Science.gov

Sample records for shape index calculation

  1. A Computer Calculated Index.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Francis J.

    The Gunning Fog Index of readability indicates both the average length of words and the difficult words (three or more syllables) in written material. This document describes a business communication course at Wayne State University in which students calculate the Gunning Fog Index of two of their writing assignments with the aid of the…

  2. Calculate Your Body Mass Index

    MedlinePlus

    ... Can! ) Health Professional Resources Calculate Your Body Mass Index Body mass index (BMI) is a measure of body fat based ... to content Twitter Facebook YouTube Google+ SEARCH | SITE INDEX | ACCESSIBILITY | PRIVACY STATEMENT | FOIA | OIG | CONTACT US National ...

  3. A Three-dimensional Non-spherical Calculation Of The Rotationally Distorted Shape And Internal Structure Of A Model Of Jupiter With A Polytropic Index Of Unity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Keke; Kong, D.; Schubert, G.; Anderson, J.

    2012-10-01

    An accurate calculation of the rotationally distorted shape and internal structure of Jupiter is required to understand the high-precision gravitational field that will be measured by the Juno spacecraft now on its way to Jupiter. We present a three-dimensional non-spherical numerical calculation of the shape and internal structure of a model of Jupiter with a polytropic index of unity. The calculation is based on a finite element method and accounts for the full effects of rotation. After validating the numerical approach against the asymptotic solution of Chandrasekhar (1933) that is valid only for a slowly rotating gaseous planet, we apply it to a model of Jupiter whose rapid rotation causes a significant departure from spherical geometry. The two-dimensional distribution of the density and the pressure within Jupiter is then determined via a hybrid inverse approach by matching the a priori unknown coefficient in the equation of state to the observed shape of Jupiter. After obtaining the two-dimensional distribution of Jupiter's density, we then compute the zonal gravity coefficients and the total mass from the non-spherical Jupiter model that takes full account of rotation-induced shape changes. Our non-spherical model with a polytrope of unit index is able to produce the known mass and zonal gravitational coefficients of Jupiter. Chandrasekhar, S. 1933, The equilibrium of distorted polytropes, MNRAS 93, 390

  4. Film shape calculations on supercomputers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.

    1982-01-01

    Both scalar and vector operations are described to demonstrate usefulness of supercomputers (computers with peak computing speeds exceeding 100 million operative per second) in solving tribological problems. A simple kernel of the film shape calculations in an elastohydrodynamic lubricated rectangular contact is presented and the relevant equations are described. Both scalar and vector versions of the film shape code are presented. The run times of the two types of code indicate that over a 50-to-1 speedup of scalar to vector computational time for vector lengths typically used in elastohydrodynamic lubrication analysis is obtained.

  5. Atomic Force Microscopy Based Cell Shape Index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adia-Nimuwa, Usienemfon; Mujdat Tiryaki, Volkan; Hartz, Steven; Xie, Kan; Ayres, Virginia

    2013-03-01

    Stellation is a measure of cell physiology and pathology for several cell groups including neural, liver and pancreatic cells. In the present work, we compare the results of a conventional two-dimensional shape index study of both atomic force microscopy (AFM) and fluorescent microscopy images with the results obtained using a new three-dimensional AFM-based shape index similar to sphericity index. The stellation of astrocytes is investigated on nanofibrillar scaffolds composed of electrospun polyamide nanofibers that has demonstrated promise for central nervous system (CNS) repair. Recent work by our group has given us the ability to clearly segment the cells from nanofibrillar scaffolds in AFM images. The clear-featured AFM images indicated that the astrocyte processes were longer than previously identified at 24h. It was furthermore shown that cell spreading could vary significantly as a function of environmental parameters, and that AFM images could record these variations. The new three-dimensional AFM-based shape index incorporates the new information: longer stellate processes and cell spreading. The support of NSF PHY-095776 is acknowledged.

  6. Shape integral method for magnetospheric shapes. [boundary layer calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michel, F. C.

    1979-01-01

    A method is developed for calculating the shape of any magnetopause to arbitrarily high precision. The method uses an integral equation which is evaluated for a trial shape. The resulting values of the integral equation as a function of auxiliary variables indicate how close one is to the desired solution. A variational method can then be used to improve the trial shape. Some potential applications are briefly mentioned.

  7. GPU-based fast gamma index calculation.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xuejun; Jia, Xun; Jiang, Steve B

    2011-03-01

    The γ-index dose comparison tool has been widely used to compare dose distributions in cancer radiotherapy. The accurate calculation of γ-index requires an exhaustive search of the closest Euclidean distance in the high-resolution dose-distance space. This is a computational intensive task when dealing with 3D dose distributions. In this work, we combine a geometric method (Ju et al 2008 Med. Phys. 35 879-87) with a radial pre-sorting technique (Wendling et al 2007 Med. Phys. 34 1647-54) and implement them on computer graphics processing units (GPUs). The developed GPU-based γ-index computational tool is evaluated on eight pairs of IMRT dose distributions. The γ-index calculations can be finished within a few seconds for all 3D testing cases on one single NVIDIA Tesla C1060 card, achieving 45-75× speedup compared to CPU computations conducted on an Intel Xeon 2.27 GHz processor. We further investigated the effect of various factors on both CPU and GPU computation time. The strategy of pre-sorting voxels based on their dose difference values speeds up the GPU calculation by about 2.7-5.5 times. For n-dimensional dose distributions, γ-index calculation time on CPU is proportional to the summation of γ(n) over all voxels, while that on GPU is affected by γ(n) distributions and is approximately proportional to the γ(n) summation over all voxels. We found that increasing the resolution of dose distributions leads to a quadratic increase of computation time on CPU, while less-than-quadratic increase on GPU. The values of dose difference and distance-to-agreement criteria also have an impact on γ-index calculation time. PMID:21317484

  8. GPU-based fast gamma index calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Xuejun; Jia, Xun; Jiang, Steve B.

    2011-03-01

    The γ-index dose comparison tool has been widely used to compare dose distributions in cancer radiotherapy. The accurate calculation of γ-index requires an exhaustive search of the closest Euclidean distance in the high-resolution dose-distance space. This is a computational intensive task when dealing with 3D dose distributions. In this work, we combine a geometric method (Ju et al 2008 Med. Phys. 35 879-87) with a radial pre-sorting technique (Wendling et al 2007 Med. Phys. 34 1647-54) and implement them on computer graphics processing units (GPUs). The developed GPU-based γ-index computational tool is evaluated on eight pairs of IMRT dose distributions. The γ-index calculations can be finished within a few seconds for all 3D testing cases on one single NVIDIA Tesla C1060 card, achieving 45-75× speedup compared to CPU computations conducted on an Intel Xeon 2.27 GHz processor. We further investigated the effect of various factors on both CPU and GPU computation time. The strategy of pre-sorting voxels based on their dose difference values speeds up the GPU calculation by about 2.7-5.5 times. For n-dimensional dose distributions, γ-index calculation time on CPU is proportional to the summation of γn over all voxels, while that on GPU is affected by γn distributions and is approximately proportional to the γn summation over all voxels. We found that increasing the resolution of dose distributions leads to a quadratic increase of computation time on CPU, while less-than-quadratic increase on GPU. The values of dose difference and distance-to-agreement criteria also have an impact on γ-index calculation time.

  9. New unifying procedure for PC index calculations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauning, P.

    2012-04-01

    The Polar Cap (PC) index is a controversial topic within the IAGA scientific community. Since 1997 discussions of the validity of the index to be endorsed as an official IAGA index have ensued. Currently, there are now the three separate PC index versions constructed from the different procedures used at the three institutes: the Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute (AARI), the Danish Meteorological Institute (DMI), and the Danish National Space Institute (DTU Space). It is demonstrated in this presentation, that two consistent unifying procedures can be built from the best elements of the three different versions. One procedure uses a set of coefficients aimed at the calculation of final PC index values to be accepted by IAGA. The other procedure uses coefficients aimed at on-line real-time production of preliminary PC index values for Space Weather monitoring applications. For each of the two cases the same procedure is used for the northern (PCN) and the southern (PCS) polar cap indices, and the derived PCN and PCS coefficients are similar.

  10. Index calculation by means of harmonic expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imamura, Yosuke

    2015-11-01

    We review derivation of superconformal indices by means of supersymmetric localization and spherical harmonic expansion for 3d mathcal {N}=2, 4d mathcal {N}=1, and 6d mathcal {N}=(1,0) supersymmetric gauge theories. We demonstrate calculation of indices for vector multiplets in each dimension by analyzing energy eigenmodes in {boldsymbol S}^p × mathbb {R}. For the 6d index we consider the perturbative contribution only. We focus on the technical details of harmonic expansion rather than physical applications.

  11. Fast calculation of a voltage stability index

    SciTech Connect

    Loef, P.A.; Smed, T.; Andersson, G. ); Hill, D.J. )

    1992-02-01

    The minimum singular value of the power flow Jacobian matrix has been used as a static voltage stability index, indicating the distance between the studied operating point and the steady state voltage stability limit. In this paper a fast method to calculate the minimum singular value and the corresponding (left and right) singular vectors is presented. The main advantages of the developed algorithm are the small amount of computation time needed, and that it only requires information available from an ordinary program for power flow calculations. Furthermore, the proposed method fully utilizes the sparsity of the power flow Jacobian matrix and hence the memory requirements for the computation are low. These advantages are preserved when applied to various submatrices of the Jacobian matrix, which can be useful in constructing special voltage stability indices. The developed algorithm was applied to small test systems as well as to a large (real size) system with over 1000 nodes, with satisfactory results.

  12. Shape matching utilizing indexed hypotheses generation and testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehrotra, Rajiv; Grosky, William I.

    1989-01-01

    An indexing mechanism is developed as part of an overall scheme called SMITH (shape matching utilizing indexed hypothesis generation and testing) for two-dimensional model-based object recognition. The approach is based on a dynamic programming implementation of attributed string matching, is computationally efficient, and works effectively for both nonoccluded and occluded shapes. Another advantage of this technique is that models may be inserted or deleted with relatively little cost.

  13. Calculation of electron wave functions and refractive index of Ne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Min; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Tao

    2008-10-01

    The radial wave functions of inner electron shell and outer electron shell of a Ne atom were obtained by the approximate analytical method and tested by calculating the ground state energy of the Ne atom. The equivalent volume of electron cloud and the refractive index of Ne were calculated. The calculated refractive index agrees well with the experimental result. Relationship between the refractive index and the wave function of Ne was discovered.

  14. How to Calculate an Employee Relations Index.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cash, William B., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Proposes using an employee relations index (ERI) to measure factors affecting employee relations and job performance ability. Examines five of ten major ERI factors: attenance, turnover, safety, grievances/complaints, and motor vehicle accidents. Discusses weighing the factors and interpreting the outcome. (CSS)

  15. Normalized mean shapes and reference index values for computerized quantitative assessment indices of chest wall deformities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ho Chul; Park, Man Sik; Lee, Seong Keon; Nam, Ki Chang; Park, Hyung Joo; Kim, Min Gi; Song, Jae-Jun; Choi, Hyuk

    2015-11-01

    We previously proposed a computerized index (eccentricity index [EI]) for chest-wall deformity measurements, such as pectus excavatum. We sought to define mean shapes based on normal chest walls and to propose for computerized index reference values of that are used in the quantitative analysis of the severity of chest-wall deformities. A total of 584 patients were classified into 18 groups, and a database of their chest-wall computed tomography (CT) scan images was constructed. The boundaries of the chest wall were extracted by using a segmentation algorithm, and the mean shapes were subsequently developed. The reference index values were calculated from the developed mean shapes. Reference index values for the EI were compared with a conventional index, the Haller index (HI). A close association has been shown between the two indices in multiple subjects (r = 0.974, P < 0.001). The newly developed mean shapes and reference index values supply both reliability and objectivity to the diagnosis, analysis, and treatment of chest-wall deformities. They promise to be highly useful in clinical settings.

  16. Calculating the Candy Price Index: A Classroom Inflation Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hazlett, Denise; Hill, Cynthia D.

    2003-01-01

    Outlines how students develop a price index based on candy-purchasing decisions made by class members. Explains that students used the index to practice calculating inflation rates and to consider the strengths and weaknesses of the consumer price index (CPI). States that the exercise has been used in introductory and intermediate macroeconomics…

  17. Body shape index versus body mass index as correlates of health risk in young healthy sedentary men.

    PubMed

    Malara, Marzena; Kęska, Anna; Tkaczyk, Joanna; Lutosławska, Grażyna

    2015-01-01

    Recently a new simply calculated index of body composition -a body shape index (ABSI) has been introduced as an index more reliable than BMI of association between body composition and all-cause mortality. However, until now associations between ABSI and metabolic risk factors have not been evaluated. A total of 114 male university students not engaged in any planned physical activity participated in the present study. Anthropometric measurements (weight, height, waist circumference) were recorded. Body mass index (BMI) was calculated from weight and height, body shape index (ABSI) was calculated from waist circumference, weight, height and BMI. Blood was withdrawn after an overnight fast from the antecubital vein. Triacylglycerols, total cholesterol and HDL-cholesterol levels in plasma were determined using colorimetric methods and Randox commercial kits. Plasma LDL-cholesterol concentrations were calculated according to the Friedewald formula. Circulating insulin was assayed using a standard radioimmunological method with monoclonal antibodies against insulin and BioSource commercial kits. BMI was slightly, but significantly correlated only with circulating TG (r=0.330, p < 0.001) In contrast, ABSI was slightly, but significantly correlated with plasma levels of insulin (r=0.360, p<0.001), TC (r=0.270, p<0.002), LDL-C and non-HDL-C (r=0.300, p<0.001). In participants at the upper quartile of BMI circulating TG was higher (by 50%, p<0.05) than in their counterparts at the lower BMI quartile. Subjects representing the upper quartile of ABSI were characterized by higher plasma levels of insulin, TC, LDL-C and non-HDL in comparison with subjects at the lower ABSI quartile. (by 92 %, 11. %, 29 % and 21 % respectively, p<0.001). ABSI, a new simply calculated index of body fat seems to more accurately depict the variability in circulating insulin and lipoproteins than BMI at least in young, healthy male subjects. PMID:25890016

  18. RAPID TECHNIQUES FOR CALCULATING THE POLLUTANT STANDARDS INDEX (PSI)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rapid techniques for calculating the Pollutant Standards Index (PSI) for daily public reporting of air quality are discussed. A complete set of original nomograms for calculating the PSI in gravimetric or volumetric units is presented. The nomograms are recommended for use by all...

  19. The vulnerability index calculation for determination of groundwater quality

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtz, D.A.; Parizek, R.R.

    1995-12-01

    Non-point source pollutants, such as pesticides, enter groundwater systems in a variety of means at wide-ranging concentrations. Risks in using groundwater in human consumption vary depending on the amounts of contaminants, the type of groundwater aquifer, and various use factors. We have devised a method of determining the vulnerability of an aquifer towards contamination with the Vulnerability Index. The Index can be used either as a comparative or an absolute index (comparative with a pure water source or aquifer spring or without comparison, assuming no peaks in the compared sample). Data for the calculation is obtained by extraction of a given water sample followed by analysis with a nitrogen/phosphorus detector on gas chromatography. The calculation uses the sum of peak heights as its determination. An additional peak number factor is added to emphasize higher numbers of compounds found in a given sample. Karst aquifers are considered to be highly vulnerable due to the large solution openings in its structure. Examples will be given of Vulnerability Indices taken from springs emanating from karst, intermediate, and diffuse flow aquifers taken at various times of the 1992 sampling year and compared with rainfall during that time. Comparisons will be made of the Index vs. rainfall events and vs. pesticide application data. The risk of using contaminated drinking water sources can be evaluated with the use of this index.

  20. New approaches for calculating Moran's index of spatial autocorrelation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yanguang

    2013-01-01

    Spatial autocorrelation plays an important role in geographical analysis; however, there is still room for improvement of this method. The formula for Moran's index is complicated, and several basic problems remain to be solved. Therefore, I will reconstruct its mathematical framework using mathematical derivation based on linear algebra and present four simple approaches to calculating Moran's index. Moran's scatterplot will be ameliorated, and new test methods will be proposed. The relationship between the global Moran's index and Geary's coefficient will be discussed from two different vantage points: spatial population and spatial sample. The sphere of applications for both Moran's index and Geary's coefficient will be clarified and defined. One of theoretical findings is that Moran's index is a characteristic parameter of spatial weight matrices, so the selection of weight functions is very significant for autocorrelation analysis of geographical systems. A case study of 29 Chinese cities in 2000 will be employed to validate the innovatory models and methods. This work is a methodological study, which will simplify the process of autocorrelation analysis. The results of this study will lay the foundation for the scaling analysis of spatial autocorrelation. PMID:23874592

  1. A loudness calculation procedure applied to shaped sonic booms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, Kevin P.; Sullivan, Brenda M.

    1991-01-01

    Described here is a procedure that can be used to calculate the loudness of sonic booms. The procedure is applied to a wide range of sonic booms, both classical N-waves and a variety of other shapes of booms. The loudness of N-waves is controlled by overpressure and the associated rise time. The loudness of shaped booms is highly dependent on the characteristics of the initial shock. A comparison of the calculated loudness values indicates that shaped booms may have significantly reduced loudness relative to N-waves having the same peak overpressure. This result implies that a supersonic transport designed to yield minimized sonic booms may be substantially more acceptable than an unconstrained design.

  2. Introducing "UCA-FUKUI" software: reactivity-index calculations.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Márquez, Jesús; Zorrilla, David; Sánchez-Coronilla, Antonio; de los Santos, Desireé M; Navas, Javier; Fernández-Lorenzo, Concha; Alcántara, Rodrigo; Martín-Calleja, Joaquín

    2014-11-01

    A new software (UCA-FUKUI) has been developed to facilitate the theoretical study of chemical reactivity. This program can calculate global parameters like hardness, softness, philicities, and Fukui condensed functions, and also local parameters from the condensed functions. To facilitate access to the program we have developed a very easy-to-use interface. We have tested the performance of the software by calculating the global and local reactivity indexes of a group of representative molecules. Finite difference and frontier molecular orbital methods were compared and their correlation tested. Finally, we have extended the analysis to a set of ligands of importance in coordination chemistry, and the results are compared with the exact calculation. As a general trend, our study shows the existence of a high correlation between global parameters, but a weaker correlation between local parameters. PMID:25338819

  3. On the local operational geomagnetic index K calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stankov, Stan; Stegen, Koen; Wautelet, Gilles; Warnant, Rene

    2010-05-01

    There is an ongoing demand for services that can provide real-time assessment of the (global and local) geomagnetic activity and identified as being of importance to the exploration geophysics, radio communications and precise position/navigation practices, space weather research and modelling, etc. Such services depend largely on the reduction of solar, geomagnetic and ionospheric observations to generate activity indices, one of the most widely used being the K index. The K index is a quasi-logarithmic index characterising the 3-hourly range in transient magnetic activity relative to the regular "quiet-day" activity for a single site location. A derivative "planetary" index (Kp), the mean standardized K index from several globally distributed stations, provides a convenient measure of the global geomagnetic activity. Computer-based derivation of K/Kp indices was a major step towards higher efficiency and lower costs. Nowadays, automated data acquisition, processing and generating the index in real time is mandatory for any reliable service. However, Kp may not be accurate enough when monitoring disturbances of smaller scale, so the local K index (derived from the nearest magnetic station/s) might be considered as the better choice. Moreover, the 3-hour time scale is much larger than the shorter characteristic time of localised ionospheric phenomena that are of particular interest to us. Our experience in developing a novel nowcast system for local operational geomagnetic index K calculation (K-LOGIC) will be presented. The system is based on a fully automated computer procedure for real-time digital magnetogram data acquisition, screening the dataset and removing the outliers, establishing the solar regular (Sr) variation of the geomagnetic field, calculating the K index, and issuing an alert if storm-level activity is indicated. This is a time-controlled (rather than event-driven) system delivering as regular output (time resolution set to 1 hour) the K value

  4. A body shape index and heart rate variability in healthy indians with low body mass index.

    PubMed

    Sowmya, Sharma; Thomas, Tinku; Bharathi, Ankalmadagu Venkatsubbareddy; Sucharita, Sambashivaiah

    2014-01-01

    Background. One third of Indian population is said to be suffering from chronic energy deficiency (CED), with increased risk of developing chronic diseases. A new anthropometric measure called A Body Shape Index (ABSI) is said to be a better index in predicting risks for premature mortality. ABSI is also in part said to be a surrogate of visceral fat. Objective. The present study aimed to explore the association between indices of HRV (heart rate variability), BMI, WC, and ABSI in healthy Indian males with low BMI (BMI < 18.5 kg/m(2)) and to compare with normal BMI group (BMI 18.5 to 24.9 kg/m(2)). Methodology. ABSI and BMI were derived from anthropometric parameters, namely, height, weight, and waist circumference in 178 males aged 18 to 78 years. Subjects were categorized into two groups based on their BMI. Results and Conclusions. Power spectral analysis of HRV demonstrated a significant negative correlation between Log HF (high frequency) and ABSI in both low BMI [-24.2 (9.4), P < 0.05] and normal BMI group [-23.41 (10.1), P < 0.05] even after controlling for age. Thus even with slight increase in BMI among low BMI individuals, there could be a greater risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. PMID:25371818

  5. A Body Shape Index and Heart Rate Variability in Healthy Indians with Low Body Mass Index

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Tinku; Bharathi, Ankalmadagu Venkatsubbareddy; Sucharita, Sambashivaiah

    2014-01-01

    Background. One third of Indian population is said to be suffering from chronic energy deficiency (CED), with increased risk of developing chronic diseases. A new anthropometric measure called A Body Shape Index (ABSI) is said to be a better index in predicting risks for premature mortality. ABSI is also in part said to be a surrogate of visceral fat. Objective. The present study aimed to explore the association between indices of HRV (heart rate variability), BMI, WC, and ABSI in healthy Indian males with low BMI (BMI < 18.5 kg/m2) and to compare with normal BMI group (BMI 18.5 to 24.9 kg/m2). Methodology. ABSI and BMI were derived from anthropometric parameters, namely, height, weight, and waist circumference in 178 males aged 18 to 78 years. Subjects were categorized into two groups based on their BMI. Results and Conclusions. Power spectral analysis of HRV demonstrated a significant negative correlation between Log HF (high frequency) and ABSI in both low BMI [−24.2 (9.4), P < 0.05] and normal BMI group [−23.41 (10.1), P < 0.05] even after controlling for age. Thus even with slight increase in BMI among low BMI individuals, there could be a greater risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. PMID:25371818

  6. Intersubband transitions and refractive index changes in coupled double quantum well with different well shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozturk, Emine; Sokmen, Ismail

    2011-10-01

    In this study, both the linear intersubband transitions and the refractive index changes in coupled double quantum well (DQW) with different well shapes for different electric fields are theoretically calculated within framework of the effective mass approximation. Results obtained show that intersubband transitions and the energy levels in coupled DQW can importantly be modified and controlled by the electric field strength and direction. By considering the variation of the energy differences, it should point out that by varying electric field we can obtain a blue or red shift in the intersubband optical transitions. The modulation of the absorption coefficients and the refractive index changes which can be suitable for good performance optical modulators and various infrared optical device applications can be easy obtained by tuning applied electric field strength and direction.

  7. Calculating nonlocal optical properties of structures with arbitrary shape.

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon, J. M.; Gray, S. K.; Schatz, G. C.; Northwestern Univ.

    2010-07-16

    In a recent Letter [J. M. McMahon, S. K. Gray, and G. C. Schatz, Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 097403 (2009)], we outlined a computational method to calculate the optical properties of structures with a spatially nonlocal dielectric function. In this paper, we detail the full method and verify it against analytical results for cylindrical nanowires. Then, as examples of our method, we calculate the optical properties of Au nanostructures in one, two, and three dimensions. We first calculate the transmission, reflection, and absorption spectra of thin films. Because of their simplicity, these systems demonstrate clearly the longitudinal (or volume) plasmons characteristic of nonlocal effects, which result in anomalous absorption and plasmon blueshifting. We then study the optical properties of spherical nanoparticles, which also exhibit such nonlocal effects. Finally, we compare the maximum and average electric field enhancements around nanowires of various shapes to local theory predictions. We demonstrate that when nonlocal effects are included, significant decreases in such properties can occur.

  8. Body Mass Index: Calculator for Child and Teen

    MedlinePlus

    ... Link BMI Percentile Calculator for Child and Teen English Version Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... At Home BMI Calculator for Child and Teen ( English | Metric ) 1. Birth Date : Month: Day: Year: 2. ...

  9. 5 CFR 591.220 - How does OPM calculate energy utility cost indexes?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false How does OPM calculate energy utility... Areas Cost-Of-Living Allowances § 591.220 How does OPM calculate energy utility cost indexes? (a) OPM calculates energy utility cost indexes based on the relative cost of maintaining a standard size dwelling...

  10. 5 CFR 591.220 - How does OPM calculate energy utility cost indexes?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false How does OPM calculate energy utility... Areas Cost-Of-Living Allowances § 591.220 How does OPM calculate energy utility cost indexes? (a) OPM calculates energy utility cost indexes based on the relative cost of maintaining a standard size dwelling...

  11. 5 CFR 591.220 - How does OPM calculate energy utility cost indexes?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false How does OPM calculate energy utility... Areas Cost-Of-Living Allowances § 591.220 How does OPM calculate energy utility cost indexes? (a) OPM calculates energy utility cost indexes based on the relative cost of maintaining a standard size dwelling...

  12. 5 CFR 591.220 - How does OPM calculate energy utility cost indexes?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false How does OPM calculate energy utility... Areas Cost-Of-Living Allowances § 591.220 How does OPM calculate energy utility cost indexes? (a) OPM calculates energy utility cost indexes based on the relative cost of maintaining a standard size dwelling...

  13. 5 CFR 591.220 - How does OPM calculate energy utility cost indexes?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false How does OPM calculate energy utility... Areas Cost-Of-Living Allowances § 591.220 How does OPM calculate energy utility cost indexes? (a) OPM calculates energy utility cost indexes based on the relative cost of maintaining a standard size dwelling...

  14. A short note on calculating the adjusted SAR index

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A simple algebraic technique is presented for computing the adjusted SAR Index proposed by Suarez (1981). The statistical formula presented in this note facilitates the computation of the adjusted SAR without the use of either a look-up table, custom computer software or the need to compute exact a...

  15. Calculation of the room-temperature shapes of unsymmetric laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyer, M. W.

    1981-01-01

    A theory explaining the characteristics of the cured shapes of unsymmetric laminates is presented. The theory is based on an extension of classical lamination theory which accounts for geometric nonlinearities. A Rayleigh-Ritz approach to minimizing the total potential energy is used to obtain quantitative information regarding the room temperature shapes of square T300/5208 (0(2)/90(2))T and (0(4)/90(4))T graphite-epoxy laminates. It is shown that, depending on the thickness of the laminate and the length of the side the square, the saddle shape configuration is actually unstable. For values of length and thickness that render the saddle shape unstable, it is shown that two stable cylindrical shapes exist. The predictions of the theory are compared with existing experimental data.

  16. Modulation index for VMAT considering both mechanical and dose calculation uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jong Min; Park, So-Yeon; Kim, Hyoungnyoun

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study is to present a modulation index considering both mechanical and dose calculation uncertainties for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). As a modulation index considering only mechanical uncertainty of VMAT, MIt has been previously suggested. In this study, we developed a weighting factor which represents dose calculation uncertainty based on the aperture shapes of fluence maps at every control point of VMAT plans. In order to calculate the weighting factor, the thinning algorithm of image processing techniques was applied to measure field aperture irregularity. By combining this weighting factor with the previously suggested modulation index, MIt, comprehensive modulation index (MIc) was designed. To evaluate the performance of MIc, gamma passing rates, differences in mechanical parameters between plans and log files and differences in dose-volume parameters between plans and the plans reconstructed from log files were acquired with a total of 52 VMAT plans. Spearman’s correlation coefficients (rs) between the values of MIc and measures of VMAT delivery accuracy were calculated. The rs values of MIc (f = 0.5) to global gamma passing rates with 2%/2 mm, 1%/2 mm and 2%/1 mm were  -0.728,-0.847 and  -0.617, respectively (p  <  0.001). Those to local gamma passing rates were  -0.765,-0.767 and  -0.748, respectively (p  <  0.001). The rs values of MIc (f = 0.5) to multi-leaf collimator and gantry angle errors were 0.800 and  -0.712, respectively (p  <  0.001). The MIc (f = 0.5) showed a total of 20 rs values (p  <  0.05) to the differences in dose-volumetric parameters from a total of 35 tested cases. The MIc (f = 0.5) demonstrated considerable power to predict VMAT delivery accuracy showing strong correlations to various measures of VMAT delivery accuracy.

  17. Modulation index for VMAT considering both mechanical and dose calculation uncertainties.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong Min; Park, So-Yeon; Kim, Hyoungnyoun

    2015-09-21

    The aim of this study is to present a modulation index considering both mechanical and dose calculation uncertainties for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). As a modulation index considering only mechanical uncertainty of VMAT, MIt has been previously suggested. In this study, we developed a weighting factor which represents dose calculation uncertainty based on the aperture shapes of fluence maps at every control point of VMAT plans. In order to calculate the weighting factor, the thinning algorithm of image processing techniques was applied to measure field aperture irregularity. By combining this weighting factor with the previously suggested modulation index, MIt, comprehensive modulation index (MIc) was designed. To evaluate the performance of MIc, gamma passing rates, differences in mechanical parameters between plans and log files and differences in dose-volume parameters between plans and the plans reconstructed from log files were acquired with a total of 52 VMAT plans. Spearman's correlation coefficients (rs) between the values of MIc and measures of VMAT delivery accuracy were calculated. The rs values of MIc (f = 0.5) to global gamma passing rates with 2%/2 mm, 1%/2 mm and 2%/1 mm were  -0.728,-0.847 and  -0.617, respectively (p  <  0.001). Those to local gamma passing rates were  -0.765,-0.767 and  -0.748, respectively (p  <  0.001). The rs values of MIc (f = 0.5) to multi-leaf collimator and gantry angle errors were 0.800 and  -0.712, respectively (p  <  0.001). The MIc (f = 0.5) showed a total of 20 rs values (p  <  0.05) to the differences in dose-volumetric parameters from a total of 35 tested cases. The MIc (f = 0.5) demonstrated considerable power to predict VMAT delivery accuracy showing strong correlations to various measures of VMAT delivery accuracy. PMID:26317697

  18. The Calculation of Adsorption Isotherms from Chromatographic Peak Shapes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neumann, M. G.

    1976-01-01

    Discusses the relationship between adsorption isotherms and elution peak shapes in gas chromatography, and describes a laboratory experiment which involves the adsorption of hexane, cyclohexane, and benzene on alumina at different temperatures. (MLH)

  19. A THREE-DIMENSIONAL NUMERICAL SOLUTION FOR THE SHAPE OF A ROTATIONALLY DISTORTED POLYTROPE OF INDEX UNITY

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Dali; Zhang, Keke; Schubert, Gerald; Anderson, John E-mail: K.Zhang@exeter.ac.uk

    2013-02-15

    We present a new three-dimensional numerical method for calculating the non-spherical shape and internal structure of a model of a rapidly rotating gaseous body with a polytropic index of unity. The calculation is based on a finite-element method and accounts for the full effects of rotation. After validating the numerical approach against the asymptotic solution of Chandrasekhar that is valid only for a slowly rotating gaseous body, we apply it to models of Jupiter and a rapidly rotating, highly flattened star ({alpha} Eridani). In the case of Jupiter, the two-dimensional distributions of density and pressure are determined via a hybrid inverse approach by adjusting an a priori unknown coefficient in the equation of state until the model shape matches the observed shape of Jupiter. After obtaining the two-dimensional distribution of density, we then compute the zonal gravity coefficients and the total mass from the non-spherical model that takes full account of rotation-induced shape change. Our non-spherical model with a polytropic index of unity is able to produce the known mass of Jupiter with about 4% accuracy and the zonal gravitational coefficient J {sub 2} of Jupiter with better than 2% accuracy, a reasonable result considering that there is only one parameter in the model. For {alpha} Eridani, we calculate its rotationally distorted shape and internal structure based on the observationally deduced rotation rate and size of the star by using a similar hybrid inverse approach. Our model of the star closely approximates the observed flattening.

  20. Surface-Based Body Shape Index and Its Relationship with All-Cause Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Syed Ashiqur; Adjeroh, Donald

    2015-01-01

    Background Obesity is a global public health challenge. In the US, for instance, obesity prevalence remains high at more than one-third of the adult population, while over two-thirds are obese or overweight. Obesity is associated with various health problems, such as diabetes, cardiovascular diseases (CVDs), depression, some forms of cancer, sleep apnea, osteoarthritis, among others. The body mass index (BMI) is one of the best known measures of obesity. The BMI, however, has serious limitations, for instance, its inability to capture the distribution of lean mass and adipose tissue, which is a better predictor of diabetes and CVDs, and its curved (“U-shaped”) relationship with mortality hazard. Other anthropometric measures and their relation to obesity have been studied, each with its advantages and limitations. In this work, we introduce a new anthropometric measure (called Surface-based Body Shape Index, SBSI) that accounts for both body shape and body size, and evaluate its performance as a predictor of all-cause mortality. Methods and Findings We analyzed data on 11,808 subjects (ages 18–85), from the National Health and Human Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 1999–2004, with 8-year mortality follow up. Based on the analysis, we introduce a new body shape index constructed from four important anthropometric determinants of body shape and body size: body surface area (BSA), vertical trunk circumference (VTC), height (H) and waist circumference (WC). The surface-based body shape index (SBSI) is defined as follows: SBSI=(H7/4)(WC5/6)BSAVTC(1) SBSI has negative correlation with BMI and weight respectively, no correlation with WC, and shows a generally linear relationship with age. Results on mortality hazard prediction using both the Cox proportionality model, and Kaplan-Meier curves each show that SBSI outperforms currently popular body shape indices (e.g., BMI, WC, waist-to-height ratio (WHtR), waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), A Body Shape Index (ABSI)) in

  1. A Multi-D-Shaped Optical Fiber for Refractive Index Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chien-Hsing; Tsao, Tzu-Chein; Tang, Jaw-Luen; Wu, Wei-Te

    2010-01-01

    A novel class of multi-D-shaped optical fiber suited for refractive index measurements is presented. The multi-D-shaped optical fiber was constructed by forming several D-sections in a multimode optical fiber at localized regions with femtosecond laser pulses. The total number of D-shaped zones fabricated could range from three to seven. Each D-shaped zone covered a sensor volume of 100 μm depth, 250 μm width, and 1 mm length. The mean roughness of the core surface obtained by the AFM images was 231.7 nm, which is relatively smooth. Results of the tensile test indicated that the fibers have sufficient mechanical strength to resist damage from further processing. The multi-D-shaped optical fiber as a high sensitive refractive-index sensor to detect changes in the surrounding refractive index was studied. The results for different concentrations of sucrose solution show that a resolution of 1.27 × 10−3–3.13 × 10−4 RIU is achieved for refractive indices in the range of 1.333 to 1.403, suggesting that the multi-D-shaped fibers are attractive for chemical, biological, and biochemical sensing with aqueous solutions. PMID:22399908

  2. Shape index distribution based local surface complexity applied to the human cortex

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sun Hyung; Fonov, Vladimir; Collins, D. Louis; Gerig, Guido; Styner, Martin A.

    2015-01-01

    The quantification of local surface complexity in the human cortex has shown to be of interest in investigating population differences as well as developmental changes in neurodegenerative or neurodevelopment diseases. We propose a novel assessment method that represents local complexity as the difference between the observed distributions of local surface topology to its best-fit basic topology model within a given local neighborhood. This distribution difference is estimated via Earth Move Distance (EMD) over the histogram within the local neighborhood of the surface topology quantified via the Shape Index (SI) measure. The EMD scores have a range from simple complexity (0.0), which indicates a consistent local surface topology, up to high complexity (1.0), which indicates a highly variable local surface topology. The basic topology models are categorized as 9 geometric situation modeling situations such as crowns, ridges and fundi of cortical gyro and sulci. We apply a geodesic kernel to calculate the local SI histrogram distribution within a given region. In our experiments, we obtained the results of local complexity that shows generally higher complexity in the gyral/sulcal wall regions and lower complexity in some gyral ridges and lowest complexity in sulcal fundus areas. In addition, we show expected, preliminary results of increased surface complexity across most of the cortical surface within the first years of postnatal life, hypothesized to be due to the changes such as development of sulcal pits. PMID:26028803

  3. The eye lens: age-related trends and individual variations in refractive index and shape parameters.

    PubMed

    Pierscionek, Barbara; Bahrami, Mehdi; Hoshino, Masato; Uesugi, Kentaro; Regini, Justyn; Yagi, Naoto

    2015-10-13

    The eye lens grows throughout life by cell accrual on its surface and can change shape to adjust the focussing power of the eye. Varying concentrations of proteins in successive cell layers create a refractive index gradient. The continued growth of the lens and age-related changes in proteins render it less able to alter shape with loss of capacity by the end of the sixth decade of life. Growth and protein ageing alter the refractive index but as accurate measurement of this parameter is difficult, the nature of such alterations remains uncertain. The most accurate method to date for measuring refractive index in intact lenses has been developed at the SPring-8 synchrotron. The technique, based on Talbot interferometry, has an X-ray source and was used to measure refractive index in sixty-six human lenses, aged from 16 to 91 years. Height and width were measured for forty-five lenses. Refractive index contours show decentration in some older lenses but individual variations mask age-related trends. Refractive index profiles along the optic axis have relatively flat central sections with distinct micro-fluctuations and a steep gradient in the cortex but do not exhibit an age-related trend. The refractive index profiles in the equatorial aspect show statistical significance with age, particularly for lenses below the age of sixty that had capacity to alter shape in vivo. The maximum refractive index in the lens centre decreases slightly with age with considerable scatter in the data and there are age-related variations in sagittal thickness and equatorial height. PMID:26416418

  4. The eye lens: age-related trends and individual variations in refractive index and shape parameters

    PubMed Central

    Pierscionek, Barbara; Bahrami, Mehdi; Hoshino, Masato; Uesugi, Kentaro; Regini, Justyn; Yagi, Naoto

    2015-01-01

    The eye lens grows throughout life by cell accrual on its surface and can change shape to adjust the focussing power of the eye. Varying concentrations of proteins in successive cell layers create a refractive index gradient. The continued growth of the lens and age-related changes in proteins render it less able to alter shape with loss of capacity by the end of the sixth decade of life. Growth and protein ageing alter the refractive index but as accurate measurement of this parameter is difficult, the nature of such alterations remains uncertain. The most accurate method to date for measuring refractive index in intact lenses has been developed at the SPring-8 synchrotron. The technique, based on Talbot interferometry, has an X-ray source and was used to measure refractive index in sixty-six human lenses, aged from 16 to 91 years. Height and width were measured for forty-five lenses. Refractive index contours show decentration in some older lenses but individual variations mask age-related trends. Refractive index profiles along the optic axis have relatively flat central sections with distinct micro-fluctuations and a steep gradient in the cortex but do not exhibit an age-related trend. The refractive index profiles in the equatorial aspect show statistical significance with age, particularly for lenses below the age of sixty that had capacity to alter shape in vivo. The maximum refractive index in the lens centre decreases slightly with age with considerable scatter in the data and there are age-related variations in sagittal thickness and equatorial height. PMID:26416418

  5. H-Index of Astrophysicists at Raman Research Institute: Performance of Different Calculators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meera, B. M.; Manjunath, M.

    2012-08-01

    H-index, a single number proposed by J. E. Hirsch in 2005 has gained popularity as an index number to measure the research performance of individuals, institutions, universities, etc. There are many calculators to derive the h-in dex number, such as Google Scholar, Web of Science, Scopus, etc. However, h-index can be calculated manually, provided we have access to a complete list of publications of a scientist and the number of citations received by them. It is observed that h-index for a given scientist at a ny given point of time differs from one calculator to the other. Here is an attempt to calculate the H-index of scientists of the Astronomy and Astrophysics Group at Raman Research Institute using Google Scholar Free calculator, Web of Science Paid calculator and The SAO/NASA As trophysics Data System manual calculation and comparison of the results. Application of this h- index phenomenon to the research output of RRI scientists in a group is done while keeping in mi nd Hirsch's systematic in vestigation to predict the position of a scientist using h-index in physics. It is believed that the higher the academic age of a scientist, the higher will be the h-index. An attempt is made to find whether this assumption is true with respect to the sample studied by including the superannuated scientists from Astronomy and Astrophysics Group at Raman Research Institute under the purview of this study.

  6. Detecting Growth Shape Misspecifications in Latent Growth Models: An Evaluation of Fit Indexes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leite, Walter L.; Stapleton, Laura M.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the authors compared the likelihood ratio test and fit indexes for detection of misspecifications of growth shape in latent growth models through a simulation study and a graphical analysis. They found that the likelihood ratio test, MFI, and root mean square error of approximation performed best for detecting model misspecification…

  7. Object signature curve and invariant shape patches for geometric indexing into pictorial databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Zhibin; Tasdizen, Tolga; Cooper, David B.

    1997-10-01

    Implicit polynomials (IPs) are among the most effective representations for modeling and recognition of complex geometric shape structures because of their stability, robustness and invariant characteristics. In this paper, we describe an approach for geometric indexing into pictorial databases using IP representations. We discuss in detail a breakthrough in invariant decomposition of a complex object shape into manageable pieces or patches. The self and mutual invariants of those invariant patches can be then used as geometric indexing features vectors. The new concept of invariant signature curve for complex shapes ins developed that captures the semi-global algebraic structure of the object and has the advantage of being able to deal with multi-scale and object occlusion.

  8. Simulation of imperfections in plastic lenses - transferring local refractive index changes into surface shape modifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arasa, Josep; Pizarro, Carles; Blanco, Patricia

    2016-06-01

    Injection molded plastic lenses have continuously improved their performance regarding optical quality and nowadays are as usual as glass lenses in image forming devices. However, during the manufacturing process unavoidable fluctuations in material density occur, resulting in local changes in the distribution of refractive index, which degrade the imaging properties of the polymer lens. Such material density fluctuations correlate to phase delays, which opens a path for their mapping. However, it is difficult to transfer the measured variations in refractive index into conventional optical simulation tool. Thus, we propose a method to convert the local variations in refractive index into local changes of one surface of the lens, which can then be described as a free-form surface, easy to introduce in conventional simulation tools. The proposed method was tested on a commercial gradient index (GRIN) lens for a set of six different object positions, using the MTF sagittal and tangential cuts to compare the differences between the real lens and a lens with homogenous refractive index, and the last surface converted into a free-form shape containing the internal refractive index changes. The same procedure was used to reproduce the local refractive index changes of an injected plastic lens with local index changes measured using an in-house built polariscopic arrangement, showing the capability of the method to provide successful results.

  9. FlowShape: a runoff connectivity index for patched environments, based on shape and orientation of runoff sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callegaro, Chiara; Malkinson, Dan; Ursino, Nadia; Wittenberg, Lea

    2016-04-01

    The properties of vegetation cover are recognized to be a key factor in determining runoff processes and yield over natural areas. Still, how the actual vegetation spatial distribution affects these processes is not completely understood. In Mediterranean semi-arid regions, patched landscapes are often found, with clumped vegetation, grass or shrubs, surrounded by bare soil patches. These two phases produce a sink-source system for runoff, as precipitation falling over bare areas barely infiltrates and rather flows downslope. In contrast, vegetated patches have high infiltrability and can partially retain the runon water. We hypothesize that, at a relatively small scale, the shape and orientation of bare soil patches with respect to the runoff flow direction is a significant for the connectivity of the runoff flow paths, and consequently for runoff values. We derive an index, FlowShape, which is candidate to be a good proxy for runoff connectivity and thus runoff production in patched environments. FlowShape is an area-weighted average of the geometrical properties of each bare soil patch. Eight experimental plots in northern Israel were monitored during 2 years after a wildfire which occurred in 2006. Runoff was collected and measured - along with rainfall depth - after each rainfall event, at different levels of vegetation cover corresponding to post-fire recovery of vegetation and seasonality. We obtained a good correlation between FlowShape and the runoff coefficient, at two conditions: a minimal percentage of vegetation cover over the plot, and minimal rainfall depth. Our results support the hypothesis that the spatial distribution of the two phases (vegetation and bare soil) in patched landscapes dictates, at least partially, runoff yield. The correlation between the runoff coefficient and FlowShape, which accounts for shape and orientation of soil patches, is higher than the correlation between the runoff coefficient and the bare soil percentage alone

  10. Water quality index calculated from biological, physical and chemical attributes.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Francisco Cleiton; Andrade, Eunice Maia; Lopes, Fernando Bezerra

    2015-01-01

    To ensure a safe drinking water supply, it is necessary to protect water quality. To classify the suitability of the Orós Reservoir (Northeast of Brazil) water for human consumption, a Water Quality Index (WQI) was enhanced and refined through a Principal Component Analysis (PCA). Samples were collected bi-monthly at seven points (P1 - P7) from July 2009 to July 2011. Samples were analysed for 29 physico-chemical attributes and 4 macroinvertebrate metrics associated with the macrophytes Pistia stratiotes and Eichhornia crassipes. PCA allowed us to reduce the number of attributes from 33 to 12, and 85.32% of the variance was explained in five dimensions (C1 - C5). Components C1 and C3 were related to water-soluble salts and reflect the weathering process, while C2 was related to surface runoff. C4 was associated with macroinvertebrate diversity, represented by ten pollution-resistant families. C5 was related to the nutrient phosphorus, an indicator of the degree of eutrophication. The mean values for the WQIs ranged from 49 to 65 (rated as fair), indicating that water can be used for human consumption after treatment. The lowest values for the WQI were recorded at the entry points to the reservoir (P3, P1, P5, and P4), while the best WQIs were recorded at the exit points (P6 and P7), highlighting the reservoir's purification ability. The proposed WQI adequately expressed water quality, and can be used for monitoring surface water quality. PMID:25492707

  11. Calculations of oxide formation on low-index Cu surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Xin; Xiao, Penghao; Yang, Sheng-Che; Liu, Renlong; Henkelman, Graeme

    2016-07-01

    Density-functional theory is used to evaluate the mechanism of copper surface oxidation. Reaction pathways of O2 dissociation on the surface and oxidation of the sub-surface are found on the Cu(100), Cu(110), and Cu(111) facets. At low oxygen coverage, all three surfaces dissociate O2 spontaneously. As oxygen accumulates on the surfaces, O2 dissociation becomes more difficult. A bottleneck to further oxidation occurs when the surfaces are saturated with oxygen. The barriers for O2 dissociation on the O-saturated Cu(100)-c(2×2)-0.5 monolayer (ML) and Cu(100) missing-row structures are 0.97 eV and 0.75 eV, respectively; significantly lower than those have been reported previously. Oxidation of Cu(110)-c(6×2), the most stable (110) surface oxide, has a barrier of 0.72 eV. As the reconstructions grow from step edges, clean Cu(110) surfaces can dissociatively adsorb oxygen until the surface Cu atoms are saturated. After slight rearrangements, these surface areas form a "1 ML" oxide structure which has not been reported in the literature. The barrier for further oxidation of this "1 ML" phase is only 0.31 eV. Finally the oxidized Cu(111) surface has a relatively low reaction energy barrier for O2 dissociation, even at high oxygen coverage, and allows for facile oxidation of the subsurface by fast O diffusion through the surface oxide. The kinetic mechanisms found provide a qualitative explanation of the observed oxidation of the low-index Cu surfaces.

  12. Calculations of oxide formation on low-index Cu surfaces.

    PubMed

    Lian, Xin; Xiao, Penghao; Yang, Sheng-Che; Liu, Renlong; Henkelman, Graeme

    2016-07-28

    Density-functional theory is used to evaluate the mechanism of copper surface oxidation. Reaction pathways of O2 dissociation on the surface and oxidation of the sub-surface are found on the Cu(100), Cu(110), and Cu(111) facets. At low oxygen coverage, all three surfaces dissociate O2 spontaneously. As oxygen accumulates on the surfaces, O2 dissociation becomes more difficult. A bottleneck to further oxidation occurs when the surfaces are saturated with oxygen. The barriers for O2 dissociation on the O-saturated Cu(100)-c(2×2)-0.5 monolayer (ML) and Cu(100) missing-row structures are 0.97 eV and 0.75 eV, respectively; significantly lower than those have been reported previously. Oxidation of Cu(110)-c(6×2), the most stable (110) surface oxide, has a barrier of 0.72 eV. As the reconstructions grow from step edges, clean Cu(110) surfaces can dissociatively adsorb oxygen until the surface Cu atoms are saturated. After slight rearrangements, these surface areas form a "1 ML" oxide structure which has not been reported in the literature. The barrier for further oxidation of this "1 ML" phase is only 0.31 eV. Finally the oxidized Cu(111) surface has a relatively low reaction energy barrier for O2 dissociation, even at high oxygen coverage, and allows for facile oxidation of the subsurface by fast O diffusion through the surface oxide. The kinetic mechanisms found provide a qualitative explanation of the observed oxidation of the low-index Cu surfaces. PMID:27475390

  13. Shape L’Âne Rouge: Sliding Wavelets for Indexing and Retrieval

    PubMed Central

    Peter, Adrian; Rangarajan, Anand; Ho, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    Shape representation and retrieval of stored shape models are becoming increasingly more prominent in fields such as medical imaging, molecular biology and remote sensing. We present a novel framework that directly addresses the necessity for a rich and compressible shape representation, while simultaneously providing an accurate method to index stored shapes. The core idea is to represent point-set shapes as the square root of probability densities expanded in a wavelet basis. We then use this representation to develop a natural similarity metric that respects the geometry of these probability distributions, i.e. under the wavelet expansion, densities are points on a unit hypersphere and the distance between densities is given by the separating arc length. The process uses a linear assignment solver for non-rigid alignment between densities prior to matching; this has the connotation of “sliding” wavelet coefficients akin to the sliding block puzzle L’Âne Rouge. We illustrate the utility of this framework by matching shapes from the MPEG-7 data set and provide comparisons to other similarity measures, such as Euclidean distance shape distributions. PMID:20717478

  14. D-shaped fiber grating refractive index sensor induced by an ultrashort pulse laser.

    PubMed

    Liao, Changrui; Wang, Qiao; Xu, Lei; Liu, Shen; He, Jun; Zhao, Jing; Li, Zhengyong; Wang, Yiping

    2016-03-01

    The fabrication of fiber Bragg gratings was here demonstrated using ultrashort pulse laser point-by-point inscription. This is a very convenient means of creating fiber Bragg gratings with different grating periods and works by changing the translation speed of the fiber. The laser energy was first optimized in order to improve the spectral properties of the fiber gratings. Then, fiber Bragg gratings were formed into D-shaped fibers for use as refractive index sensors. A nonlinear relationship was observed between the Bragg wavelength and liquid refractive index, and a sensitivity of ∼30  nm/RIU was observed at 1.450. This shows that D-shaped fiber Bragg gratings might be used to develop promising biochemical sensors. PMID:26974608

  15. Evaluation of shape indexing methods for content-based retrieval of x-ray images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antani, Sameer; Long, L. Rodney; Thoma, George R.; Lee, Dah-Jye

    2003-01-01

    Efficient content-based image retrieval of biomedical images is a challenging problem of growing research interest. Feature representation algorithms used in indexing medical images on the pathology of interest have to address conflicting goals of reducing feature dimensionality while retaining important and often subtle biomedical features. At the Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical Communications, a R&D division of the National Library of Medicine, we are developing a content-based image retrieval system for digitized images of a collection of 17,000 cervical and lumbar x-rays taken as a part of the second National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES II). Shape is the only feature that effectively describes various pathologies identified by medical experts as being consistently and reliably found in the image collection. In order to determine if the state of the art in shape representation methods is suitable for this application, we have evaluated representative algorithms selected from the literature. The algorithms were tested on a subset of 250 vertebral shapes. In this paper we present the requirements of an ideal algorithm, define the evaluation criteria, and present the results and our analysis of the evaluation. We observe that while the shape methods perform well on visual inspection of the overall shape boundaries, they fall short in meeting the needs of determining similarity between the vertebral shapes based on the pathology.

  16. Single-mode D-shaped optical fiber sensor for the refractive index monitoring of liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qazi, Hummad Habib; Mohammad, Abu Bakar bin; Ahmad, Harith; Zamani Zulkifli, Mohd; Wadi Harun, Sulaiman

    2016-04-01

    A new fabrication method is introduced for the production of D-shaped optical fiber. A mechanical end and edge polishing system with aluminum oxide polishing film is utilized to perform sequential polishing on one side (lengthwise) of single-mode optical fiber in order to obtain a D-shaped cross section. Adjusting specific mechanical parameters allows for control of the volume of the D-shaped zone, while the fiber surface smoothness is governed by selection of polishing film grit size. To meet the accuracy and repeatability requirements, optical power loss is monitored during the entire polishing process in situ and in real time. This proposed technique possesses advantages of rapidity, safety, simplicity, repeatability and stability with high precision in comparison with contemporary methods for production. Sensor performance tests on the fiber reveal a linear response with linearity up to R2 = 0.984 for surrounding refractive index in the range of 1.320-1.342 refractive index, which corresponds to different concentrations of the glucose solution test environment. The produced D-shaped optical fiber has potential sensing and monitoring applications in chemical, environmental, biological and biochemical fields.

  17. Evaluation of 3D Gamma index calculation implemented in two commercial dosimetry systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Aitang; Arumugam, Sankar; Deshpande, Shrikant; George, Armia; Vial, Philip; Holloway, Lois; Goozee, Gary

    2015-01-01

    3D Gamma index is one of the metrics which have been widely used for clinical routine patient specific quality assurance for IMRT, Tomotherapy and VMAT. The algorithms for calculating the 3D Gamma index using global and local methods implemented in two software tools: PTW- VeriSoft® as a part of OCTIVIUS 4D dosimeter systems and 3DVHTM from Sun Nuclear were assessed. The Gamma index calculated by the two systems was compared with manual calculated for one data set. The Gamma pass rate calculated by the two systems was compared using 3%/3mm, 2%/2mm, 3%/2mm and 2%/3mm for two additional data sets. The Gamma indexes calculated by the two systems were accurate, but Gamma pass rates calculated by the two software tools for same data set with the same dose threshold were different due to the different interpolation of raw dose data by the two systems and different implementation of Gamma index calculation and other modules in the two software tools. The mean difference was -1.3%±3.38 (1SD) with a maximum difference of 11.7%.

  18. The modified equipartition calculation for supernova remnants with the spectral index α = 0.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urošević, Dejan; Pavlović, Marko Z.; Arbutina, Bojan; Dobardžić, Aleksandra

    2015-03-01

    Recently, the modified equipartition calculation for supernova remnants (SNRs) has been derived by Arbutina et al. (2012). Their formulae can be used for SNRs with the spectral indices between 0.5 < α < 1. Here, by using approximately the same analytical method, we derive the equipartition formulae useful for SNRs with spectral index α=0.5. These formulae represent next step upgrade of Arbutina et al. (2012) derivation, because among 30 Galactic SNRs with available observational parameters for the equipartition calculation, 16 have spectral index α = 0.5. For these 16 Galactic SNRs we calculated the magnetic field strengths which are approximately 40 per cent higher than those calculated by using Pacholczyk (1970) equipartition and similar to those calculated by using Beck & Krause (2005) calculation.

  19. Thermal and shape stability of high-index-faceted rhodium nanoparticles: a molecular dynamics investigation.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiang-Ming; Huang, Rao; Wen, Yu-Hua; Sun, Shi-Gang

    2015-02-28

    Nanosized noble metallic particles enclosed by high-index facets exhibit superior catalytic activity because of their high density of low-coordinated step atoms at the surface, and thus have attracted growing interest over the past decade. In this article, we employed molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the thermodynamic evolution of tetrahexahedral Rh nanoparticles respectively covered by {210}, {310}, and {830} facets during the heating process. Our results reveal that the {210} faceted nanoparticle exhibits better thermal and shape stability than the {310} and {830} faceted ones. Meanwhile, because the {830} facet consists of {210} and {310} subfacets, the stability of the {830} faceted Rh nanoparticle is dominated by the {310} subfacet, which possesses a relatively poor stability. Furthermore, the shape transformation of these nanoparticles occurs much earlier than their melting. Further analyses indicate that surface atoms with higher coordination numbers display lower surface diffusivity, and are thus more helpful for stabilizing the particle shape. This study offers an atomistic understanding of the thermodynamic behaviors of high-index-faceted Rh nanoparticles. PMID:25628229

  20. Methods to retrieve the complex refractive index of aquatic suspended particles: going beyond simple shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, Albert-Miquel; Piera, Jaume

    2016-07-01

    The scattering properties of aquatic suspended particles have many optical applications. Several data inversion methods have been proposed to estimate important features of particles, such as their size distribution or their refractive index. Most of the proposed methods are based on the Lorenz-Mie theory to solve Maxwell's equations, where particles are considered homogeneous spheres. A generalization that allows consideration of more complex-shaped particles is the T-matrix method. Although this approach imposes some geometrical restrictions (particles must be rotationally symmetrical) it is applicable to many life forms of phytoplankton. In this paper, three different scenarios are considered in order to compare the performance of several inversion methods for retrieving refractive indices. The error associated with each method is discussed and analyzed. The results suggest that inverse methods using the T-matrix approach are useful to accurately retrieve the refractive indices of particles with complex shapes, such as for many phytoplankton organisms.

  1. Comparison of K-index Calculations between Several Geomagnetic Stations during IQDs and IDDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Junga; Kim, Hang-Pyo; Park, Young-Deuk

    2013-09-01

    BOH magnetometer was installed at Mt. Bohyun in 2007 and has provided continuous dataset for 3-axis geomagnetic field over the South Korea. We have calculated real-time K-index based on BOH magnetic field data using well-known FMI method. Local K-index is calculated eight times a day, per every three hours. To calculate K-index, it is critical to get the Quiet Day Curve (QDC). For QDC calculation, we take the previous one month's average of H-component. In this paper, we compared four geomagnetic stations' magnetic field data over South Korea and Japan and K-indices of each stations; Bohyun, Gangneung, Jeju, and Kakioka for two years data, 2011-2012. To investigate the difference depending on the latitude, longitude and local time in more detail, we compare K-index on International Quiet Days (IQDs) and International Disturbed Days (IDDs). As a result, we report the correlation between local K-indices are higher than those between Kp and local K-indices, and the correlation is much better after sunset than after sunrise. As the geomagnetic activity becomes stronger, the correlation between the local K-indices and global Kp-index become higher.

  2. Ginzburg-Landau Calculations of Star-shaped Mo80Ge20 Superconducting Small Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyoshi, Hiroki; Kato, Masaru.; Huy, Ho Thanh; Dang, Vu The; Matsumoto, Hitoshi; Fujita, Norio; Ishida, Takekazu

    Our study focused on vortex states in small star-shaped Mo80Ge20 plates. Vortex states are greatly influenced by the sample geometry, temperature and magnetic field, and could be exotic. We already have conducted experimental studies on small star- shaped Mo80Ge20 plates. In this work, we present the theoretical calculations on vortex structures in star-shaped superconducting. The numerical calculations of Ginzburg-Landau equation have been carried out with the aid of the finite element method, which is convenient to treat an arbitrarily shaped superconductor. We found that good agreement between theory and experiment. A distinctive feature of a star-shaped plate predicted is that the superconductivity is destroyed from the inscribed circle of the star when the magnetic field increases. Our theoretical studies will be compared to the experimental studies.

  3. Taking into account nighttime annoyance in the calculation of the psophic index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Francois, J.

    1981-01-01

    The annoyance factor caused by air traffic noise on the residents of areas near airports is discussed. The psophic index is used to predict the level of overall annoyance suffered on the average by residents around airports. The calculation method differentiates between daytime and nighttime annoyance.

  4. Synthesis of convex hexoctahedral Pt micro/nanocrystals with high-index facets and electrochemistry-mediated shape evolution.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jing; Liu, Shuo; Tian, Na; Zhou, Zhi-You; Liu, Hai-Xia; Xu, Bin-Bin; Sun, Shi-Gang

    2013-12-18

    Systematic manipulation of nanocrystal shapes is prerequisite for revealing their shape-dependent physical and chemical properties. Here we successfully prepared a complex shape of Pt micro/nanocrystals: convex hexoctahedron (HOH) enclosed with 48 {15 5 3} high-index facets by electrochemical square-wave-potential (SWP) method. This shape is the last crystal single form that had not been achieved previously for face-centered-cubic (fcc) metals. We further realized the shape evolution of Pt nanocrystals with high-index facets from tetrahexahedron (THH) to the HOH, and finally to trapezohedron (TPH) by increasing either the upper (EU) or lower potential (EL). The shape evolution, accompanied by the decrease of low-coordinated kink atoms, can be correlated with the competitive interactions between preferentially oxidative dissolution of kink atoms at high EU and the redeposition of Pt atoms at the EL. PMID:24299234

  5. Study of shape transitions in N{approx}90 isotopes with beyond mean field calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Tomas R.; Egido, J. L.

    2009-01-28

    We study the spherical to prolate-deformed shape transition in {sup 144-158}Sm and {sup 146-160}Gd isotopes with modern calculations beyond the mean field with the Gogny D1S force. We compare the results with the shape-phase transition predicted by the collective Hamiltonian model and with the experimental data. Our calculations do not support the existence of a first order phase transition in these isotopic chains in the viewpoint of the Bohr Hamiltonian neither the interpretation of the nuclei N = 90 as critical points.

  6. Use of the SLW index to calculate growth function in the sea cucumber Isostichopus badionotus

    PubMed Central

    Poot-Salazar, Alicia; Hernández-Flores, Álvaro; Ardisson, Pedro-Luis

    2014-01-01

    Age and growth analysis is essential to fisheries management. Indirect methods to calculate growth are widely used; however, length frequency data analysis in sea cucumbers is complicated by high data variability caused by body wall elasticity. Here we calculated Isostichopus badionotus parameters of the von Bertalanffy growth function. In order to address bias produced by body wall elasticity, we compared the performance of four measurements and one compound index that combines different biometric parameters: the square root of the length-width product (SLW). Results showed that variability in length data due to body wall elasticity was controlled by using body length (Le) from the SLW compound index. Growth in I. badionotus follows a negative allometric tendency. Slow or zero growth periods were observed during October and November, when weather conditions were adverse. PMID:24909262

  7. Nanoparticle shapes by using Wulff constructions and first-principles calculations

    PubMed Central

    Barmparis, Georgios D; Lodziana, Zbigniew; Lopez, Nuria

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background: The majority of complex and advanced materials contain nanoparticles. The properties of these materials depend crucially on the size and shape of these nanoparticles. Wulff construction offers a simple method of predicting the equilibrium shape of nanoparticles given the surface energies of the material. Results: We review the mathematical formulation and the main applications of Wulff construction during the last two decades. We then focus to three recent extensions: active sites of metal nanoparticles for heterogeneous catalysis, ligand-protected nanoparticles generated as colloidal suspensions and nanoparticles of complex metal hydrides for hydrogen storage. Conclusion: Wulff construction, in particular when linked to first-principles calculations, is a powerful tool for the analysis and prediction of the shapes of nanoparticles and tailor the properties of shape-inducing species. PMID:25821675

  8. Ab-Initio Calculations of Electronic Properties and Quantum Transport in U-Shaped Graphene Nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuong, Nguyen Tien; Mizuta, Hiroshi; Cong, Bach Thanh; Otsuka, Nobuo; Chi, Dam Hieu

    2012-09-01

    Graphene is a promising candidate as a material used in nano-scale devices because of recent developments in advanced experimental techniques. Motivated by recent successful fabrications of U-shaped graphene channel transistors by using the gallium focused ion beam technology, we have performed ab-initio calculations to investigate the electronic properties and quantum transport in U-shaped graphene nanoribbons. The electronic properties are calculated using a numerical atomic orbital basis set in the framework of the density functional theory. The transport properties are investigated using the non-equilibrium Green's function method. The transmission spectra of U-shaped graphenes are analyzed in order to reveal the quantum transport of the systems. We found that the graphene nanoribbons tend to open a band gap when U-shaped structures are formed in both armchair and zigzag cases. The geometrical structures of U-shaped GNRs had enormous influences on the electron transport around the Fermi energy due to the formation of quasi-bound states at zigzag edges. The obtained results have provided valuable information for designing potential nano-scale devices based on graphenes.

  9. Field analysis and calculation of interdigital transducers with arbitrary finger shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhaohong; Tang, Tiantong; Chen, Shi; Chen, Bing

    2006-11-01

    The interdigital transducer (IDT) is a key component in surface-acoustic wave (SAW) and acousto-optical devices and has extensive applications in signal processing and optical communication at present. Properties of the acoustic field are mainly dominated by the geometric shapes of the electrodes (i.e. fingers) of the IDT and the piezoelectric characteristics of the substrate. However, the studies on excitation and acoustic wave field characteristics of IDTs are still not matured or perfect. In this paper, the 2D interface Green's function method (GFM) for simulating numerically the SAW field of IDTs with arbitrary finger shapes is presented. The electric charge densities originated from the electrostatic field and the generated SAW on the IDT electrodes are calculated first using the 2D interface GFM. Then the charge density distribution as the distributed source of SAW used to calculate the SAW field. IDT with arbitrary finger shapes can be treated. As an example, the properties of a SAW field generated by focused IDTs with the shape of concentric circular arc fingers on Y-Z LiNbO3 and c-oriented PZT substrates are also analysed and discussed. The method can be applied to numerical analysis of IDTs with arbitrary finger shapes, such as broadband chirp transducers, curved-finger transducers and finger-length weighted transducers.

  10. Rock Physics Model and Brittleness Index Calculation for Shale Gas Study in Jambi Basin, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatkhan, Fatkhan; Fauzi, Inusa P.; Sule, Rachmat; Usman, Alfian

    2014-05-01

    Research about shale gas is often conducted in oil and gas industries since the demand of energy supply has increased recently. Indonesia is newly interested on researching, exploring and even producing shale gas. To seek prospects of shale gas play in an area, one needs to look into some of characteristics. This paper describes about rock physics model that is used to investigate a prospect zone of shale gas play by looking into percentage of TOC and brittleness index. Method used to modeling rock physics are as follows, first Hashin-Shtrikman bound is employed to estimate percentage of minerals, then inclusions are modeled by Kuster-Toksoz method and finally kerogens are calculated by Ciz and Shapiro's model. In addition, we compared between inclusion saturated by kerogen and water and inclusion filled up by only kerogen. Modulus Young is used to estimate brittleness index. Then in order to map and delineate brittle area, simultaneous seismic inversion method using pre stack data is employed to generate volume of P-wave, S-wave and density. Finally, these volumes are used to calculate Modulus Young value. Since the area of study has a very thick shale then the area is divided into four zones based on modulus shear and bulk values. The rock physics model shows that there are two zones having quartz-rich mineral and the inclusion saturated by water and kerogen. More over Modulus Young calculations show there are two zones having high values or more than 50%. The rock physics model can be used for predicting mineralogy leading into zones of prospect brittle shale. These zones are then correlated with brittleness index calculations. In addition, results show that the study area has a shale gas prospect for further exploration.

  11. Improved Frequency Fluctuation Model for Spectral Line Shape Calculations in Fusion Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferri, S.; Calisti, A.; Mossé, C.; Talin, B.; Lisitsa, V.

    2010-10-01

    A very fast method to calculate spectral line shapes emitted by plasmas accounting for charge particle dynamics and effects of an external magnetic field is proposed. This method relies on a new formulation of the Frequency Fluctuation Model (FFM), which yields to an expression of the dynamic line profile as a functional of the static distribution function of frequencies. This highly efficient formalism, not limited to hydrogen-like systems, allows to calculate pure Stark and Stark-Zeeman line shapes for a wide range of density, temperature and magnetic field values, which is of importance in plasma physics and astrophysics. Various applications of this method are presented for conditions related to fusion plasmas.

  12. Three-dimensional surface grid generation for calculation of thermal radiation shape factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aly, Hany M.

    1992-01-01

    A technique is described to generate three dimensional surface grids suitable for calculating shape factors for thermal radiative heat transfer. The surface under consideration is approximated by finite triangular elements generated in a special manner. The grid is generated by dividing the surface into a two dimensional array of nodes. Each node is defined by its coordinates. Each set of four adjacent nodes is used to construct two triangular elements. Each triangular element is characterized by the vector representation of its vertices. Vector algebra is used to calculate all desired geometric properties of grid elements. The properties are used to determine the shape factor between the element and an area element in space. The grid generation can be graphically displayed using any software with three dimensional features. DISSPLA was used to view the grids.

  13. Basic Properties of Magnetic Shape-Memory Materials from First-Principles Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Entel, Peter; Dannenberg, Antje; Siewert, Mario; Herper, Heike C.; Gruner, Markus E.; Comtesse, Denis; Elmers, Hans-Joachim; Kallmayer, Michael

    2012-08-01

    The mutual influence of phase transformations, magnetism, and electronic properties of magnetic-shape memory Heusler materials is a basic issue of electronic structure calculations based on density functional theory. In this article, we show that these calculations can be pursued to finite temperatures, which allows to derive on a first-principles basis the temperature versus composition phase diagram of the pseudo-binary Ni-Mn-(Ga, In, Sn, Sb) system. The free energy calculations show that the phonon contribution stabilizes the body-centered-cubic (bcc)-like austenite structure at elevated temperatures, whereas magnetism favors the low-temperature martensite phase with body-centered-tetragonal (bct) or rather face-centered-tetragonal (fct) structure. The calculations also allow to make predictions of magnetostructural and magnetic field induced properties of other (new) magnetic Heusler alloys not based on NiMn such as Co-Ni-(Ga-Zn) and Fe-Co-Ni-(Ga-Zn) intermetallic compounds.

  14. A simple method of calculating pulse amplitudes and shapes arising from reflection from linear segments

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, S.A. Jr.

    1988-01-02

    A new formulation for the amplitude and pulse shape from reflections from a linear segment for a bistatic planar geometry is presented. The formulation is useful in calculating reverberation from high intensity signals in an deep ocean basin where long range propagation can occur. This reverberation is important in calculating the acoustic interference to sonar arising from the detonation of nuclear or large chemical explosives, and for modeling long range active sonar. The reflections computed with the new formulation are significantly different from those of earlier versions of the reverberation model, with pulses generally shorter and more intense, leading to predictions of louder but more sporadic reverberation than previously estimated. 9 refs

  15. SU-E-T-601: Output Factor Calculation of Irregular Shape Electron Cutout at Extended SSD

    SciTech Connect

    Alkhatib, H; Gebreamlak, W

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To calculate the output factor of irregular shape electron beam at extended SSD using modified lateral build-up-ratio method. Methods: Circular cutouts from 2.0cm diameter to maximum possible sizes were prepared for applicator cone size of 15×15cm. In addition, different irregular cutouts were prepared. Percentage depth dose (PDD) curves were measured for each cutout using 6, 9, 12 and 16-MeV at the standard SSD of 100cm. The scanning was done using Multidata system and Scanditronix diodes on 2100SC Varian LINAC. In addition, for each cutout and electron beam energy doses were measured at SSD values of 100, 105, 110, 115cm using EDR2 films and diodes. Results: The measured PDD were normalized to the depth of 1.0mm. The lateral build-up-ratio (LBR) and the lateral scatter parameter (sigma) were calculated for each circular cutout using the open 15X15-cm2 field as the reference field. Taking the linear increase of sigma with cutout size into account, PDD of the irregular cutouts were calculated at 100 cm SSD. Furthermore, using the dose measured at different SSDs, the effective SSD value for each circular cutout and electron beam energy was determined. Employing the LBR and the effective-SSD values of the circular cutouts along with the calculated PDD of the irregular cutouts, the output factors of the irregular cutout at different extended SSD values were calculated. Finally, the calculated output factors were compared with the measured values. Conclusion: In this research, it is shown that output factor of irregular shape electron beam at extended SSD can be determined by using the LBR and the effective SSD values of circular cutouts. The percentage difference of the calculated output factor from the measured output factor for irregular cutouts at extended SSD were within 3.0%.

  16. Calculation of an interaction index between extractive activity and groundwater resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, Louise; Hallet, Vincent; Barthélemy, Johan; Moriamé, Marie; Cartletti, Timotéo

    2015-04-01

    categories. A quarry matches with a combination of these categories depending on its current state. This quarry state, as will the index, can vary over time according to its extension. In order to correlate and properly weight these parameters in the calculation of the interaction index, the discrete choice model has been used (Train, 2009). Depending on the interaction index value, the quarry will present a low, a medium, a high, or a very high impact on the regional hydrogeology. This will determine the level of investigation of the feasibility study, namely (1) a geological and hydrogeological contextualization, (2) a continuous piezometric monitoring, (3) a steady flow mathematical modeling and, the most detailed, (4) a non-steady flow transient state model.

  17. Limited Area Coverage/High Resolution Picture Transmission (LAC/HRPT) data vegetative index calculation processor user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, S. O. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    The program, LACVIN, calculates vegetative indexes numbers on limited area coverage/high resolution picture transmission data for selected IJ grid sections. The IJ grid sections were previously extracted from the full resolution data tapes and stored on disk files.

  18. Prediction of Outcome after Traumatic Brain Injury: Comparison of Disease State Index and IMPACT Calculator.

    PubMed

    Liedes, Hilkka; Mattila, Jussi; Lingsma, Hester; Lötjönen, Jyrki; Menon, David; Tenovuo, Olli; van Gils, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of death and disability, especially in young adults. A reliable prediction of outcome after TBI is of great importance in clinical practice and research. We aimed to compare performance of the well-established IMPACT calculator and an alternative method, Disease State Index (DSI), in the prediction of six-month outcome after TBI. Performance of the models was evaluated using 2036 patients with moderate or severe TBI from the International Mission for Prognosis and Analysis of Clinical Trials in TBI (IMPACT) database. Prediction performance of both models was similar. The models with more variables provided better performance than the simpler models. This study showed that the DSI is a valid tool with efficient visualizations that can help clinicians with their decision making process in clinical practice. PMID:27225575

  19. Calculation of the Lightning Potential Index and electric field in numerical weather prediction models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dementyeva, S. O.; Ilin, N. V.; Mareev, E. A.

    2015-03-01

    Modern methods for predicting thunderstorms and lightnings with the use of high-resolution numerical models are considered. An analysis of the Lightning Potential Index (LPI) is performed for various microphysics parameterizations with the use of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. The maximum index values are shown to depend significantly on the type of parameterization. This makes it impossible to specify a single threshold LPI for various parameterizations as a criterion for the occurrence of lightning flashes. The topographic LPI maps underestimate the sizes of regions of likely thunderstorm-hazard events. Calculating the electric field under the assumption that ice and graupel are the main charge carriers is considered a new algorithm of lightning prediction. The model shows that the potential difference (between the ground and cloud layer at a given altitude) sufficient to generate a discharge is retained in a larger region than is predicted by the LPI. The main features of the spatial distribution of the electric field and potential agree with observed data.

  20. Spectral line shape of the P(2) transition in CO-Ar: Uncorrelated ab initio calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Wehr, R.; Vitcu, A.; Drummond, J.R.; May, A.D.; Ciurylo, R.

    2002-12-01

    We calculate the spectral line shape of an isolated line from first principles, assuming that the translational motion is not statistically correlated with the evolution of the optical coherence, i.e., with the broadening. We use the known, realistic potentials for the influence of collisions on the translational motion and on the internal motion. We show that the calculated profiles do not agree, particularly at low pressures, with very precise experimental profiles of the P(2) line of CO in a bath of Ar. We establish that the source of the disagreement lies in the assumption of uncorrelated effects of collisions on the translational motion and the optical coherence associated with the internal degrees of freedom.

  1. Vegetation Canopies and Objects of Arbitrary Shapes: Computer Generation and Bidirectional Reflectance Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goel, Narenda S.; Rozehnal, I.; Thompson, R. L.

    1991-01-01

    A general computer graphics based model is presented for computer generation of objects of arbitrary shape and for calculating Bidirectional Reflectance Factor (BRF) and scattering from them, in the optical region. The computer generation uses a modified Lindemayer system (L system) approach. For rendering on a computer screen, the object is divided into polygons, and innovative computer graphics techniques are used to display the object and to calculate the scattering and reflectance from the object. The use of the technique is illustrated with scattering from canopies of simulated corn plants and from a snow covered mountain. The scattering is quantified using measures like BRF and albedo and by rendering the objects with brightness of each of the two facets of a polygon proportional to the amount of light scattered from the object in the viewer's direction.

  2. Irregularly shaped otoliths from saugers prevent back-calculation of length at previous ages in Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krueger, K.L.; Hubert, W.A.

    1997-01-01

    We collected otoliths from saugers Stizostedion canadense in Boysen Reservoir, Bighorn Reservoir, and the Bighorn River in Wyoming to evaluate age and growth. All otoliths in our samples (264 fish) were irregularly shaped, and the irregularities became more pronounced with increasing age of the fish. Age estimates with irregular otoliths were possible, but back-calculation of length at previous ages was not possible as a result of radically inconsistent lengths of radii. It should not be assumed that otoliths can be used for back calculation of length at age among all stocks of sauger. The assumption of regular otolith formation within a stock should be tested before obtaining samples of otoliths for age and growth assessment.

  3. Experimental scattering investigations and radiative transfer calculations of large arbitrarily shaped absorbing particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasse, Christian

    1993-12-01

    Measured optical properties of large absorbing arbitrarily shaped particulates are compared to calculated optical properties of smooth homogeneous spheres. The particulates examined are spherical carbon particles with rough surface structure and oil shale. The results of measurements of phase functions of single particles at (lambda) equals 514.5 nm and hemispherical reflectance from 450 to 1959 nm are used in an inverse two-flux model to calculate the average albedo of a single particle. For carbon particles, ideal spheres show a higher forward scatter contribution than measured properties of rough spheres. Two types of oil shale particles with different optical properties but similar size and surface structure are investigated. Particle albedo and phase functions are compared, and the error of measuring the phase function at one wavelength is investigated. Results are also compared to isotropic scattering particles.

  4. Shape-to-String Mapping: A Novel Approach to Clustering Time-Index Biomics Data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Herein we describe a qualitative approach for clustering time-index biomics data. The data are transformed into angles from the intensity-ratios between adjacent time-points. A code is used to map a qualitative representation of the numerical time-index data which captures the features in the data ...

  5. Body Shape, Adiposity Index, and Mortality in Postmenopausal Women: Findings from the Women’s Health Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Cynthia A.; Garcia, David O.; Wertheim, Betsy C.; Hingle, Melanie D.; Bea, Jennifer W.; Zaslavsky, Oleg; Caire-Juvera, Graciela; Rohan, Thomas; Vitolins, Mara Z.; Thompson, Patricia A.; Lewis, Cora E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Studies evaluating the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and mortality demonstrate a U-shaped association. To expand, this study evaluated the relationship between adiposity indices, a body shape index (ABSI) and body adiposity index (BAI), and mortality in 77,505 postmenopausal women. Methods A prospective cohort analysis was conducted in the Women’s Health Initiative to ascertain the independent relationships between adiposity indices and mortality in order to inform on the clinical usefulness of alternate measures of mortality risk. ABSI (waist circumference (cm)/[BMI2/3 × height (cm)1/2]), BAI (hip circumference (cm)/[height (m)1.5] − 18), weight, BMI, and waist circumference (WC) were evaluated in relation to mortality risk using adjusted Cox proportional hazards regression models. Results ABSI showed a linear association with mortality (HR, 1.37; 95% CI, 1.28–1.47 for quintile 5 vs. 1) while BMI and BAI had U-shaped relationships with HR of 1.30; 95% CI, 1.20–1.40 for obesity II/III BMI and 1.06, 95% CI, 0.99–1.13 for BAI. Higher WC (HR, 1.21; 95% CI, 1.13–1.29 for quintile 5 vs. 1) showed relationships similar to BMI. Conclusions ABSI appears to be a clinically useful measure for estimating mortality risk, perhaps more so than BAI and BMI in postmenopausal women. PMID:26991923

  6. Negative refractive index of metallic cross-I-shaped pairs: origin and evolution with pair gap width.

    PubMed

    Ma, Y G; Wang, X C; Ong, C K

    2008-07-01

    A structured composite of the negative index of refraction was fabricated by one layer of cross-I-shaped metal pairs. In this structure, the electric and magnetic inclusions were effectively integrated into one small unit. We varied the spacing of the cross pair to control the location of the magnetic resonance mode and their intercoupling with the electric mode. The frequency dependences of permittivity, permeability, and refractive indices with different gap widths of the pairs were systematically discussed by free-space measurement as well as numerical simulation. A spacing window dependent on the geometrical parameters was found in which the real part of the refractive index could have a negative value. The one-layer cross-pair pattern proposed in this work can be extended to three-dimensional structures with well-controlled interlayer coupling that will greatly facilitate the fabrication and measurement of negative-index materials in high frequencies. PMID:18764072

  7. Low spring index, large displacement Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) coil actuators for use in macro- and micro-systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holschuh, Brad; Newman, Dava

    2014-03-01

    Shape memory alloys (SMA) offer unique shape changing characteristics that can be exploited to produce low­ mass, low-bulk, large-stroke actuators. We are investigating the use of low spring index (defined as the ratio of coil diameter to wire diameter) SMA coils for use as actuators in morphing aerospace systems. Specifically, we describe the development and characterization of minimum achievable spring index coiled actuators made from 0.3048 mm (0.012") diameter shape memory alloy (SMA) wire for integration in textile architectures for future compression space suit applications. Production and shape setting of the coiled actuators, as well as experimental test methods, are described. Force, length and voltage relationships for multiple coil actuators are reported and discussed. The actuators exhibit a highly linear (R2 < 0.99) relationship between isometric blocking force and coil displacement, which is consistent with current SMA coil models; and SMA coil actuators demonstrate the ability to produce significant linear forces (i.e., greater than 8 N per coil) at strains up to 3x their initial (i.e., fully coiled) length. Discussions of both the potential use of these actuators in future compression space suit designs, and the broader viability of these actuators in both macro- and micro-systems, are presented.

  8. A new bibliometric index based on the shape of the citation distribution.

    PubMed

    Lando, Tommaso; Bertoli-Barsotti, Lucio

    2014-01-01

    In order to improve the h-index in terms of its accuracy and sensitivity to the form of the citation distribution, we propose the new bibliometric index [symbol in text]. The basic idea is to define, for any author with a given number of citations, an "ideal" citation distribution which represents a benchmark in terms of number of papers and number of citations per publication, and to obtain an index which increases its value when the real citation distribution approaches its ideal form. The method is very general because the ideal distribution can be defined differently according to the main objective of the index. In this paper we propose to define it by a "squared-form" distribution: this is consistent with many popular bibliometric indices, which reach their maximum value when the distribution is basically a "square". This approach generally rewards the more regular and reliable researchers, and it seems to be especially suitable for dealing with common situations such as applications for academic positions. To show the advantages of the [symbol in text]-index some mathematical properties are proved and an application to real data is proposed. PMID:25542026

  9. In vivo measurement of the shape of the tissue-refractive-index correlation function and its applicationto detection of colorectal field carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Andrew J.; Ruderman, Sarah; DelaCruz, Mart; Wali, Ramesh K.; Roy, Hemant K.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. Polarization-gated spectroscopy is an established method to depth-selectively interrogate the structural properties of biological tissue. We employ this method in vivo in the azoxymethane (AOM)-treated rat model to monitor the morphological changes that occur in the field of a tumor during early carcinogenesis. The results demonstrate a statistically significant change in the shape of the refractive-index correlation function for AOM-treated rats versus saline-treated controls. Since refractive index is linearly proportional to mass density, these refractive-index changes can be directly linked to alterations in the spatial distribution patterns of macromolecular density. Furthermore, we found that alterations in the shape of the refractive-index correlation function shape were an indicator of both present and future risk of tumor development. These results suggest that noninvasive measurement of the shape of the refractive-index correlation function could be a promising marker of early cancer development. PMID:22559696

  10. H{sub 2}-He vibrational line-shape parameters: Measurement and semiclassical calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Forsman, J.W.; Bonamy, J.; Robert, D.; Berger, J.P.; Saint-Loup, R.; Berger, H.

    1995-10-01

    High-resolution inverse Raman spectroscopy has been used to obtain the line shifting and line broadening coefficients of H{sub 2} perturbed by He. Measurements have been made for the {ital Q}-branch transitions ({ital J}=0{r_arrow}5) in a density range of 10 to 20 amagat and from 296 to 995 K. Up to 795 K we have directly deduced from the experimental broadening coefficients the inelastic rotational state-to-state and vibrational dephasing rates. At higher temperatures, owing to the larger number of channels of relaxation which occur, the results have been analyzed using a scaling law. The line shift and broadening coefficients exhibit a square root and a linear dependence on temperature, respectively, and a significant {ital J} dependence. Semiclassical calculations based on an accurate {ital ab} {ital initio} potential lead to line-shape parameters consistent with experiment. They allow a clear understanding of their observed temperature dependence.

  11. Interpretation of an index of phytoplankton population composition calculated from Remote Airborne Fluorsensor (RAF) data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, F. H.

    1981-01-01

    The calculation of indices of phytoplankton population composition from chlorophyll a fluorescence at 685 nm excited by narrow band light at 454 and 539 nm is discussed. The ratio of the fluorescence excited by light of these two wavelengths is a function of the distribution of the phytoplankton between two color groups, designated the golden-brown and the green. The golden-brown group consists of those species which have the highly photosynthetically active carotenoid-chlorophyll-a-protein complexes, i.e. members of the classes Bacillariophyceae, diatoms Dinophyceae, dinoflagellates, and some members of the class Prymnesiophyceae. The green color group consists those species of phytoplankton which apparently lack those complexes, i.e. members of the classes Chlorophyceae, Euglenophyceae, Prasinophyceae, Eustigmatophyceae, Xanthophyceae, and a few members of the Prymnesiophyceae. A few species of phytoplankton appear to have intermediate characteristics, and would apparently belong to neither group. Most of these species are members of the class Cryptophyceae. The composition index for this class is examined in detail.

  12. Calculation of Compressible Flows past Aerodynamic Shapes by Use of the Streamline Curvature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perl, W

    1947-01-01

    A simple approximate method is given for the calculation of isentropic irrotational flows past symmetrical airfoils, including mixed subsonic-supersonic flows. The method is based on the choice of suitable values for the streamline curvature in the flow field and the subsequent integration of the equations of motion. The method yields limiting solutions for potential flow. The effect of circulation is considered. A comparison of derived velocity distributions with existing results that are based on calculation to the third order in the thickness ratio indicated satisfactory agreement. The results are also presented in the form of a set of compressibility correction rules that lie between the Prandtl-Glauert rule and the von Karman-Tsien rule (approximately). The different rules correspond to different values of the local shape parameter square root sign YC sub a, in which Y is the ordinate and C sub a is the curvature at a point on an airfoil. Bodies of revolution, completely supersonic flows, and the significance of the limiting solutions for potential flow are also briefly discussed.

  13. Three-dimensional shape measurement based on dual-refractive-index digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Xiao-ou; Hu, Feng-jun; Wang, Hui

    2015-09-01

    A novel phase-imaging method based on dual-refractive-index digital holography has been presented, which in principle can be arbitrarily large compared to the wavelength and does not involve the usual phase unwrapping by detection of phase discontinuity. The method consists of the generation and combination of two phase maps in a digital holography system by use of two separate refractive indexes which varies with the air density in an air chamber where a recorded 3D object is in. For example, we have reconstructed the surface of a remote control keypad of size 5 mm×5 mm and maximum axial depth 0.631 mm, and the experimental result shows that the proposed approach is feasible and effective.

  14. Design of a gradient-index beam shaping system via a genetic algorithm optimization method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Neal C.; Shealy, David L.

    2000-10-01

    Geometrical optics - the laws of reflection and refraction, ray tracing, conservation of energy within a bundle of rays, and the condition of constant optical path length - provides a foundation for design of laser beam shaping systems. This paper explores the use of machine learning techniques, concentrating on genetic algorithms, to design laser beam shaping systems using geometrical optics. Specifically, a three-element GRIN laser beam shaping system has been designed to expand and transform a Gaussian input beam profile into one with a uniform irradiance profile. Solution to this problem involves the constrained optimization of a merit function involving a mix of discrete and continuous parameters. The merit function involves terms that measure the deviation of the output beam diameter, divergence, and irradiance from target values. The continuous parameters include the distances between the lens elements, the thickness, and radii of the lens elements. The discrete parameters include the GRIN glass types from a manufacturer's database, the gradient direction of the GRIN elements (positive or negative), and the actual number of lens elements in the system (one to four).

  15. Calculating Dropout Rates Locally and Nationally with the Holding Power Index.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartzell, Gary; And Others

    A nationally standardized dropout definition will be of little practical value unless it can be related to the structure, practices, and processes of a given school. A proposed measure of school completion and school leaving called the High School Holding Power Index is described. The index is built on these assumptions: (1) there is a…

  16. Development and evaluation of a method for calculating the Healthy Eating Index-2005 using the Nutrition Data System for Research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: To develop and evaluate a method for calculating the Healthy Eating Index-2005 (HEI-2005) with the widely used Nutrition Data System for Research (NDSR) based on the method developed for use with the US Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Food and Nutrient Dietary Data System (FNDDS) and M...

  17. Shooting and bouncing rays - Calculating the RCS of an arbitrarily shaped cavity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ling, Hao; Chou, Ri-Chee; Lee, Shung-Wu

    1989-01-01

    A ray-shooting approach is presented for calculating the interior radar cross section (RCS) from a partially open cavity. In the problem considered, a dense grid of rays is launched into the cavity through the opening. The rays bounce from the cavity walls based on the laws of geometrical optics and eventually exit the cavity via the aperture. The ray-bouncing method is based on tracking a large number of rays launched into the cavity through the opening and determining the geometrical optics field associated with each ray by taking into consideration (1) the geometrical divergence factor, (2) polarization, and (3) material loading of the cavity walls. A physical optics scheme is then applied to compute the backscattered field from the exit rays. This method is so simple in concept that there is virtually no restriction on the shape or material loading of the cavity. Numerical results obtained by this method are compared with those for the modal analysis for a circular cylinder terminated by a PEC plate. RCS results for an S-bend circular cylinder generated on the Cray X-MP supercomputer show significant RCS reduction. Some of the limitations and possible extensions of this technique are discussed.

  18. Shooting and bouncing rays - Calculating the RCS of an arbitrarily shaped cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Hao; Chou, Ri-Chee; Lee, Shung-Wu

    1989-02-01

    A ray-shooting approach is presented for calculating the interior radar cross section (RCS) from a partially open cavity. In the problem considered, a dense grid of rays is launched into the cavity through the opening. The rays bounce from the cavity walls based on the laws of geometrical optics and eventually exit the cavity via the aperture. The ray-bouncing method is based on tracking a large number of rays launched into the cavity through the opening and determining the geometrical optics field associated with each ray by taking into consideration (1) the geometrical divergence factor, (2) polarization, and (3) material loading of the cavity walls. A physical optics scheme is then applied to compute the backscattered field from the exit rays. This method is so simple in concept that there is virtually no restriction on the shape or material loading of the cavity. Numerical results obtained by this method are compared with those for the modal analysis for a circular cylinder terminated by a PEC plate. RCS results for an S-bend circular cylinder generated on the Cray X-MP supercomputer show significant RCS reduction. Some of the limitations and possible extensions of this technique are discussed.

  19. First-and Second-Order Displacement Transfer Functions for Structural Shape Calculations Using Analytically Predicted Surface Strains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Fleischer, Van Tran

    2012-01-01

    New first- and second-order displacement transfer functions have been developed for deformed shape calculations of nonuniform cross-sectional beam structures such as aircraft wings. The displacement transfer functions are expressed explicitly in terms of beam geometrical parameters and surface strains (uniaxial bending strains) obtained at equally spaced strain stations along the surface of the beam structure. By inputting the measured or analytically calculated surface strains into the displacement transfer functions, one could calculate local slopes, deflections, and cross-sectional twist angles of the nonuniform beam structure for mapping the overall structural deformed shapes for visual display. The accuracy of deformed shape calculations by the first- and second-order displacement transfer functions are determined by comparing these values to the analytically predicted values obtained from finite element analyses. This comparison shows that the new displacement transfer functions could quite accurately calculate the deformed shapes of tapered cantilever tubular beams with different tapered angles. The accuracy of the present displacement transfer functions also are compared to those of the previously developed displacement transfer functions.

  20. Calculation of the refractive index of metal on the basis of nonlocal potential theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrzanowski, Janusz

    2008-12-01

    In this paper a quantative discussion upon the frequency dependence of the refractive index of metal, in wide range of frequency, is performed on the basis of nonlocal potential theory connected with the concept of quasiparticles. Obtained results, for chosen metals, have been compared to evidence.

  1. Diet History Questionnaire II: Calculating the Healthy Eating Index (HEI)-2010 Using Diet*Calc Output

    Cancer.gov

    The Healthy Eating Index-2010 (HEI-2010) is the latest iteration of the HEI. The HEI is a measure of diet quality, independent of quantity that can be used to assess compliance with the US Dietary Guidelines for Americans and monitor changes in dietary patterns.

  2. Calculation of the Ki67 index in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: a comparative analysis of four counting methodologies

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Michelle D; Bagci, Pelin; Ohike, Nobuyuki; Saka, Burcu; Seven, Ipek Erbarut; Dursun, Nevra; Balci, Serdar; Gucer, Hasan; Jang, Kee-Taek; Tajiri, Takuma; Basturk, Olca; Kong, So Yeon; Goodman, Michael; Akkas, Gizem; Adsay, Volkan

    2015-01-01

    Ki67 index is now an essential part of classification of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. However, its adaptation into daily practice has been fraught with challenges related to counting methodology. In this study, three reviewers used four counting methodologies to calculate Ki67 index in 68 well-differentiated pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: (1) ‘eye-ball’ estimation, which has been advocated as reliable and is widely used; (2) automated counting by image analyzer; (3) manual eye-counting (eye under a microscope without a grid); and (4) manual count of camera-captured/printed image. Pearson’s correlation (R) was used to measure pair-wise correlation among three reviewers using all four methodologies. Average level of agreement was calculated using mean of R values. The results showed that: (1) ‘eye-balling’ was least expensive and fastest (average time <1 min) but had poor reliability and reproducibility. (2) Automated count was the most expensive and least practical with major impact on turnaround time (limited by machine and personnel accessibility), and, more importantly, had inaccuracies in overcounting unwanted material. (3) Manual eye count had no additional cost, averaged 6 min, but proved impractical and poorly reproducible. (4) Camera-captured/printed image was most reliable, had highest reproducibility, but took longer than ‘eye-balling’. In conclusion, based on its comparatively low cost/benefit ratio and reproducibility, camera-captured/printed image appears to be the most practical for calculating Ki67 index. Although automated counting is generally advertised as the gold standard for index calculation, in this study it was not as accurate or cost-effective as camera-captured/printed image and was highly operator-dependent. ‘Eye-balling’ produces highly inaccurate and unreliable results, and is not recommended for routine use. PMID:25412850

  3. Δg: The new aromaticity index based on g-factor calculation applied for polycyclic benzene rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ucun, Fatih; Tokatlı, Ahmet

    2015-02-01

    In this work, the aromaticity of polycyclic benzene rings was evaluated by the calculation of g-factor for a hydrogen placed perpendicularly at geometrical center of related ring plane at a distance of 1.2 Å. The results have compared with the other commonly used aromatic indices, such as HOMA, NICSs, PDI, FLU, MCI, CTED and, generally been found to be in agreement with them. So, it was proposed that the calculation of the average g-factor as Δg could be applied to study the aromaticity of polycyclic benzene rings without any restriction in the number of benzene rings as a new magnetic-based aromaticity index.

  4. Magnetically modulated refractive index of a magnetic fluid film based on cigar-shaped ferrite submicron particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mormile, P.; Petti, L.; Rippa, M.; Guo, J.; Song, W.; Zhou, J.

    2010-10-01

    Light beam propagation at a prism-magnetic fluid film interface is experimentally studied. The magnetic fluid is made through dispersion of synthesized cigar-shaped sub-micron particles of Fe2O3 in an oil solution. This was injected into a glass cell with an active area of 10mm2 and a depth ranging from 10 microns to 30 microns whose base is a glass microscope slide and on the top it was covered with a glass prism. The set up was developed by one of the authors to measure light switching at a prism-liquid crystal interface in a previous publication.1 Polarized Light (TE or TM) from a He-Ne laser impinges at the prism-magnetic film interface. The external reflected light is detected by a photodiode connected to a data acquisition system. Since the properties of the magnetic fluid can be modulated by external magnetic fields, we investigated the effects of the magnetic field on the refractive index of the magnetic fluid. For our magnetic fluid, the reflection of light has been investigated as a function of particles concentration and thickness of the films with a wavelength of 633nm and both TE and TM polarization, and applied magnetic fields up to 25 Oe. It was found that the intensity of reflected light increases with increasing magnetic field up to 4 times the initial value, and saturates at 20 Oe for TE light, while decreases with increasing magnetic field up to 4 times less for TM light with the same saturation value. Moreover, under a given magnetic field, the output light increases with the increasing film thickness in TE polarization, and decreases with the increasing film thickness in TM case. The refractive index of the magnetic fluid depends on the concentration of the dilute oil-based magnetic fluid under zero field. These behaviors are explained in terms of the organization of the submicron particles when the magnetic field is applied.2 The cigar-shaped sub-micron particles are oriented along their long axis to form an organized mesostructure. The

  5. ABCD matrix of the human lens gradient-index profile: applicability of the calculation methods.

    PubMed

    Díaz, José Antonio

    2008-01-10

    The applicability of different approximate methods proposed to determine the paraxial properties of the gradient-index (GRIN) distribution resembling that of the human lens, by means of the system ABCD matrix, is tested. Thus, the parabolic-ray-path approximation has been extended to provide the ABCD matrix of a slab lens comprised of a rotationally GRIN medium. The results show that this method has good numerical stability, and it is also the easiest one in determining the Gaussian constants of the human lens GRIN profile. PMID:18188201

  6. Occlusion culling and calculation for a computer generated hologram using spatial frequency index method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Kai; Huang, Yingqing; Yan, Xingpeng; Jiang, Xiaoyu

    2015-10-01

    A spatial frequency index method is proposed to cull occlusion and generate a hologram. Object points with the same spatial frequency are put into a set for their mutual occlusion. The hidden surfaces of the three-dimensional (3D) scene are quickly removed through culling the object points that are furthest from the hologram plane in the set. The phases of plane wave, which are only interrelated with the spatial frequencies, are precomputed and stored in a table. According to the spatial frequency of the object points, the phases of plane wave for generating fringes are obtained directly from the table. Three 3D scenes are chosen to verify the spatial frequency index method. Both numerical simulation and optical reconstruction are performed. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can cull the hidden surfaces of the 3D scene correctly. The occlusion effect of the 3D scene can be well reproduced. The computational speed is better than that obtained using conventional methods but is still time-consuming.

  7. A new methodology to calculate the environmental protection index (Ep). A case study applied to a company producing composite materials.

    PubMed

    Siracusa, G; La Rosa, A D; Sterlini, S E

    2004-12-01

    Environmental indicators can be used as a first stage in progress towards comprehensive environmental impact measures [J. Environ. Manage 65/3 (2002) 285]. In this article, we develop a 'pollutant interaction matrix method' that allows calculation of a global environmental protection index (Ep) in order to verify the eco-compatibility of an industrial activity. Two methods are proposed for the Ep index evaluation (which represents the numerical measure of the environmental sustainability): the Direct Method (Epd) and the Weighted Method (Epw). Both methods need to define, in the whole industrial process, homogeneous sectors (defined as construction sites where activities of the same type are carried out). Furthermore, for each activity a set of parameters (t, duration of pollution effect, P, quantity of pollutant produced,G, hazard of the pollutant) are required to evaluate the relative pollution index Y. All indices calculations were carried out using a set of matrices. The correct use of Ep evaluation provides an improvement in the total environmental performance of companies because it points out possible critical operations in each homogeneous sector which require solutions. The methodology is applied to evaluate the environmental pollution risk of a company that produces polymer materials and to improve their environmental performance. The results obtained show that the whole productive process has a low environmental impact factor. Nevertheless the applied methodology puts in evidence some processes that generate local pollution in specific areas of the factory and which could be dangerous for the workers' health. PMID:15531386

  8. Hazard index calculation for 31 May 1984 microburst at Erie, Colorado

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kropfli, R. A.

    1988-01-01

    Two x-band Doppler radars, operated by NOAA, were used to collect high resolution data within a small, benign looking microburst during the PHOENIX II boundary layer experiment. The lowest 2.5 km of the microbursts was observed throughout its development and dissipation over a 15 minute period. These observations presented an excellent opportunity to compute a quantitative threat to a hypothetical aircraft whose flight track would carry it through the microburst. The hazard index is based on the kinetic energy loss to the aircraft that would be produced by the microburst; it is a function of the vertical air motion, horizontal spatial derivatives of the wind field, and the assumed aircraft air speed and direction. Indices were computed and plotted for all 8 volume scans and peak values were observed to be sufficiently high to present a significant hazard to an aircraft.

  9. Error correction of the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index and Brightness Temperature calculated from the AVHRR observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Mohammed Zahidur

    This thesis investigates Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and Brightness Temperature (BT) stability in the NOAA/NESDIS Global Vegetation Index (GVI) data during 1982-2003. This data was collected from five NOAA series satellites. We have proposed to apply Empirical distribution function (EDF) to improve the stability of the NDVI and BT data derived from the AVHRR sensor on NOAA polar orbiting satellite. The instability of data results from orbit degradation as well as the circuit drifts over the life or a satellite. Degradation of NDVI and BT over time and shifts of NDVI and BT between the satellites was estimated China data set, for it includes a wide variety or different ecosystems represented globally. It was found that data for the years 1988, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995 and 2000 are not stable enough compared to other years because of satellite orbit drift, AVHRR sensor degradation, and also Mt Pinatubo volcanic eruption in 1992. We assume data from NOAA-7(1982, 1983), NOAA-9 (1985, 1986), NOAA-11(1989, 1990), NOAA-14(1996, 1997), and NOAA-16 (2001, 2002) to be standard because theses satellite's equator crossing time falls between 1330 and 1500. Data from this particular period of the day maximized the value of coefficients. The crux of the proposed correction procedure consists of dividing standard year's data sets into two subsets. The subset 1(standard data correction sets) is used for correcting unstable years and then corrected data for this years compared with the standard data in the subset 2 (standard data validation sets). In this dissertation, we apply EDF to correct this deficiency of data for the affected years. We normalize or correct data by the method of empirical distribution functions compared with the standard. Using these normalized values, we estimate new NDVI and BT time series which provides NDVI and BT data for these years that match in subset 2 that is used for data validation.

  10. Line shape and ray trace calculations in saturated X-ray lasers: Application to Ni-like silver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benredjem, D.; Guilbaud, O.; Möller, C.; Klisnick, A.; Ros, D.; Dubau, J.; Calisti, A.; Talin, B.

    2006-05-01

    Longitudinal coherence length in X-ray lasers depends strongly on the shape of the amplified line. We have modelled an experiment performed at the LULI facility of Ecole Polytechnique. The experiment was devoted to the study of the temporal (longitudinal) coherence of the transient Ni-like silver 4d 4p transition X-ray laser at 13.9 nm. Accurate line shape calculations using PPP, a spectral line shape code, confirm that the Voigt profile is a good approximation for this X-ray laser line. This allows us to extensively use the Voigt shape in conditions where the amplifier, i.e. the plasma produced by the interaction of a high intensity laser with a slab target, is neither stationary nor homogeneous. Our calculations involve a ray trace code which is a post-processor to the hydrodynamic simulation EHYBRID. As the effect of saturation is important for the level populations and gains we include the interaction between the amplified beam and the medium using the Maxwell-Bloch formalism. While the FWHM of the spontaneous emission profile is ˜10 mÅ, the amplified X-ray line exhibits gain narrowing leading to the smaller width ˜3 mÅ. Comparison with experiment is discussed.

  11. The Size and Shape of Caldesmon and Its Fragments in Solution Studied by Dynamic Light Scattering and Hydrodynamic Model Calculations

    PubMed Central

    Czuryło, Edward A.; Hellweg, Thomas; Eimer, Wolfgang; Da̧browska, Renata

    1997-01-01

    The size and the shape of caldesmon as well as its 50-kDa central and 19-kDa C-terminal fragments were investigated by photon correlation spectroscopy. The hydrodynamic radii, which have been calculated from the experimentally obtained translational diffusion coefficients, are 9.8 nm, 6.0 nm, and 2.9 nm, respectively. Moreover, the experimental values for the translational diffusion coefficients are compared with results obtained from hydrodynamic model calculations. Detailed models for the structure of caldesmon in solution are derived. The contour length is about 64 nm for all of the models used for caldesmon. ImagesFIGURE 3FIGURE 4 PMID:9017208

  12. Assessing the validity of station location assumptions made in the calculation of the geomagnetic disturbance index, Dst

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gannon, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the effects of the assumptions made in the calculation of the Dst index with regard to longitude sampling, hemisphere bias, and latitude correction are explored. The insights gained from this study will allow operational users to better understand the local implications of the Dst index and will lead to future index formulations that are more physically motivated. We recompute the index using 12 longitudinally spaced low-latitude stations, including the traditional 4 (in Honolulu, Kakioka, San Juan, and Hermanus), and compare it to the standard United States Geological Survey definitive Dst. We look at the hemisphere balance by comparing stations at equal geomagnetic latitudes in the Northern and Southern hemispheres. We further separate the 12-station time series into two hemispheric indices and find that there are measurable differences in the traditional Dst formulation due to the undersampling of the Southern Hemisphere in comparison with the Northern Hemisphere. To analyze the effect of latitude correction, we plot latitudinal variation in a disturbance observed during the year 2005 using two separate longitudinal observatory chains. We separate these by activity level and find that while the traditional cosine form fits the latitudinal distributions well for low levels of activity, at higher levels of disturbance the cosine form does not fit the observed variation. This suggests that the traditional latitude scaling is insufficient during active times. The effect of the Northern Hemisphere bias and the inadequate latitude scaling is such that the standard correction underestimates the true disturbance by 10–30 nT for storms of main phase magnitude deviation greater than 150 nT in the traditional Dst index.

  13. Detection of venous needle dislodgement during haemodialysis using fractional order shape index ratio and fuzzy colour relation analysis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chia-Hung; Chen, Wei-Ling; Kan, Chung-Dann; Wu, Ming-Jui; Mai, Yi-Chen

    2015-12-01

    Venous needle dislodgement (VND) is a life-threatening complication during haemodialysis (HD) treatment. When VND occurs, it only takes a few minutes for blood loss in an adult patient. According to the ANNA (American Nephrology Nurses' Association) VND survey reports, VND is a concerning issue for the nephrology nurses/staff and patients. To ensure HD care and an effective treatment environment, this Letter proposes a combination of fractional order shape index ratio (SIR) and fuzzy colour relation analysis (CRA) to detect VND. If the venous needle drops out, clinical examinations show that both heart pulses and pressure wave variations have a low correlation at the venous anatomic site. Therefore, fractional order SIR is used to quantify the differences in transverse vibration pressures (TVPs) between the normal condition and meter reading. Linear regression shows that the fractional order SIR has a high correlation with the TVP variation. Fuzzy CRA is designed in a simple and visual message manner to identify the risk levels. A worst-case study demonstrated that the proposed model can be used for VND detection in clinical applications. PMID:26713159

  14. A stable procedure to calculate the transient scattering by conducting surfaces of arbitrary shape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vechinski, Douglas A.; Rao, Sadasiva M.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, a solution procedure is presented to obtain the transient scattering by arbitrarily shaped conducting objects directly in the time-domain using the marching-on-in-time method. The late-time oscillations are eliminated by a simple stabilization procedure which involves negligible amount of extra computation. Numerical results for surface current density and far-scattered fields are given for various structures and compared with other methods.

  15. Lyman-alpha line as a solar activity index for calculations of solar spectrum in the EUV region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nusinov, Anatoliy; Kazachevskaya, Tamara; Katyushina, Valeria; Woods, Thomas

    It is investigated a possibility of retrieval of solar spectrum data using intensity observational data of the only solar spectral line L (Hydrogen Lyman-alpha, 121.6 nm).Using as an example spectra obtained by SEE instruments on TIMED satellite, it was shown, that both for lines and for continuum in the spectral range 27-105 nm, which is essential for ionization processes in the ionosphere, a correlation between their intensities and L was high. Therefore it becomes possible to use L measurements data as a natural solar activity index for calculations of EUV solar emission spectrum for solving aeronomical problems. It is noticed, that EUV model, obtained with using SEE data, does not allow to calculate correctly critical frequencies of ionospheric E-layer owing to low intensities of lines 97.7 and 102.6 nm, which produce the main part of ionization in ionospheric E-region.

  16. Deformed Shape Calculation of a Full-Scale Wing Using Fiber Optic Strain Data from a Ground Loads Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jutte, Christine V.; Ko, William L.; Stephens, Craig A.; Bakalyar, John A.; Richards, W. Lance

    2011-01-01

    A ground loads test of a full-scale wing (175-ft span) was conducted using a fiber optic strain-sensing system to obtain distributed surface strain data. These data were input into previously developed deformed shape equations to calculate the wing s bending and twist deformation. A photogrammetry system measured actual shape deformation. The wing deflections reached 100 percent of the positive design limit load (equivalent to 3 g) and 97 percent of the negative design limit load (equivalent to -1 g). The calculated wing bending results were in excellent agreement with the actual bending; tip deflections were within +/- 2.7 in. (out of 155-in. max deflection) for 91 percent of the load steps. Experimental testing revealed valuable opportunities for improving the deformed shape equations robustness to real world (not perfect) strain data, which previous analytical testing did not detect. These improvements, which include filtering methods developed in this work, minimize errors due to numerical anomalies discovered in the remaining 9 percent of the load steps. As a result, all load steps attained +/- 2.7 in. accuracy. Wing twist results were very sensitive to errors in bending and require further development. A sensitivity analysis and recommendations for fiber implementation practices, along with, effective filtering methods are included

  17. Abinitio calculations of the spectral shapes of CO2 isolated lines including non-Voigt effects and comparisons with experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, J.-M.; Tran, H.; Ngo, N. H.; Landsheere, X.; Chelin, P.; Lu, Y.; Liu, A.-W.; Hu, S.-M.; Gianfrani, L.; Casa, G.; Castrillo, A.; Lepère, M.; Delière, Q.; Dhyne, M.; Fissiaux, L.

    2013-01-01

    We present a fully ab initio model and calculations of the spectral shapes of absorption lines in a pure molecular gas under conditions where the influences of collisions and of the Doppler effect are significant. Predictions of the time dependence of dipole autocorrelation functions (DACFs) are made for pure CO2 at room temperature using requantized classical molecular dynamics simulations. These are carried, free of any adjusted parameter, on the basis of an accurate anisotropic intermolecular potential. The Fourier-Laplace transforms of these DACFs then yield calculated spectra which are analyzed, as some measured ones, through fits using Voigt line profiles. Comparisons between theory and various experiments not only show that the main line-shape parameters (Lorentz pressure-broadening coefficients) are accurately predicted, but that subtle observed non-Voigt features are also quantitatively reproduced by the model. These successes open renewed perspectives for the understanding of the mechanisms involved (translational-velocity and rotational-state changes and their dependences on the molecular speed) and the quantification of their respective contributions. The proposed model should also be of great help for the test of widely used empirical line-shape models and, if needed, the construction of more physically based ones.

  18. Calculation of the shape of a two-dimensional supersonic nozzle in closed form

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunsolo, Dante

    1953-01-01

    The idea is advanced of making a supersonic nozzle by producing one, two, or three successive turns of the whole flow; with the result that the wall contour can be calculated exactly by means of the Prandtl-Meyer "Lost Solution."

  19. CaCO/sub 3/ precipitation in high temperature and pressure brines in the presence of scale inhibitors using novel saturation index calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Oddo, J.E.; Sloan, K.B.; Tomson, M.B.; Bebout, D.G.; Bachman, A.L.

    1981-01-01

    A simplified method to calculate CaCO/sub 3/ saturation is developed using only commonly measured field parameters. The calculated saturation index (SI) and pH values are shown to be accurate at high temperatures and pressures in brines and are compared to less sophisticated and more complex calculations.

  20. Calculation of Molecular Shape Resonances Using Grid Based Exterior Complex Scaling and N2-Term Separable Potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abeln, Brant; Rescigno, Thomas N.; McCurdy, C. William

    2015-05-01

    A novel approach employing Exterior Complex Scaling (ECS) and discrete grid methods is used to calculate molecular resonance energies and widths for the 2Πg shape resonance state of N2-and 2Πu shape resonance of CO2-.These calculations are performed using a Finite Element Discrete Variable Representation (FE-DVR) in prolate spheroidal coordinates with an atomic center placed at each of the foci of the coordinate system, thereby preserving the cusp condition at those sites. A separable approximation to the interaction potential is made from the matrices of the nuclear attraction, direct and exchange operators generated by an existing quantum chemistry structure code in a Gaussian basis. These potentials are then represented on our ECS FE-DVR grid allowing the calculation of complex-valued resonance energies. The method is demonstrated here in the static-exchange approximation. Work supported by NSFGRF DGE1148897, USDOE, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division.

  1. A simple method of calculating power-law velocity profile exponents from experimental data. [for boundary layer shape factor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, J. M.

    1974-01-01

    Analytical expressions for the effects of compressibility and heat transfer on laminar and turbulent shape factors H have been developed. Solving the turbulent equation for the power law velocity profile exponent N has resulted in a simple technique by which the N values of experimental turbulent profiles can be calculated directly from the integral parameters. Thus the data plotting, curve fitting, and slope measuring, which is the normal technique of obtaining experimental N values, is eliminated. The N values obtained by this method should be within the accuracy with which they could be measured.

  2. Calculation of sheath and wake structure about a pillbox-shaped spacecraft in a flowing plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, L. W.

    1977-01-01

    A computer program was used for studies of the disturbed zones around bodies in flowing plasmas, particularly spacecraft and their associated sheaths and wakes. The program solved a coupled Poisson-Vlasov system of nonlinear partial differential integral equations to obtain distributions of electric potential and ion and electron density about a finite length cylinder in a plasma flow at arbitrary ion Mach numbers. The approach was applicable to a larger range of parameters than other available approaches. In sample calculations, bodies up to 100 Debye lengths in radius were treated, that is, larger than any previously treated realistically. Applications were made to in-situ satellite experiments.

  3. A Drought Monitoring Tool for Customized Calculation of a Standardized Precipitation Index Value in the Navajo Nation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cary, C.; Ly, V.; Gao, M.; Surunis, A.; Turnbull-Appell, S.; Sodergren, C.; Brooks, A. N.

    2015-12-01

    The Navajo Nation, located in the southwestern United States, has been increasingly impacted by severe drought events and regional changes in climate. These events are coupled with a lack of domestic water infrastructure and economic resources, leaving approximately one-third of the population without access to potable water in their homes. Current methods of monitoring climate and drought are dependent on national-scale monthly drought maps calculated by the Western Regional Climate Center (WRCC). These maps do not provide the spatial resolution needed to examine differences in drought severity across the vast Nation. To better understand and monitor drought regime changes in the Navajo Nation, this project comprises of two main components: 1) a geodatabase of historical climate information necessary to calculate Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) values and 2) a tool that calculates SPI values for a user-selected area within the study site. The tool and geodatabase use TRMM and GPM observed precipitation data, and Parameter-elevation Relationships on Independent Slopes Model (PRISM) modeled historical precipitation data. These products allow resource managers in the Navajo Nation to utilize current and future NASA Earth observation data for increased decision-making capacity regarding future climate change impact on water resources.

  4. Avoiding the 4-index transformation in one-body reduced density matrix functional calculations for separable functionals.

    PubMed

    Giesbertz, Klaas J H

    2016-08-01

    One of the major computational bottlenecks in one-body reduced density matrix (1RDM) functional theory is the evaluation of approximate 1RDM functionals and their derivatives. The reason is that more advanced approximate functionals are almost exclusively defined in the natural orbital basis, so a 4-index transformation of the two-electron integrals appears to be unavoidable. I will show that this is not the case and that so-called separable functionals can be evaluated much more efficiently, i.e. only at cubic cost in the basis size. Since most approximate functionals are actually separable, this new algorithm is an important development to make 1RDM functional theory calculations feasible for large electronic systems. PMID:26908059

  5. Self-validated calculation of characteristics of a Francis turbine and the mechanism of the S-shape operational instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z.; Titzschkau, M.

    2012-11-01

    A calculation method has been presented to accurately estimate the characteristics of a Francis turbine. Both the shock loss at the impeller inlet and the swirling flow loss at the Impeller exit have been confirmed to dominantly influence the turbine characteristics and particularly the hydraulic efficiency. Both together totally govern the through flow of water through the impeller being at the rest. Calculations have been performed for the flow rate, the shaft torque and the hydraulic efficiency and compared with the available measurements on a model turbine. Excellent agreements have been achieved. Some other interesting properties of the turbine characteristics could also be derived from the calculations and verified by experiments. For this reason and because of not using any unreliable assumptions the calculation method has been confirmed to be self-validated. The operational instability in the upper range of the rotational speed, known as the S-shape instability, is ascribed to the total flow separation and stagnation at the impeller inlet. In that range of the rotational speed, the operation of the Francis turbine oscillates between pump and turbine mode.

  6. Calculating electronic tunnel currents in networks of disordered irregularly shaped nanoparticles by mapping networks to arrays of parallel nonlinear resistors

    SciTech Connect

    Aghili Yajadda, Mir Massoud

    2014-10-21

    We have shown both theoretically and experimentally that tunnel currents in networks of disordered irregularly shaped nanoparticles (NPs) can be calculated by considering the networks as arrays of parallel nonlinear resistors. Each resistor is described by a one-dimensional or a two-dimensional array of equal size nanoparticles that the tunnel junction gaps between nanoparticles in each resistor is assumed to be equal. The number of tunnel junctions between two contact electrodes and the tunnel junction gaps between nanoparticles are found to be functions of Coulomb blockade energies. In addition, the tunnel barriers between nanoparticles were considered to be tilted at high voltages. Furthermore, the role of thermal expansion coefficient of the tunnel junction gaps on the tunnel current is taken into account. The model calculations fit very well to the experimental data of a network of disordered gold nanoparticles, a forest of multi-wall carbon nanotubes, and a network of few-layer graphene nanoplates over a wide temperature range (5-300 K) at low and high DC bias voltages (0.001 mV–50 V). Our investigations indicate, although electron cotunneling in networks of disordered irregularly shaped NPs may occur, non-Arrhenius behavior at low temperatures cannot be described by the cotunneling model due to size distribution in the networks and irregular shape of nanoparticles. Non-Arrhenius behavior of the samples at zero bias voltage limit was attributed to the disorder in the samples. Unlike the electron cotunneling model, we found that the crossover from Arrhenius to non-Arrhenius behavior occurs at two temperatures, one at a high temperature and the other at a low temperature.

  7. The reduced density matrix method for electronic structure calculations and the role of three-index representability conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhengji; Braams, Bastiaan J; Fukuda, Mituhiro; Overton, Michael L; Percus, Jerome K

    2004-02-01

    The variational approach for electronic structure based on the two-body reduced density matrix is studied, incorporating two representability conditions beyond the previously used P, Q, and G conditions. The additional conditions (called T1 and T2 here) are implicit in the work of Erdahl [Int. J. Quantum Chem. 13, 697 (1978)] and extend the well-known three-index diagonal conditions also known as the Weinhold-Wilson inequalities. The resulting optimization problem is a semidefinite program, a convex optimization problem for which computational methods have greatly advanced during the past decade. Formulating the reduced density matrix computation using the standard dual formulation of semidefinite programming, as opposed to the primal one, results in substantial computational savings and makes it possible to study larger systems than was done previously. Calculations of the ground state energy and the dipole moment are reported for 47 different systems, in each case using an STO-6G basis set and comparing with Hartree-Fock, singly and doubly substituted configuration interaction, Brueckner doubles (with triples), coupled cluster singles and doubles with perturbational treatment of triples, and full configuration interaction calculations. It is found that the use of the T1 and T2 conditions gives a significant improvement over just the P, Q, and G conditions, and provides in all cases that we have studied more accurate results than the other mentioned approximations. PMID:15268347

  8. Analysis of Endoscopic Electronic Image of Intramucosal Gastric Carcinoma Using a Software Program for Calculating Hemoglobin Index

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Gwang Ha; Kim, Kwang Baek; Lim, Eun Kyung; Choi, Seong Ho; Kim, Tae Oh; Heo, Jeong; Kang, Dae Hwan; Cho, Mong; Park, Do Youn

    2006-01-01

    Hemoglobin is the predominent pigment in the gastrointestinal mucosa, and the development of electronic endoscopy has made it possible to quantitatively measure the mucosal hemoglobin volume, by using a hemoglobin index (IHb). The aims of this study were to make a software program to calculate the IHb and then to investigate whether the mucosal IHb determined from the electronic endoscopic data is a useful marker for evaluating the color of intramucosal gastric carcinoma with regard to its value for discriminating between the histologic types. We made a software program for calculating the IHb in the endoscopic images. By using this program, the mean values of the IHb for the carcinoma (IHb-C) and those of the IHb for the surrounding non-cancerous mucosa (IHb-N) were calculated in 75 intestinal-type and 34 diffuse-type intramucosal gastric carcinomas. We then analyzed the ratio of the IHb-C to the IHb-N (C/N ratio). The C/N ratio in the intestinal-type carcinoma group was higher than that in the diffuse-type carcinoma group (p<0.001). In the diffuse-type carcinoma group, the C/N ratio in the body was lower than that in the antrum (p=0.022). The accuracy rate, sensitivity, specificity, and the positive and negative predictive values for the differential diagnosis of the diffuse-type carcinoma from the intestinal-type carcinoma were 94.5%, 94.1%, 94.7%, 88.9% and 97.3%, respectively. IHb is useful for making quantitative measurement of the endoscopic color in the intramucosal gastric carcinoma, and the C/N ratio by using the IHb would be helpful for distinguishing the diffuse-type carcinoma from the intestinal-type carcinoma. PMID:17179684

  9. Calculating Hillslope Contributions to River Basin Sediment Yield Using Observations in Small Watersheds and an Index-based Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinner, D. A.; Kinner, D. A.; Stallard, R. F.

    2001-12-01

    Detailed observations of hillslope erosion are generally made in < 1 km2 watersheds to gain a process-level understanding in a given geomorphic setting. In addressing sediment and nutrient source-to-sink questions, a broader, river basin ( > 1000 km2) view of erosion and deposition is necessary to incorporate the geographic variability in the factors controlling sediment mobilization and storage. At the river basin scale, floodplain and reservoir storage become significant in sediment budgets. In this study, we used observations from USDA experimental watersheds to constrain an index-based model of hillslope erosion for the 7270 km2 Nishnabotna River Basin in the agricultural, loess-mantled region of southwest Iowa. Spatial and time-series measurements from two watersheds near Treynor, Iowa were used to calibrate the model for the row-cropped fields of the basin. By modeling rainfall events over an 18-year period, model error was quantified. We then applied the model to calculate basin-wide hillslope erosion and colluvial storage. Soil maps and the National Land-Cover Dataset were used to estimate model soil erodibility and land-use factors. By comparing modeled hillslope yields with observed basin sediment yields, we calculated that hillslope contributions to sediment yield were < 50% for the period 1974-1992. A major uncertainty in modeling is the percentage of basin area that is terraced. We will use the isotopes Cs137 and Pb210 to distinguish bank (isotope-poor) and hillslope (isotope-rich) contributions in flood plain deposits. This independent estimate of the relative hillslope contribution to sediment yield will reduce modeling uncertainty.

  10. The rapid shallow breathing index as a predictor of successful mechanical ventilation weaning: clinical utility when calculated from ventilator data

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Leonardo Cordeiro; Lugon, Jocemir Ronaldo

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: The use of the rapid shallow breathing index (RSBI) is recommended in ICUs, where it is used as a predictor of mechanical ventilation (MV) weaning success. The aim of this study was to compare the performance of the RSBI calculated by the traditional method (described in 1991) with that of the RSBI calculated directly from MV parameters. METHODS: This was a prospective observational study involving patients who had been on MV for more than 24 h and were candidates for weaning. The RSBI was obtained by the same examiner using the two different methods (employing a spirometer and the parameters from the ventilator display) at random. In comparing the values obtained with the two methods, we used the Mann-Whitney test, Pearson's linear correlation test, and Bland-Altman plots. The performance of the methods was compared by evaluation of the areas under the ROC curves. RESULTS: Of the 109 selected patients (60 males; mean age, 62 ± 20 years), 65 were successfully weaned, and 36 died. There were statistically significant differences between the two methods for respiratory rate, tidal volume, and RSBI (p < 0.001 for all). However, when the two methods were compared, the concordance and the intra-observer variation coefficient were 0.94 (0.92-0.96) and 11.16%, respectively. The area under the ROC curve was similar for both methods (0.81 ± 0.04 vs. 0.82 ± 0.04; p = 0.935), which is relevant in the context of this study. CONCLUSIONS: The satisfactory performance of the RSBI as a predictor of weaning success, regardless of the method employed, demonstrates the utility of the method using the mechanical ventilator. PMID:26785962

  11. Reliability of Functional Connectivity of Electroencephalography Applying Microstate-Segmented Versus Classical Calculation of Phase Lag Index.

    PubMed

    Hatz, Florian; Hardmeier, Martin; Bousleiman, Habib; Rüegg, Stephan; Schindler, Christian; Fuhr, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Connectivity analysis characterizes normal and altered brain function, for example, using the phase lag index (PLI), which is based on phase relations. However, reliability of PLI over time is limited, especially for single- or regional-link analysis. One possible cause is repeated changes of network configuration during registration. These network changes may be associated with changes of the surface potential fields, which can be characterized by microstate analysis. Microstate analysis describes repeating periods of quasistable surface potential fields lasting in the subsecond time range. This study aims to describe a novel combination of PLI with microstate analysis (microstate-segmented PLI = msPLI) and to determine its impact on the reliability of single links, regional links, and derived graph measures. msPLI was calculated in a cohort of 34 healthy controls three times over 2 years. A fully automated processing of electroencephalography was used. Resulting connectomes were compared using Pearson correlation, and test-retest reliability (TRT reliability) was assessed using the intraclass correlation coefficient. msPLI resulted in higher TRT reliability than classical PLI analysis for single or regional links, average clustering coefficient, average shortest path length, and degree diversity. Combination of microstates and phase-derived connectivity measures such as PLI improves reliability of single-link, regional-link, and graph analysis. PMID:27220459

  12. Impact of Radiatively Interactive Dust Aerosols in the NASA GEOS-5 Climate Model: Sensitivity to Dust Particle Shape and Refractive Index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colarco, Peter R.; Nowottnick, Edward Paul; Randles, Cynthia A.; Yi, Bingqi; Yang, Ping; Kim, Kyu-Myong; Smith, Jamison A.; Bardeen, Charles D.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the radiative effects of dust aerosols in the NASA GEOS-5 atmospheric general circulation model. GEOS-5 is improved with the inclusion of a sectional aerosol and cloud microphysics module, the Community Aerosol and Radiation Model for Atmospheres (CARMA). Into CARMA we introduce treatment of the dust and sea salt aerosol lifecycle, including sources, transport evolution, and sinks. The aerosols are radiatively coupled to GEOS-5, and we perform a series of multi-decade AMIP-style simulations in which dust optical properties (spectral refractive index and particle shape distribution) are varied. Optical properties assuming spherical dust particles are from Mie theory, while those for non-spherical shape distributions are drawn from a recently available database for tri-axial ellipsoids. The climatologies of the various simulations generally compare well to data from the MODIS, MISR, and CALIOP space-based sensors, the ground-based AERONET, and surface measurements of dust deposition and concentration. Focusing on the summertime Saharan dust cycle we show significant variability in our simulations resulting from different choices of dust optical properties. Atmospheric heating due to dust enhances surface winds over important Saharan dust sources, and we find a positive feedback where increased dust absorption leads to increased dust emissions. We further find that increased dust absorption leads to a strengthening of the summertime Hadley cell circulation, increasing dust lofting to higher altitudes and strengthening the African Easterly Jet. This leads to a longer atmospheric residence time, higher altitude, and generally more northward transport of dust in simulations with the most absorbing dust optical properties. We find that particle shape, although important for radiance simulations, is a minor effect compared to choices of refractive index, although total atmospheric forcing is enhanced by greater than 10 percent for simulations incorporating a

  13. PT -symmetry-induced evolution of sharp asymmetric line shapes and high-sensitivity refractive index sensors in a three-cavity array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiahua; Yu, Rong; Ding, Chunling; Wu, Ying

    2016-02-01

    It is important to control and tune the Fano-resonance spectra to achieve a large slope with, in addition, a relatively high extinction ratio for low-power optical switching and high-sensitivity sensing. Here, we explore the evolution of sharp asymmetric Fano-like line shapes in a three-cavity array with local parity-time (PT ) symmetry. In this three-cavity configuration, a single cavity is coupled to a PT -symmetric combination of two cavities via a common waveguide. The influences of local PT symmetry on the asymmetric Fano-like line shapes are investigated by monitoring the output transmission spectra at various system parameters. It is found that both the slope and the extinction ratio within the sharp asymmetric line shapes can be significantly enhanced by introducing the PT -symmetric unit, compared with the configuration of two indirectly coupled cavities. Subsequently we discuss the application of such a PT -assisted configuration as a family of high-sensitivity refractive index sensors by numerical analysis. For practical parameters based on microring resonators, the best sensitivity of refractive index sensors is more than five orders of magnitude larger than two indirectly coupled lossy cavities. The proposed scheme can be implemented in current state-of-the-art experiments. This investigation can help us to understand the interplay between the Fano resonance and PT symmetry.

  14. SU-E-I-76: Matching Primary and Scattered X-Ray Spectra for Use in Calculating the Diagnostic Radiation Index of Protection

    SciTech Connect

    Pasciak, A; Jones, A; Wagner, L

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Lightweight lead-free or lead-composite protective garments exploit k-edge interactions to attenuate scattered X-rays. Manufacturers specify the protective value of garments in terms of lead equivalence at a single kVp. This is inadequate, as the protection provided by such garments varies with radiation quality in different use conditions. We present a method for matching scattered X-ray spectra to primary X-ray spectra. The resulting primary spectra can be used to measure penetration through protective garments, and such measurements can be weighted and summed to determine a Diagnostic Radiation Index for Protection (DRIP). Methods: Scattered X-ray spectra from fluoroscopic procedures were modeled using Monte Carlo techniques in MCNP-X 2.7. Data on imaging geometry, operator position, patient size, and primary beam spectra were gathered from clinical fluoroscopy procedures. These data were used to generate scattered X-ray spectra resulting from procedural conditions. Technical factors, including kV and added filtration, that yielded primary X-ray spectra that optimally matched the generated scattered X-ray spectra were identified through numerical optimization using a sequential quadratic programming (SQP) algorithm. Results: The primary spectra generated with shape functions matched the relative flux in each bin of the scattered spectra within 5%, and half and quarter-value layers matched within 0.1%. The DRIP for protective garments can be determined by measuring the penetration through protective garments using the matched primary spectra, then calculating a weighted average according to the expected clinical use of the garment. The matched primary spectra are specified in terms of first and second half-value layers in aluminum and acrylic. Conclusion: Lead equivalence is inadequate for completely specifying the protective value of garments. Measuring penetration through a garment using full scatter conditions is very difficult. The primary spectra

  15. Impact of radiatively interactive dust aerosols in the NASA GEOS-5 climate model: Sensitivity to dust particle shape and refractive index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colarco, Peter R.; Nowottnick, Edward P.; Randles, Cynthia A.; Yi, Bingqi; Yang, Ping; Kim, Kyu-Myong; Smith, Jamison A.; Bardeen, Charles G.

    2014-01-01

    The radiative effects of Saharan dust aerosols are investigated in the NASA GEOS-5 atmospheric general circulation model. A sectional aerosol microphysics model (CARMA) is run online in GEOS-5. CARMA treats the dust aerosol lifecycle, and its tracers are radiatively coupled to GEOS-5. A series of AMIP-style simulations are performed, in which input dust optical properties (particle shape and refractive index) are varied. Simulated dust distributions for summertime Saharan dust compare well to observations, with best results found when the most absorbing dust optical properties are assumed. Dust absorption leads to a strengthening of the summertime Hadley cell circulation, increased dust lofting to higher altitudes, and a strengthening of the African easterly jet, resulting in increased dust atmospheric lifetime and farther northward and westward transport. We find a positive feedback of dust radiative forcing on emissions, in contrast with previous studies, which we attribute to our having a relatively strong longwave forcing caused by our simulating larger effective particle sizes. This longwave forcing reduces the magnitude of midday net surface cooling relative to other studies, and leads to a nighttime warming that results in higher nighttime wind speeds and dust emissions. The radiative effects of dust particle shape have only minor impact on transport and emissions, with small (~5%) impact on top of atmosphere shortwave forcing, in line with previous studies, but relatively more pronounced effects on shortwave atmospheric heating and surface forcing (~20% increase in atmospheric forcing for spheroids). Shape effects on longwave heating terms are of order ~10%.

  16. A method to calculate fission-fragment yields Y(Z,N) versus proton and neutron number in the Brownian shape-motion model

    SciTech Connect

    Moller, Peter; Ichikawa, Takatoshi

    2015-12-23

    In this study, we propose a method to calculate the two-dimensional (2D) fission-fragment yield Y(Z,N) versus both proton and neutron number, with inclusion of odd-even staggering effects in both variables. The approach is to use the Brownian shape-motion on a macroscopic-microscopic potential-energy surface which, for a particular compound system is calculated versus four shape variables: elongation (quadrupole moment Q2), neck d, left nascent fragment spheroidal deformation ϵf1, right nascent fragment deformation ϵf2 and two asymmetry variables, namely proton and neutron numbers in each of the two fragments. The extension of previous models 1) introduces a method to calculate this generalized potential-energy function and 2) allows the correlated transfer of nucleon pairs in one step, in addition to sequential transfer. In the previous version the potential energy was calculated as a function of Z and N of the compound system and its shape, including the asymmetry of the shape. We outline here how to generalize the model from the “compound-system” model to a model where the emerging fragment proton and neutron numbers also enter, over and above the compound system composition.

  17. A method to calculate fission-fragment yields Y(Z,N) versus proton and neutron number in the Brownian shape-motion model

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Moller, Peter; Ichikawa, Takatoshi

    2015-12-23

    In this study, we propose a method to calculate the two-dimensional (2D) fission-fragment yield Y(Z,N) versus both proton and neutron number, with inclusion of odd-even staggering effects in both variables. The approach is to use the Brownian shape-motion on a macroscopic-microscopic potential-energy surface which, for a particular compound system is calculated versus four shape variables: elongation (quadrupole moment Q2), neck d, left nascent fragment spheroidal deformation ϵf1, right nascent fragment deformation ϵf2 and two asymmetry variables, namely proton and neutron numbers in each of the two fragments. The extension of previous models 1) introduces a method to calculate this generalizedmore » potential-energy function and 2) allows the correlated transfer of nucleon pairs in one step, in addition to sequential transfer. In the previous version the potential energy was calculated as a function of Z and N of the compound system and its shape, including the asymmetry of the shape. We outline here how to generalize the model from the “compound-system” model to a model where the emerging fragment proton and neutron numbers also enter, over and above the compound system composition.« less

  18. A method to calculate fission-fragment yields Y(Z,N) versus proton and neutron number in the Brownian shape-motion model. Application to calculations of U and Pu charge yields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möller, Peter; Ichikawa, Takatoshi

    2015-12-01

    We propose a method to calculate the two-dimensional (2D) fission-fragment yield Y(Z,N) versus both proton and neutron number, with inclusion of odd-even staggering effects in both variables. The approach is to use the Brownian shape-motion on a macroscopic-microscopic potential-energy surface which, for a particular compound system is calculated versus four shape variables: elongation (quadrupole moment Q2), neck d , left nascent fragment spheroidal deformation ɛ_{f1}, right nascent fragment deformation ɛ_{f2} and two asymmetry variables, namely proton and neutron numbers in each of the two fragments. The extension of previous models 1) introduces a method to calculate this generalized potential-energy function and 2) allows the correlated transfer of nucleon pairs in one step, in addition to sequential transfer. In the previous version the potential energy was calculated as a function of Z and N of the compound system and its shape, including the asymmetry of the shape. We outline here how to generalize the model from the "compound-system" model to a model where the emerging fragment proton and neutron numbers also enter, over and above the compound system composition.

  19. Noodles and stars allow a precise and efficient calculation of the Z-line shape and the polarization asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung-Choon Im, Carl

    1990-03-01

    We give a pedagogical introduction to the star functions and the Noodle method. The Z-line shape and the polarization asymmetry at SLC/LEP can be evaluated elegantly and efficiently using the star functions and the Noodle method.

  20. Linear calculation model for prediction of color rendering index performance associated with correlated color temperature of white light-emitting diodes with two phosphors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ching-Cherng; Chen, Ching-Yi; Chang, Jung-Hsuan; Yang, Tsung-Hsun; Ji, Wei-Shih; Jeng, Yow-Shiuan; Wu, Hsin-Mei

    2012-05-01

    Linear calculation models are proposed and demonstrated to evaluate the color rendering index (CRI) performance associated with the correlated color temperature (CCT) of a white light emitting diode with two phosphors. All the three proposed models are simple and easy, and the error in predicting the CRI is within 1, while the deviation of the CCT is around 300 K and less. Such models can be useful in evaluating the chromatic performance of a specific recipe with two phosphors.

  1. Calculated Effects of Body Shape on the Bow-Shock Overpressures in the Far Field of Bodies in Supersonic Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lansing, Donald L.

    1960-01-01

    A theory for the supersonic flow about bodies in uniform flight in a homogeneous medium is reviewed and an integral which expresses the effect of body shape upon the flow parameters in the far field is reduced to a form which may be readily evaluated for arbitrary body shapes. This expression is then used to investigate the effect of nose angle, fineness ratio, and location of maximum body cross section upon the far-field pressure jump across the bow-shock of slender bodies. Curves are presented showing the variation of the shock strength with each of these parameters. It is found that, for a wide variety of shapes having equal fineness ratios, the integral has nearly a constant value.

  2. Determinants and Regression Equations for the Calculation of z Scores of Left Ventricular Tissue Doppler Longitudinal Indexes in a Healthy Italian Pediatric Population

    PubMed Central

    Fibbi, Veronica; Ballo, Piercarlo; Spaziani, Gaia; Calabri, Giovanni B.; Pollini, Iva; Zuppiroli, Alfredo; Chiappa, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Aim. We investigated the predictors of tissue Doppler left ventricular (LV) longitudinal indexes in a healthy Italian pediatric population and established normative data and regression equations for the calculation of z scores. Methods and Results. A total of 369 healthy subjects aged 1–17 years (age of 6.4 ± 1.1 years, 49.1% female) underwent echocardiography. LV peak longitudinal velocity at systole (s'), early diastole (e'), and late diastole (a') was determined by tissue Doppler. The ratio of peak early diastolic LV filling velocity to e' was calculated. Age was the only independent determinant of s' (β = 0.491, p < 0.0001) and the strongest determinant of e' (β = 0.334, p < 0.0001) and E/e' (β = −0.369, p < 0.0001). Heart rate was the main determinant of a' (β = 0.265, p < 0.0001). Male gender showed no effects except for a weak association with lateral s', suggesting no need of gender-specific reference ranges. Age-specific reference ranges, regression equations, and scatterplots for the calculation of z scores were determined for each index. Conclusion. In a pediatric Italian population, age was the strongest determinant of LV longitudinal dynamics. The availability of age-specific normality data for the calculation of z scores may allow for correctly detecting LV dysfunction in pediatric pathological populations. PMID:26759729

  3. Ab initio calculation of the cross sections for electron impact vibrational excitation of CO via the 2Π shape resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcetta, Michael F.; Fair, Mark C.; Tharnish, Emily M.; Williams, Lorna M.; Hayes, Nathan J.; Jordan, Kenneth D.

    2016-03-01

    The stabilization method is used to calculate the complex potential energy curve of the 2Π state of CO- as a function of bond length, with the refinement that separate potentials are determined for p-wave and d-wave attachment and detachment of the excess electron. Using the resulting complex potentials, absolute vibrational excitation cross sections are calculated as a function of electron energy and scattering angle. The calculated cross sections agree well with experiment.

  4. Noodles and stars allow a precise and efficient calculation of the Z-line shape and the polarization asymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Jung-Choon Im, C. Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 )

    1990-03-05

    We give a pedagogical introduction to the star functions and the Noodle method. The {ital Z}-line shape and the polarization asymmetry at SLC/LEP can be evaluated elegantly and efficiently using the star functions and the Noodle method.

  5. Airborne Coarse Mode Aerosol Measurements with the CAS-DPOL Instrument: Effects of Particle Shape and Refractive Index and Implications for Radiative Transfer Estimate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauer, D. N.; Weinzierl, B.; Gasteiger, J.; Spanu, A.; Freudenthaler, V.; Gross, S.

    2015-12-01

    Each year huge amounts of mineral dust are mobilized in deserts and arid regions of the world and transported over large distances forming thick elevated aerosol layers with a substantial fraction of coarse mode particles. Optical properties of mineral dust, including the absorptive refractive index of some components, cause a significant effect on the atmospheric radiative energy balance from optical to infrared wavelengths. The aerosol characteristics, in particular its coarse mode size distribution, are modified during long-range transport by aging and deposition processes. This also affects the aerosol optical properties and therefore the effect on the atmospheric radiative energy budget. In-situ measurements of aerosol microphysical properties are essential to characterize those effects in order to be implemented in global climate models in parametrized form. However, in-situ measurements of airborne coarse mode aerosols such as mineral dust and volcanic ash are challenging and the measurements are usually affected by substantial uncertainties. In this work we use airborne measurements of mineral dust from our optical light-scattering spectrometer CAS-DPOL during SALTRACE 2013 to discuss the analysis of such data. We cover the effects of varying refractive index and particle shapes and develop recommendations for the configuration of the CAS-DPOL for aerosol studies. We also present an inversion method to derive coarse mode size distributions from light-scattering probes for mixtures of non-spherical, absorbing aerosols. The size distributions retrieved from the in-situ measurements are then validated using an independent analysis with a combination of sun-photometer and lidar data. We apply these methods to investigate the Saharan mineral dust particle size distributions measured on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean and discuss the influence of aerosol aging on the atmospheric radiative energy budget. With this example we also assess how the uncertainties

  6. Unsteady coupled 3D calculations of melt flow, interface shape, and species transport for directional solidification of silicon in a traveling magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadzis, K.; Vizman, D.; Friedrich, J.

    2013-03-01

    Directional solidification of large multi-crystalline silicon ingots is a distinctly unsteady process with a complex interaction between melt flow, crystallization interface, and species transport. Both the different time-scales and the three-dimensional character make numerical simulations of this process a challenging task. The complexity of such simulations increases further if external magnetic fields are used to enhance the melt flow. In this contribution, several three-dimensional coupled unsteady calculations are carried out for a 22×22×11 cm3 silicon melt directionally solidified in a traveling magnetic field. The justification of various approximations in the numerical models is discussed with an emphasis on the frequently used quasi steady-state models for the calculation of the interface shape. It is shown that an upward traveling magnetic field leads to a symmetric concave interface shape while a downward field results in a convex interface with a distinct asymmetry at the current supplies. These results agree in both unsteady and quasi steady-state calculations, but only unsteady calculations reveal the flow-induced local oscillations of the interface. The unsteady segregation process of carbon and oxygen impurities exhibits a non-uniform concentration along the crystallization interface although the bulk concentration is near to the complete mixing limit in the cases with a traveling magnetic field.

  7. High peak- and average-power pulse shaped fiber laser in the ns-regime applying step-index XLMA gain fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinger, R.; Grundmann, F.-P.; Hapke, C.; Ruppik, S.

    2014-03-01

    Pulsed fiber lasers and continuous-wave (cw) fiber lasers have become the tool of choice in more and more laser based industrial applications like metal cutting and welding mainly because of their robustness, compactness, high brightness, high efficiency and reasonable costs. However, to further increase the productivity with those laser types there is a great demand for even higher laser power specifications. In this context we demonstrate a pulsed high peak- and averagepower fiber laser in a Master Oscillator Power Amplifier (MOPA) configuration with selectable pulse durations between 1 ns and several hundred nanoseconds. To overcome fiber nonlinearities such as stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) and self-phase-modulation (SPM) flexible Ytterbium doped extra-large mode area (XLMA) step index fibers, prepared by novel powder-sinter technology, have been used as gain fibers. As an example, for 12 ns pulses with a repetition rate of 10 kHz, a pump power limited average laser output power of more than 400 W in combination with peak powers of more than 3.5 MW (close to self-focusing-threshold) has been achieved in stable operation. The potentials of this laser system have been further explored towards longer pulse durations in order to achieve even higher pulse energies by means of pulse shaping techniques. In addition, investigations have been conducted with reduced pulse energies and repetition rates up to 500 kHz and average powers of more than 500 W at nearly diffraction limited beam quality.

  8. On realistic size equivalence and shape of spheroidal Saharan mineral dust particles applied in solar and thermal radiative transfer calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto, S.; Trautmann, T.; Wendisch, M.

    2010-11-01

    Realistic size equivalence and shape of Saharan mineral dust particles are derived from on in-situ particle, lidar and sun photometer measurements during SAMUM-1 in Morocco (19 May 2006), dealing with measured size- and altitude-resolved axis ratio distributions of assumed spheroidal model particles. The data were applied in optical property, radiative effect, forcing and heating effect simulations to quantify the realistic impact of particle non-sphericity. It turned out that volume-to-surface equivalent spheroids with prolate shape are most realistic: particle non-sphericity only slightly affects single scattering albedo and asymmetry parameter but may enhance extinction coefficient by up to 10%. At the bottom of the atmosphere (BOA) the Saharan mineral dust always leads to a loss of solar radiation, while the sign of the forcing at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) depends on surface albedo: solar cooling/warming over a mean ocean/land surface. In the thermal spectral range the dust inhibits the emission of radiation to space and warms the BOA. The most realistic case of particle non-sphericity causes changes of total (solar plus thermal) forcing by 55/5% at the TOA over ocean/land and 15% at the BOA over both land and ocean and enhances total radiative heating within the dust plume by up to 20%. Large dust particles significantly contribute to all the radiative effects reported.

  9. On realistic size equivalence and shape of spheroidal Saharan mineral dust particles applied in solar and thermal radiative transfer calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto, S.; Trautmann, T.; Wendisch, M.

    2011-05-01

    Realistic size equivalence and shape of Saharan mineral dust particles are derived from in-situ particle, lidar and sun photometer measurements during SAMUM-1 in Morocco (19 May 2006), dealing with measured size- and altitude-resolved axis ratio distributions of assumed spheroidal model particles. The data were applied in optical property, radiative effect, forcing and heating effect simulations to quantify the realistic impact of particle non-sphericity. It turned out that volume-to-surface equivalent spheroids with prolate shape are most realistic: particle non-sphericity only slightly affects single scattering albedo and asymmetry parameter but may enhance extinction coefficient by up to 10 %. At the bottom of the atmosphere (BOA) the Saharan mineral dust always leads to a loss of solar radiation, while the sign of the forcing at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) depends on surface albedo: solar cooling/warming over a mean ocean/land surface. In the thermal spectral range the dust inhibits the emission of radiation to space and warms the BOA. The most realistic case of particle non-sphericity causes changes of total (solar plus thermal) forcing by 55/5 % at the TOA over ocean/land and 15 % at the BOA over both land and ocean and enhances total radiative heating within the dust plume by up to 20 %. Large dust particles significantly contribute to all the radiative effects reported. They strongly enhance the absorbing properties and forward scattering in the solar and increase predominantly, e.g., the total TOA forcing of the dust over land.

  10. LORES: Low resolution shape program for the calculation of small angle scattering profiles for biological macromolecules in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, J.; Deyhim, A.; Krueger, S.; Gregurick, S. K.

    2005-08-01

    A program for determining the low resolution shape of biological macromolecules, based on the optimization of a small angle neutron scattering profile to experimental data, is presented. This program, termed LORES, relies on a Monte Carlo optimization procedure and will allow for multiple scattering length densities of complex structures. It is therefore more versatile than utilizing a form factor approach to produce low resolution structural models. LORES is easy to compile and use, and allows for structural modeling of biological samples in real time. To illustrate the effectiveness and versatility of the program, we present four specific biological examples, Apoferritin (shell model), Ribonuclease S (ellipsoidal model), a 10-mer dsDNA (duplex helix) and a construct of a 10-mer DNA/PNA duplex helix (heterogeneous structure). These examples are taken from protein and nucleic acid SANS studies, of both large and small scale structures. We find, in general, that our program will accurately reproduce the geometric shape of a given macromolecule, when compared with the known crystallographic structures. We also present results to illustrate the lower limit of the experimental resolution which the LORES program is capable of modeling. Program summaryTitle of program:LORES Catalogue identifier: ADVC Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADVC Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Computer:SGI Origin200, SGI Octane, SGI Linux, Intel Pentium PC Operating systems:UNIX64 6.5 and LINUX 2.4.7 Programming language used:C Memory required to execute with typical data:8 MB No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.:2270 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.:13 302 Distribution format:tar.gz External subprograms used:The entire code must be linked with the MATH library

  11. Calculation of the resonance escape factor of magnesium spectral line shapes in the case of a MgCl{sub 2}--water plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hannachi, R.; Cressault, Y.; Teulet, Ph.; Gleizes, A.; Ben Lakhdar, Z.; Taieeb, G.

    2007-09-19

    The resonance escape factors for the lines emitted by a neutral magnesium atom MgI at 285.2127 nm (3 {sup 1}S-3 {sup 1}P) and of ionic magnesium MgII at 279.5528 nm (3 {sup 2}S-3 {sup 2}P) are calculated assuming a Voigt profile and in the case of MgCl{sub 2}-water plasma. The dependence of the escape factor on the optical thickness {tau}{sub 0} from the line center which itself depends on the two main spectral line shape broadening mechanisms (pressure and Doppler effects) are considered. The variation of the resonance escape factors with the temperature and the MgCl{sub 2} molar proportion are also investigated. This calculation is useful for the application of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy in the quantitative analysis of elemental composition.

  12. A program system for ab initio MO calculations on vector and parallel processing machines III. Integral reordering and four-index transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiest, Roland; Demuynck, Jean; Bénard, Marc; Rohmer, Marie-Madeleine; Ernenwein, René

    1991-01-01

    This series of three papers presents a program system for ab initio molecular orbital calculations on vector and parallel computers. Part III is devoted to the four-index transformation on a molecular orbital basis of size NMO of the file of two-electron integrals ( pq∥ rs) generated by a contracted Gaussian set of size NATO (number of atomic orbitals). A fast Yoshimine algorithm first sorts the ( pq∥ rs) integrals with respect to index pq only. This file of half-sorted integrals labelled by their rs-index can be processed without further modification to generate either the transformed integrals or the supermatrix elements. The large memory available on the CRAY-2 has made possible to implement the transformation algorithm proposed by Bender in 1972, which requires a core-storage allocation varying as (NATO) 3. Two versions of Bender's algorithm are included in the present program. The first version is an in-core version, where the complete file of accumulated contributions to transformed integrals is stored and updated in central memory. This version has been parallelized by distributing over a limited number of logical tasks the NATO steps corresponding to the scanning of the most external loop. The second version is an out-of-core version, in which twin fires are alternatively used as input and output for the accumulated contributions to transformed integrals. This version is not parallel. The choice of one or another version and (for version 1) the determination of the number of tasks depends upon the balance between the available and the requested amounts of storage. The storage management and the choice of the proper version are carried out automatically using dynamic storage allocation. Both versions are vectorized and take advantage of the molecular symmetry.

  13. A regression model for calculating the second dimension retention index in comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bing; Shen, Hao; Fang, Aiqin; Huang, De-Shuang; Jiang, Changjun; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Peng

    2016-06-17

    Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC/TOF-MS) system has become a key analytical technology in high-throughput analysis. Retention index has been approved to be helpful for compound identification in one-dimensional gas chromatography, which is also true for two-dimensional gas chromatography. In this work, a novel regression model was proposed for calculating the second dimension retention index of target components where n-alkanes were used as reference compounds. This model was developed to depict the relationship among adjusted second dimension retention time, temperature of the second dimension column and carbon number of n-alkanes by an exponential nonlinear function with only five parameters. Three different criteria were introduced to find the optimal values of parameters. The performance of this model was evaluated using experimental data of n-alkanes (C7-C31) at 24 temperatures which can cover all 0-6s adjusted retention time area. The experimental results show that the mean relative error between predicted adjusted retention time and experimental data of n-alkanes was only 2%. Furthermore, our proposed model demonstrates a good extrapolation capability for predicting adjusted retention time of target compounds which located out of the range of the reference compounds in the second dimension adjusted retention time space. Our work shows the deviation was less than 9 retention index units (iu) while the number of alkanes were added up to 5. The performance of our proposed model has also been demonstrated by analyzing a mixture of compounds in temperature programmed experiments. PMID:27208985

  14. Calculated absorption and scattering properties of gold nanoparticles of different size, shape, and composition: applications in biological imaging and biomedicine.

    PubMed

    Jain, Prashant K; Lee, Kyeong Seok; El-Sayed, Ivan H; El-Sayed, Mostafa A

    2006-04-13

    The selection of nanoparticles for achieving efficient contrast for biological and cell imaging applications, as well as for photothermal therapeutic applications, is based on the optical properties of the nanoparticles. We use Mie theory and discrete dipole approximation method to calculate absorption and scattering efficiencies and optical resonance wavelengths for three commonly used classes of nanoparticles: gold nanospheres, silica-gold nanoshells, and gold nanorods. The calculated spectra clearly reflect the well-known dependence of nanoparticle optical properties viz. the resonance wavelength, the extinction cross-section, and the ratio of scattering to absorption, on the nanoparticle dimensions. A systematic quantitative study of the various trends is presented. By increasing the size of gold nanospheres from 20 to 80 nm, the magnitude of extinction as well as the relative contribution of scattering to the extinction rapidly increases. Gold nanospheres in the size range commonly employed ( approximately 40 nm) show an absorption cross-section 5 orders higher than conventional absorbing dyes, while the magnitude of light scattering by 80-nm gold nanospheres is 5 orders higher than the light emission from strongly fluorescing dyes. The variation in the plasmon wavelength maximum of nanospheres, i.e., from approximately 520 to 550 nm, is however too limited to be useful for in vivo applications. Gold nanoshells are found to have optical cross-sections comparable to and even higher than the nanospheres. Additionally, their optical resonances lie favorably in the near-infrared region. The resonance wavelength can be rapidly increased by either increasing the total nanoshell size or increasing the ratio of the core-to-shell radius. The total extinction of nanoshells shows a linear dependence on their total size, however, it is independent of the core/shell radius ratio. The relative scattering contribution to the extinction can be rapidly increased by increasing

  15. Competition between Zener's double exchange and p-d exchange in δ-(Zn, Mn, Li)Se with shape deformation: LDA + U calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Y.; Liu, T.; Wei, X. Y.; Zhu, Y.; Shi, D. N.; Ma, C. L.; Zhang, K. C.; Yang, Z. Q.

    2015-11-01

    By local-density approximation plus U (LDA + U) calculations, diluted magnetic semiconductors (DMS) δ-(Zn, Mn, Li)Se are dominated by Zener's p-d exchange, which is different from Zener's double exchange mechanism by PBE calculations. The main peak of Mn d states is shifted to lower energy -3.9 eV versus Fermi energy. All configurations under shape deformation are strong ferromagnetic (FM) ones due to the large splitting of Mn d states. Because of the two-dimensional (2D) ordered Mn atoms with hole and long ranged effect of p-d exchange coupling, exchange energy of the supercell with crystal constant is much larger with p-d exchange than that with double exchange. The largest exchange energy is around the crystal constant. Fermi level across the valley of FM Mn d states makes the FM state much stable. Comparing with pure ZnSe, p-type co-doping of Li in δ-(Zn, Mn, Li)Se has a significant effect on the atomic structure. These results are useful in the research of DMS with shape deformation and p-type co-doping for spintronic applications.

  16. Calculation of the gas temperature in a throughflow atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge torch by spectral line shape analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ionascut-Nedelcescu, A.; Carlone, C.; Kogelschatz, U.; Gravelle, D. V.; Boulos, M. I

    2008-03-15

    An analysis of spectral line profiles is used to calculate the gas temperature and to estimate the upper limit of the electron density in an atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge torch. Two transitions are studied, that of helium (He) at 587.5 nm and that of hydrogen (H{sub {beta}}) at 486.1 nm, both observed in the spectra of the light emitted from the gap-space region. Relevant broadening mechanisms including the Doppler and Stark effects, as well as the collision processes between an emitter and a neutral particle, are reviewed. It is deduced that the main contribution to the broadened profiles is due to collisions. Through knowledge of the van der Waals interaction potential, a general expression for determining the gas temperature is derived and applied to each transition. The results obtained from both lines are in agreement; i.e., the gas temperature is found to be 460{+-}60 K at the highest voltage applied. This value is consistent with the experimental observation that at these conditions the afterglow plasma cannot ignite paper, whose ignition temperature is 507 K. Since no signature of the Stark effect can be detected either in He or H{sub {beta}} transition, the upper limit of the electron density, estimated from the uncertainty on the H{sub {beta}} linewidth, is 4x10{sup 12} cm{sup -3}. The generality of the method allows one to determine the temperature as a function of other parameters, such as voltage and flow rate. Concerning the applied voltage, the gas temperature increases linearly from 315{+-}30 to 460{+-}60 K, as derived from both lines. Over the same voltage range, a similar behavior is found for the rotational temperature, as deduced from the first negative B({sup 2}{sigma}{sub u}{sup +},v=0){yields}X({sup 2}{sigma}{sub g}{sup +},v=0) transition of the molecular nitrogen ion. However, the temperature varies between 325{+-}30 and 533{+-}15 K, indicating an overestimation of the gas temperature. On the other hand, the gas

  17. Interobserver and intraobserver variability in the calculation of the lipid-laden macrophage index: implications for its use in the evaluation of aspiration in children.

    PubMed

    Reid-Nicholson, Michelle; Kulkarni, Renuka; Adeagbo, Bamidele; Looney, Stephen; Crosby, John

    2010-12-01

    The lipid-laden macrophage index (LLMI) is a semiquantitative test used to evaluate aspiration in children. We assessed the reliability and reproducibility of LLMI by calculating interobserver and intraobserver variability among pathologists, with and without expertise in cytopathology. Forty-nine bronchoalveolar washes/lavages were blindly reviewed by four reviewers and assigned an LLMI. Three pathologists (two cytopathologists, one pathology fellow) reviewed slides twice and one cytotechnologist reviewed them once. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) with 95% confidence interval (C.I.) was used to measure overall intraobserver and interobserver agreement. Interobserver agreement was also calculated separately for each pair of reviewers. ICC values did not indicate an acceptable level of interobserver agreement among pathologists, with (ICC = 0.67, 95% C.I.: 0.56-0.77) and without (ICC = 0.77, 95% C.I.: 0.61-0.84) the cytotechnologist included in the analysis. An ICC of 0.84 (95% C.I.: 0.78-0.89) indicated an acceptable level of intraobserver agreement among pathologists. When calculated separately for each pair of reviewers, all but two ICC values for interobserver agreement were less than 0.75 (the minimally acceptable value for a reliable clinical measurement), and the lower confidence limit of each of the 95% C.I. was far below the 0.75 cutoff. Using Lin's coefficient, intraobserver variability was only acceptable for two pathologists. Our study highlights the lack of precision and subjectivity of the LLMI, as well as the significant inter and intraobserver bias that may occur among experienced and inexperienced pathologists, and cytotechnologists. Clinicians and cytopathologists alike should be mindful of this potential pitfall and interpret LLMI scores with caution. PMID:20049966

  18. Engineered SOI slot waveguide ring resonator V-shape resonance combs for refraction index sensing up to 1300nm/RIU (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weiwei; Serna, Samuel; Le Roux, Xavier; Vivien, Laurent; Cassan, Eric

    2016-05-01

    breakthrough of the performance of slot ring resonator sensing ability. Different from the normal sensing regime by monitoring one specific resonance (λres) peak shift, the proposed approach stems from the sensitivity of the RR critical coupling. The critical coupling peak is auto-selected out by matching the following condition: the ring resonator's round trip attenuation coefficient a(λ) being equal to the coupler self-coupling coefficient k(λ), thus resulting in the deepest extinction ratio (ER) among the spectrum RR comb. The obtained sensing comb, based on a V-shape spectrum envelop, is engineered by controlling a(λ) and k(λ) with opposite monotonicities. Both a(λ)and k(λ) are tuned to have a large dispersion along the wavelength, which means that |a(λ)-k(λ)| keeps rapidly increasing as λres is far away from λc, eliminating the resonance ER quickly down to 0. Experimentally, slot waveguide ring resonators with a radius of 50µm have been fabricated on a standard silicon platform with a Si thickness of 220nm, loaded by racetrack couplers with a straight coupling length of 20µm. Sensing experiments have been carried out by changing the top cladding material from a series of Cargille optical liquids with refraction index values ranging from 1.3 to 1.5. The Q factors of critical coupling resonances was monitored from 2,000 to 6,000, and measured wavelength shifts of this peak are from 1.41µm to 1.56µm. The maximum sensitivity of 1300nm/RIU is observed in the cladding index range 1.30-1.35. To conclude, a new sensing regime by tracking the critical coupling resonance λc of slot waveguide ring resonators is demonstrated. The reported sensitivity is up 1300nm/RIU around the water RI of 1.33, and the monitored sensing FOM is about 2300, which is very close to the FOM values achieved from nanobeam cavities. This work can thus contribute to future integrated optical sensing schemes based on slot RRs.

  19. Experimental studies, line-shape analysis and semi-empirical calculations of broadening coefficients for CH335Cl-CO2 submillimeter transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudaryonok, A. S.; Lavrentieva, N. N.; Buldyreva, J.; Margulès, L.; Motiyenko, R. A.; Rohart, F.

    2014-09-01

    Rotational transitions in CH335Cl mixed with CO2 are recorded at 296 K and total pressures up to 0.6 Torr in the frequency interval 186-901 GHz (1.6-0.3 mm) for J=6→7, 10→11, 17→18, 22→23, 31→32, 33→34 and K=0-6, using the frequency-modulation spectrometer of the Laboratory PhLAM (Lille, France). These line-shapes are analyzed with the commonly used Voigt profile as well as with more refined Speed-Dependent Voigt and Galatry models accounting for the line narrowing induced, respectively, by the speed-dependence of the relaxation parameters and by velocity-changing collisions. Due to the high line intensities, the fitting procedure involves the full implementation of the Bee-Lambert law instead of its traditional linear approximation. The experimentally deduced J- and K-dependences of the pressure-broadening coefficients are further used to obtain the model parameters of a semi-empirical approach allowing massive calculations of line-shape parameters for enlarged ranges of rotational quantum numbers requested by spectroscopic databases.

  20. Crystallographic, magnetic, and electronic structures of ferromagnetic shape memory alloys Ni2XGa (X=Mn,Fe,Co) from first-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, J.; Raulot, J. M.; Zhang, Y. D.; Esling, C.; Zhao, X.; Zuo, L.

    2011-01-01

    The crystallographic, magnetic and electronic structures of the ferromagnetic shape memory alloys Ni2XGa (X=Mn, Fe, and Co), are systematically investigated by means of the first-principles calculations within the framework of density functional theory using the VIENNA AB INITIO SOFTWARE PACKAGE. The lattice parameters of both austenitic and martensitic phases in Ni2MnGa have been calculated. The formation energies of the cubic phase of Ni2XGa are estimated, and show a destabilization tendency if Mn atom is substituted by Fe or Co. From Ni2MnGa to Ni2CoGa, the down spin total density of states (DOS) at Fermi level is gradually increasing, whereas that of the up spin part remains almost unchanged. This is the main origin of the difference of the magnetic moment in these alloys. The partial DOS is dominated by the Ni and Mn 3d states in the bonding region below EF. There are two bond types existing in Ni2XGa: one is between neighboring Ni atoms in Ni2MnGa; the other is between Ni and X atoms in Ni2FeGa and Ni2CoGa alloys.

  1. Correlation between Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) scores and Work Limitations Questionnaire (WLQ) allows the calculation of percent work productivity loss in patients with psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Jochen; Küster, Denise

    2015-07-01

    Data on indirect costs are vital for cost-effectiveness studies from a societal perspective. In contrast to quality of life, information on productivity loss is rarely collected in psoriasis trials. We aimed to identify a model to deduce indirect costs (presenteeism and absenteeism) of psoriasis from the Dermatologic Life Quality Index (DLQI) of affected patients to facilitate health economic evaluations for psoriasis. We undertook a cross-sectional mapping study including 201 patients with physician-diagnosed psoriasis and investigated the relationship between quality of life (DLQI) and productivity loss (Work Limitations Questionnaire, WLQ--using the "output demands" subscale) using linear bootstrap regression analysis to set up an equation model allowing the calculation of percent work productivity loss per DLQI unit increase. DLQI and WLQ scores were significantly correlated (r = 0.47; p < 0.0001) The final equation model suggests a 0.545 and 0.560% decrease in productivity due to presenteeism and absenteeism per DLQI unit increase, with y-intercepts at 1.654 and 0.536, respectively. In the absence of data on indirect cost, work productivity loss due to psoriasis can be estimated from DLQI scores using the equations, Y = 0.545 × DLQI score + 1.654 for presenteeism (%) and Y = 0.560 × DLQI score + 0.536 for absenteeism (%). PMID:25940274

  2. Parallelization of Four-Component Calculations. I. Integral Generation, SCF, and Four-Index Transformation in the Dirac-Fock Package MOLFDIR.

    SciTech Connect

    Pernpointner, M.; Visscher, Lucas; De Jong, Wibe A.; Broer, R.

    2000-10-01

    The treatment of relativity and electron correlation on an equal footing is essential for the computation of systems containing heavy elements. Correlation treatments that are based on four-component Dirac-Hartree-Fock calculations presently provide the most accurate, albeit costly, way of taking relativity into account. The requirement of having two expansion basis sets for the molecular wave function puts a high demand on computer resources. The treatment of larger systems is thereby often prohibited by the very large run times and files that arise in a conventional Dirac-Hartree-Fock approach. A possible solution for this bottleneck is a parallel approach that not only reduces the turnaround time but also spreads out the large files over a number of local disks. Here, we present a distributed-memory parallelization of the program package MOLFDIR for the integral generation, Dirac-Hartree-Fock and four-index MS transformation steps. This implementation scales best for large AO spaces and moderately sized active spaces.

  3. Humidity coefficient correction in the calculation equations of air refractive index by He-Ne laser based on phase step interferometry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qianghua; Liu, Jinghai; He, Yongxi; Luo, Huifu; Luo, Jun; Wang, Feng

    2015-02-10

    The refractive index of air (RIA) is an important parameter in precision measurement. The revisions to Edlen's equations by Boensch and Potulski [Metrologia 35, 133 (1998)] are mostly used to calculate the RIA at present. Since the humidity correction coefficients in the formulas were performed with four wavelengths of a Cd(114) lamp (644.0, 508.7, 480.1, and 467.9 nm) and at the temperature range of 19.6°C-20.1°C, the application is restricted when an He-Ne laser is used as the light source, which is mostly applied in optical precision measurement, and the environmental temperature is far away from 20°C as well. To solve this problem, a measurement system based on phase step interferometry for measuring the effect of the humidity to the RIA is presented, and a corresponding humidity correction equation is derived. The analysis and comparison results show that the uncertainty of the presented equation is better than that of Boensch and Potulski's. It is more suitable in present precision measurements by He-Ne laser, and the application temperature range extends to 14.6°C-24.0°C as well. PMID:25968028

  4. New concept for a toxicity assay based on multiple indexes from the wave shape of damped metabolic oscillation induced in living yeast cells (part II): application to analytical toxicology.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, H; Suzuki, M

    2007-10-01

    An ideal toxicity assay should utilize multiple indexes obtained from transient changes of metabolic activities. Here, we demonstrate the possibility for a novel toxicity bioassay using the damped glycolytic oscillation phenomenon occurring in starved yeast cells. In a previous study, the phenomenon was characterized in detail. Under optimum conditions to induce the phenomenon, the wave shapes of the damped glycolytic oscillations were changed by the instantaneous addition of both glucose and chemicals and by changing the chemical concentration. We estimated the changes in the oscillation wave shapes as six indexes, i.e., the number of wave cycles, maximum amplitude, oscillation frequency, attenuation coefficient, initial peak height, and non-steady-state time. These index changes were obtained from several kinds of chemicals. The chemicals, especially those for acids (0.01-100 mM HCl and 0.01-50 mM citric acid), bases (0.001-50 mM KOH), heavy metal ions (1-1,000 mg L(-1); Cu(2+), Pb(2+), Cd(2+), Hg(2+)), respiratory inhibitors (3-500 mg L(-1) NaN(3)), dissolved oxygen removers (10-300 mg L(-1) NaSO(3)), surfactants (10-200 mg L(-1) benzalkonium chloride), and aldehyde (10-1,000 mg L(-1) acetaldehyde), showed characteristic patterns depending on each chemical and its concentration. These significant results demonstrate the possibilities of new methods for both toxicity qualification and quantification. PMID:17717646

  5. Electrochemically shape-controlled synthesis in deep eutectic solvents: triambic icosahedral platinum nanocrystals with high-index facets and their enhanced catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Wei, Lu; Zhou, Zhi-You; Chen, Sheng-Pei; Xu, Chang-Deng; Su, Dangsheng; Schuster, Manfred Erwin; Sun, Shi-Gang

    2013-12-11

    Pt triambic icosahedral nanocrystals (TIH NCs) enclosed by {771} high-index facets were successfully synthesized electrochemically, for the first time, in ChCl-urea based deep eutectic solvents, and exhibited higher electrocatalytic activity and stability towards ethanol electrooxidation than a commercial Pt black catalyst. PMID:24084858

  6. The HumanIndexMod and New Calculations Demonstrating Heat Stress Effects All Aspects of Human Life Through Industry, Agriculture, and Daily Life.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzan, J. R.; Huber, M.

    2014-12-01

    We show the new climatic tool, HumanIndexMod (HIM), for quantitatively assessing key climatic variables that are critical for decision making. The HIM calculates 9 different heat stress and 4 moist thermodynamic quantities using meteorological inputs of T, P, and Q. These heat stress metrics are commonly used throughout the world. We show new methods for integrating and standardizing practices for applying these metrics with the latest Earth system models. We implemented the HIM into CLM4.5, a component of CESM, maintained by NCAR. These heat stress metrics cover philosophical approaches of comfort, physiology, and empirically based algorithms. The metrics are directly connected to the Urban, Canopy, Bare Ground, and Lake modules, to differentiate distinct regimes within each grid cell. The module calculates the instantaneous moisture-temperature covariance at every model time step and in every land surface type, capturing all aspects of non-linearity. The HIM uses the most accurate and computationally efficient moist thermodynamic algorithms available. Additionally, we show ways that the HIM may be effectively integrated into climate modeling and observations. The module is flexible. The user may decide which metrics to call, and there is an offline version of the HIM that is available to be used with weather and climate datasets. Examples include using high temporal resolution CMIP5 archive data, local weather station data, and weather and forecasting models. To provide comprehensive standards for applying the HIM to climate data, we executed a CLM4.5 simulation using the RCP8.5 boundary conditions. Preliminary results show moist thermodynamic and heat stress quantities have smaller variability in the extremes as compared to extremes in T (both at the 95th percentile). Additionally, the magnitude of the moist thermodynamic changes over land is similar to sea surface temperature changes. The metric changes from the early part of the 21st century as compared to the

  7. Temperature dependences of self- and N2-broadened line-shape parameters in the ν3 and ν5 bands of 12CH3D: Measurements and calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Predoi-Cross, A.; Malathy Devi, V.; Sutradhar, P.; Sinyakova, T.; Buldyreva, J.; Sung, K.; Smith, M. A. H.; Mantz, A. W.

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents the results of a spectroscopic line shape study of self- and nitrogen-broadened 12CH3D transitions in the ν3 and ν5 bands in the Triad region. We combined five pure gas spectra with eighteen spectra of lean mixtures of 12CH3D and nitrogen, all recorded with a Bruker IFS-125 HR Fourier transform spectrometer. The spectra have been analyzed simultaneously using a multispectrum nonlinear least squares fitting technique. N2-broadened line parameters for 184 transitions in the ν3 band and 205 transitions in the ν5 band were measured. In addition, line positions and line intensities were measured for 168 transitions in the ν3 band and 214 transitions in the ν5 band. We have observed 10 instances of weak line mixing corresponding to K″=3 A1 or A2 transitions. Comparisons were made for the N2-broadening coefficients and associated temperature exponents with corresponding values calculated using a semi-classical Robert Bonamy type formalism that involved an inter-molecular potential with terms corresponding to short- and long-range interactions, and exact classical molecular trajectories. The theoretical N2-broadened coefficients are overestimated for high J values, but are in good agreement with the experimental values for small and middle range J values.

  8. I can't stop looking at them: interactive effects of body mass index and weight dissatisfaction on attention towards body shape photographs.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiao; Li, Xiaojing; Yang, Xiaoying; Wang, Yang; Jackson, Todd; Chen, Hong

    2013-03-01

    Although attentional biases toward body-related information contribute to the etiology and maintenance of body dissatisfaction (BD) and eating disorders (EDs), attentional disengagement in women with BD and EDs is not clear. The present study investigated the association between weight dissatisfaction and attentional disengagement from body-related pictures and the possible moderating effect of body mass index (BMI) on this relation. Two hundred and four undergraduate women engaged in an experiment using a pictorial spatial cueing paradigm including fat/thin bodies and neutral household photos. Partial correlations and simple slopes regression analyses were conducted with attentional disengagement index scores of each category of cues. Findings suggested that independent of BMI, weight dissatisfaction was directly associated with attentional disengagement from both fat and thin pictures. In addition, among women with low and medium BMIs, the more they were dissatisfied with their bodyweight, the more difficulty they had disengaging their attention from fat body pictures. PMID:23352761

  9. Gradient index retroreflector

    DOEpatents

    Layne, Clyde B.

    1988-01-01

    A retroreflector is formed of a graded index lens with a reflective coating at one end. The lens has a length of an odd multiple of a quarter period thereof. Hexagonally shaped graded index lenses may be closely packed in an array to form a retroreflecting surface.

  10. Efficient and automatic calculation of optical band shapes and resonance Raman spectra for larger molecules within the independent mode displaced harmonic oscillator model.

    PubMed

    Petrenko, Taras; Neese, Frank

    2012-12-21

    In this work, an improved method for the efficient automatic simulation of optical band shapes and resonance Raman (rR) intensities within the "independent mode displaced harmonic oscillator" is described. Despite the relative simplicity of this model, it is able to account for the intensity distribution in absorption (ABS), fluorescence, and rR spectra corresponding to strongly dipole allowed electronic transitions with high accuracy. In order to include temperature-induced effects, we propose a simple extension of the time dependent wavepacket formalism developed by Heller which enables one to derive analytical expressions for the intensities of hot bands in ABS and rR spectra from the dependence of the wavepacket evolution on its initial coordinate. We have also greatly optimized the computational procedures for numerical integration of complicated oscillating integrals. This is important for efficient simulations of higher-order rR spectra and excitation profiles, as well as for the fitting of experimental spectra of large molecules. In particular, the multimode damping mechanism is taken into account for efficient reduction of the upper time limit in the numerical integration. Excited state energy gradient as well as excited state geometry optimization calculations are employed in order to determine excited state dimensionless normal coordinate displacements. The gradient techniques are highly cost-effective provided that analytical excited state derivatives with respect to nuclear displacements are available. Through comparison with experimental spectra of some representative molecules, we illustrate that the gradient techniques can even outperform the geometry optimization method if the harmonic approximation becomes inadequate. PMID:23267471

  11. Retinoblastoma external beam photon irradiation with a special ‘D’-shaped collimator: a comparison between measurements, Monte Carlo simulation and a treatment planning system calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brualla, L.; Mayorga, P. A.; Flühs, A.; Lallena, A. M.; Sempau, J.; Sauerwein, W.

    2012-11-01

    Retinoblastoma is the most common eye tumour in childhood. According to the available long-term data, the best outcome regarding tumour control and visual function has been reached by external beam radiotherapy. The benefits of the treatment are, however, jeopardized by a high incidence of radiation-induced secondary malignancies and the fact that irradiated bones grow asymmetrically. In order to better exploit the advantages of external beam radiotherapy, it is necessary to improve current techniques by reducing the irradiated volume and minimizing the dose to the facial bones. To this end, dose measurements and simulated data in a water phantom are essential. A Varian Clinac 2100 C/D operating at 6 MV is used in conjunction with a dedicated collimator for the retinoblastoma treatment. This collimator conforms a ‘D’-shaped off-axis field whose irradiated area can be either 5.2 or 3.1 cm2. Depth dose distributions and lateral profiles were experimentally measured. Experimental results were compared with Monte Carlo simulations’ run with the penelope code and with calculations performed with the analytical anisotropic algorithm implemented in the Eclipse treatment planning system using the gamma test. penelope simulations agree reasonably well with the experimental data with discrepancies in the dose profiles less than 3 mm of distance to agreement and 3% of dose. Discrepancies between the results found with the analytical anisotropic algorithm and the experimental data reach 3 mm and 6%. Although the discrepancies between the results obtained with the analytical anisotropic algorithm and the experimental data are notable, it is possible to consider this algorithm for routine treatment planning of retinoblastoma patients, provided the limitations of the algorithm are known and taken into account by the medical physicist and the clinician. Monte Carlo simulation is essential for knowing these limitations. Monte Carlo simulation is required for optimizing the

  12. A U-shaped Association between Body Mass Index and Psychological Distress on the Multiphasic Personality Inventory: Retrospective Cross-sectional Analysis of 19-year-old Men in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taehyun; Kim, Jung Jun; Kim, Mi Yeon; Kim, Shin Kyoung; Roh, Sungwon; Seo, Jeong Seok

    2015-06-01

    Objective personality tests, such as the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI), might be more sensitive to reflect subclinical personality and be more state-dependent in an individual's lifetime, so they are good scales to predict the psychological distress regarding certain states. The aim of this study was to identify the specific pattern between body mass index (BMI) and psychological distress using the objective personality test. For this study, we investigated BMI and the Korean Military Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MPI). A retrospective cross-sectional study was conducted with 19-yr-old examinees who were admitted to the Military Manpower Administration in Korea from February 2007 to January 2010. Of 1,088,107 examinees, we enrolled 771,408 subjects who were psychologically apparent healthy possible-military-service groups. Afterwards, we reviewed and analyzed directly measured BMI and MPI results. In terms of the validity scales, the faking-good subscale showed an inverted U-shaped association, and faking-bad and infrequency subscales showed a U-shaped association with BMI groups. In terms of the neurosis scales, all clinical subscales (anxiety, depression, somatization, and personality disorder) also showed a U-shaped association with BMI groups. For the psychopath scales, the schizophrenia subscale showed a U-shaped association, and the paranoia subscale showed a near-positive correlation with BMI. In conclusion, a specific U-shaped pattern was observed between BMI and the MPI in 19-yr-old men in Korea. Underweight and obesity are related to psychological distress, so supportive advice and education are needed to them. PMID:26028934

  13. Refractive Index Determination of Transparent Polymers: Experimental Setup for Multi-Wavelength Determination and Calculation at Specific Frequencies Using Group Contribution Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dlutowski, Jay; Cardenas-Valencia, Andres M.; Fries, David; Langebrake, Larry

    2006-01-01

    An experiment which enables students to determine the index of refraction at various wavelengths is demonstrated by using two polymers examples, poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS) and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA). This experiment would be suitable for a course in organic chemistry or any course discussing the optical properties of polymeric…

  14. On the effective refractive index of blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahmad-Rohen, Alexander; Contreras-Tello, Humberto; Morales-Luna, Gesuri; García-Valenzuela, Augusto

    2016-01-01

    We calculated the real and imaginary parts of the effective refractive index {n}{eff} of blood as functions of wavelength from 400 to 800 nm; we employed van de Hulst’s theory, together with the anomalous diffraction approximation, for the calculation. We modelled blood as a mixture of plasma and erythrocytes. Our results indicate that erythrocyte orientation has a strong effect on {n}{eff}, making blood an optically anisotropic medium except when the erythrocytes are randomly oriented. In the case in which their symmetry axis is perpendicular to the wave vector, {n}{eff} equals the refractive index of plasma at certain wavelengths. Furthermore, the erythrocytes’ shape affects their contribution to {n}{eff} in an important way, implying that studies on the effective refractive index of blood should avoid approximating them as spheres or spheroids. Finally, the effective refractive index of blood predicted by van de Hulst’s theory is different from what would be obtained by averaging the refractive indices of its constituents weighted by volume; such a volume-weighted average is appropriate only for haemolysed blood. We then measured the real part of the refractive index of various blood solutions using two different experimental setups. One of the most important results of our expriment is that {n}{eff} is measurable to a good degree of precision even for undiluted blood, although not all measuring apparatuses are appropriate. The experimental data is self-consistent and in reasonable agreement with our theoretical calculations.

  15. Water absorption in a refractive index model for bacterial spores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegrist, K. M.; Thrush, E.; Airola, M.; Carr, A. K.; Limsui, D. M.; Boggs, N. T.; Thomas, M. E.; Carter, C. C.

    2009-05-01

    The complexity of biological agents can make it difficult to identify the important factors impacting scattering characteristics among variables such as size, shape, internal structure and biochemical composition, particle aggregation, and sample additives. This difficulty is exacerbated by the environmentally interactive nature of biological organisms. In particular, bacterial spores equilibrate with environmental humidity by absorption/desorption of water which can affect both the complex refractive index and the size/shape distributions of particles - two factors upon which scattering characteristics depend critically. Therefore accurate analysis of experimental data for determination of refractive index must take account of particle water content. First, spectral transmission measurements to determine visible refractive index done on suspensions of bacterial spores must account for water (or other solvent) uptake. Second, realistic calculations of aerosol scattering cross sections should consider effects of atmospheric humidity on particle water content, size and shape. In this work we demonstrate a method for determining refractive index of bacterial spores bacillus atropheus (BG), bacillus thuringiensis (BT) and bacillus anthracis Sterne (BAs) which accounts for these effects. Visible index is found from transmission measurements on aqueous and DMSO suspensions of particles, using an anomalous diffraction approximation. A simplified version of the anomalous diffraction theory is used to eliminate the need for knowledge of particle size. Results using this approach indicate the technique can be useful in determining the visible refractive index of particles when size and shape distributions are not well known but fall within the region of validity of anomalous dispersion theory.

  16. Understanding the effect of ultrathin AuPd alloy shells of irregularly shaped Au@AuPd nanoparticles with high-index facets on enhanced performance of ethanol oxidation.

    PubMed

    Bi, Cuixia; Feng, Cong; Miao, Tingting; Song, Yahui; Wang, Dayang; Xia, Haibing

    2015-12-21

    In this study, irregularly shaped, concave cuboidal Au@AuPd nanoparticles (ISCC-Au@AuPd NPs) with high-index facets were synthesized via Pd overgrowth on pre-formed ISCC-Au NPs with a concentration of Pd precursors as low as 2%. The AuPd alloy nature of the resulting shells was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, cyclic voltammogram analysis, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Among the irregularly shaped NPs obtained, the ISCC-Au97.5@Au0.5Pd2.0 NPs display the largest electrochemically active surface area (up to 92.11 m(2) g(-1)), as their closed-packed agglomeration was prevented, and the best long-term stability with respect to ethanol oxidation (0.50 M) in alkaline media (0.30 KOH) by efficiently removing intermediates. Their mass- and ECSA-normalized current densities (4.15 A mgPd(-1) and 4.51 mA cm(-2)) are about 20.7 times and 6.9 times higher than those of commercial Pd/C catalysts (0.20 A mgPd(-1) and 0.65 mA cm(-2)), respectively. PMID:26567631

  17. Combining Body Mass and Shape Indices in Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Krakauer, Jesse C.

    2016-01-01

    We present preliminary clinical experience with combined consideration of the commonly used BMI (body mass index) and the newly developed ABSI (a body shape index) using a point of care anthropometric calculator for comparisons of index values and associated relative risks to population normals. In a series of 282 patients, BMI and ABSI were close to being independently distributed, supporting the value of considering both indices. Three selected cases illustrate scenarios where assessment of ABSI together with BMI could inform patient care and counseling. These data suggest that combined assessment of BMI and ABSI may prove useful in clinical practice. PMID:27034680

  18. Assessment of the accuracy of shape-consistent relativistic effective core potentials using multireference spin-orbit configuration interaction singles and doubles calculations of the ground and low-lying excited states of U(4+) and U(5+).

    PubMed

    Beck, Eric V; Brozell, Scott R; Blaudeau, Jean-Philippe; Burggraf, Larry W; Pitzer, Russell M

    2009-11-12

    Multireference spin-orbit configuration interaction calculations were used to determine the accuracy of 60-, 68-, and 78-electron shape-consistent relativistic effective core potentials (RECPs) for uranium V and VI ground and low-lying excited states. Both 5f(n) and (5f6d)(n), (n = 1, 2) reference spaces were investigated using correlation-consistent double-zeta quality basis sets. Accuracy was assessed against gas-phase experimental spectra. The 68-electron RECP calculations yielded low relative and rms errors and predicted the empirical ordering of states most consistently. PMID:19888778

  19. Price Indexes for Institutions of Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Michael P.

    The need for a system of price indexes for colleges and universities is discussed. First, past efforts to develop price indexes are reviewed, dating back to 1952 and highlighting two specific indexes, the Higher Education Price Index (HEPI) and the Uniform Price Index Calculation System (UPICS). For the latter, the price indexes of direct costs…

  20. Critical dose and toxicity index of organs at risk in radiotherapy: Analyzing the calculated effects of modified dose fractionation in non–small cell lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Pedicini, Piernicola; Strigari, Lidia; Benassi, Marcello; Caivano, Rocchina; Fiorentino, Alba; Nappi, Antonio; Salvatore, Marco; Storto, Giovanni

    2014-04-01

    To increase the efficacy of radiotherapy for non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), many schemes of dose fractionation were assessed by a new “toxicity index” (I), which allows one to choose the fractionation schedules that produce less toxic treatments. Thirty-two patients affected by non resectable NSCLC were treated by standard 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) with a strategy of limited treated volume. Computed tomography datasets were employed to re plan by simultaneous integrated boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). The dose distributions from plans were used to test various schemes of dose fractionation, in 3DCRT as well as in IMRT, by transforming the dose-volume histogram (DVH) into a biological equivalent DVH (BDVH) and by varying the overall treatment time. The BDVHs were obtained through the toxicity index, which was defined for each of the organs at risk (OAR) by a linear quadratic model keeping an equivalent radiobiological effect on the target volume. The less toxic fractionation consisted in a severe/moderate hyper fractionation for the volume including the primary tumor and lymph nodes, followed by a hypofractionation for the reduced volume of the primary tumor. The 3DCRT and IMRT resulted, respectively, in 4.7% and 4.3% of dose sparing for the spinal cord, without significant changes for the combined-lungs toxicity (p < 0.001). Schedules with reduced overall treatment time (accelerated fractionations) led to a 12.5% dose sparing for the spinal cord (7.5% in IMRT), 8.3% dose sparing for V{sub 20} in the combined lungs (5.5% in IMRT), and also significant dose sparing for all the other OARs (p < 0.001). The toxicity index allows to choose fractionation schedules with reduced toxicity for all the OARs and equivalent radiobiological effect for the tumor in 3DCRT, as well as in IMRT, treatments of NSCLC.

  1. Indexing Images.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasmussen, Edie M.

    1997-01-01

    Focuses on access to digital image collections by means of manual and automatic indexing. Contains six sections: (1) Studies of Image Systems and their Use; (2) Approaches to Indexing Images; (3) Image Attributes; (4) Concept-Based Indexing; (5) Content-Based Indexing; and (6) Browsing in Image Retrieval. Contains 105 references. (AEF)

  2. Topical hydrocortisone 17-butyrate 21-propionate in the treatment of inflammatory skin diseases: pharmacological data, clinical efficacy, safety and calculation of the therapeutic index.

    PubMed

    Fölster-Holst, R; Abeck, D; Torrelo, A

    2016-03-01

    Hydrocortisone 17-butyrate 21-propionate (hydrocortisone buteprate, HBP) is a medium potent, non-halogenated double-ester of hydrocortisone with a favorable benefit/risk ratio for the treatment of inflammatory skin disorders. HBP is available as a 0.1% cream or ointment formulation. Good results were obtained with a once-daily topical treatment. HBP is characterized by a strong topical anti-inflammatory activity and weak systemic action. It is considered to have potency comparable to that of betamethasone 17-valerate (BV), but its systemic effects are less pronounced. HBP was shown to have a good efficacy in the treatment of various oozing and lichenified eczematous skin diseases including atopic dermatitis (AD) and in the treatment of psoriasis vulgaris. Even in very young children, HBP proved successful as an effective and safe drug. A therapeutic index of 2.0 can be attributed to this glucocorticoid. In this respect, there is no difference between topical HBP and other topical glucocorticoids with increased benefit/risk ratio, e.g. prednicarbate (PC), methylprednisolone aceponate (MPA) and mometasone furoate (MM). PMID:27183704

  3. Hydrodynamic behavior and electrochemical impedance of the Hanging Meniscus Rotating Disk (HMRD) electrode. I - Meniscus shape under rotation. II - I-BIEM calculations of frequency dispersion and minimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahan, Boris D.

    1991-01-01

    The shape equations for an HMRD in static and rotating configurations are developed and solved numerically. A rationale for the applicability of the standard Levich equations to the rotating case is given. The region of stability of the HMRD is examined, and the observed small negative intercept for a Levich plot is explained. The iterative boundary integral equation method is applied to the problem of frequency dispersion at an HMRD electrode. It is shown that a range of disk sizes and heights can be chosen to give almost uniform primary and secondary current distribution and minimal frequency disperison.

  4. The Density Matrix of H20 - N2 In the Coordinate Representation: A Monte Carlo Calculation of the Far-Wing Line Shape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Q.; Tipping, R. H.

    1999-01-01

    The far-wing line shape theory within the binary collision and quasistatic framework has been developed using the coordinate representation. Within this formalism, the main computational task is the evaluation of multidimensional integrals whose variables are the orientational angles needed to specify the initial and final positions of the system during transition processes. Using standard methods, one is able to evaluate the 7-dimensional integrations required for linear molecular systems, or the 7-dimensional integrations for more complicated asymmetric-top (or symmetric-top) molecular systems whose interaction potential contains cyclic coordinates. In order to obviate this latter restriction on the form of the interaction potential, a Monte Carlo method is used to evaluate the 9-dimensional integrations required for systems consisting of one asymmetric-top (or symmetric-top) and one linear molecule, such as H20-N2. Combined with techniques developed previously to deal with sophisticated potential models, one is able to implement realistic potentials for these systems and derive accurate, converged results for the far-wing line shapes and the corresponding absorption coefficients. Conversely, comparison of the far-wing absorption with experimental data can serve as a sensitive diagnostic tool in order to obtain detailed information on the short-range anisotropic dependence of interaction potentials.

  5. Area Over Length (AOL): A program for the calculation of effective two-dimensional thermal conductance through an arbitrarily shaped region

    SciTech Connect

    Wendel, M.W.

    1990-02-01

    A computer program, Area Over Length (AOL), has been developed to solve for the effective thermal conductance between two isothermal surfaces through a region or arbitrary shape. It is based on a boundary integral method that is derived using complex variables. It is especially useful as an aid to finite-difference and finite-element modeling of irregularly shaped regions. The theory behind AOL applies to the linear solution of any two-dimensional, steady state heat conduction problem without holes in the computational domain. However, AOL has been developed for the specific case in which the boundary consists of four pieces: two opposing isothermal pieces and two opposing adiabatic pieces. This case applies when the effective thermal conductance of a heat flow path between two nodes in a discretization of a larger domain is desired. The program requires that the user supply a boundary discretization of the region across which heat transfer occurs. Also, the points in the boundary discretization that separate the pieces of the boundary must be indicated. A sample problem is discussed. 4 refs., 10 figs.

  6. Area Over Length (AOL): A program for the calculation of effective two-dimensional thermal conductance through an arbitrarily shaped region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendel, M. W.

    1990-02-01

    A computer program, Area Over Length (AOL), has been developed to solve for the effective thermal conductance between two isothermal surfaces through a region or arbitrary shape. It is based on a boundary integral method that is derived using complex variables. It is especially useful as an aid to finite-difference and finite-element modeling of irregularly shaped regions. The theory behind AOL applies to the linear solution of any two-dimensional, steady state heat conduction problem without holes in the computational domain. However, AOL has been developed for the specific case in which the boundary consists of four pieces: two opposing isothermal pieces and two opposing adiabatic pieces. This case applies when the effective thermal conductance of a heat flow path between two nodes in a discretization of a larger domain is desired. The program requires that the user supply a boundary discretization of the region across which heat transfer occurs. Also, the points in the boundary discretization that separate the pieces of the boundary must be indicated. A sample problem is discussed.

  7. Total Testosterone and Calculated Estimates for Free and Bioavailable Testosterone: Influence of Age and Body Mass Index and Establishment of Sex-Specific Reference Ranges.

    PubMed

    Deutschbein, T; Mann, K; Petersenn, S

    2015-10-01

    Measurement of sex steroids is required to evaluate gonadal function, but normative data are lacking (especially for estimates of physiologically active testosterone). Using modern immunoassays, this study established sex-specific reference ranges (2.5% and 97.5% percentiles) for total testosterone (TOT), bioactive testosterone Vermeulen (BTV), free androgen index (FAI), free testosterone Sartorius (FTS), free testosterone Vermeulen (FTV), and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG). In the comparative study, subjects were grouped by age (18-30; 31-50; >50 years), BMI (<25; 25-30; >30 kg/m(2)), and sex. Study participants were selected in such a way that each group comprised 12 subjects (e.g., 12 males between 18 and 30 years with a BMI of <25 kg/m(2), and so on), resulting in a total of 216 controls (108 males, 108 females; age: 40.3 ± 1.0; BMI: 27.8 ± 0.4). Multiple stepwise regression analyses were performed (covariates: age, BMI, sex), and sex-specific reference ranges were applied to 50 males (age: 46.1 ± 2.3; BMI: 27.4 ± 0.7) with suspected hypogonadism. Regression analysis identified the strongest predictor of each parameter apart from sex, resulting in age-specific (males: FAI, SHBG, BTV, FTV; females: TOT, FTS, SHBG), BMI-specific (males: TOT, FTS; females: FAI, BTV, FTV) and overall cutoffs for both sexes. In male patients, overall agreement between the results derived from the estimates (i.e., BTV, FTS, FTV) was high (with discordant results in only 4%). In summary, if both the endocrine workup and the clinical presentation were taken into account, the newly established reference ranges allowed reliable identification of hypogonadal males. PMID:25565093

  8. Exploring electrical conductivity anomalies across the martensite transition in Fe{sub 7}Pd{sub 3} ferromagnetic shape memory alloys: Experiments and ab-initio calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Arabi-Hashemi, A.; Mayr, S. G.

    2015-03-02

    Conductivity in Fe{sub 7}Pd{sub 3} is characterized by an anomalous increase when traversing the face–centered–cubic (fcc) austenite to face–centered–tetragonal (fct) martensite transition, contrary to most other conventional and ferromagnetic shape memory alloys. Experiments on molecular– beam–epitaxy–grown single crystals indicate a resistivity change of ≈20% during the transformation on top of a quadratic temperature dependence reaching up to room temperature. The physical foundations of residual resistivity changes along the full Bain path are addressed by a Kubo– Greenwood approach within the framework of density functional theory. To do so, a concept to reliably extract the DC conductivities is proposed that yields reproducible results consistent with experiments. Finding that conductivity peaks in the fct phase, we identify a large density of states paired with high velocities at the Fermi level in the majority spin sub–bands in presence of minimum s–d electron scattering as underlying physical origin.

  9. Saddle-shaped macrocycle distortion and symmetry decrease in cobalt (II) meso-tetraphenylporphyrin: Structure of a dichloromethane solvate and DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Melo, Cristiane Cabral; Moreira, Wania da Conceição; Martins, Tássia Joi; Cordeiro, Márcia Regina; Ellena, Javier; Guimarães, Freddy Fernandes; Martins, Felipe Terra

    2014-11-01

    Many studies about porphyrins have emerged in recent years, including studies using porphyrins as building blocks for supramolecular assemblies. Understanding new solid state forms of porphyrins and the elucidation of their structures can have remarkable benefits for nanoscience and synthetic biology. In this study, a new pseudopolymorph of cobalt (II) meso-tetraphenylporphyrin, (CoTPP), was synthesized in a known one-pot reaction, rather than using many-step conventional methods, was isolated and was characterized for the first time by low-temperature single crystal X-ray diffraction. It is a nonstoichiometric solvate assembled into dichloromethane channels. The most striking feature of this structure is the conformation adopted by the porphyrin macrocycle. In contrast to the non-solvated form of CoTPP that exhibits a ruffled core distortion and crystallizes in the tetragonal space group I-42d, this solvated form has been crystallized in the triclinic space group Pī and shows a distinct saddle-shaped macrocycle distortion. In the triclinic form, the conformation of one of the four phenyl rings is remarkably different from the others. A potential energy surface scan of the torsional angles around the bonds between this phenyl moiety and the macrocycle of CoTPP in both the non-solvated and the solvate forms demonstrates that the saddle-shaped macrocycle distortion depends on the unusual phenyl conformation. The distortion is responsible for the symmetry decrease in the channel solvate form, causing a loss of the 4-fold rotoinversion axis observed in the non-solvated tetragonal phase, which has identical phenyl conformations.

  10. Equilibrium Shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izzo, Dario; Petazzi, Lorenzo

    2006-08-01

    We present a satellite path planning technique able to make identical spacecraft aquire a given configuration. The technique exploits a behaviour-based approach to achieve an autonomous and distributed control over the relative geometry making use of limited sensorial information. A desired velocity is defined for each satellite as a sum of different contributions coming from generic high level behaviours: forcing the final desired configuration the behaviours are further defined by an inverse dynamic calculation dubbed Equilibrium Shaping. We show how considering only three different kind of behaviours it is possible to acquire a number of interesting formations and we set down the theoretical framework to find the entire set. We find that allowing a limited amount of communication the technique may be used also to form complex lattice structures. Several control feedbacks able to track the desired velocities are introduced and discussed. Our results suggest that sliding mode control is particularly appropriate in connection with the developed technique.

  11. Martensitic transformation and phase stability of In-doped Ni-Mn-Sn shape memory alloys from first-principles calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, H. B.; Yang, C. P. Wang, R. L.; Luo, X.; Marchenkov, V. V.

    2014-05-28

    The effect of the alloying element Indium (In) on the martensitic transition, magnetic properties, and phase stabilities of Ni{sub 8}Mn{sub 6}Sn{sub 2−x}In{sub x} shape memory alloys has been investigated using the first-principles pseudopotential plane-wave method based on density functional theory. The energy difference between the austenitic and martensitic phases was found to increase with increasing In content, which implies an enhancement of the martensitic phase transition temperature (T{sub M}). Moreover, the formation energy results indicate that In-doping increases the relative stability of Ni{sub 8}Mn{sub 6}Sn{sub 2−x}In{sub x} both in austenite and martensite. This results from a reduction in density of states near the Fermi level regions caused by Ni-3d–In-5p hybridization when Sn is replaced by In. The equilibrium equation of state results show that the alloys Ni{sub 8}Mn{sub 6}Sn{sub 2−x}In{sub x} exhibit an energetically degenerated effect for an In content of x = ∼1.5. This implies the coexistence of antiparallel and parallel configurations in the austenite.

  12. General shape optimization capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chargin, Mladen K.; Raasch, Ingo; Bruns, Rudolf; Deuermeyer, Dawson

    1991-01-01

    A method is described for calculating shape sensitivities, within MSC/NASTRAN, in a simple manner without resort to external programs. The method uses natural design variables to define the shape changes in a given structure. Once the shape sensitivities are obtained, the shape optimization process is carried out in a manner similar to property optimization processes. The capability of this method is illustrated by two examples: the shape optimization of a cantilever beam with holes, loaded by a point load at the free end (with the shape of the holes and the thickness of the beam selected as the design variables), and the shape optimization of a connecting rod subjected to several different loading and boundary conditions.

  13. Molecular and electron-spin structures of a ring-shaped mixed-valence polyoxovanadate (IV, V) studied by (11)B and (23)Na solid-state NMR spectroscopy and DFT calculations.

    PubMed

    Iijima, Takahiro; Yamase, Toshihiro; Nishimura, Katsuyuki

    2016-01-01

    (11)B and (23)Na solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of ring-shaped paramagnetic crystals of H15[V7(IV)V5(V)B32O84Na4]·13H2O containing seven d(1) electrons from V(IV) were studied. Magic-angle-spinning (MAS) and multiple-quantum MAS NMR experiments were performed at moderate (9.4T) and ultrahigh magnetic fields (21.6T). The NMR parameters for quadrupole and isotropic chemical shift interactions were estimated by simulation of the NMR spectra and from relativistic density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Four Na ions incorporated into the framework were found to occupy four distinct sites with different populations. The DFT calculation showed that d(1) electrons with effectively one up-spin caused by strong antiferromagnetic interactions were delocalized over the 12V ions. PMID:27018827

  14. Determination of the vibrational contribution to the entropy change at the martensitic transformation in Ni-Mn-Sn metamagnetic shape memory alloys: a combined approach of time-of-flight neutron spectroscopy and ab initio calculations.

    PubMed

    Recarte, V; Zbiri, M; Jiménez-Ruiz, M; Sánchez-Alarcos, V; Pérez-Landazábal, J I

    2016-05-25

    The different contributions to the entropy change linked to the austenite-martensitic transition in a Ni-Mn-Sn metamagnetic shape memory alloy have been determined by combining different experimental techniques. The vibrational contribution has been inferred from the vibrational density of states of both the martensitic and austenite phases. This has been accomplished by combining time-of-flight neutron scattering measurements and ab initio calculations. Further, the electronic part of the entropy change has also been calculated. Since the martensitic transformation takes place between two paramagnetic phases, the magnetic contribution can be neglected and the entropy change can be reduced to the sum of two terms: vibrational and electronic. The obtained value of the vibrational contribution ([Formula: see text]) nearly provides the total entropy change measured by calorimetry ([Formula: see text]), the difference being the electronic contribution within the experimental error. PMID:27120315

  15. Defect formation energy and magnetic structure of shape memory alloys Ni-X-Ga (X=Mn, Fe, Co) by first principle calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, J.; Raulot, J. M.; Zhang, Y. D.; Esling, C.; Zhao, X.; Zuo, L.

    2010-09-01

    The crystallographic and magnetic structures of the Ni2XGa (X=Mn, Fe, Co), are systematically investigated by means of the first-principles calculations within the framework of density functional theory using the VIENNA AB INITIO SOFTWARE PACKAGE. The formation energies of several kinds of defects (atomic exchange, antisite, vacancy) are estimated. The Ga atoms stabilize the cubic structure, and the effect of X atoms on the structural stability is opposite. For most cases of the site occupation, the excess atoms of the rich component directly occupy the site(s) of the deficient one(s), except for Ga-rich Ni-deficient type. The magnitude of the variation in Ni moments is much larger than that of Mn in defective Ni2XGa. The value of Ni magnetic moment sensitively depends on the distance between Ni and X. Excess Mn could be ferromagnetic or antiferromagnetic, depending on the distance between the neighboring Mn atoms.

  16. Understanding the effect of ultrathin AuPd alloy shells of irregularly shaped Au@AuPd nanoparticles with high-index facets on enhanced performance of ethanol oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Cuixia; Feng, Cong; Miao, Tingting; Song, Yahui; Wang, Dayang; Xia, Haibing

    2015-11-01

    In this study, irregularly shaped, concave cuboidal Au@AuPd nanoparticles (ISCC-Au@AuPd NPs) with high-index facets were synthesized via Pd overgrowth on pre-formed ISCC-Au NPs with a concentration of Pd precursors as low as 2%. The AuPd alloy nature of the resulting shells was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, cyclic voltammogram analysis, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Among the irregularly shaped NPs obtained, the ISCC-Au97.5@Au0.5Pd2.0 NPs display the largest electrochemically active surface area (up to 92.11 m2 g-1), as their closed-packed agglomeration was prevented, and the best long-term stability with respect to ethanol oxidation (0.50 M) in alkaline media (0.30 KOH) by efficiently removing intermediates. Their mass- and ECSA-normalized current densities (4.15 A mgPd-1 and 4.51 mA cm-2) are about 20.7 times and 6.9 times higher than those of commercial Pd/C catalysts (0.20 A mgPd-1 and 0.65 mA cm-2), respectively.In this study, irregularly shaped, concave cuboidal Au@AuPd nanoparticles (ISCC-Au@AuPd NPs) with high-index facets were synthesized via Pd overgrowth on pre-formed ISCC-Au NPs with a concentration of Pd precursors as low as 2%. The AuPd alloy nature of the resulting shells was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, cyclic voltammogram analysis, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Among the irregularly shaped NPs obtained, the ISCC-Au97.5@Au0.5Pd2.0 NPs display the largest electrochemically active surface area (up to 92.11 m2 g-1), as their closed-packed agglomeration was prevented, and the best long-term stability with respect to ethanol oxidation (0.50 M) in alkaline media (0.30 KOH) by efficiently removing intermediates. Their mass- and ECSA-normalized current densities (4.15 A mgPd-1 and 4.51 mA cm-2) are about 20.7 times and 6.9 times higher than those of commercial Pd/C catalysts (0.20 A mgPd-1 and 0.65 mA cm-2), respectively. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: High magnification TEM

  17. Midpoint Shapes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welchman, Rosamond; Urso, Josephine

    2000-01-01

    Emphasizes the importance of children exploring hands-on and minds-on mathematics. Presents a midpoint shape activity for students to explore the midpoint shape of familiar quadrilaterals, such as squares and rectangles. (KHR)

  18. Alpha shapes applied to molecular shape characterization exhibit novel properties compared to established shape descriptors

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, J. Anthony; Bender, Andreas; Kaya, Taner; Clemons, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    Despite considerable efforts, description of molecular shape is still largely an unresolved problem. Given the importance of molecular shape in the description of spatial interactions in crystals or ligand-target complexes, this is not a satisfying state. In the current work, we propose a novel application of alpha shapes to the description of the shapes of small molecules. Alpha shapes are parameterized generalizations of the convex hull. For a specific value of α, the alpha shape is the geometric dual of the space-filling model of a molecule, with the parameter α allowing description of shape in varying degrees of detail. To date, alpha shapes have been used to find macromolecular cavities and to estimate molecular surface areas and volumes. We developed a novel methodology for computing molecular shape characteristics from the alpha shape. In this work, we show that alpha-shape descriptors reveal aspects of molecular shape that are complementary to other shape descriptors, and that accord well with chemists’ intuition about shape. While our implementation of alpha-shape descriptors is not computationally trivial, we suggest that the additional shape characteristics they provide can be used to improve and complement shape-analysis methods in domains such as crystallography and ligand-target interactions. In this communication, we present a unique methodology for computing molecular shape characteristics from the alpha shape. We first describe details of the alpha-shape calculation, an outline of validation experiments performed, and a discussion of the advantages and challenges we found while implementing this approach. The results show that, relative to known shape calculations, this method provides a high degree of shape resolution with even small changes in atomic coordinates. PMID:19775113

  19. Determination of the vibrational contribution to the entropy change at the martensitic transformation in Ni–Mn–Sn metamagnetic shape memory alloys: a combined approach of time-of-flight neutron spectroscopy and ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recarte, V.; Zbiri, M.; Jiménez-Ruiz, M.; Sánchez-Alarcos, V.; Pérez-Landazábal, J. I.

    2016-05-01

    The different contributions to the entropy change linked to the austenite-martensitic transition in a Ni–Mn–Sn metamagnetic shape memory alloy have been determined by combining different experimental techniques. The vibrational contribution has been inferred from the vibrational density of states of both the martensitic and austenite phases. This has been accomplished by combining time-of-flight neutron scattering measurements and ab initio calculations. Further, the electronic part of the entropy change has also been calculated. Since the martensitic transformation takes place between two paramagnetic phases, the magnetic contribution can be neglected and the entropy change can be reduced to the sum of two terms: vibrational and electronic. The obtained value of the vibrational contribution (-36+/- 5 \\text{J} \\text{k}{{\\text{g}}-1} {{\\text{K}}-1} ) nearly provides the total entropy change measured by calorimetry (-41~+/- 3 \\text{J} \\text{k}{{\\text{g}}-1} {{\\text{K}}-1} ), the difference being the electronic contribution within the experimental error.

  20. The tree BVOC index.

    PubMed

    Simpson, J R; McPherson, E G

    2011-01-01

    Urban trees can produce a number of benefits, among them improved air quality. Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) emitted by some species are ozone precursors. Modifying future tree planting to favor lower-emitting species can reduce these emissions and aid air management districts in meeting federally mandated emissions reductions for these compounds. Changes in BVOC emissions are calculated as the result of transitioning to a lower-emitting species mix in future planting. A simplified method for calculating the emissions reduction and a Tree BVOC index based on the calculated reduction is described. An example illustrates the use of the index as a tool for implementation and monitoring of a tree program designed to reduce BVOC emissions as a control measure being developed as part of the State Implementation Plan (SIP) for the Sacramento Federal Nonattainment Area. PMID:21435760

  1. Index of endemicity

    PubMed Central

    Swaroop, Satya

    1957-01-01

    The author discusses the difficulties involved in defining the term “endemicity”, and suggests a new approach to the problem—namely, the establishment of indices of endemicity, based on such data as are usually collected by national health administrations (mortality and morbidity rates, spleen-rates, case incidence in seaports, etc.). Examples are given of the calculation of the endemicity index for a number of diseases from different types of data obtained from various countries. An important advantage of the endemicity index is that it provides an easy means of studying the geographical pattern of endemic foci of disease. PMID:13479767

  2. INDEXING MECHANISM

    DOEpatents

    Kock, L.J.

    1959-09-22

    A device is presented for loading and unloading fuel elements containing material fissionable by neutrons of thermal energy. The device comprises a combination of mechanical features Including a base, a lever pivotally attached to the base, an Indexing plate on the base parallel to the plane of lever rotation and having a plurality of apertures, the apertures being disposed In rows, each aperture having a keyway, an Index pin movably disposed to the plane of lever rotation and having a plurality of apertures, the apertures being disposed in rows, each aperture having a keyway, an index pin movably disposed on the lever normal to the plane rotation, a key on the pin, a sleeve on the lever spaced from and parallel to the index pin, a pair of pulleys and a cable disposed between them, an open collar rotatably attached to the sleeve and linked to one of the pulleys, a pin extending from the collar, and a bearing movably mounted in the sleeve and having at least two longitudinal grooves in the outside surface.

  3. Schapiro Shapes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connell, Emily

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a lesson on Schapiro Shapes. Schapiro Shapes is based on the art of Miriam Schapiro, who created a number of works of figures in action. Using the basic concepts of this project, students learn to create their own figures and styles. (Contains 1 online resource.)

  4. Refractive index dependence of Papilio Ulysses butterfly wings reflectance spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isnaeni, Muslimin, Ahmad Novi; Birowosuto, Muhammad Danang

    2016-02-01

    We have observed and utilized butterfly wings of Papilio Ulysses for refractive index sensor. We noticed this butterfly wings have photonic crystal structure, which causes blue color appearance on the wings. The photonic crystal structure, which consists of cuticle and air void, is approximated as one dimensional photonic crystal structure. This photonic crystal structure opens potential to several optical devices application, such as refractive index sensor. We have utilized small piece of Papilio Ulysses butterfly wings to characterize refractive index of several liquid base on reflectance spectrum of butterfly wings in the presence of sample liquid. For comparison, we simulated reflectance spectrum of one dimensional photonic crystal structure having material parameter based on real structure of butterfly wings. We found that reflectance spectrum peaks shifted as refractive index of sample changes. Although there is a slight difference in reflectance spectrum peaks between measured spectrum and calculated spectrum, the trend of reflectance spectrum peaks as function of sample's refractive index is the similar. We assume that during the measurement, the air void that filled by sample liquid is expanded due to liquid pressure. This change of void shape causes non-similarity between measured spectrum and calculated spectrum.

  5. Sustainability index for Taipei

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.-J. . E-mail: yungjaanlee@pchome.com.tw; Huang Chingming . E-mail: michael@everwin.com.tw

    2007-08-15

    Sustainability indicators are an effective means of determining whether a city is moving towards sustainable development (SD). After considering the characteristics of Taipei, Taiwan, discussions with experts, scholars and government departments and an exhaustive literature review, this study selected 51 sustainability indicators corresponding to the socio-economic characteristic of Taipei City. Such indicators should be regarded as a basis for assessing SD in Taipei City. The 51 indicators are classified into economic, social, environmental and institutional dimensions. Furthermore, statistical data is adopted to identify the trend of SD from 1994 to 2004. Moreover, the sustainability index is calculated for the four dimensions and for Taipei as a whole. Analysis results demonstrate that social and environmental indicators are moving towards SD, while economic and institutional dimensions are performing relatively poorly. However, since 2002, the economic sustainability index has gradually moved towards SD. Overall, the Taipei sustainability index indicates a gradual trend towards sustainable development during the past 11 years.

  6. Development of cortical shape in the human brain from 6 to 24months of age via a novel measure of shape complexity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun Hyung; Lyu, Ilwoo; Fonov, Vladimir S; Vachet, Clement; Hazlett, Heather C; Smith, Rachel G; Piven, Joseph; Dager, Stephen R; Mckinstry, Robert C; Pruett, John R; Evans, Alan C; Collins, D Louis; Botteron, Kelly N; Schultz, Robert T; Gerig, Guido; Styner, Martin A

    2016-07-15

    The quantification of local surface morphology in the human cortex is important for examining population differences as well as developmental changes in neurodegenerative or neurodevelopmental disorders. We propose a novel cortical shape measure, referred to as the 'shape complexity index' (SCI), that represents localized shape complexity as the difference between the observed distributions of local surface topology, as quantified by the shape index (SI) measure, to its best fitting simple topological model within a given neighborhood. We apply a relatively small, adaptive geodesic kernel to calculate the SCI. Due to the small size of the kernel, the proposed SCI measure captures fine differences of cortical shape. With this novel cortical feature, we aim to capture comparatively small local surface changes that capture a) the widening versus deepening of sulcal and gyral regions, as well as b) the emergence and development of secondary and tertiary sulci. Current cortical shape measures, such as the gyrification index (GI) or intrinsic curvature measures, investigate the cortical surface at a different scale and are less well suited to capture these particular cortical surface changes. In our experiments, the proposed SCI demonstrates higher complexity in the gyral/sulcal wall regions, lower complexity in wider gyral ridges and lowest complexity in wider sulcal fundus regions. In early postnatal brain development, our experiments show that SCI reveals a pattern of increased cortical shape complexity with age, as well as sexual dimorphisms in the insula, middle cingulate, parieto-occipital sulcal and Broca's regions. Overall, sex differences were greatest at 6months of age and were reduced at 24months, with the difference pattern switching from higher complexity in males at 6months to higher complexity in females at 24months. This is the first study of longitudinal, cortical complexity maturation and sex differences, in the early postnatal period from 6 to 24months

  7. Effect of temperature on the shape of spatial quasi-periodic oscillations of the refractive index of alkali atoms in an optically dense medium with a closed excitation contour of Δ type

    SciTech Connect

    Barantsev, K A; Litvinov, A N

    2014-10-31

    A theory of a closed excitation contour (Δ system) of a three-level atom in an optically dense medium is constructed with allowance for temperature. The spatial quasi-periodic oscillations of the refractive index in the system under study are shown to damp with increasing temperature. The range of temperatures at which these oscillations are most pronounced is found. (quantum optics)

  8. Reconstruction of low-index graphite surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thinius, Sascha; Islam, Mazharul M.; Bredow, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    The low-index graphite surfaces (10 1 -0), (10 1 -1), (11 2 -0) and (11 2 - 1) have been studied by density functional theory (DFT) including van-der-Waals (vdW) corrections. Different from the (0001) surface which has been extensively investigated both experimentally and theoretically, there is no comprehensive study on the (10 1 -0)- (10 1 -1)-, (11 2 -0)- and (11 2 - 1)-surfaces available, although they are of relevance for Li insertion processes, e.g. in Li-ion batteries. In this study the structure and stability of all non-(0001) low-index surfaces were calculated with RPBE-D3 and converged slab models. In all cases reconstruction involving bond formation between unsaturated carbon atoms of two neighboring graphene sheets reduces the surface energy dramatically. Two possible reconstruction patterns have been considered. The first possibility leads to formation of oblong nanotubes. Alternatively, the graphene sheets form bonds to different neighboring sheets at the upper and lower sides and sinusoidal structures are formed. Both structure types have similar stabilities. Based on the calculated surface energies the Gibbs-Wulff theorem was applied to construct the macroscopic shape of graphite single crystals.

  9. A Simple Method to Determine the Refractive Index of Glass.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mak, Se-yuen

    1988-01-01

    Describes an experiment for determining the refractive index. Discusses the experiment procedure and mathematical expression for calculating the index. Provides two geometrical diagrams and a graph for determining the index with a typical data. (YP)

  10. Variable Lifting Index (VLI)

    PubMed Central

    Waters, Thomas; Occhipinti, Enrico; Colombini, Daniela; Alvarez-Casado, Enrique; Fox, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We seek to develop a new approach for analyzing the physical demands of highly variable lifting tasks through an adaptation of the Revised NIOSH (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health) Lifting Equation (RNLE) into a Variable Lifting Index (VLI). Background: There are many jobs that contain individual lifts that vary from lift to lift due to the task requirements. The NIOSH Lifting Equation is not suitable in its present form to analyze variable lifting tasks. Method: In extending the prior work on the VLI, two procedures are presented to allow users to analyze variable lifting tasks. One approach involves the sampling of lifting tasks performed by a worker over a shift and the calculation of the Frequency Independent Lift Index (FILI) for each sampled lift and the aggregation of the FILI values into six categories. The Composite Lift Index (CLI) equation is used with lifting index (LI) category frequency data to calculate the VLI. The second approach employs a detailed systematic collection of lifting task data from production and/or organizational sources. The data are organized into simplified task parameter categories and further aggregated into six FILI categories, which also use the CLI equation to calculate the VLI. Results: The two procedures will allow practitioners to systematically employ the VLI method to a variety of work situations where highly variable lifting tasks are performed. Conclusions: The scientific basis for the VLI procedure is similar to that for the CLI originally presented by NIOSH; however, the VLI method remains to be validated. Application: The VLI method allows an analyst to assess highly variable manual lifting jobs in which the task characteristics vary from lift to lift during a shift. PMID:26646300

  11. Extraordinary-mode refractive-index change produced by the linear electro-optic effect in LiNbO3 and reverse-poled LiNbO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Joseph T.; Servizzi, Anthony J.; Sriram, S.; Kingsley, Stuart A.

    1995-07-01

    To examine aspects of an integrated photonic electric-field sensor, we calculate electro-optically induced refractive-index change in regular and reverse-poled LiNbO3. Specifically, for y-propagating extraordinary modes, we determine how index change depends on electric-field magnitude and direction. To accomplish this, changes in index-ellipsoid shape and orientation are found by the use of a numerical eigenvalue procedure to diagonalize the impermeability tensor; then, refractive index is calculated by the use of a vector reference-frame transformation and a small perturbation approximation. A general formula is inferred from calculations for specific field directions. Electro-optic coefficients for reverse-poled LiNbO3 are obtained by application of a tensor reference-frame transformation to those of LiNbO3. The index-calculation procedure has utility beyond the problem that is considered.

  12. Education Price Index, Elementary-Secondary Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dupuis, Y.

    This paper explains the education price index formulated in 1979 for Canada. It defines a price index as a statistical measure designed to show changes in the price of a commodity or a set of commodities with respect to time. The index calculated for the project covers salaries and wages, instructional supplies, school facilities, supplies and…

  13. Refractive index gradient measurement across the thickness of a dielectric film by the prism coupling method

    SciTech Connect

    Sokolov, Viktor I; Panchenko, Vladislav Ya; Seminogov, V N

    2012-08-31

    A method is proposed for measuring the refractive index gradient n(z) in nonuniformly thick dielectric films. The method is based on the excitation of waveguide modes in a film using the prism coupling technique and on the calculation of n(z) and film thickness H{sub f} with the help of the angular positions of the TE or TM modes. The method can be used for an arbitrary shape of the index modulation over the film thickness in the limit of a small gradient [{Delta} n(z)/n(z) || 1]. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  14. Updated Methods for Seed Shape Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cervantes, Emilio; Martín, José Javier; Saadaoui, Ezzeddine

    2016-01-01

    Morphological variation in seed characters includes differences in seed size and shape. Seed shape is an important trait in plant identification and classification. In addition it has agronomic importance because it reflects genetic, physiological, and ecological components and affects yield, quality, and market price. The use of digital technologies, together with development of quantification and modeling methods, allows a better description of seed shape. Image processing systems are used in the automatic determination of seed size and shape, becoming a basic tool in the study of diversity. Seed shape is determined by a variety of indexes (circularity, roundness, and J index). The comparison of the seed images to a geometrical figure (circle, cardioid, ellipse, ellipsoid, etc.) provides a precise quantification of shape. The methods of shape quantification based on these models are useful for an accurate description allowing to compare between genotypes or along developmental phases as well as to establish the level of variation in different sets of seeds. PMID:27190684

  15. Updated Methods for Seed Shape Analysis.

    PubMed

    Cervantes, Emilio; Martín, José Javier; Saadaoui, Ezzeddine

    2016-01-01

    Morphological variation in seed characters includes differences in seed size and shape. Seed shape is an important trait in plant identification and classification. In addition it has agronomic importance because it reflects genetic, physiological, and ecological components and affects yield, quality, and market price. The use of digital technologies, together with development of quantification and modeling methods, allows a better description of seed shape. Image processing systems are used in the automatic determination of seed size and shape, becoming a basic tool in the study of diversity. Seed shape is determined by a variety of indexes (circularity, roundness, and J index). The comparison of the seed images to a geometrical figure (circle, cardioid, ellipse, ellipsoid, etc.) provides a precise quantification of shape. The methods of shape quantification based on these models are useful for an accurate description allowing to compare between genotypes or along developmental phases as well as to establish the level of variation in different sets of seeds. PMID:27190684

  16. New weather index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scientists at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the University of Delaware have refined the wind-chill factor, a common measurement of weather discomfort, into a new misery register called the weather stress index. In addition to the mix of temperature and wind speed data used to calculate wind chill, the recipe for the index adds two new ingredients—humidity and a dash of benchmark statistics—to estimate human reaction to weather conditions. NOAA says that the weather stress index estimates human reaction to weather conditions and that the reaction depends on variations from the ‘normal’ conditions in the locality involved.Discomfort criteria for New Orleans, La., and Bismarck, N.D., for example, differ drastically. According to NOAA, when it's the middle of winter and it's -10°C with a relative humidity of 80% and 24 km/h winds, persons in New Orleans would be highly stressed while those in Bismarck wouldn't bat an eye.

  17. The relation between geometric morphometrics and functional morphology, as explored by Procrustes interpretation of individual shape measures pertinent to function.

    PubMed

    Bookstein, Fred L

    2015-01-01

    A frequent concern in today's functional morphology is the relation of a landmark configuration to some a priori index or suite of indices of function. When an index is itself a generic mathematical or biomechanical shape function of landmark locations, meaning a dimensionless expression that has a nonzero gradient everywhere in the feasible region of morphospace, the question becomes sharper: how can we exploit it as a reference direction for representations within the realm of the customary geometric morphometric (GM) analyses? This article argues that the only valid approach to this problem is geometric, not statistical: to represent any such a priori index by way of its differential (its gradient) calculated as an explicit vector in the Procrustes dual space of the complete list of landmarks whether or not involved in the formulation of the index. Interpretation of the index follows by comparing its direction after this embedding with other interesting directions in the same shape space, such as principal warps, relative warps, group mean shape contrasts, specific form factors extracted independently, or directions corresponding to other functional indices. Here, I work an artificial but realistic example of this technique in complete detail: the construction of a Procrustes shape formula exactly aligned with a specific angle among three landmarks within an arbitrary configuration of six. A closing discussion traces the spirit of this intervention to comments by W. W. Howells and C. E. Oxnard, originally intended for anthropometric contexts other than GM, on the different purposes of systematics and functional morphology. PMID:25339502

  18. Indexing Consistency and Quality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zunde, Pranas; Dexter, Margaret E.

    A measure of indexing consistency is developed based on the concept of 'fuzzy sets'. It assigns a higher consistency value if indexers agree on the more important terms than if they agree on less important terms. Measures of the quality of an indexer's work and exhaustivity of indexing are also proposed. Experimental data on indexing consistency…

  19. Constructal blade shape in nanofluids

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Blade configuration of nanofluids has been proven to perform much better than dispersed configuration for some heat conduction systems. The analytical analysis and numerical calculation are made for the cylinder--shaped and regular-rectangular-prism--shaped building blocks of the blade-configured heat conduction systems (using nanofluids as the heat conduction media) to find the optimal cross-sectional shape for the nanoparticle blade under the same composing materials, composition ratio, volumetric heat generation rate, and total building block volume. The regular-triangular-prism--shaped blade has been proven to perform better than all the other three kinds of blades, namely, the regular-rectangular-prism--shaped blade, the regular-hexagonal-prism--shaped blade, and the cylinder--shaped blade. Thus, the regular-triangular-prism--shaped blade is selected as the optimally shaped blade for the two kinds of building blocks that are considered in this study. It is also proven that the constructal cylinder--regular-triangular-prism building block performs better than the constructal regular-rectangular-prism--regular-triangular-prism building block. PMID:21711751

  20. Leaf Shape Recognition using Centroid Contour Distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasim, Abdurrasyid; Herdiyeni, Yeni; Douady, Stephane

    2016-01-01

    This research recognizes the leaf shape using Centroid Contour Distance (CCD) as shape descriptor. CCD is an algorithm of shape representation contour-based approach which only exploits boundary information. CCD calculates the distance between the midpoint and the points on the edge corresponding to interval angle. Leaf shapes that included in this study are ellips, cordate, ovate, and lanceolate. We analyzed 200 leaf images of tropical plant. Each class consists of 50 images. The best accuracy is obtained by 96.67%. We used Probabilistic Neural Network to classify the leaf shape. Experimental results demonstrated the effectiveness of the proposed approach for shape recognition with high accuracy.

  1. Observing shape in spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gryb, Sean

    2015-04-01

    The notion of reference frame is a central theoretical construct for interpreting the physical implications of spacetime diffeomorphism invariance in General Relativity. However, the alternative formulation of classical General Relativity known as Shape Dynamics suggest that a subset of spacetime diffeomorphisms—namely hypersurface deformations—are, in a precise sense, dual to spatial conformal (or Weyl) invariance. Moreover, holographic gauge/gravity dualities suggest that bulk spacetime diffeomorphism invariance can be replaced by the properties of boundary CFTs. How can these new frameworks be compatible with the traditional notion of reference frame so fundamental to our interpretation of General Relativity? In this paper, we address this question by investigating the classical case of maximally symmetric spacetimes with a positive cosmological constant. We find that it is possible to define a notion of Shape Observer that represents a conformal reference frame dual to the notion of inertial reference frame in spacetime and provide a precise dictionary relating the two notions. We explicitly calculate the Hamilton-Jacobi functional for a theory of reparametrization invariant shape configurations dual to a theory of free inertial observers in de Sitter. These Shape Observers are holographic in the sense that they are defined on the asymptotic conformal boundaries of spacetime but know about bulk physics, and show that the dual theory is conformally invariant at the classical level. This leads to a first principles derivation of an exact classical holographic correspondence that can easily be generalized to more complicated situations and may lead to insights regarding the interpretation of the conformal invariance manifest in Shape Dynamics.

  2. Superordinate Shape Classification Using Natural Shape Statistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilder, John; Feldman, Jacob; Singh, Manish

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates the classification of shapes into broad natural categories such as "animal" or "leaf". We asked whether such coarse classifications can be achieved by a simple statistical classification of the shape skeleton. We surveyed databases of natural shapes, extracting shape skeletons and tabulating their parameters within each…

  3. Traffic air quality index.

    PubMed

    Bagieński, Zbigniew

    2015-02-01

    Vehicle emissions are responsible for a considerable share of urban air pollution concentrations. The traffic air quality index (TAQI) is proposed as a useful tool for evaluating air quality near roadways. The TAQI associates air quality with the equivalent emission from traffic sources and with street structure (roadway structure) as anthropogenic factors. The paper presents a method of determining the TAQI and defines the degrees of harmfulness of emitted pollution. It proposes a classification specifying a potential threat to human health based on the TAQI value and shows an example of calculating the TAQI value for real urban streets. It also considers the role that car traffic plays in creating a local UHI. PMID:25461063

  4. Rapid shallow breathing index.

    PubMed

    Karthika, Manjush; Al Enezi, Farhan A; Pillai, Lalitha V; Arabi, Yaseen M

    2016-01-01

    Predicting successful liberation of patients from mechanical ventilation has been a focus of interest to clinicians practicing in intensive care. Various weaning indices have been investigated to identify an optimal weaning window. Among them, the rapid shallow breathing index (RSBI) has gained wide use due to its simple technique and avoidance of calculation of complex pulmonary mechanics. Since its first description, several modifications have been suggested, such as the serial measurements and the rate of change of RSBI, to further improve its predictive value. The objective of this paper is to review the utility of RSBI in predicting weaning success. In addition, the use of RSBI in specific patient populations and the reported modifications of RSBI technique that attempt to improve the utility of RSBI are also reviewed. PMID:27512505

  5. Rapid shallow breathing index

    PubMed Central

    Karthika, Manjush; Al Enezi, Farhan A.; Pillai, Lalitha V.; Arabi, Yaseen M.

    2016-01-01

    Predicting successful liberation of patients from mechanical ventilation has been a focus of interest to clinicians practicing in intensive care. Various weaning indices have been investigated to identify an optimal weaning window. Among them, the rapid shallow breathing index (RSBI) has gained wide use due to its simple technique and avoidance of calculation of complex pulmonary mechanics. Since its first description, several modifications have been suggested, such as the serial measurements and the rate of change of RSBI, to further improve its predictive value. The objective of this paper is to review the utility of RSBI in predicting weaning success. In addition, the use of RSBI in specific patient populations and the reported modifications of RSBI technique that attempt to improve the utility of RSBI are also reviewed. PMID:27512505

  6. A Calibrated Index of Human Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lind, Niels

    2010-01-01

    The weightings of the four component indicators of the UNDP's Human Development Index HDI appear to be arbitrary and have not been given justification. This paper develops a variant of the HDI, calculated to reflect peoples' revealed evaluations of education and the productivity of work. The resulting Calibrated human Development Index CDI has a…

  7. Nucleic acid indexing

    DOEpatents

    Guilfoyle, Richard A.; Guo, Zhen

    1999-01-01

    A restriction site indexing method for selectively amplifying any fragment generated by a Class II restriction enzyme includes adaptors specific to fragment ends containing adaptor indexing sequences complementary to fragment indexing sequences near the termini of fragments generated by Class II enzyme cleavage. A method for combinatorial indexing facilitates amplification of restriction fragments whose sequence is not known.

  8. Nucleic acid indexing

    DOEpatents

    Guilfoyle, Richard A.; Guo, Zhen

    2001-01-01

    A restriction site indexing method for selectively amplifying any fragment generated by a Class II restriction enzyme includes adaptors specific to fragment ends containing adaptor indexing sequences complementary to fragment indexing sequences near the termini of fragments generated by Class II enzyme cleavage. A method for combinatorial indexing facilitates amplification of restriction fragments whose sequence is not known.

  9. KSC Construction Cost Index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    Kennedy Space Center cost Index aids in conceptual design cost estimates. Report discusses development of KSC Cost Index since January 1974. Index since January 1974. Index provides management, design engineers, and estimators an up-to-data reference for local labor and material process. Also provides mount and rate of change in these costs used to predict future construction costs.

  10. Gradient-index ophthalmic lens design and polymer material studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, David Joel

    Unifocal ophthalmic lenses are conventionally designed using homogeneous glass or plastic materials and aspheric surfaces. The desired power and aberration correction are provided by selection of surface shape and refractive index. This thesis studies the design of ophthalmic lenses utilizing gradient-index (GRIN) materials for both the optical power and aberration control. This is done using geometrical optical theory and ray-tracing simulations. Progressive addition lenses (PALS) are vision correction lenses with a continuous change in power used to treat presbyopia. The power variation is typically located in the lower half of the lens. Progressive addition lenses are currently made with aspheric surfaces to achieve the focal power transition and aberration control. These surfaces have at most, mirror symmetry about the vertical axis. The possible design of progressive addition lenses with GRIN materials has not been well studied. This thesis studies PALS and identifies how gradient-index materials can be used to provide both the power progression and aberration control. The optical theory for rotationally symmetric and asymmetric power additions is given. Analytical and numerical methods for calculating the index profile are used, and the results examined using ray-tracing simulations. The theory developed for ophthalmic lenses is applied to the design of GRIN axicon. This is the first GRIN axicon manufactured, and is fabricated using ion-exchanged GRIN glass. Experimental measurements of its performance are compared and found to match theoretical predictions. This demonstrates the generality of the theory developed: it may be applied to non-visual applications, and even to non-imaging applications. Realistic implementation of GRIN technology to ophthalmic application requires the fabrication of large scale refractive index gradients in polymer material systems. The methyl-methacrylate/styrene copolymer system is studied to develop an empirical model of its

  11. Refractive index measurements of single, spherical cells using digital holographic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Schürmann, Mirjam; Scholze, Jana; Müller, Paul; Chan, Chii J; Ekpenyong, Andrew E; Chalut, Kevin J; Guck, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter, we introduce digital holographic microscopy (DHM) as a marker-free method to determine the refractive index of single, spherical cells in suspension. The refractive index is a conclusive measure in a biological context. Cell conditions, such as differentiation or infection, are known to yield significant changes in the refractive index. Furthermore, the refractive index of biological tissue determines the way it interacts with light. Besides the biological relevance of this interaction in the retina, a lot of methods used in biology, including microscopy, rely on light-tissue or light-cell interactions. Hence, determining the refractive index of cells using DHM is valuable in many biological applications. This chapter covers the main topics that are important for the implementation of DHM: setup, sample preparation, and analysis. First, the optical setup is described in detail including notes and suggestions for the implementation. Following that, a protocol for the sample and measurement preparation is explained. In the analysis section, an algorithm for the determination of quantitative phase maps is described. Subsequently, all intermediate steps for the calculation of the refractive index of suspended cells are presented, exploiting their spherical shape. In the last section, a discussion of possible extensions to the setup, further measurement configurations, and additional analysis methods are given. Throughout this chapter, we describe a simple, robust, and thus easily reproducible implementation of DHM. The different possibilities for extensions show the diverse fields of application for this technique. PMID:25640428

  12. Microelectromechanical reciprocating-tooth indexing apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, J.J..

    1999-09-28

    An indexing apparatus is disclosed that can be used to rotate a gear or move a rack in a precise, controllable manner. The indexing apparatus, based on a reciprocating shuttle driven by one or more actuators, can be formed either as a micromachine, or as a millimachine. The reciprocating shuttle of the indexing apparatus can be driven by a thermal, electrostatic or electromagnetic actuator, with one or more wedge-shaped drive teeth of the shuttle being moveable to engage and slide against indexing teeth on the gear or rack, thereby moving the gear or rack. The indexing apparatus can be formed by either surface micromachining processes or LIGA processes, depending on the size of the apparatus that is to be formed.

  13. Microelectromechanical reciprocating-tooth indexing apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Allen, James J.

    1999-01-01

    An indexing apparatus is disclosed that can be used to rotate a gear or move a rack in a precise, controllable manner. The indexing apparatus, based on a reciprocating shuttle driven by one or more actuators, can be formed either as a micromachine, or as a millimachine. The reciprocating shuttle of the indexing apparatus can be driven by a thermal, electrostatic or electromagnetic actuator, with one or more wedge-shaped drive teeth of the shuttle being moveable to engage and slide against indexing teeth on the gear or rack, thereby moving the gear or rack. The indexing apparatus can be formed by either surface micromachining processes or LIGA processes, depending on the size of the apparatus that is to be formed.

  14. Highly localized quasiatomic minimal basis orbitals for Mo from ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, T.-L.; Yao, Y. X.; Wang, C. Z.; Lu, W. C.; Li, J.; Qian, X. F.; Yip, S.; Ho, K. M.

    2007-11-01

    A minimal basis set of localized quasiatomic orbitals for Mo is constructed using the fully converged eigenstates from first-principles calculations with a large basis set. The orbitals, although similar in shape to those of a free atom, are slightly deformed such that it can reproduce all the occupied-state electronic properties of the system. They are very useful for analyzing chemical bonding by calculating the Mulliken overlap population and bond order index between atoms. In addition, the transferability of tight-binding parametrizations can be evaluated, for example, the effect of the two-center approximation.

  15. CENDI Indexing Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The CENDI Indexing Workshop held at NASA Headquarters, Two Independence Square, 300 E Street, Washington, DC, on September 21-22, 1994 focused on the following topics: machine aided indexing, indexing quality, an indexing pilot project, the MedIndEx Prototype, Department of Energy/Office of Scientific and Technical Information indexing activities, high-tech coding structures, category indexing schemes, and the Government Information Locator Service. This publication consists mostly of viewgraphs related to the above noted topics. In an appendix is a description of the Government Information Locator Service.

  16. Local shape of pictorial relief

    PubMed Central

    Koenderink, Jan; van Doorn, Andrea; Wagemans, Johan

    2014-01-01

    How is pictorial relief represented in visual awareness? Certainly not as a “depth map,” but perhaps as a map of local surface attitudes (Koenderink & van Doorn, 1995). Here we consider the possibility that observers might instead, or concurrently, represent local surface shape, a geometrical invariant with respect to motions. Observers judge local surface shape, in a picture of a piece of sculpture, on a five-point categorical scale. Categories are cap–ridge–saddle–rut–cup–flat, where “flat” denotes the absence of shape. We find that observers readily perform such a task, with full resolution of a shape index scale (cap–ridge–saddle–rut–cup), and with excellent self-consistency over days. There exist remarkable inter-observer differences. Over a group of 10 naive observers we find that the dispersion of judgments peaks at the saddle category. There may be a relation of this finding to the history of the topic—Alberti's (1827) omission of the saddle category in his purportedly exhaustive catalog of local surface shapes. PMID:25469225

  17. SEM-contour shape analysis method for advanced semiconductor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyoda, Yasutaka; Shindo, Hiroyuki; Ota, Yoshihiro; Matsuoka, Ryoichi; Hojo, Yutaka; Fuchimoto, Daisuke; Hibino, Daisuke; Sakai, Hideo

    2013-04-01

    The new measuring method that we developed executes a contour shape analysis that is based on the pattern edge information from a SEM image. This analysis helps to create a highly precise quantification of every circuit pattern shape by comparing the contour extracted from the SEM image using a CD measurement algorithm and the ideal circuit pattern. The developed method, in the next phase, can generate four shape indices by using the analysis mass measurement data. When the shape index measured using the developed method is compared the CD, the difference of the shape index and the CD is negligibly small for the quantification of the circuit pattern shape. In addition, when the 2D patterns on a FEM wafer are measured using the developed method, the tendency for shape deformations is precisely caught by the four shape indices. This new method and the evaluation results will be presented in detail in this paper.

  18. Shape-Shifting Plastic

    SciTech Connect

    2015-05-20

    A new plastic developed by ORNL and Washington State University transforms from its original shape through a series of temporary shapes and returns to its initial form. The shape-shifting process is controlled through changes in temperature

  19. Thermodynamic Stability of Low- and High-Index Spinel LiMn2O4 Surface Terminations.

    PubMed

    Warburton, Robert E; Iddir, Hakim; Curtiss, Larry A; Greeley, Jeffrey

    2016-05-01

    Density functional theory calculations are performed within the generalized gradient approximation (GGA+U) to determine stable terminations of both low- and high-index spinel LiMn2O4 (LMO) surfaces. A grand canonical thermodynamic approach is employed, permitting a direct comparison of off-stoichiometric surfaces with previously reported stoichiometric surface terminations at various environmental conditions. Within this formalism, we have identified trends in the structure of the low-index surfaces as a function of the Li and O chemical potentials. The results suggest that, under a range of chemical potentials for which bulk LMO is stable, Li/O and Li-rich (111) surface terminations are favored, neither of which adopts an inverse spinel structure in the subsurface region. This thermodynamic analysis is extended to identify stable structures for certain high-index surfaces, including (311), (331), (511), and (531), which constitute simple models for steps or defects that may be present on real LMO particles. The low- and high-index results are combined to determine the relative stability of each surface facet under a range of environmental conditions. The relative surface energies are further employed to predict LMO particle shapes through a Wulff construction approach, which suggests that LMO particles will adopt either an octahedron or a truncated octahedron shape at conditions in which LMO is thermodynamically stable. These results are in agreement with the experimental observations of LMO particle shapes. PMID:27031889

  20. Body mass index

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007196.htm Body mass index To use the sharing features on this ... your height is to figure out your body mass index (BMI). You and your health care provider ...

  1. Body Mass Index Table

    MedlinePlus

    ... Families ( We Can! ) Health Professional Resources Body Mass Index Table 1 for BMI greater than 35, go ... to content Twitter Facebook YouTube Google+ SEARCH | SITE INDEX | ACCESSIBILITY | PRIVACY STATEMENT | FOIA | OIG | CONTACT US National ...

  2. MEMS Calculator

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 166 MEMS Calculator (Web, free access)   This MEMS Calculator determines the following thin film properties from data taken with an optical interferometer or comparable instrument: a) residual strain from fixed-fixed beams, b) strain gradient from cantilevers, c) step heights or thicknesses from step-height test structures, and d) in-plane lengths or deflections. Then, residual stress and stress gradient calculations can be made after an optical vibrometer or comparable instrument is used to obtain Young's modulus from resonating cantilevers or fixed-fixed beams. In addition, wafer bond strength is determined from micro-chevron test structures using a material test machine.

  3. Tooth - abnormal shape

    MedlinePlus

    Hutchinson incisors; Abnormal tooth shape; Peg teeth; Mulberry teeth; Conical teeth ... from many different conditions. Specific diseases can affect tooth shape, tooth color, time of appearance, or absence ...

  4. Tooth - abnormal shape

    MedlinePlus

    Hutchinson incisors; Abnormal tooth shape; Peg teeth; Mulberry teeth; Conical teeth ... The appearance of normal teeth varies, especially the molars. ... conditions. Specific diseases can affect tooth shape, tooth ...

  5. California Nitrogen Index

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The California N Index User Manual is designed to help you become accustomed to the software environment in which the N Index runs. This manual will use an example scenario to demonstrate how to use the N Index to assess nitrogen losses. The objective of this theoretical example is to guide you towa...

  6. The Europe 2020 Index

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pasimeni, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a new index to quantify, measure and monitor the progress towards the objectives of the Europe 2020 strategy. This index is based on a set of relevant, accepted, credible, easy to monitor and robust indicators presented by the European Commission at the time the strategy was launched. The internal analysis of the index shows…

  7. Similarity of molecular shape.

    PubMed

    Meyer, A Y; Richards, W G

    1991-10-01

    The similarity of one molecule to another has usually been defined in terms of electron densities or electrostatic potentials or fields. Here it is expressed as a function of the molecular shape. Formulations of similarity (S) reduce to very simple forms, thus rendering the computerised calculation straightforward and fast. 'Elements of similarity' are identified, in the same spirit as 'elements of chirality', except that the former are understood to be variable rather than present-or-absent. Methods are presented which bypass the time-consuming mathematical optimisation of the relative orientation of the molecules. Numerical results are presented and examined, with emphasis on the similarity of isomers. At the extreme, enantiomeric pairs are considered, where it is the dissimilarity (D = 1 - S) that is of consequence. We argue that chiral molecules can be graded by dissimilarity, and show that D is the shape-analog of the 'chirality coefficient', with the simple form of the former opening up numerical access to the latter. PMID:1770379

  8. Creatinine arm index as alternative for creatinine height index.

    PubMed

    Van Hoeyweghen, R J; De Leeuw, I H; Vandewoude, M F

    1992-10-01

    Nutritional assessment of elderly people is limited due to a lack of age-corrected standards. The objective of this study was to develop a new, more age-independent index for nutritional assessment by correcting the creatinine height index (CHI) for the age-induced changes in its variables. This might improve the differentiation between physiological reduction in muscle mass in elderly people and the changes induced by malnutrition. Seventy-four elderly and 100 young healthy volunteers were compared by anthropometric and biochemical-assessment variables. From the high correlation between total arm length and body length (r = 0.86; P less than 0.001) and the use of an alternative formula to calculate ideal body weight (IBW) from height and wrist circumference, a relatively age-independent estimate of IBW was determined. Creatinine arm index, as an adapted index of CHI, is proposed based on this age-independent IBW estimation and a specific creatinine coefficient for different age groups. PMID:1414958

  9. National Hospital Input Price Index

    PubMed Central

    Freeland, Mark S.; Anderson, Gerard; Schendler, Carol Ellen

    1979-01-01

    The national community hospital input price index presented here isolates the effects of prices of goods and services required to produce hospital care and measures the average percent change in prices for a fixed market basket of hospital inputs. Using the methodology described in this article, weights for various expenditure categories were estimated and proxy price variables associated with each were selected. The index is calculated for the historical period 1970 through 1978 and forecast for 1979 through 1981. During the historical period, the input price index increased an average of 8.0 percent a year, compared with an average rate of increase of 6.6 percent for overall consumer prices. For the period 1979 through 1981, the average annual increase is forecast at between 8.5 and 9.0 percent. Using the index to deflate growth in expenses, the level of real growth in expenditures per inpatient day (net service intensity growth) averaged 4.5 percent per year with considerable annual variation related to government and hospital industry policies. PMID:10309052

  10. Shape memory polymers

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Thomas S.; Bearinger, Jane P.

    2015-06-09

    New shape memory polymer compositions, methods for synthesizing new shape memory polymers, and apparatus comprising an actuator and a shape memory polymer wherein the shape memory polymer comprises at least a portion of the actuator. A shape memory polymer comprising a polymer composition which physically forms a network structure wherein the polymer composition has shape-memory behavior and can be formed into a permanent primary shape, re-formed into a stable secondary shape, and controllably actuated to recover the permanent primary shape. Polymers have optimal aliphatic network structures due to minimization of dangling chains by using monomers that are symmetrical and that have matching amine and hydroxyl groups providing polymers and polymer foams with clarity, tight (narrow temperature range) single transitions, and high shape recovery and recovery force that are especially useful for implanting in the human body.