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Sample records for severe steroid-refractory ulcerative

  1. Response of Steroid-Refractory Acute GVHD to α1-Antitrypsin.

    PubMed

    Marcondes, A Mario; Hockenbery, David; Lesnikova, Marina; Dinarello, Charles A; Woolfrey, Ann; Gernsheimer, Terry; Loghman-Adham, Mahmoud; Gelmont, David; Storer, Barry; Hansen, John A; Deeg, H Joachim

    2016-09-01

    α1-Antitrypsin (AAT) is a serine protease inhibitor with anti-inflammatory, antiapoptotic, and immunomodulatory properties. It has therapeutic efficacy in animal models of autoimmune diseases, inflammatory disorders, and transplantation. In a phase I/II open-label single-center study, we administered AAT (Glassia; Baxalta/Kamada, New Ziona, Israel) as salvage therapy to 12 patients with steroid-refractory acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). AAT was given i.v. at 2 dose levels over a 15-day course. All patients had grades III or IV GVHD with stage 4 gut involvement. After treatment, plasma AAT levels increased in both cohorts and remained within 2 to 4 mg/mL for the duration of treatment. No clinically relevant toxicities attributable to AAT were observed. GVHD manifestations improved in 8 of 12 patients, and 4 responses were complete. Six patients (50%) were alive at last follow-up (>104 to >820 days). These findings show that AAT is well tolerated and has efficacy in the treatment of steroid-refractory severe acute GVHD. Further studies are warranted. PMID:27223109

  2. Extracorporeal photopheresis for the treatment of steroid refractory acute GVHD.

    PubMed

    Perfetti, P; Carlier, P; Strada, P; Gualandi, F; Occhini, D; Van Lint, M T; Ibatici, A; Lamparelli, T; Bruno, B; Raiola, A M; Dominietto, A; Di Grazia, C; Bregante, S; Zia, S; Ferrari, G M; Stura, P; Pogliani, E; Bacigalupo, A

    2008-11-01

    Extracorporeal photopheresis (ECP) was given to 23 patients with steroid-refractory acute GVHD (aGVHD, grade II (n=10), III (n=7) or IV (n=6)). The median duration of ECP was 7 months (1-33) and the median number of ECP cycles in each patient was 10. Twelve patients (52%) had complete responses. Eleven patients (48%) survived and 12 died, 10 of GVHD with or without infections and two of leukaemia relapse. The average grade of GVHD was reduced from 2.8 (on the first day of ECP) to 1.4 (on day +90 from ECP) (P=0.08), and the average dose of i.v. methylprednisolone from 2.17 to 0.2 mg/kg/d (P=0.004). Complete responses were obtained in 70, 42 and 0% of patients, respectively, with grades II, III and IV aGVHD; complete responses in the skin, liver and gut were 66, 27 and 40%. Patients treated within 35 days from onset of aGVHD had higher responses (83 vs 47%; P=0.1). A trend for improved survival was seen in grade III-IV aGVHD treated with ECP as compared to matched controls (38 vs 16%; P 0.08). ECP is a treatment option for patients with steroid refractory aGVHD and should be considered early in the course of the disease. PMID:18660840

  3. Mesenchymal stromal cells from pooled mononuclear cells of multiple bone marrow donors as rescue therapy in pediatric severe steroid-refractory graft-versus-host disease: a multicenter survey

    PubMed Central

    Kuçi, Zyrafete; Bönig, Halvard; Kreyenberg, Hermann; Bunos, Milica; Jauch, Anna; Janssen, Johannes W.G.; Škifić, Marijana; Michel, Kristina; Eising, Ben; Lucchini, Giovanna; Bakhtiar, Shahrzad; Greil, Johann; Lang, Peter; Basu, Oliver; von Luettichau, Irene; Schulz, Ansgar; Sykora, Karl-Walter; Jarisch, Andrea; Soerensen, Jan; Salzmann-Manrique, Emilia; Seifried, Erhard; Klingebiel, Thomas; Bader, Peter; Kuçi, Selim

    2016-01-01

    To circumvent donor-to-donor heterogeneity which may lead to inconsistent results after treatment of acute graft-versus-host disease with mesenchymal stromal cells generated from single donors we developed a novel approach by generating these cells from pooled bone marrow mononuclear cells of 8 healthy “3rd-party” donors. Generated cells were frozen in 209 vials and designated as mesenchymal stromal cell bank. These vials served as a source for generation of clinical grade mesenchymal stromal cell end-products, which exhibited typical mesenchymal stromal cell phenotype, trilineage differentiation potential and at later passages expressed replicative senescence-related markers (p21 and p16). Genetic analysis demonstrated their genomic stability (normal karyotype and a diploid pattern). Importantly, clinical end-products exerted a significantly higher allosuppressive potential than the mean allosuppressive potential of mesenchymal stromal cells generated from the same donors individually. Administration of 81 mesenchymal stromal cell end-products to 26 patients with severe steroid-resistant acute graft-versus-host disease in 7 stem cell transplant centers who were refractory to many lines of treatment, induced a 77% overall response at the primary end point (day 28). Remarkably, although the cohort of patients was highly challenging (96% grade III/IV and only 4% grade II graft-versus-host disease), after treatment with mesenchymal stromal cell end-products the overall survival rate at two years follow up was 71±11% for the entire patient cohort, compared to 51.4±9.0% in graft-versus-host disease clinical studies, in which mesenchymal stromal cells were derived from single donors. Mesenchymal stromal cell end-products may, therefore, provide a novel therapeutic tool for the effective treatment of severe acute graft-versus-host disease. PMID:27175026

  4. Mesenchymal stromal cells from pooled mononuclear cells of multiple bone marrow donors as rescue therapy in pediatric severe steroid-refractory graft-versus-host disease: a multicenter survey.

    PubMed

    Kuçi, Zyrafete; Bönig, Halvard; Kreyenberg, Hermann; Bunos, Milica; Jauch, Anna; Janssen, Johannes W G; Škifić, Marijana; Michel, Kristina; Eising, Ben; Lucchini, Giovanna; Bakhtiar, Shahrzad; Greil, Johann; Lang, Peter; Basu, Oliver; von Luettichau, Irene; Schulz, Ansgar; Sykora, Karl-Walter; Jarisch, Andrea; Soerensen, Jan; Salzmann-Manrique, Emilia; Seifried, Erhard; Klingebiel, Thomas; Bader, Peter; Kuçi, Selim

    2016-08-01

    To circumvent donor-to-donor heterogeneity which may lead to inconsistent results after treatment of acute graft-versus-host disease with mesenchymal stromal cells generated from single donors we developed a novel approach by generating these cells from pooled bone marrow mononuclear cells of 8 healthy "3(rd)-party" donors. Generated cells were frozen in 209 vials and designated as mesenchymal stromal cell bank. These vials served as a source for generation of clinical grade mesenchymal stromal cell end-products, which exhibited typical mesenchymal stromal cell phenotype, trilineage differentiation potential and at later passages expressed replicative senescence-related markers (p21 and p16). Genetic analysis demonstrated their genomic stability (normal karyotype and a diploid pattern). Importantly, clinical end-products exerted a significantly higher allosuppressive potential than the mean allosuppressive potential of mesenchymal stromal cells generated from the same donors individually. Administration of 81 mesenchymal stromal cell end-products to 26 patients with severe steroid-resistant acute graft-versus-host disease in 7 stem cell transplant centers who were refractory to many lines of treatment, induced a 77% overall response at the primary end point (day 28). Remarkably, although the cohort of patients was highly challenging (96% grade III/IV and only 4% grade II graft-versus-host disease), after treatment with mesenchymal stromal cell end-products the overall survival rate at two years follow up was 71±11% for the entire patient cohort, compared to 51.4±9.0% in graft-versus-host disease clinical studies, in which mesenchymal stromal cells were derived from single donors. Mesenchymal stromal cell end-products may, therefore, provide a novel therapeutic tool for the effective treatment of severe acute graft-versus-host disease. PMID:27175026

  5. Tocilizumab for steroid refractory acute graft-versus-host disease

    PubMed Central

    Roddy, Julianna V. F.; Haverkos, Bradley M.; McBride, Ali; Leininger, Kathryn M.; Jaglowski, Samantha; Penza, Sam; Klisovic, Rebecca; Blum, William; Vasu, Sumithira; Hofmeister, Craig C.; Benson, Don M.; Andritsos, Leslie A.; Devine, Steven M.; Efebera, Yvonne A.

    2015-01-01

    Acute graft-versus-host-disease (aGVHD) is a frequent and often lethal complication of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant despite prophylaxis. Tocilizumab is a humanized anti-IL-6 receptor monoclonal antibody that has evidence of activity in patients with steroid refractory (SR) GVHD. We retrospectively report on nine patients with grade 3 or 4 SR aGVHD who received tocilizumab. Eight mg/kg of tocilizumab was administered intravenously every 3–4 weeks. aGVHD grading and responses were based on consensus criteria. Median age at transplant was 48 years. Five patients had alternate donor sources. Median time from aGVHD onset to tocilizumab administration was 44 days. Two patients had complete responses and two had partial responses. Median survival from start of tocilizumab was 26 days (range 13–1054). Our limited experience demonstrated an overall response rate of 44% (CR + PR); however, this response was not durable. Further studies are needed to determine the optimal time for tocilizumab initiation. PMID:26140610

  6. Prognostic factors affecting early colectomy in patients with moderate to severe ulcerative colitis treated with calcineurin inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Ban, Hiromitsu; Bamba, Shigeki; Nishida, Atsushi; Inatomi, Osamu; Shioya, Makoto; Takahashi, Ken-Ichiro; Imaeda, Hirotsugu; Murata, Masaki; Sasaki, Masaya; Tsujikawa, Tomoyuki; Andoh, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs) such as cyclosporine A (CSA) and tacrolimus (FK506) are often used as a second-line drug for steroid-refractory or steroid-dependent patients with ulcerative colitis (UC). The aim of the present study was to determine the prognostic factors for early colectomy. A total of 85 hospitalized patients with UC (CSA, 50 patients; FK506, 35 patients) were enrolled. Colectomy carried out within 60 days of starting CNI therapy was defined as ‘early colectomy’. To assess the prognostic factors affecting early colectomy, clinical practical variables, including the Onodera-prognostic nutritional index (O-PNI): 10xAlb+0.005× (total lymphocyte count), were analyzed. The results demonstrated that the significant factors predicting early colectomy were i) disease severity, ii) immunomodulator-naïve history, iii) lower serum hematocrit, iv) lower serum albumin and v) lower O-PNI. In addition, the significant factors predicting overall colectomy were as follows: i) C7-HRP positivity and ii) >10,000 mg of prednisolone used prior to the initiation of CNI treatment. The combination of hematocrit and O-PNI enhanced the prediction of early colectomy. Clinical variables such as hematocrit and O-PNI were the significant factors predicting colectomy. These results may be used as a guide to predict the outcome of patients with UC in clinical settings.

  7. Elemental diet in steroid-dependent and steroid-refractory Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, C J; Giaffer, M H; Cann, P A; Holdsworth, C D

    1991-11-01

    Sixteen patients with Crohn's disease who had symptoms uncontrolled by high-dose steroids (n = 11) or symptoms invariably appearing on reduction or withdrawal of immunosuppressive therapy (n = 5) were treated with elemental diet. After 4 wk of dietary treatment, 10 patients were in remission and off all medication. Seven continued to be well without treatment for a minimum of 6 months, and four for at least 1 yr. No patient who subsequently relapsed had further steroid-refractory symptoms. Of the six patients failing to respond to elemental diet, four with steroid-refractory disease required early resective surgery for symptom relief, and two continued with steroid therapy, one in much reduced dosage. Elemental diet can bring about a sustained remission in many patients with Crohn's disease dependent on or refractory to corticosteroids, and reduce the need for surgical intervention. PMID:1951239

  8. Microbial Ligand Costimulation Drives Neutrophilic Steroid-Refractory Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Hadebe, Sabelo; Kirstein, Frank; Fierens, Kaat; Chen, Kong; Drummond, Rebecca A.; Vautier, Simon; Sajaniemi, Sara; Murray, Graeme; Williams, David L.; Redelinghuys, Pierre; Reinhart, Todd A.; Fallert Junecko, Beth A.; Kolls, Jay K.; Lambrecht, Bart N.; Brombacher, Frank; Brown, Gordon D.

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is a heterogeneous disease whose etiology is poorly understood but is likely to involve innate responses to inhaled microbial components that are found in allergens. The influence of these components on pulmonary inflammation has been largely studied in the context of individual agonists, despite knowledge that they can have synergistic effects when used in combination. Here we have explored the effects of LPS and β-glucan, two commonly-encountered microbial agonists, on the pathogenesis of allergic and non-allergic respiratory responses to house dust mite allergen. Notably, sensitization with these microbial components in combination acted synergistically to promote robust neutrophilic inflammation, which involved both Dectin-1 and TLR-4. This pulmonary neutrophilic inflammation was corticosteroid-refractory, resembling that found in patients with severe asthma. Thus our results provide key new insights into how microbial components influence the development of respiratory pathology. PMID:26261989

  9. Steroid Refractory Autoimmune Haemolytic Anaemia Secondary to Sarcoidosis Successfully Treated with Rituximab and Mycophenolate Mofetil.

    PubMed

    Green, Sarah; Partridge, Erica; Idedevbo, Edore; Borg, Anton

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune haemolytic anaemia is not a well-recognised complication of sarcoidosis. We describe the case of a 30-year-old female who presented with acute warm haemolytic anaemia and widespread lymphadenopathy. Sarcoidosis was diagnosed on lymph node biopsy and further investigation. The haemolytic anaemia responded only to a high dose of steroids. Evidence regarding treatment of steroid refractory autoimmune haemolysis secondary to sarcoidosis is lacking. Based on the emergent evidence that both disorders share common immunopathogenic mechanisms involving Th1 and Th17 lymphocytes, our patient was given rituximab and mycophenolate mofetil to successfully suppress the haemolysis and sarcoid activity. PMID:27563474

  10. Steroid Refractory Autoimmune Haemolytic Anaemia Secondary to Sarcoidosis Successfully Treated with Rituximab and Mycophenolate Mofetil

    PubMed Central

    Idedevbo, Edore; Borg, Anton

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune haemolytic anaemia is not a well-recognised complication of sarcoidosis. We describe the case of a 30-year-old female who presented with acute warm haemolytic anaemia and widespread lymphadenopathy. Sarcoidosis was diagnosed on lymph node biopsy and further investigation. The haemolytic anaemia responded only to a high dose of steroids. Evidence regarding treatment of steroid refractory autoimmune haemolysis secondary to sarcoidosis is lacking. Based on the emergent evidence that both disorders share common immunopathogenic mechanisms involving Th1 and Th17 lymphocytes, our patient was given rituximab and mycophenolate mofetil to successfully suppress the haemolysis and sarcoid activity. PMID:27563474

  11. Immunological effects in patients with steroid-refractory graft-versus-host disease following treatment with basiliximab, a CD25 monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Chakupurakal, Geothy; García-Márquez, María Alejandra; Shimabukuro-Vornhagen, Alexander; Theurich, Sebastian; Holtick, Udo; Hallek, Michael; Scheid, Christof; von Bergwelt-Baildon, Michael

    2016-08-01

    Steroid-refractory graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) is a complication following an allogeneic stem cell transplantation with limited therapeutic options. Studies have shown a response in up to 80% of patients with this condition after treatment with the CD25 monoclonal antibody, basiliximab. Despite the good responses to treatment, around 50% of the patients experience recurrence of their GvHD symptoms 4-6 wk following cessation of therapy. The in vivo changes in the following treatment with this antibody have not been elucidated so far. We treated 14 patients with severe steroid-refractory GvHD with basiliximab weekly for 4 wk and monitored the changes in the T-, B-, NK- and dendritic cell subsets over this time period. The overall response to treatment was 92% (13/14) with 50% (7/14) achieving a complete response. Fifty four percentage (7/13) of the patients who responded showed recurrence of their GvHD symptoms. Contrary to expectations, our observations showed a significant depletion of the regulatory T-cell subset following treatment. Our findings suggest that the undesirable depletion of the regulatory T cells along with the CD25(+) acute inflammatory cells might be responsible for the high incidence of GvHD recurrence in this cohort of patients. PMID:26492560

  12. Plasmapheresis and immunoadsorption in patients with steroid refractory multiple sclerosis relapses.

    PubMed

    Faissner, Simon; Nikolayczik, Johanna; Chan, Andrew; Hellwig, Kerstin; Gold, Ralf; Yoon, Min-Suk; Haghikia, Aiden

    2016-06-01

    Patients suffering from multiple sclerosis (MS) are treated with high-dose intravenous steroids during acute relapses. In case of steroid refractory relapses, patients are treated with plasmapheresis or immunoadsorption. Until now data concerning the efficacy of both procedures are scarce. Visual evoked potentials (VEP), visual acuity and degree of remission of deficits caused by a relapse that had led to admission in MS patients (n = 48) treated with PLEX, IA or both in a single university centre setting were evaluated retrospectively. In a grouped analysis of patients treated with combined PLEX/IA, PLEX or IA alone, patients in all groups profited as assessed by VEP. Visual acuity also showed a trend towards a better performance, but lacked significance. In a subgroup analysis only concerning patients with initially pathological VEP there was a significant beneficial effect in the groups treated with PLEX/IA as well as in the group summarizing all patients. The combination of PLEX and IA provides a valid treatment option in steroid-refractory MS-relapses, and IA should be considered in acute relapses especially in patients with side effect of PLEX. PMID:27039388

  13. Imatinib mesylate for the treatment of steroid-refractory sclerotic-type cutaneous chronic graft-versus-host disease

    PubMed Central

    Baird, Kristin; Comis, Leora E.; Joe, Galen O.; Steinberg, Seth M.; Hakim, Fran T.; Rose, Jeremy J.; Mitchell, Sandra A.; Pavletic, Steven Z.; Figg, William D.; Yao, Lawrence; Flanders, Kathleen C.; Takebe, Naoko; Sarantopoulos, Stefanie; Booher, Susan; Cowen, Edward W.

    2015-01-01

    Sclerotic skin manifestations of chronic graft-versus-host disease (ScGVHD) lead to significant morbidity, including functional disability from joint range of motion (ROM) restriction. No superior second-line therapy has been established for steroid-refractory disease. Imatinib mesylate is a multi-kinase inhibitor of several signaling pathways implicated in skin fibrosis with in vitro antifibrotic activity. We performed an open label pilot Phase 2 trial of imatinib in children and adults with corticosteroid refractory ScGVHD. Twenty patients were enrolled in a 6 month trial. Eight received a standard dose (adult: 400 mg daily; children: 260 mg/m2 daily). Due to poor tolerability, 12 additional patients underwent a dose escalation regimen (adult: 100 mg daily initial dose up to 200 mg daily maximum; children initial dose 65 mg/m2 daily up to 130 mg/m2 daily). Fourteen patients were evaluable for primary response, improvement in joint range of motion (ROM) deficit, at 6 months. Primary outcome criteria for partial response (PR) was met in 5/14 (36%), stable disease (SD) in 7/14 (50%), and progressive disease (PD) in 2/14 (14%) patients. Eleven (79%) patients, including 5 PR and 6 with SD, demonstrated a positive gain in ROM (range 3–94% improvement in deficit). Of 13 patients with measurable changes at 6 months, the average improvement in ROM deficit was 24.2% (IQR: 15.5% to 30.5%; p=0.011). This trial is registered at http://clinicaltrials.gov as NCT007020689. PMID:25771402

  14. Imatinib mesylate for the treatment of steroid-refractory sclerotic-type cutaneous chronic graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Baird, Kristin; Comis, Leora E; Joe, Galen O; Steinberg, Seth M; Hakim, Fran T; Rose, Jeremy J; Mitchell, Sandra A; Pavletic, Steven Z; Figg, William D; Yao, Lawrence; Flanders, Kathleen C; Takebe, Naoko; Sarantopoulos, Stefanie; Booher, Susan; Cowen, Edward W

    2015-06-01

    Sclerotic skin manifestations of chronic graft-versus-host disease (ScGVHD) lead to significant morbidity, including functional disability from joint range of motion (ROM) restriction. No superior second-line therapy has been established for steroid-refractory disease. Imatinib mesylate is a multikinase inhibitor of several signaling pathways implicated in skin fibrosis with in vitro antifibrotic activity. We performed an open-label pilot phase II trial of imatinib in children and adults with corticosteroid-refractory ScGVHD. Twenty patients were enrolled in a 6-month trial. Eight received a standard dose (adult, 400 mg daily; children, 260 mg/m(2) daily). Because of poor tolerability, 12 additional patients underwent a dose escalation regimen (adult, 100 mg daily initial dose up to 200 mg daily maximum; children, initial dose 65 mg/m(2) daily up to 130 mg/m(2) daily). Fourteen patients were assessable for primary response, improvement in joint ROM deficit, at 6 months. Primary outcome criteria for partial response was met in 5 of 14 (36%), stable disease in 7 of 14 (50%), and progressive disease in 2 of 14 (14%) patients. Eleven patients (79%), including 5 with partial response and 6 with stable disease, demonstrated a positive gain in ROM (range of 3% to 94% improvement in deficit). Of 13 patients with measurable changes at 6 months, the average improvement in ROM deficit was 24.2% (interquartile range, 15.5% to 30.5%; P = .011). This trial is registered at http://clinicaltrials.gov as NCT007020689. PMID:25771402

  15. Severe tracheobronchial stenosis and bronchiectasis complicating ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Toshio; Tsushima, Kenji; Sakairi, Yuichi; Yoshida, Shigetoshi; Yoshino, Ichiro; Tatsumi, Koichiro

    2014-03-01

    A 37-year-old woman with a 20-year history of ulcerative colitis (UC) was admitted with complaints of cough and increasing sputum production. Chest computed tomography showed severe stenosis of the left main bronchus and bronchiectasis of the left lower lobe. Biopsy specimens from the area of bronchial stenosis showed chronic inflammation with lymphocyte infiltration, and we diagnosed respiratory involvement of UC. The bronchial stenosis was successfully treated with yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) laser. UC is a systemic illness with occasional extraintestinal manifestations, but upper airway involvement is rare, and to our knowledge, this is the first published report of UC complicated with bronchopulmonary lesions with successful YAG laser treatment of the main bronchial stenosis. PMID:25473563

  16. Ulcers

    MedlinePlus

    ... have one. Ulcers can also be caused by anti-inflammatory medicines. Although most people take these medicines without ... may damage the stomach lining and cause ulcers. Anti-inflammatory drugs include aspirin, ibuprofen (one brand name: Motrin), ...

  17. Resolution of Severe Ulcerative Colitis with the Specific Carbohydrate Diet.

    PubMed

    Khandalavala, Birgit N; Nirmalraj, Maya C

    2015-01-01

    A 73-year-old female of Asian origin was diagnosed with ulcerative colitis (UC) after initial gastrointestinal symptoms of abdominal pain and bloody diarrhea. She had a relatively benign course over the subsequent 12 years. In 2009, she had increased left-sided abdominal pain, bloody diarrhea and progressive weight loss, due to a severe exacerbation. In spite of a variety of standard treatments, her condition continued to decline with a significant impact on normal life and functioning. In December of 2010, repeat colonoscopy and microscopy confirmed pancolitis, without diverticulitis. The Specific Carbohydrate Diet (SCD) was initiated due to failure of conventional therapies. Following this highly restricted diet, within a period of 3-6 months, improvement was noted, and within a year, no abdominal pain or diarrhea were present, and she returned to her baseline functioning and career. Two years later, repeat colonoscopy showed resolution of the pancolitis, confirmed with microscopic evaluation. Successful use of the SCD in children with UC has been documented. We describe previously unreported, highly beneficial results with both symptomatic and clinical improvement and complete remission of UC in an adult female with the SCD. PMID:26351419

  18. Resolution of Severe Ulcerative Colitis with the Specific Carbohydrate Diet

    PubMed Central

    Khandalavala, Birgit N.; Nirmalraj, Maya C.

    2015-01-01

    A 73-year-old female of Asian origin was diagnosed with ulcerative colitis (UC) after initial gastrointestinal symptoms of abdominal pain and bloody diarrhea. She had a relatively benign course over the subsequent 12 years. In 2009, she had increased left-sided abdominal pain, bloody diarrhea and progressive weight loss, due to a severe exacerbation. In spite of a variety of standard treatments, her condition continued to decline with a significant impact on normal life and functioning. In December of 2010, repeat colonoscopy and microscopy confirmed pancolitis, without diverticulitis. The Specific Carbohydrate Diet (SCD) was initiated due to failure of conventional therapies. Following this highly restricted diet, within a period of 3–6 months, improvement was noted, and within a year, no abdominal pain or diarrhea were present, and she returned to her baseline functioning and career. Two years later, repeat colonoscopy showed resolution of the pancolitis, confirmed with microscopic evaluation. Successful use of the SCD in children with UC has been documented. We describe previously unreported, highly beneficial results with both symptomatic and clinical improvement and complete remission of UC in an adult female with the SCD. PMID:26351419

  19. A precordial rub in a boy with a severe attack of ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Badina, Laura; Ferrara, Giovanna; Guastalla, Pierpaolo; Barbi, Egidio

    2014-04-01

    A case of a pneumomediastinum mimicking a pericarditis in a boy with an occult perforation due to ulcerative colitis is reported. Pneumomediastinum is a rare complication of severe attacks of ulcerative colitis, with or without the previous development of a toxic megacolon, that should be considered in the differential diagnosis. PMID:24694884

  20. A patient with foot ulcer and severe metabolic alkalosis.

    PubMed

    John, Ruby Samuel; Simoes, Sonia; Reddi, Alluru S

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of triple acid-base disorder with metabolic alkalosis as the primary disorder in a 65-year-old man due to ingestion and application to leg ulcers of baking soda (calcium bicarbonate). The blood pH was 7.65 with hypochloremia, hypokalemia, and prerenal azotemia. He was treated with isotonic saline with K replacement, and the patient improved without any adverse clinical consequences. We discuss the causes, mechanisms, and management of Cl-responsive (depletion) metabolic alkalosis. PMID:21185672

  1. Parameters of a severe disease course in ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Stallmach, Andreas; Nickel, Luisa; Lehmann, Thomas; Bokemeyer, Bernd; Bürger, Martin; Hüppe, Dietrich; Kruis, Wolfgang; Nikolaus, Susanna; Preiss, Jan C; Sturm, Andreas; Teich, Niels; Schmidt, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To detect high risk patients with a progressive disease course of ulcerative colitis (UC) requiring immunosuppressive therapy (IT). METHODS: A retrospective, multicenter analysis of 262 UC patients from eight German tertiary inflammatory bowel disease centres was performed. Patients were divided into two groups depending on the patients need to initiate immunosuppressive therapy in the disease course. A comparison between the two groups was made with regard to demographics, clinical and laboratory parameters obtained within three months after UC diagnosis and the response to first medical therapy. Using this data, a prognostic model was established to predict the individual patients probability of requiring an immunosuppressive therapy. RESULTS: In 104 (39.7%) out of 262 patients, UC therapy required an immunosuppressive treatment. Patients in this group were significantly younger at time of diagnosis (HR = 0.981 ± 0.014 per year, P = 0.009), and required significantly more often a hospitalisation (HR = 2.5 ± 1.0, P < 0.001) and a systemic corticosteroid therapy at disease onset (HR = 2.4 ± 0.8, P < 0.001), respectively. Response to steroid treatment was significantly different between the two groups of patients (HR = 5.2 ± 3.9 to 50.8 ± 35.6 compared to no steroids, P = 0.016 to P < 0.001). Furthermore, in the IT group an extended disease (HR = 3.5 ± 2.4 to 6.1 ± 4.0 compared to proctitis, P = 0.007 to P = 0.001), anemia (HR = 2.2 ± 0.8, P < 0.001), thrombocytosis (HR = 1.9 ± 1.8, P = 0.009), elevated C-reactive protein (CRP) (HR = 2.1 ± 0.9, P < 0.001), and extraintestinal manifestations in the course of disease (HR = 2.6 ± 1.1, P = 0.004) were observed. Six simple clinical items were used to establish a prognostic model to predict the individual risk requiring an IT. This probability ranges from less than 2% up to 100% after 5 years. Using this, the necessity of an immunosuppressive therapy can be predicted in 60% of patients. Our model can

  2. Systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective studies for ECP treatment in patients with steroid-refractory acute GVHD

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongming; Chen, Runzhe; Cheng, Jian; Jin, Nan; Chen, Baoan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of extracorporeal photopheresis (ECP) treatment in patients with steroid-refractory acute graft-versus-host disease (SR-aGVHD). Methods An electronic search was carried out on the MEDLINE, EMBASE, Science Citation Index (SCI), and Cochrane Library databases. We included prospective clinical trials in SR-aGVHD treated by ECP. The main endpoints consisted of mortality, exacerbation, or response. Results Only seven studies involving 121 patients met the inclusion criteria for further review. Our analysis showed positive results of ECP for aGVHD. The overall response rate (ORR) was 0.71 and the complete response rate (CRR) was 0.71. The efficacy of ECP for skin aGVHD, liver aGVHD, and gut aGVHD were 0.86, 0.60, and 0.68, respectively. However, no sufficient evidence verifies the exact benefit in this review, because the number of patients enrolled in trials is limited and publish bias exists. Conclusion ECP is an effective therapy for skin, liver, and gut aGVHD, and large double-blind clinical trials are required to prove the outcome of this meta-analysis. PMID:25653504

  3. Sleep and duodenal motor activity in patients with severe non-ulcer dyspepsia.

    PubMed Central

    David, D; Mertz, H; Fefer, L; Sytnik, B; Raeen, H; Niazi, N; Kodner, A; Mayer, E A

    1994-01-01

    The prevalence of sleep disturbances was studied in patients with severe non-ulcer dyspepsia. It was also considered if the change in sleep pattern was associated with changes in the rhythmic fasting motor activity of the gastrointestinal tract, and if motor events correlate with the patient's symptoms. Motor activity in the duodenum was monitored over a 24 hour period under freely ambulatory conditions in 10 healthy controls and in 10 patients with severe non-ulcer dyspepsia using a transnasally placed catheter with six solid state pressure transducers connected to a digital data logging device. Symptoms and sleep disturbance were assessed by questionnaire and diary. Based on their symptoms, the patients were separated into two groups: those with dyspepsia symptoms only (non-ulcer dyspepsia; n = 5) and those with dyspepsia and additional functional symptoms thought to arise from the lower gastrointestinal tract (non-ulcer dyspepsia+irritable bowel syndrome; n = 5). When compared with either the control or the non-ulcer dyspepsia+irritable bowel syndrome group, non-ulcer dyspepsia patients had a considerably decreased number of migrating motor complexes during the nocturnal period (0.7 v 4.6), a decreased percentage of nocturnal phase I (5.2% v 78.0%), and an increased percentage of the nocturnal period in phase II (94% v 15.4%). Patients with non-ulcer dyspepsia+irritable bowel syndrome were not different from normal controls. Four of the non-ulcer dyspepsia patients and all of the non-ulcer dyspepsia+irritable bowel syndrome patients reported difficulties with sleep. Clusters of high amplitude tonic and phasic activity, not accompanied by subjective reports of discomfort were noted in several patients in both groups during the study. In eight of 10 patients, abdominal pain was reported during normal motor activity, while in one patient, pain correlated with phase III of the migrating motor complex. In contrast with previous reports in patients with irritable

  4. [Leg ulcers].

    PubMed

    Wollina, U; Unger, L; Stelzner, C; Machetanz, J; Schellong, S

    2013-11-01

    The lower leg is in particular prone to the development of ulceration. Many different causes may lead to ulceration. Thus, a thorough diagnosis is mandatory, and a biopsy is often required. By far the most common type is the classical venous ulcer due to chronic venous insufficiency, located at the medial ankle. A more complicated-and more difficult to treat-type of venous ulcer is arthrogenic congestion syndrome with its extreme variant of a "legging" ulcer. In cases with severe peripheral arterial disease, an arterial ulcer may develop. The hypertensive ulcer Martorell is associated with arterial hypertension and diabetes; the underlying pathology is occlusion of arteriolar vessels. A typical diabetic ulceration is the necrobiosis lipoidica. Important differential diagnoses of leg ulceration include pyoderma gangrenosum and the calciphylactic ulcer. Due to a long-standing course, an ulceration may turn malignant. Vice versa, ulceration may occur as sign of a primary malignant lesion. PMID:24005788

  5. Applying Pharmacokinetics to Optimize Dosing of Anti-TNF Biologics in Acute Severe Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Michael J.; Minar, Philip; Vinks, Alexander A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute severe ulcerative colitis (ASUC), the most aggressive presentation ulcerative colitis (UC), occurs in 15 percent of adults and children with UC. First line therapy with intravenous corticosteroids is ineffective in half of adults and one third of children. Therapeutic monoclonal antibodies against TNF (anti-TNF therapy) are emerging as a common treatment for ASUC due to their similar efficacy to calcineurin inhibitors and more favorable adverse effect profile. Aim To comprehensively review the evidence for anti-TNF therapy for ASUC in children and adults with regard to outcomes and pharmacokinetics. Methods PubMed and recent conference proceedings were searched using the terms “ulcerative colitis”, “acute severe ulcerative colitis”, “anti-TNF”, “pharmacokinetics”, and the generic names of specific anti-TNF agents. Results Outcomes after anti-TNF therapy for ASUC remain suboptimal with aboutone half of children and adults undergoing colectomy. While several randomized controlled trials have demonstrated the efficacy of anti-TNF therapy for ambulatory patients with moderate to severely active UC, patients in these studies were less ill than those with ASUC. Patients with ASUC may exhibit more rapid clearance of anti-TNF biologics due pharmacokinetic mechanisms influenced by disease severity. Conclusions Conventional weight-based dosing effective in patients with moderately to severely active UC, may not be equally effective in those with ASUC. Personalized anti-TNF dosing strategies that integratepatient factors and early measures of pharmacokinetics and response hold promise for ensuring sustained drug exposure and maximizing early mucosal healing in patients with ASUC. PMID:25809869

  6. A case report of severe ulcerative colitis with mediastinal and subcutaneous emphysema.

    PubMed

    Terasaki, Kei; Okuyama, Yusuke; Ueda, Tomohiro; Matsuyama, Kiichi; Urata, Yoji; Yoshida, Norimasa

    2016-03-01

    A 17-year-old boy developed prominent mediastinal and subcutaneous emphysema while receiving treatment with 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) and oral corticosteroids for severe ulcerative colitis. We ruled out infection and initiated oral administration of tacrolimus, after which both the underlying disease and mediastinal and subcutaneous emphysema improved. However, he continued to experience repeated bouts of ulcerative colitis, so we ultimately opted for surgical intervention. Although mediastinal and subcutaneous emphysema is rare, it is one of the known extra-intestinal complications and can be particularly concerning. In this patient, mediastinal and subcutaneous emphysema might have been caused by the vulnerability of pulmonary alveolar walls to steroid medication and the increase of pulmonary alveolar pressure with abdominal pain and breath holding. Here, we report a case of inflammatory bowel disease with mediastinal and subcutaneous emphysema, along with a review of the literature. PMID:26947047

  7. Predictive factors for a severe clinical course in ulcerative colitis: Results from population-based studies

    PubMed Central

    Wanderås, Magnus Hofrenning; Moum, Bjørn A; Høivik, Marte Lie; Hovde, Øistein

    2016-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is characterized by chronic inflammation of the large bowel in genetically susceptible individuals exposed to environmental risk factors. The disease course can be difficult to predict, with symptoms ranging from mild to severe. There is no generally accepted definition of severe UC, and no single outcome is sufficient to classify a disease course as severe. There are several outcomes indicating a severe disease course, including progression of the disease’s extension, a high relapse rate, the development of acute severe colitis, colectomy, the occurrence of colorectal cancer and UC-related mortality. When evaluating a patient’s prognosis, it is helpful to do so in relation to these outcomes. Using these outcomes also makes it easier to isolate factors predictive of severe disease. The aims of this article are to evaluate different disease outcomes and to present predictive factors for these outcomes. PMID:27158539

  8. Peptic Ulcer

    MedlinePlus

    A peptic ulcer is a sore in the lining of your stomach or your duodenum, the first part of your ... Comes and goes for several days or weeks Peptic ulcers happen when the acids that help you digest ...

  9. Efficacy of Mesenchymal Stem Cell Therapy for Steroid-Refractory Acute Graft-Versus-Host Disease following Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaomei; Wang, Chunyan; Yin, Jin; Xu, Jinhuan; Wei, Jia; Zhang, Yicheng

    2015-01-01

    Background Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been broadly used experimentally in various clinical contexts. The addition of MSCs to initial steroid therapy for acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) may improve patient outcomes. However, investigations regarding prognostic factors affecting the efficacy of MSC therapy for steroid-refractory aGVHD remain controversial. We thus conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of published clinical trials to determine possible prognostic factors affecting the efficacy of MSCs in treating steroid-refractory aGVHD. Methods and Findings Clinical trials using MSC therapy for steroid-refractory aGVHD were identified by searching PubMed and EMBASE databases. A total of 6,963 citations were reviewed, and 13 studies met the inclusion criteria. A total of 301 patients from thirteen studies were included. Of these, 136 patients showed a complete response (CR), and 69 patients displayed a partial (PR) or mixed response (MR). In total, 205 patients exhibited overall response (ORR). Patients with skin steroid-refractory aGVHD showed a better clinical response than gastrointestinal (CR: odds ratio [OR] = 1.93, 95% confidence interval [95%CI]: 1.05–3.57, p < 0.05) and liver (CR: OR = 2.30, 95%CI: 1.12–4.69, p < 0.05, and ORR: OR = 2.93, 95%CI: 1.06–8.08, p < 0.05) steroid-refractory aGVHD. Those with grade II steroid-refractory aGVHD exhibited a better clinical response following MSC therapy than recipients with grade III–IV (CR: OR = 3.22, 95%CI: 1.24–8.34, p < 0.05). Completion therapy may improve the CR but reduce ORR compared with induction therapy (CR: OR = 0.20, 95%CI: 0.09–0.44, p < 0.05; ORR: OR = 2.18, 95%CI: 1.17–4.05, p = 0.01). There was also a trend towards a better clinical response in children compared with adults (CR: OR = 2.41, 95%CI: 1.01–5.73, p = 0.05). Conclusions Age, skin involvement, lower aGVHD grade, and the number of infusions are the main prognostic factors affecting the efficacy of MSC

  10. Extracorporeal photopheresis in steroid-refractory acute or chronic graft-versus-host disease: results of a systematic review of prospective studies.

    PubMed

    Abu-Dalle, Iman; Reljic, Tea; Nishihori, Taiga; Antar, Ahmad; Bazarbachi, Ali; Djulbegovic, Benjamin; Kumar, Ambuj; Kharfan-Dabaja, Mohamed A

    2014-11-01

    Acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) remain major obstacles for successful allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. Extracorporeal photopheresis (ECP) modulates immune cells, such as alloreactive T cells and dendritic cells, and improves GVHD target organ function(s) in steroid-refractory GVHD patients. We performed a systematic review to evaluate the totality of evidence regarding the efficacy of ECP for treatment of acute and chronic steroid-refractory or steroid-dependent GVHD. Nine studies, including 1 randomized controlled trial, met inclusion criteria, with a total of 323 subjects. In pooled analyses, overall response rates (ORR) were .69 (95% confidence interval [CI], .34 to .95) and .64 (95% CI, .47 to .79) for acute and chronic GVHD, respectively. In acute GVHD organ-specific responses, ECP resulted in the highest ORR for cutaneous, with .84 (95% CI, .75 to .92), followed by gastrointestinal with .65 (95% CI, .52 to .78). Similar response rates were seen in chronic GVHD involving the skin and gastrointestinal tract. Conversely, ORR for chronic GVHD involving the lungs was only .15 (95% CI, 0 to .5). In chronic GVHD, grades 3 to 4 adverse events were reported at .38 (95% CI, .06 to .78). ECP-related mortality rates were extremely low. Rates of immunosuppression discontinuation were .55 (95% CI, .40 to .70) and .23 (95% CI, .07 to .44) for acute and chronic GVHD, respectively. In summary, albeit limited by numbers of available studies, pooled analyses of prospective studies demonstrate encouraging responses after ECP treatment in acute and chronic GVHD after failing corticosteroids. Further research efforts are needed to improve organ-specific responses. PMID:24867779

  11. A rare cause of severe periorbital edema and dermonecrotic ulcer of the eyelid in a child: brown recluse spider bite.

    PubMed

    Taşkesen, Mustafa; Akdeniz, Sedat; Taş, Taşkin; Keklikçi, Uğur; Taş, Mehmet Ali

    2011-01-01

    Spider bites are a worldwide problem. Brown recluse spider bites can lead to severe local or systemic clinical effects, such as edema, necrotic ulcer, rashes, fever, chills, nausea, vomiting, malaise, arthralgia, myalgia, hemolysis, leukocytosis, disseminated intravascular coagulation, renal failure, and death. Eyelid bites from brown recluse spiders are rare. We report a child with severe facial edema and a dermonecrotic ulcer on the eyelid. Upon laboratory examination, leukocytosis with a significant left shift was detected. The patient was treated with antibiotics, systemic corticosteroid and conservative therapy that included saline compresses and ocular lubrication. No surgical excision was required. Vision was not impaired. A dermonecrotic ulcer is a severe complication of brown recluse spider bites. Since the diagnosis is difficult, clinical and epidemiological findings and a detailed history are important for an accurate diagnosis. PMID:21534346

  12. Potential application of in vivo imaging of impaired lymphatic duct to evaluate the severity of pressure ulcer in mouse model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasuya, Akira; Sakabe, Jun-Ichi; Tokura, Yoshiki

    2014-02-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury is a cause of pressure ulcer. However, a mechanism underlying the IR injury-induced lymphatic vessel damage remains unclear. We investigated the alterations of structure and function of lymphatic ducts in a mouse cutaneous IR model. And we suggested a new method for evaluating the severity of pressure ulcer. Immunohistochemistry showed that lymphatic ducts were totally vanished by IR injury, while blood vessels were relatively preserved. The production of harmful reactive oxygen species (ROS) was increased in injured tissue. In vitro study showed a high vulnerability of lymphatic endothelial cells to ROS. Then we evaluated the impaired lymphatic drainage using an in vivo imaging system for intradermally injected indocyanine green (ICG). The dysfunction of ICG drainage positively correlated with the severity of subsequent cutaneous changes. Quantification of the lymphatic duct dysfunction by this imaging system could be a useful strategy to estimate the severity of pressure ulcer.

  13. Heat Shock Factor 2 Levels Are Associated with the Severity of Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kunhua; Xiao, Yuliang; Du, Yan; Zhou, Lifeng; Duan, Liping; Li, Shuan; Yang, Gang; Chen, Lifang; Tong, Mingxia; Miao, Yinglei

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims The morbidity of ulcerative colitis (UC) is increasing in China every year. In addition, there is a lack of accurate diagnostic indices with which to evaluate the activity of the disease. The aim of this study was to identify UC-associated proteins as biomarkers for the diagnosis, and objective assessment of disease activity. Methods Differential expression of serum proteins from UC patients compared to normal controls was analyzed by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). The expression of heat shock factor 2(HSF2)in colonic mucosa in Crohn's disease, Behcet's disease, ulcerative colitis, intestinal tuberculosis, infective enteritis, intestinal lymphoma, and normal controls was investigated by immunohistochemistry (IHC). The expression of the HSF2 in colonic mucosa of UC subjects with varying severity of disease was measured by real time-PCR and Western Blots. The expression of HSF2 was inhibited by HSF2 small interfering RNA (siRNA) transfection in Caco-2 cells. The concentrations of HSF2, IL-1β, and TNF-α in serum and IL-1β, and TNF-α in the supernatants of transfected Caco-2 cells were determined by ELISA. Results HSF2 was differentially expressed in UC patients compared to normal controls. HSF2 expression was significantly higher in the intestinal mucosa of UC patients compared to other six groups. The results of immunohistochemistry, real time-PCR, Western Blots, and ELISA showed that the expression of HSF2 increased in parallel with the severity of UC. The serum concentration of HSF2 also positively correlated with levels of IL-1β and TNF-α. After down-regulation expression of HSF2 in Caco-2 cells by RNA interference, the productions of IL-1β and TNF-α stimulated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) increased dramatically. Conclusions HSF2 appears to be a potential novel molecular marker for UC activity, and may provide a basis for studies on

  14. Effects of topical 10% ascorbate solution on established corneal ulcers after severe alkali burns.

    PubMed

    Pfister, R R; Paterson, C A; Hayes, S A

    1982-03-01

    When established corneal ulcers induced by alkali burning were treated with 10% ascorbate drops, no perforation occurred, in contrast to a 25% incidence in the control group. If perforations and descemetoceles were grouped together, these difference became insignificant (i.e., 14.2% ascorbate-treated vs. 25% control). Prolongation of descemetocele presence without perforation in the ascorbate-treated group indicated some therapeutic effect. We conclude that topical ascorbate does not substantially alter the outcome of established corneal ulcers. PMID:7061209

  15. Severe Henoch-Schönlein purpura with infliximab for ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yang; Shi, Yan-Hong; He, Chong; Liu, Chang-Qin; Wang, Jun-Shan; Zhao, Yu-Jie; Guo, Yan-Min; Wu, Rui-Jin; Feng, Xiao-Yue; Liu, Zhan-Ju

    2015-01-01

    Infliximab (IFX) is an anti-tumor necrosis factor chimeric antibody that is effective for treatment of autoimmune disorders such as Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis (UC). IFX is well tolerated with a low incidence of adverse effects such as infections, skin reactions, autoimmunity, and malignancy. Dermatological manifestations can appear as infusion reaction, vasculitis, cutaneous infections, psoriasis, eczema, and skin cancer. Here, we present an unusual case of extensive and sporadic subcutaneous ecchymosis in a 69-year-old woman with severe UC, partial colectomy and cecostomy, following her initial dose of IFX. The reaction occurred during infliximab infusion, and withdrawal of IFX led to gradual alleviation of her symptoms. We concluded that Henoch-Schönlein purpura, a kind of leukocytoclastic vasculitis, might have contributed to the development of the bruising. Although the precise mechanisms of the vasculitis are still controversial, such a case highlights the importance of subcutaneous adverse effects in the management of UC with IFX. PMID:26019477

  16. Risk Factors for Steroid-Refractory Acute Graft-versus-Host Disease after Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation from Matched Related or Unrelated Donors.

    PubMed

    Calmettes, Claire; Vigouroux, Stéphane; Labopin, Myriam; Tabrizi, Reza; Turlure, Pascal; Lafarge, Xavier; Marit, Gérald; Pigneux, Arnaud; Leguay, Thibaut; Bouabdallah, Krimo; Dilhuydy, Marie-Sarah; Duclos, Cédric; Mohr, Catherine; Lascaux, Axelle; Dumas, Pierre-Yves; Dimicoli-Salazar, Sophie; Saint-Lézer, Arnaud; Milpied, Noël

    2015-05-01

    We performed a retrospective study to identify pretransplantation risk factors for steroid-refractory (SR) acute graft-versus host disease (aGVHD) after allogeneic stem cell transplantation from matched donors in 630 adult patients who underwent transplantation at our center between 2000 and 2012. The cumulative incidence (CI) of SR aGVHD was 11.3% ± 2.3%. The identified independent risk factors were matched unrelated donor (hazard ratio [HR], 2.52; P = .001), female donor for male recipient (HR, 1.84; P = .023) and absence of antithymocyte globulin (HR, 2.02; P = .005). Three risk groups were defined according to the presence of these risk factors. In the whole cohort, the CI of SR aGVHD was 3.5% ± 1.7% in the low-risk group (0 risk factor, n = 115), 9.3% ± 1.6% in the intermediate-risk group (1 risk factor, n = 323), and 19.3% ± 2.9% in the high-risk group (2 or 3 risk factors, n = 192). Our study suggests that pretransplantation characteristics might help identify patients at high risk for SR aGVHD. A risk adapted first-line treatment of aGVHD could be evaluated in those patients. PMID:25617807

  17. Secondary Buruli Ulcer Skin Lesions Emerging Several Months after Completion of Chemotherapy: Paradoxical Reaction or Evidence for Immune Protection?

    PubMed Central

    Ruf, Marie-Thérèse; Chauty, Annick; Adeye, Ambroise; Ardant, Marie-Françoise; Koussemou, Hugues; Johnson, Roch Christian; Pluschke, Gerd

    2011-01-01

    Background The neglected tropical disease Buruli ulcer (BU) caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans is an infection of the subcutaneous tissue leading to chronic ulcerative skin lesions. Histopathological features are progressive tissue necrosis, extracellular clusters of acid fast bacilli (AFB) and poor inflammatory responses at the site of infection. After the recommended eight weeks standard treatment with rifampicin and streptomycin, a reversal of the local immunosuppression caused by the macrolide toxin mycolactone of M. ulcerans is observed. Methodology/Principal Findings We have conducted a detailed histopathological and immunohistochemical analysis of tissue specimens from two patients developing multiple new skin lesions 12 to 409 days after completion of antibiotic treatment. Lesions exhibited characteristic histopathological hallmarks of Buruli ulcer and AFB with degenerated appearance were found in several of them. However, other than in active disease, lesions contained massive leukocyte infiltrates including large B-cell clusters, as typically found in cured lesions. Conclusion/Significance Our histopathological findings demonstrate that the skin lesions emerging several months after completion of antibiotic treatment were associated with M. ulcerans infection. During antibiotic therapy of Buruli ulcer development of new skin lesions may be caused by immune response-mediated paradoxical reactions. These seem to be triggered by mycobacterial antigens and immunostimulators released from clinically unrecognized bacterial foci. However, in particular the lesions that appeared more than one year after completion of antibiotic treatment may have been associated with new infection foci resolved by immune responses primed by the successful treatment of the initial lesion. PMID:21829740

  18. Confusing untypical intestinal Behcet’s disease: Skip ulcers with severe lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhen-Kai; Shi, Hui; Wang, Shao-Dong; Liu, Jiong; Zhu, Wei-Ming; Yang, Miao-Fang; Liu, Chan; Lu, Heng; Wang, Fang-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Behcet’s disease (BD) is a rare and life-long disorder characterized by inflammation of blood vessels throughout the body. BD was originally described in 1937 as a syndrome involving oral and genital ulceration in addition to ocular inflammation. Intestinal BD refers to colonic ulcerative lesions documented by objective measures in patients with BD. Many studies have shown that over 40% of BD patients have gastrointestinal complaints. Symptoms include abdominal pain, diarrhea, nausea, anorexia and abdominal distension. Although gastrointestinal symptoms are common, the demonstration of gastrointestinal ulcers is rare. This so-called intestinal BD accounts for approximately 1% of cases. There is no specific test for BD, and the diagnosis is based on clinical criteria. The manifestations of intestinal BD are similar to those of other colitis conditions such as Crohn’s disease or intestinal tuberculosis, thus, it is challenging for gastroenterologists to accurately diagnose intestinal BD in patients with ileo-colonic ulcers. However, giant ulcers distributed in the esophagus and ileocecal junction with gastrointestinal hemorrhage are rare in intestinal BD. Here, we present a case of untypical intestinal BD. The patient had recurrent aphthous ulceration of the oral mucosa, and esophageal and ileo-colonic ulceration, but no typical extra-intestinal symptoms. During examination, the patient had massive acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding. The patient underwent ileostomy after an emergency right hemicolectomy and partial ileectomy, and was subsequently diagnosed with incomplete-type intestinal BD by pathology. The literature on the evaluation and management of this condition is reviewed. PMID:24527178

  19. Severe complications of ulcerative colitis after high-dose prednisolone and azathioprine treatment.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, K; Watanabe, T; Abo, Y; Uchida, H; Kawamura, Y J; Masaki, T; Muto, T

    1999-06-01

    We report a rare case of ulcerative colitis (UC) associated with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections in multiple organs, and with compressive fracture from osteoporosis after the administration of high-dose prednisolone and azathioprine. A 25-year-old man had been treated with high-dose prednisolone for UC. He suddenly experienced severe lumbago, which prevented him from walking. Plain X-ray demonstrated compressive fractures of the thoracic and the lumbar vertebrae, which were thought to be due to osteoporosis as a side effect of the high-dose prednisolone. At this admission, in another hospital, he also had a bloody discharge from the rectum, and azathioprine was started; however, the patient's condition still did not show any improvement. The total doses of azathioprine and prednisolone he had received were 3150 mg and more than 15,000 mg, respectively. Considering the presence of the serious complications, surgical intervention was the treatment selected. Culture study revealed MRSA in the feces and nasal cavity, and P. aeruginosa in the feces and urine. Vancomycin hydrochloride and gentamicin were administered, and were effective, with a subsequent negative culture study. Subtotal colectomy with mucus fistula was performed. After the operation, culture studies remained negative. Major steroid side effects such as bone fracture and osteoporosis should be considered as an indication for surgery in UC patients. MRSA and P. aeruginosa are a menace, especially for UC immunosuppressed patients on steroid or immunosuppressive therapy. When these bacteria are detected, there should be prompt and adequate antimicrobial therapy against the organisms and the immunosuppressive therapy should be immediately discontinued. We conclude that surgical therapy should be considered in the earlier stage for patients with intractable UC, rather than continuing long-term administration of steroid or azathioprine, which may lead to

  20. Medical Therapy of Active Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Bürger, Martin; Schmidt, Carsten; Teich, Niels; Stallmach, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Medical therapy of mild and moderate ulcerative colitis (UC) of any extent is evidence-based and standardized by national and international guidelines. However, patients with steroid-refractory UC still represent a challenge. Methods A literature search using PubMed (search terms: ulcerative colitis, therapy, new, 1-2008-2015) resulted in 821 publications. For the current article, 88 citations were extracted including 36 randomized controlled studies, 18 reviews, and 8 meta-analyses. Results In steroid-refractory UC, early intensive therapy using anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) antibodies or the calcineurin inhibitors cyclosporine and tacrolimus is indicated in any case to prevent progression to a toxic megacolon and/or to avoid proctocolectomy. In patients with chronic disease activity, treatment with anti-TNF antibodies has a higher level of evidence than azathioprine therapy and should therefore be preferred. However, there is a subgroup of UC patients who may achieve prolonged steroid-free remission on azathioprine monotherapy. The importance of vedolizumab, a newly registered inhibiting antibody against integrin, has not yet been fully clarified since direct comparison studies are lacking, in particular in relation to anti-TNF antibodies. Conclusion There is a great need for additional innovative therapies, especially in cases of primary non-response or secondary loss of response to anti-TNF antibodies. New small molecules (Janus kinase inhibitors) are promising with an acceptable safety profile and efficacy in UC. Further, strategies that target the intestinal microbiome are currently considered for patients with active or relapsing UC, and may in the future open up new therapeutic options. PMID:26557831

  1. Effects of the magnitude of pressure on the severity of injury and capillary closure in rat experimental pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Kawamata, Seiichi; Kurose, Tomoyuki; Kubori, Yohei; Muramoto, Hiroaki; Honkawa, Yuta

    2015-03-01

    Experimental pressure ulcers were successfully produced in the rat abdominal wall at 100 mmHg in our previous study. We hypothesized that injury is less severe when pressures are lower than 100 mmHg and explored a critical pressure in the production of pressure ulcers. At 70 and 60 mmHg, repeated compressions for 4 h daily for 5 consecutive days resulted in partial skin necrosis and eschar formation in the majority of rats, whereas skin injuries were absent or very mild in most of the rats at 50 mmHg. The extent of ischemia was also examined by visualization of capillary blood flow using intravascular infusion of Lycopersicon esculentum lectin. Rat abdominal walls were compressed in the range from 0 (control) to 100 mmHg. The percentages of open capillaries were 62.8 ± 10.1% at 0 mmHg and 34.7 ± 18.5% at 10 mmHg. The ratio of open capillaries was further decreased with increasing pressure, but not pressure dependently. In conclusion, the severity of injury at 50 mmHg was drastically milder than that at 60 mmHg or higher, whereas the extent of ischemia (capillary closure) was not significantly different. The pressure is vitally important; however, other factor(s) besides ischemia is likely to promote the development of pressure ulcers. PMID:24676460

  2. Refractory ulcerative colitis accompanied with cytomegalovirus colitis and multiple liver abscesses: a case report.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Takuya; Hirata, Ichiro; Egashira, Yutaro; Ishida, Kumi; Kawakami, Ken; Morita, Eijiro; Murano, Naoko; Yasumoto, Shingo; Murano, Mitsuyuki; Toshina, Ken; Nishikawa, Takashi; Hamamoto, Norihiro; Nakagawa, Ken; Katsu, Ken-Ichi

    2005-09-01

    Various hepato-biliary complications are an increased incidence in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, and portal bacteremia is well documented in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC). However, few reports mention UC in association with liver abscesses. Recently, there are several reports describing cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection in association with disease exacerbation and steroid refractoriness in patients with UC. Here we present a case of refractory UC accompanied with multiple liver abscesses and CMV colitis. The patient, a 72-year-old male, with a five-year history of repeated admissions to our hospital for UC, presented with an exacerbation of his UC. Sigmoidoscopy performed on admission suggested that his UC was exacerbated, then he was given prednisolone and mesalazine orally, and betamethasone enemas. However, he had exacerbated symptoms. Repeat sigmoidoscopy revealed multiple longitudinal ulcers and pseudopolyps in the rectosigmoid colon. Although immunohistochemical staining of biopsy specimens and the serum testing for antigenemia were negative on admission and after the repeat sigmoidoscopy, they became histologically positive for CMV. Nonetheless, the patient developed spiking fevers, soon after ganciclovir was administered. Laboratory studies revealed an increased white cell count with left shift, and Enterococcus fecalis grew in blood cultures. An abdominal computed tomography (CT) scan was obtained and the diagnosis of liver abscesses associated with UC was made, based on CT results. The hepatic abscesses were successfully treated with intravenous meropenem for 6 wk, without further percutaneous drainage. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of multiple liver abscesses that develop during UC exacerbation complicated by CMV colitis. PMID:16127763

  3. Gastroprotective effects of several H2RAs on ibuprofen-induced gastric ulcer in rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Sun, Dan; He, Jinfeng; Yang, Chengli; Hu, Tingting; Zhang, Lijing; Cao, Hua; Tong, Ai-Ping; Song, Xiangrong; Xie, Yongmei; He, Gu; Guo, Gang; Luo, Youfu; Cheng, Ping; Zheng, Yu

    2016-03-15

    Ibuprofen is the first line of treatment for osteoarthritis and arthritis. The main side effects of ibuprofen especially in long-term treatment include gastric ulcer, duodenal ulcer and indigestion etc. Therefore, screening drugs with effective gastric protective effects and low toxicity for combination therapy with ibuprofen is necessary. The mechanism of gastric damage induced by ibuprofen is still unclear, however, cell damage caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS) is considered as the main reason. Preliminary screening of literature with the criteria of low toxicity led to four histamine-2 receptor antagonists (H2RAs): nizatidine, famotidine, lafutidine, and roxatidine acetate, which were selected for further investigation. These drugs were evaluated systemically by examining the gastric ulcer index, lipid peroxidation (LPO), membrane permeability, toxicity to main organs, and the influence on the activity of antioxidant enzymes, and myeloperoxidase (MPO). Nizatidine was found to be the best gastric protective agent. It exhibited excellent protective effect by increasing antioxidant enzyme activity, decreasing MPO activity, reducing LPO, and membrane permeability. Combination treatment with nizatidine and ibuprofen did not show any significant toxicity. Nizatidine was considered as a good option for combination therapy with ibuprofen especially for diseases that require long-term treatment such as arthritis and osteoarthritis. PMID:26883979

  4. "Toothbrush" the Feet: A Periodic Mechanical Stimulus for Healing of a Severe Chronic Leg Ulcer.

    PubMed

    Vounotrypidis, Periklis; Pappas, Periklis; Vrangalas, Vasilios; Pehlivanidis, Anthimos

    2015-09-01

    Chronic wounds develop when the sequence of healing events are disrupted, usually in patients with underlying diseases such as diabetes mellitus, venous insufficiency, peripheral artery disease, and neuropathies and they affect most often the lower extremities. We present a 68-year-old woman with plantar ulceration, lasting for approximately 18 months, resistant to healing with conventional therapy and various modalities we used. The patient had a long history of seronegative enteropathic arthritis, Crohn's disease, secondary fibrillar amyloidosis, multiplex neuropathy, and small vessel vasculitis, the latter being the trigger event for the ulceration of her right foot. Before the decision for a final surgical intervention, we implemented a mechanical periodic stimulus using a soft toothbrush, which resulted in the gradual and complete healing of the ulcer within a period of 6 weeks. Patient's history and previous treatments are presented along with the procedures that led to the healing of the chronic wound. This report supports the idea that periodic mechanical stimulus is of great importance for the healing process and this could be the mechanism of action of some other methods that have been described in the medical literature. PMID:25845912

  5. Impact of extracorporeal photopheresis on skin scores and quality of life in patients with steroid-refractory chronic GVHD.

    PubMed

    Dignan, F L; Aguilar, S; Scarisbrick, J J; Shaw, B E; Potter, M N; Cavenagh, J; Apperley, J F; Fielding, A K; Pagliuca, A; Raj, K; Marks, D I; Peniket, A; Crawley, C; Koh, M B; Child, F J

    2014-05-01

    There are few prospective studies evaluating the role of extracorporeal photopheresis (ECP) in chronic GVHD (cGVHD) and only occasional reports of the effect of ECP on patients' quality of life (QoL). We report a single-centre prospective study of patients undergoing fortnightly ECP for moderate or severe cGVHD. Response was assessed after 6 months of treatment using NIH scoring criteria and reduction in immunosuppression. QoL assessments were undertaken at baseline and at 6 months using the chronic GVHD symptom scale (cGVHD SS) and dermatology life quality index (DLQI). An intention-to-treat analysis showed that 19/38 (50%) of patients had a complete or partial response. Twenty-seven out of 38 patients completed 6 months of ECP treatment and 70% (19/27) had a complete or partial response. Eighty per cent of patients who completed 6 months of ECP treatment had a reduction in immunosuppression dose. A subset of patients completed QoL questionnaires. Seventeen out of 18 patients (94%) showed an improvement in scores. The mean cGVHD SS and mean DLQI score were both significantly lower after 6 months of ECP (22 compared with 36, P=0.012 and 3.4 compared with 6.9, P=0.009, respectively). This study confirms that ECP can lead to objective clinical responses and, in addition, may lead to an improvement in QoL in cGVHD. PMID:24566709

  6. Extracorporeal photopheresis performed on the CELLEX® compared with the UVAR-XTS® instrument is more efficient and better tolerated in children with steroid-refractory graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Kapadia, Ekta; Wong, Edward; Perez-Albuerne, Evelio; Jacobsohn, David

    2015-08-01

    Extracorporeal photopheresis (ECP) is an effective therapy in children with refractory graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). The two most frequently used instruments are UVAR-XTS® and CELLEX®. We performed a retrospective chart review of ten patients who underwent ECP with both UVAR-XTS® and CELLEX® instruments for steroid-refractory acute or chronic GVHD to compare instrument run times, percentages of cells treated, and complication rates. We found that compared to the UVAR-XTS® instrument, use of the CELLEX® instrument resulted in shorter run times, increased percentage of mononuclear cells treated, reduced incidence of line occlusions requiring TPA treatment, and decreased incidence of patient-related complications. PMID:25881179

  7. Alterations in the Composition of the Supramucosal Defense Barrier in Relation to Disease Severity of Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Longman, Rob J.; Poulsom, Richard; Corfield, Anthony P.; Warren, Bryan F.; Wright, Nicholas A.; Thomas, Michael G.

    2006-01-01

    Mucin glycoproteins and trefoil peptides play an important role in protection and repair of the gastrointestinal epithelium. This study investigates alterations in mucin and trefoil peptide gene expression and product localization in ulcerative colitis (UC). Product localization and message expression of mucin MUC1 to 6 and trefoil peptide TFF1 to 3 genes was analyzed in rectosigmoid tissue from a cohort of patients with active UC and compared with that of normal colorectal mucosa. MUC1 expression was upregulated in severe UC at the site of rupture of crypt abscesses. Reduction in MUC2 expression occurred in UC adjacent to ulceration. No alteration in MUC3 or MUC4 gene expression was detectable in UC compared with normal colorectal mucosa. No ectopic expression of MUC5AC, MUC5B, or MUC6 was identified in UC. Ectopic TFF1 expression was identified in tissues eliciting histological features of severe disease. Decreased TFF3 localization was demonstrated in UC tissues, but no TFF2 expression was detected in any colorectal specimens. Subtle alterations in composition of the supramucosal defense barrier exist in UC and vary in relation to clinical severity of disease. There is upregulation in mucin MUC1 at crypt abscesses and neo-expression of TFF1 trefoil peptide in severe disease. PMID:16924127

  8. The role of vedolizumab in patients with moderate-to-severe Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Shahidi, Neal; Bressler, Brian; Panaccione, Remo

    2016-01-01

    Vedolizumab, an α4β7-integrin antagonist, is the first gut-selective monoclonal antibody that has been approved for the treatment of moderate-to-severe ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease in many countries in the world. However, questions still remain regarding its appropriate use and placement in current treatment algorithms. Therefore, we sought out to evaluate the existing literature on the use of vedolizumab in inflammatory bowel disease. From inception to 21 June 2015 we searched MEDLINE for phase III randomized control trials assessing the utility of vedolizumab in inflammatory bowel disease, of which three were identified. The GEMINI trials demonstrate that vedolizumab is an effective and safe treatment for patients suffering from moderate-to-severe ulcerative colitis (GEMINI I) and Crohn’s disease (GEMINI II and III). However, further studies are needed comparing its efficacy directly with anti-tumor necrosis factor therapies to allow for further delineation of current treatment algorithms as well as ensuring its long-term safety profile. PMID:27134663

  9. Vasculitic Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Papi, Massimo; Papi, Claudia

    2016-03-01

    Vasculitic ulcers are an emerging problem in wound care that needs to be well defined and adequately approached by caregivers. Cutaneous vasculitis includes several inflammatory disorders that compromise microvessels and specifically the cutaneous vascular system: arterioles, capillaries, postcapillary venules. The pathogenetic role of circulating immunocomplexes and autoantibodies (antineutrophil antibodies) in these diseases has been widely demonstrated in animal models and in humans. Vasculitis can be limited to the skin or represent the cutaneous signs in case of systemic vasculitis with visceral involvement. The injury of cutaneous microvessels may result in impairment of blood flow and consequent focal ischemia and formation of skin ulcers. The ulcers are often multiple and localized on the lower leg and foot where the microcirculatory anatomy and rheologic dynamics are predisposing factors. Approximately 3% to 5% of skin ulcers may be caused by a vasculitic disorder. PMID:26657344

  10. [Gastric ulcer, duodenal ulcer].

    PubMed

    Matsui, Shigenaga; Kashida, Hiroshi; Asakuma, Yutaka; Sakurai, Toshiharu; Kudo, Masatoshi

    2015-07-01

    Recently, the acid secretion amount is increased by westernization of foods and Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infected patient's decrease in Japanese. Therefore, the recent tendencies are decrease of peptic ulcer diseases by H. pylori infection and increase of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs(NSAIDs) ulcers. The endoscopic hemostasis should be performed for upper gastrointestinal bleeding from peptic ulcers in the first choice. A surgery or interventional radiology (IVR) should be performed in the unsuccessfulness of endoscopic hemostasis. H. pylori eradication therapy is effective for healing and prevention of recurrence from peptic ulcers. For prevention of recurrence of NSAIDs ulcers, therapy with proton pump inhibitor is effective. PMID:26165067

  11. Granulo-monocyto apheresis is more effective in mild ulcerative colitis than in moderate to severe disease

    PubMed Central

    De Cassan, Chiara; Savarino, Edoardo; Marson, Piero; Tison, Tiziana; Hatem, Giorgia; Sturniolo, Giacomo Carlo; D’Incà, Renata

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate whether the effectiveness of Granulo-monocyto apheresis (GMA), a technique that consists of the extracorporeal removal of granulocytes and monocytes from the peripheral blood, might vary according to the severity of ulcerative colitis (UC) in patients with mild to moderate-severe disease UC activity. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed prospectively collected data of patients undergoing GMA at our inflammatory bowel disease centre who had at least a 6 mo of follow-up. The demographics, clinical and laboratory data were extracted from the patients’ charts and electronic records. The severity of UC was scored according to the Modified Truelove Witts Severity Index (MTWSI). A clinical response was defined as a decrease from baseline of ≥ 2 points or a value of MTWSI ≤ 2 points. RESULTS: A total of 41 (24 males/17 females; mean age 47 years) patients were included in the study. After GMA cycle completion, 21/28 (75%) of mild UC patients showed a clinical response compared with 7/13 (54%) of patients with moderate to severe disease (P = 0.27). At 6-mo, 14/28 (50%) of the mild UC patients maintained a clinical response compared with 2/13 (15%) of the patients with moderate to severe disease (P = 0.04). After the GMA cycle completion and during the 6-mo follow up period, 13/16 (81%) and 9/16 (56%) of mild UC patients with intolerance, resistance and contraindications to immunosuppressants and/or biologics showed a clinical response compared with 2/6 (33%) and 0/6 (0%) of patients with moderate to severe disease activity with these characteristics (P = 0.05 and P = 0.04, respectively). CONCLUSION: Patients with mild UC benefit from GMA more than patients with moderate to severe disease in the short-term period. GMA should be considered a valid therapeutic option in cases of contraindications to immunosuppressants, corticosteroids and/or biologics. PMID:25493030

  12. Disease Severity and Immune Activity Relate to Distinct Interkingdom Gut Microbiome States in Ethnically Distinct Ulcerative Colitis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mar, Jordan S.; LaMere, Brandon J.; Lin, Din L.; Levan, Sophia; Nazareth, Michelle; Mahadevan, Uma

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Significant gut microbiota heterogeneity exists among ulcerative colitis (UC) patients, though the clinical implications of this variance are unknown. We hypothesized that ethnically distinct UC patients exhibit discrete gut microbiotas with unique metabolic programming that differentially influence immune activity and clinical status. Using parallel 16S rRNA and internal transcribed spacer 2 sequencing of fecal samples (UC, 30; healthy, 13), we corroborated previous observations of UC-associated bacterial diversity depletion and demonstrated significant Saccharomycetales expansion as characteristic of UC gut dysbiosis. Furthermore, we identified four distinct microbial community states (MCSs) within our cohort, confirmed their existence in an independent UC cohort, and demonstrated their coassociation with both patient ethnicity and disease severity. Each MCS was uniquely enriched for specific amino acid, carbohydrate, and lipid metabolism pathways and exhibited significant luminal enrichment of the metabolic products of these pathways. Using a novel ex vivo human dendritic cell and T-cell coculture assay, we showed that exposure to fecal water from UC patients caused significant Th2 skewing in CD4+ T-cell populations compared to that of healthy participants. In addition, fecal water from patients in whom their MCS was associated with the highest level of disease severity induced the most dramatic Th2 skewing. Combined with future investigations, these observations could lead to the identification of highly resolved UC subsets based on defined microbial gradients or discrete microbial features that may be exploited for the development of novel, more effective therapies. PMID:27531910

  13. UNUSUAL CAUSES OF CUTANEOUS ULCERATION

    PubMed Central

    Panuncialman, Jaymie; Falanga, Vincent

    2010-01-01

    Synopsis Skin ulceration is a major source of morbidity and is often difficult to manage. Ulcers due to an inflammatory etiology or microvascular occlusion are particularly challenging in terms of diagnosis and treatment. The management of such ulcers requires careful assessment of associated systemic conditions and a thorough analysis of the ulcer's clinical and histologic findings. In this report, we discuss several examples of inflammatory ulcers and the approach to their diagnosis and treatment. PMID:21074034

  14. A randomised phase I study of etrolizumab (rhuMAb β7) in moderate to severe ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Fedorak, Richard N; Hommes, Daan W; Sturm, Andreas; Baumgart, Daniel C; Bressler, Brian; Schreiber, Stefan; Mansfield, John C; Williams, Marna; Tang, Meina; Visich, Jennifer; Wei, Xiaohui; Keir, Mary; Luca, Diana; Danilenko, Dimitri; Egen, Jackson; O'Byrne, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    Objective Etrolizumab (rhuMAb β7, anti-β7, PRO145223) is a humanised monoclonal antibody targeting the β7 subunit of the heterodimeric integrins α4β7 and αEβ7, which are implicated in leucocyte migration and retention in ulcerative colitis (UC). This randomised phase I study evaluated the safety and pharmacology of etrolizumab in patients with moderate to severe UC. Design In the single ascending dose (SAD) stage, etrolizumab (0.3, 1.0, 3.0, 10 mg/kg intravenous, 3.0 mg/kg subcutaneous (SC) or placebo) was administered 4:1 (n=25) in each cohort. In the multiple dose (MD) stage, new patients received monthly etrolizumab (0.5 mg/kg SC (n=4), 1.5 mg/kg SC (n=5), 3.0 mg/kg SC (n=4), 4.0 mg/kg intravenous (n=5)) or placebo (n=5). The pharmacokinetics was studied and Mayo Clinic Score evaluated at baseline, day 29 (SAD), and days 43 and 71 (MD). Results In the SAD stage, there were no dose limiting toxicities, infusion or injection site reactions. Two impaired wound healing serious adverse events occurred in two patients receiving etrolizumab. In the MD stage, there were no dose limiting toxicities, and no infusion or injection site reactions. Headache was the most common adverse event, occurring more often in etrolizumab patients. Antietrolizumab antibodies were detected in two subjects. The duration of β7 receptor full occupancy was dose related. A clinical response was observed in 12/18 patients, and clinical remission in 3/18 patients treated with etrolizumab in the MD stage, compared with 4/5 and 1/5 placebo patients, respectively. Conclusion Etrolizumab is well tolerated in moderate to severe UC. Further investigation is warranted. PMID:22717454

  15. Implantation of self-expanding metal stent in the treatment of severe bleeding from esophageal ulcer after endoscopic band ligation.

    PubMed

    Mishin, I; Ghidirim, G; Dolghii, A; Bunic, G; Zastavnitsky, G

    2010-09-01

    Endoscopic variceal ligation is superior to sclerotherapy because of its lower rebleeding and complication rates. However, ligation may be associated with life-threatening bleeding from postbanding esophageal ulcer. We report a case of a 49-year-old male with massive hemorrhage from esophageal ulcer on 8th day after successful band ligation of bleeding esophageal varices caused by postviral liver cirrhosis (Child-Pugh class C). A removable polyurethane membrane-covered self-expanding metal stent (SX-ELLA stent Danis, 135 mm × 25 mm, ELLA-CS, Hradec-Kralove, Czech Republic) was inserted in ICU for preventing fatal hemorrhage. Complete hemostasis was achieved and stent was removed after 8 days without rebleeding or any complications. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report in English literature regarding life-threatening hemorrhage from postbanding esophageal ulcer successfully treated by self-expanding metal stent in a patient with portal hypertension. PMID:20731698

  16. [Oral ulcers].

    PubMed

    Bascones-Martínez, Antonio; Figuero-Ruiz, Elena; Esparza-Gómez, Germán Carlos

    2005-10-29

    Ulcers commonly occur in the oral cavity, their main symptom being pain. There are different ways to classify oral ulcers. The most widely accepted form divides them into acute ulcers--sudden onset and short lasting--and chronic ulcers--insidious onset and long lasting. Commonest acute oral ulcers include traumatic ulcer, recurrent aphthous stomatitis, viral and bacterial infections and necrotizing sialometaplasia. On the other hand, oral lichen planus, oral cancer, benign mucous membrane pemphigoid, pemphigus and drug-induced ulcers belong to the group of chronic oral ulcers. It is very important to make a proper differential diagnosis in order to establish the appropriate treatment for each pathology. PMID:16277953

  17. In Vitro Shear Stress Measurements Using Particle Image Velocimetry in a Family of Carotid Artery Models: Effect of Stenosis Severity, Plaque Eccentricity, and Ulceration

    PubMed Central

    Kefayati, Sarah; Milner, Jaques S.; Holdsworth, David W.; Poepping, Tamie L.

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerotic disease, and the subsequent complications of thrombosis and plaque rupture, has been associated with local shear stress. In the diseased carotid artery, local variations in shear stress are induced by various geometrical features of the stenotic plaque. Greater stenosis severity, plaque eccentricity (symmetry) and plaque ulceration have been associated with increased risk of cerebrovascular events based on clinical trial studies. Using particle image velocimetry, the levels and patterns of shear stress (derived from both laminar and turbulent phases) were studied for a family of eight matched-geometry models incorporating independently varied plaque features – i.e. stenosis severity up to 70%, one of two forms of plaque eccentricity, and the presence of plaque ulceration). The level of laminar (ensemble-averaged) shear stress increased with increasing stenosis severity resulting in 2–16 Pa for free shear stress (FSS) and approximately double (4–36 Pa) for wall shear stress (WSS). Independent of stenosis severity, marked differences were found in the distribution and extent of shear stress between the concentric and eccentric plaque formations. The maximum WSS, found at the apex of the stenosis, decayed significantly steeper along the outer wall of an eccentric model compared to the concentric counterpart, with a 70% eccentric stenosis having 249% steeper decay coinciding with the large outer-wall recirculation zone. The presence of ulceration (in a 50% eccentric plaque) resulted in both elevated FSS and WSS levels that were sustained longer (∼20 ms) through the systolic phase compared to the non-ulcerated counterpart model, among other notable differences. Reynolds (turbulent) shear stress, elevated around the point of distal jet detachment, became prominent during the systolic deceleration phase and was widely distributed over the large recirculation zone in the eccentric stenoses. PMID:25007248

  18. Impact of the amount of straw provided to pigs kept in intensive production conditions on the occurrence and severity of gastric ulceration at slaughter.

    PubMed

    Herskin, Mette S; Jensen, Henrik E; Jespersen, Anna; Forkman, Björn; Jensen, Margit B; Canibe, Nuria; Pedersen, Lene J

    2016-02-01

    This study examined effects of the amount of straw offered on occurrence and severity of gastric lesions in pigs kept in pens (18 pigs, 0.7 m(2)/pig) with partly slatted flooring and 10, 500 or 1000 g straw/pig/day from 30 kg live weight. The pigs had ad libitum access to dry feed. Forty-five pigs were used, three from each of 15 pens. After euthanization, the dimension of the non-glandular region of the stomach was measured. Lesions were characterized and scored. Irrespective of straw provided, 67% of the pigs showed signs of gastric pathology. Pigs provided with 500 or 1000 g straw were pooled as 'permanent access'. The proportion of pigs with ulcerations was reduced by permanent access to straw (7 vs. 33%; P<0.05), suggesting that permanent access to straw may improve animal health, and be considered as one possible strategy to limit gastric ulceration in pigs. PMID:26850561

  19. [Aphthous ulcers and oral ulcerations].

    PubMed

    Vaillant, Loïc; Samimi, Mahtab

    2016-02-01

    Aphthous ulcers are painful ulcerations located on the mucous membrane, generally in the mouth, less often in the genital area. Three clinical forms of aphthous ulcers have been described: minor aphthous ulcers, herpetiform aphthous ulcers and major aphthous ulcers. Many other conditions presenting with oral bullous or vesiculous lesions orulcerations and erosions can be mistaken for aphthous ulcers. Currently, treatment of aphthous ulcers is palliative and symptomatic. Topical treatments (topical anesthetics, topical steroids and sucralfate) are the first line therapy. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is defined by the recurrence of oral aphthous ulcers at least 4 times per year. RAS is often idiopathic but can be associated with gastro-intestinal diseases (i.e. celiac disease, inflammatory bowel diseases), nutritional deficiencies (iron, folates...), immune disorders (HIV infection, neutropenia) and rare syndromes. Behçet's disease is a chronic, inflammatory, disease whose main clinical feature is recurrent bipolar aphthosis. Colchicine associated with topical treatments constitutes a suitable treatment of most RAS. Thalidomide is the most effective treatment of RAS but its use is limited by frequent adverse effects. Oral ulcers can be related to a wide range of conditions that constitute the differential diagnoses of aphthous ulcers. Oral ulcers are classified into three main groups: acute ulcers with abrupt onset and short duration, recurrent ulcers (mainly due to postherpetic erythema multiforme) and chronic ulcers (with slow onset and insidious progression). Acute oral ulcers are due to trauma, bacterial infections (including acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis), deep fungal infection, gastro-intestinal (namely inflammatory bowel disease) or systemic diseases. Chronic oral ulcers may be drug-induced, or due to benign or malignant tumors. Every oral solitary chronic ulcer should be biopsied to rule out squamous cell carcinoma. A solitary palatal ulcer

  20. Peptic ulcer

    MedlinePlus

    ... patients with ulcer bleeding. Am J Gastroenterol . 2012 Mar;107(3):345-60. PMID: 22310222 www.ncbi. ... NSAID-related ulcer complications. Am J Gastroenterol . 2009 Mar;104(3):728-38. McColl KEL. Helicobacter pylori ...

  1. Ulcerative Colitis

    MedlinePlus

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a disease that causes inflammation and sores, called ulcers, in the lining of the rectum and colon. It is one of a group of diseases called inflammatory bowel disease. UC can happen at ...

  2. Peptic ulcer

    MedlinePlus

    ... health conditions. Other medicines used for ulcers are: Misoprostol, a drug that may help prevent ulcers in ... acid blocker Have you take a drug called misoprostol The following lifestyle changes may help prevent peptic ...

  3. Pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    O'Byrne, Deborah

    2016-04-13

    My nursing experience is in acute care. Acute medical nurses are well placed to assess skin integrity, identify patients at risk of pressure ulcer development, and commence appropriate interventions to prevent or treat pressure ulcers. PMID:27073966

  4. Environmentally Endemic Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strains with Mutations in lasR Are Associated with Increased Disease Severity in Corneal Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, John H.; Hebert, Wesley P.; Naimie, Amanda; Ray, Kathryn; Van Gelder, Rachel D.; DiGiandomenico, Antonio; Lalitha, Prajna; Srinivasan, Muthiah; Acharya, Nisha R.; Lietman, Thomas; Hogan, Deborah A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Steroids for Corneal Ulcers Trial (SCUT) was a multicenter, international study of bacterial keratitis in which 101 Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections were treated. Twenty-two of 101 P. aeruginosa isolates collected had a colony morphology characteristic of a loss-of-function mutation in lasR, the gene encoding a quorum-sensing master regulator. Ulcers caused by these 22 strains were associated with larger areas of corneal opacification, worse vision, and a lower rate of vision recovery in response to treatment than ulcers caused by the other isolates. The lasR sequences from these isolates each contained one of three nonsynonymous substitutions, and these strains were deficient in production of LasR-regulated protease and rhamnolipids. Replacement of lasR with either of the two most common lasR alleles from the SCUT isolates was sufficient to decrease protease and rhamnolipid production in PA14. Loss of LasR function is associated with increased production of CupA fimbriae, and the LasR-defective isolates exhibited higher production of CupA fimbriae than LasR-intact isolates. Strains with the same lasR mutation were of the same multilocus sequence type, suggesting that LasR-deficient, environmental P. aeruginosa strains were endemic to the area, and infections caused by these strains were associated with worse patient outcomes in the SCUT study. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT00324168.) IMPORTANCE The LasR transcription factor is an important regulator of quorum sensing in P. aeruginosa and positively controls multiple virulence-associated pathways. The emergence of strains with lasR loss-of-function alleles in chronic disease is well described and is thought to represent a specific adaptation to the host environment. However, the prevalence and virulence of these strains in acute infections remain unclear. This report describes observations revealing that lasR mutants were common among isolates from

  5. A giant phyllodes tumor causing ulceration and severe breast disfigurement: case report and review of giant phyllodes

    PubMed Central

    Sbeih, Mohammed A.; Engdahl, Ryan; Landa, Marina; Ojutiku, Oreoluwa; Morrison, Norman; Depaz, Hector

    2015-01-01

    Phyllodes tumors are rare fibroepithelial tumors that account for <1% of the breast tumors in women. These tumors are often benign unilateral lesions of the female breast (70%). Less common are malignant phyllodes, which have the potential for hematogenous spread. Phyllodes tumors can be seen in all age groups, and the median age of presentation is 45 years. Surgery is the main form of treatment. Wide excisions with margins of 1cm are suggested. While smaller and moderate size phyllodes may typically be seen, gigantic ones are very rare. These may be seen in neglected tumors. By definition, a giant phyllodes tumor is one larger than 10 cm in diameter. We report a gigantic phyllodes tumor that grew over 7 years period causing significant ulceration and disfigurement and review features of these tumors and management. PMID:26703928

  6. A giant phyllodes tumor causing ulceration and severe breast disfigurement: case report and review of giant phyllodes.

    PubMed

    Sbeih, Mohammed A; Engdahl, Ryan; Landa, Marina; Ojutiku, Oreoluwa; Morrison, Norman; Depaz, Hector

    2015-01-01

    Phyllodes tumors are rare fibroepithelial tumors that account for <1% of the breast tumors in women. These tumors are often benign unilateral lesions of the female breast (70%). Less common are malignant phyllodes, which have the potential for hematogenous spread. Phyllodes tumors can be seen in all age groups, and the median age of presentation is 45 years. Surgery is the main form of treatment. Wide excisions with margins of 1cm are suggested. While smaller and moderate size phyllodes may typically be seen, gigantic ones are very rare. These may be seen in neglected tumors. By definition, a giant phyllodes tumor is one larger than 10 cm in diameter. We report a gigantic phyllodes tumor that grew over 7 years period causing significant ulceration and disfigurement and review features of these tumors and management. PMID:26703928

  7. [Martorell ulcer].

    PubMed

    Kluger, Nicolas; Koljonen, Virve; Senet, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    Martorell ulcer (also called hypertensive leg ulcer) is an unusual, but not rare, cause of leg ulcers. It represents up to 15% of the leg ulcers hospitalized in a dermatology ward. It affects patients, aged from 40 to 85 years old, with a past long history of poorly controlled hypertension and sometimes diabetes. Clinical presentation is highly characteristic with an extremely painful, slowly extensive, superficial necrotic ulcer with a purpuric rim. Delay of healing is usually slow. Skin biopsies of the wound border, are warranted for differential diagnosis only in atypical cases. Management includes active pain control, wound debridement, skin grafting and hypertension control. PMID:23767134

  8. Infliximab versus Cyclosporine Treatment for Severe Corticosteroid-Refractory Ulcerative Colitis: A Korean, Retrospective, Single Center Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Hye; Kim, Duk Hwan; Park, Soo Jung; Hong, Sung Pil; Kim, Tae Il; Kim, Won Ho; Cheon, Jae Hee

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims In patients with corticosteroid-refractory ulcerative colitis (UC), cyclosporine or infliximab may be added to the treatment regimen to induce remission. Here, we aimed to compare the efficacy of cyclosporine and infliximab. Methods Between January 1995 and May 2012, the medical records of 43 patients with corticosteroid-refractory UC who received either infliximab or cyclosporine as a rescue therapy at a tertiary care hospital in Korea were reviewed. Results Among the 43 patients, 10 underwent rescue therapy with cyclosporine and the remaining 33 patients received infliximab. A follow-up of 12 months was completed for all patients. The colectomy rate at 12 months was 30% and 3% in the cyclosporine and the infliximab groups, respectively (p=0.034). However, the Cox proportional hazard model indicated that the treatment of rescue therapy was not an independent associate factor for preventing colectomy (p=0.164). In the subgroup analysis, infliximab with azathioprine was superior to cyclosporine for preventing colectomy (hazard ratio of infliximab with azathioprine compared with cyclosporine only, 0.073; 95% confidence interval, 0.008 to 0.629). Conclusions No difference between infliximab and cyclosporine with respect to preventing colectomy was noted. However, infliximab with azathioprine may be more effective than cyclosporine alone for preventing colectomy. PMID:25473080

  9. [Venous ulcer].

    PubMed

    Böhler, Kornelia

    2016-06-01

    Venous disorders causing a permanent increase in venous pressure are by far the most frequent reason for ulcers of the lower extremity. With a prevalence of 1 % in the general population rising to 4 % in the elderly over 80 and its chronic character, 1 % of healthcare budgets of the western world are spent on treatment of venous ulcers. A thorough investigation of the underlying venous disorder is the prerequisite for a differenciated therapy. This should comprise elimination of venous reflux as well as local wound management. Chronic ulcers can successfully be treated by shave therapy and split skin grafting. Compression therapy is a basic measure not only in venous ulcer treatment but also in prevention of ulcer recurrence. Differential diagnosis which have to be considered are arterial ulcers, vasculitis and neoplasms. PMID:27405863

  10. Palatal ulceration.

    PubMed

    Sardana, Kabir; Bansal, Shuchi

    2014-01-01

    Palatal ulcers are a common presentation and can be conveniently divided into developmental and acquired causes, the latter of which is subdivided into acute and chronic causes. Most commonly seen dermatologic causes have associated skin manifestations. Acute and multiple ulcers are usually infectious or drug induced in origin. Recurrent ulcers are largely dominated by aphthosis, while chronic ulcers are seen in immunocompromised patients and can occasionally be malignant. It is essential to involve the oral and maxillofacial surgeons early in the therapeutic management to tackle the inevitable complications that may ensue in the chronic cases. PMID:25441477

  11. Martorell's ulcer.

    PubMed Central

    Shutler, S. D.; Baragwanath, P.; Harding, K. G.

    1995-01-01

    This paper reports a rare form of ulceration of the lower leg and, as a result of subsequent investigations and literature review, readdresses a recent debate regarding the legitimate classification of these ulcers as a separate disease entity. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8552533

  12. Venous ulcers.

    PubMed

    Reichenberg, Jason; Davis, Mark

    2005-12-01

    Veneous ulcers are extremely common, accounting for a large proportin of all lower extremity ulcers. Due to their chronicity and relatively high prevalence, their impact on the cost of healthcare and the lives of the patients affected is quite significant. There has been progress in understanding the pathophysiology, clinical features, and diagnosis of these ulcers, but the basic principles of care have remained consistent for almost a half century. To allow for optimal healing, it is important to maintain a clean moist wound bed, treat any clinically significant infection, and decrease surrounding edema. PMID:16387266

  13. Stomach ulcer

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... are absorbed in the small intestine. It produces acid and various enzymes that break down food into ... wall of the stomach is protected from the acid and enzymes by a mucous lining. Ulcers are ...

  14. Mouth ulcers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Canker sores Gingivostomatitis Herpes simplex ( fever blister ) Leukoplakia Oral cancer Oral lichen planus Oral thrush A skin sore ... bacterial infection of ulcers Dental infections ( tooth abscesses ) Oral cancer Spread of contagious disorders to other people When ...

  15. Mouth ulcers

    MedlinePlus

    ... by many disorders. These include: Canker sores Gingivostomatitis Herpes simplex ( fever blister ) Leukoplakia Oral cancer Oral lichen planus Oral thrush A skin sore caused by histoplasmosis may also appear as a mouth ulcer.

  16. Stomach ulcer

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... the small intestine. It produces acid and various enzymes that break down food into simple substances. The ... the stomach is protected from the acid and enzymes by a mucous lining. Ulcers are caused when ...

  17. Ulcerative colitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... of nonhospitalized ulcerative colitis: the Toronto consensus. Gastroenterology . 2015;148(5):1035-58. PMID: 25747596 www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25747596 . Burger D, Travis S. Conventional medical management of inflammatory bowel ...

  18. The Impact of Clinical Information on the Assessment of Endoscopic Activity: Characteristics of the Ulcerative Colitis Endoscopic Index Of Severity [UCEIS

    PubMed Central

    Schnell, Dan; Feagan, Brian G.; Abreu, Maria T.; Altman, Douglas G.; Hanauer, Stephen B.; Krzeski, Piotr; Lichtenstein, Gary R.; Marteau, Philippe R.; Mary, Jean-Yves; Reinisch, Walter; Sands, Bruce E.; Schnell, Patrick; Yacyshyn, Bruce R.; Colombel, Jean-Frédéric; Bernhardt, Christian A.; Sandborn, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: To determine whether clinical information influences endoscopic scoring by central readers using the Ulcerative Colitis Endoscopic Index of Severity [UCEIS; comprising ‘vascular pattern’, ‘bleeding’, ‘erosions and ulcers’]. Methods: Forty central readers performed 28 evaluations, including 2 repeats, from a library of 44 video sigmoidoscopies stratified by Mayo Clinic Score. Following training, readers were randomised to scoring with [‘unblinded’, n = 20, including 4 control videos with misleading information] or without [‘blinded’, n 20] clinical information. A total of 21 virtual Central Reader Groups [CRGs], of three blinded readers, were created. Agreement criteria were pre-specified. Kappa [κ] statistics quantified intra- and inter-reader variability. Results: Mean UCEIS scores did not differ between blinded and unblinded readers for any of the 40 main videos. UCEIS standard deviations [SD] were similar [median blinded 0.94, unblinded 0.93; p = 0.97]. Correlation between UCEIS and visual analogue scale [VAS] assessment of overall severity was high [r blinded = 0.90, unblinded = 0.93; p = 0.02]. Scores for control videos were similar [UCEIS: p ≥ 0.55; VAS: p ≥ 0.07]. Intra- [κ 0.47–0.74] and inter-reader [κ 0.40–0.53] variability for items and full UCEIS was ‘moderate’-to-‘substantial’, with no significant differences except for intra-reader variability for erosions and ulcers [κ blinded: 0.47 vs unblinded: 0.74; p 0.047]. The SD of CRGs was lower than for individual central readers [0.54 vs 0.95; p < 0.001]. Correlation between blinded UCEIS and patient-reported symptoms was high [stool frequency: 0.76; rectal bleeding: 0.82; both: 0.81]. Conclusions: The UCEIS is minimally affected by knowledge of clinical details, strongly correlates with patient-reported symptoms, and is a suitable instrument for trials. CRGs performed better than individuals. PMID:25956538

  19. Foscarnet-induced penile ulceration.

    PubMed

    Torres, T; Fernandes, I; Sanches, M; Selores, M

    2011-01-01

    Foscarnet is used to treat herpes viruses, including drug-resistant cytomegalovirus (CMV) and herpes simplex viruses types 1 and 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2). There are some reports of intravenous foscarnet-induced penile and vulvar ulceration. The authors report a case of the development of severe penile ulcers after the initiation of intravenous foscarnet therapy. PMID:21879205

  20. Pyoderma gangrenosum in ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Misra, S P; Singh, S K; Chari, S T; Sarin, S K; Anand, B S

    1991-07-01

    We present a patient with pyoderma gangrenosum, a rare complication of ulcerative colitis. The patient's disease was limited to the distal colon, was clinically mild and responded quickly to treatment, and yet it was associated with pyoderma gangrenosum and arthritis, complications generally associated with more severe and extensive ulcerative colitis. PMID:1839305

  1. Prospective study on Incontinence-Associated Dermatitis and its Severity instrument for verifying its ability to predict the development of pressure ulcers in patients with fecal incontinence.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyung Hee; Choi, Heejung

    2016-03-01

    Fecal incontinence with loose stools is a risk factor for skin damage that may develop into a pressure ulcer (PU). The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility of applying the Incontinence-Associated Dermatitis and its Severity (IADS) instrument to patients with fecal incontinence as a tool to predict PU development. This prospective study enrolled 120 intensive care unit patients with bowel incontinence of Bristol Stool type 5, 6, and 7. Trained nurses evaluated IADS scores and the occurrence of PUs daily for 7 days. Patients with higher IADS scores were significantly more likely to develop a PU (odds ratio = 1·22, 95% confidence interval = 1·12-1·33). The receiver operating characteristic curve analysis revealed the area under curve to be 0·790, suggesting that higher IADS scores are associated with an increased likelihood of developing a PU (sensitivity 72·5%, specificity 71·2%, using a cut-off value of 8/9). Our results suggest that the IADS instrument can serve as a tool for predicting the occurrence of PUs in patients with fecal incontinence. Patients with IADS scores that exceed eight points should be classified as being at risk of developing a PU, and placed under intensive care as a proactive measure to prevent PU development. PMID:26847935

  2. Methods to elicit experts' beliefs over uncertain quantities: application to a cost effectiveness transition model of negative pressure wound therapy for severe pressure ulceration.

    PubMed

    Soares, Marta O; Bojke, Laura; Dumville, Jo; Iglesias, Cynthia; Cullum, Nicky; Claxton, Karl

    2011-08-30

    We can use decision models to estimate cost effectiveness, quantify uncertainty regarding the adoption decision and provide estimates of the value of further research. In many cases, the existence of only limited data with which to populate a decision model can mean that a cost-effectiveness analysis either does not proceed or may misrepresent the degree of uncertainty associated with model inputs. An example is the case of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) used to treat severe pressure ulceration, for which the evidence base is limited and sparse. There is, however, substantial practical experience of using this treatment and its comparators. We can capture this knowledge quantitatively to inform a cost-effectiveness model by eliciting beliefs from experts. This paper describes the design and conduct of an elicitation exercise to generate estimates of multiple uncertain model inputs and validate analytical assumptions for a decision model on the use of NPWT. In designing the exercise, the primary focus was the use of elicitation to inform decision models (multistate models), where representations of uncertain beliefs need to be probabilistically coherent. This paper demonstrates that it is feasible to collect formally elicited evidence to inform decision models. PMID:21748773

  3. Cost-effectiveness of adalimumab, infliximab or vedolizumab as first-line biological therapy in moderate-to-severe ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Yokomizo, Lauren; Limketkai, Berkeley; Park, K T

    2016-01-01

    Background There are no head-to-head randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing the effectiveness of biologics in ulcerative colitis (UC). We aimed to assess the cost-effectiveness of adalimumab, infliximab and vedolizumab as first-line agents to induce clinical remission and mucosal healing (MH) in UC. Methods We constructed a decision tree based on a payer's perspective in the USA to estimate the first year costs of adalimumab, infliximab or vedolizumab to achieve clinical remission and MH in patients with moderate-to-severe UC. Transition probabilities were derived from ACT, ULTRA and GEMINI RCT data. Costs were derived from Medicare reimbursement rates and wholesale drug prices. Results Assuming a biological-naïve cohort, infliximab 5 mg/kg every 8 weeks was more cost-effective ($99 171 per MH achieved) than adalimumab 40 mg every other week ($316 378 per MH achieved) and vedolizumab every 8 weeks ($301 969 per MH achieved) at 1 year. Non-drug administration cost of infliximab exceeding $1974 per infusion would make adalimumab more cost-effective. First-line UC therapy with vedolizumab would be cost-effective if the drug acquisition price was <$2537 for each 300 mg administration during the 1-year time horizon. Conclusions If non-drug costs of infliximab administration are not excessive (<$2000), infliximab is the most cost-effective first-line biologic for moderate-to-severe UC. Exceeding this threshold infusion-related cost would make adalimumab the more cost-effective therapy. Considering its drug costs in the USA, vedolizumab appears to be appropriately used as a second-line biologic after antitumour necrosis factor failure. PMID:27195130

  4. Efficacy and Safety of Adalimumab in Moderately to Severely Active Cases of Ulcerative Colitis: A Meta-Analysis of Published Placebo-Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zong Mei; Li, Wei; Jiang, Xue Liang

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims To evaluate the efficacy and safety of adalimumab (ADA) in moderately to severely active ulcerative colitis (UC) patients who are unresponsive to traditional therapy. Methods Electronic databases, including the PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane databases, were searched to April 20, 2014. UC-related randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared ADA with placebo were eligible. Review Manager 5.1 was used for data analysis. Results This meta-analysis included three RCTs. ADA was considerably more effective compared with a placebo, and it increased the ratio of patients with clinical remission, clinical responses, mucosal healing and inflammatory bowel disease questionnaire responses in the induction and maintenance phases (p<0.05), as well as patients with steroid-free remission (p<0.05) during the maintenance phase. Clinical remission was achieved in a greater number of UC cases in the ADA 160/80/40 mg groups (0/2/4 week, every other week) compared with the placebo group at week 8 (p=0.006) and week 52 (p=0.0002), whereas the week 8 clinical remission rate was equivalent between the ADA 80/40 mg groups and the placebo group. Among the patients who received immunomodulators (IMM) at baseline, ADA was superior to the placebo in terms of inducing clinical remission (p=0.01). Between-group differences were not observed in terms of serious adverse events (p=0.61). Conclusions ADA, particularly at doses of 160/80/40 mg (0/2/4 week, every other week), is effective and safe in patients with moderate-to-severe UC who are unresponsive to traditional treatment. Concomitant IMM therapy may improve the short-term therapeutic efficacy of ADA. PMID:26780088

  5. [Ulcerative colitis].

    PubMed

    Lopetuso, Loris; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2016-06-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), such as Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), are chronic, relapsing inflammatory disorders of the digestive tract resulting from dysregulated immune responses toward environmental factors in genetically predisposed individuals. This review focus on what is the state of the art of UC pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment and how any future findings could drive our clinical practice. PMID:27362722

  6. Peptic Ulcers

    MedlinePlus

    ... is a good alternative to NSAIDs for most childhood conditions. Signs and Symptoms Although peptic ulcers are rare in kids, if your child has any of these signs and symptoms, call your doctor: burning pain in the abdomen between the breastbone and the belly button (the ...

  7. Pressure Ulcer Prevention

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Executive Summary In April 2008, the Medical Advisory Secretariat began an evidence-based review of the literature concerning pressure ulcers. Please visit the Medical Advisory Secretariat Web site, http://www.health.gov.on.ca/english/providers/program/mas/tech/tech_mn.html to review these titles that are currently available within the Pressure Ulcers series. Pressure ulcer prevention: an evidence based analysis The cost-effectiveness of prevention strategies for pressure ulcers in long-term care homes in Ontario: projections of the Ontario Pressure Ulcer Model (field evaluation) Management of chronic pressure ulcers: an evidence-based analysis (anticipated pubicstion date - mid-2009) Purpose A pressure ulcer, also known as a pressure sore, decubitus ulcer, or bedsore, is defined as a localized injury to the skin/and or underlying tissue occurring most often over a bony prominence and caused by pressure, shear, or friction, alone or in combination. (1) Those at risk for developing pressure ulcers include the elderly and critically ill as well as persons with neurological impairments and those who suffer conditions associated with immobility. Pressure ulcers are graded or staged with a 4-point classification system denoting severity. Stage I represents the beginnings of a pressure ulcer and stage IV, the severest grade, consists of full thickness tissue loss with exposed bone, tendon, and or muscle. (1) In a 2004 survey of Canadian health care settings, Woodbury and Houghton (2) estimated that the prevalence of pressure ulcers at a stage 1 or greater in Ontario ranged between 13.1% and 53% with nonacute health care settings having the highest prevalence rate (Table 1). Executive Summary Table 1: Prevalence of Pressure Ulcers* Setting Canadian Prevalence,% (95% CI) Ontario Prevalence,Range % (n) Acute care 25 (23.8–26.3) 23.9–29.7 (3418) Nonacute care† 30 (29.3–31.4) 30.0–53.3 (1165) Community care 15 (13.4–16.8) 13.2 (91) Mixed health care‡ 22 (20.9

  8. Complete resolution of non-necrotizing lung granuloma and pyoderma gangrenosum after restorative proctocolectomy in a woman with severe ulcerative colitis and cytomegalovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Sartini, Alessandro; Bianchini, Marcello; Schepis, Filippo; Marzi, Luca; De Maria, Nicola; Villa, Erica

    2016-02-01

    Here, we report the unusual case of an ulcerative colitis female patient presenting together with cytomegalovirus infection, pyoderma gangrenosum and a noncaseating lung granuloma, both resistant to immunomodulatory drugs which dramatically obtained a clinical stable remission after restorative proctocolectomy. PMID:26862424

  9. Selective treatment of duodenal ulcer with perforation.

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, A J; Vinson, T L; Maulsby, G O; Gewin, J R

    1979-01-01

    Selective treatment of duodenal ulcer with perforation has been based on several premises: 1) The natural history of the ulcer following closure of a perforation is generally favorable with an acute and unfavorable with a chronic ulcer. 2) An upper gastrointestinal series with water soluble contrast media can reliably document a spontaneously sealed perforation. 3) With a spontaneous seal, nonsurgical therapy is an acceptable option and is preferable for an acute ulcer or a chronic ulcer with poor surgical risk. 4) The treatment of choice for an unsealed perforation of an acute ulcer is simple surgical closure. 5) The treatment of choice of perforation of a chronic ulcer with acceptable surgical risk is an ulcer definitive operation. Sixty cases of perforation of duodenal ulcer have been treated. Nonsurgical therapy was employed without complication in eight cases with radiologically documented spontaneous seal. Truncal vagotomy and pyloroplasty in 36 cases and truncal vagotomy and antrectomy in two cases were each without mortality. Four fatalities occurred among 13 cases of closure and omental patch, each a case with severe associated disease. The mortality was 6.7% among the 60 cases; 2.4% for chronic ulcer and 16% for acute ulcer. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:443915

  10. Venous Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Caprini, J.A.; Partsch, H.; Simman, R.

    2013-01-01

    Venous leg ulcers are the most frequent form of wounds seen in patients. This article presents an overview on some practical aspects concerning diagnosis, differential diagnosis and treatment. Duplex ultrasound investigations are essential to ascertain the diagnosis of the underlying venous pathology and to treat venous refluxes. Differential diagnosis includes mainly other vascular lesions (arterial, microcirculatory causes), hematologic and metabolic diseases, trauma, infection, malignancies. Patients with superficial venous incompetence may benefit from endovenous or surgical reflux abolition diagnosed by Duplex ultrasound. The most important basic component of the management is compression therapy, for which we prefer materials with low elasticity applied with high initial pressure (short-stretch bandages and Velcro-strap devices). Local treatment should be simple, absorbing and not sticky dressings keeping adequate moisture balance after debridement of necrotic tissue and biofilms are preferred. After the ulcer is healed compression therapy should be continued in order to prevent recurrence. PMID:26236636

  11. Anti-ulcer Activity.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    This chapter explains the procedure of ethanol-induced ulcer to check the protective effect of drugs over induced ulcer in rats. Ulcer is defined as the erosion in the lining of the stomach or duodenum and is caused by the disruptions of the gastric mucosal defence and repair systems. Ulceration of stomach is called gastric ulcer and that of duodenum is called duodenal ulcer and together peptic ulcer. In clinical practice, peptic ulcer is one of the most prevalent gastrointestinal disorders, which commonly occurs in developed countries. PMID:26939278

  12. Reversal of Refractory Ulcerative Colitis and Severe Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Symptoms Arising from Immune Disturbance in an HLADR/DQ Genetically Susceptible Individual with Multiple Biotoxin Exposures

    PubMed Central

    Gunn, Shelly R.; Gibson Gunn, G.; Mueller, Francis W.

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 25 Final Diagnosis: Ulcerative colitis and chronic fatigue syndrome Symptoms: Colitis • profound fatigue • multi-joint pain • cognitive impairment • corneal keratitis Medication: — Clinical Procedure: VIP replacement therapy Specialty: Family Medicine Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Patients with multisymptom chronic conditions, such as refractory ulcerative colitis (RUC) and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), present diagnostic and management challenges for clinicians, as well as the opportunity to recognize and treat emerging disease entities. In the current case we report reversal of co-existing RUC and CFS symptoms arising from biotoxin exposures in a genetically susceptible individual. Case Report: A 25-year-old previously healthy male with new-onset refractory ulcerative colitis (RUC) and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) tested negative for autoimmune disease biomarkers. However, urine mycotoxin panel testing was positive for trichothecene group and air filter testing from the patient’s water-damaged rental house identified the toxic mold Stachybotrys chartarum. HLA-DR/DQ testing revealed a multisusceptible haplotype for development of chronic inflammation, and serum chronic inflammatory response syndrome (CIRS) biomarker testing was positive for highly elevated TGF-beta and a clinically undetectable level of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). Following elimination of biotoxin exposures, VIP replacement therapy, dental extractions, and implementation of a mind body intervention-relaxation response (MBI-RR) program, the patient’s symptoms resolved. He is off medications, back to work, and resuming normal exercise. Conclusions: This constellation of RUC and CFS symptoms in an HLA-DR/DQ genetically susceptible individual with biotoxin exposures is consistent with the recently described CIRS disease pathophysiology. Chronic immune disturbance (turbatio immuno) can be identified with clinically available CIRS biomarkers and

  13. Severe anemia, gastric ulcer, pneumonitis and cholangitis in a liver transplant patient: multiple organic dysfunction and one etiology: a case report.

    PubMed

    García-Pajares, F; Santos-Santamarta, F; Fernández-Fontecha, E; Sánchez-Ocaña, R; Amo-Alonso, R; Loza-Vargas, A; Madrigal, B; Pérez-Saborido, B; Almohalla, C; Sánchez-Antolín, G

    2015-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is the most common viral pathogen that negatively affects the outcome of liver transplantation. CMV causes febrile illness often accompanied by bone marrow suppression, and in some cases it invades tissues, including the transplanted allograft. In addition, CMV has been significantly associated with an increased predisposition to allograft rejection, accelerated hepatitis C recurrence, and other opportunistic infections, as well as reduced overall patient and allograft survivals. We carried out a study on a Spanish adult liver transplant recipient who rapidly presented anemia and was diagnosed as having Coomb negative (nonimmune) hemolytic anemia, gastric ulcer, pneumonitis, and cholangitis associated with a CMV infection. PMID:25645792

  14. Nutrition management of pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Doley, Jennifer

    2010-02-01

    Despite our knowledge of how to prevent pressure ulcers, and improvements in treatment, pressure ulcers remain prevalent and impose a significant burden on financial and labor resources in the healthcare industry. Although there is no known role for specific nutrients in the prevention of pressure ulcers, undernutrition is a risk factor, and nutrition therapy plays a crucial role in pressure ulcer treatment. Limitations in research make it difficult to develop evidence-based nutrition guidelines, so it is important that clinicians conduct a comprehensive assessment that includes weight and intake history, biochemical data, and comorbidities as well as symptoms that may affect the intake, absorption, or excretion of nutrients. These data, combined with clinical judgment, must be used to estimate energy and protein needs, considering the size and severity of the pressure ulcer. Micronutriture is difficult to assess; usual intake, comorbidities and disease symptoms must be considered in addition to biochemical data. Micronutrients should be replaced if depleted, but routine supplementation of vitamins and minerals in all pressure ulcer patients is not warranted. PMID:20130157

  15. Pressure ulcer prevention in frail older people.

    PubMed

    Barry, Maree; Nugent, Linda

    2015-12-16

    Pressure ulcers are painful and cause discomfort, have a negative effect on quality of life, and are costly to treat. The incidence and severity of preventable pressure ulcers is an important indicator of quality of care; it is essential that healthcare providers monitor prevalence and incidence rates to ensure that care strategies implemented are effective. Frail older people are at increased risk of developing pressure ulcers. This article discusses the complexities of preventing pressure ulcers in frail older people and emphasises the importance of structured educational programmes that incorporate effective clinical leadership and multidisciplinary teamwork. PMID:26669407

  16. Refractory leg ulcers associated with Klinefelter syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yabuno, Yuto; Tosa, Mamiko; Iwakiri, Itaru; Nomoto, Shunichi; Kaneko, Mayuko; Kuwahara, Kousuke; Hyakusoku, Hiko; Murakami, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    We present a man with refractory leg ulcers, bilateral varicosis of the lower extremities, and Buerger disease. Autoimmune work-up was negative. However, chromosome analysis showed Klinefelter syndrome (48 XXY). Ulcerative lesions of the lower extremities are a complication of Klinefelter syndrome. To date, the pathogenesis of ulcers in Klinefelter syndrome has not been clarified, but several factors, such as abnormalities of fibrinolysis and prothrombotic states, might be involved. Our present case emphasizes the importance of considering Klinefelter syndrome in the differential diagnosis of a male patient with nonhealing ulcers of the lower extremities. PMID:25797879

  17. Mesenchymal stromal cell therapy is associated with increased adenovirus-associated but not cytomegalovirus-associated mortality in children with severe acute graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Calkoen, Friso G J; Vervat, Carly; van Halteren, Astrid G S; Welters, Marij J P; Veltrop-Duits, Louise A; Lankester, Arjan C; Egeler, R Maarten; Ball, Lynne M; van Tol, Maarten J D

    2014-08-01

    Beneficial effects of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) in patients with severe steroid-refractory acute graft-versus-host disease (aGvHD) have been reported. However, controversy exists about the effect of MSCs on virus-specific T cells. We evaluated 56 patients with grade II-IV aGvHD who responded to steroids (n = 21) or were steroid refractory receiving either MSCs (n = 22) or other second-line therapy (n = 13). Although the overall incidence of cytomegalovirus (CMV), Epstein-Barr virus, and human adenovirus (HAdV) infections was not significantly increased, HAdV infection was associated with decreased survival in children treated with MSCs. Thus, we investigated in vitro the effects of MSCs on virus-specific T cells. Both CMV-specific and, to a lesser extent, HAdV-specific T-cell activation and proliferation were negatively affected by MSCs either after induction of a response in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) or after restimulation of virus-specific T-cell lines. In patient-derived PBMCs, CMV-specific proliferative responses were greatly decreased on first-line treatment of aGvHD with systemic steroids and slowly recovered after MSC administration and tapering of steroids. HAdV-specific T-cell proliferation could not be detected. In contrast, the proportion of CMV- and HAdV-specific effector T cells, measured as interferon-γ-secreting cells, remained stable or increased after treatment with MSCs. In conclusion, although in vitro experimental conditions indicated a negative impact of MSCs on CMV- and HAdV-specific T-cell responses, no solid evidence was obtained to support such an effect of MSCs on T-cell responses in vivo. Still, the susceptibility of steroid-refractory severe aGvHD patients to viral reactivation warrants critical viral monitoring during randomized controlled trials on second-line treatment including MSCs. PMID:24904175

  18. Reversal of Refractory Ulcerative Colitis and Severe Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Symptoms Arising from Immune Disturbance in an HLA-DR/DQ Genetically Susceptible Individual with Multiple Biotoxin Exposures.

    PubMed

    Gunn, Shelly R; Gunn, G Gibson; Mueller, Francis W

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Patients with multisymptom chronic conditions, such as refractory ulcerative colitis (RUC) and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), present diagnostic and management challenges for clinicians, as well as the opportunity to recognize and treat emerging disease entities. In the current case we report reversal of co-existing RUC and CFS symptoms arising from biotoxin exposures in a genetically susceptible individual. CASE REPORT A 25-year-old previously healthy male with new-onset refractory ulcerative colitis (RUC) and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) tested negative for autoimmune disease biomarkers. However, urine mycotoxin panel testing was positive for trichothecene group and air filter testing from the patient's water-damaged rental house identified the toxic mold Stachybotrys chartarum. HLA-DR/DQ testing revealed a multisusceptible haplotype for development of chronic inflammation, and serum chronic inflammatory response syndrome (CIRS) biomarker testing was positive for highly elevated TGF-beta and a clinically undetectable level of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). Following elimination of biotoxin exposures, VIP replacement therapy, dental extractions, and implementation of a mind body intervention-relaxation response (MBI-RR) program, the patient's symptoms resolved. He is off medications, back to work, and resuming normal exercise. CONCLUSIONS This constellation of RUC and CFS symptoms in an HLA-DR/DQ genetically susceptible individual with biotoxin exposures is consistent with the recently described CIRS disease pathophysiology. Chronic immune disturbance (turbatio immuno) can be identified with clinically available CIRS biomarkers and may represent a treatable underlying disease etiology in a subset of genetically susceptible patients with RUC, CFS, and other immune disorders. PMID:27165859

  19. Medical management of venous ulcers.

    PubMed

    Pascarella, Luigi; Shortell, Cynthia K

    2015-03-01

    Venous disease is the most common cause of chronic leg ulceration and represents an advanced clinical manifestation of venous insufficiency. Due to their frequency and chronicity, venous ulcers have a high socioeconomic impact, with treatment costs accounting for 1% of the health care budget in Western countries. The evaluation of patients with venous ulcers should include a thorough medical history for prior deep venous thrombosis, assessment for an hypercoagulable state, and a physical examination. Use of the CEAP (clinical, etiology, anatomy, pathophysiology) Classification System and the revised Venous Clinical Severity Scoring System is strongly recommended to characterize disease severity and assess response to treatment. This venous condition requires lifestyle modification, with affected individuals performing daily intervals of leg elevation to control edema; use of elastic compression garments; and moderate physical activity, such as walking wearing below-knee elastic stockings. Meticulous skin care, treatment of dermatitis, and prompt treatment of cellulitis are important aspects of medical management. The pharmacology of chronic venous insufficiency and venous ulcers include essentially two medications: pentoxifylline and phlebotropic agents. The micronized purified flavonoid fraction is an effective adjunct to compression therapy in patients with large, chronic ulceration. PMID:26358306

  20. Noninfectious genital ulcers.

    PubMed

    Kirshen, Carly; Edwards, Libby

    2015-12-01

    Noninfectious genital ulcers are much more common than ulcers arising from infections. Still, it is important to take a thorough history of sexual activity and a sexual abuse screen. A physical exam should include skin, oral mucosa, nails, hair, vulva, and vaginal mucosa if needed. The differential diagnosis of noninfectious genital ulcers includes: lipschütz ulcers, complex aphthosis, Behçet's syndrome, vulvar metastatic Crohn's disease, hidradenitis suppurativa, pyoderma gangrenosum, pressure ulcers, and malignancies. It is important to come to the correct diagnosis to avoid undue testing, stress, and anxiety in patients experiencing genital ulcerations. PMID:26650697

  1. Assessment of Disease-Related Therapeutic Protein Drug-Drug Interaction for Etrolizumab in Patients With Moderately to Severely Active Ulcerative Colitis.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaohui; Kenny, Jane R; Dickmann, Leslie; Maciuca, Romeo; Looney, Caroline; Tang, Meina T

    2016-06-01

    The efficacy and safety of etrolizumab, a humanized IgG1 mAb, were evaluated in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) in a phase 2 study (EUCALYPTUS). The current study assessed the risk of therapeutic protein drug-drug interaction (TP-DDI) of etrolizumab on CYP3A activity in patients with UC. Literature review was performed to compare serum proinflammatory cytokine levels and pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters of CYP3A substrate drugs between patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and healthy subjects. Treatment effect of etrolizumab on CYP3A activity was evaluated by measuring colonic CYP3A4 mRNA expression and serum C-reactive protein (CRP) in EUCALYPTUS patients. Literature data suggested similar levels between IBD patients and healthy subjects for serum proinflammatory cytokines and PK parameters of CYP3A substrate drugs. Additionally, treatment with etrolizumab did not change colonic CYP3A4 mRNA expression or serum CRP levels in UC patients. In conclusion, our results indicate a low TP-DDI risk for etrolizumab in UC patients, particularly on medications metabolized by CYP3A. PMID:26412221

  2. Autologous mesenchymal stem cells applied on the pressure ulcers had produced a surprising outcome in a severe case of neuromyelitis optica

    PubMed Central

    Dulamea, Adriana Octaviana; Sirbu-Boeti, Mirela-Patricia; Bleotu, Coralia; Dragu, Denisa; Moldovan, Lucia; Lupescu, Ioana; Comi, Giancarlo

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies provided evidence that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have regenerative potential in cutaneous repair and profound immunomodulatory properties making them a candidate for therapy of neuroimmunologic diseases. Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is an autoimmune, demyelinating central nervous system disorder characterized by a longitudinally extensive spinal cord lesion. A 46-year-old male diagnosed with NMO had relapses with paraplegia despite treatment and developed two stage IV pressure ulcers (PUs) on his legs. The patient consented for local application of autologous MSCs on PUs. MSCs isolated from the patient's bone marrow aspirate were multiplied in vitro during three passages and embedded in a tridimensional collagen-rich matrix which was applied on the PUs. Eight days after MSCs application the patient showed a progressive healing of PUs and improvement of disability. Two months later the patient was able to walk 20 m with bilateral assistance and one year later he started to walk without assistance. For 76 months the patient had no relapse and no adverse event was reported. The original method of local application of autologous BM-MSCs contributed to healing of PUs. For 6 years the patient was free of relapses and showed an improvement of disability. The association of cutaneous repair, sustained remission of NMO and improvement of disability might be explained by a promotion/optimization of recovery mechanisms in the central nervous system even if alternative hypothesis should be considered. Further studies are needed to assess the safety and efficacy of mesenchymal stem cells in NMO treatment. PMID:26807122

  3. Autologous mesenchymal stem cells applied on the pressure ulcers had produced a surprising outcome in a severe case of neuromyelitis optica.

    PubMed

    Dulamea, Adriana Octaviana; Sirbu-Boeti, Mirela-Patricia; Bleotu, Coralia; Dragu, Denisa; Moldovan, Lucia; Lupescu, Ioana; Comi, Giancarlo

    2015-11-01

    Recent studies provided evidence that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have regenerative potential in cutaneous repair and profound immunomodulatory properties making them a candidate for therapy of neuroimmunologic diseases. Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is an autoimmune, demyelinating central nervous system disorder characterized by a longitudinally extensive spinal cord lesion. A 46-year-old male diagnosed with NMO had relapses with paraplegia despite treatment and developed two stage IV pressure ulcers (PUs) on his legs. The patient consented for local application of autologous MSCs on PUs. MSCs isolated from the patient's bone marrow aspirate were multiplied in vitro during three passages and embedded in a tridimensional collagen-rich matrix which was applied on the PUs. Eight days after MSCs application the patient showed a progressive healing of PUs and improvement of disability. Two months later the patient was able to walk 20 m with bilateral assistance and one year later he started to walk without assistance. For 76 months the patient had no relapse and no adverse event was reported. The original method of local application of autologous BM-MSCs contributed to healing of PUs. For 6 years the patient was free of relapses and showed an improvement of disability. The association of cutaneous repair, sustained remission of NMO and improvement of disability might be explained by a promotion/optimization of recovery mechanisms in the central nervous system even if alternative hypothesis should be considered. Further studies are needed to assess the safety and efficacy of mesenchymal stem cells in NMO treatment. PMID:26807122

  4. Peptic Ulcer Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... stomach and duodenum to diagnose or treat disease. Erosion – a very shallow sore, similar to an abrasion ... Ulcer – an open sore. Ulcers are deeper than erosions. Author(s) and Publication Date(s) Sean P. Caufield, MD, ...

  5. Diabetes - foot ulcers

    MedlinePlus

    ... ulcer has healed. These devices will take the pressure off of the ulcer area. This will help speed healing. Be sure to wear shoes that do not put a lot of pressure on only one part of your foot. Wear ...

  6. Acute genital ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Delgado-García, Silvia; Palacios-Marqués, Ana; Martínez-Escoriza, Juan Carlos; Martín-Bayón, Tina-Aurora

    2014-01-01

    Acute genital ulcers, also known as acute vulvar ulcers, ulcus vulvae acutum or Lipschütz ulcers, refer to an ulceration of the vulva or lower vagina of non-venereal origin that usually presents in young women, predominantly virgins. Although its incidence is unknown, it seems a rare entity, with few cases reported in the literature. Their aetiology and pathogenesis are still unknown. The disease is characterised by an acute onset of flu-like symptoms with single or multiple painful ulcers on the vulva. Diagnosis is mainly clinical, after exclusion of other causes of vulvar ulcers. The treatment is mainly symptomatic, with spontaneous resolution in 2 weeks and without recurrences in most cases. We present a case report of a 13-year-old girl with two episodes of acute ulcers that fit the clinical criteria for Lipschütz ulcers. PMID:24473429

  7. Facial ulcer treated with olanzapine.

    PubMed

    Lowry, C L; Bewley, A; Taylor, R

    2013-07-01

    A 69-year-old woman presented with a nonhealing ulcer on her right cheek. On histological examination of a biopsy, no evidence of granuloma formation or malignancy was found, and the overall picture was felt to be consistent with dermatitis artefacta (DA). The patient was referred to a joint psychodermatology clinic, where treatment with risperidone was started. However, at follow-up the ulcer remained unchanged, and treatment was changed to olanzapine 2.5 mg twice daily. Within 10 months, the large facial ulcer, which had been refractory to treatment for several years, had completely healed. Anxiolytics, antidepressants and low-dose antipsychotics have been shown to be helpful in the management of DA. Successful treatment with olanzapine has been described. The good clinical response to olanzapine may be attributed to its anti-impulsive effect, antihistaminic properties and low risk of parkinsonian side-effects. PMID:23611260

  8. Ulcerative Colitis: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Archambault, Andre

    1990-01-01

    Idiopathic ulcerative colitis primarily affects young adults. Colonic symptoms are the most annoying. In severe colitis, systemic and extraintestinal inflammatory manifestations can be disabling. Proximal extension of colitis is demonstrated by double-contrast barium enema and total colonoscopy. Bacterial and parasitic colitis must be excluded by appropriate microbiological studies. Colonoscopy is recommended to screen for high-grade dysplasia or neoplasia in cases of chronic diffuse colitis (after seven years). Severe colitis can benefit from hospitalization, parenteral nutritional support, and high doses of corticosteroids that are progressively tapered. Mild or moderate cases or severe cases in remission respond well to rest, low-irritant diets, mild symptomatic medication, oral sulfasalazine, or more recent 5-acetylsalicylic derivatives. Long-term maintenance with reduced dosages will control more than 80% of cases. PMID:21234051

  9. Probiotics and prebiotics in ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Derikx, Lauranne A A P; Dieleman, Levinus A; Hoentjen, Frank

    2016-02-01

    The intestinal microbiota is one of the key players in the etiology of ulcerative colitis. Manipulation of this microflora with probiotics and prebiotics is an attractive strategy in the management of ulcerative colitis. Several intervention studies for both the induction and maintenance of remission in ulcerative colitis patients have been performed. Most of these studies evaluated VSL#3 or E. Coli Nissle 1917 and in general there is evidence for efficacy of these agents for induction and maintenance of remission. However, studies are frequently underpowered, lack a control group, and are very heterogeneous investigating different probiotic strains in different study populations. The absence of well-powered robust randomized placebo-controlled trials impedes the widespread use of probiotics and prebiotics in ulcerative colitis. However, given the promising results that are currently available, probiotics and prebiotics may find their way to the treatment algorithm for ulcerative colitis in the near future. PMID:27048897

  10. [Diagnostic guideline of ulcerative colitis].

    PubMed

    Choi, Chang Hwan; Jung, Sung Ae; Lee, Bo In; Lee, Kang Moon; Kim, Joo Sung; Han, Dong Soo

    2009-03-01

    Ulcerative colitis is a chronic inflammatory disorder causing mucosal inflammation of the colorectum with crypt abnormality on biopsy. It affects the rectum and a variable extent of the colon in continuity. Ulcerative colitis is characterized by a relapsing and remitting course. It arises from an interaction between genetic and environmental factors, but the precise etiology is unknown. The incidence and prevalence in Korea are still low compared with those of Western countries, but have increased in recent years. There are many challenging issues on the diagnosis of ulcerative colitis, and sometimes these lead to differences in practice between clinicians. Therefore, IBD Study Group of KASID set out the Korean diagnostic guideline of ulcerative colitis. The diagnosis is based on clinical, endoscopic, radiologic, and histologic criteria. The symptoms are dependent upon the extent and severity of disease and most commonly include bloody diarrhea, rectal bleeding, and/or urgency. The systemic symptoms of malaise, tachycardia, fever, or weight loss are features of a severe attack. The laboratory findings may reveal leucocytosis, thrombocytosis, iron deficiency anemia, hypoalbuminemia, and elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein indicating severe disease activity or chronicity. For the elimination of infectious causes, microbial investigation with stool specimens should be performed for common enteric pathogens including assays for Clostridium difficile toxin, and sometimes for amoeba or other parasites. The most typical endoscopic features are continuous, confluent, and concentric colonic involvement proximal to the anal verge. Endoscopic severity may be best well reflected by the presence of mucosal friability, spontaneous bleeding, and deep ulcerations. Typical pathologic findings are composed of widespread crypt architectural distortion (cryptitis, crypt abscess, and crypt atrophy), heavy, diffuse lamina propria cell infiltration, and basal

  11. Compression and venous ulcers.

    PubMed

    Stücker, M; Link, K; Reich-Schupke, S; Altmeyer, P; Doerler, M

    2013-03-01

    Compression therapy is considered to be the most important conservative treatment of venous leg ulcers. Until a few years ago, compression bandages were regarded as first-line therapy of venous leg ulcers. However, to date medical compression stockings are the first choice of treatment. With respect to compression therapy of venous leg ulcers the following statements are widely accepted: 1. Compression improves the healing of ulcers when compared with no compression; 2. Multicomponent compression systems are more effective than single-component compression systems; 3. High compression is more effective than lower compression; 4. Medical compression stockings are more effective than compression with short stretch bandages. Healed venous leg ulcers show a high relapse rate without ongoing treatment. The use of medical stockings significantly reduces the amount of recurrent ulcers. Furthermore, the relapse rate of venous leg ulcers can be significantly reduced by a combination of compression therapy and surgery of varicose veins compared with compression therapy alone. PMID:23482538

  12. Risk factors for healing of duodenal ulcer under antacid treatment: do ulcer patients need individual treatment?

    PubMed

    Massarrat, S; Müller, H G; Schmitz-Moormann, P

    1988-03-01

    In order to identify the risk factors affecting the healing of duodenal ulcer, a clinical trial with effective dose of antacid was carried out in 53 patients. Duration of ulcer history, number of relapses, duration of the last and present relapse, number, duration and severity of pain attacks in the present ulcer relapse, pain radiation to back, vomiting, appetite, smoking habit, intake of analgesics and previous haemorrhage were registered. Number of ulcers, ulcer depth, bublar narrowing, erosions, duodenitis at initial endoscopy and healing of ulcer were assessed by one endoscopist. Basic and peak acid output were measured. The extent of duodenitis on the site opposite the ulcer was determined by histological examination. Sixty per cent of the duodenal ulcers were healed after three weeks. By univariate analysis, the following factors affect the healing; pain radiation to back and pain duration during treatment (p less than 0.001), multiple or deep ulcers, narrowing of duodenal bulb (p less than 0.01), number of pain attacks and poor appetite (p less than 0.05). By the stepwise logistic regression model, the following factors were selected as predictors for healing of duodenal ulcer with 76% correct classification: pain radiation to back (p = 0.002), deep ulcer (p = 0.013), multiple ulcers (p = 0.028). Number of cigarettes/day (p less than 0.007) and male sex (p = 0.036). By this model, the prediction of healing could be accurately assessed in 78% in a new sample. Individual treatment should be carried out on the basis of these factors. PMID:3356359

  13. Cutaneous leishmaniasis "chiclero's ulcer" in subtropical Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Calvopiña, Manuel; Martinez, Leonardo; Hashiguchi, Yoshihisa

    2013-08-01

    An 18-year-old female presented with a severe ulcerative lesion on her right ear of 6 weeks duration. Her right ear was edematous and erythematous with a large, painless ulcerative lesion covering a third of the pinna and satellite papular lesions on the posterior. She was diagnosed with chiclero's ulcer. A skin smear stained with Diff-quik showed abundant Leishmania parasites. Chiclero's ulcer is a rare clinical presentation and is typically severe and difficult to treat. Physicians in Ecuador recommend administering prolonged intramuscular Glucantime. Side effects are common and can be severe resulting in low patient compliance. Because of preferences of the patient and the large volume needed for her weight, we recommended topical treatment with a lotion of Glucantime mixed half and half with white Merthiolate. After applying this lotion to the lesion 3 to 4 times a day for 6 weeks, the lesion healed. PMID:23926136

  14. Small bowel ulcerative lesions are common in elderly NSAIDs users with peptic ulcer bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Tsibouris, Panagiotis; Kalantzis, Chissostomos; Apostolopoulos, Periklis; Zalonis, Antonios; Isaacs, Peter Edward Thomas; Hendrickse, Mark; Alexandrakis, Georgios

    2014-01-01

    bleeding recurrence most possibly attributed to small bowel ulcers, nevertheless 30-d mortality was zero. Presence of chronic obstructive lung disease and diabetes was related with unexplained recurrence of hemorrhage in logistic regression analysis, while absence of small bowel ulcers was protective (relative risk 0.13, P = 0.05). CONCLUSION: Among NSAID consumers, more bleeders than non-bleeders with peptic ulcers present small bowel ulcers; lesions related to more severe bleeding and unexplained episodes of bleeding recurrence. PMID:25512771

  15. Contact lens related corneal ulcer.

    PubMed

    Loh, Ky; Agarwal, P

    2010-01-01

    A corneal ulcer caused by infection is one of the major causes of blindness worldwide. One of the recent health concerns is the increasing incidence of corneal ulcers associated with contact lens user especially if the users fail to follow specific instruction in using their contact lenses. Risk factors associated with increased risk of contact lens related corneal ulcers are: overnight wear, long duration of continuous wear, lower socio-economic classes, smoking, dry eye and poor hygiene. The presenting symptoms of contact lens related corneal ulcers include eye discomfort, foreign body sensation and lacrimation. More serious symptoms are redness (especially circum-corneal injection), severe pain, photophobia, eye discharge and blurring of vision. The diagnosis is established by a thorough slit lamp microscopic examination with fluorescein staining and corneal scraping for Gram stain and culture of the infective organism. Delay in diagnosing and treatment can cause permanent blindness, therefore an early referral to ophthalmologist and commencing of antimicrobial therapy can prevent visual loss. PMID:25606178

  16. [Weight loss and healing of ulcers - case report].

    PubMed

    Seremet, Jasmina; Laginja, Stanislava; Marinović, Marin

    2013-10-01

    Diabetes mellitus type 2 is one of the most common diseases with a prevalence increasing with age. If blood sugar is not controlled, complications arise and diabetic foot ulcer occurs. Depending on the blood vessels involved, we distinguish venous and arterial ulcers. Venous ulcers respond very well to modern methods of treatment such as compression therapy and hydrocolloid dressings, but for arterial ulcer prevention is most significant, e.g. weight loss, dietary modification, etc. The aim of this study was to show that despite all the available therapeutic options, we cannot cure ulcers completely because the patient's readiness to change his lifestyle plays a decisive role. Therefore, we present a patient having suffered from venous ulcers for several years and arterial ulcer that healed only after the patient had lost about 20 pounds. PMID:24371990

  17. 'Kissing' duodenal ulcers.

    PubMed

    Stabile, B E; Hardy, H J; Passaro, E

    1979-10-01

    Among 70 cases of perforated duodenal ulcers treated by plication, eight were complicated by massive postoperative hemorrhage from a syncronous posterior "kissing" duodenal ulcer. Critical analysis revealed that only signs of gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding preoperatively had predictive value for postoperative hemorrhage. Twenty-four patients had one or more predictive signs, and eight actually bled postoperatively. There was a 50% mortality and 75% additional complication rate for the bleeders. In contrast, the nonbleeders had a mortality and a complication rate of only 18% and 35%, respectively. There was no observed superiority of either surgical or medical treatment for postoperative hemorrhage. In perforated duodenal ulcer with evidence of GI blood loss, an intraoperative search for a posterior kissing ulcer is recommended. If a kissing ulcer is found, an acid-reducing operation and suture ligation of the ulcer is indicated. PMID:485825

  18. Venous ulcers -- self-care

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000744.htm Venous ulcers - self-care To use the sharing features on this ... slow to heal. Alternative names Venous leg ulcers - self-care; Venous insufficiency ulcers - self-care; Stasis leg ...

  19. Dutch Venous Ulcer guideline update.

    PubMed

    Maessen-Visch, M Birgitte; de Roos, Kees-Peter

    2014-05-19

    The revised guideline of 2013 is an update of the 2005 guideline "venous leg ulcer". In this special project four separate guidelines (venous leg ulcer, varicose veins, compression therapy and deep venous disorders) were revised and developed simultaneously. A meeting was held including representatives of any organisation involved in venous disease management including patient organizations and health insurance companies. Eighteen clinical questions where defined, and a new strategy was used to accelerate the process. This resulted in two new and two revised guidelines within one year. The guideline committee advises use of the C of the CEAP classification as well as the Venous Clinical Severity Score (VCSS) and a Quality of life (QoL) score in the assessment of clinical signs. These can provide insight into the burden of disease and the effects of treatment as experienced by the patient. A duplex ultrasound should be performed in every patient to establish the underlying aetiology and to evaluate the need for treatment (which is discussed in a separate guideline). The use of the TIME model for describing venous ulcers is recommended. There is no evidence for antiseptic or antibiotic wound care products except for a Cochrane review in which some evidence is presented for cadexomer iodine. Signs of infection are the main reason for the use of oral antibiotics. When the ulcer fails to heal the use of oral aspirin and pentoxifylline can be considered as an adjunct. For the individual patient, the following aspects should be considered: the appearance of the ulcer (amount of exudate) according to the TIME model, the influence of wound care products on moisturising the wound, frequency of changing compression bandages, pain and allergies. The cost of the dressings should also be considered. Education and training of patients t improves compliance with compression therapy but does not influence wound healing rates. PMID:24843102

  20. Automatic analysis of the corneal ulcer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventura, Liliane; Chiaradia, Caio; Faria de Sousa, Sidney J.

    1999-06-01

    A very common disease in agricultural countries is the corneal ulcer. Particularly in the public hospitals, several patients come every week presenting this kind of pathology. One of the most important features to diagnose the regression of the disease is the determination of the vanishing of the affected area. An automatic system (optical system and software), attached to a Slit Lamp, has been developed to determine automatically the area of the ulcer and to follow up its regression. The clinical procedure to isolate the ulcer is still done, but the measuring time is fast enough to not cause discomfort to the patient as the traditional evaluation does. The system has been used in the last 6 months in a hospital that has about 80 patients per week presenting corneal ulcer. The patients follow up (which is an indispensable criteria for the cure of the disease) has been improved by the system and has guaranteed the treatment success.

  1. Tannins, Peptic Ulcers and Related Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    de Jesus, Neyres Zinia Taveira; de Souza Falcão, Heloina; Gomes, Isis Fernandes; de Almeida Leite, Thiago Jose; de Morais Lima, Gedson Rodrigues; Barbosa-Filho, Jose Maria; Tavares, Josean Fechine; da Silva, Marcelo Sobral; de Athayde-Filho, Petrônio Filgueiras; Batista, Leonia Maria

    2012-01-01

    This review of the current literature aims to study correlations between the chemical structure and gastric anti-ulcer activity of tannins. Tannins are used in medicine primarily because of their astringent properties. These properties are due to the fact that tannins react with the tissue proteins with which they come into contact. In gastric ulcers, this tannin-protein complex layer protects the stomach by promoting greater resistance to chemical and mechanical injury or irritation. Moreover, in several experimental models of gastric ulcer, tannins have been shown to present antioxidant activity, promote tissue repair, exhibit anti Helicobacter pylori effects, and they are involved in gastrointestinal tract anti-inflammatory processes. The presence of tannins explains the anti-ulcer effects of many natural products. PMID:22489149

  2. Neonatal Pressure Ulcer Prevention.

    PubMed

    Scheans, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of pressure ulcers in acutely ill infants and children ranges up to 27 percent in intensive care units, with a range of 16-19 percent in NICUs. Anatomic, physiologic, and developmental factors place ill and preterm newborns at risk for skin breakdown. Two case studies illustrate these factors, and best practices for pressure ulcer prevention are described. PMID:26803094

  3. PEPTIC ULCER DISEASE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peptic ulcer disease (PUD) is an ulcerative condition of the stomach or duodenum that may be accompanied by mucosal inflammation. PUD is classified as primary when it occurs in healthy children and as secondary when underlying disorders associated with injury, illness, or drug therapy co-exists. Pri...

  4. Subfascial endoscopic perforator surgery for venous ulcers.

    PubMed

    Lee, D W H; Lam, Y H; Chan, A C W; Chung, S C S

    2003-08-01

    We report the treatment and outcomes of 12 patients who underwent subfascial endoscopic perforator surgery for severe chronic venous insufficiency and venous ulceration. All patients had received prior superficial venous ablative surgery and presented with incompetent perforating veins in the calf and persistent venous ulceration (lasting >10 years). Outcome measures included ulcer healing time, recurrence, clinical symptom, and disability scores. There was one wound complication after subfascial endoscopic perforator surgery. The cumulative ulcer healing rate was 25% at 3 months, 42% at 6 months, and 92% at 1 year. One patient developed ulcer recurrence at 12 months after surgery. The mean clinical score and disability score decreased from 13.00 (standard deviation, 2.26) to 4.83 (1.47) and 1.75 (0.45) to 0.50 (0.52), respectively (P<0.001) after a median follow-up of 15.0 months (interquartile range, 12.0-21.5 months). Subfascial endoscopic perforator surgery was safe and effective in the treatment of patients with severe chronic venous insufficiency and venous ulceration caused by incompetent perforating veins in the calf. PMID:12904616

  5. Epidemiology of peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Kurata, J H; Haile, B M

    1984-05-01

    In the United States about four million people have active peptic ulcers and about 350,000 new cases are diagnosed each year. Four times as many duodenal ulcers as gastric ulcers are diagnosed. Approximately 3000 deaths per year in the United States are due to duodenal ulcer and 3000 to gastric ulcer. There has been a marked decrease in reported hospitalization and mortality rates for peptic ulcer in the United States. Changes in criteria for selecting the underlying cause of death might account for some of the apparent decrease in ulcer mortality rates. Hospitalization rates for duodenal ulcers decreased nearly 50 per cent from 1970 to 1978, but hospitalization rates for gastric ulcers did not decrease. Although this decrease in hospitalization rates may reflect a decrease in duodenal ulcer disease incidence, it appears that changes in coding practices, hospitalization criteria, and diagnostic procedures have contributed to the reported declines in peptic ulcer hospitalization and mortality rates. There is no good evidence to support the popular belief that peptic ulcer is most common in the spring and autumn. The most consistent pattern appears to be low ulcer rates in the summer. There is strong evidence that cigarette smoking, regular use of aspirin, and prolonged use of steroids are associated with the development of peptic ulcer. There is some evidence that coffee and aspirin substitutes may affect ulcers, but most studies do not implicate alcohol, food, or psychological stress as causes of ulcer disease. Genetic factors play a role in both duodenal and gastric ulcer. The first-degree relatives of patients with duodenal ulcer have a two- to threefold increase in risk of getting duodenal ulcer and relatives of gastric ulcer patients have a similarly increased risk of getting a gastric ulcer. About half of the patients with duodenal ulcer have elevated plasma pepsinogen I. A small increase in risk of duodenal ulcer is found in persons with blood group O and in

  6. Connective Tissue Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Dabiri, Ganary; Falanga, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Connective tissue disorders (CTD), which are often also termed collagen vascular diseases, include a number of related inflammatory conditions. Some of these diseases include rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis (scleroderma), localized scleroderma (morphea variants localized to the skin), Sjogren’s syndrome, dermatomyositis, polymyositis, and mixed connective tissue disease. In addition to the systemic manifestations of these diseases, there are a number of cutaneous features that make these conditions recognizable on physical exam. Lower extremity ulcers and digital ulcers are an infrequent but disabling complication of long-standing connective tissue disease. The exact frequency with which these ulcers occur is not known, and the cause of the ulcerations is often multifactorial. Moreover, a challenging component of CTD ulcerations is that there are still no established guidelines for their diagnosis and treatment. The morbidity associated with these ulcerations and their underlying conditions is very substantial. Indeed, these less common but intractable ulcers represent a major medical and economic problem for patients, physicians and nurses, and even well organized multidisciplinary wound healing centers. PMID:23756459

  7. Acute oral ulcers.

    PubMed

    Lehman, Julia S; Rogers, Roy S

    2016-01-01

    Accurate diagnosis of acute oral ulcers can be challenging. Important historic details include the pattern of recurrence, anatomic areas of involvement within the mouth and elsewhere on the mucocutaneous surface, associated medical symptoms or comorbidities, and symptomology. Careful mucocutaneous examination is essential. When necessary, biopsy at an active site without ulceration is generally optimal. Depending on the clinical scenario, supplemental studies that may be useful include cultures; perilesional biopsy for direct immunofluorescence testing; and evaluation for infectious diseases, gluten sensitivity, inflammatory bowel disease, human immunodeficiency virus infection, connective tissue diseases, or hematinic deficiencies. Clinicians should maintain a broad differential diagnosis when evaluating patients with acute oral ulcers. PMID:27343961

  8. A case report and literature review of "Chiclero's ulcer".

    PubMed

    Blaylock, Jason M; Wortmann, Glenn W

    2012-09-01

    An 86-year-old man with history of travel to Guatemala presented with a 4-month history of an enlarging ulcerative lesion on his right ear. After several weeks of empiric treatment for otitis externa, histopathology, culture, and PCR analysis of a biopsy specimen confirmed the diagnosis of localized cutaneous leishmaniasis secondary to Leishmania mexicana. Known as "Chiclero's ulcer" in southeast Mexico and Latin America, this unique presentation of cutaneous leishmaniasis is caused mainly by the L. mexicana complex. Infection results in a single ulcerative lesion, most commonly involving the ear pinna, without a tendency for cutaneous metastasis, lymphatic or mucosal involvement. The majority of cases of "Chiclero's ulcer" spontaneously re-epithelialize without treatment within 3-9 months. This patient's lesion completely resolved without therapy after 11 months. "Chiclero's ulcer" should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a patient presenting with a chronic ulcerative lesion and history of travel to an endemic area. PMID:23146325

  9. [Dyspepsia, Ulcer Disease – Helicobacter pylori, Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease].

    PubMed

    Wirth, Hans-Peter

    2016-06-01

    Prevalence of H. pylori (HP) is declining, whereas reflux disease and the proportion of non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAR) to HP-induced ulcers increase. Eradication heals HP-ulcer disease, interrupts cancerous progression and can improve dyspeptic symptoms. NSAR-ulcers heal under proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy but tend to recur after reexposition. Anticoagulants and antiplatlet agents increase the risk additionally. PPI reduces NSAR-ulcer recurrence. Reflux patients with severe inflammation and complications often need long-term therapy. Barrett’s esophagus patients are at risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma. PMID:27269775

  10. Differential diagnosis of leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Pannier, F; Rabe, E

    2013-03-01

    Leg and foot ulcers are symptoms of very different diseases. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the differential diagnosis of leg ulcers. The majority of leg ulcers occur in the lower leg or foot. In non-venous ulcers the localization in the foot area is more frequent. The most frequent underlying disease is chronic venous disease. In 354 leg ulcers, Koerber found 75.25% venous leg ulcers, 3.66% arterial leg ulcers, 14.66% ulcers of mixed venous and arterial origin and 13.5% vasculitic ulcers. In the Swedish population of Skaraborg, Nelzen found a venous origin in 54% of the ulcer patients. Each leg ulcer needs a clinical and anamnestic evaluation. Duplex ultrasound is the basic diagnostic tool to exclude vascular anomalies especially chronic venous and arterial occlusive disease. Skin biopsies help to find a correct diagnosis in unclear or non-healing cases. In conclusion, chronic venous disease is the most frequent cause of leg ulcerations. Because 25% of the population have varicose veins or other chronic venous disease the coincidence of pathological venous findings and ulceration is very frequent even in non-venous ulcerations. Leg ulcers without the symptoms of chronic venous disease should be considered as non-venous. PMID:23482536

  11. Homicide by decubitus ulcers.

    PubMed

    Di Maio, Vincent J M; Di Maio, Theresa G

    2002-03-01

    Traditionally, the only penalties for poor treatment of nursing home patients have been civil lawsuits against nursing homes and their employees by families, or fines and license suspension by government organizations. Recently, government agencies have become much more aggressive in citing institutions for the development of decubitus ulcers (pressure sores) in their patients. A few government institutions have concluded that in some cases, the development of ulcers with resultant death is so grievous that there should be criminal prosecution of the individuals and/or institutions providing care. A leader in this concept has been the State of Hawaii. In November 2000, the State of Hawaii convicted an individual of manslaughter in the death of a patient at an adult residential care home (a form of nursing home) for permitting the progression of decubitus ulcers without seeking medical help, and for not bringing the patient back to a physician for treatment of the ulcers. PMID:11953485

  12. Ulcerated Hemangioma - Surveillance Only.

    PubMed

    Chiriac, Anca; Chiriac, Anca Eduard; Pinteala, Tudor; Foia, Liliana; Brzezinski, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Infantile hemangiomas are reported in 10-12% of children less than 1 year of age, with ulceration in about 5-13% of cases. Little is known about the mechanism of this disease and explanations are still being looked for. We present a 4-month-old female infant with haemangioma on the left buttock; the hemangioma was noticed at 2 weeks of age, progressively enlarging and ulcerated. PMID:26431099

  13. Martorell's Ulcer: Diagnostic and Therapeutic Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Lima Pinto, Ana Paula Frade; Silva, Nelson Araújo; Osorio, Carolina Teixeira; Rivera, Lina Maria; Carneiro, Sueli; Ramos-e-Silva, Marcia; Gomes Bica, Blanca Elena Rios

    2015-01-01

    Martorell's ulcer is an uncommon ischemic and extremely painful lesion located in the distal portion of the lower limb, resulting from severe systemic and poorly controlled hypertension. It is common in women between 50 and 70 years of age. The diagnosis is clinical and mostly belated, following exclusion of other causes. The response to treatment takes time and is unsatisfactory. A combination of several drugs associated with surgery may be required for wound healing. The authors present a case of Martorell's hypertensive ulcer, with emphasis on the diagnostic and therapeutic difficulties. PMID:26351431

  14. Cushing's ulcer: Further reflections

    PubMed Central

    Kemp, William J.; Bashir, Asif; Dababneh, Haitham; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Brain tumors, traumatic head injury, and other intracranial processes including infections, can cause increased intracranial pressure and lead to overstimulation of the vagus nerve. As a result, increased secretion of gastric acid may occur which leads to gastro-duodenal ulcer formation known as Cushing's ulcer. Methods: A review of original records of Dr. Harvey Cushing's patients suffering from gastro-duodenal ulcers was performed followed by a discussion of the available literature. We also reviewed the clinical records of the patients never reported by Cushing to gain his perspective in describing this phenomenon. Dr. Cushing was intrigued to investigate gastro-duodenal ulcers as he lost patients to acute gastrointestinal perforations following successful brain tumor operations. It is indeed ironic that Harvey Cushing developed a gastro-duodenal ulcer in his later years with failing health. Results: Clinically shown by Cushing's Yale Registry, a tumor or lesion can disrupt this circuitry, leading to gastroduodenal ulceration. Cushing said that it was “reasonable to believe that the perforations following posterior fossa cerebellar operations were produced in like fashion by an irritative disturbance either of fiber tracts or vagal centers in the brain stem.” Conclusion: Harvey Cushing's pioneering work depicted in his Yale registry serves as a milestone for continuing research that can further discern this pathway. PMID:25972936

  15. Skin ulceration due to cement.

    PubMed

    Robinson, S M; Tachakra, S S

    1992-09-01

    Despite legislation that requires manufacturers to inform the public about the dangers of contact with cement, severe ulceration from cement contact still occurs. We present a retrospective study of seven patients presenting to this department over a 2-year period. All were male and employed in the building trade, their injuries being sustained whilst at work. The injuries were to the lower limb, often multiple and required a median of seven visits before healing was complete. One required hospital admission and skin grafting. PMID:1449582

  16. Perforated Duodenal Ulcer in a Cow

    PubMed Central

    Fatimah, I.; Butler, D. G.; Physick-Sheard, P. W.

    1982-01-01

    A case report of perforated duodenal ulcer in a ten year old Holstein cow is presented. On three occasions, sudden anorexia and rapidly progressing abdominal fluid distension were associated with metabolic alkalosis, hypochloremia and hypokalemia. Rumen fluid at the time of the second episode was acidic and contained an excessive amount of chloride ion. An abdominal mass dorsal to the abomasum involving the pylorus and several loops of small bowel was identified but not corrected at surgery. Necropsy confirmed a 1.5 cm diameter duodenal ulcer 6 cm distal to the pylorus. PMID:17422146

  17. A case of HIV ulcer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    HIV-associated ulcers must be distinguished from idiopathic anal fissures in HIV-positive patients and from other sexually transmitted diseases that cause anogenital ulcers as the treatments differ. PMID:26266040

  18. Understanding non ulcer dyspepsia.

    PubMed

    Loh, K Y; Siang, T K

    2008-06-01

    Non ulcer dyspepsia is one of the most common problems encountered in primary care practice. The underlying pathophysiology of non ulcer dyspepsia is not fully understood, but it is known that this condition is associated with H. pylori infection and motility disorder. The presenting abdominal symptoms are non specific: they include bloating, belching, flatulence, excessive fullness after eating and nausea. Psychological condition such as anxiety, depression and stress do play a role in the recurrence of symptoms. Upper GI endoscopy is necessary in patients who presents with alarm symptoms suggestive of possible underlying organic condition before one makes the diagnosis of non ulcer dyspepsia. Pharmacological therapy using H2 receptor antagonist and proton pump inhibitors are effective for symptom relief. Patient's education and supportive care should be part of the management strategy in recurrent chronic dyspepsia. PMID:18942314

  19. Investigation of venous ulcers.

    PubMed

    Kokkosis, Angela A; Labropoulos, Nicos; Gasparis, Antonios P

    2015-03-01

    The evaluation of patients with venous ulceration primarily includes noninvasive methods to elucidate the distribution and extent of pathology. Duplex ultrasound is the first line of investigation, as it provides assessment of both reflux and obstruction conditions. In patients with iliofemoral pathology, axial imaging with computed tomography scan or magnetic resonance imaging should be performed. If the treatment of iliofemoral vein obstruction is warranted, then invasive assessment using venography and/or intravascular ultrasound should be used to guide the interventional procedure. Venous valve reflux can be identified and accurately characterized by duplex ultrasound, whereas the ultrasound assessment of functional abnormality associated with obstruction is less reliable. In patients with ulceration, the evaluation for and treatment of proximal venous obstruction has resulted in improved ulcer healing. PMID:26358305

  20. Ulcerated tophaceous gout.

    PubMed

    Filanovsky, Michelle Gita; Sukhdeo, Kumar; McNamara, Megan Cunnane

    2015-01-01

    Gout is an inflammatory arthritis characterised by hyperuricemia, which, if poorly controlled, can lead to the development of tophi. We report the case of a 60-year-old Caucasian man with poorly controlled polyarticular tophaceous gout with multiple comorbidities (including renal failure) who presented with tophaceous ulcers of the upper extremity. These ulcers caused extreme pain, requiring chronic opiate medications, and were associated with decreased sensation and reduced ability to move the extremity. His hospital course was complicated by acute kidney injury, haemolytic anaemia and Clostridium difficile infection. He required 1 month of antibiotics and intensive wound care for his ulcers. This case highlights the diagnosis, natural history and management of an unusual complication of hyperuricemia. PMID:26240104

  1. Thyroid storm precipitated by duodenal ulcer perforation.

    PubMed

    Natsuda, Shoko; Nakashima, Yomi; Horie, Ichiro; Ando, Takao; Kawakami, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid storm is a rare and life-threatening complication of thyrotoxicosis that requires prompt treatment. Thyroid storm is also known to be associated with precipitating events. The simultaneous treatment of thyroid storm and its precipitant, when they are recognized, in a patient is recommended; otherwise such disorders, including thyroid storm, can exacerbate each other. Here we report the case of a thyroid storm patient (a 55-year-old Japanese male) complicated with a perforated duodenal ulcer. The patient was successfully treated with intensive treatment for thyroid storm and a prompt operation. Although it is believed that peptic ulcer rarely coexists with hyperthyroidism, among patients with thyroid storm, perforation of a peptic ulcer has been reported as one of the causes of fatal outcome. We determined that surgical intervention was required in this patient, reported despite ongoing severe thyrotoxicosis, and reported herein a successful outcome. PMID:25838951

  2. Thyroid Storm Precipitated by Duodenal Ulcer Perforation

    PubMed Central

    Natsuda, Shoko; Nakashima, Yomi; Horie, Ichiro; Kawakami, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid storm is a rare and life-threatening complication of thyrotoxicosis that requires prompt treatment. Thyroid storm is also known to be associated with precipitating events. The simultaneous treatment of thyroid storm and its precipitant, when they are recognized, in a patient is recommended; otherwise such disorders, including thyroid storm, can exacerbate each other. Here we report the case of a thyroid storm patient (a 55-year-old Japanese male) complicated with a perforated duodenal ulcer. The patient was successfully treated with intensive treatment for thyroid storm and a prompt operation. Although it is believed that peptic ulcer rarely coexists with hyperthyroidism, among patients with thyroid storm, perforation of a peptic ulcer has been reported as one of the causes of fatal outcome. We determined that surgical intervention was required in this patient, reported despite ongoing severe thyrotoxicosis, and reported herein a successful outcome. PMID:25838951

  3. Venous leg ulcers

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Leg ulcers usually occur secondary to venous reflux or obstruction, but 20% of people with leg ulcers have arterial disease, with or without venous disorders. Between 1.5 and 3.0/1000 people have active leg ulcers. Prevalence increases with age to about 20/1000 in people aged over 80 years. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of standard treatments, adjuvant treatments, and organisational interventions for venous leg ulcers? What are the effects of advice about self-help interventions in people receiving usual care for venous leg ulcers? What are the effects of interventions to prevent recurrence of venous leg ulcers? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to June 2011 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 101 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: compression bandages and stockings, cultured allogenic (single or bilayer) skin replacement, debriding agents, dressings (cellulose, collagen, film, foam, hyaluronic acid-derived, semi-occlusive alginate), hydrocolloid (occlusive) dressings in the presence of compression, intermittent pneumatic compression, intravenous prostaglandin E1, larval therapy, laser treatment (low-level), leg ulcer clinics, multilayer elastic system, multilayer elastomeric (or non-elastomeric) high-compression regimens or bandages, oral treatments (aspirin, flavonoids

  4. [Helicobacter pylori and gastric ulcer].

    PubMed

    Maaroos, H I

    1994-01-01

    In connection with longitudinal ulcer studies and the demonstration of Helicobacter pylori as the main cause of chronic gastritis, new aspects of gastric ulcer recurrences and healing become evident. This extends the possibilities to prognosticate the course of gastric ulcer and to use more effective treatment. PMID:7937016

  5. Golimumab: clinical update on its use for ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Gilardi, D; Fiorino, G; Allocca, M; Bravatà, I; Danese, S

    2015-03-01

    Monoclonal antibodies directed against tumor necrosis factor alpha (anti-TNF-α agents) have dramatically changed the therapeutical approach to inflammatory bowel diseases, such as Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. A new anti-TNF drug, golimumab, has recently been approved for patients with moderate to severe ulcerative colitis. Its efficacy has been demonstrated by preclinical and clinical studies and the drug showed an efficacy and safety profile in line with the other anti-TNF agents, such as infliximab and adalimumab. This review gives an overview on golimumab in the treatment of moderate to severe ulcerative colitis. PMID:25876561

  6. A resource-efficient planning for pressure ulcer prevention.

    PubMed

    Ostadabbas, Sarah; Yousefi, Rasoul; Nourani, Mehrdad; Faezipour, Miad; Tamil, Lakshman; Pompeo, Matthew Q

    2012-11-01

    Pressure ulcer is a critical problem for bed-ridden and wheelchair-bound patients, diabetics, and the elderly. Patients need to be regularly repositioned to prevent excessive pressure on a single area of body, which can lead to ulcers. Pressure ulcers are extremely costly to treat and may lead to several other health problems, including death. The current standard for prevention is to reposition at-risk patients every two hours. Even if it is done properly, a fixed schedule is not sufficient to prevent all ulcers. Moreover, it may result in nurses being overworked by turning some patients too frequently. In this paper, we present an algorithm for finding a nurse-effort optimal repositioning schedule that prevents pressure ulcer formation for a finite planning horizon. Our proposed algorithm uses data from a commercial pressure mat assembled on the beds surface and provides a sequence of next positions and the time of repositioning for each patient. PMID:22922729

  7. Eosinophilic ulcer of the tongue--Case report.

    PubMed

    Didona, Dario; Paolino, Giovanni; Donati, Michele; Didona, Biagio; Calvieri, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic ulcer of the oral mucosa is a rare, self-limiting, chronic and benign lesion of unknown pathogenesis that affects the oral mucosa. We present the case of a 65 year-old Caucasian female with a five month history of a painful ulcer on the lateral side of her tongue. The ulcer was not adhered to the underlying structures and there was no evidence of regional lymph node involvement. Laboratory examinations and X-rays revealed no abnormalities. Topical treatments had been performed without any improvement. Histopathological examination showed an ulcerated surface and mixed inflammatory infiltrate with several eosinophils extending into the mucosa and submucosa. No cellular atypia was observed. Based on the patient-s history and mucosal biopsy, a final diagnosis of eosinophilic ulcer of the oral mucosa was made. PMID:26312683

  8. Peptic ulcer in hospital

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, H. Daintree

    1962-01-01

    This study corresponds to an estimated 142,250 admissions for peptic ulcer to the wards of National Health Service hospitals in England and Wales during the two years 1956 and 1957. It presents a picture of the incidence and mortality of complications and surgical treatment throughout England and Wales. PMID:14036965

  9. Anti-Ulcer Efficacy of Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase Inhibitor TPPU on Diclofenac-Induced Intestinal Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Sumanta Kumar; Wan, Debin; Yang, Jun; Trindade da Silva, Carlos A; Morisseau, Christophe; Kodani, Sean D; Yang, Guang-Yu; Inceoglu, Bora; Hammock, Bruce D

    2016-06-01

    Proton pump inhibitors such as omeprazole (OME) reduce the severity of gastrointestinal (GI) ulcers induced by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) but can also increase the chance of dysbiosis. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that preventive use of a soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitor (sEHI) such as TPPU can decrease NSAID-induced ulcers by increasing anti-inflammatory epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs). Dose- [10, 30, and 100 mg/kg, by mouth (PO)] and time-dependent (6 and 18 hours) ulcerative effects of diclofenac sodium (DCF, an NSAID) were studied in the small intestine of Swiss Webster mice. Dose-dependent effects of TPPU (0.001-0.1 mg/kg per day for 7 days, in drinking water) were evaluated in DCF-induced intestinal toxicity and compared with OME (20 mg/kg, PO). In addition, the effect of treatment was studied on levels of Hb in blood, EETs in plasma, inflammatory markers such as myeloperoxidase (MPO) in intestinal tissue homogenates, and tissue necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in serum. DCF dose dependently induced ulcers that were associated with both a significant (P < 0.05) loss of Hb and an increase in the level of MPO and TNF-α, with severity of ulceration highest at 18 hours. Pretreatment with TPPU dose dependently prevented ulcer formation by DCF, increased the levels of epoxy fatty acids, including EETs, and TPPU's efficacy was comparable to OME. TPPU significantly (P < 0.05) reversed the effect of DCF on the level of Hb, MPO, and TNF-α Thus sEHI might be useful in the management of NSAID-induced ulcers. PMID:26989141

  10. Anti-Ulcer Efficacy of Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase Inhibitor TPPU on Diclofenac-Induced Intestinal Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Sumanta Kumar; Wan, Debin; Yang, Jun; Trindade da Silva, Carlos A.; Morisseau, Christophe; Kodani, Sean D.; Yang, Guang-Yu; Inceoglu, Bora

    2016-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitors such as omeprazole (OME) reduce the severity of gastrointestinal (GI) ulcers induced by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) but can also increase the chance of dysbiosis. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that preventive use of a soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitor (sEHI) such as TPPU can decrease NSAID-induced ulcers by increasing anti-inflammatory epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs). Dose- [10, 30, and 100 mg/kg, by mouth (PO)] and time-dependent (6 and 18 hours) ulcerative effects of diclofenac sodium (DCF, an NSAID) were studied in the small intestine of Swiss Webster mice. Dose-dependent effects of TPPU (0.001–0.1 mg/kg per day for 7 days, in drinking water) were evaluated in DCF-induced intestinal toxicity and compared with OME (20 mg/kg, PO). In addition, the effect of treatment was studied on levels of Hb in blood, EETs in plasma, inflammatory markers such as myeloperoxidase (MPO) in intestinal tissue homogenates, and tissue necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in serum. DCF dose dependently induced ulcers that were associated with both a significant (P < 0.05) loss of Hb and an increase in the level of MPO and TNF-α, with severity of ulceration highest at 18 hours. Pretreatment with TPPU dose dependently prevented ulcer formation by DCF, increased the levels of epoxy fatty acids, including EETs, and TPPU’s efficacy was comparable to OME. TPPU significantly (P < 0.05) reversed the effect of DCF on the level of Hb, MPO, and TNF-α. Thus sEHI might be useful in the management of NSAID-induced ulcers. PMID:26989141

  11. HYPERTENSIVE-ISCHEMIC LEG ULCERS

    PubMed Central

    Farber, Eugene M.; Schmidt, Otto E. L.

    1950-01-01

    Ischemic ulcers of the leg having characteristics different from those of ordinary leg ulcers have been observed in a small number of hypertensive patients, mostly women, during the past few years. Such ulcers are usually located above the ankle. They begin with a small area of purplish discoloration at the site of slight trauma, and progress to acutely tender ulceration. In studies of tissue removed from the margin and the base of an ulcer of this kind, obliterative arteriolar sclerotic changes, ischemic-appearing connective tissue and inflammatory changes were noted. Two additional cases are reported. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4. PMID:15398887

  12. Quality of healing of gastric ulcers: Natural products beyond acid suppression

    PubMed Central

    Kangwan, Napapan; Park, Jong-Min; Kim, Eun-Hee; Hahm, Ki Baik

    2014-01-01

    Gastric ulcer is a chronic disease featured with unexpected complications, including bleeding, stenosis and perforation, as well as a high incidence of recurrence. Clinical treatments for gastric ulcer have allowed the rapid development of potent anti-ulcer drugs during the last several decades. Gastric ulcer healing is successful with conventional treatments including H2-receptor antagonists, and proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have been essential for ulcer healing and prevention of complications. Additionally, Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy is effective in reducing ulcer recurrence and leads to physiological changes in the gastric mucosa which affect the ulcer healing process. However, in spite of these advancements, some patients have suffered from recurrence or intractability in spite of continuous anti-ulcer therapy. A new concept of the quality of ulcer healing (QOUH) was initiated that considers the reconstruction of the mucosal structure and its function for preventing ulcer recurrence. Although several gastroprotection provided these achievements of the QOUH, which PPI or other acid suppressants did not accomplish, we found that gastroprotection that originated from natural products, such as a newer formulation from either Artemisia or S-allyl cysteine from garlic, were very effective in the QOUH, as well as improving clinical symptoms with fewer side effects. In this review, we will introduce the importance of the QOUH in ulcer healing and the achievements from natural products. PMID:24891974

  13. Extended-wear aphakic soft contact lenses and corneal ulcers.

    PubMed Central

    Eichenbaum, J W; Feldstein, M; Podos, S M

    1982-01-01

    A review of 100 aphakic extended-wear soft contact lenses is presented for the period July 1980 to August 1981. Four previously successfully fitted patients with either American Optical Company's Sofcon or Cooper Laboratories' Permalens for extended wear developed corneal ulcers either directly under the lenses or shortly after removal. Three of the female patients were well controlled diabetics without retinopathy, one of whom sustained severe visual loss and neovascular glaucoma after a pseudomonas ulcer. Another patient, who had developed a Seratia marcescens ulcer 3 months later, developed metastatic carcinoma of the bowel. Special attention to diabetic aphakic patients being fitted with extended-wear soft contact lenses is suggested. PMID:7115649

  14. Recurrent aphthous ulcers in Fanconi's anaemia: a case report.

    PubMed

    Otan, Feyza; Açikgöz, Gokhan; Sakallioglu, Umur; Ozkan, Burcu

    2004-05-01

    Fanconi's anaemia (FA) is an autosomal recessive disorder that is clinically characterized by aplastic anaemia, congenital malformations of the renal, cardiac, skeletal and skin structures, and an increased predisposition to malignancies. Patients with FA often present with bleeding and infection, which are symptoms related to thrombocytopenia and neutropenia. There are few reports of the oral manifestations of FA. We describe oral aphthous ulcerations in two siblings with FA. There was a rapid improvement and healing of ulcers after blood transfusions and increased haemoglobin levels. This may support the role of severe anaemia in oral ulcerations. PMID:15139958

  15. Management of Chronic Pressure Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Executive Summary In April 2008, the Medical Advisory Secretariat began an evidence-based review of the literature concerning pressure ulcers. Please visit the Medical Advisory Secretariat Web site, http://www.health.gov.on.ca/english/providers/program/mas/tech/tech_mn.html to review these titles that are currently available within the Pressure Ulcers series. Pressure ulcer prevention: an evidence based analysis The cost-effectiveness of prevention strategies for pressure ulcers in long-term care homes in Ontario: projections of the Ontario Pressure Ulcer Model (field evaluation) Management of chronic pressure ulcers: an evidence-based analysis Objective The Medical Advisory Secretariat (MAS) conducted a systematic review on interventions used to treat pressure ulcers in order to answer the following questions: Do currently available interventions for the treatment of pressure ulcers increase the healing rate of pressure ulcers compared with standard care, a placebo, or other similar interventions? Within each category of intervention, which one is most effective in promoting the healing of existing pressure ulcers? Background A pressure ulcer is a localized injury to the skin and/or underlying tissue usually over a bony prominence, as a result of pressure, or pressure in conjunction with shear and/or friction. Many areas of the body, especially the sacrum and the heel, are prone to the development of pressure ulcers. People with impaired mobility (e.g., stroke or spinal cord injury patients) are most vulnerable to pressure ulcers. Other factors that predispose people to pressure ulcer formation are poor nutrition, poor sensation, urinary and fecal incontinence, and poor overall physical and mental health. The prevalence of pressure ulcers in Ontario has been estimated to range from a median of 22.1% in community settings to a median of 29.9% in nonacute care facilities. Pressure ulcers have been shown to increase the risk of mortality among geriatric patients by

  16. Management of ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Fell, John M; Muhammed, Rafeeq; Spray, Chris; Crook, Kay; Russell, Richard K

    2016-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) in children is increasing. The range of treatments available has also increased too but around 1 in 4 children still require surgery to control their disease. An up-to-date understanding of treatments is essential for all clinicians involved in the care of UC patients to ensure appropriate and timely treatment while minimising the risk of complications and side effects. PMID:26553909

  17. Venous Leg Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Vivas, Alejandra; Lev-Tov, Hadar; Kirsner, Robert S

    2016-08-01

    This issue provides a clinical overview of venous leg ulcers, focusing on prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and practice improvement. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of additional science writers and physician writers. PMID:27479227

  18. Persistent nicorandil induced oral ulceration

    PubMed Central

    Healy, C M; Smyth, Y; Flint, S R

    2004-01-01

    Four patients with nicorandil induced ulceration are described, and the literature on the subject is reviewed. Nicorandil induced ulcers are very painful and distressing for patients. Clinically they appear as large, deep, persistent ulcers that have punched out edges. They are poorly responsive to topical steroids and usually require alteration of nicorandil treatment. The ulceration tends to occur at high doses of nicorandil and all four cases reported here were on doses of 40 mg per day or greater. In these situations reduction of nicorandil dose may be sufficient to promote ulcer healing and prevent further recurrence. However, nicorandil induced ulcers have been reported at doses as low as 10 mg daily and complete cessation of nicorandil may be required. PMID:15201264

  19. Infliximab, adalimumab and golimumab for treating moderately to severely active ulcerative colitis after the failure of conventional therapy (including a review of TA140 and TA262): clinical effectiveness systematic review and economic model.

    PubMed Central

    Archer, Rachel; Tappenden, Paul; Ren, Shijie; Martyn-St James, Marrissa; Harvey, Rebecca; Basarir, Hasan; Stevens, John; Carroll, Christopher; Cantrell, Anna; Lobo, Alan; Hoque, Sami

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Ulcerative colitis (UC) is the most common form of inflammatory bowel disease in the UK. UC can have a considerable impact on patients' quality of life. The burden for the NHS is substantial. OBJECTIVES To evaluate the clinical effectiveness and safety of interventions, to evaluate the incremental cost-effectiveness of all interventions and comparators (including medical and surgical options), to estimate the expected net budget impact of each intervention, and to identify key research priorities. DATA SOURCES Peer-reviewed publications, European Public Assessment Reports and manufacturers' submissions. The following databases were searched from inception to December 2013 for clinical effectiveness searches and from inception to January 2014 for cost-effectiveness searches for published and unpublished research evidence: MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, The Cochrane Library including the Cochrane Systematic Reviews Database, Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects, the Health Technology Assessment database and NHS Economic Evaluation Database; ISI Web of Science, including Science Citation Index, and the Conference Proceedings Citation Index-Science and Bioscience Information Service Previews. The US Food and Drug Administration website and the European Medicines Agency website were also searched, as were research registers, conference proceedings and key journals. REVIEW METHODS A systematic review [including network meta-analysis (NMA)] was conducted to evaluate the clinical effectiveness and safety of named interventions. The health economic analysis included a review of published economic evaluations and the development of a de novo model. RESULTS Ten randomised controlled trials were included in the systematic review. The trials suggest that adult patients receiving infliximab (IFX) [Remicade(®), Merck Sharp & Dohme Ltd (MSD)], adalimumab (ADA) (Humira(®), Abb

  20. [Neuropathy and diabetic foot ulcers].

    PubMed

    Lobmann, R

    2015-05-01

    Diabetic foot ulceration is a serious complication of diabetes mellitus worldwide and the most common cause of hospitalization in diabetic patients. The etiology of diabetic foot ulcerations is complex due to their multifactorial nature. Polyneuropathy plays an important role in the pathophysiology of diabetic foot ulceration. Proper adherence to standard treatment strategies and interdisciplinary cooperation can reduce the high rates of major amputations. PMID:25903093

  1. Marginal ulcer in achlorhydric patients.

    PubMed Central

    Tauxe, R V; Wright, L F; Hirschowitz, B I

    1975-01-01

    Recurrent gastrojejunal ulceration is reported in three patients with histamine-fast achlorhydria. In none of these patients was extruding suture material responsible for the ulceration. However, all three patients had a history of alcohol abuse, and one abused aspirin as well. These cases demonstrate that achlorhydria does not protect against anastomotic ulceration. It is suggested that surgical manipulation produces an increased susceptibility to mucosal damage, and that it is erroneous to consider all anastomotic ulceration as a continuation or recurrence of acid peptic disease. PMID:1130864

  2. Venous ulcers: pathophysiology and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Trent, Jennifer T; Falabella, Anna; Eaglstein, William H; Kirsner, Robert S

    2005-05-01

    Venous ulcers affect approximately 1% of the world's population, increasing healthcare expenditures and decreasing quality of life. Several hypotheses may help explain their origin. Incompetent veins or valves or impaired muscle function may lead to abnormal calf muscle pump function that can elevate ambulatory venous pressure (venous hypertension). This hypertension subsequently results in local venous dilatation and pooling, concomitantly trapping leukocytes that may release proteolytic enzymes that destroy tissues. Venous pooling also induces interendothelial pore widening and deposition of fibrin and other macromolecules that "trap" growth factors within them, rendering them unavailable for wound repair. Compression therapy, the mainstay treatment, reduces edema, reverses venous hypertension, and improves calf muscle pump function. Several treatment options can be employed as adjuvants to compression--eg, systemic therapy with pentoxifylline or aspirin, autologous grafts, tissue-engineered skin, growth factor therapy, and/or vein surgery. The epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management options regarding venous ulcers are reviewed. PMID:16014984

  3. Nasal septal ulceration.

    PubMed

    Sardana, Kabir; Goel, Khushbu

    2014-01-01

    Nasal septal ulceration can have multiple etiologies. Determining the exact cause depends on who the consulting specialist is, who could either be the ENT surgeon or the dermatologist. The common causes are infections (tuberculosis, leprosy, leishmaniasis), vasculitis (Wegener's granulomatosis and Churg-Strauss syndrome), and lupus erythematosus. Traumatic causes and malignancy can also be seen in tertiary referral centers. The diagnosis often requires thorough investigations and multiple tissue specimens from various sites, and in chronic cases, a suspicion of lymphoma should be considered. Apart from disease-specific therapy, a multidisciplinary approach is required in most cases to tackle the cosmetic disfigurement. PMID:25441476

  4. Tofacitinib in ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Archer, Thomas P; Moran, Gordon W; Ghosh, Subrata

    2016-05-01

    Cytokines orchestrate immune and inflammatory responses involved in the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis (UC). Protein kinases are essential for signal transduction in eukaryotic cells. Janus kinases (JAKs) are a family of protein tyrosine kinases that play a pivotal role in cytokine receptor signaling. Indeed, a major subgroup of cytokines use Type I and II cytokine receptors which signal via the activation of JAKs. Tofacitinib is an oral JAK inhibitor that has been studied in autoimmune pathologies, including UC and rheumatoid arthritis with good overall efficacy and acceptable safety profile. This literature review was performed with the goal of summarizing the knowledge on JAK inhibitors in UC treatment. PMID:27140405

  5. [Hemodynamic basis for the development of varicose ulcers and their therapy].

    PubMed

    Recek, C

    2003-09-01

    The prevalence of leg ulcers is about 1%, approximately 75% of them are of venous origin. The precondition for the development of venous ulcers is ambulatory venous hypertension. It is assumed than a linear correlation exists between the severity of ambulatory venous hypertension and the incidence of venous ulcers. Venous ulcers caused by superficial vein reflux are called varicose ulcers and are more frequent than postthrombotic ones. Crossectomy removes the hemodynamic disorder responsible for the development of varicose ulcers and creates conditions for a quick and mostly definitive ulcer healing. In cases with simultaneous reflux in the saphenous and femoral veins the saphenous reflux is responsible for the severity of venous disorder, whereas femoral reflux is hemodynamically unimportant. Selective abolition of saphenous reflux restores normal hemodynamic conditions in such cases. Compressive therapy continues to be the most frequently used therapeutic procedure in the treatment of venous ulcers; it must be considered as a symptomatic measure, because it is not able to substantially affect the underlying venous disorder in spite of the fact that the correctly lying bandage positively influences venous hemodynamics. The diagnostic procedure in patients with leg ulcers should screen out cases with varicose ulcers; abolition of superficial vein reflux can deliver these patients from their annoying disease. PMID:14658257

  6. Wound care in venous ulcers.

    PubMed

    Mosti, G

    2013-03-01

    Wound dressings: ulcer dressings should create and maintain a moist environment on the ulcer surface. It has been shown that in an ulcer with a hard crust and desiccated bed, the healing process is significantly slowed and sometimes completely blocked so favouring infection, inflammation and pain. In contrast a moist environment promotes autolytic debridement, angiogenesis and the more rapid formation of granulation tissue, favours keratinocytes migration and accelerates healing of wounds. Apart from these common characteristics, wound dressings are completely different in other aspects and must be used according to the ulcer stage. In necrotic ulcers, autolytic debridement by means of hydrogel and hydrocolloids or with enzymatic paste is preferred. In case of largely exuding wounds alginate or hydrofibre are indicated. When bleeding occurs alginate is indicated due to its haemostatic power. Where ulcers are covered by granulation tissue, polyurethane foams are preferred. When infection coexists antiseptics are necessary: dressing containing silver or iodine with large antibacterial spectrum have proved to be very effective. In the epithelization stage polyurethane films or membranes, thin hydrocolloids or collagen based dressings are very useful to favour advancement of the healing wound edge. Despite these considerations, a Cochrane review failed to find advantages for any dressing type compared with low-adherent dressings applied beneath compression. Surgical debridement and grafting of wounds, negative wound pressure treatment: surgical and hydrosurgical debridement are indicated in large, necrotic and infected wounds as these treatments are able to get rid of necrotic, infected tissue very quickly in a single surgical session, thereby significantly accelerating wound bed preparation and healing time. Negative wound pressure treatment creating a negative pressure on ulcer bed is able to favour granulation tissue and shorten healing time. In case of hard

  7. Common Questions About Pressure Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Raetz, Jaqueline G M; Wick, Keren H

    2015-11-15

    Patients with limited mobility due to physical or cognitive impairment are at risk of pressure ulcers. Primary care physicians should examine at-risk patients because pressure ulcers are often missed in inpatient, outpatient, and long-term care settings. High-risk patients should use advanced static support surfaces to prevent pressure ulcers and air-fluidized beds to treat pressure ulcers. Physicians should document the size and clinical features of ulcers. Cleansing should be done with saline or tap water, while avoiding caustic agents, such as hydrogen peroxide. Dressings should promote a moist, but not wet, wound healing environment. The presence of infection is determined through clinical judgment; if uncertain, a tissue biopsy should be performed. New or worsening pain may indicate infection of a pressure ulcer. When treating patients with pressure ulcers, it is important to keep in mind the patient's psychological, behavioral, and cognitive status. The patient's social, financial, and caregiver resources, as well as goals and long-term prognosis, should also be considered in the treatment plan. PMID:26554282

  8. [Mixed leg ulcers].

    PubMed

    Willenberg, Torsten

    2011-03-01

    Coexisting peripheral arterial disease is not uncommon (15 - 21 %) in patients with ulcera cruris primarily based on a venous etiology. Patient's history, clinical examination and detection of ABI as well as duplex scan will establish diagnosis of mixed arterial-venous ulcera. Clinical significance of coexisting arterial disease is often difficult to define and should be evaluated by a vascular specialist. The concept of treatment of mixed ulcers should always include the arterial component. Frequently peripheral arterial perfusion and healing can be improved by minimal invasive, endovascular revascularization. Compression therapy is the corner stone in treatment of venous disease and should be complemented by contemporary two piece graduated compression systems if ulcera are present. According to circumstances ablation of varicose veins must be considered. PMID:21360460

  9. Assessing diabetic foot ulcer development risk with hyperspectral tissue oximetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yudovsky, Dmitry; Nouvong, Aksone; Schomacker, Kevin; Pilon, Laurent

    2011-02-01

    Foot ulceration remains a serious health concern for diabetic patients and has a major impact on the cost of diabetes treatment. Early detection and preventive care, such as offloading or improved hygiene, can greatly reduce the risk of further complications. We aim to assess the use of hyperspectral tissue oximetry in predicting the risk of diabetic foot ulcer formation. Tissue oximetry measurements are performed during several visits with hyperspectral imaging of the feet in type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus subjects that are at risk for foot ulceration. The data are retrospectively analyzed at 21 sites that ulcerated during the course of our study and an ulceration prediction index is developed. Then, an image processing algorithm based on this index is implemented. This algorithm is able to predict tissue at risk of ulceration with a sensitivity and specificity of 95 and 80%, respectively, for images taken, on average, 58 days before tissue damage is apparent to the naked eye. Receiver operating characteristic analysis is also performed to give a range of sensitivity/specificity values resulting in a Q-value of 89%.

  10. Vascular leg ulcers: histopathologic study of 293 patients.

    PubMed

    Misciali, Cosimo; Dika, Emi; Baraldi, Carlotta; Fanti, Pier Alessandro; Mirelli, Michele; Stella, Andrea; Bertoncelli, Marco; Patrizi, Annalisa

    2014-12-01

    Vascular leg ulcers remain a challenge for the modern health care, and a systematic pathological study on this kind of lesions has not been reported so far. A total of 293 consecutive white patients with chronic leg ulcers (present for a minimum of 6 months and up to several years) referred to the Wound Care Unit (Dermatology, University of Bologna) between March 2008 and June 2011. Thirty-four patients affected by other than vascular ulcers, neoplastic or inflammatory conditions, were excluded. The remaining 259 patients affected by vascular leg ulcers were enrolled in this study. Assessment of the patients general health, skin biopsy, and vascular Doppler of the lower limbs were performed to determine the etiology and to formulate an appropriate management plan, whereas 2 punch biopsies of 3 mm were performed on the border and on the bed of each ulcer. Doppler evaluation showed the presence of vascular hemodynamic impairment in 259 patients. Of these, 181 (69.9%) patients were affected by venous insufficiency, 58 (22.4%) by venous and arterial insufficiency, and 20 (7.7%) by arterial insufficiency. Histopathologic features revealed significant differences, thus, reflecting the clinicopathologic correlation with the underlying hemodynamic impairments. In conclusion, histopathologic and hemodynamic data correlation could provide the basis for future analysis of leg ulcers pathogenesis and may improve treatment protocols. We should underline that this observational study represents a single-institute experience and that larger series are needed to confirm our observations. PMID:25072681

  11. Gastric emptying and Helicobacter pylori infection in duodenal ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Perri, F; Ghoos, Y F; Maes, B D; Geypens, B J; Ectors, N; Geboes, K; Hiele, M I; Rutgeerts, P J

    1996-03-01

    The pathogenetic link between Helicobacter pylori gastritis and duodenal ulcer is still unknown. Fast gastric emptying of liquids might be important in the pathogenesis of gastric metaplasia of the duodenum and duodenal ulcer through an increased exposure of the duodenum to gastric acid. In H. pylori-infected subjects, an abnormal gastric emptying could affect urea breath test results and correlate with histological gastritis. This study was performed to evaluate the gastric emptying of liquids in duodenal ulcer patients with H. pylori infection and the possible relation between the bacterial load, gastric emptying, and urea breath test results. Seventeen duodenal ulcer patients with H. pylori gastritis and 15 healthy volunteers were studied by a [14C]octanoic acid and [13C]urea breath test to evaluate gastric emptying rate and H. pylori status simultaneously. Endoscopy with antral biopsies were performed in all duodenal ulcer patients. Duodenal ulcer patients with H. pylori infection have a normal liquid gastric emptying that is unrelated with histological severity of gastritis. The urea breath test results and the gastric emptying parameters do not correlate with histology. A significant correlation between the gastric emptying and the urea hydrolysis rate is found. It is concluded that H. pylori infection and duodenal ulcer disease is not associated with abnormally fast liquid gastric emptying, and this finding should be taken into account when a casual link between H. pylori infection and duodenal ulcer disease is searched for. The correlation between gastric emptying and urea hydrolysis rate explains why no conclusions on intragastric bacterial load can be drawn from the urea breath test results. PMID:8617116

  12. Clinical management of pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Thomas, David R

    2013-05-01

    Pressure ulcers are chronic and difficult to heal. Pressure-reducing devices are clearly superior to a standard hospital mattress in preventing pressure ulcers, but only limited evidence and clinical intuition supports pressure-reducing devices in improving the healing rate of pressure ulcers. Local wound treatment should aim at maintaining a moist wound environment. The choice of a particular dressing depends on wound characteristics, such as the amount of exudate, dead space, or wound location. Nutritional status should be addressed as a process of good care. Debridement may improve time to a clean wound bed, but no clearly superior approach has been demonstrated. PMID:23571035

  13. Current management of venous ulceration.

    PubMed

    Patel, Nima P; Labropoulos, Nicos; Pappas, Peter J

    2006-06-01

    It has been estimated that chronic venous insufficiency affects 10 to 35 percent of the entire U.S. population and that 4 percent of people older than 65 have active venous ulcers. The high prevalence of the disease results in an annual expenditure of more than 1 billion dollars a year to the U.S. health care system. To have a rational approach toward patients with venous ulcers, it is important to understand the pathophysiology and clinical characteristics of the disease process, in order to initiate appropriate treatment and prevent venous ulcer recurrence. PMID:16799394

  14. Adverse Outcomes after Major Surgery in Patients with Pressure Ulcer: A Nationwide Population-Based Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Chia-Lun; Lee, Woan-Ruoh; Yeh, Chun-Chieh; Shih, Chun-Chuan

    2015-01-01

    Background Postoperative adverse outcomes in patients with pressure ulcer are not completely understood. This study evaluated the association between preoperative pressure ulcer and adverse events after major surgeries. Methods Using reimbursement claims from Taiwan’s National Health Insurance Research Database, we conducted a nationwide retrospective cohort study of 17391 patients with preoperative pressure ulcer receiving major surgery in 2008-2010. With a propensity score matching procedure, 17391 surgical patients without pressure ulcer were selected for comparison. Eight major surgical postoperative complications and 30-day postoperative mortality were evaluated among patients with pressure ulcer of varying severity. Results Patients with preoperative pressure ulcer had significantly higher risk than controls for postoperative adverse outcomes, including septicemia, pneumonia, stroke, urinary tract infection, and acute renal failure. Surgical patients with pressure ulcer had approximately 1.83-fold risk (95% confidence interval 1.54-2.18) of 30-day postoperative mortality compared with control group. The most significant postoperative mortality was found in those with serious pressure ulcer, such as pressure ulcer with local infection, cellulitis, wound or treatment by change dressing, hospitalized care, debridement or antibiotics. Prolonged hospital or intensive care unit stay and increased medical expenditures were also associated with preoperative pressure ulcer. Conclusion This nationwide propensity score-matched retrospective cohort study showed increased postoperative complications and mortality in patients with preoperative pressure ulcer. Our findings suggest the urgency of preventing and managing preoperative pressure ulcer by a multidisciplinary medical team for this specific population. PMID:26000606

  15. Chronic leg ulcer: does a patient always get a correct diagnosis and adequate treatment?

    PubMed

    Mooij, Michael C; Huisman, Laurens C

    2016-03-01

    Patients with chronic leg ulcers have severely impaired quality of life and account for a high percentage of annual healthcare costs. To establish the cause of a chronic leg ulcer, referral to a center with a multidisciplinary team of professionals is often necessary. Treating the underlying cause diminishes healing time and reduces costs. In venous leg ulcers adequate compression therapy is still a problem. It can be improved by training the professionals with pressure measuring devices. A perfect fitting of elastic stockings is important to prevent venous leg ulcer recurrence. In most cases, custom-made stockings are the best choice for this purpose. PMID:26916772

  16. Rectal ulcers induced by systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Yau, Alan Hoi Lun; Chu, Karen; Yang, Hui Min; Ko, Hin Hin

    2014-01-01

    A 28-year-old woman presented with diarrhoea, haematochezia, tenesmus and rectal pain for 2 months. She was diagnosed with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) 8 years ago and remained on prednisone, azathioprine and hydroxychloroquine. Blood work revealed a positive ANA (antinuclear antibody test), anti-dsDNA 749 IU/mL (0–300 IU/mL), C3 0.22 g/L (0.65–1.65 g/L) and C4 0.05 g/L (0.16–0.60 g/L). Stool studies were unremarkable. MRI of the pelvis showed a rectum with eccentric wall thickening. Flexible sigmoidoscopy showed severe proctitis with multiple deep ulcers and diffuse submucosal haemorrhage. Rectal biopsy revealed crypt architectural distortion and reactive fibrosis in the lamina propria. The patient was given mesalamine suppository for 2 weeks with minimal improvement. Repeat flexible sigmoidoscopy showed a coalesced 3×4 cm full-thickness rectal ulcer. Therefore, the patient was given intravenous methylprednisolone for 3 days, followed by intravenous cyclophosphamide for 2 weeks. Her symptoms resolved and repeat flexible sigmoidoscopy showed fibrotic healing of the rectal ulcers. PMID:25150239

  17. Pressure ulcers: Current understanding and newer modalities of treatment.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Surajit; Mishra, R K

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews the mechanism, symptoms, causes, severity, diagnosis, prevention and present recommendations for surgical as well as non-surgical management of pressure ulcers. Particular focus has been placed on the current understandings and the newer modalities for the treatment of pressure ulcers. The paper also covers the role of nutrition and pressure-release devices such as cushions and mattresses as a part of the treatment algorithm for preventing and quick healing process of these wounds. Pressure ulcers develop primarily from pressure and shear; are progressive in nature and most frequently found in bedridden, chair bound or immobile people. They often develop in people who have been hospitalised for a long time generally for a different problem and increase the overall time as well as cost of hospitalisation that have detrimental effects on patient's quality of life. Loss of sensation compounds the problem manifold, and failure of reactive hyperaemia cycle of the pressure prone area remains the most important aetiopathology. Pressure ulcers are largely preventable in nature, and their management depends on their severity. The available literature about severity of pressure ulcers, their classification and medical care protocols have been described in this paper. The present treatment options include various approaches of cleaning the wound, debridement, optimised dressings, role of antibiotics and reconstructive surgery. The newer treatment options such as negative pressure wound therapy, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, cell therapy have been discussed, and the advantages and disadvantages of current and newer methods have also been described. PMID:25991879

  18. Pressure ulcers: Current understanding and newer modalities of treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Surajit; Mishra, R. K.

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews the mechanism, symptoms, causes, severity, diagnosis, prevention and present recommendations for surgical as well as non-surgical management of pressure ulcers. Particular focus has been placed on the current understandings and the newer modalities for the treatment of pressure ulcers. The paper also covers the role of nutrition and pressure-release devices such as cushions and mattresses as a part of the treatment algorithm for preventing and quick healing process of these wounds. Pressure ulcers develop primarily from pressure and shear; are progressive in nature and most frequently found in bedridden, chair bound or immobile people. They often develop in people who have been hospitalised for a long time generally for a different problem and increase the overall time as well as cost of hospitalisation that have detrimental effects on patient's quality of life. Loss of sensation compounds the problem manifold, and failure of reactive hyperaemia cycle of the pressure prone area remains the most important aetiopathology. Pressure ulcers are largely preventable in nature, and their management depends on their severity. The available literature about severity of pressure ulcers, their classification and medical care protocols have been described in this paper. The present treatment options include various approaches of cleaning the wound, debridement, optimised dressings, role of antibiotics and reconstructive surgery. The newer treatment options such as negative pressure wound therapy, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, cell therapy have been discussed, and the advantages and disadvantages of current and newer methods have also been described. PMID:25991879

  19. Ischemic ulcers - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    ... restrict blood flow. Certain lifestyle changes can help prevent ischemic ulcers. If you have a wound, taking these steps can improve blood flow and aid healing. Quit smoking. Smoking can lead to clogged arteries. ...

  20. Refractory ulcerative colitis and iatrogenic colorectal Kaposi's sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Girelli, C M; Serio, G; Rocca, E; Rocca, F

    2009-02-01

    Colorectal Kaposi's sarcoma, a human herpes virus-8 associated mesenchymal tumour, is exceedingly rare in human immunodeficiency virus-negative subjects and almost always reported in association with severe, refractory, inflammatory bowel disease. In this paper we report a case--the second from Italy--of a colorectal Kaposi's sarcoma in a human immunodeficiency virus-negative, heterosexual man with severe refractory ulcerative colitis. Kaposi's sarcoma developed after starting glucocorticosteroid therapy, supporting the theory that colorectal Kaposi's sarcoma associated with ulcerative colitis is iatrogenic. PMID:18054849

  1. Arthropathy, ankylosing spondylitis, and clubbing of fingers in ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Jalan, K. N.; Prescott, R. J.; Walker, R. J.; Sircus, W.; McManus, J. P. A.; Card, W. I.

    1970-01-01

    In a retrospective study of 399 patients with ulcerative colitis, 27 patients had colitic arthritis, 17 had ankylosing spondylitis, and 20 had clubbing of the fingers. Colitic arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis were not related to severity, extent of involvement, or duration of colitis. A significant association between colitic arthropathy and other complications of ulcerative colitis, such as pseudopolyposis, perianal disease, eye lesions, skin eruptions, aphthous ulceration, and liver disease has been demonstrated. The outcome of the first referred attack of colitis in the presence of colitic arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis remained uninfluenced. Clubbing of fingers was related to severity, extent of involvement, and length of the history of colitis. A significant association between clubbing of the fingers and carcinoma of the colon, pseudopolyposis, toxic dilatation, and arthropathy has been shown. The frequency of surgical intervention in patients with clubbing was higher but the overall mortality was not significantly different from the patients without clubbing. PMID:5473606

  2. Transdermal deferoxamine prevents pressure-induced diabetic ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Duscher, Dominik; Neofytou, Evgenios; Wong, Victor W.; Maan, Zeshaan N.; Rennert, Robert C.; Januszyk, Michael; Rodrigues, Melanie; Malkovskiy, Andrey V.; Whitmore, Arnetha J.; Galvez, Michael G.; Whittam, Alexander J.; Brownlee, Michael; Rajadas, Jayakumar; Gurtner, Geoffrey C.

    2015-01-01

    There is a high mortality in patients with diabetes and severe pressure ulcers. For example, chronic pressure sores of the heels often lead to limb loss in diabetic patients. A major factor underlying this is reduced neovascularization caused by impaired activity of the transcription factor hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α). In diabetes, HIF-1α function is compromised by a high glucose-induced and reactive oxygen species-mediated modification of its coactivator p300, leading to impaired HIF-1α transactivation. We examined whether local enhancement of HIF-1α activity would improve diabetic wound healing and minimize the severity of diabetic ulcers. To improve HIF-1α activity we designed a transdermal drug delivery system (TDDS) containing the FDA-approved small molecule deferoxamine (DFO), an iron chelator that increases HIF-1α transactivation in diabetes by preventing iron-catalyzed reactive oxygen stress. Applying this TDDS to a pressure-induced ulcer model in diabetic mice, we found that transdermal delivery of DFO significantly improved wound healing. Unexpectedly, prophylactic application of this transdermal delivery system also prevented diabetic ulcer formation. DFO-treated wounds demonstrated increased collagen density, improved neovascularization, and reduction of free radical formation, leading to decreased cell death. These findings suggest that transdermal delivery of DFO provides a targeted means to both prevent ulcer formation and accelerate diabetic wound healing with the potential for rapid clinical translation. PMID:25535360

  3. Guidelines for treatment of patients with diabetes and infected ulcers.

    PubMed

    Mansilha, A; Brandão, D

    2013-02-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers and their consequences do not only represent a major tragedy for the patient and his/her family, but also place a significant burden on the healthcare systems and society in general. Diabetic patients may develop foot ulcers due to neuropathy (autonomic, sensory, and motor deficits), angiopathy or both. As a result of the additional immunopathy associated with diabetes, the probability of these wounds to become infected is extremely high. Diabetic foot infections can be classified in mild, moderate and severe according to local and systemic signs. Their identification should lead to a prompt and systematic evaluation and treatment, ideally performed by a multidisciplinary team. Decisions concerning empirical initial antibiotic agent(s), desirable route of administration, duration and need of hospitalization should be based on the more likely involved pathogen(s), the severity of the infection, the ulcer chronicity and the presence of significant ischemia. Wound cultures, ideally from ulcer tissue, are strongly advisable and can help guiding and narrowing the antibiotic spectrum. Appropriate wound care and off-loading should not be neglected. When revascularization is required, the correct timing can be crucial for limb salvage. Since the recurrence of ulcer and infection is high, the implementation of appropriate preventive measures can be critical. Ultimately, the definitive goal in the treatment of diabetic foot infections is to prevent the amputation catastrophe. PMID:23443604

  4. Enhanced expression of matrilysin, collagenase, and stromelysin-1 in gastrointestinal ulcers.

    PubMed Central

    Saarialho-Kere, U. K.; Vaalamo, M.; Puolakkainen, P.; Airola, K.; Parks, W. C.; Karjalainen-Lindsberg, M. L.

    1996-01-01

    Programmed expression of several matrix metalloproteinases is an important feature of cutaneous wound healing. To study whether this also applies to gastrointestinal ulcer healing, we used in situ hybridization with 35S-labeled probes to localize sites of collagenase, stromelysin-1, and matrilysin expression in 26 samples representing peptic ulcers, Crohn's disease, and ulcerative colitis. In contrast to skin wounds, collagenase mRNA was not detected in the surface epithelium bordering gastrointestinal ulcer areas. However, together with stromelysin-1 mRNA, it was abundantly expressed by the granulation tissue in all types of ulcers. Signal for matrilysin mRNA and protein was detected in the mucosal epithelium bordering the ulcerations but never in the ulcer stroma. The gut basement membrane was disrupted under the matrilysin-producing epithelial cells as assessed by immunostaining for laminin. Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMP-1) mRNA never co-localized with matrilysin-positive mucosal epithelial cells. These data indicate that matrilysin plays a significant role in epithelial remodelling occurring in gastrointestinal ulcerations whereas collagenase and stromelysin-1 are involved in the reparative processes in the ulcer bed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8579114

  5. Ulcer Protective Activity of Jatropha gossypiifolia Linn. in Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakumar, Arumugam Ramamoorthy; Daniel, Epison Prabu; Ilavarasan, Raju; Venkataraman, S.; Vijayakumar, S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Several synthetic drugs are useful in the treatment of peptic ulcer, but almost of these drugs are used in prolonging time, it may cause several adverse reactions. However, the herbal medicines are more potent to the treatment and minimize the side effects. Objective: To evaluate the methanol extract of Jatropha gossypiifolia Linn. (MEJG) for gastro protective activity against Wistar rats. Materials and Methods: Anti-ulcer potency of MEJG (100 and 200 mg/kg, b.w.) was assessed using aspirin (200 mg/kg, p.o.) plus pylorus ligation ulcer model and the parameters studied were ulcer index (UI), gastric juice volume, pH, total acidity, and total acid output. Same extract was studied by ethanol-induced (80%, 5 mL/kg, intragastrically) ulcer model, and the UI and biochemical parameters were studied. Results: The oral administration of MEJG (100 and 200 mg/kg) significantly (P < 0.001) attenuated the ulcer score and anti-secretary parameters (such as the volume of gastric content, free acidity, total acidity, and total acid output) in the aspirin plus pylorus ligation rats. The extract also significantly attenuated (P < 0.001) ulcer score in ethanol-induced ulcer model and lipid peroxidation level and significantly increased the level of glutathione peroxides, catalase, and superoxide dismutase activity. The MEJG may possess active constituents such as alkaloids, glycosides, flavonoids, and terpenes, which may play a major role in gastroprotective effect in Wistar rats. Conclusion: The present study provides scientific support for the anti-ulcer activities of extracts of JG and also claimed that antioxidant potential of the extracts. However, substantiates the traditional claims for the usage of this drug in the treatment of gastric ulcer. SUMMARY The methanolic extract of jatropha gossypiifolia Linn. for gastro protective activity against aspirin plus pyloric ligation and ethanol induced ulcer models was studied in Wistar rats. JG shows significantly

  6. Corneal cross-linking in 9 horses with ulcerative keratitis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Corneal ulcers are one of the most common eye problems in the horse and can cause varying degrees of visual impairment. Secondary infection and protease activity causing melting of the corneal stroma are always concerns in patients with corneal ulcers. Corneal collagen cross-linking (CXL), induced by illumination of the corneal stroma with ultraviolet light (UVA) after instillation of riboflavin (vitamin B2) eye drops, introduces crosslinks which stabilize melting corneas, and has been used to successfully treat infectious ulcerative keratitis in human patients. Therefore we decided to study if CXL can be performed in sedated, standing horses with ulcerative keratitis with or without stromal melting. Results Nine horses, aged 1 month to 16 years (median 5 years) were treated with a combination of CXL and medical therapy. Two horses were diagnosed with mycotic, 5 with bacterial and 2 with aseptic ulcerative keratitis. A modified Dresden-protocol for CXL could readily be performed in all 9 horses after sedation. Stromal melting, diagnosed in 4 horses, stopped within 24 h. Eight of nine eyes became fluorescein negative in 13.5 days (median time; range 4–26 days) days after CXL. One horse developed a bacterial conjunctivitis the day after CXL, which was successfully treated with topical antibiotics. One horse with fungal ulcerative keratitis and severe uveitis was enucleated 4 days after treatment due to panophthalmitis. Conclusions CXL can be performed in standing, sedated horses. We did not observe any deleterious effects attributed to riboflavin or UVA irradiation per se during the follow-up, neither in horses with infectious nor aseptic ulcerative keratitis. These data support that CXL can be performed in the standing horse, but further studies are required to compare CXL to conventional medical treatment in equine keratitis and to optimize the CXL protocol in this species. PMID:23803176

  7. A Real World, Observational Registry of Chronic Wounds and Ulcers

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-18

    Diabetic Foot; Varicose Ulcer; Pressure Ulcer; Surgical Wound Dehiscence; Vasculitis; Skin Ulcer; Leg Ulcer; Wounds and Injuries; Pyoderma; Peripheral Arterial Disease; Diabetic Neuropathies; Lymphedema; Venous Insufficiency; Diabetes Complications; Amputation Stump

  8. Helicobacter pylori in oral ulcerations.

    PubMed

    Shimoyama, T; Horie, N; Kato, T; Kaneko, T; Komiyama, K

    2000-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori is an important pathogen involved in the development of gastrointestinal ulcers, but its involvement in oral ulcerous lesions is unclear. As culture is generally recognized as the gold standard for diagnosis of H. pylori infection, we employed this approach to assess the association of H. pylori with oral mucosal ulcerations. Samples were collected from patients with oral mucosal ulcerative disorders: 12 cases of recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS), 7 cases of herpes simplex virus (HSV) stomatitis, and 3 cases of erosive lichen planus (LP). Serum IgG antibodies against H. pylori were examined in all cases. All of the RAS and erosive LP cases were culture-negative for H. pylori, while two cases of HSV stomatitis were positive. The two culture-positive cases were also seropositve for the H. pylori antigen. It is suggested that H. pylori might not have a direct association with oral ulcerations. However, H. pylori in the oral cavity might exist in a non-culturable coccoid state without productive infection, and might form colonies only under special conditions such as HSV infection. PMID:11269381

  9. Nutritional care in peptic ulcer

    PubMed Central

    VOMERO, Nathália Dalcin; COLPO, Elisângela

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Peptic ulcer is a lesion of the mucosal lining of the upper gastrointestinal tract characterized by an imbalance between aggressive and protective factors of the mucosa, having H. pylori as the main etiologic factor. Dietotherapy is important in the prevention and treatment of this disease. Aim To update nutritional therapy in adults' peptic ulcer. Methods Exploratory review without restrictions with primary sources indexed in Scielo, PubMed, Medline, ISI, and Scopus databases. Results Dietotherapy, as well as caloric distribution, should be adjusted to the patient's needs aiming to normalize the nutritional status and promote healing. Recommended nutrients can be different in the acute phase and in the recovery phase, and there is a greater need of protein and some micronutrients, such as vitamin A, zinc, selenium, and vitamin C in the recovery phase. In addition, some studies have shown that vitamin C has a beneficial effect in eradication of H. pylori. Fibers and probiotics also play a important role in the treatment of peptic ulcer, because they reduce the side effects of antibiotics and help reduce treatment time. Conclusion A balanced diet is vital in the treatment of peptic ulcer, once food can prevent, treat or even alleviate the symptoms involving this pathology. However, there are few papers that innovate dietotherapy; so additional studies addressing more specifically the dietotherapy for treatment of peptic ulcer are necessary. PMID:25626944

  10. [Duodenal ulcers caused by chloroquine-proguanil association].

    PubMed

    Roux, X; Imbert, P; Rivière, F; Méchaï, F; Rapp, C

    2010-12-01

    Chloroquine-proguanil association is recommended for prophylaxis against falciparum malaria in countries with a low prevalence of chloroquine resistance. It is usually well tolerated with mild side effects consisting mainly of transient digestive discomfort and buccal manifestations (mouth sores or ulcers). The purpose of this report is to describe a case of duodenal ulcers presenting as epigastric pain with 10-kg weight-loss in a 32-year-old man taking chloroquine-proguanil for malaria prophylaxis during a stay in Haiti. No other causes of duodenal ulcers or weight-loss were found. Chloroquine-proguanil prophylaxis was discontinued and replaced by omeprazole for four weeks. Symptoms improved quickly and full recovery was observed within one month. To our knowledge, the occurrence of duodenal ulcers under chloroquine-proguanil association is quite rare, but possibly severe. Upper digestive endoscopy should be performed if a patient under chloroquine-proguanil develops abdominal pain especially in association with weight-loss. If endoscopy reveals duodenal ulcers, chloroquine-proguanil should be discontinued and replaced by another prophylactic regimen. PMID:21520638

  11. Peptic Ulcer - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Peptic Ulcer URL of this page: https://www.nlm.nih. ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Peptic Ulcer - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on ...

  12. Peptic Ulcer - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Peptic Ulcer URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/ ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Peptic Ulcer - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on ...

  13. Multisystemic Sarcoidosis Presenting as Pretibial Leg Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Wollina, Uwe; Baunacke, Anja; Hansel, Gesina

    2016-09-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystemic disease of unknown etiology. Up to 30% of patients develop cutaneous manifestations, either specific or nonspecific. Ulcerating sarcoidosis leading to leg ulcers is a rare observation that may lead to confusions with other, more common types of chronic leg ulcers. We report the case of a 45-year-old female patient with chronic multisystemic sarcoidosis presenting with pretibial leg ulcers. Other etiology could be excluded. Histology revealed nonspecific findings. Therefore, the diagnosis of nonspecific leg ulcers in sarcoidosis was confirmed. Treatment consisted of oral prednisolone and good ulcer care. Complete healing was achieved within 6 months. Sarcoidosis is a rare cause of leg ulcers and usually sarcoid granulomas can be found. Our patient illustrates that even in the absence of sarcoid granulomas, leg ulcers can be due to sarcoidosis. PMID:27272316

  14. Detection of esophageal ulcerations with technetium-99m albumin sucralfate

    SciTech Connect

    Goff, J.S.; Adcock, K.A.; Schmelter, R.

    1986-07-01

    Technetium-99m albumin-sucralfate ((/sup 99m/Tc)Su) can be used to demonstrate peptic ulcer disease in man and animals. We evaluated the usefulness of (/sup 99m/Tc)Su for detecting various grades of esophagitis. (/sup 99m/Tc)Su adhered to the distal esophagus for up to 3 hr in five of six patients with esophageal ulcers but adhered to only two of nine with lesser degrees of esophagitis. No adherence was seen in five patients without esophagitis. Thus, (/sup 99m/Tc)Su may not be useful for detecting any but the most severe grade of esophagitis. Based on these results, we speculate that the previously documented beneficial effects of sucralfate on mild to moderate esophagitis may be due to other mechanisms besides adherence to the ulcerated mucosa.

  15. Pressure ulcers. Local wound care.

    PubMed

    Goode, P S; Thomas, D R

    1997-08-01

    Local care of pressure ulcers includes wound cleansing, débridement, and dressings. Wound cleansing should remove loose debris and exudate but should not damage viable tissue. Saline irrigation is the standard. Débridement is often necessary for Stage III and IV pressure ulcers and can be performed autolytically, mechanically, enzymatically, or sharply. Prompt débridement is essential for infected wounds. Dressings should keep the wound bed continuously moist, should not be toxic to granulation tissue, and should keep the surrounding intact skin dry. Randomized, controlled clinical trials are necessary to define optimal local wound care further. PMID:9227943

  16. Computed tomographic findings in penetrating peptic ulcer

    SciTech Connect

    Madrazo, B.L.; Halpert, R.D.; Sandler, M.A.; Pearlberg, J.L.

    1984-12-01

    Four cases of peptic ulcer penetrating the head of the pancreas were diagnosed by computed tomography (CT). Findings common to 3 cases included (a) an ulcer crater, (b) a sinus tract, and (c) enlargement of the head of the pancreas. Unlike other modalities, the inherent spatial resolution of CT allows a convenient diagnosis of this important complication of peptic ulcer disease.

  17. Preventing Decubitus Ulcers with Cotton Sheeting Systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Decubitus pressure ulcers are a worldwide health crisis and their prevention and treatment has become a national priority. The National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Board estimates that as many as three million people in the United States have pressure ulcers. The causes of the ailment include both extr...

  18. Acute Pancreatitis Due to a Duodenal Ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Pyeon, Sung Ik; Kim, Yong Tae; Lee, Ban Seok; Lee, Sang Ho; Lee, Jae Nam; Cheong, Jae Hoon; Oh, Kong Jin

    2014-01-01

    Duodenal ulcers and acute pancreatitis are two of the most commonly encountered gastrointestinal diseases among the general population. However, duodenal ulcer-induced pancreatitis is very rarely reported worldwide. This report elaborates on a distinct medical treatment that contributes to partial or complete treatment of acute pancreatitis induced by a duodenal ulcer scar. PMID:25505728

  19. [Important of off loading in the treatment of foot diabetic ulcers].

    PubMed

    Malacarne, S; Paoli, C; Philippe, J

    2011-06-01

    Foot ulcers are a frequent complication and develop in 15% of patient with diabetes. Ulceration is caused by several factor including neuropathy, arterial insufficiency and infection. Neuropathy results in a loss of the protective sensation and foot deformation. Off loading is an important part of the treatment permitting to reduce pressure and improve healing. Total casting is the gold standard and healing is observed in 90%, but there are several contraindications and limitations. Alternatives include removal devices that must be evaluated to improve off-loading and patient observance. Prevention with specific follow-up and shoes adaptation is recommended to prevent recurrent ulcer. PMID:21751724

  20. Role of Nutrition in the Treatment and Prevention of Pressure Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Thomas, David R

    2014-06-24

    Undernutrition has been associated with pressure ulcers in epidemiological studies over several decades. Accumulating evidence from recent systematic reviews and randomized controlled trials has shown that nutrition therapy has only modest effects on prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers. Since undernutrition should be responsive to the provision of adequate nutrients, the poor response suggests a different nutrition construct is required. Weight loss and changes in acute inflammatory reactants may reflect the syndrome of cachexia rather than simple undernutrition. Nutrition prescriptions should be individually tailored to persons with pressure ulcers with regard to both macro- and micronutrients. This review evaluates effects of malnutrition on pressure ulcers and analyzes effects of nutrition on pressure ulcer prevention and healing. PMID:24961876

  1. Treatment of experimental ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Lazebnik, L B; Lychkova, A E; Knyazev, O V

    2012-10-01

    The effects of infliximab, an anticytokine drug, on the course of inflammatory process was studied on the model of ulcerative colitis induced by injection of picrylsulfonic acid. Infliximab prevented the development of toxic dilatation and a drop of bioelectric activity of smooth muscles via maintenance of activity of the intramural nervous system neurons. PMID:23113311

  2. Colonic motility in ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Antonelli, Elisabetta; Villanacci, Vincenzo; Baldoni, Monia; Dore, Maria Pina

    2014-01-01

    Background Inflammatory conditions affecting the gut may cause motility disturbances, and ulcerative colitis – one of the main disorders among the inflammatory bowel diseases – may display abnormal colonic motility. Aim To review the abnormalities of the large bowel in ulcerative colitis, by considering the motility, laboratory (in vitro) and pathological studies dealing with this topic. Methods A comprehensive online search of Medline and the Science Citation Index was carried out. Results Patients with ulcerative colitis frequently display colonic motor abnormalities, including lack of contractility, an increase of propulsive contractile waves, an excessive production of nitric oxide, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide nerves, interleukin 1 beta, neurotensin, tachykinins levels and the weaker action of substance P, likely related to a neuromuscular dysfunction due to the inflammatory process. Conclusions A better understanding of the pathophysiological grounds of altered colonic motility in ulcerative colitis may lead to a more in-depth knowledge of the accompanying symptoms and to better and more targeted therapeutic approaches. PMID:25452840

  3. Successful treatment of ileal ulcers caused by immunosuppressants in two organ transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yun-Wei; Gu, Hua-Ying; Abassa, Kodjo-Kunale; Lin, Xian-Yi; Wei, Xiu-Qing

    2016-06-28

    Although gastroduodenal ulcers are common in solid organ transplant patients, there are few reports on multiple giant ulcers in the distal ileum and ileocecal valve caused by immunosuppressants Herein, we report on a liver transplant recipient and a renal transplant recipient with multiple large ulcers in the distal ileum and ileocecal valve who rapidly achieved ulcer healing upon withdrawal of sirolimus or tacrolimus and administration of thalidomide. In case 1, a 56-year-old man with primary hepatocellular carcinoma had received a liver transplantation. Tacrolimus combined with sirolimus and prednisolone was used as the anti-rejection regimen. Colonoscopy was performed because of severe abdominal pain and diarrhea at post-operative month 10. Multiple giant ulcers were found at the ileocecal valve and distal ileum. The ulcers healed rapidly with withdrawal of sirolimus and treatment with thalidomide. There was no recurrence during 2 years of follow-up. In case 2, a 34-year-old man with end-stage kidney disease received kidney transplantation and was put on tacrolimus combined with mycophenolate mofetil and prednisolone as the anti-rejection regimen. Twelve weeks after the operation, the patient presented with hematochezia and severe anemia. Colonoscopy revealed multiple large ulcers in the ileocecal valve and distal ileum, with massive accumulation of fresh blood. The bleeding ceased after treatment with intravenous somatostatin and oral thalidomide. Tacrolimus was withdrawn at the same time. Colonoscopy at week 4 of follow-up revealed remarkable healing of the ulcers, and there was no recurrence of bleeding during 1 year of follow-up. No lymphoma, tuberculosis, or infection of cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, or fungus was found in either patient. In post-transplantation cases with ulcers in the distal ileum and ileocecal valve, sirolimus or tacrolimus should be considered a possible risk factor, and withdrawing them or switching to another immunosuppressant

  4. Successful treatment of ileal ulcers caused by immunosuppressants in two organ transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yun-Wei; Gu, Hua-Ying; Abassa, Kodjo-Kunale; Lin, Xian-Yi; Wei, Xiu-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Although gastroduodenal ulcers are common in solid organ transplant patients, there are few reports on multiple giant ulcers in the distal ileum and ileocecal valve caused by immunosuppressants Herein, we report on a liver transplant recipient and a renal transplant recipient with multiple large ulcers in the distal ileum and ileocecal valve who rapidly achieved ulcer healing upon withdrawal of sirolimus or tacrolimus and administration of thalidomide. In case 1, a 56-year-old man with primary hepatocellular carcinoma had received a liver transplantation. Tacrolimus combined with sirolimus and prednisolone was used as the anti-rejection regimen. Colonoscopy was performed because of severe abdominal pain and diarrhea at post-operative month 10. Multiple giant ulcers were found at the ileocecal valve and distal ileum. The ulcers healed rapidly with withdrawal of sirolimus and treatment with thalidomide. There was no recurrence during 2 years of follow-up. In case 2, a 34-year-old man with end-stage kidney disease received kidney transplantation and was put on tacrolimus combined with mycophenolate mofetil and prednisolone as the anti-rejection regimen. Twelve weeks after the operation, the patient presented with hematochezia and severe anemia. Colonoscopy revealed multiple large ulcers in the ileocecal valve and distal ileum, with massive accumulation of fresh blood. The bleeding ceased after treatment with intravenous somatostatin and oral thalidomide. Tacrolimus was withdrawn at the same time. Colonoscopy at week 4 of follow-up revealed remarkable healing of the ulcers, and there was no recurrence of bleeding during 1 year of follow-up. No lymphoma, tuberculosis, or infection of cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, or fungus was found in either patient. In post-transplantation cases with ulcers in the distal ileum and ileocecal valve, sirolimus or tacrolimus should be considered a possible risk factor, and withdrawing them or switching to another immunosuppressant

  5. Is Helicobacter pylori Infection the Primary Cause of Duodenal Ulceration or a Secondary Factor? A Review of the Evidence.

    PubMed

    Kate, Vikram; Ananthakrishnan, N; Tovey, Frank I

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) has a role in the multifactorial etiology of peptic ulcer disease. A link between H. pylori infection and duodenal ulcer disease is now established. Other contributing factors and their interaction with the organism may initiate the ulcerative process. The fact that eradication of H. pylori infection leads to a long-term cure in the majority of duodenal ulcer patients and the fact that the prevalence of infection is higher in ulcer patients than in the normal population are cogent arguments in favor of it being the primary cause of the ulceration. Against this concept there are issues that need explanation such as the reason why only a minority of infected persons develop duodenal ulceration when infection with H. pylori is widespread. There is evidence that H. pylori infection has been prevalent for several centuries, yet duodenal ulceration became common at the beginning of the twentieth century. The prevalence of duodenal ulceration is not higher in countries with a high prevalence of H. pylori infection. This paper debate puts forth the point of view of two groups of workers in this field whether H. pylori infection is the primary cause of duodenal ulcer disease or a secondary factor. PMID:23606834

  6. Pressure ulcer prevention in the community setting.

    PubMed

    Jones, Donna

    Pressure ulcers are associated with reduced quality of life, affecting individuals physically, socially and emotionally. The financial cost to the NHS of preventing and treating such ulcers is substantial. Although largely preventable, pressure ulcers are still common. The Department of Health is committed to eliminating all avoidable pressure ulcers in NHS-provided care. This article explores methods of preventing pressure ulcers, with particular focus on risk assessment, skin inspection, pressure-relieving measures, nutrition and hydration, and patient and carer education. PMID:24044860

  7. Drug therapy of peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Ching, C K; Lam, S K

    Healing of peptic ulcers can be achieved by using a variety of anti-ulcer medications. The most commonly used agents include the histamine-2 receptor antagonists (H2RAs) and the proton pump inhibitors. They are also efficacious in preventing ulcer recurrence providing maintenance treatment is given. The ideal treatment for peptic ulcers today is aiming at eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection. Successful elimination of the latter not only heals the ulcers but also provides a cure for the disease, so that the patients will no longer require lifelong maintenance medical therapy. PMID:7551483

  8. Experimental ulcerative disease of the colon.

    PubMed

    Watt, J; Marcus, R

    1975-01-01

    The oral administration to guinea-pigs of an aqueous solution of carrageenan derived from the red seaweed, Eucheuma spinosum, provides a useful, readily available experimental model for the study of ulcerative disease of the colon. Two types of ulcerative disease can be produced within a 4-6 week period, viz., ulceration localised mainly to the caecum by using 1% undegraded carrageenan in the drinking fluid, and extensive ulceration involving caecum, colon, and rectum by using 5% degraded carrageenan. Ulceration is probably due to the local action of carrageenan in the bowel. PMID:1202321

  9. Peptic ulcers: mortality and hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Riley, R

    1991-01-01

    This study analyzes data on peptic ulcer disease based on deaths for 1951-1988 and hospital separations for 1969-1988. The source of the data are mortality and morbidity statistics provided to Statistics Canada by the provinces. The age-standardized mortality rates (ASMR) for peptic ulcer disease decreased from 1951 to 1988 by 69.4% for men (8.5 to 2.6 per 100,000 population), and 31.8% for women (2.2 to 1.5). Separation rates from hospitals during 1969-1988 for peptic ulcer disease also decreased by 59.8% for men (242.7 to 97.6 per 100,000 population) and 35.6% for women (103.2 to 66.5). Age-specific rates for both mortality and hospital separations increased with age. Epidemiological studies indicate that the incidence of peptic ulcer disease is declining in the general population. The downward trends in mortality and hospitalization rates for peptic ulcer disease reflect this change in incidence, but additional factors probably contribute as well to this decline. Male rates for both mortality and hospital separations were much higher than female rates at the beginning of the study period; but toward the end, the gap between the sexes narrowed considerably, mainly because the male rates declined substantially while the female rates decline moderately. The slower decline in the rates for women may be related to such factors as the increasing labour force participation among women and the slower decline in the population of female smokers. PMID:1801957

  10. Prevention and management of diabetic foot ulcers.

    PubMed

    Turns, Martin

    2015-03-01

    As part of an annual foot review, trained and competent personnel should examine patients' feet to detect risk factors for ulceration. Foot examination with shoes and stockings removed should include: palpation of foot pulses; testing foot sensations using 10g monofilament or vibration; inspection for significant callus or deformed nails; inspection for any structural deformity; asking about any previous ulceration; checking for signs of ulceration; asking about any pain; and inspecting footwear. Following assessment, a foot risk classification score should be given. The person with diabetes should then be informed of their risk score, with education offered regarding future foot-care management. Diabetic foot complications include ulceration, Charcot foot, painful neuropathy, gangrene and amputation. Risk factors for ulceration include non-palpable pulses, insensate foot, significant callus, deformed nails, history of previous ulcer or amputation, tissue damage or signs of ulceration, foot pain and unsuitable footwear. PMID:25757381

  11. Cohort study of atypical pressure ulcers development.

    PubMed

    Jaul, Efraim

    2014-12-01

    Atypical pressure ulcers (APU) are distinguished from common pressure ulcers (PU) with both unusual location and different aetiology. The occurrence and attempts to characterise APU remain unrecognised. The purpose of this cohort study was to analyse the occurrence of atypical location and the circumstances of the causation, and draw attention to the prevention and treatment by a multidisciplinary team. The cohort study spanned three and a half years totalling 174 patients. The unit incorporates two weekly combined staff meetings. One concentrates on wound assessment with treatment decisions made by the physician and nurse, and the other, a multidisciplinary team reviewing all patients and coordinating treatment. The main finding of this study identified APU occurrence rate of 21% within acquired PU over a three and a half year period. Severe spasticity constituted the largest group in this study and the most difficult to cure wounds, located in medial aspects of knees, elbows and palms. Medical devices caused the second largest occurrence of atypical wounds, located in the nape of the neck, penis and nostrils. Bony deformities were the third recognisable atypical wound group located in shoulder blades and upper spine. These three categories are definable and time observable. APU are important to be recognisable, and can be healed as well as being prevented. The prominent role of the multidisciplinary team is primary in identification, prevention and treatment. PMID:23374746

  12. The prevalence of lymphoid follicles in Helicobacter pylori associated gastritis in patients with ulcers and non-ulcer dyspepsia.

    PubMed Central

    Zaitoun, A M

    1995-01-01

    AIMS--To determine the prevalence of lymphoid follicles in Helicobacter pylori positive and negative gastritis in antral and body type gastric mucosa in patients with non-ulcer dyspepsia (NUD), duodenal ulcer, or gastric ulcer; to correlate follicle presence with patient age; to evaluate the correlation between the prevalence of lymphoid follicles and active and inactive gastritis and its severity; and to assess the positive predictive value of lymphoid follicle prevalence with respect to H pylori infection. METHODS--Gastric biopsy specimens, graded according to the Sydney system, from 337 patients were studied. RESULTS--Lymphoid follicles occurred more often in antral mucosa (78%) than in body type mucosa (41%) and were observed in 85% of patients with H pylori positive gastritis. There was no significant difference between NUD and gastric and duodenal ulcer disease with regard to the presence of lymphoid follicles. The positive predictive value of the presence of lymphoid follicles in H pylori infection was 96%. Lymphoid follicles were more commonly observed in patients aged between 10 and 29 years. Lymphoid follicles were more frequently found in pangastritis of all subtypes than in antral gastritis and also in active gastritis than in inactive gastritis. The presence of lymphoid follicles correlated strongly with the degree and severity of gastritis. CONCLUSION--Lymphoid follicles are a constant morphological feature of H pylori associated gastritis. Images PMID:7615851

  13. Potential efficiency of antioxidants to prevent pressure ulcers. A neglected hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Bonne, Claude

    2016-06-01

    Pressure ulcers are necrotic lesions mainly due to capillary hypoperfusion. It is well known that hypoxia and also subsequent oxygenation at reperfusion provoke the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) responsible for cell death. The hypothesis of their participation in the pathogenesis of pressure ulcers has already been tested; several antioxidants have the capacity to inhibit skin necrosis in animal models but their efficiency in preventing bedsores has never been demonstrated in patients. The failure of clinical trials to show the protective activity of some antioxidants does not rule out the involvement of ROS in ischemic ulcers and the potential efficacy of other antioxidants in preventing their formation remains possible. PMID:27142137

  14. Spontaneous Corneal Hydrops in a Patient with a Corneal Ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Batawi, Hatim; Kothari, Nikisha; Camp, Andrew; Bernhard, Luis; Karp, Carol L.; Galor, Anat

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We report the case of a 77-year-old man with no history of keratoconus or other ectatic disorders who presented with corneal hydrops in the setting of a corneal ulcer. The risk factors, pathogenesis and treatment options of corneal hydrops are discussed. Method This is an observational case report study. Results A 77-year-old man presented with a 1-day history of severe pain, redness, mucous discharge and photophobia in the right eye. A slit-lamp examination of the right eye showed an area of focal corneal edema and protrusion. Within the area of edema and protrusion, there was an infiltrate with an overlying epithelial defect consistent with an infectious corneal ulcer. The Seidel test showed no leakage, so a clinical diagnosis of corneal hydrops associated with nonperforated corneal ulcer was made. With appropriate antibiotic treatment, the corneal ulcer and hydrops both resolved over a 1-month period. Conclusion Corneal hydrops can occur in the setting of corneal infections. PMID:26889160

  15. Ulcerative umbrellar lesions in captive moon jelly (Aurelia aurita) medusae.

    PubMed

    LaDouceur, E E B; Garner, M M; Wynne, J; Fish, S; Adams, L

    2013-05-01

    Over a period of 6 months, dozens of moon jelly (Aurelia aurita) medusae from a single-species exhibit at the California Science Center (CSC) developed exumbrellar ulcers. Ulcers were progressive, causing umbrellar creases that expanded radially to the bell rim and occasional adoral erosions that extended into gastrovascular cavities. Husbandry interventions, including addition of ultraviolet light sterilizers, repopulation with fresh cultures, and enclosure disinfection, did not arrest the recurrence of lesions. Biopsies or whole specimens representing 17 medusae (15 affected and 2 grossly unaffected) from CSC and 2 control medusae from Aquarium of the Pacific were submitted to a private diagnostic laboratory and processed for light and electron microscopy. Microscopic lesions were present in all CSC medusae and were not observed or negligible in control medusae. Lesions included ulceration, necrosis, and hyperplasia in all umbrellar layers, with most severe lesions in the exumbrella and amoebocyte infiltration in the underlying mesoglea. Special stains, electron microscopy, and fungal culture did not associate microorganisms with the lesions. Bacterial cultures from the CSC population consistently grew Shewanella and Vibrio spp, both of which were considered commensal. Trauma and environmental stress are proposed as possible causes for the ulcers. PMID:23024139

  16. Diversity of the Gastric Microbiota in Thoroughbred Racehorses Having Gastric Ulcer.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hee-Jin; Ho, Hungwui; Hwang, Hyeshin; Kim, Yongbaek; Han, Janet; Lee, Inhyung; Cho, Seongbeom

    2016-04-28

    Equine gastric ulcer syndrome is one of the most frequently reported diseases in thoroughbred racehorses. Although several risk factors for the development of gastric ulcers have been widely studied, investigation of microbiological factors has been limited. In this study, the presence of Helicobacter spp. and the gastric microbial communities of thoroughbred racehorses having mild to severe gastric ulcers were investigated. Although Helicobacter spp. were not detected using culture and PCR techniques from 52 gastric biopsies and 52 fecal samples, the genomic sequences of H. pylori and H. ganmani were detected using nextgeneration sequencing techniques from 2 out of 10 representative gastric samples. The gastric microbiota of horses was mainly composed of Firmicutes (50.0%), Proteobacteria (18.7%), Bacteroidetes (14.4%), and Actinobacteria (9.7%), but the proportion of each phylum varied among samples. There was no major difference in microbial composition among samples having mild to severe gastric ulcers. Using phylogenetic analysis, three distinct clusters were observed, and one cluster differed from the other two clusters in the frequency of feeding, amount of water consumption, and type of bedding. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to investigate the gastric microbiota of thoroughbred racehorses having gastric ulcer and to evaluate the microbial diversity in relation to the severity of gastric ulcer and management factors. This study is important for further exploration of the gastric microbiota in racehorses and is ultimately applicable to improving animal and human health. PMID:26809803

  17. Approach to skin ulcers in older patients.

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Christopher

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide family physicians with an approach to managing skin ulcers in older patients. SOURCES OF INFORMATION: Clinical practice guidelines and best practice guidelines were summarized to describe an evidence-based approach. MAIN MESSAGE; Preventing ulcers is important in frail older patients. Using guidelines can help prevent ulcers in institutions. Clarifying the cause and contributing factors is the first step in management. Pressure and venous ulcers are common in elderly people. Poor nutrition, edema, arterial insufficiency, and anemia often impair wound healing. Adequate debridement is important to decrease risk of infection and to promote healing. There are guidelines for cleaning ulcers. Choice of dressings depends on the circumstances of each wound, but dressings should provide a moist environment. Options for dressings are summarized. CONCLUSION: Family physicians can manage skin ulcers effectively by applying basic principles and using readily available guidelines. PMID:15648380

  18. Engaging patients in pressure ulcer prevention.

    PubMed

    Hudgell, Lynne; Dalphinis, Julie; Blunt, Chris; Zonouzi, Maryam; Procter, Susan

    2015-05-01

    As patients increasingly care for themselves at home, they require accessible information to enable informed self-care. This article describes the development of an educational electronic application (app) designed for use by patients at risk of pressure ulcers, and their carers. The app can be downloaded to Windows, Android or Apple smartphones or tablets. The app is based on the current pressure ulcer prevention and management guidelines from the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel and the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence, and is designed to educate patients and carers about how to prevent a pressure ulcer, how to recognise a pressure ulcer, and what to do if they suspect they are developing a pressure ulcer. We hope the app will be used to help with educational conversations among patients, carers and healthcare professionals. PMID:25942988

  19. [SURGICAL TREATMENT OF COMPLICATED GASTRODUODENAL ULCER].

    PubMed

    Lupahltsov, V I

    2016-03-01

    Results of operative treatment of 437 patients with complicated gastroduodenal ulcer were summarized. The modern views on the problem of conservative therapy for gas- troduodenal ulcer were presented. A rational individual approach with a certain terms is necessary for conservative treatment of gastroduodenal ulcer. A real way for improve- ment of the patients treatment results--it is a combination of effective conservative treatment with a timely established indications for a planned operative treatment before dangerous complications occur. PMID:27514084

  20. Lawsonia intracellularis-associated ulcerative and necro-hemorrhagic enteritis in 5 weanling foals

    PubMed Central

    Arroyo, Luis G.; ter Woort, Federica; Baird, John D.; Tatiersky, Laetitia; DeLay, Josepha; van Dreumel, Tony

    2013-01-01

    This report describes 5 cases of fatal Lawsonia intracellularis-associated ulcerative and necro-hemorrhagic enteritis in weanling Thoroughbred and Standardbred foals. The lesions are similar to those of the L. intracellularis-associated ulcerative and necro-hemorrhagic enteritis syndrome in pigs. Two foals had concurrent severe typhlo-colitis as a result of a large burden of encysted cyathostomes. The clinical, diagnostic, and therapeutic challenges, and the potential complications encountered during the management of such cases are discussed. PMID:24155489

  1. Lawsonia intracellularis-associated ulcerative and necro-hemorrhagic enteritis in 5 weanling foals.

    PubMed

    Arroyo, Luis G; Ter Woort, Federica; Baird, John D; Tatiersky, Laetitia; Delay, Josepha; van Dreumel, Tony

    2013-09-01

    This report describes 5 cases of fatal Lawsonia intracellularis-associated ulcerative and necro-hemorrhagic enteritis in weanling Thoroughbred and Standardbred foals. The lesions are similar to those of the L. intracellularis-associated ulcerative and necro-hemorrhagic enteritis syndrome in pigs. Two foals had concurrent severe typhlo-colitis as a result of a large burden of encysted cyathostomes. The clinical, diagnostic, and therapeutic challenges, and the potential complications encountered during the management of such cases are discussed. PMID:24155489

  2. Parasite load in intact and ulcerative skin of dogs with leishmaniais.

    PubMed

    Silva, Francine Maria de França; Santos, Edna Michely de Sá; Torres, Sandra Maria; Yamasak, Elise Miyuki; Ramos, Rafael Antonio Nascimento; Alves, Leucio Câmara

    2016-03-01

    The skin is the site of inoculation of Leishmania spp. in susceptible hosts, and consequently dermatopathies, especially ulcerative dermatitis, are the main clinical signs observed. The aim of this study was to assess parasitism of the skin (intact and ulcerated) among dogs that were naturally infected by Leishmania spp., through immunohistochemical analysis. Skin fragments (intact and ulcerated) were collected from 13 dogs with positive parasitological (bone marrow aspiration and exfoliative skin) and serological examinations (ELISA S7® Biogene) forLeishmania spp. These samples were processed using the immunohistochemical technique, involving the streptavidin-peroxidase complex. Ulcerative lesions were mainly observed on the elbows (53.84%; 7/13), nostrils (15.38%; 2/13), ears (23.07%; 3/13) and wings of the ilium (7.69%; 1/13). A severe parasite load was detected in 46.15% and 76.92% of the intact and ulcerated skin samples tested, respectively. The parasite load on ulcerated skin was statistically higher than on intact skin (p = 0.0221). These results indicate that the intact and ulcerated skin may host a high parasite load of amastigote forms of Leishmania spp., which can favor the transmission of the parasite. PMID:27007246

  3. Ischemic Gastropathic Ulcer Mimics Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Daher, Saleh; Lahav, Ziv; Rmeileh, Ayman Abu; Mizrahi, Meir

    2016-01-01

    Gastric ulcer due to mesenteric ischemia is a rare clinical finding. As a result, few reports of ischemic gastric ulcers have been reported in the literature. The diagnosis of ischemic gastropathy is seldom considered in patients presenting with abdominal pain and gastric ulcers. In this case report, we describe a patient with increasing abdominal pain, weight loss, and gastric ulcers, who underwent extensive medical evaluation and whose symptoms were resistant to medical interventions. Finally he was diagnosed with chronic mesenteric ischemia, and his clinical and endoscopic abnormalities resolved after surgical revascularization of both the superior mesenteric artery and the celiac trunk. PMID:27579191

  4. Practice recommendations for preventing heel pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Evonne; Scott-Williams, Suzy; McGuire, James B

    2008-10-01

    Heels are the second most common anatomical location for pressure ulcers. A combination of risk factors, including pressure, may cause ulceration. Heel pressure ulcers are a particular concern for surgical patients. A review of the literature, including poster presentations, shows that controlled clinical studies to assess the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of available interventions are not available. Case series (with or without historical controls) as well as pressure ulcer guideline recommendations suggest the most important aspect of heel ulcer prevention is pressure relief (offloading). It also has been documented that the incidence of heel ulcers can be reduced using a total-patient care approach and heel offloading devices. Guidelines, observational studies, and expert opinion intimate that reducing heel ulceration rates can be expected to improve patient outcomes, decrease costs associated with their care, and avoid costs related to hospital-acquired pressure ulcers. The heel pressure ulcer prevention strategies reviewed should be implemented until the results of prospective, randomized controlled studies to compare the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of these strategies are available. PMID:18927483

  5. [Peptic ulcer surgery in the aged].

    PubMed

    Michel, D

    1981-04-01

    Particular problems are discussed in 257 patients over 75 years of age, who were treated for peptic ulcer disease between 1960 and 1979. In elderly patients the peptic ulcer is complicated, often requiring emergency surgery. A special problem in the aged is simultaneous appearance of various sicknesses, which produces further complications. The chosen method of surgery is described and the post-operative period and its general and surgical problems are discussed. The result is a concept of indication for surgery, particularly for the elective operation of chronic ulcers not responding to therapy, before the ulcer becomes complicated. PMID:7227008

  6. Pneumoperitoneum secondary to a perforated gastric ulcer in a cat.

    PubMed

    Lykken, Jennifer D; Brisson, Brigitte A; Etue, Sheila M

    2003-06-15

    A 7-year-old domestic cat was examined because of a history of weight loss, intermittent diarrhea, and anorexia of 6 months' duration. Results of physical examination were normal except for marked abdominal tension. Results of a CBC and serum biochemistry profile were unremarkable. Severe pneumoperitoneum was noted radiographically, and abdominocentesis yielded 640 mL of air. Abdominal distension recurred 1 day after abdominocentesis. Exploratory laparotomy was performed 3 days after recurrence of abdominal distension and revealed a gastric perforation along the greater curvature of the stomach with omental and pancreatic adhesions at the site of perforation. Mild local peritoneal inflammation was also noted. A partial gastrectomy was performed to resect the lesion, and histologic examination confirmed a severe perforating ulcer. The gastric wall adjacent to the ulcer was histologically normal. Aerobic and anaerobic bacteriologic cultures of abdominal swab specimens were negative for bacterial growth. The cat was discharged 4 days after surgery and clinically normal at suture removal. PMID:12830863

  7. Vitiligo in a patient receiving infliximab for refractory ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Waleed A; Al-Enzy, Saleh A; Alsurayei, Saqer A; Ismail, Ali E

    2011-06-01

    Infliximab is a chimerical monoclonal antibody that inhibits pro-inflammatory activity of tumour-necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and it is the primary biological agent used in the treatment of moderate-to-severe ulcerative colitis (UC). We report a case of vitiligo following infliximab administration in a patient with refractory UC. The case serves as a reminder of adverse cutaneous reactions induced by TNFα-antagonist therapy. PMID:21684486

  8. Retrospective review of corneal ulcers in Ipoh Hospital.

    PubMed

    Kursiah, M R; Sharif, F Mohd; Balaravi, P

    2008-12-01

    This study was a retrospective study on corneal ulcer of one year period in Hospital Ipoh. A total of 28 cases were studied. Among the risk factors identified were foreign body on cornea, trauma, contact lens, vernal keratoconjunctivitis and surgical complication. The nature of this disease which was severe and slow healing caused prolonged hospital admission. Identification of causative microorganism by corneal scraping help in the treatment and management of this condition. PMID:19803298

  9. Pressure ulcer classification: defining early skin damage.

    PubMed

    Russell, Linda

    2002-09-01

    This article is the second of a two-part series. The first part (Russell, 2002) looked at various systems and pitfalls of pressure ulcer classification systems. This article focuses on the difficulties of defining early skin damage. Patients' quality of life suffers significantly with a pressure ulcer. The smell of the exudate may be an embarrassment to the patient. The pain and the distress the patient will experience will not easily be forgotten, i.e. the number of dressings required for a deep pressure ulcer, even after the pressure ulcer has healed, will be a memorable intrusion to the patient's daily routine. Early detection of pressure ulcers and timely intervention are essential in the management of patients with pressure ulcers. Controversy exists over the definition of the first three stages of pressure ulcers, but there is consensus on the definition of deep tissue damage. If the pressure ulcer is covered with black necrotic tissue it is difficult to establish depth of the tissue damage. Intact skin can cause problems, as a sacrum may be purple but intact. There is still considerable debate with regard to reactive hyperaemia, as the exact time parameters for persistent erythema to occur are unknown. Little is understood with regard to the exact pathophysiology of reactive hyperaemia and this area requires further investigation. Blistered skin and skin tone also cause confusion in grading of pressure ulcers. The problems associated with classification of pressure ulcers, using colour classification systems, are discussed and the implications for practice are considered. The confusion surrounding early classification of pressure ulcers is discussed and it is hoped that such confusion can be addressed by standardizing training using one national classification system. PMID:12362151

  10. Late Onset and Protracted Course of Steroid Refractory Chronic Graft-versus-Host Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gunes, Gursel; Demiroglu, Haluk; Goker, Hakan; Malkan, Umit Yavuz; Eliacik, Eylem; Yayar, Okan; Buyukasik, Yahya

    2015-01-01

    Chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) is one of the most important causes of morbidity and mortality after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (aHSCT). Occurring in 30% to 70% of patients, cGVHD has a median time to onset of 4 to 6 months and most cases present within 2 years after aHSCT. Here, we present a patient transplanted at the age of 55 who developed refractory cutaneous cGVHD more than 5.5 years after aHSCT. PMID:26613052

  11. Assessing Ulcerative Pododermatitis of Breeding Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Rosell, Joan M.; de la Fuente, L. Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Simple Summary Sore hocks are a health and welfare problem in rabbits housed in cages with mesh floors. Footrests are used to prevent them. They occupy part of the mesh floor of the cage but allow droppings to fall and also protect the rabbit’s feet. In this study we evaluated the use of footrests on 664 commercial farms visited in Spain and Portugal, and the rates of sick animals during 2001–2012; the attention given by producers to animal care was evident as 28% of farms with footrests in 2001 increased to 75% in 2012. Abstract Rabbits in conventional farms are housed in wire net cages with mesh floors to separate them from droppings. In time, lacerations appear on the legs of adult rabbits causing ulcerative pododermatitis or sore hocks, a severe health and welfare problem. Pain causes behavioral changes; productivity is reduced and the most seriously affected animals die or are culled. In this study we evaluated the attention producers have given to this problem and its prevention by installing footrests in cages. We made 2,331 visits to 664 commercial farms in Spain and Portugal between 2001 and 2012, and evaluated morbidity by examining 105,009 females and 10,722 males. The study highlights that the rate of farms with footrests increased from 27.8% in 2001 to 75.2% in 2012. Prevalence of sore hocks in does in 2001 was 11.4%, decreasing to 6.3% in 2012; prevention of ulcerative pododermatitis was associated (P < 0.001) with the presence of footrests. Overall, prevalence was 4.87 ± 0.26 on farms with footrests and 13.71 ± 0.32 without (P < 0.01). PMID:26487404

  12. Peculiar Presentation of Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Diab, Amany; Ahmed, Ayman; Abohamad, Samar; Elgendy, Hala

    2016-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic inflammatory and recurrent disorder that is characterized by bowel inflammation. Among the extraintestinal manifestations (EIMs) that associate UC are the joints and renal manifestations. Joint affection in the form of arthritis can precede the intestinal manifestations of UC. However, renal affection with amyloidosis does not precede the UC diagnosis. Herein, we report a case of 26-year-old male diagnosed with UC after having peripheral arthritis for long time in addition to spondylitis and kidney amyloidosis. PMID:27042365

  13. Scleritis and Peripheral Ulcerative Keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Galor, Anat; Thorne, Jennifer E.

    2008-01-01

    Scleritis and peripheral ulcerative keratitis (PUK) can present as isolated conditions or as part of a systemic inflammatory or infectious disorder. Both are serious ocular conditions that can result in vision loss and therefore require early diagnosis and treatment. Nearly two-thirds of patients with non-infectious scleritis require systemic glucocorticoid therapy, and one fourth need a glucocorticoid-sparing agent, as well. Essentially all patients with non-infectious PUK require systemic glucocorticoids. Detailed clinical history, thorough physical examination, and thoughtful laboratory evaluations are all important in the exclusion of underlying disorders and extraocular involvement. PMID:18037120

  14. Triple gastric peptic ulcer perforation.

    PubMed

    Radojkovic, Milan; Mihajlovic, Suncica; Stojanovic, Miroslav; Stanojevic, Goran; Damnjanovic, Zoran

    2016-03-01

    Patients with advanced or metastatic cancer have compromised nutritional, metabolic, and immune conditions. Nevertheless, little is known about gastroduodenal perforation in cancer patients. Described in the present report is the case of a 41-year old woman with stage IV recurrent laryngeal cancer, who used homeopathic anticancer therapy and who had triple peptic ulcer perforation (PUP) that required surgical repair. Triple gastric PUP is a rare complication. Self-administration of homeopathic anticancer medication should be strongly discouraged when evidence-based data regarding efficacy and toxicity is lacking. PMID:27193988

  15. Symptoms and Causes of Peptic Ulcer Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ulcer Disease Next: Diagnosis of Peptic Ulcer Disease Digestive Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support to patients and medical professionals. View the full list of Digestive Disease Organizations​​ (PDF, 341 KB)​​​​​ NIH...Turning Discovery ...

  16. 38 CFR 4.110 - Ulcers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Ulcers. 4.110 Section 4.110 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SCHEDULE FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Digestive System § 4.110 Ulcers. Experience has shown that the term...

  17. 38 CFR 4.110 - Ulcers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Ulcers. 4.110 Section 4.110 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SCHEDULE FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Digestive System § 4.110 Ulcers. Experience has shown that the term...

  18. The prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Ho, Chester H; Bogie, Kath

    2007-05-01

    Pressure ulcers remain a significant secondary complication for many individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). Technological advances have the potential to affect both the prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers. The focus of this article is hi-tech devices and methodologies. The current state-of-the-art methods are discussed and conceptual approaches are presented. PMID:17543771

  19. Hypostatic ulcers in 47,XXY Klinefelter's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Verp, Marion S; Simpson, Joe Leigh; Martin, Alice O

    1983-01-01

    Hypostatic leg ulcers, probably secondary to vascular insufficiency, were observed in two adult men with 47,XXY Klinefelter's syndrome. The association between leg ulcers and 47,XXY Klinefelter's syndrome deserves increased attention because knowledge of the association may alert clinicians to an otherwise unsuspected chromosome abnormality. PMID:6842542

  20. Prevention, Assessment and Treatment Of Decubitus Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Morden, Patricia; Bayne, Ronald

    1976-01-01

    Decubitus ulcers are not uncommon in chronically ill and disabled people who are bedridden. Prevention is better than cure, but the chief ingredient in both is avoidance of excess pressure on the tissues, especially over bony prominences. If an ulcer does occur, it requires scrutiny, appropriate therapy with the agents listed and repeated re-examination. PMID:21308073

  1. 38 CFR 4.110 - Ulcers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ulcers. 4.110 Section 4.110 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SCHEDULE FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Digestive System § 4.110 Ulcers. Experience has shown that the term “peptic ulcer” is not sufficiently specific...

  2. Abomasal ulceration and tympany of calves.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Tessa S

    2009-03-01

    This article reviews the current knowledge on the pathophysiology of abomasal ulcer formation and abomasal tympany in calves. The development of ulcers and bloat has been attributed to many factors, including coarse feed, environmental stress, vitamin and mineral deficiencies, and bacterial infections. This article discusses various factors thought to play a role in the development of these abomasal conditions in calves. PMID:19174290

  3. Pressure ulcers: Back to the basics

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Karoon; Chauhan, Neha

    2012-01-01

    Pressure ulcer in an otherwise sick patient is a matter of concern for the care givers as well as the medical personnel. A lot has been done to understand the disease process. So much so that USA and European countries have established advisory panels in their respective continents. Since the establishment of these organizations, the understanding of the pressure ulcer has improved significantly. The authors feel that the well documented and well publicized definition of pressure ulcer is somewhat lacking in the correct description of the disease process. Hence, a modified definition has been presented. This disease is here to stay. In the process of managing these ulcers the basic pathology needs to be understood well. Pressure ischemia is the main reason behind the occurrence of ulceration. Different extrinsic and intrinsic factors have been described in detail with review of literature. There are a large number of risk factors causing ulceration. The risk assessment scales have eluded the surgical literature and mostly remained in nursing books and websites. These scales have been reproduced for completion of the basics on decubitus ulcer. The classification of the pressure sores has been given in a comparative form to elucidate that most of the classifications are the same except for minor variations. The management of these ulcers is ever evolving but the age old saying of “prevention is better than cure” suits this condition the most. PMID:23162223

  4. The microbiological flora of penile ulcerations.

    PubMed

    Chapel, T; Brown, W J; Jeffries, C; Stewart, J A

    1978-01-01

    The penile ulcerations of 100 consecutive men were tested for microorganisms. A polymicrobial flora was identified in the ulcers of 97 men. The microorganisms recovered from these ulcers included combinations of anaerobic and aerobic bacteria (including Mycoplasma), herpes simplex virus, yeasts, and filamentous fungi. Fifty-three study entrants had microorganisms, identified by culture or serologic tests, that were considered primary in ulcer pathogenesis. Herpes simplex virus was the most prevalent and Treponema pallidum was the next most prevalent pathogen identified. Of our patients, 5% had two recognized pathogens confirmed by laboratory tests, and only one of these was suspected at clinical examination. In addition, the study suggests that microorganisms other than Haemophilus ducreyi can produce ulcers with a morphology mimicking chancroid. PMID:203634

  5. Comorbid Depression and Diabetic Foot Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Maydick, Diane R; Acee, Anna M

    2016-02-01

    In the United States, 9.3% of the population, or 29.1 million people have diabetes, and depression affects 20% to 40% of these individuals. Diabetic foot ulcers are a common and serious complication of diabetes and one of the most costly. It is estimated that 2% to 3% of persons with diabetes will develop diabetic foot ulcers each year. There is an association between depression and the development of diabetic foot ulcers. The estimated costs associated with managing diabetes, depression, and diabetic foot ulcers place a substantial burden on the U.S. healthcare system and society. Patients should be screened and evaluated by professionals qualified in the diagnosis and management of depression and diabetic foot ulcers. To be effective, an interprofessional approach that includes the patient and significant others should be used. PMID:26835804

  6. Diagnosis and management of venous ulcers.

    PubMed

    Carr, Sandra C

    2008-03-01

    Venous ulceration of the lower extremities is a common and often disabling condition. Venous ulcers are the result of a chronic inflammatory condition caused by persistent venous hypertension. Therapy is directed at counteracting the chronic inflammation in the tissues and at decreasing ambulatory venous hypertension in the area. Compression therapy helps decrease the venous hypertension and aids healing. Topical agents may be used to help decrease the bacterial load in the wound, provide a moist healing environment for dry wounds, or absorb the exudate in wounds with a lot of drainage. Pharmacological adjuncts, such as pentoxifylline or flavanoids, may help counteract the chronic inflammation in the ulcerated area. Interventions to decrease the ambulatory venous hypertension can help patients with either active or healed ulcers. Ablation of incompetent superficial truncal veins and/or perforating veins using radiofrequency ablation, endovenous laser ablation, or foam sclerotherapy can speed ulcer healing and prevent recurrence. PMID:18388013

  7. Lower-extremity ulcers: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Kirsner, R S; Vivas, A C

    2015-08-01

    Chronic wounds of the lower extremities are occurring with increasing prevalence. They affect millions of individuals annually, representing both a significant health risk and a large economic burden. Chronic wounds are associated with increased mortality and substantial morbidity due to infection, pain, limitation of daily activities, and psychosocial consequences. To manage these wounds effectively, clinicians must be able to diagnose and manage their aetiology. Diagnosis starts with determining whether the wound is one of the four most common chronic wounds: venous leg ulcers, diabetic foot ulcers, pressure ulcers and arterial ulcers. Moreover, despite many recent advances in wound care, the challenge of managing chronic wounds is complicated by the lack of consistently accepted diagnostic methods and wound-care standards. We present a comprehensive yet condensed approach to managing lower-extremity ulcers, from diagnosis to basic management. PMID:26257052

  8. Method of healing diabetic forefoot ulcers.

    PubMed Central

    Pollard, J P; Le Quesne, L P

    1983-01-01

    Six diabetic patients with neuropathic ulceration of the sole of the foot (seven feet, eight ulcers) were treated by the application of a below knee walking plaster with a rubber rocker. All the ulcers healed with this treatment, greatly reducing the usual period of hospital inpatient stay. After healing, study of the forces acting on the sole of the foot showed that these ulcers occur at the site of maximal horizontal shear force and confirmed that they occur at the site of maximal vertical force. This treatment is highly effective for neuropathic ulcers of the sole not affecting bone or complicated by deep sepsis. There may be a high rate of recurrence, however, reflecting inadequacy of methods of protecting damaged neuropathic feet. PMID:6401552

  9. Ulcers

    MedlinePlus

    ... stomach is empty. Eating something or taking an antacid medication sometimes makes the pain go away for ... are taken every day for about 2 weeks. Antacids — acid blockers or proton pump inhibitors — are given ...

  10. [Cytological changes in patients with diabetes mellitus and corneal ulcer].

    PubMed

    Raica, D; Turlea, M; Ciocmăreanu, M; Haidar, A; Demian, C; Jinga, F

    1999-01-01

    There were studied 11 diabetic patients, insulin dependents, from 4 were with juvenile diabetes mellitus. These were hospitalized in the Dept. Ophthalm. of the City Hospital of Arad, during 1996-1998, admitted with the diagnosis of corneal ulcer. There were made samples of the gathered secretion from the level of conjunctiva and of the grataj material, gathered at the level of the edges of the corneal ulcer. All samples were stained with the BPT-Drăgan method. There are described cytologic alterations, insisting on details that indicate the severity of the corneal disease. There are taken into consideration cytologic aspects in relationship with the clinical outcome of the disease, pointing out the cellular alterations which announce a nonfavourable prognosis. Cytologic results can improve the diagnosis and they are involved in therapeutic schedule. PMID:10641114