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1

Toxic Metals and Essential Elements in Hair and Severity of Symptoms among Children with Autism  

PubMed Central

ABSTRACT Objective: The objective of this study was to assess the levels of ten toxic metals and essential elements in hair samples of children with autism, and to correlate the level of these elements with the severity of autism. Method: The participants were 44 children, age 3 to 9 years, with Autistic Spectrum Disorder (ASD) according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders 4th Edition, (DSM-IV). The severity of autistic symptomatology was measured by the Childhood Autism Rating Scale (CARS). Hair analysis was performed to evaluate the long term metal exposure and mineral level. Results: By comparing hair concentration of autistic vs nonautistic children, elevated hair concentrations were noted for aluminum, arsenic, cadmium, mercury, antimony, nickel, lead, and vanadium. Hair levels of calcium, iron, iodine, magnesium, manganese, molybdenum, zinc, and selenium were considered deficient. There was a significant positive correlation between lead & verbal communication (p = 0.020) and general impression (p = 0.008). In addition, there was a significant negative correlation between zinc & fear and nervousness (p = 0.022). Conclusion: Our data supports the historic evidence that heavy metals play a role in the development of ASD. In combination with an inadequate nutritional status the toxic effect of metals increase along with the severity of symptoms. PMID:23118818

BLAUROCK-BUSCH, Eleonor; AMIN, Omnia R.; DESSOKI, Hani H.; RABAH, Thanaa

2012-01-01

2

Symptom severity and distress in advanced cancer.  

PubMed

We determined the relationship between symptom severity and distress for multiple cancer symptoms, and examined patient demographic influences on severity and distress in advanced cancer. A Cochran-Armitage trend test determined whether symptom distress increased with severity. Chi-square, Fisher's exact test and logistic regression analysis examined moderate/severe ('clinically important') and distressful symptoms by age (65), gender, primary site group, and ECOG performance status. Forty-six symptoms were analyzed in 181 individuals. More than 50% of individuals with clinically important symptoms rated them as distressful. The median percentage of individuals with mild but still distressful symptoms was 25%, with a range of 0% (bad dreams) to 73% (sore mouth). In both univariate and multivariate analysis, younger (symptoms (only anxiety was more frequently distressful to older individuals). Clinically important symptoms and two of those considered distressful varied by primary site group. After control for severity, symptom distress did not differ by primary site group. The prevalence of distress increased with greater symptom severity. Younger individuals, those with poor performance status, and females had greater symptom severity and distress. Mild symptoms were often distressful. After adjustment for severity, age, gender, and performance status all influenced symptom distress. PMID:20015920

Kirkova, Jordanka; Walsh, Declan; Rybicki, Lisa; Davis, Mellar P; Aktas, Aynur; Tao Jin; Homsi, Jade

2010-04-01

3

Menopausal symptoms: is spirituality associated with the severity of symptoms?  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to explore whether spirituality was associated with menopausal symptoms. Menopausal symptoms, spirituality, health and menopausal status, and socio-demographic variables were assessed in a community sample of 710 peri- and postmenopausal women. A structural model was explored using structural equation modeling. The results evidence spirituality as a significant contributor regarding the severity of most menopausal symptoms. Among others, spirituality had a significant weight in depressive mood (? = -.414; p < .001), anxiety (? = -.308; p < .001), cognitive impairment (? = -.287; p < .001), aches/pain (? = -.148; p < .001), vasomotor (? = -.125; p = .005) and sexual symptoms (? = -.211; p < .001). Some socio-demographic variables, as well as perceived health, also predicted the menopausal symptoms' severity. Therefore, spirituality can have a positive impact on the menopausal symptoms' reporting. PMID:23471772

Pimenta, Filipa; Maroco, João; Ramos, Catarina; Leal, Isabel

2014-08-01

4

Severe toxic hepatitis associated with dronedarone.  

PubMed

Dronedarone was introduced in 2009 as a new antiarrhythmic agent and since then has been increasingly prescribed in atrial fibrillation or flutter. To date, two cases of severe toxic hepatitis have been reported in patients treated with dronedarone, both requiring emergency liver transplantation, and the FDA as well as the EMA have issued warnings about possible severe hepatotoxicity of dronedarone. Here we report an additional case of toxic hepatitis associated with dronedarone presenting with acute liver failure, followed by spontaneous recovery, in a 69-year old woman. PMID:23789833

Jahn, Stephan; Zollner, Gernot; Lackner, Carolin; Stauber, Rudolf E

2013-07-01

5

Cortical neuroanatomic correlates of symptom severity in primary progressive aphasia  

E-print Network

Cortical neuroanatomic correlates of symptom severity in primary progressive aphasia D. Sapolsky of a new measure of clinical impairment in primary progressive aphasia (PPA), the Progressive Aphasia Diagnostic Aphasia Examination; CDR Clinical Dementia Rating; CSB Cam- bridge Semantic Battery; ICC

Dickerson, Brad

6

Autism and ADHD Symptoms in Patients with OCD: Are They Associated with Specific OC Symptom Dimensions or OC Symptom Severity?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), the relationship between autism spectrum disorders (ASD), attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptom, and obsessive-compulsive (OC) symptom dimensions and severity has scarcely been studied. Therefore, 109 adult outpatients with primary OCD were compared to 87 healthy controls on OC, ADHD and…

Anholt, Gideon E.; Cath, Danielle C.; van Oppen, Patricia; Eikelenboom, Merijn; Smit, Johannes H.; van Megen, Harold; van Balkom, Anton J. L. M.

2010-01-01

7

Latent structure of irritable bowel syndrome symptom severity  

PubMed Central

AIM: To investigate the latent structure of an irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) symptom severity scale in a population of healthy adults. METHODS: The Birmingham IBS symptom questionnaire which consists of three symptom specific scales (diarrhea, constipation, pain) was evaluated by means of structural equation modeling. We compared the original 3-factor solution to a general factor model and a bifactor solution in a large internet sample of college students (n = 875). Statistical comparisons of competing models were conducted by means of ?2 difference tests. Regarding the evaluation of model fit, we examined the comparative fit index (CFI) and the Root Mean Square Error of Approximation (RMSEA). RESULTS: Results clearly favored a bifactor model of IBS symptom severity (CFI = 0.99, RMSEA = 0.05) which consisted of a strong general IBS somatization factor and three symptom specific factors (diarrhea, constipation, pain) based on the subscales of the Birmingham IBS symptom questionnaire. The fit indices of the competing one factor model (CFI = 0.85, RMSEA = 0.17) and three factor model (CFI = 0.97, RMSEA = 0.08) were clearly inferior. ?2 difference tests showed that the differences between the models were indeed significant in favor of the bifactor model (P < 0.001). Correlations of the four latent factors with measures of pain sensitivity, somatoform dissociation, fatigue severity, and demographic variables support the validity of our bifactor model of IBS specific symptom severity. CONCLUSION: The findings suggest that IBS symptom severity might best be understood as a continuous and multidimensional construct which can be reliably and validly assessed with the B-IBS. PMID:25574104

Jasper, Fabian; Egloff, Boris; Roalfe, Andrea; Witthöft, Michael

2015-01-01

8

[Hyponatraemia as the cause of severe cerebral symptoms.  

PubMed

Hyponatraemia with severe symptoms is a medical emergency that warrants swift action. Treatment can be delayed and/or insufficient if a systematic approach fails. We present two cases of severe symptomatic hyponatraemia: 1) Seizures treated with antiepileptics and isotonic saline, which fails to increase the plasma [Na+]/reveal the symptoms and 2) coma treated successfully with infusions of hypertonic saline boluses. Effective treatment is simple and involves management of airway, breathing and circulation together with bolus infusions of hypertonic saline to ensure controllable plasma [Na+] increase. PMID:24063711

Sonne, David P; Overgaard-Steensen, Christian

2013-09-23

9

Caregiver Life Satisfaction: Relationship to Youth Symptom Severity through Treatment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study utilized the Satisfaction with Life Scale to investigate the life satisfaction of caregivers for youth receiving mental health services (N = 383). Specifically, this study assessed how caregiver life satisfaction relates to youth symptom severity throughout treatment. Hierarchical linear modeling with a time-varying covariate was used…

Athay, M. Michele

2012-01-01

10

Linguistic Correlates of Asymmetric Motor Symptom Severity in Parkinson's Disease  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Asymmetric motor severity is common in Parkinson's Disease (PD) and provides a method for examining the neurobiologic mechanisms underlying cognitive and linguistic deficits associated with the disorder. In the present research, PD participants (N = 31) were assessed in terms of the asymmetry of their motor symptoms. Interviews with the…

Holtgraves, Thomas; McNamara, Patrick; Cappaert, Kevin; Durso, Raymond

2010-01-01

11

Indicate severe toxicity of highway runoff.  

PubMed

Road runoff is recognized as a substantial nonpoint source of contamination to the aquatic environment. Highway seasonal first flushes contain particularly high concentrations of pollutants. To fully account for the toxicity potential of the runoff, the cumulative effects of the pollutants should be assessed, ideally by biological analyses. Acute toxicity tests with were used to measure the toxicity of runoff from three major highway sections in Israel for 2 yr. Highway first flushes resulted in the mortality of all tested individuals within 24 to 48 h. A first flush collected from Highway 4 (traffic volume: 81,200 cars d) remained toxic even after dilution to <5% (48 h EC <5%). Synthetic solutions with metal concentrations corresponding to highways' first flushes revealed a synergistic adverse effect on survival and a potential additive effect of nonmetal pollutants in the runoff. Because daphnids and other invertebrates constitute the base of the aquatic food chain, detrimental effects of highway runoff may propagate to higher levels of biological organization. The observed high potential of environmental contamination warrants the control of highway runoff in proximity to natural watercourses. PMID:24216417

Dorchin, Achik; Shanas, Uri

2013-09-01

12

Single nucleotide polymorphisms predict symptom severity of autism spectrum disorder  

PubMed Central

Autism is widely believed to be a heterogeneous disorder; diagnosis is currently based solely on clinical criteria, although genetic, as well as environmental, influences are thought to be prominent factors in the etiology of most forms of autism. Our goal is to determine whether a predictive model based on single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) can predict symptom severity of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). We divided 118 ASD children into a mild/moderate autism group (n = 65) and a severe autism group (n = 53), based on the Childhood Autism Rating Scale (CARS). For each child, we obtained 29 SNPs of 9 ASD-related genes. To generate predictive models, we employed three machine-learning techniques: decision stumps (DSs), alternating decision trees (ADTrees), and FlexTrees. DS and FlexTree generated modestly better classifiers, with accuracy = 67%, sensitivity = 0.88 and specificity = 0.42. The SNP rs878960 in GABRB3 was selected by all models, and was related associated with CARS assessment. Our results suggest that SNPs have the potential to offer accurate classification of ASD symptom severity. PMID:21786105

Jiao, Yun; Chen, Rong; Ke, Xiaoyan; Cheng, Lu; Chu, Kangkang; Lu, Zuhong; Herskovits, Edward H

2011-01-01

13

Effects of neuregulin-1 genetic variation and depression symptom severity on longitudinal patterns of psychotic symptoms in primary care attendees.  

PubMed

A better understanding of the factors associated with psychotic symptoms could aid early identification and treatment of psychotic disorders. Previous studies have typically utilized cross-sectional study designs and have focused on individuals with psychotic disorders. Thus, examination of promising correlates of psychotic symptoms using longitudinal designs among more broadly defined populations is warranted. Two such correlates are neuregulin-1 (NRG1) genotypic variation and depression symptom severity. Both NRG1 and depression symptom severity have cross-sectional evidence for an association with psychosis but their affect on longitudinal patterns of psychotic symptoms and their potential interaction effects are less clear. Using repeated measures analysis of variance and covariance we modeled the main and interaction effects of NRG1 genotypic variation and depressive symptom severity on longitudinal psychotic symptom patterns in 301 primary care attendees assessed annually over 4 years. One-fifth (19.9%) of the participants reported one or more psychotic symptoms over the 4-year assessment period. We observed a curvilinear (i.e., cubic) association between depression symptom severity at baseline and longitudinal patterns of psychotic symptoms but did not observe a main effect for NRG1 genotypic variation on psychotic symptom patterns. However, NRG1 rs6994992 genotype moderated the curvilinear association between depression symptom severity and psychotic symptom patterns. Specifically, depression symptom severity had less of an effect on longitudinal psychotic symptoms among carriers of the rs6994992 TT genotype compared to CC and CT carriers. Our findings suggest a curvilinear association between depression symptom severity and longitudinal patterns of psychotic symptoms that is moderated by NRG1 genotype. PMID:24123921

Bousman, C A; Potiriadis, M; Everall, I P; Gunn, J M

2014-01-01

14

Role of Folic Acid on Symptoms of Chronic Arsenic Toxicity  

PubMed Central

Background: Chronic arsenic toxicity (Arsenicosis) due to drinking of arsenic contaminated ground water is a global problem. However, its treatment is unsatisfactory. Methylation of arsenic facilitates its urinary excretion. Persons with relatively lower proportion of urinary dimethyl arsenic acid (DMA) are found to have at greater risk of developing symptoms of arsenicosis including its complications. The biochemical pathway responsible for methylation of arsenic is a folate-dependent pathway. Studies in rodents and humans suggest that folate nutritional status influences the metabolism of arsenic. Methods: The present study compares the effect of giving folic acid on 32 arsenicosis patients during a 6-month period and comparing the results with clinical effect of taking only arsenic-free safe water on 45 age and sex-matched arsenic-affected people for the same period. Results: There was significant improvement of arsenical skin lesion score of both patients treated with folic acid (2.96 ± 1.46 to 1.90 ± 0.90, P < 0.001) and arsenic free safe water (2.91 ± 1.26 to 1.62 ± 1.05, P < 0.001) for a period of 6 months. Significant improvement in systemic disease score was also observed from the baseline systemic score in folic acid treated group (4.78 ± 3.43 to 1.00 ± 1.56, P < 0.001) and the group treated with arsenic-free water (1.87 ± 2.11 to 0.82 ± 1.62, P < 0.001). However, there was a significant increased improvement of systematic disease score in the folic acid treated group compared to the control group taking arsenic free water (P < 0.001). Conclusions: This study provides evidence that folic acid treatment in arsenicosis cases could help in reducing clinical symptoms of arsenicosis. PMID:24554997

Ghose, Nelima; Majumdar, Kunal Kanti; Ghose, A. K.; Saha, C. K.; Nandy, A. K.; Mazumder, D. N. Guha

2014-01-01

15

Effects of severity of dementia on a symptom validity measure.  

PubMed

While prior research has shown symptom validity tests (SVTs) to have clinical utility with cognitively impaired individuals, these studies typically excluded those diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and dementia. The purpose of this study was to determine the utility of an SVT, the Test of Memory Malingering (TOMM), in those with MCI and moderate to severe dementia. Participants included 30 cognitively intact individuals (Control Group), 28 diagnosed with MCI (MCI Group), and 31 diagnosed with moderate to severe dementia (Moderate-Severe Group). The range of Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS) Total Standard Scores were then calculated for each group and all participants were administered the TOMM. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) revealed no significant differences on TOMM Trail 2 scores between the Control Group and the MCI Group. While all group means were above established cut-off scores, approximately 20% of participants in the Moderate-Severe Group failed the TOMM according to established criteria. Results suggest that the TOMM may be an appropriate test of effort in older adults diagnosed with MCI, but is not recommended for assessing potential malingering in those with at least moderate to severe dementia. PMID:25249229

Walter, Jamie; Morris, Jeri; Swier-Vosnos, Amy; Pliskin, Neil

2014-01-01

16

Differences in Shoot Boron Concentrations, Leaf Symptoms, and Yield of Turkish Barley Cultivars Grown on Boron?Toxic Soil in Field  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using 10 barley Turkish cultivars (Hordeum vulgare L.) field experiments were carried out on soils containing normal and very high soluble boron (B) concentration to study genotypic variation in tolerance to B toxicity in soil and the relationships between the shoot or leaf concentrations of B, severity of B?toxicity symptoms and yield. As judged by differences in degree of severity

B. Torun; M. Kalayci; L. Ozturk; A. Torun; M. Aydin; I. Cakmak

2002-01-01

17

Symptom Cluster Analyses Based on Symptom Occurrence and Severity Ratings Among Pediatric Oncology Patients During Myelosuppressive Chemotherapy  

PubMed Central

Background Symptom cluster research is an emerging field in symptom management. The ability to identify symptom clusters that are specific to pediatric oncology patients may lead to improved understanding of symptoms’ underlying mechanisms among patients of all ages. Objective The purpose of this study, in a sample of children and adolescents with cancer who underwent a cycle of myelosuppressive chemotherapy, was to compare the number and types of symptom clusters identified using patients’ ratings of symptom occurrence and symptom severity. Interventions/Methods Children and adolescents with cancer (10 to 18 years of age; N=131) completed the Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale 10–18 on the day they started a cycle of myelosuppressive chemotherapy, using a one week recall of experiences. Symptom data based on occurrence and severity ratings were examined using Exploratory Factor Analysis (EFA). The defined measurement model suggested by the best EFA model was then examined with a latent variable analysis. Results Three clusters were identified when symptom occurrence ratings were evaluated which were classified as a chemotherapy sequelae cluster, mood disturbance cluster, and a neuropsychological discomforts cluster. Analysis of symptom severity ratings yielded similar cluster configurations. Conclusions Cluster configurations remained relatively stable between symptom occurrence and severity ratings. The evaluation of patients at a common point in the chemotherapy cycle may have contributed to these findings. Implications for Practice Additional uniformity in symptom clusters investigations is needed to allow appropriate comparisons among studies. The dissemination of symptom clusters research methodology through publication and presentation may promote uniformity in this field. PMID:21921793

Baggott, Christina; Cooper, Bruce A.; Marina, Neyssa; Matthay, Katherine K.; Miaskowski, Christine

2011-01-01

18

Parent perceptions of symptom severity in Tourette's syndrome.  

PubMed

The families of 66 consecutive children with Tourette's syndrome were surveyed for their perception of symptom significance using a questionnaire. Families considered attention deficit and learning difficulties to be most significant, while motor and vocal tics were least important. When present, episodic rage was the most impairing symptom. Physicians must be aware of the significance of these comorbid symptoms for patients with Tourette's syndrome. PMID:10519722

Dooley, J M; Brna, P M; Gordon, K E

1999-11-01

19

Neuropsychological Impairments and Their Association with Obsessive-Compulsive Symptom Severity in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

Neurobiological research in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) consistently demonstrates an association between abnormal brain activity and symptom severity. Conversely, research addressing the corresponding neuropsychological impairments in OCD and their associ- ation with symptom severity has produced inconsistent results. This study reexamines neuropsychological performance and its association with symptom severity in 30 participants with OCD while controlling for confounding variables. We used

Amitai Abramovitch; Reuven Dar; Avraham Schweiger; Haggai Hermesh

2011-01-01

20

Symptom Variability, Not Severity, Predicts Rehospitalization and Mortality in Patients with Heart Failure  

PubMed Central

Background Inability of heart failure (HF) patients to recognize worsening symptoms that herald an exacerbation is a common reason for HF readmissions. Aims To examine the relationship between patterns of HF symptom variability, and HF event-free survival. Methods Patients with HF (N = 71) rated HF symptoms daily for 30 days. Symptoms were rated on a 10 point scale anchored at the extreme ends by “worst symptom could be” and “best symptom could be”. Patients were followed for an average of 1 year to track HF and cardiac rehospitalizations and all-cause mortality. Results Cox regression comparing event-free survival between patients who had highly variable symptom ratings across the 30-days and those whose symptoms were less variable revealed worse event-free survival in patients with more variable symptoms of shortness of breath or edema. Symptom variability predicted event-free survival independently of severity of symptoms, ejection fraction, comorbidities, age and gender. Symptom severity did not predict rehospitalization or mortality. Conclusion Regardless of symptom severity, patients whose symptoms fluctuated in an improving and worsening pattern were at substantially greater risk for poorer event-free survival. These patients may become accustomed to this pattern such that they expect symptoms to improve and thus do not seek treatment with worsening symptoms. PMID:20637697

Moser, Debra K.; Frazier, Susan K.; Worrall-Carter, Linda; Biddle, Martha J.; Chung, Misook L.; Lee, Kyoung Suk; Lennie, Terry A.

2010-01-01

21

Asthma Severity and PTSD Symptoms Among Inner City Children: A Pilot Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although the association between posttraumatic stress symptoms and asthma severity among children has been hypothesized, it has yet to be explored rigorously. This study sought to describe the posttraumatic stress symptoms of children with asthma and explore the relationship between asthma severity and posttraumatic stress symptoms in an inner city sample with high rates of traumatic exposures. Children aged 7

Douglas Vanderbilt; Robin Young; Helen Z. MacDonald; Wanda Grant-Knight; Glenn Saxe; Barry Zuckerman

2008-01-01

22

Stress, depression, and anxiety predict average symptom severity and daily symptom fluctuation in systemic lupus erythematosus  

Microsoft Academic Search

Forty-one subjects diagnosed with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) were recruited from across the United States. Regressions were conducted to evaluate the relation among stress, depression, anxiety, anger, and SLE symptom complaints. Negative weighting of major life events predicted symptom history. Significant hierarchical regressions using negative weighting of major life events, impact of daily stress, depression, anxiety, and anger were found

Serrhel G. Adams; Paul M. Dammers; Tara L. Saia; Phillip J. Brantley; Gerard R. Gaydos

1994-01-01

23

Children with Autism: Sleep Problems and Symptom Severity  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Relationships between the specific sleep problems and specific behavioral problems of children with autism were evaluated. Mothers' reports of sleep habits and autism symptoms were collected for 109 children with autism. Unlike previous research in this area, only children diagnosed with autism without any commonly comorbid diagnoses (e.g.,…

Tudor, Megan E.; Hoffman, Charles D.; Sweeney, Dwight P.

2012-01-01

24

Perceived Stress and Severity of Perimenstrual Symptoms: The BioCycle Study  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objective To examine the longitudinal relation between perceived stress in the previous month and perimenstrual symptom severity across two cycles among regularly menstruating, healthy women (n?=?259). Methods At baseline (11 days before the first cycle), participants completed the 4-item Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) for the previous month (first cycle exposure) and questionnaires on lifestyle factors. On cycle day 22 of a standardized 28-day cycle, participants again completed the PSS for the previous week (second cycle exposure) and each week rated the severity (none, mild, moderate, severe) of 17 psychological and physical symptoms (e.g., crying, cramping, pain). Mixed models estimated the association between perceived stress scores and number of moderate/severe symptoms and symptom severity scores, allowing both stress and perimenstrual symptoms to vary by cycle. Results Adjusting for age, education, passive and active smoking, and waist/height ratio (WHtR), high stress (fourth quartile PSS) was associated with an increased risk of reporting ?8 or more (OR 7.2, 3.3-15.8) and ?5 (OR 2.5, 1.6-4.1) symptoms as moderate/severe during the perimenstrual period compared with lower stress (quartiles one, two, and three). Stress scores were positively (p?symptom severity scores for total, psychological, and physical symptoms. Conclusions These analyses show that higher perceived stress precedes an increased severity of perimenstrual symptoms. Stress reduction programs may be an effective, nonpharmaceutical treatment for physical and psychological symptom relief. PMID:20384452

Hediger, Mary L.; Mumford, Sunni L.; Whitcomb, Brian W.; Hovey, Kathleen M.; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Schisterman, Enrique F.

2010-01-01

25

Erectile function and late-onset hypogonadism symptoms related to lower urinary tract symptom severity in elderly men  

PubMed Central

The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTSs), erectile dysfunction (ED) and symptomatic late-onset hypogonadism (SLOH) in ageing men in the Aegean region of Turkey. Five hundred consecutive patients >40 years old who had been in a steady sexual relationship for the past 6 months and were admitted to one of six urology clinics were included in the study. Serum prostate-specific antigen and testosterone levels and urinary flow rates were measured. All patients filled out the International Prostate Symptom Score and Quality of Life (IPSS–QoL), International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) and Aging Males' Symptoms (AMS) scale forms. Of the patients, 23.9% had mild LUTSs, 53.3% had moderate LUTSs and 22.8% had severe LUTSs. The total testosterone level did not differ between groups. Additionally, 69.6% had ED. The presence of impotence increased with increasing LUTS severity. Symptomatic late-onset hypogonadism (AMS >27) was observed in 71.2% of the patients. The prevalence of severe hypogonadism symptoms increased with the IPSS scores. A correlation analysis revealed that all three questionnaire scores were significantly correlated. In conclusion, LUTS severity is an age-independent risk factor for ED and SLOH. LUTS severity and SLOH symptoms appear to have a strong link that requires etiological and biological clarification in future studies. PMID:23817501

Bozkurt, Ozan; Bolat, Deniz; Demir, Omer; Ucer, Oktay; ?ahin, Ali; Ozcift, Burak; Pekta?, Abdulkadir; Turan, Tahir; Gümü?, Bilal H; Can, Ertan; Bolukbasi, Ahmet; Erol, Haluk; Esen, Adil

2013-01-01

26

Symptoms and toxicity of rituximab maintenance relative to observation following immunochemotherapy in patients with follicular lymphoma.  

PubMed

Objectives The randomized phase 3 PRIMA trial established that 2 years of rituximab maintenance therapy after attaining disease response to immunochemotherapy as first-line treatment of follicular lymphoma, reduced the risk of disease progression, compared with observation, without adversely affecting patient-reported quality of life (QoL). We now report additional analyses of symptom burden and toxicity. Methods Symptom burden was measured by the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-Core 30 items. The proportion of patients with worsening, no change, or improvement in symptoms from maintenance baseline was compared between rituximab maintenance and observation groups with Pearson ?(2) tests. Improvement in symptoms after 1 and 2 years of maintenance was further analyzed using generalized mixed models. The adverse event (AE) rate was calculated from the toxicity checklist at each visit to explore the frequency and timing of the toxicity AE in each treatment arm. The study protocol was approved by local ethics committees and is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under NCT00140582. Results Being tired, needing to rest, feeling weak, and trouble sleeping were the most frequently reported symptoms at the end of immunochemotherapy. By the end of maintenance, notable improvement was seen for fatigue symptoms, trouble sleeping, shortness of breath, lack of appetite, and nausea, with no significant difference in QoL symptoms between the rituximab maintenance and observation groups. The rate of AEs was low, and hematologic toxicity induced during chemotherapy treatment improved in both rituximab maintenance and observation groups. Discussion These results indicated that rituximab maintenance did not negatively impact disease- or treatment-related symptoms. PMID:25029908

Zhou, Xiaolei; Wang, Jianmin; Zhang, Jessica; Copley-Merriman, Catherine; Torigoe, Yasuhiro; Reyes, Carolina; Seymour, John F; Offner, Fritz C; Trneny, Marek; Salles, Gilles Andre

2014-07-16

27

Cholinergic symptoms with low serum cholinesterase from therapeutic cholinesterase inhibitor toxicity.  

PubMed

Although cholinesterase inhibitors have been frequently used in the treatment of Alzheimer disease, its effects on serum cholinesterase concentrations have been rarely described. We described significant depression of serum cholinesterase levels due to cholinesterase inhibitor toxicity from redundant use of donepezil and rivastigmine in a 78-year-old man. Recovery of serum cholinesterase level was noted upon drug discontinuation and cholinergic symptom resolution. Serum cholinesterase level can be used as a biomarker for central cholinesterase inhibitor toxicity. PMID:24589024

Leikin, Jerrold B; Braund, Victoria; DesLauris, Carol

2014-07-01

28

A Literature Synthesis of Symptom Prevalence and Severity in Persons Receiving Active Cancer Treatment  

PubMed Central

Purpose Patients with cancer experience acute and chronic symptoms caused by their underlying disease or by the treatment. While numerous studies have examined the impact of various treatments on symptoms experienced by cancer patients, there are inconsistencies regarding the symptoms measured and reported in treatment trials. This article presents a systematic review of the research literature of the prevalence and severity of symptoms in patients undergoing cancer treatment. Methods A systematic search for studies of persons receiving active cancer treatment was performed with the search terms of “multiple symptoms” and “cancer” for studies involving patients over the age of 18 years and published in English during the years 2001 to 2011. Search outputs were reviewed independently by seven authors, resulting in the synthesis of 21 studies meeting criteria for generation of an Evidence Table reporting symptom prevalence and severity ratings. Results Data were extracted from 21 multi-national studies to develop a pooled sample of 4067 cancer patients in whom the prevalence and severity of individual symptoms was reported. In total, the pooled sample across the 21 studies was comprised of 62% female, with a mean age of 58 years (range: 18 to 97 years). A majority (62%) of these studies assessed symptoms in homogeneous samples with respect to tumor site (predominantly breast and lung cancer), while 38% of the included studies utilized samples with mixed diagnoses and treatment regimens. Eighteen instruments and structured interviews were including those measuring single symptoms, multi-symptom inventories, and single symptom items drawn from HRQOL or health status measures. The MD Anderson Symptom Inventory (MDASI) was the most commonly used instrument in the studies analyzed (n=9 studies; 43%), while the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy (FACT-G), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Subscale (HADS-D), Medical Outcomes Survey Short Form-36 (SF-36), and Symptom Distress Scale (SDS) were each employed in two studies. Forty-seven symptoms were identified across the 21 studies which were then categorized into 17 logical groupings. Symptom prevalence and severity were calculated across the entire cohort and also based upon sample sizes in which the symptoms were measured providing the ability to rank symptoms. Conclusions Symptoms are prevalent and severe among patients with cancer. Therefore, any clinical study seeking to evaluate the impact of treatment on patients should consider including measurement of symptoms. This study demonstrates that a discrete set of symptoms is common across cancer types. This set may serve as the basis for defining a “core” set of symptoms to be recommended for elicitation across cancer clinical trials, particularly among patients with advanced disease. PMID:23314601

Reilly, Carolyn Miller; Bruner, Deborah Watkins; Mitchell, Sandra A.; Minasian, Lori M.; Basch, Ethan; Dueck, Amylou C.; Cella, David; Reeve, Bryce B.

2014-01-01

29

Brief Report: Concurrent Validity of Autism Symptom Severity Measures  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The autism spectrum disorder (ASD) diagnostic classifications, according to the DSM-5, include a severity rating. Several screening and/or diagnostic measures, such as the autism diagnostic and observation schedule (ADOS), Childhood Autism Rating Scale (CARS) and social responsiveness scale (SRS) (teacher and parent versions), include an…

Reszka, Stephanie S.; Boyd, Brian A.; McBee, Matthew; Hume, Kara A.; Odom, Samuel L.

2014-01-01

30

PTSD symptom severity and psychiatric comorbidity in recent motor vehicle accident victims: a latent class analysis.  

PubMed

We conducted a latent class analysis (LCA) on 249 recent motor vehicle accident (MVA) victims to examine subgroups that differed in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptom severity, current major depressive disorder and alcohol/other drug use disorders (MDD/AoDs), gender, and interpersonal trauma history 6-weeks post-MVA. A 4-class model best fit the data with a resilient class displaying asymptomatic PTSD symptom levels/low levels of comorbid disorders; a mild psychopathology class displaying mild PTSD symptom severity and current MDD; a moderate psychopathology class displaying severe PTSD symptom severity and current MDD/AoDs; and a severe psychopathology class displaying extreme PTSD symptom severity and current MDD. Classes also differed with respect to gender composition and history of interpersonal trauma experience. These findings may aid in the development of targeted interventions for recent MVA victims through the identification of subgroups distinguished by different patterns of psychiatric problems experienced 6-weeks post-MVA. PMID:25124501

Hruska, Bryce; Irish, Leah A; Pacella, Maria L; Sledjeski, Eve M; Delahanty, Douglas L

2014-10-01

31

Evaluating Symptom Expression as a Function of a Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Severity  

PubMed Central

Little is known about the relative severity or typical sequence of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM-IV) symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Using data from the National Comorbidity Study – Replication (Kessler et al., 2004), the current study used a logistic item response model to assess the degree to which DSM-IV symptoms combine to define a primary construct underlying PTSD, to identify which symptoms are associated with greater severity of PTSD, and to determine whether the symptoms and symptom patterns are influenced by gender. Results suggested that PTSD symptoms can be combined to assess a single dimension of PTSD severity, providing support for a continuum of symptom severity. However, several DSM-IV symptoms provided overlapping information, potentially reducing the effectiveness of these symptoms in describing a broad range of PTSD. More precise assessment of PTSD severity may help improve the descriptive value of PTSD measures relationship to continuous measures of treatment outcomes, and ultimately inform more effective treatments. PMID:18434083

Palm, Kathleen M.; Strong, David R.; MacPherson, Laura

2009-01-01

32

Testing the Effects of Treatment Complications on a Cognitive-Behavioral Intervention for Reducing Symptom Severity  

Microsoft Academic Search

Patients (n=231) diagnosed with solid tumors and undergoing chemotherapy were randomly assigned to the experimental arm (n=114) or to conventional care (n=117). A symptom severity index based on summed severity scores across 15 symptoms was the primary outcome. Building on previously published work, an analysis was undertaken to determine the effects of patient characteristics and treatment complications on reductions in

Alla Sikorskii; Charles Given; Barbara Given; Sangchoon Jeon; Ruth McCorkle

2006-01-01

33

Predictors of PTSD Symptom Severity and Social Reactions in Sexual Assault Victims  

Microsoft Academic Search

Demographics, assault variables, and postassault responses were analyzed as correlates of PTSD symptom severity in a sample of 323 sexual assault victims. Regression analyses indicated that less education, greater perceived life threat, and receipt of more negative social reactions upon disclosing assault were each related to greater PTSD symptom severity. Ethnic minority victims reported more negative social reactions from others.

Sarah E. Ullman; Henrietta H. Filipas

2001-01-01

34

Symptom cluster, healthcare use and mortality in patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease  

PubMed Central

Aims and objectives To examine how subgroups of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, identified by ratings of symptoms (dyspnoea, anxiety, depression and fatigue), affect healthcare use and mortality. Background People with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease often experience multiple symptoms. The importance of multiple symptoms and symptom clusters has received increased attention. However, little is known about symptom clusters and their effect on healthcare use and mortality in this population. Design Descriptive cross-sectional study. Methods This secondary data analysis used data from the National Emphysema Treatment Trial. Participants (n = 597) had severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyse the data that were drawn from structured interviews, questionnaires and clinical measures. Results Three subgroup clusters emerged based on four symptom ratings. Mean age, proportion with higher education, proportion using oxygen, disease severity, exercise capacity and quality of life differed significantly between subgroups. Participants with high levels of symptoms used healthcare services more and were more likely to have died at the five-year follow-up than those with low levels of symptoms. Symptom cluster subgroups had more significant relationship with mortality than single symptoms. Conclusion Patients with high levels of symptoms require greater clinical attention. Relevance to clinical practice Understanding subgroups of patients, based on symptom ratings and their adverse effect on outcomes, may enable healthcare providers to assess multiple symptoms and identify subgroups of patients at risk of increased healthcare use and mortality. Targeting modifiable symptoms within the cluster may be more beneficial than focusing on a single symptom for certain health-related outcome. PMID:24460846

Park, Soo Kyung; Larson, Janet L

2014-01-01

35

Prevalence, Severity and Risk Factors for Depressive Symptoms and Insomnia in College Undergraduates.  

PubMed

Although the college years represent a high-risk period for depressive symptoms and insomnia, little research has explored their prevalence, comorbidities and risk factors within this developmental period. Two studies were conducted; the first evaluated the prevalence and comorbidity of depressive symptoms and insomnia in 1338 students (ages 18-23?years) from a large Southwestern University. Mild depressive symptoms were endorsed by 19% of students and 14.5% reported moderate to severe symptoms. Forty-seven percent of students reported mild insomnia and 22.5% endorsed moderate to severe insomnia severity. A second study investigated perceived stress as a potential mediator of the relation between self-reported childhood adversity and concurrent depressive symptoms and insomnia. Undergraduates (N?=?447) from a Southwestern and Southeastern University reported prior childhood adversity, current perceived stress, insomnia and depressive symptoms. Self-reported childhood adversity predicted higher levels of depressive symptoms and insomnia severity, partially mediated by perceived stress. Results support the high prevalence of depressive symptoms and insomnia among undergraduates. The risk for depressive and insomnia symptoms may be increased among students who experienced greater levels of childhood adversity. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:23897800

Gress-Smith, Jenna L; Roubinov, Danielle S; Andreotti, Charissa; Compas, Bruce E; Luecken, Linda J

2013-07-30

36

The epidemiology of anal incontinence and symptom severity scoring  

PubMed Central

For many patients, anal incontinence (AI) is a devastating condition that can lead to social isolation and loss of independence, contributing to a substantial economic health burden, not only for the individual but also for the allocation of healthcare resources. Its prevalence is underestimated because of poor patient reporting, with many unrecorded but symptomatic cases residing in nursing homes. Endosonography has improved our understanding of the incidence of post-obstetric sphincter tears that are potentially suitable for repair and those cases resulting from anorectal surgery, most notably after fistula and hemorrhoid operations. The clinical scoring systems assessing the severity of AI are discussed in this review, along with their limitations. Improvements in the standardization of these scales will advance our understanding of treatment response in an era where the therapeutic options have multiplied and will permit a better comparison between specific therapies. PMID:24759339

Nevler, Avinoam

2014-01-01

37

Intravenous Lipid Emulsion Given to Volunteers does not Affect Symptoms of Lidocaine Brain Toxicity.  

PubMed

Intravenous lipid emulsion has been suggested as treatment for local anaesthetic toxicity, but the exact mechanism of action is still uncertain. Controlled studies on the effect of lipid emulsion on toxic doses of local anaesthetics have not been performed in man. In randomized, subject-blinded and two-phase cross-over fashion, eight healthy volunteers were given a 1.5 ml/kg bolus of 20% Intralipid(®) (200 mg/ml) or Ringer's acetate solution intravenously, followed by a rapid injection of lidocaine 1.0 mg/kg. Then, the same solution as in the bolus was infused at a rate of 0.25 ml/kg/min. for 30 min. Electroencephalography (EEG) was recorded, and 5 min. after lidocaine injection, the volunteers were asked to report subjective symptoms. Total and un-entrapped lidocaine plasma concentrations were measured from venous blood samples. EEG band power changes (delta, alpha and beta) after the lidocaine bolus were similar during lipid and during Ringer infusion. There were no differences between infusions in the subjective symptoms of central nervous system toxicity. Lidocaine was only minimally entrapped in the plasma by lipid emulsion, but the mean un-entrapped lidocaine area under concentration-time curve from 0 to 30 min. was clearly smaller during lipid than Ringer infusion (16.4 versus 21.3 mg × min/l, p = 0.044). Intravenous lipid emulsion did not influence subjective toxicity symptoms nor affect the EEG changes caused by lidocaine. PMID:25207682

Heinonen, Juho A; Litonius, Erik; Salmi, Tapani; Haasio, Juhani; Tarkkila, Pekka; Backman, Janne T; Rosenberg, Per H

2014-09-10

38

Trajectories of the cortisol awakening responses during weight gain in anorexia nervosa patients with severe and less severe symptoms.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to examine the features and changes of the cortisol awakening response (CAR) in patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) with severe and less severe symptoms over the course of inpatient treatment. Our study included n=20 AN patients who received treatment at the University Hospital, Heidelberg. N=11 patients were admitted at a psychosomatic and internal-medicine ward that specialized in the treatment of AN patients with a very low BMI (patient group with high symptom severity, HSS). The mean BMI of these patients was 13.2kg/m(2) (SD=1.4) at the beginning of the study and 16.9kg/m(2) (SD=1.7) at the end. N=9 patients were treated at a psychotherapeutic ward where AN patients with less severe symptoms are admitted (patient group with low symptom severity, LSS). The mean BMI of these latter patients was 16.3kg/m(2) (SD=0.89) at the beginning of the study and 17.1kg/m(2) (SD=0.65) at the end. Salivary cortisol was measured on two consecutive days respectively, both at the beginning and the end of the study. At the beginning of the study, patients with HSS had a significantly lower mean CAR compared to patients from the LSS group (3.4nmol/l vs. 11.4nmol/l). At the end of the study, the mean CAR of patients from the HSS group was still significantly lower compared to the mean CAR of patients with LSS (2.0nmol/l vs. 9.2nmol/l). Results indicate that AN patients with severe symptoms exhibit a lower CAR compared to AN patients with less severe symptoms. PMID:25286448

Wild, Beate; Wesche, Daniela; Schultz, Jobst-Hendrik; Stroe-Kunold, Esther; Herzog, Wolfgang; Rudofsky, Gottfried; Maser-Gluth, Christiane; Friederich, Hans-Christoph

2014-12-01

39

Psychological symptoms and drug use severity among Israeli adolescents presenting for outpatient drug abuse treatment.  

PubMed

The objective of this study was to assess the rates of externalizing and internalizing symptoms, and the relation between psychological symptoms and drug use severity, among 117 Israeli adolescents presenting for outpatient drug abuse treatment. Psychological symptoms were assessed via both adolescent self-report and parent report. Drug use was assessed using both adolescent self-report and urinalysis. Results showed that 58% of the sample evidenced clinical levels of psychological symptoms, with girls evidencing higher rates of externalizing and mixed symptomatology than boys. Parents' report of adolescents' internalizing symptoms predicted severity of drug use. These findings suggest that treatment for this population should be multidimensional, and address not only drug use per se, but also psychological risk factors. PMID:16022884

Diamond, Gary M; Izzard, Miriam C; Kedar, Tami; Hutlzer, Anat; Mell, Haim

2005-08-01

40

Severe suicidal digoxin toxicity managed with resin hemoperfusion: A case report  

PubMed Central

Owing to its wide and easy availability, digoxin has got a significant abuse potential and may be used for suicidal purposes. Digoxin-specific antibody (Fab) fragments have become the mainstay of therapy for severe digoxin toxicity and have significantly helped in reducing mortality. However, due to its high cost and limited availability alternative measures may need to be used to manage severe intoxications especially in countries like India, where Fab fragments are unavailable. Here, we present a case of a young female who presented to our casualty with alleged history of consumption of 17.5 mg of digoxin tablets. After admission to ICU, she developed atrioventricular blocks with hemodynamic instability which had to be managed with temporary pacemaker. Her serum digoxin levels were high (12.63 ng/ml) and in the absence of Fab fragments, resin hemoperfusion was done which drastically reduced the serum digoxin levels and reverted the symptoms. PMID:23559736

Juneja, Deven; Singh, Omender; Bhasin, Alka; Gupta, Manish; Saxena, Sanjay; Chaturvedi, Archana

2012-01-01

41

Comparison of Depressive Symptom Severity Scores in Low-Income Women  

PubMed Central

Background The Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) and the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) are considered reliable and valid for measuring depressive symptom severity and screening for a depressive disorder. Few studies have examined the convergent or divergent validity of these two measures, and none have been conducted among low-income women – even though rates of depression in this group are extremely high. Moreover, variation in within-subject scores suggests these measures may be less comparable in select subgroups. Objective We sought to compare these two measures in terms of construct validity, and examine whether within-subject differences in depressive symptom severity scores could be accounted for by select characteristics in low-income women. Method In a sample of 308 low-income women, construct validity was assessed using a multitrait-monomethod matrix approach, between-instrument differences in continuous symptom severity scores were regressed on select characteristics using backward stepwise selection, and differences in depressive symptom classification were assessed using the Mantel-Haenszel test. Results Convergent validity was high (rs = 0.80, p < .001). Among predictors that included age, race, education, number of chronic health conditions, history of depression, perceived stress, anxiety, and/or the number of generalized symptoms, none explained within-subject differences in depressive symptom scores between the BDI-II and PHQ-9 (p > .05, R2 < 0.04). Similarly, there was consistency in depressive symptom classification (X2 = 172 and 172.6, p < .0001). Discussion These findings demonstrate the BDI-II and PHQ-9 perform similarly among low-income women in terms of depressive symptom severity measurement and classifying levels of depressive symptoms, and do not vary across subgroups based on select demographics. PMID:21048482

Kneipp, Shawn M.; Kairalla, John A.; Stacciarini, Jeanne Marie R.; Pereira, Deidre; Miller, M. David

2010-01-01

42

Genetic variation throughout the folate metabolic pathway influences negative symptom severity in schizophrenia.  

PubMed

Low serum folate levels previously have been associated with negative symptom risk in schizophrenia, as has the hypofunctional 677C>T variant of the MTHFR gene. This study examined whether other missense polymorphisms in folate-regulating enzymes, in concert with MTHFR, influence negative symptoms in schizophrenia, and whether total risk allele load interacts with serum folate status to further stratify negative symptom risk. Medicated outpatients with schizophrenia (n = 219), all of European origin and some included in a previous report, were rated with the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale. A subset of 82 patients also underwent nonfasting serum folate testing. Patients were genotyped for the MTHFR 677C>T (rs1801133), MTHFR 1298A>C (rs1801131), MTR 2756A>G (rs1805087), MTRR 203A>G (rs1801394), FOLH1 484T>C (rs202676), RFC 80A>G (rs1051266), and COMT 675G>A (rs4680) polymorphisms. All genotypes were entered into a linear regression model to determine significant predictors of negative symptoms, and risk scores were calculated based on total risk allele dose. Four variants, MTHFR 677T, MTR 2756A, FOLH1 484C, and COMT 675A, emerged as significant independent predictors of negative symptom severity, accounting for significantly greater variance in negative symptoms than MTHFR 677C>T alone. Total allele dose across the 4 variants predicted negative symptom severity only among patients with low folate levels. These findings indicate that multiple genetic variants within the folate metabolic pathway contribute to negative symptoms of schizophrenia. A relationship between folate level and negative symptom severity among patients with greater genetic vulnerability is biologically plausible and suggests the utility of folate supplementation in these patients. PMID:22021659

Roffman, Joshua L; Brohawn, David G; Nitenson, Adam Z; Macklin, Eric A; Smoller, Jordan W; Goff, Donald C

2013-03-01

43

Correlation of symptoms with location and severity of pelvic organ prolapse  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: The purpose of this study was to compare the symptoms that are related to pelvic floor dysfunction with the location and severity of the coexisting prolapse. Study Design: Two hundred thirty-seven consecutive patients with symptomatic pelvic organ prolapse came to Johns Hopkins Medicine during a 24-month period beginning in July 1998 and completed a symptom-specific Likert scale questionnaire that

R. Mark Ellerkmann; Geoffrey W. Cundiff; Clifford F. Melick; Mikio A. Nihira; Kenneth Leffler; Alfred E. Bent

2001-01-01

44

High prevalence of symptoms in a severely abused “non-patient” women population  

PubMed Central

Objective The objective of this article is to assess the prevalence of somatic symptoms and of gastrointestinal (GI) syndromes in abused “non-patient” women and the association with the time of perpetration, type, and severity of abuse. Methods Sixty-seven women, 18–58 years, receiving shelter in anti-violence associations were invited to fill out an anonymous questionnaire with a medical and an abuse section. The severity of abuse was expressed as the 0–6 Abuse Severity Measure (ASM). The association between abuse characteristics and the number of symptoms, and GI syndromes was assessed by Poisson regression model. Results Most women suffered from childhood and adulthood sexual and physical abuse. They reported a mean of 5.1 GI symptoms (range 0–13; median 5; IQR 6) and of 1.3 extra-GI symptoms (range 0–6; median 1; IQR 2); 30% of women matched the Rome II Criteria for one, 36% for two, and 4.4% for three or more syndromes, respectively. Women with an ASM of 5–6, having suffered from both sexual and physical abuse, reported significantly (p?=?0.02) more GI symptoms, but not extra-GI ones (p?=?0.07), and met criteria for more GI syndromes than women with an ASM ?4 and those reporting only one type of abuse. No association was found between the time of perpetration of the abuse and the number of GI and extra-GI symptoms. Conclusions Symptoms in abused “non-patient” women mainly concern the abdomen and the GI tract. A history of severe, combined physical and sexual abuse is associated with a higher number of GI symptoms. PMID:25452847

Pallotta, N; Piacentino, D; Ciccantelli, B; Rivera, M; Golini, N; Spagnoli, A; Vincoli, G; Farchi, S

2014-01-01

45

Symptoms during cancer pain treatment following WHO-guidelines: a longitudinal follow-up study of symptom prevalence, severity and etiology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Most patients with advanced cancer develop diverse symptoms that can limit the efficacy of pain treatment and undermine their quality of life. The present study surveys symptom prevalence, etiology and severity in 593 cancer patients treated by a pain service. Non-opioid analgesics, opioids and adjuvants were administered following the WHO-guidelines for cancer pain relief. Other symptoms were systematically treated by

Thomas Meuser; Christian Pietruck; Lukas Radbruch; Petra Stute; Klaus A Lehmann; Stefan Grond

2001-01-01

46

Treatment-related toxicity and symptom-related bother following postoperative radiotherapy for prostate cancer  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Patients have reported late effects and symptom-related bother following postoperative radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods: Patients treated with postoperative radiotherapy were surveyed at a median 56 months after radiotherapy using the Prostate Cancer Radiation Therapy instrument. A retrospective review was undertaken to obtain Radiation Therapy Oncology Group-Late Effects Normal Tissue (RTOG-LENT) toxicity scores at baseline and during follow-up. Results: Survey response was 64.5%. Median prostate bed radiation dose was 66 Gy given at a median 14 months after surgery. Adjuvant hormone therapy was given for 2 to 3 years to 40 patients; 22 received salvage therapy. PCRT impairment subscales were reported as mild for gastrointestinal dysfunction, moderate for genitourinary dysfunction and marked for sexual dysfunction. The use of one or more incontinence pads daily was reported by 25.6% and was similar to 23% use reported at baseline. Frequent or worse urinary frequency or hematuria was reported by 4.8%, and by 8.4% of respondents for bowel dysfunction. Moderate to severe disruption from bowel and bladder dysfunction was reported by up to 5.4% and 2.4% of respondents, respectively. Erectile function was described as poor to none in 88.3% of respondents, and dissatisfaction with sexual functioning was reported by 42.7%. Counselling or treatment was offered to 59% of those followed. Conclusion: Combined surgery and postoperative radiotherapy are associated with low and moderate rates of bowel and bladder dysfunction respectively, with low reported bother. High levels of sexual dysfunction and bother are seen following combined therapy. More effective pre- and post-treatment counselling are required, along with research into more effective prevention and treatment strategies. PMID:20368892

Sia, Michael; Rodrigues, George; Menard, Cynthia; Bayley, Andrew; Bristow, Robert; Chung, Peter; Gospodarowicz, Mary; Milosevic, Michael; Warde, Padraig; Catton, Charles

2010-01-01

47

The Contribution of High Levels of Somatic Symptom Severity to Sickness Absence Duration, Disability and Discharge  

PubMed Central

Introduction: The primary objectives were to compare the duration of sickness absence in employees with high levels of somatic symptom severity (HLSSS) with employees with lower levels of somatic symptom severity, and to establish the long-term outcomes concerning return to work (RTW), disability and discharge. Secondary objective was to evaluate determinants of the duration of sickness absence in employees with HLSSS. Methods: 489 sick-listed employees registered with five Occupational Health Physician (OHP) group practices were included in this study. We measured their baseline scores for somatic symptoms severity, depressive disorders, anxiety disorders, health anxiety, distress and functional impairment. The OHPs filled in a questionnaire on their diagnosis. A prospective 2-year follow-up was carried out to assess the long-term outcomes concerning sickness absence, and retrospective information was gathered with regard to sickness absence during the 12 months before the employees were sick-listed. Results: The median duration of sickness absence was 78 days longer for employees with HLSSS. They more often remained disabled and were discharged more often, especially due to problems in the relationship between the employer and the employee. HLSSS, health anxiety and older age contributed to a longer duration of sickness absence of employees. Conclusion: High levels of somatic symptom severity are a determinant of prolonged sickness absence, enduring disabilities and health-related job loss. Occupational health physicians should identify employees who are at risk and adhere to guidelines for medically unexplained somatic symptoms. PMID:20373134

Blankenstein, Annette H.; Krol, Boudien; Koopmans, Petra C.; Groothoff, Johan W.

2010-01-01

48

Postprandial Plasma Glucose Response and Gastrointestinal Symptom Severity in Patients With Diabetic Gastroparesis.  

PubMed

Gastroparesis is a well-known diabetic complication. The pathogenesis is not fully understood. However, it is important to early diagnose these patients. This study evaluated the plasma glucose response after a test meal, and gastrointestinal (GI) symptom severity in patients with clinical suspicion of diabetic gastroparesis, and assessed its usefulness to predict gastroparesis. In all, 83 subjects with insulin-treated diabetes mellitus (DM) type 1 and 2 were included; 53 subjects had gastroparesis and 30 had normal gastric emptying determined by gastric scintigraphy. GI symptom severity during the preceding 2 weeks was evaluated with a validated questionnaire. The test meal consisted of 100 g meat, 40 g pasta, 150 g carrot, and 5 g oil. The subjects ingested the meal under fasting conditions, and plasma glucose was followed during 180 minutes. Patients with gastroparesis demonstrated a blunted plasma glucose response after a test meal versus patients with normal gastric emptying (P < .005), reflected by lower maximum increase in plasma glucose response and incremental area under the curve of the plasma glucose, but a similar time to the maximum plasma glucose level. All GI symptoms were more severe in patients with gastroparesis. GI symptom severity had the best discriminative value to identify patients with gastroparesis with an area under the receiver operating curve of 0.83 (optimal cutoff: sensitivity 87%, specificity 80%). Patients with diabetic gastroparesis have a blunted postprandial plasma glucose response. Combining this information with the presence of GI symptoms can help clinicians identify diabetic patients with gastroparesis. PMID:24876417

Olausson, Eva A; Grundin, Håkan; Isaksson, Mats; Brock, Christina; Drewes, Asbjørn M; Attvall, Stig; Simrén, Magnus

2014-05-01

49

Child Sexual Abuse Severity and Disclosure Predict PTSD Symptoms and Biomarkers in Ethnic Minority Women  

PubMed Central

Objective Adult posttraumatic stress symptoms (PSS) and a biomarker index of current health risk in childhood sexual abuse (CSA) survivors was investigated in relation to CSA severity, disclosure and other peri-and post-trauma factors. Methods A community sample of 94 African American and Latina women CSA survivors was assessed. Results Severe CSA predicted PSS overall, avoidance/numbing symptoms and greater biomarker risk, and was not mediated by post-trauma variables. Moderate CSA severity was mediated by post-trauma disclosure, predicted re-experiencing symptoms but was unrelated to biomarker risk. No overall ethnic differences were found. Conclusions Results suggest targets for interventions to improve the well-being of minority women CSA survivors. PMID:20373204

Glover, Dorie A.; Loeb, Tamra Burns; Carmona, Jennifer Vargas; Sciolla, Andres; Zhang, Muyu; Myers, Hector F.; Wyatt, Gail E.

2010-01-01

50

Predicting posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms and pain intensity following severe injury: the role of catastrophizing  

PubMed Central

Background A number of theories have proposed possible mechanisms that may explain the high rates of comorbidity between posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and persistent pain; however, there has been limited research investigating these factors. Objective The present study sought to prospectively examine whether catastrophizing predicted the development of PTSD symptoms and persistent pain following physical injury. Design Participants (N=208) completed measures of PTSD symptomatology, pain intensity and catastrophizing during hospitalization following severe injury, and 3 and 12 months postinjury. Cross-lagged path analysis explored the longitudinal relationship between these variables. Results Acute catastrophizing significantly predicted PTSD symptoms but not pain intensity 3 months postinjury. In turn, 3-month catastrophizing predicted pain intensity, but not PTSD symptoms 12 months postinjury. Indirect relations were also found between acute catastrophizing and 12-month PTSD symptoms and pain intensity. Relations were mediated via 3-month PTSD symptoms and 3-month catastrophizing, respectively. Acute symptoms did not predict 3-month catastrophizing and catastrophizing did not fully account for the relationship between PTSD symptoms and pain intensity. Conclusions Findings partially support theories that propose a role for catastrophizing processes in understanding vulnerability to pain and posttrauma symptomatology and, thus, a possible mechanism for comorbidity between these conditions. PMID:22893804

Carty, Jessica; O'Donnell, Meaghan; Evans, Lynette; Kazantzis, Nikolaos; Creamer, Mark

2011-01-01

51

Psychopathology and alexithymia in severe mental illness: the impact of trauma and posttraumatic stress symptoms  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective  To empirically investigate whether or not symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are essential for transferring\\u000a the negative effects of trauma on the severity of severe mental illness (SMI) as recently suggested by an interactive model.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  About 122 inpatients with either schizophrenia or major affective disorder were administered the Posttraumatic Diagnostic\\u000a Scale, the Symptom Checklist and the Toronto Alexithymia Scale.

Carsten Spitzer; Matthias Vogel; Sven Barnow; Harald J. Freyberger; Hans Joergen Grabe

2007-01-01

52

Association of interleukin-8 and neutrophils with nasal symptom severity during acute respiratory infection.  

PubMed

Using a large data set (n?=?811), the relationship between acute respiratory infection illness severity and inflammatory biomarkers was investigated to determine whether certain symptoms are correlated more closely than others with the inflammatory biomarkers, interleukin-8 (IL-8) and nasal neutrophils. Participants with community acquired acute respiratory infection underwent nasal lavage for IL-8 and neutrophil testing, in addition to multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods for the detection and identification of respiratory viruses. Information about symptoms was obtained throughout the duration of the illness episode using the well-validated Wisconsin Upper Respiratory Symptom Survey (WURSS-21). Global symptom severity was calculated by the area under the curve (AUC) plotting duration versus WURSS total. Of the specimens tested, 56% were positively identified for one or more of nine different respiratory viruses. During acute respiratory infection illness, both IL-8 and neutrophils positively correlate with AUC (rs ?=?0.082, P?=?0.022; rs ?=?0.080, P?=?0.030). IL-8 and neutrophils correlate with nasal symptom severity: runny nose (r?=?0.13, P?=?severity of nasal symptoms during acute respiratory infection. Further research is necessary to determine if the concentration of these or other biomarkers can predict the overall duration and severity of acute respiratory infection illness. J. Med. Virol. 87:330-337, 2015. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25132248

Henriquez, Kelsey M; Hayney, Mary S; Xie, Yaoguo; Zhang, Zhengjun; Barrett, Bruce

2015-02-01

53

[Acute poisoning with selected hepatotoxic agents: biochemistry of toxic effect, clinical symptoms and treatment].  

PubMed

The paper discusses etiopathogenesis, clinical symptoms and treatment in acute poisoning with hepatotoxic agents. The liver is a critical organ in acute poisoning with Amanita phalloides, carbon tetrachloride, iron compounds and isonicotinic acid hydrazide. Based on literature reports and own experience the authors present the current outlook on the specific treatment of acute poisoning with these xenobiotics. Special consideration was given to biochemical etiopathogenesis of hepatoxicity: oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation and impaired homeostasis of calcium ions and glutathione. Basic principles were also discussed of conservative treatment in hepatic encephalopathy due to toxic liver necrosis. PMID:14569886

Rusi?ski, Piotr; Ko?aci?ski, Zbigniew

2003-01-01

54

The association between erectile function and severity of lower urinary tract symptoms.  

PubMed

It is unclear whether the erectile dysfunction (ED) that frequently occurs with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) may have a common causative factor: sympathetic overactivity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between ED and LUTS. From June 1998 to March 2000, 75 male patients, presenting with LUTS, enrolled into the present study. A total of 63 patients were included into the study, age ranging from 51 - 74 years (mean 61.5). Allpatients completed an American Urological Association (AUA) symptom severity index and IIEF-5 questionnaires. The results from the present study demonstrated that the AUA symptom and IIEF-5 scores do not correlate with increasing age. When the statistical analyses were performed for each age group, there were no significant differences in mean IIEF-5 values between any degree of AUA symptom score in the same age group (p > 0.05). The present results indicate that there is no association between the degree of LUTS and the erectile function. Moreover, the statistical analyses of the association between any degree of erectile function and the mean A UA symptom score either for obstructive or irritative symptoms revealed no significant differences (p > 0.05). The present study demonstrates that there is no association between BPH and erectile function in any age group, inconsistent with the sympathetic overactivity theory. PMID:15960225

Leungwattanakij, Somboon; Roongreungsilp, Ubolrat; Lertsithichai, Panuwat; Ratana-Olarn, Krisda

2005-01-01

55

Longitudinal Study of Symptom Severity and Language in Minimally Verbal Children with Autism  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: A significant minority of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are considered "minimally verbal" due to language development stagnating at a few words. Recent developments allow for the severity of ASD symptoms to be examined using Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS) Social Affect (SA) and Restricted and…

Thurm, Audrey; Manwaring, Stacy S.; Swineford, Lauren; Farmer, Cristan

2015-01-01

56

Case Series of an Intraoral Balancing Appliance Therapy on Subjective Symptom Severity and Cervical Spine Alignment  

PubMed Central

Objective. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of a holistic intraoral appliance (OA) on cervical spine alignment and subjective symptom severity. Design. An observational study on case series with holistic OA therapy. Setting. An outpatient clinic for holistic temporomandibular joint (TMJ) therapy under the supervision of the Pain Center, CHA Biomedical center, CHA University. Subjects. Ambulatory patients presenting with diverse chief complaints in the holistic TMJ clinic. Main Measures. Any immediate change in the curvature of cervical spine and the degree of atlantoaxial rotation was investigated in the images of simple X-ray and computed tomography of cervical spine with or without OA. Changes of subjective symptom severity were also analyzed for the holistic OA therapy cases. Results. A total of 59 cases were reviewed. Alignment of upper cervical spine rotation showed an immediate improvement (P < 0.001). Changes of subjective symptom severity also showed significant improvement (P < 0.05). Conclusion. These cases revealed rudimentary clinical evidence that holistic OA therapy may be related to an alleviated symptom severity and an improved cervical spinal alignment. These results show that further researches may warrant for the holistic TMJ therapy. PMID:23935655

Lee, Young Jun; Lee, Joo Kang; Jung, Soo Chang; Lee, Hwang-woo; Yin, Chang Shik; Lee, Young Jin

2013-01-01

57

Problematic alcohol use among individuals with HIV: relations with everyday memory functioning and HIV symptom severity.  

PubMed

Problematic alcohol use has been shown to negatively impact cognitive functions germane to achieving optimal HIV health outcomes. The present study, a secondary data analysis, examined the impact of problematic alcohol use on aspects of everyday memory functioning in a sample of 172 HIV-infected individuals (22 % female; Mage = 48.37 years, SD = 8.64; 39 % Black/non-Hispanic). Additionally, we tested whether self-reported memory functioning explained the relation between problematic alcohol use and HIV symptom severity. Results indicated that problematic patterns of alcohol use were associated with lower total memory functioning, retrieval (e.g., recall-difficulty) and memory for activity (e.g., what you did yesterday) and greater HIV symptom severity. Memory functioning mediated the relation between problematic alcohol use and HIV symptom severity. However, the direction of this relation was unclear as HIV symptom severity also mediated the relation between problematic alcohol use and memory functioning. Findings highlight the importance of integrated care for HIV and alcohol use disorders and suggest that routine alcohol and cognitive screenings may bolster health outcomes among this vulnerable population. PMID:23979498

Heinz, Adrienne J; Fogler, Kethera A; Newcomb, Michael E; Trafton, Jodie A; Bonn-Miller, Marcel O

2014-07-01

58

Trajectories of Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms in Significant Others of Patients with Severe Traumatic Brain Injury  

Microsoft Academic Search

Long-term psychological distress has been reported for significant others of patients who sustained traumatic brain injury (TBI). This study examined the course and potential predictors of posttraumatic stress symptoms in a relative sample (N = 135) drawn from a national cohort study on severe TBI in Switzerland. Latent growth mixture model analyses revealed two main groups: Across 3, 6, and 12 months

Laura Pielmaier; Anne Milek; Fridtjof W. Nussbeck; Bernhard Walder; Andreas Maercker

2012-01-01

59

Severity of Children's ADHD Symptoms and Parenting Stress: A Multiple Mediation Model of Self-Regulation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The goal of the current study was to determine the extent to which the perceived self-regulation deficits across behavioral, cognitive, and emotional domains seen in children with ADHD explain the association between the severity of ADHD symptoms and parenting stress. Participants for this study included 80 children (mean age = 10 years, 9 months)…

Graziano, Paulo A.; McNamara, Joseph P.; Geffken, Gary R.; Reid, Adam

2011-01-01

60

The Relationship Between Violence Dimensions and Symptom Severity Among Homeless, Mentally Ill Women  

Microsoft Academic Search

Little is known about the relationship between violence and symptomatology in the lives of homeless, mentally ill women. This study investigates the possibility that specific dimensions of violence—frequency, recentness and type—may be associated with severity of psychiatric symptomatology in this population. Results indicate that each of the abuse dimensions is associated with a broad range of psychiatric symptoms and, in

Lisa A. Goodman; Mary Ann Dutton; Maxine Harris

1997-01-01

61

Assessment of plant toxicity threshold of several heat transfer and storage fluids and eutectic salts  

Microsoft Academic Search

Plant toxicity threshold levels of several heat transfer and storage fluids and eutectic salts were determined by using a modified Neubauer technique. Barley seed germination and seedling growth were used for the toxicity tests. The general order of toxicity of the fluids applied to three mineral soils was ethylene gloycol > Dow 200 much greater than Caloria HT43 > Therminol

Nishita

1980-01-01

62

Drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms vs toxic epidermal necrolysis: the dilemma of classification  

Microsoft Academic Search

According to contemporary vernacular, when the cutaneous manifestations of drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic signs (DRESS) syndrome are those of Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) or toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN), the condition is defined as “DRESS syndrome with severe cutaneous reactions”. In this article, we have presented arguments for and against including patients with skin lesions of the SJS\\/TEN syndromes who

Ronni Wolf; Hagit Matz; Batsheva Marcos; Edith Orion

2005-01-01

63

Incidence and Prediction of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms in Severely Injured Accident Victims  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: This study was designed to as- sess the incidence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in severely injured acci- dent victims and to predict the presence of PTSD symptoms at a 12-month follow-up. Method: A longitudinal, 1-year follow-up study was carried out with 106 consecu- tive patients with severe accidental inju- ries who were admitted to the trauma surgeons' intensive

Ulrich Schnyder; Hanspeter Moergeli; Richard Klaghofer; D. Claus Buddeberg

2001-01-01

64

UPTAKE AND TOXICITY OF TOXAPHENE IN SEVERAL ESTUARINE ORGANISMS  

EPA Science Inventory

The organochlorine insecticide, toxaphene, was tested in flow-through bioassays to evaluate its toxicity to estuarine organisms. The organisms tested and their respective 96-hr LC50s (based on measured concentrations) are: pink shrimp (Penaeus duorarum), 1.4 micrograms/L; grass s...

65

Genitourinary Toxicity After High-Dose-Rate (HDR) Brachytherapy Combined With Hypofractionated External Beam Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer: An Analysis to Determine the Correlation Between Dose-Volume Histogram Parameters in HDR Brachytherapy and Severity of Toxicity  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate the severity of genitourinary (GU) toxicity in high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy combined with hypofractionated external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer and to explore factors that might affect the severity of GU toxicity. Methods and Materials: A total of 100 Japanese men with prostate cancer underwent {sup 192}Ir HDR brachytherapy combined with hypofractionated EBRT. Mean (SD) dose to 90% of the planning target volume was 6.3 (0.7) Gy per fraction of HDR. After 5 fractions of HDR treatment, EBRT with 10 fractions of 3 Gy was administrated. The urethral volume receiving 1-15 Gy per fraction in HDR brachytherapy (V1-V15) and the dose to at least 5-100% of urethral volume in HDR brachytherapy (D5-D100) were compared between patients with Grade 3 toxicity and those with Grade 0-2 toxicity. Prostate volume, patient age, and International Prostate Symptom Score were also compared between the two groups. Results: Of the 100 patients, 6 displayed Grade 3 acute GU toxicity, and 12 displayed Grade 3 late GU toxicity. Regarding acute GU toxicity, values of V1, V2, V3, and V4 were significantly higher in patients with Grade 3 toxicity than in those with Grade 0-2 toxicity. Regarding late GU toxicity, values of D70, D80, V12, and V13 were significantly higher in patients with Grade 3 toxicity than in those with Grade 0-2 toxicity. Conclusions: The severity of GU toxicity in HDR brachytherapy combined with hypofractionated EBRT for prostate cancer was relatively high. The volume of prostatic urethra was associated with grade of acute GU toxicity, and urethral dose was associated with grade of late GU toxicity.

Ishiyama, Hiromichi [Department of Radiology, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Kitasato, Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan)], E-mail: hishiyam@kitasato-u.ac.jp; Kitano, Masashi [Department of Radiology, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Kitasato, Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan); Satoh, Takefumi [Department of Urology, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Kitasato, Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan); Kotani, Shouko [Department of Radiology, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Kitasato, Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan); Uemae, Mineko [Division of Radiation Oncology, Kitasato University Hospital, Kitasato, Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan); Matsumoto, Kazumasa; Okusa, Hiroshi; Tabata, Ken-ichi; Baba, Shiro [Department of Urology, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Kitasato, Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan); Hayakawa, Kazushige [Department of Radiology, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Kitasato, Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan)

2009-09-01

66

Symptoms  

MedlinePLUS

... swallowing Shortness of breath or wheezing Turning blue Drop in blood pressure (feeling faint, confused, weak, passing ... Resources About Anaphylaxis Allergens Peanut Tree Nuts Milk Egg Wheat Soy Fish Shellfish Other Symptoms Diagnosis & Testing ...

67

COMPARISON OF EFFLUENT TOXICITY RESULTS USING CERIODAPHNIA DUBIA CULTURED ON SEVERAL DIETS  

EPA Science Inventory

Several diets have been proposed for Ceriodaphnia dubia, but no single diet has been universally accepted as optimal for toxicity testing. lthough several diets for Ceriodaphnia dubia culturing and testing are commonly used, little or no data exist on whether toxicity varies with...

68

When Parents with Severe Mental Illness Lose Contact with Their Children: Are Psychiatric Symptoms or Substance Use to Blame?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study compared parental psychiatric symptom severity, and the absence or presence of severe substance abuse, as predictors of contact with minor children for a representative sample of adults with diagnoses of serious mental illness (N = 45). Child contact and psychiatric symptom severity were measured during regularly scheduled 6-month…

Jones, Danson; Macias, Rosemarie Lillianne; Gold, Paul B.; Barreira, Paul; Fisher, William

2008-01-01

69

Is ideology a risk factor for PTSD symptom severity among Israeli political evacuees?  

PubMed

To study the role of ideology in situations of extreme stress, a research questionnaire, measuring posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), settlement ideology (the importance of Jewish settlement in Gaza), and type of evacuation was administered to 326 Jewish residents who were evacuated from Gaza settlements by the Israeli government. Forty percent of the participants met the criteria of probable PTSD. Forcibly evicted individuals reported higher levels of settlement ideology and higher levels of PTSD symptom severity compared to voluntarily evacuated individuals. Contrary to previous studies, ideology was found to be positively associated with PTSD symptom severity. The results are explained by the conservation of resources and terror management theories. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed. PMID:20623597

Oren, Lior; Possick, Chaya

2010-08-01

70

Neurophysiological Indices of Atypical Auditory Processing and Multisensory Integration are Associated with Symptom Severity in Autism.  

PubMed

Atypical processing and integration of sensory inputs are hypothesized to play a role in unusual sensory reactions and social-cognitive deficits in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Reports on the relationship between objective metrics of sensory processing and clinical symptoms, however, are surprisingly sparse. Here we examined the relationship between neurophysiological assays of sensory processing and (1) autism severity and (2) sensory sensitivities, in individuals with ASD aged 6-17. Multiple linear regression indicated significant associations between neural markers of auditory processing and multisensory integration, and autism severity. No such relationships were apparent for clinical measures of visual/auditory sensitivities. These data support that aberrant early sensory processing contributes to autism symptoms, and reveal the potential of electrophysiology to objectively subtype autism. PMID:25245785

Brandwein, Alice B; Foxe, John J; Butler, John S; Frey, Hans-Peter; Bates, Juliana C; Shulman, Lisa H; Molholm, Sophie

2015-01-01

71

Hereditary triosephosphate isomerase (TPI) deficiency: two severely affected brothers one with and one without neurological symptoms  

Microsoft Academic Search

A 13-year-old Hungarian boy (B.J. Jr.) with congenital haemolytic anaemia (CHA) and hyperkinetic torsion dyskinesia was found to have severe triose-phosphate isomerase (TPI) deficiency. One of his two brothers (A.J.), a 23-year-old amateur wrestler, has CHA as well, but no neurological symptoms. Both have less than 10% TPI activity and a highly increased dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP) level in their red

Susan Hollán; H. Fujii; A. Hirono; K. Hirono; H. Karro; S. Miwa; Veronica Harsányi; Éva Gyódi; Marianna Inselt-Kovács

1993-01-01

72

Enlargement of visual processing regions in social anxiety disorder is related to symptom severity.  

PubMed

Social anxiety disorder (SAD) is associated with altered brain function and structure, but most structural studies include small samples and findings are mixed. This study compared regional gray matter volume between 48 SAD patients and 29 healthy controls (HC) as well as the relationship between volume and symptom severity. Structural magnetic resonance images from SAD patients and HC were evaluated using standard voxel-based morphometry (VBM) processing in the SPM8 software package. Social anxiety symptom severity was rated in SAD patients by a clinician using the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale (LSAS). SAD patients had greater regional gray matter volume in the lingual gyrus and lateral occipital cortex than the controls, and within the SAD group a positive correlation was found between symptom severity and regional gray matter volume in the lingual gyrus and the retrosplenial cortex. These findings replicate and extend earlier reports of enlarged visual processing areas in SAD. Increased gray matter volume in regions involved in visual processing and self-consciousness could underlie, or be the result of, abnormal emotional information processing and self-focused attention previously demonstrated in patients with SAD. PMID:25258347

Frick, Andreas; Engman, Jonas; Alaie, Iman; Björkstrand, Johannes; Faria, Vanda; Gingnell, Malin; Wallenquist, Ulrika; Agren, Thomas; Wahlstedt, Kurt; Larsson, Elna-Marie; Morell, Arvid; Fredrikson, Mats; Furmark, Tomas

2014-11-01

73

Health Care Utilization and Symptom Severity in Ghanaian Children – a Cross-Sectional Study  

PubMed Central

The aim of this study was to identify factors influencing health care utilization behavior for children with mild or severe disease symptoms in rural Ghana. Between March and September 2008 a cross-sectional health care utilization survey was conducted and 8,715 caregivers were interviewed regarding their intended behavior in case their children had mild or severe fever or diarrhea. To show associations between hospital attendance and further independent factors (e.g. travel distance or socio-economic status) prevalence ratios were calculated for the four disease symptoms. A Poisson regression model was used to control for potential confounding. Frequency of hospital attendance decreased constantly with increasing distance to the health facility. Being enrolled in the national health insurance scheme increased the intention to attend a hospital. The effect of the other factors diminished in the Poisson regression if modeled together with travel distance. The observed associations weakened with increasing severity of symptoms, which indicates that barriers to visit a hospital are less important if children experience a more serious illness. As shown in other studies, travel distance to a health care provider had the strongest effect on health care utilization. Studies to identify local barriers to access health care services are important to inform health policy making as they identify deprived populations with low access to health services and to early treatment. PMID:24244698

Krumkamp, Ralf; Sarpong, Nimako; Kreuels, Benno; Ehlkes, Lutz; Loag, Wibke; Schwarz, Norbert Georg; Zeeb, Hajo; Adu-Sarkodie, Yaw; May, Jürgen

2013-01-01

74

Health care utilization and symptom severity in Ghanaian children--a cross-sectional study.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to identify factors influencing health care utilization behavior for children with mild or severe disease symptoms in rural Ghana. Between March and September 2008 a cross-sectional health care utilization survey was conducted and 8,715 caregivers were interviewed regarding their intended behavior in case their children had mild or severe fever or diarrhea. To show associations between hospital attendance and further independent factors (e.g. travel distance or socio-economic status) prevalence ratios were calculated for the four disease symptoms. A Poisson regression model was used to control for potential confounding. Frequency of hospital attendance decreased constantly with increasing distance to the health facility. Being enrolled in the national health insurance scheme increased the intention to attend a hospital. The effect of the other factors diminished in the Poisson regression if modeled together with travel distance. The observed associations weakened with increasing severity of symptoms, which indicates that barriers to visit a hospital are less important if children experience a more serious illness. As shown in other studies, travel distance to a health care provider had the strongest effect on health care utilization. Studies to identify local barriers to access health care services are important to inform health policy making as they identify deprived populations with low access to health services and to early treatment. PMID:24244698

Krumkamp, Ralf; Sarpong, Nimako; Kreuels, Benno; Ehlkes, Lutz; Loag, Wibke; Schwarz, Norbert Georg; Zeeb, Hajo; Adu-Sarkodie, Yaw; May, Jürgen

2013-01-01

75

Segmental Urethral Dosimetry and Urinary Toxicity in Patients With No Urinary Symptoms Before Permanent Prostate Brachytherapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To determine whether segmental urethral dosimetry is predictive for the degree of urinary morbidity after prostate brachytherapy in patients with no urinary symptoms before prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Between May 2000 and November 2005, 1,107 patients underwent iodine-125 monotherapy with urethral sparing techniques. A total of 166 patients fulfilled the selection criteria: baseline (International Prostate Symptom Score) IPSS {<=}5, no androgen deprivation therapy, and prostate ultrasound planning volumes (PUTV) <45 mL. The median follow-up was 44 months. Urinary morbidity was defined by maximum increase in IPSS, time to IPSS resolution, maximum Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) score, time to RTOG resolution, and urinary retention. Surrogate deviated urethra was contoured and doses calculated at the base, mid-prostate, apex, and urogenital diaphragm. Univariate and multivariate analysis was used to evaluate urethral and prostate dosimetry, age, PUTV, and number of needles for their association with urinary morbidity. Results: Urethral dose was fairly constant in all urethra segments except prostate base, where the variation in does was large. On multivariate analysis, higher urethral base D50, V100, and larger PUTV were predictive for higher maximum increase in IPSS. Higher urethral base V100 and larger PUTV predicted for prolonged IPSS resolution. Higher urethral base D50 and larger needle number predicted for longer RTOG resolution. Higher urethral base V100 predicted for RTOG {>=}2 toxicity. Conclusions: Radiation dose to the urethral base, larger PUTV, and needle number, predicted for increased urinary toxicity after prostate brachytherapy. Correlation between urinary morbidity and urethral base dosimetry may reflect a large variation in urethral dose observed at the prostate base.

Thomas, Carys [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vancouver Cancer Centre, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Keyes, Mira [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vancouver Cancer Centre, Vancouver, BC (Canada)], E-mail: mkeyes@bccancer.bc.ca; Liu, Mitchell [Radiation Oncology, Fraser Valley Cancer Centre, Surrey, BC (Canada); Moravan, Veronika [Surveillance and Outcomes Unit, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

2008-10-01

76

DUF1220 Dosage Is Linearly Associated with Increasing Severity of the Three Primary Symptoms of Autism  

PubMed Central

One of the three most frequently documented copy number variations associated with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a 1q21.1 duplication that encompasses sequences encoding DUF1220 protein domains, the dosage of which we previously implicated in increased human brain size. Further, individuals with ASD frequently display accelerated brain growth and a larger brain size that is also associated with increased symptom severity. Given these findings, we investigated the relationship between DUF1220 copy number and ASD severity, and here show that in individuals with ASD (n?=?170), the copy number (dosage) of DUF1220 subtype CON1 is highly variable, ranging from 56 to 88 copies following a Gaussian distribution. More remarkably, in individuals with ASD CON1 copy number is also linearly associated, in a dose-response manner, with increased severity of each of the three primary symptoms of ASD: social deficits (p?=?0.021), communicative impairments (p?=?0.030), and repetitive behaviors (p?=?0.047). These data indicate that DUF1220 protein domain (CON1) dosage has an ASD-wide effect and, as such, is likely to be a key component of a major pathway underlying ASD severity. Finally, these findings, by implicating the dosage of a previously unexamined, copy number polymorphic and brain evolution-related gene coding sequence in ASD severity, provide an important new direction for further research into the genetic factors underlying ASD. PMID:24651471

Davis, Jonathan M.; Searles, Veronica B.; Anderson, Nathan; Keeney, Jonathon; Dumas, Laura; Sikela, James M.

2014-01-01

77

Peer Victimization in Youth with Tourette’s Syndrome and Chronic Tic Disorder: Relations with Tic Severity and Internalizing Symptoms  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study analyzed rates of peer victimization in children with a chronic tic disorder as compared to children with\\u000a type 1 diabetes and healthy controls. The associations among peer victimization, tic symptom severity, and psychological symptoms,\\u000a as well as the potential mediating relationship between peer victimization, tic severity, and child internalizing symptoms,\\u000a were also explored. Children with tics displayed

Eric A. Storch; Tanya K. Murphy; Rhea M. Chase; Mary Keeley; Wayne K. Goodman; Maurice Murray; Gary R. Geffken

2007-01-01

78

Toxic traveler? Latrodectus species envenomation in Michigan with refractory symptoms after antivenin administration.  

PubMed

A 17-year-old male was envenomated on the right forearm by a black widow spider that had presumably traveled in a packaged dishwasher and been shipped from Mexico to Michigan. The patient experienced vomiting and severe pain in his abdomen and chest approximately 30 min after being bitten. He received 6000 units (1 vial) of Latrodectus antivenin intravenously about 7 h after he was envenomated. He did not experience significant improvement in his symptoms after the administration of antivenin and additional antivenin was not given. The patient was hospitalized for 7 days and still was complaining of intermittent episodes of pain in his chest and lower back 3 weeks after envenomation. To avoid prolonged symptomatology and hospitalization, additional Latrodectus antivenin should be given promptly to those individuals whose symptoms are not ameliorated after 1 vial. PMID:19274505

Edberg, Allison L; Lanphear, Jackson R; Riley, Bradley D; Judge, Bryan S

2009-04-01

79

Electroconvulsive therapy on severe obsessive-compulsive disorder comorbid depressive symptoms.  

PubMed

Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is not currently used as a first-line treatment for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). However, several related case reports have demonstrated that ECT seems to be effective for severe OCD, especially when first-line therapies have failed. In this study, we describe the courses, detailed parameters, effects, and follow-up information relating to three patients with severe OCD who were treated by modified bifrontal ECT after their first-line anti-OCD treatments pharmacotherapy, behavioral therapy, and cognitive behavioral therapy failed. The number of ECT procedures administered in each case is as follows: Case 1, eight; Case 2, three; and Case 3, four. In all three cases, the patients' depressive symptoms improved considerably after the ECT procedures. In addition, the condition of all three patients' OCD significantly improved and remained stable at regular follow-ups. ECT may play an effective role in treating severe OCD. PMID:24843380

Liu, Xiaohui; Cui, Hong; Wei, Qiang; Wang, Ying; Wang, Keyong; Wang, Chen; Zhu, Chunyan; Xie, Xinhui

2014-04-01

80

Acute Toxicity of Zinc to Several Aquatic Species Native to the Rocky Mountains  

Microsoft Academic Search

National water-quality criteria for the protection of aquatic life are based on toxicity tests, often using organisms that\\u000a are easy to culture in the laboratory. Species native to the Rocky Mountains are poorly represented in data sets used to derive\\u000a national water-quality criteria. To provide additional data on the toxicity of zinc, several laboratory acute-toxicity tests\\u000a were conducted with a

Stephen F. BrinkmanWalter; Walter D. Johnston

81

Predictors of Posttraumatic Distress 1 Year After Exposure to Community Violence: The Importance of Acute Symptom Severity  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this longitudinal study of 333 primarily male, Hispanic survivors of community violence, the authors investigated the effects of 4 categories of risk factors on posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptom severity: demographic characteristics, pretraumatic psychological factors, characteristics of the trauma, and reactions to the trauma. Replicating past research, exemplars from all 4 categories predicted PTSD symptom severity at 12-month follow-up.

Thomas F. Denson; Grant N. Marshall; Terry L. Schell; Lisa H. Jaycox

2007-01-01

82

Efficacy of Atomoxetine in Children with Severe Autistic Disorders and Symptoms of ADHD: An Open-Label Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: This study aims to examine the efficacy of atomoxetine in treating symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children with severe autistic disorder. Method: Children with severe autistic disorder who had symptoms of ADHD were given atomoxetine for 10 weeks. The efficacy of atomoxetine was evaluated by using the…

Charnsil, Chawanun

2011-01-01

83

[Toxicity and bioactivity of several alternative nematocides against Ditylenchus destructor].  

PubMed

By the methods of fumigation and contact assay, this paper determined the toxicity of four kinds of soil fumigants and six kinds of non-fumigants against Ditylenchus destructor. In the meantime, the bioactivity of the agents was evaluated by the corrected mortality rate of D. destructor after treated with the LC50 dose of each agent for different time. The LC50 values of soil fumigants dazomet, 1, 3-dichloropropene, metham-sodium, and chloropicrin were 0.49, 0.89, 0.91, and 3.60 mg x L(-1), and those of non-fumigants emamectin benzoate, abamectin, ethoprophos, fosthiazate, aldicarb, and carbosulfan were 31.2, 48.1, 224.3, 288.4, 632.3, and 823.9 mg x L(-1), respectively. The corrected mortality rate increased with treating time. After treated with LC50 dose, the inhibitory effects of dazomet, 1,3-dichloropropene, abamectin, and emamectin benzoate kept on a higher level at the time, and the corrected mortality rate did not decline after breaking away from the treatment, but the D. destructor recovered when exposed to natural state after treated with ethoprophos and aldicarb for 48h. It was suggested that dazomet, 1,3-dichloropropene, abamectin, and emamectin benzoate were the potential alternative nematicides used for the control of D. destructor. PMID:22303683

Gao, De-Liang; Yu, Wei-Li; Miao, Jian-Qiang; Liu, Feng

2011-11-01

84

Effect of baseline symptom severity on continence improvement mediated by oxybutynin chloride topical gel  

PubMed Central

Background In a recent placebo-controlled Phase III study, oxybutynin chloride topical gel (OTG) significantly improved urinary continence in patients with overactive bladder. In this post hoc analysis, the effect of incontinence severity on OTG-mediated improvement in continence was evaluated. Methods Change from baseline in the number of incontinence episodes was evaluated in patients with two to three incontinence episodes/day (moderate incontinence) and those with more than three incontinence episodes/day (severe incontinence). Results In patients with moderate (n = 171) and severe (n = 556) incontinence, reduction in incontinence episodes (mean ± standard deviation) was greater (P < 0.01) with OTG (moderate, ?1.7 ± 1.4; severe, ?3.6 ± 3.0) than with placebo (moderate, ?1.2 ± 1.3; severe, ?3.1 ± 3.4). Continence achievement rate with OTG was 48.2% (placebo, 24.4%) among patients with moderate incontinence and 17.8% (placebo, 12.1%) among those with severe incontinence. Conclusion Absolute placebo-adjusted reduction in incontinence episodes with OTG was not affected by baseline incontinence severity. Continence achievement was more likely if symptoms were less severe. PMID:24198648

Sand, Peter K; MacDiarmid, Scott A; Thomas, Heather; Caramelli, Kim E; Hoel, Gary

2011-01-01

85

Development of Late Toxicity and International Prostate Symptom Score Resolution After External-Beam Radiotherapy Combined With Pulsed Dose Rate Brachytherapy for Prostate Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To investigate the development of gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity, genitourinary (GU) toxicity, erectile dysfunction, and International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) resolution in a cohort of patients treated with external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) followed by a brachytherapy pulsed dose rate (PDR) boost. Methods and Materials: Between 2002 and 2008, 110 patients were treated with 46-Gy EBRT followed by PDR brachytherapy (24.96-28.80 Gy). The investigated outcome variables, GI toxicity, GU toxicity, erectile dysfunction, and IPSS were prospectively scored at several time points during follow-up. Association between time (as continuous and categorical variable) and the outcome variables was assessed using generalized linear models. Results: No statistically significant association was found between time (continuous) and GI toxicity (odds ratio [OR], 0.97; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.89-1.06), GU toxicity (OR, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.91-1.03), erectile dysfunction (OR, 1.06; 95% CI, 0.99-1.11), and IPSS (-0.11; 95% CI, -0.41-0.20). Also, no statistically significant association was found between these variables and time as a categorical variable. GU toxicity was associated with IPSS resolution (OR, 1.16; 95% CI, 1.09-1.24). Posttreatment IPSS was associated with pretreatment IPSS (0.52; 95% CI, 0.25-0.79). Conclusions: No accumulation of high-grade toxicity over time could be established for a group of patients treated with EBRT and PDR brachytherapy for prostate cancer, probably because high-grade late toxicity resolves with time. Also, differences in IPSS values among patients are smaller after treatment than before treatment.

Pieters, Bradley R., E-mail: b.r.pieters@amc.uva.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rezaie, Elisa; Geijsen, Elisabeth D.; Koedooder, Kees; Grient, Johan N.B. van der; Blank, Leo E.C.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Reijke, Theo M. de [Department of Urology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Koning, Caro C.E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam (Netherlands)

2011-11-01

86

Activity Parameters of Subthalamic Nucleus Neurons Selectively Predict Motor Symptom Severity in Parkinson's Disease  

PubMed Central

Parkinson's disease (PD) is a heterogeneous disorder that leads to variable expression of several different motor symptoms. While changes in firing rate, pattern, and oscillation of basal ganglia neurons have been observed in PD patients and experimental animals, there is limited evidence linking them to specific motor symptoms. Here we examined this relationship using extracellular recordings of subthalamic nucleus neurons from 19 PD patients undergoing surgery for deep brain stimulation. For each patient, ?10 single units and/or multi-units were recorded in the OFF medication state. We correlated the proportion of neurons displaying different activities with preoperative Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale subscores (OFF medication). The mean spectral power at sub-beta frequencies and percentage of units oscillating at beta frequencies were positively correlated with the axial and limb rigidity scores, respectively. The percentage of units oscillating at gamma frequency was negatively correlated with the bradykinesia scores. The mean intraburst rate was positively correlated with both bradykinesia and axial scores, while the related ratio of interspike intervals below/above 10 ms was positively correlated with these symptoms and limb rigidity. None of the activity parameters correlated with tremor. The grand average of all the significantly correlated subthalamic nucleus activities accounted for >60% of the variance of the combined bradykinetic-rigid and axial scores. Our results demonstrate that the occurrence of alterations in the rate and pattern of basal ganglia neurons could partly underlie the variability in parkinsonian phenotype. PMID:24790198

Gulberti, Alessandro; Zittel, Simone; Tudor Jones, Adam A.; Fickel, Ulrich; Münchau, Alexander; Köppen, Johannes A.; Gerloff, Christian; Westphal, Manfred; Buhmann, Carsten; Hamel, Wolfgang; Engel, Andreas K.

2014-01-01

87

Effects of Fenugreek Seed on the Severity and Systemic Symptoms of Dysmenorrhea  

PubMed Central

Background Primary dysmenorrhea is a prevalent disorder and its unfavorable effects deteriorates the quality of life in many people across the world. Based on some evidence on the characteristics of fenugreek as a medical plant with anti-inflammato-ry and analgesic properties, this double-blind, randomized, placebo controlled trial was conducted. The main purpose of the study was to evaluate the effects of fenugreek seeds on the severity of primary dysmenorrhea among students. Methods Unmarried Students were randomly assigned to two groups who received fenugreek (n = 51) or placebo (n = 50). For the first 3 days of menstruation, 2–3 capsules containing fenugreek seed powder (900 mg) were given to the subjects three times daily for two consecutive menstrual cycles. Pain severity was evaluated using a visual analog scale and systemic symptoms were assessed using a multidimensional verbal scale. Results Pain severity at baseline did not differ significantly between the two groups. Pain severity was significantly reduced in both groups after the intervention; however, the fenugreek group experienced significantly larger pain reduction (p < 0.001). With respect to the duration of pain, there was no meaningful difference between the two cycles in the placebo group (p = 0.07) but in the fenugreek group, the duration of pain decreased between the two cycles (p < 0.001). Systemic symptoms of dysmenorrhea (fatigue, headache, nausea, vomiting, lack of energy, syncope) decreased in the fenugreek seed group (p < 0.05). No side effects were reported in the fenugreek group. Conclusion These data suggest that prescription of fenugreek seed powder during menstruation can reduce the severity of dysmenorrhea. PMID:24695380

Younesy, Sima; Amiraliakbari, Sedigheh; Esmaeili, Somayeh; Alavimajd, Hamid; Nouraei, Soheila

2014-01-01

88

The toxicity of several organic phosphorus compounds to cotton insects and spider mites  

E-print Network

THE TOXICITY OF SEVERAL ORGANIC PHOSPHORUS COMPOUNDS TO COTTON INSECTS AND SPIDER MITES A Dissertation By FREEMAN MIREE FULLER, JR. Approved as to style and content lays TH EOX flnnmn +.*h*Chairraan^of Committee Head or Department May 1THE... THE TOXICITY OF SEVERAL ORGANIC PHOSPHORUS COMPOUNDS TO COTTON INSECTS AND SPIDER MITES By FREEMAN MIREE FULLER, JR. ?? ? A Dissertation Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment...

Fuller, Freeman Miree

2013-10-04

89

Unexpected, severe central nerve system toxicity of ofloxacine: report of two cases.  

PubMed

Central nerve system toxicity of fluoroquinolones is well known but nearly always benign. Old age, concomittant central nerve system disease, drug interactions and/ or partial or total loss of renal function are the major risk factors. Although, in literature there is very limited number of severe central nerve system toxicity cases related to fluoroqinolones, prompt realization is vital as the only therapy is discontinuation of the drug. In this article, two cases of acute central nerve system toxicity of ofloxacin with an unexpected severity are described. PMID:17268904

Guven, E Oguz; Balbay, Derya; Kilciler, Mete

2007-01-01

90

Impaired functioning and quality of life in severe migraine: the role of catastrophizing and associated symptoms  

PubMed Central

Migraine characteristics are associated with impaired functioning and quality of life (Fn/QoL), but the impact of other factors on Fn/QoL in headache patients is largely unexplored. We examined catastrophizing, comorbid anxiety/depression and migraine characteristics as related to Fn/QoL, and explored the consistency of these relationships across five Fn/QoL measures. We evaluated 232 frequent migraine sufferers for comorbid psychiatric diagnosis, and they completed anxiety, depression and catastrophizing measures, recorded migraine characteristics in a diary and completed five Fn/QoL measures (four self-report questionnaires, one diary disability measure). Backward regression revealed catastrophizing and severity of associated symptoms (photophobia, phonophobia, nausea) independently predicted Fn/QoL across all five measures (? weights 0.16–0.50, all P < 0.01). This is the first demonstration that a psychological response to migraines (catastrophizing) is associated with impaired Fn/QoL independent of migraine characteristics and other demographic and psychological variables. Severity of associated symptoms also emerged as an important contributor to Fn/QoL. PMID:17784854

Holroyd, KA; Drew, JB; Cottrell, CK; Romanek, KM; Heh, V

2007-01-01

91

PTSD symptom severity as a predictor of cue-elicited drug craving in victims of violent crime  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptom severity as a predictor of cue-elicited craving among alcohol- and cocaine-dependent individuals with a history of at least one physical and\\/or sexual assault. Approximately half of the sample had current PTSD. Severity of PTSD symptoms was measured via the Impact of Events Scale—Revised (IES-R) total severity score. Subjects listened to four trials

Michael E Saladin; David J Drobes; Scott F Coffey; Bonnie S Dansky; Kathleen T Brady; Dean G Kilpatrick

2003-01-01

92

Severity of Borderline Personality Symptoms in Adolescence: Relationship With Maternal Parenting Stress, Maternal Psychopathology, and Rearing Styles.  

PubMed

The development of borderline personality disorder (BPD) has been associated with parenting styles and parental psychopathology. Only a few studies have examined current parental rearing styles and parental psychopathology in relationship to BPD symptoms in adolescents. Moreover, parenting stress has not been examined in this group. The current study examined 101 adolescents (14-19 years old) with BPD symptoms and their mothers. Assessments were made on severity of BPD symptoms, youth-perceived maternal rearing styles, and psychopathology and parenting stress in mothers. Multiple regression analyses were used to examine potential predictors of borderline severity. No correlation was found between severity of BPD symptoms in adolescents and parenting stress. Only youth-perceived maternal overprotection was significantly related to BPD severity. The combination of perceived maternal rejection with cluster B traits in mothers was significantly related to BPD severity in adolescents. This study provides a contribution to the disentanglement of the developmental pathways that lead to BPD. PMID:25102082

Schuppert, H Marieke; Albers, Casper J; Minderaa, Ruud B; Emmelkamp, Paul M G; Nauta, Maaike H

2014-08-01

93

Gastro-Esophageal Reflux in Young Children and Adolescents: Is There a Relationship between Symptom Severity and Esophageal Histological Grade?  

PubMed

AIM:: The pediatric literature about the correlation between symptoms and histological lesions in patients investigated for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is scarce and inconclusive. The primary aim of the present study was to assess the relationship between the complained symptom severity and the esophageal histological grade, through the use of validated and reliable scores. PMID:25373865

Quitadamo, Paolo; Di Nardo, Giovanni; Miele, Erasmo; Campione, Severo; Mancusi, Valeria; Oliva, Salvatore; Rossi, Paolo; Tiberti, Antonio; Staiano, Annamaria; D'Armiento, Maria

2014-11-01

94

Influenza-Like Illness among University Students: Symptom Severity and Duration Due to Influenza Virus Infection Compared to Other Etiologies  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: University students with influenza-like illness (ILI) were assessed to determine whether symptom severity, duration, or missed days of school or work varied according to etiology. Participants: Sixty persons presenting to a university health clinic with ILI symptoms during 3 consecutive influenza seasons completed baseline survey and…

Mullins, Jocelyn; Cook, Robert; Rinaldo, Charles; Yablonsky, Eric; Hess, Rachel; Piazza, Paolo

2011-01-01

95

Peritraumatic tonic immobility is associated with PTSD symptom severity in Brazilian police officers: a prospective study.  

PubMed

Objective: Peritraumatic reactions feature prominently among the main predictors for development of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Peritraumatic tonic immobility (PTI), a less investigated but equally important type of peritraumatic response, has been recently attracting the attention of researchers and clinicians for its close association with traumatic reactions and PTSD. Our objective was to investigate the role of PTI, peritraumatic panic, and dissociation as predictors of PTSD symptoms in a cohort of police recruits (n=132). Methods: Participants were asked to complete the following questionnaires during academy training and after the first year of work: Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist - Civilian Version (PCL-C), Physical Reactions Subscale (PRS), Peritraumatic Dissociative Experiences Questionnaire (PDEQ), Tonic Immobility Scale (TIS), and Critical Incident History Questionnaire. Results: Employing a zero-inflated negative binomial regression model, we found that each additional point in the TIS was associated with a 9% increment in PCL-C mean scores (RM = 1.09), whereas for PRS, the increment was 7% (RM = 1.07). As the severity of peritraumatic dissociation increased one point in the PDEQ, the chance of having at least one symptom in the PCL-C increased 22% (OR = 1.22). Conclusions: Our findings highlight the need to expand investigation on the incidence and impact of PTI on the mental health of police officers. PMID:25466958

Maia, Deborah B; Nóbrega, Augusta; Marques-Portella, Carla; Mendlowicz, Mauro V; Volchan, Eliane; Coutinho, Evandro S; Figueira, Ivan

2014-12-01

96

Etanercept Reduces Symptoms and Severity of Psoriasis After Cessation of Cyclosporine Therapy: Results of the SCORE Study.  

PubMed

Cyclosporine is an established therapy for psoriasis that provides rapid relief of symptoms but has long-term toxic side effects. The objective of this study was to demonstrate the efficacy of etanercept as replacement therapy for cyclosporine in patients with moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis. Patients with plaque psoriasis were given cyclosporine 5 mg/kg/day until achievement of PASI50 at which point cyclosporine was tapered to 0 over 6 weeks. At week 6, patients were randomised (1:1) to receive etanercept (50 mg/week) or placebo for an additional 24 weeks. Patients in the etanercept group (n?=?58) experienced a reduction of -1.1 in mean PASI score (p?=?0.233 vs. cyclosporine) at week 30; patients in the placebo group (n?=?62) had mean PASI increase of 3.7 (p?

Micali, Giuseppe; Wilsmann-Theis, Dagmar; Mallbris, Lotus; Gallo, Gaia; Marino, Valentina; Brault, Yves; Germain, Jean-Michel

2015-01-15

97

Interdisciplinary residential treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder and traumatic brain injury: effects on symptom severity and occupational performance and satisfaction.  

PubMed

OBJECTIVE. This study examined outcomes of an 8-wk residential treatment program for veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and a history of traumatic brain injury (TBI). METHOD. Twenty-six veterans completed the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure, Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale, Beck Depression Inventory-2nd Edition, and PTSD Checklist before and after treatment. RESULTS. Veterans demonstrated significant improvements in occupational performance and satisfaction with their performance, as well as in PTSD and depression symptom severity after residential PTSD/TBI treatment. Additionally, improvements in occupational performance and satisfaction were associated with decreases in depression symptom severity. CONCLUSION. Although preliminary, results suggest that veterans with PTSD and a history of TBI experienced significant decreases in PTSD and depression symptom severity and improvement in self-perception of performance and satisfaction in problematic occupational areas. Changes in occupational areas and depression symptom severity were related, highlighting the importance of interdisciplinary treatment. PMID:25005504

Speicher, Sarah M; Walter, Kristen H; Chard, Kathleen M

2014-01-01

98

Brain reactivity to unpleasant stimuli is associated with severity of posttraumatic stress symptoms.  

PubMed

Despite the impressive progress in the biological research of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), little is known about the neurobiological correlates of emotional reactions in healthy people with posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS). The present study investigated whether PTSS are related to the electrocortical processing of unpleasant pictures in a sample of undergraduate students. Participants were instructed to judge whether images were unpleasant or neutral while an EEG was taken. The late positive potential (LPP) to unpleasant relative to neutral was more positive for people with high PTSS than with low PTSS. Additionally, a temporospatial principal components analysis (PCA) for the whole sample identified positivities that were directly correlated with PTSS. These results provide evidence that brain reactivity to unpleasant cues would predict PTSS intensity and thus be a biomarker of PTSS severity. PMID:25258033

Lobo, Isabela; David, Isabel A; Figueira, Ivan; Campagnoli, Rafaela R; Volchan, Eliane; Pereira, Mirtes G; de Oliveira, Leticia

2014-12-01

99

Assessment of plant toxicity threshold of several heat transfer and storage fluids and eutectic salts  

SciTech Connect

Plant toxicity threshold levels of several heat transfer and storage fluids and eutectic salts were determined by using a modified Neubauer technique. Barley seed germination and seedling growth were used for the toxicity tests. The general order of toxicity of the fluids applied to three mineral soils was ethylene gloycol > Dow 200 much greater than Caloria HT43 > Therminol 66. The toxicity order of the fluids applied to an organic soil was ethylene glycol > Caloria HT43 > Dow 200 > Therminol 66. Thus, Therminol 66 was the least toxic among the fluids used. Among the eutectic salts tested Dupont HITEC was more toxic than 8.4 percent NaCl-86.3 percent NaNO/sub 3/-5.3 percent Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ mixture in three of the four soils used. In the fourth soil there was no apparent difference of toxicity between the two salt mixtures. Depending on the fluid and the salt mixture, the toxicity threshold levels for barley seedlings ranged from 4451 to 317,488 ppM in the soils used.

Nishita, H.

1980-10-01

100

Multi-domain patient reported outcomes of irritable bowel syndrome: exploring person centered perspectives to better understand symptom severity scores  

PubMed Central

Objectives Patient reported outcomes (PRO) assessing multiple gastrointestinal symptoms are central to characterizing the therapeutic benefit of novel agents for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Common approaches that sum or average responses across different illness components must be unidimensional and have small unique variances to avoid aggregation bias and misinterpretation of clinical data. This study sought to evaluate the unidimensionality of the IBS Symptom Severity Scale (IBS-SSS) and to explore person centered cluster analytic methods for characterizing multivariate-based patient profiles. Methods Ninety-eight Rome-diagnosed IBS patients completed the IBS-SSS and a single, global item of symptom severity (UCLA Symptom Severity Scale) at pretreatment baseline of an NIH funded clinical trial. A k-means cluster analyses were performed on participants symptom severity scores. Results The IBS-SSS was not unidimensional. Exploratory cluster analyses revealed four common symptom profiles across five items of the IBS-SSS. One cluster of patients (25%) had elevated scores on pain frequency and bowel dissatisfaction, with less elevated but still high scores on life interference and low pain severity ratings. A second cluster (19%) was characterized by intermediate scores on both pain dimensions, but more elevated scores on bowel dissatisfaction. A third cluster (18%) was elevated across all IBS-SSS sub-components. The fourth and most common cluster (37%) had relatively low scores on all dimensions except bowel dissatisfaction and life interference due to IBS symptoms. Conclusions PRO endpoints and research on IBS more generally relying on multicomponent assessments of symptom severity should take into account the multidimensional structure of symptoms to avoid aggregation bias and to optimize the sensitivity of detecting treatment effects. PMID:23337220

Lackner, Jeffrey M.; Jaccard, James; Baum, Charles

2012-01-01

101

Patient-reported symptoms are independent of disease severity in patients with primary varicose veins.  

PubMed

The objective of this paper is to explore patterns of incompetence and disease distribution in patients with chronic venous disorders and to correlate this with CEAP (Clinical, Etiologic, Anatomic and Pathologic) classification and presenting symptoms to determine which features of chronic venous disorder (CVD) could be used to guide a patient pathway for referral and treatment. Consecutive patients attending a one-stop venous clinic at a university teaching hospital were recruited over a 12-month period. Patients were clinically assessed, assigned CEAP scores, duplex-scanned and categorized. Data were analyzed to identify associations between symptomatology and disease. Four hundred twenty-four limbs were divided into groups A (C2-3) (339) and B (C4-6) (85). The number of men, mean patient age, varicose vein diameter and quality-of-life score (Aberdeen Varicose Vein Questionnaire - AVVS) were significantly higher in group B (P < 0.01). Ache occurred more commonly in group A and in women (P < 0.01). Ache and pain were seen more frequently with saphenofemoral junction reflux (P < 0.05). Group A women were more likely to be offered surgical intervention while men were managed conservatively (P < 0.05). In conclusion, CVD symptoms are independent of disease severity assessed by CEAP score. Advanced disease is associated with larger venous diameters, older age and corresponds to a poorer quality of life. Objective markers such as CEAP, Venous Clinical Severity Score and AVVS should be used in determining a patient pathway for referral and treatment of CVD. PMID:21821663

Conway, A M; Nordon, I M; Hinchliffe, R J; Thompson, M M; Loftus, I M

2011-10-01

102

Salience Network–Based Classification and Prediction of Symptom Severity in Children With Autism  

PubMed Central

IMPORTANCE Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) affects 1 in 88 children and is characterized by a complex phenotype, including social, communicative, and sensorimotor deficits. Autism spectrum disorder has been linked with atypical connectivity across multiple brain systems, yet the nature of these differences in young children with the disorder is not well understood. OBJECTIVES To examine connectivity of large-scale brain networks and determine whether specific networks can distinguish children with ASD from typically developing (TD) children and predict symptom severity in children with ASD. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Case-control study performed at Stanford University School of Medicine of 20 children 7 to 12 years old with ASD and 20 age-, sex-, and IQ-matched TD children. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Between-group differences in intrinsic functional connectivity of large-scale brain networks, performance of a classifier built to discriminate children with ASD from TD children based on specific brain networks, and correlations between brain networks and core symptoms of ASD. RESULTS We observed stronger functional connectivity within several large-scale brain networks in children with ASD compared with TD children. This hyperconnectivity in ASD encompassed salience, default mode, frontotemporal, motor, and visual networks. This hyperconnectivity result was replicated in an independent cohort obtained from publicly available databases. Using maps of each individual’s salience network, children with ASD could be discriminated from TD children with a classification accuracy of 78%, with 75% sensitivity and 80% specificity. The salience network showed the highest classification accuracy among all networks examined, and the blood oxygen–level dependent signal in this network predicted restricted and repetitive behavior scores. The classifier discriminated ASD from TD in the independent sample with 83% accuracy, 67% sensitivity, and 100% specificity. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Salience network hyperconnectivity may be a distinguishing feature in children with ASD. Quantification of brain network connectivity is a step toward developing biomarkers for objectively identifying children with ASD. PMID:23803651

Uddin, Lucina Q.; Supekar, Kaustubh; Lynch, Charles J.; Khouzam, Amirah; Phillips, Jennifer; Feinstein, Carl; Ryali, Srikanth; Menon, Vinod

2014-01-01

103

Docetaxel-induced nail toxicity: a case of severe onycholysis and topic review.  

PubMed

Docetaxel is a commonly-used anti-cancer chemotherapeutic agent given its efficacy in a large variety of solid tumors. It is associated with various adverse effects one of which is nail toxicity. We report a case of severe onycholysis as a result of treatment with docetaxel in a patient who suffered from metastatic nasopharyngeal carcinoma. The case report will be followed by a discussion on the possible mechanism and preventive strategies for taxane-induced nail toxicity. PMID:21933605

Lau, Chi-Pan; Hui, Pun; Chan, Tak-Cheung

2011-08-01

104

Symptom differences in moderate to severe IBS patients based on predominant bowel habit  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE:We sought to determine if irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients with different bowel habit predominance differ in self-reported viscerosensory symptoms related to the upper and lower gastrointestinal (GI) tract, somatosensory symptoms, and constitutional functions.METHODS:Six hundred and twenty-five Rome criteria-positive IBS patients completed a bowel symptom questionnaire (BSQ), psychological symptom checklist (SCL-90), and health status (SF-36). Bowel habit predominance for IBS

Max Schmulson; Oh-Young Lee; Lin Chang; Bruce Naliboff; Emeran A Mayer

1999-01-01

105

Early severe toxicities after capecitabine intake: possible implication of a cytidine deaminase extensive metabolizer profile.  

PubMed

We report here the case of a 19-year-old female patient who suffered from extremely severe toxicities (G4 mucitis, fever, diarrhea, alteration of general state) while undergoing low-dose capecitabine treatment for her metastatic corticosurrenaloma. The severe toxicities stopped as soon as treatment was suspended. Interestingly, this patient was not deficient in DPD, a pharmacogenetic syndrome usually associated with increased risk of developing severe/lethal toxicities in patients undergoing fluoropyrimidine therapy, and she had been treated previously with 5-FU with a good tolerance. We then hypothesized that cytidine deaminase (CDA) extensive phenotype could be responsible for the severe toxicities observed with capecitabine. CDA is affected by genetic polymorphism, with subsequent acquisition of either deficient or extensive metabolizer profile. Phenotypic investigations confirmed that CDA activity in this patient was +180% higher than the ones usually recorded in the general population. This strongly suggests that the extensive activation of triple-prodrug capecitabine could have occurred in this patient, resulting in overexposure to 5-FU and its cytotoxic metabolites eventually. This case report suggest for the first time that severe toxicities with a capecitabine-containing protocol could be, at least in part, linked with an extensive-CDA syndrome. The case reported here suggests therefore that besides DPD, screening for CDA activity could be of interest to ensure a better safety in the handling of oral capecitabine at the bedside. PMID:19107485

Mercier, Cedric; Dupuis, Charlotte; Blesius, Aurore; Fanciullino, Raphaelle; Yang, Chen Guang; Padovani, Laetitia; Giacometti, Sarah; Frances, Nicolas; Iliadis, Athanassios; Duffaud, Florence; Ciccolini, Joseph

2009-05-01

106

Parent Alcoholism Impacts the Severity and Timing of Children's Externalizing Symptoms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although previous studies show that children of alcoholic parents have higher rates of externalizing symptoms compared to their peers, it remains unclear whether the timing of children's externalizing symptoms is linked to that of their parent's alcohol-related symptoms. Using a multilevel modeling approach, we tested whether children aged 2…

Hussong, Andrea M.; Huang, Wenjing; Curran, Patrick J.; Chassin, Laurie; Zucker, Robert A.

2010-01-01

107

Determinants of symptom profile and severity of conduct disorder in a tertiary level pediatric care set up: A pilot study  

PubMed Central

Background: Conduct disorders (CDs) are one of the most common causes for referral to child and adolescent mental health centers. CD varies in its environmental factors, symptom profile, severity, co-morbidity, and functional impairment. Aims: The aim was to analyze the determinants of symptom profile and severity among childhood and adolescent onset CD. Settings and Design: Clinic based study with 60 consecutive children between 6 and 18 years of age satisfying International Classification of Disease-10 Development Control Rules guidelines for CD, attending behavioral pediatrics unit outpatient. Materials and Methods: The family psychopathology, symptom severity, and functional level were assessed using parent interview schedule, revised behavioral problem checklist and Children's Global Assessment Scale. Statistical Analysis: The correlation and predictive power of the variables were analyzed using SPSS 16.0 version. Results: There was significant male dominance (88.3%) with boy girl ratio 7.5:1. Most common comorbidity noticed was hyperkinetic disorders (45%). Childhood onset group was more predominant (70%). Prevalence of comorbidity was more among early onset group (66.7%) than the late-onset group (33.3%). The family psychopathology, symptom severity, and the functional impairment were significantly higher in the childhood onset group. Conclusion: The determinants of symptom profile and severity are early onset (childhood onset CD), nature, and quantity of family psychopathology, prevalence, and type of comorbidity and nature of symptom profile itself. The family psychopathology is positively correlated with the symptom severity and negatively correlated with the functional level of the children with CD. The symptom severity was negatively correlated with the functional level of the child with CD. PMID:25568472

Jayaprakash, R.; Rajamohanan, K.; Anil, P.

2014-01-01

108

Prolonged Bilateral Reactive Miosis as a Symptom of Severe Insulin Intoxication  

PubMed Central

Patient: Female, 64 Final Diagnosis: Insulin self poisoning Symptoms: Coma Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Supportive care Specialty: Critical Care Medicine Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Miosis occurs following exposure to toxins that decrease the sympathomimetic tone, increase the cholinergic tone, or exert sedative-hypnotic effects, but has not been reported in insulin poisoning. Case Report: A 64-year- old woman without co-morbidities was found unconscious next to an empty insulin pen. Her Glasgow Coma Scale was 3 with absent reflexes, bilateral reactive miosis, and injection marks across the abdominal wall. The patient was endotracheally intubated, mechanically ventilated, and transferred to this hospital. At admission, the blood glucose level was 34 mg/dL. Glasgow Coma Scale remained at 3, with persistent bilateral reactive miosis. The toxicology screening was negative for ethanol, barbiturates, tricyclic antidepressants, phenothiazines, amphetamines, cannabinoids, salicylates, acetaminophen, and cocaine. Cranial computed tomography with angiography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) did not show any structural brain lesions. Intravenous glucose was continued at 6–14 g/h for 3 days. On repeated neurological examinations, the patient remained deeply comatose, with partial loss of cranial nerve function. Bilateral reactive miosis persisted for 4 days. From day 5 on, the patient awoke progressively. At discharge, the patient was fully alert and orientated, without a focal neurological deficit. Conclusions: Prolonged bilateral reactive miosis can be a clinical symptom accompanying metabolic encephalopathy in severe insulin poisoning. Functional impairment of the pons due to relative hypoperfusion during hypoglycemia may serve as a reasonable pathophysiologic explanation for this phenomenon. PMID:25556593

Gradwohl-Matis, Ilse; Pann, Jakob; Schmittinger, Christian A.; Brunauer, Andreas; Dankl, Daniel; Dünser, Martin W.

2015-01-01

109

Severe reversible myocardial injury associated with aluminium phosphide toxicity: A case report and review of literature  

PubMed Central

Aluminium phosphide is commonly used as an insecticide and can be toxic to humans at the cellular level by interfering with mitochondrial energy metabolism. We report on three cases of severe aluminium phosphide cardio-toxicity, resulting in severe decrease in both ventricular heart functions. The first case succumbed to intractable ventricular arrhythmias complicated by multi-organ failure before she died; while the other two cases required invasive hemodynamic support and eventually improved over the course of 10–14 days. We describe our experience and the challenges faced while managing one of them. PMID:25278724

Elabbassi, Wael; Chowdhury, Mohammed Andaleeb; Fachtartz, Arif Al Nooryani

2013-01-01

110

The Impact of Dyspepsia on Symptom Severity and Quality of Life in Adults with Headache  

PubMed Central

Background Dyspepsia and headache frequently co-exist, but the clinical implication of this association is uncertain. We planned to examine the prevalence and impact of dyspepsia in adults with headache. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in a secondary care setting. Clinical, psychological and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) data were compared between subjects with headache and controls (non-headache subjects). The impact of dyspepsia was analysed further in subjects with headache alone. Results 280 subjects (93 cases with headache and 187 matched controls) were recruited. The following baseline characteristics of subjects were as follows: mean age 45.0±17.3 years, 57.0% females and ethnic distribution—Malaysian = 45 (48.4%), Chinese n = 24 (25.8%) and Indians n = 24 (25.8%). Headache sub-types among cases with headache were as follows: tension-type headache (TTH) n = 53 (57.0%) and migraine n = 40 (43.0%). Dyspepsia was more prevalent in cases with headache compared to controls (25.8% vs 12.8%, p = 0.011), and headache was independently associated with dyspepsia (OR 2.75, 95% CI 1.39–5.43). Among cases with headache, there was a trend towards a higher prevalence of dyspepsia in those with migraine (27.5%) compared to TTH (24.5%). Subjects with headache and dyspepsia, compared to those with headache alone, had a greater severity of headache symptoms (63.67±22.85 mm vs 51.20 ±24.0 mm VAS, p = 0.029). Overall HRQOL scores were lower in headache subjects with dyspepsia (EQ-5D summary score 0.82±0.18 vs 0.90 ±0.16, p = 0.037 and EQ-5D VAS 62.08±17.50 mm vs 72.62 ±18.85 mm, p = 0.018), compared to those without dyspepsia. Conclusion Dyspepsia is associated with more severe headache symptoms and results in a lower HRQOL in patients with headache. PMID:25629323

Tai, Mei-Ling Sharon; Norhatta, Norbelinda; Goh, Khean Jin; Moy, Foong Ming; Sujarita, Ramanujam; Asraff, Azman Ahmad; Lee, Qin Zhi; Ng, Jiun Hoong; Tan, Eugene Choon Li; Mahadeva, Sanjiv

2015-01-01

111

Objective Cognitive Performance is Related to Subjective Memory Complaints in Midlife Women with Moderate to Severe Vasomotor Symptoms  

PubMed Central

Objective Memory complaints increase as women transition from premenopausal to postmenopausal stages. We explored the extent to which subjective memory complaints were associated with objective cognitive test performance, affective symptoms, and menopausal symptoms in midlife women with moderate to severe vasomotor symptoms. We predicted that subjective memory complaints would be related to affective symptoms and lower performance on tests of memory and attention. Methods Sixty-eight midlife women (mean age = 53; 54% African American) with ? 35 hot flashes per week completed the Memory Functioning Questionnaire (MFQ), a battery of objective cognitive tests, a menopausal symptom inventory and mood questionnaires. Linear regression analyses were conducted to examine predictors (symptoms and objective cognitive scores) of ratings on each of four MFQ subscales and a validated, single-item rating of current memory. Results Negative affect and delayed verbal memory predicted a single-item rating of current memory. Negative affect and poorer scores on tests of attention and working memory predicted Frequency of Forgetting. Lower positive affect, higher vasomotor symptoms, and increased age predicted lower Retrospective Memory Functioning. Increased age predicted Use of Mnemonics. Conclusions These findings strengthen the growing body of evidence that women with memory complaints during the menopausal transition have an accurate appraisal of their memory function and that their complaints also relate to affect and to a lesser extent vasomotor symptoms. Given that cognitive performance was in the normal range, these findings suggest that women can detect subtle changes in memory performance during the transition. PMID:23676633

Drogos, Lauren L.; Rubin, Leah H.; Geller, Stacie E.; Banuvar, Suzanne; Shulman, Lee P.; Maki, Pauline M.

2013-01-01

112

Severe fluoropyrimidine-related toxicity: clinical implications of DPYD analysis and UH2/U ratio evaluation.  

PubMed

The fluoropyrimidines are commonly used in chemotherapeutic cancer medicine, but many patients still experience severe adverse side effects from these drugs. We observed a severe toxicity in a 50-year-old woman treated with capecitabine and docetaxel for a metastatic breast cancer. Since dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) is the main candidate for pharmacogenetic studies on 5-FU toxicity, the entire coding sequence and exon-flanking intronic regions of the DPYD gene were sequenced in the patient. None of the previously described deleterious variants were detected. Also, the haplotype-based analysis failed to reveal DPYD variations associated with 5-FU toxicity. We also evaluated the UH2/U ratio in plasma as an index of 5-FU pharmacokinetics. The UH2/U value did not demonstrate low DPD activity in the patient. We discuss the advantages and limitations of this approach, particularly concerning the clinical applications of 5-FU pharmacogenetics in the family setting. PMID:21833589

Giorgio, E; Caroti, C; Mattioli, F; Uliana, V; Parodi, M I; D'Amico, Mauro; Fucile, C; Marini, V; Forzano, F; Cassola, G; Martelli, A; Faravelli, F; Di Maria, E

2011-11-01

113

Bcl-2 associated with severity of manic symptoms in bipolar patients in a manic phase.  

PubMed

B cell lymphoma protein-2 (Bcl-2) may contribute to the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder, and may be involved in the therapeutic action of anti-manic drugs. The aim of this study was to investigate serum levels of Bcl-2 in bipolar patients in a manic phase, and evaluate the Bcl-2 changes after treatment. We consecutively enrolled 23 bipolar inpatients in a manic phase and 40 healthy subjects; 20 bipolar patients were followed up with treatment. Serum Bcl-2 levels were measured with assay kits. All 20 patients were evaluated by examining the correlation between Bcl-2 levels and Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) scores, using Spearman?s correlation coefficients. The serum Bcl-2 levels in bipolar patients in a manic phase were higher than in healthy subjects, but without a significant difference. The YMRS scores were significantly negatively associated with serum Bcl-2 levels (p=0.042). Bcl-2 levels of the 20 bipolar patients were measured at the end of treatment. Using the Wilcoxon Signed Rank test, we found no significant difference in the Bcl-2 levels of bipolar patients after treatment. Our results suggest that Bcl-2 levels might be an indicator of severity of manic symptoms in bipolar patients in a manic phase. PMID:25563670

Chen, Wei-Ting; Huang, Tiao-Lai; Tsai, Meng-Chang

2015-02-28

114

Prolonged bilateral reactive miosis as a symptom of severe insulin intoxication.  

PubMed

Background Miosis occurs following exposure to toxins that decrease the sympathomimetic tone, increase the cholinergic tone, or exert sedative-hypnotic effects, but has not been reported in insulin poisoning. Case Report A 64-year- old woman without co-morbidities was found unconscious next to an empty insulin pen. Her Glasgow Coma Scale was 3 with absent reflexes, bilateral reactive miosis, and injection marks across the abdominal wall. The patient was endotracheally intubated, mechanically ventilated, and transferred to this hospital. At admission, the blood glucose level was 34 mg/dL. Glasgow Coma Scale remained at 3, with persistent bilateral reactive miosis. The toxicology screening was negative for ethanol, barbiturates, tricyclic antidepressants, phenothiazines, amphetamines, cannabinoids, salicylates, acetaminophen, and cocaine. Cranial computed tomography with angiography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) did not show any structural brain lesions. Intravenous glucose was continued at 6-14 g/h for 3 days. On repeated neurological examinations, the patient remained deeply comatose, with partial loss of cranial nerve function. Bilateral reactive miosis persisted for 4 days. From day 5 on, the patient awoke progressively. At discharge, the patient was fully alert and orientated, without a focal neurological deficit. Conclusions Prolonged bilateral reactive miosis can be a clinical symptom accompanying metabolic encephalopathy in severe insulin poisoning. Functional impairment of the pons due to relative hypoperfusion during hypoglycemia may serve as a reasonable pathophysiologic explanation for this phenomenon. PMID:25556593

Gradwohl-Matis, Ilse; Pann, Jakob; Schmittinger, Christian A; Brunauer, Andreas; Dankl, Daniel; Duenser, Martin W

2015-01-01

115

MODERATE TO SEVERE DEPRESSIVE SYMPTOMS AMONG ADOLESCENT MOTHERS FOLLOWED FOUR YEARS POSTPARTUM  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Our objective was to examine race/ethnic differences in depressive symptoms among adolescent mothers during the first four years postpartum. A prospective study of 623 adolescent mothers, 18 years or younger followed four years after delivery. Depressive symptoms were measured using the Beck Depress...

116

ACUTE TOXICITY OF AMMONIA TO SEVERAL DEVELOPMENTAL STAGES OF RAINBOW TROUT, SALMO GAIRDNERI  

E-print Network

ACUTE TOXICITY OF AMMONIA TO SEVERAL DEVELOPMENTAL STAGES OF RAINBOW TROUT, SALMO GAIRDNERI STANLEY.58 ppm un-ionized ammonia at 10°C (pH 8.3). At the end of yolk absorption, rainbow trout fry increased trout. Fertilization of eggs was not prevented in un-ionized ammonia solutions up to 1.79 ppm

117

Network Analysis of Toxic Chemicals and Symptoms: Implications for Designing First-Responder Systems  

E-print Network

situations. Introduction Toxic chemicals pose a universal threat to humans in situations ranging from bioterrorism to pesticide exposure. In emergency situations such as 9/11, there is a critical need for the rapid and accurate identification of toxic chemicals to reduce harm to large numbers of humans

Bhavnani, Suresh K.

118

Severe Late Toxicities Following Concomitant Chemoradiotherapy Compared to Radiotherapy Alone in Cervical Cancer: An Inter-era Analysis  

PubMed Central

Purpose To compare rates of severe late toxicities following concomitant chemoradiotherapy and radiotherapy alone for cervical cancer. Methods and Materials Patients with cervical cancer were treated at a single institution with radiotherapy alone or concomitant chemoradiotherapy for curative intent. Severe late toxicity was defined as grade ?3 vaginal, urologic, or gastrointestinal toxicity or any pelvic fracture, using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0 (CTCAE), occurring ?6 months from treatment completion and predating any salvage therapy. Severe late toxicity rates were compared after adjusting for pertinent covariates. Results At 3 years, probability of vaginal severe late toxicity was 20.2% for radiotherapy alone and 35.1% for concomitant chemoradiotherapy (P=.026). At 3 years, probability of skeletal severe late toxicity was 1.6% for radiotherapy alone and 7.5% for concomitant chemoradiotherapy (P=.010). After adjustment for case mix, concomitant chemoradiotherapy was associated with higher vaginal (hazard ratio [HR] 3.0, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.7–5.2, P<001), and skeletal (HR 7.0, 95% CI 1.4–34.1, P=.016) severe late toxicity. Compared to high dilator compliance, moderate (HR 3.6, 95% CI 2.0–6.5, P<.001) and poor (HR 8.5, 95% CI 4.3–16.9, P<.001) dilator compliance was associated with higher vaginal severe late toxicity. Age >50 was associated with higher vaginal (HR 1.8, 95% CI 1.1–3.0, P=.013) and skeletal (HR 5.7, 95% CI 1.2–27.0, P=.028) severe late toxicity. Concomitant chemoradiotherapy was not associated with higher gastrointestinal (P=.886) or urologic (unadjusted, P=.053; adjusted, P=.063) severe late toxicity. Conclusion Compared to radiotherapy alone, concomitant chemoradiotherapy is associated with higher rates of severe vaginal and skeletal late toxicities. Other predictive factors include dilator compliance for severe vaginal late toxicity and age for severe vaginal and skeletal late toxicities. PMID:22898381

Gondi, Vinai; Bentzen, Søren M.; Sklenar, Kathryn L.; Dunn, Emily F.; Petereit, Daniel G.; Tannehill, Scott P.; Straub, Margaret; Bradley, Kristin A.

2013-01-01

119

Postdural puncture headache (PDPH): onset, duration, severity, and associated symptoms. An analysis of 75 consecutive patients with PDPH.  

PubMed

Among 873 consecutive patients who had undergone a total of 1021 spinal anaesthesias involving puncture of the lumbar dura, 75 (7.35%) complained of Postdural Puncture Headache (PDPH). The severity of each patient's PDPH was categorized, on a scale from mild to severe, on the basis of the onset, duration, severity of the headaches, and the degree to which they were accompanied by auditory and vestibular symptoms. In the patients who developed PDPH, 65% developed symptoms within 24 hours of the lumbar punctures and 92% developed symptoms within 48 hours. For the patients who recovered spontaneously the mean duration of the PDPHs was 5 days, with a range of 1-12 dyas. PDPH was characterized by headaches that were influenced by the patient's posture and the severity of PDPH was categorized as follows: Mild PDPH resulted in a slight restriction of their physical activity. These patients were not confined to bed and had no associated symptoms. Moderate PDPH forced the patient to stay in bed for part of the day, and resulted in restricted physical activity. Associated symptoms were not necessarily present. Severe PDPH. Patients were bedridden for the entire day and made no attempt to raise their head or to stand. Associated symptoms were always present. Forty-five of the PDPH patients (60%) recovered spontaneously. Of these, 8 patients (11%) were categorized as mild cases of PDPH, 14 (19%) as moderate, and 23 (30%) patients as severe cases of PDPH. Thirty of the PDPH patients (40%) were treated with an autologous epidural blood patch (AEBP). Of these, 27 patients (36%) were classified as severe and 3 patients (4%) as moderate PDPH.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7572008

Lybecker, H; Djernes, M; Schmidt, J F

1995-07-01

120

Bleeding symptoms and laboratory correlation in patients with severe von Willebrand disease.  

PubMed

Type 3 von Willebrand disease (VWD) is a rare bleeding disorder with markedly decreased or absent von Willebrand factor (VWF) protein, accompanied by a parallel decrease in VWF function and factor VIII (FVIII) activity. The goal of this study was to describe the population of patients enrolled in the USA Centers for Disease Control Universal Data Collection (UDC) study with type 3 VWD, defined as a VWF:Ag of <10%, and to correlate bleeding symptoms with VWF and FVIII levels. Data on 150 patients were analysed. Almost all patients experienced bleeding episodes (98%) and required blood and/or factor product treatment (92%). While oral mucosal bleeding (the site of first bleed in 54%) was most common, subsequent muscle and joint bleeds were also seen (28%, 45%, respectively), and intracranial haemorrhage occurred in 8% of individuals. Mean age of first bleed was lower in those with either a FVIII < or =5% or a VWF:Ag <1%. Univariate marginal model analysis showed lower levels of FVIII and VWF:Ag both predicted a higher risk of joint bleeding. Longitudinal multivariate analysis found a lower FVIII level (P = 0.03), increasing age (P < 0.0001), history of joint bleeding (P = 0.001), higher body mass index (BMI) (P < 0.0001), and use of home infusion (P = 0.02) were all negatively associated with joint mobility. Low levels of VWF:Ag (P = 0.003) and male sex (P = 0.007) were also negatively associated with joint function. This study documents the strong bleeding phenotype in severe VWD and provides data to help target therapy, including prophylaxis, for patients most at risk of bleeding complications. PMID:19473418

Metjian, A D; Wang, C; Sood, S L; Cuker, A; Peterson, S M; Soucie, J M; Konkle, B A

2009-07-01

121

The Frequency and Severity of Gastrointestinal Symptoms in Patients with Early Parkinson’s Disease  

PubMed Central

Objective Although gastrointestinal dysfunctions occur in the majority of patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD), they are often unrecognized because many patients remain relatively asymptomatic in the early stage. We investigated the frequency of gastrointestinal symptoms in patients with PD using newly developed gastrointestinal symptom questionnaires. Methods Early PD patients with a symptom duration not exceeding 3 years were included in this study. All PD patients were evaluated using a questionnaire, which consisted of three relevant domains: oropharyngoesophageal (10 items); gastric (3 items); and intestinal-anorectal (7 items). The frequency of symptoms was calculated as a proportion with an item score ? 2. Results Of the 54 patients enrolled, 48 patients (88.9%) responded that bowel symptoms developed before the onset of Parkinsonian motor symptoms, and four patients reported that the onset of two types of symptoms (i.e., bowel and neurological) occurred approximately simultaneously, with only months between them. The frequencies of gastrointestinal symptoms are as follows: speech disturbance (40.7%), drooling (24.1%), sense of getting stuck (31.5%), choking (27.8%), globus pharyngis (16.7%), repetitive deglutition (29.6%), pain during swallowing (5.6%), food regurgitation (3.7%), acid reflux (7.4%), nausea/vomiting (11.1%), early satiety (16.7%), postprandial fullness (14.8%), epigastric soreness (9.3%), abdominal pain (3.7%), constipation (46.3%), excessive strain during defecation (33.3%), fecal incontinence (7.4%), tenesmus (20.4%), loose stool or diarrhea (3.7%), and difficulty in relaxing anal sphincter (11.1%). Two patients were scored at zero. Conclusions Our findings confirm that gastrointestinal dysfunction occurs in early PD in relatively high frequency. PMID:24926404

Sung, Hye-Young; Park, Jeong-Wook; Kim, Joong-Seok

2014-01-01

122

Effects of Ambient Pollen Concentrations on Frequency and Severity of Asthma Symptoms Among Asthmatic Children  

PubMed Central

Background Previous studies on the associations between ambient pollen exposures and daily respiratory symptoms have produced inconsistent results. We investigated these relationships in a cohort of asthmatic children, using pollen exposure models to estimate individual ambient exposures. Methods Daily symptoms of wheeze, night symptoms, shortness of breath, chest tightness, persistent cough and rescue medication use were recorded in a cohort of 430 children age 4-12 years with asthma in Connecticut, Massachusetts and New York. Daily ambient exposures to tree, grass, weed and all-type pollen were estimated using mixed effects models. We stratified analyses by asthma maintenance medication and sensitization to grass or weed pollens. Separate logistic regression analysis using generalized estimating equations were performed for each symptom outcome and pollen type. We adjusted analyses for maximum daily temperature, maximum 8-hr average ozone, fine particles (PM2.5), season and antibiotic use. Results Associations were observed among children sensitized to specific pollens; these associations varied by use of asthma maintenance medication. Exposures to even relatively low levels of weed pollen (6-9 grains/m3) were associated with increased shortness of breath, chest tightness, rescue medication use, wheeze, and persistent cough, compared with lower exposure among sensitized children taking maintenance medication. Grass pollen exposures ?2 grains/m3 were associated with wheeze, night symptoms, shortness of breath and persistent cough compared with lower exposure among sensitized children who did not take maintenance medication. Conclusion Even low-level pollen exposure was associated with daily asthmatic symptoms. PMID:22082997

Triche, Elizabeth W.; Leaderer, Brian P.; Bell, Michelle L.

2011-01-01

123

The severity of Internet addiction risk and its relationship with the severity of borderline personality features, childhood traumas, dissociative experiences, depression and anxiety symptoms among Turkish university students.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship of Internet addiction (IA) risk with the severity of borderline personality features, childhood traumas, dissociative experiences, depression and anxiety symptoms among Turkish university students. A total of 271 Turkish university students participated in this study. The students were assessed through the Internet Addiction Scale (IAS), the Borderline Personality Inventory (BPI), the Dissociative Experiences Scale (DES), the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ-28), the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI). The rates of students were 19.9% (n=54) in the high IA risk group, 38.7% (n=105) in the mild IA risk group and 41.3% (n=112) in the group without IA risk. Correlation analyses revealed that the severity of IA risk was related with BPI, DES, emotional abuse, CTQ-28, depression and anxiety scores. Univariate covariance analysis (ANCOVA) indicated that the severity of borderline personality features, emotional abuse, depression and anxiety symptoms were the predictors of IAS score, while gender had no effect on IAS score. Among childhood trauma types, emotional abuse seems to be the main predictor of IA risk severity. Borderline personality features predicted the severity of IA risk together with emotional abuse, depression and anxiety symptoms among Turkish university students. PMID:25023365

Dalbudak, Ercan; Evren, Cuneyt; Aldemir, Secil; Evren, Bilge

2014-11-30

124

Depressive Symptoms in Severely Obese Compared to Normal Weight Adolescents: Results from a Community-Based Longitudinal Study  

PubMed Central

Purpose Little is known about the relationship between severe obesity and depressive symptoms, particularly in community as opposed to clinic-based samples. This study determined the relationship of severe obesity and depressive symptoms over three years in a community-based sample of non–Hispanic black and white adolescents in grades 7–12 at baseline. Methods Nested matched cohort study using data from a longitudinal school-based study of youth followed for three years. 51 severely obese participants (BMI-for-age ? 99% and a BMI ? 40 at one or more study visit) were identified and paired with an age-, sex-, and race-matched normal weight subject. Depressive symptoms (CESD scale) were assessed at baseline, 2 and 3 years later. CESD score above cut points predictive of major depressive disorder or use of antidepressant medication defined High Depressive Symptoms (HDS). Results Pairs were 73% non-Hispanic black, 67% female. There was no relationship between weight status and HDS at any assessment point. However, a positive association between weight status and CESD scores, while not present at baseline or 2 years, emerged at 3 years (p=0.02). This relationship was present only among non-Hispanic whites (p=0.006 whites, p=0.25 blacks) and did not differ by sex. Conclusions Severely obese youth in this community sample did not have increased likelihood of high levels of depressive symptoms. However, significantly increased depressive symptoms among non-Hispanic white youth at the end of the follow up period suggests that this racial/ethnic group may be particularly vulnerable to the psychological effects of obesity in late adolescence/early adulthood. PMID:21700159

Goodman, Elizabeth; Must, Aviva

2010-01-01

125

Propafenone associated severe central nervous system and cardiovascular toxicity due to mirtazapine: a case of severe drug interaction.  

PubMed

We describe a rare case of severe drug-drug interaction between propafenone and mirtazapine leading to propafenone toxicity. A 69-year-old Caucasian male taking propafenone for atrial fibrillation was prescribed mirtazapine for insomnia. Subsequent to the first dose of mirtazapine the patient experienced seizures, bradycardia and prolonged QRS as well as QTc intervals on EKG. The patient was admitted to the ICU and recovered after supportive management. Propafenone is an established class IC antiarrhythmic drug commonly used in the treatment of atrial fibrillation. It is metabolized through the CYP4502D6 pathway. Five to 10 percent of Caucasians are poor metabolizers. Mirtazapine is a commonly prescribed antidepressant drug, which is also metabolized through and may modulate the CYP4502D6 pathway leading to altered metabolism of propafenone and possible adverse effects. In this case, toxicity was reversed once the offending drugs were discontinued. An extensive review of the literature revealed this to be the first described case of drug interaction between propafenone and mirtazapine. PMID:24791374

Rajpurohit, Naveen; Aryal, Sudeep Raj; Khan, Muhammad A; Stys, Adam T; Stys, Tomasz P

2014-04-01

126

What Symptoms Predict the Diagnosis of Mania in Persons with Severe/Profound Intellectual Disability In Clinical Practice?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: While researchers have attempted to address the difficulties of diagnosing affective disorders in the intellectually disabled population, diagnosing bipolar disorder in an individual with severe intellectual disability (ID) remains a challenge. The aim of this study was to identify what symptoms can predict a diagnosis of mania in the…

Matson, J. L.; Gonzalez, M. L.; Terlonge, C.; Thorson, R. T.; Laud, R. B.

2007-01-01

127

Extending an Anxiety Sensitivity Model of Uncued Panic Attack Frequency and Symptom Severity: The Role of Emotion Dysregulation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Models of panic disorder are primarily cognitive in nature, and the role of emotion regulation has not been extensively examined. This study investigates the extent to which emotion dysregulation predicts uncued panic attack frequency and symptom severity above and beyond anxiety sensitivity (AS). Participants were 77 undergraduate students reporting a recent history of uncued panic attacks. Emotion dysregulation was not

Matthew T. Tull

2006-01-01

128

Emergency Medical Service and In-Hospital Vital Signs as Predictors of Subsequent PTSD Symptom Severity in Pediatric Injury Patients  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: The present study investigated the extent to which heart rate (HR) levels soon after a traumatic event predicted posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptom severity assessed 6 weeks and 6 months later in child trauma victims. Methods: Participants consisted of 82 children (56 boys, 26 girls) aged 8-18 who were admitted to a…

Nugent, Nicole R.; Christopher, Norman C.; Delahanty, Douglas L.

2006-01-01

129

The Association of Quality of Social Relations, Symptom Severity and Intelligence with Anxiety in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Limited quality of social relations, milder symptom severity and higher intelligence were shown to account for higher anxiety levels in autism spectrum disorders. The current study replicated and extended earlier findings by combining these three determinants of anxiety in autism spectrum disorders in one study. The sample consisted of 134…

Eussen, Mart L. J. M.; Van Gool, Arthur R.; Verheij, Fop; De Nijs, Pieter F. A.; Verhulst, Frank C.; Greaves-Lord, Kirstin

2013-01-01

130

Cross-Ethnic Measurement Invariance of the Brief Symptom Inventory for Individuals with Severe and Persistent Mental Illness  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to test the measurement invariance of the Brief Symptom Inventory's (BSI) secondary factor model across African, white, and Latino Americans using multiple-group confirmatory factor analyses. This study provides an examination of the BSI's validity for use in mental health service research for people with severe and…

Hoe, Maanse; Brekke, John S.

2008-01-01

131

Lifetime Traumatic Events and High-Risk Behaviors as Predictors of PTSD Symptoms in People with Severe Mental Illnesses  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research is limited regarding the role of high-risk behaviors, trauma, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in people with severe mental illnesses (SMI). The current survey of 276 community mental health clients diagnosed with either a schizophrenia spectrum disorder or a major mood disorder examined the mediating role of lifetime…

O'Hare, Thomas; Sherrer, Margaret V.

2009-01-01

132

Impact of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy on Observed Autism Symptom Severity during School Recess: A Preliminary Randomized, Controlled Trial  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study compared cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and treatment-as-usual (TAU) in terms of effects on observed social communication-related autism symptom severity during unstructured play time at school for children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Thirteen children with ASD (7-11 years old) were randomly assigned to 32 sessions of CBT…

Wood, Jeffrey J.; Fujii, Cori; Renno, Patricia; Van Dyke, Marilyn

2014-01-01

133

Severity of Depressive Symptoms and Accuracy of Dietary Reporting among Obese Women with Major Depressive Disorder Seeking Weight Loss Treatment  

PubMed Central

An elevation in symptoms of depression has previously been associated with greater accuracy of reported dietary intake, however this association has not been investigated among individuals with a diagnosis of major depressive disorder. The purpose of this study was to investigate reporting accuracy of dietary intake among a group of women with major depressive disorder in order to determine if reporting accuracy is similarly associated with depressive symptoms among depressed women. Reporting accuracy of dietary intake was calculated based on three 24-hour phone-delivered dietary recalls from the baseline phase of a randomized trial of weight loss treatment for 161 obese women with major depressive disorder. Regression models indicated that higher severity of depressive symptoms was associated with greater reporting accuracy, even when controlling for other factors traditionally associated with reporting accuracy (coefficient ?=? 0.01 95% CI?=?0.01 – 0.02). Seventeen percent of the sample was classified as low energy reporters. Reporting accuracy of dietary intake increases along with depressive symptoms, even among individuals with major depressive disorder. These results suggest that any study investigating associations between diet quality and depression should also include an index of reporting accuracy of dietary intake as accuracy varies with the severity of depressive symptoms. PMID:24587338

Whited, Matthew C.; Schneider, Kristin L.; Appelhans, Bradley M.; Ma, Yunsheng; Waring, Molly E.; DeBiasse, Michele A.; Busch, Andrew M.; Oleski, Jessica L.; Merriam, Philip A.; Olendzki, Barbara C.; Crawford, Sybil L.; Ockene, Ira S.; Lemon, Stephenie C.; Pagoto, Sherry L.

2014-01-01

134

Ambulatory gastrojejunal manometry in severe motility-like dyspepsia: lack of correlation between dysmotility, symptoms, and gastric emptying  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background—Previous studies have failed to identify manometric patterns of gastrointestinal motor activity that can distinguish dyspepsia from health.Aims—To test the hypothesis that the combined use of prolonged, ambulatory, antrojejunal manometry and computer aided analysis in patients selected for the severity of their symptoms could reveal new insights into gastrointestinal motor activity in patients with severe motility-like dyspesiaMethods—Twenty four hour antrojejunal

A Wilmer; E Van Cutsem; A Andrioli; J Tack; G Coremans; J Janssens

1998-01-01

135

Safety and Toxicity of Saw palmetto in the Complementary and Alternative Medicine for Urological Symptoms (CAMUS) Trial  

PubMed Central

Purpose Extracts of the saw palmetto berry are used by many men in the U.S. as self-treatment for lower urinary tract symptoms due to benign prostatic hyperplasia. While the most recent data from double-blind clinical trials do not support efficacy superior to that of placebo, there are few data on the toxicity of saw palmetto. Materials and Methods 369 patients were randomized in the Complementary and Alternative Medicine for Urological Symptoms (CAMUS) trial; 357 participants are included in this modified intention-to-treat analysis. Participants were randomized to 320mg, 640mg, and 960mg daily of an ethanolic saw palmetto extract or an identical-appearing placebo, in an escalating manner at 6-month intervals, for a total of 18 months follow-up. Adverse-event assessments, vital signs, and blood and urine laboratory tests were obtained at regular intervals. Results There were no statistically significant differences between groups in rates of serious or non-serious adverse events, changes in vital signs, digital prostate exam findings, or study withdrawal rates. Overall, there were no significant inter-group differences in the occurrence of laboratory-test abnormalities; differences in individual laboratory tests were uncommon and small in magnitude. No evidence of significant dose-response phenomena were identified. Conclusions The saw palmetto extract used in the CAMUS trial showed no evidence of toxicity at doses up to three times the usual clinical dose over a period of 18 months. PMID:23063633

Avins, Andrew L.; Lee, Jeannette Y.; Meyers, Catherine M.; Barry, Michael J.

2013-01-01

136

PTSD symptom severity is associated with increased recruitment of top-down attentional control in a trauma-exposed sample?  

PubMed Central

Background Recent neuroimaging work suggests that increased amygdala responses to emotional stimuli and dysfunction within regions mediating top down attentional control (dorsomedial frontal, lateral frontal and parietal cortices) may be associated with the emergence of anxiety disorders, including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This report examines amygdala responsiveness to emotional stimuli and the recruitment of top down attention systems as a function of task demands in a population of U.S. military service members who had recently returned from combat deployment in Afghanistan/Iraq. Given current interest in dimensional aspects of pathophysiology, it is worthwhile examining patients who, while not meeting full PTSD criteria, show clinically significant functional impairment. Methods Fifty-seven participants with sub-threshold levels of PTSD symptoms completed the affective Stroop task while undergoing fMRI. Participants with PTSD or depression at baseline were excluded. Results Greater PTSD symptom severity scores were associated with increased amygdala activation to emotional, particularly positive, stimuli relative to neutral stimuli. Furthermore, greater PTSD symptom severity was associated with increased superior/middle frontal cortex response during task conditions relative to passive viewing conditions. In addition, greater PTSD symptom severity scores were associated with: (i) increased activation in the dorsolateral prefrontal, lateral frontal, inferior parietal cortices and dorsomedial frontal cortex/dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dmFC/dACC) in response to emotional relative to neutral stimuli; and (ii) increased functional connectivity during emotional trials, particularly positive trials, relative to neutral trials between the right amygdala and dmFC/dACC, left caudate/anterior insula cortex, right lentiform nucleus/caudate, bilateral inferior parietal cortex and left middle temporal cortex. Conclusions We suggest that these data may reflect two phenomena associated with increased PTSD symptomatology in combat-exposed, but PTSD negative, armed services members. First, these data indicate increased emotional responsiveness by: (i) the positive relationship between PTSD symptom severity and amygdala responsiveness to emotional relative to neutral stimuli; (ii) greater BOLD response as a function of PTSD symptom severity in regions implicated in emotion (striatum) and representation (occipital and temporal cortices) during emotional relative to neutral conditions; and (iii) increased connectivity between the amygdala and regions implicated in emotion (insula/caudate) and representation (middle temporal cortex) as a function of PTSD symptom severity during emotional relative to neutral trials. Second, these data indicate a greater need for the recruitment of regions implicated in top down attention as indicated by (i) greater BOLD response in superior/middle frontal gyrus as a function of PTSD symptom severity in task relative to view conditions; (ii) greater BOLD response in dmFC/dACC, lateral frontal and inferior parietal cortices as a function of PTSD symptom severity in emotional relative to neutral conditions and (iii) greater functional connectivity between the amygdala and inferior parietal cortex as a function of PTSD symptom severity during emotional relative to neutral conditions. PMID:25610763

White, Stuart F.; Costanzo, Michelle E.; Blair, James R.; Roy, Michael J.

2014-01-01

137

Association of cocaine withdrawal symptoms with more severe dependence and enhanced subjective response to cocaine  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this two part study was to better characterize cocaine users based on self-reported cocaine withdrawal symptoms by examining screening data and response to smoked cocaine in the human laboratory. The first study sample included male and female non-treatment seeking cocaine users who were screened as potential subjects for inpatient studies. Of the 555 subjects, 462 (82%) endorsed

Mehmet Sofuoglu; Susan Dudish-Poulsen; Scott B Brown; Dorothy K Hatsukami

2003-01-01

138

Neurophysiological Indices of Atypical Auditory Processing and Multisensory Integration Are Associated with Symptom Severity in Autism  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Atypical processing and integration of sensory inputs are hypothesized to play a role in unusual sensory reactions and social-cognitive deficits in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Reports on the relationship between objective metrics of sensory processing and clinical symptoms, however, are surprisingly sparse. Here we examined the relationship…

Brandwein, Alice B.; Foxe, John J.; Butler, John S.; Frey, Hans-Peter; Bates, Juliana C.; Shulman, Lisa H.; Molholm, Sophie

2015-01-01

139

IMAGE ANALYSIS VERSUS VISUAL ASSESSMENT OF INCIDENCE AND SEVERITY OF CITRUS CANKER SYMPTOMS  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Xanthomonas axonopodis pv citri causes citrus canker. Disease assessment is important for monitoring epidemics. Visual assessment (VA) is presently the only reliable means of detection. To investigate how VA of symptoms compared to image analysis we used digital images of 214 citrus le...

140

Evaluation of the presence and severity of menopausal symptoms among postmenopausal women screened for the metabolic syndrome.  

PubMed

Abstract Background: The prevalence of the metabolic syndrome (METS) increases after the menopause. Reports indicate that the METS and its components, especially obesity, enhance the intensity of menopausal symptoms. Objective: Assess the frequency and severity of menopausal symptoms in postmenopausal women. Factors related to the symptom severity were also analyzed including depressive and metabolic status. Methods: A total of 204 natural postmenopausal women (40-65 years) participating in a METS screening program were asked to fill out the Menopause Rating Scale (MRS), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), and a general socio-demographic questionnaire containing personal and partner data. Criteria of the American Heart Association were used to define the METS. Results: Median age of the whole sample was 56 years. A 52.9% presented the METS, with 37.3% presenting hyperglycemia, 51.5% hypertension, 58.3% abdominal obesity, 45.6% high triglyceride and 56.4% low HDL-C levels. Total and subscale MRS scores did not differ in accordance to the presence or not of the METS. The three top prevalent menopausal symptoms were muscle and joint problems (87.2%), physical and mental exhaustion (72%) and depressive mood (64.7%). A 19.6% of women presented total MRS scores above 16 defined as severe. Multivariate linear regression analysis determined that anxiety (higher HADS anxiety subscale scores) was significantly and positively correlated with all components of the MRS (Total and subscale scores). Higher total MRS scores correlated positively with abdominal perimeter and higher parity. Somatic scores correlated inversely with female education and positively with psychotropic drug use; and psychological MRS scores positively correlated depressed mood (higher HADS depressive subscale scores) and abdominal perimeter. Conclusion: In this postmenopausal sample, severity of menopausal symptoms correlated to abdominal obesity, mood and other personal aspects. PMID:25347000

Chedraui, Peter; Pérez-López, Faustino R; Hidalgo, Luis; Villacreses, Diego; Domínguez, Andrea; Escobar, Gustavo S; Genazzani, Andrea R; Simoncini, Tommaso

2014-10-27

141

Drinking motives as mediators between PTSD symptom severity and alcohol consumption in persons with severe mental illnesses  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research has consistently shown that drinking to alleviate negative emotional states predicts alcohol use and relapse among clients with co-occurring disorders including depressive and posttraumatic stress disorders. However, studies examining the mediating role of drinking motives in persons with severe mental illness (SMI) are few. The current survey of 116 community mental health clients (51.7% men; 47.4% women) diagnosed with

Thomas O'Hare; Margaret Sherrer

2011-01-01

142

Acute toxicity of zinc to several aquatic species native to the Rocky Mountains.  

PubMed

National water-quality criteria for the protection of aquatic life are based on toxicity tests, often using organisms that are easy to culture in the laboratory. Species native to the Rocky Mountains are poorly represented in data sets used to derive national water-quality criteria. To provide additional data on the toxicity of zinc, several laboratory acute-toxicity tests were conducted with a diverse assortment of fish, benthic invertebrates, and an amphibian native to the Rocky Mountains. Tests with fish were conducted using three subspecies of cutthroat trout (Colorado River cutthroat trout Oncorhynchus clarkii pleuriticus, greenback cutthroat trout O. clarkii stomias, and Rio Grande cutthroat trout O. clarkii virginalis), mountain whitefish (Prosopium williamsoni), mottled sculpin (Cottus bairdi), longnose dace (Rhinichthys cataractae), and flathead chub (Platygobio gracilis). Aquatic invertebrate tests were conducted with mayflies (Baetis tricaudatus, Drunella doddsi, Cinygmula sp. and Ephemerella sp.), a stonefly (Chloroperlidae), and a caddis fly (Lepidostoma sp.). The amphibian test was conducted with tadpoles of the boreal toad (Bufo boreas). Median lethal concentrations (LC(50)s) ranged more than three orders of magnitude from 166 ?g/L for Rio Grande cutthroat trout to >67,000 ?g/L for several benthic invertebrates. Of the organisms tested, vertebrates were the most sensitive, and benthic invertebrates were the most tolerant. PMID:21811884

Brinkman, Stephen F; Johnston, Walter D

2012-02-01

143

Amyloid-Associated Activity Contributes to the Severity and Toxicity of a Prion Phenotype  

PubMed Central

The self-assembly of alternative conformations of normal proteins into amyloid aggregates has been implicated in both the acquisition of new functions and in the appearance and progression of disease. However, while these amyloidogenic pathways are linked to the emergence of new phenotypes, numerous studies have uncoupled the accumulation of aggregates from their biological consequences, revealing currently underappreciated complexity in the determination of these traits. Here, to explore the molecular basis of protein-only phenotypes, we focused on the S. cerevisiae Sup35/[PSI+] prion, which confers a translation termination defect and expression level-dependent toxicity in its amyloid form. Our studies reveal that aggregated Sup35 retains its normal function as a translation release factor. However, fluctuations in the composition and size of these complexes specifically alter the level of this aggregate-associated activity and thereby the severity and toxicity of the amyloid state. Thus, amyloid heterogeneity is a crucial contributor to protein-only phenotypes. PMID:25023996

Pezza, John A.; Villali, Janice; Sindi, Suzanne S.; Serio, Tricia R.

2014-01-01

144

Association between elevated depressive symptoms and clinical disease severity in African-American adults with sickle cell disease.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to examine the association between elevated depressive symptoms and the clinical severity of sickle cell disease (SCD) using African-American adults with and without SCD. STUDY DESIGN: The population consisted of 102 African-American adults with SCD, diagnosed using hemoglobin electrophoresis, individually matched on age (+/-5 years), gender and recruitment location to 103 African-American adults without SCD (mean age of all subjects was 35.4 years, 55.6% female). Logistic regression was used to examine the association between SCD clinical severity and elevated depressive symptoms in bivariate and multivariable analyses. RESULTS: The prevalence of elevated depressive symptoms as measured using the 10-item Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) was 38.6% in those with SCD, compared to 27.5% in those without SCD; however, this difference was not statistically significant (p>0.05). Compared to African Americans without SCD, African Americans with SCD were less educated, had lower incomes, and were more likely to be unemployed or disabled (p<0.01). The odds of having elevated depressive symptoms were 1.78 (CI: 0.94, 3.38) for those with high clinical SCD severity compared to those without SCD in bivariate analysis and 1.37 (CI: 0.62, 3.02) in multivariable analysis after adjusting for socioeconomic factors. CONCLUSIONS: The reported relationship between elevated depressive symptoms and SCD may be a result of the adverse economic conditions associated with SCD. PMID:16573300

Laurence, Brian; George, David; Woods, Dexter

2006-01-01

145

Are stressful life events causally related to the severity of obsessive-compulsive symptoms? A monozygotic twin difference study.  

PubMed

Traumatic or stressful life events have long been hypothesized to play a role in causing or precipitating obsessive-compulsive symptoms but the impact of these environmental factors has rarely been investigated using genetically informative designs. We tested whether a wide range of retrospectively-reported stressful life events (SLEs) influence the lifetime presence and severity of obsessive-compulsive symptoms (OCS) in a large Swedish population-based cohort of 22,084 twins. Multiple regression models examined whether differences in SLEs within twin pairs were significantly associated with differences in OCS. In the entire sample (i.e., both monozygotic [MZ] and dizygotic twin pairs), two SLEs factors, "abuse and family disruption" and "sexual abuse", were significantly associated with the severity of OCS even after controlling for depressive symptoms. Other SLEs factors were either not associated with OCS ("loss", "non-sexual assault") or were no longer associated with OCS after controlling for depression ("illness/injury"). Within MZ pair analyses, which effectively control for genetic and shared environmental effects, showed that only the "abuse and family disruption" factor remained independently related to within-pair differences in OCS severity, even after controlling for depressive symptoms. Despite being statistically significant, the magnitude of the associations was small; "abuse and family disruption" explained approximately 3% of the variance in OCS severity. We conclude that OCS are selectively associated with certain types of stressful life events. In particular, a history of interpersonal abuse, neglect and family disruption may make a modest but significant contribution to the severity of OCS. Further replication in longitudinal cohorts is essential before causality can be firmly established. PMID:25511316

Vidal-Ribas, P; Stringaris, A; Rück, C; Serlachius, E; Lichtenstein, P; Mataix-Cols, D

2015-02-01

146

Predictor of Severe Gastroduodenal Toxicity After Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Abdominopelvic Malignancies  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To identify the predictors for the development of severe gastroduodenal toxicity (GDT) in patients treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) using 3 fractionations for abdominopelvic malignancies. Methods and Materials: From 2001 to 2011, 202 patients with abdominopelvic malignancies were treated with curative-intent SBRT. Among these patients, we retrospectively reviewed the clinical records of 40 patients with the eligibility criteria as follows: 3 fractionations, follow-up period {>=}1 year, absence of previous radiation therapy (RT) history or combination of external-beam RT and the presence of gastroduodenum (GD) that received a dose higher than 20% of prescribed dose. The median SBRT dose was 45 Gy (range, 33-60 Gy) with 3 fractions. We analyzed the clinical and dosimetric parameters, including multiple dose-volume histogram endpoints: V{sub 20} (volume of GD that received 20 Gy), V{sub 25}, V{sub 30}, V{sub 35}, and D{sub max} (the maximum point dose). The grade of GDT was defined by the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria version 4.0, and GDT {>=}grade 3 was defined as severe GDT. Results: The median time to the development of severe GDT was 6 months (range, 3-12 months). Severe GDT was found in 6 patients (15%). D{sub max} was the best dosimetric predictor for severe GDT. D{sub max} of 35 Gy and 38 Gy were respectively associated with a 5% and 10% probability of the development of severe GDT. A history of ulcer before SBRT was the best clinical predictor on univariate analysis (P=.0001). Conclusions: We suggest that D{sub max} is a valuable predictor of severe GDT after SBRT using 3 fractionations for abdominopelvic malignancies. A history of ulcer before SBRT should be carefully considered as a clinical predictor, especially in patients who receive a high dose to GD.

Bae, Sun Hyun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Mi-Sook, E-mail: mskim@kcch.re.kr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Chul Koo; Kang, Jin-Kyu; Lee, Sang Yeob; Lee, Kyung-Nam [Department of Radiation Oncology, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Dong Han [CyberKnife Center, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [CyberKnife Center, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Han, Chul Ju; Yang, Ki Young [Department of Internal Medicine, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Internal Medicine, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang Bum [Department of General Surgery, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of General Surgery, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

2012-11-15

147

Association of ADHD symptoms severity with higher paternal and lower maternal age of a clinical sample of children.  

PubMed

This study examines the association of father's and mother's age with the severity of inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity. Participants are 470 children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) diagnosed according to DSM-IV diagnostic criteria. Moreover, parents reported the severity of ADHD symptoms through completing ADHD checklist. Mother's and father's age was associated with the score of hyperactivity/impulsivity. Lower father's age and advanced maternal age are associated with higher severity of hyperactivity/impulsivity in children and adolescents with ADHD. None of mothers' and fathers' age is associated with ADHD inattentiveness severity in children. Maternal and paternal education levels are not associated with ADHD severity. Older mothers and younger fathers have ADHD children with higher hyperactivity/impulsivity severity. It should be investigated whether the father's and mother's age are risk factors for ADHD. PMID:24658987

Ghanizadeh, Ahmad

2014-01-01

148

Individual differences in symptom severity and behavior predict neural activation during face processing in adolescents with autism  

PubMed Central

Despite the impressive literature describing atypical neural activation in visuoperceptual face processing regions in autism, almost nothing is known about whether these perturbations extend to more affective regions in the circuitry and whether they bear any relationship to symptom severity or atypical behavior. Using fMRI, we compared face-, object-, and house-related activation in adolescent males with high-functioning autism (HFA) and typically developing (TD) matched controls. HFA adolescents exhibited hypo-activation throughout the core visuoperceptual regions, particularly in the right hemisphere, as well as in some of the affective/motivational face-processing regions, including the posterior cingulate cortex and right anterior temporal lobe. Conclusions about the relative hyper- or hypo-activation of the amygdala depended on the nature of the contrast that was used to define the activation. Individual differences in symptom severity predicted the magnitude of face activation, particularly in the right fusiform gyrus. Also, among the HFA adolescents, face recognition performance predicted the magnitude of face activation in the right anterior temporal lobe, a region that supports face individuation in TD adults. Our findings reveal a systematic relation between the magnitude of neural dysfunction, severity of autism symptoms, and variation in face recognition behavior in adolescents with autism. In so doing, we uncover brain–behavior relations that underlie one of the most prominent social deficits in autism and help resolve discrepancies in the literature. PMID:25610767

Scherf, K. Suzanne; Elbich, Daniel; Minshew, Nancy; Behrmann, Marlene

2014-01-01

149

Automated image analysis of the severity of foliar citrus canker symptoms  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Citrus canker (caused by Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri) is a destructive disease, reducing yield, and rendering fruit unfit for fresh sale. Accurate assessment of citrus canker severity and other diseases is needed for several purposes, including monitoring epidemics and evaluation of germplasm. ...

150

Severe oral symptoms after the use of an oral solution containing ketoprofen in two NSAIDs-sensitive patients.  

PubMed

Cutaneous application of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) ketoprofen has been reported to induce contact dermatitis. However, there is no report of intraoral symptoms after the use of solutions containing this drug. In this report we describe two cases of severe intraoral symptoms after the use of a gargle containing ketoprofen in two patients with NSAIDs hypersensitivity. The patients underwent diagnostic procedures 6 months after the episodes of intraoral symptoms. Procedures included skin prick test for inhalant and food allergens, and total- and specific-IgE determinations to evaluate the presence of atopy. A single-blind, placebo-controlled challenge with different dilutions (1/1000, 1/100, 1/10, and 1/1) of ketoprofen oral solution was carried out by a modified version of a standardized protocol. We used the same commercial solution without the drug as placebo. Diagnostic procedures failed to demonstrate allergic sensitization to the common inhalant and food allergens. Both patients experienced a slight intraoral itching and edema of the lips a few minutes after the intraoral use of 1/100 dilution of active drug. Our cases suggest that the contact of an oral solution containing ketoprofen with oral mucosa may induce locally severe oral manifestations. Patients with NSAIDs sensitivity should be warned on the potential risk of using an oral solution containing this class of drugs. PMID:14989118

Liccardi, G; Triggiani, M; D'Amato, M; D'Amato, G

2003-01-01

151

Experience of insomnia, symptom attribution and treatment preferences in individuals with moderate to severe COPD: a qualitative study  

PubMed Central

Persons with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are known to have poor sleep quality. Acceptance of and adherence to therapies for sleep problems may depend on how the person with COPD regards the source of his sleep problem, yet little is known about their attribution as to the cause of these sleep symptoms. The objective of this study was to describe the subjective sleep complaints of individuals with COPD along with their attributions as to the cause of these symptoms, and their treatment preferences for insomnia. Three focus groups were conducted (N=18) with participants who have moderate to severe COPD. Focus group data were transcribed, compared and contrasted to identify themes of attribution. Participants reported difficulty falling asleep, staying asleep, and daytime sleepiness. They attributed their sleep problems primarily to their pulmonary symptoms, but also poor air quality (thick humid air) and death anxiety when awake during the night. There was no clear preference for type of treatment to remedy this problem (medication, cognitive therapy), although they indicated that traveling to the clinic was difficult and should be avoided as much as possible. These data suggest that environmental manipulation to improve air quality (eg, air conditioning) and modifications to reduce death anxiety could be beneficial to persons with COPD. In-person multi-session therapy may not be acceptable to persons with moderate to severe COPD, however internet-based therapy might make treatment more accessible.

Kauffman, Karen S; Doede, Megan; Diaz-Abad, Montserrat; Scharf, Steven M; Bell-Farrell, Wanda; Rogers, Valerie E; Geiger-Brown, Jeanne

2014-01-01

152

Behaviorally-inhibited temperament is associated with severity of PTSD symptoms and faster eyeblink conditioning in veterans  

PubMed Central

Prior studies have sometimes demonstrated facilitated acquisition of classically-conditioned responses and/or resistance to extinction in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, it is unclear whether these behaviors are acquired as a result of PTSD or exposure to trauma, or reflect pre-existing risk factors that confer vulnerability for PTSD. Here, we examined classical eyeblink conditioning and extinction in veterans self-assessed for current PTSD symptoms, exposure to combat, and the personality trait of behavioral inhibition (BI), a risk factor for PTSD. 128 veterans were recruited (mean age 51.2 years; 13.3% female); 126 completed self-assessment, with 25.4% reporting a history of exposure to combat and 30.9% reporting severe, current PTSD symptoms (PTSS). PTSD symptom severity was correlated with current BI (R2=0.497) and PTSS status could be predicted based on current BI and combat history (80.2% correct classification). A subset of the veterans (n=87) also completed eyeblink conditioning. Among veterans without PTSS, childhood BI was associated with faster acquisition; veterans with PTSS showed delayed extinction, under some conditions. These data demonstrate a relationship between current BI and PTSS, and suggest that the facilitated conditioning sometimes observed in PTSD patients may partially reflect personality traits such as childhood BI that pre-date and contribute to vulnerability for PTSD. PMID:21790343

Myers, Catherine E.; VanMeenen, Kirsten M.; McAuley, J. Devin; Beck, Kevin D.; Pang, Kevin C. H.; Servatius, Richard J.

2012-01-01

153

Gender Differences in Severity and Correlates of Depression Symptoms in People Living with HIV in Ontario, Canada.  

PubMed

This study investigates the differences in severity and correlates of depression symptoms among 1069 men and 267 women living with HIV in Ontario, Canada, who completed the 20-item Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D). Women had higher CES-D scores than that of men (median [interquartile range]: 13 [5-26] versus 9 [3-20], P = .0004). More women had total CES-D scores >15 (mild-moderate depression; 44% versus 33%, P = .002) and >21 (severe depression; 31% versus 23%, P = .003). Unlike men, at age 40, women's scores increased yearly (0.4 per increased year, P = .005). The distribution of scores differed by gender: There was no difference in the 10th percentile of depression scores, 0 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.0-1.0) but the 75th percentile of depression scores for women was 6 (95% CI: 2.0-10.0) points higher than that of men. Important gender differences exist in depression symptoms and in correlates of symptoms in people living with HIV. PMID:24899261

Aljassem, Kinda; Raboud, Janet M; Hart, Trevor A; Benoit, Anita; Su, DeSheng; Margolese, Shari L; Rourke, Sean B; Rueda, Sergio; Burchell, Ann; Cairney, John; Shuper, Paul; Loutfy, Mona R

2014-06-01

154

Is postpartum depression a homogenous disorder: time of onset, severity, symptoms and hopelessness in relation to the course of depression.  

PubMed

BackgroundPostpartum depression (PPD) is a common illness, but due to the underlying processes and the diversity of symptoms, some variability is exhibited. The risk of postpartum depression is great if the mother has previously suffered from depression, but there is some evidence that a certain subgroup of women only experience depression during the postpartum period.MethodsThe study group consisted of 104 mothers with postpartum major depression and a control group of 104 postpartum mothers without depression. The Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders (SCID-I) was used for data collection. The severity of depression and other mental symptoms were assessed using several validated rating scales.ResultsA history of past depression (82%), including depression during pregnancy (42%) and during the postpartum period (53%), was very common in those with current PPD. Eighteen per cent of mothers with current PPD had previously not had any depressive episodes and four per cent had experienced depression only during the postpartum period. Therefore, pure PPD was rare. The onset of PPD was usually (84%) within six weeks of childbirth. Obsessive-compulsive symptoms, phobic anxiety, paranoid ideation, depressed mood, diminished pleasure/interest, decreased energy, and psychomotor agitation/retardation were common with all kinds of depression histories. Pure PPD was the most similar to the first depressive episode. Nevertheless, the severity of depression, the level of hopelessness, somatisation, interpersonal sensitivity, anxiety, hostility, psychoticism, sleep disturbance, and suicidal ideation were lower, appetite changed less, and concentration was better than in other recurrent depressions.ConclusionsAccording to this study, PPD is not a homogenous disorder. The time of onset, severity, symptoms, level of hopelessness, and the course of depression vary. Recurrent depression is common. All mothers must be screened during the sixth week postpartum at the latest. Screening alone is not effective; it is also important to give mothers information about PPD and to discuss the symptoms with them in order for them to recognise this disorder and possible new episodes in the future. PMID:25491477

Kettunen, Pirjo; Koistinen, Eeva; Hintikka, Jukka

2014-12-10

155

High blood pressure is one of the symptoms of paraquat-induced toxicity in rats.  

PubMed

This study investigated whether paraquat (Pq)-induced lipidic peroxidation (LP) is accompanied by changes in blood pressure and heart rate (HR) in rats. Groups of adult male Wistar rats were studied 2 and 12 h after Pq (35 mg/kg, i.p.) administration. The LP was evaluated by monitoring thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) in the kidneys, liver and lungs, and validated by including a group treated with an antioxidant, superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD 50,000 IU/kg), in the study. The TBARS levels were significantly higher (p<0.05) in the kidneys of the rats studied 2 h after Pq than in their respective controls. Similarly, systolic and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were higher (p<0.05), while HR was lower (p<0.05) than basal levels 2 and 12 h after Pq administration. In contrast, the group treated simultaneously with Pq and CuZnSOD exhibited lower levels of TBARS (p<0.05) in all studied organs compared to the control group, while the mean arterial pressure and HR did not differ from those seen in the control group. These findings indicate that acute Pq poisoning symptoms include high blood pressure. PMID:16032370

Oliveira, M V B; Albuquerque, J A; Paixão, A D O; Guedes, L S; Cabral, A M S

2005-09-01

156

IMRT for Sinonasal Tumors Minimizes Severe Late Ocular Toxicity and Preserves Disease Control and Survival  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To report late ocular (primary endpoint) and other toxicity, disease control, and survival (secondary endpoints) after intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for sinonasal tumors. Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2009, 130 patients with nonmetastatic sinonasal tumors were treated with IMRT at Ghent University Hospital. Prescription doses were 70 Gy (n = 117) and 60-66 Gy (n = 13) at 2 Gy per fraction over 6-7 weeks. Most patients had adenocarcinoma (n = 82) and squamous cell carcinoma (n = 23). One hundred and one (101) patients were treated postoperatively. Of 17 patients with recurrent tumors, 9 were reirradiated. T-stages were T1-2 (n = 39), T3 (n = 21), T4a (n = 38), and T4b (n = 22). Esthesioneuroblastoma was staged as Kadish A, B, and C in 1, 3, and 6 cases, respectively. Results: Median follow-up was 52, range 15-121 months. There was no radiation-induced blindness in 86 patients available for late toxicity assessment ({>=}6 month follow-up). We observed late Grade 3 tearing in 10 patients, which reduced to Grade 1-2 in 5 patients and Grade 3 visual impairment because of radiation-induced ipsilateral retinopathy and neovascular glaucoma in 1 patient. There was no severe dry eye syndrome. The worst grade of late ocular toxicity was Grade 3 (n = 11), Grade 2 (n = 31), Grade 1 (n = 33), and Grade 0 (n = 11). Brain necrosis and osteoradionecrosis occurred in 6 and 1 patients, respectively. Actuarial 5-year local control and overall survival were 59% and 52%, respectively. On multivariate analysis local control was negatively affected by cribriform plate and brain invasion (p = 0.044 and 0.029, respectively) and absence of surgery (p = 0.009); overall survival was negatively affected by cribriform plate and orbit invasion (p = 0.04 and <0.001, respectively) and absence of surgery (p = 0.001). Conclusions: IMRT for sinonasal tumors allowed delivering high doses to targets at minimized ocular toxicity, while maintaining disease control and survival. Avoidance of severe dry eye syndrome and radiation-induced blindness suggests IMRT as a standard treatment for sinonasal tumors.

Duprez, Frederic, E-mail: frederic.duprez@ugent.be [Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Madani, Indira; Morbee, Lieve [Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Bonte, Katrien; Deron, Philippe; Domjan, Vilmos [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Boterberg, Tom; De Gersem, Werner; De Neve, Wilfried [Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium)

2012-05-01

157

Severe low back pain as the initial symptom of venous thrombosis of the inferior vena cava.  

PubMed

A 45-year-old previously well male truck driver presented to the emergency department with severe low back pain; lumbosacral X-ray was normal and he was given analgaesics and discharged. The following day, he presented to the emergency department again, his pain had not responded to the analgaesics; this time he also presented with massive bilateral swelling of lower limbs and left testicle that started 3?h earlier. The pain was severe, dull and interfered with the patient's ability to walk. An urgent workup revealed extensive thrombosis of the inferior vena cava. PMID:25155491

Tabatabai, Mohsen Abdul Wahab; Butros, Victor Mikhaeel; Mahdi, Shihab Ahmed; Ahmad, Mohammad Javad

2014-01-01

158

Evaluation of toxic effects of several carboxylic acids on bacterial growth by toxicodynamic modelling  

PubMed Central

Background Effects of organic acids on microbial fermentation are commonly tested in investigations about metabolic behaviour of bacteria. However, they typically provide only descriptive information without modelling the influence of acid concentrations on bacterial kinetics. Results We developed and applied a mathematical model (secondary model) to capture the toxicological effects of those chemicals on kinetic parameters that define the growth of bacteria in batch cultures. Thus, dose-response kinetics were performed with different bacteria (Leuconostoc mesenteroides, Carnobacterium pisicola, Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis and Listonella anguillarum) exposed at increasing concentrations of individual carboxylic acids (formic, acetic, propionic, butyric and lactic). In all bioassays the acids affected the maximum bacterial load (Xm) and the maximum growth rate (vm) but only in specific cases the lag phase (?) was modified. Significance of the parameters was always high and in all fermentations the toxicodynamic equation was statistically consistent and had good predictability. The differences between D and L-lactic acid effects were significant for the growth of E. coli, L. mesenteroides and C. piscicola. In addition, a global parameter (EC50,?) was used to compare toxic effects and provided a realistic characterization of antimicrobial agents using a single value. Conclusions The effect of several organic acids on the growth of different bacteria was accurately studied and perfectly characterized by a bivariate equation which combines the basis of dose-response theory with microbial growth kinetics (secondary model). The toxicity of carboxylic acids was lower with the increase of the molecular weight of these chemicals. PMID:22118421

2011-01-01

159

Comparisons of Exercise Dose and Symptom Severity Between Exercisers and Nonexercisers in Women During and After Cancer Treatment  

PubMed Central

Context Although numerous studies of the efficacy of exercise are reported, few studies have evaluated changes in characteristics of exercise dose in women with cancer both during and after cancer treatment. Objectives To describe the characteristics of exercise dose (i.e., frequency, duration, and intensity), and to evaluate for differences in symptom severity (i.e., fatigue, sleep disturbance, depression, pain) between women who did and did not exercise during and after cancer treatment. Methods In a sample of 119 women, two groups were classified: exercisers and nonexercisers. Exercisers were defined as women who met specific criteria for frequency (three times per week), duration (20 minutes per session), intensity (moderate), and mode (aerobic). Nonexercisers were defined as women who did not meet all of these criteria. Evaluation of exercise dose was completed at baseline (T1: the week before chemotherapy cycle two), at the end of cancer treatment (T2), and at the end of the study (T3: approximately one year after the T1 assessment) using self-report exercise questionnaires. Results Approximately 50% of the participants exercised during and 70% exercised after treatment. At T1, exercisers had lower total fatigue, lower behavioral and sensory subscale fatigue scores, and lower depression scores (P =0.038) than nonexercisers. No significant differences in sleep disturbance or pain were found between groups. At T2, exercisers had lower cognitive/mood subscale fatigue and depression scores than nonexercisers (P =0.047). At T3, no significant differences were found between groups in any symptom severity scores. Conclusion Both during and after cancer treatment, achieving or maintaining exercise guideline levels were met by most patients. Further study is needed to examine the link between exercise dose and symptom severity. PMID:22436836

Cho, Maria H.; Dodd, Marylin J.; Cooper, Bruce A.; Miaskowski, Christine

2012-01-01

160

Child Victims' Attributions about Being Physically Abused: An Examination of Factors Associated with Symptom Severity  

Microsoft Academic Search

The goal of the present study was to examine a conceptual attributional model for the development of psychopathology after child physical abuse. Physically abused or maltreated children referred for treatment completed a series of measures to assess parent-to-child violence, abuse-specific attributions and general attributional style, other potential predictors, and children's psychopathology. Results revealed that the severity of current parent-to-child violence

Elissa J. Brown; David J. Kolko

1999-01-01

161

[Severe drug-induced skin reactions. Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis].  

PubMed

Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) are characterized by extensive blistering of the skin and mucosa; they are considered as one disease entity with varying severity. They are rare but potentially life-threatening and accompanied by high mortality. A clear clinical diagnosis is needed to direct specific therapy, but supportive therapy remains most important. In order to identify and withdraw the inducing drug, a very detailed and thorough medication history has to be obtained. Among the highly suspected (strongly associated) agents are allopurinol, antibacterial sulfonamides, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs of the oxicam type, various anti-epileptics and nevaripine. Together they account for more than half of the cases of SJS/TEN. Although a drug is not always the cause, it is considered very like in approximately 75% of cases. Infections have also to be considered as etiologic factors. PMID:24820799

Mockenhaupt, M

2014-05-01

162

Quantitative characterization of disease severity in diseases with complex symptom profiles.  

PubMed

A number of clinical and research situations arise that require the integration of complex, multi-dimensional, performance-related information to determine a single quantity such as "disease severity" or "risk level" (for subsequent development of a disease). This process is generally carried out either by relying on a subjective gestalt approach or by using rating scales that combine scores for component measures using an additive process without justification. Concepts from general systems performance theory have provided insights into this problem, teaching that a fundamentally multiplicative method of integrating components is often appropriate. In this paper, concepts and previous supportive experimental work are reviewed in the context of the quantitative characterization of disease severity. A Parkinson's disease study (n=114) is presented that mimics the "two-condition" situation encountered in the clinical trial of a new drug or other therapy. Traditional and performance theory-based composite scores are computed for each condition ("on" and "off" medications) and compared, with emphasis on the different quantitative "pictures" conveyed by each approach. It is concluded that performance theory based composites are not only more sensitive to therapeutic agents experimentally, but also have superior conceptual validity compared to traditional forms of single-number composites. PMID:17946592

Kondraske, George V; Stewart, R Malcolm

2006-01-01

163

The capability of several toxic plants to condition taste aversions in sheep  

Microsoft Academic Search

Grazing livestock frequently ingest toxic plants, occasionally with fatal results. Behavioral adjustments by livestock may reduce toxin intake; for example they can develop food aversions which may protect animals from over-ingestion of toxic plants. The purpose of this study was to evaluate three plants with different mechanisms of toxicity for their efficacy in conditioning a taste aversion: (1) a seleniferous

James A. Pfister; Dale R. Gardner; Carl. C. Cheney; Kip E. Panter; Jeffery O. Hall

2010-01-01

164

Aberrant error processing in relation to symptom severity in obsessive–compulsive disorder: A multimodal neuroimaging study  

PubMed Central

Background Obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD) is characterized by maladaptive repetitive behaviors that persist despite feedback. Using multimodal neuroimaging, we tested the hypothesis that this behavioral rigidity reflects impaired use of behavioral outcomes (here, errors) to adaptively adjust responses. We measured both neural responses to errors and adjustments in the subsequent trial to determine whether abnormalities correlate with symptom severity. Since error processing depends on communication between the anterior and the posterior cingulate cortex, we also examined the integrity of the cingulum bundle with diffusion tensor imaging. Methods Participants performed the same antisaccade task during functional MRI and electroencephalography sessions. We measured error-related activation of the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and the error-related negativity (ERN). We also examined post-error adjustments, indexed by changes in activation of the default network in trials surrounding errors. Results OCD patients showed intact error-related ACC activation and ERN, but abnormal adjustments in the post- vs. pre-error trial. Relative to controls, who responded to errors by deactivating the default network, OCD patients showed increased default network activation including in the rostral ACC (rACC). Greater rACC activation in the post-error trial correlated with more severe compulsions. Patients also showed increased fractional anisotropy (FA) in the white matter underlying rACC. Conclusions Impaired use of behavioral outcomes to adaptively adjust neural responses may contribute to symptoms in OCD. The rACC locus of abnormal adjustment and relations with symptoms suggests difficulty suppressing emotional responses to aversive, unexpected events (e.g., errors). Increased structural connectivity of this paralimbic default network region may contribute to this impairment. PMID:25057466

Agam, Yigal; Greenberg, Jennifer L.; Isom, Marlisa; Falkenstein, Martha J.; Jenike, Eric; Wilhelm, Sabine; Manoach, Dara S.

2014-01-01

165

Predictors of Severe Acute and Late Toxicities in Patients With Localized Head-and-Neck Cancer Treated With Radiation Therapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Radiation therapy (RT) causes acute and late toxicities that affect various organs and functions. In a large cohort of patients treated with RT for localized head and neck cancer (HNC), we prospectively assessed the occurrence of RT-induced acute and late toxicities and identified characteristics that predicted these toxicities. Methods and Materials: We conducted a randomized trial among 540 patients treated with RT for localized HNC to assess whether vitamin E supplementation could improve disease outcomes. Adverse effects of RT were assessed using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Acute Radiation Morbidity Criteria during RT and one month after RT, and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Late Radiation Morbidity Scoring Scheme at six and 12 months after RT. The most severe adverse effect among the organs/tissues was selected as an overall measure of either acute or late toxicity. Grade 3 and 4 toxicities were considered as severe. Stepwise multivariate logistic regression models were used to identify all independent predictors (p < 0.05) of acute or late toxicity and to estimate odds ratios (OR) for severe toxicity with their 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results: Grade 3 or 4 toxicity was observed in 23% and 4% of patients, respectively, for acute and late toxicity. Four independent predictors of severe acute toxicity were identified: sex (female vs. male: OR = 1.72, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.06-2.80), Karnofsky Performance Status (OR = 0.67 for a 10-point increment, 95% CI: 0.52-0.88), body mass index (above 25 vs. below: OR = 1.88, 95% CI: 1.22-2.90), TNM stage (Stage II vs. I: OR = 1.91, 95% CI: 1.25-2.92). Two independent predictors were found for severe late toxicity: female sex (OR = 3.96, 95% CI: 1.41-11.08) and weight loss during RT (OR = 1.26 for a 1 kg increment, 95% CI: 1.12-1.41). Conclusions: Knowledge of these predictors easily collected in a clinical setting could help tailoring therapies to reduce toxicities among patients treated with RT for HNC.

Meyer, Francois, E-mail: francois.meyer@chuq.qc.ca [Laval University Cancer Research Center, Centre hospitalier universitaire de Quebec - L'Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec (Canada); Fortin, Andre; Wang, Chang Shu [Radiation Therapy Department, Centre hospitalier universitaire de Quebec - L'Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec (Canada); Liu, Geoffrey [Applied Molecular Oncology, Ontario Cancer Institute/Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto (Canada); Bairati, Isabelle [Laval University Cancer Research Center, Centre hospitalier universitaire de Quebec - L'Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec (Canada)

2012-03-15

166

Dopamine transporter gene polymorphism moderates the effects of severe deprivation on ADHD symptoms: developmental continuities in gene-environment interplay.  

PubMed

Early institutional deprivation is a risk factor for Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) symptoms. However not all individuals are affected. We tested the hypothesis that this heterogeneity is influenced by gene x environment (GxE) interaction and that genetic polymorphisms involved in dopamine neurotransmission moderate the effects of severe early institutional deprivation on symptoms of ADHD (sADHD). Using a prospective-longitudinal design sADHD were measured at ages 6, 11, and 15 years in a sample of individuals who experienced severe institutional deprivation (up to 42 months of age) in Romanian orphanages and a non-institutionalized comparison group. Individuals were genotyped for polymorphisms in the dopamine D4 receptor (DRD4 48-bp VNTR in exon 3) and dopamine transporter gene (DAT1 haplotypes combining a 40-bp VNTR in 3'UTR and a 30-bp VNTR in intron 8). The risk for sADHD associated with early institutional deprivation was moderated by the DAT1 but not the DRD4 genotypes; an effect that was first apparent in early-, and persisted to mid-adolescence. The results (i) provide evidence for developmental continuities in G x E interaction, (ii) explain some of the heterogeneity in ADHD outcomes following institutional deprivation and, (iii) add to our understanding of environmental determinants of sADHD. PMID:19655343

Stevens, Suzanne E; Kumsta, Robert; Kreppner, Jana M; Brookes, Keeley J; Rutter, Michael; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund J S

2009-09-01

167

Cluster Analysis of the Yale Global Tic Severity Scale (YGTSS): Symptom Dimensions and Clinical Correlates in an Outpatient Youth Sample  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Tic disorders are heterogeneous, with symptoms varying widely both within and across patients. Exploration of symptom clusters may aid in the identification of symptom dimensions of empirical and treatment import. This article presents the results of two studies investigating tic symptom clusters using a sample of 99 youth (M age = 10.7, 81% male,…

Kircanski, Katharina; Woods, Douglas W.; Chang, Susanna W.; Ricketts, Emily J.; Piacentini, John C.

2010-01-01

168

Respiratory failure from severe organophosphate toxicity due to absorption through the skin.  

PubMed

Organophosphates are the most common group of chemicals involved in poisoning in Sri Lanka. Usually, poisoning is by ingestion for suicidal purposes, although accidental poisoning is not uncommon. Poisoning due to absorption through intact or damaged skin is rare. A 32-year-old man was admitted to a peripheral hospital following assault with a 100-ml bottle of insecticide called Monocrotophos, an organophosphate. He had a 2-in. long laceration just above his left eyebrow and there was spilling of the liquid contained in the bottle over his head and face. The liquid was wiped off but the head or face was not washed. After about 3 h the patient developed symptoms and signs of early organophosphate poisoning which were treated with atropine and pralidoxime. On the 3rd day, while on therapy, the patient developed severe weakness of limbs and respiratory distress needing intubation and assisted ventilation. The patient was transferred to the neurology intensive care unit of the General Hospital, Colombo, on the eighth day. His serum potassium levels were low and an ECG showed prominent U waves in all leads. The plasma cholinesterase levels were within 37.5-50% of normal even on the 20th day indicating severe exposure. PMID:3350449

Peiris, J B; Fernando, R; De Abrew, K

1988-02-01

169

The first reported case of ureteral perforation in a patient with severe toxic epidermal necrolysis syndrome.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to briefly review toxic epidermal necrolysis syndrome (TENS) and Steven Johnson Syndrome (SJS), as well as describe the unique complication of ureteral perforation. A case of ureteral perforation in an 18-year old woman with TENS was documented and reviewed. In addition to studying this unusual presentation the authors have also provided a brief review of TENS and SJS along with several common complications of this disease process. The patient in question suffered a severe case of TENS with extensive mucocutaneous involvement. After 2 weeks of intensive therapy, she suddenly became anuric. She developed obstructive uropathy and bilateral hydronephrosis from mucosal debris and sludge. A left forniceal rupture was visualized on pyelography. SJS and TENS are two different presentations in the spectrum of the same disease process. There have been descriptions of gastrointestinal, respiratory, vaginal, and ocular mucosal involvement, including cases of corneal and colonic perforation. However, acute renal failure secondary to ureteral obstruction and perforation has never been described. Although rare, one must entertain every possibility when attempting to diagnose complications of the disease. PMID:24879396

Baccaro, Leopoldo M; Sakharpe, Aniket; Miller, April; Amani, Hamed

2014-01-01

170

An Exploration of Family Problem-Solving and Affective Involvement as Moderators Between Disease Severity and Depressive Symptoms in Adolescents with Inflammatory Bowel Disease  

PubMed Central

Little is known about how family functioning relates to psychosocial functioning of youth with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The study aim was to examine family problem solving and affective involvement as moderators between adolescent disease severity and depressive symptoms. Participants were 122 adolescents with IBD and their parents. Measures included self-reported and parent-reported adolescent depressive symptoms, parent-reported family functioning, and physician-completed measures of disease severity. Disease severity was a significant predictor of adolescent-reported depressive symptoms, but not parent-reported adolescent depressive symptoms. Family affective involvement significantly predicted parent-reported adolescent depressive symptoms, while family problem-solving significantly predicted adolescent self-report of depressive symptoms. Neither affective involvement nor problem-solving served as moderators. Family affective involvement may play an important role in adolescent emotional functioning but may not moderate the effect of disease severity on depressive symptoms. Research should continue to examine effects of family functioning on youth emotional functioning and include a sample with a wider range of disease severity to determine if interventions aimed to enhance family functioning are warranted. PMID:23793840

Schuman, Shana L.; Graef, Danielle M.; Janicke, David M.; Gray, Wendy N.; Hommel, Kevin A.

2014-01-01

171

Impact of cognitive behavioral therapy on observed autism symptom severity during school recess: a preliminary randomized, controlled trial.  

PubMed

This study compared cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and treatment-as-usual (TAU) in terms of effects on observed social communication-related autism symptom severity during unstructured play time at school for children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Thirteen children with ASD (7-11 years old) were randomly assigned to 32 sessions of CBT or community-based psychosocial treatment (TAU) for 16 weeks. The CBT program is based on the memory retrieval competition model and emphasizes the development of perspective-taking through guided behavioral experimentation supplemented with reflective Socratic discussion and supported by parent training and school consultation to promote generalization of social communication and emotion regulation skills. Trained observers blind to treatment condition observed each child during recess on two separate days at baseline and again at posttreatment, using a structured behavioral observation system that generates frequency scores for observed social communication-related autism symptoms. CBT outperformed TAU at posttreatment on the frequency of self-isolation, the proportion of time spent with peers, the frequency of positive or appropriate interaction with peers, and the frequency of positive or appropriate peer responses to the target child (d effect size range 1.34-1.62). On average, children in CBT were engaged in positive or appropriate social interaction with peers in 68.6% of observed intervals at posttreatment, compared to 25% of intervals for children in TAU. Further investigation of this intervention modality with larger samples and follow-up assessments is warranted. PMID:24671750

Wood, Jeffrey J; Fujii, Cori; Renno, Patricia; Van Dyke, Marilyn

2014-09-01

172

Physical health symptoms reported by trafficked women receiving post-trafficking support in Moldova: prevalence, severity and associated factors  

PubMed Central

Background Many trafficked people suffer high levels of physical, sexual and psychological abuse. Yet, there has been limited research on the physical health problems associated with human trafficking or how the health needs of women in post-trafficking support settings vary according to socio-demographic or trafficking characteristics. Methods We analysed the prevalence and severity of 15 health symptoms reported by 120 trafficked women who had returned to Moldova between December 2007 and December 2008 and were registered with the International Organisation for Migration Assistance and Protection Programme. Women had returned to Moldova an average of 5.9 months prior to interview (range 2-12 months). Results Headaches (61.7%), stomach pain (60.9%), memory problems (44.2%), back pain (42.5%), loss of appetite (35%), and tooth pain (35%) were amongst the most commonly reported symptoms amongst both women trafficked for sexual exploitation and women trafficked for labour exploitation. The prevalence of headache and memory problems was strongly associated with duration of exploitation. Conclusions Trafficked women who register for post-trafficking support services after returning to their country of origin are likely to have long-term physical and dental health needs and should be provided with access to comprehensive medical services. Health problems among women who register for post-trafficking support services after returning to their country of origin are not limited to women trafficked for sexual exploitation but are also experienced by victims of labour exploitation. PMID:22834807

2012-01-01

173

Blood Dendritic Cell Frequency Declines in Idiopathic Parkinson’s Disease and Is Associated with Motor Symptom Severity  

PubMed Central

The role of inflammation in Parkinson’s Disease (PD) is well appreciated, but its underlying mechanisms are still unclear. Our objective was to determine whether dendritic cells (DC), a unique type of migratory immune cells that regulate immunological response and inflammation have an impact on PD. In a case-control study including 80 PD patients and 80 age- and gender-matched healthy control subjects, the two main blood subsets of plasmacytoid and myeloid DC were defined by flow cytometry analysis. Clinical evaluation of subjects consisting of cognition and depression assessment was performed using the Mini Mental State Examination and the Beck Depression Inventory. The severity of motor symptoms was measured using the Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale-Part III. Comparison between patient and control DC measures and their relationships with clinical assessments were evaluated.The following main results were obtained: 1) the level of circulating DC (mainly the myeloid subset) was significantly reduced in PD patients in comparison with healthy controls; 2) after controlling for depressive and cognitive characteristics, the frequency of myeloid DC was confirmed as one of the independent determinants of PD; 3) the number of both myeloid and plasmacytoid DC was negatively associated with motor symptom severity. Overall, the decline of blood DC, perhaps due to the recruitment of immune cells to the site of disease-specific lesions, can be considered a clue of the immune alteration that characterizes PD, suggesting innovative exploitations of DC monitoring as a clinically significant tool for PD treatment. Indeed, this study suggests that reduced peripheral blood DC are a pathologically-relevant factor of PD and also displays the urgency to better understand DC role in PD for unraveling the immune system contribution to disease progression and thus favoring the development of innovative therapies ideally based on immunomodulation. PMID:23776473

Ciaramella, Antonio; Salani, Francesca; Bizzoni, Federica; Pontieri, Francesco E.; Stefani, Alessandro; Pierantozzi, Mariangela; Assogna, Francesca; Caltagirone, Carlo; Spalletta, Gianfranco; Bossù, Paola

2013-01-01

174

Flu Symptoms & Severity  

MedlinePLUS

... Images Flu Prevention Toolkit Influenza Types Seasonal Avian Swine Variant Pandemic Other Get Email Updates To receive ... 65 years and older. Influenza Types Seasonal Avian Swine Variant Pandemic Other Get Email Updates To receive ...

175

The association of pain severity and pain interference levels with abuse experiences and mental health symptoms among 300 mothers: baseline data analysis for a 7-year prospective study.  

PubMed

Women who experience interpersonal violence are at increased risk for anxiety, depression, posttraumatic stress symptoms, and chronic pain and other physical disorders. Although the effects of mental health disorders on women's functioning and well-being are well established, less is known about the effects of pain. We examined participants' (n = 300 mothers) experiences of pain severity and pain interference. Higher levels of pain severity and pain interference were significantly associated with anxiety, PTSD, and depression symptoms. Mental health symptoms compounded by pain, may leave abused women less able to access resources or practice safety behaviors to protect themselves and their children. PMID:23301564

Symes, Lene; McFarlane, Judith; Nava, Angeles; Gilroy, Heidi; Maddoux, John

2013-01-01

176

Beyond Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS) Symptom Severity: Stress Management Skills are Related to Lower Illness Burden  

PubMed Central

Background The onset of Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS) typically involves reductions in activities of daily living and social interactions (jointly referred to as “illness burden”). Emotional distress has been linked to increased reported symptoms, and stress management skills have been related to lower fatigue severity in CFS patients. Symptom severity and illness burden are highly correlated. The ability to manage stress may attenuate this relationship, allowing individuals to feel less burdened by the illness independent of the severity of their symptoms. Purpose This study aimed to evaluate if perceived stress management skills affect illness burden via emotional distress, independent of ME/CFS symptom severity. Methods A total of 117 adults with ME/CFS completed measures of perceived stress management skills, emotional distress, ME/CFS symptom severity and illness burden. Results Regression analyses revealed that greater perceived stress management skills related to less social and fatigue-related illness burden, via lower emotional distress. This relationship existed independent of the association of symptom severity on illness burden, and was stronger among those not currently employed. Conclusions Ability to manage stress is associated with a lower illness burden for individuals with ME/CFS. Future studies should evaluate the efficacy of psychosocial interventions in lowering illness burden by targeting stress management skills. PMID:24278791

Lattie, Emily G.; Antoni, Michael H.; Fletcher, Mary Ann; Czaja, Sara; Perdomo, Dolores; Sala, Andreina; Nair, Sankaran; Fu, Shih Hua; Penedo, Frank J.; Klimas, Nancy

2013-01-01

177

Increases in prefrontal cortex activity when regulating negative emotion predicts symptom severity trajectory over six months in depression  

PubMed Central

Context Emotion regulation is critically disrupted in depression and use of paradigms tapping these processes may uncover essential changes in neurobiology during treatment. In addition, as neuroimaging outcome studies of depression commonly utilize solely baseline and endpoint data – which is more prone to week-to week noise in symptomatology – we sought to use all data points over the course of a six month trial. Objective To examine changes in neurobiology resulting from successful treatment. Design Double-blind trial examining changes in the neural circuits involved in emotion regulation resulting from one of two antidepressant treatments over a six month trial. Participants were scanned pretreatment, at 2 months and 6 months posttreatment. Setting University functional magnetic resonance imaging facility. Participants 21 patients with Major Depressive Disorder and without other Axis I or Axis II diagnoses. Interventions Venlafaxine XR (doses up to 300mg) or Fluoxetine (doses up to 80mg). Main Outcome Measure Neural activity, as measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging during performance of an emotion regulation paradigm as well as regular assessments of symptom severity by the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression. To utilize all data points, slope trajectories were calculated for rate of change in depression severity as well as rate of change of neural engagement. Results Those depressed individuals showing the steepest decrease in depression severity over the six months were those individuals showing the most rapid increases in BA10 and right DLPFC activity when regulating negative affect over the same time frame. This relationship was more robust than when using solely the baseline and endpoint data. Conclusions Changes in PFC engagement when regulating negative affect correlate with changes in depression severity over six months. These results are buttressed by calculating these statistics which are more reliable and robust to week-to-week variation than difference scores. PMID:24173657

Heller, Aaron S.; Johnstone, Tom; Peterson, Michael J.; Kolden, Gregory G.; Kalin, Ned H.; Davidson, Richard J.

2013-01-01

178

Abstract Aflatoxins are toxic and carcinogenic metabo-lites of several Aspergillus species. The effect of nitrate  

E-print Network

Abstract Aflatoxins are toxic and carcinogenic metabo- lites of several Aspergillus species. The effect of nitrate on aflatoxin production and expression of the key regula- tory genes involved in aflatoxin biosynthesis, aflR and aflJ, were compared among isolates of the SB and SBG strains of A. flavus

Cotty, Peter J.

179

The relative toxicities of several pesticides to naiads of three species of stoneflies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Static bioassays were conducted to determine the relative acute toxicities of some insecti- cides, herbicides, fungicides, a defoliant, and a molluscicide to the naiads of three species of stonefly, Pteronarcys californica, Pteronarcella badia, and Claassenia sabulosa. Toxic effects were measured by determination of median lethal concn (~~50) for 24-, 48-, and 96-hr exposures, at 15.X Endrin and dieldrin were the

HERMAN O. SANDERS; OLIVER B. COPE

1968-01-01

180

Severe Genitourinary Toxicity Following Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer: How Long Does it Last?  

PubMed Central

Purpose Radiation therapy (RT) is a common treatment for localized prostate cancer, but long-term data regarding treatment- related toxicities compared to observation is sparse. In this study, we evaluate the time course of grade 2–4 genitourinary (GU) toxicities in men treated with either primary radiation or observation for T1-T2 prostate cancer. Methods and Materials We performed a population-based cohort study, using Medicare claims data linked to the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) data. Cumulative incidence functions for time to first GU event were computed based on the competing risks model, with death before any GU event as a competing event. The generalized estimating equation (GEE) method was used to evaluate the risk ratios of recurrent events. Results Among patients in this study, 60,134 received RT and 25,904 underwent observation. The adjusted risk ratio for GU toxicity is 2.49 (95% CI 2.00–3.11) for 10 years and beyond. Patients who had required prior procedures for obstruction/stricture (including TURP) before RT experienced a significantly increased risk of GU toxicities: risk ratio 2.78 (95% CI 2.56–2.94) Conclusions This study demonstrates that the increased risk of grade 2–4 GU toxicity attributable to RT persists 10 years and beyond after treatment. Patients who had required prior procedures for obstruction/stricture experienced a higher risk of GU toxicity than those without these pre-existing conditions. PMID:23164376

Kim, Sung; Moore, Dirk F.; Shih, Weichung; Lin, Yong; Li, Hui; Shao, Yu-Hsuan; Shen, Shunhua; Lu-Yao, Grace L.

2013-01-01

181

The relationship between severe maternal morbidity and psychological health symptoms at 6–8 weeks postpartum: a prospective cohort study in one English maternity unit  

PubMed Central

Background The incidence of severe maternal morbidity is increasing in high-income countries. However, little has been known about the impact on postnatal morbidity, particularly on psychological health outcomes. The objective of this study was to assess the relationship between severe maternal morbidity (ie. major obstetric haemorrhage, severe hypertensive disorders or intensive care unit/obstetric high dependency unit admission) and postnatal psychological health symptoms, focusing on post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms at 6–8 weeks postpartum. Method A prospective cohort study was undertaken of women who gave birth over six months in 2010 in an inner city maternity unit in England. Primary outcomes were prevalence of PTSD symptoms namely: 1) intrusion and 2) avoidance as measured using the Impact of Event Scale at 6 – 8 weeks postpartum via a self-administered postal questionnaire. Secondary outcomes included probable depression. Data on incidence of severe maternal morbidity were extracted from maternity records. Multivariable logistic regression analysis examined the relationship between severe maternal morbidity and PTSD symptoms taking into account factors that might influence the relationship. Results Of women eligible to participate (n=3509), 52% responded. Prevalence of a clinically significant level of intrusion and avoidance were 6.4% (n=114) and 8.4% (n=150) respectively. There was a higher risk of PTSD symptoms among women who experienced severe maternal morbidity compared with women who did not (adjusted OR = 2.11, 95%CI = 1.17-3.78 for intrusion; adjusted OR = 3.28, 95%CI = 2.01-5.36 for avoidance). Higher ratings of reported sense of control during labour/birth partially mediated the risk of PTSD symptoms. There were no statistically significant differences in the prevalence or severity of symptoms of depression. Conclusion This is one of the largest studies to date of PTSD symptoms among women who had recently given birth. Findings showed that an experience of severe maternal morbidity was independently associated with symptoms of PTSD. Individually tailored care that increases women’s sense of control during labour may be a protective factor with further work required to promote effective interventions to prevent these symptoms. Findings have important implications for women’s health and the content and organisation of maternity services during and after the birth. PMID:24708797

2014-01-01

182

The Frequencies of Gastroesophageal and Extragastroesophageal Symptoms in Patients with Mild Erosive Esophagitis, Severe Erosive Esophagitis, and Barrett's Esophagus in Taiwan  

PubMed Central

Background. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) may present with gastroesophageal and extraesophageal symptoms. Currently, the frequencies of gastroesophageal and extragastroesophageal symptoms in Asian patients with different categories of GERD remain unclear. Aim. To investigate the frequencies of gastroesophageal and extragastroesophageal symptoms in patients with mild erosive esophagitis, severe erosive esophagitis, and Barrett's esophagus of GERD. Methods. The symptoms of symptomatic subjects with (1) Los Angeles grade A/B erosive esophagitis, (2) Los Angeles grade C/D erosive esophagitis, and (3) Barrett's esophagus proven by endoscopy were prospectively assessed by a standard questionnaire for gastroesophageal and extragastroesophageal symptoms. The frequencies of the symptoms were compared by Chi-square test. Result. Six hundred and twenty-five patients (LA grade A/B: 534 patients; LA grade C/D: 37 patients; Barrett's esophagus: 54 patients) were assessed for gastroesophageal and extragastroesophageal symptoms. Patients with Los Angeles grade A/B erosive esophagitis had higher frequencies of symptoms including epigastric pain, epigastric fullness, dysphagia, and throat cleaning than patients with Los Angeles grade C/D erosive esophagitis. Patients with Los Angeles grade A/B erosive esophagitis also had higher frequencies of symptoms including acid regurgitation, epigastric acidity, regurgitation of food, nausea, vomiting, epigastric fullness, dysphagia, foreign body sensation of throat, throat cleaning, and cough than patients with Barrett's esophagus. Conclusion. The frequencies of some esophageal and extraesophageal symptoms in patients with Los Angeles grade A/B erosive esophagitis were higher than those in patients with Los Angeles grade C/D erosive esophagitis and Barrett's esophagus. The causes of different symptom profiles in different categories of GERD patients merit further investigations. PMID:23997765

Kao, Sung-Shuo; Chen, Wen-Chih; Hsu, Ping-I; Chuah, Seng-Kee; Lu, Ching-Liang; Lai, Kwok-Hung; Tsai, Feng-Woei; Chang, Chun-Chao; Tai, Wei-Chen

2013-01-01

183

A longitudinal study of several potential mediators of the relationship between child maltreatment and posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms.  

PubMed

Child maltreatment is a reliable predictor of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms. However, not all maltreated children develop PTSD symptoms, suggesting that additional mediating variables explain how certain maltreated children develop PTSD symptoms and others do not. The current study tested three potential mediators of the relationship between child maltreatment and subsequent PTSD symptoms: (a) respiratory sinus arrhythmia reactivity, (b) cortisol reactivity, and (c) experiential avoidance, or the unwillingness to experience painful private events, such as thoughts and memories. Maltreated (n = 51) and nonmaltreated groups (n = 59) completed a stressor paradigm, a measure of experiential avoidance, and a semistructured interview of PTSD symptoms. One year later, participants were readministered the PTSD symptoms interview. Results of a multiple mediator model showed the set of potential mediators mediated the relationship between child maltreatment and subsequent PTSD symptoms. However, experiential avoidance was the only significant, specific indirect effect, demonstrating that maltreated children avoiding painful private events after the abuse were more likely to develop a range of PTSD symptoms 1 year later. These results highlight the importance of experiential avoidance in the development of PTSD symptoms for maltreated children, and implications for secondary prevention and clinical intervention models are discussed. PMID:24444173

Shenk, Chad E; Putnam, Frank W; Rausch, Joseph R; Peugh, James L; Noll, Jennie G

2014-02-01

184

Acute cardiovascular toxicity of sterilizers, PHMG, and PGH: severe inflammation in human cells and heart failure in zebrafish.  

PubMed

In 2011, dozens of children and pregnant women in Korea died by exposure to sterilizer for household humidifier, such as Oxy(®) and Cefu(®). Until now, however, it remains unknown how the sterilizer affect the human health to cause the acute deaths. To find its toxicity for organ, we investigated the putative toxicity of the sterilizer in the cardiovascular system. The sterilizers, polyhexamethylene guanidine phosphate (PHMG, Cefu(®)), and oligo-[2-(2-ethoxy)-ethoxyethyl)-guanidinium-chloride (PGH, Oxy(®)) were treated to human lipoproteins, macrophages, and dermal fibroblast cells. The PGH and PHMG at normal dosages caused severe atherogenic process in human macrophages, cytotoxic effect, and aging in human dermal cell. Zebrafish embryos, which were exposed to the sterilizer, showed early death with acute inflammation and attenuated developmental speed. All zebrafish exposed to the working concentration of PHMG (final 0.3 %) and PGH (final 10 mM) died within 70 min and displayed acute increases in serum triacylglycerol level and fatty liver induction. The dead zebrafish showed severe accumulation of fibrous collagen in the bulbous artery of the heart with elevation of reactive oxygen species. In conclusion, the sterilizers showed acute toxic effect in blood circulation system, causing by severe inflammation, atherogenesis, and aging, with embryo toxicity. PMID:23225114

Kim, Jae-Yong; Kim, Hak Hyeon; Cho, Kyung-Hyun

2013-06-01

185

Prevalence of pain and association with psychiatric symptom severity in perinatally HIV-infected children as compared to controls living in HIV-affected households  

Microsoft Academic Search

This cross-sectional study evaluated the prevalence of pain and psychiatric symptoms in perinatally HIV-infected children at entry into P1055, a multicenter investigation of the prevalence and severity of psychiatric symptoms in HIV-infected children. Subjects 6–17 years of age and their primary caregivers were recruited from 29 International Maternal Pediatric Adolescent AIDS Clinical Trials sites in the USA and Puerto Rico.

Leslie K. Serchuck; Paige L. Williams; Sharon Nachman; Kenneth D. Gadow; Miriam Chernoff; Lynnae Schwartz

2010-01-01

186

Toxic effects of several phthalate esters on the embryos and larvae of abalone Haliotis diversicolor supertexta  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As the most widely used plasticizers in the world, phthalate esters (PAEs) are potential endocrine disruption compounds (EDCs). In the present study, the toxicity of dimethyl phthalate (DMP), diethyl phthalate (DEP), dibutyl phthalate (DBP), di (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) on embryogenesis and larvae development of the marine univalve Haliotis diversicolor supertexta was examined in laboratory. The results show that the malformation of embryos appeared during the experiment, such as embryos died or lysed, small transparent flocculent rings studded on the periphery of the embryo, and the larvae could failed to hatch. In embryo toxic test, embryos incubated at the highest concentration of DMP, DEP and DBP solutions showed significantly high abnormal rate compared with the control, while DEHP solutions displayed no significant difference. In larval toxic test, in all concentrations of DMP, DEP and DBP solutions, larval settlement rates were low significantly than that of the control. Similarly, DEHP solutions show nearly no effect on the larval settlement. The order of toxicity on embryos and larvae is DBP>DEP>DMP>DEHP. Being a simple and easy stimulation to indoor spawn, sensitive to environmental factors, and short culture time, the embryos of H. diversicolor supertexta can be used to indicate toxicity of the PAEs.

Yang, Zhihui; Zhang, Xiangjing; Cai, Zhonghua

2009-05-01

187

Is depression severity the sole cause of psychotic symptoms during an episode of unipolar major depression? A study both between and within subjects  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundDespite the common clinical assumption that psychosis is an indicator of severity in depression, it is not known what determines the presence of psychotic features in major depression. Our aim was to answer the question: Is depression severity the sole cause of psychotic symptoms during an episode of unipolar major depression?

Liz Forty; Lisa Jones; Ian Jones; Carly Cooper; Elen Russell; Anne Farmer; Peter McGuffin; Nick Craddock

2009-01-01

188

Are multiple physical symptoms a poor prognostic factor or just a marker of depression severity? Secondary analysis of the GenPod trial  

PubMed Central

Background Using data from the GenPod trial this study investigates: (i) if depressed individuals with multiple physical symptoms have a poorer response to antidepressants before and after adjustment for baseline Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II); and (ii) if reboxetine is more effective than citalopram in depression with multiple physical symptoms. Methods Linear regression models were used to estimate differences in mean BDI-II score at 6 and 12 weeks. Results Before adjusting for baseline BDI-II, the difference in mean BDI-II score between no and multiple physical symptoms was 4.5 (95% CI 1.87, 7.14) at 6 weeks, 4.51 (95% CI 1.60, 7.42) at 12 weeks. After adjustment for baseline BDI-II, there was no evidence of a difference in outcome according to physical symptoms with a difference in mean BDI-II of 2.17 (95% CI ?0.39, 4.73) at 6 weeks and 2.43 (95% CI ?0.46, 5.32) at 12 weeks. There was no evidence that reboxetine was more effective than citalopram in those with multiple physical symptoms at 6 (P=0.18) or 12 weeks (P=0.24). Limitations Differential non-adherence between treatment arms has the potential to bias estimates of treatment efficacy. Conclusion Multiple physical symptoms predict response to antidepressants, but not after adjustment for baseline depression severity. Physical symptoms could be a marker of severe depression rather than an independent prognostic factor and depression should be considered in patients with multiple physical symptoms. Treatment with reboxetine conferred no advantage over citalopram in those with physical symptoms, and it is less well tolerated. PMID:24836086

Green, Amy; Crawford, Andrew; Button, Katherine S.; Wiles, Nicola; Peters, Tim J.; Nutt, David; Lewis, Glyn

2014-01-01

189

Report of a Study on the Toxicity of Several Food Preserving Agents1  

Microsoft Academic Search

The deterioration of some foods caused by the activity of microorganisms may be prevented and the keeping quality of the foods greatly improved by the addition of certain chemical compounds. It is obvious that preserva- tives which produce a marked toxic effect should not be used in food intended for human consumption. On the other hand, even when a marked

K. E. Harshbarger

1942-01-01

190

Toxicity of the herbicide glyphosate and several of its formulations to fish and aquatic invertebrates  

Microsoft Academic Search

Studies were initiated to determine the acute toxicity of technical grade glyphosate (MON0573), the isopropylamine salt of glyphosate (MON0139), the formulated herbicide Roundup® (MON02139), and the Roundup® surfactant (MON0818) to four aquatic invertebrates and four fishes: daphnids (Daphnia magna), scuds (Gammarus pseudolimnaeus), midge larvae (Chironomous plumosus), mayfly nymphs (Ephemerella walkeri), Rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri), fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas), channel catfish

L. C. Folmar; H. O. Sanders; A. M. Julin

1979-01-01

191

Symptoms and impact of COPD assessed by an electronic diary in patients with moderate-to-severe COPD: psychometric results from the SHINE study  

PubMed Central

Background Symptoms, particularly dyspnea, and activity limitation, have an impact on the health status and the ability to function normally in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Methods To develop an electronic patient diary (eDiary), qualitative patient interviews were conducted from 2009 to 2010 to identify relevant symptoms and degree of bother due to symptoms. The eDiary was completed by a subset of 209 patients with moderate-to-severe COPD in the 26-week QVA149 SHINE study. Two morning assessments (since awakening and since the last assessment) and one evening assessment were made each day. Assessments covered five symptoms (“shortness of breath,” “phlegm/mucus,” “chest tightness,” “wheezing,” and “coughing”) and two impact items (“bothered by COPD” and “difficulty with activities”) and were scored on a 10-point numeric scale. Results Patient compliance with the eDiary was 90.4% at baseline and 81.3% at week 26. Correlations between shortness of breath and impact items were >0.95. Regression analysis showed that shortness of breath was a highly significant (P<0.0001) predictor of impact items. Exploratory factor analysis gave a single factor comprising all eDiary items, including both symptoms and impact items. Shortness of breath, the total score (including five symptoms and two impact items), and the five-item symptom score from the eDiary performed well, with good consistency and reliability. The eDiary showed good sensitivity to change, with a 0.6 points reduction in the symptoms scores (on a 0–10 point scale) representing a meaningful change. Conclusion The eDiary was found to be valid, reliable, and responsive. The high correlations obtained between “shortness of breath” and the ratings of “bother” and “difficulty with activities” confirmed the relevance of this symptom in patients with COPD. Future studies will be required to explore further psychometric properties and their ability to differentiate between COPD treatments. PMID:25609942

Kulich, Károly; Keininger, Dorothy L; Tiplady, Brian; Banerji, Donald

2015-01-01

192

Association between symptoms of attention-deficit\\/hyperactivity disorder and bulimic behaviors in a clinical sample of severely obese adolescents  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective:Preliminary evidence suggests a comorbidity between attention-deficit\\/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and obesity. This study was carried out to identify the clinical characteristics of obese adolescents with a higher probability of ADHD and advance the understanding of the potential factors underlying the comorbidity between obesity and ADHD. We evaluated the association between ADHD symptoms and bulimic behaviors, depressive and anxiety symptoms, degree

S Cortese; P Isnard; M L Frelut; G Michel; L Quantin; A Guedeney; B Falissard; E Acquaviva; B Dalla Bernardina; M C Mouren

2007-01-01

193

Initial dose effect of 5-fluorouracil: rapidly improving severe, acute toxic myopericarditis.  

PubMed

5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) has a significant antineoplastic activity and has been used for the management of various malignant neoplasms. Cardiotoxicity of 5-FU is rare but may be life-threatening. A 55-year-old female patient was admitted to our hospital with atypical chest pain. Her electrocardiogram revealed widespread ST-segment elevations, and she had an elevated troponin level. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed global myocardial hypokinesia with impaired left ventricular systolic function (ejection fraction, 20%). Coronary angiography revealed normal coronary arteries with no vasospasm, and therefore, she was hospitalized with the diagnosis of acute toxic myopericarditis and was treated medically. In literature, this case is the first case of acute toxic myocarditis occurring because of the first dose of 5-FU. PMID:21208764

Çal?k, Ali Nazmi; Çeliker, Emel; Velibey, Yalç?n; Ça?da?, Metin; Güzelburç, Özge

2012-01-01

194

The Toxicity of Glyphosate and Several Glyphosate Formulations to Four Species of Southwestern Australian Frogs  

Microsoft Academic Search

.   The acute toxicity of technical-grade glyphosate acid, glyphosate isopropylamine, and three glyphosate formulations was\\u000a determined for adults of one species and tadpoles of four species of southwestern Australian frogs in 48-h static\\/renewal\\u000a tests. The 48-h LC50 values for Roundup? Herbicide (MON 2139) tested against tadpoles of Crinia insignifera, Heleioporus eyrei, Limnodynastes dorsalis, and Litoria moorei ranged between 8.1 and

R. M. Mann; J. R. Bidwell

1999-01-01

195

Ratio of mutated versus wild-type coat protein sequences in Pepino mosaic virus determines the nature and severity of yellowing symptoms on tomato plants.  

PubMed

Recently, Pepino mosaic virus (PepMV) infections causing severe yellowing symptoms in tomato plants have been reported in glasshouse tomato crops. When studying this phenomenon in commercial glasshouses, two different types of yellowing symptoms, occurring in adjacent plants, were distinguished: interveinal leaf yellowing and yellow mosaics. After several weeks, the interveinal leaf yellowing symptoms gradually disappeared and the plant heads became green again, with yellow mosaic patterns on the leaves as an intermediate stage. The sequencing of multiple isolates causing interveinal leaf yellowing identified two point mutations, occurring in positions 155 and 166 of the coat protein (CP), as unique to the yellowing pathotype. Site-directed mutagenesis of infectious clones confirmed that both CP mutations are determinants of the interveinal leaf yellowing symptoms. Sequencing of CP clones from plants or plant parts with the yellow mosaic symptoms resulted in a mixture of wild-type and mutated sequences, whereas sequencing of CP clones from the green heads of recovered plants resulted in only wild-type sequences. Yellow mosaic symptoms could be reproduced by inoculation of an artificial 1:1 mixture of RNA transcripts from the wild-type and mutated infectious clones. These results show that the ratio of mutated versus wild-type sequences can determine the nature and severity of symptom development. The gradual recovery of the plants, which coincides with the disappearance of the yellowing mutations, suggests that selection pressure acts to the advantage of the wild-type virus. Experiments with wild-type and mutated infectious clones showed that reverse mutation events from mutant to wild-type occur and that the wild-type virus does not have a replicative advantage over the mutant. These results suggest that reverse mutation events occur, with subsequent selection pressure acting in favour of the wild-type virus in the growing plant parts, possibly related to a lower long-distance movement efficiency of the mutant. PMID:23855964

Hasiów-Jaroszewska, Beata; Paeleman, Anneleen; Ortega-Parra, Nelia; Borodynko, Natasza; Minicka, Julia; Czerwoniec, Anna; Thomma, Bart P H J; Hanssen, Inge M

2013-12-01

196

From sub cellular to community level: toxicity of glutaraldehyde to several aquatic organisms.  

PubMed

The biocide glutaraldehyde (GA) is widely used as a disinfectant and sterilizing agent against bacteria and virus in hospital and veterinary facilities. GA or its metabolites may reach aquatic ecosystems due to incomplete or inadequate treatment of wastewaters. Data about GA effects at lethal and a sub lethal level to non-target organisms is needed so that a risk assessment to aquatic ecosystems can be done. Thus, in this work a battery of toxicity tests with primary producers, primary consumers and secondary consumers were performed and a species sensitive distribution (SSD) for GA was built. Moreover, effects on biomarkers (catalase, lactate dehydrogenase, glutathione-S-transferase, and cholinesterase) were measured in Danio rerio embryos and adults. Primary consumers (Thamnocephalus platyurus 24h - EC50=3.6 mg/l; Daphnia magna 48 h - EC50=6.6 mg/l) and D. rerio adults (96 h - LC50=5.5mg/l) were slightly more sensitive to GA than D. rerio embryos (96 h - LC50=22.2mg/l) and primary producers (Lemna minor 168 h - EC50=73.8 mg/l; Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata 72h - EC50=12.3mg/l; Chlamydomonas reinhardtii 72 h - EC50=14.6 mg/l; Chlorella vulgaris 72 h - EC50=31.3mg/l). However, no significant differences between the trophic levels were found and general HC5 and HC50 values of 0.6 and 11.4 mg/l were respectively estimated. Despite the low GA toxicity to D. rerio embryos, hatching delay and malformations were found (96 h - EC50=11.9 mg/l). For biomarkers, an inhibition of lactate dehydrogenase activity was observed in embryos whereas an inhibition in catalase, lactate dehydrogenase and glutathione-S-transferase activities was observed in adults. Thus, GA is moderately toxic (doses>1mg/l) to aquatic organisms, independently of the trophic level. However, considering the varied range of effects depending on the life stage and organism tested and relatively low HC5 value of 0.6 mg/l, mesocosm and chronic toxicity tests seem to be the next step in direction of more realistic scenarios of GA risk assessment in aquatic ecosystems. PMID:24131562

Pereira, Susana P P; Oliveira, Rhaul; Coelho, Sónia; Musso, Carolina; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Domingues, Inês; Nogueira, António J A

2014-02-01

197

Systematic variation of the severity of motor vehicle accident-related traumatic brain injury vignettes produces different post-concussion symptom reports.  

PubMed

This study investigated the specificity of the post-concussion syndrome (PCS) expectation-as-etiology hypothesis. Undergraduate students (n?=?551) were randomly allocated to one of three vignette conditions. Vignettes depicted either a very mild (VMI), mild (MI), or moderate-to-severe (MSI) motor vehicle-related traumatic brain injury (TBI). Participants reported the PCS and PTSD symptoms that they imagined the depicted injury would produce. Secondary outcomes (knowledge of mild TBI, and the perceived undesirability of TBI) were also assessed. After data screening, the distribution of participants by condition was: VMI (n?=?100), MI (n?=?96), and MSI (n?=?71). There was a significant effect of condition on PCS symptomatology, F(2, 264)?=?16.55, p??VMI; medium effect, r?=?.33; MSI?> MI; small-to-medium effect, r?=?.22). The same pattern of group differences was found for PTSD symptoms, F(2, 264)?=?17.12, p?symptoms by condition; and the perceived undesirability of TBI was only associated with reported PCS symptomatology in the MSI condition. Systematic variation in the severity of a depicted TBI produces different PCS and PTSD symptom expectations. Even a very mild TBI vignette can elicit expectations of PCS symptoms. PMID:23186297

Sullivan, Karen A; Edmed, Shannon L

2012-01-01

198

Moderate-dose cyclophosphamide for severe aplastic anemia has significant toxicity and does not prevent relapse and clonal evolution.  

PubMed

First-line therapy of severe aplastic anemia (SAA) with high-dose cyclophosphamide causes toxicity and increased short-term mortality. We investigated cyclophosphamide at a lower, more moderate dose in combination with aggressive supportive care to determine whether severe infections might be avoided and hematologic outcomes defined for this regimen. From 2010 to 2012, 22 patients received cyclophosphamide at 120 mg/kg plus cyclosporine and antibacterial, antiviral, and antifungal prophylaxis. Toxicity was considerable, mainly due to prolonged absolute neutropenia, which occurred regardless of pretherapy blood counts, and persisted an average of 2 months. Granulocyte transfusions for uncontrolled infection were required in 5 patients, confirmed fungal infections were documented in 6, and 9 patients died. Nine patients (41%) responded at 6 months. After a median follow-up of 2.2 years, relapse occurred in 2 patients, and cytogenetic abnormalities (including monosomy 7) were observed in 4 patients. Although cyclophosphamide has activity in SAA, its toxicity is not justified when far less dangerous alternatives are available. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01193283. PMID:25185712

Scheinberg, Phillip; Townsley, Danielle; Dumitriu, Bogdan; Scheinberg, Priscila; Weinstein, Barbara; Daphtary, Maithili; Rios, Olga; Wu, Colin O; Young, Neal S

2014-10-30

199

Cytoplasmic expression of mouse prion protein causes severe toxicity in Caenorhabditis elegans.  

PubMed

To test if Caenorhabditis elegans could be established as a model organism for prion study, we created transgenic C. elegans expressing the cytosolic form of the mouse prion protein, MoPrP(23-231), which lacks the N-terminal signal sequence and the C-terminal glycosylphosphatidylinisotol (GPI) anchor site. We report here that transgenic worms expressing MoPrP(23-231)-CFP exhibited a wide range of distinct phenotypes: from normal growth and development, reduced mobility and development delay, complete paralysis and development arrest, to embryonic lethality. Similar levels of MoPrP(23-231)-CFP were produced in animals exhibiting these distinct phenotypes, suggesting that MoPrP(23-231)-CFP might have misfolded into distinct toxic species. In combining with the observation that mutations in PrP that affect prion pathogenesis also affect the toxic phenotypes in C. elegans, we conclude that the prion protein-folding mechanism is similar in mammals and C. elegans. Thus, C. elegans can be a useful model organism for prion research. PMID:18519028

Park, Kyung-Won; Li, Liming

2008-08-01

200

The relationship between Swiss needle cast symptom severity and level of Phaeocryptopus gaeumannii colonization in coastal Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. menziesii)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary This study examined 108 15-year-old Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. menziesii) trees to investigate whether trees exhibiting less severe Swiss needle cast (SNC) symptoms were more resistant (had less fungal colonization) or more tolerant (maintained healthy foliage under similar infection levels). Trees were sampled from six open pollinated families that were categorized into three disease severity groups (two families for

F. Temel; G. R. Johnson; J. K. Stone

2004-01-01

201

Successful treatment of severe disruptive disorder featuring symptoms of the Klüver-Bucy Syndrome following a massive right temporal-parietal hemorrhage.  

PubMed

We know little about effective treatment for patients suffering from partial or complete Klüver-Bucy Syndrome (KBS) and other disruptive behaviors following a stroke. Reported cases have shown that certain medication, given alone or combined, can be partially effective. In this specific case study, we will try to demonstrate the effectiveness of a combination of carbamazepine, clonidine, quetiapine and methylphenidate in the alleviating of these symptoms. The wide range of symptoms found in KBS led us to use several kinds of psychotropic medication in spite of the inherent risks associated to polypharmacy. PMID:22215142

De Benedictis, Luigi; Dumais, Alexandre; Landry, Pierre

2013-01-01

202

The relationship of theory of mind and executive functions to symptom type and severity in children with autism  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although neurocognitive impairments in theory of mind and in executive functions have both been hypothesized to play a causal role in autism, little research has investigated the explanatory power of these impairments with regard to autistic symptomatology. The present study examined the degree to which individual differences in theory of mind and executive functions could explain variation in autism symptom

ROBERT M. JOSEPH

2004-01-01

203

Internalizing Symptoms and Affective Reactivity in Relation to the Severity of Aggression in Clinically Referred, Behavior-Disordered Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We examined the affective correlates of aggression in children referred to a partial hospitalization program for the treatment of behavior disorders who did not have a mood or anxiety disorder. Parent and teacher ratings of the children's impulsivity, internalizing symptoms, affective reactivity, and aggression were examined for their…

Kolko, David J.; Baumann, Barbara L.; Bukstein, Oscar G.; Brown, Elissa J.

2007-01-01

204

Group Counseling Psychotherapy for Patients with Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders: Development of New Measures for Symptom Severity and Quality of Life  

Microsoft Academic Search

Functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGID) can benefit from various psychological interventions. The main objective here was to define the contribution of a new psychotherapeutic intervention, group counseling psychotherapy, for the management of FGID patients. Secondary aims included validation of new measures for gastrointestinal symptoms and quality of life in patients with FGID. Fifty patients seen in a tertiary care center were

Monique Riberdy Poitras; Pierre Verrier; Christiane So; Stéphanie Pâquet; Mickael Bouin; Pierre Poitras

2002-01-01

205

Effects of several variables on whole effluent toxicity test performance and interpretation  

SciTech Connect

Protocol changes and options contained within US Environmental Protection Agency whole effluent toxicity tests represent variables that have the potential to affect bioassay performance and interpretation of results. Variables evaluated in this study include: the change in allowable age in the Pimephales promelas acute bioassay from up to 90 d to a maximum of 14 d, age-specific acute responses of P. promelas among the allowable ages of 1 to 14 d, change in the chronic growth endpoint definition from final mass to biomass, differences between hemacytometer and fluorometer measurements in the Selenastrum capricornutum protocol, and options for statistical interpretation of species sensitivity in multiple test/species screening bioassays. Clear age-related sensitivity and precision differences were observed in acute responses of P. promelas. Results obtained using the younger age classes were typically more variable in studies of both 1- to 14-d-old and 14- to 90-d-old P. promelas. In the experiments on 1- to 14-d-old organisms, larvae at 1 d of age were significantly less sensitive. In the tests on 14- to 90-d-old organisms, the 14-d-old organisms were significantly less sensitive. The change in endpoint definition in the P. promelas chronic bioassay resulted in an apparent increase in toxic response in the inhibition concentration (ICp) value for each bioassay, evaluated by the biomass method, with no general improvement in statistical interest precision estimates and no predictable impact on the no-observed-effect concentration endpoint. Fluorometric scoring in the Selenastrum bioassay was significantly more precise and better capable of estimating counts than hemacytometer measurements. Discrepancies associated with commonly used statistical endpoints used to determine the most sensitive species were identified, and potential solutions were proposed.

Markle, P.J.; Gully, J.R.; Baird, R.B.; Nakada, K.M.; Bottomley, J.P.

2000-01-01

206

Language and communication skills in preschool children with autism spectrum disorders: contribution of cognition, severity of autism symptoms, and adaptive functioning to the variability.  

PubMed

This study examined the contribution of cognitive function, severity of autism, and adaptive functioning to the variability in language and communication skills in 129 preschool children (aged 24-63 months) with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Participants were selected from a representative research cohort of 208 preschool children on the basis of caregiver completion of the MacArthur-Bates Communicative Development Inventories (CDI). The children were classified into three cognitive groups: (a) Normal intelligence; (b) Developmental delay; and (c) Intellectual disability. Autism symptom severity was measured by the Autistic Behavior Checklist (ABC), and adaptive functioning by the Daily Living Skills (DLS) and Socialization (Soc) subscales from the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales. For each of five CDI variables (Phrases understood, Words understood, Words produced, Gestures and actions, and Language use), the contribution of cognition, severity of autism symptoms, and adaptive functioning to the variability was examined. Cognition and age explained about half or more of the variance in the four verbal language CDI variables, but only about one fourth of the variance in the non-verbal communication variable Gestures and actions. Severity of autism symptoms and the two adaptive measures (DLS and Soc) each only accounted for a few percent more of the variance in the four CDI language variables; however, for Gestures and actions, an additional 11-21% of the variance was accounted for. In conclusion, for children with ASD, receptive and expressive language is mainly related to cognitive level, whereas non-verbal communication skills seem to also be related to severity of autism symptoms and adaptive functioning. PMID:22093662

Kjellmer, Liselotte; Hedvall, Åsa; Fernell, Elisabeth; Gillberg, Christopher; Norrelgen, Fritjof

2012-01-01

207

Increased Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) Associated with Hepatocyte Growth Factor (HGF) and Symptom Severity in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs)  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND One in 88 children in the US is thought to have one of the autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). ASDs are characterized by social impairments and communication problems. Growth factors and their receptors may play a role in the etiology of ASDs. Research has shown that epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation is associated with nerve cell development and repair. This study was designed to measure plasma levels of EGFR in autistic children and correlate these levels with its ligand, epidermal growth factor, other related putative biomarkers such as hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), the ligand for MET (MNNG HOS transforming gene) receptor, as well as the symptom severity of 19 different behavioral symptoms. SUBJECTS AND METHODS Plasma EGFR concentration was measured in 33 autistic children and 34 age- and gender-similar neurotypical controls, using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Plasma EGFR levels were compared to putative biomarkers known to be associated with EGFR and MET and severity levels of 19 autism-related symptoms. RESULTS We found plasma EGFR levels significantly higher in autistic children, when compared to neurotypical controls. EGFR levels correlated with HGF and high-mobility group protein B1 (HMGB1) levels, but not other tested putative biomarkers, and EGFR levels correlated significantly with severity of expressive language, conversational language, focus/attention, hyperactivity, eye contact, and sound sensitivity deficiencies. CONCLUSIONS These results suggest a relationship between increased plasma EGFR levels and designated symptom severity in autistic children. A strong correlation between plasma EGFR and HGF and HMGB1 suggests that increased EGFR levels may be associated with the HGF/Met signaling pathway, as well as inflammation. PMID:25249767

Russo, Anthony J

2014-01-01

208

Consumption of gold kiwifruit reduces severity and duration of selected upper respiratory tract infection symptoms and increases plasma vitamin C concentration in healthy older adults.  

PubMed

In the elderly, immunosenescence and malnourishment can contribute to increased risk and severity of upper respiratory tract infections (URTI). Gold kiwifruit (Actinidia chinensis 'Hort16A') contains nutrients important for immune function and mitigation of symptoms of infection, including vitamins C and E, folate, polyphenols and carotenoids. The objective of the present study was to evaluate whether regular consumption of gold kiwifruit reduces symptoms of URTI in older people, and determine the effect it has on plasma antioxidants, and markers of oxidative stress, inflammation and immune function. A total of thirty-two community-dwelling people (?65 years) participated in a randomised crossover study, consuming the equivalent of four kiwifruit or two bananas daily for 4 weeks, with treatments separated by a 4-week washout period. Participants completed the Wisconsin Upper Respiratory Symptom Survey-21 daily, and blood samples were collected at baseline and at the end of each treatment and washout period. Gold kiwifruit did not significantly reduce the overall incidence of URTI compared with banana, but significantly reduced the severity and duration of head congestion, and the duration of sore throat. Gold kiwifruit significantly increased plasma vitamin C, ?-tocopherol and lutein/zeaxanthin concentrations, and erythrocyte folate concentrations, and significantly reduced plasma lipid peroxidation. No changes to innate immune function (natural killer cell activity, phagocytosis) or inflammation markers (high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, homocysteine) were detected. Consumption of gold kiwifruit enhanced the concentrations of several dietary plasma analytes, which may contribute to reduced duration and severity of selected URTI symptoms, offering a novel tool for reducing the burden of URTI in older individuals. PMID:22172428

Hunter, Denise C; Skinner, Margot A; Wolber, Frances M; Booth, Chris L; Loh, Jacelyn M S; Wohlers, Mark; Stevenson, Lesley M; Kruger, Marlena C

2012-10-01

209

The 2010 American college of rheumatology fibromyalgia survey diagnostic criteria and symptom severity scale is a valid and reliable tool in a French speaking fibromyalgia cohort  

PubMed Central

Background Fibromyalgia (FM) is a pain condition with associated symptoms contributing to distress. The Fibromyalgia Survey Diagnostic Criteria and Severity Scale (FSDC) is a patient-administered questionnaire assessing diagnosis and symptom severity. Locations of body pain measured by the Widespread Pain Index (WPI), and the Symptom Severity scale (SS) measuring fatigue, unrefreshing sleep, cognitive and somatic complaints provide a score (0–31), measuring a composite of polysymptomatic distress. The reliability and validity of the translated French version of the FSDC was evaluated. Methods The French FSDC was administered twice to 73 FM patients, and was correlated with measures of symptom status including: Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ), McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ), and a visual analogue scale (VAS) for global severity and pain. Test-retest reliability, internal consistency, and construct validity were evaluated. Results Test-retest reliability was between .600 and .888 for the 25 single items of the FSDC, and .912 for the total FSDC, with all correlations significant (p?

2012-01-01

210

Interplay between Bladder Microbiota and Urinary Antimicrobial Peptides: Mechanisms for Human Urinary Tract Infection Risk and Symptom Severity  

PubMed Central

Resident bacterial communities (microbiota) and host antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are both essential components of normal host innate immune responses that limit infection and pathogen induced inflammation. However, their interdependence has not been investigated in the context of urinary tract infection (UTI) susceptibility. Here, we explored the interrelationship between the urinary microbiota and host AMP responses as mechanisms for UTI risk. Using prospectively collected day of surgery (DOS) urine specimens from female pelvic floor surgery participants, we report that the relative abundance and/or frequency of specific urinary microbiota distinguished between participants who did or did not develop a post-operative UTI. Furthermore, UTI risk significantly correlated with both specific urinary microbiota and ?-defensin AMP levels. Finally, urinary AMP hydrophobicity and protease activity were greater in participants who developed UTI, and correlated positively with both UTI risk and pelvic floor symptoms. These data demonstrate an interdependency between the urinary microbiota, AMP responses and symptoms, and identify a potential mechanism for UTI risk. Assessment of bacterial microbiota and host innate immune AMP responses in parallel may identify increased risk of UTI in certain populations. PMID:25486068

Nienhouse, Vanessa; Gao, Xiang; Dong, Qunfeng; Nelson, David E.; Toh, Evelyn; McKinley, Kathleen; Schreckenberger, Paul; Shibata, Noriko; Fok, Cynthia S.; Mueller, Elizabeth R.; Brubaker, Linda; Wolfe, Alan J.; Radek, Katherine A.

2014-01-01

211

Assessment of 5-hydroxytryptamine efflux in rat brain during a mild, moderate and severe serotonin-toxicity syndrome  

PubMed Central

Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT)-toxicity syndrome, an iatrogenic brain disorder induced by excessive efflux of 5-HT, has received much attention because of increasing incidents of serotonergic antidepressants. However, the neural mechanism by which extracellular 5-HT is elevated to a toxic level for the syndrome remains to be determined. The goal of the present study was to test the hypothesis that extracellular 5-HT is composed of two component effluxes responsible for distinct aspects of the syndrome. The first set of experiments was to characterize the syndrome by measuring changes in neuromuscular signs, body-core temperature and mortality rate. Our results indicate that the syndrome severity can be categorized into mild, moderate and severe levels. The second set of experiments was to determine a threshold of extracellular 5-HT for induction of each level of the syndrome. Our results demonstrate that there were an 11-fold increase in the mild syndrome and an over 55-fold increase in the severe syndrome. In the last series of experiments, the excessive increases in 5-HT were pharmacologically separated into primary and secondary component effluxes with the 5-HT2A receptor antagonists cyproheptadine and ketanserin and NMDA receptor antagonist (+)-MK-801. Our results suggest primary component efflux was caused by direct drug effects on 5-HT biosynthetic and metabolic pathways and secondary efflux ascribed to indirect drug effect on a positive feedback circuit involving 5-HT2A and NMDA receptors. In summary, the primary efflux could be an initial cause for the induction of the syndrome while the secondary efflux might involve deterioration of the syndrome. PMID:19464285

Zhang, Gongliang; Krishnamoorthy, Swapna; Ma, Zhiyuan; Vukovich, Nick P.; Huang, Xupei; Tao, Rui

2009-01-01

212

Predictive symptoms and signs of severe dengue disease for patients with dengue fever: a meta-analysis.  

PubMed

The aim of the meta-analysis was to provide more solid evidence for the reliability of the new classification. A systematic literature search was performed using PubMed, Armed Forces Pest Management Board Literature Retrieval System, and Google Scholar up to August 2012. A pooled odds ratio (OR) was calculated using either a random-effect or a fixed-effect model. A total of 16 papers were identified. Among the 11 factors studied, five symptoms demonstrated an increased risk for SDD, including bleeding [OR: 13.617; 95% confidence interval (CI): 3.281, 56.508], vomiting/nausea (OR: 1.692; 95% CI: 1.256, 2.280), abdominal pain (OR: 2.278; 95% CI: 1.631, 3.182), skin rashes (OR: 2.031; 95% CI: 1.269, 3.250), and hepatomegaly (OR: 4.751; 95% CI: 1.769, 12.570). Among the four bleeding-related symptoms including hematemesis, melena, gum bleeding, and epistaxis, only hematemesis (OR: 6.174; 95% CI: 2.66, 14.334; P < 0.001) and melena (OR: 10.351; 95% CI: 3.065, 34.956; P < 0.001) were significantly associated with SDD. No significant associations with SDD were found for gender, lethargy, retroorbital pain, diarrhea, or tourniquet test, whereas headache appeared protective (OR: 0.555; 95% CI: 0.455, 0.676). The meta-analysis suggests that bleeding (hematemesis/melena), vomiting/nausea, abdominal pain, skin rashes, and hepatomegaly may predict the development of SDD in patients with DF, while headache may predict otherwise. PMID:25097856

Zhang, H; Zhou, Y P; Peng, H J; Zhang, X H; Zhou, F Y; Liu, Z H; Chen, X G

2014-01-01

213

Predictive Symptoms and Signs of Severe Dengue Disease for Patients with Dengue Fever: A Meta-Analysis  

PubMed Central

The aim of the meta-analysis was to provide more solid evidence for the reliability of the new classification. A systematic literature search was performed using PubMed, Armed Forces Pest Management Board Literature Retrieval System, and Google Scholar up to August 2012. A pooled odds ratio (OR) was calculated using either a random-effect or a fixed-effect model. A total of 16 papers were identified. Among the 11 factors studied, five symptoms demonstrated an increased risk for SDD, including bleeding [OR: 13.617; 95% confidence interval (CI): 3.281, 56.508], vomiting/nausea (OR: 1.692; 95% CI: 1.256, 2.280), abdominal pain (OR: 2.278; 95% CI: 1.631, 3.182), skin rashes (OR: 2.031; 95% CI: 1.269, 3.250), and hepatomegaly (OR: 4.751; 95% CI: 1.769, 12.570). Among the four bleeding-related symptoms including hematemesis, melena, gum bleeding, and epistaxis, only hematemesis (OR: 6.174; 95% CI: 2.66, 14.334; P < 0.001) and melena (OR: 10.351; 95% CI: 3.065, 34.956; P < 0.001) were significantly associated with SDD. No significant associations with SDD were found for gender, lethargy, retroorbital pain, diarrhea, or tourniquet test, whereas headache appeared protective (OR: 0.555; 95% CI: 0.455, 0.676). The meta-analysis suggests that bleeding (hematemesis/melena), vomiting/nausea, abdominal pain, skin rashes, and hepatomegaly may predict the development of SDD in patients with DF, while headache may predict otherwise. PMID:25097856

Zhang, H.; Zhou, Y. P.; Peng, H. J.; Zhang, X. H.; Zhou, F. Y.; Liu, Z. H.; Chen, X. G.

2014-01-01

214

Toxicity of a glufosinate- and several glyphosate-based herbicides to juvenile amphibians from the Southern High Plains, USA.  

PubMed

Pesticide toxicity is often proposed as a contributing factor to the world-wide decline of amphibian populations. We assessed acute toxicity (48 h) of a glufosinate-based herbicide (Ignite 280 SL) and several glyphosate-based herbicide formulations (Roundup WeatherMAX, Roundup Weed and Grass Killer Super Concentrate, Roundup Weed and Grass Killer Ready-To-Use Plus on two species of amphibians housed on soil or moist paper towels. Survival of juvenile Great Plains toads (Bufo cognatus) and New Mexico spadefoots (Spea multiplicata) was reduced by exposure to Roundup Weed and Grass Killer Ready-To-Use Plus on both substrates. Great Plains toad survival was also reduced by exposure to Roundup Weed and Grass Killer Super Concentrate on paper towels. New Mexico spadefoot and Great Plains toad survival was not affected by exposure to the two agricultural herbicides (Roundup WeatherMAX and Ignite 280 SL) on either substrate, suggesting that these herbicides likely do not pose an immediate risk to these species under field conditions. PMID:19000631

Dinehart, Simon K; Smith, Loren M; McMurry, Scott T; Anderson, Todd A; Smith, Philip N; Haukos, David A

2009-01-15

215

Synovial pathology detected on ultrasound correlates with the severity of radiographic knee osteoarthritis more than with symptoms  

PubMed Central

Summary Objective To [1] compare the frequency and severity of ultrasound (US) features in people with normal knees (controls), knee pain (KP), asymptomatic radiographic OA (ROA), and symptomatic OA (SROA), [2] examine relationships between US features, pain and radiographic severity, [3] explore the relationship between change in pain and US features over a 3-month period. Method Community participants were recruited into a multiple group case–control study. All underwent assessment for pain, knee radiographs and US examination for effusion, synovial hypertrophy, popliteal cysts and power Doppler (PD) signal within the synovium. A 3-month follow-up was undertaken in over half of control and SROA participants. Results 243 participants were recruited (90 controls; 59 KP; 32 ROA; 62 SROA). Effusion and synovial hypertrophy were more common in ROA and SROA participants. Severity of effusion and synovial hypertrophy were greater in SROA compared to ROA (P < 0.05). Severity of US effusion and synovial hypertrophy were correlated with radiographic severity (r = 0.6 and r = 0.7, P < 0.01) but the relationship between pain severity and US features was weak (r = 0.3, P < 0.01). In SROA participants, pain severity did not change in tandem with a change in synovial hypertrophy over time. Conclusion US abnormalities are common in OA. Effusion and synovial hypertrophy were moderately correlated with radiographic severity but the relationship with pain is less strong. The degree to which these features reflect “active inflammation” is questionable and they may be better considered as part of the total organ pathology in OA. Further studies are warranted to confirm these findings. PMID:25278071

Hall, M.; Doherty, S.; Courtney, P.; Latief, K.; Zhang, W.; Doherty, M.

2014-01-01

216

The Impact of Pretreatment Prostate Volume on Severe Acute Genitourinary Toxicity in Prostate Cancer Patients Treated With Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To assess the impact of pretreatment prostate volume on the development of severe acute genitourinary toxicity in patients undergoing intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between 2004 and 2007, a consecutive sample of 214 patients who underwent IMRT (75.6 Gy) for prostate cancer at two referral centers was analyzed. Prostate volumes were obtained from computed tomography scans taken during treatment simulation. Genitourinary toxicity was defined using the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events Version 3.0 guidelines. Acute toxicity was defined as any toxicity originating within 90 days of the completion of radiation therapy. Patients were characterized as having a small or large prostate depending on whether their prostate volume was less than or greater than 50 cm{sup 3}, respectively. Genitourinary toxicity was compared in these groups using the chi-square or Fisher's exact test, as appropriate. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to further assess the impact of prostate volume on severe (Grade 3) acute genitourinary toxicity. Results: Patients with large prostates (>50 cm{sup 3}) had a higher rate of acute Grade 3 genitourinary toxicity (p = .02). Prostate volume was predictive of the likelihood of developing acute Grade 3 genitourinary toxicity on bivariate (p = .004) and multivariate (p = .006) logistic regression. Every 27.0 cm{sup 3} increase in prostate volume doubled the likelihood of acute Grade 3 genitourinary toxicity. Conclusions: Patients with larger prostates are at higher risk for the development of severe acute genitourinary toxicity when treated with IMRT for prostate cancer.

Aizer, Ayal A., E-mail: Ayal.Aizer@yale.ed [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States); Anderson, Nicole S.; Oh, Steven C.; Yu, James B.; McKeon, Anne M.; Decker, Roy H.; Peschel, Richard E. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States)

2011-02-01

217

Sick-listed employees with severe medically unexplained physical symptoms: burden or routine for the occupational health physician? A cross sectional study  

PubMed Central

Background The two primary objectives of this study were to the assess consultation load of occupational health physicians (OHPs), and their difficulties and needs with regard to their sickness certification tasks in sick-listed employees with severe medical unexplained physical symptoms (MUPS). Third objective was to determine which disease-, patient-, doctor- and practice-related factors are associated with the difficulties and needs of the OHPs. Methods In this cross-sectional study, 43 participating OHPs from 5 group practices assessed 489 sick-listed employees with and without severe MUPS. The OHPs filled in a questionnaire about difficulties concerning sickness certification tasks, consultation time, their needs with regard to consultation with or referral to a psychiatrist or psychologist, and communication with GPs. The OHPs also completed a questionnaire about their personal characteristics. Results OHPs only experienced task difficulties in employees with severe MUPS in relation to their communication with the treating physician. This only occured in cases in which the OHP attributed the physical symptoms to somatoform causes. If they attributed the physical symptoms to mental causes, the OHPs reported a need to consultate a psychiatrist about the diagnosis and treatment. Conclusions OHPs experience few difficulties with their sickness certification tasks and consultation load concerning employees with severe MUPS. However, they encounter problems if the diagnostic uncertainties of the treating physician interfere with the return to work process. OHPs have a need for psychiatric expertise whenever they are uncertain about the psychiatric causes of a delayed return to work process. We recommend further training programs for OHPs. They should also have more opportunity for consultation and referral to a psychiatrist, and their communication with treating physicians should be improved. PMID:21059232

2010-01-01

218

What patients do to counteract the symptoms of Willis-Ekbom disease (RLS/WED): Effect of gender and severity of illness  

PubMed Central

Objectives: This study was carried out to assess different counteracting strategies used by patients with idiopathic Willis-Ekbom disease (RLS/WED). Whether these strategies were influenced by gender or disease severity was also assessed. Materials and Methods: A total of 173 patients of idiopathic RLS/WED were included in this study. Their demographic data was recorded. Details regarding the RLS/WED and strategies that they used to counteract the symptoms were asked. The severity of RLS/WED was measured with the help of the Hindi version of international restless legs syndrome severity rating scale. They were asked to provide the details regarding the relief obtained from all the strategies they used on three-point scale: no relief, some relief, and complete relief. Results: Of the patients, 72% were females. Mean age of the subjects in this study was 39.6 ± 12.6 years, and male subjects were older than females. Four common strategies were reported by the patients to counter the sensations of RLS/WED: moving legs while in bed (85.5%), asking somebody to massage their legs or massaging legs themselves (76.9%), walking (53.2%), and tying a cloth/rope tightly on the legs (39.3%). Of all the patients who moved their legs, 6.7% did not experience any relief, 64.2% reported some relief, and 28.4% reported complete relief. Similarly, of all the patients who used “walking” to counteract symptoms, 50% reported complete relief, 44.5% reported some relief, and the rest did not experience any relief. Many of these patients reported that massage and tying a cloth/rope on legs brought greater relief than any of these strategies. Tying cloth on the leg was more common among females as compared to males (45.9% females vs. 23.5% males; ?2 = 7.54; P = 0.006), while patients with moderately severe to severe RLS/WED reported “moving legs in bed” (79.3% in mild to moderate RLS/WED; 91.8% in severe to very severe RLS; ?2 = 5.36; P = 0.02). Conclusion: Patients with RLS/WED use a variety of strategies to counteract symptoms. These strategies may be influenced by gender, disease severity, and cultural practices. PMID:25506161

Gupta, Ravi; Goel, Deepak; Ahmed, Sohaib; Dhar, Minakshi; Lahan, Vivekananda

2014-01-01

219

Association of levels of N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminidase with severity of psychiatric symptoms in panic disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

Urinary levels of N-acetyl-?-glucosaminidase (NAG) were measured in 58 patients with panic disorder. NAG levels were found to be significantly related to the severity of 23 of 72 mood states, measured by the Profile of Mood States, which were grouped in three categories: hostility or irritability, sadness, and panic. A similar result was found in a previous study of bipolar

Michael J. Garvey; Russell Noyes

1996-01-01

220

Coping Style Use Predicts Posttraumatic Stress and Complicated Grief Symptom Severity Among College Students Reporting a Traumatic Loss  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Problem-focused coping, and active and avoidant emotional coping were examined as correlates of grief and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) severity among 123 college students reporting the unexpected death of an immediate family member, romantic partner, or very close friend. The authors administered to participants, via the Internet, 5…

Schnider, Kimberly R.; Elhai, Jon D.; Gray, Matt J.

2007-01-01

221

Young child with severe brain volume loss easily passes the word memory test and medical symptom validity test: implications for mild TBI.  

PubMed

The Word Memory Test (WMT) and Medical Symptom Validity Test (MSVT) are two commonly used free-standing measures of test-taking effort. The use of any test as a measure of effort is enhanced when evidence shows that it can be easily passed by patients with severe neurological conditions. The opportunity arose to administer the WMT and MSVT to a 9-year-old girl (referred to as CJ) with severe congenital bilateral brain tissue loss (shown via a compelling brain MRI image), chronic epilepsy, an extremely low Full Scale IQ, extremely low adaptive functioning, developmental delays, numerous severe cognitive impairments, and treatment with multiple high-dose benzodiazepines. She received extensive early intervention services and numerous academic accommodations. Despite this set of problems, CJ passed the WMT and MSVT at perfect to near perfect levels. Implications for failure on these tests among patients with known or alleged mild traumatic brain injury are discussed. PMID:24266623

Carone, Dominic A

2014-01-01

222

Relationship between Lifestyle and Health Factors and Severe Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms (LUTS) in 106,435 Middle-Aged and Older Australian Men: Population-Based Study  

PubMed Central

Background Despite growing interest in prevention of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) through better understanding of modifiable risk factors, large-scale population-based evidence is limited. Objective To describe risk factors associated with severe LUTS in the 45 and Up Study, a large cohort study. Design, Setting, and Participants A cross-sectional analysis of questionnaire data from 106,435 men aged ?45 years, living in New South Wales, Australia. Outcome Measures and Statistical Analysis LUTS were measured by a modified version of the International Prostate Symptom Score (m-IPSS). The strength of association between severe LUTS and socio-demographic, lifestyle and health-related factors was estimated, using logistic regression to calculate odds ratios, adjusted for a range of confounding factors. Results Overall, 18.3% reported moderate, and 3.6% severe, LUTS. Severe LUTS were more common among men reporting previous prostate cancer (7.6%), total prostatectomy (4.9%) or having part of the prostate removed (8.2%). After excluding men with prostate cancer or prostate surgery, the prevalence of moderate-severe LUTS in the cohort (n?=?95,089) ranged from 10.6% to 35.4% for ages 45–49 to ?80; the age-related increase was steeper for storage than voiding symptoms. The adjusted odds of severe LUTS decreased with increasing education (tertiary qualification versus no school certificate, odds ratio (OR?=?0.78 (0.68–0.89))) and increasing physical activity (high versus low, OR?=?0.83 (0.76–0.91)). Odds were elevated among current smokers versus never-smokers (OR?=?1.64 (1.43–1.88)), obese versus healthy-weight men (OR?=?1.27 (1.14–1.41)) and for comorbid conditions (e.g., heart disease versus no heart disease, OR?=?1.36 (1.24–1.49)), and particularly for severe versus no physical functional limitation (OR?=?5.17 (4.51–5.93)). Conclusions LUTS was associated with a number of factors, including modifiable risk factors, suggesting potential targets for prevention. PMID:25333345

Smith, David P.; Weber, Marianne F.; Soga, Kay; Korda, Rosemary J.; Tikellis, Gabriella; Patel, Manish I.; Clements, Mark S.; Dwyer, Terry; Latz, Isabel K.; Banks, Emily

2014-01-01

223

Correlation of Prostatic Urethral Angle with the Severity of Urinary Symptom and Peak Flow Rate in Men with Small Prostate Volume  

PubMed Central

Purpose To evaluate the effects of prostatic anatomical factors on male lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and the peak flow rate (Qmax) in patients with small prostate volume (PV). Materials and Methods Records were obtained from a prospectively maintained database of first-visit men with LUTS. Patients whose total PV (TPV) was greater than 30 mL were excluded; 444 patients were enrolled in the study. The TPV, transitional zone volume (TZV), transitional zone index (TZI), intravesical prostatic protrusion (IPP), and prostatic urethral angle (PUA) were measured by transrectal ultrasonography. LUTS were evaluated using the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) and the Overactive Bladder Symptom Score (OABSS) questionnaires. Uroflowmetric measurements were also made. Results PUA (r?=?0.269, P<0.001), TZV (r?=?0.160, P<0.001), and TZI (r?=?0.109, P?=?0.022) significantly correlated with the IPSS. Qmax (r?=??0.334, P<0.001) and OABSS (r?=?0.211, P<0.001) correlated only with PUA. In a multivariate regression analysis, PUA and age were independently associated with IPSS, OABSS, and Qmax. For IPSS of 20 or greater, the area under the ROC curve (AUC) of PUA was 0.667 and the cut-off value was 43.7°. When Qmax was 10 mL/s or less, the AUC of PUA was 0.664 and the cut-off value was 43.5°. Conclusions PUA has a significant association with symptom severity and Qmax among prostatic anatomical factors analyzed in men with LUTS and small PV. PUA should be considered as an important clinical factor in male LUTS management. Furthermore, the impact of PUA on response to medical treatment and disease progression needs to be investigated. PMID:25127394

Kang, Dong Hyuk; Lee, Joo Yong; Hah, Yoon Soo; Chung, Doo Yong; Lee, Dae Hun; Cho, Kang Su

2014-01-01

224

Tobacco smoking in treatment-resistant schizophrenia patients is associated with impaired cognitive functioning, more severe negative symptoms, and poorer social adjustment  

PubMed Central

Tobacco smoking is common in schizophrenia patients. It has been reported that schizophrenia patients who are tobacco smokers have better cognitive performances compared to those who are nonsmokers. However, little is known on the effects of tobacco smoking in treatment-resistant schizophrenia (TRS) patients. The aim of this study was to compare cognitive performances, psychotic symptoms, and social adjustment in tobacco smoker TRS patients compared to nonsmoker TRS patients. Smoker and nonsmoker TRS patients did not differ in demographics and in mean daily antipsychotic dose. Smoker TRS patients had significantly higher scores than nonsmoker patients on the positive and negative syndrome scale (PANSS) and on the negative symptoms subscale. These patients also performed worse than nonsmoker patients on problem-solving cognitive domain. Social adjustment was not significantly different between the two groups. In both groups of patients, worse cognitive performances were mostly predicted by higher severity of negative symptoms. Worse performances on the verbal memory and problem-solving cognitive domains were correlated with social-functioning impairment in tobacco smoker TRS patients but not in nonsmoker ones. The results showed that tobacco smoking was not significantly associated with better cognitive performances in TRS patients, while it was significantly associated with higher negative symptoms. Even if a direct causative mechanism cannot be inferred and despite the fact that these patients may use tobacco to self-medicate, it could be speculated that these associations may, at least partially, be related to a tobacco-smoking–induced worsening of abnormal dopamine dysfunction, which has been suggested to occur in TRS patients. PMID:23950651

Iasevoli, Felice; Balletta, Raffaele; Gilardi, Valentina; Giordano, Sara; de Bartolomeis, Andrea

2013-01-01

225

Selective Interaction Between Chloroplast ?-ATPase and TGB1L88 Retards Severe Symptoms Caused by Alternanthera mosaic virus Infection  

PubMed Central

The multifunctional triple gene block protein 1 (TGB1) of the Potexvirus Alternanthera mosaic virus (AltMV) has been reported to have silencing suppressor, cell-to-cell movement, and helicase functions. Yeast two hybrid screening using an Arabidopsis thaliana cDNA library with TGB1 as bait, and co-purification with TGB1 inclusion bodies identified several host proteins which interact with AltMV TGB1. Host protein interactions with TGB1 were confirmed by biomolecular fluorescence complementation, which showed positive TGB1 interaction with mitochondrial ATP synthase delta? chain subunit (ATP synthase delta?), light harvesting chlorophyll-protein complex I subunit A4 (LHCA4), chlorophyll a/b binding protein 1 (LHB1B2), chloroplast-localized IscA-like protein (ATCPISCA), and chloroplast ?-ATPase. However, chloroplast ?-ATPase interacts only with TGB1L88, and not with weak silencing suppressor TGB1P88. This selective interaction indicates that chloroplast ?-ATPase is not required for AltMV movement and replication; however, TRV silencing of chloroplast ?-ATPase in Nicotiana benthamiana induced severe tissue necrosis when plants were infected by AltMV TGB1L88 but not AltMV TGB1P88, suggesting that ?-ATPase selectively responded to TGB1L88 to induce defense responses. PMID:25288986

Seo, Eun-Young; Nam, Jiryun; Kim, Hyun-Seung; Park, Young-Hwan; Hong, Seok Myeong; Lakshman, Dilip; Bae, Hanhong; Hammond, John; Lim, Hyoun-Sub

2014-01-01

226

Neural activation during response inhibition in adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: preliminary findings on the effects of medication and symptom severity.  

PubMed

Studies of adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have suggested that they have deficient response inhibition, but findings concerning the neural correlates of inhibition in this patient population are inconsistent. We used the Stop-Signal task and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to compare neural activation associated with response inhibition between adults with ADHD (N=35) and healthy comparison subjects (N=62), and in follow-up tests to examine the effect of current medication use and symptom severity. There were no differences in Stop-Signal task performance or neural activation between ADHD and control participants. Among the ADHD participants, however, significant differences were associated with current medication, with individuals taking psychostimulants (N=25) showing less stopping-related activation than those not currently receiving psychostimulant medication (N=10). Follow-up analyses suggested that this difference in activation was independent of symptom severity. These results provide evidence that deficits in inhibition-related neural activation persist in a subset of adult ADHD individuals, namely those individuals currently taking psychostimulants. These findings help to explain some of the disparities in the literature, and advance our understanding of why deficits in response inhibition are more variable in adult, as compared with child and adolescent, ADHD patients. PMID:24581734

Congdon, Eliza; Altshuler, Lori L; Mumford, Jeanette A; Karlsgodt, Katherine H; Sabb, Fred W; Ventura, Joseph; McGough, James J; London, Edythe D; Cannon, Tyrone D; Bilder, Robert M; Poldrack, Russell A

2014-04-30

227

Serum matrix metalloproteinase-9 levels and severity of symptoms in boys with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder ADHD/hyperkinetic disorder HKD.  

PubMed

The serum levels of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) in neuropsychiatric disorders of adults have been widely investigated. So far, no studies have been conducted on the relationship of MMP-9 and cognitive domains in children with two phenotype models, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder and hyperkinetic disorder (ADHD/HKD). The aim of this research was to evaluate and test the hypothesis that serum MMP-9 levels are associated with the severity of symptoms in children with ADHD/HKD and to compare the results in two models of this disorder. The study group comprised 37 Caucasian boys aged 7-12 years with HKD, being a subset of the combined ADHD subtype. Intellectual functions were measured using Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised. The analysis of serum concentrations of MMP-9 was based on a quantitative sandwich ELISA. The statistical regression analysis revealed a correlation between increased serum MMP-9 levels and severity of symptoms in the ADHD (? = 0.33; p = 0.043) and HKD (? = 0.34, p = 0.037) model. According to the results, elevated levels of serum MMP-9 in boys with HKD may be associated with clinical impulsivity domain (? = 0.38; p = 0.019). PMID:24633733

Kadziela-Olech, Halina; Cichocki, Piotr; Chwiesko, Justyna; Konstantynowicz, Jerzy; Braszko, Jan Józef

2015-01-01

228

Significance of 40-, 45-, and 48-kDa Proteins in the Moderate-to-Severe Clinical Symptoms of Buckwheat Allergy  

PubMed Central

Purpose This study was aimed to investigate the relationship between the allergen components and moderate-to-severe allergic reactions in patients with buckwheat allergy. Methods Fifteen patients with a history of buckwheat ingestion and a buckwheat specific IgE level?0.35 kU/L were enrolled. They were divided into 2 groups according to clinical severity scores, with 0-1 being asymptomatic-to-mild and 2-4 being moderate-to-severe symptoms. Immunoblotting was performed to investigate IgE reactivity toward buckwheat allergens and to measure intensity of each component by using a reflective densitometer. Results The proportions of positive band to the 16 kDa (62.5% vs 0%, P=0.026) and 40-50 kDa (87.5% vs 28.6%, P=0.041) buckwheat allergens in the grade 2-4 group were higher than those in grade 0-1 group. The level of buckwheat specific IgE of grade 2-4 group was higher than that of grade 0-1 group (41.3 kU/L vs 5.5 kU/L, P=0.037). The median optical densities (ODs) of IgE antibody binding to 40-50 kDa protein were higher in the grade 2-4 group, compared with those in the grade 0-1 group (130% OD vs 60.8% OD, P=0.037). Conclusions The 40-50 kDa protein is implicated as an important allergen to predict moderate-to-severe clinical symptoms in Korean children with buckwheat allergy. PMID:25553261

Cho, Joongbum; Lee, Jeong-Ok; Choi, Jaehee; Park, Mi-Ran; Shon, Dong-Hwa; Kim, Jihyun; Ahn, Kangmo

2015-01-01

229

An exploratory study of the relationship of symptom domains and diagnostic severity to PET scan imaging in borderline personality disorder.  

PubMed

The purpose of this report is to describe the relationship between clinical rating assessments of borderline personality disorder (BPD) and regional brain metabolism as measured by positron emission tomography with fluorodeoxyglucuse-F18 (PET-FDG). Fourteen women with BPD underwent PET-FDG scanning in a medication-free state. Correlations were performed on a voxel-by-voxel basis with Buss-Durkee Hostility Index (BDHI) and the Zanarini Rating Scale for Borderline Personality Disorder (ZAN-BPD) which provides a score for BPD severity. There was a significant negative correlation between glucose metabolism in frontal brain areas and the BDHI. Correlations of brain metabolic changes and diagnostic behavioral rating scale scores (ZAN-BPD) were small and seen mostly in posterior areas. The assessment of the statistical relationship of the BDHI to brain regions was substantially more robust than the correlations of the total ZAN-BPD. This exploratory study illustrates regional metabolic values that are highly related to hostile behavior. Our findings replicate some prior studies that have identified a negative relationship between frontal metabolism and aggression in personality disorders. We have also identified a range of other areas that relate to both positive (representing increased drive) and negative (representing impaired control) hostility scores. The substantially greater correlations of the BDHI compared with the ZAN-BPD provide information about the neural underpinnings of BPD. PMID:24011393

Charles Schulz, S; Camchong, Jazmin; Romine, Ann; Schlesinger, Amanda; Kuskowski, Michael; Pardo, Jose V; Cullen, Kathryn R; Lim, Kelvin O

2013-11-30

230

Streptococcal upper respiratory tract infections and psychosocial stress predict future tic and obsessive-compulsive symptom severity in children and adolescents with Tourette syndrome and/or obsessive-compulsive disorder  

PubMed Central

Background: One goal of this prospective longitudinal study was to identify new group A beta hemolytic streptococcal (GABHS) infections in children and adolescents with Tourette syndrome (TS) and/or obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) compared to healthy control subjects. We then examined the power of GABHS infections and measures of psychosocial stress to predict future tic, obsessive-compulsive (OC), and depressive symptom severity. Methods: Consecutive ratings of tic, OC and depressive symptom severity were obtained for 45 cases and 41 matched control subjects over a two-year period. Clinical raters were blinded to the results of laboratory tests. Laboratory personnel were blinded to case or control status and clinical ratings. Structural equation modeling for unbalanced repeated measures was used to assess the sequence of new GABHS infections and psychosocial stress and their impact on future symptom severity. Results: Increases in tic and OC symptom severity did not occur after every new GABHS infection. However, the structural equation model found that these newly diagnosed infections were predictive of modest increases in future tic and OC symptom severity, but did not predict future depressive symptom severity. In addition, the inclusion of new infections in the model greatly enhanced, by a factor of three, the power of psychosocial stress in predicting future tic and OC symptom severity. Conclusions: Our data suggest that a minority of children with TS and early-onset OCD were sensitive to antecedent GABHS infections. These infections also enhanced the predictive power of current psychosocial stress on future tic and OC symptom severity. PMID:19833320

Lin, Haiqun; Williams, Kyle A.; Katsovich, Liliya; Findley, Diane B.; Grantz, Heidi; Lombroso, Paul J.; King, Robert A.; Bessen, Debra E.; Johnson, Dwight; Kaplan, Edward L.; Landeros-Weisenberger, Angeli; Zhang, Heping; Leckman, James F.

2009-01-01

231

Reduction of N-acetylaspartate in the medial prefrontal cortex correlated with symptom severity in obsessive-compulsive disorder: meta-analyses of 1H-MRS studies  

PubMed Central

Structural and functional neuroimaging findings suggest that disturbance of the cortico–striato–thalamo–cortical (CSTC) circuits may underlie obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). However, some studies with 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) reported altered level of N-acetylaspartate (NAA), they yielded inconsistency in direction and location of abnormality within CSTC circuits. We conducted a comprehensive literature search and a meta-analysis of 1H-MRS studies in OCD. Seventeen met the inclusion criteria for a meta-analysis. Data were separated by frontal cortex region: medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, orbitofrontal cortex, basal ganglia and thalamus. The mean and s.d. of the NAA measure were calculated for each region. A random effects model integrating 16 separate datasets with 225 OCD patients and 233 healthy comparison subjects demonstrated that OCD patients exhibit decreased NAA levels in the frontal cortex (P=0.025), but no significant changes in the basal ganglia (P=0.770) or thalamus (P=0.466). Sensitivity analysis in an anatomically specified subgroup consisting of datasets examining the mPFC demonstrated marginally significant reduction of NAA (P=0.061). Meta-regression revealed that NAA reduction in the mPFC was positively correlated with symptom severity measured by Yale–Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (P=0.011). The specific reduction of NAA in the mPFC and significant relationship between neurochemical alteration in the mPFC and symptom severity indicate that the mPFC is one of the brain regions that directly related to abnormal behavior in the pathophysiology of OCD. The current meta-analysis indicates that cortices and sub-cortices contribute in different ways to the etiology of OCD. PMID:22892718

Aoki, Yuta; Aoki, Ai; Suwa, Hiroshi

2012-01-01

232

Multiple White Matter Volume Reductions in Patients with Panic Disorder: Relationships between Orbitofrontal Gyrus Volume and Symptom Severity and Social Dysfunction  

PubMed Central

Numerous brain regions are believed to be involved in the neuropathology of panic disorder (PD) including fronto-limbic regions, thalamus, brain stem, and cerebellum. However, while several previous studies have demonstrated volumetric gray matter reductions in these brain regions, there have been no studies evaluating volumetric white matter changes in the fiber bundles connecting these regions. In addition, although patients with PD typically exhibit social, interpersonal and occupational dysfunction, the neuropathologies underlying these dysfunctions remain unclear. A voxel-based morphometry study was conducted to evaluate differences in regional white matter volume between 40 patients with PD and 40 healthy control subjects (HC). Correlation analyses were performed between the regional white matter volumes and patients' scores on the Panic Disorder Severity Scale (PDSS) and the Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF). Patients with PD demonstrated significant volumetric reductions in widespread white matter regions including fronto-limbic, thalamo-cortical and cerebellar pathways (p<0.05, FDR corrected). Furthermore, there was a significant negative relationship between right orbitofrontal gyrus (OFG) white matter volume and the severity of patients' clinical symptoms, as assessed with the PDSS. A significant positive relationship was also observed between patients' right OFG volumes and their scores on the GAF. Our results suggest that volumetric reductions in widespread white matter regions may play an important role in the pathology of PD. In particular, our results suggest that structural white matter abnormalities in the right OFG may contribute to the social, personal and occupational dysfunction typically experienced by patients with PD. PMID:24663245

Konishi, Jun; Asami, Takeshi; Hayano, Fumi; Yoshimi, Asuka; Hayasaka, Shunsuke; Fukushima, Hiroshi; Whitford, Thomas J.; Inoue, Tomio; Hirayasu, Yoshio

2014-01-01

233

STRUCTURE-TOXICITY RELATIONSHIPS FOR INDUSTRIAL CHEMICALS CAUSING TYPE(II) NARCOSIS SYNDROME  

EPA Science Inventory

Several structure-activity relationships have been published for estimating the lethality of nonpolar nonelectrolytes to fish. The vast majority of non-reactive industrial chemicals produce toxicity symptoms consistent with narcosis. However, researchers have found that many chem...

234

The intrinsic toxicity of several neonicotinoids to Lygus lineolaris and Hyaliodes vitripennis, a phytophagous and a predacious mirid.  

PubMed

The tarnished plant bug Lygus lineolaris (Palisot de Beauvois) is a key pest of apples in eastern Canada and, currently, chemical control is the only way to manage this pest. Hyaliodes vitripennis (Say) is a univoltine indigenous predacious mirid and an integral part of biological control programs for apples in certain regions of Quebec. In worst-case laboratory conditions, thiamethoxam, thiacloprid and acetamiprid were exceptionally toxic to this predacious mirid. The adults were more susceptible than the nymphs. However, the residual toxicity of these neonicotinoids to L lineolaris in orchards was very short-lived. Because of the short residual toxicity, neonicotinoids should be applied when L lineolaris is at maximum abundance and well before eggs of H vitripennis hatch in late June. PMID:15912570

Bostanian, Noubar J; Hardman, John M; Ventard, Estelle; Racette, Gaétan

2005-10-01

235

The Efficacy of Echinacea Compound Herbal Tea Preparation on the Severity and Duration of Upper Respiratory and Flu Symptoms: A Randomized, Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of an echinacea compound herbal tea preparation (Echinacea Plus®) given at early onset of cold or flu symptoms in a ran- dom assignment double-blind placebo-controlled study. Design and Subjects: A total of 95 subjects with early symptoms of cold or flu (runny nose, scratchy throat, fever) were randomly assigned

G. Frank Lindenmuth; Elise B. Lindenmuth

2000-01-01

236

Associations between omega-3 poly-unsaturated fatty acids from fish consumption and severity of depressive symptoms: an analysis of the 2005–2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey  

PubMed Central

SUMMARY Fish is the primary source of dietary omega-3 poly-unsaturated fatty acids EPA and DHA, which have been reported to reduce depressive symptoms in clinical trials. We assessed the association between fish consumption and depressive symptoms in a nationally representative sample of 10,480 adults from the 2005–2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Depressive symptoms were classified by severity using the Patient Health Questionnaire. Fish meal consumption reported in 30-day food frequency questionnaires, and EPA+DHA intake computed from 24-hour dietary recalls were evaluated in relation to depressive symptoms using multivariable ordinal logistic regression. Consumption of breaded fish showed an increased risk of greater depressive symptom severity, while all fish, non-breaded fish, and shell fish were not associated. Any EPA+DHA intake was significantly associated with fewer depressive symptoms. Exposure-response analyses revealed no clear patterns for any intake measures. Inconsistent patterns of associations in our study may be partially explained by exposure misclassification. PMID:22472486

Hoffmire, Claire A.; Block, Robert C.; Thevenet-Morrison, Kelly; van Wijngaarden, Edwin

2012-01-01

237

Symptom Management  

Cancer.gov

Symptom Management & Quality of Life Concept Design This video covers a variety of practical considerations for developing a symptom management concept for clinical research.. Co-sponsored by the National Cancer Institute Symptom Management and Health

238

Prognostic significance of atrial fibrillation and severity of symptoms of heart failure in patients with low gradient aortic stenosis and preserved left ventricular ejection fraction.  

PubMed

The aims of this study were to investigate the clinical outcomes of patients with low-gradient aortic stenosis despite preserved left ventricular ejection fraction and to assess reliable prognostic clinical-instrumental features in patients experiencing or not experiencing aortic valve replacement (AVR). Clinical-laboratory and echocardiographic data from 167 patients (median age 78 years, interquartile range 69 to 83) with aortic valve areas <1.0 cm(2), mean gradients ?30 mm Hg, and preserved left ventricular ejection fraction (?55%), enrolled from 2005 to 2010, were analyzed. During a mean follow-up period of 44 ± 23 months, 33% of patients died. On multivariate analysis, independent predictors of death were baseline New York Heart Association functional class III or IV (hazard ratio 2.16, p = 0.038) and atrial fibrillation (hazard ratio 2.00, p = 0.025). Conversely, AVR was protective (hazard ratio 0.25, p = 0.01). The magnitude of the protective effect of AVR seemed to be relatively more important in patients with atrial fibrillation than in those in sinus rhythm, independently of the severity of symptoms. Age >70 years showed a trend toward being a prognostic predictor (p = 0.082). In conclusion, in patients with low-gradient aortic stenosis despite a preserved left ventricular ejection fraction, AVR was strongly correlated with a better prognosis. Patients with atrial fibrillation associated with advanced New York Heart Association class had the worst prognosis if treated medically but at the same time a relative better benefit from surgical intervention. PMID:25316349

Moretti, Michele; Fabris, Enrico; Morosin, Marco; Merlo, Marco; Barbati, Giulia; Pinamonti, Bruno; Gatti, Giuseppe; Pappalardo, Aniello; Sinagra, Gianfranco

2014-12-01

239

Long-term symptom recovery and health-related quality of life in patients with mild-to-moderate-severe community-acquired pneumonia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Study objectives: The long-term outcomes of patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in terms of symptom resolution and health-related quality of life (HRQL) is unknown. Our objective was to determine the rate of symptom resolution using validated patient-based outcome measures, and to assess HRQL IS months after the episode. Participants: Patients were recruited from a group enrolled in a randomized trial

R. El Moussaoui; B. C. Opmeer; Borgie de C. A. J. M; P. Nieuwkerk; P. M. M. Bossuyt; P. Speelman; J. M. Prins

2006-01-01

240

Multi-analyte profile analysis of plasma immune proteins: altered expression of peripheral immune factors is associated with neuropsychiatric symptom severity in adults with and without chronic hepatitis C virus infection  

PubMed Central

Background The purpose of this study was to characterize hepatitis C virus (HCV)-associated differences in the expression of 47 inflammatory factors and to evaluate the potential role of peripheral immune activation in HCV-associated neuropsychiatric symptoms—depression, anxiety, fatigue, and pain. An additional objective was to evaluate the role of immune factor dysregulation in the expression of specific neuropsychiatric symptoms to identify biomarkers that may be relevant to the treatment of these neuropsychiatric symptoms in adults with or without HCV. Methods Blood samples and neuropsychiatric symptom severity scales were collected from HCV-infected adults (HCV+, n = 39) and demographically similar noninfected controls (HCV?, n = 40). Multi-analyte profile analysis was used to evaluate plasma biomarkers. Results Compared with HCV? controls, HCV+ adults reported significantly (P < 0.050) greater depression, anxiety, fatigue, and pain, and they were more likely to present with an increased inflammatory profile as indicated by significantly higher plasma levels of 40% (19/47) of the factors assessed (21%, after correcting for multiple comparisons). Within the HCV+ group, but not within the HCV? group, an increased inflammatory profile (indicated by the number of immune factors > the LDC) significantly correlated with depression, anxiety, and pain. Within the total sample, neuropsychiatric symptom severity was significantly predicted by protein signatures consisting of 4–10 plasma immune factors; protein signatures significantly accounted for 19–40% of the variance in depression, anxiety, fatigue, and pain. Conclusions Overall, the results demonstrate that altered expression of a network of plasma immune factors contributes to neuropsychiatric symptom severity. These findings offer new biomarkers to potentially facilitate pharmacotherapeutic development and to increase our understanding of the molecular pathways associated with neuropsychiatric symptoms in adults with or without HCV. PMID:24683507

Huckans, Marilyn; Fuller, Bret E; Olavarria, Hannah; Sasaki, Anna W; Chang, Michael; Flora, Kenneth D; Kolessar, Michael; Kriz, Daniel; Anderson, Jeanne R; Vandenbark, Arthur A; Loftis, Jennifer M

2014-01-01

241

The Manganese Toxicity of Cotton 1  

PubMed Central

Cotton plants (Gossypium hirsutum. Linn. var. Sankar 4) were grown at normal and toxic levels of substrate manganese, and the altered metabolism of manganese toxic plants was studied. The tissues of plants exposed to toxic levels of manganese had higher activities of peroxidase and polyphenol oxidase, and the activities of catalase, ascorbic acid oxidase, glutathione oxidase and cytochrome c oxidase were lowered. In addition, the high manganese tissue had lower contents of ATP and glutathione but higher amounts of ascorbic acid. The respiration of the partially expanded leaves and the growing tips of toxic plants were depressed when compared to that of the normal tissues. The metabolic changes of manganese toxicity of cotton are placed in the following order: accumulation of manganese in the leaf tissue; a rise in respiration; stimulation of polyphenol oxidase; the appearance of initial toxicity symptoms; the evolution of ethylene and stimulation of peroxidase; the presence of severe toxicity symptoms; the depression of terminal oxidases and respiration; abscission of the growing tip and proliferation of the stem tissue. The early stimulation of polyphenol oxidase may be used to detect potential manganese toxicity. PMID:16658924

Sirkar, Sheela; Amin, J. V.

1974-01-01

242

Antimony Toxicity  

PubMed Central

Antimony toxicity occurs either due to occupational exposure or during therapy. Occupational exposure may cause respiratory irritation, pneumoconiosis, antimony spots on the skin and gastrointestinal symptoms. In addition antimony trioxide is possibly carcinogenic to humans. Improvements in working conditions have remarkably decreased the incidence of antimony toxicity in the workplace. As a therapeutic, antimony has been mostly used for the treatment of leishmaniasis and schistosomiasis. The major toxic side-effects of antimonials as a result of therapy are cardiotoxicity (~9% of patients) and pancreatitis, which is seen commonly in HIV and visceral leishmaniasis co-infections. Quality control of each batch of drugs produced and regular monitoring for toxicity is required when antimonials are used therapeutically. PMID:21318007

Sundar, Shyam; Chakravarty, Jaya

2010-01-01

243

Economic modeling to assess the costs of treatment with finasteride, terazosin, and transurethral resection of the prostate for men with moderate to severe symptoms of benign prostatic hyperplasia  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectivesWe developed a decision analytic model to compare the costs of treatment for an initial 2-year period with finasteride, terazosin, and transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) in men with at least moderate symptoms of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Outcome measures were BPH treatment costs, duration of symptomatic improvement, and lost productivity days (work or other customary activity).

Franklin C. Lowe; Ron L. Mcdaniel; Joseph J. Chmiel; Alan L. Hillman

1995-01-01

244

Severe systemic toxicity and urinary bladder cytotoxicity and regenerative hyperplasia induced by arsenite in arsenic (+ 3 oxidation state) methyltransferase knockout mice. A preliminary report  

SciTech Connect

Arsenic (+ 3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (As3mt) catalyzes reactions which convert inorganic arsenic to methylated metabolites. This study determined whether the As3mt null genotype in the mouse modifies cytotoxic and proliferative effects seen in urinary bladders of wild type mice after exposure to inorganic arsenic. Female wild type C57BL/6 mice and As3mt KO mice were divided into 3 groups each (n = 8) with free access to a diet containing 0, 100 or 150 ppm of arsenic as arsenite (As{sup III}). During the first week of As{sup III} exposure, As3mt KO mice exhibited severe and lethal systemic toxicity. At termination, urinary bladders of both As3mt KO and wild type mice showed hyperplasia by light microscopy. As expected, arsenic-containing granules were found in the superficial urothelial layer of wild type mice. In As3mt KO mice these granules were present in all layers of the bladder epithelium and were more abundant and larger than in wild type mice. Scanning electron microscopy of the bladder urothelium of As3mt KO mice treated with 100 ppm As{sup III} showed extensive superficial necrosis and hyperplastic changes. In As3mt KO mice, livers showed severe acute inflammatory changes and spleen size and lymphoid areas were decreased compared with wild type mice. Thus, diminished arsenic methylation in As3mt KO mice exacerbates systemic toxicity and the effects of As{sup III} on the bladder epithelium, showing that altered kinetic and dynamic behavior of arsenic can affect its toxicity.

Yokohira, Masanao; Arnold, Lora L.; Pennington, Karen L. [Department of Pathology and Microbiology, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-3135 (United States); Suzuki, Shugo [Department of Pathology and Microbiology, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-3135 (United States); Department of Experimental Pathology and Tumor Biology, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences (Japan); Kakiuchi-Kiyota, Satoko [Department of Pathology and Microbiology, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-3135 (United States); Herbin-Davis, Karen; Thomas, David J. [Pharmacokinetics Branch, Integrated Systems Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Cohen, Samuel M., E-mail: scohen@unmc.ed [Department of Pathology and Microbiology, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-3135 (United States)

2010-07-15

245

Severe Aplastic Anemia following Acute Hepatitis from Toxic Liver Injury: Literature Review and Case Report of a Successful Outcome  

PubMed Central

Hepatitis associated aplastic anemia (HAAA) is a rare syndrome in which severe aplastic anemia (SAA) complicates the recovery of acute hepatitis (AH). HAAA is described to occur with AH caused by viral infections and also with idiopathic cases of AH and no clear etiology of liver injury. Clinically, AH can be mild to fulminant and transient to persistent and precedes the onset SAA. It is assumed that immunologic dysregulation following AH leads to the development of SAA. Several observations have been made to elucidate the immune mediated injury mechanisms, ensuing from liver injury and progressing to trigger bone marrow failure with the involvement of activated lymphocytes and severe T-cell imbalance. HAAA has a very poor outcome and often requires bone marrow transplant (BMT). The findings of immune related myeloid injury implied the use of immunosuppressive therapy (IST) and led to improved survival from HAAA. We report a case of young male who presented with AH resulting from the intake of muscle building protein supplements and anabolic steroids. The liver injury slowly resolved with supportive care and after 4 months of attack of AH, he developed SAA. He was treated with IST with successful outcome without the need for a BMT. PMID:25587471

Qureshi, Kamran; Sarwar, Usman; Khallafi, Hicham

2014-01-01

246

Symptom burden in cancer survivorship  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction  The subjective experience of cancer survivorship can be assessed by various patient-reported outcome (PRO) methods, including\\u000a measures of symptom burden and health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Symptom burden includes the presence and severity of\\u000a multiple symptoms and the level of distress caused by symptoms that go untreated or unrelieved. The concept of symptom burden\\u000a is more limited in scope than

V. Shannon Burkett; Charles S. Cleeland

2007-01-01

247

The effects of several acaricides and non-toxic polymers on organophosphate resistant spider mites Tetranychus cinnabarinus (Boisduval  

E-print Network

varying degl ees of success. Pjithalic glyceryl alkyd resin, po3yhutenes, folal'Il3 ticns of oo1yethvlene, acrylic resin, viiiyj. ace- tate, pojyvinyl alcohc3. , 'Iydrox & ethyl cellulose, an&3 several oiher" w "re ried as possible controls {Ar...;. p " i!1. ot and ci&?i?t, ' no tlie tet i 1 l&i t . . s Raci, ?!iic1er a l, q, '. ?i 1st?s 1!osage mort-!, ty curve:- of insectii= j. des 5 Dos ige mortal' tv curve o polymer -oluti. oils. Total n i?aner of mites samplecl p. ::r 50 sq. sample...

Nowlin, Thomas Malcomb

1972-01-01

248

Lack of association of GPX1 and MnSOD genes with symptom severity and response to clozapine treatment in schizophrenia subjects.  

PubMed

Abnormal activities of critical antioxidant enzymes and other indices of lipid peroxidation in plasma and red blood cells were detected in patients with schizophrenia. Other results have shown that oxidative stress may be modulated by clozapine. Based on that and some studies already found different clinical relations between reactive oxygen species and negative and positive symptoms, we evaluated association between clinical response and the polymorphism in the human glutathione peroxidase (GPX1) (Pro200Leu, rs1050450) and manganese SOD (MNSOD) (Ala16Val, rs4880) gene in 216 clozapine-treated patients with schizophrenia. No association was found with these two functional polymorphisms and clozapine response and symptom change after 6 months. No correlations were found between positive/negative symptoms score and both polymorphisms. Our results present that GPX1 (Pro200Leu) and MNSOD (Ala16Val) polymorphisms seem do not play a central role in the clozapine response, although studies in larger and independent samples are necessary to confirm our findings. PMID:19946932

Souza, Renan P; Tampakeras, Maria; Basile, Vince; Shinkai, Takahiro; Rosa, Daniela V F; Potkin, Steve; Meltzer, Herbert Y; Lieberman, Jeffrey A; Romano-Silva, Marco A; Kennedy, James L

2009-12-01

249

Acute toxicity of pyrazolones.  

PubMed

Pyrazolone intoxication accounts for most (52 percent) mild analgesic poisonings in West Germany. Severe and fatal intoxication with pyrazolones is, however, rare. In the German literature, only 50 cases have been described in the past 62 years; 80 to 90 percent of these were caused by aminopyrine, which was withdrawn from the West German market in 1978 and replaced by propyphenazone. Up to now, no fatal poisoning with propyphenazone has been reported. However, the signs and symptoms of severe intoxication are similar for both propyphenazone and aminopyrine. The acute toxicity of dipyrone is slightly lower than that of propyphenazone, whereas phenylbutazone and oxyphenbutazone clearly cause less severe reactions. Characteristic symptoms include impaired consciousness progressing to coma, and convulsions. In addition, arrhythmia and cardiogenic shock may occur. Severe aminopyrine intoxication may also be complicated by sudden apnea. Liver damage may develop after a latent period of about 24 hours, especially after phenylbutazone and oxyphenbutazone poisoning. Therapy involves supportive measures as well as gastric emptying by emesis or lavage, installation of medical charcoal, and induction of diarrhea or gut lavage. Although exact clinicotoxicologic data on hemoperfusion are not available as yet, distribution volumes, plasma half-lives, and endogenous plasma clearances as well as results of in vitro trials all suggest the efficacy of this procedure. Hemoperfusion with uncoated amberlite XAD-4 resin is, therefore, recommended for patients with severe pyrazolone intoxication. PMID:6359872

Okonek, S; Reinecke, H J

1983-11-14

250

Incidence of Boron Toxicity in Spring Barley in Southwestern Australia  

Microsoft Academic Search

One hundred and four crops of spring barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cv. Stirling) grown throughout southwestern Australia (WA) were surveyed for symptoms of boron (B) toxicity. Symptoms were identified as B toxicity and not spot-type net blotch, a foliar disease, caused by the fungus Pyrenohora teres f. spp. maculata that produces similar leaf symptoms. Symptoms of B toxicity occurred in

R. F. Brennan; K. G. Adcock

2004-01-01

251

Chiari Malformation: Symptoms  

MedlinePLUS

... the back of the head, is the defining Chiari symptom Chiari headaches are usually described as starting ... and upper back is another common problem with Chiari due to several causes: nerves are compressed by ...

252

Symptoms of Tickborne Illness  

MedlinePLUS

... symptoms include headache, fatigue, and muscle aches. With Lyme disease you may also experience joint pain. The severity ... disease and the patient's personal tolerance level. Rash: Lyme disease , southern tick-associated rash illness (STARI) , Rocky Mountain ...

253

Long-term fish intake is associated with less severe depressive symptoms among elderly men and women: the MEDIS (MEDiterranean ISlands Elderly) epidemiological study.  

PubMed

Objectives. This work aims at exploring the association between fish intake and depressive symptoms, in older adults. Method. During 2005-2007, 1,190 men and women (>65 years) free living in various Greek islands and in Cyprus participated in the study. Depressive symptoms were assessed using the validated Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS), and foods intake through a Food Frequency Questionnaire. Results. Almost 70% of the participants scored above the depressive cutoff (i.e., GDS score > 5), with women having higher values. People classified under the 1st tertile of GDS score (i.e., GDS

Bountziouka, Vassiliki; Polychronopoulos, Evangelos; Zeimbekis, Akis; Papavenetiou, Eftichia; Ladoukaki, Evaggelia; Papairakleous, Natassa; Gotsis, Efthimios; Metallinos, George; Lionis, Christos; Panagiotakos, Demosthenes

2009-09-01

254

The Cortical Signature of Alzheimer's Disease: Regionally Specific Cortical Thinning Relates to Symptom Severity in Very Mild to Mild AD Dementia and is Detectable in Asymptomatic Amyloid-Positive Individuals  

PubMed Central

Alzheimer's disease (AD) is associated with neurodegeneration in vulnerable limbic and heteromodal regions of the cerebral cortex, detectable in vivo using magnetic resonance imaging. It is not clear whether abnormalities of cortical anatomy in AD can be reliably measured across different subject samples, how closely they track symptoms, and whether they are detectable prior to symptoms. An exploratory map of cortical thinning in mild AD was used to define regions of interest that were applied in a hypothesis-driven fashion to other subject samples. Results demonstrate a reliably quantifiable in vivo signature of abnormal cortical anatomy in AD, which parallels known regional vulnerability to AD neuropathology. Thinning in vulnerable cortical regions relates to symptom severity even in the earliest stages of clinical symptoms. Furthermore, subtle thinning is present in asymptomatic older controls with brain amyloid binding as detected with amyloid imaging. The reliability and clinical validity of AD-related cortical thinning suggests potential utility as an imaging biomarker. This “disease signature” approach to cortical morphometry, in which disease effects are mapped across the cortical mantle and then used to define ROIs for hypothesis-driven analyses, may provide a powerful methodological framework for studies of neuropsychiatric diseases. PMID:18632739

Bakkour, Akram; Salat, David H.; Feczko, Eric; Pacheco, Jenni; Greve, Douglas N.; Grodstein, Fran; Wright, Christopher I.; Blacker, Deborah; Rosas, H. Diana; Sperling, Reisa A.; Atri, Alireza; Growdon, John H.; Hyman, Bradley T.; Morris, John C.; Fischl, Bruce; Buckner, Randy L.

2009-01-01

255

Effects of needs-assessment–based psycho-education of schizophrenic patients’ families on the severity of symptoms and relapse rate of patients  

PubMed Central

Background: Family psycho-education is one of the most effective interventions for preventing relapse in patients with schizophrenia. We evaluated the efficacy of a needs-assessment–based educational program in comparison with a current program (textbook based) in the treatment of schizophrenia. Materials and Methods: Patients with schizophrenia and their families (N = 60) were allocated to needs-assessment–based education (treatment) and textbook-based (control) programs; both included 10 sessions of education within about 6 months. Symptoms were assessed by the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) prior to intervention and every 3 months for a total of 18 months. A 25% decrease or increase in total PANSS score was considered as response or relapse, respectively. Results: Forty-two cases completed the study. The total PANSS score was significantly decreased in both groups with more reduction in the treatment group. Positive and negative scale scores were reduced in the treatment group, but not significantly in the control group. Response rate was higher in the treatment group and relapse rate was lower (15% vs. 27.2%, P = 0.279). In logistic regression analysis, needs-assessment–based psycho-education was associated with more treatment response. Conclusions: Needs-assessment–based psycho-education is more effective than textbook-based education for treating schizophrenia. We recommend psychiatric care centers to conduct needs-assessment and develop their own program for family psycho-education.

Kheirabadi, Gholam Reza; Rafizadeh, Mahnaz; Omranifard, Victoria; Yari, Azam; Maracy, Mohammad Reza; Mehrabi, Tayebe; Sadri, Sima

2014-01-01

256

Elemental Mercury Vapour Toxicity, Treatment, and Prognosis After Acute, Intensive Exposure in Chloralkali Plant Workers. Part II: Hyperchloraemia and Genitourinary Symptoms  

Microsoft Academic Search

Exposure to elemental mercury vapour is known to influence renal function; however, severe renal disease has not been consistently identified. Eleven men were evaluated for renal disease after acute, massive mercury poisoning. Significant hyperchloraemia was identified in this group of patients and a reversible renal tubular defect was suggested by low normal serum bicarbonate, a normal serum anion gap and

Renata E. Bluhm; Julia A. Breyer; Robert G. Bobbitt; Larry W. Welch; Alastair J. J. Wood; Robert A. Branch

1992-01-01

257

Psoriasis Severity: Mild, Moderate or Severe  

MedlinePLUS

... Symptoms and Diagnosis Types of Psoriasis Plaque Guttate Inverse Pustular Erythrodermic Specific Locations Plaque Guttate Inverse Pustular Erythrodermic Severity Triggers Plaque Guttate Inverse Pustular ...

258

Impact of Adalimumab on Symptoms of Psoriatic Arthritis in Patients with Moderate to Severe Psoriasis: A Pooled Analysis of Randomized Clinical Trials  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Psoriatic arthritis often affects patients with psoriasis. Objective: To examine the effect of adalimumab on psoriatic arthritis in patients with moderate to severe psoriasis. Methods: Data from patients with psoriasis and a reported history of comorbid psoriatic arthritis in 3 randomized, placebo-controlled psoriasis trials of adalimumab were analyzed. Results: Adalimumab (n = 274) reduced the risk of psoriatic arthropathy

Philip J. Mease; James Signorovitch; Andrew P. Yu; Eric Q. Wu; Shiraz R. Gupta; Yanjun Bao; Parvez M. Mulani

2010-01-01

259

Language and Communication Skills in Preschool Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: Contribution of Cognition, Severity of Autism Symptoms, and Adaptive Functioning to the Variability  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the contribution of cognitive function, severity of autism, and adaptive functioning to the variability in language and communication skills in 129 preschool children (aged 24-63 months) with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Participants were selected from a representative research cohort of 208 preschool children on the basis…

Kjellmer, Liselotte; Hedvall, Asa; Fernell, Elisabeth; Gillberg, Christopher; Norrelgen, Fritjof

2012-01-01

260

Adaptive Behaviors in High-Functioning Taiwanese Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: An Investigation of the Mediating Roles of Symptom Severity and Cognitive Ability  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We investigated the relationship among cognitive level, autistic severity and adaptive function in a Taiwanese sample of 94 high-functioning children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) (mean full scale intelligent quotients FSIQ = 84.8). Parents and teachers both completed the Adaptive Behavior Assessment System-II and the Social Responsiveness…

Chang, Chen-Lin; Lung, For-Wey; Yen, Cheng-Fang; Yang, Pinchen

2013-01-01

261

Depression symptoms during pregnancy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  Pregnancy impacts common symptoms of major depressive disorder (MDD), such as energy, appetite, weight change, and sleep and\\u000a somatic complaints. However, it is not known whether the presentation of depression during pregnancy is different from that\\u000a at other times in women’s lives. This study compares the severity of symptoms of depression in 61 pregnant women with MDD\\u000a (PD), 50 nonpregnant

R. Manber; C. Blasey; J. J. B. Allen

2008-01-01

262

Relationship between the prefrontal function during a cognitive task and the severity of the symptoms in patients with panic disorder: A multi-channel NIRS study  

Microsoft Academic Search

To investigate whether prefrontal function during a cognitive task reflects the severity of panic disorder, the prefrontal function during a word fluency task in 109 panic disorder patients with or without agoraphobia was measured by multi-channel near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). [Oxy-Hb] changes in the left inferior prefrontal cortex were significantly associated with the frequency of panic attacks, and, in addition, [deoxy-Hb

Yukika Nishimura; Hisashi Tanii; Naomi Hara; Ken Inoue; Hisanobu Kaiya; Atsushi Nishida; Motohiro Okada; Yuji Okazaki

2009-01-01

263

A Lifetime Alcohol or Other Drug Use Disorder and Specific Psychiatric Symptoms Predict Sexual Risk for HIV Infection Among People With Severe Mental Illness  

Microsoft Academic Search

To clarify the relative contributions of psychiatric and alcohol or other drug (AOD) use disorders on sexual risk for HIV infection among people with severe mental illness, we interviewed 195 psychiatric patients. In the prior 6 months the 100 (51%) sexually active patients had a mean of 3.9 sex partners and 27.5 sex episodes; 49% had known high-risk sex partners;

Karen McKinnon; Francine Cournos; Richard Herman

2001-01-01

264

Rotavirus Symptoms  

MedlinePLUS

... Rotavirus Vaccine Program American Academy of Pediatrics Symptoms Language: English Español (Spanish) Share Compartir Español: SÃntomas Rotavirus ... PATH's Rotavirus Vaccine Program American Academy of Pediatrics Language: English Español (Spanish) File Formats Help: How do I ...

265

Syphilis Symptoms  

MedlinePLUS

... JavaScript on. Read more information on enabling JavaScript. Syphilis Skip Content Marketing Share this: Main Content Area ... occurs in four stages that sometimes overlap. Primary Syphilis The first symptom of primary syphilis is often ...

266

Toxic and Harmful Algal Blooms  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Primarily through the use of engaging graphics, this resource outlines where Toxic and Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) occur in U.S. waters. It also addresses the differences between toxic and non-toxic HABs, which organisms in the food web are affected, how specific toxins work and the symptoms associated with them, and the causative phytoplankton species.

Laboratory, Bigelow

267

CO sub 2 - toxicity in greenhouse tomato: Interaction with carbohydrate metabolism  

SciTech Connect

Greenhouse tomatoes grown with CO{sub 2}-enrichment at 1000 ul/l exhibit a non-epinastic foliar deformation (CO{sub 2}-toxicity). Symptoms include yellowing and purpling of the leaf blade accompanied by helical twisting and undercurling of the blade and midrib. Toxicity symptoms were more severe and yield response to CO{sub 2}-enrichment was reduced in the tomato cultivar Laura compared to Michigan-Ohio. There was no clear relationship between foliar starch concentration and toxicity severity between cultivars but CO{sub 2}-enriched plants had more foliar starch than non-enriched plants. Increased foliar soluble sugar concentrations do appear to be associated with increased toxicity severity and possibly decreased yield response to CO{sub 2}-enrichment.

Tripp, K.E.; Peet, M.M.; Pharr, D.M.; Willits, D.H. (North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh (USA))

1989-04-01

268

Some cases of severe normal tissue toxicity can be anticipated with ablated fractionated radiation with appropriate long-term follow-up.  

PubMed

As new technologies have allowed physicians to both better image and characterize malignant disease as well as deliver radiation dose with high precision and accuracy, there has been a resurgence in interest in hypofractionated or even single-fraction radiation therapy schemas. Late-reacting tissues have a low alpha/beta ratio (compared with early reacting tissues) and are therefore more sensitive to increments in fraction size. When we hypofractionate, we may lose some of the biological advantages associated with fractionation while we may simultaneously increase our risk of damaging late-responding normal tissues. The ideal 4 R's for tumor cells are exactly opposite those 4 R's ideally desired for normal tissues, and this represents the major dilemma to the practicing radiation oncologist. The long-term safety profile for modern hypofractionated radiation schemes will depend on the area and volume treated, the total dose delivered, and the level of baseline function observed before initiating radiation therapy. These issues are raised in the context of hypofractionation for central nervous system malignancies, lung cancers, pelvic malignancies, head and neck cancers, and breast cancers. If we are careful when choosing the site (and most importantly the volume), it is likely that hypofractionation may benefit our patients. However, history has taught us to be very careful when using hypofractionation to large volumes or when incorporating critical structures. With appropriate long-term follow-up, some cases of severe normal tissue toxicity can be anticipated. Hypofractionation should continue to be studied in randomized clinical trials, with a particular focus on careful follow-up. PMID:18725108

Dolinsky, Christopher; Glatstein, Eli

2008-10-01

269

Urethral toxicity after LDR brachytherapy: Experience in Japan.  

PubMed

Urinary toxicity is common after low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy, and the resolution of urinary toxicity is a concern. In particular, urinary frequency is the most common adverse event among the urinary toxicities. We have previously reported that approximately 70% of patients experience urinary frequency during the first 6 months after seed implantation. Most urinary adverse events were classified as Grade 1, and Grade 2 or higher adverse events were rare. The incidence of urinary retention was approximately 2-4%. A high International Prostate Symptom Score before seed implantation was an independent predictor of acute urinary toxicity of Grade 2 or higher. Several previous reports from the United States also supported this trend. In Japan, LDR brachytherapy was legally approved in 2003. A nationwide prospective cohort study entitled Japanese Prostate Cancer Outcome Study of Permanent Iodine-125 Seed Implantation was initiated in July 2005. It is an important issue to limit urinary toxicities in patients who undergo LDR brachytherapy. PMID:25455383

Tanaka, Nobumichi; Asakawa, Isao; Hasegawa, Masatoshi; Fujimoto, Kiyohide

2014-11-01

270

Menopausal symptoms  

PubMed Central

Introduction Menopause is a physiological event. In the UK, the median age for onset of menopausal symptoms is 45.5 to 47.5 years. Although endocrine changes are permanent, menopausal symptoms such as hot flushes, which are experienced by about 70% of women, usually resolve with time, although they can persist for decades in some women. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of medical treatments for menopausal symptoms? What are the effects of non-prescribed treatments for menopausal symptoms? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to March 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 68 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: agnus castus, antidepressants, black cohosh, clonidine, oestrogens, phyto-oestrogens, progestogens, testosterone, and tibolone. PMID:21718582

2010-01-01

271

Menopausal symptoms  

PubMed Central

Introduction Menopause is a physiological event. In the UK, the median age for onset of menopausal symptoms is 45.5 to 47.5 years. Although endocrine changes are permanent, menopausal symptoms such as hot flushes, which are experienced by about 70% of women, usually resolve with time, although they can persist for decades in some women. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of medical treatments for menopausal symptoms? What are the effects of non-prescribed treatments for menopausal symptoms? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to June 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 79 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: agnus castus, antidepressants, black cohosh, clonidine, oestrogens, phyto-oestrogens, progestogens, testosterone, and tibolone. PMID:21696644

2011-01-01

272

Efficacy and Safety of the Selective ?1A-Adrenoceptor Blocker Silodosin for Severe Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms Associated With Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia: A Prospective, Single-Open-Label, Multicenter Study in Korea  

PubMed Central

Purpose To evaluate the efficacy and safety of silodosin 8 mg once daily in a 12-week treatment of subjects with severe lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) associated with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Materials and Methods A total of 100 subjects from 10 urology centers in Korea were included in this study. The inclusion criteria were as follows: age ?50 years, International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) ?20, quality of life (QoL) score ?3, urine volume ?120 mL and maximal urinary flow rate (Qmax) <15 mL/s, and postvoid residual volume (PVR) <100 mL. We assessed the improvement of LUTS with change in IPSS, QoL score, Qmax, PVR, and adverse events at baseline and 4 and 12 weeks after treatment with silodosin 8 mg once daily. Results The IPSS values were 23.27±3.34, 15.89±6.26, and 13.80±6.31 at baseline, 4, and 12 weeks, respectively, with significant improvements (p<0.0001, p=0.0214, respectively). QoL scores were 4.44±0.85, 3.38±1.20, and 3.04±1.20 at baseline, 4, and 12 weeks, respectively, and the differences were statistically significant (p<0.0001). There was a significant difference in Qmax between baseline and 12 weeks (p<0.0001) but not in PVR (p=0.9404) during the clinical trial. The most frequent adverse event in this study was ejaculation failure with 13 cases. However, no subject dropped out because of ejaculation failure, and in 12 of the 13 cases it was fully resolved without further treatment. Conclusions Silodosin 8 mg once daily may be effective and safe in Korean patients with severe LUTS associated with BPH. PMID:24868338

Moon, Ki Hak; Song, Phil Hyun; Yang, Dae Yul; Park, Nam Cheol; Kim, Soo Woong; Lee, Sung Won; Kim, Sae Woong; Moon, Du Geon; Park, Jong Kwan; Ahn, Tai Young

2014-01-01

273

Evaluation of a gastrointestinal symptoms questionnaire.  

PubMed

Questionnaires are widely used instruments to monitor gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms. However, few of these questionnaires have been formally evaluated. We sought to evaluate our GI symptoms questionnaire in terms of clarity and reproducibility. Primary care patients referred for open access Helicobacter pylori urea breath testing reported GI symptoms (type+severity) and demographic information by written questionnaire. In an interview, patients gave a personal description of the meaning of the GI symptoms on the questionnaire. Patients' descriptions of GI symptoms were compared with current definitions. Symptom severity scores were compared before and after, interview versus questionnaire. Of the 45 patients included, 19 (42%) described all symptoms correctly, whereas 17 (38%) described one symptom incorrectly. None of the patients made more than three mistakes. Regurgitation was the most common incorrectly described symptom (16 patients [36%]), whereas the other individual symptoms were well explained. Symptom severities before the interview, after the interview and reported by questionnaire (mean value+/-SEM) were 2.1 +/- 0.2, 2.1 +/- 0.2, and 1.5 +/- 0.2 points on a 7-point Likert scale (0-6), respectively. Mean severity reported by interview (95% CI) was 1.4 (1.3-1.5) times higher than reported by questionnaire (P < .05). In conclusion, the GI symptom questionnaire is understandable and has good reproducibility for measuring the presence of GI symptoms, although symptom severity is consistently rated higher when reported by interview. PMID:16927133

Bovenschen, H J; Janssen, M J R; van Oijen, M G H; Laheij, R J F; van Rossum, L G M; Jansen, J B M J

2006-09-01

274

Indoor environmental exposures and symptoms.  

PubMed Central

The label "sick building syndrome" is often used to imply the absence of a physiologic basis for symptoms in the built environment. Although building-related illness is widely recognized but considered rare, several well-studied mechanisms may be responsible for many symptoms in buildings. These mechanisms do not explain why some individuals perceive disability. Until researchers distinguish physiologic mechanisms from other aspects of disease and study them systematically, poorly defined symptoms will remain poorly understood. The disability associated with such symptoms and syndromes, not the physiology, is the primary interest and generates controversy. PMID:12194903

Hodgson, Michael

2002-01-01

275

Effect of the Botanical Compound LCS101 on Chemotherapy-Induced Symptoms in Patients with Breast Cancer: A Case Series Report  

PubMed Central

The treatment of breast cancer invariably results in severe and often debilitating symptoms that can cause significant distress and severely impair daily function and quality-of-life (QOL). We treated a series of 20 female breast cancer patients with the botanical compound LCS101 as adjuvant to conventional chemotherapy. At the end of the treatment regimen, patients rated their symptoms. 70% reported that they had either no or mildly severe levels of fatigue; 60% none to mildly severe weakness; 85% none to mildly severe pain; 70% none to mildly severe nausea; and 80% none to mildly severe vomiting. Only 20% reported severe impairment of overall function, and only 40% severely impaired QOL. No toxic effects were attributed by patients to the LCS101 treatment, and 85% reported that they believed the botanical compound had helped reduce symptoms. The effects of LCS101 on clinical outcomes in breast cancer should be tested further using randomized controlled trials. PMID:23400272

Samuels, Noah; Maimon, Yair; Zisk-Rony, Rachel Y.

2013-01-01

276

Mechanisms of Phosphine Toxicity  

PubMed Central

Fumigation with phosphine gas is by far the most widely used treatment for the protection of stored grain against insect pests. The development of high-level resistance in insects now threatens its continued use. As there is no suitable chemical to replace phosphine, it is essential to understand the mechanisms of phosphine toxicity to increase the effectiveness of resistance management. Because phosphine is such a simple molecule (PH3), the chemistry of phosphorus is central to its toxicity. The elements above and below phosphorus in the periodic table are nitrogen (N) and arsenic (As), which also produce toxic hydrides, namely, NH3 and AsH3. The three hydrides cause related symptoms and similar changes to cellular and organismal physiology, including disruption of the sympathetic nervous system, suppressed energy metabolism and toxic changes to the redox state of the cell. We propose that these three effects are interdependent contributors to phosphine toxicity. PMID:21776261

Nath, Nisa S.; Bhattacharya, Ishita; Tuck, Andrew G.; Schlipalius, David I.; Ebert, Paul R.

2011-01-01

277

Predicting toxicity in aquatic ecosystems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ash leachates and other utility wastes that may enter lakes or streams contain mixtures of chemicals that include several kinds of toxicants. The toxic properties of these mixtures vary with the chemical form and concentration of their constituents. EPRI is developing a general toxicity model (GTM) to simulate environmental conditions in bodies of water where toxicants are present, and to

Porcella

1992-01-01

278

What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Carotid Artery Disease?  

MedlinePLUS

... What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Carotid Artery Disease? Carotid artery disease may not cause signs or symptoms until it severely narrows or blocks a carotid artery. Signs and symptoms may include a bruit (broo- ...

279

Mindfulness Is Associated with Fewer PTSD Symptoms, Depressive Symptoms, Physical Symptoms, and Alcohol Problems in Urban Firefighters  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: This study investigated the association between mindfulness, other resilience resources, and several measures of health in 124 urban firefighters. Method: Participants completed health measures of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, depressive symptoms, physical symptoms, and alcohol problems and measures of resilience…

Smith, Bruce W.; Ortiz, J. Alexis; Steffen, Laurie E.; Tooley, Erin M.; Wiggins, Kathryn T.; Yeater, Elizabeth A.; Montoya, John D.; Bernard, Michael L.

2011-01-01

280

Mindfulness Is Associated With Fewer PTSD Symptoms, Depressive Symptoms, Physical Symptoms, and Alcohol Problems in Urban Firefighters  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: This study investigated the association between mindfulness, other resilience resources, and several measures of health in 124 urban firefighters. Method: Participants completed health measures of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, depressive symptoms, physical symptoms, and alcohol problems and measures of resilience resources including mindfulness, optimism, personal mastery, and social support. The Mindful Awareness and Attention Scale (MAAS; Brown &

Bruce W. Smith; J. Alexis Ortiz; Laurie E. Steffen; Erin M. Tooley; Kathryn T. Wiggins; Elizabeth A. Yeater; John D. Montoya; Michael L. Bernard

2011-01-01

281

Acute and late gastrointestinal toxicity after radiotherapy in prostate cancer patients: Consequential late damage  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Late gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity after radiotherapy can be partly explained by late effects of acute toxicity (consequential late damage). We studied whether there is a direct relationship between acute and late GI toxicity. Patients and Methods: A total of 553 evaluable patients from the Dutch dose escalation trial (68 Gy vs. 78 Gy) were included. We defined three outcomes for acute reactions: 1) maximum Radiation Therapy Oncology Group acute toxicity, 2) maximum acute mucous discharge (AMD), and 3) maximum acute proctitis. Within a multivariable model, late endpoints (overall toxicity and five toxicity indicators) were studied as a function of acute toxicity, pretreatment symptoms, and relevant dose parameters. Results: At multivariable analysis, AMD and acute proctitis were strong predictors for overall toxicity, 'intermittent bleeding,' and 'incontinence pads' (p {<=} 0.01). For 'stools {>=}6/day' all three were strong predictors. No significant associations were found for 'severe bleeding' and 'use of steroids.' The predictive power of the dose parameters remained at the same level or became weaker for most late endpoints. Conclusions: Acute GI toxicity is an independent significant predictor of late GI toxicity. This suggests a significant consequential component in the development of late GI toxicity.

Heemsbergen, Wilma D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands)]. E-mail: w.heemsbergen@nki.nl; Peeters, Stephanie T.H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Koper, Peter [Department of Radiotherapy, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Department of Radiotherapy, Haga Hospital, Den Haag (Netherlands); Hoogeman, Mischa S. [Department of Radiotherapy, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Lebesque, Joos V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

2006-09-01

282

Assessing the Symptoms of Cancer Using Patient-Reported Outcomes (ASCPRO): searching for standards.  

PubMed

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) 2006 draft guidance on "Patient-Reported Outcome Measures: Use in Medical Product Development to Support Labeling Claims" has engendered wide discussion about patient-reported outcome (PRO) domains that should be endpoints in clinical trials. Reducing the severity and impact of symptoms is a natural intervention endpoint for cancer, a condition associated with considerable symptom burden. Because symptoms are best described by patients who have them, including PROs as measures of treatment effectiveness or the differences among treatments provides essential information about the efficacy and toxicity of a treatment and its effects on function. The FDA guidance provides a framework for addressing such issues as clinical significance, study design, and statistical methods as they relate to applications for labeling claims; however, no set of recommended approaches for assessing specific symptoms by patient report in clinical trials exists, other than for pain. Accordingly, an interdisciplinary workgroup, Assessing the Symptoms of Cancer using Patient-Reported Outcomes (ASCPRO), has been formed to generate evidence-based recommendations for the assessment of patient-reported cancer-related symptoms and the use of that information to facilitate clinical research and decision making. ASCPRO is among the first working groups to focus primarily on nonpain symptoms, including fatigue, sleep disturbance, appetite loss, depression, cognitive impairment, and shortness of breath. ASCPRO members are stakeholders in optimal symptom assessment, including patient advocates, academics, clinicians, those who pay for symptom control and monitor quality of care, and those who produce products that palliate cancer-related symptoms but that may also engender treatment-related symptoms. PMID:20538189

Cleeland, Charles S; Sloan, Jeff A

2010-06-01

283

Pulmonary toxicity following exposure to a tile coating product containing alkylsiloxanes. A clinical and toxicological evaluation  

PubMed Central

Context Coating products are widely used for making surfaces water and dirt repellent. However, on several occasions the use of these products has been associated with lung toxicity. Objective In the present study, we evaluated the toxic effects of an aerosolized tile-coating product. Methods Thirty-nine persons, who reported respiratory and systemic symptoms following exposure to the tile-coating product, were clinically examined. The product was analysed chemically and furthermore, the exposure scenario was reconstructed using a climate chamber and the toxicological properties of the product were studied using in vivo and by in vitro surfactometry. Results The symptoms developed within few hours and included coughing, tachypnoea, chest pain, general malaise and fever. The physical examination revealed perihilar lung infiltrates on chest radiograph and reduced blood oxygen saturation. The acute symptoms resolved gradually within 1–3 days and no delayed symptoms were observed. By means of mass spectrometry and X-ray spectroscopy, it was shown that the product contained non-fluorinated alkylsiloxanes. The exposure conditions in the supermarket were reconstructed under controlled conditions in a climate chamber and particle and gas exposure levels were monitored over time allowing estimation of human exposure levels. Mice exposed to the product developed symptoms of acute pulmonary toxicity in a concentration-and time-dependent manner. The symptoms of acute pulmonary toxicity likely resulted from inhibition of the pulmonary surfactant function as demonstrated by in vitro surfactometry. Among these patients only a partial association between the level of exposure and the degree of respiratory symptoms was observed, which could be because of a high inter-individual difference in sensitivity and time-dependent changes in the chemical composition of the aerosol. Conclusion Workers need to cautiously apply surface coating products because the contents can be highly toxic through inhalation, and the aerosols can disperse to locations remote from the worksite and affect bystanders. PMID:24815546

Nørgaard, A. W.; Hansen, J. S.; Sørli, J. B.; Jacobsen, P.; Lynggard, F.; Levin, M.; Nielsen, G. D.; Wolkoff, P.; Ebbehøj, N. E.; Larsen, S. T.

2014-01-01

284

Symptoms of Pneumocystis pneumonia  

MedlinePLUS

... gov . Fungal Diseases Share Compartir Symptoms of Pneumocystis pneumonia The symptoms of PCP are fever, dry cough, ... Diagnosis & Testing Treatment & Outcomes Statistics Additional Information Pneumocystis pneumonia Definition Symptoms People at Risk & Prevention Sources Diagnosis & ...

285

The Impact of Depressive Symptoms in Adults with ADHD Symptoms on Family Function and ADHD Symptoms of Their Children  

PubMed Central

Objective People with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) exhibit considerable impairment in social, academic, or occupational functioning. The present study aimed to examine the patterns of associations between ADHD symptoms, depression, and family functioning. Methods The sample consisted of 1,022 adults randomly selected from a district in Seoul, South Korea. Several self-assessment scales were utilized to rate ADHD symptoms (both past and current), current symptoms of depression, and level of family functioning. ADHD symptoms in the children of these participants were also assessed. Pearson's correlation and multiple linear regression analyses were performed; structural equation modeling (SEM) was conducted to determine the best fitting model. Results Adult ADHD symptoms were positively associated with depressive symptoms. Depressive symptoms, in turn, mediated the relationship between adult ADHD symptoms and cohesion among family members. In addition, depressive symptoms mediated the relationship between adult ADHD symptoms and their children's ADHD symptoms. Conclusion The relationship between adult ADHD symptoms and family dysfunction may be influenced by depressive symptoms. When treating ADHD in adults, clinicians should pay attention to the presence or absence of depression. PMID:24843366

Hong, Soon-Beom; Lee, Jong-Ha; Chun, Duk Hee; Shin, Min-Sup; Yoo, Hee-Jeong; Kim, Boong-Nyun; Cho, Soo-Churl

2014-01-01

286

Symptoms of Parkinson's  

MedlinePLUS

... Secondary Motor Symptoms Nonmotor Symptoms Causes Progression Medications & Treatments Clinical Trials Statistics on Parkinson's Chasing the Cure National HelpLine Educational Publications Online ...

287

Free phenytoin toxicity.  

PubMed

Phenytoin has a narrow therapeutic window, and when managing cases of toxicity, clinicians are very wary of this fact. Typically, if patient presents with symptoms suggestive of phenytoin toxicity, total serum phenytoin is promptly ordered. That could be falsely low especially in elderly or critically ill patients, which may lead to a low albumin level resulting in this discrepancy. The free phenytoin can be best estimated using the Sheiner-Tozer equation. Herein, we describe a case of an elderly male patient who presented with drowsiness, gait changes, and elevated liver enzymes and a normal total serum phenytoin level of 18 ng/dL (normal, 10-20 ng/dL).After taking his albumin level into account, his free phenytoin level was calculated to be 27 ng/dL, and the phenytoin was discontinued leading to resolution of his symptoms as well as a return of his liver function panel values to baseline. PMID:24768668

Imam, Syed Haider; Landry, Kristen; Kaul, Viren; Gambhir, Harvir; John, Dinesh; Kloss, Brian

2014-10-01

288

Effectiveness of high trough levels of cyclosporine for 5 months in a case of steroid-dependent nephrotic syndrome with severe steroid toxicity.  

PubMed

Glucocorticoid treatment for steroid-dependent nephrotic syndrome (NS) is associated with severe adverse effects, such as bone fractures and epidural lipomatosis. Furthermore, a high trough level of cyclosporine (CsA) over an extended period of time is known to induce CsA nephropathy. We present a girl with steroid-dependent NS and steroid-induced vertebral compression fractures and epidural lipomatosis who was treated with a high-dose of prednisolone after experiencing several relapses. A high CsA trough level (between 147 and 225 ng/mL) over a period of only 5 months was effective in improving the vertebral compression fractures, alleviating the epidural lipomatosis by enabling the discontinuation of prednisolone treatment. Thus, high trough levels of CsA over a short period of time may enable prednisolone to be discontinued in cases of steroid-dependent NS without causing any clinical, histological, serum and/or urinary CsA-related adverse effects. PMID:15663646

Kano, Kenichi; Yamada, Yumi; Shiraiwa, Taeko; Shimizu, Aki; Nishikura, Kiyoshi; Arisaka, Osamu; Tomita, Shigeki; Ueda, Yoshihiko

2004-12-01

289

Psychologic sequelae of chronic toxic waste exposure  

SciTech Connect

Exposure to toxic industrial substances has been a topic of increasing concern to environmentalists, government agencies, industrial engineers, and medical specialists. Our study focuses on the psychologic symptom responses of a community to perceived long-term exposure to toxic waste products. We compared their symptom clusters, as shown by their responses to questions on the Hopkins Symptom Checklist-90 Item (SCL-90) and the Social Adjustment Scale (SAS), with symptom levels of normal and depressed subjects. Issues of media coverage, litigation, and potential for compensation complicate the psychiatric epidemiology of the subject.

Foulks, E.; McLellen, T. (Department of Psychiatry and Neurology, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA (United States))

1992-02-01

290

Gastrointestinal Symptoms in Morbid Obesity  

PubMed Central

Background: Several reports have shown an increased prevalence of gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms in obese subjects in community-based studies. To better understand the role of the GI tract in obesity, and because there are limited clinic-based studies, we documented the prevalence of upper and lower GI symptoms in morbidly obese individuals in a clinic setting. Objective: The aim of our study was to compare the prevalence of GI symptoms in morbidly obese individuals in a weight management clinic with non-obese individuals with similar comorbidities as morbidly obese individuals in an Internal Medicine clinic. Methods: Class II and III obese patients BMI >35?kg/m2 (N?=?114) and 182 non-obese patients (BMI <25?kg/m2) completed the GI symptoms survey between August 2011 and April 2012 were included in this study. The survey included 24 items pertaining to upper and lower GI symptoms. The participants rated the frequency of symptoms as absent (never, rarely) or present (occasionally, frequently). The symptoms were clustered into five categories: oral symptoms, dysphagia, gastroesophageal reflux, abdominal pain, and bowel habits. Responses to each symptom cluster were compared between obese group and normal weight groups using logistic regression. Results: Of the 24 items, 18 had a higher frequency in the obese group (p?symptoms: any oral symptom (OR?=?2.3, p?=?0.0013), dysphagia (OR 2.9, p?=?0.0006), and any gastroesophageal reflux (OR 3.8, p?symptoms: any abdominal pain (OR?=?1.7, p?=?0.042) and altered bowel habits (OR?=?2.8, p?symptoms in morbidly obese patients when compared to non-obese subjects. PMID:25593922

Huseini, Mustafa; Wood, G. Craig; Seiler, Jamie; Argyropoulos, George; Irving, Brian A.; Gerhard, Glenn S.; Benotti, Peter; Still, Christopher; Rolston, David D. K.

2014-01-01

291

What are the symptoms of flu? Symptoms include sudden onset of  

E-print Network

What are the symptoms of flu? · Symptoms include sudden onset of: o fever/chills o cough o muscle a doctor? Most people recover without needing to see a doctor; the flu usually lasts 7 ­ 10 days and goes · Disorientation or confusion · Pain or pressure in chest · Severe or persistent vomiting · Flu-like symptoms

Ellis, Randy

292

Symptom burden in individuals with cerebral palsy.  

PubMed

The current study sought to (1) determine the relative frequency and severity of eight symptoms in adults with cerebral palsy (CP), (2) examine the perceived course of these eight symptoms over time, and (3) determine the associations between the severity of these symptoms and psychosocial functioning. Eighty-three adults with CP completed a measure assessing the frequency, severity, and perceived course of eight symptoms (pain, weakness, fatigue, imbalance, numbness, memory loss, vision loss, and shortness of breath). Respondents also completed measures of community integration and psychological functioning. The results indicated that pain, fatigue, imbalance, and weakness were the most common and severe symptoms reported. All symptoms were reported to have either stayed the same or worsened, rather than resolved, over time. The symptoms were more closely related to social integration than to home integration, productive activity, or psychological functioning. Memory loss was a unique predictor of social integration in the multivariate context. This study highlighted several common and problematic symptoms experienced by adults with CP. Additional research is needed to identify the most effective treatments for those symptoms that affect community integration and psychological functioning as a way to improve the quality of life of individuals with CP. PMID:21174251

Hirsh, Adam T; Gallegos, Juan C; Gertz, Kevin J; Engel, Joyce M; Jensen, Mark P

2010-01-01

293

Texas A&M University System Extension: Toxic Plant Database  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Toxic Plant Database was developed by a team of Professors working through Texas Cooperative Extension, a division of the Texas A&M University System. Although the database focuses on toxic plants in Texas, many of the plants are found in other states as well as Mexico. This is a well-organized website containing pictures, maps, plant descriptions, information on the toxic agent, symptoms of poisoning, habitat, distribution, and "Integrated Toxic Plant Management for each toxic plant." Site users may search this extensive listing of Toxic Plants by the following categories: Common or Scientific Name, Region, Symptom, Livestock, or Plant Images. This site also links to a glossary of relevant terms.

294

Prevalene of perimenstrual symptoms.  

PubMed Central

The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of perimenstrual symptoms (PMS) in a free-living population of US women and to determine if prevalence estimates varied with parity, contraceptive status, characteristics of the menstrual cycle, and selected demographic variables. We identified all households from a census listing for five southeastern city neighborhoods that offered variation in racial composition and socioeconomic status. We ascertained all households in which there was one nonpregnant woman between the ages of 18 and 35 years per household. Of the 241 eligible women, 179 (74 per cent) participated in the study. Trained interviewers administered the Moos Menstrual Distress Questionnaire (MDQ) and other demographic measures to women between March and July 1979. Symptoms with a prevalence greater than 30 per cent included weight gain, headache, skin disorders, cramps, anxiety, backache, fatigue, painful breasts, irritability, mood swings, depression, or tension. Only 2 to 8 per cent of women found most of these severe or disabling. The exceptions were severe cramps reported by 17 per cent of women and severe premenstrual and menstrual irritability by 12 per cent. Cramps, backaches, fatigue, and tension were most prevalent during the menstruum; weight gain, skin disorders, painful breasts, swelling, irritability, mood swings, and depression were more prevalent in the premenstruum. Parity, oral contraceptive use, age, employment, education, and income were negatively associated with selected PMS. Use of an IUD, having long menstrual cycles, long menstrual flow, or heavy menstrual flow, and being able to predict the next period were positively associated with selected PMS. Race had both positive and negative effects on PMS. PMID:6889817

Woods, N F; Most, A; Dery, G K

1982-01-01

295

Psychiatric symptoms in vertiginous patients.  

PubMed

Backgrounds: Psychiatric comorbidity is common in vertiginous patients. The risk of psychiatric disorder is increased in patients with previous mental problems, but earlier mentally healthy may develop symptoms as well. Especially in chronic phase of vertigo, psychological factors have a significant role in the morbidity. Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of psychiatric problems in vertiginous patients in a community sample. Methods: A prospective evaluation of psychiatric symptoms based on self-rating scales [Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Zung Anxiety Scale (SAS), DSM-IV and ICD-10 Personality Questionnaire (DIP-Q)] in a community sample of 100 vertiginous subjects in the Academic Tertiary Otolaryngology Department at the Helsinki University Hospital, Finland. Results: The prevalence of any psychiatric problem was 68% (68 patients); 19% had depressiveness and 12% symptoms of anxiety. Altogether 63 (63%) patients met the criteria of personality disorder. The most prevalent personality disorder was obsessive-compulsive (46 patients). Personality disorder alone seems not to affect functional capacity and is of importance only when comorbid with symptoms of anxiety and depression. The prevalence of psychiatric symptoms did not correlate with severity of vertigo symptoms or other co-occurring diseases. Conclusions: The prevalence of any psychiatric symptoms was high among vertiginous patients. In the chronic phase of vertigo, it seems that vertigo symptoms themselves do not influence on subjective feelings of debilitation. Psychiatric disorders worsen the clinical picture of vertigo along a more debilitating and disabling course. Psychiatric differential diagnoses should accompany the neuro-otology diagnostic procedure in patients with a chronic state of vertigo and greater disability. PMID:25394373

Ketola, Sirpa; Havia, Mari; Appelberg, Björn; Kentala, Erna

2014-11-14

296

Autonomic nervous symptoms in primary Sjogren's; syndrome  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives. Objective signs of autonomic dysfunction (AD) have been reported in patients with primary SS (pSS) while the presence of associated symptoms has not been systematically studied. Therefore, the aims of this study were (i) to assess the presence and severity of various AD symptoms in pSS patients and (ii) to relate AD symptoms to other clinical features of pSS.

T. Mandl; V. Granberg; J. Apelqvist; P. Wollmer; R. Manthorpe; L. T. H. Jacobsson

2008-01-01

297

Posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms in trauma-exposed college students: The role  

E-print Network

and maintenance of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms. The present study utilized regression analysis to examine the unique relationships between various trauma-related cognitions and PTSD symptoms after to PTSD symptom severity. Gender and anxiety symptoms were also related to PTSD symptom severity

Liu, Taosheng

298

Vitiligo: Signs and Symptoms  

MedlinePLUS

... Diseases and treatments U - W Vitiligo Signs, symptoms Vitiligo: Signs and symptoms Vitiligo causes loss of color. ... amount of color loss or type of vitiligo. Vitiligo has types and subtypes If you are diagnosed ...

299

Shingles: Signs and Symptoms  

MedlinePLUS

... Diseases and treatments Q - T Shingles Signs, symptoms Shingles: Signs and symptoms Shingles tends to cause more ... painful before the shingles appeared. Learn more about shingles: Shingles Shingles: Who gets, causes Shingles: Diagnosis, treatment, ...

300

E. coli Symptoms  

MedlinePLUS

... JavaScript on. Read more information on enabling JavaScript. E. coli Skip Content Marketing Share this: Main Content Area Symptoms Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) can cause the following symptoms: Nausea ...

301

Symptoms of Ovarian Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... Informed Cancer Home What Are the Symptoms of Ovarian Cancer? Language: English Español (Spanish) Share Compartir Gynecologic cancer symptoms diaries Ovarian cancer may cause one or more of these ...

302

Rosacea: Signs and Symptoms  

MedlinePLUS

... Diseases and treatments Q - T Rosacea Signs, symptoms Rosacea: Signs and symptoms Rosacea causes more than a ... ophthalmologist (doctor who specializes in treating eye diseases). Rosacea can affect quality of life Rosacea can affect ...

303

Prostate Cancer Symptoms  

MedlinePLUS

... About the Prostate Risk Factors Prevention Symptoms Early Detection & Screening Living With Prostate Cancer Newly Diagnosed Treatment ... About the Prostate Risk Factors Prevention Symptoms Early Detection & Screening Living With Prostate Cancer Newly Diagnosed Treatment ...

304

Treating the Treatment: Toxicity of Cancer Chemotherapy  

PubMed Central

Many cancer chemotherapeutic agents can produce toxicity, even at the usual therapeutic doses. Family physicians are often called upon to treat symptoms of these toxicities and to advise patients about them. This brief discussion may help family physicians to anticipate some of the problems, to avoid some, and to manage others more effectively. PMID:21234006

Plenderleith, Ian H.

1990-01-01

305

Copper toxicity in woody ornamentals  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rhododenderon obtusum Planch. Delaware Valley (Delaware Valley Azalea), Buxus sempervirens L. (common boxwood) and Cotoneaster divaricata Redh. and Wils. (spreading cotoneaster) grown in sand culture received a complete nutrient solution containing Cu concns ranging from 0.032 ppm to 100 ppm. Development of Cu toxicity symptoms were recorded for 8 weeks, then Cu, Fe, and Mn levels in roots, stems, and

L. J. Kuhns; T. D. Sydnor

1976-01-01

306

COPPER TOXICITY IN WOODY ORNAMENTALS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rhododendron obtusum Planch. 'Delaware Valley' (Delaware Valley Azalea), Buxus sempervirens L. (common boxwood) and Cotoneaster divaricata Rehd. and Wils. (spreading cotoneaster) grown in sand culture received a complete nutrient solution containing Cu concns ranging from 0.032 ppm to 100 ppm. Development of Cu toxicity symptoms were recorded for 8 weeks, then Cu, Fe, and Mn levels in roots, stems, and

Larry J. Kuhns; T. Davis Sydnor

2001-01-01

307

Autism Symptom Topography and Maternal Socioemotional Functioning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Researchers examining the relationship of autism "symptomatology" and maternal stress have defined symptomatology in terms of level of severity, frequency of occurrence, or symptom type. In the present study, the relationship of maternal perceptions of these dimensions, along with a fourth, symptom diversity, and negative and positive indices of…

Ekas, Naomi; Whitman, Thomas L.

2010-01-01

308

Psychotic symptoms in Parkinson’s disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Psychotic symptoms are common in Parkinson’s disease (PD) and occur in at least 20% of medication-treated patients. Benign visual hallucinations usually appear earlier, while malignant hallucinations, confusional states, delusions, paranoid beliefs, agitation, and delirium become more frequent with disease progression. Virtually all antiparkinsonian drugs may produce psychotic symptoms. Cognitive impairment, increased age, disease duration and severity, depression, and sleep disorders

Spiridon Papapetropoulos; D. C. Mash

2005-01-01

309

Role of oxidative stress in Deoxynivalenol induced toxicity.  

PubMed

Deoxynivalenol (DON) is a Fusarium toxin that causes a variety of toxic effects with symptoms such as diarrhoea and low weight gain. To date, no review has addressed the toxicity of DON in relation to oxidative stress. The focus of this article is primarily intended to summarize the information associated with oxidative stress as a plausible mechanism for DON-induced toxicity. The present review shows that over the past two decades, several investigators have documented the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) in oxidative stress as a result of DON treatment and have correlated them with various types of toxicity. The evidence for induction of an oxidative stress response resulting from DON exposure has been more focused on in vitro models and is relatively lacking in in vivo studies. Hence, more emphasis should be laid on in vivo investigations with doses that are commonly encountered in food products. Since DON is commonly found in food and feed, the cellular effects of this toxin in relation to oxidative stress, as well as effective measures to combat its toxicity, are important aspects to be considered for future studies. PMID:25010452

Mishra, Sakshi; Dwivedi, Premendra D; Pandey, Haushila P; Das, Mukul

2014-10-01

310

Traumatic War Stressors and Psychiatric Symptoms Among World War II, Korean, and Vietnam War Veterans  

Microsoft Academic Search

Three hypotheses regarding symptoms of war-related posttraumatic stress disorder and general psychiatric distress were tested: that symptoms are more severe the more severe the traumatic exposure, regardless of the war in question; that symptoms are less severe the older the veterans’ age; and that symptom levels differ across sociocultural cohorts. A total of 5,138 war zone veterans who were seeking

Alan Fontana; Robert Rosenheck

1994-01-01

311

What is called symptom?  

PubMed

There is one concept in medicine which is prominent, the symptom. The omnipresence of the symptom seems, however, not to be reflected by an equally prominent curiosity aimed at investigating this concept as a phenomenon. In classic, traditional or conventional medical diagnostics and treatment, the lack of distinction with respect to the symptom represents a minor problem. Faced with enigmatic conditions and their accompanying labels such as chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia, medically unexplained symptoms, and functional somatic syndromes, the contestation of the symptom and its origin is immediate and obvious and calls for further exploration. Based on a description of the diagnostic framework encompassing medically unexplained conditions and a brief introduction to how such symptoms are managed both within and outside of the medical clinic, we argue on one hand how unexplained conditions invite us to reconsider and re-think the concept we call a "symptom" and on the other hand how the concept "symptom" is no longer an adequate and necessary fulcrum and must be enriched by socio-cultural, phenomenological and existential dimensions. Consequently, our main aim is to expand both our interpretative horizon and the linguistic repertoire in the face of those appearances we label medically unexplained symptoms. PMID:23877313

Eriksen, Thor Eirik; Risør, Mette Bech

2014-02-01

312

Frontotemporal Disorders: Common Symptoms  

MedlinePLUS

... Information for Patients, Families, and Professionals Understanding Alzheimer's Disease: What You Need to ... Symptoms Treatment and Management Caring for a Person with a Frontotemporal Disorder Conclusion ...

313

Symptoms and Signs Associated with Postpartum Thyroiditis  

PubMed Central

Background. Postpartum thyroiditis (PPT) is a common triphasic autoimmune disease in women with thyroid peroxidase (TPO) autoantibodies. This study evaluated women's thyroid disease symptoms, physical findings, stress levels, and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) levels across six postpartum months in three groups, TPO negative, TPO positive, and PPT positive women. Methods. Women were recruited in midpregnancy (n = 631) and TPO status was determined which then was used to form the three postpartum groups. The three groups were compared on TSH levels, thyroid symptoms, weight, blood pressure, heart rate, a thyroid exam, and stress scores. Results. Fifty-six percent of the TPO positive women developed PPT. Hypothyroid group (F (2, 742) = 5.8, P = .003) and hyperthyroid group (F (2, 747) = 6.6, P = .001) subscale scores differed by group. Several symptoms and stress scores were highest in the PPT group. Conclusions. The normal postpartum is associated with many symptoms that mimic thyroid disease symptoms, but severity is greater in women with either TPO or PPT positivity. While the most severe symptoms were generally seen in PPT positive women, even TPO positive women seem to have higher risk for these signs and symptoms. PMID:25405057

2014-01-01

314

Rheumatic symptoms in autoimmune thyroiditis.  

PubMed

Autoimmune thyroiditis (ATD) is generally regarded as a classic example of single organ autoimmunity with a high association with endocrine thyroid disorders. However, it is closely associated with several autoimmune diseases including rheumatologic syndromes and has long been known to have several rheumatic manifestations particularly in association with hypothyroidism. More recently, it has also been implicated in rheumatologic syndromes in the absence of hypothyroidism or subclinical hypothyroidism. There is also an emerging body of evidence that ATD is highly linked to chronic generalized pain syndromes including fibromyalgia. This review examines the rheumatic symptoms of ATD described in the current literature and discusses the clinical relevance of ATD in general rheumatology. PMID:25618571

Tagoe, Clement E

2015-02-01

315

Toxic Newts  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The father and son team of Brodie and Brodie track down the predator able to stomach a mysteriously hyper-toxic newt, an example of an evolutionary arms race in action. From Evolution: Evolutionary Arms Race.

WGBH Educational Foundation

2003-09-26

316

Physical symptoms of depression.  

PubMed

The incidence of physical symptoms in depression was studied in 51 drug-free patients and in an age and sex-matched control group. Mean symptom intensity and number of symptoms were significantly higher in the patient than in the control group. The subjects' personality structure and relationships between their symptoms and degrees of depression and anxiety were examined using the Eysenck Personality Inventory (EPI), the Beck Depression Inventory, and the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, respectively. Of the variables studied, only the N score of the EPI was shown to influence the symptoms significantly. The effect of such non-specific factors as age, gender, use of alcohol, coffee, tea, and cigarettes was also evaluated and found to be minimal. PMID:7326538

Mathew, R J; Weinman, M L; Mirabi, M

1981-10-01

317

Defining and measuring negative symptoms of schizophrenia in clinical trials.  

PubMed

Recent attention has focused on negative symptoms as a target for new therapeutic approaches including pharmacological agents, medical devices, and psychosocial treatments. Each of these approaches requires an instrument for measuring the severity of negative symptoms as well as changes in severity over time. The instrument selected should provide coverage for the domains of negative symptoms; it should be sensitive to change; it should be reliable and relatively brief; and it should be useful for large international trials. These criteria were used to evaluate a number of older instruments including the Schedule for the Assessment of Negative Symptoms (SANS), the Positive and Negative Symptoms Scale (PANSS), and the Negative Symptom Assessment Scale (NSA). Two newer scales, the Brief Negative Symptom Scale (BNSS) and the Clinical Assessment Interview for Negative Symptoms (CAINS) were developed following a National Institute of Mental Health consensus meeting and addressed some of the shortcomings of earlier instruments. PMID:24275698

Marder, Stephen R; Kirkpatrick, Brian

2014-05-01

318

The relationships between posttraumatic stress disorder severity, depression severity and physical health.  

PubMed

This study examines the relationship among posttraumatic stress disorder severity, depression severity, and subjective and objective physical health in a sample of 200 adults with posttraumatic stress disorder. Posttraumatic stress disorder severity was correlated with subjective, but not objective, health. Similarly, depression symptoms had an indirect effect on the relationship between posttraumatic stress disorder symptom severity and three measures of subjective physical health. Finally, depression symptoms had an indirect effect on the relationship between both reexperiencing and hyperarousal symptoms and subjective physical health. This research underscores the important role that posttraumatic stress disorder, particularly reexperiencing and hyperarousal symptoms, and depression may have on perceptions of physical health. PMID:23449677

Rytwinski, Nina K; Avena, Jennifer S; Echiverri-Cohen, Aileen M; Zoellner, Lori A; Feeny, Norah C

2014-04-01

319

Detection of sub-clinical lead toxicity in monocasters  

SciTech Connect

Lead poisoning has been documented since antiquity but occupational lead intoxication still continues to occur. Now there is a growing consensus that low levels of lead exposure often do not result in the manifestation of toxic symptoms, but may have subclinical toxicity on haemopoitic and renal system. Such toxicities are reported even at blood lead concentrations which were thought to be safe (60-80 {mu}g/dl) a decade ago. One of the several effects of lead, is inhibition of erythrocyte delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (d-ALAD), rate limiting enzyme of the heme synthesis. Similar effect on d-ALAD has been reported even at the blood lead concentrations of 20-30 {mu}g/dl which are much below the toxic limits of 60 {mu}g/dl. Occupational lead nephropathy has been reported from several countries. Ultrastructural alteration in renal tubules, due to chronic exposure of lead, are seen in both animals and human renal biopsy samples. However, detecting early renal damage is a difficult task, since the routine renal function tests like creatine clearance, Insulin clearance (GFR) etc. are altered only after severe kidney damage. Recently increased urinary excretion of lysomal enzyme N-acetyl-B-D-glucosaminidase, a marker of early nephrotoxicity has been reported in the workers exposed to various chemicals including lead. The present study has therefore been undertaken to evaluate the subclinical lead toxicity on haemopoetic and renal system using non invassive techniques in monocasters, who are occupationally exposed to lead fumes while preparing the type set letter blocks. 23 refs., 3 figs.

Kumar, B.D.; Krishnaswamy, K. [Food and Drug Toxicology Research Centre National Institute of Nutrition, Jamai Osmania (India)

1995-06-01

320

Comparison of the toxicity of aqueous and ethanol fractions of Angelica keiskei leaf using the eye irritancy test.  

PubMed

To determine whether aqueous and ethanol fractions of the Angelica keiskei leaf exert toxicity when used for cosmetic purposes, we performed the acute eye irritancy test. Animals were treated with sample fractions (100 mg/dose) according to standard procedure guidelines. No significant changes or damage was detected in the fraction-treated groups in terms of ocular lesions in the cornea, the size of the cornea with turbidity, swelling of the eyelid and emission discharge. However, sodium dioctyl sulfosuccinate, a positive control, induced severe toxic symptoms. Thus, aqueous and ethanol fractions of Angelica keiskei do not appear to induce acute toxicity in the eye lens, as assessed from anatomical and pathological observations in the rabbit eye. Our results collectively suggest that aqueous and ethanol fractions show promise as cosmetic ingredients that do not cause eye toxicity. PMID:23226733

Son, Hyeong-U; Yoon, Eun-Kyung; Cha, Yong-Soo; Kim, Min-A; Shin, Yong-Kyu; Kim, Jong-Myung; Choi, Yong-Hee; Lee, Sang-Han

2012-11-01

321

Comparison of the toxicity of aqueous and ethanol fractions of Angelica keiskei leaf using the eye irritancy test  

PubMed Central

To determine whether aqueous and ethanol fractions of the Angelica keiskei leaf exert toxicity when used for cosmetic purposes, we performed the acute eye irritancy test. Animals were treated with sample fractions (100 mg/dose) according to standard procedure guidelines. No significant changes or damage was detected in the fraction-treated groups in terms of ocular lesions in the cornea, the size of the cornea with turbidity, swelling of the eyelid and emission discharge. However, sodium dioctyl sulfosuccinate, a positive control, induced severe toxic symptoms. Thus, aqueous and ethanol fractions of Angelica keiskei do not appear to induce acute toxicity in the eye lens, as assessed from anatomical and pathological observations in the rabbit eye. Our results collectively suggest that aqueous and ethanol fractions show promise as cosmetic ingredients that do not cause eye toxicity. PMID:23226733

SON, HYEONG-U; YOON, EUN-KYUNG; CHA, YONG-SOO; KIM, MIN-A; SHIN, YONG-KYU; KIM, JONG-MYUNG; CHOI, YONG-HEE; LEE, SANG-HAN

2012-01-01

322

Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms in Alzheimer's Disease  

PubMed Central

Neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) such as depression, apathy, aggression, and psychosis are now recognized as core features of Alzheimer's disease (AD), and there is a general consensus that greater symptom severity is predictive of faster cognitive decline, loss of independence, and even shorter survival. Whether these symptoms result from the same pathogenic processes responsible for cognitive decline or have unique etiologies independent of AD-associated neurodegeneration is unclear. Many structural and metabolic features of the AD brain are associated with individual neuropsychiatric symptoms or symptom clusters. In addition, many genes have been identified and confirmed that are associated with symptom risk in a few cases. However, there are no single genes strongly predictive of individual neuropsychiatric syndromes, while functional and structural brain changes unique to specific symptoms may reflect variability in progression of the same pathological processes. Unfortunately, treatment success for these psychiatric symptoms may be lower when comorbid with AD, underscoring the importance of future research on their pathobiology and treatment. This review summarizes some of the most salient aspects of NPS pathogenesis. PMID:25133184

Li, Xiao-Ling; Tan, Meng-Shan

2014-01-01

323

Sensory symptoms in autism spectrum disorders.  

PubMed

The aim of this review is to summarize the recent literature regarding abnormalities in sensory functioning in individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), including evidence regarding the neurobiological basis of these symptoms, their clinical correlates, and their treatment. Abnormalities in responses to sensory stimuli are highly prevalent in individuals with ASD. The underlying neurobiology of these symptoms is unclear, but several theories have been proposed linking possible etiologies of sensory dysfunction with known abnormalities in brain structure and function that are associated with ASD. In addition to the distress that sensory symptoms can cause patients and caregivers, these phenomena have been correlated with several other problematic symptoms and behaviors associated with ASD, including restrictive and repetitive behavior, self-injurious behavior, anxiety, inattention, and gastrointestinal complaints. It is unclear whether these correlations are causative in nature or whether they are due to shared underlying pathophysiology. The best-known treatments for sensory symptoms in ASD involve a program of occupational therapy that is specifically tailored to the needs of the individual and that may include sensory integration therapy, a sensory diet, and environmental modifications. While some empirical evidence supports these treatments, more research is needed to evaluate their efficacy, and other means of alleviating these symptoms, including possible psychopharmacological interventions, need to be explored. Additional research into the sensory symptoms associated with ASD has the potential to shed more light on the nature and pathophysiology of these disorders and to open new avenues of effective treatments. PMID:24614766

Hazen, Eric P; Stornelli, Jennifer L; O'Rourke, Julia A; Koesterer, Karmen; McDougle, Christopher J

2014-01-01

324

Delayed Bedtimes and Obsessive Compulsive Symptoms  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is increasing recognition of an important interplay between psychiatric disorders and sleep. Clinical observations and several empirical studies have shown that later bedtimes are associated with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). The current study examined the relationship of delayed bedtimes and symptoms of OCD. Two-hundred and sixty-six undergraduates completed a battery of questionnaires assessing sleep patterns, mood, and OC symptoms. Results

Meredith E. Coles; Jessica R. Schubert; Katherine M. Sharkey

2012-01-01

325

Psychiatric Symptoms in Alpha-Mannosidosis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Alpha-mannosidosis is characterized by mild to moderate intellectual disability (ID), moderate to severe neurosensory hearing loss, frequent infections, psychomotor disturbances and skeletal dysmorphism. For the first time, a panel of nine alpha-mannosidosis patients with psychiatric symptoms is presented. The clinical picture has several

Malm, D.; Pantel, J.; Linaker, O. M.

2005-01-01

326

Experience of symptoms indicative of gynaecological cancers in UK women  

PubMed Central

Background: Gynaecological cancers account for ?12% of female cancer incidence in the United Kingdom. Encouraging prompt help-seeking for potential symptoms could help improve outcomes. However, before developing help-seeking interventions, it is important to estimate the number of women with symptoms potentially indicative of a gynaecological cancer to help estimate the impact of such interventions on primary care. Methods: As part of a face-to-face, population-based survey, women aged ?16 (n=911) were shown a list of symptoms potentially indicative of a gynaecological cancer and were asked to indicate any experienced in the last 3 months. Those who reported symptoms were asked about their responses to one randomly selected index symptom. Results: Just under half (44%) of the respondents reported a symptom, with 35% reporting a frequent and/or severe symptom. Younger (P<0.001), lower socioeconomic status (P<0.01) and non-White women (P<0.05) were significantly more likely to report symptoms. Few (14%) respondents were both older (?45 years) and had a frequent and/or severe symptom. Of these women, 38% had seen a GP. Conclusion: Symptoms that potentially indicate a gynaecological cancer, even if limited to those that are frequent and/or severe, appear to be common. Consequently, encouraging prompt help-seeking may increase the burden on primary care. However, targeting those at increased risk (older women with frequent or severe symptoms) should avoid unmanageable increases in primary care consultations for gynaecological conditions. PMID:23880819

Low, E L; Simon, A E; Waller, J; Wardle, J; Menon, U

2013-01-01

327

Module 3 – Symptoms  

Cancer.gov

Module three of the EPEC-O (Education in Palliative and End-of-Life Care for Oncology) Self-Study Original Version presents approaches to and management of commonly encountered symptoms and syndromes of cancer patients.

328

Symptoms, Diagnosis & Treatment  

MedlinePLUS

... type "leukemia" or "lymphoma" in the search box) Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma Symptoms Swollen, painless lymph nodes in the neck, ... A lymph node biopsy is used to diagnose non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Sometimes the diagnosis may be delayed because enlarged ...

329

Acne: Signs and Symptoms  

MedlinePLUS

... Signs, symptoms Who gets, causes Diagnosis, treatment Tips Acne scars Actinic keratosis Alopecia areata Atopic dermatitis Basal cell ... skin. When a nodule heals, it leaves an acne scar. Acne cyst An acne cyst forms when the ...

330

Protection Against Toxic Substances In Space Travel  

Microsoft Academic Search

Of the many sources of toxic contaminants in the space cabin atmosphere, thermal decomposition products from elastomers, plastics and other compounds are the most hazardous. A study of the decomposition characteristics and toxicity of several of these materials indicates that the smoke and fumes given off contribute significantly to the toxicity predicted on the basis of gaseous decomposition products only.

H. H. Bovee; J. E. Schubert

1963-01-01

331

Vaginal stenosis after toxic epidermal necrolysis.  

PubMed

A 17-year-old adolescent girl developed severe toxic epidermal necrolysis after inhalation of methamphetamine. Recovery was complicated by vaginal synechiae and occlusion necessitating surgery. PMID:20885170

Rowan, Darion M; Jones, Ronald W; Oakley, Amanda; de Silva, Hiromel

2010-10-01

332

Contact Dermatitis: Signs and Symptoms  

MedlinePLUS

... treatments A - D Contact dermatitis Signs and symptoms Contact dermatitis: Signs and symptoms Allergic contact dermatitis : Testing ... these symptoms, you need immediate medical care. Allergic contact dermatitis This skin condition occurs when you have ...

333

Toxic terror  

Microsoft Academic Search

A review of toxic materials in the environment explores the evolution of public awareness of the problem, public and governmental reaction, the effort to establish standards of safe levels and danger thresholds, and the struggle to implement and enforce environmental policy. Separate chapters deal with environmental premises and scientific realities, the DDT debate and birth of environmentalism, the disaster of

Whelan

1985-01-01

334

Thallium toxicity  

Microsoft Academic Search

Thallium (Tl+) is a toxic heavy metal which was accidentally discovered by Sir William Crookes in 1861 by burning the dust from a sulfuric acid industrial plant. He observed a bright green spectral band that quickly disappeared. Crookes named the new element ‘Thallium’ (after thallos meaning young shoot). In 1862, Lamy described the same spectral line and studied both the

Sonia Galván-Arzate; Abel Santamar??a

1998-01-01

335

[Toxic fungi in Buenos Aires City and surroundings].  

PubMed

In Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales,Universidad de Buenos Aires there is a service called Servicio de Identificación de Hongos Tóxicos, directed by researchers of the Program of Medicinal Plants and Fungi Involved in Biological Degradation (PROPLAME-PRHIDEB, CONICET) that assist hospitals and other health establishments, identifying the different samples of fungi and providing information about their toxicity, so that patients can receive the correct treatment. The objective of the present study was to analyze all the cases received from 1985 to 2012. This analysis permitted the confection of a table identifying the most common toxic species. The information gathered revealed that 47% of the patients were under 18 years of age and had eaten basidiomes; the remaining 53% were adults who insisted that they were able to distinguish edible from toxic mushrooms. Chlorophyllum molybdites turned out to be the main cause of fungal intoxication in Buenos Aires, which is commonly confused with Macrolepiota procera, an edible mushroom. In the second place Amanita phalloides was registered, an agaric known to cause severe symptoms after a long period of latency (6-10 hours), and which can lead to hepatic failure even requiring a transplant to prevent severe internal injuries or even death, is not early and correctly treated. PMID:24152394

Romano, Gonzalo M; Iannone, Leopoldo; Novas, María V; Carmarán, Cecilia; Romero, Andrea I; López, Silvia E; Lechner, Bernardo E

2013-01-01

336

An unblinded, randomised phase II study of platinum-based chemotherapy with vitamin B12 and folic acid supplementation in the treatment of lung cancer with plasma homocysteine blood levels as a biomarker of severe neutropenic toxicity  

PubMed Central

Background Vitamin B12 and folic acid (referred to as vitamin supplementation) improves the toxicity profile of pemetrexed containing regimens. Low baseline vitamin B12 and folate levels are reflected in a raised total homocysteine level (HC). Studies have suggested that pretreatment HC levels predict neutropenia toxicity. We have tested supplementation with vitamin B12 and folate in non-pemetrexed platinum-based regimens to decrease treatment-related toxicity and looked for a correlation between toxicity and change in homocysteine levels. Patient and method Eighty-three patients with advanced lung cancer and malignant mesothelioma were randomly assigned to receive platinum-based chemotherapy with (arm A) or without (arm B) vitamin B12 and folic acid supplementation. The primary end point was grade 3/4 neutropenia and death within 30?days of treatment. Secondary end points included quality of life, overall survival (OS) and the relationship between baseline and post supplementation HC levels and toxicity. Results In the intention-to-treat population, no significant difference was seen between the two groups with respect to chemotherapy-induced grade 3/4 neutropenia and death within 30?days of chemotherapy (36% vs 37%; p=0.966, emesis (2% vs 6%; p=0.9) or OS (12.3?months vs 7?months; p=0.41). There was no significant difference in survival rates by baseline HC level (p=0.9). Decrease in HC with vitamin supplementation was less frequent than expected. High baseline HC levels decreased with vitamin supplementation in only 9/36 (25%) patients (successful supplementation). Post hoc analysis showed that patients in arm A who were successfully supplemented (9/36=25%) had less neutropenic toxicity (0% vs 69%; p=0.02) compared to unsupplemented patients. Conclusions The addition of vitamin B12 and folic acid to platinum-containing regimens did not overall improve the toxicity, quality of life or OS. Rates of grade 3/4 neutropenia at 36/37% was as predicted. Further studies to increase the rate of successful supplementation and to further test the biomarker potential of post supplementation HC levels in predicting chemotherapy-induced neutropenia in platinum-based chemotherapy are warranted. Trial registration number: EudracCT 2005-002736-10 ISRCTN8734355. PMID:25553247

Minchom, A R; Saksornchai, K; Bhosle, J; Gunapala, R; Puglisi, M; Lu, S K; Nimako, K; Coward, J; Yu, K C; Bordi, P; Popat, S; O'Brien, M E R

2014-01-01

337

Pharmacogenetic markers of severe cutaneous adverse drug reactions.  

PubMed

Different responses, in terms both of efficacy and toxicity, are commonly observed for any drug administered to apparently homogeneous groups of patients. It is estimated that adverse drug reactions (ADRs) cause 3-6% of all hospitalizations, accounting for 5% to 9% of hospital admission costs. The skin is often involved in ADRs and although most cutaneous ADRs have a favorable course, they may present as severe adverse cutaneous drug reactions (SCARs), such as Stevens-Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis, drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (also referred to as drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome), and acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis. SCARs are associated with significant mortality and require prompt diagnosis and adequate treatment. Pharmacogenetics studies individual variants in the DNA sequence associated with drug efficacy and toxicity, allowing prescription of a drug to patients expected to benefit from it, and excluding from treatment those who are at risk of developing ADRs. Pharmacogenetics already achieved several important results in the prevention of SCARs, and pharmacogenetic testing is now recommended by regulatory agencies before administration of abacavir and carbamazepine, leading to reduced incidence of SCARs. In this review, the pharmacogenetic associations of SCARs that have been validated in independent, case-control association studies will be presented. By familiarizing with principles of pharmacogenetics, dermatologists should be able to correlate specific cutaneous ADR phenotypes to the underlying genotype, thus contributing to better drug safety and facilitating drug discovery, development and approval. PMID:24819643

Borroni, R G

2014-04-01

338

Asthma Outcomes: Asthma Symptoms  

PubMed Central

Background Respiratory symptoms are commonly used to assess the impact of patient-centered interventions. Objective At the request of National Institutes of Health (NIH) institutes and other federal agencies, an expert group was convened to propose which measurements of asthma symptoms should be used as a standardized measure in future clinical research studies. Methods Asthma symptom instruments were classified as daily diaries (prospectively recording symptoms between research visits) or retrospective questionnaires (completed at research visits). We conducted a systematic search in PubMed and a search for articles that cited key studies describing development of instruments. We classified outcome instruments as either core (required in future studies), supplemental (used according to study aims and standardized), or emerging (requiring validation and standardization). This work was discussed at an NIH-organized workshop in March 2010 and finalized in September 2011. Results Four instruments (3 daily diaries, 1 for adults and 2 for children; and 1 retrospective questionnaire for adults) were identified. Minimal clinically important differences have not been established for these instruments, and validation studies were only conducted in a limited number of patient populations. Validity of existing instruments may not be generalizable across racial-ethnic or other subgroups. Conclusions An evaluation of symptoms should be a core asthma outcome measure in clinical research. However, available instruments have limitations that preclude selection of a core instrument. The working group participants propose validation studies in diverse populations, comparisons of diaries versus retrospective questionnaires, and evaluations of symptom assessment alone versus composite scores of asthma control. PMID:22386505

Krishnan, Jerry A.; Lemanske, Robert F.; Canino, Glorisa J.; Elward, Kurtis S.; Kattan, Meyer; Matsui, Elizabeth C.; Mitchell, Herman; Sutherland, E. Rand; Minnicozzi, Michael

2014-01-01

339

Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms Predict Symptom Severity of Autism Spectrum Disorder  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Autism is widely believed to be a heterogeneous disorder; diagnosis is currently based solely on clinical criteria, although genetic, as well as environmental, influences are thought to be prominent factors in the etiology of most forms of autism. Our goal is to determine whether a predictive model based on single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)…

Jiao, Yun; Chen, Rong; Ke, Xiaoyan; Cheng, Lu; Chu, Kangkang; Lu, Zuhong; Herskovits, Edward H.

2012-01-01

340

Marital predictors of symptom severity in panic disorder with agoraphobia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Twenty-six to forty percent of individuals suffering from panic disorder with agoraphobia (PDA) do not benefit significantly from cognitive-behavior therapy. Marital problems are among risk factors that may explain this limited impact. Some studies suggest that PDA treatment outcome is related to the couple’s ability to communicate and solve problems during and after treatment. It may be also useful to

Roger Marcaurelle; Claude Bélanger; André Marchand; Theodora E. Katerelos; Nicole Mainguy

2005-01-01

341

Symptom Severity and Challenging Behavior in Children with ASD  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The prevalence of challenging behaviors in the autism spectrum disorders (ASD) population is often assumed to be high but relatively little research has actually been published on it. Furthermore, challenging behaviors are likely to impede progress in evidence-based treatment programs, such as early intensive behavioral intervention (EIBI). Little…

Jang, Jina; Dixon, Dennis R.; Tarbox, Jonathan; Granpeesheh, Doreen

2011-01-01

342

Pharmacology of Hallucinations: Several Mechanisms for One Single Symptom?  

PubMed Central

Hallucinations are complex misperceptions, that principally occur in schizophrenia or after intoxication induced by three main classes of drugs: psychostimulants, psychedelics, and dissociative anesthetics. There are at least three different pharmacological ways to induce hallucinations: (1) activation of dopamine D2 receptors (D2Rs) with psychostimulants, (2) activation of serotonin 5HT2A receptors (HT2ARs) with psychedelics, and (3) blockage of glutamate NMDA receptors (NMDARs) with dissociative anesthetics. In schizophrenia, the relative importance of NMDAR and D2R in the occurrence of hallucinations is still debated. Slight clinical differences are observed for each etiology. Thus, we investigated whether the concept of hallucination is homogenous, both clinically and neurobiologically. A narrative review of the literature is proposed to synthesize how the main contributors in the field have approached and tried to solve these outstanding questions. While some authors prefer one explanatory mechanism, others have proposed more integrated theories based on the different pharmacological psychosis models. In this review, such theories are discussed and faced with the clinical data. In addition, the nosological aspects of hallucinations and psychosis are addressed. We suggest that if there may be common neurobiological pathways between the different pharmacological systems that are responsible for the hallucinations, there may also be unique properties of each system, which explains the clinical differences observed. PMID:24991548

Rolland, Benjamin; Amad, Ali; Cottencin, Olivier; Bordet, Régis

2014-01-01

343

[Aseptic tissue necrosis: a severe complication after intramuscular injections].  

PubMed

Aseptic necrosis after intramuscular injection (Nicolau syndrome) occurred in 38 patients. Symptoms were severe immediate pain, swelling and livid discoloration of the skin with development of gangrene of skin and muscle tissue. It was the result of an unintentional intra-arterial injection of toxic substances: to assume an allergic reaction is unwarranted. Since irreversible tissue damage occurs within a short time, treatment results are unsatisfactory. For this reason prevention is essential. Using proper precautions, intra-arterial injections can be largely avoided. Since the greater proportion of these severe complications occurs after the administration of antirheumatic drugs, there should be a fundamental reconsideration of the need for intramuscular application of such drugs, as pharmacologically it is not essential. PMID:6723533

Müller-Vahl, H

1984-05-18

344

Natural History of Multiple Sclerosis Symptoms  

PubMed Central

The North American Research Committee on Multiple Sclerosis (NARCOMS) Registry is a database that contains information from over 35,000 patient volunteers on symptom severity in 11 domains commonly affected in multiple sclerosis (MS): mobility, hand function, vision, fatigue, cognition, bowel/bladder function, sensory, spasticity, pain, depression, and tremor/coordination. The Registry affords a unique opportunity to study the frequency and severity of domain-specific impairment in a contemporary, mostly treated MS cohort over the course of the disease. The objective of this work was to calculate symptom prevalence in each of the 11 domains for years 0 to 30 from symptom onset. The resulting “symptom prevalence tables” demonstrate that a majority of participants perceive at least some degree of impairment in most domains as early as the first year of disease. The severity of impairment increases with disease duration across all domains, but the patterns of disability accumulation differ. The symptom prevalence tables illustrate the magnitude of perceived impact of the disease and highlight the extent of unmet need in symptomatic management. The tables are easy to use and allow MS patients and their clinicians to compare an individual's own impairment in any of the 11 domains to that of NARCOMS participants with the same disease duration. PMID:24453777

Bacon, Tamar E.; Chamot, Eric; Salter, Amber R.; Cutter, Gary R.; Kalina, Jennifer T.; Herbert, Joseph

2013-01-01

345

Bullying and PTSD Symptoms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

PTSD symptoms related to school bullying have rarely been investigated, and never in national samples. We used data from a national survey to investigate this among students from grades 8 and 9 (n = 963). The prevalence estimates of exposure to bullying were within the range of earlier research findings. Multinomial logistic regression showed that…

Idsoe, Thormod; Dyregrov, Atle; Idsoe, Ella Cosmovici

2012-01-01

346

The toxic mind: the biology of mental illness and violence  

Microsoft Academic Search

The continual suppression of emotions during fight or flight reactions results in atrophy and endogenous toxicosis in noradrenergic neurons. Toxic metabolites interfere with neurotransmission, causing depression. During periodic detoxification crises, excess norepinephrine floods synapses overexcite postsynaptic neurons, and cause symptoms ranging from mild anxiety to violent behavior. When toxic metabolites, which may include excess dopamine, epinephrine, serotonin, ?-aminobutyric acid, peptides,

E. Van Winkle

2000-01-01

347

Holiday plants with toxic misconceptions.  

PubMed

Several plants are used for their decorative effect during winter holidays. This review explores the toxic reputation and proposed management for exposures to several of those, namely poinsettia (Euphorbia pulcherrima), English holly (Ilex aquifolium), American holly (Ilex opaca), bittersweet (Solanum dulcamara), Jerusalem cherry (Solanum pseudocapsicum), American mistletoe (Phoradendron serotinum), and European mistletoe (Viscum album). PMID:23359840

Evens, Zabrina N; Stellpflug, Samuel J

2012-12-01

348

Turning the Tide on Toxics in the Home.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This booklet provides a guide for the safe use and disposal of toxic chemicals found around the home. Toxicity ratings given to compounds are explained along with the amount needed for a probable fatal dose for a 150-pound person. Each category of hazardous waste is provided with typical examples of the toxicants, a toxicity rating, several

Washington State Dept. of Ecology, Olympia.

349

Dose-Volume Effects on Patient-Reported Acute Gastrointestinal Symptoms During Chemoradiation Therapy for Rectal Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Research on patient-reported outcomes (PROs) in rectal cancer is limited. We examined whether dose-volume parameters of the small bowel and large bowel were associated with patient-reported gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms during 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-based chemoradiation treatment for rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: 66 patients treated at the Brigham and Women's Hospital or Massachusetts General Hospital between 2006 and 2008 were included. Weekly during treatment, patients completed a questionnaire assessing severity of diarrhea, urgency, pain, cramping, mucus, and tenesmus. The association between dosimetric parameters and changes in overall GI symptoms from baseline through treatment was examined by using Spearman's correlation. Potential associations between these parameters and individual GI symptoms were also explored. Results: The amount of small bowel receiving at least 15 Gy (V15) was significantly associated with acute symptoms (p = 0.01), and other dosimetric parameters ranging from V5 to V45 also trended toward association. For the large bowel, correlations between dosimetric parameters and overall GI symptoms at the higher dose levels from V25 to V45 did not reach statistical significance (p = 0.1), and a significant association was seen with rectal pain from V15 to V45 (p < 0.01). Other individual symptoms did not correlate with small bowel or large bowel dosimetric parameters. Conclusions: The results of this study using PROs are consistent with prior studies with physician-assessed acute toxicity, and they identify small bowel V15 as an important predictor of acute GI symptoms during 5-FU-based chemoradiation treatment. A better understanding of the relationship between radiation dosimetric parameters and PROs may allow physicians to improve radiation planning to optimize patient outcomes.

Chen, Ronald C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Mamon, Harvey J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Ancukiewicz, Marek [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Killoran, Joseph H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Crowley, Elizabeth M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S. [Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Wo, Jennifer Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Ryan, David P. [Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Hong, Theodore S., E-mail: tshong1@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

2012-07-15

350

Tackling Negative Symptoms of Schizophrenia with Memantine  

PubMed Central

We present a case of a 52-year-old male patient suffering from chronic schizophrenia stabilized on risperidone long-acting injection (37,5?mg/2 weeks) and biperiden 4?mg/day. Residual symptoms are affective flattening, alogia, avolition, and asociality. Memantine 10?mg/day was added. After 1.5 months, the patient spontaneously referred to “feel better being in company of my relatives.” The following scales have been completed: the Scale for the Assessment of Negative Symptoms (96), the Scale for the Assessment of Positive Symptoms (3), the Mini Mental Scale Examination (26), and the Calgary Depression for Schizophrenia Scale (2). Memantine was increased to 20?mg/day and biperiden was decreased to 2?mg/day. Two months later, apathy and asociality considerably improved and affective flattening, alogia, and attention slightly got better (SANS 76, SAPS 1, MMSE 26, and CDSS 1). After two more months, the improvement continued in the same domains (SANS: 70, SAPS: 1 MMSE: 27, and CDSS: 1). Positive symptoms remained in full remission. It has been hypothesized that one of the causes of schizophrenia is glutamate excitotoxicity. Memantine, a glutamate receptor antagonist, could possibly ameliorate schizophrenia symptoms, the negative ones among them, used as add-on therapy to atypical antipsychotics. Memantine could be of potential help in schizophrenia patients with severe residual negative symptoms. PMID:24818033

2014-01-01

351

Thallium toxicity.  

PubMed

Thallium (T1+) is a toxic heavy metal which was accidentally discovered by Sir William Crookes in 1861 by burning the dust from a sulfuric acid industrial plant. He observed a bright green spectral band that quickly disappeared. Crookes named the new element 'Thallium' (after thallos meaning young shoot). In 1862, Lamy described the same spectral line and studied both the physical and chemical properties of this new element (Prick, J.J.G., 1979. Thallium poisoning. In: Vinkrn, P.J., Bruyn, G.W. (Eds.), Intoxication of the Nervous System, Handbook of Clinical Neurology, vol. 36. North-Holland, New York. pp. 239-278). PMID:9801025

Galván-Arzate, S; Santamaría, A

1998-09-30

352

External Beam Radiation Therapy After Transurethral Resection of the Prostate: A Report on Acute and Late Genitourinary Toxicity  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To describe genitourinary (GU) toxicity in men with a history of transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) treated with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Seventy-one men with a history of TURP were treated with EBRT for prostate cancer. The median time from TURP to EBRT was 15 months. The median EBRT dose was 70 Gy, and 21 men (30%) received androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Acute GU toxicity and late GU toxicity were scored by Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria and compared with a cohort of 538 men without prior TURP. The median follow-up for men with TURP and men without TURP was 40 months and 50 months, respectively (p = 0.7605). Results: The rate of acute Grade 2 GU toxicity or higher was 41%, and was increased with a history of more than 1 TURP (73% vs. 31%, p = 0.0036). The 4-year rate of freedom from late Grade 3 GU toxicity or higher was 84%, and was decreased with ADT (45% vs. 95% without ADT, p = 0.0024). By last follow-up, maximal GU toxicity tended to resolve (p < 0.0001) and there was no worsening of urinary symptom scores (p = 0.6911). Compared to men without a prior TURP, TURP patients had a lower rate of freedom from late Grade 3 toxicity or higher (84% vs. 96%, p = 0.0483). Multivariate analysis suggested a higher rate of late Grade 3 toxicity or higher with TURP (risk ratio, 2.87; p = 0.0612) and EBRT dose of 74 Gy or greater (risk ratio, 2.26; p = 0.0521). Conclusions: Men treated for prostate cancer with EBRT after TURP have a higher risk of severe GU toxicity; however, the overall incidence is low, and toxicity tends not to persist.

Devisetty, Kiran [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Zorn, Kevin C.; Katz, Mark H. [Department of Urology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Jani, Ashesh B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Liauw, Stanley L., E-mail: sliauw@radonc.uchicago.ed [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States)

2010-07-15

353

Acculturation, Ethnicity, and Symptoms of Schizophrenia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research findings on acculturation and mental health are complex. Previous research has demonstrated mixed results indicating that an increasing level of acculturation can be associated with both detrimental and beneficial health outcomes. Research focusing on the association of acculturation and schizophrenia remains largely unexplored. This study evaluated the relationship between acculturation and symptom severity with 47 Latino, Black, and White

Vamsi K. Koneru; Amy G. Weisman de Mamani

2006-01-01

354

Transient Neurologic Symptoms After Spinal Anesthesia  

Microsoft Academic Search

- We recently reported several cases consistent with tran- sient radicular irritation after spinal anesthesia with hy- perbaric 5% lidocaine. The present prospective, blind, nonrandomized study was performed to determine the incidence of these transient neurologic symptoms and to identify factors that might be associated with their occurrence. We studied 270 patients scheduled for gy- necologic or obstetric procedures under

Karl F. Hampl; Markus C. Schneider; Wolfgang Ummenhofer; Jurgen Drewe

1995-01-01

355

[Dissociative symptoms and sleep].  

PubMed

There is a widespread view among psychiatrists that dissociative experiences such as depersonalisation, derealisation, absorption, and psychogenic amnesia have a traumatic etiology. This view is subjected to a critical evaluation. We also discuss an alternative interpretation namely that dissociative experiences are caused by a labile sleep-wake rhythm. We evaluated this alternative view in two exploratory studies. In study 1 we looked at the relationship between the Dissociative Experience Scale (DES) and the Iowa Sleep Experiences Survey (ISES) and in study 2, we checked this relationship when the response bias was controlled for. Dissociative experiences (measured with the DES) correlated with the ISES. The correlation between DES and ISES remained completely intact even when we controlledfor response bias. Our findings show that dissociative symptoms are associated with typical sleep experiences such as nightmares and strange dreams. The association is not the by-product of the positive response bias which generally characterises persons with dissociative symptoms. PMID:16956084

Giesbrecht, T; Merckelbach, H

2006-01-01

356

Blood coagulation in patients with toxic goiter  

Microsoft Academic Search

Data are presented on the study of blood coagulation in 128 patients ; with toxic goiter--- mild, moderately severe, and severe forms before and after ; mercazolyl (mild) and ¹³¹I (moderately severe and severe) treatment. Signs ; of reduction of blood coagulative activity and an increase of fibrinolytic ; activity, and heparin, which elevated in parallel with the clinical severity

V. M. Panchenko; A. V. Antonidze

1973-01-01

357

Obsessive–compulsive symptoms in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The goals of this work were to: (1) determine the prevalence of clinically significant obsessive–compulsive (OC) symptoms in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), (2) characterize the differences in self-reported OC symptoms in patients with TLE and a normative control group, and (3) compare the severity of OC symptoms in right and left hemisphere TLE patients. Patients with TLE (n=30)

Keren L. Isaacs; John W. Philbeck; William B. Barr; Orrin Devinsky; Kenneth Alperb

2004-01-01

358

Instrument for the Assessment of Prodromal Symptoms and States  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Certain constellations of prodromal symptoms have recently been shown to predict the onset of psychosis with a high degree\\u000a of accuracy, thus making treatment intervention in the prodromal phase more feasible scientifically and ethically. Here we\\u000a present a structured interview, the Structured Interview for Prodromal Symptoms (SIPS) and a severity scale, the Scale of\\u000a Prodromal Symptoms (SOPS), to identify operationally

Thomas H. McGlashan; Tandy J. Miller; Scott W. Woods; Ralph E. Hoffman; Larry Davidson

359

[Depressive symptoms and sexuality].  

PubMed

The mutually reinforcing dyad of depressive symptoms and erectile dysfunction is scientifically established. The cure of depression improves sexual dysfunction (SD) and the treatment of SD induces improvement of depression. Most of anti-depressants induce negative sexual side effects that lead to non-compliance of these treatments. The knowledge of interrelation between depression, anti-depressants and sexuality is of great importance in clinical practice. PMID:25148948

Porto, Robert

2014-10-01

360

ADHD Symptoms and Subtypes: Relationship between Childhood and Adolescent Symptoms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study aims to examine attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder(ADHD) symptoms and subtypes in childhood and adolescence. The results conclude the persistence of ADHD from childhood to adolescence with specific symptoms contributing to persistent ADHD.

Hurtig, Tuula; Ebeling, Hanna; Taanila, Anja; Miettunen, Jouko; Smalley, Susan L.; McGough, James J.; Loo, Sandra K.; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Moilanen, Irma K.

2007-01-01

361

Update on toxic myopathies.  

PubMed

The toxic myopathies are a clinically and pathologically diverse group of disorders that can be caused by a variety of therapeutic agents used in clinical practice, as well as various venoms and other biological toxins. The most important iatrogenic causes are the statin and fibrate cholesterol-lowering agents that can cause a severe necrotizing myopathy and acute rhabdomyolysis and myoglobinuria. The current update focuses on the mechanisms of statin myotoxicity and the importance of genetic predisposing factors for statin myopathy, as well as the recently described form of necrotizing autoimmune myopathy, which is associated with antibodies to the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase enzyme and is responsive to aggressive immunotherapy. Mitochondrial myopathies associated with antiretroviral agents and the pyrimidine nucleoside analogue clevudine, and recent reports of myopathies caused by ingestion of red yeast rice and toxic species of mushrooms are also discussed. PMID:21968786

Mastaglia, F L; Needham, M

2012-02-01

362

Toxicity assessment of thiodiglycol.  

PubMed

Sulfur mustard (HD) undergoes hydrolysis to form various products such as thiodiglycol (TG) in biological and environmental systems. TG is a precursor in the production of HD and it is also considered as a "Schedule 2" compound (dual-use chemicals with low to moderate commercial use and high-risk precursors). Several toxicological studies on TG were conducted to assess environmental and health effects. The oral LD(50) values were >5000 mg/kg in rats. It was a mild skin and moderate ocular irritant and was not a skin sensitizer in animals. It was not mutagenic in Ames Salmonella, Escherichia coli, mouse lymphoma, and in vivo mouse micronucleus assays, but it induced chromosomal aberrations in Chinese hamster ovarian (CHO) cells. A 90-day oral subchronic toxicity study with neat TG at doses of 0, 50, 500, and 5000 mg/kg/day (5 days/week) in Sprague-Dawley rats results show that there are no treatment-related changes in food consumption, hematology, and clinical chemistry in rats of either sex. The body weights of both sexes were significantly lower than controls at 5000 mg/kg/day. Significant changes were also noted in both sexes in absolute weights of kidneys, kidney to body weight ratios, and kidney to brain weight ratios, in the high-dose group. The no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) for oral toxicity was 500 mg/kg/day. The developmental toxicity conducted at 0, 430, 1290, and 3870 mg/kg by oral gavage showed maternal toxicity in dams receiving 3870 mg/kg. TG was not a developmental toxicant. The NOAEL for the developmental toxicity in rats was 1290 mg/kg. The provisional oral reference dose (RfD) of 0.4 mg/kg/day was calculated for health risk assessments. The fate of TG in the environment and soil showed biological formation of thiodiglycalic acid with formation of an intermediate ((2-hydroxyethyl)thio)acetic acid. It was slowly biodegraded under anaerobic conditions. It was not toxic to bluegill sunfish at 1000 mg/L and its metabolism and environmental and biochemical effects are summarized. PMID:16393936

Reddy, Gunda; Major, Michael A; Leach, Glenn J

2005-01-01

363

Pre-synaptic Cholinergic and Cannabinergic Signaling in the Expression of Organophosphate Toxicity.  

E-print Network

??Organophosphorus toxicants (OPs) inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE) leading to acetylcholine (ACh) accumulation and cholinergic toxicity. The current approach for treating OP intoxication has several shortcomings, thus… (more)

Baireddy, Praveena

2009-01-01

364

Depression symptom dimensions as predictors of antidepressant treatment outcome: replicable evidence for interest-activity symptoms  

PubMed Central

Background Symptom dimensions have not yet been comprehensively tested as predictors of the substantial heterogeneity in outcomes of antidepressant treatment in major depressive disorder. Method We tested nine symptom dimensions derived from a previously published factor analysis of depression rating scales as predictors of outcome in 811 adults with moderate to severe depression treated with flexibly dosed escitalopram or nortriptyline in Genome-based Therapeutic Drugs for Depression (GENDEP). The effects of symptom dimensions were tested in mixed-effect regression models that controlled for overall initial depression severity, age, sex and recruitment centre. Significant results were tested for replicability in 3637 adult out-patients with non-psychotic major depression treated with citalopram in level I of Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression (STAR*D). Results The interest-activity symptom dimension (reflecting low interest, reduced activity, indecisiveness and lack of enjoyment) at baseline strongly predicted poor treatment outcome in GENDEP, irrespective of overall depression severity, antidepressant type and outcome measure used. The prediction of poor treatment outcome by the interest-activity dimension was robustly replicated in STAR*D, independent of a comprehensive list of baseline covariates. Conclusions Loss of interest, diminished activity and inability to make decisions predict poor outcome of antidepressant treatment even after adjustment for overall depression severity and other clinical covariates. The prominence of such symptoms may require additional treatment strategies and should be accounted for in future investigations of antidepressant response. PMID:21929846

Uher, R.; Perlis, R. H.; Henigsberg, N.; Zobel, A.; Rietschel, M.; Mors, O.; Hauser, J.; Dernovsek, M. Z.; Souery, D.; Bajs, M.; Maier, W.; Aitchison, K. J.; Farmer, A.; McGuffin, P.

2013-01-01

365

Toxic terror  

SciTech Connect

A review of toxic materials in the environment explores the evolution of public awareness of the problem, public and governmental reaction, the effort to establish standards of safe levels and danger thresholds, and the struggle to implement and enforce environmental policy. Separate chapters deal with environmental premises and scientific realities, the DDT debate and birth of environmentalism, the disaster of Love Canal, pesticides, PCBs, PBBs, formaldehyde, dioxin, air pollution, water pollution, nuclear energy and radioactive materials, acid rain, and the status of American health. The book concludes with a chapter on the need for scientific research and hard evidence to either prove or disprove the pessimism of those who warn of a threat to human health and survival.

Whelan, E.M.

1985-01-01

366

Experimental investigation of the effects of naturalistic dieting on bulimic symptoms: moderating effects of depressive symptoms.  

PubMed

Prospective studies suggest that dieting increases risk for bulimic symptoms, but experimental trials indicate dieting reduces bulimic symptoms. However, these experiments may be unrepresentative of real-world weight loss dieting. In addition, the fact that most dieters do not develop eating disorders suggests moderating factors may be important. Accordingly, we randomly assigned 157 female intermittent dieters to either diet as they usually do for weight loss or eat as they normally do when not dieting for 4 weeks. Naturalistic dieting halted the weight gain shown by controls, but did not result in significant weight loss. Although there was no main effect of the dieting manipulation on bulimic symptoms, moderation analyses indicated that naturalistic dieting decreased bulimic symptoms among participants with initially low depressive symptoms. Results suggest that self-initiated weight loss dieting is not particularly effective, which appears to explain several discrepancies in the literature. Additionally, depressive symptoms may be an important determinant of bulimic symptoms that eclipses the effects of naturalistic dieting on this outcome. PMID:17662503

Presnell, Katherine; Stice, Eric; Tristan, Jennifer

2008-01-01

367

Signs and Symptoms of COPD  

MedlinePLUS

... Why is shortness of breath a symptom of COPD? Shortness of breath (or breathlessness ) is a common ... better or worse. Signs and Symptoms of COPD COPD MINI-SERIES #2 Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) ...

368

Hidradenitis Suppurativa: Signs and Symptoms  

MedlinePLUS

... treatments E - H Hidradenitis suppurativa Signs and symptoms Hidradenitis suppurativa: Signs and symptoms Hidradenitis suppurativa : In its ... suppurativa: Who gets and causes. Learn more about hidradenitis suppurativa: Hidradenitis suppurativa Hidradenitis suppurativa: Who gets and ...

369

Herpes Simplex: Signs and Symptoms  

MedlinePLUS

... and treatments E - H Herpes simplex Signs, symptoms Herpes simplex: Signs and symptoms Herpes simplex: If a ... 6 weeks (the first outbreak) Learn more about herpes simplex: Herpes simplex Herpes simplex: Who gets and ...

370

Skin Cancer: Signs and Symptoms  

MedlinePLUS

... treatments Q - T Skin cancer Signs, symptoms Skin cancer: Signs and symptoms The most common warning sign ... appears in many ways. Learn more about skin cancer: Skin cancer Skin cancer: Who gets and causes ...

371

BACTERIAL MENINGITIS AND SWINE FLU THE DIFFERENCES BETWEEN THE SYMPTOMS  

E-print Network

BACTERIAL MENINGITIS AND SWINE FLU THE DIFFERENCES BETWEEN THE SYMPTOMS At this time of year, flu is becoming more common and, even with swine flu, is usually not a severe disease. However, the symptoms of meningitis can superficially resemble those of flu, so beware. Below is a brief summary of how

Oxford, University of

372

Gender differences in the perceptions of common cold symptoms  

Microsoft Academic Search

Higher rates of reported morbidity among women are sometimes attributed to lower thresholds among women for experiencing and reporting symptoms. Gender differences in the perception of signs and symptoms of minor illness were examined on data from the MRC Common Cold Unit. Volunteers assessed the presence and severity of colds at the end of their stay in the Unit, using

Sally Macintyre

1993-01-01

373

Chronic rhinosinusitis: correlation of symptoms with computed tomography scan findings  

PubMed Central

Introduction Symptomatology, nasal endoscopy and Computerised Tomographic (CT) scan have been used to diagnose chronic rhinosinusitis. The value of disease severity score in the assessment of chronic rhinosinusitis has not been well investigated. Hence, this study aims to correlate the pre-operative symptom severity score as well as overall disease severity scoreof patients with chronic rhinosinusitis with CT scan scores. Methods This is a prospective study of 60 patients diagnosed clinically with chronic rhinosinusitis. Each patientsubjectively assessed his/her presenting symptoms and severity of disease on a visual analogue scale. The patients had CT scan of the paranasal sinuses which were graded and scored using Lund-Mackay grading system. The correlation study between severity of symptoms/disease severity and CT scores was performed. The level of statistical significance was considered at p < 0.05 and confidence interval at 95%. Results All patients had more than one symptom with mean symptom severity scores highest for nasal discharge and nasal obstruction. There was a significant correlation between CT scores and nasal discharge (r = -0.132; p = 0.03)and nasal obstruction (r = 0.193; p = 0.049). No correlation with other symptoms. There wasno correlation between the overall disease severity scores and the Lund-Mackay CT scores (r = 0.195; p = 0.6). Conclusion This study showed that CT scan scores can help clinicians to predict severity of symptom for nasal obstruction and discharge but not for other symptoms of chronic rhinosinusitis. However, there was no association of CT score with the overall disease severity score. PMID:25368729

Amodu, Enema Job; Fasunla, Ayotunde James; Akano, Aliu Oyebamiji; Daud Olusesi, Abiodun

2014-01-01

374

Symptom onset in autosomal dominant Alzheimer disease  

PubMed Central

Objective: To identify factors influencing age at symptom onset and disease course in autosomal dominant Alzheimer disease (ADAD), and develop evidence-based criteria for predicting symptom onset in ADAD. Methods: We have collected individual-level data on ages at symptom onset and death from 387 ADAD pedigrees, compiled from 137 peer-reviewed publications, the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network (DIAN) database, and 2 large kindreds of Colombian (PSEN1 E280A) and Volga German (PSEN2 N141I) ancestry. Our combined dataset includes 3,275 individuals, of whom 1,307 were affected by ADAD with known age at symptom onset. We assessed the relative contributions of several factors in influencing age at onset, including parental age at onset, age at onset by mutation type and family, and APOE genotype and sex. We additionally performed survival analysis using data on symptom onset collected from 183 ADAD mutation carriers followed longitudinally in the DIAN Study. Results: We report summary statistics on age at onset and disease course for 174 ADAD mutations, and discover strong and highly significant (p < 10?16, r2 > 0.38) correlations between individual age at symptom onset and predicted values based on parental age at onset and mean ages at onset by mutation type and family, which persist after controlling for APOE genotype and sex. Conclusions: Significant proportions of the observed variance in age at symptom onset in ADAD can be explained by family history and mutation type, providing empirical support for use of these data to estimate onset in clinical research. PMID:24928124

Acosta-Baena, Natalia; Aisen, Paul S.; Bird, Thomas; Danek, Adrian; Fox, Nick C.; Goate, Alison; Frommelt, Peter; Ghetti, Bernardino; Langbaum, Jessica B.S.; Lopera, Francisco; Martins, Ralph; Masters, Colin L.; Mayeux, Richard P.; McDade, Eric; Moreno, Sonia; Reiman, Eric M.; Ringman, John M.; Salloway, Steve; Schofield, Peter R.; Sperling, Reisa; Tariot, Pierre N.; Xiong, Chengjie; Morris, John C.; Bateman, Randall J.

2014-01-01

375

Symptoms in Children with Convergence Insufficiency: Before and After Treatment  

PubMed Central

Purpose To investigate symptom patterns and evaluate the relationship between patient characteristics and symptom severity before and after treatment for symptomatic children with convergence insufficiency (CI). Methods In a randomized clinical trial, the Convergence Insufficiency Symptom Survey (CISS) was administered pre- and post-treatment to 221 children 9 to <18 years with symptomatic CI. Frequency of symptom type was determined at baseline, mean change in performance-related versus eye-related symptoms for treatment responders was compared, and the relationship between patient characteristics and symptom severity at baseline for the entire cohort and after treatment for those who responded to treatment, was determined. Results At baseline, the score for performance-related symptoms was greater than that for eye-related symptoms (mean response of 2.3 vs. 1.8, p<0.001) regardless age, sex, race/ethnicity, or presence of parent-reported ADHD. Symptom severity increased with age for both the overall and eye-related subscale scores (p=0.048, p=0.022, respectively). Children with parent-reported ADHD were more symptomatic (p=0.005) than those without parent-reported ADHD because of a higher performance-related score (p<0.001). A significant and equal improvement (p<0.01) for the performance-related and eye-related symptoms was found in treatment responders. Girls had significantly lower performance-related symptoms than boys (p=0.014) and African-American children reported less eye-related symptoms than White children (p=0.022). Children without parent-reported ADHD had significantly less symptoms overall and less eye-related symptoms than children with parent-reported ADHD (p=0.019, p=0.011, respectively). Conclusions Because of a high frequency of both performance- and eye-related symptoms, clinicians should perform a targeted history that addresses both types of symptoms to help identify children with symptomatic CI. Future study regarding the relationship of CI and symptoms and their potential influence on ADHD, reading performance, and attention is warranted. PMID:22922781

Barnhardt, Carmen; Cotter, Susan A.; Mitchell, G. Lynn; Scheiman, Mitchell; Kulp, Marjean T.

2012-01-01

376

Molecular toxicity mechanism of nanosilver.  

PubMed

Silver is an ancient antibiotic that has found many new uses due to its unique properties on the nanoscale. Due to its presence in many consumer products, the toxicity of nanosilver has become a hot topic. This review summarizes recent advances, particularly the molecular mechanism of nanosilver toxicity. The surface of nanosilver can easily be oxidized by O(2) and other molecules in the environmental and biological systems leading to the release of Ag(+), a known toxic ion. Therefore, nanosilver toxicity is closely related to the release of Ag(+). In fact, it is difficult to determine what portion of the toxicity is from the nano-form and what is from the ionic form. The surface oxidation rate is closely related to the nanosilver surface coating, coexisting molecules, especially thiol-containing compounds, lighting conditions, and the interaction of nanosilver with nucleic acids, lipid molecules, and proteins in a biological system. Nanosilver has been shown to penetrate the cell and become internalized. Thus, nanosilver often acts as a source of Ag(+) inside the cell. One of the main mechanisms of toxicity is that it causes oxidative stress through the generation of reactive oxygen species and causes damage to cellular components including DNA damage, activation of antioxidant enzymes, depletion of antioxidant molecules (e.g., glutathione), binding and disabling of proteins, and damage to the cell membrane. Several major questions remain to be answered: (1) the toxic contribution from the ionic form versus the nano-form; (2) key enzymes and signaling pathways responsible for the toxicity; and (3) effect of coexisting molecules on the toxicity and its relationship to surface coating. PMID:24673909

McShan, Danielle; Ray, Paresh C; Yu, Hongtao

2014-03-01

377

Pitt study reports esophageal cancer risk higher in medically treated GERD patients with fewest symptoms:  

Cancer.gov

Medically treated patients with mild or no symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) are at higher risk for developing esophageal cancer than those with severe GERD symptoms, according to a University of Pittsburgh study...

378

Psychotic and compulsive symptoms in Parkinson's disease.  

PubMed

The objective of this study is to evaluate psychiatric symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients and to assess their relation with other clinical aspects of PD. Psychotic symptoms (PS) and compulsive symptoms (CS) as well as other nonmotor and motor features were evaluated in 353 PD patients. Psychotic and compulsive symptom scores did not correlate significantly. PS occurred in 65% of patients, with item frequencies ranging from 10% (paranoid ideation) to 55% (altered dream phenomena). Regression analysis showed that autonomic impairment accounted for 20% of the 32% explained variance of PS, whereas cognitive problems, depression, daytime sleepiness, and dopamine agonist (DA) dose explained the rest. CS occurred in 19%, with item frequencies of 10% for both sexual preoccupation and compulsive shopping/gambling. Patients with more severe CS (score > or = 2 on one or both items) were significantly more often men, had a younger age at onset, a higher DA dose and experienced more motor fluctuations compared to the other patients. PS and CS are common but unrelated psychiatric symptoms in PD. The relations found between PS and cognitive problems, depression, daytime sleepiness, and autonomic impairment suggests a resemblance with Dementia with Lewy Bodies. The prominent association between PS and autonomic impairment may be explained by a shared underlying mechanism. Our results confirm previous reports on the profile of patients developing CS, and mechanisms underlying motor fluctuations may also play a role in the development of CS in PD. PMID:19133665

Verbaan, Dagmar; van Rooden, Stephanie M; Visser, Martine; Marinus, Johan; Emre, Murat; van Hilten, Jacobus J

2009-04-15

379

AN EXPANDED EVALUATION OF INSECTICIDIAL TOXICITY TO COTTON FLEAHOPPERS  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

An adult vial test was used to determine the contact toxicity of several technical insecticides comprised of synthetic pyrethroids, organophosphates, neonicotinoids and carbamates to cotton fleahopper, Pseudatomoscelis seriatus (Reuter). Among the synthetic pyrethroids, bifenthrin was most toxic to ...

380

Anchoring the Panic Disorder Severity Scale  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Panic Disorder Severity Scale (PDSS) is a clinician-administered measure of panic disorder symptom severity widely used in clinical research. This investigation sought to provide clinically meaningful anchor points for the PDSS both in terms of clinical severity as measured by the Clinical Global Impression-Severity Scale (CGI-S) and to extend…

Keough, Meghan E.; Porter, Eliora; Kredlow, M. Alexandra; Worthington, John J.; Hoge, Elizabeth A.; Pollack, Mark H.; Shear, M. Katherine; Simon, Naomi M.

2012-01-01

381

IDENTIFYING TOXICANTS: NETAC'S TOXICITY-BASED APPROACH  

EPA Science Inventory

Successful implementation of the NPDES program with toxiciry limits requires routine toxicity tests for monitoring as well as protocols for performing Toxicity Reduction Evaluations (TREs). TREs are performed when discharaers are not in compliance with their permits and are inten...

382

Severe Storms  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Part of the University of Illinois Weather World 2010 project, this guide uses multimedia technology and the dynamic capabilities of the web to incorporate text, colorful diagrams, animations, computer simulations, audio, and video to introduce topics and concepts in the atmospheric sciences. This module is a combination of two elements. The first is the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Severe Storms Spotters Guide. The second is a section discussing the efforts and results of modeling severe storms. The Spotters Guide contains supplemental instructional resources and a program designed to familiarize meteorologists and advanced severe storm spotters with the building blocks of convective storm structure. The focus of the training series is the development of a thunderstorm spectrum and a discussion of the physical characteristics and severe weather potential of the various storm types in the spectrum.

2010-01-01

383

Control of air toxics  

SciTech Connect

For more than 10 years, Argonne National Laboratory has supported the US DOE`s Flue Gas Cleanup Program objective by developing new or improved environmental controls for industries that use fossil fuels. Argonne`s pollutant emissions research has ranged from experiments in the basic chemistry of pollution-control systems, through laboratory-scale process development and testing, to pilot-scale field tests of several technologies. The work on air toxics is currently divided into two components: Investigating measures to improve the removal of mercury in existing pollution-control systems applied to coal combustion; and, Developing sensors and control techniques for emissions found in the textile industry.

Livengood, C.D.

1995-03-01

384

Latent Class Analysis of YBOCS Symptoms in Obsessive Compulsive Disorder  

PubMed Central

Objective Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is phenomenologically heterogeneous, and findings of underlying structure classification based on symptom grouping have been ambiguous to date. Variable-centered approaches, primarily factor analysis, have been used to identify homogeneous groups of symptoms, but person-centered latent methods have seen little use. This study was designed to uncover sets of homogeneous groupings within 1611 individuals with OCD, based on symptoms. Method Latent class analysis (LCA) models using 61 obsessive-compulsive symptoms (OCS) collected from the Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale were fit. Relationships between latent class membership and treatment response, gender, symptom severity and comorbid tic disorders were tested for relationship to class membership. Results LCA models of best fit yielded three classes. Classes differed only in frequency of symptom endorsement. Classes with higher symptom endorsement were associated with earlier age of onset, being male, higher YBOCS symptom severity scores, and comorbid tic disorders. There were no differences in treatment response between classes. Conclusions These results provide support for the validity of a single underlying latent OCD construct, in addition to the distinct symptom factors identified previously via factor analyses. PMID:21145539

Delucchi, Kevin L.; Katerberg, Hilga; Stewart, S. Evelyn; Denys, Damiaan A.J.P.; Lochner, Christine; Stack, Denise E.; den Boer, Johan A.; van Balkom, Anton J.L.M.; Jenike, Michael A.; Stein, Dan J.; Cath, Danielle C.; Mathews, Carol A.

2010-01-01

385

Nonmotor Symptoms in a Malaysian Parkinson's Disease Population  

PubMed Central

Background. The nonmotor symptoms are important determinants of health and quality of life in Parkinson's disease but are not well recognized and addressed in clinical practice. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of nonmotor symptoms and their impact on quality of life in patients with Parkinson's disease. Methods. This was a cross-sectional study among patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease. Exclusion criteria were a Mini Mental State Examination score of <21/30. Prevalence of nonmotor symptoms was determined using the NMSQuest. The severity of nonmotor symptoms and the quality of life were assessed using validated disease-specific questionnaires (PDQ-39 and NMSS). Results. A total of 113 patients consisting of 60 males and 53 females were recruited. The median duration of illness was 5.0 (2.0–8.0) years. The prevalence rate of nonmotor symptoms in our cohort was 97.3%. The most common reported nonmotor symptom in our cohort was gastrointestinal (76.1%). We found that the severity of the nonmotor symptoms was associated with poorer quality of life scores (rs: 0.727, P < 0.001). Conclusions. Nonmotor symptoms were highly prevalent in our patients with Parkinson's disease and adversely affected the quality of life of our patients. In contrast to western studies, the most common nonmotor symptom is gastrointestinal. The possibility of an Asian diet playing a role in this observation requires further study. PMID:24800102

Azmin, Shahrul; Khairul Anuar, Abdul Manaf; Tan, Hui Jan; Nafisah, Wan Yahya; Raymond, Azman Ali; Hanita, Othman; Shah, Shamsul Azhar; Norlinah, Mohamed Ibrahim

2014-01-01

386

Severe murine typhus with pulmonary system involvement.  

PubMed

We encountered a case of severe murine typhus complicated by acute respiratory distress syndrome. To determine worldwide prevalence of such cases, we reviewed the literature and found that respiratory symptoms occur in ?30% of murine typhus patients. In disease-endemic areas, murine typhus should be considered for patients with respiratory symptoms and fever. PMID:25062435

van der Vaart, Thomas W; van Thiel, Pieter P A M; Juffermans, Nicole P; van Vugt, Michèle; Geerlings, Suzanne E; Grobusch, Martin P; Goorhuis, Abraham

2014-08-01

387

Severe Murine Typhus with Pulmonary System Involvement  

PubMed Central

We encountered a case of severe murine typhus complicated by acute respiratory distress syndrome. To determine worldwide prevalence of such cases, we reviewed the literature and found that respiratory symptoms occur in ?30% of murine typhus patients. In disease-endemic areas, murine typhus should be considered for patients with respiratory symptoms and fever. PMID:25062435

van der Vaart, Thomas W.; van Thiel, Pieter P.A.M.; Juffermans, Nicole P.; van Vugt, Michèle; Geerlings, Suzanne E.; Grobusch, Martin P.

2014-01-01

388

Neuropsychiatric symptoms in Parkinson's disease  

PubMed Central

Neuropsychiatric symptoms are common in Parkinson's disease, even at the earliest stages, and have important consequences for quality of life and daily functioning, are associated with increased carer burden and increased risk for nursing home admission. In addition to cognitive impairment, a wide range of neuropsychiatric symptoms have been reported. In this paper, the epidemiology, clinical course, diagnosis, and management of some of the most common neuropsychiatric symptoms in PD are discussed: depression, anxiety, apathy, fatigue and psychotic symptoms. Although much is known regarding the prevalence and course of these symptoms, the empirical evidence for how to manage these symptoms is limited at best. There is thus an urgent need for systematic studies for the pharmacological and non-pharmacological management of these symptoms. PMID:19768724

Aarsland, D.; Marsh, L.; Schrag, A.

2009-01-01

389

Residency Program Influenza Algorithm: Updated 07/14/10 Symptomatic with Rapid Onset of Symptoms: Fevers> 100 F URI Symptoms no Fevers  

E-print Network

Residency Program Influenza Algorithm: Updated 07/14/10 Symptomatic with Rapid Onset of Symptoms nausea/diarrhea. ~ ASSUME INFLUENZA DO NOT COME TO WORK ~ ~ ! ~ If Fevers> 100°F develop: If symptoms are not ASSUME INFLUENZA progressive and !!Q fevers develop: I Assume URI. If severe symptoms w/o fevers: Stay

Leistikow, Bruce N.

390

The Potential Role of Respiratory Motion Management and Image Guidance in the Reduction of Severe Toxicities Following Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy for Patients with Centrally Located Early Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer or Lung Metastases  

PubMed Central

Image guidance allows delivery of very high doses of radiation over a few fractions, known as stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR). This treatment is associated with excellent outcome for early stage non-small cell lung cancer and metastases to the lungs. In the delivery of SABR, central location constantly poses a challenge due to the difficulty of adequately sparing critical thoracic structures that are immediately adjacent to the tumor if an ablative dose of radiation is to be delivered to the tumor target. As of current, various respiratory motion management and image guidance strategies can be used to ensure accurate tumor target localization prior and/or during daily treatment, which allows for maximal and safe reduction of set up margins. The incorporation of both may lead to the most optimal normal tissue sparing and the most accurate SABR delivery. Here, the clinical outcome, treatment related toxicities, and the pertinent respiratory motion management/image guidance strategies reported in the current literature on SABR for central lung tumors are reviewed. PMID:25009800

Chi, Alexander; Nguyen, Nam Phong; Komaki, Ritsuko

2014-01-01

391

Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Severity Scale  

Microsoft Academic Search

The amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) severity scale has been developed to provide an ordinal staging system and a means of rapid functional assessment for patients with ALS. The scale allows an examiner to evaluate the symptoms of ALS numerically in four categories that describe speech, swallowing, lower extremity, and upper extremity abilities. These scores, combined with a vital capacity measured

Allen D. Hillel; Robert M. Miller; Kathryn Yorkston; Evelyn McDonald; Forbes H. Norris; Nancy Konikow

1989-01-01

392

Severe Human Bocavirus Infection, Germany  

PubMed Central

Human bocavirus (HBoV), discovered in 2005, can cause respiratory disease or no symptoms at all. We confirmed HBoV infection in an 8-month-old girl with hypoxia, respiratory distress, wheezing, cough, and fever. This case demonstrates that lower respiratory tract infection caused by HBoV can lead to severe and life-threatening disease. PMID:22172367

Söderlund-Venermo, Maria; van Koningsbruggen-Rietschel, Silke; Kaiser, Rolf; Malecki, Monika; Schildgen, Oliver

2011-01-01

393

Jatropha Toxicity—A Review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Jatropha is a nonedible oil seed plant belonging to Euphorbiaceae family. Global awareness of sustainable and alternative energy resources has propelled research on Jatropha oil as a feedstock for biodiesel production. During the past two decades, several cultivation projects were undertaken to produce Jatropha oil. In future, the increased cultivation of toxic Jatropha plants and utilization of its agro-industrial by-products

Rakshit K. Devappa; Harinder P. S. Makkar; Klaus Becker

2010-01-01

394

Lithium toxicity in a neonate.  

PubMed Central

Severe transplacental lithium toxicity in a neonate is described. There were gross functional lesions of the cardiovascular, renal, and neuromuscular systems with no structural abnormalities. At 1 year of age cardiovascular and renal function is normal, but there is developmental delay. PMID:6870337

Morrell, P; Sutherland, G R; Buamah, P K; Oo, M; Bain, H H

1983-01-01

395

TODDLERS WITH ELEVATED AUTISM SYMPTOMS SHOW SLOWED HABITUATION TO FACES  

PubMed Central

We explored social information processing and its relation to social and communicative symptoms in toddlers with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and their siblings. Toddlers with more severe symptoms of autism showed slower habituation to faces than comparison groups; slower face learning correlated with poorer social skills and lower verbal ability. Unaffected toddlers who were siblings of children with ASD also showed slower habituation to faces compared with toddlers without siblings with ASD. We conclude that slower rates of face learning may be an endophenotype of ASD and is associated with more severe symptoms among affected individuals. PMID:20301009

Webb, Sara Jane; Jones, Emily J. H.; Merkle, Kristen; Namkung, Jessica; Toth, Karen; Greenson, Jessica; Murias, Michael; Dawson, Geraldine

2010-01-01

396

Pb Neurotoxicity: Neuropsychological Effects of Lead Toxicity  

PubMed Central

Neurotoxicity is a term used to describe neurophysiological changes caused by exposure to toxic agents. Such exposure can result in neurocognitive symptoms and/or psychiatric disturbances. Common toxic agents include heavy metals, drugs, organophosphates, bacterial, and animal neurotoxins. Among heavy metal exposures, lead exposure is one of the most common exposures that can lead to significant neuropsychological and functional decline in humans. In this review, neurotoxic lead exposure's pathophysiology, etiology, and epidemiology are explored. In addition, commonly associated neuropsychological difficulties in intelligence, memory, executive functioning, attention, processing speed, language, visuospatial skills, motor skills, and affect/mood are explored. PMID:24516855

Mason, Lisa H.; Harp, Jordan P.; Han, Dong Y.

2014-01-01

397

Severe Encephalopathy, Lactic Acidosis, Vegetative Instability and Neuropathy with 5-Fluorouracil Treatment – Pyrimidine Degradation Defect or Beriberi?  

PubMed Central

We present the case of a 19-year-old female with nasopharyngeal carcinoma, who received two courses of chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in combination with folic acid and cisplatin. Upon developing esophageal strictures in the course of her radiotherapy, she required total parenteral nutrition. In the course of therapy, the patient developed severe multisystem failure with encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, vegetative instability and neuropathy. The treatment with 5-FU can lead to severe toxicity due to enzyme deficiencies in the degradation of pyrimidines, but it can also lead to thiamine deficiency with the classic symptoms of beriberi. Beriberi is a rare disorder, usually attributed to malnutrition or alcoholism. 5-FU has been shown to induce thiamine depletion. Reduced food intake or total parenteral nutrition devoid of vitamin supplements may aggravate symptoms. We were unable to find a genetic cause for increased 5-FU toxicity in our patient, ruling out deficiencies of dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase, dihydropyrimidinase or ?-ureidopropionase and double-strand break repair deficits. We come to the conclusion that, even without any definable enzyme deficiency, treatment with 5-FU can lead to high toxicity due to thiamine deficiency if vitamin supplementation is not undertaken. PMID:21941485

Rosen, A.; van Kuilenburg, A.; Assmann, B.; Kuhlen, M.; Borkhardt, A.

2011-01-01

398

Pain and other symptoms in cancer survivors.  

PubMed

Pain is common in cancer survivors. Long-term pain, often of neuropathic origin, is common after operations, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. Pain and other concomitant symptoms and side effects should be assessed with validated and reliable scales and questionnaires. Cancer survivors with severe pain should be seen by a pain specialist. Multidisciplinary rehabilitation and individualized pain management may improve quality of life in cancer survivors. Four case reports are presented to illustrate this. PMID:24801977

Westerling, Dagmar

2014-06-01

399

Urinary Symptoms and Risk of Falls in Older Men  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE To evaluate the association of urinary symptoms with risk of falls in community-dwelling elderly men. PATIENTS AND METHODS We evaluated 5872 participants in MrOS, a prospective cohort study of risk factors for falls and osteoporotic fractures among community-dwelling men aged 65 years and older. We used Poisson regression models with a robust variance estimator to evaluate the association of urinary symptoms at study entry with falls occurring during 1 year of follow-up. We considered age, history of falls, history of dizziness, multiple physical performance measures, body size, and medication use as potential confounders. RESULTS At baseline, 3188 (54%) reported mild, 2301 (39%) moderate, and 383 (7%) severe symptoms. Compared to men with mild symptoms, the adjusted 1-year cumulative incidence of falls was significantly higher among men with moderate or severe symptoms. Risk of at least 1 fall was increased by 11% among those with moderate (relative risk [RR] 1.11, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] = 1.01 - 1.22; P = 0.02) and by 33% among those with severe symptoms (RR 1.33, 95% CI = 1.15 - 1.53; P < 0.001). Further, those with moderate had a 21% (RR 1.21, 95% CI = 1.05 - 1.40; P = 0.01) and those with severe symptoms a 63% (RR 1.63, 95% CI = 1.31 - 2.02; P < 0.001) increased risk of at least 2 falls. Symptoms most strongly associated with falls were urinary urgency, difficulty initiating urination, and nocturia. CONCLUSION Moderate and severe urinary symptoms independently increase the 1-year risk of falls—particularly recurrent falls—in community-dwelling older men. PMID:19154508

Parsons, J. Kellogg; Mougey, Jolee; Lambert, Lori; Wilt, Timothy J.; Fink, Howard A.; Garzotto, Mark; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth; Marshall, Lynn M.

2011-01-01

400

Predictors of posttraumatic stress symptoms following childbirth  

PubMed Central

Background Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) following childbirth has gained growing attention in the recent years. Although a number of predictors for PTSD following childbirth have been identified (e.g., history of sexual trauma, emergency caesarean section, low social support), only very few studies have tested predictors derived from current theoretical models of the disorder. This study first aimed to replicate the association of PTSD symptoms after childbirth with predictors identified in earlier research. Second, cognitive predictors derived from Ehlers and Clark’s (2000) model of PTSD were examined. Methods N = 224 women who had recently given birth completed an online survey. In addition to computing single correlations between PTSD symptom severities and variables of interest, in a hierarchical multiple regression analyses posttraumatic stress symptoms were predicted by (1) prenatal variables, (2) birth-related variables, (3) postnatal social support, and (4) cognitive variables. Results Wellbeing during pregnancy and age were the only prenatal variables contributing significantly to the explanation of PTSD symptoms in the first step of the regression analysis. In the second step, the birth-related variables peritraumatic emotions and wellbeing during childbed significantly increased the explanation of variance. Despite showing significant bivariate correlations, social support entered in the third step did not predict PTSD symptom severities over and above the variables included in the first two steps. However, with the exception of peritraumatic dissociation all cognitive variables emerged as powerful predictors and increased the amount of variance explained from 43% to a total amount of 68%. Conclusions The findings suggest that the prediction of PTSD following childbirth can be improved by focusing on variables derived from a current theoretical model of the disorder. PMID:25026966

2014-01-01

401

Symptoms and Warning Signs  

MedlinePLUS

... and pulse feeling cold all the time lethargy Bulimia Nervosa frequently eating large amounts of food (binge- ... from diuretic abuse severe dehydration from purging Binge Eating Disorder frequently eating large amounts of food (binge-eating) ...

402

Pertussis Signs & Symptoms  

MedlinePLUS

... 2 weeks, severe coughing can begin. Unlike the common cold, pertussis can become a series of coughing fits ... stages appears to be nothing more than the common cold, it is often not suspected or diagnosed until ...

403

[Pharmacological treatment of behavioral symptoms in dementia patients].  

PubMed

Cognitive manifestations usually are the primary abnormalities in dementia. In most cases cognitive deterioration arise in association with behavioral disturbances, and may accelerate institutionalization of patients. Noncognitive symptoms are distressing for both patients and their caregivers. These symptoms are described as "behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia--BPSD" or neuropsychiatric symptoms. BPSD occurs in all types of dementia, and often are among the most prominent symptoms in the clinical course of the disease. Some disturbances like agitation and aggression may be disruptive and life-treating for patients and surrounding people. Non-pharmacological interventions should be recommended as a first line treatment unless BPSD symptoms are severe, persistent or recurrent. Drug treatment should have a specific target symptom. Atypical antipsychotics are widely used as the first line pharmacological approach to treat BPSD. Antidepressants, anxiolytics and antiepileptic's are also used. Treatment with cholinesterase inhibitors and/or memantine may delay the onset of BPSD and reduce the severity of some symptoms. Effective and safe treatment of BPSD should significantly improves the quality of life of patients and their caregivers. PMID:25141581

Gabryelewicz, Tomasz

2014-01-01

404

Heterogeneous trajectories of depressive symptoms: Adolescent predictors and adult outcomes  

PubMed Central

Background Depressive symptoms display heterogeneous trajectories across adolescence and early adulthood. Identifying risk and protective factors for distinct trajectory groups, and their respective outcomes, may provide insight into the etiological underpinnings of different symptom courses and inform the targets and timing of intervention. Methods A school-based sample of 719 adolescents completed four diagnostic evaluations and up to 7 annually mailed questionnaires assessing psychiatric symptoms and psychosocial risk and protective factors. Parental history of psychiatric disorder was assessed. Growth mixture modeling (GMM) was used to identify latent depressive symptom trajectories from mid-adolescence through age 30, as well as their predictors in mid-adolescence and adult outcomes. Results A three class model consisting of high stable (32%), moderate decreasing (44%), and low decreasing (24%) depressive symptom trajectories emerged as the preferred solution. Demographic, psychosocial, and psychiatric characteristics differentiated the low and high symptom classes, and provided support for interpersonal models of depression chronicity. Members of the moderate and high symptom classes evidenced the worst psychosocial and psychiatric outcomes by age 30, with members of the high symptom class showing the greatest levels of impairment. Limitations Cross-sectional measurement and floor effects of several predictor variables may have obscured the relations between those predictors and trajectory class membership. Conclusion These findings suggest that prevention and intervention strategies may specifically target young women and those who experience poor interpersonal functioning in an effort to alter the course of depressive symptoms through early adulthood. PMID:22963892

Yaroslavsky, Ilya; Pettit, Jeremy W.; Lewinsohn, Peter M.; Seeley, John R.; Roberts, Robert E.

2012-01-01

405

Timing of Symptom Improvement After Parathyroidectomy for Primary Hyperparathyroidism  

PubMed Central

Background The timing of symptom improvement after parathyroidectomy for primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) has not been well characterized. Methods This prospective study involved administering a questionnaire to patients with PHPT who underwent curative parathyroidectomy over an 11-month period. The questionnaire evaluated the frequency of 18 symptoms of PHPT on a 5-point Likert scale, and was administered pre-operatively, and 1 week, 6 weeks, and 6 months postoperatively. Results Of 197 eligible patients, 132 (67%) participated in the study. The questionnaires were completed at a rate of 91%, 92%, and 86% at 1 week, 6 weeks, and 6 months post-operatively, respectively. The most commonly reported pre-operative symptoms were fatigue (98%), muscle aches (89%), and bone/joint pain (87%). Improvement in symptom severity occurred across all symptoms and was separated into three categories based on the timing of improvement. Fatigue and bone/joint pain demonstrated ‘Immediate Improvement’ (>50% of patients reporting improvement by post-operative week 1), whereas the majority of symptoms showed peak improvement at 6 weeks (‘Delayed Improvement’). Symptoms categorized as ‘Continuous Improvement’ were those showing progressive improvement up to 6 months post-operatively (polydipsia, headaches, and nausea/vomiting). Conclusions Symptom improvement was most prominent 6 weeks post-parathyroidectomy, though some symptoms showed continued improvement at 6 months. PMID:24238059

Murray, Sara E.; Pathak, Priya R.; Pontes, David S.; Schneider, David F.; Schaefer, Sarah C.; Chen, Herbert; Sippel, Rebecca S.

2013-01-01

406

ATMOSPHERIC MEASUREMENTS OF SELECTED TOXIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS  

EPA Science Inventory

Atmospheric concentrations of 37 selected toxic organic chemicals, including aromatic hydrocarbons, halohydrocarbons, and secondary organic pollutants were measured under varying meteorological and source-strength conditions at several urban locations - Los Angeles, California; P...

407

Behavioral symptoms related to cognitive impairment  

PubMed Central

Neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) are core features of Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias. On one hand, behavioral symptoms in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) can indicate an increased risk of progressing to dementia. On the other hand, mild behavioral impairment (MBI) in patients who usually have normal cognition indicates an increased risk of developing dementia. Whatever the cause, all dementias carry a high rate of NPI. These symptoms can be observed at any stage of the disease, may fluctuate over its course, are a leading cause of stress and overload for caregivers, and increase rates of hospitalization and early institutionalization for patients with dementia. The clinician should be able to promptly recognize NPI through the use of instruments capable of measuring their frequency and severity to support diagnosis, and to help monitor the treatment of behavioral symptoms. The aims of this review are to describe and update the construct ‘MBI’ and to revise the reported NPS related to prodromal stages of dementia (MCI and MBI) and dementia stages of Alzheimer’s disease and frontotemporal lobar degeneration. PMID:24092982

Dillon, Carol; Serrano, Cecilia M; Castro, Diego; Leguizamón, Patricio Perez; Heisecke, Silvina L; Taragano, Fernando E

2013-01-01

408

Symptoms and signs in fibromyalgia syndrome.  

PubMed

Fibromyalgia syndrome (FM) is a common chronic pain condition that affects at least 2% of the adult population. Chronic widespread pain is the defining feature of FM, but patients may also exhibit a range of other symptoms, including sleep disturbance, fatigue, irritable bowel syndrome, headaches, and mood disorders. The etiology of FM is not completely understood and the syndrome is influenced by factors such as stress, medical illness, and a variety of pain conditions. Establishing diagnosis may be difficult because of the multifaceted nature of the syndrome and overlap with other chronically painful conditions. A unifying hypothesis is that FM results from sensitization of the central nervous system; this new concept could justify the variety of characteristics of the syndrome. FM symptoms can be musculoskeletal, non-musculoskeletal, or a combination of both; and many patients will also experience a host of associated symptoms or conditions. The ACR classification criteria focus only on pain and disregard other important symptoms; but three key features, pain, fatigue and sleep disturbance, are present in virtually every patient with FM. Several other associated syndromes, including circulatory, nervous, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems are probably a part of the so called central sensitivity or sensitization syndrome. A minority subgroup of patients (30-40%) has a significant psychological disturbance. Psychological factors are an important determinant of any type of pain, and psychological comorbidity is frequent in FM. Psychiatric disorders most commonly described are mood disorders, but psychiatric illness is not a necessary factor in the etiopathogenesis of FM. PMID:18852905

Cassisi, G; Sarzi-Puttini, P; Alciati, A; Casale, R; Bazzichi, L; Carignola, R; Gracely, R H; Salaffi, F; Marinangeli, F; Torta, R; Giamberardino, M A; Buskila, D; Spath, M; Cazzola, M; Di Franco, M; Biasi, G; Stisi, S; Altomonte, L; Arioli, G; Leardini, G; Gorla, R; Marsico, A; Ceccherelli, F; Atzeni, F

2008-01-01

409

A case report of adult lead toxicity following use of Ayurvedic herbal medication  

PubMed Central

Introduction Ayurvedic medications consist of herbs that may be intentionally combined with metals, such as lead, mercury, iron, and zinc. Ayurvedic practitioners and their patients believe that the toxic properties of the metals are reduced or eliminated during preparation and processing. Case report A 69 year old Caucasian male retired professional with a prior history of stroke presented for evaluation of new onset depression, fatigue, generalized weakness, constipation, anorexia, and weight loss. History revealed that his symptoms were temporally related to initiation of an Ayurvedic herbal medication. The patient had been previously admitted to another hospital for these symptoms and was found to have a severe anemia for which no etiology was found. Laboratory tests revealed an elevated blood lead level and a diagnosis of symptomatic lead toxicity was made. The patient was treated with intramuscular, intravenous, and oral chelation therapy to promote lead excretion. Because of complaints of continued poor mental function, neuropsychological tests were administered before and after one of the chelation treatments and showed improvement in measures of attention and other cognitive domains. In addition, the patient was able to discontinue use of antidepressant medication after chelation. Discussion A high index of suspicion of metal toxicity is necessary among persons with characteristic symptoms and signs in the absence of occupational exposure. Despite limited evidence for chelation in adults and in those with modest blood lead levels, this patient appeared to benefit from repeated chelation therapy. Both allopathic and alternative medicine practitioners and public health specialists need to be aware of the potential for contamination of and side effects from alternative pharmacologic and herbal therapies. PMID:24083830

2013-01-01

410

Induced micronutrient toxicity in Petunia hybrida  

Microsoft Academic Search

Plant micronutnent toxicity symptoms of petunia (Petunia hybrida) cv. Ultra Crimson Star were experimentally induced and characterized. Starting at the 3–4 true leaf stage, plants grown in peat?lite mix in 11 cm pots were constantly fed for 5 weeks with fertilizer solutions containing 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 mM plus the control concentration of boron, copper,

Chiwon W. Lee; James R. Self

1992-01-01

411

Cadmium as a respiratory toxicant  

SciTech Connect

Cadmium is a major respiratory toxicant as evidenced by numerous human and animal studies. Controlled animal inhalation studies provide supporting evidence to the associations observed in epidemiological studies that Cd has the potential to cause lung fibrosis, emphysema, cancer, and kidney disease after prolonged exposure. Shorter-term exposure studies indicate that mechanisms thought to be involved in several of these chronic disease states (especially fibrosis and emphysema) are acutely activated. The evidence of toxicity is sufficiently clear that a TLV has been set and the International Agency for Research on Cancer has named Cd as a Group B1 substance (probable human carcinogen). The risk to Cd exposure is enhanced by its chemical and physical properties that result in bioaccumulation. Thus, even a low-level exposure over long periods of time would be expected to reach doses that could be toxic.

Grose, E.C.; Graham, J.A.

1987-01-01

412

The Prevalence and Incremental Validity of Identity Problem Symptoms in a High School Sample  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper examines the expression, prevalence, and incremental validity of identity problem symptoms in adolescence. A sample of high school students (N = 140) aged 15-18 completed measures of identity problem symptoms, identity status, and psychological symptom severity. Findings suggested that 14.3% would meet DSM IV criteria for identity…

Berman, Steven L.; Weems, Carl F.; Petkus, Veronica F.

2009-01-01

413

Trajectories of Individual Depressive Symptoms in Adolescents: Gender and Family Relationships as Predictors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Depressive syndrome and disorders increase substantially during adolescence. Little is known, however, about how "individual" symptoms of depression change over the course of this developmental period. The present study examined within-person changes in symptom severity of each individual symptom of depression, utilizing longitudinal…

Kouros, Chrystyna D.; Garber, Judy

2014-01-01

414

The role of rumination in depressive disorders and mixed anxiety\\/depressive symptoms  

Microsoft Academic Search

Several studies have shown that people who engage in ruminative responses to depressive symptoms have higher levels of depressive symptoms over time, after accounting for baseline levels of depressive symptoms. The analyses reported here showed that rumination also predicted depressive disorders, including new onsets of depressive episodes. Rumination predicted chronicity of depressive disorders before accounting for the effects of baseline

Susan Nolen-Hoeksema

2000-01-01

415

Menopause. How Exercise Mitigates Symptoms.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

During menopause and the climacteric, women experience many changes that can affect nearly every organ system and cause psychological symptoms. This article reviews the specific changes and explains how exercise can address each symptom; outlines a practical approach physicians can use to help menopausal patients improve their quality of life. (SM)

Hargarten, Kathleen M.

1994-01-01

416

Toxic Inhalational Injury-Associated Interstitial Lung Disease in Children  

PubMed Central

Interstitial lung disease in children (chILD) is a group of disorders characterized by lung inflammation and interstitial fibrosis. In the past recent years, we noted an outbreak of child in Korea, which is possibly associated with inhalation toxicity. Here, we report a series of cases involving toxic inhalational injury-associated chILD with bronchiolitis obliterans pattern in Korean children. This study included 16 pediatric patients confirmed by lung biopsy and chest computed tomography, between February 2006 and May 2011 at Asan Medical Center Children's Hospital. The most common presenting symptoms were cough and dyspnea. The median age at presentation was 26 months (range: 12-47 months), with high mortality (44%). Histopathological analysis showed bronchiolar destruction and centrilobular distribution of alveolar destruction by inflammatory and fibroproliferative process with subpleural sparing. Chest computed tomography showed ground-glass opacities and consolidation in the early phase and diffuse centrilobular nodular opacity in the late phase. Air leak with severe respiratory difficulty was associated with poor prognosis. Although respiratory chemicals such as humidifier disinfectants were strongly considered as a cause of this disease, further studies are needed to understand the etiology and pathophysiology of the disease to improve the prognosis and allow early diagnosis and treatment. PMID:23772158

Lee, Eun; Seo, Ju-Hee; Kim, Hyung Young; Yu, Jinho; Jhang, Won-Kyoung; Park, Seong-Jong; Kwon, Ji-Won; Kim, Byoung-Ju; Do, Kyung-Hyun; Cho, Young Ah; Kim, Sun-A; Jang, Se Jin

2013-01-01

417

Jatropha toxicity--a review.  

PubMed

Jatropha is a nonedible oil seed plant belonging to Euphorbiaceae family. Global awareness of sustainable and alternative energy resources has propelled research on Jatropha oil as a feedstock for biodiesel production. During the past two decades, several cultivation projects were undertaken to produce Jatropha oil. In future, the increased cultivation of toxic Jatropha plants and utilization of its agro-industrial by-products may raise the frequency of contact with humans, animals, and other organisms. An attempt was thus made to present known information on toxicity of Jatropha plants. The toxicity of Jatropha plant extracts from fruit, seed, oil, roots, latex, bark, and leaf to a number of species, from microorganisms to higher animals, is well established. Broadly, these extracts possess moluscicidal, piscicidal, insecticidal, rodenticidal, antimicrobial, and cytotoxic properties, and exert adverse effects on animals including rats, poultry, and ruminants. The toxicity attributed to these seeds due to their accidental consumption by children is also well documented. An attempt was also made to identify areas that need further study. The information provided in this review may aid in enhancing awareness in agroindustries involved in the cultivation, harvesting, and utilization of Jatropha plants and its products with respect to the potential toxicity of Jatropha, and consequently in application and enforcement of occupational safety measures. Data on the wide range of bioactivities of Jatropha and its products were collated and it is hoped will create new avenues for exploiting these chemicals by the phamaceutical industry to develop chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:20711929

Devappa, Rakshit K; Makkar, Harinder P S; Becker, Klaus

2010-08-01

418

Evaluation of symptoms and quality of life in men with benign prostatic hyperplasia.  

PubMed

Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a common histologic condition among older men, which conveys its morbidity through lower urinary tract symptoms and complications, such as acute urinary retention, obstructive uropathy, and urinary tract infections. The mechanisms linking the histologic process and lower urinary tract symptoms remain uncertain; prostatic enlargement and bladder outlet obstruction are involved. However, measurements of prostate size and the severity of bladder outlet obstruction correlate poorly with the severity of lower urinary tract symptoms. The severity of lower urinary tract symptoms associated with BPH can be measured reliably, from the patient's perspective, with a number of validated questionnaires, including the International Prostate Symptom Score, the Danish Prostate Symptom Score, and the International Continence Society (ICS)male questionnaire. In the clinical setting, these questionnaires can be used (1) to assess the severity of symptoms in men with lower urinary tract symptoms that may be attributable to BPH, based on their age and clinical characteristics; and (2) to follow changes in symptoms over time and with treatment. None of these questionnaires can accurately determine whether a symptomatic patient has underlying bladder outlet obstruction. Additional questionnaires are available to measure the impact of lower urinary tract symptoms on men's lives, as well as associated phenomena, such as continence and sexual function, which may be affected by BPH and its treatments. Men with a severe burden of lower urinary tract symptoms often have measurable decrements in overall health-related quality of life, which can be ameliorated by treatment. PMID:11750246

Barry, M J

2001-12-01

419

The heterogeneity of non-motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease.  

PubMed

In addition to motor symptoms, patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) may experience non-motor symptoms (NMS), more often with more advanced disease stage. However, the clinical feature of the NMS and potential risk factors that affect NMS in idiopathic PD patients remain unclear. 493 PD patients diagnosed with PD via the UK. Parkinson's Disease Society Brain Bank Clinical Diagnostic Criteria and 93 healthy control subjects (CN) were recruited in the current study. Questionnaires were used to assess the NMS, motor symptoms, cognitive function, and disease severity in both groups. Levodopa daily dose was calculated in PD patients. Multivariate linear regression analysis was used to identify the risk factors that potentially affect NMS in PD patients. The results showed that, the NMS occurrence and positive endorsement rate of PD patients were significantly higher compared to CN subjects. Multiple stepwise regression analysis found the motor symptom was the only factor that affected NMS in PD patients within five years of the disease course, whereas motor symptoms, cognitive function, disease severity and Levodopa daily dose significantly affected NMS if the disease course was more than five years. These findings demonstrated that NMS are affected by several risk factors at different stages of PD. The distribution of difference NMS is associated with the severity of motor symptoms and the dosage of anti-PD medications in Chinese PD patients. PMID:25376559

Zhang, Ning; Liu, Weiguo; Ye, Min; Cohen, Alexander D; Zhang, Yingdong

2014-11-01

420

Effect of prucalopride on symptoms of chronic constipation  

PubMed Central

Background Prucalopride is a 5-HT4 receptor agonist with gastrointestinal prokinetic activities. This integrated analysis of data from three 12-week, double-blind trials evaluated the effect of prucalopride 2 mg q.d. on common constipation symptoms in women in whom laxatives had failed to provide adequate relief. The effect of prucalopride on bowel function was outside the scope of the analysis and has been described elsewhere. Methods Women with self-reported inadequate relief from laxatives and included in the prucalopride 2 mg or placebo arm of the trials were selected for analysis. Symptom severity was determined with the Patient Assessment of Constipation Symptoms (PAC–SYM) questionnaire. Observed changes from baseline in individual item scores were also evaluated by calculating Cohen's D effect sizes using baseline standard deviation (SD) (>0.2–0.5, >0.5–0.8 and >0.8 for small, moderate and large effects, respectively). Key Results Data were analyzed for 936 women. The proportion of women with a PAC-SYM severity score >2 at baseline was 50.0% for abdominal symptoms, 71.4% for stool symptoms, and 15.5% for rectal symptoms. Excluding the women without presence of a symptom at baseline from the effect size calculations showed that prucalopride 2 mg had a large effect (>0.8) on all PAC-SYM items, in