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  1. Severe Traumatic Head Injury Affects Systemic Cytokine Expression

    PubMed Central

    LaPar, Damien J; Rosenberger, Laura H; Walters, Dustin M; Hedrick, Traci L; Swenson, Brian R; Young, Jeffrey S; Dossett, Lesly A; May, Addison K; Sawyer, Robert G

    2012-01-01

    Background The neuroimmunologic effect of traumatic head injury remains ill-defined. This study aimed to characterize systemic cytokine profiles among traumatically injured patients to assess the effect of traumatic head injury on the systemic inflammatory response. Study Design Over five years, 1,022 patients were evaluated from a multi-institutional trauma immunomodulatory database (TIMD). Patients were stratified by presence of severe head injury (SHI, Head ISS ≥ 4, n=335) versus non-severe head injury (NHI, Head ISS ≤ 3, n=687). Systemic cytokine expression was quantified by ELISA within 72 hours of admission. Patient factors, outcomes, and cytokine profiles were compared by univariate analyses. Results SHI patients were more severely injured with higher mortality despite similar ICU infection and ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP) rates. Expression of early pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-6 (p<0.001) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α (p=0.02), were higher among NHI patients, while expression of immunomodulatory cytokines, interferon-γ (p=0.01) and IL-12 (p=0.003), was higher in SHI patients. High TNF-α levels in NHI patients were associated with mortality (p=0.01), increased mechanical ventilation (p=0.02), and development of VAP (p=0.01). Alternatively, among SHI patients, high IL-2 levels were associated with survival, decreased mechanical ventilation, and absence of VAP. Conclusions The presence of severe traumatic head injury significantly alters systemic cytokine expression and exerts an immunomodulatory effect. Early recognition of these profiles may allow for targeted intervention to reduce patient morbidity and mortality. PMID:22342787

  2. The King's Outcome Scale for Childhood Head Injury and Injury Severity and Outcome Measures in Children with Traumatic Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calvert, Sophie; Miller, Helen E.; Curran, Andrew; Hameed, Biju; McCarter, Renee; Edwards, Richard J.; Hunt, Linda; Sharples, Peta Mary

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to relate discharge King's Outcome Scale for Childhood Head Injury (KOSCHI) category to injury severity and detailed outcome measures obtained in the first year post-traumatic brain injury (TBI). We used a prospective cohort study. Eighty-one children with TBI were studied: 29 had severe, 15 moderate, and 37 mild TBI. The…

  3. Head Impact Severity Measures for Evaluating Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Risk Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Greenwald, Richard M.; Gwin, Joseph T.; Chu, Jeffrey J.; Crisco, Joseph J.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To quantify sensitivity of various biomechanical measures of head impact (linear acceleration, rotational acceleration, impact duration, impact location) to clinical diagnosis of concussion in American football players and to develop a novel measure of head impact severity which combines these measures into a single score that better predicts the incidence of concussion. Methods On-field head impact data were collected from 449 football players at 13 organizations (n = 289,916) using in-helmet systems of six single axis accelerometers. 1,2,3,4,5 Concussions were diagnosed by medical staff and later associated with impact data. Principal Component Analysis 6, 7 and a weighting coefficient based on impact location were used to transform correlated head impact measures into a new composite variable (wPCS). The predictive power of linear acceleration, rotational acceleration, Head Injury Criteria, and wPCS was quantified using Receiver Operating Characteristic8,9,10 curves. The null hypothesis that a measure was no more predictive than guessing was tested (α=0.05). Additionally, ROC curves for wPCS and classical measures were directly compared to test the hypothesis that wPCS was more predictive of concussion than classic measures (α=0.05). Results When all impacts were considered, every biomechanical measure evaluated was statistically more predictive of concussion than guessing (p < 0.005). However, for the top 1% and 2% of impacts based on linear acceleration, a subset that consisted of 82% of all diagnosed concussions, only wPCS was significantly more predictive of concussion than guessing (p<0.03), and, when compared to each other, wPCS was more predictive of concussion than classical measures for the top 1% and 2% of all data (p < 0.04). Conclusions A weighted combination of several biomechanical inputs, including impact location, is more predictive of concussion than a single biomechanical measure. This study is the first to quantify improvements in

  4. [Traumatic rupture of the aortic isthmus in a patient with severe head injury].

    PubMed

    Lassié, P; Tentillier, E; Thicoïpé, M; Pinaquy, C; Laborde, N

    1993-01-01

    A 32-year-old man sustained a severe head injury in a road traffic accident. On admission, he was in deep coma (6 on the Glasgow coma scale). The aortic knuckle was difficult to identify on a plain chest film. Twenty hours after admission, the aortic knuckle had completely disappeared and the mediastinal shadow had become enlarged. The diagnosis of a ruptured aortic isthmus was confirmed by angiography. Surgical repair of this lesion may be carried out either with simple aortic cross-clamping, or by using cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Either technique may worsen other injuries, especially head injury, by initiating severe arterial hypertension or coagulation disturbances. In this patient, the technique chosen was aortic cross-clamping with permanent monitoring of the intracranial and cerebral perfusion pressures. Anaesthesia was obtained with 5 mg.kg-1 of thiopentone, 30 mg.kg-1 x h-1 of sodium gamma hydroxybutyrate and 8 micrograms.kg-1 x h-1 of fentanyl. Surgery lasted for 90 min, with 33 min of aortic clamping. The increase in arterial blood pressure was controlled with 0.25 mg.kg-1 x h-1 of thiopentone and nicardipine which was stopped 8 min before unclamping. The postoperative course was uneventful. Sedation was stopped after 8 days, and the patient regained consciousness two days later. These remained a paraplegia with no sensory deficit, which had totally receded 15 months later. Carrying out this emergency surgery without CPB means that the intracranial pressure must imperatively be monitored during surgery. Any intracranial hypertension should delay the surgery. PMID:8338263

  5. Severe Traumatic Injury

    PubMed Central

    Minei, Joseph P.; Schmicker, Robert H.; Kerby, Jeffrey D.; Stiell, Ian G.; Schreiber, Martin A.; Bulger, Eileen; Tisherman, Samuel; Hoyt, David B.; Nichol, Graham

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The public health implications of regional variation in incidence and outcome of severe traumatic injury remain to be analyzed. The objective of this study was to determine whether the incidence and outcome associated with severe traumatic injury differs across geographic regions of North America. Methods A prospective, observational study was conducted of the Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium of all patients in 9 North American sites (6 US and 3 Canadian) sustaining severe traumatic injury from April 1, 2006 to March 31, 2007 followed to hospital discharge. Eligible patients were assessed by organized emergency medical services, and had field-based physiologic criteria including systolic blood pressure ≤90 mm Hg, Glasgow Coma Scale score ≤12, respiratory rate <10 or >29 per minute, advanced airway procedure, or traumatic death in the field. Census data were used to determine rates adjusted for age and sex. The main outcome measures were incidence rate, mortality rate, case fatality rate, and survival to discharge for patients sustaining severe traumatic injury assessed by EMS. Results The total catchment population of 20.5 million yielded 7080 cases of severe traumatic injury. Median age was 36 years and 67% were male. The median incidence of EMS-assessed severe traumatic injury per 100,000 population across sites was 37.4 (interquartile range [IQR] = 24.6 – 69.6); survival ranged from 39.8% to 80.8%, with a median of 64.5% (IQR = 55.5–78.4). About 942 cases were pronounced dead at the scene and 5857 patients were transported to hospital; 4477 (63.2%) were discharged alive. The median incidence of severe trauma due to a blunt mechanism, transported to hospital, was 25.8 (IQR = 13.1–44.3); survival ranged from 52.6% to 87.3%, with a median of 78.0% (IQR = 68.4–83.5). The median incidence of severe penetrating trauma, transported to hospital, was 2.6 (IQR = 1.5–10.4); survival ranged from 37.5% to 84.7%, with a median of 67.5% (IQR = 54.1

  6. Low risk of late post-traumatic seizures following severe head injury: implications for clinical trials of prophylaxis.

    PubMed Central

    McQueen, J K; Blackwood, D H; Harris, P; Kalbag, R M; Johnson, A L

    1983-01-01

    A randomised, controlled, double-blind clinical trial designed to determine the effectiveness of phenytoin in preventing epilepsy in patients who had suffered a serious head injury is reported. One hundred and sixty-four patients were randomly assigned to treatment with phenytoin or placebo capsules for one year. Patients who had a fit within one week of injury were excluded. Drug levels were monitored throughout with appropriate dosage adjustment; however only 48% of the phenytoin group had plasma levels greater than 40 mumol/l. There were seven deaths during the study. Only 11 patients (six in the phenytoin group and five in the placebo group) developed post-traumatic epilepsy within one year; a further four patients developed seizures between 1 and 2 years after injury. This low incidence of post-traumatic epilepsy (7% (SE 2%) at one year and 10 (SE 2%) at two years) means that future clinical trials of prophylaxis will have to be much larger (at least six fold). PMID:6417279

  7. Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Clinton G.; Elta, Tara; Bannister, Jeanette; Dzandu, James; Mangram, Alicia; Zach, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 28 Final Diagnosis: Closed head injury Symptoms: Bilateral mydriasis • coma Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Ventriculostomy and hemicraniectomy Specialty: Neurology Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Traumatic brain injury remains a challenging and complicated disease process to care for, despite the advance of technology used to monitor and guide treatment. Currently, the mainstay of treatment is aimed at limiting secondary brain injury, with the help of multiple specialties in a critical care setting. Prognosis after TBI is often even more challenging than the treatment itself, although there are various exam and imaging findings that are associated with poor outcome. These findings are important because they can be used to guide families and loved ones when making decisions about goals of care. Case Report: In this case report, we demonstrate the unanticipated recovery of a 28-year-old male patient who presented with a severe traumatic brain injury after being in a motorcycle accident without wearing a helmet. He presented with several exam and imaging findings that are statistically associated with increased mortality and morbidity. Conclusions: The care of severe traumatic brain injuries is challenging and dynamic. This case highlights the unexpected recovery of a patient and serves as a reminder that there is variability among patients. PMID:27005826

  8. School Psychologists' Knowledge of Traumatic Head Injury: Implications for Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mira, Mary P.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Seventy-one school psychologists were surveyed concerning their knowledge base, training, and experience in the area of traumatic head injury. Results indicated that school psychologists have received little systematic training in the area of traumatic head injury and do not have broad-based information about this group of children. (Author/JDD)

  9. Components of Traumatic Brain Injury Severity Indices

    PubMed Central

    Corrigan, John D.; Kreider, Scott; Cuthbert, Jeffrey; Whyte, John; Dams-O’Connor, Kristen; Faul, Mark; Harrison-Felix, Cynthia; Whiteneck, Gale; Pretz, Christopher R.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether there are underlying dimensions common among traditional traumatic brain injury (TBI) severity indices and, if so, the extent to which they are interchangeable when predicting short-term outcomes. This study had an observational design, and took place in United States trauma centers reporting to the National Trauma Data Bank (NTDB). The sample consisted of 77,470 unweighted adult cases reported to the NTDB from 2007 to 2010, with International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) TBI codes. There were no interventions. Severity indices used were the Emergency Department Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) Total score and each of the subscales for eye opening (four levels), verbal response (five levels), and motor response (six levels); the worst Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) severity score for the head (six levels); and the worst Barell index type (three categories). Prediction models were computed for acute care length of stay (days), intensive care unit length of stay (days), hospital discharge status (alive or dead), and, if alive, discharge disposition (home versus institutional). Multiple correspondence analysis (MCA) indicated a two dimensional relationship among items of severity indexes. The primary dimension reflected overall injury severity. The second dimension seemed to capture volitional behavior without the capability for cogent responding. Together, they defined two vectors around which most of the items clustered. A scale that took advantage of the order of items along these vectors proved to be the most consistent index for predicting short-term health outcomes. MCA provided useful insight into the relationships among components of traditional TBI severity indices. The two vector pattern may reflect the impact of injury on different cortical and subcortical networks. Results are discussed in terms of score substitution and the ability to impute missing values. PMID

  10. Contribution of traumatic head injury to neuropsychological deficits in alcoholics.

    PubMed Central

    Hillbom, M; Holm, L

    1986-01-01

    The contribution of head injuries to neuropsychological deficits was studied in 157 recently detoxified alcoholics and 400 control subjects consisting of age-stratified randomly selected men and women from the same geographical area as the alcoholics. Head injuries had occurred in 41% and 22% of the male and female alcoholics, but only in 15% and 6% of the male and female control subjects. One third of the injured subjects in both groups had been admitted to hospital for treatment of the acute injury. The neuropsychological test results of alcoholics were significantly inferior to those of control subjects. Unexpectedly, alcoholics with head injuries not identified at hospital were significantly inferior in several Halstead-Reitan subtests when compared with uninjured alcoholics with a similar duration of alcoholism and abstinence. By contrast, control subjects who had sustained a head injury not identified at hospital did not show signs of intellectual impairment when compared with uninjured controls. We conclude that traumatic brain injuries that may cause significant intellectual impairment may easily remain unrecognised in alcoholics. PMID:3806110

  11. Traumatic Intracranial Aneurysm Formation following Closed Head Injury

    PubMed Central

    Miley, Jefferson T; Rodriguez, Gustavo J; Qureshi, Adnan I

    2008-01-01

    Background: Traumatic intracranial aneurysms are rare conditions that can be a result of non-penetrating head trauma. We report the occurrence of intracranial aneurysms in patients with traumatic brain injury. Methods: All diagnostic cerebral angiograms performed in patients with traumatic brain injury at a level I trauma center from January 2006 to July 2007 were reviewed. Results: Diagnostic cerebral angiography was performed in 74 patients with the diagnosis of closed head injury. A total of 4 traumatic intracranial pseudoaneurysms were found in 4 patients, two in the supraclinoid segment of the internal carotid artery, one in the cavernous segment of the internal carotid artery and one in the paraophthalmic segment of the internal carotid artery. Two patients were treated with coil embolization. One patient had follow up imaging on which there was no change in the size and morphology of the aneurysm. Conclusion: Intracranial aneurysms can develop in patients with closed head injury presumably related to shear or rotational injury. It is unclear whether these aneurysms should be classified as traumatic intracranial aneurysms or pseudoaneurysms, but the pathological findings frequently reveal disruption of the three vascular layers fulfilling the definition of pseudoaneurysm. For these reason we favor the name of post-traumatic intracranial pseudoaneurysms. PMID:22518228

  12. Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI): Moderate or Severe

    MedlinePlus

    ... know? There are two types of TBIs: Closed Head Injury Caused by a blow or jolt to the head that does not penetrate the skull Penetrating Head Injury Occurs when an object goes through the skull ...

  13. [Usefulness of biomarkers in the prognosis of severe head injuries].

    PubMed

    Gordillo-Escobar, E; Egea-Guerrero, J J; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, A; Murillo-Cabezas, F

    2016-03-01

    Severe head injuries have a great socioeconomic and public health impact. Despite progress in diagnosis and treatment, no sufficiently reliable predictive models have been established for developing clinical trials and promoting effective therapeutic strategies capable of improving the prognosis. In the last decades, several brain damage biomarkers have been studied as potential diagnostic and prognostic tools in traumatic brain injury. However, all of them have limitations that preclude their universalized application. The properties of the known biomarkers -both those traditionally shown to correlate with severity and prognosis, and those recently announced as promising options- should be analyzed. New studies are needed to define their properties, both isolatedly and in combined use. PMID:26823158

  14. Ischemic retinopathy and neovascular proliferation secondary to severe head injury.

    PubMed

    Coban-Karatas, Muge; Altan-Yaycioglu, Rana

    2014-01-01

    We report a case with severe head trauma and perforating globe injury in one eye and ischemic retinopathy and neovascular proliferation in the other eye. A 37-year-old male was brought to the emergency department after a motor vehicle accident with severe maxillofacial trauma. Ophthalmic examination revealed hematoma of the left eyelids as well as traumatic rupture and disorganization of the left globe. On the right eye, anterior segment and fundoscopic examination were normal. Primary globe repair was performed. At postoperative one-month visit, the right eye revealed no pathology of the optic disc and macula but severe neovascularization in the temporal peripheral retina. The patient was diagnosed as ischemic retinopathy and neovascular proliferation due to head trauma. PMID:25143848

  15. Pathophysiology and Treatment of Severe Traumatic Brain Injuries in Children.

    PubMed

    Allen, Kimberly A

    2016-02-01

    Traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) in children are a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Severe TBIs account for 15,000 admissions annually and a mortality rate of 24% in children in the United States. The purpose of this article is to explore pathophysiologic events, examine monitoring techniques, and explain current treatment modalities and nursing care related to caring for children with severe TBI. The primary injury of a TBI is because of direct trauma from an external force, a penetrating object, blast waves, or a jolt to the head. Secondary injury occurs because of alterations in cerebral blood flow, and the development of cerebral edema leads to necrotic and apoptotic cellular death after TBI. Monitoring focuses on intracranial pressure, cerebral oxygenation, cerebral edema, and cerebrovascular injuries. If abnormalities are identified, treatments are available to manage the negative effects caused to the cerebral tissue. The mainstay treatments are hyperosmolar therapy; temperature control; cerebrospinal fluid drainage; barbiturate therapy; decompressive craniectomy; analgesia, sedation, and neuromuscular blockade; and antiseizure prophylaxis. PMID:26720317

  16. The Effect of Hemoglobin Levels on Mortality in Pediatric Patients with Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective. There is increasing evidence of adverse outcomes associated with blood transfusions for adult traumatic brain injury patients. However, current evidence suggests that pediatric traumatic brain injury patients may respond to blood transfusions differently on a vascular level. This study examined the influence of blood transfusions and anemia on the outcome of pediatric traumatic brain injury patients. Design. A retrospective cohort analysis of severe pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients was undertaken to investigate the association between blood transfusions and anemia on patient outcomes. Measurements and Main Results. One hundred and twenty patients with severe traumatic brain injury were identified and included in the analysis. The median Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) was 6 and the mean hemoglobin (Hgb) on admission was 115.8 g/L. Forty-three percent of patients (43%) received at least one blood transfusion and the mean hemoglobin before transfusion was 80.1 g/L. Multivariable regression analysis revealed that anemia and the administration of packed red blood cells were not associated with adverse outcomes. Factors that were significantly associated with mortality were presence of abusive head trauma, increasing PRISM score, and low GCS after admission. Conclusion. In this single centre retrospective cohort study, there was no association found between anemia, blood transfusions, and hospital mortality in a pediatric traumatic brain injury patient population.

  17. Study Links Severe Head Injury to Parkinson's Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... News) -- A traumatic brain injury with loss of consciousness may increase the risk of developing Parkinson's disease, ... 865 had suffered a head injury and lost consciousness at some point in their lives -- some fairly ...

  18. Early hospital care of severe traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Protheroe, R T; Gwinnutt, C L

    2011-11-01

    Head injury is one of the major causes of trauma-related morbidity and mortality in all age groups in the United Kingdom, and anaesthetists encounter this problem in many areas of their work. Despite a better understanding of the pathophysiological processes following traumatic brain injury and a wealth of research, there is currently no specific treatment. Outcome remains dependant on basic clinical care: management of the patient's airway with particular attention to preventing hypoxia; avoidance of the extremes of lung ventilation; and the maintenance of adequate cerebral perfusion, in an attempt to avoid exacerbating any secondary injury. Hypertonic fluids show promise in the management of patients with raised intracranial pressure. Computed tomography scanning has had a major impact on the early identification of lesions amenable to surgery, and recent guidelines have rationalised its use in those with less severe injuries. Within critical care, the importance of controlling blood glucose is becoming clearer, along with the potential beneficial effects of hyperoxia. The major improvement in outcome reflects the use of protocols to guide resuscitation, investigation and treatment and the role of specialist neurosciences centres in caring for these patients. Finally, certain groups are now recognised as being at greater risk, in particular the elderly, anticoagulated patient. PMID:21950689

  19. [Severe apathy following head injury: improvement with Selegiline treatment].

    PubMed

    Moutaouakil, F; El Otmani, H; Fadel, H; Slassi, I

    2009-12-01

    Apathy is defined as reduced goal-directed behavior due to lack of motivation. Traumatic brain injury is a frequent cause. Drugs activating the dopaminergic system provide variable benefit. A 30-year-old patient was the victim of a severe head injury with frontal bruise at the age of 15. At the request of his family, he consulted for a 7-year history that included a lack of initiative and the inability to generate behavior spontaneously, contrasting with the ability to execute behaviors on command. He also presented indifference, major emotional disruption without sadness, pessimism, and other depressive signs. The examination found a severe apathetic syndrome confirmed by specific scales with a mild impairment of executive functions and without depressive syndrome. Encephalic MRI showed atrophy of the whole prefrontal cerebral cortex. The patient was treated with bromocriptine, which he did not tolerate, then with Selegiline at 15 mg per day, which dramatically improved his symptoms. Apathy occurs frequently after traumatic brain injury, in 23-71% of patients according to the authors. The pathophysiology of apathy has been described in anatomical terms as related to disruption of frontal-subcortical pathways. The biochemical hypothesis postulates a disruption in dopaminergic activity. The use of dopaminergic agents usually improves cases similar to our patient. Apathy is frequent following head injury, warranting a search for systematic causes. Since it increases dopaminergic activity, Selegiline is well worth trying in these patients. PMID:19084243

  20. Tauopathy PET and amyloid PET in the diagnosis of chronic traumatic encephalopathies: studies of a retired NFL player and of a man with FTD and a severe head injury

    PubMed Central

    Mitsis, E M; Riggio, S; Kostakoglu, L; Dickstein, D L; Machac, J; Delman, B; Goldstein, M; Jennings, D; D'Antonio, E; Martin, J; Naidich, T P; Aloysi, A; Fernandez, C; Seibyl, J; DeKosky, S T; Elder, G A; Marek, K; Gordon, W; Hof, P R; Sano, M; Gandy, S

    2014-01-01

    Single, severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) which elevates CNS amyloid, increases the risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD); while repetitive concussive and subconcussive events as observed in athletes and military personnel, may increase the risk of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). We describe two clinical cases, one with a history of multiple concussions during a career in the National Football League (NFL) and the second with frontotemporal dementia and a single, severe TBI. Both patients presented with cognitive decline and underwent [18F]-Florbetapir positron emission tomography (PET) imaging for amyloid plaques; the retired NFL player also underwent [18F]-T807 PET imaging, a new ligand binding to tau, the main constituent of neurofibrillary tangles (NFT). Case 1, the former NFL player, was 71 years old when he presented with memory impairment and a clinical profile highly similar to AD. [18F]-Florbetapir PET imaging was negative, essentially excluding AD as a diagnosis. CTE was suspected clinically, and [18F]-T807 PET imaging revealed striatal and nigral [18F]-T807 retention consistent with the presence of tauopathy. Case 2 was a 56-year-old man with personality changes and cognitive decline who had sustained a fall complicated by a subdural hematoma. At 1 year post injury, [18F]-Florbetapir PET imaging was negative for an AD pattern of amyloid accumulation in this subject. Focal [18F]-Florbetapir retention was noted at the site of impact. In case 1, amyloid imaging provided improved diagnostic accuracy where standard clinical and laboratory criteria were inadequate. In that same case, tau imaging with [18F]-T807 revealed a subcortical tauopathy that we interpret as a novel form of CTE with a distribution of tauopathy that mimics, to some extent, that of progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), despite a clinical presentation of amnesia without any movement disorder complaints or signs. A key distinguishing feature is that our patient presented with

  1. Tauopathy PET and amyloid PET in the diagnosis of chronic traumatic encephalopathies: studies of a retired NFL player and of a man with FTD and a severe head injury.

    PubMed

    Mitsis, E M; Riggio, S; Kostakoglu, L; Dickstein, D L; Machac, J; Delman, B; Goldstein, M; Jennings, D; D'Antonio, E; Martin, J; Naidich, T P; Aloysi, A; Fernandez, C; Seibyl, J; DeKosky, S T; Elder, G A; Marek, K; Gordon, W; Hof, P R; Sano, M; Gandy, S

    2014-01-01

    Single, severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) which elevates CNS amyloid, increases the risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD); while repetitive concussive and subconcussive events as observed in athletes and military personnel, may increase the risk of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). We describe two clinical cases, one with a history of multiple concussions during a career in the National Football League (NFL) and the second with frontotemporal dementia and a single, severe TBI. Both patients presented with cognitive decline and underwent [(18)F]-Florbetapir positron emission tomography (PET) imaging for amyloid plaques; the retired NFL player also underwent [(18)F]-T807 PET imaging, a new ligand binding to tau, the main constituent of neurofibrillary tangles (NFT). Case 1, the former NFL player, was 71 years old when he presented with memory impairment and a clinical profile highly similar to AD. [(18)F]-Florbetapir PET imaging was negative, essentially excluding AD as a diagnosis. CTE was suspected clinically, and [(18)F]-T807 PET imaging revealed striatal and nigral [(18)F]-T807 retention consistent with the presence of tauopathy. Case 2 was a 56-year-old man with personality changes and cognitive decline who had sustained a fall complicated by a subdural hematoma. At 1 year post injury, [(18)F]-Florbetapir PET imaging was negative for an AD pattern of amyloid accumulation in this subject. Focal [(18)F]-Florbetapir retention was noted at the site of impact. In case 1, amyloid imaging provided improved diagnostic accuracy where standard clinical and laboratory criteria were inadequate. In that same case, tau imaging with [(18)F]-T807 revealed a subcortical tauopathy that we interpret as a novel form of CTE with a distribution of tauopathy that mimics, to some extent, that of progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), despite a clinical presentation of amnesia without any movement disorder complaints or signs. A key distinguishing feature is that our patient presented

  2. Gender differences in self reported long term outcomes following moderate to severe traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The majority of research on health outcomes after a traumatic brain injury is focused on male participants. Information examining gender differences in health outcomes post traumatic brain injury is limited. The purpose of this study was to investigate gender differences in symptoms reported after a traumatic brain injury and to examine the degree to which these symptoms are problematic in daily functioning. Methods This is a secondary data analysis of a retrospective cohort study of 306 individuals who sustained a moderate to severe traumatic brain injury 8 to 24 years ago. Data were collected using the Problem Checklist (PCL) from the Head Injury Family Interview (HIFI). Using Bonferroni correction, group differences between women and men were explored using Chi-square and Wilcoxon analysis. Results Chi-square analysis by gender revealed that significantly more men reported difficulty setting realistic goals and restlessness whereas significantly more women reported headaches, dizziness and loss of confidence. Wilcoxon analysis by gender revealed that men reported sensitivity to noise and sleep disturbances as significantly more problematic than women, whereas for women, lack of initiative and needing supervision were significantly more problematic in daily functioning. Conclusion This study provides insight into gender differences on outcomes after traumatic brain injury. There are significant differences between problems reported by men compared to women. This insight may facilitate health service planners and clinicians when developing programs for individuals with brain injury. PMID:21029463

  3. Closed traumatic brain injury model in sheep mimicking high-velocity, closed head trauma in humans.

    PubMed

    Grimmelt, A-C; Eitzen, S; Balakhadze, I; Fischer, B; Wölfer, J; Schiffbauer, H; Gorji, A; Greiner, C

    2011-08-01

    To date, there are only a few, non-evidence based, cerebroprotective therapeutic strategies for treatment and, accordingly, for prevention of secondary brain injuries following severe closed head trauma. In order to develop new therapy strategies, existing realistic animal models need to be advanced. The objective is to bridge standardized small animal models and actual patient medical care, since the results of experimental small animal studies often cannot be transferred to brain-injured humans. For improved standardization of high-velocity trauma, new trauma devices for initiating closed traumatic brain injury in sheep were developed. The following new devices were tested: 1. An anatomically shaped rubber bolt with an integrated oscillation absorber for prevention of skull fractures; 2. Stationary mounting of the bolt to guarantee stable experimental conditions; 3. Varying degrees of trauma severity, i. e., mild and severe closed traumatic brain injury, using different cartridges; and 4. Trauma analysis via high-speed video recording. Peritraumatic measurements of intracranial pressure, brain tissue pH, brain tissue oxygen, and carbon dioxide pressure, as well as neurotransmitter concentrations were performed. Cerebral injuries were documented with magnetic resonance imaging and compared to neuropathological results. Due to the new trauma devices, skull fractures were prevented. The high-speed video recording documented a realistic trauma mechanism for a car accident. Enhancement of extracellular glutamate, aspartate, and gamma amino butyric acid concentrations began 60 min after the trauma. Magnetic resonance imaging and neuropathological results showed characteristic injury patterns of mild, and severe, closed traumatic brain injury. The severe, closed traumatic brain injury group showed diffuse axonal injuries, traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage, and hemorrhagic contusions with inconsistent distribution among the animals. The model presented here achieves

  4. A Porcine Model of Traumatic Brain Injury via Head Rotational Acceleration.

    PubMed

    Cullen, D Kacy; Harris, James P; Browne, Kevin D; Wolf, John A; Duda, John E; Meaney, David F; Margulies, Susan S; Smith, Douglas H

    2016-01-01

    Unique from other brain disorders, traumatic brain injury (TBI) generally results from a discrete biomechanical event that induces rapid head movement. The large size and high organization of the human brain makes it particularly vulnerable to traumatic injury from rotational accelerations that can cause dynamic deformation of the brain tissue. Therefore, replicating the injury biomechanics of human TBI in animal models presents a substantial challenge, particularly with regard to addressing brain size and injury parameters. Here we present the historical development and use of a porcine model of head rotational acceleration. By scaling up the rotational forces to account for difference in brain mass between swine and humans, this model has been shown to produce the same tissue deformations and identical neuropathologies found in human TBI. The parameters of scaled rapid angular accelerations applied for the model reproduce inertial forces generated when the human head suddenly accelerates or decelerates in falls, collisions, or blunt impacts. The model uses custom-built linkage assemblies and a powerful linear actuator designed to produce purely impulsive non-impact head rotation in different angular planes at controlled rotational acceleration levels. Through a range of head rotational kinematics, this model can produce functional and neuropathological changes across the spectrum from concussion to severe TBI. Notably, however, the model is very difficult to employ, requiring a highly skilled team for medical management, biomechanics, neurological recovery, and specialized outcome measures including neuromonitoring, neurophysiology, neuroimaging, and neuropathology. Nonetheless, while challenging, this clinically relevant model has proven valuable for identifying mechanisms of acute and progressive neuropathologies as well as for the evaluation of noninvasive diagnostic techniques and potential neuroprotective treatments following TBI. PMID:27604725

  5. [Severe head injuries during Judo practice].

    PubMed

    Nagahiro, Shinji; Mizobuchi, Yoshifumi; Hondo, Hideki; Kasuya, Hidetoshi; Kamitani, Takeshi; Shinbara, Yuzo; Nimura, Yuji; Tomatsu, Taisuke

    2011-12-01

    The goal of this study is to elucidate the characteristic features of Judo head injuries and to propose safety measures and a reaction manual on how to prevent and to deal with such accidents in Japan. Thirty cases of severe head injuries suffered during Judo practice were enrolled in this study. They have made insurance claims for damage compensation and inquiries about Judo accidents attributed to the All Japan Judo Federation, from 2003 to 2010. The average age of the patients was 16.5 year old. The incidence of injury showed 2 peaks in different academic grade levels; one is in the first year of junior high-school (30.0%, n=9) and the other is in senior high school (26.7%, n=8). Around half of them were beginners. Four cases (13.3%) had past history of head trauma or headache and dizziness before a catastrophic accident, suggesting the presence of a second impact. Lucid interval was observed in 25 cases (83.3%). Most patients (93.3%) suffered acute subdural hematoma associated with avulsion of a cerebral bridging vein. Of patients who underwent emergency removal of the hematoma, 15 patients (50%) died and 7 patients (23.3%) entered a persistent vegetative state. Based on these findings, we propose an emergency manual with safety measures for effectively preventing and treating Judo head injuries in an appropriate manner. To reduce the disastrous head injuries in Judo, the safety measures and an optimal action manual should be reconsidered and widely spread and accepted by society. PMID:22128268

  6. A Drosophila model of closed head traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Katzenberger, Rebeccah J.; Loewen, Carin A.; Wassarman, Douglas R.; Petersen, Andrew J.; Ganetzky, Barry; Wassarman, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a substantial health issue worldwide, yet the mechanisms responsible for its complex spectrum of pathologies remains largely unknown. To investigate the mechanisms underlying TBI pathologies, we developed a model of TBI in Drosophila melanogaster. The model allows us to take advantage of the wealth of experimental tools available in flies. Closed head TBI was inflicted with a mechanical device that subjects flies to rapid acceleration and deceleration. Similar to humans with TBI, flies with TBI exhibited temporary incapacitation, ataxia, activation of the innate immune response, neurodegeneration, and death. Our data indicate that TBI results in death shortly after a primary injury only if the injury exceeds a certain threshold and that age and genetic background, but not sex, substantially affect this threshold. Furthermore, this threshold also appears to be dependent on the same cellular and molecular mechanisms that control normal longevity. This study demonstrates the potential of flies for providing key insights into human TBI that may ultimately provide unique opportunities for therapeutic intervention. PMID:24127584

  7. Mechanics of blast loading on the head models in the study of traumatic brain injury using experimental and computational approaches.

    PubMed

    Ganpule, S; Alai, A; Plougonven, E; Chandra, N

    2013-06-01

    Blast waves generated by improvised explosive devices can cause mild, moderate to severe traumatic brain injury in soldiers and civilians. To understand the interactions of blast waves on the head and brain and to identify the mechanisms of injury, compression-driven air shock tubes are extensively used in laboratory settings to simulate the field conditions. The overall goal of this effort is to understand the mechanics of blast wave-head interactions as the blast wave traverses the head/brain continuum. Toward this goal, surrogate head model is subjected to well-controlled blast wave profile in the shock tube environment, and the results are analyzed using combined experimental and numerical approaches. The validated numerical models are then used to investigate the spatiotemporal distribution of stresses and pressure in the human skull and brain. By detailing the results from a series of careful experiments and numerical simulations, this paper demonstrates that: (1) Geometry of the head governs the flow dynamics around the head which in turn determines the net mechanical load on the head. (2) Biomechanical loading of the brain is governed by direct wave transmission, structural deformations, and wave reflections from tissue-material interfaces. (3) Deformation and stress analysis of the skull and brain show that skull flexure and tissue cavitation are possible mechanisms of blast-induced traumatic brain injury. PMID:22832705

  8. [Guidelines for the management of severe traumatic brain injury. Part 3. Surgical management of severe traumatic brain injury (Options)].

    PubMed

    Potapov, A A; Krylov, V V; Gavrilov, A G; Kravchuk, A D; Likhterman, L B; Petrikov, S S; Talypov, A E; Zakharova, N E; Solodov, A A

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one of the main causes of mortality and severe disability in young and middle age patients. Patients with severe TBI, who are in coma, are of particular concern. Adequate diagnosis of primary brain injuries and timely prevention and treatment of secondary injury mechanisms markedly affect the possibility of reducing mortality and severe disability. The present guidelines are based on the authors' experience in developing international and national recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of mild TBI, penetrating gunshot wounds of the skull and brain, severe TBI, and severe consequences of brain injury, including a vegetative state. In addition, we used the materials of international and national guidelines for the diagnosis, intensive care, and surgical treatment of severe TBI, which were published in recent years. The proposed recommendations for surgical treatment of severe TBI in adults are addressed primarily to neurosurgeons, neurologists, neuroradiologists, anesthesiologists, and intensivists who are routinely involved in treating these patients. PMID:27070263

  9. Post-traumatic migraine: chronic migraine precipitated by minor head or neck trauma.

    PubMed

    Weiss, H D; Stern, B J; Goldberg, J

    1991-07-01

    Minor trauma to the head or neck is occasionally followed by severe chronic headaches. We have evaluated 35 adults (27 women, 8 men) with no prior history of headaches, who developed recurrent episodic attacks typical of common or classic migraine following minor head or neck injuries ("post-traumatic migraine"-PTM). The median age of these patients was 38 years (range 17 to 63 years), which is older than the usual age at onset of idiopathic migraine. The trauma was relatively minor: 14 patients experienced head trauma with brief loss of consciousness, 14 patients sustained head trauma without loss of consciousness, and 7 patients had a "whiplash" neck injury with no documented head trauma. Headaches began immediately or within the first few days after the injury. PTM typically recurred several times per week and was often incapacitating. The patients had been unsuccessfully treated by other physicians, and there was a median delay of 4 months (range 1 to 30 months) before the diagnosis of PTM was suspected. The response to prophylactic anti-migraine medication (propranolol or amitriptyline used alone or in combination) was gratifying, with 21 of 30 adequately treated patients (70%) reporting dramatic reduction in the frequency and severity of their headaches. Improvement was noted in 18 of the 23 patients (78%) who were still involved in litigation at the time of treatment. The neurologic literature has placed excessive emphasis on compensation neurosis and psychological factors in the etiology of chronic headaches after minor trauma. Physicians must be aware of PTM, as it is both common and treatable. PMID:1774160

  10. [International multicenter studies of treatment of severe traumatic brain injury].

    PubMed

    Talypov, A E; Kordonsky, A Yu; Krylov, V V

    2016-01-01

    Despite the introduction of new diagnostic and therapeutic methods, traumatic brain injury (TBI) remains one of the leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Standards and recommendations on conservative and surgical treatment of TBI patients should be based on concepts and methods with proven efficacy. The authors present a review of studies of the treatment and surgery of severe TBI: DECRA, RESCUEicp, STITCH(TRAUMA), CRASH, CRASH-2, CAPTAIN, NABIS: H ll, Eurotherm 3235. Important recommendations of the international group IMPACT are considered. PMID:27045148

  11. The Evolution of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder following Moderate-to-Severe Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Alway, Yvette; Gould, Kate Rachel; McKay, Adam; Johnston, Lisa; Ponsford, Jennie

    2016-05-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) may develop following traumatic brain injury (TBI), despite most patients having no conscious memory of their accident. This prospective study examined the frequency, timing of onset, symptom profile, and trajectory of PTSD and its psychiatric comorbidities during the first 4 years following moderate-to-severe TBI. Participants were 85 individuals (78.8% male) with moderate or severe TBI recruited following admission to acute rehabilitation between 2005 and 2010. Using the Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Disorders (SCID-I), participants were evaluated for pre- and post-injury PTSD soon after injury and reassessed at 6 months, 12 months, 2 years, 3 years, and 4 years post-injury. Over the first 4 years post-injury, 17.6% developed injury-related PTSD, none of whom had PTSD prior to injury. PTSD onset peaked between 6 and 12 months post-injury. The majority of PTSD cases (66.7%) had a delayed-onset, which for a third was preceded by subsyndromal symptoms in the first 6 months post-injury. PTSD frequency increased over the first year post-injury, remained stable during the second year, and gradually declined thereafter. The majority of subjects with PTSD experienced a chronic symptom course and all developed one or more than one comorbid psychiatric disorder, with mood, other anxiety, and substance-use disorders being the most common. Despite event-related amnesia, post-traumatic stress symptoms, including vivid re-experiencing phenomena, may develop following moderate-to-severe TBI. Onset is typically delayed and symptoms may persist for several years post-injury. PMID:26176500

  12. Glasgow Coma Scale and Outcomes after Structural Traumatic Head Injury in Early Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Heather, Natasha L.; Derraik, José G. B.; Beca, John; Hofman, Paul L.; Dansey, Rangi; Hamill, James; Cutfield, Wayne S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess the association of the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) with radiological evidence of head injury (the Abbreviated Injury Scale for the head region, AIS-HR) in young children hospitalized with traumatic head injury (THI), and the predictive value of GCS and AIS-HR scores for long-term impairment. Methods Our study involved a 10-year retrospective review of a database encompassing all patients admitted to Starship Children’s Hospital (Auckland, New Zealand, 2000–2010) with THI. Results We studied 619 children aged <5 years at the time of THI, with long-term outcome data available for 161 subjects. Both GCS and AIS-HR scores were predictive of length of intensive care unit and hospital stay (all p<0.001). GCS was correlated with AIS-HR (ρ=-0.46; p<0.001), although mild GCS scores (13–15) commonly under-estimated the severity of radiological injury: 42% of children with mild GCS scores had serious–critical THI (AIS-HR 3–5). Increasingly severe GCS or AIS-HR scores were both associated with a greater likelihood of long-term impairment (neurological disability, residual problems, and educational support). However, long-term impairment was also relatively common in children with mild GCS scores paired with structural THI more severe than a simple linear skull fracture. Conclusion Severe GCS scores will identify most cases of severe radiological injury in early childhood, and are good predictors of poor long-term outcome. However, young children admitted to hospital with structural THI and mild GCS scores have an appreciable risk of long-term disability, and also warrant long-term follow-up. PMID:24312648

  13. Traumatic subchondral fracture of the femoral head in a healed trochanteric fracture

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Yang; Niikura, Takahiro; Iwakura, Takashi; Kurosaka, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    An 82-year-old woman sustained a trochanteric fracture of the left femur after a fall. Fracture fixation was performed using proximal femoral nail antirotation (PFNA) II, and she was able to walk with a T-cane after 3 months. Eleven months following the operation, the patient presented with left hip pain after a fall. Radiographs showed a subchondral collapse of the femoral head located above the blade tip. The authors removed the PFNA-II and subsequently performed cemented bipolar hemiarthroplasty. Histological evaluation of the femoral head showed osteoporosis with no evidence of osteonecrosis. Repair tissue, granulation tissue and callus formation were seen at the collapsed subchondral area. Based on these findings, a traumatic subchondral fracture of the femoral head in a healed trochanteric fracture was diagnosed. A traumatic subchondral fracture of the femoral head may need to be considered as a possible diagnosis after internal fixation of the trochanteric fracture. PMID:25015169

  14. Cognitive contributions to theory of mind ability in children with a traumatic head injury.

    PubMed

    Levy, Naomi Kahana; Milgram, Noach

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the current study is to examine the contribution of intellectual abilities, executive functions (EF), and facial emotion recognition to difficulties in Theory of Mind (ToM) abilities in children with a traumatic head injury. Israeli children with a traumatic head injury were compared with their non-injured counterparts. Each group included 18 children (12 males) ages 7-13. Measurements included reading the mind in the eyes, facial emotion recognition, reasoning the other's characteristics based on motive and outcome, Raven's Coloured Progressive Matrices, similarities and digit span (Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children - Revised 95 subscales), verbal fluency, and the Behaviour Rating Inventory of Executive Functions. Non-injured children performed significantly better on ToM, abstract reasoning, and EF measures compared with children with a traumatic head injury. However, differences in ToM abilities between the groups were no longer significant after controlling for abstract reasoning, working memory, verbal fluency, or facial emotion recognition. Impaired ToM recognition and reasoning abilities after a head injury may result from other cognitive impairments. In children with mild and moderate head injury, poorer performance on ToM tasks may reflect poorer abstract reasoning, a general tendency to concretize stimuli, working memory and verbal fluency deficits, and difficulties in facial emotion recognition, rather than deficits in the ability to understand the other's thoughts and emotions. ToM impairments may be secondary to a range of cognitive deficits in determining social outcomes in this population. PMID:25495376

  15. The profile of head injuries and traumatic brain injury deaths in Kashmir

    PubMed Central

    Yattoo, GH; Tabish, Amin

    2008-01-01

    This study was conducted on patients of head injury admitted through Accident & Emergency Department of Sher-i-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences during the year 2004 to determine the number of head injury patients, nature of head injuries, condition at presentation, treatment given in hospital and the outcome of intervention. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) deaths were also studied retrospectively for a period of eight years (1996 to 2003). The traumatic brain injury deaths showed a steady increase in number from year 1996 to 2003 except for 1999 that showed decline in TBI deaths. TBI deaths were highest in age group of 21–30 years (18.8%), followed by 11–20 years age group (17.8%) and 31–40 years (14.3%). The TBI death was more common in males. Maximum number of traumatic brain injury deaths was from rural areas as compared to urban areas. To minimize the morbidity and mortality resulting from head injury there is a need for better maintenance of roads, improvement of road visibility and lighting, proper mechanical maintenance of automobile and other vehicles, rigid enforcement of traffic rules, compulsory wearing of crash helmets by motor cyclist and scooterists and shoulder belt in cars and imparting compulsory road safety education to school children from primary education level. Moreover, appropriate medical care facilities (including trauma centres) need to be established at district level, sub-divisional and block levels to provide prompt and quality care to head injury patients PMID:18570674

  16. Caregiver burden at 1 year following severe traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Marsh, N V; Kersel, D A; Havill, J H; Sleigh, J W

    1998-12-01

    Sixty-nine primary caregivers of adults with a severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) were assessed at 1-year post-injury. Caregivers completed questionnaires on the physical, cognitive, emotional, behavioural, and social functioning of the person with TBI. Caregiver objective burden, psychosocial functioning, and subjective burden were also assessed. Clinically significant levels of anxiety and depression were evident in over a third of the caregivers. Similarly, a quarter of the caregivers reported poor social adjustment. There was no consistent relationship between the prevalence of various types of objective burden and the level of subjective distress that resulted from these changes. The person with TBI's emotional difficulties, in particular their anger, apathy, and dependency, caused the greatest distress for caregivers. With regard to the impact that caregiving had on their own lives, caregivers were most distressed by the loss of personal free time. Results from a regression analysis indicated that the person with TBI's physical impairment, number of behavioural problems, and social isolation were the strongest predictors of caregiver burden. The impact that caring for a person with severe TBI can have on the extended family unit is discussed. PMID:9876864

  17. Who Gets Head Trauma or Recruited in Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Research?

    PubMed

    Isokuortti, Harri; Iverson, Grant L; Kataja, Anneli; Brander, Antti; Öhman, Juha; Luoto, Teemu M

    2016-01-15

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is a public health problem. Outcome from mTBI is heterogeneous in part due to pre-injury individual differences that typically are not well described or understood. Pre-injury health characteristics of all consecutive patients (n=3023) who underwent head computed tomography due to acute head trauma in the emergency department of Tampere University Hospital, Finland, between August 2010 and July 2012 were examined. Patients were screened to obtain a sample of working age adults with no pre-injury medical or mental health problems who had sustained a "pure" mTBI. Of all patients screened, 1990 (65.8%) fulfilled the mTBI criteria, 257 (8.5%) had a more severe TBI, and 776 (25.7%) had a head trauma without obvious signs of brain injury. Injury-related data and participant-related data (e.g., age, sex, diagnosed diseases, and medications) were collected from hospital records. The most common pre-injury diseases were circulatory (39.4%-43.2%), neurological (23.7%-25.2%), and psychiatric (25.8%-27.5%) disorders. Alcohol abuse was present in 18.4%-26.8%. The most common medications were for cardiovascular (33.1%-36.6%), central nervous system (21.4%-30.8%), and blood clotting and anemia indications (21.5%-22.6%). Of the screened patients, only 2.5% met all the enrollment criteria. Age, neurological conditions, and psychiatric problems were the most common reasons for exclusion. Most of the patients sustaining an mTBI have some pre-injury diseases or conditions that could affect clinical outcome. By excluding patients with pre-existing conditions, the patients with known risk factors for poor outcome remain poorly studied. PMID:26054639

  18. Exploring Self-Perceived Growth in a Clinical Sample of Severely Traumatized Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glad, Kristin Alve; Jensen, Tine K.; Holt, Tonje; Ormhaug, Silje Morup

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aims of this study were threefold: (1) examine the prevalence of Posttraumatic Growth (PTG) among severely traumatized youth, (2) systematically describe the PTG reported, and (3) study the course of PTG from pre- to post-treatment. Method: The sample consisted of 148 severely traumatized Norwegian youth (M age = 15, SD = 2.2, 79.1%…

  19. Factors prognosticating the outcome of decompressive craniectomy in severe traumatic brain injury: A Malaysian experience

    PubMed Central

    Sharda, Priya; Haspani, Saffari; Idris, Zamzuri

    2014-01-01

    (P < 0.001). Multivariate logistic regression with stepwise likelihood ratio (LR) method concluded that hypoxia post operatively (P = 0.152), the unmaintained Cerebral Perfusion Pressure (CPP) (P = 0.007) and unstable blood pressure (BP) (P = <0.001). Poor outcome noted 10.2 times higher in post operative hypoxia [OR10.184; 95% CI: 0.424, 244.495]. Odds of having poor outcome if CPP unmaintained was 13.8 times higher [OR: 13.754; CI: 2.050, 92.301]. Highest predictor of poor outcome was the unstable BP, 32 times higher [OR 31.600; CI: 4.530, 220440]. Conclusion: Our series represent both urban and rural population, noted to be the largest series in severe TBI in this region. Severe head injury accounts for significant proportion of neurosurgical admissions, resources with its impact on socio-economic concerns to a growing population like Malaysia. This study concludes that the predictors of outcome in severe TBI post DC were postoperative hypoxia, unmaintained cerebral perfusion pressure and unstable blood pressure as independent predictors of poor outcome. Key words: Decompressive craniectomy, prognostication of decompressive craniectomy, prognostication of severe head injury, prognostication of traumatic brain injury, severe head injury, severe traumatic brain injury, traumatic brain injury. PMID:25685217

  20. Injury predictors for traumatic axonal injury in a rodent head impact acceleration model.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Zhang, Liying; Kallakuri, Srinivasu; Zhou, Runzhou; Cavanaugh, John M

    2011-11-01

    A modified Marmarou impact acceleration injury model was developed to study the kinematics of the rat head to quantify traumatic axonal injury (TAI) in the corpus callosum (CC) and brainstem pyramidal tract (Py), to determine injury predictors and to establish injury thresholds for severe TAI. Thirty-one anesthetized male Sprague-Dawley rats (392±13 grams) were impacted using a modified impact acceleration injury device from 2.25 m and 1.25 m heights. Beta-amyloid precursor protein (β-APP) immunocytochemistry was used to assess and quantify axonal changes in CC and Py. Over 600 injury maps in CC and Py were constructed in the 31 impacted rats. TAI distribution along the rostro-caudal direction in CC and Py was determined. Linear and angular responses of the rat head were monitored and measured in vivo with an attached accelerometer and angular rate sensor, and were correlated to TAI data. Logistic regression analysis suggested that the occurrence of severe TAI in CC was best predicted by average linear acceleration, followed by power and time to surface righting. The combination of average linear acceleration and time to surface righting showed an improved predictive result. In Py, severe TAI was best predicted by time to surface righting, followed by peak and average angular velocity. When both CC and Py were combined, power was the best predictor, and the combined average linear acceleration and average angular velocity was also found to have good injury predictive ability. Receiver operator characteristic curves were used to assess the predictive power of individual and paired injury predictors. TAI tolerance curves were also proposed in this study. PMID:22869303

  1. Traumatic Hip Dislocation with Associated Femoral Head Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Dortaj, H.; Emamifar, A.

    2015-01-01

    Dislocation of the hip is a critical injury that results from high-energy trauma. This paper describes a case of posterior dislocation of the right hip in a 35-year-old woman with associated ipsilateral femoral head fracture. Initial treatment included reduction of the right hip through posterior approach and fixation of the femoral head fracture with three absorbable screws. After 15-month follow-up, a full range of motion has been achieved and there are no signs of avascular necrosis, hip instability, or limping. The authors describe their method of surgery. PMID:25874147

  2. Mitochondrial Polymorphisms Impact Outcomes after Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Okonkwo, David O.; Deslouches, Sandra; Alexander, Sheila; Puccio, Ava M.; Beers, Sue R.; Ren, Dianxu

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Patient outcomes are variable following severe traumatic brain injury (TBI); however, the biological underpinnings explaining this variability are unclear. Mitochondrial dysfunction after TBI is well documented, particularly in animal studies. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of mitochondrial polymorphisms on mitochondrial function and patient outcomes out to 1 year after a severe TBI in a human adult population. The Human MitoChip V2.0 was used to evaluate mitochondrial variants in an initial set of n=136 subjects. SNPs found to be significantly associated with patient outcomes [Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS), Neurobehavioral Rating Scale (NRS), Disability Rating Scale (DRS), in-hospital mortality, and hospital length of stay] or neurochemical level (lactate:pyruvate ratio from cerebrospinal fluid) were further evaluated in an expanded sample of n=336 subjects. A10398G was associated with DRS at 6 and 12 months (p=0.02) and a significant time by SNP interaction for DRS was found (p=0.0013). The A10398 allele was associated with greater disability over time. There was a T195C by sex interaction for GOS (p=0.03) with the T195 allele associated with poorer outcomes in females. This is consistent with our findings that the T195 allele was associated with mitochondrial dysfunction (p=0.01), but only in females. This is the first study associating mitochondrial DNA variation with both mitochondrial function and neurobehavioral outcomes after TBI in humans. Our findings indicate that mitochondrial DNA variation may impact patient outcomes after a TBI potentially by influencing mitochondrial function, and that sex of the patient may be important in evaluating these associations in future studies. PMID:23883111

  3. Association between Hyperglycaemia with Neurological Outcomes Following Severe Head Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Khajavikhan, Javaher; Kokhazade, Taleb; Khani, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Head Trauma (HT) is a major cause of death, disability and important public health problem. HT is also the main cause of hyperglycaemia that can increase mortality. Aim The aim of this study was to assess the correlation between hyperglycaemia with neurological outcomes following severe Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI). Materials and Methods This is a descriptive and correlation study that was carried out at the Imam Khomeini Hospital affiliated with Ilam University of Medical Sciences, Ilam, IR, during March 2014–March 2015 on patients with severe TBI. Data were collected from the patient records on mortality, Intensive Care Unit (ICU) length of stay, hospital length of stay, admission GCS score, Injury Severity Score (ISS), mechanical ventilation, Ventilation Associated Pneumonia (VAP) and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS). Random Blood Sugar (RBS) level on admission was recorded. Patients with diabetes mellitus (to minimize the overlap between acute stress hyperglycaemia and diabetic hyperglycaemia) were excluded. Results About 34(40%) of patients were admitted with hyperglycaemia (RBS ≥ 200 mg/dl) over the study period. The mortality rate, length of ICU stay, hospital stay, ISS and VAP & ARDS in patients with RBS levels ≥ 200 mg was significantly higher than patients with RBS levels below ≤ 200mg (p<0.05, p<0.001). A significant correlation was found between RBS with GCS arrival, length of ICU stay, length of hospital stay, ISS, mechanical ventilation and VAP & ARDS (p<0.05, p< 0.001). RBS is a predicate factor for ISS (p <0.05, OR : 1.36), GCS (p <0.001, OR : 1.69), mechanical ventilation (p< 0.05, OR : 1.27), VAP & ARDS (p <0.001, OR : 1.68), length of ICU stay (p <0.001, OR : 1.87) and length of hospital stay (p <0.05, OR : 1.24). Conclusion Hyperglycaemia after severe TBI (RBS ≥ 200) is associated with poor outcome. It can be a predictive factor for mortality rate, ICU stay, GCS arrival, VAP & RDS, hospital stay and ISS

  4. Head Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... before. Often, the injury is minor because your skull is hard and it protects your brain. But ... injuries can be more severe, such as a skull fracture, concussion, or traumatic brain injury. Head injuries ...

  5. Head Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... before. Usually, the injury is minor because your skull is hard and it protects your brain. But ... injuries can be more severe, such as a skull fracture, concussion, or traumatic brain injury. Head injuries ...

  6. Role of a Dentist in Comprehensive Management of a Comatose Patient with Post Traumatic Head Injury and Neuropathological Chewing

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sunanda; Nanda, Aditi; Koli, Dheeraj; Daksh, Sapna; Verma, Mahesh

    2014-01-01

    Injury of the head and neck region can result in substantial morbidity. Comprehensive management of such patients requires team work of several specialties, including dentists. A young female patient with extensive loss of cranium and associated pathological chewing was referred to the dental department. The lost cranium was replaced by a custom-made, hand-fabricated cranioplast. Trauma due to pathological mastication was reduced by usage of a custom-made mouthguard. Favorable results were seen in the appearance of the patient and after insertion of the mouthguard as evidenced in good healing response. The intricate role of a dental specialist in the team to manage a patient with post traumatic head injury has been highlighted. The take away message is to make the surgical fraternity aware of the scope of dentistry in the comprehensive management of patients requiring special care. PMID:25125873

  7. Naloxone for Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Du, Renfei; Xu, Enxi; Dong, Lun; Wang, Xingdong; Yan, Zhengcun; Pang, Lujun; Wei, Min; She, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Objective The efficiency of naloxone for the management of secondary brain injury after severe traumatic brain injury (sTBI) remains undefined. The aim of this study is to evaluate the current evidence regarding the clinical efficiency and safety of naloxone as a treatment for sTBI in mainland China. Methodology/Principal Findings A systematic search of the China Biology Medicine disc (CBM), China Science and Technology Journal Database (VIP), China National Knowledge Internet (CNKI), and Wan Fang Database was performed to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of naloxone treatment for patients with sTBI in mainland China. The quality of the included trials was assessed, and the RevMan 5.1 software was employed to conduct this meta-analysis. Nineteen RCTs including 2332 patients were included in this study. The odds ratio (OR) showed statistically significant differences between the naloxone group and the control group (placebo) in terms of mortality at 18 months after treatment (OR, 0.51, 95%CI: 0.38–0.67; p<0.00001), prevalence of abnormal heart rates (OR, 0.30, 95%CI: 0.21–0.43; p<0.00001), abnormal breathing rate (OR, 0.25, 95%CI: 0.17–0.36; p<0.00001) at discharge, the level of intracranial pressure at discharge (OR, 2.00, 95%CI: 1.41–2.83; p = 0.0001), verbal or physical dysfunction rate (OR, 0.65, 95%CI: 0.43–0.98; p = 0.04), and severe disability rate (OR, 0.47, 95%CI: 0.30–0.73; p = 0.0001) at 18 months after the treatment. The mean difference (MD) showed statistically significant differences in awakening time at discharge (MD, −4.81, 95%CI: −5.49 to −4.12; p<0.00001), and GCS at 3 days (MD, 1.00, 95%CI: 0.70–1.30; p<0.00001) and 10 days (MD, 1.76, 95%CI: 1.55–1.97; p<0.00001) after treatment comparing naloxone with placebo group. Conclusions/Significance This study indicated that applying naloxone in the early stage for sTBI patients might effectively reduce mortality, control intracranial pressure (ICP), and

  8. External validation of the CRASH and IMPACT prognostic models in severe traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Han, Julian; King, Nicolas K K; Neilson, Sam J; Gandhi, Mihir P; Ng, Ivan

    2014-07-01

    An accurate prognostic model is extremely important in severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) for both patient management and research. Clinical prediction models must be validated both internally and externally before they are considered widely applicable. Our aim is to independently externally validate two prediction models, one developed by the Corticosteroid Randomization After Significant Head injury (CRASH) trial investigators, and the other from the International Mission for Prognosis and Analysis of Clinical Trials in Traumatic Brain Injury (IMPACT) group. We used a cohort of 300 patients with severe TBI (Glasgow Coma Score [GCS] ≤8) consecutively admitted to the National Neuroscience Institute (NNI), Singapore, between February 2006 and December 2009. The CRASH models (base and CT) predict 14 day mortality and 6 month unfavorable outcome. The IMPACT models (core, extended, and laboratory) estimate 6 month mortality and unfavorable outcome. Validation was based on measures of discrimination and calibration. Discrimination was assessed using the area under the receiving operating characteristic curve (AUC), and calibration was assessed using the Hosmer-Lemeshow (H-L) goodness-of-fit test and Cox calibration regression analysis. In the NNI database, the overall observed 14 day mortality was 47.7%, and the observed 6 month unfavorable outcome was 71.0%. The CRASH base model and all three IMPACT models gave an underestimate of the observed values in our cohort when used to predict outcome. Using the CRASH CT model, the predicted 14 day mortality of 46.6% approximated the observed outcome, whereas the predicted 6 month unfavorable outcome was an overestimate at 74.8%. Overall, both the CRASH and IMPACT models showed good discrimination, with AUCs ranging from 0.80 to 0.89, and good overall calibration. We conclude that both the CRASH and IMPACT models satisfactorily predicted outcome in our patients with severe TBI. PMID:24568201

  9. Interleukin (IL)-8 immunoreactivity of injured axons and surrounding oligodendrocytes in traumatic head injury.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Takahito; Ago, Kazutoshi; Nakamae, Takuma; Higo, Eri; Ogata, Mamoru

    2016-06-01

    Interleukin (IL)-8 has been suggested to be a positive regulator of myelination in the central nervous system, in addition to its principal role as a chemokine for neutrophils. Immunostaining for beta-amyloid precursor protein (AβPP) is an effective tool for detecting traumatic axonal injury, although AβPP immunoreactivity can also indicate axonal injury due to hypoxic causes. In this study, we examined IL-8 and AβPP immunoreactivity in sections of corpus callosum obtained from deceased patients with blunt head injury and from equivalent control tissue. AβPP immunoreactivity was detected in injured axons, such as axonal bulbs and varicose axons, in 24 of 44 head injury cases. These AβPP immunoreactive cases had survived for more than 3h. The AβPP immunostaining pattern can be classified into two types: traumatic (Pattern 1) and non-traumatic (Pattern 2) axonal injuries, which we described previously [Hayashi et al. Int. J. Legal Med. 129 (2015) 1085-1090]. Three of 44 control cases also showed AβPP immunoreactive injured axons as Pattern 2. In contrast, IL-8 immunoreactivity was detected in 7 AβPP immunoreactive and in 2 non-AβPP immunoreactive head injury cases, but was not detected in any of the 44 control cases, including the 3 AβPP immunoreactive control cases. The IL-8 immunoreactive cases had survived from 3 to 24 days, whereas those cases who survived less than 3 days (n=29) and who survived 90 days (n=1) were not IL-8 immunoreactive. Moreover, IL-8 was detected as Pattern 1 axons only. In addition, double immunofluorescence analysis showed that IL-8 is expressed by oligodendrocytes surrounding injured axons. In conclusion, our results suggest that immunohistochemical detection of IL-8 may be useful as a complementary diagnostic marker of traumatic axonal injury. PMID:27065055

  10. Traumatic Brain Injury by a Closed Head Injury Device Induces Cerebral Blood Flow Changes and Microhemorrhages

    PubMed Central

    Kallakuri, Srinivasu; Bandaru, Sharath; Zakaria, Nisrine; Shen, Yimin; Kou, Zhifeng; Zhang, Liying; Haacke, Ewart Mark; Cavanaugh, John M

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Traumatic brain injury is a poly-pathology characterized by changes in the cerebral blood flow, inflammation, diffuse axonal, cellular, and vascular injuries. However, studies related to understanding the temporal changes in the cerebral blood flow following traumatic brain injury extending to sub-acute periods are limited. In addition, knowledge related to microhemorrhages, such as their detection, localization, and temporal progression, is important in the evaluation of traumatic brain injury. Materials and Methods: Cerebral blood flow changes and microhemorrhages in male Sprague Dawley rats at 4 h, 24 h, 3 days, and 7 days were assessed following a closed head injury induced by the Marmarou impact acceleration device (2 m height, 450 g brass weight). Cerebral blood flow was measured by arterial spin labeling. Microhemorrhages were assessed by susceptibility-weighted imaging and Prussian blue histology. Results: Traumatic brain injury rats showed reduced regional and global cerebral blood flow at 4 h and 7 days post-injury. Injured rats showed hemorrhagic lesions in the cortex, corpus callosum, hippocampus, and brainstem in susceptibility-weighted imaging. Injured rats also showed Prussian blue reaction products in both the white and gray matter regions up to 7 days after the injury. These lesions were observed in various areas of the cortex, corpus callosum, hippocampus, thalamus, and midbrain. Conclusions: These results suggest that changes in cerebral blood flow and hemorrhagic lesions can persist for sub-acute periods after the initial traumatic insult in an animal model. In addition, microhemorrhages otherwise not seen by susceptibility-weighted imaging are present in diverse regions of the brain. The combination of altered cerebral blood flow and microhemorrhages can potentially be a source of secondary injury changes following traumatic brain injury and may need to be taken into consideration in the long-term care of these cases. PMID:26605126

  11. Witnessing traumatic events causes severe behavioral impairments in rats.

    PubMed

    Patki, Gaurav; Solanki, Naimesh; Salim, Samina

    2014-12-01

    Witnessing a traumatic event but not directly experiencing it can be psychologically quite damaging. In North America alone, ∼30% of individuals who witness a traumatic event develop post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). While effects of direct trauma are evident, consequences of indirect or secondary trauma are often ignored. Also unclear is the role of social support in the consequences of these experiences. The social defeat paradigm, which involves aggressive encounters by a large Long-Evans male rat (resident) towards a smaller Sprague-Dawley male rat (intruder), is considered a rodent model of PTSD. We have modified this model to create a trauma witness model (TWM) and have used our TWM model to also evaluate social support effects. Basically, when an intruder rat is placed into the home cage of a resident rat, it encounters an agonistic behavior resulting in intruder subordination. The socially defeated intruder is designated the SD rat. A second rat, the cage mate of the SD, is positioned to witness the event and is the trauma witnessing (TW) rat. Experiments were performed in two different experimental conditions. In one, the SD and TW rats were cagemates and acclimatized together. Then, one SD rat was subjected to three sessions of social defeat for 7 d. TW rat witnessed these events. After each social defeat exposure, the TW and SD rats were housed together. In the second, the TW and SD rats were housed separately starting after the first defeat. At the end of each protocol, depression-anxiety-like behavior and memory tests were conducted on the SD and TW rats, blood withdrawn and specific organs collected. Witnessing traumatic events led to depression- and anxiety-like behavior and produced memory deficits in TW rats associated with elevated corticosterone levels. PMID:24887568

  12. Witnessing traumatic events causes severe behavioral impairments in rats

    PubMed Central

    Patki, Gaurav; Solanki, Naimesh; Salim, Samina

    2015-01-01

    Witnessing a traumatic event but not directly experiencing it can be psychologically quite damaging. In North America alone, ~30% of individuals who witness a traumatic event develop post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). While effects of direct trauma are evident, consequences of indirect or secondary trauma are often ignored. Also unclear is the role of social support in the consequences of these experiences. The social defeat paradigm, which involves aggressive encounters by a large Long–Evans male rat (resident) towards a smaller Sprague–Dawley male rat (intruder), is considered a rodent model of PTSD. We have modified this model to create a trauma witness model (TWM) and have used our TWM model to also evaluate social support effects. Basically, when an intruder rat is placed into the home cage of a resident rat, it encounters an agonistic behavior resulting in intruder subordination. The socially defeated intruder is designated the SD rat. A second rat, the cage mate of the SD, is positioned to witness the event and is the trauma witnessing (TW) rat. Experiments were performed in two different experimental conditions. In one, the SD and TW rats were cagemates and acclimatized together. Then, one SD rat was subjected to three sessions of social defeat for 7 d. TW rat witnessed these events. After each social defeat exposure, the TW and SD rats were housed together. In the second, the TW and SD rats were housed separately starting after the first defeat. At the end of each protocol, depression-anxiety-like behavior and memory tests were conducted on the SD and TW rats, blood withdrawn and specific organs collected. Witnessing traumatic events led to depression- and anxiety-like behavior and produced memory deficits in TW rats associated with elevated corticosterone levels. PMID:24887568

  13. Experimental study of blast-induced traumatic brain injury using a physical head model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiangyue; Pintar, Frank A; Yoganandan, Narayan; Gennarelli, Thomas A; Son, Steven F

    2009-11-01

    This study was conducted to quantify intracranial biomechanical responses and external blast overpressures using physical head model to understand the biomechanics of blast traumatic brain injury and to provide experimental data for computer simulation of blast-induced brain trauma. Ellipsoidal-shaped physical head models, made from 3-mm polycarbonate shell filled with Sylgard 527 silicon gel, were used. Six blast tests were conducted in frontal, side, and 45 degrees oblique orientations. External blast overpressures and internal pressures were quantified with ballistic pressure sensors. Blast overpressures, ranging from 129.5 kPa to 769.3 kPa, were generated using a rigid cannon and 1.3 to 3.0 grams of pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) plastic sheet explosive (explosive yield of 13.24 kJ and TNT equivalent mass of 2.87 grams for 3 grams of material). The PETN plastic sheet explosive consisted of 63% PETN powder, 29% plasticizer, and 8% nitrocellulose with a density of 1.48 g/cm3 and detonation velocity of 6.8 km/s. Propagation and reflection of the shockwave was captured using a shadowgraph technique. Shockwave speeds ranging from 423.3 m/s to 680.3 m/s were recorded. The model demonstrated a two-stage response: a pressure dominant (overpressure) stage followed by kinematic dominant (blast wind) stage. Positive pressures in the brain simulant ranged from 75.1 kPa to 1095 kPa, and negative pressures ranged from -43.6 kPa to -646.0 kPa. High- and normal-speed videos did not reveal observable deformations in the brain simulant from the neutral density markers embedded in the midsagittal plane of the head model. Amplitudes of the internal positive and negative pressures were found to linearly correlate with external overpressure. Results from the current study suggested a pressure-dominant brain injury mechanism instead of strain injury mechanism under the blast severity of the current study. These quantitative results also served as the validation and calibration

  14. Managing traumatic brain injury in children: When do we need a computed tomography of the head?

    PubMed Central

    Kambal, Mohammed A; Abou, Manal E; Gadi, Iman Al; Al Boukai, Ahmad Amer; Al Jurayyan, Nasir A

    2014-01-01

    Accidents still represent a major cause of death and disability in children. The resultant traumatic brain injury (TBI) usually needs a multidisciplinary approach of management. Although computed tomographic (CT) head scan is generally a preferred investigation in TBI, however, clear guidelines are required to help decision making by different team members on “when a head CT scan is needed”, its limitations, and “when it is likely to be informative”. The answers to these queries are highlighted, in the present article, with other aspects of treatment of children with TBI. This article discusses different worldwide-accepted approaches for managing children with TBI, and places special emphasis on the issue of “indications for a head CT scan”.

  15. Risk taking in hospitalized patients with acute and severe traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Fecteau, Shirley; Levasseur-Moreau, Jean; García-Molina, Alberto; Kumru, Hatiche; Vergara, Raúl Pelayo; Bernabeu, Monste; Roig, Teresa; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Tormos, José Maria

    2013-01-01

    Rehabilitation can improve cognitive deficits observed in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, despite rehabilitation, the ability of making a choice often remains impaired. Risk taking is a daily activity involving numerous cognitive processes subserved by a complex neural network. In this work we investigated risk taking using the Balloon Analogue Risk Task (BART) in patients with acute TBI and healthy controls. We hypothesized that individuals with TBI will take less risk at the BART as compared to healthy individuals. We also predicted that within the TBI group factors such as the number of days since the injury, severity of the injury, and sites of the lesion will play a role in risk taking as assessed with the BART. Main findings revealed that participants with TBI displayed abnormally cautious risk taking at the BART as compared to healthy subjects. Moreover, healthy individuals showed increased risk taking throughout the task which is in line with previous work. However, individuals with TBI did not show this increased risk taking during the task. We also investigated the influence of three patients' characteristics on their performance at the BART: Number of days post injury, Severity of the head injury, and Status of the frontal lobe. Results indicate that performance at the BART was influenced by the number of days post injury and the status of the frontal lobe, but not by the severity of the head injury. Reported findings are encouraging for risk taking seems to naturally improve with time postinjury. They support the need of conducting longitudinal prospective studies to ultimately identify impaired and intact cognitive skills that should be trained postinjury. PMID:24386232

  16. Use of serum biomarkers to predict secondary insults following severe traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Stein, Deborah M; Lindel, Allison L; Murdock, Karen R; Kufera, Joseph A; Menaker, Jay; Scalea, Thomas M

    2012-06-01

    The management of severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) focuses on prevention and treatment of intracranial hypertension (ICH) and cerebral hypoperfusion (CH). Predicting which patients will develop these secondary insults is currently not possible. This study investigates the systemic manifestation of neuroinflammation and its role in helping to predict clinical deterioration following severe TBI. Patients with head Abbreviated Injury Severity greater than 3, age older than 14 years, "isolated" TBI, and placement of intracranial pressure monitor were prospectively enrolled. Serum was collected within 24 h and twice daily for 7 days. Measures of moderate and severe ICH (intracranial pressure >20 and >30 mmHg) and moderate and severe CH (cerebral perfusion pressure <60 and <50 mmHg) were compared with interleukin 8 (IL-8) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) levels drawn before periods of monitoring. An adjusted mixed-model analysis accounting for longitudinal correlations was applied. Sixty-eight patients were enrolled; 670 12-h periods of monitoring and 845 serum samples were available for analysis. Associations were found between serum levels of IL-8 and moderate and severe CH. Levels of TNF-α and severe ICH and CH were also correlated. Specificities of 81% to 95% were found for prediction of ICH and CH for TNF-α and CH for IL-8. Interleukin 8 and TNF-α demonstrate promise as candidate serum markers of impending ICH and CH. This suggests that we may be able to "predict" imminent events following TBI before clinical manifestations. Given the morbidity of ICH and CH, minimizing the effects of these secondary insults may have a significant impact on outcome and help guide decisions about timing of interventions. PMID:22552017

  17. Pathophysiology and Management of Moderate and Severe Traumatic Brain Injury in Children.

    PubMed

    Guilliams, Kristin; Wainwright, Mark S

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in children. Key pathophysiologic processes of traumatic brain injury are initiated by mechanical forces at the time of trauma, followed by complex excitotoxic cascades associated with compromised cerebral autoregulation and progressive edema. Acute care focuses on avoiding secondary insults, including hypoxia, hypotension, and hyperthermia. Children with moderate or severe traumatic brain injury often require intensive monitoring and treatment of multiple parameters, including intracranial pressure, blood pressure, metabolism, and seizures, to minimize secondary brain injury. Child neurologists can play an important role in acute and long-term care. Acutely, as members of a multidisciplinary team in the intensive care unit, child neurologists monitor for early signs of neurological change, guide neuroprotective therapies, and transition patients to long-term recovery. In the longer term, neurologists are uniquely positioned to treat complications of moderate and severe traumatic brain injury, including epilepsy and cognitive and behavioral issues. PMID:25512361

  18. NIR light propagation in a digital head model for traumatic brain injury (TBI)

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Robert; Khan, Bilal; Alexandrakis, George; Florence, James; MacFarlane, Duncan

    2015-01-01

    Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is capable of detecting and monitoring acute changes in cerebral blood volume and oxygenation associated with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Wavelength selection, source-detector separation, optode density, and detector sensitivity are key design parameters that determine the imaging depth, chromophore separability, and, ultimately, clinical usefulness of a NIRS instrument. We present simulation results of NIR light propagation in a digital head model as it relates to the ability to detect intracranial hematomas and monitor the peri-hematomal tissue viability. These results inform NIRS instrument design specific to TBI diagnosis and monitoring. PMID:26417498

  19. NIR light propagation in a digital head model for traumatic brain injury (TBI).

    PubMed

    Francis, Robert; Khan, Bilal; Alexandrakis, George; Florence, James; MacFarlane, Duncan

    2015-09-01

    Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is capable of detecting and monitoring acute changes in cerebral blood volume and oxygenation associated with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Wavelength selection, source-detector separation, optode density, and detector sensitivity are key design parameters that determine the imaging depth, chromophore separability, and, ultimately, clinical usefulness of a NIRS instrument. We present simulation results of NIR light propagation in a digital head model as it relates to the ability to detect intracranial hematomas and monitor the peri-hematomal tissue viability. These results inform NIRS instrument design specific to TBI diagnosis and monitoring. PMID:26417498

  20. Triage of children with moderate and severe traumatic brain injury to trauma centers.

    PubMed

    Kernic, Mary A; Rivara, Frederick P; Zatzick, Douglas F; Bell, Michael J; Wainwright, Mark S; Groner, Jonathan I; Giza, Christopher C; Mink, Richard B; Ellenbogen, Richard G; Boyle, Linda; Mitchell, Pamela H; Kannan, Nithya; Vavilala, Monica S

    2013-07-01

    Outcomes after pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI) are related to pre-treatment factors including age, injury severity, and mechanism of injury, and may be positively affected by treatment at trauma centers relative to non-trauma centers. This study estimated the proportion of children with moderate to severe TBI who receive care at trauma centers, and examined factors associated with receipt of care at adult (ATC), pediatric (PTC), and adult/pediatric trauma centers (APTC), compared with care at non-trauma centers (NTC) using a nationally representative database. The Kids' Inpatient Database was used to identify hospitalizations for moderate to severe pediatric TBI. Pediatric inpatients ages 0 to 17 years with at least one diagnosis of TBI and a maximum head Abbreviated Injury Scale score of ≥3 were studied. Multinomial logistic regression was performed to examine factors predictive of the level and type of facility where care was received. A total of 16.7% of patients were hospitalized at NTC, 44.2% at Level I or II ATC, 17.9% at Level I or II PTC, and 21.2% at Level I or II APTC. Multiple regression analyses showed receipt of care at a trauma center was associated with age and polytrauma. We concluded that almost 84% of children with moderate to severe TBI currently receive care at a Level I or Level II trauma center. Children with trauma to multiple body regions in addition to more severe TBI are more likely to receive care a trauma center relative to a NTC. PMID:23343131

  1. Prehospital risk factors of mortality and impaired consciousness after severe traumatic brain injury: an epidemiological study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a significant health concern and a major burden for society. The period between trauma event and hospital admission in an emergency department (ED) could be a determinant for secondary brain injury and early survival. The aim was to investigate the relationship between prehospital factors associated with secondary brain injury (arterial hypotension, hypoxemia, hypothermia) and the outcomes of mortality and impaired consciousness of survivors at 14 days. Methods A multicenter, prospective cohort study was performed in dedicated trauma centres of Switzerland. Adults with severe TBI (Abbreviated Injury Scale score of head region (HAIS) >3) were included. Main outcome measures were death and impaired consciousness (Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) ≤13) at 14 days. The associations between risk factors and outcome were assessed with univariate and multivariate regression models. Results 589 patients were included, median age was 55 years (IQR 33, 70). The median GCS in ED was 4 (IQR 3-14), with abnormal pupil reaction in 167 patients (29.2%). Median ISS was 25 (IQR 21, 34). Three hundred seven patients sustained their TBI from falls (52.1%) and 190 from a road traffic accidents (32.3%). Median time from Out-of-hospital Emergency Medical Service (OHEMS) departure on scene to arrival in ED was 50 minutes (IQR 37-72); 451 patients had a direct admission (76.6%). Prehospital hypotension was observed in 24 (4.1%) patients, hypoxemia in 73 (12.6%) patients and hypothermia in 146 (24.8%). Prehospital hypotension and hypothermia (apart of age and trauma severity) was associated with mortality. Prehospital hypoxemia (apart of trauma severity) was associated with impaired consciousness; indirect admission was a protective factor. Conclusion Mortality and impaired consciousness at 14 days do not have the same prehospital risk factors; prehospital hypotension and hypothermia is associated with mortality, and prehospital hypoxemia with

  2. Role of hyperbaric oxygen therapy in severe head injury in children

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Advait; Parelkar, Sandesh V.; Oak, Sanjay N.; Gupta, Rahul K.; Sanghvi, Beejal V.; Bachani, Mitesh; Patil, Rajashekhar

    2012-01-01

    Aim: A brain injury results in a temporary or permanent impairment of cognitive, emotional, and/or physical function. Predicting the outcome of pediatric brain injury is difficult. Prognostic instruments are not precise enough to reliably predict individual patient's mortality and long-term functional status. The purpose of this article is to provide a guide to the strengths and limitations of the use of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) in treating pediatric patients with severe brain injury. Materials and Methods: We studied total 56 patients of head injury. Out of them 28 received HBOT. Only cases with severe head injury [Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) < 8] with no other associated injury were included in the study group. After an initial period of resuscitation and conservative management (10–12 days), all were subjected to three sessions of HBOT at 1-week interval. This study group was compared with a control group of similar severity of head injury (GCS < 8). Results: The study and control groups were compared in terms of duration of hospitalization, GCS, disability reduction,and social behavior. Patients who received HBOT were significantly better than the control group on all the parameters with decreased hospital stay, better GCS, and drastic reduction in disability. Conclusion: In children with traumatic brain injury, the addition of HBOT significantly improved outcome and quality of life and reduced the risk of complications. PMID:22837768

  3. Traumatic Osteochondral Injury of the Femoral Head Treated by Mosaicplasty: A Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Shindle, Michael K.; Buly, Robert L.; Kelly, Bryan T.; Lorich, Dean G.

    2010-01-01

    The increased risk of symptomatic progression towards osteoarthritis after chondral damage has led to the development of multiple treatment options for cartilage repair. These procedures have evolved from arthroscopic lavage and debridement, to marrow stimulation techniques, and more recently, to osteochondral autograft and allograft transplants, and autogenous chondrocyte implantation. The success of mosaicplasty procedures in the knee has led to its application to other surfaces, including the talus, tibial plateau, patella, and humeral capitellum. In this report, we present two cases of a chondral defect to the femoral head after a traumatic hip dislocation, treated with an osteochondral autograft (OATS) from the ipsilateral knee, and the inferior femoral head, respectively, combined with a surgical dislocation of the hip. At greater than 1 year and greater than 5 years of follow-up, MRI studies have demonstrated good autograft incorporation with maintenance of articular surface conformity, and both patients clinically continue to have no pain and full active range of motion of their respective hips. In our opinion, treatment of osteochondral defects in the femoral head surface using a surgical dislocation combined with an OATS procedure is a promising approach, as full exposure of the femoral head can be obtained while preserving its vasculature, thus enabling adequate restoration of the articular cartilage surface. PMID:21886541

  4. Outcome and Predicting Factor Following Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: A Retrospective Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Khajavikhan, Javaher; Vasigh, Aminolah; Khani, Ali; Kokhazade, Taleb

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major and challenging problem in critical care medicine. Aim To assess the outcome and predicting factor following severe TBI. Materials and Methods This is a retrospective and cross-sectional study. Data were collected from two sections; one section consisting of a questionnaire answered by the patients and other section from the patient records. The instruments used included the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS), SF-36 and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HAD). Results The mortality rate of the patients was 46.2%. The quality of life (QOL) of the patients in most dimension were impaired and (58%) of patients had unfavourable QOL. About (37.5%) of patients with anxiety and (27.5%) had a depression. A significant correlation was found between age, GCS arrival, length of ICU stay, mechanical ventilation, VAP & ARDS and pupil reactivity with QOL, GOS, HAD-A and HAD-D (p<0.05, p< 0.001). GCS arrival a predicate factor for QOL and GOS (p <0.001, OR: 1.75, 1.94 respectively); length of ICU stay a predicate factor for QOL and GOS (p <0.05, OR : 1.11, 1.28 respectively); mechanical ventilation a predicate factor for GOS (p <0.001, OR : 1.78); ventilation associated pneumonia (VAP) & acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and pupil reactivity a predicate factor for GOS (p <0.05, OR : 1.36; p<0.001, OR: 1.94 respectively). The GCS arrival and ICU stay a predicate factor for HAD-A (p<0.05, OR: 1.73, 1.38 respectively). Conclusion With respect to results advanced in pre hospital, medical and surgical care for the decrease in mortality rates of Head trauma (HT), the use of trauma triage tools and strict enforcement of traffic rules are necessary. PMID:27042518

  5. Measuring the Severity of Negative and Traumatic Events

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, David C.; Feeling, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    We devised three measures of the general severity of events, which raters applied to participants’ narrative descriptions: 1) placing events on a standard normed scale of stressful events, 2) placing events into five bins based on their severity relative to all other events in the sample, and 3) an average of ratings of the events’ effects on six distinct areas of the participants’ lives. Protocols of negative events were obtained from two non-diagnosed undergraduate samples (n = 688 and 328), a clinically diagnosed undergraduate sample all of whom had traumas and half of whom met PTSD criteria (n = 30), and a clinically diagnosed community sample who met PTSD criteria (n = 75). The three measures of severity correlated highly in all four samples but failed to correlate with PTSD symptom severity in any sample. Theoretical implications for the role of trauma severity in PTSD are discussed. PMID:25309831

  6. Recovery and compensatory strategies in head injured memory impaired people several years after insult.

    PubMed

    Wilson, B

    1992-03-01

    A follow up study of 29 patients with traumatic head injury who were referred for memory therapy five to 10 years earlier is described. Of the original sample, 28 were traced, one had died, and one refused to take part, thus leaving 26 subjects who were seen and reassessed. Most (21) were living in their own homes with relatives, friends or alone; the others were in long term residential care or residential college or in warden controlled accommodation. Eleven subjects were in paid employment, although only one was in a position comparable to pre-injury status. On a standardised memory test some 58% of subjects showed no change since their last assessment several years earlier; 31% improved; and 11% deteriorated. The most encouraging finding was that subjects were using more memory aids and strategies now than before or at the end of their rehabilitation programme. PMID:1564475

  7. Impact of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Injury Severity on Recovery in Children with Traumatic Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenardy, Justin; Le Brocque, Robyne; Hendrikz, Joan; Iselin, Greg; Anderson, Vicki; McKinlay, Lynne

    2012-01-01

    The adverse impact on recovery of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been demonstrated in returned veterans. The study assessed this effect in children's health outcomes following TBI and extended previous work by including a full range of TBI severity, and improved assessment of PTSD within a…

  8. Consonant Accuracy after Severe Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury: A Prospective Cohort Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Thomas F.; Dollaghan, Christine; Janosky, Janine; Rusiewicz, Heather Leavy; Small, Steven L.; Dick, Frederic; Vick, Jennell; Adelson, P. David

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The authors sought to describe longitudinal changes in Percentage of Consonants Correct--Revised (PCC-R) after severe pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI), to compare the odds of normal-range PCC-R in children injured at older and younger ages, and to correlate predictor variables and PCC-R outcomes. Method: In 56 children injured…

  9. Relation of Executive Functioning to Pragmatic Outcome following Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglas, Jacinta M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This study was designed to explore the behavioral nature of pragmatic impairment following severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) and to evaluate the contribution of executive skills to the experience of pragmatic difficulties after TBI. Method: Participants were grouped into 43 TBI dyads (TBI adults and close relatives) and 43 control…

  10. Endovascular Therapy of Traumatic Vascular Lesions of the Head and Neck

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz-Daza, Orlando; Arraiza, Francisco J.; Barkley, John M.; Whigham, Cliff J.

    2003-06-15

    Pseudoaneurysm and fistula formation are well-documented complications of arterial vascular injury and may be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this manuscript is to review the presentation and therapy of patients with traumatic vascular injuries of the head and neck. Eight patients were admitted to a Level 1 Trauma Center and diagnostic angiography of the carotid artery and vertebral circulation was performed. The mechanisms of injury included motor vehicle accident, gunshot wound,stab wound and aggravated assault. Cause of trauma, vascular lesion,endovascular therapy and outcome were analyzed retrospectively. The angiographic findings, clinical presentation and hospital course were reviewed. There were eight patients, seven males and one female, aged 17-65. Four patients (50%) had multiple lesions; four had pseudoaneurysms, two with fistula formation and two with active arterial hemorrhage. A total of 17 lesions were embolized using coils,Polyvinyl Alcohol (PVA), Gelfoam or a combination. Two of the 17 lesions received stents. Six of the eight patients remained clinically improved or stable at varying follow-up intervals. One of the four patients who presented with penetrating trauma and neurological deficits had resolution of right hemiplegia at the 8{sup th}month follow-up. One of the four patients who sustained blunt trauma and carotid-cavernous fistula presented with a new pseudoaneurysm at the 2-month post-embolization follow-up. The evolution of diagnostics neuroangiogaphic techniques provides opportunities for endovascular therapy of traumatic vascular lesions of the head and neck that are minimally invasive, attractive options in selected cases.

  11. The head that wears the crown: Henry VIII and traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Ikram, Muhammad Qaiser; Sajjad, Fazle Hakim; Salardini, Arash

    2016-06-01

    Henry VIII of England is one of the most controversial figures in European history. He was born on 28 June 1491 as the second son of Henry VII and Elizabeth of York and became the heir to the English throne after his elder brother died prematurely. A contradictory picture of Henry's character emerges from history: the young Henry was a vigorous, generous and intelligent king who saw early military and naval successes. In contrast, in his later years he became cruel, petty and tyrannical. His political paranoia and military misjudgements are in direct contrast to his earlier successes and promise. Several hypotheses have been put forward regarding his transformation from a renaissance king to a later medieval tyrant, including endocrinopathies, psychiatric illnesses and traumatic brain injury. In this paper we examine the historical evidence linking the change in Henry's personality and health problems to traumatic brain injury. To our knowledge this is the first systematic neurological study of traumatic brain injury in Henry VIII. PMID:26857293

  12. Free vascularized fibular grafting benefits severely collapsed femoral head in concomitant with osteoarthritis in very young adults: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Ding, Hao; Gao, You-Shui; Chen, Sheng-Bao; Jin, Dong-Xu; Zhang, Chang-Qing

    2013-07-01

    Although free vascularized fibular grafting (FVFG) has been successfully employed for precollapsed osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH), there are few reports concerning its radiographic and functional results for ONFH concomitant with osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip. In the current study, 12 patients with OA induced by traumatic ONFH were enrolled, with FVFG employed as the treatment protocol. The collapsed step of the cartilage surface was measured and compared with the postoperative value, and the Merle d'Aubigné scoring system was used to evaluate preoperative and postoperative status of the hip joint. The collapsed step disappeared, and sphericity of the femoral head could be restored at an average duration of 56 months postoperatively in seven patients. With regard to the severity of hip OA, six were improved to Grade 1 and one to Grade 2. In terms of functionality, all patients with a restored femoral head experienced postoperative improvement in pain relief, mobility, and functional capacity. The average Merle d'Aubigné score increased from 6.0 to 16.9 postoperatively (p < 0.001). In conclusion, for traumatic ONFH concomitant with OA, FVFG can confer benefits in the form of restoration of the contour of the femoral head and improvement in joint function. PMID:23588546

  13. Intraparenchymal hemorrhage segmentation from clinical head CT of patients with traumatic brain injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Snehashis; Wilkes, Sean; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; Butman, John A.; Pham, Dzung L.

    2015-03-01

    Quantification of hemorrhages in head computed tomography (CT) images from patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) has potential applications in monitoring disease progression and better understanding of the patho-physiology of TBI. Although manual segmentations can provide accurate measures of hemorrhages, the processing time and inter-rater variability make it infeasible for large studies. In this paper, we propose a fully automatic novel pipeline for segmenting intraparenchymal hemorrhages (IPH) from clinical head CT images. Unlike previous methods of model based segmentation or active contour techniques, we rely on relevant and matching examples from already segmented images by trained raters. The CT images are first skull-stripped. Then example patches from an "atlas" CT and its manual segmentation are used to learn a two-class sparse dictionary for hemorrhage and normal tissue. Next, for a given "subject" CT, a subject patch is modeled as a sparse convex combination of a few atlas patches from the dictionary. The same convex combination is applied to the atlas segmentation patches to generate a membership for the hemorrhages at each voxel. Hemorrhages are segmented from 25 subjects with various degrees of TBI. Results are compared with segmentations obtained from an expert rater. A median Dice coefficient of 0.85 between automated and manual segmentations is achieved. A linear fit between automated and manual volumes show a slope of 1.0047, indicating a negligible bias in volume estimation.

  14. Effects of α-tocopherol and ascorbic acid in the severity and management of traumatic brain injury in albino rats

    PubMed Central

    Ishaq, Gaafar M.; Saidu, Yusuf; Bilbis, Lawal S.; Muhammad, Suleiman A.; Jinjir, Nasir; Shehu, Bello B.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is accompanied by substantial accumulation of biomarkers of oxidative stress and depletion of antioxidants reserve which initiate chain reactions that damage brain cells. The present study investigated the role of ascorbic acid and α-tocopherol on the severity and management of TBI in rats. Materials and Methods: Wistar rats were subjected to closed head injury using an accelerated impact device. Rats were administered 45 mg/kg and 60 mg/kg body weight of ascorbic acid, α-tocopherol or a combination of the two vitamins for 2 weeks pre- and post injury. Blood and brain tissue homogenates were analyzed for vitamin C, vitamin E, malondialdehyde, superoxide dismutase, and creatine kinase activities. Results: The results indicated that TBI caused significant (P < 0.05) decreased in vitamins C and E levels in the blood and brain tissue of TBI-untreated rats. The activities of superoxide dismutase in TBI rats were markedly reduced when compared with non traumatized control and showed a tendency to increased following supplementation with vitamins C and E. Supplementation of the vitamins significantly (P < 0.05) reduced malondialdehyde in the treatment groups compared with the TBI-untreated group. Conclusion: The study indicated that pre and post treatment with ascorbic acid and α-tocopherol reduced oxidative stress induced by brain injury and effectively reduced mortality rate in rats. PMID:24250162

  15. Vestibulo-ocular monitoring as a predictor of outcome after severe traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Based on the knowledge that traumatic brainstem damage often leads to alteration in brainstem functions, including the vestibulo-ocular reflex, the present study is designed to determine whether prediction of outcome in the early phase after severe traumatic brain injury is possible by means of vestibulo-ocular monitoring. Methods Vestibulo-ocular monitoring is based on video-oculographic recording of eye movements during galvanic labyrinth polarization. The integrity of vestibulo-ocular reflex is determined from the eye movement response during vestibular galvanic labyrinth polarization stimulation. Vestibulo-ocular monitoring is performed within three days after traumatic brain injury and the oculomotor response compared to outcome after six months (Glasgow Outcome Score). Results Twenty-seven patients underwent vestibulo-ocular monitoring within three days after severe traumatic brain injury. One patient was excluded from the study. In 16 patients oculomotor response was induced, in the remaining 11 patients no oculomotor response was observed. The patients' outcome was classified as Glasgow Outcome Score 1-2 or as Glasgow Outcome Score 3 to 5. Statistical testing supported the hypothesis that those patients with oculomotor response tended to recover (exact two-sided Fisher-Test (P < 10-3)). Conclusions The results indicate that vestibulo-ocular monitoring with galvanic labyrinth polarization performed during the first days after traumatic brain injury helps to predict favourable or unfavourable outcome. As an indicator of brainstem function, vestibulo-ocular monitoring provides a useful, complementary approach to the identification of brainstem lesions by imaging techniques. PMID:19948056

  16. Repetitive head trauma, chronic traumatic encephalopathy and tau: Challenges in translating from mice to men.

    PubMed

    Ojo, Joseph O; Mouzon, Benoit C; Crawford, Fiona

    2016-01-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a neurological and psychiatric condition marked by preferential perivascular foci of neurofibrillary and glial tangles (composed of hyperphosphorylated-tau proteins) in the depths of the sulci. Recent retrospective case series published over the last decade on athletes and military personnel have added considerably to our clinical and histopathological knowledge of CTE. This has marked a vital turning point in the traumatic brain injury (TBI) field, raising public awareness of the potential long-term effects of mild and moderate repetitive TBI, which has been recognized as one of the major risk factors associated with CTE. Although these human studies have been informative, their retrospective design carries certain inherent limitations that should be cautiously interpreted. In particular, the current overriding issue in the CTE literature remains confusing in regard to appropriate definitions of terminology, variability in individual pathologies and the potential case selection bias in autopsy based studies. There are currently no epidemiological or prospective studies on CTE. Controlled preclinical studies in animals therefore provide an alternative means for specifically interrogating aspects of CTE pathogenesis. In this article, we review the current literature and discuss difficulties and challenges of developing in-vivo TBI experimental paradigms to explore the link between repetitive head trauma and tau-dependent changes. We provide our current opinion list of recommended features to consider for successfully modeling CTE in animals to better understand the pathobiology and develop therapeutics and diagnostics, and critical factors, which might influence outcome. We finally discuss the possible directions of future experimental research in the repetitive TBI/CTE field. PMID:26054886

  17. Severe Traumatic Brain Injury, Frontal Lesions, and Social Aspects of Language Use: A Study of French-Speaking Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dardier, Virginie; Bernicot, Josie; Delanoe, Anaig; Vanberten, Melanie; Fayada, Catherine; Chevignard, Mathilde; Delaye, Corinne; Laurent-Vannier, Anne; Dubois, Bruno

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to gain insight into the social (pragmatic) aspects of language use by French-speaking individuals with frontal lesions following a severe traumatic brain injury. Eleven participants with traumatic brain injury performed tasks in three areas of communication: production (interview situation), comprehension (direct…

  18. [SEPTIC SHOCK IN PATIENT WITH SEVERE HEAD TRAUMA].

    PubMed

    Sichev, A A; Tabasaransky, T Φ; Savin, I A; Gorachev, A S; Tenedieva, V D; Abramov, T A; Oshorov, A V; Polupan, A A; Mazkovsky, I V; Gavrilov, A G; Potapov, A A

    2015-01-01

    The clinical observation illustrates the role of screening of inflammatory markers and advanced hemodynamic monitoring in optimization of the treatment of the patient with severe traumatic brain injury (sTBI). The level of consciousness by the Glasgow Coma Scale at admission was 5 points. From the first day of stay the patient suffered hyperthermia to 39,0° C° The diagnosis of the aspiration pneumonia was determined by radiological signs, bronchoscopy and inflammatory blood markers, C-reactive protein, leukocytosis. From the second day the constant infusion of norepinephrine was necessary to maintain mean ABP above 80 mmHg. On the 10th day the patient's condition deteriorated sharply. Developed hyperthermia to 40, 2° and cardiovascular collapse (in spite of the high level of norepinephrine support a sharp decline in ABP up to 49/20 mmHg). Invasive advanced hemodynamic PiCCO monitoring (transpulmonary thermodilution) was started Septic shock was suspected. Standard laboratory tests did not meet the criteria for septic shock. Witnessed a slight increase in CRP and procalcitonin (PCT) was within normal limits. Diagnostic search was supplemented by a study of interleukins (IL-6 and IL-2R) in the blood plasma. The significant increase in their values, was regarded as the initial manifestations of the systemic inflammatory response. Sepsis was confirmed. The extended antibiotic therapy started Continuous Veno-Venous hemofiltration was used as part of treatment of the inflammatory-toxic condition. In two days of the therapy the patient's condition has stabilized, the patient recovered consciousness in the form of opening the eyes, simple instructions. At discharge, the patient's condition according to the Glasgow outcome scale was estimated at 4 points. PMID:26596036

  19. Predicting clearing of post-traumatic amnesia following closed-head injury.

    PubMed

    Saneda, D L; Corrigan, J D

    1992-01-01

    The ability to predict the resolution of post-traumatic amnesia (PTA) early in the course of acute rehabilitation was studied in a sample of 98 closed-head injury (CHI) patients admitted for acute rehabilitation. The subjects' age, length of coma, time post-injury and Orientation Group Monitoring System (OGMS) subscale and aggregate scores were evaluated for the ability to predict if and when a patient would clear PTA. The results indicated that the combination of time post-injury and week one OGMS aggregate score provided the best prediction of whether and when PTA would clear. A shorter time from injury to acute rehabilitation was a positive prognostic indicator, accounting for more variance than either age or duration of coma. Whereas the aggregate OGMS score was a better indicator than any of the subscale scores, the results also suggested that specific aspects of cognition have differential predictive power, which may derive from different types of injury to the brain. Although the prediction model was statistically significant, its practical significance was limited. In particular, the high base rate for clearing PTA, 83.7%, attenuated the potential for differential prediction. Finally, this study provided additional support for the construct validity of the OGMS as a measure of cognitive function during the acute phase of recovery from CHI. PMID:1571721

  20. Bilateral non-traumatic aseptic osteonecrosis in the femoral head. An experimental study of incidence

    SciTech Connect

    Hauzeur, J.P.; Pasteels, J.L.; Orloff, S.

    1987-10-01

    Thirty-five patients who were seen with non-traumatic aseptic osteonecrosis of the femoral head were included in a study of the contralateral hip to evaluate the incidence of bilateral disease. We used not only conventional radiography and scintigraphy but also measurement of intramedullary pressure and core biopsy. Pain was caused by 14.3 per cent of the contralateral hips, a lesion was demonstrated on plain radiographs in 51.4 per cent, and increased isotopic uptake was seen in 31.4 per cent. Histological study of specimens obtained by osteomedullary biopsy (after special procedure) showed bilateral necrosis in 88.5 per cent of the patients. After a mean follow-up of thirty-four months, only one of nine hips that were painless and had negative radiographic and isotopic findings, but had positive findings on biopsy, became painful and radiographically positive. The intramedullary pressure in the intertrochanteric area was recorded in each hip, and no correlation was found with the radiographic stage or with pain.

  1. Prolonged hippocampal cell death following closed-head traumatic brain injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Shigeharu; Hou, Jiamei; Nelson, Rachel L; Wilkie, Zachary J; Mustafa, Golam; Sinharoy, Ankita; Watts, Joseph V; Thompson, Floyd J; Bose, Prodip K

    2016-07-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) leads to enduring cognitive disorders. Although recent evidence has shown that controlled cortical impact in a rodent may induce memory deficits with prolonged cell death in the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus, few studies have reported long-term chronic hippocampal cell death following 'closed-head' TBI (cTBI), the predominant form of human TBI. Therefore, the aim of this study was to quantify terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL)(+) apoptotic hippocampal cells as well as hippocampal cells with hallmark morphological features of degenerating cells in a chronic setting of cTBI in rats. TUNEL assays and Cresyl violet staining were performed using 6-month post-TBI fixed hippocampal sections. Evidence of prolonged hippocampal cell death was shown by the presence of a significantly increased number of TUNEL(+) cells in the cornu ammonis 1-3 (CA1-CA3) and DG of the hippocampus compared with intact controls. In addition, Cresyl violet staining indicated a significantly elevated number of cells with the degenerative morphological features in all hippocampal subregions (CA1-CA3, hilus, and DG). These results suggest that prolonged cell death may occur in multiple regions of the hippocampus following cTBI. PMID:27213933

  2. A case of “Borrowed Identity Syndrome” after severe traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Pachalska, Maria; MacQueen, Bruce Duncan; Kaczmarek, Bozydar L. J.; Wilk-Franczuk, Magdalena; Herman-Sucharska, Izabela

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background It is well known that traumatic brain injury often changes the way the patient perceives reality, which often means a distortion of the perception of self and the world. The purpose of this article is to understand the processes of identity change after traumatic brain injury. Case Report We describe progressive deterioration in personal identity in a former physician who had sustained a serious head injury (1998), resulting in focal injuries to the right frontal and temporal areas. He regained consciousness after 63 days in coma and 98 days of post-traumatic amnesia, but has since displayed a persistent loss of autobiographical memory, self-image, and emotional bonds to family and significant others. Qualitative ‘life-story’ interviewing was undertaken to explore the mental state of a patient whose subjective, “first person” identity has been disengaged, despite the retention of significant amounts of objective, “third person” information about himself and his personal history (though this was also lost at a later stage in the patient’s deterioration). Identity change in our patient was characterized by a dynamic and convoluted process of contraction, expansion and tentative balance. Our patient tends to cling to the self of others, borrowing their identities at least for the period he is able to remember. Identity is closely connected with the processes of memory. Conclusions The results will be examined in relation to the microgenetic theory of brain function. The brain mechanisms that may account for these impairments are discussed. Findings from this study have important implications for the delivery of person-focused rehabilitation. PMID:21278697

  3. Severe and penetrating traumatic brain injury in the context of war.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Kimberly; Helmick, Kathy; Doncevic, Selina; Park, Rachel

    2008-01-01

    Our data suggests that traumatic brain injury (TBI) may account for up to one third of battle-related injuries in today's war. Although the majority of these injuries are classified as mild in severity, service members with severe or penetrating TBI can be faced with many challenges. Injuries sustained on the battlefield require a slightly different approach than the TBI care that is traditionally seen in a civilian setting. This article presents the range of care that occurs beginning on the battlefield and continuing to state-of-the-art rehabilitation within the Department of Defense and Veterans Affairs Polytrauma System of Care. PMID:19092508

  4. Late outcome of very severe blunt head trauma: a 10-15 year second follow-up.

    PubMed Central

    Thomsen, I V

    1984-01-01

    Forty patients with very severe blunt head trauma (post-traumatic amnesia greater than or equal to 1 month) were initially examined at an average of 4.5 months after the injury. The patients were visited in their homes 2.5 years and 10-15 years after the accident and questionnaires were presented to patients, relatives and/or staff. Though physical impairment, dysarthria and defects of memory remained severe in many cases, the psychosocial sequelae presented the most serious problems. Permanent changes in personality and emotion were reported in two thirds and were especially frequent among the youngest patients. The worse overall outcome was seen in cases with severe brainstem involvement or anterior lesions or both. In spite of the great frequency of deficits long-term improvement of functional state was common and several regained at least some work capacity. PMID:6707671

  5. Arterial hyperoxia in severe head injury: a useful or harmful option?

    PubMed

    Alves, O L; Daugherty, W P; Rios, M

    2004-01-01

    There is mounting evidence both from experimental and clinical studies that traumatic brain injury (TBI) is associated with a reduction of aerobic metabolism. This results from a variable combination of impaired substrate delivery and mitochondrial failure. Mitochondria, which are responsible for the production of 95% of cell adenosine triphosphate (ATP), may become compromised after TBI. On the other hand, in the very early period after the primary injury, oxygen delivery may be impaired due to arterial hypoxia and/or to a reduction of cerebral blood flow (CBF). As a consequence, 80-90% of patients who die of head injury show ischemia on histo-pathological examination of the brain tissue. In the absence of an appropriate treatment for TBI, these observations favored the hypothesis that manipulation of brain oxygen delivery could be a therapeutic tool to improve aerobic metabolism. Several strategies were developed, including the increase of cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) using amines or the increase of arterial partial pressure of oxygen (PaO(2)) through hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) or normobaric hyperoxia. Several experimental and clinical studies, using normobaric hyperoxia, demonstrated an increase in brain tissue oxygen tension and a reduction of brain extracellular lactate levels, but there is no consensus about the biological meaning of these findings. For some authors, they translate an improvement of brain oxidative metabolism, while for others they represent only biological epiphenomena. The current review addresses the rational behind normobaric hyperoxia as a therapeutic application and discusses the experimental and clinical results achieved so far. PMID:15281892

  6. Decompressive craniectomy in severe traumatic brain injury: prognostic factors and complications

    PubMed Central

    Grille, Pedro; Tommasino, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Objective To analyze the clinical characteristics, complications and factors associated with the prognosis of severe traumatic brain injury among patients who undergo a decompressive craniectomy. Methods Retrospective study of patients seen in an intensive care unit with severe traumatic brain injury in whom a decompressive craniectomy was performed between the years 2003 and 2012. Patients were followed until their discharge from the intensive care unit. Their clinical-tomographic characteristics, complications, and factors associated with prognosis (univariate and multivariate analysis) were analyzed. Results A total of 64 patients were studied. Primary and lateral decompressive craniectomies were performed for the majority of patients. A high incidence of complications was found (78% neurological and 52% nonneurological). A total of 42 patients (66%) presented poor outcomes, and 22 (34%) had good neurological outcomes. Of the patients who survived, 61% had good neurological outcomes. In the univariate analysis, the factors significantly associated with poor neurological outcome were postdecompressive craniectomy intracranial hypertension, greater severity and worse neurological state at admission. In the multivariate analysis, only postcraniectomy intracranial hypertension was significantly associated with a poor outcome. Conclusion This study involved a very severe and difficult to manage group of patients with high morbimortality. Intracranial hypertension was a main factor of poor outcome in this population. PMID:26340150

  7. External Foam Layers to Football Helmets Reduce Head Impact Severity

    PubMed Central

    Nakatsuka, Austin S

    2014-01-01

    Current American football helmet design has a rigid exterior with a padded interior. Softening the hard external layer of the helmet may reduce the impact potential of the helmet, providing extra head protection and reducing its use as an offensive device. The objective of this study is to measure the impact reduction potential provided by external foam. We obtained a football helmet with built-in accelerometer-based sensors, placed it on a boxing mannequin and struck it with a weighted swinging pendulum helmet to mimic the forces sustained during a helmet-to-helmet strike. We then applied layers of 1.3 cm thick polyolefin foam to the exterior surface of the helmets and repeated the process. All impact severity measures were significantly reduced with the application of the external foam. These results support the hypothesis that adding a soft exterior layer reduces the force of impact which may be applicable to the football field. Redesigning football helmets could reduce the injury potential of the sport. PMID:25157327

  8. External foam layers to football helmets reduce head impact severity.

    PubMed

    Nakatsuka, Austin S; Yamamoto, Loren G

    2014-08-01

    Current American football helmet design has a rigid exterior with a padded interior. Softening the hard external layer of the helmet may reduce the impact potential of the helmet, providing extra head protection and reducing its use as an offensive device. The objective of this study is to measure the impact reduction potential provided by external foam. We obtained a football helmet with built-in accelerometer-based sensors, placed it on a boxing mannequin and struck it with a weighted swinging pendulum helmet to mimic the forces sustained during a helmet-to-helmet strike. We then applied layers of 1.3 cm thick polyolefin foam to the exterior surface of the helmets and repeated the process. All impact severity measures were significantly reduced with the application of the external foam. These results support the hypothesis that adding a soft exterior layer reduces the force of impact which may be applicable to the football field. Redesigning football helmets could reduce the injury potential of the sport. PMID:25157327

  9. Restoration of Function With Acupuncture Following Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Jacob; Sparks, Linda; Deng, Yong

    2015-01-01

    This case report illustrates the improvement of an acupuncture-treated patient who incurred a severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) from a snowboarding accident. Over 4 years, the patient progressed from initially not being able to walk, having difficulty with speech, and suffering from poor eyesight to where he has now regained significant motor function, speech, and vision and has returned to snowboarding. A core acupuncture protocol plus specific points added to address the patient's ongoing concerns was used. This case adds to the medical literature by demonstrating the potential role of acupuncture in TBI treatment. PMID:26665023

  10. Restoration of Function With Acupuncture Following Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Jacob; Sparks, Linda; Deng, Yong; Langland, Jeffrey

    2015-11-01

    This case report illustrates the improvement of an acupuncture-treated patient who incurred a severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) from a snowboarding accident. Over 4 years, the patient progressed from initially not being able to walk, having difficulty with speech, and suffering from poor eyesight to where he has now regained significant motor function, speech, and vision and has returned to snowboarding. A core acupuncture protocol plus specific points added to address the patient's ongoing concerns was used. This case adds to the medical literature by demonstrating the potential role of acupuncture in TBI treatment. PMID:26665023

  11. Severe Mechanical Hemolysis After Transcatheter Closure of a Traumatic Ventricular Septal Defect Using the Amplatzer Atrial Septal Occluder.

    PubMed

    Tang, Liang; Tang, Jian-Jun; Fang, Zhen-Fei; Hu, Xin-Qun; Shen, Xiang-Qian; Zhou, Sheng-Hua

    2016-07-27

    Traumatic ventricular septal defect (VSD) resulting from chest trauma, either penetrating or blunt, is a relatively rare occurrence. Herein, we describe the case of a previously healthy 26-year-old man who presented with congestive heart failure, which was secondary to a large traumatic VSD following violent blunt chest trauma. The traumatic VSD was initially closed percutaneously using an Amplatzer atrial septal defect occluder. Post-device closure, however, the patient developed severe intravascular hemolysis refractory to medical treatment. The patient subsequently underwent surgical removal of the Amplatzer device, with concomitant VSD patch closure. PMID:27357435

  12. Differences in Medical Therapy Goals for Children With Severe Traumatic Brain Injury— An International Study

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Michael J.; Adelson, P. David; Hutchison, James S.; Kochanek, Patrick M.; Tasker, Robert C.; Vavilala, Monica S.; Beers, Sue R.; Fabio, Anthony; Kelsey, Sheryl F.; Wisniewski, Stephen R.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To describe the differences in goals for their usual practice for various medical therapies from a number of international centers for children with severe traumatic brain injury. Design A survey of the goals from representatives of the international centers. Setting Thirty-two pediatric traumatic brain injury centers in the United States, United Kingdom, France, and Spain. Patients None. Interventions None. Measurements and Main Results A survey instrument was developed that required free-form responses from the centers regarding their usual practice goals for topics of intracranial hypertension therapies, hypoxia/ischemia prevention and detection, and metabolic support. Cerebrospinal fluid diversion strategies varied both across centers and within centers, with roughly equal proportion of centers adopting a strategy of continuous cerebrospinal fluid diversion and a strategy of no cerebrospinal fluid diversion. Use of mannitol and hypertonic saline for hyperosmolar therapies was widespread among centers (90.1% and 96.9%, respectively). Of centers using hypertonic saline, 3% saline preparations were the most common but many other concentrations were in common use. Routine hyperventilation was not reported as a standard goal and 31.3% of centers currently use Pbo2 monitoring for cerebral hypoxia. The time to start nutritional support and glucose administration varied widely, with nutritional support beginning before 96 hours and glucose administration being started earlier in most centers. Conclusions There were marked differences in medical goals for children with severe traumatic brain injury across our international consortium, and these differences seemed to be greatest in areas with the weakest evidence in the literature. Future studies that determine the superiority of the various medical therapies outlined within our survey would be a significant advance for the pediatric neurotrauma field and may lead to new standards of care and improved study

  13. A systematic review of the relationship between severe maternal morbidity and post-traumatic stress disorder

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The incidence of severe maternal morbidity is increasing in high-income countries as a consequence, in part, of increased obstetric intervention and increasingly complex medical needs of women who become pregnant. Access to emergency obstetric care means that for the majority of women in these countries, an experience of severe maternal morbidity is unlikely to result in loss of life. However, little is known about the subsequent impact on postnatal psychological health resulting in an evidence gap to support provision of appropriate care for these women. There has recently been increasing recognition that childbirth can be a cause of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The combination of experiencing a life-threatening complication and its management may culminate in psychological trauma. This systematic review examined the association between women’s experience of severe maternal morbidity during labour, at the time of giving birth or within the first week following birth, and PTSD and its symptoms. Methods Relevant literature was identified through multiple databases, including MEDLINE, PsycINFO, EMBASE, CINAHL, British Nursing Index, Web of Science, Cochrane library and the British Library, using predetermined search strategies. The search terms included "post-traumatic stress disorder", "PTSD", "stress disorders, post-traumatic", "maternal morbidity", “pregnancy complications” “puerperal disorders”, "obstetric labo(u)r complication", "postpartum h(a)emorrhage", "eclampsia”. Studies identified were categorised according to pre-defined inclusion and exclusion criteria. The quality of included studies was assessed using the relevant CASP appraisal tools. Results Eleven primary studies met review criteria. Evidence of a relationship between severe maternal morbidity and PTSD/PTSD symptoms was inconsistent and findings varied between studies. Nevertheless, there is some evidence that severe pre-eclampsia is a risk factor for PTSD and its

  14. Predictors of quality of life after moderate to severe traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Weber, Karina Tavares; Guimarães, Viviane Assunção; Pontes Neto, Octávio M; Leite, João P; Takayanagui, Osvaldo Massaiti; Santos-Pontelli, Taiza E G

    2016-05-01

    Objective To verify correlations between age, injury severity, length of stay (LOS), cognition, functional capacity and quality of life (QOL) six months after hospital discharge (HD) of victims of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Method 50 patients consecutively treated in a Brazilian emergency hospital were assessed at admission, HD and six months after HD. The assessment protocol consisted in Abbreviated Injury Scale, Injury Severity Score, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), Revised Trauma Score (RTS), Mini Mental Test, Barthel Index and World Health Organization QOL - Brief. Results Strong negative correlation was observed between LOS and GCS and LOS and RTS. An almost maximal correlation was found between RTS and GCS and functional capacity and GCS at HD. Age and LOS were considered independent predictors of QOL. Conclusion Age and LOS are independent predictors of QOL after moderate to severe TBI. PMID:27191238

  15. Differential Activation of Infiltrating Monocyte-Derived Cells After Mild and Severe Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Trahanas, Diane M; Cuda, Carla M; Perlman, Harris; Schwulst, Steven J

    2015-03-01

    Microglia are the resident innate immune cells of the brain. Although embryologically and functionally distinct, they are morphologically similar to peripheral monocyte-derived cells, resulting in a poor ability to discriminate between the two cell types. The purpose of this study was to develop a rapid and reliable method to simultaneously characterize, quantify, and discriminate between whole populations of myeloid cells from the brain in a murine model of traumatic brain injury. Male C57BL/6 mice underwent traumatic brain injury (n = 16) or sham injury (n = 14). Brains were harvested at 24 h after injury. Multiparameter flow cytometry and sequential gating analysis were performed, allowing for discrimination between microglia and infiltrating leukocytes as well as for the characterization and quantification of individual subtypes within the infiltrating population. The proportion of infiltrating leukocytes within the brain increased with the severity of injury, and the predominant cell types within the infiltrating population were monocyte derived (P = 0.01). In addition, the severity of injury altered the overall makeup of the infiltrating monocyte-derived cells. In conclusion, we describe a flow cytometry-based technique for gross discrimination between infiltrating leukocytes and microglia as well as the ability to simultaneously characterize and quantify individual myeloid subtypes and their maturation states within these populations. PMID:26091024

  16. Sleep in the Acute Phase of Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: A Snapshot of Polysomnography.

    PubMed

    Wiseman-Hakes, Catherine; Duclos, Catherine; Blais, Hélène; Dumont, Marie; Bernard, Francis; Desautels, Alex; Menon, David K; Gilbert, Danielle; Carrier, Julie; Gosselin, Nadia

    2016-09-01

    Background and Objectives The onset of pervasive sleep-wake disturbances associated with traumatic brain injury (TBI) is poorly understood. This study aimed to (a) determine the feasibility of using polysomnography in patients in the acute, hospitalized stage of severe TBI and (b) explore sleep quality and sleep architecture during this stage of recovery, compared to patients with other traumatic injuries. Methods A cross-sectional case-control design was used. We examined the sleep of 7 patients with severe TBI (17-47 years; 20.3 ± 15.0 days postinjury) and 6 patients with orthopedic and/or spinal cord injuries (OSCI; 19-58 years; 16.9 ± 4.9 days postinjury). One night of ambulatory polysomnography was performed at bedside. Results Compared to OSCI patients, TBI patients showed a significantly longer duration of nocturnal sleep and earlier nighttime sleep onset. Sleep efficiency was low and comparable in both groups. All sleep stages were observed in both groups with normal proportions according to age. Conclusion Patients in the acute stage of severe TBI exhibit increased sleep duration and earlier sleep onset, suggesting that the injured brain enhances sleep need and/or decreases the ability to maintain wakefulness. As poor sleep efficiency could compromise brain recovery, further studies should investigate whether strategies known to optimize sleep in healthy individuals are efficacious in acute TBI. While there are several inherent challenges, polysomnography is a useful means of examining sleep in the early stage of recovery in patients with severe TBI. PMID:26704256

  17. Mental Trauma Experienced by Caregivers of patients with Diffuse Axonal Injury or Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Syed Hassan, Syed Tajuddin; Jamaludin, Husna; Abd Raman, Rosna; Mohd Riji, Haliza; Wan Fei, Khaw

    2013-01-01

    Context As with care giving and rehabilitation in chronic illnesses, the concern with traumatic brain injury (TBI), particularly with diffuse axonal injury (DAI), is that the caregivers are so overwhelmingly involved in caring and rehabilitation of the victim that in the process they become traumatized themselves. This review intends to shed light on the hidden and silent trauma sustained by the caregivers of severe brain injury survivors. Motor vehicle accident (MVA) is the highest contributor of TBI or DAI. The essence of trauma is the infliction of pain and suffering and having to bear the pain (i.e. by the TBI survivor) and the burden of having to take care and manage and rehabilitate the TBI survivor (i.e. by the TBI caregiver). Moreover many caregivers are not trained for their care giving task, thus compounding the stress of care giving and rehabilitating patients. Most research on TBI including DAI, focus on the survivors and not on the caregivers. TBI injury and its effects and impacts remain the core question of most studies, which are largely based on the quantitative approach. Evidence Acquisition Qualitative research can better assess human sufferings such as in the case of DAI trauma. While quantitative research can measure many psychometric parameters to assess some aspects of trauma conditions, qualitative research is able to fully reveal the meaning, ramification and experience of TBI trauma. Both care giving and rehabilitation are overwhelmingly demanding; hence , they may complicate the caregivers’ stress. However, some positive outcomes also exist. Results Caregivers involved in caring and rehabilitation of TBI victims may become mentally traumatized. Posttraumatic recovery of the TBI survivor can enhance the entire family’s closeness and bonding as well as improve the mental status of the caregiver. Conclusions A long-term longitudinal study encompassing integrated research is needed to fully understand the traumatic experiences of

  18. Parents' Experiences Following Children's Moderate to Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: A Clash of Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Roscigno, Cecelia I.; Swanson, Kristen M.

    2012-01-01

    Little is understood about parents' experiences following children's moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Using descriptive phenomenology we explored common experiences of parents whose children were diagnosed with moderate to severe TBI. Parents from across the United States (N = 42 from 37 families) participated in two semistructured interviews (~ 90 minutes and 12–15 months apart) in the first five years following children's TBI. First interviews were in person. Second interviews, done in person or by phone, facilitated updating parents' experiences and garnering their critique of the descriptive model. Parent themes were: (a) grateful to still have my child; (b) grieving for the child I knew; (c) running on nerves; and (d) grappling to get what your child and family need. Parents reported cultural barriers because of others' misunderstandings. More qualitative inquiry is needed to understand how the knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, and expectations of others (culture) influence parents' interactions and the family's adjustment and well-being. PMID:21613654

  19. Predicting Outcomes after Severe and Moderate Traumatic Brain Injury: An External Validation of Impact and Crash Prognostic Models in a Large Spanish Cohort.

    PubMed

    Castaño-Leon, Ana M; Lora, David; Munarriz, Pablo M; Cepeda, Santiago; Paredes, Igor; de la Cruz, Javier; Gómez Lopez, Pedro A; Lagares, Alfonso

    2016-09-01

    Prognostic models that were developed by the International Mission on Prognosis and Analysis of Clinical Trials in Traumatic Brain Injury (IMPACT) study group and the Corticosteroid Randomization After Signification Head injury (CRASH) collaborators are the most commonly used prognostic models for outcome after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Although they have been considered to be useful tools in clinical practice, a continuous process of external validation in recent cohorts of different populations is necessary. The objective of this study was to determine the external validity and compare the IMPACT and CRASH-refitted models for prediction of outcomes after moderate or severe TBI in a non-selected 1301-patient Spanish cohort. We studied discrimination, calibration, and overall fit as external validation measures. Excellent discrimination was indicated (area under the curve [AUC] 0.78-0.87) by the higher values in the validation than in the development sample for both models and outcomes. Calibration revealed that IMPACT models, in general, predict lower probabilities of both outcomes (mortality and disability). In contrast, CRASH-refitted models provided higher predicted probabilities than those observed. We can conclude that both models demonstrate an adequate performance in our representative traumatic brain Mediterranean population. Therefore, these models can be sensibly applied in our clinical practice so long as their limitations are observed during individual outcome prediction. PMID:26982260

  20. Paramedic intubation of patients with severe head injury: a review of current Australian practice and recommendations for change.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Stephen A

    2006-06-01

    Secondary brain injury may occur early after severe traumatic brain injury due to hypoxia and/or hypotension. Prehospital care by ambulance paramedics has the goal of preventing and treating these complications and, thus, improving outcomes. In Australia, most ambulance services recommend paramedics attempt endotracheal intubation in patients with severe head injury. Even though most patients with severe head injury retain airway reflexes, most states do not allow the use of appropriate drugs to facilitate intubation. In contrast, recent evidence from trauma registries suggests that this approach may be associated with significantly worse outcomes compared with no intubation. Two states allow intubation facilitated by sedative (but not relaxant) drugs, but this has a low success rate and could worsen brain injury because of a decrease in cerebral perfusion pressure. For road-based paramedics, the role of rapid sequence intubation is uncertain. Given the risks of this procedure and the lack of proven benefit, this procedure should not be introduced without supportive evidence from randomised, controlled trials. In contrast, for safety reasons, comatose patients transported by helicopter should undergo rapid sequence intubation prior to flight. However, this is not authorised in most states, despite good supportive evidence that this can be safely and effectively undertaken by paramedics. Finally, there is evidence that inadvertent hyperventilation is associated with adverse outcome, yet only two ambulance services use waveform capnography in head injury patients who are intubated. Overall, current paramedic airway practice in most states of Australia is not supported by the evidence and is probably associated with worse patient outcomes after severe head injury. For road-based paramedics, rapid transport to hospital without intubation should be regarded as the current standard of care. Rapid sequence intubation should be limited to use within appropriate clinical

  1. Safety and Tolerability of Cyclosporin A in Severe Traumatic Brain Injury Patients: Results from a Prospective Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Mazzeo, Anna Teresa; Brophy, Gretchen M.; Gilman, Charlotte B.; Alves, Óscar Luís; Robles, Jaime R.; Hayes, Ronald L.; Povlishock, John T.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Cyclosporin A (CsA) has recently been proposed for use in the early phase after traumatic brain injury (TBI), for its ability to preserve mitochondrial integrity in experimental brain injury models, and thereby provide improved behavioral outcomes as well as significant histological protection. The aim of this prospective, randomized, double-blind, dual-center, placebo-controlled trial was to evaluate the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of a single intravenous infusion of CsA in patients with severe TBI. Fifty adult severe TBI patients were enrolled over a 22-month period. Within 12 h of the injury patients received 5 mg/kg of CsA infused over 24 h, or placebo. Blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine, hemoglobin, platelets, white blood cell count (WBC), and a hepatic panel were monitored on admission, and at 12, 24, 36, and 48 h, and on days 4 and 7. Potential adverse events (AEs) were also recorded. Neurological outcome was recorded at 3 and 6 months after injury. This study revealed only transient differences in BUN levels at 24 and 48 h and for WBC counts at 24 h between the CsA and placebo patients. These modest differences were not clinically significant in that they did not negatively impact on patient course. Both BUN and creatinine values, markers of renal function, remained within their normal limits over the entire monitoring period. There were no significant differences in other mean laboratory values, or in the incidence of AEs at any other measured time point. Also, no significant difference was demonstrated for neurological outcome. Based on these results, we report a good safety profile of CsA infusion when given at the chosen dose of 5 mg/kg, infused over 24 h, during the early phase after severe head injury in humans, with the aim of neuroprotection. PMID:19621985

  2. Incidence of sport-related traumatic brain injury and risk factors of severity: a population-based epidemiologic study

    PubMed Central

    Selassie, Anbesaw W.; Wilson, Dulaney A.; Pickelsimer, E. Elisabeth; Voronca, Delia C.; Williams, Nolan R.; Edwards, Jonathan C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Few studies of sport-related traumatic brain injury (TBI) are population-based or rely on directly observed data on cause, demographic characteristics, and severity. This study addresses the epidemiology of sport-related TBI in a large population. Methods Data on all South Carolina hospital and emergency department encounters for TBI, 1998–2011, were analyzed. Annual incidence rate of sport-related TBI was calculated, and rates were compared across demographic groups. Sport-related TBI severity was modeled as a function of demographic and TBI characteristics using logistic regression. Results A total of 16,642 individuals with sport-related TBI yielded an average annual incidence rate of 31.5/100,000 population with a steady increase from 19.7 in 1998 to 45.6 in 2011. The most common mechanisms of sport-related TBI were kicked in football (38.1%), followed by fall injuries in sports (20.3%). Incidence rate was greatest in adolescents ages 12–18 (120.6/100,000/persons). Severe sport-related TBI was strongly associated with off-road vehicular sport (odds ratio [OR], 4.73; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 2.92–7.67); repeated head trauma (OR, 4.36; 95% CI, 3.69–5.15); equestrian sport (OR, 2.73; 95% CI, 1.64–4.51); and falls during sport activities (OR, 2.72; 95% CI, 1.67–4.46). Conclusions The high incidence of sport-related TBI in youth, potential for repetitive mild TBI, and its long-term consequences on learning warrants coordinated surveillance activities and population-based outcome studies. PMID:24060276

  3. Building trust to work with children after a severe traumatic accident.

    PubMed

    Hall, Julianne; Nayar, Shoba

    2014-01-01

    Trust is integral to nursing; yet little is known about how nurses establish trust when working with patients. This grounded theory study explored nurses' perspectives of how to build trust with a child and family in the context of paediatric acute health care. Seven paediatric acute care nurses were asked what they did when they cared for a child admitted to an acute care ward from emergency department or intensive care unit following a severe traumatic accident. Building trust emerged as the basic social process for an effective working relationship between a nurse and family to promote the rehabilitation of the child. This paper argues that building trust is critical to nurses developing a working relationship with both child and family to promote optimal health, and enables nurses to effectively step out and handover the care of the child to the family. PMID:24787249

  4. Family Coping Following Traumatic Head Injury: An Exploratory Analysis with Recommendations for Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Bruce W.; McCormick, Tony

    1988-01-01

    Used intensive interviewing and observation of volunteer sample of six families of victims of head injuries over eight-month period. Results indicated similar experiences and coping responses occurring in families following head injury. Head-injury rehabilitation systems were found to be more client centered than family centered. (Author/NB)

  5. 'It's the hearing that is last to go': a case of traumatic head injury.

    PubMed

    Tapson, Kate; Sierotowicz, Wanda; Marks-Maran, Di; Thompson, Trish Morris

    This article explores the literature related to acquired brain injury (ABI) and is followed by a case study of one patient with ABI, which reflects how the evidence, when implemented by a team of health professionals, can have a positive impact on recovery. Gregor is a middle-aged Polish man who suffered traumatic ABI when knocked down by a car. He spent a number of years in a specialist neurosurgical unit, then a rehabilitation unit, and for the past several years has been cared for in a care home. For most of this time he was in a coma. He began to come out of his coma and during his time in the care home received intensive physiotherapy and speech therapy. At the time of his brain injury Gregor could speak no English yet years later, when he began to regain consciousness, he was able to speak and understand English, a fact that might be attributed in part to 6 years of nurses talking to him in English as part of caring for him. Nurses are always told that hearing is the last of the senses to be lost when a person is unconscious or has a brain injury (Sisson, 1990). The case study presented in this article demonstrates the potential power of talking to a patient when providing care, even when that patient is in a coma, and the impact this may have had on Gregor. It also demonstrates the importance of the need for evidence-based neuro-rehabilitation, including multi-professional working by a team of specialist physiotherapists, nurses, speech therapists, continence specialist nurse and nutritionist. PMID:25757582

  6. Angular Impact Mitigation system for bicycle helmets to reduce head acceleration and risk of traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Kirk; Dau, Nathan; Feist, Florian; Deck, Caroline; Willinger, Rémy; Madey, Steven M; Bottlang, Michael

    2013-10-01

    Angular acceleration of the head is a known cause of traumatic brain injury (TBI), but contemporary bicycle helmets lack dedicated mechanisms to mitigate angular acceleration. A novel Angular Impact Mitigation (AIM) system for bicycle helmets has been developed that employs an elastically suspended aluminum honeycomb liner to absorb linear acceleration in normal impacts as well as angular acceleration in oblique impacts. This study tested bicycle helmets with and without AIM technology to comparatively assess impact mitigation. Normal impact tests were performed to measure linear head acceleration. Oblique impact tests were performed to measure angular head acceleration and neck loading. Furthermore, acceleration histories of oblique impacts were analyzed in a computational head model to predict the resulting risk of TBI in the form of concussion and diffuse axonal injury (DAI). Compared to standard helmets, AIM helmets resulted in a 14% reduction in peak linear acceleration (p<0.001), a 34% reduction in peak angular acceleration (p<0.001), and a 22-32% reduction in neck loading (p<0.001). Computational results predicted that AIM helmets reduced the risk of concussion and DAI by 27% and 44%, respectively. In conclusion, these results demonstrated that AIM technology could effectively improve impact mitigation compared to a contemporary expanded polystyrene-based bicycle helmet, and may enhance prevention of bicycle-related TBI. Further research is required. PMID:23770518

  7. Angular Impact Mitigation System for Bicycle Helmets to Reduce Head Acceleration and Risk of Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Kirk; Dau, Nathan; Feist, Florian; Deck, Caroline; Willinger, Rémy; Madey, Steven M.; Bottlang, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Angular acceleration of the head is a known cause of traumatic brain injury (TBI), but contemporary bicycle helmets lack dedicated mechanisms to mitigate angular acceleration. A novel Angular Impact Mitigation (AIM) system for bicycle helmets has been developed that employs an elastically suspended aluminum honeycomb liner to absorb linear acceleration in normal impacts as well as angular acceleration in oblique impacts. This study tested bicycle helmets with and without AIM technology to comparatively assess impact mitigation. Normal impact tests were performed to measure linear head acceleration. Oblique impact tests were performed to measure angular head acceleration and neck loading. Furthermore, acceleration histories of oblique impacts were analyzed in a computational head model to predict the resulting risk of TBI in the form of concussion and diffuse axonal injury (DAI). Compared to standard helmets, AIM helmets resulted in a 14% reduction in peak linear acceleration (p < 0.001), a 34% reduction in peak angular acceleration (p < 0.001), and a 22% to 32% reduction in neck loading (p < 0.001). Computational results predicted that AIM helmets reduced the risk of concussion and DAI by 27% and 44%, respectively. In conclusion, these results demonstrated that AIM technology could effectively improve impact mitigation compared to a contemporary expanded polystyrene-based bicycle helmet, and may enhance prevention of bicycle-related TBI. Further research is required. PMID:23770518

  8. Femoral Varus Osteotomy for Hip Instability after Traumatic Fracture Dislocations of the Hip Associated with Femoral Head Fractures: A Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Junichi; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2016-01-01

    Fracture of the femoral head and the acetabulum with traumatic dislocation of the hip is a severe injury representing various types and unfavorable outcome. We showed a 45-year-old man with Pipkin type-IV fracture and coxa valga. An immediate closed reduction was achieved followed by open reduction and internal fixation via a posterior approach 6 days later. However, dislocation occurred three times without traumatic events after three weeks. CT demonstrated no displacement of posterior fragments or implant failure. Femoral intertrochanteric varus osteotomy was performed to gain concentric stability and successfully resolved recurrent dislocation. Another 45-year-old woman with Pipkin type-IV fracture and coxa valga also underwent closed reduction initially and then continued conservative treatment. After eight weeks, when she started gait training, progressive pain became symptomatic. Persistent hip pain at weight bearing was not improved in spite of arthroscopic synovectomy and osteochondroplasty. Two years after injury, femoral intertrochanteric varus osteotomy was indicated and her refractory pain was resolved gradually. We suggest that femoral varus osteotomy should be considered for superolateral subluxation associated fracture dislocation of the hip in Pipkin type-IV and coxa valga. PMID:27293934

  9. Femoral Varus Osteotomy for Hip Instability after Traumatic Fracture Dislocations of the Hip Associated with Femoral Head Fractures: A Report of Two Cases.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Shuichi; Nakamura, Junichi; Iida, Satoshi; Suzuki, Chiho; Ohtori, Seiji; Orita, Sumihisa; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2016-01-01

    Fracture of the femoral head and the acetabulum with traumatic dislocation of the hip is a severe injury representing various types and unfavorable outcome. We showed a 45-year-old man with Pipkin type-IV fracture and coxa valga. An immediate closed reduction was achieved followed by open reduction and internal fixation via a posterior approach 6 days later. However, dislocation occurred three times without traumatic events after three weeks. CT demonstrated no displacement of posterior fragments or implant failure. Femoral intertrochanteric varus osteotomy was performed to gain concentric stability and successfully resolved recurrent dislocation. Another 45-year-old woman with Pipkin type-IV fracture and coxa valga also underwent closed reduction initially and then continued conservative treatment. After eight weeks, when she started gait training, progressive pain became symptomatic. Persistent hip pain at weight bearing was not improved in spite of arthroscopic synovectomy and osteochondroplasty. Two years after injury, femoral intertrochanteric varus osteotomy was indicated and her refractory pain was resolved gradually. We suggest that femoral varus osteotomy should be considered for superolateral subluxation associated fracture dislocation of the hip in Pipkin type-IV and coxa valga. PMID:27293934

  10. Moderate-to-Severe Traumatic Brain Injury in Children: Complications and Rehabilitation Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Popernack, Myra L.; Gray, Nicola; Reuter-Rice, Karin

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of death in children in the United States. Each year 37,200 children sustain a severe TBI, with up to 1.3 million life-years potentially adversely affected. Severe pediatric TBI is associated with significant mortality and morbidity. Of the children who survive their injury, more than 50% experience unfavorable outcomes 6 months after the injury. Although TBI-associated death rates decreased between 1997–2007, disabilities for TBI survivors continue to have both a direct and indirect impact on the economic and human integrity of our society. The degree of disability varies with the severity and mechanism of the injury, but a realm of physical and emotional deficits may be evident for years after the injury occurs. This article describes the pathophysiology of moderate to severe TBI, its associated complications, and opportunities to improve patient outcomes through use of acute management and rehabilitation strategies. To address the many challenges for TBI survivors and their families, including significant financial and emotional burdens, a collaborative effort is necessary to help affected children transition seamlessly from acute care through long-term rehabilitation. PMID:25449002

  11. Pituitary and/or hypothalamic dysfunction following moderate to severe traumatic brain injury: Current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Javed, Zeeshan; Qamar, Unaiza; Sathyapalan, Thozhukat

    2015-01-01

    There is an increasing deliberation regarding hypopituitarism following traumatic brain injury (TBI) and recent data have suggested that pituitary dysfunction is very common among survivors of patients having moderate-severe TBI which may evolve or resolve over time. Due to high prevalence of pituitary dysfunction after moderate-severe TBI and its association with increased morbidity and poor recovery and the fact that it can be easily treated with hormone replacement, it has been suggested that early detection and treatment is necessary to prevent long-term neurological consequences. The cause of pituitary dysfunction after TBI is still not well understood, but evidence suggests few possible primary and secondary causes. Results of recent studies focusing on the incidence of hypopituitarism in the acute and chronic phases after TBI are varied in terms of severity and time of occurrence. Although the literature available does not show consistent values and there is difference in study parameters and diagnostic tests used, it is clear that pituitary dysfunction is very common after moderate to severe TBI and patients should be carefully monitored. The exact timing of development cannot be predicted but has suggested regular assessment of pituitary function up to 1 year after TBI. In this narrative review, we aim to explore the current evidence available regarding the incidence of pituitary dysfunction in acute and chronic phase post-TBI and recommendations for screening and follow-up in these patients. We will also focus light over areas in this field worthy of further investigation. PMID:26693424

  12. A “virtually minimal” visuo-haptic training of attention in severe traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Although common during the early stages of recovery from severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), attention deficits have been scarcely investigated. Encouraging evidence suggests beneficial effects of attention training in more chronic and higher functioning patients. Interactive technology may provide new opportunities for rehabilitation in inpatients who are earlier in their recovery. Methods We designed a “virtually minimal” approach using robot-rendered haptics in a virtual environment to train severely injured inpatients in the early stages of recovery to sustain attention to a visuo-motor task. 21 inpatients with severe TBI completed repetitive reaching toward targets that were both seen and felt. Patients were tested over two consecutive days, experiencing 3 conditions (no haptic feedback, a break-through force, and haptic nudge) in 12 successive, 4-minute blocks. Results The interactive visuo-haptic environments were well-tolerated and engaging. Patients typically remained attentive to the task. However, patients exhibited attention loss both before (prolonged initiation) and during (pauses during motion) a movement. Compared to no haptic feedback, patients benefited from haptic nudge cues but not break-through forces. As training progressed, patients increased the number of targets acquired and spontaneously improved from one day to the next. Conclusions Interactive visuo-haptic environments could be beneficial for attention training for severe TBI patients in the early stages of recovery and warrants further and more prolonged clinical testing. PMID:23938101

  13. Cisternostomy for Management of Intracranial Hypertension in Severe Traumatic Brain Injury; Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Masoudi, Mohammad Sadegh; Rezaee, Elahe; Hakiminejad, Hasanali; Tavakoli, Maryam; Sadeghpoor, Tayebe

    2016-01-01

    Main goal in the management of patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) is control of intracranial pressure (ICP). Decompressive craniectomy is an accepted technique for control of refractory intracranial hypertension in patients with severe TBI. Because of high complication rate after decompressive craniectomy, new techniques such as basal cisternostomy have developed. We herein report a case of severe TBI in a 13-year-old boy treated by cisternostomy. The patient was admitted following a motor vehicle accident. Brain CT scan showed diffuse brain edema, left frontal contusion and posterior interhemispheric subdural hematoma. The patient underwent ICP monitoring. Subsequently, with 26 mmHg mean-value of ICP, he was treated surgically by cisternostomy technique. A progressive improvement of the neurological conditions in the following hours. After 5 days the boy was discharged and in the 3-months follow-up he was completely recovered. Cisternostomy could be an appropriate alternative to decompressive craniectomy for management of intracranial hypertension in patietns with sever TBI. PMID:27540551

  14. Life beyond severe traumatic injury: an integrative review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Halcomb, Elizabeth; Daly, John; Davidson, Patricia; Elliott, Doug; Griffiths, Rhonda

    2005-02-01

    It is only recently that recognition of the serious and debilitating sequelae of trauma has prompted exploration of outcomes beyond survival, such as disability, health status and quality of life. This paper aims to review the literature describing outcomes following severe traumatic injury to provide clinicians with a greater understanding of the recovery trajectory following severe trauma and highlight the issues faced by those recovering from such injury. Electronic databases, published reference lists and the Internet were searched to identify relevant literature. The heterogeneous nature of published literature in this area prohibited a systematic approach to inclusion of papers in this review. Trauma survivors report significant sequelae that influence functional status, psychological wellbeing, quality of life and return to productivity following severe injury. Key themes that emerge from the review include: current trauma systems which provide inadequate support along the recovery trajectory; rehabilitation referral which is affected by geographical location and provider preferences; a long-term loss of productivity in both society and the workplace; a high incidence of psychological sequelae; a link between poor recovery and increased drug and alcohol consumption; and valued social support which can augment recovery. Future research to evaluate interventions which target the recovery needs of the severely injured patients is recommended. Particular emphasis is required to develop systematic, sustainable and cost-effective follow-up to augment the successes of existing acute trauma services in providing high quality acute resuscitation and definitive trauma management. PMID:18038530

  15. Clinico-statistical and morphological aspects of severe traumatic brain injuries.

    PubMed

    Florou, Charoula; Zorilă, Andreea Lavinia; Zorilă, Marian Valentin; Marinescu, Magdalena Alice; Andrei, Cristina Maria; Păvăloiu, Raluca Maria; Mogoantă, LaurenŢiu; Zăvoi, Roxana Eugenia

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) represent a problem of public health all over the world if we consider its incidence, mortality and the big social costs. The increase of road and train traffic, the development of industry, the growth of alcohol consumption, the emergence and increase of terrorist attacks have led to more frequent and severe TBIs. There were registered 3260 deaths at the Institute of Forensic Medicine in Craiova, Romania, between 2010 and 2014; they were the result of severe traumas, 622 (19.07%) being caused by TBIs. The most affected by TBIs were men (the men÷women ratio was of 3÷1) and the elderly, mainly in the rural area. The main risk factor was alcohol intake; about 44% of the deceased people were under alcohol influence. The forensic examination highlighted the severity of cerebral meningeal lesions, the most frequent being cerebral and vascular lesions. The histopathological and immunohistochemical examinations emphasized various microscopic changes in accordance with the severity of the trauma and the time passed from impact until death. PMID:27516010

  16. Evaluation of cognitive restructuring for post-traumatic stress disorder in people with severe mental illness

    PubMed Central

    Mueser, Kim T.; Gottlieb, Jennifer D.; Xie, Haiyi; Lu, Weili; Yanos, Philip T.; Rosenberg, Stanley D.; Silverstein, Steven M.; Duva, Stephanie Marcello; Minsky, Shula; Wolfe, Rosemarie S.; McHugo, Gregory J.

    2015-01-01

    Background A cognitive–behavioural therapy (CBT) programme designed for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in people with severe mental illness, including breathing retraining, education and cognitive restructuring, was shown to be more effective than usual services. Aims To evaluate the incremental benefit of adding cognitive restructuring to the breathing retraining and education components of the CBT programme (trial registration: clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT00494650). Method In all, 201 people with severe mental illness and PTSD were randomised to 12- to 16-session CBT or a 3-session brief treatment programme (breathing retraining and education). The primary outcome was PTSD symptom severity. Secondary outcomes were PTSD diagnosis, other symptoms, functioning and quality of life. Results There was greater improvement in PTSD symptoms and functioning in the CBT group than in the brief treatment group, with both groups improving on other outcomes and effects maintained 1-year post-treatment. Conclusions Cognitive restructuring has a significant impact beyond breathing retraining and education in the CBT programme, reducing PTSD symptoms and improving functioning in people with severe mental illness. PMID:25858178

  17. Cisternostomy for Management of Intracranial Hypertension in Severe Traumatic Brain Injury; Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Masoudi, Mohammad Sadegh; Rezaee, Elahe; Hakiminejad, Hasanali; Tavakoli, Maryam; Sadeghpoor, Tayebe

    2016-07-01

    Main goal in the management of patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) is control of intracranial pressure (ICP). Decompressive craniectomy is an accepted technique for control of refractory intracranial hypertension in patients with severe TBI. Because of high complication rate after decompressive craniectomy, new techniques such as basal cisternostomy have developed. We herein report a case of severe TBI in a 13-year-old boy treated by cisternostomy. The patient was admitted following a motor vehicle accident. Brain CT scan showed diffuse brain edema, left frontal contusion and posterior interhemispheric subdural hematoma. The patient underwent ICP monitoring. Subsequently, with 26 mmHg mean-value of ICP, he was treated surgically by cisternostomy technique. A progressive improvement of the neurological conditions in the following hours. After 5 days the boy was discharged and in the 3-months follow-up he was completely recovered. Cisternostomy could be an appropriate alternative to decompressive craniectomy for management of intracranial hypertension in patietns with sever TBI. PMID:27540551

  18. Pituitary and/or hypothalamic dysfunction following moderate to severe traumatic brain injury: Current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Javed, Zeeshan; Qamar, Unaiza; Sathyapalan, Thozhukat

    2015-01-01

    There is an increasing deliberation regarding hypopituitarism following traumatic brain injury (TBI) and recent data have suggested that pituitary dysfunction is very common among survivors of patients having moderate-severe TBI which may evolve or resolve over time. Due to high prevalence of pituitary dysfunction after moderate-severe TBI and its association with increased morbidity and poor recovery and the fact that it can be easily treated with hormone replacement, it has been suggested that early detection and treatment is necessary to prevent long-term neurological consequences. The cause of pituitary dysfunction after TBI is still not well understood, but evidence suggests few possible primary and secondary causes. Results of recent studies focusing on the incidence of hypopituitarism in the acute and chronic phases after TBI are varied in terms of severity and time of occurrence. Although the literature available does not show consistent values and there is difference in study parameters and diagnostic tests used, it is clear that pituitary dysfunction is very common after moderate to severe TBI and patients should be carefully monitored. The exact timing of development cannot be predicted but has suggested regular assessment of pituitary function up to 1 year after TBI. In this narrative review, we aim to explore the current evidence available regarding the incidence of pituitary dysfunction in acute and chronic phase post-TBI and recommendations for screening and follow-up in these patients. We will also focus light over areas in this field worthy of further investigation. PMID:26693424

  19. [Guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of severe traumatic brain injury. Part 2. Intensive care and neuromonitoring].

    PubMed

    Potapov, A A; Krylov, V V; Gavrilov, A G; Kravchuk, A D; Likhterman, L B; Petrikov, S S; Talypov, A E; Zakharova, N E; Oshorov, A V; Sychev, A A; Aleksandrova, E V; Solodov, A A

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one of the major causes of death and disability in young and middle-aged people. The most problematic group is comprised of patients with severe TBI who are in a coma. The adequate diagnosis of primary brain injuries and timely prevention and treatment of the secondary injury mechanisms largely define the possibility of reducing mortality and severe disabling consequences. When developing these guidelines, we used our experience in the development of international and national recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of mild traumatic brain injury, penetrating gunshot wounds to the skull and brain, severe traumatic brain injury, and severe consequences of brain injuries, including a vegetative state. In addition, we used international and national guidelines for the diagnosis, intensive care, and surgical treatment of severe traumatic brain injury, which had been published in recent years. The proposed guidelines concern intensive care of severe TBI in adults and are particularly intended for neurosurgeons, neurologists, neuroradiologists, anesthesiologists, and intensivists who are routinely involved in the treatment of these patients. PMID:27029336

  20. Neuroprotective effects of bloodletting at Jing points combined with mild induced hypothermia in acute severe traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Yue; Miao, Xiao-mei; Yi, Tai-long; Chen, Xu-yi; Sun, Hong-tao; Cheng, Shi-xiang; Zhang, Sai

    2016-01-01

    Bloodletting at Jing points has been used to treat coma in traditional Chinese medicine. Mild induced hypothermia has also been shown to have neuroprotective effects. However, the therapeutic effects of bloodletting at Jing points and mild induced hypothermia alone are limited. Therefore, we investigated whether combined treatment might have clinical effectiveness for the treatment of acute severe traumatic brain injury. Using a rat model of traumatic brain injury, combined treatment substantially alleviated cerebral edema and blood-brain barrier dysfunction. Furthermore, neurological function was ameliorated, and cellular necrosis and the inflammatory response were lessened. These findings suggest that the combined effects of bloodletting at Jing points (20 μL, twice a day, for 2 days) and mild induced hypothermia (6 hours) are better than their individual effects alone. Their combined application may have marked neuroprotective effects in the clinical treatment of acute severe traumatic brain injury. PMID:27482221

  1. Surgical Decision Making for the Elderly Patients in Severe Head Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Jae-Jun; Yoon, Seok-Man; Oh, Jae-Sang; Bae, Hack-Gun; Doh, Jae-Won

    2014-01-01

    Objective Age is a strong predictor of mortality in traumatic brain injuries. A surgical decision making is difficult especially for the elderly patients with severe head injuries. We studied so-called 'withholding a life-saving surgery' over a two year period at a university hospital. Methods We collected data from 227 elderly patients. In 35 patients with Glasgow Coma Score 3-8, 28 patients had lesions that required operation. A life-saving surgery was withheld in 15 patients either by doctors and/or the families (Group A). Surgery was performed in 13 patients (Group B). We retrospectively examined the medical records and radiological findings of these 28 patients. We calculated the predicted probability of 6 month mortality (IPM) and 6 month unfavorable outcome (IPU) to compare the result of decision by the International Mission for Prognosis and Analysis of Clinical Trials in TBI (IMPACT) calculator. Results Types of the mass lesion did not affect on the surgical decision making. None of the motor score 1 underwent surgery, while all patients with reactive pupils underwent surgery. Causes of injury or episodes of hypoxia/hypotension might have affected on the decision making, however, their role was not distinct. All patients in the group A died. In the group B, the outcome was unfavorable in 11 of 13 patients. Patients with high IPM or IPU were more common in group A than group B. Wrong decisions brought futile cares. Conclusion Ethical training and developing decision-making skills are necessary including shared decision making. PMID:25024822

  2. Vagus Nerve Stimulation to Augment Recovery from Severe Traumatic Brain Injury Impeding Consciousness: A Prospective Pilot Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Chen; Flanagan, Steven R.; Samadani, Uzma

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Traumatic brain injury has a high morbidity and mortality in both civilian and military populations. Blast and other mechanisms of traumatic brain injury damage the brain by causing neurons to disconnect and atrophy. Such traumatic axonal injury can lead to persistently vegetative and minimally conscious states, for which limited treatment options exist, including physical, occupational, speech and cognitive therapies. More than 60,000 patients have received vagus nerve stimulation for epilepsy and depression. In addition to decreased seizure frequency and severity, patients report enhanced mood, reduced daytime sleepiness independent of seizure control, increased slow wave sleep, and improved cognition, memory, and quality of life. Early stimulation of the vagus nerve accelerates the rate and extent of behavioral and cognitive recovery after fluid percussion brain injury in rats. Methods We recently obtained FDA approval for a pilot prospective randomized crossover trial to demonstrate objective improvement in clinical outcome by placement of a vagus nerve stimulator in patients who are recovering from severe traumatic brain injury. Our hypothesis is that stimulation of the vagus nerve results in increased cerebral blood flow and metabolism in the forebrain, thalamus and reticular formation, which promotes arousal and improved consciousness, thereby improving outcome after traumatic brain injury resulting in minimally conscious or persistent vegetative states. Discussion If this study demonstrates that vagus nerve stimulation can safely and positively impact outcome, then a larger randomized prospective crossover trial will be proposed. PMID:23485054

  3. Cerebrovascular carbon dioxide reactivity assessed by intracranial pressure dynamics in severely head injured patients.

    PubMed

    Yoshihara, M; Bandoh, K; Marmarou, A

    1995-03-01

    Appropriate management of intracranial pressure (ICP) in severely head injured patients depends in part on the cerebral vessel reactivity to PCO2; loss of CO2 reactivity has been associated with poor outcome. This study describes a new method for evaluating vascular reactivity in head-injured patients by determining the sensitivity of ICP change to alterations in PCO2. This method was combined with measurements of the pressure volume index (PVI), which allowed calculation of blood volume change necessary to alter ICP. The objective of this study was to investigate the ICP response and the blood volume change corresponding to alterations in PCO2 and to examine the correlation of responsivity and outcome as measured on the Glasgow Outcome Scale. The PVI and ICP at different end-tidal PCO2 levels produced by mild hypo- and hyperventilation were obtained in 49 patients with Glasgow Coma Scale scores of less than 8 and over a wide range of PCO2 (25 to 40 mm Hg) in eight patients. Given the assumption that the PVI remained constant during alteration of PaCO2, the estimated blood volume change per torr change of PCO2 was calculated by the following equation: BVR = PVI x delta log(ICP)/delta PCO2, where BVR = blood volume reactivity. The data in this study showed that PVI remained stable with changes in PCO2, thus validating the assumption used in the blood volume estimates. Moreover, the response of ICP to PCO2 alterations followed an exponential curve that could be described in terms of the responsivity indices to capnic stimuli. It was found that responsivity to hypocapnia was reduced by 50% compared to responsivity to hypercapnia measured within 24 hours of injury (p < 0.01). The sensitivity of ICP to estimated blood volume changes in patients with a PVI of less than 15 ml was extremely high with only 4 ml of blood required to raise ICP by 10 mm Hg. The authors conclude from these data that, following traumatic injury, the resistance vessels are in a state of

  4. Text-to-Speech and Reading While Listening: Reading Support for Individuals with Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, Judy

    2013-01-01

    Individuals with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) often have reading challenges. They maintain or reestablish basic decoding and word recognition skills following injury, but problems with reading comprehension often persist. Practitioners have the potential to accommodate struggling readers by changing the presentational mode of text in a…

  5. Characteristics of Dysphagia in Severe Traumatic Brain Injury Patients: A Comparison With Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Won Kyung; Yeom, Jiwoon; Lee, Woo Hyung; Seo, Han Gil; Oh, Byung-Mo

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the swallowing characteristics of dysphagic patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) with those of dysphagic stroke patients. Methods Forty-one patients with TBI were selected from medical records (between December 2004 to March 2013) and matched to patients with stroke (n=41) based on age, sex, and disease duration. Patients' swallowing characteristics were analyzed retrospectively using a videofluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS) and compared between both groups. Following thorough review of medical records, patients who had a history of diseases that could affect swallowing function at the time of the study were excluded. Dysphagia characteristics and severity were evaluated using the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association National Outcome Measurement System swallowing scale, clinical dysphagia scale, and the videofluoroscopic dysphagia scale. Results There was a significant difference in radiological lesion location (p=0.024) between the two groups. The most common VFSS finding was aspiration or penetration, followed by decreased laryngeal elevation and reduced epiglottis inversion. Swallowing function, VFSS findings, or quantified dysphagia severity showed no significant differences between the groups. In a subgroup analysis of TBI patients, the incidence of tube feeding was higher in patients with surgical intervention than in those without (p=0.011). Conclusion The swallowing characteristics of dysphagic patients after TBI were comparable to those of dysphagic stroke patients. Common VFSS findings comprised aspiration or penetration, decreased laryngeal elevation, and reduced epiglottis inversion. Patients who underwent surgical intervention after TBI were at high risk of tube feeding requirement. PMID:27446779

  6. Differential activation of infiltrating monocyte-derived cells after mild and severe traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Trahanas, Diane M.; Cuda, Carla M.; Perlman, Harris; Schwulst, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    Microglia are the resident innate immune cells of the brain. Although embryologically and functionally distinct, they are morphologically similar to peripheral monocyte-derived cells resulting in a poor ability to discriminate between the two cell types. The purpose of this study was to develop a rapid and reliable method to simultaneously characterize, quantify, and discriminate between whole populations of myeloid cells from the brain in a murine model of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Male C57BL/6 mice underwent TBI (n=16) or sham injury (n=14). Brains were harvested at 24 hours post injury. Multiparameter flow cytometry and sequential gating analysis was performed allowing for discrimination between microglia and infiltrating leukocytes as well as for the characterization and quantification of individual subtypes within the infiltrating population. The proportion of infiltrating leukocytes within the brain increased with the severity of injury and the predominate cell types within the infiltrating population were monocyte-derived (p=0.01). Additionally, the severity of injury altered the overall makeup of the infiltrating monocyte-derived cells. In conclusion, we describe a flow cytometry based technique for gross discrimination between infiltrating leukocytes and microglia as well as the ability to simultaneously characterize and quantify individual myeloid subtypes and their maturation states within these populations. PMID:26091024

  7. According to which factors in severe traumatic brain injury craniectomy could be beneficial

    PubMed Central

    Fotakopoulos, George; Tsianaka, Eleni; Vagkopoulos, Konstantinos; Fountas, Kostas N.

    2016-01-01

    Background: To investigate the clinical outcome at 101 patients undergoing decompressive craniectomy (DC) after severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Methods: Age, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) at the time of intubation, and the intraoperative intracranial pressure (ICP) were recorded. Formal DC was performed in all cases and the square surface of bone flap was calculated in cm2 based on the length and the width from computed tomography scan. Results: The difference of good neurological recovery (Glasgow outcome score 4–5), between patients with ICP ≤20 mmHg, GCS ≥5, age ≤60 years, and bone flap ≥130 cm2 and those with ICP >20 mmHg, GCS <5, age >60 years, and bone flap <130 cm2, was statistically significant. Conclusion: Although the application of DC in severe TBI is controversial and the population in this study is small, our study demonstrates the threshold of the specific factors (patient age, ICP and GCS on the day of the surgery and the size of the bone flap) which may help in the decision of performing DC. Furthermore, this study proves that the different combinations and mainly at the same time involvement of all prognostic parameters (age <60, GCS <5, bone flap ≥130 cm2, and ICP ≤20 at time of DC surgery) allow a better outcome. PMID:26981320

  8. The impact of injury severity on long-term social outcome following paediatric traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Muscara, Frank; Catroppa, Cathy; Eren, Senem; Anderson, Vicki

    2009-08-01

    Despite suggestions that paediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI) disrupts social skill development, few studies have investigated long-term social outcome following the transition into adulthood. The current study aimed to investigate long-term social outcome, in a sample of 36 survivors who suffered a mild, moderate or severe TBI between 8 and 12 years of age. At 7-10 years post-injury, the age of participants ranged between 16 and 22 years. Social outcome was assessed using a number of self-rated and parent-rated questionnaires, in order to obtain self- and other-rated accounts of the groups' current social functioning. Predictors of long-term social outcome were also explored, with findings suggesting that young people who suffered mild TBI during childhood tended to be functioning at a higher level on some measures of social functioning, compared to those that suffered a moderate and severe injury. Further, results suggested that pre-injury adaptive functioning and socio-economic status predicted long-term functioning for some measures of social outcome. Finally, social problem-solving skills predicted the success of social reintegration post-TBI. These preliminary findings indicate that there is a risk of social difficulties following paediatric TBI continuing into adulthood, and that a number of demographic, social, and neuropsychological variables continue to predict social outcome even at this late stage post-injury. PMID:18839384

  9. Cerebral extracellular lactate increase is predominantly nonischemic in patients with severe traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Sala, Nathalie; Suys, Tamarah; Zerlauth, Jean-Baptiste; Bouzat, Pierre; Messerer, Mahmoud; Bloch, Jocelyne; Levivier, Marc; Magistretti, Pierre J; Meuli, Reto; Oddo, Mauro

    2013-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that endogenous lactate is an important substrate for neurons. This study aimed to examine cerebral lactate metabolism and its relationship with brain perfusion in patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). A prospective cohort of 24 patients with severe TBI monitored with cerebral microdialysis (CMD) and brain tissue oxygen tension (PbtO2) was studied. Brain lactate metabolism was assessed by quantification of elevated CMD lactate samples (>4 mmol/L); these were matched to CMD pyruvate and PbtO2 values and dichotomized as glycolytic (CMD pyruvate >119 μmol/L vs. low pyruvate) and hypoxic (PbtO2 <20 mm Hg vs. nonhypoxic). Using perfusion computed tomography (CT), brain perfusion was categorized as oligemic, normal, or hyperemic, and was compared with CMD and PbtO2 data. Samples with elevated CMD lactate were frequently observed (41±8%), and we found that brain lactate elevations were predominantly associated with glycolysis and normal PbtO2 (73±8%) rather than brain hypoxia (14±6%). Furthermore, glycolytic lactate was always associated with normal or hyperemic brain perfusion, whereas all episodes with hypoxic lactate were associated with diffuse oligemia. Our findings suggest predominant nonischemic cerebral extracellular lactate release after TBI and support the concept that lactate may be used as an energy substrate by the injured human brain. PMID:23963367

  10. Pathophysiology and Clinical Management of Moderate and Severe Traumatic Brain Injury in the ICU

    PubMed Central

    Sheriff, Faheem G.; Hinson, Holly E.

    2015-01-01

    Moderate and severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality among young individuals in high-income countries. Its pathophysiology is divided into two major phases: the initial neuronal injury (or primary injury) followed by secondary insults (secondary injury). Multimodality monitoring now offers neurointensivists the ability to monitor multiple physiologic parameters that act as surrogates of brain ischemia and hypoxia, the major driving forces behind secondary brain injury. The heterogeneity of the pathophysiology of TBI makes it necessary to take into consideration these interacting physiologic factors when recommending for or against any therapies; it may also account for the failure of all the neuroprotective therapies studied so far. In this review, the authors focus on neuroclinicians and neurointensivists, and discuss the developments in therapeutic strategies aimed at optimizing intracranial pressure and cerebral perfusion pressure, and minimizing cerebral hypoxia. The management of moderate to severe TBI in the intensive care unit is moving away from a pure “threshold-based” treatment approach toward consideration of patient-specific characteristics, including the state of cerebral autoregulation. The authors also include a concise discussion on the management of medical and neurologic complications peculiar to TBI as well as an overview of prognostication. PMID:25714866

  11. Imaging of Cerebral Blood Flow in Patients with Severe Traumatic Brain Injury in the Neurointensive Care

    PubMed Central

    Rostami, Elham; Engquist, Henrik; Enblad, Per

    2014-01-01

    Ischemia is a common and deleterious secondary injury following traumatic brain injury (TBI). A great challenge for the treatment of TBI patients in the neurointensive care unit (NICU) is to detect early signs of ischemia in order to prevent further advancement and deterioration of the brain tissue. Today, several imaging techniques are available to monitor cerebral blood flow (CBF) in the injured brain such as positron emission tomography (PET), single-photon emission computed tomography, xenon computed tomography (Xenon-CT), perfusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and CT perfusion scan. An ideal imaging technique would enable continuous non-invasive measurement of blood flow and metabolism across the whole brain. Unfortunately, no current imaging method meets all these criteria. These techniques offer snapshots of the CBF. MRI may also provide some information about the metabolic state of the brain. PET provides images with high resolution and quantitative measurements of CBF and metabolism; however, it is a complex and costly method limited to few TBI centers. All of these methods except mobile Xenon-CT require transfer of TBI patients to the radiological department. Mobile Xenon-CT emerges as a feasible technique to monitor CBF in the NICU, with lower risk of adverse effects. Promising results have been demonstrated with Xenon-CT in predicting outcome in TBI patients. This review covers available imaging methods used to monitor CBF in patients with severe TBI. PMID:25071702

  12. Treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder in patients with severe mental illness: a review.

    PubMed

    Mabey, Linda; van Servellen, Gwen

    2014-02-01

    Although the prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is high among those with severe mental illness, little is known about the use of interventions to lessen the burden of PTSD in this population. Currently, there are limited data about safe and effective interventions to treat these individuals. This systematic published work review presents the scientific published work reporting studies of psychological treatment approaches for individuals with comorbid PTSD and severe mental illness. A secondary aim of this study was to identify the specific models implemented and tested, and their impact upon patient outcomes. A review of the published work from January 2001 through January 2012 of English-language publications retrieved from the Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), MEDLINE, and the American Psychological Association generated abstracts (PsycINFO) databases was conducted. Six studies met the inclusion criteria for the review. The treatment programs described were cognitive-behavioural therapy, psychoeducation, exposure-based cognitive-behavioural therapy, and eye movement desensitization and reprocessing. Evidence of the effectiveness of these programs is examined. Data to support the use of these interventions are limited, indicating the need for further research and efficacy trials. Future areas of research and implications for nursing are discussed. PMID:23363327

  13. Better Glasgow outcome score, cerebral perfusion pressure and focal brain oxygenation in severely traumatized brain following direct regional brain hypothermia therapy: A prospective randomized study

    PubMed Central

    Idris, Zamzuri; Zenian, Mohd Sofan; Muzaimi, Mustapha; Hamid, Wan Zuraida Wan Abdul

    2014-01-01

    Background: Induced hypothermia for treatment of traumatic brain injury is controversial. Since many pathways involved in the pathophysiology of secondary brain injury are temperature dependent, regional brain hypothermia is thought capable to mitigate those processes. The objectives of this study are to assess the therapeutic effects and complications of regional brain cooling in severe head injury with Glasgow coma scale (GCS) 6-7. Materials and Methods: A prospective randomized controlled pilot study involving patients with severe traumatic brain injury with GCS 6 and 7 who required decompressive craniectomy. Patients were randomized into two groups: Cooling and no cooling. For the cooling group, analysis was made by dividing the group into mild and deep cooling. Brain was cooled by irrigating the brain continuously with cold Hartmann solution for 24-48 h. Main outcome assessments were a dichotomized Glasgow outcome score (GOS) at 6 months posttrauma. Results: A total of 32 patients were recruited. The cooling-treated patients did better than no cooling. There were 63.2% of patients in cooling group attained good GOS at 6 months compared to only 15.4% in noncooling group (P = 0.007). Interestingly, the analysis at 6 months post-trauma disclosed mild-cooling-treated patients did better than no cooling (70% vs. 15.4% attained good GOS, P = 0.013) and apparently, the deep-cooling-treated patients failed to be better than either no cooling (P = 0.074) or mild cooling group (P = 0.650). Conclusion: Data from this pilot study imply direct regional brain hypothermia appears safe, feasible and maybe beneficial in treating severely head-injured patients. PMID:25685201

  14. Acute Serum Hormone Levels: Characterization and Prognosis after Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    McCullough, Emily H.; Niyonkuru, Christian; Ozawa, Haishin; Loucks, Tammy L.; Dobos, Julie A.; Brett, Christopher A.; Santarsieri, Martina; Dixon, C. Edward; Berga, Sarah L.; Fabio, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Experimental traumatic brain injury (TBI) studies report the neuroprotective effects of female sex steroids on multiple mechanisms of injury, with the clinical assumption that women have hormonally mediated neuroprotection because of the endogenous presence of these hormones. Other literature indicates that testosterone may exacerbate injury. Further, stress hormone abnormalities that accompany critical illness may both amplify or blunt sex steroid levels. To better understand the role of sex steroid exposure in mediating TBI, we 1) characterized temporal profiles of serum gonadal and stress hormones in a population with severe TBI during the acute phases of their injury; and 2) used a biological systems approach to evaluate these hormones as biomarkers predicting global outcome. The study population was 117 adults (28 women; 89 men) with severe TBI. Serum samples (n=536) were collected for 7 days post-TBI for cortisol, progesterone, testosterone, estradiol, luteinizing hormone (LH), and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH). Hormone data were linked with clinical data, including acute care mortality and Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) scores at 6 months. Hormone levels after TBI were compared to those in healthy controls (n=14). Group based trajectory analysis (TRAJ) was used to develop temporal hormone profiles that delineate distinct subpopulations in the cohort. Structural equations models were used to determine inter-relationships between hormones and outcomes within a multivariate model. Compared to controls, acute serum hormone levels were significantly altered after severe TBI. Changes in the post-TBI adrenal response and peripheral aromatization influenced hormone TRAJ profiles and contributed to the abnormalities, including increased estradiol in men and increased testosterone in women. In addition to older age and greater injury severity, increased estradiol and testosterone levels over time were associated with increased mortality and worse global

  15. Acute serum hormone levels: characterization and prognosis after severe traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Amy K; McCullough, Emily H; Niyonkuru, Christian; Ozawa, Haishin; Loucks, Tammy L; Dobos, Julie A; Brett, Christopher A; Santarsieri, Martina; Dixon, C Edward; Berga, Sarah L; Fabio, Anthony

    2011-06-01

    Experimental traumatic brain injury (TBI) studies report the neuroprotective effects of female sex steroids on multiple mechanisms of injury, with the clinical assumption that women have hormonally mediated neuroprotection because of the endogenous presence of these hormones. Other literature indicates that testosterone may exacerbate injury. Further, stress hormone abnormalities that accompany critical illness may both amplify or blunt sex steroid levels. To better understand the role of sex steroid exposure in mediating TBI, we 1) characterized temporal profiles of serum gonadal and stress hormones in a population with severe TBI during the acute phases of their injury; and 2) used a biological systems approach to evaluate these hormones as biomarkers predicting global outcome. The study population was 117 adults (28 women; 89 men) with severe TBI. Serum samples (n=536) were collected for 7 days post-TBI for cortisol, progesterone, testosterone, estradiol, luteinizing hormone (LH), and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH). Hormone data were linked with clinical data, including acute care mortality and Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) scores at 6 months. Hormone levels after TBI were compared to those in healthy controls (n=14). Group based trajectory analysis (TRAJ) was used to develop temporal hormone profiles that delineate distinct subpopulations in the cohort. Structural equations models were used to determine inter-relationships between hormones and outcomes within a multivariate model. Compared to controls, acute serum hormone levels were significantly altered after severe TBI. Changes in the post-TBI adrenal response and peripheral aromatization influenced hormone TRAJ profiles and contributed to the abnormalities, including increased estradiol in men and increased testosterone in women. In addition to older age and greater injury severity, increased estradiol and testosterone levels over time were associated with increased mortality and worse global outcome for

  16. Spillway-induced salmon head injury triggers the generation of brain alphaII-spectrin breakdown product biomarkers similar to mammalian traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Miracle, Ann; Denslow, Nancy D; Kroll, Kevin J; Liu, Ming Cheng; Wang, Kevin K W

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in biomedical research have resulted in the development of specific biomarkers for diagnostic testing of disease condition or physiological risk. Of specific interest are alphaII-spectrin breakdown products (SBDPs), which are produced by proteolytic events in traumatic brain injury and have been used as biomarkers to predict the severity of injury in humans and other mammalian brain injury models. This study describes and demonstrates the successful use of antibody-based mammalian SBDP biomarkers to detect head injury in migrating juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) that have been injured during passage through high-energy hydraulic environments present in spillways under different operational configurations. Mortality and injury assessment techniques currently measure only near-term direct mortality and easily observable acute injury. Injury-based biomarkers may serve as a quantitative indicator of subacute physical injury and recovery, and aid hydropower operators in evaluation of safest passage configuration and operation actions for migrating juvenile salmonids. We describe a novel application of SBDP biomarkers for head injury for migrating salmon. To our knowledge, this is the first documented cross-over use of a human molecular biomarker in a wildlife and operational risk management scenario. PMID:19214235

  17. Spillway-Induced Salmon Head Injury Triggers the Generation of Brain αII-Spectrin Breakdown Product Biomarkers Similar to Mammalian Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Miracle, Ann; Denslow, Nancy D.; Kroll, Kevin J.; Liu, Ming Cheng; Wang, Kevin K. W.

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in biomedical research have resulted in the development of specific biomarkers for diagnostic testing of disease condition or physiological risk. Of specific interest are αII-spectrin breakdown products (SBDPs), which are produced by proteolytic events in traumatic brain injury and have been used as biomarkers to predict the severity of injury in humans and other mammalian brain injury models. This study describes and demonstrates the successful use of antibody-based mammalian SBDP biomarkers to detect head injury in migrating juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) that have been injured during passage through high-energy hydraulic environments present in spillways under different operational configurations. Mortality and injury assessment techniques currently measure only near-term direct mortality and easily observable acute injury. Injury-based biomarkers may serve as a quantitative indicator of subacute physical injury and recovery, and aid hydropower operators in evaluation of safest passage configuration and operation actions for migrating juvenile salmonids. We describe a novel application of SBDP biomarkers for head injury for migrating salmon. To our knowledge, this is the first documented cross-over use of a human molecular biomarker in a wildlife and operational risk management scenario. PMID:19214235

  18. Early Altered Resting-State Functional Connectivity Predicts the Severity of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms in Acutely Traumatized Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Ling-di; Wan, Jie-qing; Sun, Ya-wen; Su, Shan-shan; Ding, Wei-na; Xu, Jian-rong

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the relationship between resting-state functional connectivity and the severity of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in 15 people who developed PTSD following recent trauma. Fifteen participants who experienced acute traumatic events underwent a 7.3-min resting functional magnetic resonance imaging scan within 2 days post-event. All the patients were diagnosed with PTSD within 1 to 6 months after trauma. Brain areas in which activity was correlated with that of the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) were assessed. To assess the relationship between the severity of PTSD symptoms and PCC connectivity, contrast images representing areas positively correlated with the PCC were correlated with the subject’s Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale scores (CAPS) when they were diagnosed. Furthermore, the PCC, medial prefrontal cortex and bilateral amygdala were selected to assess the correlation of the strength of functional connectivity with the CAPS. Resting state connectivity with the PCC was negatively correlated with CAPS scores in the left superior temporal gyrus and right hippocampus/amygdala. Furthermore, the strength of connectivity between the PCC and bilateral amygdala, and even between the bilateral amygdala could predict the severity of PTSD symptoms later. These results suggest that early altered resting-state functional connectivity of the PCC with the left superior temporal gyrus, right hippocampus and amygdala could predict the severity of the disease and may be a major risk factor that predisposes patients to develop PTSD. PMID:23056477

  19. Subacute complications during recovery from severe traumatic brain injury: frequency and associations with outcome

    PubMed Central

    Godbolt, Alison K; Stenberg, Maud; Jakobsson, Jan; Sorjonen, Kimmo; Krakau, Karolina; Stålnacke, Britt-Marie; Nygren DeBoussard, Catharina

    2015-01-01

    Background Medical complications after severe traumatic brain injury (S-TBI) may delay or prevent transfer to rehabilitation units and impact on long-term outcome. Objective Mapping of medical complications in the subacute period after S-TBI and the impact of these complications on 1-year outcome to inform healthcare planning and discussion of prognosis with relatives. Setting Prospective multicentre observational study. Recruitment from 6 neurosurgical centres in Sweden and Iceland. Participants and assessments Patients aged 18–65 years with S-TBI and acute Glasgow Coma Scale 3–8, who were admitted to neurointensive care. Assessment of medical complications 3 weeks and 3 months after injury. Follow-up to 1 year. 114 patients recruited with follow-up at 1 year as follows: 100 assessed, 7 dead and 7 dropped out. Outcome measure Glasgow Outcome Scale Extended. Results 68 patients had ≥1 complication 3 weeks after injury. 3 weeks after injury, factors associated with unfavourable outcome at 1 year were: tracheostomy, assisted ventilation, on-going infection, epilepsy and nutrition via nasogastric tube or percutaneous endoscopic gastroscopy (PEG) tube (univariate logistic regression analyses). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that tracheostomy and epilepsy retained significance even after incorporating acute injury severity into the model. 3 months after injury, factors associated with unfavourable outcome were tracheostomy and heterotopic ossification (Fisher's test), infection, hydrocephalus, autonomic instability, PEG feeding and weight loss (univariate logistic regression). PEG feeding and weight loss at 3 months were retained in a multivariate model. Conclusions Subacute complications occurred in two-thirds of patients. Presence of a tracheostomy or epilepsy at 3 weeks, and of PEG feeding and weight loss at 3 months, had robust associations with unfavourable outcome that were incompletely explained by acute injury severity. PMID

  20. Diagnostic protein biomarkers for severe, moderate and mild traumatic brain injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streeter, Jackson; Hayes, Ronald L.; Wang, Kevin K. W.

    2011-06-01

    Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) is a major problem in military and civilian medicine. Yet, there are no simple non-invasive diagnostics for TBI. Our goal is to develop and clinically validate blood-based biomarker assays for the diagnosis, prognosis and management of mild, moderate and severe TBI patients. These assays will ultimately be suitable for deployment to far-forward combat environments. Using a proteomic and systems biology approach, we identified over 20 candidate biomarkers for TBI and developed robust ELISAs for at least 6 candidate biomarkers, including Ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase- L1 (UCH-L1), Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP) and a 145 kDa breakdown products of αII-spectrin (SBDP 145) generated by calpain proteolysis. In a multi-center feasibility study (Biomarker Assessment For Neurotrauma Diagnosis And Improved Triage System (BANDITS), we analyzed CSF and blood samples from 101 adult patients with severe TBI [Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) <= 8] at 6 sites and analyzed 27 mild TBI patients and 5 moderate TBI patients [GCS 9-15] from 2 sites in a pilot study. We identified that serum levels of UCH-L1, GFAP and SBDP145 have strong diagnostic and prognostic properties for severe TBI over controls. Similarly initial post-TBI serum levels (< 6 h) of UCH-L1 and GFAP have diagnostic characteristics for moderate and mild TBI. We are now furthering assay production, refining assay platforms (both benchtop and point-ofcare/ handheld) and planning a pivotal clinical study to seek FDA approval of these TBI diagnostic assays.

  1. Script-event representation in patients with severe traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Allain, Philippe; Fasotti, Luciano; Roy, Arnaud; Chauviré, Valérie; Etcharry-Bouyx, Frédérique; Le Gall, Didier

    2012-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the syntactic and semantic dimensions of script representation in patients with structural damage within the cerebral cortex following a severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Forty TBI patients and 38 healthy control subjects (HC) were asked to sort cards describing actions belonging to eight scripts according to the script to which they belonged and according to their order of execution. Each script included actions which were low in centrality and distinctiveness (NCA & NDA), and high in centrality (CA), distinctiveness (DA), and CA and DA. Actions were presented in three conditions. In the scripts with headers (SH) condition, the actions were given with each script header written on a separate card. In the scripts without headers condition (SwH) no script header was provided. In the scripts with distractor header (SDH) condition, the actions were given with each script header and a distractor header written on separate cards. The results showed that performance of TBI patients was significantly lower in all conditions. Overall, TBI patients made significantly more sequencing and sorting errors (for all types of actions) than HC subjects. These data are consistent with the view that TBI produces impairment of both the syntactic and semantic dimensions of script representation. PMID:21689812

  2. Protein profile changes in the frontotemporal lobes in human severe traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Xu, Benhong; Tian, Rui; Wang, Xia; Zhan, Shaohua; Wang, Renzhi; Guo, Yi; Ge, Wei

    2016-07-01

    Severe traumatic brain injury (sTBI) is a serious public health issue with high morbidity and mortality rates. Previous proteomic studies on sTBI have mainly focused on human cerebrospinal fluid and serum, as well as on brain protein changes in murine models. However, human proteomic data in sTBI brain is still scarce. We used proteomic and bioinformatic strategies to investigate variations in protein expression levels in human brains after sTBI, using samples from the Department of Neurosurgery, Affiliated Hospital of Hebei University (Hebei, China). Our proteomic data identified 4031 proteins, of which 160 proteins were overexpressed and 5 proteins were downregulated. Bioinformatics analysis showed significant changes in biological pathways including glial cell differentiation, complement activation and apolipoprotein catalysis in the statin pathway. Western blot verification of protein changes in a subset of the available tissue samples showed results that were consistent with the proteomic data. This study is one of the first to investigate the whole proteome of human sTBI brains, and provide a characteristic signature and overall landscape of the sTBI brain proteome. PMID:27067185

  3. Mild traumatic brain injury in children: just another bump on the head?

    PubMed

    Cook, Rebecca S; Schweer, Lynn; Shebesta, Kaaren Fanta; Hartjes, Karen; Falcone, Richard A

    2006-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) is frequently encountered in pediatrics and challenges healthcare practitioners to provide safe, consistent, cost-effective care. Clinical management of children who sustain MTBI poses dilemmas for healthcare practitioners. This article will provide an overview of pediatric MTBI including definition, issues impacting diagnosis and management, risk factors for intracranial injury, indications for diagnostic imaging, disposition, and return to sports/activity. Knowledge and understanding of MTBI in children aid healthcare practitioners to make informed competent recommendations for care. Clinicians must have a thorough understanding and working knowledge of pediatric MTBI to aid clinical decisions and optimize patient outcomes. PMID:16884134

  4. Removing Part of Skull After Severe Head Injury Brings Mixed Results

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_160857.html Removing Part of Skull After Severe Head Injury Brings Mixed Results More ... 8, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Removing part of the skull to relieve pressure in the brain following a ...

  5. Intravenous Administration of Simvastatin Improves Cognitive Outcome following Severe Traumatic Brain Injury in Rats.

    PubMed

    Mountney, Andrea; Boutté, Angela M; Gilsdorf, Janice; Lu, Xi-Chun; Tortella, Frank C; Shear, Deborah A

    2016-08-15

    Simvastatin is a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitor commonly used to reduce serum cholesterol. The beneficial effects of oral simvastatin have been reported in pre-clinical models of traumatic brain injury (TBI). The current study was designed to evaluate the potential beneficial effects of simvastatin in a model of severe penetrating TBI using an intravenous (IV) route of administration. Rats were subjected to unilateral frontal penetrating ballistic-like brain injury (PBBI), and simvastatin was delivered intravenously at 30 min and 6 h post-injury and continued once daily for either 4 or 10 days post-PBBI. Motor function was assessed on the rotarod and cognitive performance was evaluated using the Morris water maze (MWM) task. Serum levels of inflammatory cytokines and the astrocytic biomarker, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), were quantified at 1 h, 4 h, and 24 h post-injury. Histopathological damage was assessed at the terminal end-point. Rotarod testing revealed significant motor deficits in all injury groups but no significant simvastatin-induced therapeutic benefits. All PBBI-injured animals showed cognitive impairment on the MWM test; however, 10-day simvastatin treatment mitigated these effects. Animals showed significantly improved latency to platform and retention scores, whereas the 4-day treatment regimen failed to produce any significant improvements. Biomarker and cytokine analysis showed that IV simvastatin significantly reduced GFAP, interleukin (IL)-1α, and IL-17 serum levels by 4.0-, 2.6-, and 7.0-fold, respectively, at 4 h post-injury. Collectively, our results demonstrate that IV simvastatin provides significant protection against injury-induced cognitive dysfunction and reduces TBI-specific biomarker levels. Further research is warranted to identify the optimal dose and therapeutic window for IV delivery of simvastatin in models of severe TBI. PMID:26542887

  6. Laser head for simultaneous optical pumping of several dye lasers. [with single flash lamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mumola, P. B.; Mcalexander, B. T. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    The invention is a laser head for simultaneous pumping several dye lasers with a single flash lamp. The laser head includes primarily a multi-elliptical cylinder cavity with a single flash lamp placed along the common focal axis of the cavity and with capillary tube dye cells placed along each of the other focal axes of the cavity. The inside surface of the cavity is polished. Hence, the single flash lamp supplies the energy to the several dye cells.

  7. Behavioural and psychosocial sequelae of severe closed head injury and regional cerebral blood flow: a SPECT study.

    PubMed Central

    Oder, W; Goldenberg, G; Spatt, J; Podreka, I; Binder, H; Deecke, L

    1992-01-01

    Thirty six patients (31 male, 5 female) who had suffered severe closed head injury were re-examined at an average of 39.3 (SD 12.8, range 7-66) months after the injury. Behavioural symptoms were measured using the Giessen test. The relatives' reports were used for data analysis to ensure that results were valid. The neurophysical impairment subscale of the Glasgow assessment schedule was completed by two neurologists, and the number connection test was completed by each patient. The adjective mood scale was completed by each relative. All patients were investigated by single photon emission computerised tomography (SPECT). Exploratory factor analysis using the principal components method was carried out separately for SPECT results and psychological measures and correlations were sought between the resulting factors. Factor analysis of the data from the Giessen test identified social isolation, disinhibition, and aggressive behaviour as major components of post-traumatic personality changes; it indicates that these behavioural features are independent of the level of neurological and neuropsychological impairment, which loaded on a single independent factor. Relatives' psychic health seemed to be relatively resistant to physical and cognitive disability and was mainly affected by disinhibitive behaviour. The highest correlation was between frontal flow indices and disinhibitive behaviour (p less than 0.01): the severity of disinhibition increased with lower frontal flow rates. There was a significant but somewhat weaker correlation (p less than 0.05) between flow indices of the left cerebral hemisphere and social isolation. Low flow values of the right brain regions were related to aggressive behaviour (p less than 0.05). Neurological and cognitive impairment correlated negatively with the thalamus; worse neurological and cognitive performance indicate by raised scores on the neurophysical scale and on the number connection test was associated with low thalamic

  8. Unexpected Recovery of Function after Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: The Limits of Early Neuroimaging-Based Outcome Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Edlow, Brian L.; Giacino, Joseph T.; Hirschberg, Ronald E.; Gerrard, Jason; Wu, Ona; Hochberg, Leigh R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Prognostication in the early stage of traumatic coma is a common challenge in the neuro-intensive care unit. We report the unexpected recovery of functional milestones (i.e., consciousness, communication, and community reintegration) in a 19-year-old man who sustained a severe traumatic brain injury. The early magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings, at the time, suggested a poor prognosis. Methods During the first year of the patient’s recovery, MRI with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and T2*-weighted imaging was performed on day 8 (coma), day 44 (minimally conscious state), day 198 (post-traumatic confusional state), and day 366 (community reintegration). Mean apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and fractional anisotropy (FA) values in the corpus callosum, cerebral hemispheric white matter and thalamus were compared with clinical assessments using the Disability Rating Scale (DRS). Results Extensive diffusion restriction in the corpus callosum and bihemispheric white matter was observed on day 8, with ADC values in a range typically associated with neurotoxic injury (230 to 400 × 10−6 mm2/sec). T2*-weighted MRI revealed widespread hemorrhagic axonal injury in the cerebral hemispheres, corpus callosum, and brainstem. Despite the presence of severe axonal injury on early MRI, the patient regained the ability to communicate and perform activities of daily living independently at one year post-injury (DRS = 8). Conclusions MRI data should be interpreted with caution when prognosticating for patients in traumatic coma. Recovery of consciousness and community reintegration are possible even when extensive traumatic axonal injury is demonstrated by early MRI. PMID:23860665

  9. Preschool children with head injury: comparing injury severity measures and clinical care.

    PubMed

    Youngblut, JoAnne M; Caicedo, Carmen; Brooten, Dorothy

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare child, hospital course, and discharge characteristics by admitting unit, injury type, head Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS), and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), and test congruence of AIS and GCS categories. Chart data were collected from seven hospitals on 183 preschool children with head injury (90 admitted to PICU, 93 to general care unit). Injury events included falls (n = 89, 49%), hit by car (n = 35, 19%), motor vehicle crashes (n = 26, 14%), bicycle crashes (n = 12, 7%), and blunt traumas (n = 21, 11%). Most children (68%) had head injuries only, 20% had other fractures, 5% had organ damage, and 7% had all three. Injury severity was measured by head AIS and GCS scores. Treatments and procedures included tubes/lines, blood/blood products, and medications. Children with head injuries only had fewer hospital days, less severe head injuries, and near normal GCS scores. They were less likely to have tubes/lines and medications. Children were discharged with medications (61%) and medical equipment (14%). Five children were discharged to long-term care facilities, and five were discharged to rehabilitation facilities. Concordance of head AIS and GCS categories occurred for only 50 (28%) children. Although the GCS is the gold standard for identifying changes in neurological status, it was not as helpful in representing hospital care. Head AIS injury categories clustered children in more homogeneous groups and better represented hospital care. Head AIS categories are better indicators of injury severity and care provided than GCS. Head injury AIS score may be an important addition to GCS for guiding care. PMID:24640315

  10. Preschool Children with Head Injury: Comparing Injury Severity Measures And Clinical Care

    PubMed Central

    Youngblut, JoAnne M.; Caicedo, Carmen; Brooten, Dorothy

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare child, hospital course, and discharge characteristics by admitting unit, injury type, head Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS), and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), and test congruence of AIS and GCS categories. Chart data were collected from seven hospitals on 183 preschool children with head injury (90 admitted to PICU, 93 to general care unit). Injury events included falls (n = 89, 49%), hit by car (n = 35, 19%), motor vehicle crashes (n = 26, 14%), bicycle crashes (n = 12, 7%), and blunt traumas (n = 21, 11%). Most children (68%) had head injuries only, 20% had other fractures, 5% had organ damage, and 7% had all three. Injury severity was measured by head AIS and GCS scores. Treatments and procedures included tubes/lines, blood/blood products, and medications. Children with head injuries only had fewer hospital days, less severe head injuries, and near normal GCS scores. They were less likely to have tubes/lines and medications. Children were discharged with medications (61%) and medical equipment (14%). Five children were discharged to long-term care facilities, and five were discharged to rehabilitation facilities. Concordance of head AIS and GCS categories occurred for only 50 (28%) children. Although the GCS is the gold standard for identifying changes in neurological status, it was not as helpful in representing hospital care. Head AIS injury categories clustered children in more homogeneous groups and better represented hospital care. Head AIS categories are better indicators of injury severity and care provided than GCS. Head injury AIS score may be an important addition to GCS for guiding care. PMID:24640315

  11. Tensor-Based Morphometry Reveals Volumetric Deficits in Moderate=Severe Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Emily L; Hua, Xue; Villalon-Reina, Julio; Moran, Lisa M; Kernan, Claudia; Babikian, Talin; Mink, Richard; Babbitt, Christopher; Johnson, Jeffrey; Giza, Christopher C; Thompson, Paul M; Asarnow, Robert F

    2016-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) can cause widespread and prolonged brain degeneration. TBI can affect cognitive function and brain integrity for many years after injury, often with lasting effects in children, whose brains are still immature. Although TBI varies in how it affects different individuals, image analysis methods such as tensor-based morphometry (TBM) can reveal common areas of brain atrophy on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), secondary effects of the initial injury, which will differ between subjects. Here we studied 36 pediatric moderate to severe TBI (msTBI) participants in the post-acute phase (1-6 months post-injury) and 18 msTBI participants who returned for their chronic assessment, along with well-matched controls at both time-points. Participants completed a battery of cognitive tests that we used to create a global cognitive performance score. Using TBM, we created three-dimensional (3D) maps of individual and group differences in regional brain volumes. At both the post-acute and chronic time-points, the greatest group differences were expansion of the lateral ventricles and reduction of the lingual gyrus in the TBI group. We found a number of smaller clusters of volume reduction in the cingulate gyrus, thalamus, and fusiform gyrus, and throughout the frontal, temporal, and parietal cortices. Additionally, we found extensive associations between our cognitive performance measure and regional brain volume. Our results indicate a pattern of atrophy still detectable 1-year post-injury, which may partially underlie the cognitive deficits frequently found in TBI. PMID:26393494

  12. Tensor-Based Morphometry Reveals Volumetric Deficits in Moderate=Severe Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Xue; Villalon-Reina, Julio; Moran, Lisa M.; Kernan, Claudia; Babikian, Talin; Mink, Richard; Babbitt, Christopher; Johnson, Jeffrey; Giza, Christopher C.; Thompson, Paul M.; Asarnow, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Traumatic brain injury (TBI) can cause widespread and prolonged brain degeneration. TBI can affect cognitive function and brain integrity for many years after injury, often with lasting effects in children, whose brains are still immature. Although TBI varies in how it affects different individuals, image analysis methods such as tensor-based morphometry (TBM) can reveal common areas of brain atrophy on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), secondary effects of the initial injury, which will differ between subjects. Here we studied 36 pediatric moderate to severe TBI (msTBI) participants in the post-acute phase (1–6 months post-injury) and 18 msTBI participants who returned for their chronic assessment, along with well-matched controls at both time-points. Participants completed a battery of cognitive tests that we used to create a global cognitive performance score. Using TBM, we created three-dimensional (3D) maps of individual and group differences in regional brain volumes. At both the post-acute and chronic time-points, the greatest group differences were expansion of the lateral ventricles and reduction of the lingual gyrus in the TBI group. We found a number of smaller clusters of volume reduction in the cingulate gyrus, thalamus, and fusiform gyrus, and throughout the frontal, temporal, and parietal cortices. Additionally, we found extensive associations between our cognitive performance measure and regional brain volume. Our results indicate a pattern of atrophy still detectable 1-year post-injury, which may partially underlie the cognitive deficits frequently found in TBI. PMID:26393494

  13. Impact of Intracranial Pressure Monitoring on Prognosis of Patients With Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jinsong; Yang, Shumao; Zhang, Chunyu; Zhao, Ming; Li, Anmin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To evaluate the influences of using intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring on the prognosis of patients with severe traumatic brain injury. Systematic search were conducted in PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, Wanfang, and CNKI. The eligible studies were identified for pooling analysis under fixed- or random effects model. Hospital mortality, functional outcomes, length of hospital stay, and the related complications in patients were extracted. Six randomized controlled trials with 880 cases and 12 cohort studies with 12,606 cases were included. Combined analysis found that ICP monitoring was effective for reducing the risk rate of electrolyte disturbances (RR = 0.47, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.63–0.90), rate of renal failure (RR = 0.50, 95% CI: 0.30–0.83), and for improving favorable prognosis (RR = 1.15, 95% CI: 1.00–1.35). However, ICP monitoring was not significant for hospital mortality (RR = 0.91, 95% CI: 0.77–0.1.06), decreasing rate of pulmonary infection (RR = 0.93, 95% CI: 0.76–1.14), rate of mechanical ventilation (RR = 1.02, 95% CI: 0.86–1.09), and duration of hospital stays (weighted mean difference (WMD) = 0.06, 95% CI: −0.03, 0.16). ICP monitoring may not reduce the risk of hospital mortality, but plays a role in decreasing the rate of electrolyte disturbances, rate of renal failure, and increasing favorable functional outcome. However, effect of other outcomes need to be further confirmed in the future randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with larger sample size. PMID:26886639

  14. Glucose turnover, oxidation, and indices of recycling in severely traumatized patients

    SciTech Connect

    Jeevanandam, M.; Young, D.H.; Schiller, W.R. )

    1990-05-01

    Hyperglycemia is often seen in trauma patients and its etiology is not clearly understood. We have determined parameters of glucose metabolism by using simultaneous primed-constant intravenous infusion of both (6-3H) glucose and (U-14C) glucose in ten severely traumatized hypermetabolic subjects during the early flow phase of injury and in six post-absorptive normal volunteers. The mean rate of glucose production (determined by means of (6-3H) glucose) was 3.96 +/- 0.40 mg/kg/min in trauma patients, which was significantly (p = 0.025) higher than the value of 2.75 +/- 0.13 observed in normal volunteers. Glucose turnover rates determined with (U-14C) glucose as tracer were lower in all subjects. The difference between the turnover rates determined by the two tracers represents an index of recycling of glucose through three-carbon fragments. This recycling index was similar in both groups of subjects in amount (0.24 +/- 0.07 vs. 0.26 +/- 0.08 mg glucose/kg/min) but different when expressed as percentage of total glucose turnover (5.6 +/- 1.4% vs. 9.8 +/- 1.7%; p = 0.05). The absolute rates of glucose clearance, oxidation, and recycling were similar in stressed trauma patients and unstressed controls although the rate of production was increased by 44% due to injury. Post-trauma hyperglycemia was mainly due to an increased hepatic output of glucose and not due to a decreased ability of the tissue to extract glucose from the plasma. Hyperglycemia may be the driving force in the metabolic effects of injury.

  15. Decompressive craniectomy for severe traumatic brain injury patients with fixed dilated pupils

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Xiang; Miao, Guozhuan; Hao, Shuyu; Tao, Xiaogang; Hou, Zonggang; Li, Huan; Tian, Runfa; Zhang, Hao; Lu, Te; Ma, Jun; Zhang, Xiaodong; Cheng, Hongwei; Liu, Baiyun

    2015-01-01

    Objective The outcome of decompressive craniectomy (DC) for severe traumatic brain injury (sTBI) patients with fixed dilated pupils (FDPs) is not clear. The objective of this study was to validate the outcome of DC in sTBI patients with FDPs. Patients We retrospectively collected data from 207 sTBI patients with FDPs during the time period of May 4, 2003–October 22, 2013: DC group (n=166) and conservative care (CC) group (n=41). Measurements Outcomes that were used as indicators in this study were mortality and favorable outcome. The analysis was based on the Glasgow Outcome Scale recorded at 6 months after trauma. Results A total of 49.28% patients died (39.76% [DC group] vs 87.80% [CC group]). The mean increased intracranial pressure values after admission before operation were 36.20±7.55 mmHg in the DC group and 35.59±8.18 mmHg in the CC group. After performing DC, the mean ICP value was 14.38±2.60 mmHg. Approximately, 34.34% sTBI patients with FDPs in the DC group gained favorable scores and none of the patients in the CC group gained favorable scores. Conclusion We found that DC plays a therapeutic role in sTBI patients with FDPs, and it is particularly important to reduce intracranial pressure as soon as possible after trauma. For the patients undergoing DC, favorable outcome and low mortality could be achieved. PMID:26543370

  16. Age-related carbon dioxide reactivity in children after moderate and severe traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Maa, Tensing; Yeates, Keith Owen; Moore-Clingenpeel, Melissa; O'Brien, Nicole F

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE The objective of this study is to assess carbon dioxide reactivity (CO2R) in children following traumatic brain injury (TBI). METHODS This prospective observational study enrolled children younger than 18 years old following moderate and severe TBI. Thirty-eight mechanically ventilated children had daily CO2R testing performed by measuring changes in their bilateral middle cerebral artery flow velocities using transcranial Doppler ultrasonography (TCD) after a transient increase in minute ventilation. The cohort was divided into 3 age groups: younger than 2 years (n = 12); 2 to 5 years old (n = 9); and older than 5 years (n = 17). RESULTS Children younger than 2 years old had a lower mean CO2R over time. The 2-5-year-old age group had higher mean CO2R than younger patients (p = 0.01), and the highest CO2R values compared with either of the other age groups (vs > 5 years old, p = 0.046; vs < 2 years old, p = 0.002). Having a lower minimum CO2R had a statistically significant negative effect on outcome at discharge (p = 0.0413). Impaired CO2R beyond Postinjury Day 4 trended toward having an effect on outcome at discharge (p = 0.0855). CONCLUSIONS Abnormal CO2R is prevalent in children following TBI, and the degree of impairment varies by age. No clinical or laboratory parameters were identified as risk factors for impaired CO2R. Lower minimum CO2R values are associated with worse outcome at discharge. PMID:27035550

  17. Selective Inhibition of Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 Attenuates Secondary Damage Resulting from Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Gooyit, Major; Chen, Shanyan; Purdy, Justin J.; Walker, Jennifer M.; Giritharan, Andrew B.; Purnell, Whitley; Robinson, Christopher R.; Shin, Dmitriy; Schroeder, Valerie A.; Suckow, Mark A.; Simonyi, Agnes; Y. Sun, Grace; Mobashery, Shahriar; Cui, Jiankun; Chang, Mayland; Gu, Zezong

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of death and long-term disability. Following the initial insult, severe TBI progresses to a secondary injury phase associated with biochemical and cellular changes. The secondary injury is thought to be responsible for the development of many of the neurological deficits observed after TBI and also provides a window of opportunity for therapeutic intervention. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 or gelatinase B) expression is elevated in neurological diseases and its activation is an important factor in detrimental outcomes including excitotoxicity, mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis, and increases in inflammatory responses and astrogliosis. In this study, we used an experimental mouse model of TBI to examine the role of MMP-9 and the therapeutic potential of SB-3CT, a mechanism-based gelatinase selective inhibitor, in ameliorating the secondary injury. We observed that activation of MMP-9 occurred within one day following TBI, and remained elevated for 7 days after the initial insult. SB-3CT effectively attenuated MMP-9 activity, reduced brain lesion volumes and prevented neuronal loss and dendritic degeneration. Pharmacokinetic studies revealed that SB-3CT and its active metabolite, p-OH SB-3CT, were rapidly absorbed and distributed to the brain. Moreover, SB-3CT treatment mitigated microglial activation and astrogliosis after TBI. Importantly, SB-3CT treatment improved long-term neurobehavioral outcomes, including sensorimotor function, and hippocampus-associated spatial learning and memory. These results demonstrate that MMP-9 is a key target for therapy to attenuate secondary injury cascades and that this class of mechanism-based gelatinase inhibitor–with such desirable pharmacokinetic properties–holds considerable promise as a potential pharmacological treatment of TBI. PMID:24194849

  18. A Qualitative Study Exploring Factors Associated with Provider Adherence to Severe Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Brolliar, Sarah M; Moore, Megan; Thompson, Hilaire J; Whiteside, Lauren K; Mink, Richard B; Wainwright, Mark S; Groner, Jonathan I; Bell, Michael J; Giza, Christopher C; Zatzick, Douglas F; Ellenbogen, Richard G; Ng Boyle, Linda; Mitchell, Pamela H; Rivara, Frederick P; Vavilala, Monica S

    2016-08-15

    Despite demonstrated improvement in patient outcomes with use of the Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) Guidelines (Guidelines), there are differential rates of adherence. Provider perspectives on barriers and facilitators to adherence have not been elucidated. This study aimed to identify and explore in depth the provider perspective on factors associated with adherence to the Guidelines using 19 focus groups with nurses and physicians who provided acute management for pediatric patients with TBI at five university-affiliated Level 1 trauma centers. Data were examined using deductive and inductive content analysis. Results indicated that three inter-related domains were associated with clinical adherence: 1) perceived guideline credibility and applicability to individual patients, 2) implementation, dissemination, and enforcement strategies, and 3) provider culture, communication styles, and attitudes towards protocols. Specifically, Guideline usefulness was determined by the perceived relevance to the individual patient given age, injury etiology, and severity and the strength of the evidence. Institutional methods to formally endorse, codify, and implement the Guidelines into the local culture were important. Providers wanted local protocols developed using interdisciplinary consensus. Finally, a culture of collaboration, including consistent, respectful communication and interdisciplinary cooperation, facilitated adherence. Provider training and experience, as well as attitudes towards other standardized care protocols, mirror the use and attitudes towards the Guidelines. Adherence was determined by the interaction of each of these guideline, institutional, and provider factors acting in concert. Incorporating provider perspectives on barriers and facilitators to adherence into hospital and team protocols is an important step toward improving adherence and ultimately patient outcomes. PMID:26760283

  19. Lateral Ventricle Volume Asymmetry Predicts Midline Shift in Severe Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Arnold; Schmalfuss, Ilona; Heaton, Shelley C; Gabrielli, Andrea; Hannay, H Julia; Papa, Linda; Brophy, Gretchen M; Wang, Kevin K W; Büki, András; Schwarcz, Attila; Hayes, Ronald L; Robertson, Claudia S; Robicsek, Steven A

    2015-09-01

    Midline shift following severe traumatic brain injury (sTBI) detected on computed tomography (CT) scans is an established predictor of poor outcome. We hypothesized that lateral ventricular volume (LVV) asymmetry is an earlier sign of developing asymmetric intracranial pathology than midline shift. This retrospective analysis was performed on data from 84 adults with blunt sTBI requiring a ventriculostomy who presented to a Level I trauma center. Seventy-six patients underwent serial CTs within 3 h and an average of three scans within the first 10 d of sTBI. Left and right LVVs were quantified by computer-assisted manual volumetric measurements. LVV ratios (LVR) were determined on the admission CT to evaluate ventricular asymmetry. The relationship between the admission LVR value and subsequent midline shift development was tested using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, and odds ratio (OR) and relative risk tests. Sixty patients had no >5 mm midline shift on the initial admission scan. Of these, 15 patients developed it subsequently (16 patients already had >5 mm midline shift on admission scans). For >5 mm midline shift development, admission LVR of >1.67 was shown to have a sensitivity of 73.3% and a specificity of 73.3% (area under the curve=0.782; p<0.0001). LVR of >1.67 as exposure yielded an OR of 7.56 (p<0.01), and a risk ratio of 4.42 (p<0.01) for midline shift development as unfavorable outcome. We propose that LVR captures LVV asymmetry and is not only related to, but also predicts the development of midline shift already at admission CT examination. Lateral ventricles may have a higher "compliance" than midline structures to developing asymmetric brain pathology. LVR analysis is simple, rapidly accomplished and may allow earlier interventions to attenuate midline shift and potentially improve ultimate outcomes. PMID:25752227

  20. Chronic Post-Traumatic Headache after Head Injury in Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirk, Charlotte; Nagiub, George; Abu-Arafeh, Ishaq

    2008-01-01

    This was a prospective, observational study of children aged 3 to 15 years admitted to hospital with head injury (HI). Demographic data and information on the nature of the HI, and history of premorbid headache were collected. A structured telephone questionnaire was used to interview parents and children 2 months after injury and at 4-monthly…

  1. Assessing the Prevalence of Traumatic Head Injury amongst Recreational Surfers in the United States

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Surfing is a popular recreational sport that carries a substantial risk of injury. Although head injuries are frequently documented in the surfing population, an in depth assessment of the prevalence of surfing-related head injury has not been reported. A web-based survey was conducted in May of 2015. Participants were asked a series of questions regarding surfing-related injuries and demographic characteristics. A total of 50 responses were obtained, of which 35 (70%) reported sustaining a head injury. The most common injury was laceration of the head/face (n=27), followed by concussion (n=13). Other injuries, such as skull fracture and broken nose, were also reported. Only 2 of the 50 participants reported wearing a protective helmet. Neurosurgical intervention was required in 2 instances. Increased emphasis on preventative measures by the medical community may reduce the future incidence of such injuries. Medical professionals should be aware of the most common forms of injury sustained by the surfing population in order to better recognize and treat these conditions. PMID:26668771

  2. [The hardness of the traumatic object and the extent of injury (as exemplified by head injuries)].

    PubMed

    Shadymov, A B; Kazymov, M A

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to study the influence of the surface hardness of a traumatic agent on the extent and character of the injury to the soft and bone tissues of the cranial vault associated with various forms of injurious exposure. The authors evaluated forensic medical significance of the hardness as one of the most important properties of the major injurious agents involved in the formation of skull fractures and soft tissue ruptures under effect of an impact action or compression. The objects differing in the hardness of the contact element (striking pin) were studied in comparison with the hardness of the bone tissue. The extent and morphological features of the injuries to the bones and soft tissues in different parts of the skull were compared with reference to deformation and strength characteristics developing in response to a blow and compression. PMID:25269169

  3. Is erythropoietin a worthy candidate for traumatic brain injury or are we heading the wrong way?

    PubMed Central

    Grasso, Giovanni; Alafaci, Concetta; Ghezzi, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of death and disability in the modern society. Although primary prevention is the only strategy that can counteract the primary brain damage, numerous preclinical studies have been accumulated in order to find therapeutic strategies against the secondary damage. In this scenario erythropoietin (EPO) has been shown to be a promising candidate as neuroprotective agent. A recent clinical trial, however, has shown that EPO has not an overall effect on outcomes following TBI thus renewing old concerns.  However, the results of a prespecified sensitivity analysis indicate that the effect of EPO on mortality remains still unclear. In the light of these observations, further investigations are needed to resolve doubts on EPO effectiveness in order to provide a more solid base for tailoring conclusive clinical trials. PMID:27239280

  4. Out-of-Hospital Hypertonic Resuscitation Following Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bulger, Eileen M.; May, Susanne; Brasel, Karen J.; Schreiber, Martin; Kerby, Jeffrey D.; Tisherman, Samuel A.; Newgard, Craig; Slutsky, Arthur; Coimbra, Raul; Emerson, Scott; Minei, Joseph P.; Bardarson, Berit; Kudenchuk, Peter; Baker, Andrew; Christenson, Jim; Idris, Ahamed; Davis, Daniel; Fabian, Timothy C.; Aufderheide, Tom P.; Callaway, Clifton; Williams, Carolyn; Banek, Jane; Vaillancourt, Christian; van Heest, Rardi; Sopko, George; Hata, J. Steven; Hoyt, David B.

    2010-01-01

    Context Hypertonic fluids restore cerebral perfusion with reduced cerebral edema and modulate inflammatory response to reduce subsequent neuronal injury and thus have potential benefit in resuscitation of patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Objective To determine whether out-of-hospital administration of hypertonic fluids improves neurologic outcome following severe TBI. Design, Setting, and Participants Multicenter, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial involving 114 North American emergency medical services agencies within the Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium, conducted between May 2006 and May 2009 among patients 15 years or older with blunt trauma and a prehospital Glasgow Coma Scale score of 8 or less who did not meet criteria for hypovolemic shock. Planned enrollment was 2122 patients. Intervention A single 250-mL bolus of 7.5% saline/6% dextran 70 (hypertonic saline/dextran), 7.5% saline (hypertonic saline), or 0.9% saline (normal saline) initiated in the out-of-hospital setting. Main Outcome Measure Six-month neurologic outcome based on the Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOSE) (dichotomized as >4 or ≤4). Results The study was terminated by the data and safety monitoring board after randomization of 1331 patients, having met prespecified futility criteria. Among the 1282 patients enrolled, 6-month outcomes data were available for 1087 (85%). Baseline characteristics of the groups were equivalent. There was no difference in 6-month neurologic outcome among groups with regard to proportions of patients with severe TBI (GOSE ≤4) (hypertonic saline/dextran vs normal saline: 53.7% vs 51.5%; difference, 2.2% [95% CI, −4.5% to 9.0%]; hypertonic saline vs normal saline: 54.3% vs 51.5%; difference, 2.9% [95% CI, −4.0% to 9.7%]; P=.67). There were no statistically significant differences in distribution of GOSE category or Disability Rating Score by treatment group. Survival at 28 days was 74.3% with hypertonic saline

  5. The diagnostic value of magnetic resonance imaging in non-traumatic osteonecrosis of the femoral head

    SciTech Connect

    Hauzeur, J.P.; Pasteels, J.L.; Schoutens, A.; Hinsenkamp, M.; Appelboom, T.; Chochrad, I.; Perlmutter, N.

    1989-06-01

    To assess the effectiveness of nuclear magnetic-resonance imaging in the detection of osteonecrosis of the femoral head, we studied the cases of twenty-five patients (forty-nine hips) in whom necrosis of the femoral head was suspected on the basis of plain radiographs, computed tomographic scans, radionuclide bone scans, and magnetic resonance-imaging scans. The results of these investigations were compared, for all except one patient, with the pathological findings of transtrochanteric core biopsies of the femoral head and neck of both hips. Of the forty-nine hips, thirty-three had histological proof of osteonecrosis. Twenty-two (67 per cent) of these hips showed definite necrosis on the plain radiographs; eighteen (62 per cent), on the twenty-nine available computed tomographic scans; twenty-four (77 per cent), on the thirty-one available radionuclide bone scans; and all of the hips, on the magnetic resonance-imaging studies. In six additional hips, there were histological changes (marrow necrosis, edema, hemorrhage, and fibrosis) in the medullary spaces without detectable osteonecrosis. The plain radiographs and computed tomographic scans of these six hips were normal except for the computed tomographic scan of one, and the radionuclide uptake on bone-scanning was abnormal in four of the six, as were the magnetic resonance-imaging studies. In the two hips that had normal magnetic resonance-imaging studies, the biopsies showed only destruction of fat cells in the medullary spaces, with no edema or fibroblastic reaction.

  6. Time Perception in Severe Traumatic Brain Injury Patients: A Study Comparing Different Methodologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mioni, G.; Mattalia, G.; Stablum, F.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we investigated time perception in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Fifteen TBI patients and 15 matched healthy controls participated in the study. Participants were tested with durations above and below 1s on three different temporal tasks that involved time reproduction, production, and discrimination tasks. Data…

  7. Return to Work and Social Communication Ability Following Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglas, Jacinta M.; Bracy, Christine A.; Snow, Pamela C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Return to competitive employment presents a major challenge to adults who survive traumatic brain injury (TBI). This study was undertaken to better understand factors that shape employment outcome by comparing the communication profiles and self-awareness of communication deficits of adults who return to and maintain employment with those…

  8. Head injury - first aid

    MedlinePlus

    ... is shaken, is the most common type of traumatic brain injury. Scalp wounds. Skull fractures. Head injuries may cause ... of people who suffer head injuries are children. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) accounts for over 1 in 6 injury- ...

  9. [S3 Guideline. Part 1: Diagnosis and Differential Diagnosis of Non-Traumatic Adult Femoral Head Necrosis].

    PubMed

    Bohndorf, K; Beckmann, J; Jäger, M; Kenn, W; Maus, U; Nöth, U; Peters, K M; Rader, C; Reppenhagen, S; Roth, A

    2015-08-01

    Non-traumatic femoral head necrosis (FHN) is primarily a disease of the middle-aged adult. Early diagnosis, at a time with lacking or minimal clinical symptoms, is mandatory to consider conservative therapy or joint preserving operations as a therapeutic option. The new German S3 guideline about diagnosis and therapy of FHN is a cooperative effort of five professional medical societies, overall headed by the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Orthopädie und Orthopädische Chirurgie (DGOOC). This review (part I/III) cites and explains the statements of the S3 guideline as agreed on the use of imaging methods for diagnosis of FHN. A diagnostic algorithm is presented. FHN clinically has to be considered in case of equivocal pain of a hip joint with a minimum of 6 weeks duration, when risk factors can be revealed, groin pain at clinical investigation, limping, pain or limitation of movement in case of load, and no obvious differential diagnoses. Is an FHN clinically suspected, primarily radiographs of the pelvis ap and a Lauenstein projection of the hip involved should be carried out. When the radiographs are normal, an MRI of the hips should follow routinely. MRI allows the diagnosis of FNH with high accuracy. Furthermore, MRI reveals the site and the size of the necrotic area involved and evaluates the integrity of the joint surface and subchondral fractures. When ARCO stage II (ARCO: Association Research Circulation Osseous) is diagnosed and MRI does not allow one to determine the joint surface with certainty, a CT of the hip joints should be performed. The S3 guideline explains and recommends the use of the ARCO classification. Although, this classification of 1993 is still largely based on radiographs, the pragmatic use of an "extended" version seems reasonable. Today, classical radiographic criteria like impression of the joint surface and subchondral fractures ("crescent sign") are better to be evaluated by MRI, in cases of subtle findings MRI is even surpassed by CT

  10. Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy in Athletes: Progressive Tauopathy following Repetitive Head Injury

    PubMed Central

    McKee, Ann C.; Cantu, Robert C.; Nowinski, Christopher J.; Hedley-Whyte, E. Tessa; Gavett, Brandon E.; Budson, Andrew E.; Santini, Veronica E.; Lee, Hyo-Soon; Kubilus, Caroline A.; Stern, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    Since the 1920s, it has been known that the repetitive brain trauma associated with boxing may produce a progressive neurological deterioration, originally termed “dementia pugilistica” and more recently, chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). We review the 47 cases of neuropathologically verified CTE recorded in the literature and document the detailed findings of CTE in 3 professional athletes: one football player and 2 boxers. Clinically, CTE is associated with memory disturbances, behavioral and personality changes, Parkinsonism, and speech and gait abnormalities. Neuropathologically, CTE is characterized by atrophy of the cerebral hemispheres, medial temporal lobe, thalamus, mammillary bodies, and brainstem, with ventricular dilatation and a fenestrated cavum septum pellucidum. Microscopically, there are extensive tau-immunoreactive neurofibrillary tangles, astrocytic tangles, and spindle-shaped and threadlike neurites throughout the brain. The neurofibrillary degeneration of CTE is distinguished from other tauopathies by preferential involvement of the superficial cortical layers, irregular, patchy distribution in the frontal and temporal cortices, propensity for sulcal depths, prominent perivascular, periventricular and subpial distribution, and marked accumulation of tau-immunoreactive astrocytes. Deposition of beta amyloid, most commonly as diffuse plaques, occurs in fewer than half the cases. CTE is a neuropathologically distinct, slowly progressive tauopathy with a clear environmental etiology. PMID:19535999

  11. Variable Neuroendocrine-Immune Dysfunction in Individuals with Unfavorable Outcome after Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Santarsieri, Martina; Kumar, Raj G.; Kochanek, Patrick M.; Berga, Sarah L.; Wagner, Amy K.

    2014-01-01

    Bidirectional communication between the immune and neuroendocrine systems is not well understood in the context of traumatic brain injury (TBI). The purpose of this study was to characterize relationships between cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cortisol and inflammation after TBI, and to determine how these relationships differ by outcome. CSF samples were collected from 91 subjects with severe TBI during days 0–6 post-injury, analyzed for cortisol and inflammatory markers, and compared to healthy controls (n=13 cortisol, n=11 inflammatory markers). Group-based trajectory analysis (TRAJ) delineated subpopulations with similar longitudinal CSF cortisol profiles (high vs. low cortisol). Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) scores at 6 months served as the primary outcome measure reflecting global outcome. Inflammatory markers that displayed significant bivariate associations with both GOS and cortisol TRAJ (interleukin [IL]-6, IL-10, soluble Fas [sFas], soluble intracellular adhesion molecule [sICAM]-1, and tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF]-α) were used to generate a cumulative inflammatory load score (ILS). Subsequent analysis revealed that cortisol TRAJ group membership mediated ILS effects on outcome (indirect effect estimate= −0.253, 95% CI (−0.481, −0.025), p=0.03). Correlational analysis between mean cortisol levels and ILS were examined separately within each cortisol TRAJ group and by outcome. Within the low cortisol TRAJ group, subjects with unfavorable 6-month outcome displayed a negative correlation between ILS and mean cortisol (r=−0.562, p=0.045). Conversely, subjects with unfavorable outcome in the high cortisol TRAJ group displayed a positive correlation between ILS and mean cortisol (r=0.391, p=0.006). Our results suggest that unfavorable outcome after TBI may result from dysfunctional neuroendocrine-immune communication wherein an adequate immune response is not mounted or, alternatively, neuroinflammation is prolonged. Importantly, the nature of

  12. Variable neuroendocrine-immune dysfunction in individuals with unfavorable outcome after severe traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Santarsieri, M; Kumar, R G; Kochanek, P M; Berga, S; Wagner, A K

    2015-03-01

    Bidirectional communication between the immune and neuroendocrine systems is not well understood in the context of traumatic brain injury (TBI). The purpose of this study was to characterize relationships between cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cortisol and inflammation after TBI, and to determine how these relationships differ by outcome. CSF samples were collected from 91 subjects with severe TBI during days 0-6 post-injury, analyzed for cortisol and inflammatory markers, and compared to healthy controls (n=13 cortisol, n=11 inflammatory markers). Group-based trajectory analysis (TRAJ) delineated subpopulations with similar longitudinal CSF cortisol profiles (high vs. low cortisol). Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) scores at 6months served as the primary outcome measure reflecting global outcome. Inflammatory markers that displayed significant bivariate associations with both GOS and cortisol TRAJ (interleukin [IL]-6, IL-10, soluble Fas [sFas], soluble intracellular adhesion molecule [sICAM]-1, and tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF]-α) were used to generate a cumulative inflammatory load score (ILS). Subsequent analysis revealed that cortisol TRAJ group membership mediated ILS effects on outcome (indirect effect estimate=-0.253, 95% CI (-0.481, -0.025), p=0.03). Correlational analysis between mean cortisol levels and ILS were examined separately within each cortisol TRAJ group and by outcome. Within the low cortisol TRAJ group, subjects with unfavorable 6-month outcome displayed a negative correlation between ILS and mean cortisol (r=-0.562, p=0.045). Conversely, subjects with unfavorable outcome in the high cortisol TRAJ group displayed a positive correlation between ILS and mean cortisol (r=0.391, p=0.006). Our results suggest that unfavorable outcome after TBI may result from dysfunctional neuroendocrine-immune communication wherein an adequate immune response is not mounted or, alternatively, neuroinflammation is prolonged. Importantly, the nature of neuroendocrine

  13. The Mental Health Sequelae of Traumatic Head Injury in South Vietnamese Ex-Political Detainees Who Survived Torture

    PubMed Central

    Mollica, Richard F.; Chernoff, Miriam C.; Berthold, S. Megan; Lavelle, James; Lyoo, In Kyoon; Renshaw, Perry

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the relationship between traumatic head injury (THI) and psychiatric morbidity in torture survivors. We examine the relationship between THI and depression, PTSD, post-concussive syndrome (PCS), disability and poor health status in Vietnamese ex-political detainees who survived incarceration in Vietnamese re-education camps. A community sample of ex-political detainees (n=337) and a non-THI, non-ex-detainee comparison group (n=82) were surveyed. 78% of the ex-political detainees had experienced THI. 90.6% of the ex-political detainees and 3.6% of the comparison group had experienced 7 or more trauma events. Depression and PTSD were greater in ex-detainees than the comparison group (40.9% vs 23.2% and 13.4% vs 0%). Dose-effect relationships for THI and trauma/torture in the ex-political detainee group were significant. Logistic regression in the pooled sample of ex-detainees and the comparison group confirmed the independent impact of THI from trauma/torture on psychiatric morbidity (OR for PTSD=22.4; 95% CI: 3.0-165.8). These results demonstrate important effects of THI on depression and PTSD in Vietnamese ex-detainees who have survived torture. PMID:24962448

  14. The mental health sequelae of traumatic head injury in South Vietnamese ex-political detainees who survived torture.

    PubMed

    Mollica, Richard F; Chernoff, Miriam C; Megan Berthold, S; Lavelle, James; Lyoo, In Kyoon; Renshaw, Perry

    2014-10-01

    Little is known about the relationship between traumatic head injury (THI) and psychiatric morbidity in torture survivors. We examine the relationship between THI and depression, PTSD, post-concussive syndrome (PCS), disability and poor health status in Vietnamese ex-political detainees who survived incarceration in Vietnamese re-education camps. A community sample of ex-political detainees (n=337) and a non-THI, non-ex-detainee comparison group (n=82) were surveyed. Seventy-eight percent of the ex-political detainees had experienced THI; 90.6% of the ex-political detainees and 3.6% of the comparison group had experienced 7 or more trauma events. Depression and PTSD were greater in ex-detainees than in the comparison group (40.9% vs 23.2% and 13.4% vs 0%). Dose-effect relationships for THI and trauma/torture in the ex-political detainee group were significant. Logistic regression in the pooled sample of ex-detainees and the comparison group confirmed the independent impact of THI from trauma/torture on psychiatric morbidity (OR for PTSD=22.4; 95% CI: 3.0-165.8). These results demonstrate important effects of THI on depression and PTSD in Vietnamese ex-detainees who have survived torture. PMID:24962448

  15. Maximum Running Speed of Captive Bar-Headed Geese Is Unaffected by Severe Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Hawkes, Lucy A.; Butler, Patrick J.; Frappell, Peter B.; Meir, Jessica U.; Milsom, William K.; Scott, Graham R.; Bishop, Charles M.

    2014-01-01

    While bar-headed geese are renowned for migration at high altitude over the Himalayas, previous work on captive birds suggested that these geese are unable to maintain rates of oxygen consumption while running in severely hypoxic conditions. To investigate this paradox, we re-examined the running performance and heart rates of bar-headed geese and barnacle geese (a low altitude species) during exercise in hypoxia. Bar-headed geese (n = 7) were able to run at maximum speeds (determined in normoxia) for 15 minutes in severe hypoxia (7% O2; simulating the hypoxia at 8500 m) with mean heart rates of 466±8 beats min−1. Barnacle geese (n = 10), on the other hand, were unable to complete similar trials in severe hypoxia and their mean heart rate (316 beats.min−1) was significantly lower than bar-headed geese. In bar-headed geese, partial pressures of oxygen and carbon dioxide in both arterial and mixed venous blood were significantly lower during hypoxia than normoxia, both at rest and while running. However, measurements of blood lactate in bar-headed geese suggested that anaerobic metabolism was not a major energy source during running in hypoxia. We combined these data with values taken from the literature to estimate (i) oxygen supply, using the Fick equation and (ii) oxygen demand using aerodynamic theory for bar-headed geese flying aerobically, and under their own power, at altitude. This analysis predicts that the maximum altitude at which geese can transport enough oxygen to fly without environmental assistance ranges from 6,800 m to 8,900 m altitude, depending on the parameters used in the model but that such flights should be rare. PMID:24710001

  16. Mortality and One-Year Functional Outcome in Elderly and Very Old Patients with Severe Traumatic Brain Injuries: Observed and Predicted

    PubMed Central

    Røe, Cecilie; Skandsen, Toril; Manskow, Unn; Ader, Tiina; Anke, Audny

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate mortality and functional outcome in old and very old patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) and compare to the predicted outcome according to the internet based CRASH (Corticosteroid Randomization After Significant Head injury) model based prediction, from the Medical Research Council (MRC). Methods. Prospective, national multicenter study including patients with severe TBI ≥65 years. Predicted mortality and outcome were calculated based on clinical information (CRASH basic) (age, GCS score, and pupil reactivity to light), as well as with additional CT findings (CRASH CT). Observed 14-day mortality and favorable/unfavorable outcome according to the Glasgow Outcome Scale at one year was compared to the predicted outcome according to the CRASH models. Results. 97 patients, mean age 75 (SD 7) years, 64% men, were included. Two patients were lost to follow-up; 48 died within 14 days. The predicted versus the observed odds ratio (OR) for mortality was 2.65. Unfavorable outcome (GOSE < 5) was observed at one year follow-up in 72% of patients. The CRASH models predicted unfavorable outcome in all patients. Conclusion. The CRASH model overestimated mortality and unfavorable outcome in old and very old Norwegian patients with severe TBI. PMID:26688614

  17. Mortality and One-Year Functional Outcome in Elderly and Very Old Patients with Severe Traumatic Brain Injuries: Observed and Predicted.

    PubMed

    Røe, Cecilie; Skandsen, Toril; Manskow, Unn; Ader, Tiina; Anke, Audny

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate mortality and functional outcome in old and very old patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) and compare to the predicted outcome according to the internet based CRASH (Corticosteroid Randomization After Significant Head injury) model based prediction, from the Medical Research Council (MRC). Methods. Prospective, national multicenter study including patients with severe TBI ≥ 65 years. Predicted mortality and outcome were calculated based on clinical information (CRASH basic) (age, GCS score, and pupil reactivity to light), as well as with additional CT findings (CRASH CT). Observed 14-day mortality and favorable/unfavorable outcome according to the Glasgow Outcome Scale at one year was compared to the predicted outcome according to the CRASH models. Results. 97 patients, mean age 75 (SD 7) years, 64% men, were included. Two patients were lost to follow-up; 48 died within 14 days. The predicted versus the observed odds ratio (OR) for mortality was 2.65. Unfavorable outcome (GOSE < 5) was observed at one year follow-up in 72% of patients. The CRASH models predicted unfavorable outcome in all patients. Conclusion. The CRASH model overestimated mortality and unfavorable outcome in old and very old Norwegian patients with severe TBI. PMID:26688614

  18. ‘Cool and quiet’ therapy for malignant hyperthermia following severe traumatic brain injury: A preliminary clinical approach

    PubMed Central

    LIU, YU-HE; SHANG, ZHEN-DE; CHEN, CHAO; LU, NAN; LIU, QI-FENG; LIU, MING; YAN, JING

    2015-01-01

    Malignant hyperthermia increases mortality and disability in patients with brain trauma. A clinical treatment for malignant hyperthermia following severe traumatic brain injury, termed ‘cool and quiet’ therapy by the authors of the current study, was investigated. Between June 2003 and June 2013, 110 consecutive patients with malignant hyperthermia following severe traumatic brain injury were treated using mild hypothermia (35–36°C) associated with small doses of sedative and muscle relaxant. Physiological parameters and intracranial pressure were monitored, and the patients slowly rewarmed following the maintenance of mild hypothermia for 3–12 days. Consecutive patients who had undergone normothermia therapy were retrospectively analyzed as the control. In the mild hypothermia group, the recovery rate was 54.5%, the mortality rate was 22.7%, and the severe and mild disability rates were 11.8 and 10.9%, respectively. The mortality rate of the patients, particularly that of patients with a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of between 3 and 5 differed significantly between the hypothermia group and the normothermia group (P<0.05). The mortality of patients with a GCS score of between 6 and 8 was not significantly different between the two groups (P> 0.05). The therapy using mild hypothermia with a combination of sedative and muscle relaxant was beneficial in decreasing the mortality of patients with malignant hyperthermia following severe traumatic brain injury, particularly in patients with a GCS score within the range 3–5 on admission. The therapy was found to be safe, effective and convenient. However, rigorous clinical trials are required to provide evidence of the effectiveness of ‘cool and quiet’ therapy for hyperthermia. PMID:25574217

  19. Impaired Cerebral Autoregulation during Head Up Tilt in Patients with Severe Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Riberholt, Christian Gunge; Olesen, Niels Damkjær; Thing, Mira; Juhl, Carsten Bogh; Mehlsen, Jesper; Petersen, Tue Hvass

    2016-01-01

    Early mobilization is of importance for improving long-term outcome for patients after severe acquired brain injury. A limiting factor for early mobilization by head-up tilt is orthostatic intolerance. The purpose of the present study was to examine cerebral autoregulation in patients with severe acquired brain injury and a low level of consciousness. Fourteen patients with severe acquired brain injury and orthostatic intolerance and fifteen healthy volunteers were enrolled. Blood pressure was evaluated by pulse contour analysis, heart rate and RR-intervals were determined by electrocardiography, middle cerebral artery velocity was evaluated by transcranial Doppler, and near-infrared spectroscopy determined frontal lobe oxygenation in the supine position and during head-up tilt. Cerebral autoregulation was evaluated as the mean flow index calculated as the ratio between middle cerebral artery mean velocity and estimated cerebral perfusion pressure. Patients with acquired brain injury presented an increase in mean flow index during head-up tilt indicating impaired autoregulation (P < 0.001). Spectral analysis of heart rate variability in the frequency domain revealed lower magnitudes of ~0.1 Hz spectral power in patients compared to healthy controls suggesting baroreflex dysfunction. In conclusion, patients with severe acquired brain injury and orthostatic intolerance during head-up tilt have impaired cerebral autoregulation more than one month after brain injury. PMID:27168188

  20. Predicting severe head injury after light motor vehicle crashes: implications for automatic crash notification systems.

    PubMed

    Talmor, Daniel; Thompson, Kimberly M; Legedza, Anna T R; Nirula, Ram

    2006-07-01

    Motor vehicle crashes (MVC) are a leading public health problem. Improving notification times and the ability to predict which crashes will involve severe injuries may improve trauma system utilization. This study was undertaken to develop and validate a model to predict severe head injury following MVC using information readily incorporated into an automatic crash notification system. A cross-sectional study with derivation and validation sets was performed. The cohort was drawn from drivers of vehicles involved in MVC obtained from the National Automotive Sampling System (NASS). Independent multivariable predictors of severe head injury were identified. The model was able to stratify drivers according to their risk of severe head injury indicating its validity. The areas under the receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves were 0.7928 in the derivation set and 0.7940 in the validation set. We have developed a prediction model for head injury in MVC. As the development of automatic crash notification systems improves, models such as this one will be necessary to permit triage of what would be an overwhelming increase in crash notifications to pre-hospital responders. PMID:16530717

  1. Impaired Cerebral Autoregulation during Head Up Tilt in Patients with Severe Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Riberholt, Christian Gunge; Olesen, Niels Damkjær; Thing, Mira; Juhl, Carsten Bogh; Mehlsen, Jesper; Petersen, Tue Hvass

    2016-01-01

    Early mobilization is of importance for improving long-term outcome for patients after severe acquired brain injury. A limiting factor for early mobilization by head-up tilt is orthostatic intolerance. The purpose of the present study was to examine cerebral autoregulation in patients with severe acquired brain injury and a low level of consciousness. Fourteen patients with severe acquired brain injury and orthostatic intolerance and fifteen healthy volunteers were enrolled. Blood pressure was evaluated by pulse contour analysis, heart rate and RR-intervals were determined by electrocardiography, middle cerebral artery velocity was evaluated by transcranial Doppler, and near-infrared spectroscopy determined frontal lobe oxygenation in the supine position and during head-up tilt. Cerebral autoregulation was evaluated as the mean flow index calculated as the ratio between middle cerebral artery mean velocity and estimated cerebral perfusion pressure. Patients with acquired brain injury presented an increase in mean flow index during head-up tilt indicating impaired autoregulation (P < 0.001). Spectral analysis of heart rate variability in the frequency domain revealed lower magnitudes of ~0.1 Hz spectral power in patients compared to healthy controls suggesting baroreflex dysfunction. In conclusion, patients with severe acquired brain injury and orthostatic intolerance during head-up tilt have impaired cerebral autoregulation more than one month after brain injury. PMID:27168188

  2. Increased risk of revision in patients with non-traumatic femoral head necrosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose Previous studies of patients who have undergone total hip arthroplasty (THA) due to femoral head necrosis (FHN) have shown an increased risk of revision compared to cases with primary osteoarthritis (POA), but recent studies have suggested that this procedure is not associated with poor outcome. We compared the risk of revision after operation with THA due to FHN or POA in the Nordic Arthroplasty Register Association (NARA) database including Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden. Patients and methods 427,806 THAs performed between 1995 and 2011 were included. The relative risk of revision for any reason, for aseptic loosening, dislocation, deep infection, and periprosthetic fracture was studied before and after adjustment for covariates using Cox regression models. Results 416,217 hips with POA (mean age 69 (SD 10), 59% females) and 11,589 with FHN (mean age 65 (SD 16), 58% females) were registered. The mean follow-up was 6.3 (SD 4.3) years. After 2 years of observation, 1.7% in the POA group and 3.0% in the FHN group had been revised. The corresponding proportions after 16 years of observation were 4.2% and 6.1%, respectively. The 16-year survival in the 2 groups was 86% (95% CI: 86–86) and 77% (CI: 74–80). After adjusting for covariates, the relative risk (RR) of revision for any reason was higher in patients with FHN for both periods studied (up to 2 years: RR = 1.44, 95% CI: 1.34–1.54; p < 0.001; and 2–16 years: RR = 1.25, 1.14–1.38; p < 0.001). Interpretation Patients with FHN had an overall increased risk of revision. This increased risk persisted over the entire period of observation and covered more or less all of the 4 most common reasons for revision. PMID:24359026

  3. Interdisciplinary Residential Treatment of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Traumatic Brain Injury: Effects on Symptom Severity and Occupational Performance and Satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Speicher, Sarah M.; Walter, Kristen H.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. This study examined outcomes of an 8-wk residential treatment program for veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and a history of traumatic brain injury (TBI). METHOD. Twenty-six veterans completed the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure, Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale, Beck Depression Inventory–2nd Edition, and PTSD Checklist before and after treatment. RESULTS. Veterans demonstrated significant improvements in occupational performance and satisfaction with their performance, as well as in PTSD and depression symptom severity after residential PTSD/TBI treatment. Additionally, improvements in occupational performance and satisfaction were associated with decreases in depression symptom severity. CONCLUSION. Although preliminary, results suggest that veterans with PTSD and a history of TBI experienced significant decreases in PTSD and depression symptom severity and improvement in self-perception of performance and satisfaction in problematic occupational areas. Changes in occupational areas and depression symptom severity were related, highlighting the importance of interdisciplinary treatment. PMID:25005504

  4. Pilot study of the effects of mixed light touch manual therapies on active duty soldiers with chronic post-traumatic stress disorder and injury to the head.

    PubMed

    Davis, Lauren; Hanson, Brenda; Gilliam, Sara

    2016-01-01

    This pilot study was designed to examine the effects of mixed Light Touch Manual Therapies (LTMT) on headache, anxiety and other symptoms suffered by active duty United States service members experiencing chronic Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Ten service members diagnosed with PTSD and having a self-reported injury to the head acquired at least two years prior, were provided with two hour-long sessions of mixed LTMT given a week apart. Data to assess the immediate and durable effects were gathered before and after the LTMT sessions. Results indicate that headache, anxiety, and pain interference were significantly reduced during the course of the pilot study. This suggests that mixed LTMT may be helpful in reducing some of the symptoms of PTSD and injury to the head. Further studies will be needed to determine if LTMT is an effective non-pharmacological treatment for headache, anxiety or other problems associated with PTSD or injury to the head. PMID:26891636

  5. Identification of Serum MicroRNA Signatures for Diagnosis of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury in a Closed Head Injury Model

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Erin S.; Bhomia, Manish; Hutchison, Mary Anne; Balakathiresan, Nagaraja S.; Grunberg, Neil E.; Maheshwari, Radha K.

    2014-01-01

    Wars in Iraq and Afghanistan have highlighted the problems of diagnosis and treatment of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). MTBI is a heterogeneous injury that may lead to the development of neurological and behavioral disorders. In the absence of specific diagnostic markers, mTBI is often unnoticed or misdiagnosed. In this study, mice were induced with increasing levels of mTBI and microRNA (miRNA) changes in the serum were determined. MTBI was induced by varying weight and fall height of the impactor rod resulting in four different severity grades of the mTBI. Injuries were characterized as mild by assessing with the neurobehavioral severity scale-revised (NSS-R) at day 1 post injury. Open field locomotion and acoustic startle response showed behavioral and sensory motor deficits in 3 of the 4 injury groups at day 1 post injury. All of the animals recovered after day 1 with no significant neurobehavioral alteration by day 30 post injury. Serum microRNA (miRNA) profiles clearly differentiated injured from uninjured animals. Overall, the number of miRNAs that were significantly modulated in injured animals over the sham controls increased with the severity of the injury. Thirteen miRNAs were found to identify mTBI regardless of its severity within the mild spectrum of injury. Bioinformatics analyses revealed that the more severe brain injuries were associated with a greater number of miRNAs involved in brain related functions. The evaluation of serum miRNA may help to identify the severity of brain injury and the risk of developing adverse effects after TBI. PMID:25379886

  6. Report of a Consensus Meeting on Human Brain Temperature After Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: Its Measurement and Management During Pyrexia

    PubMed Central

    Childs, Charmaine; Wieloch, Tadeusz; Lecky, Fiona; Machin, Graham; Harris, Bridget; Stocchetti, Nino

    2010-01-01

    Temperature disturbances are common in patients with severe traumatic brain injury. The possibility of an adaptive, potentially beneficial role for fever in patients with severe brain trauma has been dismissed, but without good justification. Fever might, in some patients, confer benefit. A cadre of clinicians and scientists met to debate the clinically relevant, but often controversial issue about whether raised brain temperature after human traumatic brain injury (TBI) should be regarded as “good or bad” for outcome. The objective was to produce a consensus document of views about current temperature measurement and pyrexia treatment. Lectures were delivered by invited speakers with National and International publication track records in thermoregulation, neuroscience, epidemiology, measurement standards and neurocritical care. Summaries of the lectures and workshop discussions were produced from transcriptions of the lectures and workshop discussions. At the close of meeting, there was agreement on four key issues relevant to modern temperature measurement and management and for undergirding of an evidence-based practice, culminating in a consensus statement. There is no robust scientific data to support the use of hypothermia in patients whose intracranial pressure is controllable using standard therapy. A randomized clinical trial is justified to establish if body cooling for control of pyrexia (to normothermia) vs moderate pyrexia leads to a better patient outcome for TBI patients. PMID:21206519

  7. Surgical treatment achieves better outcome in severe traumatic pericallosal aneurysm: case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Sui, Mingxing; Mei, Qiyong; Sun, Kehua

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic pericallosal aneurysm (TPA) is typically seldom yet potentially lethal. Because of its rarity, also complicated by the unpredictable delayed-onset, TPA is more difficult to be diagnosed promptly. Due to the sporadic reports and diverse opinions on the priority of surgical treatment, a consensus about effective management of TPA has not been reached. Here we report a 55 year-old male patient with TPA, who received an emergent craniotomy to clip the pseudoaneurysm and remove the hematoma under intense intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring. A satisfactory clinical outcome was achieved at a 3-month follow-up. Thereafter, a review was conducted to evaluate the outcomes of different managing modalities. PMID:25932088

  8. Use of the adult attachment projective picture system in psychodynamic psychotherapy with a severely traumatized patient

    PubMed Central

    George, Carol; Buchheim, Anna

    2014-01-01

    The following case study is presented to facilitate an understanding of how the attachment information evident from Adult Attachment Projective Picture System (AAP) assessment can be integrated into a psychodynamic perspective in making therapeutic recommendations that integrate an attachment perspective. The Adult Attachment Projective Picture System (AAP) is a valid representational measure of internal representations of attachment based on the analysis of a set of free response picture stimuli designed to systematically activate the attachment system (George and West, 2012). The AAP provides a fruitful diagnostic tool for psychodynamic-oriented clinicians to identify attachment-based deficits and resources for an individual patient in therapy. This paper considers the use of the AAP with a traumatized patient in an inpatient setting and uses a case study to illustrate the components of the AAP that are particularly relevant to a psychodynamic conceptualization. The paper discusses also attachment-based recommendations for intervention. PMID:25140164

  9. Severe traumatic injury during long duration spaceflight: Light years beyond ATLS

    PubMed Central

    Kirkpatrick, Andrew W; Ball, Chad G; Campbell, Mark; Williams, David R; Parazynski, Scott E; Mattox, Kenneth L; Broderick, Timothy J

    2009-01-01

    Traumatic injury strikes unexpectedly among the healthiest members of the human population, and has been an inevitable companion of exploration throughout history. In space flight beyond the Earth's orbit, NASA considers trauma to be the highest level of concern regarding the probable incidence versus impact on mission and health. Because of limited resources, medical care will have to focus on the conditions most likely to occur, as well as those with the most significant impact on the crew and mission. Although the relative risk of disabling injuries is significantly higher than traumatic deaths on earth, either issue would have catastrophic implications during space flight. As a result this review focuses on serious life-threatening injuries during space flight as determined by a NASA consensus conference attended by experts in all aspects of injury and space flight. In addition to discussing the impact of various mission profiles on the risk of injury, this manuscript outlines all issues relevant to trauma during space flight. These include the epidemiology of trauma, the pathophysiology of injury during weightlessness, pre-hospital issues, novel technologies, the concept of a space surgeon, appropriate training for a space physician, resuscitation of injured astronauts, hemorrhage control (cavitary and external), surgery in space (open and minimally invasive), postoperative care, vascular access, interventional radiology and pharmacology. Given the risks and isolation inherent in long duration space flight, a well trained surgeon and/or surgical capability will be required onboard any exploration vessel. More specifically, a broadly-trained surgically capable emergency/critical care specialist with innate capabilities to problem-solve and improvise would be desirable. It will be the ultimate remote setting, and hopefully one in which the most advanced of our societies' technologies can be pre-positioned to safeguard precious astronaut lives. Like so many

  10. Elucidating the Severity of Preclinical Traumatic Brain Injury Models: A Role for Functional Assessment?

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Ryan C.; VanGilder, Reyna L.; Naser, Zachary J.; Lucke-Wold, Brandon P.; Bailes, Julian E.; Matsumoto, Rae R.; Huber, Jason D.; Rosen, Charles L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Concussion remains a symptom-based diagnosis clinically, yet preclinical studies investigating traumatic brain injury, of which concussion is believed to represent a ‘mild’ form, emphasize histological endpoints with functional assessments often minimized or ignored all together. Recently, clinical studies have identified the importance of cognitive and neuropsychiatric symptoms, in addition to somatic complaints, following concussion. How these findings may translate to preclinical studies is unclear at present. Objective To address the contrasting endpoints utilized clinically compared to those in preclinical studies and the potential role of functional assessments in a commonly used model of diffuse axonal injury (DAI).. Methods Animals were subjected to DAI using the impact-acceleration model. Functional and behavioral assessments were conducted over 1 week following DAI prior to completion of histological assessment at 1-week post-DAI. Results We show, despite the suggestion that this model represents concussive injury, no functional impairments as determined using common measures of motor, sensorimotor, cognitive, and neuropsychiatric function following injury over the course of 1 week. The lack of functional deficits is in sharp contrast to neuropathologic findings indicating neural degeneration, astrocyte reactivity, and microglial activation. Conclusion Future studies are needed to identify functional assessments, neurophysiologic techniques, and imaging assessments more apt to distinguish differences following so-called ‘mild’ traumatic brain injury (TBI) in preclinical models and determine whether these models are truly studying concussive or subconcussive injury. These studies are needed to not only understand mechanism of injury and production of subsequent deficits, but also for rigorous evaluation of potential therapeutic agents. PMID:24448183

  11. Post-traumatic neurodegeneration and chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Daneshvar, Daniel H; Goldstein, Lee E; Kiernan, Patrick T; Stein, Thor D; McKee, Ann C

    2015-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity around the world. Concussive and subconcussive forms of closed-head injury due to impact or blast neurotrauma represent the most common types of TBI in civilian and military settings. It is becoming increasingly evident that TBI can lead to persistent, long-term debilitating effects, and in some cases, progressive neurodegeneration and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). The epidemiological literature suggests that a single moderate-to-severe TBI may be associated with accelerated neurodegeneration and increased risk of Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, or motor neuron disease. However, the pathologic phenotype of these post-traumatic neurodegenerations is largely unknown and there may be pathobiological differences between post-traumatic disease and the corresponding sporadic disorder. By contrast, the pathology of CTE is increasingly well known and is characterized by a distinctive pattern of progressive brain atrophy and accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau neurofibrillary and glial tangles, dystrophic neurites, 43 kDa TAR DNA-binding protein (TDP-43) neuronal and glial aggregates, microvasculopathy, myelinated axonopathy, neuroinflammation, and white matter degeneration. Clinically, CTE is associated with behavioral changes, executive dysfunction, memory deficits, and cognitive impairments that begin insidiously and most often progress slowly over decades. Although research on the long-term effects of TBI is advancing quickly, the incidence and prevalence of post-traumatic neurodegeneration and CTE are unknown. Critical knowledge gaps include elucidation of pathogenic mechanisms, identification of genetic risk factors, and clarification of relevant variables-including age at exposure to trauma, history of prior and subsequent head trauma, substance use, gender, stress, and comorbidities-all of which may contribute to risk profiles and the development of post-traumatic

  12. Determination of Serum Lost Goodwill Target Proteome in Patients with Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Hongming; Hu, Changchen; Zhang, Gangli; Ren, Jinrui; Tan, Yihu; Sun, Wenxiao; Wang, Junwen; Li, Jun; Liu, Hongchao; Xie, Ruifan; Hao, Zhipeng; Guo, Dongsheng

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the biokinetics of LGT proteome, a potential biomarker of severe TBI, in serum of severe TBI patients. The LGT proteome presents in the serum of severe TBI patients. The abundance diversity of LGT proteome is closely associated with pathologic condition of TBI patients. Serum LGT proteome may be used as a promising marker for evaluating severity of severe TBI. PMID:26491659

  13. A Novel Closed-Head Model of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Using Focal Primary Overpressure Blast to the Cranium in Mice.

    PubMed

    Guley, Natalie H; Rogers, Joshua T; Del Mar, Nobel A; Deng, Yunping; Islam, Rafiqul M; D'Surney, Lauren; Ferrell, Jessica; Deng, Bowei; Hines-Beard, Jessica; Bu, Wei; Ren, Huiling; Elberger, Andrea J; Marchetta, Jeffrey G; Rex, Tonia S; Honig, Marcia G; Reiner, Anton

    2016-02-15

    Mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) from focal head impact is the most common form of TBI in humans. Animal models, however, typically use direct impact to the exposed dura or skull, or blast to the entire head. We present a detailed characterization of a novel overpressure blast system to create focal closed-head mild TBI in mice. A high-pressure air pulse limited to a 7.5 mm diameter area on the left side of the head overlying the forebrain is delivered to anesthetized mice. The mouse eyes and ears are shielded, and its head and body are cushioned to minimize movement. This approach creates mild TBI by a pressure wave that acts on the brain, with minimal accompanying head acceleration-deceleration. A single 20-psi blast yields no functional deficits or brain injury, while a single 25-40 psi blast yields only slight motor deficits and brain damage. By contrast, a single 50-60 psi blast produces significant visual, motor, and neuropsychiatric impairments and axonal damage and microglial activation in major fiber tracts, but no contusive brain injury. This model thus reproduces the widespread axonal injury and functional impairments characteristic of closed-head mild TBI, without the complications of systemic or ocular blast effects or head acceleration that typically occur in other blast or impact models of closed-skull mild TBI. Accordingly, our model provides a simple way to examine the biomechanics, pathophysiology, and functional deficits that result from TBI and can serve as a reliable platform for testing therapies that reduce brain pathology and deficits. PMID:26414413

  14. The experience of fatigue in the first 2 years after moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Bushnik, Tamara; Englander, Jeffrey; Wright, Jerry

    2008-01-01

    Fatigue is a well-recognized issue for individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI). This prospective study examined the rate and types of fatigue that are experienced by a cohort of individuals with TBI within the first 2 years, using a multidimensional fatigue scale. The impact of factors such as demographics, injury severity indices, and concomitant psychosocial variables was also examined. Using 2 measures of overall fatigue, 16%-32% at Year 1 and 21%-34% at Year 2 reported significant levels of fatigue. Fatigue did not appear to change between 1 and 2 years post-TBI. Sleep quality was the most prevalent concomitant disturbance followed by depression and pain. PMID:18219231

  15. Magnetic resonance volumetry and spectroscopy of hippocampus and insula in relation to severe exposure of traumatic stress.

    PubMed

    Eckart, Cindy; Kaufmann, Jörn; Kanowski, Martin; Tempelmann, Claus; Hinrichs, Hermann; Elbert, Thomas; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Kolassa, Iris-Tatjana

    2012-02-01

    Severe and chronic stress affects the hippocampus, especially during development. However, studies concerning structural alterations of the hippocampus yielded a rather inconsistent picture. Moreover, further anxiety-relevant brain regions, such as the insula, might be implicated in the pathophysiology of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). We combined magnetic resonance (MR) volumetric and spectroscopic analyses of hippocampus and insula in highly traumatized refugees without a history of alcohol/substance abuse or other comorbid diseases. No PTSD-related difference was apparent in the volumes or neurometabolite levels of bilateral hippocampus or insula. However, an association between left hippocampal N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA) and adverse childhood experiences indicated a potential detrimental effect of the early environment on hippocampal integrity. Our results add to increasing evidence that PTSD-related, morphological alterations in the hippocampus are a consequence of early adversity or may result from other factors, such as extensive use of alcohol. PMID:22092224

  16. [Extracorporeal lung support and endovascular stent in traumatic aortic rupture and severe lung failure].

    PubMed

    Schmid, F X; Philipp, A; Faltermeier, H; Schädinger, U; Link, J; Birnbaum, D

    2002-07-01

    Blunt thoracic injury in association with aortic rupture represents a life-threatening situation. Surgical repair used to be the preferred method of treatment. Because most patients are multiple trauma patients including head injuries, bone fractures and respiratory failure, urgent surgical procedures portend excessively high morbidity and mortality rates. Delay in operative management bears the risk of exsanguinating hemorrhage, secondary complications, prolonged hospital stay with increased costs. We present here an alternative treatment protocol including pumpless extracorporal lung assist and endovascular aortic stent graft placement in a 20-year old traffic accident victim. This procedure may be an especially useful treatment option in managing patients with complex lung and aortic pathology primarily not suitable for transportation or surgery. PMID:12219652

  17. The efficacy of sequential compression devices in multiple trauma patients with severe head injury.

    PubMed

    Gersin, K; Grindlinger, G A; Lee, V; Dennis, R C; Wedel, S K; Cachecho, R

    1994-08-01

    Thirty-two multiple trauma patients with severe head injury and a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of 8 or less were prospectively studied to assess the occurrence of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE). All patients required mechanical ventilation. A sequential compression device (SCD) was used in 14 patients and 18 patients received no prophylaxis for thromboembolism. Bilateral lower extremity technetium venoscans and ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) lung scans were performed within 6 days of admission and every week for 1 month or until the patient developed DVT or PE or was discharged from the SICU. Deep venous thrombosis occurred in two patients (6%) at 16 and 28 days following trauma. Twenty-five patients had normal or low probability V/Q scans. Six had high probability V/Q scans confirmed by pulmonary arteriograms (PAGs) at 12.5 +/- 4 days. Clinical signs of PE were absent in all patients with a positive PAG. There were no differences in age, Injury Severity Score (ISS), GCS Score, APACHE II Score, or Trauma Score between the patients who developed DVT or PE and those who did not. A SCD was used in four of the eight patients with DVT or PE. All but one patient with DVT or PE underwent placement of a vena caval filter. Multiple trauma patients with severe head injury (GCS score < or = 8) are at high risk for thromboembolism. The available means of prevention and diagnosis of DVT or PE in multiple trauma patients with severe head injury are not entirely effective. PMID:8064917

  18. Elevated Cell-Free Plasma DNA Level as an Independent Predictor of Mortality in Patients with Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues Filho, Edison Moraes; Simon, Daniel; Ikuta, Nilo; Klovan, Caroline; Dannebrock, Fernando Augusto; Oliveira de Oliveira, Carla

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Trauma is the leading cause of death in individuals less than 45 years old worldwide, and up to 50% of trauma fatalities are because of brain injury. Prediction of outcome is one of the major problems associated with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), and research efforts have focused on the investigation of biomarkers with prognostic value after TBI. Therefore, our aim was to investigate whether cell-free DNA concentrations correlated to short-term primary outcome (survival or death) and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores after severe TBI. A total of 188 patients with severe TBI were enrolled in this prospective study; outcome variables comprised survival and neurological assessment using the GCS at intensive care unit (ICU) discharge. Control blood samples were obtained from 25 healthy volunteers. Peripheral venous blood was collected at admission to the ICU. Plasma DNA was measured using a real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for the β-globin gene. There was correlation between higher DNA levels and both fatal outcome and lower hospital admission GCS scores. Plasma DNA concentrations at the chosen cutoff point (≥171,381 kilogenomes-equivalents/L) predicted mortality with a specificity of 90% and a sensitivity of 43%. Logistic regression analysis showed that elevated plasma DNA levels were independently associated with death (p<0.001). In conclusion, high cell-free DNA concentration was a predictor of short-term mortality after severe TBI. PMID:24827371

  19. Elevated cell-free plasma DNA level as an independent predictor of mortality in patients with severe traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues Filho, Edison Moraes; Simon, Daniel; Ikuta, Nilo; Klovan, Caroline; Dannebrock, Fernando Augusto; Oliveira de Oliveira, Carla; Regner, Andrea

    2014-10-01

    Trauma is the leading cause of death in individuals less than 45 years old worldwide, and up to 50% of trauma fatalities are because of brain injury. Prediction of outcome is one of the major problems associated with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), and research efforts have focused on the investigation of biomarkers with prognostic value after TBI. Therefore, our aim was to investigate whether cell-free DNA concentrations correlated to short-term primary outcome (survival or death) and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores after severe TBI. A total of 188 patients with severe TBI were enrolled in this prospective study; outcome variables comprised survival and neurological assessment using the GCS at intensive care unit (ICU) discharge. Control blood samples were obtained from 25 healthy volunteers. Peripheral venous blood was collected at admission to the ICU. Plasma DNA was measured using a real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for the β-globin gene. There was correlation between higher DNA levels and both fatal outcome and lower hospital admission GCS scores. Plasma DNA concentrations at the chosen cutoff point (≥171,381 kilogenomes-equivalents/L) predicted mortality with a specificity of 90% and a sensitivity of 43%. Logistic regression analysis showed that elevated plasma DNA levels were independently associated with death (p<0.001). In conclusion, high cell-free DNA concentration was a predictor of short-term mortality after severe TBI. PMID:24827371

  20. Creep failure of a reactor pressure vessel lower head under severe accident conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Pilch, M.M.; Ludwigsen, J.S.; Chu, T.Y.; Rashid, Y.R.

    1998-08-01

    A severe accident in a nuclear power plant could result in the relocation of large quantities of molten core material onto the lower head of he reactor pressure vessel (RPV). In the absence of inherent cooling mechanisms, failure of the RPV ultimately becomes possible under the combined effects of system pressure and the thermal heat-up of the lower head. Sandia National Laboratories has performed seven experiments at 1:5th scale simulating creep failure of a RPV lower head. This paper describes a modeling program that complements the experimental program. Analyses have been performed using the general-purpose finite-element code ABAQUS-5.6. In order to make ABAQUS solve the specific problem at hand, a material constitutive model that utilizes temperature dependent properties has been developed and attached to ABAQUS-executable through its UMAT utility. Analyses of the LHF-1 experiment predict instability-type failure. Predicted strains are delayed relative to the observed strain histories. Parametric variations on either the yield stress, creep rate, or both (within the range of material property data) can bring predictions into agreement with experiment. The analysis indicates that it is necessary to conduct material property tests on the actual material used in the experimental program. The constitutive model employed in the present analyses is the subject of a separate publication.

  1. Assessment of ultrasound as a diagnostic modality for detecting potentially unstable cervical spine fractures in pediatric severe traumatic brain injury: A feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Deepak; Sinha, Tej Prakash; Bhoi, Sanjeev

    2015-01-01

    Background: Early cervical spine clearance is extremely important in unconscious trauma patients and may be difficult to achieve in emergency setting. Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of standard portable ultrasound in detecting potentially unstable cervical spine injuries in severe traumatic brain injured (TBI) patients during initial resuscitation. Materials and Methods: This retro-prospective pilot study carried out over 1-month period (June–July 2013) after approval from the institutional ethics committee. Initially, the technique of cervical ultrasound was standardized by the authors and tested on ten admitted patients of cervical spine injury. To assess feasibility in the emergency setting, three hemodynamically stable pediatric patients (≦18 years) with isolated severe head injury (Glasgow coma scale ≤8) coming to emergency department underwent an ultrasound examination. Results: The best window for the cervical spine was through the anterior triangle using the linear array probe (6–13 MHz). In the ten patients with documented cervical spine injury, bilateral facet dislocation at C5–C6 was seen in 4 patients and at C6–C7 was seen in 3 patients. C5 burst fracture was present in one and cervical vertebra (C2) anterolisthesis was seen in one patient. Cervical ultrasound could easily detect fracture lines, canal compromise and ligamental injury in all cases. Ultrasound examination of the cervical spine was possible in the emergency setting, even in unstable patients and could be done without moving the neck. Conclusions: Cervical ultrasound may be a useful tool for detecting potentially unstable cervical spine injury in TBI patients, especially those who are hemodynamically unstable. PMID:26167212

  2. Send severely head-injured children to a pediatric trauma center.

    PubMed

    Johnson, D L; Krishnamurthy, S

    1996-12-01

    Between 1985 and 1988, a total of 1,320 head-injured children were seen by the neurosurgical service at the Children's Hospital in Washington, D.C. (CHOW). This included 1,095 minor injuries, 127 moderate injuries, and 98 severe injuries. Children brought from the scene of an accident were considered direct transports, whereas those taken to another hospital prior to transfer to CHOW were indirect. Of the children that suffered severe head injuries, 56 were admitted directly to the hospital and 42 indirectly. The indirect group had a higher percentage of children with lower coma scores and abused children. The trauma score was significantly higher in the direct group (9 vs. 7). The mortality rate for severe injuries referred directly from the scene of the accident was 26.8%, and the mortality rate for children referred indirectly was 50.0%. The higher number of abused children in the indirect group did not account for the increase in mortality rate (p = 0.021) in this group. This is the first study to show that children brought directly from the scene of an accident to a well-established pediatric trauma center have a significantly better chance of survival than children transported first to the nearest available hospital. PMID:9348151

  3. Post-concussional symptoms, financial compensation and outcome of severe blunt head injury.

    PubMed Central

    McKinlay, W W; Brooks, D N; Bond, M R

    1983-01-01

    Two groups, each of 21 cases of severe blunt head injury, were compared. Patients in one group were pursuing claims for financial compensation while patients in the other were not. Patients were assessed on cognitive tests, and both patients and relatives were interviewed at 3, 6 and 12 months after injury. There were few differences between claimants and non-claimants: post-concussional symptoms were common in both, cognitive performance was equal, and the reports given by relatives of changes in the patients were very similar. However, the reports given by patients themselves differed with claimants reporting slightly more symptoms than non-claimants. PMID:6663307

  4. Expedited CT-Based Methods for Evaluating Fracture Severity to Assess Risk of Post-Traumatic Osteoarthritis After Articular Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Donald D.; Kilburg, Anthony T.; Thomas, Thaddeus P.; Marsh, J Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Background Post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA) is common after intra-articular fractures of the tibial plafond. An objective CT-based measure of fracture severity was previously found to reliably predict whether PTOA developed following surgical treatment of such fractures. However, the extended time required obtaining the fracture energy metric and its reliance upon an intact contralateral limb CT limited its clinical applicability. The objective of this study was to establish an expedited fracture severity metric that provided comparable PTOA predictive ability without the prior limitations Methods An expedited fracture severity metric was computed from the CT scans of 30 tibial plafond fractures using textural analysis to quantify disorder in CT images. The expedited method utilized an intact surrogate model to enable severity assessment without requiring a contralateral limb CT. Agreement between the expedited fracture severity metric and the Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) radiographic OA score at two-year follow-up was assessed using concordance. The ability of the metric to differentiate between patients that did or did not develop PTOA was assessed using the Wilcoxon Ranked Sum test. Results The expedited severity metric agreed well (75.2% concordance) with the KL scores. The initial fracture severity of cases that developed PTOA differed significantly (p = 0.004) from those that did not. Receiver operating characteristic analysis showed that the expedited severity metric could accurately predict PTOA outcome in 80% of the cases. The time required to obtain the expedited severity metric averaged 14.9 minutes/ case, and the metric was obtained without using an intact contralateral CT Conclusion The expedited CT-based methods for fracture severity assessment present a solution to issues limiting the utility of prior methods. In a relatively short amount of time, the expedited methodology provided a severity score capable of predicting PTOA risk, without needing to

  5. Traumatic Brain Injury

    MedlinePlus

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) happens when a bump, blow, jolt, or other head injury causes damage to the brain. Every year, millions of people in the U.S. suffer brain injuries. More than half are bad enough that ...

  6. Serum Total Cholinesterase Activity on Admission Is Associated with Disease Severity and Outcome in Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qing-Hong; Li, An-Min; He, Sai-Lin; Yao, Xu-Dong; Zhu, Jing; Zhang, Zhi-Wen; Sheng, Zhi-Yong; Yao, Yong-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Background Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one of the leading causes of neurological disability. In this retrospective study, serum total cholinesterase (ChE) activities were analyzed in 188 patients for diagnostic as well as predictive values for mortality. Methods and Findings Within 72 hours after injury, serum ChE activities including both acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase were measured. Disease severity was evaluated with Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score, Glasgow Coma Score, length of coma, post-traumatic amnesia and injury feature. Neurocognitive and functional scores were assessed using clinical records. Of 188 patients, 146 (77.7%) survived and 42 (22.3%) died within 90 days. Lower ChE activities were noted in the non-survivors vs. survivors (5.94±2.19 vs. 7.04±2.16 kU/L, p=0.023), in septic vs. non-infected patients (5.93±1.89 vs. 7.31±2.45 kU/L, p=0.0005) and in patients with extremely severe injury vs. mild injury (6.3±1.98 vs. 7.57±2.48 kU/L, p=0.049). The trajectories of serum ChE levels were also different between non-survivors and survivors, septic and non-infected patients, mild and severely injured patients, respectively. Admission ChE activities were closely correlated with blood cell counts, neurocognitive and functional scores both on admission and at discharge. Receiver operating characteristic analysis showed that the area under the curve for ChE was inferior to that for either APACHE II or white blood cell (WBC) count. However, at the optimal cutoff value of 5 kU/L, the sensitivity of ChE for correct prediction of 90-day mortality was 65.5% and the specificity was 86.4%. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that lower ChE activity (<5 kU/L) was more closely correlated with poor survival than higher ChE activity (>5 kU/L) (p=0.04). After adjusting for other variables, ChE was identified as a borderline independent predictor for mortality as analyzed by Binary logistic regression (P=0.078). Conclusions

  7. A Prospective Randomized Study of Brain Tissue Oxygen Pressure-Guided Management in Moderate and Severe Traumatic Brain Injury Patients.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chien-Min; Lin, Ming-Chin; Huang, Sheng-Jean; Chang, Cheng-Kuei; Chao, Dan-Ping; Lui, Tai-Ngar; Ma, Hsin-I; Liu, Ming-Ying; Chung, Wen-Yuh; Shih, Yang-Hsin; Tsai, Shin-Han; Chiou, Hung-Yi; Lin, Mau-Roung; Jen, Sen-Li; Wei, Li; Wu, Chung-Che; Lin, En-Yuan; Liao, Kuo-Hsing; Chiang, Yung-Hsiao; Chiu, Wen-Ta; Lin, Jia-Wei

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of PbtO2-guided therapy with traditional intracranial pressure- (ICP-) guided treatment on the management of cerebral variables, therapeutic interventions, survival rates, and neurological outcomes of moderate and severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients. From 2009 to 2010, TBI patients with a Glasgow coma scale <12 were recruited from 6 collaborative hospitals in northern Taiwan, excluding patients with severe systemic injuries, fixed and dilated pupils, and other major diseases. In total, 23 patients were treated with PbtO2-guided management (PbtO2 > 20 mmHg), and 27 patients were treated with ICP-guided therapy (ICP < 20 mmHg and CPP > 60 mmHg) in the neurosurgical intensive care unit (NICU); demographic characteristics were similar across groups. The survival rate in the PbtO2-guided group was also significantly increased at 3 and 6 months after injury. Moreover, there was a significant correlation between the PbtO2 signal and Glasgow outcome scale-extended in patients from 1 to 6 months after injury. This finding demonstrates that therapy directed by PbtO2 monitoring is valuable for the treatment of patients with moderate and severe TBI and that increasing PaO2 to 150 mmHg may be efficacious for preventing cerebral hypoxic events after brain trauma. PMID:26413530

  8. Dimensional depression severity in women with major depression and post-traumatic stress disorder correlates with fronto-amygdalar hypoconnectivty.

    PubMed

    Satterthwaite, T D; Cook, P A; Bruce, S E; Conway, C; Mikkelsen, E; Satchell, E; Vandekar, S N; Durbin, T; Shinohara, R T; Sheline, Y I

    2016-07-01

    Depressive symptoms are common in multiple psychiatric disorders and are frequent sequelae of trauma. A dimensional conceptualization of depression suggests that symptoms should be associated with a continuum of deficits in specific neural circuits. However, most prior investigations of abnormalities in functional connectivity have typically focused on a single diagnostic category using hypothesis-driven seed-based analyses. Here, using a sample of 105 adult female participants from three diagnostic groups (healthy controls, n=17; major depression, n=38; and post-traumatic stress disorder, n=50), we examine the dimensional relationship between resting-state functional dysconnectivity and severity of depressive symptoms across diagnostic categories using a data-driven analysis (multivariate distance-based matrix regression). This connectome-wide analysis identified foci of dysconnectivity associated with depression severity in the bilateral amygdala. Follow-up seed analyses using subject-specific amygdala segmentations revealed that depression severity was associated with amygdalo-frontal hypo-connectivity in a network of regions including bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate and anterior insula. In contrast, anxiety was associated with elevated connectivity between the amygdala and the ventromedial prefrontal cortex. Taken together, these results emphasize the centrality of the amygdala in the pathophysiology of depressive symptoms, and suggest that dissociable patterns of amygdalo-frontal dysconnectivity are a critical neurobiological feature across clinical diagnostic categories. PMID:26416545

  9. The Potential Utility of Blood-Derived Biochemical Markers as Indicators of Early Clinical Trends Following Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    DeFazio, Michael; Rammo, Richard; Robles, Jaime R.; Bramlett, Helen M.; Dietrich, W. Dalton; Bullock, M. Ross

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a dynamic neuropathologic process in which a substantial proportion of patients die within the first 48-hours. The assessment of injury severity and prognosis are of primary concern in the initial management of severe TBI. Supplemental testing that aids in the stratification of patients at high risk for deterioration may significantly improve posttraumatic management in the acute setting. METHODS This retrospective study assessed the utility of both single-marker and multimarker models as predictive indicators of acute clinical status after severe TBI. Forty-four patients who sustained severe TBI (admission Glasgow Coma Scale [GCS] score ≤8) were divided into two cohorts according to a dichotomized clinical outcome at 72 hours after admission: Poor status (death or GCS score ≤8) and improved status (GCS score improved to >8). Threshold values for clinical status prediction were calculated for serum S-100B, matrix metalloproteinase-9, and plasma D-dimer, upon admission and at 24 hours after TBI by the use of receiver operating characteristic analysis. Performance characteristics of these single-marker predictors were compared with those derived from a multimarker logistic regression analysis. RESULTS Biomarkers with the greatest predictive value for poor status at 72 hours included serum S-100B on admission, as well as plasma D-dimer and serum S-100B at 24 hours, for which, associations were strongly significant. Multimarker analysis indicated no substantial improvement in prediction accuracy over the best single predictors during this time frame. CONCLUSION In conjunction with other clinical, physical, and radiologic evidence, blood-derived biochemical markers may serve to enhance prediction of early clinical trends after severe TBI. PMID:23313262

  10. Abnormal Functional MRI BOLD Contrast in the Vegetative State after Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heelmann, Volker

    2010-01-01

    For the rehabilitation process, the treatment of patients surviving brain injury in a vegetative state is still a serious challenge. The aim of this study was to investigate patients exhibiting severely disturbed consciousness using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Five cases of posttraumatic vegetative state and one with minimal…

  11. Management of severe head injury with brain exposure in three loggerhead sea turtles Caretta caretta.

    PubMed

    Franchini, D; Cavaliere, L; Valastro, C; Carnevali, F; van der Esch, A; Lai, O; Di Bello, A

    2016-05-01

    The loggerhead Caretta caretta is the most common sea turtle in the Mediterranean. Currently, sea turtles are considered endangered, mainly due to the impact of human activities. Among traumatic lesions, those involving the skull, if complicated by brain exposure, are often life-threatening. In these cases, death could be the outcome of direct trauma of the cerebral tissue or of secondary meningoencephalitis. This uncontrolled study aims to evaluate the use of a plant-derived dressing (1 Primary Wound Dressing®) in 3 sea turtles with severe lesions of the skull exposing the brain. Following surgical curettage, the treatment protocol involved exclusive use of the plant-derived dressing applied on the wound surface as the primary dressing, daily for the first month and then every other day until the end of treatment. The wound and peri-wound skin were covered with a simple secondary dressing without any active compound (non-woven gauze with petroleum jelly). Data presented herein show an excellent healing process in all 3 cases and no side effects due to contact of the medication with the cerebral tissue. PMID:27137072

  12. Self-regulation abilities in children with severe traumatic brain injury: a preliminary investigation of naturalistic action.

    PubMed

    Cook, Lori G; Chapman, Sandra B; Levin, Harvey S

    2008-01-01

    Research suggests that the occurrence of a traumatic brain injury (TBI) in childhood may disrupt self-regulation abilities, putting children at risk for difficulty on everyday tasks requiring self-regulation throughout their development. In the current exploratory study, a novel age-appropriate task assessed the ability to perform three familiar tasks using real objects while adhering to specific rules. Performance of children (ages 8-16) with severe TBI (n = 11) on the naturalistic task was compared to that of typically developing children (n = 21), including measures of the amount/types of errors and number of broken rules. The children with TBI exhibited significantly increased use of distractor objects in place of target objects as compared to the non-injured children. Additionally, children with TBI demonstrated trends of increased breaking of rules during the task and failure to include necessary steps. The preliminary results support the theory that children with severe TBI possess inefficient supervisory processes of self-regulation, corresponding to a decreased ability to carry out goal-based top-down processing. They may instead exhibit a bias towards a bottom-up approach, depending primarily on environmental cues such as the objects present to guide their actions, thus impeding self-regulation abilities. PMID:19127000

  13. Ethical considerations for performing decompressive craniectomy as a life-saving intervention for severe traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Honeybul, Stephen; Gillett, Grant; Ho, Kwok; Lind, Christopher

    2012-11-01

    In all fields of clinical medicine, there is an increasing awareness that outcome must be assessed in terms of quality of life and cost effectiveness, rather than merely length of survival. This is especially the case when considering decompressive craniectomy for severe traumatic brain injury. The procedure itself is technically straightforward and involves temporarily removing a large section of the skull vault in order to provide extra space into which the injured brain can expand. A number of studies have demonstrated many patients going on to make a good long-term functional recovery, however, this is not always the case and a significant number survive but are left with severe neurocognitive impairment. Unfortunately, many of these patients are young adults who were previously fit and well and are, therefore, likely to spend many years in a condition that they may feel to be unacceptable, and this raises a number of ethical issues regarding consent and resource allocation. In an attempt to address these issues, we have used the analytical framework proposed by Jonsen, that requires systematic consideration of medical indications, patient preferences, quality of life and contextual features. PMID:22807572

  14. Severe Dry Eye Syndrome After Radiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Bhandare, Niranjan; Moiseenko, Vitali; Song, William Y.; Morris, Christopher G.; Bhatti, M. Tariq; Mendenhall, William M.

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the incidence of severe dry eye syndrome (DES) after external beam radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer and its dependence on the parameters relevant to external beam radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The present retrospective study included 78 patients treated for primary extracranial head-and-neck tumors between 1965 and 2000, whose lacrimal apparatus/entire globe was exposed to fractionated external beam radiotherapy. The dose received by the major lacrimal gland was used for analysis. The end point of the present study was the ophthalmologic diagnosis of severe DES leading to vision compromise. Results: Of the 78 patients, 40 developed severe DES leading to visual compromise. The incidence of DES increased steadily from 6% at 35-39.99 Gy to 50% at 45-49.99 Gy and 90% at 60-64.99 Gy. With a mean of 0.9 years (range, 1 month to 3 years), the latency of DES was observed to be a function of the total dose and the dose per fraction. On univariate and multivariate analysis, the total dose (p < .0001 and p < .0001, respectively) and dose per fraction (p {<=} .0001 and p = .0044, respectively) were significant. However, age, gender, and the use of chemoradiotherapy were not. The actuarial analysis indicated a 5-year probability of freedom from DES of 93% for doses <45 Gy, 29% for 45-59.9 Gy, and 3% doses {>=}60 Gy. A logistic normal tissue complication probability model fit to our data obtained a dose of 34 and 38 Gy corresponding to a 5% and 10% incidence of DES. Conclusion: With a dose of 34 Gy corresponding to a 5% incidence of DES, the risk of severe DES increased, and the latency decreased with an increase in the total dose and dose per fraction to the lacrimal gland. The effect of chemoradiotherapy and hyperfractionation on the risk of DES needs additional investigation.

  15. Proximal coracobrachialis tendon rupture, subscapularis tendon rupture, and medial dislocation of the long head of the biceps tendon in an adult after traumatic anterior shoulder dislocation.

    PubMed

    Saltzman, Bryan M; Harris, Joshua D; Forsythe, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Rupture of the coracobrachialis is a rare entity, in isolation or in combination with other muscular or tendinous structures. When described, it is often a result of direct trauma to the anatomic area resulting in rupture of the muscle belly. The authors present a case of a 57-year-old female who suffered a proximal coracobrachialis tendon rupture from its origin at the coracoid process, with concomitant subscapularis tear and medial dislocation of the long head of biceps tendon after first time traumatic anterior shoulder dislocation. Two weeks after injury, magnetic resonance imaging suggested the diagnosis, which was confirmed during combined arthroscopic and open technique. Soft-tissue tenodesis of coracobrachialis to the intact short head of the biceps, tenodesis of the long head of biceps to the intertubercular groove, and double-row anatomic repair of the subscapularis were performed. The patient did well postoperatively, and ultimately at 6 months follow-up, she was without pain, and obtained 160° of active forward elevation, 45° of external rotation, internal rotation to T8, 5/5 subscapularis and biceps strength. Scoring scales had improved from the following preoperative to final follow-up: American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons, 53.33-98.33; constant, 10-100; visual analogue scale-pain, 4-0. DASH score was 5. PMID:25937715

  16. Proximal coracobrachialis tendon rupture, subscapularis tendon rupture, and medial dislocation of the long head of the biceps tendon in an adult after traumatic anterior shoulder dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Saltzman, Bryan M.; Harris, Joshua D.; Forsythe, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Rupture of the coracobrachialis is a rare entity, in isolation or in combination with other muscular or tendinous structures. When described, it is often a result of direct trauma to the anatomic area resulting in rupture of the muscle belly. The authors present a case of a 57-year-old female who suffered a proximal coracobrachialis tendon rupture from its origin at the coracoid process, with concomitant subscapularis tear and medial dislocation of the long head of biceps tendon after first time traumatic anterior shoulder dislocation. Two weeks after injury, magnetic resonance imaging suggested the diagnosis, which was confirmed during combined arthroscopic and open technique. Soft-tissue tenodesis of coracobrachialis to the intact short head of the biceps, tenodesis of the long head of biceps to the intertubercular groove, and double-row anatomic repair of the subscapularis were performed. The patient did well postoperatively, and ultimately at 6 months follow-up, she was without pain, and obtained 160° of active forward elevation, 45° of external rotation, internal rotation to T8, 5/5 subscapularis and biceps strength. Scoring scales had improved from the following preoperative to final follow-up: American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons, 53.33-98.33; constant, 10-100; visual analogue scale-pain, 4-0. DASH score was 5. PMID:25937715

  17. The fake bad scale in atypical and severe closed head injury litigants.

    PubMed

    Greiffenstein, M Frank; Baker, W John; Gola, Thomas; Donders, Jacobus; Miller, Lori

    2002-12-01

    The correlational and diagnostic properties of Lees-Haley's MMPI-2 Fake Bad Scale (FBS) were examined in litigating atypical minor, litigating moderate-severe, and non-litigating moderate-severe head injury samples. Overall, the FBS was sensitive to both litigation status and nonconforming versus conforming symptom courses. The FBS appeared superior to the MMPI-2 F and F-K scales in differentiating atypical from real brain-injury outcomes. High FBS scorers also had higher scores on somatic complaining (Hs, Hy) and to a lesser degree with psychotic complaints (F, Pa, Sc). FBS showed significant associations with various neuropsychological symptom validity measures. FBS appears to capture a hybrid of infrequent symptom reporting styles with an emphasis on unauthentic physical complaints. However, FBS also correlated with documented abnormal neurological signs within a litigating moderate-severe brain-injury group. Its use as a symptom infrequency measure may have to be modified in more severe injury litigants, as some FBS items may reflect true long-term outcome in severe cerebral dysfunction. PMID:12455024

  18. Traumatic rhabdomyolysis from severe beating--experience of volume diuresis in 200 patients.

    PubMed

    Knottenbelt, J D

    1994-08-01

    Fluid loading with balanced salt solution (BSS) was carried out in 200 patients with extensive soft tissue injuries from severe beatings. Urinary volume and dipstick specific gravity testing were used to monitor renal function with administration of furosemide for persistent oliguria. Acute intrinsic renal failure (AIRF) occurred in 21 patients (10.5%) and five patients died (2.5%); two of hyperkalemia, two of sepsis and one of multiple organ failure. Significantly increased rates of AIRF and death were associated with injury-admission intervals of more than 12 hours, severe metabolic acidosis, low initial hemoglobin, heavy pigmenturia, and high serum creatine kinase (CK) levels. An increased serum creatinine/BUN ratio was noted in four of the five patients who died. An average of 7.5 L fluids was needed in non-AIRF patients to achieve adequate diuresis with a mean positive fluid balance of 4.7 L. No patient without pigmenturia developed AIRF. Balanced salt solution volume diuresis supplemented with furosemide as necessary appears to be safe and effective in preventing AIRF in soft tissue injuries sustained in beatings. PMID:8064919

  19. How Healthcare Provider Talk with Parents of Children Following Severe Traumatic Brain Injury is Perceived in Early Acute Care

    PubMed Central

    Savage, Teresa A.; Grant, Gerald; Philipsen, Gerry

    2013-01-01

    Healthcare provider talk with parents in early acute care following children’s severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) affects parents’ orientations to these locales, but this connection has been minimally studied. This lack of attention to this topic in previous research may reflect providers’ and researchers’ views that these locales are generally neutral or supportive to parents’ subsequent needs. This secondary analysis used data from a larger descriptive phenomenological study (2005 – 2007) with parents of children following moderate to severe TBI recruited from across the United States. Parents of children with severe TBI consistently had strong negative responses to the early acute care talk processes they experienced with providers, while parents of children with moderate TBI did not. Transcript data were independently coded using discourse analysis in the framework of ethnography of speaking. The purpose was to understand the linguistic and paralinguistic talk factors parents used in their meta-communications that could give a preliminary understanding of their cultural expectations for early acute care talk in these settings. Final participants included 27 parents of children with severe TBI from 23 families. We found the human constructed talk factors that parents reacted to were: a) access to the child, which is where information was; b) regular discussions with key personnel; c) updated information that is explained; d) differing expectations for talk in this context; and, e) perceived parental involvement in decisions. We found that the organization and nature of providers’ talk with parents was perceived by parents to positively or negatively shape their early acute care identities in these locales, which influenced how they viewed these locales as places that either supported them and decreased their workload or discounted them and increased their workload for getting what they needed. PMID:23746606

  20. Age-dependent effects of severe traumatic brain injury on cerebral dopaminergic activity in newborn and juvenile pigs.

    PubMed

    Walter, Bernd; Brust, Peter; Füchtner, Frank; Müller, Marco; Hinz, Rainer; Kuwabara, Hiroto; Fritz, Harald; Zwiener, Ulrich; Bauer, Reinhard

    2004-08-01

    There is evidence that the dopaminergic system is sensitive to traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, the age-dependency of this sensitivity has not been studied together with brain oxidative metabolism. We postulate that the acute effects of severe TBI on brain dopamine turnover are age-dependent. Therefore 18F-labelled 6-fluoro-L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (FDOPA) together with Positron-Emission-Tomography (PET) was used to estimate the activity of the aromatic amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) in the brain of 11 newborn piglets (7-10 days old) and nine juvenile pigs (6-7 weeks old). Six newborn and five juvenile animals were subjected to a severe fluid-percussion (FP) induced TBI. The remaining animals were used as sham operated untreated control groups. Simultaneously, the regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) was measured with colored microspheres and the cerebral metabolic rates of oxygen and glucose were determined. At 1 h after FP-TBI, [18F]FDOPA was infused and PET scanning was performed for 2 h. At 2 h after FP-TBI administration, a second series of measurements of physiological values including CBF and brain oxidative metabolism data had been obtained. Severe FP-TBI elicited a marked increase in the rate constant for fluorodopamine production (k3FDOPA) in all brain regions of newborn piglets studied by between 97% (mesencephalon) and 143% (frontal cortex) (p < 0.05). In contrast, brain hemodynamics and cerebral oxidative metabolism remained unaltered after TBI. Furthermore, the permeability-surface area product of FDOPA (PSFDOPA) was unchanged. In addition, regional blood flow differences between corresponding ipsi- and contralateral brain regions did not occur after TBI. Thus, it is suggested that severe FP-TBI induces an upregulation of AADC activity of newborn piglets that is not related to alterations in brain oxidative metabolism. PMID:15319007

  1. The study protocol for the Head Injury Retrieval Trial (HIRT): a single centre randomised controlled trial of physician prehospital management of severe blunt head injury compared with management by paramedics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The utility of advanced prehospital interventions for severe blunt traumatic brain injury (BTI) remains controversial. Of all trauma patient subgroups it has been anticipated that this patient group would most benefit from advanced prehospital interventions as hypoxia and hypotension have been demonstrated to be associated with poor outcomes and these factors may be amenable to prehospital intervention. Supporting evidence is largely lacking however. In particular the efficacy of early anaesthesia/muscle relaxant assisted intubation has proved difficult to substantiate. Methods This article describes the design and protocol of the Head Injury Retrieval Trial (HIRT) which is a randomised controlled single centre trial of physician prehospital care (delivering advanced interventions such as rapid sequence intubation and blood transfusion) in addition to paramedic care for severe blunt TBI compared with paramedic care alone. Results Primary endpoint is Glasgow Outcome Scale score at six months post injury. Issues with trial integrity resulting from drop ins from standard care to the treatment arm as the result of policy changes by the local ambulance system are discussed. Conclusion This randomised controlled trial will contribute to the evaluation of the efficacy of advance prehospital interventions in severe blunt TBI. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00112398 PMID:24034628

  2. A headform for testing helmet and mouthguard sensors that measure head impact severity in football players.

    PubMed

    Siegmund, Gunter P; Guskiewicz, Kevin M; Marshall, Stephen W; DeMarco, Alyssa L; Bonin, Stephanie J

    2014-09-01

    A headform is needed to validate and compare helmet- and mouthguard-based sensors that measure the severity and direction of football head impacts. Our goal was to quantify the dynamic response of a mandibular load-sensing headform (MLSH) and to compare its performance and repeatability to an unmodified Hybrid III headform. Linear impactors in two independent laboratories were used to strike each headform at six locations at 5.5 m/s and at two locations at 3.6 and 7.4 m/s. Impact severity was quantified using peak linear acceleration (PLA) and peak angular acceleration (PAA), and direction was quantified using the azimuth and elevation of the PLA. Repeatability was quantified using coefficients of variation (COV) and standard deviations (SD). Across all impacts, PLA was 1.6±1.8 g higher in the MLSH than in the Hybrid III (p=0.002), but there were no differences in PAA (p=0.25), azimuth (p=0.43) and elevation (p=0.11). Both headforms exhibited excellent or acceptable repeatability for PLA (HIII:COV=2.1±0.8%, MLSH:COV=2.0±1.2%, p=0.98), but site-specific repeatability ranging from excellent to poor for PAA (HIII:COV=7.2±4.0%, MLSH:COV=8.3±5.8%, p=0.58). Direction SD were generally <1° and did not vary between headforms. Overall, both headforms are similarly suitable for validating PLA in sensors that measure head impact severity in football players, however their utility for validating sensor PAA values varies with impact location. PMID:24920257

  3. Foam dressing with epidermal growth factor for severe radiation dermatitis in head and neck cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jihyo; Lee, Sang-Wook; Hong, Joon Pio; Shon, Myeong Wha; Ryu, Seung-Hee; Ahn, Seung Do

    2016-06-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of foam dressing with human recombinant human epidermal growth factor (rhEGF) on the healing process in head and neck cancer patients who experience radiation-induced dermatitis (RID). Seven patients, including three with oropharyngeal, two with nasopharyngeal and one each with hypopharyngeal and laryngeal carcinoma, who underwent radiotherapy (RT) for head and neck cancer at the Asan Medical Center from March to December 2008 were prospectively included in this study. Patients who showed severe RID (more than wet desquamation) on the supraclavicular fossa or neck areas were treated by wound cleaning and debridement of granulation tissue, followed by daily rhEGF spray and foam dressing. Median time to stop exudates and reepithelialisation was 4 days. Within 14 days (median 8 days), all patients showed complete healing of RID and no longer required dressings. This new method of treatment with dressing containing rhEGF may have the potential to accelerate the healing process in patients with RID. A case-control study is needed to confirm this finding. PMID:24947011

  4. Combination of Temperature-Sensitive Stem Cells and Mild Hypothermia: A New Potential Therapy for Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Yue; Chen, Chong; Sun, Hong-Tao; Cheng, Shi-Xiang; Liu, Xiao-Zhi; Qu, Yang; Li, Xiao-hong

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Stem cell transplantation holds great potential for the treatment of traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, the micro-environment of reduced oxygen and accumulated toxins leads to low survival rates of grafted cells, which dramatically limits their clinical application. Mild hypothermia has been demonstrated to improve the micro-environment after severe TBI. Thus, we speculate that combinational therapy of mild hypothermia may promote survival of grafted cells, especially temperature-sensitive stem cells, which show the most activity in mild temperatures. In this study, we first isolated mesenchymal stem cells from umbilical cord (UCSMCs) and generated the temperature-sensitive UCSMCs (tsUCSMCs) by infection with a retrovirus carrying the temperature-sensitive tsA58 SV40 LT antigen gene. We demonstrated that tsUCSMCs grew and proliferated with more activity at 33°C than at 37°C by counting cell numbers with a hematocytometer, measuring the cell cycle with flow cytometry, and detecting proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) with immunofluorescence staining. Thereafter, we established the rat severe TBI model by fluid percussion, and injected PBS, UCSMCs, or tsUCSMCs into the injured region, and subject the animals to normothermia or mild hypothermia (33°C). We found that, compared with UCSMC or tsUCSMC treatment alone, their combination with hypothermia could significantly improve motor and cognitive function with more survival of the grafted cells. Furthermore, we observed that combined therapy with hypothermia and tsUCSMCs exerted the most protective effect on the recovery of neurological function of all the tested treatments, with the highest survival and proliferation rates, and the lowest apoptosis rate. Thus this may represent a new therapeutic strategy for the treatment of severe TBI. PMID:22655683

  5. Deficits in facial emotion recognition indicate behavioral changes and impaired self-awareness after moderate to severe traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Spikman, Jacoba M; Milders, Maarten V; Visser-Keizer, Annemarie C; Westerhof-Evers, Herma J; Herben-Dekker, Meike; van der Naalt, Joukje

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of disability, specifically among younger adults. Behavioral changes are common after moderate to severe TBI and have adverse consequences for social and vocational functioning. It is hypothesized that deficits in social cognition, including facial affect recognition, might underlie these behavioral changes. Measurement of behavioral deficits is complicated, because the rating scales used rely on subjective judgement, often lack specificity and many patients provide unrealistically positive reports of their functioning due to impaired self-awareness. Accordingly, it is important to find performance based tests that allow objective and early identification of these problems. In the present study 51 moderate to severe TBI patients in the sub-acute and chronic stage were assessed with a test for emotion recognition (FEEST) and a questionnaire for behavioral problems (DEX) with a self and proxy rated version. Patients performed worse on the total score and on the negative emotion subscores of the FEEST than a matched group of 31 healthy controls. Patients also exhibited significantly more behavioral problems on both the DEX self and proxy rated version, but proxy ratings revealed more severe problems. No significant correlation was found between FEEST scores and DEX self ratings. However, impaired emotion recognition in the patients, and in particular of Sadness and Anger, was significantly correlated with behavioral problems as rated by proxies and with impaired self-awareness. This is the first study to find these associations, strengthening the proposed recognition of social signals as a condition for adequate social functioning. Hence, deficits in emotion recognition can be conceived as markers for behavioral problems and lack of insight in TBI patients. This finding is also of clinical importance since, unlike behavioral problems, emotion recognition can be objectively measured early after injury, allowing for early

  6. Alcohol and mortality after moderate to severe traumatic brain injury: a meta-analysis of observational studies.

    PubMed

    Raj, Rahul; Mikkonen, Era D; Siironen, Jari; Hernesniemi, Juha; Lappalainen, Jaakko; Skrifvars, Markus B

    2016-06-01

    OBJECT Experimental studies have shown numerous neuroprotective properties of alcohol ("ethanol") after TBI, but clinical studies have provided conflicting results. The authors aimed to assess the relationship between positive blood alcohol concentration (BAC) on hospital admission and mortality after moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). METHODS The authors searched 8 databases for observational studies reported between January 1, 1990, and October 7, 2013, and investigated the effect of BAC on mortality after moderate to severe TBI. Reviews of each study were conducted, and data were extracted according to the MOOSE and PRISMA guidelines. Study quality was assessed using the Newcastle-Ottawa scale. The Mantel-Haenszel fixed effect methodology was used to generate pooled estimates. Heterogeneity was dealt with by multiple sensitivity analyses. RESULTS Eleven studies with a total of 95,941 patients (42% BAC positive and 58% BAC negative) were identified for the primary analysis (overall mortality 12%). Primary analysis showed a significantly lower risk of death for BAC-positive patients compared with BAC-negative patients (crude mortality 11.0% vs 12.3%, pooled OR 0.84 [95% CI 0.81-0.88]), although flawed by heterogeneity (I(2) = 68%). Multiple sensitivity analyses, including 55,949 and 51,772 patients, yielded similar results to the primary analysis (crude mortality 12.2% vs 14.0%, pooled OR 0.87 [95% CI 0.83-0.92] and crude mortality 8.7% vs 10.7%, pooled OR 0.78 [95% CI 0.74-0.83]) but with good study homogeneity (I(2) = 36% and 14%). CONCLUSIONS Positive BAC was significantly associated with lower mortality rates in moderate to severe TBI. Whether this observation is due to selection bias or neuroprotective effects of alcohol remains unknown. Future prospective studies adjusting for TBI heterogeneity is advocated to establish the potential favorable effects of alcohol on outcome after TBI. PMID:26495950

  7. Monitoring intracranial pressure utilizing a novel pattern of brain multiparameters in the treatment of severe traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hong-tao; Zheng, Maohua; Wang, Yanmin; Diao, Yunfeng; Zhao, Wanyong; Wei, Zhengjun

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the clinical value of multiple brain parameters on monitoring intracranial pressure (ICP) procedures in the therapy of severe traumatic brain injury (sTBI) utilizing mild hypothermia treatment (MHT) alone or a combination strategy with other therapeutic techniques. A total of 62 patients with sTBI (Glasgow Coma Scale score <8) were treated using mild hypothermia alone or mild hypothermia combined with conventional ICP procedures such as dehydration using mannitol, hyperventilation, and decompressive craniectomy. The multiple brain parameters, which included ICP, cerebral perfusion pressure, transcranial Doppler, brain tissue partial pressure of oxygen, and jugular venous oxygen saturation, were detected and analyzed. All of these measures can control the ICP of sTBI patients to a certain extent, but multiparameters associated with brain environment and functions have to be critically monitored simultaneously because some procedures of reducing ICP can cause side effects for long-term recovery in sTBI patients. The result suggested that multimodality monitoring must be performed during the process of mild hypothermia combined with conventional ICP procedures in order to safely target different clinical methods to specific patients who may benefit from an individual therapy. PMID:27382294

  8. Preliminary guidelines for safe and effective use of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in moderate to severe traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Nielson, Dylan M; McKnight, Curtis A; Patel, Riddhi N; Kalnin, Andrew J; Mysiw, Walter J

    2015-04-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation has generated extensive interest within the traumatic brain injury (TBI) rehabilitation community, but little work has been done with repetitive protocols, which can produce prolonged changes in behavior. This is partly because of concerns about the safety of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in subjects with TBI, particularly the risk of seizures. These risks can be minimized by careful selection of the rTMS protocol and exclusion criteria. In this article, we identify guidelines for safe use of rTMS in subjects with TBI based on a review of the literature and illustrate their application with a case study. Our subject is a 48-year-old man who sustained a severe TBI 5 years prior to beginning rTMS for the treatment of post-TBI depression. After a 4-week baseline period, we administered daily sessions of low-frequency stimulation to the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex for 6 weeks. After stimulation, we performed monthly assessments for 3 months. The Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD) was our primary outcome measure. The stimulation was well tolerated and the patient reported no side effects. After 6 weeks of stimulation, the patient's depression was slightly improved, and these improvements continued through follow-up. At the end of follow-up, the patient's HAMD score was 49% of the average baseline score. PMID:25281871

  9. Parent Management of the School Reintegration Needs of Children and Youth Following Moderate or Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Roscigno, Cecelia I.; Fleig, Denise K.; Knafl, Kathleen A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose School reintegration following children’s traumatic brain injury (TBI) is still poorly understood from families’ perspectives. We aimed to understand how both unique and common experiences during children’s school reintegration were explained by parents to influence the family. Methods Data came from an investigation using descriptive phenomenology (2005–2007) to understand parents’ experiences in the first 5 years following children’s moderate to severe TBI. Parents (N = 42 from 37 families in the United States) participated in two 90-minute interviews (first M = 15 months; second M = 27 months). Two investigators independently coded parents’ discussions of school reintegration using content analysis to understand the unique and common factors that parents perceived affected the family. Results Parents’ school negotiation themes included: 1) legal versus moral basis for helping the child; 2) inappropriate state and local services that did not consider needs specific to TBI; and, 3) involvement in planning, implementing, and evaluating the child’s education plan. Parents perceived that coordinated and collaboration leadership with school personnel lessened families’ workload. Families who home-schooled had unique challenges. Conclusions School reintegration can add to family workload by changing roles and relationships, and by adding to parents’ perceived stress in managing of the child’s condition. PMID:24969697

  10. Permutation entropy analysis of vital signs data for outcome prediction of patients with severe traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Kalpakis, Konstantinos; Yang, Shiming; Hu, Peter F; Mackenzie, Colin F; Stansbury, Lynn G; Stein, Deborah M; Scalea, Thomas M

    2015-01-01

    Permutation entropy is computationally efficient, robust to outliers, and effective to measure complexity of time series. We used this technique to quantify the complexity of continuous vital signs recorded from patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Using permutation entropy calculated from early vital signs (initial 10-20% of patient hospital stay time), we built classifiers to predict in-hospital mortality and mobility, measured by 3-month Extended Glasgow Outcome Score (GOSE). Sixty patients with severe TBI produced a skewed dataset that we evaluated for accuracy, sensitivity and specificity. The overall prediction accuracy achieved 91.67% for mortality, and 76.67% for 3-month GOSE in testing datasets, using the leave-one-out cross validation. We also applied Receiver Operating Characteristic analysis to compare classifiers built from different learning methods. Those results support the applicability of permutation entropy in analyzing the dynamic behavior of TBI vital signs for early prediction of mortality and long-term patient outcomes. PMID:25464358

  11. Brain tissue partial pressure of oxygen predicts the outcome of severe traumatic brain injury under mild hypothermia treatment

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hongtao; Zheng, Maohua; Wang, Yanmin; Diao, Yunfeng; Zhao, Wanyong; Wei, Zhengjun

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical significance and changes of brain tissue partial pressure of oxygen (PbtO2) in the course of mild hypothermia treatment (MHT) for treating severe traumatic brain injury (sTBI). Methods There were 68 cases with sTBI undergoing MHT. PbtO2, intracranial pressure (ICP), jugular venous oxygen saturation (SjvO2), and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) were continuously monitored, and clinical outcomes were evaluated using the Glasgow Outcome Scale score. Results Of 68 patients with sTBI, PbtO2, SjvO2, and CPP were obviously increased, but decreased ICP level was observed throughout the MHT. PbtO2 and ICP were negatively linearly correlated, while there was a positive linear correlation between PbtO2 and SjvO2. Monitoring CPP and SjvO2 was performed under normal circumstances, and a large proportion of patients were detected with low PbtO2. Decreased PbtO2 was also found after MHT. Conclusion Continuous PbtO2 monitoring could be introduced to evaluate the condition of regional cerebral oxygen metabolism, thereby guiding the clinical treatment and predicting the outcome. PMID:27601907

  12. Effects of moderate to severe traumatic brain injury on anticipating consequences of actions in adolescents: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Cook, Lori G; Hanten, Gerri; Orsten, Kimberley D; Chapman, Sandra B; Li, Xiaoqi; Wilde, Elisabeth A; Schnelle, Kathleen P; Levin, Harvey S

    2013-05-01

    For this pilot study, we compared performance of 15 adolescents with moderate-severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) to that of 13 typically developing (TD) adolescents in predicting social actions and consequences for avatars in a virtual microworld environment faced with dilemmas involving legal or moral infractions. Performance was analyzed in relation to cortical thickness in brain regions implicated in social cognition. Groups did not differ in number of actions predicted nor in reasons cited for predictions when presented only the conflict situation. After viewing the entire scenario, including the choice made by the avatar, TD and TBI adolescents provided similar numbers of short-term consequences. However, TD adolescents provided significantly more long-term consequences (p = .010). Additionally, for the Overall qualitative score, TD adolescents' responses were more likely to reflect the long-term impact of the decision made (p = .053). Groups differed in relation of the Overall measure to thickness of right medial prefrontal cortex/frontal pole and precuneus, with stronger relations for the TD group (p < .01). For long-term consequences, the relations to the posterior cingulate, superior medial frontal, and precentral regions, and to a lesser extent, the middle temporal region, were stronger for the TBI group (p < .01). PMID:23312035

  13. Evaluation of the severity of traumatic rhabdomyolysis using technetium-99m pyrophosphate scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Chang, H R; Kao, C H; Lian, J D; Shu, K H; Cheng, C H; Wu, M J; Chen, C H

    2001-01-01

    A quantitative scoring method was designed to assess the extent of muscle damage. Technetium-99m pyrophosphate (99mTc-PYP) scintigraphy was performed for 9 patients experiencing crush injury in the Chichi (Taiwan) earthquake. The magnitude of muscle uptake of 99mTc-PYP was graded as follows: grade 0, less than bone radioactivity (BRA); grade 1, equal to BRA; grade 2, higher than BRA; or grade 3, greatly higher than BRA. The area of muscle injury was estimated according to the rule of nines. The sum of the muscle injury size multiplied by its corresponding grading was defined as the anterior or posterior score according to the anterior or posterior images. Each image was interpreted by two physicians and average anterior and posterior scores were calculated. The muscle score was defined as the geometric mean of the average anterior and posterior scores. Significant correlations were obtained between the muscle score and duration of time trapped (r = 0.868, p < 0.01), peak serum creatine kinase level (r = 0.866, p < 0.01), peak serum phosphorus level (r = 0.877, p < 0.01) and number of hospital days (r = 0.875, p < 0.01). A negative correlation between the muscle score and blood pH (r = -0.706, p < 0.01) was also observed. We concluded that this scoring method may be used as an adjunct for evaluating the locations of trauma and the severity of crush syndrome, and for predicting the duration of hospital stay. PMID:11423690

  14. Management of Severe Frostbite in a Grey-Headed Parrot (Poicephalus fuscicollis suahelicus).

    PubMed

    Martel-Arquette, Anna; Mans, Christoph; Sladky, Kurt

    2016-03-01

    An approximately 5-year-old female grey-headed parrot (Poicephalus fuscicollis suahelicus) was evaluated after exposure to outdoor temperatures below -20°C (-4°F) for approximately 22 hours. Severe frostbite affecting multiple digits, as well as dehydration and a depressed attitude, were diagnosed. Treatment included oral antibiotics, antifungals, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories (NSAIDs), pentoxifylline, and topical aloe vera. Surgical amputation of the affected toes was not performed. Mild to moderate pododermatitis over the intertarsal joints developed because of a shift in weight bearing after the loss of most digits. Within 5 months after initial presentation, all frost-damaged toes had self-amputated, and the bird was able to function independently with no limitations in mobility. PMID:27088743

  15. [Interest of S100B protein blood level determination in severe or moderate head injury].

    PubMed

    Bouvier, Damien

    2013-01-01

    S100B, a suffering brain marker, exhibits a different interest in traumatic brain injury (TBI) as the trauma is severe (sTBI) or mild (mTBI). Our works presented for the attribution of the SFBC 2012 price talked about both aspects. Firstly, the extent of S100B elevation has been found to be useful in predicting clinical outcome after sTBI. However, few studies were realized with jugular venous blood samples. After comparing the interest between jugular venous and arterial blood concentrations evaluation of serum S100B protein in patients with sTBI, determination of S100B concentration in jugular blood samples appears to be better than in arterial ones to predict clinical outcome after brain injury. Secondly, it's difficult to determine the indication of cranial computed tomography (CCT) for patients with mTBI. Actually, 90% of patients with mTBI have unnecessary CCT or short hospitalization for observation. Serum concentrations of S100B were found to provide useful information. We have investigated in 2 studies (1 for adult, 1 for children) whether S100B concentrations in patients with mTBI could provide additional information to improve indication of the need for an initial CCT scan or for a short hospitalization. Patients with intracerebral lesions on the CCT scan (CCT+) or with bad clinical evolution were identified with a sensitivity level of 100% and a specificity level of 30%. Adding the measurement of S-100B serum concentration to the clinical decision rules for a CCT scan or hospitalization in patients with mTBI could allow a 30% reduction in scans and in hospitalization for clinical observation. PMID:23587577

  16. Endothelin-1 Is Increased in Cerebrospinal Fluid and Associated with Unfavorable Outcomes in Children after Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Empey, Philip E.; Poloyac, Samuel M.; Wisniewski, Stephen R.; Klamerus, Megan; Ozawa, Haishin; Wagner, Amy K.; Ruppel, Randall; Bell, Michael J.; Feldman, Keri; Adelson, P. David; Clark, Robert S.B.; Kochanek, Patrick M.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Severe pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI) is associated with unfavorable outcomes secondary to injury from activation of the inflammatory cascade, the release of excitotoxic neurotransmitters, and changes in the reactivity of cerebral vessels, causing ischemia. Hypoperfusion of injured brain tissues after TBI is also associated with unfavorable outcomes. Therapeutic hypothermia is an investigational treatment strategy for use in patients with severe TBI that has shown differential effects on various cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) mediators in pediatric patients. Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is a powerful vasoconstrictor that exerts its effects on the cerebrovascular endothelium for sustained periods after TBI. The purpose of this study was to determine if CSF concentrations of ET-1 are increased after severe TBI in children, and if they are associated with demographics and outcomes that are affected by therapeutic hypothermia. This was an ancillary study to a prospective, randomized-controlled trial of early hypothermia in a tertiary care pediatric intensive care unit. Children (n = 34, age 3 months–15 years) suffering from severe TBI were randomized to hypothermia (n = 19) and normothermia (n = 15) as part of the efficacy study. Children undergoing diagnostic lumbar puncture (n = 11) to rule out infection were used as controls. Patients received either mild to moderate hypothermia (32–33°C) or normothermia as part of their treatment protocol. CSF was serially collected during the first 5 days after TBI. ET-1 concentrations were quantitated in patient and control CSF samples by a validated ELISA in duplicate with a limit of quantification of 0.195 pg/mL. CSF ET-1 concentrations were increased by two- to threefold in children after TBI compared to controls, and the increase was sustained for up to 5 days post-TBI. This relationship was not affected by hypothermia, and there were no differences in ET-1 response between children with inflicted

  17. Costs of a Predictable Switch Between Simple Cognitive Tasks Following Severe Closed-Head Injury

    PubMed Central

    Schmitter-Edgecombe, Maureen; Langill, Michelle

    2007-01-01

    The authors used a predictable, externally cued task-switching paradigm to investigate executive control in a severe closed-head injury (CHI) population. Eighteen individuals with severe CHI and 18 controls switched between classifying whether a digit was odd or even and whether a letter was a consonant or vowel on every 4th trial. The target stimuli appeared in a circle divided into 8 equivalent parts. Presentation of the stimuli rotated clockwise. Participants performed the switching task at both a short (200 ms) and a long (1,000 ms) preparatory interval. Although the participants with CHI exhibited slower response times and greater switch costs, similar to controls, additional preparatory time reduced the switch costs, and the switch costs were limited to the 1st trial in the run. These findings indicate that participants with severe CHI were able to take advantage of time to prepare for the task switch, and the executive control processes involved in the switch costs were completed before the 1st trial of the run ended. PMID:17100512

  18. Re-evaluating the need for hospital admission and observation of pediatric traumatic brain injury after a normal head CT.

    PubMed

    Plackett, Timothy P; Asturias, Sabrina; Tadlock, Matthew; Wright, Franklin; Ton-That, Hieu; Demetriades, Demetrios; Esposito, Thomas; Inaba, Kenji

    2015-10-01

    There is no consensus on the optimal management of pediatric patients with suspected trauma brain injury and a normal head CT. This study characterizes the clinical outcomes of patients with a normal initial CT scan of the head. A retrospective chart review of pediatric blunt trauma patients who underwent head CT for closed head injury at two trauma centers was performed. Charts were reviewed for demographics, neurologic function, CT findings, and complications. 631 blunt pediatric trauma patients underwent a head CT. 63% had a negative CT, 7% had a non-displaced skull fracture, and 31% had an intracranial hemorrhage and/or displaced skull fracture. For patients without intracranial injury, the mean age was 8 years, mean ISS was 5, and 92% had a GCS of 13-15 on arrival. All patients with an initial GCS of 13-15 and no intracranial injury were eventually discharged to home with a normal neurologic exam and no patient required craniotomy. Not admitting those children with an initial GCS of 13-15, normal CT scan, and no other injuries would have saved 1.8 ± 1.5 hospital days per patient. Pediatric patients who have sustained head trauma, have a negative CT scan, and present with a GCS 13-15 can safely be discharged home without admission. PMID:25957025

  19. Clinical experience with an active intravascular rewarming technique for near-severe hypothermia associated with traumatic injury.

    PubMed

    Kiridume, Kazutaka; Hifumi, Toru; Kawakita, Kenya; Okazaki, Tomoya; Hamaya, Hideyuki; Shinohara, Natsuyo; Abe, Yuko; Takano, Koshiro; Hagiike, Masanobu; Kuroda, Yasuhiro

    2014-01-01

    recovered well following rehabilitation and was discharged on day 46. These findings suggest that active intravascular rewarming should be considered as an aggressive, additional rewarming technique in patients with near-severe hypothermia associated with traumatic injury. PMID:25520827

  20. Bench-to-bedside review: Oxygen debt and its metabolic correlates as quantifiers of the severity of hemorrhagic and post-traumatic shock

    PubMed Central

    Rixen, Dieter; Siegel, John H

    2005-01-01

    Evidence is increasing that oxygen debt and its metabolic correlates are important quantifiers of the severity of hemorrhagic and post-traumatic shock and and may serve as useful guides in the treatment of these conditions. The aim of this review is to demonstrate the similarity between experimental oxygen debt in animals and human hemorrhage/post-traumatic conditions, and to examine metabolic oxygen debt correlates, namely base deficit and lactate, as indices of shock severity and adequacy of volume resuscitation. Relevant studies in the medical literature were identified using Medline and Cochrane Library searches. Findings in both experimental animals (dog/pig) and humans suggest that oxygen debt or its metabolic correlates may be more useful quantifiers of hemorrhagic shock than estimates of blood loss, volume replacement, blood pressure, or heart rate. This is evidenced by the oxygen debt/probability of death curves for the animals, and by the consistency of lethal dose (LD)25,50 points for base deficit across all three species. Quantifying human post-traumatic shock based on base deficit and adjusting for Glasgow Coma Scale score, prothrombin time, Injury Severity Score and age is demonstrated to be superior to anatomic injury severity alone or in combination with Trauma and Injury Severity Score. The data examined in this review indicate that estimates of oxygen debt and its metabolic correlates should be included in studies of experimental shock and in the management of patients suffering from hemorrhagic shock. PMID:16277731

  1. Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... to Congress: Epidemiology and Rehabilitation Report to Congress: Military Personnel TBI in the US: Emergency Department Visits, Hospitalizations ... a leading cause of TBI for active duty military personnel in war zones. 15 CDC estimates of TBI ...

  2. Polaprezinc reduces the severity of radiation-induced mucositis in head and neck cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    DOI, HIROSHI; FUJIWARA, MASAYUKI; SUZUKI, HITOMI; NIWA, YASUE; NAKAYAMA, MASAHIRO; SHIKATA, TOSHIYUKI; ODAWARA, SOICHI; TAKADA, YASUHIRO; KIMURA, TAKESHI; KAMIKONYA, NORIHIKO; HIROTA, SHOZO

    2015-01-01

    Polaprezinc (PZ), an antiulcer drug, has been reported to have antioxidant properties. The aim of the present study was to assess the feasibility and efficacy of administering PZ for radiation-induced mucositis in head and neck cancer patients. Patients with newly diagnosed head and neck cancer were enrolled in this prospective study. PZ was prepared as an oral rinse. The PZ oral rinse was used four times per day during the course of radiotherapy. Sequential changes in radiation mucositis were assessed during and after radiotherapy according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0. Furthermore, a retrospective comparison analysis was performed to assess the efficacy of PZ for radiation-induced mucositis. A total of 32 patients were enrolled in the prospective study of the PZ oral rinse. Radiotherapy was performed up to a total dose of 60–66 Gy using a conventional schedule combined with chemotherapy. Of the 32 patients, 30 (93.8%) reported no complaints due to the PZ oral rinse. In addition, PZ was not associated with severe adverse effects. Among the patients who received PZ, grade 3 mucositis was observed in 29.0% based on the mucosal findings and in 39.3% based on the symptoms. In the patients who did not receive PZ, the incidence of grade 3 mucositis was 40.0% based on the mucosal findings and 60.7% based on the symptoms. Moreover, PZ promoted the recovery from mucositis caused by chemoradiotherapy and was not associated with reduced tumor response to radiotherapy. Therefore, the PZ oral rinse was well tolerated and proved to be efficient for the treatment of radiotherapy-induced oral mucositis. PMID:25798271

  3. Extended follow-up of neurological, cognitive, behavioral and academic outcomes after severe abusive head trauma.

    PubMed

    Lind, Katia; Toure, Hanna; Brugel, Dominique; Meyer, Philippe; Laurent-Vannier, Anne; Chevignard, Mathilde

    2016-01-01

    Studies about long-term outcome following abusive head trauma (AHT) are scarce. The aims of this study were to report long-term neurological, cognitive, behavioral and academic outcomes, ongoing treatments and/or rehabilitation, several years after AHT diagnosis, and factors associated with outcome. In this retrospective study, all patients admitted to a single rehabilitation unit following AHT between 1996 and 2005, with subsequent follow-up exceeding 3 years, were included. Medical files were reviewed and a medical interview was performed with parents on the phone when possible. The primary outcome measure was the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS). Forty-seven children (out of 66) met the inclusion criteria (mean age at injury 5.7 months; SD=3.2). After a median length of follow-up of 8 years (range 3.7-12), only seven children (15%) had "good outcome" (normal life - GOS I) and 19 children (40%) presented with severe neurological impairment (GOS III and IV). Children sustained epilepsy (38%), motor deficits (45%), visual deficit (45%), sleep disorders (17%), language abnormalities (49%), attention deficits (79%) and behavioral disorders (53%). Most children (83%) had ongoing rehabilitation. Only 30% followed a normal curriculum, whereas 30% required special education services. Children with better overall outcome (GOS I and II) had significantly higher educated mothers than those with worse outcomes (GOS III and IV): graduation from high school 59% and 21% respectively (p=0.006). This study highlights the high rate of severe sequelae and health care needs several years post-AHT, and emphasizes the need for extended follow-up of medical, cognitive and academic outcomes. PMID:26299396

  4. [Intracranial pressure monitoring in severe traumatic brain injury: A different perspective of the BestTrip trial].

    PubMed

    Murillo-Cabezas, F; Godoy, D A

    2014-05-01

    The present study outlines a series of questions and reflections upon the recent publication of Chesnut et al., who compared 2 approaches to the treatment of intracranial hypertension (ICH) in severe head injuries: one with and the other without intracranial pressure monitoring (ICP). The authors concluded that no improved outcome was observed in the treatment group guided by ICP monitoring. The main concerns relate to the degree of training of the physicians involved in the monitoring and management of ICH in the ICP group, as well as to the possible inter-observer variability in interpreting the CT scans, the capacity of clinical signs to guide the treatment of ICH, and the suitability of randomization. The analysis of this trial should not be taken to suggest the futility of ICP monitoring but rather the need to correctly use the information afforded by ICP monitoring, with emphasis on the importance of the definition of alternative methods for non-invasive monitoring. PMID:24674667

  5. Early Cerebral Circulation Disturbance in Patients Suffering from Severe Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI): A Xenon CT and Perfusion CT Study

    PubMed Central

    HONDA, Mitsuru; ICHIBAYASHI, Ryo; YOKOMURO, Hiroki; YOSHIHARA, Katsunori; MASUDA, Hiroyuki; HAGA, Daisuke; SEIKI, Yoshikatsu; KUDOH, Chiaki; KISHI, Taichi

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is widely known to cause dynamic changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF). Ischemia is a common and deleterious secondary injury following TBI. Detecting early ischemia in TBI patients is important to prevent further advancement and deterioration of the brain tissue. The purpose of this study was to clarify the cerebral circulatory disturbance during the early phase and whether it can be used to predict patient outcome. A total of 90 patients with TBI underwent a xenon-computed tomography (Xe-CT) and subsequently perfusion CT to evaluate the cerebral circulation on days 1–3. We measured CBF using Xe-CT and mean transit time (MTT: the width between two inflection points [maximum upward slope and maximum downward slope from inflow to outflow of the contrast agent]) using perfusion CT and calculated the cerebral blood volume (CBV) using the AZ-7000W98 computer system. The relationships of the hemodynamic parameters CBF, MTT, and CBV to the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score and the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) score were examined. There were no significant differences in CBF, MTT, and CBV among GCS3–4, GCS5–6, and GCS7–8 groups. The patients with a favorable outcome (GR and MD) had significantly higher CBF and lower MTT than those with an unfavorable one (SD, VS, or D). The discriminant analysis of these parameters could predict patient outcome with a probability of 70.6%. During the early phase, CBF reduction and MTT prolongation might influence the clinical outcome of TBI. These parameters are helpful for evaluating the severity of cerebral circulatory disturbance and predicting the outcome of TBI patients. PMID:27356957

  6. Early Cerebral Circulation Disturbance in Patients Suffering from Severe Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI): A Xenon CT and Perfusion CT Study.

    PubMed

    Honda, Mitsuru; Ichibayashi, Ryo; Yokomuro, Hiroki; Yoshihara, Katsunori; Masuda, Hiroyuki; Haga, Daisuke; Seiki, Yoshikatsu; Kudoh, Chiaki; Kishi, Taichi

    2016-08-15

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is widely known to cause dynamic changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF). Ischemia is a common and deleterious secondary injury following TBI. Detecting early ischemia in TBI patients is important to prevent further advancement and deterioration of the brain tissue. The purpose of this study was to clarify the cerebral circulatory disturbance during the early phase and whether it can be used to predict patient outcome. A total of 90 patients with TBI underwent a xenon-computed tomography (Xe-CT) and subsequently perfusion CT to evaluate the cerebral circulation on days 1-3. We measured CBF using Xe-CT and mean transit time (MTT: the width between two inflection points [maximum upward slope and maximum downward slope from inflow to outflow of the contrast agent]) using perfusion CT and calculated the cerebral blood volume (CBV) using the AZ-7000W98 computer system. The relationships of the hemodynamic parameters CBF, MTT, and CBV to the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score and the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) score were examined. There were no significant differences in CBF, MTT, and CBV among GCS3-4, GCS5-6, and GCS7-8 groups. The patients with a favorable outcome (GR and MD) had significantly higher CBF and lower MTT than those with an unfavorable one (SD, VS, or D). The discriminant analysis of these parameters could predict patient outcome with a probability of 70.6%. During the early phase, CBF reduction and MTT prolongation might influence the clinical outcome of TBI. These parameters are helpful for evaluating the severity of cerebral circulatory disturbance and predicting the outcome of TBI patients. PMID:27356957

  7. Blood mitochondrial enzymatic assay as a predictor of long-term outcome in severe traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Sumit; Raheja, Amol; Samson, Neha; Bhoi, Sanjeev; Selvi, Arul; Sharma, Pushpa; Sharma, Bhawani Shankar

    2016-08-01

    Recent studies have observed the central role of mitochondrial dysfunction in severe traumatic brain injury (sTBI). One hundred and seven sTBI patients (18-65years old, presenting within 8hours of injury) were randomised for a placebo controlled phase II trial of progesterone with or without hypothermia. We serially analysed blood mitochondrial enzymes (Complex I [C1], Complex IV [C4] and pyruvate dehydrogenase complex [PDH]) using a dipstick assay at admission and 7days later for 37 patients, irrespective of assigned group. Favorable Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) at 1year was associated with admission C1 levels above 0.19μg, admission C4 levels above 0.19μg and day 7 C1 levels above 0.17μg, all per 25μl of blood. Unfavorable GOS at 1year was associated with admission serum PDH levels above 0.23μg/25μl of blood. Survivors at 1year had significantly higher admission serum C1 levels above 0.19μg/25μl and day 7 C1 levels above 0.17μg/25μl. To our knowledge this is the first clinical trial associating blood mitochondrial enzymes with long-term outcome in sTBI. Serial monitoring and optimisation of blood C1, C4 and PDH levels could aid in prognostication and potentially guide in using mitochondrial targeted therapies. Blood mitochondrial enzymatic assay might suggest global reduction-oxidation status. PMID:27262871

  8. Head injury. Second edition

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, P.R.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 22 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Radiographic Evaluation; Epidemiology of Head Injury; Emergency Care and Initial Evaluation; Skull Fracture and Traumatic Cerebrospinal Fluid Fistulas; Mild Head Injury; and Injuries of the Cranial Nerves.

  9. Post-Traumatic Pneumocele of the Frontal Sinus

    PubMed Central

    Calisir, Cuneyt; Adapinar, Baki

    2008-01-01

    A pneumocele is an abnormal dilatation of a paranasal sinus, most commonly affecting the frontal sinus. Although the etiology of pneumocele is not entirely known, several causative factors have been suggested including trauma, surgery, tumor and infection. We report here a case of post-traumatic pneumocele of the frontal sinus following a head trauma. PMID:18682678

  10. Pre- and inter-hospital transport of severely head-injured patients in rural Northern Norway.

    PubMed

    Sollid, Snorre; Munch-Ellingsen, Jens; Gilbert, Mads; Ingebrigtsen, Tor

    2003-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to survey the time consumed during the pre- and inter-hospital transport of severely head injured patients in Northern Norway. All patients (n = 85) operated for an intracranial mass lesions within 48 h after injury during the 10-year period 1986-1995 were included in this retrospective analysis. Ambulance records, transfer notes, and hospital records were reviewed. The transport of patients was classified as either direct from the trauma scene to the University Hospital (direct admission group) or as an inter-hospital transfer (transfer group). Forty-seven (55%) patients were in the direct admission group, and 38 (45%) were transferred through another hospital. The majority of patients (81%) were transported by air ambulance. Median time from injury to arrival in the emergency room was 5 (1-44) h. Time necessary for transport was significantly (p < 0.001) shorter in the direct admission group (median 3 h) compared to the transfer group (median 8 h). The inter-hospital transfer time was < or = 3 h in 17%. Clearly, the advanced air ambulance service in Northern Norway makes rapid inter-hospital transfer possible despite extremely long geographical distances. Our findings indicate that this possibility is not always utilized. PMID:12820685