.4 mg dose of naloxone, but because of persistent severe respiratory acidosis (pH 7.21; PCO2, 105 mm Hg), he was immediately commenced on noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NIV) displaying a remarkable improvement in arterial blood gas values within the next few hours. However, in the days that followed, he remained dependent on NIV, and he was finally discharged on a home mechanical ventilation prescription. In cases of drug-induced respiratory depression, NIV should be regarded as an acceptable treatment, as it can provide ventilatory support without the increased risks associated with invasive mechanical ventilation. PMID:25176564

  18. Acidosis, alkalosis, and aqueous humor dynamics in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Krupin, T; Oestrich, C J; Bass, J; Podos, S M; Becker, B

    1977-11-01

    Systemic acidosis induced by intravenous administration of hydrochloric acid lowered intraocular pressure in unanesthetized rabbits. Aqueous humor flow was reduced by approximately 50%, as measured by the iodide method and as calculated from tonographic data. Outflow facility, episcleral venous pressure, plasma osmolality, blood pressure, pulse, and body temperature were not altered by systemic acidosis. Systemic alkalosis induced by intravenously administered sodium bicarbonate was associated with an increased intraocular pressure. Aqueous humor flow following systemic alkalosis was increased by approximately 100%, as measured by the iodide method and as calculated from tonographic data. Alkalosis was not associated with alterations in outflow facility, episcleral venous pressure, plasma osmality, blood pressure, pulse, or rectal temperature. PMID:914483

  19. Metformin-Associated Lactic Acidosis: Predisposing Factors and Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Ju; Han, Ju Young; Shin, Jun Young; Kim, Shin Il; Lee, Jeong Min; Hong, Seongbin; Kim, So Hun; Kim, Yong Seong

    2015-01-01

    Background Metformin is considered the first choice oral treatment for type 2 diabetes patients in the absence of contraindications. Rarely, life-threatening complications associated with metformin treatment are seen in some patients with underlying diseases. The aim of this study was to further investigate the clinical profiles and risk factors for metformin-associated lactic acidosis (MALA) and the treatment modalities according to survival. Methods To identify MALA, we performed a retrospective study in seven diabetic patients who were taking metformin and had been diagnosed with lactic acidosis at Inha University Hospital between 1995 and 2012. For each patient, we recorded the age, sex, daily metformin dosage, laboratory test results, admission diagnosis, and risk factors. Also, concurrent conditions, treatment modalities, and outcomes were evaluated. Results Six patients had risk factors for lactic acidosis before admission. All patients had renal impairment on admission as a precipitating risk factor. Five patients survived and two patients died despite early renal replacement therapy. Older patients tended to have a poorer prognosis. Conclusion Renal function must be monitored in elderly type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with underlying diseases and conditions causing renal impairment who begin metformin treatment. Accurate recognition of MALA and initiation of renal replacement are essential for treatment. PMID:25827460

  20. Analysis of metabolic flux phenotypes for two Arabidopsis mutants with severe impairment in seed storage lipid synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Lonien, J.; Schwender, J.

    2009-11-01

    Major storage reserves of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seeds are triacylglycerols (seed oils) and proteins. Seed oil content is severely reduced for the regulatory mutant wrinkled1 (wri1-1; At3g54320) and for a double mutant in two isoforms of plastidic pyruvate kinase (pkp{beta}{sub 1}pkp{alpha}; At5g52920 and At3g22960). Both already biochemically well-characterized mutants were now studied by {sup 13}C metabolic flux analysis of cultured developing embryos based on comparison with their respective genetic wild-type backgrounds. For both mutations, in seeds as well as in cultured embryos, the oil fraction was strongly reduced while the fractions of proteins and free metabolites increased. Flux analysis in cultured embryos revealed changes in nutrient uptakes and fluxes into biomass as well as an increase in tricarboxylic acid cycle activity for both mutations. While in both wild types plastidic pyruvate kinase (PK{sub p}) provides most of the pyruvate for plastidic fatty acid synthesis, the flux through PK{sub p} is reduced in pkp{beta}{sub 1}pkp{alpha} by 43% of the wild-type value. In wri1-1, PK{sub p} flux is even more reduced (by 82%), although the genes PKp{beta}{sub 1} and PKp{alpha} are still expressed. Along a common paradigm of metabolic control theory, it is hypothesized that a large reduction in PK{sub p} enzyme activity in pkp{beta}{sub 1}pkp{alpha} has less effect on PK{sub p} flux than multiple smaller reductions in glycolytic enzymes in wri1-1. In addition, only in the wri1-1 mutant is the large reduction in PK{sub p} flux compensated in part by an increased import of cytosolic pyruvate and by plastidic malic enzyme. No such limited compensatory bypass could be observed in pkp{beta}{sub 1}pkp{alpha}.

  1. Tumor cell metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Garcia, Susana; Lopez-Gonzalez, Jose Sullivan; B´ez-Viveros, José Luis; Aguilar-Cazares, Dolores

    2011-01-01

    Cancer is a genetic disease that is caused by mutations in oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes and stability genes. The fact that the metabolism of tumor cells is altered has been known for many years. However, the mechanisms and consequences of metabolic reprogramming have just begun to be understood. In this review, an integral view of tumor cell metabolism is presented, showing how metabolic pathways are reprogrammed to satisfy tumor cell proliferation and survival requirements. In tumor cells, glycolysis is strongly enhanced to fulfill the high ATP demands of these cells; glucose carbons are the main building blocks in fatty acid and nucleotide biosynthesis. Glutaminolysis is also increased to satisfy NADPH regeneration, whereas glutamine carbons replenish the Krebs cycle, which produces metabolites that are constantly used for macromolecular biosynthesis. A characteristic feature of the tumor microenvironment is acidosis, which results from the local increase in lactic acid production by tumor cells. This phenomenon is attributed to the carbons from glutamine and glucose, which are also used for lactic acid production. Lactic acidosis also directs the metabolic reprogramming of tumor cells and serves as an additional selective pressure. Finally, we also discuss the role of mitochondria in supporting tumor cell metabolism. PMID:22057267

  2. Multifractal Analysis of Fetal Heart Rate Variability in Fetuses with and without Severe

    E-print Network

    Abry, Patrice

    Multifractal Analysis of Fetal Heart Rate Variability in Fetuses with and without Severe Acidosis multifractal analysis of fetal heart rate (FHR) variability in fetuses with and without acidosis during labor hours before delivery in 45 term fetuses divided in three groups according to umbilical arterial p

  3. Metabolic studies of transient tyrosinemia in premature infants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernbach, S. A.; Summons, R. E.; Pereira, W. E.; Duffield, A. M.

    1975-01-01

    The recently developed technique of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry supported by computer has considerably improved the analysis of physiologic fluids. This study attempted to demonstrate the value of this system in the investigation of metabolite patterns in urine in two metabolic problems of prematurity, transient tyrosinemia and late metabolic acidosis. Serial 24-hr urine specimens were analyzed in 9 infants. Transient tyrosinemia, characterized by 5- 10-fold increases over basal excretion of tyrosine, p-hydroxyphenyllactate, and p-hydroxyphenylpyruvate in urine, was noted in five of the infants. Late metabolic acidosis was seen in four infants, but bore no relation to transient tyrosinemia.

  4. Bench-to-bedside review: oxygen debt and its metabolic correlates as quantifiers of the severity of hemorrhagic and post-traumatic shock.

    PubMed

    Rixen, Dieter; Siegel, John H

    2005-10-01

    Evidence is increasing that oxygen debt and its metabolic correlates are important quantifiers of the severity of hemorrhagic and post-traumatic shock and and may serve as useful guides in the treatment of these conditions. The aim of this review is to demonstrate the similarity between experimental oxygen debt in animals and human hemorrhage/post-traumatic conditions, and to examine metabolic oxygen debt correlates, namely base deficit and lactate, as indices of shock severity and adequacy of volume resuscitation. Relevant studies in the medical literature were identified using Medline and Cochrane Library searches. Findings in both experimental animals (dog/pig) and humans suggest that oxygen debt or its metabolic correlates may be more useful quantifiers of hemorrhagic shock than estimates of blood loss, volume replacement, blood pressure, or heart rate. This is evidenced by the oxygen debt/probability of death curves for the animals, and by the consistency of lethal dose (LD)25,50 points for base deficit across all three species. Quantifying human post-traumatic shock based on base deficit and adjusting for Glasgow Coma Scale score, prothrombin time, Injury Severity Score and age is demonstrated to be superior to anatomic injury severity alone or in combination with Trauma and Injury Severity Score. The data examined in this review indicate that estimates of oxygen debt and its metabolic correlates should be included in studies of experimental shock and in the management of patients suffering from hemorrhagic shock. PMID:16277731

  5. Bench-to-bedside review: Oxygen debt and its metabolic correlates as quantifiers of the severity of hemorrhagic and post-traumatic shock

    PubMed Central

    Rixen, Dieter; Siegel, John H

    2005-01-01

    Evidence is increasing that oxygen debt and its metabolic correlates are important quantifiers of the severity of hemorrhagic and post-traumatic shock and and may serve as useful guides in the treatment of these conditions. The aim of this review is to demonstrate the similarity between experimental oxygen debt in animals and human hemorrhage/post-traumatic conditions, and to examine metabolic oxygen debt correlates, namely base deficit and lactate, as indices of shock severity and adequacy of volume resuscitation. Relevant studies in the medical literature were identified using Medline and Cochrane Library searches. Findings in both experimental animals (dog/pig) and humans suggest that oxygen debt or its metabolic correlates may be more useful quantifiers of hemorrhagic shock than estimates of blood loss, volume replacement, blood pressure, or heart rate. This is evidenced by the oxygen debt/probability of death curves for the animals, and by the consistency of lethal dose (LD)25,50 points for base deficit across all three species. Quantifying human post-traumatic shock based on base deficit and adjusting for Glasgow Coma Scale score, prothrombin time, Injury Severity Score and age is demonstrated to be superior to anatomic injury severity alone or in combination with Trauma and Injury Severity Score. The data examined in this review indicate that estimates of oxygen debt and its metabolic correlates should be included in studies of experimental shock and in the management of patients suffering from hemorrhagic shock. PMID:16277731

  6. EFFECTS OF SODIUM BICARBONATE ON REDUCING ACIDOSIS IN CATTLE LAURA JANE PATON

    E-print Network

    Farrell, Anthony P.

    EFFECTS OF SODIUM BICARBONATE ON REDUCING ACIDOSIS IN CATTLE by LAURA JANE PATON B sodium bicarbonate (SB) reduces the risk of subacute acidosis (SARA) in cattle receiving high concentrate by treatment. Sodium bicarbonate intake differed when provided free choice verses when mixed into the diet (P

  7. The role of tissue acidosis in ischaemic tissue injury: the concept of the pH integral.

    PubMed

    Halsey, J H; Conger, K A; Hudetz, A G; Hobbes, F M; Garcia, J H; Strong, E R

    1988-06-01

    Cerebral cortical tissue pH was monitored with an extracellular glass electrode in 32 rats subjected to total global cerebral ischaemia produced by ligation of the basilar and carotid arteries with systemic hypotension for periods of 8 to 60 min. The totality of the ischaemia, and its duration were confirmed by monitoring with a brain tissue O2 electrode. Reperfusion was induced by hypertension and maintained thereafter to exclude delayed ischaemia during 3 h survival after which the rats were sacrificed by perfusion fixation. The severity of tissue pH change was varied by inducing hyperglycaemia in some of the rats. Quantitative counts were made of neurons demonstrating changes reflecting severe ischaemic injury within 500 microns of the electrode tip. For the criterion of an ischaemically injured neuron count greater than 20%, there appeared to be a threshold at about 30 min, and more than 0.8 units change in pH. For quantitative assessment of the ischaemic insult a more satisfactory index was found by combining both time and acidosis as the integral of the pH change during the period of ischaemia. This was found to have a strong correlation with the histologic changes. There was a less strong correlation between the acidosis during reperfusion and the histologic change. Comparing these results with those for 3 rats subjected to 215 min of ischaemia without reperfusion, it appears that most of the effect of acidosis in aggravating ischaemic injury takes place during the first hour of ischaemia with little further aggravation for longer periods. PMID:2902534

  8. Beyond Warburg effect – dual metabolic nature of cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jiansheng; Wu, Hao; Dai, Chunyan; Pan, Qiangrong; Ding, Zonghui; Hu, Danqing; Ji, Bingyan; Luo, Yan; Hu, Xun

    2014-01-01

    Warburg effect is a dominant phenotype of most cancer cells. Here we show that this phenotype depends on its environment. When cancer cells are under regular culture condition, they show Warburg effect; whereas under lactic acidosis, they show a nonglycolytic phenotype, characterized by a high ratio of oxygen consumption rate over glycolytic rate, negligible lactate production and efficient incorporation of glucose carbon(s) into cellular mass. These two metabolic modes are intimately interrelated, for Warburg effect generates lactic acidosis that promotes a transition to a nonglycolytic mode. This dual metabolic nature confers growth advantage to cancer cells adapting to ever changing microenvironment. PMID:24820099

  9. Lactic acidosis and diastolic hypotension after intermittent albuterol nebulization in a pediatric patient

    PubMed Central

    Saadia, Tehila A.; George, Mathew; Lee, Haesoon

    2015-01-01

    We describe a case of 13-year-old female with intermittent asthma who developed lactic acidosis and diastolic hypotension after receiving intermittent albuterol nebulizer treatment. She presented to the emergency department (ED) with sudden onset of shortness of breath and chest pain. She received two albuterol nebulizer treatments at home without symptomatic relief. She was treated in the ED with intermittent albuterol nebulization for a total of 22.5 mg over the next 5 hours. A decrease in diastolic blood pressure from 60 mmHg to 40 mmHg was noted after the treatment. Blood lactate level was 5.9 mmol/L. She recovered from it and was discharged to home but she had recurrence of shortness of breath and presented to the ED two days later. She was treated with albuterol nebulization for a total of 17.5 mg over the next two and half hours and developed diastolic hypotension again, as low as 30 mm Hg. After discontinuation of albuterol nebulization, her BP normalized. Cardiopulmonary and metabolic side effects of continuous albuterol therapy have been reported in the recent medical literature. Our patient, however, developed these adverse effects on intermittent albuterol nebulizer treatment. It is important for the pediatrician to recognize the adverse effects of ?2-agonist therapy to avoid carrying out extensive workup for hypotension and hyperlactatemia prolonging hospital stay.

  10. Different patterns of testicular in vitro metabolism of (/sup 14/C)testosterone in several Betta (Anabantoidei, Belontiidae) species

    SciTech Connect

    Leitz, T.

    1987-07-01

    Testicular tissues of Betta picta, Betta smaragdina, and the short-finned variety of Betta splendens were incubated with (/sup 14/C)testosterone at 27 degrees for 120 min and the metabolites were isolated and characterized by paper and thin-layer chromatography and eventually by crystallization to constant specific activity. The metabolic profiles of the species were totally different. The short-finned B. splendens formed mainly 11-ketotestosterone (51.4%) as does the veiltail variety. B. smaragdina was the only species which formed considerable amounts of conjugates (24.3%), whereas in B. picta almost exclusively reduced (5 beta-) compounds (66.2%) were metabolites of testosterone. The results are discussed to be attributable to differences in testicular steroid metabolism. The significance of this observation remains unclear.

  11. [Water-electrolyte and acid-base disorders. VIII. Respiratory acidosis].

    PubMed

    Velásquez-Jones, L

    1990-08-01

    Acute respiratory acidosis will result from many processes that acutely interfere with the excretion of CO2 by the lungs. CO2 excretion by the lungs can be interfered with by processes that inappropriately decrease minute ventilation, processes that impair the transport of CO2 from the site of production to the lungs for export, and by processes that impair the transfer of CO2 from the blood through the alveolar space to the atmosphere. The underlying clinical syndrome generating the primary hypercapnia will determine the duration of the acidosis as well as the anticipated clinical manifestations attributable to the acidosis. PMID:2124129

  12. Lactacidosis modulates glutathione metabolism and oxidative glutamate toxicity.

    PubMed

    Lewerenz, Jan; Dargusch, Richard; Maher, Pamela

    2010-04-01

    Lactate and acidosis increase infarct size in humans and in animal models of cerebral ischemia but the mechanisms by which they exert their neurotoxic effects are poorly understood. Oxidative glutamate toxicity is a form of nerve cell death, wherein glutamate inhibits cystine uptake via the cystine/glutamate antiporter system leading to glutathione depletion, accumulation of reactive oxygen species and, ultimately, programmed cell death. Using the hippocampal cell line, HT22, we show that lactate and acidosis exacerbate oxidative glutamate toxicity and further decrease glutathione levels. Acidosis but not lactate inhibits system , whereas both acidosis and lactate inhibit the enzymatic steps of glutathione synthesis downstream of cystine uptake. In contrast, when glutathione synthesis is completely inhibited by cystine-free medium, acidosis partially protects against glutathione depletion and cell death. Both effects of acidosis are also present in primary neuronal and astrocyte cultures. Furthermore, we show that some neuroprotective compounds are much less effective in the presence of lactacidosis. Our findings indicate that lactacidosis modulates glutathione metabolism and neuronal cell death. Furthermore, lactacidosis may interfere with the action of some neuroprotective drugs rendering these less likely to be therapeutically effective in cerebral ischemia. PMID:20132475

  13. Identification of elevated urea as a severe, ubiquitous metabolic defect in the brain of patients with Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Patassini, Stefano; Begley, Paul; Reid, Suzanne J; Xu, Jingshu; Church, Stephanie J; Curtis, Maurice; Dragunow, Mike; Waldvogel, Henry J; Unwin, Richard D; Snell, Russell G; Faull, Richard L M; Cooper, Garth J S

    2015-12-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder wherein the aetiological defect is a mutation in the Huntington's gene (HTT), which alters the structure of the huntingtin protein through the lengthening of a polyglutamine tract and initiates a cascade that ultimately leads to dementia and premature death. However, neurodegeneration typically manifests in HD only in middle age, and processes linking the causative mutation to brain disease are poorly understood. Here, our objective was to elucidate further the processes that cause neurodegeneration in HD, by measuring levels of metabolites in brain regions known to undergo varying degrees of damage. We applied gas-chromatography/mass spectrometry-based metabolomics in a case-control study of eleven brain regions in short post-mortem-delay human tissue from nine well-characterized HD patients and nine controls. Unexpectedly, a single major abnormality was evident in all eleven brain regions studied across the forebrain, midbrain and hindbrain, namely marked elevation of urea, a metabolite formed in the urea cycle by arginase-mediated cleavage of arginine. Urea cycle activity localizes primarily in the liver, where it functions to incorporate protein-derived amine-nitrogen into urea for recycling or urinary excretion. It also occurs in other cell-types, but systemic over-production of urea is not known in HD. These findings are consistent with impaired local urea regulation in brain, by up-regulation of synthesis and/or defective clearance. We hypothesize that defective brain urea metabolism could play a substantive role in the pathogenesis of neurodegeneration, perhaps via defects in osmoregulation or nitrogen metabolism. Brain urea metabolism is therefore a target for generating novel monitoring/imaging strategies and/or therapeutic interventions aimed at ameliorating the impact of HD in patients. PMID:26522227

  14. [Damage control applied to severe maxillofacial trauma].

    PubMed

    Laversanne, S; Pierrou, C; Haen, P; Brignol, L; Thiéry, G

    2014-02-01

    Damage control is defined by the extreme emergency implementation of a first resuscitation and surgical step, during which there is no attempt at repairing lesions but only at restoring adequate physiological function. In recent years, "damage control" has considerably improved the management of polytrauma patients, especially in war surgery. Respiratory distress or hemorrhagic shock requirements are critical maxillofacial emergencies. We present the specificities of "damage control" management for patients with severe maxillofacial trauma. Some clinical and biological criteria have been defined to choose "damage control" strategy, in patients presenting with life-threatening facial hemorrhage after facial trauma. A rapid initial stage restores vital functions. Airways are maintained and secured: oro-tracheal intubation, cricothyroidotomy, surgical tracheotomy. Facial bleeding is controlled with various means: oronasal packing, angiographic embolization, selective ligation then external carotid artery if necessary. The resuscitation step stabilizes the lethal triad: hypothermia, coagulopathy, metabolic acidosis. The second step that comes in later is a surgical repair of facial injuries. "Damage control" can be adequately applied to the management of patients with severe maxillofacial trauma. PMID:24507725

  15. Severe Sepsis in Severely Malnourished Young Bangladeshi Children with Pneumonia: A Retrospective Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Chisti, Mohammod Jobayer; Salam, Mohammed Abdus; Bardhan, Pradip Kumar; Faruque, Abu S. G.; Shahid, Abu S. M. S. B.; Shahunja, K. M.; Das, Sumon Kumar; Hossain, Md Iqbal; Ahmed, Tahmeed

    2015-01-01

    Background In developing countries, there is no published report on predicting factors of severe sepsis in severely acute malnourished (SAM) children having pneumonia and impact of fluid resuscitation in such children. Thus, we aimed to identify predicting factors for severe sepsis and assess the outcome of fluid resuscitation of such children. Methods In this retrospective case-control study SAM children aged 0–59 months, admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of the Dhaka Hospital of the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh from April 2011 through July 2012 with history of cough or difficult breathing and radiologic pneumonia, who were assessed for severe sepsis at admission constituted the study population. We compared the pneumonic SAM children with severe sepsis (cases = 50) with those without severe sepsis (controls = 354). Severe sepsis was defined with objective clinical criteria and managed with fluid resuscitation, in addition to antibiotic and other supportive therapy, following the standard hospital guideline, which is very similar to the WHO guideline. Results The case-fatality-rate was significantly higher among the cases than the controls (40% vs. 4%; p<0.001). In logistic regression analysis after adjusting for potential confounders, lack of BCG vaccination, drowsiness, abdominal distension, acute kidney injury, and metabolic acidosis at admission remained as independent predicting factors for severe sepsis in pneumonic SAM children (p<0.05 for all comparisons). Conclusion and Significance We noted a much higher case fatality among under-five SAM children with pneumonia and severe sepsis who required fluid resuscitation in addition to standard antibiotic and other supportive therapy compared to those without severe sepsis. Independent risk factors and outcome of the management of severe sepsis in our study children highlight the importance for defining optimal fluid resuscitation therapy aiming at reducing the case fatality in such children. PMID:26440279

  16. Genealogy Profiling through Strain Improvement by Using Metabolic Network Analysis: Metabolic Flux Genealogy of Several Generations of Lysine-Producing Corynebacteria

    PubMed Central

    Wittmann, Christoph; Heinzle, Elmar

    2002-01-01

    A comprehensive approach of metabolite balancing, 13C tracer studies, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry, and isotopomer modeling was applied for comparative metabolic network analysis of a genealogy of five successive generations of lysine-producing Corynebacterium glutamicum. The five strains examined (C. glutamicum ATCC 13032, 13287, 21253, 21526, and 21543) were previously obtained by random mutagenesis and selection. Throughout the genealogy, the lysine yield in batch cultures increased markedly from 1.2 to 24.9% relative to the glucose uptake flux. Strain optimization was accompanied by significant changes in intracellular flux distributions. The relative pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) flux successively increased, clearly corresponding to the product yield. Moreover, the anaplerotic net flux increased almost twofold as a consequence of concerted regulation of C3 carboxylation and C4 decarboxylation fluxes to cover the increased demand for lysine formation; thus, the overall increase was a consequence of concerted regulation of C3 carboxylation and C4 decarboxylation fluxes. The relative flux through isocitrate dehydrogenase dropped from 82.7% in the wild type to 59.9% in the lysine-producing mutants. In contrast to the NADPH demand, which increased from 109 to 172% due to the increasing lysine yield, the overall NADPH supply remained constant between 185 and 196%, resulting in a decrease in the apparent NADPH excess through strain optimization. Extrapolated to industrial lysine producers, the NADPH supply might become a limiting factor. The relative contributions of PPP and the tricarboxylic acid cycle to NADPH generation changed markedly, indicating that C. glutamicum is able to maintain a constant supply of NADPH under completely different flux conditions. Statistical analysis by a Monte Carlo approach revealed high precision for the estimated fluxes, underlining the fact that the observed differences were clearly strain specific. PMID:12450803

  17. Assimilation, Accumulation, and Metabolism of Dinophysistoxins (DTXs) and Pectenotoxins (PTXs) in the Several Tissues of Japanese Scallop Patinopecten yessoensis

    PubMed Central

    Matsushima, Ryoji; Uchida, Hajime; Nagai, Satoshi; Watanabe, Ryuichi; Kamio, Michiya; Nagai, Hiroshi; Kaneniwa, Masaki; Suzuki, Toshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Japanese scallops, Patinopecten yessoensis, were fed with the toxic dinoflagellate Dinophysis fortii to elucidate the relative magnitude of assimilation, accumulation, and metabolism of diarrhetic shellfish toxins (DSTs) and pectenotoxins (PTXs). Three individual scallops were separately exposed to cultured D. fortii for four days. The average cell number of D. fortii assimilated by each individual scallop was 7.7 × 105. Dinophysistoxin-1 (DTX1), pectenotoxin-2 (PTX2) and their metabolites were analyzed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) and the toxin content in individual tissues (digestive gland, adductor muscle, gill, gonad, mantle, and the others), feces and the seawater medium were quantified. Toxins were almost exclusively accumulated in the digestive gland with only low levels being detected in the gills, mantles, gonads, and adductor muscles. DTX1 and PTX2 were the dominant toxins in the D. fortii cells fed to the scallops, whereas the dominant toxins detected in the digestive gland of scallops were PTX6 and esterified acyl-O-DTX1 (DTX3). In other tissues PTX2 was the dominant toxin observed. The ratio of accumulated to assimilated toxins was 21%–39% and 7%–23% for PTXs and DTXs respectively. Approximately 54%–75% of PTX2 and 52%–70% of DTX1 assimilated by the scallops was directly excreted into the seawater mainly without metabolic transformation. PMID:26633503

  18. Assimilation, Accumulation, and Metabolism of Dinophysistoxins (DTXs) and Pectenotoxins (PTXs) in the Several Tissues of Japanese Scallop Patinopecten yessoensis.

    PubMed

    Matsushima, Ryoji; Uchida, Hajime; Nagai, Satoshi; Watanabe, Ryuichi; Kamio, Michiya; Nagai, Hiroshi; Kaneniwa, Masaki; Suzuki, Toshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Japanese scallops, Patinopecten yessoensis, were fed with the toxic dinoflagellate Dinophysis fortii to elucidate the relative magnitude of assimilation, accumulation, and metabolism of diarrhetic shellfish toxins (DSTs) and pectenotoxins (PTXs). Three individual scallops were separately exposed to cultured D. fortii for four days. The average cell number of D. fortii assimilated by each individual scallop was 7.7 × 10?. Dinophysistoxin-1 (DTX1), pectenotoxin-2 (PTX2) and their metabolites were analyzed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) and the toxin content in individual tissues (digestive gland, adductor muscle, gill, gonad, mantle, and the others), feces and the seawater medium were quantified. Toxins were almost exclusively accumulated in the digestive gland with only low levels being detected in the gills, mantles, gonads, and adductor muscles. DTX1 and PTX2 were the dominant toxins in the D. fortii cells fed to the scallops, whereas the dominant toxins detected in the digestive gland of scallops were PTX6 and esterified acyl-O-DTX1 (DTX3). In other tissues PTX2 was the dominant toxin observed. The ratio of accumulated to assimilated toxins was 21%-39% and 7%-23% for PTXs and DTXs respectively. Approximately 54%-75% of PTX2 and 52%-70% of DTX1 assimilated by the scallops was directly excreted into the seawater mainly without metabolic transformation. PMID:26633503

  19. X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy: very long-chain fatty acid metabolism is severely impaired in monocytes but not in lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Weber, Franziska D; Wiesinger, Christoph; Forss-Petter, Sonja; Regelsberger, Günther; Einwich, Angelika; Weber, Willi H A; Köhler, Wolfgang; Stockinger, Hannes; Berger, Johannes

    2014-05-15

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease caused by mutations in the ABCD1 gene, encoding a member of the peroxisomal ABC transporter family. The ABCD1 protein transports CoA-activated very long-chain fatty acids (VLCFAs) into peroxisomes for degradation via ?-oxidation. In the severest form, X-ALD patients suffer from inflammatory demyelination of the brain. As the extent of the metabolic defect in the main immune cells is unknown, we explored their phenotypes concerning mRNA expression pattern of the three peroxisomal ABC transporters, VLCFA accumulation and peroxisomal ?-oxidation. In controls, ABCD1 expression was high in monocytes, intermediate in B cells and low in T cells; ABCD2 expression was extremely low in monocytes, intermediate in B cells and highest in T cells; ABCD3 mRNA was equally distributed. In X-ALD patients, the expression patterns remained unaltered; accordingly, monocytes, which lack compensatory VLCFA transport by ABCD2, displayed the severest biochemical phenotype with a 6-fold accumulation of C26:0 and a striking 70% reduction in peroxisomal ?-oxidation activity. In contrast, VLCFA metabolism was close to control values in B cells and T cells, supporting the hypothesis that sufficient ABCD2 is present to compensate for ABCD1 deficiency. Thus, the vulnerability of the main immune cell types is highly variable in X-ALD. Based on these results, we propose that in X-ALD the halt of inflammation after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation relies particularly on the replacement of the monocyte lineage. Additionally, these findings support the concept that ABCD2 is a target for pharmacological induction as an alternative therapeutic strategy. PMID:24363066

  20. [Experimental reproduction of lactic acidosis in the pony].

    PubMed

    Wolter, R; Durix, A; Letourneau, J C; Carcelen, M; Henry, N

    1983-01-01

    One pony has been subjected to the intravenous injections of L-lactic acid. Two other ponies have been trained to intracaecal administration of L-lactic acid or sucrose. The obtained results show that: Intravenous injection of lactic acid increases the concentration of histamin and lactic acid, decreases the level of magnesium and reduces the pressure of carbon dioxide in the blood (the control animals and the treated animals) without the clinical symptoms of lactic acidosis. Intracaecal administration of lactic acid induces a high liberation of histamin in the caecum (the control animals and the treated animals), however, the level of histamin in the blood is not modified. Intracaecal administration of sucrose decreases pH and increases the concentration of lactic acid in the caecum, although, in this case, the accumulation of histamin in the caecum appears only in the non-fasting ponies, the starved animals, and the fed animals, which suggests the necessity of food's proteins for histamin synthesis. PMID:6197926

  1. Expression of Glutamine Transporter Slc38a3 (SNAT3) During Acidosis is Mediated by a Different Mechanism than Tissue-Specific Expression

    PubMed Central

    Balkrishna, Sarojini; Bröer, Angelika; Welford, Scott M.; Hatzoglou, Maria; Bröer, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite homeostatic pH regulation, systemic and cellular pH changes take place and strongly influence metabolic processes. Transcription of the glutamine transporter SNAT3 (Slc38a3) for instance is highly up-regulated in the kidney during metabolic acidosis to provide glutamine for ammonia production. Methods Slc38a3 promoter activity and messenger RNA stability were measured in cultured cells in response to different extracellular pH values. Results Up-regulation of SNAT3 mRNA was mediated both by the stabilization of its mRNA and by the up-regulation of gene transcription. Stabilisation of the mRNA involved a pH-response element, while enhanced transcription made use of a second pH-sensitive Sp1 binding site in addition to a constitutive Sp1 binding site. Transcriptional regulation dominated the early response to acidosis, while mRNA stability was more important for chronic adaptation. Tissue-specific expression of SNAT3, by contrast, appeared to be controlled by promoter methylation and histone modifications. Conclusions Regulation of SNAT3 gene expression by extracellular pH involves post-transcriptional and transcriptional mechanisms, the latter being distinct from the mechanisms that control the tissue-specific expression of the gene. PMID:24854847

  2. Reversible lactic acidosis in a newborn with thiamine transporter-2 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Dueñas, Belén; Serrano, Mercedes; Rebollo, Mónica; Muchart, Jordi; Gargallo, Eva; Dupuits, Celine; Artuch, Rafael

    2013-05-01

    Thiamine transporter-2 deficiency is a recessive disease caused by mutations in the SLC19A3 gene. Patients manifest acute episodes of encephalopathy; symmetric lesions in the cortex, basal ganglia, thalami or periaqueductal gray matter, and a dramatic response to biotin or thiamine. We report a 30-day-old patient with mutations in the SLC19A3 gene who presented with acute encephalopathy and increased level of lactate in the blood (8.6 mmol/L) and cerebrospinal fluid (7.12 mmol/L), a high excretion of ?-ketoglutarate in the urine, and increased concentrations of the branched-chain amino acids leucine and isoleucine in the plasma. MRI detected bilateral and symmetric cortico-subcortical lesions involving the perirolandic area, bilateral putamina, and medial thalami. Some lesions showed low apparent diffusion coefficient values suggesting an acute evolution; others had high values likely to be subacute or chronic, most likely related to the perinatal period. After treatment with thiamine and biotin, irritability and opisthotonus disappeared, and the patient recovered consciousness. Biochemical disturbances also disappeared within 48 hours. After discontinuing biotin, the patient remained stable for 6 months on thiamine supplementation (20 mg/kg/day). The examination revealed subtle signs of neurologic sequelae, and MRI showed necrotic changes and volume loss in some affected areas. Our observations suggest that patients with thiamine transporter 2 deficiency may be vulnerable to metabolic decompensation during the perinatal period, when energy demands are high. Thiamine defects should be excluded in newborns and infants with lactic acidosis because prognosis largely depends on the time from diagnosis to thiamine supplementation. PMID:23589815

  3. DUSP1 Gene Polymorphisms Are Associated with Obesity-Related Metabolic Complications among Severely Obese Patients and Impact on Gene Methylation and Expression

    PubMed Central

    Guénard, F.; Bouchard, L.; Tchernof, A.; Deshaies, Y.; Hould, F. S.; Lebel, S.; Marceau, P.; Pérusse, L.; Vohl, M. C.

    2013-01-01

    The DUSP1 gene encodes a member of the dual-specificity phosphatase family previously identified as being differentially expressed in visceral adipose tissue (VAT) of severely obese men with versus without the metabolic syndrome. Objective. To test the association between DUSP1 polymorphisms, obesity-related metabolic complications, gene methylation, and expression levels in VAT. Methods. The DUSP1 locus and promoter region were sequenced in 25 individuals. SNPs were tested for association with obesity-related complications in a cohort of more than 1900 severely obese individuals. The impact of SNPs on methylation levels of 36 CpG sites and correlations between DNA methylation and gene expression levels in VAT were computed in a subset of 14 samples. Results. Heterozygotes for rs881150 had lower HDL-cholesterol levels (HDL-C; P = 0.01), and homozygotes for the minor allele of rs13184134 and rs7702178 had increased fasting glucose levels (P = 0.04 and 0.01, resp.). rs881150 was associated with methylation levels of CpG sites located ~1250?bp upstream the transcription start site. Methylation levels of 4 CpG sites were inversely correlated with DUSP1 gene expression. Conclusion. These results suggest that DUSP1 polymorphisms modulate plasma glucose and HDL-C levels in obese patients possibly through alterations of DNA methylation and gene expression levels. PMID:23986905

  4. RMND1 deficiency associated with neonatal lactic acidosis, infantile onset renal failure, deafness, and multiorgan involvement.

    PubMed

    Janer, Alexandre; van Karnebeek, Clara Dm; Sasarman, Florin; Antonicka, Hana; Al Ghamdi, Malak; Shyr, Casper; Dunbar, Mary; Stockler-Ispiroglu, Sylvia; Ross, Colin J; Vallance, Hilary; Dionne, Janis; Wasserman, Wyeth W; Shoubridge, Eric A

    2015-10-01

    RMND1 is an integral inner membrane mitochondrial protein that assembles into a large 240?kDa complex to support translation of the 13 polypeptides encoded on mtDNA, all of which are essential subunits of the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) complexes. Variants in RMND1 produce global defects in mitochondrial translation and were first reported in patients with severe neurological phenotypes leading to mortality in the first months of life. Using whole-exome sequencing, we identified compound heterozygous RMND1 variants in a 4-year-old patient with congenital lactic acidosis, severe myopathy, hearing loss, renal failure, and dysautonomia. The levels of mitochondrial ribosome proteins were reduced in patient fibroblasts, causing a translation defect, which was rescued by expression of the wild-type cDNA. RMND1 was almost undetectable by immunoblot analysis in patient muscle and fibroblasts. BN-PAGE analysis showed a severe combined OXPHOS assembly defect that was more prominent in patient muscle than in fibroblasts. Immunofluorescence experiments showed that RMND1 localizes to discrete foci in the mitochondrial network, juxtaposed to RNA granules where the primary mitochondrial transcripts are processed. RMND1 foci were not detected in patient fibroblasts. We hypothesize that RMND1 acts to anchor or stabilize the mitochondrial ribosome near the sites where the mRNAs are matured, spatially coupling post-transcriptional handling mRNAs with their translation, and that loss of function variants in RMND1 are associated with a unique constellation of clinical phenotypes that vary with the severity of the mitochondrial translation defect. PMID:25604853

  5. Embryonic phenotype, ?-carotene and retinoid metabolism upon maternal supplementation of ?-carotene in a mouse model of severe vitamin A deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Wassef, L.; Spiegler, E.; Quadro, L.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the effect of ?-carotene (bC) supplementation during pregnancy in a mouse model of severe vitamin A deficiency, i.e. Lrat?/?Rbp?/? dams maintained on a vitamin A-deficient diet during gestation. bC, a provitamin A carotenoid, can be enzymatically cleaved to form vitamin A for use by the developing embryo. We found that an acute supplementation (13.5 days post coitum, dpc) of bC to Lrat?/?Rbp?/? dams on a vitamin A-deficient diet activated transcriptional mechanisms in the developing tissues to maximize the utilization of bC provided to the dams. Nevertheless, these regulatory mechanisms are inefficient under this regimen, as the embryonic phenotype was not improved. We further investigated the effect of a repeated supplementation of bC during a crucial developmental period (6.5–9.5 dpc) on the above-mentioned mouse model. This treatment improved the embryonic abnormalities, as 40% of the embryos showed a normal phenotype. In addition, analysis of retinoic acid-responsive genes, such as Cyp26a1 in these embryos suggests that bC cleavage results in the production of retinoic acid which then can be used by the embryo. Taken together, these in vivo studies show that bC can be used as a source of vitamin A for severely vitamin A-deficient mammalian embryos. PMID:23871845

  6. Blueberries and Metabolic Syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Metabolic Syndrome is a cluster of metabolic disorders that increase the risk of cardiovascular diseases. Type 2 diabetes, elevated blood pressure, and atherogenic dyslipidemia are among the metabolic alterations that predispose the individual to several adverse cardiovascular complications. The hea...

  7. Seasonal influence over serum and urine metabolic markers in submariners during prolonged patrols

    PubMed Central

    Holy, Xavier; Bégot, Laurent; Renault, Sylvie; Butigieg, Xavier; André, Catherine; Bonneau, Dominique; Savourey, Gustave; Collombet, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    Within the framework of earlier publications, we have consistently dedicated our investigations to eliciting the effects of both seasonal vitamin D deficiency and submarine-induced hypercapnia on serum parameters for acid–base balance and bone metabolism in submariners over a 2-month winter (WP) or summer (SP) patrols. The latest findings reported herein, contribute further evidence with regard to overall physiological regulations in the same submariner populations that underwent past scrutiny. Hence, urine and blood samples were collected in WP and SP submariners at control prepatrol time as well as on submarine patrol days 20, 41, and 58. Several urine and serum metabolic markers were quantified, namely, deoxypyridinoline (DPD), lactate, albumin, creatinine, nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA), and ionized sodium (Na+) or potassium (K+), with a view to assessing bone, muscle, liver, or kidney metabolisms. We evidenced bone metabolism alteration (urine DPD, calcium, and phosphorus) previously recorded in submarine crewmembers under prolonged patrols. We also highlighted transitory modifications in liver metabolism (serum albumin) occurring within the first 20 days of submersion. We further evidenced changes in submariners’ renal physiology (serum creatinine) throughout the entire patrol time span. Measurements of ionic homeostasis (serum Na+ and K+) displayed potential seasonal impact over active ionic pumps in submariners. Finally, there is some evidence that submersion provides beneficial conditions prone to fend off seasonal lactic acidosis (serum lactate) detected in WP submariners. PMID:26265754

  8. Seasonal influence over serum and urine metabolic markers in submariners during prolonged patrols.

    PubMed

    Holy, Xavier; Bégot, Laurent; Renault, Sylvie; Butigieg, Xavier; André, Catherine; Bonneau, Dominique; Savourey, Gustave; Collombet, Jean-Marc

    2015-08-01

    Within the framework of earlier publications, we have consistently dedicated our investigations to eliciting the effects of both seasonal vitamin D deficiency and submarine-induced hypercapnia on serum parameters for acid-base balance and bone metabolism in submariners over a 2-month winter (WP) or summer (SP) patrols. The latest findings reported herein, contribute further evidence with regard to overall physiological regulations in the same submariner populations that underwent past scrutiny. Hence, urine and blood samples were collected in WP and SP submariners at control prepatrol time as well as on submarine patrol days 20, 41, and 58. Several urine and serum metabolic markers were quantified, namely, deoxypyridinoline (DPD), lactate, albumin, creatinine, nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA), and ionized sodium (Na(+)) or potassium (K(+)), with a view to assessing bone, muscle, liver, or kidney metabolisms. We evidenced bone metabolism alteration (urine DPD, calcium, and phosphorus) previously recorded in submarine crewmembers under prolonged patrols. We also highlighted transitory modifications in liver metabolism (serum albumin) occurring within the first 20 days of submersion. We further evidenced changes in submariners' renal physiology (serum creatinine) throughout the entire patrol time span. Measurements of ionic homeostasis (serum Na(+) and K(+)) displayed potential seasonal impact over active ionic pumps in submariners. Finally, there is some evidence that submersion provides beneficial conditions prone to fend off seasonal lactic acidosis (serum lactate) detected in WP submariners. PMID:26265754

  9. Utility of the modified ATP III defined metabolic syndrome and severe obesity as predictors of insulin resistance in overweight children and adolescents: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Dhuper, Sarita; Cohen, Hillel W; Daniel, Josephine; Gumidyala, Padmasree; Agarwalla, Vipin; St Victor, Rosemarie; Dhuper, Sunil

    2007-01-01

    Background The rising prevalence of obesity and metabolic syndrome (MetS) has received increased attention since both place individuals at risk for Type II diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Insulin resistance (IR) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of obesity and MetS in both children and adults and is a known independent cardiovascular risk factor. However measures of IR are not routinely performed in children while MetS or severe obesity when present, are considered as clinical markers for IR. Objective The study was undertaken to assess the utility of ATPIII defined metabolic syndrome (MetS) and severe obesity as predictors of insulin resistance (IR) in a group of 576 overweight children and adolescents attending a pediatric obesity clinic in Brooklyn. Methods Inclusion criteria were children ages 3–19, and body mass index > 95th percentile for age. MetS was defined using ATP III criteria, modified for age. IR was defined as upper tertile of homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) within 3 age groups (3–8, n = 122; 9–11, n = 164; 12–19, n = 290). Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive values and odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated within age groups for predicting IR using MetS and severe obesity respectively. Results MetS was present in 45%, 48% and 42% of the respective age groups and significantly predicted IR only in the oldest group (OR = 2.0, 95% CI 1.2, 3.4; p = .006). Sensitivities were <55%; specificities <63% and positive predictive values ? 42% in all groups. Severe obesity was significantly associated with IR in both the 9–11 (p = .002) and 12–18 (p = .01) groups but positive predictive values were nonetheless ? 51% for all groups. Conclusion The expression of IR in overweight children and adolescents is heterogeneous and MetS or severe obesity may not be sufficiently sensitive and specific indicators of insulin resistance. In addition to screening for MetS in overweight children markers for IR should be routinely performed. Further research is needed to establish threshold values of insulin measures in overweight children who may be at greater associated risk of adverse outcomes whether or not MetS is present. PMID:17300718

  10. Effect of telmisartan and ramipril on atrial fibrillation recurrence and severity in hypertensive patients with metabolic syndrome and recurrent symptomatic paroxysmal and persistent atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Fogari, Roberto; Mugellini, Amedeo; Zoppi, Annalisa; Preti, Paola; Destro, Maurizio; Lazzari, Pierangelo; Derosa, Giuseppe

    2012-03-01

    This study evaluated the effect of telmisartan, ramipril, and amlodipine on atrial fibrillation (AF) recurrence and severity in hypertensive patients with metabolic syndrome. A total of 391 hypertensive outpatients with metabolic syndrome, in sinus rhythm but with at least 2 episodes of AF in the previous 6 months were randomized to telmisartan, ramipril, or amlodipine for 1 year. At the first AF, ventricular rate (VR) and plasma cardiac troponin I (TnI) were evaluated. P-wave dispersion (PWD) and procollagen type I carboxy-terminal peptide (PIP) were evaluated before and after 12 months of treatment. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were similarly and significantly reduced by all treatments (P < .001). In all, 49% of patients treated with amlodipine had a recurrence of AF as did 25.5% of patients with ramipril and 12.9% of patients with telmisartan (P < .01 vs amlodipine and P < .05 vs ramipril). Ventricular rate and TnI at the first AF recurrence were significantly lower with telmisartan and ramipril than with amlodipine. P-wave dispersion was reduced by ramipril (-5.1 ms, P < .05) and even more by telmisartan (-11 ms, P < .01). Telmisartan and ramipril induced a similar PIP reduction (-52.8 and -49.8 µg/L, respectively, P < .01). These findings suggested that in these patients telmisartan was more effective than ramipril in reducing AF recurrence and severity as well as in improving PWD, despite a similar BP reduction and a similar improvement in cardiac fibrosis. This could be related to a specific effect of telmisartan on atrial electric remodeling. PMID:21335482

  11. A 44-year-old woman with metabolic acidosis, high anion gap, and delayed neurologic deterioration.

    PubMed

    Vakil, Abhay; Upadhyay, Hinesh; Sherani, Khalid; Cervellione, Kelly; Trepeta, Scott; Patel, Mahendra C

    2015-01-01

    A 44-year-old woman was brought to the ED from John F. Kennedy International Airport. The patient was returning with her son from a 3-month visit to Bangladesh. Her journey started with a 4-h flight from Dhaka, Bangladesh to Dubai, United Arab Emirates. She consumed 240 mL of whiskey during the flight. This was followed by a 14-h flight from Dubai to New York. According to the patient's son, she did not consume any alcohol during the second flight. The patient was in her usual state of health with normal mentation throughout her journey. Upon landing, she started complaining of shortness of breath. After disembarking, she was witnessed to have seizure-like activity with involuntary passage of urine, following which she collapsed. The patient was intubated by emergency medical services in the field. PMID:25560868

  12. Dental Aspect of Distal Tubular Renal Acidosis with Genu Valgum Secondary to Rickets: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Bahadure, Rakesh N.; Thosar, Nilima; Kriplani, Ritika; Baliga, Sudhindra; Fulzele, Punit

    2012-01-01

    Distal renal tubular acidosis is a disease that occurs when the kidneys do not remove acid properly into the urine, leaving the blood too acidic (called acidosis). Distal renal tubular acidosis (type I RTA) is caused by a defect in the kidney tubes that causes acid to build up in the bloodstream. It ultimately results rickets which include chronic skeletal pain, in skeletal deformities, skeletal fractures. Rickets is among the most frequent childhood diseases in many developing countries. Dental problems in rickets include delayed eruption of permanent teeth, premature fall of deciduous teeth, defects in structure of teeth, enamel defects in permanent teeth (hypoplastic), pulp defects, intraglobular dentine, and caries tooth. Herewith, reported a case of distal tubular renal acidosis with genu valgum secondary to rickets, with pain and extraoral swelling associated with right and left mandibular 1st permanent molars. Teeth were infected with pulp without being involved with caries. Radiographically cracks in enamel and dentin were observed. Pulp revascularization with 46 and root canal treatment was done for 36 with followup of 1 year. PMID:22567455

  13. Acidosis and hypercalciuria: renal mechanisms affecting calcium, magnesium and sodium excretion in the sheep

    PubMed Central

    Stacy, B. D.; Wilson, B. W.

    1970-01-01

    1. Observations were made on the excretion of calcium and magnesium by the sheep's kidney following manipulation of the acid—base status. 2. Intravascular administration of a synthetic solution resembling saliva abolished the naturally occurring acidosis in sheep during feeding, and it also prevented the normal onset of post-prandial hypercalciuria and hypermagnesiuria. 3. Non-respiratory acidosis (induced by infusion of hydrochloric acid) and respiratory acidosis arising from inhalation of 6% (v/v) CO2 in air both caused an acute increase in calcium excretion. 4. Measurement of filtered loads showed that feeding exerted an effect on the functional characteristics of the sheep's kidney. The renal clearances of calcium and magnesium increased, whereas sodium clearance decreased. 5. Experimental conditions were arranged so that variations in acid—base status could be imposed at a time when the filtered load of calcium was declining. 6. With hydrochloric acid-acidosis the renal excretion of calcium increased, despite a steady fall in the filtered load. With sodium bicarbonate alkalosis, the filtered load and the renal excretion of calcium decreased in unison. 7. These variations in calcium excretion were not accompanied by corresponding changes in the excretion of sodium. 8. It is concluded that the renal tubules in the sheep are sensitive to acid—base status and that they respond to a lowering of the blood pH by decreasing the tubular reabsorption of filtered calcium. PMID:5499811

  14. Disruption of glycerol metabolism by RNAi targeting of genes encoding glycerol kinase results in a range of phenotype severity in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Wightman, Patrick J; Jackson, George R; Dipple, Katrina M

    2013-01-01

    In Drosophila, RNAi targeting of either dGyk or dGK can result in two alternative phenotypes: adult glycerol hypersensitivity or larval lethality. Here we compare these two phenotypes at the level of glycerol kinase (GK) phosphorylation activity, dGyk and dGK-RNA expression, and glycerol levels. We found both phenotypes exhibit reduced but similar levels of GK phosphorylation activity. Reduced RNA expression levels of dGyk and dGK corresponded with RNAi progeny that developed into glycerol hypersensitive adult flies. However, quantification of dGyk/dGK expression levels for the larval lethality phenotype revealed unexpected levels possibly due to a compensatory mechanism between dGyk and dGK or RNAi inhibition. The enzymatic role of glycerol kinase converts glycerol to glycerol 3-phosphate. As expected, elevated glycerol levels were observed in larvae that went on to develop into glycerol hypersensitive adults. Interestingly, larvae that died before eclosion revealed extremely low glycerol levels. Further characterization identified a wing phenotype that is enhanced by a dGpdh null mutation, indicating disrupted glycerol metabolism underlies the wing phenotype. In humans, glycerol kinase deficiency (GKD) exhibits a wide range of phenotypic variation with no obvious genotype-phenotype correlations. Additionally, disease severity often does not correlate with GK phosphorylation activity. It is intriguing that both human GKD patients and our GKD Drosophila model show a range of phenotype severity. Additionally, the lack of correlation between GK phosphorylation and dGyk/dGK-RNA expression with phenotypic severity suggests further study including understanding the alternative functions of the GK protein, could provide insights into the complex pathogenic mechanism observed in human GKD patients. PMID:24039719

  15. Tumor cell metabolism: an integral view.

    PubMed

    Romero-Garcia, Susana; Lopez-Gonzalez, Jose Sullivan; Báez-Viveros, José Luis; Aguilar-Cazares, Dolores; Prado-Garcia, Heriberto

    2011-12-01

    Cancer is a genetic disease that is caused by mutations in oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes and stability genes. The fact that the metabolism of tumor cells is altered has been known for many years. However, the mechanisms and consequences of metabolic reprogramming have just begun to be understood. In this review, an integral view of tumor cell metabolism is presented, showing how metabolic pathways are reprogrammed to satisfy tumor cell proliferation and survival requirements. In tumor cells, glycolysis is strongly enhanced to fulfill the high ATP demands of these cells; glucose carbons are the main building blocks in fatty acid and nucleotide biosynthesis. Glutaminolysis is also increased to satisfy NADPH regeneration, whereas glutamine carbons replenish the Krebs cycle, which produces metabolites that are constantly used for macromolecular biosynthesis. A characteristic feature of the tumor microenvironment is acidosis, which results from the local increase in lactic acid production by tumor cells. This phenomenon is attributed to the carbons from glutamine and glucose, which are also used for lactic acid production. Lactic acidosis also directs the metabolic reprogramming of tumor cells and serves as an additional selective pressure. Finally, we also discuss the role of mitochondria in supporting tumor cell metabolism. PMID:22057267

  16. [Distal renal tubular acidosis: report of 3 cases].

    PubMed

    Guibaud, P; Parchoux, B; Langue, J; Bouissou, F; Barthe, P; Larbre, F

    1979-06-01

    Three observations of R.T.A. with nerve deafness are reported. Case 1 and 2 concern consanguinous brothers whose parents are not affected, which confirm the syndrom as an autosomal recessive entity. The third, sporadic, case relates to a 13-year-old non consanguinous girl. Metabolic abnormalities and renal evolution with nephrocalcinosis was such as in Albright disease. However a progressive nerve deafness makes distinction. The authors underline the importance of this sometimes difficult distinction for genetic counseling. PMID:541679

  17. Outcomes of Extremely Low Birth Weight Infants with Acidosis at Birth

    PubMed Central

    Randolph, David A.; Nolen, Tracy L.; Ambalavanan, Namasivayam; Carlo, Waldemar A.; Peralta-Carcelen, Myriam; Das, Abhik; Bell, Edward F.; Davis, Alexis S.; Laptook, Abbot R.; Stoll, Barbara J.; Shankaran, Seetha; Higgins, Rosemary D.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To test the hypothesis that acidosis at birth is associated with the combined primary outcome of death or neurodevelopmental impairment (NDI) in extremely low birth weight (ELBW) infants, and to develop a predictive model of death/NDI exploring perinatal acidosis as a predictor variable. STUDY DESIGN The study population consisted of ELBW infants born between 2002-2007 at NICHD Neonatal Research Network hospitals. Infants with cord blood gas data and documentation of either mortality prior to discharge or 18-22 month neurodevelopmental outcomes were included. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to determine the contribution of perinatal acidosis, defined as a cord blood gas with a pH<7 or base excess (BE)<-12, to death/NDI in ELBW infants. In addition, a multivariable model predicting death/NDI was developed. RESULTS 3979 patients were identified of whom 249 had a cord gas pH<7 or BE<-12 mEq/L. 2124 patients (53%) had the primary outcome of death/NDI. After adjustment for confounding variables, pH<7 and BE<-12 mEq/L were each significantly associated with death/NDI (OR=2.5[1.6,4.2]; and OR=1.5[1.1,2.0], respectively). However, inclusion of pH or BE did not improve the ability of the multivariable model to predict death/NDI. CONCLUSIONS Perinatal acidosis is significantly associated with death/NDI in ELBW infants. Perinatal acidosis is infrequent in ELBW infants, however, and other factors are more important in predicting death/NDI. PMID:24554564

  18. Severe dermatitis, multiple allergies, and metabolic wasting syndrome caused by a novel mutation in the N-terminal plakin domain of desmoplakin

    PubMed Central

    McAleer, Maeve A.; Pohler, Elizabeth; Smith, Frances J.D.; Wilson, Neil J.; Cole, Christian; MacGowan, Stuart; Koetsier, Jennifer L.; Godsel, Lisa M.; Harmon, Robert M.; Gruber, Robert; Crumrine, Debra; Elias, Peter M.; McDermott, Michael; Butler, Karina; Broderick, Annemarie; Sarig, Ofer; Sprecher, Eli; Green, Kathleen J.; McLean, W.H. Irwin; Irvine, Alan D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Severe dermatitis, multiple allergies, and metabolic wasting (SAM) syndrome is a recently recognized syndrome caused by mutations in the desmoglein 1 gene (DSG1). To date, only 3 families have been reported. Objective We studied a new case of SAM syndrome known to have no mutations in DSG1 to detail the clinical, histopathologic, immunofluorescent, and ultrastructural phenotype and to identify the underlying molecular mechanisms in this rare genodermatosis. Methods Histopathologic, electron microscopy, and immunofluorescent studies were performed. Whole-exome sequencing data were interrogated for mutations in desmosomal and other skin structural genes, followed by Sanger sequencing of candidate genes in the patient and his parents. Results No mutations were identified in DSG1; however, a novel de novo heterozygous missense c.1757A>C mutation in the desmoplakin gene (DSP) was identified in the patient, predicting the amino acid substitution p.His586Pro in the desmoplakin polypeptide. Conclusions SAM syndrome can be caused by mutations in both DSG1 and DSP. Knowledge of this genetic heterogeneity is important for both analysis of patients and genetic counseling of families. This condition and these observations reinforce the importance of heritable skin barrier defects, in this case desmosomal proteins, in the pathogenesis of atopic disease. PMID:26073755

  19. The plasticizer benzyl butyl phthalate (BBP) alters the ecdysone hormone pathway, the cellular response to stress, the energy metabolism, and several detoxication mechanisms in Chironomus riparius larvae.

    PubMed

    Herrero, Óscar; Planelló, Rosario; Morcillo, Gloria

    2015-06-01

    Butyl benzyl phthalate (BBP) has been extensively used worldwide as a plasticizer in the polyvinyl chloride (PVC) industry and the manufacturing of many other products, and its presence in the aquatic environment is expected for decades. In the present study, the toxicity of BBP was investigated in Chironomus riparius aquatic larvae. The effects of acute 24-h and 48-h exposures to a wide range of BBP doses were evaluated at the molecular level by analysing changes in genes related to the stress response, the endocrine system, the energy metabolism, and detoxication pathways, as well as in the enzyme activity of glutathione S-transferase. BBP caused a dose and time-dependent toxicity in most of the selected biomarkers. 24-h exposures to high doses affected larval survival and lead to a significant response of several heat-shock genes (hsp70, hsp40, and hsp27), and to a clear endocrine disrupting effect by upregulating the ecdysone receptor gene (EcR). Longer treatments with low doses triggered a general repression of transcription and GST activity. Furthermore, delayed toxicity studies were specially relevant, since they allowed us to detect unpredictable toxic effects, not immediately manifested after contact with the phthalate. This study provides novel and interesting results on the toxic effects of BBP in C. riparius and highlights the suitability of this organism for ecotoxicological risk assessment, especially in aquatic ecosystems. PMID:25725395

  20. Effects of the neurological wake-up test on clinical examination, intracranial pressure, brain metabolism and brain tissue oxygenation in severely brain-injured patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Daily interruption of sedation (IS) has been implemented in 30 to 40% of intensive care units worldwide and may improve outcome in medical intensive care patients. Little is known about the benefit of IS in acutely brain-injured patients. Methods This prospective observational study was performed in a neuroscience intensive care unit in a tertiary-care academic center. Twenty consecutive severely brain-injured patients with multimodal neuromonitoring were analyzed for levels of brain lactate, pyruvate and glucose, intracranial pressure (ICP), cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) and brain tissue oxygen tension (PbtO2) during IS trials. Results Of the 82 trial days, 54 IS-trials were performed as interruption of sedation and analgesics were not considered safe on 28 days (34%). An increase in the FOUR Score (Full Outline of UnResponsiveness score) was observed in 50% of IS-trials by a median of three (two to four) points. Detection of a new neurologic deficit occurred in one trial (2%), and in one-third of IS-trials the trial had to be stopped due to an ICP-crisis (> 20 mmHg), agitation or systemic desaturation. In IS-trials that had to be aborted, a significant increase in ICP and decrease in PbtO2 (P < 0.05), including 67% with critical values of PbtO2 < 20 mmHg, a tendency to brain metabolic distress (P < 0.07) was observed. Conclusions Interruption of sedation revealed new relevant clinical information in only one trial and a large number of trials could not be performed or had to be stopped due to safety issues. Weighing pros and cons of IS-trials in patients with acute brain injury seems important as related side effects may overcome the clinical benefit. PMID:23186037

  1. A mouse model for distal renal tubular acidosis reveals a previously unrecognized role of the V-ATPase a4 subunit in the proximal tubule

    PubMed Central

    Hennings, J Christopher; Picard, Nicolas; Huebner, Antje K; Stauber, Tobias; Maier, Hannes; Brown, Dennis; Jentsch, Thomas J; Vargas-Poussou, Rosa; Eladari, Dominique; Hübner, Christian A

    2012-01-01

    The V-ATPase is a multisubunit complex that transports protons across membranes. Mutations of its B1 or a4 subunit are associated with distal renal tubular acidosis and deafness. In the kidney, the a4 subunit is expressed in intercalated cells of the distal nephron, where the V-ATPase controls acid/base secretion, and in proximal tubule cells, where its role is less clear. Here, we report that a4 KO mice suffer not only from severe acidosis but also from proximal tubule dysfunction with defective endocytic trafficking, proteinuria, phosphaturia and accumulation of lysosomal material and we provide evidence that these findings may be also relevant in patients. In the inner ear, the a4 subunit co-localized with pendrin at the apical side of epithelial cells lining the endolymphatic sac. As a4 KO mice were profoundly deaf and displayed enlarged endolymphatic fluid compartments mirroring the alterations in pendrin KO mice, we propose that pendrin and the proton pump co-operate in endolymph homeostasis. Thus, our mouse model gives new insights into the divergent functions of the V-ATPase and the pathophysiology of a4-related symptoms. PMID:22933323

  2. A triad of linezolid toxicity: hypoglycemia, lactic acidosis, and acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, P. Connor; Phillips, Kristy M.; O'Donnell, Walter J.

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of suspected linezolid toxicity in a 34-year-old man with sickle cell disease and line-related vancomycin-resistant enterococcal bacteremia and tricuspid valve endocarditis. The patient developed sudden-onset hypoglycemia, lactic acidosis, and acute pancreatitis 11 days after initiation of linezolid. All adverse effects quickly resolved with drug cessation. The pathophysiology underlying this triad of linezolid toxicity is unclear, but may be related to mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:26424943

  3. Chronic acidosis in the tumour microenvironment selects for overexpression of LAMP2 in the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Damaghi, Mehdi; Tafreshi, Narges K; Lloyd, Mark C; Sprung, Robert; Estrella, Veronica; Wojtkowiak, Jonathan W; Morse, David L; Koomen, John M; Bui, Marilyn M; Gatenby, Robert A; Gillies, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    Early cancers are avascular and hence, profoundly acidic. Pre-malignant cells must adapt to acidosis to thrive in this hostile microenvironment. Here, we investigate MCF-7 cells that are adapted to grow in acidic conditions using SILAC proteomics and we reveal a significant upregulation of lysosomal proteins. Prominent among these is LAMP2 that functions to protect lysosomal membranes from acid proteolysis. LAMP2 upregulation by acidosis is confirmed both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, we show that the depletion of LAMP2 is sufficient to increase acidosis-mediated toxicity. In breast cancer patient samples, there is a high correlation of LAMP2 mRNA and protein expression with progression. We also observe that LAMP2 is located at the plasma membrane in clinical samples and this redistribution is acid-induced in vitro. Our findings suggest a potential adaptive mechanism, wherein cells chronically exposed to an acidic environment translocate lysosomal proteins to their surface, thus protecting the plasmalemma from acid-induced hydrolysis. PMID:26658462

  4. Chronic acidosis in the tumour microenvironment selects for overexpression of LAMP2 in the plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    Damaghi, Mehdi; Tafreshi, Narges K.; Lloyd, Mark C.; Sprung, Robert; Estrella, Veronica; Wojtkowiak, Jonathan W.; Morse, David L.; Koomen, John M.; Bui, Marilyn M.; Gatenby, Robert A; Gillies, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    Early cancers are avascular and hence, profoundly acidic. Pre-malignant cells must adapt to acidosis to thrive in this hostile microenvironment. Here, we investigate MCF-7 cells that are adapted to grow in acidic conditions using SILAC proteomics and we reveal a significant upregulation of lysosomal proteins. Prominent among these is LAMP2 that functions to protect lysosomal membranes from acid proteolysis. LAMP2 upregulation by acidosis is confirmed both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, we show that the depletion of LAMP2 is sufficient to increase acidosis-mediated toxicity. In breast cancer patient samples, there is a high correlation of LAMP2 mRNA and protein expression with progression. We also observe that LAMP2 is located at the plasma membrane in clinical samples and this redistribution is acid-induced in vitro. Our findings suggest a potential adaptive mechanism, wherein cells chronically exposed to an acidic environment translocate lysosomal proteins to their surface, thus protecting the plasmalemma from acid-induced hydrolysis. PMID:26658462

  5. Mutations in GTPBP3 Cause a Mitochondrial Translation Defect Associated with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy, Lactic Acidosis, and Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kopajtich, Robert; Nicholls, Thomas J.; Rorbach, Joanna; Metodiev, Metodi D.; Freisinger, Peter; Mandel, Hanna; Vanlander, Arnaud; Ghezzi, Daniele; Carrozzo, Rosalba; Taylor, Robert W.; Marquard, Klaus; Murayama, Kei; Wieland, Thomas; Schwarzmayr, Thomas; Mayr, Johannes A.; Pearce, Sarah F.; Powell, Christopher A.; Saada, Ann; Ohtake, Akira; Invernizzi, Federica; Lamantea, Eleonora; Sommerville, Ewen W.; Pyle, Angela; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Crushell, Ellen; Okazaki, Yasushi; Kohda, Masakazu; Kishita, Yoshihito; Tokuzawa, Yoshimi; Assouline, Zahra; Rio, Marlène; Feillet, François; Mousson de Camaret, Bénédict; Chretien, Dominique; Munnich, Arnold; Menten, Björn; Sante, Tom; Smet, Joél; Régal, Luc; Lorber, Abraham; Khoury, Asaad; Zeviani, Massimo; Strom, Tim M.; Meitinger, Thomas; Bertini, Enrico S.; Van Coster, Rudy; Klopstock, Thomas; Rötig, Agnès; Haack, Tobias B.; Minczuk, Michal; Prokisch, Holger

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory chain deficiencies exhibit a wide variety of clinical phenotypes resulting from defective mitochondrial energy production through oxidative phosphorylation. These defects can be caused by either mutations in the mtDNA or mutations in nuclear genes coding for mitochondrial proteins. The underlying pathomechanisms can affect numerous pathways involved in mitochondrial physiology. By whole-exome and candidate gene sequencing, we identified 11 individuals from 9 families carrying compound heterozygous or homozygous mutations in GTPBP3, encoding the mitochondrial GTP-binding protein 3. Affected individuals from eight out of nine families presented with combined respiratory chain complex deficiencies in skeletal muscle. Mutations in GTPBP3 are associated with a severe mitochondrial translation defect, consistent with the predicted function of the protein in catalyzing the formation of 5-taurinomethyluridine (?m5U) in the anticodon wobble position of five mitochondrial tRNAs. All case subjects presented with lactic acidosis and nine developed hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. In contrast to individuals with mutations in MTO1, the protein product of which is predicted to participate in the generation of the same modification, most individuals with GTPBP3 mutations developed neurological symptoms and MRI involvement of thalamus, putamen, and brainstem resembling Leigh syndrome. Our study of a mitochondrial translation disorder points toward the importance of posttranscriptional modification of mitochondrial tRNAs for proper mitochondrial function. PMID:25434004

  6. Microbial Metabolism Metabolic Engineering

    E-print Network

    Huang, Ching-Tsan

    1 Microbial Metabolism Metabolic Engineering in Post-Genomic Era Ching-Tsan Huang () Office of recombinant DNA technology. Alteration of metabolic pathways to better understand and use cellular pathways Physiology Metabolic Engineering #12;4 http://ocw.osaka-u.ac.jp/contents/19/Prof.%20Shimizu%201.pdf Systems

  7. Cadmium toxicity in diazotrophic Anabaena spp. adjudged by hasty up-accumulation of transporter and signaling and severe down-accumulation of nitrogen metabolism proteins.

    PubMed

    Singh, Prashant Kumar; Shrivastava, Alok Kumar; Chatterjee, Antra; Pandey, Sarita; Rai, Snigdha; Singh, Shilpi; Rai, L C

    2015-09-01

    Present study demonstrates interspecies variation in proteome and survival strategy of three Anabaena species i.e., Anabaena L31, Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 and Anabaena doliolum subjected to respective LC50 doses of Cd at 0, 1, 3, 5 and 7day intervals. The proteome coverage with 452 differentially accumulated proteins unveiled species and time specific expression and interaction network of proteins involved in important cellular functions. Statistical analysis of protein abundance across Cd-treated proteomes clustered their co-expression pattern into four groups viz., (i) early (days 1 and 3) accumulated proteins, (ii) proteins up-accumulated for longer duration, (iii) late (days 5 and 7) accumulated proteins, and (iv) mostly down-accumulated proteins. Appreciable growth of Cd treated A L31 over other two species may be ascribed to proteins contained in the first and second groups (belonging to energy and carbohydrate metabolism (TK, G6-PI, PGD, FBA, PPA, ATP synthase)), sulfur metabolism (GR, GST, PGDH, PAPS reductase, GDC-P, and SAM synthetase), fatty acid metabolism (AspD, PspA, SQD-1), phosphorous metabolism (PhoD, PstB and SQD1), molecular chaperones (Gro-EL, FKBP-type peptidylprolyl isomerase), and antioxidative defense enzymes (SOD-A, catalase). Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 harboring proteins largely from the third group qualified as a late accumulator and A. doliolum housing majority of proteins from the fourth group emerged as the most sensitive species. Thus early up-accumulation of transporter and signaling category proteins and drastic reduction of nitrogen assimilation proteins could be taken as a vital indicator of cadmium toxicity in Anabaena spp. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Proteomics in India. PMID:26021478

  8. Misexpression of a Chloroplast Aspartyl Protease Leads to Severe Growth Defects and Alters Carbohydrate Metabolism in Arabidopsis1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Paparelli, Eleonora; Gonzali, Silvia; Parlanti, Sandro; Novi, Giacomo; Giorgi, Federico M.; Licausi, Francesco; Kosmacz, Monika; Feil, Regina; Lunn, John E.; Brust, Henrike; van Dongen, Joost T.; Steup, Martin; Perata, Pierdomenico

    2012-01-01

    The crucial role of carbohydrate in plant growth and morphogenesis is widely recognized. In this study, we describe the characterization of nana, a dwarf Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutant impaired in carbohydrate metabolism. We show that the nana dwarf phenotype was accompanied by altered leaf morphology and a delayed flowering time. Our genetic and molecular data indicate that the mutation in nana is due to a transfer DNA insertion in the promoter region of a gene encoding a chloroplast-located aspartyl protease that alters its pattern of expression. Overexpression of the gene (oxNANA) phenocopies the mutation. Both nana and oxNANA display alterations in carbohydrate content, and the extent of these changes varies depending on growth light intensity. In particular, in low light, soluble sugar levels are lower and do not show the daily fluctuations observed in wild-type plants. Moreover, nana and oxNANA are defective in the expression of some genes implicated in sugar metabolism and photosynthetic light harvesting. Interestingly, some chloroplast-encoded genes as well as genes whose products seem to be involved in retrograde signaling appear to be down-regulated. These findings suggest that the NANA aspartic protease has an important regulatory function in chloroplasts that not only influences photosynthetic carbon metabolism but also plastid and nuclear gene expression. PMID:22987884

  9. Effect of ionophore antibiotics on experimentally induced lactic acidosis in cattle.

    PubMed

    Nagaraja, T G; Avery, T B; Galitzer, S J; Harmon, D L

    1985-12-01

    Salinomycin, a new ionophore antibiotic, was tested and compared with lasalocid and monensin for preventing experimentally induced lactic acidosis. Five rumen-fistulated adult cattle were used in a 5 X 5 Latin square design, and the treatments were as follows: no treatment (control), 0.11 mg of salinomycin/kg of body weight (S1), 0.22 mg of salinomycin/kg (S2), 0.66 of lasalocid/kg, and 0.66 mg of monensin/kg. Acidosis was induced by intraruminal administration of a ground corn-corn starch mixture (50:50, 12.5 g/kg) once a day for up to 4 days. Antibiotics were administered along with grain-starch mixture. Rumen and blood samples were obtained before and at 6, 12, and 24 hours after each carbohydrate-antibiotic dosing to monitor acid-base status. Control and S1-treated cattle became ruminally acidotic within 54 hours, whereas cattle treated with S2, lasalocid, and monensin resisted acidosis for up to 78 hours after dosing. Cattle treated with S2, lasalocid, or monensin had higher rumen pH and lower L(+)- and D(-)-lactate concentrations than did control or S1-treated cattle. Rumen pH decrease to below 5.0 in S2-, lasalocid-, and monensin-treated cattle was not due to lactic acid, but to increased production of volatile fatty acids. Rumen propionate proportion increased initially in antibiotic-treated cattle, but after 48 hours, butyrate proportion increased significantly. Despite low rumen pH and high lactate concentration, lacticacidemia was not evident, and the systemic acid-base disturbance was mild in control cattle.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:4083576

  10. Metabolic Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Your Best Self Smart Snacking Losing Weight Safely Metabolic Syndrome KidsHealth > Teens > Diabetes Center > Treatment & Prevention > Metabolic Syndrome ... applies to a condition known as metabolic syndrome. Metabolic Syndrome Is an Early Warning Sign Metabolic syndrome isn' ...

  11. D-Lactic Acidosis: An Underrecognized Complication of Short Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kowlgi, N. Gurukripa; Chhabra, Lovely

    2015-01-01

    D-lactic acidosis or D-lactate encephalopathy is a rare condition that occurs primarily in individuals who have a history of short bowel syndrome. The unabsorbed carbohydrates act as a substrate for colonic bacteria to form D-lactic acid among other organic acids. The acidic pH generated as a result of D-lactate production further propagates production of D-lactic acid, hence giving rise to a vicious cycle. D-lactic acid accumulation in the blood can cause neurologic symptoms such as delirium, ataxia, and slurred speech. Diagnosis is made by a combination of clinical and laboratory data including special assays for D-lactate. Treatment includes correcting the acidosis and decreasing substrate for D-lactate such as carbohydrates in meals. In addition, antibiotics can be used to clear colonic flora. Although newer techniques for diagnosis and treatment are being developed, clinical diagnosis still holds paramount importance, as there can be many confounders in the diagnosis as will be discussed subsequently. PMID:25977687

  12. Comparison of Malated Ringer's with Two Other Balanced Crystalloid Solutions in Resuscitation of Both Severe and Moderate Hemorrhagic Shock in Rats.

    PubMed

    Keitel, Judith; Hussmann, Bjoern; Lendemans, Sven; de Groot, Herbert; Rohrig, Ricarda

    2015-01-01

    In preclinical treatment of polytraumatized patients crystalloids are preferentially used. To avoid metabolic acidosis, metabolizable anions like lactate or acetate are used to replace chloride in these solutions. We here studied the effects of malated Ringer's in resuscitation of both shock severities in comparison to lactated and acetated Ringer's. Male Wistar rats underwent severe (mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) of 25-30 mmHg) or moderate (MAP 40-45 mmHg) hemorrhagic shock. Adjacent to the shock period animals were resuscitated with acetated (AR), lactated (LR), or malated Ringer's (MR) and observed for 150 min. MR improved survival compared with LR and AR in severe hemorrhagic shock whereas it was equally effective to LR and superior to AR in moderate hemorrhagic shock. In all other parameters tested, MR was also effective similar to the other solutions under these conditions. We conclude that MR is preferable to AR and LR in resuscitation of hemorrhagic shock independent of shock depth. The positive effects of MR may stem from the absence of any adverse impact on energy metabolism under both conditions. PMID:26106600

  13. Metabolic alkalosis transition in renal proximal tubule cells facilitates an increase in CYP27B1, while blunting responsiveness to PTH

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) is the central activator of renal proximal 1-alpha-hydroxylase (CYP27B1), the enzyme responsible for synthesis of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3). Past studies have documented a disruption of CYP27B1 activity in chronic metabolic acidosis in vivo, while simulated ac...

  14. Individual animal variability in ruminal bacterial communities and ruminal acidosis in primiparous Holstein cows during the periparturient period

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this study was to investigate variability among individual cows for their susceptibility to ruminal acidosis (RA) pre- and postpartum, and determine whether this variability was related to differences in their ruminal bacterial community composition (BCC). Variability in susceptibilit...

  15. Impact of hard vs. soft wheat and monensin level on rumen acidosis in feedlot heifers.

    PubMed

    Yang, W Z; Xu, L; Zhao, Y L; Chen, L Y; McAllister, T A

    2014-11-01

    Many feedlot finishing diets include wheat when the relative wheat prices are low. This study was conducted to examine the responses in ruminal pH and fermentation as well as site and extent of digestion from substituting soft or hard wheat for barley grain and to determine whether an elevated monensin concentration might decrease indicators of ruminal acidosis in feedlot heifers. Five ruminally cannulated beef heifers were used in a 5 × 5 Latin square with 2 × 2 + 1 factorial arrangement. Treatments included barley (10% barley silage, 86% barley, 4% supplement, with 28 mg monensin/kg DM) and diets where barley was substituted by either soft or hard wheat with either 28 or 44 mg monensin/kg diet DM. Intake of DM was not affected by grain source, whereas increasing monensin with wheat diets reduced (P < 0.02) DMI. Mean ruminal pH was lower (P < 0.04) and durations of pH < 5.8 and pH < 5.5 greater (P < 0.03) for wheat than for barley diets. However, ruminal pH was not affected by wheat type or monensin level. Total VFA concentrations were greater (P < 0.03) for wheat than barley diets with no effect of wheat type. The molar proportion of propionate was greater (P < 0.04), whereas butyrate (P < 0.01) and ratio of acetate to propionate tended to be lower (P < 0.09), with the high as compared to low level of monensin. Replacing barley with wheat in finishing diets did not affect the duodenal flow or the digestibility of OM, likely as a result of greater (P < 0.01) NDF digestion from barley offsetting the increased (P < 0.03) supply of digested starch from wheat. Feeding soft vs. hard wheat delivered a greater (P < 0.03) duodenal supply of OM and nonammonia N with no differences in total tract nutrient digestion. The increased monensin concentration decreased the flow of OM (P < 0.01), total N (P < 0.05), and microbial protein (P < 0.05) to the small intestine due to decreased DMI. These results indicated that hard and soft wheat exhibited digestive characteristics similar to barley, but ruminal pH measurements indicate that compared with barley, wheat increased the risk of ruminal acidosis. Although an increased level of monensin had limited impact on ruminal indicators of acidosis, an increase in propionate would be expected to improve efficiency of feed use by heifers fed wheat-based finishing diets. PMID:25253812

  16. Role of interleukin 1 and tumor necrosis factor on energy metabolism in rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Tredget, E.E.; Yu, Y.M.; Zhong, S.; Burini, R.; Okusawa, S.; Gelfand, J.A.; Dinarello, C.A.; Young, V.R.; Burke, J.F.

    1988-12-01

    A study of the combined effects of intravenous infusion of the recombinant cytokines beta-interleukin 1 (IL-1) and alpha-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) on energy substrate metabolism in awake, conditioned, adult rabbits was performed. After a 2-h basal or control period, 48-h fasted rabbits were administered TNF and IL-1 as a bolus (5 micrograms/kg) followed by a continuous intravenous infusion (25 ng.kg-1.min-1) for 3 h. Significant increases in plasma lactate (P less than 0.01), glucose (P less than 0.01), and triglycerides (P less than 0.05) occurred during the combined infusion of IL-1 and TNF, whereas neither cytokine alone had no effect. There was a 33% increase in the rate of glucose appearance (P less than 0.05), but glucose clearance was not altered compared with the control period. Glucose oxidation increased during the combined cytokine infusion period and glucose recycling increased by 600% (P less than 0.002). Lactic acidosis and decreased oxygen consumption, as a result of the cytokine infusions, indicated development of anaerobic glycolytic metabolism. A reduction in the activity state of hepatic mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase (65 vs. 82% in control animals, P less than 0.05) was consistent with the observed increase in anaerobic glycolysis. Thus the combined infusion of IL-1 and TNF in rabbits produces metabolic manifestations seen in severe injury and sepsis in human patients and, as such, may account for the profound alterations of energy metabolism seen in these conditions.

  17. Subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA) challenge, ruminal condition and cellular immunity in cattle.

    PubMed

    Sato, Shigeru

    2015-02-01

    Subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA) is characterized by repeated bouts of low ruminal pH. Cows with SARA often develop complications or other diseases, and associate physiologically with immunosuppression and inflammation. Ruminal free lipopolysaccharide (LPS) increases during SARA and translocates into the blood circulation activating an inflammatory response. Ruminal fermentation and cellular immunity are encouraged by supplementing hay with calf starter during weaning. SARA calves given a 5-day repeated administration of a bacteria-based probiotic had stable ruminal pH levels (6.6-6.8). The repeated administration of probiotics enhance cellular immune function and encourage recovery from diarrhea in pre-weaning calves. Furthermore, the ruminal fermentation could guard against acute and short-term feeding changes, and changes in the rumen microbial composition of SARA cattle might occur following changes in ruminal pH. The repeated bouts of low ruminal pH in SARA cattle might be associated with depression of cellular immunity. PMID:25872324

  18. Metabolic Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Metabolic Syndrome? Metabolic syndrome is the name for a group of risk ... three metabolic risk factors to be diagnosed with metabolic syndrome. A large waistline. This also is called abdominal ...

  19. Regulation of intracellular pH in cnidarians: response to acidosis in Anemonia viridis.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Julien; Venn, Alexander; Tambutté, Éric; Ganot, Philippe; Allemand, Denis; Tambutté, Sylvie

    2014-02-01

    The regulation of intracellular pH (pHi) is a fundamental aspect of cell physiology that has received little attention in studies of the phylum Cnidaria, which includes ecologically important sea anemones and reef-building corals. Like all organisms, cnidarians must maintain pH homeostasis to counterbalance reductions in pHi, which can arise because of changes in either intrinsic or extrinsic parameters. Corals and sea anemones face natural daily changes in internal fluids, where the extracellular pH can range from 8.9 during the day to 7.4 at night. Furthermore, cnidarians are likely to experience future CO?-driven declines in seawater pH, a process known as ocean acidification. Here, we carried out the first mechanistic investigation to determine how cnidarian pHi regulation responds to decreases in extracellular and intracellular pH. Using the anemone Anemonia viridis, we employed confocal live cell imaging and a pH-sensitive dye to track the dynamics of pHi after intracellular acidosis induced by acute exposure to decreases in seawater pH and NH?Cl prepulses. The investigation was conducted on cells that contained intracellular symbiotic algae (Symbiodinium sp.) and on symbiont-free endoderm cells. Experiments using inhibitors and Na?-free seawater indicate a potential role of Na?/H? plasma membrane exchangers (NHEs) in mediating pHi recovery following intracellular acidosis in both cell types. We also measured the buffering capacity of cells, and obtained values between 20.8 and 43.8 mM per pH unit, which are comparable to those in other invertebrates. Our findings provide the first steps towards a better understanding of acid-base regulation in these basal metazoans, for which information on cell physiology is extremely limited. PMID:24256552

  20. Effect of pump prime on acidosis, strong-ion-difference and unmeasured ions during cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Liskaser, F; Story, D A; Hayhoe, M; Poustie, S J; Bailey, M J; Bellomo, R

    2009-09-01

    We tested the hypothesis that a cardiopulmonary bypass prime with lactate would be associated with less acidosis than a prime with only chloride anions because of differences in the measured strong-ion-difference. We randomised 20 patients to a 1500 ml bypass prime with either a chloride-only solution (Ringer's Injection; anions: chloride 152 mmol/l) or a lactated solution (Hartmann's solution; anions: chloride 109 mmol/l, lactate 29 mmol/l). Arterial blood was sampled before bypass and then two, five, 15 and 30 minutes after initiating bypass. We used repeated measures analysis of variance to compare groups. In both groups, the base-excess and measured strong-ion-difference decreased markedly from baseline after two minutes of bypass. The chloride-only group had greater acidosis with lower base-excess and pH (P < 0.05), greatest after five minutes of bypass (C5). Contrary to our hypothesis, however, the difference between the groups was not due to a difference in the measured strong-ion-difference, P = 0.88. At C5 when the difference in standard base-excess between the groups was greatest, 1.9 mmol/l (95% confidence interval: 0.1 to 3.6 mmol/l, P < 0.05), the difference in the measured strong-ion-difference was only 0.2 mmol/l (95% confidence interval: -2.4 to 2.7 mmol/l, P > 0.05). There was, however a difference in the net-unmeasured-ions (strong-ion-gap). We conclude that acid-base changes with cardiopulmonary bypass may differ with the prime but that the early differences between chloride-only and lactated primes appear not to be due to differences in the measured strong-ion-difference. We suggest future studies examine other possible mechanisms including unmeasured ions. PMID:19775041

  1. Cellular metabolism and disease: what do metabolic outliers teach us?

    PubMed

    DeBerardinis, Ralph J; Thompson, Craig B

    2012-03-16

    An understanding of metabolic pathways based solely on biochemistry textbooks would underestimate the pervasive role of metabolism in essentially every aspect of biology. It is evident from recent work that many human diseases involve abnormal metabolic states--often genetically programmed--that perturb normal physiology and lead to severe tissue dysfunction. Understanding these metabolic outliers is now a crucial frontier in disease-oriented research. This Review discusses the broad impact of metabolism in cellular function and how modern concepts of metabolism can inform our understanding of common diseases like cancer and also considers the prospects of developing new metabolic approaches to disease treatment. PMID:22424225

  2. Cellular metabolism and disease: what do metabolic outliers teach us?

    PubMed Central

    DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; Thompson, Craig B.

    2012-01-01

    An understanding of metabolic pathways based solely on biochemistry textbooks would underestimate the pervasive role of metabolism in essentially every aspect of biology. It is evident from recent work that many human diseases involve abnormal metabolic states – often genetically programmed – that perturb normal physiology and lead to severe tissue dysfunction. Understanding these metabolic outliers is now a crucial frontier in disease-oriented research. This review discusses the broad impact of metabolism in cellular function, how modern concepts of metabolism can inform our understanding of common diseases like cancer, and considers the prospects of developing new metabolic approaches to disease treatment. PMID:22424225

  3. Molecular Connections between Cancer Cell Metabolism and the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Justus, Calvin R.; Sanderlin, Edward J.; Yang, Li V.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells preferentially utilize glycolysis, instead of oxidative phosphorylation, for metabolism even in the presence of oxygen. This phenomenon of aerobic glycolysis, referred to as the “Warburg effect”, commonly exists in a variety of tumors. Recent studies further demonstrate that both genetic factors such as oncogenes and tumor suppressors and microenvironmental factors such as spatial hypoxia and acidosis can regulate the glycolytic metabolism of cancer cells. Reciprocally, altered cancer cell metabolism can modulate the tumor microenvironment which plays important roles in cancer cell somatic evolution, metastasis, and therapeutic response. In this article, we review the progression of current understandings on the molecular interaction between cancer cell metabolism and the tumor microenvironment. In addition, we discuss the implications of these interactions in cancer therapy and chemoprevention. PMID:25988385

  4. Genetic Variation in Iron Metabolism Is Associated with Neuropathic Pain and Pain Severity in HIV-Infected Patients on Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kallianpur, Asha R.; Jia, Peilin; Ellis, Ronald J.; Zhao, Zhongming; Bloss, Cinnamon; Wen, Wanqing; Marra, Christina M.; Hulgan, Todd; Simpson, David M.; Morgello, Susan; McArthur, Justin C.; Clifford, David B.; Collier, Ann C.; Gelman, Benjamin B.; McCutchan, J. Allen; Franklin, Donald; Samuels, David C.; Rosario, Debralee; Holzinger, Emily; Murdock, Deborah G.; Letendre, Scott; Grant, Igor

    2014-01-01

    HIV sensory neuropathy and distal neuropathic pain (DNP) are common, disabling complications associated with combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). We previously associated iron-regulatory genetic polymorphisms with a reduced risk of HIV sensory neuropathy during more neurotoxic types of cART. We here evaluated the impact of polymorphisms in 19 iron-regulatory genes on DNP in 560 HIV-infected subjects from a prospective, observational study, who underwent neurological examinations to ascertain peripheral neuropathy and structured interviews to ascertain DNP. Genotype-DNP associations were explored by logistic regression and permutation-based analytical methods. Among 559 evaluable subjects, 331 (59%) developed HIV-SN, and 168 (30%) reported DNP. Fifteen polymorphisms in 8 genes (p<0.05) and 5 variants in 4 genes (p<0.01) were nominally associated with DNP: polymorphisms in TF, TFRC, BMP6, ACO1, SLC11A2, and FXN conferred reduced risk (adjusted odds ratios [ORs] ranging from 0.2 to 0.7, all p<0.05); other variants in TF, CP, ACO1, BMP6, and B2M conferred increased risk (ORs ranging from 1.3 to 3.1, all p<0.05). Risks associated with some variants were statistically significant either in black or white subgroups but were consistent in direction. ACO1 rs2026739 remained significantly associated with DNP in whites (permutation p<0.0001) after correction for multiple tests. Several of the same iron-regulatory-gene polymorphisms, including ACO1 rs2026739, were also associated with severity of DNP (all p<0.05). Common polymorphisms in iron-management genes are associated with DNP and with DNP severity in HIV-infected persons receiving cART. Consistent risk estimates across population subgroups and persistence of the ACO1 rs2026739 association after adjustment for multiple testing suggest that genetic variation in iron-regulation and transport modulates susceptibility to DNP. PMID:25144566

  5. Glucide metabolism disorders (excluding glycogen myopathies).

    PubMed

    Klepper, Joerg

    2013-01-01

    Glucide metabolism comprises pathways for transport, intermediate metabolism, utilization, and storage of carbohydrates. Defects affect multiple organs and present as systemic diseases. Neurological symptoms result from hypoglycemia, lactic acidosis, or inadequate storage of complex glucide molecules in neurological tissues. In glycogen storage disorders hypoglycemia indicates hepatic involvement, weakness and muscle cramps muscle involvement. Hypoglycemia is also the leading neurological symptom in disorders of gluconeogenesis. Disorders of galactose and fructose metabolism are rare, detectable by neonatal screening, and manifest following dietary intake of these sugars. Rare defects within the pentose metabolism constitute a new area of inborn metabolic disorders and may present with neurological symptoms. Treatment of these disorders involves the avoidance of fasting, dietary treatment eliminating specific carbohydrates, and enzyme replacement therapy in individual glycogen storage diseases.GLUT1 deficiency syndrome, a specific disorder of glucose transport into brain, results in global developmental delay, early-onset epilepsy, and a complex movement disorder. Treatment with a high-fat, low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet provides ketones as an alternative fuel to the brain and restores brain energy metabolism. Recently paroxysmal exertion-induced dyskinesia and stomatin-deficient cryohydrocytosis have been identified as an allelic disorder to GLUT1 deficiency equally responding to a ketogenic diet. PMID:23622389

  6. DREAMS of metabolism.

    PubMed

    Soh, Keng Cher; Hatzimanikatis, Vassily

    2010-10-01

    Metabolic networks have been studied for several decades, and sophisticated computational frameworks are needed to augment experimental approaches to harness these complex networks. BNICE (Biochemical Network Integrated Computational Explorer), a computational approach for the discovery of novel biochemical pathways that is based on biochemical transformations, overcomes many of the current limitations. BNICE and similar frameworks can be used in several different areas: (i) 'Design' of novel pathways for metabolic engineering; (ii) 'Retrosynthesis' of metabolic compounds; (iii) 'Evolution' analysis between metabolic pathways of different organisms; (iv) 'Analysis' of metabolic pathways; (v) 'Mining' of omics data; and (vi) 'Selection' of targets for enzyme engineering. Here, we discuss the issues and challenges in building such frameworks as well as the gamut of applications in biotechnology, metabolic engineering and synthetic biology. PMID:20727603

  7. Rare mutation in the SLC26A3 transporter causes life-long diarrhoea with metabolic alkalosis.

    PubMed

    Abou Ziki, Maen D; Verjee, Mohamud A

    2015-01-01

    SLC26A3, a chloride/bicarbonate transporter mainly expressed in the intestines, plays a pivotal role in chloride absorption. We present a 23-year-old woman with a history of congenital chloride diarrhoea (CCD) and renal transplant who was admitted for rehydration and treatment of acute kidney injury after she presented with an acute diarrhoeal episode. Laboratory investigations confirmed metabolic alkalosis and severe hypochloraemia, consistent with her underlying CCD. This contrasts with most other forms of diarrhoea, which are normally associated with metabolic acidosis. Genetic testing was offered and revealed a homozygous non-sense mutation in SLC26A3 (Gly-187-Stop). This loss-of-function mutation results in bicarbonate retention in the blood and chloride loss into the intestinal lumen. Symptomatic management with daily NaCl and KCl oral syrups was supplemented with omeprazole therapy. The loss of her own kidneys is most likely due to crystal-induced nephropathy secondary to chronic volume contraction and chloride depletion. This case summarises the pathophysiology and management of CCD. PMID:25568271

  8. Protective effects of polyethylene oxide on the vascular and organ function of rats with severe hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiang; Huang, Tao; Dong, Zhen

    2015-08-01

    This study examined the effects of polyethylene oxide (PEO) on the survival rate, hemodynamics, blood gas indexes, lactic acid levels, microcirculation, and inflammatory cytokine levels in rats subjected to severe hemorrhagic shock. The shocked rats were resuscitated with either Ringer's lactate solution or 20 ppm of PEO in Ringer's lactate solution for 1 h. It was found that infusion of PEO effectively improved the survival, metabolic acidosis, oxygen delivery, hyperlactacidemia, tissue perfusion, and inflammatory responses of rats subjected to hemorrhagic shock. In addition, we found, for the first time, that PEO showed protective effects on hepatic and renal injury, as evidenced by the significant decreases in the elevated levels of alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, blood urea nitrogen, and creatinine caused by shock induction after infusion of PEO (p < 0.05, 60 min post-resuscitation by comparison with pre-resuscitation). All of these findings indicate that PEO exhibits strong therapeutic effects under conditions of severe hemorrhagic shock,which also provides theoretical and experimental bases for the clinical use of PEO. PMID:26047259

  9. 17?-Estradiol Enhances ASIC Activity in Primary Sensory Neurons to Produce Sex Difference in Acidosis-Induced Nociception.

    PubMed

    Qu, Zu-Wei; Liu, Ting-Ting; Ren, Cuixia; Gan, Xiong; Qiu, Chun-Yu; Ren, Ping; Rao, Zhiguo; Hu, Wang-Ping

    2015-12-01

    Sex differences have been reported in a number of pain conditions. Women are more sensitive to most types of painful stimuli than men, and estrogen plays a key role in the sex differences in pain perception. However, it is unclear whether there is a sex difference in acidosis-evoked pain. We report here that both male and female rats exhibit nociceptive behaviors in response to acetic acid, with females being more sensitive than males. Local application of exogenous 17?-estradiol (E2) exacerbated acidosis-evoked nociceptive response in male rats. E2 and estrogen receptor (ER)-? agonist 1,3,5-Tris(4-hydroxyphenyl)-4-propyl-1H-pyrazole, but not ER? agonist 2,3-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-propionitrile, replacement also reversed attenuation of the acetic acid-induced nociceptive response in ovariectomized females. Moreover, E2 can exert a rapid potentiating effect on the functional activity of acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs), which mediated the acidosis-induced events. E2 dose dependently increased the amplitude of ASIC currents with a 42.8 ± 1.6 nM of EC50. E2 shifted the concentration-response curve for proton upward with a 50.1% ± 6.2% increase of the maximal current response to proton. E2 potentiated ASIC currents via an ER? and ERK1/2 signaling pathway. E2 also altered acidosis-evoked membrane excitability of dorsal root ganglia neurons and caused a significant increase in the amplitude of the depolarization and the number of spikes induced by acidic stimuli. E2 potentiation of the functional activity of ASICs revealed a peripheral mechanism underlying this sex difference in acetic acid-induced nociception. PMID:26441237

  10. Acidosis is a key regulator of osteoblast ecto-nucleotidase pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase 1 (NPP1) expression and activity.

    PubMed

    Orriss, Isabel R; Key, Michelle L; Hajjawi, Mark O R; Millán, José L; Arnett, Timothy R

    2015-12-01

    Previous work has shown that acidosis prevents bone nodule formation by osteoblasts in vitro by inhibiting mineralisation of the collagenous matrix. The ratio of phosphate (Pi ) to pyrophosphate (PPi ) in the bone microenvironment is a fundamental regulator of bone mineralisation. Both Pi and PPi , a potent inhibitor of mineralisation, are generated from extracellular nucleotides by the actions of ecto-nucleotidases. This study investigated the expression and activity of ecto-nucleotidases by osteoblasts under normal and acid conditions. We found that osteoblasts express mRNA for a number of ecto-nucleotidases including NTPdase 1-6 (ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase) and NPP1-3 (ecto-nucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase). The rank order of mRNA expression in differentiating rat osteoblasts (day 7) was Enpp1 > NTPdase 4 > NTPdase 6 >?NTPdase 5 >? alkaline phosphatase > ecto-5-nucleotidase > Enpp3 >?NTPdase 1 >?NTPdase 3 > Enpp2 >?NTPdase 2. Acidosis (pH 6.9) upregulated NPP1 mRNA (2.8-fold) and protein expression at all stages of osteoblast differentiation compared to physiological pH (pH 7.4); expression of other ecto-nucleotidases was unaffected. Furthermore, total NPP activity was increased up to 53% in osteoblasts cultured in acid conditions (P < 0.001). Release of ATP, one of the key substrates for NPP1, from osteoblasts, was unaffected by acidosis. Further studies showed that mineralised bone formation by osteoblasts cultured from NPP1 knockout mice was increased compared with wildtypes (2.5-fold, P < 0.001) and was partially resistant to the inhibitory effect of acidosis. These results indicate that increased NPP1 expression and activity might contribute to the decreased mineralisation observed when osteoblasts are exposed to acid conditions. PMID:26033523

  11. ACIDOSIS IS A KEY REGULATIOR OF OSTEOBLAST ECTO-NUCLEOTIDASE PYROPHOSPHATASE/PHOSPHODIESTERASE 1 (NPP1) EXPRESSION AND ACTIVITY

    PubMed Central

    Orriss, Isabel R; Key, Michelle L; Hajjawi, Mark OR; Millán, José Luis; Arnett, Timothy R

    2015-01-01

    Previous work has shown that acidosis prevents bone nodule formation by osteoblasts in vitro by inhibiting mineralisation of the collagenous matrix. The ratio of phosphate (Pi) to pyrophosphate (PPi) in the bone microenvironment is a fundamental regulator of bone mineralisation. Both Pi and PPi, a potent inhibitor of mineralisation, are generated from extracellular nucleotides by the actions of ecto-nucleotidases. This study investigated the expression and activity of ecto-nucleotidases by osteoblasts under normal and acid conditions. We found that osteoblasts express mRNA for a number of ecto-nucleotidases including NTPdase 1–6 (ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase) and NPP1-3 (ecto-nucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase). The rank order of mRNA expression in differentiating rat osteoblasts (day 7) was Enpp1 > NTPdase 4 > NTPdase 6 > NTPdase 5 > alkaline phosphatase > ecto-5-nucleotidase > Enpp3 > NTPdase 1 > NTPdase 3 > Enpp2 > NTPdase 2. Acidosis (pH 6.9) upregulated NPP1 mRNA (2.8-fold) and protein expression at all stages of osteoblast differentiation compared to physiological pH (pH 7.4); expression of other ecto-nucleotidases was unaffected. Furthermore, total NPP activity was increased up to 53% in osteoblasts cultured in acid conditions (p<0.001). Release of ATP, one of the key substrates for NPP1, from osteoblasts, was unaffected by acidosis. Further studies showed that mineralised bone formation by osteoblasts cultured from NPP1 knockout mice was increased compared with wildtypes (2.5-fold, p<0.001) and was partially resistant to the inhibitory effect of acidosis. These results indicate that increased NPP1 expression and activity might contribute to the decreased mineralisation observed when osteoblasts are exposed to acid conditions. PMID:26033523

  12. A reliable, practical, and economical protocol for inducing diarrhea and severe dehydration in the neonatal calf.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, P G; Constable, P D; Morin, D E; Drackley, J K; Foreman, J H; Thurmon, J C

    1998-01-01

    Fifteen healthy, colostrum-fed, male dairy calves, aged 2 to 7 d were used in a study to develop a diarrhea protocol for neonatal calves that is reliable, practical, and economical. After instrumentation and recording baseline data, diarrhea and dehydration were induced by administering milk replacer [16.5 mL/kg of body weight (BW), PO], sucrose (2 g/kg in a 20% aqueous solution, p.o.), spironolactone and hydrochlorothiazide (1 mg/kg, PO) every 8 h, and furosemide (2 mg/kg, i.m., q6h). Calves were administered sucrose and diuretic agents for 48 h to induce diarrhea and severe dehydration. Clinical changes after 48 h were severe watery diarrhea, severe depression, and marked dehydration (mean, 14% BW loss). Cardiac output, stroke volume, mean central venous pressure, plasma volume, thiocyanate space, blood pH and bicarbonate concentration, base excess, serum chloride concentration, and fetlock temperature were decreased. Plasma lactate concentration, hematocrit, and serum potassium, creatinine, phosphorus, total protein and albumin concentrations were increased. This non-infectious calf diarrhea protocol has a 100% response rate, while providing a consistent and predictable hypovolemic state with diarrhea that reflects most of the clinicopathologic changes observed in osmotic/maldigestive diarrhea caused by infection with rotavirus, coronavirus or cryptosporidia. Limitations of the protocol, when compared to infectious diarrhea models, include failure to induce a severe metabolic acidosis, absence of hyponatremia, renal instead of enteric loss of chloride, renal as well as enteric loss of free water, absence of profound clinical depression and suspected differences in the morphologic and functional effect on intestinal epithelium. Despite these differences, the sucrose/diuretic protocol should be useful in the initial screening of new treatment modalities for calf diarrhea. To confirm their efficacy, the most effective treatment methods should then be examined in calves with naturally-acquired diarrhea. PMID:9684050

  13. Targeting the Metabolic Microenvironment of Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Kate M.; Wojtkowiak, Jonathan W.; Hashim, Arig Ibrahim; Gillies, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    The observation of aerobic glycolysis by tumor cells in 1924 by Otto Warburg, and subsequent innovation of imaging glucose uptake by tumors in patients with PET-CT has incited a renewed interest in the altered metabolism of tumors. As tumors grow in situ, a fraction of it is further away from their blood supply, leading to decreased oxygen concentrations (hypoxia), which induces the hypoxia response pathways of HIF1?, mTOR and UPR. In normal tissues, these responses mitigate hypoxic stress and induce neo-angiogenesis. In tumors, these pathways are dysregulated and lead to decreased perfusion and exacerbation of hypoxia as a result of immature and chaotic blood vessels. Hypoxia selects for a glycolytic phenotype and resultant acidification of the tumor microenvironment, facilitated by upregulation of proton transporters. Acidification selects for enhanced metastatic potential and reduced drug efficacy through ion trapping. In this review, we provide a comprehensive summary of pre-clinical and clinical drugs under development for targeting aerobic glycolysis, acidosis, hypoxia and hypoxia-response pathways. Hypoxia and acidosis can be manipulated, providing further therapeutic benefit for cancers that feature these common phenotypes. PMID:22959024

  14. Metabolic neuropathies

    MedlinePLUS

    Neuropathy - metabolic ... can be caused by many different things. Metabolic neuropathy may be caused by: A problem with the ... one of the most common causes of metabolic neuropathies. People who are at the highest risk of ...

  15. Metabolic Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Th M e etabolic Syndrome What is the metabolic syndrome? The term metabolic syndrome describes a cluster of risk factors that increase ... high blood sugar). The exact cause of the metabolic syndrome is not known but genetic factors, too much ...

  16. Metabolic Panel

    MedlinePLUS

    A metabolic panel is a group of tests that measures different chemicals in the blood. These tests are usually done on ... and liver. There are two types: basic metabolic panel (BMP) and comprehensive metabolic panel (CMP). The BMP ...

  17. Cation transport activity of anion exchanger 1 mutations found in inherited distal renal tubular acidosis.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Stephen; Borgese, Franck; Gabillat, Nicole; Unwin, Robert; Guizouarn, Helene

    2008-08-01

    Anion exchanger 1 (AE1) is encoded by SLC4A1 and mediates electroneutral anion exchange across cell membranes. It is the most abundant protein in the red cell membrane, but it is also found in the basolateral membrane of renal alpha-intercalated cells, where it is required for normal urinary acidification. Recently, four point mutations in red cell AE1 have been described that convert the anion exchanger to a cation conductance. SLC4A1 mutations can also cause type 1 hypokalemic distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA). We investigated the properties of four dRTA-associated AE1 mutations (R589H, G609R, S613F, and G701D) by heterologous expression in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Although these AE1 mutants are functional anion exchangers, unlike the red cell disease mutants, we found that they also demonstrated a cation leak. We found a large cation leak in the G701D mutant. This mutant normally requires coexpression with glycophorin A for surface membrane expression in red blood cells and oocytes. However, we found that coexpressing wild-type kidney AE1 with G701D in oocytes still caused a cation leak, consistent with heterodimerized G701D reaching the cell membrane and retaining its cation conductance property. These findings have potential structural and functional implications for AE1, and they indicate that while anion exchange and cation conductance properties are distinct, they can coexist. PMID:18524859

  18. Early respiratory acidosis is a new risk factor for pneumonia after lung resection.

    PubMed

    Planquette, Benjamin; Le Pimpec-Barthes, Françoise; Trinquart, Ludovic; Meyer, Guy; Riquet, Marc; Sanchez, Olivier

    2012-03-01

    Postoperative pneumonia (POP) is a life-threatening complication of lung resection (LR). Its risk factors, bacteriological profile and outcome are not well known. The aims of this study were to describe the outcome and causal bacteria and to identify risk factors for POP. We reviewed all cases admitted to intensive care after LR. Clinical parameters, operative and postoperative data were recorded. POP was suspected on the basis of fever, radiographic infiltrate, and either leucocytosis or purulent sputum. The diagnosis was confirmed by culture of a respiratory sample. Risk factors for POP were identified by univariate and multivariate analysis. We included 159 patients in this study. POP was diagnosed in 23 patients (14.4%) and was associated with a higher hospital mortality rate (30% versus 5%, P = 0.0007) and a longer hospital stay. Members of the Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas species were the most frequently identified pathogens. Early respiratory acidosis (ERA; OR, 2.94; 95% CI, 1.1-8.1), blood transfusion (OR, 3.8; 95% CI, 1.1-13.1), bilobectomy (OR, 7.26; 95% CI, 1.2-43.1) and smoking history (OR, 1.84; 95% CI, 1.1-3) were identified as independent risk factors. ERA may be a risk factor for POP and could serve as a target for therapeutic interventions. PMID:22184462

  19. Contribution of Malate and Amino Acid Metabolism to Cytoplasmic pH Regulation in Hypoxic Maize Root Tips Studied Using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Roberts, J K; Hooks, M A; Miaullis, A P; Edwards, S; Webster, C

    1992-02-01

    (31)P-, (13)C-, and (15)N-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy were used to determine the roles of malate, succinate, Ala, Asp, Glu, Gln, and gamma-aminobutyrate (GABA) in the energy metabolism and regulation of cytoplasmic pH in hypoxic maize (Zea mays L.) root tips. Nitrogen status was manipulated by perfusing root tips with ammonium sulfate prior to hypoxia; this pretreatment led to enhanced synthesis of Ala early in hypoxia, and of GABA at later times. We show that: (a) the ability to regulate cytoplasmic pH during hypoxia is not significantly affected by enhanced Ala synthesis. (b) Independent of nitrogen status, decarboxylation of Glu to GABA is greatest after several hours of hypoxia, as metabolism collapses. (c) Early in hypoxia, cytoplasmic malate is in part decarboxylated to pyruvate (leading to Ala, lactate, and ethanol), and in part converted to succinate. It appears that activation of malic enzyme serves to limit cytoplasmic acidosis early in hypoxia. (d) Ala synthesis in hypoxic root tips under these conditions is due to transfer of nitrogen ultimately derived from Asp and Gln, present in oxygenated tissue. We describe the relative contributions of glycolysis and malate decarboxylation in providing Ala carbons. (e) Succinate accumulation during hypoxia can be attributed to metabolism of Asp and malate; this flux to succinate is energetically negligible. There is no detectable net flux from Glc to succinate during hypoxia. The significance of the above metabolic reactions relative to ethanol and lactate production, and to flooding tolerance, is discussed. The regulation of the patterns of metabolism during hypoxia is considered with respect to cytoplasmic pH and redox state. PMID:16668665

  20. Metabolism at Evolutionary Optimal States

    PubMed Central

    Rabbers, Iraes; van Heerden, Johan H.; Nordholt, Niclas; Bachmann, Herwig; Teusink, Bas; Bruggeman, Frank J.

    2015-01-01

    Metabolism is generally required for cellular maintenance and for the generation of offspring under conditions that support growth. The rates, yields (efficiencies), adaptation time and robustness of metabolism are therefore key determinants of cellular fitness. For biotechnological applications and our understanding of the evolution of metabolism, it is necessary to figure out how the functional system properties of metabolism can be optimized, via adjustments of the kinetics and expression of enzymes, and by rewiring metabolism. The trade-offs that can occur during such optimizations then indicate fundamental limits to evolutionary innovations and bioengineering. In this paper, we review several theoretical and experimental findings about mechanisms for metabolic optimization. PMID:26042723

  1. Metabolic disturbances and renal stone promotion on treatment with topiramate: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Dell'Orto, Valentina G; Belotti, Eva A; Goeggel-Simonetti, Barbara; Simonetti, Giacomo D; Ramelli, Gian Paolo; Bianchetti, Mario G; Lava, Sebastiano A G

    2014-01-01

    Aims The use of topiramate, which is prescribed for the management of epilepsy, for migraine headache prophylaxis and as a weight-loss agent, has been associated with the development of metabolic acidosis, hypokalaemia and renal stone disease. We systematically reviewed all the literature. Methods The systematic review of the literature was realized using the principles underlying the UK Economic and Social Research Council guidance on the conduct of narrative synthesis and the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses statement. Results Fourty-seven reports published between 1996 and 2013 were retained for the final analysis. Five case–control studies and six longitudinal studies addressed the effect of topiramate on acid–base and potassium balance. A significant tendency towards mild-to-moderate hyperchloraemic metabolic acidosis (with bicarbonate ?21.0 mmol l?1 in approximately every third case) and mild hypokalaemia (with potassium ?3.5 mmol l?1 in 10% of the cases) was noted on treatment with topiramate, which was similar in children and adults. A single study observed that topiramate causes mild hyperuricaemia in male adults. A tendency towards hypocitraturia, a recognized promoter of renal stone formation, was noted in all patients on topiramate. Conclusions Increasing evidence supports the use of topiramate. Topiramate is generally well tolerated, and serious adverse events are rare. Nonetheless, the present systematic review of the literature indicates that its use is linked with the development of acidosis, hypokalaemia, hyperuricaemia and hypocitraturia. PMID:24219102

  2. Inhibition of the oxygen sensor PHD2 in the liver improves survival in lactic acidosis by activating the Cori cycle.

    PubMed

    Suhara, Tomohiro; Hishiki, Takako; Kasahara, Masataka; Hayakawa, Noriyo; Oyaizu, Tomoko; Nakanishi, Tsuyoshi; Kubo, Akiko; Morisaki, Hiroshi; Kaelin, William G; Suematsu, Makoto; Minamishima, Yoji Andrew

    2015-09-15

    Loss of prolyl hydroxylase 2 (PHD2) activates the hypoxia-inducible factor-dependent hypoxic response, including anaerobic glycolysis, which causes large amounts of lactate to be released from cells into the circulation. We found that Phd2-null mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) produced more lactate than wild-type MEFs, as expected, whereas systemic inactivation of PHD2 in mice did not cause hyperlacticacidemia. This unexpected observation led us to hypothesize that the hypoxic response activated in the liver enhances the Cori cycle, a lactate-glucose carbon recycling system between muscle and liver, and thereby decreases circulating lactate. Consistent with this hypothesis, blood lactate levels measured after a treadmill or lactate tolerance test were significantly lower in Phd2-liver-specific knockout (Phd2-LKO) mice than in control mice. An in vivo (13)C-labeled lactate incorporation assay revealed that the livers of Phd2-LKO mice produce significantly more glucose derived from (13)C-labeled lactate than control mice, suggesting that blockade of PHD2 in the liver ameliorates lactic acidosis by activating gluconeogenesis from lactate. Phd2-LKO mice were resistant to lactic acidosis induced by injection of a lethal dose of lactate, displaying a significant elongation of survival. Moreover, oral administration of a PHD inhibitor improved survival in an endotoxin shock mice model. These data suggest that PHD2 is a potentially novel drug target for the treatment of lactic acidosis, which is a serious and often fatal complication observed in some critically ill patients. PMID:26324945

  3. Involvement of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator in the acidosis-induced efflux of ATP from rat skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Jie; Le, Gengyun; Ballard, Heather J

    2010-01-01

    The present study was performed to investigate the effect of acidosis on the efflux of ATP from skeletal muscle. Infusion of lactic acid to the perfused hindlimb muscles of anaesthetised rats produced dose-dependent decreases in pH and increases in the interstitial ATP of extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle: 10 mm lactic acid reduced the venous pH from 7.22 ± 0.04 to 6.97 ± 0.02 and increased interstitial ATP from 38 ± 8 to 67 ± 11 nm. The increase in interstitial ATP was well-correlated with the decrease in pH (r2 = 0.93; P < 0.05). Blockade of cellular uptake of lactic acid using ?-cyano-hydroxycinnamic acid abolished the lactic acid-induced ATP release, whilst infusion of sodium lactate failed to depress pH or increase interstitial ATP, suggesting that intracellular pH depression, rather than lactate, stimulated the ATP efflux. Incubation of cultured skeletal myoblasts with 10 mm lactic acid significantly increased the accumulation of ATP in the bathing medium from 0.46 ± 0.06 to 0.76 ± 0.08 ?m, confirming the skeletal muscle cells as the source of the released ATP. Acidosis-induced ATP efflux from the perfused muscle was abolished by CFTRinh-172, a specific inhibitor of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), or glibenclamide, an inhibitor of both KATP channels and CFTR, but it was not affected by atractyloside, an inhibitor of the mitochondrial ATP transporter. Silencing of the CFTR gene using an siRNA abolished the acidosis-induced increase in ATP release from cultured myoblasts. CFTR expression on skeletal muscle cells was confirmed using immunostaining in the intact muscle and Western blotting in the cultured cells. These data suggest that depression of the intracellular pH of skeletal muscle cells stimulates ATP efflux, and that CFTR plays an important role in the release mechanism. PMID:20819945

  4. Inhalational sevoflurane in severe bronchial obstruction unresponsive to multipharmacologic therapy: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Bronchial asthma with respiratory failure is a challenge for the intensivist as mechanical ventilation is often difficult due to bronchoconstriction and air-trapping. We describe a case of severe asthma with respiratory acidosis in a 10-year-old patient unresponsive to multipharmacologic broncholytic therapy. Only the initiation of sevoflurane inhalation resolved severe bronchoconstriction and dynamic hyperinflation, leading to complete recovery. Case presentation: A 10-year-old Caucasian boy was intubated and mechanically ventilated due to an asthmatic attack. Bronchoconstriction and dynamic hyperinflation were severe while multipharmacological broncholytic therapy was unsuccessful. Inhalation with sevoflurane via an anaesthesia machine was the key intervention leading to gradual resolving of severe hypercapnia and respiratory acidosis. Furthermore bilateral pupil dilation occurred during hypercapnia, but no intracranial pathology could be detected. The patient made an uneventful recovery. To our knowledge this is the first case where hypercapnia and respiratory acidosis were so profound and long lasting yet the patient survived without any damage. Conclusions: Inhalational anaesthetics must be considered as an early treatment option in ventilated asthmatic patients with bronchial obstruction unresponsive to conventional therapy even though their administration in intensive care units may be difficult. PMID:24358829

  5. Evolution of Metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nealson, K. H.; Rye, R.

    2003-12-01

    This chapter is devoted to the discussion of the evolution of metabolism, with a particular focus towards redox metabolism and the utilization of redox energy by life. We will deal with various aspects of metabolism that involve direct interaction with, and the extraction of energy from, the environment (catabolic metabolism) and will talk briefly of the reactions that affect mineral formation and dissolution. However, we will de-emphasize the aspects related to the formation of complex molecules and organisms. To some, it will be refreshingly brief; to others, somewhat superficial. This is unavoidable, as our knowledge of the details of the evolution of metabolism is at best slim. However, by piecing together aspects of the properties and history of the Earth and coupling these with what we know of today's metabolism, it is possible to at least frame several different hypotheses that, with time, should be possible to test and modify so that the next writing of this chapter might contain some intellectual entrees and not just the appetizers. Any discussion of metabolic evolution must occur in concert with a consideration of the Earth - the understanding of the forces that drove the co-evolution of life and Earth can be achieved only by considering them together. This theme will pervade this chapter, and any real understanding of the evolution of metabolism must be inexorably coupled to, and consistent with, the geological record of the Earth.The first aspect of evolution concerns the metabolic participants as we know them now (i.e., a definition of metabolic diversity), and the second concerns the sequence of events that have led to this remarkable metabolic diversity. The first part is fairly straightforward: a discussion of the domains of life, and the metabolic achievements that are expressed in the various domains, and relating metabolism to biogeochemical processes whenever possible. The second part is much more problematic. While it is possible to make up nearly any story regarding the evolution of metabolism (and nearly all have been attempted!), the starting point of life is not known (great debates still rage as to the nature and origin of the first living systems), and it is not a trivial matter to specify the sequence and timing of metabolic innovations. As will be discussed below, genetic and genomic data have revealed that genetic exchange between organisms has been so pervasive that it has essentially uncoupled the evolution of taxonomic groups from the evolution of metabolic processes, thus, obscuring the evolutionary trail with blurred signals. Given these challenges, it may be prudent at this time to admit what we do not know, and lay out the challenges for the coming years.

  6. Intracellular adenosine formation and release by freshly-isolated vascular endothelial cells from rat skeletal muscle: effects of hypoxia and/or acidosis.

    PubMed

    Le, G Y; Essackjee, H C; Ballard, H J

    2014-07-18

    Previous studies suggested indirectly that vascular endothelial cells (VECs) might be able to release intracellularly-formed adenosine. We isolated VECs from the rat soleus muscle using collagenase digestion and magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS). The VEC preparation had >90% purity based on cell morphology, fluorescence immunostaining, and RT-PCR of endothelial markers. The kinetic properties of endothelial cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase suggested it was the AMP-preferring N-I isoform: its catalytic activity was 4 times higher than ecto-5'nucleotidase. Adenosine kinase had 50 times greater catalytic activity than adenosine deaminase, suggesting that adenosine removal in VECs is mainly through incorporation into adenine nucleotides. The maximal activities of cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase and adenosine kinase were similar. Adenosine and ATP accumulated in the medium surrounding VECs in primary culture. Hypoxia doubled the adenosine, but ATP was unchanged; AOPCP did not alter medium adenosine, suggesting that hypoxic VECs had released intracellularly-formed adenosine. Acidosis increased medium ATP, but extracellular conversion of ATP to AMP was inhibited, and adenosine remained unchanged. Acidosis in the buffer-perfused rat gracilis muscle elevated AMP and adenosine in the venous effluent, but AOPCP abolished the increase in adenosine, suggesting that adenosine is formed extracellularly by non-endothelial tissues during acidosis in vivo. Hypoxia plus acidosis increased medium ATP by a similar amount to acidosis alone and adenosine 6-fold; AOPCP returned the medium adenosine to the level seen with hypoxia alone. These data suggest that VECs release intracellularly formed adenosine in hypoxia, ATP during acidosis, and both under simulated ischaemic conditions, with further extracellular conversion of ATP to adenosine. PMID:24866246

  7. Influence of an extracellular acidosis on excitatory synaptic transmission and long-term potentiation in the CA1 region of rat hippocampal slices.

    PubMed

    Hsu, K S; Liang, Y C; Huang, C C

    2000-11-01

    The effects of extracellular acidification on the synaptic function and neuronal excitability were investigated on the hippocampal CA1 neurons. A decrease of extracellular pH from 7.4 to 6.7 did not alter either the resting membrane potential or the neuronal membrane input resistance. Extracellularly recorded field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) and population spikes (PSs) were significantly reduced by acidosis. Additionally, the amplitude of presynaptic fiber volley was also reduced. The sensitivity of postsynaptic neurons to N-methyl-D-aspartate, but not to alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid, was depressed by acidosis. Lowering of extracellular pH did not significantly affect the magnitude of paired-pulse facilitation (PPF) of synaptic transmission. Acidosis also reversibly limited the sustained repetitive firing (RF) of Na(+)-dependent action potentials elicited by injection of depolarizing current pulses into the pyramidal cells. The limitation of RF by extracellular acidification was accompanied by the reduction of the maximal rate of rise (;V(max)) of the action potentials and the amplitude of afterhyperpolarization. Neither the Na (+)/H (+) antiporter blocker 5-(N -ethyl -N -isopropyl)-amiloride nor the selective adenosine A (1) receptor antagonist 1,3-dipropyl -8-cyclopentylxanthine, however, affected the acidosis -induced synaptic depression. It was also found that acidosis did not affect either the induction r maintenance of long -term potentiation (LTP) at Schaffer collateral -CA 1 synapses. These results suggest that the extracellular acidosis -induced synaptic depression is likely to result from an inhibition of presynaptic Na (+) conductance, thereby decreasing the amplitude of action potentials in individual afferent fibers or the number of afferent fiber activation to stimuli and then indirectly affecting the signaling processes contributing to trigger neurotransmitter release. PMID:11054810

  8. Metabolic Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    Metabolic syndrome is a group of conditions that put you at risk for heart disease and diabetes. These ... doctors agree on the definition or cause of metabolic syndrome. The cause might be insulin resistance. Insulin is ...

  9. Metabolic syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    Metabolic syndrome is a name for a group of risk factors that occur together and increase the chance ... Metabolic syndrome is becoming very common in the United States. Doctors are not sure whether the syndrome is ...

  10. Multiday acute sodium bicarbonate intake improves endurance capacity and reduces acidosis in men

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose was to investigate the effects of one dose of NaHCO3 per day for five consecutive days on cycling time-to-exhaustion (Tlim) at ‘Critical Power’ (CP) and acid–base parameters in endurance athletes. Methods Eight trained male cyclists and triathletes completed two exercise periods in a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind interventional crossover investigation. Before each period, CP was determined. Afterwards, participants completed five constant-load cycling trials at CP until volitional exhaustion on five consecutive days, either after a dose of NaHCO3 (0.3 g·kg-1 body mass) or placebo (0.045 g·kg-1 body mass NaCl). Results Average Tlim increased by 23.5% with NaHCO3 supplementation as compared to placebo (826.5 ± 180.1 vs. 669.0 ± 167.2 s; P = 0.001). However, there was no time effect for Tlim (P = 0.375). [HCO3-] showed a main effect for condition (NaHCO3: 32.5 ± 2.2 mmol·l-1; placebo: 26.2 ± 1.4 mmol·l-1; P < 0.001) but not for time (P = 0.835). NaHCO3 supplementation resulted in an expansion of plasma volume relative to placebo (P = 0.003). Conclusions The increase in Tlim was accompanied by an increase in [HCO3-], suggesting that acidosis might be a limiting factor for exercise at CP. Prolonged NaHCO3 supplementation did not lead to a further increase in [HCO3-] due to the concurrent elevation in plasma volume. This may explain why Tlim remained unaltered despite the prolonged NaHCO3 supplementation period. Ingestion of one single NaHCO3 dose per day before the competition during multiday competitions or tournaments might be a valuable strategy for performance enhancement. Trial registration Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT01621074 PMID:23531361

  11. Dysregulated metabolism contributes to oncogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hirschey, Matthew D; DeBerardinis, Ralph J; Diehl, Anna Mae E; Drew, Janice E; Frezza, Christian; Green, Michelle F; Jones, Lee W; Ko, Young H; Le, Anne; Lea, Michael A; Locasale, Jason W; Longo, Valter D; Lyssiotis, Costas A; McDonnell, Eoin; Mehrmohamadi, Mahya; Michelotti, Gregory; Muralidhar, Vinayak; Murphy, Michael P; Pedersen, Peter L; Poore, Brad; Raffaghello, Lizzia; Rathmell, Jeffrey C; Sivanand, Sharanya; Vander Heiden, Matthew G; Wellen, Kathryn E

    2015-12-01

    Cancer is a disease characterized by unrestrained cellular proliferation. In order to sustain growth, cancer cells undergo a complex metabolic rearrangement characterized by changes in metabolic pathways involved in energy production and biosynthetic processes. The relevance of the metabolic transformation of cancer cells has been recently included in the updated version of the review "Hallmarks of Cancer", where dysregulation of cellular metabolism was included as an emerging hallmark. While several lines of evidence suggest that metabolic rewiring is orchestrated by the concerted action of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, in some circumstances altered metabolism can play a primary role in oncogenesis. Recently, mutations of cytosolic and mitochondrial enzymes involved in key metabolic pathways have been associated with hereditary and sporadic forms of cancer. Together, these results demonstrate that aberrant metabolism, once seen just as an epiphenomenon of oncogenic reprogramming, plays a key role in oncogenesis with the power to control both genetic and epigenetic events in cells. In this review, we discuss the relationship between metabolism and cancer, as part of a larger effort to identify a broad-spectrum of therapeutic approaches. We focus on major alterations in nutrient metabolism and the emerging link between metabolism and epigenetics. Finally, we discuss potential strategies to manipulate metabolism in cancer and tradeoffs that should be considered. More research on the suite of metabolic alterations in cancer holds the potential to discover novel approaches to treat it. PMID:26454069

  12. Severe Weather

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forde, Evan B.

    2004-01-01

    Educating the public about safety issues related to severe weather is part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) mission. This month's insert, Severe Weather, has been created by NOAA to help educate the public about hazardous weather conditions. The four types of severe weather highlighted in this poster are hurricanes,…

  13. Severe Weather

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forde, Evan B.

    2004-01-01

    Educating the public about safety issues related to severe weather is part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) mission. This article deals with a poster entitled, "Severe Weather," that has been created by NOAA to help educate the public about hazardous weather conditions. The four types of severe weather highlighted in…

  14. Metabolic cutis laxa syndromes.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Miski; Kouwenberg, Dorus; Gardeitchik, Thatjana; Kornak, Uwe; Wevers, Ron A; Morava, Eva

    2011-08-01

    Cutis laxa is a rare skin disorder characterized by wrinkled, redundant, inelastic and sagging skin due to defective synthesis of elastic fibers and other proteins of the extracellular matrix. Wrinkled, inelastic skin occurs in many cases as an acquired condition. Syndromic forms of cutis laxa, however, are caused by diverse genetic defects, mostly coding for structural extracellular matrix proteins. Surprisingly a number of metabolic disorders have been also found to be associated with inherited cutis laxa. Menkes disease was the first metabolic disease reported with old-looking, wrinkled skin. Cutis laxa has recently been found in patients with abnormal glycosylation. The discovery of the COG7 defect in patients with wrinkled, inelastic skin was the first genetic link with the Congenital Disorders of Glycosylation (CDG). Since then several inborn errors of metabolism with cutis laxa have been described with variable severity. These include P5CS, ATP6V0A2-CDG and PYCR1 defects. In spite of the evolving number of cutis laxa-related diseases a large part of the cases remain genetically unsolved. In metabolic cutis laxa syndromes the clinical and laboratory features might partially overlap, however there are some distinct, discriminative features. In this review on metabolic diseases causing cutis laxa we offer a practical approach for the differential diagnosis of metabolic cutis laxa syndromes. PMID:21431621

  15. Hypercapnic thresholds for embryonic acid-base metabolic compensation and hematological regulation during CO2 challenges in layer and broiler chicken strains.

    PubMed

    Burggren, Warren W; Mueller, Casey A; Tazawa, Hiroshi

    2015-08-15

    Time specific acid-base metabolic compensation and responses of hematological respiratory variables were measured in day 15 layer (Hyline) and broiler (Cornish Rock) chicken embryos during acute hypercapnic challenges (3, 6, 10 and 20% CO2). Control acid-base status and hematology differed between two strains. Broiler embryos were relatively respiratory acidotic and had higher hematocrit (Hct) and hemoglobin concentration. The partial metabolic compensation for respiratory acidosis produced by ? 10% CO2 exposures occurred in proportion to CO2 concentrations in both strains, but metabolic compensation for 20% CO2 respiratory acidosis was depressed at 2, 6 and 24h, particularly in broiler embryos. Exposure to ? 10% CO2 induced the same hematological responses across CO2 concentrations; i.e., Hct and mean corpuscular volume (MCV) increased while RBC concentration remained unchanged. In response to 20% CO2 exposure, Hct and MCV increased dramatically in both stains. Consequently, altered acid-base and hematology responses to 20% CO2 exposure compared to ? 10% CO2 suggest that the hypercapnic threshold to compensation for acidosis and regulation of hematology is >10% CO2. PMID:25911559

  16. The metabolic effects of sodium depletion in calves on salt appetite assessed by operant methods.

    PubMed Central

    Bell, F R; Sly, J

    1979-01-01

    1. Sodium deficiency was induced in calves by unilateral exteriorization of the parotid duct, the continual loss of alkaline saliva from the body to the environment causing negative sodium balance. 2. The metabolic effect of negative sodium balance was seen in statistically significant reduction in plasma sodium and blood bicarbonate, together with marked acidosis and reduced plasma osmolality. 3. The homoeostatic response to sodium depletion was associated with a reversal of sodium/potassium ratio in parotid saliva and a reduction of the rate of secretion. Appetite diminished. The extracellular fluid was halved as marked diuresis developed with considerable weight loss. Urinary and faecal sodium was reduced to zero. 4. On restoration of sodium balance by allowing the calves to drink sodium bicarbonate solutions the metabolic deviations were eliminated. 5. During sodium depletion the parotid gland was able to respond to transient reflex stimulation by increasing flow rate and the sodium concentration of the saliva. 6. When sodium depleted, the calves became restless and agitated and would run from the home pen to the operant procedure stand. The sodium depleted animals readily pressed a panel for sodium bicarbonate rewards in direct proportion to the degree of sodium imbalance. When the balance was restored the motivation to work for sodium bicarbonate disappeared. 7. The motivation which developed during sodium depletion was directed specifically towards the sodium ion. Lithium was an exception to this rule and sodium carbonate was aversive. 8. It is possible that in sodium depletion the glottal sodium taste receptors develop an enhanced threshold for sodium ions because of the reduced sodium content of the saliva. This effect would be abolished when the content of sodium was restored in saliva. 9. The correlation of operant reactions and sodium depletion suggests that the consequential metabolic effects activate changes in the central nervous system. 10. The metabolic changes which develop in parallel with the severity of the sodium deficit appear to be able to evoke behavioural changes with increase in salt appetite directed towards restoration of sodium balance. PMID:521958

  17. Metabolic ecology.

    PubMed

    Humphries, Murray M; McCann, Kevin S

    2014-01-01

    Ecological theory that is grounded in metabolic currencies and constraints offers the potential to link ecological outcomes to biophysical processes across multiple scales of organization. The metabolic theory of ecology (MTE) has emphasized the potential for metabolism to serve as a unified theory of ecology, while focusing primarily on the size and temperature dependence of whole-organism metabolic rates. Generalizing metabolic ecology requires extending beyond prediction and application of standardized metabolic rates to theory focused on how energy moves through ecological systems. A bibliometric and network analysis of recent metabolic ecology literature reveals a research network characterized by major clusters focused on MTE, foraging theory, bioenergetics, trophic status, and generalized patterns and predictions. This generalized research network, which we refer to as metabolic ecology, can be considered to include the scaling, temperature and stoichiometric models forming the core of MTE, as well as bioenergetic equations, foraging theory, life-history allocation models, consumer-resource equations, food web theory and energy-based macroecology models that are frequently employed in ecological literature. We conclude with six points we believe to be important to the advancement and integration of metabolic ecology, including nomination of a second fundamental equation, complementary to the first fundamental equation offered by the MTE. PMID:24028511

  18. A human autoantibody to renal collecting duct cells associated with thyroid and gastric autoimmunity and possibly renal tubular acidosis.

    PubMed Central

    Gaarder, P I; Heier, H E

    1983-01-01

    A complement fixing autoantibody reacting with certain renal collecting duct cells, possibly so called dark cells, is described in 113 patients. Clinically, the antibody was strongly associated with thyroid disorders and pernicious anaemia. The patients also showed a markedly increased frequency of thyroid antibodies and antibodies to gastric parietal cells and to intrinsic factor. One of the patients had a distal renal tubular acidosis (RTA) and pernicious anaemia. The antibody was also found in all of three other patients with either latent or manifest RTA. RTA is associated with various immunological diseases, and the renal collecting duct cell antibody may turn out to be a marker of this disorder, either involved in its pathogenesis or representing a secondary phenomenon. PMID:6339124

  19. Severe Sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Kouranos, Vasileios; Jacob, Joe; Wells, Athol U

    2015-12-01

    In sarcoidosis, reduction in mortality and the prevention of disability due to major organ involvement are treatment goals. Thus, it is important to recognize severe disease and identify patients at higher risk of progression to severe disease. In this article, fibrotic lung disease and cardiac sarcoidosis are reviewed as the major contributors to sarcoidosis mortality and morbidity. In the absence of a standardized definition of severe pulmonary disease, a multidisciplinary approach to clinical staging is suggested, based on symptoms, pulmonary function tests, and imaging findings at presentation, integrated with the duration of disease and longitudinal disease behavior during early follow-up. PMID:26593144

  20. NBCe1 expression is required for normal renal ammonia metabolism.

    PubMed

    Handlogten, Mary E; Osis, Gunars; Lee, Hyun-Wook; Romero, Michael F; Verlander, Jill W; Weiner, I David

    2015-10-01

    The mechanisms regulating proximal tubule ammonia metabolism are incompletely understood. The present study addressed the role of the proximal tubule basolateral electrogenic Na(+)-coupled bicarbonate cotransporter (NBCe1; Slc4a4) in renal ammonia metabolism. We used mice with heterozygous and homozygous NBCe1 gene deletion and compared these mice with their wild-type littermates. Because homozygous NBCe1 gene deletion causes 100% mortality before day 25, we studied mice at day 8 (±1 day). Both heterozygous and homozygous gene deletion caused a gene dose-related decrease in serum bicarbonate. The ability to lower urinary pH was intact, and even accentuated, with NBCe1 deletion. However, in contrast to the well-known effect of metabolic acidosis to increase urinary ammonia excretion, NBCe1 deletion caused a gene dose-related decrease in ammonia excretion. There was no identifiable change in proximal tubule structure by light microscopy. Examination of proteins involved in renal ammonia metabolism showed decreased expression of phosphate-dependent glutaminase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, key enzymes in proximal tubule ammonia generation, and increased expression of glutamine synthetase, which recycles intrarenal ammonia and regenerates glutamine. Expression of key proteins involved in ammonia transport outside of the proximal tubule (rhesus B glycoprotein and rhesus C glycoprotein) was not significantly changed by NBCe1 deletion. We conclude from these findings that NBCe1 expression is necessary for normal proximal tubule ammonia metabolism. PMID:26224717

  1. Lipoic Acid Synthetase Deficiency Causes Neonatal-Onset Epilepsy, Defective Mitochondrial Energy Metabolism, and Glycine Elevation

    PubMed Central

    Mayr, Johannes A.; Zimmermann, Franz A.; Fauth, Christine; Bergheim, Christa; Meierhofer, David; Radmayr, Doris; Zschocke, Johannes; Koch, Johannes; Sperl, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    Lipoic acid is an essential prosthetic group of four mitochondrial enzymes involved in the oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate, ?-ketoglutarate, and branched chain amino acids and in the glycine cleavage. Lipoic acid is synthesized stepwise within mitochondria through a process that includes lipoic acid synthetase. We identified the homozygous mutation c.746G>A (p.Arg249His) in LIAS in an individual with neonatal-onset epilepsy, muscular hypotonia, lactic acidosis, and elevated glycine concentration in plasma and urine. Investigation of the mitochondrial energy metabolism showed reduced oxidation of pyruvate and decreased pyruvate dehydrogenase complex activity. A pronounced reduction of the prosthetic group lipoamide was found in lipoylated proteins. PMID:22152680

  2. Gut Microbiota and Metabolic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Hur, Kyu Yeon

    2015-01-01

    Gut microbiota plays critical physiological roles in the energy extraction and in the control of local or systemic immunity. Gut microbiota and its disturbance also appear to be involved in the pathogenesis of diverse diseases including metabolic disorders, gastrointestinal diseases, cancer, etc. In the metabolic point of view, gut microbiota can modulate lipid accumulation, lipopolysaccharide content and the production of short-chain fatty acids that affect food intake, inflammatory tone, or insulin signaling. Several strategies have been developed to change gut microbiota such as prebiotics, probiotics, certain antidiabetic drugs or fecal microbiota transplantation, which have diverse effects on body metabolism and on the development of metabolic disorders. PMID:26124989

  3. Early hemorrhage triggers metabolic responses that build up during prolonged shock.

    PubMed

    D'Alessandro, Angelo; Moore, Hunter B; Moore, Ernest E; Wither, Matthew; Nemkov, Travis; Gonzalez, Eduardo; Slaughter, Anne; Fragoso, Miguel; Hansen, Kirk C; Silliman, Christopher C; Banerjee, Anirban

    2015-06-15

    Metabolic staging after trauma/hemorrhagic shock is a key driver of acidosis and directly relates to hypothermia and coagulopathy. Metabolic responses to trauma/hemorrhagic shock have been assayed through classic biochemical approaches or NMR, thereby lacking a comprehensive overview of the dynamic metabolic changes occurring after shock. Sprague-Dawley rats underwent progressive hemorrhage and shock. Baseline and postshock blood was collected, and late hyperfibrinolysis was assessed (LY30 >3%) in all of the tested rats. Extreme and intermediate time points were collected to assay the dynamic changes of the plasma metabolome via ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Sham controls were used to determine whether metabolic changes could be primarily attributable to anesthesia and supine positioning. Early hemorrhage-triggered metabolic changes that built up progressively and became significant during sustained hemorrhagic shock. Metabolic phenotypes either resulted in immediate hypercatabolism, or late hypercatabolism, preceded by metabolic deregulation during early hemorrhage in a subset of rats. Hemorrhagic shock consistently promoted hyperglycemia, glycolysis, Krebs cycle, fatty acid, amino acid, and nitrogen metabolism (urate and polyamines), and impaired redox homeostasis. Early dynamic changes of the plasma metabolome are triggered by hemorrhage in rats. Future studies will determine whether metabolic subphenotypes observed in rats might be consistently observed in humans and pave the way for tailored resuscitative strategies. PMID:25876652

  4. Coagulopathy after severe pediatric trauma: A review

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Robert T.; Lisco, Steven J.; Kerby, Jeffrey D.; Pittet, Jean-François

    2014-01-01

    Trauma remains the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States among children from the age 1 year to 21 years old. The most common cause of lethality in pediatric trauma is traumatic brain injury (TBI). Early coagulopathy has been commonly observed after severe trauma and is usually associated with severe hemorrhage and/or traumatic brain injury. In contrast to adult patients, massive bleeding is less common after pediatric trauma. The classical drivers of trauma-induced coagulopathy (TIC) include hypothermia, acidosis, hemodilution and consumption of coagulation factors secondary to local activation of the coagulation system following severe traumatic injury. Furthermore, there is also recent evidence for a distinct mechanism of TIC that involves the activation of the anticoagulant protein C pathway. Whether this new mechanism of posttraumatic coagulopathy plays a role in children is still unknown. The goal of this review is to summarize the current knowledge on the incidence and potential mechanisms of coagulopathy after pediatric trauma and the role of rapid diagnostic tests for early identification of coagulopathy. Finally, we discuss different options for treating coagulopathy after severe pediatric trauma. PMID:24569507

  5. Sever's Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... after activity. If the child has a pronated foot, a flat or high arch, or another condition that increases the risk of Sever's disease, the doctor might recommend special shoe inserts, called ... goes away on its own when foot growth is complete and the growth plate has ...

  6. Simultaneous Hypoxia and Low Extracellular pH Suppress Overall Metabolic Rate and Protein Synthesis In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Sørensen, Brita Singers; Busk, Morten; Overgaard, Jens; Horsman, Michael R.; Alsner, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Background The tumor microenvironment is characterized by regions of hypoxia and acidosis which are linked to poor prognosis. This occurs due to an aberrant vasculature as well as high rates of glycolysis and lactate production in tumor cells even in the presence of oxygen (the Warburg effect), which weakens the spatial linkage between hypoxia and acidosis. Methods Five different human squamous cell carcinoma cell lines (SiHa, FaDuDD, UTSCC5, UTSCC14 and UTSCC15) were treated with hypoxia, acidosis (pH 6.3), or a combination, and gene expression analyzed using microarray. SiHa and FaDuDD were chosen for further characterization of cell energetics and protein synthesis. Total cellular ATP turnover and relative glycolytic dependency was determined by simultaneous measurements of oxygen consumption and lactate synthesis rates and total protein synthesis was determined by autoradiographic quantification of the incorporation of 35S-labelled methionine and cysteine into protein. Results Microarray analysis allowed differentiation between genes induced at low oxygen only at normal extracellular pH (pHe), genes induced at low oxygen at both normal and low pHe, and genes induced at low pHe independent of oxygen concentration. Several genes were found to be upregulated by acidosis independent of oxygenation. Acidosis resulted in a more wide-scale change in gene expression profiles than hypoxia including upregulation of genes involved in the translation process, for example Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4A, isoform 2 (EIF4A2), and Ribosomal protein L37 (RPL37). Acidosis suppressed overall ATP turnover and protein synthesis by 50%. Protein synthesis, but not total ATP production, was also suppressed under hypoxic conditions. A dramatic decrease in ATP turnover (SiHa) and protein synthesis (both cell lines) was observed when hypoxia and low pHe were combined. Conclusions We demonstrate here that the influence of hypoxia and acidosis causes different responses, both in gene expression and in de novo protein synthesis, depending on whether the two factors induced alone or overlapping, and as such it is important for in vivo studies to take this into account. PMID:26274822

  7. Computational Approaches for Understanding Energy Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Shestov, Alexander A; Barker, Brandon; Gu, Zhenglong; Locasale, Jason W

    2013-01-01

    There has been a surge of interest in understanding the regulation of metabolic networks involved in disease in recent years. Quantitative models are increasingly being used to i nterrogate the metabolic pathways that are contained within this complex disease biology. At the core of this effort is the mathematical modeling of central carbon metabolism involving glycolysis and the citric acid cycle (referred to as energy metabolism). Here we discuss several approaches used to quantitatively model metabolic pathways relating to energy metabolism and discuss their formalisms, successes, and limitations. PMID:23897661

  8. Metabolic Control of Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Pietrocola, Federico; Levine, Beth; Kroemer, Guido

    2015-01-01

    Macroautophagy (herein referred to as autophagy) is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism of adaptation to adverse microenvironmental conditions, including limited nutrient supplies. Several sensors interacting with the autophagic machinery have evolved to detect fluctuations in key metabolic parameters. The signal transduction cascades operating downstream of these sensors are highly interconnected to control a spatially and chronologically coordinated autophagic response that maintains the health and function of individual cells while preserving organismal homeostasis. Here, we discuss the physiological regulation of autophagy by metabolic circuitries, as well as alterations of such control in disease. PMID:25480292

  9. Mobile technology support for clinical decision in diabetic keto-acidosis emergency.

    PubMed

    Frandes, Mirela; Timar, Bogdan; Tole, Alexandra; Holban, Stefan; Lungeanu, Diana

    2015-01-01

    The main challenge of effectively managing emergencies in diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is the fine tuning of the treatment in order to re-establish the normal metabolic homeostasis. We propose a mobile application for clinical decision support in DKA emergencies (mDKA), running under Android on smart phones and tablet PCs. mDKA provides decision support for treatment concerning the main components (i.e. choice and dose of re-hydration agent, insulin, potassium or bicarbonate) for up to 12 hours after the diagnosis. The application underwent a preliminary scanty evaluation aimed at assessing its perceived usability. The results sustained the informal hints that mDKA's accuracy in deciding the treatment path was acceptable in terms of general variability of medical decision in DKA and brought evidence of positive attitude towards the application itself. PMID:25991157

  10. Why Metabolic Syndrome Matters

    MedlinePLUS

    ... High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Why Metabolic Syndrome Matters Updated:Jul 24,2014 Metabolic syndrome may ... Diabetes High Blood Pressure My Life Check Heart360® Metabolic Syndrome • Home • About Metabolic Syndrome • Why Metabolic Syndrome Matters • ...

  11. Metabolic Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... to Web version Metabolic Syndrome Overview What is insulin resistance? Your body changes most of the food you ... to insulin. Doctors refer to this condition as insulin resistance. If you have insulin resistance, your body will ...

  12. Metabolic Myopathies

    MedlinePLUS

    ... muscles. Metabolic refers to chemical reactions that provide energy, nutrients and substances necessary for health and growth. ... occur when muscle cells don’t get enough energy. Without enough energy, the muscle lacks enough fuel ...

  13. Congenital metabolic diseases: Diagnosis and treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Wapnir, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains eight parts, each consisting of several papers. The part titles are: The Heritage of Sir Archibald Garrod; New Approaches to the Diagnosis and Treatment of Genetic Disease; Achievements, New Trends, and Policies in the Detection of Inborn Errors of Metabolism; Disorders of Amino Acid Metabolism; Diseases of Energy Metabolism; Problems of Abnormal Storage Diseases; Inherited Diseases of Membrane Transport and Receptors; and Inborn Errors of Purine Metabolism and Urea Synthesis.

  14. [Severe Asthma].

    PubMed

    Hagmeyer, Lars; Randerath, Winfried J

    2015-10-01

    The European Respiratory Society and the American Thoracic Society recently published the international ERS/ATS guidelines on definition, evaluation and treatment of severe asthma. It is aim of the guideline to establish standardized diagnostic criteria and to develop evidence based diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. In the diagnostic approach verifying the diagnosis of asthma and identifying comorbidities and contributing factors are very important. In the therapeutic guidance of asthma patients steroid insensitivity and overdosage of betamimetic inhaler therapy are typical challenges. Novel therapeutic strategies open the perspective to personalized therapy in asthma. PMID:26445257

  15. Arrhythmogenic Biophysical Phenotype for SCN5A Mutation S1787N Depends upon Splice Variant Background and Intracellular Acidosis

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Rou-Mu; Tan, Bi-Hua; Tester, David J.; Song, Chunhua; He, Yang; Dovat, Sinisa; Peterson, Blaise Z.; Ackerman, Michael J.; Makielski, Jonathan C.

    2015-01-01

    Background SCN5A is a susceptibility gene for type 3 long QT syndrome, Brugada syndrome, and sudden infant death syndrome. INa dysfunction from mutated SCN5A can depend upon the splice variant background in which it is expressed and also upon environmental factors such as acidosis. S1787N was reported previously as a LQT3-associated mutation and has also been observed in 1 of 295 healthy white controls. Here, we determined the in vitro biophysical phenotype of SCN5A-S1787N in an effort to further assess its possible pathogenicity. Methods and Results We engineered S1787N in the two most common alternatively spliced SCN5A isoforms, the major isoform lacking a glutamine at position 1077 (Q1077del) and the minor isoform containing Q1077, and expressed these two engineered constructs in HEK293 cells for electrophysiological study. Macroscopic voltage-gated INa was measured 24 hours after transfection with standard whole-cell patch clamp techniques. We applied intracellular solutions with pH7.4 or pH6.7. S1787N in the Q1077 background had WT-like INa including peak INa density, activation and inactivation parameters, and late INa amplitude in both pH 7.4 and pH 6.7. However, with S1787N in the Q1077del background, the percentages of INa late/peak were increased by 2.1 fold in pH 7.4 and by 2.9 fold in pH 6.7 when compared to WT. Conclusion The LQT3-like biophysical phenotype for S1787N depends on both the SCN5A splice variant and on the intracellular pH. These findings provide further evidence that the splice variant and environmental factors affect the molecular phenotype of cardiac SCN5A-encoded sodium channel (Nav1.5), has implications for the clinical phenotype, and may provide insight into acidosis-induced arrhythmia mechanisms. PMID:25923670

  16. Dorzolamide-induced relaxation of porcine retinal arterioles in vitro depends on nitric oxide but not on acidosis in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    El-Galaly, A; Aalkjaer, C; Kringelholt, S K; Misfeldt, M W; Bek, T

    2014-11-01

    The carbonic anhydrase inhibitor dorzolamide can induce relaxation of retinal arterioles with a consequent increase in blood flow and oxygenation of the retina. It has been shown that the mechanisms underlying this relaxation are independent of extracellular acidosis and CO2. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the possible involvement of nitric oxide (NO) and intracellular acidosis in dorzolamide-induced relaxation of retinal arterioles. Porcine retinal arterioles were mounted in a wire myograph and dorzolamide induced relaxation was studied after 1) the addition of the NO synthase inhibitor l-NAME (3 × 10(-4) M) or the guanylyl cyclase inhibitor ODQ (3 × 10(-6) M), and 2) after loading the smooth muscle cells with the pH sensitive fluorophore SNARF-1-AM and studying changes in vascular tone and intracellular fluorescence after the induction of hypoxia, addition of lactate (10(-2) M), and extracellular acidification (pH = 7.0) alone and in the presence of dorzolamide (10(-3) M). Dorzolamide significantly relaxed retinal arterioles (p < 0.03), and the effect was significantly higher in the presence of perivascular tissue than in isolated vessels at the highest concentration (p < 0.01). In the presence of perivascular tissue dorzolamide-induced relaxation could be reduced by NO inhibition (p < 0.02). Dorzolamide increased intracellular acidification (p < 0.02) during extracellular acidosis, but there was no relation between relaxation and intracellular acidosis. In conclusion, dorzolamide-induced vasorelaxation depends on NO and the perivascular retinal tissue, but is independent of acidification in the extracellular and the intracellular space of retinal vascular smooth muscle cells. Other factors than NO and acidification are involved in dorzolamide-induced relaxation of retinal arterioles. PMID:25251883

  17. Structure, Function, and Regulation of the SLC4 NBCe1 Transporter and its Role in Causing Proximal Renal Tubular Acidosis

    PubMed Central

    Kurtz, Ira; Zhu, Quansheng

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review There has been significant progress in our understanding of the structural and functional properties and regulation of NBCe1, a membrane transporter that plays a key role in renal acid-base physiology. NBCe1-A mediates basolateral electrogenic sodium-base transport in the proximal tubule and is critically required for transepithelial bicarbonate absorption. Mutations in NBCe1 cause autosomal recessive proximal renal tubular acidosis (pRTA). The review summarizes recent advances in this area. Recent findings A topological model of NBCe1 has been established that provides a foundation for future structure-functional studies of the transporter. Critical residues and regions have been identified in NBCe1 that play key roles in its structure, function (substrate transport, electrogenicity) and regulation. The mechanisms of how NBC1 mutations cause pRTA have also recently been elucidated. Summary Given the important role of proximal tubule transepithelial bicarbonate absorption in systemic acid-base balance, a clear understanding of the structure-functional properties of the NBCe1-A is a prerequisite for elucidating the mechanisms of defective transepithelial bicarbonate transport in pRTA. PMID:23917030

  18. Identification and quantification of acidosis inducing metabolites in cases of alcohols intoxication by GC-MS for emergency toxicology.

    PubMed

    Hložek, Tomáš; Bursová, Miroslava; Coufal, Pavel; ?abala, Radomír

    2015-10-10

    A simple, cost effective, and fast gas chromatography method with mass spectrometry detection (GC-MS) for simultaneous measurement of formic acid, glycolic acid, methoxyacetic acid, ethoxyacetic acid and 2-hydroxyethoxyacetic acid in serum and urine was developed and validated. This multi-analyte method is highly suitable for clinical and emergency toxicology laboratory diagnostic, allowing identification and quantification of five most common acidosis inducing organic acids present in cases of alcohol intoxication. Furthermore, when patients are admitted to emergency unit at late stage of toxic alcohol intoxication, the concentration of parent compound may be already low or not detectable. This new method employs a relatively less used class of derivatization agents - alkyl chloroformates, allowing the efficient and rapid derivatization of carboxylic acids within seconds. The entire sample preparation procedure is completed within 5 min. The optimal conditions of derivatization procedure have been found using chemometric approach (design of experiment). The calibration dependence of the method was proved to be quadratic in the range of 25-3000 mg L(-1), with adequate accuracy (97.3-108.0%) and precision (<12.8%). The method was successfully applied for identification and quantification of the selected compounds in serum of patients from emergency units. PMID:26001161

  19. Acidosis Mediates the Switching of Gs-PKA and Gi-PKC? Dependence in Prolonged Hyperalgesia Induced by Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei-Yu; Dai, Shih-Ping; Chang, Yan-Ching; Sun, Wei-Hsin

    2015-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory pain, when not effectively treated, is a costly health problem and has a harmful effect on all aspects of health-related quality of life. Previous studies suggested that in male Sprague Dawley rats, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2)-induced short-term hyperalgesia depends on protein kinase A (PKA) activity, whereas long-lasting hyperalgesia induced by PGE2 with carrageenan pre-injection, requires protein kinase C? (PKC?). However, the mechanism underlying the kinase switch with short- to long-term hyperalgesia remains unclear. In this study, we used the inflammatory agents carrageenan or complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) to induce long-term hyperalgesia, and examined PKA and PKC? dependence and switching time. Hyperalgesia induced by both agents depended on PKA/PKC? and Gs/Gi-proteins, and the switching time from PKA to PKC? and from Gs to Gi was about 3 to 4 h after inflammation induction. Among the single inflammatory mediators tested, PGE2 and 5-HT induced transient hyperalgesia, which depended on PKA and PKC?, respectively. Only acidic solution-induced hyperalgesia required Gs-PKA and Gi-PKC?, and the switch time for kinase dependency matched inflammatory hyperalgesia, in approximately 2 to 4 h. Thus, acidosis in inflamed tissues may be a decisive factor to regulate switching of PKA and PKC? dependence via proton-sensing G-protein–coupled receptors. PMID:25933021

  20. Tissue-specific metabolic responses of Cyprinus flammans to copper.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ming-Yan; Ye, Yang-Fang; Xue, Liang-Yi; Tang, Ze-Yuan

    2015-07-01

    Copper (Cu) contamination is serious in China, with ?2.76 mg/L in some waters. Exposure to Cu causes a high toxicity to the aquatic organisms and subsequent ecological risk. To understand fish responses to Cu exposure, we analyzed the metabonomic changes in multiple tissues (gill, liver, and muscle) of Cyprinus flammans using an nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabonomic technique. Our results showed that metabolic alterations are dose-dependent. No significant metabolic alterations in three tissues of fish are caused by 0.25 mg/L Cu. However, 1.53 mg/L Cu caused changes of energy-related metabolites and amino acids, which we suggest are due to enhanced metabolic acidosis in gill and muscle, decreased tricarboxylic acid cycle activity in muscle, increased gluconeogenesis from amino acids in liver, and improved glycogenesis in liver and muscle. The Cori cycle between liver and muscle is concurrently triggered. Furthermore, high concentration of Cu resulted in the alteration of choline metabolism such that we hypothesize that Cu induces membrane damage and detoxification of CuSO4 in gill as well as altered osmoregulation in all three tissues. Choline-O-sulfate in gill may be used as a biomarker to provide an early warning of Cu exposure in C. flammans. Moreover, Cu exposure caused alterations of nucleoside and nucleotide metabolism in both gill and muscle. These findings provide a new insight into the metabolic effects of Cu exposure on C. flammans and highlight the value of metabonomics in the study of metabolic metal disturbance in fish. PMID:25827945

  1. Lipid Chaperones and Metabolic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Furuhashi, Masato; Ishimura, Shutaro; Ota, Hideki; Miura, Tetsuji

    2011-01-01

    Over the past decade, a large body of evidence has emerged demonstrating an integration of metabolic and immune response pathways. It is now clear that obesity and associated disorders such as insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes are associated with a metabolically driven, low-grade, chronic inflammatory state, referred to as “metaflammation.” Several inflammatory cytokines as well as lipids and metabolic stress pathways can activate metaflammation, which targets metabolically critical organs and tissues including adipocytes and macrophages to adversely affect systemic homeostasis. On the other hand, inside the cell, fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs), a family of lipid chaperones, as well as endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and reactive oxygen species derived from mitochondria play significant roles in promotion of metabolically triggered inflammation. Here, we discuss the molecular and cellular basis of the roles of FABPs, especially FABP4 and FABP5, in metaflammation and related diseases including obesity, diabetes, and atherosclerosis. PMID:22121495

  2. Can you boost your metabolism?

    MedlinePLUS

    Resting metabolism rate (RMR); Total daily energy expenditure (TDEE); Non-exercise activity thermogenesis (NEAT); Weight loss - metabolism; Overweight - metabolism; Obesity - metabolism; Diet - metabolism

  3. Modeling of Zymomonas mobilis central metabolism for novel metabolic engineering strategies

    PubMed Central

    Kalnenieks, Uldis; Pentjuss, Agris; Rutkis, Reinis; Stalidzans, Egils; Fell, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Mathematical modeling of metabolism is essential for rational metabolic engineering. The present work focuses on several types of modeling approach to quantitative understanding of central metabolic network and energetics in the bioethanol-producing bacterium Zymomonas mobilis. Combined use of Flux Balance, Elementary Flux Mode, and thermodynamic analysis of its central metabolism, together with dynamic modeling of the core catabolic pathways, can help to design novel substrate and product pathways by systematically analyzing the solution space for metabolic engineering, and yields insights into the function of metabolic network, hardly achievable without applying modeling tools. PMID:24550906

  4. Inborn errors of metabolism.

    PubMed

    El-Hattab, Ayman W

    2015-06-01

    Inborn errors of metabolism (IEM) are individually rare but collectively common. Approximately 25% of IEMs can have manifestations in the neonatal period. Neonates with IEM are usually healthy at birth; however, in hours to days after birth they can develop nonspecific signs that are common to several other neonatal conditions. Therefore, maintaining a high index of suspicion is extremely important for early diagnosis and the institution of appropriate therapy, which are mandatory to prevent death and ameliorate complications from many IEMs. PMID:26042912

  5. Metabolic cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    Guertl, Barbara; Noehammer, Christa; Hoefler, Gerald

    2000-01-01

    The energy needed by cardiac muscle to maintain proper function is supplied by adenosine Ariphosphate primarily (ATP) production through breakdown of fatty acids. Metabolic cardiomyopathies can be caused by disturbances in metabolism, for example diabetes mellitus, hypertrophy and heart failure or alcoholic cardiomyopathy. Deficiency in enzymes of the mitochondrial ?-oxidation show a varying degree of cardiac manifestation. Aberrations of mitochondrial DNA lead to a wide variety of cardiac disorders, without any obvious correlation between genotype and phenotype. A completely different pathogenetic model comprises cardiac manifestation of systemic metabolic diseases caused by deficiencies of various enzymes in a variety of metabolic pathways. Examples of these disorders are glycogen storage diseases (e.g. glycogenosis type II and III), lysosomal storage diseases (e.g. Niemann-Pick disease, Gaucher disease, I-cell disease, various types of mucopolysaccharidoses, GM1 gangliosidosis, galactosialidosis, carbohydrate–deficient glycoprotein syndromes and Sandhoff's disease). There are some systemic diseases which can also affect the heart, for example triosephosphate isomerase deficiency, hereditary haemochromatosis, CD 36 defect or propionic acidaemia. PMID:11298185

  6. PPAR? governs glycerol metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Patsouris, David; Mandard, Stéphane; Voshol, Peter J.; Escher, Pascal; Tan, Nguan Soon; Havekes, Louis M.; Koenig, Wolfgang; März, Winfried; Tafuri, Sherrie; Wahli, Walter; Müller, Michael; Kersten, Sander

    2004-01-01

    Glycerol, a product of adipose tissue lipolysis, is an important substrate for hepatic glucose synthesis. However, little is known about the regulation of hepatic glycerol metabolism. Here we show that several genes involved in the hepatic metabolism of glycerol, i.e., cytosolic and mitochondrial glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPDH), glycerol kinase, and glycerol transporters aquaporin 3 and 9, are upregulated by fasting in wild-type mice but not in mice lacking PPAR?. Furthermore, expression of these genes was induced by the PPAR? agonist Wy14643 in wild-type but not PPAR??null mice. In adipocytes, which express high levels of PPAR?, expression of cytosolic GPDH was enhanced by PPAR? and ?/? agonists, while expression was decreased in PPAR?+/– and PPAR?/?–/– mice. Transactivation, gel shift, and chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated that cytosolic GPDH is a direct PPAR target gene. In line with a stimulating role of PPAR? in hepatic glycerol utilization, administration of synthetic PPAR? agonists in mice and humans decreased plasma glycerol. Finally, hepatic glucose production was decreased in PPAR?-null mice simultaneously fasted and exposed to Wy14643, suggesting that the stimulatory effect of PPAR? on gluconeogenic gene expression was translated at the functional level. Overall, these data indicate that PPAR? directly governs glycerol metabolism in liver, whereas PPAR? regulates glycerol metabolism in adipose tissue. PMID:15232616

  7. Functional hyperspectral imaging captures subtle details of cell metabolism in olfactory neurosphere cells, disease-specific models of neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Gosnell, Martin E; Anwer, Ayad G; Cassano, Juan C; Sue, Carolyn M; Goldys, Ewa M

    2016-01-01

    Hyperspectral imaging uses spectral and spatial image information for target detection and classification. In this work hyperspectral autofluorescence imaging was applied to patient olfactory neurosphere-derived cells, a cell model of a human metabolic disease MELAS (mitochondrial myopathy, encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, stroke-like syndrome). By using an endogenous source of contrast subtle metabolic variations have been detected between living cells in their full morphological context which made it possible to distinguish healthy from diseased cells before and after therapy. Cellular maps of native fluorophores, flavins, bound and free NADH and retinoids unveiled subtle metabolic signatures and helped uncover significant cell subpopulations, in particular a subpopulation with compromised mitochondrial function. Taken together, our results demonstrate that multispectral spectral imaging provides a new non-invasive method to investigate neurodegenerative and other disease models, and it paves the way for novel cellular characterisation in health, disease and during treatment, with proper account of intrinsic cellular heterogeneity. PMID:26431992

  8. Metabolic Myoglobinuria.

    PubMed

    Barca, Emanuele; Emmanuele, Valentina; DiMauro, Salvatore Billi

    2015-10-01

    One large group of hereditary myopathies characterized by recurrent myoglobinuria, almost invariably triggered by exercise, comprises metabolic disorders of two main fuels, glycogen and long-chain fatty acids, or mitochondrial diseases of the respiratory chain. Differential diagnosis is required to distinguish the three conditions, although all cause a crisis of muscle energy. Muscle biopsy may be useful when performed well after the episode of rhabdomyolysis. Molecular genetics is increasingly the diagnostic test of choice to discover the underlying genetic basis. PMID:26319173

  9. Flux-Balance Modeling of Plant Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Sweetlove, Lee J.; Ratcliffe, R. George

    2011-01-01

    Flux-balance modeling of plant metabolic networks provides an important complement to 13C-based metabolic flux analysis. Flux-balance modeling is a constraints-based approach in which steady-state fluxes in a metabolic network are predicted by using optimization algorithms within an experimentally bounded solution space. In the last 2?years several flux-balance models of plant metabolism have been published including genome-scale models of Arabidopsis metabolism. In this review we consider what has been learnt from these models. In addition, we consider the limitations of flux-balance modeling and identify the main challenges to generating improved and more detailed models of plant metabolism at tissue- and cell-specific scales. Finally we discuss the types of question that flux-balance modeling is well suited to address and its potential role in metabolic engineering and crop improvement. PMID:22645533

  10. Metabolic control of cell death

    PubMed Central

    Green, Douglas R.; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Kroemer, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Summary Beyond their contribution to basic metabolism, the major cellular organelles, in particular mitochondria, can determine whether cells respond to stress in an adaptive or suicidal manner. Thus, mitochondria can continuously adapt their shape to changing bioenergetic demands as they are subjected to quality control by autophagy, or they can undergo a lethal permeabilization process that initiates apoptosis. Along similar lines, multiple proteins involved in metabolic circuitries including oxidative phosphorylation and transport of metabolites across membranes may participate in the regulated or catastrophic dismantling of organelles. Many factors that were initially characterized as cell death regulators are now known to physically or functionally interact with metabolic enzymes. Thus, several metabolic cues regulate the propensity of cells to activate self-destructive programs, in part by acting on nutrient sensors. This suggests the existence of “metabolic checkpoints” that dictate cell fate in response to metabolic fluctuations. Here, we discuss recent insights into the intersection between metabolism and cell death regulation that have major implications for the comprehension and manipulation of unwarranted cell loss. PMID:25237106

  11. Metabolic comorbidities in Cushing's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ferraù, Francesco; Korbonits, Márta

    2015-10-01

    Cushing's syndrome (CS) patients have increased mortality primarily due to cardiovascular events induced by glucocorticoid (GC) excess-related severe metabolic changes. Glucose metabolism abnormalities are common in CS due to increased gluconeogenesis, disruption of insulin signalling with reduced glucose uptake and disposal of glucose and altered insulin secretion, consequent to the combination of GCs effects on liver, muscle, adipose tissue and pancreas. Dyslipidaemia is a frequent feature in CS as a result of GC-induced increased lipolysis, lipid mobilisation, liponeogenesis and adipogenesis. Protein metabolism is severely affected by GC excess via complex direct and indirect stimulation of protein breakdown and inhibition of protein synthesis, which can lead to muscle loss. CS patients show changes in body composition, with fat redistribution resulting in accumulation of central adipose tissue. Metabolic changes, altered adipokine release, GC-induced heart and vasculature abnormalities, hypertension and atherosclerosis contribute to the increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. In paediatric CS patients, the interplay between GC and the GH/IGF1 axis affects growth and body composition, while in adults it further contributes to the metabolic derangement. GC excess has a myriad of deleterious effects and here we attempt to summarise the metabolic comorbidities related to CS and their management in the perspective of reducing the cardiovascular risk and mortality overall. PMID:26060052

  12. Metabolic pancreatitis: Etiopathogenesis and management

    PubMed Central

    Kota, Sunil Kumar; Krishna, S.V.S.; Lakhtakia, Sandeep; Modi, Kirtikumar D.

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a medical emergency. Alcohol and gallstones are the most common etiologies accounting for 60%-75% cases. Other important causes include postendoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography procedure, abdominal trauma, drug toxicity, various infections, autoimmune, ischemia, and hereditary causes. In about 15% of cases the cause remains unknown (idiopathic pancreatitis). Metabolic conditions giving rise to pancreatitis are less common, accounting for 5%-10% cases. The causes include hypertriglyceridemia, hypercalcemia, diabetes mellitus, porphyria, and Wilson's disease. The episodes of pancreatitis tend to be more severe. In cases of metabolic pancreatitis, over and above the standard routine management of pancreatitis, careful management of the underlying metabolic abnormalities is of paramount importance. If not treated properly, it leads to recurrent life-threatening bouts of acute pancreatitis. We hereby review the pathogenesis and management of various causes of metabolic pancreatitis. PMID:24083160

  13. Metabolism and biochemistry in hypogravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leach, Carolyn S.

    1991-01-01

    The headward shift of body fluid and increase in stress-related hormones that occur in hypogravity bring about a number of changes in metabolism and biochemistry of the human body. Such alterations may have important effects on health during flight and during a recovery period after return to earth. Body fluid and electrolytes are lost, and blood levels of several hormones that control metabolism are altered during space flight. Increased serum calcium may lead to an increased risk of renal stone formation during flight, and altered drug metabolism could influence the efficacy of therapeutic agents. Orthostatic intolerance and an increased risk of fracturing weakened bones are concerns at landing. It is important to understand biochemistry and metabolism in hypogravity so that clinically important developments can be anticipated and prevented or ameliorated.

  14. Plant Metabolic Modeling: Achieving New Insight into Metabolism and Metabolic Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Baghalian, Kambiz; Hajirezaei, Mohammad-Reza; Schreiber, Falk

    2014-01-01

    Models are used to represent aspects of the real world for specific purposes, and mathematical models have opened up new approaches in studying the behavior and complexity of biological systems. However, modeling is often time-consuming and requires significant computational resources for data development, data analysis, and simulation. Computational modeling has been successfully applied as an aid for metabolic engineering in microorganisms. But such model-based approaches have only recently been extended to plant metabolic engineering, mainly due to greater pathway complexity in plants and their highly compartmentalized cellular structure. Recent progress in plant systems biology and bioinformatics has begun to disentangle this complexity and facilitate the creation of efficient plant metabolic models. This review highlights several aspects of plant metabolic modeling in the context of understanding, predicting and modifying complex plant metabolism. We discuss opportunities for engineering photosynthetic carbon metabolism, sucrose synthesis, and the tricarboxylic acid cycle in leaves and oil synthesis in seeds and the application of metabolic modeling to the study of plant acclimation to the environment. The aim of the review is to offer a current perspective for plant biologists without requiring specialized knowledge of bioinformatics or systems biology. PMID:25344492

  15. Insights into acidosis-induced regulation of SLC26A4 (pendrin) and SLC4A9 (AE4) transporters using three-dimensional morphometric analysis of ?-intercalated cells

    PubMed Central

    Purkerson, Jeffrey M.; Heintz, Eric V.; Nakamori, Aya

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the three-dimensional (3-D) expression and distribution of anion transporters pendrin (SLC26A4) and anion exchanger (AE)4 (SLC4A9) in ?-intercalated cells (?-ICs) of the rabbit cortical collecting duct (CCD) to better characterize the adaptation to acid-base disturbances. Confocal analysis and 3-D reconstruction of ?-ICs, using identifiers of the nucleus and zona occludens, permitted the specific orientation of cells from normal, acidotic, and recovering rabbits, so that adaptive changes could be quantified and compared. The pendrin cap likely mediates apical Cl?/HCO3? exchange, but it was also found beneath the zona occludens and in early endosomes, some of which may recycle back to the apical membrane via Rab11a+ vesicles. Acidosis reduced the size of the pendrin cap, observed as a large decrease in cap volume above and below the zona occludens, and the volume of the Rab11a+ apical recycling compartment. Correction of the acidosis over 12–18 h reversed these changes. Consistent with its proposed function in the basolateral exit of Na+ via Na+-HCO3? cotransport, AE4 was expressed as a barrel-like structure in the lateral membrane of ?-ICs. Acidosis reduced AE4 expression in ?-ICs, but this was rapidly reversed during the recovery from acidosis. The coordinate regulation of pendrin and AE4 during acidosis and recovery is likely to affect the magnitude of acid-base and possibly Na+ transport across the CCD. In conclusion, acidosis induces a downregulation of AE expression in ?-ICs and a diminished presence of pendrin in apical recycling endosomes. PMID:24990900

  16. Using organic acids to control subacute ruminal acidosis and fermentation in feedlot cattle fed a high-grain diet.

    PubMed

    Vyas, D; Beauchemin, K A; Koenig, K M

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether supplementing organic acids can prevent incidences of subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA) in beef heifers fed a diet consisting of 8% barley silage and 92% barley grain-based concentrate (DM basis). Ten ruminally cannulated Hereford crossbred heifers (484 ± 25 kg BW) were used in a replicated 5 × 5 Latin square design with 14-d periods including 10 d for dietary adaptation and 4 d for measurements. Dietary treatments included no supplementation (Control), low fumaric acid (61 g/d), high fumaric acid (125 g/d), low malic acid (59 g/d), and high malic acid (134 g/d). Organic acid supplementation had no effect on DMI ( = 0.77). Similarly, no effects were observed on mean ( = 0.74), minimum ( = 0.64), and maximum ( = 0.27) ruminal pH measured continuously for 48 h. Moreover, area under the curve for pH thresholds 6.2 ( = 0.97), 5.8 ( = 0.66), 5.5 ( = 0.55), and 5.2 ( = 0.93) was similar for all treatments. However, malic acid supplementation lowered the amount of time that ruminal pH was <6.2 compared with the Control ( = 0.02) and fumaric acid treatments ( < 0.01). No effects were observed on total VFA concentrations with organic acid supplementation ( = 0.98) compared with the Control, but greater total VFA concentrations were observed with fumaric acid compared with the malic acid treatments ( = 0.02). The population of total culturable bacteria 3 h after feeding was reduced with supplemental malic acid compared with the Control ( = 0.03) and fumaric acid treatments ( = 0.03). However, no effects were observed with organic acid supplementation on lactic acid-utilizing bacteria ( = 0.59). In conclusion, under the conditions of the present study, organic acid supplementation did not have any significant effects on ruminal fermentation parameters compared with the Control and were not effective in preventing SARA in beef cattle fed high-grain diets. PMID:26440175

  17. Protective Effect of Hypercapnic Acidosis in Ischemia-Reperfusion Lung Injury Is Attributable to Upregulation of Heme Oxygenase-1

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shu-Yu; Li, Min-Hui; Ko, Fu-Chang; Wu, Geng-Chin

    2013-01-01

    Hypercapnic acidosis (HCA) has protective effects in animal models of acute lung injury, but the mechanism underlying the effect of HCA is unclear. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is an antioxidant enzyme that protects tissue from inflammation injury. We investigated whether HO-1 contributes to the protective effects of HCA in ischemia-reperfusion (IR)-induced lung injury. Typical acute lung injury in rats was successfully induced by 40 min of ischemia and 90 min of reperfusion in an isolated perfused lung model. The rat lungs were randomly assigned to the control group, IR group or IR + HCA group with or without zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP), an HO-1 activity inhibitor. At the end of the experiment, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lung tissues were collected to evaluate the degree of lung injury. In in vitro experiments, HO-1 siRNA transfected A549 cells were exposed to a normoxic or hypoxia-reoxygenation (H/R) environment in the presence or absence of HCA. IR caused significant increases in the pulmonary arterial pressure, lung weight to body weight and wet/dry ratios, lung weight gain, capillary filtration coefficient, lung injury scores, neutrophil infiltration, and concentrations of protein and TNF-? in the BALF. IR also induced degradation of inhibitor of nuclear factor (NF)-?B-?, increased I?B kinase (IKK)-? phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of NF-?B, and up-regulated HO-1 expression and activity. Furthermore, IR decreased Bcl-2 protein expression and increased the number of active caspase-3 stained cells. HCA treatment enhanced HO-1 expression and activity, and accordingly reduced IKK-NF-?B signaling, inhibited apoptosis, and significantly attenuated IR-induced changes. Treatment with ZnPP partially blocked the protective effect of HCA. In addition, HO-1 siRNA significantly reversed HCA-mediated inhibition of NF-?B signaling in A549 cells subjected to H/R. In conclusion, the protective effect of HCA in IR lung injury in rats was mediated in part by the anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic action of HO-1. PMID:24040332

  18. Microbial Metabolism Biodegradation of

    E-print Network

    Huang, Ching-Tsan

    1 Microbial Metabolism Biodegradation of Organic Compounds Ching-Tsan Huang () Office: Agronomy to less harmful forms. #12;5 Metabolic Logic The guiding hand of natural selection makes a metabolicMaps Show clusters of metabolism that are linked by a common metabolic logic and stripped of all

  19. Cell Metabolism Perspective

    E-print Network

    Borenstein, Elhanan

    Cell Metabolism Perspective Mapping the Inner Workings of the Microbiome: Genomic-andMetagenomic-BasedStudyofMetabolism and Metabolic Interactions in the Human Microbiome Ohad Manor,1,4 Roie Levy,1,4 and Elhanan Borenstein1,2,3,* 1 contributor to human metabolism and health, yet the metabolic pro- cesses that are carried out by various

  20. An Advance Organizer for Teaching Bacterial Metabolism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbosa, Heloiza R.; Marques, Marilis V.; Torres, Bayardo B.

    2005-01-01

    The metabolic versatility of bacteria is a source of learning difficulty for students in classical microbiology courses. To facilitate the learning process, the authors developed an advance organizer. It consists of a set of six diagrams of metabolic pathways describing the basic living requirements of several types of bacteria: energy, carbon…

  1. Sarcoglycan Complex IMPLICATIONS FOR METABOLIC DEFECTS

    E-print Network

    Campbell, Kevin P.

    assessments of disease severity in Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients (3). Association of adipose tissueSarcoglycan Complex IMPLICATIONS FOR METABOLIC DEFECTS IN MUSCULAR DYSTROPHIES*S Received that the impairment of the skeletal muscle metabolism influences the pathogenesis of muscular dystrophy. Muscle fat

  2. Renal Tubular Acidosis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... disturb many bodily functions. Healthy kidneys help maintain acid-base balance by excreting acids into the urine and ... RTA diagnosed? To diagnose RTA, doctors check the acid-base balance in blood and urine samples. If the ...

  3. Renal Tubular Acidosis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... other organs. Hyperkalemic RTA can be caused by urinary tract infections (UTIs) , autoimmune disorders, sickle cell disease, diabetes, kidney ... MORE ON THIS TOPIC Definition: Kidney Nephrotic Syndrome Urinary Tract Infections When Your Child Has a Chronic Kidney Disease ...

  4. Distal renal tubular acidosis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... that may be prescribed include potassium citrate and sodium bicarbonate. These are alkaline medicines that help correct the acidic condition of the body. Sodium bicarbonate may correct the loss of potassium and calcium.

  5. Human metabolic atlas: an online resource for human metabolism.

    PubMed

    Pornputtapong, Natapol; Nookaew, Intawat; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Human tissue-specific genome-scale metabolic models (GEMs) provide comprehensive understanding of human metabolism, which is of great value to the biomedical research community. To make this kind of data easily accessible to the public, we have designed and deployed the human metabolic atlas (HMA) website (http://www.metabolicatlas.org). This online resource provides comprehensive information about human metabolism, including the results of metabolic network analyses. We hope that it can also serve as an information exchange interface for human metabolism knowledge within the research community. The HMA consists of three major components: Repository, Hreed (Human REaction Entities Database) and Atlas. Repository is a collection of GEMs for specific human cell types and human-related microorganisms in SBML (System Biology Markup Language) format. The current release consists of several types of GEMs: a generic human GEM, 82 GEMs for normal cell types, 16 GEMs for different cancer cell types, 2 curated GEMs and 5 GEMs for human gut bacteria. Hreed contains detailed information about biochemical reactions. A web interface for Hreed facilitates an access to the Hreed reaction data, which can be easily retrieved by using specific keywords or names of related genes, proteins, compounds and cross-references. Atlas web interface can be used for visualization of the GEMs collection overlaid on KEGG metabolic pathway maps with a zoom/pan user interface. The HMA is a unique tool for studying human metabolism, ranging in scope from an individual cell, to a specific organ, to the overall human body. This resource is freely available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License. PMID:26209309

  6. Human metabolic atlas: an online resource for human metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Nookaew, Intawat; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Human tissue-specific genome-scale metabolic models (GEMs) provide comprehensive understanding of human metabolism, which is of great value to the biomedical research community. To make this kind of data easily accessible to the public, we have designed and deployed the human metabolic atlas (HMA) website (http://www.metabolicatlas.org). This online resource provides comprehensive information about human metabolism, including the results of metabolic network analyses. We hope that it can also serve as an information exchange interface for human metabolism knowledge within the research community. The HMA consists of three major components: Repository, Hreed (Human REaction Entities Database) and Atlas. Repository is a collection of GEMs for specific human cell types and human-related microorganisms in SBML (System Biology Markup Language) format. The current release consists of several types of GEMs: a generic human GEM, 82 GEMs for normal cell types, 16 GEMs for different cancer cell types, 2 curated GEMs and 5 GEMs for human gut bacteria. Hreed contains detailed information about biochemical reactions. A web interface for Hreed facilitates an access to the Hreed reaction data, which can be easily retrieved by using specific keywords or names of related genes, proteins, compounds and cross-references. Atlas web interface can be used for visualization of the GEMs collection overlaid on KEGG metabolic pathway maps with a zoom/pan user interface. The HMA is a unique tool for studying human metabolism, ranging in scope from an individual cell, to a specific organ, to the overall human body. This resource is freely available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License. Database URL: http://www.metabolicatlas.org. PMID:26209309

  7. Metabolic Response of Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Prins, Mayumi L; Matsumoto, Joyce

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) in the pediatric brain presents unique challenges as the complex cascades of metabolic and biochemical responses to TBI are further complicated ongoing maturational changes of the developing brain. TBIs of all severities have been shown to significantly alter metabolism and hormones which impair the ability of the brain to process glucose for cellular energy. Under these conditions, the brain's primary fuel (glucose) becomes a less favorable fuel and the ability of the younger brain to revert to ketone metabolism can an advantage. This review addresses the potential of alternative substrate metabolic intervention as a logical pediatric TBI neuroprotective strategy. PMID:25336427

  8. PPAR? and human metabolic disease

    PubMed Central

    Semple, Robert K.; Chatterjee, V. Krishna K.; O’Rahilly, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    The nuclear receptor family of PPARs was named for the ability of the original member to induce hepatic peroxisome proliferation in mice in response to xenobiotic stimuli. However, studies on the action and structure of the 3 human PPAR isotypes (PPAR?, PPAR?, and PPAR?) suggest that these moieties are intimately involved in nutrient sensing and the regulation of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. PPAR? and PPAR? appear primarily to stimulate oxidative lipid metabolism, while PPAR? is principally involved in the cellular assimilation of lipids via anabolic pathways. Our understanding of the functions of PPAR? in humans has been increased by the clinical use of potent agonists and by the discovery of both rare and severely deleterious dominant-negative mutations leading to a stereotyped syndrome of partial lipodystrophy and severe insulin resistance, as well as more common sequence variants with a much smaller impact on receptor function. These may nevertheless have much greater significance for the public health burden of metabolic disease. This Review will focus on the role of PPAR? in human physiology, with specific reference to clinical pharmacological studies, and analysis of PPARG gene variants in the abnormal lipid and carbohydrate metabolism of the metabolic syndrome. PMID:16511590

  9. Metabolic effects of hypergravity on experimental animals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oyama, J.

    1982-01-01

    Several experiments concerned with the exposure of animals to acute or chronic centrifugation are described. The effects of hypergravity particularly discussed include the decreased growth rate and body weight, increased metabolic rate, skeletal deformation, and loss of body fat.

  10. Modeling cancer metabolism on a genome scale Keren Yizhak1,*

    E-print Network

    Ruppin, Eytan

    Review Modeling cancer metabolism on a genome scale Keren Yizhak1,* , Barbara Chaneton2 , Eyal Gottlieb2 & Eytan Ruppin1,3,4,** Abstract Cancer cells have fundamentally altered cellular metabolism, several new key metabolic alterations in cancer have been established over the last decade, leading

  11. Peripartal changes in reticuloruminal pH and temperature in dairy cows differing in the susceptibility to subacute rumen acidosis.

    PubMed

    Humer, E; Ghareeb, K; Harder, H; Mickdam, E; Khol-Parisini, A; Zebeli, Q

    2015-12-01

    The present study aimed to investigate changes in the reticuloruminal pH and temperature dynamics in periparturient dairy cows. Reticuloruminal pH and temperature measurements were conducted from 7 d before until 8 d after parturition using indwelling sensors. Nine Simmental and 4 Brown Swiss dairy cows were fed a close-up total mixed ration (52.5% neutral detergent fiber, 5.68MJ of net energy for lactation per kg of dry matter) with additional 1kg/cow per d concentrate mixture (29.5% neutral detergent fiber and 6.25MJ of net energy for lactation per kg of dry matter), starting from 2 wk before the estimated calving date. Postpartum, all cows had free access to the same close-up diet and were gradually fed increasing amounts of a concentrate-rich total mixed ration for early-lactation cows (32.7% neutral detergent fiber, 7.22MJ of net energy for lactation per kg of dry matter). Data showed depressed reticuloruminal pH early postpartum, but only in the group of cows defined as subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA) susceptible (n=8), which had a higher duration time of pH <5.8 (753±82min/d) compared with SARA-tolerant cows (n=5; 15±6min/d). Also, compared with SARA-tolerant cows (112±91min/d), the SARA-susceptible group showed longer (1,049±75min/d) duration time of pH <6.0. When compared by breed, mean reticuloruminal pH tended to be lower in Simmental (6.16±0.03) than in Brown Swiss cows (6.25±0.05), but no differences were observed in the duration of pH <5.8 between breeds. Simmental cows produced more milk (30.4±1.2kg/d) compared with Brown Swiss cows (27.9±1.3kg/d). Neither total dry matter intake nor milk yield were different between SARA-susceptible and SARA-tolerant groups. However, SARA-tolerant cows consumed greater amounts of the close-up total mixed ration than their SARA-susceptible counterparts, whereas no difference was observed in the intake of the early-lactating total mixed ration between the groups. Reticuloruminal temperature was not affected by breed or SARA susceptibility. Interestingly, the mean reticuloruminal temperature and the time duration of temperature >39.5°C abruptly dropped from d 2 to 1 before calving by 0.35°C and 430min/d, respectively. In conclusion, the strong inter-animal variation in reticuloruminal pH responses suggests the need for more careful monitoring and differentiated feeding management of cows during the transition period, whereby the SARA-susceptible cows may require particular attention regarding feeding management and diet composition. The abrupt decrease in reticuloruminal temperature the day before parturition may enable this noninvasive method as a management tool for prediction of parturition time. PMID:26433416

  12. Establishment of Quantitative Severity Evaluation Model for Spinal Cord Injury by Metabolomic Fingerprinting

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hao; Cohen, Mitchell Jay; Chen, Wei; Sun, Ming-Wei; Lu, Charles Damien

    2014-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating event with a limited hope for recovery and represents an enormous public health issue. It is crucial to understand the disturbances in the metabolic network after SCI to identify injury mechanisms and opportunities for treatment intervention. Through plasma 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) screening, we identified 15 metabolites that made up an “Eigen-metabolome” capable of distinguishing rats with severe SCI from healthy control rats. Forty enzymes regulated these 15 metabolites in the metabolic network. We also found that 16 metabolites regulated by 130 enzymes in the metabolic network impacted neurobehavioral recovery. Using the Eigen-metabolome, we established a linear discrimination model to cluster rats with severe and mild SCI and control rats into separate groups and identify the interactive relationships between metabolic biomarkers in the global metabolic network. We identified 10 clusters in the global metabolic network and defined them as distinct metabolic disturbance domains of SCI. Metabolic paths such as retinal, glycerophospholipid, arachidonic acid metabolism; NAD–NADPH conversion process, tyrosine metabolism, and cadaverine and putrescine metabolism were included. In summary, we presented a novel interdisciplinary method that integrates metabolomics and global metabolic network analysis to visualize metabolic network disturbances after SCI. Our study demonstrated the systems biological study paradigm that integration of 1H-NMR, metabolomics, and global metabolic network analysis is useful to visualize complex metabolic disturbances after severe SCI. Furthermore, our findings may provide a new quantitative injury severity evaluation model for clinical use. PMID:24727691

  13. Establishment of quantitative severity evaluation model for spinal cord injury by metabolomic fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jin; Zeng, Jun; Cai, Bin; Yang, Hao; Cohen, Mitchell Jay; Chen, Wei; Sun, Ming-Wei; Lu, Charles Damien; Jiang, Hua

    2014-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating event with a limited hope for recovery and represents an enormous public health issue. It is crucial to understand the disturbances in the metabolic network after SCI to identify injury mechanisms and opportunities for treatment intervention. Through plasma 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) screening, we identified 15 metabolites that made up an "Eigen-metabolome" capable of distinguishing rats with severe SCI from healthy control rats. Forty enzymes regulated these 15 metabolites in the metabolic network. We also found that 16 metabolites regulated by 130 enzymes in the metabolic network impacted neurobehavioral recovery. Using the Eigen-metabolome, we established a linear discrimination model to cluster rats with severe and mild SCI and control rats into separate groups and identify the interactive relationships between metabolic biomarkers in the global metabolic network. We identified 10 clusters in the global metabolic network and defined them as distinct metabolic disturbance domains of SCI. Metabolic paths such as retinal, glycerophospholipid, arachidonic acid metabolism; NAD-NADPH conversion process, tyrosine metabolism, and cadaverine and putrescine metabolism were included. In summary, we presented a novel interdisciplinary method that integrates metabolomics and global metabolic network analysis to visualize metabolic network disturbances after SCI. Our study demonstrated the systems biological study paradigm that integration of 1H-NMR, metabolomics, and global metabolic network analysis is useful to visualize complex metabolic disturbances after severe SCI. Furthermore, our findings may provide a new quantitative injury severity evaluation model for clinical use. PMID:24727691

  14. Response to trauma and metabolic changes: posttraumatic metabolism.

    PubMed

    ?im?ek, Turgay; ?im?ek, Hayal Uzelli; Cantürk, Nuh Zafer

    2014-01-01

    Stress response caused by events such as surgical trauma includes endocrine, metabolic and immunological changes. Stress hormones and cytokines play a role in these reactions. More reactions are induced by greater stress, ultimately leading to greater catabolic effects. Cuthbertson reported the characteristic response that occurs in trauma patients: protein and fat consumption and protection of body fluids and electrolytes because of hypermetabolism in the early period. The oxygen and energy requirement increases in proportion to the severity of trauma. The awareness of alterations in amino acid, lipid, and carbohydrate metabolism changes in surgical patients is important in determining metabolic and nutritional support. The main metabolic change in response to injury that leads to a series of reactions is the reduction of the normal anabolic effect of insulin, i.e. the development of insulin resistance. Free fatty acids are primary sources of energy after trauma. Triglycerides meet 50 to 80 % of the consumed energy after trauma and in critical illness. Surgical stress and trauma result in a reduction in protein synthesis and moderate protein degradation. Severe trauma, burns and sepsis result in increased protein degradation. The aim of glucose administration to surgical patients during fasting is to reduce proteolysis and to prevent loss of muscle mass. In major stress such as sepsis and trauma, it is important both to reduce the catabolic response that is the key to faster healing after surgery and to obtain a balanced metabolism in the shortest possible time with minimum loss. For these reasons, the details of metabolic response to trauma should be known in managing these situations and patients should be treated accordingly. PMID:25931917

  15. Opioid metabolism and clinical aspects.

    PubMed

    Mercadante, Sebastiano

    2015-12-15

    Opioids are are commonly used for the management of acute and chronic pain. Opioids have different physicochemical and pharmacokinetic characteristics, which explain the profound changes in the clinical effect in several clinical conditions. Pharmacokinetics influences the opioid response affecting bioavailability, production of metabolites with residual clinical activity, and elimination. Generality of opioid metabolism and clinical implications for specific opioids in different clinical conditions were reviewed to bridge the gap between pharmacokinetics and clinical response. The knowledge of opioid metabolism is essential, particularly for older and complicated patients who receive multiple medications and may have impaired of renal and hepatic function. The recognition of possible metabolic problems and the consideration of adverse drug-drug interactions are fundamental to optimize the use of opioids in clinical practice. PMID:26522929

  16. Gitelman’s syndrome complicated by mild renal insufficiency and high anion gap acidosis; a rare presentation in a young female

    PubMed Central

    Hassan Jafry, Nazrul; Ahmed, Ejaz; Mubarak, Muhammed

    2015-01-01

    Background: Gitelman’s syndrome (GS) is a rare autosomal recessive renal tubular disorder that is characterized by episodic clinical manifestations and persistent biochemical abnormalities. The disorder manifests in adolescent or adult age and is characterized by transient episodes of muscle weakness and tetany. Its diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion and skillful interpretation of laboratory investigations. Case Presentation: We herein present a case of a 20-year-old female patient who presented with generalized muscle weakness and mild renal insufficiency. Laboratory investigations revealed mild azotemia, high anion gap acidosis, hypokalemia, hypomagnesemia, and hypocalciuria. She recovered her renal functions and muscle power with appropriate management and is doing well seven months after her first presentation to our hospital. Conclusions: This case highlights the need to create high index of suspicion among the general practitioners about this syndrome and an early referral of such patients to nephrologists for an accurate diagnosis and appropriate management. PMID:25964887

  17. [Disorders of phosphate metabolism].

    PubMed

    Fukumoto, Seiji

    2010-03-01

    Serum phosphate is maintained within a certain range by intestinal phosphate absorption, renal phosphate handling, and dynamic equilibrium with the intracellular phosphate or phosphate in bone. Of these, renal phosphate handling is believed to be the main determinant of the serum phosphate level at least in a chronic state. Most of the phosphate filtered from the glomeruli is reabsorbed in proximal tubules through type 2a and 2c sodium-phosphate co-transporters. Therefore, chronic hypophosphatemia and hyperphosphatemia are usually caused by changes in renal phosphate handling. Several humoral factors, including parathyroid hormone and insulin-like growth factor-I, have been known to affect proximal tubular phosphate reabsorption. In addition, fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) was shown to inhibit phosphate reabsorption by suppressing the expression of type 2a and 2c sodium-phosphate co-transporters. FGF23 also reduces the circulatory 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25 (OH)2D] level. FGF23 is produced by bone, especially by osteocytes, and works in the kidney by binding to the Klotho-FGF receptor complex. It has been shown that excess actions of FGF23 cause several kinds of hypophosphatemic rickets/osteomalacia with impaired proximal tubular phosphate reabsorption and a rather low 1,25 (OH)2D level. In contrast, deficient actions of FGF23 result in familial hyperphosphatemic tumoral calcinosis with enhanced proximal tubular phosphate reabsorption and high 1,25 (OH)2D. These results indicate that FGF23 is a hormone regulating phosphate and vitamin D metabolism. In addition, several hypophosphatemic and hyperphosphatemic diseases can be classified as endocrine diseases caused by the aberrant actions of FGF23. It is possible that some drugs that modulate the action of FGF23 can be novel therapeutic measures for abnormal phosphate metabolism in the future. PMID:20408440

  18. Transgenerational inheritance of metabolic disease.

    PubMed

    Stegemann, Rachel; Buchner, David A

    2015-07-01

    Metabolic disease encompasses several disorders including obesity, type 2 diabetes, and dyslipidemia. Recently, the incidence of metabolic disease has drastically increased, driven primarily by a worldwide obesity epidemic. Transgenerational inheritance remains controversial, but has been proposed to contribute to human metabolic disease risk based on a growing number of proof-of-principle studies in model organisms ranging from Caenorhabditis elegans to Mus musculus to Sus scrofa. Collectively, these studies demonstrate that heritable risk is epigenetically transmitted from parent to offspring over multiple generations in the absence of a continued exposure to the triggering stimuli. A diverse assortment of initial triggers can induce transgenerational inheritance including high-fat or high-sugar diets, low-protein diets, various toxins, and ancestral genetic variants. Although the mechanistic basis underlying the transgenerational inheritance of disease risk remains largely unknown, putative molecules mediating transmission include small RNAs, histone modifications, and DNA methylation. Due to the considerable impact of metabolic disease on human health, it is critical to better understand the role of transgenerational inheritance of metabolic disease risk to open new avenues for therapeutic intervention and improve upon the current methods for clinical diagnoses and treatment. PMID:25937492

  19. Glycogen Storage Disease Type Ia in Canines: A Model for Human Metabolic and Genetic Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Specht, Andrew; Fiske, Laurie; Erger, Kirsten; Cossette, Travis; Verstegen, John; Campbell-Thompson, Martha; Struck, Maggie B.; Lee, Young Mok; Chou, Janice Y.; Byrne, Barry J.; Correia, Catherine E.; Mah, Cathryn S.; Weinstein, David A.; Conlon, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    A canine model of Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSDIa) is described. Affected dogs are homozygous for a previously described M121I mutation resulting in a deficiency of glucose-6-phosphatase-?. Metabolic, clinicopathologic, pathologic, and clinical manifestations of GSDIa observed in this model are described and compared to those observed in humans. The canine model shows more complete recapitulation of the clinical manifestations seen in humans including “lactic acidosis”, larger size, and longer lifespan compared to other animal models. Use of this model in preclinical trials of gene therapy is described and briefly compared to the murine model. Although the canine model offers a number of advantages for evaluating potential therapies for GSDIa, there are also some significant challenges involved in its use. Despite these challenges, the canine model of GSDIa should continue to provide valuable information about the potential for generating curative therapies for GSDIa as well as other genetic hepatic diseases. PMID:21318173

  20. Molecular Interactions between NAFLD and Xenobiotic Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Naik, Adviti; Beli?, Aleš; Zanger, Ulrich M.; Rozman, Damjana

    2013-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), the hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome, is a complex multifactorial disease characterized by metabolic deregulations that include accumulation of lipids in the liver, lipotoxicity, and insulin resistance. The progression of NAFLD to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis and cirrhosis, and ultimately to carcinomas, is governed by interplay of pro-inflammatory pathways, oxidative stress, as well as fibrogenic and apoptotic cues. As the liver is the major organ of biotransformation, deregulations in hepatic signaling pathways have effects on both, xenobiotic and endobiotic metabolism. Several major nuclear receptors involved in the transcription and regulation of phase I and II drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters also have endobiotic ligands including several lipids. Hence, hepatic lipid accumulation in steatosis and NAFLD, which leads to deregulated activation patterns of nuclear receptors, may result in altered drug metabolism capacity in NAFLD patients. On the other hand, genetic and association studies have indicated that a malfunction in drug metabolism can affect the prevalence and severity of NAFLD. This review focuses on the complex interplay between NAFLD pathogenesis and drug metabolism. A better understanding of these relationships is a prerequisite for developing improved drug dosing algorithms for the pharmacotherapy of patients with different stages of NAFLD. PMID:23346097

  1. Metabolic regulation of yeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiechter, A.

    1982-12-01

    Metabolic regulation which is based on endogeneous and exogeneous process variables which may act constantly or time dependently on the living cell is discussed. The observed phenomena of the regulation are the result of physical, chemical, and biological parameters. These parameters are identified. Ethanol is accumulated as an intermediate product and the synthesis of biomass is reduced. This regulatory effect of glucose is used for the aerobic production of ethanol. Very high production rates are thereby obtained. Understanding of the regulation mechanism of the glucose effect has improved. In addition to catabolite repression, several other mechanisms of enzyme regulation have been described, that are mostly governed by exogeneous factors. Glucose also affects the control of respiration in a third class of yeasts which are unable to make use of ethanol as a substrate for growth. This is due to the lack of any anaplerotic activity. As a consequence, diauxic growth behavior is reduced to a one-stage growth with a drastically reduced cell yield. The pulse chemostat technique, a systematic approach for medium design is developed and medium supplements that are essential for metabolic control are identified.

  2. Microbial Metabolism Databases of Microbial

    E-print Network

    Huang, Ching-Tsan

    1 Microbial Metabolism Databases of Microbial Metabolism & Degradation Ching-Tsan Huang () Office and Metabolism Encyclopedia of E. coli K12 Genes and Metabolism Databases of Metabolism #12;6 Genome Eco. coli transport proteins Metabolism EcoCyc describes all known metabolic pathways and signal

  3. (Regulation of teopene metabolism). Progress report. [Mentha piperita

    SciTech Connect

    Croteau, R.

    1985-01-01

    Progress in elucidating the biosynthesis of several monoterpenes in the peppermint is described. Tracer studies were performed to clarify metabolic pathways involved. Several growth regulators were screened for their influence on monoterpene composition and yield in peppermint and sage. (DT)

  4. Automated Microbial Metabolism Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The effect of several environmental parameters on previously developed life detection systems is explored. Initial attempts were made to conduct all the experiments in a moist mode (high soil volume to water volume ratio). However, only labeled release and measurement of ATP were found to be feasible under conditions of low moisture. Therefore, these two life detection experiments were used for most of the environmental effects studies. Three soils, Mojave (California desert), Wyaconda (Maryland, sandy loam) and Victoria Valley (Antarctic desert) were generally used throughout. The environmental conditions studied included: incubation temperature 3 C to 80 C, ultraviolet irradiation of soils, variations in soil/liquid ratio, specific atmospheric gases, various antimetabolites, specific substrates, and variation in pH. An experiment designed to monitor nitrogen metabolism was also investigated.

  5. Leptocephalus energetics: metabolism and excretion.

    PubMed

    Bishop; Torres

    1999-01-01

    Leptocephali are the unusual transparent larvae that are typical of eels, bonefish, tarpon and ladyfish. Unlike the larvae of all other fishes, leptocephali may remain in the plankton as larvae for several months before metamorphosing into the juvenile form. During their planktonic phase, leptocephali accumulate energy reserves in the form of glycosaminoglycans, which are then expended to fuel metamorphosis. The leptocephalus developmental strategy is thus fundamentally different from that exhibited in all other fishes in two respects: it is far longer in duration and energy reserves are accumulated. It was anticipated that the unusual character of leptocephalus development would be reflected in the energy budget of the larva. This study describes the allocation of energy to metabolism and excretion, two important elements of the energy budget. Metabolic rates were measured directly in four species of leptocephali, Paraconger caudilimbatus, Ariosoma balearicum, Gymnothorax saxicola and Ophichthus gomesii, using sealed-jar respirometry at sea. Direct measurements of metabolic rates were corroborated by measuring activities of lactate dehydrogenase and citrate synthase, two key enzymes of intermediary metabolism, in addition to that of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, a ubiquitous ion pump important in osmotic regulation. Excretion rates were determined by subsampling the sea water used in the respiratory incubations. The entire premetamorphic size range for each species was used in all assays. Mass-specific oxygen consumption rate, excretion rate and all enzyme activities (y) declined precipitously with increasing mass (M) according to the equation y=aM(b), where a is a species-specific constant and -1.74metabolic rate and mass, normally between -0.33 and 0, showed that a massive decline in metabolic rate occurs with increasing size. The result suggests that the proportion of actively metabolizing tissue also declines with size, being replaced in large measure by the metabolically inert energy depot, the glycosaminoglycans. Leptocephali can thus grow to a large size with minimal metabolic penalty, which is an unusual and successful developmental strategy. PMID:10460735

  6. Aerobic and Anaerobic Metabolism Aerobic = oxidative metabolism

    E-print Network

    Jodice, Patrick

    Aerobic and Anaerobic Metabolism · Aerobic = oxidative metabolism ­ 1 mol glucose CO2 and H20, 36 are disrupted · All activity in vertebrates is aerobic ­ anaerobiosis in vertebrates is just aerobiosis and velocity (F9.9) From McNab 2002. #12;Locomotion in Reptiles · Aerobic scope appears to vary among taxa

  7. Thyroid Hormone Regulation of Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Mullur, Rashmi; Liu, Yan-Yun

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) is required for normal development as well as regulating metabolism in the adult. The thyroid hormone receptor (TR) isoforms, ? and ?, are differentially expressed in tissues and have distinct roles in TH signaling. Local activation of thyroxine (T4), to the active form, triiodothyronine (T3), by 5?-deiodinase type 2 (D2) is a key mechanism of TH regulation of metabolism. D2 is expressed in the hypothalamus, white fat, brown adipose tissue (BAT), and skeletal muscle and is required for adaptive thermogenesis. The thyroid gland is regulated by thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). In addition to TRH/TSH regulation by TH feedback, there is central modulation by nutritional signals, such as leptin, as well as peptides regulating appetite. The nutrient status of the cell provides feedback on TH signaling pathways through epigentic modification of histones. Integration of TH signaling with the adrenergic nervous system occurs peripherally, in liver, white fat, and BAT, but also centrally, in the hypothalamus. TR regulates cholesterol and carbohydrate metabolism through direct actions on gene expression as well as cross-talk with other nuclear receptors, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR), liver X receptor (LXR), and bile acid signaling pathways. TH modulates hepatic insulin sensitivity, especially important for the suppression of hepatic gluconeogenesis. The role of TH in regulating metabolic pathways has led to several new therapeutic targets for metabolic disorders. Understanding the mechanisms and interactions of the various TH signaling pathways in metabolism will improve our likelihood of identifying effective and selective targets. PMID:24692351

  8. Metabolic Diseases of Muscle

    MedlinePLUS

    ... genes has allowed researchers to begin experiments with gene therapy, a potential cure for some metabolic dis- eases. ... to Myozyme for enzyme deficiencies; and development of gene therapies for metabolic diseases. The knowledge MDA-funded researchers ...

  9. Modeling cancer metabolism on a genome scale

    PubMed Central

    Yizhak, Keren; Chaneton, Barbara; Gottlieb, Eyal; Ruppin, Eytan

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells have fundamentally altered cellular metabolism that is associated with their tumorigenicity and malignancy. In addition to the widely studied Warburg effect, several new key metabolic alterations in cancer have been established over the last decade, leading to the recognition that altered tumor metabolism is one of the hallmarks of cancer. Deciphering the full scope and functional implications of the dysregulated metabolism in cancer requires both the advancement of a variety of omics measurements and the advancement of computational approaches for the analysis and contextualization of the accumulated data. Encouragingly, while the metabolic network is highly interconnected and complex, it is at the same time probably the best characterized cellular network. Following, this review discusses the challenges that genome-scale modeling of cancer metabolism has been facing. We survey several recent studies demonstrating the first strides that have been done, testifying to the value of this approach in portraying a network-level view of the cancer metabolism and in identifying novel drug targets and biomarkers. Finally, we outline a few new steps that may further advance this field. PMID:26130389

  10. Glutathionyl systems and metabolic dysfunction in obesity.

    PubMed

    Picklo, Matthew J; Long, Eric K; Vomhof-DeKrey, Emilie E

    2015-12-01

    Oxidative stress is associated with obesity. However, glutathione (GSH), one of the body's most abundant antioxidants, plays dual and seemingly contradictory roles in the development of obesity and its comorbidities. Glutathione has complex metabolic and biochemical fates and is a cofactor for several enzymes that function in modifying obesity-related responses. For example, depletion of GSH increases energy metabolism and reduces adipose accretion, while elevation of GSH peroxidase activity induces insulin resistance. This review summarizes the literature linking GSH and its related enzymes, GSH peroxidase, glutaredoxins, and glutathione S-transferases, to obesity and its pertinent endpoints (e.g., energy metabolism, inflammation, and insulin resistance). PMID:26493322

  11. Cell Metabolism Short Article

    E-print Network

    Chanfreau, Guillaume

    Cell Metabolism Short Article Sphingolipid Signaling Mediates Iron Toxicity Yueh-Jung Lee,1 Xinhe of cellular macromolecules to ROS (Touati, 2000; Valko et al., 2005). Defects in Fe metabolism can result of limiting iron toxicity. Thus, iron levels must be regulated to meet the demands of cellular metabolism

  12. Metabolic Engineering X Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Flach, Evan

    2015-05-07

    The International Metabolic Engineering Society (IMES) and the Society for Biological Engineering (SBE), both technological communities of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE), hosted the Metabolic Engineering X Conference (ME-X) on June 15-19, 2014 at the Westin Bayshore in Vancouver, British Columbia. It attracted 395 metabolic engineers from academia, industry and government from around the globe.

  13. Substrate channeling in proline metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Arentson, Benjamin W.; Sanyal, Nikhilesh; Becker, Donald F.

    2012-01-01

    Proline metabolism is an important pathway that has relevance in several cellular functions such as redox balance, apoptosis, and cell survival. Results from different groups have indicated that substrate channeling of proline metabolic intermediates may be a critical mechanism. One intermediate is pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C), which upon hydrolysis opens to glutamic semialdehyde (GSA). Recent structural and kinetic evidence indicate substrate channeling of P5C/GSA occurs in the proline catabolic pathway between the proline dehydrogenase and P5C dehydrogenase active sites of bifunctional proline utilization A (PutA). Substrate channeling in PutA is proposed to facilitate the hydrolysis of P5C to GSA which is unfavorable at physiological pH. The second intermediate, gamma-glutamyl phosphate, is part of the proline biosynthetic pathway and is extremely labile. Substrate channeling of gamma-glutamyl phosphate is thought to be necessary to protect it from bulk solvent. Because of the unfavorable equilibrium of P5C/GSA and the reactivity of gamma-glutamyl phosphate, substrate channeling likely improves the efficiency of proline metabolism. Here, we outline general strategies for testing substrate channeling and review the evidence for channeling in proline metabolism. PMID:22201749

  14. An overview of benzene metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, R; Hedli, C C

    1996-01-01

    Benzene toxicity involves both bone marrow depression and leukemogenesis caused by damage to multiple classes of hematopoietic cells and a variety of hematopoietic cell functions. Study of the relationship between the metabolism and toxicity of benzene indicates that several metabolites of benzene play significant roles in generating benzene toxicity. Benzene is metabolized, primarily in the liver, to a variety of hydroxylated and ring-opened products that are transported to the bone marrow where subsequent secondary metabolism occurs. Two potential mechanisms by which benzene metabolites may damage cellular macromolecules to induce toxicity include the covalent binding of reactive metabolites of benzene and the capacity of benzene metabolites to induce oxidative damage. Although the relative contributions of each of these mechanisms to toxicity remains unestablished, it is clear that different mechanisms contribute to the toxicities associated with different metabolites. As a corollary, it is unlikely that benzene toxicity can be described as the result of the interaction of a single metabolite with a single biological target. Continued investigation of the metabolism of benzene and its metabolites will allow us to determine the specific combination of metabolites as well as the biological target(s) involved in toxicity and will ultimately lead to our understanding of the relationship between the production of benzene metabolites and bone marrow toxicity. PMID:9118888

  15. Metabolic origins of childhood asthma.

    PubMed

    Grasemann, Hartmut

    2015-12-01

    Childhood obesity and incidence of asthma are increasing globally. The parallel increase of the two suggests that obesity and asthma may be related and that abnormalities in the lipid and/or glucose metabolism may contribute to the pathogenesis of asthma. The clinical presentation of obese asthma is distinct from other asthma phenotypes and depending on age of onset of symptoms. Asthma in obese people tends to be more severe, not typically associated with allergy, and less responsive to standard anti-inflammatory therapy, including corticosteroids. Obesity and obesity-related comorbidities may lead to asthma via a number of mechanisms including changes in lung mechanics, the nitric oxide metabolism, and by causing inflammation. Furthermore, evidence suggests that nutrition during pregnancy contributes to intrauterine immune and metabolic programming in the offspring, which may have major influences on predisposition to cardiovascular, metabolic, and allergic diseases, including asthma, later in life. This review will highlight some suggested mechanistic links between obesity and diabetes with asthma. PMID:26542296

  16. Association of cancer metabolism-related proteins with oral carcinogenesis – indications for chemoprevention and metabolic sensitizing of oral squamous cell carcinoma?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Tumor metabolism is a crucial factor for the carcinogenesis of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Methods Expression of IGF-R1, glycolysis-related proteins (GLUT-1, HK 2, PFK-1, LDHA, TKTL1), mitochondrial enzymes (SDHA, SDHB, ATP synthase) were analyzed in normal oral mucosa (n?=?5), oral precursor lesions (simple hyperplasia, n?=?11; squamous intraepithelial neoplasia, SIN I-III, n?=?35), and OSCC specimen (n?=?42) by immunohistochemistry and real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analysis in OSCC cell lines. Metabolism-related proteins were correlated with proliferation activity (Ki-67) and apoptotic properties (TUNEL assay) in OSCC. Specificity of antibodies was confirmed by western blotting in cancer cell lines. Results Expression of IGF-R1, glycolysis-related proteins (GLUT-1, HK 2, LDHA, TKTL1), and mitochondrial enzymes (SDHA, SDHB, ATP synthase) were significantly increased in the carcinogenesis of OSCC. Metabolic active regions of OSCC were strongly correlated with proliferating cancer (Ki-67+) cells without detection of apoptosis (TUNEL assay). Conclusions This study provides the first evidence of the expression of IGF-R1, glycolysis-related proteins GLUT-1, HK 2, PFK-1, LDHA, and TKTL1, as well as mitochondrial enzymes SDHA, SDHB, and ATP synthase in the multi-step carcinogenesis of OSCC. Both, hypoxia-related glucose metabolism and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation characteristics are associated with the carcinogenesis of OSCC. Acidosis and OXPHOS may drive a metabolic shift towards the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP). Therefore, inhibition of the PPP, glycolysis, and targeted anti-mitochondrial therapies (ROS generation) by natural compounds or synthetic vitamin derivatives may act as sensitizer for apoptosis in cancer cells mediated by adjuvant therapies in OSCC. PMID:25048361

  17. Phosphate metabolism and vitamin D

    PubMed Central

    Fukumoto, Seiji

    2014-01-01

    Phosphate plays many essential roles in our body. To accomplish these functions, serum phosphate needs to be maintained in a certain range. Serum phosphate level is regulated by intestinal phosphate absorption, renal phosphate handling and equilibrium of extracellular phosphate with that in bone or intracellular fluid. Several hormones such as parathyroid hormone, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D) and fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) regulate serum phosphate by modulating intestinal phosphate absorption, renal phosphate reabsorption and/or bone metabolism. In addition, dietary phosphate rapidly enhances renal phosphate excretion, although detailed mechanisms of this adaptation remain to be clarified. Physiologically, extracellular concentrations of phosphate and these hormones are maintained by several negative feedback loops. For example, 1,25(OH)2D enhances FGF23 production and FGF23 reduces 1,25(OH)2D level. In addition, phosphate affects 1,25(OH)2D and FGF23 levels. Dysfunction of these negative feedback loops results in several diseases with abnormal phosphate and 1,25(OH)2D levels. Especially, excess actions of FGF23 cause several hypophosphatemic rickets/osteomalacia with relatively low level of 1,25(OH)2D that had been classified as vitamin D-resistant rickets/osteomalacia. In contrast, deficient actions of FGF23 cause hyperphosphatemic familial tumoral calcinosis. However, there still remain several unanswered questions regarding phosphate and vitamin D metabolism. PMID:24605214

  18. Phosphate metabolism and vitamin D.

    PubMed

    Fukumoto, Seiji

    2014-01-01

    Phosphate plays many essential roles in our body. To accomplish these functions, serum phosphate needs to be maintained in a certain range. Serum phosphate level is regulated by intestinal phosphate absorption, renal phosphate handling and equilibrium of extracellular phosphate with that in bone or intracellular fluid. Several hormones such as parathyroid hormone, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D) and fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) regulate serum phosphate by modulating intestinal phosphate absorption, renal phosphate reabsorption and/or bone metabolism. In addition, dietary phosphate rapidly enhances renal phosphate excretion, although detailed mechanisms of this adaptation remain to be clarified. Physiologically, extracellular concentrations of phosphate and these hormones are maintained by several negative feedback loops. For example, 1,25(OH)2D enhances FGF23 production and FGF23 reduces 1,25(OH)2D level. In addition, phosphate affects 1,25(OH)2D and FGF23 levels. Dysfunction of these negative feedback loops results in several diseases with abnormal phosphate and 1,25(OH)2D levels. Especially, excess actions of FGF23 cause several hypophosphatemic rickets/osteomalacia with relatively low level of 1,25(OH)2D that had been classified as vitamin D-resistant rickets/osteomalacia. In contrast, deficient actions of FGF23 cause hyperphosphatemic familial tumoral calcinosis. However, there still remain several unanswered questions regarding phosphate and vitamin D metabolism. PMID:24605214

  19. [Regulation of terpene metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Croteau, R.

    1991-01-01

    During the last grant period, we have completed studies on the key pathways of monoterpene biosynthesis and catabolism in sage and peppermint, and have, by several lines of evidence, deciphered the rate-limiting step of each pathway. We have at least partially purified and characterized the relevant enzymes of each pathway. We have made a strong case, based on analytical, in vivo, and in vitro studies, that terpene accumulation depends upon the balance between biosynthesis and catabolism, and provided supporting evidence that these processes are developmentally-regulated and very closely associated with senescence of the oil glands. Oil gland ontogeny has been characterized at the ultrastructural level. We have exploited foliar-applied bioregulators to delay gland senescence, and have developed tissue explant and cell culture systems to study several elusive aspects of catabolism. We have isolated pure gland cell clusters and localized monoterpene biosynthesis and catabolism within these structures, and have used these preparations as starting materials for the purification to homogeneity of target regulatory'' enzymes. We have thus developed the necessary background knowledge, based on a firm understanding of enzymology, as well as the necessary experimental tools for studying the regulation of monoterpene metabolism at the molecular level. Furthermore, we are now in a position to extend our systematic approach to other terpenoid classes (C[sub 15]-C[sub 30]) produced by oil glands.

  20. Metabolism of molybdenum.

    PubMed

    Mendel, Ralf R

    2013-01-01

    The transition element molybdenum is of essential importance for (nearly) all biological systems. It needs to be complexed by a special cofactor in order to gain catalytic activity. With the exception of bacterial Mo-nitrogenase, where Mo is a constituent of the FeMo-cofactor, Mo is bound to a pterin, thus forming the molybdenum cofactor Moco, which in different versions is the active compound at the catalytic site of all other Mo-containing enzymes. In eukaryotes, the most prominent Mo enzymes are nitrate reductase, sulfite oxidase, xanthine dehydrogenase, aldehyde oxidase, and the mitochondrial amidoxime reductase. The biosynthesis of Moco involves the complex interaction of six proteins and is a process of four steps, which also requires iron, ATP, and copper. After its synthesis, Moco is distributed to the apoproteins of Mo enzymes by Moco-carrier/binding proteins. A deficiency in the biosynthesis of Moco has lethal consequences for the respective organisms. In humans, Moco deficiency is a severe inherited inborn error in metabolism resulting in severe neurodegeneration in newborns and causing early childhood death. Eubacteria possess different versions of the pteridin cofactor as reflected by a large number of enzymes such as nitrate reductase, formate dehydrogenase, and dimethyl sulfoxide reductase, while in archaea a tungsten atom replaced molybdenum as catalytic metal in the active center. PMID:23595682

  1. Acidosis and Formaldehyde Secretion as a Possible Pathway of Cancer Pain and Options for Improved Cancer Pain Control.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Ba X; Shaw, D Graeme; Han, Bo; Fang, Josephine Y; Nimni, Marcel

    2015-09-01

    The prevalence of cancer pain in patients with cancer is high. The majority of efforts are spent on research in cancer treatment, but only a small fraction focuses on cancer pain. Pain in cancer patients, viewed predominantly as a secondary issue, is considered to be due to the destruction of tissues, compression of the nerves, inflammation, and secretion of biological mediators from the necrotic tumor mass. As a result, opioid drugs have remained as the primary pharmacological therapy for cancer pain for the past hundred years. This report reviews evidence that cancer pain may be produced by the metabolic effects of two byproducts of cancer-high acidity in the cancer microenvironment and the secretion of formaldehyde and its metabolites. We propose the research and development of therapeutic approaches for preemptive, short- and long-term management of cancer pain using available drugs or nutraceutical agents that can suppress or neutralize lactic acid production in combination with formaldehyde scavengers. We believe this approach may not only improve cancer pain control but may also enhance the quality of life for patients. PMID:26368037

  2. Genetics Home Reference: MEGDEL syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of metabolism ; inherited ; involuntary ; lactic acid ; lactic acidosis ; metabolism ; mitochondria ; muscle tone ; neurological ; newborn screening ; oxidative phosphorylation ; phospholipid ; phospholipids ; ...

  3. Calcium metabolism in microgravity.

    PubMed

    Heer, M; Kamps, N; Biener, C; Korr, C; Boerger, A; Zittermann, A; Stehle, P; Drummer, C

    1999-09-01

    Unloading of weight bearing bones as induced by microgravity or immobilization has significant impacts on the calcium and bone metabolism and is the most likely cause for space osteoporosis. During a 4.5 to 6 month stay in space most of the astronauts develop a reduction in bone mineral density in spine, femoral neck, trochanter, and pelvis of 1%-1.6% measured by Dual Energy X-ray Absorption (DEXA). Dependent on the mission length and the individual turnover rates of the astronauts it can even reach individual losses of up to 14% in the femoral neck. Osteoporosis itself is defined as the deterioration of bone tissue leading to enhanced bone fragility and to a consequent increase in fracture risk. Thinking of long-term missions to Mars or interplanetary missions for years, space osteoporosis is one of the major concerns for manned spaceflight. However, decrease in bone density can be initiated differently. It either can be caused by increases in bone formation and bone resorption resulting in a net bone loss, as obtained in fast looser postmenopausal osteoporosis. On the other hand decrease in bone formation and increase in bone resorption also leads to bone losses as obtained in slow looser postmenopausal osteoporosis or in Anorexia Nervosa patients. Biomarkers of bone turnover measured during several missions indicated that the pattern of space osteoporosis is very similar to the pattern of Anorexia Nervosa patients or slow looser postmenopausal osteoporosis. However, beside unloading, other risk factors for space osteoporosis exist such as stress, nutrition, fluid shifts, dehydration and bone perfusion. Especially nutritional factors may contribute considerably to the development of osteoporosis. From earthbound studies it is known that calcium supplementation in women and men can prevent bone loss of 1% bone per year. Based on these results we studied the calcium intake during several European missions and performed an experiment during the German MIR 97 mission where we investigated the effects of high calcium intake (>1000 mg/d) and vitamin D supplementation (650 IU/d) on the calcium and bone metabolism during 21 days in microgravity. In the MIR 97 mission high calcium intake and vitamin D supplementation led to high ionized calcium levels and a marked decrease in calcitriol levels together with decreased bone formation and increased bone resorption markers. Our conclusion from the MIR 97 mission is that an adequate calcium intake and vitamin D supplementation during space missions is mandatory but, in contrast to terrestrial conditions, does not efficiently counteract the development of space osteoporosis. PMID:10477499

  4. Progress in Metabolic Engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Nevoigt, Elke

    2008-01-01

    Summary: The traditional use of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in alcoholic fermentation has, over time, resulted in substantial accumulated knowledge concerning genetics, physiology, and biochemistry as well as genetic engineering and fermentation technologies. S. cerevisiae has become a platform organism for developing metabolic engineering strategies, methods, and tools. The current review discusses the relevance of several engineering strategies, such as rational and inverse metabolic engineering, evolutionary engineering, and global transcription machinery engineering, in yeast strain improvement. It also summarizes existing tools for fine-tuning and regulating enzyme activities and thus metabolic pathways. Recent examples of yeast metabolic engineering for food, beverage, and industrial biotechnology (bioethanol and bulk and fine chemicals) follow. S. cerevisiae currently enjoys increasing popularity as a production organism in industrial (“white”) biotechnology due to its inherent tolerance of low pH values and high ethanol and inhibitor concentrations and its ability to grow anaerobically. Attention is paid to utilizing lignocellulosic biomass as a potential substrate. PMID:18772282

  5. [Liver and drug metabolism].

    PubMed

    Mikheeva, O M

    2011-01-01

    Liver metabolism aims to change the biological activity of drugs to make them water-soluble to be excreted with bile and urine. The degree of metabolism depends on fermentative capacity for each drag (P450 fermentative system is localized in microsomal fraction of hepatocyte). Metabolism ability also changes under the influence of other substances. Liver diseases lead up to decrease of drug clirens and to increase the semi-excretion time because of reduction of liver metabolism. Therefore the drags usually undergoing intensive liver metabolism necessitate a high risk of overdose when liver diseases present. On the other hand no risk of overdose exist when drags with low liver metabolism are used. PMID:21560652

  6. Metabolic Syndrome and Migraine

    PubMed Central

    Sachdev, Amit; Marmura, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Migraine and metabolic syndrome are highly prevalent and costly conditions. The two conditions coexist, but it is unclear what relationship may exist between the two processes. Metabolic syndrome involves a number of findings, including insulin resistance, systemic hypertension, obesity, a proinflammatory state, and a prothrombotic state. Only one study addresses migraine in metabolic syndrome, finding significant differences in the presentation of metabolic syndrome in migraineurs. However, controversy exists regarding the contribution of each individual risk factor to migraine pathogenesis and prevalence. It is unclear what treatment implications, if any, exist as a result of the concomitant diagnosis of migraine and metabolic syndrome. The cornerstone of migraine and metabolic syndrome treatments is prevention, relying heavily on diet modification, sleep hygiene, medication use, and exercise. PMID:23181051

  7. Hypokalaemic paralysis and normocalcaemic tetany--a rare presentation of Sjogren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Selvaganesh, M; Murali, A; Mookambik, R V; Jayachandran, K

    2013-11-01

    38 year old woman was admitted with acute onset of quadriplegia. Biochemical investigation revealed severe hypokalaemia with hyperchloraemic metabolic acidosis, alkaline urine, and positive urinary anion gap which are the hallmark of distal tubular acidosis. In addition she also had hypophosphataemia, normoglycaemic glycosuria, aminoaciduria, and hyperphosphaturia suggestive of proximal tubular dysfunction. Further evaluation confirmed the diagnosis of Sjogren's syndrome. Interestingly our patient also had carpopedal spasm despite normal calcium and magnesium level. Quadriplegia and carpopedal spasm improved with correction of hypokalaemia and acidosis. Proximal tubular abnormalities (except albuminuria) were normalised at the time of discharge. Distal tubular acidosis is a well known renal manifestation of Sjogren's syndrome. But this type of transient proximal tubular dysfunction with distal tubular acidosis in Sjogren's syndrome is very rare and hypokalaemic tetany also deserves mention. PMID:24974497

  8. Mevalonate metabolism in cancer.

    PubMed

    Gruenbacher, Georg; Thurnher, Martin

    2015-01-28

    Cancer cells are characterized by sustained proliferative signaling, insensitivity to growth suppressors and resistance to apoptosis as well as by replicative immortality, the capacity to induce angiogenesis and to perform invasive growth. Additional hallmarks of cancer cells include the reprogramming of energy metabolism as well as the ability to evade immune surveillance. The current review focuses on the metabolic reprogramming of cancer cells and on the immune system's capacity to detect such changes in cancer cell metabolism. Specifically, we focus on mevalonate metabolism, which is a target for drug and immune based cancer treatment. PMID:24467965

  9. [Metabolic functions and sport].

    PubMed

    Riviere, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    Current epidemiological studies emphasize the increased of metabolic diseases of the adults, such as obesity, type-2 diabetes and metabolic syndromes. Even more worrying is the rising prevalence of obesity in children. It is due more to sedentariness, caused more by inactivity (television, video, games, etc.) than by overeating. Many studies have shown that regular physical activities benefit various bodily functions including metabolism. After dealing with the major benefits of physical exercise on some adult metabolic disorders, we focus on the prime role played by physical activity in combating the public health problem of childhood obesity. PMID:15651421

  10. Eicosanoids in Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hardwick, James P.; Eckman, Katie; Lee, Yoon Kwang; Abdelmegeed, Mohamed A.; Esterle, Andrew; Chilian, William M.; Chiang, John Y.; Song, Byoung-Joon

    2013-01-01

    Chronic persistent inflammation plays a significant role in disease pathology of cancer, cardiovascular disease, and metabolic syndrome (MetS). MetS is a constellation of diseases that include obesity, diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, hypertriglyceridemia, and hypercholesterolemia. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is associated with many of the MetS diseases. These metabolic derangements trigger a persistent inflammatory cascade, which includes production of lipid autacoids (eicosanoids) that recruit immune cells to the site of injury and subsequent expression of cytokines and chemokines that amplify the inflammatory response. In acute inflammation, the transcellular synthesis of antiinflammatory eicosanoids resolve inflammation, while persistent activation of the autacoid-cytokine-chemokine cascade in metabolic disease leads to chronic inflammation and accompanying tissue pathology. Many drugs targeting the eicosanoid pathways have been shown to be effective in the treatment of MetS, suggesting a common linkage between inflammation, MetS and drug metabolism.The cross-talk between inflammation and MetS seems apparent because of the growing evidence linking immune cell activation and metabolic disorders such as insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and hypertriglyceridemia. Thus modulation of lipid metabolism through either dietary adjustment or selective drugs may become a new paradigm in the treatment of metabolic disorders. This review focuses on the mechanisms linking eicosanoid metabolism to persistent inflammation and altered lipid and carbohydrate metabolism in MetS. PMID:23433458

  11. Severe Strep Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    ... severe group A strep infections may lead to shock, organ failure, and death. Therefore, healthcare providers must diagnose and treat such infections quickly. Treatment Antibiotics used to treat these severe infections include ...

  12. Metabolic activity, experiment M171. [space flight effects on human metabolism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michel, E. L.; Rummel, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    The Skylab metabolic activity experiment determines if man's metabolic effectiveness in doing mechanical work is progressively altered by a simulated Skylab environment, including environmental factors such as slightly increased pCO2. This test identified several hardware/procedural anomalies. The most important of these were: (1) the metabolic analyzer measured carbon dioxide production and expired water too high; (2) the ergometer load module failed under continuous high workload conditions; (3) a higher than desirable number of erroneous blood pressure measurements were recorded; (4) vital capacity measurements were unreliable; and (5) anticipated crew personal exercise needs to be more structured.

  13. Metabolic Flux Analysis -application in plant metabolic modelling for advanced life support systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasidharan L, Swathy; Hezard, Pauline; Poughon, Laurent; Dussap, Claude-Gilles

    Plants have an important role in providing food and fresh oxygen for humans in a closed environment during long duration missions to Mars or Moon. Also, plants play an important role for recycling water. Thus, plant modelling (crop composition, yield prediction and the responses to its environment within the closed loop) gets much attention in the development of closed ecological life support systems. In order to achieve this, metabolic flux computation methods accounting for reactions stoichiometry and chemical energy conservation obtained from metabolic pathways description of different plant parts are required. The basic ideas of metabolic modelling and their application to various plant parts will be discussed. Metabolic systems consist of a set of metabolites and reactions that consume or produce them. The metabolic pathways within a metabolic network for each plant part or sub level are characterised and the metabolic fluxes, defined as the amount of converted metabolite per unit time and per unit mass of tissue (or per plant part), can be calculated. MBA (Metabolic flux analysis) which is a constraint based approach is effective at calculating flux distributions through bio-chemical networks. This methodology can be applied to several plants' growth situations. In terms of space appli-cations, it is shown how this approach could bring valuable tools for assessing and quantifying the effects of the environment of a close system on growth rate and conversion yields.

  14. Quantitation of acidosis in neonatal brain tissue using the /sup 31/P NMR resonance peak of phosphoethanolamine

    SciTech Connect

    Corbett, R.J.; Laptook, A.R.; Hassan, A.; Nunnally, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    /sup 31/P NMR brain spectra were obtained from piglets over a range of mild hypocarbia to severe hypercarbia (PaCO225 to 198 mm Hg). The chemical shifts of the phosphoethanolamine and inorganic phosphate were used to calculate intracellular brain pH (pHet and pHpi, respectively). Both pHpi and pHet underwent parallel significant decreases during hypercarbia, corresponding to 51 and 53% pHregulation, respectively. We conclude that the chemical shift of the phosphomonoester peak in vivo can be used to measure decreases in intracellular pH in neonatal brain.

  15. Acyl-Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Li-Beisson, Yonghua; Shorrosh, Basil; Beisson, Fred; Andersson, Mats X.; Arondel, Vincent; Bates, Philip D.; Baud, Sébastien; Bird, David; DeBono, Allan; Durrett, Timothy P.; Franke, Rochus B.; Graham, Ian A.; Katayama, Kenta; Kelly, Amélie A.; Larson, Tony; Markham, Jonathan E.; Miquel, Martine; Molina, Isabel; Nishida, Ikuo; Rowland, Owen; Samuels, Lacey; Schmid, Katherine M.; Wada, Hajime; Welti, Ruth; Xu, Changcheng; Zallot, Rémi; Ohlrogge, John

    2013-01-01

    Acyl lipids in Arabidopsis and all other plants have a myriad of diverse functions. These include providing the core diffusion barrier of the membranes that separates cells and subcellular organelles. This function alone involves more than 10 membrane lipid classes, including the phospholipids, galactolipids, and sphingolipids, and within each class the variations in acyl chain composition expand the number of structures to several hundred possible molecular species. Acyl lipids in the form of triacylglycerol account for 35% of the weight of Arabidopsis seeds and represent their major form of carbon and energy storage. A layer of cutin and cuticular waxes that restricts the loss of water and provides protection from invasions by pathogens and other stresses covers the entire aerial surface of Arabidopsis. Similar functions are provided by suberin and its associated waxes that are localized in roots, seed coats, and abscission zones and are produced in response to wounding. This chapter focuses on the metabolic pathways that are associated with the biosynthesis and degradation of the acyl lipids mentioned above. These pathways, enzymes, and genes are also presented in detail in an associated website (ARALIP: http://aralip.plantbiology.msu.edu/). Protocols and methods used for analysis of Arabidopsis lipids are provided. Finally, a detailed summary of the composition of Arabidopsis lipids is provided in three figures and 15 tables. PMID:23505340

  16. Equine metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, R.; Keen, J.; McGowan, C.

    2015-01-01

    Laminitis is one of the most common and frustrating clinical presentations in equine practice. While the principles of treatment for laminitis have not changed for several decades, there have been some important paradigm shifts in our understanding of laminitis. Most importantly, it is essential to consider laminitis as a clinical sign of disease and not as a disease in its own right. Once this shift in thinking has occurred, it is logical to then question what disease caused the laminitis. More than 90 per cent of horses presented with laminitis as their primary clinical sign will have developed it as a consequence of endocrine disease; most commonly equine metabolic syndrome (EMS). Given the fact that many horses will have painful protracted and/or chronic recurrent disease, a good understanding of the predisposing factors and how to diagnose and manage them is crucial. Current evidence suggests that early diagnosis and effective management of EMS should be a key aim for practising veterinary surgeons to prevent the devastating consequences of laminitis. This review will focus on EMS, its diagnosis and management. PMID:26273009

  17. Acyl-Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Li-Beisson, Yonghua; Shorrosh, Basil; Beisson, Fred; Andersson, Mats X.; Arondel, Vincent; Bates, Philip D.; Baud, Sébastien; Bird, David; DeBono, Allan; Durrett, Timothy P.; Franke, Rochus B.; Graham, Ian A.; Katayama, Kenta; Kelly, Amélie A.; Larson, Tony; Markham, Jonathan E.; Miquel, Martine; Molina, Isabel; Nishida, Ikuo; Rowland, Owen; Samuels, Lacey; Schmid, Katherine M.; Wada, Hajime; Welti, Ruth; Xu, Changcheng; Zallot, Rémi; Ohlrogge, John

    2010-01-01

    Acyl lipids in Arabidopsis and all other plants have a myriad of diverse functions. These include providing the core diffusion barrier of the membranes that separates cells and subcellular organelles. This function alone involves more than 10 membrane lipid classes, including the phospholipids, galactolipids, and sphingolipids, and within each class the variations in acyl chain composition expand the number of structures to several hundred possible molecular species. Acyl lipids in the form of triacylglycerol account for 35% of the weight of Arabidopsis seeds and represent their major form of carbon and energy storage. A layer of cutin and cuticular waxes that restricts the loss of water and provides protection from invasions by pathogens and other stresses covers the entire aerial surface of Arabidopsis. Similar functions are provided by suberin and its associated waxes that are localized in roots, seed coats, and abscission zones and are produced in response to wounding. This chapter focuses on the metabolic pathways that are associated with the biosynthesis and degradation of the acyl lipids mentioned above. These pathways, enzymes, and genes are also presented in detail in an associated website (ARALIP: http://aralip.plantbiology.msu.edu/). Protocols and methods used for analysis of Arabidopsis lipids are provided. Finally, a detailed summary of the composition of Arabidopsis lipids is provided in three figures and 15 tables. PMID:22303259

  18. Phosphonate metabolism in Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Ford, Justin L; Kaakoush, Nadeem O; Mendz, George L

    2010-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori has been shown to degrade two phosphonates, N-phosphonoacetyl-L: -aspartate and phosphonoacetate; however, the bacterium does not have any genes homologous to those of the known phosphonate metabolism pathways suggesting that H. pylori may have a novel phosphonate metabolism pathway. Growth of H. pylori on phosphonates was studied and the catabolism of these compounds was measured employing (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The specificity of the catabolic enzymes was elucidated by assaying the degradation of several phosphonates and through substrate competition studies. H. pylori was able to utilise phenylphosphonate as a sole source of phosphate for growth. Three strains of H. pylori showed sigmoidal enzyme kinetics of phenylphosphonate catabolism. Allosteric kinetics were removed when lysates were fractionated into cytosolic and membrane fractions. Catabolic rates increased with the addition of DTT, Mg(2+) and phosphate and decreased with the addition of EDTA. The physiological properties of H. pylori phosphonate metabolism were characterised and the presence of at least two novel phosphonate catabolism pathways that do not require phosphate starvation growth conditions for activity has been established. PMID:19842056

  19. Metabolic pathways of ochratoxin A.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qinghua; Dohnal, Vlastimil; Huang, Lingli; Ku?a, Kamil; Wang, Xu; Chen, Guyue; Yuan, Zonghui

    2011-01-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) as a carcinogenic of group 2B to humans is produced by various fungi strains as Aspergillus and Penicillium. It is one of the most common contaminant in foodstuff. OTA is nephrotoxic, hepatotoxic, teratogenic, and immunotoxic and is assumed to cause Balkan Endemic Nephropathy (BEN), a chronic kidney disease in humans when it is digested in combination with mycotoxin citrinin. The metabolism affects greatly the fates and the toxicity of a mycotoxins in humans, animals, and plants. The understanding of the metabolism of mycotoxins by the organism as fungi, yeast, bacteria and enzymes would be very helpful for the control of the contamination by the mycotoxins in foods and feeds, and understanding of the biotransformation of the mycotoxin in the body of humans, animals, plants, microorganisms would be beneficial to the risk assessment of food safety. In animals and humans, OTA can be metabolized in the kidney, liver and intestines. Hydrolysis, hydroxylation, lactone-opening and conjugation are the major metabolic pathways. OTalpha (OT?) formed by the cleavage of the peptidic bond in OTA is a major metabolite not only in animals and humans, but also in microorganisms and enzyme systems. It is considered as a nontoxic product. However, the lactone-opened product (OP-OTA), found in rodents, is higher toxic than its parent, OTA.. (4R)-4-OH-OTA is the major hydroxy product in rodents, whereas the 4S isomer is the major in pigs. 10-OH-OTA is currently found only in rabbits. Furthermore, OTA can lose the chlorine on C-5 to produce ochratoxin B (OTB), and OTB is further to 4-OH-OTB and ochratoxin ? (OT?). Ochratoxin quinine/hydroquinone (OTQ/OTHQ) is the metabolite of OTA in animals. In addition, the conjugates of OTA such as hexose and pentose conjugates can be found in animals. Such more polar metabolites make OTA to eliminate faster. Currently, a debate exits on the formation of OTA-DNA adducts. Plants can metabolize OTA as well. OH-OTA methyl ester and OH-OTA-?-glucoside are formed in many plants besides OT? and OH-OTA. OTA can be biotransformed into OT? by some yeast strains. Fungi can produce some of the same metabolites as animals. OT?, OT?, 4-R-OH-OTA, 4-R-OH-OTB, and 10-OH-OTA are the metabolites in fungi. Several commercial enzymes are able to biodegrade OTA into the nontoxic OT? efficiently. This review on the metabolism of OTA helps to well understand the fate of OTA in different organisms, as well as provides very crucial information for toxicology and food safety assessments on human health. PMID:21222585

  20. Metabolic rate measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koester, K.; Crosier, W.

    1980-01-01

    The Metabolic Rate Measurement System (MRMS) is an uncomplicated and accurate apparatus for measuring oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production of a test subject. From this one can determine the subject's metabolic rate for a variety of conditions, such as resting or light exercise. MRMS utilizes an LSI/11-03 microcomputer to monitor and control the experimental apparatus.

  1. METABOLISM OF CARBAMATE INSECTICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The results of studies conducted to determine the metabolic fate of carbamate insecticides and its toxicological significance are presented. Methomyl metabolism in rats was investigated in detail as was Croneton in the rat, cow, pig and chicken. Carbaryl and carbofuran were admin...

  2. Comprehensive metabolic panel

    MedlinePLUS

    Metabolic panel - comprehensive; Chem-20; SMA20; Sequential multi-channel analysis with computer-20; SMAC20; Metabolic panel 20 ... McPherson RA, Pincus MR. Disease/organ panels. McPherson RA, ... . 22nd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2011:appendix 7.

  3. METABOLIC PATHWAY REGULATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Research efforts in the past two decades have revealed the complex mechanisms employed by fungi to control gene activity. The tremendous expansion in our knowledge of the regulation of nitrogen metabolism and carbon metabolism, due largely to the powerful combination of genetics, biochemistry, and ...

  4. The compositional and evolutionary logic of metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braakman, Rogier; Smith, Eric

    2013-02-01

    Metabolism is built on a foundation of organic chemistry, and employs structures and interactions at many scales. Despite these sources of complexity, metabolism also displays striking and robust regularities in the forms of modularity and hierarchy, which may be described compactly in terms of relatively few principles of composition. These regularities render metabolic architecture comprehensible as a system, and also suggests the order in which layers of that system came into existence. In addition metabolism also serves as a foundational layer in other hierarchies, up to at least the levels of cellular integration including bioenergetics and molecular replication, and trophic ecology. The recapitulation of patterns first seen in metabolism, in these higher levels, motivates us to interpret metabolism as a source of causation or constraint on many forms of organization in the biosphere. Many of the forms of modularity and hierarchy exhibited by metabolism are readily interpreted as stages in the emergence of catalytic control by living systems over organic chemistry, sometimes recapitulating or incorporating geochemical mechanisms. We identify as modules, either subsets of chemicals and reactions, or subsets of functions, that are re-used in many contexts with a conserved internal structure. At the small molecule substrate level, module boundaries are often associated with the most complex reaction mechanisms, catalyzed by highly conserved enzymes. Cofactors form a biosynthetically and functionally distinctive control layer over the small-molecule substrate. The most complex members among the cofactors are often associated with the reactions at module boundaries in the substrate networks, while simpler cofactors participate in widely generalized reactions. The highly tuned chemical structures of cofactors (sometimes exploiting distinctive properties of the elements of the periodic table) thereby act as ‘keys’ that incorporate classes of organic reactions within biochemistry. Module boundaries provide the interfaces where change is concentrated, when we catalogue extant diversity of metabolic phenotypes. The same modules that organize the compositional diversity of metabolism are argued, with many explicit examples, to have governed long-term evolution. Early evolution of core metabolism, and especially of carbon-fixation, appears to have required very few innovations, and to have used few rules of composition of conserved modules, to produce adaptations to simple chemical or energetic differences of environment without diverse solutions and without historical contingency. We demonstrate these features of metabolism at each of several levels of hierarchy, beginning with the small-molecule metabolic substrate and network architecture, continuing with cofactors and key conserved reactions, and culminating in the aggregation of multiple diverse physical and biochemical processes in cells.

  5. Metabolism of halophilic archaea

    PubMed Central

    Falb, Michaela; Müller, Kerstin; Königsmaier, Lisa; Oberwinkler, Tanja; Horn, Patrick; von Gronau, Susanne; Gonzalez, Orland; Pfeiffer, Friedhelm; Bornberg-Bauer, Erich

    2008-01-01

    In spite of their common hypersaline environment, halophilic archaea are surprisingly different in their nutritional demands and metabolic pathways. The metabolic diversity of halophilic archaea was investigated at the genomic level through systematic metabolic reconstruction and comparative analysis of four completely sequenced species: Halobacterium salinarum, Haloarcula marismortui, Haloquadratum walsbyi, and the haloalkaliphile Natronomonas pharaonis. The comparative study reveals different sets of enzyme genes amongst halophilic archaea, e.g. in glycerol degradation, pentose metabolism, and folate synthesis. The carefully assessed metabolic data represent a reliable resource for future system biology approaches as it also links to current experimental data on (halo)archaea from the literature. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00792-008-0138-x) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:18278431

  6. Metabolic Engineering VII Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin Korpics

    2012-12-04

    The aims of this Metabolic Engineering conference are to provide a forum for academic and industrial researchers in the field; to bring together the different scientific disciplines that contribute to the design, analysis and optimization of metabolic pathways; and to explore the role of Metabolic Engineering in the areas of health and sustainability. Presentations, both written and oral, panel discussions, and workshops will focus on both applications and techniques used for pathway engineering. Various applications including bioenergy, industrial chemicals and materials, drug targets, health, agriculture, and nutrition will be discussed. Workshops focused on technology development for mathematical and experimental techniques important for metabolic engineering applications will be held for more in depth discussion. This 2008 meeting will celebrate our conference tradition of high quality and relevance to both industrial and academic participants, with topics ranging from the frontiers of fundamental science to the practical aspects of metabolic engineering.

  7. Metabolic Syndrome and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pothiwala, Pooja; Jain, Sushil K.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Since its first description by Reavan in 1988, accepted criteria for clinical identification of the components of metabolic syndrome have been promulgated by the National Cholesterol Education Program/Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP/ATP III) and the World Health Organization (WHO) as well as the International Diabetes Federation (IDF), and the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE). Insulin resistance is a common metabolic abnormality underlying type 2 diabetes mellitus and is also an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Although ATP III identified cardiovascular disease (CVD) as the primary clinical outcome of the metabolic syndrome, we now have evidence that metabolic syndrome is associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus, polycystic ovarian disease, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and possibly some cancers. This review summarizes evidence in support of the relationship between metabolic syndrome and various cancers and possible underlying mechanisms and therapeutic interventions. PMID:19284314

  8. DIABETES, OBESITY AND METABOLISM INSTITUTE

    E-print Network

    Chisholm, Rex L.

    DIABETES, OBESITY AND METABOLISM INSTITUTE AT NORTHWESTERN MEDICINE THE INSTITUTES AT NORTHWESTERN MEDICINE #12;THE INSTITUTES AT NORTHWESTERN MEDICINE DIABETES, OBESITY AND METABOLISM INSTITUTE AT NORTHWESTERN MEDICINE "As we launch the Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism Institute at Northwestern Medicine, I

  9. Congenital genetic inborn errors of metabolism presenting as an adult or persisting into adulthood: neuroimaging in the more common or recognizable disorders.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Shri H; McKinney, Alexander M; Lucato, Leandro T

    2014-04-01

    Numerous congenital-genetic inborn errors of metabolism (CIEMs) have been identified and characterized in detail within recent decades, with promising therapeutic options. Neuroimaging is becoming increasingly utilized in earlier stages of CIEMs, and even in asymptomatic relatives of patients with a CIEM, so as to monitor disease progress and treatment response. This review attempts to summarize in a concise fashion the neuroimaging findings of various CIEMs that may present in adulthood, as well as those that may persist into adulthood, whether because of beneficial therapy or a delay in diagnosis. Notably, some of these disorders have neuroimaging findings that differ from their classic infantile or early childhood forms, whereas others are identical to their early pediatric forms. The focus of this review is their appearance on routine magnetic resonance imaging sequences, with some basic attention to the findings of such CIEMs on specialized neuroimaging, based on recent or preliminary research. The general classes of disorders covered in this complex review are: peroxisomal disorders (adrenoleukodystrophy), lysosomal storage disorders (including metachromatic leukodystrophy, Krabbe or globoid cell leukodystrophy, Fabry, Niemann-Pick, GM1, GM2, Gaucher, mucopolysaccharidoses, and Salla diseases), mitochondrial disorders (including mitochondrial encephalomyopathy with lactic acidosis and strokelike episodes, myoclonic epilepsy with ragged red fibers, Leigh disease, and Kearns-Sayre syndrome), urea cycle disorders, several organic acidemias (including phenylketonuria, maple syrup urine disease, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl colyase deficiency, glutaric acidurias, methylmalonic academia, proprionic academia, 3-methylglucatonic aciduria, and 2-hydroxyglutaric acidurias), cytoskeletal or transporter molecule defects (including Alexander or fibrinoid leukodystrophy, proteolipid protein-1 defect or Pelizaeus Merzbacher, Wilson, and Huntington diseases), and several neurodegenerative disorders of brain iron accumulation. Additionally, an arbitrary "miscellaneous" category of 5 recognizable disorders that may present in or persist into adulthood is summarized, which include megalencephalic leukoencephalopathy with subcortical cysts (megancephalic leukoencephalopathy with subcortical cysts or van der Knaap disease), polymerase-III gene defect ("4H syndrome"), childhood ataxia with central nervous system hypomyelination ("vanishing white matter disease"), striopallidodentate calcinosis ("Fahr disease"), and Cockayne syndrome. PMID:24745891

  10. Metabolic regulation during early embryo development

    E-print Network

    Wyatt, Lucy

    i Metabolic regulation during early embryo development Paul Joseph McKeegan, BSc (Hons), PGCE Medical School January 2015 #12;ii Abstract The preimplantation embryo must satisfy dynamic changes the bioenergetics of embryo development. Several methods were optimised to measure components of OCR by individual

  11. Metabolic anatomy of paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, N.E.; Posner, J.B.; Sidtis, J.J.; Moeller, J.R.; Strother, S.C.; Dhawan, V.; Rottenberg, D.A.

    1988-06-01

    Eleven patients with acquired cerebellar degeneration (10 of whom had paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration (PCD)) were evaluated using neuropsychological tests and /sup 18/F-fluorodeoxyglucose/positron emission tomography to (1) quantify motor, cognitive, and metabolic abnormalities; (2) determine if characteristic alterations in the regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (rCMRGlc) are associated with PCD; and (3) correlate behavioral and metabolic measures of disease severity. Eighteen volunteer subjects served as normal controls. Although some PCD neuropsychological test scores were abnormal, these results could not, in general, be dissociated from the effects of dysarthria and ataxia. rCMRGlc was reduced in patients with PCD (versus normal control subjects) in all regions except the brainstem. Analysis of patient and control rCMRGlc data using a mathematical model of regional metabolic interactions revealed two metabolic pattern descriptors, SSF1 and SSF2, which distinguished patients with PCD from normal control subjects; SSF2, which described a metabolic coupling between cerebellum, cuneus, and posterior temporal, lateral frontal, and paracentral cortex, correlated with quantitative indices of cerebellar dysfunction. Our inability to document substantial intellectual impairment in 7 of 10 patients with PCD contrasts with the 50% incidence of dementia in PCD reported by previous investigators. Widespread reductions in PCD rCMRGlc may result from the loss of cerebellar efferents to thalamus and forebrain structures, a reverse cerebellar diaschisis.

  12. Stressful Life Events and the Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Pyykkönen, Antti-Jussi; Räikkönen, Katri; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Eriksson, Johan G.; Groop, Leif; Isomaa, Bo

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Stress may play a role in the pathogenesis of the metabolic syndrome. However, the scant evidence available is not population-based, restricting the external validity of the findings. Our aim was to test associations between stressful life events, their accumulation, and the metabolic syndrome in a large population-based cohort. We also tested associations between stress and the individual components related to the metabolic syndrome. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This was a population-based, random sample of 3,407 women and men aged 18–78 years residing in Western Finland. Metabolic syndrome was defined according to the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III and International Diabetes Federation criteria. The severity of 15 stressful life events pertaining to finance, work, social relationships, health, and housing was self-rated. RESULTS In comparison with subjects not reporting any extremely stressful life events, those reporting work- or finance-related events had an increased odds for having the metabolic syndrome. The risk was further increased according to accumulation of stressful finance-related events and to having at least three stressful life events in any of the life domains assessed. Accumulation of stressful life events was associated with insulin resistance, obesity, and triglycerides. The associations were not confounded by sex, age, lifestyle, or family history of diabetes. CONCLUSIONS Life events perceived as stressful, particularly those related to finance and work, may be a signal for poor metabolic health. PMID:19880581

  13. Classification of metabolic patients using dynamic variables.

    PubMed

    Svacina, S; Haas, T; Matoulek, M; Nedelnikova, K

    1999-01-01

    The severity of metabolic syndrome is usually determined according to static variables (blood glucose, insulin level, body mass index etc.) The most important classification is dynamic and prognostic classification which can be used to determine the ability to decrease elevated metabolite and hormone levels or to lose weight. Different mathematical approaches were used to determine these phenomena: 1. Mathematical modelling e.g. (Bergman minimal model or glycation model). 2. Predictive calculations using multiple regression (using static and dynamic parameters to determine weight loss in obesity treatment). 3. One day starvation test (finding very variable hormone and metabolic changes in obese patients). We can conclude There are 3 types of metabolic parameters: A. Static (basic) description, B. Functional (actual) description, C. Dynamic-stability describing variables. Mathematical modelling is a complicated method needing many blood samples. It is very invasive for patients and it is difficult to be repeated. Predictive importance can have also repeated measured metabolic data which are able to classify the stability (fixation) of metabolic state. Some basic parameters and simple dynamic tests like one day starvation test can be used in prognostic classification of patients who are able to change their fixed metabolic state. PMID:10724967

  14. Metabolic effects of non-nutritive sweeteners.

    PubMed

    Pepino, M Yanina

    2015-12-01

    Until recently, the general belief was that non-nutritive sweeteners (NNSs) were healthy sugar substitutes because they provide sweet taste without calories or glycemic effects. However, data from several epidemiological studies have found that consumption of NNSs, mainly in diet sodas, is associated with increased risk to develop obesity, metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes. The main purpose of this article is to review recent scientific evidence supporting potential mechanisms that explain how "metabolically inactive" NNSs, which have few, if any, calories, might promote metabolic dysregulation. Three potential mechanisms, which are not mutually exclusive, are presented: 1) NNSs interfere with learned responses that contribute to control glucose and energy homeostasis, 2) NNSs interfere with gut microbiota and induce glucose intolerance, and 3) NNSs interact with sweet-taste receptors expressed throughout the digestive system that play a role in glucose absorption and trigger insulin secretion. In addition, recent findings from our laboratory showing an association between individual taste sensitivity to detect sucralose and sucralose's acute effects on metabolic response to an oral glucose load are reported. Taken as a whole, data support the notion that NNSs have metabolic effects. More research is needed to elucidate the mechanisms by which NNSs may drive metabolic dysregulation and better understand potential effects of these commonly used food additives. PMID:26095119

  15. [Metabolic correction: a biochemical option against diseases].

    PubMed

    Miranda-Massari, Jorge R; González, Michael J; Rodriguez-Gomez, José R; Duconge, Jorge; Allende-Vigo, Myriam Z; Jiménez Ramirez, Francisco J; Cintrón, Kenneth; Ricart, Carlos; Zaragoza-Urdaz, Rafael; Berdiel, Miguel Jabbar; Vázquez, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Human development and its physiology depends on a number of complex biochemical body processes, many of which are interactive and codependent. The speed and the degree in which many physiological reactions are completed depend on enzyme activity, which in turn depends on the bioavailability of co-factors and micronutrients such as vitamins and minerals. To achieve a healthy physiological state, organism need that biochemical reactions occur in a controlled and specific way at a particular speed and level or grade fully completed. To achieve this, is required an optimal metabolic balance. Factors such as, a particular genetic composition, inadequate dietary consumption patterns, traumas, diseases, toxins and environmental stress all of these factors rising demands for nutrients in order to obtain optimal metabolic balance. Metabolic correction is a biochemical and physiological concept that explains how improvements in cellular biochemistry of an organism can help the body achieve metabolic and physiological optimization. We summarize the contribution of several pioneers in understanding the role of micronutrients in health management. The concept of metabolic correction is becoming a significant term due to the presence of genetic variants that affect the speed of reactions of enzymes, causing metabolic alterations that enhance or promote the state/development of multiple diseases. Decline in the nutritional value of the food we eat, the increase in demand for certain nutrients caused by normal development, diseases and medications induce, usually, nutrients consumption. These nutritional deficiencies and insufficiencies are causing massive economic costs due to increased morbidity and mortality in our society. In summary, metabolic correction improves the enzymatic function, which favors the physiological normal functions, thus, contributing to improving health and the welfare of the human being. The purpose of this paper is to describe and introduce the concept of optimal metabolic correction as a functional cost-effective mechanism against disease, in addition, to contribute to diseases prevention and regeneration of the body and health. PMID:26434086

  16. Intestinal absorption and metabolism of xenobiotics

    PubMed Central

    Chhabra, Rajendra S.

    1979-01-01

    There are five possible processes of intestinal absorption of xenobiotics. These are active transport, passive diffusions, pinocytosis, filtration through “pores,” and lymphatic absorption. The passive diffusion is major process for transport of foreign chemicals across the intestine. Though the lymphatic absorption of drugs is not of any major therapeutic significance, the uptake of toxic chemicals such as 3-MC, benzpyrene, and DDT through lymphatics may enhance their toxicity, since they are distributed to other organ systems in the body without being metabolized by liver. A number of factors such as diet, motility of intestine, interference with gastrointestinal flora, changes in the rate of gastric emptying, age of the animal, and dissolution rate of xenobiotic can alter the rate of absorption of chemicals. Liver is the major site of metabolism of xenobiotics, but the contribution of intestinal metabolism of xenobiotic can influence the overall bioavailability of chemicals. The xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes located in endoplasmic reticulum of intestine possess biochemical characteristics similar to that of liver. In general, the rate of metabolism of xenobiotics by intestinal microsomal preparation is lower than that observed with similar hepatic microsomal preparations. The in vitro intestinal metabolism of xenobiotics is affected by several factors including age, sex, diurnal variations, species, and nutritional status of the animal. The intestinal xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes are stimulated by the pretreatment of animals with foreign chemicals, but this depends on the route of administration of chemicals, drug substrate and the animal species used. Rabbit intestinal drug metabolizing enzymes seem to be resistant to induction by foreign chemicals. PMID:540626

  17. Controlling the Cyanobacterial Clock by Synthetically Rewiring Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Pattanayak, Gopal K.; Lambert, Guillaume; Bernat, Kevin; Rust, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Circadian clocks are oscillatory systems and allow organisms to anticipate rhythmic changes in the environment. Several studies have shown that circadian clocks are connected to metabolism, but it is not generally clear whether metabolic signaling is one voice among many that influence the clock, or whether metabolic cycling is the major clock synchronizer. To address this question in cyanobacteria, we used a synthetic biology approach to make normally autotrophic cells capable of growth on exogenous sugar. This allowed us to manipulate metabolism independently from the light and dark. We found that feeding sugar to cultures blocked the clock-resetting effect of a dark pulse. Further, in the absence of light, the clock efficiently synchronizes to metabolic cycles driven by rhythmic feeding. We conclude that metabolic activity, independent of its source, is the primary clock driver in cyanobacteria. PMID:26686627

  18. Severe Weather Perceptions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abrams, Karol

    Severe weather is an element of nature that cannot be controlled. Therefore, it is important that the general public be aware of severe weather and know how to react quickly and appropriately in a weather emergency. This study, done in the community surrounding the Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, was conducted to compile and analyze…

  19. Currency flaw severity. [Banknotes

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, C.; Burnett, M.; Goodman, C.; Sherrod, R.; Schmoyer, R.; Harrison, C.; Uppuluri, R.

    1986-01-01

    A survey of currency flaw severity was carried out using 300 banknotes and 37 judges. Each judge assigned each note to one of five flaw severity categories. These categories correspond to severity grades of 1 to 5 with 1 equivalent to ''always accepted'' and 5 ''never accepted.'' An average flaw severity grade for each note was obtained by taking the mean of the severity grades assigned to that note by the 37 judges. Thus, each note has a single numerical real-number flaw grade between 1 and 5. Mathematical modeling of the currency flaw survey results is continuing with some very promising initial results. Our present model handles common excess ink and missing ink flaw types quite well. We plan to extend the model to ink level, mash, setoff and blanket impression flaw types.

  20. Metabolic disorders in menopause

    PubMed Central

    Perty?ski, Tomasz; Perty?ska-Marczewska, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic disorders occurring in menopause, including dyslipidemia, disorders of carbohydrate metabolism (impaired glucose tolerance – IGT, type 2 diabetes mellitus – T2DM) or components of metabolic syndrome, constitute risk factors for cardiovascular disease in women. A key role could be played here by hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance and visceral obesity, all contributing to dyslipidemia, oxidative stress, inflammation, alter coagulation and atherosclerosis observed during the menopausal period. Undiagnosed and untreated, metabolic disorders may adversely affect the length and quality of women's life. Prevention and treatment preceded by early diagnosis should be the main goal for the physicians involved in menopausal care. This article represents a short review of the current knowledge concerning metabolic disorders (e.g. obesity, polycystic ovary syndrome or thyroid diseases) in menopause, including the role of a tailored menopausal hormone therapy (HT). According to current data, HT is not recommend as a preventive strategy for metabolic disorders in menopause. Nevertheless, as part of a comprehensive strategy to prevent chronic diseases after menopause, menopausal hormone therapy, particularly estrogen therapy may be considered (after balancing benefits/risks and excluding women with absolute contraindications to this therapy). Life-style modifications, with moderate physical activity and healthy diet at the forefront, should be still the first choice recommendation for all patients with menopausal metabolic abnormalities. PMID:26327890

  1. A perspective of polyamine metabolism.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Heather M; Fraser, Alison V; Hughes, Alun

    2003-11-15

    Polyamines are essential for the growth and function of normal cells. They interact with various macromolecules, both electrostatically and covalently and, as a consequence, have a variety of cellular effects. The complexity of polyamine metabolism and the multitude of compensatory mechanisms that are invoked to maintain polyamine homoeostasis argue that these amines are critical to cell survival. The regulation of polyamine content within cells occurs at several levels, including transcription and translation. In addition, novel features such as the +1 frameshift required for antizyme production and the rapid turnover of several of the enzymes involved in the pathway make the regulation of polyamine metabolism a fascinating subject. The link between polyamine content and human disease is unequivocal, and significant success has been obtained in the treatment of a number of parasitic infections. Targeting the polyamine pathway as a means of treating cancer has met with limited success, although the development of drugs such as DFMO (alpha-difluoromethylornithine), a rationally designed anticancer agent, has revolutionized our understanding of polyamine function in cell growth and provided 'proof of concept' that influencing polyamine metabolism and content within tumour cells will prevent tumour growth. The more recent development of the polyamine analogues has been pivotal in advancing our understanding of the necessity to deplete all three polyamines to induce apoptosis in tumour cells. The current thinking is that the polyamine inhibitors/analogues may also be useful agents in the chemoprevention of cancer and, in this area, we may yet see a revival of DFMO. The future will be in adopting a functional genomics approach to identifying polyamine-regulated genes linked to either carcinogenesis or apoptosis. PMID:13678416

  2. Ammonia metabolism and hyperammonemic disorders.

    PubMed

    Walker, Valerie

    2014-01-01

    Human adults produce around 1000 mmol of ammonia daily. Some is reutilized in biosynthesis. The remainder is waste and neurotoxic. Eventually most is excreted in urine as urea, together with ammonia used as a buffer. In extrahepatic tissues, ammonia is incorporated into nontoxic glutamine and released into blood. Large amounts are metabolized by the kidneys and small intestine. In the intestine, this yields ammonia, which is sequestered in portal blood and transported to the liver for ureagenesis, and citrulline, which is converted to arginine by the kidneys. The amazing developments in NMR imaging and spectroscopy and molecular biology have confirmed concepts derived from early studies in animals and cell cultures. The processes involved are exquisitely tuned. When they are faulty, ammonia accumulates. Severe acute hyperammonemia causes a rapidly progressive, often fatal, encephalopathy with brain edema. Chronic milder hyperammonemia causes a neuropsychiatric illness. Survivors of severe neonatal hyperammonemia have structural brain damage. Proposed explanations for brain edema are an increase in astrocyte osmolality, generally attributed to glutamine accumulation, and cytotoxic oxidative/nitrosative damage. However, ammonia neurotoxicity is multifactorial, with disturbances also in neurotransmitters, energy production, anaplerosis, cerebral blood flow, potassium, and sodium. Around 90% of hyperammonemic patients have liver disease. Inherited defects are rare. They are being recognized increasingly in adults. Deficiencies of urea cycle enzymes, citrin, and pyruvate carboxylase demonstrate the roles of isolated pathways in ammonia metabolism. Phenylbutyrate is used routinely to treat inherited urea cycle disorders, and its use for hepatic encephalopathy is under investigation. PMID:25735860

  3. Physiology of iron metabolism.

    PubMed

    Waldvogel-Abramowski, Sophie; Waeber, Gérard; Gassner, Christoph; Buser, Andreas; Frey, Beat M; Favrat, Bernard; Tissot, Jean-Daniel

    2014-06-01

    A revolution occurred during the last decade in the comprehension of the physiology as well as in the physiopathology of iron metabolism. The purpose of this review is to summarize the recent knowledge that has accumulated, allowing a better comprehension of the mechanisms implicated in iron homeostasis. Iron metabolism is very fine tuned. The free molecule is very toxic; therefore, complex regulatory mechanisms have been developed in mammalian to insure adequate intestinal absorption, transportation, utilization, and elimination. 'Ironomics' certainly will be the future of the understanding of genes as well as of the protein-protein interactions involved in iron metabolism. PMID:25053935

  4. Physiology of Iron Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Waldvogel-Abramowski, Sophie; Waeber, Gérard; Gassner, Christoph; Buser, Andreas; Frey, Beat M.; Favrat, Bernard; Tissot, Jean-Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Summary A revolution occurred during the last decade in the comprehension of the physiology as well as in the physiopathology of iron metabolism. The purpose of this review is to summarize the recent knowledge that has accumulated, allowing a better comprehension of the mechanisms implicated in iron homeostasis. Iron metabolism is very fine tuned. The free molecule is very toxic; therefore, complex regulatory mechanisms have been developed in mammalian to insure adequate intestinal absorption, transportation, utilization, and elimination. ‘Ironomics’ certainly will be the future of the understanding of genes as well as of the protein-protein interactions involved in iron metabolism. PMID:25053935

  5. Hepatic metabolism of carcinogenic ?-asarone.

    PubMed

    Cartus, Alexander T; Stegmüller, Simone; Simson, Nadine; Wahl, Andrea; Neef, Sylvia; Kelm, Harald; Schrenk, Dieter

    2015-09-21

    ?-Asarone (1) belongs to the group of naturally occurring phenylpropenes like eugenol or anethole. Compound 1 is found in several plants, e.g., Acorus calamus or Asarum europaeum. Compound 1-containing plant materials and essential oils thereof are used to flavor foods and alcoholic beverages and as ingredients of many drugs in traditional phytomedicines. Although 1 has been claimed to have several positive pharmacological effects, it was found to be genotoxic and carcinogenic in rodents (liver and small intestine). The mechanism of action of carcinogenic allylic phenylpropenes consists of the metabolic activation via cytochrome P450 enzymes and sulfotransferases. In vivo experiments suggested that this pathway does not play a major role in the carcinogenicity of the propenylic compound 1 as is the case for other propenylic compounds, e.g., anethole. Since the metabolic pathways of 1 have not been investigated and its carcinogenic mode of action is unknown, we investigated the metabolism of 1 in liver microsomes of rats, bovines, porcines, and humans using (1)H NMR, HPLC-DAD, and LC-ESI-MS/MS techniques. We synthesized the majority of identified metabolites which were used as reference compounds for the quantification and final verification of metabolites. Microsomal epoxidation of the side chain of 1 presumably yielded (Z)-asarone-1',2'-epoxide (8a) which instantly was hydrolyzed to the corresponding erythro- and threo-configurated diols (9b, 9a) and the ketone 2,4,5-trimethoxyphenylacetone (13). This was the main metabolic pathway in the metabolism of 1 in all investigated liver microsomes. Hydroxylation of the side chain of 1 led to the formation of three alcohols at total yields of less than 30%: 1'-hydroxyasarone (2), (E)- and (Z)-3'-hydroxyasarone (4 and 6), with 6 being the mainly formed alcohol and 2 being detectable only in liver microsomes of Aroclor 1254-pretreated rats. Small amounts of 4 and 6 were further oxidized to the corresponding carbonyl compounds (E)- and (Z)-3'-oxoasarone (5, 7). 1'-Oxoasarone (3) was probably also formed in incubations with 1 but was not detectable, possibly due to its rapid reaction with nucleophiles. Eventually, three mono-O-demethylated metabolites of 1 were detected in minor concentrations. The time course of metabolite formation and determined kinetic parameters show little species-specific differences in the microsomal metabolism of 1. Furthermore, the kinetic parameters imply a very low dependence of the pattern of metabolite formation from substrate concentration. In human liver microsomes, 71-75% of 1 will be metabolized via epoxidation, 21-15% via hydroxylation (and further oxidation), and 8-10% via demethylation at lower as well as higher concentrations of 1, respectively (relative values). On the basis of our results, we hypothesize that the genotoxic epoxides of 1 are the ultimate carcinogens formed from 1. PMID:26273788

  6. Severe asthma in children

    PubMed Central

    Guilbert, TW; Bacharier, LB; Fitzpatrick, AM

    2015-01-01

    Severe asthma in children is characterized by sustained symptoms despite treatment with high doses of ICS or oral corticosteroids. Children with severe asthma may fall into two categories, difficult-to-treat asthma or severe therapy-resistant asthma. Difficult-to-treat asthma is defined as poor control due to an incorrect diagnosis or comorbidities, poor adherence due to adverse psychological or environmental factors. In contrast, treatment-resistant is defined as difficult asthma despite management of these factors. It is increasingly recognized that severe asthma is a highly heterogeneous disorder associated with a number of clinical and inflammatory phenotypes that have been described in children with severe asthma. Guideline based drug therapy of severe childhood asthma is based primarily on extrapolated data from adult studies. The recommendation is that children with severe asthma be treated with higher-dose inhaled or oral corticosteroids combined with long-acting beta-agonists and other add on therapies such as antileukotrienes and methylxanthines. It is important to identify and address the influences that make asthma difficult to control including reviewing the diagnosis and the removal of causal or aggravating factors. Better definition of the phenotypes and better targeting of therapy based upon individual patient phenotypes is likely to improve asthma treatment in the future. PMID:25213041

  7. Predicting metabolic biomarkers of human inborn errors of metabolism

    E-print Network

    Ruppin, Eytan

    REPORT Predicting metabolic biomarkers of human inborn errors of metabolism Tomer Shlomi1.7.08; accepted 25.2.09 Early diagnosis of inborn errors of metabolism is commonly performed through biofluid metabolomics, which detects specific metabolic biomarkers whose concentration is altered due to genomic

  8. A Systems Biology Approach to Iron Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Chifman, J.; Laubenbacher, R.; Torti, S.V.

    2015-01-01

    Iron is critical to the survival of almost all living organisms. However, inappropriately low or high levels of iron are detrimental and contribute to a wide range of diseases. Recent advances in the study of iron metabolism have revealed multiple intricate pathways that are essential to the maintenance of iron homeostasis. Further, iron regulation involves processes at several scales, ranging from the subcellular to the organismal. This complexity makes a systems biology approach crucial, with its enabling technology of computational models based on a mathematical description of regulatory systems. Systems biology may represent a new strategy for understanding imbalances in iron metabolism and their underlying causes. PMID:25480643

  9. Metabolic bone disease: a review and update.

    PubMed

    Mankin, Henry J; Mankin, Carole J

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the structure and formation of bone and the metabolic diseases that cause intrinsic biochemical alterations and ultimate damage to the skeletal system is an essential part of orthopaedic education and knowledge. Metabolic bone diseases such as rickets, osteomalacia, renal osteodystrophy, hyperparathyroidism, and osteoporosis often lead to subtle alterations in the patient's clinical status and to severe and disabling changes in the patient's bone structure. It is essential that orthopaedists recognize these conditions, provide a correct diagnosis, and use appropriate preventive and therapeutic treatments. PMID:18399611

  10. Engineering of metabolic control

    DOEpatents

    Liao, James C.

    2006-10-17

    The invention features a method of producing heterologous molecules in cells under the regulatory control of a metabolite and metabolic flux. The method can enhance the synthesis of heterologous polypeptides and metabolites.

  11. Engineering of metabolic control

    DOEpatents

    Liao, James C.

    2004-03-16

    The invention features a method of producing heterologous molecules in cells under the regulatory control of a metabolite and metabolic flux. The method can enhance the synthesis of heterologous polypeptides and metabolites.

  12. Metabolism. Part III: Lipids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodner, George M.

    1986-01-01

    Describes the metabolic processes of complex lipids, including saponification, activation and transport, and the beta-oxidation spiral. Discusses fatty acid degradation in regard to biochemical energy and ketone bodies. (TW)

  13. [Porphyrin metabolism in men with metabolic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Krivosheev, A B; Kuimov, A D; Peskov, S A; Krivosheeva, I A; Paul', G A

    2006-01-01

    Forty-three patients with metabolic syndrome (MS) were examined. The urinary (uroporphyrin--UP and coproporphyrin--CP) and fecal (CP and protoporphyrin) fractions of porphyrin, as well as the urinary excretion of porphyrin precursors (S-aminolevulinic acid and porphobilinogen) were measured. Porphyrin metabolic disturbances were registered in 33 (76.7%) patients. Nine of these patients displayed such qualitative changes as fraction mismatch (CP/UP < 1; the normal value is 2.1 +/- 0.4), and an increase in the level of porphyrin precursors, while their total urinary porphyrin level was normal. In 24 patients pathological changes in porphyrin exchange were characterized by such quantitative changes as a many-fold increase in urinary and/or fecal porphyrin fraction as well as the development of secondary biochemical coproporphyrinuria syndromes, symptomatic elevation of fecal porphyrin level, and latent late cutaneous porphyria. Changes in porphyrin exchange in patients with metabolic syndrome broaden the scope of disturbances occurring in this syndrome, and allow considering these changes as additional criteria. PMID:17243613

  14. Exercise testing in metabolic myopathies.

    PubMed

    Tarnopolsky, Mark

    2012-02-01

    Metabolic myopathies are a group of genetic disorders specifically affecting glucose/glycogen, lipid, and mitochondrial metabolism. The main metabolic myopathies that are evaluated in this article are the mitochondrial myopathies, fatty acid oxidation defects, and glycogen storage disease. This article focuses on the usefulness of exercise in the evaluation of genetic metabolic myopathies. PMID:22239882

  15. Abstract Aflatoxins are toxic and carcinogenic metabo-lites of several Aspergillus species. The effect of nitrate

    E-print Network

    Cotty, Peter J.

    Abstract Aflatoxins are toxic and carcinogenic metabo- lites of several Aspergillus species in regulation of nitrogen metabolism. Introduction Aflatoxins are toxic and carcinogenic secondary metabo- lites

  16. Changes in feed intake, nutrient digestion, plasma metabolites, and oxidative stress parameters in dairy cows with subacute ruminal acidosis and its regulation with pelleted beet pulp

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to 1) determine the variation of nutrient digestion, plasma metabolites and oxidative stress parameters triggered by induced subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA); and 2) evaluate the ability of pelleted beet pulp (BP) as a replacement for ground corn to alleviate SARA. Eight Holstein-Friesian cows were fed four diets during four successive17-day periods: 1) total mixed ration (TMR) containing 0% finely ground wheat (FGW) (W0); 2) TMR containing 10% FGW (W10); 3) TMR containing 20% FGW (W20); and 4) TMR containing 10% BP as a replacement for 10% ground corn (BP10). The SARA induction protocol reduced the mean ruminal pH from 6.37 to 5.94, and the minimum ruminal pH decreased from 5.99 to 5.41 from baseline to challenge period. Mean ruminal pH increased from 5.94 to 6.05, and minimum daily ruminal pH increased from 5.41 to 5.63, when BP was substituted for corn. The apparent digestibility of nutrients was not affected by the dietary treatments, except that the digestibility of neutral detergent fibre (NDF) and acid detergent fibre (ADF) was reduced in cows fed the W20 diet compared with cows fed the W0 and W10 diets, and cows fed the BP10 diet had higher NDF and ADF digestibility than the cows fed the W20 diet. Cows fed the W20 diet had a lower plasma concentration of ?-hydroxybutyrate (BHBA), non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA), cholesterol, triglyceride, and total antioxidative capacity (TAC), and a higher plasma concentration of glucose, insulin, malonaldehyde (MDA), super oxygen dehydrogenises (SOD), and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) than cows fed the W0 diet. Substitution of BP for corn increased concentrations of plasma BHBA and TAC, but decreased concentrations of plasma MDA. Our results indicate that reduction of fibre digestion; the concomitant increase of plasma glucose and insulin; the decrease of plasma BHBA, NEFA, cholesterol, and triglyceride; and changes of plasma oxidative stress parameters are highly related to SARA induced by W20 diets. These variables may be alternative candidates for SARA diagnosis. We also suggest that the substitution of BP for corn could reduce the risk of SARA, increase fibre digestion, and improve the antioxidant status in dairy cows. PMID:23947764

  17. Genome of Bifidobacteria and Carbohydrate Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the knowledge about bifidobacteria has considerably evolved thanks to recent progress in molecular biology. The analysis of the whole genome sequences of 48 taxa of bifidobacteria offers new perspectives for their classification, especially to set up limit between two species. Indeed, several species are presenting a high homology and should be reclassified. On the other hand, some subspecies are presenting a low homology and should therefore be reclassified into different species. In addition, a better knowledge of the genome of bifidobacteria allows a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in complex carbohydrate metabolism. The genome of some species of bifidobacteria from human but also from animal origin demonstrates high presence in genes involved in the metabolism of complex oligosaccharides. Those species should be further tested to confirm their potential to metabolize complex oligosaccharides in vitro and in vivo.

  18. Antioxidants, metabolic rate and aging in Drosophila

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miquel, J.; Fleming, J.; Economos, A. C.

    1982-01-01

    The metabolic rate-of-living theory of aging was investigated by determining the effect of several life-prolonging antioxidants on the metabolic rate and life span of Drosophila. The respiration rate of groups of continuously agitated flies was determined in a Gilson respirometer. Vitamin E, 2,4-dinitrophenol, nordihydroguaiaretic acid, and thiazolidine carboxylic acid were employed as antioxidants. Results show that all of these antioxidants reduced the oxygen consumption rate and increased the mean life span, and a significant negative linear correlation was found between the mean life span and the metabolic rate. It is concluded that these findings indicate that some antioxidants may inhibit respiration rate in addition to their protective effect against free radical-induced cellular damage.

  19. Gut microbiota, enteroendocrine functions and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Cani, Patrice D; Everard, Amandine; Duparc, Thibaut

    2013-12-01

    The gut microbiota affects host metabolism through a number of physiological processes. Emerging evidence suggests that gut microbes interact with the host through several pathways involving enteroendocrine cells (e.g. L cells). The activation of specific G protein coupled receptors expressed on L cells (e.g. GPR41, GPR43, GPR119 and TGR5) triggers the secretion of glucagon-like peptides (GLP-1 and GLP-2) and PYY. These gut peptides are known to control energy homeostasis, glucose metabolism, gut barrier function and metabolic inflammation. Here, we explore how crosstalk between the ligands produced by the gut microbiota (short chain fatty acids, or SCFAs), or produced by the host but influenced by gut microbes (endocannabinoids and bile acids), impact host physiology. PMID:24075718

  20. Effects of thirty elements on bone metabolism.

    PubMed

    Dermience, Michael; Lognay, Georges; Mathieu, Françoise; Goyens, Philippe

    2015-10-01

    The human skeleton, made of 206 bones, plays vital roles including supporting the body, protecting organs, enabling movement, and storing minerals. Bones are made of organic structures, intimately connected with an inorganic matrix produced by bone cells. Many elements are ubiquitous in our environment, and many impact bone metabolism. Most elements have antagonistic actions depending on concentration. Indeed, some elements are essential, others are deleterious, and many can be both. Several pathways mediate effects of element deficiencies or excesses on bone metabolism. This paper aims to identify all elements that impact bone health and explore the mechanisms by which they act. To date, this is the first time that the effects of thirty minerals on bone metabolism have been summarized. PMID:26302917

  1. Over-nutrition and metabolic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Mandavia, Chirag H; Pulakat, Lakshmi; DeMarco, Vincent; Sowers, James R

    2012-09-01

    Cardiovascular disease, which accounts for the highest morbidity and mortality in the United States, has several major risk factors, including aging and diabetes. Overweight and obesity, especially abdominal obesity, have been increasingly implicated as independent risk factors in the development of cardiovascular disease. Metabolic and/or diabetic cardiomyopathy has been especially associated with excess body weight caused by chronic over-nutrition and high-fat feeding. In the initial stages, obesity is now understood to cause significant dysregulation of cardiac fatty acid and glucose metabolism. These abnormalities are due, in part, to increased oxidative stress, which in turn can cause deleterious effects on intracellular signaling pathways that control cellular growth and proliferation. This increase in oxidative stress is coupled with reduced anti-oxidant species and dysregulation of metabolic signaling pathways. The cardiomyopathy seen with obesity is associated with increased interstitial fibrosis and diastolic dysfunction. Over time, evolving abnormalities include hypertrophy and systolic dysfunction, eventually leading to heart failure. PMID:22465089

  2. Metabolic disturbances connecting obesity and depression

    PubMed Central

    Hryhorczuk, Cecile; Sharma, Sandeep; Fulton, Stephanie E.

    2013-01-01

    Obesity markedly increases the odds of developing depression. Depressed mood not only impairs motivation, quality of life and overall functioning but also increases the risks of obesity complications. Abdominal obesity is a better predictor of depression and anxiety risk than overall adipose mass. A growing amount of research suggests that metabolic abnormalities stemming from central obesity that lead to metabolic disease may also be responsible for the increased incidence of depression in obesity. As reviewed here, a higher mass of dysfunctional adipose tissue is associated with several metabolic disturbances that are either directly or indirectly implicated in the control of emotions and mood. To better comprehend the development of depression in obesity, this review pulls together select findings addressing the link between adiposity, diet and negative emotional states and discusses the evidence that alterations in glucocorticoids, adipose-derived hormones, insulin and inflammatory signaling that are characteristic of central obesity may be involved. PMID:24109426

  3. [Severe depression : psychoanalysis].

    PubMed

    Bouvet de la Maisonneuve, O

    2009-12-01

    The indication for psychoanalysis in severe depression is not clear. And yet, demands for this type of intervention are increasing, despite the absence of any form of consensus on the subject. Freud considered depression as a failure of analytical efforts and, based on this observation, revised his theory, in particular to include the notions of narcissism and the death drive. Many analysts have been reluctant to follow his teachings on this last point and provide depressed patients with analytical-type therapies aimed at restoring narcissism. Melanie Klein pushed Freud's ideas about depression even further and brought such therapies back to the heart of analytical practice. Jacques Lacan took the debate to another level by proposing an overhaul of the principles on which analysis has been based. Today, while following certain precautionary rules, true psychoanalyses can be proposed to patients with severe depression, whether of the bipolar, recurring or even neurotic type that can reach this level of severity. PMID:20141799

  4. Epidemiology of severe sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Mayr, Florian B; Yende, Sachin; Angus, Derek C

    2014-01-01

    Severe sepsis is a leading cause of death in the United States and the most common cause of death among critically ill patients in non-coronary intensive care units (ICU). Respiratory tract infections, particularly pneumonia, are the most common site of infection, and associated with the highest mortality. The type of organism causing severe sepsis is an important determinant of outcome, and gram-positive organisms as a cause of sepsis have increased in frequency over time and are now more common than gram-negative infections. Recent studies suggest that acute infections worsen pre-existing chronic diseases or result in new chronic diseases, leading to poor long-term outcomes in acute illness survivors. People of older age, male gender, black race, and preexisting chronic health conditions are particularly prone to develop severe sepsis; hence prevention strategies should be targeted at these vulnerable populations in future studies. PMID:24335434

  5. Severe Combined Immunodeficiency Disorders.

    PubMed

    Chinn, Ivan K; Shearer, William T

    2015-11-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency disorders represent pediatric emergencies due to absence of adaptive immune responses to infections. The conditions result from either intrinsic defects in T-cell development (ie, severe combined immunodeficiency disease [SCID]) or congenital athymia (eg, complete DiGeorge anomaly). Hematopoietic stem cell transplant provides the only clinically approved cure for SCID, although gene therapy research trials are showing significant promise. For greatest survival, patients should undergo transplant before 3.5 months of age and before the onset of infections. Newborn screening programs have yielded successful early identification and treatment of infants with SCID and congenital athymia in the United States. PMID:26454313

  6. Flux-p: automating metabolic flux analysis.

    PubMed

    Ebert, Birgitta E; Lamprecht, Anna-Lena; Steffen, Bernhard; Blank, Lars M

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative knowledge of intracellular fluxes in metabolic networks is invaluable for inferring metabolic system behavior and the design principles of biological systems. However, intracellular reaction rates can not often be calculated directly but have to be estimated; for instance, via 13C-based metabolic flux analysis, a model-based interpretation of stable carbon isotope patterns in intermediates of metabolism. Existing software such as FiatFlux, OpenFLUX or 13CFLUX supports experts in this complex analysis, but requires several steps that have to be carried out manually, hence restricting the use of this software for data interpretation to a rather small number of experiments. In this paper, we present Flux-P as an approach to automate and standardize 13C-based metabolic flux analysis, using the Bio-jETI workflow framework. Exemplarily based on the FiatFlux software, it demonstrates how services can be created that carry out the different analysis steps autonomously and how these can subsequently be assembled into software workflows that perform automated, high-throughput intracellular flux analysis of high quality and reproducibility. Besides significant acceleration and standardization of the data analysis, the agile workflow-based realization supports flexible changes of the analysis workflows on the user level, making it easy to perform custom analyses. PMID:24957766

  7. Regulation of human drug metabolism by dietary factors.

    PubMed

    Conney, A H; Buening, M K; Pantuck, E J; Pantuck, C B; Fortner, J G; Anderson, K E; Kappas, A

    1980-01-01

    Several dietary factors influence the oxidative metabolism of chemicals in humans. Increasing the ratio of protein to carbohydrate or fat in the diet, feeding cabbage and brussels sprouts or feeding charcoal-broiled beef for several days stimulates human drug metabolism. The chronic ingestion of ethanol stimulates drug metabolism whereas the chronic ingestion of methylxanthine-containing foods inhibits drug metabolism. In contrast, an increase in the ratio of fat to carbohydrate in the diet of normal subjects or the fasting of obese individuals for several days has little or no effect on drug metabolism. Flavonoids in edible plants influence the metabolism of foreign chemicals by human liver in vitro. The addition of flavone, tangeretin or nobiletin to human liver microsomes activates both the hydroxylation of benzo[alpha]pyrene and the metabolism of aflatoxin B1 to mutagens. On the other hand, quercetin, kaempferol, morin and chrysin, which are also normally occurring flavonoids, inhibit the hydroxylation of benzo[alpha]pyrene by human liver microsomes. PMID:6906262

  8. Diagnostics of Severe PCVAD

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    About 2 years ago case reports in Eastern Canada described a syndrome of an acute onset of high mortality in finishing age pigs. Within a year this syndrome had spread westward in Canada and was reported in several states in the U.S. Although diagnostic investigations into these cases have detecte...

  9. Multiculturalism and Severe Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Luanna H.

    2001-01-01

    This article discusses the need for educators to acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to help students with severe disabilities from mainstream groups to develop cross-cultural knowledge, values, and competencies. It outlines goals for multicultural understanding for educational researches, for teacher educators, and for school leaders and…

  10. Metabolic reprogramming: the emerging concept and associated therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Go J

    2015-01-01

    Tumor tissue is composed of cancer cells and surrounding stromal cells with diverse genetic/epigenetic backgrounds, a situation known as intra-tumoral heterogeneity. Cancer cells are surrounded by a totally different microenvironment than that of normal cells; consequently, tumor cells must exhibit rapidly adaptive responses to hypoxia and hypo-nutrient conditions. This phenomenon of changes of tumor cellular bioenergetics, called "metabolic reprogramming", has been recognized as one of 10 hallmarks of cancer. Metabolic reprogramming is required for both malignant transformation and tumor development, including invasion and metastasis. Although the Warburg effect has been widely accepted as a common feature of metabolic reprogramming, accumulating evidence has revealed that tumor cells depend on mitochondrial metabolism as well as aerobic glycolysis. Remarkably, cancer-associated fibroblasts in tumor stroma tend to activate both glycolysis and autophagy in contrast to neighboring cancer cells, which leads to a reverse Warburg effect. Heterogeneity of monocarboxylate transporter expression reflects cellular metabolic heterogeneity with respect to the production and uptake of lactate. In tumor tissue, metabolic heterogeneity induces metabolic symbiosis, which is responsible for adaptation to drastic changes in the nutrient microenvironment resulting from chemotherapy. In addition, metabolic heterogeneity is responsible for the failure to induce the same therapeutic effect against cancer cells as a whole. In particular, cancer stem cells exhibit several biological features responsible for resistance to conventional anti-tumor therapies. Consequently, cancer stem cells tend to form minimal residual disease after chemotherapy and exhibit metastatic potential with additional metabolic reprogramming. This type of altered metabolic reprogramming leads to adaptive/acquired resistance to anti-tumor therapy. Collectively, complex and dynamic metabolic reprogramming should be regarded as a reflection of the "robustness" of tumor cells against unfavorable conditions. This review focuses on the concept of metabolic reprogramming in heterogeneous tumor tissue, and further emphasizes the importance of developing novel therapeutic strategies based on drug repositioning. PMID:26445347

  11. Starch Metabolism in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Streb, Sebastian; Zeeman, Samuel C.

    2012-01-01

    Starch is the major non-structural carbohydrate in plants. It serves as an important store of carbon that fuels plant metabolism and growth when they are unable to photosynthesise. This storage can be in leaves and other green tissues, where it is degraded during the night, or in heterotrophic tissues such as roots, seeds and tubers, where it is stored over longer time periods. Arabidopsis accumulates starch in many of its tissues, but mostly in its leaves during the day. It has proven to be a powerful genetic system for discovering how starch is synthesised and degraded, and new proteins and processes have been discovered. Such work has major significance for our starch crops, whose yield and quality could be improved by the application of this knowledge. Research into Arabidopsis starch metabolism has begun to reveal how its daily turnover is integrated into the rest of metabolism and adapted to the environmental conditions. Furthermore, Arabidopsis mutant lines deficient in starch metabolism have been employed as tools to study other biological processes ranging from sugar sensing to gravitropism and flowering time control. This review gives a detailed account of the use of Arabidopsis to study starch metabolism. It describes the major discoveries made and presents an overview of our understanding today, together with some as-yet unresolved questions. PMID:23393426

  12. Artemether for severe malaria

    PubMed Central

    Esu, Ekpereonne; Effa, Emmanuel E; Opie, Oko N; Uwaoma, Amirahobu; Meremikwu, Martin M

    2014-01-01

    Background In 2011 the World Health Organization (WHO) recommended parenteral artesunate in preference to quinine as first-line treatment for people with severe malaria. Prior to this recommendation, many countries, particularly in Africa, had begun to use artemether, an alternative artemisinin derivative. This review evaluates intramuscular artemether compared with both quinine and artesunate. Objectives To assess the efficacy and safety of intramuscular artemether versus any other parenteral medication in treating severe malaria in adults and children. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register, CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE, EMBASE and LILACS, ISI Web of Science, conference proceedings and reference lists of articles. We also searched the WHO clinical trial registry platform, ClinicalTrials.gov and the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) for ongoing trials up to 9 April 2014. Selection criteria Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing intramuscular artemether with intravenous or intramuscular antimalarial for treating severe malaria. Data collection and analysis The primary outcome was all-cause death.Two authors independently assessed trial eligibility, risk of bias and extracted data. We summarized dichotomous outcomes using risk ratios (RR) and continuous outcomes using mean differences (MD), and presented both measures with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Where appropriate, we combined data in meta-analyses and assessed the quality of the evidence using the GRADE approach. Main results We included 18 RCTs, enrolling 2662 adults and children with severe malaria, carried out in Africa (11) and in Asia (7). Artemether versus quinine For children in Africa, there is probably little or no difference in the risk of death between intramuscular artemether and quinine (RR 0.96, 95% CI 0.76 to 1.20; 12 trials, 1447 participants, moderate quality evidence). Coma recovery may be about five hours shorter with artemether (MD -5.45, 95% CI -7.90 to -3.00; six trials, 358 participants, low quality evidence), and artemether may result in fewer neurological sequelae, but larger trials would be needed to confirm this (RR 0.84, 95% CI 0.66 to 1.07; seven trials, 968 participants, low quality evidence). Artemether probably shortens the parasite clearance time by about nine hours (MD -9.03, 95% CI -11.43 to -6.63; seven trials, 420 participants, moderate quality evidence), and may shorten the fever clearance time by about three hours (MD -3.73, 95% CI -6.55 to -0.92; eight trials, 457 participants, low quality evidence). For adults in Asia, treatment with intramuscular artemether probably results in fewer deaths than treatment with quinine (RR 0.59, 95% CI 0.42 to 0.83; four trials, 716 participants, moderate quality evidence). Artemether versus artesunate Artemether and artesunate have not been directly compared in randomized trials in African children. For adults in Asia, mortality is probably higher with intramuscular artemether (RR 1.80, 95% CI 1.09 to 2.97, two trials,494 participants, moderate quality evidence). Authors' conclusions Although there is a lack of direct evidence comparing artemether with artesunate, artemether is probably less effective than artesunate at preventing deaths from severe malaria. In circumstances where artesunate is not available, artemether is an alternative to quinine. PLAIN LANGUAGE SUMMARY Artemether injection for treating people with severe malaria In this review, researchers from The Cochrane Collaboration examined the effects of treating people that have severe malaria with artemether injected intramuscularly, and compared it to treatment with other antimalarial drugs given intramuscularly or intravenously. After searching for relevant trials up to 9 April 2014, we included 18 randomized controlled trials that recruited 2662 adults and children and were conducted mainly in Africa and Asia. What is severe malaria and how might artemether injection reduce deaths Severe malaria is caused by infection with the Plasmodium parasite, which

  13. Regulation of cellular iron metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian; Pantopoulos, Kostas

    2011-01-01

    Iron is an essential but potentially hazardous biometal. Mammalian cells require sufficient amounts of iron to satisfy metabolic needs or to accomplish specialized functions. Iron is delivered to tissues by circulating transferrin, a transporter that captures iron released into the plasma mainly from intestinal enterocytes or reticuloendothelial macrophages. The binding of iron-laden transferrin to the cell-surface transferrin receptor 1 results in endocytosis and uptake of the metal cargo. Internalized iron is transported to mitochondria for the synthesis of haem or iron–sulfur clusters, which are integral parts of several metalloproteins, and excess iron is stored and detoxified in cytosolic ferritin. Iron metabolism is controlled at different levels and by diverse mechanisms. The present review summarizes basic concepts of iron transport, use and storage and focuses on the IRE (iron-responsive element)/IRP (iron-regulatory protein) system, a well known post-transcriptional regulatory circuit that not only maintains iron homoeostasis in various cell types, but also contributes to systemic iron balance. PMID:21348856

  14. Simulating Metabolism with Statistical Thermodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, William R.

    2014-08-04

    Kinetic probabilities of state are usually based on empirical measurements, while thermodynamic state probabilities are based on the assumption that chemical species are distributed to according to a multinomial Boltzmann distribution. While the use of kinetic simulations is desirable, obtaining all the mass action rate constants necessary to carry out kinetic simulations is an overwhelming challenge. Here, the kinetic probability of a state is compared in depth to the thermodynamic probability of a state for sets of coupled reactions. The entropic and energetic contributions to thermodynamic stable states are described and compared to entropic and energetic contributions of kinetic steady states. It is shown that many kinetic steady states are possible for a system of coupled reactions depending on the relative values of the mass action rate constants, but only one of these corresponds to a thermodynamically stable state. Furthermore, the thermodynamic stable state corresponds to a minimum free energy state. The use of thermodynamic simulations of state to model metabolic processes is attractive, since metabolite levels and energy requirements of pathways can be evaluated using only standard free energies of formation as parameters in the probability distribution. In chemical physics, the assumption of a Boltzmann distribution is the basis of transition state theory for modeling transitory species. Application to stable species, such as those found in metabolic processes, is a less severe assumption that would enable the use of simulations of state.

  15. Modelling runway incursion severity.

    PubMed

    Wilke, Sabine; Majumdar, Arnab; Ochieng, Washington Y

    2015-06-01

    Analysis of the causes underlying runway incursions is fundamental for the development of effective mitigation measures. However, there are significant weaknesses in the current methods to model these factors. This paper proposes a structured framework for modelling causal factors and their relationship to severity, which includes a description of the airport surface system architecture, establishment of terminological definitions, the determination and collection of appropriate data, the analysis of occurrences for severity and causes, and the execution of a statistical analysis framework. It is implemented in the context of U.S. airports, enabling the identification of a number of priority interventions, including the need for better investigation and causal factor capture, recommendations for airfield design, operating scenarios and technologies, and better training for human operators in the system. The framework is recommended for the analysis of runway incursions to support safety improvements and the methodology is transferable to other areas of aviation safety risk analysis. PMID:25819211

  16. Metabolism of phencyclidine

    SciTech Connect

    Hoag, M.K.P.

    1987-01-01

    Phencyclidine (PCP) is a drug of abuse which may produce, in some users, a persistent schizophreniform psychosis. The possibility that long term effects of PCP are mediated by metabolic activation of the parent compound to reactive species is consistent with the demonstration of metabolism-dependent covalent binding of radiolabeled PCP in vivo and in vitro to macromolecules in rodent lung, liver, and kidney. Formation of the electrophilic iminium ion metabolite of PCP is believed to be critical for covalent binding since binding was inhibited by cyanide ion at concentrations which did not inhibit metabolism of PCP but did trap the iminium ion to form the corresponding alpha-aminonitrile. The present studies were designed to characterize further the biological fate of PCP by identifying possible macromolecular targets of the reactive metabolite(s).

  17. Nitrile Metabolizing Yeasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhalla, Tek Chand; Sharma, Monica; Sharma, Nitya Nand

    Nitriles and amides are widely distributed in the biotic and abiotic components of our ecosystem. Nitrile form an important group of organic compounds which find their applications in the synthesis of a large number of compounds used as/in pharmaceutical, cosmetics, plastics, dyes, etc>. Nitriles are mainly hydro-lyzed to corresponding amide/acid in organic chemistry. Industrial and agricultural activities have also lead to release of nitriles and amides into the environment and some of them pose threat to human health. Biocatalysis and biotransformations are increasingly replacing chemical routes of synthesis in organic chemistry as a part of ‘green chemistry’. Nitrile metabolizing organisms or enzymes thus has assumed greater significance in all these years to convert nitriles to amides/ acids. The nitrile metabolizing enzymes are widely present in bacteria, fungi and yeasts. Yeasts metabolize nitriles through nitrilase and/or nitrile hydratase and amidase enzymes. Only few yeasts have been reported to possess aldoxime dehydratase. More than sixty nitrile metabolizing yeast strains have been hither to isolated from cyanide treatment bioreactor, fermented foods and soil. Most of the yeasts contain nitrile hydratase-amidase system for metabolizing nitriles. Transformations of nitriles to amides/acids have been carried out with free and immobilized yeast cells. The nitrilases of Torulopsis candida>and Exophiala oligosperma>R1 are enantioselec-tive and regiospecific respectively. Geotrichum>sp. JR1 grows in the presence of 2M acetonitrile and may have potential for application in bioremediation of nitrile contaminated soil/water. The nitrilase of E. oligosperma>R1 being active at low pH (3-6) has shown promise for the hydroxy acids. Immobilized yeast cells hydrolyze some additional nitriles in comparison to free cells. It is expected that more focus in future will be on purification, characterization, cloning, expression and immobilization of nitrile metabolizing enzymes of yeasts.

  18. Sleep and Metabolism: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sunil; Kavuru, Mani

    2010-01-01

    Sleep and its disorders are increasingly becoming important in our sleep deprived society. Sleep is intricately connected to various hormonal and metabolic processes in the body and is important in maintaining metabolic homeostasis. Research shows that sleep deprivation and sleep disorders may have profound metabolic and cardiovascular implications. Sleep deprivation, sleep disordered breathing, and circadian misalignment are believed to cause metabolic dysregulation through myriad pathways involving sympathetic overstimulation, hormonal imbalance, and subclinical inflammation. This paper reviews sleep and metabolism, and how sleep deprivation and sleep disorders may be altering human metabolism. PMID:20811596

  19. Obesity-Driven Gut Microbiota Inflammatory Pathways to Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cavalcante-Silva, Luiz H. A.; Galvão, José G. F. M.; da Silva, Juliane Santos de França; de Sales-Neto, José M.; Rodrigues-Mascarenhas, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    The intimate interplay between immune system, metabolism, and gut microbiota plays an important role in controlling metabolic homeostasis and possible obesity development. Obesity involves impairment of immune response affecting both innate and adaptive immunity. The main factors involved in the relationship of obesity with inflammation have not been completely elucidated. On the other hand, gut microbiota, via innate immune receptors, has emerged as one of the key factors regulating events triggering acute inflammation associated with obesity and metabolic syndrome. Inflammatory disorders lead to several signaling transduction pathways activation, inflammatory cytokine, chemokine production and cell migration, which in turn cause metabolic dysfunction. Inflamed adipose tissue, with increased macrophages infiltration, is associated with impaired preadipocyte development and differentiation to mature adipose cells, leading to ectopic lipid accumulation and insulin resistance. This review focuses on the relationship between obesity and inflammation, which is essential to understand the pathological mechanisms governing metabolic syndrome. PMID:26635627

  20. [Bone metabolism: molecular mechanisms].

    PubMed

    Neumann, E; Schett, G

    2007-07-01

    In order to accommodate individual load, the skeletal system is in a continual state of change. Bone metabolism guarantees optimal bone structure. The osteoblasts are responsible for the synthesis and the osteoclasts for resorption of the bone. A finely adjusted interplay between molecular mechanisms leads, via cytokines, hormones and growth factors, to an homeostasis in bone metabolism. Disturbances of this process lead via increased bone resorption to osteoporosis, and via increased synthesis to osteopetrosis. This contribution describes the known molecular mechanisms in this remodelling process. PMID:17562055

  1. Humanoid Flight Metabolic Simulator Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Evolvable Mars Campaign (EMC) has identified several areas of technology that will require significant improvements in terms of performance, capacity, and efficiency, in order to make a manned mission to Mars possible. These include crew vehicle Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS), EVA suit Portable Life Support System (PLSS) and Information Systems, autonomous environmental monitoring, radiation exposure monitoring and protection, and vehicle thermal control systems (TCS). (MADMACS) in a Suit can be configured to simulate human metabolism, consuming crew resources (oxygen) in the process. In addition to providing support for testing Life Support on unmanned flights, MADMACS will also support testing of suit thermal controls, and monitor radiation exposure, body zone temperatures, moisture, and loads.

  2. METABOLISM AND METABOLIC ACTIVATION OF CHEMICALS: IN-SILICO SIMULATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The role of metabolism in prioritizing chemicals according to their potential adverse health effects is extremely important because innocuous parents can be transformed into toxic metabolites. This work presents the TIssue MEtabolism Simulator (TIMES) platform for simulating met...

  3. Normal roles for dietary fructose in carbohydrate metabolism.

    PubMed

    Laughlin, Maren R

    2014-08-01

    Although there are many well-documented metabolic effects linked to the fructose component of a very high sugar diet, a healthy diet is also likely to contain appreciable fructose, even if confined to that found in fruits and vegetables. These normal levels of fructose are metabolized in specialized pathways that synergize with glucose at several metabolic steps. Glucose potentiates fructose absorption from the gut, while fructose catalyzes glucose uptake and storage in the liver. Fructose accelerates carbohydrate oxidation after a meal. In addition, emerging evidence suggests that fructose may also play a role in the secretion of insulin and GLP-1, and in the maturation of preadipocytes to increase fat storage capacity. Therefore, fructose undergoing its normal metabolism has the interesting property of potentiating the disposal of a dietary carbohydrate load through several routes. PMID:25100436

  4. Normal Roles for Dietary Fructose in Carbohydrate Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Laughlin, Maren R.

    2014-01-01

    Although there are many well-documented metabolic effects linked to the fructose component of a very high sugar diet, a healthy diet is also likely to contain appreciable fructose, even if confined to that found in fruits and vegetables. These normal levels of fructose are metabolized in specialized pathways that synergize with glucose at several metabolic steps. Glucose potentiates fructose absorption from the gut, while fructose catalyzes glucose uptake and storage in the liver. Fructose accelerates carbohydrate oxidation after a meal. In addition, emerging evidence suggests that fructose may also play a role in the secretion of insulin and GLP-1, and in the maturation of preadipocytes to increase fat storage capacity. Therefore, fructose undergoing its normal metabolism has the interesting property of potentiating the disposal of a dietary carbohydrate load through several routes. PMID:25100436

  5. Arsenic Toxicity: The Effects on Plant Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Finnegan, Patrick M.; Chen, Weihua

    2012-01-01

    The two forms of inorganic arsenic, arsenate (AsV) and arsenite (AsIII), are easily taken up by the cells of the plant root. Once in the cell, AsV can be readily converted to AsIII, the more toxic of the two forms. AsV and AsIII both disrupt plant metabolism, but through distinct mechanisms. AsV is a chemical analog of phosphate that can disrupt at least some phosphate-dependent aspects of metabolism. AsV can be translocated across cellular membranes by phosphate transport proteins, leading to imbalances in phosphate supply. It can compete with phosphate during phosphorylation reactions, leading to the formation of AsV adducts that are often unstable and short-lived. As an example, the formation and rapid autohydrolysis of AsV-ADP sets in place a futile cycle that uncouples photophosphorylation and oxidative phosphorylation, decreasing the ability of cells to produce ATP and carry out normal metabolism. AsIII is a dithiol reactive compound that binds to and potentially inactivates enzymes containing closely spaced cysteine residues or dithiol co-factors. Arsenic exposure generally induces the production of reactive oxygen species that can lead to the production of antioxidant metabolites and numerous enzymes involved in antioxidant defense. Oxidative carbon metabolism, amino acid and protein relationships, and nitrogen and sulfur assimilation pathways are also impacted by As exposure. Readjustment of several metabolic pathways, such as glutathione production, has been shown to lead to increased arsenic tolerance in plants. Species- and cultivar-dependent variation in arsenic sensitivity and the remodeling of metabolite pools that occurs in response to As exposure gives hope that additional metabolic pathways associated with As tolerance will be identified. PMID:22685440

  6. Branched Tricarboxylic Acid Metabolism in Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Olszewski, Kellen L.; Mather, Michael W.; Morrisey, Joanne M.; Garcia, Benjamin A.; Vaidya, Akhil B.; Rabinowitz, Joshua D.; Llinás, Manuel

    2010-01-01

    A central hub of carbon metabolism is the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle1, which serves to connect the processes of glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, respiration, amino acid synthesis and other biosynthetic pathways. The protozoan intracellular malaria parasites (Plasmodium spp.), however, have long been suspected of possessing a significantly streamlined carbon metabolic network in which TCA metabolism plays a minor role2. Blood-stage Plasmodium parasites rely almost entirely on glucose fermentation for energy and consume minimal amounts of oxygen3, yet the parasite genome encodes all of the enzymes necessary for a complete TCA cycle4. By tracing 13C-labeled compounds using mass spectrometry5 we show that TCA metabolism in the human malaria parasite P. falciparum is largely disconnected from glycolysis and is organized along a fundamentally different architecture than the canonical textbook pathway. We find that this pathway is not cyclic but rather a branched structure in which the major carbon sources are the amino acids glutamate and glutamine. As a consequence of this branched architecture, several reactions must run in the reverse of the standard direction thereby generating two-carbon units in the form of acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA). We further show that glutamine-derived acetyl-CoA is used for histone acetylation while glucose-derived acetyl-CoA is used to acetylate aminosugars. Thus the parasite has evolved two independent acetyl-CoA-production mechanisms with different biological functions. These results significantly clarify our understanding of the Plasmodium metabolic network and highlight the ability of altered variants of central carbon metabolism to arise in response to unique environments. PMID:20686576

  7. Spectrum of metabolic myopathies.

    PubMed

    Angelini, Corrado

    2015-04-01

    Metabolic myopathies are disorders of utilization of carbohydrates or fat in muscles. The acute nature of energy failure is manifested either by a metabolic crisis with weakness, sometimes associated with respiratory failure, or by myoglobinuria. A typical disorder where permanent weakness occurs is glycogenosis type II (GSDII or Pompe disease) both in infantile and late-onset forms, where respiratory insufficiency is manifested by a large number of cases. In GSDII the pathogenetic mechanism is still poorly understood, and has to be attributed more to structural muscle alterations, possibly in correlation to macro-autophagy, rather than to energetic failure. This review is focused on recent advances about GSDII and its treatment, and the most recent notions about the management and treatment of other metabolic myopathies will be briefly reviewed, including glycogenosis type V (McArdle disease), glycogenosis type III (debrancher enzyme deficiency or Cori disease), CPT-II deficiency, and ETF-dehydrogenase deficiency (also known as riboflavin-responsive multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency or RR-MADD). The discovery of the genetic defect in ETF dehydrogenase confirms the etiology of this syndrome. Other metabolic myopathies with massive lipid storage and weakness are carnitine deficiency, neutral lipid storage-myopathy (NLSD-M), besides RR-MADD. Enzyme replacement therapy is presented with critical consideration and for each of the lipid storage disorders, representative cases and their response to therapy is included. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neuromuscular Diseases: Pathology and Molecular Pathogenesis. PMID:24997454

  8. NUTRITIONAL AND METABOLIC ENDPOINTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    None of the metabolic indicators which have been used to date provides a single or necessarily ideal endpoint for interventional management in wasting disorders. Some of these indicators may provide better endpoints for the acute rather than the chronic wasting conditions. In addition, it is imper...

  9. Energetics Metabolic scaling relationships

    E-print Network

    Wilkinson, Gerald S.

    Energetics · Metabolic scaling relationships · Behavioral thermoregulation · Torpor and hibernation from torpor can be expensive #12;Hibernation = long torpor Ground squirrel maintained at 4oC #12;Hibernation has evolved twice in bats and has allowed some species to occupy cold climates Vespertilionidae

  10. Microbial Metabolism Systems Microbiology

    E-print Network

    Huang, Ching-Tsan

    1 Microbial Metabolism Systems Microbiology Ching-Tsan Huang () Office: Agronomy Hall, Room 111 Tel: (02) 33664454 E-mail: cthuang@ntu.edu.tw MIT OCW #12;2 Systems Microbiology aims to integrate basic to create an integrated model of how a microbial cell or community functions. (Nature Review Microbiology

  11. Microbial Metabolism Course Introduction

    E-print Network

    Huang, Ching-Tsan

    Respiration Reproduction Fermentation Catabolism Anabolism Light Energy #12;6 Substrates Products Energy Catabolism Anabolism Light Energy Photosynthesis Enzymes Overview of metabolism Purpose: Trapping, generation - PO4 -, SO4 = Catabolism Anabolism Polymers Monomers Molecules #12;8 Procaryotic and Eucaryotic Cell

  12. Complexity of dopamine metabolism

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) coincides with a dramatic loss of dopaminergic neurons within the substantia nigra. A key player in the loss of dopaminergic neurons is oxidative stress. Dopamine (DA) metabolism itself is strongly linked to oxidative stress as its degradation generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) and DA oxidation can lead to endogenous neurotoxins whereas some DA derivatives show antioxidative effects. Therefore, DA metabolism is of special importance for neuronal redox-homeostasis and viability. In this review we highlight different aspects of dopamine metabolism in the context of PD and neurodegeneration. Since most reviews focus only on single aspects of the DA system, we will give a broader overview by looking at DA biosynthesis, sequestration, degradation and oxidation chemistry at the metabolic level, as well as at the transcriptional, translational and posttranslational regulation of all enzymes involved. This is followed by a short overview of cellular models currently used in PD research. Finally, we will address the topic from a medical point of view which directly aims to encounter PD. PMID:23683503

  13. Estuarine Total Ecosystem Metabolism

    EPA Science Inventory

    Total ecosystem metabolism (TEM), both as discrete measurements and as a theoretical concept, has an important history in ecosystem ecology, particularly in estuaries. Some of the earliest ecological studies were developed to determine how energy flowed through an ecosystem and w...

  14. GENES REGULATING CHOLESTEROL METABOLISM

    E-print Network

    Brutlag, Doug

    GENES REGULATING CHOLESTEROL METABOLISM Chau Vu Bio 118 #12;FUNCTIONS OF CHOLESTEROL Maintain atherosclerosis #12;SYNTHESIS OF CHOLESTEROL Occurs in cytoplasm and microsomes acetyl-CoA ­ starting material OF CHOLESTEROL #12;REGULATION OF CHOLESTEROL Synthesis and dietary intake: Normal Adult: produce1g/day; consume

  15. Alcoholic metabolic emergencies.

    PubMed

    Allison, Michael G; McCurdy, Michael T

    2014-05-01

    Ethanol intoxication and ethanol use are associated with a variety of metabolic derangements encountered in the Emergency Department. In this article, the authors discuss alcohol intoxication and its treatment, dispel the myth that alcohol intoxication is associated with hypoglycemia, comment on electrolyte derangements and their management, review alcoholic ketoacidosis, and end with a section on alcoholic encephalopathy. PMID:24766933

  16. Cellular compartmentalization of secondary metabolism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fungal secondary metabolism is often considered apart from the essential housekeeping functions of the cell. However, there are clear links between fundamental cellular metabolism and the biochemical pathways leading to secondary metabolite synthesis. Besides utilizing key biochemical precursors sh...

  17. How Is Metabolic Syndrome Treated?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Metabolic Syndrome Treated? Heart-healthy lifestyle changes are the first line of treatment for metabolic syndrome. Lifestyle changes include heart-healthy eating , losing and ...

  18. Mycoplasmas and cancer: focus on nucleoside metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Vande Voorde, Johan; Balzarini, Jan; Liekens, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    The standard of care for patients suffering cancer often includes treatment with nucleoside analogues (NAs). NAs are internalized by cell-specific nucleobase/nucleoside transporters and, after enzymatic activation (often one or more phosphorylation steps), interfere with cellular nucleo(s)(t)ide metabolism and DNA/RNA synthesis. Therefore, their efficacy is highly dependent on the expression and activity of nucleo(s)(t)ide-metabolizing enzymes, and alterations thereof (e.g. by down/upregulated expression or mutations) may change the susceptibility to NA-based therapy and/or confer drug resistance. Apart from host cell factors, several other variables including microbial presence may determine the metabolome (i.e. metabolite concentrations) of human tissues. Studying the diversity of microorganisms that are associated with the human body has already provided new insights in several diseases (e.g. diabetes and inflammatory bowel disease) and the metabolic exchange between tissues and their specific microbiota was found to affect the bioavailability and toxicity of certain anticancer drugs, including NAs. Several studies report a preferential colonization of tumor tissues with some mycoplasma species (mostly Mycoplasma hyorhinis). These prokaryotes are also a common source of cell culture contamination and alter the cytostatic activity of some NAs in vitro due to the expression of nucleoside-catabolizing enzymes. Mycoplasma infection may therefore bias experimental work with NAs, and their presence in the tumor microenvironment could be of significance when optimizing nucleoside-based cancer treatment. PMID:26417262

  19. Metabolic Interdependence of Obligate Intracellular Bacteria and Their Insect Hosts†

    PubMed Central

    Zientz, Evelyn; Dandekar, Thomas; Gross, Roy

    2004-01-01

    Mutualistic associations of obligate intracellular bacteria and insects have attracted much interest in the past few years due to the evolutionary consequences for their genome structure. However, much less attention has been paid to the metabolic ramifications for these endosymbiotic microorganisms, which have to compete with but also to adapt to another metabolism—that of the host cell. This review attempts to provide insights into the complex physiological interactions and the evolution of metabolic pathways of several mutualistic bacteria of aphids, ants, and tsetse flies and their insect hosts. PMID:15590782

  20. Metabolic Factors and Chronic Hepatitis C: A Complex Interplay

    PubMed Central

    Maida, Marcello; Minissale, Maria Giovanna; Orlando, Emanuele; Petta, Salvatore

    2013-01-01

    In the last years, several lines of evidence showed how metabolic factors may influence the natural history of patients with chronic hepatitis C. Chronic HCV infection is able to perturb the metabolic homeostasis of the host, in a context of complex interactions where pre-existent metabolic status and genetic background play an important role, allowing us to state that HCV infection is a systemic disease. In this review, we discuss the most recent lines of evidence on the main metabolic factors that are known to be associated with CHC, namely, insulin resistance/type 2 diabetes, steatosis, visceral obesity, atherosclerosis, vitamin D, menopause, fructose and coffee intake, lipoproteins, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase status, and hyperuricaemia. In particular, we focus on the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the correlation between HCV infection and metabolic disorders, the impact of metabolic factors on the progression of liver and non-liver-related diseases, and, on the contrary, the possible influence of chronic HCV infection on metabolic features. In this setting, the importance of a multifaceted evaluation of CHC patients and a prompt correction of modifiable metabolic risk factors should be emphasized. PMID:23956991

  1. Menstrual Health and the Metabolic Syndrome in Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Tfayli, Hala; Arslanian, Silva

    2009-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome, a constellation of interrelated risk factors for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus, has become a major public health concern against the backdrop of increasing rates of obesity. Insulin resistance plays a pivotal role as the underlying pathophysiological linchpin of the various components of the syndrome. The metabolic syndrome is well recognized in adults, and there is convincing evidence that it starts in childhood, with progressive clustering of the various components over time and tracking through adulthood. Adult women and adolescents with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) have higher prevalence rates of the metabolic syndrome compared with the general population. Several anthropometric (obesity, particularly abdominal obesity), metabolic (insulin resistance/hyperinsulinemia, dyslipidemia) and hormonal (low IGFBP1, IGFBP2 and low sex hormone binding globulin) features of adolescents with PCOS are also features of the metabolic syndrome. Insulin resistance, believed to be a key pathogenic factor in both PCOS and the metabolic syndrome, may be the thread that links the two conditions. Menstrual health in adolescents could be viewed as yet another component in the evaluation of the metabolic syndrome. Careful assessment of menstrual history and appropriate laboratory work-up could reveal the presence of PCOS in obese at-risk adolescent girls with a family history of the metabolic syndrome. PMID:18574212

  2. Phenomenological correlates of metabolic activity in 18 patients with chronic schizophrenia

    SciTech Connect

    Volkow, N.D.; Wolf, A.P.; Van Gelder, P.; Brodie, J.D.; Overall, J.E.; Cancro, R.; Gomez-Mont, F.

    1987-02-01

    Using (11C)-deoxy-D-glucose and positron emission tomography (PET), the authors measured brain metabolism in 18 patients with chronic schizophrenia to assess which of the metabolic measures from two test conditions was more closely related to the patients' differing clinical characteristics. The two conditions were resting and activation, and an eye tracking task was used. Patients with more negative symptoms showed lower global metabolic rates and more severe hypofrontality than did the patients with fewer negative symptoms. Differences among the patients were distinguished by the task: sicker patients failed to show a metabolic activation response. These findings suggest that cerebral metabolic patterns reflect clinical characteristics of schizophrenic patients.

  3. Nutrition in severe dementia.

    PubMed

    Pivi, Glaucia Akiko Kamikado; Bertolucci, Paulo Henrique Ferreira; Schultz, Rodrigo Rizek

    2012-01-01

    An increasing proportion of older adults with Alzheimer's disease or other dementias are now surviving to more advanced stages of the illness. Advanced dementia is associated with feeding problems, including difficulty in swallowing and respiratory diseases. Patients become incompetent to make decisions. As a result, complex situations may arise in which physicians and families decide whether artificial nutrition and hydration (ANH) is likely to be beneficial for the patient. The objective of this paper is to present methods for evaluating the nutritional status of patients with severe dementia as well as measures for the treatment of nutritional disorders, the use of vitamin and mineral supplementation, and indications for ANH and pharmacological therapy. PMID:22645608

  4. Severe storm electricity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, R. T.; Rust, W. D.

    1984-01-01

    Successful ground truth support of U-2 overflights was been accomplished. Data have been reduced for 4 June 1984 and some of the results have been integrated into some of MSFC's efforts. Staccato lightning (multiply branched, single stroke flash with no continuing current) is prevalent within the rainfree region around the main storm updraft and this is believed to be important, i.e., staccato flashes might be an important indicator of severe storm electrification. Results from data analysis from two stations appear to indicate that charge center heights can be estimated from a combination of intercept data with data from the fixed laboratory at NSSL. An excellent data base has been provided for determining the sight errors and efficiency of NSSL's LLP system. Cloud structures, observable in a low radar reflectivity region and on a scale smaller than is currently resolved by radar, which appear to be related to electrical activity are studied.

  5. Severe peripartum sepsis.

    PubMed

    Sriskandan, S

    2011-12-01

    Despite global efforts to reduce maternal mortality, maternal deaths from bacterial sepsis have actually risen in the UK. The group A streptococcus, also known as Streptococcus pyogenes, is the leading cause of infection-related death in pregnancy and the puerperium. Many clinicians remain unaware of the risks posed to this particular group of otherwise fit, healthy patients despite the fact that S. pyogenes has been the leading infective cause of puerperal deaths since records began. S. pyogenes has a specific but unexplained predilection for the recently pregnant woman, and has an attributable mortality greater than many other invasive bacteria. Here, the epidemiology, aetiology, and management of severe peripartum sepsis are discussed, as are potential approaches to reduce risks. While fundamental changes in healthcare access can lead to dramatic reductions in maternal deaths in developing countries, an improvement in maternal sepsis deaths in the UK will require heightened awareness among both hospital and community-based clinical staff. PMID:22184573

  6. Microbial Metabolism Production and Regulation

    E-print Network

    Huang, Ching-Tsan

    1 Microbial Metabolism Production and Regulation of Primary and Secondary Metabolites Ching antibiotics and toxins #12;5 Primary metabolic pathway for the synthesis of aromatic amino acids The secondary metabolite antibiotics containing aromatic rings. Relation between 1o and 2o metabolic pathway #12

  7. Jason W. Moore GROUNDING METABOLISM

    E-print Network

    Ellis, Erle C.

    021 Jason W. Moore #12;GROUNDING METABOLISM editedby DANIELIBAÑEZ&NIKOSKATSIKIS #12;New Geographies 06 Grounding Metabolism Editors Daniel Ibañez & Nikos Katsikis Editorial Board Daniel Daou Ali Fard, technology, ecology, and globalization. New Geographies 06--Grounding Metabolism has been made possible

  8. Pulmonary metabolism of foreign compounds: Its role in metabolic activation

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, G.M. )

    1990-04-01

    The lung has the potential of metabolizing many foreign chemicals to a vast array of metabolites with different pharmacological and toxicological properties. Because many chemicals require metabolic activation in order to exert their toxicity, the cellular distribution of the drug-metabolizing enzymes in a heterogeneous tissue, such as the lung, and the balance of metabolic activation and deactivation pathways in any particular cell are key factors in determining the cellular specificity of many pulmonary toxins. Environmental factors such as air pollution, cigarette smoking, and diet markedly affect the pulmonary metabolism of some chemicals and, thereby, possibly affect their toxicity.

  9. Scaling metabolism from organisms to ecosystems

    E-print Network

    Enquist, Brian Joseph

    .............................................................. Scaling metabolism from organisms biomass, but are strongly influenced by temperature, variation in cellular metabolism and rates of supply metabolic rates of individuals, which combine to determine eco- system flux rates. Metabolism

  10. Symptoms and Diagnosis of Metabolic Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Tools & Resources Stroke More Symptoms and Diagnosis of Metabolic Syndrome Updated:Nov 20,2014 What are the symptoms ... content was last reviewed on 05/14/2014. Metabolic Syndrome • Home • About Metabolic Syndrome • Why Metabolic Syndrome Matters • ...

  11. Construction of a Genome-Scale Metabolic Model of Arthrospira platensis NIES-39 and Metabolic Design for Cyanobacterial Bioproduction

    PubMed Central

    Yoshikawa, Katsunori; Aikawa, Shimpei; Kojima, Yuta; Toya, Yoshihiro; Furusawa, Chikara; Kondo, Akihiko; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Arthrospira (Spirulina) platensis is a promising feedstock and host strain for bioproduction because of its high accumulation of glycogen and superior characteristics for industrial production. Metabolic simulation using a genome-scale metabolic model and flux balance analysis is a powerful method that can be used to design metabolic engineering strategies for the improvement of target molecule production. In this study, we constructed a genome-scale metabolic model of A. platensis NIES-39 including 746 metabolic reactions and 673 metabolites, and developed novel strategies to improve the production of valuable metabolites, such as glycogen and ethanol. The simulation results obtained using the metabolic model showed high consistency with experimental results for growth rates under several trophic conditions and growth capabilities on various organic substrates. The metabolic model was further applied to design a metabolic network to improve the autotrophic production of glycogen and ethanol. Decreased flux of reactions related to the TCA cycle and phosphoenolpyruvate reaction were found to improve glycogen production. Furthermore, in silico knockout simulation indicated that deletion of genes related to the respiratory chain, such as NAD(P)H dehydrogenase and cytochrome-c oxidase, could enhance ethanol production by using ammonium as a nitrogen source. PMID:26640947

  12. Metabolic signatures linked to macrophage polarization: from glucose metabolism to oxidative phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Boscá, Lisardo; González-Ramos, Silvia; Prieto, Patricia; Fernández-Velasco, María; Mojena, Marina; Martín-Sanz, Paloma; Alemany, Susana

    2015-08-01

    Macrophages are present in a large variety of locations, playing distinct functions that are determined by its developmental origin and by the nature of the activators of the microenvironment. Macrophage activation can be classified as pro-inflammatory (M1 polarization) or anti-inflammatory-pro-resolution-deactivation (M2), these profiles coexisting in the course of the immune response and playing a relevant functional role in the onset of inflammation (Figure 1). Several groups have analysed the metabolic aspects associated with macrophage activation to answer the question about what changes in the regulation of energy metabolism and biosynthesis of anabolic precursors accompany the different types of polarization and to what extent they are necessary for the expression of the activation phenotypes. The interest of these studies is to regulate macrophage function by altering their metabolic activity in a 'therapeutic way'. PMID:26551722

  13. Endothelial cell metabolism: parallels and divergences with cancer cell metabolism

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The stromal vasculature in tumors is a vital conduit of nutrients and oxygen for cancer cells. To date, the vast majority of studies have focused on unraveling the genetic basis of vessel sprouting (also termed angiogenesis). In contrast to the widely studied changes in cancer cell metabolism, insight in the metabolic regulation of angiogenesis is only just emerging. These studies show that metabolic pathways in endothelial cells (ECs) importantly regulate angiogenesis in conjunction with genetic signals. In this review, we will highlight these emerging insights in EC metabolism and discuss them in perspective of cancer cell metabolism. While it is generally assumed that cancer cells have unique metabolic adaptations, not shared by healthy non-transformed cells, we will discuss parallels and highlight differences between endothelial and cancer cell metabolism and consider possible novel therapeutic opportunities arising from targeting both cancer and endothelial cells. PMID:25250177

  14. Individual differences in arsenic metabolism and lung cancer in a case-control study in Cordoba, Argentina

    E-print Network

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Individual differences in arsenic metabolism and lung cancer in a case-control study in Cordoba: Arsenic Lung cancer Drinking water Metabolism In humans, ingested inorganic arsenic is metabolized risks of several arsenic-related diseases, although none of these reported on lung cancer. In this study

  15. Effects of forearm bier block with bretylium on the hemodynamic and metabolic responses to handgrip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, F.; Shoemaker, J. K.; McQuillan, P. M.; Kunselman, A. R.; Smith, M. B.; Yang, Q. X.; Smith, H.; Gray, K.; Sinoway, L. I.

    2000-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that a reduction in sympathetic tone to exercising forearm muscle would increase blood flow, reduce muscle acidosis, and attenuate reflex responses. Subjects performed a progressive, four-stage rhythmic handgrip protocol before and after forearm bier block with bretylium as forearm blood flow (Doppler) and metabolic (venous effluent metabolite concentration and (31)P-NMR indexes) and autonomic reflex responses (heart rate, blood pressure, and sympathetic nerve traffic) were measured. Bretylium inhibits the release of norepinephrine at the neurovascular junction. Bier block increased blood flow as well as oxygen consumption in the exercising forearm (P < 0.03 and P < 0.02, respectively). However, despite this increase in flow, venous K(+) release and H(+) release were both increased during exercise (P < 0.002 for both indexes). Additionally, minimal muscle pH measured during the first minute of recovery with NMR was lower after bier block (6.41 +/- 0.08 vs. 6.20 +/- 0.06; P < 0.036, simple effects). Meanwhile, reflex effects were unaffected by the bretylium bier block. The results support the conclusion that sympathetic stimulation to muscle during exercise not only limits muscle blood flow but also appears to limit anaerobiosis and H(+) release, presumably through a preferential recruitment of oxidative fibers.

  16. Metabolic profiling in human exposome studies.

    PubMed

    Athersuch, Toby J; Keun, Hector C

    2015-11-01

    The human metabolome-the complement of small molecule metabolites present in biofluids and tissues-represents a significant part of the internal chemical milieu and is therefore an important aspect of the human exposome. Metabolic profiling approaches, commonly referred to as metabonomics or metabolomics, permit detailed and efficient characterisation of human biospecimens; application to population studies holds great promise for uncovering new associations and causal relationships between environmental factors and chronic disease. In addition to the insight metabolic information can provide, metabolic phenotypes anchor other molecular readouts and help formulate a systems-level interpretation of biological phenomena. In this commentary, we discuss the general approach for applying metabolic profiling in exposome studies, alongside recent exemplars. We also comment on the complexity and dynamism of the metabolome and highlight both the limitations such properties impart and the requirements for dealing with such issues in real-world phenotyping studies. Given that several large-scale exposome studies are now underway, we offer a perspective on current and future challenges that will need to be addressed to maximise their utility in environmental health research. PMID:26290610

  17. Targeting glycogen metabolism in bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Ritterson Lew, Carolyn; Guin, Sunny; Theodorescu, Dan

    2015-07-01

    Metabolism has been a heavily investigated topic in cancer research for the past decade. Although the role of aerobic glycolysis (the Warburg effect) in cancer has been extensively studied, abnormalities in other metabolic pathways are only just being understood in cancer. One such pathway is glycogen metabolism; its involvement in cancer development, particularly in urothelial malignancies, and possible ways of exploiting aberrations in this process for treatment are currently being studied. New research shows that the glycogen debranching enzyme amylo-?-1,6-glucosidase, 4-?-glucanotransferase (AGL) is a novel tumour suppressor in bladder cancer. Loss of AGL leads to rapid proliferation of bladder cancer cells. Another enzyme involved in glycogen debranching, glycogen phosphorylase, has been shown to be a tumour promoter in cancer, including in prostate cancer. Studies demonstrate that bladder cancer cells in which AGL expression is lost are more metabolically active than cells with intact AGL expression, and these cells are more sensitive to inhibition of both glycolysis and glycine synthesis--two targetable pathways. As a tumour promoter and enzyme, glycogen phosphorylase can be directly targeted, and preclinical inhibitor studies are promising. However, few of these glycogen phosphorylase inhibitors have been tested for cancer treatment in the clinical setting. Several possible limitations to the targeting of AGL and glycogen phosphorylase might also exist. PMID:26032551

  18. Targeting glycogen metabolism in bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lew, Carolyn Ritterson; Guin, Sunny; Theodorescu, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Metabolism has been a heavily investigated topic in cancer research for the past decade. Although the role of aerobic glycolysis (the Warburg effect) in cancer has been extensively studied, abnormalities in other metabolic pathways are only just being understood in cancer. One such pathway is glycogen metabolism; its involvement in cancer development, particularly in urothelial malignancies, and possible ways of exploiting aberrations in this process for treatment are currently being studied. New research shows that the glycogen debranching enzyme amylo-?-1,6-glucosidase, 4-?-glucanotransferase (AGL) is a novel tumour suppressor in bladder cancer. Loss of AGL leads to rapid proliferation of bladder cancer cells. Another enzyme involved in glycogen debranching, glycogen phosphorylase, has been shown to be a tumour promoter in cancer, including in prostate cancer. Studies demonstrate that bladder cancer cells in which AGL expression is lost are more metabolically active than cells with intact AGL expression, and these cells are more sensitive to inhibition of both glycolysis and glycine synthesis—two targetable pathways. As a tumour promoter and enzyme, glycogen phosphorylase can be directly targeted, and preclinical inhibitor studies are promising. However, few of these glycogen phosphorylase inhibitors have been tested for cancer treatment in the clinical setting. Several possible limitations to the targeting of AGL and glycogen phosphorylase might also exist. PMID:26032551

  19. Relation between blood pH and ionized calcium during acute metabolic alteration of the acid-base balance in vivo.

    PubMed

    Gaiter, A M; Bonfant, G; Manes, M; Belfanti, P; Alloatti, S

    1997-07-01

    We induced metabolic alkalosis and acidosis in 10 healthy volunteers in order to analyse in vivo relation between pH and ionized calcium (cCa2+). In the alkalinization test, 2.7 mol/kg NaHCO3 was injected. In the acidification test, volunteers took 4 mmol/kg NH4Cl. Blood pH and cCa2+ (mmol/l) mean values (SD) baseline, after alkalinization and acidification tests, were: 7.363 (0.018), 7.456 (0.031), 7.244 (0.031), 1.27 (0.03), 1.14 (0.03) and 1.38 (0.04). Mean slope of regression log cCa2+/pH was -0.39 (SD 0.11). Such a slope differs after in vivo or in vitro changes, due to the in vivo rapid restoration of equilibrium between the plasmatic and interstitial compartments following changes in water and electrolyte concentrations. The type of acid-base alteration-respiratory or metabolic-influences pH changes, and consequently the regression slope. The in vivo slope for log cCa2+/pH in normal subjects (-0.21) is much the same as in acute respiratory alterations (-0.17), whereas it differs in acute metabolic alterations (present study). Bicarbonates play different roles: the same changes in pH cause greater changes in cCa2+ after acute metabolic rather than respiratory alterations. Ca2+ homeostasis is maintained in acute respiratory acid-base imbalance, despite wide shifts in pH, whereas in acute metabolic alterations even small pH changes have striking repercussions on cCa2+. The experimental angular coefficient for in vivo acute metabolic acid-base alterations differs from the theoretical one calculated by Thode's differential equation (-0.25). PMID:9249879

  20. Metabolic disease in 10 patients with sudden unexpected death in infancy or acute life-threatening events.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Tomoo; Yamada, Kenji; Kobayashi, Hironori; Hasegawa, Yuki; Taketani, Takeshi; Fukuda, Seiji; Yamaguchi, Seiji

    2015-06-01

    In order to determine the associations between sudden unexpected death in infancy (SUDI) or acute life-threatening events (ALTE) and inborn errors of metabolism, particularly organic acidemia and fatty acid oxidation disorders, we evaluated clinical features in patients with SUDI or ALTE. The subjects were infants between the ages of 7 days and 3 years who developed SUDI or ALTE between January 2004 and December 2013. They were then diagnosed as having inborn errors of metabolism on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and/or tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The age distribution, onset forms, and clinical findings were evaluated during the acute phase. Inborn errors of metabolism were detected in three of 196 patients with SUDI, and in seven of 167 patients with ALTE. Of these 10 patients, nine had a history of poor feeding and somnolence during the neonatal period, and symptoms of infection such as cough, fever or vomiting during infancy. Routine laboratory tests during an acute phase indicated hyperammonemia, liver dysfunction, increased blood creatine kinase, acidosis, positive ketone bodies in urine or blood, or hypoglycemia. When SUDI or ALTE are encountered in the emergency unit, it is essential that a detailed medical history is taken, particularly with regard to the neonatal period, and that specific abnormalities are investigated on routine laboratory tests. Moreover, samples such as urine, serum, and filter paper blood specimens should be collected for GC/MS and/or MS/MS of organic acids and acylcarnitines, to identify inborn metabolic disorders. PMID:25919294

  1. Treatment of severe tinnitus.

    PubMed

    Laurikainen, E; Johansson, R; Akaan-Penttilä, E; Haapaniemi, J

    2000-01-01

    In 1995-96 we selected a group of 26 patients who were suffering from severe invalidating idiopathic tinnitus (IT) in order to evaluate the efficacy of rehabilitation and some alternative therapies. All patients were assessed thoroughly by means of audiology and radiology regarding any objective cause for the symptom. In order to help patients control their symptom by increasing knowledge and adding supportive elements, they were given basic education (presentations of the anatomy and physiology of the ear and hearing system, psychological and social aspects of IT, guided and non-guided group discussions, relaxation therapy, physiotherapy, music therapy) for 4 months, comprising one 2-h session bi-weekly. This type of group therapy was found to be extremely helpful, although no objective evaluation revealed effects on IT sensation (VAS) or psychometric measures (SLC-90). In a second limb of the study, the same patients attended a 6-day intensive course in a spa. The purpose was to evaluate the possible usefulness of the widely recommended alternative therapies for IT. All patients had an opportunity to sample the treatments. Six months later only a few had tried any of these treatments, but all reported that the lessons were the most helpful in association with supportive group discussions. The results indicated that none of these therapies can be recommended, based on rational medical practise. PMID:10908984

  2. Severe storm electricity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, W. D.; Macgorman, D. R.; Taylor, W.; Arnold, R. T.

    1984-01-01

    Severe storms and lightning were measured with a NASA U2 and ground based facilities, both fixed base and mobile. Aspects of this program are reported. The following results are presented: (1) ground truth measurements of lightning for comparison with those obtained by the U2. These measurements include flash type identification, electric field changes, optical waveforms, and ground strike location; (2) simultaneous extremely low frequency (ELF) waveforms for cloud to ground (CG) flashes; (3) the CG strike location system (LLP) using a combination of mobile laboratory and television video data are assessed; (4) continued development of analog-to-digital conversion techniques for processing lightning data from the U2, mobile laboratory, and NSSL sensors; (5) completion of an all azimuth TV system for CG ground truth; (6) a preliminary analysis of both IC and CG lightning in a mesocyclone; and (7) the finding of a bimodal peak in altitude lightning activity in some storms in the Great Plains and on the east coast. In the forms on the Great Plains, there was a distinct class of flash what forms the upper mode of the distribution. These flashes are smaller horizontal extent, but occur more frequently than flashes in the lower mode of the distribution.

  3. The Virus as Metabolic Engineer

    PubMed Central

    Maynard, Nathaniel D.; Gutschow, Miriam V.; Birch, Elsa W.; Covert, Markus W.

    2010-01-01

    Recent genome-wide screens of host genetic requirements for viral infection have reemphasized the critical role of host metabolism in enabling the production of viral particles. In this review, we highlight the metabolic aspects of viral infection found in these studies, and focus on the opportunities these requirements present for metabolic engineers. In particular, the objectives and approaches that metabolic engineers use are readily comparable to the behaviors exhibited by viruses during infection. As a result, metabolic engineers have a unique perspective that could lead to novel and effective methods to combat viral infection. PMID:20665642

  4. Metabolic Plasticity and Inter-Compartmental Interactions in Rice Metabolism: An Analysis from Reaction Deletion Study

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Rahul; Kundu, Sudip

    2015-01-01

    More than 20% of the total caloric intake of human population comes from rice. The expression of rice genes and hence, the concentration of enzymatic proteins might vary due to several biotic and abiotic stresses. It in turn, can influence the overall metabolism and survivability of rice plant. Thus, understanding the rice cellular metabolism, its plasticity and potential readjustments under different perturbations can help rice biotechnologists to design efficient rice cultivars. Here, using the flux balance analysis (FBA) method, with the help of in-silico reaction deletion strategy, we study the metabolic plasticity of genome-scale metabolic model of rice leaf. A set of 131 reactions, essential for the production of primary biomass precursors is identified; deletion of any of them can inhibit the overall biomass production. Usability Index (IU) for the rest of the reactions are estimated and based on this parameter, they are classified into three categories—maximally-favourable, quasi-favourable and unfavourable for the primary biomass production. The lower value of 1 ? IU of a reaction suggests that the cell cannot easily bypass it for biomass production. While some of the alternative paths are energetically equally efficient, others demand for higher photon. The variations in (i) ATP/NADPH ratio, (ii) exchange of metabolites through chloroplastic transporters and (iii) total biomass production are also presented here. Mutual metabolic dependencies of different cellular compartments are also demonstrated. PMID:26222686

  5. Interaction between hepatitis C virus and metabolic factors.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Yasunori; Mizuta, Toshihiko

    2014-03-21

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection disrupts the normal metabolism processes, but is also influenced by several of the host's metabolic factors. An obvious and significantly detrimental pathophysiological feature of HCV infection is insulin resistance in hepatic and peripheral tissues. Substantial research efforts have been put forth recently to elucidate the molecular mechanism of HCV-induced insulin resistance, and several cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-?, have been identified as important contributors to the development of insulin resistance in the distant peripheral tissues of HCV-infected patients and animal models. The demonstrated etiologies of HCV-induced whole-body insulin resistance include oxidative stress, lipid metabolism abnormalities, hepatic steatosis and iron overload. In addition, myriad effects of this condition have been characterized, including glucose intolerance, resistance to antiviral therapy, progression of hepatic fibrosis, development of hepatocellular carcinoma, and general decrease in quality of life. Metabolic-related conditions and disorders, such as visceral obesity and diabetes mellitus, have been shown to synergistically enhance HCV-induced metabolic disturbance, and are associated with worse prognosis. Yet, the molecular interactions between HCV-induced metabolic disturbance and host-associated metabolic factors remain largely unknown. The diet and lifestyle recommendations for chronic hepatitis C are basically the same as those for obesity, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome. Specifically, patients are suggested to restrict their dietary iron intake, abstain from alcohol and tobacco, and increase their intake of green tea and coffee (to attain the beneficial effects of caffeine and polyphenols). While successful clinical management of HCV-infected patients with metabolic disorders has also been achieved with some anti-diabetic (i.e., metformin) and anti-lipid (i.e., statins) medications, it is recommended that sulfonylurea and insulin be avoided. PMID:24659880

  6. Interplay between epigenetics & cancer metabolism.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vibhor; Gopinath, P; Iqbal, Mohd Askandar; Mazurek, Sybille; Wellen, Kathryn E; Bamezai, Rameshwar N K

    2014-01-01

    Nutrient utilization is dramatically altered when cells receive signals to proliferate. Characteristic metabolic changes enable cells to meet the large biosynthetic demands associated with cell growth and division. Changes in rate-limiting glycolytic enzymes redirect metabolism to support growth and proliferation. Metabolic reprogramming in cancer is controlled largely by oncogenic activation of signal transduction pathways and transcription factors. Although less well understood, epigenetic mechanisms may seem to contribute to the regulation of metabolic gene expression in cancer. Reciprocally, accumulating evidence suggests that metabolic alterations may affect the epigenome. Understanding the relation between metabolism and epigenetics in cancer cells may open new avenues for anti-cancer strategies. In multi-cellular systems, molecular signals promoting cell growth and proliferation mediate the switch between catabolism and anabolism. Both normal proliferating and cancer cells must achieve high levels of macromolecular biosynthesis to provide the raw materials needed to produce new daughter cells. From a therapeutic view point, it is of great interest to determine metabolic differences that exist between normal proliferating cells and cancer cells. Cancer cells also exhibit significant alterations in the epigenome. Recent data indicate that cellular metabolism and epigenetic phenomenon are engaged in crosstalk. Considering current efforts to target both cancer metabolism and epigenetics, an understanding of the relationship between these two key features is of paramount importance. Here we discuss the role of cellular metabolism in regulation of the epigenome. Moreover, we discuss how epigenetic changes may contribute to establish cancer-specific metabolic features. PMID:23888952

  7. Metabolism of halogenated ethylenes.

    PubMed Central

    Leibman, K C; Ortiz, E

    1977-01-01

    The metabolism of the chlorinated ethylenes may be explained by the formation of chloroethylene epoxides as the first intermediate products. The evidence indicates that these epoxides rearrange with migration of chlorine to form chloroacetaldehydes and chloroacetyl chlorides. Thus, monochloroacetic acid, chloral hydrate, and trichloroacetic acid have been found in reaction mixtures of 1,1-dichloroethylene, trichloroethylene, and tetrachloroethylene, respectively, with rat liver microsomal systems. Rearrangements of the chloroethylene, and glycols formed from the epoxides by hydration may also take place, but would appear, at least in the case of 1,1-dichloroethylene, to be quantitatively less important. The literature on the metabolism of chlorinated ethylenes and its relationship to their toxicity is reviewed. PMID:612463

  8. Molybdenum metabolism in plants.

    PubMed

    Tejada-Jiménez, Manuel; Chamizo-Ampudia, Alejandro; Galván, Aurora; Fernández, Emilio; Llamas, Ángel

    2013-09-01

    The viability of plants relies on molybdenum, which after binding to the organic moiety of molybdopterin forms the molybdenum cofactor (Moco) and acquires remarkable redox properties. Moco is in the active site of critical molybdoenzymes, which use to work as small electron transport chains and participate in N and S metabolism, hormone biosynthesis, toxic compound transformations and other important processes not only in plants but also in all the other kingdoms of life. Molybdate metabolism in plants is reviewed here, with special attention to two main aspects, the different molybdate transporters that with a very high affinity participate in molybdenum acquisition and the recently discovered Moco enzyme amidoxime-reducing component. Their functionality is starting to be understood. PMID:23800757

  9. Portable Unit for Metabolic Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietrich, Daniel L.; Pitch, Nancy D.; Lewis, Mark E.; Juergens, Jeffrey R.; Lichter, Michael J.; Stuk, Peter M.; Diedrick, Dale M.; Valentine, Russell W.; Pettegrew, Richard D.

    2007-01-01

    The Portable Unit for Metabolic Analysis (PUMA) is an instrument that measures several quantities indicative of human metabolic function. Specifically, this instrument makes time-resolved measurements of temperature, pressure, flow, and the partial pressures of oxygen and carbon dioxide in breath during both inhalation and exhalation. Portable instruments for measuring these quantities have been commercially available, but the response times of those instruments are too long to enable temporal resolution of phenomena on the time scales of human respiration cycles. In contrast, the response time of the PUMA is significantly shorter than characteristic times of human respiration phenomena, making it possible to analyze varying metabolic parameters, not only on sequential breath cycles but also at successive phases of inhalation and exhalation within the same breath cycle. In operation, the PUMA is positioned to sample breath near the subject s mouth. Commercial off-the-shelf sensors are used for three of the measurements: a miniature pressure transducer for pressure, a thermistor for temperature, and an ultrasonic sensor for flow. Sensors developed at Glenn Research Center are used for measuring the partial pressures of oxygen and carbon dioxide: The carbon dioxide sensor exploits the relatively strong absorption of infrared light by carbon dioxide. Light from an infrared source passes through the stream of inhaled or exhaled gas and is focused on an infrared- sensitive photodetector. The oxygen sensor exploits the effect of oxygen in quenching the fluorescence of ruthenium-doped organic molecules in a dye on the tip of an optical fiber. A blue laser diode is used to excite the fluorescence, and the optical fiber carries the fluorescent light to a photodiode, the temporal variation of the output of which bears a known relationship with the rate of quenching of fluorescence and, hence, with the partial pressure of oxygen. The outputs of the sensors are digitized, preprocessed by a small onboard computer, and then sent wirelessly to a desktop computer, where the collected data are analyzed and displayed. In addition to the raw data on temperature, pressure, flow, and mole fractions of oxygen and carbon dioxide, the display can include volumetric oxygen consumption, volumetric carbon dioxide production, respiratory equivalent ratio, and volumetric flow rate of exhaled gas.

  10. Diseases of Phenylalanine Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Charles E.

    1979-01-01

    Continuing investigation of the system that hydroxylates phenylalanine to tyrosine has led to new insights into diseases associated with the malfunction of this system. Good evidence has confirmed that phenylketonuria (PKU) is not caused by a simple lack of phenylalanine hydroxylase. Dihydropteridine reductase deficiency as well as defects in biopterin metabolism may also cause the clinical features of phenylketonuria. Furthermore, these diseases do not respond to the standard treatment for phenylketonuria. PMID:388868

  11. Arsenic metabolism and thioarsenicals.

    PubMed

    Rehman, Kanwal; Naranmandura, Hua

    2012-08-01

    Arsenic has received considerable attention in the world, since it can lead to a multitude of toxic effects and has been recognized as a human carcinogen causing cancers. Here, we focus on the current state of knowledge regarding the proposed mechanisms of arsenic biotransformation, with a little about cellular uptake, toxicity and clinical utilization of arsenicals. Since pentavalent methylated metabolites were found in animal urine after exposure to iAs(III), methylation was considered to be a detoxification process, but the discovery of methylated trivalent intermediates and thioarsenicals in urine has diverted the view and gained much interest regarding arsenic biotransformation. To further investigate the partially understood phenomena relating to arsenic toxicity and the uses of arsenic as a drug, it is important to elucidate the exact pathways involved in metabolism of this metalloid, as the toxicity and the clinical uses of arsenic can be best recognized in context of its biotransformation. Thereby, in this perspective, we have focused on arsenic metabolic pathways including three proposed mechanisms: a classic pathway by Challenger in 1945, followed by a new metabolic pathway proposed by Hayakawa in 2005 involving arsenic-glutathione complexes, while the third is a new reductive methylation pathway that is proposed by our group involving As-protein complexes. According to previous and present in vivo and in vitro experiments, we conclude that the methylation reaction takes place with simultaneous reductive rather than stepwise oxidative methylation. In addition, production of pentavalent methylated arsenic metabolites are suggested to be as the end product of metabolism, rather than intermediates. PMID:22358131

  12. Autophagy, Metabolism, and Cancer.

    PubMed

    White, Eileen; Mehnert, Janice M; Chan, Chang S

    2015-11-15

    Macroautophagy (autophagy hereafter) captures intracellular proteins and organelles and degrades them in lysosomes. The degradation breakdown products are released from lysosomes and recycled into metabolic and biosynthetic pathways. Basal autophagy provides protein and organelle quality control by eliminating damaged cellular components. Starvation-induced autophagy recycles intracellular components into metabolic pathways to sustain mitochondrial metabolic function and energy homeostasis. Recycling by autophagy is essential for yeast and mammals to survive starvation through intracellular nutrient scavenging. Autophagy suppresses degenerative diseases and has a context-dependent role in cancer. In some models, cancer initiation is suppressed by autophagy. By preventing the toxic accumulation of damaged protein and organelles, particularly mitochondria, autophagy limits oxidative stress, chronic tissue damage, and oncogenic signaling, which suppresses cancer initiation. This suggests a role for autophagy stimulation in cancer prevention, although the role of autophagy in the suppression of human cancer is unclear. In contrast, some cancers induce autophagy and are dependent on autophagy for survival. Much in the way that autophagy promotes survival in starvation, cancers can use autophagy-mediated recycling to maintain mitochondrial function and energy homeostasis to meet the elevated metabolic demand of growth and proliferation. Thus, autophagy inhibition may be beneficial for cancer therapy. Moreover, tumors are more autophagy-dependent than normal tissues, suggesting that there is a therapeutic window. Despite these insights, many important unanswered questions remain about the exact mechanisms of autophagy-mediated cancer suppression and promotion, how relevant these observations are to humans, and whether the autophagy pathway can be modulated therapeutically in cancer. Clin Cancer Res; 21(22); 5037-46. ©2015 AACR.See all articles in this CCR Focus section, "Cell Death and Cancer Therapy." PMID:26567363

  13. Metabolic Reprogramming of Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Freemerman, Alex J.; Johnson, Amy R.; Sacks, Gina N.; Milner, J. Justin; Kirk, Erin L.; Troester, Melissa A.; Macintyre, Andrew N.; Goraksha-Hicks, Pankuri; Rathmell, Jeffery C.; Makowski, Liza

    2014-01-01

    Glucose is a critical component in the proinflammatory response of macrophages (M?s). However, the contribution of glucose transporters (GLUTs) and the mechanisms regulating subsequent glucose metabolism in the inflammatory response are not well understood. Because M?s contribute to obesity-induced inflammation, it is important to understand how substrate metabolism may alter inflammatory function. We report that GLUT1 (SLC2A1) is the primary rate-limiting glucose transporter on proinflammatory-polarized M?s. Furthermore, in high fat diet-fed rodents, M?s in crown-like structures and inflammatory loci in adipose and liver, respectively, stain positively for GLUT1. We hypothesized that metabolic reprogramming via increased glucose availability could modulate the M? inflammatory response. To increase glucose uptake, we stably overexpressed the GLUT1 transporter in RAW264.7 M?s (GLUT1-OE M?s). Cellular bioenergetics analysis, metabolomics, and radiotracer studies demonstrated that GLUT1 overexpression resulted in elevated glucose uptake and metabolism, increased pentose phosphate pathway intermediates, with a complimentary reduction in cellular oxygen consumption rates. Gene expression and proteome profiling analysis revealed that GLUT1-OE M?s demonstrated a hyperinflammatory state characterized by elevated secretion of inflammatory mediators and that this effect could be blunted by pharmacologic inhibition of glycolysis. Finally, reactive oxygen species production and evidence of oxidative stress were significantly enhanced in GLUT1-OE M?s; antioxidant treatment blunted the expression of inflammatory mediators such as PAI-1 (plasminogen activator inhibitor 1), suggesting that glucose-mediated oxidative stress was driving the proinflammatory response. Our results indicate that increased utilization of glucose induced a ROS-driven proinflammatory phenotype in M?s, which may play an integral role in the promotion of obesity-associated insulin resistance. PMID:24492615

  14. Automated Microbial Metabolism Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Development of the automated microbial metabolism laboratory (AMML) concept is reported. The focus of effort of AMML was on the advanced labeled release experiment. Labeled substrates, inhibitors, and temperatures were investigated to establish a comparative biochemical profile. Profiles at three time intervals on soil and pure cultures of bacteria isolated from soil were prepared to establish a complete library. The development of a strategy for the return of a soil sample from Mars is also reported.

  15. Metabolic Signatures of Bacterial Vaginosis

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Martin T.; Fiedler, Tina L.; Djukovic, Danijel; Hoffman, Noah G.; Raftery, Daniel; Marrazzo, Jeanne M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is characterized by shifts in the vaginal microbiota from Lactobacillus dominant to a microbiota with diverse anaerobic bacteria. Few studies have linked specific metabolites with bacteria found in the human vagina. Here, we report dramatic differences in metabolite compositions and concentrations associated with BV using a global metabolomics approach. We further validated important metabolites using samples from a second cohort of women and a different platform to measure metabolites. In the primary study, we compared metabolite profiles in cervicovaginal lavage fluid from 40 women with BV and 20 women without BV. Vaginal bacterial representation was determined using broad-range PCR with pyrosequencing and concentrations of bacteria by quantitative PCR. We detected 279 named biochemicals; levels of 62% of metabolites were significantly different in women with BV. Unsupervised clustering of metabolites separated women with and without BV. Women with BV have metabolite profiles marked by lower concentrations of amino acids and dipeptides, concomitant with higher levels of amino acid catabolites and polyamines. Higher levels of the signaling eicosanoid 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (12-HETE), a biomarker for inflammation, were noted in BV. Lactobacillus crispatus and Lactobacillus jensenii exhibited similar metabolite correlation patterns, which were distinct from correlation patterns exhibited by BV-associated bacteria. Several metabolites were significantly associated with clinical signs and symptoms (Amsel criteria) used to diagnose BV, and no metabolite was associated with all four clinical criteria. BV has strong metabolic signatures across multiple metabolic pathways, and these signatures are associated with the presence and concentrations of particular bacteria. PMID:25873373

  16. Analytics for Metabolic Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Petzold, Christopher J.; Chan, Leanne Jade G.; Nhan, Melissa; Adams, Paul D.

    2015-01-01

    Realizing the promise of metabolic engineering has been slowed by challenges related to moving beyond proof-of-concept examples to robust and economically viable systems. Key to advancing metabolic engineering beyond trial-and-error research is access to parts with well-defined performance metrics that can be readily applied in vastly different contexts with predictable effects. As the field now stands, research depends greatly on analytical tools that assay target molecules, transcripts, proteins, and metabolites across different hosts and pathways. Screening technologies yield specific information for many thousands of strain variants, while deep omics analysis provides a systems-level view of the cell factory. Efforts focused on a combination of these analyses yield quantitative information of dynamic processes between parts and the host chassis that drive the next engineering steps. Overall, the data generated from these types of assays aid better decision-making at the design and strain construction stages to speed progress in metabolic engineering research. PMID:26442249

  17. Dystrophinopathy mimicking metabolic myopathies.

    PubMed

    Liewluck, Teerin; Tian, Xia; Wong, Lee-Jun; Pestronk, Alan

    2015-08-01

    Recurrent rhabdomyolysis warrants comprehensive evaluations to search for underlying muscle diseases, including metabolic myopathies, LPIN1-myopathy, RYR1-myopathy, and less commonly muscular dystrophies. The absence of weakness and the normal or minimally elevated creatine kinase levels between attacks are typical of metabolic myopathies, LPIN1-myopathy, and RYR1-myopathy, while the presence of weakness and the highly elevated creatine kinase levels between attacks point toward muscular dystrophies. Here we report a 32-year-old man with a one-year history of recurrent rhabdomyolysis, who had normal strength, slightly elevated baseline creatine kinase level, and normal muscle histopathology. All workups for metabolic myopathies, LPIN1-myopathy and RYR1-myopathy were unrevealing. Next generation sequencing of muscular dystrophy-related genes revealed a hemizygous deletion of exons 17-34 of the dystrophin-encoding gene. Immunohistochemical study revealed absent staining for the rod domain of dystrophin. Dystrophinopathy should be considered in patients with recurrent rhabdomyolysis despite the absence of fixed weakness or highly elevated resting creatine kinase level. PMID:25998609

  18. Integration of metabolomics data into metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Töpfer, Nadine; Kleessen, Sabrina; Nikoloski, Zoran

    2015-01-01

    Metabolite levels together with their corresponding metabolic fluxes are integrative outcomes of biochemical transformations and regulatory processes and they can be used to characterize the response of biological systems to genetic and/or environmental changes. However, while changes in transcript or to some extent protein levels can usually be traced back to one or several responsible genes, changes in fluxes and particularly changes in metabolite levels do not follow such rationale and are often the outcome of complex interactions of several components. The increasing quality and coverage of metabolomics technologies have fostered the development of computational approaches for integrating metabolic read-outs with large-scale models to predict the physiological state of a system. Constraint-based approaches, relying on the stoichiometry of the considered reactions, provide a modeling framework amenable to analyses of large-scale systems and to the integration of high-throughput data. Here we review the existing approaches that integrate metabolomics data in variants of constrained-based approaches to refine model reconstructions, to constrain flux predictions in metabolic models, and to relate network structural properties to metabolite levels. Finally, we discuss the challenges and perspectives in the developments of constraint-based modeling approaches driven by metabolomics data. PMID:25741348

  19. Integration of metabolomics data into metabolic networks

    PubMed Central

    Töpfer, Nadine; Kleessen, Sabrina; Nikoloski, Zoran

    2015-01-01

    Metabolite levels together with their corresponding metabolic fluxes are integrative outcomes of biochemical transformations and regulatory processes and they can be used to characterize the response of biological systems to genetic and/or environmental changes. However, while changes in transcript or to some extent protein levels can usually be traced back to one or several responsible genes, changes in fluxes and particularly changes in metabolite levels do not follow such rationale and are often the outcome of complex interactions of several components. The increasing quality and coverage of metabolomics technologies have fostered the development of computational approaches for integrating metabolic read-outs with large-scale models to predict the physiological state of a system. Constraint-based approaches, relying on the stoichiometry of the considered reactions, provide a modeling framework amenable to analyses of large-scale systems and to the integration of high-throughput data. Here we review the existing approaches that integrate metabolomics data in variants of constrained-based approaches to refine model reconstructions, to constrain flux predictions in metabolic models, and to relate network structural properties to metabolite levels. Finally, we discuss the challenges and perspectives in the developments of constraint-based modeling approaches driven by metabolomics data. PMID:25741348

  20. Genetically constrained metabolic flux analysis.

    PubMed

    Cox, Steven J; Shalel Levanon, Sagit; Bennett, George N; San, Ka-Yiu

    2005-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in using existing metabolic databases to estimate metabolic fluxes. Traditional metabolic flux analysis generally starts with a predetermined metabolic network. This approach has been employed successfully to analyze the behaviors of recombinant strains by manually adding or removing the corresponding pathway(s) in the metabolic map. The current work focuses on the development of a new framework that utilizes genomic and metabolic databases, including available genetic/regulatory network structures and gene chip expression data, to constrain metabolic flux analysis. The genetic network consisting of the sensing/regulatory circuits will activate or deactivate a specific set of genes in response to external stimulus. The activation and/or repression of this set of genes will result in different gene expression levels that will in turn change the structure of the metabolic map. Hence, the metabolic map will automatically "adapt" to the external stimulus as captured by the genetic network. This adaptation selects a subnetwork from the pool of feasible reactions and so performs what we term "environmentally driven dimensional reduction." The Escherichia coli oxygen and redox sensing/regulatory system, which controls the metabolic patterns connected to glycolysis and the TCA cycle, was used as a model system to illustrate the proposed approach. PMID:16143552

  1. Metabolomics reveals metabolic biomarkers of Crohn's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Jansson, J.K.; Willing, B.; Lucio, M.; Fekete, A.; Dicksved, J.; Halfvarson, J.; Tysk, C.; Schmitt-Kopplin, P.

    2009-06-01

    The causes and etiology of Crohn's disease (CD) are currently unknown although both host genetics and environmental factors play a role. Here we used non-targeted metabolic profiling to determine the contribution of metabolites produced by the gut microbiota towards disease status of the host. Ion Cyclotron Resonance Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry (ICR-FT/MS) was used to discern the masses of thousands of metabolites in fecal samples collected from 17 identical twin pairs, including healthy individuals and those with CD. Pathways with differentiating metabolites included those involved in the metabolism and or synthesis of amino acids, fatty acids, bile acids and arachidonic acid. Several metabolites were positively or negatively correlated to the disease phenotype and to specific microbes previously characterized in the same samples. Our data reveal novel differentiating metabolites for CD that may provide diagnostic biomarkers and/or monitoring tools as well as insight into potential targets for disease therapy and prevention.

  2. Epileptic focus and alteration of metabolism.

    PubMed

    Otáhal, Jakub; Folbergrová, Jaroslava; Kovacs, Richard; Kunz, Wolfram S; Maggio, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurologic disorders affecting a substantial part of the population worldwide. Epileptic seizures represent the situation of increased neuronal activity associated with the enhanced demands for sufficient energy supply. For that purpose, very efficient regulatory mechanisms have to operate to ensure that cerebral blood flow, delivery of oxygen, and nutrients are continuously adapted to the local metabolic needs. The sophisticated regulation has to function in concert at several levels (systemic, tissue, cellular, and subcellular). Particularly, mitochondria play a key role not only in the energy production, but they are also central to many other processes including those leading to neuronal death. Impairment of any of the involved pathways can result in serious functional alterations, neurodegeneration, and potentially in epileptogenesis. The present review will address some of the important issues concerning vascular and metabolic changes in pathophysiology of epilepsy. PMID:25078504

  3. Inherited Disorders of Calcium and Phosphate Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Gattineni, Jyothsna

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of Review Inherited disorders of calcium and phosphate homeostasis have variable presentation and can cause significant morbidity. Understanding the mode of inheritance and pathophysiology of these conditions will help in the diagnosis and early institution of therapy. Recent Findings Identification of genetic mutations in human subjects and animal models has advanced our understanding of many inherited disorders of calcium and phosphate regulation. Identification of mutations of CaSR also has improved our understanding of hypocalcemic and hypercalcemic conditions. Mutations of Fgf23, Klotho and phosphate transporter genes have been identified as causes for disorders of phosphate metabolism. Summary Calcium and phosphate homeostasis is tightly regulated in a narrow range due to their vital role in many biological processes. Inherited disorders of calcium and phosphate metabolism though uncommon can have severe morbidity. Genetic counseling of the affected families is an important part of the follow up of these patients. PMID:24553630

  4. kpath: integration of metabolic pathway linked data.

    PubMed

    Navas-Delgado, Ismael; García-Godoy, María Jesús; López-Camacho, Esteban; Rybinski, Maciej; Reyes-Palomares, Armando; Medina, Miguel Ángel; Aldana-Montes, José F

    2015-01-01

    In the last few years, the Life Sciences domain has experienced a rapid growth in the amount of available biological databases. The heterogeneity of these databases makes data integration a challenging issue. Some integration challenges are locating resources, relationships, data formats, synonyms or ambiguity. The Linked Data approach partially solves the heterogeneity problems by introducing a uniform data representation model. Linked Data refers to a set of best practices for publishing and connecting structured data on the Web. This article introduces kpath, a database that integrates information related to metabolic pathways. kpath also provides a navigational interface that enables not only the browsing, but also the deep use of the integrated data to build metabolic networks based on existing disperse knowledge. This user interface has been used to showcase relationships that can be inferred from the information available in several public databases. PMID:26055101

  5. A personalized approach to metabolic aspects of obesity.

    PubMed

    Brietzke, Stephen A

    2010-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome, which is entwined in semantic controversy as to its actual existence as a distinct entity, links several important health conditions with obesity, and more specifically, excessive visceral adiposity. The most common linked disease states include type 2 diabetes mellitus, hypertension, dyslipidemia, obstructive sleep apnea, and cardiovascular and coronary heart disease. Much of the controversy surrounding the metabolic syndrome case definition is the purported centrality of insulin resistance as root cause, there being no universally agreed-upon standard for measurement of insulin resistance. Over the past decade, the visceral adipocyte itself has emerged as a key contributor rather than passive bystander in the genesis of the metabolic syndrome. Rather than being a simple storage bin for excess triglyceride, the visceral adipocyte is an active endocrine cell secreting a variety of signal hormones known in the aggregate as adipokines. In optimal health, the predominant recognized adipokine is adiponectin, with downstream insulin-sensitizing, anti-inflammatory, antithrombotic, provasodilatory effects systemically. By contrast, metabolic syndrome is characterized by reduced adiponectin and increased inflammatory adipokine secretion, with downstream effects of insulin resistance, heightened inflammation, prothrombosis, and vasoconstriction. These alternative metabolic states of the adipocyte are characterized in this review as metabolic "yin" and "yang." Lifestyle modifications and drug therapies that promote weight loss, increased physical exercise activity, and increased adiponectin production tend to modulate the system favorably toward metabolic "yin." PMID:20960552

  6. The role of the gut microbiota in metabolic health.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Aafke W F; Kersten, Sander

    2015-08-01

    The global prevalence of obesity and related comorbidities has increased considerably over the past decades. In addition to an increase in food consumption and a reduction in physical activity, growing evidence implicates the microorganisms in our gastrointestinal tract, referred to as the gut microbiota, in obesity and related metabolic disturbances. The composition of the gut microbiota can fluctuate markedly within an individual and between individuals. Changes in gut microbial composition may be unfavorable and predispose an individual to disease. Studies in mice that are germ free, mice that are cohoused, and mice that are treated with antibiotics have provided some evidence that changes in gut microbiota may causally contribute to metabolic disorders. Several mechanisms have been proposed and explored that may mediate the effects of the gut microbiota on metabolic disorders. In this review, we carefully analyze the literature on the connection between the gut microbiota and metabolic health, with a focus on studies demonstrating a causal relation and clarifying potential underlying mechanisms. Despite a growing appreciation for a role of the gut microbiota in metabolic health, more experimental evidence is needed to substantiate a cause-and-effect relationship. If a clear causal relationship between the gut microbiota and metabolic health can be established, dietary interventions can be targeted toward improving gut microbial composition in the prevention and perhaps even the treatment of metabolic diseases. PMID:25921831

  7. Computational Strategies for a System-Level Understanding of Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Cazzaniga, Paolo; Damiani, Chiara; Besozzi, Daniela; Colombo, Riccardo; Nobile, Marco S.; Gaglio, Daniela; Pescini, Dario; Molinari, Sara; Mauri, Giancarlo; Alberghina, Lilia; Vanoni, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Cell metabolism is the biochemical machinery that provides energy and building blocks to sustain life. Understanding its fine regulation is of pivotal relevance in several fields, from metabolic engineering applications to the treatment of metabolic disorders and cancer. Sophisticated computational approaches are needed to unravel the complexity of metabolism. To this aim, a plethora of methods have been developed, yet it is generally hard to identify which computational strategy is most suited for the investigation of a specific aspect of metabolism. This review provides an up-to-date description of the computational methods available for the analysis of metabolic pathways, discussing their main advantages and drawbacks.  In particular, attention is devoted to the identification of the appropriate scale and level of accuracy in the reconstruction of metabolic networks, and to the inference of model structure and parameters, especially when dealing with a shortage of experimental measurements. The choice of the proper computational methods to derive in silico data is then addressed, including topological analyses, constraint-based modeling and simulation of the system dynamics. A description of some computational approaches to gain new biological knowledge or to formulate hypotheses is finally provided. PMID:25427076

  8. Computational strategies for a system-level understanding of metabolism.

    PubMed

    Cazzaniga, Paolo; Damiani, Chiara; Besozzi, Daniela; Colombo, Riccardo; Nobile, Marco S; Gaglio, Daniela; Pescini, Dario; Molinari, Sara; Mauri, Giancarlo; Alberghina, Lilia; Vanoni, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Cell metabolism is the biochemical machinery that provides energy and building blocks to sustain life. Understanding its fine regulation is of pivotal relevance in several fields, from metabolic engineering applications to the treatment of metabolic disorders and cancer. Sophisticated computational approaches are needed to unravel the complexity of metabolism. To this aim, a plethora of methods have been developed, yet it is generally hard to identify which computational strategy is most suited for the investigation of a specific aspect of metabolism. This review provides an up-to-date description of the computational methods available for the analysis of metabolic pathways, discussing their main advantages and drawbacks. In particular, attention is devoted to the identification of the appropriate scale and level of accuracy in the reconstruction of metabolic networks, and to the inference of model structure and parameters, especially when dealing with a shortage of experimental measurements. The choice of the proper computational methods to derive in silico data is then addressed, including topological analyses, constraint-based modeling and simulation of the system dynamics. A description of some computational approaches to gain new biological knowledge or to formulate hypotheses is finally provided. PMID:25427076

  9. Simulation of mitochondrial metabolism using multi-agents system

    E-print Network

    Charles Lales; N. Parisey; Jean-Pierre Mazat; Marie Beurton-Aimar

    2009-01-25

    Metabolic pathways describe chains of enzymatic reactions. Their modelling is a key point to understand living systems. An enzymatic reaction is an interaction between one or several metabolites (substrates) and an enzyme (simple protein or enzymatic complex build of several subunits). In our Mitochondria in Silico Project, MitoScop, we study the metabolism of the mitochondria, an intra-cellular organelle. Many ordinary differential equation models are available in the literature. They well fit experimental results on flux values inside the metabolic pathways, but many parameters are di$\\pm$cult to transcribe with such models: localization of enzymes, rules about the reactions scheduler, etc Moreover, a model of a significant part of mitochondrial metabolism could become very complex and contain more than 50 equations. In this context, the multi-agents systems appear as an alternative to model the metabolic pathways. Firstly, we have looked after membrane design. The mitochondria is a particular case because the inner mitochondrial space, ie matricial space, is delimited by two membranes: the inner and the outer one. In addition to matricial enzymes, other enzymes are located inside the membranes or in the inter-membrane space. Analysis of mitochondrial metabolism must take into account this kind of architecture.

  10. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses a supplement to the "water to rose" demonstration in which a pink color is produced. Also discusses blood buffer demonstrations, including hydrolysis of sodium bicarbonate, simulated blood buffer, metabolic acidosis, natural compensation of metabolic acidosis, metabolic alkalosis, acidosis treatment, and alkalosis treatment. Procedures…

  11. Comparison of several potential myocardial imaging agents

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, E.E.; Stabin, M.G.; Goodman, M.M.; Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Srivastava, P.C.

    1985-01-01

    Although myocardial imaging is currently dominated by Tl-201, several alternative agents with improved physiologic or radionuclidic properties have been proposed. Based on human and animal studies in the literature, the metabolism of several of these compounds was studied for the purpose of generating radiation dose estimates. Dose estimates are listed for several I-123 labeled free fatty acids, an I-123 labeled phosphonium compound, Rb-82, Cu-64, F-18 FDG (all compounds which are taken up by the normal myocardium), and for Tc-99m pyrophosphate (PYP) (which localizes in myocardial infarcts). Dose estimates could not be generated for C-11 palmitate, but this compound was included in a comparison of myocardial retention times. For the I-123 labeled compounds, I-124 was included as a contaminant in generating the dose estimates. Radiation doses were lowest for Rb-82 (gonads 0.3 to 0.5 ..mu..Gy/MBq, heart wall 15 ..mu..Gy/MBq). Doses for the I-123 labeled fatty acids were similar to one another, with IPPA being the lowest (gonads 20 ..mu..Gy/MBq, heart wall 15 ..mu..Gy/MBq). Doses for Tc-99m PYP were also low (gonads 4 to 7 ..mu..Gy/MBq, heart wall 4 ..mu..Gy/MBq, skeleton 15 ..mu..Gy/MBq). The desirability of these compounds is discussed briefly, considering half life, imaging mode and energy, and dosimetry, including a comparison of the effective whole body dose equivalents. 34 refs., 11 tabs.

  12. [Basic mechanisms: structure, function and metabolism of plasma lipoproteins].

    PubMed

    Errico, Teresa L; Chen, Xiangyu; Martin Campos, Jesús M; Julve, Josep; Escolà-Gil, Joan Carles; Blanco-Vaca, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work is to present basic information on the lipoprotein physiology. The protein fraction of lipoproteins consists of several apolipoproteins and enzymes whose functions are lipid transport and metabolism. Classification of lipoproteins is based on their density. Chylomicrons, VLDL, IDL, LDL and HDL can be isolated by ultracentrifugation. Both chylomicrons- and VLDL-triglycerides are transported from the intestine and liver, respectively, to the peripheral tissues. The metabolism of VLDL originates IDL and LDL. LDL is the main transporter of cholesterol to extrahepatic tissues. HDL mobilizes cholesterol from peripheral tissues to the liver where it is secreted to bile as free cholesterol or bile salts, a process termed reverse cholesterol transport. Lipoprotein metabolism can be regulated by nuclear receptors that regulate the expression of genes involved in triglyceride and apolipoprotein metabolism. PMID:23769508

  13. Stress kinases in the modulation of metabolism and energy balance.

    PubMed

    Manieri, Elisa; Sabio, Guadalupe

    2015-10-01

    Obesity is a new global pandemic, with growing incidence and prevalence. This disease is associated with increased risk of several pathologies, including diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and cancer. The mechanisms underlying obesity-associated metabolic changes are the focus of efforts to identify new therapies. Stress-activated protein kinases (SAPK), including cJun N-terminal kinases (JNKs) and p38, are required for cellular responses to metabolic stress and therefore might contribute to the pathogenesis of obesity. Tissue-specific knockout models support a cell-type-specific role for JNK isoforms, in particular JNK1, highlighting its importance in cell homeostasis and organ crosstalk. However, more efforts are needed to elucidate the specific roles of other JNK isoforms and p38 family members in metabolism and obesity. This review provides an overview of the role of SAPKs in the regulation of metabolism. PMID:26363062

  14. Metabolic comorbidity in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Rajesh; Chowdhury, Arabinda Narayan

    2008-01-01

    People with schizophrenia are at greater risk of developing obesity, type 2 diabetes, hypertension and dyslipidemia as compared to the general population. This results in an increased incidence of cardiovascular disease, leading to greater morbidity and mortality in this vulnerable group of patients. Use of certain antipsychotic agents can compound this risk and increase the risk of developing metabolic syndrome. Appropriate identification and management of these risk factors are very important in reducing the risk and thereby improving the physical health of these patients. This review recommends a framework based on existing guidelines for the assessment, monitoring and management of patients with schizophrenia in the Indian setting. PMID:18239269

  15. Connecting Myokines and Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyeong-Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is the largest organ of the body in non-obese individuals and is now considered to be an endocrine organ. Hormones (myokines) secreted by skeletal muscle mediate communications between muscle and liver, adipose tissue, brain, and other organs. Myokines affect muscle mass and myofiber switching, and have profound effects on glucose and lipid metabolism and inflammation, thus contributing to energy homeostasis and the pathogenesis of obesity, diabetes, and other diseases. In this review, we summarize recent findings on the biology of myokines and provide an assessment of their potential as therapeutic targets. PMID:26248861

  16. Carotenoid metabolism in plants.

    PubMed

    Nisar, Nazia; Li, Li; Lu, Shan; Khin, Nay Chi; Pogson, Barry J

    2015-01-01

    Carotenoids are mostly C40 terpenoids, a class of hydrocarbons that participate in various biological processes in plants, such as photosynthesis, photomorphogenesis, photoprotection, and development. Carotenoids also serve as precursors for two plant hormones and a diverse set of apocarotenoids. They are colorants and critical components of the human diet as antioxidants and provitamin A. In this review, we summarize current knowledge of the genes and enzymes involved in carotenoid metabolism and describe recent progress in understanding the regulatory mechanisms underlying carotenoid accumulation. The importance of the specific location of carotenoid enzyme metabolons and plastid types as well as of carotenoid-derived signals is discussed. PMID:25578273

  17. Severe Weather Planning for Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Barbara McNaught; Strong, Christopher; Bunting, Bill

    2008-01-01

    Flash floods, severe thunderstorms, and tornadoes occur with rapid onset and often no warning. Decisions must be made quickly and actions taken immediately. This paper provides tips for schools on: (1) Preparing for Severe Weather Emergencies; (2) Activating a Severe Weather Plan; (3) Severe Weather Plan Checklist; and (4) Periodic Drills and…

  18. Metabolic compensation during high energy output in fasting, lactating grey seals (Halichoerus grypus): metabolic ceilings revisited.

    PubMed Central

    Mellish, J A; Iverson, S J; Bowen, W D

    2000-01-01

    Lactation is the most energetically expensive period for female mammals and is associated with some of the highest sustained metabolic rates (SusMR) in vertebrates (reported as total energy throughput). Females typically deal with this energy demand by increasing food intake and the structure of the alimentary tract may act as the central constraint to ceilings on SusMR at about seven times resting or standard metabolic rate (SMR). However, demands of lactation may also be met by using a form of metabolic compensation such as reducing locomotor activities or entering torpor. In some phocid seals, cetaceans and bears, females fast throughout lactation and thus cannot offset the high energetic costs of lactation through increased food intake. We demonstrate that fasting grey seal females sustain, for several weeks, one of the highest total daily energy expenditures (DEE; 7.4 x SMR) reported in mammals, while progressively reducing maintenance metabolic expenditures during lactation through means not explained by reduction in lean body mass or behavioural changes. Simultaneously, the energy-exported in milk is progressively increased, associated with increased lipoprotein lipase activity in the mammary gland, resulting in greater offspring growth. Our results suggest that females use compensatory mechanisms to help meet the extraordinary energetic costs of lactation. Additionally, although the concepts of SusMR and ceilings on total DEE may be somewhat different in fasting lactating species, our data on phocid seals demonstrate that metabolic ceilings on milk energy output, in general, are not constrained by the same kind of peripheral limitations as are other energy-consuming tissues. In phocid seals, the high ceilings on DEE during lactation, coupled with metabolic compensation, are undoubtedly important factors enabling shortened lactation. PMID:10902691

  19. Nitrogen metabolism, acid-base regulation, and molecular responses to ammonia and acid infusions in the spiny dogfish shark (Squalus acanthias).

    PubMed

    Nawata, C Michele; Walsh, Patrick J; Wood, Chris M

    2015-07-01

    Although they are ureotelic, marine elasmobranchs express Rh glycoproteins, putative ammonia channels. To address questions raised by a recent study on high environmental ammonia (HEA) exposure, dogfish were intravascularly infused for 24 h at 3 ml kg(-1) h(-1) with isosmotic NaCl (500 mmol l(-1), control), NH4HCO3 (500 mmol l(-1)), NH4Cl (500 mmol l(-1)), or HCl (as 125 mmol l(-1) HCl + 375 mmol l(-1) NaCl). While NaCl had no effect on arterial acid-base status, NH4HCO3 caused mild alkalosis, NH4Cl caused strong acidosis, and HCl caused lesser acidosis, all predominantly metabolic in nature. Total plasma ammonia (T(Amm)) and excretion rates of ammonia (J(Amm)) and urea-N (J(Urea-N)) were unaffected by NaCl or HCl. However, despite equal loading rates, plasma T(Amm) increased to a greater extent with NH4Cl, while J(Amm) increased to a greater extent with NH4HCO3 due to much greater increases in blood-to-water PNH3 gradients. As with HEA, both treatments caused large (90%) elevations of J(Urea-N), indicating that urea-N synthesis by the ornithine-urea cycle (OUC) is driven primarily by ammonia rather than HCO3(-). Branchial mRNA expressions of Rhbg and Rhp2 were unaffected by NH4HCO3 or NH4Cl, but v-type H(+)-ATPase was down-regulated by both treatments, and Rhbg and Na(+)/H(+) exchanger NHE2 were up-regulated by HCl. In the kidney, Rhbg was unresponsive to all treatments, but Rhp2 was up-regulated by HCl, and the urea transporter UT was up-regulated by HCl and NH4Cl. These responses are discussed in the context of current ideas about branchial, renal, and OUC function in this nitrogen-limited predator. PMID:25794843

  20. Long-Term Effects of Subacute Ruminal Acidosis (SARA) on Milk Quality and Hepatic Gene Expression in Lactating Goats Fed a High-Concentrate Diet

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Haibo; Wang, Shaoqing; Jia, Yuanyuan; Ni, Yingdong; Zhang, Yuanshu; Zhuang, Su; Shen, Xiangzhen; Zhao, Ruqian

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The mechanism underlying the decline in milk quality during periods of feeding high-concentrate diets to dairy ruminants is not well documented. The aim of this study was to investigate the metabolic changes in the liver that contribute to the input of substrate precursors to the mammary gland after feeding a high-concentrate diet to lactating goats for a long period. Experimental Design Eight mid-lactating goats with rumen cannulas were randomly assigned to two groups. For 9 weeks, the treatment group was fed a high-concentrate diet (60% concentrate of dry matter, HC) and the control group was fed a low-concentrate diet (40% concentrate of dry matter, LC). Ruminal fluid, plasma, and liver tissues were sampled, microarray techniques and real-time polymerase chain reaction were used to evaluate metabolic parameters and gene expression in liver. Results Feeding a 60%-concentrate diet for 9 weeks resulted in a significant decrease in rumen pH. Changes in fat and protein content also occurred, which negatively affected milk quality. Plasma levels of leptin (p?=?0.058), non-esterified fatty acid (p?=?0.071), and glucose (p?=?0.014) increased markedly in HC group. Plasma cortisol concentration was significantly elevated in the treatment group (p<0.05). Expression of the glucocorticoid receptor protein gene was significantly down-regulated (p<0.05) in the liver. The expression of genes for interleukin 1?, serum amyloid A, C-reactive protein, and haptoglobin mRNA was significantly increased (p<0.05) in the HC group. GeneRelNet analysis showed that gene expression involved in inflammatory responses and the metabolism of lipids, protein, and carbohydrate were significantly altered by feeding a high-concentrate diet for 9 weeks. Conclusions Activation of the acute phase response and the inflammatory response may contribute to nutrient partitioning and re-distribution of energy in the liver, and ultimately lead to a decline in milk quality. PMID:24376594

  1. Metabolic Profiling of Children Undergoing Surgery for Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Correia, Goncalo D. S.; Wooi Ng, Keng; Wijeyesekera, Anisha; Gala-Peralta, Sandra; Williams, Rachel; MacCarthy-Morrogh, S.; Jiménez, Beatriz; Inwald, David; Macrae, Duncan; Frost, Gary; Holmes, Elaine

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Inflammation and metabolism are closely interlinked. Both undergo significant dysregulation following surgery for congenital heart disease, contributing to organ failure and morbidity. In this study, we combined cytokine and metabolic profiling to examine the effect of postoperative tight glycemic control compared with conventional blood glucose management on metabolic and inflammatory outcomes in children undergoing congenital heart surgery. The aim was to evaluate changes in key metabolites following congenital heart surgery and to examine the potential of metabolic profiling for stratifying patients in terms of expected clinical outcomes. Design: Laboratory and clinical study. Setting: University Hospital and Laboratory. Patients: Of 28 children undergoing surgery for congenital heart disease, 15 underwent tight glycemic control postoperatively and 13 were treated conventionally. Interventions: Metabolic profiling of blood plasma was undertaken using proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. A panel of metabolites was measured using a curve-fitting algorithm. Inflammatory cytokines were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The data were assessed with respect to clinical markers of disease severity (Risk Adjusted Congenital heart surgery score-1, Pediatric Logistic Organ Dysfunction, inotrope score, duration of ventilation and pediatric ICU-free days). Measurements and Main Results: Changes in metabolic and inflammatory profiles were seen over the time course from surgery to recovery, compared with the preoperative state. Tight glycemic control did not significantly alter the response profile. We identified eight metabolites (3-d-hydroxybutyrate, acetone, acetoacetate, citrate, lactate, creatine, creatinine, and alanine) associated with surgical and disease severity. The strength of proinflammatory response, particularly interleukin-8 and interleukin-6 concentrations, inversely correlated with PICU-free days at 28 days. The interleukin-6/interleukin-10 ratio directly correlated with plasma lactate. Conclusions: This is the first report on the metabolic response to cardiac surgery in children. Using nuclear magnetic resonance to monitor the patient journey, we identified metabolites whose concentrations and trajectory appeared to be associated with clinical outcome. Metabolic profiling could be useful for patient stratification and directing investigations of clinical interventions. PMID:25844698

  2. Metabolic Evolution of a Deep-Branching Hyperthermophilic Chemoautotrophic Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Braakman, Rogier; Smith, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Aquifex aeolicus is a deep-branching hyperthermophilic chemoautotrophic bacterium restricted to hydrothermal vents and hot springs. These characteristics make it an excellent model system for studying the early evolution of metabolism. Here we present the whole-genome metabolic network of this organism and examine in detail the driving forces that have shaped it. We make extensive use of phylometabolic analysis, a method we recently introduced that generates trees of metabolic phenotypes by integrating phylogenetic and metabolic constraints. We reconstruct the evolution of a range of metabolic sub-systems, including the reductive citric acid (rTCA) cycle, as well as the biosynthesis and functional roles of several amino acids and cofactors. We show that A. aeolicus uses the reconstructed ancestral pathways within many of these sub-systems, and highlight how the evolutionary interconnections between sub-systems facilitated several key innovations. Our analyses further highlight three general classes of driving forces in metabolic evolution. One is the duplication and divergence of genes for enzymes as these progress from lower to higher substrate specificity, improving the kinetics of certain sub-systems. A second is the kinetic optimization of established pathways through fusion of enzymes, or their organization into larger complexes. The third is the minimization of the ATP unit cost to synthesize biomass, improving thermodynamic efficiency. Quantifying the distribution of these classes of innovations across metabolic sub-systems and across the tree of life will allow us to assess how a tradeoff between maximizing growth rate and growth efficiency has shaped the long-term metabolic evolution of the biosphere. PMID:24516572

  3. Bioactive food components, cancer cell growth limitation and reversal of glycolytic metabolism.

    PubMed

    Keijer, Jaap; Bekkenkamp-Grovenstein, Melissa; Venema, Dini; Dommels, Yvonne E M

    2011-06-01

    Cancer cells are resistant to apoptosis and show a shift in energy production from mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation to cytosolic glycolysis. Apoptosis resistance and metabolic reprogramming are linked in many cancer cells and both processes center on mitochondria. Clearly, mutated cancer cells escape surveillance and turn into selfish cells. However, many of the mechanisms that operate cellular metabolic control still function in cancer cells. This review describes the metabolic importance of glucose and glutamine, glycolytic enzymes, oxygen, growth cofactors and mitochondria and focuses on the potential role of bioactive food components, including micronutrients. The role of B- and A-vitamin cofactors in (mitochondrial) metabolism is highlighted and the cancer protective potential of omega-3 fatty acids and several polyphenols is discussed in relation to metabolic reprogramming, including the mechanisms that may be involved. Furthermore, it is shown that cancer cell growth reduction by limiting the growth cofactor folic acid seems to be associated with reversal of metabolic reprogramming. Altogether, reversal of metabolic reprogramming may be an attractive strategy to increase susceptibility to apoptotic surveillance. Food bioactive components that affect various aspects of metabolism may be important tools to reverse glycolytic to oxidative metabolism and enhance sensitivity to apoptosis. The success of such a strategy may depend on several actors, acting in concert. Growth cofactors may be one of these, which call for careful (re)evaluation of their function in normal and in cancer metabolism. PMID:20732296

  4. The metabolic regulation of aging.

    PubMed

    Finkel, Toren

    2015-12-01

    Here we review the environmental and genetic manipulations that link cellular and organismal metabolism to aging. In particular, we explore how nutrients are sensed and how various intracellular energy nodes seem to coordinate distinct metabolic alterations linked to extended longevity. In addition, the role of mitochondria as both a metabolic and signaling organelle is discussed. Finally, we review a host of new targeted pharmacological approaches that attempt to exploit the connection between aging and metabolism to treat a wide range of age-related diseases. Together, these insights are beginning to reveal answers to century-old mysteries and are providing a future road map for the rational extension of lifespan. PMID:26646498

  5. Obesity, metabolic syndrome, and adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Dodson, M V; Mir, P S; Hausman, G J; Guan, L L; Du, Min; Jiang, Z; Fernyhough, M E; Bergen, W G

    2011-01-01

    Obesity and metabolic syndromes are examples whereby excess energy consumption and energy flux disruptions are causative agents of increased fatness. Because other, as yet elucidated, cellular factors may be involved and because potential treatments of these metabolic problems involve systemic agents that are not adipose depot-specific in their actions, should we be thinking of adipose depot-specific (cellular) treatments for these problems? For sure, whether treating obesity or metabolic syndrome, the characteristics of all adipose depot-specific adipocytes and stromal vascular cells should be considered. The focus of this paper is to begin to align metabolic dysfunctions with specific characteristics of adipocytes. PMID:21811683

  6. Obesity, Metabolic Syndrome, and Adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Dodson, M. V.; Mir, P. S.; Hausman, G. J.; Guan, L. L.; Du, Min; Jiang, Z.; Fernyhough, M. E.; Bergen, W. G.

    2011-01-01

    Obesity and metabolic syndromes are examples whereby excess energy consumption and energy flux disruptions are causative agents of increased fatness. Because other, as yet elucidated, cellular factors may be involved and because potential treatments of these metabolic problems involve systemic agents that are not adipose depot-specific in their actions, should we be thinking of adipose depot-specific (cellular) treatments for these problems? For sure, whether treating obesity or metabolic syndrome, the characteristics of all adipose depot-specific adipocytes and stromal vascular cells should be considered. The focus of this paper is to begin to align metabolic dysfunctions with specific characteristics of adipocytes. PMID:21811683

  7. Metabolic Adaptation to Muscle Ischemia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabrera, Marco E.; Coon, Jennifer E.; Kalhan, Satish C.; Radhakrishnan, Krishnan; Saidel, Gerald M.; Stanley, William C.

    2000-01-01

    Although all tissues in the body can adapt to varying physiological/pathological conditions, muscle is the most adaptable. To understand the significance of cellular events and their role in controlling metabolic adaptations in complex physiological systems, it is necessary to link cellular and system levels by means of mechanistic computational models. The main objective of this work is to improve understanding of the regulation of energy metabolism during skeletal/cardiac muscle ischemia by combining in vivo experiments and quantitative models of metabolism. Our main focus is to investigate factors affecting lactate metabolism (e.g., NADH/NAD) and the inter-regulation between carbohydrate and fatty acid metabolism during a reduction in regional blood flow. A mechanistic mathematical model of energy metabolism has been developed to link cellular metabolic processes and their control mechanisms to tissue (skeletal muscle) and organ (heart) physiological responses. We applied this model to simulate the relationship between tissue oxygenation, redox state, and lactate metabolism in skeletal muscle. The model was validated using human data from published occlusion studies. Currently, we are investigating the difference in the responses to sudden vs. gradual onset ischemia in swine by combining in vivo experimental studies with computational models of myocardial energy metabolism during normal and ischemic conditions.

  8. Regulatory Biology: Depressed Metabolic States

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holton, E. M. (ed)

    1973-01-01

    Exobiological aspects of depressed metabolism and thermoregulation are discussed for subsequent development of biological space flight experiments. Included is a brief description of differential hypothermia in cancer chemotherapy.

  9. OVCAR-3 Spheroid-Derived Cells Display Distinct Metabolic Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Vermeersch, Kathleen A.; Wang, Lijuan; Mezencev, Roman; McDonald, John F.; Styczynski, Mark P.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Recently, multicellular spheroids were isolated from a well-established epithelial ovarian cancer cell line, OVCAR-3, and were propagated in vitro. These spheroid-derived cells displayed numerous hallmarks of cancer stem cells, which are chemo- and radioresistant cells thought to be a significant cause of cancer recurrence and resultant mortality. Gene set enrichment analysis of expression data from the OVCAR-3 cells and the spheroid-derived putative cancer stem cells identified several metabolic pathways enriched in differentially expressed genes. Before this, there had been little previous knowledge or investigation of systems-scale metabolic differences between cancer cells and cancer stem cells, and no knowledge of such differences in ovarian cancer stem cells. Methods To determine if there were substantial metabolic changes corresponding with these transcriptional differences, we used two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry to measure the metabolite profiles of the two cell lines. Results These two cell lines exhibited significant metabolic differences in both intracellular and extracellular metabolite measurements. Principal components analysis, an unsupervised dimensional reduction technique, showed complete separation between the two cell types based on their metabolite profiles. Pathway analysis of intracellular metabolomics data revealed close overlap with metabolic pathways identified from gene expression data, with four out of six pathways found enriched in gene-level analysis also enriched in metabolite-level analysis. Some of those pathways contained multiple metabolites that were individually statistically significantly different between the two cell lines, with one of the most broadly and consistently different pathways, arginine and proline metabolism, suggesting an interesting hypothesis about cancerous and stem-like metabolic phenotypes in this pair of cell lines. Conclusions Overall, we demonstrate for the first time that metabolism in an ovarian cancer stem cell line is distinct from that of more differentiated isogenic cancer cells, supporting the potential importance of metabolism in the differences between cancer cells and cancer stem cells. PMID:25688563

  10. Intestinal glucose metabolism revisited.

    PubMed

    Mithieux, Gilles; Gautier-Stein, Amandine

    2014-09-01

    It is long known that the gut can contribute to the control of glucose homeostasis via its high glucose utilization capacity. Recently, a novel function in intestinal glucose metabolism (gluconeogenesis) was described. The intestine notably contributes to about 20-25% of total endogenous glucose production during fasting. More importantly, intestinal gluconeogenesis is capable of regulating energy homeostasis through a communication with the brain. The periportal neural system senses glucose (produced by intestinal gluconeogenesis) in the portal vein walls, which sends a signal to the brain to modulate hunger sensations and whole body glucose homeostasis. Relating to the mechanism of glucose sensing, the role of the glucose receptor SGLT3 has been strongly suggested. Moreover, dietary proteins mobilize intestinal gluconeogenesis as a mandatory link between their detection in the portal vein and their effect of satiety. In the same manner, dietary soluble fibers exert their anti-obesity and anti-diabetic effects via the induction of intestinal gluconeogenesis. FFAR3 is a key neural receptor involved in the specific sensing of propionate to activate a gut-brain reflex arc triggering the induction of the gut gluconeogenic function. Lastly, intestinal gluconeogenesis might also be involved in the rapid metabolic improvements induced by gastric bypass surgeries of obesity. PMID:24969963

  11. Mammalian isovalthine metabolism.

    PubMed

    Rutherfurd-Markwick, K J; Rogers, Q R; Hendriks, W H

    2005-02-01

    Isovalthine is a branched-chain sulphur amino acid, which has been found in the urine of normal cats. The concentrations of isovalthine in the urine of healthy adult cats are approximately 24-66 micromol/l and are not affected by the gender of the cat. Isovalthinuria can be induced in other species (rats, rabbits, guinea-pigs, humans, dogs) following the administration of certain inducing agents such as some hypocholesterolaemic agents, bile acids, hormones or cholesterol precursors. The method of induction of isovalthinuria was studied extensively during the 1960s, and efforts were made to understand its biosynthesis. However, although the origin of the sulphur atom in isovalthine was shown to be from cysteine or methionine, the origin of the carbon skeleton remains unknown. Interest in isovalthine metabolism was generated in part because it was reportedly found in the urine of patients with hypercholesterolaemia. The validity of this finding however, was brought into question following reports that administration of the drug Bromural (alpha-bromoisovalerylurea), to humans results in the generation of compounds which break down to yield isovalthine following acid hydrolysis. This article presents a review and discussion of the experimental data on isovalthine metabolism. PMID:19112709

  12. Arginine metabolism in wounds

    SciTech Connect

    Albina, J.E.; Mills, C.D.; Barbul, A.; Thirkill, C.E.; Henry, W.L. Jr.; Mastrofrancesco, B.; Caldwell, M.D.

    1988-04-01

    Arginine metabolism in wounds was investigated in the rat in 1) lambda-carrageenan-wounded skeletal muscle, 2) Schilling chambers, and 3) subcutaneous polyvinyl alcohol sponges. All showed decreased arginine and elevated ornithine contents and high arginase activity. Arginase could be brought to the wound by macrophages, which were found to contain arginase activity. However, arginase was expressed by macrophages only after cell lysis and no arginase was released by viable macrophages in vitro. Thus the extracellular arginase of wounds may derive from dead macrophages within the injured tissue. Wound and peritoneal macrophages exhibited arginase deiminase activity as demonstrated by the conversion of (guanido-/sup 14/C)arginine to radiolabeled citrulline during culture, the inhibition of this reaction by formamidinium acetate, and the lack of prokaryotic contamination of the cultures. These findings and the known metabolic fates of the products of arginase and arginine deiminase in the cellular populations of the wound suggest the possibility of cooperativity among cells for the production of substrates for collagen synthesis.

  13. Metabolic Syndrome: Hyperlipidemia.

    PubMed

    Bragg, Dee Ann Stults; Walling, Anne

    2015-08-01

    Metabolic syndrome is associated with an elevated risk of cardiovascular disease and premature mortality. When metabolic syndrome includes lipid abnormalities, management goals are weight loss and cardiovascular risk management through lifestyle modifications (eg, diet, exercise), and, when appropriate, lowering of lipid levels with pharmacotherapy. Healthy diets are recommended, particularly the Mediterranean diet. Patients also should set a goal of at least 30 minutes of moderate to vigorous exercise on most, preferably all, days of the week. Guidelines provide criteria for statin treatment based on overall cardiovascular risk. High-intensity statin treatment (eg, rosuvastatin 20 to 40 mg, atorvastatin 40 to 80 mg) typically is recommended unless the patient cannot tolerate therapy. Approximately 5% of patients experience statin-induced myalgia, in which case moderate-intensity treatment can be tried. Lipid levels should be reevaluated 4 to 12 weeks after initiating therapy; lipid levels can be measured without fasting. A lack of improvement often indicates nonadherence. Bile acid sequestrants, fibric acids, and niacin can be used if other drugs are not tolerated. The evidence to support use of integrative medicine is limited, but the strongest evidence of benefit is for garlic (Allium sativum). PMID:26280341

  14. Identifying Branched Metabolic Pathways by Merging Linear Metabolic Pathways

    E-print Network

    Kavraki, Lydia E.

    presents a graph-based algorithm for identify- ing complex metabolic pathways in multi-genome scale of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) [17] and MetaCyc [8]. Gaining understanding from these vast quantities by manual means. Importantly, the ability to find metabolic pathways in multi-genome scale data has

  15. Central Carbon Metabolism and Electron Transport in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: Metabolic Constraints for Carbon

    E-print Network

    Central Carbon Metabolism and Electron Transport in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: Metabolic Pierre et Marie Curie (Paris VI), Institut de Biologie Physico-Chimique, Paris, Francee The metabolism- tween the various metabolic pathways. There are, however, constraints that govern central carbon

  16. Neurological aspects of biopterin metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, I; Leeming, R J; Cavanagh, N P; Hyland, K

    1986-01-01

    Plasma total biopterin concentration was measured by bioassay in 59 infants with hyperphenylalaninaemia and in 50 children with developmental regression and or movement disorder with normal plasma phenylalanine concentrations. In infants with raised phenylalanine concentrations plasma biopterin concentrations were significantly raised in proportion to the phenylalanine values. Five patients had plasma biopterin concentrations at the extremes of the range, and of these two had defective biopterin metabolism. One with low plasma biopterin concentration apparently had a partial defect of biopterin synthesis but died before investigations were complete. One with high plasma biopterin concentration, even when phenylalanine concentrations had fallen to the normal range, had dihydropteridine reductase deficiency. In this patient concentrations of homovanillic acid and 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were severely reduced. In children without hyperphenylalaninaemia plasma biopterin concentrations were normal. Twenty two patients were subjected to lumbar puncture, of whom six with developmental regression without movement disorder had normal CSF biopterin concentrations, and 11 with movement disorder other than torsion dystonia had significantly lower CSF biopterin concentrations. Five patients with torsion dystonia had normal biopterin concentrations. PMID:3954438

  17. Heterogeneity of cells may explain allometric scaling of metabolic rate

    E-print Network

    Takemoto, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    The origin of allometric scaling of metabolic rate is a long-standing question in biology. Several models has been proposed for explaining the origin; however, they have advantages and disadvantages. In particular, previous models only demonstrate either two important observations for the allometric scaling: the variability of scaling exponents and predominance of 3/4-power law. Thus, these models have a dispute over their validity. In this study, we propose a simple geometry model, and show that a hypothesis that total surface area of cells determines metabolic rate can reproduce these two observations by combining two concepts: the impact of cell sizes on metabolic rate and fractal-like (hierarchical) organization. The proposed model both theoretically and numerically demonstrates the approximately 3/4-power law although several different biological strategies are considered. The model validity is confirmed using empirical data. Furthermore, the model suggests the importance of heterogeneity of cell size fo...

  18. Metabolic shifts in the Antarctic fish Notothenia rossii in response to rising temperature and PCO2

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Ongoing ocean warming and acidification increasingly affect marine ecosystems, in particular around the Antarctic Peninsula. Yet little is known about the capability of Antarctic notothenioid fish to cope with rising temperature in acidifying seawater. While the whole animal level is expected to be more sensitive towards hypercapnia and temperature, the basis of thermal tolerance is set at the cellular level, with a putative key role for mitochondria. This study therefore investigates the physiological responses of the Antarctic Notothenia rossii after long-term acclimation to increased temperatures (7°C) and elevated PCO2 (0.2 kPa CO2) at different levels of physiological organisation. Results For an integrated picture, we analysed the acclimation capacities of N. rossii by measuring routine metabolic rate (RMR), mitochondrial capacities (state III respiration) as well as intra- and extracellular acid–base status during acute thermal challenges and after long-term acclimation to changing temperature and hypercapnia. RMR was partially compensated during warm- acclimation (decreased below the rate observed after acute warming), while elevated PCO2 had no effect on cold or warm acclimated RMR. Mitochondrial state III respiration was unaffected by temperature acclimation but depressed in cold and warm hypercapnia-acclimated fish. In both cold- and warm-exposed N. rossii, hypercapnia acclimation resulted in a shift of extracellular pH (pHe) towards more alkaline values. A similar overcompensation was visible in muscle intracellular pH (pHi). pHi in liver displayed a slight acidosis after warm normo- or hypercapnia acclimation, nevertheless, long-term exposure to higher PCO2 was compensated for by intracellular bicarbonate accumulation. Conclusion The partial warm compensation in whole animal metabolic rate indicates beginning limitations in tissue oxygen supply after warm-acclimation of N. rossii. Compensatory mechanisms of the reduced mitochondrial capacities under chronic hypercapnia may include a new metabolic equilibrium to meet the elevated energy demand for acid–base regulation. New set points of acid–base regulation under hypercapnia, visible at the systemic and intracellular level, indicate that N. rossii can at least in part acclimate to ocean warming and acidification. It remains open whether the reduced capacities of mitochondrial energy metabolism are adaptive or would impair population fitness over longer timescales under chronically elevated temperature and PCO2. PMID:23075125

  19. Sirtuins: from metabolic regulation to brain aging

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Wenzhen

    2013-01-01

    Brain aging is characterized by progressive loss of neurophysiological functions that is often accompanied by age-associated neurodegeneration. Calorie restriction has been linked to extension of lifespan and reduction of the risk of neurodegenerative diseases in experimental model systems. Several signaling pathways have been indicated to underlie the beneficial effects of calorie restriction, among which the sirtuin family has been suggested to play a central role. In mammals, it has been established that sirtuins regulate physiological responses to metabolism and stress, two key factors that affect the process of aging. Sirtuins represent a promising new class of conserved deacetylases that play an important role in regulating metabolism and aging. This review focuses on current understanding of the relation between metabolic pathways involving sirtuins and the brain aging process, with focus on SIRT1 and SIRT3. Identification of therapeutic agents capable of modulating the expression and/or activity of sirtuins is expected to provide promising strategies for ameliorating neurodegeneration. Future investigations regarding the concerted interplay of the different sirtuins will help us understand more about the aging process, and potentially lead to the development of therapeutic approaches for the treatment of age-related neurodegenerative diseases and promotion of successful aging. PMID:23888142

  20. kpath: integration of metabolic pathway linked data

    PubMed Central

    Navas-Delgado, Ismael; García-Godoy, María Jesús; López-Camacho, Esteban; Rybinski, Maciej; Reyes-Palomares, Armando; Medina, Miguel Ángel; Aldana-Montes, José F.

    2015-01-01

    In the last few years, the Life Sciences domain has experienced a rapid growth in the amount of available biological databases. The heterogeneity of these databases makes data integration a challenging issue. Some integration challenges are locating resources, relationships, data formats, synonyms or ambiguity. The Linked Data approach partially solves the heterogeneity problems by introducing a uniform data representation model. Linked Data refers to a set of best practices for publishing and connecting structured data on the Web. This article introduces kpath, a database that integrates information related to metabolic pathways. kpath also provides a navigational interface that enables not only the browsing, but also the deep use of the integrated data to build metabolic networks based on existing disperse knowledge. This user interface has been used to showcase relationships that can be inferred from the information available in several public databases. Database URL: The public Linked Data repository can be queried at http://sparql.kpath.khaos.uma.es using the graph URI “www.khaos.uma.es/metabolic-pathways-app”. The GUI providing navigational access to kpath database is available at http://browser.kpath.khaos.uma.es. PMID:26055101